WorldWideScience

Sample records for warm ischaemia times

  1. [Cold ischaemia time and outcome of renal transplantation].

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Warle, M.C.; Cheung, C.L.; Teerenstra, S.; Hoitsma, A.J.; Vliet, J.A. van der

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the effect of cold ischaemia time (CIT) on the outcome of cadaveric renal transplantation in the Netherlands. DESIGN: Retrospective, comparative. METHODS: We studied data from the Netherlands organ transplant registry of cadaveric renal transplants from 1990-2007. Results :

  2. Prevention of Renal Injury After Induction of Ozone Tolerance in Rats Submitted to Warm Ischaemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Barber

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available On the basis that ozone (O3 can upregulate cellular antioxidant enzymes, a morphological, biochemical and functional renal study was performed in rats undergoing a prolonged treatment with O3 before renal ischaemia. Rats were divided into four groups: (1 control, a medial abdominal incision was performed to expose the kidneys; (2 ischaemia, in animals undergoing a bilateral renal ischaemia (30 min, with subsequent reperfusion (3 h; (3 O3 + ischaemia, as group 2, but with previous treatment with O3 (0.5 mg/kg per day given in 2.5 ml O2 via rectal administration for 15 treatments; (4 O2 + ischaemia, as group 3, but using oxygen (O2 alone. Biochemical parameters as fructosamine level, phospholipase A, and superoxide dismutases (SOD activities, as well as renal plasma flow (RPF and glomerular filtration rate (GFR, were measured by means of plasma clearance of p-amino-hippurate and inulin, respectively. In comparison with groups 1 and 3, the RPF and GFR were significantly decreased in groups 2 and 4. Interestingly, renal homogenates of the latter groups yielded significantly higher values of phospholipase A activity and fructosamine level in comparison with either the control (1 and the O3 (3 treated groups. Moreover renal SOD activity showed a significant increase in group 3 without significant differences among groups 1, 2 and 4. Morphological alterations of the kidney were present in 100%, 88% and 30% of the animals in groups 2, 4 and 3, respectively. It is proposed that the O3 protective effect can be ascribed to the substantial possibility of upregulating the antioxidant defence system capable of counteracting the damaging effect of ischaemia. These findings suggest that, whenever possible, ozone preconditioning may represent a prophylactic approach for minimizing renal damage before transplantation.

  3. Extended normothermic extracorporeal perfusion of isolated human liver after warm ischaemia: a preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellomo, Rinaldo; Marino, Bruno; Starkey, Graeme; Fink, Michael; Wang, Bao Zhong; Eastwood, Glenn M; Peck, Leah; Young, Helen; Houston, Shane; Skene, Alison; Opdam, Helen; Jones, Robert

    2014-09-01

    Donation after circulatory death (DCD) livers are at markedly increased risk of primary graft dysfunction and biliary tract ischaemia. Normothermic extracorporeal liver perfusion (NELP) may increase the ability to transplant DCD livers and may allow their use for artificial extracorporeal liver support of patients with fulminant liver failure. We conducted two proof-of-concept experiments using human livers after DCD to assess the feasibility and functional efficacy of NELP over an extended period. We applied extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, parenteral nutrition, separate hepatic artery and portal vein perfusion and physiological perfusion pressures to two livers obtained after DCD. We achieved NELP and evidence of liver function (bile production, paracetamol removal and maintenance of normal lactate levels) in both livers; one for 24 hours and the other for 43 hours. Histological examination showed areas of patchy ischaemia but preserved biliary ducts and canaliculi. Our experiments justify further investigations of the feasibility and efficacy of extended DCD liver preservation by ex-vivo perfusion.

  4. Normothermic extracorporeal perfusion of isolated porcine liver after warm ischaemia: a preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellomo, Rinaldo; Suzuki, Satoshi; Marino, Bruno; Starkey, Graeme K; Chambers, Brenton; Fink, Michael A; Wang, Bao Zhong; Houston, Shane; Eastwood, Glenn; Calzavacca, Paolo; Glassford, Neil; Skene, Alison; Jones, Daryl A; Jones, Robert

    2012-09-01

    Liver transplantation is a major life-saving procedure, and donation after cardiac death (DCD) has increased the pool of potential liver donors. However, DCD livers are at increased risk of primary graft dysfunction and biliary tract ischaemia. Normothermic extracorporeal liver perfusion (NELP) may increase the ability to protect, evaluate and, in future, transplant DCD livers. We conducted proof-of-concept experiments using a DCD model in the pig to assess the short-term (4 hours) feasibility and functional efficacy of NELP. Using extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, parenteral nutrition, separate hepatic artery and portal vein perfusion, and physiological perfusion pressures, we achieved NELP and evidence of function (bile production, paracetamol removal, maintenance of normal ammonia and lactate levels) for 4 hours in pig livers subjected to 15 and 30 minutes of cardiac arrest before explantation. Our experiments justify further investigations of the feasibility and efficacy of human DCD liver preservation by ex-vivo perfusion.

  5. Daytime warming has stronger negative effects on soil nematodes than night-time warming

    OpenAIRE

    Yan, Xiumin; Wang, Kehong; Song, Lihong; Wang, Xuefeng; Wu, Donghui

    2017-01-01

    Warming of the climate system is unequivocal, that is, stronger warming during night-time than during daytime. Here we focus on how soil nematodes respond to the current asymmetric warming. A field infrared heating experiment was performed in the western of the Songnen Plain, Northeast China. Three warming modes, i.e. daytime warming, night-time warming and diurnal warming, were taken to perform the asymmetric warming condition. Our results showed that the daytime and diurnal warming treatmen...

  6. Acute lower extremity ischaemia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Acute lower extremity ischaemia. Acute lower limb ischaemia is a surgical emergency. ... is ~1.5 cases per 10 000 persons per year. Acute ischaemia ... Table 2. Clinical features discriminating embolic from thrombotic ALEXI. Clinical features.

  7. Global Warming in Geologic Time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Archer, David

    2008-01-01

    The notion is pervasive in the climate science community and in the public at large that the climate impacts of fossil fuel CO2 release will only persist for a few centuries. This conclusion has no basis in theory or models of the atmosphere/ ocean carbon cycle, which we review here. The largest fraction of the CO2 recovery will take place on time scales of centuries, as CO2 invades the ocean, but a significant fraction of the fossil fuel CO2, ranging in published models in the literature from 20-60%, remains airborne for a thousand years or longer. Ultimate recovery takes place on time scales of hundreds of thousands of years, a geologic longevity typically associated in public perceptions with nuclear waste. The glacial/interglacial climate cycles demonstrate that ice sheets and sea level respond dramatically to millennial-timescale changes in climate forcing. There are also potential positive feedbacks in the carbon cycle, including methane hydrates in the ocean, and peat frozen in permafrost, that are most sensitive to the long tail of the fossil fuel CO2 in the atmosphere.

  8. A real-time Global Warming Index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haustein, K; Allen, M R; Forster, P M; Otto, F E L; Mitchell, D M; Matthews, H D; Frame, D J

    2017-11-13

    We propose a simple real-time index of global human-induced warming and assess its robustness to uncertainties in climate forcing and short-term climate fluctuations. This index provides improved scientific context for temperature stabilisation targets and has the potential to decrease the volatility of climate policy. We quantify uncertainties arising from temperature observations, climate radiative forcings, internal variability and the model response. Our index and the associated rate of human-induced warming is compatible with a range of other more sophisticated methods to estimate the human contribution to observed global temperature change.

  9. Daytime warming has stronger negative effects on soil nematodes than night-time warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xiumin; Wang, Kehong; Song, Lihong; Wang, Xuefeng; Wu, Donghui

    2017-03-01

    Warming of the climate system is unequivocal, that is, stronger warming during night-time than during daytime. Here we focus on how soil nematodes respond to the current asymmetric warming. A field infrared heating experiment was performed in the western of the Songnen Plain, Northeast China. Three warming modes, i.e. daytime warming, night-time warming and diurnal warming, were taken to perform the asymmetric warming condition. Our results showed that the daytime and diurnal warming treatment significantly decreased soil nematodes density, and night-time warming treatment marginally affected the density. The response of bacterivorous nematode and fungivorous nematode to experimental warming showed the same trend with the total density. Redundancy analysis revealed an opposite effect of soil moisture and soil temperature, and the most important of soil moisture and temperature in night-time among the measured environment factors, affecting soil nematode community. Our findings suggested that daily minimum temperature and warming induced drying are most important factors affecting soil nematode community under the current global asymmetric warming.

  10. Silent ischaemia and hypertension

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boon, D.; Piek, J. J.; van Montfrans, G. A.

    2000-01-01

    For many years now, silent ischaemia has been recognized as a distinct clinical entity, and its relevance in different patient groups has been established. However, a number of basic questions have not been answered. In explaining the pathophysiology of silent ischaemia, factors affecting both the

  11. Global warming - Time to get things done

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cognasse, Olivier; Dumas, Arnaud; Dupin, Ludovic; Moragues, Manuel; Rouaud, Pierre-Olivier

    2016-01-01

    A set of articles is proposed just before the COP22 in Morocco. A first article comments the content of the Paris agreement signed at the end of the COP21, evokes some commitments adopted by various countries to play a role in the struggle against global warming, mentions the various institutional steps before the COP22 in Marrakech, and evokes the commitment of the private sector. A second article highlights that actors of the finance sector trend to take the climate risk always more into account in their investments: this can be noticed with the development of green bonds. Then, in an interview, Nicolas Hulot comments the challenges and stakes of the COP22, outlines that everything is still to be done regarding the struggle against global warming and the decrease of the use of fossil energies, comments political and social consequences, criticizes the behaviour and approach of industries, notably Monsanto, and concludes by the need of a new tax policy. The next article discusses the recent evolutions of energy mixes in different countries and at the World level: slow decrease of carbon share, issue of the importance of nuclear energy, impact of carbon price, development of wind and solar energy everywhere. The other articles concern Morocco. An article then comments the Moroccan energy policy which is characterized by massive investments in green energies even if fossil energies are still prevailing. These developments are financed through a performing system based on public-private partnership. An article addresses the project of rehabilitation of a landfill by Suez in Meknes, and another one a Renault-Nissan factory, near Tangier, where water recycling is remarkable. The last article proposes a brief overview of the development of public and urban transport in Morocco: electric buses, tramways, project of a TGV line

  12. Renal blood flow and metabolism after cold ischaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, J H; Petersen, H K

    1984-01-01

    Peroperative measurements of renal blood flow (RBF), renal O2-uptake, and renal venous lactate/pyruvate (L/P) ratio were performed before and after a period of 30-71 min of hypothermic (10-15 degrees C) renal ischaemia in nine patients, undergoing surgery for renal calculi. Before ischaemia, RBF.......01) immediately after re-established perfusion and 36% (P less than 0.02) 30 min later. In one additional patient, who had a short warm ischaemia (8 min), the flow pattern was the same. As arterial pressure remained constant, the reduced RBF signifies an increased renal vascular resistance. Renal O2-uptake...... and renal venous L/P ratio were almost constant, indicating no significant anaerobic processes being involved in the flow response. None of the patients showed any signs of reactive hyperaemia. It is concluded that hypothermic renal ischaemia may be followed by an increased renal vascular resistance even...

  13. Night-time warming and the greenhouse effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kukla, G.; Karl, T.R.

    1993-01-01

    Studies of temperature data collected mainly from rural stations in North America, China, the Commonwealth of Independent States, Australia, Sudan, Japan, Denmark, Northern Finland, several Pacific Islands, Pakistan, South Africa and Europe suggest that the reported warming of the Northern Hemisphere since WWII is principally a result of an increase in night-time temperatures. The average monthly maximum and minimum temperatures, as well as the mean diurnal temperature range (DTR), were calculated for various regions from data supplied by 1000 stations from 1951 to 1990. Average and minimum temperatures generally rose during the analysed interval and the rise in night-time temperatures was more pronounced than the increase in daily maximum temperatures. As a result, the mean DTR decreased almost everywhere. The most probable causes of the rise in night-time temperatures are: an increase in cloudiness owing to natural changes in the circulation patterns of oceans and the atmosphere; increased cloud cover density caused by industrial pollution; urban heat islands, generated by cities, which are strongest during the night; irrigation which keeps the surface warmer at night and cooler by day; and anthropogenic greenhouse gases. 18 refs., 3 figs

  14. Validation of housekeeping genes for quantitative real-time PCR in in-vivo and in-vitro models of cerebral ischaemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serena Joaquín

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies of gene expression in experimental cerebral ischaemia models can contribute to understanding the pathophysiology of brain ischaemia and to identifying prognostic markers and potential therapeutic targets. The normalization of relative qRT-PCR data using a suitable reference gene is a crucial prerequisite for obtaining reliable conclusions. No validated housekeeping genes have been reported for the relative quantification of the mRNA expression profile activated in in-vitro ischaemic conditions, whereas for the in-vivo model different reference genes have been used. The present study aims to determine the expression stability of ten housekeeping genes (Gapdh, β2m, Hprt, Ppia, Rpl13a, Oaz1, 18S rRNA, Gusb, Ywhaz and Sdha to establish their suitability as control genes for in-vitro and in-vivo cerebral ischaemia models. Results The expression stability of the candidate reference genes was evaluated using the 2-ΔC'T method and ANOVA followed by Dunnett's test. For the in-vitro model using primary cultures of rat astrocytes, all genes analysed except for Rpl13a and Sdha were found to have significantly different levels of mRNA expression. These different levels were also found in the case of the in-vivo model of pMCAO in rats except for Hprt, Sdha and Ywhaz mRNA, where the expression did not vary. Sdha and Ywhaz were identified by geNorm and NormFinder as the two most stable genes. Conclusion We have validated endogenous control genes for qRT-PCR analysis of gene expression in in-vitro and in-vivo cerebral ischaemia models. For normalization purposes, Rpl13a and Sdha are found to be the most suitable genes for the in-vitro model and Sdha and Ywhaz for the in-vivo model. Genes previously used as housekeeping genes for the in-vivo model in the literature were not validated as good control genes in the present study, showing the need for careful evaluation for each new experimental setup.

  15. Renal blood flow and metabolism after cold ischaemia: peroperative measurements in patients with calculi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, H K; Henriksen, Jens Henrik Sahl

    1984-01-01

    Peroperative measurements of renal blood flow (RBF), renal O2-uptake, and renal venous lactate/pyruvate (L/P) ratio were performed before and after a period of 30-71 min of hypothermic (10-15 degrees C) renal ischaemia in nine patients, undergoing surgery for renal calculi. Before ischaemia, RBF.......01) immediately after re-established perfusion and 36% (P less than 0.02) 30 min later. In one additional patient, who had a short warm ischaemia (8 min), the flow pattern was the same. As arterial pressure remained constant, the reduced RBF signifies an increased renal vascular resistance. Renal O2-uptake...... and renal venous L/P ratio were almost constant, indicating no significant anaerobic processes being involved in the flow response. None of the patients showed any signs of reactive hyperaemia. It is concluded that hypothermic renal ischaemia may be followed by an increased renal vascular resistance even...

  16. Deep time evidence for climate sensitivity increase with warming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shaffer, Gary; Huber, Matthew; Rondanelli, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    warming analogue. We obtain constrained estimates of CO2 and climate sensitivity before and during the PETM and of the PETM carbon input amount and nature. Sensitivity increased from 3.3-5.6 to 3.7-6.5K (Kelvin) into the PETM. When taken together with Last Glacial Maximum and modern estimates, this result...... world, but past warming events may provide insight. Here we employ paleoreconstructions and new climate-carbon model simulations in a novel framework to explore a wide scenario range for the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) carbon release and global warming event 55.8Ma ago, a possible future...

  17. Half-time re-warm up increases performance capacity in male elite soccer players

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edholm, P; Krustrup, Peter; Randers, Morten Bredsgaard

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the acute effects of a half-time re-warm up on performance and movement patterns in soccer match play. Using a crossover design, 22 professional male players performed traditional passive rest (CON) or a low-intensity re-warm up (RW) during the half-time period of two soccer.......01). Moreover, RW had more possession of the ball in the beginning of the second half. In conclusion, traditional passive half-time rest leads to impaired sprint and jump performance during the initial phase of the second half in professional soccer players whereas a re-warm up effectively attenuates...

  18. Ischaemia-reperfusion injury: a major protagonist in kidney transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponticelli, Claudio

    2014-06-01

    Ischaemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) is a frequent event in kidney transplantation, particularly when the kidney comes from a deceased donor. The brain death is usually associated with generalized ischaemia due to a hyperactivity of the sympathetic system. In spite of this, most donors have profound hypotension and require administration of vasoconstrictor agents. Warm ischaemia after kidney vessels clamping and the cold ischaemia after refrigeration also reduce oxygen and nutrients supply to tissues. The reperfusion further aggravates the state of oxidation and inflammation created by ischaemia. IRI first attacks endothelial cells and tubular epithelial cells. The lesions may be so severe that they lead to acute kidney injury (AKI) and delayed graft function (DGF), which can impair the graft survival. The unfavourable impact of DGF is worse when DGF is associated with acute rejection. Another consequence of IRI is the activation of the innate immunity. Danger signals released by dying cells alarm Toll-like receptors that, through adapter molecules and a chain of kinases, transmit the signal to transcription factors which encode the genes regulating inflammatory cells and mediators. In the inflammatory environment, dendritic cells (DCs) intercept the antigen, migrate to lymph nodes and present the antigen to immunocompetent cells, so activating the adaptive immunity and favouring rejection. Attempts to prevent IRI include optimal management of donor and recipient. Calcium-channel blockers, l-arginine and N-acetylcysteine could obtain a small reduction in the incidence of post-transplant DGF. Fenoldopam, Atrial Natriuretic Peptide, Brain Natriuretic Peptide and Dopamine proved to be helpful in reducing the risk of AKI in experimental models, but there is no controlled evidence that these agents may be of benefit in preventing DGF in kidney transplant recipients. Other antioxidants have been successfully used in experimental models of AKI but only a few studies of poor

  19. The rise of global warming skepticism: exploring affective image associations in the United States over time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Nicholas; Leiserowitz, Anthony

    2012-06-01

    This article explores how affective image associations to global warming have changed over time. Four nationally representative surveys of the American public were conducted between 2002 and 2010 to assess public global warming risk perceptions, policy preferences, and behavior. Affective images (positive or negative feelings and cognitive representations) were collected and content analyzed. The results demonstrate a large increase in "naysayer" associations, indicating extreme skepticism about the issue of climate change. Multiple regression analyses found that holistic affect and "naysayer" associations were more significant predictors of global warming risk perceptions than cultural worldviews or sociodemographic variables, including political party and ideology. The results demonstrate the important role affective imagery plays in judgment and decision-making processes, how these variables change over time, and how global warming is currently perceived by the American public. © 2012 Society for Risk Analysis.

  20. Global assessment of experimental climate warming on tundra vegetation: heterogeneity over space and time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmendorf, Sarah C; Henry, Gregory H R; Hollister, Robert D; Björk, Robert G; Bjorkman, Anne D; Callaghan, Terry V; Collier, Laura Siegwart; Cooper, Elisabeth J; Cornelissen, Johannes H C; Day, Thomas A; Fosaa, Anna Maria; Gould, William A; Grétarsdóttir, Járngerður; Harte, John; Hermanutz, Luise; Hik, David S; Hofgaard, Annika; Jarrad, Frith; Jónsdóttir, Ingibjörg Svala; Keuper, Frida; Klanderud, Kari; Klein, Julia A; Koh, Saewan; Kudo, Gaku; Lang, Simone I; Loewen, Val; May, Jeremy L; Mercado, Joel; Michelsen, Anders; Molau, Ulf; Myers-Smith, Isla H; Oberbauer, Steven F; Pieper, Sara; Post, Eric; Rixen, Christian; Robinson, Clare H; Schmidt, Niels Martin; Shaver, Gaius R; Stenström, Anna; Tolvanen, Anne; Totland, Orjan; Troxler, Tiffany; Wahren, Carl-Henrik; Webber, Patrick J; Welker, Jeffery M; Wookey, Philip A

    2012-02-01

    Understanding the sensitivity of tundra vegetation to climate warming is critical to forecasting future biodiversity and vegetation feedbacks to climate. In situ warming experiments accelerate climate change on a small scale to forecast responses of local plant communities. Limitations of this approach include the apparent site-specificity of results and uncertainty about the power of short-term studies to anticipate longer term change. We address these issues with a synthesis of 61 experimental warming studies, of up to 20 years duration, in tundra sites worldwide. The response of plant groups to warming often differed with ambient summer temperature, soil moisture and experimental duration. Shrubs increased with warming only where ambient temperature was high, whereas graminoids increased primarily in the coldest study sites. Linear increases in effect size over time were frequently observed. There was little indication of saturating or accelerating effects, as would be predicted if negative or positive vegetation feedbacks were common. These results indicate that tundra vegetation exhibits strong regional variation in response to warming, and that in vulnerable regions, cumulative effects of long-term warming on tundra vegetation - and associated ecosystem consequences - have the potential to be much greater than we have observed to date. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd/CNRS.

  1. Lower limb ischaemia and reperfusion injury in healthy volunteers measured by oxidative and inflammatory biomarkers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halladin, N. L.; Busch, Sarah Victoria Ekeløf; Alamili, M.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Ischaemia-reperfusion (IR) injury is partly caused by the release of reactive oxygen species and cytokines and may result in remote organ injury. Surgical patients are exposed to surgical stress and anaesthesia, both of which can influence the IR response. An IR model without these int......OBJECTIVE: Ischaemia-reperfusion (IR) injury is partly caused by the release of reactive oxygen species and cytokines and may result in remote organ injury. Surgical patients are exposed to surgical stress and anaesthesia, both of which can influence the IR response. An IR model without...... at any sampling time. CONCLUSION: Twenty minutes of lower limb ischaemia does not result in an ischaemia-reperfusion injury in healthy volunteers, measurable by oxidative and pro- and anti-inflammatory biomarkers in muscle biopsies and in the systemic circulation....

  2. The effect of prolonged of warm ischaemic injury on renal function in an experimental ex vivo normothermic perfusion system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosgood, Sarah A; Shah, K; Patel, M; Nicholson, M L

    2015-06-30

    Donation after circulatory death (DCD) kidney transplants inevitably sustain a degree of warm ischaemic injury, which is manifested clinically as delayed graft function. The aim of this study was to define the effects of prolonged periods of warm ischaemic injury on renal function in a normothermic haemoperfused kidney model. Porcine kidneys were subjected to 15, 60, 90 (n = 6 per group) and 120 min (n = 4) of in situ warm ischaemia (WI) and then retrieved, flushed with cold preservation fluid and stored in ice for 2 h. Kidneys then underwent 3 h of normothermic reperfusion with a whole blood-based perfusate using an ex vivo circuit developed from clinical grade cardiopulmonary bypass technology. Creatinine clearance, urine output and fractional excretion of sodium deteriorated sequentially with increasing warm time. Renal function was severely compromised after 90 or 120 min of WI but haemodynamic, metabolic and histological parameters demonstrated the viability of kidneys subjected to prolonged warm ischaemia. Isolated kidney perfusion using a warm, oxygenated, red cell-based perfusate allows an accurate ex vivo assessment of the potential for recovery from warm ischaemic injury. Prolonged renal warm ischaemic injury caused a severe decrement in renal function but was not associated with tissue necrosis.

  3. Monitoring of glycolytic activity secondary to ischaemia in knee replacement surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    León-Muñoz, V J; Lisón-Almagro, A J; Hernández-García, C H; López-López, M

    2018-04-17

    To non-invasively assess tissue lesion secondary to ischaemia applied during knee replacement surgery. Secondary objectives: to assess whether this lesion correlates with the duration of ischaemia and whether instrumental and gender variables influence it. Prospective cohort study. Pre and postoperative serum lactate levels have been determined as an indicator of glycolytic activity secondary to ischaemia in 88 patients. Serum lactate determination was performed by reactive strips of enzymatic-amperometric detection on capillary blood. Preoperative serum lactate levels (mean and SD): 2.467±1.036 mmol/L. Postoperative serum lactate levels: 3.938±2.018 mmol/L. Ischaemia time 102.98±18.25minutes. Postoperative serum lactate levels were significantly higher than preoperative lactate levels. There are no statistical differences according to the time that the ischaemia was prolonged, gender or type of instrumentation used. In our study, postoperative serum lactate values were significantly higher than preoperative lactate values, with no correlation to the duration of ischaemia during knee replacement surgery. Copyright © 2018 SECOT. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Prolonged warm ischemia time is associated with graft failure and mortality after kidney transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tennankore, Karthik K; Kim, S Joseph; Alwayn, Ian P J; Kiberd, Bryce A

    2016-03-01

    Warm ischemia time is a potentially modifiable insult to transplanted kidneys, but little is known about its effect on long-term outcomes. Here we conducted a study of United States kidney transplant recipients (years 2000-2013) to determine the association between warm ischemia time (the time from organ removal from cold storage to reperfusion with warm blood) and death/graft failure. Times under 10 minutes were potentially attributed to coding error. Therefore, the 10-to-under-20-minute interval was chosen as the reference group. The primary outcome was mortality and graft failure (return to chronic dialysis or preemptive retransplantation) adjusted for recipient, donor, immunologic, and surgical factors. The study included 131,677 patients with 35,901 events. Relative to the reference patients, times of 10 to under 20, 20 to under 30, 30 to under 40, 40 to under 50, 50 to under 60, and 60 and more minutes were associated with hazard ratios of 1.07 (95% confidence interval, 0.99-1.15), 1.13 (1.06-1.22), 1.17 (1.09-1.26), 1.20 (1.12-1.30), and 1.23 (1.15-1.33) for the composite event, respectively. Association between prolonged warm ischemia time and death/graft failure persisted after stratification by donor type (living vs. deceased donor) and delayed graft function status. Thus, warm ischemia time is associated with adverse long-term patient and graft survival after kidney transplantation. Identifying strategies to reduce warm ischemia time is an important consideration for future study. Copyright © 2015 International Society of Nephrology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Mesenteric ischaemia after endovascular coiling of ruptured cerebral aneurysms.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kamel, M H

    2012-02-03

    Three patients were referred to a national neurosurgical centre following CT evidence of subarachnoid haemorrhage. The three patients, who were referred from different institutions within a seven week period, were Fisher grade 3 and WFNS Grade I at all times. Angiography showed a PCOM aneurysm in one case, a ruptured Basilar tip aneurysm and an unruptured ACOM aneurysm in another case, and an ACOM aneurysm in the third case. It was decided that the aneurysms were suitable for endovascular coiling. These patients had unremarkable intraoperative catheterizations and coiling but subsequently deteriorated post-operatively due to mesenteric ischaemia. Two patients required colectomy for mesenteric ischaemia, and the third arrested secondary to sepsis from bowel perforation. We discuss the various causes that may explain this association, and we alert the neurosurgical community for this complication which has not been reported before.

  6. Gender differences in symptoms of myocardial ischaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackay, Martha H; Ratner, Pamela A; Johnson, Joy L; Humphries, Karin H; Buller, Christopher E

    2011-12-01

    Better understanding of symptoms of myocardial ischaemia is needed to improve timeliness of treatment for acute coronary syndromes (ACS). Although researchers have suggested sex differences exist in ischaemic symptoms, methodological issues prevent conclusions. Using percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) balloon inflation as a model of myocardial ischaemia, we explored sex differences in reported symptoms of ischaemia. Patients having non-emergent PCI, but not haemodynamic instability or left bundle branch block or non-acute coronary occlusion, were prospectively recruited. Pre-procedure, descriptions of pre-existing symptoms were obtained using open-ended questioning. Inflation was maintained for 2 min or until moderate discomfort or clinical instability occurred. During inflation, subjects were exhaustively questioned about their symptoms. Concurrent ECG data were collected. The final sample was 305 [39.7% women; mean age 63.9 (± 10.6)]. No sex differences were found in rates of chest or typical ischaemic discomfort, regardless of ischaemic status. Women were significantly more likely to report throat/jaw discomfort [odds ratio: 2.91; 95% confidence interval: 1.58-5.37] even after statistical adjustment for clinical and demographic variables. This prospective study with ECG-affirmed ischaemia found no statistically significant differences in women's and men's rates of chest and other typical symptoms during ischaemia, although women were more likely to experience throat and jaw discomfort. Currently both popular press and some patient education materials suggest women experience myocardial ischaemia differently from men. Steps to ensure women and health professionals are alert for the classic symptoms of myocardial ischaemia in women, as well as men, may be warranted.

  7. The time of day effects of warm temperature on flowering time involve PIF4 and PIF5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thines, Bryan C.; Duarte, Maritza I.; Harmon, Frank G.

    2014-01-01

    Warm temperature promotes flowering in Arabidopsis thaliana and this response involves multiple signalling pathways. To understand the temporal dynamics of temperature perception, tests were carried out to determine if there was a daily window of enhanced sensitivity to warm temperature (28 °C). Warm temperature applied during daytime, night-time, or continuously elicited earlier flowering, but the effects of each treatment were unequal. Plants exposed to warm night (WN) conditions flowered nearly as early as those in constant warm (CW) conditions, while treatment with warm days (WD) caused later flowering than either WN or CW. Flowering in each condition relied to varying degrees on the activity of CO , FT , PIF4 , and PIF5 , as well as the action of unknown genes. The combination of signalling pathways involved in flowering depended on the time of the temperature cue. WN treatments caused a significant advance in the rhythmic expression waveform of CO, which correlated with pronounced up-regulation of FT expression, while WD caused limited changes in CO expression and no stimulation of FT expression. WN- and WD-induced flowering was partially CO independent and, unexpectedly, dependent on PIF4 and PIF5 . pif4-2, pif5-3, and pif4-2 pif5-3 mutants had delayed flowering under all three warm conditions. The double mutant was also late flowering in control conditions. In addition, WN conditions alone imposed selective changes to PIF4 and PIF5 expression. Thus, the PIF4 and PIF5 transcription factors promote flowering by at least two means: inducing FT expression in WN and acting outside of FT by an unknown mechanism in WD. PMID:24574484

  8. Progress towards an ab initio real-time treatment of warm dense matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baczewski, Andrew; Cangi, Attila; Hansen, Stephanie; Jensen, Daniel

    2017-10-01

    Time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) provides an accurate description of equilibrium properties of warm dense matter, such as the dynamic structure factor (Baczewski et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 116(11), 2016). While non-equilibrium properties, such as stopping power, have also been demonstrated to be within the grasp of TDDFT, the ultrafast isochoric heating of condensed matter into the warm dense state, enabled by recent advances in XFELs, remains beyond its capabilities. In this talk, we will describe the successes of and continuing challenges for TDDFT for warm dense matter, and present progress towards a more complete ab initio treatment of isochoric x-ray heating. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-mission laboratory managed and operated by National Technology and Engineering Solutions of Sandia, LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Honeywell International, Inc., for the DOE's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-NA0003525.

  9. Precooling and Warm-Up Effects on Time Trial Cycling During Heat Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Horani, Ramzi A; Wingo, Jonathan E; Ng, Jason; Bishop, Phillip; Richardson, Mark

    2018-02-01

    Heat stress limits endurance exercise performance. Combining precooling and warm-up prior to endurance exercise in the heat may exploit the benefits of both strategies while avoiding the potential negative consequences of each. This study tested the hypothesis that precooling combined with warm-up improves time trial cycling performance in the heat relative to either treatment alone. Nine healthy men completed three 16.1-km time trials in 33°C after: 1) precooling (ice slurry and ice vest) alone (PREC); 2) warm-up alone (WU); or 3) PREC plus WU (COMBO). Tre was lower after PREC compared to WU throughout exercise and lower than COMBO for the first 12 km; COMBO was lower than WU for the first 4 km. Tsk during PREC was lower than COMBO and WU for the first 8 km, and lower in COMBO than WU for the first 4 km. PREC lowered pre-exercise heart rate relative to COMBO and WU (68 ± 10, 106 ± 12, 101 ± 13 bpm, respectively), but it increased similarly during exercise. Local sweat rate (SR) was lower in PREC (0.1 ± 0.1 mg · cm-2 · min-1) than COMBO (0.5 ± 0.2 mg · cm-2 · min-1) and WU (0.6 ± 0.2 mg · cm-2 · min-1) for the first 4 km. Treatments did not differentially affect performance (PREC = 31.9 ± 1.9 min, COMBO = 32.6 ± 2.7 min, WU = 33.1 ± 2.9 min). We conclude precooling alone or with warm-up mitigated thermal strain during exercise, but did not significantly improve 16.1-km cycling time trial performance.Al-horani RA, Wingo JE, Ng J, Bishop P, Richardson M. Precooling and warm-up effects on time trial cycling during heat stress. Aerosp Med Hum Perform. 2018; 89(2):87-93.

  10. Cardiac biomarkers in neonatal hypoxic ischaemia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sweetman, D

    2012-04-01

    Following a perinatal hypoxic-ischaemic insult, term infants commonly develop cardiovascular dysfunction. Troponin-T, troponin-I and brain natriuretic peptide are sensitive indicators of myocardial compromise. The long-term effects of cardiovascular dysfunction on neurodevelopmental outcome following perinatal hypoxic ischaemia remain controversial. Follow-up studies are warranted to ensure optimal cardiac function in adulthood. CONCLUSION: Cardiac biomarkers may improve the diagnosis of myocardial injury, help guide management, estimate mortality risk and may also aid in longterm neurodevelopmental outcome prediction following neonatal hypoxic-ischaemia.

  11. Isoprostanes--markers of ischaemia reperfusion injury.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sakamoto, H

    2012-02-03

    Ischaemia reperfusion injury is a common and important phenomenon that occurs predictably in patients undergoing such procedures as cardiopulmonary bypass, thrombolysis, surgery under tourniquet, organ transplantation or embolectomy. Oxidative stress and the resulting lipid peroxidation play a major role in reperfusion injury. Membrane and cellular dysfunction result and, subsequently, organ injury or failure may ensue. Traditional methods of quantifying ischaemia reperfusion injury, including measurement of malondialdehyde, lack specificity and sensitivity. It was reported in 1990 that isoprostanes, a series of prostaglandin-like compounds, are produced by the free radical-catalyzed peroxidation of arachidonic acid. Measurement of the isoprostane concentration in urine or plasma provides the most reliable, non-invasive method currently available to assess oxidative stress in vivo. Serial measurement of isoprostanes in biological fluids has enhanced our understanding of the mechanisms underlying ischaemia reperfusion injury itself and its role in certain diseases. Furthermore, measurement of the isoprostane concentration provides a means to assess the effects of prophylactic and therapeutic interventions. In the future, the development of rapid, simple assays for isoprostanes offers the potential to assess prognosis during and after ischaemia reperfusion events.

  12. Aerosolized PGE1, PGI2 and nitroprusside protect against vascular leakage in lung ischaemia-reperfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schütte, H; Löckinger, A; Seeger, W; Grimminger, F

    2001-07-01

    High permeability oedema is an important feature in lung injury secondary to ischaemia-reperfusion. This study investigated the influence of aerosolized prostaglandin E1 (PGE1), prostaglandin I2 (PCI2) and the nitric oxide (NO)-donor, sodium nitroprusside (SNP) on microvascular barrier function in pulmonary ischaemia-reperfusion. Buffer-perfused rabbit lungs were exposed to 180 or 210 min of warm ischaemia while maintaining anoxic ventilation and a positive intravascular pressure. Reperfusion provoked a transient, mostly precapillary elevation of vascular resistance, followed by a severe increase of the capillary filtration coefficient (Kfc) versus nonischaemic controls (3.17+/-0.34 versus 0.85+/-0.05 cm3 x s(-1) cmH2O(-1) x g(-1) x 10(-4) after 30 min of reperfusion), and progressive oedema formation. Short-term aerosolization of SNP, PGE1 or PGI2 at the beginning of ischaemia largely suppressed the Kfc increase (1.36+/-0.22, 1.32+/-0.23 and 1.32+/-0.22 cm3 x s(-1) x cmH2O(-1) x g(-1) x 10(-4), respectively) and oedema formation. In contrast, application prior to reperfusion was much less effective, with some reduction of Kfc increase by PGI2 and SNP and no effect of PGE, (1.79+/-0.31, 2.2+/-0.53 and 3.2+/-0.05 cm3 x s(-1) x cmH2O(-1) x g(-1) x 10(-4), respectively). Haemodynamics, including microvascular pressure, were only marginally affected by the chosen doses of aerosolized vasodilators. It is concluded that short-term aerosolization of prostaglandin E1, prostaglandin I2 and sodium nitroprusside at the onset of ischaemia is highly effective in maintaining endothelial barrier properties in pulmonary ischaemia-reperfusion. This effect is apparently attributable to nonvasodilatory mechanisms exerted by these agents. Alveolar deposition of prostaglandins and/or nitric oxide donors by the aerosol technique may offer pulmonary protection in ischaemia-reperfusion injury.

  13. The detection of brain ischaemia in rats by inductive phase shift spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    González, C A; Villanueva, C; Vera, C; Flores, O; Reyes, R D; Rubinsky, B

    2009-01-01

    Ischaemia in the brain is an important clinical problem that is often monitored and studied with expensive devices such as MRI and PET, which are not readily available in low economical resource parts of the world. We have developed a new less expensive tool for non-invasive monitoring of ischaemia in the brain. This is a first feasibility study describing the concept. The system is based on the hypothesis that electromagnetic properties of the tissue change during ischaemia and that measuring the electromagnetic properties of the bulk of the brain with non-contact means can detect these changes. The apparatus we have built and whose design we describe here consists of two electromagnetic coils placed around the head. The system measures the bulk change in time of the phase difference between the electromagnetic signal on the two coils in a range of frequencies. A mathematical model simulating the device and the measurement is also introduced. Ischaemia was induced in the brain of rats by occlusion of the right cerebral and carotid arteries. Experimental subjects were monitored for 24 h. Inductive phase shift measurements were made at five frequencies in the range of 0.1–50 MHz eight times during the observation period. An ex vivo estimation of the percentage of necrosis in the ischemic subjects at t = 24 h was done. The mathematical model was also applied to the experimental tested situation. The results of both experiments and theory show significant phase shifts increase as a function of frequency and ischaemia time. The theoretical and experimental results suggest that the tested technique has the potential to detect the processes and level of ischaemia in the brain by non-invasive, continuous, bulk volumetric monitoring with a simple and inexpensive apparatus

  14. Amount and timing of permafrost carbon release in response to climate warming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaefer, Kevin; Zhang, Tingjun; Barrett, Andrew P. (National Snow and Ice Data Center, Cooperative Inst. for Research in Environmental Sciences, Univ. of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder (United States)), e-mail: kevin.schaefer@nsidc.org; Bruhwiler, Lori (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Earth System Research Laboratory, Boulder (United States))

    2011-04-15

    The thaw and release of carbon currently frozen in permafrost will increase atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations and amplify surface warming to initiate a positive permafrost carbon feedback (PCF) on climate.We use surface weather from three global climate models based on the moderate warming, A1B Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change emissions scenario and the SiBCASA land surface model to estimate the strength and timing of the PCF and associated uncertainty. By 2200, we predict a 29-59% decrease in permafrost area and a 53-97 cm increase in active layer thickness. By 2200, the PCF strength in terms of cumulative permafrost carbon flux to the atmosphere is 190 +- 64 Gt C. This estimate may be low because it does not account for amplified surface warming due to the PCF itself and excludes some discontinuous permafrost regions where SiBCASA did not simulate permafrost. We predict that the PCF will change the arctic from a carbon sink to a source after the mid-2020s and is strong enough to cancel 42-88% of the total global land sink. The thaw and decay of permafrost carbon is irreversible and accounting for the PCF will require larger reductions in fossil fuel emissions to reach a target atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration

  15. Stopping of deuterium in warm dense deuterium from Ehrenfest time-dependent density functional theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magyar, R.J.; Shulenburger, L.; Baczewski, A.D. [Sandia National Laboratories - Multi-scale Physics 1444 MS 1322, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-06-15

    In these proceedings, we show that time-dependent density functional theory is capable of stopping calculations at the extreme conditions of temperature and pressure seen in warm dense matter. The accuracy of the stopping curves tends to be up to about 20% lower than empirical models that are in use. However, TDDFT calculations are free from fitting parameters and assumptions about the model form of the dielectric function. This work allows the simulation of ion stopping in many materials that are difficult to study experimentally. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  16. Impact of warm ischemia time on the change of split renal function after minimally invasive partial nephrectomy in Taiwanese patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hung-Keng Li

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: SRF is more sensitive for postoperative follow-up than eGFR. Longer warm ischemia time is associated with poorer postoperative renal function. RPN is a safe and feasible alternative to LPN.

  17. Reversible myocardial ischaemia or irreversible myocardial fibrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathey, D.; Hanrath, P.; Kupper, W.; Bleifeld, W.; Montz, R.; Knop, J.; Stritzke, P.; Kroeger, E.; Bleese, N.

    1978-01-01

    The results of biphasis 201 thallium ( 201 Tl) scanning were compared with those of coronary arteriography, left ventricular angiography and stress ECG in 56 patients with coronary artery disease and six with no evidence of heart disease. There were 104 201 Tl defects, 50 of them reversible. The defects were always located in the area supplied by a critically stenotic coronary artery. Correlation of regional wall motion with 201 Tl activity demonstrated that in all forms of abnormal wall motion there was either ischaemia or fibrosis. The resting LV angiogram thus does not make it possible to distinguish between myocardial ischaemia and fibrosis. Taking the LV angiogram as a standard, the rate of false-positive 201 Tl scintigrams was 5%, that of false-negative ones 23%. The biphasic 201 Tl scintigram was more sensitive than the stress ECG in detecting myocardial ischaemia. It furthermore made it possible to localize the ischaemic (or fibrotic) region within the LV and to estimate its size. (orig.) [de

  18. Assessing the magnitude and timing of anthropogenic warming of a shallow aquifer: example from Virginia Beach, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggleston, John R.; McCoy, Kurt J.

    2015-01-01

    Groundwater temperature measurements in a shallow coastal aquifer in Virginia Beach, Virginia, USA, suggest groundwater warming of +4.1 °C relative to deeper geothermal gradients. Observed warming is related to timing and depth of influence of two potential thermal drivers—atmospheric temperature increases and urbanization. Results indicate that up to 30 % of groundwater warming at the water table can be attributed to atmospheric warming while up to 70 % of warming can be attributed to urbanization. Groundwater temperature readings to 30-m depth correlate positively with percentage of impervious cover and negatively with percentage of tree canopy cover; thus, these two land-use metrics explain up to 70 % of warming at the water table. Analytical and numerical modeling results indicate that an average vertical groundwater temperature profile for the study area, constructed from repeat measurement at 11 locations over 15 months, is consistent with the timing of land-use change over the past century in Virginia Beach. The magnitude of human-induced warming at the water table (+4.1 °C) is twice the current seasonal temperature variation, indicating the potential for ecological impacts on wetlands and estuaries receiving groundwater discharge from shallow aquifers.

  19. Space-Time Characterization of Laser Plasma Interactions in the Warm Dense Matter Regime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, L F; Uschmann, I; Forster, E; Zamponi, F; Kampfer, T; Fuhrmann, A; Holl, A; Redmer, R; Toleikis, S; Tschentsher, T; Glenzer, S H

    2008-04-30

    Laser plasma interaction experiments have been performed using a fs Titanium Sapphire laser. Plasmas have been generated from planar PMMA targets using single laser pulses with 3.3 mJ pulse energy, 50 fs pulse duration at 800 nm wavelength. The electron density distributions of the plasmas in different delay times have been characterized by means of Nomarski Interferometry. Experimental data were compared with hydrodynamic simulation. First results to characterize the plasma density and temperature as a function of space and time are obtained. This work aims to generate plasmas in the warm dense matter (WDM) regime at near solid-density in an ultra-fast laser target interaction process. Plasmas under these conditions can serve as targets to develop x-ray Thomson scattering as a plasma diagnostic tool, e.g., using the VUV free-electron laser (FLASH) at DESY Hamburg.

  20. Effect of prior warm-up duration on the time limit at peak speed in untrained men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Cruz, Victor H; Peserico, Cecília S; Machado, Fabiana A

    2017-10-01

    The peak speed (Vpeak) and its time limit (tlim) are variables used to prescribe training loads and the intervals durations during interval training, respectively. The aim of this study was to test different warm-up durations (5, 10 and 15 minutes), adapted from the protocol proposed by Billat et al.,1 to determine tlim in untrained men. Fifteen untrained men were submitted to the following laboratory evaluations: 1) an incremental running exercise test on a treadmill starting with a speed of 8 km/h, after a warm-up of walking at 6 km/h for three minutes, and increased by 1 km/h between each successive 3-minute stage until volitional exhaustion to determine Vpeak; 2) three rectangular tests, performed in randomized order, with warm-up durations of 5, 10, and 15 minutes at 60% of Vpeak to determine the tlim5, tlim10, and tlim15; after the warm-up the tests were performed at the speed of the individual Vpeak until volitional exhaustion. It was demonstrated that the duration of the warm-up affected the test duration (tlim). Significant differences were observed between tlim5 and tlim15, and between tlim10 and tlim15. However, tlim15 and tlim10 did not differ. Additionally, duration of the warm-up did not influence other variables (HRmax, RPEmax and post lactate concentrations). Therefore, it was concluded that the duration of the warm-up in tlim tests modifies the test duration in untrained men.

  1. Seasonal timing in a warming world : Plasticity of seasonal timing of growth and reproduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salis, Lucia

    2015-01-01

    In seasonal environments the timing of various biological processes is crucial for growth, survival and reproductive success of an individual. Nowadays, rapid large-scale climate change is altering species’ seasonal timing (phenology) in many eco¬systems. In this thesis Lucia Salis focuses on the

  2. Seasonal timing in a warming world : plasticity of seasonal timing of growth and reproduction

    OpenAIRE

    Salis, L.

    2015-01-01

    In seasonal environments the timing of various biological processes is crucial for growth, survival and reproductive success of an individual. Nowadays, rapid large-scale climate change is altering species’ seasonal timing (phenology) in many eco¬systems. In this thesis Lucia Salis focuses on the study of seasonal timing in the food chain of the oak-winter moth-great tit. As temperature increased over the last decades, both phenologies of the host plant, the oak, and the herbivorous insect, t...

  3. The effect warming time of mechanical properties and structural phase aluminum alloy nickel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Husna Al Hasa, M.; Anwar Muchsin

    2011-01-01

    Ferrous aluminum alloys as fuel cladding will experience the process of heat treatment above the recrystallization temperature. Temperature and time of heat treatment will affect the nature of the metal. Heating time allows will affect change in mechanical properties, thermal and structure of the metal phase. This study aims to determine the effect of time of heat treatment on mechanical properties and phase metal alloys. Testing the mechanical properties of materials, especially violence done by the method of Vickers. Observation of microstructural changes made by metallographic-optical and phase structure were analyzed Based on the x-ray diffraction patterns Elemental analysis phase alloy compounds made by EDS-SEM. Test results show the nature of violence AlFeNiMg alloy by heating at 500°C with a warm-up time 1 hour, 2 hours and 3 hours respectively decreased range 94.4 HV, 87.6 HV and 85.1 HV. The nature of violence AlFeNi alloy showed a decrease in line with the longer heating time. Metallographic-optical observations show the microstructural changes with increasing heating time. Microstructure shows the longer the heating time trend equi axial shaped grain structure of growing and the results showed a trend analyst diffraction pattern formation and phase θ α phase (FeAl3) in the alloy. (author)

  4. Changes in intestinal electrical activity during ischaemia correlate to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To study this, the electrical activity of the ileum in 14 adult male rabbits was recorded during ischaemia. At baseline, 60, 120 and 210 minutes of ischaemia, segments of bowel were resected for histopathologic evaluation. The BER frequency was determined using the Fast Fourier Transformation (FFT) spectral analysis.

  5. How does warming affect carbon allocation, respiration and residence time in trees? An isotope tracer approach in a eucalypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendall, E.; Drake, J. E.; Furze, M.; Barton, C. V.; Carillo, Y.; Richter, A.; Tjoelker, M. G.

    2017-12-01

    Climate warming has the potential to alter the balance between photosynthetic carbon assimilation and respiratory losses in forest trees, leading to uncertainty in predicting their future physiological functioning. In a previous experiment, warming decreased canopy CO2 assimilation (A) rates of Eucalyptus tereticornis trees, but respiration (R) rates were usually not significantly affected, due to physiological acclimation to temperature. This led to a slight increase in (R/A) and thus decrease in plant carbon use efficiency with climate warming. In contrast to carbon fluxes, the effect of warming on carbon allocation and residence time in trees has received less attention. We conducted a study to test the hypothesis that warming would decrease the allocation of C belowground owing to reduced cost of nutrient uptake. E. parramattensis trees were grown in the field in unique whole-tree chambers operated at ambient and ambient +3 °C temperature treatments (n=3 per treatment). We applied a 13CO2 pulse and followed the label in CO2 respired from leaves, roots, canopy and soil, in plant sugars, and in rhizosphere microbes over a 3-week period in conjunction with measurements of tree growth. The 9-m tall, 57 m3 whole-tree chambers were monitored for CO2 concentrations in independent canopy and below ground (root and soil) compartments; periodic monitoring of δ13C values in air in the compartments allowed us to quantify the amount of 13CO2 assimilated and respired by each tree. Warmed trees grew faster and assimilated more of the label than control trees, but the 13C allocation to canopy, root and soil respiration was not altered. However, warming appeared to reduce the residence time of carbon respired from leaves, and especially from roots and soil, indicating that autotrophic respiration has the potential to feedback to climate change. This experiment provides insights into how warming may affect the fate of assimilated carbon from the leaf to the ecosystem scale.

  6. Effects of warm ischemic time on gene expression profiling in colorectal cancer tissues and normal mucosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria Musella

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Genome-wide gene expression analyses of tumors are a powerful tool to identify gene signatures associated with biologically and clinically relevant characteristics and for several tumor types are under clinical validation by prospective trials. However, handling and processing of clinical specimens may significantly affect the molecular data obtained from their analysis. We studied the effects of tissue handling time on gene expression in human normal and tumor colon tissues undergoing routine surgical procedures. METHODS: RNA extracted from specimens of 15 patients at four time points (for a total of 180 samples after surgery was analyzed for gene expression on high-density oligonucleotide microarrays. A mixed-effects model was used to identify probes with different expression means across the four different time points. The p-values of the model were adjusted with the Bonferroni method. RESULTS: Thirty-two probe sets associated with tissue handling time in the tumor specimens, and thirty-one in the normal tissues, were identified. Most genes exhibited moderate changes in expression over the time points analyzed; however four of them were oncogenes, and two confirmed the effect of tissue handling by independent validation. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that a critical time point for tissue handling in colon seems to be 60 minutes at room temperature. Although the number of time-dependent genes we identified was low, the three genes that already showed changes at this time point in tumor samples were all oncogenes, hence recommending standardization of tissue-handling protocols and effort to reduce the time from specimen removal to snap freezing accounting for warm ischemia in this tumor type.

  7. Global assessment of experimental climate warming on tundra vegetation: heterogeneity over space and time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarah C. Elmendorf; Gregory H.R. Henry; Robert D. Hollister; Robert G. Björk; Anne D. Bjorkman; Terry V. Callaghan; [and others] NO-VALUE; William Gould; Joel Mercado

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the sensitivity of tundra vegetation to climate warming is critical to forecasting future biodiversity and vegetation feedbacks to climate. In situ warming experiments accelerate climate change on a small scale to forecast responses of local plant communities. Limitations of this approach include the apparent site-specificity of results and uncertainty...

  8. Implementation of methane cycling for deep time, global warming simulations with the DCESS Earth System Model (Version 1.2)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shaffer, Gary; Villanueva, Esteban Fernández; Rondanelli, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    Geological records reveal a number of ancient, large and rapid negative excursions of carbon-13 isotope. Such excursions can only be explained by massive injections of depleted carbon to the Earth System over a short duration. These injections may have forced strong global warming events, sometimes....... With this improved DCESS model version and paleo-reconstructions, we are now better armed to gauge the amounts, types, time scales and locations of methane injections driving specific, observed deep time, global warming events....

  9. Implementation of methane cycling for deep time, global warming simulations with the DCESS Earth System Model (Version 1.2)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shaffer, Gary; Villanueva, Esteban Fernández; Rondanelli, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    Geological records reveal a number of ancient, large and rapid negative excursions of carbon-13 isotope. Such excursions can only be explained by massive injections of depleted carbon to the Earth System over a short duration. These injections may have forced strong global warming events, sometimes....... With this improved DCESS model version and paleo-reconstructions, we are now better armed to gauge the amounts, types, time scales and locations of methane injections driving specific, observed deep time, global warming events......., or from warming-induced dissociation of methane hydrate, a solid compound of methane and water found in ocean sediments. As a consequence of the ubiquity and importance of methane in major Earth events, Earth System models should include a comprehensive treatment of methane cycling but such a treatment...

  10. Optical Response of Warm Dense Matter Using Real-Time Electron Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baczewski, Andrew; Shulenburger, Luke; Desjarlais, Michael; Magyar, Rudolph

    2014-03-01

    The extreme temperatures and solid-like densities in warm dense matter present a unique challenge for theory, wherein neither conventional models from condensed matter nor plasma physics capture all of the relevant phenomenology. While Kubo-Greenwood DFT calculations have proven capable of reproducing optical properties of WDM, they require a significant number of virtual orbitals to reach convergence due to their perturbative nature. Real-time TDDFT presents a complementary framework with a number of computationally favorable properties, including reduced cost complexity and better scalability, and has been used to reproduce the optical response of finite and ordered extended systems. We will describe the use of Ehrenfest-TDDFT to evolve coupled electron-nuclear dynamics in WDM systems, and the subsequent evaluation of optical response functions from the real-time electron dynamics. The advantages and disadvantages of this approach will be discussed relative to the current state-of-the-art. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  11. [Effects of the of renal warm ischemia time on the recovery of filtration function in the experiment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guseinov, R G; Popov, S V; Gorshkov, A N; Sivak, K V; Martov, A G

    2017-12-01

    To investigate experimentally ultrastructural and biochemical signs of acute injury to the renal parenchyma after warm renal ischemia of various duration and subsequent reperfusion. The experiments were performed on 44 healthy conventional female rabbits of the "Chinchilla" breed weighted 2.6-2.7 kg, which were divided into four groups. In the first, control, group included pseudo-operated animals. In the remaining three groups, an experimental model of warm ischemia of renal tissue was created, followed by a 60-minute reperfusion. The renal warm ischemia time was 30, 60 and 90 minutes in the 2nd, 3rd and 4th groups, respectively. Electron microscopy was used to study ultrastructural disturbances of the renal parenchyma. Biochemical signs of acute kidney damage were detected by measuring the following blood serum and/or urine analytes: NGAL, cystatin C, KIM-1, L-FABP, interleukin-18. The glomerular filtration was evaluated by creatinine clearance, which was determined on days 1, 5, 7, 14, 21 and 35 of follow-up. A 30-minute renal warm ischemia followed by a 60-minute reperfusion induced swelling and edema of the brush membrane, vacuolation of the cytoplasm of the endothelial cells of the proximal tubules, and microvilli restructuring. The observed disorders were reversible, and the epithelial cells retained their viability. After 60 minutes of ischemia and 60 minutes of reperfusion, the observed changes in the ultrastructure of the epithelial cells were much more pronounced, some of the epithelial cells were in a state of apoptosis. 90 min of ischemia and 60 min of reperfusion resulted in electron-microscopic signs of the mass cellular death of the tubular epithelium. Concentration in serum and/or biochemical urine markers of acute renal damage increased sharply after ischemic-reperfusion injury. Restoration of indicators was observed only in cases when the renal warm ischemia time did not exceed 60 minutes. The decrease in creatinine clearance occurred in the

  12. Time-dependent postural control adaptations following a neuromuscular warm-up in female handball players: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steib, Simon; Zahn, Peter; Zu Eulenburg, Christine; Pfeifer, Klaus; Zech, Astrid

    2016-01-01

    Female handball athletes are at a particular risk of sustaining lower extremity injuries. The study examines time-dependent adaptations of static and dynamic balance as potential injury risk factors to a specific warm-up program focusing on neuromuscular control. Fourty one (24.0 ± 5.9 years) female handball athletes were randomized to an intervention or control group. The intervention group implemented a 15-min specific neuromuscular warm-up program, three times per week for eleven weeks, whereas the control group continued with their regular warm-up. Balance was assessed at five time points. Measures included the star excursion balance test (SEBT), and center of pressure (COP) sway velocity during single-leg standing. No baseline differences existed between groups in demographic data. Adherence to neuromuscular warm-up was 88.7 %. Mean COP sway velocity decreased significantly over time in the intervention group (-14.4 %; p  control group (-6.2 %; p  = 0.056). However, these effects did not differ significantly between groups ( p  = .098). Mean changes over time in the SEBT score were significantly greater ( p  = .014) in the intervention group (+5.48) compared to the control group (+3.45). Paired t-tests revealed that the first significant balance improvements were observed after 6 weeks of training. A neuromuscular warm-up positively influences balance variables associated with an increased risk of lower extremity injuries in female handball athletes. The course of adaptations suggests that a training volume of 15 min, three times weekly over at least six weeks produces measurable changes. Retrospectively registered on 4th October 2016. Registry: clinicaltrials.gov. Trial number: NCT02925377.

  13. Impact of spring warming on sowing times of cereal, potato and sugar beet in Finland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. KAUKORANTA

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Historical data were used to determine if the warm springs experienced in recent decades have influenced time of sowing of spring cereals (barley, wheat and oats, potato and sugar beet in Finland. The start of the thermal growing season was used to represent all climatic factors affecting sowing time. Regional anomalies in sowing and start of growing season were computed for the years 1965–2007. The start of the growing season was 2–2.8 days earlier per decade, with a steeper increase since 1980. Sugar beet sowing advanced 2.5 (since 1980 5.2 and potato planting 3.4 (since 1980 4.5 days per decade, more than expected solely due to earlier starts to the growing season. Sowing of spring cereals advanced 0.6, 0.7 and 1.7 days per decade in the east, north and west respectively (since 1980 1.0, 1.9 and 3.1, with statistically significant trend (p < 0.01 in the west. Earlier sowings can be largely explained by warmer springs, but the trend was not as steep as that for the growing season. This has however not led to increased temperatures during early vegetative phases and thus faster development and increased drought or pest risk, which would have reduced the positive effects of earlier sowing on yield potential. Earlier sowing detected in the west can be explained by changes in spring temperatures, but may also result from economic and technological development. Farmers seem to have adequately adjusted their field activities to the changes in spring temperatures.;

  14. Intestinal Ischaemia-Reperfusion Injury and Semen Characteristics ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    olayemitoyin

    Nigeria. Summary: Increasing production of goats takes their reproductive ... of testicular damage and infertility and is a form of ischaemia-reperfusion injury. ... concentration, percentage of normal sperm cells, abnormal sperm cells and ...

  15. Management of renal dysfunction following term perinatal hypoxia-ischaemia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sweetman, Deirdre U

    2013-03-01

    Acute kidney injury frequently develops following the term perinatal hypoxia-ischaemia. Quantifying the degree of acute kidney injury is difficult, however, as the methods currently in use are suboptimal. Acute kidney injury management is largely supportive with little evidence basis for many interventions. This review discusses management strategies and novel biomarkers that may improve diagnosis and management of renal injury following perinatal hypoxia-ischaemia.

  16. Application of streptokinase and PTA in lower limb chronic ischaemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syberyjski, R.; Domanski, Z.; Cyrylowski, L.

    1994-01-01

    In 14 patients with chronic ischaemia of lower limbs, local fibrynolysis with streptokinase followed by PTA was performed in occluded arteries. The procedure was successful in 10 patients. An adverse reaction was observed in 1 patient (gingivorrhea), and a complication was noticed in another one (acute ischaemia due a trombosis). These results suggest that the method may appear as a safe alternative to a surgery treatment, and encourage to evaluate an effectiveness of the procedure in a large group of patients. (author)

  17. In a warming climate, just how predictable are temperature extremes at weather and seasonal time scales?

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Landman, WA

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available stream_source_info Landman7_2011.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 3538 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name Landman7_2011.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 In a warming climate... at UK Met Office N9 members SA Japan UKUSA USA Brazil* SA SASA * IBSA-Ocean In use Near future Far future VCM/UTCM ENSEMBLES Strong anthropogenically forced warming trends have been observed over southern Africa and are projected...

  18. Influences of spawning timing, water temperature, and climatic warming on early life history phenology in western Alaska sockeye salmon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparks, Morgan M.; Falke, Jeffrey A.; Quinn, Thomas P.; Adkison, Milo D.; Schindler, Daniel E.; Bartz, Krista K.; Young, Daniel B.; Westley, Peter A. H.

    2018-01-01

    We applied an empirical model to predict hatching and emergence timing for 25 western Alaska sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) populations in four lake-nursery systems to explore current patterns and potential responses of early life history phenology to warming water temperatures. Given experienced temperature regimes during development, we predicted hatching to occur in as few as 58 d to as many as 260 d depending on spawning timing and temperature. For a focal lake spawning population, our climate-lake temperature model predicted a water temperature increase of 0.7 to 1.4 °C from 2015 to 2099 during the incubation period, which translated to a 16 d to 30 d earlier hatching timing. The most extreme scenarios of warming advanced development by approximately a week earlier than historical minima and thus climatic warming may lead to only modest shifts in phenology during the early life history stage of this population. The marked variation in the predicted timing of hatching and emergence among populations in close proximity on the landscape may serve to buffer this metapopulation from climate change.

  19. Long time management of fossil fuel resources to limit global warming and avoid ice age onsets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, Gary

    2009-02-01

    There are about 5000 billion tons of fossil fuel carbon in accessible reserves. Combustion of all this carbon within the next few centuries would force high atmospheric CO2 content and extreme global warming. On the other hand, low atmospheric CO2 content favors the onset of an ice age when changes in the Earth's orbit lead to low summer insolation at high northern latitudes. Here I present Earth System Model projections showing that typical reduction targets for fossil fuel use in the present century could limit ongoing global warming to less than one degree Celcius above present. Furthermore, the projections show that combustion pulses of remaining fossil fuel reserves could then be tailored to raise atmospheric CO2 content high and long enough to parry forcing of ice age onsets by summer insolation minima far into the future. Our present interglacial period could be extended by about 500,000 years in this way.

  20. The timing of bud break in warming conditions: variation among seven sympatric conifer species from Eastern Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Sergio; Isabel, Nathalie

    2017-11-01

    Phenological changes are expected with the ongoing global warming, which could create mismatches in the growth patterns among sympatric species or create synchrony with insect herbivores. In this study, we performed a comparative assessment of the timings of bud break among seven conifer species of Eastern Canada by evaluating seedling development in growth chambers under different temperatures (16, 20 and 24 °C). Bud break occurred earliest in Larix laricina, while Pinus strobus and Pinus resinosa had the latest. Warmer conditions advanced bud break, with the greatest effects being observed at the lower temperatures. Mixed models estimated that one additional degree of temperature produced advancements of 5.3 and 2.1 days at 16 and 20 °C, respectively. The hypothesis of an asynchronous change between species under warming was demonstrated only for the last phenological phases (split buds and exposed shoots), and principally in pines. Abies balsamea showed changes in bud break comparable with the other species analysed, rejecting the hypothesis of mismatches under warmer conditions. The observed non-linear responses of the timings of bud break to warming suggest that the major changes in bud phenology should be expected at the lowest temperatures.

  1. Testing species distribution models across space and time: high latitude butterflies and recent warming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eskildsen, Anne; LeRoux, Peter C.; Heikkinen, Risto K.

    2013-01-01

    changes at expanding range margins can be predicted accurately. Location. Finland. Methods. Using 10-km resolution butterfly atlas data from two periods, 1992–1999 (t1) and 2002–2009 (t2), with a significant between-period temperature increase, we modelled the effects of climatic warming on butterfly...... butterfly distributions under climate change. Model performance was lower with independent compared to non-independent validation and improved when land cover and soil type variables were included, compared to climate-only models. SDMs performed less well for highly mobile species and for species with long......Aim. To quantify whether species distribution models (SDMs) can reliably forecast species distributions under observed climate change. In particular, to test whether the predictive ability of SDMs depends on species traits or the inclusion of land cover and soil type, and whether distributional...

  2. Transcranial Doppler for detection of cerebral ischaemia during carotid endarterectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, L G; Schroeder, T V

    1992-01-01

    We evaluated transcranial Doppler sonography (TCD) for the detection of cerebral ischaemia during carotid endarterectomy in 30 male and 14 female patients with ipsilateral focal cerebro-vascular symptoms. Surgery was performed during halothane-nitrous oxide anaesthesia with moderate hypocapnia...

  3. Treatment of severe foot ischaemia by defibrination with ancrod

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tønnesen, K H; Sager, P; Gormsen, J

    1978-01-01

    factors which could affect the degree of ischaemia. Objective measurements showed a significant rise in ankle and toe systolic blood pressure in the ancrod group lasting for 3 months. There was no rise in distal blood pressure in the control group. In the ancrod treated group the toe and ankle systolic...

  4. Short communication:Intestinal Ischaemia-Reperfusion Injury and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigates the effect of intestinal ischaemia-reperfusion (IIR) injury on semen characteristics in WAD bucks. Six healthy adult male ... Many of the abnormalities involved midpiece and tail abnormalities which are very vital to propulsion and may cause an inability of the sperm cells to fertilize. This hitherto silent ...

  5. Dynamics of the ice mass in Antarctica in the time of warming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. M. Kotlyakov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The modern age of global warming affect the general state of the Antarctic ice sheet and its mass balance. Studies of the Southern polar region of the Earth during the International Geophysical Year  (1957–1958 called the assumption of growth in the modern ice mass in East Antarctica. However, with the development of new methods, this conclusion has been questioned. At the turn of the century the study of global processes Earth started to use the satellite radar or laser altimetry and satellite gravimetry, which allows determining change of different masses on the Earth, including ice bodies. From the beginning of the XXI century, these methods have been used to calculate the continental ice balance. In our study, we analyze different data of recent years, supporting the earlier conclusion on continued growth of the ice mass in East Antarctica. How‑ ever, in West Antarctica and the Antarctic Peninsula, on the contrary, there is increased loss of ice, leveling the increased income of ice mass of in the Central Antarctica. So all in all in the modern era of global warm‑ ing, the ice mass in Antarctica appears to be decreasing despite some growth of the East Antarctic ice sheet. Fluctuations of land ice mass reflect in the sea level variations, but in comparison with the scale of the Ant‑ arctic ice sheet its contribution to sea‑level rise is not so significant. The main reason for this is that the mass accumulation in East Antarctica with significant probability prevails over the ice outflow.

  6. Acute and Time-Course Effects of Traditional and Dynamic Warm-Up Routines in Young Elite Junior Tennis Players.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Ayala

    Full Text Available Despite the large number of studies that have examined the acute effects of different warm up modalities (WU on physical performance, none of them have documented the time course of potential performance recovery in tennis players. The aim of this study was twofold: (a to analyze and compare the acute effects of two different WU modalities (traditional WU [TWU] and dynamic WU [DWU] on physical performance (i.e., CMJ, sprint, serve speed and accuracy in elite junior players, as well as (b to monitor the time course of any WU-induced changes after 30 and 60 min of simulated match-play. Twelve junior elite players completed both WUs modalities (TWU and DWU in a counterbalanced order on separate days. In each experimental session, counter movement jump (CMJ, 20-m sprint, tennis serve speed and accuracy tests were performed before (immediately after TWU or DWU during (30 min and after 60 min of a simulated match play. Measures were compared via four factorial (WU intervention and time repeated measures ANOVAs. There were main effects of WU (TWU and DWU throughout the time for all the variables analysed. The results indicate that DWU routine led to significantly faster 20 m sprint times and higher CMJs as well as faster and more accurate tennis serves at both post warm-up and 30 min match-play testing moments in comparison with the scores reported by the TWU routine (p 75-99%. No significant intergroup differences were found at 60-min match-play testing moment in any variable (except for the 20 m sprint. Therefore, the findings of this study recommend for optimal performance in these elite tennis players, DWU routines should be performed prior to formal training and competition rather than TWU routines.

  7. Ischaemia and insulin, but not ischaemia and contraction, act synergistically in stimulating muscle glucose uptake in vivo in humans.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosselaar, M.; Smits, P.; Tack, C.J.J.

    2009-01-01

    Ischaemia, like muscle contraction, has been reported to induce skeletal muscle glucose uptake in in vitro models. This stimulating effect appears independent of insulin and is probably mediated by activation of AMPK (AMP-activated protein kinase). In the present study, we hypothesized that in vivo

  8. Near real time/low latency data collection for climate warming manipulations and an elevated CO2 SPRUCE experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krassovski, M.; Hanson, P. J.; Riggs, J. S.; Nettles, W. R., IV

    2017-12-01

    Climate change studies are one of the most important aspects of modern science and related experiments are getting bigger and more complex. One such experiment is the Spruce and Peatland Responses Under Climatic and Environmental Change experiment (SPRUCE, http://mnspruce.ornl.gov) conducted in in northern Minnesota, 40 km north of Grand Rapids, in the USDA Forest Service Marcell Experimental Forest (MEF). The SPRUCE experimental mission is to assess ecosystem-level biological responses of vulnerable, high carbon terrestrial ecosystems to a range of climate warming manipulations and an elevated CO2 atmosphere. This manipulation experiment generates a lot of observational data and requires a reliable onsite data collection system, dependable methods to transfer data to a robust scientific facility, and real-time monitoring capabilities. This presentation shares our experience of establishing near real time/low latency data collection and monitoring system using satellite communication.

  9. Value of cerebral blood flow rate and regional oxygen consumption studies in cerebral ischaemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clanet, M

    1987-06-18

    Studies of experimentally-induced ischaemia have shown that the intensity of neuronal suffering is related to the fall in perfusion rate. Below a certain level, called functional threshold, cerebral function is reversibly altered, whereas at a lower level (tissue necrosis threshold) the damage inflicted on neurons is irreversible. Between these two thresholds lies a ''penumbra zone''. This concept of thresholds must be mitigated by 2 parameters: duration of ischaemia and selective vulnerability of the various structures affected. Variations in blood flow rate only indirectly affect the state of tissues. Techniques developed from positron emission tomography make it possible to evaluate the metabolic activity of brain tissue in vivo: oxygen consumption (CMRO/sub 2/), oxygen extraction (EO/sub 2/) and glucose consumption (CMRG) which are thus correlated to cerebral blood flow and cerebral blood volume, sometimes also to tissue pH. Normal relations between blood flow rate and metabolism may be altered. Misery perfusion reflects a fall in cerebral blood flow with an increase in EO/sub 2/ and often a decrease in CMRO/sub 2/, whereas luxury perfusion reflects an increase in cerebral blood flow rate with reduction of CMRO/sub 2/, EO/sub 2/ and CMRG. The type of alteration encountered in human ischaemia varies according to the nature of the accident: studies of transient accidents emphasize the different haemodynamic aspects of occlusion of the wider arteries. The metabolic and haemodynamic profiles of established ischaemic accidents vary according to their type and to the time of the study, reflecting the complexity of the physiopathological mechanisms involved; they are frequently associated with metabolic repercussions at a distance from the ischaemic focus, which supports the concept of diaschisis.

  10. Value of cerebral blood flow rate and regional oxygen consumption studies in cerebral ischaemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clanet, M.

    1987-01-01

    Studies of experimentally-induced ischaemia have shown that the intensity of neuronal suffering is related to the fall in perfusion rate. Below a certain level, called functional threshold, cerebral function is reversibly altered, whereas at a lower level (tissue necrosis threshold) the damage inflicted on neurons is irreversible. Between these two thresholds lies a ''penumbra zone''. This concept of thresholds must be mitigated by 2 parameters: duration of ischaemia and selective vulnerability of the various structures affected. Variations in blood flow rate only indirectly affect the state of tissues. Techniques developed from positron emission tomography make it possible to evaluate the metabolic activity of brain tissue in vivo: oxygen consumption (CMRO 2 ), oxygen extraction (EO 2 ) and glucose consumption (CMRG) which are thus correlated to cerebral blood flow and cerebral blood volume, sometimes also to tissue pH. Normal relations between blood flow rate and metabolism may be altered. Misery perfusion reflects a fall in cerebral blood flow with an increase in EO 2 and often a decrease in CMRO 2 , whereas luxury perfusion reflects an increase in cerebral blood flow rate with reduction of CMRO 2 , EO 2 and CMRG. The type of alteration encountered in human ischaemia varies according to the nature of the accident: studies of transient accidents emphasize the different haemodynamic aspects of occlusion of the wider arteries. The metabolic and haemodynamic profiles of established ischaemic accidents vary according to their type and to the time of the study, reflecting the complexity of the physiopathological mechanisms involved; they are frequently associated with metabolic repercussions at a distance from the ischaemic focus, which supports the concept of diaschisis [fr

  11. Differences in autonomic nerve function in patients with silent and symptomatic myocardial ischaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakespeare, C. F.; Katritsis, D.; Crowther, A.; Cooper, I. C.; Coltart, J. D.; Webb-Peploe, M. W.

    1994-01-01

    BACKGROUND--Autonomic neuropathy provides a mechanism for the absence of symptoms in silent myocardial ischaemia, but characterisation of the type of neuropathy is lacking. AIM--To characterise and compare autonomic nerve function in patients with silent and symptomatic myocardial ischaemia. METHODS AND RESULTS--The Valsalva manoeuvre, heart rate variation (HRV) in response to deep breathing and standing, lower body negative pressure, isometric handgrip, and the cold pressor test were performed by patients with silent (n = 25) and symptomatic (n = 25) ambulatory ischaemia and by controls (n = 21). No difference in parasympathetic efferent function between patients with silent and symptomatic ischaemia was recorded, but both had significantly less HRV in response to standing than the controls (p < 0.005 for silent and p < 0.01 for symptomatic). Patients with silent ischaemia showed an increased propensity for peripheral vasodilatation compared with symptomatic patients (p < 0.02) and controls (p < 0.04). Impaired sympathetic function was found in patients with pure silent ischaemia (n = 4) compared with the remaining patients with silent ischaemia whose pain pathways were presumed to be intact. CONCLUSIONS--Patients with silent ischaemia and pain pathways presumed to be intact have an enhanced peripheral vasodilator response, and if this applied to the coronary vasculature it could provide a mechanism for limiting ischaemia to below the pain threshold. Patients with pure silent ischaemia have evidence of sympathetic autonomic dysfunction. Images PMID:8297687

  12. The effects of levosimendan on brain metabolism during initial recovery from global transient ischaemia/hypoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roehl Anna B

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Backround Neuroprotective strategies after cardiopulmonary resuscitation are currently the focus of experimental and clinical research. Levosimendan has been proposed as a promising drug candidate because of its cardioprotective properties, improved haemodynamic effects in vivo and reduced traumatic brain injury in vitro. The effects of levosimendan on brain metabolism during and after ischaemia/hypoxia are unknown. Methods Transient cerebral ischaemia/hypoxia was induced in 30 male Wistar rats by bilateral common carotid artery clamping for 15 min and concomitant ventilation with 6% O2 during general anaesthesia with urethane. After 10 min of global ischaemia/hypoxia, the rats were treated with an i.v. bolus of 24 μg kg-1 levosimendan followed by a continuous infusion of 0.2 μg kg-1 min-1. The changes in the energy-related metabolites lactate, the lactate/pyruvate ratio, glucose and glutamate were monitored by microdialysis. In addition, the effects on global haemodynamics, cerebral perfusion and autoregulation, oedema and expression of proinflammatory genes in the neocortex were assessed. Results Levosimendan reduced blood pressure during initial reperfusion (72 ± 14 vs. 109 ± 2 mmHg, p = 0.03 and delayed flow maximum by 5 minutes (p = 0.002. Whereas no effects on time course of lactate, glucose, pyruvate and glutamate concentrations in the dialysate could be observed, the lactate/pyruvate ratio during initial reperfusion (144 ± 31 vs. 77 ± 8, p = 0.017 and the glutamate release during 90 minutes of reperfusion (75 ± 19 vs. 24 ± 28 μmol·L-1 were higher in the levosimendan group. The increased expression of IL-6, IL-1ß TNFα and ICAM-1, extend of cerebral edema and cerebral autoregulation was not influenced by levosimendan. Conclusion Although levosimendan has neuroprotective actions in vitro and on the spinal cord in vivo and has been shown to cross the blood–brain barrier, the present

  13. Time-dependent, non-monotonic response of warm convective cloud fields to changes in aerosol loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Dagan

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Large eddy simulations (LESs with bin microphysics are used here to study cloud fields' sensitivity to changes in aerosol loading and the time evolution of this response. Similarly to the known response of a single cloud, we show that the mean field properties change in a non-monotonic trend, with an optimum aerosol concentration for which the field reaches its maximal water mass or rain yield. This trend is a result of competition between processes that encourage cloud development versus those that suppress it. However, another layer of complexity is added when considering clouds' impact on the field's thermodynamic properties and how this is dependent on aerosol loading. Under polluted conditions, rain is suppressed and the non-precipitating clouds act to increase atmospheric instability. This results in warming of the lower part of the cloudy layer (in which there is net condensation and cooling of the upper part (net evaporation. Evaporation at the upper part of the cloudy layer in the polluted simulations raises humidity at these levels and thus amplifies the development of the next generation of clouds (preconditioning effect. On the other hand, under clean conditions, the precipitating clouds drive net warming of the cloudy layer and net cooling of the sub-cloud layer due to rain evaporation. These two effects act to stabilize the atmospheric boundary layer with time (consumption of the instability. The evolution of the field's thermodynamic properties affects the cloud properties in return, as shown by the migration of the optimal aerosol concentration toward higher values.

  14. Multi-modal assessment of neurovascular coupling during cerebral ischaemia and reperfusion using remote middle cerebral artery occlusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sutherland, Brad A; Fordsmann, Jonas C; Martin, Chris

    2017-01-01

    . Male Wistar rats were subjected to remote middle cerebral artery occlusion, where a long filament was advanced intraluminally through a guide cannula in the common carotid artery. Transcallosal stimulation evoked increases in blood flow, tissue oxygenation and neuronal activity, which were diminished...... that neurovascular dysfunction was not sustained. These data show for the first time that the rat remote middle cerebral artery occlusion model coupled with transcallosal stimulation provides a novel method for continuous assessment of hyperacute neurovascular coupling changes during ischaemia and reperfusion......Hyperacute changes in cerebral blood flow during cerebral ischaemia and reperfusion are important determinants of injury. Cerebral blood flow is regulated by neurovascular coupling, and disruption of neurovascular coupling contributes to brain plasticity and repair problems. However, it is unknown...

  15. Allowable warm ischemic time and morphological and biochemical changes in uterine ischemia/reperfusion injury in cynomolgus macaque: a basic study for uterus transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisu, Iori; Umene, Kiyoko; Adachi, Masataka; Emoto, Katsura; Nogami, Yuya; Banno, Kouji; Itagaki, Iori; Kawamoto, Ikuo; Nakagawa, Takahiro; Narita, Hayato; Yoshida, Atsushi; Tsuchiya, Hideaki; Ogasawara, Kazumasa; Aoki, Daisuke

    2017-10-01

    How long is the allowable warm ischemic time of the uterus and what morphological and biochemical changes are caused by uterine ischemia/reperfusion injury in cynomolgus macaques? Warm ischemia in the uterus of cynomolgus macaques is tolerated for up to 4 h and reperfusion after uterine ischemia caused no further morphological and biochemical changes. Uterus transplantation is a potential option for women with uterine factor infertility. The allowable warm ischemic time and ischemia/reperfusion injury of the uterus in humans and non-human primates is unknown. This experimental study included 18 female cynomolgus macaques with periodic menstruation. Animals were divided into six groups of three monkeys each: a control group and groups with uterine ischemia for 0.5, 1, 2, 4 and 8 h. Biopsies of uterine tissues were performed before blood flow blockage, after each blockage time, and after reperfusion for 3 h. Blood sampling was performed after each blockage time, and after reperfusion for 5, 15 and 30 min for measurement of biochemical data. Resumption of menstruation was monitored after the surgical procedure. Morphological, physiological and biochemical changes after ischemia and reperfusion were evaluated. Mild muscle degeneration and zonal degeneration were observed in all animals subjected to warm ischemia for 4 or 8 h, but there were no marked differences in the appearance of specimens immediately after ischemia and after reperfusion for 3 h in animals subjected to 4 or 8 h of warm ischemia. There were no significant changes in any biochemical parameters at any time point in each group. Periodical menstruation resumed in all animals with warm ischemia up to 4 h, but did not recover in animals with warm ischemia for 8 h with atrophic uteri. Warm ischemia in actual transplantation was not exactly mimicked in this study because uteri were not perfused, cooled, transplanted or reanastomosed with vessels. Results in non-human primates cannot always be extrapolated to

  16. Near Real-time Ecological Forecasting of Peatland Responses to Warming and CO2 Treatment through EcoPAD-SPRUCE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Y.; Jiang, J.; Stacy, M.; Ricciuto, D. M.; Hanson, P. J.; Sundi, N.; Luo, Y.

    2016-12-01

    Ecological forecasting is critical in various aspects of our coupled human-nature systems, such as disaster risk reduction, natural resource management and climate change mitigation. Novel advancements are in urgent need to deepen our understandings of ecosystem dynamics, boost the predictive capacity of ecology, and provide timely and effective information for decision-makers in a rapidly changing world. Our Ecological Platform for Assimilation of Data (EcoPAD) facilitates the integration of current best knowledge from models, manipulative experimentations, observations and other modern techniques and provides both near real-time and long-term forecasting of ecosystem dynamics. As a case study, the web-based EcoPAD platform synchronizes real- or near real-time field measurements from the Spruce and Peatland Responses Under Climatic and Environmental Change Experiment (SPRUCE), a whole ecosystem warming and CO2 enrichment treatment experiment, assimilates multiple data streams into process based models, enhances timely feedback between modelers and experimenters, and ultimately improves ecosystem forecasting and makes best utilization of current knowledge. In addition to enable users to (i) estimate model parameters or state variables, (ii) quantify uncertainty of estimated parameters and projected states of ecosystems, (iii) evaluate model structures, (iv) assess sampling strategies, and (v) conduct ecological forecasting, EcoPAD-SPRUCE automated the workflow from real-time data acquisition, model simulation to result visualization. EcoPAD-SPRUCE promotes seamless feedback between modelers and experimenters, hand in hand to make better forecasting of future changes. The framework of EcoPAD-SPRUCE (with flexible API, Application Programming Interface) is easily portable and will benefit scientific communities, policy makers as well as the general public.

  17. Local adaptation and the potential effects of a contaminant on predator avoidance and antipredator responses under global warming: a space-for-time substitution approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssens, Lizanne; Dinh Van, Khuong; Debecker, Sara; Bervoets, Lieven; Stoks, Robby

    2014-01-01

    The ability to deal with temperature-induced changes in interactions with contaminants and predators under global warming is one of the outstanding, applied evolutionary questions. For this, it is crucial to understand how contaminants will affect activity levels, predator avoidance and antipredator responses under global warming and to what extent gradual thermal evolution may mitigate these effects. Using a space-for-time substitution approach, we assessed the potential for gradual thermal evolution shaping activity (mobility and foraging), predator avoidance and antipredator responses when Ischnura elegans damselfly larvae were exposed to zinc in a common-garden warming experiment at the mean summer water temperatures of shallow water bodies at southern and northern latitudes (24 and 20°C, respectively). Zinc reduced mobility and foraging, predator avoidance and escape swimming speed. Importantly, high-latitude populations showed stronger zinc-induced reductions in escape swimming speed at both temperatures, and in activity levels at the high temperature. The latter indicates that local thermal adaptation may strongly change the ecological impact of contaminants under global warming. Our study underscores the critical importance of considering local adaptation along natural gradients when integrating biotic interactions in ecological risk assessment, and the potential of gradual thermal evolution mitigating the effects of warming on the vulnerability to contaminants. PMID:24665344

  18. Local adaptation and the potential effects of a contaminant on predator avoidance and antipredator responses under global warming: a space-for-time substitution approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssens, Lizanne; Dinh Van, Khuong; Debecker, Sara; Bervoets, Lieven; Stoks, Robby

    2014-03-01

    The ability to deal with temperature-induced changes in interactions with contaminants and predators under global warming is one of the outstanding, applied evolutionary questions. For this, it is crucial to understand how contaminants will affect activity levels, predator avoidance and antipredator responses under global warming and to what extent gradual thermal evolution may mitigate these effects. Using a space-for-time substitution approach, we assessed the potential for gradual thermal evolution shaping activity (mobility and foraging), predator avoidance and antipredator responses when Ischnura elegans damselfly larvae were exposed to zinc in a common-garden warming experiment at the mean summer water temperatures of shallow water bodies at southern and northern latitudes (24 and 20°C, respectively). Zinc reduced mobility and foraging, predator avoidance and escape swimming speed. Importantly, high-latitude populations showed stronger zinc-induced reductions in escape swimming speed at both temperatures, and in activity levels at the high temperature. The latter indicates that local thermal adaptation may strongly change the ecological impact of contaminants under global warming. Our study underscores the critical importance of considering local adaptation along natural gradients when integrating biotic interactions in ecological risk assessment, and the potential of gradual thermal evolution mitigating the effects of warming on the vulnerability to contaminants.

  19. Medium intensity oral anticoagulants versus aspirin after cerebral ischaemia of arterial origin (ESPRIT) : a randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Halkes, P H A; van Gijn, J; Kappelle, L J; Algra, A; Koudstaal, P J

    BACKGROUND: Oral anticoagulants are better than aspirin for secondary prevention after myocardial infarction and after cerebral ischaemia in combination with non-rheumatic atrial fibrillation. The European/Australasian Stroke Prevention in Reversible Ischaemia Trial (ESPRIT) aimed to determine

  20. Medium intensity oral anticoagulants versus aspirin after cerebral ischaemia of arterial origin (ESPRIT): a randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Halkes, P. H. A.; van Gijn, J.; Kappelle, L. J.; Koudstaal, P. J.; Algra, A.; Banga, J. D.; Boiten, J.; van der Bom, J. G.; Boon, A. E.; Dippel, D. W. J.; Donders, R. C. J. M.; Eefting, F. D.; Franke, C. L.; Frenken, C. W. G. M.; Frijns, C. J. M.; van Gemert, H. M. A.; de Jaegere, P. P. Th; Kamp, O.; Kwa, V. I. H.; de Leeuw, F.-E.; Linn, F. H. H.; van der Meer, W. K.; Mosterd, A.; Pop, G. A. M.; Raaymakers, T. W. M.; van Schooneveld, M. J.; Stam, J.; Verheugt, F. W. A.; van der Worp, H. B.; Zijlstra, F.; Boekweit, M. P.; van Buuren, M.; Greebe, P.; Mooibroek, G. E.; Slabbers, D. C. V.; Beijer, I. S.; van den Bergh, W. M.; Biessels, G. J.; de Schryver, E. L. L. M.; van Dijk, G. W.; Dorhout-Mees, S. M.; Ferrier, C. H.; Gorter, J. W.; Hofmeijer, J.; Hop, J. W.; Klijn, C. J. M.; Manschot, S. M.; Vermeulen, M.; Foncke, E.; Lucas, C.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Oral anticoagulants are better than aspirin for secondary prevention after myocardial infarction and after cerebral ischaemia in combination with non-rheumatic atrial fibrillation. The European/Australasian Stroke Prevention in Reversible Ischaemia Trial (ESPRIT) aimed to determine

  1. Global warming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    Canada's Green Plan strategy for dealing with global warming is being implemented as a multidepartmental partnership involving all Canadians and the international community. Many of the elements of this strategy are built on an existing base of activities predating the Green Plan. Elements of the strategy include programs to limit emissions of greenhouse gases, such as initiatives to encourage more energy-efficient practices and development of alternate fuel sources; studies and policy developments to help Canadians prepare and adapt to climate change; research on the global warming phenomenon; and stimulation of international action on global warming, including obligations arising out of the Framework Convention on Climate Change. All the program elements have been approved, funded, and announced. Major achievements to date are summarized, including improvements in the Energy Efficiency Act, studies on the socioeconomic impacts of global warming, and participation in monitoring networks. Milestones associated with the remaining global warming initiatives are listed

  2. Measurement of ischaemia-reperfusion in patients with intermittent claudication using NMR-based metabonomics.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coolen, S.A.; Daykin, C.A.; Duynhoven, J.P. van; Dorsten, F.A. van; Wulfert, F.; Mathot, J.; Scheltinga, M.R.M.; Stroosma, O.; Vader, H.L.; Wijnen, M.H.W.A.

    2008-01-01

    Intermittent claudication has proved to be a good in vivo model for ischaemia-reperfusion. For assessment of ischaemia-reperfusion damage, the known biochemical markers all have disadvantages with respect to sensitivity and interference with other physiological events. In this work, we studied the

  3. Acute upper arm ischaemia: a rare presentation of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Daruwalla, Z J

    2010-12-01

    Digital ischaemia has been sparsely reported in current literature. Its association with lymphomatous conditions has been described in even more exceptional occurrences. We present the first case of upper arm ischaemia associated with non-Hodgkin\\'s lymphoma. A brief literature review of this rare phenomenon is also accompanied with it.

  4. Effect of 5-aminosalicylic acid on myocardial capillary permeability following ischaemia and reperfusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, P R; Svendsen, Jesper Hastrup; Høst, N B

    1992-01-01

    The aim was to evaluate the effect of 5-aminosalicylic acid on myocardial capillary permeability for small hydrophilic molecules after ischaemia and reperfusion.......The aim was to evaluate the effect of 5-aminosalicylic acid on myocardial capillary permeability for small hydrophilic molecules after ischaemia and reperfusion....

  5. Induction of interleukin-1β mRNA after focal cerebral ischaemia in the rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buttini, M.; Sauter, A.; Boddeke, H.W.G.M.

    1994-01-01

    The expression of interleukin-1β (IL-1β) mRNA in the brain in response to cerebral ischaemia in rats was examined using in situ hybridization histochemistry. Focal cerebral ischaemia was induced in spontaneously hypertensive rats by permanent occlusion of the left middle cerebral artery (MCAO).

  6. Functional neuroimaging in the assessment of cerebral ischaemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sartor, K.; Heiland, S.

    1997-01-01

    Cerebral infarct causes over 170, 000 deaths per year in the United States. Recent developments in neuroimaging are providing an insight into focal cerebral ischaemia, including its pathophysiology and the area of brain at risk. Perfusion-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) allows evaluation of the blood supply to the ischaemic area, and diffusion-weighted MR permits assessment of tissue damage. Although both functional imaging techniques require some refinement, it is likely that they will soon become part of the normal clinical routine and allow accurate characterisation of pathology. It is expected that this may eventually lead to the development of new treatments. (orig.)

  7. The diagnosis and treatment of non-occlusive gut ischaemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schindler, G.; Bruch, H.P.; Wuerzburg Univ.

    1991-01-01

    Non-occlusive gut ischaemia is a disease of advanced age. Its causes are reduced cardiac output or shock, facilitated by digitalis, adrenaline, ergotamine and diuretics. The persisting microcirculation and development of gut necrois leads to an increase in certain serum enzymes, such as lactate, LDH and CK-NB. The early application of mesenteric angiography using a DSA technique reveals four grades of under-perfusion. Early and correct diagnosis of the disease should lead to intra-arterial treatment with prostaglandin. In 10 out of 42 cases, conservative therapy led to re-perfusion of the gut. (orig.) [de

  8. Honey improves spermatogenesis and hormone secretion in testicular ischaemia-reperfusion-induced injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholami, M; Abbaszadeh, A; Khanipour Khayat, Z; Anbari, K; Baharvand, P; Gharravi, A M

    2018-02-01

    This study was conducted to survey the protective effect of pre-treatment with Persian honey during post-ischaemia reperfusion on ischaemia-reperfusion (IR)-induced testis injury. Animals were divided into four groups of IR, honey + ischaemia- reperfusion (HIR), vitamin C + ischaemia- reperfusion (VIR) and carbohydrates + ischaemia- reperfusion (CIR). The testes were examined for spermatogenesis index. Detection of single- and double-stranded DNA breaks at the early stages of apoptosis was performed. Total serum concentration of FSH, LH and testosterone was measured using ELISA. All data were expressed as mean ± SD in each group, and significance was set at p ≤ .05. Spermatogenesis index was significant in the HIR group (p honey decreases the cellular damage and apoptosis during testicular I/R injury, with significant protective effects on reproductive hormone production. © 2017 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  9. Regional difference of the start time of the recent warming in Eastern China: prompted by a 165-year temperature record deduced from tree rings in the Dabie Mountains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Qiufang; Liu, Yu; Duan, Bingchuang; Sun, Changfeng

    2018-03-01

    Tree-ring studies from tropical to subtropical regions are rarer than that from extratropical regions, which greatly limit our understanding of some critical climate change issues. Based on the tree-ring-width chronology of samples collected from the Dabie Mountains, we reconstructed the April-June mean temperature for this region with an explained variance of 46.8%. Five cold (1861-1869, 1889-1899, 1913-1920, 1936-1942 and 1952-1990) and three warm (1870-1888, 1922-1934 and 2000-2005) periods were identified in the reconstruction. The reconstruction not only agreed well with the instrumental records in and around the study area, but also showed good resemblance to previous temperature reconstructions from nearby regions, indicating its spatial and temporal representativeness of the temperature variation in the central part of eastern China. Although no secular warming trend was found, the warming trend since 1970 was unambiguous in the Dabie Mountains (0.064 °C/year). Further temperature comparison indicated that the start time of the recent warming in eastern China was regional different. It delayed gradually from north to south, starting at least around 1940 AD in the north part, around 1970 AD in the central part and around 1980s in the south part. This work enriches the high-resolution temperature reconstructions in eastern China. We expect that climate warming in the future would promote the radial growth of alpine Pinus taiwanensis in the subtropical areas of China, therefore promote the carbon capture and carbon storage in the Pinus taiwanensis forest. It also helps to clarify the regional characteristic of recent warming in eastern China.

  10. Predicting renal recovery after liver transplant with severe pretransplant subacute kidney injury: The impact of warm ischemia time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laskey, Heather L; Schomaker, Nathan; Hung, Kenneth W; Asrani, Sumeet K; Jennings, Linda; Nydam, Trevor L; Gralla, Jane; Wiseman, Alex; Rosen, Hugo R; Biggins, Scott W

    2016-08-01

    Identifying which liver transplantation (LT) candidates with severe kidney injury will have a full recovery of renal function after liver transplantation alone (LTA) is difficult. Avoiding unnecessary simultaneous liver-kidney transplantation (SLKT) can optimize the use of scarce kidney grafts. Incorrect predictions of spontaneous renal recovery after LTA can lead to increased morbidity and mortality. We retrospectively analyzed all LTA patients at our institution from February 2002 to February 2013 (n = 583) and identified a cohort with severe subacute renal injury (n = 40; creatinine <2 mg/dL in the 14-89 days prior to LTA and not on renal replacement therapy [RRT] yet, ≥2 mg/dL within 14 days of LTA and/or on RRT). Of 40 LTA recipients, 26 (65%) had renal recovery and 14 (35%) did not. The median (interquartile range) warm ischemia time (WIT) in recipients with and without renal recovery after LTA was 31 minutes (24-46 minutes) and 39 minutes (34-49 minutes; P = 0.02), respectively. Adjusting for the severity of the subacute kidney injury with either Acute Kidney Injury Network or Risk, Injury, Failure, Loss, and End-Stage Kidney Disease criteria, increasing WIT was associated with lack of renal recovery (serum creatinine <2 mg/dL after LTA, not on RRT), with an odds ratio (OR) of 1.08 (1.01-1.16; P = 0.03) and 1.09 (1.01-1.17; P = 0.02), respectively. For each minute of increased WIT, there was an 8%-9% increase in the risk of lack of renal recovery after LTA. In a separate cohort of 98 LTA recipients with subacute kidney injury, we confirmed the association of WIT and lack of renal recovery (OR, 1.04; P = 0.04). In LT candidates with severe subacute renal injury, operative measures to minimize WIT may improve renal recovery potentially avoiding RRT and the need for subsequent kidney transplant. Liver Transplantation 22 1085-1091 2016 AASLD. © 2016 American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  11. Culture time of vitrified/warmed zygotes before microinjection affects the production efficiency of CRISPR-Cas9-mediated knock-in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Yoshiko; Sakuma, Tetsushi; Nishimichi, Norihisa; Yokosaki, Yasuyuki; Takeo, Toru; Nakagata, Naomi; Yamamoto, Takashi

    2017-05-15

    Robust reproductive engineering techniques are required for the efficient and rapid production of genetically modified mice. We have reported the efficient production of genome-edited mice using reproductive engineering techniques, such as ultra-superovulation, in vitro fertilization (IVF) and vitrification/warming of zygotes. We usually use vitrified/warmed fertilized oocytes created by IVF for microinjection because of work efficiency and flexible scheduling. Here, we investigated whether the culture time of zygotes before microinjection influences the efficiency of producing knock-in mice. Knock-in mice were generated using clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9) system and single-stranded oligodeoxynucleotide (ssODN) or PITCh (Precise Integration into Target Chromosome) system, a method of integrating a donor vector assisted by microhomology-mediated end-joining. The cryopreserved fertilized oocytes were warmed, cultured for several hours and microinjected at different timings. Microinjection was performed with Cas9 protein, guide RNA(s), and an ssODN or PITCh donor plasmid for the ssODN knock-in and the PITCh knock-in, respectively. Different production efficiencies of knock-in mice were observed by changing the timing of microinjection. Our study provides useful information for the CRISPR-Cas9-based generation of knock-in mice. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  12. Refrigeration and global warming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1997-01-01

    Some aspects of global warming in general, and the implications for refrigerants and refrigerator efficiency in particular, are briefly considered in a question and answer format. The concepts of Global Warming Potential (GWP) and Total Equivalent Warming Impact (TEWI) are explained. GWP is an index which allows a simple comparison to be make between the warming effects of different gases on a kg to kg basis relative to carbon. The GWP depends both on the lifetime of a substance in the atmosphere and its infra-red absorption capacity. The overall warming effect of operating a refrigeration system for its entire life is measured by its TEWI. Chloroflourocarbons (CFCs) which have been widely used as refrigerants are powerful greenhouse gases with high GWPs. Because of the bank of CFCs in refrigerating systems, their levels in the atmosphere are still increasing and it will be some time before refrigerant changes will be effective in reducing the warming effects of refrigerant releases. Hydrocarbons, hydroflourocarbons and ammonia all have a part to play as substitute refrigerants. Refrigerator efficiency is very important in terms of reducing CO 2 emissions. (UK)

  13. Pathways limiting warming to 1.5°C: a tale of turning around in no time?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriegler, Elmar; Luderer, Gunnar; Bauer, Nico; Baumstark, Lavinia; Fujimori, Shinichiro; Popp, Alexander; Rogelj, Joeri; Strefler, Jessica; van Vuuren, Detlef P

    2018-05-13

    We explore the feasibility of limiting global warming to 1.5°C without overshoot and without the deployment of carbon dioxide removal (CDR) technologies. For this purpose, we perform a sensitivity analysis of four generic emissions reduction measures to identify a lower bound on future CO 2 emissions from fossil fuel combustion and industrial processes. Final energy demand reductions and electrification of energy end uses as well as decarbonization of electricity and non-electric energy supply are all considered. We find the lower bound of cumulative fossil fuel and industry CO 2 emissions to be 570 GtCO 2 for the period 2016-2100, around 250 GtCO 2 lower than the lower end of available 1.5°C mitigation pathways generated with integrated assessment models. Estimates of 1.5°C-consistent CO 2 budgets are highly uncertain and range between 100 and 900 GtCO 2 from 2016 onwards. Based on our sensitivity analysis, limiting warming to 1.5°C will require CDR or terrestrial net carbon uptake if 1.5°C-consistent budgets are smaller than 650 GtCO 2 The earlier CDR is deployed, the more it neutralizes post-2020 emissions rather than producing net negative emissions. Nevertheless, if the 1.5°C budget is smaller than 550 GtCO 2 , temporary overshoot of the 1.5°C limit becomes unavoidable if CDR cannot be ramped up faster than to 4 GtCO 2 in 2040 and 10 GtCO 2 in 2050.This article is part of the theme issue 'The Paris Agreement: understanding the physical and social challenges for a warming world of 1.5°C above pre-industrial levels'. © 2018 The Author(s).

  14. Pathways limiting warming to 1.5°C: a tale of turning around in no time?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriegler, Elmar; Luderer, Gunnar; Bauer, Nico; Baumstark, Lavinia; Fujimori, Shinichiro; Popp, Alexander; Rogelj, Joeri; Strefler, Jessica; van Vuuren, Detlef P.

    2018-05-01

    We explore the feasibility of limiting global warming to 1.5°C without overshoot and without the deployment of carbon dioxide removal (CDR) technologies. For this purpose, we perform a sensitivity analysis of four generic emissions reduction measures to identify a lower bound on future CO2 emissions from fossil fuel combustion and industrial processes. Final energy demand reductions and electrification of energy end uses as well as decarbonization of electricity and non-electric energy supply are all considered. We find the lower bound of cumulative fossil fuel and industry CO2 emissions to be 570 GtCO2 for the period 2016-2100, around 250 GtCO2 lower than the lower end of available 1.5°C mitigation pathways generated with integrated assessment models. Estimates of 1.5°C-consistent CO2 budgets are highly uncertain and range between 100 and 900 GtCO2 from 2016 onwards. Based on our sensitivity analysis, limiting warming to 1.5°C will require CDR or terrestrial net carbon uptake if 1.5°C-consistent budgets are smaller than 650 GtCO2. The earlier CDR is deployed, the more it neutralizes post-2020 emissions rather than producing net negative emissions. Nevertheless, if the 1.5°C budget is smaller than 550 GtCO2, temporary overshoot of the 1.5°C limit becomes unavoidable if CDR cannot be ramped up faster than to 4 GtCO2 in 2040 and 10 GtCO2 in 2050. This article is part of the theme issue `The Paris Agreement: understanding the physical and social challenges for a warming world of 1.5°C above pre-industrial levels'.

  15. The value of non-invasive techniques for the assessment of critical limb ischaemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ubbink, D. T.; Tulevski, I. I.; den Hartog, D.; Koelemay, M. J.; Legemate, D. A.; Jacobs, M. J.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The European Consensus Document (ECD) defines critical ischaemia (CI) according to clinical (Fontaine) and blood pressure parameters. However, clinical symptoms may be non-specific and CI may exist without severely reduced blood pressures. This study prospectively investigated the

  16. Automated quantitative coronary computed tomography correlates of myocardial ischaemia on gated myocardial perfusion SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graaf, Michiel A. de; Boogers, Mark J.; Veltman, Caroline E.; El-Naggar, Heba M.; Bax, Jeroen J.; Delgado, Victoria; Broersen, Alexander; Kitslaar, Pieter H.; Dijkstra, Jouke; Kroft, Lucia J.; Younis, Imad Al; Reiber, Johan H.; Scholte, Arthur J.

    2013-01-01

    Automated software tools have permitted more comprehensive, robust and reproducible quantification of coronary stenosis, plaque burden and plaque location of coronary computed tomography angiography (CTA) data. The association between these quantitative CTA (QCT) parameters and the presence of myocardial ischaemia has not been explored. The aim of the present investigation was to evaluate the association between QCT parameters of coronary artery lesions and the presence of myocardial ischaemia on gated myocardial perfusion single-photon emission CT (SPECT). Included in the study were 40 patients (mean age 58.2 ± 10.9 years, 27 men) with known or suspected coronary artery disease (CAD) who had undergone multidetector row CTA and gated myocardial perfusion SPECT within 6 months. From the CTA datasets, vessel-based and lesion-based visual analyses were performed. Consecutively, lesion-based QCT was performed to assess plaque length, plaque burden, percentage lumen area stenosis and remodelling index. Subsequently, the presence of myocardial ischaemia was assessed using the summed difference score (SDS ≥2) on gated myocardial perfusion SPECT. Myocardial ischaemia was seen in 25 patients (62.5 %) in 37 vascular territories. Quantitatively assessed significant stenosis and quantitatively assessed lesion length were independently associated with myocardial ischaemia (OR 7.72, 95 % CI 2.41-24.7, p 2 = 20.7) and lesion length (χ 2 = 26.0) to the clinical variables and the visual assessment (χ 2 = 5.9) had incremental value in the association with myocardial ischaemia. Coronary lesion length and quantitatively assessed significant stenosis were independently associated with myocardial ischaemia. Both quantitative parameters have incremental value over baseline variables and visually assessed significant stenosis. Potentially, QCT can refine assessment of CAD, which may be of potential use for identification of patients with myocardial ischaemia. (orig.)

  17. Global warming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houghton, John

    2005-01-01

    'Global warming' is a phrase that refers to the effect on the climate of human activities, in particular the burning of fossil fuels (coal, oil and gas) and large-scale deforestation, which cause emissions to the atmosphere of large amounts of 'greenhouse gases', of which the most important is carbon dioxide. Such gases absorb infrared radiation emitted by the Earth's surface and act as blankets over the surface keeping it warmer than it would otherwise be. Associated with this warming are changes of climate. The basic science of the 'greenhouse effect' that leads to the warming is well understood. More detailed understanding relies on numerical models of the climate that integrate the basic dynamical and physical equations describing the complete climate system. Many of the likely characteristics of the resulting changes in climate (such as more frequent heat waves, increases in rainfall, increase in frequency and intensity of many extreme climate events) can be identified. Substantial uncertainties remain in knowledge of some of the feedbacks within the climate system (that affect the overall magnitude of change) and in much of the detail of likely regional change. Because of its negative impacts on human communities (including for instance substantial sea-level rise) and on ecosystems, global warming is the most important environmental problem the world faces. Adaptation to the inevitable impacts and mitigation to reduce their magnitude are both necessary. International action is being taken by the world's scientific and political communities. Because of the need for urgent action, the greatest challenge is to move rapidly to much increased energy efficiency and to non-fossil-fuel energy sources

  18. Laser wakefield generated X-ray probe for femtosecond time-resolved measurements of ionization states of warm dense aluminum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mo, M. Z.; Chen, Z.; Tsui, Y. Y.; Fedosejevs, R. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2V4 (Canada); Fourmaux, S.; Saraf, A.; Otani, K.; Kieffer, J. C. [INRS-EMT, Université du Québec, 1650 Lionel Boulet, Varennes, Québec J3X 1S2 (Canada); Ng, A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, British Columbia V6T 1Z1 (Canada)

    2013-12-15

    We have developed a laser wakefield generated X-ray probe to directly measure the temporal evolution of the ionization states in warm dense aluminum by means of absorption spectroscopy. As a promising alternative to the free electron excited X-ray sources, Betatron X-ray radiation, with femtosecond pulse duration, provides a new technique to diagnose femtosecond to picosecond transitions in the atomic structure. The X-ray probe system consists of an adjustable Kirkpatrick-Baez (KB) microscope for focusing the Betatron emission to a small probe spot on the sample being measured, and a flat Potassium Acid Phthalate Bragg crystal spectrometer to measure the transmitted X-ray spectrum in the region of the aluminum K-edge absorption lines. An X-ray focal spot size of around 50 μm was achieved after reflection from the platinum-coated 10-cm-long KB microscope mirrors. Shot to shot positioning stability of the Betatron radiation was measured resulting in an rms shot to shot variation in spatial pointing on the sample of 16 μm. The entire probe setup had a spectral resolution of ∼1.5 eV, a detection bandwidth of ∼24 eV, and an overall photon throughput efficiency of the order of 10{sup −5}. Approximately 10 photons were detected by the X-ray CCD per laser shot within the spectrally resolved detection band. Thus, it is expected that hundreds of shots will be required per absorption spectrum to clearly observe the K-shell absorption features expected from the ionization states of the warm dense aluminum.

  19. The sensitivity of the Indian summer monsoon to a global warming of 2 C with respect to pre-industrial times

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    May, Wilhelm [Danish Meteorological Institute, Danish Climate Centre, Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2011-11-15

    In this study the potential future changes in different aspects of the Indian summer monsoon associated with a global warming of 2 C with respect to pre-industrial times are assessed, focussing on the role of the different mechanisms leading to these changes. In addition, these changes as well as the underlying mechanisms are compared to the corresponding changes associated with a markedly stronger global warming exceeding 4.5 C, associated with the widely used SRES A1B scenario. The study is based on two sets of four ensemble simulations with the ECHAM5/MPI-OM coupled climate model, each starting from different initial conditions. In one set of simulations (2020-2200), greenhouse gas concentrations and sulphate aerosol load have been prescribed in such a way that the simulated global warming does not exceed 2 C with respect to pre-industrial times. In the other set of simulations (1860-2200), greenhouse gas concentrations and sulphate aerosol load have been prescribed according to observations until 2000 and according to the SRES A1B scenario after 2000. The study reveals marked changes in the Indian summer monsoon associated with a global warming of 2 C with respect to pre-industrial conditions, namely an intensification of the summer monsoon precipitation despite a weakening of the large-scale monsoon circulation. The increase in the monsoon rainfall is related to a variety of different mechanisms, with the intensification of the atmospheric moisture transport into the Indian region as the most important one. The weakening of the large-scale monsoon circulation is mainly caused by changes in the Walker circulation with large-scale divergence (convergence) in the lower (upper) troposphere over the Indian Ocean in response to enhanced convective activity over the Indian Ocean and the central and eastern Pacific and reduced convective activity over the western tropical Pacific. These changes in the Walker circulation induce westerly (easterly) wind anomalies at

  20. Implementation of methane cycling for deep-time global warming simulations with the DCESS Earth system model (version 1.2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, Gary; Fernández Villanueva, Esteban; Rondanelli, Roberto; Olaf Pepke Pedersen, Jens; Malskær Olsen, Steffen; Huber, Matthew

    2017-11-01

    from land soils. Analysis of synthetic sediment cores from the simulations provides guidelines for the interpretation of real sediment cores spanning the warming events. With this improved DCESS model version and paleo-reconstructions, we are now better armed to gauge the amounts, types, timescales and locations of methane injections driving specific, observed deep-time, global warming events.

  1. Implementation of methane cycling for deep-time global warming simulations with the DCESS Earth system model (version 1.2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Shaffer

    2017-11-01

    , greater carbon dioxide release from land soils. Analysis of synthetic sediment cores from the simulations provides guidelines for the interpretation of real sediment cores spanning the warming events. With this improved DCESS model version and paleo-reconstructions, we are now better armed to gauge the amounts, types, timescales and locations of methane injections driving specific, observed deep-time, global warming events.

  2. Coronary plaque quantification and fractional flow reserve by coronary computed tomography angiography identify ischaemia-causing lesions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaur, Sara; Øvrehus, Kristian Altern; Dey, Damini

    2016-01-01

    AIMS: Coronary plaque characteristics are associated with ischaemia. Differences in plaque volumes and composition may explain the discordance between coronary stenosis severity and ischaemia. We evaluated the association between coronary stenosis severity, plaque characteristics, coronary computed...... tomography angiography (CTA)-derived fractional flow reserve (FFRCT), and lesion-specific ischaemia identified by FFR in a substudy of the NXT trial (Analysis of Coronary Blood Flow Using CT Angiography: Next Steps). METHODS AND RESULTS: Coronary CTA stenosis, plaque volumes, FFRCT, and FFR were assessed...

  3. Involvement of protein kinase B and mitogen-activated protein kinases in experimental normothermic liver ischaemia-reperfusion injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cursio, R; Filippa, N; Miele, C; Van Obberghen, E; Gugenheim, J

    2006-06-01

    This study evaluated the role of protein kinase B (PKB), phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-K), Bcl-2-associated death protein (BAD) and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) in normothermic ischaemia-reperfusion (IR)-induced apoptosis in rat liver. Rats were divided into two groups that received either phosphate-buffered saline (control) or the caspase inhibitor Z-Asp-2,6-dichorobenzoyloxymethylketone (Z-Asp-cmk), injected intravenously 2 min before the induction of 120 min of normothermic liver ischaemia. Liver apoptosis was assessed by the terminal deoxyribonucleotidyltransferase-mediated dUTP nick end labelling (TUNEL) method. PI3-K, PKB, BAD and MAPK activities were measured in ischaemic and non-ischaemic lobes at various times after reperfusion. The number of TUNEL-positive cells was significantly decreased after pretreatment with Z-Asp-cmk. In controls, PI3-K and PKB activities and BAD phosphorylation were inhibited in ischaemic liver lobes. The MAPKs (extracellular signal-regulated kinases, c-Jun N-terminal kinase and p38) showed different patterns of activation during IR. PKB activity was not modified by pretreatment with Z-Asp-cmk. Induction of apoptosis during IR liver injury might be triggered by inactivation of the antiapoptotic PI3-K-PKB pathway and activation of the proapoptotic MAPKs. Copyright (c) 2006 British Journal of Surgery Society Ltd. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Inhalation gases or gaseous mediators as neuroprotectants for cerebral ischaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, Brad A; Harrison, Joanne C; Nair, Shiva M; Sammut, Ivan A

    2013-01-01

    Ischaemic stroke is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. While recombinant tissue plasminogen activator can be administered to produce thrombolysis and restore blood flow to the ischaemic brain, therapeutic benefit is only achieved in a fraction of the subset of patients eligible for fibrinolytic intervention. Neuroprotective therapies attempting to restrict the extent of brain injury following cerebral ischaemia have not been successfully translated into the clinic despite overwhelming pre-clinical evidence of neuroprotection. Therefore, an adequate treatment for the majority of acute ischaemic stroke patients remains elusive. In the stroke literature, the use of therapeutic gases has received relatively little attention. Gases such as hyperbaric and normobaric oxygen, xenon, hydrogen, helium and argon all possess biological effects that have shown to be neuroprotective in pre-clinical models of ischaemic stroke. There are significant advantages to using gases including their relative abundance, low cost and feasibility for administration, all of which make them ideal candidates for a translational therapy for stroke. In addition, modulating cellular gaseous mediators including nitric oxide, carbon monoxide, and hydrogen sulphide may be an attractive option for ischaemic stroke therapy. Inhalation of these gaseous mediators can also produce neuroprotection, but this strategy remains to be confirmed as a viable therapy for ischaemic stroke. This review highlights the neuroprotective potential of therapeutic gas therapy and modulation of gaseous mediators for ischaemic stroke. The therapeutic advantages of gaseous therapy offer new promising directions in breaking the translational barrier for ischaemic stroke.

  5. Stem cells and their role in renal ischaemia reperfusion injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagul, Atul; Frost, Jodie H; Drage, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Ischaemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) remains one of the leading causes of acute kidney injury (AKI). IRI is an underlying multifactorial pathophysiological process which affects the outcome in both native and transplanted patients. The high morbidity and mortality associated with IRI/AKI and disappointing results from current available clinical therapeutic approaches prompt further research. Stem cells (SC) are undifferentiated cells that can undergo both renewal and differentiation into one or more cell types which can possibly ameliorate IRI. To carry out a detailed literature analysis and construct a comprehensive literature review addressing the role of SC in AKI secondary to IRI. Evidence favouring the role of SC in renal IRI and evidence showing no benefits of SC in renal IRI are the two main aspects to be studied. The search strategy was based on an extensive search addressing MESH terms and free text terms. The majority of studies in the field of renal IRI and stem cell therapy show substantial benefits. Studies were mostly conducted in small animal models, thus underscoring the need for further pre-clinical studies in larger animal models, and results should be taken with caution. SC therapy may be promising though controversy exists in the exact mechanism. Thorough scientific exploration is required to assess mechanism, safety profile, reproducibility and methods to monitor administered SC. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Delay-induced rebounds in CO2 emissions and critical time-scales to meet global warming targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manoli, Gabriele; Katul, Gabriel G.; Marani, Marco

    2016-12-01

    While climate science debates are focused on the attainment of peak anthropogenic CO2 emissions and policy tools to reduce peak temperatures, the human-energy-climate system can hold "rebound" surprises beyond this peak. Following the second industrial revolution, global per capita CO2 emissions (cc) experienced a punctuated growth of about 100% every 60 years, mainly attributable to technological development and its global spread. A model of the human-energy-climate system capable of reproducing past punctuated dynamics shows that rebounds in global CO2 emissions emerge due to delays intrinsic to the diffusion of innovations. Such intrinsic delays in the adoption and spread of low-carbon emitting technologies, together with projected population growth, upset the warming target set by the Paris Agreement. To avoid rebounds and their negative climate effects, model calculations show that the diffusion of climate-friendly technologies must occur with lags one-order of magnitude shorter (i.e., ˜6 years) than the characteristic timescale of past punctuated growth in cc. Radically new strategies to globally implement the technological advances at unprecedented rates are needed if the current emission goals are to be achieved.

  7. Global warming

    CERN Document Server

    Hulme, M

    1998-01-01

    Global warming-like deforestation, the ozone hole and the loss of species- has become one of the late 20the century icons of global environmental damage. The threat, is not the reality, of such a global climate change has motivated governments. businesses and environmental organisations, to take serious action ot try and achieve serious control of the future climate. This culminated last December in Kyoto in the agreement for legally-binding climate protocol. In this series of three lectures I will provide a perspective on the phenomenon of global warming that accepts the scientific basis for our concern, but one that also recognises the dynamic interaction between climate and society that has always exited The future will be no different. The challenge of global warning is not to pretend it is not happening (as with some pressure groups), nor to pretend it threatens global civilisation (as with other pressure groups), and it is not even a challenge to try and stop it from happening-we are too far down the ro...

  8. Impact of thermal time shift on wheat phenology and yield under warming climate in the Huang-Huai-Hai Plain, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Dengpan; Qi, Yongqing; Li, Zhiqiang; Wang, Rende; Moiwo, Juana P.; Liu, Fengshan

    2017-03-01

    Given climate change can potentially influence crop phenology and subsequent yield, an investigation of relevant adaptation measures could increase the understanding and mitigation of these responses in the future. In this study, field observations at 10 stations in the Huang-Huai-Hai Plain of China (HHHP) are used in combination with the Agricultural Production Systems Simulator (APSIM)-Wheat model to determine the effect of thermal time shift on the phenology and potential yield of wheat from 1981-2009. Warming climate speeds up winter wheat development and thereby decreases the duration of the wheat growth period. However, APSIM-Wheat model simulation suggests prolongation of the period from flowering to maturity (Gr) of winter wheat by 0.2-0.8 d•10yr-1 as the number of days by which maturity advances, which is less than that by which flowering advances. Based on computed thermal time of the two critical growth phases of wheat, total thermal time from floral initiation to flowering (TT_floral_initiation) increasesd in seven out of the 10 investigated stations. Alternatively, total thermal time from the start of grainfilling to maturity (TT_start_ grain_fill) increased in all investigated stations, except Laiyang. It is thus concluded that thermal time shift during the past three decades (1981-2009) prolongs Gr by 0.2-3.0 d•10yr-1 in the study area. This suggests that an increase in thermal time (TT) of the wheat growth period is critical for mitigating the effect of growth period reduction due to warming climatic condition. Furthermore, climate change reduces potential yield of winter wheat in 80% of the stations by 2.3-58.8 kg•yr-1. However, thermal time shift (TTS) increases potential yield of winter wheat in most of the stations by 3.0-51.0 kg•yr-1. It is concluded that wheat cultivars with longer growth periods and higher thermal requirements could mitigate the negative effects of warming climate on crop production in the study area.

  9. Calcinosis is associated with digital ischaemia in systemic sclerosis—a longitudinal study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Janet; Robinson, David; Jones, Niall; Khalidi, Nader; Docherty, Peter; Kaminska, Elzbieta; Masetto, Ariel; Sutton, Evelyn; Mathieu, Jean-Pierre; Ligier, Sophie; Grodzicky, Tamara; LeClercq, Sharon; Thorne, Carter; Gyger, Geneviève; Smith, Douglas; Fortin, Paul R.; Larché, Maggie; Abu-Hakima, Maysan; Rodriguez-Reyna, Tatiana S.; Cabral-Castaneda, Antonio R.; Fritzler, Marvin J.; Wang, Mianbo; Hudson, Marie

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To determine if ischaemia is a causal factor in the development of calcinosis in SSc. Methods. Patients with SSc were assessed yearly. Physicians reported the presence of calcinosis, digital ischaemia (digital ulcers, digital necrosis/gangrene, loss of digital pulp on any digits and/or auto- or surgical digital amputation) and nailfold capillary dropout assessed using a dermatoscope. The number of digits with digital ischaemia was used as an assessment of the severity of digital ischaemia. SSc specific antibodies were detected with a line immunoassay. Multiple logistic regression and Cox proportional hazards models were generated to determine associations between calcinosis, digital ischaemia and capillary dropout. Results. One thousand three hundred and five patients were included in this study, of whom 300 (23.0%) had calcinosis at study entry. In a cross-sectional multivariate analysis, at baseline, calcinosis was associated with digital ischaemia (odds ratio (OR) = 2.37, 95% CI: 1.66, 3.39), severity of ischaemia (OR = 1.12, 95% CI: 1.06, 1.18), capillary dropout (OR = 1.41, 95% CI: 1.05, 1.89), ACAs (OR = 1.68, 95% CI: 1.17, 2.43) and anti-RNA polymerase III antibodies (OR = 1.77, 95% CI: 1.08, 2.89). Current use of calcium channel blockers was inversely associated with the presence of calcinosis (OR = 0.70, 95% CI: 0.52, 0.96). Of the 805 patients with no calcinosis at study entry and at least one follow-up visit, 215 (26.7%) developed calcinosis during follow-up. Significant baseline predictors of the development of calcinosis in follow-up were digital ischaemia (hazard ratio (HR) = 1.82, 95% CI: 1.30, 2.54), capillary dropout (HR = 1.46, 95% CI: 1.08, 1.99), dcSSc (HR = 1.57, 95% CI: 1.11, 2.21), ACA (HR = 2.18, 95% CI: 1.50, 3.17) and anti-RNA polymerase III antibodies (HR = 2.58, 95% CI: 1.65, 4.04). Conclusion. Ischaemia may play a role in the development of calcinosis in SSc. PMID:27593964

  10. Calcinosis is associated with digital ischaemia in systemic sclerosis-a longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, Murray; Pope, Janet; Robinson, David; Jones, Niall; Khalidi, Nader; Docherty, Peter; Kaminska, Elzbieta; Masetto, Ariel; Sutton, Evelyn; Mathieu, Jean-Pierre; Ligier, Sophie; Grodzicky, Tamara; LeClercq, Sharon; Thorne, Carter; Gyger, Geneviève; Smith, Douglas; Fortin, Paul R; Larché, Maggie; Abu-Hakima, Maysan; Rodriguez-Reyna, Tatiana S; Cabral-Castaneda, Antonio R; Fritzler, Marvin J; Wang, Mianbo; Hudson, Marie

    2016-12-01

    To determine if ischaemia is a causal factor in the development of calcinosis in SSc. Patients with SSc were assessed yearly. Physicians reported the presence of calcinosis, digital ischaemia (digital ulcers, digital necrosis/gangrene, loss of digital pulp on any digits and/or auto- or surgical digital amputation) and nailfold capillary dropout assessed using a dermatoscope. The number of digits with digital ischaemia was used as an assessment of the severity of digital ischaemia. SSc specific antibodies were detected with a line immunoassay. Multiple logistic regression and Cox proportional hazards models were generated to determine associations between calcinosis, digital ischaemia and capillary dropout. One thousand three hundred and five patients were included in this study, of whom 300 (23.0%) had calcinosis at study entry. In a cross-sectional multivariate analysis, at baseline, calcinosis was associated with digital ischaemia (odds ratio (OR) = 2.37, 95% CI: 1.66, 3.39), severity of ischaemia (OR = 1.12, 95% CI: 1.06, 1.18), capillary dropout (OR = 1.41, 95% CI: 1.05, 1.89), ACAs (OR = 1.68, 95% CI: 1.17, 2.43) and anti-RNA polymerase III antibodies (OR = 1.77, 95% CI: 1.08, 2.89). Current use of calcium channel blockers was inversely associated with the presence of calcinosis (OR = 0.70, 95% CI: 0.52, 0.96). Of the 805 patients with no calcinosis at study entry and at least one follow-up visit, 215 (26.7%) developed calcinosis during follow-up. Significant baseline predictors of the development of calcinosis in follow-up were digital ischaemia (hazard ratio (HR) = 1.82, 95% CI: 1.30, 2.54), capillary dropout (HR = 1.46, 95% CI: 1.08, 1.99), dcSSc (HR = 1.57, 95% CI: 1.11, 2.21), ACA (HR = 2.18, 95% CI: 1.50, 3.17) and anti-RNA polymerase III antibodies (HR = 2.58, 95% CI: 1.65, 4.04). Ischaemia may play a role in the development of calcinosis in SSc. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Rheumatology

  11. An integrative review of health-related quality of life in patients with critical limb ischaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monaro, Susan; West, Sandra; Gullick, Janice

    2017-10-01

    To examine the domains and the domain-specific characteristics within a peripheral arterial disease health-related quality of life framework for their usefulness in defining critical limb ischaemia health-related quality of life. Critical Limb Ischaemia presents a highly individualised set of personal and health circumstances. Treatment options include conservative management, revascularisation or amputation. However, the links between treatment decisions and quality of life require further investigation. The framework for this integrative review was the peripheral arterial disease-specific health-related quality of life domains identified by Treat-Jacobson et al. The literature expanded and refined Treat-Jacobson's framework by modifying the characteristics to better describe health-related quality of life in critical limb ischaemia. Given that critical limb ischaemia is a highly individualised situation with powerful health-related quality of life implications, further research focusing on patient and family-centred decision-making relating to therapeutic options and advanced care planning is required. A critical limb ischaemia-specific, health-related quality of life tool is required to capture both the unique characteristics of this disorder, and the outcomes for active or conservative care among this complex group of patients. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Effects of defibrotide, a novel oligodeoxyribonucleotide, on ischaemia and reperfusion injury of the rat liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kwang Joon; Shin, Yong Kyoo; Song, Jin Ho; Oh, Byung Kwon; Choi, Myung Sup; Sohn, Uy Dong

    2002-02-01

    1. The purpose of this study was to investigate the protective effects of defibrotide, a single-stranded polydeoxyribonucleotide, on ischaemia-reperfusion injury to the liver using a rat model. 2. Ischaemia of the left and median lobes was created by total inflow occlusion for 30 min followed by 60 min of reperfusion. Hepatic injury was assessed by the release of liver enzymes (alanine transferase, ALT and lactic dehydrogenase, LDH). Hepatic oxidant stress was measured by superoxide production, lipid peroxidation and nitrite/nitrate formation. Leukocyte-endothelium interaction and Kupffer cell mobilization were quantified by measuring hepatic myeloperoxidase (MPO), polymorphonuclear leukocyte adherence to superior mesenteric artery (SMA) and immunostaining of Kupffer cell. 3. Defibrotide treatment resulted in a significant inhibition of postreperfusion superoxide generation, lipid peroxidation, serum ALT activity, serum LDH activity, MPO activity, serum nitrite/nitrate level, leukocyte adherence to SMA, and Kupffer cell mobilization, indicating a significant attenuation of hepatic dysfunction. 4. A significant correlation existed between liver ischaemia/reperfusion and hepatic injury, suggesting that liver ischaemia/reperfusion injury is mediated predominantly by generation of oxygen free radicals and mobilization of Kupffer cells. 5. We conclude that defibrotide significantly protects the liver against liver ischaemia/reperfusion injury by interfering with Kupffer cell mobilization and formation of oxygen free radicals. This study provides strong evidence that defibrotide has important beneficial effects on acute inflammatory tissue injury such as that occurring in the reperfusion of the ischaemic liver.

  13. Protective effects of Rosmarinic acid against renal ischaemia/reperfusion injury in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozturk, H.; Ozturk, H.; Terzi, E.H.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the potential protective effects of Rosmarinic acid (RA) on rats exposed to ischaemia/reperfusion renal injury. Methods: The prospective study was conducted at Abant Izzet Baysal University, Turkey, and comprised 21 male Spraque Dawley rats weighing 250-270g each. They were divided into three equal groups. Unilaterally nephrectomised rats were subjected to 60 minutes of left renal ischaemia followed by 60 minutes of reperfusion. Group 1 had shamoperated animals; group 2 had ischaemia/reperfusion untreated animals; and group 3 had ischaemia/reperfusion animals treated with rosmarinic acid. Serum creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, tissue malondialdehyde, glutathione peroxidase, superoxide dismutase and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activities, and light microscopic findings were evaluated. SPSS 17 was used for statistical analysis. Results: Treatment of rats with rosmarinic acid produced a reduction in the serum levels of creatinine and blood urea nitrogen compared to the other groups. However, no statistically significant difference was found. The levels of malondialdehyde and myeloperoxidase were decreased in the renal tissue of group 3, while glutathione peroxidose and superoxide dismutase levels remained unchanged. The injury score decreased in the treatment group rats compared to the untreated group. Rosmarinic acid significantly decreased focal glomerular necrosis, dilatation of Bowman's capsule, degeneration of tubular epithelium, necrosis in tubular epithelium, and tubular dilatation. Conclusions: Rosmarinic acid prevented ischaemia/reperfusion injury in the kidneys by decreasing oxidative stress. (author)

  14. Sustained multiple organ ischaemia after transarterial chemoembolization with drug-eluting beads for hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young Woon; Kwon, Jung Hyun; Nam, Soon Woo; Jang, Jeong Won; Jung, Hyun Suk; Shin, Yu Ri; Park, Eun Su; Shim, Dong Jae

    2018-02-01

    Transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) with drug-eluting beads (DC beads) may enhance drug delivery to tumours and reduce systemic toxicity. TACE with DC beads leads to significantly fewer serious side-effects compared with conventional TACE. A 66-year-old man with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) complained of continuous abdominal pain 1 month after TACE with DC beads. At the time of TACE, angiography revealed severe stenosis of both hepatic arteries. The diagnostic work up on admission suggested severe bile duct injury with regional bile duct dilatation, segmental liver and spleen infarction, necrotizing pancreatitis, as well as gastric and duodenal ulcers. The pathology specimens of the duodenum contained DC beads that had passed through small vessels in the connective tissue. The patient's condition appeared to improve after 2 weeks of antibiotic treatment and supportive care, but new multifocal liver and spleen infarction subsequently developed. After 2 months, he was well enough to be discharged. His HCC partially responded to the TACE with DC beads but eventually progressed and he died after 11 months. The present case report highlights unexpected ongoing multiple organ ischaemia in a 66-year-old man treated for HCC using TACE with DC beads. The use of TACE with DC beads should be carefully considered in patients with vascular strictures or aberrant blood supply.

  15. Self-reported symptoms and risk factors for digital ischaemia among international world-class beach volleyball players

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Pol, Daan; Alaeikhanehshir, Sena; Maas, Mario; Kuijer, P. Paul F. M.

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of ischaemia-related symptoms is remarkably high among elite indoor volleyball players. Since the exposure to sport-specific demands may be higher in beach volleyball compared to indoor volleyball, the aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of ischaemia-related symptoms and

  16. Abdominal symptoms during physical exercise and the role of gastrointestinal ischaemia : a study in 12 symptomatic athletes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ter Steege, Rinze W. F.; Geelkerken, Robert H.; Huisman, Ad B.; Kolkman, Jeroen J.

    2012-01-01

    Background Gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms during exercise may be caused by GI ischaemia. The authors report their experience with the diagnostic protocol and management of athletes with symptomatic exercise-induced GI ischaemia. The value of prolonged exercise tonometry in the diagnostic protocol of

  17. Polysensory response characteristics of dorsal root ganglion neurones that may serve sensory functions during myocardial ischaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, M H; Horackova, M; Negoescu, R M; Wolf, S; Armour, J A

    1996-09-01

    To determine the response characteristics of dorsal root ganglion neurones that may serve sensory functions during myocardial ischaemia. Extracellular recordings were made from 54 spontaneously active and 5 normally quiescent dorsal root ganglion neurones (T2-T5) in 22 anaesthetized open-chest dogs under control conditions and during epicardial mechanical or chemical stimulation and myocardial ischaemia. The activity of 78% of spontaneously active and all quiescent neurones with left ventricular sensory fields was modified by left ventricular ischaemia. Forty-six spontaneously active neurones (85%) were polysensory with respect to mechanical and chemical stimuli. The 5 quiescent neurones responded only to chemical stimuli. Spontaneously active neurones associated with left ventricular mechanosensory endings (37 neurones) generated four different activity patterns in response to similar mechanical stimuli (high or low pressure active, high-low pressure active, high-low pressure inactive). A fifth group generated activity which was not related to chamber dynamics. Adenosine, adenosine 5'-triphosphate, substance P and bradykinin modified 72, 61, 65 and 63% of the spontaneously active neurones, respectively. Maximum local mechanical or chemical stimuli enhanced activity to similar degrees, as did ischaemia. Each ischaemia-sensitive neurone displayed unique activity patterns in response to similar mechanical or chemical stimuli. Most myocardial ischemia-sensitive dorsal root ganglion neurones associated with epicardial neurites sense mechanical and multiple chemical stimuli, a small population sensing only mechanical or chemical stimuli. Activity patterns generated by these neurones depend on their primary sensory characteristics or those of other neurones that may converge on them, as well as the type and magnitude of the stimuli that impinge upon their sensory fields, both normally and during ischaemia.

  18. Can the household sector reduce global warming mitigation costs? sensitivity to key parameters in a TIMES techno-economic energy model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Astudillo, Miguel F.; Vaillancourt, Kathleen; Pineau, Pierre-Olivier; Amor, Ben

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: •An energy system model of Quebec is combined with building simulation software. •Greenhouse gas emission reductions efforts increase annual electricity peak demand. •Alternative heating tech. And building envelopes can effectively reduce peak demand. •Denser urban developments massively reduced costs of global warming mitigation. •CO 2 emissions from hydropower reservoirs are relevant in global warming mitigation. -- Abstract: The transition to low carbon societies may increase peak electricity demand, which can be costly to supply with renewable energy, whose availability is uncertain. Buildings are often the main cause of peak demand, and they are believed to hold a large unrealised energy-efficiency potential. If realised, this potential could considerably mitigate the transition costs to low carbon societies, reducing average and peak electricity demands. We explore this potential in several cost-optimal global warming (GW) mitigation scenarios using a multi-sector TIMES energy system model of the province of Quebec for the period 2011–2050. Heating and conservation measures in the residential sector are modelled using building simulations and parameters’ values from the literature. The intra-annual availability of renewable energy and electricity imports is derived from time-series analysis. Additionally, the influence of key parameters such as the projections of primary energy demand and emissions from reservoir impoundment is evaluated. Finally, we discuss some of the barriers that could hamper the energy transition and how they can be overcome. Results indicate that peak demand would rise by 30% due to GW mitigation efforts, but it can be effectively reduced by interventions in the residential sector. Heat pumps are the most cost effective heating technology, despite their lower efficiencies in cold climates. Better-insulated building envelopes have an important role in new houses, reducing by 14% the GW mitigation costs and

  19. Automated quantitative coronary computed tomography correlates of myocardial ischaemia on gated myocardial perfusion SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graaf, Michiel A. de; Boogers, Mark J.; Veltman, Caroline E. [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Cardiology, Leiden (Netherlands); The Interuniversity Cardiology Institute of The Netherlands, Utrecht (Netherlands); El-Naggar, Heba M.; Bax, Jeroen J.; Delgado, Victoria [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Cardiology, Leiden (Netherlands); Broersen, Alexander; Kitslaar, Pieter H.; Dijkstra, Jouke [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Division of Image Processing, Leiden (Netherlands); Kroft, Lucia J. [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Leiden (Netherlands); Younis, Imad Al [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Leiden (Netherlands); Reiber, Johan H. [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Division of Image Processing, Leiden (Netherlands); Medis medical imaging systems B.V., Leiden (Netherlands); Scholte, Arthur J. [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Cardiology, Leiden (Netherlands)

    2013-08-15

    Automated software tools have permitted more comprehensive, robust and reproducible quantification of coronary stenosis, plaque burden and plaque location of coronary computed tomography angiography (CTA) data. The association between these quantitative CTA (QCT) parameters and the presence of myocardial ischaemia has not been explored. The aim of the present investigation was to evaluate the association between QCT parameters of coronary artery lesions and the presence of myocardial ischaemia on gated myocardial perfusion single-photon emission CT (SPECT). Included in the study were 40 patients (mean age 58.2 {+-} 10.9 years, 27 men) with known or suspected coronary artery disease (CAD) who had undergone multidetector row CTA and gated myocardial perfusion SPECT within 6 months. From the CTA datasets, vessel-based and lesion-based visual analyses were performed. Consecutively, lesion-based QCT was performed to assess plaque length, plaque burden, percentage lumen area stenosis and remodelling index. Subsequently, the presence of myocardial ischaemia was assessed using the summed difference score (SDS {>=}2) on gated myocardial perfusion SPECT. Myocardial ischaemia was seen in 25 patients (62.5 %) in 37 vascular territories. Quantitatively assessed significant stenosis and quantitatively assessed lesion length were independently associated with myocardial ischaemia (OR 7.72, 95 % CI 2.41-24.7, p < 0.001, and OR 1.07, 95 % CI 1.00-1.45, p = 0.032, respectively) after correcting for clinical variables and visually assessed significant stenosis. The addition of quantitatively assessed significant stenosis ({chi} {sup 2} = 20.7) and lesion length ({chi} {sup 2} = 26.0) to the clinical variables and the visual assessment ({chi} {sup 2} = 5.9) had incremental value in the association with myocardial ischaemia. Coronary lesion length and quantitatively assessed significant stenosis were independently associated with myocardial ischaemia. Both quantitative parameters have

  20. Monoterpene emissions in response to long-term night-time warming, elevated CO2 and extended summer drought in a temperate heath ecosystem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tiiva, Päivi; Tang, Jing; Michelsen, Anders

    2017-01-01

    Monoterpenes emitted from plants have an important role in atmospheric chemistry through changing atmospheric oxidative capacity, forming new particles and secondary organic aerosols. The emission rates and patterns can be affected by changing climate. In this study, emission responses to six years...... of climatic manipulations (elevated CO2, extended summer drought and night-time warming) were investigated in a temperate semi-natural heath ecosystem. Samples for monoterpene analysis were collected in seven campaigns during an entire growing season (April-November, 2011). The results showed...... that the temperate heath ecosystem was a considerable source of monoterpenes to the atmosphere, with the emission averaged over the 8month measurement period of 21.7±6.8μgm(-2)groundareah(-1) for the untreated heath. Altogether, 16 monoterpenes were detected, of which the most abundant were α-pinene, δ-3-carene...

  1. Abdominal symptoms during physical exercise and the role of gastrointestinal ischaemia: a study in 12 symptomatic athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ter Steege, Rinze W F; Geelkerken, Robert H; Huisman, Ad B; Kolkman, Jeroen J

    2012-10-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms during exercise may be caused by GI ischaemia. The authors report their experience with the diagnostic protocol and management of athletes with symptomatic exercise-induced GI ischaemia. The value of prolonged exercise tonometry in the diagnostic protocol of these patients was evaluated. Patients referred for GI symptoms during physical exercise underwent a standardised diagnostic protocol, including prolonged exercise tonometry. Indicators of GI ischaemia, as measured by tonometry, were related to the presence of symptoms during the exercise test (S+ and S- tests) and exercise intensity. 12 athletes were specifically referred for GI symptoms during exercise (five males and seven females; median age 29 years (range 15-46 years)). Type of sport was cycling, long-distance running and triathlon. Median duration of symptoms was 32 months (range 7-240 months). Splanchnic artery stenosis was found in one athlete. GI ischaemia was found in six athletes during submaximal exercise. All athletes had gastric and jejunal ischaemia during maximum intensity exercise. No significant difference was found in gastric and jejunal Pco(2) or gradients between S+ and S- tests during any phase of the exercise protocol. In S+ tests, but not in S- tests, a significant correlation between lactate and gastric gradient was found. In S+ tests, the regression coefficients of gradients were higher than those in S- tests. Treatment advice aimed at limiting GI ischaemia were successful in reducing complaints in the majority of the athletes. GI ischaemia was present in all athletes during maximum intensity exercise and in 50% during submaximal exercise. Athletes with GI symptoms had higher gastric gradients per mmol/l increase in lactate, suggesting an increased susceptibility for the development of ischaemia during exercise. Treatment advice aimed at limiting GI ischaemia helped the majority of the referred athletes to reduce their complaints. Our results suggest an

  2. Lentiviral vector mediated modification of mesenchymal stem cells & enhanced survival in an in vitro model of ischaemia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McGinley, Lisa

    2012-01-31

    INTRODUCTION: A combination of gene and cell therapies has the potential to significantly enhance the therapeutic value of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). The development of efficient gene delivery methods is essential if MSCs are to be of benefit using such an approach. Achieving high levels of transgene expression for the required period of time, without adversely affecting cell viability and differentiation capacity, is crucial. In the present study, we investigate lentiviral vector-mediated genetic modification of rat bone-marrow derived MSCs and examine any functional effect of such genetic modification in an in vitro model of ischaemia. METHODS: Transduction efficiency and transgene persistence of second and third generation rHIV-1 based lentiviral vectors were tested using reporter gene constructs. Use of the rHIV-pWPT-EF1-alpha-GFP-W vector was optimised in terms of dose, toxicity, cell species, and storage. The in vivo condition of ischaemia was modelled in vitro by separation into its associated constituent parts i.e. hypoxia, serum and glucose deprivation, in which the effect of therapeutic gene over-expression on MSC survival was investigated. RESULTS: The second generation lentiviral vector rHIV-pWPT-EF1-alpha-GFP-W, was the most efficient and provided the most durable transgene expression of the vectors tested. Transduction with this vector did not adversely affect MSC morphology, viability or differentiation potential, and transgene expression levels were unaffected by cryopreservation of transduced cells. Over-expression of HSP70 resulted in enhanced MSC survival and increased resistance to apoptosis in conditions of hypoxia and ischaemia. MSC differentiation capacity was significantly reduced after oxygen deprivation, but was preserved with HSP70 over-expression. CONCLUSIONS: Collectively, these data validate the use of lentiviral vectors for efficient in vitro gene delivery to MSCs and suggest that lentiviral vector transduction can facilitate

  3. Lentiviral vector mediated modification of mesenchymal stem cells & enhanced survival in an in vitro model of ischaemia

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McGinley, Lisa

    2011-03-07

    Abstract Introduction A combination of gene and cell therapies has the potential to significantly enhance the therapeutic value of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). The development of efficient gene delivery methods is essential if MSCs are to be of benefit using such an approach. Achieving high levels of transgene expression for the required period of time, without adversely affecting cell viability and differentiation capacity, is crucial. In the present study, we investigate lentiviral vector-mediated genetic modification of rat bone-marrow derived MSCs and examine any functional effect of such genetic modification in an in vitro model of ischaemia. Methods Transduction efficiency and transgene persistence of second and third generation rHIV-1 based lentiviral vectors were tested using reporter gene constructs. Use of the rHIV-pWPT-EF1-α-GFP-W vector was optimised in terms of dose, toxicity, cell species, and storage. The in vivo condition of ischaemia was modelled in vitro by separation into its associated constituent parts i.e. hypoxia, serum and glucose deprivation, in which the effect of therapeutic gene over-expression on MSC survival was investigated. Results The second generation lentiviral vector rHIV-pWPT-EF1-α-GFP-W, was the most efficient and provided the most durable transgene expression of the vectors tested. Transduction with this vector did not adversely affect MSC morphology, viability or differentiation potential, and transgene expression levels were unaffected by cryopreservation of transduced cells. Over-expression of HSP70 resulted in enhanced MSC survival and increased resistance to apoptosis in conditions of hypoxia and ischaemia. MSC differentiation capacity was significantly reduced after oxygen deprivation, but was preserved with HSP70 over-expression. Conclusions Collectively, these data validate the use of lentiviral vectors for efficient in vitro gene delivery to MSCs and suggest that lentiviral vector transduction can facilitate

  4. Keeping the feet of the gods and the saints warm: mundane pragmatics in times of suffering and uncertainty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dongen, Els

    2008-12-01

    In this article the author writes about mundane pragmatics, or everyday deeds, in times of suffering and uncertainty. Such pragmatics differ from cultural practices such as biomedical therapies or individual health-seeking behaviour patterns. Medical anthropologists and others working in the field of health and illness often overlook such pragmatics. However, these actions are of great social value and express the connectedness and bonds between people. They also express our deep beliefs, hopes, powerlessness and vulnerability.

  5. Evolving changes in fetal heart rate variability and brain injury after hypoxia-ischaemia in preterm fetal sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Kyohei; Lear, Christopher A; Beacom, Michael J; Ikeda, Tomoaki; Gunn, Alistair J; Bennet, Laura

    2018-01-08

    Fetal heart rate variability is a critical index of fetal wellbeing. Suppression of heart rate variability may provide prognostic information on the risk of hypoxic-ischaemic brain injury after birth. In the present study, we report the evolution of fetal heart rate variability after both mild and severe hypoxia-ischaemia. Both mild and severe hypoxia-ischaemia were associated with an initial, brief suppression of multiple measures of heart rate variability. This was followed by normal or increased levels of heart rate variability during the latent phase of injury. Severe hypoxia-ischaemia was subsequently associated with the prolonged suppression of measures of heart rate variability during the secondary phase of injury, which is the period of time when brain injury is no longer treatable. These findings suggest that a biphasic pattern of heart rate variability may be an early marker of brain injury when treatment or intervention is probably most effective. Hypoxia-ischaemia (HI) is a major contributor to preterm brain injury, although there are currently no reliable biomarkers for identifying infants who are at risk. We tested the hypothesis that fetal heart rate (FHR) and FHR variability (FHRV) would identify evolving brain injury after HI. Fetal sheep at 0.7 of gestation were subjected to either 15 (n = 10) or 25 min (n = 17) of complete umbilical cord occlusion or sham occlusion (n = 12). FHR and four measures of FHRV [short-term variation, long-term variation, standard deviation of normal to normal R-R intervals (SDNN), root mean square of successive differences) were assessed until 72 h after HI. All measures of FHRV were suppressed for the first 3-4 h in the 15 min group and 1-2 h in the 25 min group. Measures of FHRV recovered to control levels by 4 h in the 15 min group, whereas the 25 min group showed tachycardia and an increase in short-term variation and SDNN from 4 to 6 h after occlusion. The measures of FHRV then progressively

  6. Digital ischaemia during cooling is independently related to nailfold capillaroscopic pattern in patients with Raynaud's phenomenon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Roon, Anniek M.; Smit, Andries J.; van Roon, Arie M.; Bootsma, Hendrika; Mulder, Douwe J.

    Objective. The aim of the study was to assess the association between plethysmographically measured vasospasms during stepwise cooling and recovery, as an index for digital ischaemia, and nailfold capillaroscopic pattern (NCP) severity in patients with primary or secondary RP, including SSc.

  7. Effects of vacuum compression therapy on skin microcirculation in patients suffering from lower limb ischaemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ubbink, D. T.; van der Oord, B. M.; Sobotka, M. R.; Jacobs, M. J.

    2000-01-01

    We investigated the short-term effect of vacuum compression (VC) treatment on skin microcirculatory perfusion in the foot of patients with lower limb ischaemia and healthy controls. Ten patients with intermittent claudication or rest pain and 5 healthy controls underwent vacuum-compression treatment

  8. Surgical manipulation compromises leukocyte mobilisation responses and inflammation after experimental cerebral ischaemia in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam eDenes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute brain injury results in peripheral inflammatory changes, although the impact of these processes on neuronal death and neuroinflammation is currently unclear. To facilitate the translation of experimental studies to clinical benefit, it is vital to characterize the mechanisms by which acute brain injury induces peripheral inflammatory changes, and how these are affected by surgical manipulation in experimental models. Here we show that in mice, even mild surgical manipulation of extracranial tissues induced marked granulocyte mobilisation (300% and systemic induction of cytokines. However, intracranial changes induced by craniotomy, or subsequent induction of focal cerebral ischaemia were required to induce egress of CXCR2-positive granulocytes from the bone marrow. CXCR2 blockade resulted in reduced mobilisation of granulocytes from the bone marrow, caused an unexpected increase in circulating granulocytes, but failed to effect brain injury induced by cerebral ischaemia. We also demonstrate that isoflurane anaesthesia interferes with circulating leukocyte responses, which could contribute to the reported vascular and neuroprotective effects of isoflurane. In addition, no immunosuppression develops in the bone marrow after experimental stroke. Thus, experimental models of cerebral ischaemia are compromised by surgery and anaesthesia in proportion to the severity of surgical stress and overall tissue injury. Understanding the inherent confounding effects of surgical manipulation and development of new models of cerebral ischaemia with minimal surgical intervention could facilitate better understanding of interactions between inflammation and brain injury.

  9. Tissue Doppler echocardiography reveals impaired cardiac function in patients with reversible ischaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Søren; Mogelvang, Rasmus; Sogaard, Peter

    2011-01-01

    AIMS: To determine if echocardiographic tissue Doppler imaging (TDI) performed at rest detects reduced myocardial function in patients with reversible ischaemia. METHODS AND RESULTS: Eighty-four patients with angina pectoris, no previous history of ischaemic heart disease and normal left ventricu...

  10. Prognostic significance of distal blood pressure measurements in patients with severe ischaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paaske, William; Tønnesen, K H

    1980-01-01

    The clinical course was followed and the ankle and toe blood pressures were measured with the strain gauge technique on 5 occasions during 2 years in 43 patients with pain at rest and/or ischaemic ulceration due to severe ischaemia of the legs on the basis of occlusive arterial disease. Although...

  11. Coronary artery angioplasty for treatment of peri-operative myocardial ischaemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Obal, D.; Kindgen-Milles, D.; Schoebel, F.; Schlack, W.

    2005-01-01

    Increasing numbers of elderly patients with severe co-existing medical diseases undergo major surgery. With these patients there is also an accompanying risk of age-related cardiovascular complications such as life-threatening myocardial ischaemia. We present a patient who suffered a myocardial

  12. Ischaemia-induced (symptomatic) migraine attacks may be more frequent than migraine-induced ischaemic insults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Jes; Friberg, L; Olsen, T S

    1993-01-01

    deficits after the very first migraine attack, severe atherosclerosis, risk factors for stroke, high age and no family history of migraine. In these cases the evidence indicates that thromboembolic ischaemia had triggered an attack of migraine with aura (likely symptomatic migraine). Three young females...

  13. Effect of hypothermic renal ischaemia on renin secretion rate in man

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Jens Henrik Sahl; Petersen, H K; Giese, J

    1985-01-01

    Plasma renin concentration (PRC), renal blood flow (RBF) and renin secretion rate (RSR = renal veno-arterial PRC difference multiplied by renal plasma flow) were measured before and after a period of hypothermic renal ischaemia in seven patients undergoing surgery for renal calculi. After...

  14. Expression of tumor necrosis factor alpha after focal cerebral ischaemia in the rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buttini, M; Appel, K; Sauter, A; GebickeHaerter, PJ; Boddeke, HWGM

    Induction of tumor necrosis factor alpha was studied in the brain of rats after focal cerebral ischaemia by occlusion of the left middle cerebral artery. Using a specific antisense riboprobe for in situ hybridization histochemistry, cells positive for tumor necrosis factor alpha messenger RNA were

  15. Warm natural inflation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishra, Hiranmaya; Mohanty, Subhendra; Nautiyal, Akhilesh

    2012-01-01

    In warm inflation models there is the requirement of generating large dissipative couplings of the inflaton with radiation, while at the same time, not de-stabilising the flatness of the inflaton potential due to radiative corrections. One way to achieve this without fine tuning unrelated couplings is by supersymmetry. In this Letter we show that if the inflaton and other light fields are pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone bosons then the radiative corrections to the potential are suppressed and the thermal corrections are small as long as the temperature is below the symmetry breaking scale. In such models it is possible to fulfil the contrary requirements of an inflaton potential which is stable under radiative corrections and the generation of a large dissipative coupling of the inflaton field with other light fields. We construct a warm inflation model which gives the observed CMB-anisotropy amplitude and spectral index where the symmetry breaking is at the GUT scale.

  16. Interrelation of ST-segment depression during bicycle ergometry and extent of myocardial ischaemia by myocardial perfusion SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muzzarelli, Stefano; Pfisterer, Matthias Emil; Zellweger, Michael Johannes [University Hospital Basel, Cardiology Department, Basel (Switzerland); Mueller-Brand, Jan [University Hospital Basel, Nuclear Medicine Department, Basel (Switzerland)

    2009-11-15

    The aim of this study was to compare ST-segment depression (STD) during bicycle ergometry and extent of myocardial ischaemia assessed by myocardial perfusion SPECT (MPS) in a large patient cohort. Consecutive patients (n = 955) referred for MPS with bicycle ergometry and interpretable stress ECG were evaluated with respect to ECG and MPS findings of ischaemia. The maximal STD was recorded and exercise ECG was considered ischaemic if STD was horizontal or downsloping ({>=}1 mm). MPS was interpreted using a 20-segment model with a scale of 0 to 4. A summed stress (SSS), summed rest (SRS) and summed difference score (SDS = SSS-SRS, e.g. extent of ischaemia) were derived. Ischaemia was defined as an SDS {>=} 2. An exercise-induced STD was present in 215 patients (22%) and myocardial ischaemia on MPS was present in 366 patients (38%). The extent of ST-segment depression and the number of ECG leads with significant STD were each strongly and significantly associated with increasing severity of ischaemia and the number of coronary territories involved (p < 0.01 for all correlations). These data demonstrate a strong correlation between the extent of STD, number of ischaemic leads and severity of myocardial ischaemia as assessed by MPS during bicycle ergometry. (orig.)

  17. Interrelation of ST-segment depression during bicycle ergometry and extent of myocardial ischaemia by myocardial perfusion SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muzzarelli, Stefano; Pfisterer, Matthias Emil; Zellweger, Michael Johannes; Mueller-Brand, Jan

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare ST-segment depression (STD) during bicycle ergometry and extent of myocardial ischaemia assessed by myocardial perfusion SPECT (MPS) in a large patient cohort. Consecutive patients (n = 955) referred for MPS with bicycle ergometry and interpretable stress ECG were evaluated with respect to ECG and MPS findings of ischaemia. The maximal STD was recorded and exercise ECG was considered ischaemic if STD was horizontal or downsloping (≥1 mm). MPS was interpreted using a 20-segment model with a scale of 0 to 4. A summed stress (SSS), summed rest (SRS) and summed difference score (SDS = SSS-SRS, e.g. extent of ischaemia) were derived. Ischaemia was defined as an SDS ≥ 2. An exercise-induced STD was present in 215 patients (22%) and myocardial ischaemia on MPS was present in 366 patients (38%). The extent of ST-segment depression and the number of ECG leads with significant STD were each strongly and significantly associated with increasing severity of ischaemia and the number of coronary territories involved (p < 0.01 for all correlations). These data demonstrate a strong correlation between the extent of STD, number of ischaemic leads and severity of myocardial ischaemia as assessed by MPS during bicycle ergometry. (orig.)

  18. Dobutamine stress magnetic resonance imaging suffices for the demonstration of myocardial ischaemia and viability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamers, F P L; van Dijkman, P R M; Kuijpers, Th J A; van Herpen, G

    2003-02-01

    We report three patients in whom dobutamine stress magnetic imaging (DS-MRI) was essential in assessing myocardial ischaemia. Two patients were referred to the cardiologist because of chest pain. Patient A had typical exertional angina and a normal resting electrocardiogram (ECG). Patient B had typical exercise-induced angina and had recently experienced an attack of severe chest pain at rest for 15 minutes. The ECG showed a complete left bundle branch block (LBBB). Patient C was referred for heart failure of unknown origin. There were no symptoms of chest pain during rest or exercise. Echocardiography in this patient demonstrated global left ventricular (LV) dilatation, systolic dysfunction and a small dyskinetic segment in the inferior wall. In all these patients exercise stress testing had failed to demonstrate myocardial ischaemia. Patients A and C produced normal findings whereas in patient B the abnormal repolarisation due to pre-existent LBBB precluded a diagnosis of ischaemia. Breath-hold DS-MRI was performed to study LV wall motion and wall thickening at rest through increasing doses of dobutamine. A test was considered positive for myocardial ischaemia if wall motion abnormalities developed at high-dose levels of the drug (20 μg/kg/min or more with a maximum of 40 μg/kg/min) in previously normal vascular territories or worsened in a segment that was normal at baseline. Recovery of wall thickening in a previously hypokinetic or akinetic segment at a low dose of dobutamine (5-10 μg/kg/min) was taken as proof of viability. Patients A and B developed hypokinesia progressing into akinesia at high-dose dobutamine in the anteroseptal area of the LV indicative of ischaemia. These findings were corroborated by coronary angiography demonstrating severe coronary artery disease which led to coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) in patient A and balloon angioplasty in patient B. In patient C global recovery of LV contractions during low-dose dobutamine was

  19. Recent warming of lake Kivu.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsev, Sergei; Aaberg, Arthur A; Crowe, Sean A; Hecky, Robert E

    2014-01-01

    Lake Kivu in East Africa has gained notoriety for its prodigious amounts of dissolved methane and dangers of limnic eruption. Being meromictic, it is also expected to accumulate heat due to rising regional air temperatures. To investigate the warming trend and distinguish between atmospheric and geothermal heating sources, we compiled historical temperature data, performed measurements with logging instruments, and simulated heat propagation. We also performed isotopic analyses of water from the lake's main basin and isolated Kabuno Bay. The results reveal that the lake surface is warming at the rate of 0.12°C per decade, which matches the warming rates in other East African lakes. Temperatures increase throughout the entire water column. Though warming is strongest near the surface, warming rates in the deep waters cannot be accounted for solely by propagation of atmospheric heat at presently assumed rates of vertical mixing. Unless the transport rates are significantly higher than presently believed, this indicates significant contributions from subterranean heat sources. Temperature time series in the deep monimolimnion suggest evidence of convection. The progressive deepening of the depth of temperature minimum in the water column is expected to accelerate the warming in deeper waters. The warming trend, however, is unlikely to strongly affect the physical stability of the lake, which depends primarily on salinity gradient.

  20. Recent warming of lake Kivu.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergei Katsev

    Full Text Available Lake Kivu in East Africa has gained notoriety for its prodigious amounts of dissolved methane and dangers of limnic eruption. Being meromictic, it is also expected to accumulate heat due to rising regional air temperatures. To investigate the warming trend and distinguish between atmospheric and geothermal heating sources, we compiled historical temperature data, performed measurements with logging instruments, and simulated heat propagation. We also performed isotopic analyses of water from the lake's main basin and isolated Kabuno Bay. The results reveal that the lake surface is warming at the rate of 0.12°C per decade, which matches the warming rates in other East African lakes. Temperatures increase throughout the entire water column. Though warming is strongest near the surface, warming rates in the deep waters cannot be accounted for solely by propagation of atmospheric heat at presently assumed rates of vertical mixing. Unless the transport rates are significantly higher than presently believed, this indicates significant contributions from subterranean heat sources. Temperature time series in the deep monimolimnion suggest evidence of convection. The progressive deepening of the depth of temperature minimum in the water column is expected to accelerate the warming in deeper waters. The warming trend, however, is unlikely to strongly affect the physical stability of the lake, which depends primarily on salinity gradient.

  1. Emergency revascularisation in a patient with acute mesenteric ischaemia: the role of open revascularisation and compensatory blood flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morbi, Abigail H M; Nordon, Ian M

    2016-08-01

    This case highlights the importance of timely diagnosis and management of acute mesenteric ischaemia and illustrates the compensatory mechanisms of the mesenteric vasculature. A 53-year-old female presented with fever, abdominal pain, and vomiting. The patient had no risk factors for atherosclerosis and was a non-smoker in sinus rhythm with no history of coagulopathy. She was initially treated for viral gastroenteritis. Due to lack of clinical improvement and a rising C-Reactive Protein (416), a CT scan was performed. This demonstrated small bowel ischaemia, chronic occlusion of the coeliac axis, and a long acute-on-chronic occlusion of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA). The length and morphology of the SMA occlusion precluded endovascular treatment. Emergency laparotomy demonstrated 1 m of necrotic small bowel and a pulseless mesentery. An aorto-SMA bypass, using good-quality long saphenous vein was performed, with segmental small bowel resection. Postoperative nutritional support was required with discharge on the 23rd post-operative day. Interval surveillance confirmed graft patency. One year post-discharge, she presented to routine clinic with paroxysmal right iliac fossa pain and decreased appetite. CT angiography showed a long tight 75% stenosis of the graft and she was admitted for mesenteric angioplasty. Angiography confirmed a significantly hypertrophied inferior mesenteric artery, which was now the dominant mesenteric supply. This case demonstrates the importance of emergency mesenteric revascularisation and how it acts as a bridge to anatomical compensation, allowing the collateral circulation to develop and the IMA to hypertrophy, becoming the dominant mesenteric supply.

  2. Modulation of ASIC channels in rat cerebellar purkinje neurons by ischaemia-related signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Nicola J; Attwell, David

    2002-01-01

    Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs), activated by a decrease of extracellular pH, are found in neurons throughout the nervous system. They have an amino acid sequence similar to that of ion channels activated by membrane stretch, and have been implicated in touch sensation. Here we characterize the pH-dependent activation of ASICs in cerebellar Purkinje cells and investigate how they are modulated by factors released in ischaemia. Lowering the external pH from 7.4 activated an inward current at −66 mV, carried largely by Na+ ions, which was half-maximal for a step to pH 6.4 and was blocked by amiloride and gadolinium. The H+-gated current desensitized within a few seconds, but approximately 30% of cells showed a sustained inward current (11% of the peak current) in response to the maintained presence of pH 6 solution. The peak H+-evoked current was potentiated by membrane stretch (which occurs in ischaemia when [K+]o rises) and by arachidonic acid (which is released when [Ca2+]i rises in ischaemia). Arachidonic acid increased to 77% the fraction of cells showing a sustained current evoked by acid pH. The ASIC currents were also potentiated by lactate (which is released when metabolism becomes anaerobic in ischaemia) and by FMRFamide (which may mimic the action of related mammalian RFamide transmitters). These data reinforce suggestions of a mechanosensory aspect to ASIC channel function, and show that the activation of ASICs reflects the integration of multiple signals which are present during ischaemia. PMID:12205186

  3. Atrophy of the corpus callosum correlates with white matter lesions in patients with cerebral ischaemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meguro, K.; Yamadori, A.; Constans, J.M.; Courtheoux, P.; Theron, J.; Viader, F.

    2000-01-01

    Many studies of white matter high signal (WMHS) on T2-weighted MRI have disclosed that it is related to cerebral ischaemia and to brain atrophy. Atrophy of the corpus callosum (CC) has also been studied in relation to ischaemia. Our objective was to test the hypothesis that CC atrophy could be due to ischaemia. We therefore assessed CC, WMHS and brain atrophy in patients with risk factors without strokes (the risk factor group) and in those with infarcts (the infarct group), to investigate the relationships between these factors. We studied 30 patients in the infarct group, 14 in the risk factor group, and 29 normal subjects. Using axial T1-weighted MRI, cortical atrophy and ventricular enlargement (brain atrophy) were visually rated. Using axial T2-weighted MRI, WMHS was assessed in three categories: periventricular symmetrical, periventricular asymmetrical and subcortical. Using the mid-sagittal T1-weighted image, the CC was measured in its anterior, posterior, midanterior and midposterior portions. In the normal group, no correlations were noted between parameters. In the infarct group, there were significant correlations between CC and brain atrophy, and between CC atrophy and WMHS. After removing the effects of age, gender and brain atrophy, significant correlations were noted between some CC measures and subcortical WMHS. In the risk factor group, there were significant correlations between CC and brain atrophy and between CC atrophy and WMHS. After allowance for age, gender and brain atrophy, significant correlations between some CC measures and periventricular WMHS remained. The hypothesis that CC atrophy could be due to cerebral ischaemia was supported by other analyses. Namely, for correlations between the extent of infarcts and partial CC atrophy in patients with anterior middle cerebral artery (MCA) and with posterior MCA infarcts, there were significant correlations between the extent of infarct and midanterior CC atrophy in the former, and posterior

  4. Atrophy of the corpus callosum correlates with white matter lesions in patients with cerebral ischaemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meguro, K.; Yamadori, A. [Section of Neuropsychology, Division of Disability Science, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-1, Seiryo-machi, Aoba-ku, 980-8575 Sendai (Japan); Constans, J.M.; Courtheoux, P.; Theron, J. [MR Unit, University of Caen School of Medicine, Caen (France); Viader, F. [Department of Neuroradiology, University of Caen School of Medicine, Caen (France)

    2000-06-01

    Many studies of white matter high signal (WMHS) on T2-weighted MRI have disclosed that it is related to cerebral ischaemia and to brain atrophy. Atrophy of the corpus callosum (CC) has also been studied in relation to ischaemia. Our objective was to test the hypothesis that CC atrophy could be due to ischaemia. We therefore assessed CC, WMHS and brain atrophy in patients with risk factors without strokes (the risk factor group) and in those with infarcts (the infarct group), to investigate the relationships between these factors. We studied 30 patients in the infarct group, 14 in the risk factor group, and 29 normal subjects. Using axial T1-weighted MRI, cortical atrophy and ventricular enlargement (brain atrophy) were visually rated. Using axial T2-weighted MRI, WMHS was assessed in three categories: periventricular symmetrical, periventricular asymmetrical and subcortical. Using the mid-sagittal T1-weighted image, the CC was measured in its anterior, posterior, midanterior and midposterior portions. In the normal group, no correlations were noted between parameters. In the infarct group, there were significant correlations between CC and brain atrophy, and between CC atrophy and WMHS. After removing the effects of age, gender and brain atrophy, significant correlations were noted between some CC measures and subcortical WMHS. In the risk factor group, there were significant correlations between CC and brain atrophy and between CC atrophy and WMHS. After allowance for age, gender and brain atrophy, significant correlations between some CC measures and periventricular WMHS remained. The hypothesis that CC atrophy could be due to cerebral ischaemia was supported by other analyses. Namely, for correlations between the extent of infarcts and partial CC atrophy in patients with anterior middle cerebral artery (MCA) and with posterior MCA infarcts, there were significant correlations between the extent of infarct and midanterior CC atrophy in the former, and posterior

  5. Passive heating following the prematch warm-up in soccer: examining the time-course of changes in muscle temperature and contractile function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Paul W M; Cross, Rebecca; Lovell, Ric

    2015-12-01

    This study examined changes in muscle temperature, electrically evoked muscle contractile properties, and voluntary power before and after a soccer specific active warm-up and subsequent rest period. Ten amateur soccer players performed two experimental sessions that involved performance of a modified FIFA 11+ soccer specific warm-up, followed by a 12.5-min rest period where participants were required to wear either normal clothing or a passive electrical heating garment was applied to the upper thigh muscles. Assessments around the warm-up and cool-down included measures of maximal torque, rate of torque development, muscle temperature (Tm), and electrically evoked measures of quadriceps contractile function. Tm was increased after the warm-up by 3.2 ± 0.7°C (P warm-up between 20% and 30% (P warm-up did not effect variables measured. While Tm was reduced by 1.4 ± 0.4°C after the rest period (P warm-up levels. Voluntary and evoked rate of torque development remained elevated from pre warm-up levels at the end of the cool-down (P warm-up elevated muscle temperature by 3.2°C and was associated with concomitant increases of between 20% and 30% in voluntary rate of torque development, which seems explained by elevations in rate-dependent measures of intrinsic muscle contractile function. Application of a passive heating garment did not attenuate declines in muscle temperature during a 12.5-min rest period. © 2015 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American Physiological Society and The Physiological Society.

  6. Effects of Thermal Mass, Window Size, and Night-Time Ventilation on Peak Indoor Air Temperature in the Warm-Humid Climate of Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Amos-Abanyie

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Most office buildings in the warm-humid sub-Saharan countries experience high cooling load because of the predominant use of sandcrete blocks which are of low thermal mass in construction and extensive use of glazing. Relatively, low night-time temperatures are not harnessed in cooling buildings because office openings remain closed after work hours. An optimization was performed through a sensitivity analysis-based simulation, using the Energy Plus (E+ simulation software to assess the effects of thermal mass, window size, and night ventilation on peak indoor air temperature (PIAT. An experimental system was designed based on the features of the most promising simulation model, constructed and monitored, and the experimental data used to validate the simulation model. The results show that an optimization of thermal mass and window size coupled with activation of night-time ventilation provides a synergistic effect to obtain reduced peak indoor air temperature. An expression that predicts, indoor maximum temperature has been derived for models of various thermal masses.

  7. The hydraulic connectivity, perennial warming and relationship to seismicity of the Davis-Schrimpf Seep Field, Salton Trough, California from new and recent temperature time-series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Amar P.

    The Davis-Schrimpf Seep Field is a cluster of about 50 transtension-related geothermal seeps in the Imperial Valley, southeastern California. Five temperature time-series were collected from four features and compared to one another, against prior time-series, and to local seismicity. Loggers placed in separate vents within one seep returned moderate anti-correlation. Vents may selectively clog and unclog. Clogging frequencies explaining the observed level of negative correlation were given. Loggers placed in the same vent produced 87-92% positive correlation. It is therefore likely that the vast majority of temperature data measured with loggers possesses meaningful accuracy. Loggers placed in separate seeps exhibited correlation close to or greater than the statistically significant 60% threshold. I propose two lineaments provide a hydraulic connection between these seeps. Two Mw>3.0 earthquake swarms, including one Mw>4.0 event, within 24 kilometers showed possible linkage with >5 degree Celsius temperature perturbations. Seepage warmed 14.5-36.8 degrees Celsius over 5-7 years.

  8. Warm natural inflation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishra, Hiranmaya; Mohanty, Subhendra; Nautiyal, Akhilesh

    2013-01-01

    In warm inflation models there is the requirement of generating large dissipative couplings of the inflation with radiation, while at the same Âătime, not de-stabilising the flatness of the inflation potential due to radiative corrections. One way to achieve this without fine tuning unrelated couplings is by supersymmetry. In this talk we will discuss warm inflation with Pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone Bosons (PNGB). In this case inflation and other light fields are PNGB. So, the radiative corrections to the potential are suppressed and the thermal Âăcorrections are small as long as the temperature is below the symmetry breaking scale. In such models it is possible to fulfill the contrary requirements of an inflation potential which is stable under radiative corrections and the generation of a large dissipative coupling of the inflation field with other light fields. This warm inflation model with PNGB gives the observed CMB-anisotropy amplitude and spectral index having the symmetry breaking scale at the GUT scale. (author)

  9. Authropogenic Warming in North Alaska?.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaels, Patrick J.; Sappington, David E.; Stooksbury, David E.

    1988-09-01

    Using permafrost boreholes, Lachenbruch and Marshall recently reported evidence for a 2°-4°C warming in North Alaska occurring at some undetermined time during the last century. Popular accounts suggest their findings are evidence for anthropogenic warming caused by trace gases. Analyses of North Alaskan 1000-500 mb thickness onwards back to 1948 indicate that the warming was prior to that date. Relatively sparse thermometric data for the early twentieth century from Jones et al. are too noisy to support any trend since the data record begins in 1910, or to apply to any subperiod of climatic significance. Any warming detected from the permafrost record therefore occurred before the major emissions of thermally active trace gases.

  10. Over-expression of mitochondrial creatine kinase in the murine heart improves functional recovery and protects against injury following ischaemia-reperfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittington, Hannah J; Ostrowski, Philip J; McAndrew, Debra J; Cao, Fang; Shaw, Andrew; Eykyn, Thomas R; Lake, Hannah; Tyler, Jack; Schneider, Jurgen E; Neubauer, Stefan; Zervou, Sevasti; Lygate, Craig A

    2018-03-02

    Mitochondrial creatine kinase (MtCK) couples ATP production via oxidative phosphorylation to phosphocreatine in the cytosol, which acts as a mobile energy store available for regeneration of ATP at times of high demand. We hypothesised that elevating MtCK would be beneficial in ischaemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury. Mice were created overexpressing the sarcomeric MtCK gene with αMHC promoter at the Rosa26 locus (MtCK-OE) and compared with wild-type (WT) littermates. MtCK activity was 27% higher than WT, with no change in other CK isoenzymes or creatine levels. Electron microscopy confirmed normal mitochondrial cell density and mitochondrial localisation of transgenic protein. Respiration in isolated mitochondria was unaltered and metabolomic analysis by 1H-NMR suggests that cellular metabolism was not grossly affected by transgene expression. There were no significant differences in cardiac structure or function under baseline conditions by cine-MRI or LV haemodynamics. In Langendorff-perfused hearts subjected to 20min ischaemia and 30 min reperfusion, MtCK-OE exhibited less ischaemic contracture and improved functional recovery (Rate pressure product 58% above WT; P < 0.001). These hearts had reduced myocardial infarct size, which was confirmed in vivo: 55±4% in WT vs 29±4% in MtCK-OE; P < 0.0001). Isolated cardiomyocytes from MtCK-OE hearts exhibited delayed opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) compared to WT, which was confirmed by reduced mitochondrial swelling in response to calcium. There was no detectable change in the structural integrity of the mitochondrial membrane. Modest elevation of MtCK activity in the heart does not adversely affect cellular metabolism, mitochondrial or in vivo cardiac function, but modifies mPTP opening to protect against I/R injury and improve functional recovery. Our findings support MtCK as a prime therapeutic target in myocardial ischaemia.

  11. Protective agents used as additives in University of Wisconsin solution to promote protection against ischaemia-reperfusion injury in rat lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, C H; Wu, K; Yu, C P; Perng, W C; Yan, H C; Wu, C P; Chang, D M; Hsu, K

    1998-09-01

    1. An intervention to reduce ischaemia-reperfusion lung injury will be an important advance in transplant medicine. Although the mechanisms associated with producing ischaemia-reperfusion endothelial injury have not been completely elucidated, many of the injury mediators have been studied in detail. While no single pharmacological therapy is likely to be totally effective in eliminating this complex injury, we have developed a mixture of agents that are known to block pathways involved in producing ischaemia-reperfusion-associated lung vascular injury.2. The present study modified University of Wisconsin solution (UW) by adding one of the protective agents prostaglandin E1 (PGE1), dexamethasone (Dex) or dibutyryl cAMP (Bt2-cAMP), or a combination of these, to the perfusate of rat lungs exposed to 4 h of cold ischaemia followed by 1 h of reperfusion. Nine modified UW solutions were studied: (1) UW+Dex, (2) UW+PGE1, (3) UW+Bt2-cAMP, (4) UW+Dexx3, (5) UW+PGE1x3, (6) UW+Bt2-cAMPx3, (7) UW+Dex+PGE1, (8) UW+Dex+Bt2-cAMP, (9) UW+PGE1+Bt2-cAMP. These solutions were utilized in individual experiments to assess haemodynamic changes, lung weight gain, the capillary filtration coefficient (Kfc) and pathology in all lungs.3. The results indicate that lung weight gain and Kfc values were significantly lower than with UW alone in groups 1, 2 and 3, which contained only one additional protective agent. In groups 4, 5 and 6, which contain three times the concentration of each protective agent, both Kfc and lung weight gain were similar to those measured in groups 1, 2 and 3, i.e. lungs were protected but the protection was not dose dependent. In groups 7, 8 and 9, which contained two protective agents, lung weight gain and Kfc were greatly reduced compared with UW alone. Histopathological studies showed similar decreases in the injury profiles of lungs.4. Although UW contains several antioxidant protective agents such as allopurinol and glutathione, it did not provide effective

  12. Achieved serum magnesium concentrations and occurrence of delayed cerebral ischaemia and poor outcome in aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorhout Mees, Sanne M.; van den Bergh, Walter M.; Algra, Ale; Rinkel, Gabriel J. E.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Magnesium therapy probably reduces the frequency of delayed cerebral ischaemia (DCI) in subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) but uncertainty remains about the optimal serum magnesium concentration. We assessed the relationship between serum magnesium concentrations achieved with magnesium

  13. Dexmedetomidine protects from post-myocardial ischaemia reperfusion lung damage in diabetic rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kip, Gülay; Çelik, Ali; Bilge, Mustafa; Alkan, Metin; Kiraz, Hasan Ali; Özer, Abdullah; Şıvgın, Volkan; Erdem, Özlem; Arslan, Mustafa; Kavutçu, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    Objective Diabetic complications and lipid peroxidation are known to have a close association. Lipid peroxidation commonly occurs at sites exposed to ischaemia, but distant organs and tissues also get damaged during ischaemia/reperfusion (I/R). Some of these targets are vital organs, such as the lung, liver, and kidney; the lung is the most frequently affected. The aim of our study was to investigate the effects of dexmedetomidine on I/R damage in lung tissue and on the oxidant/anti-oxidant system in diabetic rats. Material and methods Diabetes was induced with streptozotocin (55 mg/kg) in 18 Wistar Albino rats, which were then randomly divided into three groups (diabetes control (DC), diabetes plus ischaemia-reperfusion (DIR), and diabetes plus dexmedetomidine-ischaemia/reperfusion (DIRD)) after the effects of diabetes were clearly evident. The rats underwent a left thoracotomy and then ischaemia was produced in the myocardium muscle by a left anterior descending artery ligation for 30 min in the DIR and DIRD groups. I/R was performed for 120 min. The DIRD group received a single intraperitoneal dose of dexmedetomidine (100 µg/kg); the DIR group received no dexmedetomidine. Group DC was evaluated as the diabetic control group and also included six rats (C group) in which diabetes was not induced. These mice underwent only left thoracotomy and were closed without undergoing myocardial ischaemia. Histopathological changes, activities of catalase (CAT) and glutathione-S-transferase anti-oxidant enzymes, and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were evaluated in the lung tissues of all rats. Results Neutrophil infiltration/aggregation was higher in the DIR group than in the C, DC, and DIRD groups (p=0.001, p=0.013, and p=0.042, respectively). The lung injury score was significantly higher in the DIR group than in the C and DC groups (p<0.0001 and p=0.024, respectively). The levels of MDA were significantly higher in the DIR group than in the C and DIRD groups. CAT activity

  14. Dexmedetomidine protects from post-myocardial ischaemia reperfusion lung damage in diabetic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gülay Kip

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Diabetic complications and lipid peroxidation are known to have a close association. Lipid peroxidation commonly occurs at sites exposed to ischaemia, but distant organs and tissues also get damaged during ischaemia/reperfusion (I/R. Some of these targets are vital organs, such as the lung, liver, and kidney; the lung is the most frequently affected. The aim of our study was to investigate the effects of dexmedetomidine on I/R damage in lung tissue and on the oxidant/anti-oxidant system in diabetic rats. Material and methods: Diabetes was induced with streptozotocin (55 mg/kg in 18 Wistar Albino rats, which were then randomly divided into three groups (diabetes control (DC, diabetes plus ischaemia-reperfusion (DIR, and diabetes plus dexmedetomidine-ischaemia/reperfusion (DIRD after the effects of diabetes were clearly evident. The rats underwent a left thoracotomy and then ischaemia was produced in the myocardium muscle by a left anterior descending artery ligation for 30 min in the DIR and DIRD groups. I/R was performed for 120 min. The DIRD group received a single intraperitoneal dose of dexmedetomidine (100 µg/kg; the DIR group received no dexmedetomidine. Group DC was evaluated as the diabetic control group and also included six rats (C group in which diabetes was not induced. These mice underwent only left thoracotomy and were closed without undergoing myocardial ischaemia. Histopathological changes, activities of catalase (CAT and glutathione-S-transferase anti-oxidant enzymes, and malondialdehyde (MDA levels were evaluated in the lung tissues of all rats. Results: Neutrophil infiltration/aggregation was higher in the DIR group than in the C, DC, and DIRD groups (p=0.001, p=0.013, and p=0.042, respectively. The lung injury score was significantly higher in the DIR group than in the C and DC groups (p<0.0001 and p=0.024, respectively. The levels of MDA were significantly higher in the DIR group than in the C and DIRD groups. CAT

  15. Pharmacological delayed preconditioning against ischaemia-induced ventricular arrhythmias: effect of an adenosine A1-receptor agonist

    OpenAIRE

    Tissier, Renaud; Souktani, Rachid; Parent de Curzon, Olivier; Lellouche, Nicolas; Henry, Patrick; Giudicelli, Jean-François; Berdeaux, Alain; Ghaleh, Bijan

    2001-01-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the effects of the delayed pharmacological preconditioning produced by an adenosine A1-receptor agonist (A1-DPC) against ventricular arrhythmias induced by ischaemia and reperfusion, compared to those of ischaemia-induced delayed preconditioning (I-DPC).Eighty-nine instrumented conscious rabbits underwent a 2 consecutive days protocol. On day 1, rabbits were randomly divided into four groups: ‘Control' (saline, i.v.), ‘I-DPC' (six 4-min coronary arter...

  16. Leucocyte depletion attenuates the early increase in myocardial capillary permeability to small hydrophilic solutes following ischaemia and reperfusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Jesper Hastrup; Hansen, P R; Ali, S

    1993-01-01

    The aim was to assess the significance of polymorphonuclear leucocytes on the myocardial capillary permeability to a small hydrophilic indicator, on the vascular tone of the resistance vessels, and on contractile function following ischaemia and reperfusion.......The aim was to assess the significance of polymorphonuclear leucocytes on the myocardial capillary permeability to a small hydrophilic indicator, on the vascular tone of the resistance vessels, and on contractile function following ischaemia and reperfusion....

  17. Total body propofol clearance (TBPC) after living-donor liver transplantation (LDLT) surgery is decreased in patients with a long warm ischemic time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Jahdari, Wael S; Kunimoto, Fumio; Saito, Shigeru; Yamamoto, Koujirou; Koyama, Hiroshi; Horiuchi, Ryuya; Goto, Fumio

    2006-01-01

    Metabolic capacity after liver transplant surgery may be affected by the graft size and by hepatic injury during the surgery. This study was carried out to investigate the postoperative total body propofol clearance (TBPC) in living-donor liver transplantation (LDLT) patients and to investigate the major factors that contribute to decreased postoperative TBPC in LDLT patients. Fourteen patients scheduled for LDLT were included in this study. Propofol was administered at a rate of 2.0 mg.kg(-1).h(-1) as a sedative in the intensive care unit (ICU) setting. To calculate TBPC, propofol arterial blood concentration was measured by HPLC. Five variables were selected as factors affecting postoperative TBPC; bleeding volume (BLD), warm ischemic time (WIT), cold ischemic time (CIT), graft weight/standard liver volume ratio (GW/SLV), and portal blood flow after surgery (PBF). After factor analysis of six variables, including TBPC, varimax rotation was carried out, and this yielded three interpretable factors that accounted for 75.5% of the total variance in the data set. TBPC, WIT, CIT, and BLD were loaded on the first factor, PBF on the second factor, and GW/SLV on the third factor. The adjusted correlation coefficient between TBPC and WIT showed the highest value (r = -0.61) in the first factor. The LDLT patients were divided into two groups according to WIT; group A (WIT > 100 min) and group B (WIT < 100 min). Mean TBPC values in group A and group B were 14.6 +/- 2.1 and 28.5 +/- 4.1 ml.kg(-1).min(-1), respectively (P < 0.0001). These data suggest that LDLT patients with a long WIT have a risk of deteriorated drug metabolism.

  18. Pre-Exercise Hyperhydration-Induced Bodyweight Gain Does Not Alter Prolonged Treadmill Running Time-Trial Performance in Warm Ambient Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric D. B. Goulet

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This study compared the effect of pre-exercise hyperhydration (PEH and pre-exercise euhydration (PEE upon treadmill running time-trial (TT performance in the heat. Six highly trained runners or triathletes underwent two 18 km TT runs (~28 °C, 25%–30% RH on a motorized treadmill, in a randomized, crossover fashion, while being euhydrated or after hyperhydration with 26 mL/kg bodyweight (BW of a 130 mmol/L sodium solution. Subjects then ran four successive 4.5 km blocks alternating between 2.5 km at 1% and 2 km at 6% gradient, while drinking a total of 7 mL/kg BW of a 6% sports drink solution (Gatorade, USA. PEH increased BW by 1.00 ± 0.34 kg (P < 0.01 and, compared with PEE, reduced BW loss from 3.1% ± 0.3% (EUH to 1.4% ± 0.4% (HYP (P < 0.01 during exercise. Running TT time did not differ between groups (PEH: 85.6 ± 11.6 min; PEE: 85.3 ± 9.6 min, P = 0.82. Heart rate (5 ± 1 beats/min and rectal (0.3 ± 0.1 °C and body (0.2 ± 0.1 °C temperatures of PEE were higher than those of PEH (P < 0.05. There was no significant difference in abdominal discomfort and perceived exertion or heat stress between groups. Our results suggest that pre-exercise sodium-induced hyperhydration of a magnitude of 1 L does not alter 80–90 min running TT performance under warm conditions in highly-trained runners drinking ~500 mL sports drink during exercise.

  19. Pain after uterine fibroid embolisation is associated with the severity of myometrial ischaemia on magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruuskanen, Anu; Sipola, Petri; Manninen, Hannu; Hippelaeinen, Maritta; Wuestefeld, Marion

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate uterine ischaemia after uterine artery embolisation (UAE) using magnetic resonance imaging and the role of myometrial and fibroid ischaemia in the pathogenesis of post-procedural pain. T1-weighted gradient echo imaging before and after contrast agent was performed on 62 women before and 24 h after UAE. We assessed the severity (mild, moderate, severe) of myometrial ischaemia, and the percentage and volume of ischaemic tissue in myometrium and fibroids. The Verbal Rating Scale was used to assess in-hospital post-procedural pain (1-3 mild, 4-6 moderate, 7-10 severe). Mean maximal pain was 7.7. Myometrial ischaemia was mild, moderate and severe in 29, 23 and 10 patients, respectively. Moderate or severe myometrial ischaemia (p = 0.041), the percentage (p = 0.037) and volume (p = 0.012) of ischaemic tissue in the myometrium, and a large volume of embolic material (p = 0.038) correlated with severe pain. In summary, pain following UAE is common and partly explained by myometrial ischaemia. (orig.)

  20. Bilirubin provides perforator flap protection from ischaemia-reperfusion injury in a rat model: a preliminary result.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung Young; Rah, Dong Kyun; Chong, Yosep; Lee, Song Hyun; Park, Tae Hwan

    2016-10-01

    The use of bilirubin, a well-known and powerful antioxidant, has gained popularity in recent years because of its role in the prevention of ischaemic heart disease in patients with Gilbert's syndrome. We investigate the effects of bilirubin on ischaemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury using a rat perforator flap model. Forty-eight rats were randomly divided into two groups: experimental (bilirubin) group (n = 24) and control group (n = 24). In each group, elevated bilateral deep inferior epigastric perforator (DIEP) flaps were created. The right (no ischaemia side) and left (ischaemia side) DIEP flaps were separated according to the presence of ischaemia induction. Ischaemia was induced in anaesthetised rats by perforator clamping for 15 or 30 minutes. After surgery, the flap survival was assessed daily on postoperative days 0 to 5, and overall histological changes of DIEP flaps above the perforator were analysed at postoperative day 5. The flap survival rate in the bilirubin group was significantly higher than that in the control group at the ischaemia side following perforator clamping for 15 or 30 minutes (93·42 ± 4·48% versus 89·63 ± 3·98%, P = 0·002; and 83·96 ± 4·23% versus 36·46 ± 6·38%, P bilirubin was found to alleviate perforator flap necrosis caused by I/R injury in this experimental rat model. © 2015 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Sudden Stratospheric Warming Compendium

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Sudden Stratospheric Warming Compendium (SSWC) data set documents the stratospheric, tropospheric, and surface climate impacts of sudden stratospheric warmings. This...

  2. Streptococcus thermophilus bacteraemia in a patient with transient bowel ischaemia secondary to polycythaemia

    OpenAIRE

    Stephens, Joanna; Turner, David P.J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The ability of Streptococcus thermophilus to convert lactose into lactic acid has long been utilised by the dairy industry. A seemingly low-pathogenicity organism, there have been no previously published reports linking the consumption of foodstuffs to bacteraemia with this bacterium.\\ud Case Presentation: Here we present a case of a regular consumer of Activia yoghurt who developed S. thermophilus bacteraemia probably due to transient bowel ischaemia secondary to polycythaemia....

  3. The effect of voluntarily ingested buprenorphine on rats subjected to surgically induced global cerebral ischaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalliokoski, Otto Henrik; Abelson, Klas; Koch, Janne

    2010-01-01

    in buprenorphine-treated and untreated animals. A part from a slightly higher hyperthermia immediately after surgery and typical opiate-associated behaviour, the buprenorphine treatment had no apparent adverse effects on the experimental model. In contrast, the analgesic treatment improved the model by minimizing......The effect of perioperatively administered buprenorphine analgesia on rats subjected to surgically induced global ischaemia was assessed. Rats supplied with buprenorphine, mixed in nut paste for voluntary ingestion, displayed significant reductions in postoperative excretions of faecal...

  4. Recent concepts concerning cerebral ischaemia in man and their implications in therapeutic evaluations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Depresseux, J C

    1987-06-18

    Recent concepts concerning focal cerebral ischaemia in man and resulting from the data obtained with positron emission tomography are reported. The evolutive steps in the ischaemic process are divided into: perfusion reserve; extraction reserve recruitment; ischaemic penumbra; lesional process and post-lesional developments. Circulatory and metabolic patterns corresponding to these evolutive steps are described and illustrated. The potentials of these data as guide-lines in therapeutic trial methodology are discussed.

  5. Reperfusion Strategies in the Management of Extremity Vascular Injury with Ischaemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    28: 1026–1031. 45 Gürke L, Marx A, Sutter PM, Stierli P, Harder F, Heberer M. Function of fast - and slow - twitch rat skeletal muscle following ischemia...influence muscle necrosis, including temperature, muscle fibre type, muscle location and residual blood flow15,16. The earliest effects of limb...Crawford et al.11 reported that in a murine model of limb ischaemia ethyl pyruvate pretreatment resulted in a lower percentage of injured muscle fibres

  6. Myocardial ischaemia following cocaine and adrenaline exposure in a child during an ophthalmological procedure.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McGovern, E

    2015-03-01

    We report a 23-month old girl who presented with bilateral epiphora who underwent bilateral lacrimal probing and syringing, during which a cocaine adrenaline solution was used. Two hours after the procedure she developed acute pulmonary oedema secondary to myocardial ischaemia. The patient was treated with intravenous glyceryltrinitrate and milrinone infusions; cardiac enzymes and left ventricular function normalised over the subsequent 72 hours. Topical administration of cocaine and adrenaline solution may have dangerous systemic cardiac effects and should always be used judiciously.

  7. Recent concepts concerning cerebral ischaemia in man and their implications in therapeutic evaluations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Depresseux, J.C.

    1987-01-01

    Recent concepts concerning focal cerebral ischaemia in man and resulting from the data obtained with positron emission tomography are reported. The evolutive steps in the ischaemic process are divided into: perfusion reserve; extraction reserve recruitment; ischaemic penumbra; lesional process and post-lesional developments. Circulatory and metabolic patterns corresponding to these evolutive steps are described and illustrated. The potentials of these data as guide-lines in therapeutic trial methodology are discussed [fr

  8. Protective effects of dexrazoxane against acute ischaemia/reperfusion injury of rat hearts

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Neckář, Jan; Boudíková, Adéla; Mandíková, Petra; Štěrba, M.; Popelová, O.; Mikšík, Ivan; Dabrowská, L.; Mráz, J.; Geršl, V.; Kolář, František

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 90, č. 9 (2012), s. 1303-1310 ISSN 0008-4212 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAAX01110901; GA ČR(CZ) GA305/09/0416 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : heart * dexrazoxane * ischaemia * reperfusion * infarct size * arrhythmias * cardioprotection * reactive oxygen species Subject RIV: FR - Pharmacology ; Medidal Chemistry Impact factor: 1.556, year: 2012

  9. Variabilities of Low-Latitude Migrating and Nonmigrating Tides in GPS-TEC and TIMED-SABER Temperature During the Sudden Stratospheric Warming Event of 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridharan, S.

    2017-10-01

    The Global Positioning System deduced total electron content (TEC) data at 15°N (geomagnetic), which is the crest region of equatorial ionization anomaly, are used to study tidal variabilities during the 2013 sudden stratospheric warming (SSW) event. The results from space-time spectral analysis reveal that the amplitudes of migrating diurnal (DW1) and semidiurnal (SW2) tides are larger than those of nonmigrating tides. After the SSW onset, the amplitudes of DW1, SW2, SW1, and DS0 increase. Moreover, they show 16 day variations similar to the periodicity of the high-latitude stratospheric planetary wave (PW), suggesting that the nonmigrating tides (SW1 and DS0) are possibly generated due to nonlinear interaction of migrating tides with PW. Similar spectral analysis on temperature at 10°N obtained from the Sounding of Atmosphere by Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER) shows that the SW2 enhances at stratospheric heights and the SW2 is more dominant at 80-90 km, but its amplitude decreases around 100 km. The amplitudes of nonmigrating tides become comparable to those of SW2 around 100 km, and their contribution becomes increasingly important at higher heights. This suggests that the nonlinear interaction between migrating tides and PW occurs at low-latitude upper mesospheric heights, as SW2 exhibits 16 day periodicity in SABER temperature at 100 km as observed in TEC. Besides, it is observed that the eastward propagating tides are less dominant than westward propagating tides in both TEC and SABER temperatures.

  10. Timing of warm water refuge use in Crystal River National Wildlife Refuge by manatees—Results and insights from Global Positioning System telemetry data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slone, Daniel H.; Butler, Susan M.; Reid, James P.; Haase, Catherine G.

    2017-11-21

    Managers at the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Crystal River National Wildlife Refuge (CRNWR) desire to update their management plan regarding the operation of select springs including Three Sisters Springs. They wish to refine existing parameters used to predict the presence of federally threatened Trichechus manatus latirostris (Florida manatee) in the springs and thereby improve their manatee management options. The U.S. Geological Survey Sirenia Project has been tracking manatees in the CRNWR area since 2006 with floating Global Positioning System (GPS) satellite-monitored telemetry tags. Analyzing movements of these tagged manatees will provide valuable insight into their habitat use patterns.A total of 136 GPS telemetry bouts were available for this project, representing 730,009 locations generated from 40 manatees tagged in the Gulf of Mexico north of Tampa, Florida. Dates from October through March were included to correspond to the times that cold ambient temperatures were expected, thus requiring a need for manatee thermoregulation and a physiologic need for warm water. Water level (tide) and water temperatures were obtained for the study from Salt River, Crystal River mouth, Bagley Cove, Kings Bay mouth, and Magnolia Spring. Polygons were drawn to subdivide the manatee locations into areas around the most-used springs (Three Sisters/Idiots Delight, House/Hunter/Jurassic, Magnolia and King), Kings Bay, Crystal/Salt Rivers and the Gulf of Mexico.Manatees were found in the Crystal or Salt Rivers or in the Gulf of Mexico when ambient temperatures were warmer (>20 °C), while they were found in or near the springs (especially Three Sisters Springs) at colder ambient water temperatures. There was a trend of manatees entering springs early in the morning and leaving in the afternoon. There was a strong association of manatee movements in and out of the Three Sisters/Idiots Delight polygon with tide cycles: manatees were more likely to enter the Three Sisters

  11. Effects of transient global ischaemia on freezing behaviour and activity in a context-dependent fear conditioning task--implications for memory investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henrich-Noack, Petra; Krautwald, Karla; Reymann, Klaus G; Wetzel, Wolfram

    2011-07-15

    Transient global ischaemia induces cell death in the CA1 layer of the hippocampus. To evaluate the functional consequences, we performed context-dependent fear conditioning. Ischaemia was induced by 2-vessel-occlusion (2VO) in gerbils. On day 6 post ischaemia or sham procedures (in control group) gerbils were placed in a test chamber and after 3 min adaption time exposed to foot-shocks (training session). On the next day the animals were placed in the same test chamber without foot-shocks (test session). As a parameter for memory performance we used the standard method of measuring the total freezing time via a cumulative time-sampling procedure during the test session. We found a significant longer total freezing time in control animals than in ischaemic animals. In addition, however, we applied a more detailed analysis of (i) quantifying the number of freezing bouts, (ii) the average duration of single freezing bouts, (iii) the activity pattern during the training and test situation and (iv) we differentially evaluated all the single time segments of the experiment. These analyses revealed that although maintenance of freezing (duration of freezing bout) was significantly lower in ischaemic animals compared to controls, the initiation of freezing (number of freezing bouts) was not significantly different between the two groups during the test session. The activity scores of ischaemic and non-ischaemic gerbils were similar during the adaption time of the training session. The foot-shock, however, induced a significantly different pattern of behaviour in the ischaemic animals, which was selectively reproduced during the test session. In conclusion, ischaemic gerbils reacted to a fearsome thread with a behavioural pattern different from unlesioned animals and they revealed this specific foot-shock induced behaviour again during the test session. This indicated that CA1 hippocampal death did not interrupt memory performance but changed expression of fear. Therefore

  12. Global Warming on Triton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliot, J. L.; Hammel, H. B.; Wasserman, L. H.; Franz, O. G.; McDonald, S. W.; Person, M. J.; Olkin, C. B.; Dunham, E. J.; Spencer, J. R.; Stansberry, J. A.; hide

    1998-01-01

    Triton, Neptune's largest moon, has been predicted to undergo significant seasonal changes that would reveal themselves as changes in its mean frost temperature. But whether this temperature should at the present time be increasing, decreasing or constant depends on a number of parameters (such as the thermal properties of the surface, and frost migration patterns) that are unknown. Here we report observations of a recent stellar occultation by Triton which, when combined with earlier results, show that Triton has undergone a period of global warming since 1989. Our most conservative estimates of the rate of temperature and surface-pressure increase during this period imply that the atmosphere is doubling in bulk every 10 years, significantly faster than predicted by any published frost model for Triton. Our result suggests that permanent polar caps on Triton play a c dominant role in regulating seasonal atmospheric changes. Similar processes should also be active on Pluto.

  13. Effect of corilagin on cerebral ischaemia/reperfusioninduced ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    At the end of the treatments, neurological deficit, brain oedema, and volume of ... tissues was evaluated by immunofluorescence, real-time PCR, and western blotting. Results: There was a significant decrease in neurological deficit, brain ...

  14. Lower limb amputation for ischaemia with special reference to the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Infection prevention and control. The time-honoured principle of excision of dead and ... election, with control of infection and oedema after .... visit the patient in hospital to show what ... field in amputation surgery for peripheral vascular ...

  15. Prevalence of silent myocardial ischaemia during exercise stress testing. Its relation to effort tolerance and myocardial perfusion abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragasso, G; Sciammarella, M G; Rossetti, E E; Xuereb, R G; Xuereb, M; Bonetti, F; Carandente, O M; Margonato, A; Chierchia, S L

    1992-07-01

    The number of underperfused myocardial segments, the extent of coronary artery disease and the severity of impairment of coronary flow reserve were compared in 147 consecutive patients exhibiting painful or painless ischaemic ST segment depression on exercise testing. Of 147 patients, only 61 (41%) experienced angina (group 1) whilst 86 (59%) did not (group 2). In the two groups coronary disease was comparable for both extent and distribution, and neither the location of transient perfusion defects nor their relation to areas of old myocardial necrosis appeared to influence the presence or absence of chest pain. However, exercise duration, exercise time and rate-pressure product at the beginning of ischaemia were lower in group 1. Furthermore, a greater proportion of asymptomatic patients had only one ischaemic segment on 99mTc-MIBI perfusion scintigraphy. We conclude that: (1) in patients with effort angina and coronary disease, the incidence of electrocardiographic silent ischaemic events induced by exercise is similar to that observed in studies based on continuous ECG monitoring. (2) Exertional angina is more frequently associated with greater ischaemic areas and with more severe degrees of impairment of residual coronary flow reserve. (3) The presence of an old myocardial infarction does not appear to influence the incidence of ischaemic cardiac pain.

  16. Hydroxychloroquine Protects against Cardiac Ischaemia/Reperfusion Injury In Vivo via Enhancement of ERK1/2 Phosphorylation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren Bourke

    Full Text Available An increasing number of investigations including human studies demonstrate that pharmacological ischaemic preconditioning is a viable way to protect the heart from myocardial ischaemia/reperfusion (I/R injury. This study investigated the role of hydroxychloroquine (HCQ in the heart during I/R injury. In vitro and in vivo models of myocardial I/R injury were used to assess the effects of HCQ. It was found that HCQ was protective in neonatal rat cardiomyocytes through inhibition of apoptosis, measured by TUNEL and cleaved caspase-3. This protection in vitro was mediated through enhancement of ERK1/2 phosphorylation mediated by HCQ in a dose-dependent fashion. A decrease in infarct size was observed in an in vivo model of myocardial I/R injury in HCQ treated animals and furthermore this protection was blocked in the presence of the ERK1/2 inhibitor U0126. For the first time, we have shown that HCQ promotes a preconditioning like protection in an in vivo simulated rat myocardial I/R injury model. Moreover, it was shown that HCQ is protective via enhanced phosphorylation of the pro-survival kinase ERK1/2.

  17. Myocardial metabolism of 123I-BMIPP during low-flow ischaemia in an experimental model: comparison with myocardial blood flow and 18F-FDG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosokawa, Ryohei; Nohara, Ryuji; Hirai, Taku; Fujita, Masatoshi; Sasayama, Shigetake; Fujibayashi, Yasuhisa; Magata, Yasuhiro; Tadamura, Eiji; Konishi, Junji

    2001-01-01

    Risk stratification of coronary artery disease may provide a basis for selection of treatment to prevent myocardial events and to assist functional recovery. Iodine-123 (ρ-iodophenyl)-3-R,S-methylpentadecanoic acid ( 123 I-BMIPP) is a radioiodinated fatty acid analogue for single-photon emission tomographic (SPET) imaging, and several reports have demonstrated that the abnormal uptake of 123 I-BMIPP is associated with wall motion abnormality and severe coronary artery stenosis. Clarification of the contribution of fatty acids to myocardial metabolism would be highly valuable in recognising this critical condition. In this study, we investigated the myocardial uptake of 123 I-BMIPP under low-flow ischaemia, and compared it with the uptake of fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose ( 18 F-FDG). Using open chest dogs, the flow of the left anterior descending coronary artery was controlled using a pneumatic occluder in order to maintain a 30%-40% reduction of Doppler flow. 123 I-BMIPP and 18 F-FDG were injected into the left atrium after 90 min of ischaemia (protocols 1 and 3). Canine hearts were excised after 120 min of ischaemia for the measurement of radioactivity. In protocol 2, 123 I-BMIPP alone was injected and hearts were excised 8 min after the injection. A time-course biopsy study was also performed at the same time (protocol 3). Wall thickening was evaluated using a wall tracker module. The uptake of 18 F-FDG increased significantly in the ischaemic region (232%±135% vs non-ischaemic, P 18 F-FDG did not correlate well with the severity of MBF. On the other hand, 123 I-BMIPP uptake decreased gradually (78.9%±23.6%, P 123 I-BMIPP was associated not only with wall motion abnormality but also with the severity of MBF. In the biopsy study (protocol 3), the radioactivity of either 123 I-BMIPP or 18 F-FDG correlated well with the MBF at the time of tracer injection and was similar to post-mortem analysis. It is concluded that 18 F-FDG is a valid tool for identifying

  18. Mass spectrometry imaging of biomarker lipids for phagocytosis and signalling during focal cerebral ischaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mette M B; Lambertsen, Kate L; Clausen, Bettina H

    2016-01-01

    biomarker CD11b, and probably with cholesteryl ester. Mass spectrometry imaging can visualize spatiotemporal changes in the lipidome during the progression and resolution of focal cerebral inflammation and suggests that BMP(22:6/22:6) and N-acyl-phosphatidylethanolamines can be used as biomarkers......Focal cerebral ischaemia has an initial phase of inflammation and tissue injury followed by a later phase of resolution and repair. Mass spectrometry imaging (desorption electrospray ionization and matrix assisted laser desorption ionization) was applied on brain sections from mice 2 h, 24 h, 5d, 7...

  19. Transient myocardial ischaemia during ambulatory monitoring out of hospital in patients with chronic stable angina pectoris

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egstrup, K

    1988-01-01

    monitoring was significantly lower than heart rate at the onset of ST-segment change during exercise testing (100.2 +/- 14.6 vs. 115.8 +/- 19.6 beats/min, p less than 0.01), which may indicate different pathophysiological mechanisms. Transient impairment in coronary oxygen supply seems to be of importance......Transient myocardial ischaemia during daily life, detected by ambulatory electrocardiographic monitoring, was investigated in 42 patients with chronic stable angina and documented coronary artery disease. Ambulatory monitoring was initiated for 36 hours after all prophylactic antianginal medication...

  20. Warm Mix Asphalt

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-04-17

    State of Alaska State of Alaska - Warm Mix Project Warm Mix Project: Location - Petersburg, Alaska which is Petersburg, Alaska which is located in the heart of Southeast Alaska located in the heart of Southeast Alaska's Inside Passage at the tip of M...

  1. Gastric mucosal electrical potential difference, pH, blood flow, and morphology during hypoxia and selective gastric ischaemia with and without allopurinol pretreatment in anaesthetized dogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højgaard, L; Bülow, J B; Madsen, J

    1990-01-01

    Ischaemia has been implicated in the pathogenesis of gastric mucosal disorders. The aim of this investigation was to study the gastric mucosal electrical potential difference (PD), pH, blood flow and morphology during hypoxia, gastric ischaemia, and gastric ischaemia following inhibition of free...... radical formation with allopurinol. PD and pH were measured simultaneously with an intragastric microelectrode, and the PD values were corrected for the liquid junction potentials created by the intragastric pH variation. Blood flow was measured by the radiolabelled microsphere technique in 18...... anaesthetized dogs. Short general hypoxia and short ischaemia caused reversible declines in PD, increases in pH, and no morphological damage. Ischaemia for 1 h caused a significant decline in PD persistent after reperfusion, an increase in pH, and morphological PD, but after reperfusion PD was normalized. Gross...

  2. Application of streptokinase and PTA in lower limb chronic ischaemia; Zastosowanie streptokinazy i przezskornej angioplastyki w przewleklym niedokrwieniu konczyn dolnych

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syberyjski, R.; Domanski, Z.; Cyrylowski, L. [Pomorska Akademia Medyczna, Szczecin (Poland)

    1994-12-31

    In 14 patients with chronic ischaemia of lower limbs, local fibrynolysis with streptokinase followed by PTA was performed in occluded arteries. The procedure was successful in 10 patients. An adverse reaction was observed in 1 patient (gingivorrhea), and a complication was noticed in another one (acute ischaemia due a trombosis). These results suggest that the method may appear as a safe alternative to a surgery treatment, and encourage to evaluate an effectiveness of the procedure in a large group of patients. (author). 6 refs, 3 figs.

  3. Stress induced right ventricular dysfunction: An indication of reversible right ventricular ischaemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Underwood, S.R.; Walton, S.; Emanuel, R.W.; Swanton, R.H.; Campos Costa, D.; Laming, P.J.; Ell, P.J.

    1987-01-01

    Stress induced changes in left ventricular ejection fraction are widely used in the detection and assessment of coronary artery disease. This study demonstrates that right ventricular dysfunction may also occur, and assesses its significance in terms of coronary artery anatomy. This study involved 14 normal subjects and 26 with coronary artery disease investigated by equilibrium radionuclide ventriculography, at rest and during maximal dynamic exercise. Mean normal resting right ventricular ejection fraction (RVEF) was 0.40 (SD 0.118), and all normal subjects increased RVEF with stress (mean ΔRVEF+0.13 SD 0.099). Mean ΔRVEF in the subjects with coronary artery disease was significantly lower at 0.00 (SD 0.080), but there was overlap between the two groups. The largest falls in RVEF were seen if the right coronary artery was occluded without retrograde filling. In this subgroup with the most severely compromised right ventricular perfusion (nine subjects), RVEF always fell with stress, and mean ΔRVEF was -0.08 (SD 0.050). There was no significant correlation between ΔLVEF and ΔRVEF, implying that the right ventricular dysfunction was due to right ventricular ischaemia, rather than secondary to left ventricular dysfunction. Stress induced right ventricular ischaemia can therefore be detected readily by radionuclide ventriculography. (orig.)

  4. Effects of Human Umbilical Cord Mesenchymal Stem Cells on Renal Ischaemia-reperfusion Injury in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenyu Qiu

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective This study aims to observe the function of umbilical cord-mesenchymal stem cells (UC-MSCs labelled with enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP in the repair of renal ischaemia-reperfusion (I/R injury, to determine the effects on inflammatory cascade in an established rat model and to explore possible pathogenesis. Materials and Methods Sixty rats were randomly divided into three groups: the sham-operated, I/R and UC-MSC treatment groups. All rats underwent right nephrectomy. Ischaemia was induced in the left kidney by occlusion of the renal artery and vein for 1hour, followed by reperfusion for 24 hours or 48 hours. Kidney samples were collected to observe morphological changes. Immunohistochemistry was performed to assess the expression of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1 in the renal tissue sample, as well as the number of infiltrating polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNLs and UC-MSCs with positive eGFP. Results Renal histopathological damages and the expression of ICAM-1 and PMNL increased significantly in the I/R group compared with those in the sham-operated group, whereas the damages were less conspicuous in the UC-MSC treatment group. Conclusions Renal ICAM-1, which mediated PMNL infiltration and contributed to renal damage, was significantly up-regulated in the I/R group. UC-MSCs were identified to inhibit these pathological processes and protect the kidney from I/R injury.

  5. Preventive Treatment with Ketamine Attenuates the Ischaemia-Reperfusion Response in a Chronic Postischaemia Pain Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suryamin Liman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ischemia and inflammation may be pathophysiological mechanisms of complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS. Ketamine has proposed anti-inflammatory effects and has been used for treating CRPS. This study aimed to evaluate anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects of ketamine after ischaemia-reperfusion injury in a chronic postischaemia pain (CPIP model of CRPS-I. Using this model, ischemia was induced in the hindlimbs of male Sprague-Dawley rats. Ketamine, methylprednisolone, or saline was administered immediately after reperfusion. Physical effects, (oedema, temperature, and mechanical and cold allodynia in the bilateral hindpaws, were assessed from 48 hours after reperfusion. Fewer (56% rats in the ketamine group developed CPIP at the 48th hour after reperfusion (nonsignificant. Ketamine treated rats showed a significantly lower temperature in the ischaemic hindpaw compared to saline (P<0.01 and methylprednisolone (P<0.05 groups. Mechanical and cold allodynia were significantly lower in the ischaemic side in the ketamine group (P<0.05. Proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-2 were significantly lower at the 48th hour after reperfusion in ketamine and methylprednisolone groups, compared to saline (all P<0.05. In conclusion, immediate administration of ketamine after an ischaemia-reperfusion injury can alleviate pain and inflammation in the CPIP model and has potential to treat postischaemic pain.

  6. Riboflavin (vitamin B-2) reduces hepatocellular injury following liver ischaemia and reperfusion in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanches, Sheila Cristina; Ramalho, Leandra Naira Z; Mendes-Braz, Mariana; Terra, Vânia Aparecida; Cecchini, Rubens; Augusto, Marlei Josiele; Ramalho, Fernando Silva

    2014-05-01

    Riboflavin has been shown to exhibit anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties in the settings of experimental sepsis and ischaemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. We investigated the effect of riboflavin on normothermic liver I/R injury. Mice were submitted to 60 min of ischaemia plus saline or riboflavin treatment (30 μmoles/kg BW) followed by 6 h of reperfusion. Hepatocellular injury was evaluated by aminotransferase levels, reduced glutathione (GSH) content and the histological damage score. Hepatic neutrophil accumulation was assessed using the naphthol method and by measuring myeloperoxidase activity. Hepatic oxidative/nitrosative stress was estimated by immunohistochemistry. Liver endothelial and inducible nitric oxide synthase (eNOS/iNOS) and nitric oxide (NO) amounts were assessed by immunoblotting and a chemiluminescence assay. Riboflavin significantly reduced serum and histological parameters of hepatocellular damage, neutrophil infiltration and oxidative/nitrosative stress. Furthermore, riboflavin infusion partially recovered hepatic GSH reserves and decreased the liver contents of eNOS/iNOS and NO. These data indicate that riboflavin exerts antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects in the ischaemic liver, protecting hepatocytes against I/R injury. The mechanism of these effects appears to be related to the intrinsic antioxidant potential of riboflavin/dihydroriboflavin and to reduced hepatic expression of eNOS/iNOS and reduced NO levels, culminating in attenuation of oxidative/nitrosative stress and the acute inflammatory response. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Long term results of polytetrafluoroethylene in above knee femoropopliteal bypass for critical ischaemia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kavanagh, E G

    2012-02-03

    Ninety-six consecutive above-knee femoropopliteal bypasses, using polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) preferentially, were performed for limb-threatening ischaemia. Cumulative primary graft patency was 68 per cent, 49 per cent and 36 per cent and limb salvage 93 per cent, 85 per cent and 75 per cent at 1, 3 and 5 yr respectively. As a result of poor long term survival (51 per cent at 5 yr), and the healing of remedial lesions before graft occlusion, 68 patients (72 per cent) required no further intervention. Eighteen secondary bypasses were undertaken, 12 using ipsilateral saphenous vein. In this group of elderly patients with poor life expectancy, where a limited operation is desirable, the use of PTFE provided excellent limb salvage with low morbidity. Although we can no longer justify our continued use of PTFE in every case of critical ischaemia because of its inferior patency to autogenous vein, we continue to use it preferentially in patients whose lifespan is likely to be short and in cases where a remedial lesion is present.

  8. Protective effect of Mangifera indica L. extract (Vimang) on the injury associated with hepatic ischaemia reperfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Gregorio Martínez; Rodríguez H, María A; Giuliani, Attilia; Núñez Sellés, Alberto J; Rodríguez, Niurka Pons; León Fernández, Olga Sonia; Re, L

    2003-03-01

    The effect of Mangifera indica L. extract (Vimang) on treatment of injury associated with hepatic ischaemia/reperfusion was tested. Vimang protects from the oxidative damage induced by oxygen-based free radicals as shown in several in vitro test systems conducted. The ability of Vimang to reduce liver damage was investigated in rats undergoing right-lobe blood fl ow occlusion for 45 min followed by 45 min of reperfusion. The ischaemia/reperfusion model leads to an increase of transaminase (ALT and AST), membrane lipid peroxidation, tissue neutrophil in filtration, DNA fragmentation, loss of protein -SH groups, cytosolic Ca2+ overload and a decrease of catalase activity. Oral administration of Vimang (50, 110 and 250 mg/kg, b.w.) 7 days before reperfusion, reduced transaminase levels and DNA fragmentation in a dose dependent manner (p Vimang also restored the cytosolic Ca2+ levels and inhibited polymorphonuclear migration at a dose of 250 mg/kg b.w., improved the oxidation of total and non protein sulfhydryl groups and prevented modification in catalase activity, uric acid and lipid peroxidation markers (p Vimang could be a useful new natural drug for preventing oxidative damage during hepatic injury associated with free radical generation. Copyright 2003 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Modern treatment of infection and ischaemia to reduce major amputation in the diabetic foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmonds, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic patients suffer a high rate of amputation. There are two main reasons; infection which can spread rapidly leading to overwhelming tissue destruction and severe peripheral arterial disease. Studies that have stratified patients according to the presence or absence of both peripheral arterial disease and infection have shown significantly worse outcomes in patients with both peripheral arterial disease and infection. There have been two crucial significant advances in diabetic foot care to improve the outlook of these diabetic patients. First, there has been the realisation that diabetic foot patients experience repeated crises from the rapid onset infection and need a special form of easily accessible care within a multidisciplinary diabetic foot service to provide prompt treatment of infection before it progresses to necrosis. Secondly, within such a service, prompt diagnosis of ischaemia and urgent revascularisation has been established as a further important aspect of successful management. The critical factor in saving limbs is making a rapid diagnosis of infection and ischaemia and administering the appropriate treatment early. In this way speedy healing can be achieved and this can prevent patients from needing amputations.

  10. Activated protein C attenuates acute ischaemia reperfusion injury in skeletal muscle.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Dillon, J P

    2012-02-03

    Activated protein C (APC) is an endogenous anti-coagulant with anti-inflammatory properties. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effects of activated protein C in the setting of skeletal muscle ischaemia reperfusion injury (IRI). IRI was induced in rats by applying rubber bands above the levels of the greater trochanters bilaterally for a period of 2h followed by 12h reperfusion. Treatment groups received either equal volumes of normal saline or activated protein C prior to tourniquet release. Following 12h reperfusion, muscle function was assessed electrophysiologically by electrical field stimulation. The animals were then sacrificed and skeletal muscle harvested for evaluation. Activated protein C significantly attenuated skeletal muscle reperfusion injury as shown by reduced myeloperoxidase content, wet to dry ratio and electrical properties of skeletal muscle. Further in vitro work was carried out on neutrophils isolated from healthy volunteers to determine the direct effect of APC on neutrophil function. The effects of APC on TNF-alpha stimulated neutrophils were examined by measuring CD18 expression as well as reactive oxygen species generation. The in vitro work demonstrated a reduction in CD18 expression and reactive oxygen species generation. We conclude that activated protein C may have a protective role in the setting of skeletal muscle ischaemia reperfusion injury and that this is in part mediated by a direct inhibitory effect on neutrophil activation.

  11. Sodium transport through the cerebral sodium-glucose transporter exacerbates neuron damage during cerebral ischaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Yui; Harada, Shinichi; Wada, Tetsuyuki; Yoshida, Shigeru; Tokuyama, Shogo

    2016-07-01

    We recently demonstrated that the cerebral sodium-glucose transporter (SGLT) is involved in postischaemic hyperglycaemia-induced exacerbation of cerebral ischaemia. However, the associated SGLT-mediated mechanisms remain unclear. Thus, we examined the involvement of cerebral SGLT-induced excessive sodium ion influx in the development of cerebral ischaemic neuronal damage. [Na+]i was estimated according to sodium-binding benzofuran isophthalate fluorescence. In the in vitro study, primary cortical neurons were prepared from fetuses of ddY mice. Primary cortical neurons were cultured for 5 days before each treatment with reagents, and these survival rates were assessed using biochemical assays. In in vivo study, a mouse model of focal ischaemia was generated using middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). In these experiments, treatment with high concentrations of glucose induced increment in [Na+]i, and this phenomenon was suppressed by the SGLT-specific inhibitor phlorizin. SGLT-specific sodium ion influx was induced using a-methyl-D-glucopyranoside (a-MG) treatments, which led to significant concentration-dependent declines in neuronal survival rates and exacerbated hydrogen peroxide-induced neuronal cell death. Moreover, phlorizin ameliorated these effects. Finally, intracerebroventricular administration of a-MG exacerbated the development of neuronal damage induced by MCAO, and these effects were ameliorated by the administration of phlorizin. Hence, excessive influx of sodium ions into neuronal cells through cerebral SGLT may exacerbate the development of cerebral ischaemic neuronal damage. © 2016 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  12. MR tomography in myocardial ischaemia: present state of the art

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szolar, D.H.; Saeed, M.; Higgins, C.B.

    1996-01-01

    Recent developments in MR imaging have opened up new avenues in the investigation of ischaemic heart disease. Conventional unenhanced spin-echo sequences have been used to detect and quantify myocardial infarction. Along with the technical advances aimed at reducing motion artifacts and imaging time, the advent of contrast media for MR imaging has further strengthened its diagnostic capacities. The applications of MR contrast media are increasing, and they are becoming more specific, to enable differentiation of occlusive and reperfused myocardial infarctions and to discriminate between reversible and irreversible myocardial injury. Previous studies have also indicated that dual administration of both relaxivity-based and susceptibility-based contrast media can be used to determine whether viable myocardium is present in the reperfused ischaemic area. Magnetic susceptibility MR contrast media have the potential to demonstrate a region of the ischaemically injured myocardium in which myocardial necrosis is present. A cornestone in the MR assessment of ischaemic heart disease has been achieved with the advent of fast MR imaging techniques. Ultrafast gradient-recalled-echo sequences or echoplanar imaging allow to monitor the first passage of the contrast medium through the heart. With the aid of MR contrast media, these techniques may be useful in estimating regional myocardial perfusion and blood volume. Experimental and clinical perfusion studies indicate that perfusion-sensitive MR imaging, particularly in concert with coronary vasodilators, can detect compromised myocardium. Combining myocardial perfusion imaging with the anatomic and functional information provided by other MR imaging techniques such as cine and velocity-encoded sequences could make MR imaging a comprehensive noninvasive diagnostic tool for the assessment of ischaemic heart disease. (orig.) [de

  13. Global Warming: A Myth?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 6; Issue 7. Global Warming: A Myth? - Credibility of Climate Scenarios Predicted by Systems Simulations. Deepanjan Majumdar. General Article Volume 6 Issue 7 July 2001 pp 13-21 ...

  14. Warm and Cool Dinosaurs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannlein, Sally

    2001-01-01

    Presents an art activity in which first grade students draw dinosaurs in order to learn about the concept of warm and cool colors. Explains how the activity also helped the students learn about the concept of distance when drawing. (CMK)

  15. Targeting hexokinase II to mitochondria to modulate energy metabolism and reduce ischaemia-reperfusion injury in heart

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nederlof, Rianne; Eerbeek, Otto; Hollmann, Markus W.; Southworth, Richard; Zuurbier, Coert J.

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrially bound hexokinase II (mtHKII) has long been known to confer cancer cells with their resilience against cell death. More recently, mtHKII has emerged as a powerful protector against cardiac cell death. mtHKII protects against ischaemia-reperfusion (IR) injury in skeletal muscle and

  16. Self-reported symptoms and risk factors for digital ischaemia among international world-class beach volleyball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van De Pol, Daan; Alaeikhanehshir, Sena; Maas, Mario; Kuijer, P Paul F M

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of ischaemia-related symptoms is remarkably high among elite indoor volleyball players. Since the exposure to sport-specific demands may be higher in beach volleyball compared to indoor volleyball, the aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of ischaemia-related symptoms and associated risk factors among world-class beach volleyball players. Therefore, a questionnaire survey was performed among beach volleyball players active during the 2013 Grand Slam Beach Volleyball in the Netherlands. In total, 60 of the 128 beach volleyball players (47%) participated: 26 males and 34 females from 17 countries. The self-reported prevalence of cold or blue or pale digits in the dominant hand during or immediately after practice or competition was 38% (n = 23). Two risk factors were independently associated with symptoms of blue or pale digits: more than 14 years playing volleyball (odds ratio (OR) 4.42, 90% confidence interval (90% CI) 1.30-15.07) and sex (female) (OR 4.62, 90% CI 1.15-18.57). In conclusion, the prevalence of symptoms associated with digital ischaemia is high among international world-class beach volleyball players. Female sex and the length of the volleyball career were independently associated with an increased risk of ischaemia-related symptoms. The high prevalence of these seemingly innocuous symptoms and possible associated risk factors warrant regular monitoring since early detection can potentially prevent thromboembolic complications and irreversible tissue damage.

  17. Effects of a heat shock protein inducer on the atrial fibrillation substrate caused by acute atrial ischaemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sakabe, Masao; Shiroshita-Takeshita, Akiko; Maguy, Ange; Brundel, Bianca J. J. M.; Fujiki, Akira; Inoue, Hiroshi; Nattel, Stanley

    2008-01-01

    Aims Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are a set of endogenous cytoprotective factors activated by various pathological conditions. This study addressed the effects of geranylgeranylacetone (GGA), an orally active HSP inducer, on the atrial fibrillation (AF) substrate associated with acute atria( ischaemia

  18. Preserved cardiac mitochondrial function and reduced ischaemia/reperfusion injury afforded by chronic continuous hypoxia: Role of opioid receptors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Maslov, L. N.; Naryzhnaya, N. V.; Prokudina, E. S.; Kolář, František; Gorbunov, A. S.; Zhang, Y.; Wang, H.; Tsibulnikov, S.Yu.; Portnichenko, A. G.; Lasukova, T. V.; Lishmanov, Yu. B.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 42, č. 5 (2015), s. 496-501 ISSN 1440-1681 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP303/12/1162 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : cardioprotection * chronic hypoxia * ischaemia/reperfusion * mitochondrial function * opioid receptors Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 2.004, year: 2015

  19. Systematic review of pharmacological therapies for the management of ischaemic pain in patients with non-reconstructable critical limb ischaemia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2017-08-23

    Critical limb ischaemia (CLI) is a severe manifestation of peripheral arterial disease, characterised by chronic ischaemic rest pain, ulcers or gangrene. Management of ischaemic pain is challenging in patients with no options for revascularisation and optimal pharmacological therapies have not been established.

  20. Global warming yearbook: 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arris, L. [ed.

    1999-02-01

    The report brings together a year`s worth of global warming stories - over 280 in all - in one convenient volume. It provides a one-stop report on the scientific, political and industrial implications of global warming. The report includes: detailed coverage of negotiations on the Kyoto Protocol; scientific findings on carbon sources and sinks, coral bleaching, Antarctic ice shelves, plankton, wildlife and tree growth; new developments on fuel economy, wind power, fuel cells, cogeneration, energy labelling and emissions trading.

  1. Media Pembelajaran Global Warming

    OpenAIRE

    Tham, Fikri Jufri; Liliana, Liliana; Purba, Kristo Radion

    2016-01-01

    Computer based learning media is one of the media has an important role in learning. Learning media will be attractive when packaged through interactive media , such as interactive media created in paper manufacture " instructional media global warming" . The advantage gained is that it can increase knowledge, generally educate people to be more concerned about the environment , and also can be a means of entertainment. This application is focused to learn about global warming and packaged in...

  2. Tourniquet-induced ischaemia-reperfusion injury: the comparison of antioxidative effects of small-dose propofol and ketamine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karaca Omer

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives: The aim of the present study was to investigate the preventive effects of propofol and ketamine as small dose sedation during spinal anaesthesia on tourniquet-induced ischaemia-reperfusion injury. Methods: 30 patients were randomly assigned into two groups of 15 patients. In the propofol group, sedation was performed with propofol 0.2 mg·kg-1 followed by infusion at a rate of 2 mg·kg-1·h-1. In the ketamine group, a continuous infusion of ketamine 0.5 mg·kg-1·h-1 was used until the end of surgery. Intravenous administration of midazolam was not used in any patients. Ramsay sedation scale was used for assessing the sedation level. Venous blood samples were obtained before propofol and ketamine infusion (T1, at 30 minutes (min of tourniquet ischaemia (T2, and 5 min after tourniquet deflation (T3 for malondialdehyde (MDA measurements. Results: No differences were noted between the groups in haemodynamic (p > 0.05 and demographic data (p > 0.05. There was no statistically significant difference between the two groups in terms of T1, T2 and T3 periods (p > 0.05. There was a statistically increase observed in MDA values respectively both in Group P and Group K between the reperfusion period (1.95 ± 0.59, 2.31 ± 0.48 and pre-ischaemia (1.41 ± 0.38, 1.54 ± 0.45, and ischaemia (1.76 ± 0.70, 1.71 ± 0.38 (µmoL-1 periods (p < 0.05. Conclusions: Small-dose propofol and ketamine has similar potential to reduce the oxidative stress caused by tourniquet-induced ischaemia-reperfusion injury in patients undergoing arthroscopic knee surgery under spinal anaesthesia.

  3. Climatic warming destabilizes forest ant communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamond, Sarah E; Nichols, Lauren M; Pelini, Shannon L; Penick, Clint A; Barber, Grace W; Cahan, Sara Helms; Dunn, Robert R; Ellison, Aaron M; Sanders, Nathan J; Gotelli, Nicholas J

    2016-10-01

    How will ecological communities change in response to climate warming? Direct effects of temperature and indirect cascading effects of species interactions are already altering the structure of local communities, but the dynamics of community change are still poorly understood. We explore the cumulative effects of warming on the dynamics and turnover of forest ant communities that were warmed as part of a 5-year climate manipulation experiment at two sites in eastern North America. At the community level, warming consistently increased occupancy of nests and decreased extinction and nest abandonment. This consistency was largely driven by strong responses of a subset of thermophilic species at each site. As colonies of thermophilic species persisted in nests for longer periods of time under warmer temperatures, turnover was diminished, and species interactions were likely altered. We found that dynamical (Lyapunov) community stability decreased with warming both within and between sites. These results refute null expectations of simple temperature-driven increases in the activity and movement of thermophilic ectotherms. The reduction in stability under warming contrasts with the findings of previous studies that suggest resilience of species interactions to experimental and natural warming. In the face of warmer, no-analog climates, communities of the future may become increasingly fragile and unstable.

  4. Global warming on trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broeker, W.S.

    1992-01-01

    Jim Hansen, a climatologist at NASA's Goddard Space Institute, is convinced that the earth's temperature is rising and places the blame on the buildup of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. Unconvinced, John Sununu, former White House chief of staff, doubts that the warming will be great enough to produce serious threat and fears that measures to reduce the emissions would throw a wrench into the gears that drive the Unites States' troubled economy. During his three years at the White House, Sununu's view prevailed, and although his role in the debate has diminished, others continue to cast doubt on the reality of global warming. A new lobbying group called the Climate Council has been created to do just this. Burning fossil fuels is not the only problem; a fifth of emissions of carbon dioxide now come from clearing and burning forests. Scientists are also tracking a host of other greenhouse gases that emanate from a variety of human activities; the warming effect of methane, chlorofluorocarbons and nitrous oxide combined equals that of carbon dioxide. Although the current warming from these gases may be difficult to detect against the background noise of natural climate variation, most climatologists are certain that as the gases continue to accumulate, increases in the earth's temperature will become evident even to skeptics. If the reality of global warming were put on trial, each side would have trouble making its case. Jim Hansen's side could not prove beyond a reasonable doubt that carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases have warmed the planet. But neither could John Sununu's side prove beyond a reasonable doubt that the warming expected from greenhouse gases has not occurred. To see why each side would have difficulty proving its case, this article reviews the arguments that might be presented in such a hearing

  5. Long range global warming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rolle, K.C.; Pulkrabek, W.W.; Fiedler, R.A.

    1995-01-01

    This paper explores one of the causes of global warming that is often overlooked, the direct heating of the environment by engineering systems. Most research and studies of global warming concentrate on the modification that is occurring to atmospheric air as a result of pollution gases being added by various systems; i.e., refrigerants, nitrogen oxides, ozone, hydrocarbons, halon, and others. This modification affects the thermal radiation balance between earth, sun and space, resulting in a decrease of radiation outflow and a slow rise in the earth's steady state temperature. For this reason the solution to the problem is perceived as one of cleaning up the processes and effluents that are discharged into the environment. In this paper arguments are presented that suggest, that there is a far more serious cause for global warming that will manifest itself in the next two or three centuries; direct heating from the exponential growth of energy usage by humankind. Because this is a minor contributor to the global warming problem at present, it is overlooked or ignored. Energy use from the combustion of fuels and from the output of nuclear reactions eventually is manifest as warming of the surroundings. Thus, as energy is used at an ever increasing rate the consequent global warming also increases at an ever increasing rate. Eventually this rate will become equal to a few percent of solar radiation. When this happens the earth's temperature will have risen by several degrees with catastrophic results. The trends in world energy use are reviewed and some mathematical models are presented to suggest future scenarios. These models can be used to predict when the global warming problem will become undeniably apparent, when it will become critical, and when it will become catastrophic

  6. Thrombolysis significantly reduces transient myocardial ischaemia following first acute myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mickley, H; Pless, P; Nielsen, J R

    1992-01-01

    In order to investigate whether thrombolysis affects residual myocardial ischaemia, we prospectively performed a predischarge maximal exercise test and early out-of-hospital ambulatory ST segment monitoring in 123 consecutive men surviving a first acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Seventy......-four patients fulfilled our criteria for thrombolysis, but only the last 35 patients included received thrombolytic therapy. As thrombolysis was not available in our Department at the start of the study, the first 39 patients included were conservatively treated (controls). No significant differences...... in baseline clinical characteristics were found between the two groups. In-hospital atrial fibrillation and digoxin therapy was more prevalent in controls (P less than 0.05). During exercise, thrombolysed patients reached a higher maximal work capacity compared with controls: 160 +/- 41 vs 139 +/- 34 W (P...

  7. Radioiodinated diacylglycerol analogue: a potential imaging agent for single-photon emission tomographic investigations of cerebral ischaemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohmori, Y. [Department of Neurosurgery, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Kyoto (Japan); Imahori, Y. [Department of Neurosurgery, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Kyoto (Japan); Ueda, S. [Department of Neurosurgery, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Kyoto (Japan); Fujii, R. [Nishijin Hospital, Kyoto (Japan); Wakita, K. [Nishijin Hospital, Kyoto (Japan); Inoue, M. [Daiichi Radioisotope Laboratories, Chiba (Japan); Tazawa, S. [Daiichi Radioisotope Laboratories, Chiba (Japan)

    1996-03-01

    Phospholipid metabolism is closely related to membrane perturbation in cerebral ischaemia. We investigated in vivo topographical lipid metabolism using an iodine-123-labelled diacylglycerol analogue, (1-(15-(4-iodine-123-iodophenyl)-pentadecanoyl)-2-stearoyl-rac-glycerol) ({sup 123}I-labelled DAG), in a middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusion model with the aim of positive imaging of ischaemic insult. Sprague-Dawley rats underwent coagulation of the MCA to induce permanent occlusion. MCA occlusion times prior to injection of {sup 123}I-labelled DAG ranged from 15 min to 14 days. Each rat was injected with 11-37 MBq of {sup 123}I-labelled DAG. After 30 min, in vivo autoradiographs were reconstructed. Scanning of the living rat brain in this MCA occlusion model was performed. Cerebral infarctions were recognized in the frontal cortex, the parietal cortex and the lateral portion of the caudate-putamen by 2, 3, 5-triphenyltetrazolium hydrochloride staining. In infarcted regions (region 1), {sup 123}I-labelled DAG incorporation showed a decrease up to 12 h; it then increased up to 6 days and decreased thereafter. In peri-infarcted regions (region 2), the incorporation showed almost no change up to 12 h, then increased up to 5-6 days and decreased thereafter. In other regions (region 3), the incorporation showed no change. Lipid analysis showed that {sup 123}I-labelled DAG was metabolized to 15-(4-iodine-123-iodophenyl)-pentadecanoic acid by DAG lipase and to {sup 123}I-labelled phosphatidylcholine. Scanning of the ischaemic region showed higher accumulation than on the non-lesioned side. We established a method to visualize ischaemic foci as positive images. The early changes in {sup 123}I-labelled DAG incorporation were related to DAG lipase, which degraded the accumulated intrinsic DAG, and increased {sup 123}I-labelled DAG incorporation in the chronic stage involves several aspects of neural destruction in the process of autolysis.

  8. Estudo da fração inspirada de oxigênio na isquemia-reperfusão pulmonar em ratos Study of ventilation with different inspired oxygen concentration on lung ischaemia-reperfusion injury in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael José Silveira

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Estudar o efeito das frações inspiradas de oxigênio (FiO2 a 0,21, 0,40 e 1,00 na isquemia-reperfusão pulmonar. MÉTODOS: Foram utilizados 40 ratos Wistar, distribuídos aleatoriamente em quatro grupos. O grupo I foi o controle e, nos grupos II, III e IV, os animais foram ventilados durante a isquemia-reperfusão com FiO2 a 0,21, 0,40 e 1,00 respectivamente. O modelo utilizado foi de isquemia-reperfusão normotérmica, in situ. O tempo de isquemia foi de 30 minutos e o de reperfusão, de 10 minutos. Como parâmetros de avaliação, utilizou-se a pressão arterial média sistêmica (PAM, a relação entre a pressão parcial de oxigênio e a fração inspirada de oxigênio (PO2/FiO2, a dosagem da glutationa reduzida (GSH e das substâncias reativas ao ácido tiobarbitúrico (TBARS no tecido pulmonar e a relação entre o peso pulmonar úmido e o peso pulmonar seco. RESULTADOS: Os resultados mostraram que a ventilação com FiO2 a 0,21, quando comparada à ventilação com FiO2 a 0,40 e 1,00, durante o período de isquemia-reperfusão, apresentou menor diminuição da PAM, melhor relação PO2/FiO2, maior valor na medida da GSH, menor produção das TBARS e menor formação de edema pulmonar. CONCLUSÃO: A ventilação com baixa FiO2 (0,21 mostrou melhores resultados quando comparada àquelas realizadas com FiO2 mais elevadas (0,40 e 1,00 na isquemia-reperfusão pulmonar.PURPOSE: To evaluate the FiO2 effect at 0,21, 0,40 and 1,00 on the lung ischaemia-reperfusion injury. METHODS: Forty Wistar rats were randomly allocated in 4 groups. The group I was the control one, and in groups II, III, IV rats were ventilated during the ischaemia-reperfusion at 0,21, 0,40 and 1.00 FiO2 respectively. The ischaemia time was 30 minutes and the reperfusion time was 10 minutes. The model used was normothermic ischaemia-reperfusion, in situ. As assessment parameters, the systemic average arterial pressure (PAM, the oxygen arterial partial pressure

  9. Defibrotide reduces infarct size in a rabbit model of experimental myocardial ischaemia and reperfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiemermann, C.; Thomas, G. R.; Vane, J. R.

    1989-01-01

    1. Defibrotide, a single-stranded polydeoxyribonucleotide obtained from bovine lungs, has significant anti-thrombotic, pro-fibrinolytic and prostacyclin-stimulating properties. 2. The present study was designed to evaluate the effects of defibrotide on infarct size and regional myocardial blood flow in a rabbit model of myocardial ischaemia and reperfusion. 3. Defibrotide (32 mg kg-1 bolus + 32 mg kg-1 h-1, i.v.) either with or without co-administration of indomethacin (5 mg kg-1 x 2, i.v.) was administered 5 min after occlusion of the left anterior-lateral coronary artery and continued during the 60 min occlusion and subsequent 3 h reperfusion periods. 4. Defibrotide significantly attenuated the ischaemia-induced ST-segment elevation and abolished the reperfusion-related changes (R-wave reduction and Q-wave development) in the electrocardiogram. In addition, defibrotide significantly improved myocardial blood flow in normal and in ischaemic, but not in infarcted sections of the heart. The improvement in blood flow in normal perfused myocardium, but not in the ischaemic area was prevented by indomethacin. 5. Although the area at risk was similar in all animal groups studied, defibrotide treatment resulted in a 51% reduction of infarct size. Indomethacin treatment abolished the reduction of infarct size seen with defibrotide alone. 6. The data demonstrate a considerable cardioprotective effect of defibrotide in the reperfused ischaemic rabbit myocardium. This effect may be related, at least in part, to a stimulation of endogenous prostaglandin formation. Other possible mechanisms are discussed. PMID:2758223

  10. Polydeoxyribonucleotides and nitric oxide release from guinea-pig hearts during ischaemia and reperfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masini, E.; Lupini, M.; Mugnai, L.; Raspanti, S.; Mannaioni, P. F.

    1995-01-01

    1. Two polydeoxyribonucleotides, produced by the controlled hydrolysis of DNA of mammalian lung (defibrotide and its lower molecular weight fraction, P.O. 085 DV), were studied for their ability to modify the release of nitrite and the coronary flow in perfusates collected from isolated, normally perfused hearts of guinea-pigs and from hearts subjected to regional ischaemia and reperfusion. 2. In guinea-pig normally perfused hearts, both defibrotide (DFT) and its fraction, P.O. 085 DV, increase the amount of nitrite appearing in perfusates in a concentration-dependent fashion. At the highest concentration studied (10(-6) M), P.O. 085 DV was more effective than DFT. A concomitant increase in the coronary flow was observed. 3. The increase in nitrite in perfusates and the increase in coronary flow induced by both DFT and P.O. 085 DV were significantly reduced by NG-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA, 10(-4) M), an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase (NOS). 4. The endothelium-dependent vasodilator, acetylcholine (ACh), enhances the formation of nitrite and the coronary flow. Both the increase in coronary flow and in the formation of nitrite were significantly reduced by L-NMMA (10(-4) M). 5. In guinea-pig hearts subjected to ischaemia and reperfusion, the effect of both compounds in increasing the amount of nitrite in perfusates was more evident and more pronounced with P.O. 085 DV. 6. Reperfusion-induced arrhythmias were significantly reduced by both compounds to the extent of complete protection afforded by compound P.O. 085 DV. 7. The cardioprotective and antiarrhythmic effects of DFT and P.O. 085 DV are discussed. PMID:7582482

  11. A century of changing flows: Forest management changed flow magnitudes and warming advanced the timing of flow in a southwestern US river.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos D Robles

    Full Text Available The continued provision of water from rivers in the southwestern United States to downstream cities, natural communities and species is at risk due to higher temperatures and drought conditions in recent decades. Snowpack and snowfall levels have declined, snowmelt and peak spring flows are arriving earlier, and summer flows have declined. Concurrent to climate change and variation, a century of fire suppression has resulted in dramatic changes to forest conditions, and yet, few studies have focused on determining the degree to which changing forests have altered flows. In this study, we evaluated changes in flow, climate, and forest conditions in the Salt River in central Arizona from 1914-2012 to compare and evaluate the effects of changing forest conditions and temperatures on flows. After using linear regression models to remove the influence of precipitation and temperature, we estimated that annual flows declined by 8-29% from 1914-1963, coincident with a 2-fold increase in basal area, a 2-3-fold increase in canopy cover, and at least a 10-fold increase in forest density within ponderosa pine forests. Streamflow volumes declined by 37-56% in summer and fall months during this period. Declines in climate-adjusted flows reversed at mid-century when spring and annual flows increased by 10-31% from 1964-2012, perhaps due to more winter rainfall. Additionally, peak spring flows occurred about 12 days earlier in this period than in the previous period, coincident with winter and spring temperatures that increased by 1-2°C. While uncertainties remain, this study adds to the knowledge gained in other regions that forest change has had effects on flow that were on par with climate variability and, in the case of mid-century declines, well before the influence of anthropogenic warming. Current large-scale forest restoration projects hold some promise of recovering seasonal flows.

  12. G-warm inflation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrera, Ramón, E-mail: ramon.herrera@pucv.cl [Instituto de Física, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Valparaíso, Avenida Brasil 2950, Casilla 4059, Valparaíso (Chile)

    2017-05-01

    A warm inflationary universe in the context of Galileon model or G-model is studied. Under a general formalism we study the inflationary dynamics and the cosmological perturbations considering a coupling of the form G (φ, X )= g (φ) X . As a concrete example, we consider an exponential potential together with the cases in which the dissipation and Galilean coefficients are constants. Also, we study the weak regime given by the condition R <1+3 gH φ-dot , and the strong regime in which 1< R +3 gH φ-dot . Additionally, we obtain constraints on the parameters during the evolution of G-warm inflation, assuming the condition for warm inflation in which the temperature T > H , the conditions or the weak and strong regimes, together with the consistency relation r = r ( n {sub s} ) from Planck data.

  13. G-warm inflation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Ramón

    2017-05-01

    A warm inflationary universe in the context of Galileon model or G-model is studied. Under a general formalism we study the inflationary dynamics and the cosmological perturbations considering a coupling of the form G(phi,X)=g(phi) X. As a concrete example, we consider an exponential potential together with the cases in which the dissipation and Galilean coefficients are constants. Also, we study the weak regime given by the condition RR+3gHdot phi. Additionally, we obtain constraints on the parameters during the evolution of G-warm inflation, assuming the condition for warm inflation in which the temperature T>H, the conditions or the weak and strong regimes, together with the consistency relation r=r(ns) from Planck data.

  14. The global warming problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    In this chapter, a discussion is presented of the global warming problem and activities contributing to the formation of acid rain, urban smog and to the depletion of the ozone layer. Globally, about two-thirds of anthropogenic carbon dioxide emissions arise from fossil-fuel burning; the rest arise primarily from deforestation. Chlorofluorocarbons are the second largest contributor to global warming, accounting for about 20% of the total. The third largest contributor is methane, followed by ozone and nitrous oxide. A study of current activities in the US that contribute to global warming shows the following: electric power plants account for about 33% of carbon dioxide emissions; motor vehicles, planes and ships (31%); industrial plants (24%); commercial and residential buildings (11%)

  15. Reconciling controversies about the 'global warming hiatus'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medhaug, Iselin; Stolpe, Martin B; Fischer, Erich M; Knutti, Reto

    2017-05-03

    Between about 1998 and 2012, a time that coincided with political negotiations for preventing climate change, the surface of Earth seemed hardly to warm. This phenomenon, often termed the 'global warming hiatus', caused doubt in the public mind about how well anthropogenic climate change and natural variability are understood. Here we show that apparently contradictory conclusions stem from different definitions of 'hiatus' and from different datasets. A combination of changes in forcing, uptake of heat by the oceans, natural variability and incomplete observational coverage reconciles models and data. Combined with stronger recent warming trends in newer datasets, we are now more confident than ever that human influence is dominant in long-term warming.

  16. Greenhouse Warming Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Bent Erik

    2016-01-01

    The changing greenhouse effect caused by natural and anthropogenic causes is explained and efforts to model the behavior of the near-surface constituents of the Earth's land, ocean and atmosphere are discussed. Emissions of various substances and other aspects of human activity influence...... the greenhouse warming, and the impacts of the warming may again impact the wellbeing of human societies. Thus physical modeling of the near-surface ocean-soil-atmosphere system cannot be carried out without an idea of the development of human activities, which is done by scenario analysis. The interactive...

  17. Scaling Potential Evapotranspiration with Greenhouse Warming (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheff, J.; Frierson, D. M.

    2013-12-01

    Potential evapotranspiration (PET) is a supply-independent measure of the evaporative demand of a terrestrial climate, of basic importance in climatology, hydrology, and agriculture. Future increases in PET from greenhouse warming are often cited as key drivers of global trends toward drought and aridity. The present work computes recent and business-as-usual-future Penman-Monteith (i.e. physically-based) PET fields at 3-hourly resolution in 14 modern global climate models. The %-change in local annual-mean PET over the upcoming century is almost always positive, modally low double-digit in magnitude, usually increasing with latitude, yet quite divergent between models. These patterns are understood as follows. In every model, the global field of PET %-change is found to be dominated by the direct, positive effects of constant-relative-humidity warming (via increasing vapor pressure deficit and increasing Clausius-Clapeyron slope.) This direct-warming term very accurately scales as the PET-weighted (warm-season daytime) local warming, times 5-6% per degree (related to the Clausius-Clapeyron equation), times an analytic factor ranging from about 0.25 in warm climates to 0.75 in cold climates, plus a small correction. With warming of several degrees, this product is of low double-digit magnitude, and the strong temperature dependence gives the latitude dependence. Similarly, the inter-model spread in the amount of warming gives most of the spread in this term. Additional spread in the total change comes from strong disagreement on radiation, relative-humidity, and windspeed changes, which make smaller yet substantial contributions to the full PET %-change fields.

  18. Warm-up and performance in competitive swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neiva, Henrique P; Marques, Mário C; Barbosa, Tiago M; Izquierdo, Mikel; Marinho, Daniel A

    2014-03-01

    Warm-up before physical activity is commonly accepted to be fundamental, and any priming practices are usually thought to optimize performance. However, specifically in swimming, studies on the effects of warm-up are scarce, which may be due to the swimming pool environment, which has a high temperature and humidity, and to the complexity of warm-up procedures. The purpose of this study is to review and summarize the different studies on how warming up affects swimming performance, and to develop recommendations for improving the efficiency of warm-up before competition. Most of the main proposed effects of warm-up, such as elevated core and muscular temperatures, increased blood flow and oxygen delivery to muscle cells and higher efficiency of muscle contractions, support the hypothesis that warm-up enhances performance. However, while many researchers have reported improvements in performance after warm-up, others have found no benefits to warm-up. This lack of consensus emphasizes the need to evaluate the real effects of warm-up and optimize its design. Little is known about the effectiveness of warm-up in competitive swimming, and the variety of warm-up methods and swimming events studied makes it difficult to compare the published conclusions about the role of warm-up in swimming. Recent findings have shown that warm-up has a positive effect on the swimmer's performance, especially for distances greater than 200 m. We recommend that swimmers warm-up for a relatively moderate distance (between 1,000 and 1,500 m) with a proper intensity (a brief approach to race pace velocity) and recovery time sufficient to prevent the early onset of fatigue and to allow the restoration of energy reserves (8-20 min).

  19. Complications impaired endothelial progenitor cell function in Type 2 diabetic patients with or without critical leg ischaemia: implication for impaired neovascularization in diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, M-C; Sheu, J-J; Wang, P-W; Chen, C-Y; Kuo, M-C; Hsieh, C-J; Chen, J-F; Chang, H-W

    2009-02-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that migratory function of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) is impaired in Type 2 diabetic patients with or without critical leg ischaemia. Seventy-four patients were classified into four groups: Type 2 diabetic (n = 21) and non-diabetic patients (n = 10) with critical leg ischaemia and Type 2 diabetic patients without lower extremity vascular disease (n = 30) and healthy subjects (n = 13). The number and functional activity of circulating and cultured EPCs were determined. The migratory function of cultured EPCs was significantly impaired in diabetic patients without (median, 48, interquartile range, 46, 49 count/view/well) and with (median, 51, interquartile range, 46, 60 count/view/well) critical leg ischaemia and non-diabetic patients with critical leg ischaemia (median, 49, interquartile range, 47, 55 count/view/well) compared with healthy subjects (median, 63, interquartile range, 57, 65 count/view/well) (P interquartile range, 1600, 6600/10(6) cytometric events) than Type 2 diabetic patients with critical leg ischaemia (median, 5300, interquartile range, 2400, 11,100/10(6) cytometric events), non-diabetic patients with critical leg ischaemia (median, 5550, interquartile range, 2000, 32,100/10(6) cytometric events) and healthy subjects (median, 5400, interquartile range, 2700, 8700/10(6) cytometric events) (P = 0.413). The migratory function of EPCs is impaired in patients with Type 2 diabetes, even in those without critical leg ischaemia. These findings present an important new insight into the pathogenesis of impaired neovascularization and critical limb ischaemia in diabetic patients and provide avenues of future clinical study.

  20. Warm pre-stressing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hedner, G.

    1983-01-01

    Literature survey and critical evaluation of the phenomenon of warm pre-stressing (WPS) is presented. It is found that the cause of it is not clear and a calculated control is missing. The effect of irradiation is unknown, and the influence of WPS on the behaviour of reactor vessels is discussed. (G.B.)

  1. Being Warm-Hearted

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李函; 任汉鼎

    2017-01-01

    Good morning,ladies and gentlemen.It’s my honor to address[向……致辞] you.My English name is Isabella.I’m a high school student of 17.I have some good personality traits[特点],including being warm-hearted.So here comes my topic:Being

  2. Warm and Cool Cityscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jubelirer, Shelly

    2012-01-01

    Painting cityscapes is a great way to teach first-grade students about warm and cool colors. Before the painting begins, the author and her class have an in-depth discussion about big cities and what types of buildings or structures that might be seen in them. They talk about large apartment and condo buildings, skyscrapers, art museums,…

  3. The global warming scare

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sunavala, P.D.

    1992-01-01

    It is argued that the present propaganda about the global warming with its disastrous consequences is a scare spread by some First World countries, especially the United States, to prevent the rapid industrialization of developing third world countries. (author). 6 refs., 1 tab

  4. Paralyzed warming world

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ač, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 2, č. 2 (2010), s. 81-86 ISSN 1876-8156 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60870520 Keywords : global warming * climate Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour http://ojs.ubvu.vu.nl/alf/article/view/134/250

  5. Effects of electroacupuncture on the cortical extracellular signal regulated kinase pathway in rats with cerebral ischaemia/reperfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chunxiao; Li, Chun; Zhou, Guoping; Yang, Lu; Jiang, Guimei; Chen, Jing; Li, Qiushi; Zhan, Zhulian; Xu, Xiuhong; Zhang, Xin

    2017-12-01

    To explore the effects of electroacupuncture (EA) on the phosphorylated extracellular signal regulated kinase (p-ERK) pathway of the cerebral cortex in a rat model of focal cerebral ischaemia/reperfusion (I/R). 160 adult Sprague-Dawley rats underwent middle carotid artery occlusion (MCAO) to establish I/R injury and were randomly divided into four groups (n=40 each) that remained untreated (I/R group) or received EA at LU5, LI4, ST36 and SP6 (I/R+EA group), the ERK inhibitor PD98059 (I/R+PD group), or both interventions (I/R+PD+EA groups). An additional 40 rats undergoing sham surgery formed a healthy control group. Eight rats from each group were sacrificed at the following time points: 2 hours, 6 hours, 1 day, 3 days and 1 week. Neurological function was assessed using neurological deficit scores, morphological examination was performed following haematoxylin-eosin staining of cortical tissues, and apoptotic indices were calculated after terminal deoxyribonucleotidyl transferase (TdT)-mediated biotin-16-dUTP nick-end labelling. Cortical protein and mRNA expression of p-ERK and ERK were measured by immunohistochemistry and real-time quantitative PCR, respectively. Compared with the I/R group, neurological deficit scores and apoptotic indices were lower in the I/R+EA group at 1 and 3 days, whereas mRNA/protein expression of ERK/p-ERK was higher in the EA group at all time points studied. Our results suggest that EA can alleviate neurological deficits and reduce cortical apoptosis in rats with I/R injury. These anti-apoptotic effects may be due to upregulation of p-ERK. Moreover, apoptosis appeared to peak at 1 day after I/R injury, which might therefore represent the optimal time point for targeting of EA. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  6. Effect of sodium nitrite on ischaemia and reperfusion-induced arrhythmias in anaesthetized dogs: is protein S-nitrosylation involved?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mária Kovács

    Full Text Available To provide evidence for the protective role of inorganic nitrite against acute ischaemia and reperfusion-induced ventricular arrhythmias in a large animal model.Dogs, anaesthetized with chloralose and urethane, were administered intravenously with sodium nitrite (0.2 µmol kg(-1 min(-1 in two protocols. In protocol 1 nitrite was infused 10 min prior to and during a 25 min occlusion of the left anterior descending (LAD coronary artery (NaNO2-PO; n = 14, whereas in protocol 2 the infusion was started 10 min prior to reperfusion of the occluded vessel (NaNO2-PR; n = 12. Control dogs (n = 15 were infused with saline and subjected to the same period of ischaemia and reperfusion. Severities of ischaemia and ventricular arrhythmias, as well as changes in plasma nitrate/nitrite (NOx levels in the coronary sinus blood, were assessed throughout the experiment. Myocardial superoxide and nitrotyrosine (NT levels were determined during reperfusion. Changes in protein S-nitrosylation (SNO and S-glutathionylation were also examined.Compared with controls, sodium nitrite administered either pre-occlusion or pre-reperfusion markedly suppressed the number and severity of ventricular arrhythmias during occlusion and increased survival (0% vs. 50 and 92% upon reperfusion. There were also significant decreases in superoxide and NT levels in the nitrite treated dogs. Compared with controls, increased SNO was found only in NaNO2-PR dogs, whereas S-glutathionylation occurred primarily in NaNO2-PO dogs.Intravenous infusion of nitrite profoundly reduced the severity of ventricular arrhythmias resulting from acute ischaemia and reperfusion in anaesthetized dogs. This effect, among several others, may result from an NO-mediated reduction in oxidative stress, perhaps through protein SNO and/or S-glutathionylation.

  7. Flow motion waves with high and low frequency in severe ischaemia before and after percutaneous transluminal angioplasty

    OpenAIRE

    Hoffmann, Ulrich; Schneider, Ernst; Bollinger, Alfred

    2017-01-01

    Study of objective - The aim was to evaluate skin flux and prevalence of low and high frequency flow motion waves in patients with severe ischaemia due to peripheral arterial occlusive disease before and after percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) with and without local thrombolysis. Design - Flow motion was recorded by the laser Doppler technique at the dorsum of the foot before, one day, and one month after PTA. The results were separately analysed in patients with successful and unsu...

  8. Sensitivity of different types of fibres in rabbit skeletal muscle to pneumatic compression by tourniquet and to ischaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fridén, J; Pedowitz, R A; Thornell, L E

    1994-06-01

    Morphometric properties (distribution of types of fibre and fibre areas) in the non-necrotic regions of four different rabbit muscles (superficial portions of semimembranosus, biceps femoris, tibialis anterior, and soleus muscles) were measured 48 hours after a tourniquet had been applied around the thigh for two hours at either 125 or 350 mmHg. There was an considerable increase of the relative numbers of both large and small fibres as well as changes in the proportions of the types of fibre. The most dramatic percentage change in type of fibre was in the semimembranosus when compressed at 350 mmHg, which showed an increase of the relative frequency of fibres with type 2AB staining characteristics from 10.2% to 18.0% (p < 0.001). Extreme changes in fibre area were found exclusively in semimembranosus and biceps femoris. Most fibres of abnormal size were of type 2, type 2B fibre areas being the most affected. This study shows that morphometry is a valuable tool in the assessment of the more subtle indications of injury. Compression and ischaemia together have a more dramatic effect on muscle morphology and morphometric properties in the non-necrotic regions than ischaemia alone. These data also show that muscles are differentially sensitive to compression and ischaemia. This information may be useful into the understanding of more complex functional deficits observed after the use of tourniquet.

  9. Myocardial Ischaemia, Coronary Atherosclerosis and Pulmonary Pressure Elevation in Antiphospholipid Syndrome Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padjas, Agnieszka; Płazak, Wojciech; Celińska-Lowenhoff, Magdalena; Mazurek, Adam; Perricone, Carlo; Podolec, Piotr; Musiał, Jacek

    2016-01-01

    Thrombotic events in antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) involve venous and arterial circulation with the possible involvement of coronary or pulmonary microcirculation. To evaluate the influence of antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) and on myocardial ischaemia assessed by single-photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT), coronary atherosclerosis assessed by multidetector computerized tomography (MDCT) and pulmonary pressure assessed by transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) in patients with primary antiphospholipid syndrome (PAPS). TTE, SPECT (Tc 99m sestamibi) and MDCT-based coronary calcium scoring were performed in 26 consecutive PAPS patients (20 females, 6 males, aged 20-61, mean 39.7) without any signs of other autoimmunological disease and without clinical symptoms of heart disease. Out of 26 patients, TEE showed normal left and right ventricle function in 25 (96.2%) and elevated (≥ 30 mm Hg) right ventricle systolic pressure in 7 (26.9%) patients. SPECT revealed myocardial perfusion defects in 15 (57.7%) patients: exercise-induced in 6 (23.1%) and persistent in 11 (42.3%). MDCT revealed coronary calcifications in 4 (15.4%) patients. The number of plaques ranged from 1 to 11 (median 2), volume 3-201.7 mm³ (median 7), calcium scores 1.3-202.6 (median 5.7). In the group with perfusion defects or coronary calcifications (n = 15), all the patients showed elevated aCL IgG. In most of the relatively young APS patients, without any symptoms of ischemic heart disease, SPECT showed myocardial perfusion defects, and coronary calcifications in 1/6 of them. Right ventricle systolic pressure was elevated in 1/4 of APS patients. These pathologies, well known as cardiovascular risk markers, were associated with elevated levels of the IgG class of both anti-cardiolipin and antiB2 GPI antibodies. Thus, in a high percentage of APS patients, clinically silent myocardial ischaemia, pulmonary pressure elevation and coronary atherosclerosis are present and related to the

  10. Reconstructing warm inflation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Ramón

    2018-03-01

    The reconstruction of a warm inflationary universe model from the scalar spectral index n_S(N) and the tensor to scalar ratio r( N) as a function of the number of e-folds N is studied. Under a general formalism we find the effective potential and the dissipative coefficient in terms of the cosmological parameters n_S and r considering the weak and strong dissipative stages under the slow roll approximation. As a specific example, we study the attractors for the index n_S given by nS-1∝ N^{-1} and for the ratio r∝ N^{-2}, in order to reconstruct the model of warm inflation. Here, expressions for the effective potential V(φ ) and the dissipation coefficient Γ (φ ) are obtained.

  11. Thinking About Global Warming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baron, J.

    2006-01-01

    Attitudes toward global warming are influenced by various heuristics, which may distort policy away from what is optimal for the well-being of people. These possible distortions, or biases, include: a focus on harms that we cause, as opposed to those that we can remedy more easily; a feeling that those who cause a problem should fix it; a desire to undo a problem rather than compensate for its presence; parochial concern with one's own group (nation); and neglect of risks that are not available. Although most of these biases tend to make us attend relatively too much to global warming, other biases, such as wishful thinking, cause us to attend too little. I discuss these possible effects and illustrate some of them with an experiment conducted on the World Wide Web

  12. Climate change - global warming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciconkov, Risto

    2001-01-01

    An explanation about climate, weather, climate changes. What is a greenhouse effect, i.e. global warming and reasons which contribute to this effect. Greenhouse gases (GHG) and GWP (Global Warming Potential) as a factor for estimating their influence on the greenhouse effect. Indicators of the climate changes in the previous period by known international institutions, higher concentrations of global average temperature. Projecting of likely scenarios for the future climate changes and consequences of them on the environment and human activities: industry, energy, agriculture, water resources. The main points of the Kyoto Protocol and problems in its realization. The need of preparing a country strategy concerning the acts of the Kyoto Protocol, suggestions which could contribute in the preparation of the strategy. A special attention is pointed to the energy, its resources, the structure of energy consumption and the energy efficiency. (Author)

  13. Slowing global warming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flavin, C.

    1990-01-01

    According to the authors, global warming promises to be one of the central environmental issues of the nineties. After a decade of scientific concern but popular neglect, the eighties ended with a growing political as well as scientific consensus that the world can no longer afford to procrastinate about this issue. This paper reports on coping with global warming which, according to the author, will force societies to move rapidly into uncharted terrain, reversing powerful trends that have dominated the industrial age. This challenge cannot be met without a strong commitment on the part of both individual consumers and governments. In terms of the earth's carbon balance, the unprecedented policy changes that have now become urgent include a new commitment to greater energy efficiency and renewable energy sources, a carbon tax on fossil fuels, a reversal of deforestation in tropical countries, and the rapid elimination of CFCs

  14. Military Implications of Global Warming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-05-20

    U.S. environmental issues also have important global implications. This paper analyzes current U.S. Policy as it pertains to global warming and climate...for military involvement to reduce global warming . Global warming and other environmental issues are important to the U.S. military. As the United

  15. EFFECTS OF GLOBAL WARMING

    OpenAIRE

    Dr. Basanti Jain

    2017-01-01

    The abnormal increase in the concentration of the greenhouse gases is resulting in higher temperatures. We call this effect is global warming. The average temperature around the world has increased about 1'c over 140 years, 75% of this has risen just over the past 30 years. The solar radiation, as it reaches the earth, produces "greenhouse effect" in the atmosphere. The thick atmospheric layers over the earth behaves as a glass surface, as it permits short wave radiations from coming in, but ...

  16. Global warming from an energy perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, A.G.

    1991-01-01

    Global climate change and energy are integrally related. The majority of greenhouse gas emissions are the result of energy production and use; at the same time, warming will affect energy patterns in California through physical increases in energy demand, physical changes in energy supply, and changes in both energy end-use patterns and supplies resulting from climate-change policies. There seems to be a growing political consensus that the world (as well as the state) needs to act soon to minimize further commitment to future warming. While California is not likely to experience the physical changes resulting from a warmer climate for years or perhaps decades, policy responses to the warming issue may cause more immediate impacts. This chapter will discuss how policy response to potential warming may be the most significant early impact of the issue on California's energy system. Makers of energy policy face the dilemma of deciding how to respond to the climate warming issue in the face of scientific uncertainties about its timing and seriousness. The chapter will conclude by presenting a conceptual framework for dealing with this dilemma, along with general recommendations for action

  17. Intestinal Ischaemia Associated with Carcinoid Tumor: A Case Report with Review of the Pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oktay Yener

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Carcinoid tumors are rare, slow-growing neuroendocrine neoplasms that are often indolent and may not become clinically apparent until there is a metastatic spread or evidence of carcinoid syndrome.  A 44-year-old man presented to our clinic department with a history of previous left colon cancer operation, chronic crampy left lower quadrant pain, mass and severe anemia.  A MR scan was obtained which demonstrated a calcified mesenteric mass 12×8×10 cm diameter with surrounding left colon mesenteric infiltration. The liver was normal. A case of ischaemic ileal necrosis is reported. It was associated with elastic vascular sclerosis produced by mesenteric metastases of an ileal carcinoid tumor. It is postulated that intestinal ischaemia may be of more importance in the production of abdominal pain by carcinoid tumors than has been generally accepted, and that it is the result of functional and structural changes in and around the mesenteric blood vessels, caused by substances secreted by the carcinoid tumor.

  18. MRI in acute cerebral ischaemia: perfusion imaging with superparamagnetic iron oxide in a rat model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsting, M.; Reith, W.; Doerfler, A.; Kummer, R. von; Hacke, W.; Sartor, K.

    1994-01-01

    An imaging technique capable of detecting ischaemic cerebral injury at an early stage could improve diagnosis in acute or transient cerebral ischaemia. We compared the ability of superparamagnetically contrast-enhanced MRI and conventional T2-weighted MRI to detect ischaemic injury early after unilateral occlusion of the middle cerebral artery in 12 male Wistar rats. Permanent vessel occlusion was achieved by a transvascular approach, which has the advantage of not requiring a craniectom. At 45-60 min after the procedure, the animals had conventional T2-weighted MRI before and after administration of a superparamagnetic contrast agent (iron oxide particles). Unenhanced images were normal in all animals. After administration of iron oxide particles, the presumed ischaemic area was clearly visible, as relatively increased signal, in all animals; this high signal area corresponded to the area of ischaemic brain infarction seen on histological studies. Our results suggest that superparamagnetic iron particles may significantly reduce the interval between an ischaemic insult and the appearance of parenchymal changes on MRI. (orig./UWA)

  19. VAC therapy to promote wound healing after surgical revascularisation for critical lower limb ischaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Caridi, Giovanni; Massara, Mafalda; Greco, Michele; Pipitò, Narayana; Spinelli, Francesco; Grande, Raffaele; Butrico, Lucia; de Franciscis, Stefano; Serra, Raffaele

    2016-06-01

    Vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) therapy is a new emerging non-invasive system in wound care, which speeds up wound healing by causing vacuum, improving tissue perfusion and suctioning the exudates, and facilitating the removal of bacteria from the wound. The application of sub-atmospheric pressure on the lesions seems to alter the cytoskeleton of the cells on the wound bed, triggering a cascade of intracellular signals that increase the rate of cell division and subsequent formation of granulation tissue. The aim of this study is to analyse the results of VAC therapy used as an adjuvant therapy for the treatment of foot wounds in patients affected by critical limb ischaemia (CLI) (Rutherford 6 class) after distal surgical revascularisation, to promote and accelerate the healing of ulcers. Twenty-nine patients (20 males, 9 females; mean age 68·4) affected by CLI of Rutherford 6 class, after surgical revascularisation of the lower limb, underwent VAC therapy in order to speed up wound healing. Complete wound healing was achieved in 19 patients (65·51%), in an average period of 45·4 ± 25·6 days. VAC therapy is a valid aid, after surgical revascularisation, to achieve rapid healing of foot lesions in patients with CLI. © 2014 The Authors. International Wound Journal © 2014 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Modelling Blood Flow and Metabolism in the Preclinical Neonatal Brain during and Following Hypoxic-Ischaemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Caldwell

    Full Text Available Hypoxia-ischaemia (HI is a major cause of neonatal brain injury, often leading to long-term damage or death. In order to improve understanding and test new treatments, piglets are used as preclinical models for human neonates. We have extended an earlier computational model of piglet cerebral physiology for application to multimodal experimental data recorded during episodes of induced HI. The data include monitoring with near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS, and the model simulates the circulatory and metabolic processes that give rise to the measured signals. Model extensions include simulation of the carotid arterial occlusion used to induce HI, inclusion of cytoplasmic pH, and loss of metabolic function due to cell death. Model behaviour is compared to data from two piglets, one of which recovered following HI while the other did not. Behaviourally-important model parameters are identified via sensitivity analysis, and these are optimised to simulate the experimental data. For the non-recovering piglet, we investigate several state changes that might explain why some MRS and NIRS signals do not return to their baseline values following the HI insult. We discover that the model can explain this failure better when we include, among other factors such as mitochondrial uncoupling and poor cerebral blood flow restoration, the death of around 40% of the brain tissue.

  1. EFFECTIVENESS OF PROSTAGLANDIN E1 IN THE PAIN MANAGEMENT OF PATIENTS WITH CRITICAL LIMB ISCHAEMIA- A PROSPECTIVE OBSERVATIONAL STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Sajan Kurien

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Critical Limb Ischaemia (CLI was defined for the first time in 1982 by P. R. F. Bell as a manifestation of peripheral artery disease, which describes patient with typical chronic ischaemic rest pain or ischaemic skin ulcers or gangrene.1 This term of CLI should only be used in patients with chronic ischaemic disease defined as presence of recurring rest pain that persists for more than two weeks requiring regular analgesics and with ulceration or gangrene of the foot or toes. These criteria correspond to stage 3 and 4 of Fontaine’s classification of POVD. Observational studies have shown that one year after diagnosis of CLI, 25% of patients experience a major amputation, 25% had died and only 50% survived without requiring a major amputation, though some have rest pain, ulcer or gangrene persisting. The primary goals in treating CLI are to relieve claudication pain and rest pain, to heal the ulcer, to prevent amputation of limbs, to improve quality of life and to prolong survival. The aim of the study is to study the improvement of claudication pain, rest pain and improvement of the level of amputation in patients with diffuse peripheral arterial disease (CLI after administration of PGE1. MATERIALS AND METHODS From June 2013 to November 2014, a total of 45 patients having advanced CLI (Fontaine’s grade III and IV not suitable for angioplasty and stenting or bypass procedures received different courses of PGE1. 20 patients (44.44% received 6 full courses of PGE1,3 patients (6.66% received 5 courses, 5 patients (11.11% received 4 courses, 4 patients (8.8% received 3 courses, 4 patients (8.8% received 2 courses and 9 patients (20% received one course. PGE1 was administered through intravenous infusion (alprostadil 100mcg over 10 hours a day for 5 days in one month (1course. The reduction in claudication and rest pain, improvement in level of amputation and complications were assessed. RESULTS In all cases, there was reduction in pain

  2. Radioiodinated diacylglycerol analogue: a potential imaging agent for single-photon emission tomographic investigations of cerebral ischaemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohmori, Y.; Imahori, Y.; Ueda, S.; Fujii, R.; Wakita, K.; Inoue, M.; Tazawa, S.

    1996-01-01

    Phospholipid metabolism is closely related to membrane perturbation in cerebral ischaemia. We investigated in vivo topographical lipid metabolism using an iodine-123-labelled diacylglycerol analogue, (1-(15-(4-iodine-123-iodophenyl)-pentadecanoyl)-2-stearoyl-rac-glycerol) ( 123 I-labelled DAG), in a middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusion model with the aim of positive imaging of ischaemic insult. Sprague-Dawley rats underwent coagulation of the MCA to induce permanent occlusion. MCA occlusion times prior to injection of 123 I-labelled DAG ranged from 15 min to 14 days. Each rat was injected with 11-37 MBq of 123 I-labelled DAG via a tail vein. After 30 min, in vivo autoradiographs were reconstructed. Scanning of the living rat brain in this MCA occlusion model was performed using a gamma camera with a pinhole collimator. Cerebral infarctions were recognized in the frontal cortex, the parietal cortex and the lateral portion of the caudate-putamen by 2, 3, 5-triphenyltetrazolium hydrochloride staining. In infarcted regions (region 1), 123 I-labelled DAG incorporation showed a slight decrease up to 12 h; it then increased up to 6 days and decreased thereafter. In peri-infarcted regions (region 2), the incorporation showed almost no change up to 12 h, then increased up to 5-6 days and decreased thereafter. In other regions (region 3), the incorporation showed no change. Lipid analysis showed that 123 I-labelled DAG was metabolized to 15-(4-iodine-123-iodophenyl)-pentadecanoic acid by DAG lipase and to 123 I-labelled phosphatidylcholine. Scanning of the ischaemic region showed higher accumulation than on the non-lesioned side. We established a method to visualize ischaemic foci as positive images. The early changes in 123 I-labelled DAG incorporation were closely related to DAG lipase, which degraded the accumulated intrinsic DAG, and increased 123 I-labelled DAG incorporation in the chronic stage involves several aspects of neural destruction in the process of

  3. Ocean acidification ameliorates harmful effects of warming in primary consumer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Sindre Andre; Hanssen, Anja Elise

    2018-01-01

    Climate change-induced warming and ocean acidification are considered two imminent threats to marine biodiversity and current ecosystem structures. Here, we have for the first time examined an animal's response to a complete life cycle of exposure to co-occurring warming (+3°C) and ocean acidification (+1,600 μatm CO 2 ), using the key subarctic planktonic copepod, Calanus finmarchicus , as a model species. The animals were generally negatively affected by warming, which significantly reduced the females' energy status and reproductive parameters (respectively, 95% and 69%-87% vs. control). Unexpectedly, simultaneous acidification partially offset the negative effect of warming in an antagonistic manner, significantly improving reproductive parameters and hatching success (233%-340% improvement vs. single warming exposure). The results provide proof of concept that ocean acidification may partially offset negative effects caused by warming in some species. Possible explanations and ecological implications for the observed antagonistic effect are discussed.

  4. Warm liquid calorimetry for LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Geulig,E; Wallraff,W; Bézaguet, Alain-Arthur; Cavanna, F; Cinnini, P; Cittolin, Sergio; Dreesen, P; Demoulin, M; Dunps, L; Fucci, A; Gallay, G; Givernaud, Alain; Gonidec, A; Jank, Werner; Maurin, Guy; Placci, Alfredo; Porte, J P; Radermacher, E; Samyn, D; Schinzel, D; Schmidt, W F; CERN. Geneva. Detector Research and Development Committee

    1990-01-01

    Results from the beam tests of the U/TMP "warm liquid" calorimeter show that such a technique is very promising for the LHC. Our aim is to extend this programme and design a calorimeter that can satisfy the requirements of high rates, high radiation levels, compensation, uniformity and granularity, as well as fully contain hadronic showers. We propose to construct liquid ionization chambers operated at very high fields, capable of collecting the total charge produced by ionizing particles within times comparable to the bunch crossing time of the future Collider. For this reason we plan to extend the current programme on tetramethylpentane (TMP) to tetramethylsilane (TMSi). An electromagnetic calorimeter consisting of very high field ionization chambers filled with TMSi as sensitive medium with Uranium and/or other high density material as absorber will first be built (to be followed by a full-scale calorimeter module), on which newly designed fast amplifiers and readout electronics will be tested. In addition...

  5. Global warming without global mean precipitation increase?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salzmann, Marc

    2016-06-01

    Global climate models simulate a robust increase of global mean precipitation of about 1.5 to 2% per kelvin surface warming in response to greenhouse gas (GHG) forcing. Here, it is shown that the sensitivity to aerosol cooling is robust as well, albeit roughly twice as large. This larger sensitivity is consistent with energy budget arguments. At the same time, it is still considerably lower than the 6.5 to 7% K(-1) decrease of the water vapor concentration with cooling from anthropogenic aerosol because the water vapor radiative feedback lowers the hydrological sensitivity to anthropogenic forcings. When GHG and aerosol forcings are combined, the climate models with a realistic 20th century warming indicate that the global mean precipitation increase due to GHG warming has, until recently, been completely masked by aerosol drying. This explains the apparent lack of sensitivity of the global mean precipitation to the net global warming recently found in observations. As the importance of GHG warming increases in the future, a clear signal will emerge.

  6. Is the enhancement of global warming important?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Symons, M.C.R.; Barrett, J.

    2001-01-01

    There is no doubt that global warming is important; without it the Earth's surface would have a mean temperature of 33 o C lower than it has currently. The IPCC maintains that human activities are to blame for the observed increase in the concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere since pre-industrial times. There are some doubts about whether global warming is being enhanced by the activities of the human race. This article reviews these doubts and the proposed remedies to the alleged enhancement. (author)

  7. Global warning, global warming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benarde, M.A.

    1992-01-01

    This book provides insights into the formidable array of issues which, in a warmer world, could impinge upon every facet of readers lives. It examines climatic change and long-term implications of global warming for the ecosystem. Topics include the ozone layer and how it works; the greenhouse effect; the dangers of imbalance and its effects on human and animal life; disruptions to the basic ecology of the planet; and the real scientific evidence for and against aberrant climatic shifts. The author also examines workable social and political programs and changes that must be instituted to avoid ecological disaster

  8. Global Warming: A Reduced Threat?.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaels, Patrick J.; Stooksbury, David E.

    1992-10-01

    One popular and apocalyptic vision of the world influenced by increasing concentrations of infrared-absorbing trace gases is that of ecological disaster brought about by rapidly rising temperatures, sea level, and evaporation rates. This vision developed from a suite of climate models that have since considerably changed in both their dynamics and their estimates of prospective warming. Observed temperatures indicate that much more warming should already have taken place than predicted by earlier models in the Northern Hemisphere, and that night, rather than day, readings in that hemisphere show a relative warming. A high-latitude polar-night warming or a general night warming could be either benign or beneficial. A large number of plant species show both increased growth and greater water-use efficiency under enhanced carbon dioxide.An extensive body of evidence now indicates that anthropo-generated sulfate emissions are mitigating some of the warming, and that increased cloudiness as a result of these emissions will further enhance night, rather than day, warming. The sulfate emissions, though, are not sufficient to explain all of the night warming. However, the sensitivity of climate to anthropogenerated aerosols, and the general lack of previously predicted warming, could drastically alter the debate on global warming in favor of less expensive policies.

  9. Antarctica: Cooling or Warming?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunde, Armin; Ludescher, Josef; Franzke, Christian

    2013-04-01

    We consider the 14 longest instrumental monthly mean temperature records from the Antarctica and analyse their correlation properties by wavelet and detrended fluctuation analysis. We show that the stations in the western and the eastern part of the Antarctica show significant long-term memory governed by Hurst exponents close to 0.8 and 0.65, respectively. In contrast, the temperature records at the inner part of the continent (South Pole and Vostok), resemble white noise. We use linear regression to estimate the respective temperature differences in the records per decade (i) for the annual data, (ii) for the summer and (iii) for the winter season. Using a recent approach by Lennartz and Bunde [1] we estimate the respective probabilities that these temperature differences can be exceeded naturally without inferring an external (anthropogenic) trend. We find that the warming in the western part of the continent and the cooling at the South Pole is due to a gradually changes in the cold extremes. For the winter months, both cooling and warming are well outside the 95 percent confidence interval, pointing to an anthropogenic origin. In the eastern Antarctica, the temperature increases and decreases are modest and well within the 95 percent confidence interval. [1] S. Lennartz and A. Bunde, Phys. Rev. E 84, 021129 (2011)

  10. Lumbar sympathectomy under CT guidance: therapeutic option in critical limb ischaemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pieri, Stefano; Agresti, Paolo; Di Cesare, Fabio; Ricci, Guiseppe

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Lumbar sympathectomy is a complementary therapeutic option for patients with severe peripheral vascular occlusive disease presenting rest pain or gangrene and not eligible for surgical revascularisation. Traditional surgical sympathectomy was widely used in the past. However, due to its invasive character, it has increasingly been replaced by percutaneous techniques and, in some recent cases, by laparoscopic procedures. Percutaneous lumbar sympathectomy is a safe, cost-effective and widely available treatment option. We report our experience on 19 patients subjected to percutaneous sympathectomy under CT guidance. Materials and methods: Between 1998 and 2000, 19 patients underwent percutaneous sympathectomy under CT guidance. All patients had severe vascular disease of the lower extremities (Fontaine stage IV), with rest pain and gangrene. They were not eligible for surgical revascularization. Phenol was injected at the level of L2 and L4 using two 22 G needles (15 cm long). Signs of interrupted sympathetic activity usually occur 2'-15' after the procedure with warmth and flushing and dryness of the lower extremities. Results: Percutaneous sympathectomy under CT guidance is a simple, safe and well-tolerated procedure with a low rate of complications. Of the 19 patients, 9 (47.3%) showed clinical improvement, whereas 5 experienced a worsening of ischaemia in the month immediately following the procedure. Discussion: Results suggest that percutaneous lumbar sympathectomy causes a sympathetic blockade in patients with advanced vascular disease of the limb. CT guidance ensures a high level of precision in drug dosing, thus lowering the risk of complications. Although the results are demoralizing. the impossibility of achieving surgical revascularisation in advanced peripheral arteriosclerosis enhances the role of Ct-guided percutaneous sympathectomy in relieving rest pain and healing ulcers in order to postpone the amputation [it

  11. Neuroprotective effects of andrographolide in a rat model of permanent cerebral ischaemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Su Jing; Wong, WS Fred; Wong, Peter TH; Bian, Jin-Song

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Andrographolide is a diterpenoid lactone isolated from a traditional medicinal herb, Andrographis paniculata. It possesses potent anti-inflammatory activity. The present study examined potential therapeutic effects of andrographolide on cerebral ischaemia using a rat model with permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (pMCAO). EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH The MCA in rats was permanently occluded (by cautery), and 24 h later neurological effects were assessed with behavioural scores. Infarct volume and microglial activation were determined histologically. The p65 form of the transcription factor, nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), was measured by Western blot, and cytokines by immunoassay of brain extracts. KEY RESULTS Andrographolide, given i.p. 1 h after pMCAO, reduced infarct volume with a maximum reduction of approximately 50% obtained at 0.1 mg·kg−1. Neurological deficits were also reduced by andrographolide, reflecting a correlation between infarct volume and neurological deficits. pMCAO was found to induce activation of microglia and elevate tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β and prostaglandin (PG)E2 in the ischaemic brain areas. Andrographolide (0.1 mg·kg−1) significantly attenuated or abolished these effects. In addition, andrographolide suppressed the translocation of p65 from cytosol to nucleus, indicating reduced NF-κB activation. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Andrographolide exhibited neuroprotective effects, with accompanying suppression of NF-κB and microglial activation, and reduction in the production of cytokines including TNF-α and IL-1β, and pro-inflammatory factors such as PGE2. Our findings suggest that andrographolide may have therapeutic value in the treatment of stroke. PMID:20880404

  12. Influence of Androgen Receptor in Vascular Cells on Reperfusion following Hindlimb Ischaemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junxi Wu

    Full Text Available Studies in global androgen receptor knockout (G-ARKO and orchidectomised mice suggest that androgen accelerates reperfusion of the ischaemic hindlimb by stimulating angiogenesis. This investigation used novel, vascular cell-specific ARKO mice to address the hypothesis that the impaired hindlimb reperfusion in G-ARKO mice was due to loss of AR from cells in the vascular wall.Mice with selective deletion of AR (ARKO from vascular smooth muscle cells (SM-ARKO, endothelial cells (VE-ARKO, or both (SM/VE-ARKO were compared with wild type (WT controls. Hindlimb ischaemia was induced in these mice by ligation and removal of the femoral artery. Post-operative reperfusion was reduced in SM-ARKO and SM/VE-ARKO mice. Immunohistochemistry indicated that this was accompanied by a reduced density of smooth muscle actin-positive vessels but no change in the density of isolectin B4-positive vessels in the gastrocnemius muscle. Deletion of AR from the endothelium (VE-ARKO did not alter post-operative reperfusion or vessel density. In an ex vivo (aortic ring culture model of angiogenesis, AR was not detected in vascular outgrowths and angiogenesis was not altered by vascular ARKO or by exposure to dihydrotestosterone (DHT 10-10-10-7M; 6 days.These results suggest that loss of AR from vascular smooth muscle, but not from the endothelium, contributes to impaired reperfusion in the ischaemic hindlimb of G-ARKO. Impaired reperfusion was associated with reduced collateral formation rather than reduced angiogenesis.

  13. Aspirin plus dipyridamole versus aspirin alone after cerebral ischaemia of arterial origin (ESPRIT): randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halkes, P H A; van Gijn, J; Kappelle, L J; Koudstaal, P J; Algra, A

    2006-05-20

    Results of trials of aspirin and dipyridamole combined versus aspirin alone for the secondary prevention of vascular events after ischaemic stroke of presumed arterial origin are inconsistent. Our aim was to resolve this uncertainty. We did a randomised controlled trial in which we assigned patients to aspirin (30-325 mg daily) with (n=1363) or without (n=1376) dipyridamole (200 mg twice daily) within 6 months of a transient ischaemic attack or minor stroke of presumed arterial origin. Our primary outcome event was the composite of death from all vascular causes, non-fatal stroke, non-fatal myocardial infarction, or major bleeding complication, whichever happened first. Treatment was open, but auditing of outcome events was blinded. Primary analysis was by intention to treat. This study is registered as an International Standard Randomised Controlled Trial (number ISRCTN73824458) and with (NCT00161070). Mean follow-up was 3.5 years (SD 2.0). Median aspirin dose was 75 mg in both treatment groups (range 30-325); extended-release dipyridamole was used by 83% (n=1131) of patients on the combination regimen. Primary outcome events arose in 173 (13%) patients on aspirin and dipyridamole and in 216 (16%) on aspirin alone (hazard ratio 0.80, 95% CI 0.66-0.98; absolute risk reduction 1.0% per year, 95% CI 0.1-1.8). Addition of the ESPRIT data to the meta-analysis of previous trials resulted in an overall risk ratio for the composite of vascular death, stroke, or myocardial infarction of 0.82 (95% CI 0.74-0.91). Patients on aspirin and dipyridamole discontinued trial medication more often than those on aspirin alone (470 vs 184), mainly because of headache. The ESPRIT results, combined with the results of previous trials, provide sufficient evidence to prefer the combination regimen of aspirin plus dipyridamole over aspirin alone as antithrombotic therapy after cerebral ischaemia of arterial origin.

  14. The cardioprotective efficacy of TVP1022 in a rat model of ischaemia/reperfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertracht, Offir; Liani, Esti; Bachner-Hinenzon, Noa; Bar-Am, Orit; Frolov, Luba; Ovcharenko, Elena; Awad, Huda; Blum, Shany; Barac, Yaron; Amit, Tamar; Adam, Dan; Youdim, Moussa; Binah, Ofer

    2011-06-01

    Because myocardial infarction is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, protecting the heart from the ischaemia and reperfusion (I/R) damage is the focus of intense research. Based on our in vitro findings showing that TVP1022 (the S-enantiomer of rasagiline, an anti-Parkinsonian drug) possesses cardioprotective effects, in the present study we investigated the hypothesis that TVP1022 can attenuate myocardial damage in an I/R model in rats. The model consisted of 30-min occlusion of the left anterior descending artery followed by 4 or 24 h reperfusion. In addition, we investigated the possible mechanisms of cardioprotection in H9c2 cells and neonatal rat ventricular myocytes (NRVM) exposed to oxidative stress induced by H(2) O(2) . TVP1022 (20 and 40 mg·kg(-1) ) administered 5 min before reperfusion followed by an additional dose 4 h after reperfusion reduced the infarct size and attenuated the decline in ventricular function. TVP1022 also attenuated I/R-induced deterioration in cardiac mitochondrial integrity evaluated by mitochondrial swelling capacity. In vitro, using H9c2 cells and NRVM, TVP1022 attenuated both serum free- and H(2) O(2) -induced damage, preserved mitochondrial membrane potential and Bcl-2 levels, inhibited mitochondrial cytochrome c release and the increase in cleaved caspase 9 and 3 levels, and enhanced the phosphorylation of protein kinase C and glycogen synthase kinase-3β. TVP1022 provided cardioprotection in a model of myocardial infarction, and therefore should be considered as a novel adjunctive therapy for attenuating myocardial damage resulting from I/R injuries. © 2011 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology © 2011 The British Pharmacological Society.

  15. Ischaemia-modified albumin: a marker of bacterial infection in hospitalized patients with cirrhosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannone, Ferdinando A; Domenicali, Marco; Baldassarre, Maurizio; Bartoletti, Michele; Naldi, Marina; Laggetta, Maristella; Bertucci, Carlo; Colecchia, Antonio; Viale, Pierluigi; Bernardi, Mauro; Caraceni, Paolo

    2015-11-01

    Patients with cirrhosis present structural changes of human serum albumin (HSA) affecting non-oncotic functions. Ischaemia-modified albumin (IMA), which reflects the capacity to bind cobalt, has been associated to patient mortality during acute-on-chronic liver failure. This study aimed to assess whether circulating IMA is elevated in advanced cirrhosis and its relationship with severity of cirrhosis and specific complications. A total of 127 cirrhotic patients hospitalized for an acute complication of the disease and 44 healthy controls were enrolled. Plasma IMA and IMA to albumin ratio (IMAr) were measured with a cobalt-binding assay. HSA isoforms carrying post-transcriptional molecular changes were assessed with HPLC-ESI-MS. The effect of endotoxemia on IMA was evaluated in rats with CCl4 -cirrhosis. IMA/IMAr is significantly higher in cirrhotic patients than in controls, but no correlations were found with prognostic scores. IMA did not correlate with the altered HSA isoforms. Ascites, renal impairment and hepatic encephalopathy did not influence IMA/IMAr levels. In contrast, IMA/IMAr is significantly higher in infected than non-infected patients. ROC curves showed that IMA/IMAr had similar discriminating performances for bacterial infection as C-reactive protein (CRP). Moreover, CRP and IMA were independently associated with bacterial infection. Consistently, endotoxin injection significantly increased IMA in cirrhotic, but not in healthy rats. IMA is elevated in patients with advanced cirrhosis. The IMA level does not correlate with disease severity scores, but it is specifically associated to bacterial infection, showing a discriminating performance similar to CRP. Further investigations to assess IMA as a novel diagnostic test for bacterial infection are advocated. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Comparison of the effects of isobutylmethylxanthine and milrinone on ischaemia-induced arrhythmias and platelet aggregation in anaesthetized rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holbrook, M.; Coker, S. J.

    1989-01-01

    1. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of the non-selective phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibitor, isobutylmethylxanthine (IBMX) and the selective PDE III inhibitor, milrinone, in a rabbit model of acute myocardial ischaemia. 2. Coronary artery occlusion caused changes in the ST-segment of the ECG and ectopic activity in all control rabbits. Ventricular fibrillation occurred in 10 out of 14 (71%) of these animals. Pretreatment with IBMX 100 micrograms kg-1 plus 10 micrograms kg-1 min-1, starting 10 min before coronary artery occlusion, reduced ischaemia-induced ST-segment changes and ventricular fibrillation occurred in only 10% of this group (n = 10). A similar dose of milrinone had no antiarrhythmic activity, whereas with a lower dose of milrinone, 30 micrograms kg-1 plus 3 micrograms kg-1 min-1 (n = 10), only 30% of rabbits fibrillated and ST-segment changes were attenuated. 3. Acute administration of both IBMX and milrinone reduced arterial blood pressure. With the higher dose of milrinone a significant effect was still present after 10 min of drug infusion. A greater hypotensive response to the higher dose of milrinone was observed in the rabbits which subsequently fibrillated during ischaemia. A marked tachycardia was also observed after administration of the higher dose of milrinone. 4. At the end of the experiment platelet aggregation was studied ex vivo. ADP-induced aggregation was reduced by pretreatment of the rabbits with milrinone but not IBMX. Both PDE inhibitors enhanced the ability of isoprenaline to inhibit ADP-induced platelet aggregation but milrinone was more effective, particularly at the higher dose.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2478245

  17. Flow motion waves with high and low frequency in severe ischaemia before and after percutaneous transluminal angioplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, U; Schneider, E; Bollinger, A

    1990-09-01

    STUDY OF OBJECTIVE: The aim was to evaluate skin flux and prevalence of low and high frequency flow motion waves in patients with severe ischaemia due to peripheral arterial occlusive disease before and after percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) with and without local thrombolysis. Flow motion was recorded by the laser Doppler technique at the dorsum of the foot before, one day, and one month after PTA. The results were separately analysed in patients with successful and unsuccessful treatment. 18 patients with rest pain or incipient gangrene were included. Mean pretreatment systolic ankle pressure was 55.8(SD 25.5) mm Hg, and mean transcutaneous PO2 at 43 degrees C was 5.2(9.4) mm Hg. Arteriography revealed relevant stenoses or occlusions of the femoropopliteal and calf arteries. Before treatment two patterns of flow motion with characteristic frequency ranges were observed at the foot dorsum and at a probe temperature of 32 degrees C: low frequency (LF) waves with a mean frequency of 2.2(0.5) cycles.min-1 and a mean amplitude of 0.73(0.42) arbitrary units (AU) and high frequency (HF) waves with a mean frequency of 22.6(4.2) cycles.min-1 and a mean amplitude of 0.39(0.33) AU. PTA was successful in 11 of the 18 patients. After successful treatment, prevalence of HF waves decreased from 10/11 to 4/11 cases (p less than 0.001), but remained nearly unchanged after failed procedure. Prevalence of LF waves before and after PTA did not differ significantly. Our data support the hypothesis that HF waves represent a reaction of skin microcirculation to severe ischaemia. With reference to animal studies it is proposed that HF waves originate from terminal arterioles. They may function as a compensatory mechanism of flow regulation involved in pathophysiology of ischaemia.

  18. [Management of coronary artery disease in diabetic patients with lower limb critical ischaemia: assessment of operational risk, drug therapy and indications for interventions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dedov, I I; Kalashnikov, V Iu; Terekhin, S A; Melkozerov, K V

    2012-01-01

    Despite obvious progress in management of diabetes mellitus, the DM-related complications rate remains inadmissibly high. Macroangiopathy is known to rank first amongst complications of diabetes mellitus, and coronary artery disease remains to be the major cause of death. Analysed herein are peculiarities of the clinical course in diabetic patients presenting with coronary artery disease and lower limb critical ischaemia, followed by discussing the issues concerning drug therapy, preoperative examination, and methods of diagnosis in this cohort of patients prior to vascular operations, assessment of the preoperative risk, indications for coronarography and myocardial revascularization. Also presented are the results of the main clinical trials dedicated to preoperative myocardial revascularization, including those in diabetic patients with limb critical ischaemia, and finally highlighting current importance of optimizing approaches to managing and working out algorithms of treatment policy for diabetic patients with a combination of coronary artery disease, diabetes mellitus, and critical limb ischaemia.

  19. Changes in the Winter-Time Storminess over the North Atlantic, Associated with the 1.5°C and 2°C Levels of Global Warming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barcikowska, M. J.; Weaver, S. J.; Feser, F.; Schenk, F.

    2017-12-01

    This study investigates the changes in extreme winter-time weather conditions over the NH midlatitudes. These conditions are to a large degree caused by extratropical storms, often associated with very intense and hazardous precipitation and wind. Although the skill of CMIP5 models in capturing these extremes is improved when compared to the previous generations, the spatial and temporal resolution of the models still remains a primary reason for the deficiencies. Therefore, many features of the storms projected for the future remain inconsistent. Here we are using the high-res horizontal (0.25° lat x lon) and temporal (3hr) output of the HAPPI experiment. This output facilitates not only an implicit extraction of storm tracks but also an analysis of the storm intensity, in terms of their maximum wind and rainfall, at subdaily time-scales. The analysis of simulated present climate shows an improved spatial pattern of large-scale circulation over North America and Europe, as compared to the CMIP5-generation models, and consequently a reduced zonal bias in storm tracks pattern. The information provided at subdaily time scale provides much more realistic representation of the magnitude of the extremes. These advances significantly contribute to our understanding of differential climate impacts between 1.5°C and 2°C levels of global warming. The spatial pattern of the north-eastward shift of storm tracks, derived from the recent CMIP5 future projections, is remarkably refined here. For example, increasing storminess expands towards Scandinavia, and not towards the north-central Europe. Derived spatial features of the storm intensity, e.g. increase in wind and precipitation on the west coasts of both the British Isles and Scandinavia underlines the relevancy of the results for the local communities and potential climate change adaptation initiatives.

  20. Structure of Warm Nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aaberg, S.; Uhrenholt, H.

    2009-01-01

    We study the structure of nuclei in the energy region between the ground state and the neutron separation energy, here called warm nuclei. The onset of chaos in the nucleus as excitation energy is increased is briefly reviewed. Chaos implies fluctuations of energies and wave functions qualitatively the same for all chaotic nuclei. On the other hand, large structure effects are seen, e.g. in the level-density function at same excitation energies. A microscopic model for the level density is reviewed and we discuss effects on structure of the total level-density function, parity enhancement, and the spin distribution function. Comparisons to data are performed at the neutron separation energy for all observed nuclei, and structure of the level-density function for a few measured cases. The role of structure effects in the level-density function for fission dynamics is exemplified.

  1. Interacting warm dark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruz, Norman; Palma, Guillermo; Zambrano, David; Avelino, Arturo

    2013-01-01

    We explore a cosmological model composed by a dark matter fluid interacting with a dark energy fluid. The interaction term has the non-linear λρ m α ρ e β form, where ρ m and ρ e are the energy densities of the dark matter and dark energy, respectively. The parameters α and β are in principle not constrained to take any particular values, and were estimated from observations. We perform an analytical study of the evolution equations, finding the fixed points and their stability properties in order to characterize suitable physical regions in the phase space of the dark matter and dark energy densities. The constants (λ,α,β) as well as w m and w e of the EoS of dark matter and dark energy respectively, were estimated using the cosmological observations of the type Ia supernovae and the Hubble expansion rate H(z) data sets. We find that the best estimated values for the free parameters of the model correspond to a warm dark matter interacting with a phantom dark energy component, with a well goodness-of-fit to data. However, using the Bayesian Information Criterion (BIC) we find that this model is overcame by a warm dark matter – phantom dark energy model without interaction, as well as by the ΛCDM model. We find also a large dispersion on the best estimated values of the (λ,α,β) parameters, so even if we are not able to set strong constraints on their values, given the goodness-of-fit to data of the model, we find that a large variety of theirs values are well compatible with the observational data used

  2. Local warming: daily temperature change influences belief in global warming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ye; Johnson, Eric J; Zaval, Lisa

    2011-04-01

    Although people are quite aware of global warming, their beliefs about it may be malleable; specifically, their beliefs may be constructed in response to questions about global warming. Beliefs may reflect irrelevant but salient information, such as the current day's temperature. This replacement of a more complex, less easily accessed judgment with a simple, more accessible one is known as attribute substitution. In three studies, we asked residents of the United States and Australia to report their opinions about global warming and whether the temperature on the day of the study was warmer or cooler than usual. Respondents who thought that day was warmer than usual believed more in and had greater concern about global warming than did respondents who thought that day was colder than usual. They also donated more money to a global-warming charity if they thought that day seemed warmer than usual. We used instrumental variable regression to rule out some alternative explanations.

  3. Mild episodes of tourniquet-induced forearm ischaemia-reperfusion injury results in leukocyte activation and changes in inflammatory and coagulation markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bastawrous Salah S

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Monocytes and neutrophils are examples of phagocytic leukocytes, with neutrophils being considered as the 'chief' phagocytic leukocyte. Both monocytes and neutrophils have been implicated to play a key role in the development of ischaemia-reperfusion injury, where they are intrinsically involved in leukocyte-endothelial cell interactions. In this pilot study we hypothesised that mild episodes of tourniquet induced forearm ischaemia-reperfusion injury results in leukocyte activation and changes in inflammatory and coagulation markers. Methods Ten healthy human volunteers were recruited after informed consent. None had any history of cardiovascular disease with each subject volunteer participating in the study for a 24 hour period. Six venous blood samples were collected from each subject volunteer at baseline, 10 minutes ischaemia, 5, 15, 30, 60 minutes and 24 hours reperfusion, by means of a cannula from the ante-cubital fossa. Monocyte and neutrophil leukocyte sub-populations were isolated by density gradient centrifugation techniques. Leukocyte trapping was investigated by measuring the concentration of leukocytes in venous blood leaving the arm. The cell surface expression of CD62L (L-selectin, CD11b and the intracellular production of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 were measured via flow cytometry. C-reactive protein (CRP was measured using a clinical chemistry analyser. Plasma concentrations of D-dimer and von Willebrand factor (vWF were measured using enzyme-linked fluorescent assays (ELFA. Results During ischaemia-reperfusion injury, there was a decrease in CD62L and an increase in CD11b cell surface expression for both monocytes and neutrophils, with changes in the measured parameters reaching statistical significance (p =2O2 production by leukocyte sub-populations, which was measured as a marker of leukocyte activation. Intracellular production of H2O2 in monocytes during ischaemia-reperfusion injury reached statistical

  4. The challenge of global warming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryner, G.C.

    1992-01-01

    The chapter outlines the science of global warming, the likely consequences of global warming and some of the major challenges in dealing with global climate change. Some of the major international organisations concerned with environmental issues are listed. International agreements might be used to limit emissions of greenhouse gases. 32 refs., 2 tabs

  5. Global warming and prairie wetlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poiani, K.A.; Johnson, W.C.

    1991-01-01

    In this article, the authors discuss current understanding and projections of global warming; review wetland vegetation dynamics to establish the strong relationship among climate, wetland hydrology, vegetation patterns and waterfowl habitat; discuss the potential effects of a greenhouse warming on these relationships; and illustrate the potential effects of climate change on wetland habitat by using a simulation model

  6. Warm Bodies: A Student Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schario, Tracy A.

    A participant in forensic tournament competition presents her perspective as well as overall student reaction to the function of "warm bodies," competitors who are entered in a tournament by the coach or tournament director only to meet qualifying requirements. Overall, participants in an informal survey believed that the warm body…

  7. Acupuncture elicits neuroprotective effect by inhibiting NAPDH oxidase-mediated reactive oxygen species production in cerebral ischaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Guang-Xia; Wang, Xue-Rui; Yan, Chao-Qun; He, Tian; Yang, Jing-Wen; Zeng, Xiang-Hong; Xu, Qian; Zhu, Wen; Du, Si-Qi; Liu, Cun-Zhi

    2015-12-10

    In the current study, we aimed to investigate whether NADPH oxidase, a major ROS-producing enzyme, was involved in the antioxidant effect of acupuncture on cognitive impairment after cerebral ischaemia. The cognitive function, infract size, neuron cell loss, level of superoxide anion and expression of NADPH oxidase subunit in hippocampus of two-vessel occlusion (2VO) rats were determined after 2-week acupuncture. Furthermore, the cognitive function and production of O2(-) were determined in the presence and absence of NADPH oxidase agonist (TBCA) and antagonist (Apocynin). The effect of acupuncture on cognitive function after cerebral ischaemia in gp91phox-KO mice was evaluated by Morris water maze. Acupuncture reduced infarct size, attenuated overproduction of O2(-), and reversed consequential cognitive impairment and neuron cell loss in 2VO rats. The elevations of gp91phox and p47phox after 2VO were significantly decreased after acupuncture treatment. However, no differences of gp91phox mRNA were found among any experimental groups. Furthermore, these beneficial effects were reversed by TBCA, whereas apocynin mimicked the effect of acupuncture by improving cognitive function and decreasing O2(-) generation. Acupuncture failed to improve the memory impairment in gp91phox KO mice. Full function of the NADPH oxidase enzyme plays an important role in neuroprotective effects against cognitive impairment via inhibition of NAPDH oxidase-mediated oxidative stress.

  8. The sensitivity of the symptom angina pectoris as a marker of transient myocardial ischaemia in chronic stable angina pectoris

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egstrup, K

    1987-01-01

    Therapeutic decisions in patients with angina pectoris are traditionally based on the history reported by the patient, since objective evidence of myocardial ischaemia during daily life is often not available. In this study, ambulatory ST segment monitoring was performed in 60 patients with a his......Therapeutic decisions in patients with angina pectoris are traditionally based on the history reported by the patient, since objective evidence of myocardial ischaemia during daily life is often not available. In this study, ambulatory ST segment monitoring was performed in 60 patients...... with a history of chronic stable angina pectoris, positive exercise test and/or positive coronary angiography, and a correlation was made between the episodes of chest pain and ST segment change. The patients were grouped according to the results of exercise testing and coronary arteriography, and one group...... was studied with and without antianginal medication. Overall, 195 episodes of angina were noted, only 94 of which (48%) were accompanied by ST segment depression. Pain and ST segment changes were best correlated in patients with a positive exercise test, positive angiography and who were not receiving...

  9. Angiopoietin-2 impairs collateral artery growth associated with the suppression of the infiltration of macrophages in mouse hindlimb ischaemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyong Tan

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Angiopoietin-2 (Ang-2, a ligand of the Tie-2 receptor, plays an important role in maintaining endothelial cells and in destabilizing blood vessels. Collateral artery growth (arteriogenesis is a key adaptive response to arterial occlusion. It is unknown whether the destabilization of blood vessels by Ang-2 can affect arteriogenesis and modulate mononuclear cell function. This study aimed to investigate the effects of Ang-2 on collateral artery growth. Methods Hindlimb ischaemia model was produced in C57BL/6 mice by femoral artery ligation. Blood flow perfusion was measured using a laser Doppler perfusion imager quantitative RT-PCR analysis was applied to identify the level of angiogenic factors. Results After the induction of hindlimb ischaemia, blood flow recovery was impaired in mice treated with recombinant Ang-2 protein; this was accompanied by a reduction of peri-collateral macrophage infiltration. In addition, quantitative RT-PCR analysis revealed that Ang-2 treatment decreased monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1, platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB mRNA levels in ischaemic adductor muscles. Ang-2 can lead to macrophage M1/M2 polarization shift inhibition in the ischaemic muscles. Furthermore, Ang-2 reduced the in vitro inflammatory response in macrophages and vascular cells involved in arteriogenesis. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that Ang-2 is essential for efficient arteriogenesis, which controls macrophage infiltration.

  10. Effect of black tea consumption on brachial artery flow-mediated dilation and ischaemia-reperfusion in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreuder, Tim H A; Eijsvogels, Thijs M H; Greyling, Arno; Draijer, Richard; Hopman, Maria T E; Thijssen, Dick H J

    2014-02-01

    Tea consumption is associated with reduced cardiovascular risk. Previous studies found that tea flavonoids work through direct effects on the vasculature, leading to dose-dependent improvements in endothelial function. Cardioprotective effects of regular tea consumption may relate to the prevention of endothelial ischaemia-reperfusion (IR) injury. Therefore, we examined the effect of black tea consumption on endothelial function and the ability of tea to prevent IR injury. In a randomized, crossover study, 20 healthy subjects underwent 7 days of tea consumption (3 cups per day) or abstinence from tea. We examined brachial artery (BA) endothelial function via flow-mediated dilation (FMD), using high resolution echo-Doppler, before and 90 min after tea or hot water consumption. Subsequently, we followed a 20-min ischaemia and 20-min reperfusion protocol of the BA after which we measured FMD to examine the potential of tea consumption to protect against IR injury. Tea consumption resulted in an immediate increase in FMD% (pre-consumption: 5.8 ± 2.5; post-consumption: 7.2 ± 3.2; p FMD (p FMD. However, the impact of the IR protocol on FMD was not influenced by tea consumption. Therefore, the cardioprotective association of tea ingestion relates to a direct effect of tea on the endothelium in humans in vivo.

  11. Global assessment of experimental climate warming on tundra vegetation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elmendorf, Sarah C.; Henry, Gregory H.R.; Hollister, Robert D.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the sensitivity of tundra vegetation to climate warming is critical to forecasting future biodiversity and vegetation feedbacks to climate. In situ warming experiments accelerate climate change on a small scale to forecast responses of local plant communities. Limitations...... of this approach include the apparent site-specificity of results and uncertainty about the power of short-term studies to anticipate longer term change. We address these issues with a synthesis of 61 experimental warming studies, of up to 20 years duration, in tundra sites worldwide. The response of plant groups...... to warming often differed with ambient summer temperature, soil moisture and experimental duration. Shrubs increased with warming only where ambient temperature was high, whereas graminoids increased primarily in the coldest study sites. Linear increases in effect size over time were frequently observed...

  12. Seagrass ecophysiological performance under ocean warming and acidification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repolho, Tiago; Duarte, Bernardo; Dionísio, Gisela; Paula, José Ricardo; Lopes, Ana R; Rosa, Inês C; Grilo, Tiago F; Caçador, Isabel; Calado, Ricardo; Rosa, Rui

    2017-02-01

    Seagrasses play an essential ecological role within coastal habitats and their worldwide population decline has been linked to different types of anthropogenic forces. We investigated, for the first time, the combined effects of future ocean warming and acidification on fundamental biological processes of Zostera noltii, including shoot density, leaf coloration, photophysiology (electron transport rate, ETR; maximum PSII quantum yield, F v /F m ) and photosynthetic pigments. Shoot density was severely affected under warming conditions, with a concomitant increase in the frequency of brownish colored leaves (seagrass die-off). Warming was responsible for a significant decrease in ETR and F v /F m (particularly under control pH conditions), while promoting the highest ETR variability (among experimental treatments). Warming also elicited a significant increase in pheophytin and carotenoid levels, alongside an increase in carotenoid/chlorophyll ratio and De-Epoxidation State (DES). Acidification significantly affected photosynthetic pigments content (antheraxanthin, β-carotene, violaxanthin and zeaxanthin), with a significant decrease being recorded under the warming scenario. No significant interaction between ocean acidification and warming was observed. Our findings suggest that future ocean warming will be a foremost determinant stressor influencing Z. noltii survival and physiological performance. Additionally, acidification conditions to occur in the future will be unable to counteract deleterious effects posed by ocean warming.

  13. Forests and global warming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curren, T.

    1991-04-01

    The importance of forests to Canada, both in economic and environmental terms, is indisputable. A warmer global climate may well have profound effects on the Canadian boreal forest, and at least some of the effects will not be beneficial. With the state of the current knowledge of climate processes and climate change it is not possible to predict the extent or rate of projected changes of anthropogenic origin. Given these uncertainties, the appropriate course of action for the Canadian forest sector is to develop policies and strategies which will make good sense under the current climatic regime, and which will also be appropriate for actions in a warmer climate scenario. The business as usual approach is not acceptable in the context of pollution control as it has become clear that anthropogenic emissions of greenhouse gases and other pollutants must be substantially reduced, both to prevent (or at least slow the rate of) possible global warming, and to reduce impacts on the biophysical environment and human health. Effective mitigative actions must be introduced on both a national and global scale. Forest management policies more effectively geared to the sustainability of forests are needed. The programs that are developed out of such policies must be cognizant of the real possibility that climate in the present boreal forest regions may change in the near future. 13 refs

  14. Impact of warm winters on microbial growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birgander, Johanna; Rousk, Johannes; Axel Olsson, Pål

    2014-05-01

    temperature relationships of the bacterial community from winter-warmed plots and plots with ambient soil temperatures were compared. No change in optimum temperature for growth could be detected, indicating that the microbial community has not been warm-adapted. This fits with what was seen also in the laboratory experiment where no changes in temperature response occurred when exposing bacteria to temperatures below 10 °C within two months. The increase in activity measured during winter should thereby be due to changes in environmental factors, which will be further investigated. One big difference between heated and control plots was that heated plots were snow free during the entire winter, while control plots were covered by a 10 cm snow cover. The plant community composition and flowering time also differed in the warmed and ambient plot.

  15. Warmed local anesthetic reduces pain of infiltration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fialkov, J A; McDougall, E P

    1996-01-01

    The effect of warming local anesthetic on the amount of pain experienced during local infiltration was tested by comparing equal volumes of 40 degrees C- and 21 degrees C-infiltrates in each of 26 subjects. Six subjects were patients undergoing excision of two benign asymptomatic nevi in separate locations, and 20 subjects were healthy adult volunteers who were injected in bilateral antebrachial sites. The warmed and room temperature solutions were randomized to each side, so that each subject received both temperature injections in random order. All subjects and the injector were blinded. The rate of injection was time-controlled (0.05 ml/sec). Following both injections, subjects were asked to rate the pain experienced at each site. In addition, the subject was asked if there was no difference, a slight difference, or a substantial difference between the two sites. A two-tailed paired t-test was used to analyze the mean difference in pain scores for all subjects. Paired analysis of the pain scores for each subject eliminated intersubject variance of pain tolerance. The mean difference in pain score between the room temperature and warmed solutions was +1.5 (p < 0.0001). Of the 21 subjects (81%) who found the warmed solution less painful, 11 (52%) found the difference to be significant, while 10 (48%) found the difference to be slight. Two subjects (8%) found no difference between the two, while 3 subjects (11%) found the colder solution slightly less painful. We conclude that warming local anesthetic to 40 degrees C prior to subcutaneous injection is a simple, inexpensive means of reducing the pain of local infiltration.

  16. Global warming: the complete briefing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houghton, J

    1994-01-01

    The science of global warming, its impacts, and what action might be taken, are described in this book, in a way which the intelligent non-scientist can understand. It also examines ethical and moral issues of concern about global warming, considering mankind as stewards of the earth. Chapter headings of the book are: global warming and climate change; the greenhouse effect; the greenhouse gases; climates of the past; modelling the climate; climate change and business-as-usual; the impacts of climate change; why should we be concerned ; weighing the uncertainty; action to slow and stabilize climate change; energy and transport for the future; and the global village.

  17. Both autologous bone marrow mononuclear cell and peripheral blood progenitor cell therapies similarly improve ischaemia in patients with diabetic foot in comparison with control treatment

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dubský, M.; Jirkovská, A.; Bém, R.; Fejfarová, V.; Pagacová, L.; Sixta, B.; Varga, M.; Langkramer, S.; Syková, Eva; Jude, E. B.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 29, č. 5 (2013), s. 369-376 ISSN 1520-7552 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP304/11/0653 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) GAUK 362311 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : stem cell therapy * diabetic foot * critical limb ischaemia Subject RIV: FP - Other Medical Disciplines Impact factor: 2.968, year: 2012

  18. Supra- and Sub-Baseline Phosphocreatine Recovery in Developing Brain after Transient Hypoxia-Ischaemia: Relation to Baseline Energetics, Insult Severity and Outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, Osuke; Iwata, Sachiko; Bainbridge, Alan; De Vita, Enrico; Matsuishi, Toyojiro; Cady, Ernest B.; Robertson, Nicola J.

    2008-01-01

    Following hypoxia-ischaemia (HI), an early biomarker of insult severity is desirable to target neuroprotective therapies to patients most likely to benefit; currently there are no biomarkers within the "latent phase" period before the establishment of secondary energy failure. Brief transient phosphocreatine (PCr) recovery overshoot (measured…

  19. Amplified Arctic warming by phytoplankton under greenhouse warming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jong-Yeon; Kug, Jong-Seong; Bader, Jürgen; Rolph, Rebecca; Kwon, Minho

    2015-05-12

    Phytoplankton have attracted increasing attention in climate science due to their impacts on climate systems. A new generation of climate models can now provide estimates of future climate change, considering the biological feedbacks through the development of the coupled physical-ecosystem model. Here we present the geophysical impact of phytoplankton, which is often overlooked in future climate projections. A suite of future warming experiments using a fully coupled ocean-atmosphere model that interacts with a marine ecosystem model reveals that the future phytoplankton change influenced by greenhouse warming can amplify Arctic surface warming considerably. The warming-induced sea ice melting and the corresponding increase in shortwave radiation penetrating into the ocean both result in a longer phytoplankton growing season in the Arctic. In turn, the increase in Arctic phytoplankton warms the ocean surface layer through direct biological heating, triggering additional positive feedbacks in the Arctic, and consequently intensifying the Arctic warming further. Our results establish the presence of marine phytoplankton as an important potential driver of the future Arctic climate changes.

  20. Performance of highly sensitive cardiac troponin T assay to detect ischaemia at PET-CT in low-risk patients with acute coronary syndrome: a prospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morawiec, Beata; Fournier, Stephane; Tapponnier, Maxime; Prior, John O; Monney, Pierre; Dunet, Vincent; Lauriers, Nathalie; Recordon, Frederique; Trana, Catalina; Iglesias, Juan-Fernando; Kawecki, Damian; Boulat, Olivier; Bardy, Daniel; Lamsidri, Sabine; Eeckhout, Eric; Hugli, Olivier; Muller, Olivier

    2017-07-10

    Highly sensitive troponin T (hs-TnT) assay has improved clinical decision-making for patients admitted with chest pain. However, this assay's performance in detecting myocardial ischaemia in a lowrisk population has been poorly documented. To assess hs-TnT assay's performance to detect myocardial ischaemia at positron emission tomography/CT (PET-CT) in low-risk patients admitted with chest pain. Patients admitted for chest pain with a nonconclusive ECG and negative standard cardiac troponin T results at admission and after 6 hours were prospectively enrolled. Their hs-TnT samples were at T0, T2 and T6. Physicians were blinded to hs-TnT results. All patients underwent a PET-CT at rest and during adenosine-induced stress. All patients with a positive PET-CT result underwent a coronary angiography. Forty-eight patients were included. Six had ischaemia at PET-CT. All of them had ≥1 significant stenosis at coronary angiography. Areas under the curve (95% CI) for predicting significant ischaemia at PET-CT using hs-TnT were 0.764 (0.515 to 1.000) at T0, 0.812(0.616 to 1.000) at T2 and 0.813(0.638 to 0.989) at T6. The receiver operating characteristicbased optimal cut-off value for hs-TnT at T0, T2 and T6 needed to exclude significant ischaemia at PET-CT was <4 ng/L. Using this value, sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values of hs-TnT to predict significant ischaemia were 83%/38%/16%/94% at T0, 100%/40%/19%/100% at T2 and 100%/43%/20%/100% at T6, respectively. Our findings suggest that in low-risk patients, using the hs-TnT assay with a cut-off value of 4 ng/L demonstrates excellent negative predictive value to exclude myocardial ischaemia detection at PET-CT, at the expense of weak specificity and positive predictive value. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01374607. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly

  1. Fewer bacteria in warm water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagh, Lene

    1999-01-01

    There has been many suggestions to how the ideal warm water system should be. Particularly whether warm water containers or heat exchangers in larger houses are the best solutions in order to maintain a water quality with low levels of bacteria. In an investigation made by Statens Byggeforskningsinstitutt (Denmark) regarding ''Bacterial growth in warm water installations with heat exchangers'' there were used several heat exchangers made by Gjelsted and Lund of three of which had HWAT heating cables. The bacterial content was low from these exchangers compared to exchangers with circulation. The article presents promising results from a study where the method was investigated over a longer period in two new larger warm water systems. Some energy conservation aspects are discussed

  2. Warm mix asphalt : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-01

    The performance of pavements constructed using warm mix asphalt (WMA) technology were : compared to the performance of conventional hot mix asphalt (HMA) pavements placed on the : same project. Measurements of friction resistance, rutting/wear, ride ...

  3. Protective effects of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in a rat model of transient cerebral ischaemia: a microPET study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, Feng; Wang, Shuang; Guo, Yi; Lou, Min; Wu, Jimin; Ding, Meiping; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Hong; Tian, Mei

    2010-01-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is a noninvasive method to excite neurons in the brain. However, the underlying mechanism of its therapeutic effects in stroke remains unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the neuroprotective effect of high-frequency rTMS in a rat model of transient cerebral ischaemia using positron emission tomography (PET). Sprague-Dawley rats (n=30) were anaesthetized with chloral hydrate and subjected to 90 min of intraluminal middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) with subsequent reperfusion in three groups: control (n=10), rTMS (n=10), or sham-rTMS groups (n=10). In the rTMS group, rTMS was given 1 h after ischaemia and every 24 h for 7 days after MCAO. In all three groups, small-animal PET (microPET) imaging with 18 F-FDG was used to evaluate brain glucose metabolism. Apoptotic molecules were measured in the infarct margin using immunohistochemical staining. The neurological scores of the rats in the rTMS group were higher than in those of the control group over the whole 7-day observation period. The total, cortical and striatal infarct volumes were significantly less in the rTMS group than in the control group, as measured by 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining. 18 F-FDG microPET images showed significantly higher standardized uptake values in the cortex and striatum in the rTMS group than in the control group in the affected hemisphere. The number of cells positive for caspase-3 was significantly lower in the rTMS group than in the control group, while the Bcl-2/Bax ratio was significantly higher in the rTMS group than in the control group. rTMS therapy increased glucose metabolism and inhibited apoptosis in the ischaemic hemisphere. 18 F-FDG PET could be used to monitor rTMS therapy in transient cerebral ischaemia in animal studies and in future clinical trials. (orig.)

  4. Protective effects of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in a rat model of transient cerebral ischaemia: a microPET study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Feng [Second Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hangzhou, Zhejiang (China); Second Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Department of Neurology, Hangzhou, Zhejiang (China); Zhejiang University Medical PET Center, Hangzhou, Zhejiang (China); Institute of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging of Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang (China); Key Laboratory of Medical Molecular Imaging of Zhejiang Province, Hangzhou, Zhejiang (China); Wang, Shuang; Guo, Yi; Lou, Min; Wu, Jimin; Ding, Meiping [Second Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Department of Neurology, Hangzhou, Zhejiang (China); Wang, Jing; Zhang, Hong [Second Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hangzhou, Zhejiang (China); Zhejiang University Medical PET Center, Hangzhou, Zhejiang (China); Institute of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging of Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang (China); Key Laboratory of Medical Molecular Imaging of Zhejiang Province, Hangzhou, Zhejiang (China); Tian, Mei [The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Experimental Diagnostic Imaging, Houston, TX (United States)

    2010-05-15

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is a noninvasive method to excite neurons in the brain. However, the underlying mechanism of its therapeutic effects in stroke remains unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the neuroprotective effect of high-frequency rTMS in a rat model of transient cerebral ischaemia using positron emission tomography (PET). Sprague-Dawley rats (n=30) were anaesthetized with chloral hydrate and subjected to 90 min of intraluminal middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) with subsequent reperfusion in three groups: control (n=10), rTMS (n=10), or sham-rTMS groups (n=10). In the rTMS group, rTMS was given 1 h after ischaemia and every 24 h for 7 days after MCAO. In all three groups, small-animal PET (microPET) imaging with {sup 18}F-FDG was used to evaluate brain glucose metabolism. Apoptotic molecules were measured in the infarct margin using immunohistochemical staining. The neurological scores of the rats in the rTMS group were higher than in those of the control group over the whole 7-day observation period. The total, cortical and striatal infarct volumes were significantly less in the rTMS group than in the control group, as measured by 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining. {sup 18}F-FDG microPET images showed significantly higher standardized uptake values in the cortex and striatum in the rTMS group than in the control group in the affected hemisphere. The number of cells positive for caspase-3 was significantly lower in the rTMS group than in the control group, while the Bcl-2/Bax ratio was significantly higher in the rTMS group than in the control group. rTMS therapy increased glucose metabolism and inhibited apoptosis in the ischaemic hemisphere. {sup 18}F-FDG PET could be used to monitor rTMS therapy in transient cerebral ischaemia in animal studies and in future clinical trials. (orig.)

  5. Protective Effect of Creatine Elevation against Ischaemia Reperfusion Injury Is Retained in the Presence of Co-Morbidities and during Cardioplegia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah J Whittington

    Full Text Available Ischaemic heart disease is most prevalent in the ageing population and often exists with other comorbidities; however the majority of laboratory research uses young, healthy animal models. Several recent workshops and focus meetings have highlighted the importance of using clinically relevant models to help aid translation to realistic patient populations. We have previously shown that mice over-expressing the creatine transporter (CrT-OE have elevated intracellular creatine levels and are protected against ischaemia-reperfusion injury. Here we test whether elevating intracellular creatine levels retains a cardioprotective effect in the presence of common comorbidities and whether it is additive to protection afforded by hypothermic cardioplegia.CrT-OE mice and wild-type controls were subjected to transverse aortic constriction for two weeks to induce compensated left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH. Hearts were retrogradely perfused in Langendorff mode for 15 minutes, followed by 20 minutes ischaemia and 30 minutes reperfusion. CrT-OE hearts exhibited significantly improved functional recovery (Rate pressure product during reperfusion compared to WT littermates (76% of baseline vs. 59%, respectively, P = 0.02. Aged CrT-OE mouse hearts (78±5 weeks also had enhanced recovery following 15 minutes ischaemia (104% of baseline vs. 67%, P = 0.0007. The cardioprotective effect of hypothermic high K+ cardioplegic arrest, as used during cardiac surgery and donor heart transplant, was further enhanced in prolonged ischaemia (90 minutes in CrT-OE Langendorff perfused mouse hearts (76% of baseline vs. 55% of baseline as seen in WT hearts, P = 0.02.These observations in clinically relevant models further support the development of modulators of intracellular creatine content as a translatable strategy for cardiac protection against ischaemia-reperfusion injury.

  6. Added prognostic value of ischaemic threshold in radionuclide myocardial perfusion imaging: a common-sense integration of exercise tolerance and ischaemia severity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marini, Cecilia [IRCCS AOU San Martino-National Institute for Cancer Research, CNR Institute of Bioimaging and Molecular Physiology, Section of Genoa c/o Nuclear Medicine, Pad. Sommariva, Genoa (Italy); Acampa, Wanda [National Council of Research, Naples (Italy); Bauckneht, Matteo; Capitanio, Selene; Fiz, Francesco; Dib, Bassam; Sambuceti, Gianmario [University of Genoa, IRCCS-AOU San Martino-National Institute for Cancer Research, Nuclear Medicine, Department of Health Science, Genoa (Italy); Daniele, Stefania; Cantoni, Valeria; Zampella, Emilia; Assante, Roberta; Cuocolo, Alberto [University Federico II, Nuclear Medicine, Naples (Italy); Bruzzi, Paolo [IRCCS AOU San Martino-National Institute for Cancer Research, Epidemiology Unit, Genoa (Italy)

    2015-04-01

    Reversible ischaemia at radionuclide myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) accurately predicts risk of cardiac death and nonfatal myocardial infarction (major adverse cardiac events, MACE). This prognostic penetrance might be empowered by accounting for exercise tolerance as an indirect index of ischaemia severity. The present study aimed to verify this hypothesis integrating imaging assessment of ischaemia severity with exercise maximal rate pressure product (RPP) in a large cohort of patients with suspected or known coronary artery disease (CAD). We analysed 1,502 consecutive patients (1,014 men aged 59 ± 10 years) submitted to exercise stress/rest MPI. To account for exercise tolerance, the summed difference score (SDS) was divided by RPP at tracer injection providing a clinical prognostic index (CPI). Reversible ischaemia was documented in 357 patients (24 %) and was classified by SDS as mild (SDS 2-4) in 180, moderate (SDS 5-7) in 118 and severe (SDS >7) in 59. CPI values of ischaemic patients were clustered into tertiles with lowest and highest values indicating low and high risk, respectively. CPI modified SDS risk prediction in 119/357 (33 %) patients. During a 60-month follow-up, MACE occurred in 68 patients. Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed that CPI significantly improved predictive power for MACE incidence with respect to SDS alone. Multivariate Cox analysis confirmed the additive independent value of CPI-derived information. Integration of ischaemic threshold and ischaemia extension and severity can improve accuracy of exercise MPI in predicting long-term outcome in a large cohort of patients with suspected or known CAD. (orig.)

  7. Global warming and nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodgson, P.E.

    1999-01-01

    The problems of pollution, global warming and renewable energy sources are not going to go away. Governments need to act with urgency if they are to produce a long-term energy policy. This paper looks at the current energy situation, and how this would project into the future without the instigation of radical changes. It concludes that nuclear is the best option available for averting a growing energy, pollution and global warming crisis. (author)

  8. Global warming: A vicious circle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinclair, J.

    1991-01-01

    As a result of increasing atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases the planet is already committed to regional droughts, storms, disruption of fisheries and the extinction of many plant and animal species. But current predictions of global warming do not take into account the reactions and interactions of the planet's land, ocean and ice masses to the rise in temperatures. It seems likely that the greenhouse effect will give rise to positive feedback reactions, leading to greater global warming than predicted

  9. Global warming 2007. An update to global warming: the balance of evidence and its policy implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Charles F

    2007-03-09

    In the four years since my original review (Keller[25]; hereafter referred to as CFK03), research has clarified and strengthened our understanding of how humans are warming the planet. So many of the details highlighted in the IPCC's Third Assessment Report[21] and in CFK03 have been resolved that I expect many to be a bit overwhelmed, and I hope that, by treating just the most significant aspects of the research, this update may provide a road map through the expected maze of new information. In particular, while most of CFK03 remains current, there are important items that have changed: Most notable is the resolution of the conundrum that mid-tropospheric warming did not seem to match surface warming. Both satellite and radiosonde (balloon-borne sensors) data reduction showed little warming in the middle troposphere (4-8 km altitude). In the CFK03 I discussed potential solutions to this problem, but at that time there was no clear resolution. This problem has now been solved, and the middle troposphere is seen to be warming apace with the surface. There have also been advances in determinations of temperatures over the past 1,000 years showing a cooler Little Ice Age (LIA) but essentially the same warming during medieval times (not as large as recent warming). The recent uproar over the so-called "hockey stick" temperature determination is much overblown since at least seven other groups have made relatively independent determinations of northern hemisphere temperatures over the same time period and derived essentially the same results. They differ on how cold the LIA was but essentially agree with the Mann's hockey stick result that the Medieval Warm Period was not as warm as the last 25 years. The question of the sun's influence on climate continues to generate controversy. It appears there is a growing consensus that, while the sun was a major factor in earlier temperature variations, it is incapable of having caused observed warming in the past quarter

  10. Benefit of revascularisation to critical limb ischaemia patients evaluated by a patient-oriented scoring system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chisci, E; Perulli, A; Iacoponi, F; Setacci, F; de Donato, G; Palasciano, G; Cappelli, A; Setacci, C

    2012-05-01

    The concept of patency and limb salvage are physician-oriented endpoints in critical limb ischaemia (CLI). These endpoints have failed to enhance function after revascularisation. The aim of this study was to create a scoring system to predict 1-year functional status and to assess the benefit to patients possible by revascularisation. During the period 2007-2009, 480 consecutive patients (mean age ± SD, 83.2 ± 8.7 years) underwent repair for CLI. Preoperative, operative and functional status characteristics and post-operative outcomes were recorded. The following patient-oriented outcomes were investigated pre- and postoperatively: basic and instrumental activities of daily living (BADL and IADL) and ambulatory and living status. Statistical analysis was performed to assess predictors of functional benefit from revascularisation. The variables significant on multivariable analysis were used to generate a scoring system to pre and postoperatively grade individual patient risk of losing baseline functional status at 1 year (CLI functional score). Ninety-three of 480 patients (19.3%) were in Rutherford class IV, 208 (43.3%) in class V and 179 (37.4%) in class VI. Surgical, endovascular and hybrid operations were performed in 108 (22.5%), 319 (66.5%) and 53 (11%) patients, respectively; mean follow-up was 408 ± 363 days. Improved or unchanged functional status was observed in 276 patients (57.5%). Preoperative mean ± SD BADL and IADL (4.26 ± 1.98 and 3.92 ± 2.69, respectively) were modified from mean values at 1-year follow-up (4.19 ± 2.06 and 4.12 ± 3, respectively) (p = 0.401 and p 80% indicates that patients are likely to lose functional abilities and require assistance for ambulation or ADL, as well as risking outcomes such as major amputation, new CLI-related hospitalisation or re-operation (p 2 cm, infection and poor tibial runoff), American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) score > II, previous cerebrovascular event and heart

  11. Blood-feeding Behaviors of Anopheles stephensi But Not Phlebotomus papatasi are Influenced by Actively Warming Guinea Pigs (Cavia porcellus) Under General Anesthesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    differential biting behaviors on warmed or unwarmed guinea pig hosts. (A) Warmed (dashed line with square time points) and control (solid line with circle time ...Fig. 2. Sand flies do not display differential biting behaviors on warmed or unwarmed guinea pig hosts. (A) Warmed (dashed line with square time ...books/NBK54050/ Peterson D, Brown A. 1951. Studies of the responses of the female Aedes mosquito. Part III. The response of Aedes aegypti (L.) to a warm

  12. Unexpected Impacts of Global warming on Extreme Warm Spells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardeshmukh, P. D.; Compo, G. P.; McColl, C.; Penland, C.

    2017-12-01

    It is generally presumed that the likelihood of extreme warm spells around the globe has increased, and will continue to increase, due to global warming. However, we find that this is generally not true in three very different types of global observational datasets and uncoupled atmospheric model simulations of the 1959 to 2012 period with prescribed observed global SSTs, sea ice, and radiative forcing changes. While extreme warm spells indeed became more common in many regions, in many other regions their likelihood remained almost the same or even decreased from the first half to the second half of this period. Such regions of unexpected changes covered nearly 40 percent of the globe in both winter and summer. The basic reason for this was a decrease of temperature variability in such regions that offset or even negated the effect of the mean temperature shift on extreme warm spell probabilities. The possibility of such an impact on extreme value probabilities was highlighted in a recent paper by Sardeshmukh, Compo, and Penland (Journal of Climate 2015). The consistency of the changes in extreme warm spell probabilities among the different observational datasets and model simulations examined suggests that they are robust regional aspects of global warming associated with atmospheric circulation changes. This highlights the need for climate models to represent not just the mean regional temperature signals but also the changes in subseasonal temperature variability associated with global warming. However, current climate models (both CMIP3 and CMIP5) generally underestimate the magnitude of the changes in the atmospheric circulation and associated temperature variability. A likely major cause of this is their continuing underestimation of the magnitude of the spatial variation of tropical SST trends. By generating an overly spatially bland tropical SST warming in response to changes in radiative forcing, the models spuriously mute tropically

  13. Cortical spreading ischaemia is a novel process involved in ischaemic damage in patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dreier, Jens P; Major, Sebastian; Manning, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    flow and electrocorticography were simultaneously recorded in 417 CSDs. Isolated CSDs occurred in 12 patients and were associated with either physiological, absent or inverse haemodynamic responses. Whereas the physiological haemodynamic response caused tissue hyperoxia, the inverse response led......, causing either transient hyperperfusion (physiological haemodynamic response) in healthy tissue; or hypoperfusion [inverse haemodynamic response = cortical spreading ischaemia (CSI)] in tissue at risk for progressive damage, which has so far only been shown experimentally. Here, we performed a prospective......, multicentre study in 13 patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage, using novel subdural opto-electrode technology for simultaneous laser-Doppler flowmetry (LDF) and direct current-electrocorticography, combined with measurements of tissue partial pressure of oxygen (ptiO(2)). Regional cerebral blood...

  14. Cardioprotective effect of hyperthyroidism on the stunned rat heart during ischaemia-reperfusion: energetics and role of mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragone, María Inés; Bonazzola, Patricia; Colareda, Germán A; Consolini, Alicia E

    2015-06-01

    What is the central question of this study? Hyperthyroidism is a cardiac risk factor, but thyroid therapy is used on myocardial stunning. What is the consequence of hyperthyroidism for mitochondrial metabolism and Ca(2+) handling of the postischaemic stunned heart? What is the main finding and its importance? Hyperthyroidism reduced stunning and improved muscle economy of the postischaemic rat heart. The activities of the mitochondrial sodium-calcium exchanger and mitochondrial K(+) channel in hyperthyroid rat hearts were different from those in the euthyroid rat hearts. These findings contribute to the understanding of mitochondrial bioenergetics in pathology and support thyroid therapy in the stunning induced by ischaemia. Transient ischaemia and hyperthyroidism are cardiovascular risk factors. Nevertheless, 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine/thyroxine therapy has been used to revert myocardial stunning. We studied the influence of hyperthyroidism on the role played by mitochondria in myocardial stunning consequent to ischaemia-reperfusion. Rats were injected s.c. daily with 20 μg kg(-1) triiodothyronine for 15 days (HpT group). Isolated ventricles from either HpT or euthyroid (EuT) rats were perfused in a calorimeter, and left intraventricular pressure (in millimetres of mercury) and heat release (Ht; in milliwatts per gram) were measured. Stunning was evoked by 20 min of no-flow ischaemia and 45 min reperfusion. The HpT hearts developed higher postischaemic contractile recovery (PICR) and improved total muscle economy (P/Ht) with lower diastolic contracture (ΔLVEDP) than EuT hearts. Release of Ca(2+) from the sarcoplasmic reticulum during reperfusion with 10 mm caffeine in low-[Na(+) ] Krebs solution evoked a higher contracture in EuT than in HpT hearts. Blockade of the mitochondrial sodium-calcium exchanger with clonazepam increased ΔLVEDP and reduced P/Ht and PICR in HpT but not in EuT hearts. The clonazepam-induced dysfunction in HpT hearts was reduced by

  15. Lower limb ischaemia in patients with diabetic foot ulcers and gangrene: recognition, anatomic patterns and revascularization strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Joseph L

    2016-01-01

    The confluence of several chronic conditions--in particular ageing, peripheral artery disease, diabetes, and chronic kidney disease--has created a global wave of lower limbs at risk for major amputation. While frequently asymptomatic or not lifestyle limiting, at least 1% of the population has peripheral artery disease of sufficient severity to be limb threatening. To avoid the critical error of failing to diagnose ischaemia, all patients with diabetic foot ulcers and gangrene should routinely undergo physiologic evaluation of foot perfusion. Ankle brachial index is useful when measurable, but may be falsely elevated or not obtainable in as many as 30% of patients with diabetic foot ulcers primarily because of medial calcinosis. Toe pressures and skin perfusion pressures are applicable to such patients. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Ischaemia of the medullary cone after stent-graft implantation in a patient with abdominal aortic aneurysm - a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachowski, Mariusz; Polguj, Michał; Ścibór, Janusz; Majos, Agata

    2018-03-01

    Preoperative visualization of the Adamkiewicz artery - the vessel which is to a great extent responsible for supplying blood to the medullary cone - is an important step which must be taken before initiating restorative procedures in the aorta. We present a case of a 67-year-old patient who underwent an intravascular stent-graft implantation procedure, due to clinical signs of abdominal aortic aneurysm. Routine pre-operative computed tomography examination failed to demonstrate the Adamkiewicz artery. On the second day after the surgery, as a result of unexpected clinical deterioration, an magnetic resonance imaging examination of the lumbar spine was carried out. Based on the magnetic resonance imaging images and clinical manifestations the diagnosis of ischaemia of the medullary cone was made. In our work we also present a deep analysis of the anatomy of small-sized vessels supplying blood to the spinal cord and discuss effective techniques which enable visualization of the Adamkiewicz artery.

  17. [Ozone therapy and phototherapy with polarized polychromatic light in treatment of patients suffering from lower limb critical ischaemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drozhzhin, E V; Sidorkina, O N

    2012-01-01

    The authors generalized their experience in treating a total of 77 patients presenting with atherosclerosis of the arteries of lower limbs with degree III-IV ischaemia according to the A.V. Pokrovsky-Fontain classification. The patients were subjected to comprehensive treatment including the impact of piler-light (apparatus Bioptron 2) and ozone therapy. The control group was composed of 66 people receiving conventional therapy. The two groups were comparable by the nosological entity of the disease, gender, age, and the nature of accompanying pathology. Despite carried out classical anticoagulation therapy there was a tendency towards hypercoagulation in phase I (formation of prothrombinase) and phase III (formation of fibrin) of plasma haemostasis, as well as insufficiency of the fibrinolytic system. The obtained results showed direct influence of ozone therapy and piler light on phase I and III plasmatic haemostasis, as well as enhanced fibrinolytic activity of blood on the background of their administration thereof.

  18. Transcriptional responses in the adaptation to ischaemia-reperfusion injury: a study of the effect of ischaemic preconditioning in total knee arthroplasty patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doran Peter P

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ischaemic preconditioning (IPC has emerged as a method of reducing ischaemia-reperfusion injury. However, the complex mechanism through which IPC elicits this protection is not fully understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the genomic response induced by IPC in muscle biopsies taken from the operative leg of total knee arthroplasty patients in order to gain insight into the IPC mechanism. Methods Twenty patients, undergoing primary total knee arthroplasty, were randomly assigned to IPC (n = 10 and control (n = 10 groups. Patients in the IPC group received ischaemic preconditioning immediately prior to surgery. IPC was induced by three five-minute cycles of tourniquet insufflation interrupted by five-minute cycles of reperfusion. A muscle biopsy was taken from the operative knee of control and IPC-treated patients at the onset of surgery and, again, at one hour into surgery. The gene expression profile of muscle biopsies was determined using the Affymetrix Human U113 2.0 microarray system and validated using real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. Measurements of C-reactive protein (CRP, erythrocyte sedimentation (ESR, white cell count (WCC, cytokines and haemoglobin were also made pre- and post-operatively. Results Microarray analysis revealed a significant increase in the expression of important oxidative stress defence genes, immediate early response genes and mitochondrial genes. Upregulation of pro-survival genes was also observed and correlated with a downregulation of pro-apoptotic gene expression. CRP, ESR, WCC, cytokine and haemoglobin levels were not significantly different between control and IPC patients. Conclusions The findings of this study suggest that IPC of the lower limb in total knee arthroplasty patients induces a protective genomic response, which results in increased expression of immediate early response genes, oxidative stress defence genes and pro-survival genes. These findings

  19. Transcriptional responses in the adaptation to ischaemia-reperfusion injury: a study of the effect of ischaemic preconditioning in total knee arthroplasty patients

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, Terence

    2010-05-10

    Abstract Background Ischaemic preconditioning (IPC) has emerged as a method of reducing ischaemia-reperfusion injury. However, the complex mechanism through which IPC elicits this protection is not fully understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the genomic response induced by IPC in muscle biopsies taken from the operative leg of total knee arthroplasty patients in order to gain insight into the IPC mechanism. Methods Twenty patients, undergoing primary total knee arthroplasty, were randomly assigned to IPC (n = 10) and control (n = 10) groups. Patients in the IPC group received ischaemic preconditioning immediately prior to surgery. IPC was induced by three five-minute cycles of tourniquet insufflation interrupted by five-minute cycles of reperfusion. A muscle biopsy was taken from the operative knee of control and IPC-treated patients at the onset of surgery and, again, at one hour into surgery. The gene expression profile of muscle biopsies was determined using the Affymetrix Human U113 2.0 microarray system and validated using real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Measurements of C-reactive protein (CRP), erythrocyte sedimentation (ESR), white cell count (WCC), cytokines and haemoglobin were also made pre- and post-operatively. Results Microarray analysis revealed a significant increase in the expression of important oxidative stress defence genes, immediate early response genes and mitochondrial genes. Upregulation of pro-survival genes was also observed and correlated with a downregulation of pro-apoptotic gene expression. CRP, ESR, WCC, cytokine and haemoglobin levels were not significantly different between control and IPC patients. Conclusions The findings of this study suggest that IPC of the lower limb in total knee arthroplasty patients induces a protective genomic response, which results in increased expression of immediate early response genes, oxidative stress defence genes and pro-survival genes. These findings indicate that

  20. HIF-1alpha and HIF-2alpha are differentially activated in distinct cell populations in retinal ischaemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freya M Mowat

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxia plays a key role in ischaemic and neovascular disorders of the retina. Cellular responses to oxygen are mediated by hypoxia-inducible transcription factors (HIFs that are stabilised in hypoxia and induce the expression of a diverse range of genes. The purpose of this study was to define the cellular specificities of HIF-1alpha and HIF-2alpha in retinal ischaemia, and to determine their correlation with the pattern of retinal hypoxia and the expression profiles of induced molecular mediators.We investigated the tissue distribution of retinal hypoxia during oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR in mice using the bio-reductive drug pimonidazole. We measured the levels of HIF-1alpha and HIF-2alpha proteins by Western blotting and determined their cellular distribution by immunohistochemistry during the development of OIR. We measured the temporal expression profiles of two downstream mediators, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF and erythropoietin (Epo by ELISA. Pimonidazole labelling was evident specifically in the inner retina. Labelling peaked at 2 hours after the onset of hypoxia and gradually declined thereafter. Marked binding to Müller glia was evident during the early hypoxic stages of OIR. Both HIF-1alpha and HIF-2alpha protein levels were significantly increased during retinal hypoxia but were evident in distinct cellular distributions; HIF-1alpha stabilisation was evident in neuronal cells throughout the inner retinal layers whereas HIF-2alpha was restricted to Müller glia and astrocytes. Hypoxia and HIF-alpha stabilisation in the retina were closely followed by upregulated expression of the downstream mediators VEGF and EPO.Both HIF-1alpha and HIF-2alpha are activated in close correlation with retinal hypoxia but have contrasting cell specificities, consistent with differential roles in retinal ischaemia. Our findings suggest that HIF-2alpha activation plays a key role in regulating the response of Müller glia to hypoxia.

  1. Mice Lacking the β2 Adrenergic Receptor Have a Unique Genetic Profile before and after Focal Brain Ischaemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin E White

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The role of the β2AR (β2 adrenergic receptor after stroke is unclear as pharmacological manipulations of the β2AR have produced contradictory results. We previously showed that mice deficient in the β2AR (β2KO had smaller infarcts compared with WT (wild-type mice (FVB after MCAO (middle cerebral artery occlusion, a model of stroke. To elucidate mechanisms of this neuroprotection, we evaluated changes in gene expression using microarrays comparing differences before and after MCAO, and differences between genotypes. Genes associated with inflammation and cell deaths were enriched after MCAO in both genotypes, and we identified several genes not previously shown to increase following ischaemia (Ccl9, Gem and Prg4. In addition to networks that were similar between genotypes, one network with a central core of GPCR (G-protein-coupled receptor and including biological functions such as carbohydrate metabolism, small molecule biochemistry and inflammation was identified in FVB mice but not in β2KO mice. Analysis of differences between genotypes revealed 11 genes differentially expressed by genotype both before and after ischaemia. We demonstrate greater Glo1 protein levels and lower Pmaip/Noxa mRNA levels in β2KO mice in both sham and MCAO conditions. As both genes are implicated in NF-κB (nuclear factor κB signalling, we measured p65 activity and TNFα (tumour necrosis factor α levels 24 h after MCAO. MCAO-induced p65 activation and post-ischaemic TNFα production were both greater in FVB compared with β2KO mice. These results suggest that loss of β2AR signaling results in a neuroprotective phenotype in part due to decreased NF-κB signalling, decreased inflammation and decreased apoptotic signalling in the brain.

  2. Altered myocardial perfusion during dobutamine stress testing in silent versus symptomatic myocardial ischaemia assessed by quantitative MIBI SPET imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elhendy, A.; Geleijnse, M.L.; Roelandt, J.R.T.C.; Cornel, J.H.; Domburg, R.T van; Reijs, A.E.M.; Nierop, P.R.; Fioretti, P.M.

    1996-01-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the extent and severity of reversible underperfusion in silent versus painful myocardial ischaemia during the dobutamine stress test. A consecutive series of 85 patients with significant coronary artery disease and reversible perfusion defects on technetium-99m methoxyisobutylisonitrile single-photon emission tomography performed at rest and during high-dose dobutamine stress (up to 40 μg kg -1 min -1 ) were studied. The left ventricle was divided into six segments. An ischaemic perfusion score was derived quantitatively by subtracting the rest from the stress defect score. Patients with multivessel disease had a higher ischaemic score (610±762 vs 310±411, P<0.05) and a higher number of reversible perfusion defects (2.1±1.2 vs 1.1±0.8, P<0.01) than patients with single-vessel disease. Typical angina occurred in 37 patients (44%) during the test. There was no significant difference between patients with and patients without angina with respecft to age, gender, peak rate-pressure product, prevalence of previous myocardial infarction, diabetes mellitus, multivessel disease or number of stenotic coronary arteries. Stress, rest and ischaemic scores as well as the number and distribution of reversible defects were not different in patients with and patients without angina. Patients with angina more frequently had a history of typical angina before the test (43% vs 17%, P<0.01) and ST-segment depression during the test (54% vs 25%, P<0.01). It is concluded that in patients with coronary artery disease and ischaemia detected by dobutamine scintigraphy, the extent and severity of coronary artery disease and myocardial perfusion abnormalities are similar with or without angina during stess testing. (orig.)

  3. The Great Warming Brian Fagan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagan, B. M.

    2010-12-01

    The Great Warming is a journey back to the world of a thousand years ago, to the Medieval Warm Period. Five centuries of irregular warming from 800 to 1250 had beneficial effects in Europe and the North Atlantic, but brought prolonged droughts to much of the Americas and lands affected by the South Asian monsoon. The book describes these impacts of warming on medieval European societies, as well as the Norse and the Inuit of the far north, then analyzes the impact of harsh, lengthy droughts on hunting societies in western North America and the Ancestral Pueblo farmers of Chaco Canyon, New Mexico. These peoples reacted to drought by relocating entire communities. The Maya civilization was much more vulnerable that small-scale hunter-gatherer societies and subsistence farmers in North America. Maya rulers created huge water storage facilities, but their civilization partially collapsed under the stress of repeated multiyear droughts, while the Chimu lords of coastal Peru adapted with sophisticated irrigation works. The climatic villain was prolonged, cool La Niñalike conditions in the Pacific, which caused droughts from Venezuela to East Asia, and as far west as East Africa. The Great Warming argues that the warm centuries brought savage drought to much of humanity, from China to Peru. It also argues that drought is one of the most dangerous elements in today’s humanly created global warming, often ignored by preoccupied commentators, but with the potential to cause over a billion people to starve. Finally, I use the book to discuss the issues and problems of communicating multidisciplinary science to the general public.

  4. Active Movement Warm-Up Routines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Teri; Quint, Ashleigh; Fischer, Kim; Kiger, Joy

    2011-01-01

    This article presents warm-ups that are designed to physiologically and psychologically prepare students for vigorous physical activity. An active movement warm-up routine is made up of three parts: (1) active warm-up movement exercises, (2) general preparation, and (3) the energy system. These warm-up routines can be used with all grade levels…

  5. How warm days increase belief in global warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaval, Lisa; Keenan, Elizabeth A.; Johnson, Eric J.; Weber, Elke U.

    2014-02-01

    Climate change judgements can depend on whether today seems warmer or colder than usual, termed the local warming effect. Although previous research has demonstrated that this effect occurs, studies have yet to explain why or how temperature abnormalities influence global warming attitudes. A better understanding of the underlying psychology of this effect can help explain the public's reaction to climate change and inform approaches used to communicate the phenomenon. Across five studies, we find evidence of attribute substitution, whereby individuals use less relevant but available information (for example, today's temperature) in place of more diagnostic but less accessible information (for example, global climate change patterns) when making judgements. Moreover, we rule out alternative hypotheses involving climate change labelling and lay mental models. Ultimately, we show that present temperature abnormalities are given undue weight and lead to an overestimation of the frequency of similar past events, thereby increasing belief in and concern for global warming.

  6. Soil warming opens the nitrogen cycle at the alpine treeline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawes, Melissa A; Schleppi, Patrick; Hättenschwiler, Stephan; Rixen, Christian; Hagedorn, Frank

    2017-01-01

    Climate warming may alter ecosystem nitrogen (N) cycling by accelerating N transformations in the soil, and changes may be especially pronounced in cold regions characterized by N-poor ecosystems. We investigated N dynamics across the plant-soil continuum during 6 years of experimental soil warming (2007-2012; +4 °C) at a Swiss high-elevation treeline site (Stillberg, Davos; 2180 m a.s.l.) featuring Larix decidua and Pinus uncinata. In the soil, we observed considerable increases in the NH4+ pool size in the first years of warming (by >50%), but this effect declined over time. In contrast, dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) concentrations in soil solutions from the organic layer increased under warming, especially in later years (maximum of +45% in 2012), suggesting enhanced DON leaching from the main rooting zone. Throughout the experimental period, foliar N concentrations showed species-specific but small warming effects, whereas δ 15 N values showed a sustained increase in warmed plots that was consistent for all species analysed. The estimated total plant N pool size at the end of the study was greater (+17%) in warmed plots with Pinus but not in those containing Larix, with responses driven by trees. Irrespective of plot tree species identity, warming led to an enhanced N pool size of Vaccinium dwarf shrubs, no change in that of Empetrum hermaphroditum (dwarf shrub) and forbs, and a reduction in that of grasses, nonvascular plants, and fine roots. In combination, higher foliar δ 15 N values and the transient response in soil inorganic N indicate a persistent increase in plant-available N and greater cumulative plant N uptake in warmer soils. Overall, greater N availability and increased DON concentrations suggest an opening of the N cycle with global warming, which might contribute to growth stimulation of some plant species while simultaneously leading to greater N losses from treeline ecosystems and possibly other cold biomes. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons

  7. Warm measurements of CBA superconducting magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engelmann, R.; Herrera, J.; Kahn, S.; Kirk, H.; Willen, E.; Yamin, P.

    1983-01-01

    We present results on magnetic field measurements of CBA dipole magnets in the warm (normal conductor) and cryogenic (superconducting) states. We apply two methods for the warm measurements, a dc and ac method. We find a good correlation between warm and cryogenic measurements which lends itself to a reliable diagnosis of magnet field errors using warm measurements early in the magnet assembly process. We further find good agreement between the two warm measurement methods, both done at low currents

  8. Peranan Environmental Accounting Terhadap Global Warming

    OpenAIRE

    Martusa, Riki

    2009-01-01

    This article explores about is global warming. The distortion of nature causes global warming. Industrial sector is one of global warming incurred. Some nations create a group to cope this matter. They try to reduce carbon emission as one of global warming causes by controlling industrial carbon emission through financial reporting. This article explores normatively roles of environmental accounting in cope with global warming.  

  9. Global warming: Sea ice and snow cover

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walsh, J.E.

    1993-01-01

    In spite of differences among global climate simulations under scenarios where atmospheric CO 2 is doubled, all models indicate at least some amplification of greenouse warming at the polar regions. Several decades of recent data on air temperature, sea ice, and snow cover of the high latitudes of the Northern Hemisphere are summarized to illustrate the general compatibility of recent variations in those parameters. Despite a data void over the Arctic Ocean, some noteworthy patterns emerge. Warming dominates in winter and spring, as projected by global climate models, with the warming strongest over subpolar land areas of Alaska, northwestern Canada, and northern Eurasia. A time-longitude summary of Arctic sea ice variations indicates that timescales of most anomalies range from several months to several years. Wintertime maxima of total sea ice extent contain no apparent secular trends. The statistical significance of trends in recent sea ice variations was evaluated by a Monte Carlo procedure, showing a statistically significant negative trend in the summer. Snow cover data over the 20-y period of record show a noticeable decrease of Arctic snow cover in the late 1980s. This is of potential climatic significance since the accompanying decrease of surface albedo leads to a rapid increase of solar heating. 21 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  10. Global Warming: Evidence from Satellite Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhakara, C.; Iacovazzi, R., Jr.; Yoo, J.-M.

    2001-01-01

    Observations made in Channel 2 (53.74 GHz) of the Microwave Sounding Unit (MSU) radiometer, flown on-board sequential, sun-synchronous, polar orbiting NOAA operational satellites, indicate that the mean temperature of the atmosphere over the globe increased during the period 1980 to 1999. In this study we have minimized systematic errors in the time series introduced by the satellite orbital drift in an objective manner. This is done with the help the onboard warm black body temperature, which is used in the calibration of the MSU radiometer. The corrected MSU Channel 2 observations of the NOAA satellite series reveal that the vertically weighted global mean temperature of the atmosphere, with a peak weight near the mid-troposphere, warmed at the rate of 0.13 K per decade (with an uncertainty of 0.05 K per decade) during 1980 to 1999. The global warming deduced from conventional meteorological data that have been corrected for urbanization effects agrees reasonably with this satellite deuced result.

  11. Effect of the non-NMDA receptor antagonist GYKI 52466 on the microdialysate and tissue concentrations of amino acids following transient forebrain ischaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvin, B; Lekieffre, D; Graham, J L; Moncada, C; Chapman, A G; Meldrum, B S

    1994-04-01

    The effect of the non-N-methyl-D-aspartate (non-NMDA) receptor antagonist 1-(4-aminophenyl)-4-methyl-7,8-methylenedioxy-5H-2,3-benzodiazepine hydrochloride (GYKI 52466) on ischaemia-induced changes in the microdialysate and tissue concentrations of glutamate, aspartate, and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) was studied in rats. Twenty minutes of four-vessel occlusion resulted in a transient increase in microdialysate levels of glutamate, aspartate, and GABA in striatum, cortex, and hippocampus. Administration of GYKI 52466 (10 mg/kg bolus + 10 mg/kg/60 min intravenously starting 20 min before onset of ischaemia) inhibited ischaemia-induced increases in microdialysate glutamate and GABA in striatum without affecting the increases in hippocampus or cortex. Twenty minutes of four-vessel occlusion resulted in immediate small decreases and larger delayed (72 h) decreases in tissue levels of glutamate and aspartate. Transient increases in tissue levels of GABA were shown in all three structures at the end of the ischaemic period. At 72 h, after the ischaemic period, significantly reduced GABA levels were observed in striatum and hippocampus. GYKI 52466, given under identical conditions as above, augmented the ischaemia-induced decrease in striatal tissue levels of glutamate and aspartate, without significantly affecting the decreases in hippocampus and cortex. Twenty minutes of ischaemia resulted in a large increase in microdialysate dopamine in striatum. GYKI 52466 failed to inhibit this increase. Kainic acid (500 microM infused through the probe for 20 min) caused increases in microdialysate glutamate and aspartate in the striatum. GYKI 52466 (10 mg/kg bolus + 10 mg/kg/60 min) completely inhibited the kainic acid-induced glutamate release. In conclusion, the action of the non-NMDA antagonist, GYKI 52466, in the striatum is different from that in the cortex and hippocampus. The inhibition by GYKI 52466 of ischaemia-induced and kainate-induced increases in microdialysate

  12. The politics of global warming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moss, N.

    1991-01-01

    The probable warming of the world over the next few decades due to human activity presents a unique threat. The threat of global warming has been brought about by the activities of the entire human race, and only action by a large part of the human race can slow down the process or halt it. Other unwanted effects of industrial activity are trans-national, and require international agreements to regulate them, most obviously radioactivity from nuclear power accidents, acid rain and river pollution; but climatic change, unlike these, is global. International negotiations are going on now to deal with the problem of global warming, mostly by reducing the emission of gases that contribute to it. These are preliminary, yet already different perceptions and conflicting interests are emerging. The aim of the present negotiations is a convention for the UN Conference on Environment and Development (UNCED) to be held in June 1992, the so-called ''Earth Summit''. (author)

  13. Priority setting of strategies and mechanisms for limiting global warming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, S.J.L.

    1994-01-01

    Scientific communities have reached a consensus that increases of greenhouse gas emission will result in climatic warming and sea level rises despite existing uncertainties. Major uncertainties include the sensitivities of climate changes in terms of timing, magnitude, and scales of regional changes. Socioeconomic uncertainties encompass population and economic growth, changes in technology, future reliance on fossil fuel, and policies compiled to stabilize the global warming. Moreover, increase in world population coupled with limited resources will increase the vulnerability of ecosystems and social systems. Global warming has become an international concern since the destinies of all nations are closely interwoven by this issue and how nations deal with it. Appropriate strategies and mechanisms are need to slow down the buildup of CO 2 and other greenhouse gases. Questionnaires were sent to 150 experts in 30 countries to evaluate such strategies and mechanisms for dealing with global warming, from both the domestic and international perspectives. This paper will focus primarily on strategy selection

  14. Reconciling controversies about the ‘global warming hiatus’

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medhaug, Iselin; Stolpe, Martin B.; Fischer, Erich M.; Knutti, Reto

    2017-05-01

    Between about 1998 and 2012, a time that coincided with political negotiations for preventing climate change, the surface of Earth seemed hardly to warm. This phenomenon, often termed the ‘global warming hiatus’, caused doubt in the public mind about how well anthropogenic climate change and natural variability are understood. Here we show that apparently contradictory conclusions stem from different definitions of ‘hiatus’ and from different datasets. A combination of changes in forcing, uptake of heat by the oceans, natural variability and incomplete observational coverage reconciles models and data. Combined with stronger recent warming trends in newer datasets, we are now more confident than ever that human influence is dominant in long-term warming.

  15. Population risk perceptions of global warming in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agho, Kingsley; Stevens, Garry; Taylor, Mel; Barr, Margo; Raphael, Beverley

    2010-11-01

    According to the World Health Organisation (WHO), global warming has the potential to dramatically disrupt some of life's essential requirements for health, water, air and food. Understanding how Australians perceive the risk of global warming is essential for climate change policy and planning. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of, and socio-demographic factors associated with, high levels of perceived likelihood that global warming would worsen, concern for self and family and reported behaviour changes. A module of questions on global warming was incorporated into the New South Wales Population Health Survey in the second quarter of 2007. This Computer Assisted Telephone Interview (CATI) was completed by a representative sample of 2004 adults. The weighted sample was comparable to the Australian population. Bivariate and multivariate statistical analyses were conducted to examine the socio-demographic and general health factors. Overall 62.1% perceived that global warming was likely to worsen; 56.3% were very or extremely concerned that they or their family would be directly affected by global warming; and 77.6% stated that they had made some level of change to the way they lived their lives, because of the possibility of global warming. After controlling for confounding factors, multivariate analyses revealed that those with high levels of psychological distress were 2.17 (Adjusted Odds Ratio (AOR)=2.17; CI: 1.16-4.03; P=0.015) times more likely to be concerned about global warming than those with low psychological distress levels. Those with a University degree or equivalent and those who lived in urban areas were significantly more likely to think that global warming would worsen compared to those without a University degree or equivalent and those who lived in the rural areas. Females were significantly (AOR=1.69; CI: 1.23-2.33; P=0.001) more likely to report they had made changes to the way they lived their lives due to the risk of

  16. Terrestrial carbon cycle affected by non-uniform climate warming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jianyang Xia; Yiqi Luo; Jiquan Chen; Shilong Piao; Ciais, Philippe; Shiqiang Wan

    2014-01-01

    Feedbacks between the terrestrial carbon cycle and climate change could affect many ecosystem functions and services, such as food production, carbon sequestration and climate regulation. The rate of climate warming varies on diurnal and seasonal timescales. A synthesis of global air temperature data reveals a greater rate of warming in winter than in summer in northern mid and high latitudes, and the inverse pattern in some tropical regions. The data also reveal a decline in the diurnal temperature range over 51% of the global land area and an increase over only 13%, because night-time temperatures in most locations have risen faster than daytime temperatures. Analyses of satellite data, model simulations and in situ observations suggest that the impact of seasonal warming varies between regions. For example, spring warming has largely stimulated ecosystem productivity at latitudes between 30 degrees and 90 degrees N, but suppressed productivity in other regions. Contrasting impacts of day- and night-time warming on plant carbon gain and loss are apparent in many regions. We argue that ascertaining the effects of non-uniform climate warming on terrestrial ecosystems is a key challenge in carbon cycle research. (authors)

  17. Efficiency, sustainability and global warming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodward, Richard T.; Bishop, Richard C.

    1995-01-01

    Economic analyses of global warming have typically been grounded in the theory of economic efficiency. Such analyses may be inappropriate because many of the underlying concerns about climate change are rooted not in efficiency, but in the intergenerational allocation of economic endowments. A simple economic model is developed which demonstrates that an efficient economy is not necessarily a sustainable economy. This result leads directly to questions about the policy relevance of several economic studies of the issue. We then consider policy alternatives to address global warming in the context of economies with the dual objectives of efficiency and sustainability, with particular attention to carbon-based taxes

  18. Global Warming: Physics and Facts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levi, B.G.; Hafemeister, D.; Scribner, R.

    1992-01-01

    This report contains papers on: A tutorial on global atmospheric energetics and the greenhouse effect; global climate models: what and how; comparison of general circulation models; climate and the earth's radiation budget; temperature and sea level change; short-term climate variability and predictions; the great ocean conveyor; trace gases in the atmosphere: temporal and spatial trends; the geochemical carbon cycle and the uptake of fossil fuel CO 2 ; forestry and global warming; the physical and policy linkages; policy implications of greenhouse warming; options for lowering US carbon dioxide emissions; options for reducing carbon dioxide emissions; and science and diplomacy: a new partnership to protect the environment

  19. Cerebrovascular endothelin-1 hyper-reactivity is associated with transient receptor potential canonical channels 1 and 6 activation and delayed cerebral hypoperfusion after forebrain ischaemia in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, S E; Andersen, X E D R; Hansen, R H

    2015-01-01

    . METHODS: Experimental forebrain ischaemia was induced in Wistar male rats by a two-vessel occlusion model, and the cerebral blood flow was measured by magnetic resonance imaging two days after reperfusion. In vitro vasoreactivity studies, immunofluorescence and quantitative PCR were performed on cerebral...... in the vascular smooth muscle cells was enhanced and correlated with decreased cerebral blood flow two days after forebrain ischaemia. Furthermore, under conditions when voltage-dependent calcium channels were inhibited, endothelin-1-induced cerebrovascular contraction was enhanced and this enhancement...... was presumably mediated by Ca(2+) influx via upregulated transient receptor potential canonical channels 1 and 6. CONCLUSIONS: Our data demonstrates that endothelin-1-mediated influx of extracellular Ca(2+) activates transient receptor potential canonical channels 1 and 6 in cerebral vascular smooth muscle cells...

  20. GlyT1 Inhibitor NFPS Exerts Neuroprotection via GlyR Alpha1 Subunit in the Rat Model of Transient Focal Cerebral Ischaemia and Reperfusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baosheng Huang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Glycine is a strychnine-sensitive inhibitory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system (CNS, especially in the spinal cord, brainstem, and retina. The objective of the present study was to investigate the potential neuroprotective effects of GlyT1 inhibitor N [3-(4'-fluorophenyl-3-(4'-phenylphenoxy propyl] sarcosine (NFPS in the rat model of experimental stroke. Methods: In vivo ischaemia was induced by transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO. The methods of Western Blotting, Nissl Staining and Morris water maze methods were applied to analyze the anti-ischaemia mechanism. Results: The results showed that high dose of NFPS (H-NFPS significantly reduced infarct volume, neuronal injury and the expression of cleaved caspase-3, enhanced Bcl-2/Bax, and improved spatial learning deficits which were administered three hours after transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO induction in rats, while, low dose of NFPS (L-NFPS exacerbated the injury of ischaemia. These findings suggested that low and high dose of NFPS produced opposite effects. Importantly, it was demonstrated that H-NFPS-dependent neuronal protection was inverted by salicylate (Sal, a specific GlyR ɑ1 antagonist. Such effects could probably be attributed to the enhanced glycine level in both synaptic and extrasynaptic clefts and the subsequently altered extrasynaptic GlyRs and their subtypes. Conclusions: These data imply that GlyT1 inhibitor NFPS may be a novel target for clinical treatment of transient focal cerebral ischaemia and reperfusion which are associated with altered GlyR alpha 1 subunits.

  1. In vivo imaging of induction of heat-shock protein-70 gene expression with fluorescence reflectance imaging and intravital confocal microscopy following brain ischaemia in reporter mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Rosa, Xavier; Santalucía, Tomàs; Fortin, Pierre-Yves; Purroy, Jesús; Calvo, Maria; Salas-Perdomo, Angélica; Justicia, Carles; Couillaud, Franck; Planas, Anna M

    2013-02-01

    Stroke induces strong expression of the 72-kDa heat-shock protein (HSP-70) in the ischaemic brain, and neuronal expression of HSP-70 is associated with the ischaemic penumbra. The aim of this study was to image induction of Hsp-70 gene expression in vivo after brain ischaemia using reporter mice. A genomic DNA sequence of the Hspa1b promoter was used to generate an Hsp70-mPlum far-red fluorescence reporter vector. The construct was tested in cellular systems (NIH3T3 mouse fibroblast cell line) by transient transfection and examining mPlum and Hsp-70 induction under a challenge. After construct validation, mPlum transgenic mice were generated. Focal brain ischaemia was induced by transient intraluminal occlusion of the middle cerebral artery and the mice were imaged in vivo with fluorescence reflectance imaging (FRI) with an intact skull, and with confocal microscopy after opening a cranial window. Cells transfected with the Hsp70-mPlum construct showed mPlum fluorescence after stimulation. One day after induction of ischaemia, reporter mice showed a FRI signal located in the HSP-70-positive zone within the ipsilateral hemisphere, as validated by immunohistochemistry. Live confocal microscopy allowed brain tissue to be visualized at the cellular level. mPlum fluorescence was observed in vivo in the ipsilateral cortex 1 day after induction of ischaemia in neurons, where it is compatible with penumbra and neuronal viability, and in blood vessels in the core of the infarction. This study showed in vivo induction of Hsp-70 gene expression in ischaemic brain using reporter mice. The fluorescence signal showed in vivo the induction of Hsp-70 in penumbra neurons and in the vasculature within the ischaemic core.

  2. Can global warming save nuclear power?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pearce, D.

    1994-01-01

    Nuclear powered electricity generation in the United Kingdom has an uncertain future. The relative costs of generating electricity by nuclear fission compared to other means and the need for a desirable mixture or ''portfolio'' of energy sources in the electricity industry are identified as the key to this uncertainty. The author argues that Government commitments to reducing Carbon Monoxide (CO) emissions, and hence global warming, may strengthen arguments in favour of a firm commitment to nuclear power, as even modern fossil-fuelled power plants emit nearly 90 times as much CO as nuclear plants. (UK)

  3. The pre-ischaemic neuroprotective effects of N1-dansyl-spermine in a transient focal cerebral ischaemia model in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Henman, Martin C; Tatlisumak, Turgut; Shaw, Graham G; Doyle, Karen M

    2005-09-07

    The pre-ischaemic neuroprotective potential of a novel polyamine/NMDA antagonist N1-dansyl-spermine (1-5 mg kg(-1)) was studied in a transient focal cerebral ischaemia model in mice in comparison to a reference compound, MK-801 (1 or 3 mg kg(-1)). The intraluminal suture transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) model was used. N1-dansyl-spermine and MK-801 were administered (i.p.) 30 min prior to ischaemia. A range of histological and behavioural assessments was employed. N1-dansyl-spermine had a comparable effect to MK-801 at reducing the percentage hemisphere lesion volume (%HLV) at the doses tested. Furthermore, N1-dansyl-spermine reduced the ischaemic brain oedema, which MK-801 did not. N1-dansyl-spermine significantly reversed the decrease of locomotor activity (LMA) caused by the MCAO and showed a significant effect at improving the rotarod performance impaired by MCAO. In contrast, MK-801 had no beneficial effect on sensorimotor function and even worsened the LMA. These results clearly demonstrate the pre-ischaemic neuroprotective effect of N1-dansyl-spermine in a transient focal cerebral ischaemia model.

  4. Women with dysmenorrhoea are hypersensitive to experimentally induced forearm ischaemia during painful menstruation and during the pain-free follicular phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacovides, S; Avidon, I; Baker, F C

    2015-07-01

    Monthly primary dysmenorrhoeic pain is associated with increased sensitivity to painful stimuli, particularly in deep tissue. We investigated whether women with dysmenorrhoea, compared with controls, have increased sensitivity to experimentally induced deep-tissue muscle ischaemia in a body area distant from that of referred menstrual pain. The sub-maximal effort tourniquet test was used to induce forearm ischaemia in 11 women with severe dysmenorrhoea and in nine control women both during menstruation and in the follicular phase of the menstrual cycle. Von Frey hair assessments confirmed the presence of experimental ischaemia. Women rated the intensity of menstrual and ischaemic pain on a 100-mm visual analogue scale. Women with dysmenorrhoea [mean (SD): 68 (20) mm] reported significantly greater menstrual pain compared with controls [mean (SD): 2 (6) mm; p = 0.0001] during the menstruation phase. They also rated their forearm ischaemic pain as significantly greater than the controls during the menstruation [dysmenorrhoeics vs. controls mean (SD): 58 (19) mm vs. 31 (21) mm, p menstruation phase and pain-free follicular phase. These findings suggest the presence of long-lasting changes in muscle pain sensitivity in women with dysmenorrhoea. Our findings that dysmenorrhoeic women are hyperalgesic to a clinically relevant, deep-muscle ischaemic pain in areas outside of referred menstrual pain confirm other studies showing long-lasting changes in pain sensitivity outside of the painful period during menstruation. © 2014 European Pain Federation - EFIC®

  5. Medium intensity oral anticoagulants versus aspirin after cerebral ischaemia of arterial origin (ESPRIT): a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halkes, P H A; van Gijn, J; Kappelle, L J; Koudstaal, P J; Algra, A

    2007-02-01

    Oral anticoagulants are better than aspirin for secondary prevention after myocardial infarction and after cerebral ischaemia in combination with non-rheumatic atrial fibrillation. The European/Australasian Stroke Prevention in Reversible Ischaemia Trial (ESPRIT) aimed to determine whether oral anticoagulation with medium intensity is more effective than aspirin in preventing future vascular events in patients with transient ischaemic attack or minor stroke of presumed arterial origin. In this international, multicentre trial, patients were randomly assigned within 6 months after a transient ischaemic attack or minor stroke of presumed arterial origin either anticoagulants (target INR range 2.0-3.0; n=536) or aspirin (30-325 mg daily; n=532). The primary outcome was the composite of death from all vascular causes, non-fatal stroke, non-fatal myocardial infarction, or major bleeding complication, whichever occurred first. In a post hoc analysis anticoagulants were compared with the combination of aspirin and dipyridamole (200 mg twice daily). Treatment was open, but auditing of outcome events was blinded. Primary analysis was by intention to treat. This study is registered as an International Standard Randomised Controlled Trial (number ISRCTN73824458) and with ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT00161070). The anticoagulants versus aspirin comparison of ESPRIT was prematurely ended because ESPRIT reported previously that the combination of aspirin and dipyridamole was more effective than aspirin alone. Mean follow-up was 4.6 years (SD 2.2). The mean achieved INR was 2.57 (SD 0.86). A primary outcome event occurred in 99 (19%) patients on anticoagulants and in 98 (18%) patients on aspirin (hazard ratio [HR] 1.02, 95% CI 0.77-1.35). The HR for ischaemic events was 0.73 (0.52-1.01) and for major bleeding complications 2.56 (1.48-4.43). The HR for the primary outcome event comparing anticoagulants with the combination treatment of aspirin and dipyridamole was 1.31 (0.98-1.75). Oral

  6. Versions of the Waste Reduction Model (WARM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page provides a brief chronology of changes made to EPA’s Waste Reduction Model (WARM), organized by WARM version number. The page includes brief summaries of changes and updates since the previous version.

  7. Documentation for the Waste Reduction Model (WARM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page describes the WARM documentation files and provides links to all documentation files associated with EPA’s Waste Reduction Model (WARM). The page includes a brief summary of the chapters documenting the greenhouse gas emission and energy factors.

  8. Global warming: Clouds cooled the Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauritsen, Thorsten

    2016-12-01

    The slow instrumental-record warming is consistent with lower-end climate sensitivity. Simulations and observations now show that changing sea surface temperature patterns could have affected cloudiness and thereby dampened the warming.

  9. Cosmic rays and global warming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erlykin, A.D. [P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); Sloan, T. [Lancaster University (United Kingdom); Wolfendale, A.W. [Durham University (United Kingdom)

    2010-07-01

    The possible effects of cosmic rays on clouds could contribute to global warming. The argument is that the observed increased solar activity during the last century caused a decrease in the ionization due to cosmic rays since the lower energy cosmic particles are deflected by the magnetic field created by the increasing solar wind. This would lead to a decrease in cloud cover allowing more heating of the earth by the sun. Meteorological data combined to solar activity observations and simulations show that any effect of solar activity on clouds and the climate is likely to be through irradiance rather than cosmic rays. Since solar irradiance transfers 8 orders of magnitude more energy to the atmosphere than cosmic rays it is more plausible that this can produce a real effect. The total contribution of variable solar activity to global warming is shown to be less than 14% of the total temperature rise. (A.C.)

  10. Global Warming and Financial Umbrellas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dosi, C.; Moretto, M.

    2001-10-01

    A new instrument for hedging weather risks has made its appearance in the financial arena. Trade in 'weather derivatives' has taken off in the US, and interest is growing elsewhere. Whilst such contracts may be simply interpreted as a new tool for solving a historical problem, the question addressed in this paper is if, besides other factors, the appearance of weather derivatives is somehow related to anthropogenic climate change. Our tentative answer is positive. Since 'global warming' does not simply mean an increase in averaged temperatures, but increased climate variability, and increased frequency and magnitude of weather extremes, derivative contracts may potentially become a useful tool for hedging some weather risks, insofar as they may provide coverage at a lower cost than standard insurance schemes. Keywords: Global warming, climate variability, insurance coverage, weather derivatives

  11. Warm Debris Disks from WISE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padgett, Deborah L.

    2011-01-01

    "The Wide Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) has just completed a sensitive all-sky survey in photometric bands at 3.4, 4.6, 12, and 22 microns. We report on a preliminary investigation of main sequence Hipparcos and Tycho catalog stars with 22 micron emission in excess of photospheric levels. This warm excess emission traces material in the circumstellar region likely to host terrestrial planets and is preferentially found in young systems with ages warm debris disk candidates are detected among FGK stars and a similar number of A stars within 120 pc. We are in the process of obtaining spectra to determine spectral types and activity level of these stars and are using HST, Herschel and Keck to characterize the dust, multiplicity, and substellar companions of these systems. In this contribution, we will discuss source selection methods and individual examples from among the WISE debris disk candidates. "

  12. Global Warming Blame the Sun

    CERN Document Server

    Calder, N

    1997-01-01

    Concern about climate change reaches a political peak at a UN conference in Kyoto, 1-10 December, but behind the scenes the science is in turmoil. A challenge to the hypothesis that greenhouse gases are responsible for global warming comes from the discovery that cosmic rays from the Galaxy are involved in making clouds (Svensmark and Friis-Christensen, 1997). During the 20th Century the wind from the Sun has grown stronger and the count of cosmic rays has diminished. With fewer clouds, the EarthÕs surface has warmed up. This surprising mechanism explains the link between the Sun and climate change that astronomers and geophysicists have suspected for 200 years.

  13. Plant movements and climate warming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Frenne, Pieter; Coomes, David A.; De Schrijver, An

    2014-01-01

    environments can establish in nonlocal sites. •We assess the intraspecific variation in growth responses to nonlocal soils by planting a widespread grass of deciduous forests (Milium effusum) into an experimental common garden using combinations of seeds and soil sampled in 22 sites across its distributional...... range, and reflecting movement scenarios of up to 1600 km. Furthermore, to determine temperature and forest-structural effects, the plants and soils were experimentally warmed and shaded. •We found significantly positive effects of the difference between the temperature of the sites of seed and soil...... collection on growth and seedling emergence rates. Migrant plants might thus encounter increasingly favourable soil conditions while tracking the isotherms towards currently ‘colder’ soils. These effects persisted under experimental warming. Rising temperatures and light availability generally enhanced plant...

  14. A meta-analysis of the association of serum ischaemia-modified albumin levels with human hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Varikasuvu Seshadri; Bukke, Suman; Mahato, Khageshwar; Kumar, Vinod; Reddy, Netala Vasudeva; Munikumar, Manne; Vodelu, Bramahanapally

    2017-02-28

    Serum levels of ischaemia-modified albumin (IMA) have been studied as a novel and simple measure of oxidative stress (OXS) in different thyroid pathologies. However, results of available studies in the literature were not consistent. This meta-analysis was attempted to quantify the overall effect size for serum IMA levels in human hypothyroidism (HT) and hyperthyroidism (HYT) and to study its associations with the thyroid profile. Databases of PubMed/Medline, EMBASE, Google Scholar, Web of Science and Science Direct were searched for articles. Data on serum IMA levels in HT, HYT patients and euthyroid controls were extracted to compute standardized mean differences (SMD) by the random-effects model. The associations between IMA and thyroid profile were computed by the meta-analysis of correlation coefficients. IMA levels in HT patients (SMD=1.12; Z=2.76; P=0.006) and HYT patients (SMD=1.64; Z=2.57; P=0.01) were significantly higher than in euthyroid controls and the thyroid treatment showed a favourble effect on serum IMA levels. There were strong and significant correlations between IMA and hormonal status in HT and HYT groups. This meta-analysis showing increased IMA level in both HT and HYT patients and its association with thyroid profile suggests that serum IMA could be used as a simple measure of increased OXS in thyroid dysfunction. © 2017 The Author(s).

  15. Global warming and climate change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-10-01

    A panel discussion was held to discuss climate change. Six panelists made presentations that summarized ozone depletion and climate change, discussed global responses, argued against the conventional scientific and policy dogmas concerning climate change, examined the effects of ultraviolet radiation on phytoplankton, examined the effects of carbon taxes on Canadian industry and its emissions, and examined the political and strategic aspects of global warming. A question session followed the presentations. Separate abstracts have been prepared for the six presentations

  16. Global warming and economic growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonand, Frederic

    2015-01-01

    The macro-economic impacts of climate change and of policies to reduce carbon content should be moderate on a global basis for the planet - a few hundredths of a % of world GDP on an annual basis, but significant for some regions (Asia-Pacific notably). The probability of extreme climatic events justifies with effect from today the implementation of measures that will carry a cost in order to limit global warming. (author)

  17. Nitrous oxide and global warming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kroeze, C.

    1994-01-01

    The climatic impact of nitrous oxide (N 2 O) emissions is calculated annually for the period 1900-2100, using a globally averaged computer model. Emissions of N 2 O have been increasing up top an estimated 12.7 Tg N/year in 1990 by human activities and global warming. If the current trends continue, emissions are estimated to be 25.7 Tg N/year by 2100, with fossil-fuel use and human food production as major contributors. The resulting equilibrium temperature increase (0.37 degree C) exceeds the forcing derived from climate goals that may be considered environmentally desirable. Limiting equilibrium warming to 0.1 degree C per decade would require anthropogenic-induced and warming-induced N 2 O emissions to be reduced by 80% relative to current trends and to be stabilized from 2050, so that 10.7 Tg N/year is emitted by 2100. To stabilize the current concentration or climate forcing of N 2 , substantially larger cuts are needed. However, even in an optimistic scenario, emissions keep increasing up to 14.4. Tg N/year by 2100. A major reason is the close connection between N 2 O emissions and human food production. Synthetic fertilizer use, land-use change, and production of manure increase almost inevitably as the human population grows. Thus if global warming is to be limited to 0.1 degree C per decade it may be necessary to set emission reductions for other greenhouse gases relatively high to compensate for growth in climatic forcing by N 2 O

  18. Movement of global warming issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugiyama, Taishi

    2015-01-01

    This paper summarizes the report of IPCC (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change), and the movement of the global warming issues as seen from the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (Conference of the Parties: COP) and the policy discussions in Japan. From the Fifth Assessment Report published by IPCC, it shows the following items: (1) increasing trends of greenhouse effect gas emissions during 1970 and 2010, (2) trends in world's greenhouse effect gas emissions according to income segment, and (3) factor analysis of changes in greenhouse effect gas emissions. Next, it takes up the greenhouse gas emission scenario of IPCC, shows the scenario due to temperature rise pattern, and introduces the assumption of emission reduction due to BECCS. Regarding the 2 deg. scenario that has become a hot topic in international negotiations, it describes the reason for difficulties in its implementation. In addition, as the international trends of global warming, it describes the agreement of numerical targets for emissions at COP3 (Kyoto Conference) and the subsequent movements. Finally, it introduces Japan's measures against global warming, as well as the future movement. (A.O.)

  19. Global warming: Economic policy responses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dornbusch, R.; Poterba, J.M.

    1991-01-01

    This volume contains the proceedings of a conference that brought together economic experts from Europe, the US, Latin America, and Japan to evaluate key issues in the policy debate in global warming. The following issues are at the center of debates on alternative policies to address global warming: scientific evidence on the magnitude of global warming and the extent to which it is due to human activities; availability of economic tools to control the anthropogenic emissions of greenhouse gases, and how vigorously should they be applied; and political economy considerations which influence the design of an international program for controlling greenhouse gases. Many perspectives are offered on the approaches to remedying environmental problems that are currently being pursued in Europe and the Pacific Rim. Deforestation in the Amazon is discussed, as well as ways to slow it. Public finance assessments are presented of both the domestic and international policy issues raised by plans to levy a tax on the carbon emissions from various fossil fuels. Nine chapters have been processed separately for inclusion in the appropriate data bases

  20. World warms to nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mortimer, N.

    1989-01-01

    The greenhouse effect and global warming is a major environmental issue. The nuclear industry has taken this opportunity to promote itself as providing clean energy without implication in either the greenhouse effect or acid rain. However, it is acknowledged that nuclear power does have its own environment concerns. Two questions are posed -does nuclear power contribute to carbon dioxide emissions and can nuclear power provide a realistic long-term solution to global warming? Although nuclear power stations do not emit carbon dioxide, emissions occur during the manufacture of reactor components, the operation of the nuclear fuel cycle and especially, during the mining and processing of the uranium ore. It is estimated that the supply of high grade ores will last only 23 years, beyond that the carbon dioxide emitted during the processing is estimated to be as great as the carbon dioxide emitted from an coal-fired reactor. Fast breeder reactors are dismissed as unable to provide an answer, so it is concluded that nuclear technology has only a very limited role to play in countering global warming.(UK)

  1. Greenhouse gases and global warming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    From previous articles we have learned about the complexities of our environment, its atmosphere and its climate system. we have also learned that climate change and, therefore global warm and cool periods are naturally occurring phenomena. Moreover, all scientific evidence suggests that global warming, are likely to occur again naturally in the future. However, we have not yet considered the role of the rates of climate change in affecting the biosphere. It appears that how quickly the climate changes may be more important than the change itself. In light of this concern, let us now consider the possibility that, is due to human activity. We may over the next century experience global warming at rates and magnitudes unparalleled in recent geologic history. The following questions are answered; What can we learn from past climates? What do we know about global climates over the past 100 years? What causes temperature change? What are the greenhouse gases? How much have concentration of greenhouse gases increased in recent years? Why are increases in concentrations of greenhouse of concern? What is the e nhanced greenhouse effect ? How can human activity impact the global climate? What are some reasons for increased concentrations of greenhouse gases? What are fossil fuel and how do they transform into greenhouse gases? Who are the biggest emitters of greenhouse gases? Why are canada per capita emissions of greenhouse gases relatively high? (Author)

  2. Global warming combat policies in energy sector of Iran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahimi, N.; Karbassi, A. R.; Abbaspour, M.

    2002-01-01

    Among the efforts to slow the potential for climate change are measures to reduce emissions of CO 2 from energy use, and promote long-term storage of carbon in forests and soils. Important environmental changes due to climate change and global warming pose potentially significant risks to humans, social systems, and natural world. Many uncertainties remain regarding precise timing,magnitude, and regional patterns of climate change and the extent to which mankind and nature can adapt to any changes. Estimating technical / economical / environmental potentials for reducing CO 2 emission in energy sector and preventing of global warming is one of the main activities, which have been performed for the first time in Iran. By use of 26 factors, model on global warming combat policies in energy sector of Iran in long-medium and short term determine decreasing amount of CO 2 emission. The results and also method of providing this model will be described in this paper

  3. Constraining the trigger for an ancient warming episode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Colin

    2011-08-01

    The Paleocene epoch (˜66-56 million years ago) was sandwiched between sudden climate shifts and mass extinctions. The boundary between the end of the Paleocene and the beginning of the Eocene (the P-E boundary) saw the global average temperature soar by 5°C over a few thousand years, leading to a pronounced reorganization of both terrestrial and oceanic plant and animal communities. The P-E boundary warming was triggered by an influx of atmospheric carbon dioxide, but the influx's ultimate trigger is still being debated. Other prominent warming events within the Paleogene (˜66-23 million years ago), the broad time span that encompasses the Paleocene and Eocene, have been linked to regularly recurring changes in the eccentricity of the Earth's orbit that take place on 100,000- and 405,000-year cycles. Proponents of this view suggest that an alignment of the two cycles could lead to the warming of deep ocean waters, melting frozen methane and triggering an increase in atmospheric carbon dioxide. However, some studies have suggested that the P-E boundary warming was instead the product of geological processes, where carbon-rich rocks were baked by injected magma, which eventually liberated the carbon to the atmosphere. Deciding between proposed explanations for the cause of the P-E warming, whether they are astronomical or geological, depends on accurately pinning the event in time. (Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems, doi:10.1029/2010GC003426, 2011)

  4. Warm Dense Matter: An Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalantar, D H; Lee, R W; Molitoris, J D

    2004-01-01

    This document provides a summary of the ''LLNL Workshop on Extreme States of Materials: Warm Dense Matter to NIF'' which was held on 20, 21, and 22 February 2002 at the Wente Conference Center in Livermore, CA. The warm dense matter regime, the transitional phase space region between cold material and hot plasma, is presently poorly understood. The drive to understand the nature of matter in this regime is sparking scientific activity worldwide. In addition to pure scientific interest, finite temperature dense matter occurs in the regimes of interest to the SSMP (Stockpile Stewardship Materials Program). So that obtaining a better understanding of WDM is important to performing effective experiments at, e.g., NIF, a primary mission of LLNL. At this workshop we examined current experimental and theoretical work performed at, and in conjunction with, LLNL to focus future activities and define our role in this rapidly emerging research area. On the experimental front LLNL plays a leading role in three of the five relevant areas and has the opportunity to become a major player in the other two. Discussion at the workshop indicated that the path forward for the experimental efforts at LLNL were two fold: First, we are doing reasonable baseline work at SPLs, HE, and High Energy Lasers with more effort encouraged. Second, we need to plan effectively for the next evolution in large scale facilities, both laser (NIF) and Light/Beam sources (LCLS/TESLA and GSI) Theoretically, LLNL has major research advantages in areas as diverse as the thermochemical approach to warm dense matter equations of state to first principles molecular dynamics simulations. However, it was clear that there is much work to be done theoretically to understand warm dense matter. Further, there is a need for a close collaboration between the generation of verifiable experimental data that can provide benchmarks of both the experimental techniques and the theoretical capabilities. The conclusion of this

  5. Impact and prevention on global warming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Heon Ryeol

    2003-11-01

    This book deals with impact and prevention on global warming with eight chapters, which introduce the change after the earth was born and natural environment, how is global atmospheric environment under the control of radiant energy? What does global warming look with the earth history like? What's the status of global warming so far? How does climate change happen? What is the impact by global warming and climate change and for preservation of global environment of 21 century with consumption of energy, measure and prospect on global warming. It has reference, index and three appendixes.

  6. Warm water and cool nests are best. How global warming might influence hatchling green turtle swimming performance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David T Booth

    Full Text Available For sea turtles nesting on beaches surrounded by coral reefs, the most important element of hatchling recruitment is escaping predation by fish as they swim across the fringing reef, and as a consequence hatchlings that minimize their exposure to fish predation by minimizing the time spent crossing the fringing reef have a greater chance of surviving the reef crossing. One way to decrease the time required to cross the fringing reef is to maximize swimming speed. We found that both water temperature and nest temperature influence swimming performance of hatchling green turtles, but in opposite directions. Warm water increases swimming ability, with hatchling turtles swimming in warm water having a faster stroke rate, while an increase in nest temperature decreases swimming ability with hatchlings from warm nests producing less thrust per stroke.

  7. Continuously amplified warming in the Alaskan Arctic: Implications for estimating global warming hiatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kang; Zhang, Tingjun; Zhang, Xiangdong; Clow, Gary D.; Jafarov, Elchin E.; Overeem, Irina; Romanovsky, Vladimir; Peng, Xiaoqing; Cao, Bin

    2017-01-01

    Historically, in situ measurements have been notoriously sparse over the Arctic. As a consequence, the existing gridded data of surface air temperature (SAT) may have large biases in estimating the warming trend in this region. Using data from an expanded monitoring network with 31 stations in the Alaskan Arctic, we demonstrate that the SAT has increased by 2.19°C in this region, or at a rate of 0.23°C/decade during 1921–2015. Meanwhile, we found that the SAT warmed at 0.71°C/decade over 1998–2015, which is 2 to 3 times faster than the rate established from the gridded data sets. Focusing on the “hiatus” period 1998–2012 as identified by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report, the SAT has increased at 0.45°C/decade, which captures more than 90% of the regional trend for 1951–2012. We suggest that sparse in situ measurements are responsible for underestimation of the SAT change in the gridded data sets. It is likely that enhanced climate warming may also have happened in the other regions of the Arctic since the late 1990s but left undetected because of incomplete observational coverage.

  8. Global Changes in Drought Conditions Under Different Levels of Warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumann, G.; Alfieri, L.; Wyser, K.; Mentaschi, L.; Betts, R. A.; Carrao, H.; Spinoni, J.; Vogt, J.; Feyen, L.

    2018-04-01

    Higher evaporative demands and more frequent and persistent dry spells associated with rising temperatures suggest that drought conditions could worsen in many regions of the world. In this study, we assess how drought conditions may develop across the globe for 1.5, 2, and 3°C warming compared to preindustrial temperatures. Results show that two thirds of global population will experience a progressive increase in drought conditions with warming. For drying areas, drought durations are projected to rise at rapidly increasing rates with warming, averaged globally from 2.0 month/°C below 1.5°C to 4.2 month/°C when approaching 3°C. Drought magnitudes could double for 30% of global landmass under stringent mitigation. If contemporary warming rates continue, water supply-demand deficits could become fivefold in size for most of Africa, Australia, southern Europe, southern and central states of the United States, Central America, the Caribbean, north-west China, and parts of Southern America. In approximately 20% of the global land surface, drought magnitude will halve with warming of 1.5°C and higher levels, mainly most land areas north of latitude 55°N, but also parts of South America and Eastern and South-eastern Asia. A progressive and significant increase in frequency of droughts is projected with warming in the Mediterranean basin, most of Africa, West and Southern Asia, Central America, and Oceania, where droughts are projected to happen 5 to 10 times more frequent even under ambitious mitigation targets and current 100-year events could occur every two to five years under 3°C of warming.

  9. Methods of patient warming during abdominal surgery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Shao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Keeping abdominal surgery patients warm is common and warming methods are needed in power outages during natural disasters. We aimed to evaluate the efficacy of low-cost, low-power warming methods for maintaining normothermia in abdominal surgery patients. METHODS: Patients (n = 160 scheduled for elective abdominal surgery were included in this prospective clinical study. Five warming methods were applied: heated blood transfusion/fluid infusion vs. unheated; wrapping patients vs. not wrapping; applying moist dressings, heated or not; surgical field rinse heated or not; and applying heating blankets or not. Patients' nasopharyngeal and rectal temperatures were recorded to evaluate warming efficacy. Significant differences were found in mean temperatures of warmed patients compared to those not warmed. RESULTS: When we compared temperatures of abdominal surgery patient groups receiving three specific warming methods with temperatures of control groups not receiving these methods, significant differences were revealed in temperatures maintained during the surgeries between the warmed groups and controls. DISCUSSION: The value of maintaining normothermia in patients undergoing abdominal surgery under general anesthesia is accepted. Three effective economical and practically applicable warming methods are combined body wrapping and heating blanket; combined body wrapping, heated moist dressings, and heating blanket; combined body wrapping, heated moist dressings, and warmed surgical rinse fluid, with or without heating blanket. These methods are practically applicable when low-cost method is indeed needed.

  10. Global warming and obesity: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, R; Ji, M; Zhang, S

    2018-02-01

    Global warming and the obesity epidemic are two unprecedented challenges mankind faces today. A literature search was conducted in the PubMed, Web of Science, EBSCO and Scopus for articles published until July 2017 that reported findings on the relationship between global warming and the obesity epidemic. Fifty studies were identified. Topic-wise, articles were classified into four relationships - global warming and the obesity epidemic are correlated because of common drivers (n = 21); global warming influences the obesity epidemic (n = 13); the obesity epidemic influences global warming (n = 13); and global warming and the obesity epidemic influence each other (n = 3). We constructed a conceptual model linking global warming and the obesity epidemic - the fossil fuel economy, population growth and industrialization impact land use and urbanization, motorized transportation and agricultural productivity and consequently influences global warming by excess greenhouse gas emission and the obesity epidemic by nutrition transition and physical inactivity; global warming also directly impacts obesity by food supply/price shock and adaptive thermogenesis, and the obesity epidemic impacts global warming by the elevated energy consumption. Policies that endorse deployment of clean and sustainable energy sources, and urban designs that promote active lifestyles, are likely to alleviate the societal burden of global warming and obesity. © 2017 World Obesity Federation.

  11. Warm-Up Exercises May Not Be So Important for Enhancing Submaximal Running Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takizawa, Kazuki; Yamaguchi, Taichi; Shibata, Keisuke

    2018-05-01

    Takizawa, K, Yamaguchi, T, and Shibata, K. Warm-up exercises may not be so important for enhancing submaximal running performance. J Strength Cond Res 32(5): 1383-1390, 2018-The purpose of this study was to determine an appropriate warm-up intensity for enhancing performance in submaximal running at 90% vV[Combining Dot Above]O2max (it assumes 3,000-5,000 m in track events). Seven trained male university athletes took part in this study (age: 21.3 ± 2.1 years, height: 169.3 ± 4.7 cm, body mass: 58.4 ± 5.6 kg, V[Combining Dot Above]O2max: 73.33 ± 5.46 ml·kg·min). Each subject ran on a treadmill at 90% vV[Combining Dot Above]O2max until exhaustion after 1 of 4 warm-up treatments. The 4 warm-up treatments were no warm-up, 15 minutes running at 60% vV[Combining Dot Above]O2max, at 70% vV[Combining Dot Above]O2max, and at 80% vV[Combining Dot Above]O2max. The running performance was evaluated by time to exhaustion (TTE). V[Combining Dot Above]O2, and vastus lateralis muscle temperature were also measured. There were no significant differences in TTE among the warm-up exercises (p > 0.05). V[Combining Dot Above]O2 in no warm-up showed slower reaction than the other warm-up exercises. Regarding, the vastus lateralis muscle temperature immediately after warm-up, no warm-up was significantly (p warm-up exercises. Our results suggested that submaximal running performance was not affected by the presence or absence of a warm-up or by warm-up intensity, although physiological changes occurred.

  12. Global warming-setting the stages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    Most of us have heard or read about global warming. However, the messages we receive are often in conflict, raising more questions than answer. Is global warming a good or a bad thing? has it already started or is it part of our future? Are we, or are we not doing anything about it? Should we be concerned? This primer on Global Warming is designed to clear up some of this confusion by providing basic scientific information on global warming issue. It is clear that there is still much to learn about global warming. However, it is also clear that there is a lot that we already know - and that dose provide cause for concern. We must understand the global warming issue if we are to make wise decisions and take responsible actions in response to the challenges and opportunities posed by global warming. Chapter 1 of 'the primer on global Warming' set the stage with a brief overview of science of global warming within the context of climate change. In addition, it introduces the specific issues that surround the global warming problem. As far as the science of global warming is concerned the following questions are discussed. What is global climate? Is climate change natural? What causes climate to vary on a global scale? How does the composition of the atmosphere relate to climate change. but there are also certain issues discussed here which surround the global warming such as: If climate varies naturally, why is there a concern about 'global warming'? What are the potential consequences of 'global warning'. What human activities contribute to 'global warming'. (Author)

  13. What if mankind warms the earth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kellogg, W.W.

    1977-01-01

    There are a variety of human activities that are being pursued on such a large scale that they may influence regional and global climate. Virtually all of these activities, including the addition of carbon dioxide and particles to the atmosphere, are expected on theoretical grounds to cause an increase in mean surface temperature in the decades ahead, and by 2000 AD the total warming effect will probably be larger than any of the natural climate fluctuations during the past 1,000 years or more. It is therefore pertinent ot inquire what a warmer earth might be like; and to obtain a first rough answer we turn to our mathematical models of the atmosphere, and also to the conditions that have been deduced for the period about 4,000 to 8,000 years ago when the earth was apparently several degress warmer the now. Atan now. At that time some areas that are now subtropical deserts received more rainfall, and there were other areas in the middle latitudes that were drier. There are several important implications for society if mankind does succeed in warming the earth - and a number of still unanswered questions as well. (orig.) [de

  14. Application of wavelet analysis in determining the periodicity of global warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xiao

    2018-04-01

    In the last two decades of the last century, the global average temperature has risen by 0.48 ° C over 100 years ago. Since then, global warming has become a hot topic. Global warming will have complex and potential impacts on humans and the Earth. However, the negative impacts far outweigh the positive impacts. The most obvious external manifestation of global warming is temperature. Therefore, this study uses wavelet analysis study the characteristics of temperature time series, solve the periodicity of the sequence, find out the trend of temperature change and predict the extent of global warming in the future, so as to take the necessary precautionary measures.

  15. Germination Shifts of C3 and C4 Species under Simulated Global Warming Scenario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongxiang; Yu, Qiang; Huang, Yingxin; Zheng, Wei; Tian, Yu; Song, Yantao; Li, Guangdi; Zhou, Daowei

    2014-01-01

    Research efforts around the world have been increasingly devoted to investigating changes in C3 and C4 species' abundance or distribution with global warming, as they provide important insight into carbon fluxes and linked biogeochemical cycles. However, changes in the early life stage (e.g. germination) of C3 and C4 species in response to global warming, particularly with respect to asymmetric warming, have received less attention. We investigated germination percentage and rate of C3 and C4 species under asymmetric (+3/+6°C at day/night) and symmetric warming (+5/+5°C at day/night), simulated by alternating temperatures. A thermal time model was used to calculate germination base temperature and thermal time constant. Two additional alternating temperature regimes were used to test temperature metrics effect. The germination percentage and rate increased continuously for C4 species, but increased and then decreased with temperature for C3 species under both symmetric and asymmetric warming. Compared to asymmetric warming, symmetric warming significantly overestimated the speed of germination percentage change with temperature for C4 species. Among the temperature metrics (minimum, maximum, diurnal temperature range and average temperature), maximum temperature was most correlated with germination of C4 species. Our results indicate that global warming may favour germination of C4 species, at least for the C4 species studied in this work. The divergent effects of asymmetric and symmetric warming on plant germination also deserve more attention in future studies. PMID:25137138

  16. Germination shifts of C3 and C4 species under simulated global warming scenario.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongxiang Zhang

    Full Text Available Research efforts around the world have been increasingly devoted to investigating changes in C3 and C4 species' abundance or distribution with global warming, as they provide important insight into carbon fluxes and linked biogeochemical cycles. However, changes in the early life stage (e.g. germination of C3 and C4 species in response to global warming, particularly with respect to asymmetric warming, have received less attention. We investigated germination percentage and rate of C3 and C4 species under asymmetric (+3/+6°C at day/night and symmetric warming (+5/+5°C at day/night, simulated by alternating temperatures. A thermal time model was used to calculate germination base temperature and thermal time constant. Two additional alternating temperature regimes were used to test temperature metrics effect. The germination percentage and rate increased continuously for C4 species, but increased and then decreased with temperature for C3 species under both symmetric and asymmetric warming. Compared to asymmetric warming, symmetric warming significantly overestimated the speed of germination percentage change with temperature for C4 species. Among the temperature metrics (minimum, maximum, diurnal temperature range and average temperature, maximum temperature was most correlated with germination of C4 species. Our results indicate that global warming may favour germination of C4 species, at least for the C4 species studied in this work. The divergent effects of asymmetric and symmetric warming on plant germination also deserve more attention in future studies.

  17. Germination shifts of C3 and C4 species under simulated global warming scenario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongxiang; Yu, Qiang; Huang, Yingxin; Zheng, Wei; Tian, Yu; Song, Yantao; Li, Guangdi; Zhou, Daowei

    2014-01-01

    Research efforts around the world have been increasingly devoted to investigating changes in C3 and C4 species' abundance or distribution with global warming, as they provide important insight into carbon fluxes and linked biogeochemical cycles. However, changes in the early life stage (e.g. germination) of C3 and C4 species in response to global warming, particularly with respect to asymmetric warming, have received less attention. We investigated germination percentage and rate of C3 and C4 species under asymmetric (+3/+6°C at day/night) and symmetric warming (+5/+5°C at day/night), simulated by alternating temperatures. A thermal time model was used to calculate germination base temperature and thermal time constant. Two additional alternating temperature regimes were used to test temperature metrics effect. The germination percentage and rate increased continuously for C4 species, but increased and then decreased with temperature for C3 species under both symmetric and asymmetric warming. Compared to asymmetric warming, symmetric warming significantly overestimated the speed of germination percentage change with temperature for C4 species. Among the temperature metrics (minimum, maximum, diurnal temperature range and average temperature), maximum temperature was most correlated with germination of C4 species. Our results indicate that global warming may favour germination of C4 species, at least for the C4 species studied in this work. The divergent effects of asymmetric and symmetric warming on plant germination also deserve more attention in future studies.

  18. Does Vibration Warm-up Enhance Kinetic and Temporal Sprint Parameters?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochrane, D J; Cronin, M J; Fink, P W

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy of vibration warm-up to enhance sprint performance. 12 males involved in representative team sports performed 4 warm-up conditions in a randomised order performed at least 24 h apart; VbX warm-up (VbX-WU); Neural activation warm-up (Neu-WU); Dynamic warm-up (Dyn-WU) and Control (No VbX). Participants completed 5 m sprint at 30 s, 2:30 min and 5 min post warm-up where sprint time, kinetics, and temporal components were recorded. There was no significant (p>0.05) main effect or interaction effect between the split sprint times of 1 m, 2.5 m, and 5 m. There was a condition effect where vertical mean force was significantly higher (p0.05) main and interaction effects in sprint kinetic and temporal parameters existed. Overall, all 4 warm-up conditions produced comparable results for sprint performance, and there was no detrimental effect on short-duration sprint performance using VbX-WU. Therefore, VbX could be useful for adding variety to the training warm-up or be included into the main warm-up routine as a supplementary modality. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  19. EFFECTS OF DYNAMIC AND STATIC STRETCHING WITHIN GENERAL AND ACTIVITY SPECIFIC WARM-UP PROTOCOLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Samson

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to determine the effects of static and dynamic stretching protocols within general and activity specific warm-ups. Nine male and ten female subjects were tested under four warm-up conditions including a 1 general aerobic warm-up with static stretching, 2 general aerobic warm-up with dynamic stretching, 3 general and specific warm-up with static stretching and 4 general and specific warm-up with dynamic stretching. Following all conditions, subjects were tested for movement time (kicking movement of leg over 0.5 m distance, countermovement jump height, sit and reach flexibility and 6 repetitions of 20 metre sprints. Results indicated that when a sport specific warm-up was included, there was an 0.94% improvement (p = 0.0013 in 20 meter sprint time with both the dynamic and static stretch groups. No such difference in sprint performance between dynamic and static stretch groups existed in the absence of the sport specific warm-up. The static stretch condition increased sit and reach range of motion (ROM by 2.8% more (p = 0.0083 than the dynamic condition. These results would support the use of static stretching within an activity specific warm-up to ensure maximal ROM along with an enhancement in sprint performance

  20. Slowing global warming biotically - Options for the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    Each of the five biotic approaches introduced in Chapter 2 is applicable to some extent in the US. Taking US land-use characteristics into account, a menu of policy options tailored to US carbon storage opportunities is presented. Several of the options are capable of significantly reducing net US carbon emissions; several offer corollary benefits in areas other than global warming mitigation. The time frame and costs of the different options vary widely, although in most cases some level of implementation appears economically justified even without considering global warming. The approach, projected costs, and advantages of seven different policy options are profiled

  1. US demilitarization and global warming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heyes, A.G.; Liston-Heyes, C.; Royal Holloway and Bedford New College, London

    1993-01-01

    In the paper input-output methods are used to generate ballpark empirical estimates of the implications for global warming of the projected demilitarization of the US federal budget. The impact is found to be qualitatively ambiguous, and highly sensitive to the manner in which the funds saved are distributed. The effect is adverse where the budgetary savings are used to fund economy-wide cuts in personal taxation and/or deficit reduction. In other cases the effect may be neutral or beneficial. (author)

  2. Global warming and drainage development: perspective and challenges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wrachien, De D.; Feddes, R.A.

    2004-01-01

    The report gives an overview of current and future (time horizon 2025) drainage developments around the world. Moreover, the paper analyses the results of four of the most advanced global circulation models for assessing the hydrological impact of global warming, due to the greenhouse effect, on the

  3. The Relational Concurrence of Global Warming and Economic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    global warming and economic development focusing on the danger it inheres in ... that both developing and developed countries should sink their differences, .... with time. Other fossils exist but are still under investigation. These fossil fuels contribute greatly to human existence in the areas of. Electricity generation and ...

  4. Global Warming: A Review of the Debates on the Causes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Global Warming: A Review of the Debates on the Causes, Consequences and ... of many species, population displacement/migration, desertification, famine, ... and make it a major political, institutional and environmental challenge of our time. ... Alternative actions such as climate change adaptation and/or mitigation ...

  5. FVS and global Warming: A prospectus for future development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholas L. Crookston; Gerald E. Rehfeldt; Dennis E. Ferguson; Marcus Warwell

    2008-01-01

    Climate change-global warming and changes in precipitation-will cause changes in tree growth rates, mortality rates, the distribution of tree species, competition, and species interactions. An implicit assumption in FVS is that site quality will remain the same as it was during the time period observations used to calibrate the component models were made and that the...

  6. Optimal design of a general warm standby system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, Won Young; Cha, Ji Hwan

    2010-01-01

    Redundancy or standby is a technique that has been widely applied to improving system reliability and availability in the stage of system design. In this paper, we consider a standby system with two units in which the first unit (unit 1) starts its operation under active state and the other unit (unit 2) is under cold standby state at the starting point. After a specified time s (switching time), the state of unit 2 is changed to warm standby state and, as soon as the operating unit 1 fails, the state of unit 2 is changed to active state. If unit 1 fails before time s, the system fails. Units can fail at both active and warm standby states. A general method for modeling the standby system is adopted and system performance measures (system reliability and mean life) based on the proposed model are derived. Three models - a perfect switching model and two imperfect switching models - are considered in this paper. Two imperfect switching models include an imperfect switching probability and a preliminary warm-up period which is required for the change from cold standby state to warm standby state. We consider the problem of determining the optimal switching time which maximizes the expected system life and related allocation problem is also discussed. Some numerical examples are studied.

  7. Recent decrease in typhoon destructive potential and global warming implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, I-I; Chan, Johnny C.L.

    2015-01-01

    Typhoons (tropical cyclones) severely impact the half-billion population of the Asian Pacific. Intriguingly, during the recent decade, typhoon destructive potential (Power Dissipation Index, PDI) has decreased considerably (by ∼35%). This decrease, paradoxically, has occurred despite the increase in typhoon intensity and ocean warming. Using the method proposed by Emanuel (in 2007), we show that the stronger negative contributions from typhoon frequency and duration, decrease to cancel the positive contribution from the increasing intensity, controlling the PDI. Examining the typhoons' environmental conditions, we find that although the ocean condition became more favourable (warming) in the recent decade, the atmospheric condition ‘worsened' at the same time. The ‘worsened' atmospheric condition appears to effectively overpower the ‘better' ocean conditions to suppress PDI. This stronger negative contribution from reduced typhoon frequency over the increased intensity is also present under the global warming scenario, based on analysis of the simulated typhoon data from high-resolution modelling. PMID:25990561

  8. Arctic plants are capable of sustained responses to long-term warming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert T. Barrett

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have shown that Arctic plants typically respond to warming with increased growth and reproductive effort and accelerated phenology, and that the magnitude of these responses is likely to change over time. We investigated the effects of long-term experimental warming on plant growth (leaf length and reproduction (inflorescence height, reproductive phenology and reproductive effort using 17–19 years of measurements collected as part of the International Tundra Experiment (ITEX at sites near Barrow and Atqasuk, Alaska. During the study period, linear regressions indicated non-significant tendencies towards warming air temperatures at our study sites. Results of our meta-analyses on the effect size of experimental warming (calculated as Hedges’ d indicated species generally responded to warming by increasing inflorescence height, increasing leaf length and flowering earlier, while reproductive effort did not respond consistently. Using weighted least-squares regressions on effect sizes, we found a significant trend towards dampened response to experimental warming over time for reproductive phenology. This tendency was consistent, though non-significant, across all traits. A separate analysis revealed significant trends towards reduced responses to experimental warming during warmer summers for all traits. We therefore propose that tendencies towards dampened plant responses to experimental warming over time are the result of regional warming. These results show that Arctic plants are capable of sustained responses to warming over long periods of time but also suggest that, as the region continues to warm, factors such as nutrient availability, competition and herbivory will become more limiting to plant growth and reproduction than temperature.

  9. a stochastic assessment of the effect of global warming on rainfall

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF EKWUEME

    KEYWORDS: Global Warming; Rainfall; Markov Process; Time Series; Agriculture. INTRODUCTION ... Central Region of Nigeria in the last three decades using .... r. Time. MSD: MAD: MAPE: Length: Moving Average. 68492.0. 229.3. 3806.2. 4.

  10. Evaluation of technetium-99m exametazime stabilised with cobalt chloride as a blood flow tracer in focal cerebral ischaemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gartshore, G [Wellcome Surgical Inst. and Hugh Fraser Neuroscience Labs., Glasgow Univ. (United Kingdom); Bannan, P [Wellcome Surgical Inst. and Hugh Fraser Neuroscience Labs., Glasgow Univ. (United Kingdom); Patterson, J [Wellcome Surgical Inst. and Hugh Fraser Neuroscience Labs., Glasgow Univ. (United Kingdom); Higley, B [Wellcome Surgical Inst. and Hugh Fraser Neuroscience Labs., Glasgow Univ. (United Kingdom); McCulloch, J [Wellcome Surgical Inst. and Hugh Fraser Neuroscience Labs., Glasgow Univ. (United Kingdom)

    1994-09-01

    A protocol has been devised to effectively extend the limited post-reconstitution shelf life of technetium-99m exametazime as a radiopharmaceutical for imaging cerebral blood flow (CBF) distribution. The potential of [sup 99m]Tc-exametazime stabilised with cobalt chloride for imaging CBF distribution as late as 4 h after reconstitution has been examined in ischaemic and non-ischaemic tissue in halothane-anaesthetised cats. Focal cerebral ischaemia was produced by permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion. The relationship between [sup 99m]Tc-exametazime uptake and retention and CBF (assessed with [[sup 14]C]iodoantipyrine 10 min after first radiopharmaceutical administration) was determined in the same tissue section with double label autoradiography. Over the CBF range 0 - 80 ml 100 g[sup -1] min[sup -1], the uptake of [sup 99m]Tc-exametazime (quantitatively and topographically) was linearly related to CBF irrespective of whether the [sup 99m]Tc-labelled tracer was unstabilised (and administered within 10 min of reconstitution) or was stabilised with cobalt chloride (and administered up to 240 min after reconstitution). For levels of CBF in excess of 80 ml 100 g[sup -1] min[sup -1] the excellent topographical relationship between [sup 99m]Tc-exametazime distribution and CBF is maintained but quantitatively, [sup 99m]Tc-exametazime underestimates CBF to a similar degree in animals receiving stabilised and unstabilised [sup 99m]Tc-exametazime. The presence of the stabiliser, cobalt chloride, extends greatly the period over which [sup 99m]Tc-exametazime can be used after reconstitution to generate images of CBF distribution in normal and ischaemic cerebral tissue. (orig.)

  11. Retinoic acid-loaded polymeric nanoparticles enhance vascular regulation of neural stem cell survival and differentiation after ischaemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, R.; Fonseca, M. C.; Santos, T.; Sargento-Freitas, J.; Tjeng, R.; Paiva, F.; Castelo-Branco, M.; Ferreira, L. S.; Bernardino, L.

    2016-04-01

    Stroke is one of the leading causes of death and disability worldwide. However, current therapies only reach a small percentage of patients and may cause serious side effects. We propose the therapeutic use of retinoic acid-loaded nanoparticles (RA-NP) to safely and efficiently repair the ischaemic brain by creating a favourable pro-angiogenic environment that enhances neurogenesis and neuronal restitution. Our data showed that RA-NP enhanced endothelial cell proliferation and tubule network formation and protected against ischaemia-induced death. To evaluate the effect of RA-NP on vascular regulation of neural stem cell (NSC) survival and differentiation, endothelial cell-conditioned media (EC-CM) were collected. EC-CM from healthy RA-NP-treated cells reduced NSC death and promoted proliferation while EC-CM from ischaemic RA-NP-treated cells decreased cell death, increased proliferation and neuronal differentiation. In parallel, human endothelial progenitor cells (hEPC), which are part of the endogenous repair response to vascular injury, were collected from ischaemic stroke patients. hEPC treated with RA-NP had significantly higher proliferation, which further highlights the therapeutic potential of this formulation. To conclude, RA-NP protected endothelial cells from ischaemic death and stimulated the release of pro-survival, proliferation-stimulating factors and differentiation cues for NSC. RA-NP were shown to be up to 83-fold more efficient than free RA and to enhance hEPC proliferation. These data serve as a stepping stone to use RA-NP as vasculotrophic and neurogenic agents for vascular disorders and neurodegenerative diseases with compromised vasculature.

  12. Popliteal Artery Entrapment Syndrome in Children: Experience With Four Cases of Acute Ischaemia and Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Settembre, N; Bouziane, Z; Bartoli, M A; Nabokov, V; Venermo, M; Feugier, P; Malikov, S

    2017-04-01

    Popliteal artery entrapment syndrome (PAES) is an uncommon anatomical anomaly, frequently described in adults. The most common symptom is claudication. Acute limb ischaemia (ALI) in children is rare, but it may evolve and lead to limb loss or lifelong complications. Clinical and surgical experience of PAES in children is reported. Data from the literature are analysed in order to assess the severity of this disease and to identify the factors characterising the diagnosis and the outcome of treatment in paediatric patients. Four children (aged 7-16 years) were referred with ALI due to PAES. Among the 439 articles reporting cases of PAES, 55 patients under 18 years of age were the focus. The PAES cases were classified according to the Love and Whelan classification modified by Rich. Data from 79 children (106 limbs, 27 bilateral PAES) were collected and analysed. Type I PAES was present in 41 (39%), Type II in 23 (22%), Type III in 24 (23%), Type IV in 12 (11%), and Type V in two (2%) limbs. A functional PAES was present in one patient bilaterally. In two cases, the type of PAES was not reported. Claudication occurred in 68 cases (64%), and ALI in 19 (18%). In 60 cases (57%), revascularisation with or without myotomy was required; myotomy alone was performed in 41 cases (39%). Symptomatic PAES in children should be considered a severe condition requiring urgent investigation in order to avoid any delays in the treatment. Early diagnosis and treatment are essential to prevent serious complications. The long-term outcomes of surgical treatment with the correction of the anatomical anomaly and vascular reconstruction are satisfactory with a low complication rate. Copyright © 2017 European Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Insolation driven biomagnetic response to Holocene Warm Period in semi-arid East Asia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, S.; Deng, Chenglong; Xiao, Jule; Li, Jinhua; Paterson, Greig; Chang, Liao; Yi, Liang; Qin, Huafeng; Pan, Yongxin; Zhu, Rixiang

    2015-01-01

    The Holocene Warm Period (HWP) provides valuable insights into the climate system and biotic responses to environmental variability and thus serves as an excellent analogue for future global climate changes. Here we document, for the first time, that warm and wet HWP conditions were highly

  14. From Static Stretching to Dynamic Exercises: Changing the Warm-Up Paradigm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Shawna

    2010-01-01

    In the United States, pre-exercise static stretching seems to have become common practice and routine. However, research suggests that it is time for a paradigm shift--that pre-exercise static stretching be replaced with dynamic warm-up exercises. Research indicates that a dynamic warm-up elevates body temperature, decreases muscle and joint…

  15. Astrochronology of extreme global warming events during the early Eocene greenhouse climate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lauretano, V.

    2016-01-01

    The early Eocene represents an ideal case study to analyse the impact of enhanced global warming on the ocean-atmosphere system and the relationship between carbon cycling and climate. During this time interval, the Earth’s surface experienced a long-term warming trend that culminated in a period of

  16. Phylogeographic differentiation versus transcriptomic adaptation to warm temperatures in Zostera marina, a globally important seagrass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jueterbock, Alexander; Franssen, S. U.; Bergmann, N.; Gu, J.; Coyer, J. A.; Reusch, T. B. H.; Bornberg-Bauer, E.; Olsen, J. L.

    2016-01-01

    Populations distributed across a broad thermal cline are instrumental in addressing adaptation to increasing temperatures under global warming. Using a space-for-time substitution design, we tested for parallel adaptation to warm temperatures along two independent thermal clines in Zostera marina,

  17. Conservation Planning for Coral Reefs Accounting for Climate Warming Disturbances.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael A Magris

    Full Text Available Incorporating warming disturbances into the design of marine protected areas (MPAs is fundamental to developing appropriate conservation actions that confer coral reef resilience. We propose an MPA design approach that includes spatially- and temporally-varying sea-surface temperature (SST data, integrating both observed (1985-2009 and projected (2010-2099 time-series. We derived indices of acute (time under reduced ecosystem function following short-term events and chronic thermal stress (rate of warming and combined them to delineate thermal-stress regimes. Coral reefs located on the Brazilian coast were used as a case study because they are considered a conservation priority in the southwestern Atlantic Ocean. We show that all coral reef areas in Brazil have experienced and are projected to continue to experience chronic warming, while acute events are expected to increase in frequency and intensity. We formulated quantitative conservation objectives for regimes of thermal stress. Based on these objectives, we then evaluated if/how they are achieved in existing Brazilian MPAs and identified priority areas where additional protection would reinforce resilience. Our results show that, although the current system of MPAs incorporates locations within some of our thermal-stress regimes, historical and future thermal refugia along the central coast are completely unprotected. Our approach is applicable to other marine ecosystems and adds to previous marine planning for climate change in two ways: (i by demonstrating how to spatially configure MPAs that meet conservation objectives for warming disturbance using spatially- and temporally-explicit data; and (ii by strategically allocating different forms of spatial management (MPA types intended to mitigate warming impacts and also enhance future resistance to climate warming.

  18. Global Warming: The Balance of Evidence and Its Policy Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Keller

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Global warming and attendant climate change have been controversial for at least a decade. This is largely because of its societal implications. With the recent publication of the Third Assessment Report of the United Nations’ Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change there has been renewed interest and controversy about how certain the scientific community is of its conclusions: that humans are influencing the climate and that global temperatures will continue to rise rapidly in this century. This review attempts to update what is known and in particular what advances have been made in the past 5 years or so. It does not attempt to be comprehensive. Rather it focuses on the most controversial issues, which are actually few in number. They are: 1-Is the surface temperature record accurate or is it biased by heat from cities, etc.? 2-Is that record significantly different from past warmings such as the Medieval Warming Period? 3-Is not the sun’s increasing activity the cause of most of the warming? 4-Can we model climate and predict its future, or is it just too complex and chaotic? 5-Are there any other changes in climate other than warming, and can they be attributed to the warming?Despite continued uncertainties, the review finds affirmative answers to these questions. Of particular interest are advances that seem to explain why satellites do not see as much warming as surface instruments, how we are getting a good idea of recent paleoclimates, and why the 20th century temperature record was so complex. It makes the point that in each area new information could come to light that would change our thinking on the quantitative magnitude and timing of anthropogenic warming, but it is unlikely to alter the basic conclusions.Finally, there is a very brief discussion of the societal policy response to the scientific message, and the author comments on his 2-year email discussions with many of the world’s most outspoken critics of the

  19. Is cold or warm blood cardioplegia superior for myocardial protection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abah, Udo; Roberts, Patrick Garfjeld; Ishaq, Muhammad; De Silva, Ravi

    2012-01-01

    required prolonged aortic cross-clamp times, results demonstrated less myocardial damage and reduced postoperative cardiac mortality and morbidity in the cold group. The clinical bottom line is that warm and cold cardioplegia result in similar short-term mortality. However, large studies have shown that warm cardioplegia reduces adverse post-operative events; the significance of which is unclear. PMID:22402501

  20. Global warming potential of pavements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santero, Nicholas J [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, 407 McLaughlin Hall, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-1712 (United States); Horvath, Arpad, E-mail: njsantero@cal.berkeley.ed, E-mail: horvath@ce.berkeley.ed [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, 215B McLaughlin Hall, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-1712 (United States)

    2009-09-15

    Pavements comprise an essential and vast infrastructure system supporting our transportation network, yet their impact on the environment is largely unquantified. Previous life-cycle assessments have only included a limited number of the applicable life-cycle components in their analysis. This research expands the current view to include eight different components: materials extraction and production, transportation, onsite equipment, traffic delay, carbonation, lighting, albedo, and rolling resistance. Using global warming potential as the environmental indicator, ranges of potential impact for each component are calculated and compared based on the information uncovered in the existing research. The relative impacts between components are found to be orders of magnitude different in some cases. Context-related factors, such as traffic level and location, are also important elements affecting the impacts of a given component. A strategic method for lowering the global warming potential of a pavement is developed based on the concept that environmental performance is improved most effectively by focusing on components with high impact potentials. This system takes advantage of the fact that small changes in high-impact components will have more effect than large changes in low-impact components.

  1. Global warming potential of pavements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santero, Nicholas J; Horvath, Arpad

    2009-01-01

    Pavements comprise an essential and vast infrastructure system supporting our transportation network, yet their impact on the environment is largely unquantified. Previous life-cycle assessments have only included a limited number of the applicable life-cycle components in their analysis. This research expands the current view to include eight different components: materials extraction and production, transportation, onsite equipment, traffic delay, carbonation, lighting, albedo, and rolling resistance. Using global warming potential as the environmental indicator, ranges of potential impact for each component are calculated and compared based on the information uncovered in the existing research. The relative impacts between components are found to be orders of magnitude different in some cases. Context-related factors, such as traffic level and location, are also important elements affecting the impacts of a given component. A strategic method for lowering the global warming potential of a pavement is developed based on the concept that environmental performance is improved most effectively by focusing on components with high impact potentials. This system takes advantage of the fact that small changes in high-impact components will have more effect than large changes in low-impact components.

  2. Economic approaches to greenhouse warming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nordhaus, W.D.

    1991-01-01

    Global environmental problems raise a host of major policy questions. They are all scientifically complex and controversial, and no scientific consensus is likely to emerge until irreversible decisions have been made. The costs and benefits of these changes transcend national boundaries, and nations, which cannot appropriate the global costs and benefits of such changes, are unlikely to be able or willing to make efficient decisions on how to combat these global externalities. In addition, these concerns sometimes have impacts over hundreds of years and thereby strain political decision making, which often functions effectively only when the crisis is at hand. This chapter considers some of the economic issues involved in deciding how to react to the threat of global warming. The author first reviews the theory and evidence on the greenhouse effect. He then presents evidence on the impacts of greenhouse warming, the costs of stabilizing climate, and the kinds of adaptations that might be available. In the final section, he reviews the policy initiatives that nations might follow in the near term

  3. The pre-ischaemic neuroprotective effect of a novel polyamine antagonist, N1-dansyl-spermine in a permanent focal cerebral ischaemia model in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Henman, Martin C; Doyle, Karen M; Strbian, Daniel; Kirby, Brian P; Tatlisumak, Turgut; Shaw, Graham G

    2004-12-10

    The polyamine sites on the NMDA receptor complex offer a therapeutic target for focal ischaemia, potentially devoid of most side effects associated with NMDA antagonists. In this study, we investigated the effect of a novel polyamine antagonist, N(1)-dansyl-spermine (0.5-10 mg kg(-1)) in a permanent focal cerebral ischaemia model in mice, and compared its effect to that of MK-801 (0.3-3 mg kg(-1)) following administration 30 min prior to ischaemia. A battery of histological and behavioural tests was employed following permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion to assess any neuroprotective effect. Following middle cerebral artery occlusion, N(1)-dansyl-spermine (1-5 mg kg(-1)) and MK-801 (1 or 3 mg kg(-1)) caused a comparable and significant reduction in the percentage hemisphere lesion volume. Similarly, both drugs significantly reduced oedema and neurological deficit score to a similar extent. Locomotor activity in MCAO mice was not significantly improved by MK-801 or N(1)-dansyl-spermine, although N(1)-dansyl-spermine induced a trend towards significant improvement. Significant improvement in rotarod performance was observed at neuroprotective doses with both drugs. Upon comparison of the profile of effects, N(1)-dansyl-spermine at least matched the effectiveness of MK-801 as a neuroprotective agent in this model. In addition, in sham-operated control mice, N(1)-dansyl-spermine was well tolerated, in contrast to the pronounced adverse effects of MK-801 on locomotor activity and rotarod performance. In conclusion, this study has shown that N(1)-dansyl-spermine is as effective a neuroprotective drug as MK-801 in this model. Moreover, in contrast to MK-801, N(1)-dansyl-spermine could be a promising therapeutic candidate for stroke as it is well tolerated at neuroprotective doses in sham-operated animals.

  4. Protective effects of n-6 fatty acids-enriched diet on intestinal ischaemia/reperfusion injury involve lipoxin A4 and its receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobbetti, T; Ducheix, S; le Faouder, P; Perez, T; Riols, F; Boue, J; Bertrand-Michel, J; Dubourdeau, M; Guillou, H; Perretti, M; Vergnolle, N; Cenac, N

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Long-term intake of dietary fatty acids is known to predispose to chronic inflammation, but their effects on acute intestinal ischaemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury is unknown. The aim of this study was to determine the consequences of a diet rich in n-3 or n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) on intestinal I/R-induced damage. Experimental Approach Mice were fed three different isocaloric diets: a balanced diet used as a control and two different PUFA-enriched diets, providing either high levels of n-3 or of n-6 PUFA. Intestinal injury was evaluated after intestinal I/R. PUFA metabolites were quantitated in intestinal tissues by LC-MS/MS. Key Results In control diet-fed mice, intestinal I/R caused inflammation and increased COX and lipoxygenase-derived metabolites compared with sham-operated animals. Lipoxin A4 (LxA4) was significantly and selectively increased after ischaemia. Animals fed a high n-3 diet did not display a different inflammatory profile following intestinal I/R compared with control diet-fed animals. In contrast, intestinal inflammation was decreased in the I/R group fed with high n-6 diet and level of LxA4 was increased post-ischaemia compared with control diet-fed mice. Blockade of the LxA4 receptor (Fpr2), prevented the anti-inflammatory effects associated with the n-6 rich diet. Conclusions and Implications This study indicates that high levels of dietary n-6, but not n-3, PUFAs provides significant protection against intestinal I/R-induced damage and demonstrates that the endogenous production of LxA4 can be influenced by diet. PMID:25296998

  5. Protective effects of n-6 fatty acids-enriched diet on intestinal ischaemia/reperfusion injury involve lipoxin A4 and its receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobbetti, T; Ducheix, S; le Faouder, P; Perez, T; Riols, F; Boue, J; Bertrand-Michel, J; Dubourdeau, M; Guillou, H; Perretti, M; Vergnolle, N; Cenac, N

    2015-02-01

    Long-term intake of dietary fatty acids is known to predispose to chronic inflammation, but their effects on acute intestinal ischaemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury is unknown. The aim of this study was to determine the consequences of a diet rich in n-3 or n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) on intestinal I/R-induced damage. Mice were fed three different isocaloric diets: a balanced diet used as a control and two different PUFA-enriched diets, providing either high levels of n-3 or of n-6 PUFA. Intestinal injury was evaluated after intestinal I/R. PUFA metabolites were quantitated in intestinal tissues by LC-MS/MS. In control diet-fed mice, intestinal I/R caused inflammation and increased COX and lipoxygenase-derived metabolites compared with sham-operated animals. Lipoxin A4 (LxA4 ) was significantly and selectively increased after ischaemia. Animals fed a high n-3 diet did not display a different inflammatory profile following intestinal I/R compared with control diet-fed animals. In contrast, intestinal inflammation was decreased in the I/R group fed with high n-6 diet and level of LxA4 was increased post-ischaemia compared with control diet-fed mice. Blockade of the LxA4 receptor (Fpr2), prevented the anti-inflammatory effects associated with the n-6 rich diet. This study indicates that high levels of dietary n-6, but not n-3, PUFAs provides significant protection against intestinal I/R-induced damage and demonstrates that the endogenous production of LxA4 can be influenced by diet. © 2014 The British Pharmacological Society.

  6. Comparison of the WarmCloud and Bair Hugger Warming Devices for the Prevention of Intraoperative Hypothermia in Patients Undergoing Orthotopic Liver Transplantation: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, Brett; Mattheyse, Linda; Ellard, Louise; Desmond, Fiona; Pillai, Param; Weinberg, Laurence

    2018-01-01

    Background The avoidance of hypothermia is vital during prolonged and open surgery to improve patient outcomes. Hypothermia is particularly common during orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) and associated with undesirable physiological effects that can adversely impact on perioperative morbidity. The KanMed WarmCloud (Bromma, Sweden) is a revolutionary, closed-loop, warm-air heating mattress developed to maintain normothermia and prevent pressure sores during major surgery. The clinical effectiveness of the WarmCloud device during OLT is unknown. Therefore, we conducted a randomized controlled trial to determine whether the WarmCloud device reduces hypothermia and prevents pressure injuries compared with the Bair Hugger underbody warming device. Methods Patients were randomly allocated to receive either the WarmCloud or Bair Hugger warming device. Both groups also received other routine standardized multimodal thermoregulatory strategies. Temperatures were recorded by nasopharyngeal temperature probe at set time points during surgery. The primary endpoint was nasopharyngeal temperature recorded 5 minutes before reperfusion. Secondary endpoints included changes in temperature over the predefined intraoperative time points, number of patients whose nadir temperature was below 35.5°C and the development of pressure injuries during surgery. Results Twenty-six patients were recruited with 13 patients randomized to each group. One patient from the WarmCloud group was excluded because of a protocol violation. Baseline characteristics were similar. The mean (standard deviation) temperature before reperfusion was 36.0°C (0.7) in the WarmCloud group versus 36.3°C (0.6) in the Bairhugger group (P = 0.25). There were no statistical differences between the groups for any of the secondary endpoints. Conclusions When combined with standardized multimodal thermoregulatory strategies, the WarmCloud device does not reduce hypothermia compared with the Bair Hugger device in

  7. The diagnosis and treatment of non-occlusive gut ischaemia. Aktueller Stand der Diagnostik und Therapie der nicht-okklusiven Darmischaemie (NOD)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schindler, G.; Bruch, H.P. (Wuerzburg Univ. (Germany). Abt. fuer Roentgendiagnostik Wuerzburg Univ. (Germany). Chirurgische Universitaetsklinik)

    1991-08-01

    Non-occlusive gut ischaemia is a disease of advanced age. Its causes are reduced cardiac output or shock, facilitated by digitalis, adrenaline, ergotamine and diuretics. The persisting microcirculation and development of gut necrois leads to an increase in certain serum enzymes, such as lactate, LDH and CK-NB. The early application of mesenteric angiography using a DSA technique reveals four grades of under-perfusion. Early and correct diagnosis of the disease should lead to intra-arterial treatment with prostaglandin. In 10 out of 42 cases, conservative therapy led to re-perfusion of the gut. (orig.).

  8. Global patterns in lake ecosystem responses to warming based on the temperature dependence of metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraemer, Benjamin M; Chandra, Sudeep; Dell, Anthony I; Dix, Margaret; Kuusisto, Esko; Livingstone, David M; Schladow, S Geoffrey; Silow, Eugene; Sitoki, Lewis M; Tamatamah, Rashid; McIntyre, Peter B

    2017-05-01

    Climate warming is expected to have large effects on ecosystems in part due to the temperature dependence of metabolism. The responses of metabolic rates to climate warming may be greatest in the tropics and at low elevations because mean temperatures are warmer there and metabolic rates respond exponentially to temperature (with exponents >1). However, if warming rates are sufficiently fast in higher latitude/elevation lakes, metabolic rate responses to warming may still be greater there even though metabolic rates respond exponentially to temperature. Thus, a wide range of global patterns in the magnitude of metabolic rate responses to warming could emerge depending on global patterns of temperature and warming rates. Here we use the Boltzmann-Arrhenius equation, published estimates of activation energy, and time series of temperature from 271 lakes to estimate long-term (1970-2010) changes in 64 metabolic processes in lakes. The estimated responses of metabolic processes to warming were usually greatest in tropical/low-elevation lakes even though surface temperatures in higher latitude/elevation lakes are warming faster. However, when the thermal sensitivity of a metabolic process is especially weak, higher latitude/elevation lakes had larger responses to warming in parallel with warming rates. Our results show that the sensitivity of a given response to temperature (as described by its activation energy) provides a simple heuristic for predicting whether tropical/low-elevation lakes will have larger or smaller metabolic responses to warming than higher latitude/elevation lakes. Overall, we conclude that the direct metabolic consequences of lake warming are likely to be felt most strongly at low latitudes and low elevations where metabolism-linked ecosystem services may be most affected. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. The physics and history of global warming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Yongyun

    2012-01-01

    Global warming is not only a hot research area in atmospheric sciences and even all Earth sciences but is also a controversial topic in the international community. The purpose of this paper is not to clarify these controversies, but instead, to address the physical basis on which our understanding of global warming is founded, and to briefly review the nearly 200-year history of global warming sciences. We hope the paper will help readers, who have no background in the atmospheric and climate sciences, understand scientific issues of global warming. (author)

  10. The tragedy of global warming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dominique Auverlot

    2014-01-01

    The author first evokes the consequences of global warming: ocean acidity, ice melt, sea level rise, repeated and always more intense extreme climatic events (a list of the main meteorological and climatic events which occurred in 2013 is given). He outlines that these phenomena happen more quickly than foreseen. He notices that these facts confirm the content of the different IPCC reports. The author outlines the need to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. He discusses the evolutions of these emissions between 1970 and 2010 in the different countries with respect to their level of economic development. It clearly appears that developed countries produce more emissions, and have only stabilized their emission level whereas emerging countries have notably increased their emissions. Developed and emerging countries should therefore act as quickly as possible

  11. Automobility: Global Warming as Symptomatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary Backhaus

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The argument of this paper is that sustainability requires a new worldview-paradigm. It critically evaluates Gore’s liberal-based environmentalism in order to show how “shallow ecologies” are called into question by deeper ecologies. This analysis leads to the notion that global warming is better understood as a symptom indicative of the worldview that is the source for environmental crises. Heidegger’s ontological hermeneutics and its critique of modern technology show that the modern worldview involves an enframing (a totalizing technological ordering of the natural. Enframing reveals entities as standing reserve (on demand energy suppliers. My thesis maintains that enframing is geographically expressed as automobility. Because of the energy needs used to maintain automobility, reaching the goal of sustainability requires rethinking the spatial organization of life as a function of stored energy technologies.

  12. Warm anisotropic inflationary universe model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharif, M.; Saleem, Rabia

    2014-01-01

    This paper is devoted to the study of warm inflation using vector fields in the background of a locally rotationally symmetric Bianchi type I model of the universe. We formulate the field equations, and slow-roll and perturbation parameters (scalar and tensor power spectra as well as their spectral indices) in the slow-roll approximation. We evaluate all these parameters in terms of the directional Hubble parameter during the intermediate and logamediate inflationary regimes by taking the dissipation factor as a function of the scalar field as well as a constant. In each case, we calculate the observational parameter of interest, i.e., the tensor-scalar ratio in terms of the inflaton. The graphical behavior of these parameters shows that the anisotropic model is also compatible with WMAP7 and the Planck observational data. (orig.)

  13. Warm anisotropic inflationary universe model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharif, M.; Saleem, Rabia [University of the Punjab, Department of Mathematics, Lahore (Pakistan)

    2014-02-15

    This paper is devoted to the study of warm inflation using vector fields in the background of a locally rotationally symmetric Bianchi type I model of the universe. We formulate the field equations, and slow-roll and perturbation parameters (scalar and tensor power spectra as well as their spectral indices) in the slow-roll approximation. We evaluate all these parameters in terms of the directional Hubble parameter during the intermediate and logamediate inflationary regimes by taking the dissipation factor as a function of the scalar field as well as a constant. In each case, we calculate the observational parameter of interest, i.e., the tensor-scalar ratio in terms of the inflaton. The graphical behavior of these parameters shows that the anisotropic model is also compatible with WMAP7 and the Planck observational data. (orig.)

  14. How to stop global warming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldenberg, J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on how to stop global warming. At the Toronto Conference on Climate Change in 1988, the world's industrialized nations agreed on a goal of cutting greenhouse gas emissions 20 percent by the year 2005. This would not stabilize atmospheric levels of greenhouse gases but would at least slow their accumulation. Although difficult to achieve, the Toronto goal is certainly reachable. Newer, more efficient technologies can lower energy consumption without effecting economic output. CFC- substitutes can provide refrigeration. In fact, an international carbon tax of just $1 per barrel of oil, or $6 per ton of coal, would generate more than enough revenue to pay for the necessary fuel-saving measures. This tax could result from an international agreement similar to the 1987 Montreal Protocol, which obliges its signatories to cut down on production of CFCs

  15. The economics of global warming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pillet, G.; Hediger, W.; Kypreos, S.; Corbaz, C.

    1993-05-01

    The global warming threat is challenging the world community to both international cooperation and national policy action. This report focuses on the necessity to alternate between ''global and national climate policies''. The Swiss perspective is at issue. The economic rationales for comparing national climate policy options are analyzed. This report explicitly focusses on the fundamental role of the normative framework and the related environmental-economic requisites for establishing an efficient national climate policy and computing a ''carbon tax''. Finally, the latest results of the energy and greenhouse gas scenarios for Switzerland, elaborated on within the network of the IEA/ETSAP Project, Annex IV, ''Greenhouse Gases and National Energy Options: Technologies and Costs for Reducing Emissions of Greenhouse Gases'', illustrate Switzerland's difficulties in reducing greenhouse gas emissions at ''reasonable cost'' compared with other countries. This should make Switzerland very sensitive to the implementation of efficient environmental-policy instruments and international cooperation. (author) figs., tabs., refs

  16. Keeping cool on global warming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seitz, F.; Hawkins, W.; Nierenberg, W.; Salmon, J.; Jastrow, R.; Moore, J.H.

    1992-01-01

    A number of scientific groups have concluded that the greenhouse effect caused by the man-made emissions of carbon dioxide and other bases has produced much or all of the rise in global temperatures. They predict that there will be an increase in greenhouse gases equivalent to a doubling of carbon dioxide by the middle of the 21st century, and that this will cause the temperature of the earth to rise by as much as 5C. According to these scientists, a temperature rise of this magnitude would cause major disruptions in the earth's ecosystem, including severe summer drought in the midwestern US and other agricultural regions. The worst-case scenarios predict a major rise in sea level as a result of the greenhouse warming, inundating areas of New York, Miami and other coastal cities as well as low-lying river deltas and islands. The lives of hundreds of millions of people would be disrupted. The available data on climate change, however, do not support these predictions, nor do they support the idea that human activity has caused, or will cause, a dangerous increase in global temperatures. As the authors make this statement, they are aware that it contradicts widespread popular opinion, as well as the technical judgments of some of their colleagues. But it would be imprudent to ignore the facts on global warming that have accumulated over the last two years. These facts indicate that theoretical estimates of the greenhouse problem have greatly exaggerated its seriousness. Enormous economic stakes ride on forthcoming government decisions regarding carbon taxes and other restrictions on CO 2 emissions. Due attention must therefore be given to the scientific evidence, no matter how contrary to popular opinion its implications appear to be. This article discusses the scientific evidence

  17. Does the projected pathway to global warming targets matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bärring, Lars; Strandberg, Gustav

    2018-02-01

    Since the ‘Paris agreement’ in 2015 there has been much focus on what a +1.5 °C or +2 °C warmer world would look like. Since the focus lies on policy relevant global warming targets, or specific warming levels (SWLs), rather than a specific point in time, projections are pooled together to form SWL ensembles based on the target temperature rather than emission scenario. This study uses an ensemble of CMIP5 global model projections to analyse how well SWL ensembles represent the stabilized climate of global warming targets. The results show that the SWL ensembles exhibit significant trends that reflect the transient nature of the RCP scenarios. These trends have clear effect on the timing and clustering of monthly cold and hot extremes, even though the effect on the temperature of the extreme months is less visible. In many regions there is a link between choice of RCP scenario used in the SWL ensemble and climate change signal in the highest monthly temperatures. In other regions there is no such clear-cut link. From this we conclude that comprehensive analyses of what prospects the different global warming targets bring about will require stabilization scenarios. Awaiting such targeted scenarios we suggest that prudent use of SWL scenarios, taking their characteristics and limitations into account, may serve as reasonable proxies in many situations.

  18. Design and performance of combined infrared canopy and belowground warming in the B4WarmED (Boreal Forest Warming at an Ecotone in Danger) experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, Roy L; Stefanski, Artur; Montgomery, Rebecca A; Hobbie, Sarah E; Kimball, Bruce A; Reich, Peter B

    2015-06-01

    Conducting manipulative climate change experiments in complex vegetation is challenging, given considerable temporal and spatial heterogeneity. One specific challenge involves warming of both plants and soils to depth. We describe the design and performance of an open-air warming experiment called Boreal Forest Warming at an Ecotone in Danger (B4WarmED) that addresses the potential for projected climate warming to alter tree function, species composition, and ecosystem processes at the boreal-temperate ecotone. The experiment includes two forested sites in northern Minnesota, USA, with plots in both open (recently clear-cut) and closed canopy habitats, where seedlings of 11 tree species were planted into native ground vegetation. Treatments include three target levels of plant canopy and soil warming (ambient, +1.7°C, +3.4°C). Warming was achieved by independent feedback control of voltage input to aboveground infrared heaters and belowground buried resistance heating cables in each of 72-7.0 m(2) plots. The treatments emulated patterns of observed diurnal, seasonal, and annual temperatures but with superimposed warming. For the 2009 to 2011 field seasons, we achieved temperature elevations near our targets with growing season overall mean differences (∆Tbelow ) of +1.84°C and +3.66°C at 10 cm soil depth and (∆T(above) ) of +1.82°C and +3.45°C for the plant canopies. We also achieved measured soil warming to at least 1 m depth. Aboveground treatment stability and control were better during nighttime than daytime and in closed vs. open canopy sites in part due to calmer conditions. Heating efficacy in open canopy areas was reduced with increasing canopy complexity and size. Results of this study suggest the warming approach is scalable: it should work well in small-statured vegetation such as grasslands, desert, agricultural crops, and tree saplings (<5 m tall). © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Eutrophication and Warming Boost Cyanobacterial Biomass and Microcystins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miquel Lürling

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Eutrophication and warming are key drivers of cyanobacterial blooms, but their combined effects on microcystin (MC concentrations are less studied. We tested the hypothesis that warming promotes cyanobacterial abundance in a natural plankton community and that eutrophication enhances cyanobacterial biomass and MC concentrations. We incubated natural seston from a eutrophic pond under normal, high, and extreme temperatures (i.e., 20, 25, and 30 °C with and without additional nutrients added (eutrophication mimicking a pulse as could be expected from projected summer storms under climate change. Eutrophication increased algal- and cyanobacterial biomass by 26 and 8 times, respectively, and led to 24 times higher MC concentrations. This effect was augmented with higher temperatures leading to 45 times higher MC concentrations at 25 °C, with 11 times more cyanobacterial chlorophyll-a and 25 times more eukaryote algal chlorophyll-a. At 30 °C, MC concentrations were 42 times higher, with cyanobacterial chlorophyll-a being 17 times and eukaryote algal chlorophyll-a being 24 times higher. In contrast, warming alone did not yield more cyanobacteria or MCs, because the in situ community had already depleted the available nutrient pool. MC per potential MC producing cell declined at higher temperatures under nutrient enrichments, which was confirmed by a controlled experiment with two laboratory strains of Microcystis aeruginosa. Nevertheless, MC concentrations were much higher at the increased temperature and nutrient treatment than under warming alone due to strongly promoted biomass, lifting N-imitation and promotion of potential MC producers like Microcystis. This study exemplifies the vulnerability of eutrophic urban waters to predicted future summer climate change effects that might aggravate cyanobacterial nuisance.

  20. New evidence of neuroprotection by lactate after transient focal cerebral ischaemia: extended benefit after intracerebroventricular injection and efficacy of intravenous administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthet, Carole; Castillo, Ximena; Magistretti, Pierre J; Hirt, Lorenz

    2012-01-01

    Lactate protects mice against the ischaemic damage resulting from transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) when administered intracerebroventricularly at reperfusion, yielding smaller lesion sizes and a better neurological outcome 48 h after ischaemia. We have now tested whether the beneficial effect of lactate is long-lasting and if lactate can be administered intravenously. Male ICR-CD1 mice were subjected to 15-min suture MCAO under xylazine + ketamine anaesthesia. Na L-lactate (2 µl of 100 mmol/l) or vehicle was administered intracerebroventricularly at reperfusion. The neurological deficit was evaluated using a composite deficit score based on the neurological score, the rotarod test and the beam walking test. Mice were sacrificed at 14 days. In a second set of experiments, Na L-lactate (1 µmol/g body weight) was administered intravenously into the tail vein at reperfusion. The neurological deficit and the lesion volume were measured at 48 h. Intracerebroventricularly injected lactate induced sustained neuroprotection shown by smaller neurological deficits at 7 days (median = 0, min = 0, max = 3, n = 7 vs. median = 2, min = 1, max = 4.5, n = 5, p mouse brain against ischaemic damage when supplied intracerebroventricularly during reperfusion with behavioural and histological benefits persisting 2 weeks after ischaemia. Importantly, lactate also protects after systemic intravenous administration, a more suitable route of administration in a clinical emergency setting. These findings provide further steps to bring this physiological, commonly available and inexpensive neuroprotectant closer to clinical translation for stroke. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. 99Tcm-MIBI single photon emission tomography (SPET) for detecting myocardial ischaemia and necrosis in patients with significant coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sciammarella, M.G.; Fragasso, G.; Gerundini, P.; Maffioli, L.; Cappelletti, A.; Margonato, A.; Savi, A.; Chierchia, S.

    1992-01-01

    The ability of 99 Tc m -methoxyisobutylisonitrile (MIBI) single photon emission tomography (SPET) to detect myocardial ischaemia and necrosis was assessed in 56 patients with clinically recognised ischaemic heart disease (IHD). All underwent coronary angiography (CA) and left ventriculography (LV). SPET images were obtained at rest and at peak exercise 90 min after injection of 99 Tc m -MIBI. The presence of persistent (P) or reversible (R) perfusion defects (PD) was then correlated to the resting and exercise ECG and to the results of CA and LV. Of the 56 patients, 34 had reversible underperfusion (RPD), 46 persistent underperfusion (PPD) and 31 had both. The occurrence of RPD correlated well with the occurrence of exercise-induced ST segment depression and/or angina (27 patients of 34 patients, 79%) and with the presence of significant coronary artery disease (CAD) (33 of 44, 73%). In 45 of 46 patients (98%) PPD corresponded to akinetic or severely hypokinetic segments (LV) usually explored by ECG leads exhibiting diagnostic Q waves (42 of 46 patients, 91%). The scan was normal both at rest and after stress in four of 11 patients with no CAD, and in two of 45 patients with CAD. Finally, an abnormal resting scan was seen in seven of 11 patients with normal coronary arteries, of whom six had regional wall motion abnormalities. In conclusion, MIBI SPET is a highly reliable technique for assessing the presence and location of myocardial ischaemia and necrosis. (Author)

  2. [sup 99]Tc[sup m]-MIBI single photon emission tomography (SPET) for detecting myocardial ischaemia and necrosis in patients with significant coronary artery disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sciammarella, M.G.; Fragasso, G.; Gerundini, P.; Maffioli, L.; Cappelletti, A.; Margonato, A.; Savi, A.; Chierchia, S. (Istituto Scientifico H San Raffaele, Milan (Italy). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine)

    1992-12-01

    The ability of [sup 99]Tc[sup m]-methoxyisobutylisonitrile (MIBI) single photon emission tomography (SPET) to detect myocardial ischaemia and necrosis was assessed in 56 patients with clinically recognised ischaemic heart disease (IHD). All underwent coronary angiography (CA) and left ventriculography (LV). SPET images were obtained at rest and at peak exercise 90 min after injection of [sup 99]Tc[sup m]-MIBI. The presence of persistent (P) or reversible (R) perfusion defects (PD) was then correlated to the resting and exercise ECG and to the results of CA and LV. Of the 56 patients, 34 had reversible underperfusion (RPD), 46 persistent underperfusion (PPD) and 31 had both. The occurrence of RPD correlated well with the occurrence of exercise-induced ST segment depression and/or angina (27 patients of 34 patients, 79%) and with the presence of significant coronary artery disease (CAD) (33 of 44, 73%). In 45 of 46 patients (98%) PPD corresponded to akinetic or severely hypokinetic segments (LV) usually explored by ECG leads exhibiting diagnostic Q waves (42 of 46 patients, 91%). The scan was normal both at rest and after stress in four of 11 patients with no CAD, and in two of 45 patients with CAD. Finally, an abnormal resting scan was seen in seven of 11 patients with normal coronary arteries, of whom six had regional wall motion abnormalities. In conclusion, MIBI SPET is a highly reliable technique for assessing the presence and location of myocardial ischaemia and necrosis. (Author).

  3. Are Claims of Global Warming Being Suppressed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowley, Thomas J.

    2006-02-01

    Over the last few years, I have heard many rumors that climate science relevant to the global warming discussion is being suppressed by the Bush Administration. One cannot do much about third-hand information. However, on 29 January, the New York Times published a front page article on NASA efforts to suppress statements about global warming by James Hansen, director of the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies. A claim by one government scientist, though, no matter how distinguished, still requires examples from other scientists before a general conclusion can be drawn about the overall scope of the problem. But if the charges are more widespread, then some government scientists might be reluctant to make such claims, because they might feel that their positions were jeopardized. Therefore, an alternate way may be needed to determine the scope of the issue, while still safeguarding government workers from possible retaliation. -On 30 January, Rep. Sherwood Boehlert (R-N.Y.), chairman of the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Science, wrote a letter to NASA Administrator Michael Griffin addressing many of the concerns Crowley has raised. Boehlert wrote,``It ought to go without saying that government scientists must be free to describe their scientific conclusions and the implications of those conclusions to their fellow scientists, policymakers and the general public.'' He continued,``Good science cannot long persist in an atmosphere of intimidation. Political figures ought to be reviewing their public statements to make sure they are consistent with the best available science; scientists should not be reviewing their statements to make sure they are consistent with the current political orthodoxy.'' I commend Rep. Boehlert for his quick and clear statement of the importance of unfettered communication of science. -FRED SPILHAUS, Editor

  4. Multi-year objective analyses of warm season ground-level ozone and PM2.5 over North America using real-time observations and Canadian operational air quality models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robichaud, A.; Ménard, R.

    2014-02-01

    Multi-year objective analyses (OA) on a high spatiotemporal resolution for the warm season period (1 May to 31 October) for ground-level ozone and for fine particulate matter (diameter less than 2.5 microns (PM2.5)) are presented. The OA used in this study combines model outputs from the Canadian air quality forecast suite with US and Canadian observations from various air quality surface monitoring networks. The analyses are based on an optimal interpolation (OI) with capabilities for adaptive error statistics for ozone and PM2.5 and an explicit bias correction scheme for the PM2.5 analyses. The estimation of error statistics has been computed using a modified version of the Hollingsworth-Lönnberg (H-L) method. The error statistics are "tuned" using a χ2 (chi-square) diagnostic, a semi-empirical procedure that provides significantly better verification than without tuning. Successful cross-validation experiments were performed with an OA setup using 90% of data observations to build the objective analyses and with the remainder left out as an independent set of data for verification purposes. Furthermore, comparisons with other external sources of information (global models and PM2.5 satellite surface-derived or ground-based measurements) show reasonable agreement. The multi-year analyses obtained provide relatively high precision with an absolute yearly averaged systematic error of less than 0.6 ppbv (parts per billion by volume) and 0.7 μg m-3 (micrograms per cubic meter) for ozone and PM2.5, respectively, and a random error generally less than 9 ppbv for ozone and under 12 μg m-3 for PM2.5. This paper focuses on two applications: (1) presenting long-term averages of OA and analysis increments as a form of summer climatology; and (2) analyzing long-term (decadal) trends and inter-annual fluctuations using OA outputs. The results show that high percentiles of ozone and PM2.5 were both following a general decreasing trend in North America, with the eastern

  5. MRI of cerebral ischaemia in rats with occlusion of the middle cerebral artery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thuomas, K.AA.; Kotwica, Z.; Bergstroem, K.; Bolander, H.; Hillered, L.; Olsson, Y.; Ponten, U.; Persson, L.

    1991-01-01

    The development of ischaemic brain oedema caused by middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusion was studied by serial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in rats. Multiple spin echo sequences were used with TR = 1500 ms and TE = 30-240 ms (8 echos). Substraction images were obtained by subtracting the last three echos from the first echo. Fourteen rats were studied 3, 6, and 12 h and 1, 1.5, 3, 4, 6, and 8 days after MCA occlusion, and 2 of them also 3 and 6 weeks later. Two T2 components could be separated, a fast one representing bound water and a slow one representing free bulk water. MR showed T2 prolongation even on the first examination, and the highest values were observed 24 h after occlusion. The subsequent examinations showed a slow reduction in oedema. MR studies 3 and 6 weeks after occlusion revealed an area of very long T2, which correlated well with infarction shown by histology. The substraction images demonstrated both the infarct location and the oedematous changes in the surrounding uninfarcted tissue. MRI imaging employing T2 components and subtraction images appears to be a valuable method for observing the time course of the development and resolution of oedema in cerebral infarction. (orig.)

  6. Protective effect of hydroalcoholic extract of Andrographis paniculata on ischaemia-reperfusion induced myocardial injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojha, Shreesh Kumar; Bharti, Saurabh; Joshi, Sujata; Kumari, Santosh; Arya, Dharamvir Singh

    2012-03-01

    Protecting myocardium from ischaemia-reperfusion (I-R) injury is important to reduce the complication of myocardial infarction (MI) and interventional revascularization procedures. In the present study, the cardioprotective potential of hydroalcoholic extract of Andrographis paniculata was evaluated against left anterior descending coronary artery (LADCA) ligation-induced I-R injury of myocardium in rats. MI was induced in rats by LADCA ligation for 45 min followed by reperfusion for 60 min. The rats were divided into five experimental groups viz., sham (saline treated, but LADCA was not ligated), I-R control (saline treated + I-R), benazepril (30 mg/kg + I-R), A. paniculata (200 mg/kg per se) and A. paniculata (200 mg/kg + I-R). A. paniculata was administered orally for 31 days. On day 31, rats were subjected to the I-R and cardiac function parameters were recorded. Further, rats were sacrificed and heart was excised for biochemical and histopathological studies. In I-R control group, LADCA ligation resulted in significant cardiac dysfunction evidenced by reduced haemodynamic parameters; mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR). The left ventricular contractile function was also altered. In I-R control group, I-R caused decline in superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and reduced glutathione (GSH) as well as leakage of myocytes injury marker enzymes, creatine phosphokinase-MB (CK-MB) isoenzyme and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), and enhanced lipid peroxidation product, malonaldialdehyde (MDA). However, rats pretreated with A. paniculata 200 mg/kg showed favourable modulation of haemodynamic and left ventricular contractile function parameters, restoration of the myocardial antioxidants and prevention of depletion of myocytes injury marker enzymes along with inhibition of lipid peroxidation. Histopathological observations confirmed the protective effects of A. paniculata. The cardioprotective effects of A. paniculata were

  7. Using isotopes for global warming observation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Namata, K.

    2002-01-01

    This paper, based on a literature review, discusses the main aspects of using isotopic techniques to obtain information about global warming. The rapid increase concentration of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) and methane (CH 4 ) in the atmosphere will result in global warming by the greenhouse effect, and the isotopic techniques constitute an efficient tool to explain this complex environmental phenomenon. (author)

  8. Mitigation of global warming through renewable biomass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhillon, R.S.; Wuehlisch, George von

    2013-01-01

    Rising level of atmospheric CO 2 and consequent global warming is evident. Global surface temperature have already increased by 0.8 °C over the 20th century and is projected to increase by 1.4–5.8 °C during the twenty-first century. The global warming will continue till atmospheric concentrations of the major greenhouse gases are stabilized. Among them, CO 2 is mainly responsible and is expected to account for about 60% of the warming over the next century. This study reviews advances on causes and consequences of global climate change and its impact on nature and society. Renewable biomass has tremendous potential to mitigate the global warming. Renewable biomass is expected to play a multifunctional role including food production, source of energy and fodder, biodiversity conservation, yield of goods and services to the society as well as mitigation of the impact of climate change. The review highlights the different management and research strategies in forestry, agriculture, agroforestry and grasslands to mitigate the global warming. -- Highlights: ► Rising level of atmospheric CO 2 and consequent global warming is evident. ► CO 2 is mainly responsible for global warming. ► Global temperature is predicted to increase by 1.4–5.8 °C during 21st century. ► Renewable biomass has great potential to mitigate the global warming

  9. Strategies for mitigation of global warming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, Niels I

    2009-01-01

    The paper analyses the international negotions on climate change leading up to COP15 in Copenhagen. Supplementary policies for mitigation of global warming are proposed.......The paper analyses the international negotions on climate change leading up to COP15 in Copenhagen. Supplementary policies for mitigation of global warming are proposed....

  10. Global Warming: Understanding and Teaching the Forecast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Bill

    1994-01-01

    A resource for the teaching of the history and causes of climate change. Discusses evidence of climate change from the Viking era, early ice ages, the most recent ice age, natural causes of climate change, human-made causes of climate change, projections of global warming, and unequal warming. (LZ)

  11. Global Warming: Lessons from Ozone Depletion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobson, Art

    2010-01-01

    My teaching and textbook have always covered many physics-related social issues, including stratospheric ozone depletion and global warming. The ozone saga is an inspiring good-news story that's instructive for solving the similar but bigger problem of global warming. Thus, as soon as students in my physics literacy course at the University of…

  12. National Security Implications of Global Warming Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    Although numerous historical examples demonstrate how actual climate change has contributed to the rise and fall of powers, global warming , in and of...become convinced that global warming is universally bad and humans are the primary cause, political leaders may develop ill-advised policies restricting

  13. Exploring the Sociopolitical Dimensions of Global Warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadler, Troy D.; Klosterman, Michelle L.

    2009-01-01

    The authors present an activity to help high school students conceptualize the sociopolitical complexity of global warming through an exploration of varied perspectives on the issue. They argue that socioscientific issues such as global warming present important contexts for learning science and that the social and political dimensions of these…

  14. Global Warming: How Much and Why?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanouette, William

    1990-01-01

    Summarizes the history of the study of global warming and includes a discussion of the role of gases, like carbon dioxide, methane, and chlorofluorocarbon (CFC). Discusses modern research on the global warming, including computer modelling and the super-greenhouse effect. (YP)

  15. Catching a Cold When It's Warm

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Print this issue Catching a Cold When It’s Warm What’s the Deal with Summertime Sniffles? En español ... more unfair than catching a cold when it’s warm? How can cold symptoms arise when it’s not ...

  16. Turkish Students' Ideas about Global Warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilinc, Ahmet; Stanisstreet, Martin; Boyes, Edward

    2008-01-01

    A questionnaire was used to explore the prevalence of ideas about global warming in Year 10 (age 15-16 years) school students in Turkey. The frequencies of individual scientific ideas and misconceptions about the causes, consequences and "cures" of global warming were identified. In addition, several general findings emerged from this…

  17. Awareness And Perception of Global Warming Among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUND: Increase in the emission of green house gases and the attendant climatic changes have led to the phenomenon of global warming with all its catastrophic consequences. OBJECTIVE: To assess knowledge and perception of the concept of global warming among undergraduate medical students

  18. Effects of in situ climate warming on monarch caterpillar (Danaus plexippus development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan P. Lemoine

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Climate warming will fundamentally alter basic life history strategies of many ectothermic insects. In the lab, rising temperatures increase growth rates of lepidopteran larvae but also reduce final pupal mass and increase mortality. Using in situ field warming experiments on their natural host plants, we assessed the impact of climate warming on development of monarch (Danaus plexippus larvae. Monarchs were reared on Asclepias tuberosa grown under ‘Ambient’ and ‘Warmed’ conditions. We quantified time to pupation, final pupal mass, and survivorship. Warming significantly decreased time to pupation, such that an increase of 1 °C corresponded to a 0.5 day decrease in pupation time. In contrast, survivorship and pupal mass were not affected by warming. Our results indicate that climate warming will speed the developmental rate of monarchs, influencing their ecological and evolutionary dynamics. However, the effects of climate warming on larval development in other monarch populations and at different times of year should be investigated.

  19. Post-ischaemic changes in the response time of oxygen consumption to demand in the isolated rat heart are mediated partly by calcium and glycolysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuurbier, C. J.; Ince, C.

    2002-01-01

    This study examined whether different durations of ischaemia (I) and reperfusion (R) altered the kinetics of O-2 consumption-to-demand matching and the contribution of changes in calcium and metabolic pathways to possible alterations. The response time of mitochondrial O-2 consumption (t(mito)) to a

  20. Global warming: What should we do to stop or slow?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guenalp, B.

    2006-01-01

    Earth is warming much faster than had been predicted. 2005 was the warmest year on record, surpassing 1998. The multinational Arctic Climate Impact Assessment (ACIA) report recently concluded that in Alaska, western Canada, and eastern Russia, average temperatures have increased 3 to 4 degrees Celsius in the past 50 years. Rising temperatures have a dramatic impact on Arctic ice. Since 1978 Arctic sea ice area has shrunk by some 9 percent per decade, and thinned as well. There are three specific events especially worrisome and potentially imminent, although the time frames are a matter of dispute: dramatic sea level rise by the end of the century that would take tens of thousand years to reverse; widespread coral bleaching that could be damage the world's fisheries within three decades; and, within 200 years, a shutdown of the ocean current that moderates temperatures in northern Europe. Global warming is caused by human activities such as burning nature's vast store of coal, oil and nature gas which releases billions of tones carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) every year. If current trends continue, we will raise atmospheric CO 2 concentrations to double pre-industrial levels during this century. That will probably be enough to raise global temperatures by around 2 degree C to 5 degree C. Even if humans stop burning oil and coal tomorrow we have already spewed enough greenhouse gases into the atmosphere to cause temperatures to warm and sea levels to rise for at least another century. So what should we do? We can not continue drawing energy from fossil fuels and there is no chance that the renewable, wind, tide, and water power can provide enough energy and in time. Nuclear energy is the only one immediately available source does not cause global warming. In this presentation consequences and risks of global warming, as well as nuclear power comparisons will be discussed comprehensively

  1. Preoperative Warm-Up Using a Virtual Reality Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Târcoveanu, Eugen; Dimofte, Gabriel; Lupaşcu, Cristian; Bradea, Costel

    2011-01-01

    Background and Objectives: All modern surgical procedures require a high level of cognitive and psychomotor skills achieved using different training methods, but could be influenced by fatigue and other psychological factors. We evaluated the effect of warm-up exercises on operative laparoscopic performances. Methods: The surgical team operated on a consecutive series of 20 patients with gallstones. Patients were randomly allocated in 2 groups: group A to be operated on without warm-up exercises and group B to be operated on after a short-term warm-up. All the patients were operated on by the same surgical team. The full-time records of the operation were analyzed by 2 independent reviewers. A modified simplified Global Rating Score (GRS) was used to assess the surgical procedures. A training module using the Lap Mentor simulator was designed for the warm-up. Results: Better performances were noted by both observers in group B only regarding “Respect for tissue” scores (3.75±0.16 vs 4.43±0.20, P=.021 and 3.87±0.22 vs 4.57±0.20, P=.041) achieving significant or marginally significant differences for all categories; GRS scores for “time and motion” and “overall impression” tend to be better after warm-up, but differences failed to reach statistical significance in our series. Conclusion: Surgeons, even the most experienced in laparoscopic surgery, can increase specific psychomotor skills associated with a laparoscopic environment by doing simple exercises on a virtual reality simulator, just before an operation. These improvements are reflected in more accurate handling of tissue during laparoscopic cholecystectomy. PMID:22643511

  2. Reduced interdecadal variability of Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation under global warming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jun; Liu, Zhengyu; Zhang, Shaoqing; Liu, Wei; Dong, Lina; Liu, Peng; Li, Hongli

    2016-03-22

    Interdecadal variability of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC-IV) plays an important role in climate variation and has significant societal impacts. Past climate reconstruction indicates that AMOC-IV has likely undergone significant changes. Despite some previous studies, responses of AMOC-IV to global warming remain unclear, in particular regarding its amplitude and time scale. In this study, we analyze the responses of AMOC-IV under various scenarios of future global warming in multiple models and find that AMOC-IV becomes weaker and shorter with enhanced global warming. From the present climate condition to the strongest future warming scenario, on average, the major period of AMOC-IV is shortened from ∼50 y to ∼20 y, and the amplitude is reduced by ∼60%. These reductions in period and amplitude of AMOC-IV are suggested to be associated with increased oceanic stratification under global warming and, in turn, the speedup of oceanic baroclinic Rossby waves.

  3. Climatic irregular staircases: generalized acceleration of global warming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Saedeleer, Bernard

    2016-01-27

    Global warming rates mentioned in the literature are often restricted to a couple of arbitrary periods of time, or of isolated values of the starting year, lacking a global view. In this study, we perform on the contrary an exhaustive parametric analysis of the NASA GISS LOTI data, and also of the HadCRUT4 data. The starting year systematically varies between 1880 and 2002, and the averaging period from 5 to 30 yr - not only decades; the ending year also varies . In this way, we uncover a whole unexplored space of values for the global warming rate, and access the full picture. Additionally, stairstep averaging and linear least squares fitting to determine climatic trends have been sofar exclusive. We propose here an original hybrid method which combines both approaches in order to derive a new type of climatic trend. We find that there is an overall acceleration of the global warming whatever the value of the averaging period, and that 99.9% of the 3029 Earth's climatic irregular staircases are rising. Graphical evidence is also given that choosing an El Niño year as starting year gives lower global warming rates - except if there is a volcanic cooling in parallel. Our rates agree and generalize several results mentioned in the literature.

  4. Time path of marginal cost for measures against global warming toward the greenhouse gas concentration target. Analytic solution and case study of the electric power sector; Onshitsu koka gas nodo mokuhyoka deno ondanka taisaku genkai hiyo no jikan keiro. Kaisekikai to denryoku bumon no case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagano, K.; Sugiyama, H.; Takahashi, M. [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-01-30

    The United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change is studied from the viewpoint of implementing costs. As far as the global warming issue is concerned, the factor to affect the environment is not the emitted volume but the concentration in the air. The ultimate target is the stabilization of greenhouse gas concentration at a level not to impose serious artificial damage on the ecosystem. Accordingly, various time paths are considered, including one in which much emission is allowed at the beginning and suppression is enforced acceleratedly in the later stage. In this study, a path demanding but the minimal cost in the period up to the target time point is discussed, using as the tool the marginal cost for measure implementation. In a reasonable emission control strategy, the emission control marginal cost follows a time path that is dependent upon an increase function to be determined by the discount rate and survival rate (time constant) in the atmosphere. In the industrial branch, instead of imposing short-term and rigid emission volume control limits, a longer-term target may be set for reduction in the loads responsible for concentration acceleration, concrete emission controls under the given conditions may be implemented at the discretion of the implementing organizations, and reduction in cost may be realized by time distribution with the environmental impacts kept at approximately equal levels. 5 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Soil Warming Elevates the Abundance of Collembola in the Songnen Plain of China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiumin Yan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of soil warming and precipitation control in the context of soil warming on Collembola community was studied in Songnen grassland, China. Treatments included (1 control; (2 soil warming; (3 soil warming with low precipitation; and (4 soil warming with high precipitation. The open top chambers were used to increase the soil temperature, and the low and high precipitation were created by covering 30% of the chamber and artificial addition after rainfall through the three-year long field experiment. Soil samples were taken and collembolans were extracted in the 15th in June, August and October from 2010 to 2012. Abundance of total Collembola and dominant morphospecies Orchesellides sp.1 was significantly increased by soil warming. Total Collembola abundance was not affected by the precipitation. However, the abundance of Mesaphorura sp.1 was significantly increased by warming with low precipitation treatment. Collembola species richness, diversity and evenness were not impacted by any treatment through all the sampling times. These results suggest that more attention should be paid to the Collembola community variation under global warming in the future.

  6. Global warming and nuclear power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodgson, P.E. [Nuclear and Particle Physics Laboratory, Department of Physics, Oxford Univ., Oxford (United Kingdom)

    1999-09-01

    The concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere is steadily increasing and it is widely believed that this will lead to global warming that will have serious consequences for life on earth. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change has estimated that the temperature of the earth will increase by between 1 and 3.5 degrees in the next century. This will melt some of the Antarctic ice cap, raise the sea level and flood many low-lying countries, and also produce unpredictable changes in the earth's climate. The possible ways of reducing carbon dioxide emission are discussed. It is essential to reduce the burning of fossil fuels, but then how are we to obtain the energy we need? We can try to reduce energy use, but we will still need to generate large amounts energy. Some possible ways of doing this are by using wind and solar generators, by hydroelectric and tidal plants, and also by nuclear power. These possibilities will be critically examined. (author)

  7. Global warming and nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodgson, P.E.

    1999-01-01

    The concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere is steadily increasing and it is widely believed that this will lead to global warming that will have serious consequences for life on earth. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change has estimated that the temperature of the earth will increase by between 1 and 3.5 degrees in the next century. This will melt some of the Antarctic ice cap, raise the sea level and flood many low-lying countries, and also produce unpredictable changes in the earth's climate. The possible ways of reducing carbon dioxide emission are discussed. It is essential to reduce the burning of fossil fuels, but then how are we to obtain the energy we need? We can try to reduce energy use, but we will still need to generate large amounts energy. Some possible ways of doing this are by using wind and solar generators, by hydroelectric and tidal plants, and also by nuclear power. These possibilities will be critically examined. (author)

  8. Global Warming in Schools: An Inquiry about the Competing Conceptions of High School Social Studies and Science Curricula and Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meehan, Casey R.

    Despite the scientific consensus supporting the theory of anthropogenic (human-induced) global warming, whether global warming is a serious problem, whether human activity is the primary cause of it, and whether scientific consensus exists at all are controversial questions among the U.S. lay-public. The cultural theory of risk perception (Schwarz and Thompson, 1990) serves as the theoretical framework for this qualitative analysis in which I ask the question how do U.S. secondary school curricula and teachers deal with the disparity between the overwhelming scientific consensus and the lay-public's skepticism regarding global warming? I analyzed nine widely used social studies and science textbooks, eight sets of supplemental materials about global warming produced by a range of not-for-profit and governmental organizations, and interviewed fourteen high school teachers who had experience teaching formal lessons about global warming in their content area. Findings suggest: 1) the range of global warming content within social studies and science textbooks and supplemental curricula reflects the spectrum of conceptualizations found among members of the U.S. public; 2) global warming curricula communicate only a narrow range of strategies for dealing with global warming and its associated threats; and 3) social studies and science teachers report taking a range of stances about global warming in their classroom, but sometimes the stance they put forth to their students does not align with their personal beliefs about global warming. The findings pose a troubling conundrum. Some of the global warming curricula treat the cause of global warming--a question that is not scientifically controversial--as a question with multiple and competing "right" answers. At the same time, much of curricula position how we should address global warming--a question that is legitimately controversial--as a question with one correct answer despite there being many reasonable responses

  9. Coarsening of AA6013-T6 Precipitates During Sheet Warm Forming Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Ciano, M.; DiCecco, S.; Esmaeili, S.; Wells, M. A.; Worswick, M. J.

    2018-03-01

    The use of warm forming for AA6xxx-T6 sheet is of interest to improve its formability; however, the effect warm forming may have on the coarsening of precipitates and the mechanical strength of these sheets has not been well studied. In this research, the coarsening behavior of AA6013-T6 precipitates has been explored, in the temperature range of 200-300 °C, and time of 30 s up to 50 h. Additionally, the effect of warm deformation on coarsening behavior was explored using: (1) simulated warm forming tests in a Gleeble thermo-mechanical simulator and (2) bi-axial warm deformation tests. Using a strong obstacle model to describe the yield strength (YS) evolution of the AA6013-T6 material, and a Lifshitz, Slyozov, and Wagner (LSW) particle coarsening law to describe the change in precipitate size with time, the coarsening kinetics were modeled for this alloy. The coarsening kinetics in the range of 220-300 °C followed a trend similar to that previously found for AA6111 for the 180-220 °C range. There was strong evidence that coarsening kinetics were not altered due to warm deformation above 220 °C. For warm forming between 200 and 220 °C, the YS of the AA6013-T6 material increased slightly, which could be attributed to strain hardening during warm deformation. Finally, a non-isothermal coarsening model was used to assess the potential reduction in the YS of AA6013-T6 for practical processing conditions related to auto-body manufacturing. The model calculations showed that 90% of the original AA6013-T6 YS could be maintained, for warm forming temperatures up to 280 °C, if the heating schedule used to get the part to the warm forming temperature was limited to 1 min.

  10. Clinical Trial Research on Mongolian Medical Warm Acupuncture in Treating Insomnia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agula Bo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Insomnia is one of the most common sleep disorders. Hypnotics have poor long-term efficacy. Mongolian medical warm acupuncture has significant efficacy in treating insomnia. The paper evaluates the role of Mongolian medical warm acupuncture in treating insomnia by investigating the Mongolian medicine syndromes and conditions, Pittsburgh sleep quality index, and polysomnography indexes. Method. The patients were diagnosed in accordance with International Classification of Sleep Disorders (ICSD-2. The insomnia patients were divided into the acupuncture group (40 cases and the estazolam group (40 cases. The patients underwent intervention of Mongolian medical warm acupuncture and estazolam. The indicators of the Mongolian medicine syndromes and conditions, Pittsburgh sleep quality index (PSQI, and polysomnography indexes (PSG have been detected. Result. Based on the comparison of the Mongolian medicine syndrome scores between the warm acupuncture group and the drug treatment group, the result indicated P<0.01. The clinical efficacy result showed that the effective rate (85% in the warm acupuncture group was higher than that (70% in the drug group. The total scores of PSQI of both groups were approximated. The sleep quality indexes of both groups decreased significantly (P<0.05. The sleep quality index in the Mongolian medical warm acupuncture group decreased significantly (P<0.01 and was better than that in the estazolam group. The sleep efficiency and daytime functions of the patients in the Mongolian medical warm acupuncture group improved significantly (P<0.01. The sleep time was significantly extended (P<0.01 in the Mongolian medical warm acupuncture group following PSG intervention. The sleep time during NREM in the Mongolian warm acupuncture group increased significantly (P<0.01. The sleep time exhibited a decreasing trend during REM and it decreased significantly in the Mongolian warm acupuncture group (P<0.01. The percentage of

  11. Three Smoking Guns Prove Falsity of Green house Warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, P.

    2001-12-01

    Three observed facts: 1, the cloud coverage increased 4.1% in 50 years; 2. the precipitation increased 7.8% in 100 years; 3. the two rates are the same. {Interpretation}. 1, By the increased albedo of the clouds heat dissipation is increased 3.98 W/m2 by 2XCO2 time, canceling out greenhouse warming of 4 W/m{2}. Thus no global warming. 2, The precipitation increase show the increased release of latent heat of vaporization, which turns out to be equal to that absorbed by ocean due to increased evaporation by the greenhouse forcing. This all greenhouse heat is used up in evaporation and the warming of the earth is zero. 3, The identity of the two rates double-checked the two independent proofs. Therefore experimentally no greenhouse warming is triply proved. A new branch of science Pleistocene Climatology is developed to study the theoretical origin of no greenhouse warming. Climatology, like mechanics of a large number of particles, is of course complex and unwieldy. If totally order-less then there is no hope. However, if some regularity appears, then a systematic treatment can be done to simplify the complexity. The rigid bodies are subjected to a special simplifying condition (the distances between all particles are constant) and only 6 degrees of freedom are significant, all others are sidetracked. To study the spinning top there is no need to study the dynamics of every particle of the top by Newton's laws through super-computer. It only needs to solve the Euler equations without computer. In climate study the use of super-computer to study all degrees of freedom of the climate is as untenable as the study of the spinning top by super-computer. Yet in spite of the complexity there is strict regularity as seen in the ice ages, which works as the simplifying conditions to establish a new science Pleistocene climatology. See my book Greenhouse Warming and Nuclear Hazards just published (www.PeterFongBook.com). This time the special condition is the presence of a

  12. Global warming and climate change: control methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laal, M.; Aliramaie, A.

    2008-01-01

    This paper aimed at finding causes of global warming and ways to bring it under control. Data based on scientific opinion as given by synthesis reports of news, articles, web sites, and books. global warming is the observed and projected increases in average temperature of Earth's atmosphere and oceans. Carbon dioxide and other air pollution that is collecting in the atmosphere like a thickening blanket, trapping the sun's heat and causing the planet to warm up. Pollution is one of the biggest man-made problems. Burning fossil fuels is the main factor of pollution. As average temperature increases, habitats, species and people are threatened by drought, changes in rainfall, altered seasons, and more violent storms and floods. Indeed the life cycle of nuclear power results in relatively little pollution. Energy efficiency, solar, wind and other renewable fuels are other weapons against global warming . Human activity, primarily burning fossil fuels, is the major driving factor in global warming . Curtailing the release of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere by reducing use of oil, gasoline, coal and employment of alternate energy, sources are the tools for keeping global warming under control. global warming can be slowed and stopped, with practical actions thal yield a cleaner, healthier atmosphere

  13. Global Warming Estimation From Microwave Sounding Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhakara, C.; Iacovazzi, R., Jr.; Yoo, J.-M.; Dalu, G.

    1998-01-01

    Microwave Sounding Unit (MSU) Ch 2 data sets, collected from sequential, polar-orbiting, Sun-synchronous National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration operational satellites, contain systematic calibration errors that are coupled to the diurnal temperature cycle over the globe. Since these coupled errors in MSU data differ between successive satellites, it is necessary to make compensatory adjustments to these multisatellite data sets in order to determine long-term global temperature change. With the aid of the observations during overlapping periods of successive satellites, we can determine such adjustments and use them to account for the coupled errors in the long-term time series of MSU Ch 2 global temperature. In turn, these adjusted MSU Ch 2 data sets can be used to yield global temperature trend. In a pioneering study, Spencer and Christy (SC) (1990) developed a procedure to derive the global temperature trend from MSU Ch 2 data. Such a procedure can leave unaccounted residual errors in the time series of the temperature anomalies deduced by SC, which could lead to a spurious long-term temperature trend derived from their analysis. In the present study, we have developed a method that avoids the shortcomings of the SC procedure, the magnitude of the coupled errors is not determined explicitly. Furthermore, based on some assumptions, these coupled errors are eliminated in three separate steps. Such a procedure can leave unaccounted residual errors in the time series of the temperature anomalies deduced by SC, which could lead to a spurious long-term temperature trend derived from their analysis. In the present study, we have developed a method that avoids the shortcomings of the SC procedures. Based on our analysis, we find there is a global warming of 0.23+/-0.12 K between 1980 and 1991. Also, in this study, the time series of global temperature anomalies constructed by removing the global mean annual temperature cycle compares favorably with a similar

  14. Differential responses of invasive and native plants to warming with simulated changes in diurnal temperature ranges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bao-Ming; Gao, Yang; Liao, Hui-Xuan; Peng, Shao-Lin

    2017-07-01

    Although many studies have documented the effects of global warming on invasive plants, little is known about whether the effects of warming on plant invasion differ depending on the imposed change in different diurnal temperature ranges (DTR). We tested the impact of warming with DTR change on seed germination and seedling growth of eight species in the family Asteraceae. Four of these are invasive ( Eupatorium catarium , Mikania micrantha , Biodens pilosa var. radiate , Ageratum conyzoides ) in China, and four are native ( Sonchus arvensis , Senecios candens , Pterocypsela indica , Eupatorium fortunei ). Four temperature treatments were set in growth chambers (three warming by 3 °C with different DTRs and control), and experiments were run to mimic wintertime and summertime conditions. The control treatment ( T c ) was set to the mean temperature for the corresponding time of year, and the three warming treatments were symmetric (i.e. equal night-and-day) (DTR sym ), asymmetric warming with increased (DTR inc ) and decreased (DTR dec ) DTR. The warming treatments did not affect seed germination of invasive species under any of the conditions, but DTR sym and DTR inc increased seed germination of natives relative to the control, suggesting that warming may not increase success of these invasive plant species via effects on seed germination of invasive plants relative to native plants. The invasive plants had higher biomass and greater stem allocation than the native ones under all of the warming treatments. Wintertime warming increased the biomass of the invasive and wintertime DTR sym and DTR inc increased that of the native plants, whereas summertime asymmetric warming decreased the biomass of the invasives but not the natives. Therefore, warming may not facilitate invasion of these invasive species due to the suppressive effects of summertime warming (particularly the asymmetric warming) on growth. Compared with DTR sym , DTR dec decreased the biomass of

  15. A New Wave of Permafrost Warming in the Alaskan Interior?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanovsky, V. E.; Nicolsky, D.; Cable, W.; Kholodov, A. L.; Panda, S. K.

    2017-12-01

    The impact of climate warming on permafrost and the potential of climate feedbacks resulting from permafrost thawing have recently received a great deal of attention. Ground temperatures are a primary indicator of permafrost stability. Many of the research sites in our permafrost network are located along the North American Arctic Permafrost-Ecological Transect that spans all permafrost zones in Alaska. Most of the sites in Alaska show substantial warming of permafrost since the 1980s. The magnitude of warming has varied with location, but was typically from 0.5 to 3°C. However, this warming was not linear in time and not spatially uniform. In some regions this warming even may be reversed and a slight recent cooling of permafrost has been observed recently at some locations. The Interior of Alaska is one of such regions where a slight permafrost cooling was observed starting in the late 1990s that has continued through the 2000s and in the beginning of the 2010s. The cooling has followed the substantial increase in permafrost temperatures documented for the Interior during the 1980s and 1990s. Permafrost temperatures at 15 m depth increased here by 0.3 to 0.6°C between 1983 and 1996. In most locations they reached their maximum in the second half of the 1990s. Since then, the permafrost temperatures started to decrease slowly and by 2013 this decrease at some locations was as much as 0.3°C at 15 m depth. There are some indications that the warming trend in the Alaskan Interior permafrost resumed during the last four years. By 2016, new record highs for the entire period of measurements of permafrost temperatures at 15 m depth were recorded at several locations. The latest observed permafrost warming in the Interior was combined with higher than normal summer precipitations. This combination has triggered near-surface permafrost degradation in many locations with adverse consequences for the ground surface stability affecting ecosystems and infrastructure. In

  16. King penguin population threatened by Southern Ocean warming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Bohec, Céline; Durant, Joël M; Gauthier-Clerc, Michel; Stenseth, Nils C; Park, Young-Hyang; Pradel, Roger; Grémillet, David; Gendner, Jean-Paul; Le Maho, Yvon

    2008-02-19

    Seabirds are sensitive indicators of changes in marine ecosystems and might integrate and/or amplify the effects of climate forcing on lower levels in food chains. Current knowledge on the impact of climate changes on penguins is primarily based on Antarctic birds identified by using flipper bands. Although flipper bands have helped to answer many questions about penguin biology, they were shown in some penguin species to have a detrimental effect. Here, we present for a Subantarctic species, king penguin (Aptenodytes patagonicus), reliable results on the effect of climate on survival and breeding based on unbanded birds but instead marked by subcutaneous electronic tags. We show that warm events negatively affect both breeding success and adult survival of this seabird. However, the observed effect is complex because it affects penguins at several spatio/temporal levels. Breeding reveals an immediate response to forcing during warm phases of El Niño Southern Oscillation affecting food availability close to the colony. Conversely, adult survival decreases with a remote sea-surface temperature forcing (i.e., a 2-year lag warming taking place at the northern boundary of pack ice, their winter foraging place). We suggest that this time lag may be explained by the delay between the recruitment and abundance of their prey, adjusted to the particular 1-year breeding cycle of the king penguin. The derived population dynamic model suggests a 9% decline in adult survival for a 0.26 degrees C warming. Our findings suggest that king penguin populations are at heavy extinction risk under the current global warming predictions.

  17. Process contributions to the intermodel spread in amplified Arctic warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boeke, R.; Taylor, P. C.

    2016-12-01

    The Arctic is warming at a rate more than twice the global average. This robust climate system response to an external forcing is referred to as Arctic Amplification (AA). While Coupled Model Intercomparison Project 5 (CMIP5) climate models simulate AA, the largest intermodel spread in projected warming is also found in the Arctic. Quantifying the amount of polar warming relative to global warming influences how society adapts to climate change; a 2°C increase in global mean temperature would result in a polar warming between 4-8°C according to the intermodel spread in CMIP5 simulations. A trove of previous work has considered AA diagnostically using variations in the surface energy budget to attribute the intermodel spread in AA to an assortment of feedbacks—surface albedo, cloud, surface turbulent flux, and atmospheric and oceanic energy transport. We consider a systems-thinking approach treating AA as a process that evolves over time. We hypothesize that two specific components of the AA process are most important and influence the intermodel spread. (1) The inability of the Arctic system to effectively remove excess heat sourced from natural variability. The change in the efficiency of the `Arctic air conditioner' is thought to be due to thinner and less extensive sea ice and the resulting ice albedo feedback. (2) The process through which energy is stored in the ocean and exchanged with the atmosphere within the context of the sea ice annual cycle is also important. This study uses CMIP5 simulations from the historical and RCP8.5 (Representative Concentration Pathway; an emission scenario with forcing increasing to 8.5 W m-2 by 2100) to analyze how the AA process operates in present and future climate. The intermodel spread in these processes and the influence on the spread in AA are discussed. This approach identifies models that more realistically simulate the AA process and will aid in narrowing intermodel spread in Arctic surface temperature

  18. Urban warming reduces aboveground carbon storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meineke, Emily; Youngsteadt, Elsa; Dunn, Robert Roberdeau

    2016-01-01

    sequestration (carbon stored per year) of mature trees. Urban warming increased herbivorous arthropod abundance on trees, but these herbivores had negligible effects on tree carbon sequestration. Instead, urban warming was associated with an estimated 12% loss of carbon sequestration, in part because...... photosynthesis was reduced at hotter sites. Ecosystem service assessments that do not consider urban conditions may overestimate urban tree carbon storage. Because urban and global warming are becoming more intense, our results suggest that urban trees will sequester even less carbon in the future....

  19. An Analysis of Historical Global Warming and Social Engagement

    OpenAIRE

    Train, Joseph; Roizenman, David; Damiani, Seth; Rochwerg, Ronny

    2018-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to determine whether there is a correlation between awareness of global warming, and where global warming occurs. This theory is carried out by analyzing maps containing various forms of data that have to do with global warming, such as precipitation and surface temperature, and comparing it with a map of engagement from tweets which mention global warming. This paper found that there is no solid correlation between mentioning global warming in tweets and global warm...

  20. The effect of warm-up on surgical performance: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdalla, Gamal; Moran-Atkin, Erin; Chen, Grace; Schweitzer, Michael A; Magnuson, Thomas H; Steele, Kimberley E

    2015-06-01

    The concept of warming-up before a performance has been accepted across many disciplines including sports and music. In contrast, it is uncommon for a surgeon to "warm-up" prior to operating. To date, few studies from various specialties have attempted to answer this question whether warm-up improved the intraoperative performance of the surgeon. However, there has not been a systematic review of these studies. The aim of our systematic review is to assess the effect of warming-up preoperatively on the laparoscopic performance of the surgeon. Pubmed and scopus were searched to identify all published prospective observational studies, which involved either residents, fellows or attending surgeons. We excluded case reports, reviews, non-English studies, and medical student participation. Study risk of bias were assessed regarding sequence generation, allocation concealment, blinding, incomplete outcome data, selective outcome reporting, and other biases, using a validated Cochrane Collaboration's tool. Out of 241 studies, 6 met the inclusion criteria. All included studies were randomized with half of them being randomized controlled studies and the rest randomized crossover studies. The total number of operative cases was 196, including 98 warm-up and 98 non warm-up. The total number of participants was 87, with the largest number in a single study being 38 and the average sample size of all studies was 14. All six studies assessed various aspects of laparoscopic surgical performances. Significant improvement in the intraoperative laparoscopic performance was observed with warming-up preoperatively in five out of six studies (p study failed to reach statistical significance (p > 0.05). Warming-up before an operative procedure improve a trainee's technical, cognitive, and psychomotor performance. Further studies are necessary to assess the ways in which warm-up could impact a surgeon's performance, and to identify the optimal timing and duration of warm-up prior to

  1. Warm Rain Processes Over the Tropical Oceans and Implications on Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, William K. M.; Wu, H. T.

    2004-01-01

    In this talk, we will first show results from TRMM regarding the characteristics of warm rains over the tropical oceans, and the dependence of rate of warm rain production on sea surface temperature. Results lead to the hypothesis that warm rain production efficiency, i.e., autoconversion, may be increased in a warm climate. We use the GEOS-II GCM to test this hypothesis. Our modeling results show that in a climate with increased rate of autoconversion, the total rain amount is increased, with warm rain contributing to a larger portion of the increase. The abundant rainout of warm precipitation at middle to low levels causes a reduction of high cloud cover due to the depletion of water available for ice-phase rain production. As a result, more isolated, but more intense penetrative convection develops. Results also show that increased autoconversion reduces the convective adjustment time scale tends, implying a faster recycling of atmospheric water. Most interestingly, the increased low level heating associated with warm rain leads to more energetic Madden and Julian oscillations in the tropics, with well-defined eastward propagation. While reducing the autoconversion leads to an abundant mix of westward and eastward tropical disturbance on daily to weekly time scales. The causes of the sensitivity of the dynamical regimes to the microphysics parameterization in the GCM will be discussed.

  2. Research on trend of warm-humid climate in Central Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Zhi; Peng, Dailiang; Wen, Jingyi; Cai, Zhanqing; Wang, Tiantian; Hu, Yuekai; Ma, Yaxin; Xu, Junfeng

    2017-07-01

    Central Asia is a typical arid area, which is sensitive and vulnerable part of climate changes, at the same time, Central Asia is the Silk Road Economic Belt of the core district, the warm-humid climate change will affect the production and economic development of neighboring countries. The average annual precipitation, average anneal temperature and evapotranspiration are the important indexes to weigh the climate change. In this paper, the annual precipitation, annual average temperature and evapotranspiration data of every pixel point in Central Asia are analyzed by using long-time series remote sensing data to analyze the trend of warm and humid conditions. Finally, using the model to analyzed the distribution of warm-dry trend, the warm-wet trend, the cold-dry trend and the cold-wet trend in Central Asia and Xinjiang area. The results showed that most of the regions of Central Asia were warm-humid and warm-dry trends, but only a small number of regions showed warm-dry and cold-dry trends. It is of great significance to study the climatic change discipline and guarantee the ecological safety and improve the ability to cope with climate change in the region. It also provide scientific basis for the formulation of regional climate change program. The first section in your paper

  3. Changes in Concurrent Risk of Warm and Dry Years under Impact of Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarhadi, A.; Wiper, M.; Touma, D. E.; Ausín, M. C.; Diffenbaugh, N. S.

    2017-12-01

    Anthropogenic global warming has changed the nature and the risk of extreme climate phenomena. The changing concurrence of multiple climatic extremes (warm and dry years) may result in intensification of undesirable consequences for water resources, human and ecosystem health, and environmental equity. The present study assesses how global warming influences the probability that warm and dry years co-occur in a global scale. In the first step of the study a designed multivariate Mann-Kendall trend analysis is used to detect the areas in which the concurrence of warm and dry years has increased in the historical climate records and also climate models in the global scale. The next step investigates the concurrent risk of the extremes under dynamic nonstationary conditions. A fully generalized multivariate risk framework is designed to evolve through time under dynamic nonstationary conditions. In this methodology, Bayesian, dynamic copulas are developed to model the time-varying dependence structure between the two different climate extremes (warm and dry years). The results reveal an increasing trend in the concurrence risk of warm and dry years, which are in agreement with the multivariate trend analysis from historical and climate models. In addition to providing a novel quantification of the changing probability of compound extreme events, the results of this study can help decision makers develop short- and long-term strategies to prepare for climate stresses now and in the future.

  4. Ecological stability in response to warming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fussmann, Katarina E.; Schwarzmueller, Florian; Brose, Ulrich; Jousset, Alexandre|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/370632656; Rall, Bjoern C.

    That species' biological rates including metabolism, growth and feeding scale with temperature is well established from warming experiments(1). The interactive influence of these changes on population dynamics, however, remains uncertain. As a result, uncertainty about ecological stability in

  5. Global temperatures and the global warming ``debate''

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubrecht, Gordon

    2009-04-01

    Many ordinary citizens listen to pronouncements on talk radio casting doubt on anthropogenic global warming. Some op-ed columnists likewise cast doubts, and are read by credulous citizens. For example, on 8 March 2009, the Boston Globe published a column by Jeff Jacoby, ``Where's global warming?'' According to Jacoby, ``But it isn't such hints of a planetary warming trend that have been piling up in profusion lately. Just the opposite.'' He goes on to write, ``the science of climate change is not nearly as important as the religion of climate change,'' and blamed Al Gore for getting his mistaken views accepted. George Will at the Washington Post also expressed denial. As a result, 44% of U.S. voters, according to the January 19 2009 Rasmussen Report, blame long-term planetary trends for global warming, not human beings. Is there global cooling, as skeptics claim? We examine the temperature record.

  6. Global Surface Warming Hiatus Analysis Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data were used to conduct the study of the global surface warming hiatus, an apparent decrease in the upward trend of global surface temperatures since 1998....

  7. A review of warm mix asphalt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-01

    Warm Mix Asphalt (WMA) technology, recently developed in Europe, is gaining strong interest in the US. By : lowering the viscosity of asphalt binder and/or increasing the workability of mixture using minimal heat, WMA : technology allows the mixing, ...

  8. Effects of global warming on respiratory diseases

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abe Olugbenga

    and tuberculosis), parasitic lung diseases, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease ... Methods: A literature search on global warming and respiratory diseases was carried out through the internet .... (COPD) The main factor to consider here is.

  9. Teaching cases on transportation and global warming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    This project developed a series of three teaching cases that explore the implications of global : warming for transportation policy in the United States. The cases are intended to be used in : graduate and undergraduate courses on transportation poli...

  10. Self-interacting warm dark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hannestad, Steen; Scherrer, Robert J.

    2000-01-01

    It has been shown by many independent studies that the cold dark matter scenario produces singular galactic dark halos, in strong contrast with observations. Possible remedies are that either the dark matter is warm so that it has significant thermal motion or that the dark matter has strong self-interactions. We combine these ideas to calculate the linear mass power spectrum and the spectrum of cosmic microwave background (CMB) fluctuations for self-interacting warm dark matter. Our results indicate that such models have more power on small scales than is the case for the standard warm dark matter model, with a CMB fluctuation spectrum which is nearly indistinguishable from standard cold dark matter. This enhanced small-scale power may provide better agreement with the observations than does standard warm dark matter. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society

  11. Abrupt warming of the Red Sea

    KAUST Repository

    Raitsos, D. E.; Hoteit, Ibrahim; Prihartato, Perdana; Chronis, T.; Triantafyllou, G.; Abualnaja, Y.

    2011-01-01

    marine temperature. The comparisons with Northern Hemisphere temperatures revealed that the observed warming is part of global climate change trends. The hitherto results also raise additional questions regarding other broader climatic impacts over

  12. Enhanced decomposition of stable soil organic carbon and microbial catabolic potentials by long-term field warming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Wenting; Liang, Junyi; Hale, Lauren E; Jung, Chang Gyo; Chen, Ji; Zhou, Jizhong; Xu, Minggang; Yuan, Mengting; Wu, Liyou; Bracho, Rosvel; Pegoraro, Elaine; Schuur, Edward A G; Luo, Yiqi

    2017-11-01

    Quantifying soil organic carbon (SOC) decomposition under warming is critical to predict carbon-climate feedbacks. According to the substrate regulating principle, SOC decomposition would decrease as labile SOC declines under field warming, but observations of SOC decomposition under warming do not always support this prediction. This discrepancy could result from varying changes in SOC components and soil microbial communities under warming. This study aimed to determine the decomposition of SOC components with different turnover times after subjected to long-term field warming and/or root exclusion to limit C input, and to test whether SOC decomposition is driven by substrate lability under warming. Taking advantage of a 12-year field warming experiment in a prairie, we assessed the decomposition of SOC components by incubating soils from control and warmed plots, with and without root exclusion for 3 years. We assayed SOC decomposition from these incubations by combining inverse modeling and microbial functional genes during decomposition with a metagenomic technique (GeoChip). The decomposition of SOC components with turnover times of years and decades, which contributed to 95% of total cumulative CO 2 respiration, was greater in soils from warmed plots. But the decomposition of labile SOC was similar in warmed plots compared to the control. The diversity of C-degradation microbial genes generally declined with time during the incubation in all treatments, suggesting shifts of microbial functional groups as substrate composition was changing. Compared to the control, soils from warmed plots showed significant increase in the signal intensities of microbial genes involved in degrading complex organic compounds, implying enhanced potential abilities of microbial catabolism. These are likely responsible for accelerated decomposition of SOC components with slow turnover rates. Overall, the shifted microbial community induced by long-term warming accelerates the

  13. Global warming and north-south solidarity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Islam, S.

    1998-01-01

    The discussion on climate change is based on 'contradictory certainties'. All sides claim to have found the truth. Much has been written and said about the connection between global warming, biodiversity and over population. The impoverished countries of the South se the insatiable intentions of the North as the major threat to the environment; and global warming as an excuse for stopping the economic development of the south

  14. Attribution of polar warming to human influence

    OpenAIRE

    Gillett, NP; Stone, DA; Stott, PA; Nozawa, T; Karpechko, AY; Hegerl, GC; Wehner, MF; Jones, PD

    2008-01-01

    The polar regions have long been expected to warm strongly as a result of anthropogenic climate change, because of the positive feedbacks associated with melting ice and snow. Several studies have noted a rise in Arctic temperatures over recent decades, but have not formally attributed the changes to human influence, owing to sparse observations and large natural variability. Both warming and cooling trends have been observed in Antarctica, which the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change ...

  15. How warm was the year 2010? Background; Wie warm war das Jahr 2010? Hintergrund

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-05-06

    In the background paper under consideration, the Federal Environment Agency (Dessau-Rosslau, Federal Republic of Germany) reports on a global measurement of the surface air temperature in order to obtain a global mean temperature. The global mean temperature of the year 2010 is not very significant. The deviation of the global mean temperature of the year 2010 from the mean temperature in a recent, extended period of time is more significant. The long-term trend in the global mean temperature shows a progressive global warming. The year 2010 was the warmest calendar year with the largest amount of rainfall since the records began in the 19th century. The global mean surface air temperature was very slight above the average temperature of the previous record year 2005.

  16. A farm-level analysis of economic and agronomic impacts of gradual climate warming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaiser, H.M.; Sampath, R.; Riha, S.J.; Wilks, D.S.; Rossiter, D.G.

    1993-01-01

    The potential economic and agronomic impacts of gradual climate warming are examined at the farm level. Three models of the relevant climatic, agronomic, and economic processes are developed and linked to address climate change impacts and agricultural adaptability. Several climate warming severity. The results indicate that grain farmers in southern Minnesota can effectively adapt to a gradually changing climate (warmer and either wetter or drier) by adopting later maturing cultivars, changing crop mix, and altering the timing of field operations to take advantage of a longer growing season resulting from climate warming

  17. Global Warming and Its Health Impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossati, Antonella

    2017-01-01

    Since the mid-19th century, human activities have increased greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxide in the Earth's atmosphere that resulted in increased average temperature. The effects of rising temperature include soil degradation, loss of productivity of agricultural land, desertification, loss of biodiversity, degradation of ecosystems, reduced fresh-water resources, acidification of the oceans, and the disruption and depletion of stratospheric ozone. All these have an impact on human health, causing non-communicable diseases such as injuries during natural disasters, malnutrition during famine, and increased mortality during heat waves due to complications in chronically ill patients. Direct exposure to natural disasters has also an impact on mental health and, although too complex to be quantified, a link has even been established between climate and civil violence. Over time, climate change can reduce agricultural resources through reduced availability of water, alterations and shrinking arable land, increased pollution, accumulation of toxic substances in the food chain, and creation of habitats suitable to the transmission of human and animal pathogens. People living in low-income countries are particularly vulnerable. Climate change scenarios include a change in distribution of infectious diseases with warming and changes in outbreaks associated with weather extreme events. After floods, increased cases of leptospirosis, campylobacter infections and cryptosporidiosis are reported. Global warming affects water heating, rising the transmission of water-borne pathogens. Pathogens transmitted by vectors are particularly sensitive to climate change because they spend a good part of their life cycle in a cold-blooded host invertebrate whose temperature is similar to the environment. A warmer climate presents more favorable conditions for the survival and the completion of the life cycle of the vector, going as far as to speed it up

  18. Global Warming and Its Health Impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonella Rossati

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the mid-19th century, human activities have increased greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxide in the Earth's atmosphere that resulted in increased average temperature. The effects of rising temperature include soil degradation, loss of productivity of agricultural land, desertification, loss of biodiversity, degradation of ecosystems, reduced fresh-water resources, acidification of the oceans, and the disruption and depletion of stratospheric ozone. All these have an impact on human health, causing non-communicable diseases such as injuries during natural disasters, malnutrition during famine, and increased mortality during heat waves due to complications in chronically ill patients. Direct exposure to natural disasters has also an impact on mental health and, although too complex to be quantified, a link has even been established between climate and civil violence. Over time, climate change can reduce agricultural resources through reduced availability of water, alterations and shrinking arable land, increased pollution, accumulation of toxic substances in the food chain, and creation of habitats suitable to the transmission of human and animal pathogens. People living in low-income countries are particularly vulnerable. Climate change scenarios include a change in distribution of infectious diseases with warming and changes in outbreaks associated with weather extreme events. After floods, increased cases of leptospirosis, campylobacter infections and cryptosporidiosis are reported. Global warming affects water heating, rising the transmission of water-borne pathogens. Pathogens transmitted by vectors are particularly sensitive to climate change because they spend a good part of their life cycle in a cold-blooded host invertebrate whose temperature is similar to the environment. A warmer climate presents more favorable conditions for the survival and the completion of the life cycle of the vector, going as far

  19. Mediterranean climate change and Indian Ocean warming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoerling, M.; Eischeid, J.; Hurrel, J.

    2006-01-01

    General circulation model (GCM) responses to 20. century changes in sea surface temperatures (SSTs) and greenhouse gases are diagnosed, with emphasis on their relationship to observed regional climate change over the Mediterranean region. A major question is whether the Mediterranean region's drying trend since 1950 can be understood as a consequence of the warming trend in tropical SSTs. We focus on the impact of Indian Ocean warming, which is itself the likely result of increasing greenhouse gases. It is discovered that a strong projection onto the positive polarity of the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) index characterizes the atmospheric response structure to the 1950-1999 warming of Indian Ocean SSTs. This influence appears to be robust in so far as it is reproduced in ensembles of experiments using three different GCMs. Both the equilibrium and transient responses to Indian Ocean warming are examined. Under each scenario, the latitude of prevailing mid latitude westerlies shifts poleward during the November-April period. The consequence is a drying of the Mediterranean region, whereas northern Europe and Scandinavia receive increased precipitation in concert with the poleward shift of storminess. The IPCC (TAR) 20. century coupled ocean-atmosphere simulations forced by observed greenhouse gas changes also yield a post-1950 drying trend over the Mediterranean. We argue that this feature of human-induced regional climate change is the outcome of a dynamical feedback, one involving Indian Ocean warming and a requisite adjustment of atmospheric circulation systems to such ocean warming

  20. Global warming and nuclear power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, L., LLNL

    1998-07-10

    -fold reduction might be attained. Even the first such halving of carbon intensivity of stationary-source energy production world-wide might permit continued slow power-demand growth in the highly developed countries and rapid development of the other 80% of the world, both without active governmental suppression of fossil fuel usage - while also stabilizing carbon input-rates into the Earth`s atmosphere. The second two-fold reduction might obviate most global warming concerns.

  1. Tides, the PIG, and 'warm' water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, Robin

    2010-01-01

    The present rapid melting of the Pine Island Glacier (PIG) has been attributed to basal melting driven by the ocean. Specifically, this ocean melting is attributed to currents and tides pumping 'warm' Circumpolar Deep Water (CDW) into the ice shelf cavity. To identify tidal activity in the region, an observational time series of yo-yo CTD (Conductivity, Temperature, and Depth) data collected in the PIG outflow region was analyzed. The water column in front of the PIG consisted of two primary layers, a meltwater layer exiting the ice shelf cavity over a layer of CDW. Semidiurnal tides were present in both layers, with both the strength and direction of the tides differing between the two layers. The upper layer tides were stronger and directed in and out of the cavity, while the lower layer tides were primarily directed along the front of the cavity. Energy was found to be transferred from the semidiurnal tide to other frequencies and to be reflected by the ice shelf front. These mechanisms were most prominent at the interfaces between layers and indicate potential mixing between the layers. In conclusion, tides were found to contribute to the circulation into the ice shelf cavity and also to mixing of the exiting water, which influences pumping of the CDW into the ice shelf cavity and melting of the PIG.

  2. Global Warming: The Complete Briefing (Second Edition)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Dennis L.

    Enough coal exists to sustain world energy consumption growth through at least the end of the next century. If fossil carbon fuel consumption continues to increase at current rates, however, atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations will likely more than double, probably leading to significant warming of global climate, shifts in regional climates, and sea-level rise. Scientists and citizens throughout the world are discussing what should be done about the effects of our energy economy on the global environment.The issue is very broad and engaging, ranging from basic issues of geoscience to economics to fundamental value systems, and it has mobilized great economic interests and concern for our global environment. We live in an interesting time when human activities have begun to compete with the global capacities of Earth to recycle the elements of life. In the coming years, we will see how the world community reacts to this challenge, and what combination of conservation, technological development, and adaptation is ultimately adopted.

  3. Warm-up with weighted bat and adjustment of upper limb muscle activity in bat swinging under movement correction conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohta, Yoichi; Ishii, Yasumitsu; Ikudome, Sachi; Nakamoto, Hiroki

    2014-02-01

    The effects of weighted bat warm-up on adjustment of upper limb muscle activity were investigated during baseball bat swinging under dynamic conditions that require a spatial and temporal adjustment of the swinging to hit a moving target. Seven male college baseball players participated in this study. Using a batting simulator, the task was to swing the standard bat coincident with the arrival timing and position of a moving target after three warm-up swings using a standard or weighted bat. There was no significant effect of weighted bat warm-up on muscle activity before impact associated with temporal or spatial movement corrections. However, lower inhibition of the extensor carpi ulnaris muscle activity was observed in a velocity-changed condition in the weighted bat warm-up, as compared to a standard bat warm-up. It is suggested that weighted bat warm-up decreases the adjustment ability associated with inhibition of muscle activation under movement correction conditions.

  4. Amelioration of renal ischaemia-reperfusion injury by liposomal delivery of curcumin to renal tubular epithelial and antigen-presenting cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, N M; Stephenson, M D; Kitching, A R; Horowitz, J D; Coates, P T H

    2012-05-01

    Renal ischaemia-reperfusion (IR) injury is an inevitable consequence of renal transplantation, causing significant graft injury, increasing the risk of rejection and contributing to poor long-term graft outcome. Renal injury is mediated by cytokine and chemokine synthesis, inflammation and oxidative stress resulting from activation of the NF-κB pathway. We utilized liposomal incorporation of a potent inhibitor of the NF-κB pathway, curcumin, to target delivery to renal tubular epithelial and antigen-presenting cells. Liposomes containing curcumin were administered before bilateral renal ischaemia in C57/B6 mice, with subsequent reperfusion. Renal function was assessed from plasma levels of urea and creatinine, 4 and 24 h after reperfusion. Renal tissue was examined for NF-κB activity and oxidative stress (histology, immunostaining) and for apoptosis (TUNEL). Cytokines and chemokines were measured by RT-PCR and Western blotting. Liposomal curcumin significantly improved serum creatinine, reduced histological injury and cellular apoptosis and lowered Toll-like receptor-4, heat shock protein-70 and TNF-α mRNA expression. Liposomal curcumin also reduced neutrophil infiltration and diminished inflammatory chemokine expression. Curcumin liposomes reduced intracellular superoxide generation and increased superoxide dismutase levels, decreased inducible NOS mRNA expression and 3-nitrotyrosine staining consistent with limitations in nitrosative stress and inhibited renal tubular mRNA and protein expression of thioredoxin-interacting protein. These actions of curcumin were mediated by inhibition of NF-κB, MAPK and phospho-S6 ribosomal protein. Liposomal delivery of curcumin promoted effective, targeted delivery of this non-toxic compound that provided cytoprotection via anti-inflammatory and multiple antioxidant mechanisms following renal IR injury. © 2011 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology © 2011 The British Pharmacological Society.

  5. Prevalence of myocardial ischaemia as assessed with myocardial perfusion scintigraphy in patients with diabetes mellitus type 2 and mild anginal symptoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiersma, Jacobijne J.; Trip, Mieke D.; Piek, Jan J.; Tijssen, Jan G.P.; Verberne, Hein J.; Eck-Smit, Berthe L.F. van; Holt, Wik L. ten

    2006-01-01

    To determine the prevalence and predictors of reversible myocardial perfusion defects, indicative of myocardial ischaemia, in patients with mild, stable anginal complaints [Canadian Cardiovascular Society classification (CCS) I-II/IV] and diabetes mellitus type 2 (T2DM). A total of 329 patients with T2DM and stable, mild anginal symptoms (CCS I-II/IV) underwent myocardial perfusion scintigraphy. Perfusion images were assessed using a five-point (semi)-quantitative scoring system according to a 17-segment myocardial model. One-hundred and fifty-six (47%) patients showed reversible myocardial perfusion defects defined as a summed difference score of ≥3. Male gender [odds ratio (OR) 2.28, 95% CI 1.4-3.71, p=0.001], previous myocardial infarction (MI) without revascularisation (OR 3.04, 95% CI 1.28-7.24, p=0.01), and the use of two or more classes of anti-anginal medication (OR 2.36, 95% CI 1.48-3.76, p<0.001) were independent predictors for the presence of reversible defects. By contrast, lipid-lowering therapy reduced the possibility of reversible perfusion defects (OR 0.56, 95% CI 0.33-0.95, p=0.03). Approximately half of the patients with mild, stable angina pectoris and T2DM showed evidence of myocardial ischaemia. Male gender, previous MI and the use of anti-anginal medication were positive predictors and lipid-lowering therapy was a negative predictor for the results of the scintigraphic stress test. (orig.)

  6. Prevalence of myocardial ischaemia as assessed with myocardial perfusion scintigraphy in patients with diabetes mellitus type 2 and mild anginal symptoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiersma, Jacobijne J.; Trip, Mieke D.; Piek, Jan J.; Tijssen, Jan G.P. [Academic Medical Center, Department of Cardiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Verberne, Hein J.; Eck-Smit, Berthe L.F. van [Academic Medical Center Amsterdam, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Holt, Wik L. ten [Amstelland Hospital, Department of Cardiology, Amstelveen (Netherlands)

    2006-12-15

    To determine the prevalence and predictors of reversible myocardial perfusion defects, indicative of myocardial ischaemia, in patients with mild, stable anginal complaints [Canadian Cardiovascular Society classification (CCS) I-II/IV] and diabetes mellitus type 2 (T2DM). A total of 329 patients with T2DM and stable, mild anginal symptoms (CCS I-II/IV) underwent myocardial perfusion scintigraphy. Perfusion images were assessed using a five-point (semi)-quantitative scoring system according to a 17-segment myocardial model. One-hundred and fifty-six (47%) patients showed reversible myocardial perfusion defects defined as a summed difference score of {>=}3. Male gender [odds ratio (OR) 2.28, 95% CI 1.4-3.71, p=0.001], previous myocardial infarction (MI) without revascularisation (OR 3.04, 95% CI 1.28-7.24, p=0.01), and the use of two or more classes of anti-anginal medication (OR 2.36, 95% CI 1.48-3.76, p<0.001) were independent predictors for the presence of reversible defects. By contrast, lipid-lowering therapy reduced the possibility of reversible perfusion defects (OR 0.56, 95% CI 0.33-0.95, p=0.03). Approximately half of the patients with mild, stable angina pectoris and T2DM showed evidence of myocardial ischaemia. Male gender, previous MI and the use of anti-anginal medication were positive predictors and lipid-lowering therapy was a negative predictor for the results of the scintigraphic stress test. (orig.)

  7. Detection of viable cortical neurons using benzodiazepine receptor imaging after reversible focal ischaemia in rats: comparison with regional cerebral blood flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Yoshiyuki; Nakano, Takayuki; Yutani, Kenji; Nishimura, Hiroshi; Nishimura, Tsunehiko; Kusuoka, Hideo; Nakamura, Hironobu

    2000-01-01

    To elucidate the utility of benzodiazepine receptor imaging for the detection of viable cortical neurons, dual-tracer autoradiography using iodine-125 iomazenil (IMZ) and iodine-123 N-isopropyl-4-iodoamphetamine (IMP) was performed in a model of reversible focal ischaemia during the acute and subacute phases. The right middle cerebral artery of anaesthetized rats was occluded for 60 min using an intraluminal filament and reperfused. In the acute phase study, 125 I-IMZ (370 kBq) was injected via the femoral vein at 2 h after reperfusion, and 123 I-IMP (37 MBq) was injected at 50 min post-injection. Rats were sacrificed 10 min after the injection of 123 I-IMP. In the subacute phase study, the same procedure was performed at 5 days after reperfusion. In the acute phase, the IMP uptake was significantly decreased in almost all areas of the lesioned hemisphere, an exception being the cerebellum; however, the IMZ uptake was significantly decreased only in ischaemic cores. The discrepancy between IMZ and IMP uptake was observed in the lateral neocortex and the lateral caudate putamen (CPu), which were most frequently damaged in this ischaemic model. In the subacute phase, the IMZ uptake in lesioned rats was significantly decreased only in the parietal lobe and hippocampus, though the IMP uptake was decreased in many regions of lesioned hemispheres (the frontal, parietal cortex, CPu, hippocampus and thalamus). Histopathological findings indicated that both the IMP and the IMZ uptake was markedly decreased in necrotic areas. Although the IMP uptake was significantly decreased in the ischaemic areas, the IMZ uptake was maintained in these areas. These results suggest that benzodiazepine receptor imaging is superior to regional cerebral blood flow imaging for the detection of viable cortical neurons in both the acute and subacute phases of ischaemia. (orig.)

  8. Depletion of kidney CD11c+ F4/80+ cells impairs the recovery process in ischaemia/reperfusion-induced acute kidney injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Myung-Gyu; Boo, Chang Su; Ko, Yoon Sook; Lee, Hee Young; Cho, Won Yong; Kim, Hyoung Kyu; Jo, Sang-Kyung

    2010-09-01

    Recent studies provided evidence of the potential role of CD11c(+) F4/80(+) dendritic subset in mediating injury and repair. The purpose of this study was to examine the role of kidney CD11c(+) F4/80(+) dendritic subset in the recovery phase of ischaemia/reperfusion injury (IRI). Following ischaemia/reperfusion (I/R), liposome clodronate or phosphate buffered saline (PBS) was administered, and on day 7 biochemical and histologic kidney damage was assessed. Activation and depletion of CD11c(+) F4/80(+) dendritic subset were confirmed by flow cytometry. Isolation of kidney CD11c(+) cells on days 1 and 7 with in vitro culture for measuring cytokines was performed to define functional characteristics of these cells, and adoptive transfer of CD11c(+) cells was also done. Following kidney IRI, the percentage of CD11c(+) F4/80(+) kidney dendritic cell subset that co-expresses maturation marker increased. Liposome clodronate injection after I/R resulted in preferential depletion of CD11c(+) F4/80(+) kidney dendritic subset, and depletion of these cells was associated with persistent kidney injury, more apoptosis, inflammation and impaired tubular cell proliferation. CD11c(+) F4/80(+) cell depletion was also associated with higher tissue levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines and lower level of IL-10, indicating the persistence of inflammatory milieu. Isolated kidney CD11c(+) cells on day 7 showed different phenotype with increased production of IL-10 compared with those on day 1. Adoptive transfer of CD11c(+) cells partially reversed impaired tissue recovery. Our results suggest that kidney CD11c(+) F4/80(+) dendritic subset might contribute to the recovery process by dynamic phenotypic change from pro-inflammatory to anti-inflammatory with modulation of immune response.

  9. Detection of viable cortical neurons using benzodiazepine receptor imaging after reversible focal ischaemia in rats: comparison with regional cerebral blood flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Yoshiyuki [Dept. of Radiology, Osaka National Hospital (Japan); Nakano, Takayuki; Yutani, Kenji; Nishimura, Hiroshi; Nishimura, Tsunehiko [Div. of Tracer Kinetics, Osaka University Medical School (Japan); Kusuoka, Hideo [Clinical Research Institute, Osaka National Hospital (Japan); Nakamura, Hironobu [Dept. of Radiology, Osaka University Medical School (Japan)

    2000-03-01

    To elucidate the utility of benzodiazepine receptor imaging for the detection of viable cortical neurons, dual-tracer autoradiography using iodine-125 iomazenil (IMZ) and iodine-123 N-isopropyl-4-iodoamphetamine (IMP) was performed in a model of reversible focal ischaemia during the acute and subacute phases. The right middle cerebral artery of anaesthetized rats was occluded for 60 min using an intraluminal filament and reperfused. In the acute phase study, {sup 125}I-IMZ (370 kBq) was injected via the femoral vein at 2 h after reperfusion, and {sup 123}I-IMP (37 MBq) was injected at 50 min post-injection. Rats were sacrificed 10 min after the injection of {sup 123}I-IMP. In the subacute phase study, the same procedure was performed at 5 days after reperfusion. In the acute phase, the IMP uptake was significantly decreased in almost all areas of the lesioned hemisphere, an exception being the cerebellum; however, the IMZ uptake was significantly decreased only in ischaemic cores. The discrepancy between IMZ and IMP uptake was observed in the lateral neocortex and the lateral caudate putamen (CPu), which were most frequently damaged in this ischaemic model. In the subacute phase, the IMZ uptake in lesioned rats was significantly decreased only in the parietal lobe and hippocampus, though the IMP uptake was decreased in many regions of lesioned hemispheres (the frontal, parietal cortex, CPu, hippocampus and thalamus). Histopathological findings indicated that both the IMP and the IMZ uptake was markedly decreased in necrotic areas. Although the IMP uptake was significantly decreased in the ischaemic areas, the IMZ uptake was maintained in these areas. These results suggest that benzodiazepine receptor imaging is superior to regional cerebral blood flow imaging for the detection of viable cortical neurons in both the acute and subacute phases of ischaemia. (orig.)

  10. The effect of zero-ischaemia laparoscopic minimally invasive partial nephrectomy using the modified sequential preplaced suture renorrhaphy technique on long-term renal functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sönmez, Mehmet Giray; Kara, Cengiz

    2017-09-01

    Laparoscopic minimally invasive partial nephrectomy (MIPN) is the preferred technique in renal surgery, especially T1 phase kidney tumours, and it is recommended for the protection of renal functions in methods that do not involve ischaemia. To evaluate long-term renal functions of zero-ischaemia laparoscopic MIPN patients who underwent a modified sequential preplaced suture renorrhaphy technique. In a total of 17 renal units in 16 patients with kidney tumours that were determined incidentally and did not cause any complaints, the masses were extracted via laparoscopic partial nephrectomy (LPN) using the modified sequential preplaced suture renorrhaphy technique. Creatinine and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) values of the patients were measured preoperatively and on the first day and after 12 months postoperatively, and the results were compared. The differences between the pre- and postoperative values were statistically significant (p = 0.033, p = 0.045), but the changes in postoperative creatinine and eGFR values were clinically insignificant. While the differences between preoperative and first-day postoperative creatinine and eGFR values were found to be statistically significant (p = 0.039, p = 0.042, respectively), a statistically significant difference was not detected between preoperative and 12-month postoperative creatinine and eGFR values (p = 0.09, p = 0.065, respectively). The global percentage of functional recovery was measured as 92.5% on the first day and 95.9% at the 12 th month. The modified sequential preplaced suture renorrhaphy technique is an effective, reliable method for avoiding complications and preserving renal functions and nephrons in appropriate patients.

  11. The importance of warm season warming to western U.S. streamflow changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, T.; Pierce, D.W.; Cayan, D.R.; Vano, J.A.; Lettenmaier, D.P.

    2011-01-01

    Warm season climate warming will be a key driver of annual streamflow changes in four major river basins of the western U.S., as shown by hydrological model simulations using fixed precipitation and idealized seasonal temperature changes based on climate projections with SRES A2 forcing. Warm season (April-September) warming reduces streamflow throughout the year; streamflow declines both immediately and in the subsequent cool season. Cool season (October-March) warming, by contrast, increases streamflow immediately, partially compensating for streamflow reductions during the subsequent warm season. A uniform warm season warming of 3C drives a wide range of annual flow declines across the basins: 13.3%, 7.2%, 1.8%, and 3.6% in the Colorado, Columbia, Northern and Southern Sierra basins, respectively. The same warming applied during the cool season gives annual declines of only 3.5%, 1.7%, 2.1%, and 3.1%, respectively. Copyright 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  12. Surface reflectance and conversion efficiency dependence of technologies for mitigating global warming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edmonds, Ian [Solartran Pty Ltd., 12 Lentara St, Kenmore, Brisbane 4069 (Australia); Smith, Geoff [Physics and Advanced Materials, University of Technology, Sydney, PO Box 123, Broadway, New South Wales 2007 (Australia)

    2011-05-15

    A means of assessing the relative impact of different renewable energy technologies on global warming has been developed. All power plants emit thermal energy to the atmosphere. Fossil fuel power plants also emit CO{sub 2} which accumulates in the atmosphere and provides an indirect increase in global warming via the greenhouse effect. A fossil fuel power plant may operate for some time before the global warming due to its CO{sub 2} emission exceeds the warming due to its direct heat emission. When a renewable energy power plant is deployed instead of a fossil fuel power plant there may be a significant time delay before the direct global warming effect is less than the combined direct and indirect global warming effect from an equivalent output coal fired plant - the ''business as usual'' case. Simple expressions are derived to calculate global temperature change as a function of ground reflectance and conversion efficiency for various types of fossil fuelled and renewable energy power plants. These expressions are used to assess the global warming mitigation potential of some proposed Australian renewable energy projects. The application of the expressions is extended to evaluate the deployment in Australia of current and new geo-engineering and carbon sequestration solutions to mitigate global warming. Principal findings are that warming mitigation depends strongly on the solar to electric conversion efficiency of renewable technologies, geo-engineering projects may offer more economic mitigation than renewable energy projects and the mitigation potential of reforestation projects depends strongly on the location of the projects. (author)

  13. Warming by immersion or exercise affects initial cooling rate during subsequent cold water immersion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Chris G; Ducharme, Michel B; Haman, François; Kenny, Glen P

    2004-11-01

    We examined the effect of prior heating, by exercise and warm-water immersion, on core cooling rates in individuals rendered mildly hypothermic by immersion in cold water. There were seven male subjects who were randomly assigned to one of three groups: 1) seated rest for 15 min (control); 2) cycling ergometry for 15 min at 70% Vo2 peak (active warming); or 3) immersion in a circulated bath at 40 degrees C to an esophageal temperature (Tes) similar to that at the end of exercise (passive warming). Subjects were then immersed in 7 degrees C water to a Tes of 34.5 degrees C. Initial Tes cooling rates (initial approximately 6 min cooling) differed significantly among the treatment conditions (0.074 +/- 0.045, 0.129 +/- 0.076, and 0.348 +/- 0.117 degrees C x min(-1) for control, active, and passive warming conditions, respectively); however, secondary cooling rates (rates following initial approximately 6 min cooling to the end of immersion) were not different between treatments (average of 0.102 +/- 0.085 degrees C x min(-1)). Overall Tes cooling rates during the full immersion period differed significantly and were 0.067 +/- 0.047, 0.085 +/- 0.045, and 0.209 +/- 0.131 degrees C x min(-1) for control, active, and passive warming, respectively. These results suggest that prior warming by both active and, to a greater extent, passive warming, may predispose a person to greater heat loss and to experience a larger decline in core temperature when subsequently exposed to cold water. Thus, functional time and possibly survival time could be reduced when cold water immersion is preceded by whole-body passive warming, and to a lesser degree by active warming.

  14. Does fossil fuel combustion lead to global warming?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwartz, S.E.

    1993-01-01

    Tropospheric sulfate aerosols produced by atmospheric oxidation of SO 2 emitted from fossil fuel combustion scatter solar radiation and enhance the reflectivity of clouds. Both effects decrease the absorption of solar radiation by the earth-atmosphere system. This cooling influence tends to offset the warming influence resulting from increased absorption of terrestrial infrared radiation by increased atmospheric concentrations of CO 2 . The sulfate forcing is estimated to be offsetting 70% of the forcing by CO 2 derived from fossil fuel combustion, although the uncertainty of this estimate is quite large--range 28-140%, the latter figure indicating that the present combined forcing is net cooling. Because of the vastly different atmospheric residence times of sulfate aerosol (about a week) and CO 2 (about 100 years), the cooling influence of sulfate aerosol is exerted immediately, whereas most of the warming influence of CO 2 is exerted over more than 100 years. Consequently the total forcing integrated over the entire time the materials reside in the atmosphere is net warming, with the total CO 2 forcing estimate to exceed the sulfate forcing by a factor of 4. The present situation in which the forcing by sulfate is comparable to that by CO 2 is shown to be a consequence of the steeply increasing rates of emission over the industrial era. (author)

  15. The role of clouds and oceans in global greenhouse warming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffert, M.I.

    1992-12-01

    During the past three years we have conducted several studies using models and a combination of satellite data, in situ meteorological and oceanic data, and paleoclimate reconstructions, under the DoE program, ''Quantifying the Link Between Change in Radiative Balance and Atmospheric Temperature''. Our goals were to investigate effects of global cloudiness variations on global climate and their implications for cloud feedback and continue development and application of NYU transient climate/ocean models, with emphasis on coupled effects of greenhouse warming and feedbacks by both the clouds and oceans. Our original research plan emphasized the use of cloud, surface temperature and ocean data sets interpreted by focused climate/ocean models to develop a cloud radiative forcing scenario for the past 100 years and to assess the transient climate response; to narrow key uncertainties in the system; and to identify those aspects of the climate system most likely to be affected by greenhouse warming over short, medium and long time scales

  16. Evaluation of RSG-GAS purification system and pool warm water layer supplier performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudiyono; Suhadi; Diah-Erlina-Lestari

    2005-01-01

    Function of RSG-GAS purification system and warm water supplier (KBE 02) are to pick up dissolve activation result and another dirts of warm water layer. To keep quality of water at the decided level. The system is equipped by heater to supply warm water layer on the reactor pool surface the distribution is to reduce radiation level in the operation hall area a speciality on the reactor pool surface. Line KBE 02 tomord beam tube headitty system supplies water necessary to be shielding to beam tube in use off time. Of the RSG-GAS purification system and pool warm water layer performance date can be shown north of water is always in good condition. To require the dechded requirement. Resin live time is two years and then months

  17. Species-specific vulnerability of Arctic copepods to oil contamination and global warming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dinh, Khuong Van; Nielsen, Torkel Gissel

    Arctic ecosystems are predicted to have more severe effects from global warming as during the last decades the temperatures have increased in this region at a rate of 2-4 times higher than the global average. In addition, oil exploitation and shipping activities in the Arctic are predicted...... to increase under global warming as the result of the retreat of sea ice, posing the risk of oil contamination. It is poorly known how cold adapted copepods in the Arctic deal with the combined effects of global warming and oil exposure. To address this, we exposed females of two copepods species Calanus...... of temperatures. Notably, exposure to high pyrene resulted in ca. 70% of mortality in C. finmarchicus, the species with North Atlantic Origin, that was two times higher than the mortality observed for C. glacialis, the true Arctic species. These results suggest that extreme temperature under global warming...

  18. Global warming: the significance of methane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dessus, B.; Le Treut, H.; Laponche, B.

    2008-01-01

    the concept of Global Warming Potential (GWP) indicates the relative contribution to global warming over a given period (for example 100 years) of a pulse emission at the start of the period of 1 kg of a specific greenhouse gas (GHG) in comparison to the contribution, over the same period, of an emission of 1 kg of CO 2 . The GWPs calculated for different time intervals take into account the differences in atmospheric lifetimes of the different GHGs. Using the '100-year GWP' to measure non CO 2 GHG emissions is not well suited to the case of permanent or long lifetime measures whose effectiveness is to be assessed at a given time horizon. In this context, it contributes to significantly playing down the importance of reducing emissions of GHGs with short atmospheric lifetimes. Thus, for example, methane which is not emitted over the period 2020- 2100 as a result of a landfill site being closed in 2020 will have an impact (as opposed to if the site remained in operation) that would be far greater towards 2100 compared to a CO 2 emission source that has also been stopped permanently and whose climate impact is measured in an equivalent manner. Using the GWP is only appropriate if applied year after year to time horizons considered to be of concern or decisive by climate studies, thus in particular 2050, 2100 and 2150. This is all the more significant as climate experts' current concerns lead them not only to advocate long-term stabilisation of GHG concentrations but also to avoid as far as possible intermediate excess of these concentrations over the coming century. Finally, it is noted that CH 4 prevention policies implemented in the short term may continue to have a long-term impact greater than merely taking into account the current GWP would imply. To more or less ignore the impact of CH 4 as it is unsuitable for accounting purposes affects the exclusive character of the link that may exist between the issue of GHGs and that of energy. Furthermore, if the

  19. Response of organic matter quality in permafrost soils to warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaza, C.; Pegoraro, E.; Schuur, E.

    2016-12-01

    Global warming is predicted to thaw large quantities of the perennially frozen organic matter stored in northern permafrost soils. Upon thaw, this organic matter will be exposed to lateral export to water bodies and to microbial decomposition, which may exacerbate climate change by releasing significant amounts of greenhouse gases. To gain an insight into these processes, we investigated how the quality of permafrost soil organic matter responded to five years of warming. In particular, we sampled control and experimentally warmed soils in 2009 and 2013 from an experiment established in 2008 in a moist acidic tundra ecosystem in Healy, Alaska. We examined surface organic (0 to 15 cm), deep organic (15 to 35 cm), and mineral soil layers (35 to 55 cm) separately by means of stable isotope analysis (δ13C and δ15N) and solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance. Compared to the control, the experimental warming did not affect the isotopic and molecular composition of soil organic matter across the depth profile. However, we did find significant changes with time. In particular, in the surface organic layer, δ13C decreased and alkyl/O-alkyl ratio increased from 2009 to 2013, which indicated variations in soil organic sources (e.g., changes in vegetation) and accelerated decomposition. In the deep organic layer, we found a slight increase in δ15N with time. In the mineral layer, δ13C values decreased slightly, whereas alkyl C/O-alkyl ratio increased, suggesting a preferential loss of relatively more degraded organic matter fractions probably by lateral transport by water flowing through the soil. Acknowledgements: This project has received funding from the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under the Marie Skłodowska-Curie grant agreement No. 654132. Web site: http://vulcan.comule.com

  20. Recognition of people with an opinion that nuclear power generation causes global warming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukue, Chiyokazu

    2004-01-01

    Almost a half of the people are thinking that nuclear power generation causes global warming. We conducted a survey in order to explore the recognition and background for the thinking of people. Consequently, the existence of the right knowledge ''nuclear power generation does not discharge carbon dioxide at the time of power generation'' influenced most the idea which nuclear power generation prevents global warming. On the other hand, the misunderstanding as ''the radioactive material produced from a nuclear power plant advances global warming'' has influenced the idea considered as a cause, and it is though that this misunderstanding depend on the negative image to nuclear power generation. Moreover, many people do not recognize the mechanism of global warming, and it is thought that they confuse global warming with the other global environment problems, such as acid rain or ozone layer destruction. Therefore, it is required to spread the knowledge that nuclear power generation does not discharge carbon dioxide, and to promote the understanding that a radioactive material is not related to global warming. Furthermore, it is required to distinguish global warming from the other global environment problems, and to explain them intelligibly. (author)

  1. Communicating the Science of Global Warming — the Role of Astronomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Jeffrey

    2018-06-01

    Global Warming is one of the most important and issues of our times, yet it is widely misunderstood among the general public (and politicians!). The American Astronomical Society has already joined many other scientific organizations in advocating for action on global warming (by supporting the AGU statement on global warming), but we as astronomers can do much more. The high public profile of astronomy gives us a unique platform — and credibility as scientists — for doing our part to educate the public about the underlying science of global warming. And while astronomers are not climate scientists, we use the same basic physics, and many aspects of global warming science come directly from astronomy, including the ways in which we measure the heat-absorbing potential of carbon dioxide and the hard evidence of greenhouse warming provided by studies of Venus. In this session, I will briefly introduce a few methods for communicating about global warming that I believe you will find effective in your own education efforts.

  2. The Warm Plasma Composition in the Inner Magnetosphere during 2012-2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahn, J. M.; Goldstein, J.; Reeves, G. D.; Fernandes, P. A.; Skoug, R. M.; Larsen, B.; Spence, H. E.

    2017-12-01

    Ionospheric heavy ions play an important role in the dynamics of Earth's magnetosphere. The greater mass and gyro radius of ionospheric oxygen differentiates its behavior from protons at the same energies. Oxygen may have an impact on tail reconnection processes, and it can at least temporarily dominate the energy content of the ring current during geomagnetic storms. At sub-keV energies, multi-species ion populations in the inner magnetosphere form the warm plasma cloak, occupying the energy range between the plasmasphere and the ring current. Lastly, cold lighter ions from the mid-latitude ionosphere create the co-rotating plasmasphere whose outer regions can interact with the plasma cloak, plasma sheet, ring current, and outer electron belt. In this paper we present a statistical view of warm, cloak-like ion populations in the inner magnetosphere, contrasting in particular the warm plasma composition during quiet and active times. We study the relative abundances and absolute densities of warm plasma measured by the Van Allen Probes, whose two spacecraft cover the inner magnetosphere from plasmaspheric altitudes close to Earth to just inside geostationary orbit. We observe that warm (> 30 eV) oxygen is most abundant closer to the plasmasphere boundary whereas warm hydrogen dominates closer to geostationary orbit. Warm helium is usually a minor constituent, but shows a noticeable enhancement in the near-Earth dusk sector.

  3. Insolation driven biomagnetic response to the Holocene Warm Period in semi-arid East Asia

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Suzhen; Deng, Chenglong; Xiao, Jule; Li, Jinhua; Paterson, Greig A.; Chang, Liao; Yi, Liang; Qin, Huafeng; Pan, Yongxin; Zhu, Rixiang

    2015-01-01

    The Holocene Warm Period (HWP) provides valuable insights into the climate system and biotic responses to environmental variability and thus serves as an excellent analogue for future global climate changes. Here we document, for the first time, that warm and wet HWP conditions were highly favourable for magnetofossil proliferation in the semi-arid Asian interior. The pronounced increase of magnetofossil concentrations at ~9.8?ka and decrease at ~5.9?ka in Dali Lake coincided respectively wit...

  4. Can Global Warming be Stopped?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luria, M.

    2013-12-01

    Earlier this year, the CO2 levels exceeded the 400 ppm level and there is no sign that the 1-2 ppm annual increase is going to slow down. Concerns regarding the danger of global warming have been reported in numerous occasions for more than a generation, ever since CO2 levels reached the 350 ppm range in the mid 1980's. Nevertheless, all efforts to slow down the increase have showed little if any effect. Mobile sources, including surface and marine transportation and aviation, consist of 20% of the global CO2 emission. The only realistic way to reduce the mobile sources' CO2 signature is by improved fuel efficiency. However, any progress in this direction is more than compensated by continuous increased demand. Stationary sources, mostly electric power generation, are responsible for the bulk of the global CO2 emission. The measurements have shown, that the effect of an increase in renewable sources, like solar wind and geothermal, combined with conversion from coal to natural gas where possible, conservation and efficiency improvement, did not compensate the increased demand mostly in developing countries. Increased usage of nuclear energy can provide some relief in carbon emission but has the potential of even greater environmental hazard. A major decrease in carbon emission can be obtained by either significant reduction in the cost of non-carbon based energy sources or by of carbon sequestration. The most economical way to make a significant decrease in carbon emission is to apply carbon sequestration technology at large point sources that use coal. Worldwide there are about 10,000 major sources that burn >7 billion metric tons of coal which generate the equivalent of 30 trillion kwh. There is a limited experience in CO2 sequestration of such huge quantities of CO2, however, it is estimated that the cost would be US$ 0.01-0.1 per kwh. The cost of eliminating this quantity can be estimated at an average of 1.5 trillion dollars annually. The major emitters, US

  5. Fish energy budget under ocean warming and flame retardant exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anacleto, Patrícia; Figueiredo, Cátia; Baptista, Miguel; Maulvault, Ana Luísa; Camacho, Carolina; Pousão-Ferreira, Pedro; Valente, Luísa M P; Marques, António; Rosa, Rui

    2018-07-01

    Climate change and chemical contamination are global environmental threats of growing concern for the scientific community and regulatory authorities. Yet, the impacts and interactions of both stressors (particularly ocean warming and emerging chemical contaminants) on physiological responses of marine organisms remain unclear and still require further understanding. Within this context, the main goal of this study was to assess, for the first time, the effects of warming (+ 5 °C) and accumulation of a polybrominated diphenyl ether congener (BDE-209, brominated flame retardant) through dietary exposure on energy budget of the juvenile white seabream (Diplodus sargus). Specifically, growth (G), routine metabolism (R), excretion (faecal, F and nitrogenous losses, U) and food consumption (C) were calculated to obtain the energy budget. The results demonstrated that the energy proportion spent for G dominated the mode of the energy allocation of juvenile white seabream (56.0-67.8%), especially under the combined effect of warming plus BDE-209 exposure. Under all treatments, the energy channelled for R varied around 26% and a much smaller percentage was channelled for excretion (F: 4.3-16.0% and U: 2.3-3.3%). An opposite trend to G was observed to F, where the highest percentage (16.0 ± 0.9%) was found under control temperature and BDE-209 exposure via diet. In general, the parameters were significantly affected by increased temperature and flame retardant exposure, where higher levels occurred for: i) wet weight, relative growth rate, protein and ash contents under warming conditions, ii) only for O:N ratio under BDE-209 exposure via diet, and iii) for feed efficiency, ammonia excretion rate, routine metabolic rate and assimilation efficiency under the combination of both stressors. On the other hand, decreased viscerosomatic index was observed under warming and lower fat content was observed under the combined effect of both stressors. Overall, under future

  6. High tide, news from a warming world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lynas, M.

    2005-01-01

    While governments debate and scientists test ever-more complicated hypotheses, ordinary people all over the world are starting to notice the effects of global warming. In High Tide, British journalist Mark Lynas visits global hot spots to record people's reactions and sound a clarion call for action. Readers looking for a 'we are the world' approach to climate change may be taken aback by Lynas' flat expression of the uncomfortable truth: 'Every time America votes, the world holds its breath.... Climate change begins and ends in America'. Lynas damns the George W. Bush administration for undermining global efforts such as the Kyoto Protocol as well as actively preventing innovation within the United States that would reduce auto and industrial emissions. But High Tide is not the firs or the best book to do that; instead, its narrative strength is in the riveting stories of how small towns, islands, riverside cities, and rural areas are being slowly destroyed. Gardeners in England will be unable to grow heritage plant species within the next 75 years. The Alaskan permafrost is melting, as temperatures there increase ''ten times faster than in the rest of the world.'' An entire Pacific Island nation--Tuvalu--will soon disappear beneath the rising sea, leaving its people homeless. Lynas visits Alaska, Tuvalu, Peru, China, and the east coast of the United States, documenting the lives, places, and cultures that will be lost in the decades to come. Thankfully, just when hopelessness threatens to overwhelm the reader, High Tide offers a five-step plan to mitigate the most catastrophic effects of global climate change. Every step in the plan involves action by United States citizens and their elected representatives, offering American activists and visionaries a chance to do penance for wrecking parts of the world far from our own driveways

  7. Warm-up for Sprint Swimming: Race-Pace or Aerobic Stimulation? A Randomized Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neiva, Henrique P; Marques, Mário C; Barbosa, Tiago M; Izquierdo, Mikel; Viana, João L; Teixeira, Ana M; Marinho, Daniel A

    2017-09-01

    Neiva, HP, Marques, MC, Barbosa, TM, Izquierdo, M, Viana, JL, Teixeira, AM, and Marinho, DA. Warm-up for sprint swimming: race-pace or aerobic stimulation? A randomized study. J Strength Cond Res 31(9): 2423-2431, 2017-The aim of this study was to compare the effects of 2 different warm-up intensities on 100-m swimming performance in a randomized controlled trial. Thirteen competitive swimmers performed two 100-m freestyle time-trials on separate days after either control or experimental warm-up in a randomized design. The control warm-up included a typical race-pace set (4 × 25 m), whereas the experimental warm-up included an aerobic set (8 × 50 m at 98-102% of critical velocity). Cortisol, testosterone, blood lactate ([La]), oxygen uptake (V[Combining Dot Above]O2), heart rate, core (Tcore and Tcorenet) and tympanic temperatures, and rating of perceived exertion (RPE) were monitored. Stroke length (SL), stroke frequency (SF), stroke index (SI), and propelling efficiency (ηp) were assessed for each 50-m lap. We found that V[Combining Dot Above]O2, heart rate, and Tcorenet were higher after experimental warm-up (d > 0.73), but only the positive effect for Tcorenet was maintained until the trial. Performance was not different between conditions (d = 0.07). Experimental warm-up was found to slow SF (mean change ±90% CL = 2.06 ± 1.48%) and increase SL (1.65 ± 1.40%) and ηp (1.87 ± 1.33%) in the first lap. After the time-trials, this warm-up had a positive effect on Tcorenet (d = 0.69) and a negative effect on [La] (d = 0.56). Although the warm-ups had similar outcomes in the 100-m freestyle, performance was achieved through different biomechanical strategies. Stroke length and efficiency were higher in the first lap after the experimental warm-up, whereas SF was higher after control warm-up. Physiological adaptations were observed mainly through an increased Tcore after experimental warm-up. In this condition, the lower [La] after the trial suggests lower

  8. The European climate under a 2 °C global warming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vautard, Robert; Stegehuis, Annemiek; Gobiet, Andreas; Mendlik, Thomas; Sobolowski, Stefan; Kjellström, Erik; Nikulin, Grigory; Watkiss, Paul; Landgren, Oskar; Teichmann, Claas; Jacob, Daniela

    2014-01-01

    A global warming of 2 °C relative to pre-industrial climate has been considered as a threshold which society should endeavor to remain below, in order to limit the dangerous effects of anthropogenic climate change. The possible changes in regional climate under this target level of global warming have so far not been investigated in detail. Using an ensemble of 15 regional climate simulations downscaling six transient global climate simulations, we identify the respective time periods corresponding to 2 °C global warming, describe the range of projected changes for the European climate for this level of global warming, and investigate the uncertainty across the multi-model ensemble. Robust changes in mean and extreme temperature, precipitation, winds and surface energy budgets are found based on the ensemble of simulations. The results indicate that most of Europe will experience higher warming than the global average. They also reveal strong distributional patterns across Europe, which will be important in subsequent impact assessments and adaptation responses in different countries and regions. For instance, a North–South (West–East) warming gradient is found for summer (winter) along with a general increase in heavy precipitation and summer extreme temperatures. Tying the ensemble analysis to time periods with a prescribed global temperature change rather than fixed time periods allows for the identification of more robust regional patterns of temperature changes due to removal of some of the uncertainty related to the global models’ climate sensitivity. (paper)

  9. A new mechanism for warm-season precipitation response to global warming based on convection-permitting simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Aiguo; Rasmussen, Roy M.; Liu, Changhai; Ikeda, Kyoko; Prein, Andreas F.

    2017-08-01

    Climate models project increasing precipitation intensity but decreasing frequency as greenhouse gases increase. However, the exact mechanism for the frequency decrease remains unclear. Here we investigate this by analyzing hourly data from regional climate change simulations with 4 km grid spacing covering most of North America using the Weather Research and Forecasting model. The model was forced with present and future boundary conditions, with the latter being derived by adding the CMIP5 19-model ensemble mean changes to the ERA-interim reanalysis. The model reproduces well the observed seasonal and spatial variations in precipitation frequency and histograms, and the dry interval between rain events over the contiguous US. Results show that overall precipitation frequency indeed decreases during the warm season mainly due to fewer light-moderate precipitation (0.1 2.0 mm/h) events, while heavy (2 10 mm/h) events increase. Dry spells become longer and more frequent, together with a reduction in time-mean relative humidity (RH) in the lower troposphere during the warm season. The increased dry hours and decreased RH lead to a reduction in overall precipitation frequency and also for light-moderate precipitation events, while water vapor-induced increases in precipitation intensity and the positive latent heating feedback in intense storms may be responsible for the large increase in intense precipitation. The size of intense storms increases while their number decreases in the future climate, which helps explain the increase in local frequency of heavy precipitation. The results generally support a new hypothesis for future warm-season precipitation: each rainstorm removes ≥7% more moisture from the air per 1 K local warming, and surface evaporation and moisture advection take slightly longer than currently to replenish the depleted moisture before the next storm forms, leading to longer dry spells and a reduction in precipitation frequency, as well as

  10. The efficacy and characteristics of warm-up and re-warm-up practices in soccer players: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammami, Amri; Zois, James; Slimani, Maamer; Russel, Mark; Bouhlel, Ezdine

    2018-01-01

    This review aimed 1) to evaluate the current research that examines the efficacy of warm-up (WU) and re-warm-up (RWU) on physical performance; and 2) to highlight the WU and RWU characteristics that optimise subsequent performance in soccer players. A computerized search was performed in the PubMed, ScienceDirect and Google Scholar (from 1995 to December 2015) for English-language, peer-reviewed investigations using the terms "soccer" OR "football" AND "warm-up" OR "stretching" OR "post-activation potentiation" OR "pre-activity" OR "re-warm-up" AND "performance" OR "jump" OR "sprint" OR "running". Twenty seven articles were retrieved. Particularly, 22 articles examined the effects of WU on soccer performance and 5 articles focused on the effects of RWU. Clear evidence exists supporting the inclusion of dynamic stretching or postactivation potentiation-based exercises within a WU as acute performance enhancements were reported (pooled estimate changes of +3.46% and +4.21%, respectively). The FIFA 11+ WU also significantly increases strength, jump, speed and explosive performances (changes from 1% to 20%). At half-time, active RWU protocols including postactivation potentiation practices and multidirectional speed drills attenuate temperature and performance reductions induced by habitual practice. The data obtained in the present review showed that the level of play did not moderate the effectiveness of WU and RWU on soccer performance. This review demonstrated that a static stretching WU reduced acute subsequent performance, while WU activities that include dynamic stretching, PAP-based exercises, and the FIFA 11+ can elicit positive effects in soccer players. The efficacy of an active RWU during half-time is also justified.

  11. Warm Absorber Diagnostics of AGN Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallman, Timothy

    Warm absorbers and related phenomena are observable manifestations of outflows or winds from active galactic nuclei (AGN) that have great potential value. Understanding AGN outflows is important for explaining the mass budgets of the central accreting black hole, and also for understanding feedback and the apparent co-evolution of black holes and their host galaxies. In the X-ray band warm absorbers are observed as photoelectric absorption and resonance line scattering features in the 0.5-10 keV energy band; the UV band also shows resonance line absorption. Warm absorbers are common in low luminosity AGN and they have been extensively studied observationally. They may play an important role in AGN feedback, regulating the net accretion onto the black hole and providing mechanical energy to the surroundings. However, fundamental properties of the warm absorbers are not known: What is the mechanism which drives the outflow?; what is the gas density in the flow and the geometrical distribution of the outflow?; what is the explanation for the apparent relation between warm absorbers and the surprising quasi-relativistic 'ultrafast outflows' (UFOs)? We propose a focused set of model calculations that are aimed at synthesizing observable properties of warm absorber flows and associated quantities. These will be used to explore various scenarios for warm absorber dynamics in order to answer the questions in the previous paragraph. The guiding principle will be to examine as wide a range as possible of warm absorber driving mechanisms, geometry and other properties, but with as careful consideration as possible to physical consistency. We will build on our previous work, which was a systematic campaign for testing important class of scenarios for driving the outflows. We have developed a set of tools that are unique and well suited for dynamical calculations including radiation in this context. We also have state-of-the-art tools for generating synthetic spectra, which are

  12. Lumbar sympathectomy under CT guidance: therapeutic option in critical limb ischaemia; la simpaticolisi TC guidata: alternativa terapeutica delle ischemie critiche

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pieri, Stefano; Agresti, Paolo [Az. Osp. S. Camillo-Forlanini, Roma (Italy). U.O. di radiologia vascolare ed interventistica; Ialongo, Pasquale; Fedeli, Stefano [Radiologia diagnostica Busi, Roma (Italy); Di Cesare, Fabio; Ricci, Guiseppe [Az. Osp. S. Camillo-Forlanini, Roma (Italy). Chirurgia vascolare

    2005-04-01

    Purpose: Lumbar sympathectomy is a complementary therapeutic option for patients with severe peripheral vascular occlusive disease presenting rest pain or gangrene and not eligible for surgical revascularisation. Traditional surgical sympathectomy was widely used in the past. However, due to its invasive character, it has increasingly been replaced by percutaneous techniques and, in some recent cases, by laparoscopic procedures. Percutaneous lumbar sympathectomy is a safe, cost-effective and widely available treatment option. We report our experience on 19 patients subjected to percutaneous sympathectomy under CT guidance. Materials and methods: Between 1998 and 2000, 19 patients underwent percutaneous sympathectomy under CT guidance. All patients had severe vascular disease of the lower extremities (Fontaine stage IV), with rest pain and gangrene. They were not eligible for surgical revascularization. Phenol was injected at the level of L2 and L4 using two 22 G needles (15 cm long). Signs of interrupted sympathetic activity usually occur 2'-15' after the procedure with warmth and flushing and dryness of the lower extremities. Results: Percutaneous sympathectomy under CT guidance is a simple, safe and well-tolerated procedure with a low rate of complications. Of the 19 patients, 9 (47.3%) showed clinical improvement, whereas 5 experienced a worsening of ischaemia in the month immediately following the procedure. Discussion: Results suggest that percutaneous lumbar sympathectomy causes a sympathetic blockade in patients with advanced vascular disease of the limb. CT guidance ensures a high level of precision in drug dosing, thus lowering the risk of complications. Although the results are demoralizing. the impossibility of achieving surgical revascularisation in advanced peripheral arteriosclerosis enhances the role of Ct-guided percutaneous sympathectomy in relieving rest pain and healing ulcers in order to postpone the amputation. [Italian] Scopo: La

  13. Specificity Responses of Grasshoppers in Temperate Grasslands to Diel Asymmetric Warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tingjuan; Hao, Shuguang; Sun, Osbert Jianxin; Kang, Le

    2012-01-01

    Background Global warming is characterized by not only an increase in the daily mean temperature, but also a diel asymmetric pattern. However, most of the current studies on climate change have only concerned with the mean values of the warming trend. Although many studies have been conducted concerning the responses of insects to climate change, studies that address the issue of diel asymmetric warming under field conditions are not found in the literature. Methodology/Principal Findings We conducted a field climate manipulative experiment and investigated developmental and demographic responses to diel asymmetric warming in three grasshopper species (an early-season species Dasyhippus barbipes, a mid-season species Oedaleus asiaticus, and a late-season species Chorthippus fallax). It was found that warming generally advanced the development of eggs and nymphs, but had no apparent impacts on the hatching rate of eggs, the emergence rate of nymphs and the survival and fecundity of adults in all the three species. Nighttime warming was more effective in advancing egg development than the daytime warming. The emergence time of adults was differentially advanced by warming in the three species; it was advanced by 5.64 days in C. fallax, 3.55 days in O. asiaticus, and 1.96 days in D. barbipes. This phenological advancement was associated with increases in the effective GDDs accumulation. Conclusions/Significance Results in this study indicate that the responses of the three grasshopper species to warming are influenced by several factors, including species traits, developmental stage, and the thermal sensitivity of the species. Moreover, species with diapausing eggs are less responsive to changes in temperature regimes, suggesting that development of diapausing eggs is a protective mechanism in early-season grasshopper for avoiding the risk of pre-winter hatching. Our results highlight the need to consider the complex relationships between climate change and

  14. Effects of Warming Hiatuses on Vegetation Growth in the Northern Hemisphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Wei

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available There have been hiatuses in global warming since the 1990s, and their potential impacts have attracted extensive attention and discussion. Changes in temperature not only directly affect the greening of vegetation but can also indirectly alter both the growth state and the growth tendency of vegetation by altering other climatic elements. The middle-high latitudes of the Northern Hemisphere (NH constitute the region that has experienced the most warming in recent decades; therefore, identifying the effects of warming hiatuses on the vegetation greening in that region is of great importance. Using satellite-derived Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI data and climatological observation data from 1982–2013, we investigated hiatuses in warming trends and their impact on vegetation greenness in the NH. Our results show that the regions with warming hiatuses in the NH accounted for 50.1% of the total area and were concentrated in Mongolia, central China, and other areas. Among these regions, 18.8% of the vegetation greenness was inhibited in the warming hiatus areas, but 31.3% of the vegetation grew faster. Because temperature was the main positive climatic factor in central China, the warming hiatuses caused the slow vegetation greening rate. However, precipitation was the main positive climatic factor affecting vegetation greenness in Mongolia; an increase in precipitation accelerated vegetation greening. The regions without a warming hiatus, which were mainly distributed in northern Russia, northern central Asia, and other areas, accounted for 49.9% of the total area. Among these regions, 21.4% of the vegetation grew faster over time, but 28.5% of the vegetation was inhibited. Temperature was the main positive factor affecting vegetation greenness in northern Russia; an increase in temperature promoted vegetation greening. However, radiation was the main positive climatic factor in northern central Asia; reductions in radiation

  15. Tropical Warm Semi-Arid Regions Expanding Over Temperate Latitudes In The Projected 21st Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajaud, A.; de Noblet, N. I.

    2015-12-01

    Two billion people today live in drylands, where extreme climatic conditions prevail, and natural resources are limited. Drylands are expected to expand under several scenarios of climatic change. However, relevant adaptation strategies need to account for the aridity level: it conditions the equilibrium tree-cover density, ranging from deserts (hyper-arid) to dense savannas (sub-humid). Here we focus on the evolution of climatically defined warm semi-arid areas, where low-tree density covers can be maintained. We study the global repartition of these regions in the future and the bioclimatic shifts involved. We adopted a bioclimatological approach based on the Köppen climate classification. The warm semi-arid class is characterized by mean annual temperatures over 18°C and a rainfall-limitation criterion. A multi-model ensemble of CMIP5 projections for three representative concentration pathways was selected to analyze future conditions. The classification was first applied to the start, middle and end of the 20th and 21st centuries, in order to localize past and future warm semi-arid regions. Then, time-series for the classification were built to characterize trends and variability in the evolution of those regions. According to the CRU datasets, global expansion of the warm semi-arid area has already started (~+13%), following the global warming trend since the 1900s. This will continue according to all projections, most significantly so outside the tropical belt. Under the "business as usual" scenario, the global warm semi-arid area will increase by 30% and expand 12° poleward in the Northern Hemisphere, according to the multi-model mean. Drying drives the conversion from equatorial sub-humid conditions. Beyond 30° of latitude, cold semi-arid conditions become warm semi-arid through warming, and temperate conditions through combined warming and drying processes. Those various transitions may have drastic but also very distinct ecological and sociological

  16. Using radiative signatures to diagnose the cause of warming during the 2013-2014 Californian drought

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Sebastian; Yin, Dongqin; Roderick, Michael L.

    2017-10-01

    California recently experienced among the worst droughts of the last century, with exceptional precipitation deficits and co-occurring record high temperatures. The dry conditions caused severe water shortages in one of the economically most important agricultural regions of the US. It has recently been hypothesized that anthropogenic warming is increasing the likelihood of such extreme droughts in California, or more specifically, that warmer temperatures from the enhanced greenhouse effect intensify drought conditions. However, separating the cause and effect is difficult because the dry conditions lead to a reduction in evaporative cooling that contributes to the warming. Here we investigate and compare the forcing of long-term greenhouse-induced warming with the short-term warming during the 2013-2014 Californian drought. We use the concept of radiative signatures to investigate the source of the radiative perturbation during the drought, relate the signatures to expected changes due to anthropogenic warming, and assess the cause of warming based on observed changes in the surface energy balance compared to the period 2001-2012. We found that the recent meteorological drought based on precipitation deficits was characterised by an increase in incoming shortwave radiation coupled with a decline in incoming longwave radiation, which contributed to record warm temperatures. In contrast, climate models project that anthropogenic warming is accompanied by little change in incoming shortwave but a large increase in incoming longwave radiation. The warming during the drought was associated with increased incoming shortwave radiation in combination with reduced evaporative cooling from water deficits, which enhanced surface temperatures and sensible heat transfer to the atmosphere. Our analyses demonstrate that radiative signatures are a powerful tool to differentiate the source of perturbations in the surface energy balance at monthly to seasonal time scales.

  17. Comparative growth analysis of cool- and warm-season grasses in a cool-temperate environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belesky, D.P.; Fedders, J.M.

    1995-01-01

    Using both cool-season (C3) and warm-season (C4) species is a viable means of optimizing herbage productivity over varying climatic conditions in temperate environments. Despite well-documented differences in water, N, and radiation use, no consistent evidence demonstrates productivity differences among C3 and C4 perennial grass species under identical management. A field study was conducted to determine relative growth rates (RGR), nitrogen productivity (NP), and mean radiation productivity (RP) (dry matter production as a function of incident radiation) of cool- and warm-season grasses managed identically. Results were used to identify management practices thd could lead to optimal productivity in combinations or mixtures of cool- and warm-season grasses. Dry matter yields of warm-season grasses equaled or surpassed those of cool-season grasses, despite a 40% shorter growth interval. Certain cool- and warm-season grasses appear to be suitable for use in mixtures, based on distribution of herbage production; however, actual compatibility may be altered by defoliation management. Relative growth rates varied among years and were about 40% lower for canopies clipped to a 10-cm residue height each time 20-cm of growth accumulated compared with other treatments. The RGR of warm-season grasses was twice that of cool-season grasses Nitrogen productivity (g DM g-1 N d -1) and mean radiation productivity (g DM MJ-1) for warm-season grasses was also more than twice that of cool-season grasses. Radiation productivity of cool-season grasses was dependent on N, while this was not always the case for warm-season grasses. The superior production capability of certain warm-season compared with cool-season grasses in a cool-temperate environment can be sustained under a range of defoliation treatments and demonstrates suitability for use in frequently defoliated situations

  18. Global warming: Towards a strategy for Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    A discussion paper is provided as background to a proposed public review of a strategy for Ontario's response to global warming. Global warming arises from the generation of greenhouse gases, which come from the use of fossil fuels, the use of chlorofluorocarbons, and deforestation. Energy policy is the backbone of achieving climate stability since the burning of fossil fuels releases most of the greenhouse gases, mainly carbon dioxide. Canada is, by international standards, a very energy-intensive country and is among the world's largest emitters of carbon dioxide on a per capita basis. Ontario is the largest energy-using province in Canada, and fossil fuels represent over 80% of provincial energy use. A proposed goal for Ontario is to provide leadership in stabilizing atmospheric concentrations of the greenhouse gases, while minimizing the social, economic, and environmental costs in Ontario of adapting to global warming. A proposed first step to address global warming is to achieve reductions in expected emissions of the greenhouse gases, especially carbon dioxide, so that levels by the year 2000 are lower than in 1989. Current policies and regulations helping to reduce the greenhouse effect include some of the current controls on automotive emissions and the adoption by the provincial electric utility of targets to reduce electricity demand. New initiatives include establishment of minimum energy efficiency standards and reduction of peak-day electricity use. Action steps for future consideration are detailed in the categories of greenhouse gas emissions reductions, carbon dioxide absorption, and research and analysis into global warming

  19. Thyroid storm and warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Joseph A; Gliga, Louise; Nagalla, Srikanth

    2017-08-01

    Graves' disease is often associated with other autoimmune disorders, including rare associations with autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA). We describe a unique presentation of thyroid storm and warm AIHA diagnosed concurrently in a young female with hyperthyroidism. The patient presented with nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and altered mental status. Laboratory studies revealed hemoglobin 3.9g/dL, platelets 171×10 9 L -1 , haptoglobin storm and warm AIHA. She was started on glucocorticoids to treat both warm AIHA and thyroid storm, as well as antithyroid medications, propranolol and folic acid. Due to profound anemia and hemodynamic instability, the patient was transfused two units of uncrossmatched packed red blood cells slowly and tolerated this well. She was discharged on methimazole as well as a prolonged prednisone taper, and achieved complete resolution of the thyrotoxicosis and anemia at one month. Hyperthyroidism can affect all three blood cell lineages of the hematopoietic system. Anemia can be seen in 10-20% of patients with thyrotoxicosis. Several autoimmune processes can lead to anemia in Graves' disease, including pernicious anemia, celiac disease, and warm AIHA. This case illustrates a rarely described presentation of a patient with Graves' disease presenting with concurrent thyroid storm and warm AIHA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Precipitation kinetics in warm forming of AW-7020 alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, M., E-mail: Manoj.kumar@ait.ac.at [Leichtmetall-Kompetenzzentrum Ranshofen GmbH, Austrian Institute of Technology, Postfach 26, A-5282 Ranshofen (Austria); Institute of Material Science and Technology, TU Vienna (Austria); Poletti, C. [Present address: Institute of Material Science and Welding, TU Graz (Austria); Institute of Material Science and Technology, TU Vienna (Austria); Degischer, H.P. [Institute of Material Science and Technology, TU Vienna (Austria)

    2013-01-20

    The warm formability of the precipitation hardening AW-7020 (AlZn 4.5Mg1) alloy is investigated by testing extruded tubes. The precipitation kinetics of different conditions before and after warm deformation is studied by differential scanning calorimetry and transmission electron microcopy. The precipitation conditions are correlated with the results of hardness tests at room temperature and of tensile tests at temperatures between 200 and 350 Degree-Sign C at different strain rates. The yield strength decreases with increasing test temperature approaching that of samples in the annealed condition, while the strain at fracture increases. The overall influence of the strain rate on ductility is dominated by the corresponding time required for deformation. The formability of the starting condition T1 as well as the corresponding strain hardening exponent is particularly promising for high strain rates at 250 Degree-Sign C, where the metastable precipitates of the T1 condition are dissolved. The short exposure of about 30 s at 250 Degree-Sign C re-establishes the potential for precipitation strengthening by natural ageing after the warm deformation and a following paint baking heat treatment maintains the hardness level.