WorldWideScience

Sample records for warts

  1. Warts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... prescription) medicines A blistering solution Freezing the wart (cryotherapy) to remove it Burning the wart ( electrocautery ) to ... and you want it removed. The wart causes pain. You have anal or genital warts. You have ...

  2. Wart (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warts are small, usually painless growths on the skin caused by a virus. The typical wart is a raised round or oval growth on the skin with a rough surface. Common warts tend to cause no discomfort unless they are ...

  3. Common Warts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diseases and Conditions Common warts By Mayo Clinic Staff Common warts are small, grainy skin growths that occur most often on your fingers or hands. Rough to the touch, common warts also often feature a pattern of tiny ...

  4. Plantar Warts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Consequently, you may contract the virus by walking barefoot around swimming pools or locker rooms. If the ... have had plantar warts before People who walk barefoot where exposure to a wart-causing virus is ...

  5. Genital Warts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genital warts are a sexually transmitted disease (STD) caused by the human papillomavirus (HPV). The warts are soft, moist, pink, or flesh-colored bumps. ... or many of these bumps. In women, the warts usually occur in or around the vagina, on ...

  6. Genital warts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... warts URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000886.htm Genital warts To use the sharing ... They may be found on the penis , vulva , urethra, vagina , cervix , and around ... in the cervix , or to cervical cancer . These are called high-risk types of HPV. ...

  7. What's Up with Warts?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Too Short All About Puberty What's Up With Warts? KidsHealth > For Kids > What's Up With Warts? Print ... doctor can remove it. Why Do Kids Get Warts? Viruses cause warts. They're called human papilloma ( ...

  8. First Aid: Warts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to Be Smart About Social Media First Aid: Warts KidsHealth > For Parents > First Aid: Warts Print A ... plantar warts. Signs and Symptoms Of a common wart include: located on back of hands, around nails, ...

  9. Genital Warts (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Kids to Be Smart About Social Media Genital Warts (HPV) KidsHealth > For Parents > Genital Warts (HPV) Print A A A What's in this ... Active Teens en español Verrugas genitales G enital warts are warts that are on or near a ...

  10. Warts (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Affects Your Child What Kids Say About: Handling Stress Anxiety, Fears, and Phobias Community Service: A Family's Guide to Getting Involved Teaching Kids to Be Smart About Social Media Warts KidsHealth > For Parents > Warts Print A A A ...

  11. Genital Warts (HPV)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Genital Warts (HPV) KidsHealth > For Teens > Genital Warts (HPV) A A ... HPV infection. How Do People Know They Have HPV? Most HPV infections have no signs or symptoms. ...

  12. Warts, multiple - on hands (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warts are a very common skin condition. They frequently appear as single lesions or in small groups. ... of an unusually severe and extensive case of warts. (Image courtesy of the Centers for Disease Control ...

  13. Warts, malnutrition, and sunshine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orozco-Topete, Rocío; Villa, Antonio; Leyva Santiago, Jaime; Scholtes, Christian; Archer-Dubon, Carla; Ysunza, Alberto

    2008-01-01

    Viral warts are common in poor rural settings but their relationship to malnutrition has not been studied. We sought to determine the prevalence of warts in children of two communities in Oaxaca, Mexico, and compared it with their nutritional status. Children from Santa Catarina Yahuio and Santiago Laxopa of the state of Oaxaca were examined. Localization, number, and type of verruca were noted. Date of birth, height, and weight were obtained to determine nutritional status. A total of 213 children (116 girls and 97 boys), 107 in Yahuio and 106 in Laxopa, were studied. Mean age was 10.24 years. Thirty children (14.1%) had warts and 80% (24/30) of these lived in Yahuio (p = 0.0002). Almost half were teenagers. Most lesions were on sun-exposed areas. First degree malnutrition was found in 24.5%; second degree in 23.6% and third degree in 14.2%. A higher frequency of warts than previously reported was found. Malnutrition was prevalent in both groups but did not correlate positively with verruca. Verruca were more frequent in females, adolescents, sun-exposed areas, and higher altitude. We believe that the higher altitude of Yahuio facilitates greater exposure to ultraviolet light-induced immune suppression.

  14. Warts - A Clinicopathological Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sen Sumit

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Fifty patients attending an urban skin clinic and suffering from different types of warts were included in this study. Verruca vulgaris was the commonest type of wart comprising 44% of cases and epidermodysplasia verruciformis was the least frequent one. Persons of the age group 16 t o 25 years were mostly affected and majorities were in the middle income group (68.2%. In male, the genital area was the most commonly affected site while in female it was the upper extremity, namely, the fingers, and housewives were predominantly affected. Majority of patients had 2 to 5 lesions of 1 to 2 cm in diameter of 6 months to 1 year duration. Common histopathological features were hyperkeratosis, acanthosis with increased number of vacuolated cells in the stratum malpighii. None showed any sign malignancy.

  15. Warts (non-genital)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Warts are caused by the human papillomavirus (HPV), of which there are over 100 types, which probably infects the skin via areas of minimal trauma. Risk factors include use of communal showers, occupational handling of meat, and immunosuppression. In immunocompetent people, warts are harmless and resolve as a result of natural immunity within months or years. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of treatments for warts (non-genital)? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to June 2008 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 12 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic, review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: intralesional bleomycin; cimetidine; contact immunotherapy; cryotherapy; duct tape occlusion; formaldehyde, glutaraldehyde; homeopathy; photodynamic treatment; pulsed dye laser; surgical procedures; topical salicylic acid; and zinc sulphate. PMID:21726478

  16. HPV-associated oral warts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feller, L; Khammissa, R A G; Wood, N H; Marnewick, J C; Meyerov, R; Lemmer, J

    2011-03-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is strictly epitheliotropic, infecting stratified squamous cutaneous and mucosal epithelial cells. Oral HPV infection may be subclinical or putatively associated with benign or malignant oral neoplasms. The benign HPV-associated oral lesions, focal epithelial hyperplasia (Heck disease), oral squamous cell papilloma, oral verruca vulgaris (common wart) and oral condyloma acuminatum, are collectively referred to as oral warts. Oral warts are usually asymptomatic, may be persistent or uncommonly, may regress spontaneously. HPV-associated oral warts have a prevalence of 0.5% in the general population, occur in up to 5% of HIV-seropositive subjects, and in up to 23% of HIV-seropositive subjects on highly active antiretroviral therapy. This paper is a clinico-pathological review of HPV-associated oral warts.

  17. Irritated Method for Flat warts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LiBingxu

    2004-01-01

    Summary Background The relation between spontaneous regression of Flat warts and T cells depended immunity was confirmed. Cells immunity against HPV was induced by presenting of HPV related antigens, and thrived by cytokine and some chemistry agent. So how to make HPV which incubated in keratinocyte to present PHV antigens and keratinocyte to secret cytokine or chemistry agents should be a pursuance for dermatologist who are looking for a efficient method to deal with flat warts. Present research had exhibited inflammable agents can induce dermatitis when apply to the skin surface, so it might bring flat warts to spontaneous regression. Objective To observe the effectiveness of irritant drugs on flat warts, and at same time to understand more on the mechanism of the regression. Methods Compared with Control we treat 88 case of flat warts with retinoid gel or 3% hydrogen peroxide solution plus 5 % salicylic acid cream (HPSC). Results Both retinoid gel and HPSC reveal significant effect on flat warts. Conclusion Retinoid gel or SPHC was effective on the treatment of flat warts. The possible explanation for this is the drugs when put on the skin will induce dermatitis and dissolve or denude keratin.

  18. Clinicoepidemiological Study of Different Types of Warts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Sanjeev; Sharma, Yugal K.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Warts are cutaneous and, sometimes, mucosal lesions caused by one of the several human papilloma viruses. Aim. Assessment of the clinicoepidemiological aspects of warts. Materials and Methods. One hundred consecutive patients of warts presenting to the department of our institution were assigned two broad locational groups: genital and nongenital warts, the latter subdivided into common, plane, palmoplantar, mosaic, and digitate/filiform. Results. Ninety had nongenital and 10 had genital warts in our study; common (42%), palmoplantar (20%), and plane (18%) were the common types of the nongenital warts. All the genital warts were acuminate. In the second decade, the commonest age group, encompassed all patients of mosaic, 40% of palmoplantar, and 20% of genital warts. Overall male (66%) preponderance xisted. All cases of filiform warts were males. Mosaic warts affected females more commonly. Students (32%), laborers (28%), and housewives (16%) were the usual occupations. Cosmetic concern (92%), pain (16%), and itching (15%) were the common complaints. All patients of genital warts sought treatment within 6 months. Conclusions. Common, palmoplantar, and plane warts were the common types of nongenital warts. Overall prevalence peaked during the second decade but one-third of the cases of plane warts occurred during the first. Extremities were the most common sites (66.7%); face was the next commonly (23%) involved. PMID:27047542

  19. Oxidative Stress in Patients With Nongenital Warts

    OpenAIRE

    Sezai Sasmaz; Ozer Arican; Ergul Belge Kurutas

    2005-01-01

    Comparison of oxidative stress status between subjects with or without warts is absent in the literature. In this study, we evaluated 31 consecutive patients with warts (15 female, 16 male) and 36 control cases with no evidence of disease to determine the effects of oxidative stress in patients with warts. The patients were classified according to the wart type, duration, number, and location of lesions. We measured the indicators of oxidative stress such as catalase (CAT), glucose-6-phosphat...

  20. Topical cidofovir for plantar warts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilla España, Laura; Del Boz, Javier; Fernández Morano, Teresa; Arenas Villafranca, Javier; de Troya Martín, Magdalena

    2014-01-01

    Plantar warts are a common reason for dermatological consultations and their treatment can occasionally be a challenge. Plantar warts are benign lesions produced by the human papillomavirus (HPV) that often fail to respond to habitual treatment. Cidofovir is a potent antiviral drug that acts competitively, inhibiting viral DNA polymerase. Our aim was to assess the efficacy and safety of cidofovir cream for the treatment of viral plantar warts. We undertook a retrospective observational study of patients with plantar warts who received treatment with topical cidofovir between July 2008 and July 2011 at the Dermatology Service of the Hospital Costa del Sol, Marbella, Spain. Data about the rate of treatment response, the adverse effects, and recurrences, as well as the characteristics of the patient cohort, were recorded. We identified 35 patients who had received some previous treatment. The usual concentration was 3% (in 33 of 35 cases), applied twice a day (in 31 of 35 cases). A greater or lesser response was noted in 28 cases. There were two recurrences. Topical cidofovir seems to be a useful alternative for the therapeutic management of recalcitrant plantar common warts that fail to respond to usual treatment.

  1. Review of Genital Wart Treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN Hongqing(田洪清); DU Donghong(杜东红)

    2002-01-01

    Although many traditional therapies areavailable for genital warts(GW), one of the major problemsin the treatment of GW is a high recurrenence rate. Inorder to resolve the problem of recurrence, new theraputicapproaches have been investigated. New approaches beingexplored include 5-fiuorouracil/epinephrine injectablecollagen gel, 5% imiguimod cream and humanpapillomavirus vaccine. Fluorouracil /epinephrine injectable collagen gel achieves high concentration of fiuorouracilat the site of injection. Imiguimod is a novelimmune-respones modifier, giving good clearance rates andtolerable side effects. Although the use of an HPV vaccine isfar away, preliminary studies show that it may be possibleto develop suitable prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines togenital warts.

  2. Heterogeneous keratohyalin formation in warts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurent, R; Nicollier, M; Kienzler, J; Coumes Marquet, S; Agache, P G

    1978-06-29

    The heterogenecity of keratohyalin (KH) has been demonstrated in rats, then in human warts where similar morphological features have been found and among them, dense homogeneous ovoïd single granules (SG) and composite granules (CG) apparently made up of single granules "coated" with a matrix. This work compares the ultrastructure of the KH of the tongue of newborn rats with that of common warts with and without post-fixation by OsO4, after oxydation by H2O2 and after pepsin treatment. The osmiophily of the SG is confirmed as well as the absence of osmiophily of the matrix of the CG. In man, however, the SG are resistant to oxydation by H2O2 and the CG matrix is oxydation sensitive whereas the opposite is observed in the case of rats. These differences show that it is impossible to deduce the composition of the KH in human warts from that of the rat despite their close ultrastructural resemblance but that important modification of the keratogenesis and KH formation are induced in the cells parasited by the virus of common warts.

  3. Lessons on Peruvian wart or "disease Carrion"

    OpenAIRE

    Arce, Julián; Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima, Perú

    2014-01-01

    Malignant wart, is, as its name implies, the way hypertoxic, violent and often fatal, Peruvian wart or Carrion's disease. Individualized for the first time in 1870, when fatty epidemically in camps for railroad workers to La Oroya, located in the valleys between chosica and Matucana, was then given the name of Oroya fever to distinguish malaria eruptive wart, typhoid and other diseases, along with her reigned in these regions. Later, in 1885, the unexpected result of the memorable experience ...

  4. Human papillomaviruses genotyping in plantar warts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Planell-Mas, Elena; Martínez-Garriga, Blanca; Zalacain, Antonio Jesús; Vinuesa, Teresa; Viñas, Miguel

    2017-05-01

    Plantar warts are caused by human papillomaviruses (HPVs) and have been associated with several HPV genotypes. However, there are few studies focused exclusively on plantar warts. In this work, we aim to identify the HPV genotypes of plantar warts and explore their relation to demographic and clinical characteristics of patients. A total of 72 patients diagnosed with plantar warts were recruited at the Laser unit at Podiatric Hospital, University of Barcelona, Spain. Inner hyperkeratosis laminar sections of warts were collected and DNA of samples were extracted. Amplification of a conserved region of the HPV L1 gene was performed with the SK-Polymerase chain reaction method. DNA amplicons were sequenced and HPV types identified. The most prevalent genotypes detected among the 105 analyzed plantar warts were HPV-57 (37.1%), HPV-27 (23.8%), HPV-1a (20.9%), HPV-2 (15.2%), and HPV-65 (2.8%). The majority of patients (78%) presented one single plantar wart, whereas multiple warts were detected in 22.2% of patients. One patient with multiple warts presented HPV types from two different genera, suggesting the spread of warts by self-inoculation as well as by de novo infection. No significant differences between the number of warts in toes, midfoot and heel were found. The most prevalent HPV types detected in all areas belonged to the alpha genus. This work provides new insight on plantar warts and their associated HPV genotypes, and evidences the usefulness and reliability of both the sample collection procedure and the PCR method used for HPV detection and typing. J. Med. Virol. 89:902-907, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Female Genital Warts: Global Trends and Treatments

    OpenAIRE

    Gall, Stanley A.

    2001-01-01

    The increasing incidence of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and HPV-associated conditions such as genital warts in women is a global concern. Genital warts are a clinical manifestation of HPV types 6 and 11, and are estimated to affect 1% of sexually active adults aged between 15 and 49. HPV infection is also strongly associated with cervical cancer, and is prevalent in as many as 99% of cases. The psychological stress of having genital warts is often greater than the morbidi...

  6. Oxidative stress in patients with nongenital warts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasmaz, Sezai; Arican, Ozer; Kurutas, Ergul Belge

    2005-08-31

    Comparison of oxidative stress status between subjects with or without warts is absent in the literature. In this study, we evaluated 31 consecutive patients with warts (15 female, 16 male) and 36 control cases with no evidence of disease to determine the effects of oxidative stress in patients with warts. The patients were classified according to the wart type, duration, number, and location of lesions. We measured the indicators of oxidative stress such as catalase (CAT), glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and malondialdehyde (MDA) in the venous blood by spectrophotometry. There was a statistically significant increase in levels of CAT, G6PD, SOD activities and MDA in the patients with warts compared to the control group (Pstress that might have a negative effect on the prognosis of the disease. Therefore, we propose an argument for the appropriateness to give priority to immunomodulatory treatment alternatives instead of destructive methods in patients with demonstrated oxidative stress.

  7. Topical treatments for cutaneous warts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwok, Chun Shing; Gibbs, Sam; Bennett, Cathy; Holland, Richard; Abbott, Rachel

    2012-09-12

    Viral warts are a common skin condition, which can range in severity from a minor nuisance that resolve spontaneously to a troublesome, chronic condition. Many different topical treatments are available. To evaluate the efficacy of local treatments for cutaneous non-genital warts in healthy, immunocompetent adults and children. We updated our searches of the following databases to May 2011: the Cochrane Skin Group Specialised Register, CENTRAL in The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE (from 2005), EMBASE (from 2010), AMED (from 1985), LILACS (from 1982), and CINAHL (from 1981). We searched reference lists of articles and online trials registries for ongoing trials. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of topical treatments for cutaneous non-genital warts. Two authors independently selected trials and extracted data; a third author resolved any disagreements. We included 85 trials involving a total of 8815 randomised participants (26 new studies were included in this update). There was a wide range of different treatments and a variety of trial designs. Many of the studies were judged to be at high risk of bias in one or more areas of trial design.Trials of salicylic acid (SA) versus placebo showed that the former significantly increased the chance of clearance of warts at all sites (RR (risk ratio) 1.56, 95% CI (confidence interval) 1.20 to 2.03). Subgroup analysis for different sites, hands (RR 2.67, 95% CI 1.43 to 5.01) and feet (RR 1.29, 95% CI 1.07 to 1.55), suggested it might be more effective for hands than feet.A meta-analysis of cryotherapy versus placebo for warts at all sites favoured neither intervention nor control (RR 1.45, 95% CI 0.65 to 3.23). Subgroup analysis for different sites, hands (RR 2.63, 95% CI 0.43 to 15.94) and feet (RR 0.90, 95% CI 0.26 to 3.07), again suggested better outcomes for hands than feet. One trial showed cryotherapy to be better than both placebo and SA, but only for hand warts.There was no significant difference in cure rates between

  8. Treatment of Warts in Children: An Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerlero, P; Hernández-Martín, Á

    2016-09-01

    Warts are among the most common skin infections in children. Although numerous treatment options are available, none are completely effective in a single session. Treatment is particularly complicated in children, not only because certain treatments are poorly tolerated, but also because parents frequently have unrealistic expectations. In this article, we offer an update on the treatments available for warts, focusing specifically on pediatric patients. We do not discuss treatments for oral and anogenital warts. Copyright © 2016 AEDV. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Female genital warts: global trends and treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gall, S A

    2001-01-01

    The increasing incidence of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and HPV-associated conditions such as genital warts in women is a global concern. Genital warts are a clinical manifestation of HPV types 6 and 11, and are estimated to affect 1% of sexually active adults aged between 15 and 49. HPV infection is also strongly associated with cervical cancer, and is prevalent in as many as 99% of cases. The psychological stress of having genital warts is often greater than the morbidity of the disease, and therefore successful treatment is crucial. Current treatments are patient-applied and provider-administered therapies. Imiquimod 5% cream, a patient-applied therapy, is an efficacious treatment with tolerable side-effects and a low recurrence rate, and has the potential to be an effective strategy for the management of genital warts.

  10. Insects are Crawling in My Genital Warts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhawan, Jyoti; Singh, Saurabh; Gupta, Somesh

    2011-05-01

    A 23-year-old woman presented with large exophytic genital wart arising from perineum, vulva, introitus of the vagina, and inner aspect of thighs. Patient developed severe itching and formication (insect-crawling sensation) in the lesions for past 1 week, though careful examination did not reveal any insects. Considering that the disease was causing psychological stress and physical symptoms, radiofrequency excision was planned. However, during the procedure, several maggots appeared from the crypts. The procedure was abandoned and maggots were removed manually. Subsequently external giant warts were removed using radiofrequency device. There was no recurrence of excised warts during 3 month follow-up. To our knowledge, this is the second reported case of maggots in genital warts.

  11. Insects are crawling in my genital warts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyoti Dhawan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A 23-year-old woman presented with large exophytic genital wart arising from perineum, vulva, introitus of the vagina, and inner aspect of thighs. Patient developed severe itching and formication (insect-crawling sensation in the lesions for past 1 week, though careful examination did not reveal any insects. Considering that the disease was causing psychological stress and physical symptoms, radiofrequency excision was planned. However, during the procedure, several maggots appeared from the crypts. The procedure was abandoned and maggots were removed manually. Subsequently external giant warts were removed using radiofrequency device. There was no recurrence of excised warts during 3 month follow-up. To our knowledge, this is the second reported case of maggots in genital warts.

  12. Primary intestinal lymphangiectasia with generalized warts

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lee, Soon Jae; Song, Hyun Joo; Boo, Sun-Jin; Na, Soo-Young; Kim, Heung Up; Hyun, Chang Lim

    2015-01-01

    .... As a result, the patients are vulnerableto chronic viral infection and lymphoma. However,cases of PIL with chronic viral infection, such as humanpapilloma virus-induced warts, are rarely reported...

  13. Warts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Boards study tools Online Learning Center Meetings and events Make a difference Career planning Media Relations Toolkit AAD apps Academy meeting Chronic urticaria—for members Chronic urticaria—for public Dermatology World Dialogues in Dermatology JAAD Mohs AUC ...

  14. Is oral contraceptive associated with genital warts?

    OpenAIRE

    Ross, J. D.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To measure the association between oral contraceptive use and the prevalence of genital warts in women. METHODS: Cross sectional case control study comparing oral contraceptive use in women with and without genital warts attending a city centre genitourinary medicine clinic controlling for recent sexual activity, the presence of other sexually transmitted infections, socio-economic class and history of pregnancy using a multivariate logistic regression model. RESULTS: After control...

  15. New approach to managing genital warts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopaschuk, Catharine C.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective To summarize and determine the appropriate use for the new and old management tools for genital warts. Sources of information The following databases were searched: MEDLINE, PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, ACP Journal Club, and Trip. The bibliographies of retrieved papers were also reviewed. Clinical trials, qualitative review articles, consensus reports, and clinical practice guidelines were retrieved. Main message Symptomatic warts are prevalent in at least 1% of the population between the ages of 15 and 49, with estimates of up to 50% of the population being infected with human papillomavirus at some point in their lifetime. Imiquimod and podophyllotoxin are 2 new treatments for external genital warts that are less painful and can be applied by patients at home. In addition, the quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccine has been shown to be efficacious in preventing genital warts and cervical cancer. There is still a role for the older treatment methods in certain situations, such as intravaginal, urethral, anal, or recalcitrant warts; or for pregnant patients. Conclusion The new treatments of external genital warts can reduce the pain of treatment and the number of office visits. Other treatment methods are still useful in certain situations. PMID:23851535

  16. 2 Doses of HPV Shot Enough to Prevent Genital Warts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Doses of HPV Shot Enough to Prevent Genital Warts: Study Findings back up new CDC recommendations for ... human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine to protect against genital warts in preteens and teens. Investigators at Boston University ...

  17. Oxidative Stress in Patients With Nongenital Warts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sezai Sasmaz

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Comparison of oxidative stress status between subjects with or without warts is absent in the literature. In this study, we evaluated 31 consecutive patients with warts (15 female, 16 male and 36 control cases with no evidence of disease to determine the effects of oxidative stress in patients with warts. The patients were classified according to the wart type, duration, number, and location of lesions. We measured the indicators of oxidative stress such as catalase (CAT, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD, superoxide dismutase (SOD, and malondialdehyde (MDA in the venous blood by spectrophotometry. There was a statistically significant increase in levels of CAT, G6PD, SOD activities and MDA in the patients with warts compared to the control group (P<.05. However, we could not define a statistically significant correlation between these increased enzyme activities and MDA levels and the type, the duration, the number, and the location of lesions. We determined possible suppression of T cells during oxidative stress that might have a negative effect on the prognosis of the disease. Therefore, we propose an argument for the appropriateness to give priority to immunomodulatory treatment alternatives instead of destructive methods in patients with demonstrated oxidative stress.

  18. Transmission and treatment of cutaneous warts in general practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruggink, Sjoerd Cristoffel

    2013-01-01

    Cutaneous warts are caused by the human papillomavirus (HPV). Although warts are one of the most common reasons to consult general practice, there is a considerable lack of evidence on the transmission and treatment of warts. This thesis presents epidemiological data from a cohort of primary school

  19. Warts transmitted in families and schools: a prospective cohort

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruggink, S.C.; Eekhof, J.A.H.; Egberts, P.F.; Blijswijk, S.C. van; Assendelft, W.J.J.; Gussekloo, J.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Cutaneous warts are common in primary schoolchildren; however, knowledge on the routes of transmission of human papillomavirus (HPV) causing warts is scarce. This study examines the association between the degree of HPV exposure and incidence of warts in primary

  20. Transmission and treatment of cutaneous warts in general practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruggink, Sjoerd Cristoffel

    2013-01-01

    Cutaneous warts are caused by the human papillomavirus (HPV). Although warts are one of the most common reasons to consult general practice, there is a considerable lack of evidence on the transmission and treatment of warts. This thesis presents epidemiological data from a cohort of primary school

  1. 9 CFR 113.206 - Wart Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Wart Vaccine, Killed Virus. 113.206... AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.206 Wart Vaccine, Killed Virus. Wart Vaccine, Killed Virus, shall be...

  2. Primary intestinal lymphangiectasia with generalized warts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Soon Jae; Song, Hyun Joo; Boo, Sun-Jin; Na, Soo-Young; Kim, Heung Up; Hyun, Chang Lim

    2015-07-21

    Primary intestinal lymphangiectasia (PIL) is a rare protein-losing enteropathy with lymphatic leakage into the small intestine. Dilated lymphatics in the small intestinal wall and mesentery are observed in this disease. Laboratory tests of PIL patients revealed hypoalbuminemia, lymphocytopenia, hypogammaglobulinemia and increased stool α-1 antitrypsin clearance. Cell-mediated immunodeficiency is also present in PIL patients because of loss of lymphocytes. As a result, the patients are vulnerable to chronic viral infection and lymphoma. However, cases of PIL with chronic viral infection, such as human papilloma virus-induced warts, are rarely reported. We report a rare case of PIL with generalized warts in a 36-year-old male patient. PIL was diagnosed by capsule endoscopy and colonoscopic biopsy with histological tissue confirmation. Generalized warts were observed on the head, chest, abdomen, back, anus, and upper and lower extremities, including the hands and feet of the patient.

  3. Cosmetic Warts: Pseudo-Koebnerization of Warts after Cosmetic Procedures for Hair Removal

    OpenAIRE

    Sidharth, Sonthalia; Rahul, Arora; Rashmi, Sarkar

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To sensitize patients, physicians, and aestheticians about the possibility of spread of cutaneous warts during cosmetic procedures, especially following temporary hair removal methods, such as shaving, waxing, threading, and using depilatory creams, so they practice the requisite safety measures. Cutaneous warts caused by human papilloma virus are highly contagious. They tend to spread locally with even the trivial trauma of scratching, resulting in autoinoculation or “pseudo-Koebn...

  4. Immunomodulators in warts: Unexplored or ineffective?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surabhi Sinha

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous warts are known to be recurrent and often resistant to therapy. Resistant warts may reflect a localized or systemic cell mediated immune (CMI deficiency to HPV. Many modalities of treatment are in use; most of the provider-administered therapies are destructive and cause scarring, such as cryotherapy, chemical cauterisation, curettage, electrodessication and laser removal. Most patient-applied agents like podophyllotoxin have the risk of application-site reactions and recurrence. Thus immunotherapy is a promising modality which could lead to resolution of warts without any physical changes or scarring and in addition would augment the host response against the causative agent, thereby leading to complete resolution and decreased recurrences. Immunomodulators can be administered systemically, intralesionally or intradermally, and topically. A few agents have been tried and studied extensively such as cimetidine and interferons; others are new on the horizon, such as Echinacea, green tea catechins and quadrivalent HPV vaccine, and their efficacy is yet to be completely established. Though some like levamisole have shown no efficacy as monotherapy and are now used only in combination, other more recent agents require large and long term randomized placebo-controlled trials to clearly establish their efficacy or lack of it. In this review, we focus on the immunomodulators that have been used for the treatment of warts and the studies that have been conducted on them.

  5. Immunomodulators in warts: Unexplored or ineffective?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Surabhi; Relhan, Vineet; Garg, Vijay K

    2015-01-01

    Cutaneous warts are known to be recurrent and often resistant to therapy. Resistant warts may reflect a localized or systemic cell mediated immune (CMI) deficiency to HPV. Many modalities of treatment are in use; most of the provider-administered therapies are destructive and cause scarring, such as cryotherapy, chemical cauterisation, curettage, electrodessication and laser removal. Most patient-applied agents like podophyllotoxin have the risk of application-site reactions and recurrence. Thus immunotherapy is a promising modality which could lead to resolution of warts without any physical changes or scarring and in addition would augment the host response against the causative agent, thereby leading to complete resolution and decreased recurrences. Immunomodulators can be administered systemically, intralesionally or intradermally, and topically. A few agents have been tried and studied extensively such as cimetidine and interferons; others are new on the horizon, such as Echinacea, green tea catechins and quadrivalent HPV vaccine, and their efficacy is yet to be completely established. Though some like levamisole have shown no efficacy as monotherapy and are now used only in combination, other more recent agents require large and long term randomized placebo-controlled trials to clearly establish their efficacy or lack of it. In this review, we focus on the immunomodulators that have been used for the treatment of warts and the studies that have been conducted on them. PMID:25814698

  6. Topical vitamin A treatment of recalcitrant common warts

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    Gaston Anca

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Common warts (verruca vulgaris are benign epithelial proliferations associated with human papillomavirus (HPV infection. Salicylic acid and cryotherapy are the most frequent treatments for common warts, but can be painful and cause scarring, and have high failure and recrudescence rates. Topical vitamin A has been shown to be a successful treatment of common warts in prior informal studies. Case The subject is a healthy, physically-active 30 old female with a 9 year history of common warts on the back of the right hand. The warts resisted treatment with salicylic acid, apple cider vinegar and an over-the-counter blend of essential oils marketed for the treatment of warts. Daily topical application of natural vitamin A derived from fish liver oil (25,000 IU led to replacement of all the warts with normal skin. Most of the smaller warts had been replaced by 70 days. A large wart on the middle knuckle required 6 months of vitamin A treatment to resolve completely. Conclusion Retinoids should be further investigated in controlled studies to determine their effectiveness in treating common warts and the broad range of other benign and cancerous lesions induced by HPVs.

  7. Topical vitamin A treatment of recalcitrant common warts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaston, Anca; Garry, Robert F

    2012-01-17

    Common warts (verruca vulgaris) are benign epithelial proliferations associated with human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. Salicylic acid and cryotherapy are the most frequent treatments for common warts, but can be painful and cause scarring, and have high failure and recrudescence rates. Topical vitamin A has been shown to be a successful treatment of common warts in prior informal studies. The subject is a healthy, physically-active 30 old female with a 9 year history of common warts on the back of the right hand. The warts resisted treatment with salicylic acid, apple cider vinegar and an over-the-counter blend of essential oils marketed for the treatment of warts. Daily topical application of natural vitamin A derived from fish liver oil (25,000 IU) led to replacement of all the warts with normal skin. Most of the smaller warts had been replaced by 70 days. A large wart on the middle knuckle required 6 months of vitamin A treatment to resolve completely. Retinoids should be further investigated in controlled studies to determine their effectiveness in treating common warts and the broad range of other benign and cancerous lesions induced by HPVs.

  8. Warts transmitted in families and schools: a prospective cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruggink, Sjoerd C; Eekhof, Just A H; Egberts, Paulette F; van Blijswijk, Sophie C E; Assendelft, Willem J J; Gussekloo, Jacobijn

    2013-05-01

    Cutaneous warts are common in primary schoolchildren; however, knowledge on the routes of transmission of human papillomavirus (HPV) causing warts is scarce. This study examines the association between the degree of HPV exposure and incidence of warts in primary schoolchildren to support evidence-based recommendations on wart prevention. In this prospective cohort study, the hands and feet of all children in grades 1 to 7 (aged 4-12 years) of 3 Dutch primary schools were inspected for the presence of warts at baseline and after 11 to 18 months of follow-up. Data on the degree of HPV exposure included information obtained from parental questionnaires: preexistent warts, warts in family, prevalence of warts at baseline in the class, and use of public places (eg, swimming pools). Of the 1134 eligible children, 97% participated; the response rate from parental questionnaires was 77%, and loss to follow-up was 9%. The incidence for developing warts was 29 per 100 person-years at risk (95% confidence interval [CI] 26-32). Children with a white skin type had an increased risk of developing warts (hazard ratio [HR] 2.3, 95% CI 1.3-3.9). Having family members with warts (HR 2.08, 95% CI 1.52-2.86) and wart prevalence in the class (HR 1.20 per 10% increase, 95% CI 1.03-1.41) were independent environmental risk factors. The degree of HPV exposure in the family and school class contributes to the development of warts in schoolchildren. Preventive recommendations should focus more on limiting HPV transmission in families and school classes, rather than in public places.

  9. A CASE REPORT OF GIANT GENITAL WARTS

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    L. Grimaldi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Giant genital warts (GGW represent a rare form of sexually transmitted disease caused by the human papillomavirus, arising more frequently in the vulvar and perianal regions as large exophytic cauliflower-like mass. Estimated rate of recurrence is 60 to 66%, while malignant transformation is possible and it has been reported in 30 to 56% of cases. A 45- years-old woman was admitted to our Structure of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Siena, Italy with an extensive cauliflower- like masses diffused on vulvar and perianal region. The patient was treated in general anaesthesia, with a wide en bloc excision up to free clinical edges and immediate reconstruction of the vulvar continuity. Buschke Lowenstein tumour or giant genital warts is a sporadic tumour with an elevate local recurrence rate. In some cases, surgery can be very difficult and it must be associated to other strategies. An accurate follow-up is always necessary

  10. Lichen Simplex Chronicus That Accompanies Anogenital Warts during the Childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seçilmiş Kerimoğlu, Ozlem; Doğan, Nasuh Utku; Tazegül, Aybike; Karameşe, Mehtap; Beyhekim, Hasan; Celik, Cetin

    2012-01-01

    Anogenital warts and lichen simplex chronicus (LSC) are rarely seen during the childhood. A 9-year-old girl has been presented to hospital by her parents with itching in the anogenital area. There were anogenital warts and a different erythematous lesion in the perianal region. On the pulpa of the right thumb, there was a wart extending under the nail. The lesions are surgically removed. The results of the histopathological examination were reported as condyloma acuminata and LSC. Children with anogenital warts should be examined carefully to discover the transmission route and other possible concomitant cutaneous diseases.

  11. Determining oxidant and antioxidant status in patients with genital warts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cokluk, Erdem; Sekeroglu, Mehmet Ramazan; Aslan, Mehmet; Balahoroglu, Ragip; Bilgili, Serap Gunes; Huyut, Zubeyir

    2015-09-01

    Warts are abnormal skin growths caused by human papilloma virus (HPV) infections within the skin of patients. Genital warts usually appear in the perianal and perigenital regions. Asymptomatic warts may be activated after years and may damage natural immunity. The inflammation that occurs during this process may lead to an imbalance between the prooxidant and the antioxidant systems. The aim of this study was to investigate erythrocyte glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activity, serum paraoxonase enzyme levels, and oxidative stress levels in patients with genital warts. In total, 32 patients with genital warts and 35 healthy subjects were included in this study. Erythrocyte GSH-Px activity, serum catalase activity, and paraoxonase enzyme, and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were determined. Erythrocyte GSH-Px activity, serum MDA levels, and catalase activity were significantly higher in patients with genital warts than in controls (P 0.05). Serum triglyceride levels were significantly lower in patients with genital warts than in controls (P 0.05). Our data suggest that oxidative stress is increased in genital warts. Increased oxidative stress levels may contribute to the pathogenesis of genital warts, and prolonged HPV infection due to chronic inflammation could also affect oxidative stress.

  12. Insects are Crawling in My Genital Warts

    OpenAIRE

    Jyoti Dhawan; Saurabh Singh; Somesh Gupta

    2011-01-01

    A 23-year-old woman presented with large exophytic genital wart arising from perineum, vulva, introitus of the vagina, and inner aspect of thighs. Patient developed severe itching and formication (insect-crawling sensation) in the lesions for past 1 week, though careful examination did not reveal any insects. Considering that the disease was causing psychological stress and physical symptoms, radiofrequency excision was planned. However, during the procedure, several maggots appeared from the...

  13. CRYOSURGERY FOR TREATMENT OF CUTANEOUS WARTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Made Bagus Adhi Paramitha

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Minor surgery is a general surgical procedure that applied with minimally invasive procedures and short duration, done in a superficial or just the affected tissue.  This technique is normally only requires a local anaesthetic and only has minimal  risk or complications. There are many cases that could be dealt with minor surgery one is veruka. Veruka or known as cutaneous warts is a disease that is often complained in children and adults. Veruka being estimated to occur until over 10% in children and young adults. Largest incident occurred in range of age 12 to 16 years. Veruka occurs more frequently in women than men. The peak incidence occur of age 13 years on women and 14.5 years in males. Salicylic acid and cryosurgery therapy are two of the most frequently performed in the treatment of cutaneous warts. Salicylic acid is therapy  for cutaneous warts who recently had already started replaced by cryosurgery because it is relatively easy to do and faster recovery.  

  14. Human papillomavirus typing of warts and response to cryotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomson, N; Sterling, J; Ahmed, I; Hague, J; Berth-Jones, J

    2011-09-01

    Cutaneous warts are common and caused by a number of different types of human papillomaviruses (HPVs). The aim of this study was to investigate the HPV types causing common warts and to determine any association between the HPV type and the duration of warts and response to cryotherapy. Eighty wart samples from 76 immunocompetent patients were taken from warts by paring prior to cryotherapy and analysed by in situ hybridization (ISH) with HPV probes specific to HPV 1, 2, 3, 4, 7, 10 and 57 and PCR analysis using degenerate cutaneous HPV primers with subsequent DNA sequencing. Each patient's details, including site, duration and response of the wart to cryotherapy were recorded. Cryotherapy was performed at 2 week intervals for a maximum of 12 weeks. An HPV type was identified in 65 samples. The majority of warts (58 samples) were typed as HPV 2/27/57 by ISH and/or PCR. Three of the 18 samples that were HPV negative with ISH were HPV positive by PCR. Response to treatment did not correlate with HPV type, duration or location. In the 21 wart parings taken from patients aged 16 and under, response to treatment did not correlate with HPV type but warts of shorter duration were more likely to resolve with cryotherapy treatment than longer standing lesions. This study demonstrates that HPV type can be determined from wart parings. HPV-2 related viruses are the prevalent HPV types causing common warts on the hands and feet in this population. © 2010 The Authors. Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology © 2010 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  15. Propolis as an alternative treatment for cutaneous warts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zedan, Hatem; Hofny, Eman R M; Ismail, Sahar A

    2009-11-01

    Warts are common problems affecting adults and children. Multiple treatment options are available, but no single therapy stands out as uniformly effective. Propolis and Echinacea are relatively safe immunomodulators with antiviral properties. The purpose of this study was to assess the efficacy of Propolis and Echinacea in treating different types of warts. In a single-blind, randomized, 3-months trial, 135 patients with different types of warts received oral Propolis, Echinacea, or placebo. In patients with plane and common warts treated with Propolis, cure was achieved in 75% and 73% of patients, respectively. These results were significantly better than those associated with Echinacea treatment or placebo. We conclude that Propolis is an effective and safe immunomodulating therapy for plane and common warts.

  16. Resolution of Novel Human Papillomavirus–induced Warts after HPV Vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieland, Ulrike; Werner, Marko; Pfister, Herbert; Potthoff, Anja; Kreuter, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) XS2 was isolated from warts on an immunosuppressed patient. After HPV vaccination, the warts resolved. HPVXS2 was also found in warts and normal skin of HIV-positive patients and rarely in HIV-negative controls. Further studies should elucidate the mechanisms that lead to wart clearance. PMID:24378072

  17. Resolution of novel human papillomavirus-induced warts after HPV vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silling, Steffi; Wieland, Ulrike; Werner, Marko; Pfister, Herbert; Potthoff, Anja; Kreuter, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) XS2 was isolated from warts on an immunosuppressed patient. After HPV vaccination, the warts resolved. HPVXS2 was also found in warts and normal skin of HIV-positive patients and rarely in HIV-negative controls. Further studies should elucidate the mechanisms that lead to wart clearance.

  18. Dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB In The Treatment Of Warts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chattopadhyay S. P

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Forty patients (male-25, female-15 of age group 15 to 46 years (mean 23 years were attempted for contact sensitization with 0.5% -3% dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB solution. Thirty five cases could be hypersensitized. Out of these cases, 11(27.5%cases responded fully with subsequent local application of 0.5-1% DNCB solution on the warts and another 32.5% cases showed moderate response while 40% of cases did not show any response. It was also seen that 77.5% of patients suffered from moderate to severe complication in the form of eczematous reaction. Pain and induration both on the site of hypersensitization and on sites away from it. The eczematous reaction subsided slowly over 2 to 4 weeks period without leaving any permanent scar. DNCB (topical could be used for a cure under direct supervision in the selected cases of verrucae not responding to standard treatment by initial sensitization and thereafter direct application over the warts. There was a marginal increased tuberculin (PPD response after hypersensitization process with DNCB.

  19. Therapeutic Effects of Islamic Intercessory Prayer on Warts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoşrik, Evren M; Cüceloğlu, Aydın E; Erpolat, Seval

    2014-02-18

    The present study aimed to examine the therapeutic effects of Islamic intercessory prayer on warts. Forty-five participants who are mostly Muslims and infected with warts were randomized into three groups: Group-1 (uncertain, with intercessory prayer), Group-2 (uncertain, no intercessory prayer), and control group (informed, no intervention). Stress symptoms were also measured before and after prayer sessions for these three groups. The results revealed that there were no significant differences between the groups in terms of healing. Although participants believed in the therapeutic effects of prayer, when participants did not trust the intercessor, prayer had no effect on warts.

  20. High prevalence of cutaneous warts in elementary school children and the ubiquitous presence of wart-associated human papillomavirus on clinically normal skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Koning, M N C; Quint, K D; Bruggink, S C; Gussekloo, J; Bouwes Bavinck, J N; Feltkamp, M C W; Quint, W G V; Eekhof, J A H

    2015-01-01

    One-third of Dutch primary school children have cutaneous warts; each year around 20% of them seek medical treatment. However, little is known about the epidemiology of the types of human papillomavirus (HPV) causing these warts. To investigate the distribution of cutaneous wart-associated HPV types in three primary school classes by analysing skin swabs taken from warts, and the forehead, hand dorsum and sole of the foot of included children. Using the hyperkeratotic skin lesion polymerase chain reaction/multiplex genotyping assay, each swab sample was used to genotype for 23 cutaneous wart-associated HPV types. Thirty-one (44%) of the 71 children had a total of 69 warts, with a maximum of six warts per child. In the wart swabs, HPV2, HPV27 and HPV57, members of Alphapapillomavirus species 4, were most frequently detected (27%, 32% and 14%, respectively), whereas HPV1 was only found in two plantar warts. The prevalence of HPV carriage, detected in swabs of clinically normal skin of the forehead, left hand and left sole was 80%, with the most prevalent types being HPV1 (59%), HPV2 (42%), HPV63 (25%) and HPV27 (21%). Cutaneous wart-associated HPV types were highly prevalent in primary school children, but did not correlate with the HPV types in warts. In contrast to the existing literature, HPV1 was frequently detected on clinically normal skin but was much less frequent in warts. © 2014 British Association of Dermatologists.

  1. Late effects of X-ray treatment of warts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veien, N.K.; Norholm, A.; Hattel, T.; Justesen, O.

    1982-04-01

    Five to 22 years after warts on hands and feet were treated by X ray, 1122 patients with a total of 3675 warts were re-examined. X-Ray therapy had been given as one dose of 3000 r using 29 kV with a 0.3-mm Al filter; 19% of the warts had been given two treatments. Sequelae were seen in 4.8% of the sites where warts had been given one X-ray treatment and in 12.2% of the sites after two treatments. These side effects include hyperkeratosis in the pressure areas of palms and soles and atrophy primarily in areas with a thin cutis. There was no evidence of malignant transformation in any treatment site, and there were no deep-seated side effects such as ostitis or tendinitis.

  2. Mucocutaneous warts in Middle Anatolia, Turkey: clinical presentations and therapeutic approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gönül, Müzeyyen; Iyidal, Ayşegül Yalçınkaya; Çakmak, Seray; Kılıç, Arzu; Gul, Ulker; Doner, Pinar

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Viral warts are common skin condition caused by the human papilloma virus. Aim To determine the clinical features of warts and therapeutic approaches to warts and compare them with the literature. Material and methods A cross-sectional survey was conducted on 362 consecutive patients presenting to a dermatology clinic in Ankara, Middle Anatolia, Turkey. Age, gender, anatomic localization, clinical types, number of warts, and medical therapy histories were recorded. Results In our study 139 (38.4%) children and 223 (61.6%) adults had warts. Warts were seen in 191 men, and 171 women. The mean age was 24.7 ±13.5. In all groups the incidence and the number of warts were higher in men. Clinical types of warts were vulgar, anogenital, plantar, verruca plana, filiform, and mosaic. Thirty-six (9.9%) of 362 cases had more than one type. The locations of warts were as follows extremities (n = 233, 64.4%), anogenital (n = 86, 23.7%) and head and neck (n = 73, 20.2%). The incidence of anogenital warts was statistically higher in men than women (p warts were higher in men, which is different than in previous reports. The anogenital wart (AW) was ranked second in all types of warts. According to this finding, we can say that the frequency of AW has been increased in Turkey. To our knowledge recently there have been no studies investigating the clinical features of viral warts in all ages in the literature. PMID:26161058

  3. Lesional HPV types of cutaneous warts can be reliably identified by surface swabs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Koning, M N C; Khoe, L V; Eekhof, J A H; Kamp, M; Gussekloo, J; Ter Schegget, J; Bouwes Bavinck, J N; Quint, W G V

    2011-10-01

    Large numbers of HPV types infect the human skin and members from the HPV genera alpha, gamma and mu are associated with cutaneous warts. The aim of this study was to test if the HPV genotypes in swabs of the overlying skin are identical to the types present within these warts. To this purpose, 25 persons being treated for persistent cutaneous warts were enrolled. Swabs of the overlying skin of the wart were collected from each participant. Additionally, scabs of the wart and deeper portions of the warts were surgically removed. HPV genotyping was performed on all samples using the novel HSL-PCR/MPG assay and the HPV genotyping results were compared. From the 25 wart biopsies one was HPV negative. 15 were positive for HPV27, 3 for HPV57, 2 for HPV2, 2 for HPV1, 1 for HPV3 and 1wart biopsy was positive for both HPV41 and HPV65. Scabs and swabs of the warts both showed identical typing results as the biopsies in 24 of the 25 cases (sensitivity: 96%). There was an excellent agreement between HPV types in the swabs of the skin that overlies the warts and the biopsies of these warts validating the use of wart swabs for future studies of wart-associated HPV types. HPV27 was highly prevalent (70%) in the in adults of the investigated population of patients with persistent cutaneous warts. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Therapeutic options for external genital warts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vender, Ronald; Bourcier, Marc; Bhatia, Neal; Lynde, Charles

    2013-12-01

    The primary goal of treatment for external genital warts (EGWs) is to eradicate visible lesions and address symptoms that may accompany them, but it does not address the underlying virus. Left untreated, warts may grow, remain the same, or spontaneously regress as a result of being cleared by the immune system. However, recurrence is common with or without treatment and may occur within 3 months of ending treatment in one-quarter to two-thirds of cases. Treatment options fall into two categories: provider or patient applied. Provider-based therapies include cryotherapy, trichloroacetic and bichloroacetic acid, electrocautery, surgical excision, and CO2 laser therapy. Patient-applied therapy choices include imiquimod and podophyllotoxin. Imiquimod 3.75% is a fairly new, patient-administered topical cream approved by Health Canada in 2011. Another recently approved patient-applied choice is sinecatechins, a green tea extract with immunomodulatory effects. Self-treatment options are attractive to patients because they offer privacy, convenience, and autonomy. In contrast, provider-administered therapies may boast increased precision (especially for areas that are hard to reach) and closer monitoring, which can be augmented by patient education and counseling. Available topical and surgical therapies vary widely in terms of cost, efficacy, adverse effects, dosage/frequency, and length of treatment. No one treatment is ideally suited to all patients or constitutes a gold standard. Treatment regimens must be tailored to each patient's needs and preferences. The health care provider's skills and experience will also factor into treatment decisions. In addition, the size, number, and location of lesions and whether the infection is new or recurrent will help guide the decision process toward the best treatment for a given patient.

  5. Viral Warts-A Clinico-Epidemiological Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laxmisha Chandrashekar

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Although clinical criteria, laboratory diagnosis and treatment are well established, scanty attention has been paid to prevalence and pattern of viral warts in India. HIV is widely prevalent and its influence on the number and morphology of viral warts has not yet been studied in our setup. Hence, this study was undertaken. One hindered and forty four cases of viral warts were studied between September 2000 and June 2002 at the department of Dermatology and STD, JIPMER, Pondicherry. These included 81childeren and 63 adults. In Children, viral warts were most commonly seen in the age group of 10to14 years (41.9%, whereas in adults, the most commonly seen in the age 14to20 years (46.03%. The average age at presentation was 11.5 years. The male to female ratio was 2.2 to 1 in children and 1.8 to 1 in adults. Family history of warts was observed in 27.7% of the cases. In children, multiple site involvement (62.9% was more common than single site involvement. The most commonly involved site was hand in children as also in adults. In adults, single site involvement (66.6%was more common than multiple site involvement. The most common type of wart seen in both children and adults was the common wart. Twenty percent of the cases showed koebnerization. Four cases were found to be seropositive for HIV infection, who were adult with genital warts, but florid manifestations were not seen.

  6. Children with Warts: A Retrospective Study in an Outpatient Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwabara, Anne M; Rainer, Barbara M; Basdag, Hatice; Cohen, Bernard A

    2015-01-01

    The purpose is to investigate the demographics and course of common warts in children in an outpatient setting. A retrospective medical chart review and telephone survey study were completed on an outpatient cohort of children (0-17 yrs) with a clinical diagnosis of warts at a single-center, university-based pediatric dermatology practice. The main outcome measures included management, time to resolution, and associated factors of warts in children. Of the 254 patients we contacted, 214 agreed to participate in the survey. The most commonly involved sites were the hands and the head and neck area. Most children received some form of therapy, but it is unclear that any form of treatment altered the course. However, children with a medical history of childhood infections or more than one anatomic site had significantly greater risk of having a longer time to resolution. Warts resolved in 65% of children by 2 years and in 80% within 4 years, regardless of treatment. With the exception of a history of childhood infections and having more than one anatomic site, time to resolution was not altered by wart or patient characteristics. Thus counseling without aggressive destructive treatment is a reasonable approach to managing warts in most children. Our findings will provide guidance in the process of shared decision making with parents and children. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Intralesional Candida antigen for common warts in people with HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Aaron; Crawford, Richard I

    2013-01-01

    Intralesional Candida antigen has been used as immunotherapy to treat refractory warts in the immunocompetent pediatric and adult populations but has not been reported in individuals with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). To examine if Candida antigen resulted in clearance of medically refractory, long-standing common warts in a series of HIV patients. At a hospital-based, adult, outpatient dermatology clinic, seven patients with HIV with common warts of the hands and feet were treated with intralesional Candida antigen. The warts had been resistant to standard patient- and physician-applied modalities. Clearance was achieved in three of seven patients, whereas four of seven did not respond due to a lack of effectiveness or an inability to tolerate treatment. Adverse events included injection-site redness, pruritus, and pain. This is the first reported case series using Candida antigen for warts in individuals with HIV. The use of Candida antigen represents a simple and novel approach to the management of treatment-refractory warts in those with HIV. This case series provides a foundation for future larger, randomized trials.

  8. Human papillomavirus (HPV) genotyping of cutaneous warts in Greek children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannaki, Maria; Kakourou, Talia; Theodoridou, Maria; Syriopoulou, Vassiliki; Kabouris, Marios; Louizou, Eirini; Chrousos, George

    2013-01-01

    The human papillomavirus (HPV) infects the squamous epithelium of the skin and produces common warts, plantar warts, and flat warts, which occur commonly on the hands, face, and feet. The objective of this study was to determine the presence of HPV in warts in children in order to associate the virus with the disease. Sixty-eight children with clinically diagnosed cutaneous warts were recruited. Skin biopsy samples were examined and DNA was extracted using a commercially available kit. To distinguish between the HPV types, we used a specific pair of primers to amplify the HPV DNA. Polymerase chain reaction amplification of the L1 region was followed by restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis and Luminex xMAP technology. HPV 57 was the predominant type in our study, although the detection of the high-risk HPV type 16 in 33% of our positive samples indicates the presence of mucosal high-risk HPV types in the skin of children. It seems that the newly introduced Luminex assay maximized the discrimination of genotypes even in the case of multiple HPV infections. Or findings also suggest the presence of high-risk HPV types in cutaneous warts. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Genital Warts -- Initial Visits to Physicians' Offices, United States, 1966 - 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Data & Statistics Sexually Transmitted Diseases Figure 46. Genital Warts — Initial Visits to Physicians’ Offices, United States, 1966 – ... page . NOTE : The relative standard errors for genital warts estimates of more than 100,000 range from ...

  10. Determining the cost of genital warts: a study from Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Dee, A

    2009-09-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the average cost of a case of genital warts, for both males and females, with a view to informing the current debate as to which Human papillomavirus vaccine would have maximum cost-effectiveness in the Irish population. METHODS: Contact time between patients and healthcare professionals was prospectively measured at five genitourinary medicine clinics in the south-west of Ireland, over a period of 3 weeks. By identifying all those with genital warts, it was possible to calculate the proportion of total time taken by patients with this condition, and from this to calculate a cost per incident case, by gender. RESULTS: A total of 25.5% of attendances were for genital warts, and these patients used 26.2% of total clinic time (CI 25.4 to 27.0%). The average cost calculated for genital warts was 335 euros per incident case, and by gender 300 euros per male case and 366 euros per female case. CONCLUSIONS: There are considerable costs associated with the treatment of genital warts, with female cases representing a higher cost than males. By vaccinating with the quadrivalent HPV vaccine, there are significant savings to be made.

  11. Cutaneous wart-associated HPV types: prevalence and relation with patient characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruggink, S.C.; Koning, M.N. de; Gussekloo, J.; Egberts, P.F.; Schegget, J. ter; Feltkamp, M.C.; Bavinck, J.N.; Quint, W.G.V.; Assendelft, W.J.J.; Eekhof, J.A.H.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Epidemiological data on cutaneous wart-associated HPV types are rare. OBJECTIVES: To examine the prevalence of cutaneous wart-associated HPV types and their relation with patient characteristics. STUDY DESIGN: Swabs were taken from all 744 warts of 246 consecutive immunocompetent

  12. The treatment and demographics of warts: an analysis of national trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeder, Virginia J; Gustafson, Cheryl J; Davis, Scott A; Fleischer, Alan B; Huang, William W

    2013-12-01

    Verrucae (warts) are a very common dermatologic disease. They can be of cosmetic concern, cause physical discomfort, and predispose patients to certain malignancies. Management of warts has traditionally been based on anatomic location, clinical appearance, and patient preference. To investigate trends in the treatment of warts, as well as patient demographics associated with the diagnosis of warts. The National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NAMCS) was queried for data regarding patient visits associated with the diagnosis of warts from 1990 to 2009. There was a significant increase in the use of topical imiquimod during the study period, such that it became the most frequently used medication for warts. No statistically significant trends were detected regarding the frequency of treatment with medication only, procedure only, or combination treatment. In terms of patient demographics, there was an upward trend in regards to increasing patient age and the diagnosis of warts. However, there were no significant trends with respect to patient gender or race and the diagnosis of warts. Warts not otherwise specified (NOS) was the reported diagnosis for more than eighty percent of patient visits for warts. Trends in the treatment of plantar warts could not be evaluated as the ICD-9 code designating this diagnosis was recently instituted in 2009. Data from NAMCS are cross-sectional in nature. The advent of a new therapy and shifts in population patterns have modified the epidemiologic profile and treatment of warts.

  13. [Viral warts on hands and feet are often self-limiting].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordentoft, Esben Lynge; Waldorf, Frans Boch

    2013-05-27

    Viral warts are common skin lesions caused by human papilloma virus. This article describes the pathogenesis, symptoms and treatment methods of cutaneous warts. The majority resolves spontaneously and the evidence on treatment of warts is rather poor, however, products with salicylic acid and cryotherapy have been surveyed most rigorously and shown to increase treatment rates.

  14. Cutaneous wart-associated HPV types: prevalence and relation with patient characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruggink, S.C.; Koning, M.N. de; Gussekloo, J.; Egberts, P.F.; Schegget, J. ter; Feltkamp, M.C.; Bavinck, J.N.; Quint, W.G.V.; Assendelft, W.J.J.; Eekhof, J.A.H.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Epidemiological data on cutaneous wart-associated HPV types are rare. OBJECTIVES: To examine the prevalence of cutaneous wart-associated HPV types and their relation with patient characteristics. STUDY DESIGN: Swabs were taken from all 744 warts of 246 consecutive immunocompetent partici

  15. A Case of Recalcitrant Plantar Warts Associated with Statin Use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron G. Wernham

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Plantar warts are a common presenting skin complaint caused by the human papillomavirus. 1st line therapies include cryotherapy and topical salicylic acid. Where there is resistance to these treatments, consideration is made for 2nd line therapies, including intralesional bleomycin, imiquimod, 5-fluorouracil, and photodynamic therapy. We present a case of bilateral persistent plantar warts, resistant to treatment with repeated cryotherapy and topical salicylic acid over a 6-year period. Following a patient initiated decision to discontinue their statin medication, we observed rapid clearance of plantar warts without change to standard therapy or their environment. This case correlates with emerging literature demonstrating a link between statin medication and proliferation of HPV through increased levels of FOXP3+ regulatory T cells.

  16. HPV type in plantar warts influences natural course and treatment response: Secondary analysis of a randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruggink, S.C.; Gussekloo, J.; Koning, M.N. de; Feltkamp, M.C.; Bavinck, J.N.; Quint, W.G.V.; Assendelft, W.J.J.; Eekhof, J.A.H.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cryotherapy is effective for common warts, but for plantar warts available treatments often fail. OBJECTIVES: Within a pragmatic randomised controlled trial, we examined whether subgroups of common and plantar warts have a favourable natural course or response to treatment based on wart-

  17. Anogenital warts in Danish men who have sex with men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skaaby, Stinna; Kofoed, K

    2011-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of anogenital warts (AGWs) and concurrent sexually transmitted infections (STIs) in men who have sex with men (MSM), and their knowledge of human papillomavirus (HPV). Attitudes towards the HPV vaccine among MSM are explored. A web-based cross-sectional survey on AGWs...... number of sexual partners within the last year. MSM with a history of another STI reported a significantly higher prevalence of warts. More than 70% did not know what causes AGWs. If a free HPV vaccine were to be offered, 94.4% would like to receive it. These data suggest a high prevalence of AGWs...

  18. Mucocutaneous warts in children: clinical presentations, risk factors, and response to treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mutairi, Nawaf; AlKhalaf, Manar

    2012-12-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPV) cause cutaneous and mucosal infections in both adults and children. Warts are very common in children. All patients younger than 13 presenting with cutaneous warts in a 1-year period at Farwaniya Hospital in Kuwait were included in the study. In addition, their parents completed a questionnaire about possible environmental risk factors for warts. The treatment modalities used and their outcomes were recorded. This study included 2,916 children with warts. Common warts affected male patients more frequently. Warts were mostly located on the hands, in 1,172 patients (40.19%), followed by the feet in 1,096 patients (37.59%). Frequently associated environmental factors were walking barefoot, using a swimming pool, or having a family member with warts. The first-line treatment used was cryotherapy, followed by topical salicylic acid preparations. A total of 2,128 (72.98%) patients were cleared of their warts, and 232 (10.90%) patients had a recurrence. The cure rate in patients with hand warts was slightly higher than with warts on the feet (78.67% versus 70.52%). Treatment side effects were a complaint of 1,796 (61.59%) patients. The prevalence of warts is lowest among children less than 6 years old. No particular therapy has been confirmed to be effective at achieving complete remission in every patient.

  19. Health related quality of life in patients with anogenital warts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Papadogeorgakis Helen

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The health-related quality-of-life (HRQoL instruments are an important tool for the evaluation of medical outcomes. Sexually transmitted diseases (STDs influence the patients' life. We aimed to evaluate the HRQoL in patients with anogenital warts at the time of and 1 month after the diagnosis. Materials and methods We used the short-form (SF-36 questionnaire to compare the HRQoL of 91 patients with anogenital warts to 53 control subjects with the same socioeconomic characteristics. Results There was no statistical difference in the overall HRQoL measurement between the anogenital wart patients and controls. However, there was an improvement in the scales of vitality (65.22 ± 15.70 vs. 69.04 ± 14.11, respectively; p Conclusions HRQoL does not appear to be influenced in anogenital wart patients, as measured by the generic instrument SF-36. It is therefore important to develop specific instruments for the measurement of HRQoL in this group of patients.

  20. Intralesional Bleomycin for Warts: Patient Satisfaction and Treatment Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruter, Laura; Saggar, Vishal; Akhavan, Alaleh; Patel, Parth; Umanoff, Nicole; Viola, Kate V; Stebbins, William; Smith, Elizabeth; Akhavan, Arash; Cohen, Justine V; Cohen, Steven R

    2015-01-01

    The treatment of warts is challenging with regards to both tolerability and efficacy. Ascertain the efficacy, tolerability, and patient satisfaction of intralesional bleomycin in the treatment of warts. Retrospective chart review followed by telephone interviews with patients from university-based dermatology referral centers. Seventy-four percent (34/46) of patients had complete resolution (CR) of all warts. Of 34 patients who experienced CR, an average of 1.7 treatments were required. Pain experienced during the procedure and recovery, irrespective of outcome, was rated 5.8 out of 10 (range, 1-10; SD, 2.72; SEM, 0.40). Approximately 70% of patients had pain that lasted less than 2 days after treatment. Seventy-eight percent (36/46) of patients in the study were satisfied with treatment and would recommend it to others. Patients felt bleomycin to be an effective treatment modality for warts, offering high rates of CR in lesions resistant to more traditional therapies. © The Author(s) 2015.

  1. Solutions for therapy-resistant warts. Squaric acid dibutylester (SADBE)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Roon, E.N.; Schootstra, R.; Blanken, R.

    2002-01-01

    Squaric acid dibutylester (SADBE) is a strongly sensitizing compound, activating the immune system by inducing a type 4 hypersensitivity reaction. SADBE has been applied in the treatment of alopecia areate and resistant warts. From the results of clinical trials in children and adults the use of

  2. Successful treatment of periungual warts with topical cidofovir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilla España, Laura; Del Boz, Javier; Fernández Morano, Teresa; Arenas-Villafranca, Javier; de Troya, Magdalena

    2014-01-01

    Periungual warts represent a treatment challenge because of its high recurrence rate and recalcitrance. These are benign lesions produced by the human papilloma virus (HPV) that often do not respond to habitual treatment. Cidofovir is a potent antiviral drug that acts inactivating viral DNA polymerase. Topical cidofovir for the treatment of HPV-related cutaneous and mucous lesions is becoming increasingly common. Our aim was to assess the efficacy and safety of cidofovir cream for the treatment of viral periungual warts. We undertook a retrospective observational study of patients with periungual warts who received treatment with topical cidofovir between January 2010 and December 2013 at the Dermatology Service of the Hospital Costa del Sol, Marbella, Spain. Data were recorded about the rate of treatment response, the adverse effects and recurrences, as well as the characteristics of the patient cohort. We identified 41 patients who had received some previous treatment. The concentration of cidofovir was 3% in all cases, usually applied twice a day (in 37 of the 41 cases). A greater or lesser response was noted in 35 cases. There were six recurrences in the follow-up period. Topical cidofovir seems to be a useful alternative for the therapeutic management of recalcitrant periungual common warts that fail to respond to usual treatment. Our experience with the use of this antiviral agent has been satisfactory, although in our opinion, it should be reserved for specific cases as its economical cost represents an important limitation.

  3. Ano-Genital Warts and HIV Status– A Clinical Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Shimpa; Gulbake, Arvind

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Ano-Genital Warts (AGW) like other Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STD) is associated with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection. This study of AGW was done in HIV positive and HIV negative patients. Aim To study the risk factors and clinical presentations of ano-genital warts in HIV positive and negative patients. Materials and Methods A comparative, cross-sectional, descriptive study of 25 HIV positive and 25 HIV negative (n=50) AGW patients between 15-60 years of both sex was conducted in Dr. D. Y. Patil Hospital and Research Centre from July 2014 to July 2016. Results Significant association of HIV positivity (phomosexuality (p0.05). No patient presented with changes of malignancy. Four were adolescents below 19 years. Two patients had atypical presentations of giant condylomata i.e., Buschke-Lowenstein Tumour (BLT). Conclusion HIV positivity was significantly associated with the risk factors of age below 30 years, homo sexuality and multiple sexual partners. Anal warts were significantly common in HIV positive patients. Four adolescents with AGW underline the need for high risk behaviour counselling. No patient had malignant ano-genital warts. Follow up of these patients with Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) sub-typing is necessary. PMID:28274028

  4. [Anogenital warts and suspicion of child sexual abuse].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouesca, Juan Pablo; Indart de Arza, Miguel Javier; Stabilito, Luis

    2012-10-01

    This article deals with anogenital warts (AGW) injuries caused by human papiloma virus (HPV) in children. Diagnosis, epidemiology, modes of transmission, differential diagnosis, relationship between AGW and cancer are descript. Also, it remarks the presence of AGW as indicator of child sexual abuse. Finally, it includes suggestions for the management of patients and their families by the paediatrician.

  5. Warts in a cohort of Danish kidney transplanted patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zachariae, Claus; Sand, Carsten; Hansen, Jesper Melchior;

    2012-01-01

    with the Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI). Of 740 patients with a functioning renal allograft and were free of dialysis who were surveyed, 568 returned the questionnaires. Patients were asked about general health issues, with a focus on transplantation history, cutaneous warts and whether they had ever had...

  6. Needling versus liquid nitrogen cryotherapy for the treatment of pedal warts a randomized controlled pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Daniel J; Brimage, Jessica T; Naraghi, Reza N; Bower, Virginia M

    2014-07-01

    We hypothesized that needling of a pedal wart creates local inflammation and a subsequent cell-mediated immune response (CMIR) against human papillomavirus. The primary objective of this study was to investigate whether needling to induce a CMIR against human papillomavirus is an effective treatment for pedal warts compared with liquid nitrogen cryotherapy. A secondary objective was to investigate whether the CMIR induced by needling is effective against satellite pedal warts. Eligible patients with pedal warts were randomly allocated to receive either needling or liquid nitrogen cryotherapy. Only the primary pedal wart was treated during the study. Follow-up was 12 weeks, with outcome assessments made independently under blinded circumstances. Of 37 patients enrolled in the study, 18 were allocated to receive needling and 19 to receive liquid nitrogen cryotherapy. Regression of the primary pedal wart occurred in 64.7% of the needling group (11 of 17) and in 6.2% of the liquid nitrogen cryotherapy group (1 of 16) (P =  .001). No significant relationship was found between needling of the primary pedal wart and regression of satellite pedal warts (P = .615) or complete pedal wart regression (P = .175). There was no significant difference in pain, satisfaction, or cosmesis between the two groups. The regression rate of the primary pedal wart was significantly higher in the needling group compared with the liquid nitrogen cryotherapy group.

  7. Natural course of cutaneous warts among primary schoolchildren: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruggink, Sjoerd C; Eekhof, Just A H; Egberts, Paulette F; van Blijswijk, Sophie C E; Assendelft, Willem J J; Gussekloo, Jacobijn

    2013-01-01

    Because cutaneous warts resolve spontaneously and available treatments often fail, family physicians and patients may consider a wait-and-see policy. We examined the natural course of cutaneous warts and treatment decisions in a prospective observational cohort of primary schoolchildren. We inspected the hands and feet of children aged 4 to 12 years from 3 Dutch primary schools for the presence of warts at baseline and after a mean follow-up of 15 months. Parental questionnaires at follow-up provided information on inconvenience caused by warts and any treatments used. Of the 1,134 eligible children, 1,099 (97%) participated, of whom 366 (33%) had cutaneous warts at baseline. Among these children with warts, loss to follow-up was 9% and the response rate to the parental questionnaires was 83%. The complete resolution rate was 52 per 100 person-years at risk (95% CI, 44-60). Younger age (hazard ratio = 1.1 per year decrease; 95% CI, 1.0-1.2) and non-Caucasian skin type (hazard ratio = 2.0; 95% CI, 1.3-2.9) increased the likelihood of resolution. During follow-up, 38% of children with warts at baseline treated their warts: 18% used over-the-counter treatment only, 15% used a family physician-provided treatment only, and 5% used both. Children were more likely to initiate treatment if the warts measured at least 1 cm in diameter (odds ratio = 3.2; 95% CI, 1.9-5.3) and especially if parents reported that the warts caused inconvenience (odds ratio = 38; 95% CI, 16-90). One-half of primary schoolchildren with warts will be free of warts within 1 year. Young age and non-Caucasian skin type enhance resolution. Children with large or inconvenient warts are more likely to start treatment. These findings will be useful in the process of shared decision making with parents and children.

  8. Novel Treatment Approach for Deep Palmoplantar Warts Using Long-Pulsed 1064-nm Nd:YAG Laser and a Moisturizing Cream Without Prior Paring of the Wart Surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshami, Mohammad Ali; Mohana, Mona Jameel

    2016-10-01

    The present study aimed to assess the safety and efficacy of palmoplantar wart removal using long-pulsed 1064-nm Nd:YAG laser after application of a moisturizing cream. Previously described laser treatments for wart removal are associated with negative side effects and need to pare the warts before laser treatment. Two hundred forty patients (142 males, 98 females) were treated for 1-40 palmoplantar warts by long-pulsed 1064-nm Nd:YAG laser (spot size 4-6 mm, pulse duration 20 msec, fluence 200 J/cm(2)) after covering the wart surface with a thin film of a moisturizing cream. The endpoint was lesion graying or whitening with or without development of a hemorrhagic bulla beneath the treated wart. Color photographs were taken before and immediately after each laser session and at 1, 4, and 16 weeks after the last session. The overall clearance rate was 97%, with 90% of treated patients cured after one session, 4% after two, and 3% after three. Clearance rate after three laser sessions decreased linearly with the number of warts from 100% to 95%. Less accessible wart location in interdigital spaces also decreased the cure rate after three sessions from 100% to 95%. Additionally, warts became more difficult to eradicate as they aged. Remission lasted up to 6 years, and complications were mild and infrequent (17.5%). This novel method is effective in removing palmoplantar warts. It is easier, time-saving, and safer than other methods described in previous studies conducted with ablative or nonablative lasers.

  9. Subcutaneous intralesional Ksharodaka injection: A novel treatment for the management of Warts: A case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manohar S Gundeti

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Warts are generally managed using cryosurgery, keratolytic ointments, curettage and electrodessication. Warts, vis-a-vis Charmakila, in Ayurvedic classical texts are classified into different types depending on the dominance of dosha. Ayurveda prescribes oral medications, topical use of Kshara (alkaline ash of herbs, Agni (thermal cautery and Shastrakarma (surgery for removal of Charmakila. Use of topical Kshara in the form of powder, aqueous solution i.e. Ksharodaka and Ksharasutra (thread smeared with Kshara for warts has been reported. However, these methods necessitate multiple sittings and takea longer duration for removal of the warts. Herewith, we report a case series of different types of warts treated with intralesional infiltration of Apamarga Ksharodaka (AK, i.e. aqueous solution of Apamarga (Achyranthes aspera Kshara. We observed that all these warts took a minimum of 2-6 days to shed off, leaving minor scars. There were no adverse reactions reported in any of these cases.

  10. Subcutaneous intralesional Ksharodaka injection: A novel treatment for the management of Warts: A case series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundeti, Manohar S.; Reddy, R. Govind; Muralidhar, Jangle Vidya

    2014-01-01

    Warts are generally managed using cryosurgery, keratolytic ointments, curettage and electrodessication. Warts, vis-a-vis Charmakila, in Ayurvedic classical texts are classified into different types depending on the dominance of dosha. Ayurveda prescribes oral medications, topical use of Kshara (alkaline ash of herbs), Agni (thermal cautery) and Shastrakarma (surgery) for removal of Charmakila. Use of topical Kshara in the form of powder, aqueous solution i.e. Ksharodaka and Ksharasutra (thread smeared with Kshara) for warts has been reported. However, these methods necessitate multiple sittings and takea longer duration for removal of the warts. Herewith, we report a case series of different types of warts treated with intralesional infiltration of Apamarga Ksharodaka (AK), i.e. aqueous solution of Apamarga (Achyranthes aspera) Kshara. We observed that all these warts took a minimum of 2-6 days to shed off, leaving minor scars. There were no adverse reactions reported in any of these cases. PMID:25624698

  11. Association Between Smoking and Size of Anal Warts in HIV-infected Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luu, HN; Amirian, ES; Beasley, RP; Piller, L; Chan, W; Scheurer, ME

    2015-01-01

    While the association between smoking and HPV infection, cervical cancer, and anal cancer has been well studied, evidence on the association between cigarette smoking and anal warts is limited. The purpose of this study was to investigate if cigarette smoking status influences the size of anal warts over time in HIV-infected women in a sample of 976 HIV-infected women from the Women’s Interagency HIV Study (WIHS). A linear mixed model was used to determine the effect of smoking on anal wart size. Even though women who were currently smokers had larger anal warts at baseline and slower growth rate of anal wart size after each visit than women who were not current smokers, there was no association between size of anal wart and current smoking status over time. Further studies on the role of smoking and interaction between smoking and other risk factors, however, should be explored. PMID:23155099

  12. The Overlapped Triple Circle Pulse Technique with Nd:YAG Laser for Refractory Hand Warts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingol, Ugur Anil; Cömert, Asuman; Cinar, Can

    2015-06-01

    Inadvertent superficial treatment of hand warts causes recurrence, whereas aggressive treatment can lead to tissue defects resulting in hand dysfunction. This study aimed to determine the effectiveness of a novel laser treatment modality for recalcitrant hand warts. The study included 51 patients who were treated for 146 recalcitrant hand warts using 1064 nm long-pulsed Nd:YAG laser between 2011 and 2014. The laser treatment method is novel because each treated wart was aligned at the intersection point of the circles of 3 laser pulses per session. Among the 146 hand warts, 88.35% were successfully treated with one session and 100% of those that required a second treatment session were treated successfully, based on the 12 month follow-up examination. Long-pulsed Nd:YAG laser treatment was observed to be a safe, rapid, and effective method for treating recalcitrant hand warts.

  13. Subcutaneous intralesional Ksharodaka injection: A novel treatment for the management of Warts: A case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundeti, Manohar S; Reddy, R Govind; Muralidhar, Jangle Vidya

    2014-01-01

    Warts are generally managed using cryosurgery, keratolytic ointments, curettage and electrodessication. Warts, vis-a-vis Charmakila, in Ayurvedic classical texts are classified into different types depending on the dominance of dosha. Ayurveda prescribes oral medications, topical use of Kshara (alkaline ash of herbs), Agni (thermal cautery) and Shastrakarma (surgery) for removal of Charmakila. Use of topical Kshara in the form of powder, aqueous solution i.e. Ksharodaka and Ksharasutra (thread smeared with Kshara) for warts has been reported. However, these methods necessitate multiple sittings and takea longer duration for removal of the warts. Herewith, we report a case series of different types of warts treated with intralesional infiltration of Apamarga Ksharodaka (AK), i.e. aqueous solution of Apamarga (Achyranthes aspera) Kshara. We observed that all these warts took a minimum of 2-6 days to shed off, leaving minor scars. There were no adverse reactions reported in any of these cases.

  14. Intralesional immunotherapy for difficult to treat warts with Mycobacterium w vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Shilpa; Baveja, Sukriti

    2014-01-01

    Background: Immunotherapy is an evolving therapeutic modality for the treatment of warts. We conducted a study to assess the efficacy and safety of intralesional Mycobacterium w vaccine for the treatment of warts at sites that were difficult to treat. Materials and Methods: Thirty patients with at least one wart present on either the plantar surface of their feet, palms, volar aspect of their fingers, or periungual or subungual region, were treated with 0.1 ml of killed Mycobacterium w vaccine given intralesionally in a single wart, without any prior sensitisation dose. Thereafter, a single injection of 0.1 ml of vaccine was given at intervals of four weeks in a single wart till there was complete resolution of the warts or a maximum of 10 injections. Treatment was stopped if there was no response after three injections. The patients were followed up for at least six months. Results: Out of the 30 patients, 28 (93.33%) patients had complete resolution of their warts, both at the injected and distant sites. The mean (SD) time for complete clearance of warts was 43.71(32.82) days and the mean (SD) dose of vaccine that was required for complete clearance of warts was 0.186 ml (0.101). Four patients (14.28%) had a recurrence of warts. The treatment was well-tolerated and the side effects were reversible in the majority of the patients. Conclusion: In comparison to the earlier studies using Mycobacterium w vaccine for the treatment of warts, our study was different in the following aspects: No sensitisation dose was given, only a single wart was injected at a time and the duration between the period of injections was increased to four weeks. With all these changes we eliminated the complications due to the sensitisation dose and achieved good results. This study provides new insight into the dose and schedule of treatment of this evolving therapeutic modality. PMID:25722598

  15. A novel modification of the autoimplantation therapy for the treatment of multiple, recurrent and palmoplantar warts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K C Nischal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ideal treatment for warts should be effective, safe, have less morbidity and provide long-lasting immunity against human papilloma virus. This can optimally achieved by the stimulation of the immune system against the virus. The autoimplantation of warts, autowart injection and quadrivalent vaccines have been used for this purpose. Autoimplanatation is a simple technique where the subcutis deep wart tissue is harvested as a donor and implanted into the uninvolved skin. However, this led to two wounds, at donor and recipient sites. Aim: The aim was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of a novel modification of autoimplantation therapy in the treatment of multiple, recurrent and palmoplantar warts. Subjects and Methods: Thirty-three patients with multiple, recurrent and palmoplantar warts were enrolled. Instead of taking a bit of the wart tissue, the donor tissue was harvested by paring the wart. The pared tissue was implanted deep into the subcutis by stab incision done using the same surgical blade no. 11. The resolution of all warts within 3 months after the procedure was considered successful. Patients with complete clearance were followed up for 1 month for any recurrence. Results: Out of 35 patients, 27 patients were available for follow-up. A total of 20 (74.1% patients showed a complete clearance of warts within 3 months. Partial clearance was seen in 1 patient. Erythematous nodules developed at the site of implantation in 3 (11.1% patients. There was relapse in one patient. Conclusion: A modified technique of autoimplantation of warts employing the pared stratum corneum tissue from the wart is a simple, effective, less traumatic and rapid procedure in the treatment of multiple, recurrent and palmoplantar warts.

  16. [Anogenital warts: a clinical, pathological and virological study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mataix Díaz, J; Betlloch Mas, I; Pastor Tomás, N; Bañuls Roca, J; Martínez, M T

    2008-12-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the possible relationship between the presence of anogenital warts (AGW) in children and the sexual abuse as mode of transmission. Our series includes 8 patients with AGW who were treated in our hospital during the year 2007. A complete physical examination was carried out, including colposcopy or anoscopy, and samples were taken for histopathological examination and human papiloma virus (HPV) subtyping. We considered perinatal transmission as a possible route in two cases. Although sexual abuse was definitively confirmed in only one case, we observed some findings in four cases that led us to consider the possibility of sexual abuse. We did not consider the possibility of heteroinoculation or autoinoculation from common warts in any case. Our results have demonstrated the difficulty in assessing with certainty the source of HPV contamination in children with AGW.

  17. Warts in a cohort of Danish kidney transplanted patients: impact on quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachariae, Claus; Sand, Carsten; Hansen, Jesper Melchior; Sørensen, Søren Schwartz; Koch, Karen; Villumsen, John; Axelsen, Mads

    2012-11-01

    There are no published clinical studies evaluating the impact of warts on quality of life after transplantation. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of self-reported skin warts and skin cancer and their impact on quality of life in kidney transplanted patients, as measured with the Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI). Of 740 patients with a functioning renal allograft and were free of dialysis who were surveyed, 568 returned the questionnaires. Patients were asked about general health issues, with a focus on transplantation history, cutaneous warts and whether they had ever had cutaneous cancer. A total of 285 (52%) patients replied that they had warts, and these increased with time since last transplantation, with a p-value warts, 1 for patients with warts, and 2 for patients having warts and skin cancer. In conclusion, renal transplant recipients experience increasing numbers of warts and skin cancer over time, and having skin cancer impairs patients' quality of life to a greater degree than warts.

  18. Intralesional cidofovir in the treatment of cutaneous warts in a renal transplant patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blouin, Marie-Michèle; Cloutier, Richard; Noël, Réal

    2012-01-01

    Cutaneous warts are often recalcitrant to conventional therapy in immunocompromised patients. Cidofovir is a potent antiviral agent shown to have a broad spectrum of action against DNA virus, including human papillomavirus. To determine the efficacy of intralesional cidofovir in the treatment of florid warts in an immunocompromised renal transplant patient. The patient received seven injections of intralesional cidofovir at 4 week intervals in his numerous palmar warts. Based on our results, intralesional cidofovir is a promising therapeutic modality in the treatment of cutaneous warts in the renal transplant population.

  19. Pulsed Dye Laser Therapy in the Treatment of Warts: A Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veitch, David; Kravvas, Georgios; Al-Niaimi, Firas

    2017-04-01

    Warts or verrucae vulgaris are common cutaneous infections with currently no definitive curative treatments available. To determine the efficacy of pulsed dye laser (PDL) in the treatment of warts. A literature search was performed using the PubMed and MEDLINE databases. A search using {(Wart[s], verruca or condylomata)} AND [(Pulsed dye laser)] was used. Forty-four articles were identified as relevant to this review. Simple warts were very responsive to PDL, being treated successfully in over 95% of patients. Facial and anogenital warts also demonstrated excellent outcomes. Recalcitrant warts, displayed significant variability in their response, ranging between 50% and 100% across all articles. The response rates seen in peripheral warts (involving the hands and feet) were also very variable, ranging between 48% and 95%. Recurrence rates at 4 months of follow-up were documented as 0% to 15%. Complications have been described as very few and rare, the main ones being topical discomfort and erythema. Pulsed dye laser is a safe and effective modality in the treatment of warts that can be applied to most body parts. Cost and availability remain a limitation to the use of PDL; however, this modality can be used when other more traditional and accessible treatments have failed.

  20. Impact of genital warts on emotional and sexual well-being differs by gender.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vriend, Henrike J; Nieuwkerk, Pythia T; van der Sande, Marianne A B

    2014-11-01

    To assess gender-specific impact of genital warts on health-related quality of life (HRQoL), and to explore to what extent sexual characteristics and clinical symptoms influenced the impact on emotional and sexual well-being of both sexes. We conducted a survey of sexual and clinical characteristics from persons diagnosed with genital warts at STI clinics. HRQoL was measured using two measurement tools: 1) the generic EQ-5D; and 2) the genital warts-specific CECA-10 including an emotional well-being and a sexual activity dimension. The EQ-5D scores were compared with scores of the general population. Descriptive analyses were used to explore characteristics associated with HRQoL scores stratified for gender. The HRQoL-measurement tools showed that genital warts have especially an emotional impact. The impact of genital warts on HRQoL was greater for women than for men. In addition, the CECA-10 showed that in women the impact of genital warts on sexual activity was influenced by age, relationship status and number of warts. No related factors were seen in men. Genital warts have a greater impact on women than on men. In women, sexual and clinical factors influenced the impact of genital warts on well-being, whereas in men no such factors were found.

  1. Vestibular papillomatosis: a benign condition mimicking genital warts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonder, Margaret A; Hunter-Yates, Jennifer; Lawrence, W Dwayne; Telang, Gladys H

    2012-12-01

    Vestibular papillomatosis (VP) is a benign condition of the female genitalia that may be mistaken for condyloma acuminatum (genital warts). In contrast to condylomata, lesions of VP each grow from a distinct mucosal insertion; match the color of the surrounding mucosa; and are symmetrically distributed, limited to the inner labia minora and vaginal introitus. Recognition of this entity will help to prevent unnecessary stress, testing, and discomfort.

  2. An expert system for selecting wart treatment method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khozeimeh, Fahime; Alizadehsani, Roohallah; Roshanzamir, Mohamad; Khosravi, Abbas; Layegh, Pouran; Nahavandi, Saeid

    2017-02-01

    As benign tumors, warts are made through the mediation of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) and may grow on all parts of body, especially hands and feet. There are several treatment methods for this illness. However, none of them can heal all patients. Consequently, physicians are looking for more effective and customized treatments for each patient. They are endeavoring to discover which treatments have better impacts on a particular patient. The aim of this study is to identify the appropriate treatment for two common types of warts (plantar and common) and to predict the responses of two of the best methods (immunotherapy and cryotherapy) to the treatment. As an original work, the study was conducted on 180 patients, with plantar and common warts, who had referred to the dermatology clinic of Ghaem Hospital, Mashhad, Iran. In this study, 90 patients were treated by cryotherapy method with liquid nitrogen and 90 patients with immunotherapy method. The selection of the treatment method was made randomly. A fuzzy logic rule-based system was proposed and implemented to predict the responses to the treatment method. It was observed that the prediction accuracy of immunotherapy and cryotherapy methods was 83.33% and 80.7%, respectively. According to the results obtained, the benefits of this expert system are multifold: assisting physicians in selecting the best treatment method, saving time for patients, reducing the treatment cost, and improving the quality of treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Pulsed dye laser treatment for facial flat warts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grillo, E; Boixeda, P; Ballester, A; Miguel-Morrondo, A; Truchuelo, T; Jaén, P

    2014-01-01

    The facial flat wart is not only a contagious viral disease, but also a cause of a distressing cosmetic problem. Although there are many therapeutic options, including salicylic acid, imiquimod, cryotherapy, retinoids, intralesional immunotherapy, and topical 5-aminolevulinic acid photodynamic therapy among others, no monotherapy has been proved to achieve complete remission in every case. Treatment with pulsed dye laser (PDL) seems to be a promising therapeutic option. To assess the efficacy and safety of PDL in a series of patients with viral flat warts on the face, in this prospective study, 32 patients were treated with PDL at 595-nm wavelength, a laser energy density of 9 or 14 J/cm(2) with a spot size of 7 or 5 mm, respectively, with air cooling and a pulse duration of 0.5 millisecond. A complete response was noted in 14 patients (44%), and an excellent response was observed in 18 patients (56%) with 1-year follow-up, with only four recurrences. No significant side effects were reported except intense transitory purpuric response. We consider that PDL is a good option of treatment for flat warts on the face due to its good clinical results, fast response, and low incidence of side effects. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. INTRALESIONAL MEASLES, MUMPS AND RUBELLA (MMR VACCINE-AN EFFECTIVE THERAPEUTIC TOOL IN THE TREATMENT OF WART

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raju

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Warts are common cutaneous viral infection. Various therapeutic modalities have been using in treatment of wart, but none of them are standardised. Immunotherapy is new current approach in the treatment of wart. AIMS: To know the efficacy and safety profile of Measles Mumps Rubella (MMR Vaccine in the treatment of wart. METHODS: MMR vaccine was injected into a largest single wart intralesionally and subsequent injections given every 2 weeks apart for about 3 to 5 times. Every month followup of patients was done to know the clearance of wart. RESULTS: Complete remission of warts seen in 70.4% of patients, partial remission seen in 22.2% and no response was seen in 7.4% of patients. No serious adverse side effects were seen in the current study. CONCLUSION: MMR vaccine can be considered as a safe, effective, inexpensive intralesional immunotherapeutic modality in the treatment of wart.

  5. Cryotherapy versus salicylic acid for the treatment of plantar warts (verrucae): a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cockayne, Sarah; Hewitt, Catherine; Hicks, Kate; Jayakody, Shalmini; Kang'ombe, Arthur Ricky; Stamuli, Eugena; Turner, Gwen; Thomas, Kim; Curran, Mike; Denby, Gary; Hashmi, Farina; McIntosh, Caroline; McLarnon, Nichola; Torgerson, David; Watt, Ian

    2011-06-07

    To compare the clinical effectiveness of cryotherapy versus salicylic acid for the treatment of plantar warts. A multicentre, open, two arm randomised controlled trial. University podiatry school clinics, NHS podiatry clinics, and primary care in England, Scotland, and Ireland. 240 patients aged 12 years and over, with a plantar wart that in the opinion of the healthcare professional was suitable for treatment with both cryotherapy and salicylic acid. Cryotherapy with liquid nitrogen delivered by a healthcare professional, up to four treatments two to three weeks apart. Patient self treatment with 50% salicylic acid (Verrugon) daily up to a maximum of eight weeks. Complete clearance of all plantar warts at 12 weeks. Secondary outcomes were (a) complete clearance of all plantar warts at 12 weeks controlling for age, whether the wart had been treated previously, and type of wart, (b) patient self reported clearance of plantar warts at six months, (c) time to clearance of plantar wart, (d) number of plantar warts at 12 weeks, and (e) patient satisfaction with the treatment. There was no evidence of a difference between the salicylic acid and cryotherapy groups in the proportions of participants with complete clearance of all plantar warts at 12 weeks (17/119 (14%) v 15/110 (14%), difference 0.65% (95% CI -8.33 to 9.63), P=0.89). The results did not change when the analysis was repeated but with adjustment for age, whether the wart had been treated previously, and type of plantar wart or for patients' preferences at baseline. There was no evidence of a difference between the salicylic acid and cryotherapy groups in self reported clearance of plantar warts at six months (29/95 (31%) v 33/98 (34%), difference -3.15% (-16.31 to 10.02), P=0.64) or in time to clearance (hazard ratio 0.80 (95% CI 0.51 to 1.25), P=0.33). There was also no evidence of a difference in the number of plantar warts at 12 weeks (incident rate ratio 1.08 (0.81 to 1.43), P=0.62). Salicylic acid and

  6. HPV type in plantar warts influences natural course and treatment response: Secondary analysis of a randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruggink, S.C.; Gussekloo, J.; Koning, M.N. de; Feltkamp, M.C.; Bavinck, J.N.; Quint, W.G.V.; Assendelft, W.J.J.; Eekhof, J.A.H.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cryotherapy is effective for common warts, but for plantar warts available treatments often fail. OBJECTIVES: Within a pragmatic randomised controlled trial, we examined whether subgroups of common and plantar warts have a favourable natural course or response to treatment based on

  7. Intralesional bleomycin in the treatment of cutaneous warts: A randomized clinical trial comparing it with cryotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhar S

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Though not in regular practice, intralesional (IL bleomycin has been used for the treatment of warts since the 1970s and on the other hand, till now cryotherapy is quite regularly used to treat warts. Aim: Our aim was to assess the evidence for the efficacy of IL bleomycin, in comparison with a control group of similar sample receiving cryotherapy, in the treatment of cutaneous warts. Methods: Patients were randomized using computer-generated codes to receive either cryotherapy (double freeze-thaw cycle or IL bleomycin (0.1% solution with concurrent anesthesia for a maximum of four treatments 3 weeks apart and a maximum of five warts treated in each visit for both groups. Patients had their warts measured at base-line and with each return visit including a post treatment follow-up that was 8 weeks apart from last treatment taken. Results: Of the 73 patients completing the study, 39 (53% were treated with IL bleomycin and 34 (47% were treated with cryotherapy. Out of 155 treated warts, 87 (56% were treated with IL beomycin and 68 (44% were treated with cryotherapy. The clearance rates in context of number of patients and number of warts were 94.9% and 97% for bleomycin and 76.5% and 82% for cryotherapy respectively ( P < 0.05 by x 2 analysis and RR = 7.67. Conclusion: IL bleomycin injection was significantly more effective than cryotherapy for treatment of cutaneous wart.

  8. Treatment of recalcitrant warts with Bacillus Calmette-Guérin: a promising new approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nofal, Ahmad; Yosef, Ayman; Salah, Eman

    2013-01-01

    Recalcitrant warts represent a therapeutic challenge for both patients and physicians. Recently, intralesional immunotherapy by different antigens has been proved effective in the treatment of different types of warts. We describe a case of a 48-year-old male who presented with troublesome huge common wart on the left little toe of 5 years duration and not responding to many lines of therapy. Nearby and distant common and plantar warts have also been observed. Intralesional Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine was injected into the huge wart of the little toe at 2-week intervals for five sessions. Follow-up was made every month for 6 months. A gradual decrease in the size of the injected wart was observed until reaching complete clearance by the end of the fifth session. Untreated nearby common and distant warts disappeared completely by the end of the third session. BCG injection was associated with erythema and edema with or without pustules, at the site of injection. A flu-like illness that rapidly subsided within 3 days was also observed with each injection. No recurrence was observed after the 6-month follow-up period. Intralesional immunotherapy with BCG vaccine seems to be a promising effective and safe treatment modality for recalcitrant warts. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Incidence of genital warts among the Hong Kong general adult population

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background The objective of this study is to estimate the incidence of genital warts in Hong Kong and explore a way to establish a surveillance system for genital warts among the Hong Kong general population. Methods A total of 170 private doctors and all doctors working in the 5 local Social Hygiene Clinics (SHC) participated in this study. During the 14-day data collection period (January 5 through18, 2009), the participating doctors filled out a log-form on a daily basis to record the number of patients with genital warts. The total number of new cases of genital warts presented to private and public doctors in Hong Kong was projected using the stratification sampling method. Results A total of 721 (0.94%) adults presented with genital warts to the participating doctors during the two-week study period, amongst them 73 (10.1%) were new cases. The projected number of new cases of genital warts among Hong Kong adults was 442 (297 male and 144 female) during the study period. The incidence of genital warts in Hong Kong was estimated to be 203.7 per 100,000 person-years (respectively 292.2 and 124.9 per 100,000 person-years for males and females). Conclusions The incidence of genital warts is high among adults in Hong Kong. The study demonstrates the importance of collecting surveillance data from both private and public sectors. PMID:20849578

  10. Photodynamic therapy with 5-aminolaevulinic acid or placebo for recalcitrant foot and hand warts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stender, I M; Na, R; Fogh, H

    2000-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) with topical 5-aminolaevulinic acid (ALA) followed by irradiation with incoherent light (ALA-PDT) for recalcitrant warts have had beneficial results. Therefore, we undertook a randomised, parallel, double-blind clinical trial of ALA-PDT versus placeboPDT for recalcitrant...... foot and hand warts....

  11. Intralesional Vitamin D Injection May Be an Effective Treatment Option for Warts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aktaş, Habibullah; Ergin, Can; Demir, Betül; Ekiz, Özlem

    2016-01-01

    Plantar warts are typically resistant to treatment. In recent years, treatments have included administration of intralesional tuberculin; measles, mumps, rubella vaccine; and Candida albicans antigen immunotherapy. To the best of our knowledge, there are no reports of intralesional vitamin D administration for the treatment of warts. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of intralesional vitamin D treatment for plantar warts. Twenty patients with single or multiple plantar warts were included in this study. Vitamin D(3) (0.2 mL, 7.5 mg/mL) was injected into the base of the warts after prilocaine (0.1 mL, 20 mg/mL) injection. A maximum of 5 warts were treated in 1 session, with at maximum 2 injections performed at 4-week intervals. In total, 16 of 20 patients (80%) showed complete resolution of warts, and 1 patient showed partial resolution. Three patients failed to show any response. No recurrence or serious adverse effects were observed. Intralesional vitamin D(3) may be an effective treatment option for warts. © The Author(s) 2015.

  12. Prevalence and Correlates of Genital Warts in Kenyan Female Sex Workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavanaugh, Barbara E.; Odem-Davis, Katherine; Jaoko, Walter; Estambale, Benson; Kiarie, James N.; Masese, Linnet N.; Deya, Ruth; Manhart, Lisa E.; Graham, Susan M.; McClelland, R. Scott

    2012-01-01

    Background Our goal in the present study was to investigate the prevalence and correlates of genital warts in a population of female sex workers in Mombasa, Kenya. Because of the high prevalence of HIV-1 in this population, we were particularly interested in the association between HIV-1 infection and genital warts. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study of the prevalence and correlates of genital warts among high-risk women in Mombasa, Kenya. Between 2001 and 2007, 1182 women were enrolled, of whom 613 (51.4%) were HIV-1-seropositive. Chi square tests and logistic regression were used to examine the associations between genital warts and potential correlates. Results Genital warts were identified on clinical examination in 27 (2.3%) women. Women who were HIV-1-seropositive were nearly 8 times as likely to have genital warts compared to HIV-1-seronegative women (OR 7.69, 95% CI 2.30–25.6). Conclusion Understanding the prevalence and correlates of genital warts will help to determine whether coverage for the wart-inducing subtypes 6 and 11 in an HPV vaccine is an important consideration in resource-limited countries. PMID:23060082

  13. Immunotherapy with Intralesional Candida Albicans Antigen in Resistant or Recurrent Warts: A Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majid, Imran; Imran, Saher

    2013-01-01

    Background: Warts are sometimes resistant or they tend to recur after every possible destructive therapy. Immunotherapy with skin-test antigens has been used as a viable therapeutic option in such recalcitrant cases. Aim: The aim of the study was to evaluate the response of resistant or recurrent warts to intralesional Candida albicans antigen immunotherapy. Materials and Methods: A total of 40 patients with resistant or recurrent warts who showed a positive test reaction to C. albicans antigen were given intralesional injections of purified C. albicans antigen solution in a single wart at 3-weekly intervals for a total of three doses. The patients were monitored for resolution of the injected wart as well as other untreated warts. The patients who responded positively were then followed up for any relapses over the next 6 months. Adverse events, if any, were also documented. Results: Of the 40 patients enrolled in the study, 34 completed the total treatment protocol of three injections and 6 months of follow-up. In these 34 patients, 19 (56%) showed a complete resolution of warts at all places on the body. In addition, two patients (6%) showed a partial or complete resolution of the treated wart, but there was no effect on the untreated warts. Thirteenpatients (38%) failed to show any response to the treatment regimen. In all patients showing resolution of all the warts, there were no relapses at any site over the next 6 months of follow-up. The most common adverse effect seen was pain during the intralesional injection. Conclusions: Intralesional Candida immunotherapy seems to be an effective treatment option in more than half of the patients who fail to show a positive response to destructive modes of treatment or in whom there are multiple recurrences. Limitations: The small sample size and lack of control group are the main limitations of the study. PMID:24082180

  14. Immunotherapy with intralesional Candida albicans antigen in resistant or recurrent warts: A study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imran Majid

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Warts are sometimes resistant or they tend to recur after every possible destructive therapy. Immunotherapy with skin-test antigens has been used as a viable therapeutic option in such recalcitrant cases. Aim: The aim of the study was to evaluate the response of resistant or recurrent warts to intralesional Candida albicans antigen immunotherapy. Materials and Methods: A total of 40 patients with resistant or recurrent warts who showed a positive test reaction to C. albicans antigen were given intralesional injections of purified C. albicans antigen solution in a single wart at 3-weekly intervals for a total of three doses. The patients were monitored for resolution of the injected wart as well as other untreated warts. The patients who responded positively were then followed up for any relapses over the next 6 months. Adverse events, if any, were also documented. Results: Of the 40 patients enrolled in the study, 34 completed the total treatment protocol of three injections and 6 months of follow-up. In these 34 patients, 19 (56% showed a complete resolution of warts at all places on the body. In addition, two patients (6% showed a partial or complete resolution of the treated wart, but there was no effect on the untreated warts. Thirteenpatients (38% failed to show any response to the treatment regimen. In all patients showing resolution of all the warts, there were no relapses at any site over the next 6 months of follow-up. The most common adverse effect seen was pain during the intralesional injection. Conclusions: Intralesional Candida immunotherapy seems to be an effective treatment option in more than half of the patients who fail to show a positive response to destructive modes of treatment or in whom there are multiple recurrences. Limitations: The small sample size and lack of control group are the main limitations of the study.

  15. Ratio of anogenital warts between different anatomical sites in homosexual and heterosexual individuals in Australia, 2002-2013: implications for susceptibility of different anatomical sites to genital warts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, E P F; Lin, A C; Read, T R H; Bradshaw, C S; Chen, M Y; Fairley, C K

    2015-05-01

    There is little known regarding the transmissibility of human papillomavirus (HPV) between different sites in men who have sex with men (MSM) and heterosexual individuals. We conducted a retrospective analysis investigating all new patients attending the Melbourne Sexual Health Centre in Australia between 2002 and 2013. We describe the prevalence and ratio of the first episode of anogenital warts in MSM and heterosexual males and females. The proportion of new MSM clients with anal and penile warts was 4·0% (362/8978) and 1·6% (141/8978), respectively; which gave an anal-to-penile wart ratio of 1:2·6. About 13·7% (1656/12112) of heterosexual males had penile warts and 10·0% (1121/11166) of females had vulval warts, which yielded a penile-to-vulval wart ratio of 1:0·7. Penile-anal transmission has a higher ratio than penile-vulval transmission, suggesting that the anal epithelium may be more susceptible to HPV infection than the vulval epithelium in females; these ratios are important in modelling the control of HPV in MSM.

  16. Two-year experience of using the measles, mumps and rubella vaccine as intralesional immunotherapy for warts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, C H; Choi, H; Song, S H; Kim, M S; Shin, B S

    2014-07-01

    The currently available treatments for warts, including cryosurgery, laser surgery, electrosurgery, and topical keratolytic applications, are often very painful and can induce disfiguring scars. Recently, intralesional immunotherapy with skin test antigens and vaccines has been shown to be effective in the management of warts. To evaluate the efficacy of a new intralesional immunotherapy for warts, using the measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccine. A retrospective study was performed, and we enrolled 136 patients with various types of warts into the study, which was for a duration of 2 years. Patients were treated for a total of six times at 2-week intervals. The treatment response was classified as one of three levels, based on reduction in the size and number of warts, and patients with complete response (CR) were checked for recurrence. Clinical evaluations were carried out using photographs and medical records. Over half (51.5%) of patients experienced > 50% reduction in the size and number of warts, and 46.7% who had distant warts (in different locations) showed good response. Common warts showed significantly higher treatment response than other types of warts (P warts after 6 months. We suggest that intralesional immunotherapy with MMR vaccine is a tolerable and effective method for patients who are sensitive to pain, concerned about side effects, or have common warts. Treatment response is improved by increasing the number of injections. © 2014 British Association of Dermatologists.

  17. Anogenital warts in children: sexual abuse or unintentional contamination?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesus Lisieux Eyer de

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Anogenital warts (AGW were recently recognized in children, and their significance as an index of childhood sexual abuse is controversial. We report our transdisciplinary approach (including a pediatric surgeon, psychologist, social worker, ethics expert, and occasionally law enforcement agents and its results in a group of 17 children with AGW treated at the public pediatric referral hospital in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, during a 3-year period (1996-1999. All children were treated by electrocauterization of the warts, tested for other STDs, and submitted to perineal examination under anesthesia. Families received psycho-social counseling as necessary and cases were referred to child protection and law enforcement agents when indicated according to Brazilian legislation. We identified a high incidence of sexual abuse (8 children, 5/7 > 5 years old, with 3 patients inconclusive as to sexual abuse and 7 cases of perinatal transmission (5/8 5 years of age. However, strong support and a transdisciplinary approach to the children and their families is necessary to identify it.

  18. Evolving role of immunotherapy in the treatment of refractory warts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thappa, Devinder M; Chiramel, Minu J

    2016-01-01

    Cutaneous and genital warts are common dermatological conditions caused by the human papilloma virus (HPV). Although it is a benign condition, it causes disfigurement, has a tendency to koebnerize, and can be transmitted to others. This makes adequate and timely treatment important. There are several conventional treatments available with variable response. Topical and systemic immunotherapy has now found a significant place in the treatment of warts because of its nondestructive action, ease of use, and promising results. Through this review, we would like to present a brief overview of the various immunotherapeutic agents used. These include more established agents such as imiquimod, Mycobacterium w vaccine, bacillus Calmette-Guérin vaccine, measles, mumps, and rubella vaccine, Candida antigen, trichophyton antigen, tuberculin, zinc, cimetidine, levamisole, HPV vaccine, and autoimplantation therapy. Other agents such as contact immunotherapy which is sparsely used now than before and newer agents such as Corynebacterium parvum, sinecatechins, echinacea, propolis, glycyrrizinic acid, and Vitamin D have also been discussed. The mechanism of action of these agents, along with their dosage, mode of administration, duration of use, expected outcomes and comparative efficacy, evidence for their use, and expected side effects, if any, are reviewed. PMID:27730031

  19. Oral zinc sulfate treatment for viral warts: an open-label study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mun, Je-Ho; Kim, Su-Han; Jung, Do-Sang; Ko, Hyun-Chang; Kim, Byung-Soo; Kwon, Kyung-Sool; Kim, Moon-Bum

    2011-06-01

    Viral warts, which are caused by the human papilloma virus, are a common problem in dermatology. Various modalities have been used to treat warts, but none are uniformly effective or directly antiviral. Recent studies show that oral zinc sulfate could be effective in the treatment of viral warts. Thirty-one patients with multiple, non-genital viral warts were recruited in this open-label clinical study. The patients were treated with oral zinc sulfate (10 mg/kg to a maximum dose of 600 mg/day) for 2 months and followed up with assessments for the resolution of their warts and for any evidence of recurrence after treatment. Among the 31 patients, 18 patients showed low serum zinc levels (58%). Of 26 patients who completed the study (84%), 13 (50%) showed complete resolution of their warts after 2 months of treatment. Complete responders remained free of lesions at 6-month follow-up. No serious side-effects were reported apart from nausea (16%), mild gastric pain (3%) and itching sensation (3%). Oral zinc sulfate was found to be a good option in the treatment of viral warts, as it was safe and effective without important side-effects. © 2010 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  20. Photodynamic therapy can improve warts' discomfort in renal transplant patients prospective multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparsa, Agnès; Blaise, Sophie; Tack, Brigitte; Dalmay, François; Leroy, Dominique; Bonnetblanc, Jean-Marie; Béani, Jean-Claude; Bédane, Christophe

    2012-01-01

    Many studies have been conducted showing that aminolevulinic acid (ALA)-photodynamic therapy (PDT) can be an alternative treatment for recalcitrant warts. Recently, we performed a study evaluating methyl-aminolevulinic acid (MAL)-PDT for the treatment of hand warts in a population of renal transplant patients. Two symmetrical targets were selected on each hand and randomly assigned to chemical keratolytic treatment followed by three cycles of ALA-PDT (75 J cm(-2) red light). Patients were evaluated after 3 months and a second run of PDT was performed if the total area and number of warts decreased less than 50%, with evaluation every 3 months for 1 year. Twenty patients were included and 16 were evaluable (9 M, 7 F). After 6 months the reduction of warts' area was 48.4% on the treated side versus 18.4% in the control area (P = 0.021). The decrease in the total number of warts was 41%versus 19.4% (P = NS). The global tolerance of the treatment was good with acceptable pain during irradiation. These results suggest that ALA-PDT is a safe and efficient treatment for transplanted patient warts. The improvement between treated and control zone is 20% due to the decrease in untreated warts' area and number. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Photochemistry and Photobiology © 2012 The American Society of Photobiology.

  1. Treatment of common warts with the immune stimulant Propionium bacterium parvum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasser, Nilton

    2012-01-01

    Warts are epithelial proliferations in the skin and mucous membrane caused by various types of HPV. They can decrease spontaneously or increase in size and number according to the patient's immune status. The Propionium bacterium parvum is a strong immune stimulant and immune modulator and has important effects in the immune system and it is able to produce antibodies in the skin. To show the efficacy of the Propionium bacterium parvum in saline solution in the treatment of skin warts. A randomized double-blind study. Twenty patients with multiple warts were divided into two groups: one received 0,1 ml intradermal injection of placebo solution in just one of the warts and the other received 0,1 ml of saline solution of Propionium bacterium parvum, one dose a month, for 3 to 5 months. Among the 20 patients who participated in the study, ten received the placebo and ten received the saline solution with Propionium bacterium parvum. In 9 patients treated with the Propionium bacterium parvum solution the warts disappeared without scars and in 1 patient it decreased in size. In 9 patients who received the placebo no change to the warts was observed and in 1 it decreased in size. The immune modulator and immune stimulant Propionium bacterium parvum produced antibodies in the skin which destroyed the warts without scars, with statistically significant results (Pwarts.

  2. Intralesional immunotherapy with killed Mycobacterium indicus pranii vaccine for the treatment of extensive cutaneous warts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Saurabh; Chouhan, Kavish; Gupta, Somesh

    2014-01-01

    Multiple cutaneous warts in adults are often symptomatic, cosmetically disabling, and difficult to treat. Killed Mycobacterium indicus pranii (previously known as Mycobacterium w, popularly known as Mw) vaccine has earlier been investigated in genital warts with encouraging results. To evaluate the efficacy and safety profile of intralesional injected killed Mw vaccine for the treatment of extensive extragenital cutaneous warts. In this study, a retrospective analysis of medical records was performed in patients with cutaneous warts treated with intralesional Mw vaccine. Only patients with more than 5 extra-genital warts, involving at least two body sites and which had not shown any signs of spontaneous regression over 6 months were treated with the vaccine. Forty four patients were treated with intralesional Mw vaccine. The mean number of warts was 41.5±25.7 with a disease duration of 3.1±2.5 years. Complete clearance was achieved in 24 (54.5%) patients with a mean of 3.4±1.1 intralesional injections. Cosmetically acceptable response to therapy (>75% clearance) was achieved in 37 (84.1%) patients. Wart response at distant sites was seen in 38 (86.3%) patients. Thirty-six patients (81.8%) experienced mild therapy-related side effects. Eighteen patients with complete response were followed up for 5.27±1.7 months and none had recurrence of lesions. Killed Mw vaccine is safe and effective in the treatment of extensive cutaneous warts. Larger, preferably randomized controlled trials are needed to assess its efficacy vis a vis standard therapies for warts.

  3. Treatment of recalcitrant warts with intralesional measles, mumps, and rubella vaccine: a promising approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nofal, Ahmad; Nofal, Eman; Yosef, Ayman; Nofal, Hager

    2015-06-01

    Recalcitrant warts represent a frustrating challenge for both patients and physicians. Although many destructive and immunotherapeutic modalities are available for the treatment of warts, an ideal, universally effective approach has not been explored to date. Recently, intralesional antigen immunotherapy has shown promising efficacy in the treatment of warts. The aim of the study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of intralesional measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccine in the treatment of recalcitrant warts. The study included 70 adult patients with multiple recalcitrant extragenital warts of different sizes and durations, with or without distant warts. They were directly injected, without a pre-sensitization skin test, with 0.3 intralesional MMR vaccine into the largest wart at 2-week intervals until complete clearance or for a maximum of five treatments. Follow-up was made every month for six months to detect any recurrence. Sixty-five patients, 35 men and 30 women, completed the study, and five patients discontinued for various reasons. Complete clearance of the lesions was observed in 41 patients (63%), partial response in 15 patients (23%), and no response in nine patients (14%). Complete response was demonstrated in 74.5% of those presenting with distant warts. Side effects were mild and insignificant in the form of pain during injection, itching, erythema, and edema at the site of injection and flu-like symptoms. Recurrence was detected in two patients only. Intralesional immunotherapy by MMR vaccine is a promising, effective, and safe treatment modality for recalcitrant warts. © 2014 The International Society of Dermatology.

  4. The quality of life of patients with genital warts: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larsen Helle K

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genital warts, which are caused by infection with human papillomavirus (HPV, are one of the most common sexually transmitted diseases in Europe. Although genital warts are commonly perceived as a non-serious condition, treatment is often long, of varying effectiveness and the recurrence rate is high. Very few studies have been performed on the personal consequences of genital warts. The aim of this qualitative study, set in Denmark, was to examine the ways in which genital warts may affect patients' quality of life. Methods To obtain an in-depth understanding of patients' perceptions of genital warts, we used qualitative focus-group interviews with five men and five women aged between 18 and 30 years who had genital warts. The interview guide was based on a literature review that identified important issues and questions. The data were analysed using a medical anthropological approach. Results Patients' experiences were related to cultural conceptions of venereal diseases and the respective identities and sexuality of the sexes. The disease had negative psychological and social effects both for men and for women and it affected their sex and love lives, in particular. The psychological burden of the disease was increased by the uncertain timeline and the varying effectiveness of treatment. We identified a need for more patient information about the disease and its psycho-sexual aspects. Conclusions The men and women participating in this study considered their quality of life to be significantly lowered because of genital warts. The experiences described by the participants give insights that may be valuable in treatment and counselling. The quadrivalent HPV vaccine that has now been added to the childhood vaccination programme for girls in Denmark for the prevention of cervical cancer can also prevent 90% of cases of genital warts. Our results suggest that HPV vaccination could considerably reduce the largely unacknowledged

  5. Cantharidin-podophylotoxin-salicylic acid versus cryotherapy in the treatment of plantar warts: a randomized prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaçar, N; Taşlı, L; Korkmaz, S; Ergin, S; Erdoğan, B Ş

    2012-07-01

    Plantar warts are refractory to any form of treatment. High cure rates have been reported with a topical proprietary formulation consisting of 1% cantharidin, 5% podophyllotoxin and 30% salicylic acid (CPS). However, no data exists comparing the efficacy of this formulation with another treatment. Cryotherapy is a method that is also widely used in the treatment of plantar warts. Likewise, there is no evidence that it is more effective than any topical treatment. We aim to compare the efficacy of topical CPS and cryotherapy in the treatment of plantar warts. Patients with plantar warts were consecutively treated with either cryotherapy or topical CPS. Both treatments were performed every 2 weeks for up to five sessions. In patients without complete clearance, the therapy was switched to the other treatment option. Twenty-six patients with a total of 134 warts were included. Fourteen patients were completely cleared of their warts with topical CPS, whereas only in five of 12 patients (41.7%) warts were completely cleared with cryotherapy (P=0.001). In seven patients without complete clearance, the therapy was switched to CPS. Four of these patients missed the follow-up. While the two of the remaining three patients were cleared of their warts, one patient's warts still failed to clear. Topical CPS is more effective than cryotherapy in the treatment of plantar warts. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology © 2011 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  6. HPV type in plantar warts influences natural course and treatment response: secondary analysis of a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruggink, Sjoerd C; Gussekloo, Jacobijn; de Koning, Maurits N C; Feltkamp, Mariet C W; Bavinck, Jan Nico Bouwes; Quint, Wim G V; Assendelft, Willem J J; Eekhof, Just A H

    2013-07-01

    Cryotherapy is effective for common warts, but for plantar warts available treatments often fail. Within a pragmatic randomised controlled trial, we examined whether subgroups of common and plantar warts have a favourable natural course or response to treatment based on wart-associated HPV type. Consecutive patients with new common or plantar warts were recruited in 30 Dutch family practices. Patients (n=250) were randomly allocated to liquid-nitrogen cryotherapy, 40% salicylic acid self-application, or wait-and-see policy. Before treatment, swabs were taken from all separate warts and analysed by a broad spectrum HPV genotyping assay. At 13 weeks, cure rates with 95% confidence intervals of common and plantar warts on intention to treat basis were compared between treatment arms for the different wart-associated HPV types. In total, 7% of swabs tested negative for HPV DNA and 16% contained multiple types, leaving 278 of 371 common swabs (75%) and 299 of 373 plantar swabs (80%) with a single type for analysis. After wait-and-see policy, cure rates were 2/70 (3%, 95% confidence interval 1-10) for HPV 2/27/57-associated common warts, 4/58 (7%, 3-16) for HPV 2/27/57-associated plantar warts, and 21/36 (58%, 42-73) for HPV 1-associated plantar warts. After cryotherapy, cure rates were 30/44 (68%, 53-80), 6/56 (11%, 5-21), and 15/23 (65%, 45-81); after salicylic acid 16/87 (18%, 12-28), 15/60 (25%, 16-37), and 24/26 (92%, 76-98), respectively. HPV type influenced the natural course and response to treatment for plantar warts. HPV testing potentially optimises wart treatment in primary care. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Bleomycin-Coated Microneedles for Treatment of Warts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Han Sol; Ryu, Ha Ryeong; Roh, Joo Young; Park, Jung-Hwan

    2017-01-01

    Bleomycin-coated microneedles were devised for delivery of bleomycin into the sub-epidermal skin layer for the treatment of warts in order to provide patient convenience and reduce patient pain and fear. Poly-lactic-acid (L-PLA) microneedles were fabricated by a molding process and then the tips were partially coated using a dip-coating method based on a microstructure well. The mechanical strength of the pre-coated polymer microneedles was observed by inserting them in porcine foot and back skin. The holes were stained with trypan blue and the mechanical failure of the microneedles was investigated using a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The initial distribution of a model drug using microneedles was compared with distribution by intralesional injection. The amount of drug leaked below the skin using microneedles was measured and compared with that leaked by intralesional injection. The pharmacokinetic properties of bleomycin-coated microneedles were studied. The bleomycin remaining on the coated microneedles after the in vivo pharmacokinetic study was measured. Bleomycin was successfully coated on the tips of L-PLA microneedles. More than 80% of the bleomycin dissolved into the skin in vitro within 15 min. L-PLA microneedles possessed sufficient mechanical strength to penetrate skin with a thick stratum corneum. Compared to intralesional injection, tip-coated microneedles were more effective in distributing a drug into the sub-epidermal skin layer. A pharmacokinetic study of bleomycin-coated microneedles showed 50 min of Tmax. Bleomycin-coated microneedles appeared to be a convenient and painless alternative to conventional intralesional injection of bleomycin. The microneedles delivered bleomycin into the targeted dermal layer regardless of body site. Bleomycin-coated microneedles therefore provide a suitable method for the treatment of warts.

  8. Human papillomavirus DNA from warts for typing by endonuclease restriction patterns: purification by alkaline plasmid methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinami, M; Tanikawa, E; Hachisuka, H; Sasai, Y; Shingu, M

    1990-01-01

    The alkaline plasmid DNA extraction method of Birnboim and Doly was applied for the isolation of human papillomavirus (HPV) from warts. Tissue from common and plantar warts was digested with proteinase K, and the extrachromosomal circular covalently-closed form of HPV-DNA was rapidly extracted by alkaline sodium dodecyl sulphate and phenol-chloroform treatment. Recovery of HPV-DNA from the tissue was sufficient for determination of endonuclease restriction patterns by agarose gel electrophoresis.

  9. Prevalence and Determinants of High-Risk Human Papillomavirus Infection in Male Genital Warts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sung Jin; Seo, Juhyung; Ha, Seong-Heon

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the prevalence and type distribution of high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in genital warts of Korean men, and for the first time, to describe the risk factors associated with high-risk HPV infection in male genital warts. Materials and Methods In a single private clinic, 150 consecutive male patients with histopathologic-confirmed genital warts who underwent HPV genotyping by use of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) were included in this study. We detected HPV DNA in male genital warts and evaluated HPV type distribution, especially high-risk HPV types, by use of PCR. The associations between HPV prevalence and various characteristics, such as age, circumcision status, type of genital warts diagnosis (new vs. recurrent), number of lesions, site of lesions, and gross morphology, were assessed by use of unconditional multiple logistic regression. Results High-risk HPV types were detected in 31 cases (23.5%), and of these, 27 cases (20.5%) contained both high-risk and low-risk HPV types. The most frequently detected high-risk HPV types were HPV16 (6.8%), HPV33 (4.5%), HPV18 (2.3%), and HPV68 (2.3%). In particular, the prevalence of infection with HPV16 and/or HPV18 was 8.3% (11 of 132). In the multivariate analysis, lesions located at sites including the base of the penis or the pubic area, papular or mixed genital warts, and lack of circumcision significantly increased the association with high-risk HPV infection in male genital warts. Conclusions The prevalence of high-risk HPV infection was substantial in male genital warts. The site and morphology of lesions and circumcision status were significantly associated with the prevalence of high-risk HPV infection. PMID:24648877

  10. Subcutaneous intralesional Ksharodaka injection: A novel treatment for the management of Warts: A case series

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Warts are generally managed using cryosurgery, keratolytic ointments, curettage and electrodessication. Warts, vis-a-vis Charmakila, in Ayurvedic classical texts are classified into different types depending on the dominance of dosha. Ayurveda prescribes oral medications, topical use of Kshara (alkaline ash of herbs), Agni (thermal cautery) and Shastrakarma (surgery) for removal of Charmakila. Use of topical Kshara in the form of powder, aqueous solution i.e. Ksharodaka and Ksharasutra (threa...

  11. Loss of quality of life associated with genital warts: baseline analyses from a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sénécal, Martin; Brisson, Marc; Maunsell, Elizabeth; Ferenczy, Alex; Franco, Eduardo L; Ratnam, Sam; Coutlée, François; Palefsky, Joel M; Mansi, James A

    2011-04-01

    The quadrivalent human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine is effective against HPV types responsible for 90% of anogenital warts. This study estimated the quality of life lost to genital warts using the EQ-5D, a generic instrument widely used for applications in economic analyses. The findings are described in terms that are more specific to individuals with genital warts using psychosocial questions adapted from the HPV impact profile, a measure developed for HPV-related conditions. Between September 2006 and February 2008, 42 physicians across Canada recruited 330 consenting patients 18 years and older with genital warts, either at the first or follow-up visit for an initial or recurrent episode. The quality of life lost associated with genital warts was estimated by the difference between participants' EQ-5D scores and age and gender-specific population norms. The study questionnaire was self-completed by 270 participants who were aged 31.5 years (SD 10.4) on average. The majority of participants were women (53.3%), heterosexual (93.5%) and in a stable relationship (66.0%). Genital warts were associated with detriments in the EQ-5D domains of anxiety/depression, pain/discomfort and usual activities. The absolute difference in the EQ-5D utility score and the EQ-VAS health status between genital warts patients and population norms was 9.9 (95% CI 7.3 to 12.5) and 6.0 (95% CI 4.1 to 7.9) percentage points, respectively. These results did not vary significantly according to patient age, gender, time since first episode or number of episodes. The results suggest that genital warts negatively affect the wellbeing of men and women as reflected by poorer quality of life scores compared with population norms.

  12. Successful Treatment of Refractory Wart with a Topical Activated Vitamin D in a Renal Transplant Recipient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano Moscarelli

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Warts are benign proliferations of the skin and mucosa caused by infection with human papillomavirus. They are commonly treated with destructive modalities such as cryotherapy with liquid nitrogen, local injection of bleomycin, electrocoagulation, topical application of glutaraldehyde, and local and systemic interferon-β therapy. These treatment modalities often cause pain and sometimes scarring or pigmentation after treatment. We herein report a case with a right index finger wart, which was successfully treated with a topical activated vitamin D.

  13. 21 CFR 358.150 - Labeling of wart remover drug products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... containing salicylic acid identified in § 358.110(b). “Wash affected area.” (Optional: “May soak wart in warm... (until wart is removed) for up to 12 weeks.” (3) For products containing salicylic acid identified in....” (ii) “Do not use this product on irritated skin, on any area that is infected or reddened, if you...

  14. Safety and effectiveness of autoinoculation therapy in cutaneous warts: A double - blind, randomized, placebo - controlled study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niharika Ranjan Lal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In spite of the availability of multiple treatment options, viral warts are known for their persistence and recurrence, causing frustration to patients and treating physicians. Aims: To study the effectiveness and safety of autoinoculation as a treatment modality in cutaneous warts. Methods: A double-blind, placebo-controlled study was carried out. In the treatment group, full-thickness warty tissue was excised, minced and implanted in a small dermal pocket. In the control group, warty tissue was only excised and not implanted, though a dermal pocket was made. Patients were evaluated every four weeks with lesion counts. The procedure was repeated at 4 and 8 weeks. Response was assessed at each visit and at 12 weeks. Results: Forty-eight patients with cutaneous warts (male: female = 32:16 were randomized into autoinoculation and control groups. The number of warts at baseline was comparable in both groups (P = 0.293. Reduction in the number of warts was significantly more in the autoinoculation group (8.50 ± 13.88 than in the control group (10.04 ± 5.80 from 8 weeks onwards (P = 0.010. Complete resolution occurred only in the autoinoculation group, in 62.5% of cases. Adverse effects were seen in 11 patients, including infection of the donor site (5 cases, keloid formation (3 and hypopigmentation (3. Conclusion: Autoinoculation may be an effective therapeutic modality for cutaneous warts and two sessions may be required for optimum results.

  15. Status of oxidative stress on lesional skin surface of plantar warts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arican, O; Ozturk, P; Kurutas, E B; Unsal, V

    2013-03-01

    Warts are abnormal skin growths caused by human papilloma virus (HPV) infections within the skin of the patients. Sometimes the disease is difficult to treatment, and also, the relationship between HPV and some forms of skin cancers is important. The cutaneous oxidative stress status of warts is absent in the literature. To evaluate the role of oxidative stress in affected skin areas in a group of patients with plantar warts. Thirty-six consecutive patients with a diagnosis of plantar warts were enrolled. The samples were obtained by scraping the skin surface. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) activities and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were measured spectrophotometrically at samples. The SOD activity was significantly lower, and the MDA level was significantly higher on the lesional area than on the non-lesional area (P warts may play a role in pathogenesis of the disease. The addition of topical drugs with antioxidative effects may be valuable in the treatment of warts. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology © 2012 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  16. Investigations of the efficacy of diphenylcyclopropenone immunotherapy for the treatment of warts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, Dong-Woo; Lew, Bark-Lynn; Sim, Woo-Young

    2014-12-01

    Diphenylcyclopropenone (DPCP) immunotherapy has been used to treat warts, particularly in patients, such as children, who cannot endure treatment-related pain and in patients with large numbers of warts. However, the efficacy of DPCP immunotherapy remains subject to much controversy. Specifically, cure rates and treatment durations have varied across reports, primarily because of the lack of large-scale studies. We performed an uncontrolled, open-label study to investigate the efficacy of DPCP immunotherapy for the treatment of cutaneous warts. A total of 170 patients with warts were enrolled in this uncontrolled, open-label study from 2006 to 2012. Each patient was sensitized with 0.1% DPCP. Two weeks after sensitization, DPCP was applied to warts once per week. We achieved high clearance rates in 141 of 170 patients (82.9%) and 434 of 511 lesions (84.9%). Immunotherapy with DPCP was much more effective when the lesions were located on the hands and when the patient was aged 0.005%. Side effects occurred in 36 patients, but no serious adverse effects occurred, and blistering at the sensitized site was the most common adverse effect. Immunotherapy with DPCP is an effective and well-tolerated option for the treatment of recalcitrant warts. © 2014 The International Society of Dermatology.

  17. Immunotherapy using purified protein derivative in the treatment of warts: An open uncontrolled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikrant Saoji

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Warts are known to clear spontaneously with the development of cell-mediated immunity (CMI to the virus. Purified protein derivative (PPD of tuberculin bacilli has been used as a non-specific stimulant of CMI to achieve this outcome. Aim: To study the effect of PPD in the treatment of warts. Methods: Patients with difficult-to-treat warts were selected for immunotherapy. Each patient received 2.5 TU of PPD intralesionally in a few warts. A total of four sessions were given at 2 weekly intervals and patients were followed up for 6 months after the last dose. Results: Sixty-one patients were recruited of which 55 completed 6 months follow up and were available for analysis. Of these, 25 had verruca vulgaris, 18 had verruca plana and 12 had plantar warts. Forty two (76% patients showed complete clearance after four sessions while the remaining 13 (24% patients were non-responders. One patient developed a recurrence after total clearance during the follow-up period. Adverse effects were erythema, edema and pain at the site of injections. Limitations: As this was an uncontrolled trial, there is no comparison with a non-intervention group. Also, a Mantoux test was not done due to practical difficulties. Conclusion: Immunotherapy with PPD is helpful in the treatment of cutaneous warts.

  18. Treatment of common and plane warts in children with topical viable Bacillus Calmette-Guerin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, Ahmed; Nofal, Ahmad; Hosny, Doaa

    2013-01-01

    Treatment of verrucae in children is difficult and may be painful using traditional methods, especially if they are multiple or on the face. The objective of the current study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of topical application of viable Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) in a paste formula as a new immunotherapeutic modality in the treatment of common and plane warts in children. The present study included 80 children with common and plane warts at different sites on the body. They were divided into two groups. Group A (40 patients) received topical viable BCG and group B (40 patients) received topical saline as control. All patients and controls had received a previous vaccination of BCG. BCG was applied once weekly for six consecutive weeks. Patients who had partial or no response received another course of treatment for another 6 weeks. Follow-up was at 6 months to detect any recurrences. A highly significant difference was found between the therapeutic response of common and plane warts to BCG and saline (placebo) (p warts and 45% of patients with plane warts. No response was detected in the control group. No recurrences or side effects were observed in the BCG group. Topical immunotherapeutic BCG is a new, effective, safe treatment option for children with common and plane warts. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Prevalence of Human Papillomavirus in Anal and Oral Sites Among Patients with Genital Warts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Kristian; Sand, Carsten; Forslund, Ola

    2014-01-01

    Genital warts are caused by human papillomavirus (HPV). HPV is a leading cause of anogenital malignancies and a role of HPV in the aetiology of oro-pharyngeal cancers has been demonstrated. The frequency of oral HPV infection in patients with genital warts and the association between concomitant...... genital, anal and oral infection is unclear. A total of 201 men and women with genital wart-like lesions were recruited. Swab samples were obtained from the genital warts and the anal canal and an oral rinse was collected. Anal HPV was found in 46.2% and oral HPV in 10.4% of the participants. Concordance...... between anal and genital wart HPV types was 78.1%, while concordance between oral and genital wart types was 60.9%. A lower concordance of 21.7% was observed between anal and oral HPV types. Significantly more women than men had multiple HPV types and anal HPV. In conclusion, extra genital HPV is common...

  20. Examining the efficacy and safety of squaric acid therapy for treatment of recalcitrant warts in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Shaily; Wilmer, Erin N; Morrell, Dean S

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the study was to determine the safety and efficacy of squaric acid dibutyl ester (SADBE) therapy on the treatment of recalcitrant warts in children. This retrospective chart review examined 72 patients treated using SADBE from July 2002 to December 2012. Patients were followed for 6 months to 11 years. Patients were treated at a pediatric dermatology outpatient clinic at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Seventy-two children with verrucae who failed initial treatment for warts were selected for the study. Full long-term follow-up was obtained in 48 patients. Four patients discontinued the use of SADBE because of adverse effects. The primary study outcome was efficacy of SADBE treatment. Adverse effects, dosages administered, type of wart, other cutaneous disease present, and level of immunosuppression were measured. Forty of 48 (83%) patients in whom treatment outcomes could be obtained reported complete resolution of their warts. Seventy percent of patients used a maximum concentration of 0.4% SADBE and 60% of patients reported no adverse effects. The majority of patients treated with SADBE reported complete resolution of warts. Most patients reported no adverse effects even while receiving doses as high as 2% daily. This study shows that SADBE is a safe and effective treatment for recalcitrant warts in children. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Treatment of recalcitrant warts with the carbon dioxide laser using an excision technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oni, Georgette; Mahaffey, Peter J

    2011-10-01

    Recalcitrant warts remain a challenging problem to treat, with considerable morbidity for patients. Our technique uses the carbon dioxide (CO2) laser as a bloodless scalpel to excise and treat recalcitrant warts. This paper reviews the results of patients with recalcitrant warts treated by the senior author using this technique. A retrospective case note review and questionnaire-based survey of patients treated by this technique. Seventy-one recalcitrant warts treated in 22 patients, all as day case procedures. A total of 54.5% of patients had complete remission after one treatment and the average length of follow-up was 71.5 months. Recurrence occurred on average 5.29 months following treatment. Of those patients, 90% were successfully retreated, giving an overall rate of 95.5%. In total, 46.7% of patients were left with scarring, but all felt this was acceptable given the benefits of the treatment, and 80.0% of patients would have the procedure again. Four patients had spontaneous regression of warts at other body sites not treated with the CO2 laser. This study illustrates the efficacy of our technique with a favourable outcome comparable to published studies. Recurrence occurred within 12 months; therefore, we would recommend this as a minimum follow-up period. In addition, the disappearance of warts at distant sites suggests that the effects of the CO2 laser therapy modulate the immune system, thereby extending it beyond simple excision or ablation.

  2. Intralesional cidofovir for the treatment of multiple and recalcitrant cutaneous viral warts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broganelli, Paolo; Chiaretta, Antonella; Fragnelli, Barbara; Bernengo, Maria Grazia

    2012-01-01

    Cidofovir is a nucleoside analog of deoxycytidine with a strong activity against a broad spectrum of DNA viruses, including human papillomavirus. The first objective was to evaluate efficacy of cidofovir for the treatment of cutaneous viral warts, recalcitrant after conventional therapies or where the surgery approach is difficult for their location or extension. Second, the present authors propose to point out possible local and systemic side effects consequent to treatment. Two-hundred eighty patients affected by recalcitrant cutaneous viral warts, were treated with intralesional cidofovir 15 mg/mL once a month. The present authors stated that candidates were those who had made before at least two other treatments reported in the guideline for management of cutaneous viral warts. In 276 cases, warts completely cleared: 158 of those have a follow-up period longer than 12 months and 118 have a follow-up of 6 months. On the average, 3,2 injections were enough to solve the problem. Local side effects consisted of pain and burning sensation during the injections; itching, erythema, and post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation were observed. No cases of systemic side effects were noted. The treatment was well tolerated, and the warts were completely cleared without relapses. Intralesional cidofovir is emerging as an effective therapeutic alternative for warts that are unresponsive to conventional treatments.

  3. [Warts, swimming pools and atopy: a case control study conducted in a private dermatology practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penso-Assathiany, D; Flahault, A; Roujeau, J C

    1999-10-01

    Our purpose was to study two risk factors of warts, i.e., swimming pool frequentation and atopy. A case-control study was performed in four dermatologists' private offices. The cases were patients consulting for the first time for warts; the controls were patients consulting for the first time for acne. Univariate analysis performed in 153 questionnaires (including 86 cases and 67 controls) showed an association between warts with swimming pool frequentation one year before consulting and between warts and history of atopy. Multivariate analysis showed an association between warts and history of atopy (OR: 4.20; confidence interval at 95 p. 100 = (1.52-11.6). The link between warts and frequentation of swimming pool one year before is not significant (OR: 1.81; confidence interval at 95 p. 100 = (0.78-4.21)) but shows a tendency. This last point should be confirmed in further studies. Additionally, this study showed that this kind of clinical research can be carried out in dermatologist private practice.

  4. Childhood atopic dermatitis and warts are associated with increased risk of infection: a US population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverberg, Jonathan I; Silverberg, Nanette B

    2014-04-01

    Previous studies suggested that atopic dermatitis (AD) is associated with aberrant immune responses, which might predispose toward both cutaneous and extracutaneous infections. The goal of this study was to determine whether childhood AD is associated with increased risk of warts, extracutaneous infections, and other atopic diseases and how these disorders cosegregate. The 2007 National Health Interview Survey from a nationally representative sample of 9417 children age 0 to 17 years was used. Children with AD and other atopic disease had higher odds of warts. In contrast, children with AD with or without other atopic disease had higher odds of extracutaneous infections, including strep throat, other sore throat, head or chest cold, influenza/pneumonia, sinus infections, recurrent ear infections, chickenpox, and urinary tract infections (P Warts were also associated with increased odds of all extracutaneous infections (P warts and AD had a higher number of infections than those with either disorder alone (P warts had higher odds of ever receiving a diagnosis of asthma, current asthma, asthma exacerbation in the past year, hay fever, and food allergy. Children with AD with warts had even higher odds of asthma, hay fever, and food allergies than those with AD and no warts. The associations between childhood AD, atopic disease, warts, and extracutaneous infections suggest that barrier disruption, immune disruption, or both contribute to susceptibility to warts and extracutaneous infections in children. Copyright © 2013 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Genital and extra-genital warts increase the risk of asymptomatic genital human papillomavirus infection in men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Brenda Y; Shvetsov, Yurii B; Goodman, Marc T; Wilkens, Lynne R; Thompson, Pamela J; Zhu, Xuemei; Tom, James; Ning, Lily

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the relationship of warts in different parts of the body and the risk of asymptomatic genital human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in men. Methods We examined the relationship of self-reported genital and extra-genital warts with the subsequent acquisition of asymptomatic genital HPV infection in a cohort of 331 adult men. Participants were followed at 2-month intervals for up to 4 years. Past and current presence of warts was queried at study entry. At each visit, the external genitals were sampled for HPV DNA testing. Results Men who reported a history of genital warts, including current warts, were at increased risk of acquisition of asymptomatic HPV infection of the penis glans/corona, penis shaft and scrotum. The magnitude of these associations was greatest for HPV 6/11 infection. History of warts on the fingers, arms and trunk of the body was also associated with increased risk of genital HPV infection. Current presence of warts on the fingers and trunk specifically increased the risk of acquisition of HPV types not typically found on the genitals. Conclusions Men with a history of warts on the genitals, fingers, arms and trunk may be at increased risk for acquisition of new genital HPV infections. Warts may provide an efficient reservoir for the transmission of virions to the genitals through auto-inoculation. The potential for the spread of HPV throughout the body through auto-inoculation has important implications for prevention and control of HPV infection. PMID:21602516

  6. Very late onset small intestinal B cell lymphoma associated with primary intestinal lymphangiectasia and diffuse cutaneous warts

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bouhnik, Y; Etienney, I; Nemeth, J; Thevenot, T; Lavergne-Slove, A; Matuchansky, C

    2000-01-01

    .... They presented with a longstanding history of fluctuating protein losing enteropathy, multiple cutaneous plane warts, and markedly dilated mucosal and submucosal lymphatic channels in duodenal biopsies...

  7. Topical adapalene in the treatment of plantar warts; Randomized comparative open trial in comparison with cryo-therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramji Gupta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Various therapeutic modalities, which are available for treating plantar wart, have not been successful every time. Aims: To evaluate topical adapalene under occlusion in the treatment of plantar warts and compare it with cryo-therapy. Materials and Methods: 50 patients with 424 plantar warts were included in this single center, two arm, prospective, randomized, control, open study. Patients were allocated randomly into two groups consisting of 25 patients each. Group A patients having 299 plantar warts were treated using adapalene gel 0.1% under occlusion while Group B patients having 125 warts were treated using cryo-therapy. All the patients were evaluated weekly till the clearance of all the warts and the results compared. Result: All the warts of 25 patients of Group A that were treated using adapalene gel 0.1% cleared in 36.71 ± 19.24 (55.95-17.47 days except those in one patient. In Group B, warts in all except one treated by cryo-therapy cleared in 52.17 ± 30.06 (82.23-22.11 days. There were no side effects like scar formation, irritation, erythema, or infections with adapalene group while in the cryo group scar was seen in 2 patients, pain in 24, erythema in 10, and infection in 3 patients. Conclusion: Adapalene gel 0.1% under occlusion is an effective, safe and easy to use treatment for plantar warts and may help clear lesions faster than cryo-therapy.

  8. Evaluation of the efficacy of 50% citric acid solution in plane wart treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vali Anahita

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Treatment of plane warts is problematic, methods such as cryotherapy and cauterization is associated with high recurrence rate, risk of scar, pain and high cost. Topical tretinoin causes irritant contact dermatitis that limited its use. Citric acid was used in treatment of warts in traditional medicine of Iran. We evaluated the efficacy of 50% citric acid solution in water in treatment of plane warts and compared it with 0.05% tretinoin lotion. Materials and Methods : This study was a double blind; prospective, case-control study.Seventy-five patients with bilateral plane warts who signed informed consent were included. Exclusion criteria were pregnancy, breast-feeding, suffering from any systemic disease and the use of any other drug due to treatment of warts in past six weeks. The patients randomly used citric acid or Tretinoin lotion to lesions at each side of the body. Randomization was performed by coin-flipping. Patients were examined at three weeks interval for six weeks and number of warts were recorded in the proforma, which included the name, sex, address and code of the drug that was used in each side of the body and side effects. The results were analyzed by Chi-square test statistically. Results: After six weeks 64.4% of the lesions in citric acid treated group disappeared versus 53.7% of the lesions in tretinoin treated group. This difference was significant ( P value Conclusion: On the basis of this study, the treatment of plane warts by 50% citric acid is strongly suggested. This modality is superior to tretinoin lotion due to higher efficacy and low incidence of side-effects and lower cost.

  9. Imiquimod in the treatment of cutaneous warts: an evidence-based review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Christine S; Huang, William W

    2014-10-01

    Cutaneous warts are highly prevalent lesions caused by the infection of keratinocytes by different types of human papillomaviruses. Although cutaneous warts are capable of resolving spontaneously, these infections can persist for long periods of time by evading the host immune system, and, as a result, many patients choose to seek treatment. Imiquimod is an immune response modifier that is approved as a topical cream for the treatment of anogenital warts by the US Food and Drug Administration. However, the efficacy of imiquimod in the treatment of cutaneous warts has not been well established. The purpose of this article is to systematically review the published literature regarding the efficacy of imiquimod in the treatment of cutaneous warts, and to evaluate the quality and outcomes of these studies. A literature search was performed through clinical queries PubMed (National Library of Medicine) database and the Cochrane database. All completed studies written in English and published through May 2014 were considered. Studies evaluating the use of imiquimod for anogenital warts were excluded. There were no other restrictions based on patient age, sex, ethnicity, or skin type. The studies were evaluated and assessed based on study design, patient population, treatment regimen, clinical outcome, and adverse events. A total of 393 records were identified in the initial search; 23 full-text articles were assessed for eligibility and included in the review. Of these studies, six publications reported on immunocompromised individuals only. The highest quality study identified was a grade B, level 3 case-control cohort study in which patients with multiple warts had certain warts treated with imiquimod and others left untreated to serve as a control. The remaining studies identified were level 4 non-controlled case series (grade C) and level 5 case reports (grade D). In immunocompetent patients enrolled in non-controlled studies, the combined rate of patients achieving

  10. Managing external genital warts: practical aspects of treatment and prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourcier, Marc; Bhatia, Neal; Lynde, Charles; Vender, Ronald

    2013-12-01

    Rising rates of human papillomavirus (HPV) infections in recent decades, including external genital warts (EGWs), underscore the need for effective management of this common sexually transmitted disease. Although treatment is a vital aspect that aims primarily to resolve physical symptoms, health care providers must also address the psychosocial burden that typically accompanies diagnosis, treatment, remission, and recurrence. Education and counseling are integral components of care to address the cascade of negative emotional reactions that follow diagnosis, which often include anger, shame, stigma, frustration, and fear. Health care providers should offer patient information that is clear and simple, both verbally and in written form. Research to date has shown that information is most helpful when it is conveyed in a supportive tone and avoids stigmatization. Treatment decisions should consider the patient's preferences and the clinician's ability to offer certain therapies. A locally relevant algorithm and an individualized treatment approach are recommended by various treatment guidelines to improve the chances of compliance and treatment success. Given that success rates are variable, monitoring treatment is also necessary to gauge the patient's response to treatment, local reactions, and the potential need to switch treatments. Patients diagnosed with EGWs should also be screened for other sexually transmitted diseases because coinfection is common. Vaccination is becoming an increasingly important aspect of prevention strategies for HPV infections and should be considered for eligible patients.

  11. Fat and expanded act in parallel to regulate growth through warts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yongqiang; Irvine, Kenneth D

    2007-12-18

    The conserved Drosophila tumor suppressors Fat and Expanded have both recently been implicated in regulating the activity of the Warts tumor suppressor. However, there has been disagreement as to the nature of the links among Fat, Expanded, and Warts and the significance of these links to growth control. We report here that mutations in either expanded or fat can be rescued to viability simply by overexpressing Warts, indicating that their essential function is their influence on Warts rather than reported effects on endocytosis or other pathways. These rescue experiments also separate the transcriptional from the planar cell polarity branches of Fat signaling and reveal that Expanded does not directly affect polarity. We also investigate the relationship between expanded and fat and show, contrary to prior reports, that they have additive effects on imaginal disk growth and development. Although mutation of fat can cause partial loss of Expanded protein from the membrane, mutation of fat promotes growth even when Expanded is overexpressed and accumulates at its normal subapical location. These observations argue against recent proposals that Fat acts simply as a receptor for the Hippo signaling pathway and instead support the proposal that Fat and Expanded can act in parallel to regulate Warts through distinct mechanisms.

  12. Intralesional antigen immunotherapy for the treatment of warts: current concepts and future prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nofal, Ahmad; Salah, Eman; Nofal, Eman; Yosef, Ayman

    2013-08-01

    Many destructive and immunotherapeutic modalities have been used for the management of warts; however, an optimal treatment with high efficacy and absent or low recurrence has not been explored to date. Recently, the use of intralesional immunotherapy with different antigens has shown promising efficacy in the treatment of warts. We review the different aspects of this new modality, including candidates, types of warts treated, dosage, number and interval between treatment sessions, mode of action, efficacy, adverse effects, recurrence rate, advantages, disadvantages, current place and future prospects. A literature review revealed that healthy immune subjects are the best candidates, and a pre-sensitization test is usually done before the start of therapy. The dosage, the number and interval between sessions, and the success rates varied among the different studies. The mode of action is still uncertain, but is essentially mediated through stimulation of T helper-1 cell cytokine response. Adverse effects are mild and generally insignificant, and the recurrence rate is absent or low. Intralesional antigen immunotherapy seems to be a promising, effective and safe treatment modality for viral warts. Future well-designed and controlled studies would help to more clearly define its place in the challenging field of wart therapy.

  13. Co-infection of Bovine Papillomavirus and feline-associated Papillomavirus in bovine cutaneous warts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, M A R; Carvalho, C C R; Coutinho, L C A; Reis, M C; de Aragão Batista, M V; de Castro, R S; Dos Anjos, F B R; de Freitas, A C

    2012-12-01

    The diversity of papillomavirus (PV) found in bovine cutaneous warts from Brazilian cattle was evaluated using the PCR technique with the utilization of consensus primers MY09/11 and by PCR using Bovine Papillomavirus (BPV) type-specific primers followed by sequencing. Eleven cutaneous warts from 6 cattle herds were selected. Six warts were positive for the presence of PV. The presence of BPV types 1, 2, 3, 6 and feline sarcoid-associated PV (FeSarPV) in cutaneous wart lesions, as well as the presence of co-infections, was found. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that FeSarPV is described co-infecting a cutaneous wart in Brazil. The present study confirms the previous finding of FeSarPV infecting cattle. These results show the necessity of more studies to investigate the diversity of PV in cattle, its diversity and the possibility of co-infection in cattle and other animals. © 2012 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  14. Impact of quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccine on genital warts in an opportunistic vaccination structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lurie, Samuel; Mizrachi, Yossi; Chodick, Gabi; Katz, Rachel; Schejter, Eduardo

    2017-08-01

    Genital warts are the most common sexually transmitted disease and have a detrimental impact on quality of life. Genital warts could be prevented by prophylactic HPV vaccination. The objective was to study real-life benefit of opportunistic HPV vaccination on age and gender specific incidence of genital warts. We performed a register-based population cohort study from publicly funded health-care provider in Israel. The incidence of genital warts was assessed during three time frame intervals: 2006-2008 (pre-vaccination effect period) 2009-2012 (early post-vaccination effect period) and 2013-2015 (late post-vaccination effect period), with an average annual number of members of 1,765,481, 1,906,774 and 2,042,678 in the years 2006-2008, 2009-2012 and 2013-2015, respectively. Among females, annual incidence of genital warts per 100,000 women decreased from 210.43 to 161.71 (OR 0.76, 95%CI 0.71-0.82, pwarts per 100,000 men decreased from 262.85 to 232.40 (OR 0.88, 95%CI 0.83-0.93, pwarts even in opportunistic HPV vaccination structure. This information may be relevant for health-care providers in countries where national immunization programs do not include HPV vaccines. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Intensive local thermotherapy cleared extensive viral warts in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yi; Huo, Wei; Qi, Rui-Qun; Hu, Lanting; Gao, Xing-Hua

    2015-02-01

    A variety of medications and procedures are available for the treatment of warts, but it appeared the treatment response in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients is poor. It is necessary to investigate the feasibility, safety and efficacy of local thermotherapy for extensive viral warts. A SLE patient on systemic steroid developed extensive viral warts on both her hands and feet for months. She had a high score of SLE Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI), up to 30, and was extensively treated with high and prolonged dosage of corticosteroid and intermittent use of cyclophosphamide. We applied local hyperthermia at 44 °C on a target lesion for 30 min on days 1, 2, 3, 17, 18, a protocol which has been successfully used in treating viral warts. There was no sign of clinical response in a 3-month follow-up. Then we treated the patient on a once-a-week protocol. All the lesions cleared in ten weeks and there was no sign of recurrence. This observation suggests that more intensive local hyperthermia is required for clearing viral warts in SLE.

  16. Monochloroacetic acid application is an effective alternative to cryotherapy for common and plantar warts in primary care: a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruggink, S.C.; Gussekloo, J.; Egberts, P.F.; Bavinck, J.N.; Waal, M.W. de; Assendelft, W.J.J.; Eekhof, J.A.

    2015-01-01

    Cryotherapy and salicylic acid (SA) often fail as treatments for skin warts. We examined the effectiveness of monochloroacetic acid (MCA) for patients with common or plantar warts. Consecutive patients aged 4 years and older with one or more newly diagnosed common or plantar warts were recruited in

  17. Paring and intense pulsed light versus paring alone for recalcitrant hand and foot warts: a randomized clinical trial with blinded outcome evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Togsverd-Bo, Katrine; Gluud, Christian; Winkel, Per

    2010-01-01

    Treatment of recalcitrant viral warts remains a therapeutic challenge. Intense pulsed light (IPL) has been suggested effective to clear wart tissue. The objective was in a randomized controlled trial to assess the efficacy of paring followed by IPL versus paring alone for recalcitrant hand and foot...... warts....

  18. Monochloroacetic acid application is an effective alternative to cryotherapy for common and plantar warts in primary care: a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruggink, S.C.; Gussekloo, J.; Egberts, P.F.; Bavinck, J.N.; Waal, M.W. de; Assendelft, W.J.J.; Eekhof, J.A.

    2015-01-01

    Cryotherapy and salicylic acid (SA) often fail as treatments for skin warts. We examined the effectiveness of monochloroacetic acid (MCA) for patients with common or plantar warts. Consecutive patients aged 4 years and older with one or more newly diagnosed common or plantar warts were recruited in

  19. The Clinical Effectiveness of Intralesional Injection of 2% Zinc Sulfate Solution in the Treatment of Common Warts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Essam-elden Mohamed; Tawfik, Khaled Mohamed; Mahmoud, Asmaa Moneir

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the clinical efficacy and safety of intralesional injection of 2% zinc sulfate solution in the treatment of common warts. Patients and Methods. One hundred and twenty patients (78 females and 42 males) aged 5–55 years with 225 common warts participated in this prospective monocentric randomized study. All lesions were treated with intralesional injection of 2% zinc sulfate. Results. From 225 warts injected, 135 warts (60%) cured from the first session, 51 warts (22.67%) cured from the second session, and 12 warts (5.33%) cured from the third session. There is no significant relation between improvement and patient's ages, duration, or number of warts (P > 0.05). All patients complained from pain during injection, and all treated lesions showed redness, tenderness, and swelling in the first 3 days after injection. Late complications were postinflammatory hyperpigmentation in 90 patients (75%), scaring in 9 patients (7.5%), and ulceration in 3 patients (2.5%). Recurrence occurred in 3 lesions (1.33%). Conclusion. The clinical data indicate that intralesional injection of 2% zinc sulfate is an effective maneuver in the treatment of common warts; however, its associated complications limit its use. PMID:27123361

  20. The Clinical Effectiveness of Intralesional Injection of 2% Zinc Sulfate Solution in the Treatment of Common Warts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Essam-elden Mohamed Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To investigate the clinical efficacy and safety of intralesional injection of 2% zinc sulfate solution in the treatment of common warts. Patients and Methods. One hundred and twenty patients (78 females and 42 males aged 5–55 years with 225 common warts participated in this prospective monocentric randomized study. All lesions were treated with intralesional injection of 2% zinc sulfate. Results. From 225 warts injected, 135 warts (60% cured from the first session, 51 warts (22.67% cured from the second session, and 12 warts (5.33% cured from the third session. There is no significant relation between improvement and patient’s ages, duration, or number of warts (P<0.05. All patients complained from pain during injection, and all treated lesions showed redness, tenderness, and swelling in the first 3 days after injection. Late complications were postinflammatory hyperpigmentation in 90 patients (75%, scaring in 9 patients (7.5%, and ulceration in 3 patients (2.5%. Recurrence occurred in 3 lesions (1.33%. Conclusion. The clinical data indicate that intralesional injection of 2% zinc sulfate is an effective maneuver in the treatment of common warts; however, its associated complications limit its use.

  1. Cryotherapy with liquid nitrogen versus topical salicylic acid application for cutaneous warts in primary care : randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruggink, Sjoerd C.; Gussekloo, Jacobijn; Berger, Marjolein Y.; Zaaijer, Krista; Assendelft, Willem J. J.; de Waal, Margot W. M.; Bavinck, Jan Nico Bouwes; Koes, Bart W.; Eekhof, Just A. H.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Cryotherapy is widely used for the treatment of cutaneous warts in primary care. However, evidence favours salicylic acid application. We compared the effectiveness of these treatments as well as a wait-and-see approach. Methods: Consecutive patients with new cutaneous warts were recruit

  2. Cryotherapy with liquid nitrogen versus topical salicylic acid application for cutaneous warts in primary care : randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruggink, Sjoerd C.; Gussekloo, Jacobijn; Berger, Marjolein Y.; Zaaijer, Krista; Assendelft, Willem J. J.; de Waal, Margot W. M.; Bavinck, Jan Nico Bouwes; Koes, Bart W.; Eekhof, Just A. H.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Cryotherapy is widely used for the treatment of cutaneous warts in primary care. However, evidence favours salicylic acid application. We compared the effectiveness of these treatments as well as a wait-and-see approach. Methods: Consecutive patients with new cutaneous warts were

  3. Retinoids strongly and selectively correlate with keratin 13 and not keratin 19 expression in cutaneous warts of renal transplant recipients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blokx, W.A.M.; Smit, J.V.; Jong, E.M.G.J. de; Link, M.M.G.M.; Kerkhof, P.C.M. van de; Ruiter, D.J.

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the expression of keratin (K) 13 and K19 in cutaneous warts of renal transplant recipients (RTRs) and immunocompetent individuals (ICIs). DESIGN: Retrospective, nonrandomized immunohistochemical study. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Specimens from cutaneous warts of RTRs and ICIs were

  4. New proposal for the treatment of viral warts with intralesional injection of 5-aminolevulinic acid photodynamic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung Eun; Kim, Sun Ji; Hwang, Jong Ik; Lee, Kyung Jin; Park, Hyun Jeong; Cho, Baik Kee

    2012-06-01

    Although photodynamic therapy (PDT) using intralesional injection (ILI) can theoretically enhance the efficacy of the PDT, the effect of ILI-PDT on warts has not been reported in the literature so far. Eight patients with multiple viral warts were enrolled in the study. PDT was performed after the incubation for 1 h, followed by the ILI of aminolevulinic acid (ALA) into the warts. The treatment was repeated at 2-3 week intervals. Fifty percent of patients showed good to cure response. Complete remission was observed in two patients. There was no apparent correlation between the initial severity of warts and the likelihood of response. No one reported severe adverse reaction. The present study suggests that intralesional administration of ALA might be a safe and effective treatment option of thick treatment-resistant warts and can be performed with a shorter incubation period.

  5. Comparative efficacy of topical 5% 5-fluorouracil with electrosurgery in treatment of warts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dogra Alka

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Warts are common dermatologicals disorder which are dificult to treat. In the present study the efficacy of topical 5% 5-fluorouracil was evaluated in various types of warts and compared with the conventional electrosurgical method which included both electrodessication and electrofulguration. 50 patients clinically diagnosed as warts were enrolled. 25 patients were treated with topical 5% 5-fluorouracil applied for 4 hrs twice daily for 3 weeks, while another 25 were treated with electrosurgery. It was observed that electrosurgery yielded better initial results than 5-fluorouracil (72 and 52% respectively, but at the end of 6 months, the results were favourable for 5-fluorouracil as compared to electrosurgery (44 and 36% respectively. This was due to the signficantly low recurrence rate with 5-fluorouracil in contrast to electrosurgery (8 and 48% respectively. Though electrosurgery yielded quicker initial results but 5-fluorouracil was better as long term measurer because of its significantly lower recurrence rates.

  6. Genital warts and infection with human immunodeficiency virus in high-risk women in Burkina Faso: a longitudinal study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van de Perre Philippe

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human papillomaviruses are the most common sexually transmitted infections, and genital warts, caused by HPV-6 and 11, entail considerable morbidity and cost. The natural history of genital warts in relation to HIV-1 infection has not been described in African women. We examined risk factors for genital warts in a cohort of high-risk women in Burkina Faso, in order to further describe their epidemiology. Methods A prospective study of 765 high-risk women who were followed at 4-monthly intervals for 27 months in Burkina Faso. Logistic and Cox regression were used to identify factors associated with prevalent, incident and persistent genital warts, including HIV-1 serostatus, CD4+ count, and concurrent sexually transmitted infections. In a subset of 306 women, cervical HPV DNA was tested at enrolment. Results Genital wart prevalence at baseline was 1.6% (8/492 among HIV-uninfected and 7.0% (19/273 among HIV-1 seropositive women. Forty women (5.2% experienced at least one incident GW episode. Incidence was 1.1 per 100 person-years among HIV-uninfected women, 7.4 per 100 person-years among HIV-1 seropositive women with a nadir CD4+ count >200 cells/μL and 14.6 per 100 person-years among HIV-1 seropositive women with a nadir CD4+ count ≤200 cells/μL. Incident genital warts were also associated with concurrent bacterial vaginosis, and genital ulceration. Antiretroviral therapy was not protective against incident or persistent genital warts. Detection of HPV-6 DNA and abnormal cervical cytology were strongly associated with incident genital warts. Conclusions Genital warts occur much more frequently among HIV-1 infected women in Africa, particularly among those with low CD4+ counts. Antiretroviral therapy did not reduce the incidence or persistence of genital warts in this population.

  7. Pulsed dye laser and intralesional bleomycin for the treatment of recalcitrant cutaneous warts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobson, Joelle S; Harland, Christopher C

    2014-02-01

    Viral warts are a common ailment. Clinicians often combine multiple treatments to boost efficacy. One such novel combination is pulsed dye laser with bleomycin intralesionally (PDL + BI), described for the successful treatment of single hand warts. To evaluate PDL + BI for the treatment of poor prognosis hand and foot warts. This 4-year retrospective case series examined the efficacy of PDL + BI used consecutively on patients whose warts were treated with this modality alone. PDL 595 nm was used in stacking mode to achieve hemorrhagic blistering prior to intralesional bleomycin (1 mg/ml normal saline). Twenty cases (65% male, age 13-62, mean age 42) were identified. Two (10%) were immunocompromised. Twenty five percent of warts affected hands, 55% feet, 20% both. Thirty five percent were solitary >1 cm(2) , 40% were multiple or mosaic verucae. The mean duration was 5.1 years (0.5-15). Seventy five percent received local anesthetic. Mean number of treatments was two. Post-operative pain varied from none to severe, sometimes causing difficulty in walking. Blistering and crusting disappeared after 17 days (range 7-42). Outcome had a mean follow-up of 24 months (3-53) with 60% complete response, 15% partial, 25% no response. Mean satisfaction level was 7 (range 0-10, 10 highest). Outcome was better with local anesthetic (complete response 75%) as it permitted more aggressive treatment. Patients that had both anesthetic and repeat treatment sessions experienced 92% complete response. PDL + BI offers a novel method for treatment of recalcitrant warts, but local anesthetic and repeat treatments are recommended. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. One stone, two birds: managing multiple common warts on hands and face by local hyperthermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Lanting; Qi, Ruiqun; Hong, Yuxiao; Huo, Wei; Chen, Hong-Duo; Gao, Xing-Hua

    2015-01-01

    A man developed with multiple warts on his hands and the inner canthus of his left eye. We applied local hyperthermia on a single target lesion on his hand at a surface temperature of 44 °C for 30 minutes on Days 1, 2, 3, 17, and 18. All the lesions treated with or without heat cleared 8 weeks after the last treatment. Treatment of a target lesion resolved all other untreated lesions, a fact suggestive that local hyperthermia could induce activation of specific immunity against human papillomavirus on the lesional skin, which lead to resolution of all the warts. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Warts signaling controls organ and body growth through regulation of ecdysone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Morten Erik; Nagy, Stanislav; Gerlach, Stephan Uwe

    2017-01-01

    under different environmental conditions is poorly understood. In Drosophila, Hippo/Warts signaling functions intrinsically to regulate tissue growth and organ size [3, 4], whereas systemic growth is controlled via antagonistic interactions of the steroid hormone ecdysone and nutrient-dependent insulin....../insulin-like growth factor (IGF) (insulin) signaling [2, 5]. The interplay between insulin and ecdysone signaling regulates systemic growth and controls organismal size. Here, we show that Warts (Wts; LATS1/2) signaling regulates systemic growth in Drosophila by activating basal ecdysone production, which negatively...

  10. Successful topical treatment of hand warts in a paediatric patient with tea tree oil (Melaleuca alternifolia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millar, B Cherie; Moore, John E

    2008-11-01

    Tea tree oil (TTO) (Melaleuca alternifolia) has been used recently as an effective topical application for the treatment of skin infections due to a variety of aetiological microbial agents, including mainly bacterial infections. We detail the first report in the peer-reviewed literature of the successful treatment with TTO of a paediatric patient with warts on her right middle finger. TTO was applied topically once daily to the lesions for 12 days, with a successful outcome, including complete re-epithelization of the infected areas. The case highlights the potential use of TTO in the treatment of common warts due to human papilloma virus.

  11. Mechanism of action of imiquimod 5% cream in the treatment of anogenital warts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyring; Arany; Stanley; Stoler; Tomai; Miller; Owens; Smith

    1998-07-01

    Objective: The objective of this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was to evaluate the mechanism of action of imiquimod cream in the treatment of anogenital warts, and to apply the findings to the results of previously conducted safety and efficacy trials.Methods: Imiquimod (16 patients) or placebo (3 patients) cream was applied 3 times a week for up to 16 weeks; cream remained on the skin overnight for 8 +/- 2 hours. Wart biopsies were taken at prestudy, week 6, and the end of treatment (just prior to clearance or at week 16) and analyzed using PCR for HPV/DNA and RT-PCR for mRNA to identify cytokines, cellular markers, markers of proliferation and differentiation, and viral gene products. Efficacy was assessed based on wart area regression as documented by wart area measurements and photographs.Results: All patients enrolled in the trial had HPV type 6/11. All imiquimod-treated patients experienced a >/=75% clearance in baseline/target wart area. Imiquimod treatment stimulated significant increases in mRNA for IFN-alpha, 2'5' AS and IFN-gamma. Increases in mRNA for CD4, CD8, and TNF-alpha were also observed, suggesting activation of a T-helper type-1 cell mediated response. During the trial one of the vehicle treated patients also experienced spontaneous wart clearance; comparisons of the cytokine levels for this patient were similar to those observed for the imiquimod treated patients.Conclusions: The results of this mechanism of action trial indicate that the stimulation of local cytokines and cellular infiltrates by imiquimod leads to a reduction of HPV types 6 and 11 viral load with subsequent wart regression and normalization of keratinocyte proliferation without evidence of scarring. In two previous randomized vehicle-controlled trials evaluating patients with anogenital warts, the majority of patients had HPV-DNA types 6 or 11 as assessed by in situ hybridization. These results provide additional insight into the mechanism of total

  12. Genital Warts and Vulvar Intraepithelial Neoplasia: Natural History and Effects of Treatment and Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massad, L. Stewart; Xie, Xianhong; Darragh, Teresa; Minkoff, Howard; Levine, Alexandra M.; Watts, D. Heather; Wright, Rodney L.; D’Souza, Gypsyamber; Colie, Christine; Strickler, Howard D.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To describe the natural history of genital warts and vulvar intraepithelial neoplasia (VIN) in women with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Methods A cohort of 2,791 HIV infected and 953 uninfected women followed for up to 13 years had genital examinations at 6-month intervals, with biopsy for lesions suspicious for VIN. Results The prevalence of warts was 4.4% (5.3% for HIV seropositive women and 1.9% for seronegative women, P warts was 33% (95% C.I. 30, 36%) in HIV seropositive and 9% (95% C.I. 6, 12%) in seronegative women (P warts. Among 501 HIV seropositive and 43 seronegative women, warts regressed in 410 (82%) seropositive and 41 (95%) seronegative women (P = 0.02), most in the first year after diagnosis. In multivariable analysis, regression was negatively associated with HIV status and lower CD4 count as well as older age. Incident VIN of any grade occurred more frequently among HIV seropositive than seronegative women: 0.42 (0.33 – 0.53) vs 0.07 (0.02 – 0.18)/100 person-years (P warts and VIN are more common among HIV seropositive than seronegative women, wart regression is common even in women with HIV, and cancers are infrequent. PMID:21934446

  13. Successful treatment of plantar warts with very diluted bleomycin using a translesional multipuncture technique: pilot prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alghamdi, Khalid M; Khurram, Huma

    2012-01-01

    Plantar warts are common and often painful. Treatment of plantar warts is difficult and requires multiple treatments. Several clinical trials have proven the efficacy of bleomycin, but relatively high concentrations have been required and considerable side effects have been experienced. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of low-concentration (0.1 U/mL) bleomycin using a translesional injection technique for the treatment of plantar warts. The study included 23 patients with single or multiple plantar warts. Very low-concentration bleomycin was injected into a single wart or the largest plantar wart in the case of multiple lesions. Injections were performed at 4-week intervals until resolution of the warts or development of side effects. The translesional multipuncture technique was used. Thirteen patients were male (56.5%), and the mean age was 27.7 years. The results revealed complete clearance of warts in 17 of 23 (74%) patients, partial response in 1 (4.3%) patient, and no response in 3 (13%) patients. Recurrence was observed in 2 patients at 3 months of follow-up. Among those two, one patient showed complete clearance after the second injection at 6 months of follow-up. All patients were followed for 6 months after the initial treatment. No significant long-term adverse effects were noted. Only three patients (13%) had localized moderate pain for 2 to 3 days after the injection. Translesional injection by very low-concentration (0.1 U/mL) bleomycin appears to be a simple, effective, and safe treatment modality for plantar warts.

  14. Comparative evaluation of topical 10% potassium hydroxide and 30% trichloroacetic acid in the treatment of plane warts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandhaya Jayaprasad

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Warts are benign proliferations of skin and mucosa caused by the human papillomavirus (HPV. Plane warts are caused by HPV types 3, 10, 28, and 41, occurring mostly in children and young adults. Among the treatment modalities, topical application of trichloroacetic acid (TCA is age old. Potassium hydroxide (KOH has a keratolytic effect on virus-infected cells. It is less irritating, less painful, less scar forming, and can be safely used in children too. Hence, it could be a better topical agent in the treatment of plane warts. Aims and Objectives: To compare the safety and efficacy of topical 10% KOH with 30% TCA in the treatment of plane warts. Materials and Methods: Sixty consecutive patients with plane warts were randomly assigned into two arms of thirty patients each; arm A received topical 10% KOH and arm B received topical 30% TCA as a once weekly application until the complete clearance of warts or a maximum period of 12 weeks. Results: Statistically no significant difference (P = 0.07 was found between the objective therapeutic response to 10% KOH and 30% TCA at the end of study (12 weeks. However, subjective response to 10% KOH was better and statistically significant (P = 0.03. There was no recurrence of warts seen on follow-up for 3 months of complete responders in both the arms. Conclusion: 10% KOH is found to be equally effective in the treatment of plane warts compared to 30% TCA with the advantage of faster onset of action and tendency of completely clearing warts with fewer side effects.

  15. Measles, mumps and rubella vaccine as an intralesional immunotherapy in treatment of warts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aarti N. Shah

    2016-02-01

    Conclusions: Intralesional immunotherapy with MMR vaccine was found to be a simple, effective, and safe treatment for warts. This study proved to be cost effective as patients can be treated with just 03 doses of MMR vaccine given at the interval of two weeks. [Int J Res Med Sci 2016; 4(2.000: 472-476

  16. Vagarious successful treatment of recalcitrant warts in combination with CO2 laser and imiquimod 5% cream.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Ying; Zheng, Yi-Qing; Wang, Lin

    2014-12-01

    Imiquimod 5% cream is widely regarded as a safe and effective option when treating recalcitrant warts, owing to the ointment's negligible side effects. However, our observations highlighted case of a patient incurring severe adverse reactions due to application of the cream, although the treatment proved successful in curing recalcitrant warts which had developed on the external auditory canal and external ear. All lesions were entirely removed with short-pulsed CO2 laser. As soon as the wound-healing process was completed, imiquimod 5% cream was self-applied on the healing wounds once daily for 5 days per week in a total of 2 weeks. The patient appeared normal after the CO2 laser treatment and experienced severe redness, itching, exudation, and incrustation after a 2-week imiquimod 5% cream therapy. All lesions showed no recurrence during the 12-month followed-up process. We concluded that a feasible treatment modality to cure recalcitrant cutaneous warts is in combination of CO2 laser and imiquimod. Immunoenhancement plays an important role in the treatment of recalcitrant warts.

  17. [Application of cantharidin, podophyllotoxin, and salicylic acid in recalcitrant plantar warts. A preliminary study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-López, Daniel; Agrasar-Cruz, Carlos; Bautista-Casasnovas, Adolfo; Álvarez-Castro, Carlos Javier

    2015-01-01

    Plantar warts often are refractory to any treatment and can last for decades in adults. Recalcitrant warts are defined as those that have persisted for more than two years, or after at least two treatment modalities. A total of 15 consecutive patients with recalcitrant plantar warts were included in this preliminary study. The treatment consisted of applying one to two sessions that comprised compounding 1% cantharidin, 5% of podophyllotoxin, and 30% salicylic acid (CPS), with an interval between applications of four weeks. With treatment and subsequent follow-up for six months, there was complete eradication of lesions in 15 patients, eight (53.3%) required a single application of the solution, and seven (46.7%) two applications, with no side effects. Patient satisfaction related to treatment was measured by a visual analog scale (VAS) of 10 cm in length, with an average score 9.73 ± 0.46, and all said they would proceed with the treatment again if necessary. Topical treatment by compounding is safe, effective, and a promising therapeutic modality when applied in recalcitrant plantar warts.

  18. Intralesional Candida Antigen Immunotherapy for the Treatment of Recalcitrant and Multiple Warts in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz Garza, Fania Z; Roé Crespo, Esther; Torres Pradilla, Mauricio; Aguilera Peirò, Paula; Baltà Cruz, Susana; Hernández Ruiz, María Eugenia; Baselga Torres, Eulàlia

    2015-01-01

    Intralesional injection of Candida antigen appears to be an effective alternative for the treatment of warts. To determine the efficacy and safety of this treatment. We retrospectively reviewed records of all children who received intralesional injection of Candida antigen at our center from January 2008 to July 2013. From a total of 220 patients, 156 (70.9%) had a complete response, 37 (16.8%) had a partial response, and 27 (12.2%) had no improvement. An average of 2.73 treatments was needed. Forty-seven of the patients with more than one wart (21.3%) also noted at least partial resolution of untreated warts at distant sites. Twenty-seven of the 47 patients (57.4%) had complete resolution. All treated patients experienced some discomfort at the time of the injection, but no serious side effects were reported. We report our results using this approach in a large group of children. Intralesional injection of Candida antigen is an effective and safe therapy for children with multiple and recalcitrant cutaneous warts. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Dose-Related Differences in Effectiveness of Human Papillomavirus Vaccination Against Genital Warts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blomberg, Maria; Dehlendorff, Christian; Sand, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Reducing the number of doses in the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination regimen from 3 to 2 could increase coverage rates. In this cohort study, we assessed the risk of genital warts (GWs) according to timing and number of doses of quadrivalent HPV vaccine. METHODS: From population...

  20. Verrugas en los pezones de vacas lecheras - Warts on the teats of dairy cows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babaahmady, Ebrahim

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available ResumenLas verrugas del ganado bovino o papilomatosis es una enfermedadviral, infectocontagiosa, que se puede transmitir entre los bovinos yotros animales, afectando diversas regiones del cuerpo.SummaryBovine wart papillomatosis is a viral disease, infectious, which can be transmitted between cattle and other animals, affecting various body’s regions.

  1. Clinical Observation on the Therapeutic Effects of Qu You Ding on Flat Wart

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu Jun; Wang Jiayuan; Huang Ying; Zhou Jifu; Zhou Yongsheng

    2005-01-01

    @@ One hundred and twenty cases of flat wart were treated from 1990 to 2000 in our hospital. Among them, 80 cases were treated with local application of the other 40 cases were treated with phthiobuzone liniment. The results showed that the former had a better therapeutic effect. A report follows.

  2. Estimation of the impact of genital warts on health-related quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodhall, S; Ramsey, T; Cai, C; Crouch, S; Jit, M; Birks, Y; Edmunds, W J; Newton, R; Lacey, C J N

    2008-06-01

    One of the two new human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines protects against HPV types 6 and 11, which cause over 95% of genital warts, in addition to protecting against HPV types 16 and 18. In anticipation of HPV vaccine implementation, the impact of genital warts on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) was measured to assess the potential benefits of the quadrivalent over the bivalent vaccine. Genitourinary medicine clinic patients aged 18 years and older with a current diagnosis of genital warts were eligible; 81 consented and were interviewed by a member of the research team. A generic HRQoL questionnaire, the EQ-5D (comprising EQ-5D index and EQ visual analogue scale (VAS) scores) and a disease-specific HRQoL instrument, the CECA10, were administered. Previously established UK population norms were used as a control group for EQ-5D comparisons. Cases (with genital warts) had lower EQ VAS and EQ-5D index scores than controls. After adjusting for age a mean difference between cases and controls 30 years of age and under (n = 70) of 13.9 points (95% CI 9.9 to 17.6, pHPV vaccination should be considered in decisions about which HPV vaccine to implement in the United Kingdom.

  3. Intravenous cidofovir for resistant cutaneous warts in a patient with psoriasis treated with monoclonal antibodies.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McAleer, M A

    2012-02-01

    Human papilloma virus is a common and often distressing cutaneous disease. It can be therapeutically challenging, especially in immunocompromised patients. We report a case of recalcitrant cutaneous warts that resolved with intravenous cidofovir treatment. The patient was immunocompromised secondary to monoclonal antibody therapy for psoriasis.

  4. Systematic review of the incidence and prevalence of genital warts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Anogenital warts (AGWs) are a common, highly infectious disease caused by the human papillomavirus (HPV), whose high recurrence rates contribute to direct medical costs, productivity loss and increased psychosocial impact. Because of the lack of a systematic review of the epidemiology of AGWs in the literature, this study reviewed the published medical literature on the incidence and prevalence of AGWs. Methods A comprehensive literature search was performed on the worldwide incidence and prevalence of AGWs between 2001 and 2012 using the PubMed and EMBASE databases. An additional screening of abstracts from relevant sexual health and infectious disease conferences from 2009 to 2011 was also conducted. Only original studies with general adult populations (i.e., at least including ages 20 through 40 years) were included. Results The overall (females and males combined) reported annual incidence of any AGWs (including new and recurrent) ranged from 160 to 289 per 100,000, with a median of 194.5 per 100,000. New AGW incidence rates among males ranged from 103 to 168 per 100,000, with a median of 137 per 100,000 and among females from 76 to 191 per 100,000, with a median of 120.5 per 100,000 per annum. The reported incidence of recurrent AGWs was as high as 110 per 100,000 among females and 163 per 100,000 among males. Incidence peaked before 24 years of age in females and between 25 and 29 years of age among males. The overall prevalence of AGWs based on retrospective administrative databases or medical chart reviews or prospectively collected physician reports ranged from 0.13% to 0.56%, whereas it ranged from 0.2% to 5.1% based on genital examinations. Conclusions The literature suggests that AGWs are widespread and the prevalence depends on study methodology as suggested by higher rates reported from routine genital examinations versus those from treatment records. However, there remains a need for more population-based studies from certain regions

  5. The combination treatment using CO₂ laser and photodynamic therapy for HIV seropositive men with intraanal warts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Juan; Xiang, Li; Chen, Jiayuan; He, Qin; Li, Qing; Li, Jing; Wang, Jing

    2013-05-01

    We evaluate the effectiveness of combination treatment using photodynamic therapy after carbon dioxide laser in preventing the recurrence of condylomata acuminata for intraanal warts in HIV positive homosexual men. A retrospective survey of 41 patients referred to the STD clinic of the Fourth People's Hospital of Shenzhen for the treatment of intraanal warts among HIV positive homosexual men between Janurary 2009 and September 2011. The patients who accepted CO₂ laser monotherapy for the same diagnosis were used as the comparison group. After the confirmation of the diagnosis of HIV infection and intraanal warts, the patients were treated with the combination treatment using PDT with 5-ALA thermal gel immediately after CO₂ laser ablation of the warts. PDT was performed with irradiation of 100 J/cm² at an irradiance of 100-150 mW/cm² with a semiconductor laser, wavelength 635 nm. PDT therapy was repeated twice with 2 weekly intervals. Follow up examinations including an anoscopy every 4 weeks after the latest PDT. After 3 cycles of PDT treatments, 39 cases of anoscopy examination showed no new or recurrent lesions. At the end of the sixth months, recurrence occurred in 12(29%) cases. HPV 11 was present in 6 (50%) of these recurrences. HPV 6/11 or 16/18 remains positive in 19 cases (46.3%) and HPV negative in 22 cases. The combination treatment with CO₂ laser and PDT is much more effective in reducing the treatment cycles and the time intervals of the whole treatment for intraanal warts in HIV infected people. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Monochloroacetic acid application is an effective alternative to cryotherapy for common and plantar warts in primary care: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruggink, Sjoerd C; Gussekloo, Jacobijn; Egberts, Paulette F; Bavinck, Jan Nico Bouwes; de Waal, Margot W M; Assendelft, Willem J J; Eekhof, Just A H

    2015-05-01

    Cryotherapy and salicylic acid (SA) often fail as treatments for skin warts. We examined the effectiveness of monochloroacetic acid (MCA) for patients with common or plantar warts. Consecutive patients aged 4 years and older with one or more newly diagnosed common or plantar warts were recruited in 53 Dutch general practices. We randomly allocated eligible patients to 13-week treatment protocols of office-applied MCA versus liquid nitrogen cryotherapy every 2 weeks for patients with common warts (n=188), and MCA versus cryotherapy combined with daily SA self-application for patients with plantar warts (n=227). The primary outcome was the proportion of patients whose warts were all cured at 13 weeks. In the common wart group, cure rates were 40/92 (43%, 95% confidence interval 34-54) for MCA and 50/93 (54%, 44-64) for cryotherapy (risk difference (RD) -10%, -25-4.0, P=0.16). In the plantar wart group, cure rates were 49/106 (46%, 37-56) for MCA and 45/115 (39%, 31-48) for cryotherapy combined with SA (RD 7.1, 5.9-20, P=0.29). For common warts, MCA is an effective alternative to cryotherapy to avoid pain during the treatment, although pain after the treatment is similar. For plantar warts, office-applied MCA may be preferred over cryotherapy combined with SA, on the basis of comparable effectiveness, less treatment pain, and less treatment burden.

  7. Successful treatment of multiple filiform facial warts with imiquimod 5% cream in a patient infected by human immunodeficiency virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagman, J H; Bianchi, L; Marulli, G C; Soda, R; Chimenti, S

    2003-05-01

    Imiquimod, an imidazoquinoline amine, is approved for the topical treatment of external anogenital warts induced by human papilloma virus. Several clinical trials have shown imiquimod to be an effective and safe drug for treatment of anogenital warts. Consequently, it was considered that imiquimod might be effective on warts caused by the same aetiological agent located on other skin areas. We describe the favourable outcome of a case of multiple facial verrucae in a human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patient treated with imiquimod 5% cream. This is a promising finding which supports those of two previous reports. We feel that imiquimod could be used in HIV-infected patients with multiple facial warts in whom conventional therapies are ineffective or produce significant side-effects.

  8. Idiopathic CD4 T-Cell Lymphocytopenia: A Case Report of a Young Boy With Recalcitrant Warts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Loretta; Weinstein, Miriam

    2016-09-01

    Idiopathic CD4 T-cell lymphocytopenia (ICL) is an immunodeficiency disorder that presents with a decrease in CD4(+) T cells without evidence of a human immunodeficiency virus infection. It is most commonly diagnosed after a patient presents with an opportunistic infection and can also be associated with malignancies and autoimmune diseases. This case presentation and literature review highlights the common skin findings in patients with ICL, mainly recalcitrant warts, and discusses the treatment options available. The patient described is the youngest reported with ICL presenting with isolated cutaneous findings of recalcitrant warts and psoriasis. Many treatment options were tried for the warts, with the most significant response to acitretin. This case highlights the importance of considering underlying immunodeficiency in patients with recalcitrant warts as well as developing treatment plans. Such patients require close follow-up by both dermatology and immunology to monitor for the development of other diseases related to ICL. © The Author(s) 2016.

  9. Ongoing decline in genital warts among young heterosexuals 7 years after the Australian human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Eric P F; Read, Tim R H; Wigan, Rebecca; Donovan, Basil; Chen, Marcus Y; Bradshaw, Catriona S; Fairley, Christopher K

    2015-05-01

    Australia has provided free quadrivalent human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines to school girls since mid-2007 and a catch-up programme in the community to women aged up to 26 years in 2007-2009. We describe the temporal trend of genital warts in different populations in Melbourne. We analysed the proportion diagnosed with genital warts for all new patients attending Melbourne Sexual Health Centre from July 2004 to June 2014, stratified by different risk groups and age. Adjusted ORs were calculated to compare the annual trend in the proportion of patients with genital warts in different risk groups in the prevaccination period (before June 2007) and the vaccination period (after July 2007). The proportion with genital warts decreased in women aged 32 years, from 4.0% to 8.5% (p=0.037). The odds per year for diagnosis of genital warts adjusted for number of sexual partners in the vaccination period were 0.55 (95% CI 0.47 to 0.65) and 0.63 (95% CI 0.54 to 0.74) in women and heterosexual men aged warts in both women and men aged >32 years. A small annual decline in genital warts was observed in men who have sex with men (aOR=0.92; 95% CI 0.88 to 0.97). Genital warts have now become rare in young Australian women and heterosexual men 7 years after the launch of the national HPV vaccination programme but in stark contrast, remain common in men who have sex with men. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  10. Long-pulsed 1064-nm neodymium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser treatment for refractory warts on hands and feet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Utako; Takeuchi, Kaori; Kinoshita, Ayako; Takamori, Kenji; Suga, Yasushi

    2014-03-01

    Common warts (verruca vulgaris) are the most commonly seen benign cutaneous tumors. However, warts in the hands and feet regions often respond poorly to treatment, some are resistant to more than 6 months of treatment with currently available modalities, including cryotherapy, being defined as refractory warts. We investigated the usefulness of long-pulsed neodymium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (LP-Nd:YAG) treatment for refractory warts. The clinical trial was conducted on 20 subjects (11 male, nine female) with a total of 34 lesions (periungual/subungual areas, plantar areas, fingers and/or toes). All the subjects suffered from refractory warts despite conventional treatments for more than 6 months. The patients were administrated up to six sessions of treatment, at intervals of 4 weeks between sessions, with an LP-Nd:YAG at a spot size of 5 mm, pulse duration of 15 msec and fluence of 150-185 J/cm(2) . Evaluation of the treatment results at 24 weeks after the initial treatment showed complete clearance of the refractory warts in 56% of the patients. Histological evaluation showed separation of the dermis and epidermis at the basement membrane with coagulated necrosis of the wart tissue in the lower epidermis, as well as coagulation and destruction of the blood vessels in the papillary dermis following the laser irradiation. No scarring, post-hyperpigmentary changes or serious adverse events were documented. Our preliminary results show that LP-Nd:YAG treatments are safe and effective for refractory warts of hands and feet, causing minimal discomfort, and is a viable treatment alternative. © 2014 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  11. Intralesional tuberculin (PPD) versus measles, mumps, rubella (MMR) vaccine in treatment of multiple warts: a comparative clinical and immunological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaheen, Maha Adel; Salem, Samar Abdallah M; Fouad, Dina Adel; El-Fatah, Abeer Aly Abd

    2015-01-01

    Intralesional purified protein derivative (PPD) or mumps, measles, rubella (MMR) were not previously compared regarding their efficacy or mechanism of action in treatment of warts. We aimed to compare their efficacy in treatment of multiple warts and investigate their effect on serum interleukin (IL)-4 and IL-12. Thirty patients with multiple warts were included (10 treated with PPD, 10 with MMR, and 10 with normal saline (control)). Injection was done every 3 weeks until clearance or maximum of three treatments. Clinical response of target and distant warts was evaluated. Serum ILs-4 and -12 were assessed before and after treatment. A significantly higher rate of complete response was found in target and distant warts with PPD (60% each) and MMR (80%, 40%, respectively) compared with controls (0%), with no significant difference between both treatments. After treatment, the control group showed the lowest serum IL-12 and IL-4 levels compared with the MMR- and PPD-treated groups with statistically significant difference in between. MMR resulted in a significantly higher serum IL-12 than PPD. With PPD, IL-4 was increased with statistically significant change compared with pretreat-ment level. Intralesional PPD and MMR show comparable efficacy and safety in treatment of multiple warts. Serum ILs-4 and-12 increase following antigen injection. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Long-Pulsed Nd:YAG Laser Treatment of Warts: Report on a Series of 369 Cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Tae Young; Lee, Ji Ho; Lee, Chang Kyun; Ahn, Ji Young; Hong, Chang Kwun

    2009-01-01

    Various treatment methods have been adopted in the management of warts; however, there is still no consensus on first-line treatment. This study was designed to evaluate the efficacy of long-pulsed Nd:YAG laser in the treatment of warts. Over the course of 1 yr, 369 patients with recalcitrant or untreated warts were exposed to a long-pulsed Nd:YAG laser. The following parameters were used: spot size, 5 mm; pulse duration, 20 msec; and fluence, 200 J/cm2. No concomitant topical treatment was used. In all, 21 patients were lost during follow up; hence, the data for 348 patients were evaluated. The clearance rate was 96% (336 of the 348 treated warts were eradicated). The clearance rate of verruca vulgaris after the first treatment was very high (72.6%), whereas the clearance rate of deep palmopantar warts after the first treatment was low (44.1%). During a median follow-up period of 2.24 months (range, 2-10 months), 11 relapses were seen (recurrence rate, 3.27%). In conclusion, long-pulsed Nd:YAG laser is safe and effective for the removal or reduction of warts and is less dependent on patient compliance than are other treatment options. PMID:19794989

  13. Safety and effectiveness of autoinoculation therapy in cutaneous warts: a double--blind, randomized, placebo--controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lal, Niharika Ranjan; Sil, Amrita; Gayen, Tirthankar; Bandyopadhyay, Debabrata; Das, Nilay Kanti

    2014-01-01

    In spite of the availability of multiple treatment options, viral warts are known for their persistence and recurrence, causing frustration to patients and treating physicians. To study the effectiveness and safety of autoinoculation as a treatment modality in cutaneous warts. A double-blind, placebo-controlled study was carried out. In the treatment group, full-thickness warty tissue was excised, minced and implanted in a small dermal pocket. In the control group, warty tissue was only excised and not implanted, though a dermal pocket was made. Patients were evaluated every four weeks with lesion counts. The procedure was repeated at 4 and 8 weeks. Response was assessed at each visit and at 12 weeks. Forty-eight patients with cutaneous warts (male: female=32:16) were randomized into autoinoculation and control groups. The number of warts at baseline was comparable in both groups (P=0.293). Reduction in the number of warts was significantly more in the autoinoculation group (8.50±13.88) than in the control group (10.04±5.80) from 8 weeks onwards (P=0.010). Complete resolution occurred only in the autoinoculation group, in 62.5% of cases. Adverse effects were seen in 11 patients, including infection of the donor site (5 cases), keloid formation (3) and hypopigmentation (3). Autoinoculation may be an effective therapeutic modality for cutaneous warts and two sessions may be required for optimum results.

  14. A double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial of oral isotretinoin in the treatment of recalcitrant facial flat warts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olguin-García, María Guadalupe; Jurado-Santa Cruz, Fermín; Peralta-Pedrero, María Luisa; Morales-Sánchez, Martha Alejandra

    2015-02-01

    Abstract Background: Recalcitrant facial flat warts are caused by human papillomavirus and may persist for years despite treatment. Isotretinoin has demonstrated benefits in the treatment of recalcitrant, genital and common warts, but placebo-controlled trials have not been performed. To determine whether isotretinoin is safe and effective for recalcitrant facial flat warts. Isotretinoin 30 mg/day or placebo was administered to 16 and 15 patients, respectively, in double-blind, randomized fashion for 12 weeks. Cutaneous lesions were assessed and adverse events including serologic and ophthalmologic changes were recorded. It is considered that warts were recalcitrant if the patient was treated for at least 3 years with at least three of the following options: retinoids, 5-fluorouracil, imiquimod and cryotherapy using liquid nitrogen. Each patient in the istotretinoin group showed complete clearance of all flat warts, while none of the patients in the placebo group showed any improvement (p=0.0001). The most frequent adverse event was cheilitis. There were no statistically significant changes in the laboratory findings. The study design does not permit complete blinding of the dermatologist who can easily recognize the adverse effects of isotretinoin. The clinical findings, however, were so dramatic that this would not have impacted the findings. Another limitation of the study is a lack of follow-up to assess for recurrence after the drug was discontinued. Isotretinoin is an effective treatment for recalcitrant flat facial warts with a well-known, manageable safety profile.

  15. Use of intralesional interferon-alpha for the treatment of recalcitrant oral warts in patients with AIDS: a report of 4 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozada-Nur, F; Glick, M; Schubert, M; Silverberg, I

    2001-12-01

    Four human immunodeficiency virus-positive homosexual men with 2- to 4.5-year histories of recurrent oral warts that had failed to respond to conventional surgical and other treatment modalities were offered treatment with interferon-alpha. All had multiple or large oral warts, 3 had skin warts, 2 had a history of anal warts, and 1 had penile lesions. All 4 patients were treated with a combination of intralesional and subcutaneous interferon-alpha. Adverse side effects were dose-related, mild, and transient; they included flulike symptoms (3 patients), hair loss and tachycardia (1 patient), and transient changes in the white blood cell count. All patients responded to therapy and remained free of disease up to 42 months. Intralesional injection with interferon-alpha appears to provide excellent clinical control for recurrent, multiple, and extensive oral warts in the human immunodeficiency virus-positive population, and is a useful adjunct to initial surgical removal of oral warts.

  16. Four year efficacy of prophylactic human papillomavirus quadrivalent vaccine against low grade cervical, vulvar, and vaginal intraepithelial neoplasia and anogenital warts: randomised controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dillner, Joakim; Kjaer, Susanne K; Wheeler, Cosette M;

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the prophylactic efficacy of the human papillomavirus (HPV) quadrivalent vaccine in preventing low grade cervical, vulvar, and vaginal intraepithelial neoplasias and anogenital warts (condyloma acuminata)....

  17. GENITAL WARTS INCIDENCE IN SAINT-PETERBURG, LENINGRADSKAYA REGION, KARELIYA REPUBLIC IN 2004–2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Yu. Stebelko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. In 2012, information on vaccination against human papillomavirus infection was included in the form of state statistics number 5 «Information on vaccinations» in according to the Order of Rosstat number 645. In the world practice, as one of the early performance criteria of effectiveness of immunization against human papilloma virus is  morbidity rate by anogenital warts. The aim of this study was to investigate the regional characteristics of distribution of anogenital (venereal warts before and in the initial periods of vaccination against human papillomavirus infection in three regions of the North-West Federal Regions — Saint Petersburg, Leningrad Oblast, Republic of Karelia. The period of retrospective epidemiological analysis was 10 years. There were significant differences in the levels and trends, morbidity by anogenital warts in general population and by gender. Moreover, different patterns of the frequency of disease among household contacts were revealed. In all three areas persons of 18–29 years old were identified as the risk group. The importance of determining the characteristics of epidemic processes for specified nosology in each territory has been demonstrated.

  18. Molecular Epidemiological Study on Prevalence of Human Papillomaviruses in Patients with Common Warts in Beijing Area

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN-JUN LEI; RUN AN; CHEN-FANG DONG; YU-KANG YUAN; XIAO-PING DONG; CHEN GAO; CHEN WANG; JUN HAN; JIAN-MING CHEN; GUANG-CAI XIANG; QI SHI; HuI-YING JIANG; WEI ZHOU

    2009-01-01

    Objective To study the circulation, distribution, and genomic diversity of HPVs in common warts in Beijing area of China. Methods Forty eight patients with pathologically diagnosed common warts were screened for the presence of HPV with HPV type-specific PCR and direct .sequencing analysis. The genomic diversity of HPVs prevalent in Chinese patients was analyzed based on LCR. Results Forty one (85.5%) samples were positive for HPV DNA, 13(31.7%)-HPV-57, 12(29.3%)-HPV-1 a, 7(17%)-HPV-27 and 5(12.2%)-HPV-2a. Four cases were infected with two different HPV types, two (4.9%) with HPV-1a and HPV-27, one (2.4%) with HPV-1 and HPV-57 and one (2.4%) with HPV-27 and HPV-57. In contrast to the prevalence of single strain of novel HPV-57 variant and HPV-1 prototype, two HPV-2 and three HPV-27 novel variants were found to circulate in Beijing. Conclusion HPV-1, -2, -27 and -57 are predominantly prevalent in patients with common warts in Beijing.

  19. Effectiveness and safety profile of 40% trichloroacetic acid and cryotherapy for plantar warts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cengiz, Fatma Pelin; Emiroglu, Nazan; Su, Ozlem; Onsun, Nahide

    2016-09-01

    Plantar warts are one of the most common infectious skin disease caused by the human papillomavirus. In this study, cryotherapy with liquid nitrogen delivered by the physician, up to four treatments 2 weeks apart. Forty percent trichloroacetic acid (TCA) was applied to warts weekly up to four treatments. At the end of 4 weeks, the clinical improvement of the TCA group (n = 30) was six patients (20%) with no change, one patient (3.3%) with a mild response, 13 patients (43.3%) with a moderate response and 10 patients (33.3%) with a good response. In the cryotherapy group, clinical responses were 12 patients (40%) with no change, four patients (13.3%) with a mild response, 12 patients (40%) with a moderate response and two patients (6.7%) with a good response. There was a statistically significant difference in improvement between the two treatment groups (P = 0.027). According to our results, TCA 40% is more effective for clearance of plantar warts with significantly improved long-term safety profile.

  20. DEVELOPING CONTROL STRATEGIES OF POTATO WART DISEASE (SYNCHYTRIUM ENDOBIOTICUM IN TURKEY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hale Gunacti

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The ultimate purpose of this study was to control Potato Wart Disease. Thus, during 2010 – 2011, in order to control the Potato Wart Disease caused by Synchytrium endobioticum the efficacy of seed fungicides and soil fumigants, the influence of 15 different plants used as alternative cropping to potato and the extracts derived from carrot, onion, garlic and radish were examined on the sporangium viability. The results revealed that the roots of turnip tuber were the most effective treatment among four different plant extracts used. Sunflower and Rye were found to be promising alternative crops to potato for the region with 74% and 73% of sporangium mortality, respectively. The most effective fumigant application on the viability of Synchytrium endobioticum sporangia in the soil was Formaldehyde with a 93.8 – 97.5 % efficacy rate. The fungicide efficacy on the diseases occurrence changed from 25.2 % to 62.5 % comparing to control plots. Although significant differences were obtained numerically between efficacy ratios, no statistically significant differences were found in all applications. The most effective application on Potato Wart Disease occurrence was the dosages of 60 and 80 g /m2 of Metham Sodium among the four different concentrations of Formaldehyde, Metham Sodium, Dazomet and Urea as plant fertilizer.

  1. Detection of human papillomavirus in oral warts using in situ hybridization

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    Suzana Orsini Machado de Sousa

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The human papillomavirus is a group of DNA epitheliotrophic viruses associated with the etiology of benign and malignant oral warts. More than 100 types have been identified and among them, 24 have been found into the oral cavity. The aim of this study was to analyze human papillomavirus prevalence and its subtypes in 50 oral warts, of which 20 were squamous papillomas, 17 condylomaacuminatum and 13 verruca vulgaris. Method: In situ hybridization was used with biotinylated DNA probes for wide-spectrum HPV and with specific probes for human papillomavirus 6/11, human papillomavirus 16/18 and human papillomavirus 31/33. Results: Human papillomavirus was present in ten (20% of the 50 oral wart cases, 03 (3/20 squamous papillomas, 05 (5/17 condyloma acuminatum and 02 (2/13 verruca vulgaris. Of these, 8 (16% were positive to the HPV probe 6/11 being 5 condyloma acuminatum, 1 squamous papilloma and 2 verruca vulgaris. Three cases (6% demonstrated positivity to the human papillomavirus probe 16/18, with 2 being cases of condyloma and the other a case of squamous papilloma. Of the six positive cases to the human papillomavirus probe 31/33, (12% 4 were condyloma acuminatum and 2 squamous papillomas. Conclusion: The human papillomavirus expression (20% found in this study was low, but within the average found in the literature. Nonetheless, in addition to in situ hybridization, other methods may be necessary for confirming the presence of human papillomavirus.

  2. Cryotherapy with liquid nitrogen versus topical salicylic acid application for cutaneous warts in primary care: randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruggink, Sjoerd C.; Gussekloo, Jacobijn; Berger, Marjolein Y.; Zaaijer, Krista; Assendelft, Willem J.J.; de Waal, Margot W.M.; Bavinck, Jan Nico Bouwes; Koes, Bart W.; Eekhof, Just A.H.

    2010-01-01

    Background Cryotherapy is widely used for the treatment of cutaneous warts in primary care. However, evidence favours salicylic acid application. We compared the effectiveness of these treatments as well as a wait-and-see approach. Methods Consecutive patients with new cutaneous warts were recruited in 30 primary care practices in the Netherlands between May 1, 2006, and Jan. 26, 2007. We randomly allocated eligible patients to one of three groups: cryotherapy with liquid nitrogen every two weeks, self-application of salicylic acid daily or a wait-and-see approach. The primary outcome was the proportion of participants whose warts were all cured at 13 weeks. Analysis was on an intention-to-treat basis. Secondary outcomes included treatment adherence, side effects and treatment satisfaction. Research nurses assessed outcomes during home visits at 4, 13 and 26 weeks. Results Of the 250 participants (age 4 to 79 years), 240 were included in the analysis at 13 weeks (loss to follow-up 4%). Cure rates were 39% (95% confidence interval [CI] 29%–51%) in the cryotherapy group, 24% (95% CI 16%–35%) in the salicylic acid group and 16% (95% CI 9.5%–25%) in the wait-and-see group. Differences in effectiveness were most pronounced among participants with common warts (n = 116): cure rates were 49% (95% CI 34%–64%) in the cryotherapy group, 15% (95% CI 7%–30%) in the salicylic acid group and 8% (95% CI 3%–21%) in the wait-and-see group. Cure rates among the participants with plantar warts (n = 124) did not differ significantly between treatment groups. Interpretation For common warts, cryotherapy was the most effective therapy in primary care. For plantar warts, we found no clinically relevant difference in effectiveness between cryotherapy, topical application of salicylic acid or a wait-and-see approach after 13 weeks. (ClinicalTrial.gov registration no. ISRCTN42730629) PMID:20837684

  3. Evaluation of topical potassium hydroxide solution for treatment of plane warts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalil I Al-Hamdi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Plane wart is a common dermatological disease that is caused by human papilloma virus; although the rate of spontaneous recovery is high, it usually takes a long time to occur. Many modalities of treatments have been used but none of them proved to be uniformly effective. Potassium hydroxide (KOH solution is a well-known keratolytic agent with many dermatological uses. Objective: To evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of topical KOH solution in the treatment of plane warts. Materials and Methods: A total of 250 patients with plane warts, consulting the department of Dermatology and Venereology of Basra Teaching Hospital between March 2008 and October 2009, were enrolled in this opened therapeutic trial study. Patients were divided into two age and sex cross-matched equal groups; patients in group (A were treated with topical 5% KOH solution once at night, while patients in group (B were treated with topical 10% KOH solution once nightly. Only 107 patients from group (A and 95 patients from group (B completed the study, while the remainders were defaulted for unknown reasons. The patients were evaluated at second and fourth week to assess the cure rates and side effects, those patients who showed complete cure were followed up for 3 months to detect any recurrence. Results: At the end of second week, 9.3% of group (A patients showed complete disappearance of their warts, vs 66.3% of group (B patients. At the end of fourth week, 80.3% of group (A patients showed complete response in comparison with 82.1% of group (B patients. The side effects for the treating solution in both concentrations include itching, burning sensation, erythema, and temporary dyspigmentations, that were reported in 77.6% of group (A patients in comparison with 90.5% of group (B patients. Recurrence rate was reported in 5.8% of group (A patients vs 5.1% of group (B patients during the three months period of follow-up. Conclusions: Topical KOH solution is

  4. Cost analysis of Human Papillomavirus-related cervical diseases and genital warts in Swaziland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartorius, Benn; Dlamini, Xolisile; Östensson, Ellinor

    2017-01-01

    Background Human papillomavirus (HPV) has proven to be the cause of several severe clinical conditions on the cervix, vulva, vagina, anus, oropharynx and penis. Several studies have assessed the costs of cervical lesions, cervical cancer (CC), and genital warts. However, few have been done in Africa and none in Swaziland. Cost analysis is critical in providing useful information for economic evaluations to guide policymakers concerned with the allocation of resources in order to reduce the disease burden. Materials and methods A prevalence-based cost of illness (COI) methodology was used to investigate the economic burden of HPV-related diseases. We used a top-down approach for the cost associated with hospital care and a bottom-up approach to estimate the cost associated with outpatient and primary care. The current study was conducted from a provider perspective since the state bears the majority of the costs of screening and treatment in Swaziland. All identifiable direct medical costs were considered for cervical lesions, cervical cancer and genital warts, which were primary diagnoses during 2015. A mix of bottom up micro-costing ingredients approach and top-down approaches was used to collect data on costs. All costs were computed at the price level of 2015 and converted to dollars ($). Results The total annual estimated direct medical cost associated with screening, managing and treating cervical lesions, CC and genital warts in Swaziland was $16 million. The largest cost in the analysis was estimated for treatment of high-grade cervical lesions and cervical cancer representing 80% of the total cost ($12.6 million). Costs for screening only represented 5% of the total cost ($0.9 million). Treatment of genital warts represented 6% of the total cost ($1million). Conclusion According to the cost estimations in this study, the economic burden of HPV-related cervical diseases and genital warts represents a major public health issue in Swaziland. Prevention of HPV

  5. Comparative study of topical 80% trichloroacetic acid with 35% trichloroacetic acid in the treatment of the common wart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezeshkpoor, Fakhrozaman; Banihashemi, Mahnaz; Yazdanpanah, Mohammad Javad; Yousefzadeh, Hadis; Sharghi, Mohammad; Hoseinzadeh, Hossein

    2012-11-01

    Common warts caused by the human papillomavirus (HPV) are considered to be the most common infectious skin disease. No individual treatment for common warts is effective as monotherapy in eradicating the lesions. The aim of this study is to evaluate the clinical efficacy of a 35% and an 80% trichloroacetic acid (TCA) solution in the treatment of the common wart. In this single-blinded clinical trial, 62 eligible patients with common warts referred to the dermatology clinic of Ghaem Hospital in Mashhad, Iran. Patients were randomly divided into two groups, each treated with a TCA solution (group A, TCA 80%; group B, TCA 35%) once per week until complete clearance of the lesions or for a maximum duration of six weeks. Seven patients were excluded from the final analysis (one patient in group A and six patients in group B) for various reasons, including irregular follow-up, using physical tools such as razor blades to remove the lesion, and failure to complete treatment; and 55 patients were included in the final analysis. Improvement to treatment responses was classified as: no change (no changes in the number of warts), mild (clearing of less than 25% of warts), moderate (clearing of 25% to 75% of warts), and good (clearing of more than 75% of warts). At the end of follow-up, the clinical improvement of group A (n=30) was: 10 patients (33.3%) with a mild response, 6 patients (20%) with a moderate response, and 14 patients (46.7%) with a good response. In group B (n=25), 16 patients (64%) showed a mild response, 6 patients (24%) a moderate response, and 3 patients (12%) a good response. There was a statistically significant difference in improvement between the two treatment groups (P=.017). Improvement was greater with a higher concentration of TCA solution. This study showed that a different concentration of TCA solution was an effective form of treatment for common warts. Trichloroacetic acid 80% is more effective, but this solution must be used only with careful

  6. Decline in in-patient treatments of genital warts among young Australians following the national HPV vaccination program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background There has been a rapid decline in the number of young heterosexuals diagnosed with genital warts at outpatient sexual health services since the national human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination program started in Australia in 2007. We assessed the impact of the vaccination program on the number of in-patient treatments for genital warts. Methods Data on in-patient treatments of genital warts in all private hospitals were extracted from the Medicare website. Medicare is the universal health insurance scheme of Australia. In the vaccine period (2007–2011) and pre-vaccine period (2000–2007) we calculated the percentage change in treatment numbers and trends in annual treatment rates in private hospitals. Australian population data were used to calculate rates. Summary rate ratios of average annual trends were determined. Results Between 2000 and 2011, 6,014 women and 936 men aged 15–44 years underwent in-patient treatment for genital warts in private hospitals. In 15–24 year old women, there was a significant decreasing trend in annual treatment rates of vulval/vaginal warts in the vaccine period (overall decrease of 85.3% in treatment numbers from 2007 to 2011) compared to no significant trend in the pre-vaccine period (summary rate ratio (SRR) = 0.33, p warts in the vaccine period (decrease of 70.6%) compared to an increasing trend in the pre-vaccine period (SRR = 0.76, p = 0.02). In 25–34 year old men there was a significant decreasing trend in the vaccine period compared to no change in the pre-vaccine period (SRR = 0.81, p = 0.04) and in 35–44 year old men there was no significant change in rates of penile warts both periods, but the rate of change was greater in the vaccine period (SRR = 0.70, p = 0.02). Conclusions The marked decline in in-patient treatment of vulval/vaginal warts in the youngest women is probably attributable to the HPV vaccine program. The moderate decline in in-patient treatments for

  7. Fractional Laser-Assisted Topical Imiquimod 5% Cream Treatment for Recalcitrant Common Warts in Children: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sung-Min; Kim, Gun-Wook; Mun, Je-Ho; Song, Margaret; Kim, Hoon-Soo; Kim, Byung-Soo; Kim, Moon-Bum; Ko, Hyun-Chang

    2016-12-01

    Conventional treatments for warts like cryotherapy are limited by the pain during procedures, especially in pediatric patients. Imiquimod is a topical immune response modifier, but the thick stratum corneum of common warts prevents drug permeation through skin. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of fractional laser/topical 5% imiquimod cream for the treatment of warts in children. Eleven pediatric patients with multiple recalcitrant common warts were included. Lesions were treated using an ablative fractional 2,940-nm Er:YAG laser at 1- or 2-week interval. After each laser treatment session, imiquimod 5% cream was self-applied once daily 5 days a week. Response and adverse effects were assessed 2 weekly until complete clearance or up to maximum of 48 weeks. Pain during fractional laser was assessed using a visual analogue scale (0-10). Eight of the 11 (72.7%) children experienced complete clearance. Mean duration was 29.7 (16-48) weeks, and the mean number of fractional laser was 17.5 (8-37). No significant adverse effect was observed. Pain visual analogue scale during fractional laser was 2.4 (1-4) compared to 6.2 (5-8) during cryotherapy. This pilot study indicates that fractional laser-assisted topical imiquimod may provide benefit for recalcitrant warts in children.

  8. Detection of bovine papilloma viruses in wart-like lesions of upper gastrointestinal tract of cattle and buffaloes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, P; Nagarajan, N; Saikumar, G; Arya, R S; Somvanshi, R

    2015-06-01

    In present investigation, etiopathological characterization of upper gastrointestinal tract (GIT) tumours of cattle and buffaloes was undertaken. A total of 27 GIT wart-like lesions in rumen, reticulum, mouth and oesophagus of cattle and buffaloes revealed the presence of small nodular to larger spherical or slender growths with thin base present on mucosa and ruminal pillar. Histopathologically, these cases were diagnosed as fibropapilloma/papilloma. This is the first world record on ruminal papillomatosis in buffaloes. Ruminal warts of cattle and buffaloes revealed the presence of BPV-5, -1 & -2, which is the first report of presence of these BPVs in the ruminal warts from India. Quantitative real-time PCR revealed that DNA samples of different GIT wart-like lesions contained varying amount of BPV DNA copy numbers. Immunohistochemistry revealed that the PCNA and Ki67 immunopositivity was present in the basal and spinosum layer of the fibropapilloma/papilloma, indicating these as the cellular proliferation site. In conclusion, the present investigation revealed that BPV-5, -1 & -2 are associated with certain ruminal wart-like lesions/growths in cattle and buffaloes, and the basal and spinosum layer of the ruminal fibropapilloma/papilloma were cellular proliferation sites.

  9. Four year efficacy of prophylactic human papillomavirus quadrivalent vaccine against low grade cervical, vulvar, and vaginal intraepithelial neoplasia and anogenital warts: randomised controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dillner, Joakim; Kjaer, Susanne K; Wheeler, Cosette M;

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the prophylactic efficacy of the human papillomavirus (HPV) quadrivalent vaccine in preventing low grade cervical, vulvar, and vaginal intraepithelial neoplasias and anogenital warts (condyloma acuminata).......To evaluate the prophylactic efficacy of the human papillomavirus (HPV) quadrivalent vaccine in preventing low grade cervical, vulvar, and vaginal intraepithelial neoplasias and anogenital warts (condyloma acuminata)....

  10. Decline in genital warts diagnoses among young women and young men since the introduction of the bivalent HPV (16/18) vaccination programme in England: an ecological analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canvin, M; Sinka, K; Hughes, G; Mesher, D

    2017-03-01

    For several decades, diagnoses of genital warts at genitourinary medicine (GUM) clinics in England had been increasing. In 2008, a national human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination programme was introduced using the bivalent vaccine (types 16 and 18 only). A decrease in genital warts was not anticipated. However, rates of genital warts in GUM clinics have declined significantly since the introduction of the vaccine. Using data from GUM clinics across England, we analysed rates of genital warts by age, gender, sexual orientation and estimated vaccine coverage. The reduction in rates of genital warts diagnoses at GUM clinics between 2009 and 2014 was 30.6% among young women aged 15-19 years and 25.4% among same age heterosexual young men. Overall there was an association showing higher warts reduction with increasing vaccination coverage with the largest declines in warts diagnoses observed in young women aged 15 years (50.9%) with the highest vaccination coverage. No such declines were observed in men who have sex with men (MSM) of the same age. The results of these ecological analyses are strongly in keeping with the bivalent HPV vaccine providing modest protection against genital warts. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  11. Paring and intense pulsed light versus paring alone for recalcitrant hand and foot warts: a randomized clinical trial with blinded outcome evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Togsverd-Bo, Katrine; Gluud, Christian; Winkel, Per

    2010-01-01

    Treatment of recalcitrant viral warts remains a therapeutic challenge. Intense pulsed light (IPL) has been suggested effective to clear wart tissue. The objective was in a randomized controlled trial to assess the efficacy of paring followed by IPL versus paring alone for recalcitrant hand and foot...

  12. Prevalence, Incidence, and Clearance of Anogenital Warts in Kenyan Men Reporting High-Risk Sexual Behavior, Including Men Who Have Sex With Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neme, Santiago; Wahome, Elizabeth; Mwashigadi, Grace; Thiong'o, Alexander N.; Stekler, Joanne D.; Wald, Anna; Sanders, Eduard J.; Graham, Susan M.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Human papillomavirus (HPV) causes a spectrum of disease, ranging from warts to cancer. Prevalence, incidence, and factors associated with anogenital warts in East African men are unknown. Methods. Kenyan men reporting high-risk sexual behavior were inspected for anogenital warts at enrollment and follow-up visits. Logistic regression was performed to identify associations with anogenital warts at baseline. Cox regression was performed to analyze predictors of incident anogenital warts, and Kaplan–Meier curves were used to estimate clearance. Results. Baseline anogenital wart prevalence in 1137 men was 2.9% (95% confidence interval [CI], 2.0%–4.0%) overall, 2.0% in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-uninfected men, and 9.4% in HIV-1-infected men (adjusted odds ratio, 5.43; 95% CI, 2.03–11.29). Over a median of 1.4 years, anogenital wart incidence among 1104 men was 5.3 (95% CI, 4.3–6.5) per 100 person-years. Having HIV-1 infection at baseline (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR], 1.66; 95% CI, 1.01–2.72) or a genital syndrome during follow-up (aHR, 4.78; 95% CI, 3.03–7.56) was associated with increased wart incidence. Wart clearance was lower in HIV-1-infected men (log-rank Pwart prevalence and incidence were increased in HIV-1-infected men, and anogenital warts co-occurred with other genital syndromes. Quadrivalent HPV vaccination should be recommended for young men in settings with high HIV-1 prevalence. PMID:26110169

  13. Treatment of Athlete's Plantar Warts Using a Botanical Blend: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Erik O; Kozin, Adam F; Ruiz, Guillermo; Lasku, Arben; Langland, Jeffrey O

    2017-05-01

    Context • Viral plantar warts, or verruca plantaris, are a benign epithelial tumor caused by various strains of the human papilloma virus (HPV). Current treatments have had mixed degrees of success, are moderately invasive, and are often incompatible with participation in sports. Objective • The study intended to examine the benefits of treating plantar warts with a topical, botanical blend that has had clinical success treating herpes simplex virus cold sores. Methods • A synergistic botanical blend was applied topically. Setting • The case report was completed at the Southwest College of Naturopathic Medicine (Tempe, Arizona, USA). Participant • The participant was a 24-y-old male soccer player, 177.8 cm tall, and weighing 69 kg with previously diagnosed, viral mosaic warts. Intervention • The patient used a pumice stone during bathing for the first week to remove dead tissue and ensure sufficient contact and entry of the botanical gel into infected tissue. After drying the area, the patient applied the botanical gel blend 1 to 2 times daily postshower, spreading it evenly across the surface of the entire lesion. The patient discontinued the exfoliation technique after the first week. Results • Within the first week of treatment, the patient noted changes to the infected area of the hallux epidermal tissue. The combination of exfoliation and application of the gel caused marked, visible differences in presentation by the fifth day of treatment. At 1-mo postintervention, or day 90, the epidermal tissue was asymptomatic and devoid of petechiae, malformations, or visible infection. Conclusions • The results of the current case study directly contrast with the drawbacks of commonly accepted, first-line interventions in the treatment of viral plantar warts and, in many respects, demonstrate better efficacy and fewer side effects than the standard of care. The positive results also highlight the necessity for additional study in the fields of sports

  14. Macular pigmentation complicating irritant contact dermatitis and viral warts in Laugier-Hunziker syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhoyrul, B; Paulus, J

    2016-04-01

    Laugier-Hunziker syndrome (LHS) is a rare acquired disorder characterized by macu-lar pigmentation of the lips and oral mucosa, with frequent longitudinal melanonychia. Involvement of other areas, such as the genitalia and fingers, has rarely been described. LHS is a benign condition with no known systemic manifestations. We report the case of a woman who developed melanotic macules on her fingers and elbow 16 years after the onset of pigmentation of her lips. This unusual feature of LHS in our patient was associated with irritant contact dermatitis and viral warts. Only two cases of an association with an inflammatory dermatosis have been reported previously in the literature.

  15. Presence and structure of the wart layer in tracheids of some junipers as visualised in the scanning electron micscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Józef Kocoń

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The presence and structure of the wart layer was investigated in the tracheids of the following juniper species: J. communis L., J. communis var. saxatilis Pall., J. sabina L., J. virginiana L., J. chinensis L. and J. squamata Lamb. The wart layer was found to be present in the tracheids of the stem, roots and branches of spring and summer growths, thus, it is an integral element of their structure. It would seem that this layer is a trait of these juniper species and may be one of the taxonomic features of their wood.

  16. Salvador-warts-hippo signaling promotes Drosophila posterior follicle cell maturation downstream of notch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polesello, Cédric; Tapon, Nicolas

    2007-11-06

    The Salvador Warts Hippo (SWH) network limits tissue size in Drosophila and vertebrates [1]. Decreased SWH pathway activity gives rise to excess proliferation and reduced apoptosis. The core of the SWH network is composed of two serine/threonine kinases Hippo (Hpo) and Warts (Wts), the scaffold proteins Salvador (Sav) and Mats, and the transcriptional coactivator Yorkie (Yki) [1]. Two band 4.1 related proteins, Merlin (Mer) and Expanded (Ex), have been proposed to act upstream of Hpo, which in turn activates Wts ([1] for review). Wts phosphorylates and inhibits Yki, repressing the expression of Yki target genes [2-4]. Recently, several planar cell polarity (PCP) genes have been implicated in the SWH network in growth control [5-8]. Here, we show that, during oogenesis, the core components of the SWH network are required in posterior follicle cells (PFCs) competent to receive the Gurken (Grk)/TGFalpha signal emitted by the oocyte to control body axis formation. Our results suggest that the SWH network controls the expression of Hindsight, the downstream effector of Notch, required for follicle cell mitotic cycle-endocycle switch. The PCP members of the SWH network are not involved in this process, indicating that signaling upstream of Hpo varies according to developmental context.

  17. Adverse Psychosexual Impact Related to the Treatment of Genital Warts and Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Bittencourt Campaner

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To compare the psychosexual impact related to the treatment of genital warts and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN in women. Methods. 75 patients presenting with HPV-induced genital lesions, belonging to one of two patient groups, were included in the study: 29 individuals with genital warts (GWs and 46 individuals with CIN grades 2 or 3 (CIN 2/3. Initially, medical charts of each woman were examined for extraction of data on the type of HPV-induced infection and treatment administered. Subjects were interviewed to collect sociodemographic data as well as personal, gynecologic, obstetric, and sexual history. After this initial anamnesis, the Sexual Quotient-Female Version (SQ-F questionnaire was applied to assess sexual function. After application of the questionnaire, patients answered specific questions produced by the researchers, aimed at assessing the impact of the disease and its treatment on their sexual lives. Results. It is noteworthy that patients with CIN 2/3 had statistically similar classification of sexual quotient to patients with GWs (P=0.115. However, patients with GWs more frequently gave positive answers to the specific questions compared to patients with CIN 2/3. Conclusion. Based on these findings, it is clear that GWs have a greater impact on sexual behavior compared to CIN 2/3.

  18. Prevalence of cutaneous warts in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Luisa Moreira; Santos, Willer Goncalves Dourado; Santiago, Mittermayer Barretto

    2016-09-30

    The aim of this study was to review and evaluate systematically the scientific evidence on the relationship between systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and cutaneous warts (CW) caused by human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. With strict inclusion and exclusion criteria, we extensively searched the PUBMED, BVS (Virtual Health Library), and SCOPUS databases for the studies that evaluated the prevalence of CW in patients with SLE. Secondary references were additionally obtained from the selected articles. Only four articles met the research criteria and showed a higher frequency of CW in SLE patients compared to healthy controls. One of them highlighted about rheumatoid factor (RF) in the sera of patients with SLE and found an inverse correlation between the occurrence of warts and RF autoantibody. Moreover, most of the selected articles showed that the presence of CW did not correlate with the use of immunosuppressive drugs. Therefore, these findings suggest that the prevalence of CW in patients with SLE is probably high due to the defects in immune mechanisms, independently of immunosuppressive drugs.

  19. Vaccines against human papillomavirus infections: protection against cancer, genital warts or both?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joura, E A; Pils, S

    2016-12-01

    Since 2006, three vaccines against infections and disease caused by human papillomavirus (HPV) became available in Europe-in 2006 a quadrivalent HPV 6/11/16/18 vaccine, in 2007 a bivalent HPV 16/18 vaccine and in 2015 a nonavalent HPV 6/11/16/18/31/33/45/52/58 vaccine. HPV 16 and 18 are the most oncogenic HPV strains, causing about 70% of cervical and other HPV-related cancers, HPV 6 and 11 cause 85% of all genital warts. The additional types of the polyvalent vaccine account for about 20% of invasive cervical cancer and >35% of pre-cancer. The potential differences between these vaccines caused some debate. All three vaccines give a robust and long-lasting protection against the strains in the various vaccines. The promise of cross-protection against other types (i.e. HPV 31/33/45) and hence a broader cancer protection was not fulfilled because these observations were confounded by the vaccine efficacy against the vaccine types. Furthermore, cross-protection was not consistent over various studies, not durable and not consistently seen in the real world experience. The protection against disease caused by oncogenic HPV strains was not compromised by the protection against low-risk types causing genital warts. The most effective cancer protection to date can be expected by the nonavalent vaccine, data indicate a 97% efficacy against cervical and vulvovaginal pre-cancer caused by these nine HPV types.

  20. Combination of Circumcision and Microwave in Treatment of Genital Warts in Uncircumcised Patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    樊翌明; 马泽粦; 吴志华; 李顺凡; 陈秋霞

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the efficacy of combina-tion of circumcision and microwave on genital warts in uncircumcised men.Methods: A randomized, prospective study of 109 uncircumcised adult men with genital warts was con-ducted in a STD clinic in Zhanjiang, Guangdong. One group (n=54) received microwave therapy only, while the other group (n=55) was taken the combination of circumcision and microwave therapy. The recurrences were observed at the end of months 3, 6 and 12, and operative complications were also recorded.Results: There were no significant differences in the mean age and duration of the disease between two groups (P>0.05). No serious operative complications were documented. The recurrence rate in circumci-sion plus microwave group was markedly lower than that in microwave group (12.7% vs 29.6%, PO.05).Conclusion: Circumcision can be safely performed under local anesthesia in an outpatient setting. Com-bination of circumcision and microwave can produce excellent effect as well as less tissue damage,therefore, it may be ideal for uncircumcised patients with extensive condvlomas.

  1. CD4+ cell count and HIV load as predictors of size of anal warts over time in HIV-infected women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luu, Hung N; Amirian, E Susan; Chan, Wenyaw; Beasley, R Palmer; Piller, Linda B; Scheurer, Michael E

    2012-02-15

    Little is known about the associations between CD4(+) cell counts, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) load, and human papillomavirus "low-risk" types in noncancerous clinical outcomes. This study examined whether CD4(+) count and HIV load predict the size of the largest anal warts in 976 HIV-infected women in an ongoing cohort. A linear mixed model was used to determine the association between size of anal wart and CD4(+) count and HIV load. The incidence of anal warts was 4.15 cases per 100 person-years (95% confidence interval [CI], 3.83-4.77) and 1.30 cases per 100 person-years (95% CI, 1.00-1.58) in HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected women, respectively. There appeared to be an inverse association between size of the largest anal warts and CD4(+) count at baseline; however, this was not statistically significant. There was no association between size of the largest anal warts and CD4(+) count or HIV load over time. There was no evidence for an association between size of the largest anal warts and CD4(+) count or HIV load over time. Further exploration on the role of immune response on the development of anal warts is warranted in a larger study.

  2. Photodynamic therapy (PDT and waterfiltered infrared A (wIRA in patients with recalcitrant common hand and foot warts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoffmann, Gerd

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Common warts (verrucae vulgares are human papilloma virus (HPV infections with a high incidence and prevalence, most often affecting hands and feet, being able to impair quality of life. About 30 different therapeutic regimens described in literature reveal a lack of a single striking strategy. Recent publications showed positive results of photodynamic therapy (PDT with 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA in the treatment of HPV-induced skin diseases, especially warts, using visible light (VIS to stimulate an absorption band of endogenously formed protoporphyrin IX. Additional experiences adding waterfiltered infrared A (wIRA during 5-ALA-PDT revealed positive effects. Aim of the study: First prospective randomised controlled blind study including PDT and wIRA in the treatment of recalcitrant common hand and foot warts. Comparison of "5-ALA cream (ALA vs. placebo cream (PLC" and "irradiation with visible light and wIRA (VIS+wIRA vs. irradiation with visible light alone (VIS". Methods: Pre-treatment with keratolysis (salicylic acid and curettage. PDT treatment: topical application of 5-ALA (Medac in "unguentum emulsificans aquosum" vs. placebo; irradiation: combination of VIS and a large amount of wIRA (Hydrosun® radiator type 501, 4 mm water cuvette, waterfiltered spectrum 590-1400 nm, contact-free, typically painless vs. VIS alone. Post-treatment with retinoic acid ointment. One to three therapy cycles every 3 weeks. Main variable of interest: "Percent change of total wart area of each patient over the time" (18 weeks. Global judgement by patient and by physician and subjective rating of feeling/pain (visual analogue scales. 80 patients with therapy-resistant common hand and foot warts were assigned randomly into one of the four therapy groups with comparable numbers of warts at comparable sites in all groups. Results: The individual total wart area decreased during 18 weeks in group 1 (ALA+VIS+wIRA and in group 2 (PLC

  3. Topical pyruvic acid (70% versus topical salicylic acid (16.7% compound in treatment of plantar warts: A randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zabihollah Shahmoradi

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Topical pyruvic acid and compound salicylic acid had the same efficacy and complications in treating plantar warts. Decision for choosing the treatment can be made based on the costs and individual factors as well as patients preferences.

  4. Genital Warts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Boards study tools Online Learning Center Meetings and events Make a difference Career planning Media Relations Toolkit AAD apps Academy meeting Chronic urticaria—for members Chronic urticaria—for public Dermatology World Dialogues in Dermatology JAAD Mohs AUC ...

  5. Anal Warts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Assessment and Safety Committee Initiatives Past Presidents Healthcare Economics Committee 2017 Tripartite Meeting Search form Search Login Join Now Find a Surgeon You are here Patients / Resources / ...

  6. Decline in hospitalization for genital warts in the Veneto region after an HPV vaccination program: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocchio, Silvia; Baldovin, Tatjana; Bertoncello, Chiara; Buja, Alessandra; Furlan, Patrizia; Saia, Mario; Baldo, Vincenzo

    2017-04-05

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is one of the most common sexually transmitted pathogens. This observational study was conducted to estimate the trend of hospitalization for genital warts (GWs) in the Veneto region (Italy) from 2004 to 2015. All patients with GWs were identified in the hospital discharge records of all public and accredited private hospitals that related to Veneto residents and contained the ICD9-CM code 078.11 associated with a genital surgical procedure (vulval/vaginal warts, penile warts and anal warts). Annual total and sex- and age-specific hospitalization rates and trends were calculated and correlated with the different HPV vaccine coverage over the study period. An annual rate of 11.8 per 100,000 population (8.6 per 100,000 males, and 14.8 per 100,000 females) was found, corresponding to 6076 hospitalizations for condyloma (53.3% vulval/vaginal, 35.8% anal, 8.3% penile, and 2.6% both penile or vulval/vaginal and anal). Among females, the rate of overall GWs remained stable to 2007 (19.1 per 100,000), then dropped significantly, reaching a rate of 11.3 per 100,000 in 2015 (average annual percent changes [AAPC]: -6.1%; 95% CI: -8.4; -3.7). For males, the overall rate increased over the study period (from 6.4 per 100,000 in 2004 to 10.8 per 100,000 in 2015; AAPC: 3.8%; 95% CI: 1.2; 6.4). Among the potentially vaccinated females (12- to 20-year-olds) there was a 62.1% decrease in the number of vulval/vaginal warts from the years 2010-2012 to the years 2013-2015 due to an increase in the HPV coverage rate. A similar reduction among males was observed in the same period and the same age group for penile warts (-68.2%). GWs have an important impact on the health services and data suggest that GW-related hospitalization rates rapidly decline in a population with a high HPV vaccination coverage (about 75%). Further efforts should be made to better clarify the epidemiological picture regarding HPV-related diseases, with particular regard to sexual

  7. The comparison study of 5 Fluorouracil vs. cryotherpy in the treatment of the backhand resistant common wart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahim Asghariazar

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Wart is a common disease which is caused by a group of viruses called Human Papilloma Virus. The most prevalent type of wart is common wart and the most prevalent site of involvement is hands. Complete recovery, no recurrency and effectiveness in all patients are not obtained by any of therapeutic methods, so in this study we decided to compare therapeutic effects of 5 Fluorouracil (FU with cryotherapy in treatment of common warts of backhand. Material and Methods: In this study, in a one year period from March 2012 to March 2013, 60 patients that referred to dermatology clinic of Sina hospital included the study with the diagnosis of backhand wart .Patients were divided into two groups of treatment, one treated with cryotherapy (30 patients and one threated with 5 FU (30 patients. Age and gender of patients, number of lesions and duration of involvement were documented. Treatment by topical 5 FU was implemented for 4 weeks, twice a day for 4 hours each course. Second group was treated by cryotherapy (liquid nitrogen spray, two sessions with a two-week interval between sessions. Their response to treatment was evaluated as good, moderate and weak. Results: There was no difference in age, gender and mean of duration of involvement and number of lesions between two groups. Response to treatment was considerably better in 5 FU group (p=0.02. Also rate of relapse and complications were lower in 5 FU group of treatment, with a statistically significant difference compared to the cryotherapy group (P<0.001. In separate evaluation of complications only scar formation was equal in two groups and pain and bullae formation were lower in 5 FU group with a statistically significant difference (P<0.001 both. Conclusions: According to limited studies in this field, results of this study could be the base of more comprehensive studies in evaluating the efficacy of 5 FU in treatment of common warts. Appropriate therapeutic response in addition to

  8. Imiquimod 3.75% Cream Applied Daily to Treat Anogenital Warts: Combined Results from Women in Two Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A. Baker

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To evaluate if new imiquimod formulations using a shorter treatment duration are safe and efficacious to treat anogenital warts. Methods. In two studies 534 women ≥12 years of age (mean 33.4 with 2–30 warts (mean 7.9 and total wart area ≥10 mm2 (mean 166.3 were randomized (1 : 2 : 2 to placebo (106, imiquimod 2.5% (212 or 3.75% (216 creams applied once daily until complete clearance or a maximum of 8 weeks. Results. For placebo, imiquimod 2.5% and 3.75%, respectively, complete clearance of all warts was achieved in 14.2%, 28.3%, and 36.6% of women (intent-to-treat, P=0.008 imiquimod 2.5%, and P<0.001 3.75% versus placebo. Mean changes in wart counts were −10.7%, −50.9%, and −63.5% (per-protocol, P<0.001 each active versus placebo and safety-related discontinuation rates 0.9%, 1.4%, and 2.3%. Conclusions. Imiquimod 3.75% applied daily for up to 8 weeks was well tolerated and superior to placebo in treating women with external anogenital warts.

  9. Human papillomavirus types detected in skin warts and cancer differ in their transforming properties but commonly counteract UVB induced protective responses in human keratinocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shterzer, Naama; Heyman, Dariya; Shapiro, Beny; Yaniv, Abraham; Jackman, Anna [Department of Clinical Microbiology and Immunology, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv (Israel); Serour, Francis [Department of Pediatric Surgery, The E. Wolfson Medical Center, Holon (Israel); Chaouat, Malka [Laboratory of Experimental Surgery, Hadassah University Hospital, Ein Karem, Jerusalem (Israel); Gonen, Pinhas [Department of Clinical Microbiology and Immunology, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv (Israel); Tommasino, Massimo [International Agency for Research on Cancer, World Health Organization, Lyon (France); Sherman, Levana [Department of Clinical Microbiology and Immunology, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv (Israel)

    2014-11-15

    In the present study, E6E7 and E6 proteins of human papillomaviruses (HPVs) associated with skin warts and cancer were compared for their transforming and carcinogenic abilities in primary human keratinocytes (PHKs). We show that E6E7 of cancer associated beta HPV types, notably 49 and 24, were able to extend the life span and enhance the clonogenic efficiency of PHKs when maintained in serum free/low calcium medium. Activities of the beta HPV E6E7 were lower than those of HPV16 E6E7. In contrast, E6 proteins from HPV types detected in skin warts or cancer, notably 10, 49 and 38, attenuated UVB induced protective responses in PHKs including cell death, proliferation arrest and accumulation of the proapoptotic proteins, p53, bax or bak. Together, this investigation revealed functional differences and commonalities between HPVs associated with skin warts and cancer, and allowed the identification of specific properties of beta HPVs supporting their involvement in skin carcinogenesis. - Highlights: • Primary keratinocytes were used to evaluate transforming and carcinogenic abilities of cutaneous HPVs. • E6E7 of cancer associated β HPV types transform primary human keratinocytes. • E6 proteins of cancer and wart associated HPVs inhibit UVB induced cell death. • E6s of cancer and wart associated HPVs attenuate UVB induced proliferation arrest. • E6s of cancer and wart associated HPVs attenuate UVB induced apoptosis signaling.

  10. Effects of high mobility group protein box 1 and toll like receptor 4 pathway on warts caused by human papillomavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Hui; Liu, Hongbo; Deng, Yunhua; Xie, Yuyan; Shen, Guanxin

    2014-10-01

    Accumulative evidence has demonstrated that inflammation has an important role in human papillomavirus (HPV) oncogenicity. However, the effects of high mobility group protein box 1 (HMGB1)-toll like receptor 4 (TLR4) signaling pathway associated inflammation on epidermal warts caused by HPV remain unclear. The present study investigated the HMGB1, TLR4 and nuclear factor-κB p65 expression in condyloma acuminatum (CA) and verruca vulgaris (VV). Immunohistochemistry and western blot analysis revealed that p65 expression in epithelial nuclei in VV and CA was significantly higher than in normal skin (NS) (Pwarts caused by HPV. HMGB1-TLR4 pathway-associated inflammation may therefore have a pivotal role in CA. HMGB1, rather than TLR4, may be a vital mediator of inflammation in VV. Therapies targeting HMGB1 may be a potential strategy for the treatment of HPV-associated warts.

  11. Comment: The comparison study of 5 Fluorouracil vs. cryotherpy in the treatment of the backhand resistant common wart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Chuh

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available We refer to the study conducted by Asghariazar R et al comparing the efficacy of 5-fluorouracil against cryotherapy in the management of backhand resistant common warts [1]. We congratulate their success in reporting such a high-quality study. We would humbly like to offer a few pieces of advice, which might further augment the clinical relevance and the scientific content for future studies along similar veins.

  12. Genetic diversity of bovine papillomavirus types, including two putative new types, in teat warts from dairy cattle herds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunardi, Michele; de Camargo Tozato, Claudia; Alfieri, Alice Fernandes; de Alcântara, Brígida Kussumoto; Vilas-Boas, Laurival Antonio; Otonel, Rodrigo Alejandro Arellano; Headley, Selwyn Arlington; Alfieri, Amauri Alcindo

    2016-06-01

    Teat papillomatosis affects dairy cows worldwide. Milking can become difficult due to teat warts, and maintaining affected cows in the herds may diminish economic profit in the dairy industry. Currently, 13 bovine papillomavirus (BPV) types have been fully characterized, and numerous putative BPV types have been identified through partial L1 gene PCR. In order to identify the viral types present in warts on the udders of dairy cows, 40 teat lesions from 24 cows from 13 cattle farms in three States of Brazil were evaluated by PV L1 gene PCR. The warts that were evaluated contained sequences from BPVs 6-10, the putative BPV types BAPV9 and BAPV4, and two unreported putative papillomavirus (PV) types, named BPV/BR-UEL6 and BPV/BR-UEL7. In addition, mixed infections and coinfections were identified, since more than one lesion was observed on the udders of 13 cows. Phylogenetic analysis showed that BPV/BR-UEL6 is closely related to BPVs belonging to the genus Xipapillomavirus, while BPV/BR-UEL7 clustered with the previously reported strains Cervus timorensis and Pudu puda PVs, which represent a putative new PV type, and it was only distantly related to xi-, epsilon-, delta- and dyoxi-PVs. These results provide information that will assist in the understanding of the association of BPVs 6, 7, 8, 9, and 10, as well as putative BPV types BAPV4 and BAPV9, with mammary papillomatosis. This is the first characterization of putative novel PV types BPV/BR-UEL6 and BPV/BR-UEL7 in teat warts of dairy cows, highlighting the high genetic diversity of BPVs associated with teat papillomatosis.

  13. Cellular signaling in sinecatechins-treated external genital and perianal warts: unraveling the mechanism of action of a botanical therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Harrison; P; Nguyen; Hung; Q; Doan; Peter; Rady; Stephen; K; Tyring

    2015-01-01

    <正>Dear Editor,Derived from green tea leaves,sinecatechins(Veregen)ointment,15%is a topical therapy that is FDA-approved to treat human papillomavirus(HPV)-induced external genital and perianal warts(EGW)in immunocompetent patients aged 18 years and older.In two phase 3 trials enrolling over 1,000 participants with EGW,a 16-week treatment regimen with sinecatechins ointment resulted in higher rates of complete clearance of all warts—both

  14. Pulsed dye laser versus Nd:YAG laser in the treatment of plantar warts: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Mohamady, Abd El-Shakor; Mearag, Ibrahim; El-Khalawany, Mohamed; Elshahed, Ahmed; Shokeir, Hisham; Mahmoud, Anas

    2014-05-01

    Plantar warts are common viral infection that are usually challenging in treatment. Conventional treatment methods are usually invasive, have low efficacy, and need long recovery periods. In this study, we compared pulsed dye laser (PDL) and neodymium yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) lasers in the treatment of recalcitrant plantar warts. The study included 46 patients with multiple plantar warts. In each patient, lesions were divided into two groups: one treated with Nd:YAG (spot size, 7 mm; energy, 100 J/cm(2); and pulse duration, 20 ms) and the other with PDL (spot size, 7 mm; energy, 8 J/cm(2); and pulse duration, 0.5 ms). Laser sessions were applied every 2 weeks with maximum of six sessions. The study included 63% males and 37% females with a mean age of 29.6 ± 7.34 years. The cure rate was 73.9% with PDL with no significant difference (p = 0.87) from Nd:YAG (78.3%). The number of sessions required was more in PDL (mean, 5.05 ± 0.2) compared with Nd:YAG (mean, 4.65 ± 0.5) but without significant difference. Complications were significantly higher with Nd:YAG (43.5%) compared with PDL (8.7%). Hematoma was the most common complication recorded by Nd:YAG (28.3 %), and it was significantly higher (p = 0.002) than PDL (2.2%). Relapse was recorded in 8.7% with Nd:YAG compared with 13% in PDL with no significant difference (p = 0.74). Our results suggested that PDL and Nd:YAG lasers are effective in the treatment of resistant plantar warts. PDL is safer and less painful but needs more sessions, while Nd:YAG is more painful and shows more complications.

  15. Correlation between pretreatment levels of interferon response genes and clinical responses to an immune response modifier (Imiquimod) in genital warts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arany, I; Tyring, S K; Brysk, M M; Stanley, M A; Tomai, M A; Miller, R L; Smith, M H; McDermott, D J; Slade, H B

    2000-07-01

    Imiquimod (IQ) has been successfully used in treatment of genital warts. In clinical settings, patients responded well but wart reduction rates varied. Our aim was to find a correlation between clinical responses and pretreatment (constitutive) levels of genes that might be involved in the molecular action of IQ. Since IQ is a cytokine inducer, we analyzed levels of expression of genes of the JAK/STAT signaling pathway and their inhibitors as well as interferon response factors (IRFs) in pretreatment biopsy specimens from complete responders (99 to 100% wart reduction rate) versus incomplete responders (75 to 92% wart reduction rate) by reverse transcription-PCR. We found that mRNA levels of signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) and IRF1 were higher in complete responders than in incomplete responders. Incomplete responders expressed larger amounts of STAT3, IRF2, and protein inhibitor of activated STAT1 (PIAS1) mRNAs compared to complete responders before IQ treatment. We hypothesize that high-level expression of STAT1 and IRF1 is advantageous for a better IQ response. The observed differences in constitutive mRNA levels of these genes may be the consequence of alterations in cellular differentiation and/or variable expression of endogenous interferons. Previous in vitro studies showed that keratinocyte differentiation coordinates the balance between positive and negative signals along the JAK/STAT pathway by regulating the IRF1:IRF2 and STAT1:PIAS1 ratios and thus affecting induction of IQ-inducible genes. Specifically, differentiation supports constitutive expression of STAT1 and IRF1 mRNAs but not expression of IRF2 and PIAS1. Our data are in good agreement with studies that showed the importance of STAT1 in cytokine induction and activation of interferon-responsive genes by IQ.

  16. The prevalence and genotype of human papillomavirus on cervical samples from an Irish female population with external genital warts.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cremin, Suzanne M

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the cervical genotype profile of females who presented to an STI Clinic with external genital warts (EGW); and to determine the potential vaccine coverage prior to the uptake of the HPV vaccines. Sixty-one cervical scrapings were taken from females aged 18-35 y who had external genital warts or a history of external genital warts. The resulting 50 samples that were positive for HPV-DNA were subjected to genotype identification. Forty-six of these samples had detectable genotypes by LIPA analysis and most (78%, 36\\/46) had multiple low risk (LR) and high risk (HR) genotypes on the cervix. Twenty-five of these samples (54%) had more than 1 HR genotype. Of the 36 patients who had any HR genotypes, 18 (50%) were identified to have the most oncogenic HPV genotypes, namely 16 and 18. Three of these samples had both 16 and 18 on the cervix. The presence of multiple HR genotypes on the majority of cervical samples from a self-referred population of females with EGW is presented. This study is of importance since persistent HR-HPV is the necessary risk factor in the development of precancerous and cancerous lesions of the cervix. Gardisil, the quadrivalent HPV vaccine would have been useful in the prevention of 28% (13\\/46) of these infections.

  17. Prevalence and incidence of external genital warts in a sample of Italian general female population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suligoi, Barbara; Vittori, Giorgio; Salfa, Maria Cristina; Timelli, Laura; Corsini, Dario; Fattorini, Giovanni; Mariani, Luciano

    2017-02-06

    The Human papillomavirus is the most common sexually transmitted virus worldwide. The objective of this study was to estimate: 1) the prevalence and the incidence of external genital warts (eGW) in a sample of women attending community outpatient clinics and 2) the total number of eGW cases in the Italian female population aged 15-64 years. A prospective study was performed for a 12-month period between 2009 and 2010, among a sample of women attending community gynecological outpatient clinics located throughout Italy. Demographic data, for every woman aged 15-64 years, were collected. For women diagnosed with eGW, behavioral and clinical data were recorded. Prevalence of eGW was calculated as the proportion between the number of women with eGW and that of women visiting any of the participating gynecologists; incidence of eGW was calculated as the proportion between the number of women with a new diagnosis of eGW and that of women visiting any of the participating gynecologists. Standardized prevalence by age was used to estimate the number of eGW cases occurring in the Italian female population aged 15-64 years. In 2009-2010, 44 community gynecologists were included in the network. In one-year period, 16,410 women visited any of the participating gynecologists; 63 women were diagnosed with eGW, corresponding to a prevalence of 3.8 cases per 1,000 women per year (95%CI: 2.9-4.9). The incidence of eGW was 3.0 cases per 1,000 women per year (95%CI: 2.2-3.9). Women aged 15-24 years showed both the highest prevalence and incidence. Prevalence and incidence significantly decreased by increasing age group (p stress the effectiveness of community clinical networks in investigating STI epidemiology among women from the general population, confirm the relevance of HPV vaccination programs among adolescents, and underscore the need of promoting safe sex, implementing early diagnosis, treatment and prevention of genital warts.

  18. Quality of life of homosexual males with genital warts: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larsen Helle K

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A recent qualitative study in Denmark showed that genital warts (GWs can considerably lower the quality of life of heterosexual patients. In this follow-up study, we interviewed men having sex with men (MSM suffering from GWs to obtain an in-depth understanding of their perception of GWs and determine the extent to which minority (homosexual cultural issues affect these patients' experiences. Qualitative interviews with six MSM were performed using a semi-structured interview guide. Questions were formulated on the basis of the earlier qualitative study in heterosexual patients with GWs along with a literature review. Data were analysed using a medical anthropological approach. Findings Many MSM worried about being stigmatised and excluded from the small homosexual 'scene', their key social group, thereby lowering their chances of finding sex and love. Most participants had suffered from GWs for several years which added to the negative psycho-sexual and social effects of the disease. Participants' fears of developing anal cancer were similar to those expressed about cervical cancer by females with GWs. Conclusions Ano-genital human papillomavirus (HPV infection is common and has a serious psychological and sexual impact among MSM. However, they do not benefit to the same extent as heterosexual men from the herd immunity effect of HPV vaccination of girls. The pathological profile and concerns specific to MSM should be addressed when communicating with these patients, and should be taken into account when considering HPV vaccination of boys.

  19. Detection and phylogenetic analysis of bovine papillomavirus in cutaneous warts in cattle in Tamaulipas, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas-Anaya, Edith; Cantú-Covarrubias, Antonio; Álvarez, José Francisco Morales; Loza-Rubio, Elizabeth

    2016-10-01

    Papillomas occur more frequently in cattle than other domestic animals. The causal agent of bovine papillomatosis is a virus that belongs to the family Papillomaviridae. In Tamaulipas, Mexico, the virus is considered a serious problem and has impeded the export of cattle to the United States, resulting in serious economic losses. Owing to the lack of information regarding the subtypes of papillomaviruses that infect cattle in Mexico, the aim of this study was to determine the subtypes in Tamaulipas. Fifty-two warts were analyzed with the use of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) involving primers that amplify the E7 gene of bovine papillomavirus (BPV). The PCR products were sequenced to differentiate the BPV-1 and BPV-2 subtypes. The sequencing quality was determined with the use of MEGA 6.0 software. Comparison of the Tamaulipas sequences with those of known BPV types by means of the MUSCLE algorithm showed that 53% of the former were BPV-1 and 47% were BPV-2. The distribution of the 2 subtypes in the cattle was homogeneous. This study demonstrated the presence of BPV-1 and BPV-2 in cattle from Tamaulipas and constitutes the first molecular characterization of papillomas in Mexico.

  20. CXCL12 Mediates Aberrant Costimulation of B Lymphocytes in Warts, Hypogammaglobulinemia, Infections, Myelokathexis Immunodeficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuliana Roselli

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The Warts, Hypogammaglobulinemia, Infections, Myelokathexis (WHIM syndrome is an immunodeficiency caused by mutations in chemokine receptor CXCR4. WHIM patient adaptive immunity defects remain largely unexplained. We have previously shown that WHIM-mutant T cells form unstable immunological synapses, affecting T cell activation. Here, we show that, in WHIM patients and WHIM CXCR4 knock-in mice, B cells are more apoptosis prone. Intriguingly, WHIM-mutant B cells were also characterized by spontaneous activation. Searching for a mechanistic explanation for these observations, we uncovered a novel costimulatory effect of CXCL12, the CXCR4 ligand, on WHIM-mutant but not wild-type B cells. The WHIM CXCR4-mediated costimulation led to increased B-cell activation, possibly involving mTOR, albeit without concurrently promoting survival. A reduction in antigenic load during immunization in the mouse was able to circumvent the adaptive immunity defects. These results suggest that WHIM-mutant CXCR4 may lead to spontaneous aberrant B-cell activation, via CXCL12-mediated costimulation, impairing B-cell survival and thus possibly contributing to the WHIM syndrome defects in adaptive immunity.

  1. Preventing cervical cancer and genital warts - How much protection is enough for HPV vaccines?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Margaret

    2016-07-01

    HPV associated disease is a global health problem: 5.2% of all cancers are HPV associated with HPV 16 and 18 accounting for 70% of cases of cervical cancer. Genital warts caused by HPV 6 and 11 have a lifetime risk of acquisition of 10%. HPV vaccines are subunit vaccines consisting of virus like particles comprised of the L1 major capsid protein. Two vaccines have been licenced since 2006/2007 and are in the National Immunisation programmes in 62 countries. Both vaccines include HPV 16 and 18 VLPs and one also includes HPV 6 and 11. The vaccines are highly immunogenic and well tolerated. Genital HPV is a sexually transmitted infection with peak incidence occurring just after the onset of sexual activity and the routine cohort for immunisation in almost all countries are adolescent girls 9-15 years of age with or without catch up for older adolescents and young women. Population effectiveness is now being demonstrated for these vaccines in countries with high vaccine coverage. HPV vaccines are highly immunogenic and effective and the original 3 dose schedules have already been reduced, for those 14 years and under, to 2 for both licenced vaccines. There is preliminary evidence that 1 dose of vaccine is as effective as 2 or 3 in preventing persistent HPV infection in the cervix in young women and further reductions in dosage may be possible if supported by appropriate virological, immunological and modelling studies.

  2. Verrucous carcinoma of the foot, not your typical plantar wart: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Diandra K; Ponder, Erinn N; Berrey, B Hudson; Kubik, Melanie J; Sindone, Joseph

    2014-06-01

    Verrucous carcinoma of the foot is often misdiagnosed initially as plantar warts. Delayed diagnostic treatments with the use of optimal biopsy techniques may result in significant hindrances for patient care and may often result in detrimental outcomes to the patient. With the use of various epidermal biopsy methods, early diagnostic treatment can be implemented to a slow-growing lesion unresponsive to topical agents preventing unfavorable pedal amputations. A case study of verrucous carcinoma of the foot with surgical resection was conducted along with a literature review. Verrucous carcinoma (VC) of the foot is known to be a rare, locally invasive, well-differentiated low-grade squamous cell carcinoma that may evolve from the human papilloma virus. This localized tumor of the foot often has low metastatic potential, however can be quite invasive. It is therefore pertinent to obtain adequate radiological studies when planning for surgical resection of this tumor. When localized to the foot, it often involves deep structures such as tendons, muscle & bone. Complete wide local excision of the tumor is essential to avoid recurrence. We present a case of verrucous carcinoma of the foot in a 46-year-old African American male with a past medical history of Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and Human papilloma virus (HPV). The patient refused a Transmetatarsal amputation. The loss of the third digit was a result of tissue loss following resection and an attempt to relocate a severely laterally dislocated 3rd digit, not PVD. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. An inhibitor of the epidermal growth factor receptor function does not affect the ability of human papillomavirus 11 to form warts in the xenografted immunodeficient mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, Tanya; Howett, Mary K; Welsh, Patricia A; Patrick, Susan D; Neely, Elizabeth B; Flanagan, Neil; Pollack, Vincent A; Pustilnik, Leslie R; Moyer, Jim; Perros, Manos

    2007-04-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFr) has been shown to be induced and activated in cells infected with HPV, suggesting that it may play a physiological role in viral replication or in the formation or maintenance of warts. To investigate this possibility, human foreskin tissue was infected with HPV11 and transplanted onto the renal capsule and the dermis of immunodeficient mice. The animals were treated orally or topically with the potent EGFr inhibitor CP-545130, with treatment starting either immediately following graft attachment, or following a 70 day period to allow development of warts. The rate of appearance of warts, wart size and number were monitored. In addition, we measured intra-lesional HPV replication levels and examined the morphology of the graft tissues. Analysis of the results showed no significant difference between placebo and compound-treated groups, despite high levels of compound present in the graft tissue. We conclude that EGFr kinase activity is not required for the development and maintenance of HPV-11-induced warts in this model.

  4. Significant Reduction in the Incidence of Genital Warts in Young Men 5 Years into the Danish Human Papillomavirus Vaccination Program for Girls and Women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bollerup, Signe; Baldur-Felskov, Birgitte; Blomberg, Maria

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Denmark introduced the quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccine into the vaccination program for 12- to 15-year-old girls in 2008 to 2009. In 2012, the program was supplemented with a catch-up program for women aged up to 27 years. We evaluated the effectiveness of the Danish...... vaccination program on the nationwide incidence of genital warts (GWs), after the second catch-up by including information on both hospital treatments and on self-administered treatment with podophyllotoxin. Genital wart incidence was investigated in both sexes; however, the main focus was on potential herd...... percentage change (EAPC) was calculated by Poisson regression. RESULTS: Genital wart incidence was either stable or increased in both sexes in 2006 to 2008. After introduction of the vaccination program, GW incidence decreased significantly in women aged 12 to 35 years and men aged 12 to 29 years, with rapid...

  5. The impact of genital warts: loss of quality of life and cost of treatment in eight sexual health clinics in the UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jit, M; Soldan, K; Kinghorn, G; Gilson, R; Nathan, M; Ross, J D; Lacey, C J N

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To estimate the loss of quality of life and cost of treatment associated with genital warts seen in sexual health clinics. Methods A cross-sectional questionnaire study and case note review of individuals with genital warts, carried out in eight sexual health clinics in England and Northern Ireland. Individuals with genital warts attending the participating clinics were invited to take part in the questionnaire study. 895 participants were recruited. A separate sample of 370 participants who had attended a participating clinic with a first visit for a first or recurrent episode of genital warts between April and June 2007 was included in the case note review. Quality of life was measured using the EQ-5D questionnaire and the cost of an episode of care was derived from the case note review. Results The weighted mean EQ-5D index score was 0.87 (95% CI 0.85 to 0.89). The weighted mean disutility was 0.056 (95% CI 0.038 to 0.074). The estimated mean loss of quality-adjusted life-years associated with an episode of genital warts was 0.018 (95% CI 0.0079 to 0.031), equivalent to 6.6 days of healthy life lost per episode. The weighted mean cost per episode of care was £94 (95% CI £84 to £104), not including the cost of a sexually transmitted infection screen. Conclusions Genital warts have a substantial impact on the health service and the individual. This information can be utilised for economic evaluation of human papillomavirus vaccination. PMID:21636616

  6. Incidence of anogenital warts in Germany: a population-based cohort study

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    Mikolajczyk Rafael T

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human papilloma virus (HPV types 6 and 11 account for 90 percent of anogenital warts (AGW. Assessment of a potential reduction of the incidence of AGW following introduction of HPV vaccines requires population-based incidence rates. The aim of this study was to estimate incidence rates of AGW in Germany, stratified by age, sex, and region. Additionally, the medical practitioner (gynaecologist, dermatologist, urologist etc. who made the initial diagnosis of AGW was assessed. Methods Retrospective cohort study in a population aged 10 to 79 years in a population-based healthcare insurance database. The database included more than 14 million insurance members from all over Germany during the years 2004-2006. A case of AGW was considered incident if a disease-free period of twelve months preceded the diagnosis. To assess regional variation, analyses were performed by federal state. Results The estimated incidence rate was 169.5/100,000 person-years for the German population aged 10 to 79 years. Most cases occurred in the 15 to 40 years age group. The incidence rate was higher and showed a peak at younger ages in females than in males. The highest incidence rates for both sexes were observed in the city-states Berlin, Hamburg and Bremen. In females, initial diagnosis of AGW was most frequently made by a gynaecologist (71.7%, whereas in males, AGW were most frequently diagnosed by a dermatologist (44.8% or urologist (25.1%. Conclusions Incidence of AGW in Germany is comparable with findings for other countries. As expected, most cases occurred in the younger age groups. The frequency of diagnoses of AGW differs between sexes and women and men receive treatment by doctors of different specialties.

  7. Serine protease Omi/HtrA2 targets WARTS kinase to control cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuninaka, S; Iida, S-I; Hara, T; Nomura, M; Naoe, H; Morisaki, T; Nitta, M; Arima, Y; Mimori, T; Yonehara, S; Saya, H

    2007-04-12

    The serine protease Omi/HtrA2 was initially regarded as a proapoptotic molecule that proteolyses several proteins to induce cell death. Recent studies, however, indicate that loss of Omi protease activity increases susceptibility to stress-induced cell death. These complicated findings suggest that the protease activity of Omi is involved not only in apoptosis but also in cellular homeostasis. However, the targets which Omi uses to mediate this novel process are unknown. Previously, we showed that WARTS (WTS)/large tumor-suppressor 1 mitotic kinase interacts with the protein/discs-large protein/zonula (PDZ) domain of Omi and promotes its protease activity. We now report that WTS is a substrate for Omi protease activity, thus it is not only a regulator but also a downstream target of this protease. Interaction with Omi PDZ domain is required for WTS to be proteolysed. When caspase-9-deficient mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) were treated with staurosporine, WTS was proteolysed by activated endogenous Omi without induction of cell death. Therefore, protease activity of Omi and proteolysis of WTS are not necessarily required for cell death. We found that depletion of Omi from HeLa cells results in accelerated cell proliferation despite no significant change in the duration of mitosis. The depletion of WTS showed the same effect on S phase progression. Therefore, WTS proteolytic fragment(s) generated by Omi may act as an inhibitor of G1/S progression. Our data reveal a role for Omi-mediated processing of WTS in negative regulation of cell cycle progression at interphase, suggesting a novel function of Omi other than apoptosis.

  8. Control of tissue growth and cell transformation by the Salvador/Warts/Hippo pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaomeng; Grusche, Felix A; Harvey, Kieran F

    2012-01-01

    The Salvador-Warts-Hippo (SWH) pathway is an important regulator of tissue growth that is frequently subverted in human cancer. The key oncoprotein of the SWH pathway is the transcriptional co-activator, Yes-associated protein (YAP). YAP promotes tissue growth and transformation of cultured cells by interacting with transcriptional regulatory proteins via its WW domains, or, in the case of the TEAD1-4 transcription factors, an N-terminal binding domain. YAP possesses a putative transactivation domain in its C-terminus that is necessary to stimulate transcription factors in vitro, but its requirement for YAP function has not been investigated in detail. Interestingly, whilst the WW domains and TEAD-binding domain are highly conserved in the Drosophila melanogaster YAP orthologue, Yorkie, the majority of the C-terminal region of YAP is not present in Yorkie. To investigate this apparent conundrum, we assessed the functional roles of the YAP and Yorkie C-termini. We found that these regions were not required for Yorkie's ability to drive tissue growth in vivo, or YAP's ability to promote anchorage-independent growth or resistance to contact inhibition. However, the YAP transactivation domain was required for YAP's ability to induce cell migration and invasion. Moreover, a role for the YAP transactivation domain in cell transformation was uncovered when the YAP WW domains were mutated together with the transactivation domain. This shows that YAP can promote cell transformation in a flexible manner, presumably by contacting transcriptional regulatory proteins either via its WW domains or its transactivation domain.

  9. Control of tissue growth and cell transformation by the Salvador/Warts/Hippo pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaomeng Zhang

    Full Text Available The Salvador-Warts-Hippo (SWH pathway is an important regulator of tissue growth that is frequently subverted in human cancer. The key oncoprotein of the SWH pathway is the transcriptional co-activator, Yes-associated protein (YAP. YAP promotes tissue growth and transformation of cultured cells by interacting with transcriptional regulatory proteins via its WW domains, or, in the case of the TEAD1-4 transcription factors, an N-terminal binding domain. YAP possesses a putative transactivation domain in its C-terminus that is necessary to stimulate transcription factors in vitro, but its requirement for YAP function has not been investigated in detail. Interestingly, whilst the WW domains and TEAD-binding domain are highly conserved in the Drosophila melanogaster YAP orthologue, Yorkie, the majority of the C-terminal region of YAP is not present in Yorkie. To investigate this apparent conundrum, we assessed the functional roles of the YAP and Yorkie C-termini. We found that these regions were not required for Yorkie's ability to drive tissue growth in vivo, or YAP's ability to promote anchorage-independent growth or resistance to contact inhibition. However, the YAP transactivation domain was required for YAP's ability to induce cell migration and invasion. Moreover, a role for the YAP transactivation domain in cell transformation was uncovered when the YAP WW domains were mutated together with the transactivation domain. This shows that YAP can promote cell transformation in a flexible manner, presumably by contacting transcriptional regulatory proteins either via its WW domains or its transactivation domain.

  10. Evaluation of TNF-α serum level in patients with recalcitrant multiple common warts, treated by lipid garlic extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenawy, Soha; Mohammed, Ghada Farouk; Younes, Soha; Elakhras, Atef Ibrahim

    2014-01-01

    No universal consensus about optimal modality for treating the recalcitrant multiple common warts (RMCW). The objective of the study was to evaluate the immunological mechanisms and clinical therapeutic effect of using lipid garlic extract (LGE) in the treatment of RMCW. The study included 50 patients with RMCW. They were randomly assigned into two groups: the first group (25 patients) received LGE, and the second group (25 patients) received saline as a control group. In both groups, treatments were made to single lesions, or largest wart in case of multiple lesions, until complete clearance of lesions or for a maximum of 4 weeks. Blood serum was taken at pre-study and at the fourth week to measure tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) level. A significant difference was found between the therapeutic responses of RMCW to LGE antigen and saline control group (p < 0.001). In the LGE group, complete response was achieved in 96% of patients presenting with RMCW. There was a statistically nonsignificant increase in TNF-α of LGE group versus saline group. No recurrence was observed in the LGE group. LGE as an immunotherapy is an inexpensive, effective, and safe modality with good cure rates for treatment of RMCWs, when other topical or physical therapies have failed. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Insulin- and Warts-Dependent Regulation of Tracheal Plasticity Modulates Systemic Larval Growth during Hypoxia in Drosophila melanogaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Daniel M.; Shen, Zhouyang; Owyang, Kristin E.; Martinez-Agosto, Julian A.

    2014-01-01

    Adaptation to dynamic environmental cues during organismal development requires coordination of tissue growth with available resources. More specifically, the effects of oxygen availability on body size have been well-documented, but the mechanisms through which hypoxia restricts systemic growth have not been fully elucidated. Here, we characterize the larval growth and metabolic defects in Drosophila that result from hypoxia. Hypoxic conditions reduced fat body opacity and increased lipid droplet accumulation in this tissue, without eliciting lipid aggregation in hepatocyte-like cells called oenocytes. Additionally, hypoxia increased the retention of Dilp2 in the insulin-producing cells of the larval brain, associated with a reduction of insulin signaling in peripheral tissues. Overexpression of the wildtype form of the insulin receptor ubiquitously and in the larval trachea rendered larvae resistant to hypoxia-induced growth restriction. Furthermore, Warts downregulation in the trachea was similar to increased insulin receptor signaling during oxygen deprivation, which both rescued hypoxia-induced growth restriction, inhibition of tracheal molting, and developmental delay. Insulin signaling and loss of Warts function increased tracheal growth and augmented tracheal plasticity under hypoxic conditions, enhancing oxygen delivery during periods of oxygen deprivation. Our findings demonstrate a mechanism that coordinates oxygen availability with systemic growth in which hypoxia-induced reduction of insulin receptor signaling decreases plasticity of the larval trachea that is required for the maintenance of systemic growth during times of limiting oxygen availability. PMID:25541690

  12. Insulin- and warts-dependent regulation of tracheal plasticity modulates systemic larval growth during hypoxia in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel M Wong

    Full Text Available Adaptation to dynamic environmental cues during organismal development requires coordination of tissue growth with available resources. More specifically, the effects of oxygen availability on body size have been well-documented, but the mechanisms through which hypoxia restricts systemic growth have not been fully elucidated. Here, we characterize the larval growth and metabolic defects in Drosophila that result from hypoxia. Hypoxic conditions reduced fat body opacity and increased lipid droplet accumulation in this tissue, without eliciting lipid aggregation in hepatocyte-like cells called oenocytes. Additionally, hypoxia increased the retention of Dilp2 in the insulin-producing cells of the larval brain, associated with a reduction of insulin signaling in peripheral tissues. Overexpression of the wildtype form of the insulin receptor ubiquitously and in the larval trachea rendered larvae resistant to hypoxia-induced growth restriction. Furthermore, Warts downregulation in the trachea was similar to increased insulin receptor signaling during oxygen deprivation, which both rescued hypoxia-induced growth restriction, inhibition of tracheal molting, and developmental delay. Insulin signaling and loss of Warts function increased tracheal growth and augmented tracheal plasticity under hypoxic conditions, enhancing oxygen delivery during periods of oxygen deprivation. Our findings demonstrate a mechanism that coordinates oxygen availability with systemic growth in which hypoxia-induced reduction of insulin receptor signaling decreases plasticity of the larval trachea that is required for the maintenance of systemic growth during times of limiting oxygen availability.

  13. Clinical, histologic, and immunohistochemical characterization of wart-like lesions on the paw pads of dogs: 24 cases (2000-2007).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balara, Jason M; McCarthy, Robert J; Kiupel, Matti; Buote, Melanie A; Wise, Annabel G; Maes, Roger K

    2009-06-15

    OBJECTIVE- To determine clinical, histologic, and immunohistochemical findings for dogs with wart-like lesions involving the paw pads. DESIGN- Retrospective case series. ANIMALS- 24 dogs (18 Greyhounds and 6 dogs of other breeds). PROCEDURES- Medical records were reviewed for information on signalment, physical examination findings, concurrent disease processes, location of all lesions, and, when available, results of histologic examination of biopsy specimens. Available biopsy specimens (n = 11) were submitted for immunohistochemical staining and a PCR assay to identify viral inclusion bodies. RESULTS- In Greyhounds, most lesions involved the pads of the third and fourth digits, had a consistent histologic appearance without evidence of inflammation, were negative for papillomavirus, and had an unsatisfactory response to treatment. In other breeds, lesions often involved the pads of non-weight-bearing digits, had histologic evidence of inflammation, were positive for papillomavirus, and responded to surgical treatment. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE- Results suggested that wart-like lesions involving the paw pads of Greyhounds were a distinct clinical entity with features resembling porokeratosis plantaris discreta in humans. In Greyhounds, these lesions were not associated with an underlying viral etiology and, therefore, should not be considered plantar warts. Alternative treatments should be investigated because current treatments were generally unsuccessful in Greyhounds. Wart-like lesions of the paw pads in other breeds were often associated with papillomavirus, and surgical excision appeared curative.

  14. Evaluation of the Efficacy, Safety, and Tolerability of 3 Dose Regimens of Topical Sodium Nitrite With Citric Acid in Patients With Anogenital Warts A Randomized Clinical Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ormerod, Anthony D.; van Voorst Vader, Pieter C.; Majewski, Slovomir; Vanscheidt, Wolfgang; Benjamin, Nigel; van der Meijden, Willem

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Anogenital warts are a common disorder associated with significant physical and mental distress and a substantial cause of health care costs. OBJECTIVE To assess the efficacy of the topical application of nitric oxide delivered using acidified nitrite. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS A

  15. Evaluation of the Efficacy, Safety, and Tolerability of 3 Dose Regimens of Topical Sodium Nitrite With Citric Acid in Patients With Anogenital Warts A Randomized Clinical Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ormerod, Anthony D.; van Voorst Vader, Pieter C.; Majewski, Slovomir; Vanscheidt, Wolfgang; Benjamin, Nigel; van der Meijden, Willem

    IMPORTANCE Anogenital warts are a common disorder associated with significant physical and mental distress and a substantial cause of health care costs. OBJECTIVE To assess the efficacy of the topical application of nitric oxide delivered using acidified nitrite. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS A

  16. Long-Pulsed 532-Nm Neodymium-Doped Yttrium Aluminium Garnet Laser for Treatment of Facial Plane Warts in 160 Yemeni Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshami, Mohammad Ali; Mohana, Mona Jameel; Alshami, Ahlam Mohammad

    2016-11-01

    Warts in general and plane warts in particular pose a therapeutic challenge for dermatologists. Many treatment modalities exist, with variable success rates, side effect profiles, and precautions. The long-pulsed 532-nm neodymium-doped yttrium aluminium garnet (LP Nd:YAG) laser has not been previously used for this indication. This study was conducted to assess the efficacy and safety of the LP Nd:YAG laser for treating facial plane warts. A total of 160 Yemeni patients (62 women, 98 men; age range, 5-55 years) were exposed to 1 laser treatment session with the following parameters: wavelength, 532 nm; pulse duration, 20 millisecond; spot size, 2 to 3 mm; and fluence, 25 J/cm. The end point was graying or whitening of the lesion. Color photographs were taken before and immediately after treatment and at follow-up visits 1, 4, and 16 weeks after the laser session. An overall clearance rate of 92% after only one session was achieved, with minimal and transient side effects. The LP Nd:YAG laser is safe and effective for treating facial plane warts, with a success rate of 92% after only one session.

  17. Low Prevalence of Oral and Nasal Human Papillomavirus in Employees Performing CO2-laser Evaporation of Genital Warts or Loop Electrode Excision Procedure of Cervical Dysplasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Kristian; Norrbom, Christina; Forslund, Ola

    2014-01-01

    Risk of human papillomavirus (HPV) transmission during laser vaporisation of genital warts or loop electrode excision procedure is controversial. An oral rinse, a nasal swabs, history of HPV related diseases and data on HPV exposure were collected from 287 employees at departments of dermato......-venerology and gynaecology in Denmark. A mucosal HPV type was found among 5.8% of employees with experience of laser treatment of genital warts as compared to 1.7% of those with no experience (p = 0.12). HPV prevalence was not higher in employees participating in electrosurgical treatment or cryotherapy of genital warts......, or loop electrode excision procedure compared with those who did not. HPV 6 or 11 were not detected in any samples. Hand warts after the age of 24 years was more common among dermatology than among non-dermatology personnel (18% vs. 8.0%, p = 0.03). Mucosal HPV types are infrequent in the oral and nasal...

  18. Quasi una mostra. Giulio Carlo Argan, Wart Arslan e l'allestimento del Museo dell'Alto Adige tra propaganda e museografia, 1933-1939

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    Angelini, Gianpaolo

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available L’articolo prende in esame la riorganizzazione del Museo dell’Alto Adige a cura di Wart Arslan negli anni 1933-1938 in relazione alle scelte dell’allestimento, alla propaganda di regime, agli studi sulla pittura barocca nel primo Novecento, sulla scorta dell’epistolario di Arslan e degli articoli apparsi sulla stampa specialistica.

  19. El Pediatra, el Abuso Sexual y Las Verrugas Anogenitales en Edad Prepuberal (The Pediatrician, Sexual Abuse, and Anogenital Warts in the Prepubertal Stage).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Roig, A.; Sanchez, X.

    1996-01-01

    This article notes that the increase of incidence in human papillomavirus infection has resulted in more frequent anogenital warts in children. Pediatricians are urged to exclude sexual abuse as a source of infection in all cases since sexual transmission is commonly, but not always, the cause. (Author/DB)

  20. Evaluating the Early Benefit of Quadrivalent HPV Vaccine on Genital Warts in Belgium: A Cohort Study.

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    Geraldine Dominiak-Felden

    Full Text Available Genital warts (GWs are common, with about 5% to 10% of people having at least one episode in their lifetime. They develop about 2-3 months after infection with human papillomavirus (HPV genotypes 6 and 11. The prophylactic quadrivalent HPV vaccine (qHPV, protects against HPV6/11 infections and diseases. In Belgium, HPV vaccines started to be reimbursed in 2007 and have been fully reimbursed since December 2008 for women 12 to 18 years old. This study aimed at evaluating the real-life benefit of qHPV vaccine introduction in Belgium on GWs by measuring both vaccine impact (VI at a population level and the direct effect of the qHPV vaccine at an individual level (vaccine effectiveness (VE, using data from a large sick-fund (MLOZ reimbursement database. A first reimbursement for imiquimod (most common first-line GWs treatment in Belgium was used as a surrogate for a first GWs episode; reimbursement of qHPV vaccine was used as surrogate for vaccination. VI was estimated by comparing the incidence of GWs before and after qHPV vaccine introduction in Belgium (ecologic evaluation. VE was assessed by comparing GWs incidences in vaccinated vs. unvaccinated women, among women eligible for HPV vaccination. VI was evaluated in 9,223,384 person-years. Overall, GWs incidence rates decreased significantly between the pre- and post-vaccination periods (-8.1% (95% CI: -15.3; -0.3 for men and women aged 18-59 years. This decrease was highest in women targeted by the HPV vaccination programme (-72.1% (95% CI: -77.9; -64.7 in women aged 16-22 years, with a 43% vaccine uptake in 2013. A significant decrease was also observed in men aged 16-22 years (-51.1%, 95%CI: -67.6; -26.2, suggesting herd-protection. VE was evaluated in 369,881 person-years. Age-adjusted VE for fully vaccinated women was 88.0% (95% CI: 79.4; 93.0. VE was higher when the first dose was given younger and remained high for over 4 years post-vaccination in all ages. High VI and VE of the q

  1. Molecular characterisation of resistance against potato wart races 1, 2, 6 and 18 in a tetraploid population of potato (Solanum tuberosum subsp. tuberosum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groth, Jennifer; Song, Yesu; Kellermann, Adolf; Schwarzfischer, Andrea

    2013-05-01

    Potato wart is caused by the obligate biotrophic fungus Synchytrium endobioticum, which is subject to quarantine regulations due to the production of long persisting spores in the soil and the lack of effective fungicides. The objective of this study was to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) for resistance against potato wart races (R) 1, 2, 6 and 18 in a tetraploid potato population developed by crossing cv. Saturna (resistant to R1) with cv. Panda (resistant to R1, R2, R6, R18). A total of 92 progenies were used for phenotyping and genotyping. Resistance tests were performed for races 1 and 18 in 2 years and for races 2 and 6 in 1 year on 10 to 20 eyepieces per genotype. Based on amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) and simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers, linkage maps were established for the female and male parent, respectively. Single marker analysis followed by a multiple regression analysis revealed initial marker-trait associations. The interval mapping routine of TetraploidMap was applied for QTL analysis. A major QTL for resistance against race 1 explaining between 46 % and 56 % of the phenotypic variation was identified near Sen1, a known resistance locus for potato wart race 1 on chromosome XI. Other resistance QTL were detected on chromosomes I (to R2), II (to R6, 18), VI (to R1, 2, 6, 18), VII (to R2, 6, 18), VIII (to R1, 2, 6, 18), X (to R2, 6, 18), XI (to R2, 6, 18) and on an unknown linkage group (to R18) explaining minor to moderate effects of the phenotypic variation. Resistance QTL against different potato wart races often overlapped, particularly concerning races 2, 6 and 18. Overall, this study gives a valuable insight into the complex inheritance of resistance against potato wart.

  2. Combination of qualitative and quantitative methods for developing a new Health Related Quality of Life measure for patients with anogenital warts

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    Olmos Luis

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anogenital warts are the most easily recognized sign of genital Human Papilloma Virus infection. The objective was to develop a short, valid and reliable questionnaire to measure Health Related Quality of Life (HRQL in patients with anogenital warts. Methods First a literature review was performed to identify relevant papers describing the impact of anogenital warts in HRQL; second the main domains were identified by some experts in a focus group, and third in-depth-semi-structured interviews were conducted in patients with anogenital warts to identify the initial set of items. A qualitative reduction of the initial set of items was performed based on the mean scoring of the experts for the three scales: clarity, frequency and importance. The initial questionnaire was pilot tested in 135 patients. Rasch analysis was performed with the results of the questionnaire in order to refine the instrument. Spearman's correlation was calculated between the initial questionnaire and the reduced version. Additionally the measurement properties (validity and reliability of the resulting final questionnaire were tested and compared using standard procedures (Cronbach's Alpha and item-total correlation. Results the main domains identified as affected in patient's life were: sexual, colleagues and partner relationships. After a proper qualitative reduction the initial set of 134 items was reduced to 22. The questionnaire was pilot tested in 135 patients and two dimensions were identified after the multifactorial analysis: emotional dimension and sexual activity dimension. As a result of the Rasch analysis the questionnaire was reduced to 10 items. High correlation was found between the initial and the reduced version for the two dimensions. Cronbach's alpha values were acceptable (0.86. Conclusion The initial 22 items questionnaire was reduced by Rasch analysis to a version of 10 items, with two dimensions: emotional and sexual. The results

  3. Characterization of two novel gammapapillomaviruses, HPV179 and HPV184, isolated from common warts of a renal-transplant recipient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hošnjak, Lea; Kocjan, Boštjan J; Pirš, Branko; Seme, Katja; Poljak, Mario

    2015-01-01

    Gammapapillomavirus (Gamma-PV) is a diverse and rapidly expanding PV-genus, currently consisting of 76 fully characterized human papillomavirus (HPV) types. In this study, DNA genomes of two novel HPV types, HPV179 and HPV184, obtained from two distinct facial verrucae vulgares specimens of a 64 year-old renal-transplant recipient, were fully cloned, sequenced and characterized. HPV179 and HPV184 genomes comprise 7,228-bp and 7,324-bp, respectively, and contain four early (E1, E2, E6 and E7) and two late genes (L1 and L2); the non-coding region is typically positioned between L1 and E6 genes. Phylogenetic analysis of the L1 nucleotide sequence placed both novel types within the Gamma-PV genus: HPV179 was classified as a novel member of species Gamma-15, additionally containing HPV135 and HPV146, while HPV184 was classified as a single member of a novel species Gamma-25. HPV179 and HPV184 type-specific quantitative real-time PCRs were further developed and used in combination with human beta-globin gene quantitative real-time PCR to determine the prevalence and viral load of the novel types in the patient's facial warts and several follow-up skin specimens, and in a representative collection, a total of 569 samples, of HPV-associated benign and malignant neoplasms, hair follicles and anal and oral mucosa specimens obtained from immunocompetent individuals. HPV179 and HPV184 viral loads in patients' facial warts were estimated to be 2,463 and 3,200 genome copies per single cell, respectively, suggesting their active role in the development of common warts in organ-transplant recipients. In addition, in this particular patient, both novel types had established a persistent infection of the skin for more than four years. Among immunocompetent individuals, HPV179 was further detected in low-copy numbers in a few skin specimens, indicating its cutaneous tissue tropism, while HPV184 was further detected in low-copy numbers in one mucosal and a few skin specimens

  4. Immunotherapy in viral warts with intradermal Bacillus Calmette–Guerin vaccine versus intradermal tuberculin purified protein derivative: A double-blind, randomized controlled trial comparing effectiveness and safety in a tertiary care center in Eastern India

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    Indrashis Podder

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: Both intradermal Bacillus Calmette–Guerin and tuberculin purified protein derivative hold promise in the treatment of viral warts. Bacillus Calmette–Guerin may be more effective, though it had more adverse events in our study.

  5. The Effect of Clove Bud, Nigella, Salix Alba and Olive Oil on Wart Treatment in Comparison with Conventional Treatment

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    roghaye Jebraili

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Jebraili R1, Rezaei K2, Matourianpour H3, Moradi L4, Meshkaat MH5, Tarrahi MJ6 1. Assistant professor, Department of Dermatology, Faculty of Medicine, Islamic Azad University of Tehran 2. Instructor, Department of Nursing, Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery, Lorestan University of Medical Sciences 3. Assistant Professor, Department of Dermatology, Faculty of Medicine, Lorestan University of Medical Sciences 4. BSc. Nurse, Haaj Seddiq Health and Treatment Center, Khorramabad 5. Assistant Professor, Department of Chemistry, Lorestan University 6. Instructor, Department of Epidemiology and Statistics, Faculty of Medicine, Lorestan University of Medical Sciences Abstract Background: Wart is a common and contagious viral disease of the skin caused by papilloma viruses which leads to aesthetic and psychological problems, and if occurred in touching and pressured parts of the body causes pain and inflammation. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of Clove bud, Nigella, Salix alba and Olive oil which have wound disinfectant, anesthetic, analgesic and wound healing properties on wart treatment in comparison with the conventional treatment. Materials and methods: This randomized double blind controlled clinical trial was conducted on 291 female students selected form guidance and high schools in Khorramabad, Lorestan, Iran, during the year 2007. The diagnosis of wart was confirmed by a dermatologist according to the diagnosis criteria. The cases fulfilling the inclusion criteria were assigned in 3 study groups randomly. The first group was treated with the conventional treatment (Salicylic acid 16.7%, lactic acid 16.7% in Collodione body, the second group with herbal medicine without acid in olive oil, and the third group with herbal medicine alongside salicylic acid 1% and lactic acid 1% in olive oil. Each group was administered the drugs for 6 weeks. The effects of drugs on lesions were assessed after 4 and 6 weeks and compared among 3

  6. Cost-effectiveness of cryotherapy versus salicylic acid for the treatment of plantar warts: economic evaluation alongside a randomised controlled trial (EVerT trial

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    Stamuli Eugena

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plantar warts (verrucae are extremely common. Although many will spontaneously disappear without treatment, treatment may be sought for a variety of reasons such as discomfort. There are a number of different treatments for cutaneous warts, with salicylic acid and cryotherapy using liquid nitrogen being two of the most common forms of treatment. To date, no full economic evaluation of either salicylic acid or cryotherapy has been conducted based on the use of primary data in a pragmatic setting. This paper describes the cost-effectiveness analysis which was conducted alongside a pragmatic multicentre, randomised trial evaluating the clinical effectiveness of cryotherapy versus 50% salicylic acid of the treatment of plantar warts. Methods A cost-effectiveness analysis was undertaken alongside a pragmatic multicentre, randomised controlled trial assessing the clinical effectiveness of 50% salicylic acid and cryotherapy using liquid nitrogen at 12 weeks after randomisation of patients. Cost-effectiveness outcomes were expressed as the additional cost required to completely cure the plantar warts of one additional patient. A NHS perspective was taken for the analysis. Results Cryotherapy costs on average £101.17 (bias corrected and accelerated (BCA 95% CI: 85.09-117.26 more per participant over the 12 week time-frame, while there is no additional benefit, in terms of proportion of patients healed compared with salicylic acid. Conclusions Cryotherapy is more costly and no more effective than salicylic acid. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN18994246 [controlled-trials.com] and National Research Register N0484189151.

  7. Conversion from tacrolimus/mycophenolic acid to tacrolimus/leflunomide to treat cutaneous warts in a series of four pediatric renal allograft recipients.

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    Nguyen, Lieuko; McClellan, Robert B; Chaudhuri, Abanti; Alexander, Steven R; Chen, Sharon F; Concepcion, Waldo; Grimm, Paul

    2012-09-15

    The challenge of immunosuppression in pediatric renal transplantation is to balance preventing rejection while avoiding infectious complications. A dermatological complication of immunosuppression is viral warts, which cause significant disfigurement and increase the risk of skin malignancy. We present three pediatric and adolescent renal allograft recipients with multiple, recalcitrant verrucae vulgares lesions and one patient with molluscum contagiosum who were switched from mycophenolate mofetil to leflunomide. Teriflunomide metabolite levels were carefully maintained between 50,000 and 100,000 ng/mL to balance its immunosuppressive and antiviral properties. No adverse events requiring discontinuation of leflunomide were encountered. Switching from mycophenolate mofetil to leflunomide successfully cleared verrucae vulgares and molluscum lesions in all four renal transplant patients. The ability to minimize and even resolve warts can improve quality of life by reducing risk of skin malignancies and emotional distress in solid organ transplant patients. Leflunomide is a potential therapeutic option for posttransplantation patients with skin warts because it serves both as an adjunct to the immunosuppressive regimen and an antiviral agent.

  8. High prevalence of genital HPV infection among long-term monogamous partners of women with cervical dysplasia or genital warts-Another reason for HPV vaccination of boys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rob, Filip; Tachezy, Ruth; Pichlík, Tomáš; Rob, Lukáš; Kružicová, Zuzana; Hamšíková, Eva; Šmahelová, Jana; Hercogová, Jana

    2017-01-01

    We conducted a cross-sectional study on the occurrence of a specific type of genital human papillomavirus (HPV) among long-term monogamous male partners of women with cervical dysplasia and genital warts. The purpose of the study was to improve knowledge with regards to the management of these couples. The presence of genital HPV-DNA was detected by PCR with broad spectrum primers followed by hybridization. 82 males met the study criteria, 41 in each group. Genital HPV-DNA prevalence was 67.5% in the genital warts group and 72.2% in the cervical dysplasia group. The prevalence of high risk HPVs was higher in the cervical dysplasia group, while low risk HPVs were more prevalent in the genital warts group (p HPV in males was independent of the duration of the relationship (73.5% for 6-24 months and 66.7% for longer relationships). In conclusion, our results suggest that the prevalence of the genital HPV infection in both groups of male partners is comparable and very high, but the spectrum of HPV types varies significantly. The presence of the genital HPV infection in male sexual partners seems to be independent of the duration of the relationship. Applying the HPV vaccination to boys may prevent this phenomenon.

  9. Human papillomavirus types detected in skin warts and cancer differ in their transforming properties but commonly counteract UVB induced protective responses in human keratinocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shterzer, Naama; Heyman, Dariya; Shapiro, Beny; Yaniv, Abraham; Jackman, Anna; Serour, Francis; Chaouat, Malka; Gonen, Pinhas; Tommasino, Massimo; Sherman, Levana

    2014-11-01

    In the present study, E6E7 and E6 proteins of human papillomaviruses (HPVs) associated with skin warts and cancer were compared for their transforming and carcinogenic abilities in primary human keratinocytes (PHKs). We show that E6E7 of cancer associated beta HPV types, notably 49 and 24, were able to extend the life span and enhance the clonogenic efficiency of PHKs when maintained in serum free/low calcium medium. Activities of the beta HPV E6E7 were lower than those of HPV16 E6E7. In contrast, E6 proteins from HPV types detected in skin warts or cancer, notably 10, 49 and 38, attenuated UVB induced protective responses in PHKs including cell death, proliferation arrest and accumulation of the proapoptotic proteins, p53, bax or bak. Together, this investigation revealed functional differences and commonalities between HPVs associated with skin warts and cancer, and allowed the identification of specific properties of beta HPVs supporting their involvement in skin carcinogenesis.

  10. Complete remission of recalcitrant genital warts with a combination approach of surgical debulking and oral isotretinoin in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yew, Yik Weng; Pan, Jiun Yit

    2014-01-01

    Genital warts in immunocompromised patients can be extensive and recalcitrant to treatment. We report a case of recalcitrant genital warts in a female patient with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), who achieved complete remission with a combination approach of surgical debulking and oral isotretinoin at an initial dose of 20 mg/day with a gradual taper of dose over 8 months. She had previously been treated with a combination of topical imiquimod cream and regular fortnightly liquid nitrogen. Although there was partial response, there was no complete clearance. Her condition worsened after topical imiquimod cream was stopped because of her pregnancy. She underwent a combination approach of surgical debulking and oral isotretinoin after her delivery and achieved full clearance for more than 2 years duration. Oral isotretinoin, especially in the treatment of recalcitrant genital warts, is a valuable and feasible option when other more conventional treatment methods have failed or are not possible. It can be used alone or in combination with other local or physical treatment methods.

  11. Decreased management of genital warts in young women in Australian general practice post introduction of national HPV vaccination program: results from a nationally representative cross-sectional general practice study.

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    Christopher Harrison

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Since the introduction of Australia's human papillomavirus vaccination program, the management rate of genital warts in sexual health clinics and private hospitals has decreased in women of vaccine-eligible age. However, most genital warts in Australia are managed in general practice. This study examines whether a similar decrease occurred in Australian general practice after the introduction of the program. METHODS: Analysis of a nationally representative cross-sectional database of Australian general practice activity (1,175,879 patient encounters with 11,780 general practitioners. Genital warts management rates were estimated for the periods before and after introduction of the program (Pre-program, July 2002-June 2006; Post-program, July 2008-June 2012. Control conditions included genital herpes and gardnerella/bacterial vaginosis in female patients and genital herpes and urethritis in male patients. Trends in management rates by year, pre-vaccine (July 2000-June 2007 and post-vaccine (July 2007-June 2012 were also calculated. RESULTS: Management rate of genital warts among women potentially covered by program (aged 15-27 years decreased by 61% from 4.33 per 1,000 encounters in the Pre-program period to 1.67 in the Post-program period. Trend analysis of the post-vaccine period showed, among women of vaccine eligible age, a significant year-on-year reduction in the rate of genital warts management (p<0.0001 and a significant increase in the management rate of control conditions per year (p<0.0001. For all other age-sex groups there was no significant change in the management rate of genital warts between the Pre- and Post-program periods. CONCLUSION: The large decrease in general practice management of genital warts in women of vaccine-eligible age highlights the success of the program in the wider community.

  12. Successful Interferon–alpha 2b Therapy for Unremitting Warts in a Patient with DOCK8 Deficiency

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    Al-Zahrani, Daifulah; Raddadi, Ali; Massaad, Michel; Keles, Sevgi; Jabara, Haifa H.

    2014-01-01

    The autosomal recessive form of the Hyper IgE syndrome (AR-HIES) with dedicator of cytokinesis 8 (DOCK8) deficiency is associated with difficult to treat persistent viral skin infections, including papilloma virus infection. Type I interferons play an important role in the defense against viruses. We examined the effect of therapy with IFN–α 2b in an 11-year old boy with DOCK8 deficiency due to a homozygous splice donor site mutation in DOCK8 intron 40. His unremitting warts showed dramatic response to IFN–α 2b therapy. Immunological studies revealed decreased circulating plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) and profound deficiency of IFN-α production by his peripheral blood mononuclear cells in response to treatment with CpG oligonucleotides. These findings indicate that underlying pDC deficiency and impaired IFN-α production may predispose to chronic viral infections in DOCk8 deficiency. IFN–α 2b therapy maybe useful in controlling recalcitrant viral infections in these patients. PMID:24743019

  13. Successful interferon-alpha 2b therapy for unremitting warts in a patient with DOCK8 deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Zahrani, Daifulah; Raddadi, Ali; Massaad, Michel; Keles, Sevgi; Jabara, Haifa H; Chatila, Talal A; Geha, Raif

    2014-07-01

    The autosomal recessive form of the Hyper IgE syndrome (AR-HIES) with dedicator of cytokinesis 8 (DOCK8) deficiency is associated with difficult to treat persistent viral skin infections, including papilloma virus infection. Type I interferons play an important role in the defense against viruses. We examined the effect of therapy with IFN-α 2b in an 11-year old boy with DOCK8 deficiency due to a homozygous splice donor site mutation in DOCK8 intron 40. His unremitting warts showed dramatic response to IFN-α 2b therapy. Immunological studies revealed decreased circulating plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) and profound deficiency of IFN-α production by his peripheral blood mononuclear cells in response to treatment with CpG oligonucleotides. These findings indicate that underlying pDC deficiency and impaired IFN-α production may predispose to chronic viral infections in DOCK8 deficiency. IFN-α 2b therapy maybe useful in controlling recalcitrant viral infections in these patients. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Decreased Management of Genital Warts in Young Women in Australian General Practice Post Introduction of National HPV Vaccination Program: Results from a Nationally Representative Cross-Sectional General Practice Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Christopher; Britt, Helena; Garland, Suzanne; Conway, Lynne; Stein, Alicia; Pirotta, Marie; Fairley, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Since the introduction of Australia's human papillomavirus vaccination program, the management rate of genital warts in sexual health clinics and private hospitals has decreased in women of vaccine-eligible age. However, most genital warts in Australia are managed in general practice. This study examines whether a similar decrease occurred in Australian general practice after the introduction of the program. Methods Analysis of a nationally representative cross-sectional database of Australian general practice activity (1,175,879 patient encounters with 11,780 general practitioners). Genital warts management rates were estimated for the periods before and after introduction of the program (Pre-program, July 2002-June 2006; Post-program, July 2008-June 2012). Control conditions included genital herpes and gardnerella/bacterial vaginosis in female patients and genital herpes and urethritis in male patients. Trends in management rates by year, pre-vaccine (July 2000-June 2007) and post-vaccine (July 2007-June 2012) were also calculated. Results Management rate of genital warts among women potentially covered by program (aged 15–27 years) decreased by 61% from 4.33 per 1,000 encounters in the Pre-program period to 1.67 in the Post-program period. Trend analysis of the post-vaccine period showed, among women of vaccine eligible age, a significant year-on-year reduction in the rate of genital warts management (pwarts between the Pre- and Post-program periods. Conclusion The large decrease in general practice management of genital warts in women of vaccine-eligible age highlights the success of the program in the wider community. PMID:25180698

  15. Transmission of human papillomavirus DNA from patient to surgical masks, gloves and oral mucosa of medical personnel during treatment of laryngeal papillomas and genital warts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilmarinen, Taru; Auvinen, Eeva; Hiltunen-Back, Eija; Ranki, Annamari; Aaltonen, Leena-Maija; Pitkäranta, Anne

    2012-11-01

    The risk of occupational human papillomavirus (HPV) transmission from patient to medical personnel during laser vaporization procedures remains controversial. The purpose of this study was to determine the risk of HPV transmission from the patient to the protective surgical masks, gloves and oral mucosa of medical personnel during the treatment of laryngeal papillomas and genital warts. The study involved five male patients scheduled for the surgical treatment of laryngeal papillomas, and five male patients undergoing carbon dioxide (CO(2)) laser treatment for urethral warts. Oral mucosa specimens were obtained from the study patients and the employees pre- and postoperatively. Samples were collected from the HPV-infected patient tissue, and from the surgical masks and gloves used by the employees. A total of 120 samples were analyzed for the presence of HPV DNA by PCR, using the degenerated MY09/11/HMB01 primers. After the papilloma procedures, the surgeons' gloves tested HPV positive in one of the five cases and those of the surgical nurse in three of the five cases. After the treatment of genital warts, HPV DNA corresponding to the patient tissue specimens was present in all the samples obtained from the surgical gloves of the operators. All oral mucosa samples obtained from 18 different employees tested HPV negative, as did the surgical mask specimens. According to our study, HPV may contaminate protective equipment, most of all surgical gloves, but transmission of HPV DNA to medical personnel is unlikely to occur provided that protective surgical gloves and masks are applied and disposed of properly.

  16. Evidence of human papillomavirus vaccine effectiveness in reducing genital warts: an analysis of California public family planning administrative claims data, 2007-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Heidi M; Wright, Glenn; Chow, Joan

    2012-05-01

    Because of the rapid development of genital warts (GW) after infection, monitoring GW trends may provide early evidence of population-level human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine effectiveness. Trends in GW diagnoses were assessed using public family planning administrative data. Between 2007 and 2010, among females younger than 21 years, these diagnoses decreased 35% from 0.94% to 0.61% (P(trend) < .001). Decreases were also observed among males younger than 21 years (19%); and among females and males ages 21-25 (10% and 11%, respectively). The diagnoses stabilized or increased among older age groups. HPV vaccine may be preventing GW among young people.

  17. Estimation of the overall burden of cancers, precancerous lesions, and genital warts attributable to 9-valent HPV vaccine types in women and men in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwig, Susanne; St Guily, Jean Lacau; Dominiak-Felden, Géraldine; Alemany, Laia; de Sanjosé, Silvia

    2017-01-01

    In addition to cervical cancer, human papillomavirus (HPV) is responsible for a significant proportion of cancers and precancerous lesions of the vulva, vagina, anus, penis, head and neck, as well as genital warts. We estimated the annual number of new cases of these diseases attributable to 9-valent HPV vaccine types in women and men in Europe. The annual number of new cancers of the cervix, vulva, vagina, anus, penis, and selected head and neck sites in the population of the European Medicines Agency territory was estimated based on age-specific incidence rates extracted from Cancer Incidence in 5 Continents, Volume X and Eurostat population data for 2015. The annual number of new cancers attributable to 9-valent HPV vaccine types was estimated by applying the HPV attributable fraction from reference publications based on a large European multicenter study. For non-cervical cancers, HPV attributable fractions were based on oncogenically-active HPV infections only (i.e., detection of HPV DNA and either mRNA and/or p16 positivity). For precancerous lesions of the cervix, vulva, vagina, and anus, and for genital warts, previously published estimations were updated for the 2015 population. The annual number of new cancers attributable to 9-valent HPV vaccine types was estimated at 47,992 (95% bound: 39,785-58,511). Cervical cancer showed the highest burden (31,130 cases), followed by head and neck cancer (6,786 cases), anal cancer (6,137 cases), vulvar cancer (1,466 cases), vaginal cancer (1,360 cases), and penile cancer (1,113 cases). About 81% were estimated to occur in women and 19% in men. The annual number of new precancerous lesions (CIN2+, VIN2/3, VaIN2/3, and AIN2/3) and genital warts attributable to 9-valent HPV vaccine types was estimated at 232,103 to 442,347 and 680,344 to 844,391, respectively. The burden of cancers associated with 9-valent HPV vaccine types in Europe is substantial in both sexes. Head and neck cancers constitute a heavy burden

  18. Treatment of facial flat wart by XL-radiofrequency ablation under operating microscope%在手术显微镜下XL-射频皮肤治疗仪祛除面部扁平疣

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王兴林; 漆军; 蒋天裕; 张立宁; 高月明; 索伟; 肖红雨

    2013-01-01

    Objective To study the therapeutic effect of XL-radiofrequency ablation under microscope on facial flat wart. Methods Forty-five patients with flat wart (13 males and 32 females) aged 16~68 years with a disease course of 3 months~10 years, who visited the Outpatient Department in our hospital from June 2006 to August 2011, were included in this study. The number of flat warts in each patient was 4 to 110 and≥10 in 31 patients. The largest flat wart was 60 mm×30 mm. The flat warts were treated once by XL-radiofrequency ablation under operating microscope. The patients were followed up for 6 months~2 years, during which relapse of the disease, pigmentation and scar formation were observed. Results The facial flat warts were cured in 43 out of the 45 patients. The number of facial flat warts was markedly reduced in 2 patients with mild pigmentation and no scar formation. Conclusion The curative rate of XL-radiofrequency ablation under operating microscope for facial flat warts is high with no scar formation.%  目的研究在手术显微镜下XL-射频皮肤治疗仪分层祛除面部扁平疣的技术及疗效.方法2006年6月-2011年8月我院门诊扁平疣患者45例,男13例,女32例,年龄16~68岁,病程3个月~10年.每例病变数4~110个,病变≥10个31例,病变最大的融成片状60 mm×30 mm.在手术显微镜下采用射频消融电极分层祛除病变,均治疗1次.随访观察6个月~2年,确定病变部位有无复发,色素沉着及疤痕形成.结果45例中43例治愈,2例数量减少,2例有轻微的色素沉着,未出现疤痕.结论在手术显微镜下XL-射频皮肤治疗仪微创分层祛除扁平疣治愈率高,无疤痕.

  19. Risk of cancer in patients with genital warts: A nationwide, population-based cohort study in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Ching-Yi; Lo, Yu-Cheng; Hung, Miao-Chiu; Lai, Chou-Cheng; Chen, Chun-Jen

    2017-01-01

    Background Condyloma acuminata currently affects around 1% of sexually active adults, and its incidence is increasing. The coexistence of genital warts (GW) and certain cancers and an association between human papillomavirus (HPV) and various malignancies have been reported. Therefore, we conducted this large national study to analyze the risk of malignancies among men and women with GW in Taiwan. Methods and findings Between January 2000 and December 2013, approximately 3 million patients were reported to the National Health Insurance Research Database of Taiwan. Of these patients, 21,763 were diagnosed with GW. In the same time period, a total of 213,541 cancer cases were reported to the registry, of which 1002 were recorded among patients with GW. The age-specific incidence rates of GW and standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) of malignancies compared to the general population were calculated. Women acquired GW earlier than men, with a mean age at diagnosis of 32.63±12.78 years. The highest incidence rate for both genders peaked at 20–29 years. Of the 1002 patients with GW and malignancies, the SIR was 1.95 (95%CI 1.83–2.07). The most markedly increased risk was found for HPV-related cancers, with a SIR of 9.74 (95%CI 3.70–15.77). Significantly elevated risks were also noted for smoking-related cancers, anogenital cancers, cervix in situ, colon, rectum, lung, kidney, and prostate cancers. Most cancers developed within 10 years after the diagnosis of GW. Conclusions Patients with GW have an increased risk of HPV-related cancers, especially anogenital malignancies in Taiwan. The elevated risk of other cancers highlights differences in exposure and risk factors among patients with GW compared to the general population. Cancer screening and HPV vaccination programs should be emphasized for at-risk patients. PMID:28806741

  20. A feed-forward circuit linking wingless, fat-dachsous signaling, and the warts-hippo pathway to Drosophila wing growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myriam Zecca

    Full Text Available During development, the Drosophila wing primordium undergoes a dramatic increase in cell number and mass under the control of the long-range morphogens Wingless (Wg, a Wnt and Decapentaplegic (Dpp, a BMP. This process depends in part on the capacity of wing cells to recruit neighboring, non-wing cells into the wing primordium. Wing cells are defined by activity of the selector gene vestigial (vg and recruitment entails the production of a vg-dependent "feed-forward signal" that acts together with morphogen to induce vg expression in neighboring non-wing cells. Here, we identify the protocadherins Fat (Ft and Dachsous (Ds, the Warts-Hippo tumor suppressor pathway, and the transcriptional co-activator Yorkie (Yki, a YES associated protein, or YAP as components of the feed-forward signaling mechanism, and we show how this mechanism promotes wing growth in response to Wg. We find that vg generates the feed-forward signal by creating a steep differential in Ft-Ds signaling between wing and non-wing cells. This differential down-regulates Warts-Hippo pathway activity in non-wing cells, leading to a burst of Yki activity and the induction of vg in response to Wg. We posit that Wg propels wing growth at least in part by fueling a wave front of Ft-Ds signaling that propagates vg expression from one cell to the next.

  1. A Reduced National Incidence of Anogenital Warts in Young Danish Men and Women after Introduction of a National Quadrivalent Human Papillomavirus Vaccination Programme for Young Women – An Ecological Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandø, Niels; Kofoed, Kristian; Zachariae, Claus

    2013-01-01

    In January 2009 the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine was included in the Danish childhood vaccination programme for girls aged 12 years. A catch-up programme for girls up to 16 years of age was started a couple of months earlier. Based on national register data, anogenital wart (AGW) incidences...

  2. Early impact of Ontario's human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination program on anogenital warts (AGWs): A population-based assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Fiona M; Rosella, Laura C; Dunn, Sheila; Wilson, Sarah E; Chen, Cynthia; Deeks, Shelley L

    2016-09-07

    This study aimed to evaluate the early population impact of Ontario's school-based human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination program, implemented in September 2007 for grade 8 females, by comparing anogenital wart (AGW) health care utilization before and after vaccine program implementation, in program-eligible and program-ineligible cohorts, focusing on 15-26year olds. Using a retrospective longitudinal population-based study design, health administrative data were used to identify incident AGWs and total health service utilization (HSU) for AGWs for Ontario residents 15years and older between April 1 2004 and March 31 2014. The study period was divided into two eras: the pre-vaccine program era and the vaccine program era. Negative binomial models were generated to analyze trends across time by age group and sex. We adjusted female rates for routine Papanicolaou (Pap) testing to address spillover effects of Pap smear policy changes on AGW diagnosis. Between fiscal years 2004 and 2013, AGW incidence decreased 2.6% on average per year in 15-17year old females, and total HSU for AGWs decreased an average of 4.8% and 2.2% per year in 15-17 and 18-20year old females. Comparing the vaccine era to the pre-vaccine era, AGW incidence decreased 6.5% in 18-20year old females, and AGW HSU decreased 13.8%, 11.1%, and 10.0% in 15-17, 18-20, and 21-23year old females respectively. In contrast, male AGW incidence rates increased an average of 4.1%, 2.8%, and 0.9% per year in 15-17, 21-23, and 24-26year old males respectively. AGW incidence rates increased 12.2% in 15-17year old males from the pre-vaccine to vaccine era. The decline in AGW incidence and HSU in program-eligible females suggests the school-based HPV vaccination program has had an early population impact in Ontario. The increasing AGW incidence in males suggests no early evidence of herd effects in males. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Inclusion of the benefits of enhanced cross-protection against cervical cancer and prevention of genital warts in the cost-effectiveness analysis of human papillomavirus vaccination in the Netherlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Westra Tjalke A

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infection with HPV 16 and 18, the major causative agents of cervical cancer, can be prevented through vaccination with a bivalent or quadrivalent vaccine. Both vaccines provide cross-protection against HPV-types not included in the vaccines. In particular, the bivalent vaccine provides additional protection against HPV 31, 33, and 45 and the quadrivalent vaccine against HPV31. The quadrivalent vaccine additionally protects against low-risk HPV type 6 and 11, responsible for most cases of genital warts. In this study, we made an analytical comparison of the two vaccines in terms of cost-effectiveness including the additional benefits of cross-protection and protection against genital warts in comparison with a screening-only strategy. Methods We used a Markov model, simulating the progression from HPV infection to cervical cancer or genital warts. The model was used to estimate the difference in future costs and health effects of both HPV-vaccines separately. Results In a cohort of 100,000 women, use of the bivalent or quadrivalent vaccine (both at 50% vaccination coverage reduces the cervical cancer incidence by 221 and 207 cases, corresponding to ICERs of €17,600/QALY and €18,900/QALY, respectively. It was estimated that the quadrivalent vaccine additionally prevents 4390 cases of genital warts, reducing the ICER to €16,300/QALY. Assuming a comparable willingness to pay for cancer and genital warts prevention, the difference in ICERs could justify a slightly higher price (~7% per dose in favor of the quadrivalent vaccine. Conclusions Clearly, HPV vaccination has been implemented for the prevention of cervical cancer. From this perspective, use of the bivalent HPV vaccine appears to be most effective and cost-effective. Including the benefits of prevention against genital warts, the ICER of the quadrivalent HPV vaccine was found to be slightly more favourable. However, current decision-making on the introduction of HPV

  4. What are Warts?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... nav nav, .header-9#header-section #main-nav, #overlay-menu nav, #mobile-menu, #one-page-nav li . ... How to Care for Your Child’s TeethRead Article >>Dental Hygiene: How to Care for Your Child’s TeethSeptember ...

  5. Plantar Wart (Verruca Plantaris)

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    ... Where do you hurt? Interactive Foot Diagram Going Barefoot? Beware! Tips for a safer barefoot summer. Millions of Americans will go barefoot this summer, and thousands will suffer injuries, such ...

  6. Impact of genital warts on health related quality of life in men and women in mainland China: a multicenter hospital-based cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi Ju-Fang

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Information on the health-related quality of life (HRQoL of patients with genital warts (GW in populations in mainland China is still limited. The aim of the study was to use a generic instrument to measure the impact of genital warts on HRQoL in men and women in this setting. Methods A multi-centre hospital-based cross-sectional study across 18 centers in China was conducted to interview patients using the European quality of life-5 dimension (EQ-5D instrument; respondents' demographic and clinical data were also collected. Results A total of 1,358 GW patients (612 men, 746 women were included in the analysis, with a mean age of 32.0 ± 10.6 years. 56.4% of the patients reported some problems in the dimension of Anxiety/Depression (highest, followed by Pain/Discomfort (24.7% and Mobility (3.5%. The overall visual analogue scale (VAS score of the study population was found to be 65.2 ± 22.0, and the EQ-5D index score was found to be 0.843 ± 0.129 using Japanese preference weights (the Chinese preference was unavailable yet. Patients with lower VAS means and EQ-5D index scores were more often female, living in urban area, and suffering multiple GW (all p values 0.05. Conclusions The HRQoL of patients with GW was substantially lower, compared to a national representative general population in China (VAS = ~80; the findings of different subgroups are informative for future GW prevention and control efforts.

  7. Higher prevalence of sexual transmitted diseases and correlates of genital warts among heterosexual males attending sexually transmitted infection clinics (MSCs in Jiangmen, China: implication for the up-taking of STD related service.

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    Shujie Huang

    Full Text Available Increasing burden of STDs is one of China's major public health concerns. However, only a limited number of studies have ever investigated the prevalence of these STDs, particular for genital warts and its correlates among heterosexual males attending STD clinics in China. In order to fill this gap, we conducted a cross-sectional study among MSCs in Jiangmen, China, between the years of 2009 and 2010.The eligible participants were recruited from several STD-clinics in public hospitals. We collected demographic information and behaviors of the participants. After HIV and syphilis testing, we further checked whether the participants had genital warts and genital herpes. In addition, urine samples were collected from part of the participants for CT and NG testing.Of the 533 eligible participants, over three-fifths were aged 35 or below, nearly three quarters had no college degree, over three-fifths were residence of Jiangmen. The prevalence of HIV, syphilis, genital warts, genital herpes, CT and NG were 0.19%, 7.50%, 7.32%, 5.25%, 9.73% and 6.19%, respectively. Living with family members (versus living alone, no STD-related service in past year, experiencing STDs related symptoms in past year, and sex with FSWs in last three months were positively associated with genital warts, with adjusted ORs of 5.54 (95% CI 1.94-15.81, 2.26 (95% CI 1.08-4.74, 1.99 (95% CI 1.00-3.99 and 2.01 (95% CI 1.00-4.04, respectively.Our study indicates that the prevalence of STDs among MSCs in Jiangmen was high, which may further spread HIV among MSCs. Targeted interventions that focused on STDs related services uptake should be implemented urgently.

  8. Higher Prevalence of Sexual Transmitted Diseases and Correlates of Genital Warts among Heterosexual Males Attending Sexually Transmitted Infection Clinics (MSCs) in Jiangmen, China: Implication for the Up-Taking of STD Related Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhengjun; Lu, Hekun; Tan, Xueling; Zhang, Baoyuan; Best, John; Yang, Ligang; Zheng, Heping; Jiang, Ning; Yin, Yueping; Yang, Bin; Chen, Xiangsheng

    2015-01-01

    Background Increasing burden of STDs is one of China’s major public health concerns. However, only a limited number of studies have ever investigated the prevalence of these STDs, particular for genital warts and its correlates among heterosexual males attending STD clinics in China. In order to fill this gap, we conducted a cross-sectional study among MSCs in Jiangmen, China, between the years of 2009 and 2010. Method The eligible participants were recruited from several STD-clinics in public hospitals. We collected demographic information and behaviors of the participants. After HIV and syphilis testing, we further checked whether the participants had genital warts and genital herpes. In addition, urine samples were collected from part of the participants for CT and NG testing. Results Of the 533 eligible participants, over three-fifths were aged 35 or below, nearly three quarters had no college degree, over three-fifths were residence of Jiangmen. The prevalence of HIV, syphilis, genital warts, genital herpes, CT and NG were 0.19%, 7.50%, 7.32%, 5.25%, 9.73% and 6.19%, respectively. Living with family members (versus living alone), no STD-related service in past year, experiencing STDs related symptoms in past year, and sex with FSWs in last three months were positively associated with genital warts, with adjusted ORs of 5.54 (95% CI 1.94–15.81), 2.26 (95% CI 1.08–4.74), 1.99 (95% CI 1.00–3.99) and 2.01 (95% CI 1.00–4.04), respectively. Conclusion Our study indicates that the prevalence of STDs among MSCs in Jiangmen was high, which may further spread HIV among MSCs. Targeted interventions that focused on STDs related services uptake should be implemented urgently. PMID:25811185

  9. The effect of patients’ preference on outcome in the EVerT cryotherapy versus salicylic acid for the treatment of plantar warts (verruca trial

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    Cockayne Sarah

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Randomised controlled trials are widely accepted as the gold standard method to evaluate medical interventions, but they are still open to bias. One such bias is the effect of patient’s preference on outcome measures. The aims of this study were to examine whether patients’ treatment preference affected clearance of plantar warts and explore whether there were any associations between patients’ treatment preference and baseline variables in the EverT trial. Methods Two hundred and forty patients were recruited from University podiatry schools, NHS podiatry clinics and primary care. Patients were aged 12 years and over and had at least one plantar wart which was suitable for treatment with salicylic acid and cryotherapy. Patients were asked their treatment preference prior to randomisation. The Kruskal-Wallis test was performed to test the association between preference group and continuous baseline variables. The Fisher’s exact test was performed to test the association between preference group and categorical baseline variables. A logistic regression analysis was undertaken with verruca clearance (yes or no as the dependent variable and treatment, age, type of verruca, previous treatment, treatment preference as independent variables. Two analyses were undertaken, one using the health professional reported outcome and one using the patient’s self reported outcomes. Data on whether the patient found it necessary to stop the treatment to which they had been allocated and whether they started another treatment were summarised by treatment group. Results Pre-randomisation preferences were: 10% for salicylic acid; 42% for cryotherapy and 48% no treatment preference. There was no evidence of an association between treatment preference group and either patient (p=0.95 or healthcare professional (p=0.46 reported verruca clearance rates. There was no evidence of an association between preference group and any of the

  10. Cell Signaling and Differential Protein Expression in Neuronal Differentiation of Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells with Hypermethylated Salvador/Warts/Hippo (SWH Pathway Genes.

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    Hui-Hung Tzeng

    Full Text Available Human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs modified by targeting DNA hypermethylation of genes in the Salvador/Warts/Hippo pathway were induced to differentiate into neuronal cells in vitro. The differentiated cells secreted a significant level of brain-derived neurotrophy factor (BDNF and the expression of BDNF receptor tyrosine receptor kinase B (TrkB correlated well with the secretion of BDNF. In the differentiating cells, CREB was active after the binding of growth factors to induce phosphorylation of ERK in the MAPK/ERK pathway. Downstream of phosphorylated CREB led to the functional maturation of differentiated cells and secretion of BDNF, which contributed to the sustained expression of pERK and pCREB. In summary, both PI3K/Akt and MAPK/ERK signaling pathways play important roles in the neuronal differentiation of MSCs. The main function of the PI3K/Akt pathway is to maintain cell survival during neural differentiation; whereas the role of the MAPK/ERK pathway is probably to promote the maturation of differentiated MSCs. Further, cellular levels of protein kinase C epsilon type (PKC-ε and kinesin heavy chain (KIF5B increased with time of induction, whereas the level of NME/NM23 nucleoside diphosphate kinase 1 (Nm23-H1 decreased during the time course of differentiation. The correlation between PKC-ε and TrkB suggested that there is cross-talk between PKC-ε and the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway.

  11. Transcriptional output of the Salvador/warts/hippo pathway is controlled in distinct fashions in Drosophila melanogaster and mammalian cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaomeng; Milton, Claire C; Humbert, Patrick O; Harvey, Kieran F

    2009-08-01

    The Salvador/Warts/Hippo (SWH) pathway is an important modulator of organ size, and deregulation of pathway activity can lead to cancer. Several SWH pathway components are mutated or expressed at altered levels in different human tumors including NF2, LATS1, LATS2, SAV1, and YAP. The SWH pathway regulates tissue growth by restricting the activity of the transcriptional coactivator protein known as Yorkie (Yki) in Drosophila melanogaster and Yes-associated protein (YAP) in mammals. Yki/YAP drives tissue growth in partnership with the Scalloped (Sd)/TEAD1-4 transcription factors. Yki/YAP also possesses two WW domains, which contact several proteins that have been suggested to either promote or inhibit the ability of Yki to induce transcription. To investigate the regulatory role of the Yki/YAP WW domains, we analyzed the functional consequence of mutating these domains. WW domain mutant YAP promoted transformation and migration of breast epithelial cells with increased potency, suggesting that WW domains mediate the inhibitory regulation of YAP in these cells. By contrast, the WW domains were required for YAP to promote NIH-3T3 cell transformation and for the ability of Yki to drive tissue growth in D. melanogaster and optimally activate Sd. This shows that Yki/YAP WW domains have distinct regulatory roles in different cell types and implies the existence of proteins that promote tissue growth in collaboration with Yki and Sd.

  12. Molecular cloning and characterisation of a novel type of human papillomavirus 160 isolated from a flat wart of an immunocompetent patient.

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    Tsuyoshi Mitsuishi

    Full Text Available More than 150 types of Human papillomaviruses (HPVs have been isolated from numerous cutaneous and/or mucosal lesions. Flat wart samples on the face from 36 immunocompetent patients were collected and screened for HPV. From one sample, we cloned a putative novel genotype. The novel type consisted of 7779 bp in length with a GC content of 47.1%, containing open reading frames for putative early proteins (E1, E2, E4, E6, and E7 and two late proteins (L1 and L2. Homology searches and phylogenetic analyses indicated that it belonged to Alphapapillomavirus (Alpha-PV species 2 and most closely resembled HPV 3. The virus fulfilled the definition of a novel type, and was named HPV 160 by the Reference Center for Papillomaviruses. The putative E7 protein of HPV 160 as well as HPV 29, 77, and 78 contained the Leu-X-Cys-X-Glu pRB-binding motif but other Alpha-PV species 2 (HPV 3, 10, 28, 94, 117, and 125 did not have this conserved motif.

  13. Clinical observation of Chinese herbal medicine combine with liquid nitrogen therapy multiple plantar warts%中药泡脚联合液氮冷冻治疗多发性跖疣的临床观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵跃凤

    2014-01-01

    目的::探讨中药祛疣汤泡脚联合液氮冷冻治疗多发性跖疣的临床疗效。方法:将2012年2月~2013年8月我科就诊的95例跖疣患者随机分为观察组50例和对照组45例。观察组采用祛疣汤泡脚4周后液氮冷冻治疗,对照组单纯用液氮冷冻治疗。2个月后评价疗效。结果:观察组疗效与对照组比较差异有统计学意义(P<0.05)。结论:中药祛疣汤泡脚联合液氮冷冻治疗跖疣,临床疗效明显优于单纯的液氮冷冻治疗,值得临床推广应用。%Objective:To observe the clinical curative effect of treating multiple plantar warts with Chinese herbal decoction called Qu You Tang soaking and liquid nitrogen cryotherapy,and explore the effect of nursing interventions in plantar wart treatment. Methods:95 patients with plantar warts were divided into observation group and control group at random. Qu You Tang soaking were adopted in the treatment of observation group,after four weeks received frozen of liquid nitrogen. And the control group was only treated with liquid nitrogen cryotherapy. Two months later,evaluated the clinical effect. Results:The effective rate of observation group was higher than the control group. And the effective rate of two groups have significant difference(P<0. 05). Conclusion:The clini-cal curative effect of employing Qu You Tang soaking and liquid nitrogen cryotherapy with appropriate nursing intervention to treat multiple plantar warts is obviously superior to merely adopting cryotherapy,and is worth widely popularizing and applying to the clinic.

  14. Detection of human papilloma virus in 249 cases of patients with genital warts%249例生殖器疣患者人乳头瘤病毒检测分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李蕾; 邹先彪

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the distribution of human papilloma virus (HPV) genotypes from outpatients with genital wart in Beijing.Method Flow cytometry HPV genotyping technique were used to detect and identify HPV genotypes from individual lesions. Result Among 249 cases of genital warts, 232 (93.17%) were DNA HPV positive. The positive rate of HPV single type was 63.86%, the positive rate of multiple type of HPV was 36.14%. The infection rate of low-risk HPV was 55.4%, in which HPV6 and HPV11 were the most popular genotypes. HPV16, HPV58, HPV18 were the most prevalent high-risk genotypes.Conclusion The peak of HPV infection concentrates in sexually active population younger than 40 years old. HPV6, HPV11 and HPV16 are the predominant genotypes for genital wart in Beijing.%目的:调查生殖器疣患者人乳头瘤病毒(human papilloma virus,HPV)感染特点,为HPV感染的预防和诊治提供理论依据。方法采用流式荧光HPV基因分型技术检测249例生殖器疣患者皮损组织中HPV的型别。结果249例生殖器疣患者中,232例(93.17%)HPV DNA阳性。单一型感染率为63.86%,复合型感染率为36.14%。低危型HPV阳性率为55.4%,其中以HPV6、HPV11最多;高危型中以HPV16最多,其次为HPV58、HPV18型。结论本地区生殖器HPV感染集中于40岁以下性活跃期的人群。以单一型感染为主,最常见HPV6、HPV11和HPV16型感染。

  15. Clinical analysis of male genital warts patients with UU infection%男性尖锐湿疣患者合并解脲支原体感染的临床特点分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苏学飞; 黄建国; 陈广新; 朱秋玲

    2015-01-01

    目的:探讨男性尖锐湿疣患者合并解脲支原体感染的临床特点分析。方法:选择86例男性尖锐湿疣患者为观察组,86例健康男性为对照组,根据患者主诉记录临床特征,采用醋酸白试验和UU培养基检测判定复发情况。结果:86例CA患者中,共41例患者检出解脲支原体感染,占47.7%。86例对照组中,共9例检出解脲支原体感染,占10.5%;二者检出率比较具有显著性差异(P<0.05);单纯CA组患者复发7例,复发率为15.6%;CA合并UU组患者复发1 6例,复发率为39.0%,二者复发率比较具有显著性差异,合并UU感染更易复发;41例UU阳性患者中,21例患者出现尿道口黏膜明显充血发红,占51.2%;24例患者镜检出现多形核白细胞,占58.5%;5例患者主诉提及尿急、尿频、尿道不适,尿道分泌物等尿道炎症状,占12.2%。结论:尖锐湿疣合并解脲支原体感染是导致尖锐湿疣复发的重要因素,需尽早进行常规检查和化验,并进行规范化治疗。%Objectives:To investigate the clinical features of male genital warts patients with UU infection. Methods:86 male genital warts patients were selected as the observation group,86 healthy male were selected as the control group.According to the clinical features of the patients’complaint,acetic acid white test and UU medi-um detection were used to determine recurrence rate.Results:Among the 86 CA patients,41 patients with UU in-fection were detected,accounting for 47.7%.Among the 86 cases in the control group,9 cases with UU infection were detected,accounting for 1 0. 5%,with significant difference in detection rates between the two group (P<0. 05 );7 cases relapsed in pure CA patients group,a recurrence rate of 1 5. 6%;1 6 cases relapsed in CA combined UU group,a recurrence rate of 39. 0%,with significant difference in recurrence rate between the two group.Among 41 cases UU

  16. Clinical observation on carbon dioxide fractional laser combined with liquid nitrogen cryotherapy for flat warts%点阵二氧化碳激光联合液氮冷冻治疗扁平疣的临床观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    缪泽群; 郑楷平; 肖桂凤; 宋韬

    2014-01-01

    目的 评价点阵二氧化碳激光联合液氮冷冻治疗扁平疣的临床疗效和安全性.方法 将83例扁平疣患者按治疗方法分为两组,观察组42例予点阵二氧化碳激光联合液氮冷冻治疗,对照组41例予液氮冷冻治疗,均10d为1个疗程,共治疗2个疗程.比较两组疗效、复发情况及不良反应.结果 观察组第1和2个疗程后痊愈率明显高于对照组[73.81%(31/42)比46.34%(19/41)和97.62%(41/42)比75.61%(31/41)],观察组复发率和不良反应发生率明显低于对照组[2.44%(1/41)比19.35%(6/31)和9.52%(4/42)比31.71%(13/41)],差异均有统计学意义(P< 0.05或< 0.01).结论 点阵二氧化碳激光联合液氮冷冻治疗扁平疣可明显提高痊愈率,降低复发率,而且安全.%Objective To evaluate the clinical efficacy and safety about carbon dioxide fractional laser combined with liquid nitrogen cryotherapy for flat warts.Methods Eighty-three patients with flat warts were divided into 2 groups according to the treatment method,42 patients in treatment group were treated by carbon dioxide fractional laser combined with liquid nitrogen cryotherapy,41 patients in control group were treated by liquid nitrogen cryotherapy alone.As a period for 10 days,2 groups were given 2 periods of treatment.The therapeutic effect,recurrence rate and adverse reaction were compared between 2 groups.Results The cure rates of 1-period and 2-period in treatment group were significantly higher than those in control group [73.81%(31/42) vs.46.34%(19/41) and 97.62%(41/42) vs.75.61%(31/41)],the recurrence rate and incidence of adverse reaction in treatment group were significantly lower than those in control group [2.44%(1/41) vs.19.35%(6/31) and 9.52%(4/42) vs.31.71%(13/41)],there were statistical differences (P < 0.05 or < 0.01).Conclusion Carbon dioxide fractional laser combined with liquid nitrogen cryotherapy for fiat warts is a safe and effective treatment with low

  17. Comparative analysis of the curative effects of topical alpha hydroxyl acids and cryotherapy in treating children periungual warts%果酸与冷冻治疗儿童甲周疣疗效比较与分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡友红; 唐先勇; 易庆阳; 周冰

    2016-01-01

    ObjectiveTo observe the clinical effect and adverse reactions of topical alpha hydroxyl acids (ARAs) and cryotherapy in treatment with children periungual warts.MethodsARAs group: the initial concentration of ARAs was 20%, for the warts body; cryotherapy group: dipped in the amount of liquid nitrogen, 2 times of freezing. The treatment was continuous to 4W, 1 times/w, to visit again before treatment, observe and record the change of the lesions and the adverse reaction.ResultsARAs, cryotherapy effective rate was 84.4%, 78.1%, the difference was not statistically significant (P> 0.05); the rate of pain, erythema and blisters was respectively 100.0%, 68.8%;43.8%,18.8%;53.1%, 15.6%, the differences were statistically signiifcant(P< 0.05).Conclusionthe effect of ARAs and cryotherapy treatment is signiifcant, the adverse reaction of ARAs is lower, and it can be used as a good choice for the treatment in children periungual warts.%目的:观察果酸、冷冻两种不同方法治疗儿童甲周疣的临床疗效及不良反应。方法:果酸组:果酸起始浓度20%,外用于疣体;冷冻组:蘸取适量液体氮,2次冻溶。两组均每周治疗1次,连续4周,于操作时、复诊再次治疗前观察和记录皮损变化及不良反应。结果:果酸、冷冻治疗儿童甲周疣有效率分别为84.4%,78.1%,疗效比较差异无统计学意义(P>0.05);冷冻、果酸治疗儿童甲周疣产生疼痛、红斑和水疱的发生率分别为100.0% VS 68.8%,43.8% VS 18.8%,53.1% VS 15.6%,差异均有统计学意义(P<0.05)。结论:果酸与冷冻治疗儿童甲周疣疗效显著,但果酸治疗不良反应低,可做为儿童甲周疣治疗的良好选择。

  18. Anogenital warts in children: sexual abuse or unintentional contamination? Verrugas anogenitais na infância: abuso sexual ou contaminação não-intencional?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisieux Eyer de Jesus

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Anogenital warts (AGW were recently recognized in children, and their significance as an index of childhood sexual abuse is controversial. We report our transdisciplinary approach (including a pediatric surgeon, psychologist, social worker, ethics expert, and occasionally law enforcement agents and its results in a group of 17 children with AGW treated at the public pediatric referral hospital in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, during a 3-year period (1996-1999. All children were treated by electrocauterization of the warts, tested for other STDs, and submitted to perineal examination under anesthesia. Families received psycho-social counseling as necessary and cases were referred to child protection and law enforcement agents when indicated according to Brazilian legislation. We identified a high incidence of sexual abuse (8 children, 5/7 > 5 years old, with 3 patients inconclusive as to sexual abuse and 7 cases of perinatal transmission (5/8 5 years of age. However, strong support and a transdisciplinary approach to the children and their families is necessary to identify it.Verrugas anogenitais (VAG são de reconhecimento recente na criança e seu significado como sinal de abuso sexual é controverso. Relatamos nossa abordagem multidisciplinar (cirurgião pediatra, psicólogo, assistente social, conselheiro de ética e eventualmente agente legal e seus resultados, num grupo de 17 crianças com VAG tratadas em um hospital público de referência no Rio de Janeiro, Brasil, em um período de três anos (1996-1999. Todos foram tratados por eletrocoagulação das verrugas, testadas para outras DSTs, e submetidos a um exame perineal sob anestesia. Todas as famílias foram amparadas pelos assistentes sociais e psicólogos na medida do necessário, e casos de violência comprovada ou suspeita foram encaminhados de acordo com as leis brasileiras. Foi descoberta uma alta incidência de abuso sexual previamente insuspeito (oito crianças, 5/7 dos maiores de

  19. Frequent epigenetic inactivation of KIBRA, an upstream member of the Salvador/Warts/Hippo (SWH) tumor suppressor network, is associated with specific genetic event in B-cell acute lymphocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Victoria K; Dunwell, Thomas L; Catchpoole, Daniel; Krex, Dietmar; Brini, Anna T; Griffiths, Mike; Craddock, Charles; Maher, Eamonn R; Latif, Farida

    2011-03-01

    The WW-domain containing protein KIBRA has recently been identified as a new member of the Salvador/Warts/Hippo (SWH) pathway in Drosophila and is shown to act as a tumor suppressor gene in Drosophila. This pathway is conserved in humans and members of the pathway have been shown to act as tumor suppressor genes in mammalian systems. We determined the methylation status of the 5' CpG island associated with the KIBRA gene in human cancers. In a large panel of cancer cell lines representing common epithelial cancers KIBRA was unmethylated. But in pediatric acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) cell lines KIBRA showed frequent hypermethylation and silencing of gene expression, which could be reversed by treatment with 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine. In ALL patient samples KIBRA was methylated in 70% B-ALL but was methylated in < 20% T-ALL leukemia (p = 0.0019). In B-ALL KIBRA methylation was associated with ETV6/RUNX1 [t(12;21) (p13;q22)] chromosomal translocation (p = 0.0082) phenotype, suggesting that KIBRA may play an important role in t(12;21) leukemogenesis. In ALL paired samples at diagnosis and remission KIBRA methylation was seen in diagnostic but not in any of the remission samples accompanied by loss of KIBRA expression in disease state compared to patients in remission. Hence KIBRA methylation occurs frequently in B-cell acute lymphocytic leukemia but not in epithelial cancers and is linked to specific genetic event in B-ALL.

  20. Analysis of Langerhans Cells and T-lymphocyte in Plantar Warts with Spontaneous Regression%自然消退倾向跖疣皮损中朗格汉斯细胞与T淋巴细胞检测分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陶茂灿; 杨敏; 曹毅; 陈微

    2011-01-01

    Objective To detect the Langerhans cells and T lymphocytes in plantar warts with the tendency of spontaneous regression and explore its occurrence, development and relevance of local immunity. Methods According to the recent changes of plantar warts' number as well as size and patients' self-feeling symptoms,22 plantar wart with spontaneous regression and 18 cases without the regression sign were selected from the Foot Specialist Out-patient. Then we removed those warts with the surgical operation, taking the routine paraffin section on those removed warts, going on immunohistochemical staining with CDla, CD3 , CD4, CD8 monoclonal antibody to compared their average density of CD1 a + LC, CD3 + , CD4 + , CD8 + , ratio of CD4 + /CD8 + and the LC modality distribution. The local immune status of the two groups was observed at the same time. Results Compared with the spontaneous regression group,CDla+ LC in the group without signs of regression mostly scattered in the lower epidermis and the dendritic processes were also significantly less, shorter than the other group and even disappeared. The average density of LC, CD4, and CD4/CD8 ratios in the group without signs of regression were significantly lower than those in spontaneous regression group (P 0. 05 ). Conclusion The group without signs of regression has local immune deficiency. The recovery of local immune is closely related to the spontaneous regression of plantar wart.%目的 通过对自然消退倾向跖疣及无消退迹象跖疣皮损中朗格汉斯细胞与T淋巴细胞的检测分析,探讨跖疣的发生、发展与局部免疫的相关性.方法 根据近期疣体数目增减及疣体大小、自觉症状情况,在皮肤科足病专科门诊收集自然消退倾向跖疣22例与无消退迹象跖疣18例.用外科手术的方法将两组患者疣体切除,所取疣体皮损,常规石蜡切片,用CD1a,CD3,CD4,CD8单克隆抗体进行免疫组化染色,比较两组患者CD1a+朗格汉斯细胞(LC),CD3

  1. 包皮环切与微波疗法联合治疗尖锐湿疣%Combination of Circumcision and Microwave in Treatment of Genital Warts in Uncircumcised Patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    樊翌明; 马泽; 吴志华; 李顺凡; 陈秋霞

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the efficacy of combination of circumcision and microwave on genital warts in uncircumcised men.Methods: A randomized, prospective study of 109uncircumcised adult men with genital warts was conducted in a STD clinic in Zhanjiang, Guangdong. One group (n=54) received microwave therapy only, while the other group (n=55) was taken the combination of circumcision and microwave therapy. The recurrences were observed at the end of months 3, 6 and 12, and operative complications were also recorded.Results: There were no significant differences in the mean age and duration of the disease between two groups (P>0.05). No serious operative complications were documented. The recurrence rate in circumcision plus microwave group was markedly lower than that in microwave group (12.7% vs 29.6%, P<0.05),while the differences in early and late recurrences between two groups showed no statistical significance (P>0.05).Conclusion: Circumcision can be safely performed under local anesthesia in an outpatient setting. Combination of circumcision and microwave can produce excellent effect as well as less tissue damage,therefore, it may be ideal for uncircumcised patients with extensive condylomas.%目的 对未接受过包皮环切手术的尖锐湿疣患者,给予微波与包皮环切联合治疗,并观察其疗效.方法 随机抽取某性病门诊109名未做过包皮环切手术的成年尖锐湿疣患者,将其分为两组进行前瞻性研究.一组(54人)接受单纯微波疗法,另一组(55人)接受微波与包皮环切联合疗法.我们观察到在第3,6和12个月后有复发出现,并记录术后合并症的发生情况.结果 两组间的平均年龄和病程无显著性差异(P>0.0 5).未发现严重的术后并发症.微波与包皮环切联合治疗组的复发率明显低于单纯微波治疗组(12.7%和29.6%,P<0.05),而两组间早期与后期的复发率差异无统计学意义(P>0.05).结论 包皮环切术是一种安全的

  2. Comparison of CO2 laser combined with imiquimod cream and CO2 laser alone for the clinical treatment of periungual wart%CO2激光联合咪喹莫特乳膏治疗甲周疣疗效观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    段民录; 赵亮; 朱蕾

    2012-01-01

    目的:观察CO2激光联合咪喹莫特乳膏治疗甲周疣的临床疗效,并与单纯CO2激光治疗做比较.方法:将入选的182例甲周疣患者随机分为两组:对照组91例,单纯CO2激光手术治疗;治疗组91例,CO2激光加咪喹莫特乳膏治疗.3个月后分别对两组有效率及复发率进行随访.结果:对照组有效率84.5%,治疗组有效率90.2%,复发率分别是12.5%、7.9%.两组疗效比较,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05).结论:CO2激光联合5%咪喹莫特乳膏治愈率高,复发率低.联合治疗对特殊部位疣有一定推广价值.%Objective To compare the treatment of periungual wart using CO2 laser combined with imiquimod cream and using CO2 laser alone. Methods 182 cases with periungual warts were selected and randomly divided into two groups. The observation group included 91 cases, which were treated by CO2 laser plus imiquimod cream. The control group with 91 cases were treated by CO2 laser alne. All patients were followed for 3 months after the initial treatment. The cure rate and recurrence rate were compared in two groups. Results The data showed that the cure rate in control group and observation group patients was 84.5% and 90.2% (P<0.05), respectively. The wart recurrence rate was 12.5% and 7.9% in two group (P<0.05), respectively. Conclusion The high cure rate and low recurrence rate can be obtained in the treatment of periungual wart using CO2 laser combined with 5% imiquimod cream. Combination therapy for periungual parts should be promoted.

  3. Evaluation of vaccination herd immunity effects for anogenital warts in a low coverage setting with human papillomavirus vaccine-an interrupted time series analysis from 2005 to 2010 using health insurance data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thöne, Kathrin; Horn, Johannes; Mikolajczyk, Rafael

    2017-08-14

    Shortly after the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine recommendation and hence the reimbursement of vaccination costs for the respective age groups in Germany in 2007, changes in the incidence of anogenital warts (AGWs) were observed, but it was not clear at what level the incidence would stabilize and to what extent herd immunity would be present. Given the relatively low HPV vaccination coverage in Germany, we aimed to assess potential vaccination herd immunity effects in the German setting. A retrospective open cohort study with data from more than nine million statutory health insurance members from 2005 to 2010 was conducted. AGW cases were identified using ICD-10-codes. The incidence of AGWs was estimated by age, sex, and calendar quarter. Age and sex specific incidence rate ratios were estimated comparing the years 2009-2010 (post-vaccination period) with 2005-2007 (pre-vaccination period). Incidence rate ratio of AGWs for the post-vaccination period compared to the pre-vaccination period showed a u-shaped decrease among the 14- to 24-year-old females and males which corresponds well with the reported HPV vaccination uptake in 2008. A maximum reduction of up to 60% was observed for the 16- to 20-year-old females and slightly less pronounced (up to 50%) for the 16- and 18-year-old males. Age groups outside of the range 14-24 years demonstrated no decrease. The decrease of incidence occurred in both sexes early after the vaccine recommendation and stabilized at lower levels in 2009-2010. A relative reduction of up to 50% among males of approximately similar age groups as that of females receiving the HPV vaccination suggests herd protection resulting from assortative mixing by age. The early decrease among males can be reduced over time due to partner change.

  4. Efficacy of electrosurgical combined foscarnet sodium and imiquimod cream in treatment of female genital warts%高频电刀联合膦甲酸钠和咪喹莫特乳膏治疗女性尖锐湿疣

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李莉

    2012-01-01

    Objective To observe the effect of high -frequency electric knife foscarnet sodium and imiquimod cream in treatment of women with genital warts. Methods Totally 130 cases of female genital warts patients were divided into three groups,group A used simple high-frequency electric knife treatment;Group B used electrosurgical treatment,the affected area coated with imiquimod cream; On the basis of group C in B group treatment programs given foscarnet sodium. Followed up for 6 months after the treatment, the recurrence rate of three groups were compared. Results The group A recurrence rate of 37. 14% and 27. 19% in group B,15. 38% in group C, three groups were significant differences. Conclusions The high - frequency electric knife foscarnet sodium and imiquimod cream in treatment of female genital warts have low recurrence rate,fewer adverse reactions.%目的 观察高频电刀联合膦甲酸钠和咪喹莫特乳膏治疗女性尖锐湿疣的疗效.方法 将130例女性尖锐湿疣患者分成3组,A组采用单纯高频电刀治疗;B组采用高频电刀治疗,患处涂咪喹莫特乳膏;C组在B组治疗方案的基础上给予膦甲酸钠.三组治疗结束后随访6个月,比较三组的复发率.结果 A组复发率为37.14%,B组为27.19%,C组为15.38%,3组比较均有显著性差异.结论 高频电刀联合膦甲酸钠和咪喹莫特乳膏治疗女性尖锐湿疣复发率低,不良反应少.

  5. Observation on the Efficacy of Thymopeptide Enteric -coated Capsules Combined with Liquid Nitrogen Cryotherapy in the Treatment of Flat Warts%胸腺肽肠溶胶囊联合液氮冷冻治疗扁平疣疗效探讨

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    聂元梅; 董心亚; 燕群

    2014-01-01

    Objective To observe the clinical efficacy of thymopeptide enteric-coated capsules combined with liquid nitrogen cryotherapy in the treatment of flat warts. Methods 92 patients with flat warts were divided into two groups randomly. The control group was given thymopeptide enteric-coated capsules 10mg, orally, 3 times a day, and recombinant human interferon α-2b gel applied to the affected area twice a day, the 0.1% tretinoin cream applied to the affected area once every night before sleeping. The treatment group was given thymopeptide enteric-coated capsules 10mg, 3 times a day, orally, and at the same time, they were given liquid nitrogen cryotherapy. The two groups were given the course of treatment of two months. Results The effective rate was 93.5% in the treatment group, and that was 65.2% in the control group. The difference between the two groups in effective rate was statistically significant (P<0.05). Conclusion The curative effect of thymopeptide enteric-coated capsules combined with liquid nitrogen cryotherapy on flat warts is remarkable.%目的:探讨胸腺肽肠溶胶囊联合液氮冷冻治疗扁平疣的疗效。方法将92例扁平疣患者随机分为两组,对照组口服胸腺肽肠溶胶囊10 mg,tid,重组人干扰素α-2b凝胶外用bid,0.1%维A酸软膏外用睡前1次。治疗组口服胸腺肽肠溶胶囊10mg,tid,同时给于液氮冷冻治疗。两组疗程均为2个月。结果治疗组有效率为93.5%,对照组为65.2%。两组比较差异有统计学意义(P<0.05)。结论胸腺肽肠溶胶囊联合液氮冷冻治疗扁平疣疗效确切。

  6. Observation on curative effect of external antibacterial washing with Chinese medcine combined with interferonα2b injection in the treatment of flat warts%中药抗菌剂联合干扰素α2b注射液治疗扁平疣疗效观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李星汇; 吕东; 秦萍萍; 刘润秋; 曹丽华; 周洋; 晓婷

    2015-01-01

    目的:观察外用中药抗菌剂联合干扰素α2b注射液治疗扁平疣的疗效。方法:将90例入选的扁平疣患者随机分为三组。观察组:30例,应用中药抗菌剂联合干扰素α2b注射液治疗扁平疣;对照1组和2组:各30例,单独应用中药抗菌剂治疗及单独应用干扰素α2b注射液治疗,比较三组疗效及复发率。结果:观察组疗效优于两对照组,复发率低于两对照组,差异均有统计学意义(P<0.05),三组均未见明显的不良反应。结论:应用中药抗菌剂联合干扰素α2b注射液治疗扁平疣具有安全、有效的特点,疗效明显高于单独使用中药抗菌剂或干扰素α2b注射液,且复发率低,可以作为临床医生的一线选择。%Objective To observe the curative effect of external antibacterial washing with Chinese medcine combined with interferon α2b injection in the treatment of flat warts. Methods Ninety patients with flat warts were randomly divided into three groups.Thirty patients in the combination group received external antibacterial washing with Chinese medcine with interferon α2b injection;the others two in the control groups received only one of these treatments,then observe the effects and relapse rates of these three groups. Results The effective rate of treatment group was significantly higher than the control groups,and the relapse rate of treatment group was significantly lower than the control groups,the above showed significant difference(P<0.05).There was no siginificant side effects in these three groups. Conclusion External antibacterial washing with Chinese medcine combined with interferon α2b injection in the treatment of flat warts had better effect,low relapse rate and high safety,it is worthy of clinical application.

  7. Comparação entre a eficácia da cimetidina e do sulfato de zinco no tratamento de verrugas múltiplas e recalcitrantes Efficacy comparison between cimetidine and zinc sulphate in the treatment of multiple and recalcitrant warts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariane Stefani

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available FUNDAMENTOS: Verrugas são proliferações epiteliais na pele e mucosas causadas por diversos tipos de HPV. Elas podem involuir espontaneamente ou aumentar em número e tamanho de acordo com estado imunitário do paciente. A cimetidina e o sulfato de zinco têm importante efeito no sistema imune, sendo usados como imunomoduladores no tratamento de diversas doenças. OBJETIVO:Comparar a eficácia terapêutica de cimetidina e sulfato de zinco no tratamento de verrugas cutâneas de difícil tratamento. MÉTODOS: Estudo prospectivo duplo-cego randomizado. Dezoito pacientes com verrugas múltiplas foram divididos em dois grupos, um recebeu cimetidina 35mg/kg/dia (máximo 1.200mg/dia, e o outro, sulfato de zinco 10mg/kg/dia (máximo de 600mg/dia por três meses. RESULTADOS: Dos 18 pacientes do estudo, nove receberam cimetidina, e nove, sulfato de zinco; apenas um do grupo do sulfato de zinco não completou o tratamento devido a náuseas e vômitos. Cura foi obtida em cinco pacientes tratados com sulfato de zinco, e apenas um não obteve alteração das lesões. Do grupo da cimetidina cinco não apresentaram modificação, e quatro apresentaram diminuição inferior a 30% das lesões iniciais. CONCLUSÕES: Sulfato de zinco na dose de 10mg/kg/dia parece ser mais efetivo que cimetidina para o tratamento de crianças e adultos com verrugas múltiplas e de difícil manejo. A pequena casuística deste trabalho não permite, entretanto, conclusão categórica.BACKGROUND: Warts are epithelial proliferations on the skin and mucous membrane caused by various types of HPV. They can decrease spontaneously or increase in number and size according to patient's immune status. Cimetidine and zinc sulphate have important effects on the immune system and are used as immunomodulators in the treatment of various diseases. OBJECTIVE: To compare the efficacy of cimetidine and zinc sulphate in the treatment of multiple and recalcitrant warts. METHODS: A random double

  8. Thinking about ... leadership. Warts and all.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellerman, Barbara

    2004-01-01

    Does using Tyco's funds to purchase a $6,000 shower curtain and a $15,000 dog-shaped umbrella stand make Dennis Kozlowski a bad leader? Is Martha Stewart's career any less instructive because she may have sold some shares on the basis of a tip-off? Is leadership synonymous with moral leadership? Before 1970, the answer from most leadership theorists would certainly have been no. Look at Hitler, Stalin, Pol Pot, Mao Tsetung--great leaders all, but hardly good men. In fact, capricious, murderous, high-handed, corrupt, and evil leaders are effective and commonplace. Machiavelli celebrated them; the U.S. constitution built in safeguards against them. Everywhere, power goes hand in hand with corruption--everywhere, that is, except in the literature of business leadership. To read Tom Peters, Jay Conger, John Kotter, and most of their colleagues, leaders are, as Warren Bennis puts it, individuals who create shared meaning, have a distinctive voice, have the capacity to adapt, and have integrity. According to today's business literature, to be a leader is, by definition, to be benevolent. But leadership is not a moral concept, and it is high time we acknowledge that fact. We have as much to learn from those we would regard as bad examples as we do from the far fewer good examples we're presented with these days. Leaders are like the rest of us: trustworthy and deceitful, cowardly and brave, greedy and generous. To assume that all good leaders are good people is to be willfully blind to the reality of the human condition, and it severely limits our ability to become better leaders. Worse, it may cause senior executives to think that, because they are leaders, they are never deceitful, cowardly, or greedy. That way lies disaster.

  9. Human papillomavirus types and recurrent cervical warts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nuovo, G.J. (Columbia Presbyterian Medical Center, New York, NY (USA)); Pedemonte, B.M. (Harlem Hospital Medical Center, New York, NY (USA))

    1990-03-02

    The authors analyzed cervical intraepithelial neoplasias (CINs) detected after cryotherapy to determine if recurrence is associated with the same human papillomavirus (HPV) type found in the original lesion. Eight women had detectable HPV DNA in CINs that occurred after ablation of another CIN, and for each patient the HPV type in the pretreatment lesion was different from that in the CIN that appeared after cryotherapy. This compares with 12 women who had HPV detected in two or more CINs present at the same time, 11 of whom had the same HPv type noted. they concluded that although multiple, simultaneous CINs in a woman often contain the same HPV type, recurrent CINs that occur after cryotherapy contain an HPV type different from that present in the pretreatment lesion.

  10. Pain induced by photodynamic therapy of warts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stender, I-M; Borgbjerg, F Molke; Villumsen, J

    2006-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy with topical 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA), followed by irradiation with red light (ALA-PDT), is used for non-melanoma skin cancer and other dermatological diseases. Pain during and after light exposure is a well-known adverse advent that may be a limiting factor for treatment,...

  11. Warts, Hypogammaglobulinemia, Infections, and Myelokathexis Syndrome (WHIMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Respond to Pre-Award Requests Manage Your Award Negotiation & Initial Award After Award ... New Trial Launched in West Africa to Evaluate Three Vaccination Strategies , April 6, 2017 Monoclonal Antibody Cures Marburg Infection ...

  12. Toads Give You Warts--Not!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasek, Terry; Matthews, Catherine E.

    2008-01-01

    The authors provide activities through which teachers can share experiences in the outdoors with young children and teach them about herpetology, the study of amphibians and reptiles. Outdoor activities include observation, classification, and mapping. The authors also include activities for the classroom, including connections between the science…

  13. Warts and All: HPV in Primary Immunodeficiencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiding, Jennifer W.; Holland, Steven M.

    2012-01-01

    Infection with human papilloma virus (HPV) is almost universal and eventually asymptomatic, but pathologic infection with HPV is severe, recurrent, and recalcitrant to therapy. It is also an underappreciated manifestation of primary immunodeficiency. Mutations in EVER1, EVER2, GATA2, CXCR4, and DOCK8 are typically associated with extensive HPV infections, whereas several other primary immune defects have severe HPV much less frequently. We review immunodeficiencies with severe HPV infections and the mechanisms underlying them. PMID:23036745

  14. Toads Give You Warts--Not!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasek, Terry; Matthews, Catherine E.

    2008-01-01

    The authors provide activities through which teachers can share experiences in the outdoors with young children and teach them about herpetology, the study of amphibians and reptiles. Outdoor activities include observation, classification, and mapping. The authors also include activities for the classroom, including connections between the science…

  15. Caracterização clínica e histopatológica e tipagem do papilomavírus humano das verrugas vulgares nos receptores de transplante renal Clinical and histopathological characterization and typing of the human papillomavirus in common warts of kidney transplant recipients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavia Martelli-Marzagão

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Os pacientes receptores de transplante renal apresentam elevada prevalência de lesões cutâneas por HPV. Foram estudados 20 receptores de transplante renal com diagnóstico de verruga vulgar. A detecção do HPV foi realizada pela polimerização em cadeia (PCR com os primers MY09/MY11 e RK91. A tipagem do HPV foi feita por meio da restrição enzimática e do sequenciamento automatizado. Identificamos a presença do HPV em 10 pacientes (50% e os tipos identificados foram: HPV-2, 27, 29, 34 e 57.The prevalence of skin lesions caused by the human papillomavirus (HPV is high in kidney transplant patients. Twenty recipients of kidney transplants with a diagnosis of common warts were evaluated. HPV detection was performed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR using the MY09/MY11 and RK91 primers. HPV typing was performed by restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis and direct sequencing. The presence of HPV was identified in 10 patients (50% and the types identified were HPV-2, 27, 29, 34 and 57.

  16. Repositioning Warts & All: A Response to Coteaching Researchers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Gallo-Fox

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper is a response to our colleague's perspectives on our paper (GALLOFOX, WASSELL, SCANTLEBURY, & JUCK, 2006, that addressed ethical dilemmas we encountered when implementing coteaching in a secondary science education program. Although the respondents addressed this issue, they also raised other important points pertaining to their own experiences with implementing and researching coteaching. In this paper, we synthesize these perspectives and further discuss the implications of implementing coteaching. URN: urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs0604239

  17. The adaptive, cut-cell Cartesian approach (warts and all)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Kenneth G.

    1995-01-01

    Solution-adaptive methods based on cutting bodies out of Cartesian grids are gaining popularity now that the ways of circumventing the accuracy problems associated with small cut cells have been developed. Researchers are applying Cartesian-based schemes to a broad class of problems now, and, although there is still development work to be done, it is becoming clearer which problems are best suited to the approach (and which are not). The purpose of this paper is to give a candid assessment, based on applying Cartesian schemes to a variety of problems, of the strengths and weaknesses of the approach as it is currently implemented.

  18. Goodbye warts, hello vitiligo: Candida antigen-induced depigmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilmer, Erin N; Burkhart, Craig N; Morrell, Dean S

    2013-01-01

    Depigmentation after the use of topical immune modulators is a rare but reported event. Herein we present what is to our knowledge the first case of vitiligo at a site of Candida antigen injection. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. 21 CFR 358.110 - Wart remover active ingredients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... ingredient. (a) Salicylic acid 12 to 40 percent in a plaster vehicle. (b) Salicylic acid 5 to 17 percent in a collodion-like vehicle. (c) Salicylic acid 15 percent in a karaya gum, glycol plaster vehicle....

  20. Weekly Versus Fortnightly Cryotherapy For Warts On Extremities - A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eapen Annamma

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Forty two patients with verruca vulgaris on the extremities who attended the Government Wenlock Hospital and KMC, Attavar, were subjected to weekly and fortnightly cryotherapy. At the end of 8 weeks, it was found that of the 37 patients who were followed up, 94% in weekly group and 84% in fortnightly group responded to treatment.

  1. A Rare Case of Plantar Epithelioma Cuniculatum Arising from a Wart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Rahul; Bhagat, Aditi; Vasudevan, Biju; Sridhar, Jandhyala; Madan, Renu; Ray, Manjusha

    2015-01-01

    A 68-year-old man, a known case of hypertension, coronary artery disease and old cardiovascular accident with right-sided hemiplegia, came with the chief complaints of a large cauliflower like growth with pus discharge on the left heel since 15 years. The patient had sustained a penetrating injury by a thorn on the left heel region few days before the lesion appeared. Dermatological examination revealed a single verrucous lesion measuring 7 × 7 cm on the left heel region associated with discharge of foul smelling cheesy material. There was also a enlarged right inguinal lymph node which was non-tender, firm, measuring 2 cm in diameter with normal overlying skin. X-ray left ankle was done which showed some soft tissue swelling. A skin biopsy showed hyperkeratosis, acanthosis and parakeratosis. Elongated rete ridges with keratinocyte hyperplasia, forming a large mass pressing on the underlying dermis were seen. There was formation of multiple large keratin filled invaginations and crypts. No atypical cells were seen. Based on history, clinical examination and investigations, a diagnosis of epithelium cuniculatum type of verrucous squamous cell carcinoma was made. A wide excision with a flap cover was performed in consultation with the oncosurgeon and the excision sample was sent for histopathological re-examination, which confirmed the diagnosis of epithelioma cuniculatum. PMID:26538697

  2. [Anogenital Warts in a Major Venereology Clinic: Centro de Saúde da Lapa - Lisbon, 2008 to 2014].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gameiro, Ana; Alves, João; Santo, Irene; Azevedo, Jacinta

    2016-02-01

    Introdução: O vírus do papiloma humano é responsável pela infeção sexualmente transmissível mais comum, podendo manifestar--se por um conjunto amplo de doenças, nomeadamente condilomas anogenitais, papilomatose laríngea recorrente, e neoplasias da região anogenital, colo do útero e orofaringe. Estima-se que os condilomas anogenitais afetem 1% da população sexualmente ativa, causados em cerca de 90% pelos genótipos 6 e 11. Material e Métodos: Identificámos os doentes com primeiro diagnóstico de condilomas anogenitais da consulta de doenças sexualmente transmissíveis do Centro de Saúde da Lapa, entre janeiro de 2008 e dezembro de 2014, e caracterizámos os doentes por sexo, orientação sexual, idade, localização das lesões, e número de parceiros nos últimos seis meses. Resultados: Foram identificados 902 indivíduos com primeiro diagnóstico de condilomas anogenitais. Observámos uma diminuição significativa de novos casos nas mulheres com papiloma humano.

  3. The Fairy Godmother--and Her Warts: Making the Dream of Evidence-Based Policy Come True

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Carol H.; Murphy-Graham, Erin; Petrosino, Anthony; Gandhi, Allison G.

    2008-01-01

    Evaluators sometimes wish for a Fairy Godmother who would make decision makers pay attention to evaluation findings when choosing programs to implement. The U.S. Department of Education came close to creating such a Fairy Godmother when it required school districts to choose drug abuse prevention programs only if their effectiveness was supported…

  4. A multiplex PCR for detection of poxvirus and papillomavirus in cutaneous warts from live birds and museum skins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Tris, J; Williams, R A J; Abel-Fernández, E; Barreiro, J; Conesa, J J; Figuerola, J; Martinez-Martínez, M; Ramírez, A; Benitez, L

    2011-12-01

    Viral cutaneous lesions are frequent in some bird populations, though we are generally ignorant of the causal agent. In some instances, they represent a threat to livestock and wildlife health. We present here a multiplex PCR which detects and distinguishes infection by two such agents, avipoxviruses and papillomaviruses, in avian hosts. We assayed biopsies and superficial skin swabs from field and preserved museum skin specimens. Ninety-three percent of samples from symptomatic specimens tested positive for the presence of avipox (n = 23) or papillomavirus (n = 5). Sixteen and five sequences, corresponding to the P4b and L1 genes, were obtained from avipox and papillomavirus, respectively. One museum specimen, of Fringilla coelebs (chaffinch), was apparently infected with both viruses. Although papillomavirus sequences proved identical to previously published sequences, four novel avipox sequences were generated and used to build a neighbor-joining phylogenetic tree. Our tree recovered a similar topology to that of several recent authors; however, we also propose here two new minor avipox clades (B1b and B3). This multiplex PCR technique shows improved sensitivity compared to other avipox and papillomavirus assays, is able to detect a wide range of avipox and papillomavirus types (it amplifies all three avian-derived papillomavirus genera described thus far and sequences from both major avipox clades), and was even able to detect ancient viral DNA contained in museum specimens of greater than 75 years antiquity for both viruses.

  5. Assessment of the carcinogenic potential of high intense-sweeteners through the test for detection of epithelial tumor clones (warts) in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasconcelos, Mirley Alves; Orsolin, Priscila Capelari; Silva-Oliveira, Rosiane Gomes; Nepomuceno, Júlio César; Spanó, Mário Antônio

    2017-03-01

    High intensity-sweeteners (HIS) are natural or synthetic substances, sweeter than sugar, providing sweetness without calories. Sweeteners are mainly used as an aid in losing weight, preventing obesity and controlling blood sugar levels for diabetics. The objective of this study was to evaluate the carcinogenic potential of the sweeteners aspartame, sucralose, sodium saccharin and steviol glycoside, using the test for detection of epithelial tumor clones in Drosophila melanogaster. Larvae of 72 ± 4h, obtained from wts/TM3 female mated with mwh/mwh males, were treated for approximately 48h with different concentrations of aspartame (0.85, 1.7, 3.4, 6.8 or 13.6 mM ); sucralose (0.5, 1.25, 2.5, 5.0 or 10 mM); sodium saccharin (25; 50; 100; 200 or 400 mM) and steviol glycoside (2.5; 5.0; 10; 20 or 40 mM). Water (Reverse Osmosis) and doxorubicin (DXR 0.4 mM) were used as negative and positive controls, respectively. No statistically significant differences were observed (p > 0.05) in tumor frequencies in individuals treated with all concentrations of these sweeteners when compared to negative control. It was therefore concluded that, in these experimental conditions, aspartame, sucralose, sodium saccharin and steviol glycoside have no carcinogenic effect in D. melanogaster. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Human papillomavirus type 29 (HPV-29), an HPV type cross-hybridizing with HPV-2 and with HPV-3-related types.

    OpenAIRE

    Favre, M.; Croissant, O; Orth, G

    1989-01-01

    The cloning and partial characterization of human papillomavirus (HPV) type 29 is presented. By hybridization analyses, this virus appears to be related to HPV types associated with common warts and HPV types associated with flat warts.

  7. Dicty_cDB: SFF332 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available patent US 6495353. 74 1e-11 3 E24614 |E24614.1 warts Protein, polynucleotide encoding the protein, antisense...|E24613.1 warts Protein, polynucleotide encoding the protein, antisense polynucleotide thereof and antibody

  8. Dicty_cDB: SSM651 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available MAGE:1526699 5' EST. 74 2e-12 2 E24614 |E24614.1 warts Protein, polynucleotide encoding the protein, antisense... |E24613.1 warts Protein, polynucleotide encoding the protein, antisense polynucleotide thereof and antibody

  9. A clinical observation about multiple warts by bairui tablet combining levamisole%百蕊片联合左旋咪唑治疗多发性寻常疣50例临床观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    付丹丹; 李敏; 田中伟; 李占国; 刘冬

    2010-01-01

    目的 探讨百蕊片治疗多发性寻常疣的疗效.方法 105例多发性寻常疣患者分成两组,治疗组口服百蕊片和左旋咪唑,对照组只口服左旋咪唑,6周后对比疗效.结果 治疗组与对照组的有效率分别为86.0%、62.5%,两组有效率差异有统计学意义(P<0.01).结论 百蕊片治疗多发性寻常疣有效.

  10. Inclusion of the benefits of enhanced cross-protection against cervical cancer and prevention of genital warts in the cost-effectiveness analysis of human papillomavirus vaccination in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westra, Tjalke A.; Stirbu-Wagner, Irina; Dorsman, Sara; Tutuhatunewa, Eric D.; de Vrij, Edwin L.; Nijman, Hans W.; Daemen, Toos; Wilschut, Jan C.; Postma, Maarten J.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Infection with HPV 16 and 18, the major causative agents of cervical cancer, can be prevented through vaccination with a bivalent or quadrivalent vaccine. Both vaccines provide cross-protection against HPV-types not included in the vaccines. In particular, the bivalent vaccine provides

  11. Inclusion of the benefits of enhanced cross-protection against cervical cancer and prevention of genital warts in the cost-effectiveness analysis of human papillomavirus vaccination in the Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westra, T.A.; Stirbu-Wagner, I.; Dorsman, S.; Tutuhatunewa, E.D.; Vrij, E.L. de; Nijman, H.W.; Daemen, T.; Wilschut, J.C.; Postma, M.J.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Infection with HPV 16 and 18, the major causative agents of cervical cancer, can be prevented through vaccination with a bivalent or quadrivalent vaccine. Both vaccines provide cross-protection against HPV-types not included in the vaccines. In particular, the bivalent vaccine provides

  12. Evaluating the Epidemiology and Morbidity Burden Associated with Human Papillomavirus in Israel: Accounting for CIN1 and Genital Warts in Addition to CIN2/3 and Cervical Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Oren Shavit; Raanan Raz; Michal Stein; Gabriel Chodick; Eduardo Schejter; Yehuda Ben-David; Raanan Cohen; Daphna Arbel; Varda Shalev

    2012-01-01

    Background:Background: Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is mostly associated with cervical cancer (CC). However, it can cause other illnesses as well, all of which impact on people's wellbeing and consume healthcare resources. Measures for prevention or early detection of these conditions differ in their effectiveness and cost. An informative evaluation of the projected benefit of these measures depends on understanding the current unmet need, not only limited to CC. Abstract: Objective:O...

  13. 水杨酸粉封包联合CO2激光治疗跖疣疗效评价%Treatment of plantar warts with salicylic acid powder packets combined with CO2 laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱海泳; 鲁佳莹; 徐慧青; 孙文彪; 何薇惟; 陈洁; 林尽染; 吴文育

    2014-01-01

    目的:评价自制水杨酸粉封包联合CO2激光治疗跖疣的临床疗效.方法:将152例跖疣患者(总疣体个数819个)给予水杨酸粉封包后刮除联合CO2激光治疗,观察创面愈合情况及原位复发情况.结果:水杨酸粉封包联合CO2激光治疗后创面愈合时间缩短,随访12周,85%跖疣疣体完全消除.结论:自制水杨酸粉封包联合CO2激光治疗跖疣安全有效.

  14. Imiquimod Topical

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cream is also used to treat superficial basal cell carcinoma (a type of skin cancer) on the trunk, neck, arms, hands, legs, or feet and warts on the skin of the genital and anal areas. Imiquimod is in a class of ... superficial basal cell carcinoma.Imiquimod cream does not cure warts, and ...

  15. Difficulties in Diagnosing Sexual Abuse in Children with Condyloma Acuminata in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulbul, Selda; Demirceken, Fulya; Cakir, Baris; Cakir, Elif Pinar; Unlu, Erdal; Soyer, Tutku

    2010-01-01

    Human papillomavirus is responsible for anogenital warts and could be regarded as an indicator of possible sexual abuse in children. A genital wart was detected during an investigation of anti-hepatitis C virus positivity in a four-year-old male patient. No pathological findings of another sexually transmitted disease were found except complete…

  16. Dicty_cDB: CFJ206 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available -52G20. 74 2e-33 8 E24614 |E24614.1 warts Protein, polynucleotide encoding the protein, antisense polynucleo... encoding the protein, antisense polynucleotide thereof and antibody recognizing the protein. 74 3e-29 5 AR3...tide thereof and antibody recognizing the protein. 74 4e-30 5 E24613 |E24613.1 warts Protein, polynucleotide

  17. Severe necrotizing cutaneous reaction to topical 5-fluorouracil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhalla M

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available 5-flourouracil (5-FU has been used for the treatment of various malignant and pre-malignant conditions. It has also been used to treat viral warts as a topical agent. It usually does not produce any significant adverse effects when used topically. Severe necrotizing cutaneous reaction following topical 5-FU used for the treatment of warts is being reported.

  18. The genus Dolabella

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engel, H.

    1942-01-01

    Diagnosis. Aplysiidae of conical form, narrower in front, wide and obliquely truncate behind. Integument more or less warty, the warts bearing villi; warts and villi being wholly retractile. Parapodia united, save for a dorsal slit; the free lobes covering the slit leave two conspicuous respiratory

  19. HPV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Human papillomaviruses (HPV) are common viruses that can cause warts. There are more than 100 types of HPV. Most are harmless, but about 30 types put ... either low-risk or high-risk. Low-risk HPV can cause genital warts. High-risk HPV can ...

  20. HPV and Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of bumps in the genital area around the penis or the anus. These warts might be small or large, raised or flat, or shaped like a cauliflower. The warts may go away, or stay the same, or grow in size or number. Usually, a healthcare provider can diagnose ...

  1. Condyloma in pregnancy is strongly predictive of juvenile-onset recurrent respiratory papillomatosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silverberg, Michael J.; Thorsen, Poul; Lindeberg, Henning

    2003-01-01

    risk of disease relative to births without a maternal history of genital warts. In women with genital warts, delivery times of more than 10 hours were associated with a two-fold greater risk of disease. Cesarean delivery was not found to be protective against respiratory papillomatosis, and no other...

  2. HLA Immunogenotype Determines Persistent Human Papillomavirus Virus Infection in HIV-Infected Patients Receiving Antiretroviral Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meys, Rhonda; Purdie, Karin J; de Koning, Maurits N C; Quint, Koen D; Little, Ann-Margaret; Baker, Finnuala; Francis, Nick; Asboe, David; Hawkins, David; Marsh, Steven G E; Harwood, Catherine A; Gotch, Frances M; Bunker, Christopher B

    2016-06-01

    A proportion of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients develop persistent, stigmatizing human papillomavirus (HPV)-related cutaneous and genital warts and anogenital (pre)cancer. This is the first study to investigate immunogenetic variations that might account for HPV susceptibility and the largest to date to categorize the HPV types associated with cutaneous warts in HIV-positive patients. The HLA class I and II allele distribution was analyzed in 49 antiretroviral (ART)-treated HIV-positive patients with persistent warts, 42 noninfected controls, and 46 HIV-positive controls. The allele HLA-B*44 was more frequently identified in HIV-positive patients with warts (P = .004); a susceptible haplotype (HLA-B*44, HLA-C*05; P = .001) and protective genes (HLA-DQB1*06; P = .03) may also contribute. Cutaneous wart biopsy specimens from HIV-positive patients harbored common wart types HPV27/57, the unusual wart type HPV7, and an excess of Betapapillomavirus types (P = .002), compared with wart specimens from noninfected controls. These findings suggest that HLA testing might assist in stratifying those patients in whom vaccination should be recommended. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Dicty_cDB: SLI815 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 01 5 E24614 |E24614.1 warts Protein, polynucleotide encoding the protein, antisense...g33080) mRNA, complete cds. 54 0.003 1 E24613 |E24613.1 warts Protein, polynucleotide encoding the protein, antisense

  4. Dicty_cDB: SSI880 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Sequence 6179 from Patent WO02068579. 74 4e-12 2 E24614 |E24614.1 warts Protein, polynucleotide encoding the protein, antisense... 74 6e-12 2 E24613 |E24613.1 warts Protein, polynucleotide encoding the protein, antisense polynucleotide th

  5. Journal of Special Operations Medicine. Volume 5, Edition 3, Summer 2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    capillaries). 2) Your differential diagnoses should include common warts, seborrheic keratoses, acrochordons, squamous cell carcinoma, linear lichen planus...nodule. Linear lichen planus and linear psoriasis are chronic dermatoses and are composed of erythematous papules with scale. COMMON WARTS (HUMAN...of infection with human papilloma virus (HPV). HPVs are a large group of DNA viruses (Papovaviridae family), with approximately 100 identified

  6. Ethanol induces heterotopias in organotypic cultures of rat cerebral cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooney, Sandra M; Siegenthaler, Julie A; Miller, Michael W

    2004-10-01

    Abnormalities in the migration of cortical neurons to ectopic sites can be caused by prenatal exposure to ethanol. In extreme cases, cells migrate past the pial surface and form suprapial heterotopias or 'warts'. We used organotypic slice cultures from 17-day-old rat fetuses to examine structural and molecular changes that accompany wart formation. Cultures were exposed to ethanol (0, 200, 400 or 800 mg/dl) and maintained for 2-32 h. Fixed slices were sectioned and immunolabeled with antibodies directed against calretinin, reelin, nestin, GFAP, doublecortin, MAP-2 and NeuN. Ethanol promoted the widespread infiltration of the marginal zone (MZ) with neurons and the focal formation of warts. The appearance of warts is time- and concentration-dependent. Heterotopias comprised migrating neurons and were not detected in control slices. Warts were associated with breaches in the array of Cajal-Retzius cells and with translocation of reelin-immunoexpression from the MZ to the outer limit of the wart. Ethanol also altered the morphology of the radial glia. Thus, damage to the integrity of superficial cortex allows neurons to infiltrate the MZ, and if the pial-subpial glial barrier is also compromised these ectopic neurons can move beyond the normal cerebral limit to form a wart.

  7. COMMUNITY MEDICINE & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    decision-making power limiting the ability to warts, herpes and HIV were reported by ... education and failure of the families and According to Bandura's Learning Theory , .... The pre-intervention and perception of factors that contribute to risky.

  8. Drug: D08997 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available rianal warts ATC code: D06BB12 Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical (ATC) classification [BR:br08303] D DERMATOLOGIC...ALS D06 ANTIBIOTICS AND CHEMOTHERAPEUTICS FOR DERMATOLOGICAL USE D06B CHEMOTHERAPEUTICS FOR TOPICAL USE D

  9. HPV Vaccination: An Investigation of Physician Reminders and Recommendation Scripts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-09

    Human Papilloma Virus Infection Type 11; Human Papilloma Virus Infection Type 16; Human Papilloma Virus Infection Type 18; Human Papilloma Virus Infection Type 6; Cervical Cancer; Genital Warts; Oropharyngeal Cancer

  10. Colposcopy - directed biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... squamous cells - colposcopy; Pap smear - colposcopy; HPV - colposcopy; Human papilloma virus - colposcopy; Cervix - colposcopy; Colposcopy ... also called cervical dysplasia) Cervical warts (infection with human papilloma virus , or HPV) If the biopsy does not ...

  11. Disease: H01052 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available infection of the mucous membranes and skin that usually affects school-aged children. The infection is trans...at molluscum contagiosum and warts in children. Pediatr Ann 34:211-21 (2005) ...

  12. Role of medical history and medication use in the aetiology of upper aerodigestive tract cancers in Europe: the ARCAGE study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Macfarlane, T V

    2012-04-01

    The study aimed to investigate the role of medical history (skin warts, Candida albicans, herpetic lesions, heartburn, regurgitation) and medication use (for heartburn; for regurgitation; aspirin) in the aetiology of upper aerodigestive tract (UADT) cancer.

  13. Dicty_cDB: CFF849 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 74 2e-33 8 E24614 |E24614.1 warts Protein, polynucleotide encoding the protein, antisense polynucleotide th...tein, polynucleotide encoding the protein, antisense polynucleotide thereof and antibody recognizing the pro

  14. Dicty_cDB: CFE380 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 179 from Patent WO02068579. 66 2e-09 2 E24614 |E24614.1 warts Protein, polynucleotide encoding the protein, antisense...tein, polynucleotide encoding the protein, antisense polynucleotide thereof and a

  15. Bladder cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the way they grow: Papillary tumors look like warts and are attached to a stalk. Nonpapillary (sessile) ... urinary control. Support Groups You can ease the stress of illness by joining a cancer support group . ...

  16. Oral cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... papillomavirus (HPV) infection (same virus that causes genital warts ) Taking medicines that weaken the immune system (immunosuppressants) ... dry mouth Support Groups You can ease the stress of illness by joining a cancer support group . ...

  17. Cimetidine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimetidine is also used sometimes to treat stress ulcers, hives and itching, and viral warts, and to prevent aspiration pneumonia during anesthesia. Talk to your doctor about the possible risks of using this medication for your condition.This ...

  18. Cancer - penis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... smelling substance under the foreskin History of genital warts , or human papillomavirus (HPV). Smoking. Injury to the ... common experiences and problems may help relieve the stress associated with diagnosis and treatment of cancer of ...

  19. Cervical cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to cervical cancer. Other strains can cause genital warts . Others do not cause any problems at all. ... or radiation. Support Groups You can ease the stress of illness by joining a cancer support group . ...

  20. Sex Education: Talking to Your Teen about Sex

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... contraception and safe sex. The doctor may also stress the importance of routine human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination, for both girls and boys, to help prevent genital warts as well as cancers of the cervix, anus, ...

  1. Correlates of STI symptoms among female sex workers with truck driver clients in two Mexican border towns

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chen, Nadine E; Strathdee, Steffanie A; Uribe-Salas, Felipe J; Patterson, Thomas L; Rangel, Maria Gudelia; Rosen, Perth; Brouwer, Kimberly C

    2012-01-01

    ... ≥1 truck driver client in the past month. The main outcome was reporting any recent STI symptoms, defined as experiencing genital/anal warts, genital ulcers/sores, genital itching, or abnormal...

  2. Lõbumajandus ja abstraktsionism Haywardis : Jaan Elken külastab talviseid Londoni galeriisid II / Jaan Elken

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Elken, Jaan, 1954-

    2002-01-01

    Kaks näitust Haywardi galeriis: 1.Videokunstniku Ann-Sofi Sidéni (s. 1962) dokumentaalkunstiteos maanteeprostitutsioonist "Warte Mal!" (Hei, oota!). 2. Paul Klee ülevaatenäitus "Loomise loomulikkus"

  3. Gardasil 9 Protects against Additional HPV Types

    Science.gov (United States)

    A summary of results from a large randomized clinical trial that shows a new human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine effectively prevented infection and disease caused by seven HPV types that cause cancer and two HPV types that cause genital warts.

  4. HPV Vaccination: Evaluation of Reminder Prompts for Doses 2 & 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-24

    Human Papilloma Virus Infection Type 11; Human Papilloma Virus Infection Type 16; Human Papilloma Virus Infection Type 18; Human Papilloma Virus Infection Type 6; Cervical Cancer; Genital Warts; Oropharyngeal Cancer

  5. Lõbumajandus ja abstraktsionism Haywardis : Jaan Elken külastab talviseid Londoni galeriisid II / Jaan Elken

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Elken, Jaan, 1954-

    2002-01-01

    Kaks näitust Haywardi galeriis: 1.Videokunstniku Ann-Sofi Sidéni (s. 1962) dokumentaalkunstiteos maanteeprostitutsioonist "Warte Mal!" (Hei, oota!). 2. Paul Klee ülevaatenäitus "Loomise loomulikkus"

  6. CME 8946 (ONLINE).indd

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Patients have to be off immunoglobulin replacement therapy for 6 ... Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, Staphylococcus aureus; viral, e.g. cytomegalovirus; ... associated with warts, hypogammaglobulinaemia, infections, and ...

  7. Common skin and mucosal disorders in HIV/AIDS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Warts. Amoebiasis. Cytomegalovirus infection. Fungal infections. Disorders of hair and nails. Candidiasis .... Genital herpes is a risk factor for transmission of HIV infection mainly through ..... topical corticosteroids, isotretinoin, and itraconazole.

  8. A REVIEW ON EPIDERMAL MANIFESTATION OF PAPPILOMA VIRUS INFECTION IN HUMAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yashbir Singh

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The Human Papilloma Viruses (HPV are non-enveloped, small DNA virus, which are responsible for worldwide problem. HPVS can be associated with different varieties of epidermal manifestations. It belongs to the Papovavirus family. On the basis of oncogenic potential these have been classified as high risk and low risk types of virus. Currently histopathological techniques are widely being used as the diagnostic method for the identification of HPV viral DNA. This article reviews the classification of HPVs and different methods used for the vaccination and diagnosis. The types includes common warts, flat warts, plantar warts, anogenital warts, anal dysplasia and epidermodysplasia verruciformis. Vaccines are available for prevention of HPV infection, and recommended vaccination schedules have been outlined.

  9. Laser surgery - skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surgery using a laser ... used is directly related to the type of surgery being performed and the color of the tissue ... Laser surgery can be used to: Close small blood vessels to reduce blood loss Remove warts , moles , sunspots, and ...

  10. Genetics Home Reference: epidermal nevus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... thicker and darker and develop a wart-like (verrucous) appearance. Often, keratinocytic epidermal nevi follow a pattern ... are also known as linear epidermal nevi or verrucous epidermal nevi, based on characteristics of their appearance. ...

  11. Tretinoin Topical

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lotions, astringents, and perfumes); they can sting your skin, especially when you first use tretinoin.Do not use any other topical medications, especially benzoyl peroxide, salicylic acid (wart remover), and dandruff shampoos containing sulfur or ...

  12. Molluscum contagiosum

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lesions may result in scarring. Medicines, such as salicylic acid preparations used to remove warts , may be helpful. But these medicines can cause blistering that leads to temporary skin discoloration. Cantharidin, commonly called beetle juice, is the ...

  13. 草分枝杆菌注射液联合中药浸泡法治疗多发性跖疣疗效观察%Clinical Observation on the Curative Effect of the Injection of Mycoba-cterium Moelleri and the Soaking of the Traditional Chinese Medicion in the Treatment for Multiple Plantar Wart

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈俊萍; 沈为兴; 田文英; 王永强

    2008-01-01

    目的 探讨草分枝杆茵注射液联合中药治疗多发性跖疣的疗效.方法 患者随机分成两组,治疗组62例,肌肉注射草分枝杆菌注射液1.72μg,2次/周,同时应用中药去疣汤浸泡,2次/d;对照组58例,应用中药去疣汤浸泡,2次/d.两组疗程均为5周.结果 治疗组痊愈率62.90%、有效率91.94%,对照组分别为44.83%,70.69%.两组差异均有显著性(P<0.05).结论 草分枝杆茵注射液联合中药浸泡法治疗多发性跖疣疗效高、安全、无毒副作用.

  14. New Three-Stage Treatmet of Patients with Genital Warts in IL-2、IFN-γ、IL-6 Influence%新型三阶段疗法对肛周尖锐湿疣患者血清IL-2、IFN-γ、IL-6细胞因子的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐小英

    2016-01-01

    目的:探讨新型三阶段疗法治疗肛周尖锐湿疣的临床疗效以及对血清白细胞介素-2(IL-2)、干扰素-γ(IFN-γ)、白细胞介素-6(IL-6)等细胞因子的影响。方法选取2015年2月~2016年1月本院收治的80例肛周尖锐湿疣患者。随机分为观察组和对照组。观察两组患者的临床治愈率、复发率、不良反应发生率和血清 IL-2、IFN-γ以及 IL-6变化情况40例。结果两组患者治疗1个月后,观察组治愈率为92.50%,对照组为77.5%,比较差异有统计学意义(P0.05)。随访3个月后,观察组复发率为8.12%,对照组复发率为16.13%,比较差异有统计学意义(P0.05). After 3 months follow-up, 3 patients in the observation group were cured, the recurrence rate was 8.12%, the recurrence rate of the control group was 16.13%, the difference was statistically significant (P<0.05). At the end of the treatment and the end of treatment 4 weeks after the two groups of patients with serum IFN-, IL-2 and IL-6 of the comparison, the difference was statistically significant (P<0.05).Conclusion The new CO2 laser therapy, 5-amino acid photodynamic therapy combined with the three phase therapy of Huang Gan granules could improved the cure rate and reduced the recurrence rate, and had a better therapeutic effect.

  15. Penile and scrotal condyloma acuminatum in a three-year-old boy: A rare case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hulya Ozturk

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Condyloma acuminatum is a common sexually transmitted diseases in adults, but its presence in children is rare and could be associated with sexual abuse. We are reporting this case because of the rarity of presence of warts on the penis and the scrotum of a child, which certainly could not have been used for sexual purposes. Surgical excision of warts was performed.

  16. Porokeratosis plantaris discreta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, R M

    1977-12-01

    Sire the basis for this study. All cases were clinically diagnosed as porokeratosis plantaris discreta (PPD). Biopsies were done in fifteen cases. Of these, eleven were confirmed as PPD and four had histopathologic features of a wart. Porokeratosis plantaris dicreta is a localized plantar hyperkeratosis that is resistant to therapy. It is often mistaken for a wart. PPD should be considered in the differential diagnosis of keratotic lesions on the sole.

  17. Operating in Uncertainty; Growing Resilient Critical Infrastructure Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    under stress . The traditional top-down rigid command and control decision-making associated with the bureaucratic model works best in the simple domain...theory in an environment similar to public utilities, Trottier, Van Wart and Wang conducted a study of federal employees. The goals for this study...leadership and employee satisfaction through a 118-question survey. Trottier, Van Wart and Wang (2008) measured five leadership dimensions as

  18. Human papillomaviruses associated with epidermodysplasia verruciformis. II. Molecular cloning and biochemical characterization of human papillomavirus 3a, 8, 10, and 12 genomes.

    OpenAIRE

    Kremsdorf, D; Jablonska, S.; Favre, M.; Orth, G

    1983-01-01

    The DNAs of four human papillomaviruses (HPVs) that were found in the benign lesions of three patients suffering from epidermodysplasia verruciformis have been characterized. The flat wart-like lesions and the macular lesions of patient 1 contained two viruses, HPV-3a and HPV-8, respectively, whose genomes had previously been only partially characterized. The flat wart-like lesions of patient 2 and the macular lesions of patient 3 each contained a virus previously considered as belonging to t...

  19. Glycolic Acid 15% Plus Salicylic Acid 2%

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Blanco, Elena

    2011-01-01

    Background: Facial flat warts are a contagious viral disease that can cause disturbing cosmetic problems. Topical glycolic acid has been reported to be effective in dermatological treatment depending on the exfoliant capacity, but has not often been reported to be effective in the treatment of facial flat warts. Objective: The aim of this paper was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of glycolic acid 15% topical gel plus salicylic acid 2% in the treatment of recalcitrant facial flat warts. Methods: A total of 20 consecutive patients 7 to 16 years of age with recalcitrant facial flat warts were enrolled in this study. Patients having warts by the eye and lip regions were excluded from the study. A fine layer of face gel was applied to the treatment area once daily. Most of the participants had tried different treatments with no success. Assessments for the response and the occurrence of side effects were performed every two weeks at Weeks 2, 4, 6, and 8. Results: All the patients were clinically cured within eight weeks. Seven patients cleared in four weeks, and 13 patients cleared in eight weeks. No noticeable adverse events were related to the skin. Conclusion: Topical gel of glycolic acid 15% plus salicylic acid 2% is safe and effective when applied to facial flat warts once daily until clearance and may be considered as first-line treatment. PMID:21938272

  20. Laser Treatment of Nongenital Verrucae: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Jannett; Korta, Dorota Z; Chapman, Lance W; Kelly, Kristen M

    2016-09-01

    Although cutaneous warts are common lesions, full remission is not always achieved with conventional therapies. Laser modalities including carbon dioxide (CO2), erbium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Er:YAG), pulsed dye (PDL), and Nd:YAG have been investigated as alternative treatments for warts. To review the use and efficacy of lasers for treating nongenital cutaneous warts. Published randomized clinical trials (RCTs), cohort studies, case series, and case reports involving laser treatment of nongenital warts were retrieved by searching PubMed with no date limits. Quality ratings of studies were based on a modified version of the Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine scheme for rating individual studies. A higher emphasis was placed on RCTs and prospective cohort studies with large sample sizes and detailed methodology. There were 35 studies published between 1989 and 2015 that comprised an aggregate of 2149 patients. Simple and recalcitrant nongenital warts treated with lasers show variable response rates (CO2 laser, 50%-100%; Er:YAG laser, 72%-100%; PDL, 47%-100%; and Nd:YAG laser, 46%-100%). Current RCTs suggest that PDL is equivalent to conventional therapies such as cryotherapy and cantharidin. Combination therapies with lasers and other agents including bleomycin, salicylic acid, and light-emitting diode have shown some success. Lasers can be an effective treatment option for both simple and recalcitrant warts. The lasers most studied for this purpose are CO2, PDL, and Nd:YAG, and of these, PDL has the fewest adverse effects. Currently, use of lasers for wart treatment is limited by lack of established treatment guidelines. Future studies are needed to compare laser modalities with each other and with nonlaser treatment options, and to establish optimal treatment protocols.

  1. Relationship between circumcision and human papillomavirus infection: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Ping Zhu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Male circumcision (MC is reported to reduce human papillomavirus (HPV prevalence in men. However, the efficacy remains imprecise. The aim of this study was to conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis to assess the relationship between MC and genital HPV infection and genital warts. PUBMED, EMBASE, and Web of Science were searched from inception to March 22, 2015. We identified 30 papers, including a total of 12149 circumcised and 12252 uncircumcised men who were evaluated for the association of circumcision with genital HPV or genital warts. Compared with men who were not circumcised, circumcised men may have had significantly reduced odds of genital HPV prevalence (odds ratio [OR]: 0.68; 95% confidence interval [95% CI]: 0.56-0.82. There was no significant association between MC and genital HPV acquisition of new infections (OR: 0.99; 95% CI: 0.62-1.60, genital HPV clearance (OR: 1.38; 95% CI: 0.96-1.97, and prevalence of genital warts (OR: 1.17; 95% CI: 0.63-2.17. This meta-analysis suggests that circumcision reduces the prevalence of genital HPV infections. However, no clear evidence was found that circumcision was associated with decreased HPV acquisition, increased HPV clearance, or decreased the prevalence of genital warts. More studies are required to evaluate adequately the effect of MC on the acquisition and clearance of HPV infections and prevalence of genital warts.

  2. Clinical, epidemiological and therapeutic studies on Bovine Papillomatosis in Northern Oases, Egypt in 2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fayez Awadalla Salib 1 and Haithm Ali Farghali 2

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Bovine papillomatosis is a viral disease of cattle characterized clinically by development of multiple benign tumours termed warts. The diagnosis of bovine papillomatosis was confirmed by clinical and pathological examinations of the warts. The prevalence of bovine papillomatosis in Northern Oases was recorded as 4.86%. The prevalence was higher in the females (2.99% than males (1.87%.The prevalence was the highest in cattle less than one year old (2.99%. The infected cattle were examined visually for detection of external parasites and faecal samples were examined for detection of internal parasites. Infestation with ticks was observed in 10 of the 13 confirmed wart infected animals, while fasciola and parasitic gastroenteritis (PGE nematode eggs were demonstrated and quantified in 4 and 5 infected bovids respectively. The statistical correlation between the number of warts and Fasciola eggs, and number of parasitic gastroenteritis (PGE nematode eggs, was 0.6 and 0.89 accordingly. Two therapeutic regimes were evaluated, regimen-I and regimen-II. All cattle treated were completely recovered in days post treatment 15 to 115. We concluded that treatment regimen-I was better than regimen-II when taking into consideration the mean days lapsed for healing and regression of warts of 42 days compared to 83 days for regimen-II. [Veterinary World 2011; 4(2.000: 53-59

  3. A randomized, controlled, molecular study of condylomata acuminata clearance during treatment with imiquimod.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyring, S K; Arany, I; Stanley, M A; Tomai, M A; Miller, R L; Smith, M H; McDermott, D J; Slade, H B

    1998-08-01

    Imiquimod, an immune response modifier, has been demonstrated to be safe and effective in the treatment of external genital and perianal warts caused by human papillomavirus (HPV). To identify the molecular mechanism(s) by which condylomata acuminata clear during topical treatment with imiquimod, wart skin biopsies were taken from patients before treatment, at treatment week 6, and at the end of treatment. Tissues were analyzed for HPV DNA and for mRNA of several cytokines and HPV gene products. Wart clearance was associated with evidence of tissue production of interferon-alpha, -beta, and -gamma and tumor necrosis factor-alpha. Regression of warts was strongly associated with a decrease in HPV DNA and in mRNA expression for both early and late viral proteins. Thus, topical imiquimod treatment of anogenital warts led to significant increases in local production of multiple interferon mRNAs and a significant reduction in virus load as measured by decreases in HPV DNA and mRNA for early HPV proteins.

  4. Condyloma in pregnancy is strongly predictive of juvenile-onset recurrent respiratory papillomatosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silverberg, Michael J.; Thorsen, Poul; Lindeberg, Henning

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the risk of juvenile-onset recurrent respiratory papillomatosis conferred by a maternal history of genital warts in pregnancy, and to identify additional cofactors such as the method of delivery (cesarean versus vaginal) and procedures or complications during pregnancy. METHODS......: A retrospective cohort design was used to evaluate maternal and infant characteristics associated with respiratory papillomatosis among Danish births between 1974 and 1993. Using data from Danish registries, we identified 3033 births with a maternal history of genital warts during pregnancy. Fifty......-seven respiratory papillomatosis cases were identified by review of medical records from ear, nose, and throat departments. RESULTS: Seven of every 1000 births with a maternal history of genital warts resulted in disease in the offspring, corresponding to a 231.4 (95% confidence interval 135.3, 395.9) times higher...

  5. Topical cidofovir for refractory verrucae in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Monique; Bayliss, Susan J; Berk, David R

    2013-01-01

    Warts are common and are a challenge to treat in some children, especially immunocompromised children and those who fail or cannot tolerate salicylic acid preparations and cryotherapy. Cidofovir, a nucleotide analogue with antiviral activity, has demonstrated promising results when compounded into a topical form to treat refractory warts. We present a retrospective institutional review of 12 children with refractory verrucae treated with 1% to 3% topical cidofovir compounded in an unscented moisturizing cream, applied every other day to daily. In our institutional series, only three patients (25%) demonstrated complete clearance of their verrucae. An additional four patients (33%) demonstrated partial clearance. Our experience using topical cidofovir has been less successful than previous institutional reviews, possibly because we used a lower concentration and less-frequent dosing. More studies are needed to better characterize the efficacy, safety, and dosing of topical cidofovir for the treatment of refractory warts.

  6. An interesting case of giant molluscum with florid verruca vulgaris in an immunocompetent patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iffat Hassan

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Molluscum contagiosum and warts are two fairly common skin infections caused by DNA viruses i.e. poxvirus and human papilloma virus (HPV respectively. Both the conditions are benign and mostly self-limited. However in immunocompromised individuals, these infections can have varied atypical presentations like larger, more extensive, recalcitrant and refractory lesions. These atypical presentations in a non-immunocompromised individual are, however, quite rare. We present one such case with atypical presentation of molluscum contagiosum and warts (verruca vulgaris.

  7. Dermatoses of the hand-an observation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Pramod

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available After going through 1000 case files of patients registered in the skin department of K.M.C. Hospital, it was found that 166 (16.6% of them had dermatoses restricted to their hands. Based on the clinical findings and clinical diagnosis recorded, the various dermatoses were tabulated and evaluated. Ninety-two males and 74 females had dermatoses of hands. Warts and eczemas formed the major chunk of cases. Females out numbered males among patients with warts and eczemas.

  8. Terahertz wide aperture reflection tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, Jeremy; Choi, Hyeokho; Mittleman, Daniel M.; White, Jeff; Zimdars, David

    2005-07-01

    We describe a powerful imaging modality for terahertz (THz) radiation, THz wide aperture reflection tomography (WART). Edge maps of an object's cross section are reconstructed from a series of time-domain reflection measurements at different viewing angles. Each measurement corresponds to a parallel line projection of the object's cross section. The filtered backprojection algorithm is applied to recover the image from the projection data. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of a reflection computed tomography technique using electromagnetic waves. We demonstrate the capabilities of THz WART by imaging the cross sections of two test objects.

  9. Giant Condyloma Acuminatum in the Genital, Perineal and Perianal Region in a Pediatric Patient. Literature Review and Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Suárez-Ibarrola

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Condyloma acuminata is caused by the proliferation of squamous epithelial cells in the presence of human papilloma virus (HPV infection. There are several treatment options available for anogenital warts, however, none have proven to be more efficacious. We present the case of a 3 year-8 months-old male, diagnosed with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection, who presented with multiple warts in the anogenital region. Lesions were treated with imiquimod 5%, electrosurgical resection and interferon α-2b. Combination of electrofulguration and interferon α-2b is an effective treatment option for children with giant condyloma accuminatum although recurrence is expected within a short follow-up period.

  10. Impact and effectiveness of the quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garland, Suzanne M; Kjaer, Susanne K.; Muñoz, Nubia

    2016-01-01

    January 2007 through February 2016 to identify observational studies reporting the impact or effectiveness of 4vHPV vaccination on infection, anogenital warts, and cervical cancer or precancerous lesions. Over the last decade, the impact of HPV vaccination in real-world settings has become increasingly...... evident, especially among girls vaccinated before HPV exposure in countries with high vaccine uptake. Maximal reductions of approximately 90% for HPV 6/11/16/18 infection, approximately 90% for genital warts, approximately 45% for low-grade cytological cervical abnormalities, and approximately 85...

  11. Den HPV-relaterede sygdomsbyrde hos mænd er stor og kan forebygges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiellberg Larsen, Helle; Kofoed, Kristian; Sand, Carsten

    2013-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a highly prevalent sexually transmitted infection. High-risk HPV causes penile cancer and a substantial proportion of oropharyngeal and anal malignancy in men. Low-risk types of HPV cause anogenital warts. The incidence of oropharyngeal and anal cancers is increasing...... in Denmark. Prevention of penile, anal and oropharyngeal cancers and anogenital warts represents potential benefits of the HPV vaccine; and vaccination of men is now recommended by the Australian and the North American health authorities. Thus, we recommend that the Danish HPV vaccination program should...

  12. Den HPV-relaterede sygdomsbyrde hos mænd er stor og kan forebygges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiellberg Larsen, Helle; Kofoed, Kristian; Sand, Carsten

    2013-01-01

    in Denmark. Prevention of penile, anal and oropharyngeal cancers and anogenital warts represents potential benefits of the HPV vaccine; and vaccination of men is now recommended by the Australian and the North American health authorities. Thus, we recommend that the Danish HPV vaccination program should......Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a highly prevalent sexually transmitted infection. High-risk HPV causes penile cancer and a substantial proportion of oropharyngeal and anal malignancy in men. Low-risk types of HPV cause anogenital warts. The incidence of oropharyngeal and anal cancers is increasing...

  13. AN APPRAISAL ON PHARMACOGNOSY, PHYTOCHEMISTRY AND BIOACTIVITY OF THUJA OCCIDENTALIS LINN. (CUPRESSACEAE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anju Dhiman

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Thuja occidentalis Linn. (Cupressaceae has been widely used for many ailments in the traditional system like hepatoprotection, anti-oxidant, anti-diabetic, anti-arthritic, anti-microbial, anti-cancer etc. because of its medicinal properties. In the nineteenth century, Thuja was commonly used as an externally applied tincture or ointment for the treatment of warts, ringworm and thrush, and a local injection of the tincture was used for treating venereal warts. The present paper summarizes a concise detail about pharmacognostic, phytohemistry and bioactivities of T. occidentalis Linn.

  14. Human papillomavirus-related verrucous carcinoma in a renal transplant patient after long-term immunosuppression: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imko-Walczuk, B; Cegielska, A; Placek, W; Kaszewski, Sebastian; Fiedor, P

    2014-10-01

    Verrucous carcinoma is a slow-growing tumor with 3 main localizations: Oral cavity, ano-urogenital region, and plantar surface of the foot. On the sole it may rise adjacent to viral warts and very often is mistaken for the common verruca plantaris. Although both conditions-viral warts and cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma-are often diagnosed in immunosuppressed patients, in literature we have found only 3 case reports of verrucous carcinoma in organ transplant recipients. We present a case of 26-year-old man after deceased donor renal transplantation with plantar verrucous carcinoma successfully treated with excision and 5% imiquimod.

  15. Successful treatment of verruca vulgaris with Thuja occidentalis in a renal allograft recipient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Human papillomavirus-driven verruca vulgaris infection is common in solid organ transplant recipients and increases the risk for squamous cell carcinoma. The available treatment modalities have limited response. We report a renal allograft recipient who presented with multiple warts not responding to cryotherapy and radiosurgery with one turning malignant, needing amputation of the finger. An extract from Thuja occidentalis (White cedar tree cured the resistant warts on the other fingers, leaving only superficial scars and without affecting allograft function. We have reviewed the pharmacological and clinical properties of T. occidentalis.

  16. HPV - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Creole (Kreyol) Hmong (Hmoob) Khmer (Khmer) Korean (한국어) Oromo (Afaan Oromo) Russian (Русский) Somali (af Soomaali) Spanish (español) Tagalog ( ... Action Coalition; Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Oromo (Afaan Oromo) Genital Warts/HPV English Biqiltuwwan Dhagna- ...

  17. HPV and Herpes Zoster Vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özlem Karabudak

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Genital warts and Herpes Zoster are relatively frequent encountered diseases in dermatology practice. Cervical cancers are also caused by some spesific types of human papillomaviruses. The purpose of this review is to give some knowledge about the vaccines which were developed for these diseases. (Turkderm 2008; 42: 108-12

  18. The Transmissibility of Sexually Transmitted Diseases in Sexually Abused Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammerschlag, Margaret R.

    1998-01-01

    This paper summarizes what is known about, and research needs on, the transmissibility to sexually abused children of the following sexually transmitted diseases: gonorrhea, chlamydia trachomatis, human papillomavirus genital warts, condylomata acuminata, syphilis, bacterial vaginosis, trichomonas vaginalis, herpes simplex, and human…

  19. Knowledge and Behavioral Intention Related to HPV Vaccination among Male College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Chandrika; Ogletree, Roberta

    2017-01-01

    Background: Although human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is commonly associated with women and cervical cancer, male HPV infection is also a public health concern. In addition to transmission risk to women, HPV is associated with anal, penile, and oral cancers in men and genital warts. Purpose: The study's purpose was to examine male college…

  20. HPV vaccination and the effect of information framing on intentions and behaviour: an application of the theory of planned behaviour and moral norm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juraskova, Ilona; O'Brien, Michaeley; Mullan, Barbara; Bari, Royena; Laidsaar-Powell, Rebekah; McCaffery, Kirsten

    2012-12-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a common sexually transmitted infection (STI) known to cause cervical cancer and genital warts. However, making the genital warts aspect explicit may reduce HPV vaccination intention and behaviour due to perceived stigma associated with STIs. This study investigated the effect of differential information framing on intention to receive the HPV vaccine using the Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB) and moral norm construct. Female university students were randomised to receive a fact sheet describing the HPV vaccine as: (1) preventing cervical cancer only (n = 81); or (2) preventing both cervical cancer and genital warts (n = 78). A 2-month follow-up investigated relationships between vaccination intention and actual behaviour. No effect of information framing was detected on intention to receive the HPV vaccine, or vaccine uptake behaviour at 2-month follow-up. The traditional TPB components predicted 54% of the variance in vaccination intention (F (3,155) = 61.580, p behaviour. The HPV vaccine does not seem to be associated with perceptions of stigma related to genital warts, and has broad acceptance among a female university population. This study demonstrates that TPB is suited to investigate HPV vaccination, and has helped clarify the role of moral norm within the TPB.

  1. Disease and Non-Battle Injuries among Navy and Marine Corps Personnel during Operation Desert Shield/Desert Storm

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-10-01

    63701 INGROWN TOENAIL 0 4 EVACUATED0 5 HOS~ITALUZED 0 OTHER SPECIFY: PLEASE TURN PAGE - MORE ON OTHER SIDE 18A IV. TREATMENT PROVIDED 0 01 NO TREATMENT...PEDICUI.OSIS 03 4 EVACUATED o 071810 WART 0 $ HOSPrTALIZED 03 6270 HEAT RASH 0 70300 INGROWN TOENAILo) OTHER. SPECIFY: FOR OFFICIAL USE ONLY NHRC 6320 20 (11

  2. A System Approach to Navy Medical Education and Training. Appendix 19. Dermatology Technician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-08-31

    DISEASE, E.G. IPREVENTION, SYMPTOMS 45 PINSTRUCT PATIENT IN PREVENTIVE CARE OF FINGER ANJ TOENAIL 1ABNORMALITIES 46 ITAKE BLOOD PRESSURE 47 ICHECK RADIAL...43 1EXCISE POLYP 44 rEXCISE SEBACEOUS CYST/LIPOMA 45 IEXTRACT SEBACEOUS MATERIAL FROM COMEOO 46 PREMOVE INGROWN NAIL 47 IFREEZE WART WITH LIQUID

  3. A summary of the post-licensure surveillance initiatives for GARDASIL/SILGARD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonanni, Paolo; Cohet, Catherine; Kjaer, Susanne K;

    2010-01-01

    GARDASIL has been shown to reduce the incidence of pre-cancerous cervical, vulvar, and vaginal lesions, and external genital warts causally related to HPV6/11/16/18. Because of its expected public health benefit on reduction of cervical cancer and other HPV-related diseases, this vaccine has been...

  4. Two new Asiatic species of the Celeopterous genus Helota

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ritsema Cz., C.

    1907-01-01

    Strongly resembling Helota Lesnei Rits. from Kouy- Tcheou (China), of which the type-specimen (♂) is in the Natural History Museum at Paris 1). The new species differs however from it by the sculpture of the elytra (the rows of raised warts or tubercles are less numerous in the new species: 5 in ste

  5. Ten Things Gay Men Should Discuss with Their Health Care Provider

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cancer) Of all the sexually transmitted infections gay men are at risk for, human papilloma virus (HVP) — which cause anal and genital warts — is often thought to be little more than an unsightly inconvenience. However, these ... gay men. Some health professionals now recommend routine screening with ...

  6. Changes in polyphenols in "Rio Red' grapefruit leaves in response to Elsinoe australis infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweet orange scab (SOS) is a fungal disease of citrus, which is caused by Elsinoë australis. It affects the aesthetics of the fruit by forming wart-like protruded lesions on the fruit skin, and also affects the leaves, which act as source of inoculum in the orchards. SOS is widespread in the differe...

  7. CO2 laser used in cosmetology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Chenglie

    1993-03-01

    Cases of various kinds of warts, nevi, papillomas, skin angiomas, ephilises, skin vegetation, scars and brandy noses were vaporized and solidified with a 2.5 - 8 W low power CO2 laser with an overall satisfaction rate up to 99.8% and the satisfaction rate for one time 92%.

  8. Globalization Education and New Realities (Keynote Address, Midwest History of Education Society Annual Meeting, 2005, Chicago, Illinois)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, William H.

    2006-01-01

    A central argument of this essay suggests that the truth of globalization is little known to the body politic as it is enmeshed in the dynamics of capitalist accumulation, avarice, and despotism. This project hopes to first locate, and then unmask the realities of globalization, warts and all. Gaining some knowledge of globalization, the…

  9. Lymphocyte profile and cytokine mRNA expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of patients with recurrent respiratory papillomatosis suggest dysregulated cytokine mRNA response and impaired cytotoxic capacity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Anna; Nagaeva, Olga; Nagaev, Ivan

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Recurrent respiratory papillomatosis (RRP) is a relatively rare, chronic disease caused by Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) 6 and 11, and characterized by wart-like lesions in the airway affecting voice and respiratory function. The majority of HPV infections are asymptomatic and resolve...

  10. Attitudes towards human papillomavirus vaccination among Arab ethnic minority in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeraiq, Lina; Nielsen, Dorthe; Sodemann, Morten

    2015-01-01

    and none of the mothers knew that HPV also causes genital warts. Both mothers and daughters acknowledged that the daughters have deeper insight into health-related issues. A gap of knowledge between generations was identified, as mothers and daughters obtained health information from different sources...

  11. Podophyllin induced urethral stricture in a young Nigerian male

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.O. Areo

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Urethral stricture is an abnormal narrowing or loss of distensibility due to fibrosis in the peri-urethral tissues. Some substances can induce chemical urethritis severe enough to cause stricture. We present a case of long segment anterior urethral stricture in a young Nigerian patient cause by self-application of podophyllin for the treatment of genital warts.

  12. Estimated health and economic impact of quadrivalent HPV (types 6/11/16/18 vaccination in Brazil using a transmission dynamic model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kawai Kosuke

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cervical cancer is the second most common cancer among women in Brazil. We examined the health and economic impacts of quadrivalent HPV vaccination in Brazil. Methods We adapted a previously developed transmission dynamic model to estimate the effectiveness of HPV vaccination on cervical cancer, cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grades 2 and 3 (CIN2/3, CIN1, and genital warts. We evaluated following vaccination strategies: routine vaccination of 12-year-old girls and routine vaccination in combination with a catch-up vaccination of 12 to 26-year-old women. Results The model projected that the vaccination would reduce the incidence rates of HPV 6/11/16/18-related cervical cancer, CIN2/3, CIN1, and female genital warts by 94% to 98% at year 100. Routine vaccination in combination with a catch-up vaccination could prevent approximately 163,000 cases of cervical cancer, 48,000 deaths from cervical cancer, 2.3 million cases of CIN2/3, and 11.4 million genital warts in the next 50 years. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratios for female vaccination strategies ranged from R$350 to R$720 (US$219 to US$450 per quality-adjusted life year (QALY gained. Conclusions Our study demonstrates that quadrivalent HPV female vaccination can be a cost-effective public health intervention that can substantially reduce the burden of cervical diseases and genital warts in Brazil.

  13. Epidemiology and Natural History of Human Papillomavirus Infections in the Female Genital Tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Human papillomavirus (HPV is the most common newly diagnosed sexually transmitted infection in the United States. Although the majority of sexually active adults will be infected with HPV at least once in their lives, it is sexually active women less than 25 years of age who consistently have the highest rates of infection. Besides youth and gender, common risk factors for HPV infection and clinical sequelae of infection include high number of sexual partners and coinfection with Chlamydia trachomatis or herpes simplex virus. Most HPV infections are cleared by the immune system and do not result in clinical complications. Clinical sequelae in cases of low-risk HPV infection consist of genital warts, and clinical manifestations of high-risk HPV infection include abnormal Pap test results, low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSIL, high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL, and cervical cancer. LSIL, HSIL, and cervical cancer carry significant morbidity and/or mortality; genital warts and abnormal Pap test results are often significant sources of psychosocial distress. Currently, there are neither effective means of preventing HPV transmission nor cures for clinical manifestations: infection can only be prevented via complete sexual abstinence, while treatment for clinical sequelae such as genital warts and cytologic abnormalities consists of removing the problematic cells and watching for recurrence; this method consumes significant health care resources and is costly. New prophylactic HPV vaccines promise to dramatically reduce the incidence of HPV infection, genital warts, and cytologic abnormalities.

  14. CXCR4-specific Nanobodies as potential therapeutics for WHIM syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Wit, Raymond H; Heukers, Raimond; Brink, Hendrik

    2017-01-01

    WHIM syndrome is a rare congenital immunodeficiency disease, named after its main clinical manifestations: Warts, Hypogammaglobulinemia, Infections and Myelokathexis. The disease is primarily caused by C-terminal truncation mutations of the chemokine receptor CXCR4. Consequently, these CXCR4-WHIM...

  15. Long-term results of carbon dioxide laser treatment of meatal condylomata acuminata

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh, J; Beuke, H P; Miskowiak, J

    1990-01-01

    A group of 74 men who underwent carbon dioxide laser treatment of meatal condylomata were observed for an average of 18 months. The cure rate after 1 treatment of isolated meatal lesions was 78%; the presence of external lesions lowered the rate to 32% and additional external and urethral warts...

  16. Five Key Changes for the Management of UK Defence - An Agenda for Research?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-04-23

    stresses between JIT and Agile must be added the dimension of resilience: that supply chains should be able to avoid or absorb shock. Arguably, defence... warts and all,” the current system which, whilst clearly not perfect, may be just about as good as it will get given the variables in play. This “do

  17. Mouth Sores

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or difficulty in swallowing, speaking, or chewing; any wart-like mass; hoarseness that lasts for more than two weeks; or any numbness in the oral/facial region. Tips to prevent mouth sores •Stop smoking. •Reduce stress. •Avoid injury to the mouth caused by hard ...

  18. [Paralytic ileus secondary to podophyllin poisoning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pottier, Y; Mullier, J P; Huysman, E; Paulet, P

    1989-01-01

    The authors report a case of general and local poisoning after erroneous intravaginal administration of podophyllin for warts. The clinical course mainly showed a 10 day paralytic ileus, vaginal and urethral lesions and a severe peripheral neurological illness: paresthesia, dysesthesia and ataxia. The authors stress the potential toxicity of podophyllin and recommend great caution in using this product.

  19. Toward Active Control of Noise from Hot Supersonic Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-15

    applied a double divergence directly to the incompressible Reynolds stress giving Ö U’UI dxgJ = -£ijk(sijUJk + ryWfc). (1) This neglected...SUPERSONIC JETS | QUARTERLY RPT. 6 ^ EXPERIMENTAL FACILITY j^i;r\\’ii Mo/ P I V • Page 6 • Prev • Wart • Last • Full Screen • Close

  20. Modernization of the Air Expeditionary Squadron AMAL 0960

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-25

    to other organism not classified 1 682.9 Cellulitis and abscess of unspecified parts 2 078.1 Viral warts 1 719.41 Pain in joint shoulder 3...acid base balance 1 724.2 Lumbago 2 309.0 Adjustment disorder with depressed mood 2 724.5 Backache unspecified 2 309.81 Posttraumatic stress

  1. Thinking and Writing: Cognitive Science and Intelligence Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-01

    at assessing odds. Warts and all, however, heuristics are likely to re- main the way we all go about our business most of the time. And it seems to...argumentative- ness. These considerations lead me to believe that a turn toward conversational prose would add to the stress of the review and (perhaps

  2. Report to Congress on Sustainable Ranges, 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-01

    energy goals and a national broadband infrastructure, while exploring cooperative land-use strategies to reduce congestion on stressed ranges. These...0 0 0 N N Y N Y N N Y N N Y Hohe Warte OS Germany USAREUR 160 0 0 0 N N Y N N N N N N N N Table A-1: Army Training and Testing Range Complex

  3. The HPV Vaccine: Framing the Arguments "for" and "against" Mandatory Vaccination of All Middle School Girls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vamos, Cheryl A.; McDermott, Robert J.; Daley, Ellen M.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Human papillomavirus (HPV), the virus responsible for cervical cancer, is the most common viral sexually transmitted infection in the United States. A vaccine was approved in 2006 that is effective in preventing the types of HPV responsible for 70% of cervical cancers and 90% of genital warts. Proposals for routine and mandatory HPV…

  4. Oma riik / Jaan Elken

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Elken, Jaan, 1954-

    2007-01-01

    Inglise kunstniku Mark Wallingeri näitusest "State Britain" Londonis Tate Britainis. Eksponeeritakse üle 40 meetri pikkust installatsiooni, mis koosneb Briti parlamendihoone vastas sõjavastast demonstratsiooni pidava Brian Haw' banneritest, lippudest, loosungitest, fotodest, kaisukarudest. Rootsi kunstniku Ann Sofi Siden'i näitusest "Warte Mal!" Londoni Haywardi galeriis 2002 a.

  5. Primary Sources and Web 2.0: Unlikely Match or Made for Each Other?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Mary J.

    2009-01-01

    Nothing comes closer to "the truth" than a primary source, even a primary source with wart--biases, narrow-minded interpretations, and historical inaccuracies. Students who learn to apply critical thinking to the analysis of primary sources also learn to situate sources within the broader historical context, test hypotheses, form their own…

  6. Pinnularia sofia Van de Vijver & Le Cohu spec. nov., a new spine-bearing, chain-forming Pinnularia species from the sub-Antarctic region

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VandeVijver, B.; Gremmen, N.J.M.; Beyens, L.; Le Cohu, T.

    2004-01-01

    The spine-bearing diatom Pinnularia sofia Van de Vijver & Le Cohn spec. nov. is described from the sub-Antarctic Heard Island. The morphology of this species was examined using the scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The most striking feature of the new taxon is the presence of three groups of wart-

  7. Exploring the Knowledge, Attitudes, Beliefs, and Communication Preferences of the General Public regarding HPV: Findings from CDC Focus Group Research and Implications for Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Allison L.; Shepeard, Hilda

    2007-01-01

    Genital human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is the most common sexually transmitted virus in the United States, causing genital warts, cervical cell abnormalities, and cervical cancer in women. To inform HPV education efforts, 35 focus groups were conducted with members of the general public, stratified by gender, race/ethnicity, and urban/rural…

  8. Oma riik / Jaan Elken

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Elken, Jaan, 1954-

    2007-01-01

    Inglise kunstniku Mark Wallingeri näitusest "State Britain" Londonis Tate Britainis. Eksponeeritakse üle 40 meetri pikkust installatsiooni, mis koosneb Briti parlamendihoone vastas sõjavastast demonstratsiooni pidava Brian Haw' banneritest, lippudest, loosungitest, fotodest, kaisukarudest. Rootsi kunstniku Ann Sofi Siden'i näitusest "Warte Mal!" Londoni Haywardi galeriis 2002 a.

  9. Squamous intraepithelial lesions of the anal squamocolumnar junction: Histopathological classification and HPV genotyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clavero, Omar; McCloskey, Jenny; Molina, Vicente Marco; Quirós, Beatriz; Bravo, Ignacio G; de Sanjosé, Silvia; Bosch, F Xavier; Pimenoff, Ville N

    2017-06-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV)-related anal cancer lesions are often found adjacent to the squamocolumnar junction (SCJ). We have assessed the histopathology and associated HPV genotypes in anal SCJ lesions in surgically excised anal warts in HIV-negative and -positive patients. Histopathology identified 47 squamous intraepithelial lesions (SILs) adjacent to the SCJ amongst a total of 145 cases of clinically diagnosed anal condylomata. The anal SCJ lesions were further analyzed with p16, CK7 and p63 immunohistochemistry and HPV genotyping. Sixteen (16/47) of the excised anal wart lesions contained HSIL; Three were HSIL and exclusively associated with oncogenic HPVs. A further thirteen (13/47) were mixed lesions. Of these eight were HSILs with LSIL and six were HSILs with papillary immature metaplasia (PIM); Ten of the mixed lesions were associated with one or more oncogenic HPVs, while three cases were exclusively associated with HPV6. Clinically diagnosed anal warts cannot be assumed to be limited to low-grade lesions as anal warts of the SCJ often show heterogeneous lesions, with coexistence of LSIL, PIM, and HSIL. Lesions showing PIM, however, may mimic HSIL, because they are hypercellular, but lack the nuclear atypia and conspicuous mitotic activity of HSIL; and are p16 negative. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. About Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STDs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... wrong. A person can get some STDs, like herpes or genital warts, through skin-to-skin contact with an infected area or sore. Another myth about STDs is that you can't get them if you have oral or anal sex. That's also wrong because the ...

  11. TMFunction data: 417 [TMFunction[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available S396A;F398L ... yes LACTOSE UPTAKE (non toxic, reduced activity) TM 12; Lactose permease Escherichia coli ... Ste...wart C, Bailey J, Manoil C. J Biol Chem. 1998 Oct 23;273(43):28078-84 cassette muta

  12. TMFunction data: 412 [TMFunction[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available L385R;L394F ... yes LACTOSE UPTAKE (non toxic, reduced activity) TM 12; Lactose permease Escherichia coli ... Ste...wart C, Bailey J, Manoil C. J Biol Chem. 1998 Oct 23;273(43):28078-84 cassette muta

  13. TMFunction data: 409 [TMFunction[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available L383M;F398L ... yes LACTOSE UPTAKE (non toxic, reduced activity) TM 12; Lactose permease Escherichia coli ... Ste...wart C, Bailey J, Manoil C. J Biol Chem. 1998 Oct 23;273(43):28078-84 cassette muta

  14. TMFunction data: 415 [TMFunction[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available G391C;T393L ... yes LACTOSE UPTAKE (non toxic, reduced activity) TM 12; Lactose permease Escherichia coli ... Ste...wart C, Bailey J, Manoil C. J Biol Chem. 1998 Oct 23;273(43):28078-84 cassette muta

  15. TMFunction data: 406 [TMFunction[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available A381V;L385K ... yes LACTOSE UPTAKE (non toxic, reduced activity) TM 12; Lactose permease Escherichia coli ... Ste...wart C, Bailey J, Manoil C. J Biol Chem. 1998 Oct 23;273(43):28078-84 cassette muta

  16. TMFunction data: 411 [TMFunction[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available V384G;G391D ... yes LACTOSE UPTAKE (non toxic, reduced activity) TM 12; Lactose permease Escherichia coli ... Ste...wart C, Bailey J, Manoil C. J Biol Chem. 1998 Oct 23;273(43):28078-84 cassette muta

  17. TMFunction data: 407 [TMFunction[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available A381S;S396F ... yes LACTOSE UPTAKE (non toxic, reduced activity) TM 12; Lactose permease Escherichia coli ... Ste...wart C, Bailey J, Manoil C. J Biol Chem. 1998 Oct 23;273(43):28078-84 cassette muta

  18. TMFunction data: 408 [TMFunction[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Y382S;V397L ... yes LACTOSE UPTAKE (non toxic, reduced activity) TM 12; Lactose permease Escherichia coli ... Ste...wart C, Bailey J, Manoil C. J Biol Chem. 1998 Oct 23;273(43):28078-84 cassette muta

  19. TMFunction data: 410 [TMFunction[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available L383Q;T399K ... yes LACTOSE UPTAKE (non toxic, reduced activity) TM 12; Lactose permease Escherichia coli ... Ste...wart C, Bailey J, Manoil C. J Biol Chem. 1998 Oct 23;273(43):28078-84 cassette muta

  20. TMFunction data: 416 [TMFunction[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available I395K;S396A ... yes LACTOSE UPTAKE (non toxic, reduced activity) TM 12; Lactose permease Escherichia coli ... Ste...wart C, Bailey J, Manoil C. J Biol Chem. 1998 Oct 23;273(43):28078-84 cassette muta

  1. TMFunction data: 418 [TMFunction[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available F398I;T399K ... yes LACTOSE UPTAKE (non toxic, reduced activity) TM 12; Lactose permease Escherichia coli ... Ste...wart C, Bailey J, Manoil C. J Biol Chem. 1998 Oct 23;273(43):28078-84 cassette muta

  2. Workaholism: are physicians at risk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezvani, A; Bouju, G; Keriven-Dessomme, B; Moret, L; Grall-Bronnec, M

    2014-09-01

    Work addiction (WA), often called 'workaholism', is a relatively recent concept that has not yet been clearly defined. Ongoing studies have found prevalence rates that are highly variable due to the diversity of the models used and the populations studied. To assess the characteristics of WA among hospital medical staff. All physicians practising at a French university hospital were invited to participate in a survey based on two questionnaires: the Work Addiction Risk Test (WART) for WA and the Job Contents Questionnaire (JCQ) to assess psychosocial constraints at work. There were 444 responding physicians. The response rate was 45%. Thirteen per cent of respondents were considered to be highly work addicted and a further 35% were considered mildly work addicted. Professors had the highest average WART score, but neither age nor sex was associated with WA. Furthermore, all 3D scores obtained using the JCQ correlated with the WART score; the highest correlation coefficient being obtained between the WART score and the job demands score, indicating that workaholics experienced high job demands. WA especially affects professors, who have the highest status amongst doctors in the hospital hierarchy. This study highlights the importance of constraints and workload, which are consistent with individual vulnerability factors. These factors may help identify ways of preventing and managing this type of addiction, through improvement of working conditions and organizational structures. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Occupational Medicine. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Bovine Immune Response to Papillomatous Digital Dermatitis (PDD)-associated Spirochetes is Skewed in Isolate Reactivity and Subclass Elicitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papillomatous digital dermatitis (PDD), also known as hairy heel wart, is a growing cause of lameness of cows in the U.S. dairy industry. Farms with PDD-afflicted cows experience economic loss due to treatment costs, decreased milk production, lower reproductive efficiency and premature culling. Cow...

  4. Cactaceae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoffers, A.L.

    1984-01-01

    Stemsucculents, branched or unbranched, columnar, globose or with thick flattened stems or internodes, usually with very small scale-like and awl-shaped, rarely foliaceous leaves; stems and internodes often with warts or ribs, bearing areoles in the axils of the often absent leaves. Areoles mostly c

  5. The HPV Vaccine: Framing the Arguments "for" and "against" Mandatory Vaccination of All Middle School Girls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vamos, Cheryl A.; McDermott, Robert J.; Daley, Ellen M.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Human papillomavirus (HPV), the virus responsible for cervical cancer, is the most common viral sexually transmitted infection in the United States. A vaccine was approved in 2006 that is effective in preventing the types of HPV responsible for 70% of cervical cancers and 90% of genital warts. Proposals for routine and mandatory HPV…

  6. Report of the Defense Science Board Task Force on Persian Gulf War Health Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-06-01

    vestibular dysfunction, CNS vasculitis, sleep disorders, compression neuropathies and various common skin conditions including nevi, warts and fungal ...exposures to mustard seem well established as a causal factor in airway cancer. Delayed keratitis has appeared more than 25 years after acute severe lesion...abnormalities, chronic skin ulceration, chronic respiratory diseases, chronic conjunctivitis, delayed recurrent keratitis of the eye, bone marrow and

  7. Focal epithelial hyperplasia (Heck's disease) in three Kenyan girls: case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chindia, M L; Awange, D O; Guthua, S W; Mwaniki, D L

    1993-09-01

    We report the first three patients diagnosed with focal epithelial hyperplasia (Heck's disease) in Kenya. Clinically they presented as focal or diffuse papillomatous lesions in the oral mucosa. Histopathological features rule out other similar lesions inter alia multiple fibro-epithelial and viral warts.

  8. Myths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheat, Maxwell Corydon, Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Deals with various myths about animals and plants. Discusses bats (not blind), toads (do not cause warts), dragonflies (will not sew up your mouth), horseshoe crabs (will not sting with their tails), owls (not so smart), and goldenrod (does not cause hayfever). (MH)

  9. Two new Asiatic species of the Celeopterous genus Helota

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ritsema Cz., C.

    1907-01-01

    Strongly resembling Helota Lesnei Rits. from Kouy- Tcheou (China), of which the type-specimen (♂) is in the Natural History Museum at Paris 1). The new species differs however from it by the sculpture of the elytra (the rows of raised warts or tubercles are less numerous in the new species: 5 in

  10. Joint Healthcare Manpower Standards (JHMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-11-01

    TREATMENT. Performs minor surgical treatment or biopsy in the clinic, to include cryotherapy for warts and colposcopy examinations on obstetrical patients...EVALUATES AND MANAGES LABOR PATIENT. Manages labor to include pain relief/augmentation. 3.4. ACCOMPLISHES VAGINAL DELIVERY, COMPLETES POST-DELIVERY

  11. Diagnosis of HIV-Associated Oral Lesions in Relation to Early versus Delayed Antiretroviral Therapy: Results from the CIPRA HT001 Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batavia, Ashita S; Secours, Rode; Espinosa, Patrice; Jean Juste, Marc Antoine; Severe, Patrice; Pape, Jean William; Fitzgerald, Daniel W

    2016-01-01

    Oral mucosal lesions that are associated with HIV infection can play an important role in guiding the decision to initiate antiretroviral therapy (ART). The incidence of these lesions relative to the timing of ART initiation has not been well characterized. A randomized controlled clinical trial was conducted at the GHESKIO Center in Port-au-Prince, Haiti between 2004 and 2009. 816 HIV-infected ART-naïve participants with CD4 T cell counts between 200 and 350 cells/mm3 were randomized to either immediate ART initiation (early group; N = 408), or initiation when CD4 T cell count was less than or equal 200 cells/mm3 or with the development of an AIDS-defining condition (delayed group; N = 408). Every 3 months, all participants underwent an oral examination. The incidence of oral lesions was 4.10 in the early group and 17.85 in the delayed group (p-value candidiasis, hairy leukoplakia, herpes labialis, and recurrent herpes simplex in the delayed group. The incidence of oral warts in delayed group was 0.97 before therapy and 4.27 post-ART initiation (p-value oral warts post-ART initiation was significantly higher than that seen in the early group (4.27 versus 1.09; p-value oral warts increased after ART was initiated, and relative to the early group there was a four-fold increase in oral warts if ART was initiated following an AIDS diagnosis. Based upon our findings, candidiasis, hairy leukoplakia, herpes labialis, and recurrent herpes simplex indicate immune suppression and the need to start ART. In contrast, oral warts are a sign of immune reconstitution following ART initiation.

  12. Diagnosis of HIV-Associated Oral Lesions in Relation to Early versus Delayed Antiretroviral Therapy: Results from the CIPRA HT001 Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashita S Batavia

    Full Text Available Oral mucosal lesions that are associated with HIV infection can play an important role in guiding the decision to initiate antiretroviral therapy (ART. The incidence of these lesions relative to the timing of ART initiation has not been well characterized. A randomized controlled clinical trial was conducted at the GHESKIO Center in Port-au-Prince, Haiti between 2004 and 2009. 816 HIV-infected ART-naïve participants with CD4 T cell counts between 200 and 350 cells/mm3 were randomized to either immediate ART initiation (early group; N = 408, or initiation when CD4 T cell count was less than or equal 200 cells/mm3 or with the development of an AIDS-defining condition (delayed group; N = 408. Every 3 months, all participants underwent an oral examination. The incidence of oral lesions was 4.10 in the early group and 17.85 in the delayed group (p-value <0.01. In comparison to the early group, there was a significantly higher incidence of candidiasis, hairy leukoplakia, herpes labialis, and recurrent herpes simplex in the delayed group. The incidence of oral warts in delayed group was 0.97 before therapy and 4.27 post-ART initiation (p-value <0.01. In the delayed group the incidence of oral warts post-ART initiation was significantly higher than that seen in the early group (4.27 versus 1.09; p-value <0.01. The incidence of oral warts increased after ART was initiated, and relative to the early group there was a four-fold increase in oral warts if ART was initiated following an AIDS diagnosis. Based upon our findings, candidiasis, hairy leukoplakia, herpes labialis, and recurrent herpes simplex indicate immune suppression and the need to start ART. In contrast, oral warts are a sign of immune reconstitution following ART initiation.

  13. Mixed Nipple Infections Caused by Variant of BPV3 and a Putative New Subtype of BPV in Cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Z; Meng, Q; Qiao, J; Peng, Y; Xie, K; Liu, Y; Cai, X; Zhang, J; Chen, C

    2016-02-01

    Bovine papilloma is a chronic and proliferative skin and mucosal wart caused by Bovine papillomavirus (BPV). In June, 2013, a leaf-and flat-shaped wart disease was observed on the nipple skins in a cattle farm in Xinjiang. To diagnose the disease, we collected the diseased skins for pathological biopsy and DNA analysis by PCR amplification using a pair of degenerate primers FAP59 and FAP64. Sequencing and phylogenetic analysis showed that the infection was caused by a variant of BPV3 and putatively a new subtype of BPV (BPV/CHI-SW1, belonging to the Xi papillomavirus genus). This is the first report of mixed infection caused by variant of BPV3 and BPV (putatively new subtype) in China, and would be of importance for the molecular epidemiological study of the disease.

  14. Generalized verrucosis in a patient with GATA2 deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, E S; Kingsbery, M Y; Mintz, E M; Hsu, A P; Holland, S M; Rady, P L; Tyring, S K; Grossman, M E

    2014-05-01

    Generalized verrucosis is a characteristic of several genetic and immunodeficiency disorders including epidermodysplasia verruciformis; warts, hypogammaglobulinaemia, infections and myelokathexis (WHIM) syndrome; warts, immunodeficiency, lymphoedema and anogenital dysplasia (WILD) syndrome; severe combined immune deficiency and HIV, among others. In recent years, it has been consistently recognized in patients with GATA2 deficiency, a novel immunodeficiency syndrome characterized by monocytopenia, B-cell and natural killer-cell lymphopenia, and a tendency to develop myeloid leukaemias and disseminated mycobacterial, human papillomavirus (HPV) and opportunistic fungal infections. Mutations in GATA2 cause haploinsufficiency and track in families as an autosomal dominant immunodeficiency. GATA2 is a transcription factor involved in early haematopoietic differentiation and lymphatic and vascular development. We describe a case of generalized verrucosis with HPV type 57 presenting in a young man with GATA2 deficiency. GATA2 deficiency is a novel dominant immunodeficiency that is often recognized later in life and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients with generalized verrucosis.

  15. Licea eremophila, a new myxomycete from arid areas of South America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrigley de Basanta, D; Lado, C; Estrada-Torres, A

    2010-01-01

    A new stipitate species of myxomycete of the genus Licea is described based on material from arid areas in Argentina and Chile. It was isolated from moist chamber cultures and found fruiting on field collections, usually on the same substrate, Puya sp. (Bromeliaceae). It differs from all described species in the genus in that it has stipitate sporocarps with dehiscence by defined preformed platelets and a smooth inner peridial surface. The new species has polyhedral, yellow spores with a uniform thick spore wall and dense warts except on irregularly dispersed raised bands with fewer warts, visible by SEM, an ornamentation not previously observed in the genus. Life-cycle events are described and illustrated, from germination to sporulation, based on moist chamber and agar cultures. The morphology of the myxomycete specimens was examined with scanning electron microscopy and light microscopy, and both light and SEM micrographs of relevant details are included.

  16. Impact and Effectiveness of the Quadrivalent Human Papillomavirus Vaccine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garland, Suzanne M; Kjaer, Susanne K; Muñoz, Nubia

    2016-01-01

    Prophylactic human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination programs constitute major public health initiatives worldwide. We assessed the global effect of quadrivalent HPV (4vHPV) vaccination on HPV infection and disease. PubMed and Embase were systematically searched for peer-reviewed articles from...... January 2007 through February 2016 to identify observational studies reporting the impact or effectiveness of 4vHPV vaccination on infection, anogenital warts, and cervical cancer or precancerous lesions. Over the last decade, the impact of HPV vaccination in real-world settings has become increasingly...... evident, especially among girls vaccinated before HPV exposure in countries with high vaccine uptake. Maximal reductions of approximately 90% for HPV 6/11/16/18 infection, approximately 90% for genital warts, approximately 45% for low-grade cytological cervical abnormalities, and approximately 85...

  17. Campania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Gasparini

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In Campania region 56% of women (aged 24-64 are screened regularly, meaning every 3 years. The analysis on cross-protective activity exercised by bivalent and quadrivalent vaccines shows that the bivalent vaccine could prevent more pre-cancerous lesions and cases of cervicocarcinoma than quadrivalent, and that the latter could prevent genital warts that are not prevented by bivalent. The major number of cases avoided by the bivalent make it possible to fully offset the cost savings related to warts associated with the quadrivalent vaccine. Furthermore, a cost-effectiveness analysis shows that, considering regional tariffs, the multiple cohort (12-year-old + 25-year-old women vaccination strategy with a 90% coverage could prevent 114 cases of cervicocarcinoma and 50 related deaths more than the vaccination of only 12-year-old girls, and thus proves to be cost-effective (9,841 €/QALY.

  18. Piemonte

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Gasparini

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In Piemonte region 82% of women (aged 24-64 are screened regularly, meaning every 3 years. The analysis on cross-protective activity exercised by bivalent and quadrivalent vaccines shows that the bivalent vaccine could prevent more pre-cancerous lesions and cases of cervicocarcinoma than quadrivalent, and that the latter could prevent genital warts that are not prevented by bivalent. The major number of cases avoided by the bivalent make it possible to fully offset the cost savings related to warts associated with the quadrivalent vaccine. Furthermore, a cost-effectiveness analysis shows that, considering regional tariffs, the multiple cohort (12-year-old + 25-year-old women vaccination strategy with a 90% coverage could prevent 33 cases of cervicocarcinoma and 15 related deaths more than the vaccination of only 12-year-old girls, and thus proves to be cost-effective (11,974 €/QALY.

  19. Umbria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Gasparini

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In Umbria region 85% of women (aged 24-64 are screened regularly, meaning every 3 years. The analysis on cross-protective activity exercised by bivalent and quadrivalent vaccines shows that the bivalent vaccine could prevent more pre-cancerous lesions and cases of cervicocarcinoma than quadrivalent, and that the latter could prevent genital warts that are not prevented by bivalent. The major number of cases avoided by the bivalent make it possible to fully offset the cost savings related to warts associated with the quadrivalent vaccine. Furthermore, a cost-effectiveness analysis shows that, considering regional tariffs, the multiple cohort (12-year-old + 25-year-old women vaccination strategy with a 90% coverage could prevent 6 cases of cervicocarcinoma and 3 related deaths more than the vaccination of only 12-year-old girls, and thus proves to be cost-effective (11,615 €/QALY.

  20. Calabria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Gasparini

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In Calabria region 56% of women (aged 24-64 are screened regularly, meaning every 3 years. The analysis on cross-protective activity exercised by bivalent and quadrivalent vaccines shows that the bivalent vaccine could prevent more pre-cancerous lesions and cases of cervicocarcinoma than quadrivalent, and that the latter could prevent genital warts that are not prevented by bivalent. The major number of cases avoided by the bivalent make it possible to fully offset the cost savings related to warts associated with the quadrivalent vaccine. Furthermore, a cost-effectiveness analysis shows that, considering regional tariffs, the multiple cohort (12-year-old + 25-year-old women vaccination strategy with a 90% coverage could prevent 37 cases of cervicocarcinoma and 17 related deaths more than the vaccination of only 12-year-old girls, and thus proves to be cost-effective (9,767 €/QALY.

  1. Lombardia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Gasparini

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In Lombardia region 75% of women (aged 24-64 are screened regularly, meaning every 3 years. The analysis on cross-protective activity exercised by bivalent and quadrivalent vaccines shows that the bivalent vaccine could prevent more pre-cancerous lesions and cases of cervicocarcinoma than quadrivalent, and that the latter could prevent genital warts that are not prevented by bivalent. The major number of cases avoided by the bivalent make it possible to fully offset the cost savings related to warts associated with the quadrivalent vaccine. Furthermore, a cost-effectiveness analysis shows that, considering regional tariffs, the multiple cohort (12-year-old + 25-year-old women vaccination strategy with a 90% coverage could prevent 92 cases of cervicocarcinoma and 42 related deaths more than the vaccination of only 12-year-old girls, and thus proves to be cost-effective (10,919 €/QALY.

  2. Marche

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Gasparini

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In Marche region 68% of women (aged 24-64 are screened regularly, meaning every 3 years. The analysis on cross-protective activity exercised by bivalent and quadrivalent vaccines shows that the bivalent vaccine could prevent more pre-cancerous lesions and cases of cervicocarcinoma than quadrivalent, and that the latter could prevent genital warts that are not prevented by bivalent. The major number of cases avoided by the bivalent make it possible to fully offset the cost savings related to warts associated with the quadrivalent vaccine. Furthermore, a cost-effectiveness analysis shows that, considering regional tariffs, the multiple cohort (12-year-old + 25-year-old women vaccination strategy with a 90% coverage could prevent 18 cases of cervicocarcinoma and 8 related deaths more than the vaccination of only 12-year-old girls, and thus proves to be cost-effective (10,700 €/QALY.

  3. Liguria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Gasparini

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In Liguria region 80% of women (aged 24-64 are screened regularly, meaning every 3 years. The analysis on cross-protective activity exercised by bivalent and quadrivalent vaccines shows that the bivalent vaccine could prevent more pre-cancerous lesions and cases of cervicocarcinoma than quadrivalent, and that the latter could prevent genital warts that are not prevented by bivalent. The major number of cases avoided by the bivalent make it possible to fully offset the cost savings related to warts associated with the quadrivalent vaccine. Furthermore, a cost-effectiveness analysis shows that, considering regional tariffs, the multiple cohort (12-year-old + 25-year-old women vaccination strategy with a 90% coverage could prevent 11 cases of cervicocarcinoma and 5 related deaths more than the vaccination of only 12-year-old girls, and thus proves to be cost-effective (11,122 €/QALY.

  4. Abruzzo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Gasparini

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In Abruzzo region 71% of women (aged 24-64 are screened regularly, meaning every 3 years. The analysis on cross-protective activity exercised by bivalent and quadrivalent vaccines shows that the bivalent vaccine could prevent more pre-cancerous lesions and cases of cervicocarcinoma than quadrivalent, and that the latter could prevent genital warts that are not prevented by bivalent. The major number of cases avoided by the bivalent make it possible to fully offset the cost savings related to warts associated with the quadrivalent vaccine. Furthermore, a cost-effectiveness analysis shows that, considering regional tariffs, the multiple cohort (12-year-old + 25-year-old women vaccination strategy with a 90% coverage could prevent 16 cases of cervicocarcinoma and 7 related deaths more than the vaccination of only 12-year-old girls, and thus proves to be cost-effective (10,393 €/QALY.

  5. Basilicata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Gasparini

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In Basilicata region 75% of women (aged 24-64 are screened regularly, meaning every 3 years. The analysis on cross-protective activity exercised by bivalent and quadrivalent vaccines shows that the bivalent vaccine could prevent more pre-cancerous lesions and cases of cervicocarcinoma than quadrivalent, and that the latter could prevent genital warts that are not prevented by bivalent. The major number of cases avoided by the bivalent make it possible to fully offset the cost savings related to warts associated with the quadrivalent vaccine. Furthermore, a cost-effectiveness analysis shows that, considering regional tariffs, the multiple cohort (12-year-old + 25-year-old women vaccination strategy with a 90% coverage could prevent 7 cases of cervicocarcinoma and 3 related deaths more than the vaccination of only 12-year-old girls, and thus proves to be cost-effective (10,933 €/QALY.

  6. Valle d’Aosta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Gasparini

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In Valle d’Aosta region 89% of women (aged 24-64 are screened regularly, meaning every 3 years. The analysis on cross-protective activity exercised by bivalent and quadrivalent vaccines shows that the bivalent vaccine could prevent more pre-cancerous lesions and cases of cervicocarcinoma than quadrivalent, and that the latter could prevent genital warts that are not prevented by bivalent. The major number of cases avoided by the bivalent make it possible to fully offset the cost savings related to warts associated with the quadrivalent vaccine. Furthermore, a cost-effectiveness analysis shows that, considering regional tariffs, the multiple cohort (12-year-old + 25-year-old women vaccination strategy with a 90% coverage could prevent 1 case of cervicocarcinoma more than the vaccination of only 12-year-old girls, and thus proves to be cost-effective (11,365 €/QALY.

  7. Trento

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Gasparini

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In the province of Trento 80% of women (aged 24-64 are screened regularly, meaning every 3 years. The analysis on cross-protective activity exercised by bivalent and quadrivalent vaccines shows that the bivalent vaccine could prevent more pre-cancerous lesions and cases of cervicocarcinoma than quadrivalent, and that the latter could prevent genital warts that are not prevented by bivalent. The major number of cases avoided by the bivalent make it possible to fully offset the cost savings related to warts associated with the quadrivalent vaccine. Furthermore, a cost-effectiveness analysis shows that, considering regional tariffs, the multiple cohort (12-year-old + 25-year-old women vaccination strategy with a 90% coverage could prevent 5 cases of cervicocarcinoma and 2 related deaths more than the vaccination of only 12-year-old girls, and thus proves to be cost-effective (11,029 €/QALY.

  8. Toscana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Gasparini

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In Toscana region 83% of women (aged 24-64 are screened regularly, meaning every 3 years. The analysis on cross-protective activity exercised by bivalent and quadrivalent vaccines shows that the bivalent vaccine could prevent more pre-cancerous lesions and cases of cervicocarcinoma than quadrivalent, and that the latter could prevent genital warts that are not prevented by bivalent. The major number of cases avoided by the bivalent make it possible to fully offset the cost savings related to warts associated with the quadrivalent vaccine. Furthermore, a cost-effectiveness analysis shows that, considering regional tariffs, the multiple cohort (12-year-old + 25-year-old women vaccination strategy with a 90% coverage could prevent 27 cases of cervicocarcinoma and 12 related deaths more than the vaccination of only 12-year-old girls, and thus proves to be cost-effective (11,466 €/QALY.

  9. Sicilia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Gasparini

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In Sicilia region 64% of women (aged 24-64 are screened regularly, meaning every 3 years. The analysis on cross-protective activity exercised by bivalent and quadrivalent vaccines shows that the bivalent vaccine could prevent more pre-cancerous lesions and cases of cervicocarcinoma than quadrivalent, and that the latter could prevent genital warts that are not prevented by bivalent. The major number of cases avoided by the bivalent make it possible to fully offset the cost savings related to warts associated with the quadrivalent vaccine. Furthermore, a cost-effectiveness analysis shows that, considering regional tariffs, the multiple cohort (12-year-old + 25-year-old women vaccination strategy with a 90% coverage could prevent 82 cases of cervicocarcinoma and 37 related deaths more than the vaccination of only 12-year-old girls, and thus proves to be cost-effective (10,534 €/QALY.

  10. Molise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Gasparini

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In Molise region 75% of women (aged 24-64 are screened regularly, meaning every 3 years. The analysis on cross-protective activity exercised by bivalent and quadrivalent vaccines shows that the bivalent vaccine could prevent more pre-cancerous lesions and cases of cervicocarcinoma than quadrivalent, and that the latter could prevent genital warts that are not prevented by bivalent. The major number of cases avoided by the bivalent make it possible to fully offset the cost savings related to warts associated with the quadrivalent vaccine. Furthermore, a cost-effectiveness analysis shows that, considering regional tariffs, the multiple cohort (12-year-old + 25-year-old women vaccination strategy with a 90% coverage could prevent 3 cases of cervicocarcinoma and 1 related death more than the vaccination of only 12-year-old girls, and thus proves to be cost-effective (10,517 €/QALY.

  11. Friuli-Venezia Giulia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Gasparini

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In Friuli-Venezia Giulia region 86% of women (aged 24-64 are screened regularly, meaning every 3 years. The analysis on cross-protective activity exercised by bivalent and quadrivalent vaccines shows that the bivalent vaccine could prevent more pre-cancerous lesions and cases of cervicocarcinoma than quadrivalent, and that the latter could prevent genital warts that are not prevented by bivalent. The major number of cases avoided by the bivalent make it possible to fully offset the cost savings related to warts associated with the quadrivalent vaccine. Furthermore, a cost-effectiveness analysis shows that, considering regional tariffs, the multiple cohort (12-year-old + 25-year-old women vaccination strategy with a 90% coverage could prevent 8 cases of cervicocarcinoma and 3 related deaths more than the vaccination of only 12-year-old girls, and thus proves to be cost-effective (11,960 €/QALY.

  12. Emilia Romagna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Gasparini

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In Emilia Romagna region 84% of women (aged 24-64 are screened regularly, meaning every 3 years. The analysis on cross-protective activity exercised by bivalent and quadrivalent vaccines shows that the bivalent vaccine could prevent more pre-cancerous lesions and cases of cervicocarcinoma than quadrivalent, and that the latter could prevent genital warts that are not prevented by bivalent. The major number of cases avoided by the bivalent make it possible to fully offset the cost savings related to warts associated with the quadrivalent vaccine. Furthermore, a cost-effectiveness analysis shows that, considering regional tariffs, the multiple cohort (12-year-old + 25-year-old women vaccination strategy with a 90% coverage could prevent 29 cases of cervicocarcinoma and 14 related deaths more than the vaccination of only 12-year-old girls, and thus proves to be cost-effective (13,352 €/QALY.

  13. Bolzano

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Gasparini

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In the province of Bolzano 86% of women (aged 24-64 are screened regularly, meaning every 3 years. The analysis on cross-protective activity exercised by bivalent and quadrivalent vaccines shows that the bivalent vaccine could prevent more pre-cancerous lesions and cases of cervicocarcinoma than quadrivalent, and that the latter could prevent genital warts that are not prevented by bivalent. The major number of cases avoided by the bivalent make it possible to fully offset the cost savings related to warts associated with the quadrivalent vaccine. Furthermore, a cost-effectiveness analysis shows that, considering regional tariffs, the multiple cohort (12-year-old + 25-year-old women vaccination strategy with a 90% coverage could prevent 4 cases of cervicocarcinoma and 2 related deaths more than the vaccination of only 12-year-old girls, and thus proves to be cost-effective (11,035 €/QALY.

  14. Veneto

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Gasparini

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In Veneto region 85% of women (aged 24-64 are screened regularly, meaning every 3 years. The analysis on cross-protective activity exercised by bivalent and quadrivalent vaccines shows that the bivalent vaccine could prevent more pre-cancerous lesions and cases of cervicocarcinoma than quadrivalent, and that the latter could prevent genital warts that are not prevented by bivalent. The major number of cases avoided by the bivalent make it possible to fully offset the cost savings related to warts associated with the quadrivalent vaccine. Furthermore, a cost-effectiveness analysis shows that, considering regional tariffs, the multiple cohort (12-year-old + 25-year-old women vaccination strategy with a 90% coverage could prevent 35 cases of cervicocarcinoma and 16 related deaths more than the vaccination of only 12-year-old girls, and thus proves to be cost-effective (11,962 €/QALY.

  15. Sardegna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Gasparini

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In Sardegna region 75% of women (aged 24-64 are screened regularly, meaning every 3 years. The analysis on cross-protective activity exercised by bivalent and quadrivalent vaccines shows that the bivalent vaccine could prevent more pre-cancerous lesions and cases of cervicocarcinoma than quadrivalent, and that the latter could prevent genital warts that are not prevented by bivalent. The major number of cases avoided by the bivalent make it possible to fully offset the cost savings related to warts associated with the quadrivalent vaccine. Furthermore, a cost-effectiveness analysis shows that, considering regional tariffs, the multiple cohort (12-year-old + 25-year-old women vaccination strategy with a 90% coverage could prevent 17 cases of cervicocarcinoma and 8 related deaths more than the vaccination of only 12-year-old girls, and thus proves to be cost-effective (10,841 €/QALY.

  16. Lazio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Gasparini

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In Lazio region 79% of women (aged 24-64 are screened regularly, meaning every 3 years. The analysis on cross-protective activity exercised by bivalent and quadrivalent vaccines shows that the bivalent vaccine could prevent more pre-cancerous lesions and cases of cervicocarcinoma than quadrivalent, and that the latter could prevent genital warts that are not prevented by bivalent. The major number of cases avoided by the bivalent make it possible to fully offset the cost savings related to warts associated with the quadrivalent vaccine. Furthermore, a cost-effectiveness analysis shows that, considering regional tariffs, the multiple cohort (12-year-old + 25-year-old women vaccination strategy with a 90% coverage could prevent 51 cases of cervicocarcinoma and 23 related deaths more than the vaccination of only 12-year-old girls, and thus proves to be cost-effective (8,555 €/QALY.

  17. Puglia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Gasparini

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In Puglia region 58% of women (aged 24-64 are screened regularly, meaning every 3 years. The analysis on cross-protective activity exercised by bivalent and quadrivalent vaccines shows that the bivalent vaccine could prevent more pre-cancerous lesions and cases of cervicocarcinoma than quadrivalent, and that the latter could prevent genital warts that are not prevented by bivalent. The major number of cases avoided by the bivalent make it possible to fully offset the cost savings related to warts associated with the quadrivalent vaccine. Furthermore, a cost-effectiveness analysis shows that, considering regional tariffs, the multiple cohort (12-year-old + 25-year-old women vaccination strategy with a 90% coverage could prevent 70 cases of cervicocarcinoma and 31 related deaths more than the vaccination of only 12-year-old girls, and thus proves to be cost-effective (9,935 €/QALY.

  18. A Case Report of Changes of Dysplasia and Multiple Malignancies in a Patient with Epidermodysplasia Verruciformis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ansar

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Epidermodysplasia verruciformis(EV is a very rare, chronic and inherited disorder characterized by widespread and persistent HPV infection. EV Patients present with widespread, discrete or confluent lesions that clinically indistinguishable from plane warts , scaly hyper or hypopigmented macules closely resemble pityriasis versicolor, and thicker plaques may resemble seborrbeic keratosis. Susceptibility to the virus is inherited, usually autosomal recessive. The disease usually manifests in childhood and continue throughout the life. The most important complication is cutaneous changes of dysplasia and malignancy.Case Report: We report a 19 years old boy with clinical and histopathological findings compatible with EV and cutaneous changes of dysplasia and malignancy.Conclusion: We concluded that in patients with combination of plane warts, pityriasis versicolor-like lesions and reddish plaques, it may be considered EV, and it is recommended to evaluate cutaneous changes of dysplasia and malignancy.

  19. Scanning electron microscopy of ascospores of Debaryomyces and Saccharomyces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtzman, C P; Smiley, M J; Baker, F L

    1975-02-28

    Ascospores from species of Debaryomyces and the Torulaspora-group of Saccharomyces were examined by scanning electron microscopy. Ornamentation on ascospores of D. hansenii varied from short to long interconnected ridges or broad based, elongated conical protuberances. A spiral rigde system was detected on the ascospores of D. marama, but wart-like protuberances occurred on those of D. cantarelli, D. castellii, D. coudertii, D. formicarius, D. phaffii, D. vanriji and D. yarrowii. Ascospores of D. halotolerans did not have protuberances and the species appears to be identical with Pichia farinosa. Wart-like protuberances also were found on ascospores of S. delbrueckii, S. microellipsodes, S. rosei, S. inconspicuus, S. fermentati, S. montanus and S. vafer, but the ascospore surface of S. pretoriensis was covered by fine ridges. Short tapered ridges covered the ascospores of S. kloeckerianus.

  20. Early Development of Squamous Cell Carsinoma in Two Sister Cases with pidermodysplasia Verruciformis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ömer Çalka

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Epidermodysplasia verruciformis (Lewandowsky-Lutz syndrome is an uncommon disease characterized by multiple plane warts, pityriasis versicolor-like lesions, defects of cell-mediated immunity, and tendency to develop skin malignancies, primarily on sun-exposed areas. Most commonly it is inherited as an autosomal recessive trait. Squamous cell carcinoma is the most common type of skin cancer found in patient with epidermodysplasia verruciformis. Human papilloma virus 5, 8, and 47 are found in more than 90% of epidermodysplasia verruciformis skin cancers. Treatment for epidermodysplasia verruciformis consists largely of preventive measures. Photoprotection remains essential for management. In this report, two sister case of epidermodisplasia verruciformis with plane warts, pityriasis versicolor-like lesions, and squamous cell carcinomas on sun-exposed areas of skin was presented for it is a rarely encountered disease and associated with early development of malignancy.

  1. Factors associated with type-specific persistence of high-risk human papillomavirus infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stensen, Signe; Kjær, Susanne Krüger; Jensen, Signe Marie

    2016-01-01

    on hospitalisations, prescriptions and socioeconomic factors were obtained from nationwide registers. Women with abnormal cytology at baseline or who had undergone conisation during follow-up were excluded. Factors associated with persistence were identified by logistic regression analysis. The overall rate of HR HPV...... persistence was 31.4%. The risk for persistence was significantly increased among women with a previous episode of genital warts (OR, 1.35; 95% CI, 1.04-1.74), current use of oral contraceptives (OR, 1.35; 95% CI, 1.13-1.63) or use of systemic glucocorticoids (OR, 2.04; 95% CI, 1.16-3.56). The number...... of pregnancies or births or use of a hormonal intrauterine device, hormonal therapy or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs was not associated with risk for HR HPV persistence. A history of genital warts and current use of oral contraceptives or systemic glucocorticoids increased the risk, potentially indicating...

  2. Profile Of Sexually Transmitted Diseases In A Clinic In The Suburb Of Kolkata (West Bengal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaiswal A K

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Records of new STD patients attending the Base Hospital, Barrackpore, near Kolkata between 1991 and 2000 were analysed to examine the pattern of STDs among them. Among 567 new STD patients examined, syphilis predominated, followed by gonorrhoea, chancroid, genital warts, lymphogramuloma venereum and herpes genitalis. Non- gonococcal urethritis constituted 4.2% of study population. The overall HIV seropositivity showed a rising treads in the recent past.

  3. Tuberculate fruit gene Tu encodes a C2 H2 zinc finger protein that is required for the warty fruit phenotype in cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xuqin; Zhang, Weiwei; He, Huanle; Nie, Jingtao; Bie, Beibei; Zhao, Junlong; Ren, Guoliang; Li, Yue; Zhang, Dabing; Pan, Junsong; Cai, Run

    2014-06-01

    Cucumber fruits that have tubercules and spines (trichomes) are known to possess a warty (Wty) phenotype. In this study, the tuberculate fruit gene Tu was identified by map-based cloning, and was found to encode a transcription factor (TF) with a single C2 H2 zinc finger domain. Tu was identified in all 38 Wty lines examined, and was completely absent from all 56 non-warty (nWty) lines. Cucumber plants transgenic for Tu (TCP) revealed that Tu was required for the Wty fruit phenotype. Subcellular localization showed that the fusion protein GFP-Tu was localized mainly to the nucleus. Based on analyses of semi-quantitative and quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and mRNA in situ hybridization, we found that Tu was expressed specifically in fruit spine cells during development of fruit tubercules. Moreover, cytokinin (CTK) content measurements and cytological observations in Wty and nWty fruits revealed that the Wty fruit phenotype correlated with high endogenous CTK concentrations. As a result of further analyses on the transcriptomic profile of the nWty fruit epidermis and TCP fruit warts, expression of CTK-associated genes, and hormone content in nWty fruit epidermis, Wty fruit warts and epidermis, and TCP fruit warts and epidermis, we found that Tu probably promoted CTK biosynthesis in fruit warts. Here we show that Tu could not be expressed in the glabrous and tubercule-free mutant line gl that contained Tu, this result that futher confirmed the epistatic effect of the trichome (spine) gene Gl over Tu. Taken together, these data led us to propose a genetic pathway for the Wty fruit trait that could guide future mechanistic studies.

  4. [Pain caused by breeding: definition, judgment, pathogenesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzog, A

    1997-02-01

    Special terms of the "German Animal Protection Law (section 11b)"and the "European Agreement for Protection of Domestic Animals" particularly "torture-breeding, genetic characteristics, well-being, soundness, pains, injuries and specific use" are commented. Examples of torture-breedings are discussed: Dog (Merle-faktor, brachycephalie, atrichosis), cat (Mans-factor, W-gene, folded-ears), birds (tuffs, ear-drops, tailesness, hypertrophy of bill-warts, abnormal position of tarsal-joints, hypertrophy of imposing behavior).

  5. Ectopic sebaceous glands in the esophagus: A case report and review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhat Ramachandra

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Ectopic sebaceous glands occur rarely in the esophagus. A 65-year-old man presented with a history of discomfort during swallowing since the last 4 months. On upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, multiple wart-like grayish-yellow projections were detected and two of them were biopsied. Microscopically, they proved to be sebaceous glands in the esophagus. Histogenesis of this rare lesion is discussed in this case report.

  6. Pattern of skin disease in Hail region of Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fawwaz Al Shammrie

    2017-07-01

    Conclusion: Dermatitis, acne, vitiligo, alopecia, viral wart and psoriasis are the most common top six skin diseases in hail region compared to other previous study in Hail region. The prevalence of skin disease in any community depends upon various factors, namely the genetic, racial constitution, the social and hygienic standards, customs and occupations, the nutritional status, age structure of the community, climatic factors and state of industrialization.

  7. Molecular epidemiology of sexually transmitted human papillomavirus in a self referred group of women in Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Menton, John F

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Human papillomavirus (HPV) causes cervical cancer and external genital warts. The purpose of this study is to document the genotype distribution of HPV in females aged between 18 and 34 who self-referred to an STI clinic with visible external genital warts (EGW). Scrapings were taken from visible external genital warts (EGW). These scrapings were analysed by PCR for the presence of HPV DNA. Positive samples were then genotyped by means of a commercially available assay (LiPA). A comparison of genotyping results determined by the LiPA assay and direct amplicon DNA sequencing was also performed. RESULTS: Ninety-two patients out of 105 samples (88%) had detectable levels of HPV DNA. The majority of individuals with EGW (66%) showed the presence of two or more genotypes. The most common HPV genotypes present in the study population were HPV-6, HPV-11, HPV-16, HPV-18, HPV-33 and HPV-53. Potential effects of vaccination on HPV molecular epidemiology indicate that 40% of the patients could have been protected from the high risk genotypes HPV-16 and HPV-18. CONCLUSION: This is the first report of the molecular epidemiology of external genital warts in women aged between 18 and 34 from Ireland based on results from a LiPA assay. The study shows that most individuals are infected with multiple genotypes including those with high oncogenic potential and that the newly available HPV vaccines could have a significant impact on prevalence of the most common HPV genotypes in this study population.

  8. The Interaction of Steroid Hormones and Oncogene in Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-10-01

    appeared swollen exhibiting a classic case of mastitis due to the failure to release milk that is produced. A couple of unique wart-like structures...with their associated eye, nose and brain portions are shown in Figure 16. The bitransgenic head section (panel A, BG) showed possible hydrocephaly... mastitis ). As previously mentioned, it was most likely that the levels of int- 2/fgf-3 expression are enormously higher than that needed for

  9. Penile Shaft : An Unusual Location For Skin Tags

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thami Gurvinder P

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Skin tags or acrochordons, commonly observed in the flexural surfaces and various folds of skin, are more frequently encountered in presence of obesity, diagetes and old age. Although lesions are quite characteristic clinically, at times these need to be differentiated from warts, fibromas and other benign tumors of skin and their appendages. A rare case with presence of skin tags over the shaft of penis is described.

  10. Virus papiloma humano y cáncer cérvico-uterino

    OpenAIRE

    O'Ryan G,Miguel; VALENZUELA,MARÍA TERESA

    2008-01-01

    Molecular, clinical and epidemiolagical studies have established beyond doubt that human papiloma viruses (HPV) cause cervical cancer. The virus is also associated with genital warts and other less common cancers in oropharynx, vulva, vagina and penis. Worldwide, VPH genotypes 16 and 18 are the most common high risk genotypes, detected in near 70% of women with cervical cáncer. The discovery of a cause-effect relationship between several carcinogenic microorganisms and cancer open avenues for...

  11. Use of Body Surface Heat Patterns for Predicting and Evaluating Acute Lower Extremity Pain Among Soldiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-31

    for plantar fasciitis . Both produced abnormal thermograms. One had been abnormal during the baseline period. One subject was seen for heel blisters...nerve damage (sciatic, peroneal, sural, mixed with lower limb weakness), two ankle pain, two plantar warts, and two generalized leg pain with no know...open skin wound, rash, or a fresh surgery scar this procedure was not performed. At the early stages of the study we tried to get a contact thermograph

  12. Benign Papules and Nodules of Oral Mucosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Salih Gürel

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews some of the more common benign oral papules and nodules of oral mucosa with emphasis on their etiology, epidemiology, clinical presentation, histopathology, and treatment. These lesions include mucocele, traumatic fibroma, epulis, pyogenic granuloma, oral papilloma, oral warts, lymphangioma, hemangioma, lipoma, oral nevi and some soft tissue benign tumors. These benign lesions must be separated clinically and histologically from precancerous and malign neoplastic lesions. Accurate clinico-pathological diagnosis is mandatory to insure appropriate therapy.

  13. Medical Surveillance Monthly Report (MSMR). Volume 17, Number 08, August 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-01

    THIS PAGE unclassified Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 2 VOL. 17 / NO. 08 deployments and high operational stresses (e.g...housing arrangements may also play roles and off er opportunities for targeted prevention.6 Human papillomavirus (HPV), the cause of genital warts ...U.S. Armed Forces, January 2004-August 2010 aIncludes behavioral health, combat stress and substance abuse referrals. bRecord of inpatient or

  14. Divergent Collaboration (service mark)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-01

    Resiliency Workshop 4.1.1. Resiliency Challenge Statement Every day the men and women in our armed forces are placed in highly stressful situations...others. If they don’t believe strongly in that, they have problems over there. But when they come home and they see all of the country’s warts ...music, senses) 3. Products • Tone changes to maintain alertness • Stress Assessment with heightened alertness • Functional movement screen • Cycle

  15. Chemical Genetic Screens for TDP-43 Modifiers and ALS Drug Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    appendix 22, Figure 3) by protecting against cellular stress (see appendix 22, Figure 6). This compound was used as a positive control for setting up...B011 Avermectin B1 (Insecticide) insectiside, antihelmintic C011 HYPERICIN antibiotic/kinases/St John wart /DA B-hydroxylase D007 DEOXYPHORBOL...Neurodegeneration in C. elegans. Plos One 7, e31321 (2012). 2 Vaccaro, A. et al. TDP-1/TDP-43 Regulates Stress Signaling and Age-Dependent Proteotoxicity in

  16. The Real Long War: The Illicit Drug Trade and the Role of the Military

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    institutional preference for a return to the land warfare-fighting ethos that preced- ed the current stress on counterterrorism operations, the Army is...reflect the societies they seek to protect, warts and all. For all that, some have suggested that the mili- tary could have a minor role in...laboration at a transnational level. Nonetheless, most analysts stress the criti- cal importance of attacking this element of the DTO system. Attacking

  17. Serial Sectioning Methods for Generating 3D Characterization Data of Grain- and Precipitate-Scale Microstructures (Preprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    Alkemper and Voorhees 2001, Spo- wart et al 2003), as well as software programs that take in the raw data stack and provide as output reconstructions...the local stress -state for the 3D volume, or the material itself is sensitive to environmental exposure. Manual demonstrations of this...Lund AC, Voorhees PW (2002) The effect of elastic stress on microstructural development: the three-dimensional microstructure of a - ʹ alloy. Acta

  18. Sinecatechins: Effects on HPV-Induced Enzymes Involved in Inflammatory Mediator Generation

    OpenAIRE

    Stephen K. Tyring

    2012-01-01

    Background: Based on published studies, the biological properties of green tea catechins are antiviral, antioxidative, anticarcinogenic, antiangiogenic, and immunostimulatory. The United States Food and Drug Administration has approved a topical ointment formulation of sinecatechins, derived from green tea catechins and other tea components, for the treatment of external genital and perianal warts. The exact mechanism of action of sinecatechins in eradication of human papillomavirus-induced e...

  19. Analytical Yield Criterion for an Anisotropic Material Containing Spherical Voids and Exhibiting Tension-Compression Asymmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-01

    factll rights reserved. wart ), cazacu@reef.ufl.eduthat it was deduced based on micromechanical considerations. Several modifications of Gurson’s (1977...non-zero anisotropy coefficients for three-dimensional stress conditions. Assuming triaxial loading conditions aligned with the material symmetry axes...a spherical void, subjected to plane- stress conditions, were performed for various initial porosities and different values of the anisotropy

  20. Incidence rate of external genital lesions (EGL) caused by human papillomavirus infection in Czech population

    OpenAIRE

    Petráš, Marek

    2016-01-01

    Incidence of external genital lesions (EGL) caused by human papillomaviruses in the Czech population Marek Petráš Abstract Genital warts (condyloma acuminate) caused up to 90% cases by two human papillomaviruses of type 6 and 11 are not life-threatening diseases but can cause not only clinical symptoms (burning, itching, bleeding, and pain) but also psychosocial stress, embarrassment, and anxiety making for impaired quality of life. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to determine the p...