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Sample records for washed curd cheeses

  1. 21 CFR 133.137 - Washed curd cheese for manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Washed curd cheese for manufacturing. 133.137... Standardized Cheese and Related Products § 133.137 Washed curd cheese for manufacturing. Washed curd cheese for manufacturing conforms to the definition and standard of identity prescribed for washed curd cheese by § 133.136...

  2. 21 CFR 133.136 - Washed curd and soaked curd cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Washed curd and soaked curd cheese. 133.136... (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION CHEESES AND RELATED CHEESE PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Cheese and Related Products § 133.136 Washed curd and soaked curd cheese. (a) Description. (1...

  3. 7 CFR 58.711 - Cheddar, colby, washed or soaked curd, granular or stirred curd cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... stirred curd cheese. 58.711 Section 58.711 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture... soaked curd, granular or stirred curd cheese. Cheese, used in the manufacture of pasteurized process cheese products should possess a pleasing and desirable taste and odor consistent with the age of the...

  4. The influence of starter and adjunct lactobacilli culture on the ripening of washed curd cheeses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Hynes

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Ten strains of lactobacillus from the CNRZ collection were tested as adjunct culture in miniature washed curd cheeses manufactured under controlled bacteriological conditions with two different starters, Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis IL 416 and Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris AM2. Lactobacilli growth seemed to be dependent on the Lactobacillus strain but was not influenced by the starter strain or counts. Lactococci counts were higher in the miniature cheeses with AM2 starter and added lactobacilli than in the control cheeses without lactobacilli. Gross composition and hydrolysis of s1 casein were similar for miniature cheeses with and without lactobacilli. In the miniature cheeses manufactured with IL416 starter, the lactobacilli adjunct slightly increased the soluble nitrogen content, but that was not verified in the AM2 miniature cheeses. Phosphotungstic acid nitrogen content increased in miniature cheeses manufactured with IL416 when Lactobacillus plantarum 1572 and 1310 adjunct cultures were added. That was also verified for several Lactobacillus strains, specially Lactobacillus casei 1227, for miniature cheeses manufactured with AM2 starter. Free fatty acid content increased in miniature cheeses made with lactobacilli adjuncts 1310, 1308 and 1219 with IL416 starter, and with strains 1218, 1244 and 1308 for miniature cheeses with AM2 starter. These results indicate that production of soluble nitrogen compounds as well as free fatty acid content could be influenced by the lactobacilli adjunct, depending on the starter strain.

  5. 21 CFR 133.129 - Dry curd cottage cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dry curd cottage cheese. 133.129 Section 133.129... FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION CHEESES AND RELATED CHEESE PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Cheese and Related Products § 133.129 Dry curd cottage cheese. (a) Cottage cheese dry curd is the soft...

  6. 21 CFR 133.144 - Granular and stirred curd cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Granular and stirred curd cheese. 133.144 Section... (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION CHEESES AND RELATED CHEESE PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Cheese and Related Products § 133.144 Granular and stirred curd cheese. (a) Description. (1...

  7. Lipase in milk, curd and cheese

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geurts, T.J.; Lettink, F.J.; Wouters, J.T.M.

    2003-01-01

    Presence of lipase in milk, curd, whey and cheese was studied. A small amount of the product was added to a large volume of lipase-free whole milk that had been made sensitive to lipolysis by homogenization. Increase of the acidity of the fat in the mixture, determined after incubation, was

  8. [Distribution of aflatoxin M1 in whey and curd during cheese processing (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiermeier, F; Buchner, M

    1977-06-30

    In model experiments on the distribution of aflatoxin M1 in whey and curd, the influence of the different processing steps was investigated. Taking the same weight ratio between whey and curd, the following results were obtained: a) The aflatoxin M1-distribution in whey and curd was not changed with increasing amounts of rennet, thus decreasing the renneting time at constant renneting temperatures. b) With increasing renneting temperatures, however, the toxin's percentage in the curd decreased at constant amounts of rennet, whereas the whey's content remained stable. For the commonly used temperature variations between 28 and 35 degrees C, the toxin content of the cheese varied in the range of about 12%. c) Processing of curd by acidification with different organic acids at constant temperatures did not show any change in the aflatoxin M1 distribution as compared to rennet coagulation. d) Curd processing by means of starter cultures led to a decrease in the aflatoxin M1 in curd only at higher temperatures; the toxin's percentage in whey remained practically the same. e) Washing of the curd with the 2 1/2 volumes of water decreased the aflatoxin M1 content of cheese by 22%.

  9. The type of cheese curds determined the colouring capacity of Brevibacterium and Arthrobacter species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclercq-Perlat, Marie-Noëlle; Spinnler, Henry-Eric

    2010-08-01

    This study compares the colouring capacity of Brevibacterium aurantiacum (BA), Brevibacterium BL and Arthrobacter species AS in relation to deacidified media made from lactic curd (Epoisses), mixed curds (Munster) and rennet curds (Livarot or Reblochon). BA colouring capacity proved to be constant, leading to a dark orange colour, irrespective of the deacidified media. However, it gave too dark a colour for Reblochon. The strains BL and AS were not adapted to the colouring of Epoisses deacidified medium. On the Livarot or Munster deacidified medium, these two strains provided a light yellow orange colour range that was not suitable for these cheeses. However, these two strains (BL and AS) produced a suitable colour for Reblochon deacidified medium.

  10. Geographical Indication Re-signifying Artisanal Production of Curd Cheese in Northeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone de Lira Almeida

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Fierce market competition and growing consumer demand for quality have spurred organizations to seek certification as a way of differentiating their products and services from those of competitors. Geographical Indication (GI is a type of certification that has received attention from agribusiness. The significance as a cultural artifact (e.g., locally-produced curd cheese does not lie in the product itself, but in the relationships that are established between those who produce it and those who consume it, thereby highlighting the interrelationships of these symbolic production practices. This study seeks to understand how the process of GI certification has conferred new meaning on (re-signified artisanal production of curd cheese in rural parts of the Brazilian state of Pernambuco. GI adds value to the product, making it competitive. Discourse analysis enabled comparison of the cheese’s original cultural meanings with those outlined by Curd Cheese Certification Association (CCCA member-producers. Certification-driven innovations have helped CCCA member-producers to re-signify their artisanal production, while providing a clear understanding of both the material and symbolic dimensions of improvements perceived to have occurred in the production process.

  11. Genome-wide association study for cheese yield and curd nutrient recovery in dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadousis, C; Biffani, S; Cipolat-Gotet, C; Nicolazzi, E L; Rosa, G J M; Gianola, D; Rossoni, A; Santus, E; Bittante, G; Cecchinato, A

    2017-02-01

    Cheese production and consumption are increasing in many countries worldwide. As a result, interest has increased in strategies for genetic selection of individuals for technological traits of milk related to cheese yield (CY) in dairy cattle breeding. However, little is known about the genetic background of a cow's ability to produce cheese. Recently, a relatively large panel (1,264 cows) of different measures of individual cow CY and milk nutrient and energy recoveries in the cheese (REC) became available. Genetic analyses showed considerable variation for CY and for aptitude to retain high proportions of fat, protein, and water in the coagulum. For the dairy industry, these characteristics are of major economic importance. Nevertheless, use of this knowledge in dairy breeding is hampered by high costs, intense labor requirement, and lack of appropriate technology. However, in the era of genomics, new possibilities are available for animal breeding and genetic improvement. For example, identification of genomic regions involved in cow CY might provide potential for marker-assisted selection. The objective of this study was to perform genome-wide association studies on different CY and REC measures. Milk and DNA samples from 1,152 Italian Brown Swiss cows were used. Three CY traits expressing the weight (wt) of fresh curd (%CYCURD), curd solids (%CYSOLIDS), and curd moisture (%CYWATER) as a percentage of weight of milk processed, and 4 REC (RECFAT, RECPROTEIN, RECSOLIDS, and RECENERGY, calculated as the % ratio between the nutrient in curd and the corresponding nutrient in processed milk) were analyzed. Animals were genotyped with the Illumina BovineSNP50 Bead Chip v.2. Single marker regressions were fitted using the GenABEL R package (genome-wide association using mixed model and regression-genomic control). In total, 103 significant associations (88 single nucleotide polymorphisms) were identified in 10 chromosomes (2, 6, 9, 11, 12, 14, 18, 19, 27, 28). For

  12. Segmentation of Parmigiano Reggiano dairies according to cheese-making technology and relationships with the aspect of the cheese curd surface at the moment of its extraction from the cheese vat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mucchetti, G; Gatti, M; Nocetti, M; Reverberi, P; Bianchi, A; Galati, F; Petroni, A

    2014-03-01

    Parmigiano Reggiano cheese dairies develop specific cheese-making strategies to adapt the variable characteristics of raw, not standardized milk to the final goal of obtaining cheese consistent with the standard. Analyzing 1,175 cheese-making reports from 30 out of 383 dairies associated with the Parmigiano Reggiano Consortium in 2010 and 2011, 4 groups of Parmigiano Reggiano dairies using specific cheese-making technologies were discriminated by means of multiple linear discriminant analysis. Cheese makers manage cheese-making practices to obtain curd with different roughness properties, classified according to jargon words such as "rigata" and "giusta" or synonyms, because they believe that the roughness of the cheese curd surface immediately after the extraction from the vat is associated with different whey-draining properties and to the final outcome of the cheese. The aspect of the surfaces of the curds produced by the 4 groups of dairies was different according to the technology applied by each group. Cutting of the coagulum when it is still soft for a longer time and faster cooking of the cheese curd grains were associated with a less rough appearance of the surface of the curd, whereas under the opposite conditions, cutting the coagulum when it is firm for a shorter time, led to a curd with a rougher surface. These findings partially support the traditional feeling of Parmigiano Reggiano cheese makers, who consider the curd surface aspect one of the main drivers for their technological choices; to date, however, no data are provided about correlation between the aspect of the curd and the quality of the ripened cheese. If a sufficiently strong correlation could be demonstrated by the future development of the research, the operational effectiveness of Parmigiano Reggiano dairies will be able to largely benefit from the availability of sound and early process markers. Copyright © 2014 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All

  13. A new study of the kinetics of curd production in the process of cheese manufacture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Susana Vargas; Torres, Maykel González; Guerrero, Francisco Quintanilla; Talavera, Rogelio Rodríguez

    2017-11-01

    We studied the role played by temperature and rennet concentration in the coagulation process for cheese manufacture and the evaluation of their kinetics. We concluded that temperature is the main factor that determines the kinetics. The rennet concentration was unimportant probably due to the fast action of the enzyme chymosin. The Dynamic light scattering technique allowed measuring the aggregate's size and their formation kinetics. The volume fraction of solids was determined from viscosity measurements, showing profiles that are in agreement with the size profiles. The results indicate that the formation of the aggregates for rennet cheese is strongly dependent on temperature and rennet concentration. The results revealed that at 35·5 °C the volume fraction of solids has the maximum slope, indicating that at this temperature the curd is formed rapidly. The optimal temperature throughout the process was established. Second-order kinetics were obtained for the process. We observed a quadratic dependence between the rennet volume and the volume fraction of solids (curd), thereby indicating that the kinetics of the curd production should be of order two.

  14. Effect of Draw pH on the Development of Curd Structure During the Manufacture of Mozzarella Cheese

    OpenAIRE

    Kiely, L. J.; Kindstedt, P. S.; Hendricks, G. M.; Levis, J. E.; Yun, J. J.; Barbano, D. M.

    1992-01-01

    The impact of varying the pH of whey at whey drainage (5.9, 6.15 or 6.4) on the development of curd structure during the manufacture of Mozzarella cheese was investigated using scanning electron microscopy. Dramatic changes in curd structure were apparent with stage of manufacture , in particular the stretching step which aligned the protein fibers. Of additional interest is the effect of draw pH on the structure of curd at whey drainage. When whey was drained at pH 6.4, an open poorly fus...

  15. Proteolysis, lipolysis, volatile compounds and sensory characteristics of Hispánico cheeses made using frozen curd from raw and pasteurized ewe milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Rocío; Picon, Antonia; Gaya, Pilar; Nuñez, Manuel

    2013-02-01

    Hispánico cheese, manufactured from a mixture of cow and ewe milk, is representative of cheese varieties made using milk from more than one animal species in Mediterranean countries. The shortage of ewe milk production in autumn hinders the uniformity of Hispánico cheese composition throughout the year. To surmount this inconvenience of ewe milk seasonality, curds made in spring from raw and pasteurized ewe milk were stored frozen and used four months later for the manufacture of Hispánico cheese. Experimental cheeses were made by mixing fresh curd from pasteurized cow milk with thawed curd from raw or pasteurized ewe milk, and control cheese from a mixture of pasteurized cow and ewe milk in the same proportion. Characteristics of experimental and control cheeses throughout a 60-d ripening period were investigated. On the one hand, the experimental cheese containing frozen curd from raw ewe milk showed the highest counts of staphylococci, Gram-negative bacteria and coliforms, the highest levels of aminopeptidase and esterase activity, and the highest concentrations of free amino acids, free fatty acids, alcohols and esters. On the other, the experimental cheese containing frozen curd from pasteurized ewe milk had concentrations of free amino acids, free fatty acids and volatile compounds similar to those of control cheese, with the only exception being a higher level of ketones. Flavour intensity reached the highest scores in the experimental cheese containing frozen curd from raw ewe milk, followed by the experimental cheese containing frozen curd from pasteurized ewe milk. Flavour quality scores of both experimental cheeses were similar, and lower than those of control cheese.

  16. Effect of high-pressure treatment of ewe raw milk curd at 200 and 300 MPa on characteristics of Hispánico cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, R; Picon, A; Gaya, P; Fernández-García, E; Nuñez, M

    2012-07-01

    Hispánico cheese is a semihard variety made from a mixture of cow and ewe milks. Production of ewe milk declines in summer and autumn. To surmount the seasonal shortage of ewe milk and prevent the inactivation of milk enzymes by pasteurization, curd made in spring from ewe raw milk was pressurized at 200 and 300 MPa and stored frozen for 4 mo. Thawed ewe milk curds were added to fresh curd made from pasteurized cow milk for the manufacture of experimental Hispánico cheeses. Control cheese was made from a mixture of pasteurized cow and ewe milk in the same proportions as those used for experimental cheeses. Experimental cheeses exhibited lower dry matter content, higher aminopeptidase activity and total free amino acid concentration, and higher levels of acetic and propionic acids, aldehydes, alcohols, and esters compared with control cheese. In contrast, the concentration of total free fatty acids and ketones and the levels of textural parameters were significantly higher in control cheese. The use of ewe raw milk curd pressurized at 200 and 300 MPa, stored frozen and thawed for Hispánico cheese manufacture, was generally beneficial for cheese characteristics and increased cheese yield because of the lower dry matter content of experimental cheeses. Copyright © 2012 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Microbial Quality of and Biochemical Changes in Fresh Soft, Acid-Curd Xinotyri Cheese Made from Raw or Pasteurized Goat’s Milk

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Eleni C. Pappa; Thomas G. Bontinis; Maria Tasioula-Margari; John Samelis

    2017-01-01

    ... of soft Xinotyri, a traditional Greek acid-curd cheese (pH≈4.4, moisture 65 %, salt 1 %) made from raw (RMC) or pasteurized (PMC) goat’s milk without starters, were evaluated during aerobic storage at 4...

  18. Textural and physico-chemical characteristics of white brined goat cheeses made from frozen milk and curd. The use of square I - distance statistics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nemanja Kljajevic

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective of this study was to investigate the effect of short term frozen storage of milk and curd on textural properties and physico-chemical composition of white brined goat cheese. Raw milk and curds (at various stages of pressing were frozen and kept for seven days at -27 °C. Following the freezing, all the experimental cheeses were manufactured by the standard procedure, the same that was used for the control cheese sample which did not undergo freezing at any stage of production. The Square I - distance was used in order to rank the cheeses according to their similarity to the control cheese in terms of texture attributes and physico-chemical characteristics. The results show that, in terms of all examined variables, the cheese made from frozen milk is the most similar to the control cheese.

  19. Relationship among the cheese yield, the characteristics of the curd and those of buffalo milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Zicarelli

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Correlation coefficients were evaluated between the theoretical cheese yield (ThCY, the real yield at 4 (FCY and 28 h (28CY, the curd dry matter (CDM and the relationships with the percentage of proteins and milk characteristics. Milk samples were collected every 50 days from 60 buffaloes (326 samples that were half-sibs (through paternal or maternal lineage ascertained by DNA test, bred in two farms. Positive correlations were found between FCY and 28CY and the enzymatic phase of coagulation and with the milk content in DM, proteins, casein and lipids. Negative correlations were found with lactose and urea milk content. These yields increased when the percentage of DM, proteins and hash of the curd were lower and that of lipids was higher. The 28CY is correlated with ThCY (r = 0.762; P < 0.01 and with the CDM (r = 0.809; P < 0.01. A high 28CY was also characterized by a high 28CY/% proteins ratio and CDM/% proteins ratio. The CDM was higher when the DM of milk and its content in proteins, casein and lipids were higher and when the content in lactose was lower. A correlation (r = 0.501; P < 0.01 was observed between the CDM and the DM percentage of the curd. For the other components the correlations found were the same as for the 28CY. The 28CY/% proteins enhanced at the increasing lipid content of the milk (r = 0.417; P < 0.01 and at decreasing content in urea (r = - 0.317; P < 0.01 and freezing point (r = - 0.123; P < 0.01. The CDM /% proteins was positively influences by fat (r = 0.596; P < 0.01 and lactose (r = - 0.341; P < 0.01. The ThCY/28CY was negatively influenced by “R” and by the pH value and positively correlated with the lipid content of milk.

  20. Effect of curd freezing and packaging methods on the organic acid contents of goat cheeses during storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pınar Balkir

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Effects of freezing and packaging methods on organic acid content of goat cheese during 12 weeks of storage were determined. Goat cheese milk curds were divided into two batches; one of the batches was directly processed in to goat cheese while the other was frozen at -18 °C and stored for six months and processed into cheese after being thawed. Cheese samples were packed in three parts and stored at 4 °C refrigerated control sample and at -18 °C for six months frozen experimental samples. Cheese samples were packed in three different packaging methods: aerobic, vacuum or modified atmosphere. Citric, malic, fumaric, acetic, lactic, pyruvic and propionic acids were analyzed using HPLC method after 1st, 3rd, 6th, 9th and 12th week of storage period. Lactic acid was the main organic acids while pyruvic acid had the lowest content in all cheese samples. Citric and fumaric acid levels of frozen samples increased during storage whereas malic, acetic, pyruvic and propionic acid amounts were decreased compared to the beginning of storage. Packaging methods and freezing process also effected lactic acid levels statistically (p<0.05. Fumaric, acetic and lactic acid concentration of refrigerated samples were increased but citric, malic and propionic acids decreased during storage. Pyruvic acid level did not change significantly. It was determined that organic acid concentrations were effected by freezing process, storage time and packaging methods significantly (p<0.05.

  1. The 9-MilCA method as a rapid, partly automated protocol for simultaneously recording milk coagulation, curd firming, syneresis, cheese yield, and curd nutrients recovery or whey loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cipolat-Gotet, C; Cecchinato, A; Stocco, G; Bittante, G

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to propose and test a new laboratory cheesemaking procedure [9-mL milk cheesemaking assessment (9-MilCA)], which records 15 traits related to milk coagulation, curd firming, syneresis, cheese yield, and curd nutrients recovery or whey loss. This procedure involves instruments found in many laboratories (i.e., heaters and lacto-dynamographs), with an easy modification of the sample rack for the insertion of 10-mL glass tubes. Four trials were carried out to test the 9-MilCA procedure. The first trial compared 8 coagulation and curd firming traits obtained using regular or modified sample racks to process milk samples from 60 cows belonging to 5 breeds and 3 farms (480 tests). The obtained patterns exhibited significant but irrelevant between-procedure differences, with better repeatability seen for 9-MilCA. The second trial tested the reproducibility and repeatability of the 7 cheesemaking traits obtained using the 9-MilCA procedure on individual samples from 60 cows tested in duplicate in 2 instruments (232 tests). The method yielded very repeatable outcomes for all 7 tested cheese yield and nutrient recovery traits (repeatability >98%), with the exception of the fresh cheese yield (84%), which was affected by the lower repeatability (67%) of the water retained in the curd. In the third trial (96 tests), we found that using centrifugation in place of curd cooking and draining (as adopted in several published studies) reduced the efficiency of whey separation, overestimated all traits, and worsened the repeatability. The fourth trial compared 9-MilCA with a more complex model cheese-manufacturing process that mimics industry practices, using 1,500-mL milk samples (72 cows, 216 tests). The average results obtained from 9-MilCA were similar to those obtained from the model cheeses, with between-method correlations ranging from 78 to 99%, except for the water retained in the curd (r=54%). Our results indicate that new 9-MilCA method is a

  2. Variation of milk coagulation properties, cheese yield, and nutrients recovery in curd of cows of different breeds before, during and after transhumance to highland summer pastures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zendri, Francesco; Ramanzin, Maurizio; Cipolat-Gotet, Claudio; Sturaro, Enrico

    2017-02-01

    This paper aimed at evaluating the effect of summer transhumance to mountain pastures of dairy cows of different breeds on cheese-making ability of milk. Data were from 649 dairy cows of specialized (Holstein Friesian and Brown Swiss) dual purpose (Simmental) and local (mostly Rendena and Alpine Grey) breeds. The Fourier-Transform Infra-Red Spectra (FTIRS) of their milk samples were collected before and after transhumance in 109 permanent dairy farms, and during transhumance in 14 summer farms (with multi-breeds herds) of the Trento Province, north-eastern Italy. A variety of 18 traits describing milk coagulation, curd firming, cheese yield and nutrients recovery in curd/loss in whey were predicted on the basis of FTIRS collected at the individual cow level. Moving the cows to summer farms improved curd firming traits but reduced cheese yields because of an increase of water and fat lost in the whey. During summer grazing, most of cheese-making traits improved, often non-linearly. The milk from summer farms supplementing cows with more concentrates showed better curd firming and cheese yield, because of lower fat lost in the whey. The breed of cows affected almost all the traits with a worst cheese-making ability for milk samples of Holsteins through all the trial, and interacted with concentrate supplementation because increasing compound feed tended to improve cheese-making traits for all breed, with the exception of local breeds for coagulation time and of Brown Swiss for curd firming time. In general, summer transhumance caused a favourable effect on cheese-making aptitude of milk, even though with some difference according to parity, initial days in milk, breed and concentrate supplementation of cows.

  3. Study of microbial diversity in raw milk and fresh curd used for Fontina cheese production by culture-independent methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannino, Maria Laura; Marzotto, Marta; Dellaglio, Franco; Feligini, Maria

    2009-04-15

    The bacterial populations of raw milk employed for the production of Fontina cheese in alpine farms located in different valleys and altitudes (from 700 to 2246 m above sea level) were investigated by culture independent techniques. Total microbial DNA was isolated from milk and curd samples and used as template in Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) to study the hypervariable V3 region of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene and analyzed by Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE). Representative bands of DGGE patterns were sequenced for identification purposes. The use of universal primer for PCR-DGGE allowed the description of the bacterial community, not only for the presence of lactic acid bacteria, but also for other adventitious species. DGGE profiles obtained from milk and fresh curd samples were generally different and typical for each farm, although some recurrent bands were observed. Cluster analysis of DGGE profiles did not show high similarity among samples and it was probably dependent on the different geographical areas of pastures. Some Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB) recurred in many samples (Streptococcus thermophilus, Enterococcus faecium, Enterococcus faecalis, Lactococcus lactis, Leuconostoc lactis) indicating that alpine milk is a preferential niche for their colonization. The microbiota included not only mesophilic and thermoresistant LAB but also adventitious bacteria (Macrococcus caseolyticus, Rothia spp.) and psychrotrophic bacteria (Chryseobacterium spp., Pseudomonas spp.), that were found in almost all samples, but disappeared after the warming up at 47-48 degrees C of coagulated milk. Pantoea spp. was primarily found in curds and only with a low incidence in milk samples, indicating the environmental origin. Finally the sequencing data confirmed the presence of E. faecium, E. faecalis and S. thermophilus as major species present in the curd. These species were found also in raw milk, proving its importance as source of the typical fermenting

  4. Breed of cow and herd productivity affect milk nutrient recovery in curd, and cheese yield, efficiency and daily production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stocco, G; Cipolat-Gotet, C; Gasparotto, V; Cecchinato, A; Bittante, G

    2018-02-01

    Little is known about cheese-making efficiency at the individual cow level, so our objective was to study the effects of herd productivity, individual herd within productivity class and breed of cow within herd by producing, then analyzing, 508 model cheeses from the milk of 508 cows of six different breeds reared in 41 multi-breed herds classified into two productivity classes (high v. low). For each cow we obtained six milk composition traits; four milk nutrient (fat, protein, solids and energy) recovery traits (REC) in curd; three actual % cheese yield traits (%CY); two theoretical %CYs (fresh cheese and cheese solids) calculated from milk composition; two overall cheese-making efficiencies (% ratio of actual to theoretical %CYs); daily milk yield (dMY); and three actual daily cheese yield traits (dCY). The aforementioned phenotypes were analyzed using a mixed model which included the fixed effects of herd productivity, parity, days in milk (DIM) and breed; the random effects were the water bath, vat, herd and residual. Cows reared in high-productivity herds yielded more milk with higher nutrient contents and more cheese per day, had greater theoretical %CY, and lower cheese-making efficiency than low-productivity herds, but there were no differences between them in terms of REC traits. Individual herd within productivity class was an intermediate source of total variation in REC, %CY and efficiency traits (10.0% to 17.2%), and a major source of variation in milk yield and dCY traits (43.1% to 46.3%). Parity of cows was an important source of variation for productivity traits, whereas DIM affected almost all traits. Breed within herd greatly affected all traits. Holsteins produced more milk, but Brown Swiss cows produced milk with higher actual and theoretical %CYs and cheese-making efficiency, so that the two large-framed breeds had the same dCY. Compared with the two large-framed breeds, the small Jersey cows produced much less milk, but with greater actual

  5. Biogenic Amine Production in Olomouc Curd Cheese (Olomoucké tvarůžky at Various Storage Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Standarová

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of temperature and storage time on the formation of biogenic amines (BAs in the traditional Czech curd cheese (Olomoucké tvarůžky. Samples were stored for 7 weeks at 5 °C and 20 °C. BAs were studied as dansyl derivatives by the RP-HPLC method with fluorescence detection, histamine was determined using a photodiode array detector. Physical and chemical properties were analyzed as specified by the Czech National Standard, as were the sensory characteristics (colour, odour, texture and flavour. The major amines found were cadaverine (124–2413 mg kg-1 and tyramine (117–1058 mg kg-1, followed by putrescine (75–767 mg kg-1 and histamine (74–411 mg kg-1. Low concentrations of tryptamine, spermine and spermidine were present. Total concentrations of BAs significantly increased with storage time (P P -1 at the end of storage. The toxicologically critical value of 900 mg kg-1 for the sum of histamine + tyramine + putrescine + cadaverine was reached 17 days later in the cheese stored at 5 °C compared to 20 °C. When stored at 5 °C, the samples retained adequate sensory characteristics for the entire safe storage time. The effects of storage conditions on BAs formation are relevant to reducing the risk associated with consumption of cheese high in BAs.

  6. IMPROVING OF THE MICROBIOLOGICAL AND PROTEOLYTIC PROFILE OF KASHKAVAL CHEESE BY MODIFICATION IN HEAT TREATMENTS OF COW'S MILK AND CHEDDARED CURD

    OpenAIRE

    Dimitar Dimitrov; Zhelyazko Simov; Zhechko Dimitrov; Assan Ospanov

    2015-01-01

    Model samples kashkaval cheese were made by the microwave processing of cow's milk in thermisation mode (62 - 67 °C) and direct microwave treatment of cheddared curd with subsequent dry salting. Control cheese samples were produced by the conventional approach with classical thermisation (62 - 67 °C) of cow's milk and classic hot brining in brine solution (72-74 °C, 14%NaCl). Samples were placed in ripening conditions (8 - 10 °C). The changes of microbiological and proteolytic profile on the ...

  7. Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) and fatty acid composition of milk, curd and Grana Padano cheese in conventional and organic farming systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prandini, Aldo; Sigolo, Samantha; Piva, Gianfranco

    2009-08-01

    CLA levels and fatty acid composition were measured to compare the fat composition in organic bulk milk, destined to the production of Grana Padano cheese, with those produced by conventional system. The curds and Grana Padano cheeses were also analysed to evaluate the effects of the production technology on the CLA content. All analysed organic samples were characterized by higher annual means of CLA, vaccenic acid (TVA) and linolenic acid (LNA) in comparison with conventional samples (with Porganic diet based on fresh or dried forage, that is rich in CLA precursory fatty acids, may improve the yield of fatty acids with beneficial effects on health.

  8. IMPROVING OF THE MICROBIOLOGICAL AND PROTEOLYTIC PROFILE OF KASHKAVAL CHEESE BY MODIFICATION IN HEAT TREATMENTS OF COW'S MILK AND CHEDDARED CURD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitar Dimitrov

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Model samples kashkaval cheese were made by the microwave processing of cow's milk in thermisation mode (62 - 67 °C and direct microwave treatment of cheddared curd with subsequent dry salting. Control cheese samples were produced by the conventional approach with classical thermisation (62 - 67 °C of cow's milk and classic hot brining in brine solution (72-74 °C, 14%NaCl. Samples were placed in ripening conditions (8 - 10 °C. The changes of microbiological and proteolytic profile on the 5th, 15th, 30th and 45th day of ripening were studied. Higher survival levels of the starter culture responsible for ripening were established in kashkaval cheese produced by microwave treatment in comparison with classical cheese. It was found that the higher cell concentration of the starter culture leads to active and accelerate process of proteolysis with production of free amino acids in concentrations significantly exceeding the obtained in the classical cheese: 490,10±2,10 mg100g-1(microwave kashkaval cheese versus 216,50±2,00 mg100g-1 (classical kashkaval cheese.

  9. Drainage of curd

    OpenAIRE

    Akkerman, J. C.

    1992-01-01

    Cheese making starts with transformation of the liquid milk into a gel by proteolytic enzymes and/or acid producing bacteria. The gel is cut into pieces. The protein matrix contracts, by which whey is expelled from the pieces, this process is called syneresis. The process of whey expulsion is enhanced by stirring and usually heating. Finally fairly rigid curd grains and a large amount of whey are obtained. The subsequent separation of whey and curd grains is called drainage of curd. ...

  10. Fluctuation in contamination dynamics of L. monocytogenes in quargel (acid curd cheese) lots recalled during the multinational listeriosis outbreak 2009/2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoder, Dagmar; Rossmanith, Peter; Glaser, Katrin; Wagner, Martin

    2012-07-16

    For the first time it has been possible to determine the contamination level of Listeria monocytogenes in the very cheese lots of acid curd cheese that caused a multinational outbreak between 2009/2010. The listeriosis outbreak accounted for 34 clinical cases and eight deaths. The cheese, which was distributed in Austria, Germany, the Czech Republic, Poland and Slovakia, was recalled on the 23rd January 2010. All recalled lots were immediately investigated after call back from the retail market. The company manufactured two different cheese types, (i) red smear ripened--and (ii) mold coated/white veined--acid curd cheese. Depending on the lot production dates, cheese samples (n=1045) were analyzed at three different time points: (i) beginning to mid shelf-life (lot nos. 15-18; production period 5.1.2010-13.1.2010); (ii) end of shelf-life (lot nos. 9-18; production period 21.12.2009-13.1.2010) and, (iii) ≤46days after the expiry date (lot nos. 1-18; production period 1.12.2009-13.1.2010). Qualitative and quantitative examinations of cheese samples were performed according to ISO 11290-1&2. Examination of the samples, according to ISO 11290-1, resulted in 16 L. monocytogenes positive (red smear type) and two negative lots (mold coated type). These results were confirmed by a combined enrichment/real-time PCR method. The contamination values obtained by quantitative ISO 11290-2 varied from ≤log 2 cell forming units (CFU)/g to log 8.1CFU/g. Three out of sixteen L. monocytogenes positive lots revealed a contamination level of ≤log 2CFU/g at the beginning of their shelf-life when stored at 4°C. Nevertheless, by increasing the storage life and/or the storage temperature (15, 22°C) the contamination level could be raised to between log 5 and log 6CFU/g. Our data indicate that 81.3% (13/16) of the recalled red smear quargel cheese lots were highly contaminated with L. monocytogenes. All this implies that the main contamination of the quargel cheese took place during

  11. Genetic parameters of cheese yield and curd nutrient recovery or whey loss traits predicted using Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy of samples collected during milk recording on Holstein, Brown Swiss, and Simmental dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecchinato, A; Albera, A; Cipolat-Gotet, C; Ferragina, A; Bittante, G

    2015-07-01

    Cheese yield is the most important technological parameter in the dairy industry in many countries. The aim of this study was to infer (co)variance components for cheese yields (CY) and nutrient recoveries in curd (REC) predicted using Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy of samples collected during milk recording on Holstein, Brown Swiss, and Simmental dairy cows. A total of 311,354 FTIR spectra representing the test-day records of 29,208 dairy cows (Holstein, Brown Swiss, and Simmental) from 654 herds, collected over a 3-yr period, were available for the study. The traits of interest for each cow consisted of 3 cheese yield traits (%CY: fresh curd, curd total solids, and curd water as a percent of the weight of the processed milk), 4 curd nutrient recovery traits (REC: fat, protein, total solids, and the energy of the curd as a percent of the same nutrient in the processed milk), and 3 daily cheese production traits (daily fresh curd, total solids, and the water of the curd per cow). Calibration equations (freely available upon request to the corresponding author) were used to predict individual test-day observations for these traits. The (co)variance components were estimated for the CY, REC, milk production, and milk composition traits via a set of 4-trait analyses within each breed. All analyses were performed using REML and linear animal models. The heritabilities of the %CY were always higher for Holstein and Brown Swiss cows (0.22 to 0.33) compared with Simmental cows (0.14 to 0.18). In general, the fresh cheese yield (%CYCURD) showed genetic variation and heritability estimates that were slightly higher than those of its components, %CYSOLIDS and %CYWATER. The parameter RECPROTEIN was the most heritable trait in all the 3 breeds, with values ranging from 0.32 to 0.41. Our estimation of the genetic relationships of the CY and REC with milk production and composition revealed that the current selection strategies used in dairy cattle are expected

  12. Microbial Quality of and Biochemical Changes in Fresh Soft, Acid-Curd Xinotyri Cheese Made from Raw or Pasteurized Goat’s Milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleni C. Pappa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The microbiological quality of and changes in the main physicochemical parameters, together with the evolution of proteolysis, lipolysis and volatile profiles of soft Xinotyri, a traditional Greek acid-curd cheese (pH≈4.4, moisture 65 %, salt 1 % made from raw (RMC or pasteurized (PMC goat’s milk without starters, were evaluated during aerobic storage at 4 °C for 60 days. No statistically significant differences between the total nitrogen (TN and nitrogen fraction (% of TN contents, the degradation of intact αs- or β-caseins, total free amino acid (FAA contents, and the ratio of hydrophilic and hydrophobic peptides in the water-soluble fraction of RMC and PMC were found. Threonine, alanine and lysine were the principal FAAs. Oleic, palmitic, capric and caprylic acids, and ethyl hexonate, ethyl octanoate, ethyl decanoate, ethanol, 3-methyl butanol, phenyl ethyl alcohol and acetone were the most abundant free fatty acids and volatile compounds, respectively. Cheese lipolysis evolved slowly at 4 °C, and milk pasteurization had no significant effect on it. Mesophilic lactic acid bacteria (LAB were predominant in fresh cheese samples. PMC samples had significantly lower levels of enterococci and enterobacteria than RMC samples, while yeasts grew at similar levels during storage at 4 °C. All cheese samples (25 g were free of Salmonella and Listeria monocytogenes. Coagulase-positive staphylococci exceeded the 5-log safety threshold in fresh RMC samples, whereas they were suppressed (<100 CFU/g in all PMC samples. Consequently, pasteurization of raw goat milk’s and utilization of commercially defined or natural mesophilic LAB starters are recommended for standardizing the biochemical, microbial and safety qualities of fresh soft Xinotyri cheese.

  13. Bitter taste – cheese failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slavko Kirin

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available Bitter taste is serous and very often cheese failure in modern cheesemaking process. In this paper the sources and bitter taste development in cheese will be presented. Bitterness in cheese is linked to bitter compounds development during cheese ripening. Most of the bitter compounds come from bitter peptides, the mechanism of theirs development being due to proteasepeptidase system of the cured enzymes and the milk cultures as well as other proteases present in cheese. By the action of curd enzymes, the milk protein - casein - is firstly degraded into high molecular weight compounds possessing no bitter taste. Those compounds are then degraded, by milk protease cultures, to hydrophobic bitter peptides of low molecular weight further degraded, by bacterial endopeptidase during cheese ripening, to bitter peptides and amino acids. In the case when no balance exists, between bitter compounds development and breakdown by lactic acid bacteria peptidase, an accumulation of bitter peptides occurs thus having an influence on cheese bitterness. During cheese ripening naturally occurring milk protease – plasmin, and thermostable proteases of raw milk microflora are also involved in proteolytic process. Fat cheese lipases, initiated by lipase originating from psychrotrophic bacteria in raw milk as well as other cheese lipases, are also associated with bitter taste generation. The other sources of bitterness come from the forages, the medicament residues as well as washing and disinfecting agents. In order to eliminate these failures a special care should be taken in milk quality as well as curd and milk culture selection. At this point technological norms and procedures, aimed to maintain the proteolysis balance during cheese ripening, should be adjusted, thus eliminating the bitter taste of the cheese.

  14. Interferência da microbiota autóctone do queijo coalho sobre Staphylococcus coagulase positiva Interference of autochthonous microbiota of curd cheese on Staphylococcus coagulase positive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terezinha Feitosa Machado

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Níveis elevados de contaminantes microbiológicos, comumente encontrados em alimentos de origem animal e ambientes de processamento de alimentos, são aptos de impedir o crescimento de patógenos nestes produtos. Em alguns contextos onde bactérias ácido láticas (BAL constituem a microbiota dominante, como nos produtos lácteos, Staphylococcus coagulase positiva (SCP colonizam, persistem e produzem intoxicação alimentar. Com o objetivo de verificar a possível interferência da microbiota encontrada no queijo Coalho sobre a presença de SCP, 64 amostras provenientes de 16 laticínios foram submetidas a análises microbiológicas para determinar os níveis de microrganismos aeróbios mesófilos (MAM, BAL e SCP. Os resultados obtidos mostraram que a microbiota autóctone das amostras analisadas não gerou condições inadequadas ao crescimento, desenvolvimento e isolamento de SCP, uma vez que este patógeno foi detectado mesmo nas amostras que apresentaram altos níveis de contagens de MAM e BAL.High levels of microbial contamination, commonly found in animal origin foods and food processing environments, are able to hinder the growth in these products. In some contexts where lactic acid bacteria (LAB are the normal dominant microbiota, such as in fermented food, Staphylococcus coagulase positive (SCP colonises, persists and produces food poisoning. With the aim of verifying the interference of autochthonous microbiota encountered in Curd cheese over the presence of Staphylococcus aureus, 64 samples from 16 dairy were submitted to microbiological analysis to determine the levels of Microorganisms aerobes mesophilics (MAM, LAB and SCP. The results showed that the indigenous microbiota of the samples did not lead to inadequate growth, development and isolation of SCP, since this pathogen was detected even in samples with high levels of counts of AM and BAL.

  15. Processing of fresh cheese depending on selected factors

    OpenAIRE

    KOŘÁN, Jakub

    2013-01-01

    Bachelor thesis is focused on processing of fresh cheese depending on selected factors. The cheeses were made in laboratory for this purpose and some factors influencing cheese making were tested. The performed experiments show the effect on cheese yield, milk composition, good manufacturing process and different fermentation temperature. This influence is particularly evident in the overall yield of cheese curd, weight of curd, release rate of whey and pH of curd. The performed experiments c...

  16. Autochthonous facility-specific microbiota dominates washed-rind Austrian hard cheese surfaces and its production environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quijada, Narciso M; Mann, Evelyne; Wagner, Martin; Rodríguez-Lázaro, David; Hernández, Marta; Schmitz-Esser, Stephan

    2018-02-21

    Cheese ripening involves the succession of complex microbial communities that are responsible for the organoleptic properties of the final products. The food processing environment can act as a source of natural microbial inoculation, especially in traditionally manufactured products. Austrian Vorarlberger Bergkäse (VB) is an artisanal washed-rind hard cheese produced in the western part of Austria without the addition of external ripening cultures. Here, the composition of the bacterial communities present on VB rinds and on different processing surfaces from two ripening cellars was assessed by near full length 16S rRNA gene amplification, cloning and sequencing. Non-inoculated aerobic bacteria dominated all surfaces in this study. VB production conditions (long ripening time, high salt concentration and low temperatures) favor the growth of psychro- and halotolerant bacteria. Several bacterial groups, such as coryneforms, Staphylococcus equorum and Halomonas dominated VB and were also found on most environmental surfaces. Analysis of OTUs shared between different surfaces suggests that VB rind bacteria are inoculated naturally during the ripening from the processing environment and that cheese surfaces exert selective pressure on these communities, as only those bacteria better adapted flourished on VB rinds. This study analyzed VB processing environment microbiota and its relationship with VB rinds for the first time, elucidating that the processing environment and the cheese microbiota should be considered as microbiologically linked ecosystems with the goal of better defining the events that take place during cheese maturation. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. COTTAGE CHEESE PRODUCTS FUNCTIONALITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. V. Golubeva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cottage cheese products holds a significant place among the dairy and milk-containing products. The range of products includes cheese: cheese, pastes, creams, cakes, etc. Such diversity can be attributed to their popularity among the population and benefit brought by the body from regular use. Curd protein is much better and easier to digest by the body than protein fish, meat or milk. Rich curd products lysine and methionine. Minerals contained in cheese products have a positive effect on bone formation and structure of tissues. The composition of curd products, in addition to cheese and dairy ingredients may include non-dairy ingredients origin. Today, for the production of cheese products use the most advanced technologies to further enrich its structure and significantly improve the nutritional value. Pine nut is widely used in the manufacture of many dairy products. But, in most cases, the production of dairy products as a filler used pine nut cake, which deprives the finished product valuable cedar oil. The authors proposed a technology for producing curd product with the addition of pine nuts and honey (pine nuts and fructose. Compatible with cream cheese filling insertion determined sensory organoleptic point scale. he optimum dosage of components: pine nuts – 5 %, honey – 10 % fructose – 7 %. Technological process of cottage cheese product is different from the traditional operations training components and their introduction into the finished cheese. Identify indicators of quality of the new product. Production of curd products thus expanding the range of dairy products functional orientation.

  18. Elaboração de um queijo análogo ao pecorino romano produzido com leite de cabra e coalhada congelados Elaboration of a similar cheese to the pecorino romano made with frozen goat milk and frozen curd

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Abdallah Curi

    2007-02-01

    cabra nas condições naturais (T1 nas épocas de pico da produção e utilizar congelamento lento do leite (T5, que seria realizado na época de pico da produção, na entressafra.Seasonal production and small yield per animal are limiting factors when using goat's milk with consequent problems in the products supply, even in countries with well developed milk goat's herds located in temperate zones. The aim of this work was the production of a similar cheese to the "Pecorino Romano" using frozen goat's milk and frozen curd. The resultant cheeses was characterizing of the point of view organoléptic related with the cure. The experimental line was established to verify the effect of slow freezing and quick freezing of goat milk and curd in the sensory characteristics of the product, using the following treatments: Treatment 1 milk and curd without freezing, (N.F.; Treatment 2 slow freezing of the obtained curd, (S.F.C.; Treatment 3 quick freezing of the obtained curd, using liquid nitrogen, (Q.F.C.; Treatment 4 quick freezing of milk, using liquid nitrogen, (Q.F.M.; Treatment 5 slow freezing of milk, (S.F.M.. The sensory evaluation was performed after a 2 month period of cheese ripening by a panel composed by 10 tasters selected and trainned. The results indicated that there was a significant statistic difference among the treatments when submitted to a sensory evaluation after cheese ripening. For the analyzed attribute group it was possibly to consider that the treatment 4 had the best performance with high average for tast, flavor and hedonic scale and low average for acid flavor, off flavor, mechanic holes and or gaseous. This treatment showed, also, average low for spiced flavor, texture e consistency. The worst performance was for treatment 3 but the medium results did not disqualify it totally. Therefore, for the production of the studied cheese, goat's milk in natural conditions could be used (T1 during high milk production season and previously slow frozen

  19. Aspectos físico-químicos e microbianos do queijo maturado por mofo obtido da coagulação mista com leite de cabra congelado e coalhada congelada Chemicophysical and microbiological aspects of cheese made of a mixed coagulation, ripened by mould using slow or fast frozen goat's milk and slow or fast frozen curd

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Morita Katili

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available A caprinocultura de leite tem sido apontada como uma alternativa econômica para as pequenas propriedades rurais, sendo que a produção de queijo pode aumentar a lucratividade devido ao valor agregado ao produto. No entanto, os animais apresentam uma estacionalidade produtiva, ou seja, em alguns períodos há abundância e em outros, escassez de leite. O congelamento do leite ou de coalhadas dessoradas para a produção de queijo consiste numa alternativa para contornar o problema. O objetivo do trabalho foi avaliar um queijo obtido de massa mole com coagulação mista, maturado pelo fungo Penicillium candidum utilizando-se leite congelado pelos processos lento (freezer comum ou rápido (nitrogênio líquido e a fabricação do mesmo queijo utilizando-se coalhada dessorada e congelada pelos mesmos processos. Verificou-se que os queijos resultantes do congelamento do leite e congelamento da coalhada pelos processos lento e rápido não diferiram dos queijos controle (sem congelamento quanto ao rendimento, características físico-químicas, composição e aspectos microbiológicos, mesmo quando comparados aos resultados obtidos na matéria seca do queijo.Milk goats are indicated as an economic alternative for small farmers and cheese making could improve their profits. Goat's milk has a seasonal production characteristic and shows periods of abundance and others of scarcity. The use of frozen milk or frozen curd to make cheese can be used to solve the problem. The aim of this work was to evaluate the preparation of cheese made from mixed curd and ripened by Penicillium candidum mould using slow frozen milk (in a domestic freezer or fast frozen milk (by liquid nitrogen. The slow frozen curd and fast frozen curd without whey were used. It was observed that the cheese from the slow and fast frozen milk and from the slow and fast frozen curd did not differ from the control cheese for the yield, chemicophysical characteristics, chemical composition

  20. Gouda cheese made from pasteurised milk.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    appearance, texture, taste and smell). It was observed that the addition of calcium chloride to pasteurised milk in cheese making promoted greater curd firming and whey expulsion which produced a firmer textured cheese with a drier appearance,.

  1. Influence of calcium and phosphorus, lactose, and salt-to-moisture ratio on Cheddar cheese quality: manufacture and composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upreti, P; Metzger, L E

    2006-02-01

    Eight Cheddar cheeses with 2 levels of calcium (Ca) and phosphorus (P), residual lactose, and salt-to-moisture ratio (S/M) were manufactured. All cheeses were made using a stirred-curd procedure and were replicated 3 times. Treatments with a high level of Ca and P were produced by setting the milk and drawing the whey at a higher pH (6.6 and 6.3, respectively) compared with the treatments with a low level of Ca and P (pH of 6.2 and 5.7, respectively). The lactose content in the cheeses was varied by adding lactose (2.5% by weight of milk) to the milk for high lactose cheeses, and washing the curd for low lactose cheeses. The difference in S/M was obtained by dividing the curds into halves, weighing each half, and salting at 3.5 and 2.25% of the weight of the curd for high and low S/M, respectively. All cheeses were salted at a pH of 5.4. Modifications in cheese-making protocols produced cheeses with desired differences in Ca and P, residual lactose, and S/M. Average Ca and P in the high Ca and P cheeses was 0.68 and 0.48%, respectively, vs. 0.53 and 0.41% for the low Ca and P cheeses. Average lactose content of the high lactose treatments at d 1 was 1.48% compared with 0.30% for the low lactose treatments. The S/M for the high and low S/M cheeses was 6.68 and 4.77%, respectively. Mean moisture, fat, and protein content of the cheeses ranged from 32.07 to 37.57%, 33.32 to 35.93%, and 24.46 to 26.40%, respectively. The moisture content differed among the treatments, whereas fat and protein content on dry basis was similar.

  2. Effect of standardizing the lactose content of cheesemilk on the properties of low-moisture, part-skim Mozzarella cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moynihan, A C; Govindasamy-Lucey, S; Molitor, M; Jaeggi, J J; Johnson, M E; McSweeney, P L H; Lucey, J A

    2016-10-01

    The texture, functionality, and quality of Mozzarella cheese are affected by critical parameters such as pH and the rate of acidification. Acidification is typically controlled by the selection of starter culture and temperature used during cheesemaking, as well as techniques such as curd washing or whey dilution, to reduce the residual curd lactose content and decrease the potential for developed acidity. In this study, we explored an alternative approach: adjusting the initial lactose concentration in the milk before cheesemaking. We adjusted the concentration of substrate available to form lactic acid. We added water to decrease the lactose content of the milk, but this also decreased the protein content, so we used ultrafiltration to help maintain a constant protein concentration. We used 3 milks with different lactose-to-casein ratios: one at a high level, 1.8 (HLC, the normal level in milk); one at a medium level, 1.3 (MLC); and one at a low level, 1.0 (LLC). All milks had similar total casein (2.5%) and fat (2.5%) content. We investigated the composition, texture, and functional and sensory properties of low-moisture, part-skim Mozzarella manufactured from these milks when the cheeses were ripened at 4°C for 84d. All cheeses had similar pH values at draining and salting, resulting in cheeses with similar total calcium contents. Cheeses made with LLC milk had higher pH values than the other cheeses throughout ripening. Cheeses had similar moisture contents. The LLC and MLC cheeses had lower levels of lactose, galactose, lactic acid, and insoluble calcium compared with HLC cheese. The lactose-to-casein ratio had no effect on the levels of proteolysis. The LLC and MLC cheeses were harder than the HLC cheese during ripening. Maximum loss tangent (LT), an index of cheese meltability, was lower for the LLC cheese until 28d of ripening, but after 28d, all treatments exhibited similar maximum LT values. The temperature where LT=1 (crossover temperature), an index

  3. Lecevacki cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siniša Matutinović

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available In this review traditional Croatian cheeses were described as well as their importance considering globalization and industrialization in food production. The most important property of traditional cheeses is their originality and origin of milk that is incorporated in those products. As the high profitability (high price of the products is very important it is necessary to conduct one of possible protections on European level. In that sense, hard cheeses from Adriatic and Dinara areas have significant potential due to the fact that high value raw material - sheep milk produced from breed with very extensively management using natural pasture with characteristic botanical composition consisting aromatic Mediteranean plants, is used in their production. This milk is characterized with high percentage of some chemical components, especially fat and protein. Considering that fact, this milk represents the best material especially for hard cheese production. In this paper the review of milk chemical composition of the most important Croatian sheep breeds which milk is used for production of hard cheeses, was performed. The review of basic technological parameters in production of hard traditional cheeses considering type, standardization and heat treatment of milk, renneting, curd cutting and drying, dimension, salting and ripening is represented. Characterization parameters of cheese, considering chemical and physical composition, biochemical changes, dominant microflora which dominates in technological production procedure and determines taste and odour of mature cheese, are shown. The basic characteristics and technology of Lecevacki cheese production was described too, as the most important traditional cheese from Split area surroundings. This cheese type was produced on family farms as well as on industrial level for some time. Its sensory characteristics are described in the paper.

  4. Effect of enterocin CCM 4231 onListeria monocytogenes in Saint-Paulin cheese

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lauková, A; Vlaemynck, G; Czikková, S

    2001-01-01

    .... No significant differences in pH were observed between the experimental and reference cheeses. Bacteriocin production during cheese manufacture was detected only in milk samples and curd, reaching a level of 100 AU/mL...

  5. Influence of pH on retention of camel chymosin in curd

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Børsting, Mette Winther; Qvist, Karsten B.; Ardö, Ylva Margareta

    2014-01-01

    Retained coagulant in cheese initiates casein breakdown and influences cheese structure and flavour formation. This study investigated the influence of milk pH on retention of camel chymosin in curd and compared it with bovine chymosin. Milk at five different pH levels was coagulated with same...... coagulation activity. The retention of camel chymosin in curd was rather constant at ∼20% between pH 6.65 and 6.00, while it increased almost linear from 2 to 21% for bovine chymosin. The lower pH dependence for retention of camel chymosin than of bovine chymosin may be explained by a lower negative charge...

  6. The influence of different kind of milk on quality of Sjenica cheese and Sjenica type cheeses made by autohthonous technology

    OpenAIRE

    Maćej Ognjen D.; Jovanović Snežana T.; Barać Miroljub B.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, influence of the composition of autohtonous Sjenica cheese and composition of cheese made from cow milk in the type of Sjenica cheese were comparatively investigated. Autohtonous Sjenica cheese, made from ewe's milk and Sjenica type cheese made from cow's milk both had high content of moisture (53.46% and 59.56% respectively), which is the result of production process (coagulation time, curd processing, drying and salting). According to moisture conten...

  7. Cheese from ultrafiltered milk : whey proteins and chymosin activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buijsse, C.A.P.

    1999-01-01

    The manufacture of (semi-)hard cheese from ultrafiltered milk (UF-cheese) enables the partial incorporation of whey proteins in the cheese, thereby increasing its yield. The transfer of whey proteins in curd from (UF-)milk was studied in relation to the degree of ultrafiltration of the milk

  8. Production and chemical composition of Istria and Pag whey cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neven Antunac

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Istria and Pag curd are specific products that are mostly consumed fresh made in coastal areas and on islands. Curd is a sort of soft cheese. Due to its structure, it is very healthy. It has a high nutritional value which is the result of a great amount of proteins that are easy to digest and have a high level of utilization. The aim of this study was to describe the technological process of production, to determine the chemical structure and to suggest the value of standardization on the basis of sensory evaluation. The total of 28 curd samples were physically and chemically analyzed according to standard and accredited scientific methods. Statistical data analysis was carried out by using the procedures of Microsoft Office Excel (2007. According to water content in cheese, Istria and Pag curd belongs to a group of soft cheeses. On average the water content in Istrian curd was 56.62 %, and in Pag curd was 63.03 %. Istrian curd showed higher values of the fat content (28.9 % and the fat in a dry matter (64.47 % than Pag curd (23.25 % and 59.65 %. The sensory quality of Istrian curd was not as homogenous as of Pag curd. Based on the research results, it can be concluded that the physical and chemical structure of Istria and Pag curd was uneven, which is understandable if the production terms and conditions and the way of draining the curd are taken into account. The description of technological process of production and the understanding of physical and chemical structure of the curd, represent the significant contribution to the research and knowledge of domestic dairy products, which certainly should not be neglected in our dairy industry. In any case, these products deserve the experts full attention.

  9. Listeriosis outbreaks in British Columbia, Canada, caused by soft ripened cheese contaminated from environmental sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntyre, Lorraine; Wilcott, Lynn; Naus, Monika

    2015-01-01

    Soft ripened cheese (SRC) caused over 130 foodborne illnesses in British Columbia (BC), Canada, during two separate listeriosis outbreaks. Multiple agencies investigated the events that lead to cheese contamination with Listeria monocytogenes (L.m.), an environmentally ubiquitous foodborne pathogen. In both outbreaks pasteurized milk and the pasteurization process were ruled out as sources of contamination. In outbreak A, environmental transmission of L.m. likely occurred from farm animals to personnel to culture solutions used during cheese production. In outbreak B, birds were identified as likely contaminating the dairy plant's water supply and cheese during the curd-washing step. Issues noted during outbreak A included the risks of operating a dairy plant in a farm environment, potential for transfer of L.m. from the farm environment to the plant via shared toilet facilities, failure to clean and sanitize culture spray bottles, and cross-contamination during cheese aging. L.m. contamination in outbreak B was traced to wild swallows defecating in the plant's open cistern water reservoir and a multibarrier failure in the water disinfection system. These outbreaks led to enhanced inspection and surveillance of cheese plants, test and release programs for all SRC manufactured in BC, improvements in plant design and prevention programs, and reduced listeriosis incidence.

  10. Listeriosis Outbreaks in British Columbia, Canada, Caused by Soft Ripened Cheese Contaminated from Environmental Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcott, Lynn; Naus, Monika

    2015-01-01

    Soft ripened cheese (SRC) caused over 130 foodborne illnesses in British Columbia (BC), Canada, during two separate listeriosis outbreaks. Multiple agencies investigated the events that lead to cheese contamination with Listeria monocytogenes (L.m.), an environmentally ubiquitous foodborne pathogen. In both outbreaks pasteurized milk and the pasteurization process were ruled out as sources of contamination. In outbreak A, environmental transmission of L.m. likely occurred from farm animals to personnel to culture solutions used during cheese production. In outbreak B, birds were identified as likely contaminating the dairy plant's water supply and cheese during the curd-washing step. Issues noted during outbreak A included the risks of operating a dairy plant in a farm environment, potential for transfer of L.m. from the farm environment to the plant via shared toilet facilities, failure to clean and sanitize culture spray bottles, and cross-contamination during cheese aging. L.m. contamination in outbreak B was traced to wild swallows defecating in the plant's open cistern water reservoir and a multibarrier failure in the water disinfection system. These outbreaks led to enhanced inspection and surveillance of cheese plants, test and release programs for all SRC manufactured in BC, improvements in plant design and prevention programs, and reduced listeriosis incidence. PMID:25918702

  11. Listeriosis Outbreaks in British Columbia, Canada, Caused by Soft Ripened Cheese Contaminated from Environmental Sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorraine McIntyre

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Soft ripened cheese (SRC caused over 130 foodborne illnesses in British Columbia (BC, Canada, during two separate listeriosis outbreaks. Multiple agencies investigated the events that lead to cheese contamination with Listeria monocytogenes (L.m., an environmentally ubiquitous foodborne pathogen. In both outbreaks pasteurized milk and the pasteurization process were ruled out as sources of contamination. In outbreak A, environmental transmission of L.m. likely occurred from farm animals to personnel to culture solutions used during cheese production. In outbreak B, birds were identified as likely contaminating the dairy plant’s water supply and cheese during the curd-washing step. Issues noted during outbreak A included the risks of operating a dairy plant in a farm environment, potential for transfer of L.m. from the farm environment to the plant via shared toilet facilities, failure to clean and sanitize culture spray bottles, and cross-contamination during cheese aging. L.m. contamination in outbreak B was traced to wild swallows defecating in the plant’s open cistern water reservoir and a multibarrier failure in the water disinfection system. These outbreaks led to enhanced inspection and surveillance of cheese plants, test and release programs for all SRC manufactured in BC, improvements in plant design and prevention programs, and reduced listeriosis incidence.

  12. Drainage of curd

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akkerman, J.C.

    1992-01-01

    Cheese making starts with transformation of the liquid milk into a gel by proteolytic enzymes and/or acid producing bacteria. The gel is cut into pieces. The protein matrix contracts, by which whey is expelled from the pieces, this process is called syneresis. The process of whey expulsion

  13. Estudo de custo-rendimento do precessamento de queijos tipo minas frescal com derivado de soja e diferentes agentes coagulantes Study of cost and yield of minas like fresh cheese produced with added fat freee soybean hydro-soluble extract powder with curd formed by different coagulants agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. D. Neves-Souza

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available O desenvolvimento de alimentos é uma constante nas indústrias, nas universidades e nos institutos de pesquisa visando otimizar processamentos, agregar diferentes ingredientes em produtos já existentes, entre outros fatores. Após o desenvolvimento de um produto, informações adicionais podem ser obtidas pela determinação do rendimento e do custo do produto final. O objetivo deste trabalho foi estimar o rendimento e o custo de queijos Minas frescal tradicionais e adicionados de extrato hidrossolúvel de soja desengordurado (EHS processados com coalho bovino e com coagulante microbiano (Aspergillus niger var. awamori. A introdução de 8% do EHS (em relação ao teor de sólidos totais do leite no queijo Minas frescal processado com coalho bovino proporcionou rendimento em gramas de sólidos totais por litro de leite (g ST/L superior de 16,67% em relação ao queijo Minas frescal tradicional processado com o mesmo coalho. O queijo tipo Minas frescal processado com coagulante microbiano e com 8% de EHS apresentou rendimento (g ST/L superior de 16,54%, quando comparado ao seu tradicional. O custo das formulações-base (kg de queijo/100L de leite processadas com coalho bovino e com coagulante microbiano foi US$ 36,75 e US$ 37,50, respectivamente, ao passo que os queijos tradicionais processados com os mesmos agentes coagulantes apresentaram custo equivalente a US$ 35,12 e US$ 35,36.Food products development occur in industries, universities and research centers with the aim of optimizing processes, to include different ingredients to existing products or for other reasons. After developing a product, additional information may be obtained by determining yield and cost of the final product. The objective of this research was to estimate yield and cost of traditional Minas fresh cheese and those produced with added fat free soybean hydro-soluble extract powder (SEP, with curd formed by rennet or microbial coagulant (Aspergillus niger var

  14. Conditions allowing the formation of biogenic amines in cheese

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joosten, H.M.L.J.

    1988-01-01

    A study was undertaken to reveal the conditions that allow the formation of biogenic amines in cheese.

    The starters most commonly used in the Dutch cheese industry do not have decarboxylative properties. Only if the milk or curd is contaminated with non-starter bacteria, amine

  15. Effect of rennet coagulation time on composition, yield, and quality of reduced-fat cheddar cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, M E; Chen, C M; Jaeggi, J J

    2001-05-01

    This study compared the effect of coagulum firmness at cutting on composition of 50% reduced-fat Cheddar cheese. Coagulum firmness was determined by subjective evaluation by the cheese maker. Three firmness levels were tested, and these corresponded to average times of coagulant addition to cutting the curd of 25, 48, and 65 min. A slow acid-producing culture was used, and ripening times were altered to give similar curd pH values throughout cheese making. A longer rennet coagulation time (firmer coagulum at cutting) resulted in an increase in cheese moisture as well as an increase in cheese yield. The percentages of fat recovered in the cheese decreased with increasing curd firmness. The percentage of nitrogen recovered in the cheese was similar among the treatments. The amount of whey collected from the curd after milling increased as the coagulum firmness at cutting increased. Higher moisture content and lower pH of cheese made from the firmer curd at cutting contributed to softer, smoother-bodied cheeses, but the Cheddar flavor intensity was not affected.

  16. Cheese Microbial Risk Assessments — A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyoung-Hee Choi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Cheese is generally considered a safe and nutritious food, but foodborne illnesses linked to cheese consumption have occurred in many countries. Several microbial risk assessments related to Listeria monocytogenes, Staphylococcus aureus, and Escherichia coli infections, causing cheese-related foodborne illnesses, have been conducted. Although the assessments of microbial risk in soft and low moisture cheeses such as semi-hard and hard cheeses have been accomplished, it has been more focused on the correlations between pathogenic bacteria and soft cheese, because cheese-associated foodborne illnesses have been attributed to the consumption of soft cheeses. As a part of this microbial risk assessment, predictive models have been developed to describe the relationship between several factors (pH, Aw, starter culture, and time and the fates of foodborne pathogens in cheese. Predictions from these studies have been used for microbial risk assessment as a part of exposure assessment. These microbial risk assessments have identified that risk increased in cheese with high moisture content, especially for raw milk cheese, but the risk can be reduced by preharvest and postharvest preventions. For accurate quantitative microbial risk assessment, more data including interventions such as curd cooking conditions (temperature and time and ripening period should be available for predictive models developed with cheese, cheese consumption amounts and cheese intake frequency data as well as more dose-response models.

  17. Cheese Microbial Risk Assessments — A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Kyoung-Hee; Lee, Heeyoung; Lee, Soomin; Kim, Sejeong; Yoon, Yohan

    2016-01-01

    Cheese is generally considered a safe and nutritious food, but foodborne illnesses linked to cheese consumption have occurred in many countries. Several microbial risk assessments related to Listeria monocytogenes, Staphylococcus aureus, and Escherichia coli infections, causing cheese-related foodborne illnesses, have been conducted. Although the assessments of microbial risk in soft and low moisture cheeses such as semi-hard and hard cheeses have been accomplished, it has been more focused on the correlations between pathogenic bacteria and soft cheese, because cheese-associated foodborne illnesses have been attributed to the consumption of soft cheeses. As a part of this microbial risk assessment, predictive models have been developed to describe the relationship between several factors (pH, Aw, starter culture, and time) and the fates of foodborne pathogens in cheese. Predictions from these studies have been used for microbial risk assessment as a part of exposure assessment. These microbial risk assessments have identified that risk increased in cheese with high moisture content, especially for raw milk cheese, but the risk can be reduced by preharvest and postharvest preventions. For accurate quantitative microbial risk assessment, more data including interventions such as curd cooking conditions (temperature and time) and ripening period should be available for predictive models developed with cheese, cheese consumption amounts and cheese intake frequency data as well as more dose-response models. PMID:26950859

  18. Microbiological Quality and Variability of Natural Microbiota in Croatian Cheese Maturing in Lambskin Sacks

    OpenAIRE

    Marija Vrdoljak; Mija Filipčić; Marko Jelić; Iva Čanak; Željko Jakopović; Jelka Pleadin; Ivana Gobin; Tibela Landeka Dragičević; Ksenija Markov; Jadranka Frece

    2016-01-01

    As in the traditional production of cheese in lambskin sacks raw cow’s or sheep’s milk is mostly used, the purpose of this study is to see how the production affects the microbiological quality of the cheese. To do that, we tested 39 samples of raw cow’s and sheep’s milk, curd, ripened cheese (15, 30 and 45 days) and lambskin sacks for native microbial population. Two-thirds of the milk, curd and cheese samples had higher counts of staphylococci and enterobacteria than permitted by regulation...

  19. Demonstration of the effective performance of a combined enrichment/real-time PCR method targeting the prfA gene of Listeria monocytogenes by testing fresh naturally contaminated acid curd cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossmanith, P; Mester, P; Wagner, M; Schoder, D

    2010-10-01

    A rapid real-time PCR-based method for the detection of Listeria monocytogenes was applied to the examination of 44 Quargel cheese samples from a recent outbreak in Austria and compared to the standard method according to ISO-16140. The combined enrichment/real-time PCR method amplifying the prfA locus was performed according to [Rossmanith et al.(2006) Res Microbiol, 157, 763-771]. Qualitative and quantitative examination of the samples was performed according to the standard method ISO-11290. Comparison of the combined enrichment/real-time PCR method with ISO-11290 resulted in 100% relative accuracy, 100% relative sensitivity and 100% relative specificity. A previously published study describing the validation of the method, including samples after storage at -80 degrees C, resulted in lower performance values. In contrast, the samples were stored at +4 degrees C in this study. The results of this study indicate an effect of storage, thus masking the true performance of the method. The results of this study are discussed together with the previously published data to demonstrate the excellent qualities of this rapid (< or = 30 h) method when applied to fresh specimens stored at +4 degrees C.

  20. Casein retention in curd and loss of casein into whey at chymosin-induced coagulation of milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallén, Elin; Lundén, Anne; Allmere, Toomas; Andrén, Anders

    2010-02-01

    Impact of milk protein composition on casein (CN) retention in curd during the milk coagulation process was studied using a model cheese making system. Individual milk samples from 110 cows in mid lactation of the Swedish Red and Swedish Holstein breeds with known genotypes of beta-casein, kappa-casein and beta-lactoglobulin were defatted, coagulated with chymosin, subjected to syneresis and subsequent pressing simulated by centrifugation. The results indicated that kappa-casein concentration of milk plays an important role in the curd formation process and initial syneresis (whey after cutting), whereas an increased CN ratio was associated with less casein in whey after simulated pressing. Increased kappa-casein concentration of milk also characterized the milk samples with no measurable loss of casein in whey, compared with milk samples with casein lost in whey, both after cutting and after simulated pressing. Concentrations of alphas1-casein, beta-casein, and total casein in milk were positively associated with fresh curd yield, which showed a strong correlation with amount of casein retained in curd. No effect of protein genotype on fresh curd yield or casein in whey was found. The beta-lactoglobulin BB genotype was associated with increased casein retention in curd, most likely due to the association of this genotype with CN ratio.

  1. The effect of compression, stretching, and cooking temperature on free oil formation in mozzarella curd.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowney, M K; Roupas, P; Hickey, M W; Everett, D W

    2003-02-01

    The effect of the extent and rate of compression and stretching on free oil formation in Mozzarella cheese curd was investigated at 55, 65, and 75 degrees C. Confocal laser scanning microscopy was used to determine the maximum cross-sectional diameter, cross-sectional area, elongation factor (maximum divided by minimum cross-sectional diameter), and circularity of fat globules in the cheese curd at the different temperatures, and after stretching or compression. Free oil was not significantly affected by the rate of biaxial compression from 50 to 2000 mm/min at 65 degrees C, the rate of tensile stretching from 1000 to 2500 mm/min at 60 degrees C, or the extent of biaxial compression from 40 to 80% of the original height at 1000 mm/min and 65 degrees C. Increasing the rate of stretching from 1000 to 2500 mm/min increased the elongation factor from 1.91 to 2.61. Cross-sectional area, maximum diameter, and circularity were not affected by the rate of biaxial compression. The extent of curd compression had no effect on the milk fat globule size and shape. Increasing the extent of stretching at 60 degrees C and at 1000 mm/min increased the free oil content (on a fat basis) from 23.8% (curd stretched by 1.4x) to 32.3% (stretched by 4.6x) and the elongation factor of the globules, but did not affect any of the other globule parameters. Increasing the temperature of the cooking-stretching water increased the cross-sectional area, diameter of the globules, and free oil content from 24.1% at 55 degrees C to 34.5% at 75 degrees C for curd compressed to 50% height at 1000 mm/min.

  2. Impact of curd milling on the chemical, functional, and rheological properties of starter-free Queso Fresco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hekken, D L; Tunick, M H; Leggett, L N; Tomasula, P M

    2012-10-01

    The manufacture of Queso Fresco (QF), a high-moisture fresh Mexican cheese that is popular in the Americas, varies from country to country, with many manufacturers milling the curd before forming the cheese block to disrupt the protein matrix and ensure the crumbly nature of the QF. Because this traditional milling step does take time and may be an unnecessary point of microbial contamination, this study was undertaken to determine whether the curd-milling step could be omitted without altering the chemical, functional, and textural properties of the QF. Starter culture-free, rennet-set QF was prepared from pasteurized, homogenized milk. Curds were cooked at 39°C for 30 min, wet salted at 1.45 g of NaCl/100 g of milk, chilled, and divided into 4 portions. Curds were not milled or were subjected to coarse, medium, or fine milling and hand-packed into molds. After 12h at 4°C, the cheese was divided, vacuum packaged, and stored at 4°C for up to 8 wk. Fresh QF contained 57.3 ± 1.2% moisture, 20.9±0.8% fat, 16.0 ± 1.3% protein, 2.61 ± 0.15% lactose, and 2.25 ± 0.22% salt and had a pH of 6.36 ± 0.03%. Moisture decreased over the 8 wk of storage, whereas the fat level tended to increase. All cheeses lost 1.3 to 1.7% of their weight in whey during the first week after manufacture, and the weight gradually increased to 2.1% (nonmilled) to 3.2% (milled) by wk 8. Milling did result in QF that were softer, less chewy, and less rigid and with lower viscoelastic properties than nonmilled cheeses. Sensory panelists differentiate the finely milled QF from the other treatments, but they detected no significant differences among the nonmilled, coarsely milled, and medium-milled QF. Milling of the curd did not affect the ability of Listeria monocytogenes to grow on the cheese surface. Results from this study indicate that the milling step, which lengthens the manufacturing time, does increase wheying off during storage and results in a more fragile protein matrix. Cheese

  3. Formation Of Volatile And Non-Volatile Compounds In Cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caglar Mert Aydin

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Flavour development in cheese is a complex process in which major catabolic pathways involved. Initially the curds of different cheese varieties have almost the same flavours however the curd produce flavour compounds which lead to discrimination among cheese verities in terms of flavour throughout ripening. The major biochemical pathways involved throughout ripening of cheese are the followings liberation of FFA free fatty acid associated catabolic reactions the degradation of the casein matrix to peptides and FAA free amino acids the reactions for catabolism of FAA and the metabolism of lactate and citrate. In this review the general pathway for formation of volatile and non-volatile flavour compounds are stated and detailed knowledge as to products of amino acid catabolism proteolysis lipolysis lactate and citrate metabolism well discussed.

  4. Effects of sodium chloride salting and substitution with potassium chloride on whey expulsion of Cheddar cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Y; McMahon, D J

    2015-01-01

    A challenge in manufacturing reduced-sodium cheese is that whey expulsion after salting decreases when less salt is applied. Our objectives were (1) to determine whether changing the salting method would increase whey syneresis when making a lower sodium cheese and (2) to better understand factors contributing to salt-induced curd syneresis. Unsalted milled Cheddar curds were salted using different salting intervals (5 or 10 min), different salting levels (20, 25, or 30g/kg), different numbers of applications when using only 20g/kg salt (1, 2, or 3 applications), and salting with the equivalent of 30g/kg NaCl using a 2:1 molar ratio of NaCl and KCl. Whey from these curds was collected every 5 or 10 min until 30 or 40 min after the start of salting, and curds were subsequently pressed for 3h. Additional trials were conducted in which salted milled Cheddar cheese curd was immersed at 22°C for 6h in various solutions to determine how milled curd pieces respond to different levels of salt and Ca. The use of 10-min intervals delayed whey syneresis without influencing total whey expulsion or cheese composition after pressing. Lowering the salt level reduced whey expulsion, resulting in cheeses with higher moisture and slightly lower pH. Adding salt faster did not increase whey expulsion in reduced-salt cheese. Partial substitution with KCl restored the extent of whey expulsion. When salted milled curd was immersed in a 30g/L salt solution, there was a net influx of salt solution into the curd and curd weight increased. When curd was immersed in 60g/L salt solution, a contraction of curd occurred. Curd shrinkage was more pronounced as the salt solution concentration was increased to 90 and 120g/L. Increasing the Ca concentration in test solutions (such that both serum and total Ca in the curd increased) also promoted curd contraction, resulting in lower curd moisture and pH and less weight gain by the curd. The proportion of Ca in the curd that was bound to the para

  5. Origin of disinfection by-products in cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardador, Maria Jose; Gallego, Mercedes; Prados, Francisco; Fernández-Salguero, José

    2017-06-01

    The disinfection of water, equipment and surfaces in a cheese factory is one of the factors that can originate disinfection by-products (DBPs) in cheese. This research has focused on studying cheese factories in order to evaluate the individual contribution of each step of the cheese-making process that can contribute to the presence of DBPs in cheese. Ten factories were selected according to their salting processes (brine or dry salting). Each factory was monitored by the collection of six representative samples (factory water supply, brine solution, milk, whey, curd and cheese) in which the concentrations of up to eight chemicals were detected. The study shows that contact with brine solutions containing significant levels of DBPs is the main source of these chemicals in cheese. A minor factor is the pasteurised milk used in their manufacture.

  6. Cream cheese products: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chanokphat Phadungath

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Cream cheese is a soft fresh acid-coagulated cheese product, which is acidified by mesophilic lactic acid starter culture, i.e. Lactococcus and Leuconostoc. Cream cheese products are categorized into two main types based on the different fat content in the initial mix and the final composition. These are double-cream cheese with at least 9-11% fat content in the initial mix, and single-cream cheese with 4.5-5% fat content in initial mix. Cream cheese was first made by using the cooked-curd method, which was developed in the early twenties, and the cold-pack and hot-pack methods were developed, and are still used at present. The products with high quality should have a uniform white to light cream color with a lightly lactic acid and cultured diacetyl flavor and aroma. The texture of the products should be smooth without lumps, grittiness, or any indication of cracking and wheying off, and with the ability to spread at room temperature.

  7. Effect of moderate pressure treatments on microstructure, texture, and sensory properties of stirred-curd cheddar shreds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, J; Velazquez, G; Lopetcharat, K; Ramírez, J A; Torres, J A

    2004-10-01

    A moderate high-pressure processing (HPP) treatment is proposed to accelerate the shredability of Cheddar cheese. High pressure processing (345 and 483 MPa for 3 and 7 min) applied to unripened (1 d old) stirred-curd Cheddar cheese yielded microstructure changes that differed with pressure level and processing time. Untreated and pressure-treated cheese shredded at d 27 and 1, respectively, shared similar visual and tactile sensory properties. The moderate (345 MPa) and the higher (483 MPa) pressure treatments reduced the presence of crumbles, increased mean shred particle length, improved length uniformity, and enhanced surface smoothness in shreds produced from unripened cheese. High-pressure processing treatments did not affect the mechanical properties of ripened cheese or the proteolytic susceptibility of milk protein. It was concluded that a moderate HPP treatment could allow processors to shred Cheddar cheese immediately after block cooling, reducing refrigerated storage costs, with expected savings of over 15 US dollars/1000 lb cheese, and allowing fewer steps in the handling of cheese blocks produced for shredding.

  8. Assessment of the effect of probiotic curd consumption on salivary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Several studies have demonstrated the beneficial effects of use of various Probiotic products including curd. The objective of this study was to compare the effect of short‑term consumption of probiotic curd containing Lactobacillus acidophilus and normal curd on salivary Streptococcus Mutans counts, as well as salivary pH.

  9. Biochemical patterns in ovine cheese: influence of probiotic strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albenzio, M; Santillo, A; Caroprese, M; Marino, R; Trani, A; Faccia, M

    2010-08-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the effect of lamb rennet paste containing probiotic strains on proteolysis, lipolysis, and glycolysis of ovine cheese manufactured with starter cultures. Cheeses included control cheese made with rennet paste, cheese made with rennet paste containing Lactobacillus acidophilus culture (LA-5), and cheese made with rennet paste containing a mix of Bifidobacterium lactis (BB-12) and Bifidobacterium longum (BB-46). Cheeses were sampled at 1, 7, 15, and 30 d of ripening. Starter cultures coupled with probiotics strains contained in rennet paste affected the acidification and coagulation phases leading to the lowest pH in curd and cheese containing probiotics during ripening. As consequence, maturing cheese profiles were different among cheese treatments. Cheeses produced using rennet paste containing probiotics displayed higher percentages of alpha(S1)-I-casein fraction than traditional cheese up to 15 d of ripening. This result could be an outcome of the greater hydrolysis of alpha-casein fraction, attributed to higher activity of the residual chymosin. Further evidence for this trend is available in chromatograms of water-soluble nitrogen fractions, which indicated a more complex profile in cheeses made using lamb paste containing probiotics versus traditional cheese. Differences can be observed for the peaks eluted in the highly hydrophobic zone being higher in cheeses containing probiotics. The proteolytic activity of probiotic bacteria led to increased accumulation of free amino acids. Their concentrations in cheese made with rennet paste containing Lb. acidophilus culture and cheese made with rennet paste containing a mix of B. lactis and B. longum were approximately 2.5 and 3.0 times higher, respectively, than in traditional cheese. Principal component analysis showed a more intense lipolysis in terms of both free fatty acids and conjugated linoleic acid content in probiotic cheeses; in particular, the lipolytic pattern of

  10. Microstructure and Composition of Full Fat Cheddar Cheese Made with Ultrafiltered Milk Retentate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Lydia; Dagastine, Raymond R.; Kentish, Sandra E.; Gras, Sally L.

    2013-01-01

    Milk protein is often standardised prior to cheese-making using low concentration factor ultrafiltration retentate (LCUFR) but the effect of LCUFR addition on the microstructure of full fat gel, curd and Cheddar cheese is not known. In this work, Cheddar cheeses were made from cheese-milk with or without LCUFR addition using a protein concentration of 3.7%–5.8% w/w. The fat lost to sweet whey was higher in cheese made from cheese-milk without LCUFR or from cheese-milk with 5.8% w/w protein. At 5.8% w/w protein concentration, the porosity of the gel increased significantly and the fat globules within the gel and curd tended to pool together, which possibly contributed to the higher fat loss in the sweet whey. The microstructure of cheese from cheese-milk with a higher protein concentration was more compact, consistent with the increased hardness, although the cohesiveness was lower. These results highlight the potential use of LCUFR for the standardization of protein concentration in cheese-milk to 4%–5% w/w (equivalent to a casein to total protein ratio of 77%–79% w/w) to increase yield. Beyond this concentration, significant changes in the gel microstructure, cheese texture and fat loss were observed. PMID:28239117

  11. Microstructure and Composition of Full Fat Cheddar Cheese Made with Ultrafiltered Milk Retentate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lydia Ong

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Milk protein is often standardised prior to cheese-making using low concentration factor ultrafiltration retentate (LCUFR but the effect of LCUFR addition on the microstructure of full fat gel, curd and Cheddar cheese is not known. In this work, Cheddar cheeses were made from cheese-milk with or without LCUFR addition using a protein concentration of 3.7%–5.8% w/w. The fat lost to sweet whey was higher in cheese made from cheese-milk without LCUFR or from cheese-milk with 5.8% w/w protein. At 5.8% w/w protein concentration, the porosity of the gel increased significantly and the fat globules within the gel and curd tended to pool together, which possibly contributed to the higher fat loss in the sweet whey. The microstructure of cheese from cheese-milk with a higher protein concentration was more compact, consistent with the increased hardness, although the cohesiveness was lower. These results highlight the potential use of LCUFR for the standardization of protein concentration in cheese-milk to 4%–5% w/w (equivalent to a casein to total protein ratio of 77%–79% w/w to increase yield. Beyond this concentration, significant changes in the gel microstructure, cheese texture and fat loss were observed.

  12. Artisanal Sonoran cheese (Cocido cheese): an exploration of its production process, chemical composition and microbiological quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuevas-González, Paúl F; Heredia-Castro, Priscilia Y; Méndez-Romero, José I; Hernández-Mendoza, Adrián; Reyes-Díaz, Ricardo; Vallejo-Cordoba, Belinda; González-Córdova, Aarón F

    2017-10-01

    The objective of this study was to explore and document the production process of artisanal Cocido cheese and to determine its chemical composition and microbiological quality, considering samples from six dairies and four retailers. Cocido cheese is a semi-hard (506-555 g kg-1 of moisture), medium fat (178.3-219.1 g kg-1 ), pasta filata-type cheese made from raw whole cow's milk. The production process is not standardized and therefore the chemical and microbiological components of the sampled cheeses varied. Indicator microorganisms significantly decreased (P cheese. Salmonella spp. were not found during the production process, and both Listeria monocytogenes and staphylococcal enterotoxin were absent in the final cheeses. This study provides more information on one of the most popular artisanal cheeses with high cultural value and economic impact in northwestern Mexico. In view of the foregoing, good manufacturing practices need to be implemented for the manufacture of Cocido cheese. Also, it is of utmost importance to make sure that the heat treatment applied for cooking the curd ensures a phosphatase-negative test, otherwise it would be necessary to pasteurize milk. Nevertheless, since Cocido cheese is a non-ripened, high-moisture product, it is a highly perishable product that could present a health risk if not properly handled. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  13. Composition, proteolysis, and volatile profile of Strachitunt cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masotti, F; Cattaneo, S; Stuknytė, M; Battelli, G; Vallone, L; De Noni, I

    2017-03-01

    Strachitunt, a blue-veined Italian cheese, received the Protected Designation of Origin (PDO) label in 2014. Its unique technological feature is represented by the dual-curd method of production. Strachitunt is produced from raw bovine milk with or without the inoculation of natural starter cultures of lactic acid bacteria, and the addition of secondary cultures of mold spores is not permitted by the product specification. Physico-chemical properties, proteolysis, and volatile profile of Strachitunt were investigated in 10 cheese samples (ripened for 75 d) made throughout spring 2015 and provided by the main cheese maker. Overall, composition parameters showed a large variability among samples. Cheese was characterized by an acid paste (pH 5.46) and a lower extent of proteolysis compared with other blue-veined varieties. The main chemical groups of volatile organic compounds were alcohols and esters, whereas ketones represented only a minor component. The erratic adventitious contamination by mold spores of the cheese milk, the unique dual-curd method of cheese-making, and the large time variability between the piercing time and the end of ripening could be highlighted as the main causes of both the distinctive analytical fingerprint and the scarce standardization of this blue-veined cheese. Copyright © 2017 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Microbiological Quality and Variability of Natural Microbiota in Croatian Cheese Maturing in Lambskin Sacks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frece, Jadranka; Vrdoljak, Marija; Filipčić, Mija; Jelić, Marko; Čanak, Iva; Jakopović, Željko; Pleadin, Jelka; Gobin, Ivana; Dragičević, Tibela Landeka; Markov, Ksenija

    2016-06-01

    As in the traditional production of cheese in lambskin sacks raw cow's or sheep's milk is mostly used, the purpose of this study is to see how the production affects the microbiological quality of the cheese. To do that, we tested 39 samples of raw cow's and sheep's milk, curd, ripened cheese (15, 30 and 45 days) and lambskin sacks for native microbial population. Two-thirds of the milk, curd and cheese samples had higher counts of staphylococci and enterobacteria than permitted by regulations. Not a single sample had Salmonella and Listeria monocytogenes, but we did find Escherichia coli in sheep's milk and cheese, and yeast and mould in both types of milk and cheese. Staphylococcus xylosus prevailed in lambskin sacks. Despite the high incidence of S. aureus, even in the final product, staphylococcal enterotoxin was detected in only two sheep's cheese samples. Among the lactic acid bacteria, Lactococcus lactis and Lactobacillus paracasei prevailed in cow's cheese, whereas Leuconostoc mesenteroides and Lactobacillus plantarum prevailed in sheep's cheese. In the lambskin sacks Leuconostoc mesenteroides and Lactobacillus plantarum were predominant. Our findings give an important insight into the fermentation and microbial ecology of the cheese in lambskin sacks.

  15. Fish oil fortification of soft goat cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Brianna H; Brian Perkins, L; Calder, Beth L; Skonberg, Denise I

    2012-02-01

    Soft goat cheese was fortified with four levels of purified fish oil (0, 60, 80, and 100 g fish oil per 3600 g goat milk) prior to curd formation to deliver high levels of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) per serving. The cheese was evaluated for proximate composition, EPA+DHA content, oxidative stability, color, pH, and consumer acceptability. The cheese was partially vacuum packed and stored at 2 °C for four weeks. The fat content was significantly (p cheeses were all liked 'moderately' by consumers (n = 105) for overall acceptability, although the 60 g fortification level did rate significantly higher. The control cheese and the 60 g fortification level had no significant differences in consumer purchase intent. These results demonstrate that fortification levels of up to 127 mg EPA+DHA per serving may be added to soft cheese without negatively affecting shelf-life or consumer purchase intent. Omega-3 fatty acids have been shown to have strong associations with health and well-being, and fish oil is a rich source of these fatty acids. In this study, goat cheese was successfully fortified to deliver 127 mg omega-3 fatty acids per 28 g serving without affecting shelf life or consumer purchase intent. © 2012 Institute of Food Technologists®

  16. Microbiological Aspects Considering the Production of Nutraceutical Curd Containing Onion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anca Dumuţa

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The curd is a traditional Romanian dairy product highly appreciated by the consumers. The purpose of this study was to produce and analyze from the microbiological point of view a nutraceutical curd containing onion, as a prebiotic source. The synbiotics generate among the organoleptic benefits also health improvement due to the different actions taken by probiotics and prebiotics, working together. The curd was produced by the traditional method using buffalo milk with reduced cholesterol content due to the treatment with crosslinked β-ciclodextrin with adipic acid.The curd prepared by rennet adding and coagulation at 30°C during 30-45 minutes was subjected to the maturation at a temperature of 12-16°C. Considering the microbiological tests, the curd recorded a pozitive evolution, being characterized by a lower microbial load compared with a control curd, prepared without onion.

  17. Artisanal cheese

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artisanal cheese, which is handmade in small batches, differs from mass-produced cheese because of the milk and procedures used. Artisanal cheese is made from the milk of pasture-fed cows, sheep, or goats instead of conventionally-fed cows, and is affected by plants eaten, stage of lactation, and s...

  18. Development of parmesan cheese production from local cow milk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliwarga, Lienda; Christianti, Elisabeth Novi; Lazarus, Chrisella

    2017-05-01

    Parmesan cheese is one of the dairy products which is used in various foods, such as pasta, bakery product, and pizza. It has a hard texture due to aging process for at least two years. Long aging period inhibited the production of parmesan cheese while consumer demands were increasing gradually. This research was conducted to figure out the effect of starter culture and rennet dose to the production of parmesan cheese. This research consists of (1) pasteurization of 1,500 ml milk at 73°C; and (2) main cheese making process that comprised of fermentation process and the addition of rennet. In latter stage, milk was converted into curd. Variations were made for the dose of bacteria culture and rennet. Both variables correlated to the fermentation time and characteristics of the produced cheese. The analysis of the produced cheese during testing stage included measured protein and cheese yield, whey pH, water activity, and moisture content. Moreover, an organoleptic test was done in a qualitative manner. The results showed that the dose of bacteria culture has a significant effect to the fermentation time, protein yield, and cheese yield. Meanwhile, rennet dose significantly affected cheese yield, pH of whey, and water activity. The highest protein yield (93.1%) was obtained at 0.6 ml of culture and 0.5 ml of rennet while the maximum cheese yield (6.81%) was achieved at 0.4 ml of culture and 0.1 ml of rennet. The water activity of produced cheeses was lower compared to the water activity of common parmesan cheese (ca. 0.6). For the organoleptic test, 0.4 ml of bacterial culture and 0.5 ml of rennet produced the most preferred cheese flavor compared to other variations.

  19. Caciotta della Garfagnana cheese: selection and evaluation of autochthonous mesophilic lactic acid bacteria as starter cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Turchi

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available he aim of this study was to isolate, identify and select, with respect to acidification and proteolytic activities, the autochthonous mesophilic lactic acid bacteria (LAB present in milk and Caciotta della Garfagnana, a cheese produced either with raw or thermised cow’s milk in small dairies and family plants of Garfagnana (Tuscany, to obtain LAB strains with attributes suitable to be employed as starter cultures in this type of cheese, particularly when thermised milk is used to control spoilage microflora. Samples of raw milk, curd and cheese were collected from three representative farmers of the production area and used to isolate autochthonous LAB. Phenotypic and genotypic (species-specific PCR assay identification of isolated LAB was done. Twenty-eight strains of LAB isolated from milk, curd and cheese were screened for acidifying and proteolytic activities. LAB strains with the better attributes were used as mesophilic starter cultures in technological trials: experimental cheeses manufactured with the addition of autochthonous LAB and control cheeses were compared for LAB and pH evolution. Experimental cheeses presented a significant increase in the mesophilic lactic acid microflora up to 14 days of ripening and significantly lower pH values up to seven days of ripening. The use of wild selected mesophilic lactic acid bacteria, together with thermisation of milk, for the Caciotta della Garfagnana looks very promising and could help to both standardise the production and improve quality and traditional characteristics of this type of cheese.

  20. Preparation of bean curds from protein fractions of six legumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, R; Klamczynska, B; Baik, B K

    2001-06-01

    Chickpeas, lentils, smooth peas, mung beans, and faba beans were milled into flours and fractionated to protein and starch fractions. Compositions of the seeds, cotyledons, and flours were compared for each legume and the weight and protein recovery of each fraction analyzed. Bean curds were prepared from the protein fractions through heat denaturation of protein milk, followed by coagulation with calcium sulfate or magnesium sulfate. The effect of chickpea protein concentration and coagulant dosage on the texture of bean curds was evaluated using a texture analyzer. Textural analysis indicated that curd prepared at 2.3-3.0% protein concentration and 1.5% CaSO(4) dosage had better yield and better texture than curds prepared under other conditions. Bean curds prepared from chickpeas and faba beans exhibited the second highest springiness and cohesiveness after those from soybeans. Curds of mung beans and smooth peas, on the other hand, had the highest yields and the highest moisture contents. The protein yield of the first and second soluble extracts used for curd preparation accounted for approximately 90% of the total protein of the seeds.

  1. Microbiota characterization of a Belgian protected designation of origin cheese, Herve cheese, using metagenomic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delcenserie, V; Taminiau, B; Delhalle, L; Nezer, C; Doyen, P; Crevecoeur, S; Roussey, D; Korsak, N; Daube, G

    2014-10-01

    Herve cheese is a Belgian soft cheese with a washed rind, and is made from raw or pasteurized milk. The specific microbiota of this cheese has never previously been fully explored and the use of raw or pasteurized milk in addition to starters is assumed to affect the microbiota of the rind and the heart. The aim of the study was to analyze the bacterial microbiota of Herve cheese using classical microbiology and a metagenomic approach based on 16S ribosomal DNA pyrosequencing. Using classical microbiology, the total counts of bacteria were comparable for the 11 samples of tested raw and pasteurized milk cheeses, reaching almost 8 log cfu/g. Using the metagenomic approach, 207 different phylotypes were identified. The rind of both the raw and pasteurized milk cheeses was found to be highly diversified. However, 96.3 and 97.9% of the total microbiota of the raw milk and pasteurized cheese rind, respectively, were composed of species present in both types of cheese, such as Corynebacterium casei, Psychrobacter spp., Lactococcus lactis ssp. cremoris, Staphylococcus equorum, Vagococcus salmoninarum, and other species present at levels below 5%. Brevibacterium linens were present at low levels (0.5 and 1.6%, respectively) on the rind of both the raw and the pasteurized milk cheeses, even though this bacterium had been inoculated during the manufacturing process. Interestingly, Psychroflexus casei, also described as giving a red smear to Raclette-type cheese, was identified in small proportions in the composition of the rind of both the raw and pasteurized milk cheeses (0.17 and 0.5%, respectively). In the heart of the cheeses, the common species of bacteria reached more than 99%. The main species identified were Lactococcus lactis ssp. cremoris, Psychrobacter spp., and Staphylococcus equorum ssp. equorum. Interestingly, 93 phylotypes were present only in the raw milk cheeses and 29 only in the pasteurized milk cheeses, showing the high diversity of the microbiota

  2. Chemical species in cheese and their origin in milk components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, A R

    1995-01-01

    Cheese making is the process of concentrating milk fat and protein by separation from water and soluble components. The objective of the cheese maker is to maximize yield efficiency by optimum utilization of each milk component while not compromising cheese quality. Cheese yielding potential of milk may be increased by selective breeding for specific protein genotypes, especially the BB variant of both kappa-casein and beta-lactoglobulin. Milk fat is included in cheese by occlusion into the protein coagulum. Participation of casein in both lactic and rennet coagulation is nearly complete so that casein losses to the whey occur mainly during cutting and the early stages of cooking. In lactic cheese, excepting cottage cheese, it is possible to eliminate losses of fines by centrifugal or membrane separation of curd. In heat-acid precipitated varieties protein recovery is increased by inclusion of whey proteins but fat recovery is very dependent on coagulation conditions. In ripened cheese obtaining the correct basic structure and composition is critical to texture and flavour development during curing.

  3. Effect of lupine as cheese base substitution on technological and nutritional properties of processed cheese analogue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awad, Rezik Azab; Salama, Wafaa Mohammed; Farahat, Azza Mahmoud

    2014-01-01

    Healthy foods have been met with marked success in the last two decades. Lupine flours, protein concentrates, and isolates can be applied as a substance for enriching different kinds of food systems such as bakery products, lupine pasta, ice cream, milk substitutes. Imitation processed cheese is made from mixtures of dairy and/or non dairy proteins and fat/oils and is variously labeled analogue, artificial, extruded, synthetic and/or filled. Processed cheese can be formulated using different types of cheese with different degree of maturation, flavorings, emulsifying, salts, and/or several ingredients of non-dairy components. Non-dairy ingredients have been used in processed cheese for many dietary and economic reasons. In this study, lupine paste was used to substitute 25, 50, 75 and 100% of cheese in base formula of processed cheese analogue (PCA). Matured Ras cheese (3 months old) was manufactured using fresh cow milk. Soft cheese curd was manufactured using fresh buffalo skim milk. Emulsifying salts S9s and Unsalted butter were used. Lupine termis paste was prepared by soaking the seeds in tap water for week with changing the water daily, and then boiled in water for 2 hrs, cooled and peeled. The peeled seeds were minced, blended to get very fine paste and kept frozen until used. Lupine paste was used to substitute 25, 50, 75 and 100% of cheese in base formula of processed cheese analogue (PCA). The obtained PCA were analysed when fresh and during storage up to 3 months at 5±2°C for chemical composition, physical and sensory properties. The histopathological effect of lupines on alloxan diabetic albino rats and nutritional parameters were also investigated. Incorporation of lupine paste in PCA increased the ash and protein contents while meltability and penetration values of resultant products were decreased. Adding lupine in PSA formula had relatively increased the oil index and firmness of products. Feeding rats a balanced diet containing processed cheese

  4. Effect of fortification of fresh cow milk with coconut milk on the proximate composition and yield of warankashi, a traditional cheese

    OpenAIRE

    Balogun, Mutiat Adebanke; Kolawole, Fausat Lola; J. K. Joseph; Adebisi, Taibat Tunrayo; Ogunleye, Opeyemi Toyin

    2016-01-01

    Cheese is a concentrated dairy product produced by acid or rennet coagulation or curdling of milk, stirring and heating the curd, draining off the whey, collecting and pressing the curd. The effect of partial substitution of fresh cow milk with coconut milk on the yield and proximate composition of cheese was examined. Extracted coconut milk was mixed with fresh raw cow milk at varying proportions of 5%: 95%, 10%: 90%, 15%: 85%, 20%: 80%, 25%:75%, 70%: 30% and the control (0%:100%) to produce...

  5. Morphological, molecular, and mycotoxigenic identification of dominant filamentous fungi from moldy civil cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cakmakci, Songul; Cetin, Bulent; Gurses, Mustafa; Dagdemir, Elif; Hayaloglu, Ali Adnan

    2012-11-01

    Moldy Civil is a mold-ripened variety of cheese produced mainly in eastern Turkey. This cheese is produced with Civil cheese and whey curd cheese (Lor). Civil cheese has had a geographical presence since 2009 and is manufactured with skim milk. In the production of Moldy Civil cheese, Civil cheese or a mixture of Civil and Lor cheese is pressed into goat skins or plastic bags and ripened for 3 months or longer. During the ripening period, natural contaminating molds grow on the surface of and inside the cheese. In this study, 186 mold strains were isolated from 41 samples of Moldy Civil cheese, and 165 of these strains were identified as Penicillium roqueforti. Identification and mycotoxicologic analyses were conducted using morphotypic and molecular methods. PCR amplicons of the ITS1-5.8S-ITS4 region were subjected to sequence analysis. This research is the first using molecular methods on Moldy Civil cheese. Mycotoxicologic analyses were conducted using thin-layer chromatography, and random amplified polymorphic DNA genotypes were determined using the ari1 primer. Of 165 isolates, only 28 produced no penicillic acid, P. roqueforti toxin, or roquefortine.

  6. Formation of early and advanced Maillard reaction products correlates to the ripening of cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanneberg, Robert; Salzwedel, Grit; Glomb, Marcus A

    2012-01-18

    The present study deals with the characterization of the ripening of cheese. A traditional German acid curd cheese was ripened under defined conditions at elevated temperature, and protein and amino acid modifications were investigated. Degree of proteolysis and analysis of early [Amadori compound furosine (6)] and advanced [N(ε)-carboxymethyllysine (4), N(ε)-carboxyethyllysine (5)] Maillard reaction products confirmed the maturation to proceed from the rind to the core of the cheese. Whereas 6 was decreased, 4 and 5 increased over time. Deeper insight into the Maillard reaction during the ripening of cheese was achieved by the determination of selected α-dicarbonyl compounds. Especially methylglyoxal (2) showed a characteristic behavior during storage of the acid curd cheese. Decrease of this reactive structure was directly correlated to the formation of 5. To extend the results of experimental ripening to commercial cheeses, different aged Gouda types were investigated. Maturation times of the samples ranged from 6 to 8 weeks (young) to more than 1 year (aged). Again, increase of 5 and decrease of 2 were able to describe the ripening of this rennet coagulated cheese. Therefore, both chemical parameters are potent markers to characterize the degree of maturation, independent of coagulation.

  7. Fate of Listeria monocytogenes during the manufacture and ripening of Parmesan cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousef, A E; Marth, E H

    1990-12-01

    Parmesan cheese was made from a mixture of pasteurized whole and skim milk that was inoculated to contain ca. 10(4) to 10(5) cells of Listeria monocytogenes/ml. Curd was cooked at 51 degrees C (124 degrees F) for ca. 45 min. During cheese making, maximum numbers of L. monocytogenes appeared just before cooking; at this point, the increase over initial numbers was a .61 to 1.0 order of magnitude. During cooking of curd, the average decrease in numbers of L. monocytogenes was a .22 order of magnitude. During cheese ripening, numbers of L. monocytogenes decreased almost linearly and faster than reported for other hard cheeses. Listeria monocytogenes strain California died faster than did strain V7. Listeria monocytogenes were not detected in cheese after 2 to 16 wk of ripening, depending on the strain of the pathogen and the lot of cheese. Parmesan cheese made in this study was not a favorable medium for survival of L. monocytogenes.

  8. [Elaboration of "cotija" type cheese made of whole milk and chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) mixture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales de León, Josefina C; Cassis Nosthas, Ma Lorena; García Beltrán, Luis Gabriel

    2003-06-01

    The objective [corrected] of this work was to elaborate "cotija" type cheese prepared with whole milk and chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.), inoculated with S. Thermophilus and to compare its physicochemical, microbiological and sensorial characteristics with a commercial cheese. Two mixture were selected 70:30 and 80:20 (whole milk:chickpea paste). Both mixture were ground, pasteurized and inoculated with. S. Thermophilus, to develop taste and aroma. Two rennet concentrations (1:10,000 and 2:10,000), lactic acid and 50% CaCl2 solution were used in both products. Results showed that cheese made with 70:30 mixture and 1:10,000 rennet concentration gave a weak curde and 12% of total solids were lost; in the same way as 70:30 mixture and 2:10,000 rennet concentration. Nevertheless, cheese made with 80:20 mixture and 10,000 or 2:10,000 rennet concentration showed hard consistency of its curd. Addition of 10% sodium chloride solution to he 80:20 mixture cheese, made better whey drain, and a "cotija" type cheese with similar sensory characteristics as a whole milk cheese, was obtained. Chemical and physical analysis of the extended "cotija" type cheese showed 14.3 +/- 0.42 and 15.5 +/- 0.21 g/100 g of protein and lipid content respectively. Microbiologically, the extended "cotija" type cheese is pathogenic microorganisms free for human consumption. Sensory evaluation of the chickpea "extended" cheese showed a 80% acceptance while the acceptance of the whole milk commercial cheese was 90%.

  9. Detection and characterization of Listeria monocytogenes in Sao Jorge (Portugal) cheese production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kongo, J M; Malcata, F X; Ho, A J; Wiedmann, M

    2006-11-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a foodborne pathogen that can cause serious invasive disease in humans. Because human listeriosis cases have previously been linked to consumption of contaminated cheese, control of this pathogen throughout the cheese production chain is of particular concern. To understand the potential for L. monocytogenes transmission via São Jorge cheese, a Portuguese artisanal cheese variety that bears a Protected Denomination of Origin classification, 357 raw milk, curd, natural whey starter, and cheese samples representative of the production chain of this cheese were collected over one year and tested for the presence of L. monocytogenes and selected physicochemical parameters. Although neither L. monocytogenes nor other Listeria spp. were detected in whey, curd, or cheese samples, 2 of the 105 raw milk samples analyzed were positive for L. monocytogenes. These 2 raw milk isolates represented a ribotype that has previously been linked to multiple human listeriosis outbreaks and cases elsewhere, indicating the potential of these isolates to cause human listeriosis. On average, physicochemical parameters of São Jorge cheese ripened for 4 mo presented values that likely minimize the risk of L. monocytogenes outgrowth during ripening and storage (mean pH = 5.48; mean moisture = 37.79%; mean NaCl concentration = 4.73%). However, some cheese samples evaluated in this study were characterized by physicochemical parameters that may allow growth and survival of L. monocytogenes. Even though our results indicate that raw milk used for São Jorge cheese manufacture as well as finished products is rarely contaminated with L. monocytogenes, continued efforts to control the presence of this pathogen in the São Jorge cheese production chain are urged and are critical to ensure the safety of this product.

  10. Effect of β-lactoglobulin A and B whey protein variants on cheese yield potential of a model milk system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meza-Nieto, M A; González-Córdova, A F; Piloni-Martini, J; Vallejo-Cordoba, B

    2013-01-01

    Cheese yield mainly depends on the amount and proportion of milk constituents; however, genetic variants of the proteins present in milk may also have an important effect. The objective of this research was to study the effect of the variants A and B of β-lactoglobulin (LG) on cheese yield using a model system consisting of skim milk powder fortified with different levels of a mixture containing α-lactalbumin and β-LG genetic variants (A, B, or A-B) in a 1:2 ratio. Fortified milk samples were subjected to pasteurization at 65 °C for 30 min. Miniature cheeses were made by acidifying (pH=5.9) fortified milk and incubating with rennet for 1h at 32 °C. The clot formed was cut, centrifuged at 2,600 × g for 30 min at 20 °C and drained for determining cheese yield. Cheese-yielding capacity was expressed as actual yield (grams of cheese curd per 100g of milk) and dry weight yield (grams of dried cheese curd per 100g of milk). Free-zone capillary electrophoresis was used for determining β-LG A or B recovery in the curd during rennet-induced coagulation. The presence of β-LG variant B resulted in a significantly higher actual and dried weight cheese yield than when A or A-B were present at levels ≤ 0.675% of whey protein (WP) addition. Results of free-zone capillary electrophoresis allowed us to infer that β-LG B associates with the casein micelles during renneting, as shown by an increase in the recovery of this variant in the curd when β-LG B was added up to a maximum at 0.45% (equivalent to 0.675% WP). In general, actual or dried weight cheese yield increased as WP addition was increased from 0.225 to 0.675%. However, when WP addition ranged from 0.675 to 0.90%, a drastic drop in cheese yield was observed. This behavior may be because an increase in the aggregation of casein micelles with a concomitant inclusion of whey protein in the gel occurs at low levels of WP addition, whereas once the association of WP with the casein micelles reach a saturation point

  11. Evaluation of microbial survival post-incidence on fresh Mozzarella cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesan, Balasubramanian; Irish, David A; Brothersen, Carl; McMahon, Donald J

    2012-12-01

    Commercial fresh Mozzarella cheese is made by direct acidification and is stored dry or in water without salt addition. The cheese has a shelf life of 6 wk, but usually develops an off-flavor and loses textural integrity by 4 wk, potentially due to the lack of salt and high moisture that allow the outgrowth of undesirable bacteria. To understand how microbial incidence affects cheese quality and how incident pathogen-related bacteria are limited by salt level during refrigerated storage, we made fresh Mozzarella cheese with high (2%) and low (0.5%) salt. The high-salt cheese was packaged and stored dry. The low-salt cheese was packaged and stored either dry or in 0.5% salt brine. One portion of cheeses was evaluated for surviving incident microbes by aerobic plate counts, coliform counts, and psychrophilic bacterial counts, of which coliforms and psychrophiles were not detected over 9 wk. Aerobic plate counts remained at 100 to 300 cfu/g up to 2 wk but increased by 1,000- to 10,000-fold between 4 and 6 wk at all salt levels and storage conditions. Other portions of cheeses were inoculated with either Escherichia coli or Enterococcus faecalis, both of which increased by 100-fold over 90 d of storage. Interestingly, E. coli added to the cheese brine first grew in the brine by 100-fold before attaching to the cheese, whereas Ent. faecalis attached to the cheese within 24h and grew only on the cheese. We conclude that incident bacteria, even from similar environments, may attach to cheese curd and survive differently in fresh Mozzarella cheese than in brine. Overall, 2% salt was insufficient to control bacterial growth, and slow-growing, cold- and salt-tolerant bacteria may survive and spoil fresh Mozzarella cheese. Copyright © 2012 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Kluyveromyces lactis but not Pichia fermentans used as adjunct culture modifies the olfactory profiles of Cantalet cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Freitas, I; Pinon, N; Berdagué, J-L; Tournayre, P; Lortal, S; Thierry, A

    2008-02-01

    Yeasts are commonly detected in cheese. Two yeast species, Kluyveromyces lactis and Pichia fermentans, were isolated at high populations from raw-milk Cantalet cheese, a French Protected Denomination of Origin hard cheese. To investigate the interest of these 2 species as adjunct cultures to promote flavor development of Cantalet cheese, they were added at 10(5) cfu/mL to microfiltered milk. The global microbiological, biochemical, and flavor changes induced by the presence of the yeasts in cheese were determined. Adjunct yeasts were present at 10(6) cfu/g in curd, declined to 10(4) to 10(5) cfu/g in cheese, and did not influence gross composition, content of free amino acids, or content of free fatty acids. By using 8-way gas chromatography-olfactometry in parallel with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, 30 odorous compounds of Cantalet cheese were identified. The olfactory profiles of K. lactis cheeses contained significantly greater levels of 8 odorous compounds (ethanol, ethyl hexanoate, 4 aldehydes, and 2 branched-chain acids) compared with the control and P. fermentans cheeses. Sensory analysis of cheeses flavor discriminated K. lactis cheeses on only 2 attributes (acetaldehyde and alcohol odors). This study shows that yeast contribution is species-specific and that K. lactis, at a population of 10(6) viable cells/g, can influence Cantalet cheese flavor.

  13. Low-sodium Cheddar cheese: Effect of fortification of cheese milk with ultrafiltration retentate and high-hydrostatic pressure treatment of cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozturk, M; Govindasamy-Lucey, S; Jaeggi, J J; Johnson, M E; Lucey, J A

    2015-10-01

    Low-sodium cheeses often exhibit an acidic flavor due to excessive acid production during the manufacturing and the initial stage of ripening, which is caused by ongoing starter culture activity facilitated by the low salt-in-moisture levels. We proposed that this excessive starter-induced acidity could be prevented by the fortification of cheese milk with ultrafiltration (UF) retentates (to increase curd buffering), and by decreasing microbial activity using the application of high-hydrostatic pressure (HHP) treatment (that is, to reduce residual starter numbers). Camel chymosin was also used as a coagulant to help reduce bitterness development (a common defect in low-sodium cheeses). Three types of low-Na (0.8% NaCl) Cheddar cheeses were manufactured: non-UF fortified, no HHP applied (L-Na); UF-fortified (cheese milk total solids = 17.2 ± 0.6%), no HHP applied (L-Na-UF); and UF-fortified, HHP-treated (L-Na-UF-HHP; 500 MPa for 3 min applied at 1 d post-cheese manufacture). Regular salt (2% NaCl) non-UF fortified, non-HHP treated (R-Na) cheese was also manufactured for comparison purposes. Analysis was performed at 4 d, 2 wk, and 1, 3, and 6 mo after cheese manufacture. Cheese functionality during ripening was assessed using texture profile analysis and dynamic low-amplitude oscillatory rheology. Sensory Spectrum and quantitative descriptive analysis was conducted with 9 trained panelists to evaluate texture and flavor attributes using a 15-point scale. At 4 d and 2 wk of ripening, L-Na-UF-HHP cheese had ~2 and ~4.5 log lower starter culture numbers, respectively, than all other cheeses. Retentate fortification of cheese milk and HHP treatment resulted in low-Na cheeses having similar insoluble calcium concentrations and pH values compared with R-Na cheese during ripening. The L-Na-UF cheese exhibited significantly higher hardness values (measured by texture profile analysis) compared with L-Na cheese until 1 mo of ripening; however, after 1 mo, all low-Na cheeses

  14. The changes of flavour and aroma active compounds content during production of Edam cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Vítová

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This work deals with the problem of flavour of Edam cheeses, i.e. natural hard cheese with low heat curd. The cheese samples were produced in dairy MILTRA B, Ltd., Městečko Trnávka.A number of volatile substances contribute to flavour of cheese including alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, fatty acids, esters, lactones, terpenes etc. The development of these components during production was monitored in chosen Edam cheese (fat 30% w/w using headspace-SPME-GC method. The samples were taken from cheesemilk up to technologically ripe cheese. In total 37 various organic compounds belonging to five chemical groups were identified in milk and cheese samples. Their total content increased during production. The first increase was observed after pressing and then especially in last part of ripening. Ethanol (185.8 ± 15.85 mg.kg−1, acetoin (97.7 ± 3.78 mg.kg−1, 2-methylpropanol (71.2 ± 5.23 mg.kg−1, acetic acid (54.4 ± 1.70 mg.kg−1 and acetaldehyde (36.4 ± 10.17 mg.kg−1 were the most abundant in ripened cheeses. The flavour and other organoleptic properties (appearance, texture of Edam cheese samples were also sensorially evaluated during ripening. The five point ordinal scale and profile tests were used for evaluation. The sensory quality was improved during ripening, until the final marked flavour characteristic for these cheese types.

  15. The nfluence of microparticulate on acid coagulation of milk proteins in curd manufacture

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    A. N. Ponomarev; E. I. Melnikova; E. B. Stanislavskaia; E. G. Korotkov

    2016-01-01

    .... Whey proteins microparticulate was proposed to use in curd technology. The influence of mass fraction of whey proteins microparticulate on the process of fermentation and acid clot formation in the production of low-fat curd was investigated...

  16. Probiotic potential of lactic acid bacteria present in home made curd in southern India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramadass Balamurugan

    2014-01-01

    Interpretation & conclusions: LAB in curd had properties consistent with probiotic potential, but these were not consistent across species. LAB abundance in curd increased rapidly at 12 h of fermentation at room temperature and declined thereafter.

  17. Real-time evaluation of individual cow milk for higher cheese-milk quality with increased cheese yield.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, G; Merin, U; Bezman, D; Lavie, S; Lemberskiy-Kuzin, L; Leitner, G

    2016-06-01

    Cheese was produced in a series of experiments from milk separated in real time during milking by using the Afilab MCS milk classification service (Afikim, Israel), which is installed on the milk line in every stall and sorts milk in real time into 2 target tanks: the A tank for cheese production (CM) and the B tank for fluid milk products (FM). The cheese milk was prepared in varying ratios ranging from ~10:90 to ~90:10 CM:FM by using this system. Cheese was made with corrected protein-to-fat ratio and without it, as well as from milk stored at 4°C for 1, 2, 3, 4, and 8d before production. Cheese weight at 24h increased along the separation cutoff level with no difference in moisture, and dry matter increased. The data compiled allowed a theoretical calculation of cheese yield and comparing it to the original van Slyke equation. Whenever the value of Afi-Cf, which is the optical measure of curd firmness obtained by the Afilab instrument, was used, a better predicted level of cheese yield was obtained. In addition, 27 bulk milk tanks with milk separated at a 50:50 CM:FM ratio resulted in cheese with a significantly higher fat and protein, dry matter, and weight at 24h. Moreover, solids incorporated from the milk into the cheese were significantly higher in cheeses made of milk from A tanks. The influence of storage of milk up to 8d before cheese making was tested. Gross milk composition did not change and no differences were found in cheese moisture, but dry matter and protein incorporated in the cheese dropped significantly along the storage time. These findings confirm that milk stored for several days before processing is prone to physico-chemical deterioration processes, which result in loss of milk constituents to the whey and therefore reduced product yield. The study demonstrates that introducing the unknown parameters for calculating the predicted cheese yield, such as the empiric measured Afi-Cf properties, are more accurate and the increase in cheese

  18. Microbiology of traditional fermented soybean curd (Sufu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukhoom, A.

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Microorganisms in traditional fermenting soybean curd (Sufu were quantitated. Total microbial populations of bacteria, molds and yeasts were 1.6×101 to 4.0×105, 2.4×101 to 3.9×105 and 4.4×103 to 8.0×105 CFU/g, respectively. Aspergillus, Penicillium, Rhizopus and Bacillus were dominantly found in koji inoculum. Bacillus, Pediococcus and Saccharomyces were mainly detected throughout the fermentation process. The other microorganisms were Staphylococcus, Pichia and Debaryomyces. All isolated microorganisms were halotolerant at salt concentrations between 5 to 20%. Aspergillus, Penicillium and Bacillus could produce potential proteolytic and amylolytic enzymes, implying that these microorganisms may play significant roles in the fermentation of tofu substrate. The nutritional evaluation of fermenting Sufu had protein content between 16.09-21.91%, sugar 4.23- 9.14%, lipid 7.20- 12.76%, salt 10.06-11.26%, humidity 47.55-57.97%, ash 9.24-15.63%, fibre 0.10-0.16%, pH 4.99-5.75 and fermenting temperature at 29-31ºC. Additionally, aflatoxin B1 at the concentration of 10.8- 22.8 ppb could be detected in the fermenting Sufu by ELISA methods whereas the final product of Sufu remained 18.4 ppb. Additionally, the commercial Sufu in the markets had aflatoxin in the range of 1.5-15.2 ppb which is in the control of FDA (U.S.A. standard that aflatoxin in food and peanut products should be less than 20 ppb.

  19. The effect of extrinsic attributes on liking of cottage cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, E M; Jervis, S M; Drake, M A

    2016-01-01

    Preference mapping studies with cottage cheese have demonstrated that cottage cheese liking is influenced by flavor, texture, curd size, and dressing content. However, extrinsic factors such as package, label claims, and brand name may also influence liking and have not been studied. The objective of this study was to evaluate the role of package attributes and brand on the liking of cottage cheese. A conjoint survey with Kano analysis (n=460) was conducted to explore the effect of extrinsic attributes (brand, label claim, milkfat content, and price) on liking. Following the survey, 150 consumers evaluated intrinsic attributes of 7 cottage cheeses with and without brand information in a 2-d crossover design. Results were evaluated by 2-way ANOVA and multivariate analyses. Milkfat content and price had the highest influence on liking by conjoint analysis. Cottage cheese with 2% milkfat and a low price was preferred. Specific label claims such as "excellent source of calcium (>10%)" were more attractive to consumers than "low sodium" or "extra creamy." Branding influenced overall liking and purchase intent for cottage cheeses to differing degrees. For national brands, acceptance scores were enhanced in the presence of the brand. An all-natural claim was more appealing than organic by conjoint analysis and this result was also confirmed with consumer acceptance testing. Findings from this study can help manufacturers, as well as food marketers, better target their products and brands with attributes that drive consumer choice. Copyright © 2016 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Research regarding accelerated ripening of pasta filata cheeses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicoleta Simona Zaharia

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The effect of adding exogenous enzymes to pasta filata cheeses was studied as a method of proteolysis' acceleration during ripening.After stretching the curd, before being turned in forms, this was divided into four portions. Three commercial proteolytic and lipolytic enzymes (Accelase® AM250 M, PromodTM215P and LipomodTM166P were added to the first three portions of stretched cheese, and the last one was left without treatment and served as a control. Pasta filata cheese samples were taken periodically, when fresh and after 8, 15, 30 days of ripening, for analysis. The changes in titratable acidity, pH value, dry matter, content ofsalt and moisture, proteic content as well as the dynamics of proteolysis were studied. Examination of the data revealed that the addition of enzymes had nosignificant effect on dry matter, fat, total nitrogen, salt contents of obtained cheeses. The exceptions were the titratable acidity and the content of dry matter, respectively humidity. An intensification of proteolysis in samples with enzymes added, unlike the witness sample, has been observed, the nitrogen components in cheese and the proteolytic index presenting higher values than the witness sample. Thus, different evolutions have been observed, confirming the acceleration of the cheese ripening.

  1. Abundance and potential contribution of Gram-negative cheese rind bacteria from Austrian artisanal hard cheeses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz-Esser, Stephan; Dzieciol, Monika; Nischler, Eva; Schornsteiner, Elisa; Bereuter, Othmar; Mann, Evelyne; Wagner, Martin

    2018-02-02

    Many different Gram-negative bacteria have been shown to be present on cheese rinds. Their contribution to cheese ripening is however, only partially understood until now. Here, cheese rind samples were taken from Vorarlberger Bergkäse (VB), an artisanal hard washed-rind cheese from Austria. Ripening cellars of two cheese production facilities in Austria were sampled at the day of production and after 14, 30, 90 and 160days of ripening. To obtain insights into the possible contribution of Advenella, Psychrobacter, and Psychroflexus to cheese ripening, we sequenced and analyzed the genomes of one strain of each genus isolated from VB cheese rinds. Additionally, quantitative PCRs (qPCRs) were performed to follow the abundance of Advenella, Psychrobacter, and Psychroflexus on VB rinds during ripening in both facilities. qPCR results showed that Psychrobacter was most abundant on cheese rinds and the abundance of Advenella decreased throughout the first month of ripening and increased significantly after 30days of ripening (p<0.01). Psychrobacter and Psychroflexus increased significantly during the first 30 ripening days (p<0.01), and decreased to their initial abundance during the rest of the ripening time (p<0.05). Genome sequencing resulted in 17 to 27 contigs with assembly sizes of 2.7 Mbp for Psychroflexus, 3 Mbp for Psychrobacter, and 4.3 Mbp for Advenella. Our results reveal that each genome harbors enzymes shown to be important for cheese ripening in other bacteria such as: Cystathionine/Methionine beta or gamma-lyases, many proteases and peptidases (including proline iminopeptidases), aminotransferases, and lipases. Thus, all three isolates have the potential to contribute positively to cheese ripening. In conclusion, the three species quantified were stable community members throughout the ripening process and their abundance on cheese rinds together with the results from genome sequencing suggest an important contribution of these bacteria to cheese

  2. Industrial-scale application of Lactobacillus reuteri coupled with glycerol as a biopreservation system for inhibiting Clostridium tyrobutyricum in semi-hard ewe milk cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ávila, Marta; Gómez-Torres, Natalia; Delgado, David; Gaya, Pilar; Garde, Sonia

    2017-09-01

    The suitability of the biopreservation system formed by reuterin-producing L. reuteri INIA P572 and glycerol (required for reuterin production) to prevent late blowing defect (LBD) was evaluated in industrial sized semi-hard ewe milk cheese contaminated with Clostridium tyrobutyricum INIA 68, a wild strain isolated from a LBD cheese. For this purpose, six batches of cheese were made (three with and three without clostridial spores): control cheeses with lactococci starter, cheeses with L. reuteri as adjunct, and cheeses with L. reuteri and 30 mM glycerol. Spores of C. tyrobutyricum INIA 68 germinated during pressing of cheese curd, causing butyric acid fermentation in cheese after 30 d of ripening. The addition of L. reuteri, without glycerol, enhanced the symptoms and the formation of volatile compounds associated with LBD. When glycerol was added to cheese milk contaminated with C. tyrobutyricum, L. reuteri was able to produce reuterin in cheese resulting in cheeses with a uniform cheese matrix and a volatile profile similar to cheese made with L. reuteri and glycerol (without spores). Accordingly, L. reuteri INIA P572 coupled with glycerol seems a novel biopreservation system to inhibit Clostridium growth and prevent LBD by means of in situ reuterin production. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Effect of Holstein Friesian and Brown Swiss breeds on quality of milk and cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Marchi, M; Bittante, G; Dal Zotto, R; Dalvit, C; Cassandro, M

    2008-10-01

    In Italy, more than 75% of milk is used for cheese making. For this reason, milk composition and coagulation traits and cheese quality represent the most important tools for the economic development of the dairy sector. In particular, cheese quality varies in relation to cheese-making technology and breed of cow. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of 3 types of milk, originating from Holstein-Friesian (HF), Brown Swiss (BS), and mixed of both breeds, on vat milk characteristics, cheese yield, and quality in 3 different typical Italian cheese-making conditions (Casolet, Vezzena, and Grana Trentino). One hundred forty-four cows (66 HF and 78 BS) were involved, and a total of 24 vats of milk were evaluated. At maturity, 30, 21, and 16 wheels of Casolet, Vezzena, and Grana Trentino cheese were analyzed. Brown Swiss cows yielded 9% less milk per day than HF cows, but milk showed greater contents of protein, casein, titratable acidity, and better rennet coagulation time and curd firmness than HF milk. The chemical composition and cholesterol content of the 3 types of cheese were similar between breeds, whereas the cheese made with BS milk showed greater contents of monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids. Cheese made with BS milk had greater b* (yellow component) than HF. Cheese yield, recorded at different ripening times, demonstrated that BS milk yielded more cheese than HF. Mixed milk showed values, on average, intermediate to HF and BS milk characteristics, and this trend was confirmed in cheese yield at different ripening times.

  4. Effect of curd suppression in a milk replacer on physiological ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fourteen Holstein calves, two to four days of age, were randomly divided into two groups to determine the effect of abomasal curd suppression on selected blood profiles. Calves received a milk replacer in which casein coagulation either was normal (CM), or was prevented by the precipitation of Ca++ with an oxalic acid ...

  5. USE OF INTELLECTUAL TECHNOLOGIES FOR QUALITY CONTROL OF CURD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Blagoveshchenskaia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary. Method of curds quality control, based on neural network model is introduced in the paper. It allows to give fair estimate of final product’s quality without use of professional degustators. Method consists in construction of neural network model to estimate quality of curds by input and output parameters. Hardware software complex of curds taste control is proposed to apply in industry for independent estimate of final product. Operation of neural network model based on usage of artificial neural networks, which is one of directions of artificial intelligence theory. Neural network model consists of several artificial neurons layers, which emulate nerve cells functioning. Feed forward network of MLP type was used in solving of curds taste control problem. Feature of this network is that signals passed from one layer’s neurons to next layer’s neurons only from input layer to output, not the other way. Neural network was trained for its correct operation by selection of optimal synaptic factors. Flow diagram of training algorithm is introduced in the paper. Algorithm of neural network tuning is described in the paper. Author proposed set of recommendations for software-hardware complex deployment. Experiment results show that this taste estimate method based on neural net works simplify a problem of final product control as allow to react to deviations in production process on proper time.

  6. Effect of curd suppression in a milk replacer on physiological ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    skimmed milk that has not been severely heat-treated, and that curd ... A coagulable milk replacer, containing 43,2% low-heat skimmed milk .... (OM) digestibilities. Variation in digestibility values was higher in the NCM treatment than in the CM treatment. Dry matter digestibilities of 77,0 and 82,3%, and OM digesti- bilities of ...

  7. A laboratory micro-manufacturing method for assessing individual cheese yield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Bittante

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to propose a micro-manufacturing method for assessing individual cheese yield (CY from dairy milk and to provide first evaluations of the method. Two water baths (WB provided with 8 stainless containers (SC each were used. The cheese making procedure involved coagulation of 500 ml of milk per SC previously inoculated with starter, cutting of the curd, separation of whey through drainage and pressure and weighing of the curd residue for computing CY. Spraydried milk powder and bulk milk were used to validate the procedure. For each type of milk, 5 cheese making sessions (CMS were performed during 5 consecutive days by the same operator; for each trial 80 records (8 replicates x 2WB x 5CMS were available. Sources of variation of CY were investigated separately for type of milk, and variance components were estimated using REML procedure for computing instrumental repeatability and reproducibility. Cheese yield averaged 11% and 13.4% for standard milk powder and bulk milk, respectively. Cheese making session significantly influenced CY, along with WB in the case of milk powder, while SC did not influence CY. Reproducible and repeatable measures of CY were obtained, indicating the method is suitable for assessing individual CY.

  8. Effect of plant extracts Kitaibelia vitifolia on antioxidant activity, chemical characteristics, microbiological status and sensory properties of Pirotski kachkaval cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurćubić Vladimir S.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of our study was to evaluate the impact of cheese (Pirotski kachkaval fortification by polyphenols attributed to Kitaibelia vitifolia ethanol herb extract, applied in two different manners (added to the cheese curd after texturizing or sprayed on surface of cheese. Investigation of the used antioxidant effects of polyphenols, physic-chemical composition, microbiological quality and sensory properties of Pirotski kachkaval was undertaken. Antioxidant activity of conventional and fortified cheese was evaluated by five contemporary and compatible methods, and revealed a slight emphasis on phenol-linked antioxidant activity of fortified samples of cheese in comparison to samples of the control group. Fortified Pirotski kachkaval had higher sensory evaluation scores than the controls. Statistically significant (P 0.05. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III 46009 i br. OI 172016

  9. Impact of thistle rennet from Carlina acanthifolia All. subsp. acanthifolia on bacterial diversity and dynamics of a specialty Italian raw ewes' milk cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardinali, Federica; Osimani, Andrea; Taccari, Manuela; Milanović, Vesna; Garofalo, Cristiana; Clementi, Francesca; Polverigiani, Serena; Zitti, Silvia; Raffaelli, Nadia; Mozzon, Massimo; Foligni, Roberta; Franciosi, Elena; Tuohy, Kieran; Aquilanti, Lucia

    2017-08-16

    Caciofiore della Sibilla is an Italian specialty soft cheese manufactured with Sopravissana raw ewes' milk and thistle rennet prepared with young fresh leaves and stems of Carlina acanthifolia All. subsp. acanthifolia, according to an ancient tradition deeply rooted in the territory of origin (mountainous hinterland of the Marche region, Central Italy). In this study, the impact of thistle rennet on the bacterial dynamics and diversity of Caciofiore della Sibilla cheese was investigated by applying a polyphasic approach based on culture and DNA-based techniques (Illumina sequencing and PCR-DGGE). A control cheese manufactured with the same batch of ewes' raw milk and commercial animal rennet was analyzed in parallel. Overall, a large number of bacterial taxa were identified, including spoilage, environmental and pro-technological bacteria, primarily ascribed to Lactobacillales. Thistle rennet was observed clearly to affect the early bacterial dynamics of Caciofiore della Sibilla cheese with Lactobacillus alimentarius/paralimentarius and Lactobacillus plantarum/paraplantarum/pentosus being detected in the phyllosphere of C. acanthifolia All., thistle rennet and curd obtained with thistle rennet. Other bacterial taxa, hypothetically originating from the vegetable coagulant (Enterococcus faecium, Lactobacillus brevis, Lactobacillus delbrueckii, Leuconostoc mesenteroides/pseudomesenteroides), were exclusively found in Caciofiore della Sibilla cheese by PCR-DGGE. At the end of the maturation period, Illumina sequencing demonstrated that both cheeses were dominated by Lactobacillales; however curd and cheese produced with thistle rennet were co-dominated by Lactobacillus and Leuconostoc, whereas Lactoccous prevailed in curd and cheese produced with commercial animal rennet followed by Lactobacillus. Differences in the bacterial composition between the two cheeses at the end of their maturation period were confirmed by PCR-DGGE analysis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B

  10. COTTAGE CHEESE PRODUCTS WITH INGREDIENTS OF PLANT ORIGIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. V. Golubeva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Proposed the use of feijoa as a filler for cheese products. Distinctive at-sign feijoa is a high content of watersoluble compounds in the fruits of iodine. According to their content feijoa can match with seafood, no plant does not accumulate a large number of iodine compounds (about 0.2 1 mg per 100 g of product. Feijoa is very useful for people living in iodine deficiency regions, as well as for preventers of thyroid diseases. The rind of the fruit is rich in antioxidants. The technology of GUT-goad product feijoa. Feature of the technology is that the finished cheese is made in the form of a mixture of filler pureed fruit pulp and sugar in a ratio of 1: 1, and the powder dry skin. Objects of research a filler in the form of syrup (pineapple guava pulp and sugar and the rind of the fruit in the form of crushed dry cottage cheese. Compatible with cream cheese filling sensory determined by the following indicators appearance, consistency, color, smell, taste. Syrup dosage ranged from 1 to 10%, dry filler from 0.5 to 3.5%. A mixture of fillers were added to the finished curd product in the ratio of syrup fairies feijoa and dry powder peel 8: 1.5. Technological process of cottage cheese product is different from the traditional operations of preparation of fillers and incorporation in the finished cheese. Determined the antioxidant activity syrup feijoa 1,963 mg / dm3 . It was found that the cheese product is rich in antioxidants, iodine, which helps to eliminate free radicals from the body and strengthen health care. Herbal additive allows to obtain a product with a new taste characteristics. The shelf life of cottage cheese products 5 days.

  11. 21 CFR 133.155 - Mozzarella cheese and scamorza cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Mozzarella cheese and scamorza cheese. 133.155... (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION CHEESES AND RELATED CHEESE PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Cheese and Related Products § 133.155 Mozzarella cheese and scamorza cheese. (a) Description. (1...

  12. Soymilk-Cow's milk ACE-inhibiting enzyme modified cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Barkat; Khan, Kiran Yasmin; Majeed, Hamid; Abid, Muhammad; Xu, Lei; Wu, Fengfeng; Xu, Xueming

    2017-12-15

    In present study, we developed and optimized soymilk-cow's milk enzyme-modified cheese with angiotensin-I converting enzyme inhibitory activity. Bioactive peptide production was found to be a multivariable-dependent process. Maximum bioactivity of hydrolysates was obtained with prolonged curd proteolysis at an increased enzyme concentration. This bioactive cheese paste was subsequently spray-dried under different drying conditions to determine the powder sorption isotherm properties. Higher drying temperatures resulted in cheese powder with weak thermal stability and lower browning indices. Experiments aimed at optimizing thermal stability and physical properties revealed that optimal conditions for producing cheese powder were an inlet air temperature of 150°C, a feeding rate of 10%, and an air flow rate of 600Lh-1. Moreover, in addition to flavour, the bioactive cheese powders produced from a combination of soymilk-cow's milk are of potential source and can be used in the dietary management of hypertension. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Domestic cooked cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slavko Kirin

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The research results of sensory properties, chemical and microbiological quality of domestic cooked cheese, which is produced around Bjelovar region, are presented in this paper.Domestic cooked cheese is Croatian autochthonous cheese produced in wider north-western region of Croatia (Bilogora, Lika, Banovina, Gorski Kotar and around Zagreb, and therefore should be registered as Protected Denomination of Origin (PDO and/or Protected Geographical Indication (PGI. Sensory properties, chemical and microbiological analyses were performed on 16 samples (7 non-smoked and 9 smoked cheeses. All cheese samples were produced according to tradition. Significant unevenness was determined in sensory, chemical and microbiological quality. Domestic cooked cheese can be classified as soft cheese according to dry matter content, and as semi-hard cheese according to water content in non fat cheese matter. According to fat content in dry matter, domestic cooked cheese can be classified as fat cheese. Standardization elements are proposed.

  14. Recovering traditional raw-milk Tetilla cheese flavour and sensory attributes by using Kocuria varians and Yarrowia lipolytica adjunct cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centeno, J A; Garabal, J I; Docampo, F; Lorenzo, J M; Carballo, J

    2017-06-19

    The rationale of the present study was to evaluate the potential of microbial adjunct cultures including Kocuria varians and/or Yarrowia lipolytica strains in the recovery of the typical sensory profile of traditional (raw-milk) Tetilla cheese. Four batches of Tetilla cheese, a short ripened cows' milk cheese produced in Galicia (NW Spain), were made in duplicate from pasteurized milk inoculated with different microbial cultures. A control batch was manufactured by adding a mesophilic commercial D-starter only. The other three batches were made with the same starter after a cheese-milk pre-ripening step carried out with (i) an adjunct culture of K. varians, (ii) an adjunct culture of Y. lipolytica, or (iii) a combination of both adjunct cultures. The highest pH and water activity values, associated with softer textures were determined in the cheeses manufactured with the Y. lipolytica adjunct after 21days of ripening. The contents of the volatile compounds 3-methylbutanol, dimethyl disulfide and dimethyl trisulfide were higher in the cheeses made with only the K. varians adjunct than in the cheeses made with the only yeast adjunct and in the control cheeses. The contents of hexanoic and octanoic acids were highest in the cheeses made with the Y. lipolytica adjunct, and levels of ethyl hexanoate, ethyl octanoate and ethyl decanoate were higher in the cheeses made with only the yeast adjunct than in the other batches of cheese. The cheeses manufactured with both adjunct cultures were awarded the highest scores for flavour and overall sensory parameters (considering the standards of the traditional product) and were considered very similar to 'good quality' artisanal raw-milk cheeses. We conclude that use of selected Micrococcaceae and Y. lipolytica strains as adjunct cultures would differentiate the sensory properties and contribute to the quality and typicality of the short-ripened rennet-curd Galician Tetilla and Arzúa-Ulloa cheeses. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B

  15. PEMANFAATAN MILK CLOTTING ENZYME DARI Lactobacillus casei D11 UNTUK PEMBUATAN KEJU MOZZARELLA [Utilization of Milk Clotting Enzyme from Lactobacillus casei D11 for Mozzarella Cheese Making

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohmatussolihat -

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Milk Clotting Enzyme (MCE is an active agent for cheese making which may be produced by Lactic acid bacteria (LAB. MCE activity differs according to the LAB strains used. Lactobacillus casei D11 could produced MCE when it is grown in MRS broth medium. In this study, MCE of L. casei D11 with the addition of rennet is used and optimized for the production of mozzarella cheese using Response Surface Method (RSM with Central Composite Design (CCD. The organoleptic properties were determined by hedonics test involving 30 respondents and analyzed statistically which was followed by a Duncan's test. Furthermore, a proximate analysis of mozzarella cheese was conducted. Our results show that the MCE activity produced by L. casei D11 was 8.471 Soxhlet Unit with protease activity of 3.28 U/mL. The ANOVA results showed that the concentration of MCE significantly influence the production of curd. Theoptimum concentration of MCE and rennet for the production of curd suited for the production of mozzarella cheese were 20 and 0.002%, respectively, with a maximum predicted curd yield of 14.996% (g/100 mL milk which is increased by 13.9% as compared to the curd yield before optimization. The statistical analysis on taste, color, flavor, and cheese texture by respondents shows that mozzarella cheese made by a combination of 15% of MCE and 0.00079 and 0.0015% of rennet, were organoleptically superior to the commercial mozzarella used in this experiment. The proximate analysis shows that mozzarella produced has a moisture content of 33.34%(w/w, 3.48% ash, 30.44% fat, 25.12% protein, 7.53% carbohydrate and energy of 404 kkal/100g.

  16. Effects of (+)-Catechin on the Composition, Phenolic Content and Antioxidant Activity of Full-Fat Cheese during Ripening and Recovery of (+)-Catechin after Simulated In Vitro Digestion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashidinejad, Ali; Birch, E. John; Everett, David W.

    2016-01-01

    (+)-Catechin, the representative catechin in green tea, was incorporated into a full-fat cheese (at 125–500 ppm) followed by ripening for 90 days at 8 °C and digesting for six hours. Determination of pH, proximate composition, total phenolic content (TPC) and antioxidant activity (AA) after manufacture and ripening demonstrated that the addition of (+)-catechin significantly (p ≤ 0.05) decreased the pH of both whey and curd during cheese manufacturing and ripening with no significant (p > 0.05) effect on the moisture, protein and fat contents. (+)-Catechin increased TPC, as well as AA, though the increase was not proportional with increasing the concentration of added (+)-catechin. About 57%–69% of (+)-catechin was retained in the cheese curd, whereas about 19%–39% (depending on the concentration) was recovered from the cheese digesta. Transmission electron micrographs showed that the ripened control cheese had a homogeneous pattern of milk fat globules with regular spacing entrapped in a homogenous structure of casein proteins, whereas the addition of (+)-catechin disrupted this homogenous structure. The apparent interaction between (+)-catechin and cheese fat globules was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. These associations should be taken into account when incorporating antioxidants, such as (+)-catechin, to create functional dairy products, such as cheese. PMID:27618910

  17. Effect of enterocin CCM 4231 on Listeria monocytogenes in Saint-Paulin cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauková, A; Vlaemynck, G; Czikková, S

    2001-01-01

    The bacteriocin production by Enterococcus faecium strain in cheese milk and cheese was demonstrated. Purified enterocin CCM 4231 exhibited an anti-listerial effect during Saint-Paulin cheese manufacture. During cheese production the strain grew to a final concentration of 10.1 +/- 0.01 log CFU per mL per g in cheese. Then only a slight decrease of the cell concentration was noticed during ripening and was almost stable for 8 weeks. No significant differences in pH were observed between the experimental and reference cheeses. Bacteriocin production during cheese manufacture was detected only in milk samples and curd, reaching a level of 100 AU/mL. After addition of purified enterocin CCM 4231 (concentration 3200 AU/mL) into the experimental cheese, the initial concentration of 6.7 +/- 0.06 log CFU per mL of Listeria monocytogenes Ohio was reduced up to 1.9 +/- 0.01 log CFU per mL per g. After 6 weeks and at the end of the experiment the difference of surviving cells of L. monocytogenes Ohio in ECH was only one or 0.7 log cycle compared to the control cheese. Although enterocin CCM 4231 partially inhibited L. monocytogenes in Saint-Paulin cheese manufacture, an inhibitory effect of enterocin added was shown in 1-week cheese; however, it was not possible to detect bacteriocin activity by the agar spot test. The traditional fermentation and ripening process was not disturbed, resulting in acceptable end-products, including sensory aspects.

  18. Amaltheys: A fluorescence-based analyzer to assess cheese milk denatured whey proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacotte, Pierre; Gomez, Franck; Bardeau, Floriane; Muller, Sabine; Acharid, Abdelhaq; Quervel, Xavier; Trossat, Philippe; Birlouez-Aragon, Inès

    2015-10-01

    The cheese industry faces many challenges to optimize cheese yield and quality. A very precise standardization of the cheese milk is needed, which is achieved by a fine control of the process and milk composition. Thorough analysis of protein composition is important to determine the amount of protein that will be retained in the curd or lost in the whey. The fluorescence-based Amaltheys analyzer (Spectralys Innovation, Romainville, France) was developed to assess pH 4.6-soluble heat-sensitive whey proteins (sWP*) in 5 min. These proteins are those that can be denatured upon heat-treatment and further retained in the curd after coagulation. Monitoring of sWP* in milk and subsequent adaptation of the process is a reliable solution to achieve stable cheese yield and quality. Performance of the method was evaluated by an accredited laboratory on a 0 to 7 g/L range. Accuracy compared with the reference Kjeldahl method is also provided with a standard error of 0.25 g/L. Finally, a 4-mo industrial trial in a cheese plant is described, where Amaltheys was used as a process analytical technology to monitor sWP* content in ingredients and final cheese milk. Calibration models over quality parameters of final cheese were also built from near-infrared and fluorescence spectroscopic data. The Amaltheys analyzer was found to be a rapid, compact, and accurate device to help implementation of standardization procedures in the dairy industry. Copyright © 2015 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Coliform detection in cheese is associated with specific cheese characteristics, but no association was found with pathogen detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trmčić, A; Chauhan, K; Kent, D J; Ralyea, R D; Martin, N H; Boor, K J; Wiedmann, M

    2016-08-01

    . monocytogenes. Although no association was found between coliform and Listeria spp. detection, Listeria spp. were significantly more likely to be detected in cheese with the washed type of rind. Our data provide information on specific risk factors for pathogen detection in cheese, which will facilitate development of risk-based strategies to control microbial food safety hazards in cheese, and suggest that generic coliform testing cannot be used to assess the safety of natural cheese. Copyright © 2016 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The Effects of the Types of Milk (Cow, Goat, Soya and Enzymes (Rennet, Papain, Bromelain Toward Cheddar Cheese Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariestya Arlene

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this research are to study the effects of different types of milk and enzymes toward the yield and quality (moisture, ash, protein, fat content, and texture of cheddar cheese and the interaction between those two variables during the process. The types of milk are cow, goat, and soya milk, while the types of enzymes are rennet, papain, and bromelain enzymes. Regarding the procedure, the milk is first pasteurized before CaCl2 and Lactobacillus lactis that acts as the acidifier starter as much as 0.2% (w/v and 0.5% of the milk volume are added respectively. The amount of enzyme added is appropriate for the determination of enzyme dose. The curd is separated from the whey and then 2.5 grams of salt is added to 100 grams of curd. Afterwards, the curd is pressed until the water content decreases (cheese, then ripened for 1 month. The analyses conducted are moisture, ash, protein, fat content, and texture (hardness. The conclusion is the goat milk and the rennet enzyme are the suitable raw material for cheddar cheese production. Furthermore, different types of milk and enzymes affect the yield. However, there is no interaction between the types of milk and enzymes to the yield.

  1. A selected core microbiome drives the early stages of three popular italian cheese manufactures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca De Filippis

    Full Text Available Mozzarella (M, Grana Padano (GP and Parmigiano Reggiano (PR are three of the most important traditional Italian cheeses. In the three cheese manufactures the initial fermentation is carried out by adding natural whey cultures (NWCs according to a back-slopping procedure. In this study, NWCs and the corresponding curds from M, GP and PR manufactures were analyzed by culture-independent pyrosequencing of the amplified V1-V3 regions of the 16S rRNA gene, in order to provide insights into the microbiota involved in the curd acidification. Moreover, culture-independent high-throughput sequencing of lacS gene amplicons was carried out to evaluate the biodiversity occurring within the S. thermophilus species. Beta diversity analysis showed a species-based differentiation between GP-PR and M manufactures indicating differences between the preparations. Nevertheless, all the samples shared a naturally-selected core microbiome, that is involved in the curd acidification. Type-level variability within S. thermophilus species was also found and twenty-eight lacS gene sequence types were identified. Although lacS gene did not prove variable enough within S. thermophilus species to be used for quantitative biotype monitoring, the possibility of using non rRNA targets for quantitative biotype identification in food was highlighted.

  2. Statistical data validation methods for large cheese plant database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez-Marquez, S A; Lacroix, C; Thibault, J

    2002-09-01

    Production data of the cheesemaking process are used to monitor milk fat and protein recoveries in cheese, cheese yield, and composition and eventually to predict these parameters. Due to the large impact of these factors on cheese quality and plant profitability, it is very important to use reliable data for analysis, modeling, and control of the process. This paper tested six methods for detecting erroneous data in industrial cheesemaking databases. The data analyzed came from 4 yr of stirred-curd Cheddar cheese production in an industrial cheesemaking facility, comprising over 10,000 vats. Single vat outliers were detected using a simple statistical criterion of mean +/- 3.6 SD on single variable distributions, Fourier series modeling of seasonal variables (fat, protein, lactose, and total solids in milk, and protein in whey), and the multivariate Mahalanobis outlier analysis. Detection of outlier productions (corresponding to several vats) was done by applying the mean +/- 3.6 SD criterion to variables obtained through calculating the fat mass balance, fat retention coefficient, and yield efficiency. Data treatment enabled the detection of outlier data, but also pinpointed variables with a low reliability (manually registered times). Single variable and multivariable methods proved complementary, and the use of both types of methods is recommended when validating an existing database.

  3. Influence of compression parameters on mechanical behavior of mozzarella cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogaça, Davi Novaes Ladeia; da Silva, William Soares; Rodrigues, Luciano Brito

    2017-10-01

    Studies on the interaction between direction and degree of compression in the Texture Profile Analysis (TPA) of cheeses are limited. For this reason the present study aimed to evaluate the mechanical properties of Mozzarella cheese by TPA at different compression degrees (65, 75, and 85%) and directions (axes X, Y, and Z). Data obtained were compared in order to identify possible interaction between both factors. Compression direction did not affect any mechanical variable, or rather, the cheese had an isotropic behavior for TPA. Compression degree had a significant influence (p manufacturing is another factor that may directly influence the mechanical properties of food. This can be seen, for instance, in stretched curd cheese, such as Mozzarella. Knowledge on such mechanical properties is highly relevant for food industries due to the mechanical resistance in piling, pressing, manufacture of packages, and food transport, or to melting features presented by the food at high temperatures in preparation of several foods, such as pizzas, snacks, sandwiches, and appetizers. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Application of high pressure processing for controlling Clostridium tyrobutyricum and late blowing defect on semi-hard cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ávila, Marta; Gómez-Torres, Natalia; Delgado, David; Gaya, Pilar; Garde, Sonia

    2016-12-01

    In this study we evaluated the application of different high pressure (HP) treatments (200-500 MPa at 14 °C for 10 min) to industrial sized semi-hard cheeses on day 7, with the aim of controlling two Clostridium tyrobutyricum strains causing butyric acid fermentation and cheese late blowing defect (LBD). Clostridium metabolism and LBD appearance in cheeses were monitored by sensory (cheese swelling, cracks/splits, off-odours) and instrumental analyses (organic acids by HPLC and volatile compounds by SPME/GC-MS) after 60 days. Cheeses with clostridial spores HP-untreated and HP-treated at 200 MPa showed visible LBD symptoms, lower concentrations of lactic, citric and acetic acids, and higher levels of pyruvic, propionic and butyric acids and of 1-butanol, ethyl and methyl butanoate, and ethyl pentanoate than cheeses without spores. However, cheeses with clostridial spores and HP-treated at ≥ 300 MPa did not show LBD symptoms and their organic acids and volatile compounds profiles were comparable to those of their respective HP-treated control cheeses, despite HP treatments caused a low spore reduction. A decrease in C. tyrobutyricum spore counts was observed after curd pressing, which seems to indicate an early spore germination, suggesting that HP treatments ≥300 MPa were able to inactivate the emerged C. tyrobutyricum vegetative cells and, thereby, prevent LBD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Cheese / Eero Epner

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Epner, Eero, 1978-

    2004-01-01

    Fotoajakirjast "Cheese". Fotograafia uurimisest, fotoajaloo läbikirjutatusest Eestis. Samas "Cheese'i" toimetaja Tiit Lepp ajakirja erainitsiatiivil väljaandmisest, Eesti Kultuurkapitali ebapiisavast ja määramatust toetusest

  6. The use of Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy to predict cheese yield and nutrient recovery or whey loss traits from unprocessed bovine milk samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferragina, A; Cipolat-Gotet, C; Cecchinato, A; Bittante, G

    2013-01-01

    Cheese yield is an important technological trait in the dairy industry in many countries. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectral analysis of fresh unprocessed milk samples for predicting cheese yield and nutrient recovery traits. A total of 1,264 model cheeses were obtained from 1,500-mL milk samples collected from individual Brown Swiss cows. Individual measurements of 7 new cheese yield-related traits were obtained from the laboratory cheese-making procedure, including the fresh cheese yield, total solid cheese yield, and the water retained in curd, all as a percentage of the processed milk, and nutrient recovery (fat, protein, total solids, and energy) in the curd as a percentage of the same nutrient contained in the milk. All individual milk samples were analyzed using a MilkoScan FT6000 over the spectral range from 5,000 to 900 wavenumber × cm(-1). Two spectral acquisitions were carried out for each sample and the results were averaged before data analysis. Different chemometric models were fitted and compared with the aim of improving the accuracy of the calibration equations for predicting these traits. The most accurate predictions were obtained for total solid cheese yield and fresh cheese yield, which exhibited coefficients of determination between the predicted and measured values in cross-validation (1-VR) of 0.95 and 0.83, respectively. A less favorable result was obtained for water retained in curd (1-VR=0.65). Promising results were obtained for recovered protein (1-VR=0.81), total solids (1-VR=0.86), and energy (1-VR=0.76), whereas recovered fat exhibited a low accuracy (1-VR=0.41). As FTIR spectroscopy is a rapid, cheap, high-throughput technique that is already used to collect standard milk recording data, these FTIR calibrations for cheese yield and nutrient recovery highlight additional potential applications of the technique in the dairy industry, especially for monitoring cheese

  7. The science of cheese

    Science.gov (United States)

    The book describes the science of cheese in everyday language. The first chapters cover milk, mammals, and principles of cheesemaking and aging, along with lactose intolerance and raw milk cheese. Succeeding chapters deal with a category of cheese along with a class of compounds associated with it...

  8. How cheese is processed

    Science.gov (United States)

    This column continues the theme of "How Is It Processed?" with a focus on cheese. A fun fact is that it takes 10 pounds of milk to make one pound of cheese. Production of cheese is described in this column, as well as the effects of processing on the final properties of this popular food....

  9. Microbial diversity, dynamics and activity throughout manufacturing and ripening of Castelmagno PDO cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolci, P; Alessandria, V; Rantsiou, K; Bertolino, M; Cocolin, L

    2010-09-30

    The diversity, dynamics and activity of Castelmagno PDO cheese microbiota were studied in three batches produced in a floor valley farm, in the Grana Valley (northwest Italy), during the wintertime. Samples of milk, curd and cheese (core and subsurface) at different ripening time were submitted to both culture-dependent and -independent analysis. In particular, DNA and RNA directly extracted from the matrices were studied by PCR-Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and reverse transcription (RT)-PCR-DGGE. Culture-dependent methods highlighted the initial dominance of a thermophilic streptococcal population with the species Streptococcus thermophilus and S. agalactiae. Then, mesophilic lactococci occurred among isolates during manufacturing, with Lactococcus lactis which was also well represented in the first month of Castelmagno PDO ripening. At this point and throughout the ripening, lactobacilli prevailed in cheese samples, represented from Lactobacillus plantarum and Lb. casei. Culture-independent analysis underlined the undoubted role of L. lactis, actively involved in both Castelmagno PDO manufacturing and ripening. Despite Lb. helveticus was never isolated on selective media, a DGGE band referred to this microorganism was detected, at RNA level, in samples from ripened cheeses. On the other hand, Lb. plantarum was widely isolated from the plates, among lactobacilli, but never detected by direct analysis. Due to the importance of microbiota in the sensory richness and properties of traditional cheeses, new information have been added, in this work, on microbial diversity of Castelmagno PDO cheese. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Effects of added caper on some physicochemical properties of White Cheese

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    Oktay Yerlikaya

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the effects of caper berries addition on some physicochemical and functional properties of White Cheese were investigated. Three batches of White Cheese were produced: a control group with no caper addition (C, a group with whole grain caper addition (W and a group with minced caper addition (M. Caper berries were added to the cheese vat after cutting at a level of 8 g per 100 g of curd weight. Changes in chemical compositions, proteolysis (ripening index, lipolysis (acid degree value, free amino acids, free fatty acids (FFAs, and some mineral substances of White Cheese samples were analysed during the ripening period for 90 days at +4 °C. According to the results obtained from statistical analyses, when compared to control sample, there was a significant difference by adding caper to White Cheese for salt %, lactic acid %, and mineral contents (p<0.05. Generally, the data obtained from this study showed that adding caper to White Cheese reduced some quality characteristics, while some properties such as physicochemical were improved

  11. Research of organoleptic, physical-chemical and microbiological indicators of the enriched cottage cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. V. Sviridova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Production of enriched curd by introducing a kelp of Laminaria family – Laminariaceae is discussed. The change of quality characteristics of the curd during storage have been studied. It was found that for the enriched product that meets the requirements of standards on the organoleptic, physico-chemical and microbiological parameters, optimal amount of kelp is 1%. Bigger amount of Laminaria led to the slight increase in the acidity of the product and the deterioration of organoleptic characteristics. The microbiological analysis of samples of enriched cheese showed absence of coliform bacteria, bacteria of the genus Staphylococcus aureus and molds. During the entire storage period of product a decrease of product contamination was observed. The most intense microflora reduction observed in the test sample after 120 hours of storage. Hence, a kelp exhibit antimicrobial activity. During the storage period the number of micro-organisms met the requirements of the standards. By the end of the storage period an amount of lactic acid bacteria in the product was at least 106 CFU / g. Adding of a 1% kelp to the curd promoted slight increase the energy value of the product, while the iodine content increased by 10 times. Thus, the use for food of 100 g of the enriched by laminaria cheese satisfy the adult daily requirement of iodine by 60–70%. Furthermore, the use of kelp as addition to the curd brings not only iodine but also vitamins, microelements and other beneficial agents for humans. Based on the above we can recommend this product as a prophylactic and preventive nutrition for different groups of the population suffering from iodine deficiency.

  12. 7 CFR 58.714 - Cream cheese, Neufchatel cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Cream cheese, Neufchatel cheese. 58.714 Section 58.714 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... Material § 58.714 Cream cheese, Neufchatel cheese. These cheeses when mixed with other foods, or used for...

  13. Measurement of pH micro-heterogeneity in natural cheese matrices by fluorescence lifetime imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuzana eBurdikova

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Cheese, a product of microbial fermentation may be defined as a protein matrix entrapping fat, moisture, minerals and solutes as well as dispersed bacterial colonies. The growth and physiology of bacterial cells in these colonies may be influenced by the microenvironment around the colony, or alternatively the cells within the colony may modify the microenvironment (e.g. pH, redox potential due to their metabolic activity. While cheese pH may be measured at macro level there remains a significant knowledge gap relating to the degree of micro-heterogeneity of pH within the cheese matrix and its relationship with microbial, enzymatic and physiochemical parameters and ultimately with cheese quality, consistency and ripening patterns. The pH of cheese samples was monitored both at macroscopic scale and at microscopic scale, using a non-destructive microscopic technique employing C-SNARF-4 and Oregon Green 488 fluorescent probes. The objectives of this work were to evaluate the suitability of these dyes for microscale pH measurements in natural cheese matrices and to enhance the sensitivity and extend the useful pH range of these probes using fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM. In particular, fluorescence lifetime of Oregon Green 488 proved to be sensitive probe to map pH micro heterogeneity within cheese matrices. Good agreement was observed between macroscopic scale pH measurement by FLIM and by traditional pH methods, but in addition considerable localized microheterogeneity in pH was evident within the curd matrix with pH range between 4.0 and 5.5. This technique provides significant potential to further investigate the relationship between cheese matrix physico-chemistry and bacterial metabolism during cheese manufacture and ripening.

  14. A large factory-scale application of selected autochthonous lactic acid bacteria for PDO Pecorino Siciliano cheese production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarcello, Rosa; Carpino, Stefania; Gaglio, Raimondo; Pino, Alessandra; Rapisarda, Teresa; Caggia, Cinzia; Marino, Giovanni; Randazzo, Cinzia L; Settanni, Luca; Todaro, Massimo

    2016-10-01

    The main hypothesis of this study was that the autochthonous lactic acid bacteria (LAB) selected for their dairy traits are able to stabilize the production of PDO (Protected Denomination of Origin) Pecorino Siciliano cheese, preserving its typicality. The experimental plan included the application of a multi-strain lactic acid bacteria (LAB) culture, composed of starter (Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis CAG4 and CAG37) and non starter (Enterococcus faecalis PSL71, Lactococcus garviae PSL67 and Streptococcus macedonicus PSL72) strains, during the traditional production of cheese at large scale level in six factories located in different areas of Sicily. The cheese making processes were followed from milk to ripened cheeses and the effects of the added LAB were evaluated on the microbiological, chemico-physical and sensorial characteristics of the final products. Results highlighted a high variability for all investigated parameters and the dominance of LAB cocci in bulk milk samples. The experimental curds showed a faster pH drop than control curds and the levels of LAB estimated in 5-month ripened experimental cheeses (7.59 and 7.27 Log CFU/g for rods and cocci, respectively) were higher than those of control cheeses (7.02 and 6.61 Log CFU/g for rods and cocci, respectively). The comparison of the bacterial isolates by randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD)-PCR evidenced the dominance of the added starter lactococci over native milk and vat LAB, while the added non starter LAB were found at almost the same levels of the indigenous strains. The sensory evaluation showed that the mixed LAB culture did not influence the majority of the sensory attributes of the cheeses and that each factory produced cheeses with unique characteristics. Finally, the multivariate statistical analysis based on all parameters evaluated on the ripened cheeses showed the dissimilarities and the relationships among cheeses. Thus, the main hypothesis of the work was accepted since the

  15. The composition of Camembert cheese-ripening cultures modulates both mycelial growth and appearance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lessard, Marie-Hélène; Bélanger, Gaétan; St-Gelais, Daniel; Labrie, Steve

    2012-03-01

    The fungal microbiota of bloomy-rind cheeses, such as Camembert, forms a complex ecosystem that has not been well studied, and its monitoring during the ripening period remains a challenge. One limitation of enumerating yeasts and molds on traditional agar media is that hyphae are multicellular structures, and colonies on a petri dish rarely develop from single cells. In addition, fungi tend to rapidly invade agar surfaces, covering small yeast colonies and resulting in an underestimation of their number. In this study, we developed a real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) method using TaqMan probes to quantify a mixed fungal community containing the most common dairy yeasts and molds: Penicillium camemberti, Geotrichum candidum, Debaryomyces hansenii, and Kluyveromyces lactis on soft-cheese model curds (SCMC). The qPCR method was optimized and validated on pure cultures and used to evaluate the growth dynamics of a ripening culture containing P. camemberti, G. candidum, and K. lactis on the surface of the SCMC during a 31-day ripening period. The results showed that P. camemberti and G. candidum quickly dominated the ecosystem, while K. lactis remained less abundant. When added to this ecosystem, D. hansenii completely inhibited the growth of K. lactis in addition to reducing the growth of the other fungi. This result was confirmed by the decrease in the mycelium biomass on SCMC. This study compares culture-dependent and qPCR methods to successfully quantify complex fungal microbiota on a model curd simulating Camembert-type cheese.

  16. Transcriptome analysis of ectopic chloroplast development in green curd cauliflower (Brassica oleracea L. var. botrytis

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    Zhou Xiangjun

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chloroplasts are the green plastids where photosynthesis takes place. The biogenesis of chloroplasts requires the coordinate expression of both nuclear and chloroplast genes and is regulated by developmental and environmental signals. Despite extensive studies of this process, the genetic basis and the regulatory control of chloroplast biogenesis and development remain to be elucidated. Results Green cauliflower mutant causes ectopic development of chloroplasts in the curd tissue of the plant, turning the otherwise white curd green. To investigate the transcriptional control of chloroplast development, we compared gene expression between green and white curds using the RNA-seq approach. Deep sequencing produced over 15 million reads with lengths of 86 base pairs from each cDNA library. A total of 7,155 genes were found to exhibit at least 3-fold changes in expression between green and white curds. These included light-regulated genes, genes encoding chloroplast constituents, and genes involved in chlorophyll biosynthesis. Moreover, we discovered that the cauliflower ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL5 (BoHY5 was expressed higher in green curds than white curds and that 2616 HY5-targeted genes, including 1600 up-regulated genes and 1016 down-regulated genes, were differently expressed in green in comparison to white curd tissue. All these 1600 up-regulated genes were HY5-targeted genes in the light. Conclusions The genome-wide profiling of gene expression by RNA-seq in green curds led to the identification of large numbers of genes associated with chloroplast development, and suggested the role of regulatory genes in the high hierarchy of light signaling pathways in mediating the ectopic chloroplast development in the green curd cauliflower mutant.

  17. Texture, flavor, and sensory quality of buffalo milk Cheddar cheese as influenced by reducing sodium salt content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murtaza, M A; Huma, N; Sameen, A; Murtaza, M S; Mahmood, S; Mueen-ud-Din, G; Meraj, A

    2014-11-01

    The adverse health effects of dietary sodium demand the production of cheese with reduced salt content. The study was aimed to assess the effect of reducing the level of sodium chloride on the texture, flavor, and sensory qualities of Cheddar cheese. Cheddar cheese was manufactured from buffalo milk standardized at 4% fat level by adding sodium chloride at 2.5, 2.0, 1.5, 1.0, and 0.5% (wt/wt of the curd obtained). Cheese samples were ripened at 6 to 8 °C for 180 d and analyzed for chemical composition after 1 wk; for texture and proteolysis after 1, 60, 120, and 180 d; and for volatile flavor compounds and sensory quality after 180 d of ripening. Decreasing the salt level significantly reduced the salt-in-moisture and pH and increased the moisture-in-nonfat-substances and water activity. Cheese hardness, toughness, and crumbliness decreased but proteolysis increased considerably on reducing the sodium content and during cheese ripening. Lowering the salt levels appreciably enhanced the concentration of volatile compounds associated with flavor but negatively affected the sensory perception. We concluded that salt level in cheese can be successfully reduced to a great extent if proteolysis and development of off-flavors resulted by the growth of starter and nonstarter bacteria can be controlled. Copyright © 2014 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Evaluation of quality measurement of Olomouc cake of cheese (Olomoucké tvarůžky during ripening

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    Daniela Strnadová

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Olomouc cake of cheese (Olomoucké tvarůžky is smear-ripened cheese, which is produced from sour industrial curd. Brevibacterium linens, which are added during the production process, are reproducing and make gold-yellow smear cover. The aim of this work was to assess the chemical analysis of the quality of Olomouc cake of cheese. Changes in chemical composition were evaluated during different stages of production and at the same time it was detected whether changes in chemical composition during the manufacturing process are same in spring as well as in summer, without statistically significant differences. Dry matter of Olomouc cake of cheese was ranged from 35 % to 39 %. The increase of dry matter during production is evident, but these changes were in the most cases not statistically signifiant (P > 0.05. The value of titratable acidity of the cheese considerably changes during the manufacturing process, it has a decreasing tendency. Titratable acidity of cheese after shaping was 106.64 (136.12 SH and at the end of life it was 49.91 (65.06 SH. These changes were very highly statistically significant (P 0.05 in cheese from summer period. Content of salt is increased from 5.30 % to 5.98 %, respectively 6.10 %. In spring period the oposite changes in most cases occured (P 0.05.

  19. Microbial interactions in cheese: implications for cheese quality and safety

    OpenAIRE

    Irlinger, Françoise; Mounier, Jérôme

    2009-01-01

    International audience; The cheese microbiota, whose community structure evolves through a succession of different microbial groups, plays a central role in cheese-making. The subtleties of cheese character, as well as cheese shelf-life and safety, are largely determined by the composition and evolution of this microbiota. Adjunct and surface-ripening cultures marketed today for smear cheeses are inadequate for adequately mimicking the real diversity encountered in cheese microbiota. The inte...

  20. Microbial diversity and dynamics during the production of May bryndza cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pangallo, Domenico; Saková, Nikoleta; Koreňová, Janka; Puškárová, Andrea; Kraková, Lucia; Valík, Lubomír; Kuchta, Tomáš

    2014-01-17

    Diversity and dynamics of microbial cultures were studied during the production of May bryndza cheese, a traditional Slovak cheese produced from unpasteurized ewes' milk. Quantitative culture-based data were obtained for lactobacilli, lactococci, total mesophilic aerobic counts, coliforms, E. coli, staphylococci, coagulase-positive staphylococci, yeasts, fungi and Geotrichum spp. in ewes' milk, curd produced from it and ripened for 0 - 10 days, and in bryndza cheese produced from the curd, in three consecutive batches. Diversity of prokaryotes and eukaryotes in selected stages of the production was studied by non-culture approach based on amplification of 16S rDNA and internal transcribed spacer region, coupled to denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and sequencing. The culture-based data demonstrated an overall trend of growth of the microbial population contributing to lactic acid production and to ripening of the cheese, lactobacilli, lactococci and Geotrichum spp. growing up to densities of 10(8) CFU/g, 10(9) CFU/g and 10(5) CFU/g, respectively, in all three consecutive batches of bryndza cheese. The diversity of bacteria encompassed Acinetobacter calcoaceticus, Acinetobacter guillouiae, Acinetobacter sp., Acinetobacter johnsonii, Citrobacter braakii, Clostridium bartlettii, Corynebacterium callunae, Corynebacterium maris, Enterobacter aerogenes, Enterobacter asburiae, Enterobacter hormaechei, Enterococcus faecium, Enterococcus pallens, Escherichia coli, Haemophilus haemolyticus, Hafnia alvei, Kluyvera cryocrescens, Lactobacillus helveticus, Lactococcus garvieae, Lc. lactis subsp. cremoris, Lc. lactis subsp. lactis, "Leuconostoc garlicum", Mannheimia glucosida, Mannheimia haemolytica, Pseudomonas sp., Ps. fluorescens, "Ps. reactans", Raoultella ornithinolytica, R. terrigena, "Rothia arfidiae", Staphylococcus aureus, Staph. epidermidis, Staph. felis, Staph. pasteuri, Staph. sciuri, Staph. xylosus, Streptococcus parauberis, Str. thermophilus and Variovorax

  1. Draining and salting as responsible key steps in the generation of the acid-forming potential of cheese: Application to a soft blue-veined cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gore, Ecaterina; Mardon, Julie; Lebecque, Annick

    2016-09-01

    A disregarded nutritional feature of cheeses is their high acid-forming potential when ingested, which is associated with deleterious effects on consumers' health. This work aimed to characterize the acid-forming potential of a blue-veined cheese during manufacturing to identify the main steps of the process involved in this phenomenon. Sampling was performed on 3 batches at 10 steps of the cheese-making process: reception of raw milk, pasteurization, maturation of milk, coagulation, stirring, draining of the curds, and 4 ripening stages: 21, 28, 42, and 56d. The acid-forming potential of each sample was evaluated by (1) the calculation of the potential renal acid load (PRAL) index (considering protein, Cl, P, Na, K, Mg, and Ca contents), and (2) its organic anion content (lactate and citrate), considered as alkalinizing elements. Draining and salting were identified as the main steps responsible for generation of the acid-forming potential of cheese. The draining process induced an increase in the PRAL index from 1.2mEq/100g in milk to 10.4mEq/100g in drained curds due to the increase in dry matter and the loss of alkaline minerals into the whey. The increase in PRAL value (20.3mEq/100g at d 56) following salting resulted from an imbalance between the strong acidogenic elements (Cl, P, and proteins) and the main alkalinizing ones (Na and Ca). Particularly, Cl had a major effect on the PRAL value. Regarding organic anions, draining induced a loss of 93% of the citrate content in initial milk. The lactate content increased as fermentation occurred (1,297.9mg/100g in drained curds), and then decreased during ripening (519.3mg/100g at d 56). This lactate level probably helps moderate the acidifying potential of end products. Technological strategies aimed at limiting the acid-forming potential of cheeses are proposed and deserve further research to evaluate their nutritional relevance. Copyright © 2016 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc

  2. Associations between pathogen-specific cases of subclinical mastitis and milk yield, quality, protein composition, and cheese-making traits in dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobbo, T; Ruegg, P L; Stocco, G; Fiore, E; Gianesella, M; Morgante, M; Pasotto, D; Bittante, G; Cecchinato, A

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate associations between pathogen-specific cases of subclinical mastitis and milk yield, quality, protein composition, and cheese-making traits. Forty-one multibreed herds were selected for the study, and composite milk samples were collected from 1,508 cows belonging to 3 specialized dairy breeds (Holstein Friesian, Brown Swiss, and Jersey) and 3 dual-purpose breeds of Alpine origin (Simmental, Rendena, and Grey Alpine). Milk composition [i.e., fat, protein, casein, lactose, pH, urea, and somatic cell count (SCC)] was analyzed, and separation of protein fractions was performed by reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography. Eleven coagulation traits were measured: 5 traditional milk coagulation properties [time from rennet addition to milk gelation (RCT, min), curd-firming rate as the time to a curd firmness (CF) of 20 mm (k20, min), and CF at 30, 45, and 60 min from rennet addition (a30, a45, and a60, mm)], and 6 new curd firming and syneresis traits [potential asymptotical CF at an infinite time (CFP, mm), curd-firming instant rate constant (kCF, % × min(-1)), curd syneresis instant rate constant (kSR, % × min(-1)), modeled RCT (RCTeq, min), maximum CF value (CFmax, mm), and time at CFmax (tmax, min)]. We also measured 3 cheese yield traits, expressing the weights of total fresh curd (%CYCURD), dry matter (%CYSOLIDS), and water (%CYWATER) in the curd as percentages of the weight of the processed milk, and 4 nutrient recovery traits (RECPROTEIN, RECFAT, RECSOLIDS, and RECENERGY), representing the percentage ratio between each nutrient in the curd and milk. Milk samples with SCC > 100,000 cells/mL were subjected to bacteriological examination. All samples were divided into 7 clusters of udder health (UH) status: healthy (cows with milk SCC production was observed in the 2 UH status groups with the highest milk SCC (i.e., contagious IMI and culture-negative samples with high SCC), revealing a discrepancy between the

  3. Cheese and cardiovascular health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjerpsted, Julie Bousgaard

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) are the number one cause of mortality worldwide. Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol is a well-known risk factor of CVD which increases after the intake of saturated fatty acids (SFA). Cheese is a dietary product commonly consumed in Western countries and known...... to contain high amounts of SFA. However, cheese also contributes with several nutrients in the diet such as essential amino acids and calcium. The aim of this thesis was to examine the effect of cheese intake on CVD risk through evidence from both observational, intervention and explorative studies....... By reviewing results from published observational studies it was concluded that cheese does not seem to increase CVD risk, despite of the high SFA content of most cheeses. A human cross-over intervention study was conducted with the purpose of investigating the effect of hard cheese intake on risk markers...

  4. Evaluation of hygiene and safety criteria in the production of a traditional Piedmont cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Astegiano

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Traditional products and related processes must be safe to protect consumers’ health. The aim of this study was to evaluate microbiological criteria of a traditional Piedmont cheese, made by two different cheese producers (A and B. Three batches of each cheese were considered. The following seven samples of each batch were collected: raw milk, milk at 38°C, curd, cheese at 7, 30, 60, 90 days of ripening. During cheese making process, training activities dealing with food safety were conducted. Analyses regarding food safety and process hygiene criteria were set up according to the EC Regulation 2073/2005. Other microbiological and chemical-physical analyses [lactic streptococci, lactobacilli, pH and water activity (Aw] were performed as well. Shiga-toxin Escherichia coli, aflatoxin M1 and antimicrobial substances were considered only for raw milk. All samples resulted negative for food safety criteria; Enterobacteriaceae, E.coli and coagulase-positive staphylococci (CPS were high in the first phase of cheese production, however they decreased at the end of ripening. A high level of CPS in milk was found in producer A, likewise in some cheese samples a count of >5 Log CFU/g was reached; staphylococcal enterotoxins resulted negative. The pH and Aw values decreased during the cheese ripening period. The competition between lactic flora and potential pathogen microorganisms and decreasing of pH and Aw are considered positive factors in order to ensure safety of dairy products. Moreover, training activities play a crucial role to manage critical points and perform corrective action. Responsible application of good manufacturing practices are considered key factors to obtain a high hygienic level in dairy products.

  5. Domestic cooked cheese

    OpenAIRE

    Slavko Kirin

    2006-01-01

    The research results of sensory properties, chemical and microbiological quality of domestic cooked cheese, which is produced around Bjelovar region, are presented in this paper.Domestic cooked cheese is Croatian autochthonous cheese produced in wider north-western region of Croatia (Bilogora, Lika, Banovina, Gorski Kotar and around Zagreb), and therefore should be registered as Protected Denomination of Origin (PDO) and/or Protected Geographical Indication (PGI). Sensory properties, chemical...

  6. Amino acid composition of cottage cheese and whey with bifidobacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. S. Rodionova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Breaking condition intestinal flora, the simplest way to create sensitive parts of the body microbiocenosis caused by various factors. Reasons for people microecology imbalances – antibiotics, preservatives, stress. The result is an imbalance – the number of gastrointestinal disorders, immune deficiency disorders metabolic processes in the body. Therapeutic effect of probiotic microorganisms is the result of exogenous and endometabolitov synthesis the character of the protein. Acid activity information probiotic microorganisms and the distribution of amino acids between the products and intermediates in biopotential evaluation process foods produced with probiotic microflora by fermentation. Test results from the amino acid composition of whey and quark are obtained by fermenting raw milk probiotics bifidobacterias. It was found that during the fermentation of the quark consortium, Bifidobacterium bifidum, Bifidobacterium longum, Bifidobacterium adolescentis, Bifidobacterium bifidum Y enriched curd 4 of leucine and glutamine. Rate of transfer amino acids in serum to 2–6% of essential amino acids is irrelevant 3–7%. The highest value observed transient threonine, isoleucyl, lysine, valine, alanine, glycine, proline, serine. The mean value of the prototype amino acid protein curd and whey protein biological value was 71.89 and 74.58. Preservation of active forms of probiotic microorganisms after heating the bunch to 53–55 °C, lg concentration of not less than 7 (in 1 g in cottage cheese and serum. The received data are actual for formation of an information data bank, necessary for the development of prescription-component solutions of eubiotic products.

  7. Effect of farming system and cheesemaking technology on the physicochemical characteristics, fatty acid profile, and sensory properties of Caciocavallo Palermitano cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonanno, A; Tornambè, G; Bellina, V; De Pasquale, C; Mazza, F; Maniaci, G; Di Grigoli, A

    2013-01-01

    Caciocavallo Palermitano is a typical stretched-curd cheese that has been produced over the centuries in Sicily according to traditional cheesemaking technology and using raw milk from autochthonous cow breeds reared at pasture. The objective of this experiment was to evaluate the effects of the farming system and processing technology on the characteristics of Caciocavallo Palermitano cheese, with particular regard to the fatty acid profile. The farming system was either extensive, using autochthonous cows fed a pasture-based diet, or intensive, with specialized dairy cow breeds fed mainly hay and concentrate. The cheese-processing technology was either artisanal, using traditional wooden tools and endemic lactic bacteria, or advanced, using modern steel equipment and selected lactic bacteria. Twelve Caciocavallo Palermitano cheeses, 3 from each of the 4 experimental theses (2 farming systems × 2 cheesemaking technologies), were obtained and aged for 1, 30, 60, and 120 d. Milk of origin and cheeses were analyzed for the main chemical and rheological parameters. Fatty acids were methylated in lyophilized cheese and analyzed by gas chromatography. Sensory analysis was carried out by trained panelists. The PROC GLM of SAS 9.1.2 (SAS Institute Inc., Cary, NY) was used for the statistical analysis. The physical, chemical, and sensory characteristics of Caciocavallo Palermitano cheese were influenced more by the farming system than by the cheesemaking technology. Compared with cheese produced through intensive farming, cheese from extensive farming was richer in polyunsaturated, n-3, and odd- and branched-chain fatty acids, as well as in conjugated linoleic acid (cis-9,trans-11 C18:2), with accompanying improved human health benefits. The cheesemaking technology produced variation in the evolution of proteolysis during aging, due presumably to the different active microflora, which influenced the sensory profile of the resulting cheese. Indeed, cheese produced by

  8. Ripening-induced changes in microbial groups of artisanal Sicilian goats’ milk cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo Di Marco

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Changes in the microbial flora of “Caprino dei Nebrodi”, a raw goat’s milk cheese produced in Sicily, were studied during ripening. From 2 batches of cheese, 4 samples were taken at day 0, 2, 15, and 30 of ripening. Also, samples of curd and milk used in the manufacturing process were analyzed. By the end of the ripening process (day 30, high log10 cfu/g were found for Lactobacilli (7.20, Lattococci (7.10, and Enterococci (7.00, whereas counts of Enterobacteriaceae (3.91, Escherichia coli (3.30, and Staphylococcus (3.89 were found to be lower. The study provides useful information on the microbiological properties of “Caprino dei Nebrodi” cheese, and the results obtained suggest that in order to increase the quality of this artisanal product, it is necessary to improve the sanitary conditions of milking and cheese-making. The study was intended as a preliminary step towards the isolation and identification of bacterial species found in this type of goat’s cheese.

  9. Effect of Abalone Hydrolysates Encapsulated by Double Emulsion on the Physicochemical and Sensorial Properties of Fresh Cheese

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    The intake of dietary salt through food now exceeds current nutritional recommendations and is thought to have negative effects on human health, such as the increasing prevalence of hypertension. This study was performed to investigate whether W1/O/W2 double emulsions can be used to enhance the saltiness of cheese without increasing the salt content (W1 is distilled water or 1% abalone hydrolysate, and W2 is 1% NaCl or 1% abalone hydrolysate + 1% NaCl solution). We also investigated the effect of adding abalone hydrolysate to the double emulsion as a saltiness enhancer. The cheeses were physico-chemically evaluated to determine curd yield, pH value, moisture content, color, texture, salt release rate, and sensory properties. No significant differences were observed in curd yield, pH value, moisture content, lightness, or redness between the cheeses made with and without the double emulsion. However, in the evaluation of salt release rate, fresh cheese made with double emulsion (W1 = distilled water, W2 = 1% NaCl + 1% abalone hydrolysate) was detected earlier than the control or the other treatments. In the sensory evaluation, fresh cheese made with the double emulsion showed higher scores for saltiness and overall preference than the control or the other treatments. We concluded that abalone hydrolysate encapsulated in a double emulsion (W1 is water and W2 is abalone hydrolysate and NaCl solution) could enhance the saltiness of fresh cheese while maintaining the same salt concentration, without altering its physical properties. PMID:28515645

  10. 21 CFR 133.128 - Cottage cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cottage cheese. 133.128 Section 133.128 Food and... CONSUMPTION CHEESES AND RELATED CHEESE PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Cheese and Related Products § 133.128 Cottage cheese. (a) Cottage cheese is the soft uncured cheese prepared by mixing cottage...

  11. 21 CFR 133.133 - Cream cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cream cheese. 133.133 Section 133.133 Food and... CONSUMPTION CHEESES AND RELATED CHEESE PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Cheese and Related Products § 133.133 Cream cheese. (a) Description. (1) Cream cheese is the soft, uncured cheese prepared by...

  12. Development of technology for production of reduced fat processed cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Torres Silva e Alves

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available An increasing share of foods with reduced fat has been observed in the diet of the Brazilian population, a trend also seen in many other countries. In this context, our-aim was to study the manufacturing parameters and to develop a process to produce a spreadable processed cheese (requeijão cremoso with reduced fat content. In the first stage of this study, modifications were performed in the traditional manufacturing process of requeijão cremoso with regular fat content to produce a reduced fat product. During the second stage of this study, two reduced fat cheeses, with and withoutthe addition of whey protein concentrate (WPC were developed, both using JOHA S9 and JOHA PZ as emulsifying salts, resulting in four different formulations. The amounts of cream and water used in both products were calculated in order to obtain a final product with 10% fat and 33% total solids. The product which presented the best results was produced with curd obtained by direct acidification of skimmed milk heated at 68-70 ºC, using 1,3% emulsifying salt JOHA S9 in the melting process and 2% WPC 34% as a partial fat substitute, both calculated as a percentage of the amountof curd used as raw material. It was also important to add WPC 34% to the product at the first cooking step of the process (70 ºC, in order to obtain a final product withthe typical spreadable texture of the traditional requeijão cremoso.

  13. Lactobacillus and Leuconostoc volatilomes in cheese conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogačić, Tomislav; Maillard, Marie-Bernadette; Leclerc, Aurélie; Hervé, Christophe; Chuat, Victoria; Valence, Florence; Thierry, Anne

    2016-03-01

    New strains are desirable to diversify flavour of fermented dairy products. The objective of this study was to evaluate the potential of Leuconostoc spp. and Lactobacillus spp. in the production of aroma compounds by metabolic fingerprints of volatiles. Eighteen strains, including five Lactobacillus species (Lactobacillus fermentum, Lactobacillus helveticus, Lactobacillus paracasei, Lactobacillus rhamnosus, Lactobacillus sakei) and three Leuconostoc species (Leuconostoc citreum, Leuconostoc lactis, and Leuconostoc mesenteroides) were incubated for 5 weeks in a curd-based slurry medium under conditions mimicking cheese ripening. Populations were enumerated and volatile compounds were analysed by headspace trap gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). A metabolomics approach followed by multivariate statistical analysis was applied for data processing and analysis. In total, 12 alcohols, 10 aldehydes, 7 esters, 11 ketones, 5 acids and 2 sulphur compounds were identified. Very large differences in concentration of volatile compounds between the highest producing strains and the control medium were observed in particular for diacetyl, 2-butanol, ethyl acetate, 3-methylbutanol, 3-methylbutanoic acid and 2-methylbutanoic acid. Some of the characterized strains demonstrated an interesting aromatizing potential to be used as adjunct culture.

  14. Probiotic potential of lactic acid bacteria present in home made curd in southern India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balamurugan, Ramadass; Chandragunasekaran, Aarthi Sophia; Chellappan, Gowri; Rajaram, Krithika; Ramamoorthi, Gayathri; Ramakrishna, Balakrishnan S

    2014-09-01

    The human gut microbiota play a significant role in nutritional processes. The concept of probiotics has led to widespread consumption of food preparations containing probiotic microbes such as curd and yogurt. Curd prepared at home is consumed every day in most homes in southern India. In this study the home-made curd was evaluated for lactic acid bacteria (LAB) with probiotic potential. Fifteen LAB (12 lactobacilli, 1 l0 actococcus , 2 Leuconostoc) and one yeast isolated from home-made curd were evaluated for resistance to acid, pepsin, pancreatin and bile salts; antimicrobial resistance; intrinsic antimicrobial activity; adherence to Caco-2 epithelial cells; ability to block pathogen adherence to Caco-2 cells; ability to inhibit interleukin (IL)-8 secretion from HT-29 epithelial cells in response to Vibrio cholerae; and ability to induce anti-inflammatory cytokine expression in THP-1 monocyte cells. Lactobacillus abundance in fermenting curd peaked sharply at 12 h. Nine of the strains survived exposure to acid (pH 3.0) for at least one hour, and all strains survived in the presence of pancreatin or bile salts for 3 h. None showed haemolytic activity. All were resistant to most antimicrobials tested, but were sensitive to imipenem. Most strains inhibited the growth of Salmonella Typhimurium while five inhibited growth of V. cholerae O139. Seven strains showed adherence to Caco-2 cells ranging from 20-104 per cent of adherence of an adherent strain of Escherichia coli, but all inhibited V. cholerae adherence to Caco-2 cells by 20-100 per cent. They inhibited interleukin-8 secretion from HT-29 cells, in response to V. cholerae, by 50-80 per cent. Two strains induced IL-10 and IL-12 messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) expression in THP-1 cells. LAB in curd had properties consistent with probiotic potential, but these were not consistent across species. LAB abundance in curd increased rapidly at 12 h of fermentation at room temperature and declined thereafter.

  15. Influence of buttermilk powder or buttermilk addition on phospholipid content, chemical and bio-chemical composition and bacterial viability in Cheddar style-cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickey, C D; Diehl, B W K; Nuzzo, M; Millqvist-Feurby, A; Wilkinson, M G; Sheehan, J J

    2017-12-01

    The effect of buttermilk powder addition post-curd formation or buttermilk addition to cheese milk on total and individual phospholipid content, chemical composition, enzyme activity, microbial populations and microstructure within Cheddar-style cheese was investigated. Buttermilk or buttermilk powder addition resulted in significant increases in total phospholipid content and their distribution throughout the cheese matrix. Addition of 10% buttermilk powder resulted in higher phospholipid content, moisture, pH and salt in moisture levels, and lower fat, fat in dry matter, L. helveticus and non-starter bacteria levels in cheeses. Buttermilk powder inclusion resulted in lower pH4.6/Soluble Nitrogen (SN) levels and significantly lower free amino acid levels in 10% buttermilk powder cheeses. Buttermilk addition provided a more porous cheese microstructure with greater fat globule coalescence and increased free fat pools, while also increasing moisture and decreasing protein, fat and pH levels. Addition of buttermilk in liquid or powdered form offers potential for new cheeses with associated health benefits. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Variability of bacterial biofilms of the "tina" wood vats used in the ragusano cheese-making process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licitra, G; Ogier, J C; Parayre, S; Pediliggieri, C; Carnemolla, T M; Falentin, H; Madec, M N; Carpino, S; Lortal, S

    2007-11-01

    Ragusano cheese is a "protected denomination of origin" cheese made in the Hyblean region of Sicily from raw milk using traditional wooden tools, without starter. To explore the Ragusano bacterial ecosystem, molecular fingerprinting was conducted at different times during the ripening and biofilms from the wooden vats called "tinas" were investigated. Raw milks collected at two farm sites, one on the mountain and one at sea level, were processed to produce Ragusano cheese. Raw milk, curd before and after cooking, curd at stretching time (cheese 0 time), and cheese samples (4 and 7 months) were analyzed by PCR-temporal temperature gel electrophoresis (PCR-TTGE) and by classical enumeration microbiology. With the use of universal primers, PCR-TTGE revealed many differences between the raw milk profiles, but also notable common bands identified as Streptococcus thermophilus, Lactobacillus lactis, Lactobacillus delbrueckii, and Enterococcus faecium. After the stretching, TTGE profiles revealed three to five dominant species only through the entire process of ripening. In the biofilms of the two tinas used, one to five species were detected, S. thermophilus being predominant in both. Biofilms from five other tinas were also analyzed by PCR-TTGE, PCR-denaturating gradient gel electrophoresis, specific PCR tests, and sequencing, confirming the predominance of lactic acid bacteria (S. thermophilus, L. lactis, and L. delbrueckii subsp. lactis) and the presence of a few high-GC-content species, like coryneform bacteria. The spontaneous acidification of raw milks before and after contact with the five tinas was followed in two independent experiments. The lag period before acidification can be up to 5 h, depending on the raw milk and the specific tina, highlighting the complexity of this natural inoculation system.

  17. Variability of Bacterial Biofilms of the “Tina” Wood Vats Used in the Ragusano Cheese-Making Process▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licitra, G.; Ogier, J. C.; Parayre, S.; Pediliggieri, C.; Carnemolla, T. M.; Falentin, H.; Madec, M. N.; Carpino, S.; Lortal, S.

    2007-01-01

    Ragusano cheese is a “protected denomination of origin” cheese made in the Hyblean region of Sicily from raw milk using traditional wooden tools, without starter. To explore the Ragusano bacterial ecosystem, molecular fingerprinting was conducted at different times during the ripening and biofilms from the wooden vats called “tinas” were investigated. Raw milks collected at two farm sites, one on the mountain and one at sea level, were processed to produce Ragusano cheese. Raw milk, curd before and after cooking, curd at stretching time (cheese 0 time), and cheese samples (4 and 7 months) were analyzed by PCR-temporal temperature gel electrophoresis (PCR-TTGE) and by classical enumeration microbiology. With the use of universal primers, PCR-TTGE revealed many differences between the raw milk profiles, but also notable common bands identified as Streptococcus thermophilus, Lactobacillus lactis, Lactobacillus delbrueckii, and Enterococcus faecium. After the stretching, TTGE profiles revealed three to five dominant species only through the entire process of ripening. In the biofilms of the two tinas used, one to five species were detected, S. thermophilus being predominant in both. Biofilms from five other tinas were also analyzed by PCR-TTGE, PCR-denaturating gradient gel electrophoresis, specific PCR tests, and sequencing, confirming the predominance of lactic acid bacteria (S. thermophilus, L. lactis, and L. delbrueckii subsp. lactis) and the presence of a few high-GC-content species, like coryneform bacteria. The spontaneous acidification of raw milks before and after contact with the five tinas was followed in two independent experiments. The lag period before acidification can be up to 5 h, depending on the raw milk and the specific tina, highlighting the complexity of this natural inoculation system. PMID:17720831

  18. Structure, Meltability, and Firmness of Process Cheese Containing White Cheese

    OpenAIRE

    Kalab, Miloslav; Modler, H. Wayne; Caric, Marijana; Milanovic, Spasenija

    1991-01-01

    White cheese made by coagulating heated milk (90"C) with a 2.5% citric acid solution to pH 5.5 consists of casein particles having a characteristic core-and-shell ultrastructure. The presence of this White cheese in process cheese can be detected by transmission electron microscopy on the basis of the core-and-shell ultrastructure which is stable during cheese processing. White cheese additions may be detected at levels equal to or higher than 8%. White cheese, which does not melt alone wh...

  19. 21 CFR 133.113 - Cheddar cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cheddar cheese. 133.113 Section 133.113 Food and... CONSUMPTION CHEESES AND RELATED CHEESE PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Cheese and Related Products § 133.113 Cheddar cheese. (a) Description. (1) Cheddar cheese is the food prepared by the...

  20. 21 CFR 133.138 - Edam cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Edam cheese. 133.138 Section 133.138 Food and... CONSUMPTION CHEESES AND RELATED CHEESE PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Cheese and Related Products § 133.138 Edam cheese. (a) Description. (1) Edam cheese is the food prepared by the procedure set...

  1. 21 CFR 133.162 - Neufchatel cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Neufchatel cheese. 133.162 Section 133.162 Food... HUMAN CONSUMPTION CHEESES AND RELATED CHEESE PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Cheese and Related Products § 133.162 Neufchatel cheese. (a) Description. (1) Neufchatel cheese is the soft uncured...

  2. 21 CFR 133.140 - Gammelost cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Gammelost cheese. 133.140 Section 133.140 Food and... CONSUMPTION CHEESES AND RELATED CHEESE PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Cheese and Related Products § 133.140 Gammelost cheese. (a) Description. (1) Gammelost cheese is the food prepared from nonfat...

  3. 21 CFR 133.152 - Limburger cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Limburger cheese. 133.152 Section 133.152 Food and... CONSUMPTION CHEESES AND RELATED CHEESE PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Cheese and Related Products § 133.152 Limburger cheese. (a) Description. (1) Limburger cheese is the food prepared by one of...

  4. 21 CFR 133.142 - Gouda cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Gouda cheese. 133.142 Section 133.142 Food and... CONSUMPTION CHEESES AND RELATED CHEESE PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Cheese and Related Products § 133.142 Gouda cheese. Gouda cheese conforms to the definition and standard of identity and...

  5. 21 CFR 133.149 - Gruyere cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Gruyere cheese. 133.149 Section 133.149 Food and... CONSUMPTION CHEESES AND RELATED CHEESE PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Cheese and Related Products § 133.149 Gruyere cheese. (a) Description. (1) Gruyere cheese is the food prepared by the...

  6. 21 CFR 133.106 - Blue cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Blue cheese. 133.106 Section 133.106 Food and... CONSUMPTION CHEESES AND RELATED CHEESE PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Cheese and Related Products § 133.106 Blue cheese. (a) Description. (1) Blue cheese is the food prepared by the procedure set...

  7. 21 CFR 133.185 - Samsoe cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Samsoe cheese. 133.185 Section 133.185 Food and... CONSUMPTION CHEESES AND RELATED CHEESE PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Cheese and Related Products § 133.185 Samsoe cheese. (a) Description. (1) Samsoe cheese is the food prepared by the procedure...

  8. 21 CFR 133.108 - Brick cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Brick cheese. 133.108 Section 133.108 Food and... CONSUMPTION CHEESES AND RELATED CHEESE PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Cheese and Related Products § 133.108 Brick cheese. (a) Description. (1) Brick cheese is the food prepared from dairy...

  9. 21 CFR 133.153 - Monterey cheese and monterey jack cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Monterey cheese and monterey jack cheese. 133.153... (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION CHEESES AND RELATED CHEESE PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Cheese and Related Products § 133.153 Monterey cheese and monterey jack cheese. (a) Description...

  10. Occurrence of Listeria spp. in critical control points and the environment of Minas Frescal cheese processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Isabella M M; Almeida, R C C; Alves, M A O; Almeida, P F

    2003-03-25

    Critical control points (CCPs) associated with Minas Frescal cheese (a Brazilian soft white cheese, eaten fresh) processing in two dairy factories were determined using flow diagrams and microbiological tests for detection of Listeria monocytogenes and other species of Listeria. A total of 218 samples were collected along the production line and environment. The CCPs identified were reception of raw milk, pasteurization, coagulation and storage. Thirteen samples were positive for Listeria; 9 samples were Listeria innocua, 2 were Listeria grayi and 2 were L. monocytogenes. In factory A, Listeria was found in 50% of raw milk samples, 33.3% of curd samples, 16.7% of pasteurized milk samples, 16.7% of cheese samples and 25% of rubber pipes used to transport the whey. The microorganism was not obtained from environmental samples in this plant. In factory B, Listeria was found in one sample of raw milk (16.7%) and in three samples of environment (17.6%) and L. monocytogenes was obtained from raw milk (16.7%) and the floor of the cheese refrigeration room (14.3%). Two serotypes, 4b and 1/2a, were observed among the strains of L. monocytogenes isolated, both which are frequently involved in outbreaks of food-borne listeriosis and sporadic cases of the disease all over the world.

  11. Mixing sweet cream buttermilk with whole milk to produce cream cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahrami Masoud

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Buttermilk is an important by-product of the manufacture of butter. Sweet-cream buttermilk (SCBM is similar in composition to skim milk, except for its high phospholipid and milk fat globular membrane protein content. The main objective of this investigation was to produce optimum quality cream cheese by replacing whole milk with different proportions of SCBM (5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35, 40, 45, and 50%. Statistical analysis showed that there were significant differences (p < 0.05 between the chemical and organoleptic properties of the samples. As the percentage of SCBM increased, the chemical composition of total solids, fat, protein, fat in dry matter (FDM and ash of cheese milk decreased significantly, leading to a softer, moister curd. Samples prepared with more than 25% SCBM were not acceptable to the taste panel. The cream cheeses prepared using 25% and 30% SCBM had the highest yields. Total solids and FDM were strong predictors of cheese yield (r2 ≈ 0.589. The results also showed that the best range for replacement using SCBM is 20–25%.

  12. Nitrogen matter changes during ripening of semihard cheese based on milk protein coaggregates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Snežana Jovanović

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Cheeses made on milk protein coaggregate basis are different thantraditionally made cheeses, in technological production process and sensory characteristics, especially texture and taste. In this research it was assumed that applied milk thermal treatment, as well as curd processing, will have appropriate influence on proteins as substratum. During ripening, due to a presence of whey proteins, which influence decrease of casein content in total cheese proteins, substratum is hydrolyzed. In traditionally made cheeses, casein is the basis of protein matrix. In comparison to whey proteins, casein is substantially faster changed during ripening, while whey proteins incorporated in the curd give so called «unspecific» ripening. Besides, application of high temperatures influences decrease of plasmin activity in cheese, regardless of its significant thermal stability. During 4 months ofexperimental cheeses ripening, changes of nitrogen matter were investigated. Significant changes of milk proteins, such as increase of soluble nitrogen matter content, the primary and secondary nitrogen products of protein breakdown during cheese ripening, as well as non-protein nitrogen (12 % TCA and phospho-tungstic-soluble nitrogen (5 % PTA were observed. The average content of soluble nitrogen after production after 15, 30, 60 and 120 days of ripening were: 135.48 mg %, 358.72 mg %, 473.52 mg %, 672.32 mg % and 845.13 mg %,respectively. According to soluble nitrogen content increase, coefficient of ripening also increased and for the same ripening period was: 4.42 %, 10.14 %, 12.95 %, 18.21 % and 23.60 %, respectively. Content of primary and secondary products of protein breakdown during cheese ripening had significant rising trend from the first day of production to 120th day of ripening. At the end of investigated ripening period, content of primary products of protein decomposition was 4.90 times higher compared to the first day of ripening, while content of

  13. Autochthonous "Bjelovars dried cheese"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slavko Kirin

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available «Dried cheese» is in autochthonous group of Bjelovar region cheeses which is still produced in rural domestic scale. The name of cheese originates from production procedure - drying for longer or shorter period in airy place after which the cheese is smoked, or is smoked only without drying. This type of cheese is produced in whole central region of Croatia which includes Međimurje, Podravina, Bilogora; Moslavina, Posavina and region around the capital. The aim of this paper is to describe and determine sensory, chemical and microbiological composition to determine its characteristics and production standards. As standards for sensory properties following characteristics can be used: a Outer shape: dimensions: diameter: 140-145 mm, height: 58-61 mm, mass: 700-750 g, equal, rounded shape, smooth skin, equal colour; b Consistency: easily cut, elastic, soft; c Cut: nicely combined white body, few improper holes of equal size; d Odour: pleasant milky acid odour, fairly smoky; e Taste: Fairly milky acidic taste, medium salty, fairly smoky taste. Depending on fat in dry matter content and water content in non fat dry matter, analyzed samples can be characterized as quarter fat, soft and semidry cheese. Higher acidity and saltiness was determined in some samples, microbiological analyses has shown that the most common contaminants are yeasts and moulds.

  14. [Edible and medical application of pasta ulmi, salt, black curd beans, vinegar and thick sauce].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jin-ping

    2010-03-01

    Pasta ulmi, salt, black curd beans, vinegar and thick sauce recorded in the book of Jijiupian (emergency chapter), written by SHI You in the Western Han dynasty could be used as condiments. For example, pasta ulmi tastes spicy, salt tastes salty, black curd beans taste bitter while vinegar tastes acidic. All of them also have high medical values, which were described as materia medica in the early classic literature of materia medica. The dual-purpose for both medicine and food reflected the characteristics of combination of food nutrition and diet-therapy as well as the important connotation of isogeny of medicine and food at early stage of the development of medicine.

  15. Milk and curd characteristics depending on farm and production level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Di Palo

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Here reported are data relative to the chemical composition/characteristics of the milk, of milk samples collected every 50 days from 60 buffaloes (326 samples that were half-sibs (through paternal or maternal lineage, ascertained by DNA test, bred in two farms (S.A. and M respectively n. = 27 and n = 33. The subjects were divided in relation to the productive level (> vs. < 2601 kg/lactation. The production level did not influence the theoretical yield (ThCY, the yield at 4 h (FCY and at 28 h (28CY, the curd dry matter (CDM and the ratios between ThCY and real yields (FCY, 28CY and CDM. Compared to the less productive subjects, despite similar percentage of proteins, the more productive subjects had a higher percentage of casein (3.73 vs. 3.64; P < 0.05, a greater incidence of the latter on total protein (80.52 vs. 79.60; P < 0.05, higher content in lactose (4.88 vs. 4.81; P < 0.01 and urea (42.44 vs. 40.48; P < 0.05 and a lower BCS value (6.79 vs. 7.25; P < 0.05. These differences are not always confirmed in both farms. Regardless of the production level, subjects of farm S.A. had a lower production/lactation (2524 vs. 2817 kg; P < 0.01, higher values of R and k20 (P < 0.01, lower value of a30, a higher SH value and lower contents in urea and solid not fat. They also showed a lower ThCY yield and a lower ratio between ThCY and 28CY when proteins were corrected for the urea content, and a higher ratio between 28CY and the percentage of proteins, both when corrected or not for the urea content. It is difficult to explain the influence of the production level on the casein content whereas the greater lactose content in more productive buffaloes may be accounted for by the greater persistence of lactation curve. The higher urea content found in buffaloes with a greater galactopoietic attitude may be due to a greater DM intake caused by the inadequacy of the diet, hypothesis confirmed by the lower BCS observed in the more productive subjects.

  16. Soil washing treatability study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krstich, M.

    1995-12-01

    Soil washing was identified as a viable treatment process option for remediating soil at the FEMP Environmental Management Project (FEMP). Little information relative to the specific application and potential effectiveness of the soil washing process exists that applies to the types of soil at the FEMP. To properly evaluate this process option in conjunction with the ongoing FEMP Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS), a treatability testing program was necessary to provide a foundation for a detailed technical evaluation of the viability of the process. In August 1991, efforts were initiated to develop a work plan and experimental design for investigating the effectiveness of soil washing on FEMP soil. In August 1992, the final Treatability Study Work Plan for Operable Unit 5: Soil Washing (DOE 1992) was issued. This document shall be referenced throughout the remainder of this report as the Treatability Study Work Plan (TSWP). The purpose of this treatability study was to generate data to support initial screening and the detailed analysis of alternatives for the Operable Unit 5 FS.

  17. Wash Your Hands

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-03-08

    This video shows kids how to properly wash their hands, one of the most important steps we can take to avoid getting sick and spreading germs to others.  Created: 3/8/2010 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 3/8/2010.

  18. Effect of fortification of fresh cow milk with coconut milk on the proximate composition and yield of warankashi, a traditional cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. K. Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cheese is a concentrated dairy product produced by acid or rennet coagulation or curdling of milk, stirring and heating the curd, draining off the whey, collecting and pressing the curd. The effect of partial substitution of fresh cow milk with coconut milk on the yield and proximate composition of cheese was examined. Extracted coconut milk was mixed with fresh raw cow milk at varying proportions of 5%: 95%, 10%: 90%, 15%: 85%, 20%: 80%, 25%:75%, 70%: 30% and the control (0%:100% to produce cheese. The control and the partially substituted cheeses were stored in a refrigerator and examined for sensory quality, percentage yield, total titrable acidity, and proximate analysis. The yield of cheese showed significant (p< 0.05 decrease from 26.71% (control sample to 13.55% as the level of coconut milk increased. The total titrable acidity of cheese was found to be between the ranges of 0.20% - 0.29% which displayed a significant increase from 0.20% - 0.29%. The protein content of the cow-coconut cheese blends showed a significant difference (p<0.05 and an increase of 14.05%-15.33% (at 5%-30% substitution of coconut milk, with the control sample having 13.75%. There was also an increase in fat content from 9.20% - 9.64% (5% - 30% substitution of coconut milk, with the control sample having 8.94%. There was a decrease in the carbohydrate content of the cheese blends which ranged between 8.23% -2.82%, with the control sample having 9.60%. There was a significant decrease (p<0.05 in the ash content of the cow-coconut cheese blends, with the control sample having 1.02%. Significant difference (p<0.05 was observed in the colour, aroma, taste, texture, and overall acceptability as influenced by varying proportions of added coconut milk. The blend with 5% coconut milk and 95% cow milk was most acceptable by panellists. The work showed the potential of coconut as an alternative source of milk in cheese making with improved nutritional value and consumer

  19. Novel extraction strategy of ribosomal RNA and genomic DNA from cheese for PCR-based investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonaïti, Catherine; Parayre, Sandrine; Irlinger, Françoise

    2006-03-15

    Cheese microorganisms, such as bacteria and fungi, constitute a complex ecosystem that plays a central role in cheeses ripening. The molecular study of cheese microbial diversity and activity is essential but the extraction of high quality nucleic acid may be problematic: the cheese samples are characterised by a strong buffering capacity which negatively influenced the yield of the extracted rRNA. The objective of this study is to develop an effective method for the direct and simultaneous isolation of yeast and bacterial ribosomal RNA and genomic DNA from the same cheese samples. DNA isolation was based on a protocol used for nucleic acids isolation from anaerobic digestor, without preliminary washing step with the combined use of the action of chaotropic agent (acid guanidinium thiocyanate), detergents (SDS, N-lauroylsarcosine), chelating agent (EDTA) and a mechanical method (bead beating system). The DNA purification was carried out by two washing steps of phenol-chloroform. RNA was isolated successfully after the second acid extraction step by recovering it from the phenolic phase of the first acid extraction. The novel method yielded pure preparation of undegraded RNA accessible for reverse transcription-PCR. The extraction protocol of genomic DNA and rRNA was applicable to complex ecosystem of different cheese matrices.

  20. The effect of partial substitution of NaCl with KCl on the physicochemical, microbiological and sensory properties of Akkawi cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamleh, Rabih; Olabi, Ammar; Toufeili, Imad; Daroub, Hamza; Younis, Tarek; Ajib, Rola

    2015-07-01

    Studies have shown a direct relationship between increased dietary sodium intake and chronic diseases such as hypertension, cardiovascular disease and osteoporosis. Potassium chloride is the most widely used salt substitute for sodium chloride in different processed foods. Akkawi cheese, commonly consumed as fresh cheese, has a semi-hard curd, chalky color, firm texture and salty flavor. The effect of partial replacement of NaCl with KCl on the chemical, textural, microbiological and sensory characteristics of fresh and mature Akkawi cheese was investigated. Salt treatment (NaCl reduction) had a significant effect on pH, lactic acid, sodium and potassium contents of cheeses. Texture profile analysis revealed a significant effect of salt treatment on adhesiveness, chewiness and hardness of cheese. All tested microorganisms increased with storage but in general did not differ between salt treatments, specifically between control (100% NaCl) and (70% NaCl, 30% KCl) samples. Descriptive analysis showed that salt treatment had a significant effect on bitterness, crumbliness and hardness, whereas the age of cheese was significant for color and fermented flavor. Salt treatment had no effect on acceptability variables for all experimental 2-week Akkawi samples. The above results suggest that a 30% substitution of NaCl by KCl (70% NaCl, 30% KCl brine) is acceptable. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  1. Olive oil enema in a pre-term infant with milk curd syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Toshihiko; Takahashi, Masataka; Amari, Shoichiro; Ohno, Michinobu; Sato, Kaori; Tanaka, Hideaki; Miyasaka, Mikiko; Fuchimoto, Yasushi; Ito, Yushi; Kanamori, Yutaka

    2013-08-01

    Milk curd syndrome was first reported in the 1960s, but was gradually forgotten because of its low incidence thereafter. This condition in pre-term infants has been reported over the last decade and has again attracted neonatologists' attention. The present report describes a pre-term infant with milk curd syndrome. Abdominal distension was evident 14 days after the start of feeding with fortified expressed milk. Abdominal X-ray showed multiple intraluminal masses surrounded by a halo of air, and ultrasound indicated hyperechoic masses. Along with that history and the appearance of fecal impaction, the diagnosis of milk curd syndrome was confirmed. This baby was treated with olive oil enemas and successive colonic lavage for 3 days, and the symptoms were relieved. Olive oil enema, which softens hard stools and induces smooth movement of these stools, may be an effective and safe first-line treatment in pre-term infants with milk curd syndrome. © 2013 The Authors. Pediatrics International © 2013 Japan Pediatric Society.

  2. Proteolysis in soft cheese, studied on Meshanger cheese and cheese models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noomen, A.

    1978-01-01

    Enzymes predominantly responsible for the primary degradation of protein in soft cheese and for the related changes in consistency were studied. Reconstructed Noordhollandse Meshanger cheese and preserved simulated soft cheeses of different composition were used as models in the

  3. Brucella melitensis survival during manufacture of ripened goat cheese at two temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méndez-González, Karla Y; Hernández-Castro, Rigoberto; Carrillo-Casas, Erika M; Monroy, Jorge F; López-Merino, Ahide; Suárez-Güemes, Francisco

    2011-12-01

    The aim of the current work was to assess the influence of two temperatures, 4°C and 24°C, on pH and water activity and their association with Brucella melitensis survival during the traditional manufacture of ripened goat cheese. Raw milk from a brucellosis-free goat herd was used for the manufacture of ripened cheese. The cheese was inoculated with 5×10(9) of the B. melitensis 16M strain during the tempering stage. The cheeses were matured for 5, 20, and 50 days at both temperatures. To assess Brucella survival, the pH and a(w) were recorded at each stage of the process (curd cutting, draining whey, immersion in brine, ripening I, ripening II, and ripening III). B. melitensis was detected at ripening stage III (1×10(3) colony-forming unit [CFU]/mL) from cheeses matured at 4°C with a pH of 5.0 and a(w) of 0.90, and at a ripening stage II (1×10(4) CFU/mL) from cheeses ripened at 24°C with a pH of 4.0 and a(w) of 0.89. The remaining stages were free from the inoculated pathogen. In addition, viable B. melitensis was recovered in significant amounts (1-2×10(6) CFU/mL) from the whey fractions of both types of cheese ripened at 24°C and 4°C. These results revealed the effects of high temperature (24°C vs. 4°C) on the low pH (4) and a(w) (0.89) that appeared to be associated with the suppression of B. melitensis at the early stages of cheese ripening. In the ripened goat cheeses, B. melitensis survived under a precise combination of temperature during maturation, ripening time, and a(w) in the manufacturing process.

  4. 40 CFR 405.50 - Applicability; description of the cottage cheese and cultured cream cheese subcategory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... cottage cheese and cultured cream cheese subcategory. 405.50 Section 405.50 Protection of Environment... SOURCE CATEGORY Cottage Cheese and Cultured Cream Cheese Subcategory § 405.50 Applicability; description of the cottage cheese and cultured cream cheese subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are...

  5. Potential of anticlostridial Lactobacillus isolated from cheese to prevent blowing defects in semihard cheese

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Pia; Vogensen,, F. K.; Nielsen, E. W

    2010-01-01

    Five anticlostridial Lactobacillus strains isolated from cheese were selected for a mixed adjunct culture. Cheese with the mixed adjunct culture (experimental) and without (control) was made in triplicate and ripened as vacuum-packed and surface-ripened cheese. Cheese gross composition was simila...... in the experimental cheeses. Anticlostridial nonstarter Lactobacillus strains have potential as protective adjunct cultures against blowing defects in cheese....

  6. Comparison between genetic parameters of cheese yield and nutrient recovery or whey loss traits measured from individual model cheese-making methods or predicted from unprocessed bovine milk samples using Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittante, G; Ferragina, A; Cipolat-Gotet, C; Cecchinato, A

    2014-10-01

    Cheese yield is an important technological trait in the dairy industry. The aim of this study was to infer the genetic parameters of some cheese yield-related traits predicted using Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectral analysis and compare the results with those obtained using an individual model cheese-producing procedure. A total of 1,264 model cheeses were produced using 1,500-mL milk samples collected from individual Brown Swiss cows, and individual measurements were taken for 10 traits: 3 cheese yield traits (fresh curd, curd total solids, and curd water as a percent of the weight of the processed milk), 4 milk nutrient recovery traits (fat, protein, total solids, and energy of the curd as a percent of the same nutrient in the processed milk), and 3 daily cheese production traits per cow (fresh curd, total solids, and water weight of the curd). Each unprocessed milk sample was analyzed using a MilkoScan FT6000 (Foss, Hillerød, Denmark) over the spectral range, from 5,000 to 900 wavenumber × cm(-1). The FTIR spectrum-based prediction models for the previously mentioned traits were developed using modified partial least-square regression. Cross-validation of the whole data set yielded coefficients of determination between the predicted and measured values in cross-validation of 0.65 to 0.95 for all traits, except for the recovery of fat (0.41). A 3-fold external validation was also used, in which the available data were partitioned into 2 subsets: a training set (one-third of the herds) and a testing set (two-thirds). The training set was used to develop calibration equations, whereas the testing subsets were used for external validation of the calibration equations and to estimate the heritabilities and genetic correlations of the measured and FTIR-predicted phenotypes. The coefficients of determination between the predicted and measured values in cross-validation results obtained from the training sets were very similar to those obtained from the whole

  7. Autochthonous cheeses of Bosnia and Herzegovina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zlatan Sarić

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Despite the migration of people towards cities, autochthonous cheeses in Bosnia and Herzegovina survived. Technologies of these cheeses are simple and adapted to humble mountain limitations. Geographical occasions and rich mountain pastures created a certain participation of ewe's milk cheeses. Communicative isolation of hilly-mountain regions resulted in "closed" cheese production in small households. Autochthonous cheeses in Bosnia and Herzegovina have various origins. Different cheeses are produced in different parts of Bosnia and Herzegovina. There are : Travnički cheese, Masni (fat cheese, Presukača, Sirac, Livanjski cheese, Posni (lean cheese, "Suvi" (dry cheese or "Mješinski" full fat cheese matured in sheepskin bag, fresh sour milk cheese "Kiseli" and dried sour milk cheese "Kiseli", Zajednica, Basa, Kalenderovački cheese and goat's milk cheeses (Hard and White soft goat's milk cheese, "Zarica" and Urda. Besides above-mentioned types of cheese in Bosnia and Herzegovina some other autochthonous dairy products are produced: Kajmak (Cream, Maslo (Rendered butter and Zimsko kiselo mlijeko (Winter sour milk. The specificity in Bosnia and Herzegovina is that autochthonous dairy products are still mainly both produced and consumed in small rural households. Exceptions are Travnički cheese and Kajmak that are significantly sold at market. Only Livanjski cheese is manufactured as industry dairy product.

  8. Hand Washing: Do's and Dont's

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for a sick person Inserting or removing contact lenses Always wash your hands after: Preparing food Using ... best to wash your hands with soap and water. Follow these steps: Wet your hands with running ...

  9. An emulsion wash fluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dotsenko, Yu.G.; Kasyanenko, N.I.; Nedoseko, L.V.; Yablonovskaya, K.M.

    1983-01-01

    The advantage of making a wash fluid at drill wells far from the clay works from concentrates of pastes delivered there is demonstrated. A formula is cited for the EP-1 emulsion paste, developed in the Dnepropetrovsk section of the Institute of Mineral Resources (IMR), along with its production technology. The low clay emulsion wash liquid, EPZh-1, obtained directly from the drill well from the EP-1 paste, after adding one of the polymers of the acrylic series (hydrolized polyacrylamide, hypan, K-4 and so on) to it is a volume of 1 to 2 percent of the total mass is suitable for use in different geological conditions. Based on the results of broad testing in the geological organizations of the Sevukreologiya and Yuzhukrgeologiya PO, it is established that the EPZh-1 wash fluid promotes an increase in the speed of well passage on the average by 13.7 percent and an increase in the technical drilling speed of 17.3 percent and a reduction in downtime due to the absence of the clearing agent by 53 percent and due to complications by 50 percent. More than 100,000 meters of wells have been drilled using EPZh-1 and a savings of 1.37 rubles per meter drilled has been achieved.

  10. Please wash your hands often

    OpenAIRE

    Moraru, C.

    2007-01-01

    This poster advises washing hands "before and after using the toilet, handling food, touching animals, eating, drinking, or smoking." It advocates "always use clean water / never wash your hands in used wash water!" The purpose is to protect self and others from diseases. LTRA-2 (An Agricultural Markets Model for Biodiversity Conservation)

  11. Derivation of multivariate indices of milk composition, coagulation properties, and individual cheese yield in dairy sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manca, M G; Serdino, J; Gaspa, G; Urgeghe, P; Ibba, I; Contu, M; Fresi, P; Macciotta, N P P

    2016-06-01

    Milk composition and its technological properties are traits of interest for the dairy sheep industry because almost all milk produced is processed into cheese. However, several variables define milk technological properties and a complex correlation pattern exists among them. In the present work, we measured milk composition, coagulation properties, and individual cheese yields in a sample of 991 Sarda breed ewes in 47 flocks. The work aimed to study the correlation pattern among measured variables and to obtain new synthetic indicators of milk composition and cheese-making properties. Multivariate factor analysis was carried out on individual measures of milk coagulation parameters; cheese yield; fat, protein, and lactose percentages; somatic cell score; casein percentage; NaCl content; pH; and freezing point. Four factors that were able to explain about 76% of the original variance were extracted. They were clearly interpretable: the first was associated with composition and cheese yield, the second with udder health status, the third with coagulation, and the fourth with curd characteristics. Factor scores were then analyzed by using a mixed linear model that included the fixed effect of parity, lambing month, and lactation stage, and the random effect of flock-test date. The patterns of factor scores along lactation stages were coherent with their technical meaning. A relevant effect of flock-test date was detected, especially on the 2 factors related to milk coagulation properties. Results of the present study suggest the existence of a simpler latent structure that regulates relationships between variables defining milk composition and coagulation properties in sheep. Heritability estimates for the 4 extracted factors were from low to moderate, suggesting potential use of these new variables as breeding goals. Copyright © 2016 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Lipids in cheese

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipids are present in cheese at levels above 20 percent and are analyzed by several techniques. Scanning electron microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy are used to examine the microstructure, gas chromatography is employed to look at fatty acid composition, and differential scanning cal...

  13. Cheese and cardiovascular health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjerpsted, Julie Bousgaard

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) are the number one cause of mortality worldwide. Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol is a well-known risk factor of CVD which increases after the intake of saturated fatty acids (SFA). Cheese is a dietary product commonly consumed in Western countries and known...

  14. Responsibility and hand washing behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Jasmine; Purdon, Christine

    2016-06-01

    Recent research suggests that compulsions persist due to a self-perpetuating mechanism of poor memory confidence and repetition. However, most of this work has examined checking compulsions and findings may not generalize well to washing compulsions. This study examined the role of responsibility in the persistence of washing behaviour. Hand washing was examined in undergraduates (n = 80) high and low in contamination fears (CF) under conditions of high or low responsibility (RL). Wash duration and number of visits to objects/locations key to the wash (e.g., soap) were examined. Overvalued responsibility predicted washing duration across groups. Neither wash duration nor number of visits was associated with memory for the wash. Wash duration predicted post-wash certainty that the wash had prevented harm, but only in the high CF group, and that effect varied according to RL: longer wash duration predicted greater certainty under conditions of low RL but predicted less certainty under conditions of high RL. Greater repetition predicted poorer sensory confidence, but only in the high CF group under high RL conditions. The data were collected in an analogue sample of modest size. Replication in a clinical sample is required. Self-perpetuating mechanisms identified in perseverative checking seem to also be present in perseverative washing, but only under conditions of high responsibility. Sensory confidence may be more important to perseverative washing than memory confidence. More research is required to understand self-perpetuating mechanisms at play when washing to under conditions of high responsibility. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Behaviour of Salmonella Typhimurium during production and storage of artisan water buffalo mozzarella cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Rosmini

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Water buffalo mozzarella cheese (WBMC is a fresh pasta filata cheese produced from whole chilled buffalo milk. Although pasteurization of milk and the use of defined starter cultures are recommended, traditional technology involving the use of unpasteurized milk and natural whey cultures is still employed for WBMC production in Italy. The aim of this study were to assess the behaviour of Salmonella Typhimurium during the production of artisan water buffalo mozzarella cheese and during its shelf life under different temperature conditions. Raw milk was inoculated with S. Typhimurium and the evolution of S. Typhimurium count during production and shelf life was monitored. In artisan WBMC production technology S. Typhimurium multiplied in the curd during ripening, but its growth rate expressed in log CFU/g/h was lower than the growth rate reported by theoretical predictions. Stretching proved to be a process with good repeatability and able to reduce S. Typhimurium contamination by 5.5 Log CFU/g. The intrinsic characteristics of traditional WBMC proved to be unable to obstacolate the growth of S. Typhimurium during storage in the case of thermal abuse. Control of raw milk contamination and a proper refrigeration temperature are key factors in reducing the risk for consumers.

  16. Abstract Swiss Cheese Space and the Classicalisation of Swiss Cheeses

    OpenAIRE

    Feinstein, J. F.; Morley, S.; Yang, H.

    2015-01-01

    Swiss cheese sets are compact subsets of the complex plane obtained by deleting a sequence of open disks from a closed disk. Such sets have provided numerous counterexamples in the theory of uniform algebras. In this paper, we introduce a topological space whose elements are what we call "abstract Swiss cheeses". Working within this topological space, we show how to prove the existence of "classical" Swiss cheese sets (as discussed in a paper of Feinstein and Heath from 2010) with various des...

  17. Autochthonous cheeses of Bosnia and Herzegovina

    OpenAIRE

    Zlatan Sarić; Sonja Bijeljac

    2003-01-01

    Despite the migration of people towards cities, autochthonous cheeses in Bosnia and Herzegovina survived. Technologies of these cheeses are simple and adapted to humble mountain limitations. Geographical occasions and rich mountain pastures created a certain participation of ewe's milk cheeses. Communicative isolation of hilly-mountain regions resulted in "closed" cheese production in small households. Autochthonous cheeses in Bosnia and Herzegovina have various origins. Different cheeses are...

  18. Molecular investigation of bacterial communities during the manufacturing and ripening of semi-hard Iranian Liqvan cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramezani, M; Hosseini, S M; Ferrocino, I; Amoozegar, M A; Cocolin, L

    2017-09-01

    Liqvan (or Lighvan) is a traditional Iranian cheese from the East Azerbaijan province of Iran, which is made of raw ewe's milk without the addition of a starter. The grazing pastures, environmental conditions and the ancient regional production methods allocate a distinctive microbial ecology to this type of cheese, and these factors are consequently associated with the quality of the product. In this study, the microbiota of the milk, curd and cheese has been investigated using culture independent approaches. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of the bacteria, 16S rRNA based high-throughput sequencing and enumeration of the live bacterial community by means of quantitative PCR (qPCR) have been used for this purpose. The results showed that the main bacterial population in the milk belonged to both microbial contaminants and lactic acid bacteria (LAB). However, both of these populations were totally replaced by LAB during ripening. The present survey contributes by describing the microbiota of this ancient cheese in more detail during fermentation and ripening. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Cardiometabolic Effects of Cheese Intake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorning, Tanja Kongerslev

    of cheese-matrix may influence the HDL-cholesterol response, while the ripening duration may affect the level of free fatty acids and insulin in the blood. Furthermore the results showed that a diet with saturated fat in cheese or meat caused a higher HDL-cholesterol, but not LDL-cholesterol, compared......In several countries, the dietary guidelines for preventing CVD focus on reducing the intake of saturated fat. A high cheese intake in particular may however not be associated with CVD risk, despite a high content of saturated fat. This could be due to a reduced digestibility of fat in cheese....... The aim of this PhD thesis was to investigate how the fat content of the cheese-matrix and the cheese ripening duration affect cardiometabolic risk markers and fecal fat excretion. The thesis is based on three intervention studies, two in pigs and one in humans. The results suggested that fat content...

  20. CHARACTERIZATION OF “SA PANEDDA” TRADITIONAL PASTA FILATA CHEESE OF MONTE ACUTO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Fadda

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Panedda is a traditional Sardinian food product. It is fresh pasta filata cheese made from cow’s milk, either raw or heat treated. The aim of this work was to acquire data on traditional cheesemaking process and microbiological profile of Panedda. In 3 dairies located in Monte Acuto area samples from 2 batches were collected during the whole cheesmaking process. Samples of raw milk, curd, acidified curd, pasta filata, and finished product after 7 and 20 days of ripening were collected and microbiologically analyzed. The results showed good hygienic quality in the finished product at 7 days and a decrease of coliforms, E. coli and coagulase-positive Stafilococci was observed during the further ripening. No pathogenic microorganisms were found in all the samples. Among Lactic Acid Bacteria rod-shaped forms were the most prevalent microflora and Enterococci reached levels of about 6 log cfu/g. The results of this study showed satisfactory hygienic characteristics of Panedda and will be useful to preserve traditional cheesemaking process.

  1. Invited review: Artisanal Mexican cheeses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Córdova, Aarón F; Yescas, Carlos; Ortiz-Estrada, Ángel Martín; De la Rosa-Alcaraz, María de Los Ángeles; Hernández-Mendoza, Adrián; Vallejo-Cordoba, Belinda

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this review is to present an overview of some of the most commonly consumed artisanal Mexican cheeses, as well as those cheeses that show potential for a protected designation of origin. A description is given for each of these cheeses, including information on their distinguishing characteristics that makes some of them potential candidates for achieving a protected designation of origin status. This distinction could help to expand their frontiers and allow them to become better known and appreciated in other parts of the world. Due to the scarcity of scientific studies concerning artisanal Mexican cheeses, which would ultimately aid in the standardization of manufacturing processes and in the establishment of regulations related to their production, more than 40 varieties of artisanal cheese are in danger of disappearing. To preserve these cheeses, it is necessary to address this challenge by working jointly with government, artisanal cheesemaking organizations, industry, academics, and commercial partners on the implementation of strategies to protect and preserve their artisanal means of production. With sufficient information, official Mexican regulations could be established that would encompass and regulate the manufacture of Mexican artisanal cheeses. Finally, as many Mexican artisanal cheeses are produced from raw milk, more scientific studies are required to show the role of the lactic acid bacteria and their antagonistic effect on pathogenic microorganisms during aging following cheese making. Copyright © 2016 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Mapping differences in consumer perception of sharp cheddar cheese in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, S L; Lopetcharat, K; Clark, S; Kwak, H S; Lee, S Y; Drake, M A

    2009-08-01

    There is tremendous variability in flavor profiles of sharp or aged U.S. cheddar cheese due to varied practices among commercial facilities and the lack of legal definitions for these terms. This study explored U.S. consumer perception and liking of commercial sharp or aged cheddar cheese profiles. Flavor profiles of 29 representative sharp cheddar cheeses were documented by descriptive sensory analysis with a trained panel. A total of 9 representative cheddar cheeses were selected and evaluated by consumers in 3 regional locations: east coast (Raleigh, N.C.; n = 150), midwest (Champaign, Ill.; n = 75), and west coast (Pullman, Wash.; n = 100). Consumers assessed the cheeses for overall liking and other consumer liking attributes. External preference mapping revealed 5 distinct consumer segments. The segment membership distribution between east coast and midwest consumers was similar while the west coast distribution was distinct (P consumers were present in segment 3, which consisted of consumers with specific likes for cheeses characterized by intense flavors of free fatty acid, brothy, and nutty flavors and salty and sour tastes. Consumer preferences in other segments differed from segment 3 due to their liking of at least 1 sensory attribute generally associated with young or mild cheddar cheese flavor. Key drivers of liking for these segments included whey flavor for segments 1 and 4 and milkfat flavor for segment 5. Segment 2 consumers liked most of the cheeses tested except those with dominant whey flavor. A sharp or aged cheddar cheese label means different things to different consumers and liking profiles are not defined by consumer location.

  3. In vivo application and dynamics of lactic acid bacteria for the four-season production of Vastedda-like cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaglio, Raimondo; Scatassa, Maria Luisa; Cruciata, Margherita; Miraglia, Viviana; Corona, Onofrio; Di Gerlando, Rosalia; Portolano, Baldassare; Moschetti, Giancarlo; Settanni, Luca

    2014-05-02

    Twelve lactic acid bacteria (LAB), previously selected in vitro (Gaglio et al., 2014), were evaluated in situ for their potential to act as starter cultures for the continuous four-season production of Vastedda-like cheese, made with raw ewes' milk. The strains belonged to Lactobacillus delbrueckii, Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris, Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. mesenteroides and Streptococcus thermophilus. LAB were first inoculated in multiple-strain combinations on the basis of their optimal growth temperatures in three process conditions which differed for milk treatment and medium for strain development: process 1, growth of strains in the optimal synthetic media and pasteurised milk; process 2, growth of strains in whey based medium (WBM) and pasteurised milk; and process 3, growth of strains in WBM and raw milk. The strains that acidified the curds in short time, as shown by a pH drop, were all mesophilic and were then tested in a single inoculum through process 3. Randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD)-PCR analysis applied to the colonies isolated from the highest dilutions of samples confirmed the dominance of the added strains after curd acidification, stretching and storage. After 15days of refrigerated storage, the decrease in pH values showed an activity of the mesophilic strains at low temperatures, but only Lc. lactis subsp. cremoris PON153, Ln. mesenteroides subsp. mesenteroides PON259 and PON559 increased their number during the 15days at 7°C. A sensory evaluation indicated that the cheeses obtained by applying protocol 3 and by inoculation with lactococci are the most similar to the protected denomination of origin (PDO) cheese and received the best scores by the judges. Thus, the experimental cheeses obtained with raw milk and inoculated with single and multiple combinations of lactococci were subjected to the analysis of the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) carried out by a headspace solid phase microextraction (SPME) technique coupled

  4. Cheesemaking in highland pastures: Milk technological properties, cream, cheese and ricotta yields, milk nutrients recovery, and products composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergamaschi, M; Cipolat-Gotet, C; Stocco, G; Valorz, C; Bazzoli, I; Sturaro, E; Ramanzin, M; Bittante, G

    2016-12-01

    (before and after natural creaming), the whole morning milk, and the mixed vat milk had different chemical compositions, traditional coagulation properties, and curd-firming modeling parameters. These variations over the pasture season were similar to the residual variations with respect to chemical composition, and much lower with respect to coagulation and curd-firming traits. Much larger variations were noted in cream, cheese, and ricotta yields, as well as in nutrient recoveries in curd during the pasture season. The protein content of forage was correlated with some of the coagulation and curd-firming traits, the ether extract of forage was positively correlated with milk fat content and cheese yields, and fiber fractions of forage were unfavorably correlated with some of the chemical and technological traits. Traditional cheese- and ricotta-making procedures showed average cream, cheese, and ricotta yields of 6.3, 14.2, and 4.9%, respectively, and an overall recovery of almost 100% of milk fat, 88% of milk protein, and 60% of total milk solids. Copyright © 2016 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Effects of nisin on Staphylococcus aureus count and physicochemical properties of Minas Frescal cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felicio, Bruna A; Pinto, Maximiliano S; Oliveira, Francielly S; Lempk, Marcus W; Pires, Ana Clarissa S; Lelis, Carini A

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the effects of nisin on in vitro and in situ Staphylococcus aureus counts. For in vitro experiment, milk was inoculated with 5.0 log cfu·mL(-1) of S. aureus and nisin was added at concentrations of 0, 100, 200, 400, and 500 IU mL(-1). The main effect of the bacteriocin was lag phase extension from 0h, for 0 and 100 IU·mL(-1) to 8h, when 200, 400, and 500 IU·mL(-1) of nisin were used; however, log phase was not affected. Microbial growth rate was found to be exponential and around 0.11 log cfu·mL(-1)·h(-1) for all treatments. For in situ experiments, 0, 400, and 500 IU·mL(-1) of nisin were directly added to pasteurized milk previously inoculated with 5.0 log cfu·g(-1) of S. aureus. Milk, curd, and whey were analyzed to S. aureus counts. Nisin at concentration of 500 IU·mL(-1) was able to reduce S. aureus count in curd and whey, demonstrating nisin partition between both phases. Throughout storage at 4°C, S. aureus count increased for all treatments, but the bacterial grew slower when nisin was added in both concentrations, maintaining S. aureus count about 1.5 log cycles lower than the control, despite abusive initial S. aureus count. Therefore, nisin seems to play an important role in reducing S. aureus initial count in cheese made with highly contaminated milk. Nisin showed potential to be used as an additional, important hurdle to improve Minas Frescal cheese safety, without replacing good manufacturing practices. Copyright © 2015 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Bacteriological studies on Limburger cheese

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    El-Erian, A.F.M.

    1969-01-01

    A study has been made of the ripening process of Limburger cheese, including microbiological investigations of the surface flora and chemical analyses of the cheese during the different stages of ripening. The microbial flora was studied both qualitatively and quantitatively. In addition to the

  7. Tyramine content of South African cheeses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapeika, N; Moodie, I M; Kaplan, E R

    1975-04-05

    The tyramine content of certain South African cheeses has been determined by gas chromatographic analysis. Aged (mature) cheese such as cheddar and Roquefort contain relatively large concentrations of tyramine as compared with other cheese, especially cottage cheese. Foods containing pressor amines must be avoided by certain patients.

  8. PEMANFAATAN BAKTERI PROBIOTIK INDIGENUS DALAM PEMBUATAN KEJU LUNAK [Utilization of Indigenous Probiotic Bacteria in the Production of Soft Cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fifi Afiati*

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Probiotic soft cheese containing lactic acid bacteria is one of functional food products. Three lactic acid bacteria namely Lactococcus lactis DSB 42 (LL-DSB42, Lactobacillus acidophilus RRM-01 (LA-RRM01 and Bifidobacterium longum RRM-01 (BL-RRM01 were used in the production of probiotic soft cheeses. Single culture (BL, LA, and LL and mixed culture (BL-LA, BL-LL, LA-LL and BL-LA-LL were used to produce diversified functional products. The preparation of probiotic soft cheese consists of pasteurization, addition of lactic acid bacterial culture (5%, v/v, addition of rennet, cutting the curd, scalding, draining and packaging. Soft cheese characteristics were analyzed physically (yield, chemically (pH, water content, crude protein, crude fat and ash and microbiologically (lactic acid bacteria. The results showed that addition of lactic acid bacteria cultures significantly decreased the pH value (pH 5.10 to 5.79. The yield of probiotic soft cheese produced was in the range of 17.86-22.51% with water content of more than 55%. The fat and carbohydrate content of both cheeses of single and mixed cultures were significantly different (p<0.05 (fat content 5.1-7.4% for single culture and 4.0-9.3% for mix culture; carbohydrate content 11.6-17.7% for single culture and 4.6-12-2% for mix culture. The combination of all three starter cultures did not result in inhibition to each other, thus these combination were able to achieve the maximum number of 9.0 log10CFU g-1 on a single culture soft cheese and 9.8 log10CFU g-1 in mixed cultures soft cheese. In conclusion, soft cheeses with single culture (BL, LA, and LL and mixed culture (BL-LA, BL-LL, LA-LL and BL-LA-LL had excellent potential properties to be developed as probiotic foods.

  9. Characterization of yeasts isolated from artisanal short-ripened cows' cheeses produced in Galicia (NW Spain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atanassova, M R; Fernández-Otero, C; Rodríguez-Alonso, P; Fernández-No, I C; Garabal, J I; Centeno, J A

    2016-02-01

    A total of 143 presumptive yeast isolates were obtained from the predominant microflora of 21 short-ripened starter-free raw cow's milk cheeses made in Galicia (NW Spain), and the following 68 isolates were identified by both genotyping and sequencing methods: Yarrowia lipolytica (21 isolates), Kluyveromyces lactis (18), Debaryomyces hansenii (11), Pichia guilliermondii (11), Pichia fermentans (4) and Saccharomyces cerevisiae (3). Of these, Y. lipolytica and K. lactis displayed the strongest extracellular proteolytic activity on skim milk agar, and none of the D. hansenii isolates showed any activity on this medium. Y. lipolytica also displayed the highest lipolytic activity on Tween 80 and on tributyrin. This species, which was characterized by production of butanoic acid, free fatty acid esters and sulfur compounds in pasteurized whole milk, was responsible for rancid and cheesy flavors. K. lactis mainly produced acetaldehyde, ethanol, branched chain aldehydes and alcohols, and acetic acid esters, which were responsible for alcoholic, fruity and acetic notes. The volatile profiles of D. hansenii were rather limited and characterized by high levels of methyl ketones. Most of the yeast isolates were described as tryptamine producers, although low concentrations of histamine were produced by five Y. lipolytica and two P. fermentans isolates. We conclude that selected Y. lipolytica strains could be used as adjunct cultures in the manufacture of Arzúa-Ulloa and Tetilla cheeses, and selected K. lactis strains could be used as co-starters in the manufacture of acid curd Cebreiro cheese, thus contributing to the sensory quality and typicality of the cheeses. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Cheese Microbial Risk Assessments ? A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Kyoung-Hee Choi; Heeyoung Lee; Soomin Lee; Sejeong Kim; Yohan Yoon

    2016-01-01

    Cheese is generally considered a safe and nutritious food, but foodborne illnesses linked to cheese consumption have occurred in many countries. Several microbial risk assessments related to Listeria monocytogenes, Staphylococcus aureus, and Escherichia coli infections, causing cheese-related foodborne illnesses, have been conducted. Although the assessments of microbial risk in soft and low moisture cheeses such as semi-hard and hard cheeses have been accomplished, it has been more focused o...

  11. Changes in isoflavones concentrations in cheese during processing and ripening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludmila Křížová

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to determine possible changes in isoflavones concentration in cheese made from either control or isoflavone-enriched milk during manufacturing and ripening. The experiment was carried out on four high-yielding lactating Holstein cows that were divided into two groups with similar mean milk yield. The control group of cows was fed a diet based on extruded rapeseed cake (C while the experimental group of animals was fed a diet based on extruded full-fat soya (S. The experiment was carried out in the form of a cross-over design and was divided into 2 periods of 14 days (a 10-d preliminary period and a 4-d experimental period. Cows were fed individually twice daily ad libitum the diet based on maize silage, lucerne hay and supplemental mixture. In each period 20 kg of morning milk was collected from each group for cheese processing. After pasteurisation (65 °C, 30 min. a total of 5 kg of milk from each sample in each period was weighed out to make cheese with a low-heated curd. Cheeses were salted in 20% solution of NaCl for 3.5 h and allowed to ripen for 90 days at 15 °C. During technological processing samples were taken to determine isoflavones content. Data concerning the nutrients intake, milk yield and concentration of isoflavones were analysed by means of multifactor analysis of variance using the GLM procedure of the Statgraphics 7.0 package. Average daily isoflavones intake in S (1284.7 mg/d was higher than in C (2.9 mg/d, P < 0.001. Milk yield expressed in 4% FCM did not differ significantly between groups (P > 0.05. Concentration of daidzein, genistein and glycitein in pasteurised full fat milk was similar in both groups. Milk from S group had higher concentration of equol (26.7 µg/L in comparison to C group (4.0 µg/L. After processing cheese in C contained 32.1 µg/kg daidzein and 5.6 µg/kg of equol while cheese in S contained 17.5 µg/kg of daidzein and 24.3 µg/kg of equol. During a 90-day ripening

  12. The quality of processed cheeses and cheese analogues the same brand domestic and foreign production

    OpenAIRE

    Jana Bezeková; Margita Čanigová; Viera Ducková; Miroslav Kročko; Renáta Kocáková

    2015-01-01

    Processed cheeses belong to Slovakia favorite dairy products. Processed cheeses are made from natural cheeses. In recent years the trend is to replace natural cheeses with other raw materials of non-dairy nature. The composition of the processed cheese analogues is not in many countries defined by legislation. The objective of this study was to determine and compare chemical properties (fat, dry matter, fat in dry matter, NaCl) two samples of processed cheeses (C, D - Veselá...

  13. Physical characterization and sanitary conditions of cheese type cabacinha market places in three municipalities of the Jequitinhonha Valley, MG, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adair da Silva Santos Filho

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Cheese type cabacinha from Vale do Jequitinhonha is obtained by curd heating in a similar process made to Mozzarella, but the raw milk is unpasteurized and the final product is stored unpackaged and at room temperature. This milk derivative may contribute to the increase the income of the local population, especially the residents of the edges of roads, due to the flow of vehicles and possible buyers. The purpose of this work was to identify the physical and sanitary conditions of cheese type cabacinha market places present in three municipalities of the Vale do Jequitinhonha, MG, Brazil. Previously the investigation was detected the number of marketplaces that sell these cheese in the Medina, Cachoeira de Pajeú and Pedra Azul, municipalities of the state of Minas Gerais, Brazil, located on the surrounding area of the highways BR 251 and BR 116. Afterward as developed a physical and sanitary checklist and it were filled in loco. It was observed that most market places were not provided of masonry walls, piped water or toilet and sink. It is also common to the presence of possible contamination vectors in surroundings, such as dogs and insects. It is verified that most of these cheese is exposed in pairs held by string and unpackaged. This study demonstrated the precariousness of the physical structures and consequently the lack of adequate sanitary conditions in the cheese type cabacinha market places. Because it is an artisanal product from family farming, which generates income and employment in the field deserve more attention of competent state and municipal authorities.

  14. Protected designation of cheese origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neven Antunac

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Croatia has completely adopted the EU set up criteria for protection of agricultural products and foodstuffs through the implementation of two Regulations: Quality of the Protected Denomination of Origin and Protected Geographical Indication (NN.80/05 and Traditional Speciality Guaranteed (NN. 127/05. According to the results obtained from the four years research period on the production characteristics of the Pag sheep, milk and the Pag cheese quality, the essential description for certification and quality control of any autochthonous cheese are shown. Additionally, regardless from the arranged criteria for protection, other legal regulations that cheeses have to comply with are also described.

  15. Microbial dynamics of Castelmagno PDO, a traditional Italian cheese, with a focus on lactic acid bacteria ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolci, Paola; Alessandria, Valentina; Rantsiou, Kalliopi; Rolle, Luca; Zeppa, Giuseppe; Cocolin, Luca

    2008-03-20

    The dynamics of dominant microflora throughout the manufacture and ripening processes were evaluated in three batches of traditional Castelmagno PDO cheese. Milk, curd and cheese samples, at different stages during cheesemaking, were collected and subjected to culture-dependent and -independent analysis. Traditional plating and genetic identification of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) isolates, and PCR-DGGE analysis of V1 region of 16S rRNA gene were carried out. The collected samples were also monitored by HPLC for the presence of organic acids, sugars and ketones. LAB resulted to be the prevailing microflora in all production stages although enterococci, coagulase-negative cocci and yeasts also showed considerable viable counts probably related to the presence, in the dairy samples analysed, of free short-chain fatty acids detected by HPLC. Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis was the species most frequently isolated during Castelmagno PDO manufacture, while Lactobacillus plantarum and Lactobacillus paracasei were isolated with the highest frequencies from ripened Castelmagno PDO cheese samples. Occasionally strains of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. lactis, Lactobacillus coryniformis subsp. torquens and Lactobacillus casei were isolated. The results obtained on Castelmagno PDO microflora underlines a partial correspondence between culture-dependent method and DGGE analysis. Thus, in this study, it is highlighted once more the importance to combine molecular culture-independent approaches with classical microbiological methods for the study of complex environmental communities occurring in food matrices.

  16. Balancing Rural and Urban Development: Applying Coordinated Urban–Rural Development (CURD Strategy to Achieve Sustainable Urbanisation in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling-Hin Li

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Land in rural China has been under a separate and closed management system for decades even after the urban land reform that started in the late 1980s. The blurred property rights over rural land have been hindering the rural welfare as surplus rural land in sub-urban areas cannot be circulated into more economic use without first being requisitioned by the state. This traditional conversion process creates a lot of problems, among them are the compensation standard as well as displacement of rural residents to the city, where they cannot find adequate welfare protection. The prolonged disparity in economic outcomes for rural and urban residents in China in the process of urbanisation has made the authority realise that land-based local finance is no longer an option. Coordinated Urban and Rural Development (CURD ideology arises to set a level playing field by giving the rural residents comparable welfare status as their urban counterparts’ one. The CURD ideology is basically linked to the strategic development of the three main issues in the rural area of China, or in the Chinese terminology: San Nong. These three issues are rural villages, rural enterprises and rural farmers (nong cun, nong ye, nong min. CURD ideology is to preserve the livelihood of rural villages, facilitate and promote rural enterprises and increase the living standard of rural farmers. Most importantly, however, CURD policy package bestows rural residents with property rights over their farmland so that they could sub-co1ntract the user-rights to other urban commercial entities for higher benefits. While CURD policies are applied in a lot of different regions in China including Chongqing in the West, Qingdao in the North, Zhongshan in the South and Wuhan in the middle, we focus our examination in Chengdu as the Chengdu model has been widely documented and highly regarded as the most successful model in implementing the CURD strategies. From our case study, we find that

  17. 21 CFR 133.104 - Asiago old cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Asiago old cheese. 133.104 Section 133.104 Food... HUMAN CONSUMPTION CHEESES AND RELATED CHEESE PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Cheese and Related Products § 133.104 Asiago old cheese. Asiago old cheese conforms to the definition and standard of...

  18. 21 CFR 133.103 - Asiago medium cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Asiago medium cheese. 133.103 Section 133.103 Food... HUMAN CONSUMPTION CHEESES AND RELATED CHEESE PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Cheese and Related Products § 133.103 Asiago medium cheese. Asiago medium cheese conforms to the definition and...

  19. 21 CFR 133.147 - Grated American cheese food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Grated American cheese food. 133.147 Section 133...) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION CHEESES AND RELATED CHEESE PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Cheese and Related Products § 133.147 Grated American cheese food. (a)(1) Grated American cheese food is...

  20. 21 CFR 133.116 - Low sodium cheddar cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Low sodium cheddar cheese. 133.116 Section 133.116... FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION CHEESES AND RELATED CHEESE PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Cheese and Related Products § 133.116 Low sodium cheddar cheese. Low sodium cheddar cheese is the food...

  1. 21 CFR 133.167 - Pasteurized blended cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Pasteurized blended cheese. 133.167 Section 133...) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION CHEESES AND RELATED CHEESE PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Cheese and Related Products § 133.167 Pasteurized blended cheese. Pasteurized blended cheese conforms to...

  2. 21 CFR 133.154 - High-moisture jack cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false High-moisture jack cheese. 133.154 Section 133.154... FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION CHEESES AND RELATED CHEESE PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Cheese and Related Products § 133.154 High-moisture jack cheese. High-moisture jack cheese conforms to...

  3. 21 CFR 133.175 - Pasteurized cheese spread.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Pasteurized cheese spread. 133.175 Section 133.175... FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION CHEESES AND RELATED CHEESE PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Cheese and Related Products § 133.175 Pasteurized cheese spread. Pasteurized cheese spread is the food...

  4. 21 CFR 133.121 - Low sodium colby cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Low sodium colby cheese. 133.121 Section 133.121... FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION CHEESES AND RELATED CHEESE PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Cheese and Related Products § 133.121 Low sodium colby cheese. Low sodium colby cheese is the food...

  5. 21 CFR 133.160 - Muenster and munster cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Muenster and munster cheese. 133.160 Section 133...) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION CHEESES AND RELATED CHEESE PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Cheese and Related Products § 133.160 Muenster and munster cheese. (a) Description. (1) Muenster cheese...

  6. Microbial diversity and succession during the manufacture and ripening of traditional, Spanish, blue-veined Cabrales cheese, as determined by PCR-DGGE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flórez, Ana Belén; Mayo, Baltasar

    2006-07-15

    The diversity and dynamics of the dominant microbial communities arising during the manufacture and ripening of four batches of naturally fermented Cabrales cheese were investigated by the PCR-DGGE culture-independent technique. Total microbial DNA was extracted from cheese milk, curd and cheese samples and used as template material in PCR experiments to amplify the V3 region of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene, plus the D1 region of the eukaryotic 26S rRNA gene. These regions were then analysed using DGGE. Eukaryotic and bacterial bands were identified by isolation, reamplification and sequencing. The results were compared to those obtained in a previous microbial characterization of the same four batches using classical culturing methods. Great variability was recorded between batches by the PCR-DGGE technique. This was also shown by culturing, and underlines the uniqueness of artisanal products. Lactocococcus lactis subsp. lactis was dominant from the cheese milk stage until the end of ripening, whereas populations of certain Lactobacillus species appeared during ripening. Populations of species never isolated by culturing were found to be numerous by the PCR-DGGE method, in particular Lactococcus garvieae and Lactococcus raffinolactis. Other, completely unknown lactococci were also detected. The dominant eukaryotic populations from day 15 onwards were those of Penicillium roqueforti and Geotrichum candidum.

  7. Cheese and cardiovascular disease risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjerpsted, Julie Bousgaard; Tholstrup, Tine

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Currently, the effect of dairy products on cardiovascular risk is a topic with much debate and conflicting results. The purpose of this review is to give an overview of the existing literature regarding the effect of cheese intake and risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Studies included...... reporting the intake of cheese and risk of CVD or risk factors of CVD represent four human intervention studies, nine prospective studies, one prospective case-cohort study, one prospective nested case-control study, five case-control studies, five cross-sectional studies and three correlation studies....... The possible mechanisms that may be of importance include calcium, protein, fermentation and the fatty acid composition of cheese. Results from four prospective studies reported no association between cheese intake and CVD risk, whereas one reported an increased risk, two reported a decreased risk and one...

  8. Antibiotic sensitivity pattern of indigenous lactobacilli isolated from curd and human milk samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Chetan; Gulati, Sachin; Thakur, Nishchal; Singh, Brij Pal; Gupta, Sanjolly; Kaur, Simranpreet; Mishra, Santosh Kumar; Puniya, Anil Kumar; Gill, Jatinder Pal Singh; Panwar, Harsh

    2017-05-01

    The gut microbiota plays a vital role in host well-being and lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have gained an overwhelming attention as health promoter. This perception has evolved from traditional dairy products to a money-spinning market of probiotics. The safety of probiotics is coupled to their intended use and LAB may act as pool of antimicrobial resistance genes that could be transferred to pathogens, either in food matrix or in gastrointestinal tract, which could be detrimental to host. This study evaluated the antibiotic susceptibility patterns of LAB isolated from curd (20) and human milk (11) samples. Antibiotic susceptibility was determined against 26 common antibiotics, following reference disc diffusion assay. A varied response in terms of susceptibility and resistance towards antibiotics was recorded. Among curd isolates, D7 (Lactobacillus plantarum) was the most resistant followed by D4, D8, D10 and D25. Among human milk isolates, HM-1 (L. casei) showed the highest resistance profile. All LAB isolates displayed high susceptibility pattern towards imipenem and meropenem. In general, high resistivity was exhibited by human milk isolates. The present study showed that antibiotic resistance is widespread among different lactobacilli, which may pose a food safety concern. Therefore, antibiotic sensitivity should be considered as a vital tool for safety assessment of probiotics.

  9. Safety assessment of the biogenic amines in fermented soya beans and fermented bean curd.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Juan; Ding, Xiaowen; Qin, Yingrui; Zeng, Yitao

    2014-08-06

    To evaluate the safety of biogenic amines, high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was used to evaluate the levels of biogenic amines in fermented soya beans and fermented bean curd. In fermented soya beans, the total biogenic amines content was in a relatively safe range in many samples, although the concentration of histamine, tyramine, and β-phenethylamine was high enough in some samples to cause a possible safety threat, and 8 of the 30 samples were deemed unsafe. In fermented bean curd, the total biogenic amines content was more than 900 mg/kg in 19 white sufu amples, a level that has been determined to pose a safety hazard; putrescine was the only one detected in all samples and also had the highest concentration, which made samples a safety hazard; the content of tryptamine, β-phenethylamine, tyramine, and histamine had reached the level of threat to human health in some white and green sufu samples, and that may imply another potential safety risk; and 25 of the 33 samples were unsafe. In conclusion, the content of biogenic amines in all fermented soya bean products should be studied and appropriate limits determined to ensure the safety of eating these foods.

  10. Rendimento e composição físico-química do queijo prato elaborado com leite pasteurizado pelo sistema HTST e injeção direta de vapor Yield and physical-chemistry composition of prato cheese elaborated with milk pasteurized by the HTST and direct steam injection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Rodrigues da Silveira

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Avaliaram-se o rendimento, a transição de gordura e extrato seco do leite para a coalhada e as características físico-químicas do queijo prato produzido com leite pasteurizado pelo sistema de placas (ou HTST e injeção direta de vapor (IDV. Utilizou-se o delineamento inteiramente casualizado, constituído por dois tratamentos (HTST e IDV e seis repetições (fabricações. O sistema IDV incorporou cerca de 8,5% de água ao leite, havendo como conseqüência redução (PCheese yield, fat and dry matter transitions from milk pasteurized by the two pasteurization systems to the curd, as well as, the physical-chemistry characteristics of cheeses were evaluated. The statistical treatment was full randomly, with two treatments: pasteurization by high temperature short time system (HTST and direct steam injection (DSI, with six replications. The DSI system incorporated about 8,5% of water to the milk, having as consequence reduction (P<.05 in the total solids, in the fat and in the acidity of the pasteurized milk. Larger transition of fat of the milk to the curd was observed, when this was pasteurized by the DSI system, it resulted in larger cheeses yield manufactured with milk pasteurized by this system. (8.48 liters of milk /kg of cheese, when compared to the HTST system (9.54 liters of milk /kg of cheese. Cheeses manufactured by the DSI system presented higher fat content and fat in dry matter (29.06 and 55.25%, compared to the HTST system (27.02 and 49.88%, respectively. The DSI system provides expressive increases in the cheeses yield and, of the components of the milk it was conclude that the fat was the main responsible for this increase.

  11. Biotechnological methods to accelerate cheddar cheese ripening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azarnia, Sorayya; Robert, Normand; Lee, Byong

    2006-01-01

    Cheese is one of the dairy products that can result from the enzymatic coagulation of milk. The basic steps of the transformation of milk into cheese are coagulation, draining, and ripening. Ripening is the complex process required for the development of a cheese's flavor, texture and aroma. Proteolysis, lipolysis and glycolysis are the three main biochemical reactions that are responsible for the basic changes during the maturation period. As ripening is a relatively expensive process for the cheese industry, reducing maturation time without destroying the quality of the ripened cheese has economic and technological benefits. Elevated ripening temperatures, addition of enzymes, addition of cheese slurry, attenuated starters, adjunct cultures, genetically engineered starters and recombinant enzymes and microencapsulation of ripening enzymes are traditional and modern methods used to accelerate cheese ripening. In this context, an up to date review of Cheddar cheese ripening is presented.

  12. Decreased antibiotic susceptibility and enhanced probiotic production potential of goat milk fermented curd in comparison with cow and buffalo milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyoti Lakhanpal

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The present study was carried out to characterize and compare the production potential and antibiotic susceptibility of probiotics isolated from goat, cow and buffalo milk. The probiotics isolated from milk fermented curd were compared with regard to their number, morphology, gram staining, motility, bile salt tolerance, pH-resistance, catalase activity, oxidase production and antibiotic resistance. We demonstrated that the probiotics isolated from milk fermented curd of all three species were gram positive, motile, catalase negative, and oxidase negative and were able to produce lactic acid. Further, we observed that buffalo milk is more potent in forming curd with the highest count of probiotics per ml (3.53 × 10!5 as compared to cow (5.8 × 10!6 and goat milk (7×10!7; moreover, goat milk bacterial isolates were more tolerant to acidic pH but were less bile-salt tolerant than cow milk. Also, probiotics isolated from goat milk curd were more resistant to antibiotics (resistant to 12 out of 15 screened antibiotics than those from cow and buffalo milk (resistant to 8-9 antibiotics. This report shows that goat milk fermented products possess the highest antibacterial potential and are highly acid-tolerant.

  13. 27 CFR 19.328 - Wash water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Wash water. 19.328 Section... THE TREASURY LIQUORS DISTILLED SPIRITS PLANTS Production Chemical By-Products § 19.328 Wash water. Water used in washing chemicals to remove spirits therefrom may be run into a wash tank or a distilling...

  14. Improvements in the Flavour of Soy Cheese

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmad, Naveed; Li, Li; Yang, Xiao-Quan; Ning, Zheng-Xiang; Randhawa, Muhammad Atif

    2008-01-01

    A review of biochemical and technological similarities and dissimilarities between soy cheese and Cheddar cheese is presented to provide guidelines for the improvements in the flavour of soy cheese. Processing technology as well as the final product of soy cheese have many similarities with Cheddar in terms of appearance, texture, mouth feel, chemical nature, biochemical processes, etc. Soy protein has many useful amino acids like Asp, Ile, Leu, Met, Phe, Trp, Tyr, Val, etc., which are precur...

  15. Late blowing of Cheddar cheese induced by accelerated ripening and ribose and galactose supplementation in presence of a novel obligatory heterofermentative nonstarter Lactobacillus wasatchensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortakci, Fatih; Broadbent, Jeffery R; Oberg, Craig J; McMahon, Donald J

    2015-11-01

    Lactobacillus wasatchensis sp. nov. has been studied for growth and gas formation in a control Cheddar cheese and in cheese supplemented with 0.5% ribose, 0.5% galactose, or 0.25% ribose plus 0.25% galactose using regular and accelerated cheese ripening temperatures of 6 and 12°C, respectively. Milk was inoculated with (1) Lactococcus lactis starter culture, or (2) Lc. lactis starter culture plus Lb. wasatchensis (10(4) cfu/mL). In the control cheese with no added Lb. wasatchensis, starter numbers decreased from 10(7) initially to ~10(4) cfu/g over 23 wk of ripening at 6°C. When the cheese was ripened at 12°C, or if Lb. wasatchensis was added, the final starter counts were 1 log lower. In contrast, nonstarter lactic acid bacteria in the cheese increased from cheese with no added Lb. wasatchensis, levels of Lb. wasatchensis were initially below the enumeration threshold but counts of up to 10(3) cfu/g were detected after 23 wk. When the cheese was inoculated with Lb. wasatchensis, it could be enumerated throughout ripening, with final levels at 23 wk being dependent on whether ribose had been added to the cheese curd. With added ribose (with or without added galactose), Lb. wasatchensis grew to 10(7) to 10(8) cfu/g after 23 wk, whereas without added ribose it was 1 log lower. In all cheeses with added Lb. wasatchensis, greater gas formation was observed at 12°C, with most gas production occurring after ~16 wk. Very little gas production was detected in cheese without added Lb. wasatchensis ripened at 12°C or in cheese with added Lb. wasatchensis ripened at 6°C. Adding a combination of ribose and galactose caused more gas formation, putatively because of the ability of Lb. wasatchensis to co-utilize both sugars and grow to high numbers, and then produce gas from galactose as ribose levels were depleted. Even without sugar supplementation, gas was observed in cheese with added Lb. wasatchensis after 16 wk. We also observed that Lb. wasatchensis could grow to

  16. 7 CFR 58.433 - Cheese cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Cheese cultures. 58.433 Section 58.433 Agriculture... Material § 58.433 Cheese cultures. Harmless microbial cultures used in the development of acid and flavor components in cheese shall have a pleasing and desirable taste and odor and shall have the ability to...

  17. Hand washing for preventing diarrhoea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ejemot, R I; Ehiri, J E; Meremikwu, M M; Critchley, J A

    2008-01-23

    Diarrhoea is a common cause of morbidity and a leading cause of death among children aged less than five years, particularly in low- and middle-income countries. It is transmitted by ingesting contaminated food or drink, by direct person-to-person contact, or from contaminated hands. Hand washing is one of a range of hygiene promotion interventions that can interrupt the transmission of diarrhoea-causing pathogens. To evaluate the effects of interventions to promote hand washing on diarrhoeal episodes in children and adults. In May 2007, we searched the Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group Specialized Register, CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library 2007, Issue 2), MEDLINE, EMBASE, LILACS, PsycINFO, Science Citation Index and Social Science Citation Index, ERIC (1966 to May 2007), SPECTR, Bibliomap, RoRe, The Grey Literature, and reference lists of articles. We also contacted researchers and organizations in the field. Randomized controlled trials, where the unit of randomization is an institution (eg day-care centre), household, or community, that compared interventions to promote hand washing or a hygiene promotion that included hand washing with no intervention to promote hand washing. Two authors independently assessed trial eligibility and methodological quality. Where appropriate, incidence rate ratios (IRR) were pooled using the generic inverse variance method and random-effects model with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Fourteen randomized controlled trials met the inclusion criteria. Eight trials were institution-based, five were community-based, and one was in a high-risk group (AIDS patients). Interventions promoting hand washing resulted in a 29% reduction in diarrhoea episodes in institutions in high-income countries (IRR 0.71, 95% CI 0.60 to 0.84; 7 trials) and a 31% reduction in such episodes in communities in low- or middle-income countries (IRR 0.69, 95% CI 0.55 to 0.87; 5 trials). Hand washing can reduce diarrhoea episodes by about 30%. This significant

  18. Abstract Swiss cheese space and classicalisation of Swiss cheeses

    OpenAIRE

    Feinstein, J. F.; Morley, S.; Yang, H.

    2016-01-01

    Swiss cheese sets are compact subsets of the complex plane obtained by deleting a sequence of open disks from a closed disk. Such sets have provided numerous counterexamples in the theory of uniform algebras. In this paper, we introduce a topological space whose elements are what we call “abstract Swiss cheeses”. Working within this topological space, we show how to prove the existence of “classical” Swiss cheese sets (as discussed in [6]) with various desired properties. We first give a new ...

  19. Monitoring and identification of bacteria associated with safety concerns in the manufacture of São Jorge, a Portuguese traditional cheese from raw cow's milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kongo, J Marcelino; Gomes, Ana P; Malcata, F Xavier

    2008-05-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the hygienic quality of raw milk used in the manufacture of São Jorge, a Protected Denomination of Origin Portuguese semihard cheese, as well as to ascertain the sanitary conditions prevailing during its processing. Viable counts of Enterobacteriaceae and Micrococcaceae were accordingly obtained, pertaining to 21 independent batches (including samples of raw milk, curd, and cheeses after 1, 3, and 4 months of ripening), from 7 dairy farms. Standard plate counts (log CFU per milliliter or per gram) ranged from 6.1 to 8.6 in raw milk, whereas they ranged from 7.0 to 8.0 in 4-month-old cheeses. Viable counts of Enterobacteriaceae ranged between 5.9 and 7.0 in raw milk and between 0.0 and 1.3 in 4-month-old cheeses. Species identified within this family encompassed Klebsiella oxytoca, Klebsiella cloacae, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Enterobacter sakazakii, and Escherichia coli; Klebsiella ornithinolytica, Klebsiella terrigena, and Serratia odorifera were detected only in raw milk. No Salmonella whatsoever could be detected in any of the samples. Viable counts of Micrococcaceae ranged between 4.7 and 5.9 and between 1.3 and 3.3 in raw milk and 4-month-old cheeses, respectively. Species identified within this family encompassed Staphylococcus sciuri, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus saprophyticus (which was found mainly in ripened cheeses), and Staphylococcus aureus (which was not detected in 4-month-old cheeses). Accompanying physicochemical analyses included determination of moisture, salt, and pH. Statistical analyses revealed a negative correlation between salt content and viable numbers of Enterobacteriaceae in cheese, whereas in the case of Micrococcaceae, a more negative correlation was found between viable numbers and moisture content than between viable numbers and pH. The results of our study indicate, in general, poor milk handling conditions in all farms, given that the indicators total mesophile and Enterobacteriaceae

  20. Hand Washing: Do's and Dont's

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... role in protecting your health. References Wash your hands. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. http://www.cdc.gov/Features/ ... antibacterial soaps: Effective or just risky? Clinical Infectious Diseases. ... S, et al. Safety of alcohol hand gel use among children and personnel at a ...

  1. Abdominopelvic washings: A comprehensive review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika F Rodriguez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Intraperitoneal spread may occur with gynecological epithelial neoplasms, as well as with non-gynecological malignancies, which may result in serosal involvement with or without concomitant effusion. Therefore, washings in patients with abdominopelvic tumors represent important specimens for cytologic examination. They are primarily utilized for staging ovarian cancers, although their role has decreased in staging of endometrial and cervical carcinoma. Abdominopelvic washings can be positive in a variety of pathologic conditions, including benign conditions, borderline neoplastic tumors, locally invasive tumors, or distant metastases. In a subset of cases, washings can be diagnostically challenging due to the presence of co-existing benign cells (e.g., mesothelial hyperplasia, endosalpingiosis, or endometriosis, lesions in which there is only minimal atypia (e.g., serous borderline tumors or scant atypical cells, and the rarity of specific tumor types (e.g., mesothelioma. Ancillary studies including immunocytochemistry and fluorescence in situ hybridization may be required in difficult cases to resolve the diagnosis. This article provides a comprehensive and contemporary review of abdominopelvic washings in the evaluation of gynecologic and non-gynecologic tumors, including primary peritoneal and mesothelial entities.

  2. Cheese maturity assessment using ultrasonics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedito, J; Carcel, J; Clemente, G; Mulet, A

    2000-02-01

    The relationship between Mahon cheese maturity and ultrasonic velocity was examined. Moisture and textural properties were used as maturity indicators. The ultrasonic velocity of the cheese varied between 1630 and 1740 m/s, increasing with the curing time mainly because of loss of water, which also produced an increase of the textural properties. Because of the nature of low-intensity ultrasonics, velocity was better related to those textural parameters that involved small displacements. Ultrasonic velocity decreased with increasing temperature because of the negative temperature coefficient of the ultrasonic velocity of fat and the melting of fat. These results highlight the potential use of ultrasonic velocity measurements to rapidly and nondestructively assess cheese maturity.

  3. 21 CFR 133.171 - Pasteurized process pimento cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Pasteurized process pimento cheese. 133.171... (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION CHEESES AND RELATED CHEESE PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Cheese and Related Products § 133.171 Pasteurized process pimento cheese. Pasteurized process...

  4. 21 CFR 133.109 - Brick cheese for manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Brick cheese for manufacturing. 133.109 Section... Standardized Cheese and Related Products § 133.109 Brick cheese for manufacturing. Brick cheese for manufacturing conforms to the definition and standard of identity for brick cheese prescribed by § 133.108...

  5. 21 CFR 133.114 - Cheddar cheese for manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cheddar cheese for manufacturing. 133.114 Section... Standardized Cheese and Related Products § 133.114 Cheddar cheese for manufacturing. Cheddar cheese for manufacturing conforms to the definition and standard of identity prescribed for cheddar cheese by § 133.113...

  6. 21 CFR 133.196 - Swiss cheese for manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Swiss cheese for manufacturing. 133.196 Section... Standardized Cheese and Related Products § 133.196 Swiss cheese for manufacturing. Swiss cheese for manufacturing conforms to the definition and standard of identity prescribed for swiss cheese by § 133.195...

  7. 21 CFR 133.119 - Colby cheese for manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Colby cheese for manufacturing. 133.119 Section... Standardized Cheese and Related Products § 133.119 Colby cheese for manufacturing. Colby cheese for manufacturing conforms to the definition and standard of identity prescribed for colby cheese by § 133.118...

  8. 21 CFR 133.145 - Granular cheese for manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Granular cheese for manufacturing. 133.145 Section... Standardized Cheese and Related Products § 133.145 Granular cheese for manufacturing. Granular cheese for manufacturing conforms to the definition and standard of identity prescribed for granular cheese by § 133.144...

  9. Quality traits and modeling of coagulation, curd firming, and syneresis of sheep milk of Alpine breeds fed diets supplemented with rumen-protected conjugated fatty acid

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bittante, G; Pellattiero, E; Malchiodi, F; Cipolat-Gotet, C; Pazzola, M; Vacca, G M; Schiavon, S; Cecchinato, A

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to test the modeling of curd-firming (CF) measures and to compare the sheep milk of 3 Alpine breeds supplemented with or without rumen-protected conjugated linoleic acid (rpCLA...

  10. Effect of gamma radiation in the ripening period of prato cheese; Efeito da radiacao gama na maturacao do queijo prato

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutierrez, Erika Maria Roel

    2001-07-01

    The Prato (cheese washed dough) is one of the must popular cheese of Brazil and must be ripening for 45 to 60 days for to reach characteristics of flavors and texture. The present work studied the effect of gamma radiation in the ripening period of Prato cheese. Two periods of irradiation was studied, in first day and 15{sup th} day of ripening. The cheese was irradiated with doses of 0 (non-irradiated), 1, 2, 3 and 4 kGy at a rate of 0,9696 kGy/h from a cobalto-60 source in the period referred and stored at 10-12 deg C and +- 85% RH for 60 days. The physical-chemical and microbiological characteristics and organoleptic properties were analysed every each 15 days of ripening. Through of the results observed that with the increase of the dose of radiation, decreased the total microbial count and that the irradiation retarded the ripening according to increase of the dose, this probability of the destruction of bacterial lactic. The greatest difference found was in the colour according the increasing of the dose, the cheese was more colorless, less yellow and red. Which the organoleptic properties verified that with the increase of the dose of radiation, there was a lost about the color. The cheese increase the firmness, became dryer and less creamy and tasted flavors less intense, a little more bitter and smoking compared with a control. Even though about these differences there was no refuse of Prato cheese, among the sensorial group for irradiated cheese until 2 kGy. (author)

  11. 21 CFR 133.181 - Provolone cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... alum, calcium sulfate, and magnesium carbonate, singly or combined, is not more than six times the... color of the curd. (ii) Calcium chloride in an amount not more than 0.02 percent (calculated as anhydrous calcium chloride) by weight of the dairy ingredients, used as a coagulation aid. (iii) Enzymes of...

  12. 21 CFR 133.141 - Gorgonzola cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... peroxide with potassium alum, calcium sulfate, and magnesium carbonate used to bleach the dairy ingredients... ingredients being bleached, and the weight of the potassium alum, calcium sulfate, and magnesium carbonate... an amount to neutralize the natural yellow color of the curd. (ii) Calcium chloride in an amount not...

  13. 21 CFR 133.183 - Romano cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... peroxide or a mixture of benzoyl peroxide with potassium alum, calcium sulfate, and magnesium carbonate... bleached, and the weight of the potassium alum, calcium, sulfate, and magnesium carbonate, singly or... safe and suitable milk-clotting enzyme that produces equivalent curd formation, singly or in any...

  14. Exploring the microbiota of the red-brown defect in smear-ripened cheese by 454-pyrosequencing and its prevention using different cleaning systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzzon, Raffaele; Carafa, Ilaria; Tuohy, Kieran; Cervantes, Gonzalo; Vernetti, Luca; Barmaz, Andrea; Larcher, Roberto; Franciosi, Elena

    2017-04-01

    Red-brown pigmentation can occasionally form in smeared-ripened cheese such as Fontina during the ripening process. This reaction is due to over-development of the typical microbiota present on the rind. Previous studies have demonstrated the relationship between red-brown pigmentation and the traditional utilization of wooden shelves during cheese ripening. The first part of the paper focuses on the characterisation of yeast and bacterial microbiota: plate counts and 454-pyrosequencing were performed in spoiled (n = 6) and non-spoiled cheeses (n = 6) and on the wooden shelves used during ripening. The second part shows different systems tested for cleaning the wooden shelves and avoiding the development of the red-brown defect in cheese: washing with hot water and ozone treatment. Actinobacteria, dominated on the wooden shelves, suggesting to be responsible for the red-brown pigmentation; they were also found in traces in the defected cheese samples. Galactomyces and Debaryomyces were the main species characterizing the yeast population, with Debaryomyces being the most dominant species on the shelves used during ripening of the red-brown defective cheese. Hot water treatment reduced the microbial contamination of shelves, whereas only the ozone treatment ensured complete elimination of both yeast and bacteria, resulting in the cheese rind not having the red-brown defect. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The quality of processed cheeses and cheese analogues the same brand domestic and foreign production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Bezeková

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Processed cheeses belong to Slovakia favorite dairy products. Processed cheeses are made from natural cheeses. In recent years the trend is to replace natural cheeses with other raw materials of non-dairy nature. The composition of the processed cheese analogues is not in many countries defined by legislation. The objective of this study was to determine and compare chemical properties (fat, dry matter, fat in dry matter, NaCl two samples of processed cheeses (C, D - Veselá krava and two samples cheese analogues (A, B - Kiri the same brand domestic and foreign production. The evaluated was taste of processed cheeses and cheese analogues, too. Chemical analysis and sensory analysis were repeated four times. The results of chemical analysis shows that all rated samples processed cheeses made on Slovakia fulfilled demands declared (dry matter and fat in dry matter as producers provided on the label. The most commonly fluctuate content of NaCl from 1 to 1.24 g.100g-1. The higher coefficient of variation in the determination of NaCl (3.88% was found in processed cheeses made in France. Processed cheese and cheese analogues made in France had not specified parameters for dry matter and fat in dry matter on the label. For production cheese analogues Kiri made in Slovakia was used different raw material than Kiri made in France. The taste of products was determined by descriptors - salty, slightly sweet, milky, buttery-creamy, fatty, sour, bitter, and unknown. The interesting that Kiri made in Slovakia had stronger milky and buttery-creamy taste than cheese analogue Kiri made in France. Significant differences were found in the slighty sweet taste of processed cheeses, the most points won processed cheese Veselá krava made in Slovakia.

  16. Application of salt whey in process cheese food made from Cheddar cheese containing exopolysaccharides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janevski, O; Hassan, A N; Metzger, L

    2012-07-01

    The objective of this work was to use salt whey in making process cheese food (PCF) from young (3-wk-old) Cheddar cheese. To maximize the level of salt whey in process cheese, low salt (0.6%) Cheddar cheese was used. Because salt reduction causes undesirable physiochemical changes during extended cheese ripening, young Cheddar cheese was used in making process cheese. An exopolysaccharide (EPS)-producing strain (JFR) and a non-EPS-producing culture (DVS) were applied in making Cheddar cheese. To obtain similar composition and pH in the EPS-positive and EPS-negative Cheddar cheeses, the cheese making protocol was modified in the latter cheese to increase its moisture content. No differences were seen in the proteolysis between EPS-positive and EPS-negative Cheddar cheeses. Cheddar cheese made with the EPS-producing strain was softer, and less gummy and chewy than that made with the EPS-negative culture. Three-week-old Cheddar cheese was shredded and stored frozen until used for PCF manufacture. Composition of Cheddar cheese was determined and used to formulate the corresponding PCF (EPS-positive PCF and EPS-negative PCF). The utilization of low salt Cheddar cheese allowed up to 13% of salt whey containing 9.1% salt to be used in process cheese making. The preblend was mixed in the rapid visco analyzer at 1,000 rpm and heated at 95°C for 3 min; then, the process cheese was transferred into copper cylinders, sealed, and kept at 4°C. Process cheese foods contained 43.28% moisture, 23.7% fat, 18.9% protein, and 2% salt. No difference in composition was seen between the EPS-positive and EPS-negative PCF. The texture profile analysis showed that EPS-positive PCF was softer, and less gummy and chewy than EPS-negative PCF. The end apparent viscosity and meltability were higher in EPS-positive PCF than in EPS-negative PCF, whereas emulsification time was shorter in the former cheese. Sensory evaluation indicated that salt whey at the level used in this study did not affect

  17. Thermal properties of selected cheeses samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika BOŽIKOVÁ

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The thermophysical parameters of selected cheeses (processed cheese and half hard cheese are presented in the article. Cheese is a generic term for a diverse group of milk-based food products. Cheese is produced throughout the world in wide-ranging flavors, textures, and forms. Cheese goes during processing through the thermal and mechanical manipulation, so thermal properties are one of the most important. Knowledge about thermal parameters of cheeses could be used in the process of quality evaluation. Based on the presented facts thermal properties of selected cheeses which are produced by Slovak producers were measured. Theoretical part of article contains description of cheese and description of plane source method which was used for thermal parameters detection. Thermophysical parameters as thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity and volume specific heat were measured during the temperature stabilisation. The results are presented as relations of thermophysical parameters to the temperature in temperature range from 13.5°C to 24°C. Every point of graphic relation was obtained as arithmetic average from measured values for the same temperature. Obtained results were statistically processed. Presented graphical relations were chosen according to the results of statistical evaluation and also according to the coefficients of determination for every relation. The results of thermal parameters are in good agreement with values measured by other authors for similar types of cheeses.

  18. Causal Relationship between Microbial Ecology Dynamics and Proteolysis during Manufacture and Ripening of Protected Designation of Origin (PDO) Cheese Canestrato Pugliese

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Pasquale, Ilaria; Calasso, Maria; Mancini, Leonardo; Ercolini, Danilo; La Storia, Antonietta; De Angelis, Maria; Gobbetti, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene, community-level physiological profiles determined by the use of Biolog EcoPlates, and proteolysis analyses were used to characterize Canestrato Pugliese Protected Designation of Origin (PDO) cheese. The number of presumptive mesophilic lactococci in raw ewes' milk was higher than that of presumptive mesophilic lactobacilli. The numbers of these microbial groups increased during ripening, showing temporal and numerical differences. Urea-PAGE showed limited primary proteolysis, whereas the analysis of the pH 4.6-soluble fraction of the cheese revealed that secondary proteolysis increased mainly from 45 to 75 days of ripening. This agreed with the concentration of free amino acids. Raw ewes' milk was contaminated by several bacterial phyla: Proteobacteria (68%; mainly Pseudomonas), Firmicutes (30%; mainly Carnobacterium and Lactococcus), Bacteroidetes (0.05%), and Actinobacteria (0.02%). Almost the same microbial composition persisted in the curd after molding. From day 1 of ripening onwards, the phylum Firmicutes dominated. Lactococcus dominated throughout ripening, and most of the Lactobacillus species appeared only at 7 or 15 days. At 90 days, Lactococcus (87.2%), Lactobacillus (4.8%; mainly Lactobacillus plantarum and Lactobacillus sakei), and Leuconostoc (3.9%) dominated. The relative utilization of carbon sources by the bacterial community reflected the succession. This study identified strategic phases that characterized the manufacture and ripening of Canestrato Pugliese cheese and established a causal relationship between mesophilic lactobacilli and proteolysis. PMID:24771032

  19. Causal relationship between microbial ecology dynamics and proteolysis during manufacture and ripening of protected designation of origin (PDO) cheese Canestrato Pugliese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Pasquale, Ilaria; Calasso, Maria; Mancini, Leonardo; Ercolini, Danilo; La Storia, Antonietta; De Angelis, Maria; Di Cagno, Raffaella; Gobbetti, Marco

    2014-07-01

    Pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene, community-level physiological profiles determined by the use of Biolog EcoPlates, and proteolysis analyses were used to characterize Canestrato Pugliese Protected Designation of Origin (PDO) cheese. The number of presumptive mesophilic lactococci in raw ewes' milk was higher than that of presumptive mesophilic lactobacilli. The numbers of these microbial groups increased during ripening, showing temporal and numerical differences. Urea-PAGE showed limited primary proteolysis, whereas the analysis of the pH 4.6-soluble fraction of the cheese revealed that secondary proteolysis increased mainly from 45 to 75 days of ripening. This agreed with the concentration of free amino acids. Raw ewes' milk was contaminated by several bacterial phyla: Proteobacteria (68%; mainly Pseudomonas), Firmicutes (30%; mainly Carnobacterium and Lactococcus), Bacteroidetes (0.05%), and Actinobacteria (0.02%). Almost the same microbial composition persisted in the curd after molding. From day 1 of ripening onwards, the phylum Firmicutes dominated. Lactococcus dominated throughout ripening, and most of the Lactobacillus species appeared only at 7 or 15 days. At 90 days, Lactococcus (87.2%), Lactobacillus (4.8%; mainly Lactobacillus plantarum and Lactobacillus sakei), and Leuconostoc (3.9%) dominated. The relative utilization of carbon sources by the bacterial community reflected the succession. This study identified strategic phases that characterized the manufacture and ripening of Canestrato Pugliese cheese and established a causal relationship between mesophilic lactobacilli and proteolysis. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  20. A model describing Debaryomyces hansenii growth and substrate consumption during a smear soft cheese deacidification and ripening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riahi, M H; Trelea, I C; Picque, D; Leclercq-Perlat, M-N; Hélias, A; Corrieu, G

    2007-05-01

    A mechanistic model for Debaryomyces hansenii growth and substrate consumption, lactose conversion into lactate by lactic acid bacteria, as well as lactose and lactate transfer from the core toward the rind was established. The model described the first step (14 d) of the ripening of a smear soft cheese and included the effects of temperature and relative humidity of the ripening chamber on the kinetic parameters. Experimental data were collected from experiments carried out in an aseptic pilot scale ripening chamber under 9 different combinations of temperature (8, 12, and 16 degrees C) and relative humidity (85, 93, and 99%) according to a complete experimental design. The model considered the cheese as a system with 2 compartments (rind and core) and included 5 state evolution equations and 16 parameters. The model succeeded in predicting D. hansenii growth and lactose and lactate concentrations during the first step of ripening (curd deacidification) in core and rind. The nonlinear data-fitting method allowed the determination of tight confidence intervals for the model parameters. The residual standard error (RSE) between model predictions and experimental data was close to the experimental standard deviation between repeated experiments.

  1. Antibacterial effects of Lactobacillus isolates of curd and human milk origin against food-borne and human pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Chetan; Singh, Brij Pal; Thakur, Nishchal; Gulati, Sachin; Gupta, Sanjolly; Mishra, Santosh Kumar; Panwar, Harsh

    2017-05-01

    This study was undertaken to assess the antibacterial efficacy of lactobacilli isolated from curd and human milk samples. Identities of thirty-one different lactobacilli (20 from curd and 11 from human milk) were confirmed by genus-specific PCR and 16S rRNA-based sequencing. These strains belonged to five species, Lactobacillus casei, L. delbrueckii, L. fermentum, L. plantarum, and L. pentosus. Antibacterial activities of cell-free supernatants (CFSs) of all the Lactobacillus isolates were estimated through standard agar-well diffusion assay, against commonly occurring food-borne and clinically important human pathogens. None of the lactobacilli cell-free supernatant (CFS) exhibited inhibitory activity against four pathogens, namely Staphylococcus aureus, Listeria monocytogenes, Escherichia coli, and Klebsiella pneumoniae. Bacillus cereus, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi, and Shigella flexneri were moderately inhibited by majority of CFSs, whereas, weak activity was observed against Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Proteus mirabilis. CFS of some of the curd isolates displayed antagonistic activity against Streptococcus mutans; however, human milk lactobacilli did not displayed any inhibitory activity against them. As expected, Nisin (Nisaplin ® ) showed inhibitory activity against Gram-positive, S. aureus, B. cereus, and L. monocytogenes. Interestingly, few of the examined CFSs exhibited inhibitory activities against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative pathogens. Findings from this study support the possibility to explore the tested lactobacilli and their CFSs as natural bio-preservatives, alone or in combination with approved bacteriocins in food and pharma formulations after validating their safety.

  2. Optimization of conditions for probiotic curd formulation by Enterococcus faecium MTCC 5695 with probiotic properties using response surface methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishnan, Vrinda; Goveas, Louella Concepta; Prakash, Maya; Halami, Prakash M; Narayan, Bhaskar

    2014-11-01

    Enterococcus faecium MTCC 5695 possessing potential probiotic properties as well as enterocin producing ability was used as starter culture. Effect of time (12-24 h) and inoculum level (3-7 % v/v) on cell growth, bacteriocin production, antioxidant property, titrable acidity and pH of curd was studied by response surface methodology (RSM). The optimized conditions were 26.48 h and 2.17%v/v inoculum and the second order model validated. Co cultivation studies revealed that the formulated product had the ability to prevent growth of foodborne pathogens that affect keeping quality of the product during storage. The results indicated that application of E. faecium MTCC 5695 along with usage of optimized conditions attributed to the formation of highly consistent well set curd with bioactive and bioprotective properties. Formulated curd with potential probiotic attributes can be used as therapeutic agent for the treatment of foodborne diseases like Traveler's diarrhea and gastroenteritis which thereby help in improvement of bowel health.

  3. Cheese powder as an ingredient in emulsion sausages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Xiang; Ruiz Carrascal, Jorge; Petersen, Mikael Agerlin

    2017-01-01

    modified their profile of volatile compounds. Blue cheese increased some ketones, alcohols, and esters, while brown cheese brought typical Maillard reaction compounds. Overall, addition of cheese powders to sausages enhanced the intensity of flavour traits. A mixture of hard and blue cheese powder showed...... the highest effect on boosting saltiness, while brown cheese powder showed the strongest umami and meat flavour boosting effect, and sausages with added blue cheese powder showed a more intense aftertaste. Hardness significantly increased due to the addition of blue cheese powder. Addition of cheese powder...

  4. Improvements in the Flavour of Soy Cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naveed Ahmad

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A review of biochemical and technological similarities and dissimilarities between soy cheese and Cheddar cheese is presented to provide guidelines for the improvements in the flavour of soy cheese. Processing technology as well as the final product of soy cheese have many similarities with Cheddar in terms of appearance, texture, mouth feel, chemical nature, biochemical processes, etc. Soy protein has many useful amino acids like Asp, Ile, Leu, Met, Phe, Trp, Tyr, Val, etc., which are precursors of flavouring compounds and the right choice of microbial cultures is necessary to benefit from them. Using low levels of sodium chloride, without the use of ethanol, and introducing new milk cheese starter and non-starter cultures like Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis (formerly L. lactis ssp. lactis biovar. diacetylactis, Lactobacillus helveticus, Lactobacillus casei, Streptococcus lactis var. maltigenes and Lactococcus lactis ssp. cremoris that enhance flavour will be helpful to improve the flavour of soy cheese.

  5. Prevalence of Listeria monocytogenes in Idiazabal cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrese, E; Arroyo-Izaga, M

    2012-01-01

    Raw-milk cheese has been identified in risk assessment as a food of greater concern to public health due to listeriosis. To determine the prevalence and levels of Listeria monocytogenes in semi-hard Idiazabal cheese manufactured by different producers in the Basque Country at consumer level. A total of 51 Idiazabal cheese samples were obtained from 10 separate retail establishments, chosen by stratified random sampling. Samples were tested using the official standard ISO procedure 11290-1 for detection and enumeration methods. All cheese samples tested negative for L. monocytogenes. However, 9.8% tested positive for Listeria spp., different from L. monocytogenes. Positive samples came from two brands, two were natural and three were smoked. The presence of Listeria spss. suggests that the cheese making process and the hygiene whether at milking or during cheese making could be insufficient.

  6. Characterization of a processed cheese spread produced from fresh cheese (quesito antioqueño

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edinson Eliecer Bejarano Toro

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Processed products are made from mixes of fresh and ripened cheeses; the use of cheeses with a short shelf-life in the development of processed cheeses is an alternative for the dairy industry. A processed cheese spread was made using only a soft and fatty fresh cheese that had been stored for 25 days. The primary materials were the fresh cheese, water, and emulsifying salts (sodium citrate (E-331 and sodium phosphate (E-450, using a STEPHAN® Universal Machine (UMSK 24E with indirect vapor injection and equipped with rasping and cutting blades. The resulting cheese (A was compared with a commercial cheese (B for compositional, physicochemical, and sensorial characteristics. The cheeses were similar except for the fat in dry matter (FDM, with values of 54.50% and 47.21%, respectively. Sensorially, there were significant differences (P0.05. Cheese A provided, in mg per 100 g of product, 935.823 for phenylalanine, 1003.070 for isoleucine, 2041.420 for leucine, 475.337 for methionine, 119.300 for tryptophan, and 758.347 for valine. Producing processed cheeses with only fresh cheese is possible, resulting in a product that is similar to others that are currently on the market with typical characteristics that are accepted by consumers.

  7. Transference of lutein during cheese making, color stability, and sensory acceptance of prato cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirian Tiaki Kaneiwa Kubo

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The consumption of lutein is associated with the prevention and reduction of age-related macular degeneration. Its incorporation into Prato cheese as a yellowish food coloring is a valid alternative to increase the daily intake of this compound. However, part of the lutein added may be lost in the whey during the cheese making, or it can be degraded by light during storage, resulting in color changes reducing the sensory acceptance of the cheese. The objectives of this study were to determine the transference of the lutein (dye, added to the milk, in the whey, and cheese, to evaluate the effect of the lutein addition, light exposure, and storage time on the cheese color, and to verify the sensory acceptance of Prato cheese with addition of lutein. The lutein recovery of cheese was 95.25%. Color saturation (chrome increased during storage time resulting in a cheese with more intense color, but there were no changes in the hue of the cheese. Adjusting the amount of lutein added to Prato cheese may lead to greater acceptance. The high recovery of lutein in the cheese and the fact that the hue remained unchanged during storage under light showed that the incorporation of lutein into Prato cheese is feasible from a technical point of view.

  8. An Electronic Nose Based on Coated Piezoelectric Quartz Crystals to Certify Ewes’ Cheese and to Discriminate between Cheese Varieties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Teresa S. R. Gomes

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available An electronic nose based on coated piezoelectric quartz crystals was used to distinguish cheese made from ewes’ milk, and to distinguish cheese varieties. Two sensors coated with Nafion and Carbowax could certify half the ewes’ cheese samples, exclude 32 cheeses made from cow’s milk and to classify half of the ewes’ cheese samples as possibly authentic. Two other sensors, coated with polyvinylpyrrolidone and triethanolamine clearly distinguished between Flamengo, Brie, Gruyère and Mozzarella cheeses. Brie cheeses were further separated according to their origin, and Mozzarella grated cheese also appeared clearly separated from non-grated Mozzarella.

  9. Formation of acrylamide in cheese bread

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedegaard, Rikke Susanne Vingborg; Sobrinho, Luis Gualberto De Andrade; Granby, Kit

    2008-01-01

    of cheese added, and addition of 23.7 g cheese resulted in 958 ppb acrylamide. For an o/w rapeseed oil emulsion as a food model heated under conditions similar to those persisting inside bread during baking, it was further shown that acrylamide formation also occurred in absence of reducing sugars....... In contrast, acrylamide was not observed in Pao de queijo a traditional Brazilian bread product made from fermented cassava flour, fresh eggs and a mixture of Brazilian Gouda type cheese and Mozzarella cheese pointing towards a role of eggs in protection against acrylamide formation....

  10. Pasture quality and cheese traceability index of Ragusano PDO cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venera Copani

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In the Iblei plateau (Sicily, Southern Italy the native dairy cattle breed Modicana during the spring season grazes exclusively on natural pastures for the production of the Ragusano protected denomination of origin cheese. Along the grazing season, herbage undergoes to changes on protein, fibre and moisture content, affecting quality parameters such as plant carotenoids concentration, involved in the colour and nutritional characteristics of dairy products and potential biomarkers for authenticating fed green pasture-based diets. The aim of this work was to assess whether the cheese traceability index, based on the carotenoids spectra data elaboration, could be related to seasonal variations of floral composition and pasture quality. Four herbage and cheese samples were collected every two weeks in two representative farms of this area, from March to May 2013. Pasture characteristics as pastoral vegetation composition and pastoral value were analysed using the methodology developed for pastoral resources studies. Traceability index showed a significant positive correlation with pasture moisture and crude protein content (r=0.729* and 0.853**, respectively, while it was negatively correlated with fibre content (r=–0.719*.

  11. Effect of somatic cell count on ewe's milk composition, its properties and the quality of rennet curd

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenka Novotná

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The evaluation of the effect of somatic cells count on ewe’s milk composition, its properties and on the quality of rennet curd was carried using milk samples obtained from a total 10 ewes F112 crossbreeds of Lacaune (L, East Friesian (EF and Improved Wallachian (IW, reared on a ecological sheep farm in Valašská Bystřice. All ewes were on the 1st  lactation, in good nutritive condition and clinically healthy. The sampling was carried on 47th, 81st, 123rd, 152nd and 189th day of lactation. The analysis involved a total of 50 milk samples, which were categorized into 5 different SCC groups: 1st group (≤ 10 000 SC/ml, 2nd  group (11 000–50 000 SC/ml, 3rd  group (51 000–100 000 SC/ml, 4th  group (101 000–200 000 SC/ml, 5th  group (≥ 201 000 SC/ml. Milk composition and milk properties were determined by standard methods. For the evaluation of the quality of rennet curd (class quality was used following scale: 1st  class – very good and hard curd, 2nd  class – good curd, 3rd  class – bad curd, 4th  class – very bad curd, 5th class – no or invisible flocculation of casein. Recorded data were statistically analyzed using the classical least squares method (SAS; PROC GLM variant ss4. The SCC had a significant effect on all components of milk under study. The lowest contents of total solids (TS, fat (F, solids non-fat (SNF, protein (P and casein (CN were found in the group with the highest SCC (5th group. On the other hand, the highest contents of all above-mentioned milk components were found in the group with the lowest SCC. The significantly lowest content of lactose (4.42 % was found in the group with the lowest SCC. The SCC had also significant effect on pH and titrable acidity. However on the other hand SCC had not a significant effect on rennetability and rennet curd quality (RCQ. The highest value of pH was found in the 5th group (the highest SCC. Titrable acidity

  12. Occurrence of foodborne pathogens in Irish farmhouse cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Martina; Hunt, Karen; McSweeney, Sara; Jordan, Kieran

    2009-12-01

    Food safety is a critical factor in the production of farmhouse cheese. In Ireland the varieties of farmhouse cheese produced reflect a much broader range than those produced commercially and some of these cheese varieties are associated with greater microbiological risk. These include cheese produced from unpasteurised milk and soft ripened cheese such as mould or smear-ripened cheeses which have high pH and relatively short ripening times. The aim of this study was to determine the microbiological quality of farmhouse cheeses in Ireland. Three hundred and fifty one cheese samples, from 15 cheese producers, were analysed for microbiological quality on a monthly basis throughout the year. The analyses included enumeration of Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Listeria monocytogenes (using the relevant agars) and enrichment for L. monocytogenes. The cheeses selected were produced from ovine, caprine and bovine milk. Both unpasteurised and pasteurised milk cheeses were sampled and these included hard, semi-hard and soft cheeses, internal/external mould-ripened and smear-ripened cheeses and the cheeses represented different geographic regions. Of the cheeses tested, 94% were free of L. monocytogenes, all were within the EU limits for E. coli and only one cheese variety had S. aureus levels above the recommended numbers for the first 6 months of the year. Due to a modified production process the numbers were within the guidelines for the second six months. The results indicate that Irish farmhouse cheeses are of a high microbiological quality.

  13. Cheese whey management: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prazeres, Ana R; Carvalho, Fátima; Rivas, Javier

    2012-11-15

    Cheese whey is simultaneously an effluent with nutritional value and a strong organic and saline content. Cheese whey management has been focused in the development of biological treatments without valorization; biological treatments with valorization; physicochemical treatments and direct land application. In the first case, aerobic digestion is reported. In the second case, six main processes are described in the literature: anaerobic digestion, lactose hydrolysis, fermentation to ethanol, hydrogen or lactic acid and direct production of electricity through microbial fuel cells. Thermal and isoelectric precipitation, thermocalcic precipitation, coagulation/flocculation, acid precipitation, electrochemical and membrane technologies have been considered as possible and attractive physicochemical processes to valorize or treat cheese whey. The direct land application is a common and longstanding practice, although some precautions are required. In this review, these different solutions are analyzed. The paper describes the main reactors used, the influence of the main operating variables, the microorganisms or reagents employed and the characterizations of the final effluent principally in terms of chemical oxygen demand. In addition, the experimental conditions and the main results reported in the literature are compiled. Finally, the comparison between the different treatment alternatives and the presentation of potential treatment lines are postulated. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Washing machine usage in remote aboriginal communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, C R

    1998-10-01

    The use of washing machines was investigated in two remote Aboriginal communities in the Anangu Pitjantjatjara homelands. The aim was to look both at machine reliability and to investigate the health aspect of washing clothes. A total of 39 machines were inspected for wear and component reliability every three months over a one-year period. Of these, 10 machines were monitored in detail for water consumption, hours of use and cycles of operation. The machines monitored were Speed Queen model EA2011 (7 kg washing load) commercial units. The field survey results suggested a high rate of operation of the machines with an average of around 1,100 washing cycles per year (range 150 and 2,300 cycles per year). The results were compared with available figures for the average Australian household. A literature survey, to ascertain the health outcomes relating to washing clothes and bedding, confirmed that washing machines are efficient at removal of bacteria from clothes and bedding but suggested that recontamination of clothing after washing often negated the prior removal. High temperature washing (> 60 degrees C) appeared to be advantageous from a health perspective. With regards to larger organisms, while dust mites and body lice transmission between people would probably be decreased by washing clothes, scabies appeared to be mainly transmitted by body contact and thus transmission would be only marginally decreased by the use of washing machines.

  15. Microbial Ecology Dynamics Reveal a Succession in the Core Microbiota Involved in the Ripening of Pasta Filata Caciocavallo Pugliese Cheese

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Pasquale, Ilaria; Buchin, Solange; De Angelis, Maria; Gobbetti, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA targeting RNA, community-level physiological profiles made with Biolog EcoPlates, proteolysis, and volatile component (VOC) analyses were mainly used to characterize the manufacture and ripening of the pasta filata cheese Caciocavallo Pugliese. Plate counts revealed that cheese manufacture affected the microbial ecology. The results agreed with those from culture-independent approaches. As shown by urea-PAGE, reverse-phase high pressure liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC), and free-amino-acid (FAA) analyses, the extent of secondary proteolysis mainly increased after 30 to 45 days of ripening. VOCs and volatile free fatty acids (VFFA) were identified by a purge-and-trap method (PT) and solid-phase microextraction (SPME) coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), respectively. Except for aldehydes, the levels of most of VOCs and VFFA mainly increased from 30 to 45 days onwards. As shown through pyrosequencing analysis, raw cows' milk was contaminated by Firmicutes (53%), Proteobacteria (39%), Bacteroidetes (7.8%), Actinobacteria (0.06%), and Fusobacteria (0.03%), with heterogeneity at the genus level. The primary starter Streptococcus thermophilus dominated the curd population. Other genera occurred at low incidence or sporadically. The microbial dynamics reflected on the overall physiological diversity. At 30 days, a microbial succession was clearly highlighted. The relative abundance of Streptococcus sp. and especially St. thermophilus decreased, while that of Lactobacillus casei, Lactobacillus sp., and especially Lactobacillus paracasei increased consistently. Despite the lower relative abundance compared to St. thermophilus, mesophilic lactobacilli were the only organisms positively correlated with the concentration of FAAs, area of hydrophilic peptide peaks, and several VOCs (e.g., alcohols, ketones, esters and all furans). This study showed that a core microbiota was naturally selected during middle ripening, which

  16. Dehydroacetic acid in cheese and cheese coating, results of official control in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scordino, Monica; Lazzaro, Francesco; Borzì, Marco A; Sabatino, Leonardo; Traulo, Pasqualino; Gagliano, Giacomo

    2018-03-01

    This paper reports the occurrence of dehydroacetic acid in cheese and cheese coatings collected in Italy during Agricultural Ministry Official control. Dehydroacetic acid is an antimicrobial substance not allowed to be used in EU countries as a food additive, with unknown effects on human health. Dehydroacetic acid was measured by a validated HPLC method according to Commission Decision 2002/657/EC criteria in terms of specificity, linearity, precision and accuracy, limit of detection, and limit of quantification. The method was successfully applied to 129 samples of commercial cheese coatings and related treated cheeses collected in Italy during 2017. The overall results demonstrated that about 40% of the investigated cheese coatings contained dehydroacetic acid, ranging from 0.010% to 2.5% w/w, evidencing illicit employment of this substance. Moreover, about 25% of treated cheeses contained dehydroacetic acid, from 5 to 250 mg/Kg, proving transfer of this substance from crust to cheese.

  17. Design of Online Washing Process for an Engine Based on Washing Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Yong

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to develop online washing process of a carrier-based aircraft engine and improve washing efficiency, washing equipments were employed in cold operation state to carry out experimental study on structural strength of spray frame, selection of nozzle and determination of injection parameters of online washing spray system, determination of washing injection timing, determination of drying procedure, liquid-washing experiments of different concentrations and water-washing experiments and so on. The results show that if engine is washed in cold operation state, mid-nozzle with upward offset angel of 7°30′ can be selected and the feed liquid pressure provided by washing vehicle is 0.9Mpa. The start time is 20s after an engine cold start-up, and sustains 30s for once washing. After a liquid-washing with the use of washing fluid, the liquid concentration of which is no more than 20%, twice water-washing can be carried out to rinse the almost all cleaning agent remaining in the engine runner(the residue is less than 1%. The engine can be thoroughly dried by power-on operation, the procedure of which is engine operating 2min in ideal state, then 2min in state of n2=85% and 2min of ideal state lastly. Washing will not affect the engine function.

  18. Studies on changes in microstructure and proteolysis in cow and soy milk curd during fermentation using lactic cultures for improving protein bioavailability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Debasree; Chattoraj, Dipti K; Chattopadhyay, Parimal

    2013-10-01

    Cow milk curd was prepared using 2% v/v of Streptococcus thermophilus DG1 and a mixed culture (0.5:1.5 v/v) of S. thermophilus DG1 and Lactobacillus plantarum and incubating at 37 °C for 16 h. Soy milk curd was prepared using different ratios of lactic cultures as stated earlier and also a mixed culture containing S. thermophilus DG1, L. plantarum and Leuconostoc mesenteroides sub spp. mesenteroides in the ratio 1:1:1 v/v along with beet pulp (2% w/w) and incubating at 37 °C for 18 h. This improved functional and probiotic properties of curd. Structural changes in curd samples during fermentation were observed by Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). Soy milk curd showed loosened structure. The degradation of proteins into peptides and amino acids were evaluated by SDS PAGE and amino acid analysis. Maximum production of amino acids i.e. cystine, histidine and asparagine were observed in both the cow and soymilk after fermentation.

  19. The individual contribution of starter and non-starter lactic acid bacteria to the volatile organic compound composition of Caciocavallo Palermitano cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarrasi, Valeria; Sannino, Ciro; Moschetti, Marta; Bonanno, Adriana; Di Grigoli, Antonino; Settanni, Luca

    2017-10-16

    The contribution of two starter (Lactobacillus delbrueckii and Streptococcus thermophilus) and nine non-starter (Enterococcus casselliflavus, Enterococcus faecalis, Enterococcus durans, Enterococcus gallinarum, Lactobacillus casei, Lactobacillus paracasei, Lactobacillus rhamnosus, Pediococcus acidilactici and Pediococcus pentosaceus) species of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) to the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) of Caciocavallo Palermitano cheese was investigated. The strains used in this study were isolated during the production/ripening of the stretched cheese and tested in a cheese-based medium (CBM). The fermented substrates were analyzed for the growth of the single strains and subjected to the head space solid phase micro-extraction (HS-SPME) and gas chromatography - mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The 11 strains tested were all able to increase their numbers in CBM, even though the development of the starter LAB was quite limited. GC-MS analysis registered 43 compounds including seven chemical classes. A lower diversity of VOCs was registered for the unfermented curd based medium (CuBM) analyzed for comparison. The class of ketones represented a consistent percentage of the VOCs for almost all LAB, followed by alcohols and esters. The volatile profile of Pediococcus acidilactici and Lactobacillus delbrueckii was mainly characterized by 2-butanol, butanoic acid and hexanoic acid and their esters, while that of Lactobacillus casei and Lactobacillus rhamnosus was characterized by 2,3-butanedione and 2-butanone, 3-hydroxy. In order to correlate the VOCs produced by Caciocavallo Palermitano cheeses with those generated by individual LAB, the 4-month ripened cheeses resulting from the dairy process monitored during the isolation of LAB were also analyzed for the volatile chemical fraction and the compounds in common were subjected to a multivariate statistical analysis. The canonical analysis indicated that the VOCs of the ripened cheeses were mainly influenced by E

  20. Domestic fresh soft cheese from Bjelovar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slavko Kirin

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper shows results of organoleptic properties, physical-chemical composition and microbiological quality investigation of domestic fresh cheese samples taken from Bjelovar market (Croatia. The results were compared to research results obtained from other markets, published by other authors. The main characteristic is great variability that results in unequal quality. Weights of different samples ranged from 610 g to 830 g, with mean value 757.58 g. Cheese consistency shows even greater difference in variety ranging from soft fragmented (28.57 % to firm fragmented (7.14 %. Odour was mostly pleasant and characteristic (71.43 % and taste pleasant, slightly acidic, pure only in 57.14 % of samples. The most common failure in soft cheese organoleptic properties is noticed yeasty odour and taste. Mean value of dry matter was 23.42 g/100 g, and 25.29 g/100 g of fat in dry matter. Acidity of fresh cheese was in pH range from 4.45 to 3.81. Due to the fat content, fresh cheese from Bjelovar is a semi fat fresh cheese, while soft cheeses from researches of other authors are described as low fat cheeses (Pravilnik, 2007. Correlation factor for different characteristics was high. Microbiological analyses show that E. coli was in higher amounts than allowed in 3 of 14 samples, and S. aureus in 2 samples. Microbiological quality is also doubtful because of higher yeasts and mould quantity, which was also concluded by other authors mentioned in this paper.

  1. Proteolysis and consistency of Meshanger cheese

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, de L.

    1978-01-01

    Proteolysis in Meshanger cheese, estimated by quantitative polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis is discussed. The conversion of α s1 -casein was proportional to rennet concentration in the cheese. Changes in consistency, after a maximum, were correlated to breakdown of

  2. Addition of whey protein to fresh cheese.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Rafael Arce-Méndez

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This work has been conducted in order to assess the effect of adding whey protein (WP to fresh cheese. The yield, proximal chemical composition, tryptophan content,and texture and consumer sensorial acceptance were obtained. The study was conducted at a cheese factory located in San Carlos, Costa Rica, in 2011. The protein obtained from whey was added during the cheese manufacturing process, before adding the microbial rennet; and four enrichment levels were evaluated, including one control. The supplemented cheese showed an acceptance rating between 6.8 and 7.1. Products with 75 and 120 g of added whey protein per kilogram of milk showed no significant differences versus non-supplemented cheese, while the preference towards the cheese with 150 g WP/kg was less than that of the control (p<0.05. A cluster analysis revealed the existence of two consumer groups: one, accounting for 65% of the members of the panel, whose preference was unaffected by the protein supplemented; and, the other group where the added protein affected their liking negatively. Adding whey protein to the cheese resulted in a significant increase in yield and in the protein-to-water ratio, as well as a reduction in fat content (p<0.05. Nevertheless, there were structural changes in the cheese that caused the reduction of certain texture properties, generating changes in their sensory properties that reduced the preference of a representative group of consumers towards the product.

  3. 21 CFR 133.150 - Hard cheeses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hard cheeses. 133.150 Section 133.150 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... or plant origin capable of aiding in the curing or development of flavor of hard cheese may be added...

  4. 21 CFR 133.182 - Soft ripened cheeses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Soft ripened cheeses. 133.182 Section 133.182 Food... Related Products § 133.182 Soft ripened cheeses. (a) The cheeses for which definitions and standards of identity are prescribed by this section are soft ripened cheeses for which specifically applicable...

  5. 21 CFR 133.189 - Skim milk cheese for manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Skim milk cheese for manufacturing. 133.189... Standardized Cheese and Related Products § 133.189 Skim milk cheese for manufacturing. (a) Skim milk cheese for manufacturing is the food prepared from skim milk and other ingredients specified in this section, by the...

  6. 21 CFR 1250.87 - Wash water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Wash water. 1250.87 Section 1250.87 Food and Drugs... Sanitation Facilities and Conditions on Vessels § 1250.87 Wash water. Where systems installed on vessels for wash water, as defined in § 1250.3(n), do not comply with the requirements of a potable water system...

  7. Postoperative washing of sutured wounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conrad Harrison

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A best evidence topic was written according to the structured protocol. The three part question addressed was: [In patients undergoing closure of surgical wounds with sutures] does [keeping the wound dry for the first 48 h after closure] [reduce the incidence of surgical site infections (SSIs]? 4 relevant papers were culled from the literature and appraised. The authors, date, country, population, study type, main outcomes, key results and study weaknesses were tabulated. Current NICE guidelines recommend cleaning surgical wounds with sterile saline only for the first 48 h following skin closure. We found no evidence that washing wounds with tap water during this period increases the incidence of SSIs compared to keeping them dry. Further randomised controlled trials will enable the construction of conclusive systematic reviews and meta-analyses.

  8. The language of cheese-ripening cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gori, Klaus; Jespersen, Lene

    2010-01-01

    Microbial interactions are of importance for the establishment and growth of cheese ripening cultures. An interesting aspect of microbial interactions is cell-cell communication, often referred to as quorum sensing; the process in which micro-organisms communicate with signalling molecules and co......-based and ammonia signalling in the dairy-relevant yeast Debaryomyces hansenii. Furthermore, the influence of cheese matrices on quorum sensing systems is briefly mentioned. Finally, we discuss how knowledge on quorum sensing systems in cheese ripening cultures may be used for optimisation of the ripening processes....... be of importance is surface ripened cheeses. The present review focuses on our findings on quorum sensing systems in cheese ripening cultures. The main focus is on the group of bacterial non-species-specific signalling molecules referred to as autoinducer-2 (AI-2) in smear bacteria as well as alcohol...

  9. Whole-Genome Sequence of Streptococcus macedonicus Strain 33MO, Isolated from the Curd of Morlacco Cheese in the Veneto Region (Italy)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vendramin, Veronica; Treu, Laura; Bovo, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    A genetic characterization of Streptococcus macedonicus is important to better understand the characteristics of this lactic acid bacterium, frequently detected in fermented food bacteria communities. This report presents the draft genome sequence description of strain 33MO, the first publicly...... available genome sequence of an Italian S. macedonicus isolate....

  10. Interferência da microbiota autóctone do queijo coalho sobre Staphylococcus coagulase positiva Interference of autochthonous microbiota of curd cheese on Staphylococcus coagulase positive

    OpenAIRE

    Terezinha Feitosa Machado; Maria de Fátima Borges; Bruna de Castro Porto; Cívita Teixeira de Sousa; Francisco Edílson Moreno de Oliveira

    2011-01-01

    Níveis elevados de contaminantes microbiológicos, comumente encontrados em alimentos de origem animal e ambientes de processamento de alimentos, são aptos de impedir o crescimento de patógenos nestes produtos. Em alguns contextos onde bactérias ácido láticas (BAL) constituem a microbiota dominante, como nos produtos lácteos, Staphylococcus coagulase positiva (SCP) colonizam, persistem e produzem intoxicação alimentar. Com o objetivo de verificar a possível interferência da microbiota encontra...

  11. Incorporação de Lactobacillus casei microencapsulado em queijo tipo coalho = Incorporation of encapsulated Lactobacillus casei into type curd cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lima, Janilton Rodrigues

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introdução: O queijo tipo coalho é um alimento típico da região nordeste do Brasil, e apresenta características físico-químicas que permitem a veiculação de micro-organismos probióticos, mas poucos trabalhos tem explorado essa possibilidade. Objetivo: Avaliar a capacidade de adesividade celular de Lactobacillus casei pelas características de hidrofobicidade e investigar a incorporação deste micro-organismo, na forma livre e encapsulada em alginato de cálcio, em queijo tipo coalho. Materiais e Métodos: Inicialmente verificaram-se as características de adesividade celular de Lactobacillus casei, por meio de testes de polaridade com xilol (caráter apolar, clorofórmio (caráter ácido e acetato de etila (caráter básico. Para crescimento celular do micro-organismo, foi elaborado um meio de cultura a base de soro de leite, sendo posteriormente microencapsulado em alginato de cálcio e seco a 35ºC. As microcápsulas secas, assim como as células livres, foram incorporadas durante a elaboração do queijo tipo coalho. Resultados: Foi possível atingir uma alta concentração celular no meio à base de soro de leite (108 UFC/mL, diminuindo uma unidade logarítmica durante a microencapsulação e secagem. Os queijos apresentaram contagem de bactérias láticas após 10 dias de maturação de 1,4x108 UFC/g para o queijo com Lactobacillus casei livre e 9,1x107 UFC/g para o queijo com Lactobacillus casei microencapsulado. Conclusão: Desta forma, os queijos obtidos com a introdução de ambas as formas de Lactobacillus casei apresentaram concentrações de células viáveis consideradas adequadas para alimentos probióticos, podendo concluir que o queijo tipo coalho é um produto com características interessantes para a veiculação de micro-organismos probióticos

  12. Plasmin and coagulant activities in a minicurd model system: Study of technological parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vélez, M A; Perotti, M C; Candioti, M C; Bergamini, C V; Hynes, E R

    2016-09-01

    The effect of scalding temperature of the curd, the inclusion of a washing step, and the pH at whey drainage on plasmin and coagulant activities were assessed in a minicurd model of young hard cooked cheese. The variables were tested as follows: draining pH was assayed at 3 levels (4.6, 5.6, and 6.4), curd scalding temperature was tested at 50 and 56°C, and washing of the curd was examined at 2 levels (no washing step, and the replacement of the whey by water). Increase in pH at whey drainage and washing of the curd had a positive effect on plasmin activity, which was also evidenced by compatible changes in soluble peptide profiles. No effect of increased cooking temperature was found on plasmin activity. Plasminogen activation was not verified in any treatment. As for coagulant, lower pH values at whey drainage and a decrease in curd cooking temperature increased its activity; washing of the curd showed no influence on coagulant residual activity. These results were consistent with proteolysis described by peptide profiles, electrophoresis, and soluble nitrogen fractions. Copyright © 2016 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. 21 CFR 133.184 - Roquefort cheese, sheep's milk blue-mold, and blue-mold cheese from sheep's milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Roquefort cheese, sheep's milk blue-mold, and blue-mold cheese from sheep's milk. 133.184 Section 133.184 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Cheese and Related Products § 133.184 Roquefort cheese...

  14. Sensory evaluation and microbiological characterization of autochthonous Sombor cheese

    OpenAIRE

    Mijačević Zora; Bulajić Snežana

    2008-01-01

    In this paper the results of organoleptic evaluation, chemical and microbiological analysis of Sombor cheese were presented. Sombor cheese is a type of autochthonous cheese whose traditional processing method is still in use in areas of northern part of Serbia. The sensory profile, chemical and microbiological analysis were performed on 19 samples of traditionally made cheese collected from two households. The sensory evaluation of cheese samples showed its variation in taste and consistency,...

  15. Behavior of Staphylococcus aureus in culture broth, in raw and thermized milk, and during processing and storage of traditional Greek Graviera cheese in the presence or absence of Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris M104, a wild, novel nisin A-producing raw milk isolate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samelis, John; Lianou, Alexandra; Pappa, Eleni C; Bogovič-Matijašić, Bojana; Parapouli, Maria; Kakouri, Athanasia; Rogelj, Irena

    2014-10-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the behavior of Staphylococcus aureus during processing, ripening, and storage of traditional Greek Graviera cheese in accordance with European Union Regulation 1441/2007 for coagulase-positive staphylococci in thermized milk cheeses. Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris M104, a wild, novel nisin A-producing (NisA+) strain, also was evaluated as an antistaphylococcal adjunct. A three-strain cocktail of enterotoxigenic (Ent+) S. aureus increased by approximately 2 log CFU/ml when co-inoculated (at approximately 3 log CFU/ml) in thermized Graviera cheese milk (TGCM; 63°C for 30 s) with commercial starter culture (CSC) and/or strain M104 at approximately 6 log CFU/ml and then incubated at 37°C for 3 h. However, after 6 h at 37°C, significant retarding effects on S. aureus growth were noted in the order TGCM + M104 > TGCM + CSC = TGCM + CSC + M104 > TGCM. Additional incubation of TGCM cultures at 18°C for 66 h resulted in a 1.2-log reduction (P nisin-encoding genes in the CSC plus M104 cheeses and their corresponding microbial consortia only. A high level of selective survival of a naturally nisin-resistant EntC z S. aureus strain from the cocktail was noted in CSC + M104 cheeses and in coculture with the NisA + M104 strain in M-17 broth. In conclusion, although S. aureus growth inhibition is assured during Graviera cheese ripening, early growth of the pathogen during milk curdling and curd cooking operations may occur. Nisin-resistant S. aureus strains that may contaminate Graviera cheese milks postthermally may be difficult to control even by the application of the NisA + L. lactis subsp. cremoris strain M104 as a bioprotective adjunct culture.

  16. Optimization of conditions for probiotic curd formulation by Enterococcus faecium MTCC 5695 with probiotic properties using response surface methodology

    OpenAIRE

    Ramakrishnan, Vrinda; Goveas, Louella Concepta; Prakash, Maya; Halami, Prakash M.; Narayan, Bhaskar

    2012-01-01

    Enterococcus faecium MTCC 5695 possessing potential probiotic properties as well as enterocin producing ability was used as starter culture. Effect of time (12–24 h) and inoculum level (3–7 % v/v) on cell growth, bacteriocin production, antioxidant property, titrable acidity and pH of curd was studied by response surface methodology (RSM). The optimized conditions were 26.48 h and 2.17%v/v inoculum and the second order model validated. Co cultivation studies revealed that the formulated produ...

  17. PENGARUH KOAGULAN DAN KONDISI KOAGULASI TERHADAP PROFIL PROTEIN CURD KEDELAI SERTA KORELASINYA TERHADAP TEKSTUR [Effect of Coagulant and Coagulation Condition to Soybean Curd Protein Profile and Its Correlation to Texture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dahrul Syah1,2*

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The research aims to study the effect of coagulation parameters to the electrophoretical profile of coagulated soybean protein as well as to texture properties and perception. Several coagulation parameters such as type of coagulant, concentration or age of coagulant, and coagulation temperature were studied. The type of coagulant used in this study were GDL (glucono delta Lactone and tofu whey. The concentrations of GDL were 0.4%, 0.8%, and 1.2% and the ages of tofu whey were 1 day, 2 days, and 3 days. Two coagulation temperatures, 60°C and 80°C, were applied. The results of curd protein profile and texture profile analysis showed that coagulant type and coagulation condition did not affect the electrophoretical profile of soybean coagulated protein. However, the proportion of each subunit was affected significantly. Texture profiles, such as hardness, cohesiveness, and gumminess, were also affected by coagulant type and coagulation condition. Based on the subunits proportion, it can be concluded that 11 S and 7S protein proportions as well as the 11S/7S ratio correlated significantly with the hardness and gumminess of soybean curd made by tofu whey.

  18. Producing specific milks for speciality cheeses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertoni, G; Calamari, L; Maianti, M G

    2001-05-01

    Protected denomination of origin (PDO) cheeses have distinctive sensorial characteristics. They can be made only from raw milk possessing specific features, which is processed through the 'art' of the cheesemaker. In general, the distinctive sensorial traits of PDO cheese cannot be achieved under different environmental-production conditions for two main reasons: (1) some milk features are linked to specific animal production systems; (2) cheese ripening is affected by the interaction between milk (specific) and the traditional technology applied to the transformation process (non-specific). Also, the environment for a good ripening stage can be quite specific and not reproducible. With reference to milk, factors of typicality are species and/or breed, pedoclimatic conditions, animal management system and feeding. Other factors that influence cheese quality are milk treatments, milk processing and the ripening procedures. The technology applied to most cheeses currently known as PDO utilizes only raw milk, rennet and natural lactic acid bacteria, so that milk must be, at its origin, suitable for processing. The specific milk characteristics that ensure a high success rate for PDO cheeses are high protein content and good renneting properties, appropriate fat content with appropriate fatty acid composition and the presence of chemical flavours originating from local feeds. Moreover, an appropriate microflora is also of major importance. The factors that contribute to achieving milk suitable for transformation into PDO cheese are genetics, age, lactation stage, season and climate, general management and health conditions, milking and particularly feeding, which affect nutrient availability, endocrine response and health status, and also the presence of microbes and chemical substances which enrich or reduce the milk-cheese quality. Many of these factors are regulated by the Producer Associations. However, the secret of the success of PDO cheeses is the combination of

  19. Viability and functional integrity of washed platelets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pineda, A.A.; Zylstra, V.W.; Clare, D.E.; Dewanjee, M.K.; Forstrom, L.A.

    1989-07-01

    The viability and functional integrity of saline- and ACD-saline-washed platelets were compared with those of unwashed platelets. After template bleeding time (TBT) was measured, 15 healthy volunteers underwent plateletpheresis and ingested 600 mg of aspirin. Autologous /sup 111/In-labeled platelets were transfused: unwashed (n = 5), washed with 0.9 percent saline solution (SS) (n = 5), and washed with a buffered 12.6 percent solution of ACD-A in 0.9 percent saline solution (n = 5). After transfusion, we measured TBT at 1, 4, and 24 hours; platelet survival at 10 minutes and 1, 4, and 24 hours and daily for 6 days; and the percentage of uptake in liver and spleen by quantitative whole-body radionuclide scintigraphy at 24 and 190 hours. We found that saline washing affected platelet recovery, 23.47 +/- 12 percent (p less than 0.001) as compared to 52.43 +/- 17 percent (p less than 0.002) for ACD-saline and 73.17 +/- 8 percent for control; that saline washing resulted in a greater liver uptake than control and ACD-saline-washed platelets (31.9 +/- 8% (p less than 0.001) vs 17.7 +/- 4.1 and 19.3 +/- 2.1% (p greater than 0.1), respectively); that, unlike control and ACD-saline-washed platelets, saline-washed platelets did not shorten bleeding time; and that neither type of washing affected survival. Although ACD-saline washing affects recovery, it also results in intact function, normal survival, higher recovery than SS platelets, and no significant liver uptake.

  20. Growth of Pseudomonas spp. in cottage cheese

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Nina Bjerre; Dalgaard, Paw

    of spoilage microorganisms in cottage cheese can cause undesirable alterations in flavour, odour, appearance and texture. Contamination and growth of psychrotolerant pseudomonads including Pseudomonas fragi and Pseudomonas putida has been reported for cottage cheese but the influence of these bacteria...... on product spoilage and shelf-life remains poorly described. The present study used a quantitative microbial ecology approach to model and predict the effect of product characteristics and storage conditions on growth of psychrotolerant pseudomonads in cottage cheese. The effect of temperature (5-15˚C) and p...

  1. Physical Properties of Milk Cincau Curd on Different Concentrations of Green Cincau Leaf (Cyclea barbata L.Miers)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertanto, B. S.; Kartikasari, L. R.; Swastike, Winny; Cahyadi, M.; Yuliani, A.; Nuhriawangsa, A. M. P.

    2017-04-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of cincau leaf (Cyclea barbata L.Miers) on the physical properties of milk cincau curd. The materials of this research were milk cow of Local Friesian Holstein and leaves of cincau. This research used one way randomized design. The treatment of this research was concentration ratio between cincau leaf and cow milk (w/v): A1 = 10%:90%; A2 = 20%:80%; A3 = 30%:70%. The data was analyzed using ANOVA, and differences between treatment means were further analysed using Duncan’s New Multiple Range Test. Our study revealed that different concentrations of cincau leaf significantly affected cohesiveness, chewiness, hardness, gumminess, springiness, pH and syneresis (p<0.01). However, it did not affect adhesiveness. In addition, the level of 30% of cincau leaf increased cohesiveness, and the level of 20% increased chewiness, hardness, gumminess, springiness, pH. On the other hand, syneresis decreased at the level of 20%. It can be concluded that the addition cincau leaf up to a level of 20% improved the physical properties of milk cincau curd.

  2. 49 CFR 230.60 - Time of washing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Boilers and Appurtenances Washing Boilers § 230.60 Time of washing. (a) Frequency of washing. All boilers shall thoroughly be washed... inspection. The date of the boiler wash shall be noted on the FRA Form No. 1 or FRA Form No. 3. (See appendix...

  3. Evaluation of Natural Food Preservatives in Domestic and Imported Cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sun-Young; Han, Noori; Kim, Sun-Young; Yoo, Mi-Young; Paik, Hyun-Dong; Lim, Sang-Dong

    2016-01-01

    In milk and milk products, a number of organic acids naturally occur. We investigated the contents of some naturally occurred food preservatives (sorbic acid, benzoic acid, propionic acid, nitrite, and nitrate) contained in domestic and imported cheeses to establish the standard for the allowable range of food preservatives content in cheese. 8 kinds of domestic precheeses (n=104), 16 kinds of domestic cured cheeses (n=204) and 40 kinds of imported cheeses (n=74) were collected. Each domestic cheese was aged for a suitable number of months and stored for 2 mon at 5℃ and 10℃. No preservatives were detected in domestic soft and fresh cheeses, except cream cheese. In case of semi-hard cheeses, 2-5 mg/kg of benzoic acid was detected after 1-2 mon of aging. In imported cheeses, only benzoic acid and propionic acid were detected. The average benzoic acid and propionic acid contents in semi-hard cheese were 8.73 mg/kg and 18.78 mg/kg, respectively. Specifically, 1.16 mg/kg and 6.80 mg/kg of benzoic acid and propionic acid, respectively, were contained in soft cheese, 3.27 mg/kg and 2.84 mg/kg, respectively, in fresh cheese, 1.87 mg/kg and not detected, respectively, in hard cheese, and 2.07 mg/kg and 182.26 mg/kg, respectively, in blended processed cheese.

  4. Evaluation of Natural Food Preservatives in Domestic and Imported Cheese

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paik, Hyun-Dong

    2016-01-01

    In milk and milk products, a number of organic acids naturally occur. We investigated the contents of some naturally occurred food preservatives (sorbic acid, benzoic acid, propionic acid, nitrite, and nitrate) contained in domestic and imported cheeses to establish the standard for the allowable range of food preservatives content in cheese. 8 kinds of domestic precheeses (n=104), 16 kinds of domestic cured cheeses (n=204) and 40 kinds of imported cheeses (n=74) were collected. Each domestic cheese was aged for a suitable number of months and stored for 2 mon at 5℃ and 10℃. No preservatives were detected in domestic soft and fresh cheeses, except cream cheese. In case of semi-hard cheeses, 2-5 mg/kg of benzoic acid was detected after 1-2 mon of aging. In imported cheeses, only benzoic acid and propionic acid were detected. The average benzoic acid and propionic acid contents in semi-hard cheese were 8.73 mg/kg and 18.78 mg/kg, respectively. Specifically, 1.16 mg/kg and 6.80 mg/kg of benzoic acid and propionic acid, respectively, were contained in soft cheese, 3.27 mg/kg and 2.84 mg/kg, respectively, in fresh cheese, 1.87 mg/kg and not detected, respectively, in hard cheese, and 2.07 mg/kg and 182.26 mg/kg, respectively, in blended processed cheese. PMID:27621695

  5. 'WARA' A WEST AFRICAN SOFT CHEESE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Babalobi

    2011-12-07

    1]. However, soft cheese produced by local processors has high microbial load and pathogenic isolates because of the unhygienic methods of processing and lack of standards in the processing techniques. Adegoke et al.

  6. Environmental diagnosis of the washing machine motor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erichsen, Hanne K. Linnet

    1997-01-01

    An environmental diagnosis of the washing machine focusing on the motor is performed. The goal of the diagnosis is to designate environmental focus points in the product. The LCA of the washing machine showed impact potentials from the life cycle of the product (see: LCA of a washing machine......). The diagnosis points to which of the impact potentials are considered to be problematic, and locates where in the product the problems are situated.The diagnosis is also used for showing which effects ideas for changes in the motor have on the environment. The ideas which are looked upon are: motor efficiency...

  7. Proteolysis of Livanjski cheese during ripening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samir KALIT

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Livanjski cheese belongs to the group of hard cheeses which is traditionally produced in Livno (Bosnia and Herzegovina. Proteolytic changes during the ripening of Livanjski cheese have not been investigated extensively. The aim of this paper was to determine its proteolytic changes during the different stages of ripening. Five Livanjski cheeses (from raw cow’s or a mixture of sheep’s and cow’s milk were observed during the ripening to evaluate its typical proteolytic profile. An electophoretic profile of Livanjski cheese was determined by Urea-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (urea-PAGE and a densitometric evaluation of the urea-PAGE gels was performed using a densitometer. The water-soluble nitrogen fraction in the total nitrogen (WSN %TN and the 12%-TCA-soluble nitrogen fraction in the total nitrogen (TCA-SN %TN of the cheese were determined using the Kjeldahl method. Degradation of αs1-casein by chymosin caused a significant decrease (P < 0.05 of relative content of this protein in Livanjski cheese at the sixth week point of ripening. Due to the activity of chymosin on αs1-casein, αs1-I-casein and αs1-II-casein developed, which caused a significant increase (P < 0.05 of Index alpha. The relative ratio of β-casein significantly decreased (P < 0.05 during ripening leading to a significant accumulation (P < 0.05 of degraded product (sum γ1-casein, γ2-casein and γ3-casein. These proteolytic changes caused a significant increase (P < 0.05 of Index betta. Accumulation of medium, small peptides and amino acids caused a significant (P < 0.05 increase of the relative content of WSN %TN and TCA-SN %TN. In general, proteolysis of Livanjski cheese during ripening was moderate probably due to the low moisture content and low water activity, although it was produced from raw milk. Taking into account that the ratio β-casein : αs1-casein at the end of ripening was 1.46, it could be concluded that degradation of αs1-casein could be the

  8. Biogenic amines in Italian Pecorino cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria eSchirone

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The quality of distinctive artisanal cheeses is closely associated with the territory of production and its traditions. Pedoclimatic characteristics, genetic autochthonous variations and anthropic components create an environment so specific that it would be extremely difficult to reproduce elsewhere. Pecorino cheese is included in this sector of the market and is widely diffused in Italy (approximately 53.727t of production. Pecorino is a common name given to indicate Italian cheeses made exclusively from pure ewes' milk characterized by a high content of fat matter and it is mainly produced in the middle and south of Italy by traditional procedures from raw or thermized milk. The microbiota plays a major role in the development of the organoleptic characteristics of the cheese but it can also be responsible for the accumulation of undesirable substances, such as biogenic amines (BA. Several factors can contribute to the qualitative and quantitative profiles of BA’s in Pecorino cheese such as environmental hygienic conditions, pH, salt concentration, aw, fat content, pasteurization of milk, decarboxylase microorganisms, starter cultures, temperature and time of ripening, storage, part of the cheese (core, edge and the presence of cofactor. Generally, the total content of BA’s can range from about 100-2400 mg/kg, with a prevalence of toxicologically important BA’s, tyramine and histamine. The presence of BA in Pecorino cheeses is becoming increasingly important to consumers and cheese-maker alike, due to the potential threats of toxicity to humans and consequent trade implications.

  9. The Effect of the Addition of Active Digester Effluent for Start-up Accelerator in Anaerobic Digestion of Soybean Curd Industry Waste Water (Basic Research for Biogas Power Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arini Wresta

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Biogas production from soybean curd industry waste water was studied in laboratory scale to improve the application of anaerobic digestion process. The problem with the soybean curd waste water was the fact that it does not sufficiently contain anaerobic microorganisms required in biogas production. Therefore, it is necessary to add a well-developed population of anaerobic microorganisms to accelerate the start-up of the anerobic digestion. This research was aimed to verify the influence of the addition of active digester effluent into the soybean curd waste water batches in an anaerobic digestion process. Batch experiments were done in two digesters. The first digester was only fed with soybean curd waste water while the second digester was fed with soybean curd waste water and active digester effluent from a digester processing cow manure which was very rich in anaerobic microorganism consortium. The results indicated that soybean curd industry waste water did not contain methanogenic bacteria but there existed some acidogenic bacteria. The addition of active digester effluent accelerated the anaerobic digestion start-up and directed the process pathway towards methanogenic process so that more methane was obtained. The high methane content obtained (more than 64% volume was very potential for power generation. The capacity of soybean curd industry must be as high as 697.13 kg soybean per day to generate the electric energy of 8.4 kWh.

  10. Whey cheese: membrane technology to increase yields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riera, Francisco; González, Pablo; Muro, Claudia

    2016-02-01

    Sweet cheese whey has been used to obtain whey cheese without the addition of milk. Pre-treated whey was concentrated by nanofiltration (NF) at different concentration ratios (2, 2.5 and 2.8) or by reverse osmosis (RO) (2-3 times). After the concentration, whey was acidified with lactic acid until a final pH of 4.6-4.8, and heated to temperatures between 85 and 90 °C. The coagulated fraction (supernatant) was collected and freely drained over 4 h. The cheese-whey yield and protein, fat, lactose and ash recoveries in the final product were calculated. The membrane pre-concentration step caused an increase in the whey-cheese yield. The final composition of products was compared with traditional cheese-whey manufacture products (without membrane concentration). Final cheese yields found were to be between 5 and 19.6%, which are higher than those achieved using the traditional 'Requesón' process.

  11. Collaborative study on the determination of natamycin in cheese and cheese rind 1984

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruig, de W.G.; Hollman, P.C.H.

    1985-01-01

    A collaborative test on the determination of natamycin in cheese and cheese rind was carried out. In total 38 laboratorles from 13 countries were participating . Eight samples, consistlog of 4 duplicates we re investigated by a spectrometric and an HPLC method.

  12. A high-throughput cheese manufacturing model for effective cheese starter screening.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bachmann, H.; Kruijswijk, Z.; Molenaar, D.; Kleerebezem, M.; van Hylckama Vlieg, J.E.T.

    2009-01-01

    Cheese making is a process in which enzymatic coagulation of milk is followed by protein separation, carbohydrate removal, and an extended bacterial fermentation. The number of variables in this complex process that influence cheese quality is so large that the developments of new manufacturing

  13. A high-throughput cheese manufacturing model for effective cheese starter culture screening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bachmann, H.; Kruijswijk, Z.; Molenaar, D.; Kleerebezem, M.; Hylckama Vlieg, van J.E.T.

    2009-01-01

    Cheese making is a process in which enzymatic coagulation of milk is followed by protein separation, carbohydrate removal, and an extended bacterial fermentation. The number of variables in this complex process that influence cheese quality is so large that the developments of new manufacturing

  14. Isolation of Listeria monocytogenes from milks used for Iranian traditional cheese in Lighvan cheese factories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moosavy, Mir-Hassan; Esmaeili, Saber; Mostafavi, Ehsan; Bagheri Amiri, Fahimeh

    2014-01-01

    Traditional Lighvan cheese is a semi-hard cheese which has a popular market in Iran and neighboring countries. The aim of this study was evaluating the contamination of milks used for Lighvan cheese making with Listeria monocytogenes. Raw milk samples were randomly collected from different cheese producing factories (sampling carried out from large milk tanks used cheese making in factories). Isolation of L. monocytogenes was performed according to ISO 11290 and biochemical tests were done to identify and confirm L. monocytogenes. 9 samples (50%) of the 18 collected samples from milk tanks in Lighvan cheese producing factories were contaminated with L. monocytogenes. The concentration of L. monocytogenes in all 9 positive samples was 40 CFU/ml. This study is the first report of L. monocytogenes contamination in raw milks used for Lighvan cheese production in Iran. Regarding the fact that these cheeses are produced from raw milk and no heating process is performed on them its milk contamination can be a potential risk for consumers.

  15. Bacterial exchange in household washing machines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris eCallewaert

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Household washing machines launder soiled clothes and textiles, but do not sterilize them. We investigated the microbial exchange occurring in five household washing machines. Samples from a new cotton T-shirt were laundered together with a normal laundry load. Analyses were performed on the influent water and the ingoing cotton samples, as well as the greywater and the washed cotton samples. The number of living bacteria was generally not lower in the washing machine effluent water as compared to the influent water. The laundering process caused a microbial exchange of influent water bacteria, skin- and clothes-related bacteria and biofilm-related bacteria in the washing machine. A variety of biofilm-producing bacteria were enriched in the effluent after laundering, although their presence in the cotton sample was low. Nearly all bacterial genera detected on the initial cotton sample were still present in the washed cotton samples. A selection for typical skin- and clothes-related microbial species occurred in the cotton samples after laundering. Accordingly, malodour-causing microbial species might be further distributed to other clothes. The bacteria on the ingoing textiles contributed for a large part to the microbiome found in the textiles after laundering.

  16. LACTIC ACID BACTERIA FLORA OF KONYA KUFLU CHEESE: A TRADITIONAL CHEESE FROM KONYA PROVINCE IN TURKEY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziba Guley

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to characterize the lactic acid bacteria flora of mature Konya Kuflu cheese. Konya Kuflu cheese is a traditional blue cheese which is produced from raw milk without starter culture addition and mould growth occurs in uncontrolled conditions during its ripening. Lactic acid bacteria (LAB isolated from 9 mature Konya Kuflu cheese samples were investigated using a combination of conventional biochemical tests, API test kits, and molecular approaches. For some isolates, different results were obtained according to the identification technique. The overall LAB profile of Konya Kuflu cheese samples revealed that Lactobacillus brevis, Lactobacillus paracasei/Lactobacillus casei, Lactobacillus plantarum, Enterococcus faecium, and Enterococcus faecalis are the predominant species. In addition, 1 Pediococcus parvulus and 1 Enterococcus durans were also identified.

  17. Chemical washing of contaminated soils and photocatalytic treatments of spent soil washing effluent

    OpenAIRE

    Race, Marco

    2016-01-01

    This dissertation has been addressed to study the reclamation of heavy metal contaminated soils by soil washing, and to investigate the feasibility of photocatalytic processes for the treatment of the spent soil washing solution (SSWS). Indeed, the collected SSWS, containing the extracted metals and chelating agents, represents one of the main drawbacks of the washing technique, as it has to be submitted to further treatments for a complete detoxification before being discharged into the envi...

  18. Cheese

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Vivi Raundahl; Lucey, J.A.

    2016-01-01

    recombinant chymosin, which is produced by several genetically modified organisms. The coagulation reaction involves two phases: the primary enzymatic phase involving hydrolysis of κ-casein and the secondary aggregation reaction that involves the association of micelles that have most of their κ......-casein peptides hydrolyzed by rennet. The rennet coagulation of milk is greatly impacted by environmental conditions such as temperature, pH, and calcium content, and by genetic differences that affects the overall composition of the milk...

  19. Chemometrics approach to substrate development, case: semisyntetic cheese

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Per Væggemose; Hansen, Birgitte Vedel

    1998-01-01

    from food production facilities.The Chemometrics approach to substrate development is illustrated by the development of a semisyntetic cheese substrate. Growth, colour formation and mycotoxin production of 6 cheese related fungi were studied on 9 types of natural cheeses and 24 synthetic cheese...... substrates and compared using principal component analysis (PCA). The synthetic cheese substrates contained various amounts of Ca, K, Mg, Na, P, Fe, Cu, Zn, lactate, lactose and casein. In this manner a robust, well-defined and easy prepared laboratory cheese substrate was developed for Penicillium commune......, the most frequently occurring contaminant on semi-hard cheese. Growth experiments on the substrate were repeatable and reproducible. The substrate was also suitable for the starter P. camemberti. Mineral elements in cheese were shown to have strong effect on growth, mycotoxin production and colour...

  20. Highlighting the microbial diversity of 12 French cheese varieties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugat-Bony, Eric; Garnier, Lucille; Denonfoux, Jeremie; Ferreira, Stéphanie; Sarthou, Anne-Sophie; Bonnarme, Pascal; Irlinger, Françoise

    2016-12-05

    Surface-ripened cheeses host complex microbial communities responsible for the transformation of milk into cheese as well as the development of important properties in terms of texture, color and sensory perception. In this study, we used high-throughput amplicon sequencing to decipher the bacterial and fungal diversity of 60 cheeses belonging to 12 popular French cheese varieties. Using this approach, 76 bacterial and 44 fungal phylotypes were identified. Major differences were observed between rind and core samples and also according to cheese varieties and manufacturing processes. Occurrence analysis revealed the presence of widespread taxa as well as operational taxonomic units (OTUs) specific to one or several cheese varieties. Finally, we observed patterns specific to the cheese production facility, supporting the importance of indigenous microorganisms for the microbial assemblage of cheese microbiota. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Quality evaluation of parmesan-type cheese: a chemometric approach

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jaster, Henrique; Campos, Anna Carolina Leonelli Pires de; Auer, Luciellen Bach; Los, Francine Gomes Basso; Salem, Renata Dinnies Santos; Esmerino, Luís Antônio; Nogueira, Alessandro; Demiate, Ivo Mottin

    2014-01-01

    Parmesan-type cheeses are the most consumed special cheeses in Brazil. It is generally sold in retail shops, either grated or in wedge-shaped pieces, and its quality varies considerably, which is reflected directly in its price...

  2. Chemical composition and microbial load of cheese produced using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aframomum sceptrum) on the chemical composition and microbial load of cheese was evaluated in a Completely Randomized Design. Cheese produced with 1% bear berry (Aframomum sceptrum) had the highest (P < 0.05) crude protein content ...

  3. Changes in the microbial composition of raw milk induced by thermization treatments applied prior to traditional Greek hard cheese processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samelis, John; Lianou, Alexandra; Kakouri, Athanasia; Delbès, Céline; Rogelj, Irena; Bogovic-Matijasić, Bojana; Montel, Marie-Christine

    2009-04-01

    The microbiological quality, safety, and composition of mixtures of ewe's and goat's milk (90:10) used for cheesemaking were evaluated before and after thermization at 60 and 67 degrees C for 30 s. Such mild thermal treatments are commonly applied to reduce natural contaminants of raw milk before processing for traditional hard Greek cheeses. Raw milk samples had an average total bacterial count of 7.3 log CFU/ml; most of these bacteria were lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and pseudomonads. The LAB flora of raw milk was dominated by enterococci (40.8%), followed by lactococci (20.4%), leuconostocs (18.4%), and mesophilic lactobacilli (10.2%). Enterococcus faecalis (30.1%) and Enterococcus faecium (13.7%) were the most common LAB isolates, followed by Enterococcus durans, Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis, Lactobacillus plantarum, and Leuconostoc lactis. Thermization at 60 degrees C for 30 s was effective for reducing raw milk contamination by enterobacteria (5.1 log CFU/ml), coagulase-positive staphylococci (3.3 log CFU/ml), and Listeria (present in 25-ml samples) to safe levels, but it also reduced mesophilic lactococci, leuconostocs, lactobacilli, and selected enterococci (72.0%) in thermized milk. Thermization at 67 degrees C for 30 s had a major inactivation effect on all bacterial groups. Two nisin-producing L. lactis subsp. lactis strains (M78 and M104) were isolated from raw milk, but neither nisin-producing nor other bacteriocin-producing LAB strains were isolated from thermized milk. Thus, thermization treatments control harmful bacteria but also may have a negative impact on milk quality by reducing desirable LAB and the biodiversity of raw milk bacteria overall, inactivating potentially protective LAB strains and enhancing the ability of potentially pathogenic enterococci to grow in fresh cheese curds.

  4. 21 CFR 133.186 - Sap sago cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Sap sago cheese. 133.186 Section 133.186 Food and... Products § 133.186 Sap sago cheese. (a) Description. (1) Sap sago cheese is the food prepared by the... method described in § 133.5. Sap sago cheese is not less than 5 months old. (2) One or more of the dairy...

  5. Evaluation of Natural Food Preservatives in Domestic and Imported Cheese

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Sun-Young; Han, Noori; Kim, Sun-Young; Yoo, Mi-Young; Paik, Hyun-Dong; Lim, Sang-Dong

    2016-01-01

    In milk and milk products, a number of organic acids naturally occur. We investigated the contents of some naturally occurred food preservatives (sorbic acid, benzoic acid, propionic acid, nitrite, and nitrate) contained in domestic and imported cheeses to establish the standard for the allowable range of food preservatives content in cheese. 8 kinds of domestic precheeses (n=104), 16 kinds of domestic cured cheeses (n=204) and 40 kinds of imported cheeses (n=74) were collected. Each domestic...

  6. The nutritional significance of cheese in the UK diet

    OpenAIRE

    Ash, Anthony; Wilbey, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Cheese currently suffers from an adverse nutritional image largely due to a perceived association between saturated fatty acid, cholesterol and the salt content of cheese with cardiovascular disease. However, cheese is also a rich source of essential nutrients such as, proteins, lipids, vitamins and minerals that play an integral part of a healthy diet. This review outlines the composition, structure and physiological characteristics of the nutritionally significant components of cheese, whil...

  7. Production And Some Properties Of Curd A Yoghurt-Like Product Manufactured By Potato Juice And Milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Aygun

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study a type of curd a yoghurt-like product YLP was prepared by potato juice and milk and some of its physico-chemical microbiological and sensory properties were examined. Analyses were applied to four yoghurt groups consisting of YLPs manufactured by using milk and potato juice at different ratios 0.5 for YLP1 1 for YLP2 and 1.5 for YLP3 and yoghurt produced using starter culture control group. Lactobacillus spp. and Lactococcus spp. numbers in all yoghurt samples manufactured by potato juice showed increase after the seventh day. The YLP manufactured by potato juice at a ratio of 0.5 was most preferred by panelists among the other YLP samples and most similar to yoghurt with starter culture.

  8. Efficacies of sodium hypochlorite and quaternary ammonium sanitizers for reduction of norovirus and selected bacteria during ware-washing operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feliciano, Lizanel; Li, Jianrong; Lee, Jaesung; Pascall, Melvin A

    2012-01-01

    Cross-contamination of ready-to-eat (RTE) foods with pathogens on contaminated tableware and food preparation utensils is an important factor associated with foodborne illnesses. To prevent this, restaurants and food service establishments are required to achieve a minimum microbial reduction of 5 logs from these surfaces. This study evaluated the sanitization efficacies of ware-washing protocols (manual and mechanical) used in restaurants to clean tableware items. Ceramic plates, drinking glasses and stainless steel forks were used as the food contact surfaces. These were contaminated with cream cheese and reduced-fat milk inoculated with murine norovirus (MNV-1), Escherichia coli K-12 and Listeria innocua. The sanitizing solutions tested were sodium hypochlorite (chlorine), quaternary ammonium (QAC) and tap water (control). During the study, the survivability and response to the experimental conditions of the bacterial species was compared with that of MNV-1. The results showed that current ware-washing protocols used to remove bacteria from tableware items were not sufficient to achieve a 5 log reduction in MNV-1 titer. After washing, a maximum of 3 log reduction in the virus were obtained. It was concluded that MNV-1 appeared to be more resistant to both the washing process and the sanitizers when compared with E. coli K-12 and L. innocua.

  9. Efficacies of sodium hypochlorite and quaternary ammonium sanitizers for reduction of norovirus and selected bacteria during ware-washing operations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lizanel Feliciano

    Full Text Available Cross-contamination of ready-to-eat (RTE foods with pathogens on contaminated tableware and food preparation utensils is an important factor associated with foodborne illnesses. To prevent this, restaurants and food service establishments are required to achieve a minimum microbial reduction of 5 logs from these surfaces. This study evaluated the sanitization efficacies of ware-washing protocols (manual and mechanical used in restaurants to clean tableware items. Ceramic plates, drinking glasses and stainless steel forks were used as the food contact surfaces. These were contaminated with cream cheese and reduced-fat milk inoculated with murine norovirus (MNV-1, Escherichia coli K-12 and Listeria innocua. The sanitizing solutions tested were sodium hypochlorite (chlorine, quaternary ammonium (QAC and tap water (control. During the study, the survivability and response to the experimental conditions of the bacterial species was compared with that of MNV-1. The results showed that current ware-washing protocols used to remove bacteria from tableware items were not sufficient to achieve a 5 log reduction in MNV-1 titer. After washing, a maximum of 3 log reduction in the virus were obtained. It was concluded that MNV-1 appeared to be more resistant to both the washing process and the sanitizers when compared with E. coli K-12 and L. innocua.

  10. Determination of histamine in Iranian cheese using enzyme-linked ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    john

    African Journal of Biotechnology Vol. 12(3), pp. 308-310, 16 January, 2013. Available online ... cheese were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method in Iran. In the two cheese samples of the 44 samples .... more histamine than fresh cheese (Numanoglu et al.,. 2008). This can be explained by the ...

  11. 7 CFR 58.512 - Cheese vats or tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Cheese vats or tanks. 58.512 Section 58.512 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....512 Cheese vats or tanks. (a) Cheese vats or tanks shall meet the requirements of § 58.416. When...

  12. Quality of Trappist cheese from Croatian dairy plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anđela Merćep

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents technological parameters, basic chemical composition and sensory evaluation, as well as the yield of 146 samples of Trappist cheese. In terms of water content in non-fat matter (56.36-58.31 %, Trappist cheese belongs to the group of semi-hard cheeses, and in terms of content of fat in dry matter (46.06-48.63 %, it belongs to the group of full-fat cheeses. In four cheese samples E. coli was determined within microbiological parameters, whereas other researched bacteria were not determined. Cheese has a shape of a symmetrical ring and it has a homogenous yellow color of protective coating. Mean mass value of one cheese ring is from 2.50 to 2.55 kg. The body of cheese has a homogenous light yellow color, which is brighter along the edges. The cheese holes have the size of a pea; they are bright and patterned over the whole surface of cross section. Consistency of cheese body is elastic, soft and interconnected. The cheese has mild, pure lactic and acidic taste and odor, and it is moderately salty. The results of sensory score show that even 91.78 % of cheese samples from experimental production can be assigned to the first quality class, whereas 8.22 % of samples belong to the second quality class.

  13. Comparative Evaluation of Cheese samples treated with Honey and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of honey and thyme solutions in extending the shelf life and enhancing the nutritional and sensory qualities of Wara, the West African soft cheese. The control treatment (A) was cheese kept in the whey, while Treatments B and C were cheese samples kept in Thyme and Honey ...

  14. 7 CFR 58.737 - Pasteurized process cheese food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pasteurized process cheese food. 58.737 Section 58.737... Finished Products § 58.737 Pasteurized process cheese food. Shall conform to the provisions of the Definitions and Standards of Identity for Pasteurized Process Cheese Food and Related Products, Food and Drug...

  15. 7 CFR 58.736 - Pasteurized process cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pasteurized process cheese. 58.736 Section 58.736... Finished Products § 58.736 Pasteurized process cheese. Shall conform to the provisions of the Definitions and Standards of Identity for Pasteurized Process Cheese and Related Products, Food and Drug...

  16. Using milk and cheese to demonstrate food chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Students usually do not realize how much chemistry is involved in making a food like cheese, and teachers may use milk and cheese to reveal interesting principles. Cheese is made by lowering the pH of milk, coagulating the protein with enzymes, and removing the whey with heat and pressure. Studies b...

  17. Who Moved My Cheese? Adjusting to Age-Related Changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, Nieli

    2012-01-01

    The popular book, Who Moved My Cheese? (Johnson, 1998) is a metaphor for change. This parable-like story has particular resonance with older adults who face many potential life-altering changes. The four characters in the book are looking for their cheese in a maze. Cheese represents whatever makes people happy. How each character adjusts to the…

  18. 21 CFR 133.193 - Spiced, flavored standardized cheeses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... of ingredients prescribed for that specific natural cheese variety promulgated pursuant to section 401 of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act. In addition a spiced and/or flavored standardized... standardized cheese shall include in addition to the varietal name of the natural cheese, a declaration of any...

  19. Emulsifying salt increase stability of cheese emulsions during holding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, Anni Bygvrå; Sijbrandij, Anna G.; Varming, Camilla

    2015-01-01

    In cheese powder production, cheese is mixed and melted with water and emulsifying salt to form an emulsion (cheese feed) which is required to remain stable at 60°C for 1h and during further processing until spray drying. Addition of emulsifying salts ensures this, but recent demands for reduction...

  20. Quality of red blood cells washed using a second wash sequence on an automated cell processor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Adele L; Turner, Tracey R; Kurach, Jayme D R; Acker, Jason P

    2015-10-01

    Washed red blood cells (RBCs) are indicated for immunoglobulin (Ig)A-deficient recipients when RBCs from IgA-deficient donors are not available. Canadian Blood Services recently began using the automated ACP 215 cell processor (Haemonetics Corporation) for RBC washing, and its suitability to produce IgA-deficient RBCs was investigated. RBCs produced from whole blood donations by the buffy coat (BC) and whole blood filtration (WBF) methods were washed using the ACP 215 or the COBE 2991 cell processors and IgA and total protein levels were assessed. A double-wash procedure using the ACP 215 was developed, tested, and validated by assessing hemolysis, hematocrit, recovery, and other in vitro quality variables in RBCs stored after washing, with and without irradiation. A single wash using the ACP 215 did not meet Canadian Standards Association recommendations for washing with more than 2 L of solution and could not consistently reduce IgA to levels suitable for IgA-deficient recipients (24/26 BC RBCs and 0/9 WBF RBCs had IgA levels < 0.05 mg/dL). Using a second wash sequence, all BC and WBF units were washed with more than 2 L and had levels of IgA of less than 0.05 mg/dL. During 7 days' postwash storage, with and without irradiation, double-washed RBCs met quality control criteria, except for the failure of one RBC unit for inadequate (69%) postwash recovery. Using the ACP 215, a double-wash procedure for the production of components for IgA-deficient recipients from either BC or WBF RBCs was developed and validated. © 2015 AABB.

  1. Habit Formation in Natural Cheese Consumption An Approach Based on Dynamic Demand Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    WAKABAYASHI, Katsufumi

    2010-01-01

    In expectation of growing cheese consumption, natural cheese production is being increased to reduce surplus milk and create high added value in raw milk. Other studies found positive trends in cheese consumption. However, those studies neither clarified recent trends, nor distinguished natural cheese from processed cheese. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the structure of natural cheese consumption, focusing on habit formation. We test structural changes in cheese demand using dynamic...

  2. Hand washing promotion for preventing diarrhoea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ejemot-Nwadiaro, Regina I; Ehiri, John E; Arikpo, Dachi; Meremikwu, Martin M; Critchley, Julia A

    2015-01-01

    Background Diarrhoea accounts for 1.8 million deaths in children in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). One of the identified strategies to prevent diarrhoea is hand washing. Objectives To assess the effects of hand washing promotion interventions on diarrhoeal episodes in children and adults. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group Specialized Register (27 May 2015); CENTRAL (published in the Cochrane Library 2015, Issue 5); MEDLINE (1966 to 27 May 2015); EMBASE (1974 to 27 May 2015); LILACS (1982 to 27 May 2015); PsycINFO (1967 to 27 May 2015); Science Citation Index and Social Science Citation Index (1981 to 27 May 2015); ERIC (1966 to 27 May 2015); SPECTR (2000 to 27 May 2015); Bibliomap (1990 to 27 May 2015); RoRe, The Grey Literature (2002 to 27 May 2015); World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trial Registry Platform (ICTRP), metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT), and reference lists of articles up to 27 May 2015. We also contacted researchers and organizations in the field. Selection criteria Individually randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and cluster-RCTs that compared the effects of hand washing interventions on diarrhoea episodes in children and adults with no intervention. Data collection and analysis Three review authors independently assessed trial eligibility, extracted data, and assessed risk of bias. We stratified the analyses for child day-care centres or schools, community, and hospital-based settings. Where appropriate, incidence rate ratios (IRR) were pooled using the generic inverse variance method and random-effects model with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). We used the GRADE approach to assess the quality of evidence. Main results We included 22 RCTs: 12 trials from child day-care centres or schools in mainly high-income countries (54,006 participants), nine community-based trials in LMICs (15,303 participants), and one hospital-based trial among people with acquired immune deficiency

  3. Comparison of Physicochemical and Sensory Properties between Cholesterol-removed Gouda Cheese and Gouda Cheese during Ripening

    OpenAIRE

    Jung, Ho-Jung; Ko, Eun-Jung; Kwak, Hae-Soo

    2013-01-01

    This study was performed to compare physicochemical and sensory properties of cholesterol-removed Gouda cheese (CRGC) and Gouda cheese made in the laboratory during ripening. Composition, short-chain free fatty acids (SCFFA), texture, color, and sensory properties were measured. In chemical composition analyses, moistures were significantly different between control cheeses (42.86%) and sample cheese (48.32%) (p0.05). The amount of cholesterol in control was 82.52 mg/100 g and the percentage ...

  4. [SATISFACTION WITH HOSPITAL MENU AND INCLUSION OF GOAT CHEESE AS DESSERT COMPARED WITH COW CHEESE].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio-Martín, Elehazara; Rojo-Martínez, Gemma; Caracuel, Ángel; Soriguer, Federico; Olivas, Lourdes; Libébana, Maribel; Roque, Rosa; Olveira, Gabriel

    2015-10-01

    the evaluation of hospital menus should be performed periodically to suit the needs of patients. Goat cheese may have nutritional benefits, compared to cow cheese. to evaluate patient satisfaction with the hospital menu and with the inclusion of goat cheese, given like dessert in hospital vs menu with cow cheese. a survey of hospital menu satisfaction and dessert (goat cheese (GC) vs cow cheese (CC)) in patients with basal diets was conducted. 334 surveys were analyzed. 46.7% were women. The average age was 58.16 ± 15.15 years and the average stay of 11.21 ± 11.53. Acceptance of the hospital menu was rated as "good" in a high percentage of respondents (91% Temperature, presentation 94%, humidity 75% and 84% schedule). Overall satisfaction lunch (1 to 10) was 7.31 ± 2.10 en CC vs 7.39 ± 1.75 GC (ns) and dessert satisfaction was 6.93 ± 2.89 vs 6.88 ± 3.52 (ns) (respectively). the overall satisfaction with the hospital menu is high and the acceptance of new dessert (QC) is equivalent to acceptance obtained with cow cheese, which could be included in the code of diets. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  5. Determining the minimum ripening time of artisanal Minas cheese, a traditional Brazilian cheese

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, José M.; Galinari, Éder; Pimentel-Filho, Natan J.; Ribeiro, José I.; Furtado, Mauro M.; Ferreira, Célia L.L.F.

    2015-01-01

    Physical, physicochemical, and microbiological changes were monitored in 256 samples of artisanal Minas cheese from eight producers from Serro region (Minas Gerais, Brazil) for 64 days of ripening to determine the minimum ripening time for the cheese to reach the safe microbiological limits established by Brazilian legislation. The cheeses were produced between dry season (April–September) and rainy season (October–March); 128 cheeses were ripened at room temperature (25 ± 4 °C), and 128 were ripened under refrigeration (8 ± 1 °C), as a control. No Listeria monocytogenes was found, but one cheese under refrigeration had Salmonella at first 15 days of ripening. However, after 22 days, the pathogen was not detected. Seventeen days was the minimum ripening time at room temperature to reduce at safe limits of total coliforms > 1000 cfu.g −1 ), Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus (> 100 cfu.g −1 ) in both periods of manufacture. Otherwise under refrigeration, as expected, the minimum ripening time was longer, 33 days in the dry season and 63 days in the rainy season. To sum up, we suggest that the ripening of artisanal Minas cheese be done at room temperature, since this condition shortens the time needed to reach the microbiological quality that falls within the safety parameters required by Brazilian law, and at the same time maintain the appearance and flavor characteristics of this traditional cheese. PMID:26221111

  6. Viscoelasticity of Edam cheese during its ripening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šárka Nedomová

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Series of the indentation of the ball (10 mm in diameter by the constant speed into blocks of Edam cheese has been conducted. The indentation tests were performed at different speeds (1, 5, 10, 20 and 100 mm/min, and the corresponding force–displacement responses were fitted with an analytical solution to obtain the time-dependent constants and the instantaneous force–displacement response. The measurement has been performed for the cheeses of different stages of their maturity. The dependence of the indentation force on the penetration depth has been evaluated. This dependence can be fitted by a polynom. The indentation force decreases with cheese fat content. It increases with the loading rate. Its value also decreases with the time of the cheese ripening. The recently proposed method for the indenation of the ball into viscoelastic solids has been used for our data analysis. This procedure, which needs the use of the numeric methods, enables to obtain stress relaxation moduli, which describe the viscoelasticity of the tested materials. The obtained moduli describe the stage of the cheese maturity.

  7. Fluorometric determination of histamine in cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, T L; Staruszkiewicz, W F

    1978-09-01

    Thirty-one samples of cheese obtained from retail outlets were analyzed for histamine, using an official AOAC fluorometric method. The types of cheese analyzed and the ranges of histamine found were: colby, 0.3--2.8; camembert, 0.4--4.2; cheddar, 1.2--5.8; gouda, 1.3--2.4; provolone, 2.0--23.5; roquefort, 1.0--16.8; mozzarella 1.6--5.0; and swiss, 0.4--250 mg histamine/100 g. Ten of the 12 samples of swiss cheese contained less than 16 mg histamine/100 g. The remaining 2 samples which contained 116 and 250 mg histamine/100 g were judged organoleptically to be of poor quality. An investigation of one processing facility showed that the production of histamine in swiss cheese may have been a result of a hydrogen peroxide/low temperature treatment of the milk supply. Recovery of histamine added to methanol extracts of cheese ranged from 93 to 105%. Histamine content was confirmed by high pressure liquid chromatographic analysis of the methanol extracts.

  8. Cheese whey wastewater: characterization and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Fátima; Prazeres, Ana R; Rivas, Javier

    2013-02-15

    Cheese whey wastewater (CWW) is a strong organic and saline effluent whose characterization and treatment have not been sufficiently addressed. CWW composition is highly variable due to raw milk used, the fraction of non valorized cheese whey and the amount of cleaning water used. Cheese whey wastewater generation is roughly four times the volume of processed milk. This research tries to conduct an exhaustive compilation of CWW characterization and a comparative study between the different features of CWW, cheese whey (CW), second cheese whey (SCW) and dairy industry effluents. Different CWW existing treatments have also been critically analyzed. The advantages and drawbacks in aerobic/anaerobic processes have been evaluated. The benefits of physicochemical pre-stages (i.e. precipitation, coagulation-flocculation) in biological aerobic systems are assessed. Pre-treatments based on coagulation or basic precipitation might allow the application of aerobic biodegradation treatments with no dilution requirements. Chemical precipitation with lime or NaOH produces a clean wastewater and a sludge rich in organic matter, N and P. Their use in agriculture may lead to the implementation of Zero discharge systems. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. 30 CFR 206.260 - Allocation of washed coal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Allocation of washed coal. 206.260 Section 206... MANAGEMENT PRODUCT VALUATION Federal Coal § 206.260 Allocation of washed coal. (a) When coal is subjected to washing, the washed coal must be allocated to the leases from which it was extracted. (b) When the net...

  10. 30 CFR 206.459 - Allocation of washed coal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Allocation of washed coal. 206.459 Section 206... MANAGEMENT PRODUCT VALUATION Indian Coal § 206.459 Allocation of washed coal. (a) When coal is subjected to washing, the washed coal must be allocated to the leases from which it was extracted. (b) When the net...

  11. Fit for washing; Human factors and ergonomic evaluations of washing machines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Busch, N.

    2006-01-01

    People do the laundry all over the world. About 500 million washing machines are in use at the moment. To reduce the heavy workload, washing machines were invented about 100 years ago. 50 years of innovations led to a reduction in water, energy and detergent consumption and the interface became

  12. Viability and contribution to proteolysis of an adjunct culture of Lactobacillus plantarum in two model cheese systems: cheddar cheese-type and soft-cheese type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milesi, M M; McSweeney, P L H; Hynes, E R

    2008-09-01

    The influence of the cheese-making process, ripening conditions and primary starter on the viability and proteolytic activity of an adjunct culture of Lactobacillus plantarum I91 was assessed in two miniature cheese models, representative of Cremoso Argentino and Cheddar cheeses. Cheeses with and without adjunct culture were made under controlled microbiological conditions and sampled during ripening for physicochemical and microbiological analyses. The addition of lactobacilli neither contributed to acid production nor caused changes to the composition of the cheeses. The strain studied exhibited good development and survival and showed a similar growth pattern in both cheese matrices. The adjunct culture caused changes to secondary proteolysis of both cheese types, which were evidenced by modification of peptide profiles and the increase in the levels of some individual amino acids as well as the total content of free amino acids. The changes observed were consistent with the acceleration of proteolysis in the two cheese models assayed. Lactobacillus plantarum I91 has desirable and robust technological properties, which makes it a suitable adjunct culture for cheese-making. Other cultures and environmental conditions prevailing in the food may affect the viability of adjunct cultures and its biochemical activities; this is the first report describing the successful performance of an adjunct culture of Lact. plantarum I91 in two different model cheese systems.

  13. Development of eco-friendly washing machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakidin Hamzah

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A portable, non-electric washing machine powered by human leg identical to cycling is produced in order to fulfil the need of varsity students to wash their clothes in a cheap, eco-friendly and time saving and also to do physical body exercises. A black plastic bin has been used as the main body. At the bottom lies the rotating disk to provide agitation to the water and also cleaning the clothes. Shaft and gears are also been used in the rotating and moving mechanism that is connected to the pedal. This eco-friendly washing machine with an affordable price will benefit the lower income family and also for the college students.

  14. Findings of Escherichia coli and Enterococcus spp. in homemade cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tambur Zoran

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available During the period from February until March 2004, 108 samples of soft cheese originating from markets of Pancevo, Subotica and Belgrade were examined. Microbiological analyses of the cheese samples to the presence of Escherichia coli was performed using methods described in the Regulations on methods for performing microbiological analyses and super analyses of consumer articles, while the presence of bacteria Enteroccocus spp. was performed on the dexter agar. From 108 samples of soft cheese from the territories of Pancevo, Belgrade and Subotica were isolated: Enterococcus spp. from 96% and Escherichia coli from 69%, cheese samples. Verocytotoxic E.coli was not isolated from any of the taken cheese samples.

  15. Microbial penicillinase in soft types of cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledford, R A; Deibel, R H

    1967-07-01

    Penicillinase activity was found in commercial samples of Limburger, Liederkranz, and Brick, as well as in Roquefort and Danish Blue cheeses. The numbers of penicillinase-producing bacteria in the cheese flora were estimated by use of the most probable numbers technique coupled with penicillinase determinations on the individual cultures. Although streptococci constituted the predominant flora in most of the samples, significant numbers of penicillinase-producing bacteria were also observed. Six of seven penicillinase-producing isolates that were studied in detail were micrococci; the other was an unidentified gram-positive, catalase-positive rod. The results suggest the widespread occurrence of penicillinase-forming micrococci on the surfaces of soft types of cheese.

  16. Washing Machine Injuries of the Upper Extremity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suresh, S S

    2008-01-01

    Washing machines are part of every household and there are various reports of upper extremity injuries due to inadequate safety precautions while operating the machine. Most of the injuries occur when an attempt is made to remove the clothes from the machine and the hand gets caught in the spinning machine. The presentation can vary from minor soft tissue injuries to a mangled upper extremity. The chance of neurovascular damage resulting in compartment syndrome is very high. The author reports three cases of washing machine injuries to draw attention to this not so uncommon injury. The relevant literature is also considered. PMID:21654964

  17. Optimal Portfolio Choice with Wash Sale Constraints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astrup Jensen, Bjarne; Marekwica, Marcel

    2011-01-01

    is to a large extent driven by the desire to realize those losses, either immediately by sharply decreasing the holding of assets carrying unrealized losses, or indirectly by increasing such holdings in order to prepare for a decrease in a future period to earn the tax rebate payment. Our findings are robust......We analytically solve the portfolio choice problem in the presence of wash sale constraints in a two-period model with one risky asset. Our results show that wash sale constraints can heavily affect portfolio choice of investors with unrealized losses. The trading behavior of such investors...

  18. Auto-Washing Panty Toilet for Care

    OpenAIRE

    長屋, 幸助; 王, 宇; 小島, 多香子; 福室, 允央

    2004-01-01

    It is important jobs to change diapers for a bedridden patient. Changing diapers hurts prides of the patient, so that a panty toilet, that can be worn to the patient, is of importance, in which feces and urine are washed automatically. In this study, a new-type automatic washing panty toilet system is presented. The system consists of a rubber made panty toilet with tubes at both thighs and a torso, and the control system. In the panty toilet, air expands the tubes, and water leakage is preve...

  19. Acid phosphatases activity in cheese and starters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, A T; Alichanidis, E

    1975-06-01

    The acid phosphatase activity levels in a number of Greek cheeses and in Cheddar cheeses were found to be unaffected by storage for up to 18 months and 12 months respectively. In Cheddar cheese, starter organisms made an insignificant contribution to this activity. Studies of acid phosphatase prepared from Streptococcus cremoris-lactis NCDO 762 starter cultures showed that the enzyme was of high molecular weight and largely particle-bound. The pH of optimum activity was 5-2 and the enzyme was inhibited by F-minus,Al-3+, a number of heavy metals, oxidizing agents and sulphydryl-modifying reagents. Kinetic measurements at pH 5-2 gave a Km value for p-nitrophenyl phosphate of 1-2 mM. Orthophosphate, pyrophosphate and isoelectrically precipitated casein behaved as competitive inhibitors to the hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl phosphate with Ki values of 1-2 mM, 1-0 mM, 1-0 MM and 1-1 mM respectively. In spite of this binding to the enzyme, casein provided a very poor substrate for the starter acid phosphatase. The properties of acid phosphatase present in Cheddar cheese made with Str. cremoris NCDO 924 starter were consistent with the enzyme being exclusively of milk origin and small differences between this and the acid phosphatase previously isolated from bovine milk were attributable to the binding of peptides produced during the cheese maturation to the enzyme molecules. It was concluded that in cheese, phosphatase action was due largely to the enzyme of milk origin, with that provided by the starter being of minor importance.

  20. Sources of umami taste in Cheddar and Swiss cheeses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, S L; Carunchia Whetstine, M E; Drake, M A; Courtney, P; Fligner, K; Jenkins, J; Pruitt, C

    2007-08-01

    Umami plays an important role in the flavor of many cheese varieties. The purpose of this study was to identify the compound(s) responsible for umami taste in Cheddar and Swiss cheeses. Four Cheddar and 4 Swiss cheeses (two with low umami intensity and two with high umami intensity from each type) were selected using a trained sensory panel. Monosodium glutamate (MSG), disodium 5'-inosine monophosphate (IMP), disodium 5'-guanosine monophosphate (GMP), sodium chloride, lactic acid, propionic acid, and succinic acid were quantified in the cheeses instrumentally. Taste thresholds (best estimate thresholds, BETs) were determined for each compound in water. Subsequently, a trained descriptive sensory analysis panel evaluated each compound in odor-free water across threshold concentrations to confirm that the thresholds were based on umami and not some other stimuli. Model system studies with trained panelists were then conducted with each compound individually or all compounds together. Comparison of analytical data and sensory thresholds indicated that IMP and GMP thresholds were 100-fold higher than their concentrations in cheese. All other compounds contributed some umami taste within their concentration range in umami cheeses. Sensory analysis of model cheeses revealed that glutamic acid played the largest role in umami taste of both Cheddar and Swiss cheeses while succinic and propionic acids contributed to umami taste in Swiss cheeses. Knowledge of the key compounds associated with umami taste in cheeses will aid in the identification of procedures to enhance formation of this taste in cheese.

  1. Water mobility and thermal properties of smoked soft cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna Maria Baranowska

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The main goal of the present study was to characterize the functional parameters of smoked soft cheese, with the emphasis on the behavior of water and milk fat, as analyzed by DSC, which was used to directly measure the melting/freezing phase transitions in the cheese. This study was complemented by NMR measurements of the organization and distribution of the aqueous phase within the emulsions constituting the cheese. The smoked and unsmoked cheeses were characterized by similar compositions in terms of protein (19.08-19.12 g∙100 g-1, fat (18.86-19.02 g∙100 g-1, and water content (59.86-60.27 g∙100 g-1. The water activity was higher in the unsmoked cheese (aw = 0.9736 than in the smoked cheese (aw = 0.9615. This result was confirmed by DSC (higher ice melting enthalpy and NMR (higher T1 value measurements. The smoking process led to differences in the distribution and binding of water to the lipid-protein matrix of the cheese. There was more non-freezed bound water in the smoked cheese which resulted in a more fragile and loosened structure in the smoked cheese than the unsmoked, which manifested in lower values of stretching and meltability. The meltability of the mozzarella smoked cheese was 1.5 times less than that of the unsmoked cheese (tube test and Schreiber test.

  2. Sensory Profile and Consumers’ Liking of Functional Ovine Cheese

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santillo, Antonella; Albenzio, Marzia

    2015-01-01

    The present research was undertaken to evaluate the sensory profile and consumers’ liking of functional ovine cheese containing probiotic cultures. Ovine cheese was made from ewe’s milk by animals reared in extensive conditions; cheesemaking trials were performed by using rennet paste containing probiotic cells. Experimental cheeses were denoted: cheese manufactured using lamb rennet paste without probiotic (C), cheese manufactured using lamb rennet paste containing a mix of Bifidobacterium lactis and Bifidobacterium longum (BB), and cheese manufactured using lamb rennet paste containing Lactobacillus acidophilus (LA). Ovine cheese containing probiotic strains highlighted a more intense proteolysis and a greater level of short chain free fatty acids and conjugated linoleic acid due to the metabolic activity of the adjunct microflora. The sensorial profile of ovine cheese showed lower humidity and gumminess in cheeses containing probiotics as a consequence of differences in the maturing process; furthermore, probiotic cheeses scored higher ratings for salty and pungent attributes. An interaction effect of probiotic, gender, and age of the consumers was detected in the perceived and the expected liking. The higher rate of expected liking in all experimental cheeses is attributed to the information given, regarding not only the presence of probiotic strains but also the farming conditions and cheesemaking technology. PMID:28231229

  3. Mold Flora of Traditional Cheeses Produced in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Musa Yalman

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In our country, there are many cheese types that are produced traditionally. Cheeses which produced from cows, sheep and goat milk that matured with spontaneous growth of molds present in livestock skins, pots and similar environments are among them. They are produced traditionally in Mediterrian, Central and Eastern Anatolia regions. Molds that grow spontaneously in cheeses could create public health risk because of their secondary metabolites. Penicillium spp. are the most isolated mold from these cheeses and Penicillium roqueforti is determined as the dominant species. Furthermore, Aspergillus, Alternaria, Mucor, Geotrichum, Cladosporium species have been isolated. It is very important to control the ripening conditions and starter strain selection since some strains were reported as mycotoxin producers. In this review, it has been tried to give general information about traditional production of mold-ripened cheese in Turkey and the mold flora found in traditional cheeses. In addition, public health risk of these cheeses is reported.

  4. 21 CFR 133.10 - Notice to manufacturers, packers, and distributors of pasteurized blended cheese, pasteurized...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION CHEESES AND RELATED CHEESE PRODUCTS General Provisions... process cheese, cheese food, cheese spread, and related foods. (a) Definitions and standards of identity have recently been promulgated under the authority of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act for a...

  5. 21 CFR 133.156 - Low-moisture mozzarella and scamorza cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Low-moisture mozzarella and scamorza cheese. 133... SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION CHEESES AND RELATED CHEESE PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Cheese and Related Products § 133.156 Low-moisture mozzarella and scamorza cheese. (a...

  6. 21 CFR 133.157 - Part-skim mozzarella and scamorza cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Part-skim mozzarella and scamorza cheese. 133.157... (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION CHEESES AND RELATED CHEESE PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Cheese and Related Products § 133.157 Part-skim mozzarella and scamorza cheese. Part-skim...

  7. 21 CFR 133.161 - Muenster and munster cheese for manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Muenster and munster cheese for manufacturing. 133... Specific Standardized Cheese and Related Products § 133.161 Muenster and munster cheese for manufacturing. Muenster cheese for manufacturing conforms to the definition and standard of identity for muenster cheese...

  8. Use of green washing fluids in a washing process for dioxin contaminated soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siwalee Yotapukdee

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available High levels of dioxin contamination in soil have significant environmental challenges. Soil washing is a successful remediation process that is primarily used to treat coarse soils. Several literature studies have used various kinds of chemical washing liquids to remove dioxins from soils, though there are secondary environmental effects. This study intends to develop environmentally friendly soil washing methods that are effective in dioxin removal at an acceptable cost. Sugarcane wine, compost leachate, and ground fish broth were chosen as potential washing liquids. Each washing liquid was analyzed to determine its content of semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs and volatile organic compounds (VOCs. These compounds are related to their bio-surfactant content. Several of the identified compounds had properties to help remove dioxins from contaminated soil. In the experiments, high removal efficiencies were observed, up to 70%~95% after five to six washes. Although effective removal was observed, a significant amount of wastewater was produced and the problems were not completely resolved. Thus, the optimal washing conditions are necessary to minimize the overall costs, while improving the process effectiveness. Moreover, an appropriate treatment method is required for wastewater containing dioxins.

  9. Cheese is a reliable alternative meal for solid-phase gastric emptying study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drubach, Laura A; Kourmouzi, Vasiliki; Fahey, Frederic H

    2010-05-01

    We evaluated the labeling stability of several alternative meals that could be used to perform solid-phase gastric emptying study. Cooked egg whites labeled with technetium-99m sulfur colloid served as a control. Packaged instant oatmeal and instant mashed potatoes were prepared by adding hot water. Cheddar cheese was melted. Peanut butter was added to bread. The different meals were mixed with technetium-99m sulfur colloid (2.2-3.7 MBq), chopped into small pieces and placed in a glass tube containing gastric juice. Four samples of each meal were analyzed after 1 and 4 h of agitation with a 3-D rotator (two samples per time point). The meal samples were washed with 2 ml of saline and filtered using a blood transfusion filter. The activity in each sample before and after filtering was assayed in a dose calibrator. The percentage of initial radioactivity remaining with the meal of admixture with gastric juice was measured and the average of the two samples was taken. The percentage of activity bound to the solid phase was 98.2+/-1.9, 95.6+/-1.1, 62.1+/-1.7, 41.8+/-0.6, and 74.5+/-3.8% at 1 h and 98.5+/-1.0, 95.8+/-2.6, 77.2+/-6.8, 55.5+/-3.4 and 40.2+/-22.1 at 4 h for egg whites, cheese, oatmeal, mashed potatoes and peanut butter respectively. For egg whites and cheese, there was no significant difference between the values at 1 and 4 h (P>0.8). Cheddar cheese provides an alternative meal for assessing solid gastric emptying in children comparable to egg whites. Oatmeal and mashed potatoes had low and variable labeling stability and are not recommended. In view of the significant proportion of pediatric patients who refuse to eat scrambled eggs or have allergy to eggs, the availability of other meal choices is essential. The versatility of cheddar cheese, which can be added to macaroni or as a topping on pizza, makes it a useful alternative to labeled eggs.

  10. Comparative study of flavor in cholesterol-removed Gouda cheese and Gouda cheese during ripening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, H J; Ganesan, P; Lee, S J; Kwak, H S

    2013-04-01

    This study was performed to compare the flavor compounds of cholesterol-removed Gouda cheese (CRGC) and those of Gouda cheese (control) during ripening. The CRGC was made using milk treated with cross-linked β-cyclodextrin (β-CD). The solid-phase microextraction (SPME) method was used to extract flavor compounds from Gouda cheese. In both CRGC and control cheese, 31 flavor compounds were identified, including 6 free fatty acids, 5 esters, 5 ketones, 1 aldehyde, 3 lactones, 5 alcohols, and 6 miscellaneous compounds. Free fatty acids were the most abundant flavor compounds quantified in CRGC and control cheese. In the early stage of ripening, concentrations of flavor compounds in CRGC and control cheese were 16.42 and 10.38 mg/kg, respectively. At 6 mo, they increased to 40.90 and 67.89 mg/kg, respectively. A group of esters was the second abundant flavor compound in CRGC and control cheese. At the initial stage of ripening, total concentrations of esters were 12.94 (CRGC) and 10.95 mg/kg (control) and they increased to 22.73 (CRGC) and 27.68 mg/kg (control). Total concentrations of ketones were 1.96 (CRGC) and 6.49 mg/kg (control) at the initial stage of ripening. After 6 mo of ripening, total concentrations reached 11.32 (CRGC) and 52.43 mg/kg (control). In the case of the lactones, at the early stage of ripening, total concentrations of CRGC and control cheese were 0.63 and 0.84mg/kg, respectively, and then increased to 1.73 (CRGC) and 3.25mg/kg (control) at the end of ripening. Based on the results of this study, the flavor compounds of CRGC and control showed slightly different profiles during ripening. Copyright © 2013 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Effect of lupine as cheese base substitution on technological and nutritional properties of processed cheese analogue

    OpenAIRE

    Rezik Azab Awad; Wafaa Mohammed Salama; Azza Mahmoud Farahat

    2014-01-01

    Background. Healthy foods have been met with marked success in the last two decades. Lupine flours, protein concentrates, and isolates can be applied as a substance for enriching different kinds of food systems such as bakery products, lupine pasta, ice cream, milk substitutes. Imitation processed cheese is made from mixtures of dairy and/or non dairy proteins and fat/oils and is variously labeled analogue, artifi cial, extruded, synthetic and/or fi lled. Processed cheese can be formulated us...

  12. Environmental control during steam boiler washing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guimaraes, Marcio A.B.; Abreu Pereira, Vera L. de [Companhia Petroquimica do Nordeste (COPENE), Camacari, BA (Brazil). Div. de Engenharia Ambiental; Ringler, Ulrich E.S. [PROMON Engenharia Ltda., Salvador, BA (Brazil)

    1993-12-31

    The washing and chemical cleaning of boilers, activities of a high polluting potential, are responsible for the generation of wastewater of high contents of heavy metals, suspended solids and chemical oxygen demand (COD). This paper describes the actions carried out by COPENE - Petroquimica do Nordeste S/A - in order to reduce this problem. (author). 10 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Washing treatment of automotive shredder residue (ASR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cossu, Raffaello; Lai, Tiziana

    2013-08-01

    Worldwide, the amount of end-of-life vehicles (ELVs) reaches 50 million units per year. Once the ELV has been processed, it may then be shredded and sorted to recover valuable metals that are recycled in iron and steelmaking processes. The residual fraction, called automotive shredder residue (ASR), represents 25% of the ELV and is usually landfilled. In order to deal with the leachable fraction of ASR that poses a potential threat to the environment, a washing treatment before landfilling was applied. To assess the potential for full-scale application of washing treatment, tests were carried out in different conditions (L/S = 3 and 5L/kgTS; t = 3 and 6 h). Moreover, to understand whether the grain size of waste could affect the washing efficiency, the treatment was applied to ground (<4 mm) and not-ground samples. The findings obtained revealed that, on average, washing treatment achieved removal rates of more than 60% for dissolved organic carbon (DOC), chemical oxygen demand (COD) and total Kjeldahl nitrogen (TKN). With regard to metals and chlorides, sulphates and fluoride leachable fraction, a removal efficiency of approximately 60% was obtained, as confirmed also by EC values. The comparison between the results for ground and not-ground samples did not highlight significant differences. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Hand wash and manual skin wipes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, D.H.; Boeniger, M.F.; Hemmen, J. van

    2000-01-01

    Hand wash and skin wipes are major techniques that have been used for dermal exposure sampling. Both techniques remove chemicals either deposited on or transferred to the skin contaminant layer by a combination of chemical and mechanical actions. The paper overviews identified methods and

  15. What happens at a car wash?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gallick, Barbara; Lee, Lisa

    2010-01-01

    ... "What Happens at a Car Wash?" were Barb Gallick, Pam Morbitzer, and Lisa Lee. During this particular semester, our class consisted of 18 children. The majority of children attended for the full day, 5 days a week. Half of the children had attended the child care center the previous semester and had experienced project work during that time. Eight girls a...

  16. 21 CFR 133.111 - Caciocavallo siciliano cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... of benzoyl peroxide with potassium alum, calcium sulfate, and magnesium carbonate; but the weight of... of the potassium alum, calcium sulfate, and magnesium carbonate, singly or combined, is not more than...-clotting enzyme that produces equivalent curd formation, singly or in any combination (with or without...

  17. 21 CFR 133.165 - Parmesan and reggiano cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... equivalent curd formation, or both, with or without purified calcium chloride in a quantity not more than 0... with potassium alum, calcium sulfate, and magnesium carbonate; but the weight of the benzoyl peroxide... alum, calcium sulfate, and magnesium carbonate, singly or combined, is not more than six times the...

  18. Curd development associated gene (CDAG1) in cauliflower (Brassica oleracea L. var. botrytis) could result in enlarged organ size and increased biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Liu, Qian; Zhang, Qingli; Qin, Erjun; Jin, Chuan; Wang, Yu; Wu, Mei; Shen, Guangshuang; Chen, Chengbin; Song, Wenqin; Wang, Chunguo

    2017-01-01

    The curd is a specialized organ and the most important product organ of cauliflower (Brassica oleracea L. var. botrytis). However, the mechanism underlying the regulation of curd formation and development remains largely unknown. In the present study, a novel homologous gene containing the Organ Size Related (OSR) domain, namely, CDAG1 (Curd Development Associated Gene 1) was identified in cauliflower. Quantitative analysis indicated that CDAG1 showed significantly higher transcript levels in young tissues. Functional analysis demonstrated that the ectopic overexpression of CDAG1 in Arabidopsis and cauliflower could significantly promote organ growth and result in larger organ size and increased biomass. Organ enlargement was predominantly due to increased cell number. In addition, 228 genes involved in the CDAG1-mediated regulatory network were discovered by transcriptome analysis. Among these genes, CDAG1 was confirmed to inhibit the transcriptional expression of the endogenous OSR genes, ARGOS and ARL, while a series of ethylene-responsive transcription factors (ERFs) were found to increased expression in 35S:CDAG1 transgenic Arabidopsis plants. This implies that CDAG1 may function in the ethylene-mediated signal pathway. These findings provide new insight into the function of OSR genes, and suggest potential applications of CDAG1 in breeding high-yielding crops. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The behavior of silver nanotextiles during washing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geranio, L; Heuberger, M; Nowack, B

    2009-11-01

    The widespread use of silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) in commercial products, especially textiles, will likely result in an unknown spread of Ag into the environment. The quantification and characterization of the Ag released from nano-Ag-products is an important parameter needed to predict the effect of Ag-NPs on the environment. The aim of this study was to determine the amount and the form of Ag released during washing from nine fabrics with different ways of silver incorporation into or onto the fibers. The effect of pH, surfactants, and oxidizing agents was evaluated. The results show that little dissolution of Ag-NPs occurs under conditions relevant to washing (pH 10) with dissolved concentrations 10 times lower than at pH 7. However, bleaching agents such as hydrogen peroxide or peracetic acid (formed by the perborate/TAED system) can greatly accelerate the dissolution of Ag. The amount and form of Ag released from the fabrics as ionic and particulate Ag depended on the type of Ag-incorporation into the textile. The percentage of the total silver emitted during one washing of the textiles varied considerably among products (from less than 1 to 45%). In the washing machine the majority of the Ag (at least 50% but mostly >75%) was released in the size fraction >450 nm, indicating the dominant role of mechanical stress. A conventional silver textile did not show any significant difference in the size distribution of the released silver compared to many of the textiles containing nano-Ag. These results have important implications for the risk assessment of Ag-textiles and also for environmental fate studies of nano-Ag, because they show that under conditions relevant to washing, primarily coarse Ag-containing particles are released.

  20. Technical bases DWPF Late Washing Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fish, D.L.; Landon, L.F.

    1992-08-10

    A task force recommended that the technical feasibility of a Late Wash' facility be assessed [1]. In this facility, each batch of tetraphenylborate slurry from Tank 49 would be given a final wash to reduce the concentrations of nitrite and radiolysis products to acceptable levels. Laboratory-scale studies have demonstrated that d the nitrite content of the slurry fed to DWPF is reduced to 0.01 M or less (and at least a 4X reduction in concentration of the soluble species is attained), (1) the need for HAN during hydrolysis is eliminated (eliminating the production of ammonium ion during hydrolysis), (2) hydrolysis may be done with a catalyst concentration that will not exceed the copper solubility in glass and (3) the non-polar organic production during hydrolysis is significantly reduced. The first phase of an aggressive research and development program has been completed and all test results obtained to date support the technical feasibility of Late Washing. Paralleling this research and development effort is an aggressive design study directed by DWPF to scope and cost retrofitting the Auxiliary Pump Pit (APP) to enable performing a final wash of each batch of precipitate slurry before R is transferred into the DWPF Soft Processing Cell (SPC). An initial technical bases for the Late Wash Facility was transmitted to DWPF on June 15, 1992. Research and development activities are continuing directed principally at optimization of the cross-f low fitter decontamination methodology and pilot-scale validation of the recommended benzene stripping metodology.

  1. A Novel Glycinate-based Body Wash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regan, Jamie; Ananthapadmanabhan, K.P.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To assess the properties of a novel body wash containing the mild surfactant glycinate. Design: Biochemical and clinical assays. Setting: Research laboratories and clinical sites in the United States and Canada. Participants: Women 18 to 65 years of age (cleansing efficacy); male and female subjects 26 to 63 years of age with mild or moderate dryness and erythema (leg-controlled application test); subjects 5 to 65 years of age with mild-to-moderate eczema (eczema compatibility); and women 18 to 64 years of age (home use). Measurements: Assessments across studies included colorimetric dye exclusion to assess skin damage potential (corneosurfametry), efficacy of cosmetic product removal from skin, change from baseline in visual dryness, change from baseline in Eczema Area and Severity Index, and self-perceived eczema attributes and self-reported product preference. Results: The glycinate-based cleanser demonstrated mildness to skin components when evaluated in a corneosurfametry assay. Short-term use under exaggerated wash conditions in subjects with dryness scores <3 and erythema scores <2 (both on a 0-6 scale) indicated an initial reduction in visual dryness. In subjects with eczema, normal use resulted in significant improvements (p<0.05) at Week 4 compared with baseline in skin dryness (change from baseline = −0.73), rash (−0.56), itch (−0.927), tightness (−0.585), and all eczema (−0.756). The glycinate-based body wash removed 56 percent of a long-lasting cosmetic foundation from skin compared with less than 30 percent removed by two competitive products tested. The glycinate-based body wash was preferred over a competitive mild cleansing product overall. Conclusion: The patented glycinate-containing body wash demonstrated better product mildness and patient-preferred attributes and clinical benefits. PMID:23882306

  2. [A nationwide survey on the hand washing behavior and awareness].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Jae Sim; Choi, Jun Kil; Jeong, Ihn Sook; Paek, Kyong Ran; In, Hye-Kyung; Park, Ki Dong

    2007-05-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the public's awareness of the importance of hand washing and to compare perceptions on the habit of hand washing with actual hand washing behavior. Data were collected by observing 2,800 participants washing their hands after using public restrooms in seven cities nationwide and by surveying 1,000 respondents (age>14 years) through telephone interviews using a structured questionnaire. Although 94% of the survey respondents claimed to mostly or always wash their hands after using public restrooms, only 63.4% of the observed participants did wash their hands after using public restrooms. Significant factors related to increased adherence to hand washing were female gender, approximate ages of 20 to 39 years by their appearance, and the presence of other people from the observation. About 79% of the survey respondents always washed their hands after using bathrooms at home, 73% washed their hands before handling food, and 67% washed their hands upon returning to their home. However, 93.2% and 86.3% of the survey respondents did not wash their hands after coughing or sneezing and after handling money, respectively. Although most of the survey respondents (77.6%) were aware that hand washing is helpful in preventing communicable diseases, 39.6% of the survey respondents did not do so because they were 'not accustomed' to washing their hands and 30.2% thought that washing their hands is 'annoying'. This is the first comprehensive report on hand washing behavior and awareness of the general population in Korea. The result of this study in terms of individual behavior and awareness of hand washing are comparable with similar studies conducted in other countries. However adherence to hand washing is still low and needs to be increased. The results of this study can be used as a baseline in setting up strategies and activities to promote adherence to hand washing.

  3. A NEW DISCOLORATION OF RICOTTA CHEESE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Alberghini

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available A new alteration of ricotta cheese is here described. The discoloration which has been noted was red. The responsible bacteria has been identified as Serratia marcescens. This is probably the first report of this rare type of spoilage identified in Italy.

  4. PEMANFAATAN BUAH LOKAL SEBAGAI KOAGULAN SOY CHEESE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Risza Fawzia Rakhmah

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Keju merupakan salah satu produk pangan dengan proses penggumpalan  protein susu. Penelitian ini memanfaatan buah lokal sebagai koagulan untuk menggumpalkan susu kedelai menjadi keju. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui pengaruh buah lokal sebagai koagulan pada soy cheese terhadap kadar protein, organoleptik dan daya terima masyarakat. Rancangan penelitian menggunakan Rancangan Acak Lengkap (RAL 2 faktor 6 taraf perlakuan  yaitu faktor 1:  jenis buah (nanas, jeruk lemon dan asam sitrat (kontrol dan konsentrasi (0,12 %; 2%; 3 %, masing-masing perlakuan dilakukan 3 ulangan. Metode penelitian yang digunakan adalah metode eksperimen, observasi, kepustakaan dan dokumentasi. Pengujian kadar protein menggunakan metode biuret, analisis data kadar protein menggunakan uji Two Way ANOVA dan dilanjutkan dengan uji Duncan’s Multiple Range Test (DMRT, sedangkan pada pengujian organoleptik dan daya terima masyarakat menggunakan analisis deskriptif kualitatif berupa data angket. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa Kadar protein tertinggi soy cheese  pada perlakuan ekstrak nanas 3 % sebesar 11,68g,  sedangkan kadar protein terendah soy cheese  pada perlakuan ekstrak jeruk lemon 3 % sebesar 4,57 g. keju paling dominan bertekstur lembut, warna putih tulang, rasa gurih dan sedikit asam. Daya terima panelis  menyukai keju  dengan penambahan ekstrak jeruk lemon 3 %. Penambahan ekstrak nanas dan jeruk lemon sebagai koagulan pada  soy cheese berpengaruh terhadap kadar protein.

  5. Packaging conditions hindering fungal growth on cheese

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Per Væggemose; Haasum, Iben

    1997-01-01

    Fungal contamination is one of the most important quality deteriorating factors on cheese. During the last 5 years we have studied in detail the underlying factors controlling these unwanted processes in a collaborative project financed by the Danish Dairy Board and the Ministry of Agriculture...

  6. CMB seen through random Swiss Cheese

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavinto, Mikko; Räsänen, Syksy, E-mail: mikko.lavinto@helsinki.fi, E-mail: syksy.rasanen@iki.fi [Physics Department, University of Helsinki and Helsinki Institute of Physics, P.O. Box 64, FIN-00014, University of Helsinki (Finland)

    2015-10-01

    We consider a Swiss Cheese model with a random arrangement of Lemaȋtre-Tolman-Bondi holes in ΛCDM cheese. We study two kinds of holes with radius r{sub b}=50 h{sup −1} Mpc, with either an underdense or an overdense centre, called the open and closed case, respectively. We calculate the effect of the holes on the temperature, angular diameter distance and, for the first time in Swiss Cheese models, shear of the CMB . We quantify the systematic shift of the mean and the statistical scatter, and calculate the power spectra. In the open case, the temperature power spectrum is three orders of magnitude below the linear ISW spectrum. It is sensitive to the details of the hole, in the closed case the amplitude is two orders of magnitude smaller. In contrast, the power spectra of the distance and shear are more robust, and agree with perturbation theory and previous Swiss Cheese results. We do not find a statistically significant mean shift in the sky average of the angular diameter distance, and obtain the 95% limit |Δ D{sub A}/ D-bar {sub A}|∼< 10{sup −4}. We consider the argument that areas of spherical surfaces are nearly unaffected by perturbations, which is often invoked in light propagation calculations. The closed case is consistent with this at 1σ, whereas in the open case the probability is only 1.4%.

  7. Statistical Analysis of Industrial processed Cheese puffs ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper studied and fit a Multivariate linear regression model to the relationship between the response variables; Weight and Bulk density on one hand, and the predictor variables; Temperature, Moisture content before extrusion and Moisture content after extrusion on the other hand, of Cheese puffs product, ...

  8. CMB seen through random Swiss Cheese

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavinto, Mikko; Räsänen, Syksy

    2015-10-01

    We consider a Swiss Cheese model with a random arrangement of Lemaȋtre-Tolman-Bondi holes in ΛCDM cheese. We study two kinds of holes with radius rb=50 h-1 Mpc, with either an underdense or an overdense centre, called the open and closed case, respectively. We calculate the effect of the holes on the temperature, angular diameter distance and, for the first time in Swiss Cheese models, shear of the CMB . We quantify the systematic shift of the mean and the statistical scatter, and calculate the power spectra. In the open case, the temperature power spectrum is three orders of magnitude below the linear ISW spectrum. It is sensitive to the details of the hole, in the closed case the amplitude is two orders of magnitude smaller. In contrast, the power spectra of the distance and shear are more robust, and agree with perturbation theory and previous Swiss Cheese results. We do not find a statistically significant mean shift in the sky average of the angular diameter distance, and obtain the 95% limit |Δ DA/bar DA|lesssim 10-4. We consider the argument that areas of spherical surfaces are nearly unaffected by perturbations, which is often invoked in light propagation calculations. The closed case is consistent with this at 1σ, whereas in the open case the probability is only 1.4%.

  9. Prevalence of Listeria monocytogenes in European cheeses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinez Rios, Veronica; Dalgaard, Paw

    2017-01-01

    Both in Europe and worldwide cheese has caused important outbreaks of listeriosis and can be a vehicle for transmission of Listeria monocytogenes to consumers. A systematic review and meta-analysis were conducted using scientific literature and European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) reports...

  10. The 'Swiss cheese' instability of bacterial biofilms

    CERN Document Server

    Jang, Hongchul; Stocker, Roman

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate a novel pattern that results in bacterial biofilms as a result of the competition between hydrodynamic forces and adhesion forces. After the passage of an air plug, the break up of the residual thin liquid film scrapes and rearranges bacteria on the surface, such that a Swiss cheese pattern of holes is left in the residual biofilm.

  11. 21 CFR 133.146 - Grated cheeses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Grated cheeses. 133.146 Section 133.146 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... 101 and 130 of this chapter, except that: (1) Enzymes of animal, plant, or microbial origin may be...

  12. 21 CFR 133.190 - Spiced cheeses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Spiced cheeses. 133.190 Section 133.190 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN..., nonfat milk, or cream, as defined in § 133.3, or corresponding products of goat or sheep origin, used...

  13. 21 CFR 133.164 - Nuworld cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...-white mold, a white mutant of Penicillium roquefortii, throughout the cheese. The minimum milkfat... forms, spores of a white mutant of the mold Penicillium roquefortii are added. The forms are turned..., used alone or in combination. (2) Clotting enzymes. Rennet and/or other clotting enzymes of animal...

  14. Parmigiano Reggiano cheese and bone health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pampaloni, Barbara; Bartolini, Elisa; Brandi, Maria Luisa

    2011-09-01

    Osteoporosis is a multifactorial disease characterized by loss of bone mass and microarchitectural deterioration of bone tissue, which leads to a consequent increase in the risk of skeletal fractures. Diet awakes a critical interest in osteoporosis, because it is one of the few determinants that can be safely modified. A healthy well balanced nutrition can play an important role in prevention and pathogenesis of osteoporosis, but also in support of a pharmacological therapy. Numerous evidences have already established that dietary calcium, proteins and vitamin D are essential nutrients for achieved peak bone mass and maintaining skeletal health.Dairy products, by providing both calcium and proteins, represent the optimal source of highly bioavailable nutrients for bone health. Among dairy foods in particular cheese results one of the major source of calcium in the adults western diet and also in the Italian adults diet.Parmigiano Reggiano cheese is an homemade Italian food whose denomination "Protected Designation of Origin" is linked to an artisanal manufacturing process in limited geographic area of Northern Italy and is an optimal source of essential nutrients for acquisition and maintenance of bone health. Parmigiano Reggiano is a cheese easy digested, for the presence of ready to use proteins and lipids, lactose free, rich in calcium, with possible prebiotic and probiotic effect. On the basis of its nutritional characteristics and of its easy digestibility Parmigiano Reggiano cheese is recommended in all feeding age groups.

  15. Physicochemical and Sensory Properties of Whey Cheese with Pine Nuts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Anamaria Semeniuc

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to develop a value-added whey cheese through addition of pine nuts. Therefore, different concentrations of pine nuts [2, 4, 6 and 8% (w/w] were added to whey cheese. The study was designed to evaluate the influence of pine nuts on physicochemical and sensory properties of whey cheese. The addition of pine nuts resulted in an increase in fat content and total solids and a decrease in moisture content. However, no statistically significant difference was found in pH values. Sensory analysis was performed using the 9-point hedonic scale, with selected assessors. The whey cheese sample with 4% pine nuts was the most appreciated (7.6 points, followed by the classic whey cheese, whey cheese with 6 and 8% pine nuts (7.4 points, and whey cheese with 2% pine nuts (7.3 points. Nevertheless, the sensory characteristics of whey cheese were not significantly influenced by the addition of pine nuts. Whey cheese sensory profiling was successful in differential characterization of whey cheese samples.

  16. Hand washing promotion for preventing diarrhoea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ejemot-Nwadiaro, Regina I; Ehiri, John E; Arikpo, Dachi; Meremikwu, Martin M; Critchley, Julia A

    2015-09-03

    Diarrhoea accounts for 1.8 million deaths in children in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). One of the identified strategies to prevent diarrhoea is hand washing. To assess the effects of hand washing promotion interventions on diarrhoeal episodes in children and adults. We searched the Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group Specialized Register (27 May 2015); CENTRAL (published in the Cochrane Library 2015, Issue 5); MEDLINE (1966 to 27 May 2015); EMBASE (1974 to 27 May 2015); LILACS (1982 to 27 May 2015); PsycINFO (1967 to 27 May 2015); Science Citation Index and Social Science Citation Index (1981 to 27 May 2015); ERIC (1966 to 27 May 2015); SPECTR (2000 to 27 May 2015); Bibliomap (1990 to 27 May 2015); RoRe, The Grey Literature (2002 to 27 May 2015); World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trial Registry Platform (ICTRP), metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT), and reference lists of articles up to 27 May 2015. We also contacted researchers and organizations in the field. Individually randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and cluster-RCTs that compared the effects of hand washing interventions on diarrhoea episodes in children and adults with no intervention. Three review authors independently assessed trial eligibility, extracted data, and assessed risk of bias. We stratified the analyses for child day-care centres or schools, community, and hospital-based settings. Where appropriate, incidence rate ratios (IRR) were pooled using the generic inverse variance method and random-effects model with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). We used the GRADE approach to assess the quality of evidence. We included 22 RCTs: 12 trials from child day-care centres or schools in mainly high-income countries (54,006 participants), nine community-based trials in LMICs (15,303 participants), and one hospital-based trial among people with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) (148 participants).Hand washing promotion (education activities, sometimes with

  17. 7 CFR 58.738 - Pasteurized process cheese spread and related products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... of Identity for Pasteurized Process Cheese Spreads, Food and Drug Administration. The pH of... depicted by the National Cheese Institute standard color guide for cheese may be used. (d) Finish and...

  18. Food worker hand washing practices: an observation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Laura R; Selman, Carol A; Radke, Vincent; Ripley, Danny; Mack, James C; Reimann, David W; Stigger, Tammi; Motsinger, Michelle; Bushnell, Lisa

    2006-10-01

    Improvement of food worker hand washing practices is critical to the reduction of foodborne illness and is dependent upon a clear understanding of current hand washing practices. To that end, this study collected detailed observational data on food worker hand washing practices. Food workers (n = 321) were observed preparing food, and data were recorded on specific work activities for which hand washing is recommended (e.g., food preparation, handling dirty equipment). Data were also recorded on hand washing behaviors that occurred in conjunction with these work activities. Results indicated that workers engaged in approximately 8.6 work activities per hour for which hand washing is recommended. However, workers made hand washing attempts (i.e., removed gloves, if worn, and placed hands in running water) in only 32% of these activities and washed their hands appropriately (i.e., removed gloves, if worn, placed hands in running water, used soap, and dried hands) in only 27% of these work activities. Attempted and appropriate hand washing rates varied by work activity--they were significantly higher in conjunction with food preparation than other work activities (46 versus hand washing; 41 versus hand washing) and were significantly lower in conjunction with touching the body than other work activities (13 versus > or = 27% for attempted hand washing; 10 versus > or = 23% for appropriate hand washing). Attempted and appropriate hand washing rates were significantly lower when gloves were worn (18 and 16%) than when gloves were not worn (37 and 30%). These findings suggest that the hand washing practices of food workers need to be improved, glove use may reduce hand washing, and restaurants should consider reorganizing their food preparation activities to reduce the frequency with which hand washing is needed.

  19. Effect of uncertainty in composition and weight measures in control of cheese yield and fat loss in large cheese factories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolies, Brenda; Adams, Michael C; Pranata, Joice; Gondoutomo, Kathleen; Barbano, David M

    2017-08-01

    Our objective was to develop a computer-based cheese yield, fat recovery, and composition control performance measurement system to provide quantitative performance records for a Cheddar and mozzarella cheese factory. The system can be used to track trends in performance of starter cultures and vats, as well as systematically calculate theoretical yield. Yield equations were built into the spreadsheet to evaluate cheese yield performance and fat losses in a cheese factory. Based on observations in commercial cheese factories, sensitivity analysis was done to demonstrate the sensitivity of cheese factory performance to analytical uncertainty of data used in the evaluation. Analytical uncertainty in the accuracy of milk weight and milk and cheese composition were identified as important factors that influence the ability to manage consistency of cheese quality and profitability. It was demonstrated that an uncertainty of ±0.1% milk fat or milk protein in the vat causes a range of theoretical Cheddar cheese yield from 10.05 to 10.37% and an uncertainty of yield efficiency of ±1.5%. This equates to ±1,451 kg (3,199 lb) of cheese per day in a factory processing 907,185 kg (2 million pounds) of milk per day. The same is true for uncertainty in cheese composition, where the effect of being 0.5% low on moisture or fat is about 484 kg (1,067 lb) of missed revenue opportunity from cheese for the day. Missing the moisture target causes other targets such as fat on a dry basis and salt in moisture to be missed. Similar impacts were demonstrated for mozzarella cheese. In analytical performance evaluations of commercial cheese quality assurance laboratories, we found that analytical uncertainty was typically a bias that was as large as 0.5% on fat and moisture. The effect of having a high bias of 0.5% moisture or fat will produce a missed opportunity of 484 kg of cheese per day for each component. More accurate rapid methods for determination of moisture, fat, and salt

  20. Biogenic amines in smear and mould-ripened cheeses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Pleva

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was the monitoring of six biogenic amines (histamine, tyramine, phenylethylamine, tryptamine, putrescine, and cadaverine and two polyamines (spermidine and spermine in 30 samples of dairy products purchased in the Czech Republic, namely in 15 samples of mould-ripened cheeses and in 15 samples of smear-ripened cheeses. A further goal was the microbiological analysis of the individual samples of cheeses (total count of microorganisms, number of enterobacteria, enterococci, lactic acid bacteria, yeasts and moulds. The monitored biogenic amines were analyzed by a high performance liquid chromatography equipped with a UV/VIS DAD detector. The amount of enterobacteria in fresh cheese exceeded 105 CFU.g‑1. In smear-ripened cheese flavourless (Romadur type, the amount was >103 CFU.g-1 and 104-105 CFU.g-1 in smear-ripened cheese with flavour. Biogenic amines were observed in two groups of blue cheeses (white veined cheese and blue veined cheese and smear-ripened cheeses. In both groups, there is a possibility of the presence of biogenic amines because the number of microorganisms and concentration of free amino acids increase during ripening. In ten samples of soft smear-ripening acid cheese and in smear-ripened cheese, the total content of biogenic amines were 22-1000 mg.kg-1 and in 5 samples of these cheeses, it was in range 1000-6000 mg.kg-1. The total amount of biogenic amines in the blue cheeses were in range 40-600 mg.kg-1. The presense of the tyramine was observed in the all analysed cheeses. The tyramine producing strains generated more than 900 mg.kg-1 of this biogenic amine. The production of tryptamine in the analysed cheeses was not proved by this study. The results of this study show that biogenic amines and polyamines are common in cheese. However, in some cases, they can pose a significant health danger for consumers. Any legislative control authority does not monitor them, as they are secondary metabolites even

  1. Comparative evaluation of enamel remineralization potential of processed cheese, calcium phosphate-based synthetic agent, and a fluoride-containing toothpaste: An in situ study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navneet Grewal

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Enamel remineralization potential of variety of products has been established, but there is a lack of evidence of comparison of remineralization potential of natural versus synthetic products. Aim: The aim of this study was to compare the enamel remineralization potential of saliva, cheese, casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP-based synthetic agent, and fluoride toothpaste. Design: In situ study was carried out on sixty individuals who wore an intraoral appliance containing demineralized enamel slabs for each agent. One out of six slabs was kept as a control so as to record the baseline values (neither subjected to demineralization nor remineralization. Experimental agents were applied on the designated enamel slabs on day 1, 4, 7, and 10 with a crossover wash out period of 7 days. Quantitative values of mineral content of slab were measured using energy dispersive X-ray and qualitative changes in surface topography of slab were seen under scanning electron microscope at ×20K magnification. Results: Highly significant changes from baseline values were seen in calcium and phosphorus content of slabs treated with cheese and CPP-ACP-based agent whereas levels of fluoride were significantly higher in enamel slabs treated with fluoride-containing toothpaste. Conclusion: Cheese is an organic, economical, and user-friendly option over prescribed synthetic agents. A synergistic effect of fluoride-containing toothpaste with intake of cheese could be a good enamel remineralization protocol.

  2. Why Is Hand Washing So Important? (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Gynecologist? Blood Test: Thyroid Peroxidase Antibodies Why Is Hand Washing So Important? KidsHealth > For Parents > Why Is ... es tan importante lavarse las manos? Why Is Hand Washing So Important? Kids don't always listen ...

  3. Washing of the AN-107 entrained solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GJ Lumetta; FV Hoopes

    2000-03-31

    This report describes the results of a test conducted by Battelle to assess the effects of inhibited water washing on the composition of the entrained solids in the diluted AN-107 low-activity waste (LAW) sample. The objective of this work was to gather data on the solubility of the AN-107 entrained solids in 0.01 M NaOH, so that BNFL can evaluate whether these solids require caustic leaching.

  4. Safety assessment of windshield washing Technologies

    OpenAIRE

    Willersinn, Dieter; Manger, Daniel; Erdnüß, Bastian; Baumgärtner, D.; Giraud, F

    2016-01-01

    We present a new assessment method for driver visibility based on reaction time measurement and workload in real driving situations from the most relevant accident scenario involving pedestrians. The procedure was validated in a balanced trial to compare a wet flatblade windshield washing system to a conventional Fluidic nozzles system. The test cohort comprised 204 subjects who form a representative sample of German driving license holders. The average reaction time gain of wet flatblade ove...

  5. Quality evaluation of Korbačik cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juraj Čuboň

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was analysed the physical and chemical parameters in lump cheese and Korbáčik cheese. Sensory evaluation was performed only in Korbáčik cheese. There was compared quality of Korbáčik cheese made from lump cheese ripened one and three weeks. The statistical analysis of the moisture showed significant differences (p <0.001 among Korbáčik cheese made from raw material ripened one and three weeks. Average moisture of the Korbáčik made from cheese ripened one week was 44.73% and of the Korbáčik made from cheese ripened three weeks was 53.73%. The statistical analysis of the dry mater value showed significant differences (p <0.001 among the Korbáčik cheese made from raw material ripened one and three weeks. Average value of dry matter of the Korbáčik made from cheese ripened one week was 55.27% and of the Korbáčik made from cheese ripened three weeks was 46.27%. The statistical analysis of the fat content showed significant differences (p <0.01 among the Korbáčik cheese made from raw material ripened one and three weeks. Average fat content of the Korbáčik made from cheese ripened one week was 22.67% and of the Korbáčik made from cheese ripened three weeks was 20.20%. The statistical analysis of the fat content in dry matter showed significant differences (p <0.001 among Korbáčik cheese made from raw material ripened one and three weeks. Average NaCl content in the Korbáčik made from cheese ripened one week was 3.78% and in the Korbáčik made from cheese ripened three weeks was 2.93%. The statistical analysis of MDA content showed significant differences (p <0.05 among the Korbáčik cheese made from raw material ripened one and three weeks. Average MDA content in the Korbáčik made from cheese ripened one week was 0.29 mg.kg-1 and in the Korbáčik made from cheese ripened three weeks was 0.36 mg.kg-1. Korbáčik cheese made from cheese aged 3 weeks was practically in all sensory

  6. Microbiological quality of sliced and block mozzarella cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Fontanetti Marinheiro

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to verify the microbiological quality of mozzarella cheese sold in retail markets of Pelotas, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. Forty samples of mozzarella cheese were analyzed, comprising 20 samples of block cheese and 20 of sliced cheese. The cheese samples were analyzed for thermotolerant coliform counts and coagulase positive staphylococci counts, and presence of Salmonella spp and Listeria monocytogenes. The percentage of 12,5% and 5% of the sliced and block cheese samples analyzed, respectively, exceeded the microbiological standards accepted by Brazilian legislation. These results indicate the need for a better product monitoring and more concern with hygiene and sanitary practices during industrial process.

  7. Response of Edam cheese to non-destructive impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šárka Nedomová

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The behaviour of the Edam cheese during its maturation under dynamic loading has been studied. The block of tested cheese has been loaded by the impact of an aluminium bar. The force between bar and cheese has been recorded. The surface displacements as well as the surface velocities have been obtained at the different points from the point of the bar impact using of the laser vibrometers. Response functions have been evaluated both in the time and frequency domains. It has been found that the degree of the cheese maturity is well characterized by the attenuation of the surface displacement maximum. This maturation is also described by the maximum of the impact force. The spectral analysis of the response functions revealed that there was a dominant frequency, which depends only on the degree of the cheese maturity. The developed method represents a promising procedure for the continuous recording of the cheese ripening.

  8. Growth and adaptation of microorganisms on the cheese surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monnet, Christophe; Landaud, Sophie; Bonnarme, Pascal; Swennen, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    Microbial communities living on cheese surfaces are composed of various bacteria, yeasts and molds that interact together, thus generating the typical sensory properties of a cheese. Physiological and genomic investigations have revealed important functions involved in the ability of microorganisms to establish themselves at the cheese surface. These functions include the ability to use the cheese's main energy sources, to acquire iron, to tolerate low pH at the beginning of ripening and to adapt to high salt concentrations and moisture levels. Horizontal gene transfer events involved in the adaptation to the cheese habitat have been described, both for bacteria and fungi. In the future, in situ microbial gene expression profiling and identification of genes that contribute to strain fitness by massive sequencing of transposon libraries will help us to better understand how cheese surface communities function. © FEMS 2014. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Mite and mite allergen removal during machine washing of laundry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arlian, Larry G; Vyszenski-Moher, DiAnn L; Morgan, Marjorie S

    2003-06-01

    Few studies have investigated live house dust mite and mite allergen removal from clothing and bedding by washing machines. No studies have investigated the transfer of mites from infested to uninfested clothing and bedding during washing. The purpose of this study was to wash different types of clothing and bedding in residential washing machines to determine the live Dermatophagoides farinae mite and allergen removal and the mite transfer from mite-infested items to mite-free items. Clothing and bedding items were machine washed in 6- and 8-lb loads in warm (36 degrees C-38 degrees C) or cold (22 degrees C-27 degrees C) water with and without recommended concentrations of laundry detergent and sodium hypochlorite bleach. Live mites and allergen present in washed versus unwashed and washed mite-infested versus washed mite-free items were compared. Washing clothing and bedding in water alone, detergent, or detergent plus bleach removed 60% to 83% of the live mites. Washing removed more mites from some items than from others. When mite-infested items were washed with identical sets of mite-free items, many live mites were transferred to the previously mite-free items. Overall, 84% of Der f 1 was removed from items washed in water alone or in detergent and 98% from items washed in detergent plus bleach. Washing clothing and bedding in cold or warm water with detergent or detergent plus bleach removed most allergen and a significant (P washing is required to further reduce mite levels. Live mites were transferred from mite-infested to mite-free items during washing.

  10. Bacterial Exchange in Household Washing Machines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callewaert, Chris; Van Nevel, Sam; Kerckhof, Frederiek-Maarten; Granitsiotis, Michael S; Boon, Nico

    2015-01-01

    Household washing machines (WMs) launder soiled clothes and textiles, but do not sterilize them. We investigated the microbial exchange occurring in five household WMs. Samples from a new cotton T-shirt were laundered together with a normal laundry load. Analyses were performed on the influent water and the ingoing cotton samples, as well as the greywater and the washed cotton samples. The number of living bacteria was generally not lower in the WM effluent water as compared to the influent water. The laundering process caused a microbial exchange of influent water bacteria, skin-, and clothes-related bacteria and biofilm-related bacteria in the WM. A variety of biofilm-producing bacteria were enriched in the effluent after laundering, although their presence in the cotton sample was low. Nearly all bacterial genera detected on the initial cotton sample were still present in the washed cotton samples. A selection for typical skin- and clothes-related microbial species occurred in the cotton samples after laundering. Accordingly, malodour-causing microbial species might be further distributed to other clothes. The bacteria on the ingoing textiles contributed for a large part to the microbiome found in the textiles after laundering.

  11. Production, composition and characteristics of organic hard cheese

    OpenAIRE

    Popović-Vranješ Anka; Paskaš Snežana; Kasalica Anka; Jevtić Marija; Popović Milka; Belić Branislava

    2016-01-01

    Organic cheeses are value added products that provide small dairy farmers with a viable source of income and has the potential to revitalize farms, provide new jobs, and develop new cheese varieties with unique flavours for consumers to experience. Production of hard organic cheese must comply with organic standards and regulations of organic production. Whole organic milk that does not contain residues of pesticides, hormones and antibiotics represents a q...

  12. Effect of acidity on stability of processed cheese

    OpenAIRE

    Prohaska, Josip

    1993-01-01

    The effect of acidity on stability of processed cheese was studied using results of chemical and microbiological analyses and sensory evaluation. Cheese samples (n = 76) were made from 22 melting blends after technological scheme for processed soft cheese "Domino" from regular production programme in "Sirela" Dairy Bjelovar, on "Stephan" melting unit, from 1983 to 1985. Research hypothesis is based on the assumption that acidity of medium would be one of essential growth limiting factors of t...

  13. The technology, chemistry, and microbiology of Serra Cheese: a review

    OpenAIRE

    Macedo, Angela C.; Malcata, F. Xavier; Oliveira, Jorge C.

    1993-01-01

    This paper comprehensively reviews fundamental and applied aspects of the manufacture of Serra cheese, its composition, the biochemical reactions that take place during coagulation and ripening, and the microbial ecology. Serra cheese is the most traditional cheese manufactured in Portugal. Aspects that make it unique are 1) its manufacture by the coagulation of raw ewe milk using a vegetable rennet (cardoon flower) and 2) its final buttery texture and flavor. The wide variation of the final ...

  14. Headspace analysis of Italian and New Zealand parmesan cheeses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langford, Vaughan S; Reed, Christine J; Milligan, Daniel B; McEwan, Murray J; Barringer, Sheryl A; Harper, W James

    2012-06-01

    New Zealand is a leader in the global dairy industry. Milk powder is the principal export product, but there is also a prominent cheese manufacturing industry, catering more for the domestic market. The Selected Ion Flow Tube-Mass Spectrometric (SIFT-MS) technique was used to compare 4 New Zealand cheeses marketed as "parmesan" with 4 Italian Parmigiano Reggiano and Grana Padano cheeses. The cheese headspace was analyzed in real time without any sample preconcentration. Total of 38 volatile compounds in the cheese headspace were monitored with headspace concentrations varying between single digit parts per billion (ppb) to tens of parts per million (ppm). When the results were subjected to multivariate statistical analysis, a clear discrimination was found between the New Zealand "parmesan" and Italian cheeses based solely on the measured concentrations of these volatile compounds. If the volatile compounds used in the analyses were restricted to known odor-active compounds in Parmigiano Reggiano cheese, the ability to discriminate between the cheeses was maintained. The analyses also showed that it was possible to clearly differentiate between the different processing plants in individual countries. Important discriminatory volatiles in the samples tested were butanoic acid and phenylacetaldehyde for discriminating between Italian cheeses and ethyl butyrate, acetaldehyde and methylbutanals between New Zealand cheeses. We conclude that the New Zealand "parmesans" do not provide a good representation of the aroma of Italian "parmesans." SIFT-MS has been shown to clearly differentiate both country of origin and the manufacturer of "parmesan" cheeses made in Italy and New Zealand based on differences in volatile organic compounds. Thus this method will have benefit for use in the quality control of "parmesan" and other cheese varieties. © 2012 Institute of Food Technologists®

  15. The formation of polycyclic hydrocarbons during smoking process of cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arzu Akpinar-Bayizit

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The smoking process determines the characteristic flavour, odour, colour and texture of several cheese varieties. Some smoke compounds are known to have bacteriostatic and antioxidant effects, and may act as preservatives. Smoked cheese is appreciated by consumers due to its sensorial properties. However, with smoking process there is a risk of formation of toxic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs. This review emphasises the occurrence of polycyclic hydrocarbons on smoked cheeses and their health impacts.

  16. Thermus and the Pink Discoloration Defect in Cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quigley, Lisa; O'Sullivan, Daniel J; Daly, David; O'Sullivan, Orla; Burdikova, Zuzana; Vana, Rostislav; Beresford, Tom P; Ross, R Paul; Fitzgerald, Gerald F; McSweeney, Paul L H; Giblin, Linda; Sheehan, Jeremiah J; Cotter, Paul D

    2016-01-01

    A DNA sequencing-based strategy was applied to study the microbiology of Continental-type cheeses with a pink discoloration defect. The basis for this phenomenon has remained elusive, despite decades of research. The bacterial composition of cheese containing the defect was compared to that of control cheese using 16S rRNA gene and shotgun metagenomic sequencing as well as quantitative PCR (qPCR). Throughout, it was apparent that Thermus, a carotenoid-producing genus, was present at higher levels in defect-associated cheeses than in control cheeses. Prompted by this finding and data confirming the pink discoloration to be associated with the presence of a carotenoid, a culture-based approach was employed, and Thermus thermophilus was successfully cultured from defect-containing cheeses. The link between Thermus and the pinking phenomenon was then established through the cheese defect equivalent of Koch's postulates when the defect was recreated by the reintroduction of a T. thermophilus isolate to a test cheese during the manufacturing process. IMPORTANCE Pink discoloration in cheese is a defect affecting many cheeses throughout the world, leading to significant financial loss for the dairy industry. Despite decades of research, the cause of this defect has remained elusive. The advent of high-throughput, next-generation sequencing has revolutionized the field of food microbiology and, with respect to this study, provided a means of testing a possible microbial basis for this defect. In this study, a combined 16S rRNA, whole-genome sequencing, and quantitative PCR approach was taken. This resulted in the identification of Thermus, a carotenoid-producing thermophile, in defect-associated cheeses and the recreation of the problem in cheeses to which Thermus was added. This finding has the potential to lead to new strategies to eliminate this defect, and our method represents an approach that can be employed to investigate the role of microbes in other food defects

  17. Characteristics of Cheeses Manufactured Using Pepsin from Adult '

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    amount of moisture retained in cheese is iJiflu~ enced by the extent and combiqation of steps :, used in cheese making as w~ll as the method of moishue determinatiori;' In Alpin~, TiFsiter . and Pasta, the.BF content incontro'lcheeses was on the higher"sid~ while it was on the. ·lower side in 'cheeses ,,:ithhighlevels Of pep-.

  18. Determination of nitrate and nitrite content of Turkish cheeses ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The levels of nitrate and nitrite were determined in 185 samples of Turkish cheese having high consumption rate. All cheese samples contained nitrate and its level in Turkish white cheese produced from cow's and sheep's milk were found between 0.92 - 22.40 (mean 8.96±4.93) mg/kg and 0.47 - 23.68 (mean 12.35±6.28) ...

  19. FOCUS ON HAND WASHING Yakubu Tahir Maigari Departm

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HP

    2014-10-24

    Oct 24, 2014 ... be told to develop the habit of hand washing to avoid infection from various types of diseases? Different organizations have mapped out strategies and schemes for hand washing, enumerating the immense benefits this action. For example, Mayo clinic has this to say: Hand washing does not take much time ...

  20. 33 CFR 157.124 - COW tank washing machines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false COW tank washing machines. 157....124 COW tank washing machines. (a) COW machines must be permanently mounted in each cargo tank. (b... allowed in paragraph (f) of this section, each cargo tank must have COW machines located to wash all...

  1. Irreversible Wash Aid Additive for Cesium Mitigation: WARRP Demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaminski, Michael [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2015-01-01

    This activity demonstrated, on a practical scale, the primary unit operations for building a containment structure for radioactive wash waters, washing down a hypothetically radioactively contaminated vehicle, collecting the hypothetically radioactive slurry waste water, filtering the hypothetically radioactive wash waters, disassembling the containment, and transporting the materials for final disposition.

  2. 21 CFR 211.52 - Washing and toilet facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Washing and toilet facilities. 211.52 Section 211... § 211.52 Washing and toilet facilities. Adequate washing facilities shall be provided, including hot and cold water, soap or detergent, air driers or single-service towels, and clean toilet facilities easily...

  3. Enhancing The Wash Oil Antifouling Action In A Cracked Gas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pure grade samples from operational wash oil (used in cracked gas compression unit), light cycle oil, heavy residue and heavy diesel oil were obtained. Miscible blend samples of ratio 1:1 were also obtained from wash oil/light cycle oil and wash oil/heavy residue. These samples were subjected to characterization and the ...

  4. Dietary fibers and protective lactobacilli drive burrata cheese microbiome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minervini, Fabio; Conte, Amalia; Del Nobile, Matteo Alessandro; Gobbetti, Marco; De Angelis, Maria

    2017-08-25

    This study aimed at improving the functional attributes and shelf-life of burrata cheese by using protective lactobacilli (Lactobacillus plantarum LPAL and Lactobacillus rhamnosus LRB), fructoligosaccharides and inulin. Six burrata cheeses were made by using: i) the traditional protocol (control); ii) addition of 0.5% fructoligosaccharides and inulin (DF cheese); iii) protective lactobacilli in milk alone (PL cheese); iv) protective lactobacilli in milk and governing liquid (2PL cheese); v) protective lactobacilli in milk and dietary fibers (DF_PL cheese); and vi) protective lactobacilli in milk, governing liquid and dietary fibers (DF_2PL cheeses). As expected, DF, DF_PL and DF_2PL cheeses showed 1.5% of total fibers. Burrata cheeses produced by adding protective lactobacilli only in milk (PL and DF_PL) showed the lowest acidification during cheese-making and storage. Lactic and acetic acids and ethanol were found at the lowest concentration in these samples. Analyses of cultivable microbiota and microbiome showed that protective lactobacilli reduced the house microbiota components (e.g., Streptococcus thermophilus, Lactococcus lactis, Leuconostoc lactis) during cheese-making and storage. Protective lactobacilli slowed down the growth of staphylococci, coliforms and Pseudomonas sp. especially in early storage. According to the different microbiome assembly, burrata samples differed in peptide profiles and level of free amino acids. As shown by sensory analysis, the addition of protective lactobacilli in milk improved the flavor and increased the shelf-life of burrata cheese. Compared to cheeses made by culture protective only in milk, those containing cultures also in the governing liquid did not further prolong shelf-life and received lower acceptability scores by the panelist.IMPORTANCE This study provided more in-depth knowledge of the microbiome of burrata cheese and set-up a novel biotechnology using prebiotics dietary fibers and probiotic protective

  5. Functional petit-suisse cheese: measure of the prebiotic effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardarelli, Haíssa R; Saad, Susana M I; Gibson, Glenn R; Vulevic, Jelena

    2007-01-01

    Prebiotics and probiotics are increasingly being used to produce potentially synbiotic foods, particularly through dairy products as vehicles. It is well known that both ingredients may offer benefits to improve the host health. This research aimed to evaluate the prebiotic potential of novel petit-suisse cheeses using an in vitro fermentation model. Five petit-suisse cheese formulations combining candidate prebiotics (inulin, oligofructose, honey) and probiotics (Lactobacillus acidophilus, Bifidobacterium lactis) were tested in vitro using sterile, stirred, batch culture fermentations with human faecal slurry. Measurement of prebiotic effect (MPE) values were generated comparing bacterial changes through determination of maximum growth rates of groups, rate of substrate assimilation and production of lactate and short chain fatty acids. Fastest fermentation and high lactic acid production, promoting increased growth rates of bifidobacteria and lactobacilli, were achieved with addition of prebiotics to a probiotic cheese (made using starter+probiotics). Addition of probiotic strains to control cheese (made using just a starter culture) also resulted in high lactic acid production. Highest MPE values were obtained with addition of prebiotics to a probiotic cheese, followed by addition of prebiotics and/or probiotics to a control cheese. Under the in vitro conditions used, cheese made with the combination of different prebiotics and probiotics resulted in the most promising functional petit-suisse cheese. The study allowed comparison of potentially functional petit-suisse cheeses and screening of preferred synbiotic potential for future market use.

  6. The Quality of Chicken Nuggets With Addition Gouda Cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eny Sri Widyastuti

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research was to acquired the best percentage of using cheese in the chicken nuggets  processing. Materials used for this research were nuggets made from chicken meat, Gouda cheese and spices. Experiment done with Random Block Analysis as experiment design by addition Gouda Cheese ( 0% (F0, 5% (F1, 10% (F2, 15% (F3, 20% (F4 . The results showed that chicken nuggets with  Gouda cheese addition gave  a highly significant effect (P0.05 on pH and Organoleptic. The best result was nuggets which made with addition of 15 percent of Gouda cheese.The conclusion of this research was the addition of Gouda Cheese to Chiken Nuggets increased fat content, protein content, ash content, WHC and tend to decreased mouistured content, textured.  Result of panelist not trained using cheese in manner chicken nuggets are like made with addition of 15 percent of Gouda cheese. The best result was nuggets which made with addition of 15 percent of Gouda chees   Keywords : Chicken nuggets, Chicken meat, Gouda cheese

  7. Radiotracer study of wash load movement in a drum-type fabric washing machine using a gamma camera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balt, A.P.; Brekel, L.D.M. van den; Vandecasteele, C.; Kolar, Z.

    1987-01-01

    A study was made of the movement of the wash loads in a drum-type washing machine. For this purpose a sup(99m)Tc source was attached to one or two separate textile pieces and the subsequent source positions were determined by means of a gamma-camera. The wash load movement pattern appears to depend on the type of textile material and its amount, as well as on the volume of water present in the washing machine.

  8. Listeria monocytogenes contamination in dairy plants: evaluation of Listeria monocytogenes environmental contamination in two cheese-making plants using sheeps milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michela Ibba

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Listeria monocytogenes harbouring niches established in the processing plant support post-process contamination of dairy products made from pasteurised or thermised milk. The present study investigated L. monocytogenes environmental contamination in two sheep’s milk cheese-making plants. Persistence of contamination in the area at higher risk was also investigated. During a one-year survey 7 samplings were carried out in each dairy plant, along the production lines of Pecorino Romano and ricotta salata cheese. A total of 613 environmental samples collected from food contact and non-food contact surfaces were analysed according to ISO 11290-1:2005 standard method. Identification of the isolated strains was carried out by polymerase chain reaction. L. monocytogenes prevalence was 23.2% in dairy A and 13.1% in dairy B, respectively. The higher prevalence rate was found in the following areas: salting, products washing, packaging, ricotta salata storage and Pecorino Romano ripening rooms. L. monocytogenes was never found in the cheese-making area. The probability of observing samples positive for the presence of L. monocytogenes was asso- ciated with dairy plant, sampling area and the period of cheese-making (P<0.001. The greater persistence of contamination over time was observed in the washing, salting, and Pecorino Romano ripening areas. The control of persistent environmental contamination relies on the identification of L. monocytogenes niches within the processing environment and the prevention of harborage sites formation. The importance of strict cleaning and sanitising procedure in controlling L. monocytogenes environmental contamination is confirmed by the lower level of contamination observed after these procedures were correctly implemented.

  9. Toxigenic fungi isolated from Roquefort cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moubasher, A H; Abdel-Kader, M I; El-Kady, I A

    1979-02-28

    To evaluate the potential for mycotoxin production by fungi contaminating blue-veined cheese, as well as by the ripening fungus, Penicillium roqueforti, the fungal flora of six of local and imported brands was determined. A total of 19 fungi were isolated from the six brands tested. Fourteen of the isolates were toxic to chicken embryos. The toxigenic fungi produced the following mycotoxins: Aspergillus fumigatus, kojic acid; A. versicolor, sterigmatocystin; Penicillium roqueforti, penicillic acid and unidentified toxic metabolites.

  10. Shifted excitation Raman difference spectroscopy for authentication of cheese and cheese analogues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sowoidnich, Kay; Kronfeldt, Heinz-Detlef

    2016-04-01

    Food authentication and the detection of adulterated products are recent major issues in the food industry as these topics are of global importance for quality control and food safety. To effectively address this challenge requires fast, reliable and non-destructive analytical techniques. Shifted Excitation Raman Difference Spectroscopy (SERDS) is well suited for identification purposes as it combines the chemically specific information obtained by Raman spectroscopy with the ability for efficient fluorescence rejection. The two slightly shifted excitation wavelengths necessary for SERDS are realized by specially designed microsystem diode lasers. At 671 nm the laser (optical power: 50 mW, spectral shift: 0.7 nm) is based on an external cavity configuration whereas an emission at 783 nm (optical power: 110 mW, spectral shift: 0.5 nm) is achieved by a distributed feedback laser. To investigate the feasibility of SERDS for rapid and nondestructive authentication purposes four types of cheese and three different cheese analogues were selected. Each sample was probed at 8 different positions using integration times of 3-10 seconds and 10 spectra were recorded at each spot. Principal components analysis was applied to the SERDS spectra revealing variations in fat and protein signals as primary distinction criterion between cheese and cheese analogues for both excitation wavelengths. Furthermore, to some extent, minor compositional differences could be identified to discriminate between individual species of cheese and cheese analogues. These findings highlight the potential of SERDS for rapid food authentication potentially paving the way for future applications of portable SERDS systems for non-invasive in situ analysis.

  11. Cheese cultures: transforming American tastes and traditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paxson, Heather

    2010-01-01

    Although the history of cheesemaking in the United States tells largely a tale of industrialization, there is a submerged yet continuous history of small-batch, hands-on, artisan cheese manufacture. This tradition, carried on in artisan cheese factories across the country, although concentrated in Wisconsin, is often overlooked by a new generation of artisan cheesemakers. Continuities in fabrication methods shared by preindustrial and post-industrial artisan creameries have been obscured by changes in the organization and significance of artisan production over the last one hundred years. Making cheese by hand has morphed from chore to occupation to vocation; from economic trade to expressive endeavor; from a craft to an art. American artisan cheesemaking tradition was invented and reinvented as a tradition of innovation. Indeed, ideological commitment to innovation as modern, progressive, American—and thus a marketable value—further obscures continuities between past and present, artisan factories, and new farmstead production. The social disconnect between the current artisan movement and American's enduring cheesemaking tradition reproduces class hierarchies even as it reflects growing equity in gendered occupational opportunities.

  12. Hand washing practices in a college town environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borchgrevink, Carl P; Cha, JaeMin; Kim, SeungHyun

    2013-04-01

    Many people do not wash their hands when the behavior in which they engage would warrant it. Most research of hand washing practices to date has taken place in high-traffic environments such as airports and public attraction venues. These studies have established a persistent shortcoming and a gender difference in hand washing compliance. Using field observations of 3,749 people in a college town environment, the research described in this article replicates and extends earlier work while identifying potential environmental and demographic predictors of hand washing compliance. Additionally, the authors' research suggests that proper hand washing practices, as recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, are not being practiced. Finally, the authors' research raises a question as to the accuracy of earlier measurements of "proper" hand washing practices, suggesting that compliance rates are inflated. The results can help increase hand washing rates for the general public and thus decrease the risk of transmitting disease.

  13. Characteristics of microbial biofilm on wooden vats ('gerles') in PDO Salers cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didienne, Robert; Defargues, Catherine; Callon, Cécile; Meylheuc, Thierry; Hulin, Sophie; Montel, Marie-Christine

    2012-05-15

    The purpose of this study was to characterize microbial biofilms from 'gerles' (wooden vats for making PDO Salers cheese) and identify their role in milk inoculation and in preventing pathogen development. Gerles from ten farms producing PDO Salers cheese were subjected to microbial analysis during at least 4 periods spread over two years. They were distinguished by their levels of Lactobacillus (between 4.50 and 6.01 log CFU/cm(2)), Gram negative bacteria (between 1.45 and 4.56 log CFU/cm(2)), yeasts (between 2.91 and 5.57 log CFU/cm(2)), and moulds (between 1.72 and 4.52 log CFU/cm(2)). They were then classed into 4 groups according their microbial characteristics. These 4 groups were characterized by different milk inoculations (with either sour whey or starter culture, daily or not), and different washing procedures (with water or whey from cheese making). The farm gerles were not contaminated by Salmonella, Listeria monocytogenes or Staphylococcus aureus. Only one slight, punctual contamination was found on one gerle among the ten studied. Even when the milk was deliberately contaminated with L. monocytogenes and S. aureus in the 40 L experimental gerles, these pathogens were found neither on the gerle surfaces nor in the cheeses. Using 40 L experimental gerles it was shown that the microbial biofilms on the gerle surfaces formed in less than one week and then remained stable. They were mainly composed of a great diversity of lactic acid bacteria (Leuconostoc pseudomesenteroides, Lactococcus lactis, Lactobacillus casei, Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus hilgardii,…), Gram positive catalase positive bacteria (Curtobacterium flaccumfaciens, Curtobacterium oceanosedimentum Citrococcus spp., Brachybacterium rhamnosum, Kocuria rhizophila, Arthrobacter spp.…) and yeast (Kluyveromyces lactis, Kluyveromyces marxianus). In less than 1 min, even in a 500 L farm gerle, the gerle's microbial biofilm can inoculate pasteurized milk with micro-organisms at levels

  14. Ripening for improving the quality of inoculated cheese Rhizopus oryzae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ARTINI PANGASTUTI

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Estikomah SA, Sutarno, Pangastuti A 2010. Ripening for improving the quality of inoculated cheese Rhizopus oryzae. Nusantara Bioscience 2: 1-6. Cheese is dairy product resulted from fermented milk in which the fermentation process can be done by lactic acid bacteria or fungus. Rhizopus oryzae is able to produce lactic acid, protease and lipase. The ripening process changes the taste and texture. The purpose of this study is ripening to improve the quality of inoculated cheese R. oryzae. In this research the ripening was conducted the concentration variation of temperature (5oC, 10oC, 15oC, and time (7 days, 14 days. The procedure of research consisted of two steps, namely un-ripened cheese preparation followed by ripening cheese preparation. Cheese produced in this study analyzed the value of pH, fat content, protein content, amino acid levels and identification of microbe with ANOVA then followed by DMRT at 5% level of significance. Data results were analyzed with the like’s nonparametric statistical test, followed by Fridman Wilcoxon Signed Rank Test (WSRT at 5% level significance. The results showed that the preferred ripened cheese panelist was at a temperature of 15oC for 14 days. Ripening conditions affect pH, fat content, protein content and do not affect the levels of amino acids that formed ripened cheese. The best quality ripened cheese i.e. at a temperature of 15°C for 14 days, had a pH value of 4.40, the highest protein content of 9.78%, and fat content of 35.02%. The results of identified microbe in un-ripened cheese and ripened cheese include Enterococcus hirae (Enterococcus faecalis, Bacillus subtilis, and Aspergillus sp.

  15. Longterm storage of post-packaged bread by controlling spoilage pathogens using Lactobacillus fermentum C14 isolated from homemade curd.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soma Barman

    Full Text Available One potent lactic acid bacterial strain C14 with strong antifungal activity was isolated from homemade curd. Based on morphological as well as biochemical characters and 16S rDNA sequence homology the strain was identified as Lactobacillus fermentum. It displayed a wide antimicrobial spectrum against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria, and also against number of food spoilage, plant and human pathogenic fungi. The cell free supernatant (CFS of the strain C14 was also effective against the fungi tested. Inhibition of radial growth of Penicillium digitatum, Trichophyton rubrum and Mucor sp. was noticed in the presence of CFS of C14 even at low concentration (1%. More than 94.3 ± 1.6% and 91.5 ± 2.2% inhibition of conidial germination of P. digitatum and Mucor sp. were noticed in the presence of 10-fold-concentrated CFS of C14. Massive deformation of the fungal mycelia was observed by SEM studies, and losses of cellular proteins and DNA are also evident upon its treatment with C14. HPLC analysis revealed the presence of phenyl lactic acid, lactic acid along with some unidentified compounds in the antifungal extract. Challenge experiment showed immense potential of the strain C14 in preventing the spoilage of bread samples caused by Mucor sp. and Bacillus subtilis. The bread samples remained fresh upto 25 days even after inoculation with Mucor sp. (3.7 × 104 spores /ml and B. subtilis (4.6 × 104 CFU /ml. Along with the antifungal properties, the isolated lactic acid bacterial strain also showed very good antioxidant activities. Unchanged level of liver enzymes serum glutamic pyruvic transaminase and serum glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase in albino mice upon feeding with C14 also suggested non-toxic nature of the bacterial isolate.

  16. The effect of quality properties on Tulum cheese using different ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    No significant difference was found in the sensory properties of cheese produced from raw and pasteurized milk. In view of these findings, the use of pasteurized milk in the production of Tulum cheese can be recommended as a suitable alternative to raw milk, and the use of cloth packaging material in place of animal skin ...

  17. 21 CFR 133.179 - Pasteurized process cheese spread.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... than 250 parts per million nisin in the food. (g) The name of the food is “pasteurized process cheese... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Pasteurized process cheese spread. 133.179 Section 133.179 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES...

  18. 7 CFR 58.423 - Cheese vacuumizing chamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Cheese vacuumizing chamber. 58.423 Section 58.423 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....423 Cheese vacuumizing chamber. The vacuum chamber shall be satisfactorily constructed and maintained...

  19. Studies on Traditional Cheese (Woagashie) Production in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cheese production has been in existence for more than 4000 years as a way of preserving milk and also serve as a source of protein supply and food or meat substitute. In Ghana as in other Sub-Sahara African countries, traditional cheese termed 'Woagashie', is gradually gaining popularity. A study was thus carried out to ...

  20. Physiological characterization of common fungi associated with cheese

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haasum, Iben; Nielsen, Per Væggemose

    1998-01-01

    A multivariate statistical method (PLS) was used for a physiological characterization of fungi associated with the cheese environment. The combined effects of pH, salt content, oxygen and carbon dioxide levels on growth and sporulation were studied. Significant factors affecting growth were salt...... may aid in eliminating unwanted fungal growth during cheese production....

  1. Feasibility of cheese production and whey valorization in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Problems associated with perishability and distribution of local milk and milk products by small-scale producers in the Adamawa province of Cameroon, justified development of an easy process for producing pressed-dough cheese and flavoured whey. Production from raw milk was technically profitable with mean cheese ...

  2. Acceptance and storage of fresh cheese made with essential oils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joelmir Grassi Presente

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to evaluate the acceptance and conservation of Minas fresh cheese with essential oils added of oregano and ginger in its formulation. The quality of the milk used as raw material was evaluated for pH, acidity, alizarol, total solids, density, and total microbial load. The cheeses produced were characterized as pH, acidity, moisture, lipids, proteins and ashes. The cheeses were also evaluated by sensorial affective tests using hedonic and attitude scales, in order to determine the acceptance and purchase intention by judges. The count of total aerobic mesophilic microorganisms was used to estimate the shelf-life of cheeses. The milk used as raw material is presented within the quality standards required by legislation. The cheeses made with essential oils showed pH and acidity around 6.9 and 0.87%, respectively, 57.6% moisture, 31.3% lipids, 11.4% protein and 0.9% ash. The cheese added essential oil of oregano and the control cheese were those given by the judges the best values for acceptance (7.5 and 7.6, respectively and purchase intention (4.2 and 4.4 respectively. Regarding the estimated shelf-life, the cheeses added essential oil of oregano and ginger had lower overall microbial load values compared to the control (no oil and mixed (two oils addition, presented counts values with up 106 UFC/g only from the 28th day of storage.

  3. Development of volatile compounds in processed cheese during storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sunesen, Lars Oddershede; Lund, Pia; Sørensen, J.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this work teas to study tire impact of storage conditions, such as light and temperature, on the development of volatile compounds to processed cheese. Cheese in glass containers was stored at 5, 20 or 37 degreesC in light or darkness for up to 1 yr. Dynamic headspace and gas...

  4. Microflora of processed cheese and the factors affecting it.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buňková, Leona; Buňka, František

    2017-07-24

    The basic raw materials for the production of processed cheese are natural cheese which is treated by heat with the addition of emulsifying salts. From a point of view of the melting temperatures used (and the pH-value of the product), the course of processed cheese production can be considered "pasteurisation of cheese." During the melting process, the majority of vegetative forms of microorganisms, including bacteria of the family Enterobacteriaceae, are inactivated. The melting temperatures are not sufficient to kill the endospores, which survive the process but are often weakened. From a microbiological point of view, the biggest contamination problem of processed cheese is caused by gram-positive spore-forming rod-shaped bacteria of the genera Bacillus, Geobacillus, and Clostridium. Other factors affecting the shelf-life and quality of processed cheese are mainly the microbiological quality of the raw materials used, strict hygienic conditions during the manufacturing process as well as the type of packaging materials and storage conditions. The quality of processed cheese is not only dependent on the ingredients used but also on other parameters such as the value of water activity of the processed cheese, its pH-value, the presence of salts and emulsifying salts and the amount of fat in the product.

  5. Characteristics of cheeses manufactured using pepsin from adult ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The cheese making quality of pepsin extracted from adult cattle abomasa using dilute HCI (HP) and commercial vinegar (VP) was assessed using three types of cheeses namely Alpine, Tilister and Pastafilata (Pasta). The level of each extract was substituted with commercial calf rennet (CR) at 0, 25, 50, 75, 100%.

  6. We tasted a genetically modified cheese - and we like it!

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech-Larsen, Tino; Grunert, Klaus G.; Scholderer, Joachim

    This paper presents the preliminary results of a conjoint study of 750 Danish, Swedish, Norwegian and Finnish consumers´ preferences for genetically modified and conventional cheese with different types of benefits. The results showed homogeneity in preferences within as well as across countries....... In general, the genetically modified cheese was rejected, but this was modified somewhat by health and taste benefits....

  7. 21 CFR 133.158 - Low-moisture part-skim mozzarella and scamorza cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... cheese. 133.158 Section 133.158 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION CHEESES AND RELATED CHEESE PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Cheese and Related Products § 133.158 Low-moisture part-skim mozzarella and...

  8. Aqueous treatment of water-sensitive paper objects: capillary unit, blotter wash or paraprint wash?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schalkx, H.; Iedema, P.; Reissland, B.; van Velzen, B.

    2011-01-01

    Blotter washing andwashing with the capillary unit are both methods used for aqueoustreatment of water-sensitive paper objects. The challenge of thistreatment is to remove water-soluble products while keeping thewater-sensitive medium in its place. In this article the two methodsare compared, along

  9. Effect of cheese as a fat replacer in fermented sausage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ercoşkun, Hüdayi

    2014-08-01

    The effects of beef fat substitution with kashar cheese were studied in traditional Turkish fermented sausage; sucuk. Six sucuk formulations were prepared by replacing 0, 10, 20, 30, 40 and 50% of beef fat was substituted with kashar cheese. The fat substitution of fat with kashar cheese decreased fat content and increased protein content of the product that affected the chemical, physical and sensorial characteristics of products. Saturated fatty acid content increased and unsaturated, mono-unsaturated and poly-unsaturated fatty acids amount were decreased as the cheese amount increased. The formulation with 10% substitution of beef fat with cheese took the best sensory overall acceptability scores followed by 20% and control groups.

  10. Discrimination of seasonality in cheeses by near-infrared technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Martín, Inmaculada; Hernández-Hierro, José Miguel; Salvador-Esteban, Javier; González-Pérez, Claudio; Revilla, Isabel; Vivar-Quintana, Ana

    2011-04-01

    Owing to the importance of the season of collection of milk for cheese quality, a study was made of the usefulness of near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) for discriminating the seasonal origin (winter or summer) of milk and quantifying the fat content of cheeses, since fat is one of the components most affected by the season of collection of milk for the elaboration of cheeses. In the internal validation, 96% of samples from winter milk and 97% of samples from summer milk were correctly classified, while in the external validation the prediction rate of samples correctly classified was 92%. Moreover, quantitative models allowed the determination of fat in winter, summer and winter + summer cheeses. Rapid prediction of the fat content of cheeses and the seasonal origin (winter or summer) of milk was achieved using NIRS without previous destruction or treatment of samples. Copyright © 2011 Society of Chemical Industry.

  11. Application of low intensity ultrasonics to cheese manufacturing processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedito, J; Carcel, J A; Gonzalez, R; Mulet, A

    2002-05-01

    Ultrasound has been used to non-destructively assess the quality of many foods such as meat, fish, vegetables and dairy products. This paper addresses the applications of low intensity ultrasonics in the cheese manufacturing processes and highlights the areas where ultrasonics could be successfully implemented in the future. The decrease of ultrasonic attenuation during the renneting process can be used to determine the optimum cut time for cheese making. The ultrasonic velocity increases during maturation for those types of cheese that become harder during this manufacturing stage, thus being an indicator of the maturity degree. Moreover, ultrasonic measurements could be linked to sensory parameters. From the ultrasonic velocity measurements at two different temperatures, it is possible to assess cheese composition, thus allowing an improvement in the quality and uniformity of cheese commercialization. In addition, in pulse-echo mode it is possible to detect cracked pieces due to abnormal fermentations and also to assess the distance of the crack from the surface.

  12. Bactérias do acido láctico e leveduras associadas com o queijo-de-minas artesanal produzido na região da Serra do Salitre, Minas Gerais Lactic acid bacteria and yeasts associated with the artisanal Minas cheese produced in the region of Serra do Salitre, Minas Gerais

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.D.L.C. Lima

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Em 10 fazendas da região da Serra do Salitre, MG, foram coletadas amostras de leite, soro fermentado (pingo, coalhada e queijo frescal para avaliar a microbiota de bactérias láticas e leveduras presentes. Uma diversidade menor de bactérias láticas foi observada durante a produção do queijo quando comparada à de leveduras. As espécies de bactérias láticas mais freqüentes foram Lactococcus lactis, Enterococcus spp., Enterococcus faecalis e Streptococcus agalactiae e de leveduras foram Debaryomyces hansenii e Kluyveromyces lactis. Apenas as populações de Enterococcus spp., Enterococcus faecalis e Leuconostoc mesenteroides apresentaram aumento significativo durante a produção do queijo. As espécies de bactérias láticas e leveduras encontradas nos diferentes substratos estudados podem ser responsáveis pelas características de aroma e sabor do queijo artesanal da Serra do Salitre.Samples of milk, curd, cheese whey, and cheese were collected in 10 farms located at the region of Serra do Salitre, Minas Gerais state. These samples were studied in relation to their lactic acid bacteria and yeast populations. The diversity of lactic acid bacteria species was lower than the diversity of yeasts in these samples. The isolated lactic acid bacteria were Lactococcus lactis, Enterococcus spp., Enterococcus faecalis, and Streptococcus agalactiae; and the yeasts were Debaryomyces hansenii and Kluyveromyces lactis. Only the species Enterococcus spp., Enterococcus faecalis, and Leuconostoc mesenteroides showed an increase in their populations during the production of the artisanal cheese. Lactic acid bacteria and yeasts found in this study could be responsible by the sensorial characteristics of the artisanal cheese produced in the region of Serra do Salitre.

  13. USE OF PROBIOTIC BACTERIA IN THE PRODUCTION OF CHEESE : PROBIOTIC CHEESE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oğuz GÜRSOY

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The interactions of the gastrointestinal microflora with human health have been the subject of considerable debate in recent years. Disruption of the ecologic equilibrium of the normal intestinal flora may result in gastrointestinal diseases. Functional foods, which are used in prevention and treatment of some intestinal diseases, are defined as "foods that may provide health benefits beyond basic nutrition". Probiotics are constituted an important part of functional foods. Probiotics are live microbial food supplements that beneficially affect the host by improving its intestinal microbial balance. To date, the most popular food delivery systems for probiotic cultures have been fermented milks and yogurts, as well as unfermented milk with cultures added. In an effort to expand the probiotic product range, a small number of researchers and dairy companies have endeavoured to production cheeses, which sustain a high viable count of probiotic cultures. This paper will first outline some of the main aspects about probiotics, cheese microbilogy and probiotic cheese development, and give examples of studies where probiotic microorganisms have been incoorporated into cheese.

  14. Isolation of [i]Listeria monocytogenes[/i] from milks used for Iranian traditional cheese in Lighvan cheese factories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mir-Hassan Moosavy

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Traditional Lighvan cheese is a semi-hard cheese which has a popular market in Iran and neighboring countries. The aim of this study was evaluating the contamination of milks used for Lighvan cheese making with[i] Listeria monocytogenes[/i]. Raw milk samples were randomly collected from different cheese producing factories (sampling carried out from large milk tanks used cheese making in factories. Isolation of [i]L. monocytogenes[/i] was performed according to ISO 11290 and biochemical tests were done to identify and confirm L. monocytogenes. 9 samples (50% of the 18 collected samples from milk tanks in Lighvan cheese producing factories were contaminated with [i]L. monocytogenes[/i]. The concentration of [i]L. monocytogenes[/i] in all 9 positive samples was 40 CFU/ml. This study is the first report of [i]L. monocytogenes[/i] contamination in raw milks used for Lighvan cheese production in Iran. Regarding the fact that these cheeses are produced from raw milk and no heating process is performed on them its milk contamination can be a potential risk for consumers.

  15. Comparison of Physicochemical and Sensory Properties between Cholesterol-removed Gouda Cheese and Gouda Cheese during Ripening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Ho-Jung; Ko, Eun-Jung; Kwak, Hae-Soo

    2013-12-01

    This study was performed to compare physicochemical and sensory properties of cholesterol-removed Gouda cheese (CRGC) and Gouda cheese made in the laboratory during ripening. Composition, short-chain free fatty acids (SCFFA), texture, color, and sensory properties were measured. In chemical composition analyses, moistures were significantly different between control cheeses (42.86%) and sample cheese (48.32%) (p0.05). The amount of cholesterol in control was 82.52 mg/100 g and the percentage of cholesterol removal was 90.7%. SCFFA increased gradually during ripening and its level of CRGC increased and significantly different from that of control (pcheeses during ripening periods (p>0.05). In comparison of the control and sample cheeses, hardness, and springiness were not significantly different, but cohesiveness, gumminess, and chewiness were different (p0.05). However, L* value decreased, while a* and b* values tended to increase significantly (pcheeses, and were not significantly different between the control and sample cheeses during ripening (p>0.05). Therefore, this study suggests that the quality of cholesterol-removed Gouda cheese is not different from the control cheese.

  16. Detection and Viability of Lactococcus lactis throughout Cheese Ripening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocolin, Luca

    2014-01-01

    Recent evidences highlighted the presence of Lactococcus lactis during late cheese ripening. For this reason, the role of this microorganism, well known as dairy starter, should be reconsidered throughout cheese manufacturing and ripening. Thus, the main objective of this study was to develop a RT-qPCR protocol for the detection, quantification and determination of the viability of L. lactis in ripened cheese samples by direct analysis of microbial nucleic acids. Standard curves were constructed for the specific quantification of L. lactis in cheese matrices and good results in terms of selectivity, correlation coefficient and efficiency were obtained. Thirty-three ripened cheeses were analyzed and, on the basis of RNA analysis, twelve samples showed 106 to 108 CFU of L. lactis per gram of product, thirteen from 103 to 105 CFU/g, and in eight cheeses, L. lactis was not detected. Traditional plating on M17 medium led to loads ranging from 105 to 109 CFU/g, including the cheese samples where no L. lactis was found by RT-qPCR. From these cheeses, none of the colonies isolated on M17 medium was identified as L. lactis species. These data could be interpreted as a lack of selectivity of M17 medium where colony growth is not always related to lactococcal species. At the same time, the absence or low abundance of L. lactis isolates on M17 medium from cheese where L. lactis was detected by RT-qPCR support the hypothesis that L. lactis starter populations are mainly present in viable but not culturable state during ripening and, for this reason, culture-dependent methods have to be supplemented with direct analysis of cheese. PMID:25503474

  17. Screening of grated cheese authenticity by nir spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Cevoli

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Parmigiano–Reggiano (PR cheese is one of the oldest traditional cheeses produced in Europe, and it is still one of the most valuable Protected Designation of Origin (PDO cheeses of Italy. The denomination of origin is extended to the grated cheese when manufactured exclusively from whole Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese wheels that respond to the production standard. The grated cheese must be matured for a period of at least 12 months and characterized by a rind content not over 18%. In this investigation the potential of near infrared spectroscopy (NIR, coupled to different statistical methods, were used to estimate the authenticity of grated Parmigiano Reggiano cheese PDO. Cheese samples were classified as: compliance PR, competitors, non-compliance PR (defected PR, and PR with rind content greater then 18%. NIR spectra were obtained using a spectrophotometer Vector 22/N (Bruker Optics, Milan, Italy in the diffuse reflectance mode. Instrument was equipped with a rotating integrating sphere. Principal Component Analysis (PCA was conducted for an explorative spectra analysis, while the Artificial Neural Networks (ANN were used to classify spectra, according to different cheese categories. Subsequently the rind percentage and month of ripening were estimated by a Partial Least Squares regression (PLS. Score plots of the PCA show a clear separation between compliance PR samples and the rest of the sample was observed. Competitors samples and the defected PR samples were grouped together. The classification performance for all sample classes, obtained by ANN analysis, was higher of 90%, in test set validation. Rind content and month of ripening were predicted by PLS a with a determination coefficient greater then 0.95 (test set. These results showed that the method can be suitable for a fast screening of grated cheese authenticity.

  18. Microbial biodiversity in cheese consortia and comparative Listeria growth on surfaces of uncooked pressed cheeses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callon, Cécile; Retureau, Emilie; Didienne, Robert; Montel, Marie-Christine

    2014-03-17

    The study set out to determine how changes in the microbial diversity of a complex antilisterial consortium from the surface of St-Nectaire cheese modify its antilisterial activities. On the basis of the microbial composition of a natural complex consortium named TR15 (Truefood consortium 15), three new consortia of different species and strain compositions were defined: TR15-SC (58 isolates from TR15 collection), TR15-M (pools of isolates from selective counting media) and TR15-BHI (pools of isolates from BHI medium). Their antilisterial activities on the surfaces of uncooked pressed cheese made with pasteurised milk were compared with the activity of complex consortium TR15 and a control cheese inoculated only with starter culture (Streptococcus thermophilus, Lactobacillus delbrueckii). The natural consortium TR15 was the most inhibitory, followed by reconstituted consortium TR15-BHI. The dynamics of the cheese rind microbial flora were monitored by counting on media and by isolate identification using 16S rDNA sequencing and direct 16S rDNA Single Strand Conformation Polymorphism analysis. The combination of these methods showed that rind with natural consortium TR15 had greater microbial diversity and different microbial dynamics than cheese rinds with reconstituted consortia. Cheese rind with the natural consortium showed higher citrate consumption and the highest concentrations of lactic and acetic acids, connected with high levels of lactic acid bacteria such as Carnobacterium maltaromaticum, Vagococcus fluvialis, Enterococcus gilvus, Leuconostoc mesenteroides, Brochothrix thermosphacta and Lactococcus lactis, ripening bacteria such as Arthrobacter nicotianae/arilaitensis, and Gram negative bacteria (Pseudomonas psychrophila and Enterobacter spp.). The highest L. monocytogenes count was on rind with TR15-M and was positively associated with the highest pH value, high succinic and citric acid contents, and the highest levels of Marinilactibacillus

  19. Yeasts from Canastra cheese production process: Isolation and evaluation of their potential for cheese whey fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Rafaela Pereira; Melo, Carolina Naves; Genisheva, Zlatina; Schwan, Rosane Freitas; Duarte, Whasley Ferreira

    2017-01-01

    Canastra cheese is a cheese with geographical indication recognized by the Brazilian National Institute of Industrial Protection under number IG201002. It is produced in seven municipalities in the state of Minas Gerais in a region called Serra da Canastra. In this work, samples of milk, "pingo" (natural starter), whey and Canastra cheese were collected on a farm in Medeiros-MG/Brazil to evaluate the yeast microbiota and select yeasts for whey fermentation to produce ethanol and volatile aromatic compounds of relevance in the production of cheese. Thirty-nine isolates capable of fermenting lactose in a synthetic medium were identified by MALDI-TOF as Kluyveromyces lactis (29), Torulaspora delbrueckii (7) and Candida intermedia (3). Eleven isolates of K. lactis and three of T. delbrueckii efficiently fermented lactose until 4th day, and due to this reason were selected for cheese whey fermentation with Brix 12, 14 and 18. Generally, the isolates T. delbrueckii B14, B35, and B20 and K. lactis B10 were the most effective regardless of the initial Brix value. The identification of these four isolates by MALDI TOF was confirmed by sequencing of the ITS region. In the fermentation of cheese whey 14 Brix, T. delbrueckii B14 and B35, respectively yielded 24.06g/L and 16.45g/L of ethanol, while K. lactis B10 was more efficient in the consumption of lactose. In sequential culture with K. lactis B10 inoculated 48h after T. delbrueckii B14, 97.82% of the total sugars were consumed resulting in the production of 19.81g/L ethanol and 39 aromatic volatile compounds. The most abundant compounds were 3-methyl-1-butanol, octanoic acid and ethyl decanoate, which are reported as important for the aroma and flavor of cheeses. Based in our results, B10 isolate inoculated 48h after B14 isolate is a promising yeast inoculum to be used for fermentation of dairy substrates. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Consensus categorization of cheese based on water activity and pH-A rational approach to systemizing cheese diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trmčić, A; Ralyea, R; Meunier-Goddik, L; Donnelly, C; Glass, K; D'Amico, D; Meredith, E; Kehler, M; Tranchina, N; McCue, C; Wiedmann, M

    2017-01-01

    Development of science-based interventions in raw milk cheese production is challenging due to the large diversity of production procedures and final products. Without an agreed upon categorization scheme, science-based food safety evaluations and validation of preventive controls would have to be completed separately on each individual cheese product, which is not feasible considering the large diversity of products and the typically small scale of production. Thus, a need exists to systematically group raw milk cheeses into logically agreed upon categories to be used for food safety evaluations. This paper proposes and outlines one such categorization scheme that provides for 30 general categories of cheese. As a base for this systematization and categorization of raw milk cheese, we used Table B of the US Food and Drug Administration's 2013 Food Code, which represents the interaction of pH and water activity for control of vegetative cells and spores in non-heat-treated food. Building on this table, we defined a set of more granular pH and water activity categories to better represent the pH and water activity range of different raw milk cheeses. The resulting categorization scheme was effectively validated using pH and water activity values determined for 273 different cheese samples collected in the marketplace throughout New York State, indicating the distribution of commercially available cheeses among the categories proposed here. This consensus categorization of cheese provides a foundation for a feasible approach to developing science-based solutions to assure compliance of the cheese processors with food safety regulations, such as those required by the US Food Safety Modernization Act. The key purpose of the cheese categorization proposed here is to facilitate product assessment for food safety risks and provide scientifically validated guidance on effective interventions for general cheese categories. Once preventive controls for a given category have

  1. Camel and bovine chymosin: the relationship between their structures and cheese-making properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langholm Jensen, Jesper [University of Copenhagen, (Denmark); Chr. Hansen A/S, Bøge Allé 10-12, DK-2970 Hørsholm (Denmark); Mølgaard, Anne; Navarro Poulsen, Jens-Christian [University of Copenhagen, (Denmark); Harboe, Marianne Kirsten [Chr. Hansen A/S, Bøge Allé 10-12, DK-2970 Hørsholm (Denmark); Simonsen, Jens Bæk [University of Copenhagen, (Denmark); Lorentzen, Andrea Maria; Hjernø, Karin [University of Southern Denmark, (Denmark); Brink, Johannes M. van den; Qvist, Karsten Bruun [Chr. Hansen A/S, Bøge Allé 10-12, DK-2970 Hørsholm (Denmark); Larsen, Sine, E-mail: sine@chem.ku.dk [University of Copenhagen, (Denmark)

    2013-05-01

    Analysis of the crystal structures of the two milk-clotting enzymes bovine and camel chymosin has revealed that the better milk-clotting activity towards bovine milk of camel chymosin compared with bovine chymosin is related to variations in their surface charges and their substrate-binding clefts. Bovine and camel chymosin are aspartic peptidases that are used industrially in cheese production. They cleave the Phe105-Met106 bond of the milk protein κ-casein, releasing its predominantly negatively charged C-terminus, which leads to the separation of the milk into curds and whey. Despite having 85% sequence identity, camel chymosin shows a 70% higher milk-clotting activity than bovine chymosin towards bovine milk. The activities, structures, thermal stabilities and glycosylation patterns of bovine and camel chymosin obtained by fermentation in Aspergillus niger have been examined. Different variants of the enzymes were isolated by hydrophobic interaction chromatography and showed variations in their glycosylation, N-terminal sequences and activities. Glycosylation at Asn291 and the loss of the first three residues of camel chymosin significantly decreased its activity. Thermal differential scanning calorimetry revealed a slightly higher thermal stability of camel chymosin compared with bovine chymosin. The crystal structure of a doubly glycosylated variant of camel chymosin was determined at a resolution of 1.6 Å and the crystal structure of unglycosylated bovine chymosin was redetermined at a slightly higher resolution (1.8 Å) than previously determined structures. Camel and bovine chymosin share the same overall fold, except for the antiparallel central β-sheet that connects the N-terminal and C-terminal domains. In bovine chymosin the N-terminus forms one of the strands which is lacking in camel chymosin. This difference leads to an increase in the flexibility of the relative orientation of the two domains in the camel enzyme. Variations in the amino acids

  2. Standard of Electrical Washing Machine for Household and Similar Purposes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lu Jianguo

    2011-01-01

    Background With further improvement of people's living,the household washing machine industry has entered a new stage of development.However,some indicators of GB/T 4288-2003 have become no longer suitable for the development of household washing machine products at present.Particularly,with an increasing number of basic functions and auxiliary functions,many aspects are not covered by the existing standard.In order to further improve the overall quality of China's household washing machines and enhance their competitiveness in the international market,guide manufacturers to produce household washing machines in line with the demands of consumers and instruct consumers to properly purchase and use household washing machines,it is imperative to revise the GB/T 4288-2003 Household Electric Washing Machine.

  3. Vegetable coagulant (Cynara cardunculus) use evidenced by capillary electrophoresis permits PDO Serpa cheese authentication

    OpenAIRE

    Roseiro, Luisa; Gómez-Ruiz, José; García-Risco, Mónica; Molina, Elena

    2003-01-01

    International audience; A capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) method was applied to a Protected Designation of Origin (PDO) cheese, namely Serpa cheese, made with local pure ovine raw milk and a vegetable coagulant (an aqueous extract from dried cardoon flowers of Cynara L.). The electropherograms of Serpa cheese showed a peak that remained throughout maturation, and it was not detected in other cheeses made with the same technology as Serpa cheese, but with animal rennet or microbial coagul...

  4. Cured meat, vegetables, and bean-curd foods in relation to childhood acute leukemia risk: A population based case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su Li

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Consumption of cured/smoked meat and fish leads to the formation of carcinogenic N-nitroso compounds in the acidic stomach. This study investigated whether consumed cured/smoked meat and fish, the major dietary resource for exposure to nitrites and nitrosamines, is associated with childhood acute leukemia. Methods A population-based case-control study of Han Chinese between 2 and 20 years old was conducted in southern Taiwan. 145 acute leukemia cases and 370 age- and sex-matched controls were recruited between 1997 and 2005. Dietary data were obtained from a questionnaire. Multiple logistic regression models were used in data analyses. Results Consumption of cured/smoked meat and fish more than once a week was associated with an increased risk of acute leukemia (OR = 1.74; 95% CI: 1.15–2.64. Conversely, higher intake of vegetables (OR = 0.55; 95% CI: 0.37–0.83 and bean-curd (OR = 0.55; 95% CI: 0.34–0.89 was associated with a reduced risk. No statistically significant association was observed between leukemia risk and the consumption of pickled vegetables, fruits, and tea. Conclusion Dietary exposure to cured/smoked meat and fish may be associated with leukemia risk through their contents of nitrites and nitrosamines among children and adolescents, and intake of vegetables and soy-bean curd may be protective.

  5. Tapioca maltodextrin in the production of soft unripened cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iakovchenko, Natalia V; Arseneva, Tamara P

    2016-01-01

    An excessive consumption of fat has been associated with an increased risk of health problems such as obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. Cheese is a highly concentrated product which is rich in protein and minerals such as calcium and phosphorus and essential amino acids, therefore it is an important food in the diet. But low fat cheeses are usually characterized as having poor body and flavour. Therefore,  it is crucial to find ways of improving the acceptability of the product. The aim of this research was to investigate the possibility of using of tapioca maltodextrin in the production of soft cheese made from ultrafiltrated skimmed milk and to create organoleptic properties of a fat product in a non-fat product. To estimate the possibility of using tapioca maltodextrin in the production of soft cheese, the influence of tapioca maltodextrin on rennet flocculation time (RFT) and rennet clotting time (RCT), pH values, moisture content were estimated. Improving the quality of cheese, rheological and sensory characteristics in the course of soft unripened cheese manufacturing has to be focused on. Using tapioca maltodextrin led to decrease in RFT and RCT. The concentration increase of the maltodextrin in milk for cheese production led to increase in moisture-binding capacity and moisture content of the cheeses, but led to decrease in RFT, RCT and pH-value. Based on the experiments data the optimal doses of tapioca maltodextrin were recommended. An addition of tapioca maltodextrin resulted in a tendency of decreasing RFT and RCT,   pH-value for cheese made with different concentrations of tapioca maltodextrin when compared to cheese made without maltodextrin addition. At the same time an increased amount of tapioca maltodextrin led to moisture content increase of cheese samples. Inclusion of tapioca maltodextrin in natural, low fat cheese may improve texture and acceptability as compared to low fat control cheeses without maltodextrin. The recommended

  6. Listeria fleischmannii sp. nov., isolated from cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertsch, David; Rau, Jörg; Eugster, Marcel R; Haug, Martina C; Lawson, Paul A; Lacroix, Christophe; Meile, Leo

    2013-02-01

    A study was performed on three isolates (LU2006-1(T), LU2006-2 and LU2006-3), which were sampled independently from cheese in western Switzerland in 2006, as well as a fourth isolate (A11-3426), which was detected in 2011, using a polyphasic approach. The isolates could all be assigned to the genus Listeria but not to any known species. Phenotypic and chemotaxonomic data were compatible with the genus Listeria and phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences confirmed that the closest relationships were with members of this genus. However, DNA-DNA hybridization demonstrated that the isolates did not belong to any currently described species. Cell-wall-binding domains of Listeria monocytogenes bacteriophage endolysins were able to attach to the isolates, confirming their tight relatedness to the genus Listeria. Although PCR targeting the central portion of the flagellin gene flaA was positive, motility was not observed. The four isolates could not be discriminated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy or pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. This suggests that they represent a single species, which seems to be adapted to the environment in a cheese-ripening cellar as it was re-isolated from the same type of Swiss cheese after more than 5 years. Conjugation experiments demonstrated that the isolates harbour a transferable resistance to clindamycin. The isolates did not exhibit haemolysis or show any indication of human pathogenicity or virulence. The four isolates are affiliated with the genus Listeria but can be differentiated from all described members of the genus Listeria and therefore they merit being classified as representatives of a novel species, for which we propose the name Listeria fleischmannii sp. nov.; the type strain is LU2006-1(T) ( = DSM 24998(T)  = LMG 26584(T)).

  7. Factors affecting consumers' preferences for and purchasing decisions regarding pasteurized and raw milk specialty cheeses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colonna, A; Durham, C; Meunier-Goddik, L

    2011-10-01

    Eight hundred ninety consumers at a local food festival were surveyed about their specialty cheese purchasing behavior and asked to taste and rate, through nonforced choice preference, 1 of 4 cheese pairs (Cheddar and Gouda) made from pasteurized and raw milks. The purpose of the survey was to examine consumers' responses to information on the safety of raw milk cheeses. The associated consumer test provided information about specialty cheese consumers' preferences and purchasing behavior. Half of the consumers tested were provided with cheese pairs that were identified as being made from unpasteurized and pasteurized milk. The other half evaluated samples that were identified only with random 3-digit codes. Overall, more consumers preferred the raw milk cheeses than the pasteurized milk cheeses. A larger portion of consumers indicated preferences for the raw milk cheese when the cheeses were labeled and thus they knew which samples were made from raw milk. Most of the consumers tested considered the raw milk cheeses to be less safe or did not know if raw milk cheeses were less safe. After being informed that the raw milk cheeses were produced by a process approved by the FDA (i.e., 60-d ripening), most consumers with concerns stated that they believed raw milk cheeses to be safe. When marketing cheese made from raw milk, producers should inform consumers that raw milk cheese is produced by an FDA-approved process. Copyright © 2011 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Factors affecting the bacteriological contamination of commercial washing machines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legnani, P P; Leoni, E

    1997-10-01

    Wash water from self-service washing machines in three commercial launderettes of Bologna (Italy) were examined to verify which factors affect their bacterial contamination and to determine which procedures in the laundering process have the most significant effects on the removal of bacteria. Four washing formulas were compared: a delicates cycle (programmed temperature 25-30 degrees C; actual temperature: 28-31 degrees C); a whites cycle (programmed temperature: 80-90 degrees C; actual temperature: 50-57.5 degrees C); a delicates cycle with the addition of an oxygen-based bleach safe for delicate fabrics and a whites cycle with the addition of an oxygen-based bleach. Bacterial contamination of washing machines was higher in the launderette most heavely used, and, furthermore, it was in relation with the washing temperature and the use of bleaches. The low temperature laundering cycle (20-30 degrees C) did not guarantee elimination of bacterial content from either the inside of the washing machine or from the fabric being washed. Washing with water at a higher temperature, of about 55 degrees C, or adding an oxygen-based bleach to the low temperature cycle did ensure a significant reduction in bacterial recovery from water samples and fabrics, but did not prevent bacteria such as P. aeruginosa from surviving inside the washing machine. Only the addition of bleaches to the hot water program ensured the almost total elimination of bacteria and also guaranteed their elimination from protected parts of the drum.

  9. Landscape of WASH-relevant Training for Humanitarian Emergencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorea, Caetano

    2015-01-01

    Background: Both employed humanitarian personnel as well as those seeking to start a career as an aid worker are often provided with or seek training on the theme of humanitarian water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH). The objective of this study was to conduct a landscaping exercise of the available WASH-relevant training for humanitarian emergencies. Methods: An open internet search was performed with specific terms related to humanitarian WASH. Retained search results included those training opportunities (including past ones) that were themed around or with a mentioned relevance to humanitarian WASH. Results and Discussion: A total of 42 training courses relevant to humanitarian emergency WASH were retained. In addition to the more generic/introductory trainings, some provided thematic variations such as coordination of WASH responses, project management, risk reduction, information, education and communication (IEC), and complex emergencies. Timely topics such as urban WASH, Ebola, and WASH innovations were also observed indicating the responsiveness of the training providers to the changing needs of humanitarian WASH response programmes. This survey also revealed a large variety in terms of target audience, duration, fees, location, and language of courses. There was no centralised listing of courses available on the Internet. Limitations of this exercise were also discussed. PMID:26064781

  10. Mould contamination in production of semi-hard cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kure, Cathrine Finne; Skaar, Ida; Brendehaug, Johanne

    2004-05-15

    Air, equipment, plastic film, brine and milk were sampled from four cheese factories in Norway during the period September 1997 to May 1999 in order to identify the critical points for mould contamination in the production process. Altogether, 672 samples were collected. Penicillium brevicompactum was the most frequently isolated species from three of the factories, while Geotrichum candidum was the most frequently isolated species from the fourth. P. commune, P. palitans, P. solitum and P. roqueforti ss. roqueforti, all common contaminants on cheese, were found in samples of air and equipment, and the former was also isolated from plastic film. The results in the present study showed that the mould levels in the cheese factories varied between the different control points. The mould levels at some of the air control points had high mould counts while the mould levels in milk and brine, on equipment and on plastic film, generally were low. The fungi at the control points with high mould levels consisted of common cheese contaminants as well as species not commonly isolated from cheese. The statistical analysis showed that air was the major source of the important cheese contaminants P. commune and P. palitans during the production process. High quality air with low number of cheese contaminants in production rooms, especially the wrapping room, is important in order to reduce mould contamination. Copyright 2003 Elsevier B.V.

  11. Survivability of Lactobacillus rhamnosus during the Preparation of Soy Cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Mei Liu

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to develop a new probiotic soy cheese on the basis of chinese sufu. The soy cheese was made from soymilk fermented with soy cheese bacterial starter cultures (DH1 and GH4 and L. rhamnosus 6013. After ripening, probiotic soy cheese sensory scores (standard SB/T 10170-93 were compared to the control. The changes in pH, bacterial growth and the survivability of the potential probiotic L. rhamnosus 6013 during fermentation and storage at 10 °C were examined. After 6 h of fermentation, L. rhamnosus 6013 was capable of growing in soymilk as high as 108–109 CFU/mL. After being stored for 30 days at 10 °C, slight decrease in pH and the viable counts of the strain was noticed. The viable counts of L. rhamnosus 6013, DH1 and GH4 were 107, 106 and 106 CFU/g, respectively, after storage for 30 days. The levels of stachyose, raffinose and sucrose in soy cheese were determined by high performance liquid chromatography. The results indicated that L. rhamnosus 6013 could utilize the soybean oligosaccharides as carbon sources. In addition, 2–4 % of NaCl had little effect on the survivability of L. rhamnosus 6013. It indicated that L. rhamnosus 6013 could withstand the technological processing of soy cheese and had no negative effect on the fermentation and the sensory properties of the soy cheese.

  12. The effect of age on Cheddar cheese melting, rheology and structure, and on the stability of feed for cheese powder manufacture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ray, Colin Andrew; Gholamhosseinpour, Aliakbar; Ipsen, Richard

    2016-01-01

    and small angle oscillation measurements. Results showed increasing stiffness and reduced activation energy for initiation of milk fat melting with age. Cheese feeds for manufacture of cheese powder were made, with or without emulsifying salts (ES), and analysed for emulsion stability. In the absence of ES......Age-related changes to the rheology and structure of Cheddar for cheese powder manufacture, and how this influences the stability of cheese feed during pre-spray-drying storage, were investigated. Cheddar cheese (3, 5, 7, 9, 12 and 15 months old) was analysed for meltability by the Schreiber Test......, feeds made from 3 month old Cheddar were significantly more stable than those made from 5 month old cheese. A similar significant increase in emulsion stability was observed for cheeses of 7 months of age compared with 12 months, indicating the necessity to use Cheddar cheese aged 3 months or less...

  13. Quantitative Microbial Risk Assessment for in Natural and Processed Cheeses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heeyoung Lee

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the risk of Clostridium perfringens (C. perfringens foodborne illness from natural and processed cheeses. Microbial risk assessment in this study was conducted according to four steps: hazard identification, hazard characterization, exposure assessment, and risk characterization. The hazard identification of C. perfringens on cheese was identified through literature, and dose response models were utilized for hazard characterization of the pathogen. For exposure assessment, the prevalence of C. perfringens, storage temperatures, storage time, and annual amounts of cheese consumption were surveyed. Eventually, a simulation model was developed using the collected data and the simulation result was used to estimate the probability of C. perfringens foodborne illness by cheese consumption with @RISK. C. perfringens was determined to be low risk on cheese based on hazard identification, and the exponential model (r = 1.82×10−11 was deemed appropriate for hazard characterization. Annual amounts of natural and processed cheese consumption were 12.40±19.43 g and 19.46±14.39 g, respectively. Since the contamination levels of C. perfringens on natural (0.30 Log CFU/g and processed cheeses (0.45 Log CFU/g were below the detection limit, the initial contamination levels of natural and processed cheeses were estimated by beta distribution (α1 = 1, α2 = 91; α1 = 1, α2 = 309×uniform distribution (a = 0, b = 2; a = 0, b = 2.8 to be −2.35 and −2.73 Log CFU/g, respectively. Moreover, no growth of C. perfringens was observed for exposure assessment to simulated conditions of distribution and storage. These data were used for risk characterization by a simulation model, and the mean values of the probability of C. perfringens foodborne illness by cheese consumption per person per day for natural and processed cheeses were 9.57×10−14 and 3.58×10−14, respectively. These results indicate that probability of C. perfringens

  14. Manufacture of White Soft Cheese from Ultrafiltered Whole Milk Retentate

    OpenAIRE

    Shammet, Khalid Mohamed

    1986-01-01

    Manufacture of white soft cheese from ultrafiltered whole cows• milk involved acidification of pasteurized homogenized whole milk to pH 6.0 with phosphoric or citric acid. The preacidified milk was ultrafiltered at 54 °C until 60% of original milk weight was removed as permeate, diafiltered with deionized water equal to 38.5% of the original milk and concentrated by UF (4.8 fold) to pre-cheese (38% total solid). The pre-cheese was heated to 76.7°C/16 sec, 71 .l°C/l6 sec (HTST) and 7l.l°C/l5 m...

  15. Quality evaluation of parmesan-type cheese: a chemometric approach

    OpenAIRE

    Henrique Jaster; Anna Carolina Leonelli Pires de Campos; Luciellen Bach Auer; Francine Gomes Basso Los; Renata Dinnies Santos Salem; Luís Antônio Esmerino; Alessandro Nogueira; Ivo Mottin Demiate

    2014-01-01

    Parmesan-type cheeses are the most consumed special cheeses in Brazil. It is generally sold in retail shops, either grated or in wedge-shaped pieces, and its quality varies considerably, which is reflected directly in its price. There is lack of processing standardization and, since the ripening period is fundamental for the quality of this hard, semi-fat cooked cheese, this stage seems to be the thin line between low and high quality products. It is important to note that the Italian Parmegi...

  16. Modified starches or stabilizers in preparation of cheese bread

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Letícia Dias dos Anjos

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Cheese bread is a Brazilian product which originated in Minas Gerais and which is highly consumed. In industrial production, there is increasing use of additives which enrich and enhance the physical of this product, adding value in the eyes of the consumer. Thus, the purpose of this paper was to study the effect of addition of modified starch and stabilizers on the physical-chemical of cheese bread. For this reason, measures taken so moisture, pH and acidity, volume, density, coefficient of expansion, and compression resistance (texturometer Results show that the stabilizers used improve these characteristics in the cheese bread, showing better physicochemical characteristics.

  17. Physicochemical and Sensory Properties of Whey Cheese with Pine Nuts

    OpenAIRE

    Cristina Anamaria Semeniuc; Laura Zăpărţan; Laura Stan; Carmen R. Pop; Maria Doiniţa Borş; Ancuţa M. Rotar

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to develop a value-added whey cheese through addition of pine nuts. Therefore, different concentrations of pine nuts [2, 4, 6 and 8% (w/w)] were added to whey cheese. The study was designed to evaluate the influence of pine nuts on physicochemical and sensory properties of whey cheese. The addition of pine nuts resulted in an increase in fat content and total solids and a decrease in moisture content. However, no statistically significant difference was found in pH values. Se...

  18. Technological Strategies to Preserve Burrata Cheese Quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Costa

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Burrata cheese is a very perishable product due to microbial proliferation and undesirable sensory changes. In this work, a step-by-step optimization approach was used to design proper processing and packaging conditions for burrata in brine. In particular, four different steps were carried out to extend its shelf life. Different headspace gas compositions (MAP-1 30:70 CO2:N2; MAP-2 50:50 CO2:N2 and MAP-3 65:35 CO2:N2 were firstly tested. To further promote product preservation, a coating was also optimized. Then, antimicrobial compounds in the filling of the burrata cheese (lysozyme and Na2-EDTA and later in the coating (enzymatic complex and silver nanoparticles were analyzed. To evaluate the quality of the samples, in each step headspace gas composition, microbial population, and pH and sensory attributes were monitored during storage at 8 ± 1 °C. The results highlight that the antimicrobial compounds in the stracciatella, coating with silver nanoparticles, and packaging under MAP-3 represent effective conditions to guarantee product preservation, moving burrata shelf life from three days (control sample to ten days.

  19. Selection of Leuconostoc strains isolated from artisanal Serrano Catarinense cheese for use as adjuncts in cheese manufacture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seixas, Felipe Nael; Rios, Edson Antônio; Martinez de Oliveira, André Luiz; Beloti, Vanerli; Poveda, Justa Maria

    2018-01-24

    Serrano Catarinense cheese is a raw bovine milk cheese produced in the region of Santa Catarina, Brazil. Twelve representative strains of Leuconostoc isolated from 20 samples of this artisanal cheese were selected and submitted for evaluation of the acidifying, proteolytic, autolytic, aminopeptidase and lipolytic activities, NaCl and acid resistance, production of dextran and biogenic amines and antimicrobial activity. The aim was to genetically and technologically characterize the Leuconostoc strains in order to use them in mixed starter cultures for cheese manufacture. L. mesenteroides subsp. mesenteroides was the species that accounted for the largest proportion of isolates of Leuconostoc genus. Two leuconostocs isolates stood out in the acidifying activity, with reduction in pH of 1.12 and 1.04 units. The isolates showed low proteolytic and autolytic activity. Most of the isolates were dextran producers, presented good resistance to the salt and pH conditions of the cheese, showed antimicrobial activity against cheese pathogen bacteria and none of them produced biogenic amines. These results allowed the selection of five strains (UEL 04, UEL 12, UEL 18, UEL 21 and UEL 28) as good candidates for use as adjunct cultures for cheese manufacture. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  20. Comparison of Physicochemical and Sensory Properties between Cholesterol-removed Gouda Cheese and Gouda Cheese during Ripening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho-Jung Jung

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This study was performed to compare physicochemical and sensory properties of cholesterol-removed Gouda cheese (CRGC and Gouda cheese made in the laboratory during ripening. Composition, short-chain free fatty acids (SCFFA, texture, color, and sensory properties were measured. In chemical composition analyses, moistures were significantly different between control cheeses (42.86% and sample cheese (48.32% (p0.05. The amount of cholesterol in control was 82.52 mg/100 g and the percentage of cholesterol removal was 90.7%. SCFFA increased gradually during ripening and its level of CRGC increased and significantly different from that of control (p0.05. In comparison of the control and sample cheeses, hardness, and springiness were not significantly different, but cohesiveness, gumminess, and chewiness were different (p0.05. However, L* value decreased, while a* and b* values tended to increase significantly (p0.05. Therefore, this study suggests that the quality of cholesterol-removed Gouda cheese is not different from the control cheese.

  1. Interaction between sodium chloride and texture in semi-hard Danish cheese as affected by brining time, DL-starter culture, chymosin type and cheese ripening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Akkerman, Marije; Søndergaard Kristensen, Lise; Jespersen, Lene

    2017-01-01

    Reduced NaCl in semi-hard cheeses greatly affects textural and sensory properties. The interaction between cheese NaCl concentration and texture was affected by brining time (0-28 h), . dl-starter cultures (C1, C2, and C3), chymosin type (bovine or camel), and ripening time (1-12 weeks). Cheese Na...

  2. BIOHYDROGEN FROM CHEESE WHEY TREATMENT IN AN AnSBBR: ACHIEVING PROCESS STABILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. M. F. Lima

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available AbstractAn AnSBBR (anaerobic sequencing batch reactor containing biomass immobilized on an inert support with liquid phase recirculation, containing a 3.5 L working volume, treated 1.5 L of cheese whey wastewater in 3 and 4 h cycles at 30 ºC to produce biohydrogen. From startup the bioreactor presented process instability. To overcome this problem the following measures were taken, however without success: adaptation of the biomass with uncontaminated easily degradable substrates, pH control at very low levels, and a different form of inoculation (natural fermentation of the feed medium. The problem was solved by cooling the feed medium to 4 ºC to prevent acidification in the storage container, by eliminating nutrient supplementation to prevent possible formation of H2S by sulfate-reducing bacteria and by periodic washing of the support material to improve the food/microorganism ratio. Hence, stable hydrogen production could be achieved with minimal presence of methane (36% H2; 62% CO2; 2% CH4 and the AnSBBR fed with cheese whey (influent concentration of 4070 mgCOD.L-1 and 3240 mgCarbohydrate.L-1 and applied volumetric organic loading of 14.6 gCOD.L-1.d-1 presented improved productivity and yield indicators compared to pure lactose and other reactor configurations, reaching values of 420 NmLH2.L-1.d-1 and 0.60 molH2.molCarbohydrate-1 in the steady-state phase (conversions of carbohydrates and COD were 98% and 30%, respectively.

  3. Evolution of phospholipid contents during the production of quark cheese from buttermilk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreiro, T; Martínez, S; Gayoso, L; Rodríguez-Otero, J L

    2016-06-01

    We report the evolution of phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), phosphatidylinositol (PI), phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidylserine (PS), and sphingomyelin (SM) contents during the production of quark cheese from buttermilk by successive ultrafiltration concentration, enrichment with cream, concurrent homogenization and pasteurization, fermentative coagulation, and separation of quark from whey by further ultrafiltration. Buttermilk is richer than milk itself in phospholipids that afford desirable functional and technological properties, and is widely used in dairy products. To investigate how phospholipid content is affected by end-product production processes such as ultrafiltration, homogenization, pasteurization or coagulation, we measured the phospholipids at several stages of each of 5 industrial-scale quark cheese production runs. In each run, 10,000L of buttermilk was concentrated to half volume by ultrafiltration, enriched with cream, homogenized, pasteurized, inoculated with lactic acid bacteria, incubated to coagulation, and once more concentrated to half volume by ultrafiltration. Phospholipid contents were determined by HPLC with evaporative light scattering detection in the starting buttermilk, concentrated buttermilk, ultrafiltrate, cream-enriched concentrated buttermilk (both before and after concurrent homogenization and pasteurization), coagulate, and quark, and also in the rinsings obtained when the ultrafiltration equipment was washed following initial concentration. The average phospholipid content of buttermilk was approximately 5 times that of milk, and the phospholipid content of buttermilk fat 26 to 29 times that of milk fat. Although phospholipids did not cross ultrafiltration membranes, significant losses occurred during ultrafiltration (due to retention on the membranes) and during the homogenization and pasteurization process. During coagulation, however, phospholipid content rose, presumably as a consequence of the proliferation of the

  4. Hand Washing Practices amongst Doctors in A Tertiary Hospital in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Washing hand with soap and water is said to be the single most important intervention against hospital acquired infections. This study aimed to explore perceptions, attitudes and hand washing practices amongst doctors in a tertiary institution in Port Harcourt, Nigeria. This was a descriptive cross sectional survey carried out ...

  5. Hand washing practices amongst medical students in Port Harcourt ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Alasia Datonye

    org. 4. arvis WR. Handwashing the Semmelweis lesson forgotten? The Lancet 1994: 344: 1311 1312. 5. Teare L, Cookson B, French G, Gould D, Jenner E,. McCollough J, et al (Hand Washing liason group). Hand washing modest measure- big ...

  6. Evaluation of Water Consumption by Car Wash Facilities in Bauchi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF HORSFALL

    ABSTRACT: Car wash can be defined as a facility used to clean the exterior and in some cases, the interior of motor vehicles. These facilities are common in Bauchi and other cities in Nigeria. They use water as a major input thereby causing serious challenges to water resources management. Car wash facilities in Bauchi ...

  7. Hand washing practices amongst medical students in Port Harcourt ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Hand washing with soap and water is one of the most effective and inexpensive means of preventing infections. Rates of hand washing are low world wide even amongst health care workers who are should know about its importance. The aim of the study was to evaluate the knowledge, attitudes and hand ...

  8. Egg wash wastewater: Estrogenic risk or environmental asset?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Commercial production of eggs and egg products requires the washing of eggs to remove urinary / fecal material and broken egg residue. In the case of one Ohio farming facility, 1.6 million birds produce 1.4 million eggs per day, using ~50mL of wash water / egg or ~ 70,000 liters per day. The aqueo...

  9. Assessment of knowledge of hand washing among health care ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Nosocomial infections increase mortality and morbidity although adherence to simple hand washing procedures is suggested to reduce these. Purpose: To assess knowledge of hand washing among health care providers in Juba Teaching Hospital (JTH) in South Sudan and establish associations with ...

  10. Road dust emission sources and assessment of street washing effect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karanasiou, A.; Amato, F.; Moreno, T.; Lumbreras, J.; Borge, R.; Linares, C.; Boldo, E.; Alastuey, A.; Querol, X.

    2014-01-01

    Although previous studies report on the effect of street washing on ambient particulate matter levels, there is a lack of studies investigating the results of street washing on the emission strength of road dust. A sampling campaign was conducted in Madrid urban area during July 2009 where road dust

  11. Effects of shampoo and water washing on hair cortisol concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamel, Amanda F; Meyer, Jerrold S; Henchey, Elizabeth; Dettmer, Amanda M; Suomi, Stephen J; Novak, Melinda A

    2011-01-30

    Measurement of cortisol in hair is an emerging biomarker for chronic stress in human and nonhuman primates. Currently unknown, however, is the extent of potential cortisol loss from hair that has been repeatedly exposed to shampoo and/or water. Pooled hair samples from 20 rhesus monkeys were subjected to five treatment conditions: 10, 20, or 30 shampoo washes, 20 water-only washes, or a no-wash control. For each wash, hair was exposed to a dilute shampoo solution or tap water for 45 s, rinsed 4 times with tap water, and rapidly dried. Samples were then processed for cortisol extraction and analysis using previously published methods. Hair cortisol levels were significantly reduced by washing, with an inverse relationship between number of shampoo washes and the cortisol concentration. This effect was mainly due to water exposure, as cortisol levels following 20 water-only washes were similar to those following 20 shampoo treatments. Repeated exposure to water with or without shampoo appears to leach cortisol from hair, yielding values that underestimate the amount of chronic hormone deposition within the shaft. Collecting samples proximal to the scalp and obtaining hair washing frequency data may be valuable when conducting human hair cortisol studies. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Hand Washing Practices and Compliance among Health Care ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There was a wide disparity between knowledge and practice of hand washing as a way of reducing hospital-acquired infections. Some reasons given for failure to observe proper hand washing include; time wasting, skin irritation and unavailability of soap and water. In addition, we found that the most preferred method of ...

  13. Tenacity of Exogenous Human Papillomavirus DNA in Sperm Washing

    OpenAIRE

    Brossfield, Jeralyn E.; Philip J. Chan; Patton, William C.; King, Alan

    1999-01-01

    Purpose:Sperm cells have been shown to take up exogenous DNA readily. The hypothesis was that sperm washing would remove exogenous viral DNA infecting sperm cells. The objective was to compare three types of sperm washing procedures for their capacity to remove exogenous human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA from infected sperm.

  14. Traditional Cheese Production and an EU Labeling Scheme: The Alpine Cheese Producers’ Opinion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Bonadonna

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In 2012, the European Union introduced two optional quality terms (OQT as new tools for the enhancement of food products. Two years later, the requirements for the use of the OQT “mountain product” were defined to enhance agricultural production in harsh environments, such as mountain areas. This new tool aimed at promoting local development, maintaining the economic activities in mountain areas and redistributing wealth. The present research aims at understanding if farmers perceived this tool as useful and evaluates their level of awareness. To this aim, a sample of 68 traditional cheese producers from the North West Alpine Arch was interviewed. The results show that some cheese producers have a positive attitude towards the concepts set out in the OQT “mountain product” and consider it a useful tool to promote and enhance their products. Some critical elements are also discussed.

  15. Car wash wastewater treatment and water reuse - a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaneti, R N; Etchepare, R; Rubio, J

    2013-01-01

    Recent features of a car wash wastewater reclamation system and results from a full-scale car wash wastewater treatment and recycling process are reported. This upcoming technology comprises a new flocculation-column flotation process, sand filtration, and a final chlorination. A water usage and savings audit (22 weeks) showed that almost 70% reclamation was possible, and fewer than 40 L of fresh water per wash were needed. Wastewater and reclaimed water were characterized by monitoring chemical, physicochemical and biological parameters. Results were discussed in terms of aesthetic quality (water clarification and odour), health (pathological) and chemical (corrosion and scaling) risks. A microbiological risk model was applied and the Escherichia coli proposed criterion for car wash reclaimed water is 200 CFU 100 mL(-1). It is believed that the discussions on car wash wastewater reclamation criteria may assist institutions to create laws in Brazil and elsewhere.

  16. Effect of grass-silage vs. hay diet on the characteristics of cheese: interactions with the cheese model

    OpenAIRE

    Verdier-Metz, Isabelle; Martin, Bruno; Pradel, Philippe; Albouy, Hélène; Hulin, Sophie; Montel, Marie-Christine; Coulon, Jean-Baptiste

    2005-01-01

    International audience; Twenty-eight multiparous dairy cows were divided into 2 groups: one group (S) was fed a ray-grass silage diet and the other one (H) a hay-based diet. The milk produced by these cows was used to make Saint-Nectaire-type cheese on one day and Cantal cheese on the following day, using identical, controlled cheesemaking techniques for each model. The S cheeses, regardless of the model, had higher fat (P < 0.01) and fat in dry matter (P < 0.05) contents but lower total nitr...

  17. Cytotoxicity of Cheese and Cheddar Cheese food flavorings on Allim cepa L root meristems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. G. Moura

    Full Text Available Abstract Despite their great importance for the food industry, flavorings, in general, raise a number of questions regarding their cytotoxicity, mutagenicity and carcinogenicity, since, in the literature, there are few studies found evaluating the toxicity on the systemic and cellular level, of these chemical compounds. The root meristems of Allium cepa (onion are widely used for the assessment of toxicity of chemical compounds of interest. Thus, this study aimed to evaluate, in A. cepa meristematic cells, individually and in combination at the cellular level, the toxicity of synthetic Cheese and Cheddar Cheese food flavorings, identical to the natural, at doses of 1.0 and 2.0 mL, at exposure times of 24 and 48 hours. In combination we used 0.5 mL of Cheese flavor associated with 0.5 mL of Cheddar flavor; and 1.0 mL of Cheese flavor associated with 1.0 mL of Cheddar flavor, at exposure times of 24 and 48 hours. For these evaluations, we used groups of five onion bulbs, which were first embedded in distilled water and then transferred to their respective doses. The root tips were collected and fixed in acetic acid (3:1 for 24 hours. The slides were prepared by crushing and were stained with 2% acetic orcein. Cells were analyzed throughout the cell cycle, totaling 5,000 for each control and exposure time. The mitotic indices calculated and cellular aberrations observed were subjected to statistical analysis using the chi-square test (p <0.05. No chromosomal abnormalities nor those of mitotic spindle were observed for the treatments performed. The results, both individually and in combination, showed that the flavorings under study significantly reduced the cell division rate of the test system cells used. Therefore, under the conditions studied, the two flavorings were cytotoxic.

  18. Gas turbine cleaning upgrade (compressor wash)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asplund, P. [Gas Turbine Efficiency, Jarfalla (Sweden)

    1998-12-31

    The influence of gas turbine degradation on operating costs is high. Gas turbine cleaning is one of many actions taken for power recovery and is to consider as preventive maintenance. It is generally performed within the industrial field and occasionally within the aero sector. In order to meet the gas turbine development win high blade loads and ever-increasing temperatures, together with emission Aces and environmental regulations, more efficient and careful cleaning methods are needed. Following a survey about potentials for cost reduction in gas turbine operation a new man-hour and water saving cleaning method has been evaluated for a standard process. Compared with traditional cleaning methods, the new method is water,- cost,- weight and space saving due to a new washing technique. Traditional methods are based on using different nozzles for ON and OFF-line cleaning, which rise the demand for complicated systems. In the new method the same nozzle installation, same liquid flow and pressure is used for both ON and OFF-line cleaning. This gives a cost reduction of appr. 20.000 - 30.000 USD per gas turbine depending on installation and size. Evaluation of the new method shows significantly improved ON -line cleaning performance and thus OFF -line cleaning is required only during scheduled stops. (orig.) 10 refs.

  19. Fate of Salmonella enterica in a mixed ingredient salad containing lettuce, cheddar cheese, and cooked chicken meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovo, Federica; De Cesare, Alessandra; Manfreda, Gerardo; Bach, Susan; Delaquis, Pascal

    2015-03-01

    Food service and retail sectors offer consumers a variety of mixed ingredient salads that contain fresh-cut vegetables and other ingredients such as fruits, nuts, cereals, dairy products, cooked seafood, cooked meat, cured meats, or dairy products obtained from external suppliers. Little is known about the behavior of enteric bacterial pathogens in mixed ingredient salads. A model system was developed to examine the fate of Salmonella enterica (inoculum consisting of S. enterica serovars Agona, Typhimurium, Enteritidis, Brandenberg, and Kentucky) on the surface of romaine lettuce tissues incubated alone and in direct contact with Cheddar cheese or cooked chicken. S. enterica survived but did not grow on lettuce tissues incubated alone or in contact with Cheddar cheese for 6 days at either 6 or 14°C. In contrast, populations increased from 2.01 ± 0.22 to 9.26 ± 0.22 CFU/cm(2) when lettuce washed in water was incubated in contact with cooked chicken at 14°C. Populations on lettuce leaves were reduced to 1.28 ± 0.14 CFU/cm(2) by washing with a chlorine solution (70 ppm of free chlorine) but increased to 8.45 ± 0.22 CFU/cm(2) after 6 days at 14°C. Experimentation with a commercial product in which one third of the fresh-cut romaine lettuce was replaced with inoculated lettuce revealed that S. enterica populations increased by 4 log CFU/g during storage for 3 days at 14°C. These findings indicate that rapid growth of bacterial enteric pathogens may occur in mixed ingredient salads; therefore, strict temperature control during the manufacture, distribution, handling, and storage of these products is critical.

  20. Obtaining a Spreadable Cheese Sort with Additives of Bioactive Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihaela Adriana TIŢA

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available To conduct this study, a market survey was conducted in the form of a questionnaire to see what assortment of cheese and what ingredients bioactive compounds people want to consume. In order to find out what assortment of cheese and what ingredients with bioactive compounds people want to consume, a market survey was made in the form of a questionnaire. Taking into account the results of the survey,to process a melted cheese mix with the addition of dried tomatoes and basil. A technological scheme was developed for this cheese and sodium bicarbonate was used instead of melting and emulsifying salts to try to obtain a healthier product. The obtained product was analyzed for a period of 30 days from a sensory and physico-chemical. Physico-chemical and sensory properties of the obtained product were analyzed for a period of 30 days.