WorldWideScience

Sample records for warm rain process

  1. Warm-Rain Precipitation over Complex Terrain: a New Polarimetric Classification Scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porcacchia, L.; Cheong, B. L.; Anagnostou, M.; Maggioni, V.; Gourley, J. J.; Kirstetter, P.

    2016-12-01

    Accurate quantitative precipitation estimation over mountainous basins is of great importance because of their susceptibility to natural hazards. It is generally hard to obtain reliable precipitation information over complex areas, due to the scarce coverage of ground sensors associated to partial beam blockage and high elevation of the study sites. Warm-rain processes are characterized by precipitation growth due to collision-coalescence of droplets in the liquid layer of a cloud. These processes lead to high precipitation rates and have been observed in several flash flood events in complex terrain. Their characteristics are often difficult to identify. X-band mobile dual-polarization radars located in complex terrain areas provide fundamental high-resolution information on raindrop sizes, shapes, and particle size distributions (PSDs). This study analyzes a dataset collected during the IPHEx field campaign (North Carolina, US) over a mountainous basin, in which the NOXP X-band dual-polarimetric radar was used along with rain gauges, Parsivel and 2DVD disdrometers. Polarimetric variables are used to generate the Cao-Zhang and Kumjian-Ryzhkov parameter spaces, which provide clues on the segregation of warm-rain precipitation from convective and stratiform processes. A new classification algorithm is proposed to identify warm-rain precipitation by merging the information coming from the polarimetric parameter spaces. The method is validated with disdrometer PSDs for the classified warm-rain events: they show a clear shift towards high concentration of small median volume diameter (D0) drops compared to the PSD climatology for the field campaign. Finally, the rainfall rate derived from radar data without the assumption of warm-rain is found to underestimate the precipitation at the ground collected by rain gauges, suggesting the necessity of a correct classification of precipitation and subsequent estimate of rainfall rates. The proposed next-generation polarimetric

  2. Exploring the use of a column model for the characterization of microphysical processes in warm rain: results from a homogeneous rainshaft model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. P. Barros

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available A study of the evolution of raindrop spectra (raindrop size distribution, DSD between cloud base and the ground surface was conducted using a column model of stochastic coalescense-breakup dynamics. Numerical results show that, under steady-state boundary conditions (i.e. constant rainfall rate and DSD at the top of the rainshaft, the equilibrium DSD is achieved only for high rain rates produced by midlevel or higher clouds and after long simulation times (~30 min or greater. Because these conditions are not typical of most rainfall, the results suggest that the theoretical equilibrium DSD might not be attainable for the duration of individual rain events, and thus DSD observations from field experiments should be analyzed conditional on the specific storm environment under which they were obtained.

  3. Implications of Warm Rain in Shallow Cumulus and Congestus Clouds for Large-Scale Circulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nuijens, Louise; Emanuel, Kerry; Masunaga, Hirohiko; L’Ecuyer, Tristan

    2017-01-01

    Space-borne observations reveal that 20–40% of marine convective clouds below the freezing level produce rain. In this paper we speculate what the prevalence of warm rain might imply for convection and large-scale circulations over tropical oceans. We present results using a two-column

  4. Implications of Warm Rain in Shallow Cumulus and Congestus Clouds for Large-Scale Circulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuijens, Louise; Emanuel, Kerry; Masunaga, Hirohiko; L'Ecuyer, Tristan

    2017-11-01

    Space-borne observations reveal that 20-40% of marine convective clouds below the freezing level produce rain. In this paper we speculate what the prevalence of warm rain might imply for convection and large-scale circulations over tropical oceans. We present results using a two-column radiative-convective model of hydrostatic, nonlinear flow on a non-rotating sphere, with parameterized convection and radiation, and review ongoing efforts in high-resolution modeling and observations of warm rain. The model experiments investigate the response of convection and circulation to sea surface temperature (SST) gradients between the columns and to changes in a parameter that controls the conversion of cloud condensate to rain. Convection over the cold ocean collapses to a shallow mode with tops near 850 hPa, but a congestus mode with tops near 600 hPa can develop at small SST differences when warm rain formation is more efficient. Here, interactive radiation and the response of the circulation are crucial: along with congestus a deeper moist layer develops, which leads to less low-level radiative cooling, a smaller buoyancy gradient between the columns, and therefore a weaker circulation and less subsidence over the cold ocean. The congestus mode is accompanied with more surface precipitation in the subsiding column and less surface precipitation in the deep convecting column. For the shallow mode over colder oceans, circulations also weaken with more efficient warm rain formation, but only marginally. Here, more warm rain reduces convective tops and the boundary layer depth—similar to Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) studies—which reduces the integrated buoyancy gradient. Elucidating the impact of warm rain can benefit from large-domain high-resolution simulations and observations. Parameterizations of warm rain may be constrained through collocated cloud and rain profiling from ground, and concurrent changes in convection and rain in subsiding and convecting branches of

  5. Implications of Warm Rain in Shallow Cumulus and Congestus Clouds for Large-Scale Circulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuijens, Louise; Emanuel, Kerry; Masunaga, Hirohiko; L'Ecuyer, Tristan

    2017-09-01

    Space-borne observations reveal that 20-40% of marine convective clouds below the freezing level produce rain. In this paper we speculate what the prevalence of warm rain might imply for convection and large-scale circulations over tropical oceans. We present results using a two-column radiative-convective model of hydrostatic, nonlinear flow on a non-rotating sphere, with parameterized convection and radiation, and review ongoing efforts in high-resolution modeling and observations of warm rain. The model experiments investigate the response of convection and circulation to sea surface temperature (SST) gradients between the columns and to changes in a parameter that controls the conversion of cloud condensate to rain. Convection over the cold ocean collapses to a shallow mode with tops near 850 hPa, but a congestus mode with tops near 600 hPa can develop at small SST differences when warm rain formation is more efficient. Here, interactive radiation and the response of the circulation are crucial: along with congestus a deeper moist layer develops, which leads to less low-level radiative cooling, a smaller buoyancy gradient between the columns, and therefore a weaker circulation and less subsidence over the cold ocean. The congestus mode is accompanied with more surface precipitation in the subsiding column and less surface precipitation in the deep convecting column. For the shallow mode over colder oceans, circulations also weaken with more efficient warm rain formation, but only marginally. Here, more warm rain reduces convective tops and the boundary layer depth—similar to Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) studies—which reduces the integrated buoyancy gradient. Elucidating the impact of warm rain can benefit from large-domain high-resolution simulations and observations. Parameterizations of warm rain may be constrained through collocated cloud and rain profiling from ground, and concurrent changes in convection and rain in subsiding and convecting branches of

  6. Simulation of hurricane response to suppression of warm rain by sub-micron aerosols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Rosenfeld

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The feasibility of hurricane modification was investigated for hurricane Katrina using the Weather Research and Forecasting Model (WRF. The possible impact of seeding of clouds with submicron cloud condensation nuclei (CCN on hurricane structure and intensity as measured by nearly halving of the area covered by hurricane force winds was simulated by "turning–off" warm rain formation in the clouds at Katrina's periphery (where wind speeds were less than 22 m s−1. This simplification of the simulation of aerosol effects is aimed at evaluating the largest possible response. This resulted in the weakening of the hurricane surface winds compared to the "non-seeded" simulated storm during the first 24 h within the entire tropical cyclone (TC area compared to a control simulation without warm rain suppression. Later, the seeding-induced evaporative cooling at the TC periphery led to a shrinking of the eye and hence to some increase in the wind within the small central area of the TC. Yet, the overall strength of the hurricane, as defined by the area covered by hurricane force winds, decreased in response to the suppressed warm rain at the periphery, as measured by a 25% reduction in the radius of hurricane force winds. In a simulation with warm rain suppression throughout the hurricane, the radius of the hurricane force winds was reduced by more than 42%, and although the diameter of the eye shrunk even further the maximum winds weakened. This shows that the main mechanism by which suppressing warm rain weakens the TC is the low level evaporative cooling of the un-precipitated cloud drops and the added cooling due to melting of precipitation that falls from above.

  7. RAIN

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Monti, Matteo; Rasmussen, Steen

    2017-01-01

    We summarize the results and perspectives from a companion article, where we presented and evaluated an alternative architecture for data storage in distributed networks. We name the bio-inspired architecture RAIN, and it offers file storage service that, in contrast with current centralized clou...... will integrate multiple current and future infrastructures ranging from online services and cryptocurrency to parts of government administration....

  8. Quasar Rain: The Broad Emission Line Region as Condensations in the Warm Accretion Disk Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elvis, Martin

    2017-09-01

    The origin of the broad emission line region (BELR) in quasars and active galactic nuclei is still unclear. I propose that condensations form in the warm, radiation-pressure-driven, accretion disk wind of quasars creating the BEL clouds and uniting them with the other two manifestations of cool (˜104 K) gas in quasars, the low ionization phase of the warm absorbers (WAs) and the clouds causing X-ray eclipses. The cool clouds will condense quickly (days to years), before the WA outflows reach escape velocity (which takes months to centuries). Cool clouds form in equilibrium with the warm phase of the wind because the rapidly varying X-ray quasar continuum changes the force multiplier, causing pressure waves to move gas into stable locations in pressure-temperature space. The narrow range of two-phase equilibrium densities may explain the (luminosity){}1/2 scaling of the BELR size, while the scaling of cloud formation timescales could produce the Baldwin effect. These dense clouds have force multipliers of order unity and so cannot be accelerated to escape velocity. They fall back on a dynamical timescale (months to centuries), producing an inflow that rains down toward the central black hole. As they soon move at Mach ˜10-100 with respect to the WA outflow, these “raindrops” will be rapidly destroyed within months. This rain of clouds may produce the elliptical BELR orbits implied by velocity-resolved reverberation mapping in some objects and can explain the opening angle and destruction timescale of the narrow “cometary” tails of the clouds seen in X-ray eclipse observations. Some consequences and challenges of this “quasar rain” model are presented, along with several avenues for theoretical investigation.

  9. Tropical rain forest biogeochemistry in a warmer world: initial results from a novel warming experiment in a Puerto Rico tropical forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, S.; Cavaleri, M. A.; Alonso-Rodríguez, A. M.; Kimball, B. A.; Wood, T. E.

    2016-12-01

    Tropical forests represent one of the planet's most active biogeochemical engines. They account for the dominant proportion of Earth's live terrestrial plant biomass, nearly one-third of all soil carbon, and exchange more CO2 with the atmosphere than any other biome. In the coming decades, the tropics will experience extraordinary changes in temperature, and our understanding of how this warming will affect biogeochemical cycling remains notably poor. Given the large amounts of carbon tropical forests store and cycle, it is no surprise that our limited ability to characterize tropical forest responses to climate change may represent the largest hurdle in accurately predicting Earth's future climate. Here we describe initial results from the world's first tropical forest field warming experiment, where forest understory plants and soils are being warmed 4 °C above ambient temperatures. This Tropical Responses to Altered Climate Experiment (TRACE) was established in a rain forest in Puerto Rico to investigate the effects of increased temperature on key biological processes that control tropical forest carbon cycling, and to establish the steps that need to be taken to resolve the uncertainties surrounding tropical forest responses to warming. In this talk we will describe the experimental design, as well as the wide range of measurements being conducted. We will also present results from the initial phase of warming, including data on how increased temperatures from infrared lamp warming affected soil moisture, soil respiration rates, a suite of carbon pools, soil microbial biomass, nutrient availability, and the exchange of elements between leaf litter and soil. These data represent a first look into tropical rain forest responses to an experimentally-warmed climate in the field, and provide exciting insight into the non-linear ways tropical biogeochemical cycles respond to change. Overall, we strive to improve Earth System Model parameterization of the pools and

  10. The Impacts of Atmospheric Moisture Transportation on Warm Sector Torrential Rains over South China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuixin Zhong

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Warm Sector Torrential Rains (WSTRs occurring during the outbreak of the monsoon in May of 2015 in South China were studied using surface automatic weather observational data, sounding, European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts Reanalysis interim Data (ERA-interim, satellite and radar data, and a four-level nested grid simulation with the finest grid spacing of 1 km using the Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF. The results show that the extreme precipitation event, which had maximum rainfall amounts of 406.3 mm in 10 h and 542.2 mm in 24 h on 20 May 2015, and was characterized by its rapid development and its highly concentrated and long duration of heavy rainfall, occurred over the trumpet-shaped topography of Haifeng. The simulation results indicated that the South China Sea (SCS atmospheric moisture transportation (AMT was crucial in triggering the precipitation of the WSTR over South China. The simulation of the WSTR was conducted by using the total energy-mass flux scheme (TEMF, which provided a reasonable simulation of the circulation and the vertical profile in the Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL as well as the estimation of the precipitation. The AMT, which extends from the Beibu Gulf and the South China Sea to the coastal areas and provides Shanwei with a considerable amount of moisture in the boundary layer, and the effects within the PBL, which include orographic effects, an extra low-level jet, and a high-energy tongue characterized by a high-potential pseudo-equivalent temperature tongue with a warm and moist southwesterly wind, were the important large-scale factors causing the WSTR.

  11. Rain: A New Concurrent Process-Oriented Programming Language

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Neil C.C.

    2006-01-01

    This paper details the design of a new concurrent process-oriented programming language, Rain. The language borrows heavily from occam-p and C++ to create a new language based on process-oriented programming, marrying channel-based communication, a clear division between statement and expression, and elements of functional programming. An expressive yet simple type system, coupled with templates, underpins the language. Modern features such as Unicode support and 64-bit integers are included ...

  12. Effect of hygroscopic seeding on warm rain clouds – numerical study using a hybrid cloud microphysical model

    OpenAIRE

    Kuba, N.; Murakami, M.

    2010-01-01

    The effect of hygroscopic seeding on warm rain clouds was examined using a hybrid cloud microphysical model combining a Lagrangian cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activation model, a semi-Lagrangian droplet growth model, and an Eulerian spatial model for advection and sedimentation of droplets. This hybrid cloud microphysical model accurately estimated the effects of CCN on cloud microstructure and suggested the following conclusions for a moderate continental air mass (an air mass wit...

  13. The hydrometeor partitioning and microphysical processes over the Pacific Warm Pool in numerical modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yi-Chih; Wang, Pao K.

    2017-01-01

    Numerical modeling is conducted to study the hydrometeor partitioning and microphysical source and sink processes during a quasi-steady state of thunderstorms over the Pacific Warm Pool by utilizing the microphysical model WISCDYMM to simulate selected storm cases. The results show that liquid-phase hydrometeors dominate thunderstorm evolution over the Pacific Warm Pool. The ratio of ice-phase mass to liquid-phase mass is about 41%: 59%, indicating that ice-phase water is not as significant over the Pacific Warm Pool as the liquid water compared to the larger than 50% in the subtropics and 80% in the US High Plains in a previous study. Sensitivity tests support the dominance of liquid-phase hydrometeors over the Pacific Warm Pool. The major rain sources are the key hail sinks: melting of hail and shedding from hail; whereas the crucial rain sinks are evaporation and accretion by hail. The major snow sources are Bergeron-Findeisen process, transfer of cloud ice to snow and accretion of cloud water; whereas the foremost sink of snow is accretion by hail. The essential hail sources are accretions of rain, cloud water, and snow; whereas the critical hail sinks are melting of hail and shedding from hail. The contribution and ranking of sources and sinks of these precipitates are compared with the previous study. Hydrometeors have their own special microphysical processes in the development and depletion over the Pacific Warm Pool. Microphysical budgets depend on atmospheric dynamical and thermodynamical conditions which determine the partitioning of hydrometeors. This knowledge would benefit the microphysics parameterization in cloud models and cumulus parameterization in global circulation models.

  14. A Three-Tier Diagnostic Test to Assess Pre-Service Teachers' Misconceptions about Global Warming, Greenhouse Effect, Ozone Layer Depletion, and Acid Rain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslan, Harika Ozge; Cigdemoglu, Ceyhan; Moseley, Christine

    2012-01-01

    This study describes the development and validation of a three-tier multiple-choice diagnostic test, the atmosphere-related environmental problems diagnostic test (AREPDiT), to reveal common misconceptions of global warming (GW), greenhouse effect (GE), ozone layer depletion (OLD), and acid rain (AR). The development of a two-tier diagnostic test…

  15. Rain or snow: hydrologic processes, observations, prediction, and research needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harpold, Adrian A.; Kaplan, Michael L.; Zion Klos, P.; Link, Timothy; McNamara, James P.; Rajagopal, Seshadri; Schumer, Rina; Steele, Caitriana M.

    2017-01-01

    The phase of precipitation when it reaches the ground is a first-order driver of hydrologic processes in a watershed. The presence of snow, rain, or mixed-phase precipitation affects the initial and boundary conditions that drive hydrological models. Despite their foundational importance to terrestrial hydrology, typical phase partitioning methods (PPMs) specify the phase based on near-surface air temperature only. Our review conveys the diversity of tools available for PPMs in hydrological modeling and the advancements needed to improve predictions in complex terrain with large spatiotemporal variations in precipitation phase. Initially, we review the processes and physics that control precipitation phase as relevant to hydrologists, focusing on the importance of processes occurring aloft. There is a wide range of options for field observations of precipitation phase, but there is a lack of a robust observation networks in complex terrain. New remote sensing observations have the potential to increase PPM fidelity, but generally require assumptions typical of other PPMs and field validation before they are operational. We review common PPMs and find that accuracy is generally increased at finer measurement intervals and by including humidity information. One important tool for PPM development is atmospheric modeling, which includes microphysical schemes that have not been effectively linked to hydrological models or validated against near-surface precipitation-phase observations. The review concludes by describing key research gaps and recommendations to improve PPMs, including better incorporation of atmospheric information, improved validation datasets, and regional-scale gridded data products. Two key points emerge from this synthesis for the hydrologic community: (1) current PPMs are too simple to capture important processes and are not well validated for most locations, (2) lack of sophisticated PPMs increases the uncertainty in estimation of hydrological

  16. Simulation and analysis of natural rain in a wind tunnel via digital image processing techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaron, K. M.; Hernan, M.; Parikh, P.; Sarohia, V.; Gharib, M.

    1986-01-01

    It is desired to simulate natural rain in a wind tunnel in order to investigate its influence on the aerodynamic characteristics of aircraft. Rain simulation nozzles have been developed and tested at JPL. Pulsed laser sheet illumination is used to photograph the droplets in the moving airstream. Digital image processing techniques are applied to these photographs for calculation of rain statistics to evaluate the performance of the nozzles. It is found that fixed hypodermic type nozzles inject too much water to simulate natural rain conditions. A modification uses two aerodynamic spinners to flex a tube in a pseudo-random fashion to distribute the water over a larger area.

  17. Disturbance regimes, gap-demanding trees and seed mass related to tree height in warm temperate rain forests worldwide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grubb, Peter J; Bellingham, Peter J; Kohyama, Takashi S; Piper, Frida I; Valido, Alfredo

    2013-08-01

    For tropical lowland rain forests, Denslow (1987) hypothesized that in areas with large-scale disturbances tree species with a high demand for light make up a larger proportion of the flora; results of tests have been inconsistent. There has been no test for warm temperate rain forests (WTRFs), but they offer a promising testing ground because they differ widely in the extent of disturbance. WTRF is dominated by microphylls sensu Raunkiaer and has a simpler structure and range of physiognomy than tropical or subtropical rain forests. It occurs in six parts of the world: eastern Asia, New Zealand, Chile, South Africa, SE Australia and the Azores. On the Azores it has been mostly destroyed, so we studied instead the subtropical montane rain forest (STMRF) on the Canary Islands which also represents a relict of the kind of WTRF that once stretched across southern Eurasia. We sought to find whether in these six regions the proportion of tree species needing canopy gaps for establishment reflects the frequency and/or extent of canopy disturbance by wind, landslide, volcanic eruptions (lava flow and ash fall), flood or fire. We used standard floras and ecological accounts to draw up lists of core tree species commonly reaching 5 m height. We excluded species which are very rare, very localized in distribution, or confined to special habitats, e.g. coastal forests or rocky sites. We used published accounts and our own experience to classify species into three groups: (1) needing canopy gaps for establishment; (2) needing either light shade throughout or a canopy gap relatively soon (a few months or years) after establishment; and (3) variously more shade-tolerant. Group 1 species were divided according the kind of canopy opening needed: tree-fall gap, landslide, lava flow, flood or fire. Only some of the significant differences in proportion of Group 1 species were consistent with differences in the extent of disturbance; even in some of those cases other factors seem

  18. Effect of hygroscopic seeding on warm rain clouds – numerical study using a hybrid cloud microphysical model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Kuba

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The effect of hygroscopic seeding on warm rain clouds was examined using a hybrid cloud microphysical model combining a Lagrangian Cloud Condensation Nuclei (CCN activation model, a semi-Lagrangian droplet growth model, and an Eulerian spatial model for advection and sedimentation of droplets. This hybrid cloud microphysical model accurately estimated the effects of CCN on cloud microstructure and suggested the following conclusions for a moderate continental air mass (an air mass with a large number of background CCN. (1 Seeding can hasten the onset of surface rainfall and increase the accumulated amount of surface rainfall if the amount and radius of seeding particles are appropriate. (2 The optimal radius of monodisperse particles to increase rainfall becomes larger with the increase in the total mass of seeding particles. (3 Seeding with salt micro-powder can hasten the onset of surface rainfall and increase the accumulated amount of surface rainfall if the amount of seeding particles is sufficient. (4 Seeding by a hygroscopic flare decreases rainfall in the case of large updraft velocity (shallow convective cloud and increases rainfall slightly in the case of small updraft velocity (stratiform cloud. (5 Seeding with hygroscopic flares including ultra-giant particles (r>5 μm hastens the onset of surface rainfall but may not significantly increase the accumulated surface rainfall amount. (6 Hygroscopic seeding increases surface rainfall by two kinds of effects: the "competition effect" by which large soluble particles prevent the activation of smaller particles and the "raindrop embryo effect" in which giant soluble particles can immediately become raindrop embryos. In some cases, one of the effects works, and in other cases, both effects work, depending on the updraft velocity and the amount and size of seeding particles.

  19. Promotion of Scientific Literacy on Global Warming by Process Drama

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pongsophon, Pongprapan; Yutakom, Naruemon; Boujaoude, Saouma B.

    2010-01-01

    This project aims to investigate how process drama promotes scientific literacy in the context of global warming. Thirty-one lower (n = 24) and upper (n = 7) secondary students of one secondary school in Bangkok, Thailand participated in a seven-day workshop which process drama strategy was implemented. In the workshop, the students were actively…

  20. Climate warming and the decline of Taxus airborne pollen in urban pollen rain (Emilia Romagna, northern Italy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercuri, A M; Torri, P; Casini, E; Olmi, L

    2013-01-01

    Woody plant performance in a changing global environment has always been at the centre of palaeoenvironmental and long-term climate reconstructions carried out by means of pollen analysis. In Mediterranean regions, Taxus constitutes the highest percentage in past pollen diagrams from cold or cool periods, and therefore it is generally considered a good index to infer climate features from past records. However, a comparison of these inferences with the true current trends in pollen production has not been attemped until now. This study reports the decline of airborne pollen of Taxus observed in Emilia Romagna, a region of northern Italy, during the period 1990-2007. Phenological observations on four male specimens and microscopic examination of fresh pollen were made in order to check Taxus flowering time and pollen morphology. Airborne pollen was monitored through continuous sampling with a Hirst volumetric sampler. In the 18-year long period of investigation, Taxus pollen production has decreased, while total woody pollen abundance in air has increased. The trend of the Taxus pollen season shows a delay at the beginning, a shortening of the pollen period, and an advance of the end of the pollen season. This was interpreted as a response to climate warming. In particular, Taxus follows the behaviour of winter-flowering plants, and therefore earlier pollination is favoured at low autumn temperatures, while late pollination occurs more often, most likely after warm autumn temperatures. © 2012 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  1. Further evidence for CCN aerosol concentrations determining the height of warm rain and ice initiation in convective clouds over the Amazon basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. C. Braga

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available We have investigated how aerosols affect the height above cloud base of rain and ice hydrometeor initiation and the subsequent vertical evolution of cloud droplet size and number concentrations in growing convective cumulus. For this purpose we used in situ data of hydrometeor size distributions measured with instruments mounted on HALO aircraft during the ACRIDICON–CHUVA campaign over the Amazon during September 2014. The results show that the height of rain initiation by collision and coalescence processes (Dr, in units of meters above cloud base is linearly correlated with the number concentration of droplets (Nd in cm−3 nucleated at cloud base (Dr ≈ 5 ⋅ Nd. Additional cloud processes associated with Dr, such as GCCN, cloud, and mixing with ambient air and other processes, produce deviations of  ∼  21 % in the linear relationship, but it does not mask the clear relationship between Dr and Nd, which was also found at different regions around the globe (e.g., Israel and India. When Nd exceeded values of about 1000 cm−3, Dr became greater than 5000 m, and the first observed precipitation particles were ice hydrometeors. Therefore, no liquid water raindrops were observed within growing convective cumulus during polluted conditions. Furthermore, the formation of ice particles also took place at higher altitudes in the clouds in polluted conditions because the resulting smaller cloud droplets froze at colder temperatures compared to the larger drops in the unpolluted cases. The measured vertical profiles of droplet effective radius (re were close to those estimated by assuming adiabatic conditions (rea, supporting the hypothesis that the entrainment and mixing of air into convective clouds is nearly inhomogeneous. Additional CCN activation on aerosol particles from biomass burning and air pollution reduced re below rea, which further inhibited the formation of raindrops and ice particles and resulted in even higher

  2. Further evidence for CCN aerosol concentrations determining the height of warm rain and ice initiation in convective clouds over the Amazon basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos Braga, Ramon; Rosenfeld, Daniel; Weigel, Ralf; Jurkat, Tina; Andreae, Meinrat O.; Wendisch, Manfred; Pöschl, Ulrich; Voigt, Christiane; Mahnke, Christoph; Borrmann, Stephan; Albrecht, Rachel I.; Molleker, Sergej; Vila, Daniel A.; Machado, Luiz A. T.; Grulich, Lucas

    2017-12-01

    We have investigated how aerosols affect the height above cloud base of rain and ice hydrometeor initiation and the subsequent vertical evolution of cloud droplet size and number concentrations in growing convective cumulus. For this purpose we used in situ data of hydrometeor size distributions measured with instruments mounted on HALO aircraft during the ACRIDICON-CHUVA campaign over the Amazon during September 2014. The results show that the height of rain initiation by collision and coalescence processes (Dr, in units of meters above cloud base) is linearly correlated with the number concentration of droplets (Nd in cm-3) nucleated at cloud base (Dr ≈ 5 ṡ Nd). Additional cloud processes associated with Dr, such as GCCN, cloud, and mixing with ambient air and other processes, produce deviations of ˜ 21 % in the linear relationship, but it does not mask the clear relationship between Dr and Nd, which was also found at different regions around the globe (e.g., Israel and India). When Nd exceeded values of about 1000 cm-3, Dr became greater than 5000 m, and the first observed precipitation particles were ice hydrometeors. Therefore, no liquid water raindrops were observed within growing convective cumulus during polluted conditions. Furthermore, the formation of ice particles also took place at higher altitudes in the clouds in polluted conditions because the resulting smaller cloud droplets froze at colder temperatures compared to the larger drops in the unpolluted cases. The measured vertical profiles of droplet effective radius (re) were close to those estimated by assuming adiabatic conditions (rea), supporting the hypothesis that the entrainment and mixing of air into convective clouds is nearly inhomogeneous. Additional CCN activation on aerosol particles from biomass burning and air pollution reduced re below rea, which further inhibited the formation of raindrops and ice particles and resulted in even higher altitudes for rain and ice initiation.

  3. Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment TWP-ICE Cloud and rain characteristics in the Australian Monsoon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    May, P.T., Jakob, C., and Mather, J.H.

    2004-05-31

    The impact of oceanic convection on its environment and the relationship between the characteristics of the convection and the resulting cirrus characteristics is still not understood. An intense airborne measurement campaign combined with an extensive network of ground-based observations is being planned for the region near Darwin, Northern Australia, during January-February, 2006, to address these questions. The Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) will be the first field program in the tropics that attempts to describe the evolution of tropical convection, including the large scale heat, moisture, and momentum budgets, while at the same time obtaining detailed observations of cloud properties and the impact of the clouds on the environment. The emphasis will be on cirrus for the cloud properties component of the experiment. Cirrus clouds are ubiquitous in the tropics and have a large impact on their environment but the properties of these clouds are poorly understood. A crucial product from this experiment will be a dataset suitable to provide the forcing and testing required by cloud-resolving models and parameterizations in global climate models. This dataset will provide the necessary link between cloud properties and the models that are attempting to simulate them.

  4. Improved Micro Rain Radar snow measurements using Doppler spectra post-processing

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    M. Maahn

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The Micro Rain Radar 2 (MRR is a compact Frequency Modulated Continuous Wave (FMCW system that operates at 24 GHz. The MRR is a low-cost, portable radar system that requires minimum supervision in the field. As such, the MRR is a frequently used radar system for conducting precipitation research. Current MRR drawbacks are the lack of a sophisticated post-processing algorithm to improve its sensitivity (currently at +3 dBz, spurious artefacts concerning radar receiver noise and the lack of high quality Doppler radar moments. Here we propose an improved processing method which is especially suited for snow observations and provides reliable values of effective reflectivity, Doppler velocity and spectral width. The proposed method is freely available on the web and features a noise removal based on recognition of the most significant peak. A dynamic dealiasing routine allows observations even if the Nyquist velocity range is exceeded. Collocated observations over 115 days of a MRR and a pulsed 35.2 GHz MIRA35 cloud radar show a very high agreement for the proposed method for snow, if reflectivities are larger than −5 dBz. The overall sensitivity is increased to −14 and −8 dBz, depending on range. The proposed method exploits the full potential of MRR's hardware and substantially enhances the use of Micro Rain Radar for studies of solid precipitation.

  5. Spontaneuos and Parametric Processes in Warm Rubidium Vapours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dąbrowski M.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Warm rubidium vapours are known to be a versatile medium for a variety of experiments in atomic physics and quantum optics. Here we present experimental results on producing the frequency converted light for quantum applications based on spontaneous and stimulated processes in rubidium vapours. In particular, we study the efficiency of spontaneously initiated stimulated Raman scattering in the Λ-level configuration and conditions of generating the coherent blue light assisted by multi-photon transitions in the diamond-level configuration. Our results will be helpful in search for new types of interfaces between light and atomic quantum memories.

  6. Rain Gauges Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartholomew, M. J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2016-01-01

    To improve the quantitative description of precipitation processes in climate models, the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility deployed rain gauges located near disdrometers (DISD and VDIS data streams). This handbook deals specifically with the rain gauges that make the observations for the RAIN data stream. Other precipitation observations are made by the surface meteorology instrument suite (i.e., MET data stream).

  7. Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE): Cloud and Rain Characteristics in the Australian Monsoon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PT May; C Jakob; JH Mather

    2004-05-30

    The impact of oceanic convection on its environment and the relationship between the characteristics of the convection and the resulting cirrus characteristics is still not understood. An intense airborne measurement campaign combined with an extensive network of ground-based observations is being planned for the region near Darwin, Northern Australia, during January-February, 2006, to address these questions. The Tropical Warm Pool – International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) will be the first field program in the tropics that attempts to describe the evolution of tropical convection, including the large scale heat, moisture, and momentum budgets, while at the same time obtaining detailed observations of cloud properties and the impact of the clouds on the environment. The emphasis will be on cirrus for the cloud properties component of the experiment. Cirrus clouds are ubiquitous in the tropics and have a large impact on their environment but the properties of these clouds are poorly understood. A crucial product from this experiment will be a dataset suitable to provide the forcing and testing required by cloud-resolving models and parameterizations in global climate models. This dataset will provide the necessary link between cloud properties and the models that are attempting to simulate them. The experiment is a collaboration between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program, the Bureau of Meteorology (BoM), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the European Commission DG RTD-1.2, and several United States, Australian, Canadian, and European Universities. This experiment will be undertaken over a 4-week period in early 2006. January and February corresponds to the wet phase of the Australia monsoon. This season has been selected because, despite Darwin’s coastal location, the convection that occurs over and near Darwin at this time is largely of maritime origin with a large fetch over water

  8. A Three-Tier Diagnostic Test to Assess Pre-Service Teachers' Misconceptions about Global Warming, Greenhouse Effect, Ozone Layer Depletion, and Acid Rain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozge Arslan, Harika; Cigdemoglu, Ceyhan; Moseley, Christine

    2012-07-01

    This study describes the development and validation of a three-tier multiple-choice diagnostic test, the atmosphere-related environmental problems diagnostic test (AREPDiT), to reveal common misconceptions of global warming (GW), greenhouse effect (GE), ozone layer depletion (OLD), and acid rain (AR). The development of a two-tier diagnostic test procedure as described by Treagust constitutes the framework for this study. To differentiate a lack of knowledge from a misconception, a certainty response index is added as a third tier to each item. Based on propositional knowledge statements, related literature, and the identified misconceptions gathered initially from 157 pre-service teachers, the AREPDiT was constructed and administered to 256 pre-service teachers. The Cronbach alpha reliability coefficient of the pre-service teachers' scores was estimated to be 0.74. Content and face validations were established by senior experts. A moderate positive correlation between the participants' both-tiers scores and their certainty scores indicated evidence for construct validity. Therefore, the AREPDiT is a reliable and valid instrument not only to identify pre-service teachers' misconceptions about GW, GE, OLD, and AR but also to differentiate these misconceptions from lack of knowledge. The results also reveal that a majority of the respondents demonstrated limited understandings about atmosphere-related environmental problems and held six common misconceptions. Future studies could test the AREPDiT as a tool for assessing the misconceptions held by pre-service teachers from different programs as well as in-service teachers and high school students.

  9. Explosive Chromospheric Evaporation and Warm Rain in a C3.1 Flare Observed by IRIS, Hinode/EIS, and RHESSI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosius, Jeffrey W.; Inglis, Andrew R.

    2017-10-01

    IRIS and EIS observed a GOES C3.1 flare in stare mode on 2014 March 15. The GOES flare started at 00:21:35 and peaked at 00:26:30 UT. The IRIS slit pointed near the center of the flare, while the EIS slit pointed 35\\prime\\prime to its west. About 4 minutes before the GOES flare start, the IRIS C II and Si IV intensities became (and remained) greater than their pre-flare averages, indicating that the flare had begun and that the chromosphere and transition region were involved. IRIS first detected blueshifted Fe xxi emission at 00:22:42 UT, by which time the C II and Si IV intensities had increased by factors around 100 and their profiles were redshifted. Simultaneous, cospatial blueshifted Fe xxi emission with redshifted C II and Si IV emission indicates explosive chromospheric evaporation. EIS spectra reveal Fe xxiii emission that is too weak to measure velocities, and intensity enhancements by factors about 1.7 in the Fe xiv and Fe xvi emission. Lines from both of these coronal ions show redshifts ≈9 km s-1 around 00:24:00 UT, and the Fe xiv 264.7/274.2 intensity ratio reveals an increase of n e from (1.03+/- 0.20)× {10}9 before to (3.58+/- 0.68)× {10}9 cm-3 during the flare. The redshifted coronal line emission and increased n e are consistent with warm rain falling and accumulating in the remote area observed by EIS. A fit to the RHESSI hard X-ray spectrum yields a nonthermal energy injection rate of 4.9× {10}26 erg s-1, from which we estimate a HXR beam energy flux range consistent with explosive evaporation.

  10. A Novel Scheme for Parameterizing Aerosol Processing in Warm Clouds

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lebo, Zachary J; Morrison, Hugh

    2013-01-01

    ..., in a kinematic model with a specified flow field. Hybrid simulations in which the explicit activation formulation is coupled to the scaling parameterization are also performed. Model results demonstrate the significance of including a physically realistic representation of aerosols contained in haze, cloud droplets, and rain. It is shown that the expli...

  11. Impaired ecosystem process despite little effects on populations: modeling combined effects of warming and toxicants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galic, Nika; Grimm, Volker; Forbes, Valery E

    2017-08-01

    Freshwater ecosystems are exposed to many stressors, including toxic chemicals and global warming, which can impair, separately or in combination, important processes in organisms and hence higher levels of organization. Investigating combined effects of warming and toxicants has been a topic of little research, but neglecting their combined effects may seriously misguide management efforts. To explore how toxic chemicals and warming, alone and in combination, propagate across levels of biological organization, including a key ecosystem process, we developed an individual-based model (IBM) of a freshwater amphipod detritivore, Gammarus pseudolimnaeus, feeding on leaf litter. In this IBM, life history emerges from the individuals' energy budgets. We quantified, in different warming scenarios (+1-+4 °C), the effects of hypothetical toxicants on suborganismal processes, including feeding, somatic and maturity maintenance, growth, and reproduction. Warming reduced mean adult body sizes and population abundance and biomass, but only in the warmest scenarios. Leaf litter processing, a key contributor to ecosystem functioning and service delivery in streams, was consistently enhanced by warming, through strengthened interaction between the detritivorous consumer and its resource. Toxicant effects on feeding and maintenance resulted in initially small adverse effects on consumers, but ultimately led to population extinction and loss of ecosystem process. Warming in combination with toxicants had little effect at the individual and population levels, but ecosystem process was impaired in the warmer scenarios. Our results suggest that exposure to the same amount of toxicants can disproportionately compromise ecosystem processing depending on global warming scenarios; for example, reducing organismal feeding rates by 50% will reduce resource processing by 50% in current temperature conditions, but by up to 200% with warming of 4 °C. Our study has implications for

  12. USGS Tracks Acid Rain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, John D.; Nilles, Mark A.; Schroder, LeRoy J.

    1995-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has been actively studying acid rain for the past 15 years. When scientists learned that acid rain could harm fish, fear of damage to our natural environment from acid rain concerned the American public. Research by USGS scientists and other groups began to show that the processes resulting in acid rain are very complex. Scientists were puzzled by the fact that in some cases it was difficult to demonstrate that the pollution from automobiles and factories was causing streams or lakes to become more acidic. Further experiments showed how the natural ability of many soils to neutralize acids would reduce the effects of acid rain in some locations--at least as long as the neutralizing ability lasted (Young, 1991). The USGS has played a key role in establishing and maintaining the only nationwide network of acid rain monitoring stations. This program is called the National Atmospheric Deposition Program/National Trends Network (NADP/NTN). Each week, at approximately 220 NADP/NTN sites across the country, rain and snow samples are collected for analysis. NADP/NTN site in Montana. The USGS supports about 72 of these sites. The information gained from monitoring the chemistry of our nation's rain and snow is important for testing the results of pollution control laws on acid rain.

  13. Potential Use of BEST® Sediment Trap in Splash - Saltation Transport Process by Simultaneous Wind and Rain Tests.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Basaran

    Full Text Available The research on wind-driven rain (WDR transport process of the splash-saltation has increased over the last twenty years as wind tunnel experimental studies provide new insights into the mechanisms of simultaneous wind and rain (WDR transport. The present study was conducted to investigate the efficiency of the BEST® sediment traps in catching the sand particles transported through the splash-saltation process under WDR conditions. Experiments were conducted in a wind tunnel rainfall simulator facility with water sprayed through sprinkler nozzles and free-flowing wind at different velocities to simulate the WDR conditions. Not only for vertical sediment distribution, but a series of experimental tests for horizontal distribution of sediments was also performed using BEST® collectors to obtain the actual total sediment mass flow by the splash-saltation in the center of the wind tunnel test section. Total mass transport (kg m-2 were estimated by analytically integrating the exponential functional relationship using the measured sediment amounts at the set trap heights for every run. Results revealed the integrated efficiency of the BEST® traps at 6, 9, 12 and 15 m s-1 wind velocities under 55.8, 50.5, 55.0 and 50.5 mm h-1 rain intensities were, respectively, 83, 106, 105, and 102%. Results as well showed that the efficiencies of BEST® did not change much as compared with those under rainless wind condition.

  14. Acid rain: An overview

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Summary of the effects of acid rain and related processes, sources, issues, corrective actions, research, current law, potential solutions, political solutions,...

  15. The interaction of radiative and dynamical processes during a simulating sudden stratospheric warming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierce, R.B.; Blackshear, W.T.; Grose, W.L.; Turner, R.E. (NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton VA (United States)); Fairlie, T.D. (Science and Technology Corporation, Hampton, VA (United States))

    1993-12-01

    An analysis of a spontaneous sudden stratospheric warming that occurred during a 2-year integration of the Langley Research Center Atmospheric Simulation Model is presented. The simulated warming resembles observed [open quotes]wave 1[close quotes] warmings in the Northern Hemisphere stratosphere and provides an opportunity to investigate the radiative and dynamical processes occurring during the warming event. Isentropic analysis of potential vorticity sources and sinks indicates that dynamically induced departures from radiative equilibrium play an important role in the warming event. Enhanced radiative cooling associated with a series of upper stratospheric warm pools leads to radiative dampening within the polar vortex. Within the [open quotes]surf zone[close quotes] large-scale radiative cooling leads to diabatic advection of high potential vorticity air from aloft. Lagrangian area diagnostics of the simulated warming agree well with LIMS analysis. Dynamical mixing is shown to account for the majority of the decrease in the size of the polar vortex during the simulated warming. An investigation of the nonlinear deformation of material lines that are initially coincident with diagnosed potential vorticity isopleths is conducted to clarify the relationship between the lagrangian area diagnostics and potential vorticity advection during wave breaking events. 27 refs., 25 figs.

  16. Dryland Precipitation Variability and Desertification Processes: An Assessment of Spatial and Temporal Rain Variability within the Grand Canyon, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caster, J.; Sankey, J. B.; Draut, A.; Fairley, H.; Collins, B. D.; Bedford, D.

    2014-12-01

    In drylands, spatial and temporal rain variability can result from natural climatic cycles, weather patterns, and physiographic factors. In these environments, minor differences in rainfall distribution can invoke significant ecosystem response. The Grand Canyon, Arizona is an iconic dryland environment that receives less than 430 mm of annual rainfall. Recent monitoring of desertification processes at culturally sensitive landscapes in Grand Canyon has examined variability in vegetation, soil crusts, and runoff induced erosion, and identified a lack of knowledge about the nature, drivers and effects of local rainfall variability. We examine rainfall variability using five years of high resolution data collected from 11 weather stations distributed along the Colorado River within Grand Canyon, coupled with 60 years of lower resolution data from National Weather Service Cooperative Observer (NOAA COOP) stations. We characterize spatial and temporal variability in 10-minute rainfall intensity, an important predictor of soil erosion, and daily rainfall depth, an important predictor of biotic cover. We quantify the intensity-daily depth relationship to infer long-term variability in rainfall intensity from the NOAA COOP data that only record rainfall depth. Results confirm findings from previous studies showing a bi-seasonally rainfall pattern with longer duration-lower intensity storms in the cool season and shorter duration-higher intensity storms during the North American Monsoon (NAM).Seasonal differences in rainfall intensity-depth relationships are significant, and suggest NAM storms have greater potential to produce erosion-generating intensities. As NAM rainfall is spatially and inter-annually more variable than cool season rain, yearly rain depths are strongly influenced by NAM fluctuations. These findings will be useful in future efforts to track desertification processes in this and other drylands characterized by complex topography and extreme rainfall

  17. Long-term versus short-term warming effects on microbial processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Tom; Leblans, Niki; Sigurdsson, Bjarni D.; Richter, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    Rapid warming in high latitude ecosystems is predicted to drive massive losses of carbon dioxide (CO2) from soils to the atmosphere, raising concerns that it will create a positive feedback to climate change. However, such predictions expect that temperature effects on soil microbes, as chief producers of CO2, will persist over time scales meaningful to the climate system (i.e. decades to centuries). There is increasing awareness that the soil microbial community can acclimate to temperature change over time scales from months to years, resulting in attenuating responses of CO2 release to the atmosphere. Despite this, nothing is currently known about long-term warming effects on the activity or physiology of high latitude soil microbes, and, through this, the longevity of CO2 losses from these ecosystems. We conducted a study at a unique research site that makes use of natural (geothermal) gradients in soil temperature that have been in place for over 35 years as a natural warming treatment. We determined long-term warming effects (+0.5 °C, +1.5 °C, +3 °C and +6 °C) on soil CO2 release through microbial respiration in a laboratory incubation experiment, and explored microbial carbon use efficiency and soil carbon and nitrogen pools as mechanisms. We also performed a companion experiment to compare long-term warming effects on microbial processes to those caused by six weeks of warming of ambient soil to +3 °C and +6 °C. We show that while six weeks of warming consistently increased microbial respiration by up to 30%, this effect did not persist in soils exposed to 35 years of warming. We present further data linking such long-term thermal acclimation to shifts in microbial carbon use efficiency and soil carbon and nitrogen availability, and discuss our findings in the context of warming-driven feedbacks from high latitude soils to future climate change.

  18. Effects of Cloud-Processed CCN on Warm Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, S. R., Jr.; Hudson, J. G.

    2014-12-01

    Cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) distributions are transformed by in-cloud processing. This can be chemical: aqueous oxidation; or physical: Brownian scavenging, collision and coalescence. Droplet evaporation then leaves behind the cloud-processed CCN. Chemical processing increases CCN size (lower critical supersaturation; Sc) but does not change CCN concentration (NCCN) (Feingold and Kreidenweis, 2000). Physical processing leads to an increase in size (lower Sc) and decrease of NCCN. These processes are especially important in stratus clouds that cover large areas and persist for long periods. Modified CCN in turn modify cloud droplet spectra. Both chemical and physical processing were observed during the 2005 MArine Stratus/stratocumulus Experiment (MASE) field campaign. Higher concentrations of SO4 and NO3 anions with lower SO2 and O3 were associated with bimodal CCN spectra whereas monomodal spectra had lower SO4 and NO3 and higher SO2 and O3. These are consistent with chemical processing. Two nearby MASE CCN spectra, one bimodal and one monomodal were input to an adiabatic cloud droplet growth model. Model runs at various updrafts (W) show that the low Sc cloud processed mode of the bimodal CCN spectrum augmented droplet activation creating higher cloud droplet concentrations (Nc) for low W characteristic of stratus clouds (Fig. 1a, black). Higher NCCN at low Sc (black data) also increased condensation competition and thus reduced cloud effective S (Seff) (Fig.1b). This increases W importance for determining Nc (Hudson and Noble, 2014). These high NCCN at low Sc and lower Seff of the bimodal CCN spectrum reduce droplet mean diameter (MD; Fig. 1c) and broaden droplet distributions (sigma; Fig. 1d). Increased Nc and decreased MD of chemical processing seems to augment the indirect aerosol effect (IAE) whereas inherently decreased Nc and increased MD of coalescence processing reduces IAE. CCN cloud-processing alters cloud microphysics (Nc, Seff, MD, and sigma

  19. Acid rain research program. Annual progress report, July 1976--September 1977. [Effects on plants and soil microbiological processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, L.S.; Francis, A.J.; Raynor, G.S.

    1977-12-01

    Experiments were carried out and chemical aspects of ambient precipitation were determined using a sequential precipitation collector for the period July 1976 through September 1977. A related report provides experimental details. In experiments with plants, experiments were aimed to document: the foliar response of six clones of hybrid poplar to simulated acid rain; effects of buffered solutions and various anions on vegetative and sexual development of gametophytes of the fern (Pteridium aquilinum) and the acid-sensitive steps of symbiotic nitrogen fixation of the garden pea (Pisum sativum). After five 6 min daily exposures to simulated rain of pH 2.7, up to 10 percent of the leaf area of some poplar clones was injured. Lesions developed mostly near stomata and vascular tissue as shown with other plant species. Acidic solutions have a marked effect on sperm motility and fertilization (sexual reproduction) of bracken fern. Since sexual reproduction of ferns is very sensitive to mildly acidic conditions under laboratory conditions, experiments are planned to view the response of sexual stages of other plant species. Nodulation and symbiotic nitrogen fixation in Pisum is very sensitive to nutrient solution acidity. Specific isolates of Rhizobium bacteria are used and the medium pH can be maintained rigidly. In experiments to determine the effects of excess acidity on soil microbiological processes, the rate of denitrification may be slowed so drastically that increases of N/sub 2/O in the atmosphere may result with a subsequent reduction in soil nitrogen levels.

  20. Molecular processes of transgenerational acclimation to a warming ocean

    KAUST Repository

    Veilleux, Heather D.

    2015-07-20

    Some animals have the remarkable capacity to acclimate across generations to projected future climate change1, 2, 3, 4; however, the underlying molecular processes are unknown. We sequenced and assembled de novo transcriptomes of adult tropical reef fish exposed developmentally or transgenerationally to projected future ocean temperatures and correlated the resulting expression profiles with acclimated metabolic traits from the same fish. We identified 69 contigs representing 53 key genes involved in thermal acclimation of aerobic capacity. Metabolic genes were among the most upregulated transgenerationally, suggesting shifts in energy production for maintaining performance at elevated temperatures. Furthermore, immune- and stress-responsive genes were upregulated transgenerationally, indicating a new complement of genes allowing the second generation of fish to better cope with elevated temperatures. Other differentially expressed genes were involved with tissue development and transcriptional regulation. Overall, we found a similar suite of differentially expressed genes among developmental and transgenerational treatments. Heat-shock protein genes were surprisingly unresponsive, indicating that short-term heat-stress responses may not be a good indicator of long-term acclimation capacity. Our results are the first to reveal the molecular processes that may enable marine fishes to adjust to a future warmer environment over multiple generations.

  1. Molecular processes of transgenerational acclimation to a warming ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veilleux, Heather D.; Ryu, Taewoo; Donelson, Jennifer M.; van Herwerden, Lynne; Seridi, Loqmane; Ghosheh, Yanal; Berumen, Michael L.; Leggat, William; Ravasi, Timothy; Munday, Philip L.

    2015-12-01

    Some animals have the remarkable capacity to acclimate across generations to projected future climate change; however, the underlying molecular processes are unknown. We sequenced and assembled de novo transcriptomes of adult tropical reef fish exposed developmentally or transgenerationally to projected future ocean temperatures and correlated the resulting expression profiles with acclimated metabolic traits from the same fish. We identified 69 contigs representing 53 key genes involved in thermal acclimation of aerobic capacity. Metabolic genes were among the most upregulated transgenerationally, suggesting shifts in energy production for maintaining performance at elevated temperatures. Furthermore, immune- and stress-responsive genes were upregulated transgenerationally, indicating a new complement of genes allowing the second generation of fish to better cope with elevated temperatures. Other differentially expressed genes were involved with tissue development and transcriptional regulation. Overall, we found a similar suite of differentially expressed genes among developmental and transgenerational treatments. Heat-shock protein genes were surprisingly unresponsive, indicating that short-term heat-stress responses may not be a good indicator of long-term acclimation capacity. Our results are the first to reveal the molecular processes that may enable marine fishes to adjust to a future warmer environment over multiple generations.

  2. Optical Rain Gauge Instrument Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartholomew, Mary Jane [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2016-04-01

    To improve the quantitative description of precipitation processes in climate models, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility deploys several types of rain gauges (MET, RAIN, and optical rain gauge [ORG] datastreams) as well as disdrometers (DISD and VDIS datastreams) at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Site. This handbook deals specifically with the independent analog ORG (i.e., the ORG datastream).

  3. Processes of Change in Acceptance and Commitment Therapy and Cognitive Therapy for Depression: A Mediation Reanalysis of Zettle and Rains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zettle, Robert D.; Rains, Jeanetta C.; Hayes, Steven C.

    2011-01-01

    Several articles have recently questioned the distinction between acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) and traditional cognitive therapy (CT). This study presents a reanalysis of data from Zettle and Rains that compared 12 weeks of group CT with group ACT. For theoretical reasons, Zettle and Rains also included a modified form of CT that did…

  4. Effects of different CO2 concentration on growth and photosynthetic of rain tree plants (Albizia saman jacq.Merr)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathurrahman, F.; Nizam, M. S.; Wan Juliana, W. A.; Doni, Febri; NorLailatul, W. M.; Che Radziah, C. M. Z.

    2016-11-01

    A preliminary study was conducted to determine the effect of elevated carbon dioxide (CO2) in rain tree growth under controllable growth chamber. The tolerance towards CO2 absorption in the photosynthesis process for the growth of tree rain is still unknown. In this study, rain tree seedlings were incubated for three months in a growth chamber with three different CO2 concentration treatment: GC1 (300 ppm), GC2 (600 ppm) and GC3 (900 ppm) at similar condition of temperature (28°C), humidity (60%) and lighting (1200 lux). The results showed that increased CO2 significantly increase the growth rate and chlorophyll content in rain tree. The results of this study add to the further understanding of how the improvement of the growth and physiological characteristics of rain tree was affected by CO2 enrichment treatment. This research can for used for global warming mitigation in the future.

  5. Effect of the droplet activation process on microphysical properties of warm clouds

    OpenAIRE

    Suzuki, Kentaroh; NAKAJIMA, Teruyuki; Nakajima, Takashi Y.; Stephens, Graeme L.

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates the effect of the droplet activation process on microphysical characteristics of warm clouds represented by correlation statistics between cloud droplet effective radius re and cloud optical thickness τc. The conceptual adiabatic model is first employed to interpret satellite-observed re-τc correlation statistics over two different regions and to reveal distinctively different increasing patterns of droplet number concentration between these regions. This difference is...

  6. Examining processes that contribute to enhanced warming rates at high elevations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, James; Chen, Yonghua; Ghatak, Debjani; Naud, Catherine; Rangwala, Imtiaz; Sinsky, Eric; Su, Xiaoou; van Oppen, Stephanie; Xu, Ming

    2017-04-01

    During the last several decades, many studies, although not all, have found enhanced warming rates in high elevation regions relative to their lower elevation surroundings. Using a combination of observations and CMIP5 climate model simulations, we provide examples of how processes associated with three different climate variables (water vapor, snow cover, and clouds) can contribute to elevation dependent warming (EDW) through their effect on shortwave and longwave radiation both in recent decades as well as for model projections later this century. We provide explanations for why EDW can be found in some studies but not in others, sometimes even in the same regions. We also analyze the relationship between 21st century model projections of changes in free-air temperatures with temperature changes at the same elevations in mountains. The primary focus is on the Tibetan Plateau region and North America where we also consider lower mountain regions ( 1500 m) than found in most EDW studies.

  7. Music after the rain

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    The group Home Cooking (left to right: Jean-Marie Planche, Tony Arnold, Serge Waeffler, Django Manglunki) entertains the crowd with a humoristic blues/rock performance. The earth moved in Prévessin on 29 July. This was not an earthquake but an 'international' music event, the seventeenth CERN Hardronic Festival, which saw musicians from many different countries, including Russia, Britain, Spain, France, Belgium and the USA, take to the stage. The audience rocked to music from eight different groups until the early hours. About a thousand people flocked to CERN to hear what the best of its musical talents had to offer. The evening was very nearly a wash-out, though. After a week of scorching hot temperatures, the heavens suddenly opened and the rain didn't stop until a few minutes before the first act came on stage. Thanks to this narrow escape, the organisers can boast a 17-year run of rain-free Hardronic festivals. All the different musical styles were given a warm reception, from traditional Russian folk...

  8. Mixed layer processes of the Arabian Sea Warm Pool during spring intermonsoon: a study based on observational and satellite data

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sabu, P.; Revichandran, C.

    The relative importance and contribution of various processes in the total heat budget in the mixed layer of the Arabian Sea Warm Pool (ASWP) during spring intermonsoon (March–April 2004) were studied using in situ observations and satellite data...

  9. Determination of processing maps for the warm working of vanadium microalloyed eutectoid steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rastegari, H., E-mail: rastegary@birjandut.ac.ir [Department of Engineering, Birjand University of Technology, South Khorasan 97198-66981 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kermanpur, A. [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Najafizadeh, A. [Fould Institute of Technology, Fouldshahar, Isfahan 8491663763 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Somani, M.C.; Porter, D.A. [Centre for Advanced Steels Research, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 4200, 90014 Oulu (Finland); Ghassemali, E.; Jarfors, A.E.W. [Jönköping University, School of Engineering, Department of Materials and Manufacturing, P.O. Box 1026, SE-551 11 Jönköping (Sweden)

    2016-03-21

    Microalloying of an eutectoid steel with V may facilitate formation of dispersed nano-scaled VC particles in the microstructure during thermomechanical processing or subsequent heat treatment. In this research, the constitutive flow behavior of vanadium microalloyed eutectoid steel has been investigated in the temperature range 620–770 °C at strain rates in the range 0.01–10 s{sup −1}. Microstructural characterization of the deformed specimens was conducted using SEM and EBSD techniques. In this context, various deformation mechanisms occurring during warm deformation have been characterized and delineated through construction of a processing map by establishing a power dissipation map and an instability map for the steel and superimposing them. The results show that the pearlitic microstructure exhibits several deformation mechanisms within these warm working conditions. Dynamic spheroidization of cementite lamella takes place in the range 660–720 °C and 0.01–0.1 s{sup −1} with a power dissipation efficiency of 27–33%, characterizing a safe window of processing this steel. The presence of vanadium carbides at grain boundaries strengthened the pearlitic microstructure and retarded the occurrence of some deformation defects during low temperature, high speed deformation in the range 620–720 °C and 1–10 s{sup −1}.

  10. Analysing Atmospheric Processes and Climatic Drivers of Tree Defoliation to Determine Forest Vulnerability to Climate Warming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raúl Sánchez-Salguero

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Crown defoliation is extensively monitored across European forests within the International Co-operative Programme (ICP as a proxy of forest health. Climate warming and drought are assumed to be the major drivers of tree growth and crown defoliation, particularly in seasonally dry areas such as the Mediterranean Basin. Here we analyse how climate, drought, and atmospheric processes are related to defoliation time series of five oak and five pine species that are dominant across Spanish ICP monitoring forest plots. We found that warmer and drier conditions during April were linked to enhanced defoliation. Warm April conditions were also related to high values of the Atlantic Multi-decadal Oscillation (AMO, thereby indicating large-scale links between atmospheric processes, temperature, and defoliation patterns. The temperature-defoliation association was species-specific since some tree species from wet sites showed a weak association (e.g., Quercus robur L. whereas others from dry sites (e.g., Quercus ilex L. presented the strongest associations. The latter tree species could be considered vulnerable to heat stress in terms of leaf shedding. We also explored if defoliation was related to radial growth and found negative associations in relatively dry areas. Warmer and drier conditions linked to increasing AMO values are connected to the post-1990s rise of defoliation in Spanish ICP forest plots. Combined incorporation of defoliation and growth into mortality models can provide insights into assessments of forest vulnerability.

  11. Warming-induced upslope advance of subalpine forest is severely limited by geomorphic processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macias-Fauria, Marc; Johnson, Edward A.

    2013-01-01

    Forests are expected to expand into alpine areas because of climate warming, causing land-cover change and fragmentation of alpine habitats. However, this expansion will only occur if the present upper treeline is limited by low-growing season temperatures that reduce plant growth. This temperature limitation has not been quantified at a landscape scale. Here, we show that temperature alone cannot realistically explain high-elevation tree cover over a >100-km2 area in the Canadian Rockies and that geologic/geomorphic processes are fundamental to understanding the heterogeneous landscape distribution of trees. Furthermore, upslope tree advance in a warmer scenario will be severely limited by availability of sites with adequate geomorphic/topographic characteristics. Our results imply that landscape-to-regional scale projections of warming-induced, high-elevation forest advance into alpine areas should not be based solely on temperature-sensitive, site-specific upper-treeline studies but also on geomorphic processes that control tree occurrence at long (centuries/millennia) timescales. PMID:23569221

  12. The Effects of Soil Properties on Rain-garden Bioretention and Soil Processes in a Semi-arid City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mckinley, M. L.; Pavao-zuckerman, M.

    2012-12-01

    Urban raingardens have the potential to retain pollutants in stormwater runoff, and are a fairly common green infrastructure practice in mesic environments. However, it is not fully understood how soil properties in desert ecosystems impact raingarden bioretention. The stormwater runoff that is intercepted by rain gardens may be treated by a number of physical, chemical and biological processes as it infiltrates through soils. Our objective was to measure pollutant removal efficiencies of urban soils combinations with different biophysicochemical properties with and without a mulch layer. During July 2012, we collected soil samples from three separate washes in the city of Tucson, AZ, each with disparate textural characteristics. Soils were sieved and analyzed soils for pH, soil moisture (%), soil organic matter (%), and microbial biomass (pg g soil-1). Soils were loaded into bioretention columns (with and without a mulch layer) and flushed with synthetic runoff (with NO3, NH4, Pb, Cd, Zn, and Cu added to reflect runoff concentrations in Tucson, AZ) for 60 minutes, and effluent samples were collected every 15 minutes. Infiltration rates were estimated for the columns and effluent samples were analyzed for concentration of heavy metals (Pb, Cd, Cu, Zn) and NO3-N and NH4-N and we then calculated pollution retention efficiencies. Surprisingly, we found that mulch decreases infiltration for the loam soils and increases rates in sandy soils. Nitrate removal ranged from 0-53% and metal removal rates ranged from 69-98%, suggesting that native Tucson soils might be suitable for raingarden applications. Nitrate removal varied by soil type, but was correlated with infiltration rates, such that soils with greater infiltration rates had a higher NO3 removal efficiency. Removal of Pb varied in a similar fashion, where soils with greater infiltration rates had higher removal efficiencies. The results from this laboratory study suggest that bioretention in desert soils may

  13. Warm Cleanup of Coal-Derived Syngas: Multicontaminant Removal Process Demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spies, Kurt A.; Rainbolt, James E.; Li, Xiaohong S.; Braunberger, Beau; Li, Liyu; King, David L.; Dagle, Robert A.

    2017-02-15

    Warm cleanup of coal- or biomass-derived syngas requires sorbent and catalytic beds to protect downstream processes and catalysts from fouling. Sulfur is particularly harmful because even parts-per-million amounts are sufficient to poison downstream synthesis catalysts. Zinc oxide (ZnO) is a conventional sorbent for sulfur removal; however, its operational performance using real gasifier-derived syngas and in an integrated warm cleanup process is not well reported. In this paper, we report the optimal temperature for bulk desulfurization to be 450oC, while removal of sulfur to parts-per-billion levels requires a lower temperature of approximately 350oC. Under these conditions, we found that sulfur in the form of both hydrogen sulfide and carbonyl sulfide could be absorbed equally well using ZnO. For long-term operation, sorbent regeneration is desirable to minimize process costs. Over the course of five sulfidation and regeneration cycles, a ZnO bed lost about a third of its initial sulfur capacity, however sorbent capacity stabilized. Here, we also demonstrate, at the bench-scale, a process and materials used for warm cleanup of coal-derived syngas using five operations: 1) Na2CO3 for HCl removal, 2) regenerable ZnO beds for bulk sulfur removal, 3) a second ZnO bed for trace sulfur removal, 4) a Ni-Cu/C sorbent for multi-contaminant inorganic removal, and 5) a Ir-Ni/MgAl2O4 catalyst employed for ammonia decomposition and tar and light hydrocarbon steam reforming. Syngas cleanup was demonstrated through successful long-term performance of a poison-sensitive, Cu-based, water-gas-shift catalyst placed downstream of the cleanup process train. The tar reformer is an important and necessary operation with this particular gasification system; its inclusion was the difference between deactivating the water-gas catalyst with carbon deposition and successful 100-hour testing using 1 LPM of coal-derived syngas.

  14. Effects of simulated acid rain on soil fauna community composition and their ecological niches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Hui; Liu, Wen; Zhang, Jiaen; Qin, Zhong

    2017-01-01

    Acid rain is one of the severest environmental issues globally. Relative to other global changes (e.g., warming, elevated atmospheric [CO2], and nitrogen deposition), however, acid rain has received less attention than its due. Soil fauna play important roles in multiple ecological processes, but how soil fauna community responds to acid rain remains less studied. This microcosm experiment was conducted using latosol with simulated acid rain (SAR) manipulations to observe potential changes in soil fauna community under acid rain stress. Four pH levels, i.e., pH 2.5, 3.5, 4.5, and 5.5, and a neutral control of pH 7.0 were set according to the current pH condition and acidification trend of precipitation in southern China. As expected, we observed that the SAR treatments induced changes in soil fauna community composition and their ecological niches in the tested soil; the treatment effects tended to increase as acidity increased. This could be attributable to the environmental stresses (such as acidity, porosity and oxygen supply) induced by the SAR treatments. In addition to direct acidity effect, we propose that potential changes in permeability and movability of water and oxygen in soils induced by acid rain could also give rise to the observed shifts in soil fauna community composition. These are most likely indirect pathways of acid rain to affect belowground community. Moreover, we found that nematodes, the dominating soil fauna group in this study, moved downwards to mitigate the stress of acid rain. This is probably detrimental to soil fauna in the long term, due to the relatively severer soil conditions in the deep than surface soil layer. Our results suggest that acid rain could change soil fauna community and the vertical distribution of soil fauna groups, consequently changing the underground ecosystem functions such as organic matter decomposition and greenhouse gas emissions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. SSM/I Rain Retrievals Within a Unified All-Weather Ocean Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wentz, Frank J.; Spencer, Roy W.

    1996-01-01

    A new method for the physical retrieval of rain rates from satellite microwave radiometers is presented and compared to two other rainfall climatologies derived from satellites. The method is part of a unified ocean parameter retrieval algorithm that is based on the fundamental principles of radiative transfer. The algorithm simultaneously finds near-surface wind speed W, columnar water vapor V, columnar cloud liquid water L, rain rate R, and effective radiating temperature T(sub U) for the upwelling radiation. The performance of the algorithm in the absence of rain is discussed in Wentz, and this paper focuses on the rain component of the algorithm. A particular strength of the unified algorithm is its ability to 'orthogonalize' the retrievals so that there is minimum cross-talk between the retrieved parameters. For example, comparisons of the retrieved water vapor with radiosonde observations show that there is very little correlation between the water vapor retrieval error and rain rate. For rain rates from 1 to 15 mm/h, the rms difference between the retrieved water vapor and the radiosonde value is 5 mm. A novel feature of the rain retrieval method is a beamfilling correction that is based upon the ratio of the retrieved liquid water absorption coefficients at 37 GHz and 19.35 GHz. This ratio decreases by about 40% when heavy and light rain co-exist within the SSM/I footprint as compared to the case of uniform rain. This correction has the effect of increasing the rain rate when the spectral ratio of the absorption coefficients is small. Even with this beamfilling correction, tropical rainfall is still unrealistically low when the freezing level in the tropics (approx. 5 km) is used to specify the rain layer thickness. We restore realism by reducing the assumed averaged tropical rain layer thickness to 3 km, thereby accounting for the existence of warm rain processes in which the rain layer does not extend to the freezing level. Global rain rates are produced

  16. More rain compensation results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sworder, D. D.; Vojak, R.

    1992-01-01

    To reduce the impact of rain-induced attenuation in the 20/30 GHz band, the attenuation at a specified signal frequency must be estimated and extrapolated forward in time on the basis of a noisy beacon measurement. Several studies have used model based procedures for solving this problem in statistical inference. Perhaps the most widely used model-based paradigm leads to the Kalman filter and its lineal variants. In this formulation, the dynamic features of the attenuation are represented by a state process (x(sub t)). The observation process (y(sub t)) is derived from beacon measurements. Some ideas relating to the signal processing problems related to uplink power control are presented. It is shown that some easily implemented algorithms hold promise for use in estimating rain induced fades. The algorithms were applied to actual data generated at the Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (VPI) test facility. Because only one such event was studied, it is not clear that the algorithms will have the same effectiveness when a wide range of events are studied.

  17. The Acid Rain Reader.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubbs, Harriett S.; And Others

    A topic which is often not sufficiently dealt with in elementary school textbooks is acid rain. This student text is designed to supplement classroom materials on the topic. Discussed are: (1) "Rain"; (2) "Water Cycle"; (3) "Fossil Fuels"; (4) "Air Pollution"; (5) "Superstacks"; (6) "Acid/Neutral/Bases"; (7) "pH Scale"; (8) "Acid Rain"; (9)…

  18. Acid Rain Study Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunger, Carolyn; And Others

    Acid rain is a complex, worldwide environmental problem. This study guide is intended to aid teachers of grades 4-12 to help their students understand what acid rain is, why it is a problem, and what possible solutions exist. The document contains specific sections on: (1) the various terms used in conjunction with acid rain (such as acid…

  19. Scalable, Economical Fabrication Processes for Ultra-Compact Warm-White LEDs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowes, Ted [Cree, Inc., Durham, NC (United States)

    2016-01-31

    Conventional warm-white LED component fabrication consists of a large number of sequential steps which are required to incorporate electrical, mechanical, and optical functionality into the component. Each of these steps presents cost and yield challenges which multiply throughout the entire process. Although there has been significant progress in LED fabrication over the last decade, significant advances are needed to enable further reductions in cost per lumen while not sacrificing efficacy or color quality. Cree conducted a focused 18-month program to develop a new low-cost, high-efficiency light emitting diode (LED) architecture enabled by novel large-area parallel processing technologies, reduced number of fabrication steps, and minimized raw materials use. This new scheme is expected to enable ultra-compact LED components exhibiting simultaneously high efficacy and high color quality. By the end of the program, Cree fabricated warm-white LEDs with a room-temperature “instant on” efficacy of >135 lm/W at ~3500K and 90 CRI (when driven at the DOE baseline current density of 35 A/cm2). Cree modified the conventional LED fabrication process flow in a manner that is expected to translate into simultaneously high throughput and yield for ultra-compact packages. Building on its deep expertise in LED wafer fabrication, Cree developed these ultra-compact LEDs to have no compromises in color quality or efficacy compared to their conventional counterparts. Despite their very small size, the LEDs will also be robustly electrically integrated into luminaire systems with the same attach yield as conventional packages. The versatility of the prototype high-efficacy LED architecture will likely benefit solid-state lighting (SSL) luminaire platforms ranging from bulbs to troffers. We anticipate that the prototype LEDs will particularly benefit luminaires with large numbers of distributed compact packages, such as linear and area luminaires (e.g. troffers). The fraction of

  20. Impact of land surface processes on the South American warm season climate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, H.-Y.; Mechoso, C.R.; Xiao, H.; Wu, C.-M. [University of California Los Angeles, Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Xue, Y. [University of California Los Angeles, Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, Los Angeles, CA (United States); University of California Los Angeles, Department of Geography, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Li, J.-L. [California Institute of Technology, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA (United States); Sales, F.De [University of California Los Angeles, Department of Geography, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2011-07-15

    The present study demonstrates that (1) the simulation of the South American warm season (December-February) climate by an atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM) is sensitive to the representation of land surface processes, (2) the sensitivity is not confined to the ''hot spot'' in Amazonia, and (3) upgrading the representation of those processes can produce a significant improvement in AGCM performance. The reasons for sensitivity and higher success are investigated based on comparisons between observational datasets and simulations by the AGCM coupled to either a simple land scheme that specifies soil moisture availability or to the Simplified Simple Biosphere Model (SSiB) that allows for consideration of soil and vegetation biophysical process. The context for the study is the UCLA AGCM. The most notable simulation improvements are along the lee of the Andes in the lower troposphere, where poleward flow transports abundant moisture from the Amazon basin to high latitudes, and in the monsoon region where the intensity and pattern of precipitation and upper level ice water content are more realistic. It is argued that a better depiction of the Chaco Low, which is controlled by local effects of land surface processes, decisively contributes to the superior model performance with low-level flows in central South America. The better representation of the atmospheric column static stability and large-scale moisture convergence in tropical South America contribute to more realistic precipitation over the monsoon region. The overall simulation improvement is, therefore, due to a combination of different regional processes. This finding is supported by idealized AGCM experiments. (orig.)

  1. A probability distribution model for rain rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kedem, Benjamin; Pavlopoulos, Harry; Guan, Xiaodong; Short, David A.

    1994-01-01

    A systematic approach is suggested for modeling the probability distribution of rain rate. Rain rate, conditional on rain and averaged over a region, is modeled as a temporally homogeneous diffusion process with appropiate boundary conditions. The approach requires a drift coefficient-conditional average instantaneous rate of change of rain intensity-as well as a diffusion coefficient-the conditional average magnitude of the rate of growth and decay of rain rate about its drift. Under certain assumptions on the drift and diffusion coefficients compatible with rain rate, a new parametric family-containing the lognormal distribution-is obtained for the continuous part of the stationary limit probability distribution. The family is fitted to tropical rainfall from Darwin and Florida, and it is found that the lognormal distribution provides adequate fits as compared with other members of the family and also with the gamma distribution.

  2. Global Warming Leading to Phenological Responses in the Process of Urbanization, South Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang-Don Lee

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Current studies are either region-limited, sole-species, or have short researching periods; so, studies about various species are necessary throughout South Korea. In this study, trends of changes in the budding and flowering dates of spring plants by climate factors served to explore the process of urbanization. Four common species, such as Forsythia koreana (forsythia, Rhododendron mucronulatum (azalea, Prunus yedoensis (Yoshino cherry and Prunus mume (Japanese apricot, are examined during the period from 1973 to 2008 due to the limitation of recent datasets. Budding of forsythia, azalea, Yoshino cherry and the flowering of Japanese apricot are defined as Type I (inland, of reverse letter ‘L’ and flowering of forsythia, azalea and Yoshino cherry were grouped as Type II (inland and south coastline. Prunus mume budding was different from others, so it was defined as Type III (subtropical climate. The inland phonological response is relatively cold and dry and areas are affected by the Siberian high atmospheric pressure. On the other hand, the south and east coastlines are humid and warm areas even in the winter season due to the southeastern wind. There were advancements for 3.1 days of forsythia, 5.5 days of azalea, 6.5 days of Yoshino cherry and 18.6 days of Japanese apricot during the research period. The greatest changes occurred with respect to the minimum temperature in January and the maximum temperature in February, while the precipitation change was not significant. However, in Type II, the precipitation significantly impacted plant flowering events. Precipitation was the lowest in early spring in South Korea and especially the flowering of plants was impacted by the small amount of precipitation in this region. Additionally, if precipitation after budding was over 1 mm for forsythia and azalea, 2 mm for Yoshino cherry and 7 mm for apricot, flowering occurred in over 80% of the region. South Korea is characterized as having a small

  3. Effect of salt on color and warmed over flavor in charqui meat processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elza Y. Youssef

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available A combination of salt (NaCl high concentration and curing salt was investigated for their role in warmed-over flavor (WOF and color changes during charqui meats processing. WOF was measured by TBARS method in uncured charqui meat (CH and in cured charqui known in Brazil as Jerked beef (JB. WOF occurred substantially in CH and sodium nitrite was able to inhibit 40-45% (pA associação entre a alta concentração do sal (NaCl e sais de cura (NaNO3 e NaNO2 foi investigada quanto ao desenvolvimento do aroma de requentado (WOF juntamente com as mudanças na coloração durante o processamento do charque e do Jerked beef. (JB. Em amostras armazenadas durante 30 dias, WOF ocorreu substancialmente em CH e nitrito de sódio foi capaz de inibir 40 a 45% (p<0,005 as amostras de JB. Os parâmetros de cor foram avaliados pelo sistema CIELAB. A razão a*/b* mostrou que amostras de CH apresentaram-se com tonalidade amarronzada indicando a formação de metamioglobina (Fe3+ enquanto que as de JB mostram uma coloração vermelha intensa indicando a formação da nitrosilmioglobina (Fe2+. Durante o cozimento, a razão a*/b* mostrou a presença da metamioglobina desnaturada (Fe3+ no CH e a formação de nitrosilmiocromogenio (Fe2+ em amostras de JB. O estado do íon ferro influenciou a cor do charque e de JB e aparentemente, o nitrito de sódio foi capaz de quelar íons Fe e conseqüentemente inibir o desenvolvimento do WOF.

  4. Scale Dependence of Spatiotemporal Intermittence of Rain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, Prasun K.; Siddani, Ravi K.

    2011-01-01

    It is a common experience that rainfall is intermittent in space and time. This is reflected by the fact that the statistics of area- and/or time-averaged rain rate is described by a mixed distribution with a nonzero probability of having a sharp value zero. In this paper we have explored the dependence of the probability of zero rain on the averaging space and time scales in large multiyear data sets based on radar and rain gauge observations. A stretched exponential fannula fits the observed scale dependence of the zero-rain probability. The proposed formula makes it apparent that the space-time support of the rain field is not quite a set of measure zero as is sometimes supposed. We also give an ex.planation of the observed behavior in tenus of a simple probabilistic model based on the premise that rainfall process has an intrinsic memory.

  5. Rain Forest Murals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleiner, Cheryl

    2010-01-01

    The rain forest murals in the author's school began as a request from her principal to have students decorate the cafeteria with their own paintings. She decided to brainstorm ideas with her eighth-grade students. Taking into consideration the architectural space and the environmental concerns they wanted to convey, students chose the rain forest…

  6. Acid rain in an Amazon rainforest

    OpenAIRE

    Haines, Bruce; Jordan, Carl; Clark, Howard; Clark, Kathleen E.

    2011-01-01

    Acid rain is reported from the Amazon territory of Venezuela. The volume weighted average pHwas 4.7 for 70 storms sampled from January 1979 through February 1980. At this location,remote from point sources of industrial pollution, acid rain might result from naturalbiogeochemical processes in the rainforest, from global atmospheric pollution, or from somecombination of natural and polliition processes.DOI: 10.1111/j.1600-0889.1983.tb00011.x

  7. Chilean coastal orographic precipitation experiment: A tale of two rain regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massmann, Adam K.

    The Chilean Coastal Orographic Precipitation Experiment Pilot Project (CCOPE-2015) was an exploratory field campaign to better understand the mechanisms of orographic precipitation enhancement in the Nahuelbuta Mountains of Southern Chile (38 deg. S.). Observations collected include: (1) surface rainfall from a network of 10 data logging rain gauges, (2) vertical precipitation profiles from a pair of K-band Micro Rain Radars, (3) rain drop size distributions from an optical disdrometer, (4) upstream wind and thermodynamic profiles from radiosonde launches, and (5) aerosol number concentration and size distribution measurements from a condensation particle counter and an ultra-high sensitivity aerosol spectrometer. An overview of observations collected during CCOPE-2015 is presented. The character of precipitation over the Nahuelbuta is contrasted between periods of ice-initiated and warm rain. Thirty-four percent of rainfall fell during warm rain periods, while fifty-two percent of rainfall fell during ice-initiated periods. Warm rain drop size distributions are characterized by many more and relatively smaller drops than ice-initiated drop size distributions. Both the portion and properties of ice-initiated and warm rainfall compare favorably with observations of coastal mountain rainfall at a similar latitude in California. Observations suggest that enhancement is stronger during warm rain periods, but uncertainty precludes declarations of significance. Additionally, the skill of satellite-based quantitative precipitation estimation is assessed for each rain regime. A cutting-edge NASA Global Precipitation Measurement mission algorithm severely underestimates orographic enhancement of precipitation in the Nahuelbuta mountains, but performs better in the lee and upwind of the mountains. Much of the error in estimating orographic rain is during warm rain periods, while performance is much improved during ice-initiated rain periods.

  8. Rain Sensor with Stacked Light Waveguide Having Tilted Air Gap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyoo Nam Choi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Vehicle sensor to detect rain drop on and above waveguide utilizing light deflection and scattering was realized, keeping wide sensing coverage and sensitivity to detect mist accumulation. Proposed sensor structure under stacked light wave guide consisted of light blocking fixture surrounding photodetector and adjacent light source. Tilted air gap between stacked light waveguide and light blocking fixture played major role to increase sensitivity and to enhance linearity. This sensor structure eliminated complex collimating optics, while keeping wide sensing coverage using simple geometry. Detection algorithm based on time-to-intensity transformation process was used to convert raining intensity into countable raining process. Experimental result inside simulated rain chamber showed distinct different response between light rain and normal rain. Application as automobile rain sensor is expected.

  9. RAINE Public Communities

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The file geodatabase (fgdb) contains the New England Town Boundaries and information related specifically to the Resilience and Adaptation in New England (RAINE) web...

  10. Acidification and Acid Rain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, S. A.; Veselã½, J.

    2003-12-01

    Air pollution by acids has been known as a problem for centuries (Ducros, 1845; Smith, 1872; Camuffo, 1992; Brimblecombe, 1992). Only in the mid-1900s did it become clear that it was a problem for more than just industrially developed areas, and that precipitation quality can affect aquatic resources ( Gorham, 1955). The last three decades of the twentieth century saw tremendous progress in the documentation of the chemistry of the atmosphere, precipitation, and the systems impacted by acid atmospheric deposition. Chronic acidification of ecosystems results in chemical changes to soil and to surface waters and groundwater as a result of reduction of base cation supply or an increase in acid (H+) supply, or both. The most fundamental changes during chronic acidification are an increase in exchangeable H+ or Al3+ (aluminum) in soils, an increase in H+ activity (˜concentration) in water in contact with soil, and a decrease in alkalinity in waters draining watersheds. Water draining from the soil is acidified and has a lower pH (=-log [H+]). As systems acidify, their biotic community changes.Acidic surface waters occur in many parts of the world as a consequence of natural processes and also due to atmospheric deposition of strong acid (e.g., Canada, Jeffries et al. (1986); the United Kingdom, Evans and Monteith (2001); Sweden, Swedish Environmental Protection Board (1986); Finland, Forsius et al. (1990); Norway, Henriksen et al. (1988a); and the United States (USA), Brakke et al. (1988)). Concern over acidification in the temperate regions of the northern hemisphere has been driven by the potential for accelerating natural acidification by pollution of the atmosphere with acidic or acidifying compounds. Atmospheric pollution ( Figure 1) has resulted in an increased flux of acid to and through ecosystems. Depending on the ability of an ecosystem to neutralize the increased flux of acidity, acidification may increase only imperceptibly or be accelerated at a rate that

  11. Impact of Dust from Ore Processing Facilities on Rain Water Collection Tanks in a Tropical Environment—The Obvious Source “Ain’t Necessarily So”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Gulson

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Concerns have been expressed that dust from the minerals processing facilities at Karumba Queensland Australia have resulted in elevated lead (Pb concentrations in rain water tanks. The ores derived from the Century mine some 304 km from the port. High precision Pb isotopic measurements on environmental samples have been undertaken to evaluate the source of Pb in rainwaters and acid digests from roof wipes and gutter wipes. There does not appear to be any relationship between sample location and the processing facility but samples from the area subject to the prevailing winds show the highest contribution of Century Pb. All gutter wipes (82 to 1270 µg Pb/wipe have contributions of Century ore ranging from 87% to 96%. The contribution of Century ore to five roof wipes (22 to 88 µg Pb/wipe ranges from 89% to 97% and in the other two samples there is a mix of Century and Broken Hill Pb. Three of the seven rainwater have contributions of Century ore Pb ranging from 33% to 75%. Two of the other four rainwater samples have the highest water Pb concentrations of 88 and 100 µg/L and their isotopic data show Broken Hill Pb contributions ranging from 77% to 80%. The source of the Broken Hill Pb is probably from the galvanized roofing material and/or brass fittings in the rainwater tanks. The discrimination between various sources is only detectable using high precision 204Pb-based isotopic ratios and not the now common inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS data presentations of the higher abundance isotopes 208Pb, 207Pb and 206Pb. Isotopic results for the waters demonstrate that apportioning blame where there is an obvious point source may not always be the correct conclusion. Nevertheless the isotopic data for the gutter wipes indicates that there was widespread contamination from the processing facilities throughout the town.

  12. Towards a rain-dominated Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bintanja, Richard; Andry, Olivier

    2017-04-01

    Current climate models project a strong increase in Arctic precipitation over the coming century, which has been attributed primarily to enhanced surface evaporation associated with sea-ice retreat. Since the Arctic is still quite cold, especially in winter, it is often (implicitly) assumed that the additional precipitation will fall mostly as snow. However, very little is known about future changes in rain/snow distribution in the Arctic, notwithstanding the importance for hydrology and biology. Here we use 37 state-of-the-art climate models in standardised twenty-first-century (2006-2100) simulations to show that 70° - 90°N average annual Arctic snowfall will actually decrease, despite the strong increase in precipitation, and that most of the additional precipitation in the future (2091-2100) will fall as rain. In fact, rain is even projected to become the dominant form of precipitation in the Arctic region. This is because Arctic atmospheric warming causes a greater fraction of snowfall to melt before it reaches the surface, in particular over the North Atlantic and the Barents Sea. The reduction in Arctic snowfall is most pronounced during summer and autumn when temperatures are close to the melting point, but also winter rainfall is found to intensify considerably. Projected (seasonal) trends in rain/snowfall will heavily impact Arctic hydrology (e.g. river discharge, permafrost melt), climatology (e.g. snow, sea ice albedo and melt) and ecology (e.g. water and food availability).

  13. Whither Acid Rain?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Brimblecombe

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Acid rain, the environmental cause célèbre of the 1980s seems to have vanished from popular conscience. By contrast, scientific research, despite funding difficulties, has continued to produce hundreds of research papers each year. Studies of acid rain taught much about precipitation chemistry, the behaviour of snow packs, long-range transport of pollutants and new issues in the biology of fish and forested ecosystems. There is now evidence of a shift away from research in precipitation and sulfur chemistry, but an impressive theoretical base remains as a legacy.

  14. Evidence of Late Palaeocene-Early Eocene equatorial rain forest ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2009-11-02

    Nov 2, 2009 ... Prevalence of excessive humid climate during this period has been seen as a result of equatorial positioning of Indian subcontinent, superimposed by a long term global warming phase (PETM and EECO) during the early Palaeogene. The study presents clear evidence that highly diversified equatorial rain ...

  15. The value of rain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snellen, W.B.

    2006-01-01

    This paper explores the gains that can be made by shifting the focus of water resources management from the water towards the rain. This causes also a shift in perception of what is the largest user of water: instead of irrigation it is the evapotranspiration

  16. quantification of rain quantification of rain induced artifacts on digital

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eobe

    located with a 90 cm offset parabolic reflector ... Ventage Vue weather station. The cumulative rain rate distribution (CD) for the 17-month .... [10] J. S. Ojo and P. A. Owolawi, "Development of one- minute rain-rate and rain-attenuation contour maps.

  17. TOPICAL REVIEW Warm spraying—a novel coating process based on high-velocity impact of solid particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seiji Kuroda et al

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, coating processes based on the impact of high-velocity solid particles such as cold spraying and aerosol deposition have been developed and attracting much industrial attention. A novel coating process called 'warm spraying' has been developed, in which coatings are formed by the high-velocity impact of solid powder particles heated to appropriate temperatures below the melting point of the powder material. The advantages of such process are as follows: (1 the critical velocity needed to form a coating can be significantly lowered by heating, (2 the degradation of feedstock powder such as oxidation can be significantly controlled compared with conventional thermal spraying where powder is molten, and (3 various coating structures can be realized from porous to dense ones by controlling the temperature and velocity of the particles. The principles and characteristics of this new process are discussed in light of other existing spray processes such as high-velocity oxy-fuel spraying and cold spraying. The gas dynamics of particle heating and acceleration by the spraying apparatus as well as the high-velocity impact phenomena of powder particles are discussed in detail. Several examples of depositing heat sensitive materials such as titanium, metallic glass, WC–Co cermet and polymers are described with potential industrial applications.

  18. A New Algorithm of Rain (Snow) Removal in Video

    OpenAIRE

    Chen Zhen; Shen Jihong

    2013-01-01

    The images acquired by outdoor vision system in the rain or snow have low contrast and are blurred, and it can cause serious degradation. Traditional rain (snow) removal method is restricted with the intensity, so the effect is not ideal. According to the characteristic of vision system acquiring multiple different degraded images in a short time, the paper processes multiple images to realize restoration. Snow and rain have the dynamic characteristic that the direction, intensity and shape o...

  19. Weighing Rain Gauge Recording Charts

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Weighing rain gauge charts record the amount of precipitation that falls at a given location. The vast majority of the Weighing Rain Gauge Recording Charts...

  20. When It Rains, It Pours

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Linda

    2012-01-01

    "It's raining, it's pouring, the old man is snoring!" "The itsy, bitsy spider crawled up the waterspout, down came the rain and washed the spider out. Out came the sun and dried up all the rain, and the itsy, bitsy spider went up the spout again." What do children's nursery rhymes have to do with the school library? The author begins by telling a…

  1. Warmed-over flavour analysis in low temperature-long time processed meat by an "electronic nose".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigioni, G M; Margaría, C A; Pensel, N A; Sánchez, G; Vaudagna, S R

    2000-11-01

    The ability of an electronic nose, comprising 32 conducting polymer sensors, to identify and classify warmed-over flavour (WOF) aroma in bovine semitendinosus muscle, processed by vacuum cook-in-bag/tray technology (VCT) and storage under refrigerated conditions, was evaluated. The VCT process employed low temperature-long time (50°C-390 min) thermal treatments. Multivariate analysis showed that VCT processed beef aroma profiles were sorted into two groups, one included samples stored for up to 20 days and the other included samples with 34 to 45 days of storage. WOF odour standard samples were recognised to have similar aroma as samples of the second group. Lipid oxidation results, measured by thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, showed an increment in oxidation level for samples stored for 34 days or more (P<0.05). This study shows that electronic nose technology can be applied to WOF odour identification and classification in VCT beef meat, complementing chemical and sensory techniques used in this field.

  2. analysis of rain analysis of rain rate and rain attenuation for earth

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eobe

    Keywords: Keywords: Rain Rate, Rain Attenuation, Propagation Impairment, Cumulative Distribution. 1. INTRODUCTION. INTRODUCTION. INTRODUCTION. The presence of rain along satellite-earth path is a major cause of signal attenuation at frequencies above. 10 GHz [1]. Raindrops absorb and scatter radio waves,.

  3. Creating a Star: The Science of Fusion--Fusion Power Would Not Contribute to Global Warming, Acid Rain, or Other Forms of Air Pollution, nor Would It Create Long-Lived Radioactive Waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, Stephen L.

    2005-01-01

    Fusion is the process that powers the sun and the stars. Since the 1950s, scientists and engineers in the United States and around the world have been conducting fusion research in pursuit of the creation of a new energy source for our planet and to further our understanding and control of plasma, the fourth state of matter that dominates the…

  4. Is it possible to create a thermal model of warm-up? Monitoring of the training process in athletic decathlon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, Jakub Grzegorz; Olszewska, Magdalena; Boguszewski, Dariusz; Białoszewski, Dariusz; Reaburn, Peter

    2016-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to define if the athletes may vary their warm-up according to the specific demands of event they are preparing for and that higher-level athletes may differ in their thermal responses than lower-level athletes. Ten top level Polish male decathletes (19.9 ± 3.0 yr, 187.9 ± 4.7 cm, 82.7 ± 6.7 kg) who participated in the study were examined with a thermographic camera. Thermal imaging of each athlete was undertaken three times: at rest before the warm-up began, immediately after the general warm-up, and immediately after the specific warm-up. As significant changes in skin surface temperatures were observed between rest and both general and specific warm-ups (p body surface temperature within the decathletes as a cohort. Interestingly, correlation was found between decathlon result measured by points and decrease of temperatures after commencing the general or specific warm-up exercises (r = 0.62; p imaging can be useful observe thermoregulatory responses. Due to these observed individual thermal reactions to the physical effort of warm-up, the present findings suggest it is possible to individually adapt the warm-up to the needs of both the event being prepared for and the level of athlete.

  5. Rain-rate data base development and rain-rate climate analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crane, Robert K.

    1993-01-01

    The single-year rain-rate distribution data available within the archives of Consultative Committee for International Radio (CCIR) Study Group 5 were compiled into a data base for use in rain-rate climate modeling and for the preparation of predictions of attenuation statistics. The four year set of tip-time sequences provided by J. Goldhirsh for locations near Wallops Island were processed to compile monthly and annual distributions of rain rate and of event durations for intervals above and below preset thresholds. A four-year data set of tropical rain-rate tip-time sequences were acquired from the NASA TRMM program for 30 gauges near Darwin, Australia. They were also processed for inclusion in the CCIR data base and the expanded data base for monthly observations at the University of Oklahoma. The empirical rain-rate distributions (edfs) accepted for inclusion in the CCIR data base were used to estimate parameters for several rain-rate distribution models: the lognormal model, the Crane two-component model, and the three parameter model proposed by Moupfuma. The intent of this segment of the study is to obtain a limited set of parameters that can be mapped globally for use in rain attenuation predictions. If the form of the distribution can be established, then perhaps available climatological data can be used to estimate the parameters rather than requiring years of rain-rate observations to set the parameters. The two-component model provided the best fit to the Wallops Island data but the Moupfuma model provided the best fit to the Darwin data.

  6. A freezing rain storm explored with a C‑band polarimetric weather radar using the QVP methodology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudolf Kaltenboeck

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available On 23rd December 2012, a warm frontal atmospheric system caused significant freezing rain at the Vienna International Airport. Analyses of Austrian C‑band polarimetric weather radar data reveal cloud microphysical insights in the internal structure of such systems accompanied by the transition from snow toward ice pellets and subsequent freezing rain and warm rain. Polarimetric radar data are exploited using a recently suggested quasi-vertical profiles (QVP technique. This method allows to analyze the evolution of the melting layer height and other important microphysical signatures as well as the following precipitation development with high temporal and vertical resolution. Because the QVP polarimetric radar data are represented in a height vs time format which is fully compatible with the format the data from vertically pointing remote sensors such as cloud radars or wind profilers are displayed, their combined use is very efficient for understanding and monitoring microphysical processes leading to precipitation formation. This is demonstrated by the joint analysis of the polarimetric and profiler data at the Vienna airport. The QVP methodology is particularly effective for monitoring weather in the terminal areas of airports because of its local coverage and high precision as well as its potential for nowcasting. The methodology is very easy to implement and its use along with traditional techniques for weather radar data analysis using PPIs and reconstructed RHIs looks very promising.

  7. High Resolution Simulation of a Colorado Rockies Extreme Snow and Rain Event in both a Current and Future Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Roy; Ikeda, Kyoko; Liu, Changhai; Gutmann, Ethan; Gochis, David

    2016-04-01

    Modeling of extreme weather events often require very finely resolved treatment of atmospheric circulation structures in order to produce and localize the large moisture fluxes that result in extreme precipitation. This is particularly true for cool season orographic precipitation processes where the representation of the landform can significantly impact vertical velocity profiles and cloud moisture entrainment rates. This study presents results for high resolution regional climate modeling study of the Colorado Headwaters region using an updated version of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model run at 4 km horizontal resolution and a hydrological extension package called WRF-Hydro. Previous work has shown that the WRF modeling system can produce credible depictions of winter orographic precipitation over the Colorado Rockies if run at horizontal resolutions warming on total precipitation, snow-rain partitioning and surface hydrological fluxes (evapotranspiration and runoff) will be discussed in the context of how potential changes in temperature impact the amount of precipitation, the phase of precipitation (rain vs. snow) and the timing and amplitude of streamflow responses. The results show using the Pseudo Global Warming technique that intense precipitation rates significantly increased during the event and a significant fraction of the snowfall converts to rain which significantly amplifies the runoff response from one where runoff is produced gradually to one in which runoff is rapidly translated into streamflow values that approach significant flooding risks. Results from a new, CONUS scale high resolution climate simulation of extreme events in a current and future climate will be presented as time permits.

  8. Possible Causes for Spatial and Temporal Variation of Warm Season Precipitation in Xinjiang from 1960–2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shikai Song

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, rain totals from 1960–2014, obtained during the warm season (May to October from 52 meteorological stations, over Xinjiang, China were classified as either light, moderate, or heavy rain in two sub-regions (northern and southern. Spatial and temporal trends for rain amounts and days for the three rain classes were determined. All light, moderate, and heavy rain amounts displayed increasing trends over the two sub-regions. Furthermore, heavy rain amounts contributed the most to changes in total rain amounts. Light rain days in northern Xinjiang significantly decreased, in contrast to increasing light rain days in southern Xinjiang and moderate and heavy rain days within two sub-regions. Results obtained from correlation and relative weights analyses implied that lower-tropospheric specific humidity was the main factor responsible for light rain day trends in Xinjiang. Increasing temperatures were not found to have a significant effect.

  9. The Attenuation of Swell Waves by Rain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavaleri, Luigi; Bertotti, Luciana

    2017-10-01

    Within the progressive improvement in wave modeling we focus on the attenuation of swell waves by rain. Till now ignored, the process is shown to be relevant, especially for the correct estimate of swell. Following the practical impossibility of devoted field experiments, we exploit the global model results over a period of more than four years to extract the tiny signal associated to the attenuation by rain. A direct comparison of the ratio model by altimeter significant wave heights versus the encountered rain amount hints to a marked related dependence. A proper quantification of the related physical effect requires a multiple step procedure that we describe in detail. We check the reliability of the results, and we provide the related source function ready for implementation in operational wave models.

  10. Acid Rain. Teacher's Guide. LHS GEMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hocking, Colin; Barber, Jacqueline; Coonrod, Jan

    This teacher's guide presents a unit on acid rain and introduces hands-on activities for sixth through eighth grade students. In each unit, students act as real scientists and gather evidence by using science process skills such as observing, measuring and recording data, classifying, role playing, problem solving, critical thinking, synthesizing…

  11. The coupled moisture‐heat process of permafrost around a thermokarst pond in Qinghai‐Tibet Plateau under global warming

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Li, Shuangyang; Zhan, Hongbin; Lai, Yuanming; Sun, Zhizhong; Pei, Wansheng

    2014-01-01

    Due to environmental disturbances such as local human activity and global warming, melting of massive ground ice has resulted in thermokarst ponds, which are extensively distributed in the Qinghai‐Tibet Plateau (QTP...

  12. Heavy Rain and Cyclones In The Western Mediterranean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campins, J.; Jansá, A.; Genovés, A.; Picornell, M. A.

    The Mediterranrean regions are periodically affected by heavy rain events. These events constitute one of the most important natural hazards of the region, and due to their social impact, the correct forecasting of them constitutes a major challenge for the local meteorologists. The accurate study of several heavy rain events in the Mediterranean revealed the role of cyclones in locating, triggering or focusing them. Cyclones, even shallow and weak, organize the low-level flow, allowing the feeding of warm and wet air over the affected area. In this study the relationship between heavy rain and cyclonic centres in the West- ern Mediterranean is analized from a statistical point of view. The simultaneity of both phenomena are seek for a 5-year period. The foundation of this approach is two databases maintained and updated at the INM in the framework of the MEDEX (Mediterranean Experiment on Cyclones that produce High Impact Weather in the Mediterranean) project. The first database contains events of heavy precipitacion (more than 60 mm/24h), and the second one is composed by surface cyclones. Futher- more, the tridimensional structure of those cyclones is studied for a shorter period. Results show that in most of the heavy rain events there is a cyclonic centre in the vicinity of the affected area. Moreover, the cyclone is usually located allowing the entrance of low-level warm and wet air over the heavy precipitacion area.

  13. Industrial ecotoxicology "acid rain".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astolfi, E; Gotelli, C; Higa, J

    1986-01-01

    The acid rain phenomenon was studied in the province of Cordoba, Argentina. This study, based on a previously outlined framework, determined the anthropogenic origin of the low pH due to the presence of industrial hydrochloric acid wastage. This industrial ecotoxicological phenomenon seriously affected the forest wealth, causing a great defoliation of trees and shrubs, with a lower effect on crops. A survey on its effects on human beings has not been carried out, but considering the corrosion caused to different metals and its denouncing biocide effect on plants and animals, we should expect to find some kind of harm to the health of the workers involved or others engaged in farming, and even to those who are far away from the polluting agent.

  14. The Rain Keeps Falling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah Rose

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The force of disaster hit me in the heart when, as a young woman, I heard Bob Dylan sing ‘Hard Rain’. In a voice stunned by violence, the young man reports on a multitude of forces that drag the world into catastrophe. In the 1960s I heard the social justice in the song. In 2004 the environmental issues ambush me. The song starts and ends in the dying world of trees and rivers. The poet’s words in both domains of justice are eerily prophetic. They call across the music, and across the years, saying that a hard rain is coming. The words bear no story at all; they give us a series of compelling images, an account of impending calamity. The artistry of the poet—Bob (Billy Boy Dylan—offers sequences of reports that, like Walter Benjamin’s storm from paradise, pile wreckage upon wreckage.

  15. Acid rain in Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatti, Neeloo; Streets, David G.; Foell, Wesley K.

    1992-07-01

    Acid rain has been an issue of great concern in North America and Europe during the past several decades. However, due to the passage of a number of recent regulations, most notably the Clean Air Act in the United States in 1990, there is an emerging perception that the problem in these Western nations is nearing solution. The situation in the developing world, particularly in Asia, is much bleaker. Given the policies of many Asian nations to achieve levels of development comparable with the industrialized world—which necessitate a significant expansion of energy consumption (most derived from indigenous coal reserves)—the potential for the formation of, and damage from, acid deposition in these developing countries is very high. This article delineates and assesses the emissions patterns, meteorology, physical geology, and biological and cultural resources present in various Asian nations. Based on this analysis and the risk factors to acidification, it is concluded that a number of areas in Asia are currently vulnerable to acid rain. These regions include Japan, North and South Korea, southern China, and the mountainous portions of Southeast Asia and southwestern India. Furthermore, with accelerated development (and its attendant increase in energy use and production of emissions of acid deposition precursors) in many nations of Asia, it is likely that other regions will also be affected by acidification in the near future. Based on the results of this overview, it is clear that acid deposition has significant potential to impact the Asian region. However, empirical evidence is urgently needed to confirm this and to provide early warning of increases in the magnitude and spread of acid deposition and its effects throughout this part of the world.

  16. Acid rain: a background report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glustrom, L.; Stolzenberg, J.

    1982-07-08

    This Staff Brief was prepared for the Wisconsin Legislative Council's Special Committee on Acid Rain to provide an introduction to the issue of acid rain. It is divided into four parts. Part I provides an overview on the controversies surrounding the measurement, formation and effects of acid rain. As described in Part I, the term acid rain is used to describe the deposition of acidic components through both wet deposition (e.g., rain or snow) and dry deposition (e.g., direct contact between atmospheric constituents and the land, water or vegetation of the earth). Part II presents background information on state agency activities relating to acid rain in Wisconsin, describes what is known about the occurrence of, susceptibility to and effects of acid rain in Wisconsin, and provides information related to man-made sources of sulfur and nitrogen oxides in Wisconsin. Part III describes major policies and regulations relating to acid rain which have been or are being developed jointly by the United States and Canadian governments, by the United States government and by the State of Wisconsin. Part IV briefly discusses possible areas for Committee action.

  17. Winter stream temperature in the rain-on-snow zone of the Pacific Northwest: influences of hillslope runoff and transient snow cover

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Leach

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Stream temperature dynamics during winter are less well studied than summer thermal regimes, but the winter season thermal regime can be critical for fish growth and development in coastal catchments. The winter thermal regimes of Pacific Northwest headwater streams, which provide vital winter habitat for salmonids and their food sources, may be particularly sensitive to changes in climate because they can remain ice-free throughout the year and are often located in rain-on-snow zones. This study examined winter stream temperature patterns and controls in small headwater catchments within the rain-on-snow zone at the Malcolm Knapp Research Forest, near Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. Two hypotheses were addressed by this study: (1 winter stream temperatures are primarily controlled by advective fluxes associated with runoff processes and (2 stream temperatures should be depressed during rain-on-snow events, compared to rain-on-bare-ground events, due to the cooling effect of rain passing through the snowpack prior to infiltrating the soil or being delivered to the stream as saturation-excess overland flow. A reach-scale energy budget analysis of two winter seasons revealed that the advective energy input associated with hillslope runoff overwhelms vertical energy exchanges (net radiation, sensible and latent heat fluxes, bed heat conduction, and stream friction and hyporheic energy fluxes during rain and rain-on-snow events. Historical stream temperature data and modelled snowpack dynamics were used to explore the influence of transient snow cover on stream temperature over 13 winters. When snow was not present, daily stream temperature during winter rain events tended to increase with increasing air temperature. However, when snow was present, stream temperature was capped at about 5 °C, regardless of air temperature. The stream energy budget modelling and historical analysis support both of our hypotheses. A key implication is that

  18. NAMMA SENEGAL RAIN GAUGE NETWORK V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The NAMMA Senegal Rain Gauge Network consisted of 40 rain gauge sites (AMMA 1-40) located in various places throughout Senegal, West Africa. The Rain Gauge Network...

  19. Rain Garden Research at EPA’s Urban Watershed Research Facility: Promoting Nitrate Removal through Rain Garden Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rain gardens are designed to infiltrate stormwater, capture suspended solids, sorb heavy metals and phosphorus, and transform nutrients through biological processes. Most studies have found a low capacity for stormwater nitrate removal. Research at the Urban Watershed Managemen...

  20. The influence of sorghum grain decortication on bioethanol production and quality of the distillers' dried grains with solubles using cold and conventional warm starch processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nkomba, Edouard Y; van Rensburg, Eugéne; Chimphango, Annie F A; Görgens, Johann F

    2016-03-01

    Very high gravity hydrolysis-fermentation of whole and decorticated sorghum grains were compared using conventional and cold hydrolysis methods to assess the extent by which decortication could minimize enzymes dosages and affect the quality of the distillers' dried grains with solubles (DDGS). All processing configurations achieved ethanol concentrations between 126 and 132 g/L (16.0-16.7%v/v), although decortication resulted in a decreased ethanol yield. Decortication resulted in a decreased volumetric productivity during warm processing from 1.55 to 1.25 g L(-1)h(-1), whereas the required enzyme dosage for cold processing was decreased from 250 to 221 μl/100 gstarch. Cold processing decreased the average acid detergent fibre (ADF) from 35.59% to 29.32% and neutral detergent fibre (NDF) from 44.04% to 32.28% in the DDGS compared to the conventional (warm) processing. Due to lower enzyme requirements, the use of decorticated grains combined with cold processing presents a favourable process configuration and source of DDGS for non-ruminants. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. [Analysis of acid rain characteristics of Lin'an Regional Background Station using long-term observation data].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zheng-Quan; Ma, Hao; Mao, Yu-Ding; Feng, Tao

    2014-02-01

    Using long-term observation data of acid rain at Lin'an Regional Background Station (Lin'an RBS), this paper studied the interannual and monthly variations of acid rain, the reasons for the variations, and the relationships between acid rain and meteorological factors. The results showed that interannual variation of acid rain at Lin'an RBS had a general increasing trend in which there were two obvious intensifying processes and two distinct weakening processes, during the period ranging from 1985 to 2012. In last two decades, the monthly variation of acid rain at Lin'an RBS indicated that rain acidity and frequency of severe acid rain were increasing but the frequency of weak acid rain was decreasing when moving towards bilateral side months of July. Acid rain occurrence was affected by rainfall intensity, wind speed and wind direction. High frequency of severe acid rain and low frequency of weak acid rain were on days with drizzle, but high frequency of weak acid rain and low frequency of severe acid rain occurred on rainstorm days. With wind speed upgrading, the frequency of acid rain and the proportion of severe acid rain were declining, the pH value of precipitation was reducing too. Another character is that daily dominant wind direction of weak acid rain majorly converged in S-W section ,however that of severe acid rain was more likely distributed in N-E section. The monthly variation of acid rain at Lin'an RBS was mainly attributed to precipitation variation, the increasing and decreasing of monthly incoming wind from SSE-WSW and NWN-ENE sections of wind direction. The interannual variation of acid rain could be due to the effects of energy consumption raising and significant green policies conducted in Zhejiang, Jiangsu and Shanghai.

  2. Collision-Coalescence Nuclei Measurements During the Rain In Cumulus over the Ocean Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, J. D.; Chuang, P. Y.

    2005-12-01

    Precipitation is a key process in both weather and climate prediction, but one that is not yet well understood. In warm clouds, precipitation requires that cloud drops approximately 10 to 20 microns in diameter which form by condensation grow to become precipitation drops on the order of 1000 microns in diameter. This occurs by the process of collision-coalescence, which, as typically described, requires the presence of a small concentration of large drops > 55 microns in diameter in order to be effective. The presence of these large drops, or collision-coalescence nuclei (C-C nuclei), cannot be explained by condensation of water vapor on cloud condensation nuclei alone when constrained by the typical lifetime of warm rain clouds. Thus, it is required that additional mechanisms occur within warm clouds to account for the existence of drops large enough to begin the collision-coalescence process and thus initiate precipitation. There are several mechanisms used to explain the production of C-C nuclei. These mechanisms are broadly described as: (1) the existence of ultra-giant aerosol (UGA), (2) enhancements in drop collision rates due to small scale turbulence and (3) entrainment based mixing. In order to investigate each of these mechanisms in- and out of cloud measurements of C-C nuclei are necessary. Previous studies have identified difficulties in observing and measuring C-C nuclei with radar and in-situ optical probes. Past attempts have been unsatisfactory for several reasons, including inadequate instrument sample volumes, difficulties making measurements in the necessary size range, measurement quality concerns, and instrument artifacts. The Phase Doppler Interferometery (PDI) technique allows for the accurate measurement of C-C nuclei size, concentration and velocity. Aircraft PDI measurements were made during the Rain In Cumulus over the Ocean (RICO) project in January 2005 off the Atlantic coasts of Antigua and Barbuda in the Eastern Caribbean. Shallow

  3. Relating Convective and Stratiform Rain to Latent Heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Lang, Stephen; Zeng, Xiping; Shige, Shoichi; Takayabu, Yukari

    2010-01-01

    The relationship among surface rainfall, its intensity, and its associated stratiform amount is established by examining observed precipitation data from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Precipitation Radar (PR). The results show that for moderate-high stratiform fractions, rain probabilities are strongly skewed toward light rain intensities. For convective-type rain, the peak probability of occurrence shifts to higher intensities but is still significantly skewed toward weaker rain rates. The main differences between the distributions for oceanic and continental rain are for heavily convective rain. The peak occurrence, as well as the tail of the distribution containing the extreme events, is shifted to higher intensities for continental rain. For rainy areas sampled at 0.58 horizontal resolution, the occurrence of conditional rain rates over 100 mm/day is significantly higher over land. Distributions of rain intensity versus stratiform fraction for simulated precipitation data obtained from cloud-resolving model (CRM) simulations are quite similar to those from the satellite, providing a basis for mapping simulated cloud quantities to the satellite observations. An improved convective-stratiform heating (CSH) algorithm is developed based on two sources of information: gridded rainfall quantities (i.e., the conditional intensity and the stratiform fraction) observed from the TRMM PR and synthetic cloud process data (i.e., latent heating, eddy heat flux convergence, and radiative heating/cooling) obtained from CRM simulations of convective cloud systems. The new CSH algorithm-derived heating has a noticeably different heating structure over both ocean and land regions compared to the previous CSH algorithm. Major differences between the new and old algorithms include a significant increase in the amount of low- and midlevel heating, a downward emphasis in the level of maximum cloud heating by about 1 km, and a larger variance between land and ocean in

  4. Volcanoes magnify Metro Manila's southwest monsoon rains and lethal floods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagmay, Alfredo Mahar; Bagtasa, Gerry; Crisologo, Irene; Racoma, Bernard Alan; David, Carlos Primo

    Many volcanoes worldwide are located near populated cities that experience monsoon seasons, characterised by shifting winds each year. Because of the severity of flood impact to large populations, it is worthy of investigation in the Philippines and elsewhere to better understand the phenomenon for possible hazard mitigating solutions, if any. During the monsoon season, the change in flow direction of winds brings moist warm air to cross the mountains and volcanoes in western Philippines and cause lift into the atmosphere, which normally leads to heavy rains and floods. Heavy southwest monsoon rains from 18-21 August 2013 flooded Metro Manila (population of 12 million) and its suburbs paralyzing the nation’s capital for an entire week. Called the 2013 Habagat event, it was a repeat of the 2012 Habagat or extreme southwest monsoon weather from 6-9 August, which delivered record rains in the mega city. In both the 2012 and 2013 Habagat events, cyclones, the usual suspects for the delivery of heavy rains, were passing northeast of the Philippine archipelago, respectively, and enhanced the southwest monsoon. Analysis of Doppler data, rainfall measurements, and Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model simulations show that two large stratovolcanoes, Natib and Mariveles, across from Manila Bay and approximately 70 km west of Metro Manila, played a substantial role in delivering extreme rains and consequent floods to Metro Manila. The study highlights how volcanoes, with their shape and height create an orographic effect and dispersive tail of rain clouds which constitutes a significant flood hazard to large communities like Metro Manila.

  5. Study on the relationship between meteorological conditions and acid rain in mid-eastern Fujian.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, C C; Liu, J X; Cai, Y Y; Li, B L; Wang, Z L; Chen, B B

    2009-08-01

    Based on the acid rain observation data and the contemporaneous historical synoptic charts of Mid-Eastern Fujian during the period of 1991 to 2003, we analyzed the distribution characteristics of acid rain in different seasons, weather types, precipitation grades and wind directions. The results showed that the acid pollution in Mid-Eastern Fujian was still serious. In winter, the precipitation pH value was 4.79, and the acid rain frequency was 60.62% which was twice higher than that in summer. The pH value of warm shear-type precipitation at 850 hPa was 4.79. Nearly half of these precipitations had the problems of acid rain pollution. The acid rain frequency of the inverted trough type was only 26.11% which was the lowest one in all types. There was no marked difference of the acid rain distribution characteristics between ahead-of-trough and behind-the-trough. The precipitation pH values of the five grades were lower than 5.30 and the acid rain frequency changed as an inverted U shape with the increasing of the rainfall. The pH values of precipitations in the eight wind directions were generally below 5.20, and the acid rain frequencies were about 40%.

  6. How do changes in warm-phase microphysics affect deep convective clouds?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qian; Koren, Ilan; Altaratz, Orit; Heiblum, Reuven H.; Dagan, Guy; Pinto, Lital

    2017-08-01

    Understanding aerosol effects on deep convective clouds and the derived effects on the radiation budget and rain patterns can largely contribute to estimations of climate uncertainties. The challenge is difficult in part because key microphysical processes in the mixed and cold phases are still not well understood. For deep convective clouds with a warm base, understanding aerosol effects on the warm processes is extremely important as they set the initial and boundary conditions for the cold processes. Therefore, the focus of this study is the warm phase, which can be better resolved. The main question is: How do aerosol-derived changes in the warm phase affect the properties of deep convective cloud systems? To explore this question, we used a weather research and forecasting (WRF) model with spectral bin microphysics to simulate a deep convective cloud system over the Marshall Islands during the Kwajalein Experiment (KWAJEX). The model results were validated against observations, showing similarities in the vertical profile of radar reflectivity and the surface rain rate. Simulations with larger aerosol loading resulted in a larger total cloud mass, a larger cloud fraction in the upper levels, and a larger frequency of strong updrafts and rain rates. Enlarged mass both below and above the zero temperature level (ZTL) contributed to the increase in cloud total mass (water and ice) in the polluted runs. Increased condensation efficiency of cloud droplets governed the gain in mass below the ZTL, while both enhanced condensational and depositional growth led to increased mass above it. The enhanced mass loading above the ZTL acted to reduce the cloud buoyancy, while the thermal buoyancy (driven by the enhanced latent heat release) increased in the polluted runs. The overall effect showed an increased upward transport (across the ZTL) of liquid water driven by both larger updrafts and larger droplet mobility. These aerosol effects were reflected in the larger ratio

  7. How do changes in warm-phase microphysics affect deep convective clouds?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Q. Chen

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Understanding aerosol effects on deep convective clouds and the derived effects on the radiation budget and rain patterns can largely contribute to estimations of climate uncertainties. The challenge is difficult in part because key microphysical processes in the mixed and cold phases are still not well understood. For deep convective clouds with a warm base, understanding aerosol effects on the warm processes is extremely important as they set the initial and boundary conditions for the cold processes. Therefore, the focus of this study is the warm phase, which can be better resolved. The main question is: How do aerosol-derived changes in the warm phase affect the properties of deep convective cloud systems? To explore this question, we used a weather research and forecasting (WRF model with spectral bin microphysics to simulate a deep convective cloud system over the Marshall Islands during the Kwajalein Experiment (KWAJEX. The model results were validated against observations, showing similarities in the vertical profile of radar reflectivity and the surface rain rate. Simulations with larger aerosol loading resulted in a larger total cloud mass, a larger cloud fraction in the upper levels, and a larger frequency of strong updrafts and rain rates. Enlarged mass both below and above the zero temperature level (ZTL contributed to the increase in cloud total mass (water and ice in the polluted runs. Increased condensation efficiency of cloud droplets governed the gain in mass below the ZTL, while both enhanced condensational and depositional growth led to increased mass above it. The enhanced mass loading above the ZTL acted to reduce the cloud buoyancy, while the thermal buoyancy (driven by the enhanced latent heat release increased in the polluted runs. The overall effect showed an increased upward transport (across the ZTL of liquid water driven by both larger updrafts and larger droplet mobility. These aerosol effects were reflected in the

  8. Destruction rains from power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-01-01

    Acid rain more acidic than lemon juice periodically falls in the U.S. east of the Mississippi River. Acid rain is the final product in a chain of reactions that begins when SO/sub 2/ is emitted from power plants. SO/sub 2/ reacts with atmospheric constituents to form sulfur trioxide, sulfate, and sulfuric acid. It is sulfate which is most harmful to human health. Nitric oxides also react in the atmosphere to form nitric acid. Coal combustion produces more than half the man-made air-borne sulfur, and half the nitrate (NOx). Auto engines produce nearly half the NOx, while catalytic convertors are a direct source of sulfuric acid. Fertilizer may also produce nitrate. As many as 21,000 people die annually from sulfur-related causes east of the Mississippi, according to a draft report by the Brookhaven National Laboratory. Acid rain has wreaked havoc in some northeastern waterways. Since 1940, it has eliminated fish from nearly half the Adirondack lakes. Acid rain also affects forest ecosystems by leaching nutrients from foliage and soil, and by killing important soil microorganisms. Antiquated buildings and sculpture are eroding. Two major obstacles for controlling acid rain and sulfates abound - bureaucratic and the National Energy Plan's commitment to coal. (MCW)

  9. Assessing forest vulnerability to climate warming using a process-based model of tree growth: bad prospects for rear-edges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Salguero, Raúl; Camarero, Jesus Julio; Gutiérrez, Emilia; González Rouco, Fidel; Gazol, Antonio; Sangüesa-Barreda, Gabriel; Andreu-Hayles, Laia; Linares, Juan Carlos; Seftigen, Kristina

    2017-07-01

    Growth models can be used to assess forest vulnerability to climate warming. If global warming amplifies water deficit in drought-prone areas, tree populations located at the driest and southernmost distribution limits (rear-edges) should be particularly threatened. Here, we address these statements by analyzing and projecting growth responses to climate of three major tree species (silver fir, Abies alba; Scots pine, Pinus sylvestris; and mountain pine, Pinus uncinata) in mountainous areas of NE Spain. This region is subjected to Mediterranean continental conditions, it encompasses wide climatic, topographic and environmental gradients, and, more importantly, it includes rear-edges of the continuous distributions of these tree species. We used tree-ring width data from a network of 110 forests in combination with the process-based Vaganov-Shashkin-Lite growth model and climate-growth analyses to forecast changes in tree growth during the 21st century. Climatic projections were based on four ensembles CO2 emission scenarios. Warm and dry conditions during the growing season constrain silver fir and Scots pine growth, particularly at the species rear-edge. By contrast, growth of high-elevation mountain pine forests is enhanced by climate warming. The emission scenario (RCP 8.5) corresponding to the most pronounced warming (+1.4 to 4.8 °C) forecasted mean growth reductions of -10.7% and -16.4% in silver fir and Scots pine, respectively, after 2050. This indicates that rising temperatures could amplify drought stress and thus constrain the growth of silver fir and Scots pine rear-edge populations growing at xeric sites. Contrastingly, mountain pine growth is expected to increase by +12.5% due to a longer and warmer growing season. The projections of growth reduction in silver fir and Scots pine portend dieback and a contraction of their species distribution areas through potential local extinctions of the most vulnerable driest rear-edge stands. Our modeling

  10. Data set: A modeling dataset that spans the rain - snow transition zone: Johnston Draw catchment, Reynolds Creek Experimental Watershed, Idaho, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hydrometeorological data from the rain-to-snow transition zone in mountain basins are limited. As the climate warms, the transition from rain to snow in mountain regions is moving to higher elevations, and these changes are altering the timing of water delivery to the downstream streams, lakes and w...

  11. Global warming

    CERN Document Server

    Hulme, M

    1998-01-01

    Global warming-like deforestation, the ozone hole and the loss of species- has become one of the late 20the century icons of global environmental damage. The threat, is not the reality, of such a global climate change has motivated governments. businesses and environmental organisations, to take serious action ot try and achieve serious control of the future climate. This culminated last December in Kyoto in the agreement for legally-binding climate protocol. In this series of three lectures I will provide a perspective on the phenomenon of global warming that accepts the scientific basis for our concern, but one that also recognises the dynamic interaction between climate and society that has always exited The future will be no different. The challenge of global warning is not to pretend it is not happening (as with some pressure groups), nor to pretend it threatens global civilisation (as with other pressure groups), and it is not even a challenge to try and stop it from happening-we are too far down the ro...

  12. The Hiccup: a dynamical coupling process during the autumn transition in the Northern Hemisphere - similarities and differences to sudden stratospheric warmings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthias, V.; Shepherd, T. G.; Hoffmann, P.; Rapp, M.

    2015-02-01

    Sudden stratospheric warmings (SSWs) are the most prominent vertical coupling process in the middle atmosphere, which occur during winter and are caused by the interaction of planetary waves (PWs) with the zonal mean flow. Vertical coupling has also been identified during the equinox transitions, and is similarly associated with PWs. We argue that there is a characteristic aspect of the autumn transition in northern high latitudes, which we call the "hiccup", and which acts like a "mini SSW", i.e. like a small minor warming. We study the average characteristics of the hiccup based on a superimposed epoch analysis using a nudged version of the Canadian Middle Atmosphere Model, representing 30 years of historical data. Hiccups can be identified in about half the years studied. The mesospheric zonal wind results are compared to radar observations over Andenes (69° N, 16° E) for the years 2000-2013. A comparison of the average characteristics of hiccups and SSWs shows both similarities and differences between the two vertical coupling processes.

  13. The Hiccup: a dynamical coupling process during the autumn transition in the Northern Hemisphere – similarities and differences to sudden stratospheric warmings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Matthias

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Sudden stratospheric warmings (SSWs are the most prominent vertical coupling process in the middle atmosphere, which occur during winter and are caused by the interaction of planetary waves (PWs with the zonal mean flow. Vertical coupling has also been identified during the equinox transitions, and is similarly associated with PWs. We argue that there is a characteristic aspect of the autumn transition in northern high latitudes, which we call the "hiccup", and which acts like a "mini SSW", i.e. like a small minor warming. We study the average characteristics of the hiccup based on a superimposed epoch analysis using a nudged version of the Canadian Middle Atmosphere Model, representing 30 years of historical data. Hiccups can be identified in about half the years studied. The mesospheric zonal wind results are compared to radar observations over Andenes (69° N, 16° E for the years 2000–2013. A comparison of the average characteristics of hiccups and SSWs shows both similarities and differences between the two vertical coupling processes.

  14. Time-dependent, non-monotonic response of warm convective cloud fields to changes in aerosol loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagan, Guy; Koren, Ilan; Altaratz, Orit; Heiblum, Reuven H.

    2017-06-01

    Large eddy simulations (LESs) with bin microphysics are used here to study cloud fields' sensitivity to changes in aerosol loading and the time evolution of this response. Similarly to the known response of a single cloud, we show that the mean field properties change in a non-monotonic trend, with an optimum aerosol concentration for which the field reaches its maximal water mass or rain yield. This trend is a result of competition between processes that encourage cloud development versus those that suppress it. However, another layer of complexity is added when considering clouds' impact on the field's thermodynamic properties and how this is dependent on aerosol loading. Under polluted conditions, rain is suppressed and the non-precipitating clouds act to increase atmospheric instability. This results in warming of the lower part of the cloudy layer (in which there is net condensation) and cooling of the upper part (net evaporation). Evaporation at the upper part of the cloudy layer in the polluted simulations raises humidity at these levels and thus amplifies the development of the next generation of clouds (preconditioning effect). On the other hand, under clean conditions, the precipitating clouds drive net warming of the cloudy layer and net cooling of the sub-cloud layer due to rain evaporation. These two effects act to stabilize the atmospheric boundary layer with time (consumption of the instability). The evolution of the field's thermodynamic properties affects the cloud properties in return, as shown by the migration of the optimal aerosol concentration toward higher values.

  15. NAMMA SENEGAL RAIN GAUGE NETWORK V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The NAMMA Senegal Rain Gauge Network consisted of 40 rain gauge sites (AMMA 1-40) located in various places throughout Senegal, West Africa. These data files were...

  16. Performance analysis of rain attenuation on earth-to-satellite microwave links design in Libya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafiqul Islam, Md; Hussein Budalal, Asma Ali; Habaebi, Mohamed H.; Badron, Khairayu; Fadzil Ismail, Ahmad

    2017-11-01

    Performances of earth-to-satellite microwave links operating in Ku, Ka, and V-bands are degraded by the environment and strongly attenuated by rain. Rain attenuation is the most significant consideration and challenge to design a reliable earth-to-satellite microwave links for these frequency bands. Hence, it is essential for satellite link designer to take into account rain fade margin accurately before system implementation. Rain rate is the main measured parameter to predict of rain attenuation. Rainfall statistical data measured and recorded in Libya for the period of 30 years are collected from 5 locations. The prediction methods require one minute integration time rain intensity. Therefore, collected data were analyzed and processed to convert into one–minute rain rate cumulative distribution in Libya. The model proposed by ITU-R is used to predict and investigate rain fade based on converted 1-minute rain rate data. Rain fade predicted at two locations are used for performance analysis in terms of link spectral efficiency and throughput. V-band downlink shows that 99.99% availability is possible in all the Southern part stations in Libya at 0.29 bps/Hz spectral efficiency and 20.74 Mbps throughput when 72 MHz transponder band width is used which is not feasible in Northern part. Results of this paper will be a very useful resource to design highly reliable earth-to-satellite communication links in Libya.

  17. A Robust Response of Precipitation to Global Warming from CMIP5 Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, K. -M.; Wu, H. -T.; Kim, K. -M.

    2012-01-01

    How precipitation responds to global warming is a major concern to society and a challenge to climate change research. Based on analyses of rainfall probability distribution functions of 14 state-of-the-art climate models, we find a robust, canonical global rainfall response to a triple CO2 warming scenario, featuring 100 250% more heavy rain, 5-10% less moderate rain, and 10-15% more very light or no-rain events. Regionally, a majority of the models project a consistent response with more heavy rain events over climatologically wet regions of the deep tropics, and more dry events over subtropical and tropical land areas. Results suggest that increased CO2 emissions induce basic structural changes in global rain systems, increasing risks of severe floods and droughts in preferred geographic locations worldwide.

  18. The Indo-Pacific Warm Pool: critical to world oceanography and world climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Deckker, Patrick

    2016-12-01

    The Indo-Pacific Warm Pool holds a unique place on the globe. It is a large area [>30 × 106 km2] that is characterised by permanent surface temperature >28 °C and is therefore called the `heat engine' of the globe. High convective clouds which can reach altitudes up to 15 km generate much latent heat in the process of convection and this area is therefore called the `steam engine' of the world. Seasonal and contrasting monsoonal activity over the region is the cause for a broad seasonal change of surface salinities, and since the area lies along the path of the Great Ocean Conveyor Belt, it is coined the `dilution' basin due to the high incidence of tropical rain and, away from the equator, tropical cyclones contribute to a significant drop in sea water salinity. Discussion about what may happen in the future of the Warm Pool under global warming is presented together with a description of the Warm Pool during the past, such as the Last Glacial Maximum when sea levels had dropped by ~125 m. A call for urgent monitoring of the IPWP area is justified on the grounds of the significance of this area for global oceanographic and climatological processes, but also because of the concerned threats to human population living there.

  19. analysis of rain analysis of rain rate and rain attenuation for earth

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eobe

    designing microwave satellite and terrestrial satellite and terrestrial ... The presence of rain along satellite-earth path is a major cause of signal .... Equation (4):. R0.01 = αMβ. (4). In (4), α and β are regression coefficients defined as α. = 12.2903 and β = 0.2973. However, using the refined Moupfouma and Chebil model, the ...

  20. analysis of rain rate and rain attenuation for earth-space ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rain rate and rain attenuation predictions are vital when designing microwave satellite and terrestrial communication links, such as in the Ku and Ka bands. This paper presents the cumulative distribution functions (CDFs) of the predicted rain rate and rain attenuation for Uyo, Akwa Ibom State (AKS) (Latitude: 4.88°N, ...

  1. Responses of leaf processing to impacts in streams in Atlantic rain forest, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil--a test of the biodiversity-ecosystem functioning relationship?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulton, T P; Magalhães, S A P

    2003-02-01

    The relationship between biodiversity and ecosystem functioning has been intensely debated and researched in recent times. It is generally agreed that there is redundancy of species in ecosystems such that loss of species does not necessarily result in change in the functioning of the ecosystem in which they occur. However the state of our knowledge does not allow prediction of sensitivity or specificity of this relationship for any particular ecosystem. A widely-held opinion is that ecosystem functioning is relatively stable to environmental impact, whereas biodiversity is more sensitive. We tested this in streams of the Atlantic forest using leaf decomposition as an aspect of ecosystem functioning and measuring the diversity of the associated fauna. In lightly impacted streams of the urban park Parque Estadual da Pedra Branca, RJ, leaf processing rate of a hard-leaf species, Myrcia rostrata (Myrtaceae) was more than 50% slower than in "intact" streams at the biological reserve of Ilha Grande, RJ. Taxon diversity of fauna of the leaves was not significantly lower in the impacted than the intact streams. We construe this as preliminary evidence contrary to the notion that ecosystem functioning is less sensitive than biodiversity to impacts in this system.

  2. Responses of leaf processing to impacts in streams in Atlantic rain Forest, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil - a test of the biodiversity-ecosystem functioning relationship?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moulton T. P.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between biodiversity and ecosystem functioning has been intensely debated and researched in recent times. It is generally agreed that there is redundancy of species in ecosystems such that loss of species does not necessarily result in change in the functioning of the ecosystem in which they occur. However the state of our knowledge does not allow prediction of sensitivity or specificity of this relationship for any particular ecosystem. A widely-held opinion is that ecosystem functioning is relatively stable to environmental impact, whereas biodiversity is more sensitive. We tested this in streams of the Atlantic forest using leaf decomposition as an aspect of ecosystem functioning and measuring the diversity of the associated fauna. In lightly impacted streams of the urban park Parque Estadual da Pedra Branca, RJ, leaf processing rate of a hard-leaf species, Myrcia rostrata (Myrtaceae was more than 50% slower than in "intact" streams at the biological reserve of Ilha Grande, RJ. Taxon diversity of fauna of the leaves was not significantly lower in the impacted than the intact streams. We construe this as preliminary evidence contrary to the notion that ecosystem functioning is less sensitive than biodiversity to impacts in this system.

  3. The effect of aerosol-derived changes in the warm phase on the properties of deep convective clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qian; Koren, Ilan; Altaratz, Orit; Heiblum, Reuven; Dagan, Guy

    2017-04-01

    The aerosol impact on deep convective clouds starts in an increased number of cloud droplets in higher aerosol loading environment. This change drives many others, like enhanced condensational growth, delay in collision-coalescence and others. Since the warm processes serve as the initial and boundary conditions for the mixed and cold-phase processes in deep clouds, it is highly important to understand the aerosol effect on them. The weather research and forecasting model (WRF) with spectral bin microphysics was used to study a deep convective system over the Marshall Islands, during the Kwajalein Experiment (KWAJEX). Three simulations were conducted with aerosol concentrations of 100, 500 and 2000 cm-3, to reflect clean, semipolluted, and polluted conditions. The results of the clean run agreed well with the radar profiles and rain rate observations. The more polluted simulations resulted in larger total cloud mass, larger upper level cloud fraction and rain rates. There was an increased mass both below and above the zero temperature level. It indicates of more efficient growth processes both below and above the zero level. In addition the polluted runs showed an increased upward transport (across the zero level) of liquid water due to both stronger updrafts and larger droplet mobility. In this work we discuss the transport of cloud mass crossing the zero temperature level (in both directions) in order to gain a process level understanding of how aerosol effects on the warm processes affect the macro- and micro-properties of deep convective clouds.

  4. Acid Rain: What It Is -- How You Can Help!

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Wildlife Federation, Washington, DC.

    This publication discusses the nature and consequences of acid precipitation (commonly called acid rain). Topic areas include: (1) the chemical nature of acid rain; (2) sources of acid rain; (3) geographic areas where acid rain is a problem; (4) effects of acid rain on lakes; (5) effect of acid rain on vegetation; (6) possible effects of acid rain…

  5. 9-year distributions of rain intensities measured in Prague and their utilization in telecommunications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvicera, V.; Grabner, M.

    2012-04-01

    Experimental research in the Department of Frequency Engineering of the Czech Metrology Institute (CMI) in Prague, the Czech Republic, is focused on stability of received signals on terrestrial radio and optical communication paths. Hydrometeors (rain, snow, fog, hails) can cause serious attenuation of electromagnetic waves in the frequency bands above 10 GHz and the availability performances of terrestrial radio communication systems are seriously affected by heavy hydrometeors events. The rain intensity data is usually used for the calculations of attenuation due to rain on terrestrial radio links in accordance with either the relevant ITU-R Recommendation or other methods. Therefore, our experimental research is also focused on our own meteorological measurements in the vicinity of experimental radio and optical paths. The heated tipping-bucket rain gauge with the collector area of 500 cm2 and the rain amount per tip of 0.1 mm is used at CMI for the measurements of intensities of hydrometeors. The time of tips is recorded with uncertainty of 1 second. Hydrometeors intensity data obtained from January 2003 to December 2011 (9 years of observation) was statistically processed over the individual years. All the recorded individual hydrometeor events were compared with the concurrent meteorological conditions and were carefully categorized according to the types of individual hydrometeors, i.e. rain, rain with snow, rain with hails, snow, fog, fog with rain, fog with snow, and fog with rain and snow. The obtained cumulative distributions (CDs) of intensities of individual hydrometeors over 9 years of observation will be presented and compared with the CD of intensities of all hydrometeors together. The rain amounts were examined too. The obtained rain amounts for individual years and the average rain amounts for individual months over the 9-year period will be given. The obtained CD of average 1-minute rain intensities for the average year over the 9-year period of

  6. Rain intensity over specific rain thresholds in Athens and Thessaloniki, Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philandras, C. M.; Nastos, P. T.; Kapsomenakis, J.; Repapis, C. C.

    2009-09-01

    It is well documented that climatic change has caused significant impacts in the water cycle and great spatial and temporal variability of the rain events. The rain scarcity in many cases is associated with extreme convective weather resulted in flash floods, which threatens the human life and the existed infrastructure. In this study, the annual mean rain intensity (mm/h) along with the annual number of rain days for rain events over specific rain thresholds, such as 10, 20, 30, 40, 50 mm, in two Greek cities Athens and Thessaloniki, during the period 1930-2007, are examined. The meteorological data, which concern daily rain totals (mm) and duration (h), were acquired from the National Observatory of Athens and from the meteorological station of the University of Thessaloniki. Our findings show that, in Athens, an increase in the number of annual rain days and the mean rain intensity over the aforementioned rain thresholds appears at the end of 1980’s and continues until nowadays. On the contrary, concerning Thessaloniki, a decrease in the rain days is apparent from 1980, while the decrease in the mean rain intensity concerns only the rain thresholds of 10 and 20 mm. This analysis reveals that extreme rain events are more frequent in Athens, which is under a high urbanization rhythm, than in Thessaloniki at the north of Greece. Finally, the patterns of the atmospheric circulation, which are associated with specific extreme cases are analysed, using NCEP reanalysis data.

  7. Acid rain attack on outdoor sculpture in perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livingston, Richard A.

    2016-12-01

    A major concern motivating research in acid rain materials effects has been the potential for damage to cultural heritage, particularly outdoor marble and bronze sculpture. However, a combination of field and laboratory studies has failed to show a correlation between rain pH and loss of materials. In order to understand this counterintuitive lack of acid rain effect, an aqueous geochemical modeling approach was used to analyze rain runoff chemistry for the relative importance of acid rain neutralization, dry deposition, and in the case of marble, natural carbonate dissolution. This approach involved the development of pH - SO42- phase diagrams for marble (calcium carbonate) and bronze (copper) under ambient environmental conditions. This then enabled reaction path modeling of the acid neutralization process using the pH range typically found in wet deposition (3.5-6). The results were for marble that the theoretical maximum amount of Ca2+ ion that could be lost due acid rain neutralization would be 0.158 mmol/l compared to 10.5 mmol/l by dry deposition, and for bronze, the Cu2+ ion losses would be 0.21 mmol/l and 47.3 mmol/l respectively. Consequently dry deposition effects on these materials have the potential to dominate over wet deposition effects. To test these predictions the geochemical models were applied to examples of data sets from mass balance (runoff vs rainfall) studies on a marble statue in New York City and some bronze memorial plaques at Gettysburg PA. Although these data sets were collected in the early 1980s they remain valid for demonstrating the mass balance method. For the marble statue, the mean Ca2+ losses by dry deposition was about 69% of the total compared 0.3% for acid rain neutralization, which was less than the natural carbonate dissolution losses of 0.8%. For the bronze, the mean Cu2+ losses were 70.6% by SO42- dry deposition and 23% by NO3- dry deposition compared to 6.4% by acid rain neutralization. Thus for both cases the wet

  8. Climate change in Eastern Taimyr over the last 80 years and the warming impact on biodiversity and ecosystem processes in its territory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena B. Pospelova

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of long-term changes of mean annual temperatures and the active temperature sum over 80 years was carried out using data of the Khatanga meteorological station. Since the 1990s, an essential warming was observed, especially after 2000. The warming influence on vegetation takes place immediately (the ecosystem composition changes due to the degradation of cryogenic processes as well as directly by increasing the time of the vegetation period and the total amount of heat on plants. As a result, in the last few years, the lead of phenological phenomena terms is observed – the time of foliage expansion and efflorescence of plants-indicators, geese arriving, mosquitos appearance, ice thawing. By long term monitoring data, the moving of some north-taiga plant species to forest tundra and tundra is observed, as well as their establishing in vegetation communities. However, at this moment, the character of the vegetation is stable. The occurrence of taiga animals is increased in tundra and forest tundra. An active revival of larch is observed in forest tundra and north sparse forests. A removing forest border to the north is not observed, but in the southern mountains of Taimyr its replacing on higher levels could be seen. A decreasing summer precipitation quantity increases the possibility of forest fires, spring and bog drying. It influences negatively on bog flora and near-water fauna. It is possible, that the main reason of the local climate change at the East of Taimyr is less connected to the global planet change, but much more to pulsations of the strong Siberian anticyclone.

  9. Classification system for rain fed wheat grain cultivars using artificial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Artificial neural network (ANN) models have found wide applications, including prediction, classification, system modeling and image processing. Image analysis based on texture, morphology and color features of grains is essential for various applications as wheat grain industry and cultivation. In order to classify the rain ...

  10. Bioremediation of a crude oil polluted tropical rain forest soil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A combination of options including Biostimulation with agricultural fertilizers, Bioaugumentation and physical processes were evaluated in-situ in the clean-up of crude oil polluted tropical rain forest soil for a period of nine weeks. Soil physicochemical parameters such as moisture (19% to 13%), pH (6.34 to 4.5) and organic ...

  11. Acid rain information book. Draft final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-12-01

    Acid rain is one of the most widely publicized environmental issues of the day. The potential consequences of increasingly widespread acid rain demand that this phenomenon be carefully evaluated. Reveiw of the literature shows a rapidly growing body of knowledge, but also reveals major gaps in understanding that need to be narrowed. This document discusses major aspects of the acid rain phenomenon, points out areas of uncertainty, and summarizes current and projected research by responsible government agencies and other concerned organizations.

  12. Rain Simulation for the Test of Automotive Surround Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasirlioglu, Sinan; Riener, Andreas; Doric, Igor

    2017-04-01

    The WHO Global Health Observatory data indicates that over 1.25 million people die in traffic accidents annually. To save lives, car manufacturers spend lot of efforts on the development of novel safety systems aiming to avoid or mitigate accidents and provide maximum protection for vehicle occupants as well as vulnerable road users. All the safety features mainly rely on data from surround sensors such as radar, lidar and camera and intelligent vehicles today use these environmental data for instant decision making and vehicle control. As already small errors in sensor data measurements could lead to catastrophes like major injuries or road traffic fatalities, it is of utmost importance to ensure high reliability and accuracy of sensors and safety systems. This work focuses on the influence of environmental factors such as rain conditions, as it is known that rain drops scatter the electromagnetic waves. The result is incorrect measurements with a direct negative impact on environment detection. To identify potential problems of sensors under varying environmental conditions, systems are today tested in real-world settings with two main problems: First, tests are time-consuming and second, environmental conditions are not reproducible. Our approach to test the influence of weather on automotive sensors is to use an indoor rain simulator. Our artificial rain maker, installed at CARISSMA (Center of Automotive Research on Integrated Safety Systems and Measurement Area), is parametrized with rain characteristics measured in the field using a standard disdrometer. System behavior on artificial rain is compared and validated with natural rainfall. With this simulator it is finally possible to test environmental influence at various levels and under reproducible conditions. This saves lot of efforts required for the test process itself and furthermore has a positive impact on the reliability of sensor systems due to the fact that test driven development is enabled.

  13. Silent scourge. [Global issues of acid rain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoyle, R.

    1982-11-08

    Acid rain is a postindustrial stress on the environment that is shaping up as the ecological issue of the 1980s. Disagreement over the effects of acid rain pit cost-conscious government officials and utility lobbyists who see acid rain as a natural phenomenon against those who fear its subtle, but lethal effects. Scientists disagree on whether there is adequate data to justify immediate action or whether more research is needed to verify the true sources of acid rain. Meanwhile, tension between the US and Canada over transboundary pollution and the more lax attitudes of developing countries relative to the urgency felt in industrialized nations are creating global strains.

  14. Retrospective analysis of a non-forecasted rain-on-snow flood in the Alps - a matter of model-limitations or unpredictable nature?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rössler, O.; Froidevaux, P.; Börst, U.; Rickli, R.; Martius, O.; Weingartner, R.

    2013-10-01

    On 10 October 2011, a rain-on-snow flood occurred in the Bernese Alps, Switzerland, and caused significant damage. As this flood peak was unpredicted by the flood forecast system, questions were raised concerning what has caused this flood and whether it was predictable at all. In this study, we focused on one valley that was heavily hit by the event, the Loetschen valley (160 km2), and aimed to reconstruct the anatomy of this rain-on-snow flood from the synoptic conditions represented by European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts ECWMF analysis data, and the local meteorology within the valley recorded by an extensive met-station network. In addition, we applied the hydrological model WaSiM-ETH to improve our hydrological process understanding about this event and to demonstrate the predictability of this rain-on-snow flood. We found an atmospheric river bringing moist and warm air to Switzerland that followed an anomalous cold front with sustained snowfall to be central for this rain-on-snow event. Intensive rainfall (average 100 mm day-1) was accompanied by a drastic temperature increase (+8 K) that shifted the zero degree line from 1500 m a.s.l. to 3200 m a.s.l. in 12 h. The northern flank of the valley received significantly more precipitation than the southern flank, leading to an enormous flood in tributaries along the northern flank, while the tributaries along the southern flank remained nearly unchanged. We hypothesized that the reason for this was a cavity circulation combined with a seeder-feeder-cloud system enhancing both local rainfall and snow melt by condensation of the warm, moist air on the snow. Applying and adjusting the hydrological model, we show that both the latent and the sensible heat fluxes were responsible for the flood and that locally large amounts of precipitation (up to 160 mm rainfall in 12 h) was necessary to produce the estimated flood peak. With considerable adjustments to the model and meteorological input data, we were

  15. A Multimodel Study on Warm Precipitation Biases in Global Models Compared to Satellite Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Xianwen; Suzuki, Kentaroh; Guo, Huan; Goto, Daisuke; Ogura, Tomoo; Koshiro, Tsuyoshi; Mülmenstädt, Johannes

    2017-11-01

    The cloud-to-precipitation transition process in warm clouds simulated by state-of-the-art global climate models (GCMs), including both traditional climate models and a high-resolution model, is evaluated against A-Train satellite observations. The models and satellite observations are compared in the form of the statistics obtained from combined analysis of multiple-satellite observables that probe signatures of the cloud-to-precipitation transition process. One common problem identified among these models is the too-frequent occurrence of warm precipitation. The precipitation is found to form when the cloud particle size and the liquid water path (LWP) are both much smaller than those in observations. The too-efficient formation of precipitation is found to be compensated for by errors of cloud microphysical properties, such as underestimated cloud particle size and LWP, to an extent that varies among the models. However, this does not completely cancel the precipitation formation bias. Robust errors are also found in the evolution of cloud microphysical properties from nonprecipitating to drizzling and then to raining clouds in some GCMs, implying unrealistic interaction between precipitation and cloud water. Nevertheless, auspicious information is found for future improvement of warm precipitation representations: the adoption of more realistic autoconversion scheme in the high-resolution model improves the triggering of precipitation, and the introduction of a sophisticated subgrid variability scheme in a traditional model improves the simulated precipitation frequency over subtropical eastern ocean. However, deterioration in other warm precipitation characteristics is also found accompanying these improvements, implying the multisource nature of warm precipitation biases in GCMs.

  16. Effects of warming on CO2, N2O and CH4 fluxes and underlying processes from subarctic tundra, Northwest Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voigt, Carolina; Lamprecht, Richard E.; Marushchak, Maija E.; Biasi, Christina; Martikainen, Pertti J.

    2014-05-01

    Peatlands, especially those located in the highly sensitive arctic and subarctic latitudes, are known to play a major role in the global carbon cycle. Predicted climatic changes - entailing an increase in near-surface temperature and a change in precipitation patterns - will most likely have a serious yet uncertain impact on the greenhouse gas (GHG) balance of these ecosystems. Microbial processes are enhanced by warmer temperatures which may lead to increased trace gas fluxes to the atmosphere. However, the response of ecosystem processes and related GHG fluxes may differ largely across the landscape depending on soil type, vegetation cover, and moisture conditions. In this study we investigate how temperature increase potentially reflects on GHG fluxes (CO2, CH4 and N2O) from various tundra surfaces in the Russian Arctic. These surfaces include raised peat plateau complexes, mineral tundra soils, bare surfaces affected by frost action such as peat circles and thermokarst lake walls, as well as wetlands. Predicted temperature increase and climate change effects are simulated by means of open top chambers (OTCs), which are placed on different soil types for the whole snow-free period. GHG fluxes, gas and nutrient concentrations in the soil profile, as well as supporting environmental parameters are monitored for the full growing season. Aim of the study is not only the quantification of aboveground GHG fluxes from the study area, but the linking of those to underlying biogeochemical processes in permafrost soils. Special emphasis is placed on the interface between active layer and old permafrost and its response to warming, since little is known about the lability of old carbon stocks made available through an increase in active layer depth. Overall goal of the study is to gain a better understanding of C and N cycling in subarctic tundra soils and to deepen knowledge in respect to carbon-permafrost feedbacks in respect to climate.

  17. Geochemical and stable isotope characteristics of urban heavy rain in the downtown of Tokyo, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchiyama, Ryunosuke; Okochi, Hiroshi; Ogata, Hiroko; Katsumi, Naoya; Asai, Daisuke; Nakano, Takanori

    2017-09-01

    In order to make clear the impact of air pollution on the formation of sudden and locally-distributed heavy rain in urban area (hereafter Urban Heavy Rain: UHR), we analyzed inorganic ion concentration and stable isotope ratio of water (δD and δ18O) in rainwater. Rainwater samples were collected in Shinjuku, which is a representative downtown of Tokyo, Japan, during four years from October 2012 to December 2015. The concentration and wet deposition fluxes of acidic components (H+, NH4+, NO3-, and nss-SO42 -) in UHR were especially higher than those in other types of rain events, i.e. normal rain, typhoon heavy rain, and frontal heavy rain. UHR had distinctly lower stable isotope ratios than those in other urban rains with same rainfall amount and summer precipitation systems. There was a high negative correlation between δ18O and the distances from the sampling point to the formation area of UHR within 10 km, while there were high positive correlations between δ18O and the concentration of acidic components in UHR. These findings indicate that UHR could effectively scavenge acidic substances within cloud and suggest the use of stable isotope ratios as tracers of an urban heavy rain's water and in-cloud scavenging process.

  18. Response of plasma membrane H+-ATPase in rice (Oryza sativa) seedlings to simulated acid rain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Chanjuan; Ge, Yuqing; Su, Lei; Bu, Jinjin

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the adaptation of plants to acid rain is important to find feasible approaches to alleviate such damage to plants. We studied effects of acid rain on plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase activity and transcription, intracellular H(+), membrane permeability, photosynthetic efficiency, and relative growth rate during stress and recovery periods. Simulated acid rain at pH 5.5 did not affect plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase activity, intracellular H(+), membrane permeability, photosynthetic efficiency, and relative growth rate. Plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase activity and transcription in leaves treated with acid rain at pH 3.5 was increased to maintain ion homeostasis by transporting excessive H(+) out of cells. Then intracellular H(+) was close to the control after a 5-day recovery, alleviating damage on membrane and sustaining photosynthetic efficiency and growth. Simulated acid rain at pH 2.5 inhibited plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase activity by decreasing the expression of H(+)-ATPase at transcription level, resulting in membrane damage and abnormal intracellular H(+), and reduction in photosynthetic efficiency and relative growth rate. After a 5-day recovery, all parameters in leaves treated with pH 2.5 acid rain show alleviated damage, implying that the increased plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase activity and its high expression were involved in repairing process in acid rain-stressed plants. Our study suggests that plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase can play a role in adaptation to acid rain for rice seedlings.

  19. Desert Dust and Monsoon Rain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, William K. M.; Kim, Kyu-Myong

    2014-01-01

    For centuries, inhabitants of the Indian subcontinent have know that heavy dust events brought on by strong winds occur frequently in the pre-monsoon season, before the onset of heavy rain. Yet scientists have never seriously considered the possibility that natural dust can affect monsoon rainfall. Up to now, most studies of the impacts of aerosols on Indian monsoon rainfall have focused on anthropogenic aerosols in the context of climate change. However, a few recent studies have show that aerosols from antropogenic and natural sources over the Indian subcontinent may affect the transition from break to active monsoon phases on short timescales of days to weeks. Writing in Nature Geoscience, Vinoj and colleagues describe how they have shown that desert dust aerosols over the Arabian Sea and West Asia can strenghten the summer monsoon over the Indial subcontinent in a matter of days.

  20. 7746 CONCENTRATIONS OF FORMALDEHYDE IN RAIN WATERS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Win7Ent

    2013-06-03

    Jun 3, 2013 ... populace of the area of study. The chromotropic acid method described by the. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) was adopted for the determination of formaldehyde in the rain waters. Results indicated that the concentration range of the formaldehyde in the rain waters varied ...

  1. Acid Thunder: Acid Rain and Ancient Mesoamerica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahl, Jonathan D. W.; Berg, Craig A.

    2006-01-01

    Much of Mesoamerica's rich cultural heritage is slowly eroding because of acid rain. Just as water dissolves an Alka-Seltzer tablet, acid rain erodes the limestone surfaces of Mexican archaeological sites at a rate of about one-half millimeter per century (Bravo et al. 2003). A half-millimeter may not seem like much, but at this pace, a few…

  2. Acid Rain. LC Science Tracer Bullet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollmann, Pauline, Comp.

    The term "acid rain," also called "acid precipitation," generally refers to any precipitation having a pH value of less than 5.6. This guide to the literature on acid rain in the collections of the Library of Congress is not necessarily intended to be a comprehensive bibliography. It is designed to provide the reader with a set…

  3. Acid rain and sugar maple decline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul G. Schaberg

    2017-01-01

    Through the increased combustion of fossil fuels, humans have dramatically increased pollutant additions of sulfur and nitrogen into the atmosphere where it conbines with water to form sulfuric and nitric acids, creating acid rain (Driscoll et al. 2001). Incoming acid rain has various impacts on human and natural systems, including the accelerated degradation of built...

  4. Rainy Day Fun: Rain-Inspired Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanger, Annie Moretz

    1999-01-01

    Rainy days are opportunities to teach campers about weather and to plan activities around a rain theme. Indoor and outdoor science-based activities concerned with rain, water, or water conservation are suggested for specific age groups from ages 5-7 through 11-14. Campers can also develop ideas for activities using questions provided. (CDS)

  5. Sudden Stratospheric Warming Compendium

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Sudden Stratospheric Warming Compendium (SSWC) data set documents the stratospheric, tropospheric, and surface climate impacts of sudden stratospheric warmings. This...

  6. A Bayesian Probabilistic Framework for Rain Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Yao

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Heavy rain deteriorates the video quality of outdoor imaging equipments. In order to improve video clearness, image-based and sensor-based methods are adopted for rain detection. In earlier literature, image-based detection methods fall into spatio-based and temporal-based categories. In this paper, we propose a new image-based method by exploring spatio-temporal united constraints in a Bayesian framework. In our framework, rain temporal motion is assumed to be Pathological Motion (PM, which is more suitable to time-varying character of rain steaks. Temporal displaced frame discontinuity and spatial Gaussian mixture model are utilized in the whole framework. Iterated expectation maximization solving method is taken for Gaussian parameters estimation. Pixels state estimation is finished by an iterated optimization method in Bayesian probability formulation. The experimental results highlight the advantage of our method in rain detection.

  7. Retrospective analysis of a nonforecasted rain-on-snow flood in the Alps - a matter of model limitations or unpredictable nature?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rössler, O.; Froidevaux, P.; Börst, U.; Rickli, R.; Martius, O.; Weingartner, R.

    2014-06-01

    A rain-on-snow flood occurred in the Bernese Alps, Switzerland, on 10 October 2011, and caused significant damage. As the flood peak was unpredicted by the flood forecast system, questions were raised concerning the causes and the predictability of the event. Here, we aimed to reconstruct the anatomy of this rain-on-snow flood in the Lötschen Valley (160 km2) by analyzing meteorological data from the synoptic to the local scale and by reproducing the flood peak with the hydrological model WaSiM-ETH (Water Flow and Balance Simulation Model). This in order to gain process understanding and to evaluate the predictability. The atmospheric drivers of this rain-on-snow flood were (i) sustained snowfall followed by (ii) the passage of an atmospheric river bringing warm and moist air towards the Alps. As a result, intensive rainfall (average of 100 mm day-1) was accompanied by a temperature increase that shifted the 0° line from 1500 to 3200 m a.s.l. (meters above sea level) in 24 h with a maximum increase of 9 K in 9 h. The south-facing slope of the valley received significantly more precipitation than the north-facing slope, leading to flooding only in tributaries along the south-facing slope. We hypothesized that the reason for this very local rainfall distribution was a cavity circulation combined with a seeder-feeder-cloud system enhancing local rainfall and snowmelt along the south-facing slope. By applying and considerably recalibrating the standard hydrological model setup, we proved that both latent and sensible heat fluxes were needed to reconstruct the snow cover dynamic, and that locally high-precipitation sums (160 mm in 12 h) were required to produce the estimated flood peak. However, to reproduce the rapid runoff responses during the event, we conceptually represent likely lateral flow dynamics within the snow cover causing the model to react "oversensitively" to meltwater. Driving the optimized model with COSMO (Consortium for Small-scale Modeling)-2

  8. GPM GROUND VALIDATION RAIN GAUGES NASA ACHIEVE IPHEX V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GPM Ground Validation Rain Gauges NASA ACHIEVE IPHEx dataset includes data from the OSi Optical Rain Gauge (ORG815), and a standard tipping bucket rain gauge....

  9. Factors Contributing to the Hydrologic Effectiveness of a Rain Garden Network (Cincinnati OH USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William D. Shuster

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Infiltrative rain gardens can add retention capacity to sewersheds, yet factors contributing to their capacity for detention and redistribution of stormwater runoff are dynamic and often unverified. Over a four-year period, we tracked whole-system water fluxes in a two-tier rain garden network and assessed near-surface hydrology and soil development across construction and operational phases. The monitoring data provided a quantitative basis for determining effectiveness of this stormwater control measure. Based on 233 monitored warm-season rainfall events, nearly half of total inflow volume was detained, with 90 percent of all events producing no flow to the combined sewer. For the events that did result in flow to the combined sewer system, the rain garden delayed flows for an average of 5.5 h. Multivariate analysis of hydrologic fluxes indicated that total event rainfall depth was a predominant hydrologic driver for network outflow during both phases, with average event intensity and daily evapotranspiration as additional, independent factors in regulating retention in the operational phase. Despite sediment loads that can clog the rooting zone, and overall lower-than-design infiltration rates, tradeoffs among soil profile development and hydrology apparently maintained relatively high overall retention effectiveness. Overall, our study identified factors relevant to regulation of retention capacity of a rain garden network. These factors may be generalizable, and guide improvement of new or existing rain garden designs.

  10. Plant movements and climate warming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Frenne, Pieter; Coomes, David A.; De Schrijver, An

    2014-01-01

    •Most range shift predictions focus on the dispersal phase of the colonization process. Because moving populations experience increasingly dissimilar nonclimatic environmental conditions as they track climate warming, it is also critical to test how individuals originating from contrasting therma...

  11. Warming of Water in a Glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulins, Paulis; Krauze, Armands; Ozolinsh, Maris; Muiznieks, Andris

    2016-01-01

    The article focuses on the process of water warming from 0 °C in a glass. An experiment is performed that analyzes the temperature in the top and bottom layers of water during warming. The experimental equipment is very simple and can be easily set up using devices available in schools. The temperature curves obtained from the experiment help us…

  12. Numerical study of the role of microphysical latent heating and surface heat fluxes in a severe precipitation event in the warm sector over southern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Jin-Fang; Wang, Dong-Hai; Liang, Zhao-Ming; Liu, Chong-Jian; Zhai, Guo-Qing; Wang, Hong

    2017-12-01

    Simulations of the severe precipitation event that occurred in the warm sector over southern China on 08 May 2014 are conducted using the Advanced Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF-ARWv3.5.1) model to investigate the roles of microphysical latent heating and surface heat fluxes during the severe precipitation processes. At first, observations from surface rain gauges and ground-based weather radars are used to evaluate the model outputs. Results show that the spatial distribution of 24-h accumulated precipitation is well reproduced, and the temporal and spatial distributions of the simulated radar reflectivity agree well with the observations. Then, several sensitive simulations are performed with the identical model configurations, except for different options in microphysical latent heating and surface heat fluxes. From the results, one of the significant findings is that the latent heating from warm rain microphysical processes heats the atmosphere in the initial phase of the precipitation and thus convective systems start by self-triggering and self-organizing, despite the fact that the environmental conditions are not favorable to the occurrence of precipitation event at the initial phase. In the case of the severe precipitation event over the warm sector, both warm and ice microphysical processes are active with the ice microphysics processes activated almost two hours later. According to the sensitive results, there is a very weak precipitation without heavy rainfall belt when microphysical latent heating is turned off. In terms of this precipitation event, the warm microphysics processes play significant roles on precipitation intensity, while the ice microphysics processes have effects on the spatial distribution of precipitation. Both surface sensible and latent heating have effects on the precipitation intensity and spatial distribution. By comparison, the surface sensible heating has a strong influence on the spatial distribution of precipitation

  13. Coronal rain in magnetic bipolar weak fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, C.; Keppens, R.; Fang, X.

    2017-07-01

    Aims: We intend to investigate the underlying physics for the coronal rain phenomenon in a representative bipolar magnetic field, including the formation and the dynamics of coronal rain blobs. Methods: With the MPI-AMRVAC code, we performed three dimensional radiative magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation with strong heating localized on footpoints of magnetic loops after a relaxation to quiet solar atmosphere. Results: Progressive cooling and in-situ condensation starts at the loop top due to radiative thermal instability. The first large-scale condensation on the loop top suffers Rayleigh-Taylor instability and becomes fragmented into smaller blobs. The blobs fall vertically dragging magnetic loops until they reach low-β regions and start to fall along the loops from loop top to loop footpoints. A statistic study of the coronal rain blobs finds that small blobs with masses of less than 1010 g dominate the population. When blobs fall to lower regions along the magnetic loops, they are stretched and develop a non-uniform velocity pattern with an anti-parallel shearing pattern seen to develop along the central axis of the blobs. Synthetic images of simulated coronal rain with Solar Dynamics Observatory Atmospheric Imaging Assembly well resemble real observations presenting dark falling clumps in hot channels and bright rain blobs in a cool channel. We also find density inhomogeneities during a coronal rain "shower", which reflects the observed multi-stranded nature of coronal rain. Movies associated to Figs. 3 and 7 are available at http://www.aanda.org

  14. Contribution of snow / glacier melt and warm season precipitation to warm season flow in a glacierized catchment in Central Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unger-Shayesteh, Katy; Weise, Stephan; Vorogushyn, Sergiy; He, Zhihua; Gafurov, Abror; Kalashnikova, Olga; Ershova, Natalya; Merz, Bruno

    2017-04-01

    The glacierized upper Ala-Archa catchment is located in Northern Kyrgyzstan and has a size of about 230 km2. Catchment runoff shows a distinct peak during the warm season with snowmelt and glacier melt contributing to river runoff in the spring and summer months, respectively. Based on an extensive field data set collected over three years (2014-2016) within the GlaSCA and GlaSCA-V projects, this study aims to quantify the contributions from snow / glacier melt and rain to warm season river runoff at the catchment outlet. For this, stable isotope signatures of river water, melt water and rain, as well as electric conductivity measurements are used for endmember definition in simple mixing models. Despite the high uncertainty related to the endmember definitions, the mixing models yield a first approximation of the shares of the different runoff components. They may explain the substantial inter-annual variation in warm season runoff with 2014 being a water-poor year with total warm season (May-September) flow volume not exceeding 115 million m3, while 2015 was a water-rich year with warm season runoff volume amounting to 170 million m3.

  15. Rainfall Process Partitioning Using S-PROF Radar Observations Collected During the CalWater Field Campaign Winters

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, A. B.; Neiman, P. J.; Creamean, J.; Hughes, M. R.; Moore, B.; Ralph, F. M.; Prather, K. A.

    2011-12-01

    Vertically pointing S-band radar (S-PROF) observations collected during the CalWater field campaign winter wet seasons are analyzed to partition the observed rainfall into three primary categories: brightband (BB) rain, non-brightband (NBB) rain, and convective rain. NBB rain is primarily a shallow, warm rain process driven by collision and coalescence. Because of its shallow nature, NBB rain is often undetected by the operational NEXRAD radar network. Previous rainfall process partitioning analysis conducted for a coastal mountain site in California has shown that NBB rain contributes about one-third, on average, of the total wet season precipitation observed there. Shallow moist flow with near neutral stability, which is often present in the coastal environment during the warm sectors of landfalling storms, is a key ingredient in the formation of NBB rain. However, NBB rain also has been observed in other storm regimes (e.g., post-cold frontal). NBB rain has been shown to produce rain rates known by forecasters to be capable of producing floods. During the CalWater field campaign winters, S-PROF radars were located in the Sierra Nevada at Sugar Pine Dam (SPD) for three consecutive winters (2009-2011) and at Mariposa (MPI) for the latter two winters (2010-2011). During the southwesterly flow present in the warm sectors of many California landfalling storms, the SPD site was directly downwind of the gap in coastal terrain associated with the San Francisco Bay Delta. This orientation would allow relatively unmodified maritime flow to arrive at SPD. The MPI site was located further south such that airflow arriving at this site during winter storms likely was processed by the coastal terrain south of San Francisco Bay. In this presentation we will examine whether the relative locations of SPD and MPI relative to the coastal terrain impacted the amount of NBB rain that was observed at each site during the CalWater wet seasons. We will use synoptic and mesoscale

  16. Competent and Warm?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Karolina; Rakić, Tamara; Steffens, Melanie C

    2017-01-01

    Most research on ethnicity has focused on visual cues. However, accents are strong social cues that can match or contradict visual cues. We examined understudied reactions to people whose one cue suggests one ethnicity, whereas the other cue contradicts it. In an experiment conducted in Germany, job candidates spoke with an accent either congruent or incongruent with their (German or Turkish) appearance. Based on ethnolinguistic identity theory, we predicted that accents would be strong cues for categorization and evaluation. Based on expectancy violations theory we expected that incongruent targets would be evaluated more extremely than congruent targets. Both predictions were confirmed: accents strongly influenced perceptions and Turkish-looking German-accented targets were perceived as most competent of all targets (and additionally most warm). The findings show that bringing together visual and auditory information yields a more complete picture of the processes underlying impression formation.

  17. Global Warming on Triton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliot, J. L.; Hammel, H. B.; Wasserman, L. H.; Franz, O. G.; McDonald, S. W.; Person, M. J.; Olkin, C. B.; Dunham, E. J.; Spencer, J. R.; Stansberry, J. A.; hide

    1998-01-01

    Triton, Neptune's largest moon, has been predicted to undergo significant seasonal changes that would reveal themselves as changes in its mean frost temperature. But whether this temperature should at the present time be increasing, decreasing or constant depends on a number of parameters (such as the thermal properties of the surface, and frost migration patterns) that are unknown. Here we report observations of a recent stellar occultation by Triton which, when combined with earlier results, show that Triton has undergone a period of global warming since 1989. Our most conservative estimates of the rate of temperature and surface-pressure increase during this period imply that the atmosphere is doubling in bulk every 10 years, significantly faster than predicted by any published frost model for Triton. Our result suggests that permanent polar caps on Triton play a c dominant role in regulating seasonal atmospheric changes. Similar processes should also be active on Pluto.

  18. Possible impacts of climate change on freezing rain in south-central Canada using downscaled future climate scenarios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. S. Cheng

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Freezing rain is a major atmospheric hazard in mid-latitude nations of the globe. Among all Canadian hydrometeorological hazards, freezing rain is associated with the highest damage costs per event. Using synoptic weather typing to identify the occurrence of freezing rain events, this study estimates changes in future freezing rain events under future climate scenarios for south-central Canada. Synoptic weather typing consists of principal components analysis, an average linkage clustering procedure (i.e., a hierarchical agglomerative cluster method, and discriminant function analysis (a nonhierarchical method. Meteorological data used in the analysis included hourly surface observations from 15 selected weather stations and six atmospheric levels of six-hourly National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP upper-air reanalysis weather variables for the winter months (November–April of 1958/59–2000/01. A statistical downscaling method was used to downscale four general circulation model (GCM scenarios to the selected weather stations. Using downscaled scenarios, discriminant function analysis was used to project the occurrence of future weather types. The within-type frequency of future freezing rain events is assumed to be directly proportional to the change in frequency of future freezing rain-related weather types The results showed that with warming temperatures in a future climate, percentage increases in the occurrence of freezing rain events in the north of the study area are likely to be greater than those in the south. By the 2050s, freezing rain events for the three colder months (December–February could increase by about 85% (95% confidence interval – CI: ±13%, 60% (95% CI: ±9%, and 40% (95% CI: ±6% in northern Ontario, eastern Ontario (including Montreal, Quebec, and southern Ontario, respectively. The increase by the 2080s could be even greater: about 135% (95% CI: ±20%, 95% (95% CI: ±13%, and 45% (95% CI: ±9

  19. TECHNOLOGICAL OPTIONS FOR ACID RAIN CONTROL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Discussed are acid rain control options available to the electric utility industry. They include coal switching, flue gas desulfurization, and such emerging lower cost technologies as Limestone Injection Multistage Burners (LIMB) and Advanced Silicate (ADVACATE), both developed ...

  20. Rain Erosion/Measurement Impact Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The FARM Rain Erosion/Impact Measurement Lab develops solutions for deficiencies in the ability of materials, coatings and designs to withstand a severe operational...

  1. NESDIS Blended Rain Rate (RR) Products

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The blended Rain Rate (RR) product is derived from multiple sensors/satellites. The blended products were merged from polar-orbiting and geostationary satellite...

  2. A Canonical Response in Rainfall Characteristics to Global Warming: Projections by IPCC CMIP5 Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, William K. M.; Wu, H. T.; Kim, K. M.

    2012-01-01

    Changes in rainfall characteristics induced by global warming are examined based on probability distribution function (PDF) analysis, from outputs of 14 IPCC (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change), CMIP (5th Coupled Model Intercomparison Project) models under various scenarios of increased CO2 emissions. Results show that collectively CMIP5 models project a robust and consistent global and regional rainfall response to CO2 warming. Globally, the models show a 1-3% increase in rainfall per degree rise in temperature, with a canonical response featuring large increase (100-250 %) in frequency of occurrence of very heavy rain, a reduction (5-10%) of moderate rain, and an increase (10-15%) of light rain events. Regionally, even though details vary among models, a majority of the models (>10 out of 14) project a consistent large scale response with more heavy rain events in climatologically wet regions, most pronounced in the Pacific ITCZ and the Asian monsoon. Moderate rain events are found to decrease over extensive regions of the subtropical and extratropical oceans, but increases over the extratropical land regions, and the Southern Oceans. The spatial distribution of light rain resembles that of moderate rain, but mostly with opposite polarity. The majority of the models also show increase in the number of dry events (absence or only trace amount of rain) over subtropical and tropical land regions in both hemispheres. These results suggest that rainfall characteristics are changing and that increased extreme rainfall events and droughts occurrences are connected, as a consequent of a global adjustment of the large scale circulation to global warming.

  3. Combined effects of lead and acid rain on photosynthesis in soybean seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Huiqing; Wang, Lihong; Liao, Chenyu; Fan, Caixia; Zhou, Qing; Huang, Xiaohua

    2014-10-01

    To explore how lead (Pb) and acid rain simultaneously affect plants, the combined effects of Pb and acid rain on the chlorophyll content, chlorophyll fluorescence reaction, Hill reaction rate, and Mg(2+)-ATPase activity in soybean seedlings were investigated. The results indicated that, when soybean seedlings were treated with Pb or acid rain alone, the chlorophyll content, Hill reaction rate, Mg(2+)-ATPase activity, and maximal photochemical efficiency (F(v)/F(m)) were decreased, while the initial fluorescence (F 0) and maximum quantum yield (Y) were increased, compared with those of the control. The combined treatment with Pb and acid rain decreased the chlorophyll content, Hill reaction rate, Mg(2+)-ATPase activity, F(v)/F(m), and Y and increased F 0 in soybean seedlings. Under the combined treatment with Pb and acid rain, the two factors showed additive effects on the chlorophyll content in soybean seedlings and exhibited antagonistic effects on the Hill reaction rate. Under the combined treatment with high-concentration Pb and acid rain, the two factors exhibited synergistic effects on the Mg(2+)-ATPase activity, F 0, F v/F m, as well as Y. In summary, the inhibition of the photosynthetic process is an important physiological basis for the simultaneous actions of Pb and acid rain in soybean seedlings.

  4. Raine syndrome: expanding the radiological spectrum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koob, Meriam; Dietemann, Jean-Louis [CHU de Strasbourg Hopital de Hautepierre, Service de Radiologie 2, Strasbourg (France); Doray, Berenice; Fradin, Melanie [CHU de Strasbourg, Hopital de Hautepierre, Laboratoire de Genetique Medicale, Strasbourg (France); Astruc, Dominique [CHU de Strasbourg Hopital de Hautepierre, Service de Neonatologie, Strasbourg (France)

    2011-03-15

    We describe ante- and postnatal imaging of a 1-year-old otherwise healthy girl with Raine syndrome. She presented with neonatal respiratory distress related to a pyriform aperture stenosis, which was diagnosed on CT. Signs of chondrodysplasia punctata, sagittal vertebral clefting and intervertebral disc and renal calcifications were also found on imaging. This new case confirms that Raine syndrome is not always lethal. The overlapping imaging signs with chondrodysplasia punctata and the disseminated calcifications give new insights into its pathophysiology. (orig.)

  5. Providing driving rain data for hygrothermal calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragh, Mikkel Kristian

    1996-01-01

    Due to a wish for driving rain data as input for hygrothermal calculations, this report deals with utilizing commonly applied empirical relations and standard meteorological data, in an attempt to provide realistic estimates rather than exact correlations.......Due to a wish for driving rain data as input for hygrothermal calculations, this report deals with utilizing commonly applied empirical relations and standard meteorological data, in an attempt to provide realistic estimates rather than exact correlations....

  6. Acid rain may cause senile dementia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pearce, F.

    1985-04-25

    Aluminium, released from the soil by acid rain, may be a cause of several forms of senile dementia including Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease. Many upland reservoirs, fed by acid rain, supply homes with water laced with significant amounts of aluminium. Studies in the Pacific have shown that communities living on soils that are extremely rich in bauxite, the rock containing aluminium, have a very high incidence of Alzheimer's disease.

  7. Global warming - some perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Erlykin, Anatoly D.; Wolfendale, Arnold W.; Hanna, Edward

    2012-01-01

    Here the authors critically review the IPCC’s claim that global warming is “very likely” caused by human activity: such a description underestimates the likelihood of the warming being due to this mechanism. Next examined are known alternative “natural” mechanisms which could give rise to the warming if, despite many claims, the man-made explanation was false because of compensation effects (greenhouse gases versus aerosol effects). Also, a number of difficulties, as yet unresolved, ...

  8. Effects of acid rain on grapevines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forsline, P.L.; Musselman, R.C.; Dee, R.J.; Kender, W.J.

    1983-01-01

    Mature vineyard-growing Concord grapevines were sprayed with simulated acid rain solutions ranging from pH 2.5 to 5.5 both as acute treatments at anthesis and chronically throughout the season in 1980 and 1981. In 1981, 8 additional varieties were also treated with simulated acid rain solutions at pH 2.75 and 3.25. With Concord in 1981, few foliar lesions on leaves were visible at pH 2.75. In contrast, many leaf lesions with decreased fruit soluble solids were observed at pH 2.5 in 1980. The relationship between acid-rain and oxidant stipple, chlorosis, and soluble solids in the absence of acid rain leaf lesions at pH>2.5 remains unclear. Acute sprays (pH2.75) at anthesis reduced pollen germination in four grape cultivars. However, fruit set was reduced in only one of these. Grape yields were not influenced by acid rain treatments. There was no evidence that acid-rain at ambient pH levels had negative effects on grape production or fruit quality.

  9. Two highly singular intermittent structures: Rain and turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waymire, Edward C.

    2006-06-01

    Rainfall charges soil moisture and river basins among its many roles with respect to the hydrologic cycle. Research aimed at improved understanding and modeling of surface water processes includes attention to rainfall at a variety of space-time scales. Given the atmospheric environment in which rain events are observed, some similarities between certain rainfall data structures and fluid turbulence can be expected. So the space-time intermittency and large fluctuations observed in both rain rates and energy dissipation rates have provided an interest among hydrologists in developing physical theories, experiments, and mathematical models. In response to a request for insights into multiplicative cascade models, the main goal of this article is to single out a special mathematical transformation, namely, "size biasing" (or "tilting"), which has proven to be very powerful in the mathematical analysis of multiplicative cascades and which has also been successfully exploited within the context of turbulence from a physical perspective.

  10. The 183-WSL Fast Rain Rate Retrieval Algorithm. Part II: Validation Using Ground Radar Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laviola, Sante; Levizzani, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    performs better during the warm months, while during the winter time the discrepancies with radar measurements tends to maximum values. A stable behavior of the 183-WSL algorithm is demonstrated over the whole study period with an overall overestimation for rain rates intensities lower than 1 millimeter per hour. This threshold is crucial especially in wintertime where the low precipitation regime is difficult to be classified.

  11. Rain events decrease boreal peatland net CO2 uptake through reduced light availability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nijp, Jelmer J; Limpens, Juul; Metselaar, Klaas; Peichl, Matthias; Nilsson, Mats B; van der Zee, Sjoerd E A T M; Berendse, Frank

    2015-06-01

    Boreal peatlands store large amounts of carbon, reflecting their important role in the global carbon cycle. The short-term exchange and the long-term storage of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2 ) in these ecosystems are closely associated with the permanently wet surface conditions and are susceptible to drought. Especially, the single most important peat forming plant genus, Sphagnum, depends heavily on surface wetness for its primary production. Changes in rainfall patterns are expected to affect surface wetness, but how this transient rewetting affects net ecosystem exchange of CO2 (NEE) remains unknown. This study explores how the timing and characteristics of rain events during photosynthetic active periods, that is daytime, affect peatland NEE and whether rain event associated changes in environmental conditions modify this response (e.g. water table, radiation, vapour pressure deficit, temperature). We analysed an 11-year time series of half-hourly eddy covariance and meteorological measurements from Degerö Stormyr, a boreal peatland in northern Sweden. Our results show that daytime rain events systematically decreased the sink strength of peatlands for atmospheric CO2 . The decrease was best explained by rain associated reduction in light, rather than by rain characteristics or drought length. An average daytime growing season rain event reduced net ecosystem CO2 uptake by 0.23-0.54 gC m(-2) . On an annual basis, this reduction of net CO2 uptake corresponds to 24% of the annual net CO2 uptake (NEE) of the study site, equivalent to a 4.4% reduction of gross primary production (GPP) during the growing season. We conclude that reduced light availability associated with rain events is more important in explaining the NEE response to rain events than rain characteristics and changes in water availability. This suggests that peatland CO2 uptake is highly sensitive to changes in cloud cover formation and to altered rainfall regimes, a process hitherto largely

  12. Deep Joint Rain Detection and Removal from a Single Image

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Wenhan; Tan, Robby T.; Feng, Jiashi; Liu, Jiaying; Guo, Zongming; Yan, Shuicheng

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we address a rain removal problem from a single image, even in the presence of heavy rain and rain streak accumulation. Our core ideas lie in the new rain image models and a novel deep learning architecture. We first modify an existing model comprising a rain streak layer and a background layer, by adding a binary map that locates rain streak regions. Second, we create a new model consisting of a component representing rain streak accumulation (where individual streaks cannot b...

  13. Chamberless residential warm air furnace design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godfree, J. [Product Design consultant, Pugwash (Canada)

    1996-07-01

    This brief paper is an introduction to the concept of designing residential warm air furnaces without combustion chambers. This is possible since some small burners do not require the thermal support of a combustion chamber to complete the combustion process.

  14. Volcanoes magnify Metro Manila’s southwest monsoon rains and lethal floods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo Mahar Amante Lagmay

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Many volcanoes worldwide are located near populated cities that experience monsoon seasons, characterised by shifting winds each year. Because of the severity of flood impact to large populations, it is worthy of investigation in the Philippines and elsewhere to better understand the phenomenon for possible hazard mitigating solutions, if any. During the monsoon season, the change in flow direction of winds brings moist warm air to cross the mountains and volcanoes in western Philippines and cause lift into the atmosphere, which normally leads to heavy rains and floods. Heavy southwest monsoon rains from 18-21 August 2013 flooded Metro Manila (population of 12 million and its suburbs paralyzing the nation’s capital for an entire week. Called the 2013 Habagat event, it was a repeat of the 2012 Habagat or extreme southwest monsoon weather from 6-9 August, which delivered record rains in the mega city. In both the 2012 and 2013 Habagat events, cyclones, the usual suspects for the delivery of heavy rains, were passing northeast of the Philippine archipelago, respectively, and enhanced the southwest monsoon. Analysis of Doppler data, rainfall measurements, and Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF model simulations show that two large stratovolcanoes, Natib and Mariveles, across from Manila Bay and approximately 70 km west of Metro Manila, played a substantial role in delivering extreme rains and consequent floods to Metro Manila. The study highlights how volcanoes, with their shape and height create an orographic effect and dispersive tail of rain clouds which constitutes a significant flood hazard to large communities like Metro Manila.

  15. Design and performance of combined infrared canopy and belowground warming in the B4WarmED (Boreal Forest Warming at an Ecotone in Danger) experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, Roy L; Stefanski, Artur; Montgomery, Rebecca A; Hobbie, Sarah E; Kimball, Bruce A; Reich, Peter B

    2015-06-01

    Conducting manipulative climate change experiments in complex vegetation is challenging, given considerable temporal and spatial heterogeneity. One specific challenge involves warming of both plants and soils to depth. We describe the design and performance of an open-air warming experiment called Boreal Forest Warming at an Ecotone in Danger (B4WarmED) that addresses the potential for projected climate warming to alter tree function, species composition, and ecosystem processes at the boreal-temperate ecotone. The experiment includes two forested sites in northern Minnesota, USA, with plots in both open (recently clear-cut) and closed canopy habitats, where seedlings of 11 tree species were planted into native ground vegetation. Treatments include three target levels of plant canopy and soil warming (ambient, +1.7°C, +3.4°C). Warming was achieved by independent feedback control of voltage input to aboveground infrared heaters and belowground buried resistance heating cables in each of 72-7.0 m(2) plots. The treatments emulated patterns of observed diurnal, seasonal, and annual temperatures but with superimposed warming. For the 2009 to 2011 field seasons, we achieved temperature elevations near our targets with growing season overall mean differences (∆Tbelow ) of +1.84°C and +3.66°C at 10 cm soil depth and (∆T(above) ) of +1.82°C and +3.45°C for the plant canopies. We also achieved measured soil warming to at least 1 m depth. Aboveground treatment stability and control were better during nighttime than daytime and in closed vs. open canopy sites in part due to calmer conditions. Heating efficacy in open canopy areas was reduced with increasing canopy complexity and size. Results of this study suggest the warming approach is scalable: it should work well in small-statured vegetation such as grasslands, desert, agricultural crops, and tree saplings (<5 m tall). © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Global Warming: A Myth?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tropospheric temperature through a 'positive feedback'. And again, as the troposphere warms up, its water holding capacity also increases, amplifying chances of further warming. But satellite data indicate that free troposphere is largely cut-off from the surface and evaporated water may not moisten the free troposphere ...

  17. Data driven analysis of rain events: feature extraction, clustering, microphysical /macro physical relationship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djallel Dilmi, Mohamed; Mallet, Cécile; Barthes, Laurent; Chazottes, Aymeric

    2017-04-01

    The study of rain time series records is mainly carried out using rainfall rate or rain accumulation parameters estimated on a fixed integration time (typically 1 min, 1 hour or 1 day). In this study we used the concept of rain event. In fact, the discrete and intermittent natures of rain processes make the definition of some features inadequate when defined on a fixed duration. Long integration times (hour, day) lead to mix rainy and clear air periods in the same sample. Small integration time (seconds, minutes) will lead to noisy data with a great sensibility to detector characteristics. The analysis on the whole rain event instead of individual short duration samples of a fixed duration allows to clarify relationships between features, in particular between macro physical and microphysical ones. This approach allows suppressing the intra-event variability partly due to measurement uncertainties and allows focusing on physical processes. An algorithm based on Genetic Algorithm (GA) and Self Organising Maps (SOM) is developed to obtain a parsimonious characterisation of rain events using a minimal set of variables. The use of self-organizing map (SOM) is justified by the fact that it allows to map a high dimensional data space in a two-dimensional space while preserving as much as possible the initial space topology in an unsupervised way. The obtained SOM allows providing the dependencies between variables and consequently removing redundant variables leading to a minimal subset of only five features (the event duration, the rain rate peak, the rain event depth, the event rain rate standard deviation and the absolute rain rate variation of order 0.5). To confirm relevance of the five selected features the corresponding SOM is analyzed. This analysis shows clearly the existence of relationships between features. It also shows the independence of the inter-event time (IETp) feature or the weak dependence of the Dry percentage in event (Dd%e) feature. This confirms

  18. Description and preliminary results of a 100 square meter rain gauge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimaldi, Salvatore; Petroselli, Andrea; Baldini, Luca; Gorgucci, Eugenio

    2018-01-01

    Rainfall is one of the most crucial processes in hydrology, and the direct and indirect rainfall measurement methods are constantly being updated and improved. The standard instrument used to measure rainfall rate and accumulation is the rain gauge, which provides direct observations. Though the small dimension of the orifice allows rain gauges to be installed anywhere, it also causes errors due to the splash and wind effects. To investigate the role of the orifice dimension, this study, for the first time, introduces and demonstrates an apparatus for observing rainfall called a giant-rain gauge that is characterised by a collecting surface of 100 m2. To discuss the new instrument and its technical details, a preliminary analysis of 26 rainfall events is provided. The results suggest that there are significant differences between the standard and proposed rain gauges. Specifically, major discrepancies are evident for low time aggregation scale (5, 10, and 15 min) and for high rainfall intensity values.

  19. Rain songs and the observance of the rain cult amongst the Lobedu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Examples of rain songs that I recorded at the tribal capital of the Lobedu rainqueen, Modjadji, will then be discussed. The focus of my discussion in the second part will be on (a) the pre-text, reflecting on the circumstances and background surrounding the performance of rain songs;(b) the main text, namely the transcription ...

  20. Global Warming: A Myth?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    calibration of the instruments. (iii) Effects of Hydrometeors: Rain and ice crystals may affect the atmospheric level from which the satellite derived MSU signal for temperature arises. These hydrometeors may act as blackbodies near 60 GHz frequency apart from 02 and may corrupt temperature data sets measured by MSUs.

  1. Changes in orographic precipitation patterns caused by a shift from snow to rain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavelsky, T. M.; Sobolowski, S.; Kapnick, S. B.; Barnes, J. B.

    2012-12-01

    Climate warming will likely cause a shift from snow to rain in midlatitude mountains. Because rain falls faster than snow, it is not advected as far by prevailing winds before reaching the ground. A shift in precipitation phase thus may alter precipitation patterns. Using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) regional climate model at 27-9-3 km resolutions over the California Sierra Nevada, we conducted an idealized experiment consisting of a present climate control run and two additional simulations in which (a) fall speed for snow is similar to rain and (b) all precipitation is constrained to fall as liquid. Rather than simulating future climates directly, these perturbation experiments allow us to test the potential impacts of changing precipitation phase in isolation from other factors such as variable large-scale atmospheric circulation. Relative to the control, both perturbations result in a rain shadow deepened by ~30-60%, with increased focusing of precipitation on the western Sierra Nevada slopes best resolved at ≤9 km resolutions. Our results suggest that altered precipitation phase associated with climate change will likely affect spatial distributions of water resources, floods, and landslides in the Sierra Nevada and similar midlatitude mountain ranges.

  2. The Coronal Monsoon: Thermal Nonequilibrium Revealed by Periodic Coronal Rain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auchère, Frédéric; Froment, Clara; Soubrié, Elie; Antolin, Patrick; Oliver, Ramon; Pelouze, Gabriel

    2018-02-01

    We report on the discovery of periodic coronal rain in an off-limb sequence of Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly images. The showers are co-spatial and in phase with periodic (6.6 hr) intensity pulsations of coronal loops of the sort described by Auchère et al. and Froment et al. These new observations make possible a unified description of both phenomena. Coronal rain and periodic intensity pulsations of loops are two manifestations of the same physical process: evaporation/condensation cycles resulting from a state of thermal nonequilibrium. The fluctuations around coronal temperatures produce the intensity pulsations of loops, and rain falls along their legs if thermal runaway cools the periodic condensations down and below transition-region temperatures. This scenario is in line with the predictions of numerical models of quasi-steadily and footpoint heated loops. The presence of coronal rain—albeit non-periodic—in several other structures within the studied field of view implies that this type of heating is at play on a large scale.

  3. Rain Attenuation at 58 GHz: Prediction versus Long-Term Trial Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kvicera Vaclav

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Electromagnetic wave propagation research in frequency band 58 GHz was started at TESTCOM in Praha due to lack of experimentally obtained results needed for a realistic calculation of quality and availability of point-to-point fixed systems. Rain attenuation data obtained from a path at 58 GHz with V polarization located in Praha was processed over a 5-year period. Rainfall intensities have been measured by means of a heated siphon rain gauge. In parallel, rainfall intensity data from rain gauge records was statistically processed over the same year periods as the rain attenuation data. Cumulative distributions of rainfall intensities obtained as well as cumulative distributions of rain attenuation obtained are compared with the calculated ones in accordance with relevant ITU-R recommendations. The results obtained can be used as the primary basis for the possible extension of the ITU-R recommendation for calculating rain attenuation distributions up to 60 GHz. The obtained dependence of percentages of time of the average year on the percentages of time of the average worst month is also compared with the relevant ITU-R recommendation. The results obtained are discussed.

  4. Oceanic temperate forest versus warm temperate rainforest: a reply to Grubb et al. (2017)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buitenwerf, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Grubb et al. (2017) point out that we (McGlone et al. 2016) erroneously stated that the definition of warm temperate rain forest (WTRF; Grubb et al. 2013) was based in part on climatic criteria. We apologise: their text made clear that this was not the case. However, they go on to say that they ‘...

  5. MULTIDIMENSIONAL MODELING OF CORONAL RAIN DYNAMICS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, X.; Xia, C.; Keppens, R. [Centre for mathematical Plasma Astrophysics, Department of Mathematics, KU Leuven, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium)

    2013-07-10

    We present the first multidimensional, magnetohydrodynamic simulations that capture the initial formation and long-term sustainment of the enigmatic coronal rain phenomenon. We demonstrate how thermal instability can induce a spectacular display of in situ forming blob-like condensations which then start their intimate ballet on top of initially linear force-free arcades. Our magnetic arcades host a chromospheric, transition region, and coronal plasma. Following coronal rain dynamics for over 80 minutes of physical time, we collect enough statistics to quantify blob widths, lengths, velocity distributions, and other characteristics which directly match modern observational knowledge. Our virtual coronal rain displays the deformation of blobs into V-shaped features, interactions of blobs due to mostly pressure-mediated levitations, and gives the first views of blobs that evaporate in situ or are siphoned over the apex of the background arcade. Our simulations pave the way for systematic surveys of coronal rain showers in true multidimensional settings to connect parameterized heating prescriptions with rain statistics, ultimately allowing us to quantify the coronal heating input.

  6. Acid rain and its ecological consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Anita; Agrawal, Madhoolika

    2008-01-01

    Acidification of rain-water is identified as one of the most serious environmental problems of transboundary nature. Acid rain is mainly a mixture of sulphuric and nitric acids depending upon the relative quantities of oxides of sulphur and nitrogen emissions. Due to the interaction of these acids with other constituents of the atmosphere, protons are released causing increase in the soil acidity Lowering of soil pH mobilizes and leaches away nutrient cations and increases availability of toxic heavy metals. Such changes in the soil chemical characteristics reduce the soil fertility which ultimately causes the negative impact on growth and productivity of forest trees and crop plants. Acidification of water bodies causes large scale negative impact on aquatic organisms including fishes. Acidification has some indirect effects on human health also. Acid rain affects each and every components of ecosystem. Acid rain also damages man-made materials and structures. By reducing the emission of the precursors of acid rain and to some extent by liming, the problem of acidification of terrestrial and aquatic ecosystem has been reduced during last two decades.

  7. Rain-induced spring wheat harvest losses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, A.; Black, A. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1983-01-01

    When rain or a combination of rain and high humidity delay wheat harvest, losses can occur in grain yield and/or grain quality. Yield losses can result from shattering, from reduction in test weight, and in the case of windrowed grain, from rooting of sprouting grain at the soil: windrow contact. Losses in grain quality can result from reduction in test weight and from sprouting. Sprouting causes a degradation of grain proteins and starches, hence flour quality is reduced, and the grain price deteriorates to the value of feed grain. Although losses in grain yield and quality are rain-induced, these losses do not necessarily occur because a standing or windrowed crop is wetted by rain. Spike water concentration in hard red spring wheat must be increased to about 45-49% before sprouting is initiated in grain that has overcome dormancy. The time required to overcome this dormancy after the cultivar has dried to 12 to 14% water concentration differs with hard red spring cultivars. The effect of rain on threshing-ready standing and windrowed hard red spring wheat grain yeild and quality was evaluated. A goal was to develop the capability to forecast the extent of expected loss of grain yield and quality from specific climatic events that delay threshing.

  8. Propagating Characteristics of Pulsed Laser in Rain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Guo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To understand the performance of laser ranging system under the rain weather condition, we need to know the propagating characteristics of laser pulse in rain. In this paper, the absorption and attenuation coefficients were calculated based on the scattering theories in discrete stochastic media, and the propagating characteristics of laser pulse in rain were simulated and analyzed using Monte-Carlo method. Some simulation results were verified by experiments, and the simulation results are well matched with the experimental data, with the maximal deviation not less than 7.5%. The results indicated that the propagating laser beam would be attenuated and distorted due to the scattering and absorption of raindrops, and the energy attenuation and pulse shape distortion strongly depended on the laser pulse widths.

  9. Modeling the impact of wintertime rain events on the thermal regime of permafrost

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Westermann

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we present field measurements and numerical process modeling from western Svalbard showing that the ground surface temperature below the snow is impacted by strong wintertime rain events. During such events, rain water percolates to the bottom of the snow pack, where it freezes and releases latent heat. In the winter season 2005/2006, on the order of 20 to 50% of the wintertime precipitation fell as rain, thus confining the surface temperature to close to 0 °C for several weeks. The measured average ground surface temperature during the snow-covered period is −0.6 °C, despite of a snow surface temperature of on average −8.5 °C. For the considered period, the temperature threshold below which permafrost is sustainable on long timescales is exceeded. We present a simplified model of rain water infiltration in the snow coupled to a transient permafrost model. While small amounts of rain have only minor impact on the ground surface temperature, strong rain events have a long-lasting impact. We show that consecutively applying the conditions encountered in the winter season 2005/2006 results in the formation of an unfrozen zone in the soil after three to five years, depending on the prescribed soil properties. If water infiltration in the snow is disabled in the model, more time is required for the permafrost to reach a similar state of degradation.

  10. Global Warming: A Myth?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 6; Issue 7. Global Warming: A Myth? - Credibility of Climate Scenarios Predicted by Systems Simulations. Deepanjan Majumdar. General Article Volume 6 Issue 7 July 2001 pp 13-21 ...

  11. Global Warming: A Myth?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 6; Issue 6. Global Warming: A Myth? - Anomalous Temperature Trends Recorded from Satellites and Radiosondes. Deepanjan Majumdar. General Article Volume 6 Issue 6 June 2001 pp 43-52 ...

  12. Global Warming on Trial

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Broecker, Wallace S

    1992-01-01

      The issue of global warming is fraught with controversy, as it pits groups who are concerned with the short-term well-being of society against those who fear for the long-term future of the planet...

  13. Warm and Cool Dinosaurs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannlein, Sally

    2001-01-01

    Presents an art activity in which first grade students draw dinosaurs in order to learn about the concept of warm and cool colors. Explains how the activity also helped the students learn about the concept of distance when drawing. (CMK)

  14. Seagrass ecophysiological performance under ocean warming and acidification

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tiago Repolho; Bernardo Duarte; Gisela Dionísio; José Ricardo Paula; Ana R Lopes; Inês C Rosa; Tiago F Grilo; Isabel Caçador; Ricardo Calado; Rui Rosa

    2017-01-01

    .... We investigated, for the first time, the combined effects of future ocean warming and acidification on fundamental biological processes of Zostera noltii, including shoot density, leaf coloration, photophysiology...

  15. Media Pembelajaran Global Warming

    OpenAIRE

    Tham, Fikri Jufri; Liliana, Liliana; Purba, Kristo Radion

    2016-01-01

    Computer based learning media is one of the media has an important role in learning. Learning media will be attractive when packaged through interactive media , such as interactive media created in paper manufacture " instructional media global warming" . The advantage gained is that it can increase knowledge, generally educate people to be more concerned about the environment , and also can be a means of entertainment. This application is focused to learn about global warming and packaged in...

  16. Global warming yearbook: 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arris, L. [ed.

    1999-02-01

    The report brings together a year`s worth of global warming stories - over 280 in all - in one convenient volume. It provides a one-stop report on the scientific, political and industrial implications of global warming. The report includes: detailed coverage of negotiations on the Kyoto Protocol; scientific findings on carbon sources and sinks, coral bleaching, Antarctic ice shelves, plankton, wildlife and tree growth; new developments on fuel economy, wind power, fuel cells, cogeneration, energy labelling and emissions trading.

  17. Acid Rain: A Student's First Sourcebook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyle, Beth Ann; And Others

    The purpose of this guide is to help students better understand the science, citizen action, and research issues that are part of the acid rain problem. The guide is designed for students in grades 4-8 and their teachers. Following an introduction, the first seven sections are informative in nature. They include: (1) "Observations about Acidity";…

  18. Acid Rain Materials for Classroom Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Factor, Lance; Kooser, Robert G.

    This booklet contains three separate papers suitable for use in an advanced high school or college chemistry course. The first paper provides background information on acids and bases. The second paper provides additional background information, focusing on certain aspects of atmospheric chemistry as it relates to the acid rain problem. An attempt…

  19. Focusing on the Interfaces, Estuaries and Redox Transition Zones, for Understanding the Microbial Processes and Biogeochemical Cycling of Carbon under the Looming Influence of Global Warming and Anthropogenic Perturbations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, H.; Jiao, N.

    2013-12-01

    Estuaries are the natural interface between terrestrial and marine ecosystems. These are also the zones where human activities exert the strongest impact on the earth and ocean environments. Due to high pressure from the effects of global warming and anthropogenic activities, many estuaries are deteriorating and experiencing significant change of the ecological processes and environmental functions. Certain fundamental microbial processes, including carbon fixation and respiration, have been changing as responses to and consequences of the altered estuarine environment and geochemistry. Increased inputs of terrigenous and anthropogenic organic materials and nutrients and elevated temperature make estuaries easy to be subjected to harmful algal blooms and hypoxic and even anoxic events. The change of the redox status of the estuarine and coastal waters and the increased nutrient loads such as that from terrestrial nitrate stimulate anaerobic respiration processes, such as nitrate reduction and denitrification. This may have strong negative impact on the marine environment, ecosystem and even climate, such as those caused by greenhouse gas production (N2O, CH4) by anaerobic microbial processes. In addition, some nutrients may be consumed by anaerobically respiring heterotrophic microorganisms, instead of being utilized by phytoplankton for carbon fixation. In this regard, the ecological function of the estuarine ecosystem may be altered and the ecological efficiency may be lowered, as less energy is produced by the microbial respiration process and less carbon is fixed by phytoplankton. However, on the other side, in hypoxic and anoxic waters, inorganic carbon fixation by anaerobic microorganisms may happen, such as those via the chemolithoautotrophic denitrifying sulfur oxidizing process and the anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) process. Global warming and anthropogenic perturbations may have lowered the diversity, complexity, stability and sustainability of

  20. Rain-Induced Propagation Parameters For Earth-Space ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    space path at two elevation angles and some rain rates representing high and low availability requirements in Nigeria. The paper first calculates the slant path scattering parameters at various frequencies and rain rates, and then uses the new ...

  1. Phenology of seed and leaves rain in response to periodic climatic variability in a seasonal wet tropical forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matteo, D.; Wright, S. J.; Davies, S. J.; Muller-Landau, H. C.; Wolfe, B.; Detto, M.

    2016-12-01

    Phenology, by controlling the rhythms of plants, plays a fundamental role in regulating access to resources, ecosystem processes, competition among species, interactions with consumers and feedbacks to the climate. In high biodiverse tropical forests, where phenology of flowering and leafing are complex, an adequate representation of phenology must take into account a given set of climatic, edaphic and biotic factors. Climatic factors are particularly important because plants may use them as cues for timing different phenological phases and be influenced by their intensity. Climatic variability can be periodic, if events occur with regular frequency, or aperiodic. One prominent periodic large-scale pattern that causes unusual weather is ENSO event. In general, Central America tends to be dry and warm during a mature phase of an ENSO event, which usually peaks between October and January with a frequency of 2-3 events per decade. Because in many tropical areas the effect of ENSO is highly prominent, it is plausible that plants have adapted their growth and reproduction mechanisms to synchronize ENSO phases, in a similar way that plants do during the seasonal cycle. We used a long dataset (30+ years) of fruits and leaves rains of tropical trees and lianas to determine ecosystem response and species specific response of these phenological events to local climate variability corresponding to the modes of ENSO. Specifically, we tested the hypothesis that phenological responses to ENSO are similar to response to seasonal cycles, i.e., higher litterfall before a warm-dry phase and higher fruiting after such phase, with strong correlation between seeds and leaves. At sub-community level, we evaluated whether evergreen and deciduous, biotic and abiotic dispersers and free and climbing life forms, have the same response to ENSO in terms of leaves and seeds rain. At species level we tested the hypothesis that species with low photosynthetic capacity leaves are more responsive

  2. Landslide triggering by rain infiltration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iverson, Richard M.

    2000-01-01

    Landsliding in response to rainfall involves physical processes that operate on disparate timescales. Relationships between these timescales guide development of a mathematical model that uses reduced forms of Richards equation to evaluate effects of rainfall infiltration on landslide occurrence, timing, depth, and acceleration in diverse situations. The longest pertinent timescale is A/D0, where D0 is the maximum hydraulic diffusivity of the soil and A is the catchment area that potentially affects groundwater pressures at a prospective landslide slip surface location with areal coordinates x, y and depth H. Times greater than A/D0 are necessary for establishment of steady background water pressures that develop at (x, y, H) in response to rainfall averaged over periods that commonly range from days to many decades. These steady groundwater pressures influence the propensity for landsliding at (x, y, H), but they do not trigger slope failure. Failure results from rainfall over a typically shorter timescale H2/D0 associated with transient pore pressure transmission during and following storms. Commonly, this timescale ranges from minutes to months. The shortest timescale affecting landslide responses to rainfall is √(H/g), where g is the magnitude of gravitational acceleration. Postfailure landslide motion occurs on this timescale, which indicates that the thinnest landslides accelerate most quickly if all other factors are constant. Effects of hydrologic processes on landslide processes across these diverse timescales are encapsulated by a response function, R(t*) = √(t*/π) exp (-1/t*) - erfc (1/√t*), which depends only on normalized time, t*. Use of R(t*) in conjunction with topographic data, rainfall intensity and duration information, an infinite-slope failure criterion, and Newton's second law predicts the timing, depth, and acceleration of rainfall-triggered landslides. Data from contrasting landslides that exhibit rapid, shallow motion and slow, deep

  3. 40 CFR 76.3 - General Acid Rain Program provisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false General Acid Rain Program provisions. 76.3 Section 76.3 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) ACID RAIN NITROGEN OXIDES EMISSION REDUCTION PROGRAM § 76.3 General Acid Rain Program provisions...

  4. TRMM Ground Validation Rain Gauge Rain Rate L2 1 month V7 (TRMM_2A56) at GES DISC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The program rgmin generates 1-minute hourly rain rates from discrete tipping bucket rain gauge data by applying an interpolation algorithm. The interpolating routine...

  5. Exceptional warming in the Western Pacific-Indian Ocean warm pool has contributed to more frequent droughts in eastern Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funk, Christopher C.; Peterson, Thomas C.; Stott, Peter A.; Herring, Stephanie

    2012-01-01

    In 2011, East Africa faced a tragic food crisis that led to famine conditions in parts of Somalia and severe food shortages in parts of Ethiopia and Somalia. While many nonclimatic factors contributed to this crisis (high global food prices, political instability, and chronic poverty, among others) failed rains in both the boreal winter of 2010/11 and the boreal spring of 2011 played a critical role. The back-to-back failures of these rains, which were linked to the dominant La Niña climate and warm SSTs in the central and southeastern Indian Ocean, were particularly problematic since they followed poor rainfall during the spring and summer of 2008 and 2009. In fact, in parts of East Africa, in recent years, there has been a substantial increase in the number of below-normal rainy seasons, which may be related to the warming of the western Pacific and Indian Oceans (for more details, see Funk et al. 2008; Williams and Funk 2011; Williams et al. 2011; Lyon and DeWitt 2012). The basic argument of this work is that recent warming in the Indian–Pacific warm pool (IPWP) enhances the export of geopotential height energy from the warm pool, which tends to produce subsidence across eastern Africa and reduce onshore moisture transports. The general pattern of this disruption has been supported by canonical correlation analyzes and numerical experiments with the Community Atmosphere Model (Funk et al. 2008), diagnostic evaluations of reanalysis data (Williams and Funk 2011; Williams et al. 2011), and SST-driven experiments with ECHAM4.5, ECHAM5, and the Community Climate Model version 3 (CCM3.6) (Lyon and DeWitt 2012).

  6. Greenhouse Warming Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Bent Erik

    2016-01-01

    The changing greenhouse effect caused by natural and anthropogenic causes is explained and efforts to model the behavior of the near-surface constituents of the Earth's land, ocean and atmosphere are discussed. Emissions of various substances and other aspects of human activity influence...... the greenhouse warming, and the impacts of the warming may again impact the wellbeing of human societies. Thus physical modeling of the near-surface ocean-soil-atmosphere system cannot be carried out without an idea of the development of human activities, which is done by scenario analysis. The interactive...

  7. Ancient Jets of Fiery Rain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, G. J.

    2015-04-01

    Chondrules are intriguing millimeter-sized crystallized droplets that are abundant in chondrites, so named because of the presence of numerous chondrules. They have puzzled cosmochemists since they were described by English scientist H. C. Sorby in 1877. Everyone agrees that they formed as molten droplets of silicates, but nobody agrees on how the little things formed. Ideas range from impacts onto asteroids, primary condensation in the solar nebula, shock waves and/or lightening in the solar nebula, or by processes operating as planets began to form. A new twist on this last idea was investigated in a new way by Brandon Johnson (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, MIT) and co-authors David Minton and Jay Melosh (Purdue University), and Maria Zuber at MIT. Johnson and coworkers modeled the effects of impacts between planetesimals 100-1000 kilometers in diameter. When such objects hit each other, the first thing that happens is jetting of molten rock. Johnson and colleagues propose that the jets will subdivide into droplets as the jetted material is shot into space. They estimate that the chondrules would have the correct cooling rates (as determined from previous studies of chondrules) and the collision frequency would be high enough to produce abundant chondrules. Johnson and coworkers suggest that chondrules are a "byproduct of [planetary] accretion."

  8. Characteristics of rainfall queues for rain attenuation studies over radio links at subtropical and equatorial Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonge, Akintunde A.; Afullo, Thomas J.

    2014-08-01

    Attenuation due to precipitation remains an important design factor in the future deployment of terrestrial and earth-space communication radio links. Largely, there are concerted efforts to understand the dynamics of precipitation in attenuation occurrence at subtropical, tropical, and equatorial region of Africa. In this deliberate approach, rainfall spikes pertaining to rain cells are conceptualized as distinct rain spike traffic over radio links, by applying queueing theory concepts. The queue distributions at Durban (29°52'S, 30°58'E) and Butare (2°36'S, 29°44'E)—respectively, of subtropical and equatorial climates—are investigated from distrometer measurements. The data sets at both sites are observed over four rain regimes: drizzle, widespread, shower, and thunderstorm. The queue parameters of service time and inter-arrival of rain spikes traffic at both regions are found to be Erlang-k distributed (Ek) and exponentially distributed (M), respectively. It is established that the appearance of rain rates over radio links invariably follows a First Come, First Served (FCFS), multi-server (s), infinite queue, and semi-Markovian process, designated as M/Ek/s/∞/FCFS discipline. Modeled queue parameters at both regions are found to vary significantly over different regimes. However, these queue parameters over the entire data set suggest similar queue patterns at both sites. More importantly, power law relationships describing other queue-related parameters are formulated. The paper concludes by demonstrating an application of queueing theory for rainfall synthesis. The proposed technique will provide an alternative method of estimating rain cell sizes and rain attenuation over satellite and terrestrial links.

  9. Pollution problem: acid rain and beekeeping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayes, B.

    1979-11-01

    Some of the problems caused by acid rain are presented with emphasis on the effects on bees, especially in the Northeast. Scientists believe that rain east of the Mississippi is below 5.6 and average Northeastern rainfall is now down to pH 4. Trace minerals are being leached out of the soils and nectar that lacks calcium is being passed by when the bees forage. The first plants to show the effects will be the wild varieties of the legumes, such as clover. This leaves only plants on the extreme end of the acid scale such as the blueberry for bee forage. This leads to the side effect of the movement of calcium in nectar which will be restricted due to a lack of calcium-lime.

  10. Quality control of rain data used for urban runoff systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, H. K.; Rosenørn, S.; Madsen, Henrik

    1998-01-01

    When improving software packages such as MOUSE and SAMBA for designing sewers and storage basins, and simulating overflows and flooding the quality of the input becomes important. The essential input to these modelling tools are the historical rain series. This paper presents the procedures...... for collection and quality control of rain data from a network of tipping bucket rain gauges in Denmark carried out by the Danish Meteorological Institute. During rain, the RIMCO gauge counts the number of tips teach of 0.2 mm of precipitation) every minute, The quality control of the rain data includes...

  11. Rain VM: Portable Concurrency through Managing Code

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Neil C.C.

    2006-01-01

    A long-running recent trend in computer programming is the growth in popularity of virtual machines. However, few have included good support for concurrency - a natural mechanism in the Rain programming language. This paper details the design and implementation of a secure virtual machine with support for concurrency, which enables portability of concurrent programs. Possible implementation ideas of many-to-many threading models for the virtual machine kernel are discussed, and initial benchm...

  12. Activation of Sahelian monsoon under future warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schewe, Jacob; Levermann, Anders

    2015-04-01

    Rainfall variability in the Sahel has been affecting the lives of millions through devastating droughts, such as in the 1970s and 80s, but also destructive rain and flood events. Future climate change is likely to alter rainfall patterns, but model projections for the central Sahel diverge significantly, with climate models simulating anything between a slight drying and a substantial wetting trend. Here we analyze 30 coupled global climate model simulations from the CMIP5 archive. We identify seven models where central Sahel rainfall increases by 40% to 300% over the 21st century, under the RCP8.5 concentration pathway. The same models also outperform the rest of the ensemble in reproducing the magnitude of the 1970s/80s drought. The magnitude and seasonality of the projected future rainfall change, together with a concurrent increase in near-surface wind speed, indicate a northward expansion of the West African monsoon domain. We further find that Sahel rainfall does not increase linearly with rising global temperatures; it is insensitive to moderate warming but then abruptly intensifies beyond a certain temperature. This non-linearity is even more pronounced when instead of global warming, sea surface temperature change in the tropical Atlantic moisture source region is considered. We propose an explanation for this behavior based on a self-amplifying dynamic-thermodynamical feedback, and suggest that the gradual increase in oceanic moisture availability under climate change can trigger the sudden activation of a continental monsoon in the Sahel region, which reaches further inland than the present-day, predominantly coastal West African monsoon. Such an abrupt regime change in response to gradual forcing would be consistent with paleoclimatic records from the Sahel region. More detailed comparison between the model simulations that exhibit this sudden rainfall increase under future warming and those that do not may help to verify this hypothesis.

  13. Rainfall time series synthesis from queue scheduling of rain event fractals over radio links

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonge, Akintunde A.; Afullo, Thomas J.

    2015-12-01

    Rainfall attenuation over wireless networks stems from random fluctuations in the natural process of arriving rainfall rates over radio links. This arrival process results in discernible rainfall traffic pattern which manifests as naturally scheduled and queue-generated rain spikes. Hence, the phenomenon of rainfall process can be approached as a semi-Markovian queueing process, with event characteristics dependent on queue parameters. However, a constraint to this approach is the knowledge of the physical characteristics of queue-generated rain spikes. Therefore, this paper explores the probability theory and descriptive mathematics of rain spikes in rainfall processes. This investigation presents the synthesis of rainfall queue with rain spikes at subtropical and equatorial locations of Durban (29°52'S, 30°58'E) and Butare (2°36'S, 29°44'E), respectively. The resulting comparative analysis of rainfall distributions, using error analysis at both locations, reveals that queue-generated rainfall compares well with measured rainfall data set. This suggests that the time-varying process of rainfall, though stochastic, can be synthesized via queue scheduling with the application of relevant queue parameters at any location.

  14. Predicting Snow-To-Rain Transitions Across The Western U.S.: When Is Daily Air Temperature Sufficient?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajagopal, S.

    2015-12-01

    The phase of precipitation at the land surface is critical for determining the timing and amount of water available for hydrological and ecological systems. Natural variability in precipitation phase due to elevation, micro-climate, and storm characteristics make it a challenge to predict phase. In addition, regional warming is expected to move the snow-rain elevation higher in the future, which has the potential to alter water availability. Despite this, there are few techniques for direct observation of precipitation phase and many predictive techniques apply simple temperature thresholds (i.e. 0 degree Celsius) to determine spatiotemporal patterns. In this paper, we asked two questions: 1) what is the optimum daily temperature for predicting snow-rain transitions in the mountains of the Western U.S.? and 2) what errors in precipitation phase estimation are associated with common temperature thresholds? We use 502 Snow Telemetry (SNOTEL) stations with data from 2004 to 2014 to determine rain versus snow using a combination of precipitation, snow depth, and SWE observations. From the observations, we determined that daily maximum temperature is a better predictor of rain and snow events than average temperature. The optimum temperature varied from -2.0 to 3 C, with an average of 0.3 C across ecoregions. The Northern Basin and Northern Cascades with lower average elevations had higher temperature thresholds and the Southern Rockies with highest elevations had the lowest thresholds. Developing a relationship based on station elevation improved the RMSE by 12%, whereas using an optimum temperature developed for each station improved the RMSE by 34% on average. While using optimum temperature thresholds reduce error in prediction, they do not eliminate misclassification of rain-show transitions. These results highlight a current weakness in our ability to predict the effects of regional warming that could have uneven impacts on water and ecological resource management

  15. Identification and Diagnosis of Rainfall Types over Southern West Africa Using Satellite and Rain Gauge Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maranan, Marlon; Fink, Andreas H.; Amekudzi, Leonard K.; Atiah, Winifred A.

    2017-04-01

    Rainfall over Southern West Africa (SWA) is mainly controlled by the West African Monsoon circulation. Not much is known, however, about the (thermo-)dynamic environmental conditions and storm dynamics of various regional rainfall systems that contribute to the total annual rainfall. This study exploits both satellite and rain gauge measurements to quantify the contribution and to examine the importance of different rainfall types in SWA. For the period of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) 1998-2014, the rainfall types are identified by analyzing the 3-D reflectivity structure using scans of the TRMM Precipitation Radar (TRMM-PR). Since TRMM-PR scans only provide instantaneous snapshots, the rainfall events are then traced back and forward in time with observations from the Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI) over the overlapping period of 2004-2014 to obtain information about their life cycle. The composition of the ensemble of the different rainfall types exhibits a substantial regional variability across SWA. Strong convection (Radar echo > 40 dBZ) generally makes a dominant contribution to the number of rainfall events and to the total rainfall amount. However, the influence of deeper (40 dBZ echo at altitudes > 10 km) and wider (Area of 40 dBZ echo > 1000 km2) systems on the total rainfall amount increases going farther northward into the continent. Additionally, the number of tracks of those systems features relative minima along the Ivorian and Ghanaian-Togolese coast, the latter reflecting the climatologically dry Dahomey Gap. In contrast, local warm rain from isolated shallow convection develops more often along the immediate coast line. Yet, their contribution to total rainfall remains negligible and is almost non-existent further north. Compared with high-resolution rain gauge data around Kumasi, Ghana, for the year 2016, it can be assumed that warm rain events show an even higher occurrence frequency. Likewise, their

  16. Direct splash dispersal prevails over indirect and subsequent spread during rains in Colletotrichum gloeosporioides infecting yams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penet, Laurent; Guyader, Sébastien; Pétro, Dalila; Salles, Michèle; Bussière, François

    2014-01-01

    Plant pathogens have evolved many dispersal mechanisms, using biotic or abiotic vectors or a combination of the two. Rain splash dispersal is known from a variety of fungi, and can be an efficient driver of crop epidemics, with infectious strains propagating rapidly among often genetically homogenous neighboring plants. Splashing is nevertheless a local dispersal process and spores taking the droplet ride seldom move farther than a few decimeters. In this study, we assessed rain splash dispersal of conidia of the yam anthracnose agent, Colletotrichum gloeosporioides, in an experimental setting using a rain simulator, with emphasis on the impact of soil contamination (i.e., effect of re-splashing events). Spores dispersed up to 50 cm from yam leaf inoculum sources, though with an exponential decrease with increasing distance. While few spores were dispersed via re-splash from spore-contaminated soil, the proportion deposited via this mechanism increased with increasing distance from the initial source. We found no soil contamination carryover from previous rains, suggesting that contamination via re-splashing from contaminated soils mainly occurred within single rains. We conclude that most dispersal occurs from direct splashing, with a weaker contribution of indirect dispersal via re-splash.

  17. Direct splash dispersal prevails over indirect and subsequent spread during rains in Colletotrichum gloeosporioides infecting yams.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent Penet

    Full Text Available Plant pathogens have evolved many dispersal mechanisms, using biotic or abiotic vectors or a combination of the two. Rain splash dispersal is known from a variety of fungi, and can be an efficient driver of crop epidemics, with infectious strains propagating rapidly among often genetically homogenous neighboring plants. Splashing is nevertheless a local dispersal process and spores taking the droplet ride seldom move farther than a few decimeters. In this study, we assessed rain splash dispersal of conidia of the yam anthracnose agent, Colletotrichum gloeosporioides, in an experimental setting using a rain simulator, with emphasis on the impact of soil contamination (i.e., effect of re-splashing events. Spores dispersed up to 50 cm from yam leaf inoculum sources, though with an exponential decrease with increasing distance. While few spores were dispersed via re-splash from spore-contaminated soil, the proportion deposited via this mechanism increased with increasing distance from the initial source. We found no soil contamination carryover from previous rains, suggesting that contamination via re-splashing from contaminated soils mainly occurred within single rains. We conclude that most dispersal occurs from direct splashing, with a weaker contribution of indirect dispersal via re-splash.

  18. Forecasting of monsoon heavy rains: challenges in NWP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Kuldeep; Ashrit, Raghavendra; Iyengar, Gopal; Bhatla, R.; Rajagopal, E. N.

    2016-05-01

    Last decade has seen a tremendous improvement in the forecasting skill of numerical weather prediction (NWP) models. This is attributed to increased sophistication in NWP models, which resolve complex physical processes, advanced data assimilation, increased grid resolution and satellite observations. However, prediction of heavy rains is still a challenge since the models exhibit large error in amounts as well as spatial and temporal distribution. Two state-of-art NWP models have been investigated over the Indian monsoon region to assess their ability in predicting the heavy rainfall events. The unified model operational at National Center for Medium Range Weather Forecasting (NCUM) and the unified model operational at the Australian Bureau of Meteorology (Australian Community Climate and Earth-System Simulator -- Global (ACCESS-G)) are used in this study. The recent (JJAS 2015) Indian monsoon season witnessed 6 depressions and 2 cyclonic storms which resulted in heavy rains and flooding. The CRA method of verification allows the decomposition of forecast errors in terms of error in the rainfall volume, pattern and location. The case by case study using CRA technique shows that contribution to the rainfall errors come from pattern and displacement is large while contribution due to error in predicted rainfall volume is least.

  19. Development of an Integrated Multi-Contaminant Removal Process Applied to Warm Syngas Cleanup for Coal-Based Advanced Gasification Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, Howard

    2010-11-30

    This project met the objective to further the development of an integrated multi-contaminant removal process in which H2S, NH3, HCl and heavy metals including Hg, As, Se and Cd present in the coal-derived syngas can be removed to specified levels in a single/integrated process step. The process supports the mission and goals of the Department of Energy's Gasification Technologies Program, namely to enhance the performance of gasification systems, thus enabling U.S. industry to improve the competitiveness of gasification-based processes. The gasification program will reduce equipment costs, improve process environmental performance, and increase process reliability and flexibility. Two sulfur conversion concepts were tested in the laboratory under this project, i.e., the solventbased, high-pressure University of California Sulfur Recovery Process High Pressure (UCSRP-HP) and the catalytic-based, direct oxidation (DO) section of the CrystaSulf-DO process. Each process required a polishing unit to meet the ultra-clean sulfur content goals of <50 ppbv (parts per billion by volume) as may be necessary for fuel cells or chemical production applications. UCSRP-HP was also tested for the removal of trace, non-sulfur contaminants, including ammonia, hydrogen chloride, and heavy metals. A bench-scale unit was commissioned and limited testing was performed with simulated syngas. Aspen-Plus®-based computer simulation models were prepared and the economics of the UCSRP-HP and CrystaSulf-DO processes were evaluated for a nominal 500 MWe, coal-based, IGCC power plant with carbon capture. This report covers the progress on the UCSRP-HP technology development and the CrystaSulf-DO technology.

  20. Response of soil respiration to acid rain in forests of different maturity in southern China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guohua Liang

    Full Text Available The response of soil respiration to acid rain in forests, especially in forests of different maturity, is poorly understood in southern China despite the fact that acid rain has become a serious environmental threat in this region in recent years. Here, we investigated this issue in three subtropical forests of different maturity [i.e. a young pine forest (PF, a transitional mixed conifer and broadleaf forest (MF and an old-growth broadleaved forest (BF] in southern China. Soil respiration was measured over two years under four simulated acid rain (SAR treatments (CK, the local lake water, pH 4.5; T1, water pH 4.0; T2, water pH 3.5; and T3, water pH 3.0. Results indicated that SAR did not significantly affect soil respiration in the PF, whereas it significantly reduced soil respiration in the MF and the BF. The depressed effects on both forests occurred mostly in the warm-wet seasons and were correlated with a decrease in soil microbial activity and in fine root biomass caused by soil acidification under SAR. The sensitivity of the response of soil respiration to SAR showed an increasing trend with the progressive maturity of the three forests, which may result from their differences in acid buffering ability in soil and in litter layer. These results indicated that the depressed effect of acid rain on soil respiration in southern China may be more pronounced in the future in light of the projected change in forest maturity. However, due to the nature of this field study with chronosequence design and the related pseudoreplication for forest types, this inference should be read with caution. Further studies are needed to draw rigorous conclusions regarding the response differences among forests of different maturity using replicated forest types.

  1. Response of soil respiration to acid rain in forests of different maturity in southern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Guohua; Liu, Xingzhao; Chen, Xiaomei; Qiu, Qingyan; Zhang, Deqiang; Chu, Guowei; Liu, Juxiu; Liu, Shizhong; Zhou, Guoyi

    2013-01-01

    The response of soil respiration to acid rain in forests, especially in forests of different maturity, is poorly understood in southern China despite the fact that acid rain has become a serious environmental threat in this region in recent years. Here, we investigated this issue in three subtropical forests of different maturity [i.e. a young pine forest (PF), a transitional mixed conifer and broadleaf forest (MF) and an old-growth broadleaved forest (BF)] in southern China. Soil respiration was measured over two years under four simulated acid rain (SAR) treatments (CK, the local lake water, pH 4.5; T1, water pH 4.0; T2, water pH 3.5; and T3, water pH 3.0). Results indicated that SAR did not significantly affect soil respiration in the PF, whereas it significantly reduced soil respiration in the MF and the BF. The depressed effects on both forests occurred mostly in the warm-wet seasons and were correlated with a decrease in soil microbial activity and in fine root biomass caused by soil acidification under SAR. The sensitivity of the response of soil respiration to SAR showed an increasing trend with the progressive maturity of the three forests, which may result from their differences in acid buffering ability in soil and in litter layer. These results indicated that the depressed effect of acid rain on soil respiration in southern China may be more pronounced in the future in light of the projected change in forest maturity. However, due to the nature of this field study with chronosequence design and the related pseudoreplication for forest types, this inference should be read with caution. Further studies are needed to draw rigorous conclusions regarding the response differences among forests of different maturity using replicated forest types.

  2. Little ecological divergence associated with speciation in two African rain forest tree genera

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Couvreur, T.L.P.; Porter-Morgan, H.; Wieringa, J.J.; Chatrou, L.W.

    2011-01-01

    Background - The tropical rain forests (TRF) of Africa are the second largest block of this biome after the Amazon and exhibit high levels of plant endemism and diversity. Two main hypotheses have been advanced to explain speciation processes that have led to this high level of biodiversity:

  3. Principal modes of variation of rain-rate probability distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Thomas L.; Suhasini, R.

    1994-01-01

    Radar or satellite observations of an area generate sequences of rain-rate maps. From a gridded map a histogram of rain rates can be obtained representing the relative areas occupied by rain rates of various strengths. The histograms vary with time as precipitating systems in the area evolve and decay and amounts of convective and stratiform rain in the area change. A method of decomposing the histograms into linear combinations of a few empirical distributions with time-dependent coefficients is developed, using principal component analysis as a starting point. When applied to a tropical Atlantic dataset (GATE), two distributions emerge naturally from the analysis, resembling stratiform and convective rain-rate distributions in that they peak at low and high rain rates, respectively. The two 'modes' have different timescales and only the high-rain-rate mode has a statistically significant diurnal cycle. The ability of just two modes to describe rain variabiltiy over an area can explain why methods of estimating area-averaged rain rate from the area covered by rain rates above a certain threshold are so successful.

  4. Isotopic equilibrium between precipitation and water vapor: evidence from continental rains in central Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soderberg, K.; Gerlein, C.; Kemeny, P. C.; Caylor, K. K.

    2013-12-01

    An accurate understanding of the relationships between the isotopic composition of liquid water and that of water vapor in the environment can help describe hydrologic processes across many scales. One such relationship is the isotopic equilibrium between falling raindrops and the surrounding vapor. The degree of equilibration is used to model the isotopic composition of precipitation in isotope-enable general circulation models and land-atmosphere exchange models. Although this equilibrium has been a topic of isotope hydrology research for more than four decades, few studies have included vapor measurements to validate modeling efforts. Recent advances in laser technology have allowed for in situ vapor measurements at high temporal resolution (e.g., >1 Hz). Here we present concomitant rain and vapor measurements for a series of 17 rain events during the 'Continental' rainy season (June through August) at Mpala Research Center in central Kenya. Rain samples (n=218) were collected at intervals of 2 to 35 minutes (median of 3 minutes) depending on the rain rate (0.4 to 10.5 mm/hr). The volume-weighted mean rain values for δ18O, δ2H and D-excess (δ2H - 8* δ18O) were 0.1 ‰, 10.7 ‰, and 10.1 ‰. These values are more enriched than the annual weighted means reported for the area (-2.2 ‰, -7.6 ‰, and 11.0 ‰, respectively). Vapor was measured continuously at ~2Hz (DLT-100, Los Gatos Research), with an inverted funnel intake 4m above the ground surface. The mean vapor isotopic composition during the rain events was -10.0 +/- 1.2 ‰ (1 σ) for δ18O and -73.9 +/- 7.0 ‰ for δ2H. The difference between the rain sample isotopic composition and that of liquid in isotopic equilibrium with the corresponding vapor at the ambient temperature was 0.8 +/- 2.2 ‰ for δ18O and 6.2 +/- 7.0 ‰ for δ2H. This disequilibrium was found to correlate with the natural log of rain rate (R2 of 0.26 for δ18O and 0.46 for δ2H), with lower rain rates having larger

  5. Uses of warmed water in agriculture. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garrett, R.E.

    1978-11-01

    Energy in the form of warmed water is available from condenser cooling water from fossil fuel or nuclear-electric power-generating facilities, geothermal power plants, geothermal fluids, or spent steam and cooling water from industrial processes. A re-analysis of the characteristics of possible agricultural uses of warmed water has revealed the need to decouple considerations of warmed water sources from those of warmed water users. Conflicting objectives and managerial requirements seem to preclude an integrated system approach. Rather an interface must be established with separate costs and benefits identified for a reliable warmed water source and for its various potential uses. These costs and benefits can be utilized as a basis for decisions separately by the energy supplier and the prospective energy users. A method of classifying uses of warmed water according to need, volume, objective, temperature, and quality is presented and preliminary classifications are discussed for several potential agricultural uses of warmed water. Specific uses for soil warming, space heating in greenhouses, and irrigation are noted. Specific uses in aquaculture for catfish, lobster, and prawn production are discussed. Warmed water use in animal shelters is mentioned. Low-quality heat is required for methane generation from biomass and warmed water heating could be utilized in this industry. 53 references. (MCW)

  6. Spherical warm shield design for infrared imaging systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Qijie; Chang, Songtao; He, Fengyun; Li, Zhou; Qiao, Yanfeng

    2017-09-01

    The F-number matching is the primary means to suppress stray radiation for infrared imaging systems. However, it is difficult to achieve exact F-number matching, owing to the restriction from detectors, or multiple F-number design. Hence, an additional shield is required to block the certain thermal radiation. Typical shield is called flat warm shield, which is flat and operates at room temperature. For flat warm shield, it cannot suppress stray radiation while achieving F-number matching. To overcome the restriction, a spherical reflective warm shield is required. First of all, the detailed theory of spherical warm shield design is developed on basis of the principle that stray radiation cannot directly reach the infrared focal plane array. According to the theory developed above, a polished spherical warm shield, whose radius is 18 mm, is designed to match an F/2 infrared detector with an F/4 infrared imaging system. Then, the performance and alignment errors of the designed spherical warm shield are analyzed by simulation. Finally, a contrast experiment between the designed spherical warm shield and two differently processed flat warm shields is performed in a chamber with controllable inside temperatures. The experimental results indicate that the designed spherical warm shield cannot only achieve F-number matching but suppress stray radiation sufficiently. Besides, it is demonstrated that the theory of spherical warm shield design developed in this paper is valid and can be employed by arbitrary infrared imaging systems.

  7. EFFECTS OF GLOBAL WARMING

    OpenAIRE

    Dr. Basanti Jain

    2017-01-01

    The abnormal increase in the concentration of the greenhouse gases is resulting in higher temperatures. We call this effect is global warming. The average temperature around the world has increased about 1'c over 140 years, 75% of this has risen just over the past 30 years. The solar radiation, as it reaches the earth, produces "greenhouse effect" in the atmosphere. The thick atmospheric layers over the earth behaves as a glass surface, as it permits short wave radiations from coming in, but ...

  8. Monitoring Fires in Southwestern Amazonia Rain Forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, I. Foster; Schroeder, Wilfrid; Setzer, Alberto; de Los Rios Maldonado, Monica; Pantoja, Nara; Duarte, Alejandro; Marengo, Jose

    2006-06-01

    From mid-July to mid-October 2005, an environmental disaster unfolded in the trinational region of Madre de Dios, Peru; Acre, Brazil; and Pando, Bolivia (the MAP region), in southwestern Amazonia. A prolonged dry season and human-initiated fires resulted in smoke pollution affecting more than 400,000 persons, fire damage to over 300,000 hectares of rain forest, and over US$50 million of direct economic losses. Indicators suggest that anomalous drought conditions could occur again this year.

  9. Global warming and neurodegenerative disorders: speculations on their linkage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habibi, Laleh; Perry, George; Mahmoudi, Morteza

    2014-01-01

    Climate change is having considerable impact on biological systems. Eras of ice ages and warming shaped the contemporary earth and origin of creatures including humans. Warming forces stress conditions on cells. Therefore, cells evolved elaborate defense mechanisms, such as creation of heat shock proteins, to combat heat stress. Global warming is becoming a crisis and this process would yield an undefined increasing rate of neurodegenerative disorders in future decades. Since heat stress is known to have a degenerative effects on neurons and, conversely, cold conditions have protective effect on these cells, we hypothesize that persistent heat stress forced by global warming might play a crucial role in increasing neurodegenerative disorders.

  10. Regional warming of hot extremes accelerated by surface energy fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donat, M. G.; Pitman, A. J.; Seneviratne, S. I.

    2017-07-01

    Strong regional differences exist in how hot temperature extremes increase under global warming. Using an ensemble of coupled climate models, we examine the regional warming rates of hot extremes relative to annual average warming rates in the same regions. We identify hot spots of accelerated warming of model-simulated hot extremes in Europe, North America, South America, and Southeast China. These hot spots indicate where the warm tail of a distribution of temperatures increases faster than the average and are robust across most Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 models. Exploring the conditions on the specific day when the hot extreme occurs demonstrates that the hot spots are explained by changes in the surface energy fluxes consistent with drying soils. However, the model-simulated accelerated warming of hot extremes appears inconsistent with observations, except over Europe. The simulated acceleration of hot extremes may therefore be unreliable, a result that necessitates a reevaluation of how climate models resolve the relevant terrestrial processes.

  11. EFFECTS OF RAIN ATTENUATION ON SATELLITE COMMUNICATION LINK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. N. Ezeh

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Rain attenuation is a major challenge to microwave satellite communication especially at frequencies above 10 GHz, causing unavailability of signals most of the time. Rain attenuation predictions have become one of the vital considerations while setting up a satellite communication link. In this study, rain attenuation models, cumulative distribution curves and other analytical tools for successful prediction of rain attenuation are presented. A three year Rain rate data was obtained from the Nigeria Meteorological Agency (NIMET database in addition to experimental data. Of the three prediction models used in the study, Ajayi model gave the range of values closest to the experimental data. A correctional factor was determined as 1.0988 and used to modify the Ajayi model. This modification to Ajayi’s model enabled its rain attenuation values conform more closely to the experimental result.

  12. Task 3.3: Warm Syngas Cleanup and Catalytic Processes for Syngas Conversion to Fuels Subtask 3: Advanced Syngas Conversion to Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lebarbier Dagel, Vanessa M.; Li, J.; Taylor, Charles E.; Wang, Yong; Dagle, Robert A.; Deshmane, Chinmay A.; Bao, Xinhe

    2014-03-31

    This collaborative joint research project is in the area of advanced gasification and conversion, within the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS)-National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL)-Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Memorandum of Understanding. The goal for this subtask is the development of advanced syngas conversion technologies. Two areas of investigation were evaluated: Sorption-Enhanced Synthetic Natural Gas Production from Syngas The conversion of synthetic gas (syngas) to synthetic natural gas (SNG) is typically catalyzed by nickel catalysts performed at moderate temperatures (275 to 325°C). The reaction is highly exothermic and substantial heat is liberated, which can lead to process thermal imbalance and destruction of the catalyst. As a result, conversion per pass is typically limited, and substantial syngas recycle is employed. Commercial methanation catalysts and processes have been developed by Haldor Topsoe, and in some reports, they have indicated that there is a need and opportunity for thermally more robust methanation catalysts to allow for higher per-pass conversion in methanation units. SNG process requires the syngas feed with a higher H2/CO ratio than typically produced from gasification processes. Therefore, the water-gas shift reaction (WGS) will be required to tailor the H2/CO ratio. Integration with CO2 separation could potentially eliminate the need for a separate WGS unit, thereby integrating WGS, methanation, and CO2 capture into one single unit operation and, consequently, leading to improved process efficiency. The SNG process also has the benefit of producing a product stream with high CO2 concentrations, which makes CO2 separation more readily achievable. The use of either adsorbents or membranes that selectively separate the CO2 from the H2 and CO would shift the methanation reaction (by driving WGS for hydrogen production) and greatly improve the overall efficiency and economics of the process. The scope of this

  13. Global Warming And Meltwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bratu, S.

    2012-04-01

    In order to find new approaches and new ideas for my students to appreciate the importance of science in their daily life, I proposed a theme for them to debate. They had to search for global warming information and illustrations in the media, and discuss the articles they found in the classroom. This task inspired them to search for new information about this important and timely theme in science. I informed my students that all the best information about global warming and meltwater they found would be used in a poster that would help us to update the knowledge base of the Physics laboratory. I guided them to choose the most eloquent images and significant information. Searching and working to create this poster, the students arrived to better appreciate the importance of science in their daily life and to critically evaluate scientific information transmitted via the media. In the poster we created, one can find images, photos and diagrams and some interesting information: Global warming refers to the rising average temperature of the Earth's atmosphere and oceans and its projected evolution. In the last 100 years, the Earth's average surface temperature increased by about 0.8 °C with about two thirds of the increase occurring over just the last three decades. Warming of the climate system is unequivocal, and scientists are more than 90% certain most of it is caused by increasing concentrations of greenhouse gases produced by human activities such as deforestation and burning fossil fuel. They indicate that during the 21st century the global surface temperature is likely to rise a further 1.1 to 2.9 °C for the lowest emissions scenario and 2.4 to 6.4 °C for the highest predictions. An increase in global temperature will cause sea levels to rise and will change the amount and pattern of precipitation, and potentially result in expansion of subtropical deserts. Warming is expected to be strongest in the Arctic and would be associated with continuing decrease of

  14. Greenhouse warming and changes in sea level

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oerlemans, J.

    1989-01-01

    It is likely that the anticipated warming due to the effect of increasing concentration of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases will lead to a further and faster rise in world mean sea level. There are many processes in the climate system controlling sea level, but the most important

  15. Soil warming and fertilization altered rates of nitrogen transformation processes and selected for adapted ammonia-oxidizing archaea in sub-arctic grassland soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daebeler, Anne; Bodelier, Paul L.E.; Hefting, Mariet M.; Rütting, Tobias; Laanbroek, Hendrikus J.

    Abstract The balance of microbial nitrogen (N) transformation processes in sub-arctic terrestrial ecosystems is most likely affected by global change, with potential feedbacks to greenhouse gas emissions and eutrophication. Soil temperature and N availability – their global increases being two of

  16. Herbivores modify the carbon cycle in a warming arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahoon, S. M.; Sullivan, P.; Welker, J. M.; Post, E.

    2009-12-01

    Typically, our studies of arctic terrestrial ecosystem responses to changes in climate focus on abiotic drivers (i.e. warming or added rain or added snow) and subsequent biogeochemical cycles and plant physiological performance. However, many arctic systems, such as those in western Greenland, are home ranges for large herbivores such as muskoxen and caribou. In order to fully understand how tundra landscapes in Greenland will respond to change, experiments are needed that allow us to quantify whether abiotic (climate warming) and or biotic (presence or absence of herbivores) drivers or their combinations regulate ecosystem function and structure. Here we present the results of two consecutive field seasons in western Greenland in which we quantified the interactive effects of local herbivore foraging and simulated climate warming on ecosystem C and N cycling and leaf level physiology. Large exclosure fences were erected in 2002, and ITEX passive warming chambers were established in 2003 within and adjacent to the fences. We performed weekly CO2 flux measurements during the 2008 and 2009 growing seasons which we normalized to a common irradiance by generating light-response curves at all plots (n=9). Although we observed interannual variability in soil moisture and average daily air temperature, browsing by herbivores was a key factor in the seasonal carbon dynamics. By physically removing leaves and upper stems, caribou and muskoxen altered the community composition, reduced leaf area and in turn decreased gross ecosystem photosynthesis (GEP), regardless of the warming treatment. Neither herbivory nor warming significantly affected ecosystem respiration rates. Thus the reduction in net ecosystem exchange (NEE) was primarily driven by reductions in GEP associated with leaf area removal by grazers. Our results indicate that the biotic influence from large herbivores can significantly influence carbon-derived climatic feedbacks and can no longer be overlooked in

  17. Rain on Snow: Little Understood Killer in the North

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putkonen, Jaakko; Grenfell, Thomas C.; Rennert, Kevin; Bitz, Cecilia; Jacobson, Paul; Russell, Don

    2009-06-01

    In October 2003, a severe rain-on-snow (ROS) event killed approximately 20,000 musk-oxen (Figure 1) on Banks Island, which is the westernmost of the Canadian Arctic islands (approximately 380 kilometers by 290 kilometers in size). The event reduced the isolated herd by 25% and significantly affected the people dependent on the herd's well-being. Because of the sparsity of weather stations in the Arctic and the lack of routinely deployed weather equipment that was capable of accurately sensing the ROS event, its detection largely was based on reports from hunters who were in the affected areas at the time. Such events can significantly alter a frozen ecosystem—with changes that often persist for the remainder of a winter—by creating ice layers at the surface of, within, or below the snowpack. The water and ice layers are known to facilitate the growth of toxic fungi, significantly warm the soil surface under thick snowpack, and deter large grazing mammals. Although ROS events of the magnitude that was experienced in Banks Island in 2003 likely have reverberations throughout the entire Arctic and subarctic ecosystem, little is presently known about them and their impacts. As understanding of ROS events expands, many ROS-related aspects of the Arctic ecology and hydrology are likely to be discovered. They may include topics such as the fate of small mammals under the snowpack at the iced soil surface, the difficulty of ptarmigans to burrow into the iced snow, the limited infiltration of spring snowmelt into the iced over soil, and the changing drifting patterns of ice-crusted snowpack.

  18. Effects of simulated acid rain on vegetation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferenbaugh, R.W.

    1974-01-01

    Experiments were performed to determine the effects of simulated acid rain on Chenopodium quinoa, Hordeum vulgare and Phaseolus vulgaris. Because of differential species' susceptibility, detailed experiments were conducted only on Phaseolus vulgaris. Acid rain was simulated by spraying the plants with a hand-held atomizer. Sulfuric acid solutions covering a pH range of 1.5 to 3.5 in one half pH unit increments were used. Gross morphological effects noted at lower pH values included failure to attain normal height, necrosis and wrinkling of leaves, excessive and adventitious budding, and premature abscission of primary leaves. Histological effects included smaller cell size, a decreased amount of intercellular space, hypertrophied nuclei and nucleoli, and a reduction in the size of starch granules within the chloroplasts. Dry weight remained an approximately constant percentage of fresh weight, and chlorophyll analyses showed that both chlorophyll concentration and ratio of chlorophyll 'a' to chlorophyll 'b' also remained constant. Respirometer studies showed that, while respiration rate increased only slightly at low pH values, photosynthetic rate increased dramatically. Quantitative analyses indicated that carbohydrate content was reduced at low pH values, with starch content reduced much more than sugar content. Root biomass was also reduced at low pH values. Application of Congo red indicator solution to the acid treated tissue showed that it was being acidified to a pH of below 4. 114 references, 23 figures, 12 tables.

  19. Thermal stability of warm-rolled tungsten

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alfonso Lopez, Angel

    , and recrystallization fitted to JMAK recrystallization kinetics, which in turn allowed thecalculation of recrystallization activation energies. Much faster recovery and recrystallizationkinetics were found for the plate warm-rolled to 90% thickness reduction, as compared to the platewarm-rolled to 67% thickness...... and recrystallization occur in tungsten, and quantifying the kinetics and microstructuralaspects of these restoration processes. Two warm-rolled tungsten plates are annealed attemperatures between 1100 °C and 1350 °C, under vacuum conditions or argon atmosphere. Theeffects of annealing on the microstructure...... reduction. An initial incubation time before recrystallization wasfound for both plates warm-rolled to 67% and 90% thickness reductions. The different Avramiexponents found for the two plates were explained microstructurally in terms of nucleation. The microstructural evolution during recovery...

  20. GPM Ground Validation Duke Rain Gauges IPHEx V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GPM Ground Validation Duke Rain Gauge data were collected during the GPM Ground Validation Integrated Precipitation and Hydrology Experiment (IPHEx) field...

  1. Effect of Rain Leaching on Chemical Composition of Alfalfa Hay

    OpenAIRE

    Garcia de Hernandez, Mercedes M.

    1981-01-01

    Yield and chemical changes of second-cutting alfalfa hay treated with artificial rain were determined in a 2 x 3 x 2 factorial experiment. Factors were 2 stages of maturity (1 late vegetative; 2 early bloom), 3 levels of artificial rain applied (1 =no rain; 2 =low or approximately 5 mm; 3 =high or approximately 20 mm), and 2 times of applying artificial rain (1 = when drying forage was 40-60% dry matter; 2 =when drying forage was 60-75% dry matter). Thirty samples of alfalfa were collected at...

  2. Response of soybean seed germination to cadmium and acid rain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ting Ting; Wu, Peng; Wang, Li Hong; Zhou, Qing

    2011-12-01

    Cadmium (Cd) pollution and acid rain are the main environmental issues, and they often occur in the same agricultural region. Nevertheless, up to now, little information on the combined pollution of Cd(2+) and acid rain action on crops were presented. Here, we investigated the combined effect of Cd(2+) and acid rain on the seed germination of soybean. The results indicated that the single treatment with the low level of Cd(2+) (0.18, 1.0, 3.0 mg L(-1)) or acid rain (pH ≥3.0) could not affect the seed germination of soybean, which was resulted in the increased activities of peroxidase and catalase. The single treatment with the high concentration of Cd(2+) (>6 mg L(-1)) or acid rain at pH 2.5 decreased the activities of peroxidase and catalase, damaged the cell membrane and then decreased the seed germination of soybean. Meanwhile, the same toxic effect was observed in the combined treatment with Cd(2+) and acid rain, and the combined treatment had more toxic effect than the single treatment with Cd(2+) or acid rain. Thus, the combined pollution of Cd(2+) and acid rain had more potential threat to the seed germination of soybean than the single pollution of Cd(2+) or acid rain.

  3. GPM Ground Validation Micro Rain Radar (MRR) OLYMPEX V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GPM Ground Validation Micro Rain Radar (MRR) OLYMPEX dataset was gathered during the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Ground Validation OLYMPEX field...

  4. Parallelization for STEM2 Code in simulating acid rain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitabata, Hideyuki; Tsuchiura, Hiroki; Ueda, Hiromasa; Aikawa, Hiroshi

    1998-03-01

    STEM2 (Sulfur Transport Eulerian Model-II) Code in simulating acid rain is parallelized by using two different types of super computer SP which is a scalar machine, and VPP300 a vector one. The result of the parallelization on SP is that it enables to obtain the 13.7 times higher performance with 34CPUs. On VPP300 its performance is enhanced up to 34.6 times by both of the vectorization and parallelization with 12CPUs. STEM2 is a numerical model which is characterized by the detailed chemical processes including the concentration of primary and secondary pollutants and dry and wet depositions during long-range transport. This report shows the parallelization and vectorization method for STEM2 Code and their performance on SP and VPP300. (author)

  5. Near-surface salinity stratification following rainfall using the Aquarius Rain Impact Model (RIM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Maria; Jones, Linwood; Asher, Bill; Drushka, Kyla; Santos-Garcia, Andrea; Scavuzzo, Marcelo

    2017-04-01

    Rainfall freshens the near-surface ocean, producing a vertical salinity profile that is fresher at the surface than at a depth of a few meters. As a result, there is a discrepancy between sea surface salinity (SSS) measured by satellites (which sample only the top few centimeters of the ocean surface) and salinity measured by in situ platforms (e.g., Argo floats, drifters, and moorings) that typically sample at a 1-5 m depth. Therefore, accurate comparisons between satellite and in-situ salinities in rainy conditions requires knowledge of how the upper ocean responds to rainfall. At moderate wind speeds in the absence of rain, the ocean upper layer (i.e. from the surface to a depth of 5 m) is well-mixed and SSS is constant as a function of depth. However, under rainy conditions the near-surface salinity is diluted by the freshwater input from rain. This fresher water is mixed downward by turbulent diffusion through gravity waves and the wind stress. These processes create a salinity gradient in the upper 1-2 m of the ocean, which dissipates over a few hours until the upper layer becomes well mixed at a slightly fresher salinity value. As part of the Aquarius/SAC-D mission, a rain impact model (RIM) was developed to estimate the change in SSS due to precipitation near the time of the satellite observation. RIM uses ocean surface salinities from HYCOM (Hybrid Coordinate Ocean Model), which does not include the short-term rain effects, and the NOAA global rainfall product CMORPH to model transient changes in the near-surface salinity profile in 0.5 h time increments. The mechanical mixing of the ocean caused by wind and waves rapidly reduces the salinity stratification caused by rain. The persistence of rain-induced salinity gradients has been shown to depend on wind speed, with rain freshening during weak winds (less than 2 m/s) persisting for 8 hours or more. The original RIM assumes a constant vertical diffusivity, which neglects the effect of wind speed on the

  6. Methods for measuring bird-mediated seed rain: Insights from a Hawaiian mesic forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Eli; Stewart, Meredith; Brinkman, Andrew; Paxton, Eben H.; Yelenik, Stephanie G.

    2017-01-01

    Amount and diversity of bird-dispersed seed rain play important roles in determining forest composition, yet neither is easy to quantify. The complex ecological processes that influence seed movement make the best approach highly context specific. Although recent advances in seed rain theory emphasize quantifying source-specific seed shadows, many ecological questions can be addressed u sing a less mechanistic approach that requires fewer assumptions. Using seed rain rates from 0.38 m2 hoop traps sampled twice monthly over the course of a year, we show that number of traps required to identify changes in seed rain varies across seed species and forest type. Detecting a 50% increase in amount of seed rain required from 65 to >300 traps, while detecting a 200% increase generally required ≤⃒50 traps. Trap size and ecological context dictate the number of seeds found in each trap, but the coefficient of variation (CV) across traps in a given ecological context can help inform future studies about number of traps needed to detect change. To better understand factors influencing variation around estimates of seed rain, we simulated both clustered and evenly distributed patterns of fecal deposition using three different levels of seed aggregation (number of seeds in each fecal deposit). When patterns of fecal deposition were clustered, rather than evenly dispersed across the study area, they required >1.5 times the number of traps to identify a 100% increase in seed rain. Similarly, we found that low seed aggregation required >1.5 times the number of traps to detect a 100% change than when aggregation was medium or high. At low aggregations, fewer seed rain traps contained seeds (low, 33 ± 5%; medium, 23 ± 4%; high, 24 ± 5%), resulting in more variation across traps than medium and high aggregations. We also illustrate the importance of training observers to discern between morphologically similar seeds from different species and provide resources to help identify

  7. Global Warming Induced Changes in Rainfall Characteristics in IPCC AR5 Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, William K. M.; Wu, Jenny, H.-T.; Kim, Kyu-Myong

    2012-01-01

    Changes in rainfall characteristic induced by global warming are examined from outputs of IPCC AR5 models. Different scenarios of climate warming including a high emissions scenario (RCP 8.5), a medium mitigation scenario (RCP 4.5), and 1% per year CO2 increase are compared to 20th century simulations (historical). Results show that even though the spatial distribution of monthly rainfall anomalies vary greatly among models, the ensemble mean from a sizable sample (about 10) of AR5 models show a robust signal attributable to GHG warming featuring a shift in the global rainfall probability distribution function (PDF) with significant increase (>100%) in very heavy rain, reduction (10-20% ) in moderate rain and increase in light to very light rains. Changes in extreme rainfall as a function of seasons and latitudes are also examined, and are similar to the non-seasonal stratified data, but with more specific spatial dependence. These results are consistent from TRMM and GPCP rainfall observations suggesting that extreme rainfall events are occurring more frequently with wet areas getting wetter and dry-area-getting drier in a GHG induced warmer climate.

  8. Irrigation enhances local warming with greater nocturnal warming effects than daytime cooling effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xing; Jeong, Su-Jong

    2018-02-01

    To meet the growing demand for food, land is being managed to be more productive using agricultural intensification practices, such as the use of irrigation. Understanding the specific environmental impacts of irrigation is a critical part of using it as a sustainable way to provide food security. However, our knowledge of irrigation effects on climate is still limited to daytime effects. This is a critical issue to define the effects of irrigation on warming related to greenhouse gases (GHGs). This study shows that irrigation led to an increasing temperature (0.002 °C year‑1) by enhancing nighttime warming (0.009 °C year‑1) more than daytime cooling (‑0.007 °C year‑1) during the dry season from 1961–2004 over the North China Plain (NCP), which is one of largest irrigated areas in the world. By implementing irrigation processes in regional climate model simulations, the consistent warming effect of irrigation on nighttime temperatures over the NCP was shown to match observations. The intensive nocturnal warming is attributed to energy storage in the wetter soil during the daytime, which contributed to the nighttime surface warming. Our results suggest that irrigation could locally amplify the warming related to GHGs, and this effect should be taken into account in future climate change projections.

  9. Simulations of ice pellets and freezing rain using an explicit parameterization of the bulk liquid fraction of ice particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cholette, Melissa; Thériault, Julie M.; Milbrandt, Jason A.; Morrison, Hugh

    2017-04-01

    During the cold season, storms can often be associated with the favorable vertical temperature structure for the formation of several winter precipitation types, such as snow, wet snow, freezing rain, ice pellets and rain. The types of precipitation reaching the surface depend on the degree of melting and re-freezing of particles as they fall through the atmosphere. For example, when a warm layer is overlaying a refreezing layer, ice particles can melt partially or completely in the warm layer to produce either ice pellets, freezing rain or a combination of the two at the surface. In this study, an explicit prognostic liquid fraction is implemented in a bulk microphysical scheme to predict freezing rain and ice pellets, and to evaluate their interactions with the environmental conditions. The approach is to modify the Predicted Particle Properties (P3) microphysics scheme by adding a prognostic variable for the liquid water mass-mixing ratio of the solid precipitation category in order to predict its bulk liquid fraction. This predicted liquid fraction is the key variable to differentiate the surface precipitation type occurring when temperatures are near 0°C. First, using a one-dimensional cloud model, it will be shown that the explicit simulation of mixed-phase particles improves the representation of the surface precipitation types with respect to the original scheme. Second, the impact of the partial melting of ice will be studied by simulating the 1998 Ice Storm over eastern North America using a full 3D mesoscale model. Overall, the prediction of the bulk liquid fraction allows a more accurate differentiation of surface winter precipitation types, which contributes to improve their forecasts.

  10. Combined acid rain and lanthanum pollution and its potential ecological risk for nitrogen assimilation in soybean seedling roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fan; Cheng, Mengzhu; Sun, Zhaoguo; Wang, Lihong; Zhou, Qing; Huang, Xiaohua

    2017-12-01

    Rare earth elements (REEs) are used in various fields, resulting in their accumulation in the environment. This accumulation has affected the survival and distribution of crops in various ways. Acid rain is a serious global environmental problem. The combined effects on crops from these two types of pollution have been reported, but the effects on crop root nitrogen assimilation are rarely known. To explore the impact of combined contamination from these two pollutants on crop nitrogen assimilation, the soybean seedlings were treated with simulated environmental pollution from acid rain and a representative rare earth ion, lanthanum ion (La3+), then the indexes related to plant nitrogen assimilation process in roots were determined. The results showed that combined treatment with pH 4.5 acid rain and 0.08 mM La3+ promoted nitrogen assimilation synergistically, while the other combined treatments all showed inhibitory effects. Moreover, acid rain aggravated the inhibitory effect of 1.20 or 0.40 mM La3+ on nitrogen assimilation in soybean seedling roots. Thus, the effects of acid rain and La3+ on crops depended on the combination levels of acid rain intensity and La3+ concentration. Acid rain increases the bioavailability of La3+, and the combined effects of these two pollutants were more serious than that of either pollutant alone. These results provide new evidence in favor of limiting overuse of REEs in agriculture. This work also provides a new framework for ecological risk assessment of combined acid rain and REEs pollution on soybean crops. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Recent Rapid Regional Climate Warming on the Antarctic Peninsula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, D. G.; Marshall, G. J.; Connolley, W. M.; Parkinson, C.; Mulvaney, R.; Hodgson, D. A.; King, J. C.; Pudsey, C. J.; Turner, J.

    2002-12-01

    The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) confirmed that global warming was 0.6 ñ 0.2 degrees C during the 20th Century and cited increases in greenhouse gases as a likely contributor. But this average conceals the complexity of observed climate change, which is seasonally biased, decadally variable and geographically patchy. In particular, over the last 50 years three high-latitude areas have undergone recent rapid regional (RRR) warming ? substantially more rapid than the global mean. We discuss the spatial and temporal significance of RRR warming in one area, the Antarctic Peninsula. New analyses of station records show no ubiquitous polar amplification of global warming but significant RRR warming on the Antarctic Peninsula. We investigate the likelihood that this could be amplification of a global warming, and use climate-proxy data to indicate that this RRR warming on the Antarctic Peninsula is unprecedented over the last two millennia and unlikely to be a natural mode of variability. We can show a strong connection between RRR warming and reduced sea-ice duration in an area on the west of the Antarctic Peninsula, but here we cannot yet distinguish cause and effect. Thus for the present we cannot determine which process causes the RRR warming, and until the mechanism initiating and sustaining it is understood, and is convincingly reproduced in climate models, we lack a sound basis for predicting climate change in this region over the coming century.

  12. Perturbations in warm inflation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Oliveira, H. P.; Joras, S. E.

    2001-09-15

    Warm inflation is an interesting possibility to describe the early universe, whose basic feature is the absence, at least in principle, of a preheating or reheating phase. Here we analyze the dynamics of warm inflation generalizing the usual slow-roll parameters that are useful for characterizing the inflationary phase. We study the evolution of entropy and adiabatic perturbations, where the main result is that for a very small amount of dissipation the entropy perturbations can be neglected and the purely adiabatic perturbations will be responsible for the primordial spectrum of inhomogeneities. Taking into account the Cosmic Background Explorer Differential Microwave Radiometer data of the cosmic microwave background anisotropy as well as the fact that the interval of inflation for which the scales of astrophysical interest cross outside the Hubble radius is about 50 e-folds before the end of inflation, we could estimate the magnitude of the dissipation term. It is also possible to show that at the end of inflation the universe is hot enough to provide a smooth transition to the radiation era.

  13. Estimation of Trends in Distributions of One-Minute Rain Rates Over the UK to Assess Impacts on Telecommunications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellerby, Tim; Ranatunga, Channa; Paulson, Kevin

    2014-05-01

    It is known that the rain rate exceeded 0.01% of the time has experienced an increasing trend, in the UK, over the last twenty years. It is very likely that rain fade and outage experience a similar trend. This paper presents a method, applicably globally, to estimate these trends. The input data are parameters easily extracted from numerical weather prediction reanalysis data. The method is verified using rain gauge data from the UK. Dynamic fading due to rain and wet snow tends to be larger than that due to other mechanisms on terrestrial and Earth-space links at frequencies above approximately 5 GHz. The International Telecommunication Union (ITU-R) maintains a set of models for predicting average annual distributions of rain fade, with a one-minute integration time, on individual links. An important parameter in these models of rain fade is the one-minute rain rate exceeded for 0.01% of an average year (R0.01%). Several recent reports have suggested that trends in climate parameters could be having significant effect on telecommunications systems over their lifetime. A satellite communications system has a typical life-cycle of 30 years, from initial conception to decommissioning. The objective of this work is to develop a method to estimate trends in the R0.01% rain rate, globally, using readily accessible data. A relationship is postulated between very low resolution rain parameters from Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) reanalysis data and the one-minute averaged, point rain rates required for radio regulation, and the optimization of network spectral efficiency and performance. Trends in these parameters can then be linked to trends in one-minute rain rates. The transformation of reanalysis parameters to one-minute rain rate CCDF parameters has been optimized to provide the best fit to the 743 experimental CCDF statistics, acquired from over the 139 locations, archived in the database of the ITU-R Study Group 3: DBSG3. Inherent in this process is the

  14. Snowmelt and rain in a marginal snowpack watershed: Amount and duration of water input controls runoff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, S. P.; Rock, N.

    2013-12-01

    Snowmelt predictably delivers a concentrated pulse of water to watersheds, and therefore structures ecosystems and human water management. The deep irrigation from snowmelt also delivers water effectively to the base of the critical zone in water-limited climates, and hence controls the advance of the weathering front. Changes in snowmelt therefore stand as a prominent concern for the impacts of future climate warming. We use a headwater watershed in the Colorado Front Range to explore the impacts of varying delivery of rain and snow on runoff. Gordon Gulch, a 2.7 km2 forested watershed at 2650 m elevation in the Colorado Front Range, is drained by a small first order stream. A snowpack builds on north-facing slopes, while snow comes and goes on south-facing slopes. In water years 2010-2012, total precipitation ranged from 480 to 560 mm. Total runoff, which ranged from 55 to 102 mm, does not correlate with annual precipitation. Over half of the total annual discharge occurs in a period of a few weeks each year; in two of the study years, peak discharge occurred in spring following snowmelt. In one year, peak discharge was entirely rain driven. In 2010 and 2011, discharge peaked during late spring (May) storms after the snow pack melted. The highest annual runoff, and longest duration high discharge period, occurred in water year 2010. In that year, ablation of most of a ~70 cm snowpack (on N-facing slopes; S facing slopes were bare) was followed by a 25 day stormy period in which ~130 mm of mixed rain and snow fell. Two discharge maxima occurred in response to precipitation events during this wet, post-snowpack period. In total, discharge remained high for ~6 weeks. In water year 2011, a smaller snowpack (max. ~30 cm), and drier spring produced a much more compact high runoff season of ~2 weeks. Although water year 2011 had ~10% more total precipitation, it produced 30% less runoff than water year 2010. A greater proportion of the 2011 precipitation fell in summer

  15. Multiple scattering of electromagnetic waves by rain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsolakis, A.; Stutzman, W. L.

    1982-01-01

    As the operating frequencies of communications systems move higher into the millimeter wave region, the effects of multiple scattering in precipitation media become more significant. In this paper, general formulations are presented for single, first-order multiple, and complete multiple scattering. Included specifically are distributions of particle size, shape, and orientation angle, as well as variation in the medium density along the direction of wave propagation. Calculations are performed for rain. It is shown that the effects of higher-order scattering are not noticeable in either attenuation or channel isolation on a dual-polarized system until frequencies of about 30 GHz are reached. The complete multiple-scattering formulation presented gives accurate results at high millimeter wave frequencies as well as including realistic medium parameter distributions. Furthermore, it is numerically efficient.

  16. The critical slope angle for orographic rain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breidenthal, R. E.; Zagar, N.

    2013-12-01

    Krishnamurti has shown that orographic rain depends on the slope of the windward terrain rather than just the total elevation gain. A simple physical model is proposed to account for the effect of slope. Based on the inhibiting effect of vortex (rotational) acceleration on entrainment, a critical slope angle is derived. If the rate of orographic lifting is sufficiently large, the enhanced buoyancy from latent heat release increases the acceleration parameter. As a consequence, the entrainment rate of under-saturated air is reduced. The critical slope corresponds to the situation where the rate of condensation in a rising adiabatic parcel just equals the rate of evaporation due to the entrainment of under-saturated air. The model is also applied to the trigger conditions for towering cumulus in general.

  17. The critical slope for orographic rain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breidenthal, Robert; Zagar, Nedjeljka

    2013-11-01

    Krishnamurti has shown that orographic rain depends on the slope of the windward terrain rather than just the total elevation gain. A simple physical model is proposed to account for the effect of slope. Based on the inhibiting effect of vortex (rotational) acceleration on entrainment, a critical slope angle is derived. If the rate of orographic lifting is sufficiently large, the enhanced buoyancy from latent heat release increases the acceleration parameter. As a consequence, the entrainment rate of under-saturated air is reduced. The critical slope corresponds to the situation where the rate of condensation in a rising adiabatic parcel just equals the rate of evaporation due to the entrainment of under-saturated air. The model is also applied to the trigger conditions for towering cumulus in general.

  18. I-Ching of acid rain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huber, P.

    The yin/yang of I Chin philosophy can describe the acid/alkali balance and the development of acid rain concerns. The author describes the science of sulfur; the chemistry, transport, and ecological impacts as it moves from coal mine to ocean. He then addresses the regulatory options for reducing sulfur emissions or mitigating their environmental impacts at various stages of the coal-sulfur cycle. He sees no fair conclusion because the scientific community is still unwilling to reach a consensus on the widespread ecological risks and because cost-benefit balancing is neither neutral nor objective. If we conclude that a new regulatory initiative is in order, we should recognize that there are better and worse ways of implementing it. Long-term solutions lie in the aggressive promotion of cleaner coal and noncoal technologies. 3 references, 4 figures.

  19. Monitoring of rain water storage in forests with satellite radar

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, JJM; Klaassen, W; Kuiper, PJC

    The sensitivity of radar backscatter to the amount of intercepted rain in temperate deciduous forests is analyzed to determine the feasibility of retrieval of this parameter from satellite radar data. A backscatter model is validated with X-band radar measurements of a single tree exposed to rain. A

  20. Acid Rain in Niger Delta Region: Implication on Water Resources ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This research focused on the effect of acid rain on the water quality of the Niger Delta region of Nigeria. Three hundred water samples were collected: 100 water samples from rain, 100 from open wells and 100 from rivers. The water samples were analysed using the paired t-test and multiple correlation analysis to ascertain ...

  1. Sources of sulphur in rain collected below a wheat canopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raybould, C.C.; Unsworth, M.H.; Gregory, P.J.

    1977-05-12

    The quantity of sulfur in rain collected below a maturing wheat canopy was measured. The measurement and calculations show that leaching of plant sulfur by rain was the main source of additional sulfur in throughfall and that most sulfur dry-deposited on leaf surfaces remained fixed there.

  2. Stable isotope ratios of rain and vapor in 1995 hurricanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, James Robert; Gedzelman, Stanley David; Zhang, Xiaoping; Arnold, Robert

    1998-05-01

    Isotope ratios of rain and vapor samples collected at the surface from four tropical cyclones during the active 1995 Atlantic hurricane season were determined. A two-dimensional bulk microphysics isotope model was applied to steady symmetric tropical cyclones to explain the observed low mean values and inward decrease of isotope ratios of the rain and vapor. The low mean value is caused by the tropical cyclone's relatively large size, longevity, and deep clouds. The inward decrease is due to diffusive isotope exchange between falling rain and converging vapor in the atmospheric boundary layer. Dean, a minimal tropical storm, produced relatively high isotope ratios because of its small size and youth. Rains from the extreme outer edge of Felix, a category 3 hurricane, exhibited high isotope ratios similar to normal summer rain. Isotope ratios of rains and vapors from Hurricane Luis in Puerto Rico decreased as the storm approached. Isotope ratios of rain exhibited an abrupt jump from low values in the eastern half of Puerto Rico to high values farther west which is linked to the storm's rainbands. Isotope ratios of Hurricane Opal's rains reflected the storm's asymmetric structure, with lowest values west of the point of landfall. Record low isotope ratios from a squall line that struck eastern Texas two days before landfall are linked to low-level outflow from Opal and demonstrate that hurricanes can vent enormous quantities of vapor to the surroundings.

  3. Surface sealing and hydraulic conductances under varying-intensity rains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giménez, D.; Dirksen, C.; Miedema, R.; Eppink, L.A.A.J.; Schoonderbeek, D.

    1992-01-01

    In the past, investigations on surface seals developing under simulated rains usually were performed with uniform rainfall intensities. Recent studies, however, showed that varying-intensity rains affect erosion and volumes of runoff. We conducted a study on surface sealing under varying-intensity

  4. 40 CFR 75.3 - General Acid Rain Program provisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false General Acid Rain Program provisions. 75.3 Section 75.3 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTINUOUS EMISSION MONITORING General § 75.3 General Acid Rain Program provisions. The...

  5. Elementary Acid Rain Kit, Interdisciplinary, Grades 4-8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubbs, Harriett S.; And Others

    An interdisciplinary approach for teaching about acid rain is offered in this curriculum guide for teachers of grades 4-8. Skill and concept areas of science, math, social studies, art, and the language arts are developed in 12 activities which focus on the acid rain problems. A matrix of the activities and subject areas indicates the coverage…

  6. Mechanics of interrill erosion with wind-driven rain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erpul, G.; Gabriels, D.; Norton, L.D.; Flanagan, D.C.; Huang, C.; Visser, S.M.

    2013-01-01

    The vector physics of wind-driven rain (WDR) differs from that of wind-free rain, and the interrill soil detachment equations in the Water Erosion Prediction Project (WEPP) model were not originally developed to deal with this phenomenon. This article provides an evaluation of the performance of the

  7. Mechanics of interrill erosion with wind-driven rain

    Science.gov (United States)

    The vector physics of wind-driven rain (WDR) differs from that of wind-free rain, and the interrill soil detachment equations in the Water Erosion Prediction Project (WEPP) model were not originally developed to deal with this phenomenon. This article provides an evaluation of the performance of the...

  8. Activity of earthworm in Latosol under simulated acid rain stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia-En Zhang; Jiayu Yu; Ying Ouyang

    2015-01-01

    Acid rain is still an issue of environmental concerns. This study investigated the impacts of simulated acid rain (SAR) upon earthworm activity from the Latosol (acidic red soil). Laboratory experiment was performed by leaching the soil columns grown with earthworms (Eisenia fetida) at the SAR pH levels ranged from 2.0 to 6.5 over a 34-day period....

  9. A deep X-ray view of the bare AGN Ark 120. IV. XMM-Newton and NuSTAR spectra dominated by two temperature (warm, hot) Comptonization processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porquet, D.; Reeves, J. N.; Matt, G.; Marinucci, A.; Nardini, E.; Braito, V.; Lobban, A.; Ballantyne, D. R.; Boggs, S. E.; Christensen, F. E.; Dauser, T.; Farrah, D.; Garcia, J.; Hailey, C. J.; Harrison, F.; Stern, D.; Tortosa, A.; Ursini, F.; Zhang, W. W.

    2018-01-01

    Context. The physical characteristics of the material closest to supermassive black holes (SMBHs) are primarily studied through X-ray observations. However, the origins of the main X-ray components such as the soft X-ray excess, the Fe Kα line complex, and the hard X-ray excess are still hotly debated. This is particularly problematic for active galactic nuclei (AGN) showing a significant intrinsic absorption, either warm or neutral, which can severely distort the observed continuum. Therefore, AGN with no (or very weak) intrinsic absorption along the line of sight, so-called "bare AGN", are the best targets to directly probe matter very close to the SMBH. Aims: We perform an X-ray spectral analysis of the brightest and cleanest bare AGN known so far, Ark 120, in order to determine the process(es) at work in the vicinity of the SMBH. Methods: We present spectral analyses of data from an extensive campaign observing Ark 120 in X-rays with XMM-Newton (4 × 120 ks, 2014 March 18-24), and NuSTAR (65.5 ks, 2014 March 22). Results: During this very deep X-ray campaign, the source was caught in a high-flux state similar to the earlier 2003 XMM-Newton observation, and about twice as bright as the lower-flux observation in 2013. The spectral analysis confirms the "softer when brighter" behavior of Ark 120. The four XMM-Newton/pn spectra are characterized by the presence of a prominent soft X-ray excess and a significant Fe Kα complex. The continuum is very similar above about 3 keV, while significant variability is present for the soft X-ray excess. We find that relativistic reflection from a constant-density, flat accretion disk cannot simultaneously produce the soft excess, broad Fe Kα complex, and hard X-ray excess. Instead, Comptonization reproduces the broadband (0.3-79 keV) continuum well, together with a contribution from a mildly relativistic disk reflection spectrum. Conclusions: During this 2014 observational campaign, the soft X-ray spectrum of Ark 120 below 0

  10. Warm-adapted microbial communities enhance their carbon-use efficiency in warmed soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousk, Johannes; Frey, Serita

    2017-04-01

    Ecosystem models predict that climate warming will stimulate microbial decomposition of soil carbon (C), resulting in a positive feedback to increasing temperatures. The current generation of models assume that the temperature sensitivities of microbial processes do not respond to warming. However, recent studies have suggested that the ability of microbial communities to adapt to warming can lead both strengthened and weakened feedbacks. A further complication is that the balance between microbial C used for growth to that used for respiration - the microbial carbon-use efficiency (CUE) - also has been shown through both modelling and empirical study to respond to warming. In our study, we set out to assess how chronic warming (+5°C over ambient during 9 years) of a temperate hardwood forest floor (Harvard Forest LTER, USA) affected temperature sensitivities of microbial processes in soil. To do this, we first determined the temperature relationships for bacterial growth, fungal growth, and respiration in plots exposed to warmed or ambient conditions. Secondly, we parametrised the established temperature functions microbial growth and respiration with plot-specific measured soil temperature data at a hourly time-resolution over the course of 3 years to estimate the real-time variation of in situ microbial C production and respiration. To estimate the microbial CUE, we also divided the microbial C production with the sum of microbial C production and respiration as a proxy for substrate use. We found that warm-adapted bacterial and fungal communities both shifted their temperature relationships to grow at higher rates in warm conditions which coincided with reduced rates at cool conditions. As such, their optimal temperature (Topt), minimum temperature (Tmin) and temperature sensitivity (Q10) were all increased. The temperature relationship for temperature, in contrast, was only marginally shifted in the same direction, but at a much smaller effect size, with

  11. Influence of Simulated Acid Rain Corrosion on the Uniaxial Tensile Mechanical Properties of Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-zi Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available An experimental study on the uniaxial tensile property of concrete exposed to the acid rain environment was carried out. Acid rain with pH level of 1.0 was deposed by the mixture of sulfate and nitric acid solution in the laboratory. Dumbbell-shaped concrete specimens were immersed in the simulated acid rain completely. After being exposed to the deposed mixture for a certain period, uniaxial tensile test was performed on the concrete specimens. The results indicate that elastic modulus, tensile strength, and peak strain have a slight increase at the initial corrosion stage, and with the extension of corrosion process, elastic modulus and tensile strength decrease gradually, while the peak strain still increases. It is found that the compressive strength is more sensitive than the tensile strength in aggressive environment. Based on the experimental results, an equation was proposed to describe the ascending branch of the stress-strain curve of the concrete corroded by acid rain.

  12. Hurricane Imaging Radiometer Wind Speed and Rain Rate Retrievals during the 2010 GRIP Flight Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahawneh, Saleem; Farrar, Spencer; Johnson, James; Jones, W. Linwood; Roberts, Jason; Biswas, Sayak; Cecil, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Microwave remote sensing observations of hurricanes, from NOAA and USAF hurricane surveillance aircraft, provide vital data for hurricane research and operations, for forecasting the intensity and track of tropical storms. The current operational standard for hurricane wind speed and rain rate measurements is the Stepped Frequency Microwave Radiometer (SFMR), which is a nadir viewing passive microwave airborne remote sensor. The Hurricane Imaging Radiometer, HIRAD, will extend the nadir viewing SFMR capability to provide wide swath images of wind speed and rain rate, while flying on a high altitude aircraft. HIRAD was first flown in the Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes, GRIP, NASA hurricane field experiment in 2010. This paper reports on geophysical retrieval results and provides hurricane images from GRIP flights. An overview of the HIRAD instrument and the radiative transfer theory based, wind speed/rain rate retrieval algorithm is included. Results are presented for hurricane wind speed and rain rate for Earl and Karl, with comparison to collocated SFMR retrievals and WP3D Fuselage Radar images for validation purposes.

  13. Daytime warming has stronger negative effects on soil nematodes than night-time warming

    OpenAIRE

    Xiumin Yan; Kehong Wang; Lihong Song; Xuefeng Wang; Donghui Wu

    2017-01-01

    Warming of the climate system is unequivocal, that is, stronger warming during night-time than during daytime. Here we focus on how soil nematodes respond to the current asymmetric warming. A field infrared heating experiment was performed in the western of the Songnen Plain, Northeast China. Three warming modes, i.e. daytime warming, night-time warming and diurnal warming, were taken to perform the asymmetric warming condition. Our results showed that the daytime and diurnal warming treatmen...

  14. Use of emulsion for warm mix asphalt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahabir Panda

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Due to increase in energy costs and emission problems in hot mix asphalt usually used, it brought a great interest to the researchers to develop the warm mix technology for pavement constructions. Commonly known as warm mix asphalt (WMA, it is a typical method in the bituminous paving technology, which allows production and placement of bituminous mixes at lower temperatures than that used for hot mix asphalt (HMA. The WMA involves an environmental friendly production process that utilises organic additives, chemical additives and water based technologies. The organic and chemical additives are normally very costly and still involve certain amount of environmental issues. These factors motivated the authors to take up this technology using simple, environment friendly and somewhat cost effective procedure. In this study, an attempt has been made to prepare warm mixes by first pre-coating the aggregates with medium setting bitumen emulsion (MS and then mixing the semi-coated aggregates with VG 30 bitumen at a lower temperature than normally required. After a number of trials it was observed that mostly three mixing temperatures, namely temperatures 110 °C, 120 °C and 130 °C were appropriate to form the bituminous mixes with satisfactory homogeneity and consistency and as such were maintained throughout this study. Marshall samples for paving mixes were prepared using this procedure for dense bituminous macadam (DBM gradings as per the specifications of Ministry of Road Transport and Highways (MORTH and subsequently Marshall properties of the resultant mixes were studied with the main objective of deciding the different parameters that were considered for development of appropriate warm mix asphalt. In this study it has been observed that out of three mixing temperatures tried, the mixes prepared at 120 °C with bitumen-emulsion composition of 80B:20E for DBM warm mix, offer highest Marshall stability and highest indirect tensile strength

  15. Changes in winter warming events in the Nordic Arctic Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vikhamar-Schuler, Dagrun; Isaksen, Ketil; Haugen, Jan Erik; Bjerke, Jarle Werner; Tømmervik, Hans

    2015-04-01

    In recent years winter warming events are frequently reported from Arctic areas. Extraordinarily warm weather episodes, occasionally combined with intense rainfall, cause severe ecological disturbance and great challenges for Arctic infrastructure. For example, the formation of ground ice due to winter rain or melting prevents reindeer from grazing, leads to vegetation browning, and impacts soil temperatures. The infrastructure may be affected by avalanches and floods resulting from intense snowmelt. The aim of our analysis is to study changes in warm spells during winter in the Nordic Arctic Region, here defined as the regions in Norway, Sweden and Finland north of the Arctic circle (66.5°N), including the Arctic islands Svalbard and Jan Mayen. Within this study area we have selected the longest available high quality observation series with daily temperature and precipitation. For studying future climate we use available regionally downscaled scenarios. We analyse three time periods: 1) the past 50-100 years, 2) the present (last 15 years, 2000-2014) and 3) the future (next 50-100 years). We define an extended winter season (October-April) and further divide it into three subseasons: 1) Early winter (October and November), 2) Mid-winter (December, January and February) and 3) Late-winter (March and April). We identify warm spells using two different classification criteria: a) days with temperature above 0°C (the melting temperature); and b) days with temperature in excess of the 90th percentile of the 1985-2014 temperature for each subseason. Both wet and dry warm spells are analysed. We compare the results for the mainland stations (maritime and inland stations) with the Arctic islands. All stations have very high frequency of warm weather events in the period 1930-1940s and for the last 15 years (2000-2014). For the most recent period the largest increase in number of warm spells are observed at the northernmost stations. We also find a continuation of this

  16. Local warming: daily temperature change influences belief in global warming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ye; Johnson, Eric J; Zaval, Lisa

    2011-04-01

    Although people are quite aware of global warming, their beliefs about it may be malleable; specifically, their beliefs may be constructed in response to questions about global warming. Beliefs may reflect irrelevant but salient information, such as the current day's temperature. This replacement of a more complex, less easily accessed judgment with a simple, more accessible one is known as attribute substitution. In three studies, we asked residents of the United States and Australia to report their opinions about global warming and whether the temperature on the day of the study was warmer or cooler than usual. Respondents who thought that day was warmer than usual believed more in and had greater concern about global warming than did respondents who thought that day was colder than usual. They also donated more money to a global-warming charity if they thought that day seemed warmer than usual. We used instrumental variable regression to rule out some alternative explanations.

  17. Heavy rain and strong wind events and cyclones in the Balearics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Campins

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between heavy rain (HR and/or strong wind (SW events and cyclones is investigated for the Balearic Islands. First, a list of HR and SW events is cross-referenced with an objective cyclone database for a 9-year period (from June 1995 to May 2004. The presence of a cyclone centre close to the Balearics is looked for each event. For HR events in most of the cases a cyclone centre is located in the vicinity. Furthermore, cyclones are located in such a way that allow the supply of warm and wet air to the affected area. But for SW events, although in the majority of cases a cyclone centre is detected, cyclones are located farther than for HR events and their geographical location is more widespread. Afterwards, the three-dimensional structure of cyclones related to HR and/or SW events is studied in detail.

  18. Heavy rain and strong wind events and cyclones in the Balearics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campins, J.; Jansà, A.; Genovés, A.

    2006-01-01

    The relationship between heavy rain (HR) and/or strong wind (SW) events and cyclones is investigated for the Balearic Islands. First, a list of HR and SW events is cross-referenced with an objective cyclone database for a 9-year period (from June 1995 to May 2004). The presence of a cyclone centre close to the Balearics is looked for each event. For HR events in most of the cases a cyclone centre is located in the vicinity. Furthermore, cyclones are located in such a way that allow the supply of warm and wet air to the affected area. But for SW events, although in the majority of cases a cyclone centre is detected, cyclones are located farther than for HR events and their geographical location is more widespread. Afterwards, the three-dimensional structure of cyclones related to HR and/or SW events is studied in detail.

  19. Water isotope tracers of tropical hydroclimate in a warming world

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konecky, B. L.; Noone, D.; Nusbaumer, J. M.; Cobb, K. M.; Di Nezio, P. N.; Otto-Bliesner, B. L.

    2016-12-01

    The tropical water cycle is projected to undergo substantial changes under a warming climate, but direct meteorological observations to contextualize these changes are rare prior to the 20th century. Stable oxygen and hydrogen isotope ratios (δ18O, δD) of environmental waters preserved in geologic archives are increasingly being used to reconstruct terrestrial rainfall over many decades to millions of years. However, a rising number of new, modern-day observations and model simulations have challenged previous interpretations of these isotopic signatures. This presentation systematically evaluates the three main influences on the δ18O and δD of modern precipitation - rainfall amount, cloud type, and moisture transport - from terrestrial stations throughout the tropics, and uses this interpretive framework to understand past changes in terrestrial tropical rainfall. Results indicate that cloud type and moisture transport have a larger influence on modern δ18O and δD of tropical precipitation than previously believed, indicating that isotope records track changes in cloud characteristics and circulation that accompany warmer and cooler climate states. We use our framework to investigate isotopic records of the land-based tropical rain belt during the Last Glacial Maximum, the period of warming following the Little Ice Age, and the 21st century. Proxy and observational data are compared with water isotope-enabled simulations with the Community Earth System Model in order to discuss how global warming and cooling may influence tropical terrestrial hydroclimate.

  20. Committed warming inferred from observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauritsen, Thorsten; Pincus, Robert

    2017-09-01

    Due to the lifetime of CO2, the thermal inertia of the oceans, and the temporary impacts of short-lived aerosols and reactive greenhouse gases, the Earth’s climate is not equilibrated with anthropogenic forcing. As a result, even if fossil-fuel emissions were to suddenly cease, some level of committed warming is expected due to past emissions as studied previously using climate models. Here, we provide an observational-based quantification of this committed warming using the instrument record of global-mean warming, recently improved estimates of Earth’s energy imbalance, and estimates of radiative forcing from the Fifth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Compared with pre-industrial levels, we find a committed warming of 1.5 K (0.9-3.6, 5th-95th percentile) at equilibrium, and of 1.3 K (0.9-2.3) within this century. However, when assuming that ocean carbon uptake cancels remnant greenhouse gas-induced warming on centennial timescales, committed warming is reduced to 1.1 K (0.7-1.8). In the latter case there is a 13% risk that committed warming already exceeds the 1.5 K target set in Paris. Regular updates of these observationally constrained committed warming estimates, although simplistic, can provide transparent guidance as uncertainty regarding transient climate sensitivity inevitably narrows and the understanding of the limitations of the framework is advanced.

  1. Modelling the embedded rainfall process using tipping bucket data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyregod, Peter; Arnbjerg-Nielsen, Karsten; Madsen, Henrik

    1998-01-01

    A new method for modelling the dynamics of rain measurement processes is suggested. The method takes the discrete nature and autocorrelation of measurements from the tipping bucket rain gauge into consideration. The considered model is a state space model with a Poisson marginal distribution....... In the model there is only one parameter, a thinning parameter. The model is tested on 39 rain events. The estimated value for the various rain events is reflecting a subjective classification of rain events into frontal and convective rain. Finally, it is demonstrated how the model can be used for simulation...

  2. Real-Time Rain Rate Evaluation via Satellite Downlink Signal Attenuation Measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannetti, Filippo; Reggiannini, Ruggero; Moretti, Marco; Adirosi, Elisa; Baldini, Luca; Facheris, Luca; Antonini, Andrea; Melani, Samantha; Bacci, Giacomo; Petrolino, Antonio; Vaccaro, Attilio

    2017-08-12

    We present the NEFOCAST project (named by the contraction of "Nefele", which is the Italian spelling for the mythological cloud nymph Nephele, and "forecast"), funded by the Tuscany Region, about the feasibility of a system for the detection and monitoring of precipitation fields over the regional territory based on the use of a widespread network of new-generation Eutelsat "SmartLNB" (smart low-noise block converter) domestic terminals. Though primarily intended for interactive satellite services, these devices can also be used as weather sensors, as they have the capability of measuring the rain-induced attenuation incurred by the downlink signal and relaying it on an auxiliary return channel. We illustrate the NEFOCAST system architecture, consisting of the network of ground sensor terminals, the space segment, and the service center, which has the task of processing the information relayed by the terminals for generating rain field maps. We discuss a few methods that allow the conversion of a rain attenuation measurement into an instantaneous rainfall rate. Specifically, we discuss an exponential model relating the specific rain attenuation to the rainfall rate, whose coefficients were obtained from extensive experimental data. The above model permits the inferring of the rainfall rate from the total signal attenuation provided by the SmartLNB and from the link geometry knowledge. Some preliminary results obtained from a SmartLNB installed in Pisa are presented and compared with the output of a conventional tipping bucket rain gauge. It is shown that the NEFOCAST sensor is able to track the fast-varying rainfall rate accurately with no delay, as opposed to a conventional gauge.

  3. Pyrite oxidation under simulated acid rain weathering conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Kai; Li, Heping; Wang, Luying; Wen, Xiaoying; Liu, Qingyou

    2017-07-31

    We investigated the electrochemical corrosion behavior of pyrite in simulated acid rain with different acidities and at different temperatures. The cyclic voltammetry, polarization curve, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy results showed that pyrite has the same electrochemical interaction mechanism under different simulated acid rain conditions, regardless of acidity or environmental temperature. Either stronger acid rain acidity or higher environmental temperature can accelerate pyrite corrosion. Compared with acid rain having a pH of 5.6 at 25 °C, the prompt efficiency of pyrite weathering reached 104.29% as the acid rain pH decreased to 3.6, and it reached 125.31% as environmental temperature increased to 45 °C. Increasing acidity dramatically decreases the charge transfer resistance, and increasing temperature dramatically decreases the passivation film resistance, when other conditions are held constant. Acid rain always causes lower acidity mine drainage, and stronger acidity or high environmental temperatures cause serious acid drainage. The natural parameters of latitude, elevation, and season have considerable influence on pyrite weathering, because temperature is an important influencing factor. These experimental results are of direct significance for the assessment and management of sulfide mineral acid drainage in regions receiving acid rain.

  4. Seagrass ecophysiological performance under ocean warming and acidification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repolho, Tiago; Duarte, Bernardo; Dionísio, Gisela; Paula, José Ricardo; Lopes, Ana R; Rosa, Inês C; Grilo, Tiago F; Caçador, Isabel; Calado, Ricardo; Rosa, Rui

    2017-02-01

    Seagrasses play an essential ecological role within coastal habitats and their worldwide population decline has been linked to different types of anthropogenic forces. We investigated, for the first time, the combined effects of future ocean warming and acidification on fundamental biological processes of Zostera noltii, including shoot density, leaf coloration, photophysiology (electron transport rate, ETR; maximum PSII quantum yield, Fv/Fm) and photosynthetic pigments. Shoot density was severely affected under warming conditions, with a concomitant increase in the frequency of brownish colored leaves (seagrass die-off). Warming was responsible for a significant decrease in ETR and Fv/Fm (particularly under control pH conditions), while promoting the highest ETR variability (among experimental treatments). Warming also elicited a significant increase in pheophytin and carotenoid levels, alongside an increase in carotenoid/chlorophyll ratio and De-Epoxidation State (DES). Acidification significantly affected photosynthetic pigments content (antheraxanthin, β-carotene, violaxanthin and zeaxanthin), with a significant decrease being recorded under the warming scenario. No significant interaction between ocean acidification and warming was observed. Our findings suggest that future ocean warming will be a foremost determinant stressor influencing Z. noltii survival and physiological performance. Additionally, acidification conditions to occur in the future will be unable to counteract deleterious effects posed by ocean warming.

  5. ACID RAIN - A PROBLEM OF THE PRESENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rozelinda Čož-Rakovac

    1995-03-01

    Full Text Available Acid rains is one of the most relevant problems of the human environment, the result being pollution of the atmosphere caused by ever growing industrial development. It is caused by the freeing of sulphuric oxides and oxygen, which along with certain chemical reactions transfer into sulphate and nitrate, and through wet or dry sediments reach the ground. This has an effect on lakes, rivers, the entire animal and plant kingdom, including all the good creations of mankind. Over a longer time period acid destroy organisms which live in the water of some freshwater ecosystems, depending on local geological characteristics (presence of natural neutralizers of acid in the ground which makes an area more of less sensitive to acidity. Investigators have determined that the activity of H+ on organisms which live in the water depend differently on species and concentrations of acidity. For many species the problems begin already with pH ≤ 6, and only a few resistant species survive at pH ≤ 4.7. Acidity changes chemical and biochemical tissue composition, decreases the osmoregulation, influences the level of hormones in the blood, has an effect on fish smoltification, and interrupts its reproduction. Acidifying sensitive water ecosystems in the Northern hemisphere corresponds with the increase of acid precipitation. To prevent this problem from spreading even more it is necessary to solve it as soon as possible, either by controlling the release of pollutants into the atmosphere, or improving of the already occurring consequences.

  6. Effect of simulated acid rain on vegetation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferenbaugh, R.W.

    1974-01-01

    Experiments were performed to determine the effects of simulated acid rain on Chenopodium quinoa, Hordeum vulgare and Phaseolus vulgaris. Detailed experiments were conducted only on Phaseolus vulgaris. Sulfuric acid solutions covering a pH range of 1.5 to 3.5 were used. Gross morphological effects noted at lower pH values included failure to attain normal height, necrosis and wrinkling of leaves, excessive and adventitious budding, and premature abscission of primary leaves. Histological effects included smaller cell size, a decreased amount of intercellular space, hypertrophied nuclei and nucleoli, and a reduction in the size of starch granules within the chloroplasts. Dry weight remained an approximately constant percentage of fresh weight, and chlorophyll analyses showed that both chlorophyll concentration and ratio of chlorophyll to chlorophyll also remained constant. Respirometer studies showed that respiration rate increased slightly and photosynthetic rate increased dramatically. Quantitative analyses indicated that carbohydrate content was reduced at low pH values. Root biomass was also reduced. Application of Congo red indicator solution to the acid treated tissue showed that it was being acidified to a pH of below 4. Experiments involving aspiration of control tissue in acid solutions suggest that the increase in photosynthetic rate and the decreases in carbohydrate content and root biomass were caused by an uncoupling of photophosphorylation of adenosine diphosphate. Uncoupling was probably caused by hydrogen ion interference with proton pumps associated with the electron transport chain in the light reactions of photosynthesis. 128 references. (MDF)

  7. Heavy rainfall in Mediterranean cyclones: Contribution of deep convection and warm conveyor belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flaounas, Emmanouil; Kotroni, Vassiliki; Lagouvardos, Konstantinos; Gray, Suzanne; Rysman, Jean-Francois; Claud, Chantal

    2017-04-01

    In this study, we provide an insight to the role of deep convection (DC) and the warm conveyor belt (WCB) as leading processes to Mediterranean cyclones heavy rainfall. To this end, we use reanalysis data, lighting and satellite observations in order to quantify the relative contribution of DC and the WCB to cyclones rainfall, as well as to analyse these processes spatial and temporal variability respect to the cyclones centre and life cycle. Results show that the relationship between cyclone rainfall and intensity shows high variability and demonstrates that even intense cyclones may produce low rainfall amounts. However, when considering rainfall averages for cyclone intensity bins, a linear relationship was found. We focus on the 500 most intense tracked cyclones (responsible for about 40-50% of the total Mediterranean rainfall) and distinguish between the ones producing high and low rainfall amounts. DC and the WCB are found to be the main cause of rainfall for the former (producing up to 70% of cyclone rainfall), while, for the latter, DC and WCB play a secondary role (producing up to 40% of rainfall). Further analysis showed that DC and WCB are rather distinct processes, being rarely collocated. In fact, rainfall due to DC tends to occur close to the cyclones' centre and to their eastern sides, while WCB tends to produce rainfall towards the northeast. Finally, DC was found to be able to produce higher rain rates than WCBs. Our results demonstrate in a climatological framework the relationship between cyclones intensity and processes that lead to heavy rainfall, one of the most prominent environmental risks in the Mediterranean. Therefore, we set perspectives for a deeper analysis of the favourable atmospheric conditions that provoke high impact weather. Our study has been performed in the context of the project: Cyclone processes leading to extreme rainfall in the Mediterranean region (ExMeCy; Marie Skłodowska-Curie actions, grant agreement-658997)

  8. Recent warming of lake Kivu.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsev, Sergei; Aaberg, Arthur A; Crowe, Sean A; Hecky, Robert E

    2014-01-01

    Lake Kivu in East Africa has gained notoriety for its prodigious amounts of dissolved methane and dangers of limnic eruption. Being meromictic, it is also expected to accumulate heat due to rising regional air temperatures. To investigate the warming trend and distinguish between atmospheric and geothermal heating sources, we compiled historical temperature data, performed measurements with logging instruments, and simulated heat propagation. We also performed isotopic analyses of water from the lake's main basin and isolated Kabuno Bay. The results reveal that the lake surface is warming at the rate of 0.12°C per decade, which matches the warming rates in other East African lakes. Temperatures increase throughout the entire water column. Though warming is strongest near the surface, warming rates in the deep waters cannot be accounted for solely by propagation of atmospheric heat at presently assumed rates of vertical mixing. Unless the transport rates are significantly higher than presently believed, this indicates significant contributions from subterranean heat sources. Temperature time series in the deep monimolimnion suggest evidence of convection. The progressive deepening of the depth of temperature minimum in the water column is expected to accelerate the warming in deeper waters. The warming trend, however, is unlikely to strongly affect the physical stability of the lake, which depends primarily on salinity gradient.

  9. Recent warming of lake Kivu.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergei Katsev

    Full Text Available Lake Kivu in East Africa has gained notoriety for its prodigious amounts of dissolved methane and dangers of limnic eruption. Being meromictic, it is also expected to accumulate heat due to rising regional air temperatures. To investigate the warming trend and distinguish between atmospheric and geothermal heating sources, we compiled historical temperature data, performed measurements with logging instruments, and simulated heat propagation. We also performed isotopic analyses of water from the lake's main basin and isolated Kabuno Bay. The results reveal that the lake surface is warming at the rate of 0.12°C per decade, which matches the warming rates in other East African lakes. Temperatures increase throughout the entire water column. Though warming is strongest near the surface, warming rates in the deep waters cannot be accounted for solely by propagation of atmospheric heat at presently assumed rates of vertical mixing. Unless the transport rates are significantly higher than presently believed, this indicates significant contributions from subterranean heat sources. Temperature time series in the deep monimolimnion suggest evidence of convection. The progressive deepening of the depth of temperature minimum in the water column is expected to accelerate the warming in deeper waters. The warming trend, however, is unlikely to strongly affect the physical stability of the lake, which depends primarily on salinity gradient.

  10. The northward shift of Meiyu rain belt and its possible association with rainfall intensity changes and the Pacific-Japan pattern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Qingjiu; Sun, Yuting; You, Qinglong

    2016-12-01

    The meridional location change of Meiyu rain belt and its relationship with the rainfall intensity and circulation background changes for the period 1958-2009 are examined using daily rainfall datasets from 756 stations in China, the 6-h ERA-Interim reanalyses, CRU monthly temperature and daily outgoing long-wave radiation (OLR) data from the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The results indicate that the Meiyu rain belt experienced a northward shift in the late 1990s in response to global warming. Moreover, the intensity of interannual and day-to-day variability of rainfall within Meiyu period has been increasing in the warming climate. The amplification of the variability within Meiyu period over the northern Yangtze-Huai River Valley (YHRV) is much larger than that of the southern YHRV. The large difference in the trends of variance within the Meiyu period between these two regions induces a spatial varying for different rainfall categories in terms of intensity. More significant positive trends in heavy and extreme heavy rainfall occur over northern YHRV compared with southern YHRV, which is a crucial indicator of changes in the rain band, despite the observation of an increase in heavy and very heavy rain events and a decrease in weak events throughout the entire YHRV. A composite of the atmospheric circulation indicates that intense northward horizontal transport and the convergence of water vapor fluxes are the immediate causes of the rain band shift. Besides, through forcing a northward extended convection over the tropics, the Pacific-Japan (P-J) pattern induces a northward expansion of western Pacific Subtropical High, leading to intensified convergence and enhanced rainfall over Northern YHRV.

  11. NOS CO-OPS Meteorological Data, Rain Fall, 6-Minute

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset has Rain Fall data from NOAA NOS Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and Services (CO-OPS). WARNING: These preliminary data have not been...

  12. Acid rain impacts on calcium nutrition and forest health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donald H. DeHayes; Paul G. Schaberg; Gary J. Hawley; G. Richard Strimbeck

    1999-01-01

    Forest ecosystems throughout the world are exposed to acid rain, a complex solution consisting largely of H+, SO42-, NH4+, and NO3- pollutant ions derived from sulfur and nitrogen oxides. Although the public in...

  13. Reliability and quality of water isotope data collected with a low-budget rain collector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prechsl, Ulrich E; Gilgen, Anna K; Kahmen, Ansgar; Buchmann, Nina

    2014-04-30

    Low-budget rain collectors for water isotope analysis, such as the 'ball-in-funnel type collector' (BiFC), are widely used in studies on stable water isotopes of rain. To date, however, an experimental quality assessment of such devices in relation to climatic factors does not exist. We used Cavity Ring-Down Spectrometry (CRDS) to quantify the effects of evaporation on the δ(18)O values of reference water under controlled conditions as a function of the elapsed time between rainfall and collection for isotope analysis, the sample volume and the relative humidity (RH: 31% and 67%; 25 °C). The climate chamber conditions were chosen to reflect the warm and dry end of field conditions that favor evaporative enrichment (EE). We also tested the performance of the BiFC in the field, and compared our δ(2)H/δ(18)O data obtained by isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) with those from the Swiss National Network for the Observation of Isotopes in the Water Cycle (ISOT). The EE increased with time, with a 1‰ increase in the δ(18)O values after 10 days (RH: 25%; 25 °C; 35 mL (corresponding to a 5 mm rain event); p <0.001). The sample volume strongly affected the EE (max. value +1.5‰ for 7 mL samples (i.e., 1 mm rain events) after 72 h at 31% and 67% RH; p <0.001), whereas the relative humidity had no significant effect. Using the BiFC in the field, we obtained very tight relationships of the δ(2)H/δ(18)O values (r(2) ≥ 0.95) for three sites along an elevational gradient, not significantly different from that of the next ISOT station. Since the chosen experimental conditions were extreme compared with the field conditions, it was concluded that the BiFC is a highly reliable and inexpensive collector of rainwater for isotope analysis. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Amplified Arctic warming by phytoplankton under greenhouse warming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jong-Yeon; Kug, Jong-Seong; Bader, Jürgen; Rolph, Rebecca; Kwon, Minho

    2015-05-12

    Phytoplankton have attracted increasing attention in climate science due to their impacts on climate systems. A new generation of climate models can now provide estimates of future climate change, considering the biological feedbacks through the development of the coupled physical-ecosystem model. Here we present the geophysical impact of phytoplankton, which is often overlooked in future climate projections. A suite of future warming experiments using a fully coupled ocean-atmosphere model that interacts with a marine ecosystem model reveals that the future phytoplankton change influenced by greenhouse warming can amplify Arctic surface warming considerably. The warming-induced sea ice melting and the corresponding increase in shortwave radiation penetrating into the ocean both result in a longer phytoplankton growing season in the Arctic. In turn, the increase in Arctic phytoplankton warms the ocean surface layer through direct biological heating, triggering additional positive feedbacks in the Arctic, and consequently intensifying the Arctic warming further. Our results establish the presence of marine phytoplankton as an important potential driver of the future Arctic climate changes.

  15. Results of Dynamic Calibration of Tipping-Bucket Rain Gauges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvicera, V.; Grabner, M.

    2009-04-01

    Experimental research in the Department of Frequency Engineering in the Czech Metrology Institute (CMI) in Prague, the Czech Republic, is focused on stability of received signal on terrestrial radio and optical paths. Rain can cause serious attenuation of electromagnetic waves in the frequency bands over 10 GHz. Therefore, our experimental research is also focused on our own meteorological measurement in the vicinity of experimental radio and optical paths. The heated tipping-bucket raingauge MR3H manufactured by Meteoservis, the Czech Republic, with the collector area of 500 cm2 and the rain amount per tip of 0.1 mm is used at CMI for the measurement of rainfall intensities. The time of tips is recorded with uncertainty of 0.1 second. The obtained time of tips are stored by PC and recorded on CD-ROM. It is generally known higher rainfall intensities measured by tipping-bucket rain gauges are underestimated. Therefore, after static calibration the tipping-bucket rain gauge was dynamically calibrated by water flowmeters. The Brooks FLOMEGA Flow Meters models 5882 and 3750 were used for the rain gauge calibration in the range from 2.6 mm/h to 530 mm/h. The used method of dynamic calibration of raingauges and our experience obtained will be described. The dependence of the measured rain intensity on the reference rain intensity (calibration curve) will be presented. Both the results obtained and the influence of dynamic calibration on our results concerning attenuation of electromagnetic waves due to rain will be discussed. Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports of the Czech Republic under the Project No. OC09076 supported the described work.

  16. Rain forest provides pollinating beetles for atemoya crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanche, Rosalind; Cunningham, Saul A

    2005-08-01

    Small beetles, usually species of Nitidulidae, are the natural pollinators of atemoya (Annona squamosa L. x A. cherimola Mill. hybrids; custard apple) flowers but commercial atemoya growers often need to carry out labor-intensive hand pollination to produce enough high-quality fruit. Because Australian rain forest has plant species in the same family as atemoya (Annonaceae) and because many rain forest plants are beetle pollinated, we set out to discover whether tropical rain forest in far north Queensland harbors beetles that could provide this ecosystem service for atemoya crops. Orchards were chosen along a gradient of increasing distance from tropical rain forest (0.1-24 km). We sampled 100 flowers from each of nine atemoya orchards and determined the identity and abundance of insects within each flower. To assess the amount of pollination due to insects, we bagged six flowers per tree and left another six flowers per tree accessible to insects on 10 trees at an orchard near rain forest. Results indicated that atemoya orchards < or = 0.5 km from rain forest were predominantly visited by five previously unrecognized native beetle pollinators that are likely to originate in tropical rain forest. These native beetles occurred reliably enough in crops near rain forest to have a positive effect on the quantity of fruit produced but their contribution was not great enough to satisfy commercial production needs. Management changes, aimed at increasing native beetle abundance in crops, are required before these beetles could eliminate the need for growers to hand pollinate atemoya flowers. Appreciation of the value of this resource is necessary if we are to develop landscapes that both conserve native biodiversity and support agricultural production.

  17. Dimethyl sulfide in the Amazon rain forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jardine, K.; Yañez-Serrano, A. M.; Williams, J.; Kunert, N.; Jardine, A.; Taylor, T.; Abrell, L.; Artaxo, P.; Guenther, A.; Hewitt, C. N.; House, E.; Florentino, A. P.; Manzi, A.; Higuchi, N.; Kesselmeier, J.; Behrendt, T.; Veres, P. R.; Derstroff, B.; Fuentes, J. D.; Martin, S. T.; Andreae, M. O.

    2015-01-01

    Surface-to-atmosphere emissions of dimethyl sulfide (DMS) may impact global climate through the formation of gaseous sulfuric acid, which can yield secondary sulfate aerosols and contribute to new particle formation. While oceans are generally considered the dominant sources of DMS, a shortage of ecosystem observations prevents an accurate analysis of terrestrial DMS sources. Using mass spectrometry, we quantified ambient DMS mixing ratios within and above a primary rainforest ecosystem in the central Amazon Basin in real-time (2010-2011) and at high vertical resolution (2013-2014). Elevated but highly variable DMS mixing ratios were observed within the canopy, showing clear evidence of a net ecosystem source to the atmosphere during both day and night in both the dry and wet seasons. Periods of high DMS mixing ratios lasting up to 8 h (up to 160 parts per trillion (ppt)) often occurred within the canopy and near the surface during many evenings and nights. Daytime gradients showed mixing ratios (up to 80 ppt) peaking near the top of the canopy as well as near the ground following a rain event. The spatial and temporal distribution of DMS suggests that ambient levels and their potential climatic impacts are dominated by local soil and plant emissions. A soil source was confirmed by measurements of DMS emission fluxes from Amazon soils as a function of temperature and soil moisture. Furthermore, light- and temperature-dependent DMS emissions were measured from seven tropical tree species. Our study has important implications for understanding terrestrial DMS sources and their role in coupled land-atmosphere climate feedbacks.

  18. Efficient inhibition of heavy metal release from mine tailings against acid rain exposure by triethylenetetramine intercalated montmorillonite (TETA-Mt).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Beini; Wu, Pingxiao; Huang, Zhujian; Li, Yuanyuan; Yang, Shanshan; Dang, Zhi; Ruan, Bo; Kang, Chunxi

    2016-11-15

    The potential application of triethylenetetramine intercalated montmorillonite (TETA-Mt) in mine tailings treatment and AMD (acid mine drainage) remediation was investigated with batch experiments. The structural and morphological characteristics of TETA-Mt were analyzed with XRD, FTIR, DTG-TG and SEM. The inhibition efficiencies of TETA-Mt against heavy metal release from mine tailings when exposed to acid rain leaching was examined and compared with that of triethylenetetramine (TETA) and Mt. Results showed that the overall inhibition by TETA-Mt surpassed that by TETA or Mt for various heavy metal ions over an acid rain pH range of 3-5.6 and a temperature range of 25-40°C. When mine tailings were exposed to acid rain of pH 4.8 (the average rain pH of the mining site where the mine tailings were from), TETA-Mt achieved an inhibition efficiency of over 90% for Cu(2+), Zn(2+), Cd(2+) and Mn(2+) release, and 70% for Pb(2+) at 25°C. It was shown that TETA-Mt has a strong buffering capacity. Moreover, TETA-Mt was able to adsorb heavy metal ions and the adsorption process was fast, suggesting that coordination was mainly responsible. These results showed the potential of TETA-Mt in AMD mitigation, especially in acid rain affected mining area. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Rain, Rain, Go Away, Come Again Another Day. Weather Preferences of Summer Tourists in Mountain Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Steiger

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Weather and climate are important factors for travel decision-making and overall tourist satisfaction. As central motivators for destination choice, they directly and indirectly influence demand patterns and can be a resource and limitation for tourism at the same time. In this paper, results of an in-situ survey of mountain summer tourists (n = 733 in the Alps in Southern Germany are presented. Respondents rated ‘rain’ as the most important aspect of weather during their holiday. During a 7-day holiday, 2.1 days of continuous rain are accepted, and 3.1 days of days with thunderstorms. The ideal temperature range is between 21 and 25 °C, thus lying 4–7 degrees lower than for beach tourism. Temperatures below 15 °C and above 30 °C are perceived as unacceptable. Statistically significant differences were found for several tourist types: Older tourists are more sensitive to heat, tourists with sports activities are more tolerant to cool temperatures, first-time visitors are more sensitive to rain and families with children prefer higher temperatures. From the results, some implications for mountain destinations arise: mountain destinations could be promoted as a heat refuge, and attracting sports tourists might be a promising way to reduce weather sensitivity; however, some variety of well-promoted weather independent attractions seems to be mandatory.

  20. Short-term exposure to warm microhabitats could explain amphibian persistence with Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua H Daskin

    Full Text Available Environmental conditions can alter the outcomes of symbiotic interactions. Many amphibian species have declined due to chytridiomycosis, caused by the pathogenic fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd, but many others persist despite high Bd infection prevalence. This indicates that Bd's virulence is lower, or it may even be a commensal, in some hosts. In the Australian Wet Tropics, chytridiomycosis extirpated Litoria nannotis from high-elevation rain forests in the early 1990 s. Although the species is recolonizing many sites, no population has fully recovered. Litoria lorica disappeared from all known sites in the early 1990 s and was thought globally extinct, but a new population was discovered in 2008, in an upland dry forest habitat it shares with L. nannotis. All frogs of both species observed during three population censuses were apparently healthy, but most carried Bd. Frogs perch on sun-warmed rocks in dry forest streams, possibly keeping Bd infections below the lethal threshold attained in cooler rain forests. We tested whether short-term elevated temperatures can hamper Bd growth in vitro over one generation (four days. Simulating the temperatures available to frogs on strongly and moderately warmed rocks in dry forests, by incubating cultures at 33°C for one hour daily, reduced Bd growth below that of Bd held at 15°C constantly (representing rain forest habitats. Even small decreases in the exponential growth rate of Bd on hosts may contribute to the survival of frogs in dry forests.

  1. Snow occurrence changes over the central and eastern United States under future warming scenarios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Liang; Bradley, Raymond S

    2015-11-20

    Changes of snow occurrence across the central and eastern United States under future warming for the late 21(st) century are investigated by applying an empirical hyperbolic tangent function to both observed and downscaled high spatial resolution (~12.5 km) daily temperature and precipitation, to compare the historical (1981-2000) and future (2081-2100) snow occurrence. The observed distributions of snow frequency show that snow-rain transition zones are mainly zonally distributed, since they are largely determined by temperature, with slight shifts to the south over the Appalachian Mountains. The snow-rain transition zone is located around 38-46°N for November and March, and 32-42°N for winter months (DJF). These observed patterns are reproduced well for the historical period by an ensemble average of multiple general circulation models (GCMs). The probabilistic projections show that the snow-rain transition zone will shift to the north under the background of global warming at magnitudes of 2-6 °C, indicating that large areas will experience a partial, or even a very large, loss of snow occurrence in the future. The northward shifts are about 2° latitude under the representative concentration pathways 4.5 (RCP4.5) scenario and 4° latitude under the RCP8.5 scenario. The percentages of the area losing snow occurrence are also assessed.

  2. On validation of the rain climatic zone designations for Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obiyemi, O. O.; Ibiyemi, T. S.; Ojo, J. S.

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, validation of rain climatic zone classifications for Nigeria is presented based on global radio-climatic models by the International Telecommunication Union-Radiocommunication (ITU-R) and Crane. Rain rate estimates deduced from several ground-based measurements and those earlier estimated from the precipitation index on the Tropical Rain Measurement Mission (TRMM) were employed for the validation exercise. Although earlier classifications indicated that Nigeria falls into zones P, Q, N, and K for the ITU-R designations, and zones E and H for Crane's climatic zone designations, the results however confirmed that the rain climatic zones across Nigeria can only be classified into four, namely P, Q, M, and N for the ITU-R designations, while the designations by Crane exhibited only three zones, namely E, G, and H. The ITU-R classification was found to be more suitable for planning microwave and millimeter wave links across Nigeria. The research outcomes are vital in boosting the confidence level of system designers in using the ITU-R designations as presented in the map developed for the rain zone designations for estimating the attenuation induced by rain along satellite and terrestrial microwave links over Nigeria.

  3. Antagonism between elevated CO2, nighttime warming, and summer drought reduces the robustness of PSII performance to freezing events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albert, Kristian Rost; Boesgaard, Kristine Stove; Ro-Poulsen, Helge

    2013-01-01

    out in the CLIMAITE multifactor experiment, which includes the combined impact of elevated CO2 (free air carbon enrichment; CO2), warming (passive nighttime warming; T) and summer drought (rain-excluding curtains; D) in a temperate heath ecosystem. PSII performance was probed by the effective quantum...... in the wavy hair-grass, Deschampsia flexuosa, and in the evergreen dwarf shrub common heather, Calluna vulgaris, and following freezing events the PItotal and Fv′/Fm′ were reduced even more. Contrary to expected, indirect effects of the previous summer drought reduced PSII performance before freezing events......, particularly in Calluna. In combinations with elevated CO2 interactive effects with drought, D×CO2 and warming, T×D×CO2, were negatively skewed and caused the reduction of PSII performance in both species after occurrence of freezing events. Neither passive nighttime warming nor elevated CO2 as single factors...

  4. Global warming and coral reefs

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Wafar, M.V.M.

    Ever increasing global warming trend is predicted to cause within the next 100 years an accelerated sea level rise, increase in sea surface temparature and enhanced ultraviolet radiation to a significant enough extent to affect drastically...

  5. Arctic dimension of global warming

    OpenAIRE

    G. V. Alekseev

    2014-01-01

    A brief assessment of the global warming in the Arctic climate system with the emphasis on sea ice is presented. The Arctic region is coupled to the global climate system by the atmosphere and ocean circulation that providesa major contribution to the Arctic energy budget. On this basis using of special indices it is shown that amplification of warming in the Arctic is associated with the increasing of meridional heat transport from the low latitudes.

  6. Acid Rain. Activities for Grades 4 to 12. A Teacher's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, David; Bryant, Jeannette

    This teacher's guide on acid rain is divided into three study areas to explain: (1) what causes acid rain; (2) what problems acid rain has created; and (3) what teachers and students can do to help combat acid rain. Instructions for activities within the study areas include suggested grade levels, objectives, materials needed, and directions for…

  7. Acid Rain: A Teacher's Guide. Activities for Grades 4 to 12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Wildlife Federation, Washington, DC.

    This guide on acid rain for elementary and secondary students is divided into three study areas: (1) What Causes Acid Rain; (2) What Problems Acid Rain Has Created; (3) How You and Your Students Can Help Combat Acid Rain. Each section presents background information and a series of lessons pertaining to the section topic. Activities include…

  8. 40 CFR 72.31 - Information requirements for Acid Rain permit applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Information requirements for Acid Rain... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) PERMITS REGULATION Acid Rain Permit Applications § 72.31 Information requirements for Acid Rain permit applications. A complete Acid Rain permit application shall include the...

  9. 40 CFR 72.69 - Issuance and effective date of acid rain permits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) PERMITS REGULATION Federal Acid Rain Permit Issuance Procedures § 72.69 Issuance and effective date of acid rain permits. (a) After the close of the public comment period, the Administrator will issue or deny an Acid Rain permit. The Administrator will serve a copy of any Acid Rain...

  10. Media narratives of global warming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meisner, M. [Syracuse Univ., Syracuse, NY (United States)

    2000-06-01

    The way in which the North American print media are representing global warming was the focus of this paper. It was suggested that the way in which the media presents the issue and proposed responses to it, will influence how the public and decision-makers perceive and respond to the problem. This paper also presented examples demonstrating how nature and humanity's relationship to nature are being presented and what types of responses to global warming are being presented. The issue of who is responsible for acting to prevent or mitigate climate change was also discussed. It was shown that media narratives of global warming are not just stories of scientists debating the existence of global warming, but that they now largely accept global warming as a reality. However, the media continue to construct the problem in narrow technical, economic and anthropocentric terms. Mass media interpretation of global warming offer up a limited selection of problem definitions, reasons for acting and ways of addressing the problem. It was cautioned that this approach will likely promote futility, denial and apathy on the part of the public. 21 refs.

  11. A new mechanism for warm-season precipitation response to global warming based on convection-permitting simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Aiguo; Rasmussen, Roy M.; Liu, Changhai; Ikeda, Kyoko; Prein, Andreas F.

    2017-08-01

    Climate models project increasing precipitation intensity but decreasing frequency as greenhouse gases increase. However, the exact mechanism for the frequency decrease remains unclear. Here we investigate this by analyzing hourly data from regional climate change simulations with 4 km grid spacing covering most of North America using the Weather Research and Forecasting model. The model was forced with present and future boundary conditions, with the latter being derived by adding the CMIP5 19-model ensemble mean changes to the ERA-interim reanalysis. The model reproduces well the observed seasonal and spatial variations in precipitation frequency and histograms, and the dry interval between rain events over the contiguous US. Results show that overall precipitation frequency indeed decreases during the warm season mainly due to fewer light-moderate precipitation (0.1 10 mm/h) events increase. Dry spells become longer and more frequent, together with a reduction in time-mean relative humidity (RH) in the lower troposphere during the warm season. The increased dry hours and decreased RH lead to a reduction in overall precipitation frequency and also for light-moderate precipitation events, while water vapor-induced increases in precipitation intensity and the positive latent heating feedback in intense storms may be responsible for the large increase in intense precipitation. The size of intense storms increases while their number decreases in the future climate, which helps explain the increase in local frequency of heavy precipitation. The results generally support a new hypothesis for future warm-season precipitation: each rainstorm removes ≥7% more moisture from the air per 1 K local warming, and surface evaporation and moisture advection take slightly longer than currently to replenish the depleted moisture before the next storm forms, leading to longer dry spells and a reduction in precipitation frequency, as well as decreases in time-mean RH and vertical

  12. Evaluation of Cloud-resolving and Limited Area Model Intercomparison Simulations using TWP-ICE Observations. Part 2: Rain Microphysics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varble, Adam; Zipser, Edward J.; Fridlind, Ann; Zhu, Ping; Ackerman, Andrew; Chaboureau, Jean-Pierre; Fan, Jiwen; Hill, Adrian; Shipway, Ben; Williams, Christopher R.

    2014-12-27

    Ten 3D cloud-resolving model (CRM) simulations and four 3D limited area model (LAM) simulations of an intense mesoscale convective system observed on January 23-24, 2006 during the Tropical Warm Pool – International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) are compared with each other and with observations and retrievals from a scanning polarimetric radar, co-located UHF and VHF vertical profilers, and a Joss-Waldvogel disdrometer in an attempt to explain published results showing a low bias in simulated stratiform rainfall. Despite different forcing methodologies, similar precipitation microphysics errors appear in CRMs and LAMs with differences that depend on the details of the bulk microphysics scheme used. One-moment schemes produce too many small raindrops, which biases Doppler velocities low, but produces rain water contents (RWCs) that are similar to observed. Two-moment rain schemes with a gamma shape parameter (μ) of 0 produce excessive size sorting, which leads to larger Doppler velocities than those produced in one-moment schemes, but lower RWCs than observed. Two moment schemes also produce a convective median volume diameter distribution that is too broad relative to observations and thus, may have issues balancing raindrop formation, collision coalescence, and raindrop breakup. Assuming a μ of 2.5 rather than 0 for the raindrop size distribution improves one-moment scheme biases, and allowing μ to have values greater than 0 may improve two-moment schemes. Under-predicted stratiform rain rates are associated with under-predicted ice water contents at the melting level rather than excessive rain evaporation, in turn likely associated with convective detrainment that is too high in the troposphere and mesoscale circulations that are too weak. In addition to stronger convective updrafts than observed, limited domain size prevents a large, well-developed stratiform region from developing in CRMs, while a dry bias in ECMWF analyses does the same to the LAMs.

  13. Chemical composition of dew and rain in an extreme desert (Negev): Cobbles serve as sink for nutrients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidron, Giora J.; Starinsky, Avraham

    2012-02-01

    SummaryDew is important source of water in the Negev Desert, yet little is known about the chemical composition of dew and consequently about its possible role in supplying nutrients to the ecosystem. Dew was collected in Sede Boqer (SB) in the central Negev Highlands and in Nizzana (NIZ) in the western Negev Desert ( P = 95 mm) during the fall of 1992 and analyzed for their main ion constituents. In addition, rain was also collected and analyzed. Dew composition was mainly of the Ca-SO 4 type and showed high total dissolved ions (TDIs) ranging between 88 and 758 mg/l, which decreased with an increase in dew precipitation. Contrarily, it increased with time since the previous dew event indicating that dissolution of dust particles may have a substantial contribution to the chemical composition of dew. When the ion concentration of dew per millimeter was compared to that of rain, all ions showed a substantial enrichment, of 1.5-7.7. High dew to rain ratios characterized the terrestrial ions and especially the major nutrients N (5.4-6.1), K (3.9-7.6), and P (3.5). When the annual contribution of dew nutrients was calculated for SB, total potential contribution was 2.5, 1.4 and 3.0 times that of rain for N, P, and K, respectively, albeit its low annual amount (˜38 mm). The findings highlight the role of substrates subjected to enhanced condensation such as cobbles and stones, implying that they may serve as sink for nutrients, and may provide an additional explanation for the relatively high plant cover and high species composition in the Negev Highlands. It also implies that a possible decrease in dew precipitation due to global warming may also result in nutrient depletion and subsequently in a reduction in plant cover.

  14. Trees and light : tree development and morphology in relation to light availability in a tropical rain forest in French Guiana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sterck, F.J.

    1997-01-01

    Tropical rain forest trees spend their life in a heterogeneous light environment. During their life history, they may change their growth in relation to different levels of light availability. Some of their physiological processes (e.g. photosynthesis, carbon allocation, and meristern

  15. Formation and evolution of coronal rain observed by SDO/AIA on February 22, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vashalomidze, Z.; Kukhianidze, V.; Zaqarashvili, T. V.; Oliver, R.; Shergelashvili, B.; Ramishvili, G.; Poedts, S.; De Causmaecker, P.

    2015-05-01

    Context. The formation and dynamics of coronal rain are currently not fully understood. Coronal rain is the fall of cool and dense blobs formed by thermal instability in the solar corona towards the solar surface with acceleration smaller than gravitational free fall. Aims: We aim to study the observational evidence of the formation of coronal rain and to trace the detailed dynamics of individual blobs. Methods: We used time series of the 171 Å and 304 Å spectral lines obtained by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamic Observatory (SDO) above active region AR 11420 on February 22, 2012. Results: Observations show that a coronal loop disappeared in the 171 Å channel and appeared in the 304 Å line more than one hour later, which indicates a rapid cooling of the coronal loop from 1 MK to 0.05 MK. An energy estimation shows that the radiation is higher than the heat input, which indicates so-called catastrophic cooling. The cooling was accompanied by the formation of coronal rain in the form of falling cold plasma. We studied two different sequences of falling blobs. The first sequence includes three different blobs. The mean velocities of the blobs were estimated to be 50 km s-1, 60 km s-1 and 40 km s-1. A polynomial fit shows the different values of the acceleration for different blobs, which are lower than free-fall in the solar corona. The first and second blob move along the same path, but with and without acceleration, respectively. We performed simple numerical simulations for two consecutive blobs, which show that the second blob moves in a medium that is modified by the passage of the first blob. Therefore, the second blob has a relatively high speed and no acceleration, as is shown by observations. The second sequence includes two different blobs with mean velocities of 100 km s-1 and 90 km s-1, respectively. Conclusions: The formation of coronal rain blobs is connected with the process of catastrophic cooling. The different

  16. Coping With Global Warming

    OpenAIRE

    Jan-Erik Lane

    2015-01-01

    The process of globalization that has framed developments in the societies on Planet Earth the last decades will be supplanted by the climate change process, which no country can evade. It amounts to a set of giant forces shaping the environment, the economies and the politics of the world. It is somehow believed that the process of change can be controlled by halting the increase in greenhouse gases so that average global temperature would only augment by 2 degrees. This is a dire illusion, ...

  17. Introduction of prognostic rain in ECHAM5: design and Single Column Model simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Posselt, R.; Lohmann, U.

    2007-01-01

    International audience; Prognostic equations for the rain mass mixing ratio and the rain drop number concentration are introduced into the large-scale cloud microphysics parameterization of the ECHAM5 general circulation model (ECHAM5-PROG). To this end, a rain flux from one level to the next with the appropriate fall speed is introduced. This maintains rain water in the atmosphere to be available for the next time step. Rain formation in ECHAM5-PROG is, therefore, less dependent on the autoc...

  18. Effects of simulated rain acidified with sulfuric acid on host-parasite interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    D. S. Shriner

    1976-01-01

    Wind-blown rain, rain splash, and films of free moisture play important roles in the epidemiology of many plant diseases. The effects of simulated rain acidified with sulfuric acid were studied on several host-parasite systems. Plants were exposed, in greenhouse or field, to simulated rain of pH 3.2 ? 0.1 or pH 6.0 ? 0.2. Simulated "rain" of pH 3.2 resulted...

  19. Polar Rain Gradients and Field-Aligned Polar Cap Potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairfield, D. H.; Wing, S.; Newell, P. T.; Ruohoniemi, J. M.; Gosling, J. T.; Skoug, R. M.

    2008-01-01

    ACE SWEPAM measurements of solar wind field-aligned electrons have been compared with simultaneous measurements of polar rain electrons precipitating over the polar cap and detected by DMSP spacecraft. Such comparisons allow investigation of cross-polarcap gradients in the intensity of otherwise-steady polar rain. The generally good agreement of the distribution functions, f, from the two data sources confirms that direct entry of solar electrons along open field lines is indeed the cause of polar rain. The agreement between the data sets is typically best on the side of the polar cap with most intense polar rain but the DMSP f's in less intense regions can be brought into agreement with ACE measurements by shifting all energies by a fixed amounts that range from tens to several hundred eV. In most cases these shifts are positive which implies that field-aligned potentials of these amounts exist on polar cap field lines which tend to retard the entry of electrons and produce the observed gradients. These retarding potentials undoubtedly appear in order to prevent the entry of low-energy electrons and maintain charge quasi-neutrality that would otherwise be violated since most tailward flowing magnetosheath ions are unable to follow polar rain electrons down to the polar cap. In more limited regions near the boundary of the polar cap there is sometimes evidence for field-aligned potentials of the opposite sign that accelerate polar rain electrons. A solar electron burst is also studied and it is concluded that electrons from such bursts can enter the magnetotail and precipitate in the same manner as polar rain.

  20. The Great Warming Brian Fagan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagan, B. M.

    2010-12-01

    The Great Warming is a journey back to the world of a thousand years ago, to the Medieval Warm Period. Five centuries of irregular warming from 800 to 1250 had beneficial effects in Europe and the North Atlantic, but brought prolonged droughts to much of the Americas and lands affected by the South Asian monsoon. The book describes these impacts of warming on medieval European societies, as well as the Norse and the Inuit of the far north, then analyzes the impact of harsh, lengthy droughts on hunting societies in western North America and the Ancestral Pueblo farmers of Chaco Canyon, New Mexico. These peoples reacted to drought by relocating entire communities. The Maya civilization was much more vulnerable that small-scale hunter-gatherer societies and subsistence farmers in North America. Maya rulers created huge water storage facilities, but their civilization partially collapsed under the stress of repeated multiyear droughts, while the Chimu lords of coastal Peru adapted with sophisticated irrigation works. The climatic villain was prolonged, cool La Niñalike conditions in the Pacific, which caused droughts from Venezuela to East Asia, and as far west as East Africa. The Great Warming argues that the warm centuries brought savage drought to much of humanity, from China to Peru. It also argues that drought is one of the most dangerous elements in today’s humanly created global warming, often ignored by preoccupied commentators, but with the potential to cause over a billion people to starve. Finally, I use the book to discuss the issues and problems of communicating multidisciplinary science to the general public.

  1. Warm Up to a Good Sound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tovey, David C.

    1977-01-01

    Most choral directors in schools today have been exposed to a variety of warm-up procedures. Yet, many do not use the warm-up time effectively as possible. Considers the factors appropriate to a warm-up exercise and three basic warm-up categories. (Author/RK)

  2. Oceanic temperate forest versus warm temperate rainforest: a reply to Grubb et al. (2017)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McGlone, Matt S.; Buitenwerf, Robert; Richardson, Sarah J.

    2017-01-01

    that they ‘see no virtue in using climatic variables to define a [vegetation] formation type’, and then discuss problems with the climate- based global biome schemes of Holdridge (1947), Whittaker (1970), Box (1981) and Prentice et al. (1992). As our oceanic temperate forest (OTF) concept is underpinned......Grubb et al. (2017) point out that we (McGlone et al. 2016) erroneously stated that the definition of warm temperate rain forest (WTRF; Grubb et al. 2013) was based in part on climatic criteria. We apologise: their text made clear that this was not the case. However, they go on to say...... by climatic variables, and as they suggest that it largely falls within their WTRF and cool temperate rain forest (CTRF) concepts, we take this opportunity to further discuss the relative merits of these contrasting ways of classifying vegetation cover....

  3. Development of a low-budget, remote, solar powered, and self-operating rain gauge for spatial rainfall real time data monitoring in pristine and urban areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafiei Shiva, J.; Chandler, D. G.; Nucera, K. J.; Valinski, N.

    2016-12-01

    Precipitation is one of the main components of the hydrological cycle and simulations and it is generally stated as an average value for the study area. However, due to high spatial variability of precipitation in some situations, more precise local data is required. In order to acquire the precipitation data, interpolation of neighbor gauged precipitation data is used which is the most affordable technique for a watershed scale study. Moreover, novel spatial rain measurements such as Doppler radars and satellite image processing have been widely used in recent studies. Although, due to impediments in the radar data processing and the effect of the local setting on the accuracy of the interpolated data, the local measurement of the precipitation remains as one of the most reliable approaches in attaining rain data. In this regard, development of a low-budget, remote, solar powered, and self-operating rain gauge for spatial rainfall real time data monitoring for pristine and urban areas has been presented in this research. The proposed rain gauge consists of two main parts: (a) hydraulic instruments and (b) electrical devices. The hydraulic instruments will collect the rain fall and store it in a PVC container which is connected to the high sensitivity pressure transducer systems. These electrical devices will transmit the data via cellphone networks which will be available for further analysis in less than one minute, after processing. The above-mentioned real time rain fall data can be employed in the precipitation measurement and the evaporation estimation. Due to the installed solar panel for battery recharging and designed siphon system for draining cumulative rain, this device is considered as a self-operating rain gauge. At this time, more than ten rain gauges are built and installed in the urban area of Syracuse, NY. Furthermore, these data are also useful for calibration and validation of data obtained by other rain gauging devices and estimation techniques

  4. How warm days increase belief in global warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaval, Lisa; Keenan, Elizabeth A.; Johnson, Eric J.; Weber, Elke U.

    2014-02-01

    Climate change judgements can depend on whether today seems warmer or colder than usual, termed the local warming effect. Although previous research has demonstrated that this effect occurs, studies have yet to explain why or how temperature abnormalities influence global warming attitudes. A better understanding of the underlying psychology of this effect can help explain the public's reaction to climate change and inform approaches used to communicate the phenomenon. Across five studies, we find evidence of attribute substitution, whereby individuals use less relevant but available information (for example, today's temperature) in place of more diagnostic but less accessible information (for example, global climate change patterns) when making judgements. Moreover, we rule out alternative hypotheses involving climate change labelling and lay mental models. Ultimately, we show that present temperature abnormalities are given undue weight and lead to an overestimation of the frequency of similar past events, thereby increasing belief in and concern for global warming.

  5. Aerosol effect on the evolution of the thermodynamic properties of warm convective cloud fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagan, Guy; Koren, Ilan; Altaratz, Orit; Heiblum, Reuven H.

    2016-12-01

    Convective cloud formation and evolution strongly depend on environmental temperature and humidity profiles. The forming clouds change the profiles that created them by redistributing heat and moisture. Here we show that the evolution of the field’s thermodynamic properties depends heavily on the concentration of aerosol, liquid or solid particles suspended in the atmosphere. Under polluted conditions, rain formation is suppressed and the non-precipitating clouds act to warm the lower part of the cloudy layer (where there is net condensation) and cool and moisten the upper part of the cloudy layer (where there is net evaporation), thereby destabilizing the layer. Under clean conditions, precipitation causes net warming of the cloudy layer and net cooling of the sub-cloud layer (driven by rain evaporation), which together act to stabilize the atmosphere with time. Previous studies have examined different aspects of the effects of clouds on their environment. Here, we offer a complete analysis of the cloudy atmosphere, spanning the aerosol effect from instability-consumption to enhancement, below, inside and above warm clouds, showing the temporal evolution of the effects. We propose a direct measure for the magnitude and sign of the aerosol effect on thermodynamic instability.

  6. Effect of automobiles on global warming: A modeling study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shyam Sundar

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Global warming threatens our environment as well as basic human needs. In the present scenario, increasing demand and excessive use of automobiles have increased the level of carbon dioxide emission in the environment, providing a significant contribution to increase the global warming. This paper deals with the modeling of the effect of automobiles on global warming. For this, three nonlinearly interacting variables namely; density of human population, density of automobiles and the concentration of carbon dioxide have been taken into account. In the modeling process, it is assumed that the density of automobiles increases in proportion to human population following a logistic growth. The model is analyzed using stability theory of ordinary differential equations. Local and global stability conditions are established to study the feasibility of the model system. It is shown that with increase in human population, the demand for automobiles increases which has significant effect on global warming increase.

  7. Rain radar measurement error estimation using data assimilation in an advection-based nowcasting system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merker, Claire; Ament, Felix; Clemens, Marco

    2017-04-01

    The quantification of measurement uncertainty for rain radar data remains challenging. Radar reflectivity measurements are affected, amongst other things, by calibration errors, noise, blocking and clutter, and attenuation. Their combined impact on measurement accuracy is difficult to quantify due to incomplete process understanding and complex interdependencies. An improved quality assessment of rain radar measurements is of interest for applications both in meteorology and hydrology, for example for precipitation ensemble generation, rainfall runoff simulations, or in data assimilation for numerical weather prediction. Especially a detailed description of the spatial and temporal structure of errors is beneficial in order to make best use of the areal precipitation information provided by radars. Radar precipitation ensembles are one promising approach to represent spatially variable radar measurement errors. We present a method combining ensemble radar precipitation nowcasting with data assimilation to estimate radar measurement uncertainty at each pixel. This combination of ensemble forecast and observation yields a consistent spatial and temporal evolution of the radar error field. We use an advection-based nowcasting method to generate an ensemble reflectivity forecast from initial data of a rain radar network. Subsequently, reflectivity data from single radars is assimilated into the forecast using the Local Ensemble Transform Kalman Filter. The spread of the resulting analysis ensemble provides a flow-dependent, spatially and temporally correlated reflectivity error estimate at each pixel. We will present first case studies that illustrate the method using data from a high-resolution X-band radar network.

  8. Recently amplified arctic warming has contributed to a continual global warming trend

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jianbin; Zhang, Xiangdong; Zhang, Qiyi; Lin, Yanluan; Hao, Mingju; Luo, Yong; Zhao, Zongci; Yao, Yao; Chen, Xin; Wang, Lei; Nie, Suping; Yin, Yizhou; Xu, Ying; Zhang, Jiansong

    2017-12-01

    The existence and magnitude of the recently suggested global warming hiatus, or slowdown, have been strongly debated1-3. Although various physical processes4-8 have been examined to elucidate this phenomenon, the accuracy and completeness of observational data that comprise global average surface air temperature (SAT) datasets is a concern9,10. In particular, these datasets lack either complete geographic coverage or in situ observations over the Arctic, owing to the sparse observational network in this area9. As a consequence, the contribution of Arctic warming to global SAT changes may have been underestimated, leading to an uncertainty in the hiatus debate. Here, we constructed a new Arctic SAT dataset using the most recently updated global SATs2 and a drifting buoys based Arctic SAT dataset11 through employing the `data interpolating empirical orthogonal functions' method12. Our estimate of global SAT rate of increase is around 0.112 °C per decade, instead of 0.05 °C per decade from IPCC AR51, for 1998-2012. Analysis of this dataset shows that the amplified Arctic warming over the past decade has significantly contributed to a continual global warming trend, rather than a hiatus or slowdown.

  9. Global warming and infectious disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khasnis, Atul A; Nettleman, Mary D

    2005-01-01

    Global warming has serious implications for all aspects of human life, including infectious diseases. The effect of global warming depends on the complex interaction between the human host population and the causative infectious agent. From the human standpoint, changes in the environment may trigger human migration, causing disease patterns to shift. Crop failures and famine may reduce host resistance to infections. Disease transmission may be enhanced through the scarcity and contamination of potable water sources. Importantly, significant economic and political stresses may damage the existing public health infrastructure, leaving mankind poorly prepared for unexpected epidemics. Global warming will certainly affect the abundance and distribution of disease vectors. Altitudes that are currently too cool to sustain vectors will become more conducive to them. Some vector populations may expand into new geographic areas, whereas others may disappear. Malaria, dengue, plague, and viruses causing encephalitic syndromes are among the many vector-borne diseases likely to be affected. Some models suggest that vector-borne diseases will become more common as the earth warms, although caution is needed in interpreting these predictions. Clearly, global warming will cause changes in the epidemiology of infectious diseases. The ability of mankind to react or adapt is dependent upon the magnitude and speed of the change. The outcome will also depend on our ability to recognize epidemics early, to contain them effectively, to provide appropriate treatment, and to commit resources to prevention and research.

  10. Construction of Polarimetric Radar-Based Reference Rain Maps for the Iowa Flood Studies Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Walt; Krajewski, Witek; Wolff, David; Gatlin, Patrick

    2015-04-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission Iowa Flood Studies (IFloodS) campaign was conducted in central and northeastern Iowa during the months of April-June, 2013. Specific science objectives for IFloodS included quantification of uncertainties in satellite and ground-based estimates of precipitation, 4-D characterization of precipitation physical processes and associated parameters (e.g., size distributions, water contents, types, structure etc.), assessment of the impact of precipitation estimation uncertainty and physical processes on hydrologic predictive skill, and refinement of field observations and data analysis approaches as they pertain to future GPM integrated hydrologic validation and related field studies. In addition to field campaign archival of raw and processed satellite data (including precipitation products), key ground-based platforms such as the NASA NPOL S-band and D3R Ka/Ku-band dual-polarimetric radars, University of Iowa X-band dual-polarimetric radars, a large network of paired rain gauge platforms, and a large network of 2D Video and Parsivel disdrometers were deployed. In something of a canonical approach, the radar (NPOL in particular), gauge and disdrometer observational assets were deployed to create a consistent high-quality distributed (time and space sampling) radar-based ground "reference" rainfall dataset, with known uncertainties, that could be used for assessing the satellite-based precipitation products at a range of space/time scales. Subsequently, the impact of uncertainties in the satellite products could be evaluated relative to the ground-benchmark in coupled weather, land-surface and distributed hydrologic modeling frameworks as related to flood prediction. Relative to establishing the ground-based "benchmark", numerous avenues were pursued in the making and verification of IFloodS "reference" dual-polarimetric radar-based rain maps, and this study documents the process and results as they pertain specifically

  11. Construction of Polarimetric Radar-Based Reference Rain Maps for the Iowa Flood Studies Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Walter; Wolff, David; Krajewski, Witek; Gatlin, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission Iowa Flood Studies (IFloodS) campaign was conducted in central and northeastern Iowa during the months of April-June, 2013. Specific science objectives for IFloodS included quantification of uncertainties in satellite and ground-based estimates of precipitation, 4-D characterization of precipitation physical processes and associated parameters (e.g., size distributions, water contents, types, structure etc.), assessment of the impact of precipitation estimation uncertainty and physical processes on hydrologic predictive skill, and refinement of field observations and data analysis approaches as they pertain to future GPM integrated hydrologic validation and related field studies. In addition to field campaign archival of raw and processed satellite data (including precipitation products), key ground-based platforms such as the NASA NPOL S-band and D3R Ka/Ku-band dual-polarimetric radars, University of Iowa X-band dual-polarimetric radars, a large network of paired rain gauge platforms, and a large network of 2D Video and Parsivel disdrometers were deployed. In something of a canonical approach, the radar (NPOL in particular), gauge and disdrometer observational assets were deployed to create a consistent high-quality distributed (time and space sampling) radar-based ground "reference" rainfall dataset, with known uncertainties, that could be used for assessing the satellite-based precipitation products at a range of space/time scales. Subsequently, the impact of uncertainties in the satellite products could be evaluated relative to the ground-benchmark in coupled weather, land-surface and distributed hydrologic modeling frameworks as related to flood prediction. Relative to establishing the ground-based "benchmark", numerous avenues were pursued in the making and verification of IFloodS "reference" dual-polarimetric radar-based rain maps, and this study documents the process and results as they pertain specifically

  12. UC Irvine CHRS iRain - An Integrated System for Global Real-time Precipitation Observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, H.; Nguyen, P.; Huynh, P.; Palacios, T.; Braithwaite, D.; Hsu, K. L.; Sorooshian, S.

    2016-12-01

    CHRS iRain developed by the Center for Hydrometeorology and Remote Sensing (CHRS), University of California, Irvine is an integrated system for global real-time rainfall observation and visualization using multiple data sources from satellites, radars, gauges, and crowd sourcing. Its backbone is the Precipitation Estimation from Remotely Sensed Information using Artificial Neural Networks - Cloud Classification System (PERSIANN-CCS, Hong et al. 2004). Apart from using traditional PERSIANN technique (Hsu et al. 1997), the PERSIANN-CCS also applies image processing and pattern recognition techniques, which significantly improve its accuracy as well as its temporal and spatial resolution (in hourly and 4 km x 4 km respectively). Although satellite-based precipitation products are developing fast, they are still relatively new compared with other precipitation observations by traditional measuring methods, such as radar or rain gauges. CHRS iRain also provides hourly precipitation information from NCEP Stage IV multi-sensor (radar + gauges) products and gauges with over 2000 NOAA River Forecast Center stations. On the website, users can retrieve data of the most recent 72 hour precipitation over different spatial regions regarding their own interests such as grid coordinate, rectangle, watershed, basin, political division, and country. CHRS iRain is a useful tool that provides important global rainfall information for water resources management and decision making for natural disasters such as flash floods, urban flooding, and river flooding. ACKNOWLEDGMENTSWe would like to acknowledge NASA, NOAA Office of Hydrologic Development (OHD) National Weather Service (NWS), Cooperative Institue for Climate and Satellites (CICS), Army Research Office (ARO), ICIWaRM, and UNESCO for supporting this research.

  13. Endangerment of cultural heritage sites by strong rain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauß, Thomas; Fischer, Peter

    2017-09-01

    Due to climate change extreme weather conditions become more and more frequent in the last years. Especially in Germany nearly every year a large flood event happens. Most of these events are caused by strong rain. There are at most two causes for these floodings: The first is locally strong rain in the area of damage, the second happens at damage sites located near confluxes and strong rain in the upper stream areas of the joining rivers. The amount of damage is often strongly correlated with unreasonable designation of new construction in such endangered regions. Our presented study is based on an earlier project together with a German insurance company. In this project we analyzed correlations of geographical settings with the insurance data of flood damages over ten years. The result of this study was a strong relation of the terrain with the amount and the probability of damages. Further investigations allow us to derive a system for estimating potential endangerment due to strong rain just from suitable digital terrain models (DTMs). In the presented study we apply this method to different types of cultural heritage (CH) sites in Germany and other parts of the world to detect which type of CH sites were build with potential endangerment of strong rain events in mind and which ones are prone to such events.

  14. [Relationship between simulated acid rain stress and leaf reflectance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xiao-dong; Jiang, Hong; Yu, Shu-quan; Zhou, Guo-mo; Jiang, Zi-shan

    2010-01-01

    Acid rain is a worldwide environmental problem. Serious acid rain pollution in subtropical China has constituted a potential threat to the health of the local forest. In the present paper, the changing properties of the chlorophyll concentration and spectral reflectance at the visible wavelengths for the six subtropical broad-leaved tree species leaves under simulated acid rain (SAR) treatment with different pH levels were studied. With the increasing strength of the SAR, the chlorophyll concentrations of the experimental species under pH 2.5 and pH 4.0 treatment were higher than that under pH 5.6; the spectral reflectance at the visible wavelengths for pH 2.5 and pH 4.0 were lower than that for pH 5.6 in general; while there weren't significant differences between pH 2.5 and pH 4.0. After the treatment with different levels of SAR, the differences in spectral reflectance at the visible wavelengths mainly focused around the green peak and red edge on the reflectance curve. The subtropical broad-leaved tree species studied were relatively not sensitive to acid rain stresses; some stronger acid rain may accelerate the growth of the tree species used here to some extent.

  15. Acid rain and its environmental effects: Recent scientific advances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Douglas A.; Aherne, Julian; Gay, David A.; Lehmann, Christopher M. B.

    2016-12-01

    The term 'acid rain' refers to atmospheric deposition of acidic constituents that impact the earth as rain, snow, particulates, gases, and vapor. Acid rain was first recognized by Ducros (1845) and subsequently described by the English chemist Robert Angus Smith (Smith, 1852) whose pioneering studies linked the sources to industrial emissions and included early observations of deleterious environmental effects (Smith, 1872). Smith's work was largely forgotten until the mid-20th century when observations began to link air pollution to the deposition of atmospheric sulfate (SO42-) and other chemical constituents, first near the metal smelter at Sudbury, Ontario, Canada, and later at locations in Europe, North America, and Australia (Gorham, 1961). Our modern understanding of acid rain as an environmental problem caused largely by regional emissions of sulfur dioxide (SO2) and nitrogen oxides (NOx) stems from observations in the 1960s and early 1970s in Sweden by Svante Odén (Odén, 1976), and in North America by Gene Likens and colleagues (Likens and Bormann, 1974). These scientists and many who followed showed the link to emissions from coal-fired power plants and other industrial sources, and documented the environmental effects of acid rain such as the acidification of surface waters and toxic effects on vegetation, fish, and other biota.

  16. Peranan Environmental Accounting Terhadap Global Warming

    OpenAIRE

    Martusa, Riki

    2009-01-01

    This article explores about is global warming. The distortion of nature causes global warming. Industrial sector is one of global warming incurred. Some nations create a group to cope this matter. They try to reduce carbon emission as one of global warming causes by controlling industrial carbon emission through financial reporting. This article explores normatively roles of environmental accounting in cope with global warming.  

  17. [Dynamics of Quercus variabilis seed rain and soil seed bank in different habitats on the north slope of Qinling Mountains].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Min; Zhang, Wen-Hui; Zhou, Jian-Yun; Ma, Chuang; Ma, Li-Wei

    2011-11-01

    In order to explore the dynamics of Quercus variabilis seed rain and soil seed bank in different habitats on the north slope of Qinling Mountains, three kinds of micro-habitats (understory, forest gap, and forest edge) were selected, with the seed rain quantity and quality of Q. variabilis, seed amount and viability in soil seed bank, as well as the seedling development of Q. variabilis studied. The seed rain of Q. variabilis started from mid August, reached the peak in mid September-early October, and ended at the beginning of November, and there existed differences in the dissemination process, occurrence time, and composition of the seed rain among the three micro-habitats. The seed rain had the maximum intensity (39.55 +/- 5.56 seeds x m(-2)) in understory, the seeds had the earliest landing time, the longest lasting duration, and the highest viability in forest gap, and the mature seeds had the largest proportion in forest edge, accounting for 58.7% of the total. From the ending time of seed rain to next August, the total reserve of soil seed bank was the largest in understory and the smallest in forest edge. In the three habitats, the amount of mature and immature seeds, that of seeds eaten by animals, and the seed viability in soil seed bank all decreased with time. In contrast, the number of moldy seeds increased. The seeds were mainly concentrated in litter layer, a few of them were in 0-2 cm soil layer, and few were in 2-5 cm soil layer. The density of the seedlings varied with habitats, being the largest in forest gap, followed by in forest edge, and the least in understory, which suggested that forest gap was more suitable for the seed germination and seedling growth of Q. variabilis, and thus, appropriate thinning should be taken to increase forest gap to provide favorable conditions for the natural regeneration of Q. variabilis forest.

  18. Unabated global surface temperature warming: evaluating the evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karl, T. R.; Arguez, A.

    2015-12-01

    New insights related to time-dependent bias corrections in global surface temperatures have led to higher rates of warming over the past few decades than previously reported in the IPCC Fifth Assessment Report (2014). Record high global temperatures in the past few years have also contributed to larger trends. The combination of these factors and new analyses of the rate of temperature change show unabated global warming since at least the mid-Twentieth Century. New time-dependent bias corrections account for: (1) differences in temperatures measured from ships and drifting buoys; (2) improved corrections to ship measured temperatures; and (3) the larger rates of warming in polar regions (particularly the Arctic). Since 1951, the period over which IPCC (2014) attributes over half of the observed global warming to human causes, it is shown that there has been a remarkably robust and sustained warming, punctuated with inter-annual and decadal variability. This finding is confirmed through simple trend analysis and Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD). Trend analysis however, especially for decadal trends, is sensitive to selection bias of beginning and ending dates. EMD has no selection bias. Additionally, it can highlight both short- and long-term processes affecting the global temperature times series since it addresses both non-linear and non-stationary processes. For the new NOAA global temperature data set, our analyses do not support the notion of a hiatus or slowing of long-term global warming. However, sub-decadal periods of little (or no warming) and rapid warming can also be found, clearly showing the impact of inter-annual and decadal variability that previously has been attributed to both natural and human-induced non-greenhouse forcings.

  19. Challenges for Planning and Maintaining of Urban Rain Harvesting Systems- the case of Hammarby Sjöstad and Årstafältet in Stockholm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suleiman, Lina

    2017-04-01

    Planners and policymakers' concern escalates over conventional systems dealing with rains in cities based on domination and control of nature rather than harmony and design with nature. A new spatial planning paradigm is needed to put in place systems which mimic natural water systems and promise multiple values instead of systems consider rain as a source of problem. However, such approach embodies significant planning challenges. Urban rain harvesting systems (URHs) are inherently viewed as 'sociotechnical' systems. As such, planning processes should consider the interdependence of 'social' and 'technical' aspects as essential elements if a transition towards sustainable urban water systems is to be realised. Drawing on a common understanding for what urban rain harvesting systems should deliver in terms of 'functions' and 'added values', a generic planning framework is developed to inform practitioners on how the 'socio' and 'technical' elements should be assimilated in a long-term and integrated planning processes of URHs. Using the developed framework, the paper examines the planning and maintenance processes of urban rain harvesting systems in Årstafältet and Hammarby Sjöstad respectively. Results show that planners lack a common operational understanding on how these systems should be designed holistically in a long term and integrated planning processes creating working gabs or positional conflicts. In practice, urban planners and water engineers look at these systems as either urban design component or water drainage system to deal with technical functions hindering a smooth transition path towards urban rain harvesting systems. The paper concludes on the urgency for reordering roles and relations within a new set-up organisation to incubate these systems in long-term planning and maintenance processes. Key words: 'Sociotechnical' system, Water, Planning, Urban Rain Harvesting systems (URHs), Hammarby Sjostad and Årstafältet

  20. The effect of artificial rain on backscattered acoustic signal: first measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titchenko, Yuriy; Karaev, Vladimir; Meshkov, Evgeny; Goldblat, Vladimir

    The problem of rain influencing on a characteristics of backscattered ultrasonic and microwave signal by water surface is considered. The rain influence on backscattering process of electromagnetic waves was investigated in laboratory and field experiments, for example [1-3]. Raindrops have a significant impact on backscattering of microwave and influence on wave spectrum measurement accuracy by string wave gauge. This occurs due to presence of raindrops in atmosphere and modification of the water surface. For measurements of water surface characteristics during precipitation we propose to use an acoustic system. This allows us obtaining of the water surface parameters independently on precipitation in atmosphere. The measurements of significant wave height of water surface using underwater acoustical systems are well known [4, 5]. Moreover, the variance of orbital velocity can be measure using these systems. However, these methods cannot be used for measurements of slope variance and the other second statistical moments of water surface that required for analyzing the radar backscatter signal. An original design Doppler underwater acoustic wave gauge allows directly measuring the surface roughness characteristics that affect on electromagnetic waves backscattering of the same wavelength [6]. Acoustic wave gauge is Doppler ultrasonic sonar which is fixed near the bottom on the floating disk. Measurements are carried out at vertically orientation of sonar antennas towards water surface. The first experiments were conducted with the first model of an acoustic wave gauge. The acoustic wave gauge (8 mm wavelength) is equipped with a transceiving antenna with a wide symmetrical antenna pattern. The gauge allows us to measure Doppler spectrum and cross section of backscattered signal. Variance of orbital velocity vertical component can be retrieved from Doppler spectrum with high accuracy. The result of laboratory and field experiments during artificial rain is presented

  1. Response of soil respiration to experimental warming and precipitation manipulation in a northern Great Plains grassland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanagan, L. B.; Sharp, E. J.; Letts, M. G.

    2012-12-01

    The interacting effects of altered temperature and precipitation are expected to have significant consequences for ecosystem net carbon storage. Here we report the results of an experiment that evaluated the effects of elevated temperature and altered precipitation, alone and in combination, on plant biomass production and soil respiration rates in a northern Great Plains grassland, near Lethbridge, Alberta Canada. Open-top chambers and rain shelters were used to establish an experiment with two temperature treatments (warmed and control), each combined with three precipitation treatments (minus 50%, ambient (no manipulation), and plus 50%). Our objectives were to determine the sensitivity of plant biomass production and soil respiration to temperature and moisture manipulations, and to test for direct and indirect effects of the environmental changes on soil respiration rates. The experimental manipulations resulted primarily in a significant increase in air temperature in the warmed treatment. There were no significant treatment effects on soil moisture content. Aboveground biomass was not significantly affected by the experimental manipulations, but the warmed plots of the ambient precipitation treatment showed an increase in root biomass relative to the control plots. The warmed treatment increased the cumulative loss of carbon in soil respiration by approximately 400 g C m-2 compared to the control during July-September. This higher soil respiration rate was not directly caused by differences among treatments in soil temperature or soil moisture, but was likely an indirect result of increased carbon substrate availability in the warmed relative to the control treatment.

  2. Potential impacts of global warming on water resources in southern California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beuhler, M

    2003-01-01

    Global warming will have a significant impact on water resources within the 20 to 90-year planning period of many water projects. Arid and semi-arid regions such as Southern California are especially vulnerable to anticipated negative impacts of global warming on water resources. Long-range water facility planning must consider global climate change in the recommended mix of new facilities needed to meet future water requirements. The generally accepted impacts of global warming include temperature, rising sea levels, more frequent and severe floods and droughts, and a shift from snowfall to rain. Precipitation changes are more difficult to predict. For Southern California, these impacts will be especially severe on surface water supplies. Additionally, rising sea levels will exacerbate salt-water intrusion into freshwater and impact the quality of surface water supplies. Integrated water resources planning is emerging as a tool to develop water supplies and demand management strategies that are less vulnerable to the impacts of global warming. These tools include water conservation, conjunctive use of surface and groundwater and desalination of brackish water and possibly seawater. Additionally, planning for future water needs should include explicit consideration of the potential range of global warming impacts through techniques such as scenario planning.

  3. The influence of global warming on natural disasters and their public health outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, James H

    2007-01-01

    With a documented increase in average global surface temperatures of 0.6 degrees C since 1975, Earth now appears to be warming due to a variety of climatic effects, most notably the cascading effects of greenhouse gas emissions resulting from human activities. There remains, however, no universal agreement on how rapidly, regionally, or asymmetrically the planet will warm or on the true impact of global warming on natural disasters and public health outcomes. Most reports to date of the public health impact of global warming have been anecdotal and retrospective in design and have focused on the increase in heat-stroke deaths following heat waves and on outbreaks of airborne and arthropod-borne diseases following tropical rains and flooding that resulted from fluctuations in ocean temperatures. The effects of global warming on rainfall and drought, tropical cyclone and tsunami activity, and tectonic and volcanic activity will have far-reaching public health effects not only on environmentally associated disease outbreaks but also on global food supplies and population movements. As a result of these and other recognized associations between climate change and public health consequences, many of which have been confounded by deficiencies in public health infrastructure and scientific debates over whether climate changes are spawned by atmospheric cycles or anthropogenic influences, the active responses to progressive climate change must include combinations of economic, environmental, legal, regulatory, and, most importantly, public health measures.

  4. A conditional simulation model of intermittent rain fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. G. Lanza

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The synthetic generation of random fields with specified probability distribution, correlation structure and probability of no-rain areas is used as the basis for the formulation of a stochastic space-time rainfall model conditional on rain gauge observations. A new procedure for conditioning while preserving intermittence is developed to provide constraints to Monte Carlo realisations of possible rainfall scenarios. The method addresses the properties of the convolution operator involved in generating random field realisations and is actually independent of the numerical algorithm used for unconditional simulation. It requires only the solution of a linear system of algebraic equations the order of which is given by the number of the conditioning nodes. Applications of the methodology are expected in rainfall field reconstruction from sparse rain gauge data and in rainfall downscaling from the large scale information that may be provided by remote sensing devices or numerical weather prediction models. Keywords: Space-time rainfall; Conditioning; Stochastic models

  5. A review of rain erosion problems for aerogenerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortimer, A. R.

    Erosive mechanisms and protective measures available for windpowered generators exposed to rain are examined. Rain erosion is modeled in two stages: an incubation phase, when plastic deformation and crack formation occur with no loss of weight; and a phase of actual material loss. Raindrop impact causes a progressive tearing action, which is significant in the erosion of soft, compliant elastomers; light rain over a long time period is noted to cause fatigue. Choosing a protective surface necessitates consideration of both surface impact and the effects on the substrate. Metal, polymeric, and composite coatings are discussed, and it is found that softness reduces impact damage, and fine weaves in composites enhances stress concentration corrosion resistance. Continued studies specifically dealing with wind turbine blades are recommended, as current knowledge is derived from existing helicopter and propeller driven airplane data.

  6. Differential Gene Expression of Longan Under Simulated Acid Rain Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Shan; Pan, Tengfei; Ma, Cuilan; Qiu, Dongliang

    2017-05-01

    Differential gene expression profile was studied in Dimocarpus longan Lour. in response to treatments of simulated acid rain with pH 2.5, 3.5, and a control (pH 5.6) using differential display reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (DDRT-PCR). Results showed that mRNA differential display conditions were optimized to find an expressed sequence tag (EST) related with acid rain stress. The potential encoding products had 80% similarity with a transcription initiation factor IIF of Gossypium raimondii and 81% similarity with a protein product of Theobroma cacao. This fragment is the transcription factor activated by second messenger substances in longan leaves after signal perception of acid rain.

  7. Global warming at the summit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showstack, Randy

    During the recent summit meeting between Russian President Vladimir Putin and U.S. President Bill Clinton, the two leaders reaffirmed their concerns about global warming and the need to continue to take actions to try to reduce the threat.In a June 4 joint statement, they stressed the need to develop flexibility mechanisms, including international emissions trading, under the Kyoto Protocol to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. They also noted that initiatives to reduce the risk of greenhouse warming, including specific mechanisms of the Kyoto Protocol, could potentially promote economic growth.

  8. Variants of synoptic-scale weather patterns inducing heavy steady rains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaspar, M.; Müller, M.

    2009-04-01

    Previous studies confirmed the close relationship between synoptic-scale meteorological conditions and the occurrence of heavy widespread and steady rains in the Czech Republic. We showed that some dynamic and thermodynamic variables had regularly reached abnormal values in specific regions before and during extreme precipitation events. On the other hand, these anomalies partly varied among individual events. The presented study utilizes the results and is aimed at the objective classification of causal synoptic-scale weather patterns. We compiled the set of extreme precipitation events that had affected the Czech Republic during warm half-years from 1958 to 2002. In order to classify the events, we employed re-analyses ERA-40. We focused on the horizontal components of moisture flux, anomalies of which are the typical features of the most significant events and are responsible for an increased water vapour supply into the rainfall area. For compiled events, we quantified the extremeness of the anomalies by distribution function in individual grid points. We applied a divisive and fuzzy clustering method in order to cluster the events in terms of the extremeness of the horizontal components of moisture flux within the rainfall area from a day before to two days after the precipitation onset. We identified and defined four variants of causal synoptic-scale weather patterns. The first two variants are associated with the passage of an extra-tropical cyclone across Central Europe. The differences between the variants consist in the cyclone track. The third variant is characterised by cold frontal waves repeatedly affecting heavy rain sites. The forth variant is similar to the third variant but is rounded off by the passage of a frontal wave cyclone. The classification method will be briefly presented and all four variants will be described using average thermo-baric fields. Further applications of the classification method will be also mentioned.

  9. Experimental wind-driven rain erosion study on agricultural soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzen, Miriam; Iserloh, Thomas; Brings, Christine; Fister, Wolfgang; Seeger, Manuel; Ries, Johannes B.

    2014-05-01

    Wind is potentially capable to considerably increase soil erosion by rain drops. In contrast to laboratory experiments, in-situ experiments enable the measurement of soil erosion by wind and rain including the reactions of relatively intact soil surfaces and a complete body of soil. The Portable Wind and Rainfall Simulator of Trier University was applied on winter cereal fields to measure rain erosion on agricultural areas with and without the influence of wind. The test areas are situated near Pamplona, Navarre and recognized to be representative for large parts of northern Spain concerning soil, land use and climate. The soil surfaces on the fields were ploughed and sparsely covered by recently sowed winter cereals. The soil water content was close to saturation due to long lasting rainfall. Runoff was medium to high with runoff-coefficients ranging from 26 to 100%. The eroded material from rainfall simulations ranged from 14.5 to 42.5 g m² / 30min. The eroded material from wind-driven rain ranged from 28.1 to 47.3 g m² / 30 min. Compared to windless rainfall, the wind-driven rain increased erosion of soil material up to 82.2%. In one case, the eroded material decreased by 18.3%. The results indicate a strong influence of wind on rain erosion on recently seeded agricultural soils. Wind influence can be an important aspect for the general assessment of sheet erosion and supports the finding that a neglect of this factor might lead to severe underestimation of soil loss.

  10. The impacts of ;urban-induced heavy rains; on the distribution of deposition fluxes of inorganic acidic substances in the Tokyo metropolitan area in summer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchiyama, Ryunosuke; Okochi, Hiroshi; Kamiya, Junichi; Asai, Daisuke; Kaneko, Chiho; Ogata, Hiroko; Katsumi, Naoya

    2018-02-01

    We analyzed the trends in rainfall amounts and the number of heavy rain events with hourly rainfall amounts over 30 mm at the inland section of the 23-ward Tokyo metropolitan area (nine wards and ten sites) in the warm season (July to September) from 1978 to 2008. Heavy rain events in the Nerima Ward occurred nine times during decade I (1978-1987; 0.90 times/yr), 13 times during decade II (1988-1997; 1.3 times/yr), and 23 times during decade III (1998-2008; 2.1 times/yr). The annual average number of heavy rain events was 1.43 times/yr in Nerima from 1978 to 2008, while it was 0.98 times/yr on average at nine locations excluding Nerima. The frequency of extremely strong heavy rain events with hourly rainfall amounts greater than 50 mm during decade III was the highest in Nerima (six times) among ten sites. These data suggest that the frequency of heavy rain events has increased at Nerima during the past 30 years. Bulk precipitation data were collected biweekly by filtration-type collectors at 14 sites around Nerima from 2008 to 2010 to determine the impacts of urban-induced heavy rains (hereafter UHR), defined as a heavy rain event other than typhoons and frontal heavy rains, on the distribution of deposition fluxes of inorganic acidic substances. The NO3- and nss-SO42 - concentrations in bulk precipitation were higher during the periods including UHR than those not including UHR. The deposition fluxes of NO3- and SO42 - showed clear differences at the center of UHR (NO3-: 231 μeq/m2/d, SO42 -: 234 μeq/m2/d) and its surrounding area (NO3-: 76.4 μeq/m2/d, SO42 -: 86.1 μeq/m2/d). Our results suggest that large amounts of inorganic acidic substances are deposited locally by UHR in urban areas in summer.

  11. Water's Journey from Rain to Stream in perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodhe, Allan; Grip, Harald

    2015-04-01

    The International Hydrological Decade (IHD) 1965-1974, sponsored by UNESCO, initiated a research effort for coordinating the fragmented branches of hydrology and for understanding and quantifying the hydrologic cycle on various scales, from continents to small catchments. One important part of the Swedish IHD-program was to quantify the terms of the water budget, including detailed data on soil water and groundwater storage dynamics, of several medium sized to small. As an outcome of these studies and subsequent process oriented studies, a new view of the runoff process in forested till soils was developed in the 1970's, stressing the dominating role of groundwater in delivering water to the streams and the usefulness of subdividing catchments into recharge and discharge areas for groundwater for understanding the flowpaths of water. This view contrasted with the general view among the public, and also among professionals within the field and in text books, according to which overland flow is the main process for runoff. With this latter view it would, for instance, not be possible to understand stream water chemistry, which had become an important question in a time of growing environmental concern. In order to decrease the time lag between research results and practice, the Swedish Natural Science Research Council initiated a text book project for presenting the recent results of hydrologic research on stream flow generation applied to Swedish conditions, and in 1985 our book "Water's Journey from Rain to Stream" was published. Founded on the basic principles for water storage and flow in soils, the book gives a general picture of the water flow through the forested till landscape, with separate chapters for recharge and discharge areas. Chemical processes along the flowpaths of water are treated and the book concludes with a few applications to current issues. The book is written in Swedish and the target audience is those working professionally with water and

  12. A European Acid Rain Program based on the US experience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, U. Steiner; Svendsen, Gert Tinggaard

    2000-01-01

    The paper shows that cost-effective involvement of the source location involves utmost difficulty in practice. Based on the RAINS model, it is recommended that source location should be ignored in a European market for SO2, as is the case in the US Acid Rain Program. Based on the political target...... levels in the Second Sulfur Protocol from 1994, free trade will, compared to Command-And-Control, lead to 37% cost-savings and 2% environmental degradation. To mitigate this 2% environmental degradation, we recommend that some of the large cost-savings should be reallocated in further overall reduction...

  13. Combating bad weather part I rain removal from video

    CERN Document Server

    Mukhopadhyay, Sudipta

    2015-01-01

    Current vision systems are designed to perform in normal weather condition. However, no one can escape from severe weather conditions. Bad weather reduces scene contrast and visibility, which results in degradation in the performance of various computer vision algorithms such as object tracking, segmentation and recognition. Thus, current vision systems must include some mechanisms that enable them to perform up to the mark in bad weather conditions such as rain and fog. Rain causes the spatial and temporal intensity variations in images or video frames. These intensity changes are due to the

  14. SMAP Salinity Artifacts Associated With Presence of Rain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, M. M.; Santos-Garcia, A.; Jones, L.

    2016-02-01

    The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) satellite carries an L-band radiometer, which measures sea surface salinity (SSS) over a swath of 1000 km @ 40 km resolution. SMAP can extend the Aquarius (AQ) salinity data record with improved temporal/spatial sampling. Previous studies [see references] have demonstrated significant differences between satellite and in-situ salinity measurements during rain. In the presence of precipitation, salinity stratification exists near the sea surface, which nullifies the presumption of a well-mixed salinity. In general, these salinity gradients last only a few hours and the upper layer becomes slightly fresher in salinity. This paper describes the Rain Impact Model (RIM) that simulates the effects of rain accumulation on the SSS [Santos-Garcia et al., 2014] applied to SMAP. This model incorporates rainfall information for the previous 24 hours to the measurement sample (in this case SMAP) and uses as initialization the Hybrid Coordinate Ocean Model (HYCOM) data. Given the better resolution of SMAP, the goal of this paper is to continue the analysis previously done with AQ to better understand the effects of the instantaneous and accumulated rain on the salinity measurements. Boutin, J., N. Martin, G. Reverdin, X. Yin, and F. Gaillard (2013), Sea surface freshening inferred from SMOS and ARGO salinity: Impact of rain, Ocean Sci., 9(1), 183-192, doi:10.5194/os-9-183-2013. Santos-Garcia, A., M. Jacob, L. Jones, W. Asher, Y. Hejazin, H. Ebrahimi, and M. Rabolli (2014), Investigation of rain effects on Aquarius Sea Surface Salinity measurements, J. Geophys. Res. Oceans, 119, 7605-7624, doi:10.1002/2014JC010137. Tang, W., S.H Yueh, A. Hayashi, A.G. Fore, W.L. Jones, A. Santos-Garcia, and M.M. Jacob, (2015), Rain-Induced Near Surface Salinity Stratification and Rain Roughness Correction for Aquarius SSS Retrieval, in Selected Topics in Applied Earth Observations and Remote Sensing, IEEE Journal of, 8(99), 1-11, doi: 10.1109/JSTARS.2015.2463768.

  15. Evidence from paleosols for the geological antiquity of rain forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retallack, G J; Germán-Heins, J

    1994-07-22

    Kaolinitic claystones in Paleozoic paleokarst underlying the Middle Pennsylvanian Fort Scott Limestone near Drake, Missouri, contain abundant fossil root traces. These include a surficial root mat as well as stout, woody, deeply penetrating root traces: a rooting pattern similar to that under rain forest. Also similar to soils of rain forest is the deeply weathered clay of the paleosol, in which minimal amounts of nutrient bases remain. Forest communities adapted to oligotrophic clayey substrates in humid climates existed at least 305 million years ago.

  16. RAIN: A Bio-Inspired Communication and Data Storage Infrastructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monti, Matteo; Rasmussen, Steen

    2017-01-01

    We summarize the results and perspectives from a companion article, where we presented and evaluated an alternative architecture for data storage in distributed networks. We name the bio-inspired architecture RAIN, and it offers file storage service that, in contrast with current centralized cloud storage, has privacy by design, is open source, is more secure, is scalable, is more sustainable, has community ownership, is inexpensive, and is potentially faster, more efficient, and more reliable. We propose that a RAIN-style architecture could form the backbone of the Internet of Things that likely will integrate multiple current and future infrastructures ranging from online services and cryptocurrency to parts of government administration.

  17. Vertical Variability of Rain Drop Size Distribution from Micro Rain Radar Measurements during IFloodS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adirosi, Elisa; Tokay, Ali; Roberto, Nicoletta; Gorgucci, Eugenio; Montopoli, Mario; Baldini, Luca

    2017-04-01

    Ground based weather radars are highly used to generate rainfall products for meteorological and hydrological applications. However, weather radar quantitative rainfall estimation is obtained at a certain altitude that depends mainly on the radar elevation angle and on the distance from the radar. Therefore, depending on the vertical variability of rainfall, a time-height ambiguity between radar measurement and rainfall at the ground can affect the rainfall products. The vertically pointing radars (such as the Micro Rain Radar, MRR) are great tool to investigate the vertical variability of rainfall and its characteristics and ultimately, to fill the gap between the ground level and the first available radar elevation. Furthermore, the knowledge of rain Drop Size Distribution (DSD) variability is linked to the well-known problem of the non-uniform beam filling that is one of the main uncertainties of Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission Dual frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR). During GPM Ground Validation Iowa Flood Studies (IFloodS) field experiment, data collected with 2D video disdrometers (2DVD), Autonomous OTT Parsivel2 Units (APU), and MRR profilers at different sites were available. In three different sites co-located APU, 2DVD and MRR are available and covered by the S-band Dual Polarimetric Doppler radar (NPOL). The first elevation height of the radar beam varies, among the three sites, between 70 m and 1100 m. The IFloodS set-up has been used to compare disdrometers, MRR and NPOL data and to evaluate the uncertainties of those measurements. First, the performance of disdrometers and MRR in determining different rainfall parameters at ground has been evaluated and then the MRR based parameters have been compared with the ones obtained from NPOL data at the lowest elevations. Furthermore, the vertical variability of DSD and integral rainfall parameters within the MRR bins (from ground to 1085 m each 35 m) has been investigated in order to provide

  18. Raindrop size distribution of different cloud types over the Western Ghats using simultaneous measurements from Micro-Rain Radar and disdrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Subrata Kumar; Konwar, Mahen; Chakravarty, Kaustav; Deshpande, Sachin M.

    2017-04-01

    Investigating the raindrop size distributions (DSDs) for different cloud types is essential for the rain characterization and understanding different microphysical processes within the cloud system. In this study, the simultaneous measurements from the Micro-Rain Radar (MRR) and Joss-Waldvogel Disdrometer (JWD) are used to investigate the DSDs of different precipitation categories during the Indian Summer Monsoon (ISM) season (June-September) for the period 2012-2015. Both the instruments deployed at Mahabaleshwar (17.92°N, 73.6°E, 1.4 km AMSL), which is located in the complex mountain terrain of the Western Ghats (WGs), India. From the MRR reflectivity factor and fall-velocity profiles, the observed precipitation systems are classified into four categories: shallow-convective, convective, stratiform and mixed convective-stratiform. In terms of rain occurrence frequency, it is found that the rain over Mahabaleshwar is mostly contributed by the shallow-convective ( 89%) system while the stratiform system contribution is about 9% and the convective and the mixed convective-stratiform systems contributes < 2%. For different precipitation categories, the rain microphysical parameters such as median volume diameter, rain liquid water content and normalized intercept parameter are estimated using the moment method (second, third and fourth moment) of the observed DSDs. The reflectivity-rainfall (Z-R) relation of the form Z = aRb is estimated for each precipitation categories. Studies of systematic and comprehensive classification of precipitation types in terms of their rain microphysical parameters and Z-R relationships over a region is important as it would improve the understanding on rain microphysics and rainfall estimation from active and passive remote sensing devices.

  19. Do thawing and warming affect the integrity of human milk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handa, D; Ahrabi, A F; Codipilly, C N; Shah, S; Ruff, S; Potak, D; Williams, J E; McGuire, M A; Schanler, R J

    2014-11-01

    To evaluate the integrity of the human milk (pH, bacterial counts, host defense factors and nutrients) subjected to thawing, warming, refrigeration and maintenance at room temperature. Mothers in the neonatal intensive care unit donated freshly expressed milk. A baseline sample was stored at -80 °C and the remainder of the milk was divided and stored for 7 days at -20 °C. The milk was then subjected to two methods of thawing and warming: tepid water and waterless warmer. Thawed milk also was refrigerated for 24 h prior to warming. Lastly, warmed milk was maintained at room temperature for 4 h to simulate a feeding session. Samples were analyzed for pH, bacterial colony counts, total fat and free fatty acids, and the content of protein, secretory IgA and lactoferrin. Data were analyzed by repeated-measures analysis of variance and paired t test. There were no differences between processing methods and no changes in fat, protein, lactoferrin and secretory immunoglobulin A with processing steps. Milk pH and bacterial colony counts declined while free fatty acids rose with processing. Refrigeration of thawed milk resulted in greater declines in pH and bacteria and increases in free fatty acids. Bacterial colony counts and free fatty acids increased with maintenance at room temperature. The integrity of the milk was affected similarly by the two thawing and warming methods. Thawing and warming change the integrity of previously frozen human milk, but not adversely. Concerns about maintaining warmed milk at room temperature need to be explored.

  20. Quantification of rain gauge measurement undercatch and wind speed correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollock, Michael; Quinn, Paul; Dutton, Mark; Wilkinson, Mark

    2014-05-01

    Hydrological processes are adversely affected by systematic rain gauge inaccuracy due to wind induced undercatching. The implications of this are discussed and addressed. Despite evidence of the undercatch problem being cited in the past and the difficulty in solving such a complex problem; it has become an inconvenient truth to hydrologists that major inaccuracies in rainfall measurement exist. A two year long experiment using new equipment and improved data logging and telemetery techniques enriches this formative work to redress the wilful neglect with which accurate rainfall measurement has been treated in recent decades. Results from this work suggest that the annual systematic undercatch can be in the order of 20 percent in the UK. During specific periods (measured at high temporal resolution), this can rise to as high as 50 percent for a single wind impacted event. As one organisation, responsible for the environment in the UK, moves towards using fewer instruments (15 percent fewer in the next year), it is scarcely possible to overstate the importance in solving this problem. It had been hoped that new equipment, such as acoustic distrometer and weighing gauge technologies, would be able to reduce the magnitude of the bias. However, through data gathered in the 2 year experiment and through secondary sources from the 1970s and 1980s, it is demonstrated that this is not the case and that the same problems with undercatching remain now as they did then. We further postulate that wider, denser networks of inexpensive telemetered equipment are now possible but they must still address the undercatch issue. There is little merit in pointing out an age old problem if no solution is put forward to fix it. The aforementioned experiment has furnished new ideas and further work has been commissioned to address this problem. This will be achieved via the medium of a Knowledge Transfer Partnership between Newcastle University and an innovative equipment manufacturer

  1. Designing connected marine reserves in the face of global warming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez-Romero, Jorge G; Munguía-Vega, Adrián; Beger, Maria; Del Mar Mancha-Cisneros, Maria; Suárez-Castillo, Alvin N; Gurney, Georgina G; Pressey, Robert L; Gerber, Leah R; Morzaria-Luna, Hem Nalini; Reyes-Bonilla, Héctor; Adams, Vanessa M; Kolb, Melanie; Graham, Erin M; VanDerWal, Jeremy; Castillo-López, Alejandro; Hinojosa-Arango, Gustavo; Petatán-Ramírez, David; Moreno-Baez, Marcia; Godínez-Reyes, Carlos R; Torre, Jorge

    2018-02-01

    Marine reserves are widely used to protect species important for conservation and fisheries and to help maintain ecological processes that sustain their populations, including recruitment and dispersal. Achieving these goals requires well-connected networks of marine reserves that maximize larval connectivity, thus allowing exchanges between populations and recolonization after local disturbances. However, global warming can disrupt connectivity by shortening potential dispersal pathways through changes in larval physiology. These changes can compromise the performance of marine reserve networks, thus requiring adjusting their design to account for ocean warming. To date, empirical approaches to marine prioritization have not considered larval connectivity as affected by global warming. Here, we develop a framework for designing marine reserve networks that integrates graph theory and changes in larval connectivity due to potential reductions in planktonic larval duration (PLD) associated with ocean warming, given current socioeconomic constraints. Using the Gulf of California as case study, we assess the benefits and costs of adjusting networks to account for connectivity, with and without ocean warming. We compare reserve networks designed to achieve representation of species and ecosystems with networks designed to also maximize connectivity under current and future ocean-warming scenarios. Our results indicate that current larval connectivity could be reduced significantly under ocean warming because of shortened PLDs. Given the potential changes in connectivity, we show that our graph-theoretical approach based on centrality (eigenvector and distance-weighted fragmentation) of habitat patches can help design better-connected marine reserve networks for the future with equivalent costs. We found that maintaining dispersal connectivity incidentally through representation-only reserve design is unlikely, particularly in regions with strong asymmetric patterns of

  2. Drought effects on ecosystem functioning and interactions with CO2 and warming - results from CLIMAITE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beier, Claus; Ibrom, Andreas; Linden, Leon G.; Selsted, Merete B.; Albert, Kristian R.; Kongstad, Jane; Andresen, Louise C.

    2010-05-01

    Current predictions indicate that, unless greenhouse gas emissions are significantly curtailed, atmospheric CO2 concentrations will double during the present century inducing an additional 1.4 to 5.8oC increase in mean global temperature, alterations in global and regional precipitation patterns, and increase the frequency and magnitude of severe weather events (e.g. droughts and floods). Such changes will have strong effects on the terrestrial ecosystems as CO2, temperature and water are main drivers in ecosystem processes. There is growing concern that climate driven changes in precipitation patterns and water availability will have significant effects on ecosystem processes and functioning, and in some regions may be the most influential climate change factor. Yet, it has received much less attention in recent climate change research relative to elevated CO2 and temperature. Furthermore, most precipitation experiments have focussed on water alone despite the fact that at least CO2 and temperature will change simultaneously and both of these factors will have direct or indirect effects on water status and use in the ecosystem. In the CLIMAITE project a Danish heathland has been exposed since 2005 to elevated CO2, temperature and extended drought in a full factorial experiment (Mikkelsen et al., 2008). The CO2 concentration in the canopy level is elevated by 50% by the Free Air Carbon Enrichment (FACE) technique, temperature is elevated by 1-2 °C by the passive night time warming technique and summer drought is extended for 4-6 weeks by rain out shelters. The full factor combination mimics recent climate projections for Denmark 2075. Following the experiments, responses of major ecosystem processes and functioning is recorded. Drought generally leads to hypothesised reductions in most ecosystem processes during and shortly after the drought but on the short term, many of these processes also show a strong potential to recover during rewetting. Drought reduces

  3. An evaluation of fall speed characteristics in bin and bulk microphysical schemes and use of bin fall speeds to improve forecasts of warm-season rainfall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aligo, Eric A.

    2011-12-01

    As computer power increases and model grid spacing decreases, more emphasis will be put on model microphysics to produce accurate forecasts of rainfall including that from warm-season mesoscale convective systems (MCSs). Some believe bin microphysical schemes are far superior to the commonly used bulk microphysical schemes because of their ability to more accurately depict certain processes like sedimentation. However, bin schemes are computationally inefficient and there are no plans in the near future to implement such schemes operationally. Instead, this study proposes to use a technique in Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) Advanced Research WRF (ARW) simulations that attempts to improve bulk microphysical forecasts of warm-season MCSs by harnessing the intrinsic characteristics of bin fall speed distributions that are important for the sedimentation process provided the fall speed characteristics in bin schemes differ from those in commonly used bulk schemes. Fall speed distributions of rain, snow, graupel and cloud ice were compared between a bin scheme and three bulk schemes, and were found to be different between the different schemes. The microphysical processes that contributed the largest to the microphysical budget in the bin scheme often occurred with the slower fall speeds, but the opposite was true for the bulk schemes. There was evidence of size-sorting in the bin and Thompson bulk schemes, a naturally occurring phenomenon. This feature was not simulated in the WSM6 and Lin schemes and can be attributed to those schemes being single moment and the Thompson scheme being double moment in ice and rain. Since the characteristics of the bin fall speeds were different from those in the bulk schemes, bin fall speeds were used to modify bulk scheme fall speeds using a probability matching technique that was developed to improve the prediction of warm-season MCSs. The sensitivity of different convective morphologies to the fall speed modifications was also

  4. A meteorological potential forecast model for acid rain in Fujian Province, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Yi Yong; Lin, Chang Cheng; Liu, Jing Xiong; Wu, De Hui; Lian, Dong Ying; Chen, Bin Bin

    2010-05-01

    Based on the acid rain and concurrent meteorological observational data during the past 10 years in Fujian Province, China, the dependence of distribution characteristics of acid rain on season, rain rate, weather pattern and dominant airflow in four regions of Fujian Province is analyzed. On the annual average, the acid rain frequency is the highest (above 40%) in the southern and mid-eastern regions, and the lowest (16.2%) in the western region. The acid rain occurs most frequently in spring and winter, and least frequent in summer. The acid rain frequency in general increases with the increase of precipitation. It also depend on the direction of dominant airflows at 850 hPa. In the mid-eastern region, more than 40% acid rains appear when the dominant wind directions are NW, W, SW, S and SE. In the southern region, high acid rain occurrence happens when the dominant wind directions are NW, W, SW and S. In the northern region, 41.8% acid rains occur when the southwesterly is pronounced. In the western region, the southwesterly is associated with a 17% acid rain rate. The examination of meteorological sounding conditions over Fuzhou, Xiamen and Shaowu cities shows that the acid rain frequency increases with increased inversion thickness. Based on the results above, a meteorological potential forecast model for acid rain is established and tested in 2007. The result is encouraging. The model provides an objective basis for the development of acid rain forecasting operation in the province.

  5. Parameterization of rain induced surface roughness and its validation study using a third generation wave model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajesh Kumar, R.; Prasad Kumar, B.; Bala Subrahamanyam, D.

    2009-09-01

    The effect of raindrops striking water surface and their role in modifying the prevailing sea-surface roughness is investigated. The work presents a new theoretical formulation developed to study rain-induced stress on sea-surface based on dimensional analysis. Rain parameters include drop size, rain intensity and rain duration. The influences of these rain parameters on young and mature waves were studied separately under varying wind speeds, rain intensity and rain duration. Contrary to popular belief that rain only attenuates surface waves, this study also points out rain duration under certain condition can contribute to wave growth at high wind speeds. Strong winds in conjunction with high rain intensity enhance the horizontal stress component on the sea-surface, leading to wave growth. Previous studies based on laboratory experiments and dimensional analysis do not account for rain duration when attempting to parameterize sea-surface roughness. This study signifies the importance of rain duration as an important parameter modifying sea-surface roughness. Qualitative as well quantitative support for the developed formulation is established through critical validation with reports of several researchers and satellite measurements for an extreme cyclonic event in the Indian Ocean. Based on skill assessment, it is suggested that the present formulation is superior to prior studies. Numerical experiments and validation performed by incorporating in state-of-art WAM wave model show the importance of treating rain-induced surface roughness as an essential pre-requisite for ocean wave modeling studies.

  6. Characteristics of rain penetration through a gravity ventilator used for natural ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Taehyeung; Lee, Dong Ho; Ahn, Kwangseog; Ha, Hyunchul; Park, Heechang; Piao, Cheng Xu; Li, Xiaoyu; Seo, Jeoungyoon

    2008-01-01

    Gravity ventilators rely simply on air buoyancy to extract air and are widely used to exhaust air contaminants and heat from workplaces using minimal energy. They are designed to maximize the exhaust flow rate, but the rain penetration sometimes causes malfunctioning. In this study, the characteristics of rain penetration through a ventilator were examined as a preliminary study to develop a ventilator with the maximum exhaust capacity while minimizing rain penetration. A model ventilator was built and exposed to artificial rain and wind. The paths, intensities and amounts of penetration through the ventilator were observed and measured in qualitative and quantitative fashions. In the first phase, the pathways and intensities of rain penetration were visually observed. In the second phase, the amounts of rain penetration were quantitatively measured under the different configurations of ventilator components that were installed based on the information obtained in the first-phase experiment. The effects of wind speed, grill direction, rain drainage width, outer wall height, neck height and leaning angle of the outer wall from the vertical position were analyzed. Wind speed significantly affected rain penetration. Under the low crosswind conditions, the rain penetration intensities were under the limit of detection. Under the high crosswind conditions, grill direction and neck height were the most significant factors in reducing rain penetration. The installation of rain drainage was also important in reducing rain penetration. The experimental results suggest that, with proper configurations of its components, a gravity ventilator can be used for natural ventilation without significant rain penetration problems.

  7. A process-based typology of hydrological drought

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. F. Van Loon

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Hydrological drought events have very different causes and effects. Classifying these events into distinct types can be useful for both science and management. We propose a hydrological drought typology that is based on governing drought propagation processes derived from catchment-scale drought analysis. In this typology six hydrological drought types are distinguished, i.e. (i classical rainfall deficit drought, (ii rain-to-snow-season drought, (iii wet-to-dry-season drought, (iv cold snow season drought, (v warm snow season drought, and (vi composite drought. The processes underlying these drought types are the result of the interplay of temperature and precipitation at catchment scale in different seasons. As a test case, about 125 groundwater droughts and 210 discharge droughts in five contrasting headwater catchments in Europe have been classified. The most common drought type in all catchments was the classical rainfall deficit drought (almost 50% of all events, but in the selected catchments these were mostly minor events. If only the five most severe drought events of each catchment are considered, a shift towards more rain-to-snow-season droughts, warm snow season droughts, and composite droughts was found. The occurrence of hydrological drought types is determined by climate and catchment characteristics. The drought typology is transferable to other catchments, including outside Europe, because it is generic and based upon processes that occur around the world. A general framework is proposed to identify drought type occurrence in relation to climate and catchment characteristics.

  8. Histochemical Characterization of Rain-Forest Strain of Onchocerca ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract: The histochemical characterization of rain-forest strain of Onchocerca volvulus isolated in Akamkpa of Cross River State, Nigeria was studied. In a preliminary survey of 350 persons from eight villages, 75(21.4%) were found to be positive for the parasite. Males (23.6%) were more infected than the females but there ...

  9. Disturbance, diversity and distributions in Central African rain forest

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gemerden, van B.S.

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study is to gain insight in the impact of human land use on plant community composition, diversity and levels of endemism in Central African rain forest. Human disturbance in this region is causing large-scale habitat degradation. The two most widespread forms of land use are

  10. Atmospheric patterns for heavy rain events in the Balearic Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lana, A.; Campins, J.; Genovés, A.; Jansà, A.

    2007-06-01

    The Balearic Islands, as well as other Mediterranean regions, are occasionally affected by heavy rain events, which can produce numerous damages. This study contributes to improve the understanding of the dynamical mechanisms that produce heavy rain events by means of a classification of their related atmospheric patterns. Heavy rainfall dataset for the Balearic Islands and some gridded atmospheric parameters, derived from the HIRLAM-INM-0.5° analyses, were the data used in this study. Heavy rain events were recorded at a set of pluviometric stations along the Balearics for a period of 9 years, from June 1995 to May 2004. The 1000 hPa and 500 hPa geopotential heights (hereafter φ1000 and φ500), as well as the 850 hPa temperature (T850) were the fields utilized in the classification. By means of a principal components analysis (PCA) the number of variables was reduced. The cluster analysis (CA) was then applied on those new variables and eight atmospheric patterns were finally obtained. Most of the patterns showed a strong relationship between heavy rain events and cyclones.

  11. Atmospheric patterns for heavy rain events in the Balearic Islands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Lana

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The Balearic Islands, as well as other Mediterranean regions, are occasionally affected by heavy rain events, which can produce numerous damages. This study contributes to improve the understanding of the dynamical mechanisms that produce heavy rain events by means of a classification of their related atmospheric patterns.

    Heavy rainfall dataset for the Balearic Islands and some gridded atmospheric parameters, derived from the HIRLAM-INM-0.5° analyses, were the data used in this study. Heavy rain events were recorded at a set of pluviometric stations along the Balearics for a period of 9 years, from June 1995 to May 2004. The 1000 hPa and 500 hPa geopotential heights (hereafter φ1000 and φ500, as well as the 850 hPa temperature (T850 were the fields utilized in the classification.

    By means of a principal components analysis (PCA the number of variables was reduced. The cluster analysis (CA was then applied on those new variables and eight atmospheric patterns were finally obtained. Most of the patterns showed a strong relationship between heavy rain events and cyclones.

  12. Speciation of 129I in sea, lake and rain waters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lehto, Jukka; Räty, Tero; Hou, Xiaolin

    2012-01-01

    Concentrations of the very long-lived fission product 129I and stable iodine (127I) in the Baltic Sea and lake and rain waters from Finland, were measured as well as their occurrence as iodide (I−) and iodate (IO3−). The highest concentrations of both 127I and 129I occurred in sea water, on avera...

  13. Rainfall analysis for Indian monsoon region using the merged rain ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rainfall analysis for Indian monsoon region using the merged rain gauge observations and satellite estimates: Evaluation of monsoon rainfall features ... When this product was used to assess the quality of other available standard climate products (CMAP and ECMWF reanalysis) at the grid resolution of 2.5°, it was found ...

  14. Rain Tolk : "Jan Uuspõld on asendamatu" / Greta Kaupmees

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kaupmees, Greta

    2006-01-01

    Kanal 2 saate "TOP 10" naljameeste pingereas platseerus näitleja Jan Uuspõld 4. kohale. Teda iseloomustades pole üks komöödiafilmi "Jan Uuspõld läheb Tartusse" autoreid Rain Tolk kiitusega kitsi

  15. Golden rain tree leaf extracts as potential inhibitor of lipid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was designed to evaluate the peroxyl radical scavenging capacity and deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) protective effect of extract/fractions of Koelreuteria paniculata Laxm. (Golden rain tree) in lipid peroxidation assay and calf thymus DNA protection assay. The leaves of the plant were extracted with different ...

  16. The US Acid Rain Program: design, performance, and assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Gert Tinggaard

    1998-01-01

    The US Acid Rain Program (ARP) from 1990 allows 1,000 major electric utilities all over the US to trade SO2 permits. Historical emission rights have been grandfathered and the target level is 50% SO2 reduction. Market performance has been successfull with much trade activity and unexpectedly low...

  17. Socio-Economic Impacts of Rain Water Harvesting Technologies in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. This study was carried out in Nyaruguru District, Southern Province of Rwanda. The aim is to assess the socio-economic impacts of Rain Water Harvesting (RWH) technologies established in the above research area. Results from the analysis postulate that there is not yet significant effects of already established ...

  18. Quantification of Rain Induced Artifacts on Digital Satellite Television ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The presence of artifacts on the high definition television (TV) content and the eventual loss of the digital TV signals to rain is still a major concern to satellite operators, ... The degrading effect is assessed using a subjective experimental approach, which is based on the quantification of the artifacts ruining user's Quality of ...

  19. 14 CFR 33.78 - Rain and hail ingestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... distribution at the inlet plane, of at least four percent. Acceptable engine operation precludes flameout, run... for flight operation, then (4) Continuation of the rain ingestion during subsequent rapid acceleration... the engine's critical face area, and their ingestion must not cause unacceptable mechanical damage or...

  20. Variation in seed rain from Widdringtonia whytei growing in different ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mulanje Mountain is one of the examples of tropical montane landscapes with plant populations varying in size from small fragments of less than 1 ha to riverine strips and stands of more than 100 ha. Seed availability is a potential limiting factor in vegetation recovery in such landscapes. Field observation on seed rain and ...

  1. Rain storage in forests detected with ERS tandem mission SAR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, Joost de; Klaassen, Wim; Ballast, Albert

    Rainfall interception by vegetation is a major component in the hydrological balance at the land surface. Small-scale variations in rainfall interception occur when both rainfall and land surface are highly variable. A key parameter of interception is the amount of rain stored on vegetation. As

  2. Factors Affecting the Adoption of Rain Water Harvesting ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This. paper analyses the soc,io-economic factors t~at influence the adoption of rain water harvesting (RWH) technologies in Western Pare lowlands of Tanzania. Data for the study. were collected from 70 smallholder farmers in Kifaru and Lembeni viilages. These data were fitted in Probit and Logit models. ,The results of the ...

  3. Prosthesis, Surrogation, and Relation in Arturo Islas's "The Rain God"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutler, John Alba

    2008-01-01

    This essay seeks to intervene in critical discussions about Arturo Islas's 1984 novel "The Rain God", as well as to suggest the potential for synthesizing discourses heretofore deployed in disparate conversations about disability, sexuality, and ethnicity. I first demonstrate how the novel's queer characters, Miguel Chico and Felix, pose critical…

  4. Acid rain and its environmental effects: Recent scientific advances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Douglas A.; Aherne, Julian; Gay, David A.; Lehmann, Christopher M.B.

    2016-01-01

    The term ‘acid rain’ refers to atmospheric deposition of acidic constituents that impact the earth as rain, snow, particulates, gases, and vapor. Acid rain was first recognized by Ducros (1845) and subsequently described by the English chemist Robert Angus Smith (Smith, 1852) whose pioneering studies linked the sources to industrial emissions and included early observations of deleterious environmental effects (Smith, 1872). Smith's work was largely forgotten until the mid-20th century when observations began to link air pollution to the deposition of atmospheric sulfate (SO42−) and other chemical constituents, first near the metal smelter at Sudbury, Ontario, Canada, and later at locations in Europe, North America, and Australia (Gorham, 1961). Our modern understanding of acid rain as an environmental problem caused largely by regional emissions of sulfur dioxide (SO2) and nitrogen oxides (NOx) stems from observations in the 1960s and early 1970s in Sweden by Svante Odén (Odén, 1976), and in North America by Gene Likens and colleagues (Likens and Bormann, 1974). These scientists and many who followed showed the link to emissions from coal-fired power plants and other industrial sources, and documented the environmental effects of acid rain such as the acidification of surface waters and toxic effects on vegetation, fish, and other biota.

  5. Electromagnetic wave propagation in rain and polarization effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    OKAMURA, Sogo; OGUCHI, Tomohiro

    2010-01-01

    This paper summarizes our study on microwave and millimeter-wave propagation in rain with special emphasis on the effects of polarization. Starting from a recount of our past findings, we will discuss developments with these and how they are connected with subsequent research. PMID:20551593

  6. Whether or Not to Run in the Rain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocci, Franco

    2012-01-01

    The problem of choosing an optimal strategy for moving in the rain has attracted considerable attention among physicists and other scientists. Taking a novel approach, this paper shows, by studying simple shaped bodies, that the answer depends on the shape and orientation of the moving body and on wind direction and intensity. For different body…

  7. Lightning-based propagation of convective rain fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Dietrich

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a new multi-sensor approach for continuously monitoring convective rain cells. It exploits lightning data from surface networks to propagate rain fields estimated from multi-frequency brightness temperature measurements taken by the AMSU/MHS microwave radiometers onboard NOAA/EUMETSAT low Earth orbiting operational satellites. Specifically, the method allows inferring the development (movement, morphology and intensity of convective rain cells from the spatial and temporal distribution of lightning strokes following any observation by a satellite-borne microwave radiometer. Obviously, this is particularly attractive for real-time operational purposes, due to the sporadic nature of the low Earth orbiting satellite measurements and the continuous availability of ground-based lightning measurements – as is the case in most of the Mediterranean region. A preliminary assessment of the lightning-based rainfall propagation algorithm has been successfully made by using two pairs of consecutive AMSU observations, in conjunction with lightning measurements from the ZEUS network, for two convective events. Specifically, we show that the evolving rain fields, which are estimated by applying the algorithm to the satellite-based rainfall estimates for the first AMSU overpass, show an overall agreement with the satellite-based rainfall estimates for the second AMSU overpass.

  8. Lessons Learnt on Rain Forest Management for Wood Production in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study was carried out with the aim of analyzing and establishing what lessons have been learnt from positive and negative experiences of various initiatives, projects and programmes aiming at sustainable management, use and conservation of rain forests in Sub-Saharan Africa. The lessons learnt from the case ...

  9. Mechanics of Interrill Erosion with Wind-Driven Rain (WDR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    This article provides an evaluation analysis for the performance of the interrill component of the Water Erosion Prediction Project (WEPP) model for Wind-Driven Rain (WDR) events. The interrill delivery rates (Di) were collected in the wind tunnel rainfall simulator facility of the International Cen...

  10. Canopy dynamics of a tropical rain forest in French Guiana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meer, van der P.J.

    1995-01-01

    The canopy dynamics (i.e. the formation and closure of canopy gaps) of a tropical rain forest in French Guiana are described. The formation of canopy gaps is investigated. The difficulties with gap size measurements are studied, and causes and consequences of treefalls and branchfalls are

  11. Subversive English in "Raining Backwards": A Different Kind of Spanglish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Stephanie

    2013-01-01

    This essay explores the relationship(s) between English and Spanish in the novel "Raining Backwards" (1988) by Cuban American Roberto G. Fernandez. While the many linked plots and characters suggest many protagonists, this study demonstrates how language itself takes on the role of protagonist. Through the author's use of calques and…

  12. Global warming and nuclear power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, L., LLNL

    1998-07-10

    Nuclear fission power reactors represent a potential solution to many aspects of global change possibly induced by inputting of either particulate or carbon or sulfur oxides into the Earth`s atmosphere. Of proven technological feasibility, they presently produce high-grade heat for large-scale electricity generation, space heating and industrial process-energizing around the world, without emitting greenhouse gases or atmospheric particulates; importantly, electricity production costs from the best nuclear plants presently are closely comparable with those of the best fossil-fired plants. However, a substantial number of issues currently stand between nuclear power and widespread substitution for large stationary fossil fuel-fired systems. These include perceptual ones regarding both long-term and acute operational safety, plant decommissioning, fuel reprocessing, radwaste disposal, fissile materials diversion to military purposes and - perhaps most seriously- readily quantifiable concerns regarding long-term fuel supply and total unit electrical energy cost. We sketch a road-map for proceeding from the present situation toward a nuclear power-intensive world, addressing along the way each of the concerns which presently impede widespread nuclear substitution for fossil fuels, particularly for coal in the most populous and rapidly developing portions of the world, e.g., China and India. This `design to societal specifications` approach to large-scale nuclear fission power systems may lead to energy sources meeting essentially all stationary demands for high-temperature heat. Such advanced options offer a human population of ten billion the electricity supply levels currently enjoyed by Americans for 10,000 years. Nuclear power systems tailored to local needs-and-interests and having a common advanced technology base could reduce present-day world-wide C0{sub 2} emissions by two-fold, if universally employed. By application to small mobile demands, a second two

  13. Threshold Responses to Soil Moisture Deficit by Trees and Soil in Tropical Rain Forests: Insights from Field Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meir, Patrick; Wood, Tana E.; Galbraith, David R.; Brando, Paulo M.; Da Costa, Antonio C. L.; Rowland, Lucy; Ferreira, Leandro V.

    2015-01-01

    Many tropical rain forest regions are at risk of increased future drought. The net effects of drought on forest ecosystem functioning will be substantial if important ecological thresholds are passed. However, understanding and predicting these effects is challenging using observational studies alone. Field-based rainfall exclusion (canopy throughfall exclusion; TFE) experiments can offer mechanistic insight into the response to extended or severe drought and can be used to help improve model-based simulations, which are currently inadequate. Only eight TFE experiments have been reported for tropical rain forests. We examine them, synthesizing key results and focusing on two processes that have shown threshold behavior in response to drought: (1) tree mortality and (2) the efflux of carbon dioxdie from soil, soil respiration. We show that: (a) where tested using large-scale field experiments, tropical rain forest tree mortality is resistant to long-term soil moisture deficit up to a threshold of 50% of the water that is extractable by vegetation from the soil, but high mortality occurs beyond this value, with evidence from one site of increased autotrophic respiration, and (b) soil respiration reaches its peak value in response to soil moisture at significantly higher soil moisture content for clay-rich soils than for clay-poor soils. This first synthesis of tropical TFE experiments offers the hypothesis that low soil moisture–related thresholds for key stress responses in soil and vegetation may prove to be widely applicable across tropical rain forests despite the diversity of these forests. PMID:26955085

  14. Separating warming-induced drought from drought-induced warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roderick, Michael; Wolf, Sebastian; Yin, Dongqin

    2017-04-01

    A very widely held public perception is that increasing temperature is a cause of "drying" and drought. The atmospheric-focused meteorologic community has often assumed that the warmer temperatures increase evaporation and that this contributes to worsening drought via atmospheric demand. On the other hand, the agricultural and hydrologic scientific communities have a very different interpretation linked to water supply, with the lack of available water leading to reduced evaporation and enhanced surface warming. This is a classic chicken-or-the-egg problem that has resisted definitive explanation probably due to the lack of radiative observations at suitable spatial and temporal scales. Here we use recently released NASA CERES satellite radiation data to study the 2013-2014 Californian drought. We evaluate whether the observed increase in near-surface air temperature should be considered a forcing (as per standard meteorological approaches) or a feedback (as per standard agricultural and hydrologic approaches). We find that the radiative perturbation associated with the drought has a distinct radiative signature for more incoming shortwave- and less incoming longwave-radiation. That result, coupled with estimates of decreased evapotranspiration show that around two-third of the warming has a radiative origin and the remaining one-third is the result of a surface feedback from reduced evaporative cooling. Hence, the radiative perturbation during the recent Californian drought was distinctly different from the projected radiative perturbation of the enhanced greenhouse effect. We conclude that the warming experienced during meteorological drought is very different from the warming projected as a consequence of the enhanced greenhouse effect.

  15. GPM GROUND VALIDATION ENVIRONMENT CANADA (EC) MICRO RAIN RADAR (MRR) GCPEX V2

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GPM Ground Validation Environment Canada (EC) Micro Rain Radar (MRR) GCPEx V2 dataset was collected from the Micro Rain Radar (MRR) during the GPM Cold-season...

  16. GPM GROUND VALIDATION NASA MICRO RAIN RADAR (MRR) GCPEX V2

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GPM Ground Validation NASA Micro Rain Radar (MRR) GCPEx dataset was collected by a Micro Rain Radar (MRR), which is a vertically pointing Doppler radar which...

  17. Attenuation of surface waves due to monsoon rains: A model study for the north Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Vethamony, P.; Kumar, B.P.; Sarma, Y.V.B.

    The dynamic interaction of intense rain with waves based on momentum exchange is applied to a second generation wave model to predict wave attenuation during monsoon. The scheme takes into account the characteristics of rain and wave parameters...

  18. GRIP HIGH ALTITUDE IMAGING WIND AND RAIN AIRBORNE PROFILER (HIWRAP) V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GRIP High Altitude Imaging Wind and Rain Airborne Profiler (HIWRAP) dataset was collected by the High-Altitude Imaging Wind and Rain Airborne Profiler (HIWRAP),...

  19. Learning About Acid Rain: A Teacher's Guide for Grades 6 through 8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Find on this page a link to the Acid Rain Teacher's Guide for Students Grades 6-8. This guide contains information, class discussions and experiments teachers can use to teach students about acid rain.

  20. GPM GROUND VALIDATION MET ONE RAIN GAUGE PAIRS IFLOODS V2

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GPM Ground Validation Met One Rain Gauge Pairs IFloodS V2 data measures the amount of fallen precipitation collected by a Model 380 tipping bucket rain gauge...

  1. GPM GROUND VALIDATION MET ONE RAIN GAUGE PAIRS IPHEX V2

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GPM Ground Validation Met One Rain Gauge Pairs IPHEx V2 data measured the amount of fallen precipitation collected by a Model 380 tipping bucket rain gauge made...

  2. GPM GROUND VALIDATION RAIN GAUGE PAIRS MC3E V2

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GPM Ground Validation Rain Gauge Pairs MC3E V2 data measures the amount of fallen precipitation collected by tipping bucket rain gauges made by Met One...

  3. GPM GROUND VALIDATION MICRO RAIN RADAR (MRR) NASA IFLOODS V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GPM Ground Validation Micro Rain Radar (MRR) NASA IFloodS dataset was collected by a Micro Rain Radar (MRR), which is a vertically pointing Doppler radar which...

  4. Liquid Film Migration in Warm Formed Aluminum Brazing Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoit, M. J.; Whitney, M. A.; Wells, M. A.; Jin, H.; Winkler, S.

    2017-10-01

    Warm forming has previously proven to be a promising manufacturing route to improve formability of Al brazing sheets used in automotive heat exchanger production; however, the impact of warm forming on subsequent brazing has not previously been studied. In particular, the interaction between liquid clad and solid core alloys during brazing through the process of liquid film migration (LFM) requires further understanding. Al brazing sheet comprised of an AA3003 core and AA4045 clad alloy, supplied in O and H24 tempers, was stretched between 0 and 12 pct strain, at room temperature and 523K (250 °C), to simulate warm forming. Brazeability was predicted through thermal and microstructure analysis. The rate of solid-liquid interactions was quantified using thermal analysis, while microstructure analysis was used to investigate the opposing processes of LFM and core alloy recrystallization during brazing. In general, liquid clad was consumed relatively rapidly and LFM occurred in forming conditions where the core alloy did not recrystallize during brazing. The results showed that warm forming could potentially impair brazeability of O temper sheet by extending the regime over which LFM occurs during brazing. No change in microstructure or thermal data was found for H24 sheet when the forming temperature was increased, and thus warm forming was not predicted to adversely affect the brazing performance of H24 sheet.

  5. AMSR-E/Aqua L2B Global Swath Rain Rate/Type GSFC Profiling Algorithm V002

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The AMSR-E/Aqua Level-2B rain product includes instantaneous rain rate and rain type over ice-free and snow-free land and ocean between 70 degrees north and south...

  6. CR@BaSO4: an acid rain-indicating material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Hong-Wen; Xu, Xin-Hui

    2011-12-28

    The CR@BaSO(4) hybrid was synthesized, characterized and used as an acid rain-indicating (ARI) material. A painted ARI umbrella was discolored after exposure to simulated acid rain of pH 5 or less and returned to the initial color after the rain stopped. Such a functionalized material may make acid rain visual to remind people in real-time. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2011

  7. Global Warming Blame the Sun

    CERN Document Server

    Calder, N

    1997-01-01

    Concern about climate change reaches a political peak at a UN conference in Kyoto, 1-10 December, but behind the scenes the science is in turmoil. A challenge to the hypothesis that greenhouse gases are responsible for global warming comes from the discovery that cosmic rays from the Galaxy are involved in making clouds (Svensmark and Friis-Christensen, 1997). During the 20th Century the wind from the Sun has grown stronger and the count of cosmic rays has diminished. With fewer clouds, the EarthÕs surface has warmed up. This surprising mechanism explains the link between the Sun and climate change that astronomers and geophysicists have suspected for 200 years.

  8. Hydrological consequences of global warming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Norman L.

    2009-06-01

    The 2007 Intergovernmental Panel for Climate Change indicates there is strong evidence that the atmospheric concentration of carbon dioxide far exceeds the natural range over the last 650,000 years, and this recent warming of the climate system is unequivocal, resulting in more frequent extreme precipitation events, earlier snowmelt runoff, increased winter flood likelihoods, increased and widespread melting of snow and ice, longer and more widespread droughts, and rising sea level. The effects of recent warming has been well documented and climate model projections indicate a range of hydrological impacts with likely to very likely probabilities (67 to 99 percent) of occurring with significant to severe consequences in response to a warmer lower atmosphere with an accelerating hydrologic cycle.

  9. PR Software: Warm Water Energie met grafieken

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kanis, J.; Verstappen-Boerekamp, J.

    1999-01-01

    Het computerprogramma Warm Water Energie (WWE) berekent het verbruik van (warm) water, energie en reinigingsmiddelen bij de melkwinning. De nieuwste versie bevat grafieken die in één oogopslag de productie en het verbruik van warm water weergeven. In de overzichtelijke rapportage staan nu ook de

  10. Global patterns in lake ecosystem responses to warming based on the temperature dependence of metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraemer, Benjamin M; Chandra, Sudeep; Dell, Anthony I; Dix, Margaret; Kuusisto, Esko; Livingstone, David M; Schladow, S Geoffrey; Silow, Eugene; Sitoki, Lewis M; Tamatamah, Rashid; McIntyre, Peter B

    2017-05-01

    Climate warming is expected to have large effects on ecosystems in part due to the temperature dependence of metabolism. The responses of metabolic rates to climate warming may be greatest in the tropics and at low elevations because mean temperatures are warmer there and metabolic rates respond exponentially to temperature (with exponents >1). However, if warming rates are sufficiently fast in higher latitude/elevation lakes, metabolic rate responses to warming may still be greater there even though metabolic rates respond exponentially to temperature. Thus, a wide range of global patterns in the magnitude of metabolic rate responses to warming could emerge depending on global patterns of temperature and warming rates. Here we use the Boltzmann-Arrhenius equation, published estimates of activation energy, and time series of temperature from 271 lakes to estimate long-term (1970-2010) changes in 64 metabolic processes in lakes. The estimated responses of metabolic processes to warming were usually greatest in tropical/low-elevation lakes even though surface temperatures in higher latitude/elevation lakes are warming faster. However, when the thermal sensitivity of a metabolic process is especially weak, higher latitude/elevation lakes had larger responses to warming in parallel with warming rates. Our results show that the sensitivity of a given response to temperature (as described by its activation energy) provides a simple heuristic for predicting whether tropical/low-elevation lakes will have larger or smaller metabolic responses to warming than higher latitude/elevation lakes. Overall, we conclude that the direct metabolic consequences of lake warming are likely to be felt most strongly at low latitudes and low elevations where metabolism-linked ecosystem services may be most affected. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Circumpolar dynamics of a marine top-predator track ocean warming rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Descamps, Sébastien; Anker-Nilssen, Tycho; Barrett, Robert T; Irons, David B; Merkel, Flemming; Robertson, Gregory J; Yoccoz, Nigel G; Mallory, Mark L; Montevecchi, William A; Boertmann, David; Artukhin, Yuri; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Signe; Erikstad, Kjell-Einar; Gilchrist, H Grant; Labansen, Aili L; Lorentsen, Svein-Håkon; Mosbech, Anders; Olsen, Bergur; Petersen, Aevar; Rail, Jean-Francois; Renner, Heather M; Strøm, Hallvard; Systad, Geir H; Wilhelm, Sabina I; Zelenskaya, Larisa

    2017-09-01

    Global warming is a nonlinear process, and temperature may increase in a stepwise manner. Periods of abrupt warming can trigger persistent changes in the state of ecosystems, also called regime shifts. The responses of organisms to abrupt warming and associated regime shifts can be unlike responses to periods of slow or moderate change. Understanding of nonlinearity in the biological responses to climate warming is needed to assess the consequences of ongoing climate change. Here, we demonstrate that the population dynamics of a long-lived, wide-ranging marine predator are associated with changes in the rate of ocean warming. Data from 556 colonies of black-legged kittiwakes Rissa tridactyla distributed throughout its breeding range revealed that an abrupt warming of sea-surface temperature in the 1990s coincided with steep kittiwake population decline. Periods of moderate warming in sea temperatures did not seem to affect kittiwake dynamics. The rapid warming observed in the 1990s may have driven large-scale, circumpolar marine ecosystem shifts that strongly affected kittiwakes through bottom-up effects. Our study sheds light on the nonlinear response of a circumpolar seabird to large-scale changes in oceanographic conditions and indicates that marine top predators may be more sensitive to the rate of ocean warming rather than to warming itself. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Economic Theory and Global Warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzawa, Hirofumi

    2003-08-01

    Hirofumi Uzawa's theoretical framework addresses three major problems concerning global warming and other environmental hazards. First, it considers all phenomena involved with global environmental issues that exhibit externalities of one kind or another. Secondly, it covers global environmental issues involving international and intergenerational equity and justice. Lastly, it deals with global environmental issues concerning the management of the atmosphere, the oceans, water, soil, and other natural resources having to be decided by a consensus of affected countries.

  13. On Rainfall Modification by Major Urban Areas. Part 1; Observations from Space-borne Rain Radar on TRMM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, J. Marshall; Pierce, Harold; Starr, David OC. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This study represents one of the first published attempts to identify rainfall modification by urban areas using satellite-based rainfall measurements. Data from the first space-based rain-radar, the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission's (TRMM) Precipitation Radar, are employed. Analysis of the data enables identification of rainfall patterns around Atlanta, Montgomery, Nashville, San Antonio, Waco, and Dallas during the warm season. Results reveal an average increase of -28% in monthly rainfall rates within 30-60 kilometers downwind of the metropolis with a modest increase of 5.6% over the metropolis. Portions of the downwind area exhibit increases as high as 51%. The percentage chances are relative to an upwind CONTROL area. It was also found that maximum rainfall rates in the downwind impact area can exceed the mean value in the upwind CONTROL area by 48%-116%. The maximum value was generally found at an average distance of 39 km from the edge of the urban center or 64 km from the center of the city. These results are consistent with METROMEX studies of St. Louis almost two decades ago and more recent studies near Atlanta. Future work will investi(yate hypothesized factors causing rainfall modification by urban areas. Additional work is also needed to provide more robust validation of space-based rain estimates near major urban areas. Such research has implications for urban planning, water resource management, and understanding human impact on the environment.

  14. The Discovery of Global Warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacCracken, Michael C.

    2004-07-01

    At the beginning of the twentieth century, the prospect of ``global warming'' as a result of human activities was thought to be far off, and in any case, likely to be beneficial. As we begin the twenty-first century, science adviser to the British government, Sir David King, has said that he considers global warming to be the world's most important problem, including terrorism. Yet, dealing with it has become the subject of a contentious international protocol, numerous conferences of international diplomats, and major scientific assessments and research programs. Spencer Weart, who is director of the Center for History of Physics of the American Institute of Physics, has taken on the challenge of explaining how this came to be. In the tradition of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), which was established in 1988 to evaluate and assess the state of global warming science, this book is roughly equivalent to the Technical Summary, in terms of its technical level, being quite readable, but with substantive content about the main lines of evidence. Underpinning this relatively concise presentation, there is a well-developed-and still developing-Web site that, like the detailed chapters of the full IPCC assessment reports, provides vastly more information and linkages to a much wider set of reference materials (see http://www.aip.org/history/climate).

  15. A statistical rain attenuation prediction model with application to the advanced communication technology satellite project. 3: A stochastic rain fade control algorithm for satellite link power via non linear Markow filtering theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Robert M.

    1991-01-01

    The dynamic and composite nature of propagation impairments that are incurred on Earth-space communications links at frequencies in and above 30/20 GHz Ka band, i.e., rain attenuation, cloud and/or clear air scintillation, etc., combined with the need to counter such degradations after the small link margins have been exceeded, necessitate the use of dynamic statistical identification and prediction processing of the fading signal in order to optimally estimate and predict the levels of each of the deleterious attenuation components. Such requirements are being met in NASA's Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) Project by the implementation of optimal processing schemes derived through the use of the Rain Attenuation Prediction Model and nonlinear Markov filtering theory.

  16. Direct effect of acid rain on leaf chlorophyll content of terrestrial plants in China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Du, Enzai; Dong, Dan; Zeng, Xuetong; Sun, Zhengzhong; Jiang, Xiaofei; Vries, de Wim

    2017-01-01

    Anthropogenic emissions of acid precursors in China have resulted in widespread acid rain since the 1980s. Although efforts have been made to assess the indirect, soil mediated ecological effects of acid rain, a systematic assessment of the direct foliage injury by acid rain across terrestrial

  17. 76 FR 71559 - Acid Rain Program: Notice of Annual Adjustment Factors for Excess Emissions Penalty

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-18

    ... AGENCY Acid Rain Program: Notice of Annual Adjustment Factors for Excess Emissions Penalty AGENCY.... SUMMARY: The Acid Rain Program under title IV of the Clean Air Act provides for automatic excess emissions penalties in dollars per ton of excess emissions for sources that do not meet their annual Acid Rain...

  18. 40 CFR 72.71 - Acceptance of State Acid Rain programs-general.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Acceptance of State Acid Rain programs... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) PERMITS REGULATION Acid Rain Phase II Implementation § 72.71 Acceptance of State Acid... State Acid Rain program meeting the requirements of §§ 72.72 and 72.73. (b) The Administrator will...

  19. 78 FR 64496 - Acid Rain Program: Notice of Annual Adjustment Factors for Excess Emissions Penalty

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-29

    ... AGENCY Acid Rain Program: Notice of Annual Adjustment Factors for Excess Emissions Penalty AGENCY.... SUMMARY: The Acid Rain Program under title IV of the Clean Air Act provides for automatic excess emissions penalties in dollars per ton of excess emissions for sources that do not meet their annual Acid Rain...

  20. Aerosol size-dependent below-cloud scavenging by rain and snow in the ECHAM5-HAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Posselt

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Wet deposition processes are highly efficient in the removal of aerosols from the atmosphere, and thus strongly influence global aerosol concentrations, and clouds, and their respective radiative forcings. In this study, physically detailed size-dependent below-cloud scavenging parameterizations for rain and snow are implemented in the ECHAM5-HAM global aerosol-climate model. Previously, below-cloud scavenging by rain in the ECHAM5-HAM was simply a function of the aerosol mode, and then scaled by the rainfall rate. The below-cloud scavenging by snow was a function of the snowfall rate alone. The global mean aerosol optical depth, and sea salt burden are sensitive to the below-cloud scavenging coefficients, with reductions near to 15% when the more vigorous size-dependent below-cloud scavenging by rain and snow is implemented. The inclusion of a prognostic rain scheme significantly reduces the fractional importance of below-cloud scavenging since there is higher evaporation in the lower troposphere, increasing the global mean sea salt burden by almost 15%. Thermophoretic effects are shown to produce increases in the global and annual mean number removal of Aitken size particles of near to 10%, but very small increases (near 1% in the global mean below-cloud mass scavenging of carbonaceous and sulfate aerosols. Changes in the assumptions about the below-cloud scavenging by rain of particles with radius smaller than 10 nm do not cause any significant changes to the global and annual mean aerosol mass or number burdens, despite a change in the below-cloud number removal rate for nucleation mode particles by near to five-fold. Annual and zonal mean nucleation mode number concentrations are enhanced by up to 30% in the lower troposphere with the more vigourous size-dependent below-cloud scavenging. Closer agreement with different observations is found when the more physically detailed below-cloud scavenging parameterization is employed in the ECHAM5

  1. The free radical chemistry of cloud droplets and its impact upon the composition of rain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chameides, W. L.; Davis, D. D.

    1982-01-01

    Calculations are presented that simulate the free radical chemistries of the gas phase and aqueous phase within a warm cloud during midday. It is demonstrated that in the presence of midday solar fluxes, the heterogeneous scavenging of OH and HO2 from the gas phase by cloud droplets can represent a major source of free radicals to cloud water, provided the accommodation or sticking coefficient for these species impinging upon water droplets is not less than 0.0001. The aqueous-phase of HO2 radicals are found to be converted to H2O2 by aqueous-phase chemical reactions at a rate that suggests that this mechanism could produce a significant fraction of the H2O2 found in cloud droplets. The rapid oxidation of sulfur species dissolved in cloudwater by this free-radical-produced H2O2 as well as by aqueous-phase OH radicals could conceivably have a significant impact upon the chemical composition of rain.

  2. Warm Dense Matter: An Overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalantar, D H; Lee, R W; Molitoris, J D

    2004-04-21

    This document provides a summary of the ''LLNL Workshop on Extreme States of Materials: Warm Dense Matter to NIF'' which was held on 20, 21, and 22 February 2002 at the Wente Conference Center in Livermore, CA. The warm dense matter regime, the transitional phase space region between cold material and hot plasma, is presently poorly understood. The drive to understand the nature of matter in this regime is sparking scientific activity worldwide. In addition to pure scientific interest, finite temperature dense matter occurs in the regimes of interest to the SSMP (Stockpile Stewardship Materials Program). So that obtaining a better understanding of WDM is important to performing effective experiments at, e.g., NIF, a primary mission of LLNL. At this workshop we examined current experimental and theoretical work performed at, and in conjunction with, LLNL to focus future activities and define our role in this rapidly emerging research area. On the experimental front LLNL plays a leading role in three of the five relevant areas and has the opportunity to become a major player in the other two. Discussion at the workshop indicated that the path forward for the experimental efforts at LLNL were two fold: First, we are doing reasonable baseline work at SPLs, HE, and High Energy Lasers with more effort encouraged. Second, we need to plan effectively for the next evolution in large scale facilities, both laser (NIF) and Light/Beam sources (LCLS/TESLA and GSI) Theoretically, LLNL has major research advantages in areas as diverse as the thermochemical approach to warm dense matter equations of state to first principles molecular dynamics simulations. However, it was clear that there is much work to be done theoretically to understand warm dense matter. Further, there is a need for a close collaboration between the generation of verifiable experimental data that can provide benchmarks of both the experimental techniques and the theoretical capabilities

  3. A Regional-Scale Evaluation on Environmental Stability Conditions for Convective Rain under Climate Change from Super-High-Resolution GCM Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takemi, T.; Nomura, S.; Oku, Y.; Ishikawa, H.

    2011-12-01

    Understanding and forecasting of convective rain due to intense thunderstorms, which develop under conditions both with and without significant synoptic-scale and/or mesoscale forcings, are critical in dealing with disaster prevention/mitigation and developing urban planning appropriate for disaster management. Thunderstorms rapidly develop even during the daytimes of fair weather conditions without any external forcings, and sometimes become strong enough to induce local-scale meteorological disasters such as torrential rain, flush flooding, high winds, and tornadoes/gusts. With the growing interests in climate change, future changes in the behavior of such convectively generated extreme events have gained scientific and societal interests. This study conducted the regional-scale evaluations on the environmental stability conditions for convective rain that develops under synoptically undisturbed, summertime conditions by using the outputs of super-high-resolution AGCM simulations, at a 20-km resolution, for the present, the near-future, and the future climates under global warming with IPCC A1B emission scenario. The GCM, MRI-AGCM3.2S, was developed by Meteorological Research Institute of Japan Meteorological Agency under the KAKUSHIN program funded by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science, and Technology of Japan. The climate simulation outputs that were used in this study corresponded to three 25-year periods: 1980-2004 for the present climate; 2020-2044 for the near-future climate; and 2075-2099 for the future climate. The Kanto Plain that includes the Tokyo metropolitan area was chosen as the study area, since the Tokyo metropolitan area is one of the largest metropolises in the world and is vulnerable to extreme weather events. Therefore, one of the purposes of this study was to examine how regional-scale evaluations are performed from the super-high-resolution GCM outputs. After verifying the usefulness of the GCM present-climate outputs with

  4. Experimental warming decreases arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal colonization in prairie plants along a Mediterranean climate gradient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah Wilson

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF provide numerous services to their plant symbionts. Understanding climate change effects on AMF, and the resulting plant responses, is crucial for predicting ecosystem responses at regional and global scales. We investigated how the effects of climate change on AMF-plant symbioses are mediated by soil water availability, soil nutrient availability, and vegetation dynamics. Methods: We used a combination of a greenhouse experiment and a manipulative climate change experiment embedded within a Mediterranean climate gradient in the Pacific Northwest, USA to examine this question. Structural equation modeling (SEM was used to determine the direct and indirect effects of experimental warming on AMF colonization. Results: Warming directly decreased AMF colonization across plant species and across the climate gradient of the study region. Other positive and negative indirect effects of warming, mediated by soil water availability, soil nutrient availability, and vegetation dynamics, canceled each other out. Discussion: A warming-induced decrease in AMF colonization would likely have substantial consequences for plant communities and ecosystem function. Moreover, predicted increases in more intense droughts and heavier rains for this region could shift the balance among indirect causal pathways, and either exacerbate or mitigate the negative, direct effect of increased temperature on AMF colonization.

  5. Soil crusts to warm the planet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Pichel, Ferran; Couradeau, Estelle; Karaoz, Ulas; da Rocha Ulisses, Nunes; Lim Hsiao, Chiem; Northen, Trent; Brodie, Eoin

    2016-04-01

    Soil surface temperature, an important driver of terrestrial biogeochemical processes, depends strongly on soil albedo, which can be significantly modified by factors such as plant cover. In sparsely vegetated lands, the soil surface can also be colonized by photosynthetic microbes that build biocrust communities. We used concurrent physical, biochemical and microbiological analyses to show that mature biocrusts can increase surface soil temperature by as much as 10 °C through the accumulation of large quantities of a secondary metabolite, the microbial sunscreen scytonemin, produced by a group of late-successional cyanobacteria. Scytonemin accumulation decreases soil albedo significantly. Such localized warming had apparent and immediate consequences for the crust soil microbiome, inducing the replacement of thermosensitive bacterial species with more thermotolerant forms. These results reveal that not only vegetation but also microorganisms are a factor in modifying terrestrial albedo, potentially impacting biosphere feedbacks on past and future climate, and call for a direct assessment of such effects at larger scales. Based on estimates of the global biomass of cyanobacteria in soil biocrusts, one can easily calculate that there must currently exist about 15 million metric tons of scytonemin at work, warming soil surfaces worldwide

  6. Global warming and obesity: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, R; Ji, M; Zhang, S

    2018-02-01

    Global warming and the obesity epidemic are two unprecedented challenges mankind faces today. A literature search was conducted in the PubMed, Web of Science, EBSCO and Scopus for articles published until July 2017 that reported findings on the relationship between global warming and the obesity epidemic. Fifty studies were identified. Topic-wise, articles were classified into four relationships - global warming and the obesity epidemic are correlated because of common drivers (n = 21); global warming influences the obesity epidemic (n = 13); the obesity epidemic influences global warming (n = 13); and global warming and the obesity epidemic influence each other (n = 3). We constructed a conceptual model linking global warming and the obesity epidemic - the fossil fuel economy, population growth and industrialization impact land use and urbanization, motorized transportation and agricultural productivity and consequently influences global warming by excess greenhouse gas emission and the obesity epidemic by nutrition transition and physical inactivity; global warming also directly impacts obesity by food supply/price shock and adaptive thermogenesis, and the obesity epidemic impacts global warming by the elevated energy consumption. Policies that endorse deployment of clean and sustainable energy sources, and urban designs that promote active lifestyles, are likely to alleviate the societal burden of global warming and obesity. © 2017 World Obesity Federation.

  7. Multi-grid Beam and Warming scheme for the simulation of unsteady ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this paper, a multi-grid algorithm is applied to a large-scale block matrix that is produced from a Beam and Warming scheme. The Beam and Warming scheme is used in the simulation of unsteady flow in an open channel. The Gauss-Seidel block-wise iteration method is used for a smoothing process with a few iterations.

  8. Calcium ions facilitate body heat emission response to warming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tkachenko, E Ya; Khramova, G M; Kozyreva, T V

    2015-01-01

    Involvement of various areas of the body surface in heat emission response to warming is characterized by a certain succession. The first response preceding the deep body temperature rise is dilation of ear skin vessels. Then, an increase in deep body temperature is counterbalanced by vascular reaction in the tail region, which plays the leading role in up-regulation of heat emission. Calcium ions accelerate the vascular response to warming in both regions, although they produce no effect on the maximum level of heat emission. Our findings confirm the involvement of Ca(2+)-dependent mechanisms in activation of the processes aimed at stabilization of body temperature in warm-blooded animals. The role of heat-sensitive TRPV1 ion channels determining modality of the temperature signal and direction of effector reactions is discussed.

  9. Warm dense matter and Thomson scattering at FLASH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faeustlin, Roland Rainer

    2010-05-15

    X-ray free electron lasers are powerful tools to investigate moderately to strongly correlated solid density low temperature plasmas, named warm dense matter. These plasmas are of most interest for astrophysics and laser plasma interaction, particularly inertial confinement fusion. This work utilizes the ultrashort soft x-ray pulse duration and high brilliance of the free electron laser in Hamburg, FLASH, to generate warm dense matter and to study its ultrafast processes. The techniques applied are absorption measurement, emission spectroscopy and Thomson scattering. Radiative hydrodynamics and Thomson scattering simulations are used to investigate the impact of temperature and density gradients in the sample and to fit the experimental data. The measurements result in a comprehensive picture of soft x-ray matter interaction related to warm dense matter and yield insight into ultrafast equilibration and relaxation mechanisms, in particular impact ionization and radiative recombination. (orig.)

  10. Effect of simulated acid rain on the litter decomposition of Quercus acutissima and Pinus massoniana in forest soil microcosms and the relationship with soil enzyme activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Congyan; Guo, Peng; Han, Guomin; Feng, Xiaoguang; Zhang, Peng; Tian, Xingjun

    2010-06-01

    With the continuing increase in human activities, ecologists are increasingly interested in understanding the effects of acid rain on litter decomposition. Two dominant litters were chosen from Zijin Mountain in China: Quercus acutissima from a broad-leaved forest and Pinus massoniana from a coniferous forest. The litters were incubated in microcosms and treated with simulated acid rain (gradient pH levels). During a six-month incubation, changes in chemical composition (i.e., lignin, total carbohydrate, and nitrogen), litter mass losses, soil pH values, and activities of degradative enzymes were determined. Results showed that litter mass losses were depressed after exposure to acid rain and the effects of acid rain on the litter decomposition rates of needles were higher than on those of leaves. Results also revealed that simulated acid rain restrained the activities of cellulase, invertase, nitrate reductase, acid phosphatase, alkaline phosphatase, polyphenol oxidase, and urease, while it enhanced the activities of catalase in most cases during the six-month decomposition process. Catalase and polyphenol oxidase were primarily responsible for litter decomposition in the broad-leaved forest, while invertase, nitrate reductase, and urease were primarily responsible for litter decomposition in the coniferous forest. The results suggest acid rain-restrained litter decomposition may be due to the depressed enzymatic activities. According to the results of this study, soil carbon in subtropical forests would accumulate as a long-term consequence of continued acid rain. This may presumably alter the balance of ecosystem carbon flux, nutrient cycling, and humus formation, which may, in turn, have multiple effects on forest ecosystems. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Washout coefficients for particle bound radionuclides in rain and snow events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernauer, Felix; Huerkamp, Kerstin; Tschiersch, Jochen [Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen, Department of Radiation Sciences, Munich (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    For the removal of particle bound radionuclides and aerosol particles in general wet deposition processes play a key role. Supposing that wet deposition depends strongly on the type and characteristics of the precipitation event we present field experiments on the quantification of wet deposition of radionuclides by snowfall and rain events. The experiments take place in the free atmosphere at the Environmental Research Station Schneefernerhaus on Mt. Zugspitze (2650 m a.s.l.). Snowfall event characterization, quantification of the washout of aerosol particles in the size range from 10{sup -2} μm to 10 μm and determination of the overall activity washout coefficient for the radionuclides {sup 7}Be, {sup 137}Cs and {sup 210}Pb are the key tasks in our experiments. A 2D Video-Distrometer (Joanneum Research), a high volume aerosol sampling station ASS1000 (Fischer, PTI), an electrical low pressure cascade impactor ELPI+ (Dekati) and a low-level background gamma spectrometer (Canberra Broad Energy Germanium Detector) make these parameters accessible and software tools for data handling and processing will be developed. First results on precipitation event characterization are shown. Relating the radioactivities in the freshly fallen snow and rain to those in the collected aerosol allows us to quantify the washout efficiency for different precipitation events.

  12. Evaluating the cave carbonate chemical signal as a proxy for rain patterns in Mallorca Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacho, Isabel; Cisneros, Mercé; Torner, Judit; Català, Albert; Moreno, Ana; Stoll, Heather; Iglesias, Miguel; Bladé, Ileana; Fornos, Joan

    2017-04-01

    Mallorca's climate is marked by a strong seasonal cycle in both temperatures and precipitations which is likely to be recorded in the carbonate precipitates formed in its extended karst systems. Here we present isotopes and trace elements measured in dripwaters collected at weakly and/or seasonal bases since spring 2013 in three caves from Mallorca that represent the eastern and S-eastern sector of the island. This information is complemented with isotopic composition of rain events in the same region, other cave environmental parameters and chemistry of seasonal farmed carbonates in the same caves. Drip water results are very consistent between the different studied caves and indicate an important attenuation of the rainfall isotopic signal in the epikarst and only extreme climate conditions such as the severe dry conditions in summer 2015. Farmed carbonates present a clear seasonal cycle with low values, in both carbon and oxygen isotopes, in summer and autumn and high values in winter and spring. This cyclicity can not be attributed to amount effect or rain composition and we propose a close relation to cave environmental conditions. High CO2 concentrations in summer and autumn would avoid degasification reducing the PCP process and resulting in more negative isotopic relationships in both oxygen and carbon isotopes. Coherently, this CO2 cycles are in phase with those of temperature since both reflect ventilation rates in the cave. Nevertheless, ultra-high resolution profiles of Mg/Ca ratios measured by laser ablation on last century carbonate precipitates in the same caves, reveal a inter-annual variability with a persistent cyclicity which show coherent patterns with the instrumental rain records from Mallorca. This comparison reveals the potential of the Mallorca carbonates to reveal the long-term precipitation evolution of the island.

  13. EFFECT OF AN ACID RAIN ENVIRONMENT ON LIMESTONE SURFACES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mossotti, Victor G.; Lindsay, James R.; Hochella, Michael F.

    1987-01-01

    Salem limestone samples were exposed to weathering for 1 y in several urban and one rural environments. Samples exposed in the rural location were chemically indistinguishable from the freshly quarried limestone, whereas all samples collected from urban exposure sites developed gypsum stains on the ground-facing surfaces where the stones were not washed by precipitation. The gas-solid reaction of SO//2 with calcite was selected for detailed consideration. It appears from the model that under arid conditions, the quantity of stain deposited on an unwashed surface is independent of atmospheric SO//2 concentration once the surface has been saturated with gypsum. Under wet conditions, surface sulfation and weight loss are probably dominated by mechanisms involving wet stone. However, if the rain events are frequent and delimited by periods of dryness, the quantity of gypsum produced by a gas-solid reaction mechanism should correlate with both the frequency of rain events and the atmospheric SO//2 level.

  14. Intense Convective Rain Estimation Using Geostationary Meteorological Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahir, Wardah; Abu Bakar, Sahol Hamid; Mohamad, Maznorizan

    2009-03-01

    In this study, a quantitative rainfall estimates model is developed using the information from the Geostationary Meteorological Satellite-5 (GMS-5) infrared (IR) image. The model is to estimate intense convective rainfalls which are responsible for the majority of flash flooding in urban areas of Klang River Basin, Malaysia. Information from records of GMS-5 IR images have been retrieved for selected convective cell clouds associated with intense rain to be trained with the radar rain rate in a back-propagation neural network. The model has been validated against the actual convective rainfalls observed over upper Klang River Basin. Results show a satisfactory performance of the model in estimating a real averaged total rainfall with a correlation coefficient of r as 0.91 between the estimated values with the Thiessen areal averaged total rainfall.

  15. The urban perspectives of acid rain. Workshop summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tonn, B.E.

    1993-06-04

    This report documents discussions held during a workshop an Urban Perspective of Acid Rain. The workshop was sponsored by the Office of the Director, National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP). NAPAP anticipates giving increased emphasis to the benefits in urban areas of emissions reductions. The goal of this informal, exploratory workshop was to serve as a first step towards identifying pollutant monitoring, and research and assessment needs to help answer, from an urban perspective, the two key questions posed to NAPAP by Congress: (1) what are the costs, benefits, and effectiveness of the acid rain control program, and (2) what reductions in deposition, rates are needed in order to prevent adverse effects? The workshop addressed research activities needed to respond to these questions. The discussions focused. sequentially, on data needs, data and model availability, and data and modeling gaps. The discussions concentrated on four areas of effects: human health, materials, urban forests, and visibility.

  16. Activity of earthworm in Latosol under simulated acid rain stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jia-En; Yu, Jiayu; Ouyang, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Acid rain is still an issue of environmental concerns. This study investigated the impacts of simulated acid rain (SAR) upon earthworm activity from the Latosol (acidic red soil). Laboratory experiment was performed by leaching the soil columns grown with earthworms (Eisenia fetida) at the SAR pH levels ranged from 2.0 to 6.5 over a 34-day period. Results showed that earthworms tended to escape from the soil and eventually died for the SAR at pH = 2.0 as a result of acid toxicity. The catalase activity in the earthworms decreased with the SAR pH levels, whereas the superoxide dismutases activity in the earthworms showed a fluctuate pattern: decreasing from pH 6.5 to 5.0 and increasing from pH 5.0 to 4.0. Results implied that the growth of earthworms was retarded at the SAR pH ≤ 3.0.

  17. Effects of acidity of simulated rain on the fruiting of Summerred' apple trees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rinallo, C. (Univ. di Firenze (Italy))

    The effects of rain acidity on field-grown Summered apple trees (Malus domestica Borkh) under natural conditions were investigated. One group of four trees was exposed to ambient rainfall. Four other groups were covered with rainshields and received water, pH 5.6, 4, and 3, respectively, as simulated rain. Simulated acid rain, particularly at pH 3, adversely affected fruit production in terms of individual fruit weight, fruit set, fruit appearance (necrosis and russetting of the peel) and dry weight. Ambient rain was not found to cause significant reductions in apple weight. Ambient rain was not found to cause significant reductions in apple fruit production in this study.

  18. Standard test method to determine the performance of tiled roofs to wind-driven rain

    OpenAIRE

    Sánchez de Rojas, M. I.; Marín Andrés, F.

    2008-01-01

    The extent to which roof coverings can resist water penetration from the combination of wind and rain, commonly referred to as wind driven rain, is important for the design of roofs. A new project of European Standard prEN 15601 (1) specifies a method of test to determine the performance of the roof covering against wind driven rain. The combined action of wind and rain varies considerably with geographical location of a building and the associated differences in the rain and wind climate. Th...

  19. Health risks from acid rain: a Canadian perspective.

    OpenAIRE

    Franklin, C A; Burnett, R T; Paolini, R J; Raizenne, M E

    1985-01-01

    Acidic deposition, commonly referred to as acid rain, is causing serious environmental damage in eastern Canada. The revenues from forest products, tourism and sport fishing are estimated to account for about 8% of the gross national product. The impact on human health is not as clearcut and a multi-department program on the Long-Range Transport of Airborne Pollutants (LRTAP) was approved by the federal government in June 1980. The objectives of the LRTAP program are to reduce wet sulfate dep...

  20. Acid Rain and the Environment: An Ethical Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    and Paulette Middleton, "Acid Rain’s Gang of Four: More Than One Impact," The Environmental Forum, 6, No. 6 (1983). 7Kay H. Jones, "Acid Deposition...Precursors," The Environmental Forum, 7, No. 2 (1984), 11-13. Acidification Today and Tomorrow, trans. Simon Harper (Stockholm: Swedish Ministry of Agri...Deposition Pre- cursors, " The Environmental Forum, 7, No.2 Ilbid. StvnL. Rhodes and Paulette Middleton, "The Complex Challenge of Controlling Acid Raid

  1. Remote sensing of the tropical rain forest boundary layer using pulsed Doppler lidar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Pearson

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Within the framework of the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC Oxidant and Particle Photochemical Processes (OP3 project, a pulsed Doppler lidar was deployed for a 3 month period in the tropical rain forest of Borneo to remotely monitor vertical and horizontal transport, aerosol distributions and clouds in the lower levels of the atmosphere. The Doppler velocity measurements reported here directly observe the mixing process and it is suggested that this is the most appropriate methodology to use in analysing the dispersion of canopy sourced species into the lower atmosphere. These data are presented with a view to elucidating the scales and structures of the transport processes, which effect the chemical and particulate concentrations in and above the forest canopy, for applications in the parameterisation of climate models.

  2. Cutaneous warming promotes sleep onset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymann, Roy J E M; Swaab, Dick F; Van Someren, Eus J W

    2005-06-01

    Sleep occurs in close relation to changes in body temperature. Both the monophasic sleep period in humans and the polyphasic sleep periods in rodents tend to be initiated when core body temperature is declining. This decline is mainly due to an increase in skin blood flow and consequently skin warming and heat loss. We have proposed that these intrinsically occurring changes in core and skin temperatures could modulate neuronal activity in sleep-regulating brain areas (Van Someren EJW, Chronobiol Int 17: 313-54, 2000). We here provide results compatible with this hypothesis. We obtained 144 sleep-onset latencies while directly manipulating core and skin temperatures within the comfortable range in eight healthy subjects under controlled conditions. The induction of a proximal skin temperature difference of only 0.78 +/- 0.03 degrees C (mean +/- SE) around a mean of 35.13 +/- 0.11 degrees C changed sleep-onset latency by 26%, i.e., by 3.09 minutes [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.91 to 4.28] around a mean of 11.85 min (CI, 9.74 to 14.41), with faster sleep onsets when the proximal skin was warmed. The reduction in sleep-onset latency occurred despite a small but significant decrease in subjective comfort during proximal skin warming. The induction of changes in core temperature (delta = 0.20 +/- 0.02 degrees C) and distal skin temperature (delta = 0.74 +/- 0.05 degrees C) were ineffective. Previous studies have demonstrated correlations between skin temperature and sleep-onset latency. Also, sleep disruption by ambient temperatures that activate thermoregulatory defense mechanisms has been shown. The present study is the first to experimentally demonstrate a causal contribution to sleep-onset latency of skin temperature manipulations within the normal nocturnal fluctuation range. Circadian and sleep-appetitive behavior-induced variations in skin temperature might act as an input signal to sleep-regulating systems.

  3. [Effects of simulated acid rain on water physiological characteristics of Myrica rubra seedlings].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaho, Zhao-bin; Jiang, Hong; Yu, Shu-quan; Lu, Mei-juan

    2011-08-01

    Taking the seedlings of typical subtropical economic tree species Myrica rubra in Zhejiang Province as test materials, a pot experiment was conducted to study their water physiological characteristics under effects of simulated acid rain (pH 2.5 and pH 4.0), with water (pH 5.6) as the control. Season, year, and acid rain all had significant effects on the photosynthetic rate (Pn). Among the treatments, the Pn had a greater difference in summer than in spring and autumn, and was higher in treatment acid rain (pH 4.0). Season, year, acid rain, and the interactions of season and year and of the three factors had significant effects on the stomata conductance (Gs), and also, the Gs had a greater difference among the treatments in summer than in spring and autumn. Acid rain had inhibitory effect on Gs. Season, year, acid rain, and the interactions of season and year and of season and acid rain affected the transpiration rate (Tr) significantly. Same as Pn and Gs, the Tr had a greater difference among the treatments in summer than in spring and autumn. Acid rain (pH 2.5) had the strongest inhibitory effect on Tr. Acid rain and the interactions of season and year and of season and acid rain had significant effects on the water use efficiency (WUE), and acid rain (pH 2.5) had definitely positive effect on the WUE.

  4. Convective rain cells: Radar-derived spatiotemporal characteristics and synoptic patterns over the eastern Mediterranean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peleg, Nadav; Morin, Efrat

    2012-08-01

    This paper examines the spatiotemporal characteristics of convective rain cells over the eastern Mediterranean (northern Israel) and their relationship to synoptic patterns. Information on rain cell features was extracted from high-resolution weather radar data. The radar-gauge adjustment, validation, cell segmentation and tracking techniques are discussed at length at the beginning of the paper. Convective rain cells were clustered into three synoptic types (two winter lows—deep Cyprus lows and shallow lows—and one tropical intrusion, Active Red Sea Trough) using several NCEP/NCAR parameters, and empirical distributions were computed for their spatial and temporal features. In the study region, it was found that the Active Red Sea Trough rain cells are larger, live for less time and possess lower rain intensities than the rain cells generated by the winter lows. The Cyprus low rain cells were found to be less intense and slightly larger on average than the shallow low rain cells. It was further discovered that the preferential orientation of the rain cells is associated with the direction and velocity of the wind. The effect of distance from the coastline was also examined. An increase in the number and area of the rain cells near the coastline was observed, presumably due to the sea breeze convection. The mean rainfall intensity was found to peak near the shore and decrease with distance inland. This information is of great importance for understanding rain patterns and can be further applied in exploring the hydrological responses of the basins in this region.

  5. Cosmic Rays and Global Warming

    OpenAIRE

    Sloan, T.; Wolfendale, A W

    2007-01-01

    It has been claimed by others that observed temporal correlations of terrestrial cloud cover with `the cosmic ray intensity' are causal. The possibility arises, therefore, of a connection between cosmic rays and Global Warming. If true, the implications would be very great. We have examined this claim to look for evidence to corroborate it. So far we have not found any and so our tentative conclusions are to doubt it. Such correlations as appear are more likely to be due to the small variatio...

  6. [Medical consequences of global warming].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swynghedauw, Bernard

    2009-04-01

    The global warming of the planet and its anthropogenic origin are no longer debatable. Nevertheless, from a medical point of view, while the epidemiological consequences of the warming are rather well-known, the biological consequences are still poorly documented. This is a good example of evolutionary (or darwinian) medicine. The research strategy of this systematic review is based on both PubMed during the period of 2000-2007 and several reviews articles for the period >2000. From a medical point of view, there are four types of consequences. 1-The simple elevation of the average external temperature is accompanied by an increased global mortality and morbidity, the mortality/external temperature is a J curve, with the warm branch more pronounced than the cold one. A recent study on 50 different cities had confirmed that global, and more specifically cardiovascular mortalities were enhanced at the two extreme of the temperatures. 2-The acute heatwaves, such as that which happened in France in August 2003, have been studied in detail by several groups. The mortality which was observed during the recent heatwaves was not compensated by harvesting, strongly suggesting that we were dealing with heat stroke, and that such an increased mortality was more reflecting the limits of our adaptational capacities than aggravation of a previously altered health status. 3-Climate changes have modified the repartition and virulence of pathogenic agents (dengue, malaria...) and above all their vectors. Such modifications were exponential and are likely to reflect the biological properties of parasites. 4-Indirect consequences of global warming include variations in the hydraulic cycle, the new form of tropical hurricanes and many different changes affecting both biodiversity and ecosystems. They will likely result in an increased level of poverty. These finding gave rise to several basic biological questions, rarely evoked, and that concern the limits of the adaptational

  7. Impacts of simulated acid rain on soil enzyme activities in a latosol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Da-Jiong; Huang, Qian-Chun; Ouyang, Ying

    2010-11-01

    Acid rain pollution is a serious environmental problem in the world. This study investigated impacts of simulated acid rain (SAR) upon four types of soil enzymes, namely the catalase, acid phosphatase, urease, and amylase, in a latosol. Latosol is an acidic red soil and forms in the tropical rainforest biome. Laboratory experiments were performed by spraying the soil columns with the SAR at pH levels of 2.5, 3.0, 3.5., 4.0, 4.5, 5.0, and 7.0 (control) over a 20-day period. Mixed results were obtained in enzyme activities for different kinds of enzymes under the influences of the SAR. The catalase activities increased rapidly from day 0 to 5, then decreased slightly from day 5 to 15, and finally decreased sharply to the end of the experiments, whereas the acid phosphatase activities decreased rapidly from day 0 to 5, then increased slightly from day 5 to 15, and finally decreased dramatically to the end of the experiments. A decrease in urease activities was observed at all of the SAR pH levels for the entire experimental period, while an increase from day 0 to 5 and then a decrease from day 5 to 20 in amylase activities were observed at all of the SAR pH levels. In general, the catalase, acid phosphatase, and urease activities increased with the SAR pH levels. However, the maximum amylase activity was found at pH 4.0 and decreased as the SAR pH increased from 4.0 to 5.0 or decreased from 4.0 to 2.5. It is apparent that acid rain had adverse environmental impacts on soil enzyme activities in the latosol. Our study further revealed that impacts of the SAR upon soil enzyme activities were in the following order: amylase>catalase>acid phosphatase>urease. These findings provide useful information on better understanding and managing soil biological processes in the nature under the influence of acid rains. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Global Warming and the Microwave Background

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robitaille P.-M.

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available In the work, the importance of assigning the microwave background to the Earth is ad- dressed while emphasizing the consequences for global climate change. Climate mod- els can only produce meaningful forecasts when they consider the real magnitude of all radiative processes. The oceans and continents both contribute to terrestrial emis- sions. However, the extent of oceanic radiation, particularly in the microwave region, raises concerns. This is not only since the globe is covered with water, but because the oceans themselves are likely to be weaker emitters than currently believed. Should the microwave background truly be generated by the oceans of the Earth, our planet would be a much less efficient emitter of radiation in this region of the electromagnetic spectrum. Furthermore, the oceans would appear unable to increase their emissions in the microwave in response to temperature elevation, as predicted by Stefan’s law. The results are significant relative to the modeling of global warming.

  9. Climate changes instead of global warming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radovanović Milan M.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Air temperature changes on Earth in recent years are the subject of numerous and increasingly interdisciplinary research. In contrast to, conditionally speaking, generally accepted views that these changes are conditioned primarily by anthropogenic activity, more results appear to suggest that it is dominant natural processes about. Whether because of the proven existence of areas in which downtrends are registered or the stagnation of air temperature, as opposed to areas where the increase is determined, in scientific papers, as well as the media, the increasingly present is the use of the term climate changes instead of the global warming. In this paper, we shall try to present arguments for the debate relating to the official view of the IPCC, as well as research indicating the opposite view.

  10. What governs the oxygen and hydrogen isotopic composition of precipitation? - A case for varying proportions of isotopically-distinct, convective and stratiform rain fractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, P. K.; araguas Araguas, L.; Belachew, D.; Schumacher, C.; Funk, A. B.; Longstaffe, F. J.; Terzer, S.

    2016-12-01

    Beginning with the pioneering work of Dansgaard in 1953, stable water isotope ratios have been observed to be different in precipitation from different clouds, such as convective showers and continuous frontal rain, hydrologically more or less organized systems, or those with or without `bright bands' in radar reflectivity. The variability in isotope ratios of precipitation has always been interpreted, however, using a Rayleigh distillation framework, with lower isotope ratios resulting from condensation at lower temperatures and/or greater air mass distillation, a lack of below-cloud evaporation or in-cloud re-cycling, etc. Rayleigh distillation based approaches do not account for the fact that tropical and midlatitude precipitation consists of varying proportions of two fundamental rain types - widespread but lower intensity, stratiform and spatially-limited but higher intensity, convective - which form under very different cloud dynamical and microphysical environments. Using rain type fraction and isotope data from a large set of monitoring stations, we will show that differences in cloud processes impart characteristic isotope signatures to the two rain types and that their changing proportions during storm events are primarily responsible for precipitation isotope variability. As a result, isotope ratios can be used to partition precipitation into convective or stratiform rain fractions, which is important for understanding cloud feedbacks and atmospheric circulation response to precipitation, as well as climate impacts on the water cycle. We will also discuss the changing character of tropical and midlatitude precipitation over the past several decades and its implications.

  11. THE ROLE OF AIR ADVECTION AND ATMOSPHERIC STABILITY INDICES FOR IDENTIFING HEAVY RAIN STORMS IN NORTH-WESTERN ROMANIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TUDOSE T.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Air advection and convection at different levels in the atmosphere affect its vertical stability. The degree of stability / instability can be determined by using vertical wind profile (hodograph and stability indices. Analysis of these two elements was used to determine the degree of atmospheric instability for heavy rains in north-western Romania, for the warm season of the 2010-2012 period. The hodographs were made using the atmospheric soundings in Cluj-Napoca, which permitted to determine the air advection intensity between different layers of the atmosphere (sea level-925 hPa, 925-850 hPa, 850-700 and 700-500 hPa. The atmospheric stability indices were used to calculate the intensity of instability. The results show that for an unstable environment a warm advection in the lower layers of the atmosphere and a cold one, in the middle layers are needed. On the other hand, in the case of stability indices, the most useful for assessing atmospheric instability are those that include data about air moisture near the ground level.

  12. Population growth and global warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, R.V.

    2009-01-01

    When I was born in 1930, the human population of the world was a mere 2 billion. Today, it has already reached 6.8 billion, and is projected to reach 9.1 billion by 2050. That is unsustainable. It is slowly beginning to dawn on us that Global Warming is the result of increasing human CO2 emissions, and the more people there are in the world, the worse it will become. Ultimately, it is the sky that will prove to be the limit to our numbers. The developed countries of the world are the most affluent, and also the most effluent, so we must lead by example and contain our own population growth and per capita emissions. We also have a big debt to repay to former colonial territories in Africa, Asia and South America, who desperately need our help to contain their excessive rates of population growth. Belgian and Dutch obstetricians and gynaecologists can play a critical role in this endeavour. After all, we already have a pill that will stop global warming – the oral contraceptive pill. PMID:25478068

  13. Rain pulse response of soil CO2 exchange by biological soil crusts and grasslands of the semiarid Colorado Plateau, United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowling, David R.; Grote, E.E.; Belnap, J.

    2011-01-01

    Biological activity in arid grasslands is strongly dependent on moisture. We examined gas exchange of biological soil crusts (biocrusts), the underlying soil biotic community, and the belowground respiratory activity of C3 and C4 grasses over 2 years in southeast Utah, USA. We used soil surface CO2 flux and the amount and carbon isotope composition (δ13C) of soil CO2 as indicators of belowground and soil surface activity. Soil respiration was always below 2 μmol m-2s-1 and highly responsive to soil moisture. When moisture was available, warm spring and summer temperature was associated with higher fluxes. Moisture pulses led to enhanced soil respiration lasting for a week or more. Biological response to rain was not simply dependent on the amount of rain, but also depended on antecedent conditions (prior moisture pulses). The short-term temperature sensitivity of respiration was very dynamic, showing enhancement within 1-2 days of rain, and diminishing each day afterward. Carbon uptake occurred by cyanobacterially dominated biocrusts following moisture pulses in fall and winter, with a maximal net carbon uptake of 0.5 μmol m-2s-1, although typically the biocrusts were a net carbon source. No difference was detected in the seasonal activity of C3 and C4 grasses, contrasting with studies from other arid regions (where warm- versus cool-season activity is important), and highlighting the unique biophysical environment of this cold desert. Contrary to other studies, the δ13C of belowground respiration in the rooting zone of each photosynthetic type did not reflect the δ13C of C3 and C4 physiology.

  14. Weakening of the North American monsoon with global warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascale, Salvatore; Boos, William R.; Bordoni, Simona; Delworth, Thomas L.; Kapnick, Sarah B.; Murakami, Hiroyuki; Vecchi, Gabriel A.; Zhang, Wei

    2017-11-01

    Future changes in the North American monsoon, a circulation system that brings abundant summer rains to vast areas of the North American Southwest, could have significant consequences for regional water resources. How this monsoon will change with increasing greenhouse gases, however, remains unclear, not least because coarse horizontal resolution and systematic sea-surface temperature biases limit the reliability of its numerical model simulations. Here we investigate the monsoon response to increased atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations using a 50-km-resolution global climate model which features a realistic representation of the monsoon climatology and its synoptic-scale variability. It is found that the monsoon response to CO2 doubling is sensitive to sea-surface temperature biases. When minimizing these biases, the model projects a robust reduction in monsoonal precipitation over the southwestern United States, contrasting with previous multi-model assessments. Most of this precipitation decline can be attributed to increased atmospheric stability, and hence weakened convection, caused by uniform sea-surface warming. These results suggest improved adaptation measures, particularly water resource planning, will be required to cope with projected reductions in monsoon rainfall in the American Southwest.

  15. Dynamics of pollutant discharge in combined sewer systems during rain events: chance or determinism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannouche, A; Chebbo, G; Joannis, C

    2014-01-01

    A large database of continuous flow and turbidity measurements cumulating data on hundreds of rain events and dry weather days from two sites in Paris (called Quais and Clichy) and one in Lyon (called Ecully) is presented. This database is used to characterize and compare the behaviour of the three sites at the inter-events scale. The analysis is probed through three various variables: total volumes and total suspended solids (TSS) masses and concentrations during both wet and dry weather periods in addition to the contributions of diverse-origin sources to event flow volume and TSS load values. The results obtained confirm the previous findings regarding the spatial consistency of TSS fluxes and concentrations between both sites in Paris having similar land uses. Moreover, masses and concentrations are proven to be correlated between Parisian sites in a way that implies the possibility of some deterministic processes being reproducible from one catchment to another for a particular rain event. The results also demonstrate the importance of the contribution of wastewater and sewer deposits to the total events' loads and show that such contributions are not specific to Paris sewer networks.

  16. Post-Fire Recovery in Coastal Sage Scrub: Seed Rain and Community Trajectory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin Conlisk

    Full Text Available Disturbance is a primary mechanism structuring ecological communities. However, human activity has the potential to alter the frequency and intensity of natural disturbance regimes, with subsequent effects on ecosystem processes. In Southern California, human development has led to increased fire frequency close to urban areas that can form a positive feedback with invasive plant spread. Understanding how abiotic and biotic factors structure post-fire plant communities is a critical component of post-fire management and restoration. In this study we considered a variety of mechanisms affecting post-fire vegetation recovery in Riversidean sage scrub. Comparing recently burned plots to unburned plots, we found that burning significantly reduced species richness and percent cover of exotic vegetation the first two years following a 100-hectare wildfire. Seed rain was higher in burned plots, with more native forb seeds, while unburned plots had more exotic grass seeds. Moreover, there were significant correlations between seed rain composition and plant cover composition the year prior and the year after. Collectively, this case study suggests that fire can alter community composition, but there was not compelling evidence of a vegetation-type conversion. Instead, the changes in the community composition were temporary and convergence in community composition was apparent within two years post-fire.

  17. Physical and Chemical Components of Cuba’s Rain: Effects on Air Quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarita Préndez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to analyze the influence of the physical and chemical components of rain affecting air quality in Cuba. Samples were obtained from pollution monitoring stations throughout Cuba. Different chemical analyses including elements and ions were conducted. Meteorological data was also included for the analysis. Results show that the pH was slightly basic for most stations, except those of the eastern region which exhibit pH values below 5.6. The major anthropogenic sources of ions are the burning of fossil fuel by power plants, cement factories, and nickel-processing industries and the burning of biomass through poor agricultural practices. The western region exhibited increased concentrations of NO3- and SO42- during the dry season, most likely due to the long-range transport of pollutants from the northeastern United States as well as local pollutants. Marine aerosols clearly influence Cuba’s rain. Only a small fraction of the potentially acidic ions contributes to the free acidity of Cuba’s rainwater, mainly due to the neutralizing capacity of some ions such as Cl-, Na+, Ca+2, and NH4+. The implementation of abatement techniques for SO2 and NOX and some elements emissions from major stationary sources will be an effective measure to improve air quality in Cuba.

  18. Early life programming of cardiometabolic disease in the Western Australian pregnancy cohort (Raine) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Rae-Chi; Mori, Trevor A; Beilin, Lawrence J

    2012-11-01

    The Raine study (http://www.rainestudy.org.au, accessed 18 June 2012) is a longitudinal Australian birth cohort that has serially assessed the offspring of 2900 pregnant women from 18 weeks gestation in utero to 17 years of age. The Raine study data have shown that low birth weight is a surrogate for poor in utero growth from 18 weeks gestation. A U-shaped relationship between birth size and cardiometabolic risk exists in this Western Australian cohort, implying that both low and high birth weight are associated with increased risk. High birth weight is a risk factor for cardiometabolic risk, particularly for females. Lifetime adiposity trajectories are better at predicting metabolic risk of the offspring than birth size or current body mass index. Therefore, early life programming is an ongoing process, starting in utero and undergoing at least some level of modification in parallel with changes in adiposity during early childhood. Maternal smoking during pregnancy, maternal obesity, hypertension and diabetes increase the risk for metabolic risk in the offspring. Breast feeding is protective for cardiometabolic risk in this Australian cohort. © 2012 The Authors Clinical and Experimental Pharmacology and Physiology © 2012 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  19. Runoff changes in Czech headwater regions after deforestation induced by acid rains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchtele, J.; Buchtelova, M.; Hrkal, Z.; Koskova, R.

    2003-04-01

    Tendencies in water regime resulting from land-use change represent an important subject for research and in the region of so called Black Triangle at the borders of Czech Republic, Germany and Poland urgent practical problem. Namely extensive deforestation in Czech hilly basins induced by acid rains, which appeared in seventies and eighties, requires attention. Discussions among professionals and public, sometimes having emotional character, took place after large floods on the rivers Odra and Morava in 1997 and in Vltava and Elbe river basins in August 2002. The influence of deforestation induced by acid rains in the Central Europe has been considered as important contribution to disastrous character of floods. Simulations of rainfall-runoff process in several catchments and experimental basins in two distinct headwater regions along German borders, with different extent of deforestation have been carried out using daily time series up to 40 years long. The outputs of two hydrological models of different structure have been compared in these investigations: - the conceptual model SAC-SMA - Sacramento soil moisture accounting - physically based 1- D model BROOK´90 The differences between observed and simulated discharge, which could show the tendencies in the runoff have been followed. They indicate increase of runoff after deforestation.

  20. Study of Alternative GPS Network Meteorological Sensors in Taiwan: Case Studies of the Plum Rains and Typhoon Sinlaku

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Kai-Wei; Peng, Wei-Chih; Yeh, Yen-Hua; Chen, Kwo-Hwa

    2009-01-01

    Plum rains and typhoons are important weather systems in the Taiwan region. They can cause huge economic losses, but they are also considered as important water resources as they strike Taiwan annually and fill the reservoirs around the island. There are many meteorological sensors available for investigating the characteristics of weather and climate systems. Recently, the use of GPS as an alternative meteorological sensor has become popular due to the catastrophic impact of global climate change. GPS provides meteorological parameters mainly from the atmosphere. Precise Point Positioning (PPP) is a proven algorithm that has attracted attention in GPS related studies. This study uses GPS measurements collected at more than fifty reference stations of the e-GPS network in Taiwan. The first data set was collected from June 1st 2008 to June 7th 2008, which corresponds to the middle of the plum rain season in Taiwan. The second data set was collected from September 11th to September 17th 2008 during the landfall of typhoon Sinlaku. The data processing strategy is to process the measurements collected at the reference stations of the e-GPS network using the PPP technique to estimate the zenith tropospheric delay (ZTD) values of the sites; thus, the correlations between the ZTD values and the variation of rainfall during the plum rains and typhoon are analyzed. In addition, several characteristics of the meteorological events are identified using spatial and temporal analyses of the ZTD values estimated with the GPS network PPP technique. PMID:22408565

  1. Daytime warming has stronger negative effects on soil nematodes than night-time warming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xiumin; Wang, Kehong; Song, Lihong; Wang, Xuefeng; Wu, Donghui

    2017-03-20

    Warming of the climate system is unequivocal, that is, stronger warming during night-time than during daytime. Here we focus on how soil nematodes respond to the current asymmetric warming. A field infrared heating experiment was performed in the western of the Songnen Plain, Northeast China. Three warming modes, i.e. daytime warming, night-time warming and diurnal warming, were taken to perform the asymmetric warming condition. Our results showed that the daytime and diurnal warming treatment significantly decreased soil nematodes density, and night-time warming treatment marginally affected the density. The response of bacterivorous nematode and fungivorous nematode to experimental warming showed the same trend with the total density. Redundancy analysis revealed an opposite effect of soil moisture and soil temperature, and the most important of soil moisture and temperature in night-time among the measured environment factors, affecting soil nematode community. Our findings suggested that daily minimum temperature and warming induced drying are most important factors affecting soil nematode community under the current global asymmetric warming.

  2. Daytime warming has stronger negative effects on soil nematodes than night-time warming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xiumin; Wang, Kehong; Song, Lihong; Wang, Xuefeng; Wu, Donghui

    2017-03-07

    Warming of the climate system is unequivocal, that is, stronger warming during night-time than during daytime. Here we focus on how soil nematodes respond to the current asymmetric warming. A field infrared heating experiment was performed in the western of the Songnen Plain, Northeast China. Three warming modes, i.e. daytime warming, night-time warming and diurnal warming, were taken to perform the asymmetric warming condition. Our results showed that the daytime and diurnal warming treatment significantly decreased soil nematodes density, and night-time warming treatment marginally affected the density. The response of bacterivorous nematode and fungivorous nematode to experimental warming showed the same trend with the total density. Redundancy analysis revealed an opposite effect of soil moisture and soil temperature, and the most important of soil moisture and temperature in night-time among the measured environment factors, affecting soil nematode community. Our findings suggested that daily minimum temperature and warming induced drying are most important factors affecting soil nematode community under the current global asymmetric warming.

  3. Recent high mountain rockfalls and warm daily temperature extremes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, S. K.; Huggel, C.

    2012-04-01

    Linkages between longer term warming of the climate, related changes in the cryosphere, and destabilisation of high mountain rockwalls have been documented in several studies. Although understanding is far from complete, a range of physical processes related to longer term warming are understood to have an effect on slope stability. More recently, some attention has turned to the possible influence of much shorter periods of extremely warm temperatures, as a contributing factor, or even trigger of slope failures. So far, studies have not extended beyond highlighting one or a few individual events, and no common approach to quantifying the 'extremity' of the prevailing temperatures has been used. In the current study, we integrate established practices used in the climatology community in the analyses of climate extremes, together with an inventory of ca. 20 recent rock failures (1987 - 2010) in the central European Alps, to assess temporal relationships between daily air temperature extremes and rock failure occurrence. Using data from three high elevation recording sites across Switzerland, we focus on daily maximum temperatures in the 4 weeks immediately prior to each rockfall occurrence, where an extremely warm day is defined as exceeding the 95th percentile during the climatological reference period of 1971 - 2000. The 95th percentile is calculated in a 21 day moving window, so that extreme temperatures are considered relative to the time of year, and not on an annual basis. In addition, rock failures from the Southern Alps of New Zealand are analysed, although high elevation climate data are limited from this region. Results from the European Alps show that a majority of recent slope failures have been preceded by one or more extreme, unseasonably warm days, most notably in the week immediately prior to the failure. For example, for 9 slope failures in the Valais - Mt Blanc region (based on Grand St Bernhard climate data), 6 were proceeded by extremely warm

  4. GLOBAL WARMING BETWEEN SCIENCE AND POLITICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugen Străuțiu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available During the last three decades, the scientific theory of global warming has become a political ideology. Significant political components are found both in the premises and (especially in the consequences. But witnessed also at least a decade of negationism: global warming research programs are questionable regarding methodology and the ethics of research. Face to all contestations, “Global warming theory” has already become “Global climate change theory”. It is true that global warming ideology preparing a global governing over a strictly limited number of people?

  5. Classification of rain regimes by the three-dimensional properties of reflectivity fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenfeld, Daniel; Amitai, Eyal; Wolff, David B.

    1995-01-01

    An automated scheme to characterize precipitation echoes within small windows in the radar field is presented and applied to previously subjectively classified tropical rain cloud systems near Darwin, Australia. The classification parameters are (a) E(sub e), effective efficiency, as determined by cloud-top and cloud-base water vapor saturation mixing ratios; (b) BBF, brightband fraction, as determined by the fraction of the radar echo area in which the maximal reflectivity occurs within +/- 1.5 km of the 0 C isotherm level; and (c) del(sub r) Z, radial reflectivity gradients (dB/km). These classification criteria were applied to tropical rain cloud systems near Darwin, Australia, and to winter convective rain cloud systems in Israel. Both sets of measurements were made with nearly identical networks of C-band radars and rain gauge networks. The results of the application of these objective classification criteria to several independently predetermined rain regimes in Darwin have shown that better organized rain systems have smaller del(sub r) Z and larger BBF. Similarly, smaller del(sub r)Z and larger BBF were also observed from maritime rain cloud systems, as compared to continental rain cloud systems with the same degree of organization. Continental rain cloud system, regardless of their degree of organization, have larger depths, as expressed by E(sub e). The rainfall analyses presented in this study are based exclusively on rain gauge measurements, while radar information was used only to classify the individual gauge measurements.

  6. Hydrograph separation during artificial rain-on-snow event using deuterium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juras, Roman; Pavlasek, Jirka; Würzer, Sebastian

    2015-04-01

    Accurate forecasts of rain-on-snow (ROS) events are vitally important for flood forecasting. Rain water can be partially held in the snowpack or it can accentuate melt. This behaviour is crucial to flood forecasting. Hydrograph separation during rain-on-snow events using deuterium to partition outflow into snowmelt and rain contributions helps to further our understanding of the mechanisms controlling ROS runoff. In this contribution we will present research from rain-on-snow simulations. The study will be held in the Swiss Alps in Davos and surroundings. Experiments were designed to estimate the retention capacity of the snowpack and time-lag from rain-onset to outflow response. Water enriched with deuterium was used to identify pre-event (non-rain) water and event rain water in the outflow hydrograph. The main objectives are: 1) how the snowpack affects rain water input to the top of the soil during ROS events, 2) what portion of event rain water contributes to the outflow and 3) how do snowpack characteristics change during ROS events?

  7. Characterization of tropical precipitation using drop size distribution and rain rate-radar reflectivity relation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Saurabh; Maitra, Animesh

    2017-03-01

    Characterization of precipitation is important for proper interpretation of rain information from remotely sensed data. Rain attenuation and radar reflectivity (Z) depend directly on the drop size distribution (DSD). The relation between radar reflectivity/rain attenuation and rain rate (R) varies widely depending upon the origin, topography, and drop evolution mechanism and needs further understanding of the precipitation characteristics. The present work utilizes 2 years of concurrent measurements of DSD using a ground-based disdrometer at five diverse climatic conditions in Indian subcontinent and explores the possibility of rain classification based on microphysical characteristics of precipitation. It is observed that both gamma and lognormal distributions are performing almost similar for Indian region with a marginally better performance by one model than other depending upon the locations. It has also been found that shape-slope relationship of gamma distribution can be a good indicator of rain type. The Z-R relation, Z = ARb, is found to vary widely for different precipitation systems, with convective rain that has higher values of A than the stratiform rain for two locations, whereas the reverse is observed for the rest of the three locations. Further, the results indicate that the majority of rainfall (>50%) in Indian region is due to the convective rain although the occurrence time of convective rain is low (<10%).

  8. Automobility: Global Warming as Symptomatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary Backhaus

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The argument of this paper is that sustainability requires a new worldview-paradigm. It critically evaluates Gore’s liberal-based environmentalism in order to show how “shallow ecologies” are called into question by deeper ecologies. This analysis leads to the notion that global warming is better understood as a symptom indicative of the worldview that is the source for environmental crises. Heidegger’s ontological hermeneutics and its critique of modern technology show that the modern worldview involves an enframing (a totalizing technological ordering of the natural. Enframing reveals entities as standing reserve (on demand energy suppliers. My thesis maintains that enframing is geographically expressed as automobility. Because of the energy needs used to maintain automobility, reaching the goal of sustainability requires rethinking the spatial organization of life as a function of stored energy technologies.

  9. Warm liquid calorimetry for LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Geulig,E; Wallraff,W; Bézaguet, Alain-Arthur; Cavanna, F; Cinnini, P; Cittolin, Sergio; Dreesen, P; Demoulin, M; Dunps, L; Fucci, A; Gallay, G; Givernaud, Alain; Gonidec, A; Jank, Werner; Maurin, Guy; Placci, Alfredo; Porte, J P; Radermacher, E; Samyn, D; Schinzel, D; Schmidt, W F; CERN. Geneva. Detector Research and Development Committee

    1990-01-01

    Results from the beam tests of the U/TMP "warm liquid" calorimeter show that such a technique is very promising for the LHC. Our aim is to extend this programme and design a calorimeter that can satisfy the requirements of high rates, high radiation levels, compensation, uniformity and granularity, as well as fully contain hadronic showers. We propose to construct liquid ionization chambers operated at very high fields, capable of collecting the total charge produced by ionizing particles within times comparable to the bunch crossing time of the future Collider. For this reason we plan to extend the current programme on tetramethylpentane (TMP) to tetramethylsilane (TMSi). An electromagnetic calorimeter consisting of very high field ionization chambers filled with TMSi as sensitive medium with Uranium and/or other high density material as absorber will first be built (to be followed by a full-scale calorimeter module), on which newly designed fast amplifiers and readout electronics will be tested. In addition...

  10. DPIS for warm dense matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kondo, K.; Kanesue, T.; Horioka, K.; Okamura, M.

    2010-05-23

    Warm Dense Matter (WDM) offers an challenging problem because WDM, which is beyond ideal plasma, is in a low temperature and high density state with partially degenerate electrons and coupled ions. WDM is a common state of matter in astrophysical objects such as cores of giant planets and white dwarfs. The WDM studies require large energy deposition into a small target volume in a shorter time than the hydrodynamical time and need uniformity across the full thickness of the target. Since moderate energy ion beams ({approx} 0.3 MeV/u) can be useful tool for WDM physics, we propose WDM generation using Direct Plasma Injection Scheme (DPIS). In the DPIS, laser ion source is connected to the Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) linear accelerator directly without the beam transport line. DPIS with a realistic final focus and a linear accelerator can produce WDM.

  11. Perihelion precession, polar ice and global warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steel, Duncan

    2013-03-01

    The increase in mean global temperature over the past 150 years is generally ascribed to human activities, in particular the rises in the atmospheric mixing ratios of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases since the Industrial Revolution began. Whilst it is thought that ice ages and interglacial periods are mainly initiated by multi-millennial variations in Earth's heliocentric orbit and obliquity, shorter-term orbital variations and consequent observable climatic effects over decadal/centurial timescales have not been considered significant causes of contemporary climate change compared to anthropogenic influences. Here it is shown that the precession of perihelion occurring over a century substantially affects the intra-annual variation of solar radiation influx at different locations, especially higher latitudes, with northern and southern hemispheres being subject to contrasting insolation changes. This north/south asymmetry has grown since perihelion was aligned with the winter solstice seven to eight centuries ago, and must cause enhanced year-on-year springtime melting of Arctic (but not Antarctic) ice and therefore feedback warming because increasing amounts of land and open sea are denuded of high-albedo ice and snow across boreal summer and into autumn. The accelerating sequence of insolation change now occurring as perihelion moves further into boreal winter has not occurred previously during the Holocene and so would not have been observed before by past or present civilisations. Reasons are given for the significance of this process having been overlooked until now. This mechanism represents a supplementary - natural - contribution to climate change in the present epoch and may even be the dominant fundamental cause of global warming, although anthropogenic effects surely play a role too.

  12. Competitive advantage on a warming planet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lash, Jonathan; Wellington, Fred

    2007-03-01

    Whether you're in a traditional smokestack industry or a "clean" business like investment banking, your company will increasingly feel the effects of climate change. Even people skeptical about global warming's dangers are recognizing that, simply because so many others are concerned, the phenomenon has wide-ranging implications. Investors already are discounting share prices of companies poorly positioned to compete in a warming world. Many businesses face higher raw material and energy costs as more and more governments enact policies placing a cost on emissions. Consumers are taking into account a company's environmental record when making purchasing decisions. There's also a burgeoning market in greenhouse gas emission allowances (the carbon market), with annual trading in these assets valued at tens of billions of dollars. Companies that manage and mitigate their exposure to the risks associated with climate change while seeking new opportunities for profit will generate a competitive advantage over rivals in a carbon-constrained future. This article offers a systematic approach to mapping and responding to climate change risks. According to Jonathan Lash and Fred Wellington of the World Resources Institute, an environmental think tank, the risks can be divided into six categories: regulatory (policies such as new emissions standards), products and technology (the development and marketing of climate-friendly products and services), litigation (lawsuits alleging environmental harm), reputational (how a company's environmental policies affect its brand), supply chain (potentially higher raw material and energy costs), and physical (such as an increase in the incidence of hurricanes). The authors propose a four-step process for responding to climate change risk: Quantify your company's carbon footprint; identify the risks and opportunities you face; adapt your business in response; and do it better than your competitors.

  13. Enhanced greenhouse gas emissions from the Arctic with experimental warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voigt, Carolina; Lamprecht, Richard E.; Marushchak, Maija E.; Lind, Saara E.; Novakovskiy, Alexander; Aurela, Mika; Martikainen, Pertti J.; Biasi, Christina

    2017-04-01

    Temperatures in the Arctic are projected to increase more rapidly than in lower latitudes. With temperature being a key factor for regulating biogeochemical processes in ecosystems, even a subtle temperature increase might promote the release of greenhouse gases (GHGs) to the atmosphere. Usually, carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) are the GHGs dominating the climatic impact of tundra. However, bare, patterned ground features in the Arctic have recently been identified as hot spots for nitrous oxide (N2O). N2O is a potent greenhouse gas, which is almost 300 times more effective in its global warming potential than CO2; but studies on arctic N2O fluxes are rare. In this study we examined the impact of temperature increase on the seasonal GHG balance of all three important GHGs (CO2, CH4 and N2O) from three tundra surface types (vegetated peat soils, unvegetated peat soils, upland mineral soils) in the Russian Arctic (67˚ 03' N 62˚ 55' E), during the course of two growing seasons. We deployed open-top chambers (OTCs), inducing air and soil surface warming, thus mimicking predicted warming scenarios. We combined detailed CO2, CH4 and N2O flux studies with concentration measurements of these gases within the soil profile down to the active layer-permafrost interface, and complemented these GHG measurements with detailed soil nutrient (nitrate and ammonium) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) measurements in the soil pore water profile. In our study, gentle air warming (˜1.0 ˚ C) increased the seasonal GHG release of all dominant surface types: the GHG budget of vegetated peat and mineral soils, which together cover more than 80 % of the land area in our study region, shifted from a sink to a source of -300 to 144 g CO2-eq m-2 and from -198 to 105 g CO2-eq m-2, respectively. While the positive warming response was governed by CO2, we provide here the first in situ evidence that warming increases arctic N2O emissions: Warming did not only enhance N2O emissions from

  14. A Climate Transect through Tropical Montane Rain Forest in Hawaii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juvik, James O.; Nullet, Dennis

    1994-11-01

    Two years of climate data from a transect of three surface meteorological stations on the windward slopes of Mauna Loa, Hawaii, are analyzed. The stations constitute a transect between 700 and 1640 m through the wet, montane rain forest zone below the trade-wind inversion. Data are compared with previous short-term measurements for the area, and previously unreported climate elements such as photosynthetically active radiation and soil temperature are presented. While absolute values vary between the sites, annual and diurnal climate patterns for the sites are remarkably similar, despite the altitudinal range involved and the close proximity of the trade-wind inversion level to the upper station.

  15. Efficient Warm-ups: Creating a Warm-up That Works.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauffenburger, Sandra Kay

    1992-01-01

    Proper warm-up is important for any activity, but designing an effective warm-up can be time consuming. An alternative approach is to take a cue from Laban Movement Analysis (LMA) and consider movement design from the perspective of space and planes of motion. Efficient warm-up exercises using LMA are described. (SM)

  16. Multi-scale responses to warming in an experimental insect metacommunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grainger, Tess Nahanni; Gilbert, Benjamin

    2017-12-01

    In metacommunities, diversity is the product of species interactions at the local scale and dispersal between habitat patches at the regional scale. Although warming can alter both species interactions and dispersal, the combined effects of warming on these two processes remains uncertain. To determine the independent and interactive effects of warming-induced changes to local species interactions and dispersal, we constructed experimental metacommunities consisting of enclosed milkweed patches seeded with five herbivorous milkweed specialist insect species. We treated metacommunities with two levels of warming (unwarmed and warmed) and three levels of connectivity (isolated, low connectivity, high connectivity). Based on metabolic theory, we predicted that if plant resources were limited, warming would accelerate resource drawdown, causing local insect declines and increasing both insect dispersal and the importance of connectivity to neighboring patches for insect persistence. Conversely, given abundant resources, warming could have positive local effects on insects, and the risk of traversing a corridor to reach a neighboring patch could outweigh the benefits of additional resources. We found support for the latter scenario. Neither resource drawdown nor the weak insect-insect associations in our system were affected by warming, and most insect species did better locally in warmed conditions and had dispersal responses that were unchanged or indirectly affected by warming. Dispersal across the matrix posed a species-specific risk that led to declines in two species in connected metacommunities. Combined, this scaled up to cause an interactive effect of warming and connectivity on diversity, with unwarmed metacommunities with low connectivity incurring the most rapid declines in diversity. Overall, this study demonstrates the importance of integrating the complex outcomes of species interactions and spatial structure in understanding community response to climate

  17. Apocalypse soon? Dire messages reduce belief in global warming by contradicting just-world beliefs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinberg, Matthew; Willer, Robb

    2011-01-01

    Though scientific evidence for the existence of global warming continues to mount, in the United States and other countries belief in global warming has stagnated or even decreased in recent years. One possible explanation for this pattern is that information about the potentially dire consequences of global warming threatens deeply held beliefs that the world is just, orderly, and stable. Individuals overcome this threat by denying or discounting the existence of global warming, and this process ultimately results in decreased willingness to counteract climate change. Two experiments provide support for this explanation of the dynamics of belief in global warming, suggesting that less dire messaging could be more effective for promoting public understanding of climate-change research.

  18. Moss-specific changes in nitrogen fixation following two decades of warming, shading, and fertilizer addition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Pernille Lærkedal; Lett, Signe; Michelsen, Anders

    2012-01-01

    . To expand the knowledge on species-specific responses, we measured nitrogen fixation associated with two moss species: Hylocomium splendens and Aulacomnium turgidum. Our expectations of decreased nitrogen fixation rates in the fertilizer and shading treatments were met. However, contrary to our expectation...... of increased nitrogen fixation in the warming treatment, we observed either no change (Hylocomium) or a decrease (Aulacomnium) in fixation in the warmed plots. We hypothesize that this could be due to moss-specific responses or to long-term induced effects of the warming. For example, we observed that the soil...... temperature increase induced by the warming treatment was low and insignificant as vegetation height and total vascular plant cover of the warmed plots increased, and moss cover decreased. Hence, truly long-term studies lasting more than two decades provide insights on changes in key biogeochemical processes...

  19. A transcriptomic study reveals differentially expressed genes and pathways respond to simulated acid rain in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ting-Wu; Niu, Li; Fu, Bin; Chen, Juan; Wu, Fei-Hua; Chen, Juan; Wang, Wen-Hua; Hu, Wen-Jun; He, Jun-Xian; Zheng, Hai-Lei

    2013-01-01

    Acid rain, as a worldwide environmental issue, can cause serious damage to plants. In this study, we provided the first case study on the systematic responses of arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh.) to simulated acid rain (SiAR) by transcriptome approach. Transcriptomic analysis revealed that the expression of a set of genes related to primary metabolisms, including nitrogen, sulfur, amino acid, photosynthesis, and reactive oxygen species metabolism, were altered under SiAR. In addition, transport and signal transduction related pathways, especially calcium-related signaling pathways, were found to play important roles in the response of arabidopsis to SiAR stress. Further, we compared our data set with previously published data sets on arabidopsis transcriptome subjected to various stresses, including wound, salt, light, heavy metal, karrikin, temperature, osmosis, etc. The results showed that many genes were overlapped in several stresses, suggesting that plant response to SiAR is a complex process, which may require the participation of multiple defense-signaling pathways. The results of this study will help us gain further insights into the response mechanisms of plants to acid rain stress.

  20. Community Risk Assessment of Rainfall Variability under Rain-fed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-10-02

    Oct 2, 2016 ... global warming, changes in precipitation, melting of glaciers and ice caps and rise in sea levels (UNFCCC, 2007; IPCC, 2007; Chauhan, 2010). The climate in Africa has become highly variable and unpredictable. These variations in Africa's climate are said to occur seasonally, annually and over decades ...

  1. Vulnerability and adaptation of rain fed agriculture to climate change ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EJIRO

    climate change. In this context, Hoggan and Littlemore. (2009) warn that despite existing scientific evidence on global warming, some media have been misused to spread propaganda generated by self-interest groups for the purpose of creating confusion about climate change. Evidence of climate change and variability ...

  2. Global Warming: Lessons from Ozone Depletion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobson, Art

    2010-01-01

    My teaching and textbook have always covered many physics-related social issues, including stratospheric ozone depletion and global warming. The ozone saga is an inspiring good-news story that's instructive for solving the similar but bigger problem of global warming. Thus, as soon as students in my physics literacy course at the University of…

  3. Strategies for mitigation of global warming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, Niels I

    2009-01-01

    The paper analyses the international negotions on climate change leading up to COP15 in Copenhagen. Supplementary policies for mitigation of global warming are proposed.......The paper analyses the international negotions on climate change leading up to COP15 in Copenhagen. Supplementary policies for mitigation of global warming are proposed....

  4. Exploring the Sociopolitical Dimensions of Global Warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadler, Troy D.; Klosterman, Michelle L.

    2009-01-01

    The authors present an activity to help high school students conceptualize the sociopolitical complexity of global warming through an exploration of varied perspectives on the issue. They argue that socioscientific issues such as global warming present important contexts for learning science and that the social and political dimensions of these…

  5. Awareness And Perception of Global Warming Among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUND: Increase in the emission of green house gases and the attendant climatic changes have led to the phenomenon of global warming with all its catastrophic consequences. OBJECTIVE: To assess knowledge and perception of the concept of global warming among undergraduate medical students

  6. National Security Implications of Global Warming Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    Although numerous historical examples demonstrate how actual climate change has contributed to the rise and fall of powers, global warming , in and of...become convinced that global warming is universally bad and humans are the primary cause, political leaders may develop ill-advised policies restricting

  7. Global warming: Evidence from satellite observations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Prabhakara, C; Iacovazzi, R; Yoo, J.‐M; Dalu, G

    2000-01-01

    ...‐weighted global‐mean temperature of the atmosphere, with a peak weight near the mid troposphere, warmed at the rate of 0.13±0.05 Kdecade −1 during 1980 to 1999. The global warming deduced from conventional meteorological data that have been corrected for urbanization effects agrees reasonably with this satellite‐deduced result.

  8. Global Warming: How Much and Why?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanouette, William

    1990-01-01

    Summarizes the history of the study of global warming and includes a discussion of the role of gases, like carbon dioxide, methane, and chlorofluorocarbon (CFC). Discusses modern research on the global warming, including computer modelling and the super-greenhouse effect. (YP)

  9. Turkish Students' Ideas about Global Warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilinc, Ahmet; Stanisstreet, Martin; Boyes, Edward

    2008-01-01

    A questionnaire was used to explore the prevalence of ideas about global warming in Year 10 (age 15-16 years) school students in Turkey. The frequencies of individual scientific ideas and misconceptions about the causes, consequences and "cures" of global warming were identified. In addition, several general findings emerged from this…

  10. Warming can boost denitrification disproportionately due to altered oxygen dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annelies J Veraart

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Global warming and the alteration of the global nitrogen cycle are major anthropogenic threats to the environment. Denitrification, the biological conversion of nitrate to gaseous nitrogen, removes a substantial fraction of the nitrogen from aquatic ecosystems, and can therefore help to reduce eutrophication effects. However, potential responses of denitrification to warming are poorly understood. Although several studies have reported increased denitrification rates with rising temperature, the impact of temperature on denitrification seems to vary widely between systems. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We explored the effects of warming on denitrification rates using microcosm experiments, field measurements and a simple model approach. Our results suggest that a three degree temperature rise will double denitrification rates. By performing experiments at fixed oxygen concentrations as well as with oxygen concentrations varying freely with temperature, we demonstrate that this strong temperature dependence of denitrification can be explained by a systematic decrease of oxygen concentrations with rising temperature. Warming decreases oxygen concentrations due to reduced solubility, and more importantly, because respiration rates rise more steeply with temperature than photosynthesis. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results show that denitrification rates in aquatic ecosystems are strongly temperature dependent, and that this is amplified by the temperature dependencies of photosynthesis and respiration. Our results illustrate the broader phenomenon that coupling of temperature dependent reactions may in some situations strongly alter overall effects of temperature on ecological processes.

  11. Coastal sea level rise with warming above 2 degree

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jevrejeva, Svetlana; Jackson, Luke; Riva, Riccardo; Grinsted, Aslak; Moore, John

    2017-04-01

    Two degrees global warming above the pre-industrial level has been suggested as an appropriate threshold beyond which climate change risks become unacceptably high. This '2 degree' threshold is likely to be reached between 2040 and 2050 for both Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) 8.5 and 4.5. Resulting sea level rises will not be globally uniform due to ocean dynamical processes and changes in gravity associated with water mass-redistribution. Here we provide probabilistic sea level rise projections for the global coastline with warming above the 2 degree goal. We demonstrate that by 2040 with two degree warming under the RCP8.5 scenario more than 90% of coastal areas will experience sea level rise exceeding the global estimate of 0.2 m, with up to 0.4 m expected along the Atlantic coast of North America and Norway. If warming continues above two degree, then by 2100 sea level will rise with speeds unprecedented throughout human civilization, reaching 0.9 m (median), and 80% of the global coastline will exceed the global ocean sea level rise upper 95% confidence limit of 1.8 m. Coastal communities of rapidly expanding cities in the developing world, small island states, and vulnerable tropical coastal ecosystems will have a very limited time after mid-century to adapt to sea level rises.

  12. Rain Basin Design Implications for Soil Microbial Activity and N-mineralization in a Semi-arid Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, C.; Pavao-Zuckerman, M.

    2014-12-01

    Rain basins have been an increasingly popular Green Infrastructure (GI) solution to the redistribution of water flow caused by urbanization. This study was conducted to examine how different approaches to basin design, specifically mulching (gravel vs. compost and gravel), influence the water availability of rain basins and the effects this has on the soil microbial activity of the basins. Soil microbes are a driving force of biogeochemical process and may impact the carbon and nitrogen dynamics of rain basin GI. In this study we sampled 12 different residential-scale rain basins, differing in design established at Biosphere 2, Arizona in 2013. Soil samples and measurements were collected before and after the onset of the monsoon season in 2014 to determine how the design of basins mediates the transition from dry to wet conditions. Soil abiotic factors were measured, such as moisture content, soil organic matter (SOM) content, texture and pH, and were related to the microbial biomass size within the basins. Field and lab potential N-mineralization and soil respiration were measured to determine how basin design influences microbial activity and N dynamics. We found that pre-monsoon basins with compost had higher moisture contents and that there was a positive correlation between the moisture content and the soil microbial biomass size of the basins. Pre-monsoon data also suggests that N-mineralization rates for basins with compost were higher than those with only gravel. These design influences on basin-scale biogeochemical dynamics and nitrogen retention may have important implications for urban biogeochemistry at neighborhood and watershed scales.

  13. Comparison Of Quantitative Precipitation Estimates Derived From Rain Gauge And Radar Derived Algorithms For Operational Flash Flood Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streubel, D. P.; Kodama, K.

    2014-12-01

    To provide continuous flash flood situational awareness and to better differentiate severity of ongoing individual precipitation events, the National Weather Service Research Distributed Hydrologic Model (RDHM) is being implemented over Hawaii and Alaska. In the implementation process of RDHM, three gridded precipitation analyses are used as forcing. The first analysis is a radar only precipitation estimate derived from WSR-88D digital hybrid reflectivity, a Z-R relationship and aggregated into an hourly ¼ HRAP grid. The second analysis is derived from a rain gauge network and interpolated into an hourly ¼ HRAP grid using PRISM climatology. The third analysis is derived from a rain gauge network where rain gauges are assigned static pre-determined weights to derive a uniform mean areal precipitation that is applied over a catchment on a ¼ HRAP grid. To assess the effect of different QPE analyses on the accuracy of RDHM simulations and to potentially identify a preferred analysis for operational use, each QPE was used to force RDHM to simulate stream flow for 20 USGS peak flow events. An evaluation of the RDHM simulations was focused on peak flow magnitude, peak flow timing, and event volume accuracy to be most relevant for operational use. Results showed RDHM simulations based on the observed rain gauge amounts were more accurate in simulating peak flow magnitude and event volume relative to the radar derived analysis. However this result was not consistent for all 20 events nor was it consistent for a few of the rainfall events where an annual peak flow was recorded at more than one USGS gage. Implications of this indicate that a more robust QPE forcing with the inclusion of uncertainty derived from the three analyses may provide a better input for simulating extreme peak flow events.

  14. Rain event properties at the source of the Blue Nile River

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. T. Haile

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, spatial and temporal patterns of rain event properties are analysed. These event properties are rain event depth, event duration, mean event rain rate, peak rain rate and the time span between two consecutive rain events which is referred to as inter-event time (IET. In addition, we assessed how rain event properties change when the period over which rainfall data is aggregated changes from 1 to 6 min and when the minimum inter-event time (MIT changes from 30 min to 8 h. Rainfall data is obtained from a field campaign in two wet seasons of June–August (JJA of 2007 and 2008 in Gilgel Abbay watershed that is situated at the source basin of the Upper Blue Nile River in Ethiopia. The rainfall data was automatically recorded at eight stations. The results revealed that rain event depth is more related to peak rain rate than to event duration. At the start and towards the end of the wet season, the rain events have larger depth with longer duration and longer IET than those in mid-season. Event rain rate and IET are strongly related to terrain elevation. Sekela which is on a mountain area has the shortest IET while Bahir Dar which is at the south shore of Lake Tana has the longest IET. The period over which rainfall data is aggregated significantly affected the values of rain event properties that are estimated using relatively small value (30 min of MIT but its effect diminished when the MIT is increased to 8 h. It is shown that increasing the value of MIT has the largest effect on rain event properties of mountain stations that are characterised by high rainfall intermittency.

  15. Convective rain cells: radar-derived spatio-temporal characteristics and synoptic patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peleg, N.; Morin, E.

    2012-04-01

    In this study we present the spatiotemporal characteristics of convective rain cells over the Eastern Mediterranean (northern Israel) and their relationship to synoptic patterns. Information on rain cell features was extracted from high-resolution weather radar data for a total of 191,586 radar volume scans from 12 hydrological years. The convective rain cell features (i.e., cell area, rainfall intensity and cell orientation) were obtained using cell segmentation technique. Cell tracking algorithm was used to analyze the changes of those features over time. Convective rain cells were clustered into three synoptic types (two extratropical winter lows: deep Cyprus low and shallow low, and a tropical intrusion: Active Red Sea Trough) using several NCEP/NCAR parameters, and empirical distributions were computed for their spatial and temporal features. In the study region, it was found that the Active Red Sea Trough rain cells are larger, live for less time and possess lower rain intensities than the rain cells generated by the winter lows. The Cyprus low rain cells were found to be less intense and slightly larger on average than the shallow low rain cells. It was further discovered that the preferential orientation of the rain cells is associated with the direction and velocity of the wind. The effect of distance from the coastline was also examined. An increase in the number and area of the rain cells near the coastline was observed, presumably due to the sea breeze convection. The mean rainfall intensity was found to peak near the shore and decrease with distance inland. This information is of great importance for understanding rain patterns and can be further applied in exploring the hydrological responses of the basins in this region. The presented study is the first step in achieving the long-term goal: to develop a high space-time resolution weather generator for creating rainfall ensembles under different climatology scenarios. Those rainfall ensembles will be

  16. Direct effect of acid rain on leaf chlorophyll content of terrestrial plants in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Enzai; Dong, Dan; Zeng, Xuetong; Sun, Zhengzhong; Jiang, Xiaofei; de Vries, Wim

    2017-12-15

    Anthropogenic emissions of acid precursors in China have resulted in widespread acid rain since the 1980s. Although efforts have been made to assess the indirect, soil mediated ecological effects of acid rain, a systematic assessment of the direct foliage injury by acid rain across terrestrial plants is lacking. Leaf chlorophyll content is an important indicator of direct foliage damage and strongly related to plant productivity. We synthesized data from published literature on experiments of simulated acid rain, by directly exposing plants to acid solutions with varying pH levels, to assess the direct effect of acid rain on leaf chlorophyll content across 67 terrestrial plants in China. Our results indicate that acid rain substantially reduces leaf chlorophyll content by 6.71% per pH unit across the recorded plant species. The direct reduction of leaf chlorophyll content due to acid rain exposure showed no significant difference across calcicole, ubiquist or calcifuge species, implying that soil acidity preference does not influence the sensitivity to leaf injury by acid rain. On average, the direct effects of acid rain on leaf chlorophyll on trees, shrubs and herbs were comparable. The effects, however varied across functional groups and economic use types. Specifically, leaf chlorophyll content of deciduous species was more sensitive to acid rain in comparison to evergreen species. Moreover, vegetables and fruit trees were more sensitive to acid rain than other economically used plants. Our findings imply a potential production reduction and economic loss due to the direct foliage damage by acid rain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Combining meteorological radar and network of rain gauges data for space–time model development

    OpenAIRE

    Pastoriza, Vicente; Núñez Fernández, Adolfo; Machado, Fernando; Mariño, Perfecto; Pérez Fontán, Fernando; Fiebig, Uwe-Carsten

    2009-01-01

    Technological developments and the trend to go higher and higher in frequency give rise to the need for true space–time rain field models for testing the dynamics of fade countermeasures. There are many models that capture the spatial correlation of rain fields. Worth mentioning are those models based on cell ensembles. However, the rain rate fields created in this way need the introduction of the time variable to reproduce their dynamics. In this paper, we have concentrated on ad...

  18. Occurrence of Erosion-Effective Rain in the Brno Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvie Kozlovská

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to the growing awareness of the extent of degradation of agricultural soils as a result of water erosion, increased attention is paid to the establishing of effective erosion control measures based on reliable and timely input data. When determining the vulnerability of farmland to water erosion, the determining factor is erosively dangerous rains, which are defined as totals over 12.5 mm and intensities of more than 24 mm.h-1. This paper analyses the dangerous erosion rainfalls using data on rainfall intensities of precipitation monitoring network of the company Brněnské vodovody a kanalizace, a.s. (BVK in the city of Brno. At first, we have set up 14 rain gauge stations distributed over an area of approximately 105 km2 and set basic indicators of individual rainfall episodes. Then we have analysed their maximum 30-minute intensity, kinetic energy and then determined the factor of erosion efficiency. We have found out a significant spatial variability of these variables throughout the area of the city of Brno. The R-factor analysis revealed that the average annual values of R-factor were the highest in the south-eastern part of the city of Brno while the least dangerous erosion rainfalls occurred in the west.

  19. Performance of a Rain Barrel Sharing Network under Climate Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seong Jin Noh

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Rain barrels can be technically shared through social practices or mutual agreement between individual households. This study proposes the evaluation system for a rain barrel sharing network (RBSN considering three performance criteria of reliability, resiliency, and vulnerability, under plausible climate change scenarios. First, this study shows how the system can be improved in terms of the performance criteria using historical daily rainfall data based on the storage-reliability-yield relationship. This study then examined how the benefits from RBSN are affected by climate change after 100 years. Three climate change scenarios (A1B, A2 and B2 and three global circulation models were used for this purpose. The results showed that the reliability and vulnerability are improved due to sharing and their improvements become larger under climate change conditions. In contrast, the resiliency reduces slightly due to sharing and its reduction is attenuated under climate change conditions. In particular, vulnerability will be reduced significantly under climate change. These results suggest that the sharing of various water resources systems can be an effective climate change adaptation strategy that reduces vulnerability and increases the reliability of the system.

  20. Urban warming in the 2013 summer heat wave in eastern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; Yan, Zhongwei; Quan, Xiao-Wei; Feng, Jinming

    2017-05-01

    The impact of urban warming during the 2013 July-August extreme heat wave event across the Yangtze River Delta (YRD) in China was assessed. Using a newly developed high-resolution, land-use dataset, urban stations were identified from a total of 101 stations in the YRD. The difference between urban and non-urban/rural stations indicates that urban warming reached 1.22 °C in the 2013 summer heat wave. The new land-use dataset was then input to the Weather Research and Forecasting model to further understand the dynamical/physical processes of the urban warming during the heat wave. The model-simulated urban warming is 1.5 °C. Impacts of urbanization on near-surface temperature had strong diurnal variation, reaching a peak at 19:00 LST, around sunset. In the daytime, urban warming was mainly caused by enhanced sensible heat fluxes and longwave radiation from the surface. Because of reduced latent heat flux and increased heat capacity, urban ground stored much more heat than rural ground during the daytime, which is later released as sensible heat flux from the surface at night, leading to the nocturnal urban warming. The simulation results also suggest a positive feedback between urban warming and heat wave intensity, which makes the heat wave more intense in urban than rural areas and the urban warming during the extreme heat wave stronger than its climatological mean.