WorldWideScience

Sample records for warriors enjoy summer

  1. Wordsmiths & Warriors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane Mattisson

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Wordsmiths & Warriors relates a real journey of thousands of miles undertaken by David and Hilary Crystal. The result is a fascinating combination of English-language history and travelogue (the study gives detailed instructions on how to find each place mentioned. David is responsible for the descriptions, and Hilary, for the full-colour photographs. The book comprises a guide for those wishing to follow in their footsteps; at the same time, it reflects the chronology of the language. The Crystals visit places associated with such well-known writers as Chaucer, Shakespeare, and Wordsworth; dictionary compilers such as Johnson and Murray; and a number of well-known and lesser-known dialect writers, elocutionists, and grammarians. Warrior wordsmiths such as King Alfred are also mentioned.Wordsmiths & Warriors emphasises the centrality of the Anglo-Saxon, medieval and early modern periods in the development of the English language as it is known today. A progressive view of language change and transition is generally avoided in the study in favor of a more personal selection of texts. The scope of the book is wide, incorporating small villages as well as major cities, ancient texts and more modern ones. Fifty-seven chapters take us to places as far apart as St Albans, Peterborough, West Malvern, Grasmere, Bath, Pegwell Bay, Lindisfarne, Cerne Abbas, Bourne, Canterbury, and Oxford. Wordsmiths & Warriors gives its readers an appetite to know more as fascinating details about the relationship between places and literary works emerge. The most important names are included: Chaucer (Southwark and Canterbury; Shakespeare (Stratford-upon-Avon and Park Street, London – the location of the original Globe Theatre, Dryden, Burns, Wordsworth, Hardy, George Bernard Shaw, and Dylan Thomas. The Bible is discussed in detail in relation to a number of geographical locations, including Lutterworth, Leicestershire, where Wycliffe translated the Bible in the 14th

  2. SEO Warrior

    CERN Document Server

    Jerkovic, John

    2010-01-01

    How can you make it easier for people to find your website? And how can you convert casual visitors into active users? SEO Warrior shows you how it's done through a collection of tried and true techniques, hacks, and best practices. Learn the nuts and bolts of search engine optimization (SEO) theory, the importance of keyword strategy, and how to avoid and remedy search engine traps. You'll also learn about search engine marketing (SEM) practices, such as Google AdWords, and how you can use social networking to increase your visibility. Ideal for web developers, savvy marketers, webmasters,

  3. Network Warrior

    CERN Document Server

    Donahue, Gary

    2011-01-01

    Pick up where certification exams leave off. With this practical, in-depth guide to the entire network infrastructure, you'll learn how to deal with real Cisco networks, rather than the hypothetical situations presented on exams like the CCNA. Network Warrior takes you step by step through the world of routers, switches, firewalls, and other technologies based on the author's extensive field experience. You'll find new content for MPLS, IPv6, VoIP, and wireless in this completely revised second edition, along with examples of Cisco Nexus 5000 and 7000 switches throughout. Topics include: An

  4. Training the Cyber Warrior

    OpenAIRE

    Fulp, J.D.

    2003-01-01

    This paper suggests the major educational components of a curriculum that is designed to educate individuals for job assignments as Information Assurance professionals - also known as: cyber warriors. It suggests a minimum common body of knowledge for all cyber warriors along with two major specialization categories: cyber tacticians and cyber strategists. The paper describes the distinction between tactician and strategist and offers a rough outline of the education each should receive.

  5. Printing Ancient Terracotta Warriors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadecki, Victoria L.

    2010-01-01

    Standing in awe in Xian, China, at the Terra Cotta warrior archaeological site, the author thought of sharing this experience and excitement with her sixth-grade students. She decided to let her students carve patterns of the ancient soldiers to understand their place in Chinese history. They would make block prints and print multiple soldiers on…

  6. Warrior culture, spirituality, and prayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malmin, Mark

    2013-09-01

    Research has shown an increase in suicides by military veterans and law enforcement officers in the United States. Etiologic research elucidates warrior culture and subculture as contributing factors of this pathology. This paper examines the idiosyncratic nature and influence of warrior culture and subculture and offers recommendations to promote culture change. Faith-based spirituality and prayer are examined as adjunct modalities for stress management and emotional healing. Further research is recommended to assess the associated hidden cost factors and long-term financial impact of warrior culture on society.

  7. All aboard the Rainbow Warrior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, I.

    1980-01-01

    An account is given of the attempt by Rainbow Warrior to intercept Pacific Swan at Cherbourg Harbour, to protest against the transport of spent nuclear fuel from England to France for reprocessing. (U.K.)

  8. Enjoying the Law

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerre, Henrik Jøker

    2005-01-01

    of the concept of enjoyment is instructive, and looking at it more closely makes it possible to spell out why obedience in itself does not suffice for a moral existence. Subjecting ourselves to the prescriptions of positive law might actually function as a way of escaping the insatiable demands of the moral law....... In this case, the positive law not only sustains our enjoyment (by securing basic liberties), but also comes to function as an object of enjoyment itself....

  9. Warrior Ethos Revisited: Implications for the Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-15

    relativism institutionally with an unambiguous imperative to align ethical behavior with the Warrior Ethos and Army Values instilled in leaders of...TERMS Creed, Ethics , Warrior, Ethos, Profession 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 19a. NAME OF...the Future FORMAT: Strategy Research Project DATE: 15 March 2011 WORD COUNT: 5,795 PAGES: 28 KEY TERMS: Creed, Ethics , Warrior, Ethos

  10. Defense.gov Special Report: Warrior Care Month - 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Operation Base Shank, Afghanistan, May 6, 2012. Story Vice Chairman Joins Warriors for Softball Classic Navy single during his final time at bat during the third annual Wounded Warriors Celebrity Softball Classic Wounded Warriors Celebrity Softball Classic in Washington D.C. Story Army Vice Chief, Warriors Share Their

  11. Making Accounting Tutorials Enjoyable

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bargate, Karen

    2018-01-01

    This paper emanates from a case study which focussed on 15 Managerial Accounting and Financial Management (MAFM) students' "enjoyment" of learning MAFM in an 18-week Writing Intensive Tutorial (WIT) programme. Interactive Qualitative Analysis (IQA) was used for the research design and as a data analysis tool. Following IQA protocols…

  12. Department of Defense Recovering Warrior Task Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-02

    accessible and available to the Veterans Benefits Administration ( VBA ) as soon as possible381; however, because military service records include health...programs are meeting expectations ........................................... 35 Facilitating Access to Health Care...Enduring RW Mission, Facilitating RW Recovery and Transition, and Facilitating Access to Health Care. SUMMARY 2  DoD Recovering Warrior Task Force

  13. Measuring the Success of Warrior Transition Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-04-30

    overworked case managers.”1 They described patients and family members who were frustrated with the “messy bureaucratic battlefield”2 of Walter Reed...on every Warrior that includes an analysis of suicide risk, violence towards others, medication use, falls, driving, alcohol, non-prescribed drug use

  14. "Jade Warrior" sai Hispaanias kolm preemiat

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2007-01-01

    Eesti osalusega Soome-Hiina kung fu film "Igavese armastuse sõdalane - Jade Warrior" võitis 1. Ibiza ja Formentera filmifestivalil kolm Falco d'Ori auhinda (AJ Annila - parim debüüt-lavastaja, Jukka Uusitalo - filmikunstniku töö eest, Henri Blomberg - operaatritöö eest)

  15. U.S. Special Forces: Culture Warriors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    definitions include:  “ culture is that complex whole which includes knowledge, beliefs, art, law, morals , custom, and any other capabilities and habits...perceptions towards others, such as ethnocentrism, cultural relativism , stereotypes, biases and worldview. Readings: ARSOF 2022, Special Warfare, Vol. 26...FORCES: CULTURE WARRIORS by Joshua L. Hill December 2014 Thesis Advisor: Heather S. Gregg Second Reader: Robert Burks THIS PAGE

  16. The Falling Rate of Enjoyment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Presskorn-Thygesen, Thomas; Bjerg, Ole

    2014-01-01

    The article explores the relation between consumer capitalism and Compulsive Buying Disorder. A theoretical approach to the study of consumption and enjoyment is developed using Baudrillard and Lacan, and existing literature on compulsive buying is reviewed using the theory. It is argued that enj......The article explores the relation between consumer capitalism and Compulsive Buying Disorder. A theoretical approach to the study of consumption and enjoyment is developed using Baudrillard and Lacan, and existing literature on compulsive buying is reviewed using the theory. It is argued...... disturbance in her identity as consumer. The analysis of Compulsive Buying Disorder is furthermore applied in diagnosing the role of enjoyment in contemporary consumer capitalism....

  17. Music enjoyment with cochlear implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prevoteau, Charlotte; Chen, Stephanie Y; Lalwani, Anil K

    2018-10-01

    Since the advent of cochlear implant (CI) surgery in the 1960s, there have been remarkable technological and surgical advances enabling excellent speech perception in quiet with many CI users able to use the telephone. However, many CI users struggle with music perception, particularly with the pitch-based and melodic elements of music. Yet remarkably, despite poor music perception, many CI users enjoy listening to music based on self-report questionnaires, and prospective studies have suggested a disassociation between music perception and enjoyment. Music enjoyment is arguably a more functional measure of one's listening experience, and thus enhancing one's listening experience is a worthy goal. Recent studies have shown that re-engineering music to reduce its complexity may enhance enjoyment in CI users and also delineate differences in musical preferences from normal hearing listeners. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Examining Enjoyment of Casual Videogames.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafer, Daniel M; Carbonara, Corey P

    2015-12-01

    This study investigated the processes leading to enjoyment of casual videogames on both mobile devices and console systems. Building upon a foundation in mental models theory and the psychology of play, the study focuses on how performance and experience-based variables impact enjoyment of casual videogames played on mobile devices and console devices. The grounding assumption of this research is that playing videogames produces enjoyment that contributes to mental health in the form of a brief distraction from the stress of daily life, social connections with family and friends through casual gameplay, and, in some cases, a compelling reason to engage in physical activity. A student sample of players (n=363) played a variety of casual games on mobile (iPad(®) or iPod(®) Touch(®) [Apple, Cupertino, CA]) or console (Wii™ [Nintendo, Japan], Xbox(®) 360 Kinect(®) [Microsoft, Redmond, WA], or PS3™ Move [Sony, Tokyo, Japan]) platforms. They then answered a questionnaire assessing their evaluations of the game's interactivity level, their sense of spatial presence in the game, their perception of the game's realism, and, most importantly, their enjoyment. Path analysis demonstrated the interrelationships among these variables. The results show that spatial presence is a powerful predictor of videogame enjoyment for both console- and mobile-based casual games. Patterns of prediction for games on each platform, as demonstrated using path analysis, were similar and aligned with predictions based on mental models and the psychology of play. The psychological theory of play and the mental models perspective offer firm theoretical grounds for understanding how enjoyment is wrought in the process of playing casual games. The relationships among interactivity, spatial presence, perceived reality, and enjoyment hold for games played on handheld or console devices. Furthermore, this study is one of the first to demonstrate these relationships and test them simultaneously

  19. A female Viking warrior confirmed by genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedenstierna-Jonson, Charlotte; Kjellström, Anna; Zachrisson, Torun; Krzewińska, Maja; Sobrado, Veronica; Price, Neil; Günther, Torsten; Jakobsson, Mattias; Götherström, Anders; Storå, Jan

    2017-12-01

    The objective of this study has been to confirm the sex and the affinity of an individual buried in a well-furnished warrior grave (Bj 581) in the Viking Age town of Birka, Sweden. Previously, based on the material and historical records, the male sex has been associated with the gender of the warrior and such was the case with Bj 581. An earlier osteological classification of the individual as female was considered controversial in a historical and archaeological context. A genomic confirmation of the biological sex of the individual was considered necessary to solve the issue. Genome-wide sequence data was generated in order to confirm the biological sex, to support skeletal integrity, and to investigate the genetic relationship of the individual to ancient individuals as well as modern-day groups. Additionally, a strontium isotope analysis was conducted to highlight the mobility of the individual. The genomic results revealed the lack of a Y-chromosome and thus a female biological sex, and the mtDNA analyses support a single-individual origin of sampled elements. The genetic affinity is close to present-day North Europeans, and within Sweden to the southern and south-central region. Nevertheless, the Sr values are not conclusive as to whether she was of local or nonlocal origin. The identification of a female Viking warrior provides a unique insight into the Viking society, social constructions, and exceptions to the norm in the Viking time-period. The results call for caution against generalizations regarding social orders in past societies. © 2017 The Authors American Journal of Physical Anthropology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. WARRIOR II, a high performance modular electric robot system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Downton, G.C.

    1996-01-01

    Initially designed for in-reactor welding by the Central Electricity Generating Board, WARRIOR has been developed using the concept of modular technology to become a light-weight, high performance robotic system. Research work on existing machines for in-reactor inspection and repair and heavy duty hydraulic manipulators was progressed in order to develop WARRIOR II, a versatile in-reactor welding system usable at any nuclear power station light enough to be deployed by existing remote handling equipment. WARRIOR II can be significantly reconfigured quickly to pursue different ends. (UK)

  1. Help for Heroes: PTSD, Warrior Recovery, and the Liturgy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, Karen

    2015-12-01

    The incidence of PTSD is on a steady rise in combative countries around the world, and civilian churches are increasingly like to encounter persons suffering from PTSD. This article will consider the ancient rituals for the purification of warriors after battle to demonstrate the responsibility of the church toward returning warriors and explore how the liturgy can function as a place for recovery. I will demonstrate how the sacraments of Reconciliation, the Eucharist, and the Anointing of the Sick function as sites of re-integration into the world the warriors have fought for, recovery from trauma, and purification after battle.

  2. Eesti filmi "Jade Warrior" esilinastus Torontos / Andres Laasik

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Laasik, Andres, 1960-2016

    2006-01-01

    Soome ja Hiina mütoloogiat ühendav fantaasiafilm "Igavese armastuse sõdalane - Jade Warrior" (Soome, Hiina ja Eesti ühistöö) esilinastus eile Toronto filmifestivalil. Andmed filmi tootmise ja levitamise kohta

  3. Brilliant Warrior: Information Technology Integration in Education and Training

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sikes, Carol

    1996-01-01

    ... questions, and even question authority. As a result, the ASF of 2025 will increase its emphasis on education and training to give its warriors the best possible learning opportunities in an effort to make them as productive...

  4. Employee Warriors and the Future of the American Fighting Force

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vest, Hugh

    2002-01-01

    ...-scientific /management-professional culture that surrounds the warrior of the 1990s. This culture seems to contrast and often times openly conflict with the values and traditional culture that once embraced the professional military...

  5. Leadership of Cyber Warriors: Enduring Principles and New Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-11

    technologists across networks (right) [6,7]. 4 smallwarsjournal.com song of conducting unethical or illegal activities, particularly as one‟s skills...analysis course. The best leaders will adapt to the characteristics and needs of their people. The cyber warrior is a different animal than the...Subordinates In this section we present leadership principles tailored to leading the cyber warrior. We‟ve included some of the 11 time- tested leadership

  6. Indian Summer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galindo, E. [Sho-Ban High School, Fort Hall, ID (United States)

    1997-08-01

    This paper focuses on preserving and strengthening two resources culturally and socially important to the Shoshone-Bannock Indian Tribe on the Fort Hall Reservation in Idaho; their young people and the Pacific-Northwest Salmon. After learning that salmon were not returning in significant numbers to ancestral fishing waters at headwater spawning sites, tribal youth wanted to know why. As a result, the Indian Summer project was conceived to give Shoshone-Bannock High School students the opportunity to develop hands-on, workable solutions to improve future Indian fishing and help make the river healthy again. The project goals were to increase the number of fry introduced into the streams, teach the Shoshone-Bannock students how to use scientific methodologies, and get students, parents, community members, and Indian and non-Indian mentors excited about learning. The students chose an egg incubation experiment to help increase self-sustaining, natural production of steelhead trout, and formulated and carried out a three step plan to increase the hatch-rate of steelhead trout in Idaho waters. With the help of local companies, governmental agencies, scientists, and mentors students have been able to meet their project goals, and at the same time, have learned how to use scientific methods to solve real life problems, how to return what they have used to the water and land, and how to have fun and enjoy life while learning.

  7. Importance of enjoyment when promoting physical exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagberg, L A; Lindahl, B; Nyberg, L; Hellénius, M-L

    2009-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the importance of enjoyment of exercise in a health care-based intervention aimed at promoting physical exercise in primary health care patients. In a controlled study design, the intervention group was offered a wide range of group exercises over 3 months, followed by support in designing their own exercise program. The control group received usual care. Enjoyment of exercise and exercise level were measured. Associations between enjoyment and exercise level were analyzed using Spearman's rank correlation coefficients. Changes in enjoyment between and within study groups were analyzed by the independent and paired t-test. Associations were found between enjoyment and exercise level (r=0.36, Pexercise level (r=0.34, Pexercise was 25% higher in the intervention group than in the control group (Phealth care patients, enjoyment of exercise was associated with exercise level. Enjoyment of exercise seems to be a mediator of exercise level. Furthermore, health care-based interventions seem to be able to affect enjoyment of exercise. Enjoyment of exercise may be important for the long-term effectiveness, of health care-based interventions.

  8. Enjoyment and entertainment in east and west

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rauterberg, G.W.M.; Rauterberg, G.W.M.

    2004-01-01

    From a users perspective entertainment is based on enjoyment in using these products or services. How and which cultural differences between eastern and western cultures are influencing enjoyment and the design of entertainment technology is described in this paper. In particular the underlying

  9. WARRIOR II, a high performance modular electric robot system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Downton, G.C.

    1996-01-01

    A high performance electric robot, WARRIOR, was built for in-reactor welding at the Oldbury nuclear power plant in the United Kingdom in the mid 1980s. WARRIOR II has been developed as a lighter, smaller diameter articulated welding robot which can be deployed on its umbilical down a stand pipe for remote docking with the manipulator system which delivers it to its work site. A key feature of WARRIOR II has been the development of a prototype spherical modular joint. The module provides the drive torque necessary to motivate the robot arm, acts as the joint bearing, has standard mechanical interfaces for the limb sections, accurately measures the joint angle and has cable services running through the centre. It can act either as a bend or rotate joint and the interconnecting limb sections need only to be simple tubular sections. A wide range of manipulator configurations to suit the access constraints of particular problems can be achieved with a set of joint modules and limb sections. A general purpose motion controller has also been developed which is capable of kinematically controlling any configuration of WARRIOR II thus contributing to the realisation of the concept of a general purpose tool which can be used over and over again, at short notice, in any situation where a high precision, light weight, versatile manipulator is required. (UK)

  10. Stoic warriors and stoic torturers: the moral psychology of military ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Stoic warriors and stoic torturers: the moral psychology of military torture. Jessica Wolfendale. Abstract. No Abstract. South African Journal of Philosophy Vol. 25(1) 2006: 62-76. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/sajpem.v25i1.

  11. Assessment of DoD Wounded Warrior Matters: Selection and Training of Warrior Transition Unit and Wounded Warrior Battalion Leaders and Cadre

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-22

    incorporated aspects of care unique to the military health system as identified in the Medical Management Guide.27 25 Department of the Army Pamphlet 611-21...Warrior Regiment brochure described the Marine Corps care model as “unique in that its approach is to return recovering Marines to their parent...operational units as quickly as their medical conditions permit.” According to this brochure , allowing Marines to “stay in the fight” is what makes the

  12. Assessment of DoD Wounded Warrior Matters - Wounded Warrior Battalion - West Headquarters and Southern California Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-22

    are medically unfit and unable to take advantage of the educational benefit to transfer these benefits to their spouses or children . In response...Warriors utilized their time to their best advantage with educational pursuits and internships. WWBn-West staff identified internships and educational...therapy, vocational rehabilitation, integrative treatment approaches such as yoga and meditation , and weekly opportunities for community outreach. The

  13. 78 FR 39608 - Safety Zone; Summer in the City Water Ski Show; Fox River, Green Bay, WI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-02

    ...-AA00 Safety Zone; Summer in the City Water Ski Show; Fox River, Green Bay, WI AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS... River in Green Bay, WI. This safety zone is intended to restrict vessels from a portion of the Fox River... Waterboard Warrior Ski Team will perform two 30-minute shows on the Fox River between the Hwy 141 Bridge and...

  14. Band of Brothers - Warrior Ethos, Unit Effectiveness and the Role of Initial Entry Training

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sando, Donald

    2004-01-01

    .... Integral to continued professionalism of the Army is developing cultural attitudes beliefs and behaviors of a Warrior Ethos the culture of disciplined initiative teamwork determination sacrifice...

  15. Prediction of enjoyment in school physical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gråstén, Arto; Jaakkola, Timo; Liukkonen, Jarmo; Watt, Anthony; Yli-Piipari, Sami

    2012-01-01

    The specific aim of this study was to examine whether motivational climate, perceived physical competence, and exercise motivation predict enjoyment in school physical education within the same sample of adolescents across three years of secondary school. A sample of 639 students (girls = 296, boys = 343) aged between 13- to 15-years at the commencement of the study completed the Intrinsic Motivation Climate in Physical Education Questionnaire, Physical Self-Perception Profile, Physical Education Motivation Scale, and Physical Education Enjoyment Scale. Results derived from path analyses indicated that task-involving motivational climate predicted enjoyment in physical education via perceived physical competence and intrinsic motivation in both girls and boys. In particular, these results supported previous findings of Vallerand et. al (1997) with the self-determination theory and the achievement goal theory. Ego-involving climate was not a significant predictor either in girls or boys. The current results provide continuing support for the investigation of Vallerand's model in the physical education setting, and highlight that motivational climate is an area that requires further evaluation as a contributing factor in the improvement of physical education teaching. A better understanding of the role of motivational climate may assist efforts to promote children's and adolescents' perceived physical competence, intrinsic motivation, and enjoyment in the school physical education setting. Key pointsThe findings of the current study support existing suggestions of Vallerand's (1997) model in which social factors mediated by a psychological mediator, and exercise motivation are related to positive consequences in the PE context.Task-involving motivational climate predicted PE enjoyment via perceived physical competence and intrinsic motivation with both girls and boys. Task-involving motivational climate in PE lessons at Grade 7 had a strong association with PE

  16. The Native American: Warriors in the U.S. Military

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-10

    large as 95 percent.Ŗ Europeans brought measles, smallpox, cholera , and other diseases that reduced the Native American population and wiped out...Press, 1984. Clevenger, Steven. America’s First Warriors: Native Americans and Iraq. Museum of New Mexico Press. 2010. Clodfelter, MichaeL The Dakota...Autobiography of a Winnebago Indian. Dover Publications, Inc., 1963. Vandervort, Bruce. Indian Wars of Mexico , Canada, and the United States, 1812-1900

  17. "Jade Warrior" kupatab Soome sampo Hiina / Kätlin Kaldmaa

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kaldmaa, Kätlin, 1970-

    2006-01-01

    Soome ja Hiina mütoloogiat ühendav fantaasiafilm "Igavese armastuse sõdalane - Jade Warrior" (Soome, Hiina, Hollandi ja Eesti ühistöö) : stsenarist Iiro Küttner : režissöör Antti-Jussi Annila : võitluskunstide koreograaf Yu Yan Kai : osades Tommi Eronen, Zhang Jingchu, Markku Peltola. Lisatud Ave Randviiru, Elle Kulli ja Antti-Jussi Annila "Esimesed muljed"

  18. Organizational aspects of the Warrior Basin Environmental Cooperative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lasseter, E.L. Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Beginning in 1987, the coalbed methane industry in the Black Warrior Coal Basin of Alabama was on the verge of a boom. The industry soon recognized plans for development might require significant changes in disposal techniques for produced water or a change in the existing system for issuance of NPDES permits for the discharge of produced water. The industry, working closely with the Alabama Department of Environmental Management (ADEM), resolved this problem through with the formation of the Warrior Basin Environmental Cooperative, Inc. (WBEC), a cooperative venture which constructed and now operates a large-scale, integrated water monitoring system providing real-time water quality data to its member organizations. The monitoring system operated by the WBEC covers a 150 mile reach of the Black Warrior River in Alabama affected by coalbed methane discharges. The system provides its eleven members with access to real-time water quality data and monthly summary reports. The system is functionally integrated with the operational requirements of its members and with relevant NPDES permit requirements. September, 1992 marked the second year of full operation of the system. The concept of cooperative use of large-scale, integrated water monitoring systems and the experience gained in the formation of the WBEC and the operation of its system appear to have many potential benefits beyond the scope of its present application

  19. PREDICTION OF ENJOYMENT IN SCHOOL PHYSICAL EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arto Gråstén

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The specific aim of this study was to examine whether motivational climate, perceived physical competence, and exercise motivation predict enjoyment in school physical education within the same sample of adolescents across three years of secondary school. A sample of 639 students (girls = 296, boys = 343 aged between 13- to 15-years at the commencement of the study completed the Intrinsic Motivation Climate in Physical Education Questionnaire, Physical Self-Perception Profile, Physical Education Motivation Scale, and Physical Education Enjoyment Scale. Results derived from path analyses indicated that task-involving motivational climate predicted enjoyment in physical education via perceived physical competence and intrinsic motivation in both girls and boys. In particular, these results supported previous findings of Vallerand et. al (1997 with the self-determination theory and the achievement goal theory. Ego-involving climate was not a significant predictor either in girls or boys. The current results provide continuing support for the investigation of Vallerand's model in the physical education setting, and highlight that motivational climate is an area that requires further evaluation as a contributing factor in the improvement of physical education teaching. A better understanding of the role of motivational climate may assist efforts to promote children's and adolescents' perceived physical competence, intrinsic motivation, and enjoyment in the school physical education setting

  20. The Interactive Trampoline - Safety and Enjoyment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karoff, Helle Skovbjerg; Elbæk, Lars; Rytz, Sigrid Alison

    2013-01-01

    This paper addresses the use of technology as a supplement to traditional and well-known dynamics of play. By examining the use of the Interactive Trampoline in the development process of play activities, this paper seeks to emphasise the relationship between physical activity, safety, enjoyment ...

  1. Planning for Enjoyment in the General Music Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koops, Lisa Huisman; Keppen, Heidi

    2015-01-01

    Enjoyment is an important but often overlooked element in the music classroom. In this article, we review research literature related to enjoyment in musical interactions and discuss the role of enjoyment in the general music classroom. Drawing on research literature, our experience as general music teachers, and our research on enjoyment during…

  2. Exploring the enjoyment of playing browser games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimmt, Christoph; Schmid, Hannah; Orthmann, Julia

    2009-04-01

    Browser games--mostly persistent game worlds that can be used without client software and monetary cost with a Web browser--belong to the understudied digital game types, although they attract large player communities and motivate sustained play. The present work reports findings from an online survey of 8,203 players of a German strategy browser game ("Travian"). Results suggest that multiplayer browser games are enjoyed primarily because of the social relationships involved in game play and the specific time and flexibility characteristics ("easy-in, easy-out"). Competition, in contrast, seems to be less important for browser gamers than for users of other game types. Findings are discussed in terms of video game enjoyment and game addiction.

  3. Summer and Autumn activities

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2013-01-01

    Time to recharge the batteries, and much more… The summer holidays are an ideal opportunity to spend more time with the family, to discover new countries, make new friends, in other words to take time away from the daily grind. This recharging is essential to your work-life balance, and CERN, as a modern and socially responsible employer, has recognized this as a central part of its human resources policy.Nevertheless we should not forget that, while many of you enjoy a well-deserved summer break, some of our colleagues are hard at work making LS1 (first Long Shutdown) a success in order to guarantee that at the beginning of 2015 the LHC will be able to start physics in an energy range never before reached by mankind. Preparing the questionnaire and the elections to the Staff Council During this summer your delegates in the Staff Council are hard at work preparing for the upcoming five-yearly review whose content will be decided by CERN Council in June 2014. Therefore, as every five years, to ...

  4. Nett Warrior: Initial Operational Test and Evaluation Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    Chemlight - K05.19/8 Aircraft/Anti-aircraft - K05.19/8 Artillery - K05.19/8 Dismounted Personnel - K05.19/8 Spot Report - K05.19/9 Other-Entity...network capable of displaying PLI (e.g., Blue Force Tracker ), display the Nett Warrior PLI. During missions, knowledge of the location of troops...digital communications message traffic and such data were harvested from the EUDs daily. The Multiple Integrated Laser Engagement System executed and

  5. The design and development of Project Warrior equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, V.R.; Jerram, K.

    1987-01-01

    The project Warrior standing for welding and repair robot in Oldbury reactors is the culmination of more than 7 years of conceptual thinking, research, development design and manufacture. The tile encompasses the whole project which includes a work performing manipulator, serving manipulator, the manipulators control system and consoles, a welding head and rangefinder with its associated control system and consoles and a large amount of auxiliary equipment. The system at the forefront of today's technology has been manufactured to carry out remote welding in nuclear reactors, on plate with an oxide covering of up to 200 microns

  6. Warrior Resilience Training in Operation Iraqi Freedom: combining rational emotive behavior therapy, resiliency, and positive psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarrett, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Warrior Resilience Training (WRT) is an educational class designed to enhance Warrior resilience, thriving, and posttraumatic growth for Soldiers deployed in Operation Iraqi Freedom. Warrior Resilience Training uses rational emotive behavior therapy (REBT), Army leadership principles, and positive psychology as a vehicle for students to apply resilient philosophies derived from Army Warrior Ethos, Stoic philosophy, and the survivor and resiliency literature. Students in WRT are trained to focus upon virtue, character, and emotional self-regulation by constructing and maintaining a personal resiliency philosophy that emphasizes critical thinking, rationality, virtue, and Warrior Ethos. The author, an Army licensed clinical social worker, executive coach, REBT doctoral fellow, and former Special Forces noncommissioned officer, describes his initial experience teaching WRT during Operation Iraqi Freedom to combat medics and Soldiers from 2005 to 2006, and his experience as a leader of a combat stress control prevention team currently in Iraq offering mobile WRT classes in-theater. Warrior Resilience Training rationale, curriculum, variants (like Warrior Family Resilience Training), and feedback are included, with suggestions as to how behavioral health providers and combat stress control teams might better integrate their services with leaders, chaplains, and commands to better market combat stress resiliency, reduce barriers to care, and promote force preservation. Informal analysis of class feedback from 1168 respondents regarding WRT reception and utilization is examined.

  7. Summer Appendicitis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hanumantp

    The increasing number of “fast food” restaurants where mainly high‑carbohydrate ... factors, food culture and the effect of migration for touristic purposes during the summer. .... Lal A, Hales S, French N, Baker MG. Seasonality in human.

  8. Preserve America - Explore and Enjoy Our Heritage

    Science.gov (United States)

    ACHP Celebrate Women's History Month - Women's Suffrage is Key ACHP to Meet March 21-22 in DC Apply Now Events Apply by March 15 for Summer ACHP Internships ACHP Celebrates Native American Heritage Awareness Internship Deadline Approaching ACHP Spring Meeting Announced DEADLINE IS EXTENDED TO MARCH 11 TO SUBMIT

  9. Effectance and control as determinants of video game enjoyment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimmt, Christoph; Hartmann, Tilo; Frey, Andreas

    2007-12-01

    This article explores video game enjoyment originated by games' key characteristic, interactivity. An online experiment (N=500) tested experiences of effectance (perceived influence on the game world) and of being in control as mechanisms that link interactivity to enjoyment. A video game was manipulated to either allow normal play, reduce perceived effectance, or reduce perceived control. Enjoyment ratings suggest that effectance is an important factor in video game enjoyment but that the relationship between control of the game situation and enjoyment is more complex.

  10. Summer Camp, July 2016

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2016-01-01

    During the month of July, the Staff Association’s Children’s Day-Care Centre and School EVEE held a summer camp for 4- to 6-year-olds. 24 children altogether joined in on the adventures. On the summer camp, the children got to “travel” to a different continent of the world every week. Day after day, they would pass through make-believe Customs upon arrival and get their passports stamped by a “customs officer”. For the first week, we went on a trip to Africa. In the spirit of the theme, the children got to do plenty of crafts and coloring, make their own little bindles and play various games. They even had the chance to visit the Museum of Ethnography in Geneva (MEG), learn to play the balafon and make musical instruments with Sterrenlab. For the second week, we set off to discover the Americas, exploring both the South and the North. Alongside different workshops (singing, dancing, storytelling, crafts), the children could enjoy several special ac...

  11. The Groningen Enjoyment Questionnaire : A measure of enjoyment in leisure-time physical activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stevens, M; Moget, P; de Greef, MHG; Lemmink, KAPM; Rispens, P

    The purpose of this study was to develop a short and easily used questionnaire to measure enjoyment in leisure-time physical activity. The first part of the study involved the questionnaire's composition. A set of 30 positively formulated potential items was generated and subsequently completed ty

  12. Train-the-Trainer Package for the Full Spectrum Warrior Game

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Centric, James

    2004-01-01

    .... Full Spectrum Warrior (FSW), built for use with Microsoft's X-Box game console system, was developed to provide Infantry squad leaders with the opportunity to practice making tactical decisions and executing the troop-leading...

  13. The Damascus Paradox the Code of the Warrior - The Kinder, Gentler Army

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Good, Wanda

    2001-01-01

    .... A number of writers have articulated, some clearly and some by implication, a root cause for this worsening situation - the supplanting of the 'Code of the Warrior' by a 'kinder, Gentler, Army...

  14. Wana Warrior Game as Animal Rescue Campaign Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adit Rama Putra

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Indonesia is a nation which rich of biodiversity. Various vegetation and good supporting climate make Indonesia a comfortable homeland for some specieses. Deforestation and illegal hunting threatened some speciecess. Seeing that situation, there are many ways to avoid that , one of them is using game as the media.Wana Warrior is a game used as education media of animal saving. The concept of this game is using game as the medium for conveying the information through design and gameplay which attract the players and they can learn without they realize from the provided information. Using Agenda Setting theory, provided informations are selected important issues. So players are focused only on provided issues. The result of the research shows “Wana Warrior” game can educate people about animal biodiversity,  especially, in Indonesia.

  15. American Akicita: Indigenous American warriors and military service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, J Douglas

    2017-08-01

    Indigenous Americans (i.e., Native/American Indians, AK natives, Pacific Islanders) have consistently volunteered for military service at greater rates than any other ethnic group, including the majority culture, since the early days of the country. This article is an introduction to the special section which includes a number of outstanding papers that provide an innovative and compelling effort to overcome the challenges of casualties from war and render effective and culturally informed care. These manuscripts describe culturally appropriate considerations of suicide (O'Keefe), family involvement and access to care (Whealin), and telehealth for treatment of rural Native veterans (Goss). Challenging and complex treatment needs call for equally mindful and competent approaches. These authors and providers present compelling examples of addressing these needs in working with our Wounded Warriors. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  16. PC Mobile Warrior with a built-in cellular phone; Keitai denwa naizogata PC 'Mobile warrior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-03-01

    A PC Mobile Warrior with a built-in cellular phone has been developed from PC Libretto through cooperation with the NTT DoCoMo. The new personal computer incorporates into itself some distinguished mobile PC features such as Wake On Radio and Wake On Ring which are defined by MCPC (Mobile Computing Promotion Consortium). Wake On Radio is a function that activates the PC upon entry into the zone from outside, and Wake On Ring is another function that does the same upon arrival of a phone call. Installed on these lower order functions are an application program for automatic transmission of stored e-mails making use of the former function and another for automatic reception of FAX messages making use of the latter function. (translated by NEDO)

  17. Reservoir heterogeneity in carboniferous sandstone of the Black Warrior basin. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kugler, R.L.; Pashin, J.C.; Carroll, R.E.; Irvin, G.D.; Moore, H.E.

    1994-06-01

    Although oil production in the Black Warrior basin of Alabama is declining, additional oil may be produced through improved recovery strategies, such as waterflooding, chemical injection, strategic well placement, and infill drilling. High-quality characterization of reservoirs in the Black Warrior basin is necessary to utilize advanced technology to recover additional oil and to avoid premature abandonment of fields. This report documents controls on the distribution and producibility of oil from heterogeneous Carboniferous reservoirs in the Black Warrior basin of Alabama. The first part of the report summarizes the structural and depositional evolution of the Black Warrior basin and establishes the geochemical characteristics of hydrocarbon source rocks and oil in the basin. This second part characterizes facies heterogeneity and petrologic and petrophysical properties of Carter and Millerella sandstone reservoirs. This is followed by a summary of oil production in the Black Warrior basin and an evaluation of seven improved-recovery projects in Alabama. In the final part, controls on the producibility of oil from sandstone reservoirs are discussed in terms of a scale-dependent heterogeneity classification.

  18. Conservation and monitoring of a persecuted African lion population by Maasai warriors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolrenry, Stephanie; Hazzah, Leela; Frank, Laurence G

    2016-06-01

    Although Africa has many threatened species and biological hot spots, there are few citizen science schemes, particularly in rural communities, and there has been limited evaluation of existing programs. We engaged traditional Maasai warriors (pastoralist men aged 15 to 35) in community-based conservation and demographic monitoring of a persecuted African lion (Panthera leo) population. Through direct engagement, we investigated whether a citizen science approach employing local warriors, who had no formal education, could produce reliable data on the demographics, predation, and movements of a species with which their communities have been in conflict for generations. Warriors were given benefits such as literacy training and skill enhancement and engaged in the monitoring of the lions. The trained warriors reported on lion sign across an area nearly 4000 km(2) . Scientists worked together with the warriors to verify their reports and gather observations on the lion population. Using the verified reports and collected observations, we examined our scientific knowledge relative to the lion population preceding and during the citizen science program. Our observations showed that data quality and quantity improved with the involvement and training of the participants. Furthermore, because they engaged in conservation and gained personal benefits, the participants came to appreciate a species that was traditionally their foe. We believe engaging other local communities in biodiversity conservation and monitoring may be an effective conservation approach in rural Africa. © 2016 Society for Conservation Biology.

  19. Reservoir heterogeneity in Carboniferous sandstone of the Black Warrior basin. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kugler, R.L.; Pashin, J.C.; Carroll, R.E.; Irvin, G.D.; Moore, H.E.

    1994-04-01

    Although oil production in the Black Warrior basin of Alabama is declining, additional oil may be produced through improved recovery strategies, such as waterflooding, chemical injection, strategic well placement, and infill drilling. High-quality characterization of reservoirs in the Black Warrior basin is necessary to utilize advanced technology to recover additional oil and to avoid premature abandonment of fields. This report documents controls on the distribution and producibility of oil from heterogeneous Carboniferous reservoirs in the Black Warrior basin of Alabama. The first part of the report summarizes the structural and depositional evolution of the Black Warrior basin and establishes the geochemical characteristics of hydrocarbon source rocks and oil in the basin. This second part characterizes facies heterogeneity and petrologic and petrophysical properties of Carter and Millerella sandstone reservoirs. This is followed by a summary of oil production in the Black Warrior basin and an evaluation of seven improved-recovery projects in Alabama. In the final part, controls on the producibility of oil from sandstone reservoirs are discussed in terms of a scale-dependent heterogeneity classification.

  20. Empirical Taxonomies of Gameplay Enjoyment: Personality and Video Game Preference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quick, John M.; Atkinson, Robert K.; Lin, Lijia

    2012-01-01

    A survey study was conducted to better understand how gameplay enjoyment relates to players' personality traits and video game preferences. This study demonstrated that the core design elements of games that lead to enjoyment can be empirically identified. Similarly, it showed that considering personality, an individual characteristic, can produce…

  1. Variety, Enjoyment, and Physical Activity Participation Among High School Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, Shannon L; Coffield, Edward; Lee, Sarah M; Fulton, Janet E

    2016-02-01

    Federal guidelines state that youth should participate in a variety of physical activity (PA) they find enjoyable. Little is known, however, about how variety and enjoyment are associated with PA participation among adolescents. Data came from the 2010 National Youth Physical Activity and Nutrition Survey, a nationally representative survey of adolescents. Path analysis was used to examine the association of a variety of self-reported PA, defined as the number of activities and activity types (ie, team sports/weightlifting, individual activities, and other competitive/recreational sports), on self-reported PA enjoyment and participation. The analysis also examined whether enjoyment mediates the association between a variety of PA and participation. Separate models were estimated for boys and girls. Number of activities was associated with increased PA enjoyment and participation. For boys and girls, team sports/weightlifting was associated with increased participation, and individual activities were indirectly associated with increased participation through enjoyment. For boys, team sports/weightlifting was indirectly related with participation. These findings suggest that participation in a variety of PA is associated with increased PA enjoyment and participation. Providing opportunities for adolescents to engage in a variety of activities might help them identify PA they enjoy and facilitate lifelong PA habits.

  2. Fun and Enjoyment in Physical Education: Young People's Attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dismore, Harriet; Bailey, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Fun and enjoyment are recurring themes in physical education literature, although there has been some debate concerning the distinction between the two concepts. Whereas enjoyment is generally regarded as helpful in fostering positive attitudes towards physical education, fun has not always been considered an appropriate outcome of physical…

  3. Effectance and control as determinants of video game enjoyment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klimmt, C.; Hartmann, T.; Frey, A.

    2007-01-01

    This article explores video game enjoyment originated by games' key characteristic, interactivity. An online experiment (N = 500) tested experiences of effectance (perceived influence on the game world) and of being in control as mechanisms that link interactivity to enjoyment. A video game was

  4. Summer Students

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    SUMMER STUDENT LECTURE PROGRAMME Main Auditorium, bldg. 500 DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Wednesday 6 July 09:15 - 10:00 F. CERUTTI (CERN) Presentation of the Summer Student Programme D. Heagerty (CERN) Computer rules O. ULLALAND (CERN) Workshops presentation 10:15 - 11:00 D. SCHLATTER (CERN) Introduction to CERN 11:15 Film on CERN Thursday 7 July 09:15 - 11:00 L. Di Lella (CERN) Introduction to Particle Physics (1-2/4) 11:15 - 12:00 P. Chomaz (GANIL / CERN) Introduction to Nuclear Physics (1/3) 12:00 Discussion Session 14:00 - 14:45 M. Lindroos (CERN) ISOLDE Facility 15:00 M. Lindroos (CERN) ISOLDE Visit Friday 8 July 09:15 - 10:00 L. Di Lella (CERN) Introduction to Particle Physics (3/4) 10:15 - 11:00 P. Chomaz (GANIL / CERN) Introduction to Nuclear Physics (2/3) 11:15 - 12:00 G. ROLANDI (CERN) How an experiment is designed (1/2) 12:00 Discussion Session Monday 11 July 09:15 - 10:00 L. Di Lella (CERN) Introduction to Particle Physi...

  5. Summer 2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric G. Strauss

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cities and the Environment Editor, Eric Strauss, provides an introduction to the Summer 2011 issue. He discusses the journal's transition to its new home at Loyola Marymount University and the creation of the Center for Urban Resilience and Ecological Solution, while underscoring highlights of the special topics section on Urban Predators. The contributors to this section participated in the International Symposium on Urban Wildlife and the Environment hosted by the Wildlife Society at the University of Massachusetts Amherst in June of 2009. Finally, Dr. Strauss notes the breadth of our issue by mentioning the additional articles' focus on rain gardens, water quality, arthropod diversity, green roofs, and socio-ecological dynamics.

  6. Un’anabasi metropolitana. The Warriors di Sol Yurick

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franco Lonati

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available La fuga, come motivo narrativo ed elemento di suspense, è utilizzata con una certa frequenza nella cultura popolare e nella letteratura di genere. Si pensi ai molti esempi di fughe disperate in romanzi, racconti e film drammatici, polizieschi, gialli, thriller e horror. Un genere, in particolare, nel quale la fuga è un elemento spesso imprescindibile è certamente il noir: esempi in tal senso possono essere i romanzi di David Goodis, autore del tesissimo Dark Passage (1946, significativamente uscito in Italia sotto il titolo di La fuga, di Martin M. Goldsmith, che nel 1939 scrisse il classico Detour (1939 o di Dorothy B. Hughes, autrice poco celebrata ma assai valida, artefice del misconosciuto ma splendido Ride the Pink Horse (1946. Oggetto del presente contributo è però un altro romanzo, più recente, che, come quelli sopracitati, è stato in seguito trasformato in un ottimo film. The Warriors (in italiano, I guerrieri della notte, fu scritto da Sol Yurick nel 1965 e, una quindicina di anni dopo, fu portato sullo schermo da Walter Hill, con molte modifiche rispetto al testo originale. Questo romanzo, che narra di scontri fra bande giovanili nella New York degli anni Sessanta, a prima vista non sembrerebbe rientrare pienamente nella categoria del noir, anche se definire il noir è un’impresa in cui si sono cimentati in molti e finora nessuno con pieno successo.

  7. The Warrior Wellness Study: A Randomized Controlled Exercise Trial for Older Veterans with PTSD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Katherine S; Morey, Miriam C; Beckham, Jean C; Bosworth, Hayden B; Pebole, Michelle M; Pieper, Carl F; Sloane, Richard

    2018-03-15

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) affects up to 30% of military veterans. Older veterans, many of whom have lived with PTSD symptoms for several decades, report a number of negative health outcomes. Despite the demonstrated benefits of regular exercise on physical and psychological health, no studies have explored the impact of exercise in older veterans with PTSD. This paper describes the development, design, and implementation of the Warrior Wellness exercise pilot study for older veterans with PTSD. Veterans aged ≥60 with a Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-V) diagnosis of PTSD will be recruited and randomized to (a) Warrior Wellness, a 12-week supervised, facility-based exercise intervention, or (b) usual care for 12 weeks. Warrior Wellness is a theory- and evidence-based behavioral intervention that involves 3 sessions per week of multi-component exercise training that targets strength, endurance, balance, and flexibility. Warrior Wellness focuses on satisfaction with outcomes, self-efficacy, self-monitoring, and autonomy. Factors associated with program adherence, defined as the number of sessions attended during the 12 weeks, will be explored. Primary outcomes include PTSD symptoms and cardiovascular endurance, assessed at baseline and 12 weeks. Compared to those in usual care, it is hypothesized that those in the Warrior Wellness condition will improve on these efficacy outcomes. The Warrior Wellness study will provide evidence on whether a short-term exercise intervention is feasible, acceptable, and effective among older veterans with PTSD, and explore factors associated with program adherence. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier : NCT02295995.

  8. Summer Students: getting professional at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    The summer season at CERN is known for the traditional visit of Summer Students coming from Member and non-Member States. This time, a total of 176 future scientists are spending part of their summer with us, learning and working in the laboratory. Summer Students enjoying a lecture on particle physics by Ronald Kleiss. Now that summer has finally arrived, you'll have noticed some changes at CERN: longer queues at the bar, faces you don't recognise in the corridors, and a breath of fresh air, but where is it coming from? The answer is easy: the Summer Students are here! Aged between 20 and 27, this group of 176 future scientists has been selected from 600 candidates to spend their summer at the Laboratory. This year, there are 24 more 'Summies' than last following a recommendation in the 2000 5-yearly review to increase the number of students. The Summies mainly come from Member States, but this year there are also 11 Americans, two Mexicans, an Armenian, a Turk, a Pakistani and two South Africans. Judith N...

  9. Summer Students

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    SUMMER STUDENT LECTURE PROGRAMME Main Auditorium, bldg. 500 Monday 8 August 09:15 - 10:00 A. Höcker CP Violation (3/4) 10:15 - 12:00 J-J. GOMEZ-CADENAS Neutrino Physics (1-2/4) 12:00 Discussion Session Tuesday 9 August 09:15 - 10:00 A. Höcker CP Violation (4/4) 10:15 - 11:00 J-J. GOMEZ-CADENAS Neutrino Physics (3/4) 11:15 - 12:00 F. GREY The GRID 12:00 Discussion Session 14:15 - 17:00 Student Sessions Wednesday 10 August 09:15 - 10:00 J-J. GOMEZ-CADENAS Neutrino Physics (4/4) 10:15 - 12:00 J. LESGOURGUES Introduction to Cosmology (1-2/5) 12:00 Discussion Session 14:15 - 17:00 Student Sessions Thursday 11 August 09:15 - 11:00 J. LESGOURGUES Introduction to Cosmology (3-4/5) 11:15 - 12:00 G. KALMUS The ILC Story 12:00 Discussion Session Friday 12 August 09:15 - 10:00 J. LESGOURGUES Introduction to Cosmology (5/5) 10:15 - 11:00 G. VENEZIANO String theory: has Einstein's dream come true? 11:00  Discussion...

  10. Summer Students

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    SUMMER STUDENT LECTURE PROGRAMME Main Auditorium, bldg. 500 DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Monday 1 August 09:15 - 10:00 P. WELLS The Higgs Saga at LEP 10:15 - 11:00 E. KIRITSIS Beyond the Standard Model (1/4) 11:15 - 12:00 G. COWAN Introduction to Statistics (1/3) 12:00 Discussion Session Tuesday 2 August 09:15 - 11:00 E. KIRITSIS Beyond the Standard Model (2-3/4) 11:15 - 12:00 G. COWAN Introduction to Statistics (2/3) 12:00 Discussion Session Wednesday 3 August 09:15 - 10:00 G. COWAN Introduction to Statistics (3/3) 10:15 - 11:00 E. KIRITSIS Beyond the Standard Model (4/4) 11:15 - 12:00 K. JAKOBS Physics at Hadronic Colliders (1/4) 12:00 Discussion Session Thursday 4 August 09:15 - 11:00 K. JAKOBS Physics at Hadronic Colliders (2-3/4) 11:15 - 12:00 A. WEINSTEIN Gravitation Waves 12:00 Discussion Session 16:30 - 18:00 Poster Session Friday 5 August 09:15 - 11:00 A. Höcker CP Violation (1-2/4) 11:15 - 12:00 K. JA...

  11. Summer Students

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    SUMMER STUDENT LECTURE PROGRAMME Main Auditorium, bldg. 500 DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Monday 18 July 09:15 - 11:00 G. ROSS Fundamental concepts in Particle Physics (1-2/6) 11:15 - 12:00 N. PALANQUE-DELABROUILLE Astroparticle Physics (1/3) 12:00 Discussion Session Tuesday 19 July 09:15 - 10:00 G. ROSS Fundamental concepts in Particle Physics (3/6) 10:15 - 12:00 N. PALANQUE-DELABROUILLE Astroparticle Physics (2-3/3) 12:00 Discussion Session Wednesday 20 July 09:15 - 10:00 G. ROSS Fundamental concepts in Particle Physics (4/6) 10:15 - 11:00 F. RADEMAKERS ROOT 11:15 - 12:00 L. ROSSI Super-conducting magnet technology for particle accelerators and detectors 12:00 Discussion Session Thursday 21 July 09:15 - 10:00 G. ROSS Fundamental concepts in Particle Physics (5/6) 10:15 - 12:00 C. DE LA TAILLE Introduction to Electronics (1-2/3) 12:00 Discussion Session Friday 22 July 09:15 - 10:00 C. DE LA TAILLE Introduction to Electronics (3/3) 10:15 -...

  12. Summer Students

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    SUMMER STUDENT LECTURE PROGRAMME Main Auditorium, bldg. 500 DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Monday 25 July 09:15 - 11:00 A. PICH The Standard Model (2-3/8) 11:15 - 12:00 J. STACHEL Quark Gluon Plasma Physics (1/3) 12:00 Discussion Session Tuesday 26 July 09:15 - 10:00 A. PICH The Standard Model (4/8) 10:15 - 12:00 J. STACHEL Quark Gluon Plasma Physics (2-3/3) 12:00 Discussion Session Wednesday 27 July 09:15 - 11:00 A. PICH The Standard Model (5-6/8) 11:15 - 12:00 J-P. DELAHAYE The CLIC Concept and Technology for an e+e-Collider at the Energy Frontier 11:15 - 12:00 Discussion Session Thursday 28 July 09:15 - 10:00 A. PICH The Standard Model (7/8) 10:15 - 11:00 P. SPHICAS Data Acquisition Systems (1/2) 11:15 - 12:00 R. JACOBSEN From Raw data to Physics Results (1/2) 12:00 Discussion Session Friday 29 July 09:15 - 10:00 A. PICH The Standard Model (8/8) 10:15 - 11:00 P. SPHICAS Data Acquisition Systems (2/2) 11:15 - 12:00 R. JACOBSEN Fr...

  13. Summer Students

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    SUMMER STUDENT LECTURE PROGRAMME Main Auditorium, bldg. 500 DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Monday 11 July 09:15 - 10:00 L. Di Lella (CERN) Introduction to Particle Physics (4/4) 10:15 - 11:00 P. Chomaz (GANIL / CERN) Introduction to Nuclear Physics (3/3) 11:15 - 12:00 G. ROLANDI (CERN) How an experiment is designed (2/2) 12:00 Discussion Session Tuesday 12 July  09:15 - 11:00 O. BrÜning (CERN) Accelerators (1-2/5) 11:15 - 12:00 O. ULLALAND (CERN) Detectors (1/5) 12:00 Discussion Session Wednesday 13 July 09:15 - 10:00 O. BrÜning (CERN) Accelerators (3/5) 10:15 - 11:00 R. LANDUA (CERN) Antimatter in the Lab (1/2) 11:15 - 12:00 O. ULLALAND (CERN) Detectors (2/5) 12:00 Discussion Session Thursday 14 July 09:15 - 10:00 O. ULLALAND (CERN) Detectors (3/5) 10:15 - 11:00 G. ROLANDI (CERN) Antimatter in the Lab (2/2) 11:15 - 12:00 O. BrÜning (CERN) Accelerators (4/5) 12:00 Discussion Session Friday 1...

  14. The effects of curiosity-evoking events on activity enjoyment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isikman, Elif; MacInnis, Deborah J; Ülkümen, Gülden; Cavanaugh, Lisa A

    2016-09-01

    Whereas prior literature has studied the positive effects of curiosity-evoking events that are integral to focal activities, we explore whether and how a curiosity-evoking event that is incidental to a focal activity induces negative outcomes for enjoyment. Four experiments and 1 field study demonstrate that curiosity about an event that is incidental to an activity in which individuals are engaged, significantly affects enjoyment of a concurrent activity. The reason why is that curiosity diverts attention away from the concurrent activity and focuses attention on the curiosity-evoking event. Thus, curiosity regarding an incidental event decreases enjoyment of a positive focal activity but increases enjoyment of a negative focal activity. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved

  15. A Diabetes-Friendly Meal Everyone Can Enjoy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Diabetes A Diabetes-Friendly Meal Everyone Can Enjoy Past Issues / Fall 2009 Table of Contents From the National Diabetes Education Program (NDEP) Knowing what to serve and ...

  16. Harmonic Structure Predicts the Enjoyment of Uplifting Trance Music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agres, Kat; Herremans, Dorien; Bigo, Louis; Conklin, Darrell

    2016-01-01

    An empirical investigation of how local harmonic structures (e.g., chord progressions) contribute to the experience and enjoyment of uplifting trance (UT) music is presented. The connection between rhythmic and percussive elements and resulting trance-like states has been highlighted by musicologists, but no research, to our knowledge, has explored whether repeated harmonic elements influence affective responses in listeners of trance music. Two alternative hypotheses are discussed, the first highlighting the direct relationship between repetition/complexity and enjoyment, and the second based on the theoretical inverted-U relationship described by the Wundt curve. We investigate the connection between harmonic structure and subjective enjoyment through interdisciplinary behavioral and computational methods: First we discuss an experiment in which listeners provided enjoyment ratings for computer-generated UT anthems with varying levels of harmonic repetition and complexity. The anthems were generated using a statistical model trained on a corpus of 100 uplifting trance anthems created for this purpose, and harmonic structure was constrained by imposing particular repetition structures (semiotic patterns defining the order of chords in the sequence) on a professional UT music production template. Second, the relationship between harmonic structure and enjoyment is further explored using two computational approaches, one based on average Information Content, and another that measures average tonal tension between chords. The results of the listening experiment indicate that harmonic repetition does in fact contribute to the enjoyment of uplifting trance music. More compelling evidence was found for the second hypothesis discussed above, however some maximally repetitive structures were also preferred. Both computational models provide evidence for a Wundt-type relationship between complexity and enjoyment. By systematically manipulating the structure of chord

  17. Refugee warriors or war refugees? Iraqi refugees' predicament in Syria, Jordan and Lebanon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leenders, R.

    2009-01-01

    This essay attempts to disentangle a debate within the study of refugee crises and their security implications involving 'refugee warriors'. It situates the debate in the context of the Iraqi refugee crisis and its purported and real manifestations in three main host countries: Syria, Jordan and

  18. 77 FR 23125 - Special Local Regulation; Tuscaloosa Dragon Boat Race; Black Warrior River; Tuscaloosa, AL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-18

    ... commercially transited river system poses significant safety hazards to both the Dragon Boat racers and the...-AA08 Special Local Regulation; Tuscaloosa Dragon Boat Race; Black Warrior River; Tuscaloosa, AL AGENCY... crews, vessels, and persons on navigable waters during the Jr. League of Tuscaloosa Dragon Boat Races...

  19. 77 FR 15597 - Special Local Regulation; USAT Triathlon/Race Rowing Competition; Black Warrior River; Tuscaloosa...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-16

    ... significant economic impact on a substantial number of small entities for the following reasons. The zone is... February 2, 2012, and February 6, 2012, from the University of Alabama and the Tuscaloosa Tourism and... University of Iowa on the Black Warrior River. The Tuscaloosa Tourism and Sports Commission is sponsoring the...

  20. Warrior Heroes and Little Green Men: Soldiers, Military Training, and the Construction of Rural Masculinities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, Rachel

    2000-01-01

    Examines military training in the United Kingdom; the construction of military masculinities, particularly the ideal type of the warrior hero; and the role of the countryside (as the training location) and rurality (as a social construction) in that process. Argues that becoming an infantry soldier means being molded to this hegemonic model of…

  1. American Indian Females and Stereotypes: Warriors, Leaders, Healers, Feminists; Not Drudges, Princesses, Prostitutes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lajimodiere, Denise K.

    2013-01-01

    This article is written by a Native female author. It delves into the historical stereotypes of Native females as drudges, princesses, and prostitutes perpetrated by media, movies, and literature. The author reviews research on the traditional and modern roles of Native females, including roles as warriors, leaders, and healers. Current literature…

  2. Reverberation time influences musical enjoyment with cochlear implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Certo, Michael V; Kohlberg, Gavriel D; Chari, Divya A; Mancuso, Dean M; Lalwani, Anil K

    2015-02-01

    To identify factors that enhance the enjoyment of music in cochlear implant (CI) recipients. Specifically, we assessed the hypothesis that variations in reverberation time (RT60) may be linked to variations in the level of musical enjoyment in CI users. Prospective analysis of music enjoyment in normal-hearing individuals. Single tertiary academic medical center. Normal-hearing adults (N = 20) were asked to rate a novel 20-second melody on three enjoyment modalities: musicality, pleasantness, and naturalness. Subjective rating of music excerpts. Participants listened to seven different instruments play the melody, each with five levels (0.2, 1.6, 3.0, 5.0, 10.0 s) of RT60, both with and without CI simulation processing. Linear regression analysis with analysis of variance was used to assess the impact of RT60 on music enjoyment. Without CI simulation, music samples with RT60 = 3.0 seconds were ranked most pleasant and most musical, whereas those with RT60 = 1.6 seconds and RT60 = 3.0 seconds were ranked equally most natural (all p < 0.05). With CI simulation, music samples with RT60 = 0.2 seconds were ranked most pleasant, most musical, and most natural (all p < 0.05). Samples without CI simulation show a preference for middle-range RT60, whereas samples with CI simulation show a negative linear relationship between RT60 and musical enjoyment, with preference for minimal reverberation. Minimization of RT60 may be a useful strategy for increasing musical enjoyment under CI conditions, both in altering existing music as well as in composition of new music.

  3. Enjoy your food: on losing weight and taking pleasure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Else; Mol, Annemarie

    2014-02-01

    Does healthy eating require people to control themselves and abstain from pleasure? This idea is dominant, but in our studies of dieting in The Netherlands we encountered professionals who work in other ways. They encourage their clients to enjoy their food, as only such joy provides satisfaction and the sense that one has eaten enough. Enjoying one's food is not easy. It depends on being sensitive. This does not come naturally but needs training. And while one kind of hunger may be difficult to distinguish from another, feeling pleasure may open the doors to feeling pain. What is more, sensitivity is not enough: enjoying one's food also depends on the food being enjoyable. A lot of care is required for that. But while engaging in such care is hard work, along the way clients are encouraged to no longer ask 'Am I being good?' but to wonder instead 'Is this good for me?' Both these questions are normative and focus on the person rather than on her socio-material context. However, in the situations related here the difference is worth making. For it entails a shift from externally controlling your behaviour to self-caringly enjoying your food. © 2014 The Authors. Sociology of Health & Illness © 2014 Foundation for the Sociology of Health & Illness/John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Commitment, enjoyment and motivation in young soccer competitive players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Mas, Alexandre; Palou, Pere; Gili, Margarita; Ponseti, Xavier; Borras, Pere A; Vidal, Josep; Cruz, Jaume; Torregrosa, Miquel; Villamarín, Francisco; Sousa, Catarina

    2010-11-01

    Building upon Deci's and Ryan (1985) Self-determination theory as well as the sportive behavioral correlates of the model of Commitment (Scanlan et al., 1976), this study tries to establish the relationship between motivation and commitment in youth sport. For this purpose 454 young competitive soccer players answered the Sport Motivation Scale (SMS) and the Sport Commitment Questionnaire (SCQ) during the regular season. The SMS measures the three dimensions of the Motivational continuum (the Amotivation, the Extrinsic Motivation and the Intrinsic Motivation). The SCQ measures the Sportive Commitment and its composing factors such as the Enjoyment, the Alternatives to the sport, and the Social Pressure. Our findings provided a clear pattern of the influence of motivation in sport enjoyment and commitment, outlining the positive contribution of intrinsic and extrinsic motivation to enjoyment and commitment. Amotivation, contributes positively to alternatives to sport and negatively to enjoyment and commitment, It should be noted that extrinsic motivation has a higher contribution to enjoyment whereas intrinsic motivation has a higher contribution to commitment.

  5. Engagement, enjoyment, and energy expenditure during active video game play.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Elizabeth J; Tate, Deborah F; Ward, Dianne S; Ribisl, Kurt M; Bowling, J Michael; Kalyanaraman, Sriram

    2014-02-01

    Playing active video games can produce moderate levels of physical activity, but little is known about how these games motivate players to be active. Several psychological predictors, such as perceptions of competence, control, and engagement, may be associated with enjoyment of a game, which has in turn been hypothesized to predict energy expended during play. However, these relationships have yet to be tested in active video games. Young adults aged 18-35 (N = 97, 50 female) game for 13 minutes while energy expenditure was measured using indirect calorimetry. Self-reported measures of engagement, perceived competence, perceived control, and enjoyment were taken immediately afterward. Mediation was analyzed using path analysis. A path model in which enjoyment mediated the effects of engagement, perceived competence, and perceived control on energy expenditure and BMI directly affected energy expenditure was an adequate fit to the data, χ(2)(1, N = 97) = .199, p = .655; CFI = 1.00; RMSEA video game play. Games that are more enjoyable and engaging may produce greater intensity activity. Developers, practitioners, and researchers should consider characteristics that influence these predictors when creating or recommending active video games. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  6. Mindful Music Listening Instruction Increases Listening Sensitivity and Enjoyment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, William Todd

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of mindful listening instruction on music listening sensitivity and music listening enjoyment. A pretest--posttest control group design was used. Participants, fourth-grade students (N = 42) from an elementary school in a large city in the Northeastern United States, were randomly assigned to two…

  7. Experimental evidence for suspence as determinant of video game enjoyment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klimmt, C.; Rizzo, A.; Vorderer, P.A.; Koch, J.; Fischer, T.

    2009-01-01

    Based on theoretical assumptions from film psychology and their application to video games, the hypothesis is tested that suspense is a major factor in video game enjoyment. A first-person shooter game was experimentally manipulated to create either a low level or a high level of suspense.

  8. The role of facial expression in resisting enjoyable advertisements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lewiński, P.

    2015-01-01

    This dissertation on consumer resistance to enjoyable advertisements is positioned in the areas of persuasive communication and social psychology. In this thesis, it is argued that consumers can resist persuasion by controlling their facial expressions of emotion when exposed to an advertisement.

  9. Super-leadership and work enjoyment: direct and moderated influences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Günter F; Georgianna, Sibylle; Schermelleh-Engel, Karin; Roth, Anne C; Schreiber, Walter A; Sauerland, Martin; Muessigmann, Michael J; Jilg, Franziska

    2013-12-01

    Super-leadership is part of an approach called 'empowering leadership.' Within this approach, super-leadership is assumed to enable subordinates to lead themselves. The current study examined correlates of super-leadership. A questionnaire measuring two dimensions of super-leadership was used to analyze relationships between super-leadership and subordinates' work enjoyment, i.e., job satisfaction, subjective well-being, and emotional organizational commitment. In addition, moderating effects of the organizational context, i.e., organizational decentralization, on the relationships between super-leadership and work enjoyment were explored. 198 German employees from different occupations participated in the study. Latent moderator structural equation analysis revealed that the two factors of super-leadership, "coaching and communicative support" and "facilitation of personal autonomy and responsibility," had direct positive effects on subordinates' work enjoyment. Organizational decentralization moderated the effect of "coaching and communicative support" on work enjoyment but not the relations involving "facilitation of personal autonomy and responsibility." Conclusions for further research and practical applications were discussed.

  10. Early Adolescents' Enjoyment Experienced in Learning Situations at School and Its Relation to Student Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagenauer, Gerda; Hascher, Tina

    2014-01-01

    While many studies confirm that positive emotions, including enjoyment, lead to better student achievement, less empirical evidence exists about possible mediator variables that link achievement to enjoyment. It is proposed that achievement and enjoyment form a circular dependency; enjoyment in learning leads to higher achievement but a degree of…

  11. Evolution and the psychology of intergroup conflict: the male warrior hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Melissa M; Navarrete, Carlos David; Van Vugt, Mark

    2012-03-05

    The social science literature contains numerous examples of human tribalism and parochialism-the tendency to categorize individuals on the basis of their group membership, and treat ingroup members benevolently and outgroup members malevolently. We hypothesize that this tribal inclination is an adaptive response to the threat of coalitional aggression and intergroup conflict perpetrated by 'warrior males' in both ancestral and modern human environments. Here, we describe how male coalitional aggression could have affected the social psychologies of men and women differently and present preliminary evidence from experimental social psychological studies testing various predictions from the 'male warrior' hypothesis. Finally, we discuss the theoretical implications of our research for studying intergroup relations both in humans and non-humans and discuss some practical implications.

  12. Warrior Burials and the Elevation of a Military Elite in LHIIIC Achaia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senn, Heidi

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The collapse of Mycenaean civilization around 1200 B.C.E. left in its wake not only displaced and vulnerable settlements, but also a kind of ‘structural vacuum’ which forced populations to re-establish settlement patterns without the strict guidance of what had been a highly stratified and hierarchical authority under the Mycenaean palace centers. In a remote north-western region of ancient Hellas, the evidence of the so-called ‘warrior graves’ suggests that Achaian communities sought a decidedly military solution to the problems of re-organization and definition which confronted the reeling post-palatial population. In this article I will argue that the Achaian warriors, entombed so respectfully with the tools of their trade, were representative of a newly elevated military elite. *

  13. Enjoyment of exercise among people with arthritis: An inductive thematic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kibblewhite, Julia R; Treharne, Gareth J; Stebbings, Simon; Hegarty, Roisin Sm

    2017-09-01

    Past research into exercise among people with long-term health conditions has paid surprisingly little attention to the concept of enjoyment. This study explored enjoyment of exercise among people with arthritis. Semi-structured interviews were held with 12 participants aged 20-85 years. The transcripts were analysed using inductive thematic analysis. Four themes were identified: enjoyment of exercise in relation to other people, benefits of exercise in relation to enjoyment, working around barriers to enjoy exercise and finding an enjoyable balance to exercise. These themes highlight the relevance of enjoyment and how it could feature in advice about exercise for people with arthritis.

  14. From Attitudes to Actions: Predictors of Lion Killing by Maasai Warriors

    OpenAIRE

    Hazzah, Leela; Bath, Alistair; Dolrenry, Stephanie; Dickman, Amy; Frank, Laurence

    2017-01-01

    Despite legal protection, deliberate killing by local people is one of the major threats to the conservation of lions and other large carnivores in Africa. Addressing this problem poses particular challenges, mainly because it is difficult to uncover illicit behavior. This article examined two groups of Maasai warriors: individuals who have killed African lions (Panthera leo) and those who have not. We conducted interviews to explore the relationship between attitudes, intentions and known li...

  15. Polymeric Materials Models in the Warrior Injury Assessment Manikin (WIAMan) Anthropomorphic Test Device (ATD) Tech Demonstrator

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    analytical model currently used by military vehicle analysts has been continuously updated to address the model’s inherent deficiencies and make the... model is a hyperelastic polymer model based upon statistical mechanics and the finite extensibility of a polymer chain.23 Its rheological ...ARL-TR-7927 ● JAN 2017 US Army Research Laboratory Polymeric Materials Models in the Warrior Injury Assessment Manikin (WIAMan

  16. Enhancing Resilience through Post-Deployment Decompression: A Softer Approach to Sharpening the Warrior Edge

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-25

    hierarchy of needs set forth by Abraham Maslow in 1943, the basic human need for love, affection, and belongingness is superseded in importance only by...February 10, 2012. 80 Abraham H. Maslow , “A Theory of Human Motivation,” Psychological Review 50, (1943): 370-396. Maslow’s paper was originally published...Warrior. Guilford, CT: Globe Pequot Press, 2010. Maslow , Abraham H. “A Theory of Human Motivation.” Psychological Review 50, (1943): 370- 396, http

  17. Summer Meal Capacity Builder

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Agriculture — Allows users to search for summer meal sites from the previous summer by zip code, adding “layers” of information, such as free and reduced-price lunch participation...

  18. Sexual Healthcare for Wounded Warriors with Serious Combat-Related Injuries and Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tepper, Mitchell S

    2014-04-01

    Short of the rich literature on sexuality in men following spinal cord injury, started largely by physicians and mental health professionals within the United States Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) system following earlier wars, little attention has been paid to the sexual healthcare of wounded warriors with other serious combat-related injuries. The recent wars in Iraq and Afghanistan-Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF), Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF), and Operation New Dawn (OND)-resulted in physical injuries including traumatic brain injuries (TBIs), amputations, and serious burns. There are wounded warriors who are left blind or deaf, and a significant percent of OEF/OIF/OND warriors acquire other "invisible" injuries. While the signature injury of the war in Iraq is said to be TBI, there are a substantial number of service members surviving with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Many with serious injury are struggling with co-occurring depression. Furthermore, many of our wounded warriors are surviving with polytrauma (multiple traumatic injuries, i.e., amputation plus burns). One specific constellation of injuries seen too frequently among our service members in Afghanistan is referred to as a Dismounted Complex Blast Injury (DCBI) sometimes resulting in orchiectomy and/or penile injury. As with other blast injuries, burns, shrapnel injuries, vision loss, hearing loss, TBI, and PTSD often accompany DCBIs. All of the above injuries have significant sexual, endocrine, psychological, and relationship issues that need to be addressed. This article presents an overview of the effects of serious, combat-related injuries on sexual health and provides medical and other health professionals a framework within which to address comprehensive sexual healthcare using a medical rehabilitation model. Sexual healthcare for persons with combat-related disabilities presents a complex array of biopsychosocial and relational issues that call for a coordinated

  19. The fuzzy cluster analysis of terracotta warriors and horses of Qin Shihuang's mausoleum in pit No.3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Weijuan; Gao Zhengyao; Li Guoxia; Xie Jianzhong; Han Guohe

    2003-01-01

    Terracotta warriors and horses of Qin Shihuang's mausoleum is famous in the world, but their original place of raw material is still a riddle up to now. A total of 44 samples of pottery warriors and horses of Qin Shihuang's mausoleum in pit No.3, 20 samples of clay nearby Museum of the Terracotta Warriors and Horses of Qin Shihuang's Mausoleum, one sample of Yaozhou porcelain body are selected for analysis. The contents of 32 micro elements in these samples are measured by neutron activation analysis (NAA). These data are analyzed by fuzzy cluster analysis, and the trend cluster analysis diagram is obtained. The results show that in terms of chemical composition of the microelements the terracotta warriors and horses from pit No.3 are close to loam soil layer nearby Qin Shihuang's mausoleum, but become estranged from loess layers, and have no relation to Yaozhou porcelain body. Thus it is reasonable to deduce that the Lishan may be considered as the original place of raw materials of the terracotta warriors and horses of Qin Shihuang's mausoleum, and the kiln sites may be also neighborhood of Qin Shihuang's mausoleum

  20. Enjoying hobbies is related to desirable cardiovascular effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saihara, Keishi; Hamasaki, Shuichi; Ishida, Sanemasa; Kataoka, Tetsuro; Yoshikawa, Akiko; Orihara, Koji; Ogawa, Masakazu; Oketani, Naoya; Fukudome, Tsuyoshi; Atsuchi, Nobuhiko; Shinsato, Takuro; Okui, Hideki; Kubozono, Takuro; Ichiki, Hitoshi; Kuwahata, So; Mizoguchi, Etsuko; Fujita, Shoji; Takumi, Takuro; Ninomiya, Yuichi; Tomita, Kaai; Tei, Chuwa

    2010-03-01

    An unhealthy lifestyle can increase the risk of cardiovascular disease. However, the mechanism by which lifestyle influences the development of cardiovascular disease remains unclear. Since coronary endothelial function is a predictor of cardiovascular prognosis, the goal of this study was to characterize the effect of enjoying hobbies on coronary endothelial function and cardiovascular outcomes. A total of 121 consecutive patients (76 men, 45 women) with almost normal coronary arteries underwent Doppler flow study of the left anterior descending coronary artery following sequential administration of papaverine, acetylcholine, and nitroglycerin. On the basis of responses to questionnaires, patients were divided into two groups; the Hobby group (n = 71) who enjoyed hobbies, and the Non-hobby group (n = 50) who had no hobbies. Cardiovascular outcomes were assessed at long-term follow-up using medical records or questionnaire surveys for major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE).The average follow-up period was 916 +/- 515 days. There were no significant differences in demographics when comparing the two groups. The percent change in coronary blood flow and coronary artery diameter induced by acetylcholine was significantly greater in the Hobby group than in the Non-hobby group (49% +/- 77% vs 25% +/- 37%, P hobbies was the only independent predictor of MACE (odds ratio 8.1 [95% confidence interval 1.60, 41.90], P = 0.01) among the variables tested. In the early stages of arteriosclerosis, enjoying hobbies may improve cardiovascular outcomes via its favorable effects on coronary endothelial function.

  1. Enjoyment and anxiety in second language communication: An idiodynamic approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Boudreau

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Emotions are a fleeting experience, sometimes lasting only moments before dissipating. Prior research in SLA has either ignored emotions, underestimated their relevance, or has studied them as a relatively stable individual difference variable. In contrast, the present study takes an idiodynamic approach to examine the rapidly changing relationship between enjoyment and anxiety in second language communication, on a moment-to-moment timescale. University students who speak French as a second language were recruited to complete oral tasks in their second language. Participants then rated their per-second fluctuations in each emotion while watching a video recording of their tasks. Immediately after this, they were interviewed about their attributions for fluctuations in their ratings. We found that the relationship between enjoyment and anxiety is highly dynamic, resulting in varying patterns of correlation ranging from negative to positive. Triangulation of ratings of anxiety and enjoyment with interview data produces a richer understanding of the role of emotions in second language communication.

  2. Enjoyment: A Conceptual Exploration and Overview of Experimental Evidence in the Context of Games for Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crutzen, Rik; van 't Riet, Jonathan; Short, Camille E

    2016-02-01

    Enjoyment is consistently noted as important for engaging audiences in games for health. However, as a term, enjoyment is often used interchangeably with a host of other terms, some of which overlap conceptually. This obscures what does and what does not constitute enjoyment, and in turn slows scientific progress by making the study of enjoyment and the synthesis of enjoyment-related research difficult. This article is aimed at improving our understanding of enjoyment by distinguishing enjoyment from other important constructs, such as fun and engagement, and by providing an overview of the experimental evidence on the determinants of enjoyment in videogames. Competence, narrative transportation, and relevance are identified as key factors related to enjoyment, and future studies examining these factors using games for health are recommended.

  3. NEWS: AAPT Summer Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellema, Steve

    2000-11-01

    The 2000 Summer Meeting of the American Association of Physics Teachers (AAPT) was held from 28~July-2~August at the University of Guelph in Ontario, Canada. Despite somewhat rainy weather throughout the week, the annual gathering was an enjoyable one, filled with interesting talks on the state of physics education in North America. Using a new scheduling format for the summer meeting, all of the paid workshops and tutorials were held on Saturday and Sunday 29-30 July. The invited and contributed papers for the main AAPT meeting were then presented on Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday. As had been done in 1999 in San Antonio, a two-day tandem meeting dedicated to Physics Education Research (PER) was held on Wednesday and Thursday 2-3 August, immediately after the main AAPT meeting. Over the three days of the main meeting, 60 sessions were held under the sponsorship of various AAPT committees. These included sessions (numbers in parentheses) organized by the committees on Apparatus (1), Astronomy Education (3), Awards (2), Computers (5), Graduate Education (2), High Schools (1), History and Philosophy (1), Instructional Media (3), International Education (1), Laboratories (2), Pre-High School Education (2), Programs (4), Professional Concerns (6), Research in Physics Education (8), Science Education for the Public (2), Two-Year Colleges (5), Undergraduate Education (7) and Women in Physics (4). Figure 1. Guelph Church of Our Lady. The main meeting opened on Sunday evening with an invited lecture by Dr John J Simpson from the host institution, the University of Guelph, describing the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory. At the ceremonial session that began the activities on Monday morning, recognition was given to Clifford Swartz for his almost 30 years of service as Editor of the AAPT journal, The Physics Teacher. This was followed by an invited talk by Jim Nelson from Seminole County Public School in Florida, who received the Excellence in Pre-College Teaching Award. The

  4. Issues in summer safety: a call for sun protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheer, B

    1999-01-01

    Summer is associated with vacation and time spent in the outdoors. It is also a time when parents and children need to be reminded of the dangers and long-term health effects of being exposed to hazards of the sun. It has been estimated that the regular use of sunscreen during childhood would reduce the lifetime incidence of certain types of skin cancer by 78%. Selecting a sunscreen may be a difficult task. Pediatric nurses and other health care professionals are in a pivotal position to educate both parents and children on the benefits of sun protection and offer information about strategies for enjoying a safe summer.

  5. The myth of the warrior: martial masculinity and the end of Don't Ask, Don't Tell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allsep, L Michael

    2013-01-01

    The image of the male warrior still dominates military culture, to the exclusion of women and homosexuals. Complicating the picture is a technological revolution that promises to widen the current gap between the myth and reality of the modern warrior even further. Nonetheless, despite long arguing that homosexuals were a direct threat to military culture and effectiveness, the Pentagon has largely treated the end of Don't Ask, Don't Tell as a policy matter. The difficulties still experienced by women in the armed services 40 years after they were first incorporated in significant numbers indicates that this response will be insufficient to address the deeper cultural issues. Gender issues implicate deeply held beliefs and values that persist even in the face of years of official admonishment and denial. Unless the military begins to transparently bridge the gap between the myth and reality of the modern warrior, military service without discrimination based on sexual orientation will remain an unachieved goal.

  6. Wii Fit U intensity and enjoyment in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripette, Julien; Murakami, Haruka; Ando, Takafumi; Kawakami, Ryoko; Tanaka, Noriko; Tanaka, Shigeho; Miyachi, Motohiko

    2014-08-26

    The Wii Fit series (Nintendo Inc., Japan) provides active video games (AVGs) to help adults to maintain a sufficient level of daily physical activity (PA). The second generation of home AVG consoles is now emerging with new game modalities (including a portable mini screen in the case of the new Wii U). The present study was performed to investigate the intensity and enjoyment of Wii Fit U games among adults. Metabolic equivalent (METs, i.e., intensity) of the Wii Fit U activities were evaluated using metabolic chambers in 16 sedentary adults (8 women and 8 men). A short version of the physical activity enjoyment scale was completed for each activity. Wii Fit U activities were distributed over a range from 2.2  ±  0.4 METs (Hula dance) to 4.7  ±  1.2 (Hip-hop dance). Seven activities were classified as light-intensity PA (game modality does not induce higher METs. Men exercised at higher intensities than women. There was no correlation between enjoyment and MET values in women or men. More and more moderate-intensity activities are available through video gaming, but the average intensity (3.2  ±  0.6) is still low. Users should be aware that AVGs alone cannot fulfill the recommendations for PA, and the video games industry still must innovate further to enhance gaming intensity and make the tool more attractive to health and fitness professionals.

  7. Defeating the Warrior: genetic architecture of triticale resistance against a novel aggressive yellow rust race.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losert, Dominik; Maurer, Hans Peter; Leiser, Willmar L; Würschum, Tobias

    2017-04-01

    Genome-wide association mapping of resistance against the novel, aggressive 'Warrior' race of yellow rust in triticale revealed a genetic architecture with some medium-effect QTL and a quantitative component, which in combination confer high levels of resistance on both leaves and ears. Yellow rust is an important destructive fungal disease in small grain cereals and the exotic 'Warrior' race has recently conquered Europe. The aim of this study was to investigate the genetic architecture of yellow rust resistance in hexaploid winter triticale as the basis for a successful resistance breeding. To this end, a diverse panel of 919 genotypes was evaluated for yellow rust infection on leaves and ears in multi-location field trials and genotyped by genotyping-by-sequencing as well as for known Yr resistance loci. Genome-wide association mapping identified ten quantitative trait loci (QTL) for yellow rust resistance on the leaves and seven of these also for ear resistance. The total genotypic variance explained by the QTL amounted to 44.0% for leaf and 26.0% for ear resistance. The same three medium-effect QTL were identified for both traits on chromosomes 1B, 2B, and 7B. Interestingly, plants pyramiding the resistance allele of all three medium-effect QTL were generally most resistant, but constitute less than 5% of the investigated triticale breeding material. Nevertheless, a genome-wide prediction yielded a higher predictive ability than prediction based on these three QTL. Taken together, our results show that yellow rust resistance in winter triticale is genetically complex, including both medium-effect QTL as well as a quantitative resistance component. Resistance to the novel 'Warrior' race of this fungal pathogen is consequently best achieved by recurrent selection in the field based on identified resistant lines and can potentially be assisted by genomic approaches.

  8. Enjoyment: A conceptual exploration and overview of experimental evidence in the context of games for health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crutzen, R.M.M.; Riet, J.P. van 't; Short, C.E.

    2016-01-01

    Enjoyment is consistently noted as important for engaging audiences in games for health. However, as a term, enjoyment is often used interchangeably with a host of other terms, some of which overlap conceptually. This obscures what does and what does not constitute enjoyment, and in turn slows

  9. Your Best Summer Ever

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleaver, Samantha

    2012-01-01

    "It must be nice to have summers off." Only other teachers know just how short summer is, with much of August devoted to planning for the new school year. This article offers 17 fresh ideas for exploring, making money, and preparing for next year. Plus, a reading list that hits all the marks!

  10. Indian Summer Arts Festival


    OpenAIRE

    Martel, Yann; Tabu; Tejpal, Tarun; Kunzru, Hari

    2011-01-01

    The SFU Woodward's Cultural Unit partnered with the Indian Summer Festival Society to kick off the inaugural Indian Summer Festival. Held at the Goldcorp Centre for the Arts, it included an interactive Literature Series with notable authors from both India and Canada, including special guests Yann Martel, Bollywood superstar Tabu, journalist Tarun Tejpal, writer Hari Kunzru, and many others.

  11. Winter warriors : Alberta company bringing hydronic heating to oilsands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ball, C.

    2005-10-01

    Hydronic heating systems are expected to become the norm on oilsands construction sites. This article presented an overview of Innovative Climate Solutions Inc. (ICS), an Alberta company who specialize in portable flame-free climate-control systems, and have earned a reputation for staying on the leading edge of technology. ICS has now established a joint venture and local Fort McMurray presence with AirCon Technologies. ICS has focused on portable flame-free heat, concrete curing, grown thawing and drying equipment services. Increasingly drying applications are used year-round to improve project schedules, as these systems can reduce excessive humidity in work environments to improve productivity and safety. Drywall compound, paint and textures cure quickly during cool or damp summer nights, and dry heat also prevents prevents moisture, safeguarding a site against mould. As well as providing solutions to overcome cold weather challenges, ICS-trained climate control consultants work closely with each customer to determine fuel costs, heating needs, and how much equipment is needed. ICS systems output capacity of up to 1.2 million Btu per system, and have the power to thaw 24,000 square feet of ground or cure 36,000 square feet of concrete per system. The design allows one climate-control system to handle the heating needs for an entire construction project, reducing downtime associated with traditional methods of cold-weather construction and preventing emissions risks to workers. The system draws upon a centrally located hydronic water heater which warms a heat-transfer fluid. The fluid is then pumped through a fluid circulation system loop to heat exchangers at remote locations. The systems can run for 125 days between oil changes, with up to 75 hours of run time between re-fuelling. 3 figs.

  12. The development of video game enjoyment in a role playing game.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirth, Werner; Ryffel, Fabian; von Pape, Thilo; Karnowski, Veronika

    2013-04-01

    This study examines the development of video game enjoyment over time. The results of a longitudinal study (N=62) show that enjoyment increases over several sessions. Moreover, results of a multilevel regression model indicate a causal link between the dependent variable video game enjoyment and the predictor variables exploratory behavior, spatial presence, competence, suspense and solution, and simulated experiences of life. These findings are important for video game research because they reveal the antecedents of video game enjoyment in a real-world longitudinal setting. Results are discussed in terms of the dynamics of video game enjoyment under real-world conditions.

  13. NE-F2: Fluids and Propulsion Design: Summer 2014 Pathways Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Katherine M.

    2014-01-01

    Describes major and minor projects I worked on over this summer and all I learned in the process. I go into detail with my main project, designing a new purge system for GODU LO2. I also highlight some significant events that I really enjoyed during my internship here at KSC

  14. The Wanderer, the Chameleon, and the Warrior: Experiences of Doctoral Students of Color Developing a Research Identity in Educational Administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami-Ramalho, Elizabeth; Piert, Joyce; Militello, Matthew

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the authors use their personal narratives and collaborative portraits as methods to shed light on the complexities of developing a research identity while journeying through a doctoral program. Using the metaphors of a wanderer, a chameleon, and a warrior, their narratives represent portraits of experiences faced by doctoral…

  15. A Virginia Wounded Warrior and School of Social Work Partnership: The "MISSION: Healthy Relationships" Project and Student Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Suzie S.; Rotabi, Karen Smith; McIntosh, Edward M.; High, Jennifer G.; Pohl, Amanda; Herrmann, Amy

    2015-01-01

    Postdeployment family reintegration and relationship breakdown among combat veterans has received considerable attention from the Department of Defense and the media. Social interventions have been developed as a family strengthening strategy. In this article, we present a university-Wounded Warrior partnership where a relationship enhancement…

  16. The 'warrior gene' and the Mãori people: the responsibility of the geneticists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perbal, Laurence

    2013-09-01

    The 'gene of' is a teleosemantic expression that conveys a simplistic and linear relationship between a gene and a phenotype. Throughout the 20th century, geneticists studied these genes of traits. The studies were often polemical when they concerned human traits: the 'crime gene', 'poverty gene', 'IQ gene', 'gay gene' or 'gene of alcoholism'. Quite recently, a controversy occurred in 2006 in New Zealand that started with the claim that a 'warrior gene' exists in the Mãori community. This claim came from a geneticist working on the MAOA gene. This article is interested in the responsibility of that researcher regarding the origin of the controversy. Several errors were made: overestimation of results, abusive use of the 'gene of' kind of expression, poor communication with the media and a lack of scientific culture. The issues of the debate were not taken into account sufficiently, either from the political, social, ethical or even the genetic points of view. After more than 100 years of debates around 'genes of' all kinds (here, the 'warrior gene'), geneticists may not hide themselves behind the media when a controversy occurs. Responsibilities have to be assumed. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Registration Summer Camp 2016

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    Reminder: registration for the CERN Staff Association Summer Camp is now open for children from 4 to 6 years old.   More information on the website: http://nurseryschool.web.cern.ch/. The summer camp is open to all children. The proposed cost is 480.-CHF/week, lunch included. The camp will be open weeks 27, 28, 29 and 30, from 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. For further questions, you are welcome to contact us by email at Summer.Camp@cern.ch. CERN Staff Association

  18. 2003 SOLAS Summer School

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McGillis, Wade R

    2003-01-01

    In 2003, the United States provided support for the participation of 18 students, three research assistants, and seven lecturers in the first Surface Ocean Lower Atmosphere Study (SOLAS) Summer School...

  19. Summer Meal Sites

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — Information pertaining to Summer Meal Sites, as collected by Citiparks in the City of Pittsburgh Department of Parks and Recreation. This dataset includes the...

  20. Changing memory of food enjoyment to increase food liking, choice and intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Eric; Blissett, Jackie; Higgs, Suzanne

    2012-10-28

    Novel ways to increase liking and intake of food are needed to encourage acceptance of healthier food. How enjoyable we remember food to have been is likely to be a significant predictor of food choice. Two studies examined whether remembered enjoyment of eating a food can be increased and whether this makes individuals more likely to eat that food in the future. In Study One, a simple manipulation of instructing participants to rehearse what they found enjoyable about a food immediately after eating it was used to increase remembered enjoyment (relative to controls). In a separate study; Study Two, the effect of increasing remembered enjoyment on food choice was tested by examining whether the manipulation to increase remembered enjoyment resulted in participants choosing to eat more of a food as part of a later buffet lunch. The experimental manipulation increased remembered enjoyment for the food (Study One). A change in remembered enjoyment was shown to have a significant effect on the amount of a food participants chose to eat the following day for lunch (Study Two). The present studies suggest that remembered enjoyment can be increased via a simple act of rehearsal, resulting in a later increase in the amount of food chosen and eaten. Interventions based on altering remembered enjoyment of healthy food choices warrant further investigation.

  1. Self-Efficacy versus Perceived Enjoyment as Predictors of Physical Activity Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Beth A.; Williams, David M.; Frayeh, Amanda L.; Marcus, Bess H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Self-efficacy and physical activity (PA) enjoyment are related to PA behavior, but it is unclear which is more important and how they interrelate. The purpose of this study was to examine how these two constructs interrelate to influence PA behavior. Design Participants were low active adults (n=448) participating in a RCT examining the effect of a PA promotion intervention. Participants completed physical activity, enjoyment, and self-efficacy measures at baseline, six, and 12 months. Results Self-efficacy and enjoyment at both baseline and six months predicted PA at 12 months. However, enjoyment was a stronger predictor than self-efficacy in that self-efficacy no longer predicted PA behavior when included alongside enjoyment. In follow-up mediation analyses, enjoyment at six months did not mediate the effect of baseline self-efficacy on 12-month PA; however, six-month self-efficacy mediated the effect of baseline enjoyment on 12-month PA. Conclusion Our results indicate that interventions should perhaps initially focus on increasing enjoyment of physical activity. Greater PA enjoyment appears to influence individuals’ self-reported ability to engage in regular PA (i.e., higher self-efficacy ratings). Additional research is needed to better understand the interrelationships between self-efficacy and enjoyment and how these constructs affect PA. PMID:26541890

  2. Precision Strike 2008 Summer Forum

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-11

    Surface Launch SEAD SFW Fuze Aerial Targets AMRAAM JDAM JASSM WCMD AIM-9X ARTS MAC IIMission: Deliver war-winning technology, acquisition, test...barrel life •Barrel construction to contain rail repulsive forces •Scaling from 8MJ (state of the art ) to 32MJ to 64MJ Muzzle Energy •Thermal...Museum Joint  Culinary   Center of  Excellence Deputy Senior  MSN Commander Warrior Tng (TA 27) DCG/Cmdt Program  Integration Sustainment  Battle Lab

  3. Summer Steelhead Distribution [ds341

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Natural Resource Agency — Summer Steelhead Distribution October 2009 Version This dataset depicts observation-based stream-level geographic distribution of anadromous summer-run steelhead...

  4. The most enjoyable way to learn the periodic table

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gümüşsoy, Verim; Kaya, Mustafa

    2017-04-01

    Constructivist learning allows students to be actively involved in the learning process and thus the learning to be permanent. It makes the lesson more interesting and enjoyable compared to classical learning where students are passive and get bored quickly. When students engage in activities during the learning process, they enjoy it more. And there is no doubt that games help this a lot. In this project, a game has been designed to make it more entertaining to learn the periodical table for the students. In this game, a huge periodical table (with empty columns) is drawn with acrylic paint in the school yard. Acrylic paint is preferred because it is resilient to outdoor conditions, quick drying and relatively durable. Besides its functionality in the game, the presence of the huge periodical table in the yard boosts students' motivation for scientific activities. Students are taught about the periodical table in their Chemistry lesson a week before the game is to be played. They are informed about the game and asked to bring some sportswear to wear during the game. On the game day, the class is divided into teams of five people. Each team wears a different color vest and is called by the color of the vest they are wearing. The starting point is drawn as far as possible from the periodical table. Furthermore, some question cards that cover the subject are used in the game. As an example from the game: one student from each team is asked to find the correct place by the atomic number of a certain element as described in the cards given to them. There is a time limit so the stopwatch is started as each student starts reading the information on the card. The student runs to the correct place of the certain element according to the clues on their given card. Then they stop and raise their hands. The teacher stops the stopwatch for that student. The teams gain points according to their speed and correct guesses. The game continues as other students are given different

  5. But I Like PE: Factors Associated With Enjoyment of Physical Education Class in Middle School Girls

    OpenAIRE

    Barr-Anderson, Daheia J.; Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne; Schmitz, Kathryn H.; Ward, Dianne S.; Conway, Terry L.; Pratt, Charlotte; Baggett, Chris D.; Lytle, Leslie; Pate, Russell R.

    2008-01-01

    The current study examined associations between physical education (PE) class enjoyment and sociodemographic, personal, and perceived school environment factors among early adolescent girls. Participants included 1,511 sixth-grade girls who completed baseline assessments for the Trial of Activity in Adolescent Girls, with 50% indicating they enjoyed PE class a lot. Variables positively associated with PE class enjoyment included physical activity level, perceived benefits of physical activity...

  6. How can we enhance enjoyment of secondary school? The student view.

    OpenAIRE

    Gorard, S.; See, B.H.

    2011-01-01

    This paper considers enjoyment of formal education for young people aged 14 to 16, largely from their own perspective, based on the view of around 3000 students in England. The data include documentary analysis, official statistics, interviews and surveys with staff and students. Enjoyment of school tends to be promoted by factors such as successful social relationships, small classes, variation in learning and students having some control of their learning. Enjoyment tends to be inhibited by...

  7. From Attitudes to Actions: Predictors of Lion Killing by Maasai Warriors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazzah, Leela; Bath, Alistair; Dolrenry, Stephanie; Dickman, Amy; Frank, Laurence

    2017-01-01

    Despite legal protection, deliberate killing by local people is one of the major threats to the conservation of lions and other large carnivores in Africa. Addressing this problem poses particular challenges, mainly because it is difficult to uncover illicit behavior. This article examined two groups of Maasai warriors: individuals who have killed African lions (Panthera leo) and those who have not. We conducted interviews to explore the relationship between attitudes, intentions and known lion killing behavior. Factor analysis and logistic regression revealed that lion killing was mainly determined by: (a) general attitudes toward lions, (b) engagement in traditional customs, (c) lion killing intentions to defend property, and (d) socio-cultural killing intentions. Our results indicated that general attitudes toward lions were the strongest predictor of lion killing behavior. Influencing attitudes to encourage pro-conservation behavior may help reduce killing.

  8. Pollution effects on stone benches of the Eagle Warriors Precinct at the Major Temple, Mexico City

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miranda, J.; Gallardo, M.L.; Grimaldi, D.M.; Roman-Berrelleza, J.A.; Ruvalcaba-Sil, J.L.; Ontalba Salamanca, M.A.; Morales, J.G.

    1999-01-01

    During Major Temple archaeological site excavations in Downtown Mexico City, the precinct of one of the most important Mexica military caste, the Eagle Warriors, was discovered. The ceremonial enclosure is composed of three rooms surrounded by paintings on 11 stone benches placed against the walls. Nowadays, these paintings and the stones present the effects of different deterioration processes produced by the underground water level, high humidity, and the presence of soil, water, and air pollutants. Ion beam analysis of samples from the benches and wall paintings was performed using PIXE and RBS techniques. Using enrichment factors of elements relative to iron concentrations, possible contamination by sulfur and chlorine salts was found, as well as airborne zinc scavenged by rain

  9. Summer Camp Registrations 2018

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2018-01-01

    Registration for the CERN SA Summer camp, for children from 4 to 6 years old, is now open. The general conditions are available on the EVE and School website: http://nurseryschool.web.cern.ch For further questions, please contact us by email at  Summer.Camp@cern.ch An inscription per week is proposed, for 450.-CHF/week, lunch included. The camp will be open on weeks 27, 28, 29 and 30, from 8:30 am to 5:30 pm. This year the theme will be Vivaldi’s Four Seasons.

  10. Developing a tool to measure the factors influencing nurses' enjoyment of nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkes, Lesley; Doull, Michelle; Ng Chok, Harrison; Mashingaidze, Gladys

    2017-07-01

    To develop a tool to measure the influencing nurses' enjoyment of nursing. Enjoyment in the workplace is an influential aspect found to boost work morale, job satisfaction leading to higher work retention which is important in nursing given the availability of nurses in the workforce. This study looks to refine the determinants of enjoyment from nurses in a large metropolitan hospital in western Sydney. Quantitative. A 23-item survey questionnaire was used to ask nurses to rate the determinants that affect their enjoyment of nursing on a five-point Likert scale. The survey was distributed in a hard copy and online through a hospital-wide broadcast. Demographic items were also collected. A total of 124 responses were received, of which 54 were from online and 70 from hard copy surveys. The data analysis found 16 determinants of enjoyment. Of these, four were perceived by over 80% of the nurses to negatively impact their enjoyment. In contrast, nine items showed a positive effect on enjoyment with educating others, connecting with others, variety of work, doing and sharing with others, supporting others being the most positive (≥89% of responses). Three items were considered neutral: criticism, busy workload and changing policies. This study has added to the growing evidence on nurse enjoyment and its effects on job satisfaction. Nurses enjoy caring for patients and also find enjoyment and satisfaction in teaching others to care as well as socially connecting. Enjoyment seems to be one of the main reasons nurses continue to stay in nursing even though the system and people are not always supportive, encouraging or conducive to career development. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Lessons learned from 350 virtual-reality sessions with warriors diagnosed with combat-related posttraumatic stress disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Dennis Patrick; Wiederhold, Brenda K; Spira, James

    2010-02-01

    Virtual-reality (VR) therapy has been distinguished from other psychotherapy interventions through the use of computer-assisted interventions that rely on the concepts of "immersion," "presence," and "synchrony." In this work, these concepts are defined, and their uses, within the VR treatment architecture, are discussed. VR therapy's emphasis on the incorporation of biofeedback and meditation, as a component of the VR treatment architecture, is also reviewed. A growing body of research has documented VR therapy as a successful treatment for combat-related Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). The VR treatment architecture, utilized to treat 30 warriors diagnosed with combat-related PTSD, is summarized. Lastly, case summaries of two warriors successfully treated with VR therapy are included to assist with the goal of better understanding a VR treatment architecture paradigm. Continued validation of the VR treatment model is encouraged.

  12. Compliance Monitoring of Underwater Blasting for Rock Removal at Warrior Point, Columbia River Channel Improvement Project, 2009/2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlson, Thomas J.; Johnson, Gary E.; Woodley, Christa M.; Skalski, J. R.; Seaburg, Adam

    2011-05-10

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District (USACE) conducted the 20-year Columbia River Channel Improvement Project (CRCIP) to deepen the navigation channel between Portland, Oregon, and the Pacific Ocean to allow transit of fully loaded Panamax ships (100 ft wide, 600 to 700 ft long, and draft 45 to 50 ft). In the vicinity of Warrior Point, between river miles (RM) 87 and 88 near St. Helens, Oregon, the USACE conducted underwater blasting and dredging to remove 300,000 yd3 of a basalt rock formation to reach a depth of 44 ft in the Columbia River navigation channel. The purpose of this report is to document methods and results of the compliance monitoring study for the blasting project at Warrior Point in the Columbia River.

  13. Reiki: Application as a Modality of Integrative Therapy for Treating Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder and Other Wounded Warrior Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-17

    Oncology Nursing 12, no. 3 (June 2008): 489-494. 62 Wounded Warrior Project, “Combat Stress Recovery Programs,” http://www.woundedwarriorproject.org...Health Care Professionals with Burnout ,” Biological Research for Nursing 13, no. 4 (October 2011): 376-82. 78 A. T. Vitale and P. C. O’Conner, “The...Variability, Cortisol Levels, and Body Temperature in Health Care Professionals with Burnout .” Biological Research for Nursing 13, no. 4 (October 2011): 376

  14. ASHRAE Summer Meeting 1998

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudbeck, Claus Christian

    1998-01-01

    ASHRAE's (American Society for Heating, Refrigerating and Air- Condition Engineering) summer meeting was visited in June in Toronto. ASHRAE is an American organization dealing with American problems in HVAC, but many results can be used under Danish conditions. It is therefore essential that Danish...

  15. Summer of history

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burman, Jeremy Trevelyan

    2017-01-01

    This summer, the University of Groningen will host three events—yes, three—that will be of special interest to the historically- and theoretically-inclined. The meeting of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science (HOPOS) will be held on July 9-12, a workshop exploring the

  16. Books for Summer Reading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phi Delta Kappan, 1992

    1992-01-01

    Advises administrators to use their summers to relax and recharge their intellectual batteries. Reading suggestions include Edith Wharton's "House of Mirth," Charlotte Perkins Gilman's "The Yellow Wallpaper," Amy Tan's "Joy Luck Club," China Achebe's "Things Fall Apart," Paule Marshall's "The Chosen…

  17. How Can We Enhance Enjoyment of Secondary School? The Student View

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorard, Stephen; See, Beng Huat

    2011-01-01

    This paper considers enjoyment of formal education for young people aged 14 to 16, largely from their own perspective, based on the view of around 3000 students in England. The data include documentary analysis, official statistics, interviews and surveys with staff and students. Enjoyment of school tends to be promoted by factors such as…

  18. EGameFlow: A Scale to Measure Learners' Enjoyment of E-Learning Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Fong-Ling; Su, Rong-Chang; Yu, Sheng-Chin

    2009-01-01

    In an effective e-learning game, the learner's enjoyment acts as a catalyst to encourage his/her learning initiative. Therefore, the availability of a scale that effectively measures the enjoyment offered by e-learning games assist the game designer to understanding the strength and flaw of the game efficiently from the learner's points of view.…

  19. Media enjoyment as need satisfaction: The contribution of hedonic and non-hedonic needs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tamborini, R.; Grizzard, M.; Bowman, N.D.; Reinecke, L.; Lewis, R.; Eden, A.L.

    2011-01-01

    Most early research on entertainment defines media enjoyment in functional terms as the satisfaction of hedonic needs. Two studies demonstrate the value of including nonhedonic and hedonic need satisfaction in defining enjoyment. Both studies find support for a need-satisfaction model showing that

  20. But I like PE: factors associated with enjoyment of physical education class in middle school girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr-Anderson, Daheia J; Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne; Schmitz, Kathryn H; Ward, Dianne S; Conway, Terry L; Pratt, Charlotte; Baggett, Chris D; Lytle, Leslie; Pate, Russell R

    2008-03-01

    The current study examined associations between physical education (PE) class enjoyment and sociodemographic, personal, and perceived school environment factors among early adolescent girls. Participants included 1,511 sixth-grade girls who completed baseline assessments for the Trial of Activity in Adolescent Girls, with 50% indicating they enjoyed PE class a lot. Variables positively associated with PE class enjoyment included physical activity level, perceived benefits of physical activity, self-efficacy for leisure time physical activity, and perceived school climate for girls' physical activity as influenced by teachers, while body mass index was inversely associated with PE class enjoyment. After adjusting for all variables in the model, PE class enjoyment was significantly greater in Blacks than in Whites. In model testing, with mutual adjustment for all variables, self-efficacy was the strongest correlate of PE class enjoyment, followed by perceived benefits, race/ethnicity, and teachers' support for girls' physical activity, as compared to boys, at school. The overall model explained 11% of the variance in PE class enjoyment. Findings suggest that efforts to enhance girls' self-efficacy and perceived benefits and to provide a supportive PE class environment that promotes gender equality can potentially increase PE class enjoyment among young girls.

  1. Adolescents' Enjoyment of Graphic Horror: Effects of Viewers' Attitudes and Portrayals of Victim.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Mary Beth

    1993-01-01

    Finds that more permissive sexual attitudes and lower levels of punitiveness were associated with adolescents' greater enjoyment of "slasher films." Shows that traditional attitudes toward females' sexuality were positively associated with gore-watching motivations and with greater enjoyment of previews featuring female victims. (SR)

  2. The Impact of Continuous and Interval Cycle Exercise on Affect and Enjoyment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilpatrick, Marcus W.; Greeley, Samuel J.; Collins, Larry H.

    2015-01-01

    Rates of physical activity remain low despite public health efforts. One form of physical activity that provides significant physiological benefit but has not been evaluated in terms of affective and enjoyment responses is interval exercise. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare affect and enjoyment assessed before, during, and after…

  3. The motive for sensory pleasure: enjoyment of nature and its representation in painting, music, and literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenberger, Robert; Sucharski, Ivan L; Yalowitz, Steven; Kent, Robert J; Loomis, Ross J; Jones, Jason R; Paylor, Sarah; Aselage, Justin; Mueller, Meta Steiger; McLaughlin, John P

    2010-04-01

    Eight studies assessed the motive for sensory pleasure (MSP) involving a general disposition to enjoy and pursue pleasant nature-related experiences and avoid unpleasant nature-related experiences. The stated enjoyment of pleasant sights, smells, sounds, and tactile sensations formed a unitary construct that was distinct from sensation seeking, novelty preference, and need for cognition. MSP was found to be related to (a) enjoyment of pleasant nature scenes and music of high but not low clarity; (b) enjoyment of writings that portrayed highly detailed nature scenes; (c) enjoyment of pleasantly themed paintings and dislike of unpleasant paintings, as distinct from findings with Openness to Experience; (d) choice of pleasant nature scenes over exciting or intellectually stimulating scenes; (e) view duration and memory of artistically rendered quilts; (f) interest in detailed information about nature scenes; and (g) frequency of sensory-type suggestions for improvement of a museum exhibit.

  4. The Importance of Parents’ Behavior in their Children’s Enjoyment and Amotivation in Sports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Miguel, Pedro A.; Leo, Francisco M.; Sánchez-Oliva, David; Amado, Diana; García-Calvo, Tomás

    2013-01-01

    The main aim of the research was to examine the relationship between motivational orientations and parents’ behavior with regard to the players’ motivational orientation, motivational climate, enjoyment and amotivation. The sample comprised 723 athletes (M = 12.37, SD = 1.48) and 723 parents (M = 46.46, SD = 2.56). Players were male and female who belonged to federative basketball, handball, football and volleyball teams. Parents and athletes completed questionnaires that assessed motivational orientations, parents’ involvement in the practice as well as enjoyment and motivation in the sport. Results showed a positive relationship between parents’ support of the sport and players’ enjoyment and a negative relationship with players’ amotivation. Moreover, in players who perceived more pressure from their parents, there was a positive association with amotivation and a negative one with enjoyment. Lastly, it was emphasized that appropriate parental participation can promote an increase of players’ enjoyment of and motivation for sport. PMID:23717366

  5. The Importance of Parents' Behavior in their Children's Enjoyment and Amotivation in Sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Miguel, Pedro A; Leo, Francisco M; Sánchez-Oliva, David; Amado, Diana; García-Calvo, Tomás

    2013-03-01

    The main aim of the research was to examine the relationship between motivational orientations and parents' behavior with regard to the players' motivational orientation, motivational climate, enjoyment and amotivation. The sample comprised 723 athletes (M = 12.37, SD = 1.48) and 723 parents (M = 46.46, SD = 2.56). Players were male and female who belonged to federative basketball, handball, football and volleyball teams. Parents and athletes completed questionnaires that assessed motivational orientations, parents' involvement in the practice as well as enjoyment and motivation in the sport. Results showed a positive relationship between parents' support of the sport and players' enjoyment and a negative relationship with players' amotivation. Moreover, in players who perceived more pressure from their parents, there was a positive association with amotivation and a negative one with enjoyment. Lastly, it was emphasized that appropriate parental participation can promote an increase of players' enjoyment of and motivation for sport.

  6. Disentangling Fun and Enjoyment in Exergames Using an Expanded Design, Play, Experience Framework: A Narrative Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellecker, Robin; Lyons, Elizabeth J; Baranowski, Tom

    2013-06-01

    With exergames (as with physical activity in general), more intense and longer-duration game play should accrue more health benefits. Exergames, however, appear to be played for relatively short durations, often at medium or lower intensities. Ostensibly games are played for fun or enjoyment. Enhancing the fun or enjoyment experienced during exergame play should enhance the intensity and duration of physical activity, and thereby the health benefits. Research, reviewed herein, indicates fun and/or enjoyment in games are inherently laden with psychosocial, physiological, and embodiment substrates. Physical activity may also have separate or closely related psychosocial, physiological, and embodiment enjoyment substrates. Research is needed to integrate these levels of experience and to identify the game mechanics that enhance, and even maximize, the fun or enjoyment experienced in exergames, to thereby increase the health benefit.

  7. Weed Warriors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buczynski, Sandy

    2007-01-01

    In these activities, middle school and high school students examine the threat of nonnative plant species to Hawaiian ecosystems. Students explore different viewpoints on alien plants and consider how beliefs and attitudes may affect others' decisions concerning nonnative plant species. Students also identify invasive plant characteristics and…

  8. Summer 2014 Pathways Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hand, Zachary

    2014-01-01

    Over the summer I had the exciting opportunity to work for NASA at the Kennedy Space Center as a Mission Assurance Engineering intern. When I was offered a position in mission assurance for the Safety and Mission Assurance directorate's Launch Services Division, I didn't really know what I would be doing, but I knew it would be an excellent opportunity to learn and grow professionally. In this report I will provide some background information on the Launch Services Division, as well as detail my duties and accomplishments during my time as an intern. Additionally, I will relate the significance of my work experience to my current academic work and future career goals. This report contains background information on Mission Assurance Engineering, a description of my duties and accomplishments over the summer of 2014, and relates the significance of my work experience to my school work and future career goals. It is a required document for the Pathways program.

  9. Summer season | Cafeteria closures

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    Please note the following cafeteria closures over the summer season: Bldg. 54 closed from 29/07/2013 to 06/09/2013. Bldg. 13: closed from 13/07/2013 to 06/09/2013. Restaurant No. 2, table service (brasserie and restaurant): closed from 01/08/2013 to 06/09/2013. Bldg. 864: closed from 29/07/2013 to 06/09/2013. Bldg. 865: closed from 29/07/2013 to 06/09/2013.

  10. GEOLOGIC SCREENING CRITERIA FOR SEQUESTRATION OF CO2 IN COAL: QUANTIFYING POTENTIAL OF THE BLACK WARRIOR COALBED METHANE FAIRWAY, ALABAMA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jack C. Pashin; Richard E. Carroll; Richard H. Groshong Jr.; Dorothy E. Raymond; Marcella McIntyre; J. Wayne Payton

    2004-01-01

    Sequestration of CO{sub 2} in coal has potential benefits for reducing greenhouse gas emissions from the highly industrialized Carboniferous coal basins of North America and Europe and for enhancing coalbed methane recovery. Hence, enhanced coalbed methane recovery operations provide a basis for a market-based environmental solution in which the cost of sequestration is offset by the production and sale of natural gas. The Black Warrior foreland basin of west-central Alabama contains the only mature coalbed methane production fairway in eastern North America, and data from this basin provide an excellent basis for quantifying the carbon sequestration potential of coal and for identifying the geologic screening criteria required to select sites for the demonstration and commercialization of carbon sequestration technology. Coalbed methane reservoirs in the upper Pottsville Formation of the Black Warrior basin are extremely heterogeneous, and this heterogeneity must be considered to screen areas for the application of CO{sub 2} sequestration and enhanced coalbed methane recovery technology. Major screening factors include stratigraphy, geologic structure, geothermics, hydrogeology, coal quality, sorption capacity, technology, and infrastructure. Applying the screening model to the Black Warrior basin indicates that geologic structure, water chemistry, and the distribution of coal mines and reserves are the principal determinants of where CO{sub 2} can be sequestered. By comparison, coal thickness, temperature-pressure conditions, and coal quality are the key determinants of sequestration capacity and unswept coalbed methane resources. Results of this investigation indicate that the potential for CO{sub 2} sequestration and enhanced coalbed methane recovery in the Black Warrior basin is substantial and can result in significant reduction of greenhouse gas emissions while increasing natural gas reserves. Coal-fired power plants serving the Black Warrior basin in

  11. Controls on summer low flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, C. B.; McNamara, J. P.

    2012-12-01

    Summer low flow has significant impacts on aquatic flora and fauna, municipal water use, and power generation. However, the controls on the minimum annual summer discharge are complex, including a combination of snowmelt dynamics, summer evapotranspiration demand, and spring, summer precipitation patterns and surface - groundwater interactions. This is especially true in the Rocky Mountain West of the United States, where snowpack provides the majority of water available for spring runoff and groundwater replenishment. In this study, we look at summer low flow conditions at four snow dominated catchments (26 km2 - 2200 km2) in South-central Idaho currently feeling the effects of climate change. Measures of snowmelt dynamics, summer evapotranspiration demand and spring and summer precipitation are used to determine the dominant controls on late summer low flow magnitude, timing and duration. These analyses show that the controls vary between watersheds, with significant implications for the impacts of climate change in snow dominated areas of the Rocky Mountain West.

  12. Allegheny County Summer Food Sites

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — This data set shows the Summer Food Sites located within Allegheny County for children (18 years and younger) for breakfast and lunch during summer recess. OPEN...

  13. [Laza K. Lazarević--doctor, lawyer, writer and warrior in three wars].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babić, Rade R; Stanković Babić, Gordana

    2010-01-01

    Laza K. Lazarevic was born on the 13th of May, 1851 in Sabac. He died on the 11th of January, 1891 in Belgrade. Laza K. Lazarevic was a Serb, lawyer, warrior, doctor and writer. He spoke Russian, German and French. Laza Lazarevic's road to the title of doctor of medicine. He studied law in Belgrade and graduated in 1871 and he graduated from the Faculty of Medicine in Berlin on the 28th of January, 1879. He took his doctor's degree in Berlin on the 8th of March, 1879 at the same Faculty. His road to the title of doctor of medicine was thorny and complicated. LAZA K. LAZAREVIC AS A WARRIOR: He took part in the Serbian-Turkish war and the Serbian-Bulgarian war. During the Serbian-Bulgarian War (1885) he was first given the rank of reserve medical major and later the rank of active medical colonel and then he was appointed assistant chief of the Supreme Command of Health Care with the task to establish the Great reserve military hospital in Nis. PROFESSIONAL AND SCIENTIFIC WORK OF DR. LAZA K. LAZAREVIC: He had seventy two professional and scientific medical papers published, a great number of which referring to nervous diseases, such as paralysis agitans, sclerosis of medulla spinalis, aphasia and others. Therefore, it can be rightly said that Dr. Laza K. Lazarevic was the first Serbian neurologist. The very first operation of cataract in Serbia was performed by Dr. Laza K. Lazarevic in aseptic conditions, when cocaine was applied for anesthesia. He was the first doctor to be sent by the Ministry of Internal Affairs to Vienna in 1884 to learn how to prepare animal lymph. In 1879 he was appointed the physician of the Belgrade District and in 1881 he was promoted to the position of head doctor and Chief of Internal Department of the General State Hospital in Belgrade. He was the personal doctor of King Milan Obrenovic. LAZA K. LAZAREVIC AS A WRITER: Laza Lazarevic is considered to be the originator of psychological stories in Serbian realistic literature and had nine

  14. Summer at CERN: a time to make friends

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    Summer brings the opportunity for many of us to spend time enjoying the company of our families and friends. It also brings a new generation of young people to CERN – the summer students.   We often talk about the extended CERN community as a being like a big family, where the common bond is the science we do. The summer students who join us every year are in many ways the newest additions to this family. This year we have welcomed 276 students in total, with an impressive 133 from non-Member states. As usual they are joining in the learning experience that the programme offers and taking the opportunity to socialise. However, this year they are showing a particular enthusiasm for developing activities together that are linked to spreading the message about CERN. They’ve shown great support for the CERN Summer Student Webfest – now in its second year - where they were invited to work in teams and design web apps that will encourage the public to learn more abou...

  15. Next Generation Summer School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eugenia, Marcu

    2013-04-01

    On 21.06.2010 the "Next Generation" Summer School has opened the doors for its first students. They were introduced in the astronomy world by astronomical observations, astronomy and radio-astronomy lectures, laboratory projects meant to initiate them into modern radio astronomy and radio communications. The didactic programme was structure as fallowing: 1) Astronomical elements from the visible spectrum (lectures + practical projects) 2) Radio astronomy elements (lectures + practical projects) 3) Radio communication base (didactic- recreative games) The students and professors accommodation was at the Agroturistic Pension "Popasul Iancului" situated at 800m from the Marisel Observatory. First day (summer solstice day) began with a practical activity: determination of the meridian by measurements of the shadow (the direction of one vertical alignment, when it has the smallest length). The experiment is very instructive and interesting because combines notions of physics, spatial geometry and basic astronomy elements. Next day the activities took place in four stages: the students processed the experimental data obtained on first day (on sheets of millimetre paper they represented the length of the shadow alignments according the time), each team realised its own sun quadrant, point were given considering the design and functionality of these quadrant, the four teams had to mimic important constellations on carton boards with phosphorescent sticky stars and the students, accompanied by the professors took a hiking trip to the surroundings, marking the interest point coordinates, using a GPS to establish the geographical coronations and at the end of the day the students realised a small map of central Marisel area based on the GPS data. On the third day, the students were introduced to basic notions of radio astronomy, the principal categories of artificial Earth satellites: low orbit satellites (LEO), Medium orbit satellites (MEO) and geostationary satellites (GEO

  16. Prenatal forehead edema in 4p- deletion: the 'Greek warrior helmet' profile revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levaillant, J M; Touboul, C; Sinico, M; Vergnaud, A; Serero, S; Druart, L; Blondeau, J R; Abd Alsamad, I; Haddad, B; Gérard-Blanluet, M

    2005-12-01

    Deletion of short arm of chromosome 4 is difficult to ascertain prenatally, and can be missed. A prenatal suspicion of 4p- syndrome was thoroughly investigated by using two-dimensional and three-dimensional sonography, with a description of the fetal face dysmorphological pattern. The cytogenetic confirmation, obtained by karyotype and FISH technique, allowed a precise description of the prenatal abnormalities. Post-termination tridimensional helicoidal scanner of the fetal face was performed. The main anomaly discovered using two-dimensional sonography was the presence of a strikingly thick prefrontal edema (8 mm, twice the normal values, at 22 weeks: 3.81 +/- 0.62 mm). Three-dimensional sonography showed the classical postnatal profile, with the phenotypic aspect of a 'Greek warrior helmet'. Nasal bones were normal in size and placement, confirmed by helicoidal scanner. Prenatal diagnosis of 4p deletion syndrome can be difficult, and it is the presence of prefrontal edema, associated with more subtle facial anomalies (short philtrum, microretrognathia) which should trigger cytogenetic investigation for 4p- deletion, even with only borderline growth retardation. Copyright 2005 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd

  17. Energiewende’s Lone Warriors: A Hyperlink Network Analysis of the German Energy Transition Discourse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonas Kaiser

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the integration of different social fields within the German Energy Transition (Energiewende discourse in the election year 2013 by analysing the hyperlink structures online. Energiewende describes the fundamental transition from non-renewable energy to sustainable sources. This goal is both ambitious and controversial. Numerous stakeholders try to make their voices and interests heard and as such politics has to both disseminate and collect information in order to include all relevant groups from different social fields in the political process. This discourse is also visible online. By analysing the hyperlink structures we are able to see the attention distribution of different actor groups in the network. This study shows that most actors tend to link within their own social field and do not aim for a more integrated public sphere. Especially political actors appear to be lone warriors who neither look left or right and mostly link within their own party and ignore other actors. Whereas social field as the media or public administration are relevant within the network we find that scientific actors are ignored by all fields, except for their own.

  18. Relations among school students' self-determined motivation, perceived enjoyment, effort, and physical activity behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tao

    2009-12-01

    Guided by the self-determination theory, the purpose of this study was to examine the predictive strength of self-determined motivation toward motivational outcomes (perceived enjoyment, perceived effort, physical activity behaviors) for 286 middle school students in physical education. Analyses indicated that intrinsic motivation, identified regulation, and introjected regulation were positively related to students' enjoyment, perceived effort, and physical activity, whereas amotivation was negatively associated with students' enjoyment and perceived effort. The findings highlighted the importance of higher self-determined motivation (intrinsic motivation and identified regulation) in students' perceived enjoyment, effort, and physical activity behaviors. This study supports the use of self-determination theory to investigate students' motivational outcomes in school physical education.

  19. RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN PHYSICAL EDUCATION STUDENTS' MOTIVATIONAL PROFILES, ENJOYMENT, STATE ANXIETY, AND SELF-REPORTED PHYSICAL ACTIVITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sami Yli-Piipari

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to analyze motivational profiles based on the self-determination theory (Deci and Ryan, 2000 and how these profiles are related to physical education students' enjoyment, state anxiety, and physical activity. The participants, 429 sixth grade students (girls = 216; boys = 213 completed SMS, Sport Enjoyment Scale, PESAS, and Physical Activity Scale. Cluster analyses identified two motivational profiles: 1 the "High motivation profile", in which the students had high intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, and low levels of amotivation, and 2 the "Low motivation profile", in which the students had low intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, and low levels of amotivation. The students in the first cluster enjoyed physical education more and were physically more active. The results revealed that students may be motivated towards physical education lessons both intrinsically and extrinsically, and still experience enjoyment in physical education.

  20. Physical Self-Concept and Physical Activity Enjoyment in Elementary School Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohbeck, Annette; Tietjens, Maike; Bund, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    The present study examined gender differences and relationships of seven specific domains of physical self-concept (PSC) ("Strength," "Endurance," "Speed," "Flexibility," "Coordination," "Global Sport Competence," and "Appearance") and physical activity enjoyment (PAE) in 447…

  1. Students' Perceptions of Motivational Climate and Enjoyment in Finnish Physical Education: A Latent Profile Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaakkola, Timo; Wang, C K John; Soini, Markus; Liukkonen, Jarmo

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify student clusters with homogenous profiles in perceptions of task- and ego-involving, autonomy, and social relatedness supporting motivational climate in school physical education. Additionally, we investigated whether different motivational climate groups differed in their enjoyment in PE. Participants of the study were 2 594 girls and 1 803 boys, aged 14-15 years. Students responded to questionnaires assessing their perception of motivational climate and enjoyment in physical education. Latent profile analyses produced a five-cluster solution labeled 1) 'low autonomy, relatedness, task, and moderate ego climate' group', 2) 'low autonomy, relatedness, and high task and ego climate, 3) 'moderate autonomy, relatedness, task and ego climate' group 4) 'high autonomy, relatedness, task, and moderate ego climate' group, and 5) 'high relatedness and task but moderate autonomy and ego climate' group. Analyses of variance showed that students in clusters 4 and 5 perceived the highest level of enjoyment whereas students in cluster 1 experienced the lowest level of enjoyment. The results showed that the students' perceptions of various motivational climates created differential levels of enjoyment in PE classes. Key pointsLatent profile analyses produced a five-cluster solution labeled 1) 'low autonomy, relatedness, task, and moderate ego climate' group', 2) 'low autonomy, relatedness, and high task and ego climate, 3) 'moderate autonomy, relatedness, task and ego climate' group 4) 'high autonomy, relatedness, task, and moderate ego climate' group, and 5) 'high relatedness and task but moderate autonomy and ego climate' group.Analyses of variance showed that clusters 4 and 5 perceived the highest level of enjoyment whereas cluster 1 experienced the lowest level of enjoyment. The results showed that the students' perceptions of motivational climate create differential levels of enjoyment in PE classes.

  2. Self-Efficacy Manipulation Influences Physical Activity Enjoyment in Chinese Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Liang; Cheng, Shoubin; Lu, Jiaying; Zhu, Lele; Chen, Ling

    2016-02-01

    In this study, we examined the effect of the manipulation of exercise self-efficacy on the enjoyment of physical activity in a sample of 44 Chinese adolescents (age = 14.27 ± .87 y), including 22 boys and 22 girls. The participants were randomized into a low-efficacy or high-efficacy condition, and their self-efficacy beliefs for engaging in moderate-intensity physical activity were manipulated by providing false feedback after a submaximal exercise test. The participants' self-efficacy was measured and compared before and after the exercise test and the participants' enjoyment of physical activity was assessed after the exercise test. It was found that exercise self-efficacy was successfully manipulated in the expected direction in both conditions, which significantly influenced the participants' enjoyment of physical activity. After the exercise test, the participants in the low-efficacy condition reported lower enjoyment scores relative to the high-efficacy participants. These results suggest that self-efficacy may have an important influence on the enjoyment of physical activity among Chinese adolescents. We recommend that physical activity promotion programs should be tailored to enhance adolescents' self-efficacy beliefs and enjoyment of the experience of physical activity.

  3. Energy expenditure and enjoyment during video game play: differences by game type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Elizabeth J; Tate, Deborah F; Ward, Dianne S; Bowling, J Michael; Ribisl, Kurt M; Kalyararaman, Sriram

    2011-10-01

    Play of physically active video games may be a way to increase physical activity and/or decrease sedentary behavior, but games are not universally active or enjoyable. Active games may differ from traditional games on important attributes, which may affect frequency and intensity of play. The purpose of this study was to investigate differences in energy expenditure and enjoyment across four game types: shooter (played with traditional controllers), band simulation (guitar or drum controller), dance simulation (dance mat controller), and fitness (balance board controller). Energy expenditure (METs) and enjoyment were measured across 10 games in 100 young adults age 18-35 yr (50 women). All games except shooter games significantly increased energy expenditure over rest (P games increased energy expenditure by 322% (mean ± SD = 3.10 ± 0.89 METs) and 298% (2.91 ± 0.87 METs), which was greater than that produced by band simulation (73%, 1.28 ± 0.28 METs) and shooter games (23%, 0.91 ± 0.16 METs). However, enjoyment was higher in band simulation games than in other types (P game types (P games can significantly increase energy expended during screen time, but these games are less enjoyable than other more sedentary games, suggesting that they may be less likely to be played over time. Less active but more enjoyable video games may be a promising method for decreasing sedentary behavior.

  4. Designing Websites for Learning and Enjoyment: A study of museum experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleck C. H. Lin

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available This study reports on an exploratory research study that examined the design of websites that encourage both learning and enjoyment. This study examines museum websites that offer educational materials. As part of their mission, most museums provide the general public with educational materials for study and enjoyment. Many museums use the Internet in support of their mission. Museum websites offer excellent opportunity to study learning environments designed for enjoyment. Computer-supported learning of various types has been studied over the years, including computer-aided learning, computer-aided instruction, computer-managed learning, and more recently, learning via the Internet. Some relevant work appears in the literature on pleasure; however, the concept of online learning for enjoyment – specifically when learning is not part of a formal instructional undertaking – has not been well studied and thus is not well understood. This study seeks to redress this gap in the literature, specifically ‘learning for enjoyment,’ by reporting on a number of semi-structured in-depth interviews with museum and educational experts in Taiwan. Our study identified a number of characteristics required of online learning websites, and we conclude some suggested guidelines for developing an online learning website for enjoyment.

  5. Energy Expenditure and Enjoyment during Video Game Play: Differences by Game Type

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Elizabeth J.; Tate, Deborah F.; Ward, Dianne S.; Bowling, J. Michael; Ribisl, Kurt M.; Kalyararaman, Sriram

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Play of physically active video games may be a way to increase physical activity and/or decrease sedentary behavior, but games are not universally active or enjoyable. Active games may differ from traditional games on important attributes, which may affect frequency and intensity of play. The purpose of this study was to investigate differences in energy expenditure and enjoyment across four game types: shooter (played with traditional controllers), band simulation (guitar or drum controller), dance simulation (dance mat controller), and fitness (balance board controller). Methods Energy expenditure (metabolic equivalents [METs]) and enjoyment were measured across ten games in 100 young adults aged 18 to 35 (50 females). Results All games except shooter games significantly increased energy expenditure over rest (P games increased energy expenditure by 322 (mean [SD] 3.10 [0.89] METs) and 298 (2.91 [0.87] METs) percent, which was greater than that produced by band simulation (73%, 1.28 [0.28] METs) and shooter games (23%, 0.91 [0.16] METs). However, enjoyment was higher in band simulation games than in other types (P game types (P games can significantly increase energy expended during screen time, but these games are less enjoyable than other more sedentary games, suggesting that they may be less likely to be played over time. Less active but more enjoyable video games may be a promising method for decreasing sedentary behavior. PMID:21364477

  6. Impact of Noise Reduction Algorithm in Cochlear Implant Processing on Music Enjoyment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohlberg, Gavriel D; Mancuso, Dean M; Griffin, Brianna M; Spitzer, Jaclyn B; Lalwani, Anil K

    2016-06-01

    Noise reduction algorithm (NRA) in speech processing strategy has positive impact on speech perception among cochlear implant (CI) listeners. We sought to evaluate the effect of NRA on music enjoyment. Prospective analysis of music enjoyment. Academic medical center. Normal-hearing (NH) adults (N = 16) and CI listeners (N = 9). Subjective rating of music excerpts. NH and CI listeners evaluated country music piece on three enjoyment modalities: pleasantness, musicality, and naturalness. Participants listened to the original version and 20 modified, less complex versions created by including subsets of musical instruments from the original song. NH participants listened to the segments through CI simulation and CI listeners listened to the segments with their usual speech processing strategy, with and without NRA. Decreasing the number of instruments was significantly associated with increase in the pleasantness and naturalness in both NH and CI subjects (p  0.05): this was true for the original and the modified music segments with one to three instruments (p > 0.05). NRA does not affect music enjoyment in CI listener or NH individual with CI simulation. This suggests that strategies to enhance speech processing will not necessarily have a positive impact on music enjoyment. However, reducing the complexity of music shows promise in enhancing music enjoyment and should be further explored.

  7. Music Engineering as a Novel Strategy for Enhancing Music Enjoyment in the Cochlear Implant Recipient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gavriel D. Kohlberg

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Enjoyment of music remains an elusive goal following cochlear implantation. We test the hypothesis that reengineering music to reduce its complexity can enhance the listening experience for the cochlear implant (CI listener. Methods. Normal hearing (NH adults (N=16 and CI listeners (N=9 evaluated a piece of country music on three enjoyment modalities: pleasantness, musicality, and naturalness. Participants listened to the original version along with 20 modified, less complex, versions created by including subsets of the musical instruments from the original song. NH participants listened to the segments both with and without CI simulation processing. Results. Compared to the original song, modified versions containing only 1–3 instruments were less enjoyable to the NH listeners but more enjoyable to the CI listeners and the NH listeners with CI simulation. Excluding vocals and including rhythmic instruments improved enjoyment for NH listeners with CI simulation but made no difference for CI listeners. Conclusions. Reengineering a piece of music to reduce its complexity has the potential to enhance music enjoyment for the cochlear implantee. Thus, in addition to improvements in software and hardware, engineering music specifically for the CI listener may be an alternative means to enhance their listening experience.

  8. Music Engineering as a Novel Strategy for Enhancing Music Enjoyment in the Cochlear Implant Recipient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohlberg, Gavriel D; Mancuso, Dean M; Chari, Divya A; Lalwani, Anil K

    2015-01-01

    Enjoyment of music remains an elusive goal following cochlear implantation. We test the hypothesis that reengineering music to reduce its complexity can enhance the listening experience for the cochlear implant (CI) listener. Normal hearing (NH) adults (N = 16) and CI listeners (N = 9) evaluated a piece of country music on three enjoyment modalities: pleasantness, musicality, and naturalness. Participants listened to the original version along with 20 modified, less complex, versions created by including subsets of the musical instruments from the original song. NH participants listened to the segments both with and without CI simulation processing. Compared to the original song, modified versions containing only 1-3 instruments were less enjoyable to the NH listeners but more enjoyable to the CI listeners and the NH listeners with CI simulation. Excluding vocals and including rhythmic instruments improved enjoyment for NH listeners with CI simulation but made no difference for CI listeners. Reengineering a piece of music to reduce its complexity has the potential to enhance music enjoyment for the cochlear implantee. Thus, in addition to improvements in software and hardware, engineering music specifically for the CI listener may be an alternative means to enhance their listening experience.

  9. Hans-Peter Schultze, a great paleoichthyologist for whom work is synonymous with enjoyment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Cloutier

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available In the summer of 1982, Hans-Peter Schultze and Gloria Arratia were invited to a small museum located on a fossiliferous site of the Devonian Escuminac Formation in Miguasha, Quebec, eastern Canada, Hans-Peter was to work with Marius Arsenault, the director of the Miguasha Museum, on the skull of the elpistostegalid Elpistostege watsoni, a species closely related to basal tetrapod. In addition, he went through the collections to describe and measure numerous juvenile specimens of the osteolepiform. Eusthenopteran foordi. As expected, there two projects turned out to be important contributions in lower vertebrate paleontology and systematics: one on the origin of tetrapods (1985, and the second one on growth patterns of a Late Devonian fish (1984. During his visit to Miguasha, Hans-Peter also spent time digging for fossils and drawing numerous specimens in the collection. In addition, in order to help the personnel of the museum to identify some of the Escuminac fished, he created an identification key based on the gross morphology of the scales. For a small group of undergraduate students, hired at the museum during the summer as naturalists, it was a unique opportunity to discuss paleontology with a leading researcher. We were amazed by his willingness to talk to us, even if then most of us only spoke French! For the first time, we were exposed to Hennigian methodology and its usage in vertebrate paleontology during and evening lecture that Hans-Peter prepared for us. His lecture was delightful; it was an intensive course in lower vertebrate anatomy, and an intellectual journey among the philosophers Karl Marx and Karl Popper, the entomologists Willy Hennig and Lars Brundin, and "The Band of Four" (Rosen et al., 1981. It was for most of us our first exposure to science, as it should be done. We were all impressed by his knowledge and above all by his simplicity and friendliness. Two years later I started my Ph.D. at The University of Kansas

  10. Water Management Strategies for Improved Coalbed Methane Production in the Black Warrior Basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pashin, Jack [Geological Survey Of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States); McIntyre-Redden, Marcella [Geological Survey Of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States); Mann, Steven [Geological Survey Of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States); Merkel, David [Geological Survey Of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States)

    2013-10-31

    The modern coalbed methane industry was born in the Black Warrior Basin of Alabama and has to date produced more than 2.6 trillion cubic feet of gas and 1.6 billion barrels of water. The coalbed gas industry in this area is dependent on instream disposal of co-produced water, which ranges from nearly potable sodium-bicarbonate water to hypersaline sodium-chloride water. This study employed diverse analytical methods to characterize water chemistry in light of the regional geologic framework and to evaluate the full range of water management options for the Black Warrior coalbed methane industry. Results reveal strong interrelationships among regional geology, water chemistry, and gas chemistry. Coalbed methane is produced from multiple coal seams in Pennsylvanian-age strata of the Pottsville Coal Interval, in which water chemistry is influenced by a structurally controlled meteoric recharge area along the southeastern margin of the basin. The most important constituents of concern in the produced water include chlorides, ammonia compounds, and organic substances. Regional mapping and statistical analysis indicate that the concentrations of most ionic compounds, metallic substances, and nonmetallic substances correlate with total dissolved solids and chlorides. Gas is effectively produced at pipeline quality, and the only significant impurity is N{sub 2}. Geochemical analysis indicates that the gas is of mixed thermogenic-biogenic origin. Stable isotopic analysis of produced gas and calcite vein fills indicates that widespread late-stage microbial methanogenesis occurred primarily along a CO{sub 2} reduction metabolic pathway. Organic compounds in the produced water appear to have helped sustain microbial communities. Ammonia and ammonium levels increase with total dissolved solids content and appear to have played a role in late-stage microbial methanogenesis and the generation of N{sub 2}. Gas production tends to decline exponentially, whereas water production

  11. Relationships between water and gas chemistry in mature coalbed methane reservoirs of the Black Warrior Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pashin, Jack C.; McIntyre-Redden, Marcella R.; Mann, Steven D.; Kopaska-Merkel, David C.; Varonka, Matthew S.; Orem, William H.

    2014-01-01

    Water and gas chemistry in coalbed methane reservoirs of the Black Warrior Basin reflects a complex interplay among burial processes, basin hydrodynamics, thermogenesis, and late-stage microbial methanogenesis. These factors are all important considerations for developing production and water management strategies. Produced water ranges from nearly potable sodium-bicarbonate water to hypersaline sodium-chloride brine. The hydrodynamic framework of the basin is dominated by structurally controlled fresh-water plumes that formed by meteoric recharge along the southeastern margin of the basin. The produced water contains significant quantities of hydrocarbons and nitrogen compounds, and the produced gas appears to be of mixed thermogenic-biogenic origin.Late-stage microbial methanogenesis began following unroofing of the basin, and stable isotopes in the produced gas and in mineral cements indicate that late-stage methanogenesis occurred along a CO2-reduction metabolic pathway. Hydrocarbons, as well as small amounts of nitrate in the formation water, probably helped nourish the microbial consortia, which were apparently active in fresh to hypersaline water. The produced water contains NH4+ and NH3, which correlate strongly with brine concentration and are interpreted to be derived from silicate minerals. Denitrification reactions may have generated some N2, which is the only major impurity in the coalbed gas. Carbon dioxide is a minor component of the produced gas, but significant quantities are dissolved in the formation water. Degradation of organic compounds, augmented by deionization of NH4+, may have been the principal sources of hydrogen facilitating late-stage CO2 reduction.

  12. The association between developmental assets and sexual enjoyment among emerging adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galinsky, Adena M; Sonenstein, Freya L

    2011-06-01

    To examine the associations between three key developmental assets and an aspect of sexual health, sexual enjoyment, which has rarely been studied in young adults, although its importance is stressed in all recent sexual health policy statements. Using data from wave III (2001-2002) of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, and multiple logistic and ordered logistic regression, we explored the associations between sexual pleasure and autonomy, self-esteem, and empathy among 3,237 respondents aged 18-26 years in heterosexual relationships of ≥ 3-month duration. We also examined the distribution of sexual pleasure across various socio-demographic groups. Compared with young women, young men reported more regular orgasms and more enjoyment of two kinds of partnered sexual behavior. Sexual enjoyment was not associated with age, race/ethnicity, or socioeconomic status. Among women, autonomy, self-esteem, and empathy co-varied positively with all three sexual enjoyment measures. Among men, all associations were in the same direction, but not all were statistically significant. A substantial gender difference in enjoyment of partnered sexual behavior exists among emerging adults in the United States. This study is the first to use a representative population sample to find a relationship between developmental assets and a positive aspect of sexual health - sexual pleasure. Copyright © 2011 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Unconventional Consumption Methods and Enjoying Things Consumed: Recapturing the "First-Time" Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Ed; Smith, Robert W

    2018-06-01

    People commonly lament the inability to re-experience familiar things as they were first experienced. Four experiments suggest that consuming familiar things in new ways can disrupt adaptation and revitalize enjoyment. Participants better enjoyed the same familiar food (Experiment 1), drink (Experiment 2), and video (Experiments 3a-3b) simply when re-experiencing the entity via unusual means (e.g., eating popcorn using chopsticks vs. hands). This occurs because unconventional methods invite an immersive "first-time" perspective on the consumption object: boosts in enjoyment were mediated by revitalized immersion into the consumption experience and were moderated by time such that they were strongest when using unconventional methods for the first time (Experiments 1-2); likewise, unconventional methods that actively disrupted immersion did not elicit the boost, despite being novel (Experiments 3a-3b). Before abandoning once-enjoyable entities, knowing to consume old things in new ways (vs. attaining new things altogether) might temporarily restore enjoyment and postpone wasteful replacement.

  14. Are Volunteer Satisfaction and Enjoyment Related to Cessation of Volunteering by Older Adults?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okun, Morris; Infurna, Frank J; Hutchinson, Ianeta

    2016-05-01

    Previous research indicates that volunteer satisfaction and enjoyment do not exert direct effects on the cessation of volunteering by older adults. This study examined whether satisfaction with and enjoyment of volunteering indirectly affect volunteer cessation via hours volunteered. Our sample consisted of participants in the Americans' Changing Lives study (N = 380) who were 65 years old and older and who volunteered at Wave 1. Volunteer satisfaction, volunteer enjoyment, hours volunteered, and several covariates were assessed at Wave 1, and volunteer cessation was assessed 3 years later at Wave 2. Volunteer satisfaction and volunteer enjoyment were positively associated with hours volunteered, and more hours volunteered was associated with decreased likelihood of volunteer cessation. The indirect effects of volunteer satisfaction and volunteer enjoyment on volunteer cessation via hours volunteered were -.023 (p = .059) and -.036 (p = .015), respectively. The dynamics of volunteer cessation are important because a volunteer shortage is forecasted and because the benefits of volunteering may attenuate when volunteering stops. Future research should test the proposed causal sequence using longitudinal data with at least 3 waves. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Enjoyment and Behavioral Intention Predict Organized Youth Sport Participation and Dropout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Lauren A; Magee, Christopher A; Vella, Stewart A

    2017-11-01

    Dropout from organized youth sport has significant adverse health implications. Enjoyment and behavioral intentions have consistently been linked with participation and dropout; however, few studies have investigated these links using a prospective design. This study explored whether enjoyment and intentions to continue predicted dropout behavior at 1-year follow-up. Questionnaires were completed by 327 regular sport participants (mean age = 13.01 y at baseline). After 1 year, 247 individuals (75.5%) continued participating in their main sport and 26 individuals (8%) dropped out. A hierarchical logistic regression model estimated the probability of dropout. In step 1, the following covariates were included: age, sex, competition level, perceived competence, parental support, coach-athlete relationship, friendship quality, and peer acceptance. In step 2, enjoyment and intentions to continue were included. Step 1 indicated that age, parental support, coach-athlete relationship quality, and peer acceptance were significantly associated with dropout. Step 2 explained further variance in dropout, with both enjoyment and intentions inversely associated with dropout. Peer acceptance was the only covariate to remain significantly associated with dropout in step 2. Findings support the use of enjoyment and behavioral intentions as indicators of sport participation/dropout behavior and may aid the development of interventions aimed at preventing future dropout.

  16. Motivational climate, goal orientation, perceived sport ability, and enjoyment within Finnish junior ice hockey players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaakkola, T; Ntoumanis, N; Liukkonen, J

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relations among situational motivational climate, dispositional approach and avoidance achievement goals, perceived sport ability, and enjoyment in Finnish male junior ice hockey players. The sample comprised 265 junior B-level male players with a mean age of 17.03 years (SD = 0.63). Players filled questionnaires tapping their perceptions of coach motivational climate, achievement goals, perceived sport ability, and enjoyment. For the statistical analysis, players were divided into high and low perceived sport ability groups. Multigroup structural equation modeling (SEM) revealed an indirect path from task-involving motivational climate via task-approach goal to enjoyment. Additionally, SEM demonstrated four other direct associations, which existed in both perceived ability groups: from ego-involving motivational climate to ego-approach and ego-avoidance goals; from ego-approach goal to ego-avoidance goal; and from task-avoidance goal to ego-avoidance goal. Additionally, in the high perceived sport ability group, there was an association from task-involving motivational climate to enjoyment. The results of this study reveal that motivational climate emphasizing effort, personal development and improvement, and achievement goal mastering tasks are significant elements of enjoyment in junior ice hockey. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Evaluation of Summer Bridge Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Lisa D.; Paz, Chiara C.

    2009-01-01

    Many colleges and universities in the United States offer summer programs for their incoming students. While programs are structured and administered in a variety of ways and target various student populations, the most common type of summer bridge program aims to serve historically underrepresented students and students of low socioeconomic…

  18. SUMMER STUDENT LECTURE PROGRAMME

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2002-01-01

    SUMMER STUDENT LECTURE PROGRAMME Main Auditorium, bldg. 500   DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Monday 29 July 09:15 - 10:00 R. RATTAZZI Beyond the Standard Model (3/3) 10:15 - 11:00 P. WELLS Experimental test of the SM - LEP (3/3) 11:15 - 12:00 P. WELLS Discussion Session 14:00 - 16:00 R. ASSMANN The CLIC Concept for a Future Particle Collider at the Energy Frontier Tuesday 30 July 09:15 - 10:00 F. ANTINORI Heavy Ions (1/2) 10:15 - 12:00 F. DYDAK Neutrino Physics (1&2/4) Wednesday 31 July  09:15 - 10:00 F. ANTINORI Heavy Ions (2/2) 10:15 - 11:00 F. DYDAK Neutrino Physics (3/4) 11:15 - 12:00 F. DYDAK / F. ANTINORI Discussion Session Thursday 1 August 09:15 - 10:00 T. NAKADA CP Violation (1/4) 10:15 - 11:00 F. DYDAK Neutrino Physics (4/4) 11:15 - 12:00 F. BEDESCHI Experimental test of the SM Tevatron (1/2) Friday 2 August 09:15 - 10:00 T. NAKADA CP Violation (2/4) 10:15 ? 11:00 F. BEDESCHI Experimental test of the SM Tevatron (2/2) 11:15 ? 12:00 F. BEDESCHI / T. NAKADA Di...

  19. Summer music festivals

    CERN Document Server

    2008-01-01

    Although July is set to be a crucial time in the working life of the Laboratory, the CERN clubs have organised musical events to make sure that there’s also a chance to chill out and relax. The group Blend at the 2007 Hardronic Festival. From left to right (on stage): Eric Pfirsch, Stephan Petit, Frédéric Lejal, Niklaus Hirt, Paulo Dos Santos with Laurent Tarrano filming.If you have a strong appetite for music the ‘Monts Jura Jazz Festival’, might tempt you this summer. Sponsored by both the CERN Administration and the Staff Association, it is an established highlight of the local arts calendar and will this year be held on 4 and 5 July in Crozet, France. For the third year running established musicians, stars of the jazz scene, and rising talent from France, Switzerland and Brazil will be joining forces to perform an exiting mixture of jazz music. A ‘master class’ in improvisation methods will also be held on Saturda...

  20. Summer student final report

    CERN Document Server

    Guzik, Jakub

    2013-01-01

    During my time spent at CERN I worked under the Technology Department of CERN, in the Machine Protection and Electrical Integrity (MPE) Group. The MPE Group supports LHC operations and maintains state of the art technology for magnet circuit protection and interlock systems for the present and future accelerators, magnet test facilities and CERN hosted experiments[1]. As a member of Magnet Powering Interlocks & Software (TE-MPE-MS) section I was involved in three different projects and used not only CERN developed tools like FESA Framework, but also open source C++ frameworks, Google Test and Google Mock. I had a chance to work with Programmable Logic Controllers and real-time devices known as Front End Computers. I was part of a software developer team, and familiarized myself with the Scrum agile software development methodology. The description and results of my work are presented in three parts of this report. Each part describes a separate project created during my participation in the CERN Summer St...

  1. Summer Student Programme

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Date Time Title Speaker 05/07/2006 09:15 - 10:00 Presentation of the Summer Student Programme F. CERUTTI Information on Computing Rules D. HEAGERTY Workshops presentation O. ULLALAND 10:15 - 11:00 Introduction to CERN J. ENGELEN 11:15 Film on CERN 11:00 Introduction to Particle Physics F. CLOSE 11:15 - 12:00 Accelerators (1/5) S. GILARDONI / E. METRAL 12:00 Discussion Session 7/07/2006 09:15 - 11:00 Introduction to Particle Physics F. CLOSE 11:15 - 12:00 Accelerators (2/5) S. GILARDONI / E. METRAL 12:00 Discussion Session 09:15 - 10:00 Accelerators (3/5) S. GILARDONI / E. METRAL 10:15 - 12:00 Detectors (1-2/5) O. ULLALAND 12:00 Discussion Session 11/07/2006 09:15 - 10:00 Accelerators (4/5) S. GILARDONI / E. METRAL 10:15 - 11:00 Detectors (3/5) O. ULLALAND 11:15 - 12:00 Introduction to Nuclear Physics (1/4) P. CHOMAZ P. CHOMAZ 10:15 - 11:00 Accelerators (5/5) S. GILARDONI / E. METRAL 11:15 - 12:00 Detectors (4/5) O. ULLALAND 12:00 Discus...

  2. Summer School on Spintronics

    CERN Document Server

    Wolf, Stuart; Idzerda, Yves

    2003-01-01

    Stuart Wolf This book originated as a series of lectures that were given as part of a Summer School on Spintronics in the end of August, 1998 at Lake Tahoe, Nevada. It has taken some time to get these lectures in a form suitable for this book and so the process has been an iterative one to provide current information on the topics that are covered. There are some topics that have developed in the intervening years and we have tried to at least alert the readers to them in the Introduction where a rather complete set of references is provided to the current state of the art. The field of magnetism, once thought to be dead or dying, has seen a remarkable rebirth in the last decade and promises to get even more important as we enter the new millennium. This rebirth is due to some very new insight into how the spin degree of freedom of both electrons and nucleons can play a role in a new type of electronics that utilizes the spin in addition to or in place of the charge. For this new field to mature and prosper, ...

  3. The Comfortable Cafeteria Program for Promoting Student Participation and Enjoyment: An Outcome Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazyk, Susan; Demirjian, Louise; Horvath, Frances; Doxsey, Lauri

    A mixed-methods design was used to explore the outcomes of a 6-wk, occupational therapist-led Comfortable Cafeteria program designed to build cafeteria supervisors' and students' capacity to create a positive mealtime environment so that all students can successfully participate in and enjoy a healthy meal and socialization with peers. Students whose scores were in the low and mid-range at the outset had statistically significant improvements in pretest-posttest visual analog scale ratings of participation and enjoyment. Cafeteria supervisors demonstrated statistically significant improvements in their perceptions of knowledge and skills to supervise and to encourage healthy eating. Qualitative findings add further insight into the program, suggesting that students learned prosocial values (e.g., being kind, helping others), supervisors actively encouraged positive social interaction, and occupational therapists enjoyed implementing the program and recognized positive supervisor and student changes as a result of integrating services in the cafeteria. Copyright © 2018 by the American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc.

  4. Perceived competence and enjoyment in predicting students' physical activity and cardiorespiratory fitness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Zan

    2008-10-01

    This study investigated the predictive strength of perceived competence and enjoyment on students' physical activity and cardiorespiratory fitness in physical education classes. Participants (N = 307; 101 in Grade 6, 96 in Grade 7, 110 in Grade 8; 149 boys, 158 girls) responded to questionnaires assessing perceived competence and enjoyment of physical education, then their cardiorespiratory fitness was assessed on the Progressive Aerobic Cardiovascular Endurance Run (PACER) test. Physical activity in one class was estimated via pedometers. Regression analyses showed enjoyment (R2 = 16.5) and perceived competence (R2 = 4.2) accounted for significant variance of only 20.7% of physical activity and, perceived competence was the only significant contributor to cardiorespiratory fitness performance (R2 = 19.3%). Only a small amount of variance here leaves 80% unaccounted for. Some educational implications and areas for research are mentioned.

  5. Benefits and Enjoyment of a Swimming Intervention for Youth With Cerebral Palsy: An RCT Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Declerck, Marlies; Verheul, Martine; Daly, Daniel; Sanders, Ross

    2016-01-01

    To investigate enjoyment and specific benefits of a swimming intervention for youth with cerebral palsy (CP). Fourteen youth with CP (aged 7 to 17 years, Gross Motor Function Classification System levels I to III) were randomly assigned to control and swimming groups. Walking ability, swimming skills, fatigue, and pain were assessed at baseline, after a 10-week swimming intervention (2/week, 40-50 minutes) or control period, after a 5-week follow-up and, for the intervention group, after a 20-week follow-up period. The level of enjoyment of each swim-session was assessed. Levels of enjoyment were high. Walking and swimming skills improved significantly more in the swimming than in the control group (P = .043; P = .002, respectively), whereas fatigue and pain did not increase. After 20 weeks, gains in walking and swimming skills were retained (P = .017; P = .016, respectively). We recommend a swimming program for youth with CP to complement a physical therapy program.

  6. Gaming across different consoles: exploring the influence of control scheme on game-player enjoyment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limperos, Anthony M; Schmierbach, Michael G; Kegerise, Andrew D; Dardis, Frank E

    2011-06-01

    Many studies have investigated how different technological features impact the experience of playing video games, yet few have focused on how control schemes may affect the play experience. This research employed a between-subjects design to explore the relationship between the type of console played (Nintendo Wii, Playstation 2) and feelings of flow and enjoyment during the game-play experience. Results indicated that participants reported greater feelings of control and enjoyment with a traditional control scheme (Playstation 2) than with the more technologically advanced control scheme (Nintendo Wii). Further mediation analysis showed that enjoyment was driven by the sense of control that participants experienced and not simply by whether they won the game. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed.

  7. Deliberate practice theory: perceived relevance, effort, and inherent enjoyment of music practice: study II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyllegard, Randy; Bories, Tamara L

    2009-10-01

    This study, based on the theory of deliberate practice, examined the practice relevance, effort, and inherent enjoyment aspects of the theory. 25 college undergraduates practiced playing a melody on an electronic keyboard for three 20-min. practice sessions. Following each session, the perceived relevance of the practice for improving performance of the melody, the effort needed to learn the melody, and the inherent enjoyment of the practice were each rated on 10-point scales. Findings were consistent with theory and similar to previous studies also involving music practice and other tasks.

  8. Reading enjoyment amongst non-leisure readers can affect achievement in secondary school

    OpenAIRE

    Mol, Suzanne E.; Jolles, Jelle

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate determinants of differences in leisure reading behavior and school achievement. We specifically examined reading enjoyment, mental imagery, and sex as predictors in a large, age-homogeneous sample of Dutch secondary school students (N = 1,071). Results showed that the prevalence of leisure reading was low in both the lower, pre-vocational track (19.5%) and the higher, pre-academic track (32.5%). Boys read even less than girls. Almost all leisure readers enjoyed re...

  9. Reduction of the Harmonic Series Influences Musical Enjoyment With Cochlear Implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemer, John S; Kohlberg, Gavriel D; Mancuso, Dean M; Griffin, Brianna M; Certo, Michael V; Chen, Stephanie Y; Chun, Michael B; Spitzer, Jaclyn B; Lalwani, Anil K

    2017-01-01

    Cochlear implantation is associated with poor music perception and enjoyment. Reducing music complexity has been shown to enhance music enjoyment in cochlear implant (CI) recipients. In this study, we assess the impact of harmonic series reduction on music enjoyment. Prospective analysis of music enjoyment in normal-hearing (NH) individuals and CI recipients. Single tertiary academic medical center. NH adults (N = 20) and CI users (N = 8) rated the Happy Birthday song on three validated enjoyment modalities-musicality, pleasantness, and naturalness. Subjective rating of music excerpts. Participants listened to seven different instruments play the melody, each with five levels of harmonic reduction (Full, F3+F2+F1+F0, F2+F1+F0, F1+F0, F0). NH participants listened to the segments both with and without CI simulation. Linear mixed effect models (LME) and likelihood ratio tests were used to assess the impact of harmonic reduction on enjoyment. NH listeners without simulation rated segments with the first four harmonics (F3+F2+F1+F0) most pleasant and natural (p <0.001, p = 0.004). NH listeners with simulation rated the first harmonic alone (F0) most pleasant and natural (p <0.001, p = 0.003). Their ratings demonstrated a positive linear relationship between harmonic reduction and both pleasantness (slope estimate = 0.030, SE = 0.004, p <0.001, LME) and naturalness (slope estimate = 0.012, SE = 0.003, p = 0.003, LME). CI recipients also found the first harmonic alone (F0) to be most pleasant (p = 0.003), with a positive linear relationship between harmonic reduction and pleasantness (slope estimate = 0.029, SE = 0.008, p <0.001, LME). Harmonic series reduction increases music enjoyment in CI and NH individuals with or without CI simulation. Therefore, minimization of the harmonics may be a useful strategy for enhancing musical enjoyment among both NH and CI listeners.

  10. Proceedings of the summer school on physics with neutrinos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Locher, M.P.

    1996-01-01

    The Summer School on physics with neutrinos concentrated on a particularly rewarding topic on the intersection between particle and astrophysics. Although the neutrino has been postulated as early as 1930 in the famous letter by Pauli the intriguing particle poses challenging problems to the present day. The speakers did not spare any effort in creating an atmosphere of stimulating scientific exchange. The participating young and old enjoyed the presence of Jack Steinberger who presented a talk on the history of the neutrino and contributed in many other ways to the meeting. Apart from the lectures and seminars that are mostly reflected in these proceedings there were also a number of extra seminars on topics ranging from special nuclear reactions to the extinction of life in the universe, adding to the breadth of the presentations. (author) figs., tabs., refs

  11. Proceedings of the summer school on physics with neutrinos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Locher, M P [ed.

    1996-11-01

    The Summer School on physics with neutrinos concentrated on a particularly rewarding topic on the intersection between particle and astrophysics. Although the neutrino has been postulated as early as 1930 in the famous letter by Pauli the intriguing particle poses challenging problems to the present day. The speakers did not spare any effort in creating an atmosphere of stimulating scientific exchange. The participating young and old enjoyed the presence of Jack Steinberger who presented a talk on the history of the neutrino and contributed in many other ways to the meeting. Apart from the lectures and seminars that are mostly reflected in these proceedings there were also a number of extra seminars on topics ranging from special nuclear reactions to the extinction of life in the universe, adding to the breadth of the presentations. (author) figs., tabs., refs.

  12. Exploring enjoyability: which factors in a consumer device make the user smile

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoonhout, Henriette C.M.; Stienstra, M.A.; de Waard, D.

    2003-01-01

    Usability is a key concern in the design of products: is using the product easy, comfortable, safe, effective, efficient, and easy to learn. However, for products with an entertainment function, other requirements need to be considered as well: is the interaction with the product enjoyable,

  13. The Effect of Mindful Listening Instruction on Listening Sensitivity and Enjoyment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, William Todd

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of Mindful Listening Instruction on Music Listening Sensitivity and Music Listening Enjoyment. The type of mindfulness investigated in this study was of the social-psychological type, which shares both commonalities with and distinctions from meditative mindfulness. Enhanced context awareness,…

  14. The Role of Graphic and Sanitized Violence in the Enjoyment of Television Dramas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Andrew J.; Wilson, Barbara J.

    2009-01-01

    This experiment explores the relationship between television violence and viewer enjoyment. Over 400 participants were randomly assigned to one of 15 conditions that were created by editing five TV programs into three versions each: A graphically violent version, a sanitized violent version, and a nonviolent version. After viewing, participants…

  15. Promoting Enjoyment in Girls' Physical Education: The Impact of Goals, Beliefs, and Self-Determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C. K. John; Liu, W. C.

    2007-01-01

    This study examined the network of relationships between sport ability beliefs, achievement goals, self-determination and female students' enjoyment in school physical education (PE). Female secondary students (n = 343) from a single-sex secondary school in Singapore participated in the survey. They were assessed on sport ability beliefs, goal…

  16. Disentangling fun and enjoyment in exergames using an expanded design, play, experience framework: A narrative review

    Science.gov (United States)

    With exergames (as with physical activity in general), more intense and longer-duration game play should accrue more health benefits. Exergames, however, appear to be played for relatively short durations, often at medium or lower intensities. Ostensibly games are played for fun or enjoyment. Enhanc...

  17. 26 CFR 1.674(a)-1 - Power to control beneficial enjoyment; scope of section 674.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... grantor is treated as the owner of a portion of trust if the grantor or a nonadverse party has a power... of time such that the grantor would not be treated as an owner under section 673 if the power were a... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Power to control beneficial enjoyment; scope of...

  18. How players manage moral concerns to make video game violence enjoyable

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klimmt, Christoph; Schmid, Hannah; Nosper, Andreas; Hartmann, Tilo; Vorderer, Peter

    Research on video game violence has focused on the impact of aggression, but has so far neglected the processes and mechanisms underlying the enjoyment of video game violence. The present contribution examines a specific process in this context, namely players' strategies to cope with moral concern

  19. Book Clubs in Developmental Reading: Building Reading Comprehension, Fostering Reading Enjoyment, and Engaging Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado, Michele

    2012-01-01

    The use of book clubs in college developmental reading classes is an effective way to encourage reluctant readers to build and strengthen reading skills, foster reading enjoyment, and engage students. In addition, book clubs build a sense of community within the classroom as the students converse and share their interpretations of the reading…

  20. Love and enjoyment in context: Four case studies of adolescent EFL learners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liana Maria Pavelescu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This study explores the foreign language learning emotions of four EFL adolescent students in Romania and the ways in which their emotions emerge in their sociocultural context. Multiple qualitative methods were employed over a school semester, including a written task, semi-structured interviews with the learners and their teachers, lesson observations and English-related events outside the classroom. It was found that, while all four participants reported experiencing positive emotions in language learning, a distinction was identified in the intensity and stability of their emotions. Two participants expressed a strong and stable emotion of love towards English, while the other two participants experienced enjoyment in their English language learning without an intense emotional attachment to English. Unlike enjoyment, love was found to be the driving force in the learning process, creating effective coping mechanisms when there was a lack of enjoyment in certain classroom situations and motivating learners to invest greater effort into language learning in and out of the classroom. The findings thus revealed that, unlike enjoyment, love broadened cognition and maintained engagement in learning. The study emphasizes the role of strong, enduring positive emotions in teenage students’ language learning process.

  1. Classroom Anxiety and Enjoyment in CLIL and Non-CLIL: Does the Target Language Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Smet, Audrey; Mettewie, Laurence; Galand, Benoit; Hiligsmann, Philippe; Van Mensel, Luk

    2018-01-01

    This study investigates pupils' anxiety and enjoyment in the classroom when learning a second or foreign language. The particularity of this study lies in the comparison of two target languages (English and Dutch) in two educational contexts (CLIL and non-CLIL) at different instruction levels (primary and secondary education). While most research…

  2. Factorial Validity and Gender Invariance of the Physical Activity Enjoyment Scale (PACES) in Older Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunton, Genevieve Fridlund; Tscherne, James; Rodriguez, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Documented gender differences in physical activity rates during adolescence (Grunbaum et al., 2004) pose the question of whether physical activity enjoyment similarly differs between boys and girls. However, a necessary precursor to research on this topic is that the factor structure of the PACES be equivalent across gender. Although gender…

  3. A social dimension to enjoyment of negative emotion in art reception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastian, Brock

    2017-01-01

    The proposed model overlooks the contribution of a relational/prosocial dimension to the enjoyment of negative emotion in art reception. Negative experiences have a unique capacity to build social bonds and may also increase motivation to "connect" with the artist. This affiliative motivation ensures that people experience an artwork as more emotional, more intense, more interesting, and ultimately more rewarding.

  4. Reading enjoyment amongst non-leisure readers can affect achievement in secondary school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mol, Suzanne E; Jolles, Jelle

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate determinants of differences in leisure reading behavior and school achievement. We specifically examined reading enjoyment, mental imagery, and sex as predictors in a large, age-homogeneous sample of Dutch secondary school students (N = 1,071). Results showed that the prevalence of leisure reading was low in both the lower, pre-vocational track (19.5%) and the higher, pre-academic track (32.5%). Boys read even less than girls. Almost all leisure readers enjoyed reading and engaged in mental imagery, i.e., the propensity "to see images" of a written story in the mind's eye. Overall, boys who did not like to read for leisure had the poorest school performance. Non-leisure readers who reported that they enjoyed reading got higher school grades in the higher educational track. In the lower track, this was the case for girls. Our study findings imply that reading promotion programs should take into account individual differences in sex, achievement level, and reading enjoyment when aiming to decrease the academic achievement gap.

  5. Reading enjoyment amongst non-leisure readers can affect achievement in secondary school

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mol, S.E.; Jolles, J.

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate determinants of differences in leisure reading behavior and school achievement. We specifically examined reading enjoyment, mental imagery, and sex as predictors in a large, age-homogeneous sample of Dutch secondary school students (N = 1,071). Results showed that the

  6. Reading enjoyment amongst non-leisure readers can affect achievement in secondary school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanne E. Mol

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate determinants of differences in leisure reading behavior and school achievement. We specifically examined reading enjoyment, mental imagery, and sex as predictors in a large, age-homogeneous sample of Dutch secondary school students (N = 1,071. Results showed that the prevalence of leisure reading was low in both the lower, pre-vocational track (19.5% and the higher, pre-academic track (32.5%. Boys read even less than girls. Almost all leisure readers enjoyed reading and engaged in mental imagery, i.e., the propensity ‘to see images’ of a written story in the mind’s eye. Overall, boys who did not like to read for leisure had the poorest school performance. Non-leisure readers who reported that they enjoyed reading got higher school grades in the higher educational track. In the lower track, this was the case for girls. Our study findings imply that reading promotion programs should take into account individual differences in sex, achievement level, and reading enjoyment when aiming to decrease the academic achievement gap.

  7. Investigating Essential Factors on Students' Perceived Accomplishment and Enjoyment and Intention to Learn in Web Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yulei; Dang, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Web development is an important component in the curriculum of computer science and information systems areas. However, it is generally considered difficult to learn among students. In this study,we examined factors that could influence students' perceptions of accomplishment and enjoyment and their intention to learn in the web development…

  8. Enjoying God's Death: "The Passion of the Christ" and the Practices of an Evangelical Public

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundberg, Christian

    2009-01-01

    Publics are not simply a product of common attention to texts, but are also animated by an economy of tropes and affects that relies on processes of metonymic connection, metaphorical condensation, and affective investment. Drawing on Jacques Lacan's theory of enjoyment and his treatments of metaphor and metonymy as rhetorical forms, this essay…

  9. Association of Enjoyable Leisure Activities With Psychological and Physical Well-Being

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pressman, Sarah D.; Matthews, Karen A.; Cohen, Sheldon; Martire, Lynn M.; Scheier, Michael; Baum, Andrew; Schulz, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Objective To examine whether engaging in multiple enjoyable activities was associated with better psychological and physiological functioning. Few studies have examined the health benefits of the enjoyable activities that individuals participate in voluntarily in their free time. Method Participants from four different studies (n = 1399 total, 74% female, age = 19–89 years) completed a self-report measure (Pittsburgh Enjoyable Activities Test (PEAT)) assessing their participation in ten different types of leisure activities as well as measures assessing positive and negative psychosocial states. Resting blood pressure, cortisol (over 2 days), body mass index, waist circumference, and perceived physiological functioning were assessed. Results Higher PEAT scores were associated with lower blood pressure, total cortisol, waist circumference, and body mass index, and perceptions of better physical function. These associations withstood controlling for demographic measures. The PEAT was correlated with higher levels of positive psychosocial states and lower levels of depression and negative affect. Conclusion Enjoyable leisure activities, taken in the aggregate, are associated with psychosocial and physical measures relevant for health and well-being. Future studies should determine the extent that these behaviors in the aggregate are useful predictors of disease and other health outcomes. PMID:19592515

  10. Association of enjoyable leisure activities with psychological and physical well-being.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pressman, Sarah D; Matthews, Karen A; Cohen, Sheldon; Martire, Lynn M; Scheier, Michael; Baum, Andrew; Schulz, Richard

    2009-09-01

    To examine whether engaging in multiple enjoyable activities was associated with better psychological and physiological functioning. Few studies have examined the health benefits of the enjoyable activities that individuals participate in voluntarily in their free time. Participants from four different studies (n = 1399 total, 74% female, age = 19-89 years) completed a self-report measure (Pittsburgh Enjoyable Activities Test (PEAT)) assessing their participation in ten different types of leisure activities as well as measures assessing positive and negative psychosocial states. Resting blood pressure, cortisol (over 2 days), body mass index, waist circumference, and perceived physiological functioning were assessed. Higher PEAT scores were associated with lower blood pressure, total cortisol, waist circumference, and body mass index, and perceptions of better physical function. These associations withstood controlling for demographic measures. The PEAT was correlated with higher levels of positive psychosocial states and lower levels of depression and negative affect. Enjoyable leisure activities, taken in the aggregate, are associated with psychosocial and physical measures relevant for health and well-being. Future studies should determine the extent that these behaviors in the aggregate are useful predictors of disease and other health outcomes.

  11. PEERS' INFLUENCE ON EXERCISE ENJOYMENT: A SELF-DETERMINATION THEORY APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Antonio Moreno Murcia

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research was to study the influence of motivational climate perceived in peers and basic psychological needs (competence, autonomy and relatedness on self-determined motivation and enjoyment in exercise. A sample comprised of 394 non- competitive physical exercisers, 156 women and 238 men aged between 16 and 54 (M = 21.64, SD = 7. 18, completed the Motivational Climate Perceived in Peers Scale, Scale of Motivational Mediators in Physical Activity, Behavioural Regulation in Exercise Questionnaire-2 and Physical Activity Enjoyment Scale. A correlation analysis between the variables studied, a confirmatory factor analysis (CFA and structural equation analysis were performed. The results showed that the task- involving peer motivational climate positively predicted the three basic psychological needs (competence, autonomy and relatedness. In turn, meeting the needs for competence and relatedness positively predicted self-determined motivation, which also positively predicted the enjoyment the exercisers had during the activity. There were no significant associations between the ego- involving peer motivational climate and psychological needs. A multisample analysis indicated that the model was invariant across age and degree of exercise involvement. This study reiterates the importance of increasing exercisers' self-determined motivation in order to obtain more enjoyment and to be more committed to the exercise. Therefore, it is essential to foster perceptions of competence, autonomy and relatedness by means of a task-involving climate. The findings provide evidence for the importance of peer motivational climate in sports motivation

  12. Peer Support and Adolescents' Physical Activity: The Mediating Roles of Self-Efficacy and Enjoyment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Han; Sun, Haichun; Dai, Jun

    2017-06-01

    The present study aimed to contrast the mediating magnitude of self-efficacy and enjoyment connecting peer support and adolescents' physical activity (PA). Participants were 9th-12th grade students ( N  = 409; 56.5% boys) who were randomly chosen from six public schools located in Fuzhou city in southeast China. The bootstrapping method in structural equation modeling was conducted to examine the direct and indirect effects of peer support on adolescents' PA. Peer support did not directly impact PA. Rather, peer support indirectly influenced PA through either self-efficacy or enjoyment, with self-efficacy demonstrating a stronger mediating effect. Additionally, we found a significant serial mediating effect with enjoyment, and self-efficacy sequentially mediated the relationship between peer support and PA. The findings highlight the role of self-efficacy and enjoyment as mediators connecting peer support and PA. Self-efficacy seems to be more important, as it demonstrated a significantly greater mediating effect. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Pediatric Psychology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  13. Gender Differences in Reading Achievement and Enjoyment of Reading: The Role of Perceived Teaching Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochweber, Jan; Vieluf, Svenja

    2018-01-01

    The authors examined the extent to which classroom-specific relationships between students' gender and their reading achievement and enjoyment of reading are associated with student-perceived teaching quality. Based on a sample of 10,543 ninth-grade students from 427 classrooms, multilevel analyses revealed that effective classroom management,…

  14. Mastery, Enjoyment, Tradition and Innovation: A Reflective Practice Model for Instrumental and Vocal Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, Tom

    2016-01-01

    This article offers a model to assist music teachers in reflecting on their teaching practice in relation to their aims and values. Initially developed as a workshop aid for use on a music education MA program, the model is intended to provoke critical engagement with two prominent tensions in music education: that between mastery and enjoyment,…

  15. Self-efficacy and enjoyment of middle school children performing the progressive aerobic cardiovascular endurance run (PACER).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Irene; Robertson, Robert J; Fertman, Carl I; Nagle, Elizabeth F; McConnaha, Wendell R; Rabin, Bruce S

    2013-10-01

    Self-efficacy and enjoyment were examined among 34 middle school children (M age = 12.5 yr.) performing the Progressive Aerobic Cardiovascular Endurance Run (PACER). Exercise self-efficacy (running) and physical activity enjoyment were measured after viewing a video illustrating the PACER, and subsequently following a PACER test. Significantly greater pre- than post-exercise self-efficacy was reported; enjoyment scores did not differ. Ratings of self-efficacy were higher before exercise than after, but enjoyment scores were not significantly different. A significant correlation was found between post-exercise self-efficacy and enjoyment, but not between pre-exercise self-efficacy and enjoyment. Although positive correlations were found between PACER laps and pre-/post-exercise self-efficacy, correlations with ratings of enjoyment were not significant. Exercise self-efficacy was associated with children's beliefs about the task-specific PACER aerobic exercise; however, exercise enjoyment was stable. Children's self-efficacy and enjoyment beliefs should be considered when developing interventional strategies to promote aerobic exercise participation.

  16. CERN Summer Student Project Report

    CERN Document Server

    Parton, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    My Summer Student project was divided between two areas: work on Thin Gap Chamber (TGC) Level-1 muon triggers for the ATLAS experiment, and data acquisition (DAQ) for an RPC muon detector at the Gamma Irradiation Facility (GIF++)

  17. The year without a summer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luterbacher, J.; Pfister, C.

    2015-04-01

    The 1815 eruption of Tambora caused an unusually cold summer in much of Europe in 1816. The extreme weather led to poor harvests and malnutrition, but also demonstrated the capability of humans to adapt and help others in worse conditions.

  18. Summer Student Report - AV Workflow

    CERN Document Server

    Abramson, Jessie

    2014-01-01

    The AV Workflow is web application which allows cern users to publish, update and delete videos from cds. During my summer internship I implemented the backend of the new version of the AV Worklow in python using the django framework.

  19. Winter/Summer Monsoon Experiment

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Winter/Summer Monsoon Experiment (MONEX) was conducted during the First Global GARP (Global Atmospheric Research Program) Experiment (FGGE). An international...

  20. Summer Research Fellowship Programme–2015

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 19; Issue 12. Summer Research Fellowship Programme - 2015. Information and Announcements Volume 19 Issue 12 December 2014 pp 1199-1199. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  1. Relationships between physical education students' motivational profiles, enjoyment, state anxiety, and self-reported physical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yli-Piipari, Sami; Watt, Anthony; Jaakkola, Timo; Liukkonen, Jarmo; Nurmi, Jari-Erik

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze motivational profiles based on the self-determination theory (Deci and Ryan, 2000) and how these profiles are related to physical education students' enjoyment, state anxiety, and physical activity. The participants, 429 sixth grade students (girls = 216; boys = 213) completed SMS, Sport Enjoyment Scale, PESAS, and Physical Activity Scale. Cluster analyses identified two motivational profiles: 1) the "High motivation profile", in which the students had high intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, and low levels of amotivation, and 2) the "Low motivation profile", in which the students had low intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, and low levels of amotivation. The students in the first cluster enjoyed physical education more and were physically more active. The results revealed that students may be motivated towards physical education lessons both intrinsically and extrinsically, and still experience enjoyment in physical education. Key pointsTWO MOTIVATIONAL PROFILES WERE REVEALED: 1) the "High motivation profile", in which the students had high intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, and low levels of amotivation, and 2) the "Low motivation profile", in which the students had low intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, and low levels of amotivation.The students in the first profile enjoyed physical education more and were physically more active than the students in the second profile.Moreover, the representatives of the "High motivation profile "experienced greater anxiety toward physical education than the representatives of the "Low motivation profile"These findings raised an interesting question whether students engaging in physical education benefit more from the presence of both self-determined and non-self-determined forms of motivation, or are the benefits higher if students are primarily self-determined?

  2. The effects of gamelike features and test location on cognitive test performance and participant enjoyment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jim Lumsden

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Computerised cognitive assessments are a vital tool in the behavioural sciences, but participants often view them as effortful and unengaging. One potential solution is to add gamelike elements to these tasks in order to make them more intrinsically enjoyable, and some researchers have posited that a more engaging task might produce higher quality data. This assumption, however, remains largely untested. We investigated the effects of gamelike features and test location on the data and enjoyment ratings from a simple cognitive task. We tested three gamified variants of the Go-No-Go task, delivered both in the laboratory and online. In the first version of the task participants were rewarded with points for performing optimally. The second version of the task was framed as a cowboy shootout. The third version was a standard Go-No-Go task, used as a control condition. We compared reaction time, accuracy and subjective measures of enjoyment and engagement between task variants and study location. We found points to be a highly suitable game mechanic for gamified cognitive testing because they did not disrupt the validity of the data collected but increased participant enjoyment. However, we found no evidence that gamelike features could increase engagement to the point where participant performance improved. We also found that while participants enjoyed the cowboy themed task, the difficulty of categorising the gamelike stimuli adversely affected participant performance, increasing No-Go error rates by 28% compared to the non-game control. Responses collected online vs. in the laboratory had slightly longer reaction times but were otherwise very similar, supporting other findings that online crowdsourcing is an acceptable method of data collection for this type of research.

  3. High-Intensity Interval Training Elicits Higher Enjoyment than Moderate Intensity Continuous Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thum, Jacob S.; Parsons, Gregory; Whittle, Taylor

    2017-01-01

    Exercise adherence is affected by factors including perceptions of enjoyment, time availability, and intrinsic motivation. Approximately 50% of individuals withdraw from an exercise program within the first 6 mo of initiation, citing lack of time as a main influence. Time efficient exercise such as high intensity interval training (HIIT) may provide an alternative to moderate intensity continuous exercise (MICT) to elicit substantial health benefits. This study examined differences in enjoyment, affect, and perceived exertion between MICT and HIIT. Twelve recreationally active men and women (age = 29.5 ± 10.7 yr, VO2max = 41.4 ± 4.1 mL/kg/min, BMI = 23.1 ± 2.1 kg/m2) initially performed a VO2max test on a cycle ergometer to determine appropriate workloads for subsequent exercise bouts. Each subject returned for two additional exercise trials, performing either HIIT (eight 1 min bouts of cycling at 85% maximal workload (Wmax) with 1 min of active recovery between bouts) or MICT (20 min of cycling at 45% Wmax) in randomized order. During exercise, rating of perceived exertion (RPE), affect, and blood lactate concentration (BLa) were measured. Additionally, the Physical Activity Enjoyment Scale (PACES) was completed after exercise. Results showed higher enjoyment (p = 0.013) in response to HIIT (103.8 ± 9.4) versus MICT (84.2 ± 19.1). Eleven of 12 participants (92%) preferred HIIT to MICT. However, affect was lower (pHIIT versus MICT. Although HIIT is more physically demanding than MICT, individuals report greater enjoyment due to its time efficiency and constantly changing stimulus. Trial Registration: NCT:02981667. PMID:28076352

  4. High-Intensity Interval Training Elicits Higher Enjoyment than Moderate Intensity Continuous Exercise.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob S Thum

    Full Text Available Exercise adherence is affected by factors including perceptions of enjoyment, time availability, and intrinsic motivation. Approximately 50% of individuals withdraw from an exercise program within the first 6 mo of initiation, citing lack of time as a main influence. Time efficient exercise such as high intensity interval training (HIIT may provide an alternative to moderate intensity continuous exercise (MICT to elicit substantial health benefits. This study examined differences in enjoyment, affect, and perceived exertion between MICT and HIIT. Twelve recreationally active men and women (age = 29.5 ± 10.7 yr, VO2max = 41.4 ± 4.1 mL/kg/min, BMI = 23.1 ± 2.1 kg/m2 initially performed a VO2max test on a cycle ergometer to determine appropriate workloads for subsequent exercise bouts. Each subject returned for two additional exercise trials, performing either HIIT (eight 1 min bouts of cycling at 85% maximal workload (Wmax with 1 min of active recovery between bouts or MICT (20 min of cycling at 45% Wmax in randomized order. During exercise, rating of perceived exertion (RPE, affect, and blood lactate concentration (BLa were measured. Additionally, the Physical Activity Enjoyment Scale (PACES was completed after exercise. Results showed higher enjoyment (p = 0.013 in response to HIIT (103.8 ± 9.4 versus MICT (84.2 ± 19.1. Eleven of 12 participants (92% preferred HIIT to MICT. However, affect was lower (p<0.05 and HR, RPE, and BLa were higher (p<0.05 in HIIT versus MICT. Although HIIT is more physically demanding than MICT, individuals report greater enjoyment due to its time efficiency and constantly changing stimulus.NCT:02981667.

  5. Summer Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makidi, Nitou

    2012-01-01

    The summer of 2012 has been filled with many memorable events and activities. As an intern, I had responsibilities that had to be fulfilled. My tour of duty was completed as an administrative student trainee in the Information Technology and Communications Services Business Office (IT-A). In accordance with the Business Objectives and Agreement of the Business Office and my performance plan, I was to provide business office support, improve business, project management, and technical work processes. With this being stated, I supported a project called "The Big Move Project" (TBMP), which will take course over the next several years. The Big Move Project is the planning of the Information Technology (IT) Directorate's relocation to various buildings in the course of upcoming years, when designs and the building of Central Campus have been completed. Working directly with my supervisor and the project manager, I was responsible for gathering both administrative and operational area requirements for the Information Technology (IT) Directorate, along with its outsourced support and contractors, such as IMCS, NICS, and ACES. My first action was to create rubrics that will serve as a guideline for the information that should be given by each branch of IT. After receiving that information via a few KAITS actions, I was able to start the consolidation process, and begin working on a presentation. A SharePoint was created shortly after for others to view the progression of the project, which I managed. During the consolidation ofthis information, I would occasionally present to the IT Deputy Director and IT Chiefs. The draft of this presentation was shown to employees of Center Operations (T A) and stakeholders-IT Chief Officers and contractor managers-in the relocation of IT to make them aware of what requirements must be met that will enable IT to be accommodated appropriately in the design of Central Campus Phase 11-the time in which IT and its contractors are scheduled

  6. The effects of animal-assisted therapy on wounded warriors in an Occupational Therapy Life Skills program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Christine E; Gonzales, Florie; Sells, Carol Haertlein; Jones, Cynthia; Reer, Theresa; Zhu, Yao Yao

    2012-01-01

    Animal-assisted therapy (AAT) has gained much attention in civilian and military health care. Evidence supports its benefits with varied populations with diseases and disabilities, but no research has been done with injured or ill service members. This pretest, posttest nonrandomized control group study evaluated the effects of AAT on Warriors in transition (N=24) attending an Occupational Therapy Life Skills program with the long-term goal of improving their successful reintegration. Although significant differences were not found between the groups on most measures, anecdotal reports by participants and observers indicate that participants eagerly anticipated being with the therapy dogs, expressed pleasure and satisfaction with the experience, and regretted seeing it end. There were significant correlations between mood, stress, resilience, fatigue, and function at various measurement points. This is the first study to formally assess the benefits of AAT with wounded service members in garrison. Suggestions for future research are provided.

  7. Combat amputees' health-related quality of life and psychological outcomes: A brief report from the wounded warrior recovery project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodruff, Susan I; Galarneau, Michael R; Sack, Daniel I; McCabe, Cameron T; Dye, Judy L

    2017-03-01

    This study extends what is known about long-term health-related quality of life (HrQoL) and other psychosocial outcomes (i.e., depression, posttraumatic stress disorder [PTSD]) among US military combat amputees serving in Operation Enduring Freedom, Operation Iraqi Freedom, and Operation New Dawn. A total of 63 combat amputees were identified from the Wounded Warrior Recovery Project, a study assessing long-term self-reported HrQoL and psychological outcomes among those wounded during military service. Another 477 service members from the Wounded Warrior Recovery Project were identified as a comparison group (i.e., nonamputees with moderate to severe extremity injuries). After adjusting for age, time since injury, overall injury severity, and traumatic brain injury, amputees had poorer functional HrQoL than those in the nonamputee comparison group overall and in the specific area related to performance of usual activities, and, to some degree, chronic and acute symptoms, and mobility/self-care. On the other hand, depression and PTSD symptoms were not different for the two groups. Results suggest that when assessed over 5 years postinjury, on average, amputees have unique physical and functional limitations, yet do not report greater depression or PTSD symptoms than others seriously injured in combat. It may be that state-of-the-art integrated amputee care that includes support networks and emphasis on adjustment and psychological health may increase successful coping and adjustment, at least to a level that is on par with other types of serious combat injury. Epidemiologic/prognostic study, level III.

  8. Pleasures of the Mind: What Makes Jokes and Insight Problems Enjoyable

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Canestrari

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a parallel analysis of the enjoyment derived from humor and insight problem solving is presented with reference to a “general” Theory of the Pleasures of the Mind (TPM (Kubovy, 1999 rather than to “local” theories regarding what makes humor and insight problem solving enjoyable. The similarity of these two cognitive activities has already been discussed in previous literature in terms of the cognitive mechanisms which underpin getting a joke or having an insight experience in a problem solving task. The paper explores whether we can learn something new about the similarities and differences between humor and problem solving by means of an investigation of what makes them pleasurable. In the first part of the paper, the framework for this joint analysis is set. Two descriptive studies are then presented in which the participants were asked to report on their experiences relating to solving visuo-spatial insight problems (Study 1 or understanding cartoons (Study 2 in terms of whether they were enjoyable or otherwise. In both studies, the responses were analyzed with reference to a set of categories inspired by the TPM. The results of Study 1 demonstrate that finding the solution to a problem is associated with a positive evaluation, and the most frequent explanations for this were reported as being Curiosity, Virtuosity and Violation of expectations. The results of Study 2 suggest that understanding a joke (Joy of verification and being surprised by it (Feeling of surprise were two essential conditions: when they were not present, the cartoons were perceived as not enjoyable. However, this was not enough to explain the motivations for the choice of the most enjoyable cartoons. Recognizing a Violation of expectations and experiencing a Diminishment in the cleverness or awareness initially attributed to the characters in the cartoon were the aspects which were most frequently indicated by the participants to explain why they

  9. Neutron activation analysis on source of raw material of terracotta warriors and horses in No.2 pit of Qin Shihuang's mausoleum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Guoxia; Zhao Weijuan; Gao Zhengyao; Xie Jianzhong; Han Guohe

    2002-01-01

    32 trace element contents in each sample are measured by neutron activation analysis for the selected that 19 samples of terracotta warriors and horses from No.2 pit of Emperor Qin shihuang's Mausoleum, 20 samples clay nearby Qin's Mausoleum and 2 samples of Yaozhou porcelain bodies. The trend cluster analysis diagram is obtained after sorting the data. The results show that the samples from the No.2 pit of Emperor Qin Shihuang's Mausoleum have a close relationship with the clay samples from the neighborhood of the Mausoleum. Consequently, the source of raw materials of the terracotta warriors and horses may come from some places nearby the Mausoleum, the kiln sites may be also neighborhood of the Mausoleum. There is also a preliminary study on the relationship between the sealing earth of the Mausoleum, rammed earth and backfill of the No.2 pit and the clay from the nearby place

  10. Influence of a health-related physical fitness model on students' physical activity, perceived competence, and enjoyment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, You; Gao, Zan; Hannon, James; Shultz, Barry; Newton, Maria; Sibthorp, Jim

    2013-12-01

    This study was designed to explore the effects of a health-related physical fitness physical education model on students' physical activity, perceived competence, and enjoyment. 61 students (25 boys, 36 girls; M age = 12.6 yr., SD = 0.6) were assigned to two groups (health-related physical fitness physical education group, and traditional physical education group), and participated in one 50-min. weekly basketball class for 6 wk. Students' in-class physical activity was assessed using NL-1000 pedometers. The physical subscale of the Perceived Competence Scale for Children was employed to assess perceived competence, and children's enjoyment was measured using the Sport Enjoyment Scale. The findings suggest that students in the intervention group increased their perceived competence, enjoyment, and physical activity over a 6-wk. intervention, while the comparison group simply increased physical activity over time. Children in the intervention group had significantly greater enjoyment.

  11. Financial motivation undermines potential enjoyment in an intensive diet and activity intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moller, Arlen C; Buscemi, Joanna; McFadden, H Gene; Hedeker, Donald; Spring, Bonnie

    2014-10-01

    The use of material incentives in healthy lifestyle interventions is becoming widespread. However, self-determination theory (SDT) posits that when material incentives are perceived as controlling, they undermine intrinsic motivation. We analyzed data from the Make Better Choices trial-a trial testing strategies for improving four risk behaviors: low fruit-vegetable intake, high saturated fat intake, low physical activity, and high sedentary activity. At baseline, participants reported the degree to which financial incentives were an important motivator (financial motivation); self-reported enjoyment of each behavior was assessed before and after the 3-week incentivization phase. Consistent with SDT, after controlling for general motivation and group assignment, lower financial motivation predicted more adaptive changes in enjoyment. Whereas participants low in financial motivation experienced adaptive changes, adaptive changes were suppressed among those high in financial motivation.

  12. Can a school physical activity intervention improve physical self-perception and enjoyment?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund-Cramer, Pernille; Christiansen, Lars Breum Skov; Smedegaard, Søren

    Purpose Physical activity at school can improve mental health of all children – especially if it is targeted to children’s needs and executed in a positive social climate. The purpose of the present study was to examine the effect of a multicomponent school-based physical activity intervention...... activity in recess. Using a cluster-randomized design, 24 Danish schools were randomized to either intervention or control. Study population included 3.136 children aged 10-13 years at baseline. Survey data (socio-demographics, physical activity, self-efficacy, physical enjoyment, physical self...... on physical self-perception and enjoyment of physical activity among children aged 10-13 years. Methods An intervention based on Self-Determination Theory was developed and pilot tested in close co-operation with schools and targeted 1) physical education lessons, 2) in-class activity, and 3) physical...

  13. Financial motivation undermines potential enjoyment in an intensive diet and activity intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moller, Arlen C.; Buscemi, Joanna; McFadden, H. Gene; Hedeker, Donald; Spring, Bonnie

    2013-01-01

    The use of material incentives in healthy lifestyle interventions is becoming widespread. However, self-determination theory (SDT) posits that when material incentives are perceived as controlling, they undermine intrinsic motivation. We analyzed data from the Make Better Choices trial—a trial testing strategies for improving four risk behaviors: low fruit–vegetable intake, high saturated fat intake, low physical activity, and high sedentary activity. At baseline, participants reported the degree to which financial incentives were an important motivator (financial motivation); self-reported enjoyment of each behavior was assessed before and after the 3-week incentivization phase. Consistent with SDT, after controlling for general motivation and group assignment, lower financial motivation predicted more adaptive changes in enjoyment. Whereas participants low in financial motivation experienced adaptive changes, adaptive changes were suppressed among those high in financial motivation. PMID:24142187

  14. Having Fun on Facebook?: Mothers' Enjoyment as a Moderator of Mental Health and Facebook Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann, Renee; Buckner, Marjorie M; Ledbetter, Andrew M

    2017-08-01

    This study reports results of a study that examined the extent to which contextual factors (i.e., income level and number of children) might predict a mother's mental health quality, which, in turn, may predict level of engagement with Facebook. Results supported this model, finding that mothers with more children and lower income possess lower mental health quality, and lower mental health quality predicted more frequent Facebook use. However, this pattern was qualified by a mother's level of enjoyment of Facebook, such that mental health quality did not significantly predict Facebook intensity when enjoyment of Facebook was low. This research extends practitioners' knowledge of mothers' mental health quality by identifying a behavior that may indicate lower mental health quality and enhance abilities to recognize mothers who may need support or treatment. Future directions for this research are included.

  15. Enjoyment and its discontents: Ecclesiastes in dialogue with Freud on the stewardship of joy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browning Helsel, Philip

    2010-03-01

    The book of Ecclesiastes has frequently been mischaracterized as a cynical or pessimistic work. Instead, this article recommends Ecclesiastes, following Eunny P. Lee, as contributing to pastoral theology through its embodied and pragmatic theology of enjoyment in which practices of joy revitalize the human spirit. However, there are some who are unable to experience satisfaction. The absence of reflection on this problem in Ecclesiastes scholarship is considered the starting point of pastoral theology, and is addressed by a turn to the frequently misunderstood passage in 7:16-18, bringing it into conversation with the structural [corrected] model of the human person developed by Freud. At the same time, the interpersonal aspects of enjoyment found in Ecclesiastes critique Freud by suggesting how the fragmented parts of self-experience can be held together in an interpersonal context.

  16. The IM ABLE Study: A Cross-Sector, Multisite Initiative to Advance Care for Warriors and Veterans Following Neuromusculoskeletal Injury of the Lower Limb

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-16-1-0738 TITLE: The IM ABLE Study: A Cross-Sector, Multisite Initiative to Advance Care for Warriors and Veterans...REPORT TYPE Annual 3. DATES COVERED 30 Sep 2016 - 29 Sep 2017 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE The IM ABLE Study: A Cross-Sector, Multisite Initiative to...widely agreed upon, if accepted at all. If the devices truly improve function and comfort, then the initial high costs of provision may be justified

  17. The Importance of Parents? Behavior in their Children?s Enjoyment and Amotivation in Sports

    OpenAIRE

    S?nchez-Miguel, Pedro A.; Leo, Francisco M.; S?nchez-Oliva, David; Amado, Diana; Garc?a-Calvo, Tom?s

    2013-01-01

    The main aim of the research was to examine the relationship between motivational orientations and parents? behavior with regard to the players? motivational orientation, motivational climate, enjoyment and amotivation. The sample comprised 723 athletes (M = 12.37, SD = 1.48) and 723 parents (M = 46.46, SD = 2.56). Players were male and female who belonged to federative basketball, handball, football and volleyball teams. Parents and athletes completed questionnaires that assessed motivationa...

  18. Interval training elicits higher enjoyment versus moderate exercise in persons with spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astorino, Todd A; Thum, Jacob S

    2018-01-01

    High intensity interval training (HIIT) is a robust and time-efficient approach to improve multiple health indices including maximal oxygen uptake (VO 2 max). Despite the intense nature of HIIT, data in untrained adults report greater enjoyment of HIIT versus continuous exercise (CEX). However, this has yet to be investigated in persons with spinal cord injury (SCI). To examine differences in enjoyment in response to CEX and HIIT in persons with SCI. Repeated measures, within-subjects design. University laboratory in San Diego, CA. Nine habitually active men and women (age = 33.3 ± 10.5 years) with chronic SCI. Participants performed progressive arm ergometry to volitional exhaustion to determine VO 2 peak. During subsequent sessions, they completed CEX, sprint interval training (SIT), or HIIT in randomized order. Physical activity enjoyment (PACES), affect, rating of perceived exertion (RPE), VO 2 , and blood lactate concentration (BLa) were measured. Despite a higher VO 2 , RPE, and BLa consequent with HIIT and SIT (P HIIT (107.4 ± 13.4) and SIT (103.7 ± 12.5) compared to CEX (81.6 ± 25.4). Fifty-five percent of participants preferred HIIT and 45% preferred SIT, with none identifying CEX as their preferred exercise mode. Compared to CEX, brief sessions of submaximal or supramaximal interval training elicit higher enjoyment despite higher metabolic strain. The long-term efficacy and feasibility of HIIT in this population should be explored considering that it is not viewed as more aversive than CEX.

  19. The Effects of Active Videogame Feedback and Practicing Experience on Children's Physical Activity Intensity and Enjoyment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Han; Sun, Haichun

    2017-08-01

    The study aims to explore the effects of receiving active videogame (AVG) feedback and playing experience on individuals' moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) and perceived enjoyment. This was a within-subject design study. The participants included 36 (n = 15 and 21 for boys and girls, respectively) fourth graders enrolled in a rural elementary school in southern Georgia area. The experiment lasted for 6 weeks with each week including three sessions. The participants were assigned in either front row (sensor feedback) or back row (no sensor feedback) during practice, which was alternated in different sessions. Two different dance games were played during the study with each game implemented for 3 weeks. The MVPA was measured with GT3X+ accelerometers. Physical activity (PA) enjoyment was assessed after the completion of the first two and last two sessions of each game. A repeated one-way ANOVA (analysis of variance) was used to examine the effects of AVG feedback and game on MVPA. A repeated one-way MANOVA (multivariate analysis of variance) was conducted for each game to examine the effects of experience and AVG feedback on enjoyment and MVPA. No effects of AVG feedback were found for MVPA or enjoyment (P > 0.05). The effects of experience on MVPA were found for Just Dance Kids 2014 with experience decreased MVPA (P < 0.05). Students who practiced dance AVG without receiving feedback still demonstrated positive affection and accumulated similar MVPA than when practicing while receiving feedback. Experience for certain dance games tends to decrease PA intensity.

  20. Brands as Product Coordinators: Matching Brands Make Joint Consumption Experiences More Enjoyable

    OpenAIRE

    Ryan Rahinel; Joseph P. Redden

    2013-01-01

    People often consume multiple products at the same time (e.g., chips and salsa). Four studies demonstrate that people enjoy such joint consumption experiences more when the products are merely labeled with the same brand (vs. different brands). Process evidence shows that this brand matching effect arises because matching brand labels cue consumers' belief that the two products were coordinated through joint testing and design to go uniquely well together. This shows that there is no universa...

  1. CERN openlab Summer Student Programme

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    CERN openlab is currently taking applications for its summer student programme. The closing date for applications is 30 March 2012.   The openlab Summer Student Programme is open for applications from bachelor, master and PhD students in computer science and physics. Successful applicants will spend 8 weeks at CERN, during the period June to September 2012, to work with some of the latest hardware and software technologies. The programme is more than just a summer at CERN: it can lead to follow-on projects at the home institute and may even inspire the students to become entrepreneurs in cutting-edge computing technologies. A series of lectures will be given by experts in various domains of CERN related high-throughput computing. Study tours to external companies and universities as well as to CERN facilities are also part of the programme. Please visit www.cern.ch/openlab-students for more information.

  2. CERN openlab summer student programme

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    CERN openlab is currently taking applications for its summer student programme. The closing date for applications is 31 March 2013.   The openlab summer student programme is open for applications from bachelor, master and PhD students in computer science and physics. Successful applicants will spend 9 weeks at CERN, during the period from June to September 2013, working with some of the latest hardware and software technologies. The programme is more than just a summer at CERN: it can lead to follow-on projects at the home institute and may even inspire students to become entrepreneurs in cutting-edge computing technologies. A series of lectures will be given by experts in various domains of CERN-related high-throughput computing. Study tours of external companies and universities as well as of CERN facilities are also part of the programme. Please visit the CERN openlab website for more information.

  3. Assistive technology use and human rights enjoyment: a cross-sectional study in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borg, Johan; Larsson, Stig; Ostergren, Per-Olof; Rahman, Asm Atiqur; Bari, Nazmul; Khan, Ahm Noman

    2012-09-19

    About half a billion people with disabilities in developing countries have limited access to assistive technology. The Convention on the Rights of persons with Disabilities requires governments to take measures to ensure provision of such technologies. To guide implementation of these measures there is a need for understanding health outcomes from a human rights perspective. The objective of this study was therefore to explore the relation between assistive technology use and enjoyment of human rights in a low-income country. Data was collected in eight districts of Bangladesh through interviews of people with hearing impairments using and not using hearings aids, and people with ambulatory impairments using and not using manual wheelchairs (N = 583). Using logistic regression, self-reported outcomes on standard of living, health, education, work, receiving information and movement were analyzed. The adjusted likelihood of reporting greater enjoyment of human rights was significantly higher among people using hearing aids compared to non-users for all outcomes except working status. Compared to non-users, users of wheelchairs reported a significantly higher adjusted likelihood of good ambulatory performance and a significantly lower adjusted likelihood of reporting a positive working status. Further analyses indicated that physical accessibility to working places and duration of wheelchair use had a statistically significant impact on the likelihood of reporting positive work outcomes. The findings support the notion that assistive technology use increases the likelihood of human rights enjoyment, particularly hearing aid use. Physical accessibility should always be addressed in wheelchair provision.

  4. Perceived enjoyment, concentration, intention, and speed violation behavior: Using flow theory and theory of planned behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atombo, Charles; Wu, Chaozhong; Zhang, Hui; Wemegah, Tina D

    2017-10-03

    Road accidents are an important public health concern, and speeding is a major contributor. Although flow theory (FLT) is a valid model for understanding behavior, currently the nature of the roles and interplay of FLT constructs within the theory of planned behavior (TPB) framework when attempting to explain the determinants of motivations for intention to speed and speeding behavior of car drivers is not yet known. The study aims to synthesize TPB and FLT in explaining drivers of advanced vehicles intentions to speed and speed violation behaviors and evaluate factors that are critical for explaining intention and behavior. The hypothesized model was validated using a sample collected from 354 fully licensed drivers of advanced vehicles, involving 278 males and 76 females on 2 occasions separated by a 3-month interval. During the first of the 2 occasions, participants completed questionnaire measures of TPB and FLT variables. Three months later, participants' speed violation behaviors were assessed. The study observed a significant positive relationship between the constructs. The proposed model accounted for 51 and 45% of the variance in intention to speed and speed violation behavior, respectively. The independent predictors of intention were enjoyment, attitude, and subjective norm. The independent predictors of speed violation behavior were enjoyment, concentration, intention, and perceived behavioral control. The findings suggest that safety interventions for preventing speed violation behaviors should be aimed at underlying beliefs influencing the speeding behaviors of drivers of advanced vehicles. Furthermore, perceived enjoyment is of equal importance to driver's intention, influencing speed violation behavior.

  5. The Role of Trait and State Absorption in the Enjoyment of Music

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the role of state versus trait characteristics on our enjoyment of music. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of state and trait absorption upon preference for music, particularly preference for music that evokes negative emotions. The sample consisted of 128 participants who were asked to listen to two pieces of self-selected music and rate the music on variables including preference and felt and expressed emotions. Participants completed a brief measure of state absorption after listening to each piece, and a trait absorption inventory. State absorption was strongly positively correlated with music preference, whereas trait absorption was not. Trait absorption was related to preference for negative emotions in music, with chi-square analyses demonstrating greater enjoyment of negative emotions in music among individuals with high trait absorption. This is the first study to show that state and trait absorption have separable and distinct effects on a listener’s music experience, with state characteristics impacting music enjoyment in the moment, and trait characteristics influencing music preference based on its emotional content. PMID:27828970

  6. Cultivating Engagement and Enjoyment in Exergames Using Feedback, Challenge, and Rewards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Elizabeth J

    2015-02-01

    This article reviews theoretical and empirical evidence related to three mechanisms for encouraging enjoyment during exergame play: Feedback, challenge, and rewards. A literature search and narrative review were conducted. Feedback is found in nearly all exergames, and richer, more in-depth feedback is associated with increased activity. Challenge is a vital component of any videogame, and exergames include physical as well as cognitive challenges. Flow states have traditionally been conceptualized as occurring when an optimal match between player skills and game challenge occurs. However, failure and retrial are necessary for feelings of overall satisfaction and fun, despite not necessarily being ideally fun or satisfying themselves. Rewards are a more complicated issue, with significant theoretical and empirical evidence suggesting positive and negative effects of reward systems. How rewards are integrated into the mechanics and storyline of the game likely impacts how they are perceived and, thus, their effectiveness. Finally, integration of these mechanisms into exergames requires specific attention to both cognitive and physical implementations. Movements that are not themselves enjoyable or engaging may lead to cheating and lower energy expenditure. Feedback, challenge, and rewards are promising mechanisms by which exergames could become more enjoyable. How these concepts are operationalized can affect physical and psychological reactions to exergames. Attention to these concepts in future exergame development and implementation would benefit theory, research, and practice.

  7. The Role of Trait and State Absorption in the Enjoyment of Music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Sarah E; Schubert, Emery; Wilson, Sarah J

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the role of state versus trait characteristics on our enjoyment of music. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of state and trait absorption upon preference for music, particularly preference for music that evokes negative emotions. The sample consisted of 128 participants who were asked to listen to two pieces of self-selected music and rate the music on variables including preference and felt and expressed emotions. Participants completed a brief measure of state absorption after listening to each piece, and a trait absorption inventory. State absorption was strongly positively correlated with music preference, whereas trait absorption was not. Trait absorption was related to preference for negative emotions in music, with chi-square analyses demonstrating greater enjoyment of negative emotions in music among individuals with high trait absorption. This is the first study to show that state and trait absorption have separable and distinct effects on a listener's music experience, with state characteristics impacting music enjoyment in the moment, and trait characteristics influencing music preference based on its emotional content.

  8. Summer Schools In Nuclear Chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, Sue; Herbert, Mieva; Mantica, Paul

    2006-01-01

    This the report for the 5 year activities for the ACS Summer Schools in Nuclear and Radiochemistry. The American Chemical Society's Summer Schools in Nuclear and Radiochemistry were held at Brookhaven National Laboratory (Upton, NY) and San Jose State University (San Jose, CA) during the award period February 1, 2002 to January 31, 2007. The Summer Schools are intensive, six-week program involving both a lecture component covering fundamental principles of nuclear chemistry and radiochemistry and a laboratory component allowing hands-on experience for the students to test many of the basic principles they learn about in lecture. Each site hosted 12 undergraduate students annually, and students received coursework credits towards their undergraduate degrees. Up to 7 student credit hours were earned at San Jose State University, and Brookhaven students received up to 6 college credits through BNL's management partner, SUNY Stony Brook. Funding from the award period covered travel, housing, educational expenses, and student stipends, for the 24 undergraduate participants. Furthermore, funding was also used to cover expenses for lecturers and staff to run the programs at the two facilities. The students were provided with nuclear and radiochemistry training equivalent to a three-hour upper-level undergraduate course along with a two-hour hands-on laboratory experience within the six-week summer period. Lectures were held 5 days per week. Students completed an extensive laboratory sequence, as well as radiation safety training at the start of the Summer Schools. The summer school curriculum was enhanced with a Guest Lecture series, as well as through several one-day symposia and organized field trips to nuclear-related research and applied science laboratories. This enrichment afforded an opportunity for students to see the broader impacts of nuclear science in today's world, and to experience some of the future challenges through formal and informal discussions with

  9. Strategic Studies Quarterly. Volume 4, Number, Summer 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    html. 68. Francis Fukuyama, "’Stateness’ First," Journal of Democracy 16, no. 1 (2005): 88. 69. Dobbins et al., Beginners Guide to Nation-Building, 255...USCENTCOM, "Operation Desert Shield/Desert Storm," 6. For a flowchart explain- ing these relationships, see Khaled bin Sultan, Desert Warrior (New

  10. Summer Student Report - Project Kryolize

    CERN Document Server

    Drozdowski, Pawel

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to describe the work and results obtained by the author during his summer student internship at CERN. The author of this document was attached to the project Kryolize as a software developer, overtaking the job from a recently departed technical student.

  11. Novel Approaches to Obesity Prevention: Effects of Game Enjoyment and Game Type on Energy Expenditure in Active Video Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Elizabeth J.; Tate, Deborah F.; Komoski, Stephanie E.; Carr, Philip M.; Ward, Dianne S.

    2012-01-01

    Background Some active video games have been found to promote physical activity adherence because of enjoyment. However, many active games are exercise themed, which may interfere with the distracting properties that make game-based exercise more enjoyable than traditional exercise. This study compared exercise-themed and game-themed active games to investigate differences in energy expenditure and enjoyment. Method Young adults (N = 100, 50 female, 55 overweight, aged 18–35 years) played two of four Wii Fit games (one aerobic game and one balance game per person) for 10 min each. Of the two aerobic games, one was exercise themed (jogging) and the other was game themed (hula hooping). Both balance games were game themed. Energy expenditure and enjoyment were measured. Results After adjustment for gender and weight, aerobic games produced 2.70 kcal/kg-1/h-1 (95% confidence interval 2.41, 3.00) greater energy expenditure than balance games (p games were more enjoyable (p games, jogging produced greater energy expenditure than hula hooping in normal-weight and male participants (p .17). Hula hooping was enjoyed more than jogging (p = .008). Enjoyment predicted energy expenditure in aerobic games (B = 0.767, p = .010). Conclusions Aerobic games produced greater energy expenditure but lower enjoyment than balance games, and a game-themed aerobic game was found more enjoyable than an exercise-themed aerobic game. Integrating more strenuous activity into entertaining games instead of games that simply simulate exercise may be a fruitful avenue for active game development. PMID:22920810

  12. GEOLOGIC SCREENING CRITERIA FOR SEQUESTRATION OF CO2 IN COAL: QUANTIFYING POTENTIAL OF THE BLACK WARRIOR COALBED METHANE FAIRWAY, ALABAMA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jack C. Pashin; Richard E. Carroll; Richard H. Groshong, Jr.; Dorothy E. Raymond; Marcella McIntyre; J. Wayne Payton

    2003-01-01

    Sequestration of CO{sub 2} in coal has potential to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from coal-fired power plants while enhancing coalbed methane recovery. Data from more than 4,000 coalbed methane wells in the Black Warrior basin of Alabama provide an opportunity to quantify the carbon sequestration potential of coal and to develop a geologic screening model for the application of carbon sequestration technology. This report summarizes stratigraphy and sedimentation, structural geology, geothermics, hydrology, coal quality, gas capacity, and production characteristics of coal in the Black Warrior coalbed methane fairway and the implications of geology for carbon sequestration and enhanced coalbed methane recovery. Coal in the Black Warrior basin is distributed among several fluvial-deltaic coal zones in the Lower Pennsylvanian Pottsville Formation. Most coal zones contain one to three coal beds that are significant targets for coalbed methane production and carbon sequestration, and net coal thickness generally increases southeastward. Pottsville strata have effectively no matrix permeability to water, so virtually all flow is through natural fractures. Faults and folds influence the abundance and openness of fractures and, hence, the performance of coalbed methane wells. Water chemistry in the Pottsville Formation ranges from fresh to saline, and zones with TDS content lower than 10,000 mg/L can be classified as USDW. An aquifer exemption facilitating enhanced recovery in USDW can be obtained where TDS content is higher than 3,000 mg/L. Carbon dioxide becomes a supercritical fluid above a temperature of 88 F and a pressure of 1,074 psi. Reservoir temperature exceeds 88 F in much of the study area. Hydrostatic pressure gradients range from normal to extremely underpressured. A large area of underpressure is developed around closely spaced longwall coal mines, and areas of natural underpressure are distributed among the coalbed methane fields. The mobility and

  13. American Summer Students At CERN - A Presence From Across The Pond

    CERN Document Server

    2001-01-01

    The reasons for American interest in the CERN summer student programme were many, but there was one which was particularly critical. With the invention of the World Wide Web, international boundaries were quickly disappearing and it was becoming clear to several American physicists that it was essential for students to have experience working in an international collaboration as early on and as frequently as possible. Photo 1: Students touring the Michigan Muon Chamber Production Labs for the CERN ATLAS Experiment during their orientation week in Ann Arbor in June, 2001. Photo 2 : American students enjoying a pleasant meal outside restraunt 1. Photo 3 : American summer students just days before coming to CERN for the experience of a lifetime.

  14. Enjoyment and other reasons for electronic cigarette use: Results from college students in New York.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saddleson, M L; Kozlowski, L T; Giovino, G A; Goniewicz, M L; Mahoney, M C; Homish, G G; Arora, A

    2016-03-01

    Young people are more likely to have experimented with e-cigarettes (e-cigs) compared with older adults. Few studies identify reasons for experimentation/use of e-cigs among young people; we sought to discover what drives college students to use e-cigs. Undergraduate students (ages 18-23) at four universities in New York State were surveyed. Among e-cig ever users (n=429), reasons for use were examined. A multinomial logistic regression model analyzed the relative risk of reasons for using e-cigs among discontinued, current non-daily and current daily e-cig users. Using e-cigs for enjoyment was associated with current non-daily (RR=2.11, 95% CI=1.18-3.75) and current daily use (RR=19.1, 95% CI=3.71-98.54). Non-daily use was related to use because e-cigs are less toxic than cigarettes (RR=2.80, 95% CI=1.75-4.50). More daily users reported use to quit smoking compared with either non-daily or discontinued users (53.3% vs. 12.2% and 13.3%, respectively; preason. The exception was daily e-cig users, who often reported use for quitting/reduction of smoking. Rather, college students report usage reasons related to affect (e.g. enjoyment). Overall, enjoyment was reported more often than was use for quitting smoking; affective reasons likely play a role in the popularity of e-cigs and should be considered in future assessments of e-cig users. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Dynamic Optimization and Conformity in Health Behavior and Life Enjoyment over the Life Cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernan Daniel Bejarano

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This article examines individual and social influences on investments in health and enjoyment from immediate consumption. Our lab experiment mimics the problem of health investment over a lifetime (Grossman 1972a, 1972b. Incentives to find the appropriate expenditures on life enjoyment and health are given by making in each period come period a function of previous health investments. In order to model social effects in the experiment, we randomly assigned individuals to chat/observation groups. Groups were permitted to freely chat between repeated lifetimes. Two treatments were employed: In the Independent-rewards treatment, an individual’s rewards from investments in life enjoyment depend only on his choice and in the Interdependent-rewards treatment; rewards not only depend on an individual’s choices but also on their similarity to the choices of the others in their group, generating a premium on conformity. The principal hypothesis is that gains from conformity increase variance in health behavior among groups and can lead to suboptimal performance. We tested three predictions and each was supported by the data: the Interdependent-rewards treatment 1 decreased within-group variance, 2 increased between-group variance, and 3 increased the likelihood of behavior far from the optimum with respect to the dynamic problem. We also test and find support for a series of subsidiary hypotheses. We found: 4 Subjects engaged in helpful chat in both treatments; 5 there was significant heterogeneity among both subjects and groups in chat frequencies; and 6 chat was most common early in the experiment, and 7 the interdependent rewards treatment increased strategic chat frequency. Incentives for conformity appear to promote prosocial behavior, but also increase variance among groups, leading to convergence on suboptimal strategies for some groups. We discuss these results in light of the growing literature focusing on social networks and health outcomes.

  16. Addressing the Impediments to the Realization and Enjoyment of Socio-Economic Rights under the ICESCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abiodun Odusote

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The realization and enjoyment of socio-economic rights is crucial to overcoming the challenges of abject poverty. These rights offer those living in poverty access to the basic and essential things that are necessary to live a dignified life. However, it is generally agreed that the protection and enjoyment of socio-economic rights is accorded less importance amongst the comity of civilized nations. Majority of governments give priority to the protection of civil and political rights to the detriment of socio-economic rights. Despite the United Nations stance on the non-hierarchical structure within human rights classifications, there is general ambivalence towards the violation of socio-economic rights by those entrusted to protect them. Though many international and regional treaties protect socio-economic rights, which instruments have been domesticated by countries; the picture appears gloomy in terms of effective realisation and protection of socio-economic rights. Their enforcements still remain a challenge for this millennium. The impediments to the realization of these rights are the focus of this paper. Through a detailed analysis of international, regional and domestic legislative framework and jurisprudence, this study provides a systematic exposition of the obstacles that impact on the ability of states to fulfil their socio-economic rights obligations under the various and diverse instruments. The impediments that are discussed in this paper include: a proliferations of human rights; corruption and inept leadership in Africa; inadequate enforcement mechanism; poor and ineffective state reports; international sanctions; wars and conflicts; globalization; debt repayment by developing countries; difficulties of monitoring compliance by State Parties and conflict of laws. In conclusion, the paper proffers a panacea and alternative models for the realization and enjoyments of socio-economic rights.

  17. Deliberate practice theory: relevance, effort, and inherent enjoyment of music practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyllegard, Randy; Bories, Tamara L

    2008-10-01

    This study examined three assumptions of the theory of deliberate practice for practice playing music on an electronic keyboard. 40 undergraduate students, divided into two separate groups, practiced one of two music sequences and rated the relevance of practice for improving performance on the sequences, the amount of effort needed to learn the sequences, and the inherent enjoyment of practice sessions. Findings for each assumption were consistent with those suggested by theory but also showed that perceptions are affected by the amount of practice completed and performance of the skill.

  18. Children and adolescent physical activity participation and enjoyment during active play.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghaddaszadeh, Asal; Ahmadi, Yasamin; Belcastro, Angelo N

    2017-10-01

    Girls' (9-19 years) participation in physical activity (PA) is known to decrease at a faster rate than boys. A reduction in PA attractiveness (enjoyment) and lower psychosocial profile of girls approaching biological maturity may underlie the decreasing rate of PA participation. Since engaging children in active play programs improves health related quality of life indictors and enjoyment levels; the purposes of this study were to: 1) assess psychosocial status and PA attractiveness/enjoyment of boys and girls to an eight-week active play program; and 2) investigate the relationships among PA participation, psychosocial status and PA attractiveness with both age and maturity status for boys and girls following an active play PA program. Thirty-three children (age 9.8±1.3 years; weight 43.1±13.4 kg; BMI 20.8±3.2 kg/m2) were recruited to participate in an active play program for 8 weeks (4x/week; 1hr/d). M-S estimates ranged from -6.7 to -2.5 years away from biological maturity Daily program PA was assessed and compared to pre-post measures of psychosocial functioning and PA attractiveness. Statistical procedures were performed using ANOVA and/or Pearson's correlation r (SPSS v. 22.0) with P=0.05. PA participation in the active play program showed a group average of 39±11% time spent in moderate-vigorous PA (%MVPA) with boys averaging 45% MVPA and girls averaging 30% MVPA (Pattractiveness scores for boys did not change following the program; whereas girls improved from 67±13% to 76±9% (Pattractiveness to %MVPA, 80% of girls reporting positive changes or no change; in contrast 56% of boys responded with negative/less PA attractiveness. PA attractiveness for all children was negatively associated with age (r=-0.19) and/or M-S (r=-0.29). The relationships, however, were gender specific with boys exhibiting a coefficient of -0.28 (age) and -0.61 (M-S) (Pattractiveness promoted less decline in %MVPA for M-S (r=0.18) compared to age (r=-0.17). For girls, approaching

  19. Positive effect of pedometer-based walking intervention on body image and physical activity enjoyment in adolescent girls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kantanista Adam

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Study aim: To assess the effects of an eight-week pedometer-based walking intervention, using different strategies of goalsetting, on self-efficacy, physical activity enjoyment, and body image.

  20. Summer Camp July 2017 - Registration

    CERN Multimedia

    EVE et École

    2017-01-01

    The CERN Staff Association’s Summer Camp will be open for children from 4 to 6 years old during four weeks, from 3 to 28 July. Registration is offered on a weekly basis for 450 CHF, lunch included. This year, the various activities will revolve around the theme of the Four Elements. Registration opened on 20 March 2017 for children currently attending the EVE and School of the Association. It will be open from 3 April for children of CERN Members of Personnel, and starting from 24 April for all other children. The general conditions are available on the website of the EVE and School of CERN Staff Association: http://nurseryschool.web.cern.ch. For further questions, please contact us by email at Summer.Camp@cern.ch.

  1. National Nuclear Physics Summer School

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    The 2016 National Nuclear Physics Summer School (NNPSS) will be held from Monday July 18 through Friday July 29, 2016, at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). The summer school is open to graduate students and postdocs within a few years of their PhD (on either side) with a strong interest in experimental and theoretical nuclear physics. The program will include the following speakers: Accelerators and Detectors - Elke-Caroline Aschenauer, Brookhaven National Laboratory Data Analysis - Michael Williams, MIT Double Beta Decay - Lindley Winslow, MIT Electron-Ion Collider - Abhay Deshpande, Stony Brook University Fundamental Symmetries - Vincenzo Cirigliano, Los Alamos National Laboratory Hadronic Spectroscopy - Matthew Shepherd, Indiana University Hadronic Structure - Jianwei Qiu, Brookhaven National Laboratory Hot Dense Nuclear Matter 1 - Jamie Nagle, Colorado University Hot Dense Nuclear Matter 2 - Wilke van der Schee, MIT Lattice QCD - Sinead Ryan, Trinity College Dublin Neutrino Theory - Cecil...

  2. Summer Mini Atomiade June 2016

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2016-01-01

    The Mini Atomiade are coming to CERN! Members of Clubs supported by the CERN Staff Association and in conjunction with ASCERI (Association of the Sports Communities of the European Research Institutes) will be organising the summer games at the beginning of June. ASCERI aims to contribute to a united Europe through regular sports meetings, bringing together members of public Research Institutes at European level. The Association's members come from over 40 Research Institutes spanning 16 countries. Numerous sports and leisure activities are represented at regular events and each tournament is organised by a different research institute. Clubs in conjunction with the CERN Staff Association have sent teams to previous winter and summer games and now, the CERN Club’s Coordination Committee (CCC) has now taken on the challenge of organising a Mini Atomiade from Friday June 3rd to Monday June 6th 2016 in Divonne-les-Bains. The games are made up of four different tournaments/competitions: Small Fi...

  3. SNOWMASS (DPF Community Summer Study)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cronin-Hennessy, et al, Daniel

    2013-08-06

    The 2013 Community Summer Study, known as Snowmass," brought together nearly 700 physicists to identify the critical research directions for the United States particle physics program. Commissioned by the American Physical Society, this meeting was the culmination of intense work over the past year by more than 1000 physicists that defined the most important questions for this field and identified the most promising opportunities to address them. This Snowmass study report is a key resource for setting priorities in particle physics.

  4. Artists Paint ... Summer: Grade 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herberholz, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    A humid summer haze covers the River Seine and the grassy bank where young men and boys go swimming on Sunday. Everything seems so quiet, still, and very hot. They wear hats to protect them from the hot sun. The artist Georges Seurat used warm tones to give viewers the feeling of the hot sun. Seurat was trying to catch the dazzle of hot sunlight…

  5. Before, During, and After Examination: Development of Prospective Preschool Teachers’ Mathematics-Related Enjoyment and Self-Efficacy

    OpenAIRE

    Blömeke, Sigrid; Thiel, Oliver; Jenssen, Lars

    2018-01-01

    This article examines the stability of Norwegian prospective preschool teachers’ enjoyment of mathematics and their mathematics-related self-efficacy before, during, and after a teacher-education examination. In addition, the stability of the two constructs across countries was examined through a comparison with Germany. The data revealed partial stability (technically speaking, metric invariance) of enjoyment but not of self-efficacy. Self-efficacy increased significantly before and after th...

  6. My Summer with Science Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Marissa

    This past summer I interned at the American Institute of Physics and helped research and write articles for the FYI Science Policy Bulletin. FYI is an objective digest of science policy developments in Washington, D.C. that impact the greater physical sciences community. Over the course of the summer, I independently attended, analyzed, and reported on a variety of science, technology, and funding related events including congressional hearings, government agency advisory committee meetings, and scientific society events. I wrote and co-wrote three articles on basic energy research legislation, the National Institute of Standards and Technology improvement act, and the National Science Foundation's big ideas for future investment. I had the opportunity to examine some challenging questions such as what is the role of government in funding applied research? How should science priorities be set? What is the right balance of funding across different agencies and programs? I learned about how science policy is a two-way street: science is used to inform policy decisions and policy is made to fund and regulate the conduct of science. I will conclude with how my summer working with FYI showed me the importance of science advocacy, being informed, and voting. Society of Physics Students.

  7. Depression and insomnia are independently associated with satisfaction and enjoyment of life in medication-overuse headache patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pompili, Maurizio; Innamorati, Marco; Lamis, Dorian A; Serafini, Gianluca; Ricci, Federica; Migliorati, Monica; Bellini, Samantha; Erbuto, Denise; Mazza, Marianna; Di Nicola, Marco; Janiri, Luigi; Gonda, Xenia; Rihmer, Zoltan; Amore, Mario; Girardi, Paolo; Martelletti, Paolo

    2016-07-01

    Objective Medication-overuse headache is often comorbid with emotional disturbances and disordered personality traits. The aim of the present study was to determine whether depression and insomnia complaints were associated with satisfaction and enjoyment with one's own life in medication-overuse headache patients, and whether insomnia complaints were able to explain part of the variance of Quality of Life explained by depression. Methods Participants were 187 consecutive adult outpatients admitted to the Regional Referral Headache Centre of the Sant'Andrea Hospital in Rome, Italy. Patients were administered the Quality of Life Enjoyment and Satisfaction Questionnaire, the Beck Depression Inventory - II, and the Athens Insomnia Scale. Results The Beck Depression Inventory was associated with all the dimensions of the Quality of Life Enjoyment and Satisfaction Questionnaire, with more severe depression being associated independently with lower satisfaction and enjoyment with one's own life. The Athens Insomnia Scale was independently and significantly associated only with physical health, such that patients with more insomnia complaints were 3.1 times ( p satisfaction. Conclusions Our findings confirmed that medication-overuse headache patients has a negative impact on quality of life and suggested that depression and insomnia were independently associated with satisfaction and enjoyment of life in medication-overuse headache patients. The early recognition and appropriate treatment of comorbid psychopathological symptoms are crucial to improve satisfaction and enjoyment of life in medication-overuse headache patients.

  8. Dede Korkut Hikâyelerinde Savaşçı Eğitimi Warrior Training In Dede Korkut Stories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lütfü Kerem BAŞAR

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available When it is considered that Dede Korkut Stories are the fundamental element of Turkish literature because of including the informations on Turkish traditions, beliefs and life style; it can be said that the Book of Dede Korkut Stories is the unique source of Turkish Literature besides being the crossing point compositon from legend to folk narratives. It is because the life style of the Oguz Turks, told in the narratives, depends on the continuous struggle and movement, these struggles and movements take place on the plot of the these twelve stories. Oguz Turks struggled against not only nature but also enemy. So, being strong and a warrior are the factors in maintenance of their life style. The tough weather conditions, the continuous struggle againstother tribes around and dealing with hunting have primary effects onestablishing a warrior and fighter identity. Based on these struggles,Dede Korkut Stories have lots of scenes in which the future expectedwarrior hero is raised. It is because nomadic tribes, like Oguz Turks,based on powerful men, male child has great importance. It is why thechildren especially male ones had a special training on saving theirfamily members when they are refugee or when they have hard times instruggling against the other tribes. They have also trained on huntingand dealing with wild animals. In this study it is tried to define themessages of the stories related to the warrior training and the processof establishing a warrior character of Dede Korkut Stories`heroes. Dede Korkut Hikâyeleri, Türk edebiyatının temel taşlarından biri olması ve eski Türk gelenekleri, inanışları, hayat tarzı ile ilgili bilgiler sunması ve destandan halk hikâyesine geçiş döneminin en önemli eseri olması açısından eşsiz bir kaynaktır. Bu eserde yer alan on iki hikâyenin olay örgüsünde genel olarak birtakım mücadeleler yer almaktadır. Çünkü hikâyelerde anlatılan göçebe Oğuz Türklerinin hayat tarz

  9. Increased frequency of social interaction is associated with enjoyment enhancement and reward system activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamichi, Hiroaki; Sugawara, Sho K; Hamano, Yuki H; Makita, Kai; Kochiyama, Takanori; Sadato, Norihiro

    2016-04-19

    Positive social interactions contribute to the sense that one's life has meaning. Enjoyment of feelings associated through social interaction motivates humans to build social connections according to their personal preferences. Therefore, we hypothesized that social interaction itself activates the reward system in a manner that depends upon individual interaction preferences. To test this hypothesis, we conducted a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study in which 38 participants played a virtual ball-toss game in which the number of ball tosses to the participant was either similar to (normal-frequency condition) or higher than (high-frequency condition) the number of tosses to the other players. Participants reported greater-than-anticipated enjoyment during the high-frequency condition, suggesting that receiving a social reward led to unexpected positive feelings. Consistent with this, the high-frequency condition produced stronger activation in the ventral striatum, which is part of the reward system, and the precuneus, representing positive self-image, which might be translated to social reward. Furthermore, ventral striatal activation covaried with individual participants' preference for interactions with others. These findings suggest that an elevated frequency of social interaction is represented as a social reward, which might motivate individuals to promote social interaction in a manner that is modulated by personal preference.

  10. Enjoying food without caloric cost: The impact of brief mindfulness on laboratory eating outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arch, Joanna J; Brown, Kirk Warren; Goodman, Robert J; Della Porta, Matthew D; Kiken, Laura G; Tillman, Shanna

    2016-04-01

    Mindfulness-based interventions have been increasingly applied to treat eating-related problems ranging from obesity to eating disorders. Yet few studies have empirically examined the mechanisms of a mindful approach to eating. The current studies examine the potential of brief mindfulness instructions to enhance the psychological and behavioral dimensions of eating. In three experiments (total N = 319 undergraduates), we examined whether brief mindfulness instructions would enhance the positive sensory experience involved in tasting food as well as healthy eating behaviors. Relative to distraction control instructions, the first two studies demonstrated that brief mindfulness instructions increased the enjoyment of a commonly pleasurable food (chocolate; Study 1), and a food with generally more mixed associations (raisins; Study 2). The third study replicated and extended these findings to show that brief mindfulness instructions also led to lower calorie consumption of unhealthy food relative to distracted or no-instruction control conditions, an effect mediated by greater eating enjoyment. Findings demonstrated the power of brief mindfulness instructions to positively impact both health-relevant behavior and sensory experience associated with eating food. Implications for both theory and clinical applications of mindfulness are discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Close the Achievement Gap with Summer Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huggins, Gary

    2012-01-01

    Summer vacation from school can bring afternoons at the swimming pool, family vacations, and maybe a spirit-filled summer camp that ignites a passion for art or rock climbing. But for many children, summer also means setbacks in learning that take a tremendous toll on teaching and student performance over time. PTA leaders can make a vital…

  12. Finding Funds to Move Summer Learning Forward

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidel, Bob

    2015-01-01

    Summer learning loss creates a permanent drag on the US education system. With the generous support of the Charles Stewart Mott Foundation, the National Summer Learning Association (NSLA) developed "Moving Summer Learning Forward: A Strategic Roadmap for Funding in Tough Times" to provide out-of-school time programs, school districts,…

  13. Thrilling News Revisited: The Role of Suspense for the Enjoyment of News Stories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaspar, Kai; Zimmermann, Daniel; Wilbers, Anne-Kathrin

    2016-01-01

    Previous research on news perception has been dominated by a cognitively oriented perspective on reception processes, whereas emotions have been widely neglected. Consequently, it has remained open which features of a news story might elicit affective responses and hence modulate news perception, shifting the focus to the emotional potential of the narrative. According to the affective-disposition theory, the experience of suspense is the striving force of immersion in fictional dramas. Thereby, a positive affective disposition toward the protagonist of a story and a high likelihood of a bad ending should increase suspense that, in turn, should positively influence reading appreciation and lingering interest in the story. We investigated whether suspense and its determinants also play such a key role in the context of news stories. Study 1 ( n = 263) successfully replicated results of an earlier study, whereas Studies 2 ( n = 255) and 3 ( n = 599) challenged the generalizability of some effects related to manipulated characteristics of a news story. In contrast, correlational relationships between perceived news characteristics and news evaluation were relatively stable. In particular, participants' liking of the protagonist and the perceived likelihood of a good ending were positively associated with suspense, reading appreciation, and lingering interest. This result indicates a preference for happy endings and contradicts the notion that likely negative outcomes are beneficial for suspense and the enjoyment of news stories, as postulated by the affective-disposition theory in the context of fictional dramas. Moreover, experienced suspense reliably mediated the correlations between, on the one hand, participants' liking of the protagonist and the perceived likelihood of a good ending and, on the other hand, reading appreciation and lingering interest. The news story's personal relevance was less influential than expected. Further, we observed a large absence of

  14. Thrilling news revisited: The role of suspense for the enjoyment of news stories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Kaspar

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Previous research on news perception has been dominated by a cognitively oriented perspective on reception processes, whereas emotions have been widely neglected. Consequently, it has remained open which features of a news story might elicit affective responses and hence modulate news perception, shifting the focus to the emotional potential of the narrative. According to the affective-disposition theory, the experience of suspense is the striving force of immersion in fictional dramas. Thereby, a positive affective disposition toward the protagonist of a story and a high likelihood of a bad ending should increase suspense that, in turn, should positively influence reading appreciation and lingering interest in the story. We investigated whether suspense and its determinants also play such a key role in the context of news stories. Study 1 (n = 263 successfully replicated results of an earlier study, whereas Studies 2 (n = 255 and 3 (n = 599 challenged the generalizability of some effects related to manipulated characteristics of a news story. In contrast, correlational relationships between perceived news characteristics were relatively stable. In particular, a higher liking of the protagonist and a higher perceived likelihood of a good versus bad ending were positively associated with suspense, reading appreciation, and lingering interest. This result indicates a preference for happy endings and it contradicts the notion that likely negative outcomes are beneficial for suspense and the enjoyment of news stories, as postulated by the affective-disposition theory in the context of fictional dramas. Moreover, experienced suspense reliably mediated the correlations between, on the one hand, participants’ liking of the protagonist and the perceived likelihood of a good ending and, on the other hand, reading appreciation and lingering interest. The news story’s personal relevance was less influential than expected. Further, we observed a large

  15. Doctors' enjoyment of their work and satisfaction with time available for leisure: UK time trend questionnaire-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surman, Geraldine; Lambert, Trevor W; Goldacre, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Doctors' job satisfaction is important to the health service to ensure commitment, effective training, service provision and retention. Job satisfaction matters to doctors for their personal happiness, fulfilment, service to patients and duty to employers. Monitoring job satisfaction trends informs workforce planning. We surveyed UK-trained doctors up to 5 years after graduation for six graduation year cohorts: 1996, 1999, 2002, 2005, 2008, 2012. Doctors scored their job enjoyment (Enjoyment) and satisfaction with time outside work (Leisure) on a scale from 1 (lowest enjoyment/satisfaction) to 10 (highest). Overall, 47% had a high level of Enjoyment (scores 8-10) 1 year after graduation and 56% after 5 years. For Leisure, the corresponding figures were 19% and 37% at 1 and 5 years, respectively. For Leisure at 1 year, high scores were given by about 10% in the 1990s, rising to about 25% in the mid-2000s. Low scores (1-3) for Enjoyment were given by 15% of qualifiers of 1996, falling to 5% by 2008; corresponding figures for Leisure were 42% and 19%. At 5 years, the corresponding figures were 6% and 4%, and 23% and 17%. Enjoyment and Leisure were scored higher by general practitioners than doctors in other specialties. Both measures varied little by sex, ethnicity or medical school attended. Scores for Enjoyment were generally high; those for Leisure were lower. Policy initiatives should address why this aspect of satisfaction is low, particularly in the first year after graduation but also among hospital doctors 5 years after graduation. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  16. The role of enjoyment in exercise for people with arthritis: Four different viewpoints from a Q-methodology study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kibblewhite, Julia R; Hegarty, Roisin S M; Stebbings, Simon; Treharne, Gareth J

    2017-12-01

    There is limited research on the role of enjoyment of exercise among people with arthritis. The aim of the present study was to determine distinct viewpoints on exercise held by people with arthritis, and how enjoyment features in these viewpoints. A Q-methodology study was conducted, which involved two interviews with people with rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis or ankylosing spondylitis (aged 20-85 years). In the first interviews, 11 participants helped to create the Q-set, a set of statements reflecting a range of existing views on exercising. In the second interviews, 12 participants (nine of the 11 from the first interviews and three others) ranked the Q-set on a forced quasi-normal distribution of agreement. A Q-method factor analysis was carried out to determine groupings of participants with similar views on exercise. Four groupings were discovered, and defined in terms of rankings of statements and illustrative quotes from the ranking procedure. The first grouping had all changed their exercise habits after diagnosis with arthritis. The second grouping had a shared enjoyment for walking to stay healthy. The third grouping's viewpoints focused on knowledge about how much exercise they should carry out. The fourth grouping shared a sense of importance of being responsible for their health by exercising. These findings provide information about the role that enjoyment plays in motivating people with arthritis to exercise, although enjoyment of exercise was not expressed by all participants. People with arthritis who share these viewpoints on exercise enjoyment may require different forms of advice regarding feasible and enjoyable exercise. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Research summer camp in photonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buyanovskaya, Elizaveta; Melnik, Maksim; Egorov, Vladimir; Gleim, Artur; Lukishova, Svetlana; Kozlov, Sergei; Zhang, Xi-Cheng

    2017-08-01

    ITMO University and the University of Rochester became close partners several years ago. One of the first outcomes of this mutually beneficial partnership was the creation of International Institute of Photonics and Optical Information Technologies led by Prof. Sergei Kozlov and Prof. Xi-Cheng Zhang. Universities have created a double Masters-degree program in optics in 2014, and several ITMO students have been awarded degrees from Rochester. At the same time ITMO University organizes Summer Research camp in Photonics for University of Rochester students. Students spent two weeks in the Northern Capital of Russia learning about the emerging practical applications of femtosecond optics, terahertz biomedicine and quantum information technologies.

  18. SAAPMB summer school and congress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    Medical and health physics are greatly stimulated by the exchange of personal experiences and research results among scientists working in their particular fields of interests. Individual contact is of exceptional importance in those rapidly developing areas of high technology which we find in hospitals and industry and therefor the social exchange of ideas at the Summer School and Congress is very important. Research in the fields of medical and health physics is covered by the papers and posters presented. 53 articles have been indexed (27 papers and 26 poster presentations), and 14 articles have been considered to be out of scope for INIS

  19. The Vulcano 1994 summer campaign

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caruso, P.; Valenza, M. [CNR, Palermo (Italy). Istituto Geochimica dei Fluidi; Graziani, G.; Martilli, A.; Mosca, S. [JRC Environment Institute, Ispra, Varese (Italy); Pareschi, M.T. [CNR, Pisa, (Italy). Centro di Studio per la Geologia Strutturale e Dinamica dell`Appennino

    1996-03-01

    A set of measurements from various sources was collected for the island of Vulcano (Aeolian archipelago, South Tyrrhenian sea) during summer 1994 with the scope of characterising the circulation pattern and the volcanic emission of the island. Ground meteorological stations were activated, wind profiles from pilot balloons were obtained, ground temperature measurements were produced. Furthermore, temperature and humidity data from satellite (Landsat TM) were also derived. A critical analysis of the data on the gathered information was performed to quantify the volcanic risk related to the toxic-volcanic-gas release in foreseeable paroxysmal events.

  20. Summer Oral Expression English course

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    An English Oral Expression course will take place this summer from 20 August to 29 September.   Schedule: to be determined (2 sessions of 2 hours per week). Please note that this course is for learners who have a good knowledge of English (CERN level 7 upwards). If you are interested in following this course, please enroll through this link. Please be sure to indicate your planned absences in the comments field so we can schedule the course. If you need more information please send a message to English.training@cern.ch

  1. Summer Oral Expression English course

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    An English Oral Expression course will take place this summer at some time between 25 June and 28 September. The exact dates will be decided according to the preferences of the students.   Schedule: to be determined (2 sessions of 2 hours per week). Please note that this course is for learners who have a good knowledge of English (CERN level 7 upwards). If you are interested in following this course, please enroll through this link. Please be sure to indicate your planned absences in the comments field so we can schedule the course. If you need more information please send a message to English.training@cern.ch

  2. Summer Oral Expression English course

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    An English Oral Expression course will take place this summer at some time between August 19 and October 4.   Schedule: to be determined (2 sessions of 2 hours per week). Please note that this course is for learners who have a good knowledge of English (CERN level 7 upwards). If you are interested in following this course, please enroll through this link. Please be sure to indicate your planned absences in the comments field so we can schedule the course. If you need more information please send a message to English.training@cern.ch.

  3. Buffy the Vampire Slayer and Xena: Warrior Princess: reception of the texts by a sample of lesbian fans and web site users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, Noelle R; Lumadue, Christine A; Wooten, H Ray

    2009-01-01

    This qualitative study of television reception examined the ways in which a sample of lesbian fans of Buffy the Vampire Slayer and Xena: Warrior Princess incorporated their experiences as viewers, fans, and Internet users with relation to their sexual identity as lesbians. Specifically, this study examined the ways in which participants used these television programs to inform their sexual identity development. Results indicated that participants used television and the Internet to normalize and affirm lesbian experience, to decrease negative feelings regarding their lesbian identities, and to decrease social isolation.

  4. Health promotion: the impact of beliefs of health benefits, social relations and enjoyment on exercise continuation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, G; Wikman, J M; Jensen, C J; Schmidt, J F; Gliemann, L; Andersen, T R

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to explore how and why participants in structured exercise intervention programs continue or stop exercising after the program is finished. We conducted four focus group interviews with four groups of middle-aged and elderly men (total n = 28) who had participated in exercise interventions involving playing either a team sport (football) or a more individually focused activity (spinning and crossfit). Our results show that different social, organizational and material structures inherent in the different activities shape the subjects' enjoyment of exercise participation, as well as their intention and ability to continue being active. In conclusion, team sport activities seem to be intrinsically motivating to the participants through positive social interaction and play. They are therefore more likely to result in exercise continuation than activities that rely primarily on extrinsic motivation such as the expectation of improved health and well-being. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. MOLT: A Mobile Learning Tool That Makes Learning New Technical English Language Words Enjoyable

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dogan - Ibrahim

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available There is an increase use of wireless technologies in education all over the world. In fact, wireless technologies such as laptop computers, palmtop computers, and mobile phones are revolutionizing education and transforming the traditional classroom based learning and teaching into anytime and anywhere education. This paper investigates the use of wireless technologies in education with particular reference to the potential of learning new technical English Language words using SMS text messaging. The system, developed by the authors, called Mobile Learning Tool (MOLT, has been tested with 45 first-year undergraduate students. Students’ opinions have been collected after the experiment. Our results show that students enjoyed and be happy used mobile phones to learn new technical English word. We believe that if we add the improvements or modifications students wish to see in the MOLT system, then using the MOLT system as an educational tool will contribute to motivation and success of students.

  6. Comedy workshop: an enjoyable way to develop multiple-choice questions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Droegemueller, William; Gant, Norman; Brekken, Alvin; Webb, Lynn

    2005-01-01

    To describe an innovative method of developing multiple-choice items for a board certification examination. The development of appropriate multiple-choice items is definitely more of an art, rather than a science. The comedy workshop format for developing questions for a certification examination is similar to the process used by comedy writers composing scripts for television shows. This group format dramatically diminishes the frustrations faced by an individual question writer attempting to create items. The vast majority of our comedy workshop participants enjoy and prefer the comedy workshop format. It provides an ideal environment in which to teach and blend the talents of inexperienced and experienced question writers. This is a descriptive article, in which we suggest an innovative process in the art of creating multiple-choice items for a high-stakes examination.

  7. Access for All! Neuro-architecture and Equal Enjoyment of Public Facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Gillen

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Since the enactment of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA, 1990, many impaired Americans are no longer disabled by socially condoned conditions in the built environment. However, many people with cognitive and neurological impairments continue to face significant barriers to access, due to disabling environmental hyper-sensitivity and sensory processing disorders. These people are equally protected under the ADA, therefore mitigation is required. Neuroarchitecture, where consideration of the impact of the built environment on the central nervous system informs design paradigms, must complement current ADA compliance guidelines. This paper serves to open the topic to discussion, and is a call for attention, and action, for the removal of these generally unrecognized barriers to access and the equal use and enjoyment of public facilities.

  8. Supported Decision-Making from Theory to Practice: Implementing the Right to Enjoy Legal Capacity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosie Harding

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The right to equal recognition before the law, protected by Article 12 of the United Nations (UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD, mandates the use of supported decision-making practices to enable disabled people, particularly those with intellectual and/or psychosocial disabilities, to enjoy their legal capacity. Finding ways to translate this theoretical mandate into practice poses a number of particularly challenging socio-legal issues, which this research seeks to address. The English Mental Capacity Act 2005 (MCA sets out a right to support with decision-making (s.1(3, underpinned by a presumption of capacity (s.1(2. Qualitative interviews with intellectually disabled people, their supporters, and care and support professionals were undertaken to explore how disabled people make decisions in their everyday lives, the kinds of support they need, and the strategies for supported decision-making used in practice. Analysis of these interviews suggests that a range of supported decision-making techniques have been developed in practice and are effective in supporting everyday preferences and some life choices. Paradoxically, it appears that as decisions become more complex, the support available to disabled people reduces. Specifically, much less support is available for more difficult decisions around finances, healthcare and legal matters. We argue that the reasons for this are due to a web of regulatory, social and policy issues. We conclude that implementing the right to enjoy legal capacity through supported decision-making will require a combination of regulatory reform, social change and policy amendment.

  9. An integrative review of the enjoyment of sadness associated with music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eerola, Tuomas; Vuoskoski, Jonna K; Peltola, Henna-Riikka; Putkinen, Vesa; Schäfer, Katharina

    2017-11-23

    The recent surge of interest towards the paradoxical pleasure produced by sad music has generated a handful of theories and an array of empirical explorations on the topic. However, none of these have attempted to weigh the existing evidence in a systematic fashion. The present work puts forward an integrative framework laid out over three levels of explanation - biological, psycho-social, and cultural - to compare and integrate the existing findings in a meaningful way. First, we review the evidence pertinent to experiences of pleasure associated with sad music from the fields of neuroscience, psychophysiology, and endocrinology. Then, the psychological and interpersonal mechanisms underlying the recognition and induction of sadness in the context of music are combined with putative explanations ranging from social surrogacy and nostalgia to feelings of being moved. Finally, we address the cultural aspects of the paradox - the extent to which it is embedded in the Western notion of music as an aesthetic, contemplative object - by synthesising findings from history, ethnography, and empirical studies. Furthermore, we complement these explanations by considering the particularly significant meanings that sadness portrayed in art can evoke in some perceivers. Our central claim is that one cannot attribute the enjoyment of sadness fully to any one of these levels, but to a chain of functionalities afforded by each level. Each explanatory level has several putative explanations and its own shift towards positive valence, but none of them deliver the full transformation from a highly negative experience to a fully enjoyable experience alone. The current evidence within this framework ranges from weak to non-existent at the biological level, moderate at the psychological level, and suggestive at the cultural level. We propose a series of focussed topics for future investigation that would allow to deconstruct the drivers and constraints of the processes leading to

  10. Energy Cost and Enjoyment of Active Videogames in Children and Teens: Xbox 360 Kinect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clevenger, Kimberly A; Howe, Cheryl A

    2015-08-01

    New active videogames (AVGs) may provide youth an alternative to traditional play. The purpose of this study was to compare the physical activity energy expenditure (PAEE), intensity, and enjoyment of AVGs with those of seated videogames (SVGs). Youth (8-17 years old) volunteered to play a random selection of six (two SVGs, four AVGs) videogames for 6-10 minutes each. Prior to participation, height, weight, and resting metabolic rate (RMR) were measured. A portable metabolic analyzer was worn during the games to measure total energy expenditure, and PAEE was calculated as (total energy expenditure - measured RMR). An accelerometer was worn on the right hip to measure intensity in counts/minute and steps/minute. Youth were classified as child (8-12 years old) versus teen (13-17 years old), healthy weight (body mass index [BMI] <85th percentile) versus overweight (BMI ≥85th percentile), and male versus female. A three-way mixed-model analysis of variance was used to compare differences in PAEE (metabolic equivalents [METs] and kcal/minute) with sex, weight status, and age group as main effects, including Bonferroni's adjustment. Most AVGs were moderate to vigorous intensity (4.6±0.1 METs; range, 2.8-6.6 METs), where steps/minute (lower-body movement) was positively related to PAEE (R(2)=0.68). All SVGs were classified as light intensity (1.7±0.0 METs). PAEE (kcal/minute) was significantly higher during AVGs and for teens, males, and overweight youth. There was no significant difference in enjoyment between AVGs and SVGs. AVGs elicited sufficient energy cost to be a suitable alternative for traditional play and may contribute to the recommended dose of physical activity, particularly in teens, males, and overweight youth.

  11. Previous Gardening Experience and Gardening Enjoyment Is Related to Vegetable Preferences and Consumption Among Low-Income Elementary School Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Alexandra; Ranjit, Nalini; Fair, Cori N; Jennings, Rose; Warren, Judith L

    2016-10-01

    To examine if gardening experience and enjoyment are associated with vegetable exposure, preferences, and consumption of vegetables among low-income third-grade children. Cross-sectional study design, using baseline data from the Texas! Grow! Eat! Go! Twenty-eight Title I elementary schools located in different counties in Texas. Third-grade students (n = 1,326, 42% Hispanic) MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Gardening experience, gardening enjoyment, vegetable exposure, preference, and consumption. Random-effects regression models, adjusted for age, sex, ethnicity, and body mass index percentile of child, estimated means and standard errors of vegetable consumption, exposure, and preference by levels of gardening experience and enjoyment. Wald χ 2 tests evaluated the significance of differences in means of outcomes across levels of gardening experience and enjoyment. Children with more gardening experience had greater vegetable exposure and higher vegetable preference and consumed more vegetables compared with children who reported less gardening experience. Those who reported that they enjoyed gardening had the highest levels of vegetable exposure, preference, and consumption. Garden-based interventions can have an important and positive effect on children's vegetable consumption by increasing exposure to fun gardening experiences. Copyright © 2016 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. How physically active are children attending summer day camps?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beets, Michael W; Weaver, Robert G; Beighle, Aaron; Webster, Collin; Pate, Russell R

    2013-08-01

    Summer day camps (SDC) represent one of the largest settings, outside the academic school year, where children can engage in safe, enjoyable physical activity (PA). Yet, little is known about this setting and how active children are while attending. System for Observing Play and Leisure Activity in Youth was used to categorize PA of boys/girls as Sedentary/Walking/Vigorous across multiple days (8 AM to 6 PM) in 4 large-scale community-based SDCs. Contextual characteristics of type of activity, activity management, equipment, and in/outdoors were collected simultaneously. Mixed-model regression analyses examined associations between PA categories and contextual characteristics. A total of 4649 scans of 2462 children were made across 27 days in the SDCs. Physical activity opportunities represented 38% of the daily schedule. Overall, 74%-79%, 13%-16%, and 7%-9% of children were observed Sedentary, Walking, or Vigorous during the SDC, and this changed to 62%-67%, 18%-19%, and 15%-18% observed Sedentary, Walking, or Vigorous during PA opportunities. Water-based PA, equipment, and free-play were related to increased PA. Children waiting-in-line for turns, staff instructing, and organized PA were related to increased sedentary. These findings provide evidence of modifiable characteristics of SDCs associated with PA. Improving staff skills related to facilitating active environments is a viable avenue to increase PA accumulated within SDCs.

  13. It's not how much you play, but how much you enjoy the game: the longitudinal associations between adolescents' self-esteem and the frequency versus enjoyment of involvement in sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Paul J C; Willoughby, Teena

    2014-01-01

    The frequency of involvement in sports often has been concurrently and longitudinally associated with higher self-esteem. The interpretation of this association consistently has been framed as involvement in sports leading to higher levels of self-esteem over time (i.e., socialization effect), although no studies have tested whether higher levels of self-esteem lead to increased involvement in sports over time (i.e., selection effect). Another important aspect of involvement in sports that may be related to self-esteem is the degree to which youth enjoy sports. However, this aspect has received much less attention. To address these gaps in the literature, we first examined the bidirectional effects between self-esteem and the frequency of involvement in sports with 1,492 adolescents (50.8 % female; 92.4 % Canadian-born) over 4 years. Higher levels of self-esteem predicted greater involvement in sports over time, but greater involvement in sports did not predict higher levels of self-esteem over time, offering support only for selection effects. We then tested the bidirectional effects between the enjoyment of sports and self-esteem and found evidence of both socialization and selection effects. Specifically, greater enjoyment of sports predicted higher self-esteem over time, and higher self-esteem predicted greater enjoyment of sports over time. These novel findings suggest that adolescents with higher self-esteem play sports more frequently and enjoy sports more than adolescents with lower self-esteem. In addition, the degree to which adolescents enjoy sports may be more important for increasing self-esteem than the frequency with which adolescents play sports.

  14. Health-related quality of life among US military personnel injured in combat: findings from the Wounded Warrior Recovery Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodruff, Susan I; Galarneau, Michael R; McCabe, Cameron T; Sack, Daniel I; Clouser, Mary C

    2018-05-01

    Little is known about the long-term, health-related quality of life (HRQOL) of those wounded in combat during Operations Enduring Freedom, Iraqi Freedom, and New Dawn. The present study described the overall HRQOL for a large group of US service members experiencing mild-to-severe combat-related injuries, and assessed the unique contribution of demographics, service- and injury-related characteristics, and mental health factors on long-term HRQOL. The Wounded Warrior Recovery Project examines patient-reported outcomes in a cohort of US military personnel wounded in combat. Participants were identified from the Expeditionary Medical Encounter Database, a US Navy-maintained deployment health database, and invited to complete a web-based survey. At the time of this study, 3245 service members consented and completed the survey. Hierarchical linear regression analyses were conducted to assess the unique contribution of each set of antecedents on HRQOL scores. HRQOL was uniquely associated with a number of demographics, and service- and injury-related characteristics. Nevertheless, screening positive for posttraumatic stress disorder (B = - .09; P < .001), depression (B = - .10; P < .001), or both as a set (B = - .19; P < .001) were the strongest predictors of lower long-term HRQOL. Postinjury HRQOL among service members wounded in combat was associated with service and injury experience, and demographic factors, but was most strongly linked with current mental health status. These findings underscore the significance of mental health issues long after injury. Further, findings reinforce that long-term mental health screening, services, and treatment are needed for those injured in combat.

  15. The Summer Monsoon of 1987.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamurti, T. N.; Bedi, H. S.; Subramaniam, M.

    1989-04-01

    In this paper we have examined the evolution of a number of parameters we believe were important for our understanding of the drought over India during the summer of 1987. The list of parameters includes monthly means or anomalies of the following fields: sea surface temperatures, divergent circulations, outgoing longwave radiation, streamfunction of the lower and upper troposphere, and monthly precipitation (expressed as a percentage departure from a long-term mean). The El Niño related warm sea surface temperature anomaly and a weaker warm sea surface temperature anomaly over the equatorial Indian Ocean provide sustained convection, as reflected by the negative values of the outgoing longwave radiation. With the seasonal heating, a pronounced planetary-scale divergent circulation evolved with a center along the western Pacific Ocean. The monsoonal divergent circulation merged with that related to the El Niño, maintaining most of the heavy rainfall activity between the equatorial Pacific Ocean and east Asia. Persistent convective activity continued south of India during the entire monsoon season. Strong Hadley type overturnings with rising motions over these warm SST anomaly regions and descent roughly near 20° to 25°S was evident as early as April 1987. The subtropical high pressure areas near 20° to 25°S showed stronger than normal circulations. This was revealed by the presence of a counterclockwise streamfunction anomaly at 850 mb during April 1987. With the seasonal heating, this anomaly moved northwards and was located over the Arabian Sea and India. This countermonsoon circulation anomaly at the low levels was associated with a weaker than normal Somali jet and Arabian Sea circulation throughout this summer. The monsoon remained active along northeast India, Bangladesh, northern lndochina, and central China during the summer monsoon season. This was related to the eastward shift of the divergent circulation. An eastward shift of the upper tropospheric

  16. The effect of points and audio on concentration, engagement, enjoyment, learning, motivation, and classroom dynamics using Kahoot!

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Alf Inge; Lieberoth, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    There are many examples on the use of game-based learning in and outside the classroom, along with evaluation of their effect in terms of engagement, learning, classroom dynamics, concentration, motivation and enjoyment. Most of the research in this area focuses on evaluations of the use of game...... that produce a positive effect on engagement, motivation, enjoyment, concentration, classroom dynamics and learning. In this paper, we present an experiment where we investigated how the use of points and audio affect the learning environment. Specifically, the paper presents results from an experiment where...... points and audio. The results from the experiment reveal that there are some significant differences whether audio and points are used in game-based learning in the areas of concentration, engagement, enjoyment, and motivation. The most surprising finding was how the classroom dynamics was positively...

  17. Improving Vocational Rehabilitation Access and Return to Work and Career Outcomes among African American Wounded Warriors, Gulf War, and Vietnam War Era Veterans with Disabilities: A White Paper Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Corey L., Ed.: Johnson, Jean E., Ed.; Washington, Andre L., Ed.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this monograph is to present documents that discuss issues related to improving access to vocational rehabilitation services and return to work rates of African American Wounded Warriors, Gulf War and Vietnam War Era veterans with disabilities. This monograph also includes a review of relevant literature on barriers to employment…

  18. Adsorption kinetics of CO2, CH4, and their equimolar mixture on coal from the Black Warrior Basin, West-Central Alabama

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruszkiewicz, M.S.; Naney, M.T.; Blencoe, J.G.; Cole, D.R.; Pashin, J.C.; Carroll, R.E.

    2009-01-01

    Laboratory experiments were conducted to investigate the adsorption kinetic behavior of pure and mixed gases (CO2, CH4, approximately equimolar CO2 + CH4 mixtures, and He) on a coal sample obtained from the Black Warrior Basin at the Littleton Mine (Twin Pine Coal Company), Jefferson County, west-central Alabama. The sample was from the Mary Lee coal zone of the Pottsville Formation (Lower Pennsylvanian). Experiments with three size fractions (45-150????m, 1-2??mm, and 5-10??mm) of crushed coal were performed at 40????C and 35????C over a pressure range of 1.4-6.9??MPa to simulate coalbed methane reservoir conditions in the Black Warrior Basin and provide data relevant for enhanced coalbed methane recovery operations. The following key observations were made: (1) CO2 adsorption on both dry and water-saturated coal is much more rapid than CH4 adsorption; (2) water saturation decreases the rates of CO2 and CH4 adsorption on coal surfaces, but it appears to have minimal effects on the final magnitude of CO2 or CH4 adsorption if the coal is not previously exposed to CO2; (3) retention of adsorbed CO2 on coal surfaces is significant even with extreme pressure cycling; and (4) adsorption is significantly faster for the 45-150????m size fraction compared to the two coarser fractions. ?? 2008 Elsevier B.V.

  19. A study protocol for tracking quality of life among U.S. service members wounded in Iraq and Afghanistan: the Wounded Warrior Recovery Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodruff, Susan I; Galarneau, Michael R; Luu, Bethi N; Sack, Daniel; Han, Peggy

    2014-03-01

    There is a need for more work to understand the quality of life (QOL) outcomes of survivors of Operations Enduring Freedom and Iraqi Freedom combat injury to improve care and treatment, and prevent poor physical, psychological, and social outcomes. We describe the study design and methods of the Wounded Warrior Recovery Project, a study supported by the Department of Defense that will track close to 10,000 military personnel wounded in Operations Enduring Freedom and Iraqi Freedom. The overall objective of the 6-year longitudinal study is to track changes in QOL and describe variations in those changes as they relate to sociodemographic factors, injury characteristics, service-related factors, clinical/diagnostic measures including traumatic brain injury and posttraumatic stress disorder, and medical procedures and services. The Wounded Warrior Recovery Project study will be among the first longitudinal population-based investigations of QOL outcomes after combat injury and will provide a basis upon which large-scale epidemiological studies can be conducted. Reprint & Copyright © 2014 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  20. Summer Programming: What Do Children Say?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nila Cobb

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Studies document that low-income children lose academic skills over the summer. Six years of reading achievement data collected by Energy Express, a nationally recognized summer reading and nutrition program in West Virginia, has established the efficacy of the intervention. The purpose of this study was to examine characteristics of a voluntary summer program that foster participation. Interview data indicates that children attend because they perceive the program as fun; large creative art (for example, full-body portraits, appliance box castles, wall murals seems particularly important. Energy Express gives children both the fun they want and the enrichment they need in the summer.

  1. Importance of the Motivational Climate in Goal, Enjoyment, and the Causes of Success in Handball Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granero-Gallegos, Antonio; Gómez-López, Manuel; Rodríguez-Suárez, Nuria; Abraldes, J Arturo; Alesi, Marianna; Bianco, Antonino

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to examine the effects of the motivational climate created by the coach and perceived by a group of young handball players on their goal orientations, their beliefs regarding reasons for success and their self-satisfaction. The study participants were 159 young handball players. Players were administered a battery composed of tests to measure the above-mentioned motivational constructs. Results showed that a perceived mastery-oriented motivational climate was positively related to a task-centered goal orientation, enjoyment, and a belief that success may be achieved through effort. In contrast, a perceived performance-orientated training climate was linked to an ego-centered goal orientation, boredom, or lack of enthusiasm, and a belief that the routes of success in this sport are the abilities and the use of deception techniques. On the whole, this study underlines the educational role of the coach in young handball players. Specifically, the coach's socializing role influences both handball player's commitment and positive motivational profile as well as sport performance.

  2. Importance of the Motivational Climate in Goal, Enjoyment, and the Causes of Success in Handball Players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Granero-Gallegos

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study is to examine the effects of the motivational climate created by the coach and perceived by a group of young handball players on their goal orientations, their beliefs regarding reasons for success and their self-satisfaction. The study participants were 159 young handball players. Players were administered a battery composed of tests to measure the above-mentioned motivational constructs. Results showed that a perceived mastery-oriented motivational climate was positively related to a task-centered goal orientation, enjoyment, and a belief that success may be achieved through effort. In contrast, a perceived performance-orientated training climate was linked to an ego-centered goal orientation, boredom, or lack of enthusiasm, and a belief that the routes of success in this sport are the abilities and the use of deception techniques. On the whole, this study underlines the educational role of the coach in young handball players. Specifically, the coach’s socializing role influences both handball player’s commitment and positive motivational profile as well as sport performance.

  3. The association between exercise enjoyment and physical activity in women with fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umeda, M; Marino, C A; Lee, W; Hilliard, S C

    2014-11-01

    Evidence suggests the role of physical activity (PA) in management of clinical symptoms of fibromyalgia. However, very little is known regarding the psychological correlates of PA in patients with fibromyalgia. Therefore, this study examined the association between exercise enjoyment (EE) and PA in women with fibromyalgia. 19 women with fibromyalgia completed a laboratory session, where EE was assessed using a self-report questionnaire immediately after 20 min of light-intensity biking. Muscle pain ratings (MPR) in the legs were assessed during exercise, and changes in clinical pain intensity after exercise were computed. PA was assessed subjectively using a self-report questionnaire and objectively using an accelerometer for one week. Results from correlation analyses indicated that EE was associated with the self-reported amount of PA (rs=0.61, R(2)=0.37, pfibromyalgia. Future research is needed to develop interventions to maximize EE to promote PA in this clinical population. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  4. Physical Activity Enjoyment, Perceived Barriers, and Beliefs Among Adolescents With and Without Intellectual Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanish, Heidi I; Curtin, Carol; Must, Aviva; Phillips, Sarah; Maslin, Melissa; Bandini, Linda G

    2016-01-01

    Youths with intellectual disabilities (ID) exhibit low levels of physical activity, but the underlying contributors to behavior are unclear. We compared physical activity enjoyment, perceived barriers, beliefs, and self-efficacy among adolescents with ID and typically developing (TD) adolescents. A questionnaire was administered to 38 adolescents with ID (mean age, 16.8 years) and 60 TD adolescents (mean age, 15.3 years). Of the original 33 questionnaire items, 23 met the test-retest reliability criteria and were included in the group comparisons. Fewer adolescents with ID reported that they have someone with whom to do physical activity (64% vs 93%: P physical activities were too hard to learn (41% vs 0%; P physical activity would be good for their health (92% vs 100%; P = .05). More adolescents with ID reported a dislike of individual physical activities (P = .02). A large percentage of adolescents with ID (84%) responded that they were good at doing physical activities, but the difference between groups was only of borderline significance (95% of TD adolescents, P = .06). Adolescents shared many of the same perceptions about physical activity, but some important differences between groups were identified.

  5. Effect of Peer Influence on Exercise Behavior and Enjoyment in Recreational Runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnes, Andrew J; Petersen, Jennifer L; Barkley, Jacob E

    2016-02-01

    Fitness professionals and popular media sources often recommend exercising with a partner to increase exercise motivation, adherence, intensity, and/or duration. Although competition with peers has been shown to enhance maximal athletic performance, experimental research examining the impact of peer influence on submaximal exercise behavior in adults is limited. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of the presence of familiar and unfamiliar peers, vs. running alone, on recreational runners' voluntary running duration, distance, intensity, liking (i.e., enjoyment), and ratings of perceived exertion (RPEs). Recreational runners (n = 12 males, n = 12 females) completed 3 experimental trials, each under a different social condition, in a randomized order. Each trial consisted of self-paced running for a duration voluntarily determined by the participant. The 3 social conditions were running alone, with a sex- and fitness-matched familiar peer, or with a sex- and fitness-matched unfamiliar peer. A wrist-worn global positioning system was used to record running duration, distance, and average speed. Liking and RPE were assessed at the end of each trial. Mixed model regression analysis showed no significant effects of social condition (p ≥ 0.40) for any of the dependent variables. The presence of a familiar or unfamiliar peer did not alter recreational runners' running behavior, liking, or perceived exertion during submaximal exercise. However, exercising with others may have other benefits (e.g., reduced attrition) not examined herein.

  6. The Distancing-Embracing model of the enjoyment of negative emotions in art reception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menninghaus, Winfried; Wagner, Valentin; Hanich, Julian; Wassiliwizky, Eugen; Jacobsen, Thomas; Koelsch, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Why are negative emotions so central in art reception far beyond tragedy? Revisiting classical aesthetics in the light of recent psychological research, we present a novel model to explain this much discussed (apparent) paradox. We argue that negative emotions are an important resource for the arts in general, rather than a special license for exceptional art forms only. The underlying rationale is that negative emotions have been shown to be particularly powerful in securing attention, intense emotional involvement, and high memorability, and hence is precisely what artworks strive for. Two groups of processing mechanisms are identified that conjointly adopt the particular powers of negative emotions for art's purposes. The first group consists of psychological distancing mechanisms that are activated along with the cognitive schemata of art, representation, and fiction. These schemata imply personal safety and control over continuing or discontinuing exposure to artworks, thereby preventing negative emotions from becoming outright incompatible with expectations of enjoyment. This distancing sets the stage for a second group of processing components that allow art recipients to positively embrace the experiencing of negative emotions, thereby rendering art reception more intense, more interesting, more emotionally moving, more profound, and occasionally even more beautiful. These components include compositional interplays of positive and negative emotions, the effects of aesthetic virtues of using the media of (re)presentation (musical sound, words/language, color, shapes) on emotion perception, and meaning-making efforts. Moreover, our Distancing-Embracing model proposes that concomitant mixed emotions often help integrate negative emotions into altogether pleasurable trajectories.

  7. Sex Feel Good: Enjoyment of Sexual Intercourse by Some Barbadian Teenagers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Hutchinson Miller Ph.D

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Within Caribbean societies and Barbados in particular issues on human sexuality are approached from a pathological, controlling, and judgmental perspective. These views resist an acknowledgment that children are sexual beings which manifestations are more evident during the teen years. Despite societal resistance, teenage pregnancies and sexual abuse forced societies to deal even if reluctantly with teenage sexuality. Based on Caribbean conservative approach to matters around sexuality it comes as no surprise that concerns around teenage sexuality is concentrated within discussions, discourses and scholarship about reproductive health, sexual abuse and sexually transmitted diseases. Based on the literature researched for Barbados and the rest of the Caribbean teenage sexual desire, and pleasurable sexual intercourses are virtually none-existent. It is the intention with this paper to contribute to scholarship on teenage sexual pleasure within Barbadian society. For its analysis the paper will utilize data collected from a teen sexuality research done during 2011-2012 among two secondary schools in Barbados. The main objective is to demonstrate that Barbadian teenagers are involved and enjoying sexual intercourse and other sexually related activities despite hegemonic discourses of sexual repression and control.

  8. Participation and enjoyment of leisure activities in adolescents born at ≤ 29 week gestation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahan-Oliel, Noémi; Mazer, Barbara; Riley, Patricia; Maltais, Désirée B; Nadeau, Line; Majnemer, Annette

    2014-06-01

    Motor, cognitive, social and behavioral problems have been found to persist in adolescents born extremely preterm. Leisure participation has been associated with health benefits; however, few studies have explored leisure participation in this population. The aim of this study was to describe leisure participation in adolescents born at ≤29week gestation. Secondary aims were to identify potential differences in participation related to sex, age, motor competence, and cognitive ability, and between adolescents born preterm and their siblings born at term. This cross-sectional study included 128 adolescents (mean age: 16.0years; 67 females) with a mean gestational age of 26.5weeks. All participants, as well as 22 siblings born at term, completed the Children's Assessment of Participation and Enjoyment. Participation levels were highest in social and recreational activities, and lowest in active-physical and skill-based activities. Boys participated in more active-physical activities (p=0.01) and more often (pleisure activities needs to be promoted in boys, and especially in girls with a history of prematurity. Activities should be adapted to sex and individual skill level in order to promote participation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Assessing the Validity of the Quality of Life Enjoyment and Satisfaction Questionnaire--Short Form in Adults with ADHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mick, Eric; Faraone, Stephen V.; Spencer, Thomas; Zhang, Huabin F.; Biederman, Joseph

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The authors assessed the psychometric properties of the Quality of Life Enjoyment and Satisfaction Questionnaire-Short Form (Q-LES-QSF) in adults with ADHD. Method: One hundred fifty ADHD and 134 non-ADHD adults from a case-control study and 173 adults randomized to placebo or methylphenidate were assessed with the Q-LES-QSF and the…

  10. Recall of vegetable eating affects future predicted enjoyment and choice of vegetables in British University undergraduate students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Eric; Blissett, Jackie; Higgs, Suzanne

    2011-10-01

    Predictions about enjoyment of future experiences are influenced by recalling similar past experiences. However, little is known about the relationship between hedonic memories of past eating episodes and future eating behavior. We investigated recall of previous experiences of eating vegetables and the effect of recall on future predicted liking for and consumption of vegetables. British University undergraduate students were asked to retrieve memories of previous occasions when they ate vegetables and were asked to rate how enjoyable those experiences were (Study 1, n=54). The effect of different types of memory recall (including vegetable eating recall) and visualization of someone else eating vegetables (to control for priming effects) on predicted likelihood of choosing vegetables and predicted enjoyment of eating vegetables was examined (Study 2, n=95). Finally, the effect of recalling vegetable eating memories on actual food choice from a buffet was assessed (Study 3, n=63). It is reported that people recall positive memories of past vegetable consumption (Precall of a personal nonfood memory, a nonvegetable food memory, or visualization of someone else enjoying eating vegetables (increase of approximately 70% in vegetable portion size compared to controls). The results suggest that recall of previous eating experiences could be a potential strategy for altering food choices. Copyright © 2011 American Dietetic Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Validity and reliability of questionnaires measuring physical activity self-efficacy, enjoyment, social support among Hong Kong Chinese children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Physical activity (PA) correlates have not been extensively studied in Hong Kong children. The aim of this study is to assess the validity and reliability of translated scales to measure PA related self-efficacy, enjoyment and social support in Hong Kong Chinese children. Sample 1 (n=273, aged 8–12 ...

  12. Association of Enjoyable Childhood Mealtimes with Adult Eating Behaviors and Subjective Diet-Related Quality of Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ainuki, Tomomi; Akamatsu, Rie; Hayashi, Fumi; Takemi, Yukari

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This study examined whether the experience of enjoyable mealtimes at home during childhood was related to eating behaviors and subjective diet-related quality of life in adulthood. Methods: The study used data (n = 2,936) obtained from a research program about "Shokuiku" (food and nutrition education) conducted by the Cabinet…

  13. The right to enjoy the benefits of scientific progress: in search of state obligations in relation to health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donders, Y.

    2011-01-01

    After having received little attention over the past decades, one of the least known human rights—the right to enjoy the benefits of scientific progress and its applications—has had its dust blown off. Although included in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) and in the International

  14. Middle school-aged child enjoyment of food tastings predicted interest in nutrition education on osteoporosis prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Feon W; Monnat, Shannon M; Lohse, Barbara

    2015-07-01

    NEEDs for Bones (NFB), based on the Health Belief Model, is a 4-lesson osteoporosis-prevention curriculum for 11- to 14-year-olds. This study examined the relationship between enjoyment of food tastings and interest in NFB. NFB was administered by teachers as part of standard practice and evaluated after the fourth lesson using a 21-item survey. Significant clustering of students within classrooms required use of random-intercept multilevel ordinal regression models in SAS proc GLIMMIX, with students nested within classrooms. Analyses considered tasting experience, eating attitudes, sex, grade, and cohort. Students (N = 1619; 50% girls) participated from 85 fourth to eighth grade classrooms (47% sixth grade and 31% seventh grade) in 16 Pennsylvania SNAP-Ed eligible schools over 2 academic years. For all foods tasted, students who did not enjoy the food tasting were less interested in the lesson than students who did enjoy the food tasting (all p < .001); refried beans (odds ratio [OR] = 0.30), soy milk (OR = 0.55), cranapple juice (OR = 0.51), sunflower kernels (OR = 0.48), and Swiss cheese (OR = 0.49). The relationship persisted net of covariates. Enjoyment of food tasting activities can predict interest in nutrition education on osteoporosis prevention, supporting resource allocation and inclusion of food tasting activities in school-age nutrition education. © 2015, American School Health Association.

  15. Right of everyone to the enjoyment of the highest attainable standard of physical and mental health : note

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toebes, Brigit; Puras, Dainus

    2017-01-01

    Corruption can have a devastating effect on good governance, the rule of law, development and the equitable enjoyment of all human rights, including the right to health. In many countries health care is among the most corrupt sectors, threatening the sustainability of health-care systems worldwide.

  16. Effects of Small-Sided Games vs. Interval Training in Aerobic Fitness and Physical Enjoyment in Young Elite Soccer Players.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asier Los Arcos

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of Small-Sided Games (SSG vs. Interval Training (IT in soccer training on aerobic fitness and physical enjoyment in youth elite soccer players during the last 8 weeks of the season. Seventeen U-16 male soccer players (age = 15.5 ± 0.6 years, and 8.5 years of experience of a Spanish First Division club academy were randomized to 2 different groups for 6 weeks: SSG group (n = 9 and IT group (n = 8. In addition to the usual technical and tactical sessions and competitive games, the SSG group performed 11 sessions with different SSGs, whereas the IT group performed the same number of sessions of IT. Players were tested before and after the 6-week training intervention with a continuous maximal multistage running field test and the counter movement jump test (CMJ. At the end of the study, players answered the physical activity enjoyment scale (PACES. During the study, heart rate (HR and session perceived effort (sRPE were assessed. SSGs were as effective as IT in maintaining the aerobic fitness in elite young soccer players during the last weeks of the season. Players in the SSG group declared a greater physical enjoyment than IT (P = 0.006; ES = 1.86 ± 1.07. Coaches could use SSG training during the last weeks of the season as an option without fear of losing aerobic fitness while promoting high physical enjoyment.

  17. THE INFLUENCE OF FIRMS STRUCTURAL CHARACTERISTICS ON THE DEGREE OF AGGLOMERATION ECONOMIES ENJOYED AMONGST FIRMS IN THE LAGOS REGION, NIGERIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FAGBOHUNKA Adejompo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Agglomeration economies is a potent tool in socio-economic revamping, rejuvenation and sustenance of regions, this is as a result of the impulse it transmitted through the multiplier effect it is capable of generated. Therefore, this paper underscores the influence of firms structural characteristics on the degree of agglomeration economies enjoyed amongst firms, using the Lagos region as a case study. The first stage in the collection of primary data involves the reconnaissance survey, thereafter one hundred and three questionnaire were administered in twelve industrial estates; one questionnaire in each of the firm. The paper reveals the following structural characteristics as germane to industrial enterprise; age of firms, areal plant size (m², capacity utilization (in percentage, and Labour size and firms investment. The paper has also found out those agglomeration economies enjoyed ranges from transportation, labour, power supply, to joint water supply. The Roy’s Largest Root test employed to test for the significance of the canonical correlations at 0.05 significant levels shows the calculated F-value 3.5247 and the tabulated F-value 2.90. This suggests that the degree of agglomeration economies enjoyed by firms is significantly explained by the size and structural characteristics of the firms. The paper therefore recommends more and active government participation in the industrial scene, given the necessary support for the expansion of firm’s structural characteristics which will lead to increase agglomeration economies enjoyed by these firms.

  18. Motivating EFL Students: E-Learning Enjoyment as a Predictor of Vocabulary Learning through Digital Video Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimzadeh, Mohsen; Alavi, Sepideh

    2016-01-01

    The present study examined e-learning enjoyment to see if it could predict high school students' vocabulary learning through a digital video game. Furthermore, the difference between those who played and those who watched the game was assessed. Participants of the study were male, high school, EFL students (N = 136, age 12-18) randomly assigned to…

  19. Summer Matters: Advocating for Summer Learning That Can Weather Political Seasons

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuade, Aaron

    2015-01-01

    Research has shown that an idle summer is not just boring; it can cost a student as much as two to three months of educational progress. Summer is critical to each child's development, both mind and body. Any meaningful attempts to get at America's equity divide and the consequent gap in opportunities for kids must include summer education as a…

  20. Summer Camp of Mathematical Modeling in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Xiaoxi; Xie, Jinxing

    2013-01-01

    The Summer Camp of Mathematical Modeling in China is a recently created experience designed to further Chinese students' academic pursuits in mathematical modeling. Students are given more than three months to research on a mathematical modeling project. Researchers and teams with outstanding projects are invited to the Summer Camp to present…

  1. TREsPASS Book 2: Summer School

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hall, Peter; Coles-Kemp, Lizzie

    2016-01-01

    The talks presented in this book were delivered as part of a summer school held at Royal Holloway University of London between the 20th and the 23rd of June 2016. The focus of the summer school was social aspects of cyber security risk and was an engagement and dissemination activity for the EU FP7

  2. Good-bye Summer Students 2009!

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    In its 47th edition, the CERN Summer Student programme has welcomed almost 200 young students from around the world. As it proves to do each year, the programme has provided a unique experience for all participants. CERN Summer Students 2009 in the Microcosm garden.During the summer months between June and August, your normal lunchtime routine is inevitably disrupted by the small stampede of students that leaves the Main Auditorium just around midday and starts queuing in Restaurant 1. When this happens, you can’t help but notice that the CERN Summer Students have arrived! With its rich lecture series, inspirational visits and actual work experience, the Summer Student programme provides a real chance to get acquainted with a career in particle physics, engineering and computation. The programme includes a morning lecture series that covers a large variety of topics, from particle physics to engineering, information technology and ...

  3. Enjoying mathematics or feeling competent in mathematics? Reciprocal effects on mathematics achievement and perceived math effort expenditure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinxten, Maarten; Marsh, Herbert W; De Fraine, Bieke; Van Den Noortgate, Wim; Van Damme, Jan

    2014-03-01

    The multidimensionality of the academic self-concept in terms of domain specificity has been well established in previous studies, whereas its multidimensionality in terms of motivational functions (the so-called affect-competence separation) needs further examination. This study aims at exploring differential effects of enjoyment and competence beliefs on two external validity criteria in the field of mathematics. Data analysed in this study were part of a large-scale longitudinal research project. Following a five-wave design, math enjoyment, math competence beliefs, math achievement, and perceived math effort expenditure measures were repeatedly collected from a cohort of 4,724 pupils in Grades 3-7. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was used to test the internal factor structure of the math self-concept. Additionally, a series of nested models was tested using structural equation modelling to examine longitudinal reciprocal interrelations between math competence beliefs and math enjoyment on the one hand and math achievement and perceived math effort expenditure on the other. Our results showed that CFA models with separate factors for math enjoyment and math competence beliefs fit the data substantially better than models without it. Furthermore, differential relationships between both constructs and the two educational outcomes were observed. Math competence beliefs had positive effects on math achievement and negative effects on perceived math effort expenditure. Math enjoyment had (mild) positive effects on subsequent perceived effort expenditure and math competence beliefs. This study provides further support for the affect-competence separation. Theoretical issues regarding adequate conceptualization and practical consequences for practitioners are discussed. © 2013 The British Psychological Society.

  4. Summer 2017 Microfluidics Research Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mcculloch, Quinn [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-07-25

    Liquid-liquid Extraction (LLE), also known as solvent extraction, represents a large subset of chemistry where one or more solutes are transferred across an interface between two immiscible liquids. This type of chemistry is used in industrial scale processes to purify solvents, refine ore, process petroleum, treat wastewater, and much more. Although LLE has been successfully employed at the macroscale, where many liters/kgs of species are processed at large flow rates, LLE stands to benefit from lab-on-a-chip technology, where reactions take place quickly and efficiently at the microscale. A device, called a screen contactor, has been invented at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to perform solvent extraction at the microscale. This invention has been submitted to LANL’s Feynman Center for Innovation, and has been filed for provisional patent under U.S. Patent Application No. 62/483,107 1. The screen contactor consists of a housing that contains two different screen materials, flametreated stainless steel and polyether ether ketone (PEEK) thermoplastic, that are uniquely wetted by either an aqueous or an organic liquid phase, respectively. Liquids in this device flow longitudinally through the screens. The fine pore size of the screens (tens of microns) provide large capillary/adhesional forces while maintaining small hydraulic pressure drops. These physical characteristics are paramount to efficient microscale liquid phase separation. To demonstrate mass transfer using the screen contactor, a well-known chemical system 2 consisting of water and n-decane as solvents and trimethylamine (TEA) as a solute was selected. TEA is basic in water so its concentration can easily be quantified using a digital pH meter and an experimentally determined base dissociation constant. Characterization of this solvent system and its behavior in the screen contactor have been the focus of my research activities this summer. In the following sections, I have detailed

  5. Do higher-priced generic medicines enjoy a competitive advantage under reference pricing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puig-Junoy, Jaume

    2012-11-01

    In many countries with generic reference pricing, generic producers and distributors compete by means of undisclosed discounts offered to pharmacies in order to reduce acquisition costs and to induce them to dispense their generic to patients in preference over others. The objective of this article is to test the hypothesis that under prevailing reference pricing systems for generic medicines, those medicines sold at a higher consumer price may enjoy a competitive advantage. Real transaction prices for 179 generic medicines acquired by pharmacies in Spain have been used to calculate the discount rate on acquisition versus reimbursed costs to pharmacies. Two empirical hypotheses are tested: the discount rate at which pharmacies acquire generic medicines is higher for those pharmaceutical presentations for which there are more generic competitors; and, the discount rate at which pharmacies acquire generic medicines is higher for those pharmaceutical forms for which the consumer price has declined less in relation to the consumer price of the brand drug before generic entry (higher-priced generic medicines). An average discount rate of 39.3% on acquisition versus reimbursed costs to pharmacies has been observed. The magnitude of the discount positively depends on the number of competitors in the market. The higher the ratio of the consumer price of the generic to that of the brand drug prior to generic entry (i.e. the smaller the price reduction of the generic in relation to the brand drug), the larger the discount rate. Under reference pricing there is intense price competition among generic firms in the form of unusually high discounts to pharmacies on official ex-factory prices reimbursed to pharmacies. However, this effect is highly distorting because it favours those medicines with a higher relative price in relation to the brand price before generic entry.

  6. An Exploratory Study of 4th, 5th, and 6th Grade Summer Camp Participants’ Attitudes and Intentions Towards Physical Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Cater

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Physical inactivity is a growing problem among children, particularly school-aged youth. Research suggests children are especially prone to inactivity in the summer months when access to structured school-time and extra-curricular activities is reduced. Community programs like residential summer camps offer an excellent environment for engaging children in enjoyable physical activities while also helping them learn to be more physically active when they return home. Pre-existing attitudes often influence how much change a program inspires in an individual. The purpose of this study was to explore 4th, 5th, and 6th grade summer camp participants’ attitudes towards physical activity. Results of this study indicate that youth have a fairly neutral, though positive, attitude towards physical activity and that parental support of physical activity is still extremely important, even at this age. Campers also indicated relatively high intentions to remain physically active in the two weeks after the camp ended

  7. Interim Feasibility Report and Environmental Impact Statement for Oliver Lock Replacement (BWT) Black Warrior-Tombigbee Rivers, Alabama. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-12-01

    low flow conditions experienced daring summer months in the river above Oliver Lock and Dam (U.S. Army 1981) contribute to depresed water quality and...hence, depresed aquatic resources. These low flow conditions can concentrate pollutants being discharged into the river, resulting in not only toxic

  8. Reaching soldiers with untreated substance use disorder: lessons learned in the development of a marketing campaign for the Warrior Check-Up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, Thomas O; Walker, Denise D; Kaysen, Debra L; Roffman, Roger A; Mbilinyi, Lyungai; Neighbors, Clayton

    2013-07-01

    The Warrior Check-Up, a confidential telephone-delivered intervention, is designed to reach active-duty soldiers with untreated substance-use disorder at a large U.S. military base. This paper describes the development and successful implementation of the study's marketing strategies at the recruitment period's midpoint (2010-2012). Qualitative analyses of focus groups (n = 26) and survey responses (n = 278) describe the process of campaign design. Measures of demographics, media exposure, post-traumatic stress, anxiety and depression gathered from callers (n = 172) are used in quantitative analysis assessing the campaign's success in reaching this population. Implications, limitations, and suggestions for future research are discussed. Department of Defense provided study funding.

  9. Reaching Soldiers with Untreated Substance Use Disorder: Lessons Learned in the Development of a Marketing Campaign for the Warrior Check-Up Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, Thomas O.; Walker, Denise D.; Kaysen, Debra L.; Roffman, Roger A.; Mbilinyi, Lyungai; Neighbors, Clayton

    2016-01-01

    The Warrior Check-Up, a confidential telephone-delivered intervention, is designed to reach active-duty soldiers with untreated substance-use disorder at a large US military base. This paper describes the development and successful implementation of the study’s marketing strategies at the recruitment period’s midpoint (2010–2012). Qualitative analyses of focus groups (n = 26) and survey responses (n = 278) describe the process of campaign design. Measures of demographics, media exposure, post-traumatic stress, anxiety and depression gathered from callers (n = 172) are used in quantitative analysis assessing the campaign’s success in reaching this population. Implications, limitations, and suggestions for future research are discussed. Department of Defense provided study funding. PMID:23869462

  10. Reading: Focus for Enjoyment. Proceedings of the Annual Reading Conference (10th, Terre Haute, Indiana, June 12-13, 1980). Studies in Curriculum Development No. 1, 1981.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waterman, David C., Comp.; Gibbs, Vanita M., Comp.

    Focusing on reading for enjoyment, the seven articles in this collection were drawn from the Tenth Annual Reading Conference held at Indiana State University. Topics discussed in the articles are: (1) reading aloud to students, (2) how to have fun while teaching vocabulary, (3) the enjoyment and affective dimensions of "EAS into Reading," (4)…

  11. Explaining the enjoyment of negative emotions evoked by the arts: The need to consider empathy and other underlying mechanisms of emotion induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuoskoski, Jonna K; Eerola, Tuomas

    2017-01-01

    Any model aiming to explain the enjoyment of negative emotions in the context of the arts should consider how works of art are able to induce emotional responses in the first place. For instance, research on empathy and the arts suggests that the psychological processes that mediate the enjoyment of sadness and horror may be fundamentally different.

  12. Risky Drinking Can Put a Chill on Your Summer Fun

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... on Your Summer Fun Print version Risky Drinking Can Put a Chill on Your Summer Fun Summer ... adults involve the use of alcohol. 1 Swimmers can get in over their heads. Alcohol impairs judgment ...

  13. Visiting summer students enhance research skills

    OpenAIRE

    Constantinescu, Ana

    2007-01-01

    Seven undergraduate students from universities across the nation and one from Virginia Tech are working side by side with Virginia Tech professors this summer on research projects related to sustainable management of resources.

  14. Summer võistleb jalgpalli MMil

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2007-01-01

    Rocklaulja Indrek Raadik (Summer) on sooloprojektiga tuuril koos bändidega Traffic ja Mees, juuni lõpul aga koos ansamblitega esindamas Eestit Sotšis toimuval artistide esimesel maailmameistrivõistlusel jalgpallis

  15. Science Academies' Summer Research Fellowship Programme

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 22; Issue 11. Science Academies' Summer Research Fellowship Programme for Students and Teachers - 2018. Information and Announcements Volume 22 Issue 11 November 2017 pp 1100-1100 ...

  16. Relationship between summer monsoon rainfall and cyclogenesis ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    relationship between Indian Ocean Dipole Mode. Index (IODMI) and the ... 2013) in the cyclogenesis over north Indian Ocean ..... Indian summer monsoon; J. Climate 17 3141–3155. ... Murakami H, Wang B and Kitoh A 2011 Future change.

  17. Opening of a summer camp at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Nursery School

    2015-01-01

    The Staff Association has the pleasure to announce the opening of a summer camp in l’EVE et Ecole de l’AP du CERN. With a capacity of 40 children, aged 4 to 6 years, it will be open from July 6 to 30. Registration Summer camp 2015 Registration for the CERN SA Summer camp for children aged 4 to 6 is open 16 to 30 April 2015 More information on the website: http://nurseryschool.web.cern.ch/ The Summer camp is open to all children of CERN Staff. An inscription per week is proposed, cost 480.-CHF/week, lunch included. The camp will be open weeks 28, 29, 30 and 31, from 8:30 am to 5:30 pm.

  18. S'Cool LAB Summer CAMP 2017

    CERN Multimedia

    Woithe, Julia

    2017-01-01

    The S’Cool LAB Summer CAMP is an opportunity for high-school students (aged 16-19) from all around the world to spend 2 weeks exploring the fascinating world of particle physics. The 24 selected participants spend their summer at S’Cool LAB, CERN’s hands-on particle physics learning laboratory, for an epic programme of lectures and tutorials, team research projects, visits of CERN’s research installations, and social activities.

  19. Ten ways to design for disgust, sadness, and other enjoyments: A design approach to enrich product experiences with negative emotions

    OpenAIRE

    Fokkinga, S.F.; Desmet, P.M.A.

    2013-01-01

    This paper demonstrates how designers can enrich user experiences by purposefully involving negative emotions in user-product interaction. This approach is derived from a framework of rich experience, which explains how and under what circumstances negative emotions make a product experience richer and enjoyable. The approach consists of three steps, where the designer decides 1) which negative emotion is most appropriate for the user context; 2) how and when this emotion is best elicited; an...

  20. The effect of points and audio on concentration, engagement, enjoyment, learning, motivation, and classroom dynamics using Kahoot!

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Alf Inge; Lieberoth, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    There are many examples on the use of game-based learning in and outside the classroom, along with evaluation of their effect in terms of engagement, learning, classroom dynamics, concentration, motivation and enjoyment. Most of the research in this area focuses on evaluations of the use of game-...... affected by use of audio. A total of 593 students participated in this experiment with a gender distribution of 44% female and 56 male students. Contribution: Factorial design method, lit review...

  1. Joy, Exercise, Enjoyment, Getting out: A Qualitative Study of Older People's Experience of Cycling in Sydney, Australia

    OpenAIRE

    Alexis Zander; Erin Passmore; Chloe Mason; Chris Rissel

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Cycling can be an enjoyable way to meet physical activity recommendations and is suitable for older people; however cycling participation by older Australians is low. This qualitative study explored motivators, enablers, and barriers to cycling among older people through an age-targeted cycling promotion program. Methods. Seventeen adults who aged 50–75 years participated in a 12-week cycling promotion program which included a cycling skills course, mentor, and resource pack...

  2. Affective and enjoyment responses in high intensity interval training and continuous training: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Ribeiro Ramalho Oliveira

    Full Text Available Previous studies investigating the effects of high intensity interval training (HIIT and moderate intensity continuous training (MICT showed controversial results. The aim of the present study was to systematically review the literature on the effects of HIIT and MICT on affective and enjoyment responses. The PRISMA Statement and the Cochrane recommendation were used to perform this systematic review and the database search was performed using PubMed, Scopus, ISI Web of Knowledge, PsycINFO, and SPORTDiscus. Eight studies investigating the acute affective and enjoyment responses on HIIT and MICT were included in the present systematic review. The standardized mean difference (SMD was calculated for Feeling Scale (FS, Physical Activity Enjoyment Scale (PACES and Exercise Enjoyment Scale (EES. The MICT was used as the reference condition. The overall results showed similar beneficial effects of HIIT on PACES and EES responses compared to MICT with SMDs classified as small (PACES-SMD = 0.49, I2 = 69.3%, p = 0.001; EES-SMD = 0.48, I2 = 24.1%, p = 0.245 while for FS, the overall result showed a trivial effect (FS-SMD = 0.19, I2 = 78.9%, p<0.001. Most of the comparisons performed presented positive effects for HIIT. For the FS, six of 12 comparisons showed beneficial effects for HIIT involving normal weight and overweight-to-obese populations. For PACES, six of 10 comparisons showed beneficial effects for HIIT involving normal weight and overweight-to-obese populations. For EES, six of seven comparisons showed beneficial effects for HIIT also involving normal weight and overweight-to-obese populations. Based on the results of the present study, it is possible to conclude that HIIT exercise may be a viable strategy for obtaining positive psychological responses. Although HIIT exercise may be recommended for obtaining positive psychological responses, chronic studies should clarify the applicability of HIIT for exercise adherence.

  3. Affective and enjoyment responses in high intensity interval training and continuous training: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Bruno Ribeiro Ramalho; Santos, Tony Meireles; Kilpatrick, Marcus; Pires, Flávio Oliveira; Deslandes, Andréa Camaz

    2018-01-01

    Previous studies investigating the effects of high intensity interval training (HIIT) and moderate intensity continuous training (MICT) showed controversial results. The aim of the present study was to systematically review the literature on the effects of HIIT and MICT on affective and enjoyment responses. The PRISMA Statement and the Cochrane recommendation were used to perform this systematic review and the database search was performed using PubMed, Scopus, ISI Web of Knowledge, PsycINFO, and SPORTDiscus. Eight studies investigating the acute affective and enjoyment responses on HIIT and MICT were included in the present systematic review. The standardized mean difference (SMD) was calculated for Feeling Scale (FS), Physical Activity Enjoyment Scale (PACES) and Exercise Enjoyment Scale (EES). The MICT was used as the reference condition. The overall results showed similar beneficial effects of HIIT on PACES and EES responses compared to MICT with SMDs classified as small (PACES-SMD = 0.49, I2 = 69.3%, p = 0.001; EES-SMD = 0.48, I2 = 24.1%, p = 0.245) while for FS, the overall result showed a trivial effect (FS-SMD = 0.19, I2 = 78.9%, pHIIT. For the FS, six of 12 comparisons showed beneficial effects for HIIT involving normal weight and overweight-to-obese populations. For PACES, six of 10 comparisons showed beneficial effects for HIIT involving normal weight and overweight-to-obese populations. For EES, six of seven comparisons showed beneficial effects for HIIT also involving normal weight and overweight-to-obese populations. Based on the results of the present study, it is possible to conclude that HIIT exercise may be a viable strategy for obtaining positive psychological responses. Although HIIT exercise may be recommended for obtaining positive psychological responses, chronic studies should clarify the applicability of HIIT for exercise adherence.

  4. SUMMER CONFERENCES: Heavy on flavour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1995-10-15

    Afocus of attention at the major international high energy physics conferences this summer in Brussels and in Beijing was the latest batch of precision information from major experiments at electronpositron colliders - the four big detectors at CERN's LEP storage ring and the SLD experiment at the SLC linear collider at SLAC (Stanford). These experiments study the decay of the Z particle - the electrically neutral carrier of the weak nuclear force - produced when the colliding electron and positron beams are tuned to the Z resonance. This precision data is a stringent test of the six-quark Standard Model, and as the weight of evidence builds up, physicists look hard for any cracks in the theoretical foundations. In 1994, the LEP experiments almost doubled their accumulated score of Z particles (an integrated luminosity of 64.5 inverse picobarns in 1994 compared with 93.5 in the previous 4 years). In addition to the increased mass of data, improved precision came from better determinations of key parameters (beam energy, luminosity, electromagnetic coupling strength,....). SLD Z data has more than doubled over the past year. SLC also provides spin oriented (polarized) beams and the machine's polarization level has improved from 63 to 77%. The intercorrelation of the different parameters of the six-quark Standard Model was also boosted this year by the discovery of the sixth ('top') quark at Fermilab's Tevatron proton-antiproton collider (April/May, page 1). In the electron-positron sector, although the LEP experiments provide the mass of the data, the SLC's polarized beams mean that the delicate asymmetries seen in SLD provide the most precise single measurement of the vital electroweak mixing parameter. Last year, it was difficult to reconcile these SLD asymmetry results from those from LEP, and some people were whispering about possible nonconformist physics effects, but with a year's additional data, the gap between the two sets of results has narrowed. To

  5. SUMMER CONFERENCES: Heavy on flavour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1995-01-01

    Afocus of attention at the major international high energy physics conferences this summer in Brussels and in Beijing was the latest batch of precision information from major experiments at electronpositron colliders - the four big detectors at CERN's LEP storage ring and the SLD experiment at the SLC linear collider at SLAC (Stanford). These experiments study the decay of the Z particle - the electrically neutral carrier of the weak nuclear force - produced when the colliding electron and positron beams are tuned to the Z resonance. This precision data is a stringent test of the six-quark Standard Model, and as the weight of evidence builds up, physicists look hard for any cracks in the theoretical foundations. In 1994, the LEP experiments almost doubled their accumulated score of Z particles (an integrated luminosity of 64.5 inverse picobarns in 1994 compared with 93.5 in the previous 4 years). In addition to the increased mass of data, improved precision came from better determinations of key parameters (beam energy, luminosity, electromagnetic coupling strength,....). SLD Z data has more than doubled over the past year. SLC also provides spin oriented (polarized) beams and the machine's polarization level has improved from 63 to 77%. The intercorrelation of the different parameters of the six-quark Standard Model was also boosted this year by the discovery of the sixth ('top') quark at Fermilab's Tevatron proton-antiproton collider (April/May, page 1). In the electron-positron sector, although the LEP experiments provide the mass of the data, the SLC's polarized beams mean that the delicate asymmetries seen in SLD provide the most precise single measurement of the vital electroweak mixing parameter. Last year, it was difficult to reconcile these SLD asymmetry results from those from LEP, and some people were whispering about possible nonconformist physics effects, but with a year's additional data, the gap between the two sets

  6. The right to enjoy the benefits of scientific progress: in search of state obligations in relation to health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donders, Yvonne

    2011-11-01

    After having received little attention over the past decades, one of the least known human rights--the right to enjoy the benefits of scientific progress and its applications--has had its dust blown off. Although included in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) and in the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (ICESCR)--be it at the very end of both instruments -this right hardly received any attention from States, UN bodies and programmes and academics. The role of science in societies and its benefits and potential danger were discussed in various international fora, but hardly ever in a human rights context. Nowadays, within a world that is increasingly turning to science and technology for solutions to persistent socio-economic and development problems, the human dimension of science also receives increased attention, including the human right to enjoy the benefits of scientific progress and its applications. This contribution analyses the possible legal obligations of States in relation to the right to enjoy the benefits of scientific progress and its applications, in particular as regards health.

  7. A Motivational Model of Physical Education and Links to Enjoyment, Knowledge, Performance, Total Physical Activity and Body Mass Index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arto Gråstén, Anthony Watt

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The present paper examined the full sequence of the Hierarchical Model of Motivation in physical education (PE including motivational climate, basic psychological needs, intrinsic motivation, and related links to contextual enjoyment, knowledge, performance, and total moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA. Gender differences and correlations with body mass index (BMI were also analyzed. Cross-sectional data was represented by self-reports and objective assessments of 770 middle school students (52% of girls in North-East Finland. The results showed that task-involving climate in girls’ PE classes was related to enjoyment and knowledge through physical competence and intrinsic motivation, whereas task-involving climate was associated with enjoyment and knowledge via competence and autonomy, and total MVPA via autonomy, intrinsic motivation, and knowledge within boys. This may indicate that girls and boys perceive PE classes in a different way. Graded PE assessments appeared to be essential in motivating both girls and boys to participate in greater total MVPA, whereas BMI was negatively linked with competence and social relatedness only among girls. Although, the current and previous empirical findings supported task-involving teaching methods in PE, in some cases, ego-involving climate should be considered. Therefore, both task- and ego-involving teaching practices can be useful ways of developing preferred behaviors in PE classes.

  8. The impact of work-related and personal resources on older workers' fatigue, work enjoyment and retirement intentions over time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stynen, Dave; Jansen, Nicole W H; Kant, IJmert

    2017-12-01

    This study aims to examine the impact of work-related and personal resources on older workers' retirement intentions by studying the pathways (fatigue and work enjoyment) from resources to retirement intentions, the buffering role of resources for psychological job demands, in a cross-sectional and longitudinal timeframe. Longitudinal results on a subsample of full-time, older workers (n = 1642) from the Maastricht Cohort Study suggest that over four years of follow-up personal resources like personal mastery and perceived health related to less (prolonged) fatigue and more work enjoyment. Personal mastery also related to later retirement intentions. A work-related resource like decision authority related to less prolonged fatigue. (Prolonged) fatigue related to earlier retirement intentions, suggesting that fatigue may be a pathway to early retirement. Finally, little evidence was found for effect modification by resources. This prospective study indicates that work-related and personal resources may be useful for prolonging working careers. Practitioner Summary: To date, the impact of work-related and personal resources on older workers' retirement intentions is rarely studied. As this prospective study shows that resources may impact older workers' (prolonged) fatigue, work enjoyment and retirement intentions, the monitoring and fostering of resources is of importance for prolonging their working careers.

  9. ENED-GEM: A Conceptual Framework Model for Psychological Enjoyment Factors and Learning Mechanisms in Educational Games about the Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fjællingsdal, Kristoffer S.; Klöckner, Christian A.

    2017-01-01

    Based on a thorough review of psychological literature, this article seeks to develop a model of game enjoyment and environmental learning (ENvironmental EDucational Game Enjoyment Model, ENED-GEM) and delineate psychological processes that might facilitate learning and inspire behavioral change from educational games about the environment. A critically acclaimed digital educational game about environmental issues (Fate of the World by Red Redemption/Soothsayer Games) was used as a case study. Two hundred forty-nine reviews of the game from the popular gaming and reviewing platform known as Steam were analyzed by means of a thematic content analysis in order to identify key player enjoyment factors believed to be relevant to the process of learning from games, as well as to gain an understanding of positive and negative impressions about the game’s general content. The end results of the thematic analysis were measured up to the suggested ENED-GEM framework. Initial results generally support the main elements of the ENED-GEM, and future research into the importance of these individual core factors is outlined. PMID:28701988

  10. ENED-GEM: A Conceptual Framework Model for Psychological Enjoyment Factors and Learning Mechanisms in Educational Games about the Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristoffer S. Fjællingsdal

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Based on a thorough review of psychological literature, this article seeks to develop a model of game enjoyment and environmental learning (ENvironmental EDucational Game Enjoyment Model, ENED-GEM and delineate psychological processes that might facilitate learning and inspire behavioral change from educational games about the environment. A critically acclaimed digital educational game about environmental issues (Fate of the World by Red Redemption/Soothsayer Games was used as a case study. Two hundred forty-nine reviews of the game from the popular gaming and reviewing platform known as Steam were analyzed by means of a thematic content analysis in order to identify key player enjoyment factors believed to be relevant to the process of learning from games, as well as to gain an understanding of positive and negative impressions about the game’s general content. The end results of the thematic analysis were measured up to the suggested ENED-GEM framework. Initial results generally support the main elements of the ENED-GEM, and future research into the importance of these individual core factors is outlined.

  11. ENED-GEM: A Conceptual Framework Model for Psychological Enjoyment Factors and Learning Mechanisms in Educational Games about the Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fjællingsdal, Kristoffer S; Klöckner, Christian A

    2017-01-01

    Based on a thorough review of psychological literature, this article seeks to develop a model of game enjoyment and environmental learning (ENvironmental EDucational Game Enjoyment Model, ENED-GEM) and delineate psychological processes that might facilitate learning and inspire behavioral change from educational games about the environment. A critically acclaimed digital educational game about environmental issues (Fate of the World by Red Redemption/Soothsayer Games) was used as a case study. Two hundred forty-nine reviews of the game from the popular gaming and reviewing platform known as Steam were analyzed by means of a thematic content analysis in order to identify key player enjoyment factors believed to be relevant to the process of learning from games, as well as to gain an understanding of positive and negative impressions about the game's general content. The end results of the thematic analysis were measured up to the suggested ENED-GEM framework. Initial results generally support the main elements of the ENED-GEM, and future research into the importance of these individual core factors is outlined.

  12. New Zealand Summer of Code/Summer of Technology: an industry, student and tertiary engagement

    OpenAIRE

    Komisarczuk, Peter; Clegg, John; McDavitt, Ruth; Linton, Andy

    2011-01-01

    In 2006 the Wellington Summer of Code was brought to life engaging ICT undergraduates with innovative Wellington employers, it has developed into a thriving talent pipeline engaging all levels of tertiary students and industry in the Wellington region. Summer of Code engages students during term time through industry led learning and a summer seminar and workshop series that are open to all. It has worked with the NZCS to integrate the Evening with Industry where undergraduates see young IT p...

  13. Observations of the summer Red Sea circulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofianos, Sarantis S.; Johns, William E.

    2007-06-01

    Aiming at exploring and understanding the summer circulation in the Red Sea, a cruise was conducted in the basin during the summer of 2001 involving hydrographic, meteorological, and direct current observations. The most prominent feature, characteristic of the summer circulation and exchange with the Indian Ocean, is a temperature, salinity, and oxygen minimum located around a depth of 75 m at the southern end of the basin, associated with Gulf of Aden Intermediate Water inflowing from the Gulf of Aden during the summer season as an intruding subsurface layer. Stirring and mixing with ambient waters lead to marked increases in temperature (from 16.5 to almost 33°C) and salinity (from 35.7 to more than 38 psu) in this layer by the time it reaches midbasin. The observed circulation presents a very vigorous pattern with strong variability and intense features that extend the width of the basin. A permanent cyclone, detected in the northern Red Sea, verifies previous observations and modeling studies, while in the central sector of the basin a series of very strong anticyclones were observed with maximum velocities exceeding 1 m/s. The three-layer flow pattern, representative of the summer exchange between the Red Sea and the Gulf of Aden, is observed in the strait of Bab el Mandeb. In the southern part of the basin the layer flow is characterized by strong banking of the inflows and outflows against the coasts. Both surface and intermediate water masses involved in the summer Red Sea circulation present prominent spatial variability in their characteristics, indicating that the eddy field and mixing processes play an important role in the summer Red Sea circulation.

  14. Leisure mobility per la fruizione della città Leisure Mobility for Enjoying the City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Anna La Rocca

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Nello scenario attuale la gran parte delle città è impegnata in investimenti nel settore turistico al fine di rendersi maggiormente competitive e di attrarre investimenti. Questo rinnovato interesse verso il settore turistico e del tempo libero ha generato una nuova tipologia turistica riconosciuta come turismo urbano, sviluppatosi sostanzialmente durante tutti gli anni Novanta. Partendo dalla consapevolezza che lo spostamento sia una condizione necessaria allo svolgimento della pratica turistica tout court e di quella urbana in particolare, l’articolo tenta di mettere in evidenza la capacità di adattamento dell’offerta di trasporto urbano alle esigenze turistiche. La relazione tra sistema di trasporto urbano e pratica turistica, se esiste, può essere analizzata alla luce dei principali interventi messi in campo per adattare l’offerta di trasporto alle richieste di un’utenza temporanea ma con una forte incidenza sul bilancio economico della città.This paper deals with leisure mobility that is a special form of mobility enabled by tourists in urban areas. As a matter of fact, tourism activity occupies a central role in the economies of cities today. Most of the processes of urban renewal actually still in progress always provide investment in tourism and leisure. The metropolitan areas as well as small and medium-sized cities, to redefine its development model stake on the rejuvenation of the tourism and culture in order to attract visitors and tourists. In this context, the urban supply system for tourism-oriented services has been enhanced with new ways of enjoying the city. Transport supply to enable travel within the city plays a significant role. Sometimes the mean of transport turns into a tourist attraction itself both giving value to tourist experience and improving accessibility to urban attractions. The first part of this paper refers to theoretical aspect of the tourism phenomenon. This is to underline how tourism is a

  15. Physical Activity With and Without TV Viewing: Effects on Enjoyment of Physical Activity and TV, Exercise Self-Efficacy, and Barriers to Being Active in Overweight Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steeves, Jeremy A; Bassett, David R; Fitzhugh, Eugene C; Raynor, Hollie; Cho, Chi; Thompson, Dixie L

    2016-04-01

    Physical activity (PA) is enjoyable, but there are barriers to participation. TV viewing is highly enjoyable with limited barriers. Exercising while viewing TV may impact enjoyment, exercise self-efficacy, and barriers to PA, compared with exercising without TV. 58 sedentary, overweight adults were randomized to 1 of 2 PA prescriptions: one that increased PA during TV viewing (TV Commercial Stepping), and another that focused solely on PA (Walking). Random effects models tested changes in enjoyment of TV and PA, exercise self-efficacy, and barriers to PA across time (baseline, 3, and 6 months) and PA prescription during a 6-month PA intervention. At baseline, TV was more enjoyable than PA. Over the 6-month intervention, enjoyment of TV viewing did not change, but enjoyment of PA and exercise self-efficacy significantly increased, while barriers to PA significantly decreased for both groups compared with baseline (P exercise increased, and barriers to being active were reduced for previously sedentary adults participating in a behavioral PA intervention. These findings highlight the importance of encouraging inactive adults to engage in some form of PA, whether it occurs with or without TV viewing.

  16. Cost Warrior Moneyball

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    program the money? That’s Army staff business in the franchise head shed, right? The truth is that we need to know its cost, afford- ability, and...address to an Armor War - fighting Conference, Gen. Peter Chiarelli said, “If you look at any one of these systems as an individual system, you can...tainment costs. The future ain’t what it used to be. Third, change takes time and patience. Over the past 10 years, big money has been flowing. It

  17. Land Warrior Power Management

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sanders, David

    2003-01-01

    .... The improvement is incremental; yet the goal of power management for this system is to significantly increase the length of time a single source can supply the system with power without resupply...

  18. The Ash Warriors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Anderegg, C. R

    2000-01-01

    .... The following pages tell the remarkable story of the men and women of the Clark community and their ordeal in planning for and carrying out their evacuation from Clark in the face of impending volcanic activity...

  19. Iroquois Warriors in Iraq

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Morales met with COL Mike Milano, the CFLCC C3. Milano provided Morales with the basic details he needed to develop the division RSOI plan. Milano...MOI.23 The 98th Division contributed 28 soldiers to the CPATT staff, to include COL Michael R. “ Mike ” Smith, who was assigned as the chief of staff...Institute, Fort Leavenworth, KS. Attachment: E-mail, COL Charles Stafford to LTC Keith Sharples , Subject: New Guy Stuff, 25 August 2004. ________. E

  20. The Ash Warriors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    toys, formula, portable crib, stroller, etc) Water supply for one day Food/ snacks for one day Food for pets (3 days) and leash POVs should have one-half...Clark’s continued. On June 7, a dome appeared on Pinatubo’s northwest face. Increased seismic activity and the extruding dome prompted the volcanologists...MWR) peo- ple passed out bottled water, snacks and other comfort items. The lines on the parking apron were long but kept moving. Personnel special

  1. Summer Schools in Nuclear and Radiochemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silber, Herbert B. [San Jose State University

    2013-06-20

    The ACS Summer Schools in Nuclear and Radiochemistry (herein called “Summer Schools”) were funded by the U.S. Department of Energy and held at San Jose State University (SJSU) and Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The Summer Schools offer undergraduate students with U.S. citizenship an opportunity to complete coursework through ACS accredited chemistry degree programs at SJSU or the State University of New York at Stony Brook (SBU). The courses include lecture and laboratory work on the fundamentals and applications of nuclear and radiochemistry. The number of students participating at each site is limited to 12, and the low student-to-instructor ratio is needed due to the intense nature of the six-week program. To broaden the students’ perspectives on nuclear science, prominent research scientists active in nuclear and/or radiochemical research participate in a Guest Lecture Series. Symposia emphasizing environmental chemistry, nuclear medicine, and career opportunities are conducted as a part of the program. The Department of Energy’s Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES) renewed the five-year proposal for the Summer Schools starting March 1, 2007, with contributions from Biological and Environmental Remediation (BER) and Nuclear Physics (NP). This Final Technical Report covers the Summer Schools held in the years 2007-2011.

  2. Effective Summer Programming: What Educators and Policymakers Should Know

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEachin, Andrew; Augustine, Catherine H.; McCombs, Jennifer

    2018-01-01

    The evidence suggests that many types of summer learning programs have the potential to reduce summer learning losses and perhaps create learning gains. However, implementing a summer program does not guarantee positive effects on students' learning. A key question then is: What factors make a summer learning program effective? This article, drawn…

  3. OECD - HRP Summer School on Nuclear Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    In cooperation with the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA), the Halden Reactor Project organised a Summer School on nuclear fuel in the period August 28 September 1, 2000. The summer school was primarily intended for people who wanted to become acquainted with fuel-related subjects and issues without being experts. It was especially hoped that the summer school would serve to transfer knowledge to the ''young generation'' in the field of nuclear fuel. Experts from Halden Project member organisations gave the following presentations: (1) Overview of the nuclear community, (2) Criteria for safe operation and design of nuclear fuel, (3) Fuel design and fabrication, (4) Cladding Manufacturing, (5) Overview of the Halden Reactor Project, (6) Fuel performance evaluation and modelling, (7) Fission gas release, and (8) Cladding issues. Except for the Overview, which is a written paper, the other contributions are overhead figures from spoken lectures.

  4. International Summer School on Nuclear Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    In cooperation with the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA), the Halden Reactor Project organised a Summer School on nuclear fuel in the period August 28 September 1, 2000. The summer school was primarily intended for people who wanted to become acquainted with fuel-related subjects and issues without being experts. It was especially hoped that the summer school would serve to transfer knowledge to the ''young generation'' in the field of nuclear fuel. Experts from Halden Project member organisations gave the following presentations: (1) Overview of the nuclear community, (2) Criteria for safe operation and design of nuclear fuel, (3) Fuel design and fabrication, (4) Cladding Manufacturing, (5) Overview of the Halden Reactor Project, (6) Fuel performance evaluation and modelling, (7) Fission gas release, and (8) Cladding issues. Except for the Overview, which is a written paper, the other contributions are overhead figures from spoken lectures.

  5. Lyons Ferry Hatchery - Summer Steelhead, Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watson, M.

    1996-05-01

    This report presents the findings of the independent audit of the Lyons Ferry Hatchery (Summer Steelhead). Lyons Ferry Hatchery is located downstream of the confluence of the Palouse and Snake rivers, about 7 miles west of Starbuck, Washington. The hatchery is used for adult collection of fall chinook and summer steelhead, egg incubation of fall chinook, spring chinook, steelhead, and rainbow trout and rearing of fall chinook, spring chinook, summer steelhead, and rainbow trout. The audit was conducted in April 1996 as part of a two-year effort that will include 67 hatcheries and satellite facilities located on the Columbia and Snake River system in Idaho, Oregon, and Washington. The hatchery operating agencies include the US Fish and Wildlife Service, Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife

  6. Modelling the Asian summer monsoon using CCAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Kim Chi; McGregor, John L. [CSIRO Marine and Atmospheric Research, Aspendale, VIC (Australia)

    2009-02-15

    A ten-year mean (1989-1998) climatology of the Asian summer monsoon is studied using the CSIRO Conformal-Cubic Atmospheric Model (CCAM) to downscale NCEP reanalyses. The aim of the current study is to validate the model results against previous work on this topic, in order to identify model strengths and weaknesses in simulating the Asian summer monsoon. The model results are compared with available observations and are presented in two parts. In the first part, the mean summer rainfall, maximum and minimum temperatures and winds are compared with the observations. The second part focuses on validation of the monsoon onset. The model captures the mean characteristics such as the cross-equatorial flow of low-level winds over the Indian Ocean and near the Somali coast, rainfall patterns, onset indices, northward movements, active-break and revival periods. (orig.)

  7. OECD - HRP Summer School on Nuclear Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    In cooperation with the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA), the Halden Reactor Project organised a Summer School on nuclear fuel in the period August 28 September 1, 2000. The summer school was primarily intended for people who wanted to become acquainted with fuel-related subjects and issues without being experts. It was especially hoped that the summer school would serve to transfer knowledge to the ''young generation'' in the field of nuclear fuel. Experts from Halden Project member organisations gave the following presentations: (1) Overview of the nuclear community, (2) Criteria for safe operation and design of nuclear fuel, (3) Fuel design and fabrication, (4) Cladding Manufacturing, (5) Overview of the Halden Reactor Project, (6) Fuel performance evaluation and modelling, (7) Fission gas release, and (8) Cladding issues. Except for the Overview, which is a written paper, the other contributions are overhead figures from spoken lectures

  8. Summer camp course in nuclear operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, P.F.; James, J.Z.; Terrell, B.E.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes a new kind of nuclear engineering curriculum that echoes an old method of professional training - the intensive summer camp. For many years a staple of the training of civil engineers and foresters, summer camp courses immerse the student in an intensive, focused experience, isolated from the familiar campus and resembling the actual work environment for which the student is being trained. With financial support from the U.S. Department of Energy, University of California-Berkeley (UCB) and Pacific Gas ampersand Electric (PG ampersand E) have launched such a course for UCB nuclear engineering undergraduates

  9. Management of diabetes at summer camps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciambra, Roberta; Locatelli, Chiara; Suprani, Tosca; Pocecco, Mauro

    2005-01-01

    We report our experience in the organization of diabetic children summer-camps since 1973. Guidelines for organization have been recently reported by the SIEDP (Società Italiana di Endocrinologia e Diabetologia Pediatrica). Our attention is focused on diabetes management at camp, organization and planning, medical staff composition and staff training, treatment of diabetes-related emergencies, written camp management plan, diabetes education and psychological issues at camp, prevention of possible risks, assessment of effectiveness of education in summer camps and research at camp.

  10. The World Nuclear University Summer Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivard, D.; McIntyre, M.

    2007-01-01

    The World Nuclear University (WNU) Summer Institute is a six weeks intensive training program aimed to develop a global leadership in the field of nuclear sciences and technologies. The topics covered include global setting, international regimes, technology innovation and nuclear industry operations. This event has been held annually since 2005. Mark McIntyre and Dominic Rivard attended this activity as a personal initiative. In this paper they will present the WNU and its Summer Institute, share their participation experience and discuss as well of some technical content covered during the Institute, highlighting the benefits this brought to their careers. (author)

  11. Interactive video game cycling leads to higher energy expenditure and is more enjoyable than conventional exercise in adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Monedero

    Full Text Available Despite the widely accepted health benefits of regular physical activity, only a small percentage of the population meets the current recommendations. The reasons include a wide use of technology and a lack of enjoyment while exercising. The purpose of this study was to compare the physiological, perceptual and enjoyment responses between a single bout of (I conventional cycling and (II interactive cycling video game at a matched workload.A cross-sectional study in 34 healthy participants was performed. Initially, participants completed an incremental maximal cycling test to measure peak oxygen uptake and to determine ventilatory threshold. In random order, participants carried out a 30 min interactive cycling trial and a 30 min conventional cycling trial at 55% of peak power output. During the trials, oxygen uptake and energy expenditure were measured by open-circuit spirometry and heart rate was measured by radiotelemetry. RPE and enjoyment were measured every 10 minutes with Borg scale and a modified PACES scale.Interactive cycling resulted in a significantly greater %V̇O2Reserve (68.2% ± 9.2% vs 64.7% ± 8.1%, rate of energy expenditure (505.8±75.2 vs 487.4±81.2 j·kg-1·min-1, and enjoyment (63.4% ± 17 vs 42% ± 13.6, P<0.05. Participants were working at a higher intensity in relation to the individual's ventilatory threshold during the interactive cycling video game trial (M = 11.86, SE = 3.08 than during the Conventional cycling trial (M = 7.55, SE = 3.16, t(33 = -2.69, P<0.05, r = .42. No significant differences were found for heart rate reserve (72.5 ± 10.4 vs 71.4±10.1% and RPE (13.1 ± 1.8 vs 13.2 ± 1.7.Interactive cycling games can be a valid alternative to conventional exercise as they result in a higher exercise intensity than conventional cycling and a distraction from aversive cognitive and physiological states at and above the ventilatory threshold.

  12. Contesting French Aesthetics of Space and Nature Enjoyment in Moroccan Travel Writing in the 19th Century

    OpenAIRE

    Idrissi Alami, Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    In their travel writings about Europe in the 19th century, Moroccan visitors compare and contrast what they see of the European artistic designs and aesthetic values with experiences from their own native cultures. In this paper, I analyze the discourse and rhetoric about the enjoyment of nature, landscape design and leisure aesthetics as explored in the travel writing of the Moroccan traveler al-‘Amrāwī in his travelogue Tuḥfat al-Malik al-ʿAzīz bimamlakat Bārīz (1860). Here we see a signifi...

  13. Locomotor activity, enjoyment and perceived exertion from 7v7 football for patients with Parkinson’s disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Trine Kjeldgaard Tang; Madsen, Mads; Frederiksen, Jakob

    ’s disease. Methods: 14 men from a football team for patients with Parkinson’s disease carried out a 1-h training session , during which heart rate (HR), accelerations, effort and distances (total, high intensity and sprints) was measured with ZXY radio wave based technology. The participants were 63±6 years...... on a 40x40 m artificial turf football pitch with 1.5x3 m goals. After each activity perceived exertion for lower limbs and total body individually was rated on a visual analogue scale (0-10). After the whole session the participants filled out a PACES questionnaire to rate enjoyment of the session. Height...

  14. US PARTICLE ACCELERATOR SCHOOL: Summer schools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1989-11-15

    Continuing it's educational efforts, the US Particle Accelerator School (USPAS) held two summer schools this year. The USPAS has two basic purposes — education in accelerator physics and technology, in particular to train apprentices and update experts; and to encourage US universities and Laboratories to offer programmes in accelerator physics by developing textbooks, training faculty, and organizing schools.

  15. Soviet Union: Summer school goes international

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1990-09-15

    The traditional annual Soviet Summer School, held in June in Dubna on the banks of the Volga, this year had international participation for the first time. Initiated by Moscow's Physical Engineering Institute and the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, the school has rotating themes, with the accent this year on developments in high energy physics.

  16. Soviet Union: Summer school goes international

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    The traditional annual Soviet Summer School, held in June in Dubna on the banks of the Volga, this year had international participation for the first time. Initiated by Moscow's Physical Engineering Institute and the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, the school has rotating themes, with the accent this year on developments in high energy physics

  17. Summer Bridge's Effects on College Student Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bir, Beth; Myrick, Mondrail

    2015-01-01

    This study considered whether participation in a rigorous, intense summer bridge program had a significant effect on the academic success of African-American male and female students in developmental education, compared to nonparticipants, at a four-year Historically Black University in terms of retention, progression, and graduation from…

  18. Science Academies' Summer Research Fellowship Programme for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    2013-11-30

    Nov 30, 2013 ... Science Academies' Summer Research Fellowship Programme for. Students and Teachers – 2014. Sponspored by. Indian Academy of Sciences, Bangalore. Indian National Science Academy, New Delhi. The National Academy of Sciences, India, Allahabad. The three national science academies offer ...

  19. Summer Session: A Time for Innovation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mola, Monty

    2013-05-01

    Summer is almost here (at least for those of us who teach semesters). Many of us are taking a well-deserved break to spend time with our families, conduct research, travel, and myriad other activities. Some of us, however, will be teaching summer school. For those of us lucky enough to be teaching this summer, we have one suggestion: Be bold! Summer is the ideal time to try something new with your teaching. We have known for some time that alternative pedagogies and engaging teaching strategies can be more effective than traditional lectures as student learning environments. However, even with headlines in The Washington Post proclaiming that the lecture is dead,2 inroads of physics education research-based curricula have been slow to diffuse into the classrooms for the greater population of college physics instructors.3 Many instructors of traditional physics courses see the use of research-based instructional strategies (RBIS) as desirable but risky and time consuming.3 Assuming a traditional physics course structure, both the where and the when each component takes place can also limit the types of engaging pedagogies used.4

  20. Summer Principals'/Directors' Orientation Training Module.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mata, Robert L.; Garcia, Richard L.

    Intended to provide current or potential project principals/directors with the basic knowledge, skills, abilities, and sensitivities needed to manage a summer migrant school project in the local educational setting, this module provides instruction in the project management areas of planning, preparation, control, and termination. The module…

  1. The importance of the Summer Student Programme

    CERN Multimedia

    Laëtitia Pedroso

    2010-01-01

    As every year, the summer months see the arrival at CERN of summer students. Over a seven-week period beginning on the first Tuesday in June, students arrive at CERN for stays that will last from 8 to 13 weeks. This means that some of them are already coming to the end of their stay.   The 2010 Summer Students gathered in front of the Globe for the souvenir picture. For 2010, a total of almost 1 650 applications was received: 950 from students coming from Member States and 700 from other countries. Of these, 237 applications were accepted: 127 from the Member States,10  from the USA, 5 from Japan and 4 from Israel, and 91 from other countries. Each year, there are students from new countries, and this year CERN is welcoming students from the Philippines for the first time. “The number of applications has been growing steadily since the programme started in 1962,” reports Sharon Hobson, coordinator of the Summer Student Programme in the Recruitment Service. &ldqu...

  2. Can Text Messages Mitigate Summer Melt?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castleman, Benjamin L.; Page, Lindsay C.

    2013-01-01

    Higher education officials have long been familiar with the concept of "summer melt," where students who have paid a deposit to attend one college or university instead matriculate at a different institution, usually presumed to be of comparable quality. In previous research, drawing on longitudinal data from various urban school…

  3. The Johns Hopkins Hospital: A Summer Internship

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Adam Smith, a native of Richmond, Indiana, is an advanced pharmacy practice student in the College of Pharmacy at Purdue University. In this article, he describes how career exploration through a summer internship with The Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, Maryland solidified his desire to pursue a career in pharmacy administration.

  4. Tri-District Arts Consortium Summer Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, Charlotte O.

    1990-01-01

    The Tri-District Arts Consortium in South Carolina was formed to serve artistically gifted students in grades six-nine. The consortium developed a summer program offering music, dance, theatre, and visual arts instruction through a curriculum of intense training, performing, and hands-on experiences with faculty members and guest artists. (JDD)

  5. What Is Summer Vacation Costing Us?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henkel, Tara

    2010-01-01

    This paper explores the standard traditional summer vacation model; this includes the accompanying food insecurity, loss of nutrition and the lost knowledge that must be re-taught at the beginning of each new academic year. It compares the number of academic days attended in various Industrialized Nations compared to the United States. Also,…

  6. US PARTICLE ACCELERATOR SCHOOL: Summer schools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1989-01-01

    Continuing it's educational efforts, the US Particle Accelerator School (USPAS) held two summer schools this year. The USPAS has two basic purposes — education in accelerator physics and technology, in particular to train apprentices and update experts; and to encourage US universities and Laboratories to offer programmes in accelerator physics by developing textbooks, training faculty, and organizing schools

  7. Summer Research Fellowship Programme – 2015

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    2014-11-20

    Nov 20, 2014 ... Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research invites applications for its Summer. Research Fellowship Programme – 2015, for motivated and talented Indian students in Science and Engineering. Detailed information and application form can be downloaded from http://www.jncasr.ac.in/fe/srfp.

  8. "What I Did over My Summer Vacation..."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Techniques: Making Education and Career Connections, 1997

    1997-01-01

    A tech prep summer camp was designed to give ninth graders a taste of tech prep before they were asked to choose a high school path. Parents were invited to dinner to learn about tech prep programs and their potential for successful careers. (JOW)

  9. Snowmass Fusion Summer Study Group workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clement, S.

    1999-01-01

    The Snowmass Fusion Summer Study Group workshop, has taken place at Snowmass, Colorado, 11-23 July 1999. Its purpose was to discuss opportunities and directions in fusion energy science for the next decade. About 300 experts from all fields in the magnetic and inertial fusion communities attended, coming mostly from the US, but with some foreign participation

  10. Report on Fulbright Summer Seminar on Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christenson, Charles Elroy

    This resource packet was compiled by a participant in the Fulbright Summer Seminar on Indonesia. The materials provide information for teaching about the diaspora of Hinduism and Islamic beliefs throughout the southeast Asia archipelagoes and their influence on art and culture. The handouts supplement information on Indonesia as part of an Asian…

  11. Summer ecology of Indiana bats in Ohio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-01

    The Indiana bat (Myotis sodalis) is a tree roosting species found throughout the eastern United States that is federally listed as endangered by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. A more detailed understanding of summer roosting and foraging habitat...

  12. Associated Western Universities summer participant program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Summer 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, B.

    1997-08-01

    The Associated Western Universities, Inc. (AWU) supports a student summer program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). This program is structured so that honors undergraduate students may participate in the Laboratory`s research program under direct supervision of senior Laboratory scientists. Included in this report is a list of the AWU participants for the summer of 1997. All students are required to submit original reports of their summer activities in a format of their own choosing. These unaltered student reports constitute the major portion of this report.

  13. Exercise motivation, self-efficacy, and enjoyment as indicators of adult exercise behavior among the transtheoretical model stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroda, Yasufumi; Sato, Yasuto; Ishizaka, Yuko; Yamakado, Minoru; Yamaguchi, Naohito

    2012-03-01

    To better understand the role of motivation in determining exercise participation at the population level, we performed a questionnaire survey of 385 Japanese adults (mean age: 55.0 years, SD: 10.9 years). At baseline, the motivation subscales (intrinsic motivation, identified regulation, and external regulation), self-efficacy, and enjoyment all showed significant differences across the stages of change for exercise. Intrinsic motivation and enjoyment had similar findings, with the highest scores being noted in the maintenance stage. Among the 385 subjects, 183 completed the follow-up questionnaire 3 months later. After 3 months, most of the participants (86.9%) who were in the maintenance stage at baseline remained in the same stage. The number of participants who dropped to a lower stage after 3 months was 23. The changes of exercise stage over the 3-month period differed significantly for identified regulation, introjected regulation, and motivation. There were significant time and group interactions for intrinsic motivation and identified regulation. These findings suggest the importance of intrinsic motivation and identified regulation for performance of regular exercise, as well as the role of introjected regulation for promoting behavioral change among Japanese adults.

  14. Mealtime Structure and Responsive Feeding Practices Are Associated With Less Food Fussiness and More Food Enjoyment in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finnane, Julia M; Jansen, Elena; Mallan, Kimberley M; Daniels, Lynne A

    2017-01-01

    To identify associations between structure-related and non-responsive feeding practices and children's eating behaviors. Cross-sectional online survey design. Parents (n = 413) of 1- to 10-year-old children. Parental feeding practices and child eating behaviors were measured via the validated Feeding Practices and Structure and Children's Eating Behaviour questionnaires. Associations between parental feeding practices and children's eating behaviors were tested using hierarchical multivariable linear regression models, adjusted for covariates. Feeding practices accounted for 28% and 21% of the variance in food fussiness and enjoyment of food, respectively (P practices was practices were associated with lower food fussiness and higher enjoyment of food. Overall, the findings suggested that mealtime structure and responsive feeding are associated with more desirable eating behaviors. Contrary to predictions, there was no evidence to indicate that these practices are associated with better self-regulation of energy intake. Longitudinal research and intervention studies are needed to confirm the importance of these feeding practices for children's eating behaviors and weight outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Enhancing Collegiate Women’s Soccer Psychosocial and Performance Outcomes by Promoting Intrinsic Sources of Sport Enjoyment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott P. Barnicle, Damon Burton

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the effectiveness of an applied mental skills training (MST intervention utilizing mental skills to enhance intrinsic sources of enjoyment (ISOEs as a means of promoting self-confidence, motivational style, and athletic performance, while also decreasing trait anxiety. The intervention project was designed to increase intrinsic SOE using a systematic and individualized mental training protocol, and then examine its relationships to mental skills and soccer performance. A Division 1 collegiate women’s soccer team was randomly assigned to treatment (n = 8 and control (n = 11 groups, equally distributed by academic year, position, and pre-season coach-evaluated starters and non-starts. Results revealed that the MST intervention significantly increased intrinsic enjoyment targeted psychological and competitive outcomes, both in practice and competition within the treatment group as compared to the control group. This study’s support for the impact mental skills training may have had on ISOEs, as well as other psychosocial outcomes and athletic performance can serve to highlight a mental skill often overlooked by consultants and coaches.

  16. Job demands and resources and their associations with early retirement intentions through recovery need and work enjoyment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bert Schreurs

    2011-05-01

    Research purpose: The objective of this study was to examine the mechanisms through which job characteristics associate with early retirement intention, using the Job Demands-Resources (JD-R model as a theoretical framework. Motivation of the study: Early retirement presents a threat to existing health and pension systems, and to organisational functioning. Therefore, it is important to examine how workrelated factors contribute to early retirement decisions. Research design, approach and method: Two parallel processes were theorised to shape early retirement intention: a health impairment process (i.e. job demands → recovery need → early retirement intention and a motivational process (i.e. job resources → work enjoyment → early retirement intention. Survey data were collected from a heterogeneous sample of 1812 older workers (age > 45. Structural equation modeling was used to test the hypotheses. Main findings: Job demands and job resources were both associated with work enjoyment, which was associated with early retirement intention. Recovery need did not add to the prediction of early retirement intention. Practical/managerial implications: To retain older workers, companies should promote work conditions and practices that keep older workers motivated. Good health may be a necessary condition for retaining older workers, but it does not appear to be a sufficient one. Contribution/value-add: The results suggest that – for early retirement intention – the motivational process is more prominent than the health impairment process.

  17. Student Autonomy and its Effects on Student Enjoyment in a Traditional Mechanics Course for First-Year Engineering Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perera, Janaki I.; Quinlivan, Brendan T.; Simonovich, Jennifer A.; Towers, Emily; Zadik, Oren H.; Zastavker, Yevgeniya V.

    2012-02-01

    In light of recent literature in educational psychology, this study investigates instructional support and students' autonomy at a small technical undergraduate school. Grounded theory is used to analyze twelve semi-structured open-ended interviews about engineering students' experiences in Introductory Mechanics that includes Lecture, Recitation, and Laboratory components. Using data triangulation with each course component as a unit of analysis, this study examines students' course enjoyment as a function of instructional support and autonomy. The Lecture utilizes traditional instructor-centered pedagogy with predominantly passive learning and no student autonomy. The Recitation creates an active learning environment through small group work with a moderate degree of autonomy. The Laboratory is designed around self-guided project-based activities with significant autonomy. Despite these differences, all three course components provide similar levels of instructional support. The data reveal that students enjoy the low autonomy provided by Lecture and Recitations while finding the Laboratory frustrating. Analyses indicate that the differences in autonomy contribute to students' misinterpretation of the three course components' value within the context of the entire course.

  18. European summer temperatures since Roman times

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luterbacher, J; Werner, J P; Smerdon, J E; Fernández-Donado, L; González-Rouco, F J; Barriopedro, D; Ljungqvist, F C; Büntgen, U; Frank, D; Zorita, E; Wagner, S; Esper, J; McCarroll, D; Toreti, A; Jungclaus, J H; Bothe, O; Barriendos, M; Bertolin, C; Camuffo, D; Brázdil, R

    2016-01-01

    The spatial context is critical when assessing present-day climate anomalies, attributing them to potential forcings and making statements regarding their frequency and severity in a long-term perspective. Recent international initiatives have expanded the number of high-quality proxy-records and developed new statistical reconstruction methods. These advances allow more rigorous regional past temperature reconstructions and, in turn, the possibility of evaluating climate models on policy-relevant, spatio-temporal scales. Here we provide a new proxy-based, annually-resolved, spatial reconstruction of the European summer (June–August) temperature fields back to 755 CE based on Bayesian hierarchical modelling (BHM), together with estimates of the European mean temperature variation since 138 BCE based on BHM and composite-plus-scaling (CPS). Our reconstructions compare well with independent instrumental and proxy-based temperature estimates, but suggest a larger amplitude in summer temperature variability than previously reported. Both CPS and BHM reconstructions indicate that the mean 20th century European summer temperature was not significantly different from some earlier centuries, including the 1st, 2nd, 8th and 10th centuries CE. The 1st century (in BHM also the 10th century) may even have been slightly warmer than the 20th century, but the difference is not statistically significant. Comparing each 50 yr period with the 1951–2000 period reveals a similar pattern. Recent summers, however, have been unusually warm in the context of the last two millennia and there are no 30 yr periods in either reconstruction that exceed the mean average European summer temperature of the last 3 decades (1986–2015 CE). A comparison with an ensemble of climate model simulations suggests that the reconstructed European summer temperature variability over the period 850–2000 CE reflects changes in both internal variability and external forcing on multi-decadal time

  19. Alpbach Summer School - a unique learning experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, K.; Aulinas, J.; Clifford, D.; Krejci, D.; Topham, R.

    2011-12-01

    The Alpbach Summer School is a ten-day program that provides a unique opportunity for young european science and engineering students, both undergraduate and graduate, to learn how to approach the entire design process of a space mission. The theme of the 2010 Summer School was "New Space Missions to Understand Climate Change", a current, challenging, very broad and complex topic. The program was established more than 35 years ago and is organised in two interrelated parts: a series of lectures held by renowned experts in the field (in the case of this specific year, climate change and space engineering experts) that provides a technical and scientific background for the workshops that follow, the core of the Summer School. For the workshops the students are split into four international, interdisciplinary teams of about 15 students. In 2010 every team had to complete a number of tasks, four in total: (1) identify climate change research gaps and design a space mission that has not yet been flown or proposed, (2) define the science objectives and requirements of the mission, (3) design a spacecraft that meets the mission requirements, which includes spacecraft design and construction, payload definition, orbit calculations, but also the satellite launch, operation and mission costs and (4) write up a short mission proposal and present the results to an expert review panel. Achieving these tasks in only a few days in a multicultural, interdisciplinary team represents a major challenge for all participants and provides an excellent practical learning experience. Over the course of the program, students do not just learn facts about climate change and space engineering, but scientists also learn from engineers and engineers from scientists. The participants have to deepen their knowledge in an often unfamiliar field, develop organisational and team-work skills and work under pressure. Moreover, teams are supported by team and roving tutors and get the opportunity to

  20. Arctic summer school onboard an icebreaker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexeev, Vladimir A.; Repina, Irina A.

    2014-05-01

    The International Arctic Research Center (IARC) of the University of Alaska Fairbanks conducted a summer school for PhD students, post-docs and early career scientists in August-September 2013, jointly with an arctic expedition as a part of NABOS project (Nansen and Amundsen Basin Observational System) onboard the Russian research vessel "Akademik Fedorov". Both the summer school and NABOS expedition were funded by the National Science Foundation. The one-month long summer school brought together graduate students and young scientists with specialists in arctic oceanography and climate to convey to a new generation of scientists the opportunities and challenges of arctic climate observations and modeling. Young scientists gained hands-on experience during the field campaign and learned about key issues in arctic climate from observational, diagnostic, and modeling perspectives. The summer school consisted of background lectures, participation in fieldwork and mini-projects. The mini-projects were performed in collaboration with summer school instructors and members of the expedition. Key topics covered in the lectures included: - arctic climate: key characteristics and processes; - physical processes in the Arctic Ocean; - sea ice and the Arctic Ocean; - trace gases, aerosols, and chemistry: importance for climate changes; - feedbacks in the arctic system (e.g., surface albedo, clouds, water vapor, circulation); - arctic climate variations: past, ongoing, and projected; - global climate models: an overview. An outreach specialist from the Miami Science Museum was writing a blog from the icebreaker with some very impressive statistics (results as of January 1, 2014): Total number of blog posts: 176 Blog posts written/contributed by scientists: 42 Blog views: 22,684 Comments: 1,215 Number of countries who viewed the blog: 89 (on 6 continents) The 33-day long NABOS expedition started on August 22, 2013 from Kirkenes, Norway. The vessel ("Akademik Fedorov") returned to

  1. Influence of Western Tibetan Plateau Summer Snow Cover on East Asian Summer Rainfall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhibiao; Wu, Renguang; Chen, Shangfeng; Huang, Gang; Liu, Ge; Zhu, Lihua

    2018-03-01

    The influence of boreal winter-spring eastern Tibetan Plateau snow anomalies on the East Asian summer rainfall variability has been the focus of previous studies. The present study documents the impacts of boreal summer western and southern Tibetan Plateau snow cover anomalies on summer rainfall over East Asia. Analysis shows that more snow cover in the western and southern Tibetan Plateau induces anomalous cooling in the overlying atmospheric column. The induced atmospheric circulation changes are different corresponding to more snow cover in the western and southern Tibetan Plateau. The atmospheric circulation changes accompanying the western Plateau snow cover anomalies are more obvious over the midlatitude Asia, whereas those corresponding to the southern Plateau snow cover anomalies are more prominent over the tropics. As such, the western and southern Tibetan Plateau snow cover anomalies influence the East Asian summer circulation and precipitation through different pathways. Nevertheless, the East Asian summer circulation and precipitation anomalies induced by the western and southern Plateau snow cover anomalies tend to display similar distribution so that they are more pronounced when the western and southern Plateau snow cover anomalies work in coherence. Analysis indicates that the summer snow cover anomalies over the Tibetan Plateau may be related to late spring snow anomalies due to the persistence. The late spring snow anomalies are related to an obvious wave train originating from the western North Atlantic that may be partly associated with sea surface temperature anomalies in the North Atlantic Ocean.

  2. High-intensity interval and moderate-intensity continuous training elicit similar enjoyment and adherence levels in overweight and obese adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vella, Chantal A; Taylor, Katrina; Drummer, Devin

    2017-10-01

    High-intensity interval training (HIIT) has been shown to improve cardiometabolic health during supervised lab-based studies but adherence, enjoyment, and health benefits of HIIT performed independently are yet to be understood. We compared adherence, enjoyment, and cardiometabolic outcomes after 8 weeks of HIIT or moderate-intensity continuous training (MICT), matched for energy expenditure, in overweight and obese young adults. 17 adults were randomized to HIIT or MICT. After completing 12 sessions of supervised training over 3 weeks, participants were asked to independently perform HIIT or MICT for 30 min, 4 times/week for 5 weeks. Cardiometabolic outcomes included cardiorespiratory fitness (VO 2 peak), lipids, and inflammatory markers. Exercise enjoyment was measured by the validated Physical Activity Enjoyment Scale. Exercise adherence (93.4 ± 3.1% vs. 93.1 ± 3.7%, respectively) and mean enjoyment across the intervention (100.1 ± 4.3 vs. 100.3 ± 4.4, respectively) were high, with no differences between HIIT and MICT (p > .05). Similarly, enjoyment levels did not change over time in either group (p > .05). After training, HIIT exhibited a greater decrease in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol than MICT (-0.66 mmol L -1 vs. -0.03 mmol L -1 , respectively) and a greater increase in VO 2 peak than MICT (p HIIT (+0.5 pg mL -1 and + 31.4 nmol L -1 , respectively) and decreased in MICT (-0.6 pg mL -1 and -6.7 nmol L -1 , respectively, p HIIT is enjoyable and has high unsupervised adherence rates in overweight and obese adults. However, HIIT may be associated with an increase in inflammation with short-term exercise in this population.

  3. Pilot ETSON/JSP Summer School succeeds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoyos, A. de; Weber, S.

    2013-01-01

    The ETSON Summer School on 'nuclear reactor safety assessment' took place on 25 to 29 August 2008 at the GRS premises in Garching near Munich. The lecturers, coming from IRSN, GRS, Bel V and NNL, brought the participants insights in the similarities, as well as differences in European reactor concepts and their safety assessments. The most technical presentations dealt with the safety of nuclear reactors, nuclear accidents and their analysis, safety assessment and multilateral tools. 45 participants attended this summer school. Besides the lectures and group work, an optional technical visit of the new research reactor FRM-II (Heinz Maier-Leibnitz research neutron source) or a presentation of the GRS Simulation Centre was offered

  4. Ventures in science status report, Summer 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-11-01

    The Ventures in Science summer program is directed towards students who are from underrepresented minority groups in mathematics and science professions. The target group of 40 was drawn from eligible students who will be entering high school freshman in the fall of 1992. 450 students applied. The theme for the summer is Chicago as an Ecosystem. The students are instructed in integrated math and science (2 hours), English/ESL (1 1/2 hrs.), counseling (1 hr.) and, physical education (1 hr.) each day four days a week. Integrated math and science are team taught. Parents are invited to participate in two workshops that will be presented based on their input. Parents may also visit the program at any time and participate in any field trip.

  5. Summer Mini Atomiade in June 2016

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    The Mini Atomiade are coming to CERN! Members of Clubs supported by the CERN Staff Association and in conjunction with ASCERI (Association of the Sports Communities of the European Research Institutes) will be organising the summer games at the beginning of June.   ASCERI aims to contribute to a united Europe through regular sports meetings, bringing together members of public Research Institutes at European level. The Association's members come from over 40 Research Institutes spanning 16 countries. Numerous sports and leisure activities are represented at regular events and each tournament is organised by a different research institute.  Clubs in conjunction with the CERN Staff Association have sent teams to previous winter and summer games and now, the CERN Club’s Coordination Committee (CCC) has taken on the challenge of organising a Mini Atomiade from Friday 3 June to Monday 6 June 2016 in Divonne-les-Bains. The ga...

  6. 2015 CERN-Fermilab HCP Summer School

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    CERN and Fermilab are jointly offering a series of "Hadron Collider Physics Summer Schools", to prepare young researchers for these exciting times. The school has alternated between CERN and Fermilab, and will return to CERN for the tenth edition, from 24 June to 3 July 2015. The CERN-Fermilab Hadron Collider Physics Summer School is an advanced school targeted particularly at young postdocs and senior PhD students working towards the completion of their thesis project, in both Experimental High Energy Physics (HEP) and phenomenology. Lecture Topics include: Statistics in HEP, Heavy Flavour, Heavy Ion, Standard Model, Higgs searches and measurements, BSM theory, BSM searches, Top physics, QCD and Monte Carlos, Accelerators, Detectors for the future, Trigger and DAQ, Dark Matter Astroparticle, and two special lectures on Future Colliders, and 20 years after the top discovery. Calendar and Details: Mark your calendar for  24 June - 3 July 2015, when CERN will welcome students to t...

  7. Developing High School Geoscientists through Summer Internships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saltzman, J.

    2012-12-01

    High school students in the San Francisco Bay Area have the opportunity to contribute to Earth sciences research during the summer at Stanford University. The School of Earth Sciences hosts about 25 high school students each summer to support ongoing research, through more than just washing glassware. To increase diversity in the geosciences, we select students from diverse backgrounds through an application process which lessens the burden on busy faculty. The students work for 15-20 hours per week under the supervision of graduate students or postdoctoral fellows. The supervisors come to value the interns for a few reasons: not only are they getting some extra help with their research, but they are getting teaching experience in an informal but powerful way and supervising the interns' work over the summer. Another key part of the internship is bringing all of the interns together regularly. Whether it is for career talks, lab tours or field trip, high school students find kindred spirits in the group. Another important reason for weekly gatherings is to introduce the students to the wide field of Earth sciences and the different approaches and paths that scientists take. The summer ends with a culminating event where interns make short informal presentations about their research which give them an opportunity to articulate the big questions they have been helping to answer. Some interns are also invited to present a poster in a session for high school students at the Fall AGU meeting. These experiences of working in the laboratory and communicating about the research are part of the world of Earth sciences that are absent for most youth. The high school internships foster good will between Stanford and the local communities, help develop a more Earth and environmentally knowledgeable public and may have a long-term affect on diversifying the geosciences by exposing more young people to these fields.

  8. Closeout Report for CTEQ Summer School 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Tao [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2016-05-30

    The CTEQ Collaboration is an informal group of 37 experimental and theoretical high energy physicists from 20 universities and 5 national labs, engaged in a program to advance research in and understanding of QCD. This program includes the well-known collaborative project on global QCD analysis of parton distributions, the organization of a variety of workshops, periodic collaboration meetings, and the subject of this proposal: the CTEQ Summer Schools on QCD Analysis and Phenomenology.

  9. Innovation in medical education: summer studentships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleland, Jennifer; Engel, Naomi; Dunlop, Ross; Kay, Christine

    2010-03-01

    few doctors choose academic medicine as a career. Reasons suggested for this include a lack of exposure. Thus, we wished to broaden the opportunities available for undergraduate medical students to experience academic medicine, specifically medical education. The approach selected was to establish a programme of competitive Teaching Development Awards: the 'Summer Studentship Scheme'. this article describes the approach taken, including an overview of the organisation of the Summer Studentship Scheme, and provides preliminary data on gains from the programme. Twenty studentships were funded over a 3-year period. The projects covered a wide range of topics. Information on what the students gained from the projects and supervisor views of the programme were sought by questionnaire and self-reflective statements. the academic gains to date include nine presentations at national conferences and four published papers. All student respondents (87%) agreed that they would recommend a summer studentship to another student. Supervising a studentship (86% response rate) was seen as a positive experience. a relatively small level of funding can lead to great gains, in terms of academic output, internally, and in terms of external dissemination, as well as in gains to participating students and staff. We plan to track the career developments of participating students to see if they are more likely to pursue academic medicine as their peers. Blackwell Publishing Ltd 2010.

  10. Effects of Exergame Play on EF in Children and Adolescents at a Summer Camp for Low Income Youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Rachel M; Richert, Rebekah A; Staiano, Amanda E; Wartella, Ellen; Calvert, Sandra L

    2014-01-01

    Past research has suggested exergame play improves adolescents' executive function (EF) skills. EF change in 70 African American and Hispanic/Latino 10- to 16-year-olds participating in an inner-city summer camp was assessed following five 30-minute exergame play sessions. Children's EF scores improved from pre- to posttest, and factors related to this change were examined. The number of exergame sessions the participants attended predicted posttest scores. In addition, level of achievement during game play was related to EF scores. Finally, the children's level of enjoyment was not related to EF; however, frustration and boredom during game play were negatively related to EF. The findings are discussed in terms of their implications for the relationship between exergame play and cognitive benefits for adolescent players.

  11. Center for Computing Research Summer Research Proceedings 2015.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradley, Andrew Michael [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Parks, Michael L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-12-18

    The Center for Computing Research (CCR) at Sandia National Laboratories organizes a summer student program each summer, in coordination with the Computer Science Research Institute (CSRI) and Cyber Engineering Research Institute (CERI).

  12. A River Summer on the Hudson

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenna, T. C.; Pfirman, S.; Selleck, B.; Son, L.; Land, M.; Cronin, J.

    2006-12-01

    River Summer is a month-long faculty development program extending from the continental shelf off New York City to the headwaters of the Hudson in the Adirondack Mountains. During the program, faculty from the Environmental Consortium of Hudson Valley Colleges and Universities teach each other about the Hudson environment, using innovative methods of teaching and learning, with a focus on incorporation of hands-on approaches from the perspective of multiple disciplines. Over four weeks, faculty from research universities, community colleges, liberal arts institutions, and middle and high schools work and live together, on board a research vessel or in a remote tent campsite, for several days at a time. Using the geology, hydrology, and landscape of the River as a foundation, River Summer focuses on understanding development of the Hudson within the context of its natural resources and cultural history. Participants conduct field sampling and analyses and consider issues through approaches that are common to many disciplines: scaling for problem solving; sampling and assessing bias and representation; observing and documenting; representing and depicting; interpretation and assessing relationships and causality; and evaluation. They also get a chance to experience, first-hand, the complexity and often open-ended nature of doing science. By allowing individuals, many of whom come from non-science disciplines, to experience these methods and processes in a safe learning environment, science is made more meaningful and accessible. The program's pedagogy is based on the principles of cognitive psychology and immersive field-, place- and inquiry-based learning. Field programs have been found to provide memorable, transformative experiences for undergraduate students, and our experience with River Summer 2005 and 2006 suggests they are equally effective with faculty. Evaluation shows that River Summer has a significant impact on its participants. Participants develop new

  13. 76 FR 23177 - Exchange Visitor Program-Summer Work Travel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-26

    ...--Summer Work Travel AGENCY: Department of State. ACTION: Interim final rule with request for comment... below, this rule modifies the Summer Work Travel regulations by establishing different employment..., the Department is establishing a new Summer Work Travel framework that recognizes potential underlying...

  14. Specialized Summer Camps: Provide Benefits for Children and Families Alike

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neff, John M.

    2009-01-01

    The arrival of summer signals a season of endless days of swimming, fishing, summer camps, and other outdoor activities. For children with chronic or terminal illnesses, it can be difficult to participate in many of these activities as well as challenging for parents to find summer camps that not only engage their children, but also offer the…

  15. Pengaruh Perceived Ease of Use, Enjoyment dan Trust Terhadap Repurchase Intention dengan Customer Satisfaction Sebagai Intervening pada Belanja Online (Studi Pada Mahasiswa Universitas Tanjungpura Pontianak

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juniwati Juniwati

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to determine the influence of perceived ease of use, perceived enjoyment, and trust on customer satisfaction and repurchase intention in online shopping of apparel. The design of the study is a survey research with type of research is explanatory, sample used of 100 people. The data analysis technique used is path analysis. The results showed that perceived ease of use variable has no significant influence on customer satisfaction, while perceived enjoyment and trusts have positive and significant influence on customer satisfaction. The results also showed that perceived enjoyment and customer satisfaction has no significant influence on repurchase intention, while perceived ease of use and trust has positive and significant influence on repurchase intention.

  16. THE EFFECT OF USEFULNESS, EASE OF USE, AND ENJOYMENT TOWARDS ATTITUDE AND INTENTION TO USE E-READER: STUDY ON JAKARTA STATE UNIVERSITY’S STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahmi Rahmi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research is to understand the effect of usefulness, ease of use, and enjoyment towards attitude and intention to use electronic book reader (e-reader. The conceptual model refers to Technology Acceptance Model theory. The research uses single cross-sectional descriptive research design to test the relationship among variables. Data is gathered with self-administered questionnaire survey method with Jakarta State University;s students as respondents. Hypotheses are tested with Structural Equation Model (SEM. The result shows that attitude still holds important role in forming intention, enjoyment comes as the strongest determinant for attitude and intention which emphasizes the hedonic value of e-reader, usefulness indirectly affects intention through attitude, and ease of use only affects usefulness and enjoyment but not attitude.

  17. High-intensity interval running is perceived to be more enjoyable than moderate-intensity continuous exercise: implications for exercise adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Jonathan D; Close, Graeme L; MacLaren, Don P M; Gregson, Warren; Drust, Barry; Morton, James P

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this study was to objectively quantify ratings of perceived enjoyment using the Physical Activity Enjoyment Scale following high-intensity interval running versus moderate-intensity continuous running. Eight recreationally active men performed two running protocols consisting of high-intensity interval running (6 × 3 min at 90% VO(2max) interspersed with 6 × 3 min active recovery at 50% VO(2max) with a 7-min warm-up and cool down at 70% VO(2max)) or 50 min moderate-intensity continuous running at 70% VO(2max). Ratings of perceived enjoyment after exercise were higher (P running compared with continuous running (88 ± 6 vs. 61 ± 12) despite higher (P running may be relevant for improving exercise adherence, since running is a low-cost exercise intervention requiring no exercise equipment and similar relative exercise intensities have previously induced health benefits in patient populations.

  18. Goodbye to Summer Vacation? The Effects of Summer Enrollment on College and Employment Outcomes. A CAPSEE Working Paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Vivian Yuen Ting

    2016-01-01

    Despite rich evidence on the benefit of summer enrollment at the K-12 level, the college completion literature has so far focused on college readiness, remediation, and financial aid, and has largely overlooked the potential benefits of taking summer courses among college students. Academic momentum theory suggests that summer enrollment may…

  19. The effect of running versus cycling high-intensity intermittent exercise on local tissue oxygenation and perceived enjoyment in 18–30-year-old sedentary men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Colin

    2018-01-01

    Background High-intensity interval training (HIIT) has been proposed as a time-efficient exercise format to improve exercise adherence, thereby targeting the chronic disease burden associated with sedentary behaviour. Exercise mode (cycling, running), if self-selected, will likely affect the physiological and enjoyment responses to HIIT in sedentary individuals. Differences in physiological and enjoyment responses, associated with the mode of exercise, could potentially influence the uptake and continued adherence to HIIT. It was hypothesised that in young sedentary men, local and systemic oxygen utilisation and enjoyment would be higher during a session of running HIIT, compared to a session of cycling HIIT. Methods A total of 12 sedentary men (mean ± SD; age 24 ± 3 years) completed three exercise sessions: a maximal incremental exercise test on a treadmill (MAX) followed by two experiment conditions, (1) free-paced cycling HIIT on a bicycle ergometer (HIITCYC) and (2) constant-paced running HIIT on a treadmill ergometer (HIITRUN). Deoxygenated haemoglobin (HHb) in the gastrocnemius (GN), the left vastus lateralis (LVL) and the right vastus lateralis (RVL) muscles, oxygen consumption (VO2), heart rate (HR), ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) and physical activity enjoyment (PACES) were measured during HIITCYC and HIITRUN. Results There was a higher HHb in the LVL (p = 0.001) and RVL (p = 0.002) sites and a higher VO2 (p = 0.017) and HR (p HIIT produces higher levels of physiological stress when compared to constant-paced running HIIT. Participants perceived running HIIT to be more enjoyable than cycling HIIT. These findings have implications for selection of mode of HIIT for physical stress, exercise enjoyment and compliance.

  20. The effect of running versus cycling high-intensity intermittent exercise on local tissue oxygenation and perceived enjoyment in 18-30-year-old sedentary men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriel, Yuri; Askew, Christopher D; Solomon, Colin

    2018-01-01

    High-intensity interval training (HIIT) has been proposed as a time-efficient exercise format to improve exercise adherence, thereby targeting the chronic disease burden associated with sedentary behaviour. Exercise mode (cycling, running), if self-selected, will likely affect the physiological and enjoyment responses to HIIT in sedentary individuals. Differences in physiological and enjoyment responses, associated with the mode of exercise, could potentially influence the uptake and continued adherence to HIIT. It was hypothesised that in young sedentary men, local and systemic oxygen utilisation and enjoyment would be higher during a session of running HIIT, compared to a session of cycling HIIT. A total of 12 sedentary men (mean ± SD; age 24 ± 3 years) completed three exercise sessions: a maximal incremental exercise test on a treadmill (MAX) followed by two experiment conditions, (1) free-paced cycling HIIT on a bicycle ergometer (HIITCYC) and (2) constant-paced running HIIT on a treadmill ergometer (HIITRUN). Deoxygenated haemoglobin (HHb) in the gastrocnemius (GN), the left vastus lateralis (LVL) and the right vastus lateralis (RVL) muscles, oxygen consumption (VO 2 ), heart rate (HR), ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) and physical activity enjoyment (PACES) were measured during HIITCYC and HIITRUN. There was a higher HHb in the LVL ( p = 0.001) and RVL ( p = 0.002) sites and a higher VO 2 ( p = 0.017) and HR ( p HIIT produces higher levels of physiological stress when compared to constant-paced running HIIT. Participants perceived running HIIT to be more enjoyable than cycling HIIT. These findings have implications for selection of mode of HIIT for physical stress, exercise enjoyment and compliance.

  1. Effects of Home Access to Active Videogames on Child Self-Esteem, Enjoyment of Physical Activity, and Anxiety Related to Electronic Games: Results from a Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Rebecca A; Smith, Anne J; Howie, Erin K; Pollock, Clare; Straker, Leon

    2014-08-01

    Active-input videogames could provide a useful conduit for increasing physical activity by improving a child's self-confidence, physical activity enjoyment, and reducing anxiety. Therefore this study evaluated the impact of (a) the removal of home access to traditional electronic games or (b) their replacement with active-input videogames, on child self-perception, enjoyment of physical activity, and electronic game use anxiety. This was a crossover, randomized controlled trial, conducted over a 6-month period in participants' family homes in metropolitan Perth, Australia, from 2007 to 2010. Children 10-12 years old were recruited through school and community media. Of 210 children who were eligible, 74 met inclusion criteria, and 8 withdrew, leaving 66 children (33 girls) for analysis. A counterbalanced randomized order of three conditions sustained for 8 weeks each: No home access to electronic games, home access to traditional electronic games, and home access to active-input electronic games. Perception of self-esteem (Harter's Self Perception Profile for Children), enjoyment of physical activity (Physical Activity Enjoyment Scale questionnaire), and anxiety toward electronic game use (modified Loyd and Gressard Computer Anxiety Subscale) were assessed. Compared with home access to traditional electronic games, neither removal of all electronic games nor replacement with active-input games resulted in any significant change to child self-esteem, enjoyment of physical activity, or anxiety related to electronic games. Although active-input videogames have been shown to be enjoyable in the short term, their ability to impact on psychological outcomes is yet to be established.

  2. Fourteenth Exotic Beam Summer School EBSS 2015

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiedenhoever, Ingo

    2016-01-01

    The Fourteenth Annual Exotic Beam Summer School EBSS 2015 was held August 2nd - August 7th, 2015, and belongs to the series of summer programs aimed at educating future workforce in nuclear physics-related areas, mostly about the challenges of radioactive ion beam physics. Through these schools the research community will be able to exploit fully the opportunities created by the exotic beam facilities. These facilities in the US include CARIBU at ANL, the NSCL and the future FRIB laboratory as well as smaller-scale university laboratories. The skill set needed by the future workforce is very diverse and a fundamental understanding of theoretical, technical, computational and applied fields are all important. Therefore, the Exotic Beam Summer Schools follow a unique approach, in which the students not only receive lectures but also participate in hands-on activities. The lectures covered broad topics in both the experimental and theoretical physics of nuclei far from stability as well as radioactive ions production and applications. The afternoons provided opportunities for 'hands-on' projects with experimental equipment and techniques useful in FRIB research. Five activities were performed in groups of eight students, rotating through the activities over the five afternoons of the school. The center of the activities was an experiment at the FSU tandem accelerator, measuring the angular distribution and cross section of the "1"2C(d,p)"1"3C transfer reaction, measured with a silicon telescope in a scattering chamber. The experimental data were analyzed by performing a DWBA calculation with the program DWUCK, and the resulting spectroscopic factors were compared to a shell model calculation. The other activities included target preparation, digital gamma-spectroscopy and modern neutron detection methods.

  3. Fourteenth Exotic Beam Summer School EBSS 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiedenhoever, Ingo [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States). Dept. of Physics

    2016-07-11

    The Fourteenth Annual Exotic Beam Summer School EBSS 2015 was held August 2nd - August 7th, 2015, and belongs to the series of summer programs aimed at educating future workforce in nuclear physics-related areas, mostly about the challenges of radioactive ion beam physics. Through these schools the research community will be able to exploit fully the opportunities created by the exotic beam facilities. These facilities in the US include CARIBU at ANL, the NSCL and the future FRIB laboratory as well as smaller-scale university laboratories. The skill set needed by the future workforce is very diverse and a fundamental understanding of theoretical, technical, computational and applied fields are all important. Therefore, the Exotic Beam Summer Schools follow a unique approach, in which the students not only receive lectures but also participate in hands-on activities. The lectures covered broad topics in both the experimental and theoretical physics of nuclei far from stability as well as radioactive ions production and applications. The afternoons provided opportunities for "hands-on" projects with experimental equipment and techniques useful in FRIB research. Five activities were performed in groups of eight students, rotating through the activities over the five afternoons of the school. The center of the activities was an experiment at the FSU tandem accelerator, measuring the angular distribution and cross section of the 12C(d,p)13C transfer reaction, measured with a silicon telescope in a scattering chamber. The experimental data were analyzed by performing a DWBA calculation with the program DWUCK, and the resulting spectroscopic factors were compared to a shell model calculation. The other activities included target preparation, digital gamma-spectroscopy and modern neutron detection methods.

  4. 2016 LLNL Nuclear Forensics Summer Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zavarin, Mavrik [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-11-15

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Nuclear Forensics Summer Program is designed to give graduate students an opportunity to come to LLNL for 8–10 weeks for a hands-on research experience. Students conduct research under the supervision of a staff scientist, attend a weekly lecture series, interact with other students, and present their work in poster format at the end of the program. Students also have the opportunity to meet staff scientists one-on-one, participate in LLNL facility tours (e.g., the National Ignition Facility and Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry), and gain a better understanding of the various science programs at LLNL.

  5. Joint Force Quarterly. Number 19, Summer 1998

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-08-01

    with original pagina - tion and issue markings at the bottom corner of each folio. However, a ring folios8 has been added at the bottom center which...Defense University World Wide Web (http://www.ndu.edu/inss/books/books.html). 0719 Owens Pgs 11/17/98 6:16 PM Page 27 72 JFQ / Summer 1993 28 roles...World Wide Web . However, contentious issues remain in certain areas which must be resolved at service chief or CINC level. Moreover, the best hope for

  6. 2017 LLNL Nuclear Forensics Summer Internship Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zavarin, Mavrik [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-12-13

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Nuclear Forensics Summer Internship Program (NFSIP) is designed to give graduate students an opportunity to come to LLNL for 8-10 weeks of hands-on research. Students conduct research under the supervision of a staff scientist, attend a weekly lecture series, interact with other students, and present their work in poster format at the end of the program. Students can also meet staff scientists one-on-one, participate in LLNL facility tours (e.g., the National Ignition Facility and Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry), and gain a better understanding of the various science programs at LLNL.

  7. 2017 Landsat Science Team Summer Meeting Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Christopher J.; Loveland, Thomas R.; Wulder, Michael A.; Irons, James R.

    2018-01-01

    The summer meeting of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS)-NASA Landsat Science Team (LST) was held June 11-13, 2017, at the USGS’s Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) Center near Sioux Falls, SD. This was the final meeting of the Second (2012-2017) LST.1 Frank Kelly [EROS—Center Director] welcomed the attendees and expressed his thanks to the LST members for their contributions. He then introduced video-recorded messages from South Dakota’s U.S. senators, John Thune and Mike Rounds, in which they acknowledged the efforts of the team in advancing the societal impacts of the Landsat Program.

  8. Algebraic Geometry and Number Theory Summer School

    CERN Document Server

    Sarıoğlu, Celal; Soulé, Christophe; Zeytin, Ayberk

    2017-01-01

    This lecture notes volume presents significant contributions from the “Algebraic Geometry and Number Theory” Summer School, held at Galatasaray University, Istanbul, June 2-13, 2014. It addresses subjects ranging from Arakelov geometry and Iwasawa theory to classical projective geometry, birational geometry and equivariant cohomology. Its main aim is to introduce these contemporary research topics to graduate students who plan to specialize in the area of algebraic geometry and/or number theory. All contributions combine main concepts and techniques with motivating examples and illustrative problems for the covered subjects. Naturally, the book will also be of interest to researchers working in algebraic geometry, number theory and related fields.

  9. Summer Student Report Paula Aschenbrenner VITO

    CERN Document Server

    Aschenbrenner, Paula

    2016-01-01

    The L’APOLLINE (LAser POLarized LINE) is set up at VITO (Versatile Ion-polarized Techniques Online) beam line at ISOLDE. It will provide laser-induced spin-polarized beams of atoms or ions to an end station. In this report the L’APOLLINE setup is explained and the current status is stated. Furthermore the summer student work and the most important results are summarized. The project was mainly connected to the generation of the magnetic field in the drift tube for optical polarization. The field is created by a set of Helmholtz Coils.

  10. 2016 LLNL Nuclear Forensics Summer Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zavarin, Mavrik

    2016-01-01

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Nuclear Forensics Summer Program is designed to give graduate students an opportunity to come to LLNL for 8-10 weeks for a hands-on research experience. Students conduct research under the supervision of a staff scientist, attend a weekly lecture series, interact with other students, and present their work in poster format at the end of the program. Students also have the opportunity to meet staff scientists one-on-one, participate in LLNL facility tours (e.g., the National Ignition Facility and Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry), and gain a better understanding of the various science programs at LLNL.

  11. European summer temperatures since Roman times

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Luterbacher, J.; Werner, J. P.; Smerdon, J. E.; Fernandez-Donado, L.; González-Rouco, J. F.; Barriopedro, D.; Ljungqvist, F. C.; Büntgen, Ulf; Zorita, E.; Wagner, S.; Esper, J.; McCarroll, D.; Toreti, A.; Frank, D.; Jungclaus, J.; Barriendos, M.; Bertolin, C.; Bothe, O.; Brázdil, Rudolf; Camuffo, D.; Dobrovolný, Petr; Gagen, M.; Garica-Bustamante, E.; Ge, Q.; Gomez-Navarro, J. J.; Guiot, J.; Hao, Z.; Hegerl, G.; Holmgren, K.; Klimenko, V. V.; Martin-Chivelet, J.; Pfister, C.; Roberts, N.; Schindler, A.; Schurer, A.; Solomina, O.; von Gunten, L.; Wahl, E.; Wanner, H.; Wetter, O.; Xoplaki, E.; Yuan, N.; Zanchettin, D.; Zhang, H.; Zerefos, C.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 2 (2016), č. článku 024001. ISSN 1748-9326 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-04291S Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : reconstructing climate anomalies * high-resolution paleoclimatology * northern-hemisphere temperature * tree-ring chronologies * last 1000 years * volcanic - eruptions * forcing reconstructions * bayesian algorithm * pmip simulations * past millennium * Common Era * heat waves * paleoclimatology * Bayesian hierarchical modelling * European summer temperature reconstruction * ensemble of climate model simulations * Medieval Climate Anomaly Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology Impact factor: 4.404, year: 2016

  12. Summer Undergraduate Research Program: Environmental studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMillan, J. [ed.

    1994-12-31

    The purpose of the summer undergraduate internship program for research in environmental studies is to provide an opportunity for well-qualified students to undertake an original research project as an apprentice to an active research scientist in basic environmental research. The students are offered research topics at the Medical University in the scientific areas of pharmacology and toxicology, epidemiology and risk assessment, environmental microbiology, and marine sciences. Students are also afforded the opportunity to work with faculty at the University of Charleston, SC, on projects with an environmental theme. Ten well-qualified students from colleges and universities throughout the eastern United States were accepted into the program.

  13. The Implementation of Role-Playing Model in Principles of Finance Accounting Learning to Improve Students’ Enjoyment and Students’ Test Scores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Saptono

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This research is a classroom action research. The goal of conducting this research is to improve students’ enjoyment level and their test scores by implementing role-playing method. The research is conducted in Accounting Education Study Program of Sanata Dharma University at odd semester on academic year 2010/2011. The participants were divided into two classes. The first class was the class that got the treatment, while the second class was the control class. The result of the study showed that there was an improvement of students’ enjoyment level and test scores in the class which implemented role-playing method.

  14. Summer fallow soil management - impact on rainfed winter wheat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Fucui; Wang, Zhaohui; Dai, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Summer fallow soil management is an important approach to improve soil and crop management in dryland areas. In the Loess Plateau regions, the annual precipitation is low and varies annually and seasonally, with more than 60% concentrated in the summer months from July to September, which...... is the summer fallow period in the winter wheat-summer fallow cropping system. With bare fallow in summer as a control, a 3-year location-fixed field experiment was conducted in the Loess Plateau to investigate the effects of wheat straw retention (SR), green manure (GM) planting, and their combination on soil...... water retention (WR) during summer fallow, winter wheat yield, and crop water use and nitrogen (N) uptake. The results showed that SR increased soil WR during summer fallow by 20 mm on average compared with the control over 3 experimental years but reduced the grain yield by 8% in the third year...

  15. CERN SUMMER SCHOOL 2015 PROJECT REPORT

    CERN Document Server

    Jin, Zizhuo Tony

    2015-01-01

    The context of this internship is the CERN summer student program for the year 2015. As a member of the CERN summer school, I have been assigned, in addition to the classes I attended in the morning, a scientific project within the BE-ABP-HSC section. This work was done under the directions of Benoit Salvant and Nicolo Biancacci whom I thank greatly for their help, patience and teaching. The project consisted in observing the effects generated by the beam passing through various devices. We focused mainly on the electromagnetic waves generated by beams of particles travelling along two of the accelerator's devices: A wire scanner and the TDI (LHC injection beam stopper). These Simulations are of importance to estimate the effect of the beam onto the surrounding apparatus and ensuring both that the latter doesn't get damaged and that the beam doesn't lose too much energy. All the models and simulations were done using c CST STUDIO SUITE software developed by the c CST company.

  16. LS1 Report: A cold, cold summer

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2014-01-01

    The cooling of the LHC is advancing quickly, with the second sector having now reached 200 K (about -73°C). By the end of the summer, four of the sectors will have been cooled. To achieve this, trucks carrying around 20 tonnes of nitrogen each are clocking up the miles to bring the cryogenic liquid to CERN. When the whole process is complete, almost four times the mass of the Eiffel Tower will have been cooled, using more than 10,000 tonnes of nitrogen and 140 tonnes of helium.   Liquid nitrogen, arriving to CERN on trucks, is injected into exchangers that pre-cool the helium flow used to cool the magnets. Cooling a sector (about 3 kilometres long) of the LHC is a fairly complex operation involving several stages. This summer, for the first time, the first two sectors will be cooled to 20 K (and not directly to the nominal temperature of 1.9 K) and will be maintained at this temperature for two weeks. “This plateau is necessary to allow the teams to carry out check...

  17. Cosmic vibes: CERN raves at summer festivals

    CERN Multimedia

    Connie Potter

    2016-01-01

    This summer, CERN appeared at various festivals in the UK.   The inaugural Physics Pavilion at the 2016 WOMAD festival received over 3600 visitors. (Image: CERN) This summer, CERN’s outreach efforts took a step in a completely new direction as the group participated at various festivals. Following an invitation from the European Science Open Forum 2016 held in Manchester, UK, to be part of the Bluedot Festival, we produced an hour-long musical presentation with a physics theme. This featured the “Cosmic Piano”, created by Arturo Fernandez Tellez and Guillermo Tejeda Muñoz of ALICE, and a piece created from the sonification of LHC data by Domenico Vicinanza and Genevieve Williams, of Anglia Ruskin University. On a much bigger scale, we (the outreach team) collaborated with the WOMAD Festival, to host its first World of Physics in the middle of the English countryside. The result was a three-day programme of talks including “What’s the Ma...

  18. LHC Report: Summer temperatures in the LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    Jan Uythoven for the LHC Team

    2012-01-01

    The LHC experiments have finished their data-taking period before the summer conferences. The machine has already delivered substantially more collisions to the experiments this year than in the whole of 2011. The LHC has now started a six-day Machine Development period, which will be followed by the second Technical Stop of the year.   The number of collisions delivered to the experiments is expressed in integrated luminosity. In 2011, the integrated luminosity delivered to both ATLAS and CMS was around 5.6 fb-1. On Monday 18 June, experiments finished taking data before the summer conferences and the integrated luminosity for 2012 so far is about 6.6 fb-1, well above the unofficial target of 5 fb-1. The LHC’s performance over the last week of running was so efficient that the injection kicker magnets – which heat up due to the circulating beam – did not have time to cool down between the subsequent fills. As the time constants for warming up and cooli...

  19. Summer Camp of the CERN Staff Association

    CERN Document Server

    Staff Association

    2017-01-01

    A Journey to Discover the Four Elements Over the past few years, the Children’s Day-Care Centre and School (EVEE) of the CERN Staff Association has transformed into a summer camp for the four weeks of July. Every year, this summer camp welcomes up to 40 children from 4 to 6 years old. The camp offers a rich and varied program. This year, the theme was the four elements of life, and the children set out on a journey to discover a different element every week: WATER was the theme of the first week. What is water? What purpose does it serve? Where can we find it? With these questions and many others in mind, the children set out on a cruise, sailing across Lake Geneva to visit the Lake Geneva Museum in Nyon. All through the week, the children were able to discover the different properties of water by carrying out various scientific experiments. For instance, getting soaked can certainly help observe a simple property of water: it’s wet! Giggles guaranteed. The children made fancy hats and e...

  20. XIII Modave Summer School in Mathematical Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    The Modave Summer School on Mathematical Physics is a yearly summer school in topics of theoretical physics. Various topics ranging from quantum gravity and cosmology to theoretical particle physics and string theory. The school takes place in Modave, a charming village in the Belgian Ardennes close to Huy. Modave School is organised by PhD students for PhD students, and this makes it rather unique. The courses are taught by Post-Docs or late PhD students, and they are all made of pedagogical, basic blackboard lectures about recent topics in theoretical physics. Participants and lecturers eat and sleep in the same place where the lectures are given. The absence of senior members, and the fact of spending day and night together in an isolated, peaceful place contribute to creating an informal atmosphere and facilitating interactions. Lectures of the thirteenth edition are centered around the following subjects: bulk reconstruction in AdS/CFT, twistor theory, AdS_2/CFT_1 and SYK, geometry and topology, and asymptotic charges.

  1. SHARP {Summer High School Apprenticeship Research Program}

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasco, Deborah (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Year 2002 was another successful year for SHARP. Even after 22 years of SHARP, the Program continues to grow. There were 12 NASA Field Installations with a total of 210 apprentices who participated in the summer 2002 Program supported by 215 mentors in the fields of science and engineering. The apprentices were chosen from a pool of 1,379 applicants. This was a record year for applications exceeding the previous year by over 60%. For the second consecutive year, the number of female participants exceeded the number of males with 53% female and 47% male participants in the program. The main thrust of our recruiting efforts is still focused on underrepresented populations; especially African American, Hispanic, and Native American. At the conclusion of the summer program, most SHARP Apprentices indicated on the EDCATS that they would be interested in pursuing careers in Aerospace (56.2%) while the second largest career choice was a job at NASA (45.7%). The smallest number (11.9%) were interested in careers in the government. The table of responses is listed in the Appendix. Once again this year we were fortunate in that the SHARP COTR, Ms. Deborah Glasco, gained the support of MURED funding sources at NASA to fully fund additional apprentices and boost the number of apprentices to 210.

  2. Radiation-use efficiency in summer rape

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrison, M.J.; Stewart, D.W.

    1995-01-01

    The radiation-use efficiency (RUE) is a parameter that represents a crop canopy's ability to convert intercepted solar energy to dry matter. The RUE is used in simulation models and can vary with crop type and environment. The objective was to examine the effects of varying row width and seeding rate on the amount of intercepted photosynthetically active radiation (IPAR) and the RUE in summer rape (Brassica napus L.). 'Westar' summer rape was seeded at rates of 1.5, 3.0, 6.0, and 12.0 kg ha-1 in rows spaced 15 or 30 cm apart. Plant sampling was done at key growth stages, and the leaf and pod areas and total plant dry weights were determined. After flowering, plants intercepted more PAR when grown in 15-cm-wide rows than 30-cm-wide rows. For both row widths, as seeding rate increased from 1.5 to 12.0 kg ha-1, IPAR increased. The RUE was greater for plants grown in 15-cm-wide rows than for those grown in 30-cm rows; however, RUE decreased with increasing seeding rate. The mean RUE value was 2.83 g MJ-1 PAR. When the pod area was added to the leaf area, the IPAR increased and the RUE decreased

  3. Super Summer Safari Manual: 1989 Summer Library Program. Bulletin No. 9240.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roeber, Jane A., Ed.

    Based on the theme, "Super Summer Safari: Make Books Your Big Game," this manual describes library activities intended to stimulate family explorations of local and regional natural environments, of urban parks, and of agricultural settings. The manual is divided into 6 sections: (1) "Planning and Promoting Programs"; (2)…

  4. Kids Enjoy Grids

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    I want to come back and work here when I'm older,' was the spontaneous reaction of one of the children invited to CERN by the Enabling Grids for E-sciencE project for a 'Grids for Kids' day at the end of January. The EGEE project is led by CERN, and the EGEE gender action team organized the day to introduce children to grid technology at an early age. The school group included both boys and girls, aged 9 to 11. All of the presenters were women. 'In general, before this visit, the children thought that scientists always wore white coats and were usually male, with wild Einstein-like hair,' said Jackie Beaver, the class's teacher at the Institut International de Lancy, a school near Geneva. 'They were surprised and pleased to see that women became scientists, and that scientists were quite 'normal'.' The half-day event included presentations about why Grids are needed, a visit of the computer centre, some online games, and plenty of time for questions. In the end, everyone agreed that it was a big success a...

  5. Subsidizing Enjoyable Education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.J. Dur (Robert); A. Glazer (Amihai)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractWe provide an explanation for why both college tuition and government grants to college students are typically means-tested. The critical idea is that attending college is both an investment good and a consumption good. The consumption benefit from education implies that, when tuition

  6. Promoción deportiva: “Disfruta con el balonmano” [Sport promotion: "Enjoys with the handball"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Francisco Nogales González

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Resumen “Disfruta con el Balonmano” es el eslogan de una iniciativa desarrollada por el Club Balonmano Badajoz dirigida a los Centros Escolares de la ciudad de Badajoz (13.243 niños. El objetivo para el club es la creación de Afición y el fomento de la identificación Emocional. Este proyecto cuenta con leal apoyo de una serie de empresas colaboradoras y patrocinadoras. Para estas entidades (siete “partners” y dos entidades colaboradoras el objetivo es utilizar la campaña como un gran escaparate para promover sus marcas, productos o servicios. Palabras clave: Club Balonmano Badajoz, Identificación Emocional, patrocinador, Grass-Root, Partnership, Eduselling. Abstract “Enjoy with handball” is the slogan of a initiativa developed by the C.B.Badajoz directed to schools of Badajoz city (13.243 childs. The sport organization´s objetive is create fans and promote emotional identification. This project has got the support and sponsorship of several companies and firms. For these firms (seven partners and two contributors the aim is to use the campaign to promote their brands, products and services. Key word: C. B. Badajoz, emotional identification, sponsor, Grass-Root, Partnership, Eduselling.

  7. Adaptation, translation and reliability of the Australian 'Juniors Enjoying Cricket Safely' injury risk perception questionnaire for Sri Lanka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamage, Prasanna J; Fortington, Lauren V; Finch, Caroline F

    2018-01-01

    Cricket is a very popular sport in Sri Lanka. In this setting there has been limited research; specifically, there is little knowledge of cricket injuries. To support future research possibilities, the aim of this study was to cross-culturally adapt, translate and test the reliability of an Australian-developed questionnaire for the Sri Lankan context. The Australian 'Juniors Enjoying Cricket Safely' (JECS-Aus) injury risk perception questionnaire was cross-culturally adapted to suit the Sri Lankan context and subsequently translated into the two main languages (Sinhala and Tamil) based on standard forward-back translation. The translated questionnaires were examined for content validity by two language schoolteachers. The questionnaires were completed twice, 2 weeks apart, by two groups of school cricketers (males) aged 11-15 years (Sinhala (n=24), Tamil (n=30)) to assess reliability. Test-retest scores were evaluated for agreement. Where responses were statistics were calculated. Questions with moderate-to-poor test-retest reliability (κAus questionnaire for use in a different population, providing an outcome measure for assessing injury risk perceptions in Sri Lankan junior cricketers.

  8. Are parents in tune with music their adolescent children enjoy? Are there missed opportunities for sexual and reproductive health dialogue?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holder-Nevins, D; James, K; Bailey, A; Eldemire-Shearer, D

    2011-03-01

    The perspectives of adolescents were solicited on the issue of sexual and reproductive health messages they received through dancehall music as well as their perceptions of parents' views of such messages and adolescents' indulgence with this genre of music. This sequential mixed methods study was completed in 2008. The study's qualitative component was summarized as the novel ALODAC (Ask, Listen and Observe, Discuss, Analyse and Confirm) model, involving a series of steps to engage adolescents 10-19 years to share their perspectives on sexual and reproductive health messages enunciated in the dancehall music to which they listen. The quantitative component saw 1626 adolescents in public schools responding to an interviewer-administered questionnaire which included questions about their families and how they respond to dancehall content. Five messages determined from content analysis of songs on adolescents' music menu were used to initiate discussions with adolescents about the issues. Almost equal proportions of respondents in the survey lived with either their mothers (37.3%) or both parents (35.6%). Most adolescents reported enjoying dancehall music and learning specific messages even when some parents were against use of such music. There were significant gender differences observed regarding perceptions about parents agreement with lyrics on transactional sex (p music their adolescent children listen to does not seem to affect the pleasure and lessons adolescents gain from this medium. Opportunities for discussing sexual issues common in Jamaican dancehall music exist but are missed.

  9. Influence of gender, single-sex and co-educational schooling on students' enjoyment and achievement in mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prendergast, Mark; O'Donoghue, John

    2014-11-01

    This research investigates the influence that gender, single-sex and co-educational schooling can have on students' mathematics education in second-level Irish classrooms. Although gender differences in mathematics education have been the subject of research for many years, recent results from PISA (Programme for International Student Assessment) show that there are still marked differences between the achievement and attitude of male and female students in Irish mathematics classrooms. This paper examines the influence of gender in more detail and also investigates the impact of single-sex or co-educational schooling. This is a follow on study which further analyses data collected by the authors when they designed a pedagogical framework and used this to develop, implement and evaluate a teaching intervention in four second-level Irish schools. The aim of this pedagogical framework was to promote student interest in the topic of algebra through effective teaching of the domain. This paper further analyses the quantitative data collected and investigates whether there were differences in students' enjoyment and achievement scores based on their gender and whether they attended single-sex or co-educational schools.

  10. Six-Year-Olds' Perception of Home Literacy Environment and Its Influence on Children's Literacy Enjoyment, Frequency, and Early Literacy Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiescholek, Sabrina; Hilkenmeier, Johanna; Greiner, Christian; Buhl, Heike M.

    2018-01-01

    Home literacy environment (HLE) makes an important contribution to children's reading acquisition in early years. Even though some research on children's perception exists, children's reports about HLE have been neglected. The present study focuses on N = 281 six-year-old's reports about HLE and its influences on literacy enjoyment, frequency, and…

  11. A Systematic Review of the Effectiveness of Physical Education and School Sport Interventions Targeting Physical Activity, Movement Skills and Enjoyment of Physical Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudley, Dean; Okely, Anthony; Pearson, Philip; Cotton, Wayne

    2011-01-01

    This article presents a systematic review of published literature on the effectiveness of physical education in promoting participation in physical activity, enjoyment of physical activity and movement skill proficiency in children and adolescents. The review utilized a literature search, specifically publications listed in Ovid, A+ Education,…

  12. Effect of exercise training on sports enjoyment and leisure-time spending in adolescents with complex congenital heart disease: the moderating effect of health behavior and disease knowledge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dulfer, Karolijn; Duppen, Nienke; Blom, Nico A.; van Dijk, Arie P. J.; Helbing, Wim A.; Verhulst, Frank C.; Utens, Elisabeth M. W. J.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of a standardized exercise program on sports enjoyment and leisure-time spending in adolescents with congenital heart disease and to know what the moderating impact of their baseline health behavior and disease knowledge is. Included were 93

  13. Effect of a holistic meal and ambiance concept on main meal enjoyment and food intake of Dutch nursing home residents: A pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kremer, S.; Derks, J.; Nijenhuis, M.A.; Boer, E.; Gorselink, M.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To explore whether or not the implementation of a holistic meal and ambiance concept has the potential to increase the meal enjoyment and/or influence food intake of the elderly in nursing homes who already eat in a social setting. Design: In a longitudinal design two groups of subjects

  14. Effects of Goal Relations on Self-Regulated Learning in Multiple Goal Pursuits: Performance, the Self-Regulatory Process, and Task Enjoyment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyunjoo

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of goal relations on self-regulation in the pursuit of multiple goals, focusing on self-regulated performance, the self-regulatory process, and task enjoyment. The effect of multiple goal relations on self-regulation was explored in a set of three studies. Goal relations were divided into…

  15. Summer 2014 Marketing Intern Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereda-Ramos, Marlee

    2014-01-01

    As a summer 2014 Marketing Intern for NASA Kennedy Space Centers (KSCs) Center Planning and Development directorate, I have gained much experience and knowledge of what is expected of me in any work environment. Throughout my time at KSC, I have had a number of responsibilities and duties, many of which involved collaborating with other directorates in order to acquire guidance and information from other NASA experts, attending and participating in meetings, and also editing and providing input to a collective project. My goal in this paper is to summarize my experience at KSC by explaining my responsibilities in detail and the skills I am able to take away as a result that will further aid me in my career path for the future.

  16. CERN Summer Student Programme 2017 Report

    CERN Document Server

    Mari, Tomoo

    2017-01-01

    This report describes the work done during my CERN Summer Student Programme 2017. A set-up has been implemented to perform studies on possible aging effects caused by different materials and eventually to validate new components for future application at the LHC gas systems. The effects are studied with a Single Wire Proportional Chamber (SWPC), which is very sensitive to pollutants and gas mixture variations. In particular, we evaluate a new flow-meter (OMRON MEMS Mass Flow Sensor) and the effect of plastic pipe on detector gain and O$_2$ and H$_2$O variations. with Single Wire Proportional Chamber (SWPC). Chapter 1 describes the characterization of the SWPC. Chapter 2 focuses on the evaluation test of the flow-meter while Chapter shows the effects of the addition of a plastic pipe in the set-up.

  17. C.I.M.E. Summer School

    CERN Document Server

    Manetti, Marco

    2008-01-01

    Starting in the middle of the 80s, there has been a growing and fruitful interaction between algebraic geometry and certain areas of theoretical high-energy physics, especially the various versions of string theory. Physical heuristics have provided inspiration for new mathematical definitions (such as that of Gromov-Witten invariants) leading in turn to the solution of problems in enumerative geometry. Conversely, the availability of mathematically rigorous definitions and theorems has benefited the physics research by providing the required evidence in fields where experimental testing seems problematic. The aim of this volume, a result of the CIME Summer School held in Cetraro, Italy, in 2005, is to cover part of the most recent and interesting findings in this subject.

  18. CERN restaurants: opening hours during summer

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    In the summer, the three CERN restaurants remain open during their usual hours. On Monday 1st August and Thursday 8 September, the Restaurant 1 will be open from 7:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m.   The satellites will be open as follows: Building 6: normal hours Building 13: normal hours Building 30: normal hours Building 40: closing at 4:30 p.m. instead of 5:00 pm Building 54: normal hours in July, closed in August Building 864: normal hours Building 865: normal hours Building 774: normal hours

  19. Lancaster Summer School in Corpus Linguistics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaka Čibej

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Med 12. in 15. julijem je na Univerzi v Lancastru potekala poletna šola korpusnega jezikoslovja Lancaster Summer Schools in Corpus Linguistics and Other Digital Methods. Poletno šolo so organizirali UCREL (University Centre for Computer Corpus Research on Language, ERC (Evropski svet za raziskave – European Research Council, CASS (ESRC Centre for Corpus Approaches to Social Science in ESRC (Economic and Social Research Council, razdeljena pa je bila na šest programov, prilagojenih različnim področjem: Korpusno jezikoslovje za proučevanje jezikov (Corpus Linguistics for Language Studies, Korpusno jezikoslovje za družbene vede (Corpus Linguistics for Social Science, Korpusno jezikoslovje za humanistiko (Corpus Linguistics for Humanities, Statistika za korpusno jezikoslovje (Statistics for Corpus Linguistics, Geografski informacijski sistemi za digitalno humanistiko (Geographical Information Systems for the Digital Humanities in Korpusno podprta obdelava naravnih jezikov (Corpus-based Natural Language Processing.

  20. Summer Student takes ISOLDE by surprise

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2012-01-01

    Two weeks ago, the Collinear Resonant Ionization Spectroscopy (CRIS) experiment at ISOLDE performed some of the world’s most sensitive measurements of the nuclear structure of francium, one of the rarest and least-understood elements. Gathered in record time and with excellent background resolution, the results are in good agreement with model predictions. The developer of their model? 2012 Summer Student, Ruben de Groote.   When student Ruben de Groote arrived at CERN this June, he joined one of CERN’s smallest experiments: CRIS. With a team of just 8 people at CERN, the CRIS experiment has become the world’s best facility to study the nuclear structure of light francium isotopes. By using a combination of resonant ionization spectroscopy and collinear laser spectroscopy, the experiment can select francium beams in a specific nuclear state with little background noise. As part of his thesis, Ruben has been developing a model – based on work by his Univers...

  1. Summer institute of sustainability and energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crabtree, George W. [Univ. of Illinois, Chicago, IL (United States); Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2012-08-01

    The vision for the Summer Institute on Sustainability and Energy (SISE) is to integrate advancements in basic energy sciences with innovative energy technologies to train the next generation of interdisciplinary scientists and policy makers for both government and industry. Through BES related research, these future leaders will be equipped to make educated decisions about energy at the personal, civic, and global levels in energy related fields including science, technology, entrepreneurship, economics, policy, planning, and behavior. This vision explicitly supports the 2008 report by the Department of Energy’s Basic Energy Science Advisory Committee (2), which outlines scientific opportunities and challenges to achieve energy security, lower CO2 emissions, reduce reliance on foreign oil and create enduring economic growth through discovery, development and the marketing of new technologies for sustainable energy production, delivery, and use (3).

  2. Summer Project on Exponential Convergence for IMC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gentile, N

    2016-01-01

    I want to look at modifying the Morel and Bolding algorithm in two ways. One is to remove the need to represent the intensity in a deterministic form and for a deterministic representation of a transport operator. The second is to look at representing the moments of the source with a simpler form that doesn't require as many terms. Morel and Bolding also didn't include scattering in their stuff. IMC has a lot of scattering occurring because of the effective scatters. I think that scattering can be added to the method, but I think that will require more than a summer's worth of work. So we'll just ignore scattering, and just look at problems with a huge c v so that there is no effective scattering.

  3. Landsat science team meeting: Summer 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Todd; Loveland, Thomas; Wulder, Michael A.; Irons, James R.

    2015-01-01

    The summer meeting of the joint U.S. Geological Survey (USGS)–NASA Landsat Science Team (LST) was held at the USGS’s Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) Center July 7-9, 2015, in Sioux Falls, SD. The LST co-chairs, Tom Loveland [EROS—Senior Scientist] and Jim Irons [NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC)—Landsat 8 Project Scientist], opened the three-day meeting on an upbeat note following the recent successful launch of the European Space Agency’s Sentinel-2 mission on June 23, 2015 (see image on page 14), and the news that work on Landsat 9 has begun, with a projected launch date of 2023.

  4. Implementing a Perioperative Nursing Student Summer Internship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, Janice; Kamel, Teya C; Sherer, Joanne; Nauer, Kathleen

    2018-01-01

    Using qualitative research and a collaborative academic service partnership, we created an innovative 120-hour perioperative nursing summer internship for eight undergraduate nursing students in 2016. Recognizing that perioperative exposure is limited in the traditional baccalaureate program, this unpaid internship served to clarify student perceptions of perioperative nursing care and encourage graduates to meet perioperative workforce demands. We based the theoretical and practical student learning experiences on the AORN Periop 101 learning modules and included faculty-led discussions, student journaling, and onsite precepted clinical activities. Evaluation data revealed that students achieved an enhanced awareness of perioperative nursing, and a majority of the participants expressed a desire to enter the perioperative field after graduation. We suggest that stakeholders continue to strategize ways to maximize educational preparation to address the evolving health care market supply and demand. © AORN, Inc, 2018.

  5. Auroral ionospheric quiet summer time conductances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brekke, A.; Hall, C.

    1988-01-01

    The auroral zone E-region conductivities and conductances have been studied for 7 quiet time summer days. The Hall- and Pedersen conductances are found to follow the solar zenith variations in a rather regular fashion, and empirical formulas for these conductances are obtained. The choice of proper collision frequency models is found to be of great importance when deriving the conductances, and it is argued that some of the different results presented by other authors may be due to different models of the collision frequencies. The Hall- to Pedersen conductance ratios can only be used as an indicator of the energy of the precipitating auroral particles when the contribution from the background solar ionization is subtracted. When this is done this ratio takes much higher values than previously reported

  6. What I did on my summer vacation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotinski, Roberta

    Imagine learning on Monday morning that you had to write an article on an area of science you knew little about. Now imagine that the article had to be finished by Thursday morning, in print by Friday, and scrutinized by millions on the following Monday morning. If you felt a rush of adrenaline reading that scenario, then you have a sense of my fellowship experience this summer. Instead of scaling mountains or feverishly experimenting in the lab, I explored a strange new frontier: the world of science journalism. I spent ten weeks immersed in the tumult and fervor of a news organization, and now have a new appreciation for the art of science communication as well as a new sympathy for science writers that would benefit any researcher.

  7. Effect of exercise training on sports enjoyment and leisure-time spending in adolescents with complex congenital heart disease: the moderating effect of health behavior and disease knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulfer, Karolijn; Duppen, Nienke; Blom, Nico A; van Dijk, Arie P J; Helbing, Wim A; Verhulst, Frank C; Utens, Elisabeth M W J

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of a standardized exercise program on sports enjoyment and leisure-time spending in adolescents with congenital heart disease and to know what the moderating impact of their baseline health behavior and disease knowledge is. Included were 93 patients, aged 10 to 25, with surgical repair for tetralogy of Fallot or with a Fontan circulation for single-ventricle physiology, of 5 participating centers of pediatric cardiology in The Netherlands. They were randomly allocated, stratified for age, gender, and type of congenital heart disease to a 12-week period with either: (1) three times per week standardized exercise training or (2) care as usual (randomization ratio 2:1). At baseline and after 12 weeks, participants completed Web-based questionnaires and were interviewed by phone. Primary analyses tested changes from baseline to follow-up in sports enjoyment and leisure-time spending in the exercise group vs. control group. Secondary analyses concerned the moderating influence of baseline health behavior and disease knowledge on changes from baseline to follow-up, and comparison with normative data. At follow-up, the exercise group reported a decrease in passive leisure-time spending (watching television and computer usage) compared with controls. Exercise training had no effect on sports enjoyment and active leisure-time spending. Disease knowledge had a moderating effect on improvement in sports enjoyment, whereas health behavior did not. Compared with normative data, patients obtained similar leisure time scores and lower frequencies as to drinking alcohol and smoking. Exercise training decreased passive, but not active, leisure-time spending. It did not influence sports enjoyment. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Perceived physical competence towards physical activity, and motivation and enjoyment in physical education as longitudinal predictors of adolescents' self-reported physical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timo, Jaakkola; Sami, Yli-Piipari; Anthony, Watt; Jarmo, Liukkonen

    2016-09-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate if adolescents' perceived physical competence towards physical activity (PA), and autonomous motivation and enjoyment in physical education (PE) during early adolescence can predict amount and intensity of self-reported physical activity six years later. This study utilized a 6-year longitudinal data set collected within Finnish school settings. Students responded to questionnaires measuring their perceived physical competence towards physical activity, and autonomous motivation and enjoyment in PE during their first year at middle school (Grade 7), and their PA engagement during their last year in high school (Grade 12). A sample of 333 students (200 girls, 133 boys; M age=12.41, years, SD=.27) participated in the study. Perceived physical competence in physical activity was assessed by the sport competence dimension of the Physical Self-Perception Profile, autonomous motivation in PE was assessed by the Sport Motivation Scale and enjoyment in PE by the Sport Enjoyment Scale. Students' self-reported metabolic equivalent (MET) and PA intensity (light [LPA], moderate [MPA], vigorous [VPA]) was calculated from the short form of International Physical Activity Questionnaire. Perceived physical competence towards physical activity significantly predicted total METs (β=.28), MPA (β=.18) and VPA (β=.29) six years later. Autonomous motivation and enjoyment in PE at Grade 7, however, were not significant predictors of later PA. The results of this study support the proposition that self-perception of an individual's abilities arising from interactions with the environment related to PA during early puberty has an influential effect on later PA behaviour. Copyright © 2015 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Nuclear theory summer meeting on ERHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLerran, L.; Venugopalan, R.

    2000-01-01

    The eRHIC BNL summer meeting was held at BNL from June 26 to July 14, 2000. The meeting was very informal with only two talks a day and with ample time for discussions and collaborations. Several of the theory talks focused on the issue of saturation of parton distributions at small x--whether screening effects have already been seen at HERA, the relation of saturation to shadowing, and on the various signatures of a proposed novel state of matter--the Colored Glass Condensate--that may be observed at eRHIC. A related topic that was addressed was that of quantifying twist four effects, and on the relevance of these for studies of energy loss. Other issues addressed were coherence effects in vector meson production, anti-quark distributions in nuclei, and the relevance of saturation for heavy ion collisions. There were, also, talks on the Pomeron--the relevance of instantons and the non-perturbative gluon condensate to constructing a Pomeron. On the spin physics side, there were talks on predictions for inclusive distributions at small x. There were also talks on Skewed Parton Distributions and Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering. Though most of the talks were theory talks, there were also several important experimental contributions. A preliminary detector design for eRHIC was presented. Studies for semi-inclusive measurements at eRHIC were also presented. The current status of pA scattering studies at RHIC was also discussed. The eRHIC summer meeting provided a vigorous discussion of the current status of eRHIC studies. It is hoped that this document summarizing these discussions will be of use to all those interested in electron nucleus and polarized electron-polarized proton studies

  10. Summer Arctic sea ice albedo in CMIP5 models

    OpenAIRE

    Koenigk, T.; Devasthale, A.; Karlsson, K.-G.

    2014-01-01

    Spatial and temporal variations of summer sea ice albedo over the Arctic are analyzed using an ensemble of historical CMIP5 model simulations. The results are compared to the CLARA-SAL product that is based on long-term satellite observations. The summer sea ice albedo varies substantially among CMIP5 models, and many models show large biases compared to the CLARA-SAL product. Single summer months show an extreme spread of ice albedo among models; July values vary between 0....

  11. Salt appetite is not increased in summer heat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leshem, Micah

    2017-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that salt appetite increases in summer heat due to increased sodium loss due to increased drinking and perspiration. A test battery in the same sample of healthy young people tested in summer and winter revealed no seasonal differences in salt appetite (or fluid intake) despite a 10 °C rise in mean environmental temperature. Unexpectedly, sweet preference is reduced in summer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. An evaluation of the 1997 JPL Summer Teacher Enhancement Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slovacek, Simeon P.; Doyle-Nichols, Adelaide R.

    1997-10-20

    There were two major components in the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) Summer Teacher Enhancement Project (STEP). First, the Summer Institute was structured as a four-week, 4-credit-unit University course for middle school science teachers, and consisted of workshops, lectures, labs, and tours as activities. The second component consists of follow-up activities related to the summer institute's contents, and again is structured as a University credit-bearing course for participants to reinforce their summer training. Considerable information from the comments and course ratings as given by the participants is included.

  13. Mehr Last als Lust – Ein weiterer Sammelband zu „(Frauen-Körper“ More Encumbrance than Enjoyment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula-Irene Villa

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Dieser Band vereint acht heterogene Aufsätze zu „Lust und Last am eigenen Körper“ von Frauen. Alle Beiträge gehören zum Spektrum psychologischer Reflexion; die Themen reichen dabei von Sport über Kochen und Essen bis Schönheit, die Zugänge von Psychoanalyse über experimentelle Psychologie bis hin zu freier Assoziation auf der Grundlage klinisch-praktischer Arbeit. Ein roter Faden durch die Beiträge ist nicht erkennbar und so wirkt die Vielfalt beliebig. So unterschiedlich die Beiträge sind, so unterschiedlich ist auch ihre Qualität. Leider kommen einige Artikel über die unkritische Zusammenstellung anderer Arbeiten nicht hinaus, die meisten nehmen kaum Bezug auf das inzwischen breite und institutionalisierte Feld der (sozial- und kulturwissenschaftlichen Körperforschung. Doch haben manche Aufsätze interessante empirische Einblicke zu bieten, die zur weiteren Reflexion anregen, und einige wenige Beiträge sind so differenziert, dass sich mit ihnen weiterdenken und -forschen lässt. Insgesamt bereitet die Lektüre des Buches weder ‚Einsteiger/-innen‘ noch ‚Fortgeschrittenen‘ der wissenschaftlichen Beschäftigung mit (Frauen-Körpern Lust, sondern erweist sich – bis auf Ausnahmen, die allerdings auch in ausführlicherer Form anderenorts publiziert wurden – eher als Last. Ärgerlich und alles andere als argumentativ überzeugend ist darüber hinaus das in manchen Texten enthaltene, mehr oder minder explizit artikulierte, ‚Feminismus- bzw. Frauenforschungs-Bashing‘.This volume joins together eight heterogeneous essays by women under the theme “enjoyment and encumbrance of the body.” All of the contributions belong within the spectrum of psychological reflection; the themes range from sports, cooking and eating, and beauty, to the process of psychoanalysis, experimental psychology, and free-association based on clinical practice. The thread throughout the contributions remains indiscernible and thus the

  14. Public Library Summer Reading Programs Contribute to Reading Progress and Proficiency. A Review of: Roman, S., & Fiore, C. (2010. Do public library summer reading programs close the achievement gap? Children and Libraries, (Winter, 27-31.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gayle Bogel

    2012-03-01

    administered, as well as a structured interview of library staff.Main Results – The students who participated in the public library summer reading program did not experience summer loss in reading as measured by the post test administered in their schools.The researchers note patterns in the demographics of students who chose to participate (participation was self-selected and voluntary: predominantly Caucasian girls above poverty level, who generally scored well on reading tests. Those who participated in the study also used libraries, had more books in their homes, and parents who used libraries and provided literacy activities at home.Teachers found that students who participated in the program started the school year ready to learn, had improved reading achievement and displayed stronger motivation, enjoyment and confidence in reading. Parents of students who participated in the program also strongly agreed that their children where better prepared to begin the school year.Conclusion – The results from this study confirmed findings from an earlier study (Heyns, 1978 and subsequent related research that summer reading programs in public libraries can contribute to maintaining reading progress and proficiency, and that the recreational reading that is available to all students regardless of socioeconomic status through the public library can make a difference in reading scores.In this article the researchers presented results and conclusions based on selected subsets of the results in the full study. The participants were self-reported and no control group was established.The researchers also use the results of the study as a starting point to provide a call to action that highlights the value of public library summer reading programs, and the need for the education community to invest in partnerships with public libraries, particularly in communities that serve children and families in low-economic or depressed areas. They also note the need to include parents and

  15. Site Characterization for CO2 Storage from Coal-fired Power Facilities in the Black Warrior Basin of Alabama

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, Peter E. [Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater, OK (United States); Pashin, Jack [Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater, OK (United States); Carlson, Eric [Univ. of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States); Goodliffe, Andrew [Univ. of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States); McIntyre-Redden, Marcella [Geological Survey of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States); Mann, Steven D. [Geological Survey of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States); Thompson, Mason [Rice Univ., Houston, TX (United States)

    2013-11-29

    Coal-fired power plants produce large quantities of carbon dioxide. In order to mitigate the greenhouse gas emissions from these power plants, it is necessary to separate and store the carbon dioxide. Saline formations provide a potential sink for carbon dioxide and delineating the capacity of the various known saline formations is a key part of building a storage inventory. As part of this effort, a project was undertaken to access the storage capacity of saline reservoirs in the Black Warrior Basin of Alabama. This basin has been a productive oil and gas reservoir that is well characterized to the west of the two major coal-fired power plants that are north of Birmingham. The saline zones were thought to extend as far east as the Sequatchie Anticline which is just east of the power plants. There is no oil or gas production in the area surrounding the power plants so little is known about the formations in that area. A geologic characterization well was drilled on the Gorgas Power Plant site, which is the farthest west of two power plants in the area. The well was planned to be drilled to approximately 8,000 feet, but drilling was halted at approximately 5,000 feet when a prolific freshwater zone was penetrated. During drilling, a complete set of cores through all of the potential injection zones and the seals above these zones were acquired. A complete set of openhole logs were run along with a vertical seismic profile (VSP). Before drilling started two approximately perpendicular seismic lines were run and later correlated with the VSP. While the zones that were expected were found at approximately the predicted depths, the zones that are typically saline through the reservoir were found to be saturated with a light crude oil. Unfortunately, both the porosity and permeability of these zones were small enough that no meaningful hydrocarbon production would be expected even with carbon dioxide flooding. While this part of the basin was found to be unsuitable for

  16. The Impact of the Summer Seminar Program on Midshipman Performance: Does Summer Seminar Participation Influence Success at the Naval Academy?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Norton, Michael

    2004-01-01

    .... Based on this literature, it is theorized that Summer Seminar program participation will be positively correlated to increased graduation rates and increased academic cumulative quality point ratings...

  17. STEM Summer Academy on the Navajo Reservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, C. J.

    2012-12-01

    The US Rosetta Project is the NASA contribution to the International Rosetta Mission, an ESA cornerstone mission to comet Churyumov-Gerasimenko. While the project's outreach efforts span multi-media, and a variety of age and ethnic groups, a special emphasis has been made to find a way to provide meaningful outreach to the reservation communities. Because language preservation is an issue of urgent concern to the reservation communities, and because Rosetta, uniquely among NASA missions, has been named after the notion that keys to missing understanding of elements of the ancient past were found in the language on the original Rosetta stone, the US Rosetta Project has embarked upon outreach with a focus on STEM vocabulary in ancient US languages of the Navajo, Hopi, Ojibwe, and other tribal communities as the project expands. NASA image and science are used and described in the native language, alongside lay English and scientific English curriculum elements. Additionally, science (geology/chemistry/botany/physics) elements drawn from the reservation environment, including geomorphology, geochemistry, soil physics, are included and discussed in the native language as much as possible — with their analogs in other planetary environments (such as Mars). In this paper we will report on the most recent Summer Science Academy [2012], a four week summer course for middle school children, created in collaboration with teachers and administrators in the Chinle Unified School District. The concept of the Academy was initiated in 2011, and the first Academy was conducted shortly thereafter, in June 2011 with 14 children, 3 instructors, and a NASA teacher workshop. The community requested three topics: geology, astronomy, and botany. The 2012 Academy built on the curriculum already developed with more robust field trips, addressed to specific science topics, additional quantitative measurements and activities, with more written material for the cultural components from

  18. The importance of cohesion and enjoyment for the fitness improvement of 8-10-year-old children participating in a team and individual sport school-based physical activity intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbe, Anne-Marie; Wikman, Johan Michael; Zheng, Miky; Larsen, Malte Nejst; Nielsen, Glen; Krustrup, Peter

    2017-04-01

    This study investigates the enjoyment and cohesion of school children participating in a school-based high-intensity physical activity (PA) intervention. Both enjoyment and cohesion have been found to be important factors for adherence to regular physical and sport activity, an important outcome of PA interventions. The sample consisted of 300 pupils (mean age: 9.3 years; 52.7% female) assigned to a team sport intervention, an individual sport intervention, or a control group for 10 months. The Physical Activity Enjoyment Scale and Youth Sport Environment Questionnaire were used to measure enjoyment and cohesion. The Yo-Yo IR1C test determined fitness improvements. Results showed that enjoyment and cohesion (social) measured at the beginning of the intervention significantly predict fitness improvements achieved after 10 months. No differing developmental effects over time could be found in the intervention groups with regard to cohesion and enjoyment when comparing them to the control group. However, enjoyment and cohesion (social) significantly decreased in the groups that performed individual sports. Team sports seem to be more advantageous for the development of enjoyment and cohesion, which are both factors that positively impact the health outcomes of the intervention.

  19. Summer Food Service Program. Nourishing News. Volume 3, Issue 8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idaho State Department of Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The primary goal of the Summer Food Service Program (SFSP) is to provide nutritious meals to children in low-income areas when school is not in session. This issue of "Nourishing News" focuses on SFSPs. The articles contained in this issue are: (1) Is Your Summer Food Program Financially Fit? (Jean Zaske); (2) Keeping the…

  20. Chinese Language Study Abroad in the Summer, 1990. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Richard T.

    After an analysis of the changing numbers of Americans studying Chinese abroad and of Sino-American academic exchanges after the Tiananmen events of 1989, this paper reports on visits to summer language programs. Enrollments were down by 13 percent between the summer of 1988 and 1989, but down by 50 percent between 1989 and 1990. The following…

  1. Summer Bridge Programs. What Works Clearinghouse Intervention Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2016

    2016-01-01

    "Summer bridge programs" are designed to ease the transition to college and support postsecondary success by providing students with the academic skills and social resources needed to succeed in a college environment. These programs occur in the summer "bridge" period between high school and college. Although the content of…

  2. 22 CFR 62.32 - Summer work travel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...-secondary students the opportunity to work and travel in the United States for a four month period during... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Summer work travel. 62.32 Section 62.32 Foreign... Provisions § 62.32 Summer work travel. (a) Introduction. These regulations govern program participation in...

  3. Can We Boost College Summer Enrollment Using Behavioral Science?

    Science.gov (United States)

    MDRC, 2017

    2017-01-01

    MDRC's Center for Applied Behavioral Science (CABS) and Postsecondary Education policy area launched the Encouraging Additional Summer Enrollment (EASE) project in collaboration with Great Lakes Higher Education Corporation & Affiliates and the Ohio Association of Community Colleges. The project aims to increase summer enrollment rates among…

  4. How I Spent My Summer Vacation: Amazing Opportunities for Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curwood, Jen Scott

    2008-01-01

    From summer programs in archaeology or Russian to teaching abroad for a year or more, there are many opportunities available for teachers. This article describes unique programs in archeology, geology, astronomy, botany, and oceanography that are available as summer programs; master's programs in languages, administration, writing, and Teaching…

  5. Surface temperature pattern of the Indian Ocean before summer monsoon

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Gopinathan, C.K.; Rao, D.P.

    , suggests that the position of the warmer areas in the Bay of Bengal in May is an indicator of the subsequent summer rainfall over India. The statistical method adopted for the long range forcasting of the Indian summer monsoon gives very little...

  6. Summer monsoon intraseasonal oscillation over eastern Arabian Sea

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Significant power is seen in the 8–15-day time scale in TWV during onset and retreat of the summer ... Intraseasonal oscillation; wavelet analysis; Indian summer monsoon. J. Earth .... be caused by synoptic scale systems, in conformity with the ...

  7. Seasonal forecasting of Bangladesh summer monsoon rainfall using ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this paper, the development of a statistical forecasting method for summer ... 2008 summer monsoon rainfall based on the model were also found to be in good agreement with the ..... nificant on the basis of a one-tailed test of Student's.

  8. Web based view of SBA beamline status (summer student report)

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2156364

    2016-01-01

    Summer student project report by Branislav Jenco. The document starts with some general opinions on the summer student program as well as the lectures, continues with a detailed work log and finally finishes with several appendices of technical documentation which make up the bulk of the material.

  9. A Innovative Engineering Summer School V2.0

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennedsen, Jens; Larsen, Peter Gorm

    2010-01-01

    This article describes a summer school which focuses on a conceive-design project. The summer school has been run three times; each of the implementations is described. The last implementation (v2.0) is discussed and four challenges are identified and discussed in detail: assignments, the role...

  10. INFLUENCE OF SEMIARID SUMMER BROWSING ON CHEMICAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Puga

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available A group (A of 20 female French Alpine goats (50 ± 5 Kg BW were fed on summer semiarid vegetation in Querétaro, México. Other group (B with similar characteristic was fed in full confinement with Lucerne hay and concentrate of cereals. Four kids of cheese were prepared: 1 browsed-raw (BR, 2 browsed-pasteurized (BP, 3 indoor-raw (IR and 4 indoor-pasteurized (IP; using 30 kg of milk per group, 15 kg each group were proceed in raw and 15 kg each were pasteurized. Moisture, energy, protein, ash, lipids, cholesterol, fatty acids profile and CLA were determined in the cheeses; the results were analyzed with a variance analysis in a 2x2 factorial arrangement. Energy, fat and ash did not affect for feeding system and heat treatment. Protein content was higher in IP cheese compared with BR and BP cheeses. BR cheese had a lowest cholesterol value in relation to BP, IR and IP cheeses. The browed cheeses had the highest concentration of CLA, EPA and DHA acids in relation to indoor cheeses. Pasteurization did not have effect in cheese quality. Browsing increased concentration of compounds with a beneficial effect on human health, factor that could add revenue to the small farmer’s income.

  11. cptnHook - Summer Student Project Report

    CERN Document Server

    Asimakopoulou, Eleni - Myrto

    2015-01-01

    The present is a report of the work that was conducted during my 8-week summer school internship at CERN. The project was centered on the development of an instrumentation tool for the usage of mathematical functions in a scientific application. More specifically, $\\textbf{cptnHook}$ addresses a current issue that arises from the the extensive use of very time-consuming mathematical functions (such as transcendental functions) that results in them accounting for a big portion of their run-time. It is believed that the problem can be addressed with ad-hoc approximations of mathematical functions, for which a clear overview of the usage of the functions in the program is required. $\\textbf{cptnHook}$ approaches this problem by providing a measurement of the use of mathematical functions in a program by hooking into the machine code and probing the arguments of the functions, without modifying the application's source code. The outputs of the tool are provided in ROOT format for further on analysis.

  12. Energy market barometer report - Summer 2015

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schleich, Joachim; Cartel, Melodie; Cateura, Olivier; Faure, Corinne; Grover, David; Jacob, Jojo; Javaudin, Laurent; Molecke, Greg; Olsthoorn, Mark; Shomali, Azadeh; Vernay, Anne-Lorene

    2015-01-01

    This Summer 2015 edition of the Grenoble Ecole de Management (GEM) Energy Market Barometer explored the expectations of French Energy experts regarding the Climate Summit (COP21) in Paris next December, and the future evolution of CO_2 certificate prices. The experts were also asked about the development of energy prices. Key findings: - 62 % of the French energy experts do not expect a legally binding agreement to emerge from the Paris Climate Summit - this share was 77 % among the German experts; - A majority of the French energy experts think that failing to reach a legally binding agreement at the Paris Climate Summit would not change the French climate policy targets; - A legally binding agreement would have positive effects on investment in the energy sector and, in particular, the electrical industry; - Two-thirds of the French energy experts believe that an agreement in Paris would generate a momentum for climate innovation in OECD countries, but less so in non-OECD countries; - CO_2 certificate prices rise only in the medium to long term but levels remain rather low. The announced intention of the G7 to phase out all fossil fuels by the end of this century did not affect the experts' expectations about CO_2 certificate prices or medium-term fuel prices; - Electricity and coal prices are expected to remain stable over the next six months. The majority of the experts consider the current low oil and gas prices to be a rather temporary phenomenon

  13. Par Pond vegetation status Summer 1995 -- Summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mackey, H.E. Jr.; Riley, R.S.

    1996-01-01

    The water level of Par Pond was lowered approximately 20 feet in mid-1991 in order to protect downstream residents from possible dam failure suggested by subsidence on the downstream slope of the dam and to repair the dam. This lowering exposed both emergent and nonemergent macrophyte beds to drying conditions resulting in extensive losses. A survey of the newly emergent, shoreline aquatic plant communities of Par Pond began in June 1995, three months after the refilling of Par Pond to approximately 200 feet above mean sea level. These surveys continued in July, September, and late October, 1995. Communities similar to the pre-drawdown, Par Pond aquatic plant communities are becoming re-established. Emergent beds of maidencane, lotus, waterlily, and watershield are extensive and well developed. Cattail occurrence continued to increase during the summer, but large beds common to Par Pond prior to the drawdown have not formed. Estimates from SPOT HRV, remote sensing satellite data indicated that as much as 120 hectares of emergent wetlands vegetation may have been present along the Par Pond shoreline by early October, 1995. To track the continued development of macrophytes in Par Pond, future surveys throughout 1996 and 1997, along with the continued evaluation of satellite data to map the areal extent of the macrophyte beds of Par Pond, are planned

  14. Summer Institute for Physical Science Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maheswaranathan, Ponn; Calloway, Cliff

    2007-04-01

    A summer institute for physical science teachers was conducted at Winthrop University, June 19-29, 2006. Ninth grade physical science teachers at schools within a 50-mile radius from Winthrop were targeted. We developed a graduate level physics professional development course covering selected topics from both the physics and chemistry content areas of the South Carolina Science Standards. Delivery of the material included traditional lectures and the following new approaches in science teaching: hands-on experiments, group activities, computer based data collection, computer modeling, with group discussions & presentations. Two experienced master teachers assisted us during the delivery of the course. The institute was funded by the South Carolina Department of Education. The requested funds were used for the following: faculty salaries, the University contract course fee, some of the participants' room and board, startup equipment for each teacher, and indirect costs to Winthrop University. Startup equipment included a Pasco stand-alone, portable Xplorer GLX interface with sensors (temperature, voltage, pH, pressure, motion, and sound), and modeling software (Wavefunction's Spartan Student and Odyssey). What we learned and ideas for future K-12 teacher preparation initiatives will be presented.

  15. CEBAF/SURA 1985 Summer Workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crannel, H.

    1985-12-01

    The 1985 Summer Workshop began a new phase of planning for the experimental program at CEBAF. One goal of the Workshop was to define and describe options for equipping the CEBAF and stations with experimental equipment. Starting with an initial list of options which grew out of discussions during the Winter of 1984 and the Spring of 1985, the five working groups met during the Workshop and developed their final reports, included in these proceedings. The program of the Workshop consisted of invited talks on both theoretical and experimental topics, and working group meetings. The five working groups, include: Magnetic Spectrometers; Large Acceptance Detectors and Low Intensity Beams; Internal Targets; Positrons; Theory. These proceedings begin with an overview of CEBAF, and a report on progress made by the Magnetic Spectrometer and Internal Target Working Groups prior to the Workshop. The next part contains the invited talks, presented in the order which they were given during the week. The final reports of the five working groups follow this, and the proceedings conclude with papers contributed to the Workshop

  16. Second Multiflow Summer School on Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, Javier

    2016-04-01

    Multiflow is a research program, funded by the European Research Council, whose goal is to improve our understanding of the multiscale dynamics of turbulence in fluids. Its second Summer School on Turbulence took place at the School of Aeronautics of the Technical University of Madrid from May 25 to June 26, 2015, with the goal of providing a meeting place for theoreticians, experimentalists and simulators, in which to develop and test new ideas on turbulence physics and structure. Around forty, mostly young, participants from twenty international groups met for five weeks of collaborative work, primarily using the computational data archived in the receiving institution but, in many cases, also contributing their own. Although the format included a few invited formal seminars and periodic plenary meetings, most of the work took place in small groups that, in many cases, changed their composition during the workshop. The papers in these proceedings reflect the results of the work of these groups which, in many cases, later continued in the form of new collaborations.

  17. Geomagnetic control of polar mesosphere summer echoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Bremer

    2000-02-01

    Full Text Available Using observations with the ALOMAR SOUSY radar near Andenes (69.3°N, 16.0°E from 1994 until 1997 polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSE have been investigated in dependence on geomagnetic K indices derived at the Auroral Observatory Tromsø (69.66°N, 18.94°E. During night-time and morning hours a significant correlation between the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR of the radar results and the geomagnetic K indices could be detected with a maximum correlation near midnight. The correlation becomes markedly smaller in the afternoon and early evening hours with a minimum near 17 UT. This diurnal variation is in reasonable agreement with riometer absorption at Ivalo (68.55°N, 27.28°E and can be explained by the diurnal variation of ionization due to precipitating high energetic particles. Therefore, a part of the diurnal PMSE variation is caused by this particle precipitation. The variability of the solar EUV variation, however, has no significant influence on the PMSE during the observation period.Keywords: Ionosphere (auroral ionosphere - Magnetospheric physics (energetic particles, precipitating - Radio science (remote sensing

  18. Summer 1994 Computational Science Workshop. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    This report documents the work performed by the University of New Mexico Principal Investigators and Research Assistants while hosting the highly successful Summer 1994 Computational Sciences Workshop in Albuquerque on August 6--11, 1994. Included in this report is a final budget for the workshop, along with a summary of the participants` evaluation of the workshop. The workshop proceeding have been delivered under separate cover. In order to assist in the organization of future workshops, we have also included in this report detailed documentation of the pre- and post-workshop activities associated with this contract. Specifically, we have included a section that documents the advertising performed, along with the manner in which applications were handled. A complete list of the workshop participants in this section. Sample letters that were generated while dealing with various commercial entities and departments at the University are also included in a section dealing with workshop logistics. Finally, we have included a section in this report that deals with suggestions for future workshops.

  19. Utilization of summer legumes as bioenergy feedstocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantrell, Keri B.; Bauer, Philip J.; Ro, Kyoung S. [United States Department of Agriculture, ARS, Coastal Plains Soil, Water, and Plant Research Center, 2611 W. Lucas St. Florence, SC 29501 (United States)

    2010-12-15

    Sunn hemp (Crotolaria juncea), is a fast growing, high biomass yielding tropical legume that may be a possible southeastern bioenergy crop. When comparing this legume to a commonly grown summer legume - cowpeas (Vigna unguiculata), sunn hemp was superior in biomass yield (kg ha{sup -1}) and subsequent energy yield (GJ ha{sup -1}). In one year of the study after 12 weeks of growth, sunn hemp had 10.7 Mg ha{sup -1} of biomass with an energy content of 19.0 Mg ha{sup -1}. This resulted in an energy yield of 204 GJ ha{sup -1}. The energy content was 6% greater than that of cowpeas. Eventhough sunn hemp had a greater amount of ash, plant mineral concentrations were lower in some cases of minerals (K, Ca, Mg, S) known to reduce thermochemical conversion process efficiency. Pyrolytic degradation of both legumes revealed that sunn hemp began to degrade at higher temperatures as well as release greater amounts of volatile matter at a faster rate. (author)

  20. Spin Glasses : Statics and Dynamics : Summer School

    CERN Document Server

    Bovier, Anton

    2009-01-01

    Over the last decade, spin glass theory has turned from a fascinating part of t- oretical physics to a ?ourishing and rapidly growing subject of probability theory as well. These developments have been triggered to a large part by the mathem- ical understanding gained on the fascinating and previously mysterious “Parisi solution” of the Sherrington–Kirkpatrick mean ?eld model of spin glasses, due to the work of Guerra, Talagrand, and others. At the same time, new aspects and applications of the methods developed there have come up. The presentvolumecollects a number of reviewsaswellas shorterarticlesby lecturers at a summer school on spin glasses that was held in July 2007 in Paris. These articles range from pedagogical introductions to state of the art papers, covering the latest developments. In their whole, they give a nice overview on the current state of the ?eld from the mathematical side. The review by Bovier and Kurkova gives a concise introduction to mean ?eld models, starting with the Curie–...