WorldWideScience

Sample records for warm fog properties

  1. Fogs: Physical Basis, Characteristic Properties, and Impacts on the Environment and Human Health

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    José L. Pérez-Díaz

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a selective overview of natural fogs in terms of fog types, forms and states of occurrence, physical, micro-physical, chemical and dynamic properties, basic characterizing parameters, etc. In focus are related achievements and contributions reported mainly during the last decade and a half, as a result of both laboratory studies and field observations. Processes of homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation are analyzed in the aspects of condensation, nuclei diversity and specifics, as related to the activation, growth and deposition of fog droplets. The effect is highlighted of the water vapor’s partial pressure on the surface tension of the liquid water–air interface and the freezing point of the water droplets. Some problems and aspects of fog modeling, parameterization, and forecasting are outlined and discussed on the examples of newly developed relevant 1D/3D theoretical models. Important issues of fog impacts on the air quality, ecosystems, water basins, societal life, and human health are also addressed and discussed, particularly in cases of anthropogenically modified (chemical, radioactive, etc. fogs. In view of reducing the possible negative effects of fogs, conclusions are drawn concerning the new demands and challenges to fog characterization imposed by the changing natural and social environment and the needs for new data on and approaches to more adequate observations of fog-related events.

  2. The Measurement and Analysis of Microphysical Capabilities of the Condensation Nucleus of Artificial Warm Fog

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    DAI, Meng-yan; CHEN, Chun-sheng; LIU, Jiang-hai; ZHANG, Liang; HE, Hai-yan

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, the microcosmic capabilities of the condensation nucleus and fog droplets of artificial fog were observed and sampled by ELPI, SEM, XRD and LPSA. The chemical composition, number concentration, volume concentration and nucleation efficiency of the artificial condensation nucleus were gained. The condensation nucleus was mainly made up of chloride. The size distribution scope was about 0.291 ∼ 1.59μm and the peak particle size was 0.609∼0.942μm. The number concentration of the condensation nuclei was 3.98×105∼4.82×105/cm3, the volume concentration was 2.02×105∼2.30×105μm3/cm3, and the maximum nucleation efficiency was 3.07×1012/g. Actually, most condensation nuclei did not participate in the actual fog performing process, and the nucleation activation proportion was 13.57%. The condensation nucleus played an important role in the microphysical performance of fog droplets. However, the growing velocity of fog droplets was not identical as the catalytic performance difference of nuclei and the uneven distribution of watervapor in air. That was the reason why the fog droplets size distribution behaved the characteristic of bi-spectrum converting into uni-spectrum gradually.

  3. The optical properties and chemical composition of Po Valley fog water

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    Jahl, L.; Hawkins, L. N.; Gilardoni, S.

    2013-12-01

    The chemical composition and solar radiation absorption properties of fog water are important because of the effects these properties can have on the climate. Fog samples contain compounds that may absorb light, and this radiative forcing may be significant. The Po Valley, located between the Apennine and Alps mountain ranges in Italy, has a high occurrence of fog events, which can be up to 30% of the time in the winter season. Absorption spectra of fog water samples from San Pietro Capofiume, Italy were taken in a Liquid Waveguide Capillary Cell with a UV-visible spectrophotometer. Spectra were fitted and absorptions at different wavelengths were correlated to the organic carbon and organic nitrogen concentrations of the samples. Ion chromatography was also used to obtain the concentrations of several ions such as nitrite, nitrate, sulfate, acetate, ammonium, and various amines. A correlation was found between absorbance and organic carbon content, as well as between absorbance at less than 300 nm wavelengths and organic nitrogen content. Characteristic absorptivities at 365 nm were calculated from Beer's law with regard to the organic carbon content and revealed similar results to those calculated from Los Angeles fog water samples earlier this year. The absorption angstrom exponents of the samples imply that the likely source of the optically active species is from biomass burning, and this will later be confirmed by a tracer analysis. High organic nitrogen : organic carbon ratios in all samples suggest that compounds containing nitrogen have a large contribution to the light absorbing properties of fog water.

  4. Hygroscopic chemicals and the formation of advection warm fog: A numerical simulation

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    Hung, R. J.; Liaw, G. S.

    1978-01-01

    The formation of advection fog is closely associated with the characteristics of the aerosol particles, including the chemical composition, mass of the nuclei, particle size, and concentration. Both macrophysical and microphysical processes are considered. In the macrophysical model, the evolution of wind components, water vapor content, liquid water content and potential temperature under the influences of vertical turbulent diffusion, turbulent momentum, and turbulent energy transfers are taken into account. In the microphysical model, the supersaturation effect is incorporated with the surface tension and hygroscopic material solution.

  5. Impact Test Analysis of the Aging Property of Power Plant Running Silicone Rubber Insulators in the Fog and Haze Days

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    Liu He

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The current fog and haze days are increasingly serious. The pollution level in various regions of our country is increasing. With all kinds of dust and acid gas pollution in the fog and haze weather, the polluted surface of the silicone rubber insulators is slowly and evenly damp aging in the open operation. Here, the aging degree of the silicone rubber insulators which ran for different years under actual fog and haze environment has been analyzed, such as surface topography, hydrophilic/hydrophobic, thermal performance, mechanical properties and so on.

  6. Unraveling the Mystery of the Blue Fog: Structure, Properties, and Applications of Amorphous Blue Phase III.

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    Gandhi, Sahil Sandesh; Chien, Liang-Chy

    2017-10-10

    The amorphous blue phase III of cholesteric liquid crystals, also known as the "blue fog," are among the rising stars in materials science that can potentially be used to develop next-generation displays with the ability to compete toe-to-toe with disruptive technologies like organic light-emitting diodes. The structure and properties of the practically unobservable blue phase III have eluded scientists for more than a century since it was discovered. This progress report reviews the developments in this field from both fundamental and applied research perspectives. The first part of this progress report gives an overview of the 130-years-long scientific tour-de-force that very recently resulted in the revelation of the mysterious structure of blue phase III. The second part reviews progress made in the past decade in developing electrooptical, optical, and photonic devices based on blue phase III. The strong and weak aspects of the development of these devices are underlined and criticized, respectively. The third- and-final part proposes ideas for further improvement in blue phase III technology to make it feasible for commercialization and widespread use. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Reduction in surgical fog with a warm humidified gas management protocol significantly shortens procedure time in pediatric robot-assisted laparoscopic procedures.

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    Meenakshi-Sundaram, B; Furr, J R; Malm-Buatsi, E; Boklage, B; Nguyen, E; Frimberger, D; Palmer, B W

    2017-10-01

    The adoption of robot-assisted laparoscopic (RAL) procedures in the field of urology has occurred rapidly, but is, to date, without pediatric-specific instrumentation. Surgical fog is a significant barrier to safe and efficient laparoscopy. This appears to be a significant challenge when adapting three-dimensional 8.5-mm scopes to use in pediatric RAL surgery. The objective of the present study was to compare matched controls from a prospectively collected database to procedures that were performed utilizing special equipment and a protocol to minimize surgical fog in pediatric RAL procedures. A prospectively collected database of all patients who underwent RAL pediatric urology procedures was used to compare: procedure, age, sex, American Society of Anesthesiologists score, weight, console time, number of times the camera was removed to clean the lens during a procedure, length of hospital stay, and morphine equivalents required in the postoperative period. A uniquely developed protocol was used, it consisted of humidified (95% relative humidity) and warmed CO2 gas (95 °F) insufflation via Insuflow® on a working trocar, with active smoke evacuation via PneuVIEW®XE on the opposite working trocar with a gas pass through of 3.5-5 l/min. The outcomes were compared with matched controls (Summary Fig). The novel gas protocol was utilized in 13 procedures (five pyeloplasties, two revision pyeloplasties, three ureteroureterostomies (UU), three nephrectomies) and compared with 13 procedures (six pyeloplasties, one revision pyeloplasty, three UU, three nephrectomies) prior to the protocol development. There was no statistical difference in age (P = 0.78), sex (P = 0.11), ASA score (P = 1.00) or weight (P = 0.69). There were no open conversions, ≥Grade 2 Clavien complications, or readmissions within 30 days in either group. This novel gas protocol yielded a statistically significant reduction in procedure time, by decreasing the number of times the camera was

  8. Impact of fog-drip versus fog immersion on leaf-level function of Bishop pines

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    Baguskas, S. A.; Still, C. J.

    2013-12-01

    Fog-water is known to be an important water source to plants in coastal, Mediterranean climates because it augments plant available water several months after the last winter rain, when conditions are otherwise warm and dry. While fog-drip to the soil surface is the most obvious contribution of fog to the water budget of an ecosystem, recent studies provide convincing evidence that foliar absorption of fog water is also possible. The focus of our research was to assess the relative importance of fog-drip and fog immersion on the photosynthetic capacity and gas exchange rates of a coastal pine species, Bishop pine (Pinus muricata, D.Don), a drought sensitive species restricted to the fogbelt of coastal California and offshore islands. We conducted a greenhouse study where we manipulated fog water inputs to potted Bishop pine saplings during a three-week dry-down period. Fifteen saplings were randomly assigned one of three treatments: 1) fog-drip and fog-immersion, 2) fog immersion alone, and 3) no fog water inputs. We artificially generated nighttime fog events using an ultrasonic device, which produces fog droplets. Given that the canopy architecture varied between saplings, we standardized the amount of fog-drip plants received by preventing direct fog drip from the canopy, and instead added the average amount of fog water that would have fallen from each canopy. To detect changes in soil moisture, we installed volumetric soil moisture probes in each pot at 2 and 10 cm depth. The plant response variables measured were photosynthetic capacity and maximum gas exchange rates of sapling trees. Our results show that plants which received both fog-drip and fog immersion sustained higher gas exchange rates and photosynthetic capacity through the dry-down period compared to trees in other treatment groups. Trees that received only fog immersion had lower rates of gas exchange and lower photosynthetic capacity relative to trees that received both fog-drip and fog immersion

  9. Urban-rural fog differences in Belgrade area, Serbia

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    Vujović, Dragana; Todorović, Nedeljko

    2016-12-01

    Urban/rural fog appearance during the last 27 years in the Belgrade region is analysed using hourly meteorological records from two meteorological stations: an urban station at Belgrade-Vračar (BV) and a rural station at Belgrade-Airport (BA). The effects of urban development on fog formation are discussed through analysis of fog frequency trends and comparison with a number of meteorological parameters. The mean annual and the mean annual minimum temperatures were greater at the urban BV station than at the rural BA station. The mean monthly relative humidity and the mean monthly water vapour pressure were greater at the rural than urban station. During the period of research (1988-2014), BA experiences 425 more days with fog than BV, which means that BV experiences fog for 62.68% of foggy days at BA. Trends in the number of days with fog were statistically non-significant. We analysed the fog occurrence during different types of weather. Fog in urban BV occurred more frequently during cyclonal circulation (in 52.75% of cases). In rural BA, the trend was the opposite and fog appeared more frequently during anticyclonic circulation (in 53.58% of cases). Fog at BV occurred most frequently in stable anticyclonic weather with light wind, when a temperature inversion existed (21.86% of cases). Most frequently, fog at BA occurred in the morning and only lasted a short time, followed by clearer skies during the anticyclonic warm and dry weather (22.55% of cases).

  10. Properties of stratospheric warming events during northern winter.

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    Maury, Pauline; Claud, Chantal; Manzini, Elisa; Hauchecorne, Alain; Keckhut, Philippe

    2015-04-01

    During wintertime the polar mid-stratosphere is characterized by the setting up of westerly winds around the pole; the so-called polar vortex. The polar vortex is one of the most variable features of the zonal-mean circulation of the earth atmosphere, due to a highly non linear interaction between planetary-scale Rossby waves and the zonal flow. Indeed, the interaction between the upward tropospheric propagating waves and the polar vortex leads to a zonal flow weakening, implying a large day to day vortex variability. In the most dramatic cases the polar vortex breaks down, the stratospheric polar flow can reverse its direction and the temperatures can rise locally by more than 50K in a span of a few days. Such phenomena are known as Sudden Stratospheric Warmings (SSWs) and constitute, since their discovery, the most impressive dynamical events in the physical climate system. There are however situations where the polar vortex does not break down, but temperatures increase dramatically. In this study, we propose a global characterization of stratospheric warmings situations based on a temperature threshold in the 50-10hPa layer, in order to assess the properties of daily stratospheric temperature variability during the northern winter. The originality of this approch consists in evaluating the wintertime positive temperature anomalies in terms of intensity and duration. We will show that there is a wide spectrum of warming types. The major SSWs are the most extreme, but there are other events that share some common properties with the major ones. Though neglected, these latter warmings may play a key role in the coupling of the stratosphere-troposphere system.

  11. Properties of Whistler Waves in Warm Electron Plasmas

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    Zhao, Jinsong

    2017-11-01

    Dispersion relation and electromagnetic properties of obliquely propagating whistler waves are investigated on the basis of a warm electron fluid model. The magnetic field of whistler waves is nearly circularly polarized with respect to the wave vector in a plasma where the electron plasma frequency {{{Ω }}}{pe} is much larger than the electron cyclotron frequency {{{Ω }}}{ce}, and the magnetic field polarization can become elliptical, or even linear, polarization as {{{Ω }}}{pe}≲ {{{Ω }}}{ce}. In the plasmas with {{{Ω }}}{pe}wave approximates a quasi-magnetostatic mode, not a quasi-electrostatic mode in the cold electron plasmas. Moreover, the detailed mode properties are given in Earth’s magnetosphere, the solar active region, and Jupiter’s polar cap. Furthermore, the study proposes that the ratio of the electrostatic to electromagnetic component of the electric field can be used to distinguish the whistler mode from the Z-mode in the frequency range of {{{Ω }}}{pe}polar cap.

  12. Effect of Precuring Warming on Mechanical Properties of Restorative Composites

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    Kareem Nada

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the effect of prepolymerization warming on composites' mechanical properties, three composites were evaluated: Clearfil Majesty (CM (Kuraray, Z-100 (3M/ESPE, and Light-Core (LC (Bisco. Specimens were prepared from each composite at room temperature as control and 2 higher temperatures (37∘C and 54∘C to test surface hardness (SH, compressive strength (CS, and diametral tensile strength (DTS. Data were statistically analyzed using ANOVA and Fisher's LSD tests. Results revealed that prewarming CM and Z100 specimens significantly improved their SH mean values (P<0.05. Prewarming also improved mean CS values of Z100 specimens (P<0.05. Furthermore, DTS mean value of CM prepared at 52∘ was significantly higher than that of room temperature specimens (P<0.05. KHN, CS, and DTS mean values varied significantly among the three composites. In conclusion, Prewarming significantly enhanced surface hardness of 2 composites. Prewarming also improved bulk properties of the composites; however, this improvement was significant in only some of the tested materials.

  13. Real-time aerosol optical properties, morphology and mixing states under clear, haze and fog episodes in the summer of urban Beijing

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    Li, Rui; Hu, Yunjie; Li, Ling; Fu, Hongbo; Chen, Jianmin

    2017-04-01

    Elucidating the relationship between characteristics of aerosol particles and optical absorption is important to deepen the understanding of atmospheric chemistry. Aerosol particles play significant roles in climate forcing via their optical absorption properties. However, the relationship between characteristics of aerosol particles and optical absorption remains poorly understood. Aerosol optical properties and morphologies were measured by a transmission electron microscope (TEM), cavity ring-down spectrometer (CRDS), a nephelometer and an Aethalometer in a urban site of Beijing from 24 May to 22 June. Five episodes were categorized according to the meteorological conditions and composition. The results showed that the clear episode (EP-2 and EP-4) featured as the low aerosol optical depth (AOD = 0.72) and fewer pollutants compared with haze (1.14) and fog (2.92) episodes and the particles are mostly externally mixed. The high Ångström exponent (> 2.0) suggests that coarse particles were scarcely observed in EP-2 due to the washout of a previous heavy rain, whereas they were widespread in EP-4 (Ångström exponent = 0.04), which had some mineral particles introduced from the north. In contrast, industry-induced haze (EP-1) and biomass-burning-induced haze (EP-5) were both affected by the south air mass. Compared with the EP-2 and EP-4, the AOD values and the size distribution of particles during EP-1 and EP-5 were much greater because of relatively high particle concentrations. All of the particles were classified into nine categories, i.e. S-rich, N-rich, mineral, K-rich, soot, tar ball, organic, metal and fly ash, on the basis of TEM analysis. In contrast to the EP-1, a large fraction of soot, which sticks to KCl, sulfate or nitrate particles, was detected during EP-5. Additionally, evident enhancement of light absorption was observed during the EP-5, which was mainly ascribed to both black carbon (BC) acceleration and other absorbing substances. However

  14. Development of fog detection algorithm using Himawari-8/AHI data at daytime

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    Han, Ji-Hye; Kim, So-Hyeong; suh, Myoung-Seok

    2017-04-01

    Fog is defined that small cloud water drops or ice particles float in the air and visibility is less than 1 km. In general, fog affects ecological system, radiation budget and human activities such as airplane, ship, and car. In this study, we developed a fog detection algorithm (FDA) consisted of four threshold tests of optical and textual properties of fog using satellite and ground observation data at daytime. For the detection of fog, we used satellite data (Himawari-8/AHI data) and other ancillary data such as air temperature from NWP data (over land), SST from OSTIA (over sea). And for validation, ground observed visibility data from KMA. The optical and textual properties of fog are normalized albedo (NAlb) and normalized local standard deviation (NLSD), respectively. In addition, differences between air temperature (SST) and fog top temperature (FTa(S)) are applied to discriminate the fog from low clouds. And post-processing is performed to detect the fog edge based on spatial continuity of fog. Threshold values for each test are determined by optimization processes based on the ROC analysis for the selected fog cases. Fog detection is performed according to solar zenith angle (SZA) because of the difference of available satellite data. In this study, we defined daytime when SZA is less than 85˚ . Result of FDA is presented by probability (0 ˜ 100 %) of fog through the weighted sum of each test result. The validation results with ground observed visibility data showed that POD and FAR are 0.63 ˜ 0.89 and 0.29 ˜ 0.46 according to the fog intensity and type, respectively. In general, the detection skills are better in the cases of intense and without high clouds than localized and weak fog. We are plan to transfer this algorithm to the National Meteorological Satellite Center of KMA for the operational detection of fog using GK-2A/AMI data which will be launched in 2018.

  15. Instant AppFog

    CERN Document Server

    Wee, Pau Kiat

    2013-01-01

    Get to grips with a new technology, understand what it is and what it can do for you, and then get to work with the most important features and tasks. This easy to follow, hands-on guide shows you how to deploy and manage your application within minutes.Instant AppFog Starter is great for developers who are new to AppFog and who are primarily working on code rather than infrastructure. This book is perfect for those who are looking to publish applications without an in-depth knowledge of servers, firewalls, and networking. It is assumed that you will have some experience of web development as

  16. Retrieving Arctic Sea Fog Geometrical Thickness and Inversion Characteristics from Surface and Radiosonde Observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilson, Gaëlle; Jiskoot, Hester

    2017-04-01

    Arctic sea fog hasn't been extensively studied despite its importance for environmental impact such as on traffic safety and on glacier ablation in coastal Arctic regions. Understanding fog processes can improve nowcasting of environmental impact in such remote regions where few observational data exist. To understand fog's physical, macrophysical and radiative properties, it is important to determine accurate Arctic fog climatology. Our previous study suggested that fog peaks in July over East Greenland and associates with sea ice break-up and a sea breeze with wind speeds between 1-4 m/s. The goal of this study is to understand Arctic coastal fog macrophysical properties and quantify its vertical extent. Radiosonde profiles were extracted from the Integrated Global Radiosonde Archive (IGRA) between 1980-2012, coincident with manual and automated fog observations at three synoptic weather stations along the coast of East Greenland. A new method using air mass saturation ratio and thermodynamic stability was developed to derive fog top height from IGRA radiosonde profiles. Soundings were classified into nine categories, based on surface and low-level saturation ratio, inversion type, and the fog top height relative to the inversion base. Results show that Arctic coastal fog mainly occurs under thermodynamically stable conditions characterized by deep and strong low-level inversions. Fog thickness is commonly about 100-400 m, often reaching the top of the boundary layer. Fog top height is greater at northern stations, where daily fog duration is also longer and often lasts throughout the day. Fog thickness is likely correlated to sea ice concentration density during sea ice break-up. Overall, it is hypothesized that our sounding classes represent development or dissipation stages of advection fog, or stratus lowering and fog lifting processes. With a new automated method, it is planned to retrieve fog height from IGRA data over Arctic terrain around the entire North

  17. Pilot Scale Advanced Fogging Demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demmer, Rick L. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Fox, Don T. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Archiblad, Kip E. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Experiments in 2006 developed a useful fog solution using three different chemical constituents. Optimization of the fog recipe and use of commercially available equipment were identified as needs that had not been addressed. During 2012 development work it was noted that low concentrations of the components hampered coverage and drying in the United Kingdom’s National Nuclear Laboratory’s testing much more so than was evident in the 2006 tests. In fiscal year 2014 the Idaho National Laboratory undertook a systematic optimization of the fogging formulation and conducted a non-radioactive, pilot scale demonstration using commercially available fogging equipment. While not as sophisticated as the equipment used in earlier testing, the new approach is much less expensive and readily available for smaller scale operations. Pilot scale testing was important to validate new equipment of an appropriate scale, optimize the chemistry of the fogging solution, and to realize the conceptual approach.

  18. Electronic and optical properties of warm dense lithium: strong coupling effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Jiayu; Gao, Cheng; Sun, Huayang; Kang, Dongdong

    2017-09-01

    The optical properties of atoms in a hot and dense environment are of critical importance and a great challenge. In a warm dense matter, strong coupling effects between ions induce new physics which is difficult to be included in statistical isolated atom models such as the average atom model or the detailed level accounting model. Here we study the optical properties of warm dense Li from ab initio molecular dynamics with Kubo-Greenwood relations. We compare the absorption coefficients with those from detailed level accounting methods, which can show a significant difference. The analyses of ionic structures and charge density distribution show that the strongly coupled ions induce local ordered structures and redistributions of the electrons away from the homogeneous electron gases. Also, we study the electronic structures of warm dense Li within the same theoretical framework, and we discover how the local environment of different atoms affects the density of states of the system, which will directly alter the optical properties of warm dense matter.

  19. Advances in fog microphysics research in China

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    Liu, Duanyang; Li, Zihua; Yan, Wenlian; Li, Yi

    2017-02-01

    Fog microphysical research in China based on field experiments obtained many important results in recent 50 years. With the fast development of China's economy, urbanization in the last 30 years, special features of fog microphysical structure also appeared, which did not appear in other countries. This article reviews the fog microphysical research around China, and introduces the effect of urbanization on fog microphysical structure and the microphysical processes as well as macroscopic conditions of radiation fog droplet spectral broadening. Urbanization led to an increase in fog droplet number concentration but decreases in fog liquid water content (LWC) and fog droplet size, as well as a decrease in visibility in large cities. Observations show that the radiation fog could be divided into wide-spectrum one, which is all extremely dense fog with the spectral width more than 40 μm, and narrow-spectrum one, most of which is dense fog with the spectral width less than 22 μm, according to droplet spectral distribution. During developing from dense fog to extremely dense fog, the widespectrum radiation fog is characterized by explosive deepening, that is, within a very short time (about 30 min), the droplet concentration increase by about one order of magnitude, droplet spectral broadening across 20 μm, generally up to 30-40 μm, or even 50 μm. As a result, water content increased obviously, visibility decreased to less than 50 m, when dense fog became extremely dense fog.

  20. Fog water chemistry in Shanghai

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    Li, Pengfei; Li, Xiang; Yang, Chenyu; Wang, Xinjun; Chen, Jianmin; Collett, Jeffrey L., Jr.

    2011-08-01

    With the aim of understanding the fog chemistry in a Chinese megacity, twenty-six fog water samples were collected in urban Shanghai from March 2009 to March 2010. The following parameters were measured: pH, electrical conductivity (EC), ten inorganic major ions ( SO42-, NO3-, NO2-, F -, Cl -, Na +, K +, Ca 2+, Mg 2+, NH4+) and four major organic acids (CH 3COO -, HCOO -, CO42-, MSA). The total ionic concentration (TIC) and EC of fog samples were one or two orders of magnitude higher than those often found in Europe, North America and other Asian countries. Pollutants were expected to be mainly from local sources, including factories, motor vehicle emissions and civil construction. Non-local sources such as moderate- and long-range transport of sea salt also contributed to pollution levels in fog events as indicated by back trajectory analysis. The pH of the fog water collected during the monitoring period varied from 4.68 to 6.58; acidic fogs represented about 30.8% of the total fog events during this period. The fog water was characterized by high concentrations of SO42- (20.0% of measured TIC), NO3- (17.1%), NH4+ (28.3%) and Ca 2+ (14.4%). SO42- and NO3-, the main precursors of fog acidity, were related to burning fossil fuels and vehicle emissions, respectively. NH4+, originating from the scavenging of gaseous ammonia and particulate ammonium nitrate and ammonium sulfate, and Ca 2+, originating from the scavenging of coarse particles, acted as acid neutralizers and were the main cause for the relatively high pH of fogs in Shanghai. The ratio of ( SO42- + NO3-)/( NH4+ + Ca 2+) was lower than 1, indicating the alkaline nature of the fog water. A high ratio of NO3-/ SO42- and low ratio of HCOO -/CH 3COO - were consistent with large contributions from vehicular emissions that produce severe air pollution in megacities.

  1. Foliar uptake of fog in the coast redwood ecosystem: a novel drought-alleviation strategy shared by most redwood forest plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emily Limm; Kevin Simonin; Tod. Dawson

    2012-01-01

    Fog inundates the coast redwood forests of northern California frequently during the summer months (May to September) when rainfall is largely absent (Azevedo and Morgan 1974, Byers 1953, Oberlander 1956). This maritime fog modifies otherwise warm and dry summer climate by increasing humidity, decreasing the air temperature, reducing solar radiation, and...

  2. Aerosol effect on the evolution of the thermodynamic properties of warm convective cloud fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagan, Guy; Koren, Ilan; Altaratz, Orit; Heiblum, Reuven H.

    2016-12-01

    Convective cloud formation and evolution strongly depend on environmental temperature and humidity profiles. The forming clouds change the profiles that created them by redistributing heat and moisture. Here we show that the evolution of the field’s thermodynamic properties depends heavily on the concentration of aerosol, liquid or solid particles suspended in the atmosphere. Under polluted conditions, rain formation is suppressed and the non-precipitating clouds act to warm the lower part of the cloudy layer (where there is net condensation) and cool and moisten the upper part of the cloudy layer (where there is net evaporation), thereby destabilizing the layer. Under clean conditions, precipitation causes net warming of the cloudy layer and net cooling of the sub-cloud layer (driven by rain evaporation), which together act to stabilize the atmosphere with time. Previous studies have examined different aspects of the effects of clouds on their environment. Here, we offer a complete analysis of the cloudy atmosphere, spanning the aerosol effect from instability-consumption to enhancement, below, inside and above warm clouds, showing the temporal evolution of the effects. We propose a direct measure for the magnitude and sign of the aerosol effect on thermodynamic instability.

  3. Evaluation of transport properties of warm dense matter using isochoric pulsed-power discharges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miki, Yasutoshi, E-mail: miki@stn.nagaokaut.ac.jp; Saito, Hirotaka; Takahashi, Takuya; Sasaki, Toru; Kikuchi, Takashi; Harada, Nob.

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate transport properties of warm dense matter (WDM), we have demonstrated an isochoric foam ablation using pulsed-power discharge. In order to confirm the uniform heating of metal foam, the AC skin effect penetration of a magnetic field is observed. The skin effect is observed to be suppressed in foam samples as compared to rod samples. We also determined the density dependence of the electrical conductivity for copper and gold at WDM conditions. The measured electrical conductivity of copper agreed with previous experimental results. However the electrical conductivity for gold at the temperature of 3000 K was 10 times larger than the present measurements at 5000 K.

  4. Cloud and fog interactions with coastal forests in the California Channel Islands

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    Still, C. J.; Baguskas, S. A.; Williams, P.; Fischer, D. T.; Carbone, M. S.; Rastogi, B.

    2015-12-01

    Coastal forests in California are frequently covered by clouds or immersed in fog in the rain-free summer. Scientists have long surmised that fog might provide critical water inputs to these forests. However, until recently, there has been little ecophysiological research to support how or why plants should prefer foggy regions; similarly, there is very little work quantifying water delivered to ecosystems by fog drip except for a few notable sites along the California coast. However, without spatial datasets of summer cloudcover and fog inundation, combined with detailed process studies, questions regarding the roles of cloud shading and fog drip in dictating plant distributions and ecosystem physiology cannot be addressed effectively. The overall objective of this project is to better understand how cloudcover and fog influence forest metabolism, growth, and distribution. Across a range of sites in California's Channel Islands National Park we measured a wide variety of ecosystem processes and properties. We then related these to cloudcover and fog immersion maps created using satellite datasets and airport and radiosonde observations. We compiled a spatially continuous dataset of summertime cloudcover frequency of the Southern California bight using satellite imagery from the NOAA geostationary GOES-11 Imager. We also created map of summertime cloudcover frequency of this area using MODIS imagery. To assess the ability of our mapping approach to predict spatial and temporal fog inundation patterns, we compared our monthly average daytime fog maps for GOES pixels corresponding to stations where fog inputs were measured with fog collectors in a Bishop pine forest. We also compared our cloudcover maps to measurements of irradiance measurements. Our results demonstrate that cloudcover and fog strongly modulate radiation, water, and carbon budgets, as well as forest distributions, in this semi-arid environment. Measurements of summertime fog drip, pine sapflow and

  5. Fog collectors and collection techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höhler, I.; Suau, C.

    2010-07-01

    The earth sciences taught that due to the occurrence of water in three phases: gas, liquid and solid, solar energy keeps the hydrological cycle going, shaping the earth surface while regulating the climate and thus allowing smart technologies to interfere in the natural process by rerouting water and employing its yield for natural and human environments’ subsistence. This is the case of traditional fog collectors implemented by several researchers along the Atacama Desert since late ’50s such as vertical tensile mesh or macro-diamonds structures. Nevertheless, these basic prototypes require to be upgraded, mainly through new shapes, fabrics and frameworks’ types by following the principles of lightness, transformability, portability and polyvalence. The vertical canvas of conventional fog collectors contain too much stressed at each joints and as result it became vulnerable. Our study constitutes a research by design of two fog-trap devices along the Atacama Desert. Different climatic factors influence the efficiency of fog harvesting. In order to increase yield of collected fog water, we need to establish suitable placements that contain high rates of fog’s accumulation. As important as the location is also the building reliability of these collectors that will be installed. Their frames and skins have to be adjustable to the wind direction and resistant against strong winds and rust. Its fabric need to be more hydrophobic, elastic and with light colours to ease dripping/drainage and avoid ultra-violet deterioration. In addition, meshes should be well-tensed and frames well-embraced too. In doing so we have conceived two fog collectors: DropNet© (Höhler) and FogHive© (Suau). These designs explore climatic design parameters combined with the agile structural principles of Tensegrity and Geodesic widely developed by Bucky Fuller and Frei Otto. The research methods mainly consisted of literature review; fieldwork; comparative analysis of existing fog

  6. Warm Spraying of High-Strength Ni-Al-Bronze: Cavitation Characteristics and Property Prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krebs, Sebastian; Kuroda, Seiji; Katanoda, Hiroshi; Gaertner, Frank; Klassen, Thomas; Araki, Hiroshi; Frede, Simon

    2017-01-01

    Bronze materials such as Ni-Al-bronze show exceptional performances against cavitation erosion, due to their high fatigue strength and high strength. These materials are used for ship propellers, pump systems or for applications with alternating stresses. Usually, the respective parts are cast. With the aim to use resources more efficiently and to reduce costs, this study aimed to evaluate opportunities to apply bronze as a coating to critical areas of respective parts. The coatings should have least amounts of pores and non-bonded areas and any contaminations that might act as crack nuclei and contribute to material damages. Processes with low oxidation and high kinetic impacts fulfill these criteria. Especially warm spraying, a nitrogen-cooled HVOF process, with similar impact velocities as cold gas spraying but enhanced process temperature, allows for depositing high-strength Ni-Al-bronze. This study systematically simulates and evaluates the formation and performance of warm-sprayed Ni-Al-bronze coatings for different combustion pressures and nitrogen flow rates. Substrate preheating was used to improve coating adhesion for lower spray parameter sets. Furthermore, this study introduces an energy-based concept to compare spray parameter sets and to predict coating properties. Coatings with low porosities and high mechanical strengths are obtained, allowing for a cavitation resistance similar to bulk material.

  7. Measuring warm dense matter properties with spectrally resolved x-ray scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenzer, Siegfried; X-ray Thomson Scattering Collaboration

    2017-10-01

    We have developed powerful ultrafast pump-probe techniques to measure the structural transformations and the physical properties of matter in extreme conditions. We apply megabar pressures to our samples using high-power laser irradiation followed by X-ray laser pulses from the Linac Coherent Light Source to take femtosecond measurements of the states that result. These experiments deliver data of unprecedented accuracy that allow critical experimental tests of theory in the challenging near-Fermi degenerate warm dense matter regime or in the non-ideal plasma state. We find good agreement with density functional theory simulations and provide predictions for new studies at the highest densities in laboratory plasmas that approach conditions of the interiors of brown dwarfs. This work is supported by DOE FES under FWP 100182.

  8. Security and Privacy in Fog Computing: Challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Mukherjee, Mithun; Matam, Rakesh; Shu, Lei; Maglaras, Leandros; Ferrag, Mohamed Amine; Choudhry, Nikumani; Kumar, Vikas

    2017-01-01

    open access article Fog computing paradigm extends the storage, networking, and computing facilities of the cloud computing toward the edge of the networks while offloading the cloud data centers and reducing service latency to the end users. However, the characteristics of fog computing arise new security and privacy challenges. The existing security and privacy measurements for cloud computing cannot be directly applied to the fog computing due to its features, such as mobility, heteroge...

  9. To what extent can global warming events influence scaling properties of climatic fluctuations in glacial periods?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberti, Tommaso; Lepreti, Fabio; Vecchio, Antonio; Carbone, Vincenzo

    2017-04-01

    The Earth's climate is an extremely unstable complex system consisting of nonlinear and still rather unknown interactions among atmosphere, land surface, ice and oceans. The system is mainly driven by solar irradiance, even if internal components as volcanic eruptions and human activities affect the atmospheric composition thus acting as a driver for climate changes. Since the extreme climate variability is the result of a set of phenomena operating from daily to multi-millennial timescales, with different correlation times, a study of the scaling properties of the system can evidence non-trivial persistent structures, internal or external physical processes. Recently, the scaling properties of the paleoclimate changes have been analyzed by distinguish between interglacial and glacial climates [Shao and Ditlevsen, 2016]. The results show that the last glacial record (20-120 kyr BP) presents some elements of multifractality, while the last interglacial period (0-10 kyr BP), say the Holocene period, seems to be characterized by a mono-fractal structure. This is associated to the absence of Dansgaard-Oeschger (DO) events in the interglacial climate that could be the cause for the absence of multifractality. This hypothesis is supported by the analysis of the period between 18 and 27 kyr BP, i.e. during the Last Glacial Period, in which a single DO event have been registred. Through the Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD) we were able to detect a timescale separation within the Last Glacial Period (20-120 kyr BP) in two main components: a high-frequency component, related to the occurrence of DO events, and a low-frequency one, associated to the cooling/warming phase switch [Alberti et al., 2014]. Here, we investigate the scaling properties of the climate fluctuations within the Last Glacial Period, where abrupt climate changes, characterized by fast increase of temperature usually called Dansgaard-Oeschger (DO) events, have been particularly pronounced. By using the

  10. Numerical Simulations of an Inversion Fog Event in the Salt Lake Valley during the MATERHORN-Fog Field Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chachere, Catherine N.; Pu, Zhaoxia

    2018-01-01

    An advanced research version of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model is employed to simulate a wintertime inversion fog event in the Salt Lake Valley during the Mountain Terrain Atmospheric Modeling and Observations Program (MATERHORN) field campaign during January 2015. Simulation results are compared to observations obtained from the field program. The sensitivity of numerical simulations to available cloud microphysical (CM), planetary boundary layer (PBL), radiation, and land surface models (LSMs) is evaluated. The influence of differing visibility algorithms and initialization times on simulation results is also examined. Results indicate that the numerical simulations of the fog event are sensitive to the choice of CM, PBL, radiation, and LSM as well as the visibility algorithm and initialization time. Although the majority of experiments accurately captured the synoptic setup environment, errors were found in most experiments within the boundary layer, specifically a 3° warm bias in simulated surface temperatures compared to observations. Accurate representation of surface and boundary layer variables are vital in correctly predicting fog in the numerical model.

  11. PERSPECTIVES FOR FOG COMPUTING IN MANUFACTURING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakub PIZOŃ

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses ongoing efforts to enable the fog computing vision in manufacturing. As a new paradigm of computing implementation of fog computing faces many challenges that open perspective of new applications within a field of manufacturing. It is expected that fog computing will be one of factors that will accelerate development of in forth industrial revolution. In this article we discuss the perspectives of manufacturing companies surrounded by new solutions of CPS, CPPS and CM in relation to fog computing.

  12. Refreshing Music: Fog Harvesting with Harps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Weiwei; Anderson, Mark; Kennedy, Brook; Boreyko, Jonathan

    2017-11-01

    Fog harvesting is a useful technique for obtaining fresh water in arid climates. The wire meshes currently utilized for fog harvesting suffer from dual constraints: coarse meshes cannot efficiently capture fog, while fine meshes suffer from clogging issues. Here, we design a new type of fog harvester comprised of an array of vertical wires, which we call ``fog harps.'' To investigate the water collection efficiency, three fog harps were designed with different diameters (254 μm, 508 μm and 1.30 mm) but the same pitch-to-diameter ratio of 2. For comparison, three different size meshes were purchased with equivalent dimensions. As expected for the mesh structures, the mid-sized wires performed the best, with a drop-off in performance for the fine or coarse meshes. In contrast, the fog harvesting rate continually increased with decreasing wire diameter for the fog harps, due to its low hysteresis that prevented droplet clogging. This resulted in a 3-fold enhancement in the fog harvesting rate for the harp form factor compared to the mesh. The lack of a performance ceiling for the harps suggest that even greater enhancements could be achieved by scaling down to yet smaller sizes.

  13. About Security Solutions in Fog Computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugen Petac

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The key for improving a system's performance, its security and reliability is to have the dataprocessed locally in remote data centers. Fog computing extends cloud computing through itsservices to devices and users at the edge of the network. Through this paper it is explored the fogcomputing environment. Security issues in this area are also described. Fog computing providesthe improved quality of services to the user by complementing shortages of cloud in IoT (Internet ofThings environment. Our proposal, named Adaptive Fog Computing Node Security Profile(AFCNSP, which is based security Linux solutions, will get an improved security of fog node withrich feature sets.

  14. Enhanced toxicity of aerosol in fog conditions in the Po Valley, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decesari, Stefano; Sowlat, Mohammad Hossein; Hasheminassab, Sina; Sandrini, Silvia; Gilardoni, Stefania; Facchini, Maria Cristina; Fuzzi, Sandro; Sioutas, Constantinos

    2017-06-01

    While numerous studies have demonstrated the association between outdoor exposure to atmospheric particulate matter (PM) and adverse health effects, the actual chemical species responsible for PM toxicological properties remain a subject of investigation. We provide here reactive oxygen species (ROS) activity data for PM samples collected at a rural site in the Po Valley, Italy, during the fog season (i.e., November-March). We show that the intrinsic ROS activity of Po Valley PM, which is mainly composed of biomass burning and secondary aerosols, is comparable to that of traffic-related particles in urban areas. The airborne concentration of PM components responsible for the ROS activity decreases in fog conditions, when water-soluble species are scavenged within the droplets. Due to this partitioning effect of fog, the measured ROS activity of fog water was contributed mainly by water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) and secondary inorganic ions rather than by transition metals. We found that the intrinsic ROS activity of fog droplets is even greater (> 2.5 times) than that of the PM on which droplets are formed, indicating that redox-active compounds are not only scavenged from the particulate phase, but are also produced within the droplets. Therefore, even if fog formation exerts a scavenging effect on PM mass and redox-active compounds, the aqueous-phase formation of reactive secondary organic compounds can eventually enhance ROS activity of PM when fog evaporates. These findings, based on a case study during a field campaign in November 2015, indicate that a significant portion of airborne toxicity in the Po Valley is largely produced by environmental conditions (fog formation and fog processing) and not simply by the emission and transport of pollutants.

  15. Influence of stretching and warm-up on Achilles tendon material properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Don Young; Rubenson, Jonas; Carr, Amelia; Mattson, James; Besier, Thor; Chou, Loretta B

    2011-04-01

    Controversy exists on stretching and warm-up in injury prevention. We hypothesized that warm up has a greater effect on Achilles tendon biomechanics than static stretching. This study investigated static stretching and warm-up on Achilles tendon biomechanics in recreational athletes, in vivo. Ten active, healthy subjects, 5 males, 5 females, With a mean age of 22.9 years with no previous Achilles tendon injuries were recruited. Typical stretching and warm-up routines were created. Testing was performed in a randomized cross-over design. A custom-built dynamometer was utilized to perform controlled isometric plantarflexion. A low profile ultrasound probe was utilized to visualize the musculotendinous junction of the medial gastrocnemius. An eight-camera motion capture system was used to capture ankle motion. Custom software calculated Achilles tendon biomechanics. Achilles tendon force production was consistent. No statistically significant differences were detected in stretch, stiffness, and strain between pre-, post-stretching, and post-warm-up interventions. Stretching or warm-up alone, and combined did not demonstrate statistically significant differences. Stretching and warm-up may have an equivalent effect on Achilles tendon biomechanics. Prolonged and more intense protocols may be required for changes to occur. Stretching and warm-up of the Achilles before exercise are commonly practiced. Investigating the effect of stretching and warm-up may shed light on potential injury prevention.

  16. Influences on the formability and mechanical properties of 7000-aluminum alloys in hot and warm forming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrens, B.-A.; Nürnberger, F.; Bonk, C.; Hübner, S.; Behrens, S.; Vogt, H.

    2017-09-01

    Aluminum alloys of the 7000 series possess high lightweight potential due to their high specific tensile strength combined with a good ultimate elongation. For this reason, hot-formed boron-manganese-steel parts can be substituted by these alloys. Therefore, the application of these aluminum alloys for structural car body components is desired to decrease the weight of the body in white and consequently CO2 emissions during vehicle operation. These days, the limited formability at room temperature limits an application in the automobile industry. By increasing the deformation temperature, formability can be improved. In this study, two different approaches to increase the formability of these alloys by means of higher temperatures were investigated. The first approach is a warm forming route to form sheets in T6 temper state with high tensile strength at temperatures between 150 °C and 300 °C. The second approach is a hot forming route. Here, the material is annealed at solution heat treatment temperature and formed directly after the annealing step. Additionally, a quench step is included in the forming stage. After the forming and quenching step, the sheets have to be artificially aged to achieve the high specific tensile strength. In this study, several parameters in the presented process routes, which influence the formability and the mechanical properties, have been investigated for the aluminum alloys EN AW7022 and EN AW7075.

  17. Fog water collection effectiveness: Mesh intercomparisons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Daniel; Torregrosa, Alicia; Weiss-Penzias, Peter; Zhang, Bong June; Sorensen, Deckard; Cohen, Robert; McKinley, Gareth; Kleingartner, Justin; Oliphant, Andrew; Bowman, Matthew

    2018-01-01

    To explore fog water harvesting potential in California, we conducted long-term measurements involving three types of mesh using standard fog collectors (SFC). Volumetric fog water measurements from SFCs and wind data were collected and recorded in 15-minute intervals over three summertime fog seasons (2014–2016) at four California sites. SFCs were deployed with: standard 1.00 m2 double-layer 35% shade coefficient Raschel; stainless steel mesh coated with the MIT-14 hydrophobic formulation; and FogHa-Tin, a German manufactured, 3-dimensional spacer fabric deployed in two orientations. Analysis of 3419 volumetric samples from all sites showed strong relationships between mesh efficiency and wind speed. Raschel mesh collected 160% more fog water than FogHa-Tin at wind speeds less than 1 m s–1 and 45% less for wind speeds greater than 5 m s–1. MIT-14 coated stainless-steel mesh collected more fog water than Raschel mesh at all wind speeds. At low wind speeds of water when the warp of the weave was oriented vertically, per manufacturer specification, than when the warp of the weave was oriented horizontally. Time series measurements of three distinct mesh across similar wind regimes revealed inconsistent lags in fog water collection and inconsistent performance. Since such differences occurred under similar wind-speed regimes, we conclude that other factors play important roles in mesh performance, including in-situ fog event and aerosol dynamics that affect droplet-size spectra and droplet-to-mesh surface interactions.

  18. Detection of fog layers characteristics with ground-based remote sensing equipments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toanca, Florica; Stefan, Sabina; Binietoglou, Ioannis; Labzovskii, Lev; Stefanie, Horatiu

    2015-04-01

    Fog is one of the phenomena that generates important economic problems and also impacts a broad variety of human activities. This study aims to determine fog layers characteristics in terms of type, time evolution, and vertical extent in Magurele, Romania (44.35 N, 26.03 E) for two periods (2012 and 2013). Data regarding fog evolution was provided by a Vaisala CL31 Ceilometer and a HATPRO Microwave Radiometer. Ceilometer profiles are obtained with a time resolution of 16 s and up to 7.5 km altitude. Microwave radiometer uses passive microwave detection in the 22.335 to 31.4 GHz and 51 to 58 GHz bands to obtain the vertical profiles of temperature and relative humidity up to 10 km with a temporal resolution of several minutes. MWR also provide integrated water vapor and liquid water path. Considering all this information from active and passive remote sensing instruments, we present preliminary results towards a method for fog type classification. The extended database containing fog measurements for a two years period is used in a statistical analysis of the evolution and geometrical properties for each fog type. Acknowledgements The work was supported by the strategic grant POSDRU/159/1.5/S/137750, "Project Doctoral and Postdoctoral programs support for increased competitiveness in Exact Sciences research" co financed by the European Social Found within the Sectorial Operational Program Human Resources Development 2007-2013 and by a grant of the STAR-ESA Programme 39/2012-SIAFIM.

  19. Toward Improving Short-Range Fog Prediction in Data-Denied Areas Using the Air Force Weather Agency Mesoscale Ensemble

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    VI.  RESULTS ....................................................................................................................173  1.  Overview ...20 !Iii: 20 20 190 1. Overview and Comparison to Cntrl We will first make some general observations about the results, and then examine...Simulation of a Warm Fog Case during FRAM Project. Pure Appl. Geophys., 164, 1161–1178. ----------, B. Hansen, S. G. Cober, G. Pearson, J. A

  20. Hydrologic Effects and Biogeographic Impacts of Coastal Fog, Channel Islands, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, D. T.; Still, C. J.; Williams, A. P.

    2006-12-01

    coastal endemic forests may be particularly susceptible to climate change, particularly if it leads to changes in the fog and low stratus cloud regime, in agreement with palynological and plant macrofossil evidence from the Santa Barbara basin showing the contraction of coastal pines during warm periods over the last 160 kyrs.

  1. Mechanical Properties of Warm Mix Asphalt Prepared Using Foamed Asphalt Binders

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    Warm mix asphalt (WMA) is a name given to a group of technologies that have the common purpose of reducing the viscosity : of the asphalt binders. This reduction in viscosity offers the advantage of producing asphalt-aggregate mixtures at lower mixin...

  2. Studies of the Fog-water Chemical Characteristics in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, D. Y.; Li, Z. H.; Yang, F.; Bin, Z.; Yang, J.

    2010-07-01

    Research of chemical characteristics of fog-water developed rapidly in China since 1980. Observation, sampling and analysis have been done in cities , on the alps and beside the sea-sides. Studies about the acidity of cloud-fog water and the source of acid fog at each place have been done. The basic characteristics of fog water chemical composition also been detected. In many compositive fog observations , there explored the related factors of fog-water chemical characteristics as well as continuous fog-water collection, and studied the primary factors which affect the concentration of the fog water chemical composition. The paper presents the primary studies of fog-water chemical characteristics in China the last 30 years. Fog -water sampling and analysis have made marked progress. the cloud-fog water chemical composition and acidity were confirmed in many cities and mountain areas. Many efficacious works have been done about the source of chemical composition. The studies shown that the cloud-fog water in many of Chinese cities and mountain areas have been acidified. Fog-water in cities was polluted with high ion concentrations and jeopardize people’s health. It’s very urgent to control pollutant discharge, raise the vegetation plant cover rate, and improve ecological environment. The fog chemical research should be continue in-depth and development.

  3. Forecasting of radiation fog with a new decision support system based on automatic LIDAR-ceilometer measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laffineur, Quentin; Haeffelin, Martial; Bravo-Aranda, Juan-Antonio; Drouin, Marc-Antoine; Casquero-Vera, Juan-Andrés; Dupont, Jean-Charles; De Backer, Hugo

    2017-04-01

    Radiation fog is the most frequent cause of surface visibility below 1 km, and is one of the most common and persistent weather hazards encountered in aviation and to nearly all forms of surface transport. Forecasting radiation fog can be difficult, a number of approaches have been used to integrate the satellite data, numerical modeling and standard surface observations. These approaches lack generally the vertical and temporal resolution, representation of boundary layer and microphysical processes. They typically do not represent accurately the activation processes of fog droplets that depend on the chemical and physical properties of the aerosols. The automatic LIDAR-ceilometer (ALC) primarily designed for cloud base height detection has greatly improved over the last years and now offers the opportunity to analyse in near real-time the backscatter signal in the boundary layer that potentially contains major information to predict radiation fog formation or not. During the preliminary stage of fog formation, the backscatter profile may be influenced by atmospheric humidity due to the presence in the atmosphere of hygroscopic aerosols that see their size increase with their moisture content inducing an increase of the backscatter magnitude. In the framework of TOPROF (COST-ACTION, http://www.toprof.imaa.cnr.it/) activities, collaboration was initiated between the Royal Meteorological Institute of Belgium (RMI) and the Site Instrumental de Recherche par Télédéction Atmosphérique (SIRTA, IPSL) to develop a forward stepwise screening algorithm (PARAFOG) to help prediction of radiation fog formation. PARAFOG is a new decision support system for radiation fog forecasting based on analysis of the attenuated backscatter measured by ALCs, found at most airports, which provides information about the aerosol-particle hygroscopic growth process (Haeffelin et al., 2016). The monitoring of this hygroscopic growth process could provide useful warning to forecasters, in

  4. Large eddy simulation of radiation fog: impact of dynamics on the fog life cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazoyer, Marie; Lac, Christine; Thouron, Odile; Bergot, Thierry; Masson, Valery; Musson-Genon, Luc

    2017-11-01

    Large eddy simulations (LESs) of a radiation fog event occurring during the ParisFog experiment are studied with a view to analyse the impact of the dynamics of the boundary layer on the fog life cycle. The LES, performed with the Meso-NH model at 5 m resolution horizontally and 1 m vertically, and with a 2-moment microphysical scheme, includes the drag effect of a tree barrier and the deposition of droplets on vegetation. The model shows good agreement with measurements of near-surface dynamic and thermodynamic parameters and liquid water path. The blocking effect of the trees induces elevated fog formation, as actually observed, and horizontal heterogeneities during the formation. It also limits cooling and cloud water production. Deposition is found to exert the most significant impact on fog prediction as it not only erodes the fog near the surface but also modifies the fog life cycle and induces vertical heterogeneities. A comparison with the 2 m horizontal resolution simulation reveals small differences, meaning that grid convergence is achieved. Conversely, increasing numerical diffusion through a wind advection operator of lower order leads to an increase in the liquid water path and has a very similar effect to removing the tree barrier. This study allows us to establish the major dynamical ingredients needed to accurately represent the fog life cycle at very high-resolution.

  5. Effect of the droplet activation process on microphysical properties of warm clouds

    OpenAIRE

    Suzuki, Kentaroh; NAKAJIMA, Teruyuki; Nakajima, Takashi Y.; Stephens, Graeme L.

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates the effect of the droplet activation process on microphysical characteristics of warm clouds represented by correlation statistics between cloud droplet effective radius re and cloud optical thickness τc. The conceptual adiabatic model is first employed to interpret satellite-observed re-τc correlation statistics over two different regions and to reveal distinctively different increasing patterns of droplet number concentration between these regions. This difference is...

  6. Equation of state and transport properties of warm dense helium via quantum molecular dynamics simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Zhi-Guo [College of Physical Science and Technology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China); National Key Laboratory for Shock Wave and Detonation Physics Research, Institute of Fluid Physics, Chinese Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Key Laboratory of High Energy Density Physics and Technology of Ministry of Education, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China); Cheng, Yan [College of Physical Science and Technology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China); Key Laboratory of High Energy Density Physics and Technology of Ministry of Education, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China); Chen, Qi-Feng, E-mail: chenqf01@gmail.com, E-mail: xrchen@scu.edu.cn [National Key Laboratory for Shock Wave and Detonation Physics Research, Institute of Fluid Physics, Chinese Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Chen, Xiang-Rong, E-mail: chenqf01@gmail.com, E-mail: xrchen@scu.edu.cn [College of Physical Science and Technology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China)

    2016-05-15

    The equation of state, self-diffusion, and viscosity coefficients of helium have been investigated by quantum molecular dynamics (QMD) simulations in the warm dense matter regime. Our simulations are validated through the comparison with the reliable experimental data. The calculated principal and reshock Hugoniots of liquid helium are in good agreement with the gas-gun data. On this basis, we revisit the issue for helium, i.e., the possibility of the instabilities predicted by chemical models at around 2000 GPa and 10 g/cm{sup 3} along the pressure isotherms of 6309, 15 849, and 31 623 K. Our calculations show no indications of instability in this pressure-temperature region, which reconfirm the predictions of previous QMD simulations. The self-diffusion and viscosity coefficients of warm dense helium have been systematically investigated by the QMD simulations. We carefully test the finite-size effects and convergences of statistics, and obtain numerically converged self-diffusion and viscosity coefficients by using the Kubo-Green formulas. The present results have been used to evaluate the existing one component plasma models. Finally, the validation of the Stokes-Einstein relationship for helium in the warm dense regime is discussed.

  7. Compressive Mechanical Properties and Micromechanical Characteristics of Warm and Ice-Rich Frozen Silt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yugui Yang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available It is recognized experimentally that the compressibility of warm and ice-rich frozen soil is remarkable under loading, which will cause a significant deformation and affect the stability of infrastructure constructed in cold region. In this paper, the real-time computerized tomography tests of warm and ice-rich frozen silt were carried out. The microstructure characteristics in the process of loading were studied, and the macromechanical behaviors were obtained at the same time. The test results showed that the stress-strain curve of warm and ice-rich frozen silt is sensitive to temperature; the peak stress was greatly enhanced with the decrease of temperature, and the section area increases with the increase of axial strain; the water content mainly decreases with the increase of axial strain at −1°C; the change of water content is not obvious at −2°C in the loading process. The density damage changes little at first and then increases with the further increase of axial strain.

  8. Assessing the impact of ocean warming on subsurface property fields in the Gulf of Maine

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDowell, E. R.; Burkholder, K. C.

    2016-12-01

    The Gulf of Maine (GOM), a semi-enclosed coastal basin on the Northwest Atlantic Continental Shelf, is defined by nutrient rich current inflows, variable geomorphology, and complex coastal currents. These factors combine to make the GOM a biologically and economically significant marine environment. Recent studies of oceanographic measurements obtained from both satellite imagery and buoy arrays deployed within the GOM have indicated significant warming trends at all locations and at multiple depths, thus threatening the biological and socio-economic stability of the GOM. However, infrequent sampling has limited the analysis of warming trends at depths below fifty meters. Here, we utilize CTD casts taken throughout the GOM since the 1970s in order to analyze decadal scale changes in subsurface temperature and salinity in the GOM. Our analysis shows significant subsurface increases in temperature in the three regions of the GOM that we investigated: The Northeast Channel, the Bay of Fundy, and Jordan's Basin on the order of 0.2°C/decade, along with significant increases in salinity in both the Northeast Channel and Jordan's Basin. An analysis of the Gulf of Maine's inflows through the Northeast Channel will be presented and discussed in the context of the observed warming.

  9. Research of HCR Gearing Properties from Warm Scuffing Damage Point of View

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuzmanović Siniša

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The issue of design and dimensioning of HCR gearing, particularly of the gearings with an internal engagement, it nowadays, especially in the design of hybrid cars drives, highly topical. This kind of gearing has many advantages in operation, but at the same time it is more complicated in stage of its design and load capacity calculation. Authors in this contribution present some results of temperature scuffing research of internal and external HCR gearing. There are given the equations for calculation of warm scuffing resistance of both external and internal HCR gearing derived according to the integral temperature criterion.

  10. Finite Temperature Green's Function Approach for Excited State and Thermodynamic Properties of Cool to Warm Dense Matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kas, J J; Rehr, J J

    2017-10-27

    We present a finite-temperature extension of the retarded cumulant Green's function for calculations of exited-state, correlation, and thermodynamic properties of electronic systems. The method incorporates a cumulant to leading order in the screened Coulomb interaction W, and improves on the GW approximation of many-body perturbation theory. Results for the homogeneous electron gas are presented for a wide range of densities and temperatures, from cool to warm dense matter regimes, which reveal several hitherto unexpected properties. For example, correlation effects remain strong at high T while the exchange-correlation energy becomes small; also the spectral function broadens and damping increases with temperature, blurring the usual quasiparticle picture. These effects are evident, e.g., in Compton scattering which exhibits many-body corrections that persist at normal densities and intermediate T. The approach also yields exchange-correlation energies and potentials in good agreement with existing methods.

  11. Combustion-related pollutants of polydisperse single-composition aerosols and advection fog formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, R. J.; Liaw, G. S.

    1982-01-01

    The most noticeable effect of air pollution on the properties of the atmosphere is the reduction in visibility, with and without the occurrence of condensation, which frequently accompanies polluted air. The present study concerns the formation of advection fog associated with aerosols, due to combustion-related pollutants, with a polydisperse population distribution and a single composition model. The results show that an aerosol population with high particle concentration-shifted distribution provides a more favorable condition for the formation of dense fog than an aerosol population with a low particle concentration-shifted distribution if the value of the mass concentration of the aerosols is kept constant.

  12. Formation of Oxidized Organic Aerosol (OOA) through Fog Processing in the Po Valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilardoni, S.; Paglione, M.; Rinaldi, M.; Giulianelli, L.; Massoli, P.; Hillamo, R. E.; Carbone, S.; Lanconelli, C.; Laaksonen, A. J.; Russell, L. M.; Poluzzi, V.; Fuzzi, S.; Facchini, C.

    2014-12-01

    Aqueous phase chemistry might be responsible for the formation of a significant fraction of the organic aerosol (OA) observed in the atmosphere, and could explain some of the discrepancies between OA concentration and properties predicted by models and observed in the environment. Aerosol - fog interaction and its effect on submicron aerosol properties were investigated in the Po Valley (northern Italy) during fall 2011, in the framework of the Supersite project (ARPA Emilia Romagna). Composition and physical properties of submicron aerosol were measured online by a High Resolution- Time of Flight - Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-TOF-AMS), a Soot Photometer - Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (SP-AMS), and a Tandem Differential Mobility Particle Sizer (TDMPS). Organic functional group analysis was performed off-line by Hydrogen - Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (H-NMR) spectrometry and by Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectrometry. Aerosol absorption, scattering, and total extinction were measured simultaneously with a Particle Soot Absorption Photometer (PSAP), a Nephelometer, and a Cavity Attenuated Phase Shift Spectrometer particle extinction monitor (CAPS PMex), respectively. Water-soluble organic carbon in fog-water was characterized off-line by HR-TOF-AMS. Fourteen distinct fog events were observed. Fog dissipation left behind an aerosol enriched in particles larger than 400 nm, typical of fog and cloud processing, and dominated by secondary species, including ammonium nitrate, ammonium sulfate and oxidized OA (OOA). Source apportionment of OA allowed us to identify OOA as the difference between total OA and primary OA (hydrocarbon like OA and biomass burning OA). The formation of OOA through fog processing is proved by the correlation of OOA concentration with hydroxyl methyl sulfonate signal and by the similarity of OOA spectra with organic mass spectra obtained by re-aerosolization of fog water samples. The oxygen to carbon ratio and the hydrogen to carbon ratio of

  13. The effect of aerosol-derived changes in the warm phase on the properties of deep convective clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qian; Koren, Ilan; Altaratz, Orit; Heiblum, Reuven; Dagan, Guy

    2017-04-01

    The aerosol impact on deep convective clouds starts in an increased number of cloud droplets in higher aerosol loading environment. This change drives many others, like enhanced condensational growth, delay in collision-coalescence and others. Since the warm processes serve as the initial and boundary conditions for the mixed and cold-phase processes in deep clouds, it is highly important to understand the aerosol effect on them. The weather research and forecasting model (WRF) with spectral bin microphysics was used to study a deep convective system over the Marshall Islands, during the Kwajalein Experiment (KWAJEX). Three simulations were conducted with aerosol concentrations of 100, 500 and 2000 cm-3, to reflect clean, semipolluted, and polluted conditions. The results of the clean run agreed well with the radar profiles and rain rate observations. The more polluted simulations resulted in larger total cloud mass, larger upper level cloud fraction and rain rates. There was an increased mass both below and above the zero temperature level. It indicates of more efficient growth processes both below and above the zero level. In addition the polluted runs showed an increased upward transport (across the zero level) of liquid water due to both stronger updrafts and larger droplet mobility. In this work we discuss the transport of cloud mass crossing the zero temperature level (in both directions) in order to gain a process level understanding of how aerosol effects on the warm processes affect the macro- and micro-properties of deep convective clouds.

  14. Performance evaluation of fog seals on chip seals and verification of fog seal field tests

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kim, Y. Richard; Im, Jeong Hyuk

    2015-01-01

    .... To mitigate a major problem with chip seals, i.e., the loose aggregate particles, fog seals, which are composed of an emulsified product placed on top of the chip seal, can be used to help control the loose aggregate...

  15. Chemical composition of fog water in Nanjing area of China and its related fog microphysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Chunsong; Niu, Shengjie; Tang, Lili; Lv, Jingjing; Zhao, Lijuan; Zhu, Bin

    2010-07-01

    Fog samples were collected at Pancheng in the Nanjing area of China during December 2006 and December 2007. Fog droplet spectra, surface meteorological elements and visibility were also measured during the same period. The data from PM 10, SO 2 and NO 2 measurements were obtained from the air quality monitoring networks of Nanjing. The total ionic concentration (TIC) and electrical conductivity (EC) in fog samples, and the local pollutant emissions were one or two orders of magnitude higher than those found in Europe or South America for instance. Pollutants were expected to be mainly from local sources, including factories, plants, freeways, soil sources, house construction, and biomass burning. Advection also contributed to pollution levels in radiation-advection fogs. The scavenging of NH 3 and coarse particles by fog droplets was the main cause for the high mean pH value of 5.9. In-phase temporal evolution of TIC, [SO 42-], [NO 3-], SO 2, NO 2, PM 10 and S/LWC (S: the surface area of fog droplets per unit volume of air; LWC: liquid water content) was found to be due to the interaction of air pollutants and fog droplets, change of air mass due to advection, and so on. S/LWC seemed to be a better indicator for describing the relationship between TIC and microphysics with respect to LWC. A formula between TIC and S/LWC was derived and the related parameters were discussed. Depositions of chemical species in fog cases were estimated and the result showed that deposition was efficient.

  16. First-principles equation of state and electronic properties of warm dense oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shuai; Driver, Kevin; Soubiran, François; Militzer, Burkhard

    We perform all-electron path integral Monte Carlo (PIMC) and density functional theory molecular dynamics (DFT-MD) calculations to explore warm dense matter states of oxygen. Our simulations cover a wide density-temperature range of 1-100 g cm⌃{ -3}and 10⌃4-10⌃9 K. By combining results from PIMC and DFT-MD, we are able to compute pressures and internal energies from first-principles at all temperatures and provide a coherent equation of state. We compare our first-principles calculations with analytic equations of state, which tend to agree for temperatures above 8 x 10⌃6 K. Pair-correlation functions and the electronic density of states reveal an evolving plasma structure and ionization process that is driven by temperature and density. As we increase the density at constant temperature, we find that the ionization fraction of the 1s state decreases while the other electronic states move towards the continuum. Finally, the computed shock Hugoniot curves show an increase in compression as the first and second shells are ionized. This work is funded by the DOE (DE-SC0010517).

  17. Radiation in fog: quantification of the impact on fog liquid water based on ground-based remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wærsted, Eivind G.; Haeffelin, Martial; Dupont, Jean-Charles; Delanoë, Julien; Dubuisson, Philippe

    2017-09-01

    Radiative cooling and heating impact the liquid water balance of fog and therefore play an important role in determining their persistence or dissipation. We demonstrate that a quantitative analysis of the radiation-driven condensation and evaporation is possible in real time using ground-based remote sensing observations (cloud radar, ceilometer, microwave radiometer). Seven continental fog events in midlatitude winter are studied, and the radiative processes are further explored through sensitivity studies. The longwave (LW) radiative cooling of the fog is able to produce 40-70 g m-2 h-1 of liquid water by condensation when the fog liquid water path exceeds 30 g m-2 and there are no clouds above the fog, which corresponds to renewing the fog water in 0.5-2 h. The variability is related to fog temperature and atmospheric humidity, with warmer fog below a drier atmosphere producing more liquid water. The appearance of a cloud layer above the fog strongly reduces the LW cooling relative to a situation with no cloud above; the effect is strongest for a low cloud, when the reduction can reach 100 %. Consequently, the appearance of clouds above will perturb the liquid water balance in the fog and may therefore induce fog dissipation. Shortwave (SW) radiative heating by absorption by fog droplets is smaller than the LW cooling, but it can contribute significantly, inducing 10-15 g m-2 h-1 of evaporation in thick fog at (winter) midday. The absorption of SW radiation by unactivated aerosols inside the fog is likely less than 30 % of the SW absorption by the water droplets, in most cases. However, the aerosols may contribute more significantly if the air mass contains a high concentration of absorbing aerosols. The absorbed radiation at the surface can reach 40-120 W m-2 during the daytime depending on the fog thickness. As in situ measurements indicate that 20-40 % of this energy is transferred to the fog as sensible heat, this surface absorption can contribute

  18. Thermomechanical and hygroelastic properties of an epoxy system under humid and cold-warm cycling conditions

    KAUST Repository

    El Yagoubi, Jalal

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we study the hygrothermal aging of an anhydride-cured epoxy under temperature and hygrometry conditions simulating those experienced by an aircraft in wet tropical or subtropical regions. Gravimetric and dimensional measurements were performed and they indicate that there are three stages in this aging process: the first one, corresponding to the early cycles can be called the "induction stage". The second stage of about 1000 cycles duration, could be named the "swelling stage", during which the volume increase is almost equal to the volume of the (liquid) water absorbed. Both the first and second stages are accompanied by modifications of the mechanical properties and the glass transition temperature. During the third ("equilibrium") stage, up to 3000 cycles, there is no significant change in the physical properties despite the continuous increase of water uptake. This can be explained by the fact that only physically sorbed water can influence physical properties. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Image quality, meteorological optical range, and fog particulate number evaluation using the Sandia National Laboratories fog chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birch, Gabriel C.; Woo, Bryana L.; Sanchez, Andres L.; Knapp, Haley

    2017-08-01

    The evaluation of optical system performance in fog conditions typically requires field testing. This can be challenging due to the unpredictable nature of fog generation and the temporal and spatial nonuniformity of the phenomenon itself. We describe the Sandia National Laboratories fog chamber, a new test facility that enables the repeatable generation of fog within a 55 m×3 m×3 m (L×W×H) environment, and demonstrate the fog chamber through a series of optical tests. These tests are performed to evaluate system image quality, determine meteorological optical range (MOR), and measure the number of particles in the atmosphere. Relationships between typical optical quality metrics, MOR values, and total number of fog particles are described using the data obtained from the fog chamber and repeated over a series of three tests.

  20. Link between K-absorption edges and thermodynamic properties of warm-dense plasmas established by improved first-principles method

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Shen; Kang, Wei; Zhang, Ping; He, Xian-Tu

    2015-01-01

    A precise calculation that translates shifts of X-ray K-absorption edges to variations of thermodynamic properties allows quantitative characterization of interior thermodynamic properties of warm dense plasmas by X-ray absorption techniques, which provides essential information for inertial confinement fusion and other astrophysical applications. We show that this interpretation can be achieved through an improved first-principles method. Our calculation shows that the shift of K-edges exhibits selective sensitivity to thermal parameters and thus would be a suitable temperature index to warm dense plasmas. We also show with a simple model that the shift of K-edges can be used to detect inhomogeneity inside warm dense plasmas when combined with other experimental tools.

  1. Coalescence of fog droplets: Differential fog water deposition on wet and dry forest canopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobón, C.; Barrero, J.

    2010-07-01

    The Páramo ecosystem is a high-altitude (2800 - 4500 masl), natural ecosystems which comprises approximately 42000 km2, extending across the Andes from north of Peru, Ecuador, Colombia and western part of Venezuela. Andean páramos are widely considered to be prime suppliers of large volumes of high-quality water for large cities and for hydropower production. As páramos tend to be subjected to persistent fog incidence, fog interception by the vegetation is a common process in these ecosystems, representing not only an extra input of water to the ecosystem but also to suppress evaporation. In this process, small drops of water, transported by the wind, are captured by the surfaces of the vegetation, acting as physical obstacles to the flow of fog. These drops condense in the exposed surfaces and drip towards the ground or evaporate from the surfaces. The quantification of the magnitude of these processes is important for the quantification of the water balance of river basins where these types of ecosystems exist. Although the great hydrological importance of fog in montane tropical ecosystems little is known about its physical principles related to the interception of fog by physical barriers as vegetation, notably the differential behaviour of a wet and dry vegetation in the efficiency of capturing water from the fog. To characterize and quantify this efficiency of páramo vegetation in capturing water from the fog, during wet and dry canopy conditions, an experimental design was set up at the Páramo de Chingaza (Colombia) where paired samples of espeletia branches (dry and wet) were exposed to different fog events, and at the same time Juvik cylinders were exposed by the side of the experimental site, to measured fog inputs. Cylinders were also paired (wet and dry) at the beginning of the experiments. Results indicated that exposed wet and dry samples have a significant difference on the magnitude of water intercepted from the fog, being, in average, the wet

  2. Experimental Study Of Fog Water Harvesting By Stainless Steel Mesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikhil R. Pawar

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The collection of fog water is a simple and sustainable technology to get hold of fresh water for various purposes. In areas where a substantial amount of fog can be obtained it is feasible to set up a stainless steel as well as black double layer plastic mesh structure for fog water harvesting. The mesh structure is directly exposed to the weather and the fog containing air is pushed through the active mesh surface by the wind. Afterward fog droplets are deposited on the active mesh area which combines to form superior droplets and run down into a gutter to storage by gravity. Fog water harvesting rates show a discrepancy from site to site. The scope of this experimental work is to review fog collection at SCOE Pune campus and to examine factors of success. This study is to synthesize the understanding of fog water harvesting in the institutional era and to analyze its benefits and boundaries for future development. The rate of fog water harvesting depends on the science of fog physics chemistry and its starring role in the hydrological cycle. This technology runs on zero energy and zeroes pollution level with cost of the benefit. The collected or treated clear water mainly could be used for different purposes as per requirement. For further development this technology public as well as government participation is needed.

  3. An analysis of fog events at Belgrade International Airport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veljović, Katarina; Vujović, Dragana; Lazić, Lazar; Vučković, Vladan

    2015-01-01

    A preliminary study of the occurrence of fog at Belgrade "Nikola Tesla" Airport was carried out using a statistical approach. The highest frequency of fog has occurred in the winter months of December and January and far exceeded the number of fog days in the spring and the beginning of autumn. The exceptionally foggy months, those having an extreme number of foggy days, occurred in January 1989 (18 days), December 1998 (18 days), February 2005 (17 days) and October 2001 (15 days). During the winter months (December, January and February) from 1990 to 2005 (16 years), fog occurred most frequently between 0600 and 1000 hours, and in the autumn, between 0500 and 0800 hours. In summer, fog occurred most frequently between 0300 and 0600 hours. During the 11-year period from 1995 to 2005, it was found that there was a 13 % chance for fog to occur on two consecutive days and a 5 % chance that it would occur 3 days in a row. In October 2001, the fog was observed over nine consecutive days. During the winter half year, 52.3 % of fog events observed at 0700 hours were in the presence of stratus clouds and 41.4 % were without the presence of low clouds. The 6-h cooling observed at the surface preceding the occurrence of fog between 0000 and 0700 hours ranged mainly from 1 to 4 °C. A new method was applied to assess the probability of fog occurrence based on complex fog criteria. It was found that the highest probability of fog occurrence (51.2 %) takes place in the cases in which the relative humidity is above 97 %, the dew-point depression is 0 °C, the cloud base is lower than 50 m and the wind is calm or weak 1 h before the onset of fog.

  4. Leveraging Cababilities of the National Laboratories and Academia to Understand the Properties of Warm Dense MgSiO3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattsson, Thomas R.; Townsend, Joshua P.; Shulenburger, Luke; Seagle, Christopher T.; Furnish, Michael D.; Fei, Yingwei

    2017-06-01

    For the past seven years, the Z Fundamental Science program has fostered collaboration between scientists at the national laboratories and academic research groups to utilize the Z-machine to explore properties of matter in extreme conditions. A recent example of this involves a collaboration between the Carnegie institution of Washington and Sandia to determine the properties of warm dense MgSiO3 by performing shock experiments using the Z-machine. To reach the higher densities desired, bridgmanite samples are being fabricated at Carnegie using multi-anvil presses. We will describe the preparations under way for these experiments, including pre-shot ab-initio calculations of the Hugoniot and the deployment of dual-layer flyer plates that allow for the measurement of sound velocities along the Hugoniot. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  5. Laparoscopic lens fogging: solving a common surgical problem in standard and robotic laparoscopes via a scientific model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Todd G; Papa, Nathan; Perera, Marlon; McGrath, Shannon; Christidis, Daniel; Khan, Munad; O'Beirne, Richard; Campbell, Nicholas; Bolton, Damien; Lawrentschuk, Nathan

    2017-08-08

    Laparoscopic lens fogging (LLF) hampers vision and impedes operative efficiency. Attempts to reduce LLF have led to the development of various anti-fogging fluids and warming devices. Limited literature exists directly comparing these techniques. We constructed a model peritoneum to simulate LLF and to compare the efficacy of various anti-fogging techniques. Intraperitoneal space was simulated using a suction bag suspended within an 8 L container of water. LLF was induced by varying the temperature and humidity within the model peritoneum. Various anti-fogging techniques were assessed including scope warmers, FRED(TM), Resoclear(TM), chlorhexidine, betadine and immersion in heated saline. These products were trialled with and without the use of a disposable scope warmer. Vision scores were evaluated by the same investigator for all tests and rated according to a predetermined scale. Fogging was assessed for each product or technique 30 times and a mean vision rating was recorded. All products tested imparted some benefit, but FRED(TM) performed better than all other techniques. Betadine and Resoclear(TM) performed no better than the use of a scope warmer alone. Immersion in saline prior to insertion resulted in decreased vision ratings. The robotic scope did not result in LLF within the model. In standard laparoscopes, the most superior preventative measure was FRED(TM) utilised on a pre-warmed scope. Despite improvements in LLF with other products FRED(TM) was better than all other techniques. The robotic laparoscope performed superiorly regarding LLF compared to standard laparoscope.

  6. Effect of gas mixing on physical properties of warm collisional helicon plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabir, M.; Niknam, A. R.

    2017-10-01

    The effect of inert gas mixing on the physical properties of a helicon plasma source with a Nagoya type III antenna is analytically investigated by taking into account the thermal and collisional effects. The dielectric permittivity tensor of this mixed gas plasma is obtained by using the Bhatnagar-Gross- Krook kinetic theory. Considering the dielectric tensor of mixed gas plasma and solving the electromagnetic field equations, the profiles of electromagnetic fields and plasma resistance are plotted and discussed. The results show that the plasma resistance peaks decrease with increasing Xe fraction in Ar-Xe plasma, and increase with the He fraction in Ar-He plasma. It is also shown that by increasing the xenon filling fraction, the electromagnetic field amplitudes are lowered, and by increasing the helium filling fraction, they are increased.

  7. Effects of pitch and shape for diffraction grating in LED fog lamp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsi-Chao; Lin, Jun-Yu; Wu, Jih-Huah; Ma, Shih-Hsin; Yang, Chi-Hao

    2011-10-01

    The characteristics of light-emitting diodes (LEDs) that make them energy-efficient and long-lasting light source for general illumination have attracted a great attention from the lighting industry and commercial market. As everyone know LEDs have the advantages of environmental protection, long lifetime, fast response time (μs), low voltage and good mechanical properties. Their high luminance and the wide region of the dominant wavelengths within the entire visible spectrum mean that people have high anticipations for the applications of LEDs. The output lighting from reflector in the traditional fog lamp was required to fit the standard of the ECE R19 F3 regulation. Therefore, this study investigated the effects of pitch and angle for a diffraction grating in LED fog lamp. The light pattern of fog lamp must be satisfied ECE regulations, so a design of diffraction grating to shift down the lighting was required. There are three LEDs (Cree XLamp XPE LEDs) as the light source in the fog lamp for the illumination efficiency. Then, an optimal simulation of diffraction grating was done for the pitch and angle of the diffraction grating at the test distance of 25 meters. The best pitch and angle was 2mm and 60 degree for the grating shape of wedge type.

  8. Carbon speciation and surface tension of fog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capel, P.D.; Gunde, R.; Zurcher, F.; Giger, W.

    1990-01-01

    The speciation of carbon (dissolved/particulate, organic/inorganic) and surface tension of a number of radiation fogs from the urban area of Zurich, Switzerland, were measured. The carbon species were dominated by "dissolved" organic carbon (DOC; i.e., the fraction that passes through a filter), which was typically present at levels of 40-200 mg/L. Less than 10% of the DOC was identified as specific individual organic compounds. Particulate organic carbon (POC) accounted for 26-41% of the mass of the particles, but usually less than 10% of the total organic carbon mass. Inorganic carbon species were relatively minor. The surface tensions of all the measured samples were less than pure water and were correlated with their DOC concentrations. The combination of high DOC and POC and low surface tension suggests a mechanism for the concentration of hydrophobic organic contaminants in the fog droplet, which have been observed by numerous investigators. ?? 1990 American Chemical Society.

  9. Statistical modeling of optical attenuation measurements in continental fog conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Muhammad Saeed; Amin, Muhammad; Awan, Muhammad Saleem; Minhas, Abid Ali; Saleem, Jawad; Khan, Rahimdad

    2017-03-01

    Free-space optics is an innovative technology that uses atmosphere as a propagation medium to provide higher data rates. These links are heavily affected by atmospheric channel mainly because of fog and clouds that act to scatter and even block the modulated beam of light from reaching the receiver end, hence imposing severe attenuation. A comprehensive statistical study of the fog effects and deep physical understanding of the fog phenomena are very important for suggesting improvements (reliability and efficiency) in such communication systems. In this regard, 6-months real-time measured fog attenuation data are considered and statistically investigated. A detailed statistical analysis related to each fog event for that period is presented; the best probability density functions are selected on the basis of Akaike information criterion, while the estimates of unknown parameters are computed by maximum likelihood estimation technique. The results show that most fog attenuation events follow normal mixture distribution and some follow the Weibull distribution.

  10. Risky driving in fog : psychological explanations

    OpenAIRE

    CAVALLO, V; CARO, S; DORE, J; COLOMB, M; DUMONT, E

    2007-01-01

    Fog doubles the risk of accidents and modifies driving behaviour in a way that leads to greater risk-taking. Traffic studies indicate that most drivers adopt excessive speeds and insufficient headways in foggy conditions. Yet our understanding of the psychological processes underlying this common but unsuitable behaviour, and the effectiveness of road safety measures, remain limited. Two main hypotheses have been put forward. The first one, stemming from social psychology, evokes a deteriorat...

  11. Fog in the coastal region of southern Brazil: seasonal variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krusche, N.; Gomes, C.

    2009-05-01

    Fog forecasting, especially advection fog, is important because a large port is located at Rio Grande, 32° S and 52° W. Fogs discontinue the cargo transport and prevent entrance of ships in the port, causing great financial loss. Atmospheric and oceanographic conditions associated to fog formation are been investigated, especially those that happen during advection fog. The result of this characterization will facilitate the forecast using mesoscale numerical models. The research started with a climatology of fog in the region, in two locations which are 2° of latitude apart, with an average temperature difference of 3°C. The observation of fog is a standard record at conventional meteorological stations. Data from this study was obtained from the Meteorological Station of Rio Grande, which belongs to the Instituto Nacional de Meteorologia network, and from the Meteorological Station operated by the Division of Meteorology of Department of Airspace Control in Porto Alegre. The period of this study is from January 1990 to December 2005. The distribution of the monthly total of fog observations shows that they occur mainly between May and August, with maximum in June. In all seasons of the year the total number of fogs is greater than in Porto Alegre in Rio Grande. There was a decrease in the average annual number of fogs from the 90s to the last five years of research, which can be attributed to urbanization around the places of observation. It increases the temperature in the layers closer to the soil and decreases the available moisture, making the occurrence of radiation fog. Atmospheric and oceanographic conditions, prevalent during these occurrences, will be examined next. The another goal is to compare the data of advection fog in Rio Grande, obtained from images of the type ARGUS in Cassino beach, with those recorded by Meteorological Station. This work is partially financed by FINEP and CAPES.

  12. Equation of state and transport property measurements of warm dense matter.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knudson, Marcus D.; Desjarlais, Michael Paul

    2009-10-01

    Location of the liquid-vapor critical point (c.p.) is one of the key features of equation of state models used in simulating high energy density physics and pulsed power experiments. For example, material behavior in the location of the vapor dome is critical in determining how and when coronal plasmas form in expanding wires. Transport properties, such as conductivity and opacity, can vary an order of magnitude depending on whether the state of the material is inside or outside of the vapor dome. Due to the difficulty in experimentally producing states near the vapor dome, for all but a few materials, such as Cesium and Mercury, the uncertainty in the location of the c.p. is of order 100%. These states of interest can be produced on Z through high-velocity shock and release experiments. For example, it is estimated that release adiabats from {approx}1000 GPa in aluminum would skirt the vapor dome allowing estimates of the c.p. to be made. This is within the reach of Z experiments (flyer plate velocity of {approx}30 km/s). Recent high-fidelity EOS models and hydrocode simulations suggest that the dynamic two-phase flow behavior observed in initial scoping experiments can be reproduced, providing a link between theory and experiment. Experimental identification of the c.p. in aluminum would represent the first measurement of its kind in a dynamic experiment. Furthermore, once the c.p. has been experimentally determined it should be possible to probe the electrical conductivity, opacity, reflectivity, etc. of the material near the vapor dome, using a variety of diagnostics. We propose a combined experimental and theoretical investigation with the initial emphasis on aluminum.

  13. On the Influence of a Simple Microphysics Parametrization on Radiation Fog Modelling: A Case Study During ParisFog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaojing; Musson-Genon, Luc; Dupont, Eric; Milliez, Maya; Carissimo, Bertrand

    2014-05-01

    A detailed numerical simulation of a radiation fog event with a single column model is presented, which takes into account recent developments in microphysical parametrizations. One-dimensional simulations are performed using the computational fluid dynamics model Code_Saturne and the results are compared to a very detailed in situ dataset collected during the ParisFog campaign, which took place near Paris, France, during the winter 2006-2007. Special attention is given to the detailed and complete diurnal simulations and to the role of microphysics in the fog life cycle. The comparison between the simulated and the observed visibility, in the single-column model case study, shows that the evolution of radiation fog is correctly simulated. Sensitivity simulations show that fog development and dissipation are sensitive to the droplet-size distribution through sedimentation/deposition processes but the aerosol number concentration in the coarse mode has a low impact on the time of fog formation.

  14. NEOSURVEY 1: INITIAL RESULTS FROM THE WARM SPITZER EXPLORATION SCIENCE SURVEY OF NEAR-EARTH OBJECT PROPERTIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trilling, David E.; Mommert, Michael [Department of Physics and Astronomy, PO Box 6010, Northern Arizona University, Flagstaff, AZ 86011 (United States); Hora, Joseph; Fazio, Giovanni; Smith, Howard [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, MS-65, Cambridge, MA 02138-1516 (United States); Chesley, Steve [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Emery, Joshua [Department of Earth and Planetary Science, University of Tennessee, 306 EPS Building, 1412 Circle Drive, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Harris, Alan [German Aerospace Center (DLR), Institute of Planetary Research, Rutherfordstrasse 2, 12489, Berlin (Germany); Mueller, Michael [SRON, Netherlands Institute for Space Research, PO Box 800, 9700AV Groningen (Netherlands)

    2016-12-01

    Near-Earth objects (NEOs) are small solar system bodies whose orbits bring them close to the Earth’s orbit. We are carrying out a Warm Spitzer Cycle 11 Exploration Science program entitled NEOSurvey—a fast and efficient flux-limited survey of 597 known NEOs in which we derive a diameter and albedo for each target. The vast majority of our targets are too faint to be observed by NEOWISE, though a small sample has been or will be observed by both observatories, which allows for a cross-check of our mutual results. Our primary goal is to create a large and uniform catalog of NEO properties. We present here the first results from this new program: fluxes and derived diameters and albedos for 80 NEOs, together with a description of the overall program and approach, including several updates to our thermal model. The largest source of error in our diameter and albedo solutions, which derive from our single-band thermal emission measurements, is uncertainty in η , the beaming parameter used in our thermal modeling; for albedos, improvements in solar system absolute magnitudes would also help significantly. All data and derived diameters and albedos from this entire program are being posted on a publicly accessible Web page at nearearthobjects.nau.edu.

  15. Impacts of the Manaus pollution plume on the microphysical properties of Amazonian warm-phase clouds in the wet season

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecchini, Micael A.; Machado, Luiz A. T.; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Mei, Fan; Wang, Jian; Fan, Jiwen; Tomlinson, Jason M.; Schmid, Beat; Albrecht, Rachel; Martin, Scot T.; Artaxo, Paulo

    2016-06-01

    The remote atmosphere over the Amazon can be similar to oceanic regions in terms of aerosol conditions and cloud type formations. This is especially true during the wet season. The main aerosol-related disturbances over the Amazon have both natural sources, such as dust transport from Africa, and anthropogenic sources, such as biomass burning or urban pollution. The present work considers the impacts of the latter on the microphysical properties of warm-phase clouds by analysing observations of the interactions between the Manaus pollution plume and its surroundings, as part of the GoAmazon2014/5 Experiment. The analysed period corresponds to the wet season (specifically from February to March 2014 and corresponding to the first Intensive Operating Period (IOP1) of GoAmazon2014/5). The droplet size distributions reported are in the range 1 µm ≤ D ≤ 50 µm in order to capture the processes leading up to the precipitation formation. The wet season largely presents a clean background atmosphere characterized by frequent rain showers. As such, the contrast between background clouds and those affected by the Manaus pollution can be observed and detailed. The focus is on the characteristics of the initial microphysical properties in cumulus clouds predominantly at their early stages. The pollution-affected clouds are found to have smaller effective diameters and higher droplet number concentrations. The differences range from 10 to 40 % for the effective diameter and are as high as 1000 % for droplet concentration for the same vertical levels. The growth rates of droplets with altitude are slower for pollution-affected clouds (2.90 compared to 5.59 µm km-1), as explained by the absence of bigger droplets at the onset of cloud development. Clouds under background conditions have higher concentrations of larger droplets (> 20 µm) near the cloud base, which would contribute significantly to the growth rates through the collision-coalescence process. The overall shape

  16. Impacts of the Manaus pollution plume on the microphysical properties of Amazonian warm-phase clouds in the wet season

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cecchini, Micael A.; Machado, Luiz A. T.; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Mei, Fan; Wang, Jian; Fan, Jiwen; Tomlinson, Jason M.; Schmid, Beat; Albrecht, Rachel; Martin, Scot T.; Artaxo, Paulo

    2016-01-01

    The remote atmosphere over the Amazon can be similar to oceanic regions in terms of aerosol conditions and cloud type formations. This is especially true during the wet season. The main aerosol-related disturbances over the Amazon have both natural sources, such as dust transport from Africa, and anthropogenic sources, such as biomass burning or urban pollution. The present work considers the impacts of the latter on the microphysical properties of warm-phase clouds by analysing observations of the interactions between the Manaus pollution plume and its surroundings, as part of the GoAmazon2014/5 Experiment. The analysed period corresponds to the wet season (specifically from February to March 2014 and corresponding to the first Intensive Operating Period (IOP1) of GoAmazon2014/5). The droplet size distributions reported are in the range 1 µm ≤ D≤50 µm in order to capture the processes leading up to the precipitation formation. The wet season largely presents a clean background atmosphere characterized by frequent rain showers. As such, the contrast between background clouds and those affected by the Manaus pollution can be observed and detailed. The focus is on the characteristics of the initial microphysical properties in cumulus clouds predominantly at their early stages. The pollution-affected clouds are found to have smaller effective diameters and higher droplet number concentrations. The differences range from 10 to 40% for the effective diameter and are as high as 1000% for droplet concentration for the same vertical levels. The growth rates of droplets with altitude are slower for pollution-affected clouds (2.90 compared to 5.59 µm km₋1), as explained by the absence of bigger droplets at the onset of cloud development. Clouds under background conditions have higher concentrations of larger droplets (>20 µm) near the cloud base, which would contribute significantly to the growth rates through the collision

  17. Impacts of the Manaus pollution plume on the microphysical properties of Amazonian warm-phase clouds in the wet season

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Cecchini

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The remote atmosphere over the Amazon can be similar to oceanic regions in terms of aerosol conditions and cloud type formations. This is especially true during the wet season. The main aerosol-related disturbances over the Amazon have both natural sources, such as dust transport from Africa, and anthropogenic sources, such as biomass burning or urban pollution. The present work considers the impacts of the latter on the microphysical properties of warm-phase clouds by analysing observations of the interactions between the Manaus pollution plume and its surroundings, as part of the GoAmazon2014/5 Experiment. The analysed period corresponds to the wet season (specifically from February to March 2014 and corresponding to the first Intensive Operating Period (IOP1 of GoAmazon2014/5. The droplet size distributions reported are in the range 1 µm ≤ D ≤ 50 µm in order to capture the processes leading up to the precipitation formation. The wet season largely presents a clean background atmosphere characterized by frequent rain showers. As such, the contrast between background clouds and those affected by the Manaus pollution can be observed and detailed. The focus is on the characteristics of the initial microphysical properties in cumulus clouds predominantly at their early stages. The pollution-affected clouds are found to have smaller effective diameters and higher droplet number concentrations. The differences range from 10 to 40 % for the effective diameter and are as high as 1000 % for droplet concentration for the same vertical levels. The growth rates of droplets with altitude are slower for pollution-affected clouds (2.90 compared to 5.59 µm km−1, as explained by the absence of bigger droplets at the onset of cloud development. Clouds under background conditions have higher concentrations of larger droplets (> 20 µm near the cloud base, which would contribute significantly to the growth rates through the

  18. Fog deposition to a Tillandsia carpet in the Atacama Desert

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Westbeld

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available In the Atacama Desert, one of the driest places on earth, fog deposition plays an important role for the water balance and for the survival of vulnerable ecosystems. The eddy covariance method, previously applied for the quantification of fog deposition to forests in various parts of the world, was used for the first time to measure deposition of fog water to a desert. In this exploratory study we estimate the amount of water available for the ecosystem by deposition and determine the relevant processes driving fog deposition. This is especially important for the species Tillandsia landbecki living in coastal Atacama at the limit of plant existence with fog and dew being the only sources of water. Between 31 July and 19 August 2008 approximately 2.5 L m−2 of water were made available through deposition. Whole-year deposition was estimated as 25 L m−2. Turbulent upward fluxes occurred several times during the evenings and are explained by the formation of radiation fog. In connection with that, underestimates of the deposition are assumed. More detailed studies covering various seasons and all parameters and fluxes contributing to the local energy balance are suggested. This will help to further develop understanding about the processes of (i deposition of water to the desert, and (ii intensification of advection fog through additional formation of radiation fog.

  19. Clearing the Fog from the Undergraduate Course in Linear Algebra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Damon

    2007-01-01

    For over a decade it has been a common observation that a "fog" passes over the course in linear algebra once abstract vector spaces are presented. See [2, 3]. We show how this fog may be cleared by having the students translate "abstract" vector-space problems to isomorphic "concrete" settings, solve the "concrete" problem either by hand or with…

  20. Detection, Imaging and Characterisation of Fog Fields by Radar

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Y.

    2016-01-01

    As a significant phenomenon in meteorology, fog has attracted more and more concern from the scientific community, because of its impacts on visibility in air- and road-transportation. E.g., at airports, the frequency of aircrafts taking off and landing has to be reduced during heavy fogs, because

  1. Steering of fogging: control of humidity: temperature or transpiration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stanghellini, C.; Kempkes, F.L.K.

    2008-01-01

    Fogging systems are increasingly used to cool greenhouses and prevent water stress. More recently, fogging systems are applied also in relatively low radiation environments (such as The Netherlands), for a better control of product quality than whitewashing and to reduce need for natural ventilation

  2. Fog Characteristics at Otis AFB, Massachusetts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-10-01

    records for the period � ^,񓎤 EDT from four selected fog nights are provided in Appendix C. 25 Lala et al (1975)* expanded the early modeling...water rather than deposition of moisture by direct condensation on the collection surface. Lala , G.G., E. Mandel and J.E. Jiusto, 1975: "A Numerical...on the amount of dew collected, so that the factor of 1.9 would not be attributable solely to the grass. Upon return to Buffalo, the measurements

  3. Radiation in fog: quantification of the impact on fog liquid water based on ground-based remote sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. G. Wærsted

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Radiative cooling and heating impact the liquid water balance of fog and therefore play an important role in determining their persistence or dissipation. We demonstrate that a quantitative analysis of the radiation-driven condensation and evaporation is possible in real time using ground-based remote sensing observations (cloud radar, ceilometer, microwave radiometer. Seven continental fog events in midlatitude winter are studied, and the radiative processes are further explored through sensitivity studies. The longwave (LW radiative cooling of the fog is able to produce 40–70 g m−2 h−1 of liquid water by condensation when the fog liquid water path exceeds 30 g m−2 and there are no clouds above the fog, which corresponds to renewing the fog water in 0.5–2 h. The variability is related to fog temperature and atmospheric humidity, with warmer fog below a drier atmosphere producing more liquid water. The appearance of a cloud layer above the fog strongly reduces the LW cooling relative to a situation with no cloud above; the effect is strongest for a low cloud, when the reduction can reach 100 %. Consequently, the appearance of clouds above will perturb the liquid water balance in the fog and may therefore induce fog dissipation. Shortwave (SW radiative heating by absorption by fog droplets is smaller than the LW cooling, but it can contribute significantly, inducing 10–15 g m−2 h−1 of evaporation in thick fog at (winter midday. The absorption of SW radiation by unactivated aerosols inside the fog is likely less than 30 % of the SW absorption by the water droplets, in most cases. However, the aerosols may contribute more significantly if the air mass contains a high concentration of absorbing aerosols. The absorbed radiation at the surface can reach 40–120 W m−2 during the daytime depending on the fog thickness. As in situ measurements indicate that 20–40 % of this energy is transferred to the fog

  4. Alternative Agents to Prevent Fogging in Head and Neck Endoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patorn Piromchai

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background The essential factor for diagnosis and treatment of diseases in head and neck endoscopy is the visibility of the image. An anti-fogging agent can reduce this problem by minimizing surface tension to prevent the condensation of water in the form of small droplets on a surface. There is no report on the use of hibiscrub ® or baby shampoo to reduce fogging in the literature. The objective of this study was to compare the efficacy between commercial anti-fogging agent, hibiscrub ® and baby shampoo to reduce fogging for the use in head and neck endoscopy. Methods The study was conducted at the Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Faculty of Medicine, Khon Kaen University in August 2010. Commercial anti-fogging agent, baby shampoo and hibiscrub ® were applied on rigid endoscope lens before putting them into a mist generator. The images were taken at baseline, 15 seconds, 30 seconds and 1 minute. The images' identifiers were removed before they were sent to two evaluators. A visual analogue scale (VAS was used to rate the image quality from 0 to 10. Results The difference in mean VAS score between anti-fogging agent, baby shampoo and hibiscrub ® versus no agent were 5.46, 4.45 and 2.1 respectively. The commercial anti-fogging agent and baby shampoo had most protective benefit and performed significantly better than no agent ( P < 0.05. Conclusions Baby shampoo is an effective agent to prevent fogging during head and neck endoscopy and compares favourably with commercial anti-fogging agent.

  5. Coastal Fog Sustains Summer Baseflow in Northern Californian Watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, M.; Dufour, A.; Leonardson, R.; Thompson, S. E.; Dawson, T. E.

    2015-12-01

    The Mediterranean climate of Northern California imposes significant water stress on ecosystems and water resources during the dry summer months. During summer, frequently the only water inputs occur as occult precipitation, in the form of fog and dew. In this study, we characterized the role of coastal fog, a dominant feature of Northern Californian coastal ecosystems and a widespread phenomenon associated with deep marine upwelling in west coast, arid, and Mediterranean climates worldwide. We monitored fog occurrence and intensity, throughfall following canopy interception of fog, soil moisture, streamflow, and meteorological variables, and made visual observations of the spatial extent of fog using time-lapse imagery in Upper Pilarcitos Creek Watershed (managed by San Francisco Public Utilities Commission as part of the San Francisco area water supply). We adopted a stratified sampling design that captured the watershed's elevation gradient, forest-edge versus interior locations, and different vegetation cover. The point-scale observations of throughfall inputs and transpiration suppression, estimated from the Penman equation, were upscaled using such watershed features and the observed fog "footprint" identified from the time-lapse images. When throughfall input and fog-induced transpiration suppression were incorporated into the operational watershed model, they improved estimates of summer baseflow, which remained persistently higher than could be explained without the fog effects. Fog, although providing relatively small volumetric inputs to the water balance, appears to offer significant relief of water stress throughout the terrestrial and aquatic components of the coastal Californian ecosystem and thus should be accounted for when assessing water stress availability in dry ecosystems.

  6. Leaf-trait responses to irrigation of the endemic fog-oasis tree Myrcianthes ferreyrae: can a fog specialist benefit from regular watering?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ramírez, David A; Balaguer, Luis; Mancilla, Rosa; González, Virginia; Coaguila, Daniel; Talavera, Carmelo; Villegas, Luis; Ortega, Aldo; Jiménez, Percy; Moreno, José M; Oren, Ram

    2012-01-01

    Myrcianthes ferreyrae is an endemic, endangered species, with a small number of individuals located only in hyperarid, fog-oases known as lomas along the Peruvian desert in southern Peru, where fog...

  7. Features of sound refraction in the atmosphere in fog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shagapov, V. Sh.; Sarapulova, V. V.

    2014-11-01

    The reflection and refraction of acoustic waves at the air-fog interface are considered. The phase velocity and the coefficient of sound damping for fog, as well as the reflection and refraction coefficients at normal and oblique incidences of a wave, are calculated. A dependence of the refraction angle on a frequency and the angle of acoustic wave incidence on the air-mist interface is studied. Based on the analytical expressions obtained and the analysis of numerical calculations, it is established that if a wave is incident from fog to the interface there is a critical angle of incidence so that total internal reflection occurs at greater angles. It is shown that the total internal reflection does not occur when a wave is incident from air on the air-fog interface.

  8. Humidification - Fogging and other evaporative cooling in greenhouses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nederhoff, E.M.; Weel, van P.A.

    2011-01-01

    Fogging, misting, roof sprinklers, pad-and-fan and other techniques based on water evaporation are effective tools for improving the growing conditions in a greenhouse when humidity is low. They should be used wisely though.

  9. Machine learning based Intelligent cognitive network using fog computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jingyang; Li, Lun; Chen, Genshe; Shen, Dan; Pham, Khanh; Blasch, Erik

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, a Cognitive Radio Network (CRN) based on artificial intelligence is proposed to distribute the limited radio spectrum resources more efficiently. The CRN framework can analyze the time-sensitive signal data close to the signal source using fog computing with different types of machine learning techniques. Depending on the computational capabilities of the fog nodes, different features and machine learning techniques are chosen to optimize spectrum allocation. Also, the computing nodes send the periodic signal summary which is much smaller than the original signal to the cloud so that the overall system spectrum source allocation strategies are dynamically updated. Applying fog computing, the system is more adaptive to the local environment and robust to spectrum changes. As most of the signal data is processed at the fog level, it further strengthens the system security by reducing the communication burden of the communications network.

  10. A Satellite Based Fog Study of the Korean Peninsula

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McDonald, David K

    2007-01-01

    Fog has always been a difficult phenomenon to forecast. Its unpredictable nature and propensity to quickly decrease visibilities have had adverse effects on military operations for many years across the Korean peninsula...

  11. Fog Collection and Sustainable Architecture in Atacama Coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suau, C.

    2010-07-01

    It is imperative to integrate renewable energy and climate into zero-carbon buildings in arid lands, particularly when it is reinforced by natural and social science-based innovation in natural and built environs. The aim is twofold: On one hand, to establish potential natural and urban habitats and their yields required in different scales of intervention and, on another hand, augment rate and yield of fog collection used for drinking and irrigation in chosen locations. The purpose of this study is to integrate zero-carbon energy, landscape and sustainable architecture as a whole and thus envision potential inhabitation through self-sufficient space-frame configurations along the coast of Tarapacá Region in Chile. In a sequential way, this study distinguishes three scales of interventions: A. Territorial scale. It consists of rural and natural zones along the shore of Tarapacá Region: Fog oases, creeks or corridors. The strategic allocation of large fog collectors can bring local agriculture back and thus stop rural emigration; and also repair existing fragile ecosystems in several fog oases by harvesting and distributing mainly crop water. B. Local scale. The space-frame fog collectors are allocated in Alto Patache (fog oasis) and Iquique city (low-income sprawl of Alto Hospicio). These artefacts can supply both water and electricity to small communities through forestation, sustainable micro-agriculture and complementary electrification. C. Domestic scale. It consists of the design of autonomous housing configuration based in polygonal space-frames. This inhabitable unit is modular, deployable and lightweight; with an adjustable polyvalent membrane which performs as water repellent skin (facing South and SW winds) and shading device facing Equator. In addition, a domestic wind turbine is installed within the structural frame to provide autonomous electrification. Water collector, filtering (purification) and irrigation network is designed with available

  12. Reliability in the utility computing era: Towards reliable Fog computing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Henrik; Burtschy, Bernard; Albeanu, G.

    2013-01-01

    This paper considers current paradigms in computing and outlines the most important aspects concerning their reliability. The Fog computing paradigm as a non-trivial extension of the Cloud is considered and the reliability of the networks of smart devices are discussed. Combining the reliability...... requirements of grid and cloud paradigms with the reliability requirements of networks of sensor and actuators it follows that designing a reliable Fog computing platform is feasible....

  13. A Satellite Based Fog Study of the Korean Peninsula

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-06-01

    Even though there have been many studies done in the U.S. and Europe, and much has been learned about the dynamics of fog for these regions over...visually enhanced to identify the fog (see Figure 3). Ice clouds like cirrus had a reversed difference value due to the increased transmissivity of...Climatic Data Summary ( OCDS ) for each station and was divided into the appropriate areas of interest from this study. AFCCC also produced modeled

  14. Fogging of Chlorine-Based Sporicidal Liquids for the ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Report The purpose of this investigation was to determine the sporicidal efficacy of a fogging technology using chlorine-based sporicidal liquids for inactivating bacterial spores (Bacillus [B.] atrophaeus, a surrogate for B. anthracis) in an office or indoor environment. The use of fogging technology to disseminate sporicidal solutions via microscopic droplets has the potential to be a less arduous, more economical volumetric decontamination alternative to fumigation.

  15. Retrieval of Fog Microphysical Parameters from NOAA AVHRR Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ling

    1995-01-01

    Identifying the droplet size distribution, frequency and location of land-based fog is valuable for climate studies, because of the effects on agricultural productivity projections, highway traffic safety, and urban pollution monitoring. It's especially important to the Central Valley of California, which frequently suffers lingering, heavy fog. Land-based fog plays an important role in surface radiation budgets, by blocking daytime solar heating and nocturnal long wave cooling. The droplet size distribution determines the optical depth and radiative attenuation of fog. An operational retrieval method for obtaining droplet size and optical depth has been developed for land -based fog from the multichannel NOAA (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration) AVHRR (Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer) digital image data. The visible and near infrared images provide the reflectances of both channels, which vary with droplet microphysical characteristics. The reflectances are interpolated to radiative cloud modeling results. A new field method has been used for obtaining the measurements of land-based fog microphysical and thermodynamic parameters. A tethered balloon carries a meteorological package and a cloud droplet imaging system which transfer the images to a recording system on the ground. The results from the satellite imagery at Esparto (ESP), California are well matched with field sampling results at the same location.

  16. Radiation in fog: Quantification of the impact on fog liquid water based on ground-based remote sensing

    OpenAIRE

    E. G. Wærsted; M. Haeffelin; J.-C. Dupont; J. Delanoë; P. Dubuisson

    2017-01-01

    Radiative cooling and heating impact the liquid water balance of fog and therefore play an important role in determining their persistence or dissipation. We demonstrate that a quantitative analysis of the radiation-driven condensation and evaporation is possible in real time using ground-based remote sensing observations (cloud radar, ceilometer, microwave radiometer). Seven continental fog events in midlatitude winter are studied, and the radiative processes are further ex...

  17. HARMONIC ANALYSIS OF LEAKAGE CURRENT OF SILICON RUBBER INSULATORS IN CLEAN-FOG AND SALT-FOG

    OpenAIRE

    Rostaghi-Chalaki, Mojtaba; Shayegani-Akmal, A,; Mohseni, H

    2013-01-01

    International audience; Environmental and electrical stresses have deterioration effects on Silicon Rubber (SIR) insulators. In coastal areas due to high amount of salt, humidity and dust suspended in the air, the deterioration process is intensive. In this paper, based on IEC 60507 the leakage current (LC) of 20kV SIR insulators has been investigated in clean-fog and salt-fog with and without artificial pollution. Tests have been executed with six similar SIR insulators. A pair of polluted a...

  18. Numerical simulation of radiation fog in complex terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X.; Musson-Genon, L.; Carissimo, B.; Dupont, E.

    2009-09-01

    The interest for micro-scale modeling of the atmosphere is growing for environmental applications related, for example, to energy production, transport and urban development. The turbulence in the stable layers where pollutant dispersion is low and can lead to strong pollution events. This could be further complicated by the presence of clouds or fog and is specifically difficult in urban or industrial area due to the presence of buildings. In this context, radiation fog formation and dissipation over complex terrain were therefore investigated with a state-of-the-art model. This study is divided into two phases. The first phase is a pilot stage, which consist of employing a database from the ParisFog campaign which took place in the south of Paris during winter 2006-07 to assess the ability of the cloud model to reproduce the detailed structure of radiation fog. The second phase use the validated model for the study of influence of complex terrain on fog evolution. Special attention is given to the detailed and complete simulations and validation technique used is to compare the simulated results using the 3D cloud model of computational fluid dynamical software Code_Saturne with one of the best collected in situ data during the ParisFog campaign. Several dynamical, microphysical parameterizations and simulation conditions have been described. The resulting 3D cloud model runs at a horizontal resolution of 30 m and a vertical resolution comparable to the 1D model. First results look very promising and are able to reproduce the spatial distribution of fog. The analysis of the behavior of the different parameterized physical processes suggests that the subtle balance between the various processes is achieved.

  19. Development of hybrid fog detection algorithm (FDA) using satellite and ground observation data for nighttime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, So-Hyeong; Han, Ji-Hae; Suh, Myoung-Seok

    2017-04-01

    In this study, we developed a hybrid fog detection algorithm (FDA) using AHI/Himawari-8 satellite and ground observation data for nighttime. In order to detect fog at nighttime, Dual Channel Difference (DCD) method based on the emissivity difference between SWIR and IR1 is most widely used. DCD is good at discriminating fog from other things (middle/high clouds, clear sea and land). However, it is difficult to distinguish fog from low clouds. In order to separate the low clouds from the pixels that satisfy the thresholds of fog in the DCD test, we conducted supplementary tests such as normalized local standard derivation (NLSD) of BT11 and the difference of fog top temperature (BT11) and air temperature (Ta) from NWP data (SST from OSTIA data). These tests are based on the larger homogeneity of fog top than low cloud tops and the similarity of fog top temperature and Ta (SST). Threshold values for the three tests were optimized through ROC analysis for the selected fog cases. In addition, considering the spatial continuity of fog, post-processing was performed to detect the missed pixels, in particular, at edge of fog or sub-pixel size fog. The final fog detection results are presented by fog probability (0 100 %). Validation was conducted by comparing fog detection probability with the ground observed visibility data from KMA. The validation results showed that POD and FAR are ranged from 0.70 0.94 and 0.45 0.72, respectively. The quantitative validation and visual inspection indicate that current FDA has a tendency to over-detect the fog. So, more works which reducing the FAR is needed. In the future, we will also validate sea fog using CALIPSO data.

  20. Elemental Carbon in Highly Polluted Urban Fog in South Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, J.; Khan, A. J.; Khan, A. R.; Ghauri, B. M.; Mirza, M. I.; Husain, L.

    2002-12-01

    Since 1998 severe winter fogs frequently occurred in Northeastern Pakistan and India. These fogs were closely related to the heavy load of aerosols and gases in the atmosphere due to the increasing emissions by the rapid industrialization in this region. In this study, aerosol data including elemental and organic carbon (EC, OC), sulfate and trace element concentrations were determined during two particularly severe fog periods at Lahore, Pakistan. In the first episode, TSP samples were collected on Whatmann 41 filters with high-volume samplers every 12 hour during and after a heavy fog event from January 1 to 5, 1999. A technique had been developed to transfer EC to quartz filter without loss for analysis with thermal-optical method. High EC concentrations were found up to 25μg/m3. Extremely high sulfate concentration was found, up to 100μg/m3. The SO4/Se ratio and trace element factor analysis suggested sulfate were formed from a distant source of hundreds of kilometers away. In the second episode, TSP samples were collected on quartz filters in 6-hour (daytime) and 12-hour (nighttime) intervals for both EC and OC measurements during December 25-31, 1999 with different fog types (very light, light, medium and heavy) and without fog. High EC and OC concentrations ranging in 10 to 25μg/m3 and 100 to 300μg/m3 were observed. EC and OC had a high correlation with stable EC/OC ratios within 8 to 16%, which suggested EC and OC in aerosols were from the same source. High sulfate concentrations were also observed, 25 to 55μg/m3. The SO4/Se ratio and trace element factor analysis also suggested sulfate were formed during the fog period. Particularly, SO4/EC ratios had a very strong relation with fog types and sunlight strength. In daytime, the ratio obviously increased with sunlight strength, and significantly changed with and without fog. In nighttime, the ratio generally increased with fog density. Compared to sulfate profile, SO4/EC ratio could show photochemical

  1. On the roles of circulation and aerosols in the decline of mist and dense fog in Europe over the last 30 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. J. van Oldenborgh

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Fog and mist are meteorological phenomena that have significant contributions to temperature variations. Understanding and predicting them is also crucial for transportation risk management. It has been shown that low visibility phenomena over Europe have been declining over the past three decades. The trends in mist and haze have been correlated to atmospheric aerosol trends. However, dense fog has not received yet such focus. The goal of this paper is to examine the roles of synoptic atmospheric circulation and aerosol content on the trends of dense fog. We show that sulphur emission trends are spatially correlated with visibility trends, with a maximum correlation when visibility is between 1 km and 10 km. We find that atmospheric dynamics overall contributes up to 40% of the variability of the frequency of fog occurrences. This contribution is spatially variable and highly depends on the topography and the season, with higher values in the winter. The observed long-term circulation changes do not contribute much to the trends in low visibility found in the data. This process is illustrated on three stations (De Bilt, Zürich Airport and Potsdam for which a long-term visibility data and a thorough meteorological description are available. We conclude that to properly represent fog in future climate simulations, it is necessary to include realistic representations of aerosol emissions and chemistry, land surface properties and atmospheric dynamics.

  2. Outdoor FSO Communications Under Fog: Attenuation Modeling and Performance Evaluation

    KAUST Repository

    Esmail, Maged Abdullah

    2016-07-18

    Fog is considered to be a primary challenge for free space optics (FSO) systems. It may cause attenuation that is up to hundreds of decibels per kilometer. Hence, accurate modeling of fog attenuation will help telecommunication operators to engineer and appropriately manage their networks. In this paper, we examine fog measurement data coming from several locations in Europe and the United States and derive a unified channel attenuation model. Compared with existing attenuation models, our proposed model achieves a minimum of 9 dB, which is lower than the average root-mean-square error (RMSE). Moreover, we have investigated the statistical behavior of the channel and developed a probabilistic model under stochastic fog conditions. Furthermore, we studied the performance of the FSO system addressing various performance metrics, including signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), bit-error rate (BER), and channel capacity. Our results show that in communication environments with frequent fog, FSO is typically a short-range data transmission technology. Therefore, FSO will have its preferred market segment in future wireless fifth-generation/sixth-generation (5G/6G) networks having cell sizes that are lower than a 1-km diameter. Moreover, the results of our modeling and analysis can be applied in determining the switching/thresholding conditions in highly reliable hybrid FSO/radio-frequency (RF) networks.

  3. Diurnal temperature asymmetries and fog at Churchill, Manitoba

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gough, William A.; He, Dianze

    2015-07-01

    A variety of methods are available to calculate daily mean temperature. We explore how the difference between two commonly used methods provides insight into the local climate of Churchill, Manitoba. In particular, we found that these differences related closely to seasonal fog. A strong statistically significant correlation was found between the fog frequency (hours per day) and the diurnal temperature asymmetries of the surface temperature using the difference between the min/max and 24-h methods of daily temperature calculation. The relationship was particularly strong for winter, spring and summer. Autumn appears to experience the joint effect of fog formation and the radiative effect of snow cover. The results of this study suggests that subtle variations of diurnality of temperature, as measured in the difference of the two mean temperature methods of calculation, may be used as a proxy for fog detection in the Hudson Bay region. These results also provide a cautionary note for the spatial analysis of mean temperatures using data derived from the two different methods particularly in areas that are fog prone.

  4. Leakage Current Waveforms and Arcing Characteristics of Epoxy Resin for Outdoor Insulators under Clean and Salt Fogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suwarno

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Ceramic outdoor insulators have been used in high voltage transmission lines since long time ago. Due to superiority in their resistance to pollution, recently, polymeric outdoor insulators are widely used. Epoxy resin is one polymer which shows good properties for outdoor insulation. During service, outdoor insulators may severe a certain degree of pollution which may reduce their surface resistance. Leakage current (LC usually increase and degradation may take place. This paper reports experimental results on the leakage current waveforms and arcing characteristics of epoxy resin under clean and salt fog. The samples used are blocks of epoxy resin with dimension of 250 x 50 x 20 mm3. The samples were put in a test chamber with dimension of 900x900x1200 mm3 with controllable humidity and pollution conditions. Clean and salt fog were generated according to IEC 60-1 and 507. The arcing experiment was done with incline plane test in accordance with IEC 587. AC voltage in the range from 5 kV to 50 kV with frequency of 50 Hz was applied. The LC waveforms up to flash over were measured. The magnitudes as well as harmonic content of the LC were analyzed. The correlation between LC waveforms and dry band arching phenomenon was elaborated. Visual observation of the arc on the sample surfaces was observed using a video camera. Experimental results indicated that LC magnitude on clean samples was slightly affected by humidity (RH. However, under salt fog, RH greatly affected the LC magnitude. The flashover voltage of clean samples under salt fog reduced significantly for fog conductivity of more than 1.2 mS/cm. Kaolin-polluted samples under salt fog showed an Ohmic behaviour. The LC magnitude was high and a large discrepancy of LC magnitude was observed for high applied voltage of larger than 25 kV. The largest LC magnitude was observed on salt-kaolin polluted samples under clean fog at high RH. LC waveforms analysis indicated that in general LC waveforms

  5. Supermicron modes of ammonium ions related to fog in rural atmosphere

    OpenAIRE

    X. H. Yao; L. Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Fog-processed aerosols were identified and analyzed in detail from a large-sized database in which size-segregated atmospheric particles and gases were simultaneously measured at eight Canadian rural sites. In ten samples collected during or following fog events, at least one supermicron mode of particulate NH4+ was observed. The supermicron modes were likely associated with fog events since they were absent on non-fog days. The supermicron mode o...

  6. 76 FR 44906 - Foremost 4809-ES Insect-O-Fog; Amended Cancellation Order

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-27

    ... 4809-ES Insect-O-Fog; Amended Cancellation Order AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION...), of an amended cancellation order for the pesticide product Foremost 4809-ES Insect-O-Fog, a pesticide product containing Piperonyl Butoxide and Pyrethrins. The registrant of Foremost 4809-ES Insect-O-Fog...

  7. Heat transfer from a high temperature condensable mixture. II. Sedimentation of fog condensate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Condiff, D.W.; Cho, D.H.; Chan, S.H.

    1985-01-01

    A kinematic wave analysis of fog sedimentation is employed to relate growth of a fog condensate deposit layer to radiation generated fog formation rates. The increase of surface radiation absorptivity with deposit layer thickness promotes a feedback mechanism for higher growth rates, which is evaluated in detail.

  8. A Molecular Explanation of How the Fog Is Produced When Dry Ice Is Placed in Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuntzleman, Thomas S.; Ford, Nathan; No, Jin-Hwan; Ott, Mark E.

    2015-01-01

    Everyone enjoys seeing the cloudy white fog generated when solid carbon dioxide (dry ice) is placed in water. Have you ever wondered what physical and chemical processes occur to produce this fog? When asked this question, many chemical educators suggest that the fog is produced when atmospheric water vapor condenses on cold carbon dioxide gas…

  9. Probabilistic Model for Free-Space Optical Links Under Continental Fog Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzuki

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The error characteristics of a free-space optical (FSO channel are significantly different from the fiber based optical links and thus require a deep physical understanding of the propagation channel. In particular different fog conditions greatly influence the optical transmissions and thus a channel model is required to estimate the detrimental fog effects. In this paper we shall present the probabilistic model for radiation fog from the measured data over a 80 m FSO link installed at Graz, Austria. The fog events are classified into thick fog, moderate fog, light fog and general fog based on the international code of visibility range. We applied some probability distribution functions (PDFs such as Kumaraswamy, Johnson SB and Logistic distribution, to the actual measured optical attenuations. The performance of each distribution is evaluated by Q-Q and P-P plots. It is found that Kumaraswamy distribution is the best fit for general fog, while Logistic distribution is the optimum choice for thick fog. On the other hand, Johnson SB distribution best fits the moderate and light fog related measured attenuation data. The difference in these probabilistic models and the resultant variation in the received signal strength under different fog types needs to be considered in designing an efficient FSO system.

  10. Fog-water harvesting along the West Coast of South Africa: a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Many parts of the West Coast of South Africa experience severe water shortages throughout the year. Despite the meager rainfall, however, the region is subject to a high incidence of fog which might provide water for water-poor communities. This paper investigates the fog water potential of the area. Since fog water ...

  11. Observations and modeling of fog by cloud radar and optical sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Y.; Hoogeboom, P.; Russchenberg, H.

    2014-01-01

    Fog is a significant factor affecting the public traffic because visibility is reduced to a large extent. Therefore the determination of optical visibility in fog from radar instruments has received much interest. To observe fog with radar, high frequency bands (millimeter waves) have the best

  12. Average-atom model for two-temperature states and ionic transport properties of aluminum in the warm dense matter regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Yong; Fu, Yongsheng; Bredow, Richard; Kang, Dongdong; Redmer, Ronald; Yuan, Jianmin

    2017-03-01

    The average-atom model combined with the hyper-netted chain approximation is an efficient tool for electronic and ionic structure calculations for warm dense matter. Here we generalize this method in order to describe non-equilibrium states with different electron and ion temperature as produced in laser-matter interactions on ultra-short time scales. In particular, the electron-ion and ion-ion correlation effects are considered when calculating the electron structure. We derive an effective ion-ion pair-potential using the electron densities in the framework of temperature-depended density functional theory. Using this ion-ion potential we perform molecular dynamics simulations in order to determine the ionic transport properties such as the ionic diffusion coefficient and the shear viscosity through the ionic velocity autocorrelation functions.

  13. Scavenging of urban air emissions by Fog at Delhi, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, P.; Kulshrestha, U. C.

    2015-12-01

    The present study focuses upon the understanding of fog water chemistry in Delhi city. Total seventy fog water samples were collected at two different sites in Delhi during December 2014 to March 2015. Selected parameters such as pH, major anions (Cl-, F-, NO3- and SO42-) and major cations (NH4+, K+, Ca2+, Mg2+, Na+) were determined in the samples. The pH of the fog water collected during the monitoring period at Site I (traffic intersection) varied from 4.68 to 5.58 indicating the acidic nature of fog water while at the site II (green cover area), it ranged from 6.11 to 6.88 having slightly lower acidity. At the Site I, the average concentration of Cl-, Na+, SO42-, NH4+ was recorded as 1.5 X 10-2, 8 X 10-3, 4 X 10-3 and 1 X 10-2 μEqu/L respectively. Such values of ionic species may be attributed to the local sources, including factories, motor vehicle emissions and civil construction etc. However, non-local sources such as moderate- and long-range transport of sea salt also had significant influence on ionic content of fog water. In general the Na+ ratio values were found to be higher side suggesting the influence of non-marine sources. Extremely high values of Cl-/ Na+ ratios indicated the contribution from combustion of organochlorine compounds. Hence, the higher ratios of inorganic ions and acidic pH revealed that fog is an effective mechanism for the scavenging of various pollutants emitted by different sources in the city.

  14. THE EFFECT OF WARM DARK MATTER ON GALAXY PROPERTIES: CONSTRAINTS FROM THE STELLAR MASS FUNCTION AND THE TULLY-FISHER RELATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Xi [Purple Mountain Observatory, the Partner Group of MPI fuer Astronomie, 2 West Beijing Road, Nanjing 210008 (China); Maccio, Andrea V.; Dutton, Aaron A. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2013-04-10

    In this paper, we combine high-resolution N-body simulations with a semi-analytical model of galaxy formation to study the effects of a possible warm dark matter (WDM) component on the observable properties of galaxies. We compare three WDM models with a dark matter (DM) mass of 0.5, 0.75, and 2.0 keV with the standard cold dark matter case. For a fixed set of parameters describing the baryonic physics, the WDM models predict fewer galaxies at low (stellar) masses, as expected due to the suppression of power on small scales, while no substantial difference is found at the high-mass end. However, these differences in the stellar mass function vanish when a different set of parameters is used to describe the (largely unknown) galaxy formation processes. We show that it is possible to break this degeneracy between DM properties and the parameterization of baryonic physics by combining observations on the stellar mass function with the Tully-Fisher relation (the relation between stellar mass and the rotation velocity at large galactic radii as probed by resolved H I rotation curves). WDM models with a too warm candidate (m{sub {nu}} < 0.75 keV) cannot simultaneously reproduce the stellar mass function and the Tully-Fisher relation. We conclude that accurate measurements of the galaxy stellar mass function and the link between galaxies and DM halos down to the very low mass end can give very tight constraints on the nature of DM candidates.

  15. Seasonal Variability of Warm Boundary Layer Cloud and Precipitation Properties in the Southern Ocean as Diagnosed from A-Train and Ship-based Remote Sensing Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mace, Gerald

    2017-04-01

    The extensive cloudiness and resulting high albedo of the Southern Oceans (SO) are predominantly due to the occurrence of widespread marine boundary layer (MBL) clouds. Recent work finds correlations between biogenically enhanced cloud condensation nuclei concentrations and cloud droplet number concentrations derived from passive satellite data. The active remote sensors in the A-Train have created a unique and long-term record of these clouds that include vertical profiles of radar reflectivity and microwave brightness temperature from CloudSat that can be combined with solar reflectances from MODIS. We examine this data record to infer warm-topped cloud and precipitation properties. We find seasonal variations in cloud properties where summer season clouds demonstrate higher cloud droplet number concentrations on average and require higher liquid water contents to produce similar precipitation rates. We compare the properties and processes implied by the A-Train data with a unique cloud and precipitation remote sensing data set collected on board the Australian RV Investigator during March and April, 2016 during a 5-week voyage into the Southern Ocean.

  16. Fog collection and deposition modelling - EcoCatch Lunz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koller, M. W.; Ramírez-Santa Cruz, C.; Leder, K.; Bauer, H.; Dorninger, M.; Hofhansl, F.; Wanek, W.; Kasper-Giebl, A.

    2010-07-01

    The area of Lunz am See (N 047.855°, E 015.068°, 650 m a.s.l.) in Lower Austria has been subject to long term monitoring of meteorological parameters as well as wet deposition. Even though Lunz is known for its good air quality, with about 200 days of precipitation per year reaching an annual average of 1500 mm deposition, immission fluxes reach levels of critical loads. For instance, nitrogen input from wet deposition of nitrate and ammonium is > 14 kg ha-1 a-1, and sulphur input from sulphate is 5 kg ha-1 a-1. In the framework of the EcoCatch project1) wet, dry and occult deposition have been investigated in detail in an alluvial forest near the Biological Station (Lunz/See) since September 2008. The overall contribution of dry and occult deposition was expected to be comparably low and only of importance in times of decreased wet deposition. Collection of fog samples was performed with an active fog sampler, regulated by a Vaisala PWD-12 sensor monitoring visibility. Temperature, relative humidity, wind speed and direction were logged by a HOBO weather station. Filter stacks were used for sampling of aerosol particles and gaseous components and a Wet And Dry Only Sampler (WADOS) was used to sample precipitation. Solute analysis was carried out via ion chromatography. Alkali and earth alkali metals, chloride as well as ammonium, sulphate and nitrate were quantified in rain, aerosol and fog samples on an event basis. In addition dry deposition included nitrogen oxide and dioxide, sulphur dioxide and ammonia measurements. A site specific relation of liquid water content (LWC) to visibility was established using the collection rate and the known collection efficiency of the fog sampler. A modified version of the fog deposition resistance model devised by G.M. Lovett was used to quantify occult deposition onto the alluvial forest. The surface area index of local vegetation was measured with a SunScan System and tree height was determined using a Vertex IV

  17. Global warming

    CERN Document Server

    Hulme, M

    1998-01-01

    Global warming-like deforestation, the ozone hole and the loss of species- has become one of the late 20the century icons of global environmental damage. The threat, is not the reality, of such a global climate change has motivated governments. businesses and environmental organisations, to take serious action ot try and achieve serious control of the future climate. This culminated last December in Kyoto in the agreement for legally-binding climate protocol. In this series of three lectures I will provide a perspective on the phenomenon of global warming that accepts the scientific basis for our concern, but one that also recognises the dynamic interaction between climate and society that has always exited The future will be no different. The challenge of global warning is not to pretend it is not happening (as with some pressure groups), nor to pretend it threatens global civilisation (as with other pressure groups), and it is not even a challenge to try and stop it from happening-we are too far down the ro...

  18. Crowd Sensing-Enabling Security Service Recommendation for Social Fog Computing Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Wu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Fog computing, shifting intelligence and resources from the remote cloud to edge networks, has the potential of providing low-latency for the communication from sensing data sources to users. For the objects from the Internet of Things (IoT to the cloud, it is a new trend that the objects establish social-like relationships with each other, which efficiently brings the benefits of developed sociality to a complex environment. As fog service become more sophisticated, it will become more convenient for fog users to share their own services, resources, and data via social networks. Meanwhile, the efficient social organization can enable more flexible, secure, and collaborative networking. Aforementioned advantages make the social network a potential architecture for fog computing systems. In this paper, we design an architecture for social fog computing, in which the services of fog are provisioned based on “friend” relationships. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first attempt at an organized fog computing system-based social model. Meanwhile, social networking enhances the complexity and security risks of fog computing services, creating difficulties of security service recommendations in social fog computing. To address this, we propose a novel crowd sensing-enabling security service provisioning method to recommend security services accurately in social fog computing systems. Simulation results show the feasibilities and efficiency of the crowd sensing-enabling security service recommendation method for social fog computing systems.

  19. SUMOylation regulates the transcriptional repression activity of FOG-2 and its association with GATA-4.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Perdomo

    Full Text Available Friend of GATA 2 (FOG-2, a co-factor of several GATA transcription factors (GATA-4, -5 and 6, is a critical regulator of coronary vessel formation and heart morphogenesis. Here we demonstrate that FOG-2 is SUMOylated and that this modification modulates its transcriptional activity. FOG-2 SUMOylation occurs at four lysine residues (K324, 471, 915, 955 [corrected]. Three of these residues are part of the characteristic SUMO consensus site (ψKXE, while K955 is found in the less frequent TKXE motif. Absence of SUMOylation did not affect FOG-2's nuclear localization. However, mutation of the FOG-2 SUMOylation sites, or de-SUMOylation, with SENP-1 or SENP-8 resulted in stronger transcriptional repression activity in both heterologous cells and cardiomyocytes. Conversely, increased FOG-2 SUMOylation by overexpression of SUMO-1 or expression of a SUMO-1-FOG-2 fusion protein rendered FOG-2 incapable of repressing GATA-4-mediated activation of the B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP promoter. Moreover, we demonstrate both increased interaction between a FOG-2 SUMO mutant and GATA-4 and enhanced SUMOylation of wild-type FOG-2 by co-expression of GATA-4. These data suggest a new dynamics in which GATA-4 may alter the activity of FOG-2 by influencing its SUMOylation status.

  20. Crowd Sensing-Enabling Security Service Recommendation for Social Fog Computing Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jun; Su, Zhou; Li, Jianhua

    2017-01-01

    Fog computing, shifting intelligence and resources from the remote cloud to edge networks, has the potential of providing low-latency for the communication from sensing data sources to users. For the objects from the Internet of Things (IoT) to the cloud, it is a new trend that the objects establish social-like relationships with each other, which efficiently brings the benefits of developed sociality to a complex environment. As fog service become more sophisticated, it will become more convenient for fog users to share their own services, resources, and data via social networks. Meanwhile, the efficient social organization can enable more flexible, secure, and collaborative networking. Aforementioned advantages make the social network a potential architecture for fog computing systems. In this paper, we design an architecture for social fog computing, in which the services of fog are provisioned based on “friend” relationships. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first attempt at an organized fog computing system-based social model. Meanwhile, social networking enhances the complexity and security risks of fog computing services, creating difficulties of security service recommendations in social fog computing. To address this, we propose a novel crowd sensing-enabling security service provisioning method to recommend security services accurately in social fog computing systems. Simulation results show the feasibilities and efficiency of the crowd sensing-enabling security service recommendation method for social fog computing systems. PMID:28758943

  1. Crowd Sensing-Enabling Security Service Recommendation for Social Fog Computing Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jun; Su, Zhou; Wang, Shen; Li, Jianhua

    2017-07-30

    Fog computing, shifting intelligence and resources from the remote cloud to edge networks, has the potential of providing low-latency for the communication from sensing data sources to users. For the objects from the Internet of Things (IoT) to the cloud, it is a new trend that the objects establish social-like relationships with each other, which efficiently brings the benefits of developed sociality to a complex environment. As fog service become more sophisticated, it will become more convenient for fog users to share their own services, resources, and data via social networks. Meanwhile, the efficient social organization can enable more flexible, secure, and collaborative networking. Aforementioned advantages make the social network a potential architecture for fog computing systems. In this paper, we design an architecture for social fog computing, in which the services of fog are provisioned based on "friend" relationships. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first attempt at an organized fog computing system-based social model. Meanwhile, social networking enhances the complexity and security risks of fog computing services, creating difficulties of security service recommendations in social fog computing. To address this, we propose a novel crowd sensing-enabling security service provisioning method to recommend security services accurately in social fog computing systems. Simulation results show the feasibilities and efficiency of the crowd sensing-enabling security service recommendation method for social fog computing systems.

  2. Evaluation of thermal and moisture management properties on knitted fabrics and comparison with a physiological model in warm conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedek, Gauthier; Salaün, Fabien; Martinkovska, Zuzana; Devaux, Eric; Dupont, Daniel

    2011-11-01

    This study reports on an experimental investigation of physical properties on the textile thermal comfort. Textile properties, such as thickness, relative porosity, air permeability, moisture regain, thermal conductivity, drying time and water-vapour transmission rate have been considered and correlated to the thermal and vapour resistance, permeability index, thermal effusivity and moisture management capability in order to determine the overall comfort performance of underwear fabrics. The results suggested that the fibre type, together with moisture regain and knitted structure characteristics appeared to affect some comfort-related properties of the fabrics. Additionally, thermal sensations, temperature and skin wetness predicted by Caseto® software for three distinct activity levels were investigated. Results show that the data obtained from this model in transient state are correlated to the thermal conductivity for the temperature and to Ret, moisture regain and drying time for the skin wetness. This provides potential information to determine the end uses of these fabrics according to the selected activity level. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd and the Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  3. The LXCXE Retinoblastoma Protein-Binding Motif of FOG-2 Regulates Adipogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Goupille

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available GATA transcription factors and their FOG cofactors play a key role in tissue-specific development and differentiation, from worms to humans. Mammals have six GATA and two FOG factors. We recently demonstrated that interactions between retinoblastoma protein (pRb and GATA-1 are crucial for erythroid proliferation and differentiation. We show here that the LXCXE pRb-binding site of FOG-2 is involved in adipogenesis. Unlike GATA-1, which inhibits cell division, FOG-2 promotes proliferation. Mice with a knockin of a Fog2 gene bearing a mutated LXCXE pRb-binding site are resistant to obesity and display higher rates of white-to-brown fat conversion. Thus, each component of the GATA/FOG complex (GATA-1 and FOG-2 is involved in pRb/E2F regulation, but these molecules have markedly different roles in the control of tissue homeostasis.

  4. Collecting fog on El Tofo | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2011-01-31

    Jan 31, 2011 ... By 1995, the Economist was still marveling at the sight of a vibrant community where "gardens thrive on land that was once barren. ... The officials have taken this approach because they "regard water from fog as an unreliable, irregular, and insufficient source for providing drinking water for Chungungo," ...

  5. Prediction of Fog/Visibility over India using NWP Model

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    54

    visibility range 200-500 m) at Amritsar (Fig. 1b). The criteria for classification of fog in different categories based on observed visibility is given in Table 1. The categories are based on International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) definition. Day-1.

  6. Radar observations and modeling of fog at 35 GHz

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Y.; Hoogeboom, P.; Russchenberg, H.

    2014-01-01

    Millimeter-wave radars are becoming prevalent in fog detection because their advantages over the other in situ and remote sensing instruments. The evaluation of a millimeter-wave radar's performance as a weather remote sensing tool must rely on assessment of the physical conditions governing

  7. Towards a medium-range coastal station fog forecasting system

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Landman, S

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available -1 29th Annual conference of South African Society for Atmospheric Sciences (SASAS) 2013 http://sasas.ukzn.ac.za/homepage.aspx Towards a Medium-Range Coastal Station Fog Forecasting System Stephanie Landman*1, Estelle Marx1, Willem A. Landman2...

  8. Transport and optical properties of warm dense aluminum in the two-temperature regime: Ab initio calculation and semiempirical approximation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knyazev, D. V. [Joint Institute for High Temperatures RAS, Izhorskaya 13 Bldg. 2, Moscow 125412 (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (State University), Institutskiy per. 9, Dolgoprudny, Moscow Region 141700 (Russian Federation); State Scientific Center of the Russian Federation—Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics of National Research Centre “Kurchatov Institute,” Bolshaya Cheremushkinskaya 25, 117218 Moscow (Russian Federation); Levashov, P. R. [Joint Institute for High Temperatures RAS, Izhorskaya 13 Bldg. 2, Moscow 125412 (Russian Federation); Tomsk State University, Lenin Prospekt 36, Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2014-07-15

    This work is devoted to the investigation of transport and optical properties of liquid aluminum in the two-temperature case. At first optical properties, static electrical, and thermal conductivities were obtained in the ab initio calculation which is based on the quantum molecular dynamics, density functional theory, and the Kubo-Greenwood formula. Then the semiempirical approximation was constructed based on the results of our simulation. This approximation yields the dependences σ{sub 1{sub D{sub C}}}∝1/T{sub i}{sup 0.25} and K∝T{sub e}/T{sub i}{sup 0.25} for the static electrical conductivity and thermal conductivity, respectively, for liquid aluminum at ρ = 2.70 g/cm{sup 3}, 3 kK ≤ T{sub i} ≤ T{sub e} ≤ 20 kK. Our results are well described by the Drude model with the effective relaxation time τ∝T{sub i}{sup −0.25}. We have considered a number of other models for the static electrical and thermal conductivities of aluminum, they are all reduced in the low-temperature limit to the Drude model with different expressions for the relaxation time τ. Our results are not consistent with the models in which τ∝T{sub i}{sup −1} and support the models which use the expressions with the slower decrease of the relaxation time.

  9. Reduced Graphene Oxide Membranes: Applications in Fog Collection and Water Purification

    KAUST Repository

    Tang, Bo

    2017-05-01

    Reduced graphene oxide (rGO) has attracted considerable interest recently as the low cost and chemical stable derivative of pristine graphene with application in many applications such as energy storage, water purification and electronic devices. This dissertation thoroughly investigated stacked rGO membrane fabrication process by vacuum-driven filtration, discovered asymmetry of the two surfaces of the rGO membrane, explored application perspectives of the asymmetric rGO membrane in fog collection and microstructure patterning, and disclosed membrane compaction issue during water filtration and species rejection. In more details, this dissertation revealed that, with suitable pore size, the filtration membrane substrate would leave its physical imprint on the bottom surface of the rGO membrane in the form of surface microstructures, which result in asymmetric dynamic water wettability properties of the two surfaces of the rGO membrane. The asymmetric wettability of the rGO membrane would lead to contrasting fog harvesting behavior of its two surfaces. The physical imprint mechanism was further extended to engineering pre-designed patterns selectively on the bottom surface of the rGO membrane. This dissertation, for the first time, reported the water flux and rejection kinetics, which was related to the compaction of the rGO membrane under pressure in the process of water filtration.

  10. An Operational Forecast Perspective on Marine Low Cloudiness and Fog along the Central Coast of California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blier, W.

    2016-12-01

    The National Weather Service (NWS), a component of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) of the U.S. Department of Commerce, has been providing the nation with timely and reliable weather and climate information for more than 140 years. For the San Francisco Bay Area/Monterey NWS Weather Forecast Office (WFO), marine low cloudiness and fog are of critical importance. Impacts range from low-ceiling restrictions on take-offs and landings at the San Francisco International Airport (and consequent adverse effects on the national aviation airspace), to reductions in visibility on traffic flow and small-scale variations in boundary layer properties on wildfire risk and spread. Marine stratus, and associated drizzle and fog-drip, are also of critical importance to the ecology of the coastal environment, and in particular the hydration of the redwood forests. This presentation will provide an overview of related operational weather forecast activities and products, along with information on their real-time access. Particular high-impact scenarios will be considered, along with discussion of key current challenges and the continuing integration of technological and scientific advances to improve forecasts.

  11. Durable anti-fogging effect and adhesion improvement on polymer surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, E. M.; Gilliéron, D.; Henrion, G.

    2010-01-01

    The hydrophobic properties of polymeric surfaces may cause fogging in transparent packaging and poor adhesion to printing colours and coatings. Novel plasma processes for durable functionalization of polypropylene and polyethylene terephthalate substrates were developed and analysed using optical emission spectroscopy. A worm-like nano pattern was created on the polypropylene surface prior to the deposition of thin polar plasma polymerised layers. For both substrates, highly polar surfaces exhibiting a surface tension of up to 69 mN/m and a water contact angle of about 10° were produced - providing the anti-fogging effect. The deposition of thin plasma polymerised layers protects the increased surface areas and enables to tailoring the surface energy of the substrate in a wide range. Wetting characteristics were determined by dynamic contact angle measurements. Investigations of the chemical composition of several layers using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and FT-infrared spectroscopy were correlated with functional testing. The surface topography was investigated using atomic force microscopy. The weldability and peeling-off characteristics of the plasma treated polymer films could be adjusted by varying the process parameters. Global and specific migration analyses were undertaken in order to ensure the manufacturing of plasma treated polymer surfaces for direct food contact purposes.

  12. Transport properties of warm and hot dense iron from orbital free and corrected Yukawa potential molecular dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.Y. Sun

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The equation of states, diffusions, and viscosities of strongly coupled Fe at 80 and 240 eV with densities from 1.6 to 40 g/cm3 are studied by orbital-free molecular dynamics, classical molecular dynamics with a corrected Yukawa potential and compared with the results from average atom model. A new local pseudopotential is generated for orbital free calculations. For low densities, the Yukawa model captures the correct ionic interaction behavior around the first peak of the radial distribution function (RDF, thus it gives correct RDFs and transport coefficients. For higher densities, the scaled transformation of the Yukawa potential or adding a short range repulsion part to the Yukawa potential can give correct RDFs and transport coefficients. The corrected potentials are further validated by the force matching method. Keywords: Transport properties, Orbital-free molecular dynamics, Yukawa model, Force matching, PACS codes: 34.20.Cf, 52.25.Fi, 52.27.Gr, 52.65.Yy

  13. Analyzing the Temporal and Spatial Variation of Fog Days in Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimi, Mohammad

    2012-05-01

    In order to study the temporal and spatial variation of fog days in Iran, the data of 115 synoptic meteorological stations have been analyzed for years 1960-2005. The results revealed that different types of fogs form all over the country, apart from central areas of Iran that are located in the big dessert of Iran. Advection fogs are common in the south coast (Persian Gulf) and north coastal (Caspian Sea) regions. Upslope fogs form in the mountainous areas of the northwest and north parts of Iran. This study shows no height dependence relationship on fog days for all types of fogs in overall. The trend analysis of fog days during the last 20 years shows some significant negative and positive trends. The frequency of advection fogs shows positive trends and most upslope fogs show negative trends. The results show that there are suitable places for fog collection projects in the north and south coastal regions during the year, especially in cold months.

  14. The role of fog in haze episode in Tianjin, China: A case study for November 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Tianyi; Han, Suqin; Chen, Shucheng; Shan, Xiaolin; Zai, Ziying; Qiu, Xiaobin; Yao, Qing; Liu, Jingle; Chen, Jing; Meng, Lihong

    2017-09-01

    A severe haze episode that heavy fog appeared in its later stage emerged in Tianjin, east-central China, from November 27 to December 2, 2015. With meteorological data and pollutants monitoring data, the characteristics of this event and the role of fog in haze were investigated. During this process, the visibility was less than 600 m, especially in the haze and fog coexisting period (below 100 m). The peak value of PM2.5 mass concentration appeared in the haze only period was 446 μg/m3. The fog played a role in scavenging and removing PM2.5 during haze and fog coexisting period. The surface high humidity province can match well with the high PM2.5 concentration region in pollutants removal period. The fog top height was reduced to about 200 m by cold air. Although the cold air has arrived in Tianjin high altitude, the saturated layer below 200 m maintained for nearly 12 h. The heavy fog prevented the momentum in upper atmosphere from transmitting downward and caused the high altitude cold air difficult to reach the ground. The latent heat flux was transmitted upward ahead of sensible heat flux in pollutants removal period, indicating the increasing tendency of mechanical turbulence after fog dissipation. Turbulent kinetic energy (Etk) and the surface mean kinetic energy (E) also enhanced after fog dissipation. It demonstrates that the termination of haze was delayed by heavy fog.

  15. Numerical simulations of an advection fog event over Shanghai Pudong International Airport with the WRF model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Caiyan; Zhang, Zhongfeng; Pu, Zhaoxia; Wang, Fengyun

    2017-10-01

    A series of numerical simulations is conducted to understand the formation, evolution, and dissipation of an advection fog event over Shanghai Pudong International Airport (ZSPD) with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. Using the current operational settings at the Meteorological Center of East China Air Traffic Management Bureau, the WRF model successfully predicts the fog event at ZSPD. Additional numerical experiments are performed to examine the physical processes associated with the fog event. The results indicate that prediction of this particular fog event is sensitive to microphysical schemes for the time of fog dissipation but not for the time of fog onset. The simulated timing of the arrival and dissipation of the fog, as well as the cloud distribution, is substantially sensitive to the planetary boundary layer and radiation (both longwave and shortwave) processes. Moreover, varying forecast lead times also produces different simulation results for the fog event regarding its onset and duration, suggesting a trade-off between more accurate initial conditions and a proper forecast lead time that allows model physical processes to spin up adequately during the fog simulation. The overall outcomes from this study imply that the complexity of physical processes and their interactions within the WRF model during fog evolution and dissipation is a key area of future research.

  16. Observation and modelling of fog at Cold Lake, Alberta, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Di; Boudala, Faisal; Weng, Wensong; Taylor, Peter A.; Gultepe, Ismail; Isaac, George A.

    2017-04-01

    Climatological data indicate that the Cold Lake, Alberta airport location (CYOD, 54.4°N, 110.3°W) is often affected by various low cloud and fog conditions. In order to better understand these conditions, Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC), in cooperation with the Canadian Department of National Defense (DND), installed a number of specialized instruments. The ground based instruments include a Vaisala PWD22 present weather sensor, a multi-channel microwave profiling radiometer (MWR) and a Jenoptik CHM15k ceilometer. The focus here will be on understanding the micro-physical and dynamical conditions within the boundary layer, on the surface and aloft that lead to the occurrence of fog using a high resolution 1-D boundary-layer model, ground based measurements, Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) data and predictions from the Canadian 2.5 km resolution NWP model (HRDPS - High Resolution Deterministic Prediction System ). Details of the 1-D model will be presented. The condensation of water vapour into droplets and the formation of fog in the Earth's atmospheric boundary layer can involve a complex balance between vertical turbulent mixing of heat and water vapour, cloud micro-physical processes and radiative transfers of heat. It is a phenomenon which has been studied for many years in a variety of contexts. On land, surface cooling via long wave radiation at night is often the trigger and a number of 1-D (one dimensional, height and time dependent) radiative fog models have been developed. Our turbulence closure includes the turbulent kinetic energy equation but we prefer to specify a height, roughness Rossby number and local stability dependent, "master" length scale instead of somewhat empirical dissipation or similar equations. Results show that low cloud and fog can develop, depending on initial profiles of wind, temperature and mixing ratio, land surface interactions and solar radiation. Preliminary analysis of Cold Lake

  17. Automatic fog detection for public safety by using camera images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagani, Giuliano Andrea; Roth, Martin; Wauben, Wiel

    2017-04-01

    Fog and reduced visibility have considerable impact on the performance of road, maritime, and aeronautical transportation networks. The impact ranges from minor delays to more serious congestions or unavailability of the infrastructure and can even lead to damage or loss of lives. Visibility is traditionally measured manually by meteorological observers using landmarks at known distances in the vicinity of the observation site. Nowadays, distributed cameras facilitate inspection of more locations from one remote monitoring center. The main idea is, however, still deriving the visibility or presence of fog by an operator judging the scenery and the presence of landmarks. Visibility sensors are also used, but they are rather costly and require regular maintenance. Moreover, observers, and in particular sensors, give only visibility information that is representative for a limited area. Hence the current density of visibility observations is insufficient to give detailed information on the presence of fog. Cameras are more and more deployed for surveillance and security reasons in cities and for monitoring traffic along main transportation ways. In addition to this primary use of cameras, we consider cameras as potential sensors to automatically identify low visibility conditions. The approach that we follow is to use machine learning techniques to determine the presence of fog and/or to make an estimation of the visibility. For that purpose a set of features are extracted from the camera images such as the number of edges, brightness, transmission of the image dark channel, fractal dimension. In addition to these image features, we also consider meteorological variables such as wind speed, temperature, relative humidity, and dew point as additional features to feed the machine learning model. The results obtained with a training and evaluation set consisting of 10-minute sampled images for two KNMI locations over a period of 1.5 years by using decision trees methods

  18. Methylmercury and other chemical constituents in Pacific coastal fog water from seven sites in Central/Northern California (FogNet) during the summer of 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss-Penzias, P. S.; Heim, W. A.; Fernandez, D.; Coale, K. H.; Oliphant, A. J.; Dann, D.; Porter, M.; Hoskins, D.; Dodge, C.

    2014-12-01

    This project investigates the mercury content in summertime Pacific coastal fog in California and whether fog could be an important vector for ocean emissions of mercury to be deposited via fog drip to upland coastal ecosystems. Efforts began in early 2014 with the building of 7 active-strand fog collectors based on the Colorado State University Caltech CASCC design. The new UCSC CASCC includes doors sealing the collector which open under microcomputer control based on environmental sensing (relative humidity). Seven sites spanning from Trinidad in the north to Marina in the south have collected samples June-August 2014 under a project called FogNet. Fog conditions were favorable for collecting large water volumes (> 250 mL) at many sites. Fog samplers were cleaned with soap and deionized water daily and field blanks taken immediately following cleaning. Fog water samples were collected overnight, split into an aliquot for anion and DOC/DIC analysis and the remaining sample was acidified. Monomethyl mercury (MMHg) concentrations in samples and field blanks for 3 sites in FogNet are shown in the accompanying figure. The range of MMHg concentrations from 10 fog water samples > 100 mL in volume was 0.9-9.3 ng/L (4.5-46.4 pM). Elevated MMHg concentrations (> 5 ng/L, 25 pM) were observed at 2 sites: UC Santa Cruz and Bodega Bay. The field blanks produced MMHg concentrations of 0.08-0.4 ng/L (0.4-2.0 pM), which was on average < 10% of the sample concentration and suggests the artifact due to sampling was small. The observed MMHg concentrations in fog water observed is this study are 1-2 orders of magnitude greater than MMHg concentrations seen previously in rain water samples from the California coast suggesting an additional source of MMHg to fog. Shipboard measurements of dimethyl mercury (DMHg) in coastal California seawater during the time period of FogNet operations (summer 2014) reveal surface waters that were supersaturated in DMHg which represents a potential

  19. A Mobility Management Using Follow-Me Cloud-Cloudlet in Fog-Computing-Based RANs for Smart Cities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuh-Shyan; Tsai, Yi-Ting

    2018-02-06

    Mobility management for supporting the location tracking and location-based service (LBS) is an important issue of smart city by providing the means for the smooth transportation of people and goods. The mobility is useful to contribute the innovation in both public and private transportation infrastructures for smart cities. With the assistance of edge/fog computing, this paper presents a fully new mobility management using the proposed follow-me cloud-cloudlet (FMCL) approach in fog-computing-based radio access networks (Fog-RANs) for smart cities. The proposed follow-me cloud-cloudlet approach is an integration strategy of follow-me cloud (FMC) and follow-me edge (FME) (or called cloudlet). A user equipment (UE) receives the data, transmitted from original cloud, into the original edge cloud before the handover operation. After the handover operation, an UE searches for a new cloud, called as a migrated cloud, and a new edge cloud, called as a migrated edge cloud near to UE, where the remaining data is migrated from the original cloud to the migrated cloud and all the remaining data are received in the new edge cloud. Existing FMC results do not have the property of the VM migration between cloudlets for the purpose of reducing the transmission latency, and existing FME results do not keep the property of the service migration between data centers for reducing the transmission latency. Our proposed FMCL approach can simultaneously keep the VM migration between cloudlets and service migration between data centers to significantly reduce the transmission latency. The new proposed mobility management using FMCL approach aims to reduce the total transmission time if some data packets are pre-scheduled and pre-stored into the cache of cloudlet if UE is switching from the previous Fog-RAN to the serving Fog-RAN. To illustrate the performance achievement, the mathematical analysis and simulation results are examined in terms of the total transmission time, the

  20. A Mobility Management Using Follow-Me Cloud-Cloudlet in Fog-Computing-Based RANs for Smart Cities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuh-Shyan Chen

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Mobility management for supporting the location tracking and location-based service (LBS is an important issue of smart city by providing the means for the smooth transportation of people and goods. The mobility is useful to contribute the innovation in both public and private transportation infrastructures for smart cities. With the assistance of edge/fog computing, this paper presents a fully new mobility management using the proposed follow-me cloud-cloudlet (FMCL approach in fog-computing-based radio access networks (Fog-RANs for smart cities. The proposed follow-me cloud-cloudlet approach is an integration strategy of follow-me cloud (FMC and follow-me edge (FME (or called cloudlet. A user equipment (UE receives the data, transmitted from original cloud, into the original edge cloud before the handover operation. After the handover operation, an UE searches for a new cloud, called as a migrated cloud, and a new edge cloud, called as a migrated edge cloud near to UE, where the remaining data is migrated from the original cloud to the migrated cloud and all the remaining data are received in the new edge cloud. Existing FMC results do not have the property of the VM migration between cloudlets for the purpose of reducing the transmission latency, and existing FME results do not keep the property of the service migration between data centers for reducing the transmission latency. Our proposed FMCL approach can simultaneously keep the VM migration between cloudlets and service migration between data centers to significantly reduce the transmission latency. The new proposed mobility management using FMCL approach aims to reduce the total transmission time if some data packets are pre-scheduled and pre-stored into the cache of cloudlet if UE is switching from the previous Fog-RAN to the serving Fog-RAN. To illustrate the performance achievement, the mathematical analysis and simulation results are examined in terms of the total transmission time

  1. Connections Between Cold Air Pools and Mountain Valley Fog Events in Salt Lake City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chachere, Catherine N.; Pu, Zhaoxia

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the connection between cold air pools and fog events in Salt Lake City, Utah, United States. Statistical analyses are conducted using soundings and reported automated surface observing system data from Salt Lake International Airport for the last eighteen cold seasons (October to March, during 1997-2015). A Chi-square test of independence is performed on identified cold air pool, and fog events to determine whether the two events are correlated. Conditional probabilities are then computed to investigate the occurrence of fog, given the presence of a cold pool. These probabilities are compared against that of random fog generation in the mid-winter. It is concluded that the dependence between cold air pools and fog events is statistically significant. The presence of a cold pool makes the formation of fog more likely than random generation.

  2. Laser Imaging Video Camera Sees Through Fire, Fog, Smoke

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Under a series of SBIR contracts with Langley Research Center, inventor Richard Billmers refined a prototype for a laser imaging camera capable of seeing through fire, fog, smoke, and other obscurants. Now, Canton, Ohio-based Laser Imaging through Obscurants (LITO) Technologies Inc. is demonstrating the technology as a perimeter security system at Glenn Research Center and planning its future use in aviation, shipping, emergency response, and other fields.

  3. Genesis of diamond dust, ice fog and thick cloud episodes observed and modelled above Dome C, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricaud, Philippe; Bazile, Eric; del Guasta, Massimo; Lanconelli, Christian; Grigioni, Paolo; Mahjoub, Achraf

    2017-04-01

    Episodes of thick cloud and diamond dust/ice fog were observed during 15 March to 8 April 2011 and 4 to 5 March 2013 in the atmosphere above Dome C (Concordia station, Antarctica; 75°06' S, 123°21' E; 3233 m a.m.s.l.). The objectives of the paper are mainly to investigate the processes that cause these episodes based on observations and to verify whether operational models can evaluate them. The measurements were obtained from the following instruments: (1) a ground-based microwave radiometer (HAMSTRAD, H2O Antarctica Microwave Stratospheric and Tropospheric Radiometers) installed at Dome C that provided vertical profiles of tropospheric temperature and absolute humidity every 7 min; (2) daily radiosoundings launched at 12:00 UTC at Dome C; (3) a tropospheric aerosol lidar that provides aerosol depolarization ratio along the vertical at Dome C; (4) down- and upward short- and long-wave radiations as provided by the Baseline Surface Radiation Network (BSRN) facilities; (5) an ICE-CAMERA to detect at an hourly rate the size of the ice crystal grains deposited at the surface of the camera; and (6) space-borne aerosol depolarization ratio from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) lidar aboard the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) platform along orbits close to the Dome C station. The time evolution of the atmosphere has also been evaluated by considering the outputs from the mesoscale AROME and the global-scale ARPEGE meteorological models. Thick clouds are detected during the warm and wet periods (24-26 March 2011 and 4 March 2013) with high depolarization ratios (greater than 30 %) from the surface to 5-7 km above the ground associated with precipitation of ice particles and the presence of a supercooled liquid water (depolarization less than 10 %) clouds. Diamond dust and/or ice fog are detected during the cold and dry periods (5 April 2011 and 5 March 2013) with high depolarization ratios (greater

  4. Gluten-induced cognitive impairment ("brain fog") in coeliac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yelland, Gregory W

    2017-03-01

    Much is known about the serious neurological effects of gluten ingestion in coeliac disease patients, such as sporadic ataxia and peripheral neuropathy, although the causal links to gluten are still under debate. However, such disorders are observed in only a small percentage of coeliac patients. Much less is known about the transient cognitive impairments to memory, attention, executive function, and the speed of cognitive processing reported by the majority of patients with coeliac disease. These mild degradations of cognitive functions, referred to as "brain fog," are yet to be formally recognized as a medical or psychological condition. However, subtle tests of cognitive function are measurable in untreated patients with coeliac disease and improve over the first 12 months' therapy with a gluten-free diet. Such deficits also occur in patients with Crohn's disease, particularly in association with systemic inflammatory activity. Thus, cognitive impairments associated with brain fog are psychologically and neurologically real and improve with adherence to a gluten-free diet. There is not yet sufficient evidence to provide a definitive account of the mechanism by which gluten ingestion causes the impairments to cognitive function associated with brain fog, but current evidence suggests that it is more likely that the causal factor is not directly related to exposure to gluten. © 2017 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  5. FOG COMPUTING PERSPECTIVES IN CONNECTION WITH THE CURRENT GEOSPATIAL STANDARDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Panidi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Cloud Computing technologies and cloud-based Geographic Information Systems have became widely used in recent decades. However, the complexity and size of geospatial datasets remains growing and sometimes become going out of the cloud infrastructure paradigm. Additionally, many of currently used client devices have sufficient computational resources to store and process some amounts of data directly. Consequently, multilevel management techniques are demanded that support capabilities of horizontal (client-to-client data flows in addition to vertical (cloud-to-client data flows. These tendencies in information technologies (in general have led to the appearance of Fog Computing paradigm that extends a cloud infrastructure with the computational resources of client devices and implements client-side data storage, management and interchange. This position paper summarizes and discusses mentioned tendencies in connection with a number of available Open Geospatial Consortium standards. The paper highlights the standards, which can be recognized as the platform for the Fog Computing implementation into geospatial domain, and analyzing their strong and weak features from the Fog Computing point of view. The analysis is built upon author’s experience in implementation of the client-side geospatial Web services.

  6. Marine Fog over the Western Pacific Marginal Seas Based Upon Ship Observations for 1950 - 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorman, C. E.; Koracin, D. R.

    2016-12-01

    An analysis is presented of the marine fog distribution over the western Pacific marginal seas based upon the International Comprehensive Ocean-Atmosphere Data Set (ICOADS) ship observations taken during 1950-2007. Fog occurrence is reported in routine weather reports that are encoded in an ICOADS ship observation. This includes the marginal seas of Okhotsk Sea, Japan Sea, Yellow Sea and South China Sea which have significant fog occurrences with values much greater than in the surrounding ocean with distinct seasonal trends but different generation mechanisms. The greatest occurrence is 55 % in Jun-Jul-Aug over the Okhotsk Sea followed by 28 % over the Japan Sea. This is seasonally controlled by the sea level pressure gradient moving air over a negative sea surface temperature gradient. During Dec-Jan-Feb, the SLP gradient reverses, moving cold, dry continental air over the Okhotsk and Japan Seas, eliminating any fog. The maximum fog over the Okhotsk Sea is over isolated locations with shallow water. In the Japan Sea, the most frequent fog occurs along the north side of the sea over a narrow shelf with the lowest SST of the entire Sea. In the Yellow Sea, the fog frequency peak is from Dec through May. In Mar-Apr-May the highest value is 18 % which is centered at 33 N 122 W while elevated values extend along the China coast to Taiwan. In Jun-Jul-Aug, highest values are mostly confined to the Yellow Sea. In Dec-Jan-Feb, decreased but significant fog occurrences extend along the entire China coast when the highest value in the Yellow Sea is 5 % and in South China Sea it is 6 %. The only other world marine fog occurrence analysis discovered by us is a US Department of Agriculture Jun-Jul-Aug marine fog frequency chart published in 1938 that does not show any fog in the Okhotsk Sea and misses most of the fog occurrence reported by ships in the Yellow Sea.

  7. Crash risk analysis during fog conditions using real-time traffic data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yina; Abdel-Aty, Mohamed; Lee, Jaeyoung

    2017-05-30

    This research investigates the changes of traffic characteristics and crash risks during fog conditions. Using real-time traffic flow and weather data at two regions in Florida, the traffic patterns at the fog duration were compared to the traffic patterns at the clear duration. It was found that the average 5-min speed and the average 5-min volume were prone to decreasing during fog. Based on previous studies, a "Crash Risk Increase Indicator (CRII)" was proposed to explore the differences of crash risk between fog and clear conditions. A binary logistic regression model was applied to link the increase of crash risks with traffic flow characteristics. The results suggested that the proposed indicator worked well in evaluating the increase of crash risk under fog condition. It was indicated that the crash risk was prone to increase at ramp vicinities in fog conditions. Also, the average 5-min volume during fog and the lane position are important factors for crash risk increase. The differences between the regions were also explored in this study. The results indicated that the locations with heavier traffic or locations at the lanes that were closest to the median in Region 2 were more likely to observe an increase in crash risks in fog conditions. It is expected that the proposed indicator can help identify the dangerous traffic status under fog conditions and then proper ITS technologies can be implemented to enhance traffic safety when the visibility declines. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Quantification of Fog Water Collection in Three Locations of Tenerife (Canary Islands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Axel Ritter

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We present the results of fog water collection obtained with cylindrical fog gauges at three locations on the northern side of Tenerife island (Spain: La Esperanza (1093 m a.s.l., Taborno (1015 m a.s.l., and El Gaitero (1747 m a.s.l.. Concomitant meteorological variables were also measured. We show that fog precipitation was more frequent than rainfall. However, the volumes and frequency of daily fog water collection varied among the three studied sites, usually not exceeding 10–40 L d−1/m2 of collecting surface. In La Esperanza, fog water harvesting occurred frequently, but was considerably lower than in the other two locations. However, while in Taborno fog water collection episodes were distributed throughout the period, in El Gaitero these were mainly concentrated in two periods, during autumn and winter 2012–2013. The study of the relationships between daily fog water yields and the averages of meteorological variables did not show any clear trend, but it suggested that the greater volumes of collected fog water were logically associated with higher wind speeds and lower solar radiation conditions. Fog water collection in La Esperanza and in Taborno typically occurred within a similar temperature interval (7.5–12.5 °C, while in El Gaitero the phenomenon was associated with a lower temperature range (2.5–10 °C.

  9. Multirule Based Diagnostic Approach for the Fog Predictions Using WRF Modelling Tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swagata Payra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The prediction of fog onset remains difficult despite the progress in numerical weather prediction. It is a complex process and requires adequate representation of the local perturbations in weather prediction models. It mainly depends upon microphysical and mesoscale processes that act within the boundary layer. This study utilizes a multirule based diagnostic (MRD approach using postprocessing of the model simulations for fog predictions. The empiricism involved in this approach is mainly to bridge the gap between mesoscale and microscale variables, which are related to mechanism of the fog formation. Fog occurrence is a common phenomenon during winter season over Delhi, India, with the passage of the western disturbances across northwestern part of the country accompanied with significant amount of moisture. This study implements the above cited approach for the prediction of occurrences of fog and its onset time over Delhi. For this purpose, a high resolution weather research and forecasting (WRF model is used for fog simulations. The study involves depiction of model validation and postprocessing of the model simulations for MRD approach and its subsequent application to fog predictions. Through this approach model identified foggy and nonfoggy days successfully 94% of the time. Further, the onset of fog events is well captured within an accuracy of 30–90 minutes. This study demonstrates that the multirule based postprocessing approach is a useful and highly promising tool in improving the fog predictions.

  10. Experimental FSO network availability estimation using interactive fog condition monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turán, Ján.; Ovseník, Łuboš

    2016-12-01

    Free Space Optics (FSO) is a license free Line of Sight (LOS) telecommunication technology which offers full duplex connectivity. FSO uses infrared beams of light to provide optical broadband connection and it can be installed literally in a few hours. Data rates go through from several hundreds of Mb/s to several Gb/s and range is from several 100 m up to several km. FSO link advantages: Easy connection establishment, License free communication, No excavation are needed, Highly secure and safe, Allows through window connectivity and single customer service and Compliments fiber by accelerating the first and last mile. FSO link disadvantages: Transmission media is air, Weather and climate dependence, Attenuation due to rain, snow and fog, Scattering of laser beam, Absorption of laser beam, Building motion and Air pollution. In this paper FSO availability evaluation is based on long term measured data from Fog sensor developed and installed at TUKE experimental FSO network in TUKE campus, Košice, Slovakia. Our FSO experimental network has three links with different physical distances between each FSO heads. Weather conditions have a tremendous impact on FSO operation in terms of FSO availability. FSO link availability is the percentage of time over a year that the FSO link will be operational. It is necessary to evaluate the climate and weather at the actual geographical location where FSO link is going to be mounted. It is important to determine the impact of a light scattering, absorption, turbulence and receiving optical power at the particular FSO link. Visibility has one of the most critical influences on the quality of an FSO optical transmission channel. FSO link availability is usually estimated using visibility information collected from nearby airport weather stations. Raw data from fog sensor (Fog Density, Relative Humidity, Temperature measured at each ms) are collected and processed by FSO Simulator software package developed at our Department. Based

  11. Influence of Sample Size of Polymer Materials on Aging Characteristics in the Salt Fog Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsubo, Masahisa; Anami, Naoya; Yamashita, Seiji; Honda, Chikahisa; Takenouchi, Osamu; Hashimoto, Yousuke

    Polymer insulators have been used in worldwide because of some superior properties; light weight, high mechanical strength, good hydrophobicity etc., as compared with porcelain insulators. In this paper, effect of sample size on the aging characteristics in the salt fog test is examined. Leakage current was measured by using 100 MHz AD board or 100 MHz digital oscilloscope and separated three components as conductive current, corona discharge current and dry band arc discharge current by using FFT and the current differential method newly proposed. Each component cumulative charge was estimated automatically by a personal computer. As the results, when the sample size increased under the same average applied electric field, the peak values of leakage current and each component current increased. Especially, the cumulative charges and the arc discharge length of dry band arc discharge increased remarkably with the increase of gap length.

  12. Light-induced formation of hydroxyl radicals in fog waters determined by an authentic fog constituent, hydroxymethanesulfonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Yuegang

    2003-04-01

    The determination of the photo-production rate of hydroxyl radical (OH) in atmospheric liquids is of fundamental importance to an understanding of atmospheric aquatic chemistry. Recently, several studies have been performed to examine the photo-chemical formation rate of OH in cloud and fog waters using a free radical quenching technique with addition of a relatively large concentration of organic compounds as an OH scavenger. The addition of free-radical scavenger chemicals may significantly alter the nature of the sample water and its OH production rate. In this paper, an authentic constituent, hydroxymethanesulfonate, is proposed as a free radical probe for the measurement of photo-chemical generation rate of OH in fog water. At 313 nm, an apparent quantum yield for the production of OH in a fog water was found to be 0.012+/-0.001, indicating that aqueous-phase photo-chemical processes could represent a significant and may be a dominant source of OH in atmospheric liquids.

  13. The Influence of Drop Size Distributions on the Relationship between Liquid Water Content and Radar Reflectivity in Radiation Fogs

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Boris Thies; Sebastian Egli; Jörg Bendix

    2017-01-01

    ... (LWC) and the radar reflectivity (Z) in fogs. Data measured during three radiation fog events at the Marburg Ground Truth and Profiling Station in Linden-Leihgestern, Germany, form the basis of this analysis...

  14. Demonstration of measuring sea fog with an SNSPD-based Lidar system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jiang; Chen, Yajun; Zhang, Labao; Jia, Xiaoqing; Feng, Zhijun; Wu, Ganhua; Yan, Xiachao; Zhai, Jiquan; Wu, Yang; Chen, Qi; Zhou, Xiaoying; Wang, Zhizhong; Zhang, Chi; Kang, Lin; Chen, Jian; Wu, Peiheng

    2017-11-08

    The monitor of sea fogs become more important with the rapid development of marine activities. Remote sensing through laser is an effective tool for monitoring sea fogs, but still challengeable for large distance. We demonstrated a Long-distance Lidar for sea fog with superconducting nanowire single-photon detector (SNSPD), which extended the ranging area to a 180-km diameter area. The system, which was verified by using a benchmark distance measurement of a known island, is applied to the Mie scattering weather prediction Lidar system. The fog echo signal distribution in the range of 42.3∼63.5 km and 53.2∼74.2 km was obtained by the Lidar system. Then the fog concentration and the velocity of the fog were deduced from the distribution, which is consistent with the weather prediction. The height of the sea fog is about two hundred meter while the visibility at this height is about 90 km due to the Earth's radius of curvature. Therefore, the capability of this SNSPD-based Lidar was close to the theoretical limit for sea fog measurements for extremely high signal-to-noise ratio of SNSPD.

  15. A Hybrid Scheme for Fine-Grained Search and Access Authorization in Fog Computing Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Min; Zhou, Jing; Liu, Xuejiao; Jiang, Mingda

    2017-06-17

    In the fog computing environment, the encrypted sensitive data may be transferred to multiple fog nodes on the edge of a network for low latency; thus, fog nodes need to implement a search over encrypted data as a cloud server. Since the fog nodes tend to provide service for IoT applications often running on resource-constrained end devices, it is necessary to design lightweight solutions. At present, there is little research on this issue. In this paper, we propose a fine-grained owner-forced data search and access authorization scheme spanning user-fog-cloud for resource constrained end users. Compared to existing schemes only supporting either index encryption with search ability or data encryption with fine-grained access control ability, the proposed hybrid scheme supports both abilities simultaneously, and index ciphertext and data ciphertext are constructed based on a single ciphertext-policy attribute based encryption (CP-ABE) primitive and share the same key pair, thus the data access efficiency is significantly improved and the cost of key management is greatly reduced. Moreover, in the proposed scheme, the resource constrained end devices are allowed to rapidly assemble ciphertexts online and securely outsource most of decryption task to fog nodes, and mediated encryption mechanism is also adopted to achieve instantaneous user revocation instead of re-encrypting ciphertexts with many copies in many fog nodes. The security and the performance analysis show that our scheme is suitable for a fog computing environment.

  16. Asymmetric ratchet effect for directional transport of fog drops on static and dynamic butterfly wings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chengcheng; Ju, Jie; Zheng, Yongmei; Jiang, Lei

    2014-02-25

    Inspired by novel creatures, researchers have developed varieties of fog drop transport systems and made significant contributions to the fields of heat transferring, water collecting, antifogging, and so on. Up to now, most of the efforts in directional fog drop transport have been focused on static surfaces. Considering it is not practical to keep surfaces still all the time in reality, conducting investigations on surfaces that can transport fog drops in both static and dynamic states has become more and more important. Here we report the wings of Morpho deidamia butterflies can directionally transport fog drops in both static and dynamic states. This directional drop transport ability results from the micro/nano ratchet-like structure of butterfly wings: the surface of butterfly wings is composed of overlapped scales, and the scales are covered with porous asymmetric ridges. Influenced by this special structure, fog drops on static wings are transported directionally as a result of the fog drops' asymmetric growth and coalescence. Fog drops on vibrating wings are propelled directionally due to the fog drops' asymmetric dewetting from the wings.

  17. Characteristics of fog and fogwater fluxes in a Puerto Rican elfin cloud forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner Eugster; Reto Burkard; Friso Holwerda; Frederick N. Scatena; L.A.(Sampurno) Bruijnzeel

    2006-01-01

    The Luquillo Mountains of northeastern Puerto Rico harbours important fractions of tropical montane cloud forests. Although it is well known that the frequent occurrence of dense fog is a common climatic characteristic of cloud forests around the world, it is poorly understood how fog processes shape and influence these ecosystems. Our study focuses on the physical...

  18. A Hybrid Scheme for Fine-Grained Search and Access Authorization in Fog Computing Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Min; Zhou, Jing; Liu, Xuejiao; Jiang, Mingda

    2017-01-01

    In the fog computing environment, the encrypted sensitive data may be transferred to multiple fog nodes on the edge of a network for low latency; thus, fog nodes need to implement a search over encrypted data as a cloud server. Since the fog nodes tend to provide service for IoT applications often running on resource-constrained end devices, it is necessary to design lightweight solutions. At present, there is little research on this issue. In this paper, we propose a fine-grained owner-forced data search and access authorization scheme spanning user-fog-cloud for resource constrained end users. Compared to existing schemes only supporting either index encryption with search ability or data encryption with fine-grained access control ability, the proposed hybrid scheme supports both abilities simultaneously, and index ciphertext and data ciphertext are constructed based on a single ciphertext-policy attribute based encryption (CP-ABE) primitive and share the same key pair, thus the data access efficiency is significantly improved and the cost of key management is greatly reduced. Moreover, in the proposed scheme, the resource constrained end devices are allowed to rapidly assemble ciphertexts online and securely outsource most of decryption task to fog nodes, and mediated encryption mechanism is also adopted to achieve instantaneous user revocation instead of re-encrypting ciphertexts with many copies in many fog nodes. The security and the performance analysis show that our scheme is suitable for a fog computing environment. PMID:28629131

  19. The lightning striking probability for offshore wind turbine blade with salt fog contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qingmin; Ma, Yufei; Guo, Zixin; Ren, Hanwen; Wang, Guozheng; Arif, Waqas; Fang, Zhiyang; Siew, Wah Hoon

    2017-08-01

    The blades of an offshore wind turbine are prone to be adhered with salt fog after long-time exposure in the marine-atmosphere environment, and salt fog reduces the efficiency of the lightning protection system. In order to study the influence of salt fog on lightning striking probability (LSP), the lightning discharge process model for the wind turbine blade is adopted in this paper considering the accumulation mechanism of surface charges around the salt fog area. The distribution of potential and electric field with the development of the downward leader is calculated by COMSOL Multiphysics LiveLink for MATLAB. A quantitative characterization method is established to calculate the LSP base on the average electric field before the return stroke and the LSP distribution of the blade is shown in the form of a graphic view. The simulation results indicate that the receptor and conductor area close to the receptor area are more likely to get struck by lightning, and the LSP increases under the influence of salt fog. The validity of the model is verified by experiments. Furthermore, the receptor can protect the blade from lightning strikes effectively when the lateral distance between the rod electrode and receptor is short. The influence of salt fog on LSP is more obvious if salt fog is close to the receptor or if the scope of salt fog area increases.

  20. 49 CFR 393.24 - Requirements for head lamps, auxiliary driving lamps and front fog lamps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY REGULATIONS PARTS AND ACCESSORIES NECESSARY FOR SAFE OPERATION Lamps, Reflective Devices, and Electrical Wiring § 393.24 Requirements for head lamps, auxiliary driving lamps and front fog... this paragraph. (b) Auxiliary driving lamps and front fog lamps. Commercial motor vehicles may be...

  1. Cloud and fog computing in 5G mobile networks emerging advances and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Markakis, Evangelos; Mavromoustakis, Constandinos X; Pallis, Evangelos

    2017-01-01

    This book focuses on the challenges and solutions related to cloud and fog computing for 5G mobile networks, and presents novel approaches to the frameworks and schemes that carry out storage, communication, computation and control in the fog/cloud paradigm.

  2. Fog and soil weathering as sources of nutrients in a California redwood forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holly A. Ewing; Kathleen C. Weathers; Amanda M. Lindsey; Pamela H. Templer; Todd E. Dawson; Damon C. Bradbury; Mary K. Firestone; Vanessa K.S. Boukili

    2012-01-01

    Fog water deposition is thought to influence the ecological function of many coastal ecosystems, including coast redwood forests. We examined cation and anion inputs from fog and rain, as well as the fate of these inputs, within a Sonoma County, California, coast redwood forest to elucidate the availability of these ions and some of the biotic and abiotic processes...

  3. Acid fog deposition and the declining forest in Tanzawa mountains, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igawa, M.; Shigihara, A.; Goto, S.; Nanzai, B.

    2010-07-01

    Since 1988, we have investigated fog chemistry in Mt. Oyama, Tanzawa mountains, Japan, and acid fog has been frequently observed there. We have observed fog on Mt. Oyama by using a night view video camera placed at the base of the mountain, by using a visibility meter at the top of the mountain, and by an active fog sampler at the mountainside. We have reported the fog frequency at the top of Mt. Oyama to be 46% measured by the video camera, but it was overestimated. The visibility measured at the top of the mountain is the most reliable index, and the top of the mountain is covered with fog for about 30%. The frequency of about 15% was added for the case of the visibility of a few km when it was measured by a night view video camera placed at the base of the mountain (8.5 km far from the top). Fog-water deposition increases with the increasing altitude to be much larger than the rain-water deposition. The factors affecting on the occult precipitation intensity were investigated by the simultaneous measurement of the rainfall intensity under a canopy, the wind speed and direction, and the visibility at the top of the mountain. Air pollution has been improved recently in Japan, but acid fog is not improved and has been affecting the leaves of the trees. In Tanzawa mountains, many fir trees and beech trees are declining, while cedar trees show no decline symptoms. We have investigated the effect of acid fog on the trees of these species by exposing simulated acid fog on the seedlings of the species. Seedlings of fir and beech are much damaged by the long term exposure of pH 3 fog, while cedar seedlings are not affected by the acid fog. By the exposure of simulated acid fog, the epicuticle wax is eroded at first, then the cross linking polycation between sugar chains of cell wall is ion-exchanged with proton and the cell wall is swollen, and the membrane calcium is desorbed from the membrane, which lowers the tolerance of the trees to the climate change. Fir and beech

  4. Fog Water Systems in South Africa: An Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Heerden, J.; Olivier, J.; van Schalkwyk, L.

    2010-07-01

    This paper reports on fog water harvesting in South Africa. Ten semi-operational fog water catchment systems were erected at rural schools in South Africa between 1999 and 2007. These systems copied the basic design features of the systems at El Tofo, Chili, modified for South African conditions. Major problems were experienced due to poor maintenance and vandalism. Another serious problem was the abrasion of the 40% shade cloth netting against the supporting cables. Gale force winds also led to the complete failure and collapse of the systems. It thus became obvious that the simple flat screen structure is not suitable for South African conditions. Co-operation with Mesh Concepts cc and Cloud Water Concepts cc resulted in the development of a new design for fog/cloud water collection. This design comprises three 40 m2 panels joined together to form the sides of an equilateral triangle. Four such triangles are linked together to form a 9 panel system. The six 6 m poles supporting the 9 panels are 11 m apart and all structure and net support cables are anchored, in line, with the sides of the panels. The system is 5.5 m high and the 9 panel system exposes 360m2 to the cloud/fog. The system is stable and wind forces are transferred to the anchors via nylon pulleys housed in brackets bolted to the poles. The mesh material is a poly yarn co-knitted with stainless steel that provides strength and stability to the mesh. An added advantage is that several 9 panel systems can be linked and expanded to cover the available space. There are currently three such systems in place - at Brook’s Nek (1650 m MSL) in the mountains of the Eastern Cape (684 m2) and at Lamberts Bay and Doring Bay (both 360 m2) on the West Coast. An experimental 3-panel system has been established on the Zondachsberg (1142m MSL), 35 km north of Plettenberg Bay. Preliminary data from this site indicate that orographic cloud forms against the mountain side soon after the wind turns to the south. Average

  5. Baby Shampoo versus Commercial Anti-fogging Solution to Prevent Fogging during Nasal Endoscopy: A Randomized Double-Blinded, Matched-Pair, Equivalent Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chainansamit, Seksun; Piromchai, Patorn; Anantpinijwatna, Intira; Kasemsiri, Pornthep; Thanaviratananich, Sanguansak

    2015-08-01

    To compare the minimization of the fog condensation during nasal endoscopy between a commercial anti-fogging agent and baby shampoo. This randomized double-blinded matched pair study was conducted at the Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Faculty of Medicine, Khon Kaen University during February 4, 2013 to March 14, 2013. The commercial anti-fogging solution (Ultrastop®) and baby shampoo solution (Johnson's® no more tear®) were compared. A computer generated randomization was performed to select the solution applying on the lens for nasal endoscopy of the right nasal cavity. The other solution was then used for the left one. Three passes of endoscopy were performed to examine the floor of the nose, the sphenoethmoidal recess and the middle meatus area which spent about 30 seconds for each time of endoscopy. The time to become foggy on the lens and the preferred solution assessed by the endoscopists were recorded. There were 71 eligible patients recruited in the study, 37 males (52.1%) and 34 females (47.9%). There was no fogging during a 30-second nasal endoscopy either by baby shampoo or commercial anti-fogging solution. However, 9.86% (95% C12.75-16.97) of endoscopists preferred commercial anti-fogging agent, 7.04% (95% CI 0.94-13.14) preferred baby shampoo and 83.10% (95% CI 74.16-92.03) had equal satisfaction. Both agents had no statistically significant difference for preventing foggy on the lens. Baby shampoo is an effective agent to prevent fogging during nasal endoscopy and comparable with the commercial anti-fogging agent.

  6. Sudden Stratospheric Warming Compendium

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Sudden Stratospheric Warming Compendium (SSWC) data set documents the stratospheric, tropospheric, and surface climate impacts of sudden stratospheric warmings. This...

  7. Global Warming on Triton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliot, J. L.; Hammel, H. B.; Wasserman, L. H.; Franz, O. G.; McDonald, S. W.; Person, M. J.; Olkin, C. B.; Dunham, E. J.; Spencer, J. R.; Stansberry, J. A.; hide

    1998-01-01

    Triton, Neptune's largest moon, has been predicted to undergo significant seasonal changes that would reveal themselves as changes in its mean frost temperature. But whether this temperature should at the present time be increasing, decreasing or constant depends on a number of parameters (such as the thermal properties of the surface, and frost migration patterns) that are unknown. Here we report observations of a recent stellar occultation by Triton which, when combined with earlier results, show that Triton has undergone a period of global warming since 1989. Our most conservative estimates of the rate of temperature and surface-pressure increase during this period imply that the atmosphere is doubling in bulk every 10 years, significantly faster than predicted by any published frost model for Triton. Our result suggests that permanent polar caps on Triton play a c dominant role in regulating seasonal atmospheric changes. Similar processes should also be active on Pluto.

  8. Standard practice for modified salt spray (fog) testing

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2009-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers and sets forth conditions for five modifications in salt spray (fog) testing for specification purposes. These are in chronological order of their development: 1.1.1 Annex A1, acetic acid-salt spray test, continuous. 1.1.2 Annex A2, cyclic acidified salt spray test. 1.1.3 Annex A3, seawater acidified test, cyclic (SWAAT). 1.1.4 Annex A4, SO2 salt spray test, cyclic. 1.1.5 Annex A5, dilute electrolyte cyclic fog dry test. 1.2 This practice does not prescribe the type of modification, test specimen or exposure periods to be used for a specific product, nor the interpretation to be given to the results. 1.3 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. No other units of measurement are included in this standard. 1.4 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to consult and establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicabilit...

  9. The stress corrosion cracking behaviour of heat-treated Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloy in modified salt spray fog testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onoro, J. [Ingenieria y Ciencia de los Materiales, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, ETS Ingenieros Industriales, Madrid (Spain)

    2010-02-15

    The stress corrosion cracking behaviour of 7075 (Al-Zn-Mg-Cu) alloy have been studied in a salt spray fog chamber with two vapourised aqueous solutions (0 and 5% NaCl). The paper analyses the stress corrosion resistance of 7075 aluminium alloy with several precipitation-ageing heat treatments. The results are compared with that obtained in 3.5% NaCl aqueous solution at 20 C. The salt spray fog testing has permitted a good evaluation of SCC susceptibility in 7075 alloy. All temper conditions studied were susceptible to SCC in the different environments tested. 7075-T6 temper was the most susceptible, while in all the cases studied 7075-T73 temper was the least susceptible. Compared to 7075-T6, 7075-RRA temper improved the resistance against the SCC process, but the mechanical properties obtained were lower. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  10. Improvement of fog predictability in a coupled system of PAFOG and WRF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Wonheung; Yum, Seong Soo; Kim, Chang Ki

    2017-04-01

    Fog is difficult to predict because of the multi-scale nature of its formation mechanism: not only the synoptic conditions but also the local meteorological conditions crucially influence fog formation. Coarse vertical resolution and parameterization errors in fog prediction models are also critical reasons for low predictability. In this study, we use a coupled model system of a 3D mesoscale model (WRF) and a single column model with a fine vertical resolution (PAFOG, PArameterized FOG) to simulate fogs formed over the southern coastal region of the Korean Peninsula, where National Center for Intensive Observation of Severe Weather (NCIO) is located. NCIO is unique in that it has a 300 m meteorological tower built at the location to measure basic meteorological variables (temperature, dew point temperature and winds) at eleven different altitudes, and comprehensive atmospheric physics measurements are made with the various remote sensing instruments such as visibility meter, cloud radar, wind profiler, microwave radiometer, and ceilometer. These measurement data are used as input data to the model system and for evaluating the results. Particularly the data for initial and external forcings, which are tightly connected to the predictability of coupled model system, are derived from the tower measurement. This study aims at finding out the most important factors that influence fog predictability of the coupled system for NCIO. Nudging of meteorological tower data and soil moisture variability are found to be critically influencing fog predictability. Detailed results will be discussed at the conference.

  11. Measurements of dew and fog chemical composition at a rural site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straub, D.; Sokoloff, R.; Ressler, D.; Herckes, P.

    2012-12-01

    Liquid water in the atmosphere has been shown to play an important role in the transport, transformation, and removal of aerosol particles and soluble gases. Dew and fog represent two forms of the atmospheric aqueous phase, both of which may enhance the deposition of trace species and enable fast aqueous phase reactions. Compared to precipitation, dews and fogs have longer residence times at ground level and therefore may be strongly influenced by local sources. Fog composition measurements in the United States have been limited to relatively few locations along the East and West coasts while only a handful of studies have focused on dew composition. To extend our knowledge of dew and fog composition, measurements have been made on the campus of Susquehanna University in central Pennsylvania. Fog samples have been collected since 2007 using an automated Caltech Heated Rod Cloudwater Collector (CHRCC). Dew sampling began during the summer of 2012 using a 90 cm by 90 cm Teflon sheet mounted on a polystyrene foam panel. All samples were analyzed for pH and one of more of the following: major inorganic ions, organic acids, total organic carbon (TOC), and trace metals. Dew and fog concentrations varied widely between samples, though concentrations of most species in fog generally exceeded those in dew. The median pH was approximately 6.0 for fog and 7.0 for dew, both of which are much higher than the median value of 4.6 for precipitation in this region. Ammonium was the most abundant ionic species in the fog samples, followed by sulfate, calcium, and nitrate. Dew samples were also dominated by ammonium, though calcium was significant in some samples. Sulfate and nitrate concentrations were substantially lower in the dew samples. Formate and acetate were the most abundant organic acids in both types of samples, although those species made up much larger fraction of the total solute in the dew samples. In addition, oxalate and propionate were observed in both types of

  12. Fog harvesting on the verge of economic competitiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiedemann, K. J.; Lummerich, A.

    2010-07-01

    Water scarcity is the bottleneck for agriculture and development of Peru’s coast and subject to aggravation due to climate change. Until present day, Peru’s coast in general and the Lima Metropolitan Area (LMA) in particular have enjoyed to a great extend the effect of the country’s high altitude glaciers that serve as a buffer for the capital’s water demand during the highland dry season. However, climate models predict the disappearance of this buffer system below 5.500 masl by 2015, leaving one of the driest places on earth with yet another decrease in freshwater supply (Zapata 2008). The deviation of water resources from the highlands has led already to allocation conflicts. Peru is in urgent need of new concepts for water management. Fog harvesting was introduced to South America in the 1980s and has since been implemented at various locations in North and Central America, Europe, Africa, Asia and Australia. The Standard Fog Collector (SFC) as described by Schemenauer and Cereceda (1994) has proven to be a successful instrument for this purpose. Apart from a number of small scale investigations, the design of the collector has barely been changed over the past three decades (e.g. Gioda et al. 1993). Within the framework of the presented project, financed primarily by the Global Exploration Fund of the National Geographic Society and Bayer AG, new fog collectors were designed at pilot and full scale. Best results in terms of simplicity of construction and water yield were obtained by a metal frame structure called Eiffel. While covering the same amount of space as an SFC and using the same Raschel 65% shadow net, the Eiffel collector harvested up to 2.650 liters of water within a frame of 8x4m compared to up to 600 liters of water harvested by a SFC at the same location. In combination with a simplified maintenance concept, our collectors present an economically competitive alternative to water supply by truck delivery in a region that is not likely to

  13. Clean fog rapid procedure test of artificially and naturally polluted HVDC porcelain barrel insulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vlastos, A.E. (Univ. of Technology, Gothenberg (SE))

    1992-07-01

    The first question asked in this paper refers to the variation of the peak leakage current prior to the flashover and the variation of the time prior to flashover in the test of artificially polluted insulators when using the up-and-down method. To answer this question sums up the test procedure used in the up-and-down method. For each trial represented the insulator was again polluted artificially and then dried following the procedure described in the paper. Then the insulator was transported into the fog chamber and the voltage and fog was switched on simultaneously. In these experiments a low fog injection rate was used.

  14. Improvement of the Fog Detection based on Himawari-8 over the Korean Peninsula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, H. W.; Sohn, E. H.; Ryu, G. H.; Jang, J. D.

    2016-12-01

    Korea Meteorological Administration (KMA) services fog detection using Communication, Ocean and Meteorological Satellite (COMS) data for nowcasting. But, it is not easy to detect fog over complex terrain using COMS. Recently, Japan Meteorological Agency launched Himawari-8 geostationary satellite and releases data from July 2015. It has better spatial and spectral resolution than COMS, so it seems that Himawari-8 may have good sensitivity to detect fog. In this study, fog detection based on COMS methodology is applied and tested using Himawari-8 measurement over the Korean peninsula. A method has four threshold tests as follows: 1. Dual Channel Difference (DCD) between 12.3㎛ and 13.3㎛ (DCD1) test to remove higher cloud. 2. DCD between 3.9㎛ and 10.4㎛ (DCD2) test to detect night fog. 3. DCD between Clear Sky Brightness Temperature (CSTB; Maximum brightness temperature of 10.4㎛ during before 15 days) and 10.4㎛ (DCD3) test to set bottom layer. 4. 0.64㎛ albedo test to detect day fog. The fog detection from COMS and Himawari-8 were compared to understand each characteristics and performance at same condition. At night, typically showing similar DCD2, Himawari-8 has smaller value than COMS in the fog area. It seems that Himawari-8 receives a stronger signal because Spectral Response Function (SRF) of AHI is narrower than MI. In addition, improved spatial resolution (AHI: 2km; MI: 4km for IR channels) might enhance sensitivity of fog detection over mountainous area (Fig.1) In evaluation of accuracy, Probability of Detection (POD) and False Alarm Ratio (FAR) of Himawari-8 are 73%, 39% respectively (COMS POD: 65%; FAR: 55%) below 1K of DCD3 at Oct. 2015, when the radiation fog occurs a lot in Korea. The result shows that Himawari-8 has good performance of fog detection near the ground. Also, It is analyzed that reduce over-detection by using a variety of channels. In conclusion, fog detection using Himawari-8 data and similar methodology with COMS shows

  15. Probabilistic Model for Free-Space Optical Links Under Continental Fog Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Marzuki; Faisal, M.; Sheikh Muhammad, S.; M. S. Awan; Khan, M S; F. Nadeem; Leitgeb, E.

    2010-01-01

    The error characteristics of a free-space optical (FSO) channel are significantly different from the fiber based optical links and thus require a deep physical understanding of the propagation channel. In particular different fog conditions greatly influence the optical transmissions and thus a channel model is required to estimate the detrimental fog effects. In this paper we shall present the probabilistic model for radiation fog from the measured data over a 80 m FSO link installed at Graz, A...

  16. Cooling analysis of a light emitting diode automotive fog lamp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zadravec Matej

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Efficiency of cooling fins inside of a light emitting diode fog lamp is studied using computational fluid dynamics. Diffusion in heat sink, natural convection and radiation are the main principles of the simulated heat transfer. The Navier-Stokes equations were solved by the computational fluid dynamics code, including Monte Carlo radiation model and no additional turbulence model was needed. The numerical simulation is tested using the existing lamp geometry and temperature measurements. The agreement is excellent inside of few degrees at all measured points. The main objective of the article is to determine the cooling effect of various heat sink parts. Based on performed simulations, some heat sink parts are found to be very ineffective. The geometry and heat sink modifications are proposed. While radiation influence is significant, compressible effects are found to be minor.

  17. UAS measurements of ice fog and diamond dust in the Arctic at the DOE ARM mobile facility of Oliktok Point, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, C. G.; Stuefer, M.; Heymsfield, A.

    2013-12-01

    We report on our planned airborne studies of ice fog and diamond dust at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) mobile facility at Oliktok Point, Alaska. Measurements are proposed with a newly developed small version of a Video-Ice Particle Sampler (VIPS) as well as ice crystal replicators; the instruments will be flown aboard a hexacopter type unmanned aerial system (UAS). The UAS will operate at favorable low wind situations within an altitude range of approximate 3000 feet from the surface. Ice fog and diamond dust have been observed up to 50% of all winter days at selected locations in the Arctic. Strong surface-based temperature inversions form during the Arctic winter months from November to May as an effect of the low solar energy received at the surface. The cold and very stable boundary layer inhibits vertical aerosol exchange processes with the free atmosphere, which leads to continuous formation and accumulation of atmospheric ice crystals. Vertical changes in particle numbers, type, and size distribution will provide a wealth of new information about the properties and variability of low level Arctic ice aerosol. Additional continuous ground based cloud particle measurements will allow evaluation of temporal changes of the ice crystals. A goal of the study is to evaluate regional anthropogenic and natural effects on ice fog microphysics. Oliktok Point is located along the typical short-range trajectories of industrial pollutants (~30 miles northwest of the Prudhoe Bay Oilfields). Differences in ice particle microphysics and nuclei characteristics will allow evaluation of regional anthropogenic effects.

  18. Secondary organic aerosol formation through fog processing of VOCs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herckes, P.; Hutchings, J. W.

    2010-07-01

    Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) including benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes (BTEX) have been determined in highly concentrated amounts (>1 ug/L) in intercepted clouds in northern Arizona (USA). These VOCs are found in concentrations much higher than predicted by partitioning alone. The reactivity of BTEX in the fog/cloud aqueous phase was investigated through laboratory studies. BTEX species showed fast degradation in the aqueous phase in the presence of peroxides and light. Observed half-lives ranged from three and six hours, substantially shorter than the respective gas phase half-lives (several days). The observed reaction rates were on the order of 1 ppb/min but decreased substantially with increasing concentrations of organic matter (TOC). The products of BTEX oxidation reactions were analyzed using HPLC-UV and LCMS. The first generation of products identified included phenol and cresols which correspond to the hydroxyl-addition reaction to benzene and toluene. Upon investigating of multi-generational products, smaller, less volatile species are predominant although a large variety of products is found. Most reaction products have substantially lower vapor pressure and will remain in the particle phase upon droplet evaporation. The SOA generation potential of cloud and fog processing of BTEX was evaluated using simple calculations and showed that in ideal situations these reactions could add up to 9% of the ambient aerosol mass. In more conservative scenarios, the contribution of the processing of BTEX was around 1% of ambient aerosol concentrations. Overall, cloud processing of VOC has the potential to contribute to the atmospheric aerosol mass. However, the contribution will depend upon many factors such as the irradiation, organic matter content in the droplets and droplet lifetime.

  19. Global warming - some perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Erlykin, Anatoly D.; Wolfendale, Arnold W.; Hanna, Edward

    2012-01-01

    Here the authors critically review the IPCC’s claim that global warming is “very likely” caused by human activity: such a description underestimates the likelihood of the warming being due to this mechanism. Next examined are known alternative “natural” mechanisms which could give rise to the warming if, despite many claims, the man-made explanation was false because of compensation effects (greenhouse gases versus aerosol effects). Also, a number of difficulties, as yet unresolved, ...

  20. A New Perspective on Formation of Haze-Fog: The Fuzzy Cognitive Map and Its Approaches to Data Mining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Peng

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Haze-fog has seriously hindered the sustainable development of the ecological environment and caused great harm to the physical and mental health of residents in China. Therefore, it is important to probe the formation of haze-fog for its early warning and prevention. The formation of haze-fog is, in fact, a fuzzy nonlinear process. The formation of haze-fog is such a complex process that it is difficult to simulate its dynamic evolution using traditional methods, mainly because of the lack of their consideration of the nonlinear relationships. It is, therefore, essential to explore new perspectives on the formation of haze-fog. In this work, previous research on haze-fog formation is summarized first. Second, a new perspective is proposed on the application of fuzzy cognitive map to the formation of haze-fog. Third, a data mining method based on the genetic algorithm is used to discover the causality values of a fuzzy cognitive map (FCM for hazefog formation. Finally, simulation results are obtained through an experiment using the fuzzy cognitive map and its data mining method for the formation of haze-fog. The validity of this approach is determined by definition of a simple rule and the Kappa values. Thus, this research not only provides a new idea using FCM modeling the formation of haze-fog, but also uses an effective method of FCM for solving the nonlinear dynamics of the haze-fog formation.

  1. A Secure and Verifiable Outsourced Access Control Scheme in Fog-Cloud Computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Kai; Wang, Junxiong; Wang, Xin; Li, Hui; Yang, Yintang

    2017-07-24

    With the rapid development of big data and Internet of things (IOT), the number of networking devices and data volume are increasing dramatically. Fog computing, which extends cloud computing to the edge of the network can effectively solve the bottleneck problems of data transmission and data storage. However, security and privacy challenges are also arising in the fog-cloud computing environment. Ciphertext-policy attribute-based encryption (CP-ABE) can be adopted to realize data access control in fog-cloud computing systems. In this paper, we propose a verifiable outsourced multi-authority access control scheme, named VO-MAACS. In our construction, most encryption and decryption computations are outsourced to fog devices and the computation results can be verified by using our verification method. Meanwhile, to address the revocation issue, we design an efficient user and attribute revocation method for it. Finally, analysis and simulation results show that our scheme is both secure and highly efficient.

  2. Application of Artificial Neural Network Forecasts to Predict Fog at Canberra International Airport

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fabbian, Dustin; de Dear, Richard; Lellyett, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    ... obtained from the Australian Bureau of Meteorology was used to develop, train, test, and validate ANNs designed to predict log occurrence. Fog forecasting aids were developed for 3-, 6-, 12-, a...

  3. Fogging formulations for fixation of particulate contamination in ductwork and enclosures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maresca, Jr., Joseph W.; Kostelnik, Lori M.; Kriskivich, James R.; Demmer, Rick L.; Tripp, Julia L.

    2015-09-08

    A method and an apparatus using aqueous fixatives for fogging of ventilation ductwork, enclosures, or buildings containing dust, lint, and particulates that may be contaminated by radionuclides and other dangerous or unsafe particulate contaminants, which method and apparatus are capable of (1) obtaining full coverage within the ductwork and (2) penetrating and fixing the lint, dust and large particles present in the ductwork so that no airborne particles are released during or after the application of the fixative. New aqueous fogging solutions outperform conventional glycerin-based solutions. These aqueous solutions will fog using conventional methods of application and contain a surfactant to aid wetting and penetration of the lint and dust, a binder to stabilize loose or respirable particles, and an agent to aid in fogging and enhance adhesiveness. The solutions are safe and easy to use.

  4. Supermicron modes of ammonium ions related to fog in rural atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, X. H.; Zhang, L.

    2012-11-01

    Fog-processed aerosols were identified and analyzed in detail from a large-sized database in which size-segregated atmospheric particles and gases were simultaneously measured at eight Canadian rural sites. In ten samples collected during or following fog events, at least one supermicron mode of particulate NH4+ was observed. The supermicron modes were likely associated with fog events since they were absent on non-fog days. The supermicron mode of NH4+ in the 5-10 μm size range probably reflected the direct contribution from fog droplets. Based on detailed analysis of the chemical compositions and the extent of neutralization, the supermicron mode of NH4+ in the 1-4 μm size range was believed to be caused by fog-processing of ammonium salt aerosols. These aerosol particles consisted of incompletely neutralized sulfuric acid aerosols in NH3-poor conditions or a mixture of ammonium nitrate and ammonium sulfate aerosols in NH3-rich conditions. Interstitial aerosols and fog droplets presented during fog events likely yielded a minor direct contribution to the measured NH4+. The mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) of the 1-4 μm mode of NH4+ strongly depended on ambient temperature (T) and can be grouped into two regimes. In one regime, the MMAD was between 1.1 and 1.7 μm in four samples, when fog occurred at T > 0 °C, and in two samples, at T > -3 °C. The MMAD of NH4+ in this size range was also observed in various atmospheric environments, as discussed in the literature. In the other regime, the MMAD was between 2.8 and 3.4 μm in four samples when fog occurred at T MMAD was not related to chemical composition and concentration of ammonium salts. Further investigations are needed in order to fully understand the cause of the MMAD. The larger supermicron mode of ammonium salts aerosol observed at T < -4 °C has added new knowledge on the size distributions and chemical compositions of fog-processed aerosols under various ambient conditions.

  5. Supermicron modes of ammonium ions related to fog in rural atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. H. Yao

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Fog-processed aerosols were identified and analyzed in detail from a large-sized database in which size-segregated atmospheric particles and gases were simultaneously measured at eight Canadian rural sites. In ten samples collected during or following fog events, at least one supermicron mode of particulate NH4+ was observed. The supermicron modes were likely associated with fog events since they were absent on non-fog days. The supermicron mode of NH4+ in the 5–10 μm size range probably reflected the direct contribution from fog droplets. Based on detailed analysis of the chemical compositions and the extent of neutralization, the supermicron mode of NH4+ in the 1–4 μm size range was believed to be caused by fog-processing of ammonium salt aerosols. These aerosol particles consisted of incompletely neutralized sulfuric acid aerosols in NH3-poor conditions or a mixture of ammonium nitrate and ammonium sulfate aerosols in NH3-rich conditions. Interstitial aerosols and fog droplets presented during fog events likely yielded a minor direct contribution to the measured NH4+. The mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD of the 1–4 μm mode of NH4+ strongly depended on ambient temperature (T and can be grouped into two regimes. In one regime, the MMAD was between 1.1 and 1.7 μm in four samples, when fog occurred at T > 0 °C, and in two samples, at T > −3 °C. The MMAD of NH4+ in this size range was also observed in various atmospheric environments, as discussed in the literature. In the other regime, the MMAD was between 2.8 and 3.4 μm in four samples when fog occurred at T < −4 °C, a phenomenon that was first observed in this study. The MMAD was not related to chemical composition and concentration of ammonium salts. Further investigations are needed in

  6. Crowd Sensing-Enabling Security Service Recommendation for Social Fog Computing Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Jun Wu; Zhou Su; Shen Wang; Jianhua Li

    2017-01-01

    Fog computing, shifting intelligence and resources from the remote cloud to edge networks, has the potential of providing low-latency for the communication from sensing data sources to users. For the objects from the Internet of Things (IoT) to the cloud, it is a new trend that the objects establish social-like relationships with each other, which efficiently brings the benefits of developed sociality to a complex environment. As fog service become more sophisticated, it will become more conv...

  7. On the study of the FSO link performance under controlled turbulence and fog atmospheric conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Rajbhandari, Sujan; Ghassemlooy, Zabih; Perez Soler, Joaquin; Le Minh, Hoa; Leitgeb, Erich; Kandus, Gorazd; Kvicera, V.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, the effect of turbulence and fog on the free space optical (FSO) communication systems for on off keying (OOK), pulse amplitude modulation (PAM) and subcarrier intensity modulation (SIM) based on binary phase shift keying (BPSK) is experimentally investigated. The experiment is carried out in a controlled laboratory environment where turbulence and fog could be generated in a dedicated FSO chamber. In comparison to 4 PAM signal, the BPSK and OOK NRZ modulation signalling format...

  8. Natural Contamination and Surface Flashover on Silicone Rubber Surface under Haze–Fog Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ang Ren

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Anti-pollution flashover of insulator is important for power systems. In recent years, haze-fog weather occurs frequently, which makes discharge occurs easily on the insulator surface and accelerates insulation aging of insulator. In order to study the influence of haze-fog on the surface discharge of room temperature vulcanized silicone rubber, an artificial haze-fog lab was established. Based on four consecutive years of insulator contamination accumulation and atmospheric sampling in haze-fog environment, the contamination configuration appropriate for RTV-coated surface discharge test under simulation environment of haze-fog was put forward. ANSYS Maxwell was used to analyze the influence of room temperature vulcanized silicone rubber surface attachments on electric field distribution. The changes of droplet on the polluted room temperature vulcanized silicone rubber surface and the corresponding surface flashover voltage under alternating current (AC, direct current (DC positive polar (+, and DC negative polar (− power source were recorded by a high speed camera. The results are as follows: The main ion components from haze-fog atmospheric particles are NO3−, SO42−, NH4+, and Ca2+. In haze-fog environment, both the equivalent salt deposit density (ESDD and non-soluble deposit density (NSDD of insulators are higher than that under general environment. The amount of large particles on the AC transmission line is greater than that of the DC transmission line. The influence of DC polarity power source on the distribution of contamination particle size is not significant. After the deposition of haze-fog, the local conductivity of the room temperature vulcanized silicone rubber surface increased, which caused the flashover voltage reduce. Discharge is liable to occur at the triple junction point of droplet, air, and room temperature vulcanized silicone rubber surface. After the deformation or movement of droplets, a new triple junction

  9. Chemical composition of rain and fog water collected in the Monteverde biological reserve

    OpenAIRE

    Vásquez Morera, Tatiana; Alfaro Solís, Rosa; Sibaja Brenes, José Pablo; Esquivel Hernández, Germain; Valdés González, Juan

    2016-01-01

    We determined the chemical composition of rain and fog water in three sampling sites in the Monteverde Biological Reserve, Puntarenas, between October 2009 and January 2010. Due to its state of conservation, and its geographic location on the continental divide, the Monteverde Biological Reserve offers an ideal study site for the environmental chemical monitoring of tropical ecosystems, which includes the analysis of rain and fog water. Samples of for water were collected using Teflon lined s...

  10. Age-related declines in car following performance under simulated fog conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Rui; Kang, Julie J; Andersen, George J

    2010-05-01

    The present study examined age-related differences in car following performance when contrast of the driving scene was reduced by simulated fog. Older (mean age of 72.6) and younger (mean age of 21.1) drivers were presented with a car following scenario in a simulator in which a lead vehicle (LV) varied speed according to a sum of three sine wave functions. Drivers were shown an initial following distance of 18 m and were asked to maintain headway distance by controlling speed to match changes in LV speed. Five simulated fog conditions were examined ranging from a no fog condition (contrast of 0.55) to a high fog condition (contrast of 0.03). Average LV speed varied across trials (40, 60, or 80 km/h). The results indicated age-related declines in car following performance for both headway distance and RMS (root mean square) error in matching speed. The greatest decline occurred at moderate speeds under the highest fog density condition, with older drivers maintaining a headway distance that was 21% closer than younger drivers. At higher speeds older drivers maintained a greater headway distance than younger drivers. These results suggest that older drivers may be at greater risk for a collision under high fog density and moderate speeds. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Can headway reduction in fog be explained by impaired perception of relative motion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caro, Stéphane; Cavallo, Viola; Marendaz, Christian; Boer, Erwin R; Vienne, Fabrice

    2009-06-01

    The goal of this study was to provide a better understanding of driver behavior in fog. Impaired perception of changes in headway is hypothesized to be one of the reasons for shorter following distances in foggy conditions as compared with clear weather. In the experiments described here, we measured response time for discriminating between whether the vehicle ahead is getting closer or farther away. Several visibility conditions were studied, ranging from a no-fog condition to a condition in which the vehicle could be seen only by its rear fog lights. Fog conditions increased response times when the outline of the vehicle was barely visible or not visible at all. The longer response times in fog were attributable to the low contrast of the vehicle outline when still visible and to the smaller spacing between the two lights when the outline could not be properly perceived. Moreover, response times were found to be shorter for shorter following distances and for faster accelerations. Reducing headway could be a way for drivers to achieve faster discrimination of relative motion in foggy weather. More specifically, shortening one's following distance until visibility of the lead vehicle changes from bad to good may have a perceptual control benefit, insofar as the response time gain compensates for the reduction in headway under these conditions. Potential applications include improving traffic safety. The results provide a possible explanation for close following in fog and point out the importance of rear-light design under these conditions.

  12. Global Warming: A Myth?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tropospheric temperature through a 'positive feedback'. And again, as the troposphere warms up, its water holding capacity also increases, amplifying chances of further warming. But satellite data indicate that free troposphere is largely cut-off from the surface and evaporated water may not moisten the free troposphere ...

  13. Fog composition at Baengnyeong Island in the eastern Yellow Sea: detecting markers of aqueous atmospheric oxidations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boris, A. J.; Lee, T.; Park, T.; Choi, J.; Seo, S. J.; Collett, J. L., Jr.

    2016-01-01

    Samples of fog water were collected at Baengnyeong Island (BYI) in the Yellow Sea during the summer of 2014. The most abundant chemical species in the fog water were NH4+ (mean of 2220 µM), NO3- (1260 µM), SO4-2 (730 µM), and Na+ (551 µM), with substantial contributions from other species consistent with marine and biomass burning influence on some dates. The pH of the samples ranged between 3.48 and 5.00, with a mean of 3.94, intermediate within pH values of fog/cloud water reported previously in Southeast Asia. Back trajectories (72 h) showed that high relative humidity ( > 80 %) was encountered upwind of the sampling site by all but one of the sampled air masses, and that the fog composition at BYI can be impacted by several different source regions, including the Sea of Japan, southeastern China, northeastern China, and the East China Sea. Sulfur in the collected fog was highly oxidized: low S(IV) concentrations were measured (mean of 2.36 µM) in contrast to SO4-2 and in contrast to fog/cloud S(IV) concentrations from pollutant source regions; organosulfate species were also observed and were most likely formed through aging of mainly biogenic volatile organic compounds. Low-molecular-mass organic acids were major contributors to total organic carbon (TOC; 36-69 %), comprising a fraction of TOC at the upper end of that seen in fogs and clouds in other polluted environments. Large contributions were observed from not only acetic and formic acids but also oxalic, succinic, maleic, and other organic acids that can be produced in aqueous atmospheric organic processing (AAOP) reactions. These samples of East Asian fog water containing highly oxidized components represent fog downwind of pollutant sources and can provide new insight into the fate of regional emissions. In particular, these samples demonstrate the result of extensive photochemical aging during multiday transport, including oxidation within wet aerosols and fogs.

  14. Fog composition at Baengnyeong Island in the eastern Yellow Sea: detecting markers of aqueous atmospheric oxidations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. J. Boris

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Samples of fog water were collected at Baengnyeong Island (BYI in the Yellow Sea during the summer of 2014. The most abundant chemical species in the fog water were NH4+ (mean of 2220 µM, NO3− (1260 µM, SO4−2 (730 µM, and Na+ (551 µM, with substantial contributions from other species consistent with marine and biomass burning influence on some dates. The pH of the samples ranged between 3.48 and 5.00, with a mean of 3.94, intermediate within pH values of fog/cloud water reported previously in Southeast Asia. Back trajectories (72 h showed that high relative humidity ( >  80 % was encountered upwind of the sampling site by all but one of the sampled air masses, and that the fog composition at BYI can be impacted by several different source regions, including the Sea of Japan, southeastern China, northeastern China, and the East China Sea. Sulfur in the collected fog was highly oxidized: low S(IV concentrations were measured (mean of 2.36 µM in contrast to SO4−2 and in contrast to fog/cloud S(IV concentrations from pollutant source regions; organosulfate species were also observed and were most likely formed through aging of mainly biogenic volatile organic compounds. Low-molecular-mass organic acids were major contributors to total organic carbon (TOC; 36–69 %, comprising a fraction of TOC at the upper end of that seen in fogs and clouds in other polluted environments. Large contributions were observed from not only acetic and formic acids but also oxalic, succinic, maleic, and other organic acids that can be produced in aqueous atmospheric organic processing (AAOP reactions. These samples of East Asian fog water containing highly oxidized components represent fog downwind of pollutant sources and can provide new insight into the fate of regional emissions. In particular, these samples demonstrate the result of extensive photochemical aging during multiday transport, including oxidation within wet aerosols and

  15. On the two tales of Warm Jupiters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chelsea; Wu, Yanqin

    2017-06-01

    Warm Jupiters often refer to giant planets with intermediate orbit periods between 10-200 days. Their period range corresponds to the so-called "period valley", the observed dip in occupation in-between the hot Jupiters and cold Jupiters. Observational evidences suggest that they are a distinct population from the hot Jupiters and are likely to be formed from at least two different channels themselves. Earlier radial velocity surveys show that at least a fraction of the warm Jupiters have modest to high eccentricities, supporting these planets migrate to their current location through either secular perturbations or planet-planet scatterings. On the other hand, transiting warm Jupiters found in Kepler are likely to have close-by transiting low mass companions interior/exterior to the warm Jupiter orbits. The existence of the companions indicating the system needs to be near coplanar, and near circular, unlike their radial velocity counter parts. In this talk, I will review observational properties to date of the warm Jupiters, as well as recent advances in the theory of the warm Jupiter formation. I will then discuss how new discoveries from TESS can help with understanding the transition between the hot and warm Jupiter population, and distinguish the contribution from different formation channels.

  16. Temporal Variability and Characterization of Aerosols across the Pakistan Region during the Winter Fog Periods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Fahim Khokhar

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Fog is a meteorological/environmental phenomenon which happens across the Indo-Gangetic Plains (IGP and leads to significant social and economic problems, especially posing significant threats to public health and causing disruptions in air and road traffic. Meteorological stations in Pakistan provide limited information regarding fog episodes as these provide only point observations. Continuous monitoring, as well as a spatially coherent picture of fog distribution, is possible through the use of satellite observations. This study focuses on the 2012–2015 winter fog episodes over the Pakistan region using the Moderate Resolution Image Spectrometer (MODIS, the Ozone Monitoring Instrument and the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO products. The main objective of the study was to map the spatial distribution of aerosols, their types, and to identify the aerosol origins during special weather conditions like fog in Pakistan. The study also included ground monitoring of particulate matter (PM concentrations, which were conducted during the 2014–2015 winter period only. Overall, this study is part of a multi-country project supported by the International Centre for Integrated Mountain Development (ICIMOD, started in 2014–2015 winter period, whereby scientists from Bangladesh, India and Nepal have also conducted measurements at their respective sites. A significant correlation between MODIS (AOD and AERONET Station (AOD data from Lahore was identified. Mass concentration of PM10 at all sampling sites within Lahore city exceeded the National Environmental Quality Standards (NEQS levels on most of the occasions. Smoke and absorbing aerosol were found to be major constituents of winter fog in Pakistan. Furthermore, an extended span of winter fog was also observed in Lahore city during the winter of 2014–2015. The Vertical Feature Mask (VFM provided by CALIPSO satellite confirmed the low-lying aerosol

  17. TOWARDS COMPATIBILITY OF CONTEMPORARY GEOSPATIAL STANDARDS WITH THE FOG COMPUTING CONCEPT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Panidi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This position paper considers the possibility of implementation of the Fog Computing paradigm into the contemporary Geographic Information Systems (GISs and into the geospatial Web services that provide data access. In particular, the paper is focused on the issue of compatibility of the existing geospatial standards developed by the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC with the principles of Fog information systems. The WMS, WMTS, WFS, WCS, WPS and CS standards are highlighted. The conclusion is made that the OGC standards can be extended by new request types to ensure the implementation of Fog Computing functionality and the inverse compatibility with currently used Cloud-based Web services. Two fundamental problems are highlighted that arise when designing geospatial Fog Web services. The first one is the need to provide processing and management operations on spatial data at client devices (particularly on mobile devices when the geospatial Fog Web service is deployed on such a device. The second problem is the necessity to insure the geospatial data transmission using the HyperText Transfer Protocol, which is used in contemporary geospatial Web services. The JavaScript programming language and the WebRTC technology (Web Real-Time Communication are mentioned as examples of basic technologies that can be applied to geospatial Fog Web services. It is concluded that contemporary technologies used in GISs and Web services ensure in general the implementation of Fog Computing into geospatial data management tasks. However, the known examples of such implementation do not exist today, and further research and development are required in this direction.

  18. Analysis of fog effects on terrestrial Free Space optical communication links

    KAUST Repository

    Esmail, Maged Abdullah

    2016-07-26

    In this paper, we consider and examine fog measurement data, coming from several locations in Europe and USA, and attempt to derive a unified model for fog attenuation in free space optics (FSO) communication links. We evaluate and compare the performance of our proposed model to that of many well-known alternative models. We found that our proposed model, achieves an average RMSE that outperforms them by more than 9 dB. Furthermore, we have studied the performance of the FSO system using different performance metrics such as signal-to-noise (SNR) ratio, bit error rate (BER), and channel capacity. Our results show that FSO is a short range technology. Therefore, FSO is expected to find its place in future networks that will have small cell size, i.e., <1 km diameter. Moreover, our investigation shows that under dense fog, it is difficult to maintain a communications link because of the high signal attenuation, which requires switching the communications to RF backup. Our results show that increasing the transmitted power will improve the system performance under light fog. However, under heavy fog, the effect is minor. To enhance the system performance under low visibility range, multi-hop link is used which can enhance the power budget by using short segments links. Using 22 dBm transmitted power, we obtained BER=10-3 over 1 km link length with 600 m visibility range which corresponds to light fog. However, under lower visibility range equals 40 m that corresponds to dense fog, we obtained the same BER but over 200 m link length. © 2016 IEEE.

  19. Fogging low concentrated organic acid in a fattening pig unit - Effect on animal health and microclimate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Heiko; Schulz, Jochen; Kemper, Nicole; Tichy, Alexander; Krauss, Ines; Knecht, Christian; Hennig-Pauka, Isabel

    2016-12-23

    In intensive pig production aerial contaminates are potential hazards for the health of animals and humans. In this study, the effect of fogging a low concentrated tartaric acid solution on pigs' health, environmental and hygiene parameters were evaluated in an inhabited fattening unit. Pigs were housed in separate units (control group n=109 and experimental group n=110). During the whole fattening period, twice a week at 48 hour intervals, a 0.1% tartaric acid solution was aerosolized by a cold-fogging system for 20 minutes in the experimental unit. Environmental parameters were spot-checked on days of fogging. Sedimentation dust and surfaces were analysed for bacterial and fungal load. Dust particle size distribution was assessed. Pigs were clinically examined weekly. Standard meat examination at an abattoir was extended by individual quantification of lung alterations. The fogging procedure had no influence on ammonia concentrations. A significant reduction of mould, but not of bacteria, was found in sedimentation dust, and bacterial and mould scores of surface samples were improved. A significant reduction of particle size classes 1.6-2.0 µm, 4.0-5.0 µm, 7.5-10 µm, as well as 10-15 µm was observed. The high sound level of the fogging machine (82-102 dB) led to higher activity and pen-mate directed behaviour. More skin alterations, conjunctivitis and sneezing were recorded in the experimental group. Gross pathological lung alterations did not differ between both groups. Although fogging of tartaric acid is limited to a concentration of 0.1% due to its irritating effect on the respiratory mucosa, reduction of microbial load can be achieved, but it would be enhanced by using more powerful fogging systems.

  20. Coupling of fog and marine microbial content in the near-shore coastal environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dueker, M. E.; O'Mullan, G. D.; Weathers, K. C.; Juhl, A. R.; Uriarte, M.

    2012-02-01

    Microbes in the atmosphere (microbial aerosols) play an important role in climate and provide an ecological and biogeochemical connection between oceanic, atmospheric, and terrestrial environments. However, the sources and environmental factors controlling the concentration, diversity, transport, and viability of microbial aerosols are poorly understood. This study examined culturable microbial aerosols from a coastal environment in Maine (USA) and determined the effect of onshore wind speed and fog presence on deposition rate, source, and community composition. During fog events with low onshore winds (marine aerosol studies, was dominated at the phylum level by Proteobacteria, with additional representation from Firmicutes, Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes. Seventy-five percent of the culturable microbial aerosols falling out under foggy conditions were most similar to GenBank-published sequences detected in marine environments. Using a 97 % similarity cut-off, sequence libraries from ocean surface and fog isolates shared eight operational taxonomic units (OTU's) in total, three of which were the most dominant OTU's in the library, representing large fractions of the ocean (28 %) and fog (21 %) libraries. The fog and ocean surface libraries were significantly more similar in microbial community composition than clear (non-foggy) and ocean surface libraries, according to both Jaccard and Sorenson indices. These findings provide the first evidence of a difference in community composition and microbial culturability of aerosols associated with fog compared to clear conditions. The data support a dual role for fog in enhancing the fallout of viable microbial aerosols via increased gravitational settling rates and decreased aerosolization stress on the organisms, which may include relief from UV inactivation, desiccation, and oligotrophic microconditions. This study provides a strong case for ocean to terrestrial transport of microbes and a potential connection

  1. Application of FTIR spectrometer to the test of extinction performance of water fog with infrared emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuanyu

    2009-05-01

    The infrared spectrum, granularity distribution and mass concentration of water fog were tested by a FTIR spectrometer, laser granularity device and other apparatus in a 75.6m3 test room. The transmittance and mass extinction coefficients of water fog with infrared emission were tested and analyzed within 3~5μm and 8~14μm wave band. The extinction efficiency factors of water fog with 3~14μm infrared were calculated according to Van der Hulst formula and the curve was drawn to show the factors varied with the incident wavelength. According to the experimental results, the water fog has a good extinction performance to infrared emission and the extinction performance is obviously influenced by incident wavelength. For example, the extinction efficiency factor increases with the incident wavelength within 3~5μm but has the least at 10.4μm and has the maximum at 13μm. By the analysis, the average mass extinction coefficient of the water fog between 3μm and 5μm infrared wave band is 0.110m2/g while between 8μm and 14μm is 0.102m2/g. The experimental result tested by FTIR spectrometer is consistent with theoretic result calculated according to Van der Hulst formula, so that the method to test the mass extinction coefficient of water fog with infrared emission by FTIR spectrometer is viable and scientific, while Van der Hulst formula may be applied to calculate the extinction efficiency factors of particles from water fog.

  2. Infarct fogging on immediate postinterventional CT - a not infrequent occurrence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dekeyzer, Sven [Onze-Lieve-Vrouw (OLV) Ziekenhuis Aalst, Department of Medical Imaging, Aalst (Belgium); RWTH University Hospital Aachen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, Aachen (Germany); Reich, Arno [RWTH University Hospital Aachen, Department of Neurology, Aachen (Germany); Othman, Ahmed E. [University Hospital Tuebingen, Department of Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Wiesmann, Martin; Nikoubashman, Omid [RWTH University Hospital Aachen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, Aachen (Germany)

    2017-09-15

    A pseudo-normalization of infarcted brain parenchyma, similar to the ''fogging effect'' which usually occurs after 2-3 weeks, can be observed on CT performed immediately after endovascular stroke treatment (EST). Goal of this study was to analyze the incidence of this phenomenon and its evolution on follow-up imaging. One hundred fifty-two patients in our database of 949 patients, who were treated for acute stroke between January 2010 and January 2015, fulfilled the inclusion criteria of (a) EST for an acute stroke in the anterior circulation, (b) an ASPECT-score < 10 on pre-interventional CT, and (c) postinterventional CT imaging within 4.5 h after the procedure. Two independent reviewers analyzed imaging data of these patients. Transformation of brain areas from hypoattenuated on pre-interventional CT to isodense on postinterventional CT was seen in 37 patients in a total of 49 ASPECTS areas (Cohen's kappa 0.819; p < 0.001). In 17 patients, the previously hypoattenuated brain areas became isodense, but appeared swollen. In 20 patients (13%), the previously hypodense brain area could not be distinguished from normal brain parenchyma. On follow-up imaging, all isodense brain areas showed signs of infarction. Pseudo-normalization of infarct hypoattenuation on postinterventional CT is not infrequent. It is most likely caused by contrast leakage in infarcted parenchyma and does not represent salvage of ischemic brain parenchyma. (orig.)

  3. Significant concentration changes of chemical components of PM1 in the Yangtze River Delta area of China and the implications for the formation mechanism of heavy haze-fog pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y W; Zhang, X Y; Zhang, Y M; Shen, X J; Sun, J Y; Ma, Q L; Yu, X M; Zhu, J L; Zhang, L; Che, H C

    2015-12-15

    Since the winter season of 2013, a number of persistent haze-fog events have occurred in central-eastern China. Continuous measurements of the chemical and physical properties of PM1 at a regional background station in the Yangtze River Delta area of China from 16 Nov. to 18 Dec., 2013 revealed several haze-fog events, among which a heavy haze-fog event occurred between 6 Dec. and 8 Dec. The mean concentration of PM1 was 212μgm(-3) in the heavy haze-fog period, which was about 10 times higher than on clean days and featured a peak mass concentration that reached 298μgm(-3). Organics were the largest contributor to the dramatic rise of PM1 on heavy haze-fog days (average mass concentration of 86μgm(-3)), followed by nitrate (58μgm(-3)), sulfate (35μgm(-3)), ammonium (29μgm(-3)), and chloride (4.0μgm(-3)). Nitrate exhibited the largest increase (~20 factors), associated with a significant increase in NOx. This was mainly attributable to increased coal combustion emissions, relative to motor vehicle emissions, and was caused by short-distance pollutant transport within surrounding areas. Low-volatility oxidized organic aerosols (OA) (LV-OOA) and biomass-burning OA (BBOA) also increased sharply on heavy haze-fog days, exhibiting an enhanced oxidation capacity of the atmosphere and increased emissions from biomass burning. The strengthening of the oxidation capacity during the heavy pollution episode, along with lower solar radiation, was probably due to increased biomass burning, which were important precursors of O3. The prevailing meteorological conditions, including low wind and high relative humidity, and short distance transported gaseous and particulate matter surrounding of the sampling site, coincided with the increased pollutant concentrations mainly from biomass-burning mentioned above to cause the persistent haze-fog event in the YRD area. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Clearing the Cosmic Fog - The Most Distant Galaxy Ever Measured

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    A European team of astronomers using ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT) has measured the distance to the most remote galaxy so far. By carefully analysing the very faint glow of the galaxy they have found that they are seeing it when the Universe was only about 600 million years old (a redshift of 8.6). These are the first confirmed observations of a galaxy whose light is clearing the opaque hydrogen fog that filled the cosmos at this early time. The results were presented at an online press conference with the scientists on 19 October 2010, and will appear in the 21 October issue of the journal Nature. "Using the ESO Very Large Telescope we have confirmed that a galaxy spotted earlier using Hubble is the most remote object identified so far in the Universe" [1], says Matt Lehnert (Observatoire de Paris) who is lead author of the paper reporting the results. "The power of the VLT and its SINFONI spectrograph allows us to actually measure the distance to this very faint galaxy and we find that we are seeing it when the Universe was less than 600 million years old." Studying these first galaxies is extremely difficult. By the time that their initially brilliant light gets to Earth they appear very faint and small. Furthermore, this dim light falls mostly in the infrared part of the spectrum because its wavelength has been stretched by the expansion of the Universe - an effect known as redshift. To make matters worse, at this early time, less than a billion years after the Big Bang, the Universe was not fully transparent and much of it was filled with a hydrogen fog that absorbed the fierce ultraviolet light from young galaxies. The period when the fog was still being cleared by this ultraviolet light is known as the era of reionisation [2]. Despite these challenges the new Wide Field Camera 3 on the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope discovered several robust candidate objects in 2009 [3] that were thought to be galaxies shining in the era of reionisation. Confirming the

  5. Chemical partitioning of fine particle-bound metals on haze-fog and non-haze-fog days in Nanjing, China and its contribution to human health risks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huiming; Wu, Hongfei; Wang, Qin'geng; Yang, Meng; Li, Fengying; Sun, Yixuan; Qian, Xin; Wang, Jinhua; Wang, Cheng

    2017-01-01

    Information on chemical partitioning and associated risk of airborne metals, particularly during a haze-fog episode, is limited. Fine particulate matter (PM2.5) was collected during a severe haze-fog event in winter and non-haze-fog periods in summer and fall from an urban region of a typical Chinese mega-city, Nanjing. The particulate-bound metals (Al, As, Ba, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Mo, Na, Ni, Pb, Sr, Ti, V, and Zn) were chemically fractionated in a four-step sequential extraction procedure and human health risk was assessed. During the haze-fog episode, PM2.5 was extremely elevated with a mean concentration of 281 μg/m3 (range: 77-431 μg/m3), whereas the mean PM2.5 concentrations in summer and fall periods were 86 μg/m3 (range: 66-111 μg/m3) and 77 μg/m3 (range: 42-131 μg/m3), respectively. All elements had significantly higher concentrations and many metals exceeded relevant limits on haze-fog days. K, Na, Sr, Zn, Mo, Ca, Cd, Mg, Mn, Cu, Ba, Cr and As all showed relatively high proportions of the soluble and exchangeable fraction and strong bio-accessible potential. High temperature and humidity may increase the bio-accessible fraction of many airborne metals. The hazard index for potential toxic metals was 0.115, which was lower than the safe limit (1). However, the combined carcinogenic risk was 1.32 × 10- 6 for children and 5.29 × 10- 6 for adults, with both values being higher than the precautionary criterion (10- 6). Results of this study provide information for the behavior and risk mitigation of airborne metals.

  6. Global Warming: A Myth?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 6; Issue 7. Global Warming: A Myth? - Credibility of Climate Scenarios Predicted by Systems Simulations. Deepanjan Majumdar. General Article Volume 6 Issue 7 July 2001 pp 13-21 ...

  7. Global Warming: A Myth?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 6; Issue 6. Global Warming: A Myth? - Anomalous Temperature Trends Recorded from Satellites and Radiosondes. Deepanjan Majumdar. General Article Volume 6 Issue 6 June 2001 pp 43-52 ...

  8. Global Warming on Trial

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Broecker, Wallace S

    1992-01-01

      The issue of global warming is fraught with controversy, as it pits groups who are concerned with the short-term well-being of society against those who fear for the long-term future of the planet...

  9. Warm and Cool Dinosaurs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannlein, Sally

    2001-01-01

    Presents an art activity in which first grade students draw dinosaurs in order to learn about the concept of warm and cool colors. Explains how the activity also helped the students learn about the concept of distance when drawing. (CMK)

  10. Media Pembelajaran Global Warming

    OpenAIRE

    Tham, Fikri Jufri; Liliana, Liliana; Purba, Kristo Radion

    2016-01-01

    Computer based learning media is one of the media has an important role in learning. Learning media will be attractive when packaged through interactive media , such as interactive media created in paper manufacture " instructional media global warming" . The advantage gained is that it can increase knowledge, generally educate people to be more concerned about the environment , and also can be a means of entertainment. This application is focused to learn about global warming and packaged in...

  11. Global warming yearbook: 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arris, L. [ed.

    1999-02-01

    The report brings together a year`s worth of global warming stories - over 280 in all - in one convenient volume. It provides a one-stop report on the scientific, political and industrial implications of global warming. The report includes: detailed coverage of negotiations on the Kyoto Protocol; scientific findings on carbon sources and sinks, coral bleaching, Antarctic ice shelves, plankton, wildlife and tree growth; new developments on fuel economy, wind power, fuel cells, cogeneration, energy labelling and emissions trading.

  12. Fog Collection Pilot Project (FCPP) in the Eastern Escarpments of Eritrea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gherezghiher, T.

    2010-07-01

    Eritrea is water scarce country that relies heavily on underground water reserve and more than 80% of the rural population does not have access to safe and clean drinking water. In the rural areas, shallow hand dug wells are the primary sources of water and in most cases their discharge rate is deteriorating due to the recurrent drought. Particularly, in the targeted project areas underground water reserve is hard to find due to the steep topography. However, in these parts of Eritrea one will find a sector of mountains, about 700 km long, where the wind transports moist air from the Red Sea forming fog on the highlands. The area of the FCPP is the region of Maakel, near the villages Nefasit and Arborobu. The overall objective of his FCPP was to provide supplementary water supply system from large fog collectors (LFCs) in order to increase access to safe and clean drinking water in the targeted Schools and surrounding villages. Communities and students were organized to participate in the implementation of the project. Forty LFCs were established in all the targeted areas in previously evaluated potential locations. The project was implemented by Vision Eritrea, a National NGO in partnership with the country's' Water Resource Department; Fog Quest a Canadian NGO and Water Foundation, a German NGO, who also funded the project. The FCPP focused on introducing a new innovative water harvesting technology which is a crucial element for the survival of the people in the mountainous escarpment of the country; and with prospect of locally owned solutions for a sustainable management of and access to natural resource. Preliminary evaluation of the project showed that there was a good production of fog water, with an average of 6-8 litters/m2/day on the low intensity of fog and from 12 -18 litters on the high fog intensity. A functional water committee was established and trained on water management and maintenance of the LFC. They also developed water bylaw by which the

  13. Recent Fog trends and impact on wheat productivity in NW plains in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, S.; Singh, D.

    2010-07-01

    Observations on fog events recorded at Agrometeorological Observatory at Hisar, India (Lat: 29010’N, Long: 75046’E and Alt: 215.2 m amsl) representing North-west plains in India during winter season (November to February) for the recent period 1993 to 2008 have been analyzed. The study period was so chosen because of significant climatic aberrations reported by IPCC (FAR, 2007). In the region, the fog season is generally considered from November to February, with the months of December and January witnessing the longest durations of dense fog. The cumulative foggy days in the region ranged between 18 to 52 during the winter/rabi seasons (1995-96 to 2007-08). The maximum (52) and minimum (18) numbers of foggy day were observed during winter/rabi season 2007-08 and 1997-98, respectively. On an average, the dense fog was witnessed for just 3-5 hours during the months of November and February while December and January experiences about 95 per cent of dense fog durations under reference. The conditions became conducive for formation of dense fog as there was little difference between day and night temperatures with no winds. Interestingly, an increasing trend (@ 2 day/season) in occurrence of fog events was seen during the period under report. Maximum foggy events (20) in a month were recorded in December, 1998. Average maximum foggy events (7) recorded in a month were observed in January. All the Niño years (SST>0.5) received above normal rainfall (50.0 mm) in fog season, but the deficient rainfall was recorded during Niña years (SSTdiseases and insect-pest development in the region. Simple and multiple regression equations using fog events explained 45 to 60 per cent variations in wheat productivity. It was concluded that the regional climatic variability may be the reason of increased duration and frequency of foggy events in the region and thus, the meteorological variables need to be monitored carefully for better predicting of ensuing foggy conditions and

  14. Aging and the detection of imminent collisions under simulated fog conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Rui; Bian, Zheng; Guindon, Amy; Andersen, George J

    2012-11-01

    The present study examined age-related differences in collision detection performance when contrast of the driving scene was reduced by simulated fog. Older and younger drivers were presented with a collision detection scenario in a simulator in which an object moved at a constant speed on a linear trajectory towards the driver. Drivers were shown part of the motion path of an approaching object that would eventually either collide with or pass by the driver and were required to determine whether or not the object would collide with the driver. Driver motion was either stationary or moving along a linear path down the roadway. A no fog condition and three different levels of fog were examined. Detection performance decreased when dense fog was simulated for older but not for younger observers. An age-related decrement was also found with shorter display durations (longer time to contact). When the vehicle was moving decrements in performance were observed for both younger and older drivers. These results suggest that under inclement weather conditions with reduced visibility, such as fog, older drivers may have an increased crash risk due to a decreased ability to detect impending collision events. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Environmental effects of fog oil and CS usage at the Combat Maneuver Training Center, Hohenfels, Germany

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brubaker, K.L.; Rosenblatt, D.H.; Snyder, C.T.

    1992-03-01

    In response to environmental concerns at the Combat Maneuver Training Center (CMTC), Hohenfels, Germany, the US Army 7th Army Training Command commissioned a scientific study by Argonne National Laboratory to investigate specific issues. The study involved three parts: (1) a field study to determine if fog oil and CS (a compound named after its discoverers, B.B. Carson and R.W. Stoughton) were accumulating in the CMTC environment, (2) a screening of selected soil samples for the presence of US Environmental Protection Agency priority pollutants, and (3) a literature review of the health effects of fog oil and CS, as well as a review of training practices at CMTC. No fog oil or fog oil degradation products were detected in any soil, sediment, or vegetation sample collected at CMTC. Trace quantities of one or more priority pollutants were tentatively detected in three of eight soil and sediment samples. However, the priority pollutant concentrations are so low that they pose no environmental or health hazards. No evidence of widespread or significant contamination in the training areas was found. Crucial data needed to fully evaluate both acute and chronic health effects of civilian exposures to CS at CMTC are not available. On the basis of the available literature, long-ten-n health effects in the civilian population near CMTC that could result from the use of fog oil and CS during training activities are believed to be negligible.

  16. Chemical characterization of fog and rain water collected at the eastern Andes cordillera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Beiderwieden

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available During a three month period in 2003 and 2004, the chemistry of fog and rainwater were studied at the 'El Tiro' site in a tropical mountain forest ecosystem in Ecuador, South America. The fogwater samples were collected using a passive fog collector, and for the rain water, a standard rain sampler was employed. For all samples, electric conductivity, pH, and the concentrations of NH4+, K+, Na+, Ca2+, Mg2+, Cl−, NO3−, PO43−, and SO42− were measured. For each fog sample, a 5 day back trajectory was calculated by the use of the HYSPLIT model. Two types of trajectories occurred. One type was characterized by advection of air masses from the East over the Amazonian basin, the other trajectory arrived one from the West after significant travel time over the Pacific Ocean. We found considerably higher ion concentrations in fogwater samples than in rain samples. Median pH values are 4.58 for fog water, and 5.26 for the rain samples, respectively. The median electric conductivity was 23 μS cm−1 for the fog and 6 μS cm−1 for the rain. The continent samples exhibit higher concentrations of most ions as compared to the pacific samples, but these differences could not be detected statistically.

  17. The fog-3 gene and regulation of cell fate in the germ line of Caenorhabditis elegans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellis, R.; Kimble, J. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    1995-02-01

    In the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, germ cells normally adopt one of three fates: mitosis, spermatogenesis or oogenesis. We have identified and characterized the gene fog-3, which is required for germ cells to differentiate as sperm rather than as oocytes. Analysis of double mutants suggests that fog-3 is absolutely required for spermatogenesis and acts at the end of the regulatory hierarchy controlling sex determination for the germ line. By contrast, mutations in fog-3 do not alter the sexual identity of other tissues. We also have characterized the null phenotype of fog-1, another gene required for spermatogenesis; we demonstrate that it too controls the sexual identity of germ cells but not of other tissues. Finally, we have studied the same interaction of these two fog genes with gld-1, a gene required for germ cells to undergo oogenesis rather than mitosis. On the basis of these results, we propose that germ-cell fate might be controlled by a set of inhibitory interactions among genes that specify one of three fates: mitosis, spermatogenesis or oogenesis. Such a regulatory network would link the adoption of one germ-cell fate to the suppression of the other two. 68 refs., 7 figs., 6 tabs.

  18. Comparative Exergoeconomic Analyses of Gas Turbine Steam Injection Cycles with and without Fogging Inlet Cooling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Athari

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The results are reported of exergoeconomic analyses of a simple gas turbine cycle without a fogging system (SGT, a simple steam injection gas turbine cycle (STIG, and a steam injection gas turbine cycle with inlet fogging cooler (FSTIG. The results show that (1 a gas-turbine cycle with steam injection and simultaneous cooling has a higher power output than the other considered cycle; (2 at maximum energy efficiency conditions the gas turbine has the highest exergy efficiency of the cycle components and the lowest value of exergy efficiency is calculated for the fog cooler, where the mixing of air and water at greatly different temperatures causes the high exergy destruction; and (3 utilization of the fogging cooler in the steam injection cycle increases the exergy destruction in the combustion chamber. Furthermore, the simple gas turbine cycle is found to be more economic as its relative cost difference, total unit product cost, and exergoeconomic factors are less than those for the two other configurations. However, its efficiency and net power output are notably lower than for the gas turbine with steam injection and/or fog cooling. The total unit product cost is highest for the simple gas turbine with steam injection.

  19. Observation of sandhill cranes' (Grus canadensis) flight behavior in heavy fog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirsch, Eileen M.; Wellik, Mike J.; Suarez, Manuel J.; Diehl, Robert H.; Lutes, Jim; Woyczik, Wendy; Krapfl, Jon; Sojda, Richard S.

    2015-01-01

    The behaviors of birds flying in low visibility conditions remain poorly understood. We had the opportunity to monitor Sandhill Cranes (Grus canadensis) flying in heavy fog with very low visibility during a comprehensive landscape use study of refuging cranes in the Horicon Marsh in southeastern Wisconsin. As part of the study, we recorded flight patterns of cranes with a portable marine radar at various locations and times of day, and visually counted cranes as they departed the roost in the morning. We compared flight patterns during a fog event with those recorded during clear conditions. In good visibility, cranes usually departed the night roost shortly after sunrise and flew in relatively straight paths toward foraging areas. In fog, cranes departed the roost later in the day, did not venture far from the roost, engaged in significantly more circling flight, and returned to the roost site rather than proceeding to foraging areas. We also noted that compared to mornings with good visibility, cranes flying in fog called more frequently than usual. The only time in this 2-year study that observers heard young of the year calling was during the fog event. The observed behavior of cranes circling and lingering in an area while flying in poor visibility conditions suggests that such situations may increase chances of colliding with natural or anthropogenic obstacles in the vicinity.

  20. Channel modeling and performance evaluation of FSO communication systems in fog

    KAUST Repository

    Esmail, Maged Abdullah

    2016-07-01

    Free space optical (FSO) communication has become more exciting during the last decade. It has unregulated spectrum with a huge capacity compared to its radio frequency (RF) counterpart. Although FSO has many applications that cover indoor and outdoor environments, its widespread is humped by weather effects. Fog is classified as an extreme weather impairment that may cause link drop. Foggy channel modeling and characterization is necessary to analyze the system performance. In this paper, we first address the statistical behavior of the foggy channel based on a set of literature experimental data and develop a probability distribution function (PDF) model for fog attenuation. We then exploit our PDF model to derive closed form expressions and evaluate the system performance theoretically and numerically, in terms of average signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and outage probability. The results show that for 10-3 outage probability and 22 dBm transmitted power, the FSO system can work over 80 m, 160 m, 310 m, and 460 m link length under dense, thick, moderate, and light fog respectively. Increasing the transmitted power will have high impact when the fog density is low. However, under very dense fog, it has almost no effect. © 2016 IEEE.

  1. Fogging Control on LDPE/EVA Coextruded Films: Wettability Behavior and Its Correlation with Electric Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel A. Waldo-Mendoza

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The transformation of fog at a non-visible water layer on a membrane of low-density polyethylene (LDPE and ethylene-vinyl acetate (EVA was evaluated. Nonionic surfactants of major demand in the polyolefin industry were studied. A kinetic study using a hot fog chamber showed that condensation is controlled by both the diffusion and permanency of the surfactant more than by the change of the surface energy developed by the wetting agents. The greatest permanency of the anti-fog effect of the LDPE/EVA surface was close to 3000 h. The contact angle results demonstrated the ability of the wetting agent to spread out to the surface. Complementarily, the migration of nonionic surfactants from the inside of the polymeric matrix to the surface was analyzed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR microscopy. Additionally, electrical measurement on the anti-fogging membrane at alternating currents and at a sweep frequency was proposed to test the conductivity and wetting ability of nonionic surfactants. We proved that the amphiphilic molecules had the ability to increase the conductivity in the polyolefin membrane. A correlation between the bulk electrical conductivity and the permanency of the fogging control on the LDPE/EVA coextruded film was found.

  2. Brain "fog," inflammation and obesity : key aspects of neuropsychiatric disorders improved by luteolin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theoharis Constantin Theoharides

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Brain fog is a constellation of symptoms that include reduced cognition, inability to concentrate and multitask, as well as loss of short and long term memory. Brain fog characterizes patients with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs, celiac disease, chronic fatigue syndrome, fibromyalgia, mastocytosis and postural tachycardia syndrome (POTS, as well as minimal cognitive impairment, an early clinical presentation of Alzheimer’s disease (AD, and other neuropsychiatric disorders. Brain fog may be due to inflammatory molecules, including adipocytokines and histamine released from mast cells (MCs further stimulating microglia activation, and causing focal brain inflammation. Recent reviews have described the potential use of natural flavonoids for the treatment of neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative diseases. The flavone luteolin has numerous useful actions that include: anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, microglia inhibition, neuroprotection, and memory increase. A liposomal luteolin formulation in olive fruit extract improved attention in children with ASDs and brain fog in mastocytosis patients. Methylated luteolin analogues with increased activity and better bioavailability could be developed into effective treatments for neuropsychiatric disorders and brain fog.

  3. Brain "fog," inflammation and obesity: key aspects of neuropsychiatric disorders improved by luteolin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theoharides, Theoharis C; Stewart, Julia M; Hatziagelaki, Erifili; Kolaitis, Gerasimos

    2015-01-01

    Brain "fog" is a constellation of symptoms that include reduced cognition, inability to concentrate and multitask, as well as loss of short and long term memory. Brain "fog" characterizes patients with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs), celiac disease, chronic fatigue syndrome, fibromyalgia, mastocytosis, and postural tachycardia syndrome (POTS), as well as "minimal cognitive impairment," an early clinical presentation of Alzheimer's disease (AD), and other neuropsychiatric disorders. Brain "fog" may be due to inflammatory molecules, including adipocytokines and histamine released from mast cells (MCs) further stimulating microglia activation, and causing focal brain inflammation. Recent reviews have described the potential use of natural flavonoids for the treatment of neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative diseases. The flavone luteolin has numerous useful actions that include: anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, microglia inhibition, neuroprotection, and memory increase. A liposomal luteolin formulation in olive fruit extract improved attention in children with ASDs and brain "fog" in mastocytosis patients. Methylated luteolin analogs with increased activity and better bioavailability could be developed into effective treatments for neuropsychiatric disorders and brain "fog."

  4. Cutoff in the Lyman-$\\alpha$ forest power spectrum: warm IGM or warm dark matter?

    OpenAIRE

    Garzilli, Antonella; Boyarsky, Alexey; Ruchayskiy, Oleg

    2015-01-01

    We re-analyse high redshift and high resolution Lyman-$\\alpha$ forest spectra considered in (Viel et al 2013), seeking to constrain the properties of warm dark matter particles. Compared to this previous work, we consider a wider range of thermal histories of the intergalactic medium. We find that both warm and cold dark matter models can explain the cut-off observed in the flux power spectra of high-resolution observations equally well. This implies, however, very different thermal histories...

  5. Cutoff in the Lyman- α forest power spectrum: Warm IGM or warm dark matter?

    OpenAIRE

    Garzilli, Antonella; Boyarsky, Alexey; Ruchayskiy, Oleg

    2017-01-01

    We re-analyse high redshift and high resolution Lyman- α forest spectra considered in [1] , seeking to constrain the properties of warm dark matter particles. Compared to this previous work, we consider a wider range of thermal histories of the intergalactic medium. We find that both warm and cold dark matter models can explain the cut-off observed in the flux power spectra of high-resolution observations equally well. This implies, however, very different thermal histories and underlying rei...

  6. Cutoff in the Lyman-α forest power spectrum: Warm IGM or warm dark matter?

    OpenAIRE

    Antonella Garzilli; Alexey Boyarsky; Oleg Ruchayskiy

    2017-01-01

    We re-analyse high redshift and high resolution Lyman-α forest spectra considered in [1], seeking to constrain the properties of warm dark matter particles. Compared to this previous work, we consider a wider range of thermal histories of the intergalactic medium. We find that both warm and cold dark matter models can explain the cut-off observed in the flux power spectra of high-resolution observations equally well. This implies, however, very different thermal histories and underlying reion...

  7. Fog in a marginal agricultural area surrounded by montane Andean cloud forest during El Niño climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Santos, G.

    2010-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate temporal variations of water inputs, rainfall and fog (cloud water), and its contribution to the water balance in a marginal agricultural area of potato surrounded by tropical montane cloud forest in Colombia. Fog in the air boundary layer was estimated using a cylindrical fog collector. Liquid water content of fog events were evaluated before and during natural climate event of El Niño. Our study shows the temporal variation of these two water inputs in both daily and monthly cycles on Boyacá at 2900 m a.s.l. Rainfall was the most frequently observed atmospheric phenomenon, being present on average 62% of the days per year, whereas fog was 45% of the time. Reflected on the lower frequency, annual amount of fog was 11% of precipitation. However during the anomalous dry climate of El Niño, total amount of rainfall was negligible and the few fog events were the only water source for plant growth. Estimated water crop requirements were higher than the water inputs. The survival of the crops was explained by meteorological conditions during dew and fog events. High relative humidity might have eased the plant’s water stress by decreasing transpiration and temperature in leaves and soil, affecting the water balance and the heat exchange between the atmosphere-land interfaces in the marginal agricultural areas during exceptional dry climate.

  8. Fluid mechanics simulation of fog formation associated with polluted atmosphere produced by energy related fuel combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, R. J.; Liaw, G. S.

    1980-01-01

    It is noted that large quantities of atmospheric aerosols with composition SO4(-2), NO3(-1), and NH4(+1) have been detected in highly industrialized areas. Most aerosol products come from energy-related fuel combustion. Fluid mechanics simulation of both microphysical and macrophysical processes is considered in studying the time dependent evolution of the saturation spectra of condensation nuclei associated with polluted and clean atmospheres during the time periods of advection fog formation. The results demonstrate that the condensation nuclei associated with a polluted atmosphere provide more favorable conditions than condensation nuclei associated with a clean atmosphere to produce dense advection fog, and that attaining a certain degree of supersaturation is not necessarily required for the formation of advection fog having condensation nuclei associated with a polluted atmosphere.

  9. A Novel Retinex Algorithm and its Application to Fog-degraded Image Enhancement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xueyou Hu

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Fog-degraded images enhancement is an important problem in the field of image enhancement and computer vision. To overcome the halo artifact, enhance the contrast and better preserve the color of original image, a novel Multi-Scale Retinex color image enhancement method is proposed in this paper. An adaptive anisotropic Gaussian filtering method and its principle are described. The orientation of the Gaussian filter long axes is determined according to the gradient orientation in the position. The procedure of algorithm is given in this paper and applied in the fog- degraded images enhancement. Finally, by comparison with histogram equalization and Multi-Scale Retinex method, the experimental results show that the proposed method can offer better performance in fog-degraded image enhancement.

  10. The impact of vertical resolution in mesoscale model AROME forecasting of radiation fog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philip, Alexandre; Bergot, Thierry; Bouteloup, Yves; Bouyssel, François

    2015-04-01

    Airports short-term forecasting of fog has a security and economic impact. Numerical simulations have been performed with the mesoscale model AROME (Application of Research to Operations at Mesoscale) (Seity et al. 2011). Three vertical resolutions (60, 90 and 156 levels) are used to show the impact of radiation fog on numerical forecasting. Observations at Roissy Charles De Gaulle airport are compared to simulations. Significant differences in the onset, evolution and dissipation of fog were found. The high resolution simulation is in better agreement with observations than a coarser one. The surface boundary layer and incoming long-wave radiations are better represented. A more realistic behaviour of liquid water content evolution allows a better anticipation of low visibility procedures (ceiling AROME-France convective scale operational model. Mon.Wea.Rev., 139, 976-991.

  11. A resource-sharing model based on a repeated game in fog computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yan; Zhang, Nan

    2017-03-01

    With the rapid development of cloud computing techniques, the number of users is undergoing exponential growth. It is difficult for traditional data centers to perform many tasks in real time because of the limited bandwidth of resources. The concept of fog computing is proposed to support traditional cloud computing and to provide cloud services. In fog computing, the resource pool is composed of sporadic distributed resources that are more flexible and movable than a traditional data center. In this paper, we propose a fog computing structure and present a crowd-funding algorithm to integrate spare resources in the network. Furthermore, to encourage more resource owners to share their resources with the resource pool and to supervise the resource supporters as they actively perform their tasks, we propose an incentive mechanism in our algorithm. Simulation results show that our proposed incentive mechanism can effectively reduce the SLA violation rate and accelerate the completion of tasks.

  12. A resource-sharing model based on a repeated game in fog computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Sun

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available With the rapid development of cloud computing techniques, the number of users is undergoing exponential growth. It is difficult for traditional data centers to perform many tasks in real time because of the limited bandwidth of resources. The concept of fog computing is proposed to support traditional cloud computing and to provide cloud services. In fog computing, the resource pool is composed of sporadic distributed resources that are more flexible and movable than a traditional data center. In this paper, we propose a fog computing structure and present a crowd-funding algorithm to integrate spare resources in the network. Furthermore, to encourage more resource owners to share their resources with the resource pool and to supervise the resource supporters as they actively perform their tasks, we propose an incentive mechanism in our algorithm. Simulation results show that our proposed incentive mechanism can effectively reduce the SLA violation rate and accelerate the completion of tasks.

  13. A Study of Fog Characteristics using Free-Space Optical Wireless Links

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Awan

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available A technique for modeling the fog droplet size distributions using modified gamma distribution has been demonstrated by considering two separate radiation fog events recorded in Graz (Austria and Prague (Czech Republic. The measurement of liquid water content (LWC and the optical attenuations at visible wavelength are used to form equations to obtain the three parameters of the modified gamma distribution i.e., the slope (Λ, the intercept (N0 and the shape parameter (m. Calculated attenuation or LWC from the retrieved parameters are in excellent agreement with attenuation or LWC obtained from the measurement. Hence this method is useful in the study of fog microphysics and in modeling the fog attenuations for terrestrial FSO links in situations when our measurement data contains values of attenuations only, or liquid water content only or both at a particular location. For the two case studies, Graz and Prague, we obtained the DSD parameters Λ=3.547 ± 1.935, N0 =3.834 ± 2.239, m=6.135 ± 2.692 and Λ=5.882 ± 2.889, N0 =13.41 ± 3.875, m=5.288 ± 3.113, respectively. It is evident that the observed behavior of computed modified gamma distribution parameters for Graz and Prague is closely the same and is consistent with the previous literature for the radiation (continental fog. Moreover, we observed the variation of the computed DSD parameters at the different stages of fog (formation, maturity and dissipation phases indicating different microphysical processes at each stage.

  14. Winter fog monitoring over south asia by using multi satellite data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasmin, Naila

    2016-07-01

    committing The South Asian region in general and the Indo-Gangetic Plains (IGP) in particular hold about 1/6th of the world's population and is considered as one of the major hotspots of increasing atmospheric pollution. Due to growing population and globalization, South Asia is experiencing high transformations in the urban and industrial sectors. Fog is one of the meteorological/environmental phenomena which can generate significant social and economic problems especially a major havoc to air and road traffic. Meteorological stations provide information about the fog episodes only on the basis of point observation. Continuous monitoring as well as a spatially coherent picture of fog distribution can only be possible through the use of satellite imagery. Current study focus on winter fog episodes over South Asian region using Moderate Resolution Image Spectrometer (MODIS) Level 2 terra Product and MODIS Aerosol Product and OMI Absorbing Aerosol Index. The datasets used in this study includes MODIS Corrected Reflectance RGBs are used to analyse fog situation over study area. MOD04 level 2 Collection 6 data is used to study aerosol load and distribution which are characterised using aerosol type land. In order to study the variation of ground based observations from satellite data MODIS, CALIPSO, AERONET and high volume air Sampler were used. Objectives of the study was to map the spatial extent of fog as well as monitor its causes and similarly to analyze the Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) over South Asia with particular focus over Indo Gangetic Plans (IGP). Current studies show an increase in AOD from past few decades over South Asia and is contributing to poor air quality in the region due to growing population, urbanization, and industrialization. Smoke and absorbing aerosol are major constituent of fog over south Asia. Furthermore, winter 2014-15 extended span of Fog was also observed over South Asia. A significant correlation between MODIS (AOD) and AERONET

  15. Robot Vision to Monitor Structures in Invisible Fog Environments Using Active Imaging Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Seungkyu; Park, Nakkyu; Baik, Sunghoon; Choi, Youngsoo; Jeong, Kyungmin [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    Active vision is a direct visualization technique using a highly sensitive image sensor and a high intensity illuminant. Range-gated imaging (RGI) technique providing 2D and 3D images is one of emerging active vision technologies. The RGI technique extracts vision information by summing time sliced vision images. In the RGI system, objects are illuminated for ultra-short time by a high intensity illuminant and then the light reflected from objects is captured by a highly sensitive image sensor with the exposure of ultra-short time. The RGI system provides 2D and 3D image data from several images and it moreover provides clear images from invisible fog and smoke environment by using summing of time-sliced images. Nowadays, the Range-gated (RG) imaging is an emerging technology in the field of surveillance for security applications, especially in the visualization of invisible night and fog environment. Although RGI viewing was discovered in the 1960's, this technology is, nowadays, more and more applicable by virtue of the rapid development of optical and sensor technologies, such as highly sensitive imaging sensor and ultra-short pulse laser light. In contrast to passive vision systems, this technology enables operation even in harsh environments like fog and smoke. During the past decades, several applications of this technology have been applied in target recognition and in harsh environments, such as fog, underwater vision. Also, this technology has been demonstrated 3D imaging based on range-gated imaging. In this paper, a robot system to monitor structures in invisible fog environment is developed using an active range-gated imaging technique. The system consists of an ultra-short pulse laser device and a highly sensitive imaging sensor. The developed vision system is carried out to monitor objects in invisible fog environment. The experimental result of this newly approach vision system is described in this paper. To see invisible objects in fog

  16. Coupling of fog and marine microbial content in the near-shore coastal environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. E. Dueker

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Microbes in the atmosphere (microbial aerosols play an important role in climate and provide an ecological and biogeochemical connection between oceanic, atmospheric, and terrestrial environments. However, the sources and environmental factors controlling the concentration, diversity, transport, and viability of microbial aerosols are poorly understood. This study examined culturable microbial aerosols from a coastal environment in Maine (USA and determined the effect of onshore wind speed and fog presence on deposition rate, source, and community composition. During fog events with low onshore winds (<2 m s−1 the near-shore deposition of microbial aerosols (microbial fallout decreased with increasing wind speeds, whereas microbial fallout rates under clear conditions and comparable low wind speeds showed no wind speed dependence. Mean aerosol particle size also increased with onshore wind speed when fog was present, indicating increased shoreward transport of larger aerosol particles. 16S rRNA sequencing of culturable ocean surface bacteria and microbial aerosols deposited onshore resulted in the detection of 31 bacterial genera, with 5 dominant genera (Vibrio, Bacillus, Pseudoalteromonas, Psychrobacter, Salinibacterium making up 66 % of all sequences. The sequence library from microbial aerosol isolates, as with libraries found in other coastal/marine aerosol studies, was dominated at the phylum level by Proteobacteria, with additional representation from Firmicutes, Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes. Seventy-five percent of the culturable microbial aerosols falling out under foggy conditions were most similar to GenBank-published sequences detected in marine environments. Using a 97 % similarity cut-off, sequence libraries from ocean surface and fog isolates shared eight operational taxonomic units (OTU's in total, three of which were the most dominant OTU's in the library, representing large fractions of the ocean (28

  17. Near-real time Monitoring of the widespread winter Fog over the Indo-Gangetic Plains using satellite data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, D. L.; Gautam, R.; Rizvi, S.; Singh, M. K.

    2016-12-01

    The persistent and widespread winter fog impacts the Indo-Gangetic Plains (IGP) on an annual basis, disrupting day-to-day lives of millions of people in parts of northern India, Pakistan, Nepal and Bangladesh. The IGP is a densely-populated region located south of the Himalaya, in the northern parts of south Asia. During the past three decades or so, associated with growing population and energy demands, the IGP has witnessed strong upward trends in air pollution, particularly leading to poor air quality in the winter months. Co-occurring with the dense haze over the IGP, severe fog episodes persist throughout the months of December and January. Building on our recent work on satellite-based detection of fog, we have further extended the detection capability towards the development of a near-real time (NRT) fog monitoring system using satellite radiances and products. Here, we use multi-spectral radiances and aerosol/cloud retrievals from Terra/Aqua MODIS data for NRT fog monitoring over the IGP for both daytime as well as nighttime. Specifically, the nighttime fog detection algorithm employs a bi-spectral brightness temperature difference technique between two spectral channels: 3.9 μm and 11 μm. Our ongoing efforts also include extending fog detection capability in NRT to geostationary satellites, for providing continuous monitoring of the onset, evolution and spatial-temporal variation of fog, as well as the geospatial integration of surface meteorological observations of visibility, relative humidity, temperature. We anticipate that the ongoing and future development of a fog monitoring system may be of particular assistance to air and rail transportation management, as well as of general interest to the public. The outputs of fog detection algorithm and related aerosol/cloud parameters are operationally disseminated via http://fogsouthasia.com/.

  18. Greenhouse Warming Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Bent Erik

    2016-01-01

    The changing greenhouse effect caused by natural and anthropogenic causes is explained and efforts to model the behavior of the near-surface constituents of the Earth's land, ocean and atmosphere are discussed. Emissions of various substances and other aspects of human activity influence...... the greenhouse warming, and the impacts of the warming may again impact the wellbeing of human societies. Thus physical modeling of the near-surface ocean-soil-atmosphere system cannot be carried out without an idea of the development of human activities, which is done by scenario analysis. The interactive...

  19. Evaluation of fog and rain water collected at Delta Barrage, Egypt as a new resource for irrigated agriculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, Talaat A.; Omar, Mohie El Din M.; El Gammal, H. A. A.

    2017-11-01

    Alternative clean water resources are needed in Egypt to face the current water shortage and water quality deterioration. Therefore, this research investigates the suitability of harvesting fog and rain water for irrigation using a pilot fog collector for water quantity, water quality, and economic aspects. A pilot fog collector was installed at one location at Delta Barrage, Egypt. Freeze liquid nitrogen was fixed at the back of the fiberglass sheet to increase the condensation rate. The experiment was conducted during the period from November 2015 to February 2016. In general, all physicochemical variables are observed with higher values in the majority of fog than rain water. The fog is assumed to contain higher concentrations of anthropogenic emissions. TDS in both waters collected are less than 700 mg/l at sodium content less than 60%, classifying these waters as good for various plants under most conditions. In addition, SAR calculated values are less than 3.0 in each of fog and rain water, which proves the water suitability for all irrigated agriculture. Al and Fe concentrations were found common in all samples with values less than the permissible limits of the guidelines. These metals originate from soil material, ash and metal surfaces. The sensitive heavy metals (Cd and Pb) were within the permissible limits of the guideline in fog water, indicating this water is suitable for irrigation. On the contrary, rain water that has heavy metals is not permitted in irrigation water as per the Egyptian law. As per WQI, the rain water is classified as good quality while fog is classified as medium quality. Regarding the water quantity, a significant increase in the harvested fog quantity was observed after cooling the collector surface with freeze liquid nitrogen. The current fog collector produced the lowest water quantity among different fog collectors worldwide. However, these comparative results confirmed that quantity is different from one location to another

  20. Cryogenic Mechanical Properties of Warm Multi-Pass Caliber-Rolled Fine-Grained Titanium Alloys: Ti-6Al-4V (Normal and ELI Grades) and VT14

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayan, Niraj; Singh, Gaurav; Antony Prabhu, T.; Narayana Murty, S. V. S.; Ramamurty, U.

    2017-11-01

    The effect of microstructural refinement and the β phase fraction, V β, on the mechanical properties at cryogenic temperatures (up to 20 K) of two commercially important aerospace titanium alloys: Ti-6Al-4V (normal as well as extra low interstitial grades) and VT14 was examined. Multi-pass caliber rolling in the temperature range of 973 K to 1223 K (700 °C to 950 °C) was employed to refine the microstructure, as V β was found to increase nonlinearly with the rolling temperature. Detailed microstructural characterization of the alloys after caliber rolling was carried out using optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electron back-scatter diffraction (EBSD), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Complete spheroidization of the primary α laths along with formation of bimodal microstructure occurred when the alloys are rolled at temperatures above 1123 K (850 °C). For rolling temperatures less than 1123 K (850 °C), complete fragmentation of the β phase with limited spheroidization of α laths was observed. The microstructural refinement due to caliber rolling was found to significantly enhance the strength with no penalty on ductility both at room and cryogenic temperatures. This was attributed to a complex interplay between microstructural refinement and reduced transformed β phase fraction. TEM suggests that the serrated stress-strain responses observed in the post-yield deformation regime of specimens tested at 20 K were due to the activation of { {10\\bar{1}2} } tensile twins.

  1. Cryogenic Mechanical Properties of Warm Multi-Pass Caliber-Rolled Fine-Grained Titanium Alloys: Ti-6Al-4V (Normal and ELI Grades) and VT14

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayan, Niraj; Singh, Gaurav; Antony Prabhu, T.; Narayana Murty, S. V. S.; Ramamurty, U.

    2018-01-01

    The effect of microstructural refinement and the β phase fraction, V β, on the mechanical properties at cryogenic temperatures (up to 20 K) of two commercially important aerospace titanium alloys: Ti-6Al-4V (normal as well as extra low interstitial grades) and VT14 was examined. Multi-pass caliber rolling in the temperature range of 973 K to 1223 K (700 °C to 950 °C) was employed to refine the microstructure, as V β was found to increase nonlinearly with the rolling temperature. Detailed microstructural characterization of the alloys after caliber rolling was carried out using optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electron back-scatter diffraction (EBSD), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Complete spheroidization of the primary α laths along with formation of bimodal microstructure occurred when the alloys are rolled at temperatures above 1123 K (850 °C). For rolling temperatures less than 1123 K (850 °C), complete fragmentation of the β phase with limited spheroidization of α laths was observed. The microstructural refinement due to caliber rolling was found to significantly enhance the strength with no penalty on ductility both at room and cryogenic temperatures. This was attributed to a complex interplay between microstructural refinement and reduced transformed β phase fraction. TEM suggests that the serrated stress-strain responses observed in the post-yield deformation regime of specimens tested at 20 K were due to the activation of {10\\bar{1}2} tensile twins.

  2. FOG: Fighting the Achilles' Heel of Gossip Protocols with Fountain Codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champel, Mary-Luc; Kermarrec, Anne-Marie; Le Scouarnec, Nicolas

    Gossip protocols are well known to provide reliable and robust dissemination protocols in highly dynamic systems. Yet, they suffer from high redundancy in the last phase of the dissemination. In this paper, we combine fountain codes (rateless erasure-correcting codes) together with gossip protocols for a robust and fast content dissemination in large-scale dynamic systems. The use of fountain enables to eliminate the unnecessary redundancy of gossip protocols. We propose the design of FOG, which fully exploits the first exponential growth phase (where the data is disseminated exponentially fast) of gossip protocols while avoiding the need for the shrinking phase by using fountain codes. FOG voluntarily increases the number of disseminations but limits those disseminations to the exponential growth phase. In addition, FOG creates a split-graph overlay that splits the peers between encoders and forwarders. Forwarder peers become encoders as soon as they have received the whole content. In order to benefit even further and quicker from encoders, FOG biases the dissemination towards the most advanced peers to make them complete earlier.

  3. Forecasting radiation fog at climatologically contrasting sites: evaluation of statistical methods and WRF

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Román-Cascón, C.; Steeneveld, G.J.; Yague, C.; Sastre, M.; Arrillaga, J.A.; Maqueda, G.

    2016-01-01

    A 6-year climatology of radiation fog has been compiled at two sites: the Research Centre for the Lower Atmosphere (CIBA, Spain) and the Cabauw Experimental Site for Atmospheric Research (CESAR, The Netherlands). These sites are contrasting in terms of geographical situation, climate zone, altitude,

  4. Sample Selected Extreme Learning Machine Based Intrusion Detection in Fog Computing and MEC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingshuo An

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Fog computing, as a new paradigm, has many characteristics that are different from cloud computing. Due to the resources being limited, fog nodes/MEC hosts are vulnerable to cyberattacks. Lightweight intrusion detection system (IDS is a key technique to solve the problem. Because extreme learning machine (ELM has the characteristics of fast training speed and good generalization ability, we present a new lightweight IDS called sample selected extreme learning machine (SS-ELM. The reason why we propose “sample selected extreme learning machine” is that fog nodes/MEC hosts do not have the ability to store extremely large amounts of training data sets. Accordingly, they are stored, computed, and sampled by the cloud servers. Then, the selected sample is given to the fog nodes/MEC hosts for training. This design can bring down the training time and increase the detection accuracy. Experimental simulation verifies that SS-ELM performs well in intrusion detection in terms of accuracy, training time, and the receiver operating characteristic (ROC value.

  5. Efficient and Anisotropic Fog Harvesting on a Hybrid and Directional Surface

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Jinbo

    2016-12-05

    A straight throughout superhydrophilic track that contains high contrast and directional wettability on a superhydrophobic surface is designed. Despite droplets that tend to slide more easily along a direction parallel to the track, it is found that such hybrid strip-pattern surfaces have higher fog harvesting efficiency along a direction perpendicular to the tracks due to the larger accumulation area for droplet removal.

  6. [Medical consequences of global warming].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swynghedauw, Bernard

    2009-04-01

    The global warming of the planet and its anthropogenic origin are no longer debatable. Nevertheless, from a medical point of view, while the epidemiological consequences of the warming are rather well-known, the biological consequences are still poorly documented. This is a good example of evolutionary (or darwinian) medicine. The research strategy of this systematic review is based on both PubMed during the period of 2000-2007 and several reviews articles for the period >2000. From a medical point of view, there are four types of consequences. 1-The simple elevation of the average external temperature is accompanied by an increased global mortality and morbidity, the mortality/external temperature is a J curve, with the warm branch more pronounced than the cold one. A recent study on 50 different cities had confirmed that global, and more specifically cardiovascular mortalities were enhanced at the two extreme of the temperatures. 2-The acute heatwaves, such as that which happened in France in August 2003, have been studied in detail by several groups. The mortality which was observed during the recent heatwaves was not compensated by harvesting, strongly suggesting that we were dealing with heat stroke, and that such an increased mortality was more reflecting the limits of our adaptational capacities than aggravation of a previously altered health status. 3-Climate changes have modified the repartition and virulence of pathogenic agents (dengue, malaria...) and above all their vectors. Such modifications were exponential and are likely to reflect the biological properties of parasites. 4-Indirect consequences of global warming include variations in the hydraulic cycle, the new form of tropical hurricanes and many different changes affecting both biodiversity and ecosystems. They will likely result in an increased level of poverty. These finding gave rise to several basic biological questions, rarely evoked, and that concern the limits of the adaptational

  7. EFFECTS OF FOG PRECIPITATION ON WATER RESOURCES AND DRINKING WATER TREATMENT IN THE JIZERA MOUNTAINS, THE CZECH REPUBLIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josef Křeček

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Water yield from catchments with a high evidence of fog or low clouds could be increased by the canopy fog drip. However, in areas with the acid atmospheric deposition, this process can lead to the decline of water quality. The aim of this study is to analyze fog related processes in headwater catchments of the Jizera Mountains (the Czech Republic with special attention to water quality and the drinking water treatment. In two years (2011-2012, the fog drip was observed by twelve passive fog collectors at transect of the Jizerka experimental catchment. Methods of space interpolation and extrapolation (ArcGis 10.2 were applied to approximate the areal atmospheric deposition of fog water, sulphur and nitrogen, in catchments of the drinking water reservoirs Josefův Důl and Souš. The mean annual fog drip from vegetation canopy was found between 88 and 106 mm (i.e. 7 to 9 percent of precipitation, and 11 to 13 percent of water yield, estimated by standard rain gauge monitoring. But, the mean annual load of sulphur and nitrogen by the fog drip was 1,975 and 1,080, kilograms per square kilometre, respectively (i.e. 55 and 48 percent of total deposition of sulphur and nitrogen, registered in the bulk. The acidification of surface waters leads to rising operational costs in the water treatment plants (liming, reduce of heavy metals, more frequent control of sand filters etc.. In a catchment scale, the additional precipitation, caused by the canopy fog drip, could be controlled by the effective watershed management (support of forests stands near the native composition with presence of deciduous trees: beech, mountain ash, or birch.

  8. Prevention of fog in a condenser by simultaneous heating and cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann, S.; Loretz, Y.; Hilfiker, K.

    By partial condensation the vaporous component of a vapour-gas mixture can be separated. This process plays an important part, especially in the recovery of solvents when the solvent is a vapour and mixed with a gas. The only drawback is, however, the frequent occurrence of undesired fog formation. This fog consists of a large number of small solvent droplets and only by a large effort can it be separated again. Through good modelling of the processes of heat and mass transfer the causes for the formation of fog and a method for its prevention can be found. The solution seems to be paradoxical: to avoid the formation of fog the condenser has to be cooled and heated simultaneously. If fog can be prevented, the degree of separation of the vapour-gas mixture even increases. The heating of the condenser may be accomplished by internal energy recovery, thereby simplifying the apparatus concept and energy supply. Zusammenfassung Durch Partialkondensation kann die dampfförmige Komponente eines Gas-Dampf-Gemisches abgetrennt werden. Gerade bei der Rückgewinnung von Lösungs- mitteln, welche dampfförmig mit einem Trägergas vermischt sind, spielt dieser Prozessschritt eine wichtige Rolle. Dabei tritt aber oft unerwünschte Nebelbildung auf. Der Nebel besteht aus sehr feinen Lösungsmitteltröpfchen und lässt sich nur mit grossem Aufwand aus der Gasströmung abscheiden. Durch eine geeignete Modellierung des kombinierten Stoff- und Wärmeübergangs kann die Ursache für die Nebelbildung und eine Methode zu deren Vermeidung gefunden werden. Die Lösung des Problems klingt paradox: Um Nebelbildung zu vermeiden, muss im Kondensator gleichzeitig gekühlt und geheizt werden. Mit dem Vermeiden der Nebelbildung wird auch eine reinere Trennung des Gas-Dampf-Gemisches erreicht. Die Beheizung des Kondensators kann über eine Energie-Regeneration erreicht werden, wodurch Apparatekonzept und Energieversorgung einfach bleiben.

  9. Caught in the thickness of brain fog: exploring the cognitive symptoms of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony James Ocon

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS is defined as greater than 6 months of persistent fatigue that is experienced physically and cognitively. The cognitive symptoms are generally thought to be a mild cognitive impairment, but individuals with CFS subjectively describe them as brain fog. The impairment is not fully understood and often is described as slow thinking, difficulty focusing, confusion, lack of concentration, forgetfulness, or a haziness in thought processes. Causes of brain fog and mild cognitive impairment have been investigated. Possible physiological correlates may be due to the effects of chronic orthostatic intolerance in the form of the Postural Tachycardia Syndrome and decreases in cerebral blood flow. In addition, fMRI studies suggest that individuals with CFS may require increased cortical and subcortical brain activation to complete difficult mental tasks. Furthermore, neurocognitive testing in CFS has demonstrated deficits in speed and efficiency of information processing, attention, concentration, and working memory. The cognitive impairments are then perceived as an exaggerated mental fatigue. As a whole, this is experienced by those with CFS as brain fog and may be viewed as the interaction of physiological, cognitive, and perceptual factors. Thus, the cognitive symptoms of CFS may be due to altered cerebral blood flow activation and regulation that are exacerbated by a stressor, such as orthostasis or a difficult mental task, resulting in the decreased ability to readily process information, which is then perceived as fatiguing and experienced as brain fog. Future research looks to further explore these interactions, how they produce cognitive impairments, and explain the perception of brain fog from a mechanistic standpoint.

  10. Severe haze episodes and seriously polluted fog water in Ji'nan, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinfeng; Chen, Jianmin; Sun, Jianfeng; Li, Weijun; Yang, Lingxiao; Wen, Liang; Wang, Wenxing; Wang, Xinming; Collett, Jeffrey L; Shi, Yang; Zhang, Qingzhu; Hu, Jingtian; Yao, Lan; Zhu, Yanhong; Sui, Xiao; Sun, Xiaomin; Mellouki, Abdelwahid

    2014-09-15

    Haze episodes often hit urban cities in China recently. Here, we present several continuous haze episodes with extremely high PM2.5 levels that occurred over several weeks in early 2013 and extended across most parts of the northern and eastern China-far exceeding the Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei region. Particularly, the haze episode covered ~1 million km(2) on January 14, 2013 and the daily averaged PM2.5 concentration exceeded 360 μg m(-3) in Ji'nan. The observed maximum hourly PM2.5 concentration in urban Ji'nan reached 701 μg m(-3) at 7:00 am (local time) in January 30. During these haze episodes, several fog events happened and the concurrent fog water was found to be seriously polluted. For the fog water collected in Ji'nan from 10:00 pm in January 14 to 11:00 am in January 15, sulfate, nitrate, and ammonium were the major ions with concentrations of 1.54 × 10(6), 8.98 × 10(5), and 1.75 × 10(6) μeq L(-1), respectively, leading to a low in-situ pH of 3.30. The sulfate content in the fog sample was more than 544 times as high as those observed in other areas. With examination of the simultaneously observed data on PM2.5 and its chemical composition, the fog played a role in scavenging and removing fine particles from the atmosphere during haze episodes and thus was seriously contaminated. However, the effect was not sufficient to obviously cleanse air pollution and block haze episodes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Rapid fluctuations in flow and water-column properties in Asan Bay, Guam: implications for selective resilience of coral reefs in warming seas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storlazzi, C.D.; Field, M.E.; Cheriton, O.M.; Presto, M.K.; Logan, J.B.

    2013-01-01

    Hydrodynamics and water-column properties were investigated off west-central Guam from July 2007 through January 2008. Rapid fluctuations, on time scales of 10s of min, in currents, temperature, salinity, and acoustic backscatter were observed to occur on sub-diurnal frequencies along more than 2 km of the fore reef but not at the reef crest. During periods characterized by higher sea-surface temperatures (SSTs), weaker wind forcing, smaller ocean surface waves, and greater thermal stratification, rapid decreases in temperature and concurrent rapid increases in salinity and acoustic backscatter coincided with onshore-directed near-bed currents and offshore-directed near-surface currents. During the study, these cool-water events, on average, lasted 2.3 h and decreased the water temperature 0.57 °C, increased the salinity 0.25 PSU, and were two orders of magnitude more prevalent during the summer season than the winter. During the summer season when the average satellite-derived SST anomaly was +0.63 °C, these cooling events, on average, lowered the temperature 1.14 °C along the fore reef but only 0.11 °C along the reef crest. The rapid shifts appear to be the result of internal tidal bores pumping cooler, more saline, higher-backscatter oceanic water from depths >50 m over cross-shore distances of 100 s of m into the warmer, less saline waters at depths of 20 m and shallower. Such internal bores appear to have the potential to buffer shallow coral reefs from predicted increases in SSTs by bringing cool, offshore water to shallow coral environments. These cooling internal bores may also provide additional benefits to offset stress such as supplying food to thermally stressed corals, reducing stress due to ultraviolet radiation and/or low salinity, and delivering coral larvae from deeper reefs not impacted by surface thermal stress. Thus, the presence of internal bores might be an important factor locally in the resilience of select coral reefs facing increased

  12. EFFECTS OF GLOBAL WARMING

    OpenAIRE

    Dr. Basanti Jain

    2017-01-01

    The abnormal increase in the concentration of the greenhouse gases is resulting in higher temperatures. We call this effect is global warming. The average temperature around the world has increased about 1'c over 140 years, 75% of this has risen just over the past 30 years. The solar radiation, as it reaches the earth, produces "greenhouse effect" in the atmosphere. The thick atmospheric layers over the earth behaves as a glass surface, as it permits short wave radiations from coming in, but ...

  13. Reformulating atmospheric aerosol thermodynamics and hygroscopic growth into fog, haze and clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Metzger

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Modeling atmospheric aerosol and cloud microphysics is rather complex, even if chemical and thermodynamical equilibrium is assumed. We show, however, that the thermodynamics can be considerably simplified by reformulating equilibrium to consistently include water, and transform laboratory-based concepts to atmospheric conditions. We generalize the thermodynamic principles that explain hydration and osmosis – merely based on solute solubilities – to explicitly account for the water mass consumed by hydration. As a result, in chemical and thermodynamical equilibrium the relative humidity (RH suffices to determine the saturation molality, including solute and solvent activities (and activity coefficients, since the water content is fixed by RH for a given aerosol concentration and type. As a consequence, gas/liquid/solid aerosol equilibrium partitioning can be solved analytically and non-iteratively. Our new concept enables an efficient and accurate calculation of the aerosol water mass and directly links the aerosol hygroscopic growth to fog, haze and cloud formation.

    We apply our new concept in the 3rd Equilibrium Simplified Aerosol Model (EQSAM3 for use in regional and global chemistry-transport and climate models. Its input is limited to the species' solubilities from which a newly introduced stoichiometric coefficient for water is derived. Analogously, we introduce effective stoichiometric coefficients for the solutes to account for complete or incomplete dissociation. We show that these coefficients can be assumed constant over the entire activity range and calculated for various inorganic, organic and non-electrolyte compounds, including alcohols, sugars and dissolved gases. EQSAM3 calculates the aerosol composition and gas/liquid/solid partitioning of mixed inorganic/organic multicomponent solutions and the associated water uptake for almost 100 major compounds. It explicitly accounts for particle hygroscopic growth by

  14. Global Warming And Meltwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bratu, S.

    2012-04-01

    In order to find new approaches and new ideas for my students to appreciate the importance of science in their daily life, I proposed a theme for them to debate. They had to search for global warming information and illustrations in the media, and discuss the articles they found in the classroom. This task inspired them to search for new information about this important and timely theme in science. I informed my students that all the best information about global warming and meltwater they found would be used in a poster that would help us to update the knowledge base of the Physics laboratory. I guided them to choose the most eloquent images and significant information. Searching and working to create this poster, the students arrived to better appreciate the importance of science in their daily life and to critically evaluate scientific information transmitted via the media. In the poster we created, one can find images, photos and diagrams and some interesting information: Global warming refers to the rising average temperature of the Earth's atmosphere and oceans and its projected evolution. In the last 100 years, the Earth's average surface temperature increased by about 0.8 °C with about two thirds of the increase occurring over just the last three decades. Warming of the climate system is unequivocal, and scientists are more than 90% certain most of it is caused by increasing concentrations of greenhouse gases produced by human activities such as deforestation and burning fossil fuel. They indicate that during the 21st century the global surface temperature is likely to rise a further 1.1 to 2.9 °C for the lowest emissions scenario and 2.4 to 6.4 °C for the highest predictions. An increase in global temperature will cause sea levels to rise and will change the amount and pattern of precipitation, and potentially result in expansion of subtropical deserts. Warming is expected to be strongest in the Arctic and would be associated with continuing decrease of

  15. Characterization of micro‐organisms isolated from dairy industry after cleaning and fogging disinfection with alkyl amine and peracetic acid

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bore, E; Langsrud, S

    2005-01-01

    Aims:  To characterize micro‐organisms isolated from Norwegian dairy production plants after cleaning and fogging disinfection with alkyl amine/peracetic acid and to indicate reasons for survival...

  16. Chemical Composition of Fog Water at Mt. Tateyama Near the Coast of the Japan Sea in Central Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, K.; Honoki, H.; Yamada, H.; Aoki, M.; Saito, Y.; Iwatake, K.; Mori, S.; Uehara, Y.

    2010-07-01

    Measurements of fog water chemistry were performed at the western slope of Mt. Tateyema located near the coast of the Japan Sea during the autumn from 2003 to 2009. The measurements were also made in the summer of 2004 and 2008. Fog water was sampled by passive samplers at Bijodaira (altitude, 977m), Midagahara (altitude, 1930m) and Murododaira (altitude, 2450m), and was usually recovered every 3- 5 day. The pH and major ions were measured. Intensive sampling of fog water was performed at Murododaira in the September. During the intensive observations, peroxide concentrations were also measured as well as major ions. The concentrations of major ions were usually higher in the summer than in the autumn. Strong acidic fogs (pH Ocean by a strong typhoon. Peroxides higher than 100 μM, which are seriously harmful to vegetation were sometimes detected.

  17. Observations of the Interaction and/or Transport of Aerosols with Cloud or Fog during DRAGON Campaigns from AERONET Ground-Based Remote Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eck, Thomas; Holben, Brent; Schafer, Joel; Giles, David; Kim, Jhoon; Kim, Young; Sano, Itaru; Reid, Jeffrey; Pickering, Kenneth; Crawford, James; Sinyuk, Alexander; Trevino, Nathan

    2014-05-01

    Ground-based remote sensing observations from Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) sun-sky radiometers have recently shown several instances where cloud-aerosol interaction had resulted in modification of aerosol properties and/or in difficulty identifying some major pollution transport events due to aerosols being imbedded in cloud systems. AERONET has established Distributed Regional Aerosol Gridded Observation Networks (DRAGON) during field campaigns that are short-term (~2-3 months) relatively dense spatial networks of ~15 to 45 sun and sky scanning photometers. Recent major DRAGON field campaigns in Japan and South Korea (Spring 2012) and California (Winter 2013) have yielded observations of aerosol transport associated with clouds and/or aerosol properties modification as a result of fog interaction. Analysis of data from the Korean and Japan DRAGON campaigns shows that major fine-mode aerosol transport events are sometimes associated with extensive cloud cover and that cloud-screening of observations often filter out significant pollution aerosol transport events. The Spectral De-convolution Algorithm (SDA) algorithm was utilized to isolate and analyze the fine-mode aerosol optical depth signal for these cases of persistent and extensive cloud cover. Additionally, extensive fog that was coincident with aerosol layer height on some days in both Korea and California resulted in large increases in fine mode aerosol radius, with a mode of cloud-processed or residual aerosol of radius ~0.4-0.5 micron sometimes observed. Cloud processed aerosol may occur much more frequently than AERONET data suggest due to inherent difficulty in observing aerosol properties near clouds from remote sensing observations. These biases of aerosols associated with clouds would likely be even greater for satellite remote sensing retrievals of aerosol properties near clouds due to 3-D effects and sub-pixel cloud contamination issues.

  18. Fog as an ecosystem service: Quantifying fog-mediated reductions in maximum temperature across coastal to inland transects in northern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torregrosa, A.; Flint, L. E.; Flint, A. L.; Combs, C.; Peters, J.

    2013-12-01

    Several studies have documented the human benefits of temperature cooling derived from coastal fog such as the reduction in the number of hospital visits/emergency response requests from heat stress-vulnerable population sectors or decreased energy consumption during periods when summer maximum temperatures are lower than normal. In this study we quantify the hourly, daily, monthly and seasonal thermal effect of fog and low clouds (FLC) hours on maximum summer temperatures across a northern California landscape. The FLC data summaries are calculated from the CIRA (Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere) 10 year archive that were derived from hourly night and day images using channels 1 (Visible), 2 (3.6 μm) and 4 (10.7 μm) NOAA GOES (Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite). The FLC summaries were analyzed with two sets of site based data, meteorological (met) station-based measurements and downscaled interpolated PRISM data for selected point locations spanning a range of coastal to inland geographic conditions and met station locations. In addition to finding a 0.4 degree C per hour of FLC effect, our results suggest variability related to site specific thermal response. For example, sites closest to the coast have less thermal variability between low cloud and sunny days than sites further from the coast suggesting a much stronger influence of ocean temperature than of FLC thermal dynamics. The thermal relief provided by summertime FLC is equivalent in magnitude to the temperature increase projected by the driest and hottest of regional downscaled climate models using the A2 ('worst') IPCC scenario. Extrapolating these thermal calculations can facilitate future quantifications of the ecosystem service provided by summertime low clouds and fog.

  19. A detailed study of advection sea fog formation to reduce the operational impacts along the Northern Gulf of Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    King, Jason M.

    2007-01-01

    This study creates rules of thumb for forecasting advection sea fog development and dissipation along the Northern Gulf of Mexico for the months of December through March. Surface observations from Tyndall AFB, Destin-Fort Walton Beach Airport, Eglin AFB, Hurlburt Field and Keesler AFB were used in conjunction with the National Data Buoy Centerαs marine sensors to determine the low-level atmospheric state and the sea surface temperatures during advection sea fog events at the five locations ...

  20. Design, Implementation and Optimization of Innovative Internet Access Networks, based on Fog Computing and Software Defined Networking

    OpenAIRE

    Iotti, Nicola

    2017-01-01

    1. DESIGN In this dissertation we introduce a new approach to Internet access networks in public spaces, such as Wi-Fi network commonly known as Hotspot, based on Fog Computing (or Edge Computing), Software Defined Networking (SDN) and the deployment of Virtual Machines (VM) and Linux containers, on the edge of the network. In this vision we deploy specialized network elements, called Fog Nodes, on the edge of the network, able to virtualize the physical infrastructure and expose APIs to e...

  1. Cutoff in the Lyman-α forest power spectrum: Warm IGM or warm dark matter?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonella Garzilli

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available We re-analyse high redshift and high resolution Lyman-α forest spectra considered in [1], seeking to constrain the properties of warm dark matter particles. Compared to this previous work, we consider a wider range of thermal histories of the intergalactic medium. We find that both warm and cold dark matter models can explain the cut-off observed in the flux power spectra of high-resolution observations equally well. This implies, however, very different thermal histories and underlying reionization models. We discuss how to remove this degeneracy.

  2. Cutoff in the Lyman-α forest power spectrum: Warm IGM or warm dark matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garzilli, Antonella; Boyarsky, Alexey; Ruchayskiy, Oleg

    2017-10-01

    We re-analyse high redshift and high resolution Lyman-α forest spectra considered in [1], seeking to constrain the properties of warm dark matter particles. Compared to this previous work, we consider a wider range of thermal histories of the intergalactic medium. We find that both warm and cold dark matter models can explain the cut-off observed in the flux power spectra of high-resolution observations equally well. This implies, however, very different thermal histories and underlying reionization models. We discuss how to remove this degeneracy.

  3. Service Migration from Cloud to Multi-tier Fog Nodes for Multimedia Dissemination with QoE Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosário, Denis; Schimuneck, Matias; Camargo, João; Nobre, Jéferson; Both, Cristiano; Rochol, Juergen; Gerla, Mario

    2018-01-24

    A wide range of multimedia services is expected to be offered for mobile users via various wireless access networks. Even the integration of Cloud Computing in such networks does not support an adequate Quality of Experience (QoE) in areas with high demands for multimedia contents. Fog computing has been conceptualized to facilitate the deployment of new services that cloud computing cannot provide, particularly those demanding QoE guarantees. These services are provided using fog nodes located at the network edge, which is capable of virtualizing their functions/applications. Service migration from the cloud to fog nodes can be actuated by request patterns and the timing issues. To the best of our knowledge, existing works on fog computing focus on architecture and fog node deployment issues. In this article, we describe the operational impacts and benefits associated with service migration from the cloud to multi-tier fog computing for video distribution with QoE support. Besides that, we perform the evaluation of such service migration of video services. Finally, we present potential research challenges and trends.

  4. Effects of disinfectant fogging procedure on dust, ammonia concentration, aerobic bacteria and fungal spores in a farrowing-weaning room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Annamaria; Colosio, Claudio; Gusmara, Claudia; Sala, Vittorio; Guarino, Marcella

    2014-01-01

    In the last decades, large-scale swine production has led to intensive rearing systems in which air quality can be easily degraded by aerial contaminants that can pose a health risk to the pigs and farm workers. This study evaluated the effects of fogging disinfectant procedure on productive performance, ammonia and dust concentration, aerobic bacteria and fungal spores spreading in the farrowing-weaning room. This trial was conducted in 2 identical farrowing-weaning rooms of a piggery. In both rooms, 30 pregnant sows were lodged in individual cages. At 75 days of age, the piglets were moved to the fattening room. In the treated room, with the birth of the first suckling-pig, the fogging disinfection with diluted Virkon S was applied once a day in the experimental room per 15 minutes at 11:00. The fogging disinfectant treatment was switched between rooms at the end of the first trial period. Temperature, relative humidity, dust (TSP-RF fractions and number of particles), ammonia concentration and aerial contaminants (enterococci, Micrococcaeae and fungal spores) were monitored in both rooms. Ammonia concentration reduction induced by fogging disinfection was estimated 18%, total suspended particles and the respirable fraction were significantly lower in the experimental room. Fungal spores resulted in a significant reduction by the fogging procedure, together with dust respirable fraction and fine particulate matter abatement. The fogging disinfection procedure improved air quality in the piggery, thereby enhancing workers and animals health.

  5. Effects of disinfectant fogging procedure on dust, ammonia concentration, aerobic bacteria and fungal spores in a farrowing-weaning room

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annamaria Costa

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and Objective. In the last decades, large-scale swine production has led to intensive rearing systems in which air quality can be easily degraded by aerial contaminants that can pose a health risk to the pigs and farm workers. This study evaluated the effects of fogging disinfectant procedure on productive performance, ammonia and dust concentration, aerobic bacteria and fungal spores spreading in the farrowing–weaning room. Materials and Method. This trial was conducted in 2 identical farrowing-weaning rooms of a piggery. In both rooms, 30 pregnant sows were lodged in individual cages. At 75 days of age, the piglets were moved to the fattening room. In the treated room, with the birth of the first suckling-pig, the fogging disinfection with diluted Virkon S was applied once a day in the experimental room per 15 minutes at 11:00. The fogging disinfectant treatment was switched between rooms at the end of the first trial period. Temperature, relative humidity, dust (TSP-RF fractions and number of particles, ammonia concentration and aerial contaminants (enterococci, Micrococcaeae and fungal spores were monitored in both rooms. Results. Ammonia concentration reduction induced by fogging disinfection was estimated 18%, total suspended particles and the respirable fraction were significantly lower in the experimental room. Fungal spores resulted in a significant reduction by the fogging procedure, together with dust respirable fraction and fine particulate matter abatement. Conclusions. The fogging disinfection procedure improved air quality in the piggery, thereby enhancing workers and animals health.

  6. Use of emulsion for warm mix asphalt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahabir Panda

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Due to increase in energy costs and emission problems in hot mix asphalt usually used, it brought a great interest to the researchers to develop the warm mix technology for pavement constructions. Commonly known as warm mix asphalt (WMA, it is a typical method in the bituminous paving technology, which allows production and placement of bituminous mixes at lower temperatures than that used for hot mix asphalt (HMA. The WMA involves an environmental friendly production process that utilises organic additives, chemical additives and water based technologies. The organic and chemical additives are normally very costly and still involve certain amount of environmental issues. These factors motivated the authors to take up this technology using simple, environment friendly and somewhat cost effective procedure. In this study, an attempt has been made to prepare warm mixes by first pre-coating the aggregates with medium setting bitumen emulsion (MS and then mixing the semi-coated aggregates with VG 30 bitumen at a lower temperature than normally required. After a number of trials it was observed that mostly three mixing temperatures, namely temperatures 110 °C, 120 °C and 130 °C were appropriate to form the bituminous mixes with satisfactory homogeneity and consistency and as such were maintained throughout this study. Marshall samples for paving mixes were prepared using this procedure for dense bituminous macadam (DBM gradings as per the specifications of Ministry of Road Transport and Highways (MORTH and subsequently Marshall properties of the resultant mixes were studied with the main objective of deciding the different parameters that were considered for development of appropriate warm mix asphalt. In this study it has been observed that out of three mixing temperatures tried, the mixes prepared at 120 °C with bitumen-emulsion composition of 80B:20E for DBM warm mix, offer highest Marshall stability and highest indirect tensile strength

  7. Demand Side Management Using the Internet of Energy based on Fog and Cloud Computing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shahryari, Kolsoom; Anvari-Moghaddam, Amjad

    2017-01-01

    is an extension of smart grid concept. A large number of connected devices and the huge amount of data generated by IoE and issues related to data transmission, process and storage, force IoE to be integrated by cloud computing. Furthermore, in order to enhance the performance and reduce the volume of transmitted...... data and process information in an acceptable time, fog computing is suggested as a layer between IoE layer and cloud layer. This layer is used as a local processing level that leads to reduction in data transmissions to the cloud. So, it can save energy consumption used by IoE devices to transmit data...... into cloud because of short-range communication technologies such as Bluetooth and Zigbee. In this paper, a smart gateway, which bridges fog domain and cloud, is introduced for scheduling devices/appliances by creating a priority queue which can perform demand side management dynamically. The queue...

  8. Experiment on Chloride Ion Content of Concrete Structure in Coastal Salt-fog Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nie Ming

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper chose the south-east coastal salt-fog area Shantou to carry out the experiment study on chloride ion content of concrete structure, through the chloride ion content field test on reinforced concrete structure in Shantou, respectively for the slat-fog atmosphere zone and the splash zone in marine environment, discuss the corrosion by chloride ion of long-time existing concrete structure.And then measure the chloride ion content of concrete cover in different depth, and determine the chloride ion diffusion model in different conditions concrete through comparative analysis.The result of study, can be used in directing the selection of design scheme for building in planning, and also it will help predict the corrosion time of reinforcement inside the concrete on different positions for existing structure.

  9. [A case study regarding the technical and public health feasibility of collecting water from fog].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Ubaque, César A; Vaca-Bohórquez, Martha L; García-Ubaque, Juan C

    2013-01-01

    Evaluating the collection of water for human consumption from fog nets in San Antonio (Cundinamarca department). Water was collected from fog using a prototype 6 m²sensor unit which was installed In the area for 53 days; this water was analysed to assess its quality regarding human consumption. The collection area's average daily volume was 43.26 L/day and the parameters evaluated met the minimum values established by local regulations for drinking water (RAS 2000), except for pH. This technique represents an alternative for obtaining water fit for human consumption and can be scaled-up to produce the quantity needed for communities living in low rainfall areas. It can thereby lead to improving such populations' health conditions. Its economic feasibility should thus be assessed regarding its implementation and sustainability.

  10. Perturbations in warm inflation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Oliveira, H. P.; Joras, S. E.

    2001-09-15

    Warm inflation is an interesting possibility to describe the early universe, whose basic feature is the absence, at least in principle, of a preheating or reheating phase. Here we analyze the dynamics of warm inflation generalizing the usual slow-roll parameters that are useful for characterizing the inflationary phase. We study the evolution of entropy and adiabatic perturbations, where the main result is that for a very small amount of dissipation the entropy perturbations can be neglected and the purely adiabatic perturbations will be responsible for the primordial spectrum of inhomogeneities. Taking into account the Cosmic Background Explorer Differential Microwave Radiometer data of the cosmic microwave background anisotropy as well as the fact that the interval of inflation for which the scales of astrophysical interest cross outside the Hubble radius is about 50 e-folds before the end of inflation, we could estimate the magnitude of the dissipation term. It is also possible to show that at the end of inflation the universe is hot enough to provide a smooth transition to the radiation era.

  11. Angle and aspect dependent dew and fog precipitation in the Negev desert

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidron, Giora J.

    2005-01-01

    Knowledge regarding dew and fog precipitation in relation to angle and aspect may be of great importance to plant photosynthesis and to rock dwelling microorganisms, especially in arid land where water is highly limited. Measurements of dew and fog were carried out periodically during the fall of two years (1989, 1992) at a hilltop in the Negev Desert Highlands, Israel. Measurements were carried out using velvet-like cloths (6×6×0.15 cm) attached to the center of different angle sides of 5 pairs of wooden boxes (50×50×10 cm) and to the top of an additional pair (10×10×5 cm) that served as a control (horizontal surface). The sides of each pair of boxes had angles of 30, 45, 60, 75 and 90° facing north, east, south and west. Whereas fog showed an advective pattern of precipitation, with windward aspects receiving higher amounts, that was not the case with dew. When the dew values received in the different aspects within each angle were grouped together, surfaces at 30, 45, 60, 75 and 90° received 99.8 (SE±11.9), 78.2 (SE±17.9), 42.0 (SE±18.3), 33.8 (SE±10.8), and 25.6 (SE±9.7) percent of the amounts condensed on the horizontal surface, respectively. A positive linear relationship characterized the dew amounts with cos ( θ). The data also showed an increase in dew duration with west>north>south>east. The data thus imply that aspect and angle may play an important role in controlling dew and fog availability.

  12. Experimental Characterisation and Modelling of Atmospheric Fog and Turbulence in FSO

    OpenAIRE

    Ijaz, Muhammad

    2013-01-01

    Free space optical (FSO) communication uses visible or infrared (IR) wavelengths to broadcast high-speed data wirelessly through the atmospheric channel. The performance of FSO communications is mainly dependent on the unpredictable atmospheric channel such as fog, smoke and temperature dependent turbulence. However, as the real outdoor atmosphere (ROA) is time varying and heterogeneous in nature as well as depending on the magnitude and intensity of different weather conditions, carrying out...

  13. Thermodynamic Analysis of a Power Plant Integrated with Fogging Inlet Cooling and a Biomass Gasification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Athari

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Biomass energy and especially biofuels produced by biomass gasification are clean and renewable options for power plants. Also, on hot days the performance of gas turbines decreases substantially, a problem that can be mitigated by fog cooling. In the present paper, a biomass-integrated fogging steam injected gas turbine cycle is analyzed with energy and exergy methods. It is observed that (1 increasing the compressor pressure ratio raises the air flow rate in the plant but reduces the biomass flow rate; (2 increasing the gas turbine inlet temperature decreases the air and biomass flow rates; (3 increasing the compressor pressure ratio raises the energy and exergy efficiencies, especially at lower pressure ratios; (4 increasing the gas turbine inlet temperature raises both efficiencies; and (5 overspray increases the energy efficiency and net cycle power slightly. The gas turbine exhibits the highest exergy efficiency of the cycle components and the combustor the lowest. A comparison of the cycle with similar cycles fired by natural gas and differently configured cycles fueled by biomass shows that the cycle with natural gas firing has an energy efficiency 18 percentage points above the biomass fired cycle, and that steam injection increases the energy efficiency about five percentage points relative to the cycle without steam injection. Also, the influence of steam injection on energy efficiency is more significant than fog cooling.

  14. A Source Anonymity-Based Lightweight Secure AODV Protocol for Fog-Based MANET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weidong Fang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Fog-based MANET (Mobile Ad hoc networks is a novel paradigm of a mobile ad hoc network with the advantages of both mobility and fog computing. Meanwhile, as traditional routing protocol, ad hoc on-demand distance vector (AODV routing protocol has been applied widely in fog-based MANET. Currently, how to improve the transmission performance and enhance security are the two major aspects in AODV’s research field. However, the researches on joint energy efficiency and security seem to be seldom considered. In this paper, we propose a source anonymity-based lightweight secure AODV (SAL-SAODV routing protocol to meet the above requirements. In SAL-SAODV protocol, source anonymous and secure transmitting schemes are proposed and applied. The scheme involves the following three parts: the source anonymity algorithm is employed to achieve the source node, without being tracked and located; the improved secure scheme based on the polynomial of CRC-4 is applied to substitute the RSA digital signature of SAODV and guarantee the data integrity, in addition to reducing the computation and energy consumption; the random delayed transmitting scheme (RDTM is implemented to separate the check code and transmitted data, and achieve tamper-proof results. The simulation results show that the comprehensive performance of the proposed SAL-SAODV is a trade-off of the transmission performance, energy efficiency, and security, and better than AODV and SAODV.

  15. A Source Anonymity-Based Lightweight Secure AODV Protocol for Fog-Based MANET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Weidong; Zhang, Wuxiong; Xiao, Jinchao; Yang, Yang; Chen, Wei

    2017-06-17

    Fog-based MANET (Mobile Ad hoc networks) is a novel paradigm of a mobile ad hoc network with the advantages of both mobility and fog computing. Meanwhile, as traditional routing protocol, ad hoc on-demand distance vector (AODV) routing protocol has been applied widely in fog-based MANET. Currently, how to improve the transmission performance and enhance security are the two major aspects in AODV's research field. However, the researches on joint energy efficiency and security seem to be seldom considered. In this paper, we propose a source anonymity-based lightweight secure AODV (SAL-SAODV) routing protocol to meet the above requirements. In SAL-SAODV protocol, source anonymous and secure transmitting schemes are proposed and applied. The scheme involves the following three parts: the source anonymity algorithm is employed to achieve the source node, without being tracked and located; the improved secure scheme based on the polynomial of CRC-4 is applied to substitute the RSA digital signature of SAODV and guarantee the data integrity, in addition to reducing the computation and energy consumption; the random delayed transmitting scheme (RDTM) is implemented to separate the check code and transmitted data, and achieve tamper-proof results. The simulation results show that the comprehensive performance of the proposed SAL-SAODV is a trade-off of the transmission performance, energy efficiency, and security, and better than AODV and SAODV.

  16. Friend of GATA (FOG interacts with the nucleosome remodeling and deacetylase complex (NuRD to support primitive erythropoiesis in Xenopus laevis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mizuho S Mimoto

    Full Text Available Friend of GATA (FOG plays many diverse roles in adult and embryonic hematopoiesis, however the mechanisms by which it functions and the roles of potential interaction partners are not completely understood. Previous work has shown that overexpression of FOG in Xenopus laevis causes loss of blood suggesting that in contrast to its role in mammals, FOG might normally function to repress erythropoiesis in this species. Using loss-of-function analysis, we demonstrate that FOG is essential to support primitive red blood cell (RBC development in Xenopus. Moreover, we show that it is specifically required to prevent excess apoptosis of circulating primitive RBCs and that in the absence of FOG, the pro-apoptotic gene Bim-1 is strongly upregulated. To identify domains of FOG that are essential for blood development and, conversely, to begin to understand the mechanism by which overexpressed FOG represses primitive erythropoiesis, we asked whether FOG mutants that are unable to interact with known co-factors retain their ability to rescue blood formation in FOG morphants and whether they repress erythropoiesis when overexpressed in wild type embryos. We find that interaction of FOG with the Nucleosome Remodeling and Deacetylase complex (NuRD, but not with C-terminal Binding Protein, is essential for normal primitive RBC development. In contrast, overexpression of all mutant and wild type constructs causes a comparable repression of primitive erythropoiesis. Together, our data suggest that a requirement for FOG and its interaction with NuRD during primitive erythropoiesis are conserved in Xenopus and that loss of blood upon FOG overexpression is due to a dominant-interfering effect.

  17. Daytime warming has stronger negative effects on soil nematodes than night-time warming

    OpenAIRE

    Xiumin Yan; Kehong Wang; Lihong Song; Xuefeng Wang; Donghui Wu

    2017-01-01

    Warming of the climate system is unequivocal, that is, stronger warming during night-time than during daytime. Here we focus on how soil nematodes respond to the current asymmetric warming. A field infrared heating experiment was performed in the western of the Songnen Plain, Northeast China. Three warming modes, i.e. daytime warming, night-time warming and diurnal warming, were taken to perform the asymmetric warming condition. Our results showed that the daytime and diurnal warming treatmen...

  18. Competent and Warm?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Karolina; Rakić, Tamara; Steffens, Melanie C

    2017-01-01

    Most research on ethnicity has focused on visual cues. However, accents are strong social cues that can match or contradict visual cues. We examined understudied reactions to people whose one cue suggests one ethnicity, whereas the other cue contradicts it. In an experiment conducted in Germany, job candidates spoke with an accent either congruent or incongruent with their (German or Turkish) appearance. Based on ethnolinguistic identity theory, we predicted that accents would be strong cues for categorization and evaluation. Based on expectancy violations theory we expected that incongruent targets would be evaluated more extremely than congruent targets. Both predictions were confirmed: accents strongly influenced perceptions and Turkish-looking German-accented targets were perceived as most competent of all targets (and additionally most warm). The findings show that bringing together visual and auditory information yields a more complete picture of the processes underlying impression formation.

  19. Analysis of Cumulonimbus (Cb), Thunderstorm and Fog for Izmir Adnan Menderes Airport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avsar, Ercument

    2016-07-01

    Demand for airline transport has been increasing day by day with the development of the aviation industry in Turkey. Meteorological conditions are among the most important factors that influence aviation facilities. Meteorological events cause delays and cancellation of flights which create economic and time losses, and they even lead to accidents and breakups. The most important meteorological events that affect the takeoff and landing of airplanes can be listed as wind, runway visual range, cloud, rain, icing, turbulence, and low level windshear. Meteorological events that affect the aviation facilities most often in Adnan Menderes Airport (LTBJ), the fourth largest airport in Turkey in terms of air traffic, are fog, Cumulonimbus (Cb) clouds and thunderstorms (TS-Thunderstorm). Therefore, it is important to identify the occurrence time of these events based on the analysis of data over many years and do the flight plans based on this meteorological information in order to make the aviation facilities safer and without delays. In this study, statistical analysis on the formation of Cb clouds, thunderstorm and foggy days is conducted using observations produced for aviation (METAR) and special observers (SPECI). It is found that there are two types of fog that are observed most often at LTBJ, namely radiation and advection fogs, accordingly to the results of statistical analysis based on data from 2004 to 2014. Fog events are found to occur most often in the months of December and January, during 04:00 - 07:00 UTC time interval, between pressure values over 1015-1020 hPa, in 130-190 degree light breeze (1-5KT) and in temperature levels between 5°C and 8°C. Thunderstorm events recorded at LTBJ between the years 2004 and 2014 are most often observed in the months of January and February, in 120-210 degree gentle breeze winds (6-10KT), and in temperature levels between 8 and 18 °C. Key Words: Adnan Menderes International Airport, LTBJ, Fog, Thunderstorm (TS), Cb

  20. Fungal spores as potential ice nuclei in fog/cloud water and snow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Heidi; Goncalves, Fabio L. T.; Schueller, Elisabeth; Puxbaum, Hans

    2010-05-01

    INTRODUCTION: In discussions about climate change and precipitation frequency biological ice nucleation has become an issue. While bacterial ice nucleation (IN) is already well characterized and even utilized in industrial processes such as the production of artificial snow or to improve freezing processes in food industry, less is known about the IN potential of fungal spores which are also ubiquitous in the atmosphere. A recent study performed at a mountain top in the Rocky Mountains suggests that fungal spores and/or pollen might play a role in increased IN abundance during periods of cloud cover (Bowers et al. 2009). In the present work concentrations of fungal spores in fog/cloud water and snow were determined. EXPERIMENTAL: Fog samples were taken with an active fog sampler in 2008 in a traffic dominated area and in a national park in São Paulo, Brazil. The number concentrations of fungal spores were determined by microscopic by direct enumeration by epifluorescence microscopy after staining with SYBR Gold nucleic acid gel stain (Bauer et al. 2008). RESULTS: In the fog water collected in the polluted area at a junction of two highly frequented highways around 22,000 fungal spores mL-1 were counted. Fog in the national park contained 35,000 spores mL-1. These results were compared with cloud water and snow samples from Mt. Rax, situated at the eastern rim of the Austrian Alps. Clouds contained on average 5,900 fungal spores mL-1 cloud water (1,300 - 11,000) or 2,200 spores m-3 (304 - 5,000). In freshly fallen snow spore concentrations were lower than in cloud water, around 1,000 fungal spores mL-1 were counted (Bauer et al. 2002). In both sets of samples representatives of the ice nucleating genus Fusarium could be observed. REFERENCES: Bauer, H., Kasper-Giebl, A., Löflund, M., Giebl, H., Hitzenberger, R., Zibuschka, F., Puxbaum, H. (2002). The contribution of bacteria and fungal spores to the organic carbon content of cloud water, precipitation and aerosols

  1. Local warming: daily temperature change influences belief in global warming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ye; Johnson, Eric J; Zaval, Lisa

    2011-04-01

    Although people are quite aware of global warming, their beliefs about it may be malleable; specifically, their beliefs may be constructed in response to questions about global warming. Beliefs may reflect irrelevant but salient information, such as the current day's temperature. This replacement of a more complex, less easily accessed judgment with a simple, more accessible one is known as attribute substitution. In three studies, we asked residents of the United States and Australia to report their opinions about global warming and whether the temperature on the day of the study was warmer or cooler than usual. Respondents who thought that day was warmer than usual believed more in and had greater concern about global warming than did respondents who thought that day was colder than usual. They also donated more money to a global-warming charity if they thought that day seemed warmer than usual. We used instrumental variable regression to rule out some alternative explanations.

  2. Fogging low concentrated organic acid in a fattening pig unit – Effect on animal health and microclimate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heiko Stein

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available [b]Introduction and objective.[/b] In intensive pig production aerial contaminates are potential hazards for the health of animals and humans. In this study, the effect of fogging a low concentrated tartaric acid solution on pigs’ health, environmental and hygiene parameters were evaluated in an inhabited fattening unit. [b]Materials and method.[/b] Pigs were housed in separate units (control group n=109 and experimental group n=110. During the whole fattening period, twice a week at 48 hour intervals, a 0.1% tartaric acid solution was aerosolized by a cold-fogging system for 20 minutes in the experimental unit. Environmental parameters were spot-checked on days of fogging. Sedimentation dust and surfaces were analysed for bacterial and fungal load. Dust particle size distribution was assessed. Pigs were clinically examined weekly. Standard meat examination at an abattoir was extended by individual quantification of lung alterations. [b]Results. [/b]The fogging procedure had no influence on ammonia concentrations. A significant reduction of mould, but not of bacteria, was found in sedimentation dust, and bacterial and mould scores of surface samples were improved. A significant reduction of particle size classes 1.6–2.0 µm, 4.0–5.0 µm, 7.5–10 µm, as well as 10–15 µm was observed. The high sound level of the fogging machine (82–102 dB led to higher activity and pen-mate directed behaviour. More skin alterations, conjunctivitis and sneezing were recorded in the experimental group. Gross pathological lung alterations did not differ between both groups. [b] Conclusions.[/b] Although fogging of tartaric acid is limited to a concentration of 0.1% due to its irritating effect on the respiratory mucosa, reduction of microbial load can be achieved, but it would be enhanced by using more powerful fogging systems.

  3. Meteorological Patterns and Fog Water in the Canary Islands and Morocco

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzol, M. V.; Sanchez Megía, J. L.; Yanes, A.; Bargach, J.; Derhem, A.

    2010-07-01

    The Stratocumulus cloud formation is very common in the Canary Islands (Spain) and on the Atlantic coast of Morocco. This cloud formation behaves as if it was fog when it comes into contact with the relief and its liquid content can be captured by artificial systems. The origin of this cloud formation is connected with the Azores anti-cyclone and with the anomalous structure of the low layers of the atmosphere caused by a subsidence thermal inversion. The aim of this article is to define a pattern of the most favourable meteorological and atmospheric conditions for this cloud formation to appear. In order to do this, a database has been compiled with the information about the days on which water has been collected in Morocco since June, 2006. This was when the collaboration with the Si Hmad Derhem Foundation (Casablanca) began. As well as meteorological data and data on water quantities, weather maps, thermodynamic soundings and satellite images are also analysed. The following two sites were studied: Anaga, on the island of Tenerife, Canary Islands, 864 m a.s.l. and 4 km from the coast, and Boutmezguida, Morocco, 1,225 m a.s.l. and 30 km from the coast. The research was conducted in three stages. The first stage consisted of looking for the most appropriate sites to obtain the greatest efficiency in fog water collection; the Standard Fog Collector (SFC, Schemenauer and Cereceda, 1994) was used for this purpose. The second stage consisted of studying the most favourable meteorological conditions for water collection where the Quarter Fog Collector (QFC, Marzol, 2002) connected to an automatic weather station providing information on temperature, humidity, precipitation, wind speed and direction and the amount of water collected on the netting every ten minutes was used to do this. The aim of the third stage, which was by nature an applied stage, was to construct large-sized fog collectors (Large Fog Collector, LFC) so that the water collected could be put to

  4. Coastal California's Fog as a Unique Habitable Niche: Design for Autonomous Sampling and Preliminary Aerobiological Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentry, Diana; Cynthia Ouandji; Arismendi, Dillon; Guarro, Marcello; Demachkie, Isabella; Crosbie, Ewan; Dadashazar, Hossein; MacDonald, Alex B.; Wang, Zhen; Sorooshian, Armin; hide

    2017-01-01

    Just as on the land or in the ocean, atmospheric regions may be more or less hospitable to life. The aerobiosphere, or collection of living things in Earth's atmosphere, is poorly understood due to the small number and ad hoc nature of samples studied. However, we know viable airborne microbes play important roles, such as providing cloud condensation nuclei. Knowing the distribution of such microorganisms and how their activity can alter water, carbon, and other geochemical cycles is key to developing criteria for planetary habitability, particularly for potential habitats with wet atmospheres but little stable surface water. Coastal California has regular, dense fog known to play a major transport role in the local ecosystem. In addition to the significant local (1 km) geographical variation in typical fog, previous studies have found that changes in height above surface of as little as a few meters can yield significant differences in typical concentrations, populations and residence times. No single current sampling platform (ground-based impactors, towers, balloons, aircraft) is capable of accessing all of these regions of interest.A novel passive fog and cloud water sampler, consisting of a lightweight passive impactor suspended from autonomous aerial vehicles (UAVs), is being developed to allow 4D point sampling within a single fog bank, allowing closer study of small-scale (100 m) system dynamics. Fog and cloud droplet water samples from low-altitude aircraft flights in nearby coastal waters were collected and assayed to estimate the required sample volumes, flight times, and sensitivity thresholds of the system under design.125 cloud water samples were collected from 16 flights of the Center for Interdisciplinary Remotely Piloted Aircraft Studies (CIRPAS) instrumented Twin Otter, equipped with a sampling tube collector, occurring between 18 July and 12 August 2016 below 1 km altitude off the central coast. The collector was flushed first with 70 ethanol

  5. Committed warming inferred from observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauritsen, Thorsten; Pincus, Robert

    2017-09-01

    Due to the lifetime of CO2, the thermal inertia of the oceans, and the temporary impacts of short-lived aerosols and reactive greenhouse gases, the Earth’s climate is not equilibrated with anthropogenic forcing. As a result, even if fossil-fuel emissions were to suddenly cease, some level of committed warming is expected due to past emissions as studied previously using climate models. Here, we provide an observational-based quantification of this committed warming using the instrument record of global-mean warming, recently improved estimates of Earth’s energy imbalance, and estimates of radiative forcing from the Fifth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Compared with pre-industrial levels, we find a committed warming of 1.5 K (0.9-3.6, 5th-95th percentile) at equilibrium, and of 1.3 K (0.9-2.3) within this century. However, when assuming that ocean carbon uptake cancels remnant greenhouse gas-induced warming on centennial timescales, committed warming is reduced to 1.1 K (0.7-1.8). In the latter case there is a 13% risk that committed warming already exceeds the 1.5 K target set in Paris. Regular updates of these observationally constrained committed warming estimates, although simplistic, can provide transparent guidance as uncertainty regarding transient climate sensitivity inevitably narrows and the understanding of the limitations of the framework is advanced.

  6. Warming effect of dust aerosols modulated by overlapping clouds below

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hui; Guo, Jianping; Wang, Yuan; Zhao, Chuanfeng; Zhang, Zhibo; Min, Min; Miao, Yucong; Liu, Huan; He, Jing; Zhou, Shunwu; Zhai, Panmao

    2017-10-01

    Due to the substantial warming effect of dust aerosols overlying clouds and its poor representation in climate models, it is imperative to accurately quantify the direct radiative forcing (DRF) of above-cloud dust aerosols. When absorbing aerosol layers are located above clouds, the warming effect of aerosols strongly depends on the cloud macro- and micro-physical properties underneath, such as cloud optical depth and cloud fraction at visible wavelength. A larger aerosol-cloud overlap is believed to cause a larger warming effect of absorbing aerosols, but the influence of overlapping cloud fraction and cloud optical depth remains to be explored. In this study, the impact of overlapping cloud properties on the shortwave all-sky DRF due to springtime above-cloud dust aerosols is quantified over northern Pacific Ocean based on 10-year satellite measurements. On average, the DRF is roughly 0.62 Wm-2. Furthermore, the warming effect of dust aerosols linearly increases with both overlapping cloud fraction and cloud optical depth. An increase of 1% in overlapping cloud fraction will amplify this warming effect by 1.11 Wm-2τ-1. For the springtime northern Pacific Ocean, top-of-atmosphere cooling by dust aerosols turns into warming when overlapping cloud fraction is beyond 0.20. The variation of critical cloud optical depth beyond which dust aerosols switch from exerting a net cooling to a net warming effect depends on the concurrent overlapping cloud fraction. When the overlapping cloud coverage range increases from 0.2 to -0.4 to 0.6-0.8, the corresponding critical cloud optical depth reduces from 6.92 to 1.16. Our results demonstrate the importance of overlapping cloud properties for determining the springtime warming effect of dust aerosols.

  7. Spatial and Temporal Analysis of Winter Fog Episodes over South Asia by exploiting ground-based and satellite observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahim Khokhar, Muhammad; Yasmin, Naila; Zaib, Naila; Murtaza, Rabia; Noreen, Asma; Ishtiaq, Hira; Khayyam, Junaid; Panday, Arnico

    2016-04-01

    The South Asian region in general and the Indo-Gangetic Plains (IGP) in particular hold about 1/6th of the world's population and is considered as one of the major hotspots with increasing air pollution. Due to growing population and globalization, South Asia is experiencing high transformations in the urban and industrial sectors. Fog is one of the meteorological/environmental phenomena which can generate significant social and economic problems especially havoc to air and road traffic. Meteorological stations provide information about the fog episodes only on the basis of point observation. Continuous monitoring as well as a spatially coherent picture of fog distribution can only be possible through the use of satellite imagery. Current study focus on winter fog episodes over South Asian region using Moderate Resolution Image Spectrometer (MODIS) Level 2 Terra Product and other MODIS Aerosol Product in addition to ground-based sampling and AERONET measurements. MODIS Corrected Reflectance RGBs are used to analyse the spatial extent of fog over study area. MOD04 level 2 Collection 6 data is used to study aerosol load and distribution which are further characterised by using aerosol type land product of MODIS. In order to study the variation of ground based observations from satellite data MODIS, AERONET and high volume air Sampler were used. Main objective of this study was to explore the spatial extent of fog, its causes and to analyse the Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) over South Asia with particular focus over Indo-Gangetic Plains (IGP). Current studies show a descent increase in AOD from past few decades over South Asia and is contributing to poor air quality in the region due to growing population, urbanization, and industrialization. Smoke and absorbing aerosol are major constituent of fog over South Asia. Furthermore, winter 2014-15 extended span of Fog was also observed over South Asia. A significant correlation between MODIS (AOD) and AERONET Station (AOD

  8. Environmental effects of fog oil and CS usage at the Combat Maneuver Training Center, Hohenfels, Germany. [2-chlorophenylmethylene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brubaker, K.L.; Rosenblatt, D.H.; Snyder, C.T.

    1992-03-01

    In response to environmental concerns at the Combat Maneuver Training Center (CMTC), Hohenfels, Germany, the US Army 7th Army Training Command commissioned a scientific study by Argonne National Laboratory to investigate specific issues. The study involved three parts: (1) a field study to determine if fog oil and CS (a compound named after its discoverers, B.B. Carson and R.W. Stoughton) were accumulating in the CMTC environment, (2) a screening of selected soil samples for the presence of US Environmental Protection Agency priority pollutants, and (3) a literature review of the health effects of fog oil and CS, as well as a review of training practices at CMTC. No fog oil or fog oil degradation products were detected in any soil, sediment, or vegetation sample collected at CMTC. Trace quantities of one or more priority pollutants were tentatively detected in three of eight soil and sediment samples. However, the priority pollutant concentrations are so low that they pose no environmental or health hazards. No evidence of widespread or significant contamination in the training areas was found. Crucial data needed to fully evaluate both acute and chronic health effects of civilian exposures to CS at CMTC are not available. On the basis of the available literature, long-ten-n health effects in the civilian population near CMTC that could result from the use of fog oil and CS during training activities are believed to be negligible.

  9. A facile strategy for the fabrication of a bioinspired hydrophilic-superhydrophobic patterned surface for highly efficient fog-harvesting

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Yuchao

    2015-08-10

    Fog water collection represents a meaningful effort in the places where regular water sources, including surface water and ground water, are scarce. Inspired by the amazing fog water collection capability of Stenocara beetles in the Namib Desert and based on the recent work in biomimetic water collection, this work reported a facile, easy-to-operate, and low-cost method for the fabrication of hydrophilic-superhydrophobic patterned hybrid surface toward highly efficient fog water collection. The essence of the method is incorporating a (super)hydrophobically modified metal-based gauze onto the surface of a hydrophilic polystyrene (PS) flat sheet by a simple lab oven-based thermal pressing procedure. The produced hybrid patterned surfaces consisted of PS patches sitting within the holes of the metal gauzes. The method allows for an easy control over the pattern dimension (e.g., patch size) by varying gauze mesh size and thermal pressing temperature, which is then translated to an easy optimization of the ultimate fog water collection efficiency. Given the low-cost and wide availability of both PS and metal gauze, this method has a great potential for scaling-up. The results showed that the hydrophilic-superhydrophobic patterned hybrid surfaces with a similar pattern size to Stenocara beetles’s back pattern produced significantly higher fog collection efficiency than the uniformly (super)hydrophilic or (super)hydrophobic surfaces. This work contributes to general effort in fabricating wettability patterned surfaces and to atmospheric water collection for direct portal use.

  10. The Influence of Drop Size Distributions on the Relationship between Liquid Water Content and Radar Reflectivity in Radiation Fogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boris Thies

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the temporal dynamics of the drop size distribution (DSD and its influence on the relationship between the liquid water content (LWC and the radar reflectivity (Z in fogs. Data measured during three radiation fog events at the Marburg Ground Truth and Profiling Station in Linden-Leihgestern, Germany, form the basis of this analysis. Specifically, we investigated the following questions: (1 Do the different fog life cycle stages exhibit significantly different DSDs? (2 Is it possible to identify characteristic DSDs for each life cycle stage? (3 Is it possible to derive reliable Z-LWC relationships by means of a characteristic DSD? The results showed that there were stage-dependent differences in the fog life cycles, although each fog event was marked by unique characteristics, and a general conclusion about the DSD during the different stages could not be made. A large degree of variation within each stage also precludes the establishment of a representative average spectrum.

  11. Recent warming of lake Kivu.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsev, Sergei; Aaberg, Arthur A; Crowe, Sean A; Hecky, Robert E

    2014-01-01

    Lake Kivu in East Africa has gained notoriety for its prodigious amounts of dissolved methane and dangers of limnic eruption. Being meromictic, it is also expected to accumulate heat due to rising regional air temperatures. To investigate the warming trend and distinguish between atmospheric and geothermal heating sources, we compiled historical temperature data, performed measurements with logging instruments, and simulated heat propagation. We also performed isotopic analyses of water from the lake's main basin and isolated Kabuno Bay. The results reveal that the lake surface is warming at the rate of 0.12°C per decade, which matches the warming rates in other East African lakes. Temperatures increase throughout the entire water column. Though warming is strongest near the surface, warming rates in the deep waters cannot be accounted for solely by propagation of atmospheric heat at presently assumed rates of vertical mixing. Unless the transport rates are significantly higher than presently believed, this indicates significant contributions from subterranean heat sources. Temperature time series in the deep monimolimnion suggest evidence of convection. The progressive deepening of the depth of temperature minimum in the water column is expected to accelerate the warming in deeper waters. The warming trend, however, is unlikely to strongly affect the physical stability of the lake, which depends primarily on salinity gradient.

  12. Recent warming of lake Kivu.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergei Katsev

    Full Text Available Lake Kivu in East Africa has gained notoriety for its prodigious amounts of dissolved methane and dangers of limnic eruption. Being meromictic, it is also expected to accumulate heat due to rising regional air temperatures. To investigate the warming trend and distinguish between atmospheric and geothermal heating sources, we compiled historical temperature data, performed measurements with logging instruments, and simulated heat propagation. We also performed isotopic analyses of water from the lake's main basin and isolated Kabuno Bay. The results reveal that the lake surface is warming at the rate of 0.12°C per decade, which matches the warming rates in other East African lakes. Temperatures increase throughout the entire water column. Though warming is strongest near the surface, warming rates in the deep waters cannot be accounted for solely by propagation of atmospheric heat at presently assumed rates of vertical mixing. Unless the transport rates are significantly higher than presently believed, this indicates significant contributions from subterranean heat sources. Temperature time series in the deep monimolimnion suggest evidence of convection. The progressive deepening of the depth of temperature minimum in the water column is expected to accelerate the warming in deeper waters. The warming trend, however, is unlikely to strongly affect the physical stability of the lake, which depends primarily on salinity gradient.

  13. Beoordeling van het Automatic Rear Fog Flashlight ARFF-systeem (knipperende mistachterlampen) : een notitie ten behoeve van het Verbond van Verzekeraars.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoon, C.C.

    1996-01-01

    The Automatic Rear Fog Flashlight (ARFF) system is an electronic circuit for activating the rear fog flashlights when braking a vehicle with the rear foglights switched on. The system aims to warn drivers of following vehicles for braking vehicles that are in front of them, in circumstances of bad

  14. Design of polarized infrared athermal telephoto objective for penetrating the fog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Duorui; Fu, Qiang; Zhao, Zhao; Zhao, Bin; Zhong, Lijun; Zhan, Juntong

    2014-11-01

    Polarized infrared imaging technology is a new detection technique which own the ability of spying through the fog, highlighting the target and recognizing the forgeries, these characters make it a good advantage of increasing the work distance in the fog. Compared to the traditional infrared imaging method, polarized infrared imaging can identify the background and target easily, that is the most distinguishing feature of polarized infrared imaging technology. Owning to the large refractive index of the infrared material, temperature change will bring defocus seriously, athermal infrared objective is necessarily. On the other hand, athermal objective has large total length, and hard to be integrated for their huge volume. However telephoto objective has the character of small volume and short total length. The paper introduce a method of polarized and athermal infrared telephoto objective which can spy the fog. First assign the optical power of the fore group and the rear group on the basis of the principle of telephoto objective, the power of the fore group is positive and the rear group is negative; then distribute the optical power within each group to realize the ability of athermalization, finally computer-aided software is used to correct aberration. In order to prove the feasibility of the scheme, an athermal optical system was designed by virtue of ZEMAX software which works at 8~12 µm, the focal length of 150mm, F number is 2, and total length of the telephoto objective is 120mm. The environment temperature analysis shows that the optical system have stable imaging quality, MTF is close to diffraction limit. This telephoto objective is available for infrared polarized imaging.

  15. Secondary Organic Aerosol Produced from Aqueous Reactions of Phenols in Fog Drops and Deliquesced Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J.; Anastasio, C.

    2014-12-01

    The formation and evolution of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) in atmospheric condensed phases (i.e., aqueous SOA) can proceed rapidly, but relatively little is known of the important aqueous SOA precursors or their reaction pathways. In our work we are studying the aqueous SOA formed from reactions of phenols (phenol, guaiacol, and syringol), benzene-diols (catechol, resorcinol, and hydroquinone), and phenolic carbonyls (e.g., vanillin and syringaldehyde). These species are potentially important aqueous SOA precursors because they are released in large quantities from biomass burning, have high Henry's Law constants (KH = 103 -109 M-1 atm-1) and are rapidly oxidized. To evaluate the importance of aqueous reactions of phenols as a source of SOA, we first quantified the kinetics and SOA mass yields for 11 phenols reacting via direct photodegradation, hydroxyl radical (•OH), and with an excited organic triplet state (3C*). In the second step, which is the focus of this work, we use these laboratory results in a simple model of fog chemistry using conditions during a previously reported heavy biomass burning event in Bakersfield, CA. Our calculations indicate that under aqueous aerosol conditions (i.e., a liquid water content of 100 μg m-3) the rate of aqueous SOA production (RSOA(aq)) from phenols is similar to the rate in the gas phase. In contrast, under fog/cloud conditions the aqueous RSOA from phenols is 10 times higher than the rate in the gas phase. In both of these cases aqueous RSOA is dominated by the oxidation of phenols by 3C*, followed by direct photodegradation of phenolic carbonyls, and then •OH oxidation. Our results suggest that aqueous oxidation of phenols is a significant source of SOA during fog events and also during times when deliquesced aerosols are present.

  16. Cloud shading and fog drip influence the metabolism of a coastal pine ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbone, Mariah S; Park Williams, A; Ambrose, Anthony R; Boot, Claudia M; Bradley, Eliza S; Dawson, Todd E; Schaeffer, Sean M; Schimel, Joshua P; Still, Christopher J

    2013-02-01

    Assessing the ecological importance of clouds has substantial implications for our basic understanding of ecosystems and for predicting how they will respond to a changing climate. This study was conducted in a coastal Bishop pine forest ecosystem that experiences regular cycles of stratus cloud cover and inundation in summer. Our objective was to understand how these clouds impact ecosystem metabolism by contrasting two sites along a gradient of summer stratus cover. The site that was under cloud cover ~15% more of the summer daytime hours had lower air temperatures and evaporation rates, higher soil moisture content, and received more frequent fog drip inputs than the site with less cloud cover. These cloud-driven differences in environmental conditions translated into large differences in plant and microbial activity. Pine trees at the site with greater cloud cover exhibited less water stress in summer, larger basal area growth, and greater rates of sap velocity. The difference in basal area growth between the two sites was largely due to summer growth. Microbial metabolism was highly responsive to fog drip, illustrated by an observed ~3-fold increase in microbial biomass C with increasing summer fog drip. In addition, the site with more cloud cover had greater total soil respiration and a larger fractional contribution from heterotrophic sources. We conclude that clouds are important to the ecological functioning of these coastal forests, providing summer shading and cooling that relieve pine and microbial drought stress as well as regular moisture inputs that elevate plant and microbial metabolism. These findings are important for understanding how these and other seasonally dry coastal ecosystems will respond to predicted changes in stratus cover, rainfall, and temperature. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  17. Forest restoration in a fog oasis: evidence indicates need for cultural awareness in constructing the reference.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís Balaguer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In the Peruvian Coastal Desert, an archipelago of fog oases, locally called lomas, are centers of biodiversity and of past human activity. Fog interception by a tree canopy, dominated by the legume tree tara (Caesalpinia spinosa, enables the occurrence in the Atiquipa lomas (southern Peru of an environmental island with a diverse flora and high productivity. Although this forest provides essential services to the local population, it has suffered 90% anthropogenic reduction in area. Restoration efforts are now getting under way, including discussion as to the most appropriate reference ecosystem to use. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Genetic diversity of tara was studied in the Atiquipa population and over a wide geographical and ecological range. Neither exclusive plastid haplotypes to loma formations nor clear geographical structuring of the genetic diversity was found. Photosynthetic performance and growth of seedlings naturally recruited in remnant patches of loma forest were compared with those of seedlings recruited or planted in the adjacent deforested area. Despite the greater water and nitrogen availability under tree canopy, growth of forest seedlings did not differ from that of those recruited into the deforested area, and was lower than that of planted seedlings. Tara seedlings exhibited tight stomatal control of photosynthesis, and a structural photoprotection by leaflet closure. These drought-avoiding mechanisms did not optimize seedling performance under the conditions produced by forest interception of fog moisture. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Both weak geographic partitioning of genetic variation and lack of physiological specialization of seedlings to the forest water regime strongly suggest that tara was introduced to lomas by humans. Therefore, the most diverse fragment of lomas is the result of landscape management and resource use by pre-Columbian cultures. We argue that an appropriate reference ecosystem for

  18. Forest restoration in a fog oasis: evidence indicates need for cultural awareness in constructing the reference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaguer, Luís; Arroyo-García, Rosa; Jiménez, Percy; Jiménez, María Dolores; Villegas, Luís; Cordero, Irene; Rubio de Casas, Rafael; Fernández-Delgado, Raúl; Ron, María Eugenia; Manrique, Esteban; Vargas, Pablo; Cano, Emilio; Pueyo, José J; Aronson, James

    2011-01-01

    In the Peruvian Coastal Desert, an archipelago of fog oases, locally called lomas, are centers of biodiversity and of past human activity. Fog interception by a tree canopy, dominated by the legume tree tara (Caesalpinia spinosa), enables the occurrence in the Atiquipa lomas (southern Peru) of an environmental island with a diverse flora and high productivity. Although this forest provides essential services to the local population, it has suffered 90% anthropogenic reduction in area. Restoration efforts are now getting under way, including discussion as to the most appropriate reference ecosystem to use. Genetic diversity of tara was studied in the Atiquipa population and over a wide geographical and ecological range. Neither exclusive plastid haplotypes to loma formations nor clear geographical structuring of the genetic diversity was found. Photosynthetic performance and growth of seedlings naturally recruited in remnant patches of loma forest were compared with those of seedlings recruited or planted in the adjacent deforested area. Despite the greater water and nitrogen availability under tree canopy, growth of forest seedlings did not differ from that of those recruited into the deforested area, and was lower than that of planted seedlings. Tara seedlings exhibited tight stomatal control of photosynthesis, and a structural photoprotection by leaflet closure. These drought-avoiding mechanisms did not optimize seedling performance under the conditions produced by forest interception of fog moisture. Both weak geographic partitioning of genetic variation and lack of physiological specialization of seedlings to the forest water regime strongly suggest that tara was introduced to lomas by humans. Therefore, the most diverse fragment of lomas is the result of landscape management and resource use by pre-Columbian cultures. We argue that an appropriate reference ecosystem for ecological restoration of lomas should include sustainable agroforestry practices that

  19. Application of Fast Dynamic Allan Variance for the Characterization of FOGs-Based Measurement While Drilling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lu; Zhang, Chunxi; Gao, Shuang; Wang, Tao; Lin, Tie; Li, Xianmu

    2016-12-07

    The stability of a fiber optic gyroscope (FOG) in measurement while drilling (MWD) could vary with time because of changing temperature, high vibration, and sudden power failure. The dynamic Allan variance (DAVAR) is a sliding version of the Allan variance. It is a practical tool that could represent the non-stationary behavior of the gyroscope signal. Since the normal DAVAR takes too long to deal with long time series, a fast DAVAR algorithm has been developed to accelerate the computation speed. However, both the normal DAVAR algorithm and the fast algorithm become invalid for discontinuous time series. What is worse, the FOG-based MWD underground often keeps working for several days; the gyro data collected aboveground is not only very time-consuming, but also sometimes discontinuous in the timeline. In this article, on the basis of the fast algorithm for DAVAR, we make a further advance in the fast algorithm (improved fast DAVAR) to extend the fast DAVAR to discontinuous time series. The improved fast DAVAR and the normal DAVAR are used to responsively characterize two sets of simulation data. The simulation results show that when the length of the time series is short, the improved fast DAVAR saves 78.93% of calculation time. When the length of the time series is long ( 6 × 10 5 samples), the improved fast DAVAR reduces calculation time by 97.09%. Another set of simulation data with missing data is characterized by the improved fast DAVAR. Its simulation results prove that the improved fast DAVAR could successfully deal with discontinuous data. In the end, a vibration experiment with FOGs-based MWD has been implemented to validate the good performance of the improved fast DAVAR. The results of the experience testify that the improved fast DAVAR not only shortens computation time, but could also analyze discontinuous time series.

  20. GOES-derived fog and low cloud indices for coastal north and central California ecological analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torregrosa, Alicia; Combs, Cindy; Peters, Jeff

    2016-02-01

    Fog and low cloud cover (FLCC) strongly influences the water, energy, and nutrient flux of coastal ecosystems. Easy-to-use FLCC data are needed to quantify the impacts of FLCC on ecosystem dynamics especially during hot and dry Mediterranean climate summers. Monthly, annual, and decadal FLCC digital maps (indices) were derived for June-September 1999-2009 for coastal California, latitude 34.50°N (south of Monterey Bay) to latitude 41.95°N (north of Crescent City) from 26,000 hourly night and day Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) images. Monthly average FLCC ranges from ocean increases from north (9 h/d) to south (14 h/d), whereas on land, FLCC is highest where land juts into the prevailing NW winds and is lowest in the lee of major capes. FLCC advects farthest inland through low-lying NW ocean-facing valleys. At night, average total hours of FLCC are higher more frequently on land than over the ocean. The interannual FLCC coefficient of variation shows long-term geographic stability that is strongly associated with landform position. FLCC hours per day mapped contours, derived from decadal average FLCC, delineate the commonly used term "fog belt" into FLCC zones with increased locational precision. FLCC indices are available for download from the California Landscape Conservation Cooperative Climate Commons website (http://climate.calcommons.org/datasets/summertime-fog). FLCC indices can improve analyses of biogeographic and bioclimatic species distribution models; understanding meteorological mechanisms driving FLCC patterns; solar energy feasibility studies; investigations of ecohydrology, evapotranspiration, and agricultural irrigation demand; and viticulture ripening models.

  1. Amplified Arctic warming by phytoplankton under greenhouse warming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jong-Yeon; Kug, Jong-Seong; Bader, Jürgen; Rolph, Rebecca; Kwon, Minho

    2015-05-12

    Phytoplankton have attracted increasing attention in climate science due to their impacts on climate systems. A new generation of climate models can now provide estimates of future climate change, considering the biological feedbacks through the development of the coupled physical-ecosystem model. Here we present the geophysical impact of phytoplankton, which is often overlooked in future climate projections. A suite of future warming experiments using a fully coupled ocean-atmosphere model that interacts with a marine ecosystem model reveals that the future phytoplankton change influenced by greenhouse warming can amplify Arctic surface warming considerably. The warming-induced sea ice melting and the corresponding increase in shortwave radiation penetrating into the ocean both result in a longer phytoplankton growing season in the Arctic. In turn, the increase in Arctic phytoplankton warms the ocean surface layer through direct biological heating, triggering additional positive feedbacks in the Arctic, and consequently intensifying the Arctic warming further. Our results establish the presence of marine phytoplankton as an important potential driver of the future Arctic climate changes.

  2. Numerical simulation of advection fog formation on multi-disperse aerosols due to combustion-related pollutants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, R. J.; Liaw, G. S.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of multi-disperse distribution of the aerosol population are presented. Single component and multi-component aerosol species on the condensation/nucleation processes which affect the reduction in visibility are described. The aerosol population with a high particle concentration provided more favorable conditions for the formation of a denser fog than the aerosol population with a greater particle size distribution when the value of the mass concentration of the aerosols was kept constant. The results were used as numerical predictions of fog formation. Two dimensional observations in horizontal and vertical coordinates, together with time-dependent measurements were needed as initial values for the following physical parameters: (1)wind profiles; (2) temperature profiles; (3) humidity profiles; (4) mass concentration of aerosol particles; (5) particle size distribution of aerosols; and (6) chemical composition of aerosols. Formation and dissipation of advection fog, thus, can be forecasted numerically by introducing initial values obtained from the observations.

  3. Understanding the role of fog in forest hydrology: Stable isotopes as tools for determining input and partitioning of cloud water in montane forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholl, M.; Eugster, W.; Burkard, R.

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the hydrology of tropical montane cloud forests (TMCF) has become essential as deforestation of mountain areas proceeds at an increased rate worldwide. Passive and active cloud-water collectors, throughfall and stemflow collectors, visibility or droplet size measurements, and micrometeorological sensors are typically used to measure the fog water inputs to ecosystems. In addition, stable isotopes may be used as a natural tracer for fog and rain. Previous studies have shown that the isotopic signature of fog tends to be more enriched in the heavier isotopes 2H and 18O than that of rain, due to differences in condensation temperature and history. Differences between fog and rain isotopes are largest when rain is from synoptic-scale storms, and fog or orographic cloud water is generated locally. Smaller isotopic differences have been observed between rain and fog on mountains with orographic clouds, but only a few studies have been conducted. Quantifying fog deposition using isotope methods is more difficult in forests receiving mixed precipitation, because of limitations in the ability of sampling equipment to separate fog from rain, and because fog and rain may, under some conditions, have similar isotopic composition. This article describes the various types of fog most relevant to montane cloud forests and the importance of fog water deposition in the hydrologic budget. A brief overview of isotope hydrology provides the background needed to understand isotope applications in cloud forests. A summary of previous work explains isotopic differences between rain and fog in different environments, and how monitoring the isotopic signature of surface water, soil water and tree xylem water can yield estimates of the contribution of fog water to streamflow, groundwater recharge and transpiration. Next, instrumentation to measure fog and rain, and methods to determine isotopic concentrations in plant and soil water are discussed. The article concludes with

  4. Microstructure and Salt Fog Corrosion Behavior of AA2219 Friction-Stir-Welded Aluminum Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasa Rao, G.; Subba Rao, V. V.; Rao, S. R. K.

    2017-07-01

    Plates (8.1-mm-thick) from aluminum alloy AA2219-T87 are studied after friction stir welding. The plates are subjected to salt fog corrosion tests according to ASTM B117 at different pH values and different spraying times. The regions affected by corrosion are studied in different zones of welded joints by the methods of optical and transmission electron microscopy. The corrosion resistance is determined in acid, basic and neutral solutions. The resistances of the base metal and of the zones of welded joints are compared.

  5. Towards Service-Oriented Middleware for Fog and Cloud Integrated Cyber Physical Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohamed, Nader; Lazarova-Molnar, Sanja; Jawhar, Imad

    2017-01-01

    enables the integration of CPS with other systems such as Cloud and Fog Computing. Furthermore, as CPS can be developed for various applications at different scales, this paper provides a classification for CPS applications and discusses how CPSWare can effectively deal with the different issues in each....... In addition, it proposes an SOM for CPS, called CPSWare. This middleware views all CPS components as a set of services and provides a service-based infrastructure to develop and operate CPS applications. This approach provides systemic solutions for solving many computing and networking issues in CPS. It also...

  6. Alto Patache fog oasis in the Atacama Desert: Geographical basis for a sustainable development program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderón, M.; Cereceda, P.; Larrain, H.; Osses, P.; Pérez, L.; Ibáñez, M.

    2010-07-01

    Alto Patache coastal fog oasis is a protected area located south of Iquique, Northern Chile, being presently in charge of the Atacama Desert Center (ADC) research group of the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, since 1997. On 2007, the Chilean Government bestowed a piece of land stretch covering 1,114 hectares to ADC scientific group for scientific research, ecosystem protection and environmental education. This oasis has been recently studied from different points of view: climate, biogeography, fog collection, geomorphology, soil survey and land use planning, plant distribution, conservation and archaeology. During 2009, a study of the geographical basis to elaborate a general management plan was undertaken to collect information to fulfill our planned out objectives. Through this study, georreferenciated strategic information was compiled to evaluate future actions conducting to a sustainable development within the protected area. This information was translated into thematic maps showing the spatial distribution of variables like: climate, geology, geomorphology, soils, vegetation, fauna, archaeological sites and management zones. The methodology used is the analysis of satellite imagery, using GPS by creating a cartographic Data Base incorporated in GIS. Results show that the area starts at the littoral plain, ranging from 500 m to 2.000 m, being continued in parts by a piedmont intercepted by a very abrupt mega-cliff, or hectares of climbing sand dunes leading to a short high plateau limited by a soft hilly area to the East. Two soil types are characteristic: Entisols (Torriorthent) covering the coastal beach sediments, and Aridisols along the cliff and adjacent hills. Vegetation consists not only of a very rich lichen cover, but also of endangered vascular species associations constituting a very fragile sub-tropical coastal desert community, such as Eulychnia, Cumulopuntia, Eriosyce cacti, and Lycium - Nolana- Ephedra communities. Fog oasis

  7. Global warming and coral reefs

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Wafar, M.V.M.

    Ever increasing global warming trend is predicted to cause within the next 100 years an accelerated sea level rise, increase in sea surface temparature and enhanced ultraviolet radiation to a significant enough extent to affect drastically...

  8. Design of an optical lens combined with a total internal reflection (TIR) freeform surface for a LED front fog lamp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hong; Li, Xiufeng; Ge, Peng

    2017-02-01

    We propose a design method of an optical lens combined with a total internal reflection (TIR) freeform surface for a LED front fog lamp. The TIR freeform surface controls the edge rays of the LED source. It totally reflects the edge rays and makes them emit from the top surface of the lens. And the middle rays of the LED source go through the refractive surface and reach the measured plane. We simulate the model by Monte Carlo method. Simulation results show that the front fog lamp system can satisfy the requirement of ECE R19 Rev7. The light control efficiency can reach up to 76%.

  9. Operational fog collection and its role in environmental education and social reintegration: A case study in Colombia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobar, C. M.; Lopez, A.; Aristizabal, H. F.; Molina, J. M.

    2010-07-01

    Experimental efforts with fog collection in Colombia began eight years ago, and in recent papers we have suggested the implementation of operational fog collection as an alternative to meet water requirements in rural areas of the Andes Mountain Range. Since then, an increasing number of individuals from academia and environmental organizations in the country have shown a remarkable interest on this appropriate technology, and some started its exploration in a larger scale. In this work we describe the implementation process of the first operational fog collection project in Colombia and discuss its role in rural water supply, in environmental education issues and in the process of "social reintegration" of people who have been victims of forced displacement. Both the fog collection evaluation stage and construction and administration of the operational system involved the participation of the community of a rural village. The study zone, located in the Andes Mountains of the Valle del Cauca Department and with altitudes ranging from 2600 to 2800 meters a.s.l., has serious limitations in water availability. Eight standard fog collectors (SFC) were implemented and used during the period May/2008 - Feb/2009 in order to assess the water yield from fog. The best average monthly collection rate in the period of study was around 2.0 l.m-2.day-1. The constructed large fog collector (LFC), with a vertical collection surface of 25 m2, and the associated hydraulic system are currently managed and administered by the village inhabitants. The fog collection system benefits a rural school, and the water is mainly used in small-scale irrigation activities for horticultural crops and livestock development. The project has also brought positive impacts in the community organization, mainly comprising people who have been forced out of their rural homes by the country's nearly half-century old armed conflict. The system also allows agriculture- and environment-related issues to be

  10. Arctic dimension of global warming

    OpenAIRE

    G. V. Alekseev

    2014-01-01

    A brief assessment of the global warming in the Arctic climate system with the emphasis on sea ice is presented. The Arctic region is coupled to the global climate system by the atmosphere and ocean circulation that providesa major contribution to the Arctic energy budget. On this basis using of special indices it is shown that amplification of warming in the Arctic is associated with the increasing of meridional heat transport from the low latitudes.

  11. Human Milk Warming Temperatures Using a Simulation of Currently Available Storage and Warming Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bransburg-Zabary, Sharron; Virozub, Alexander; Mimouni, Francis B

    2015-01-01

    Human milk handling guidelines are very demanding, based upon solid scientific evidence that handling methods can make a real difference in infant health and nutrition. Indeed, properly stored milk maintains many of its unique qualities and continues to be the second and third best infant feeding alternatives, much superior to artificial feeding. Container type and shape, mode of steering, amount of air exposure and storage temperature may adversely affect milk stability and composition. Heating above physiological temperatures significantly impacts nutritional and immunological properties of milk. In spite of this knowledge, there are no strict guidelines regarding milk warming. Human milk is often heated in electrical-based bottle warmers that can exceed 80°C, a temperature at which many beneficial human milk properties disappear. High temperatures can also induce fat profile variations as compared with fresh human milk. In this manuscript we estimate the amount of damage due to overheating during warming using a heat flow simulation of a regular water based bottle warmer. To do so, we carried out a series of warming simulations which provided us with dynamic temperature fields within bottled milk. We simulated the use of a hot water-bath at 80°C to heat bottled refrigerated milk (60 ml and 178 ml) to demonstrate that large milk portions are overheated (above 40°C). It seems that the contemporary storage method (upright feeding tool, i.e. bottle) and bottle warming device, are not optimize to preserve the unique properties of human milk. Health workers and parents should be aware of this problem especially when it relates to sick neonates and preemies that cannot be directly fed at the breast.

  12. Human Milk Warming Temperatures Using a Simulation of Currently Available Storage and Warming Methods.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharron Bransburg-Zabary

    Full Text Available Human milk handling guidelines are very demanding, based upon solid scientific evidence that handling methods can make a real difference in infant health and nutrition. Indeed, properly stored milk maintains many of its unique qualities and continues to be the second and third best infant feeding alternatives, much superior to artificial feeding. Container type and shape, mode of steering, amount of air exposure and storage temperature may adversely affect milk stability and composition. Heating above physiological temperatures significantly impacts nutritional and immunological properties of milk. In spite of this knowledge, there are no strict guidelines regarding milk warming. Human milk is often heated in electrical-based bottle warmers that can exceed 80°C, a temperature at which many beneficial human milk properties disappear. High temperatures can also induce fat profile variations as compared with fresh human milk. In this manuscript we estimate the amount of damage due to overheating during warming using a heat flow simulation of a regular water based bottle warmer. To do so, we carried out a series of warming simulations which provided us with dynamic temperature fields within bottled milk. We simulated the use of a hot water-bath at 80°C to heat bottled refrigerated milk (60 ml and 178 ml to demonstrate that large milk portions are overheated (above 40°C. It seems that the contemporary storage method (upright feeding tool, i.e. bottle and bottle warming device, are not optimize to preserve the unique properties of human milk. Health workers and parents should be aware of this problem especially when it relates to sick neonates and preemies that cannot be directly fed at the breast.

  13. Analysis of the Interaction and Transport of Aerosols with Cloud or Fog during DRAGON Campaigns in Asia from AERONET and Satellite Remote Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eck, Thomas; Holben, Brent; Reid, Jeffrey; Lynch, Peng; Schafer, Joel; Giles, David; Kim, Jhoon; Kim, Young; Sano, Itaru; Platnick, Steven; Arnold, George; Lyapustin, Alexei; Pickering, Kenneth; Crawford, James; Siniuk, Alexander; Smirnov, Alexander; Wang, Pucai; Xia, Xiangao; Li, Zhanqing

    2015-04-01

    Ground-based remote sensing observations from Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) sun-sky radiometers have recently shown several instances where cloud-aerosol interaction had resulted in modification of aerosol properties and/or in difficulty identifying some major pollution transport events due to aerosols being imbedded in cloud systems. AERONET has established Distributed Regional Aerosol Gridded Observation Networks (DRAGON) during field campaigns that are short-term (~2-3 months) relatively dense spatial networks of ~15 to 45 sun and sky scanning photometers. Major DRAGON field campaigns in Japan and South Korea during Spring of 2012 have yielded observations of aerosol transport associated with clouds and/or aerosol properties modification as a result of fog interaction. Analysis of data from the Korean and Japan DRAGON campaigns shows that major fine-mode aerosol transport events are sometimes associated with extensive cloud cover and that cloud-screening of observations often filter out significant pollution aerosol transport events. The Spectral De-convolution Algorithm (SDA) algorithm was utilized to isolate and analyze the fine-mode aerosol optical depth (AOD) signal from AERONET data for these cases of persistent and extensive cloud cover. Satellite retrievals of AOD from MODIS sensors (from both dark target and MAIAC algorithms) were also investigated to assess the issue of detectability of high AOD events associated with high cloud fraction. Cloud properties retrieved from MODIS are also investigated in relation to the AERONET and satellite measurements of AOD. Underestimation of AOD by the Navy Aerosol Analysis and Prediction System (NAAPS) model at very high AOD at sites in China and Korea was observed, especially for observations that are cloud screened by AERONET (L2 data). Additionally, extensive fog that was coincident with aerosol layer height on some days in Korea resulted in large increases in fine mode aerosol radius, with a mode of cloud

  14. Media narratives of global warming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meisner, M. [Syracuse Univ., Syracuse, NY (United States)

    2000-06-01

    The way in which the North American print media are representing global warming was the focus of this paper. It was suggested that the way in which the media presents the issue and proposed responses to it, will influence how the public and decision-makers perceive and respond to the problem. This paper also presented examples demonstrating how nature and humanity's relationship to nature are being presented and what types of responses to global warming are being presented. The issue of who is responsible for acting to prevent or mitigate climate change was also discussed. It was shown that media narratives of global warming are not just stories of scientists debating the existence of global warming, but that they now largely accept global warming as a reality. However, the media continue to construct the problem in narrow technical, economic and anthropocentric terms. Mass media interpretation of global warming offer up a limited selection of problem definitions, reasons for acting and ways of addressing the problem. It was cautioned that this approach will likely promote futility, denial and apathy on the part of the public. 21 refs.

  15. Understanding fog-plant interactions at the ecosystem scale using atmospheric carbonyl sulfide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, J. E.; Whelan, M.; Stinecipher, J.; Zumkehr, A. L.; Berry, J. A.; Dawson, T. E.; Seibt, U.; Hilton, T. W.; Kulkarni, S.; Commane, R.; Angevine, W. M.; Lu, Y.; Herndon, S. C.; Zahniser, M. S.

    2015-12-01

    Ecosystem metabolism is thought to have powerful feedbacks with the climate system as well as direct impacts on individual taxa that rely on ecosystems for food, water, and shelter. Despite the importance of an ecosystem level understanding, climate change impacts on whole ecosystems remains highly uncertain. In particular, coastal fog-dominated regions are a blind spot for whole ecosystem measurements of the land-air-sea exchange of carbon, water, and energy. To address this critical knowledge gap, our inter-displicary team from the University of California's new Institute for the Study of Ecological Effects of Climate Impacts (ISEECI) has launched a next-generation monitoring program along a gradient of UC Natural Reserve System (NRS) sites. We leverage recent breakthroughs in atmospheric spectroscopy and mechanistic ecosystem models of carbonyl sulfide that provide an unprecedented opportunity to explore the sustainability of coastal systems. Here we present our next-generation monitoring and regional analysis across a North/South transect of UC-NRS sites that has the potential to provide a new window into fog-dominated ecosystems, both currently and under climate change scenarios.

  16. An optimal control strategies using vaccination and fogging in dengue fever transmission model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitria, Irma; Winarni, Pancahayani, Sigit; Subchan

    2017-08-01

    This paper discussed regarding a model and an optimal control problem of dengue fever transmission. We classified the model as human and vector (mosquito) population classes. For the human population, there are three subclasses, such as susceptible, infected, and resistant classes. Then, for the vector population, we divided it into wiggler, susceptible, and infected vector classes. Thus, the model consists of six dynamic equations. To minimize the number of dengue fever cases, we designed two optimal control variables in the model, the giving of fogging and vaccination. The objective function of this optimal control problem is to minimize the number of infected human population, the number of vector, and the cost of the controlling efforts. By giving the fogging optimally, the number of vector can be minimized. In this case, we considered the giving of vaccination as a control variable because it is one of the efforts that are being developed to reduce the spreading of dengue fever. We used Pontryagin Minimum Principle to solve the optimal control problem. Furthermore, the numerical simulation results are given to show the effect of the optimal control strategies in order to minimize the epidemic of dengue fever.

  17. MEMS and FOG Technologies for Tactical and Navigation Grade Inertial Sensors—Recent Improvements and Comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deppe, Olaf; Dorner, Georg; König, Stefan; Martin, Tim; Voigt, Sven; Zimmermann, Steffen

    2017-01-01

    In the following paper, we present an industry perspective of inertial sensors for navigation purposes driven by applications and customer needs. Microelectromechanical system (MEMS) inertial sensors have revolutionized consumer, automotive, and industrial applications and they have started to fulfill the high end tactical grade performance requirements of hybrid navigation systems on a series production scale. The Fiber Optic Gyroscope (FOG) technology, on the other hand, is further pushed into the near navigation grade performance region and beyond. Each technology has its special pros and cons making it more or less suitable for specific applications. In our overview paper, we present latest improvements at NG LITEF in tactical and navigation grade MEMS accelerometers, MEMS gyroscopes, and Fiber Optic Gyroscopes, based on our long-term experience in the field. We demonstrate how accelerometer performance has improved by switching from wet etching to deep reactive ion etching (DRIE) technology. For MEMS gyroscopes, we show that better than 1°/h series production devices are within reach, and for FOGs we present how limitations in noise performance were overcome by signal processing. The paper also intends a comparison of the different technologies, emphasizing suitability for different navigation applications, thus providing guidance to system engineers. PMID:28287483

  18. MEMS and FOG Technologies for Tactical and Navigation Grade Inertial Sensors-Recent Improvements and Comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deppe, Olaf; Dorner, Georg; König, Stefan; Martin, Tim; Voigt, Sven; Zimmermann, Steffen

    2017-03-11

    In the following paper, we present an industry perspective of inertial sensors for navigation purposes driven by applications and customer needs. Microelectromechanical system (MEMS) inertial sensors have revolutionized consumer, automotive, and industrial applications and they have started to fulfill the high end tactical grade performance requirements of hybrid navigation systems on a series production scale. The Fiber Optic Gyroscope (FOG) technology, on the other hand, is further pushed into the near navigation grade performance region and beyond. Each technology has its special pros and cons making it more or less suitable for specific applications. In our overview paper, we present latest improvements at NG LITEF in tactical and navigation grade MEMS accelerometers, MEMS gyroscopes, and Fiber Optic Gyroscopes, based on our long-term experience in the field. We demonstrate how accelerometer performance has improved by switching from wet etching to deep reactive ion etching (DRIE) technology. For MEMS gyroscopes, we show that better than 1°/h series production devices are within reach, and for FOGs we present how limitations in noise performance were overcome by signal processing. The paper also intends a comparison of the different technologies, emphasizing suitability for different navigation applications, thus providing guidance to system engineers.

  19. Impacts of Fog Characteristics, Forward Illumination, and Warning Beacon Intensity Distribution on Roadway Hazard Visibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John D. Bullough

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Warning beacons are critical for the safety of transportation, construction, and utility workers. These devices need to produce sufficient luminous intensity to be visible without creating glare to drivers. Published standards for the photometric performance of warning beacons do not address their performance in conditions of reduced visibility such as fog. Under such conditions light emitted in directions other than toward approaching drivers can create scattered light that makes workers and other hazards less visible. Simulations of visibility of hazards under varying conditions of fog density, forward vehicle lighting, warning beacon luminous intensity, and intensity distribution were performed to assess their impacts on visual performance by drivers. Each of these factors can influence the ability of drivers to detect and identify workers and hazards along the roadway in work zones. Based on the results, it would be reasonable to specify maximum limits on the luminous intensity of warning beacons in directions that are unlikely to be seen by drivers along the roadway, limits which are not included in published performance specifications.

  20. Direct photolysis of carbonyl compounds dissolved in cloud and fog~droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, S. A.; Tapavicza, E.; Furche, F.; Nizkorodov, S. A.

    2013-09-01

    Gas-phase photolysis is an important tropospheric sink for many carbonyl compounds; however the significance of direct photolysis of these compounds dissolved in cloud and fog droplets is uncertain. We develop a theoretical approach to assess the importance of aqueous photolysis for a series of carbonyls that possess carboxyl and hydroxyl functional groups by comparison with rates of other atmospheric processes. We use computationally and experimentally derived effective Henry's law constants, hydration equilibrium parameters, aqueous hydroxyl radical (OH) rate constants, and optical extinction coefficients to identify types of compounds that will (or will not) have competitive aqueous photolysis rates. We also present molecular dynamics simulations designed to estimate gas- and aqueous-phase extinction coefficients of unstudied atmospherically relevant compounds found in d-limonene and isoprene secondary organic aerosol. In addition, experiments designed to measure the photolysis rate of glyceraldehyde, an atmospherically relevant water-soluble organic compound, reveal that aqueous quantum yields are highly molecule-specific and cannot be extrapolated from measurements of structurally similar compounds. We find that only two out of the 92 carbonyl compounds investigated, pyruvic acid and acetoacetic acid, may have aqueous photolysis rates that exceed the rate of oxidation by dissolved OH. For almost all carbonyl compounds lacking α,β-conjugation that were investigated, atmospheric removal by direct photolysis in cloud and fog droplets can be neglected under typical atmospheric conditions.

  1. Direct photolysis of carbonyl compounds dissolved in cloud and fog~droplets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Epstein

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Gas-phase photolysis is an important tropospheric sink for many carbonyl compounds; however the significance of direct photolysis of these compounds dissolved in cloud and fog droplets is uncertain. We develop a theoretical approach to assess the importance of aqueous photolysis for a series of carbonyls that possess carboxyl and hydroxyl functional groups by comparison with rates of other atmospheric processes. We use computationally and experimentally derived effective Henry's law constants, hydration equilibrium parameters, aqueous hydroxyl radical (OH rate constants, and optical extinction coefficients to identify types of compounds that will (or will not have competitive aqueous photolysis rates. We also present molecular dynamics simulations designed to estimate gas- and aqueous-phase extinction coefficients of unstudied atmospherically relevant compounds found in d-limonene and isoprene secondary organic aerosol. In addition, experiments designed to measure the photolysis rate of glyceraldehyde, an atmospherically relevant water-soluble organic compound, reveal that aqueous quantum yields are highly molecule-specific and cannot be extrapolated from measurements of structurally similar compounds. We find that only two out of the 92 carbonyl compounds investigated, pyruvic acid and acetoacetic acid, may have aqueous photolysis rates that exceed the rate of oxidation by dissolved OH. For almost all carbonyl compounds lacking α,β-conjugation that were investigated, atmospheric removal by direct photolysis in cloud and fog droplets can be neglected under typical atmospheric conditions.

  2. GOES-derived fog and low cloud indices for coastal north and central California ecological analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torregrosa, Alicia; Cindy Combs,; Peters, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    Fog and low cloud cover (FLCC) changes the water, energy, and nutrient flux of coastal ecosystems. Easy-to-use FLCC data are needed to quantify the impacts of FLC on ecosystem dynamics during hot, dry Mediterranean climate summers. FLCC indices were generated from 26,000 hourly night and day FLCC maps derived from Geostationary Environmental Operational Satellite (GOES) data for June, July, August, and September, 1999- 2009 for coastal California, latitude 34.50°N, south of Monterey Bay, to latitude 41.95°N, north of Crescent City. Monthly FLCC average hours per day (h/d) range from juts into the prevailing NW winds and is lowest in the lee of major capes. FLCC advects furthest inland through low-lying NW ocean-facing valleys. At night hours of FLCC is higher more frequently on land than over the ocean. Interannual FLCC coefficient of variation shows long term geographic stability strongly associated with landform position. Contours delineating homogeneous zones of FLCC, derived from average decadal h/d FLCC, provide data to refine the commonly used term ‘fog belt.’ FLCC indices are available for download from the California Landscape Conservation Cooperative Climate Commons website. FLCC indices can be used to improve analyses of biogeographic and bioclimatic species distribution models, meteorological mechanisms driving FLCC patterns, ecohydrological investigations of evapotranspiration, solar energy feasibility studies, agricultural irrigation demand and viticultural ripening models.

  3. Determination of visual range during fog and mist using digital camera images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, John R; Moogan, Jamie C, E-mail: j.taylor@adfa.edu.a [School of Physical, Environmental and Mathematical Sciences, UNSW-ADFA, Canberra ACT, 2600 (Australia)

    2010-08-15

    During the winter of 2008, daily time series of images of five 'unit-cell chequerboard' targets were acquired using a digital camera. The camera and targets were located in the Majura Valley approximately 3 km from Canberra airport. We show how the contrast between the black and white sections of the targets is related to the meteorological range (or standard visual range), and compare estimates of this quantity derived from images acquired during fog and mist conditions with those from the Vaisala FD-12 visibility meter operated by the Bureau of Meteorology at Canberra Airport. The two sets of ranges are consistent but show the variability of visibility in the patchy fog conditions that often prevail in the Majura Valley. Significant spatial variations of the light extinction coefficient were found to occur over the longest 570 m optical path sampled by the imaging system. Visual ranges could be estimated out to ten times the distance to the furthest target, or approximately 6 km, in these experiments. Image saturation of the white sections of the targets was the major limitation on the quantitative interpretation of the images. In the future, the camera images will be processed in real time so that the camera exposure can be adjusted to avoid saturation.

  4. Network Intelligence Based on Network State Information for Connected Vehicles Utilizing Fog Computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seongjin Park

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a method to take advantage of fog computing and SDN in the connected vehicle environment, where communication channels are unstable and the topology changes frequently. A controller knows the current state of the network by maintaining the most recent network topology. Of all the information collected by the controller in the mobile environment, node mobility information is particularly important. Thus, we divide nodes into three classes according to their mobility types and use their related attributes to efficiently manage the mobile connections. Our approach utilizes mobility information to reduce control message overhead by adjusting the period of beacon messages and to support efficient failure recovery. One is to recover the connection failures using only mobility information, and the other is to suggest a real-time scheduling algorithm to recover the services for the vehicles that lost connection in the case of a fog server failure. A real-time scheduling method is first described and then evaluated. The results show that our scheme is effective in the connected vehicle environment. We then demonstrate the reduction of control overhead and the connection recovery by using a network simulator. The simulation results show that control message overhead and failure recovery time are decreased by approximately 55% and 5%, respectively.

  5. Smart Collaborative Caching for Information-Centric IoT in Fog Computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Song

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The significant changes enabled by the fog computing had demonstrated that Internet of Things (IoT urgently needs more evolutional reforms. Limited by the inflexible design philosophy; the traditional structure of a network is hard to meet the latest demands. However, Information-Centric Networking (ICN is a promising option to bridge and cover these enormous gaps. In this paper, a Smart Collaborative Caching (SCC scheme is established by leveraging high-level ICN principles for IoT within fog computing paradigm. The proposed solution is supposed to be utilized in resource pooling, content storing, node locating and other related situations. By investigating the available characteristics of ICN, some challenges of such combination are reviewed in depth. The details of building SCC, including basic model and advanced algorithms, are presented based on theoretical analysis and simplified examples. The validation focuses on two typical scenarios: simple status inquiry and complex content sharing. The number of clusters, packet loss probability and other parameters are also considered. The analytical results demonstrate that the performance of our scheme, regarding total packet number and average transmission latency, can outperform that of the original ones. We expect that the SCC will contribute an efficient solution to the related studies.

  6. Effects of haze particles and fog droplets on NLOS ultraviolet communication channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Changming; Zhang, Hongming; Cheng, Julian

    2015-09-07

    The performance of non-line-of-sight ultraviolet (UV) scattering communication depends largely on atmospheric parameters. In this paper, we consider haze, fog, two common types of aerosols, and introduce the density and size of aerosols as variables to study the channel path loss for the UV scattering communications. We modify a Monte-Carlo based multiple-scattering model and provide fitting functions to replace the complex calculations of Mie theory, which can be used to obtain the atmospheric coefficients and phase functions for the aerosols. Simulation results reveal that, given fixed elevation angles, the channel path loss is related to both communication range, the aerosol density, and size of aerosols. For a short communication range, an increase of aerosol density can reduce the path loss, which improves the performance of UV scattering communication. However, when the communication range is extended, the path loss will fall first and then rise with density of aerosols. This phenomenon also occurs for an increase of fog drop size. The density or size of aerosols that has the lowest path loss is inversely proportional to the communication range.

  7. Passive FOG IMU for short-range missile application: from qualification toward series production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trommer, Gert F.; Mueller, R.; Opitz, S.

    1996-11-01

    An inertial measurement unit (IMU) with angular rate, angular increment and linear acceleration measurement systems for short range missile application is described. It consists of a three axis fiber optic gyroscope (FOG) cluster, three linear vibrating beam accelerometers and an electronics device for signal evaluation and data transmission via a serial transputer link. The FOG cluster is realized by means of a passive all-fiber open loop configuration. Due to the inherent optical phase shift of 3 by 3 couplers, completely passive operation near the quadrature point is achieved without the need for a non- reciprocal optical phase modulation in the fiber loop. Basing on that concept more than 50 rugged IMUs have been built for implementation into a short range air to air missile. Verification tests for flight clearance with stresses simulating air carriage and missile free flight environments have been computed. The operation under extreme vibration and shock environments without the use of vibration isolator fixings due to very tight requirements on data time delay has been demonstrated. The first telemetered missile firings have been performed successfully. The line- setup for large quantity series production is progressing. The implementation of the workstations for the integration of the IMU is finished. The production equipment for calibration and acceptance testing of IMUs in parallel allowing for a rate of more than 150 unit per month has been installed and will be operational in autumn this year.

  8. Smart Collaborative Caching for Information-Centric IoT in Fog Computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Fei; Ai, Zheng-Yang; Li, Jun-Jie; Pau, Giovanni; Collotta, Mario; You, Ilsun; Zhang, Hong-Ke

    2017-11-01

    The significant changes enabled by the fog computing had demonstrated that Internet of Things (IoT) urgently needs more evolutional reforms. Limited by the inflexible design philosophy; the traditional structure of a network is hard to meet the latest demands. However, Information-Centric Networking (ICN) is a promising option to bridge and cover these enormous gaps. In this paper, a Smart Collaborative Caching (SCC) scheme is established by leveraging high-level ICN principles for IoT within fog computing paradigm. The proposed solution is supposed to be utilized in resource pooling, content storing, node locating and other related situations. By investigating the available characteristics of ICN, some challenges of such combination are reviewed in depth. The details of building SCC, including basic model and advanced algorithms, are presented based on theoretical analysis and simplified examples. The validation focuses on two typical scenarios: simple status inquiry and complex content sharing. The number of clusters, packet loss probability and other parameters are also considered. The analytical results demonstrate that the performance of our scheme, regarding total packet number and average transmission latency, can outperform that of the original ones. We expect that the SCC will contribute an efficient solution to the related studies.

  9. Lethal effects of experimental warming approximating a future climate scenario on southern African quartz-field succulents: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musil, Charles F; Schmiedel, Ute; Midgley, Guy F

    2005-02-01

    Here we examine the response of succulents in a global biodiversity hot spot to experimental warming consistent with a future African climate scenario. Passive daytime warming (averaging 5.5 degrees C above ambient) of the natural vegetation was achieved with 18 transparent hexagonal open-top chamber arrays randomized in three different quartz-field communities. After 4-months summer treatment, the specialized-dwarf and shrubby succulents displayed between 2.1 and 4.9 times greater plant and canopy mortalities in the open-top chambers than in the control plots. Those surviving in cooler ventilated areas and shaded refuges in the chambers had lower starch concentrations and water contents; the shrubby succulents also exhibited diminished chlorophyll concentrations. It is concluded that current thermal regimes are likely to be closely proximate to tolerable extremes for many endemic succulents in the region, and that anthropogenic warming could significantly exceed their thermal thresholds. Further investigation is required to elucidate the importance of associated moisture deficits in these warming experiments, a potential consequence of supplementary (fog and dew) precipitation interception by open-top chambers and higher evaporation therein, on plant mortalities.

  10. The Great Warming Brian Fagan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagan, B. M.

    2010-12-01

    The Great Warming is a journey back to the world of a thousand years ago, to the Medieval Warm Period. Five centuries of irregular warming from 800 to 1250 had beneficial effects in Europe and the North Atlantic, but brought prolonged droughts to much of the Americas and lands affected by the South Asian monsoon. The book describes these impacts of warming on medieval European societies, as well as the Norse and the Inuit of the far north, then analyzes the impact of harsh, lengthy droughts on hunting societies in western North America and the Ancestral Pueblo farmers of Chaco Canyon, New Mexico. These peoples reacted to drought by relocating entire communities. The Maya civilization was much more vulnerable that small-scale hunter-gatherer societies and subsistence farmers in North America. Maya rulers created huge water storage facilities, but their civilization partially collapsed under the stress of repeated multiyear droughts, while the Chimu lords of coastal Peru adapted with sophisticated irrigation works. The climatic villain was prolonged, cool La Niñalike conditions in the Pacific, which caused droughts from Venezuela to East Asia, and as far west as East Africa. The Great Warming argues that the warm centuries brought savage drought to much of humanity, from China to Peru. It also argues that drought is one of the most dangerous elements in today’s humanly created global warming, often ignored by preoccupied commentators, but with the potential to cause over a billion people to starve. Finally, I use the book to discuss the issues and problems of communicating multidisciplinary science to the general public.

  11. Analysis of the Interaction and Transport of Aerosols with Cloud or Fog during Dragon Campaigns from Aeronet and Satellite Remote Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eck, T. F.; Holben, B. N.; Reid, J. S.; Schafer, J.; Giles, D. M.; Kim, J.; Kim, Y. J.; Sano, I.; Lynch, P.; Pickering, K. E.; Crawford, J. H.; Sinyuk, A.; Smirnov, A.; Trevino, N.

    2014-12-01

    Ground-based remote sensing observations from Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) sun-sky radiometers have recently shown several instances where cloud-aerosol interaction had resulted in modification of aerosol properties and/or in difficulty identifying some major pollution transport events due to aerosols being imbedded in cloud systems. AERONET has established Distributed Regional Aerosol Gridded Observation Networks (DRAGON) during field campaigns that are short-term (~2-3 months) relatively dense spatial networks of ~15 to 45 sun and sky scanning photometers. Recent major DRAGON field campaigns in Japan and South Korea (Spring 2012) and California (Winter 2013) have yielded observations of aerosol transport associated with clouds and/or aerosol properties modification as a result of fog interaction. Analysis of data from the Korean and Japan DRAGON campaigns shows that major fine-mode aerosol transport events are sometimes associated with extensive cloud cover and that cloud-screening of observations often filter out significant pollution aerosol transport events. The Spectral De-convolution Algorithm (SDA) algorithm was utilized to isolate and analyze the fine-mode aerosol optical depth signal for these cases of persistent and extensive cloud cover. Satellite retrievals of AOD from MODIS sensors were also investigated to assess the issue of detectability of high AOD events associated with high cloud fraction. AERONET is updating the cloud-screening algorithm applied to AOD data in the upcoming Version 3 database. Comparisons of cloud screening from Versions 2 and 3 of cases with high AOD associated with clouds will be studied. Additionally, extensive fog that was coincident with aerosol layer height on some days in both Korea and California resulted in large increases in fine mode aerosol radius, with a mode of cloud-processed or residual aerosol of radius ~0.4-0.5 micron sometimes observed. Cloud processed aerosol may occur much more frequently than AERONET

  12. Warm Up to a Good Sound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tovey, David C.

    1977-01-01

    Most choral directors in schools today have been exposed to a variety of warm-up procedures. Yet, many do not use the warm-up time effectively as possible. Considers the factors appropriate to a warm-up exercise and three basic warm-up categories. (Author/RK)

  13. How warm days increase belief in global warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaval, Lisa; Keenan, Elizabeth A.; Johnson, Eric J.; Weber, Elke U.

    2014-02-01

    Climate change judgements can depend on whether today seems warmer or colder than usual, termed the local warming effect. Although previous research has demonstrated that this effect occurs, studies have yet to explain why or how temperature abnormalities influence global warming attitudes. A better understanding of the underlying psychology of this effect can help explain the public's reaction to climate change and inform approaches used to communicate the phenomenon. Across five studies, we find evidence of attribute substitution, whereby individuals use less relevant but available information (for example, today's temperature) in place of more diagnostic but less accessible information (for example, global climate change patterns) when making judgements. Moreover, we rule out alternative hypotheses involving climate change labelling and lay mental models. Ultimately, we show that present temperature abnormalities are given undue weight and lead to an overestimation of the frequency of similar past events, thereby increasing belief in and concern for global warming.

  14. ExploreNEOs: The Warm Spitzer Near Earth Object Survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trilling, D. E.; Hora, J. L.; Mueller, M.; Thomas, C. A.; Harris, A. W.; Hagen, A. R.; Mommert, M.; Benner, L.; Bhattacharya, B.; Bottke, W. F.; Chesley, S.; Delbo, M.; Emery, J. P.; Fazio, G.; Kistler, J. L.; Mainzer, A.; Morbidelli, A.; Penprase, B.; Smith, H. A.; Spahr, T. B.; Stansberry, J. A.

    2012-01-01

    We have observed some 600 near Earth objects (NEOs) at 3.6 and 4.5 microns with the Warm Spitzer Space Telescope. We derive the albedo and diameter for each NEO to characterize global properties of the NEO population, among other goals.

  15. Global warming and infectious disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khasnis, Atul A; Nettleman, Mary D

    2005-01-01

    Global warming has serious implications for all aspects of human life, including infectious diseases. The effect of global warming depends on the complex interaction between the human host population and the causative infectious agent. From the human standpoint, changes in the environment may trigger human migration, causing disease patterns to shift. Crop failures and famine may reduce host resistance to infections. Disease transmission may be enhanced through the scarcity and contamination of potable water sources. Importantly, significant economic and political stresses may damage the existing public health infrastructure, leaving mankind poorly prepared for unexpected epidemics. Global warming will certainly affect the abundance and distribution of disease vectors. Altitudes that are currently too cool to sustain vectors will become more conducive to them. Some vector populations may expand into new geographic areas, whereas others may disappear. Malaria, dengue, plague, and viruses causing encephalitic syndromes are among the many vector-borne diseases likely to be affected. Some models suggest that vector-borne diseases will become more common as the earth warms, although caution is needed in interpreting these predictions. Clearly, global warming will cause changes in the epidemiology of infectious diseases. The ability of mankind to react or adapt is dependent upon the magnitude and speed of the change. The outcome will also depend on our ability to recognize epidemics early, to contain them effectively, to provide appropriate treatment, and to commit resources to prevention and research.

  16. Experimental Studies of the Transport Parameters of Warm Dense Matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chouffani, Khalid [Idaho State Univ., Pocatello, ID (United States)

    2014-12-01

    There is a need to establish fundamental properties of matter and energy under extreme physical conditions. Although high energy density physics (HEDP) research spans a wide range of plasma conditions, there is one unifying regime that is of particular importance and complexity: that of warm dense matter, the transitional state between solid state condensed matter and energetic plasmas. Most laboratory experimental conditions, including inertial confinement implosion, fall into this regime. Because all aspects of laboratory-created high-energy-density plasmas transition through the warm dense matter regime, understanding the fundamental properties to determine how matter and energy interact in this regime is an important aspect of major research efforts in HEDP. Improved understanding of warm dense matter would have significant and wide-ranging impact on HEDP science, from helping to explain wire initiation studies on the Sandia Z machine to increasing the predictive power of inertial confinement fusion modeling. The central goal or objective of our proposed research is to experimentally determine the electrical resistivity, temperature, density, and average ionization state of a variety of materials in the warm dense matter regime, without the use of theoretical calculations. Since the lack of an accurate energy of state (EOS) model is primarily due to the lack of experimental data, we propose an experimental study of the transport coefficients of warm dense matter.

  17. Motorway lighting under fog conditions : based on a paper presented at Japan Highway Corporation, Tokyo, 12 July 1990.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schreuder, D.A.

    1992-01-01

    This study defines fog as an aerosol consisting primarily of water droplets. The main effect on road traffic is the contrast reduction as a result of the scatter of light in the aerosol. Absorption plays only a small role. The effect of the contrast reduction is that many objects in the field of

  18. Impact of partitioning and oxidative processing of PAH in fogs and clouds on atmospheric lifetimes of PAH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eagar, Jershon Dale; Ervens, Barbara; Herckes, Pierre

    2017-07-01

    The importance of the atmospheric aqueous phase of fogs and clouds, for the processing and removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is not well known. A multiphase model was developed to determine the fate and lifetime of PAHs in fogs and clouds for a limited set of daytime conditions. The model describes partitioning between three phases (aqueous, liquid organic, and gas), experimental and estimated (photo)oxidation rates. Using a limited set of microphysical and chemical input conditions, the loss rates of PAHs in the complex three-phase system are explored. At 25 °C, PAHs with two, three and four rings are predicted to be primarily in the gas phase (fraction in the gas phase xg > 90%) while five- and six-ring PAHs partition significantly into droplets with aqueous phase fractions of 1-6% and liquid organic phase fractions of 31-91%, respectively. The predicted atmospheric chemical lifetimes of PAHs in the presence of fog or cloud droplets (<8 h) are significantly shorter than literature predictions of PAH lifetimes due to wet and dry deposition (1-14 days and 5-15 months, respectively) and shorter than or equal to predicted lifetimes due to chemical reactions in the gas and organic particulate phases (1-300 h). Even though PAH solubilities are ≤4 × 10-2 g L-1, the results of the current study show that often the condensed phase of fog and cloud droplets cannot be neglected as a PAH sink.

  19. Peranan Environmental Accounting Terhadap Global Warming

    OpenAIRE

    Martusa, Riki

    2009-01-01

    This article explores about is global warming. The distortion of nature causes global warming. Industrial sector is one of global warming incurred. Some nations create a group to cope this matter. They try to reduce carbon emission as one of global warming causes by controlling industrial carbon emission through financial reporting. This article explores normatively roles of environmental accounting in cope with global warming.  

  20. Regulation of Vapor Pressure Deficit by Greenhouse Micro-Fog Systems Improved Growth and Productivity of Tomato via Enhancing Photosynthesis during Summer Season.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalong Zhang

    Full Text Available The role of a proposed micro-fog system in regulating greenhouse environments and enhancing tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L. productivity during summer season was studied. Experiments were carried out in a multi-span glass greenhouse, which was divided into two identical compartments involving different environments: (1 without environment control and (2 with a micro-fog system operating when the air vapor pressure deficit (VPD of greenhouse was higher than 0.5 KPa. The micro-fog system effectively alleviated heat stress and evaporative demand in the greenhouse during summer season. The physiologically favourable environment maintained by micro-fog treatment significantly enhanced elongation of leaf and stem, which contributed to a substantial elevation of final leaf area and shoot biomass. These improvements in physiological and morphological traits resulted in around 12.3% increase of marketable tomato yield per plant. Relative growth rate (RGR of micro-fog treatment was also significantly higher than control plants, which was mainly determined by the substantial elevation in net assimilation rate (NAR, and to a lesser extent caused by leaf area ratio (LAR. Measurement of leaf gas exchange parameters also demonstrated that micro-fog treatment significantly enhanced leaf photosynthesis capacity. Taken together, manipulation of VPD in greenhouses by micro-fog systems effectively enhanced tomato growth and productivity via improving photosynthesis during summer season.

  1. Global warming at the summit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showstack, Randy

    During the recent summit meeting between Russian President Vladimir Putin and U.S. President Bill Clinton, the two leaders reaffirmed their concerns about global warming and the need to continue to take actions to try to reduce the threat.In a June 4 joint statement, they stressed the need to develop flexibility mechanisms, including international emissions trading, under the Kyoto Protocol to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. They also noted that initiatives to reduce the risk of greenhouse warming, including specific mechanisms of the Kyoto Protocol, could potentially promote economic growth.

  2. Non-Linearity Explanation in Artificial Neural Network Application with a Case Study of Fog Forecast Over Delhi Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saurabh, K.; Dimri, A. P.

    2016-05-01

    Fog affects human life in a number of ways by reducing the visibility, hence affecting critical infrastructure, transportation, tourism or by the formation of frost, thus harming the standing crops. Smog is becoming a regular phenomenon in urban areas which is highly toxic to humans. Delhi was chosen as the area of study as it encounters all these hazards of fog stated apart from other political and economic reasons. The complex relationship behind the parameters and processes behind the formation of fog makes it extremely difficult to model and forecast it accurately. It is attempted to forecast the fog and understand its dynamics through a statistical downscaling technique of artificial neural network which is deemed accurate for short-term forecasting and usually outperform time-series models. The backpropagation neural network, which is a gradient descent algorithm where the network weights are moved along the negative of the gradient of the performance function, has been used for our analysis. Indian Meteorological Department (IMD) supported National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) data had been used for carrying out the simulations. The model was found to have high accuracy but lacking in skill. An attempt has been made to present the data in a binary form by determining a threshold by the contingency table approach followed by its critical analysis. It is found that the calculation of an optimum threshold was also difficult to fix as the parameters of fog formation on which the model has been has been trained had shown some changes in their trend over a period of time.

  3. Radiation Fog in the US Mid-Atlantic Region: Chemical Composition, Trends, and Gas-Liquid Partitioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straub, D.

    2016-12-01

    The chemical composition of radiation fog has been studied at a rural site in central Pennsylvania over an eight year period extending through 2015. Bulk fog samples were collected with an automated Caltech Heated Rod Cloud Collector (CHRCC) and analyzed for pH, inorganic ions, organic acids, total organic carbon (TOC), and total nitrogen (TN). Over the duration of the project, 146 samples were collected and used to document chemical composition, evaluate changes over time, and to investigate partitioning between the gas and aqueous phases. Ammonium, sulfate, calcium, and nitrate were the most abundant inorganic ions while acetate and formate were the dominant organic acids. Organic acids contributed about 15% to TOC. Inorganic nitrogen accounted for the majority of TN, with only 18% of TN attributed to organic nitrogen. Overall, organic matter contributed 52% to the total mass loading of the fog samples, a value that is higher than reported for other radiation fog studies. Statistically significant decreasing trends were observed for sulfate, ammonium, chloride, nitrate, and pH. These trends coincide with reductions in emissions from fossil fuel combustion that have been documented over this time period. Seasonal trends were also detected for nitrate, ammonium, potassium, phosphate, acetate and formate which appear to be related to the agricultural growing season. Based on simultaneous measurements of gas phase ammonia and ammonium in the fog samples, significant deviations from equilibrium were found. In low pH samples, ammonium concentrations were much lower than equilibrium predicts, while the opposite occurred in high pH samples. Modeling suggested that mass transfer limitations contributed to the departure from equilibrium. Similarly, predictions of bicarbonate concentrations based on equilibrium with gas phase carbon dioxide appears to underestimate the actual amount of bicarbonate present in samples collected during this study.

  4. Brain Fog

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and difficulty in processing information. Remember that gradual cognitive decline from early adulthood is a fact of life. ... Always report changes in cognition/memory and mood (depression, ... of age, a major cause of cognitive dysfunction can be side effects of drugs and ...

  5. A UAV-Based Fog Collector Design for Fine-Scale Aerobiological Sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentry, D.; Guarro, M.; Demachkie, I. S.; Stumfall, I.; Dahlgren, R. P.

    2016-12-01

    Airborne microbes are found throughout the troposphere and into the stratosphere. Knowing how the activity of airborne microorganisms can alter water, carbon, and other geochemical cycles is vital to a full understanding of local and global ecosystems. Just as on the land or in the ocean, atmospheric regions vary in habitability; the underlying geochemical, climatic, and ecological dynamics must be characterized at different scales to be effectively modeled. Most aerobiological studies have focused on a high level: 'How high are airborne microbes found?' and 'How far can they travel?' Most fog and cloud water studies collect from stationary ground stations (point) or along flight transects (1D). To complement and provide context for this data, we have designed a UAV-based modified fog and cloud water collector to retrieve 4D-resolved samples for biological and chemical analysis. Our design uses a passive impacting collector hanging from a rigid rod suspended between two multi-rotor UAVs. The suspension design reduces the effect of turbulence and potential for contamination from the UAV downwash. The UAVs are currently modeled in a leader-follower configuration, taking advantage of recent advances in modular UAVs, UAV swarming, and flight planning. The collector itself is a hydrophobic mesh. Materials including Tyvek, PTFE, nylon, and polypropylene monofilament fabricated via laser cutting, CNC knife, or 3D printing were characterized for droplet collection efficiency using a benchtop atomizer and particle counter. Because the meshes can be easily and inexpensively fabricated, a set can be pre-sterilized and brought to the field for 'hot swapping' to decrease cross-contamination between flight sessions or use as negative controls. An onboard sensor and logging system records the time and location of each sample; when combined with flight tracking data, the samples can be resolved into a 4D volumetric map of the fog bank. Collected samples can be returned to the lab

  6. Guanaco traces and hunting strategies at Alto Patache North Chilean fog oasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larrain, H.; Cereceda, P.; Pérez, L.

    2010-07-01

    1. In foregoing Fog Conferences, some of us have made explicit the rich botanic and faunistic inventory to be found at this Chilean Fog site. This was specially apparent under strong ENSO conditions, as it happened in 1997/98 in the area. Among the mammal biggest species represented, the guanaco (Lama guanicoe Müller) merits special mention. Clear traces of their presence and eventual hunting and slaughtering by primitive populations have survived until present times. Among them, the myriads of guanaco trails still covering practically all the slopes along the foggy area, close to the sea, and their wollowing and defecating places are found. Also, although less studied, plant eating traces left behind by roaming camelids can be seen. 2. Guanaco hunting traces still visible at Alto Patache can be portrayed differently through : A) Analysis of lithic artifacts used as arms in hunting operations; B) Botanic response to animal attack; C) Examination of topographic traits used by primitive man in guanaco hunting strategies. A. Hundreds of lithic instruments made of stone, were abandoned by hunters in situ, some of them were intact, some fragmented, which would demonstrate a direct relationship with hunting and slaughtering, and also their elaboration in workshops at place. Lithic points, scrapers and knives were found at places specially apt for hunting or slaughtering activities. Total isolation of the mountain fog site previous to our arrival in 1996, favoured their conservation at place. B. Careful observation of some local plants showed clear traces of guanaco feeding habits. As a proof thereof, old cactus of the species Eulychnia iquiquensis show in their basal portions clear signals in the forms of scars, caused by the eating by guanacos. Guanaco faeces were found at the foot of Ephedra plants. Many dead Stipa ichu plants (Gramineae), in different areas of the oasis provide evidence of cutting close to their basis, caused by sharp guanaco tooth under severe food

  7. A UAV-Based Fog Collector Design for Fine-Scale Aerobiological Sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentry, Diana; Guarro, Marcello; Demachkie, Isabella Siham; Stumfall, Isabel; Dahlgren, Robert P.

    2017-01-01

    Airborne microbes are found throughout the troposphere and into the stratosphere. Knowing how the activity of airborne microorganisms can alter water, carbon, and other geochemical cycles is vital to a full understanding of local and global ecosystems. Just as on the land or in the ocean, atmospheric regions vary in habitability; the underlying geochemical, climatic, and ecological dynamics must be characterized at different scales to be effectively modeled. Most aerobiological studies have focused on a high level: 'How high are airborne microbes found?' and 'How far can they travel?' Most fog and cloud water studies collect from stationary ground stations (point) or along flight transects (1D). To complement and provide context for this data, we have designed a UAV-based modified fog and cloud water collector to retrieve 4D-resolved samples for biological and chemical analysis.Our design uses a passive impacting collector hanging from a rigid rod suspended between two multi-rotor UAVs. The suspension design reduces the effect of turbulence and potential for contamination from the UAV downwash. The UAVs are currently modeled in a leader-follower configuration, taking advantage of recent advances in modular UAVs, UAV swarming, and flight planning.The collector itself is a hydrophobic mesh. Materials including Tyvek, PTFE, nylon, and polypropylene monofilament fabricated via laser cutting, CNC knife, or 3D printing were characterized for droplet collection efficiency using a benchtop atomizer and particle counter. Because the meshes can be easily and inexpensively fabricated, a set can be pre-sterilized and brought to the field for 'hot swapping' to decrease cross-contamination between flight sessions or use as negative controls.An onboard sensor and logging system records the time and location of each sample; when combined with flight tracking data, the samples can be resolved into a 4D volumetric map of the fog bank. Collected samples can be returned to the lab for

  8. Bistatic imaging lidar measurements of aerosols, fogs, and clouds in the lower atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jinming; Mishima, Hidetsugu; Kawahara, Takuya D.; Saito, Yasunori; Nomura, Akio; Yamaguchi, Kenji; Morikawa, Kimio

    1998-08-01

    We have been developing a bistatic imaging lidar using a high sensitive CCD camera with an image intensifier as a high speed shutter for measuring spatial distributions of aerosols, fogs and clouds in the lower atmosphere at daytime as well as at nighttime. The bistatic imaging lidar was applied to two field observation campaigns. One was made cooperatively with a wind profiler and a radiosonde at Moriya (36 km north of Tokyo) for five days from May 26 to 30, 1997 and another cooperatively with a monostatic lidar at Hakuba alpine ski area of Nagano for 10 days from February 7 to 16, 1998 during the period of the 18th Winter Olympic Games in Japan. We report the results obtained at both campaigns and discuss the ability of this system in measuring the meteorological features of the local lower atmosphere under different conditions.

  9. On Network Coded Distributed Storage: How to Repair in a Fog of Unreliable Peers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cabrera, Juan A.; Lucani Rötter, Daniel Enrique; Fitzek, Frank H P

    2017-01-01

    This paper focuses on distributed fog storage solutions, where a number of unreliable devices organize themselves in Peer-to-Peer (P2P) networks with the purpose to store reliably their data and that of other devices and/or local users and provide lower delay and higher throughput. Cloud storage...... systems typically rely on expensive infrastructure with centralized control to store, repair and access the data. This approach introduces a large delay for accessing and storing the data driven in part by a high RTT between users and the cloud. These characteristics are at odds with the massive increase...... assume that additional nodes will be available, we focus on an unaddressed problem: performing a repair within the pool of surviving nodes because no new/alternative nodes are available. We provide a mathematical characterization under different storage and network use conditions and develop a practical...

  10. Adaptive polarimetric image representation for contrast optimization of a polarized beacon through fog

    CERN Document Server

    Panigrahi, Swapnesh; Alouini, Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    We present a contrast-maximizing optimal linear representation of polarimetric images obtained from a snapshot polarimetric camera for enhanced vision of a polarized light source in obscured weather conditions (fog, haze, cloud) over long distances (above 1 km). We quantitatively compare the gain in contrast obtained by different linear representations of the experimental polarimetric images taken during rapidly varying foggy conditions. It is shown that the adaptive image representation that depends on the correlation in background noise fluctuations in the two polarimetric images provides an optimal contrast enhancement over all weather conditions as opposed to a simple difference image which underperforms during low visibility conditions. Finally, we derive the analytic expression of the gain in contrast obtained with this optimal representation and show that the experimental results are in agreement with the assumed correlated Gaussian noise model.

  11. Plant movements and climate warming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Frenne, Pieter; Coomes, David A.; De Schrijver, An

    2014-01-01

    •Most range shift predictions focus on the dispersal phase of the colonization process. Because moving populations experience increasingly dissimilar nonclimatic environmental conditions as they track climate warming, it is also critical to test how individuals originating from contrasting therma...

  12. Calibration of gyro G-sensitivity coefficients with FOG monitoring on precision centrifuge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jiazhen; Yang, Yanqiang; Li, Baoguo; Liu, Ming

    2017-07-01

    The advantages of mechanical gyros, such as high precision, endurance and reliability, make them widely used as the core parts of inertial navigation systems (INS) utilized in the fields of aeronautics, astronautics and underground exploration. In a high-g environment, the accuracy of gyros is degraded. Therefore, the calibration and compensation of the gyro G-sensitivity coefficients is essential when the INS operates in a high-g environment. A precision centrifuge with a counter-rotating platform is the typical equipment for calibrating the gyro, as it can generate large centripetal acceleration and keep the angular rate close to zero; however, its performance is seriously restricted by the angular perturbation in the high-speed rotating process. To reduce the dependence on the precision of the centrifuge and counter-rotating platform, an effective calibration method for the gyro g-sensitivity coefficients under fiber-optic gyroscope (FOG) monitoring is proposed herein. The FOG can efficiently compensate spindle error and improve the anti-interference ability. Harmonic analysis is performed for data processing. Simulations show that the gyro G-sensitivity coefficients can be efficiently estimated to up to 99% of the true value and compensated using a lookup table or fitting method. Repeated tests indicate that the G-sensitivity coefficients can be correctly calibrated when the angular rate accuracy of the precision centrifuge is as low as 0.01%. Verification tests are performed to demonstrate that the attitude errors can be decreased from 0.36° to 0.08° in 200 s. The proposed measuring technology is generally applicable in engineering, as it can reduce the accuracy requirements for the centrifuge and the environment.

  13. The Influence of Asian Dust, Haze, Mist, and Fog on Hospital Visits for Airway Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jinkyeong; Lim, Myoung Nam; Hong, Yoonki; Kim, Woo Jin

    2015-10-01

    Asian dust is known to have harmful effects on the respiratory system. Respiratory conditions are also influenced by environmental conditions regardless of the presence of pollutants. The same pollutant can have different effects on the airway when the air is dry compared with when it is humid. We investigated hospital visits for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma in relation to the environmental conditions. We conducted a retrospective study using the Korean National Health Insurance Service claims database of patients who visited hospitals in Chuncheon between January 2006 and April 2012. Asian dust, haze, mist, and fog days were determined using reports from the Korea Meteorological Administration. Hospital visits for asthma or COPD on the index days were compared with the comparison days. We used two-way case-crossover techniques with one to two matching. The mean hospital visits for asthma and COPD were 59.37 ± 34.01 and 10.04 ± 6.18 per day, respectively. Hospital visits for asthma significantly increased at lag0 and lag1 for Asian dust (relative risk [RR], 1.10; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.01-1.19; pAsian dust (RR, 1.29; 95% CI, 1.05-1.59; pAsian dust showed an association with airway diseases and had effects for several days after the exposure. In contrast to Asian dust, mist and fog, which occur in humid air conditions, showed the opposite effects on airway diseases, after adjusting to the pollutants. It would require more research to investigate the effects of various air conditions on airway diseases.

  14. Thermal fog efficacy tests against mosquitoes in storm drains in Harris County, Texas 2008-09.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredregill, Chris L; Motl, Greg C; Dennett, James A; Flatt, Kyle L; Bueno, Rudy

    2011-03-01

    In 2008 and 2009, our current thermal fogging methods and materials were evaluated in underground systems against feral and laboratory strains of adult Culex quinquefasciatus. Culex quinquefasciatus adults collected from storm drain systems the night before treatment were tested concurrently with adults from a susceptible laboratory strain (Sebring) in 10 separate tests. During 2008, there were no significant differences in the low mean percent control obtained between any of the feral populations (29.39%) and susceptible (Sebring) populations (56.04%) tested, whereas in 2009, application of mineral oil alone yielded extremely low, but significantly different mean percent control at 0.99% for ferals and 0.01% for Sebrings. During 2009 mineral oil evaluations, 45,677 droplets were collected in storm drains at distances of 99.1, 50.6, 57.9, 67.7, and 109.7 m from the application site, with 99% of the droplets below 3 microm in diam; additionally, we found no significant differences between mean percent control of Sebring and feral mosquito populations using the higher (3.2x) 1:10 application rate of Pyrocide. However, mean percent control between the feral and susceptible strain (Sebring) during 2009 was lower than in 2008 at 16.55% for ferals and 24.43% in Sebrings. Results indicated that control methodologies and/or chemicals used were ineffective at controlling Cx. quinquefasciatus in storm drains using the chosen experimental design. Based upon this information, thermal fog operations were discontinued due to lack of effectiveness.

  15. Identifying the Molecular Origin of Global Warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bera, Partha P.; Francisco, Joseph S.; Lee, Timothy J.

    2009-01-01

    We have investigated the physical characteristics of greenhouse gases (GHGs) to assess which properties are most important in determining the efficiency of a GHG. Chlorofluorcarbons (CFCs), hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs), perfluorocarbons (PFCs), nitrogen fluorides, and various other known atmospheric trace molecules have been included in this study. Compounds containing the halogens F or Cl have in common very polar X-F or X-Cl bonds, particularly the X-F bonds. It is shown that as more F atoms bond to the same central atom, the bond dipoles become larger as a result of the central atom becoming more positive. This leads to a linear increase in the total or integrated XF bond dipole derivatives for the molecule, which leads to a non-linear (quadratic) increase in infrared (IR) intensity. Moreover, virtually all of the X-F bond stretches occur in the atmospheric IR window as opposed to X-H stretches, which do not occur in the atmospheric window. It is concluded that molecules possessing several F atoms will always have a large radiative forcing parameter in the calculation of their global warming potential. Some of the implications for global warming and climate change are discussed.

  16. Separating warming-induced drought from drought-induced warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roderick, Michael; Wolf, Sebastian; Yin, Dongqin

    2017-04-01

    A very widely held public perception is that increasing temperature is a cause of "drying" and drought. The atmospheric-focused meteorologic community has often assumed that the warmer temperatures increase evaporation and that this contributes to worsening drought via atmospheric demand. On the other hand, the agricultural and hydrologic scientific communities have a very different interpretation linked to water supply, with the lack of available water leading to reduced evaporation and enhanced surface warming. This is a classic chicken-or-the-egg problem that has resisted definitive explanation probably due to the lack of radiative observations at suitable spatial and temporal scales. Here we use recently released NASA CERES satellite radiation data to study the 2013-2014 Californian drought. We evaluate whether the observed increase in near-surface air temperature should be considered a forcing (as per standard meteorological approaches) or a feedback (as per standard agricultural and hydrologic approaches). We find that the radiative perturbation associated with the drought has a distinct radiative signature for more incoming shortwave- and less incoming longwave-radiation. That result, coupled with estimates of decreased evapotranspiration show that around two-third of the warming has a radiative origin and the remaining one-third is the result of a surface feedback from reduced evaporative cooling. Hence, the radiative perturbation during the recent Californian drought was distinctly different from the projected radiative perturbation of the enhanced greenhouse effect. We conclude that the warming experienced during meteorological drought is very different from the warming projected as a consequence of the enhanced greenhouse effect.

  17. Global Warming Blame the Sun

    CERN Document Server

    Calder, N

    1997-01-01

    Concern about climate change reaches a political peak at a UN conference in Kyoto, 1-10 December, but behind the scenes the science is in turmoil. A challenge to the hypothesis that greenhouse gases are responsible for global warming comes from the discovery that cosmic rays from the Galaxy are involved in making clouds (Svensmark and Friis-Christensen, 1997). During the 20th Century the wind from the Sun has grown stronger and the count of cosmic rays has diminished. With fewer clouds, the EarthÕs surface has warmed up. This surprising mechanism explains the link between the Sun and climate change that astronomers and geophysicists have suspected for 200 years.

  18. Hydrological consequences of global warming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Norman L.

    2009-06-01

    The 2007 Intergovernmental Panel for Climate Change indicates there is strong evidence that the atmospheric concentration of carbon dioxide far exceeds the natural range over the last 650,000 years, and this recent warming of the climate system is unequivocal, resulting in more frequent extreme precipitation events, earlier snowmelt runoff, increased winter flood likelihoods, increased and widespread melting of snow and ice, longer and more widespread droughts, and rising sea level. The effects of recent warming has been well documented and climate model projections indicate a range of hydrological impacts with likely to very likely probabilities (67 to 99 percent) of occurring with significant to severe consequences in response to a warmer lower atmosphere with an accelerating hydrologic cycle.

  19. PR Software: Warm Water Energie met grafieken

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kanis, J.; Verstappen-Boerekamp, J.

    1999-01-01

    Het computerprogramma Warm Water Energie (WWE) berekent het verbruik van (warm) water, energie en reinigingsmiddelen bij de melkwinning. De nieuwste versie bevat grafieken die in één oogopslag de productie en het verbruik van warm water weergeven. In de overzichtelijke rapportage staan nu ook de

  20. Economic Theory and Global Warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzawa, Hirofumi

    2003-08-01

    Hirofumi Uzawa's theoretical framework addresses three major problems concerning global warming and other environmental hazards. First, it considers all phenomena involved with global environmental issues that exhibit externalities of one kind or another. Secondly, it covers global environmental issues involving international and intergenerational equity and justice. Lastly, it deals with global environmental issues concerning the management of the atmosphere, the oceans, water, soil, and other natural resources having to be decided by a consensus of affected countries.

  1. The Discovery of Global Warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacCracken, Michael C.

    2004-07-01

    At the beginning of the twentieth century, the prospect of ``global warming'' as a result of human activities was thought to be far off, and in any case, likely to be beneficial. As we begin the twenty-first century, science adviser to the British government, Sir David King, has said that he considers global warming to be the world's most important problem, including terrorism. Yet, dealing with it has become the subject of a contentious international protocol, numerous conferences of international diplomats, and major scientific assessments and research programs. Spencer Weart, who is director of the Center for History of Physics of the American Institute of Physics, has taken on the challenge of explaining how this came to be. In the tradition of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), which was established in 1988 to evaluate and assess the state of global warming science, this book is roughly equivalent to the Technical Summary, in terms of its technical level, being quite readable, but with substantive content about the main lines of evidence. Underpinning this relatively concise presentation, there is a well-developed-and still developing-Web site that, like the detailed chapters of the full IPCC assessment reports, provides vastly more information and linkages to a much wider set of reference materials (see http://www.aip.org/history/climate).

  2. Offsetting global warming-induced elevated greenhouse gas emissions from an arable soil by biochar application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamminger, Chris; Poll, Christian; Marhan, Sven

    2018-01-01

    Global warming will likely enhance greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from soils. Due to its slow decomposability, biochar is widely recognized as effective in long-term soil carbon (C) sequestration and in mitigation of soil GHG emissions. In a long-term soil warming experiment (+2.5 °C, since July 2008) we studied the effect of applying high-temperature Miscanthus biochar (0, 30 t/ha, since August 2013) on GHG emissions and their global warming potential (GWP) during 2 years in a temperate agroecosystem. Crop growth, physical and chemical soil properties, temperature sensitivity of soil respiration (Rs ), and metabolic quotient (qCO2 ) were investigated to yield further information about single effects of soil warming and biochar as well as on their interactions. Soil warming increased total CO2 emissions by 28% over 2 years. The effect of warming on soil respiration did not level off as has often been observed in less intensively managed ecosystems. However, the temperature sensitivity of soil respiration was not affected by warming. Overall, biochar had no effect on most of the measured parameters, suggesting its high degradation stability and its low influence on microbial C cycling even under elevated soil temperatures. In contrast, biochar × warming interactions led to higher total N2 O emissions, possibly due to accelerated N-cycling at elevated soil temperature and to biochar-induced changes in soil properties and environmental conditions. Methane uptake was not affected by soil warming or biochar. The incorporation of biochar-C into soil was estimated to offset warming-induced elevated GHG emissions for 25 years. Our results highlight the suitability of biochar for C sequestration in cultivated temperate agricultural soil under a future elevated temperature. However, the increased N2 O emissions under warming limit the GHG mitigation potential of biochar. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Cloud/Fog Computing System Architecture and Key Technologies for South-North Water Transfer Project Safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaoling Fan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In view of the real-time and distributed features of Internet of Things (IoT safety system in water conservancy engineering, this study proposed a new safety system architecture for water conservancy engineering based on cloud/fog computing and put forward a method of data reliability detection for the false alarm caused by false abnormal data from the bottom sensors. Designed for the South-North Water Transfer Project (SNWTP, the architecture integrated project safety, water quality safety, and human safety. Using IoT devices, fog computing layer was constructed between cloud server and safety detection devices in water conservancy projects. Technologies such as real-time sensing, intelligent processing, and information interconnection were developed. Therefore, accurate forecasting, accurate positioning, and efficient management were implemented as required by safety prevention of the SNWTP, and safety protection of water conservancy projects was effectively improved, and intelligential water conservancy engineering was developed.

  4. Investigation of pitch and angle in the gradual-triangle lenticular lens for point-blank LED fog lamp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsi-Chao; Yang, Chi-Hao

    2014-05-10

    The effects of different pitch and angle of gradual-triangle lenticular lens for the point-blank LED fog lamp were investigated under the standard of ECE R19. The novel LED fog lamp was assembled from a point-blank LED light source, a parabolic reflector, and a gradual-triangle lenticular lens. Light tracing analysis was used for the design of the gradual-triangle lenticular lens. The pitch, which varied from 1 to 6 mm, and the apex angle, which changed from 5 to 32 deg, were both investigated in regard to the gradual-triangle lenticular lens. The optimum pitch was 5 mm, and the efficiency of the lamp system and lenticular lens could reach 93% and 98.1% by simulation, respectively. The results of experiment had over 94%, which is similar to that of simulation by normalized cross correlation (NCC) for the light intensity.

  5. Catheter for Cleaning Surgical Optics During Surgical Procedures: A Possible Solution for Residue Buildup and Fogging in Video Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Abreu, Igor Renato Louro Bruno; Abrão, Fernando Conrado; Silva, Alessandra Rodrigues; Corrêa, Larissa Teresa Cirera; Younes, Riad Nain

    2015-05-01

    Currently, there is a tendency to perform surgical procedures via laparoscopic or thoracoscopic access. However, even with the impressive technological advancement in surgical materials, such as improvement in quality of monitors, light sources, and optical fibers, surgeons have to face simple problems that can greatly hinder surgery by video. One is the formation of "fog" or residue buildup on the lens, causing decreased visibility. Intracavitary techniques for cleaning surgical optics and preventing fog formation have been described; however, some of these techniques employ the use of expensive and complex devices designed solely for this purpose. Moreover, these techniques allow the cleaning of surgical optics when they becomes dirty, which does not prevent the accumulation of residue in the optics. To solve this problem we have designed a device that allows cleaning the optics with no surgical stops and prevents the fogging and residue accumulation. The objective of this study is to evaluate through experimental testing the effectiveness of a simple device that prevents the accumulation of residue and fogging of optics used in surgical procedures performed through thoracoscopic or laparoscopic access. Ex-vivo experiments were performed simulating the conditions of residue presence in surgical optics during a video surgery. The experiment consists in immersing the optics and catheter set connected to the IV line with crystalloid solution in three types of materials: blood, blood plus fat solution, and 200 mL of distilled water and 1 vial of methylene blue. The optics coupled to the device were immersed in 200 mL of each type of residue, repeating each immersion 10 times for each distinct residue for both thirty and zero degrees optics, totaling 420 experiments. A success rate of 98.1% was observed after the experiments, in these cases the device was able to clean and prevent the residue accumulation in the optics.

  6. Fog Computing and Edge Computing Architectures for Processing Data From Diabetes Devices Connected to the Medical Internet of Things.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klonoff, David C

    2017-07-01

    The Internet of Things (IoT) is generating an immense volume of data. With cloud computing, medical sensor and actuator data can be stored and analyzed remotely by distributed servers. The results can then be delivered via the Internet. The number of devices in IoT includes such wireless diabetes devices as blood glucose monitors, continuous glucose monitors, insulin pens, insulin pumps, and closed-loop systems. The cloud model for data storage and analysis is increasingly unable to process the data avalanche, and processing is being pushed out to the edge of the network closer to where the data-generating devices are. Fog computing and edge computing are two architectures for data handling that can offload data from the cloud, process it nearby the patient, and transmit information machine-to-machine or machine-to-human in milliseconds or seconds. Sensor data can be processed near the sensing and actuating devices with fog computing (with local nodes) and with edge computing (within the sensing devices). Compared to cloud computing, fog computing and edge computing offer five advantages: (1) greater data transmission speed, (2) less dependence on limited bandwidths, (3) greater privacy and security, (4) greater control over data generated in foreign countries where laws may limit use or permit unwanted governmental access, and (5) lower costs because more sensor-derived data are used locally and less data are transmitted remotely. Connected diabetes devices almost all use fog computing or edge computing because diabetes patients require a very rapid response to sensor input and cannot tolerate delays for cloud computing.

  7. Warm Dense Matter: An Overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalantar, D H; Lee, R W; Molitoris, J D

    2004-04-21

    This document provides a summary of the ''LLNL Workshop on Extreme States of Materials: Warm Dense Matter to NIF'' which was held on 20, 21, and 22 February 2002 at the Wente Conference Center in Livermore, CA. The warm dense matter regime, the transitional phase space region between cold material and hot plasma, is presently poorly understood. The drive to understand the nature of matter in this regime is sparking scientific activity worldwide. In addition to pure scientific interest, finite temperature dense matter occurs in the regimes of interest to the SSMP (Stockpile Stewardship Materials Program). So that obtaining a better understanding of WDM is important to performing effective experiments at, e.g., NIF, a primary mission of LLNL. At this workshop we examined current experimental and theoretical work performed at, and in conjunction with, LLNL to focus future activities and define our role in this rapidly emerging research area. On the experimental front LLNL plays a leading role in three of the five relevant areas and has the opportunity to become a major player in the other two. Discussion at the workshop indicated that the path forward for the experimental efforts at LLNL were two fold: First, we are doing reasonable baseline work at SPLs, HE, and High Energy Lasers with more effort encouraged. Second, we need to plan effectively for the next evolution in large scale facilities, both laser (NIF) and Light/Beam sources (LCLS/TESLA and GSI) Theoretically, LLNL has major research advantages in areas as diverse as the thermochemical approach to warm dense matter equations of state to first principles molecular dynamics simulations. However, it was clear that there is much work to be done theoretically to understand warm dense matter. Further, there is a need for a close collaboration between the generation of verifiable experimental data that can provide benchmarks of both the experimental techniques and the theoretical capabilities

  8. Light absorption and the photoformation of hydroxyl radical and singlet oxygen in fog waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, R.; Anastasio, C.

    2017-09-01

    The atmospheric aqueous-phase is a rich medium for chemical transformations of organic compounds, in part via photooxidants generated within the drops. Here we measure light absorption, photoformation rates and steady-state concentrations of two photooxidants - hydroxyl radical (•OH) and singlet molecular oxygen (1O2*) - in 8 illuminated fog waters from Davis, California and Baton Rouge, Louisiana. Mass absorption coefficients for dissolved organic compounds (MACDOC) in the samples are large, with typical values of 10,000-15,000 cm2 g-C-1 at 300 nm, and absorption extends to wavelengths as long as 450-600 nm. While nitrite and nitrate together account for an average of only 1% of light absorption, they account for an average of 70% of •OH photoproduction. Mean •OH photoproduction rates in fogs at the two locations are very similar, with an overall mean of 1.2 (±0.7) μM h-1 under Davis winter sunlight. The mean (±1σ) lifetime of •OH is 1.6 (±0.6) μs, likely controlled by dissolved organic compounds. Including calculated gas-to-drop partitioning of •OH, the average aqueous concentration of •OH is approximately 2 × 10-15 M (midday during Davis winter), with aqueous reactions providing approximately one-third of the hydroxyl radical source. At this concentration, calculated lifetimes of aqueous organics are on the order of 10 h for compounds with •OH rate constants of 1 × 1010 M-1 s-1 or higher (e.g., substituted phenols such as syringol (6.4 h) and guaiacol (8.4 h)), and on the order of 100 h for compounds with rate constants near 1 × 109 M-1 s-1 (e.g., isoprene oxidation products such as glyoxal (152 h), glyoxylic acid (58 h), and pyruvic acid (239 h)). Steady-state concentrations of 1O2* are approximately 100 times higher than those of •OH, in the range of (0.1-3.0) × 10-13 M. Since 1O2* is a more selective oxidant than •OH, it will only react appreciably with electron-rich species such as dimethyl furan (lifetime of 2.0 h) and

  9. Leaf surface structures enable the endemic Namib desert grass Stipagrostis sabulicola to irrigate itself with fog water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth-Nebelsick, A.; Ebner, M.; Miranda, T.; Gottschalk, V.; Voigt, D.; Gorb, S.; Stegmaier, T.; Sarsour, J.; Linke, M.; Konrad, W.

    2012-01-01

    The Namib grass Stipagrostis sabulicola relies, to a large degree, upon fog for its water supply and is able to guide collected water towards the plant base. This directed irrigation of the plant base allows an efficient and rapid uptake of the fog water by the shallow roots. In this contribution, the mechanisms for this directed water flow are analysed. Stipagrostis sabulicola has a highly irregular surface. Advancing contact angle is 98° ± 5° and the receding angle is 56° ± 9°, with a mean of both values of approximately 77°. The surface is thus not hydrophobic, shows a substantial contact angle hysteresis and therefore, allows the development of pinned drops of a substantial size. The key factor for the water conduction is the presence of grooves within the leaf surface that run parallel to the long axis of the plant. These grooves provide a guided downslide of drops that have exceeded the maximum size for attachment. It also leads to a minimum of inefficient drop scattering around the plant. The combination of these surface traits together with the tall and upright stature of S. sabulicola contributes to a highly efficient natural fog-collecting system that enables this species to thrive in a hyperarid environment. PMID:22356817

  10. A Fine-Grained and Privacy-Preserving Query Scheme for Fog Computing-Enhanced Location-Based Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xue; Yin, Fan; Tang, Xiaohu

    2017-07-11

    Location-based services (LBS), as one of the most popular location-awareness applications, has been further developed to achieve low-latency with the assistance of fog computing. However, privacy issues remain a research challenge in the context of fog computing. Therefore, in this paper, we present a fine-grained and privacy-preserving query scheme for fog computing-enhanced location-based services, hereafter referred to as FGPQ. In particular, mobile users can obtain the fine-grained searching result satisfying not only the given spatial range but also the searching content. Detailed privacy analysis shows that our proposed scheme indeed achieves the privacy preservation for the LBS provider and mobile users. In addition, extensive performance analyses and experiments demonstrate that the FGPQ scheme can significantly reduce computational and communication overheads and ensure the low-latency, which outperforms existing state-of-the art schemes. Hence, our proposed scheme is more suitable for real-time LBS searching.

  11. Evaluation of Low Pressure Fogging System for Improving Crop Yield of Tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.: Grown under Heat Stress Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kobi Shilo

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In Mediterranean regions, many tomato plants are grown throughout the hot summer period (May–September in sheltered cultivation, mainly for plant protection reasons. Most of the shelters that are used are low cost net houses covered with 50 mesh insect proof net. In most cases these net houses have a flat roof and no ventilation or climate control measures. This insufficient ventilation during the hot summer leads to above optimal air temperatures and causes moderate heat stress inside the shelters, which leads to yield reduction. The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of a simple and inexpensive low pressure fogging system installed in a naturally ventilated net house to lower temperatures and improve the yield during the summer. The study showed that in areas where relative air humidity (RH during the daytime is less than 60%, tomato plants improved their performance when grown through the summer in net houses under moderate heat stress. Under fogging conditions pollen grain viability and fruit set were significantly improved. This improvement influenced the yield picked during September (104–136 DAP. However, total seasonal yield was not affected by the fogging treatment.

  12. An Architecture of IoT Service Delegation and Resource Allocation Based on Collaboration between Fog and Cloud Computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aymen Abdullah Alsaffar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the wide utilization of cloud computing (e.g., services, applications, and resources, some of the services, applications, and smart devices are not able to fully benefit from this attractive cloud computing paradigm due to the following issues: (1 smart devices might be lacking in their capacity (e.g., processing, memory, storage, battery, and resource allocation, (2 they might be lacking in their network resources, and (3 the high network latency to centralized server in cloud might not be efficient for delay-sensitive application, services, and resource allocations requests. Fog computing is promising paradigm that can extend cloud resources to edge of network, solving the abovementioned issue. As a result, in this work, we propose an architecture of IoT service delegation and resource allocation based on collaboration between fog and cloud computing. We provide new algorithm that is decision rules of linearized decision tree based on three conditions (services size, completion time, and VMs capacity for managing and delegating user request in order to balance workload. Moreover, we propose algorithm to allocate resources to meet service level agreement (SLA and quality of services (QoS as well as optimizing big data distribution in fog and cloud computing. Our simulation result shows that our proposed approach can efficiently balance workload, improve resource allocation efficiently, optimize big data distribution, and show better performance than other existing methods.

  13. A Fine-Grained and Privacy-Preserving Query Scheme for Fog Computing-Enhanced Location-Based Service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Yang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Location-based services (LBS, as one of the most popular location-awareness applications, has been further developed to achieve low-latency with the assistance of fog computing. However, privacy issues remain a research challenge in the context of fog computing. Therefore, in this paper, we present a fine-grained and privacy-preserving query scheme for fog computing-enhanced location-based services, hereafter referred to as FGPQ. In particular, mobile users can obtain the fine-grained searching result satisfying not only the given spatial range but also the searching content. Detailed privacy analysis shows that our proposed scheme indeed achieves the privacy preservation for the LBS provider and mobile users. In addition, extensive performance analyses and experiments demonstrate that the FGPQ scheme can significantly reduce computational and communication overheads and ensure the low-latency, which outperforms existing state-of-the art schemes. Hence, our proposed scheme is more suitable for real-time LBS searching.

  14. Global warming and obesity: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, R; Ji, M; Zhang, S

    2018-02-01

    Global warming and the obesity epidemic are two unprecedented challenges mankind faces today. A literature search was conducted in the PubMed, Web of Science, EBSCO and Scopus for articles published until July 2017 that reported findings on the relationship between global warming and the obesity epidemic. Fifty studies were identified. Topic-wise, articles were classified into four relationships - global warming and the obesity epidemic are correlated because of common drivers (n = 21); global warming influences the obesity epidemic (n = 13); the obesity epidemic influences global warming (n = 13); and global warming and the obesity epidemic influence each other (n = 3). We constructed a conceptual model linking global warming and the obesity epidemic - the fossil fuel economy, population growth and industrialization impact land use and urbanization, motorized transportation and agricultural productivity and consequently influences global warming by excess greenhouse gas emission and the obesity epidemic by nutrition transition and physical inactivity; global warming also directly impacts obesity by food supply/price shock and adaptive thermogenesis, and the obesity epidemic impacts global warming by the elevated energy consumption. Policies that endorse deployment of clean and sustainable energy sources, and urban designs that promote active lifestyles, are likely to alleviate the societal burden of global warming and obesity. © 2017 World Obesity Federation.

  15. Total- and monomethyl-mercury and major ions in coastal California fog water: Results from two years of sampling on land and at sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Weiss-Penzias

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Marine fog water samples were collected over two summers (2014–2015 with active strand collectors (CASCC at eight coastal sites from Humboldt to Monterey counties in California, USA, and on four ocean cruises along the California coastline in order to investigate mercury (Hg cycling at the ocean-atmosphere-land interface. The mean concentration of monomethylmercury (MMHg in fog water across terrestrial sites for both years was 1.6 ± 1.9 ng L-1 (<0.01–10.4 ng L-1, N = 149, which corresponds to 5.7% (2.0–10.8% of total Hg (HgT in fog. Rain water samples from three sites had mean MMHg concentrations of 0.20 ± 0.12 ng L-1 (N = 5 corresponding to 1.4% of HgT. Fog water samples collected at sea had MMHg concentrations of 0.08 ± 0.15 ng L-1 (N = 14 corresponding to 0.4% of HgT. Significantly higher MMHg concentrations in fog were observed at terrestrial sites next to the ocean relative to a site 40 kilometers inland, and the mean difference was 1.6 ng L-1. Using a rate constant for photo-demethylation of MMHg of -0.022 h-1 based on previous demethylation experiments and a coastal-inland fog transport time of 12 hours, a mean difference of only 0.5 ng L-1 of MMHg was predicted between coastal and inland sites, indicating other unknown source and/or sink pathways are important for MMHg in fog. Fog water deposition to a standard passive 1.00 m2 fog collector at six terrestrial sites averaged 0.10 ± 0.07 L m-2 d-1, which was ∼2% of typical rainwater deposition in this area. Mean air-surface fog water fluxes of MMHg and HgT were then calculated to be 34 ± 40 ng m-2 y-1 and 546 ± 581 ng m-2 y-1, respectively. These correspond to 33% and 13% of the rain fluxes, respectively.

  16. Photochemical properties of trans-1-chloro-3,3,3-trifluoropropene (trans-CHCl═CHCF3): OH reaction rate constant, UV and IR absorption spectra, global warming potential, and ozone depletion potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orkin, Vladimir L; Martynova, Larissa E; Kurylo, Michael J

    2014-07-17

    Measurements of the rate constant for the gas-phase reactions of OH radicals with trans-1-chloro-3,3,3-trifluoropropene (trans-CHCl═CHCF3) were performed using a flash photolysis resonance-fluorescence technique over the temperature range 220-370 K. The reaction rate constant exhibits a noticeable curvature of the temperature dependence in the Arrhenius plot, which can be represented by the following expression: kt-CFP (220-370 K) = 1.025 × 10(-13) × (T/298)(2.29) exp(+384/T) cm(3 )molecule(-1) s(-1). The room-temperature rate constant was determined to be kt-CFP (298 K) = (3.29 ± 0.10) × 10(-13) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1), where the uncertainty includes both two standard errors (statistical) and the estimated systematic error. For atmospheric modeling purposes, the rate constant below room temperature can be represented by the following expression: kt-CFP (220-298 K) = (7.20 ± 0.46) × 10(-13) exp[-(237 ± 16)/T] cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1). There was no difference observed between the rate constants determined at 4 kPa (30 Torr) and 40 kPa (300 Torr) at both 298 and 370 K. The UV and IR absorption cross sections of this compound were measured at room temperature. The atmospheric lifetime, global warming potential, and ozone depletion potential of trans-CHCl═CHCF3 were estimated.

  17. Modified Asphalt Binder with Natural Zeolite for Warm Mix Asphalt

    OpenAIRE

    Dubravský Marián; Mandula Ján

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, warm mix asphalt (WMA) is becoming more and more used in the asphalt industry. WMA provide a whole range of benefits, whether economic, environmental and ecological. Lower energy consumption and less pollution is the most advantages of this asphalt mixture. The paper deals with the addition of natural zeolite into the sub base asphalt layers, which is the essential constituent in the construction of the road. Measurement is focused on basic physic – mechanical properties decl...

  18. Human activities and global warming: a cointegration analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Hui; Rodríguez, Gabriel

    2005-01-01

    Do human activities indeed cause global warming? This paper attempts to answer this question by reexamining the time series properties of climate variables and the existence of long-run relationships between them. Double unit root testing shows that most of the radiative forcings of greenhouse gases are integrated of order two. We then apply an I(1) and I(2) cointegrating rank analysis to identify the presence of I(2) components. After identifying a linear combination of I(2) variables that c...

  19. Analysis of the Interaction and Transport of Aerosols with Cloud or Fog in East Asia from AERONET and Satellite Remote Sensing: 2012 DRAGON Campaigns and Climatological Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eck, T. F.; Holben, B. N.; Reid, J. S.; Lynch, P.; Schafer, J.; Giles, D. M.; Kim, J.; Kim, Y. J.; Sano, I.; Arola, A. T.; Munchak, L. A.; O'Neill, N. T.; Lyapustin, A.; Sayer, A. M.; Hsu, N. Y. C.; Randles, C. A.; da Silva, A. M., Jr.; Govindaraju, R.; Hyer, E. J.; Pickering, K. E.; Crawford, J. H.; Sinyuk, A.; Smirnov, A.

    2015-12-01

    Ground-based remote sensing observations from Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) sun-sky radiometers have recently shown several instances where cloud-aerosol interaction had resulted in modification of aerosol properties and/or in difficulty identifying some major pollution transport events due to aerosols being imbedded in cloud systems. Major Distributed Regional Aerosol Gridded Observation Networks (DRAGON) field campaigns involving multiple AERONET sites in Japan and South Korea during Spring of 2012 have yielded observations of aerosol transport associated with clouds and/or aerosol properties modification as a result of fog interaction. Analysis of data from the Korean and Japan DRAGON campaigns shows that major fine-mode aerosol transport events are sometimes associated with extensive cloud cover and that cloud-screening of observations often filter out significant pollution aerosol transport events. The Spectral De-convolution Algorithm (SDA) algorithm was utilized to isolate and analyze the fine-mode aerosol optical depth (AODf) signal from AERONET data for these cases of persistent and extensive cloud cover. Satellite retrievals of AOD from MODIS sensors (from Dark Target, Deep Blue and MAIAC algorithms) were also investigated to assess the issue of detectability of high AOD events associated with high cloud fraction. Underestimation of fine mode AOD by the Navy Aerosol Analysis and Prediction System (NAAPS) and by the NASA Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis For Research And Applications Aerosol Re-analysis (MERRAaero) models at very high AOD at sites in China and Korea was observed, especially for observations that are cloud screened by AERONET (Level 2 data). Additionally, multi-year monitoring at several AERONET sites are examined for climatological statistics of cloud screening of fine mode aerosol events. Aerosol that has been affected by clouds or the near-cloud environment may be more prevalent than AERONET data suggest due to inherent difficulty in

  20. Cutaneous warming promotes sleep onset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymann, Roy J E M; Swaab, Dick F; Van Someren, Eus J W

    2005-06-01

    Sleep occurs in close relation to changes in body temperature. Both the monophasic sleep period in humans and the polyphasic sleep periods in rodents tend to be initiated when core body temperature is declining. This decline is mainly due to an increase in skin blood flow and consequently skin warming and heat loss. We have proposed that these intrinsically occurring changes in core and skin temperatures could modulate neuronal activity in sleep-regulating brain areas (Van Someren EJW, Chronobiol Int 17: 313-54, 2000). We here provide results compatible with this hypothesis. We obtained 144 sleep-onset latencies while directly manipulating core and skin temperatures within the comfortable range in eight healthy subjects under controlled conditions. The induction of a proximal skin temperature difference of only 0.78 +/- 0.03 degrees C (mean +/- SE) around a mean of 35.13 +/- 0.11 degrees C changed sleep-onset latency by 26%, i.e., by 3.09 minutes [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.91 to 4.28] around a mean of 11.85 min (CI, 9.74 to 14.41), with faster sleep onsets when the proximal skin was warmed. The reduction in sleep-onset latency occurred despite a small but significant decrease in subjective comfort during proximal skin warming. The induction of changes in core temperature (delta = 0.20 +/- 0.02 degrees C) and distal skin temperature (delta = 0.74 +/- 0.05 degrees C) were ineffective. Previous studies have demonstrated correlations between skin temperature and sleep-onset latency. Also, sleep disruption by ambient temperatures that activate thermoregulatory defense mechanisms has been shown. The present study is the first to experimentally demonstrate a causal contribution to sleep-onset latency of skin temperature manipulations within the normal nocturnal fluctuation range. Circadian and sleep-appetitive behavior-induced variations in skin temperature might act as an input signal to sleep-regulating systems.

  1. Cosmic Rays and Global Warming

    OpenAIRE

    Sloan, T.; Wolfendale, A W

    2007-01-01

    It has been claimed by others that observed temporal correlations of terrestrial cloud cover with `the cosmic ray intensity' are causal. The possibility arises, therefore, of a connection between cosmic rays and Global Warming. If true, the implications would be very great. We have examined this claim to look for evidence to corroborate it. So far we have not found any and so our tentative conclusions are to doubt it. Such correlations as appear are more likely to be due to the small variatio...

  2. Simulation of turbulences and fog effects on the free space optical link inside of experimental box

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latal, Jan; Vitasek, Jan; Hajek, Lukas; Vanderka, Ales; Koudelka, Petr; Kepak, Stanislav; Vasinek, Vladimir

    2016-12-01

    This paper deals with problematic of Free Space Optical (FSO) Links. The theoretical part describes the effects of atmospheric transmission environment on these FSO connections. The practical part is focused on the creation of an appropriate experimental workplace for turbulences simulation (mechanical and thermal turbulences), fog effects and subsequent measurement of these effects. For definition how big impact these effects on the FSO system have is used the statistical analysis and simulation software Optiwave. Overall there were tested three optical light sources operating at wavelengths of 632.8 nm, 850 nm and 1550 nm respectively. Influences of simulated atmospheric effects on the signal attenuation were observed. Within the frame of simulation in Optiwave software there were studied influences of attenuation on given wavelengths in form of FSO link transmission parameters degradation. Also for the purposes of real measurements it was necessary to fabricate an experimental box. This box was constructed with sizes of 2.5 and 5 meters and was used for simulation of atmospheric environment.

  3. TOWARDS IMPLEMENTATION OF THE FOG COMPUTING CONCEPT INTO THE GEOSPATIAL DATA INFRASTRUCTURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Panidi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The information technologies and Global Network technologies in particular are developing very quickly. According to this, the problem remains actual that incorporates implementation issues for the general-purpose technologies into the information systems which operate with geospatial data. The paper discusses the implementation feasibility for a number of new approaches and concepts that solve the problems of spatial data publish and management on the Global Network. A brief review describes some contemporary concepts and technologies used for distributed data storage and management, which provide combined use of server-side and client-side resources. In particular, the concepts of Cloud Computing, Fog Computing, and Internet of Things, also with Java Web Start, WebRTC and WebTorrent technologies are mentioned. The author's experience is described briefly, which incorporates the number of projects devoted to the development of the portable solutions for geospatial data and GIS software publication on the Global Network.

  4. SACA: Self-Aware Communication Architecture for IoT Using Mobile Fog Servers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishal Sharma

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Internet of things (IoT aims at bringing together large business enterprise solutions and architectures for handling the huge amount of data generated by millions of devices. For this aim, IoT is necessary to connect various devices and provide a common platform for storage and retrieval of information without fail. However, the success of IoT depends on the novelty of network and its capability in sustaining the increasing demand by users. In this paper, a self-aware communication architecture (SACA is proposed for sustainable networking over IoT devices. The proposed approach employs the concept of mobile fog servers which make relay using the train and unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV networks. The problem is presented based on Wald’s maximum model, which is resolved by the application of a distributed node management (DNM system and state dependency formulations. The proposed approach is capable of providing prolonged connectivity by increasing the network reliability and sustainability even in the case of failures. The effectiveness of the proposed approach is demonstrated through numerical and network simulations in terms of significant gains attained with lesser delay and fewer packet losses. The proposed approach is also evaluated against Sybil, wormhole, and DDoS attacks for analyzing its sustainability and probability of connectivity in unfavorable conditions.

  5. Heterogeneous chemistry of NO{sub 3} in clouds and fogs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudich, Y.; Talukdar, R.K.; Fox, R. [NOAA, Aeronomy Lab., Boulder (United States)] [and others

    1996-10-01

    The heterogeneous reactions of the nitrate free radical (NO{sub 3}) an important nighttime oxidant in the lower troposphere, in clouds and fogs are unexplored. Therefore, the uptake coefficients ({gamma}) of NO{sub 3} onto pure water and other dilute solutions were measured. The product of Henry`s law constant, H, and diffusion coefficient D{sub {ell}}, for NO{sub 3} in water was calculated to be H{radical}D{sub {ell}} = (1.9{plus_minus}0.2)x10{sup -3} M atm{sup -1} cm s-{sup 1/2} and H , was determined to be 0.6{plus_minus}0.3 M atm{sup -1}. Uptake of NO{sub 3} on pure water is interpreted as due to reaction of NO{sub 3(aq)} with H{sub 2}O{sub ({ell})} to produce HNO{sub 3} and OH in the liquid phase. Details of these measurements and the implications of these findings to the chemistry of NO{sub 3} in the troposphere will discussed.

  6. Vibration Noise Modeling for Measurement While Drilling System Based on FOGs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunxi Zhang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Aiming to improve survey accuracy of Measurement While Drilling (MWD based on Fiber Optic Gyroscopes (FOGs in the long period, the external aiding sources are fused into the inertial navigation by the Kalman filter (KF method. The KF method needs to model the inertial sensors’ noise as the system noise model. The system noise is modeled as white Gaussian noise conventionally. However, because of the vibration while drilling, the noise in gyros isn’t white Gaussian noise any more. Moreover, an incorrect noise model will degrade the accuracy of KF. This paper developed a new approach for noise modeling on the basis of dynamic Allan variance (DAVAR. In contrast to conventional white noise models, the new noise model contains both the white noise and the color noise. With this new noise model, the KF for the MWD was designed. Finally, two vibration experiments have been performed. Experimental results showed that the proposed vibration noise modeling approach significantly improved the estimated accuracies of the inertial sensor drifts. Compared the navigation results based on different noise model, with the DAVAR noise model, the position error and the toolface angle error are reduced more than 90%. The velocity error is reduced more than 65%. The azimuth error is reduced more than 50%.

  7. Thermal Multifragmentation of Hot Nuclei and Liquid-Fog Phase Transition

    CERN Document Server

    Karnaukhov, V A; Duginova, E V; Petrov, L A; Rodionov, V K; Oeschler, H; Budzanowski, A; Karcz, W; Janicki, M; Bochkarev, O V; Kuzmin, E A; Chulkov, L V; Norbeck, E; Botvina, A S

    2002-01-01

    Multiple emission of intermediate-mass fragments in the collisions of protons (up to 8.1 GeV), ^{4}He (4 and 14.6 GeV) and ^{12}C (22.4 GeV) on Au has been studied with the 4\\pi-setup FASA. In all cases thermal multifragmentation of the hot and diluted target spectator takes place. The fragment multiplicity and charge distributions are well described by the combined model including the modified intranuclear cascade followed by the statistical multibody decay of the hot system. IMF-IMF correlation study supports this picture giving very short time scale of the process (\\tau\\le 70 fm/c). This decay process can be interpreted as the first order nuclear liquid-fog phase transition inside the spinodal region. The evolution of the mechanism of thermal multifragmentation with increasing projectile mass was investigated. The onset of the radial collective flow was observed for heavier projectiles. The analysis reveals the information on the fragment space distribution ins! ide the break-up volume: heavier IMF are for...

  8. The Optimal Dispatch of a Power System Containing Virtual Power Plants under Fog and Haze Weather

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yajing Gao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available With the growing influence of fog and haze (F-H weather and the rapid development of distributed energy resources (DERs and smart grids, the concept of the virtual power plant (VPP employed in this study would help to solve the dispatch problem caused by multiple DERs connected to the power grid. The effects of F-H weather on photovoltaic output forecast, load forecast and power system dispatch are discussed according to real case data. The wavelet neural network (WNN model was employed to predict photovoltaic output and load, considering F-H weather, based on the idea of “similar days of F-H”. The multi-objective optimal dispatch model of a power system adopted in this paper contains several VPPs and conventional power plants, under F-H weather, and the mixed integer linear programming (MILP and the Yalmip toolbox of MATLAB were adopted to solve the dispatch model. The analysis of the results from a case study proves the validity and feasibility of the model and the algorithms.

  9. Mitigating the Effects of Fog Attenuation in FSO Communication Link Using Multiple Transceivers and EDFA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Mehtab

    2017-05-01

    Free Space Optics (FSO) technique is an advanced form of the wireless communication system capable of transmitting data at higher transmission rates with higher channel bandwidth and over longer link distances. One of the major challenges faced by FSO technology is the distortion of received signal due to atmospheric effects which degrade the performance of the communication link by increasing the bit error rate (BER). By implementing Erbium Doped Fiber Amplifier (EDFA) in the FSO link, the degradation of the information signal due to atmospheric effects can be minimized. Also, by deploying spatial diversity technique in the FSO link, where multiple copies of the information signal are transmitted to increase the redundancy of the system, the system performance can be enhanced. In this paper, the performance of an FSO communication link has been analyzed under fog weather condition using a different number of Tx/Rx pairs and EDFA amplifier using OPTISYSTEM simulation software. Performance has been analyzed on the basis of Q Factor, SNR, BER, and total power of the received signal. Results show a significant improvement in the system performance by deploying multiple transceiver techniques.

  10. Leveraging Fog Computing for Scalable IoT Datacenter Using Spine-Leaf Network Topology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. C. Okafor

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available With the Internet of Everything (IoE paradigm that gathers almost every object online, huge traffic workload, bandwidth, security, and latency issues remain a concern for IoT users in today’s world. Besides, the scalability requirements found in the current IoT data processing (in the cloud can hardly be used for applications such as assisted living systems, Big Data analytic solutions, and smart embedded applications. This paper proposes an extended cloud IoT model that optimizes bandwidth while allowing edge devices (Internet-connected objects/devices to smartly process data without relying on a cloud network. Its integration with a massively scaled spine-leaf (SL network topology is highlighted. This is contrasted with a legacy multitier layered architecture housing network services and routing policies. The perspective offered in this paper explains how low-latency and bandwidth intensive applications can transfer data to the cloud (and then back to the edge application without impacting QoS performance. Consequently, a spine-leaf Fog computing network (SL-FCN is presented for reducing latency and network congestion issues in a highly distributed and multilayer virtualized IoT datacenter environment. This approach is cost-effective as it maximizes bandwidth while maintaining redundancy and resiliency against failures in mission critical applications.

  11. Joint Mode Selection and Resource Allocation for Downlink Fog Radio Access Networks Supported D2D

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Hongyu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Presented as an innovative paradigm incorporating the cloud computing into radio access network, Cloud radio access networks (C-RANs have been shown advantageous in curtailing the capital and operating expenditures as well as providing better services to the customers. However, heavy burden on the non-ideal fronthaul limits performances of CRANs. Here we focus on the alleviation of burden on the fronthaul via the edge devices’ caches and propose a fog computing based RAN (F-RAN architecture with three candidate transmission modes: device to device, local distributed coordination, and global C-RAN. Followed by the proposed simple mode selection scheme, the average energy efficiency (EE of systems optimization problem considering congestion control is presented. Under the Lyapunov framework, the problem is reformulated as a joint mode selection and resource allocation problem, which can be solved by block coordinate descent method. The mathematical analysis and simulation results validate the benefits of F-RAN and an EE-delay tradeoff can be achieved by the proposed algorithm.

  12. Stochastic geometry model for multi-channel fog radio access networks

    KAUST Repository

    Emara, Mostafa

    2017-06-29

    Cache-enabled base station (BS) densification, denoted as a fog radio access network (F-RAN), is foreseen as a key component of 5G cellular networks. F-RAN enables storing popular files at the network edge (i.e., BS caches), which empowers local communication and alleviates traffic congestions at the core/backhaul network. The hitting probability, which is the probability of successfully transmitting popular files request from the network edge, is a fundamental key performance indicator (KPI) for F-RAN. This paper develops a scheduling aware mathematical framework, based on stochastic geometry, to characterize the hitting probability of F-RAN in a multi-channel environment. To this end, we assess and compare the performance of two caching distribution schemes, namely, uniform caching and Zipf caching. The numerical results show that the commonly used single channel environment leads to pessimistic assessment for the hitting probability of F-RAN. Furthermore, the numerical results manifest the superiority of the Zipf caching scheme and quantify the hitting probability gains in terms of the number of channels and cache size.

  13. Inkjet printing for direct micropatterning of a superhydrophobic surface: Toward biomimetic fog harvesting surfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Lianbin

    2015-01-01

    The preparation of biomimetic superhydrophobic surfaces with hydrophilic micro-sized patterns is highly desirable, but a one-step, mask-free method to produce such surfaces has not previously been reported. We have developed a direct method to produce superhydrophilic micropatterns on superhydrophobic surfaces based on inkjet printing technology. This work was inspired by the efficient fog-harvesting behavior of Stenocara beetles in the Namib Desert. A mussel-inspired ink consisting of an optimized solution of dopamine was applied directly by inkjet printing to superhydrophobic surfaces. Stable Wenzel\\'s microdroplets of the dopamine solution with well-defined micropatterns were obtained on these surfaces. Superhydrophilic micropatterns with well-controlled dimensions were then readily achieved on the superhydrophobic surfaces by the formation of polydopamine via in situ polymerization. The micropatterned superhydrophobic surfaces prepared by this inkjet printing method showed enhanced water collection efficiency compared with uniform superhydrophilic and superhydrophobic surfaces. This method can be used for the facile large-scale patterning of superhydrophobic surfaces with high precision and superior pattern stability and is therefore a key step toward patterning superhydrophobic surfaces for practical applications. This journal is

  14. Fog camera to visualize ionizing charged particles; Camara de niebla para visualizar particulas cargadas ionizantes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trujillo A, L.; Rodriguez R, N. I.; Vega C, H. R., E-mail: ingtrujilloa@hotmail.com [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas (Mexico)

    2014-10-15

    The human being can not perceive the different types of ionizing radiation, natural or artificial, present in the nature, for what appropriate detection systems have been developed according to the sensibility to certain radiation type and certain energy type. The objective of this work was to build a fog camera to visualize the traces, and to identify the trajectories, produced by charged particles with high energy, coming mainly of the cosmic rays. The origin of the cosmic rays comes from the solar radiation generated by solar eruptions where the protons compose most of this radiation. It also comes, of the galactic radiation which is composed mainly of charged particles and gamma rays that comes from outside of the solar system. These radiation types have energy time millions higher that those detected in the earth surface, being more important as the height on the sea level increases. These particles in their interaction produce secondary particles that are detectable by means of this cameras type. The camera operates by means of a saturated atmosphere of alcohol vapor. In the moment in that a charged particle crosses the cold area of the atmosphere, the medium is ionized and the particle acts like a condensation nucleus of the alcohol vapor, leaving a visible trace of its trajectory. The built camera was very stable, allowing the detection in continuous form and the observation of diverse events. (Author)

  15. Smart Items, Fog and Cloud Computing as Enablers of Servitization in Healthcare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir STANTCHEV

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In this article we argue that smart items and cloud computing can be powerful enablers of servitization as business trend. This is exemplified by an application scenario in healthcare that was developed in the context of the OpSIT-Project in Germany. We present a three-level architecture for a smart healthcare infrastructure. The approach is based on a service-oriented architecture and extends established architectural approaches developed previously at our group. More specifically, it integrates a role model, a layered cloud computing architecture, as well as a fog- computing-informed paradigm in order to provide a viable architecture for healthcare and elderly-care applications. The integration of established paradigms is beneficial with respect to providing adequate quality of service and governance (e.g., data privacy and compliance. It has been verified by expert interviews with healthcare specialists and IT professionals. To further demonstrate the validity of this architectural model, we provide an example use-case as a template for any kind of smart sensor-based healthcare infrastructure.

  16. The effect of body warming on respiratory mechanics in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubini, Alessandro

    2011-02-15

    The temperature dependence of airway smooth muscle cells and alveolar surfactant activity, and of the elastin stress-strain relationship, suggests that body warming may affect respiratory mechanics in vivo, a possibility that has not yet been investigated. To examine this hypothesis, healthy rats were studied using the end-inflation occlusion method under control conditions and after an infrared lamp was used for body warming. Hysteresis areas, the inspiratory work of breathing, and its elastic and resistive components were also calculated. After body warming, static and dynamic elastance, ohmic airway resistance, mean value of hysteresis, the inspiratory work of breathing, and additional resistance due to pendelluft and stress relaxation were all decreased. These data suggest that body warming reduces the inspiratory work of breathing by improving the elastic and resistive mechanical properties of airways. This effect is evident even for limited temperature variations suggesting that it may occur in the event of spontaneous pathological conditions, such as fever. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Population growth and global warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, R.V.

    2009-01-01

    When I was born in 1930, the human population of the world was a mere 2 billion. Today, it has already reached 6.8 billion, and is projected to reach 9.1 billion by 2050. That is unsustainable. It is slowly beginning to dawn on us that Global Warming is the result of increasing human CO2 emissions, and the more people there are in the world, the worse it will become. Ultimately, it is the sky that will prove to be the limit to our numbers. The developed countries of the world are the most affluent, and also the most effluent, so we must lead by example and contain our own population growth and per capita emissions. We also have a big debt to repay to former colonial territories in Africa, Asia and South America, who desperately need our help to contain their excessive rates of population growth. Belgian and Dutch obstetricians and gynaecologists can play a critical role in this endeavour. After all, we already have a pill that will stop global warming – the oral contraceptive pill. PMID:25478068

  18. Compositions, thermodynamic properties, and transport coefficients of high-temperature C5F10O mixed with CO2 and O2 as substitutes for SF6 to reduce global warming potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Linlin; Rong, Mingzhe; Wang, Xiaohua; Wu, Junhui; Han, Guiquan; Han, Guohui; Lu, Yanhui; Yang, Aijun; Wu, Yi

    2017-07-01

    C5F10O has recently been found to be a very promising alternative to SF6. This paper is devoted to the investigation of compositions, thermodynamic properties, and transport coefficients of high-temperature C5F10O mixed with CO2 and O2. Firstly, the partition functions and enthalpies of formation for a few molecules (CxFy and CxFyO) which are likely to exist in the mixtures, are calculated based on the G4(MP2) theory. The isomers of the above molecules are selected according to their Gibbs energy. The compositions of C5F10O-CO2-O2 mixtures are then determined using the minimization of the Gibbs free energy. Next, the thermodynamic properties (mass density, specific enthalpy, and specific heat) are derived from the previously calculated compositions. Lastly, the transport coefficients (electrical conductivity, viscosity, and thermal conductivity) are calculated based on Chapman-Enskog method. It is found that, as an arc quenching gas, C5F10O could not recombine into itself with the temperature decreasing down to room temperature after the arc extinction. Besides, the key species at room temperature are always CF4, CO2, and C4F6 if graphite is not considered. When taken into account, graphite will replace C4F6 as one of the dominate particles. The mixing of CO2 with C5F10O plasma significantly affects the thermodynamic properties (e.g. vanishing and/or shifting of the peaks in specific heat) and transport coefficients (e.g. reducing viscosity and changing the number of peaks in thermal conductivity), while the addition of O2 with C5F10O-CO2 mixtures has no remarkable influence on both thermodynamic and transport properties.

  19. Compositions, thermodynamic properties, and transport coefficients of high-temperature C5F10O mixed with CO2 and O2 as substitutes for SF6 to reduce global warming potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linlin Zhong

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available C5F10O has recently been found to be a very promising alternative to SF6. This paper is devoted to the investigation of compositions, thermodynamic properties, and transport coefficients of high-temperature C5F10O mixed with CO2 and O2. Firstly, the partition functions and enthalpies of formation for a few molecules (CxFy and CxFyO which are likely to exist in the mixtures, are calculated based on the G4(MP2 theory. The isomers of the above molecules are selected according to their Gibbs energy. The compositions of C5F10O-CO2-O2 mixtures are then determined using the minimization of the Gibbs free energy. Next, the thermodynamic properties (mass density, specific enthalpy, and specific heat are derived from the previously calculated compositions. Lastly, the transport coefficients (electrical conductivity, viscosity, and thermal conductivity are calculated based on Chapman-Enskog method. It is found that, as an arc quenching gas, C5F10O could not recombine into itself with the temperature decreasing down to room temperature after the arc extinction. Besides, the key species at room temperature are always CF4, CO2, and C4F6 if graphite is not considered. When taken into account, graphite will replace C4F6 as one of the dominate particles. The mixing of CO2 with C5F10O plasma significantly affects the thermodynamic properties (e.g. vanishing and/or shifting of the peaks in specific heat and transport coefficients (e.g. reducing viscosity and changing the number of peaks in thermal conductivity, while the addition of O2 with C5F10O-CO2 mixtures has no remarkable influence on both thermodynamic and transport properties.

  20. Characterizing changes in soil bacterial community structure in response to short-term warming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiong, Jinbo [State Key Laboratory of Soil and Sustainable Agriculture, Institute of Soil Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing China; School of Marine Sciences, Ningbo University, Ningbo China; Sun, Huaibo [State Key Laboratory of Soil and Sustainable Agriculture, Institute of Soil Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing China; Peng, Fei [Key Laboratory of Desert and Desertification, Cold and Arid Regions Environmental and Engineering Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou China; Zhang, Huayong [State Key Laboratory of Soil and Sustainable Agriculture, Institute of Soil Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing China; Xue, Xian [Key Laboratory of Desert and Desertification, Cold and Arid Regions Environmental and Engineering Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou China; Gibbons, Sean M. [Argonne National Laboratory Biosciences Division, Argonne IL USA; Graduate Program in Biophysical Sciences, University of Chicago, Chicago IL USA; Gilbert, Jack A. [Argonne National Laboratory Biosciences Division, Argonne IL USA; Department of Ecology and Evolution, University of Chicago, Chicago IL USA; Chu, Haiyan [State Key Laboratory of Soil and Sustainable Agriculture, Institute of Soil Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing China

    2014-02-18

    High altitude alpine meadows are experiencing considerably greater than average increases in soil surface temperature, potentially as a result of ongoing climate change. The effects of warming on plant productivity and soil edaphic variables have been established previously, but the influence of warming on soil microbial community structure has not been well characterized. Here, the impact of 15 months of soil warming (both + 1 and + 2 degrees C) on bacterial community structure was examined in a field experiment on a Tibetan plateau alpine meadow using bar-coded pyrosequencing. Warming significantly changed (P < 0.05) the structure of the soil bacterial community, but the alpha diversity was not dramatically affected. Changes in the abundance of the Actinobacteria and Alphaproteobacteria were found to contribute the most to differences between ambient (AT) and artificially warmed conditions. A variance partitioning analysis (VPA) showed that warming directly explained 7.15% variation in bacterial community structure, while warming-induced changes in soil edaphic and plant phenotypic properties indirectly accounted for 28.3% and 20.6% of the community variance, respectively. Interestingly, certain taxa showed an inconsistent response to the two warming treatments, for example Deltaproteobacteria showed a decreased relative abundance at + 1 degrees C, but a return to AT control relative abundance at + 2 degrees C. This suggests complex microbial dynamics that could result from conditional dependencies between bacterial taxa.

  1. Acute toxicity of smoke screen materials to aquatic organisms, white phosphorus-felt, red phosphorus-butyl rubber and SGF No. 2 fog oil. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poston, T.M.; McFadden, K.M.; Bean, R.M.; Clark, M.L.; Thomas, B.L.; Killand, B.W.; Prohammer, L.A.; Kalkwarf, D.R.

    1986-04-01

    The acute toxicity of three obscurants was determined for nine freshwater organisms. The materials tested were white phosphorus-felt smoke, red phosphorus-butyl rubber (RP-BR) smoke, and smoke generator fuel (SGF) No. 2 fog oil (bulk and vaporized). The chemistry of WP-F and RP-BR smoke in water and the resulting effects on aquatic organisms are similar. Combustion of these two obscurants and their deposition in water leads to the formation of many complex oxy-phosphoric acids. Rates of hydrolysis of these complex products to ortho-phosphate were inconsistent and unpredictable over time. These products acidify water and produce toxic effects after exhausting the buffering capacity of the water. Acute 96 hr tests using Daphnia magna with neutralized and nonneutralized exposure solutions indicated that the presence of unidentified toxic component(s) acted independently of pH. At pH levels of 6.0 to 7.0, phosphorus combustion products precipitated out of solution leading to a bimodal toxic response in extended 96-hr tests with Daphnia magna. Most components of fog oil had low solubility in water. Saturation was apparent at approximately 0.1 to 0.3 mg/L total oil. Vaporization had no demonstrable effect on the chemistry or toxicity of the fog oil. Neither the bulk fog oil nor the vaporized fog oil was acutely toxic to freshwater animals at concentrations less than 10 mg/L total oil. In oil-water mixes in excess of 1.0 mg/L total oil, fog oil quickly separated and floated to the surface. The primary hazard associated with vaporized and bulk fog oil was the physical effect of oil fouling the organisms. Photolysis increased the concentration of water-soluble components of the fog oil. Acute toxicity was demonstrated in oil-water mixes (approx.10 mg/L total oil) of photolyzed bulk and vaporized fog oil. No difference in toxicity was observed between photolyzed and non-photolyzed dilutions of OWM at comparable levels of total oil.

  2. GATA-4 and FOG-2 expression in pediatric ovarian sex cord-stromal tumors replicates embryonal gonadal phenotype: results from the TREP project.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calogero Virgone

    Full Text Available AIM: GATA proteins are a family of zinc finger transcription factors regulating gene expression, differentiation and proliferation in various tissues. The expression of GATA-4 and FOG-2, one of its modulators, was studied in pediatric Sex Cord-Stromal tumors of the ovary, in order to evaluate their potential role as diagnostic markers and prognostic factors. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Clinical and histological data of 15 patients, enrolled into the TREP Project since 2000 were evaluated. When available, immunostaines for FOG-2, GATA-4, α-Inhibin, Vimentin and Pancytokeratin were also analyzed. RESULTS: In our series there were 6 Juvenile Granulosa Cell Tumors (JGCT, 6 Sertoli-Leydig Cell Tumors (SLCT, 1 Cellular Fibroma, 1 Theca Cell Tumor and 1 Stromal Sclerosing Tumor (SST. Thirteen patients obtained a complete remission (CR, 1 reached a second CR after the removal of a metachronous tumor and 1 died of disease. Inhibin was detectable in 11/15, Vimentin in 13/15, Pancytokeratin in 6/15, GATA-4 in 5/13 and FOG-2 in 11/15. FOG-2 was highly expressed in 5/6 JGCT, while GATA-4 was weakly detectable only in 1 of the cases. SLCT expressed diffusely FOG-2 (4/6 and GATA-4 (3/5. GATA-4 and FOG-2 were detected in fibroma and thecoma but not in the SST. CONCLUSIONS: Pediatric granulosa tumors appear to express a FOG-2/GATA-4 phenotype in keeping with primordial ovarian follicles. High expression of GATA-4 does not correlate with aggressive behaviour as seen in adults, but it is probably involved in cell proliferation its absence can be associated with the better outcome of JGCT. SLCTs replicate the phenotype of Sertoli cells during embryogenesis in normal testis. In this group, the lack of expression of FOG-2 in tumors in advanced stages might reveal a hypothetical role in inhibiting GATA-4 cell proliferation pathway. In fibroma/thecoma group GATA-4 and FOG-2 point out the abnormal activation of GATA pathway and might be involved in the onset of these tumors.

  3. First experimental evidence for carbon starvation at warm temperatures in epiphytic orchids of tropical cloud forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoch, Guenter; Roemer, Helena; Fioroni, Tiffany; Olmedo, Inayat; Kahmen, Ansgar

    2017-04-01

    Tropical cloud forests are among the most climate sensitive ecosystems world-wide. The lack of a strong seasonality and the additional dampening of temperature fluctuations by the omnipresence of clouds and fog produce year-round constant climatic conditions. With climate change the presence of clouds and fog is, however, predicted to be reduced. The disappearance of the cooling fog cover will have dramatic consequences for air temperatures, that are predicted to increase locally well over 5 °C by the end of the 21st century. Especially the large number of endemic epiphytic orchids in tropical cloud forests that contribute substantially to the biological diversity of these ecosystems, but are typically adapted to a very narrow climate envelope, are speculated to be very sensitive to the anticipated rise in temperature. In a phytotron experiment we investigated the effect of increasing temperatures on the carbon balance (gas-exchange and the carbon reserve household) of 10 epiphytic orchid species from the genera Dracula, native to tropical, South-American cloud forests. The orchids were exposed to three temperature treatments: i) a constant temperature treatment (23°C/13°C, day/night) simulating natural conditions, ii) a slow temperature ramp of +0.75 K every 10 days, and iii) a fast temperature ramp of +1.5 K every 10 days. CO2 leaf gas-exchanges was determined every 10 days, and concentrations of low molecular weight sugars and starch were analyses from leaf samples throughout the experiment. We found that increasing temperatures had only minor effects on day-time leaf respiration, but led to a moderate increase of respiration during night-time. In contrast to the rather minor effects of higher temperatures on respiration, there was a dramatic decline of net-photosynthesis above day-time temperatures of 29°C, and a complete stop of net-carbon uptake at 33°C in all investigated species. This high sensitivity of photosynthesis to warming was independent of the

  4. Daytime warming has stronger negative effects on soil nematodes than night-time warming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xiumin; Wang, Kehong; Song, Lihong; Wang, Xuefeng; Wu, Donghui

    2017-03-20

    Warming of the climate system is unequivocal, that is, stronger warming during night-time than during daytime. Here we focus on how soil nematodes respond to the current asymmetric warming. A field infrared heating experiment was performed in the western of the Songnen Plain, Northeast China. Three warming modes, i.e. daytime warming, night-time warming and diurnal warming, were taken to perform the asymmetric warming condition. Our results showed that the daytime and diurnal warming treatment significantly decreased soil nematodes density, and night-time warming treatment marginally affected the density. The response of bacterivorous nematode and fungivorous nematode to experimental warming showed the same trend with the total density. Redundancy analysis revealed an opposite effect of soil moisture and soil temperature, and the most important of soil moisture and temperature in night-time among the measured environment factors, affecting soil nematode community. Our findings suggested that daily minimum temperature and warming induced drying are most important factors affecting soil nematode community under the current global asymmetric warming.

  5. Daytime warming has stronger negative effects on soil nematodes than night-time warming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xiumin; Wang, Kehong; Song, Lihong; Wang, Xuefeng; Wu, Donghui

    2017-03-07

    Warming of the climate system is unequivocal, that is, stronger warming during night-time than during daytime. Here we focus on how soil nematodes respond to the current asymmetric warming. A field infrared heating experiment was performed in the western of the Songnen Plain, Northeast China. Three warming modes, i.e. daytime warming, night-time warming and diurnal warming, were taken to perform the asymmetric warming condition. Our results showed that the daytime and diurnal warming treatment significantly decreased soil nematodes density, and night-time warming treatment marginally affected the density. The response of bacterivorous nematode and fungivorous nematode to experimental warming showed the same trend with the total density. Redundancy analysis revealed an opposite effect of soil moisture and soil temperature, and the most important of soil moisture and temperature in night-time among the measured environment factors, affecting soil nematode community. Our findings suggested that daily minimum temperature and warming induced drying are most important factors affecting soil nematode community under the current global asymmetric warming.

  6. pH Control in Fog and Rain in East Asia: Temporal Advection of Clean Air Masses to Mt. Bamboo, Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otto Klemm

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Fog and rain was collected during an 18-day period in January 2011 at Mt. Bamboo, northern Taiwan. Almost 300 hourly fog samples and 16 daily rain samples were taken. One single fog sample (pH 3.17 was influenced by local volcanic activity, otherwise the pH ranged from 3.23 to 6.41 in fog and from 3.59 to 6.31 in rain. All the respective air masses arrived from the northeast, but exhibited two distinct groups: Group_1 had high concentrations of all ions (median interquartile range of total ion concentrations 3200–6200 µeq.·L−1 and low pHs (median 3.52, the respective air masses had travelled over densely populated and industrialized regions of mainland China. Group_2 was from air masses with long travel times over the ocean and relatively low total ion concentrations (80–570 µeq.·L−1 and higher pHs (median 4.80. The cleanest samples are among the cleanest reported in the literature of worldwide fog and rain. In both groups, the pH was governed by the balance of sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, and, in some cases, calcium. The variability of these ions was higher than the variability of 10−pH, which shows that the pH is a rather robust parameter in contrast to its drivers such as non-sea-salt sulfate.

  7. The effect of Virkon S fogging on survival of Salmonella enterica and Staphylococcus aureus on surfaces in a veterinary teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunowska, Magdalena; Morley, Paul S; Hyatt, Doreene R

    2005-02-25

    The objective of the study was to determine the disinfection efficacy of aerosolizing (cold fogging) Virkon S on survival of Stahpylococcus aureus and Salmonella enterica on different surfaces. Two experiments were conducted in different locations. Salmonella enterica and S. aureus were grown in broth culture and then seeded into pre-marked areas in each location and allowed to dry. Virkon S (1%) was aerosolized into the rooms (approximately 1L of per 30 m(3)). Samples were collected pre- and post-fogging for quantitative cultures to evaluate the efficacy of aerial disinfection. The reduction of S. enterica or S. aureus counts ranged from 3.40 to 0.95 log(10) (Salmonella) or 4.92 to 0.02 log(10) (Staphylococcus). The greatest reduction was evident in samples collected from non-porous horizontal surfaces, which were not obstructed from the air flow. These results indicate that fogging with Virkon S could be beneficial in routine disinfection of pre-cleaned surfaces. The benefits of routine use of cold fogging with Virkon S in veterinary hospital settings would include its wide-range antimicrobial action and minimal working-men power required to disinfect large areas. Also, fogging would potentially minimize microbial contamination in the hard to reach areas.

  8. Fractionation of airborne particulate-bound elements in haze-fog episode and associated health risks in a megacity of southeast China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huiming; Wang, Qin'geng; Shao, Min; Wang, Jinhua; Wang, Cheng; Sun, Yixuan; Qian, Xin; Wu, Hongfei; Yang, Meng; Li, Fengying

    2016-01-01

    Haze caused by high particulate matter loadings is an important environmental issue. PM2.5 was collected in Nanjing, China, during a severe haze-fog event and clear periods. The particulate-bound elements were chemically fractionated using sequential extractions. The average PM2.5 concentration was 3.4 times higher during haze-fog (96-518 μg/m(3)) than non-haze fog periods (49-142 μg/m(3)). Nearly all elements showed significantly higher concentrations during haze-fog than non-haze fog periods. Zn, As, Pb, Cd, Mo and Cu were considered to have higher bioavailability and enrichment degree in the atmosphere. Highly bioavailable fractions of elements were associated with high temperatures. The integrated carcinogenic risk for two possible scenarios to individuals exposed to metals was higher than the accepted criterion of 10(-6), whereas noncarcinogenic risk was lower than the safe level of 1. Residents of a city burdened with haze will incur health risks caused by exposure to airborne metals. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. GLOBAL WARMING BETWEEN SCIENCE AND POLITICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugen Străuțiu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available During the last three decades, the scientific theory of global warming has become a political ideology. Significant political components are found both in the premises and (especially in the consequences. But witnessed also at least a decade of negationism: global warming research programs are questionable regarding methodology and the ethics of research. Face to all contestations, “Global warming theory” has already become “Global climate change theory”. It is true that global warming ideology preparing a global governing over a strictly limited number of people?

  10. Attribution of the United States “warming hole”: Aerosol indirect effect and precipitable water vapor

    OpenAIRE

    Shaocai Yu; Kiran Alapaty; Rohit Mathur; Jonathan Pleim; Yuanhang Zhang; Chris Nolte; Brian Eder; Kristen Foley; Tatsuya Nagashima

    2014-01-01

    Aerosols can influence the climate indirectly by acting as cloud condensation nuclei and/or ice nuclei, thereby modifying cloud optical properties. In contrast to the widespread global warming, the central and south central United States display a noteworthy overall cooling trend during the 20th century, with an especially striking cooling trend in summertime daily maximum temperature (Tmax) (termed the U.S. “warming hole”). Here we used observations of temperature, shortwave cloud forcing (S...

  11. Automobility: Global Warming as Symptomatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary Backhaus

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The argument of this paper is that sustainability requires a new worldview-paradigm. It critically evaluates Gore’s liberal-based environmentalism in order to show how “shallow ecologies” are called into question by deeper ecologies. This analysis leads to the notion that global warming is better understood as a symptom indicative of the worldview that is the source for environmental crises. Heidegger’s ontological hermeneutics and its critique of modern technology show that the modern worldview involves an enframing (a totalizing technological ordering of the natural. Enframing reveals entities as standing reserve (on demand energy suppliers. My thesis maintains that enframing is geographically expressed as automobility. Because of the energy needs used to maintain automobility, reaching the goal of sustainability requires rethinking the spatial organization of life as a function of stored energy technologies.

  12. Warm liquid calorimetry for LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Geulig,E; Wallraff,W; Bézaguet, Alain-Arthur; Cavanna, F; Cinnini, P; Cittolin, Sergio; Dreesen, P; Demoulin, M; Dunps, L; Fucci, A; Gallay, G; Givernaud, Alain; Gonidec, A; Jank, Werner; Maurin, Guy; Placci, Alfredo; Porte, J P; Radermacher, E; Samyn, D; Schinzel, D; Schmidt, W F; CERN. Geneva. Detector Research and Development Committee

    1990-01-01

    Results from the beam tests of the U/TMP "warm liquid" calorimeter show that such a technique is very promising for the LHC. Our aim is to extend this programme and design a calorimeter that can satisfy the requirements of high rates, high radiation levels, compensation, uniformity and granularity, as well as fully contain hadronic showers. We propose to construct liquid ionization chambers operated at very high fields, capable of collecting the total charge produced by ionizing particles within times comparable to the bunch crossing time of the future Collider. For this reason we plan to extend the current programme on tetramethylpentane (TMP) to tetramethylsilane (TMSi). An electromagnetic calorimeter consisting of very high field ionization chambers filled with TMSi as sensitive medium with Uranium and/or other high density material as absorber will first be built (to be followed by a full-scale calorimeter module), on which newly designed fast amplifiers and readout electronics will be tested. In addition...

  13. DPIS for warm dense matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kondo, K.; Kanesue, T.; Horioka, K.; Okamura, M.

    2010-05-23

    Warm Dense Matter (WDM) offers an challenging problem because WDM, which is beyond ideal plasma, is in a low temperature and high density state with partially degenerate electrons and coupled ions. WDM is a common state of matter in astrophysical objects such as cores of giant planets and white dwarfs. The WDM studies require large energy deposition into a small target volume in a shorter time than the hydrodynamical time and need uniformity across the full thickness of the target. Since moderate energy ion beams ({approx} 0.3 MeV/u) can be useful tool for WDM physics, we propose WDM generation using Direct Plasma Injection Scheme (DPIS). In the DPIS, laser ion source is connected to the Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) linear accelerator directly without the beam transport line. DPIS with a realistic final focus and a linear accelerator can produce WDM.

  14. Predicting the efficacy of convection warming in anaesthetized children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanger, R; Colyvas, K; Cassey, J G; Robinson, I A; Armstrong, P

    2009-08-01

    We previously described a convection warming technique (Cassey J, Armstrong P, Smith GE, Farrell PT. Paediatr Anaesth 2006; 16: 654-62). This study further analyses the children in that original study with three aims: (i) to investigate factors purported to influence children's heating rates, (ii) to describe the most effective usage of this warming technique, and (iii) to understand better the physiology of convection warming. Children having anaesthesia for elective surgery lasting longer than 90 min in ambient temperature 21 degrees C were warmed by a 'Bair Hugger' attached to a custom-built heat dissipation unit. Relationships between child and procedure characteristics and various thermal measures were analysed, and a thermodynamic model was evaluated. Thirty-nine children (aged 2 days to 12.5 yr) were studied. There were statistically significant correlations between a number of factors (e.g. height and weight) and heating efficacy. Our model demonstrated the impact of changing patient characteristics on temperature profiles. Neither the morphological characteristics nor our model could predict an individual's T(core) behaviour. (i) Although the effectiveness of this warming technique is influenced by patient/procedure characteristics, these do not predict normothermia (uncertainty +/-28 min). Effectiveness is independent of simple thermal measures. (ii) Previously described measures of vasoconstriction are not valid in children. (iii) Our model shows children's thermal properties change with their T(core). However, key factors are unknown for an individual and our model does not predict heating efficacy. (iv) To minimize the risk of hyperthermia, we recommend continuous measurement of T(core) during convection heating. The device air temperature should be turned to medium (38 degrees C) as T(core) approaches 37 degrees C.

  15. Design and performance of combined infrared canopy and belowground warming in the B4WarmED (Boreal Forest Warming at an Ecotone in Danger) experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, Roy L; Stefanski, Artur; Montgomery, Rebecca A; Hobbie, Sarah E; Kimball, Bruce A; Reich, Peter B

    2015-06-01

    Conducting manipulative climate change experiments in complex vegetation is challenging, given considerable temporal and spatial heterogeneity. One specific challenge involves warming of both plants and soils to depth. We describe the design and performance of an open-air warming experiment called Boreal Forest Warming at an Ecotone in Danger (B4WarmED) that addresses the potential for projected climate warming to alter tree function, species composition, and ecosystem processes at the boreal-temperate ecotone. The experiment includes two forested sites in northern Minnesota, USA, with plots in both open (recently clear-cut) and closed canopy habitats, where seedlings of 11 tree species were planted into native ground vegetation. Treatments include three target levels of plant canopy and soil warming (ambient, +1.7°C, +3.4°C). Warming was achieved by independent feedback control of voltage input to aboveground infrared heaters and belowground buried resistance heating cables in each of 72-7.0 m(2) plots. The treatments emulated patterns of observed diurnal, seasonal, and annual temperatures but with superimposed warming. For the 2009 to 2011 field seasons, we achieved temperature elevations near our targets with growing season overall mean differences (∆Tbelow ) of +1.84°C and +3.66°C at 10 cm soil depth and (∆T(above) ) of +1.82°C and +3.45°C for the plant canopies. We also achieved measured soil warming to at least 1 m depth. Aboveground treatment stability and control were better during nighttime than daytime and in closed vs. open canopy sites in part due to calmer conditions. Heating efficacy in open canopy areas was reduced with increasing canopy complexity and size. Results of this study suggest the warming approach is scalable: it should work well in small-statured vegetation such as grasslands, desert, agricultural crops, and tree saplings (<5 m tall). © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Efficient Warm-ups: Creating a Warm-up That Works.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauffenburger, Sandra Kay

    1992-01-01

    Proper warm-up is important for any activity, but designing an effective warm-up can be time consuming. An alternative approach is to take a cue from Laban Movement Analysis (LMA) and consider movement design from the perspective of space and planes of motion. Efficient warm-up exercises using LMA are described. (SM)

  17. Oxygen Isotopic Composition of Nitrate and Sulfate in Fog and River water in Podocarpus National Forest, Ecuador

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brothers, L. A.; Fabian, P.; Thiemens, M. H.

    2006-12-01

    The eastern slopes of the Andean rainforests of Ecuador possess some of the highest plant biodiversity found on the planet; however, these ecosystems are in jeopardy because region is experiences one of the highest deforestation rates in South America. This rainforest characterized by high acidity and low nutrient soils and experiences natural process which are both destabilizing and stabilizing to biodiversity rendering this a unique, though sensitive environment. There is increased concern that anthropogenic activities are affecting rainforests and could lead to higher extinction rates, changes in the biodiversity and far reaching effects on the global troposphere. Measurements of nitrate and sulfate in rain and fog water have shown periods of elevated concentrations in the Podocarpus National Park near Loja, Ecuador. These high episodes contribute to annual deposition rates that are comparable to polluted central Europe. Significant anthropogenic sources near this region are lacking and it is believed that the majority of the nitrate and sulfate pollution can be attributed to biomass burning in the Amazon basin. Concentration measurements do not elucidate the source of high nitrate and sulfate pollution; however, by measuring all three stable isotopes of oxygen in nitrate and sulfate from fog and river water provides a new way to examine the impacts of biomass burning on the region. By using stable isotope techniques atmospheric nitrate and sulfate can be resolved from terrestrial sources. This provides an unique way to trace the contributions from the biomass burning and farming sources. Current research at the field station monitors sulfate and nitrate concentrations in rain and fog water by standard methods to investigate water and nutrient pathways along with data from satellite and ground based remote sensing, in-situ observations and numerical models.

  18. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) associated with PM2.5within boundary layer: Cloud/fog and regional transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Minmin; Wang, Yan; Li, Hongli; Li, Tao; Nie, Xiaoling; Cao, Fangfang; Yang, Fengchun; Wang, Zhe; Wang, Tao; Qie, Guanghao; Jin, Tong; Du, Lili; Wang, Wenxing

    2018-01-31

    A study of PM 2.5 -associated PAHs analysis at Mount Lushan (1165m) was conducted to investigate the distributions of PAHs in PM 2.5 and influences of cloud/fog. The main purpose was to quantify the main emission sources of PAHs and estimate regional transport effects within the boundary layer. Mount Lushan is located between the boundary layer and troposphere, which is an ideal site for atmosphere transport investigation. The concentrations of PAHs in PM 2.5 were analyzed with GC-MS. The results showed that the volume concentration was 6.98ng/m 3 with a range from 1.47 to 25.17ng/m 3 and PAHs mass were 160.24μg/g (from 63.86 to 427.97μg/g) during the sampling time at Mount Lushan. The dominant compounds are BbF, Pyr and BP. In terms of aromatic-ring PAHs distributions, 4-6-ring PAHs are predominant, indicating that the high-ring PAHs tend to contribute more than low-ring PAHs in particulates. Due to frequent cloud/fog days at Mount Lushan, PAHs concentrations in the PM 2.5 were determined before and after cloud/fog weather. The results demonstrated that the cloud/fog and rain conditions cause lower PAHs levels. Regression analysis was used for studying the relationship of PAHs distributions with meteorological conditions like temperature, humidity and wind. The results showed that the temperature and wind speed were inversely related with PAHs concentration but humidity had no significant relationship. Furthermore, backward trajectories and PCA combined with DR (diagnostic ratio analysis) were employed to identify the influences of regional transport and main emission sources. The results revealed that PAHs in PM 2.5 were mainly affected by regional transport with the main emissions by mobile vehicle and steel industry, which contributed about 56.0% to the total PAHs in the area of Mount Lushan. In addition, backward trajectories revealed that the dominant air masses were from the northwest accounting for about one third of total PAHs. Copyright © 2018

  19. Software é desenvolvido, e não fabricado como geladeira e fogão - Gerenciamento é essencial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Mendes Silva Filho

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Software não é fabricado como geladeira e fogão que são montados. Software é um produto desenvolvido, de modo sistemático, através de um conjunto de atividades bem definidas, seguindo a execução disciplinada do gerenciamento de projeto. Software requer um processo de desenvolvimento e não um processo de ‘fabricação’, implicando que ele exigirá o uso da engenharia de software. Nesse sentido, este artigo explora a importancia da estimativa de tamanho de projeto para o desenvolvimento de software.

  20. Peripheral refraction and higher-order aberrations with cycloplegia and fogging lenses using the BHVI-EyeMapper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakaraju, Ravi Chandra; Fedtke, Cathleen; Ehrmann, Klaus; Falk, Darrin; Thomas, Varghese; Holden, Brien Anthony

    2016-01-01

    To determine if a fogging lens ameliorates accommodative effects driven by the closed-view design of the BHVI-EyeMapper (EM) instrument. We compared cycloplegic refraction and higher-order aberration measurements of the EM with those obtained with a fogging lens. Twenty-six, young, participants (15F, 25±5 years, range: 18-35 years, SE: +0.25 D and -3.50 D) with good ocular health were recruited. Five independent measurements of on- and off-axis refraction and higher-order aberrations were recorded across the horizontal visual field, under two conditions: non-cycloplegic measurements with +1.00 D fogging lens and cycloplegia, always in the same sequence. The contralateral eye was occluded during the measurements. Two drops of 1% Tropicamide delivered within 5 min facilitated cycloplegic measurements. All participants were refracted 30 min after installation of the second drop. Mean spherical equivalent measures of the non-cycloplegic condition were significantly more myopic than their cycloplegic counterparts (p<0.05); approximately by 0.50 D centrally, increasing to 1.00 D towards the periphery. The horizontal astigmatic component, J180, demonstrated small but statistically significant differences between the test conditions. Differences were predominant for eccentricities greater than 30°, in both nasal and temporal meridians. The oblique astigmatic component, J45, was not significantly different between the test conditions. The primary spherical aberration coefficient C(4, 0) was significantly less positive for the non-cycloplegic state than its cycloplegic counterpart. This result held true across the entire horizontal visual field. The horizontal coma and trefoil coefficients C(3, 1) and C(3, 3) were not significantly different between the two conditions. The use of +1.00 D fogging lens without cycloplegia did not provide complete relaxation of accommodation. The discrepancies between cycloplegic and non-cycloplegic EM measurements were found to be more

  1. Peripheral refraction and higher-order aberrations with cycloplegia and fogging lenses using the BHVI-EyeMapper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakaraju, Ravi Chandra; Fedtke, Cathleen; Ehrmann, Klaus; Falk, Darrin; Thomas, Varghese; Holden, Brien Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine if a fogging lens ameliorates accommodative effects driven by the closed-view design of the BHVI-EyeMapper (EM) instrument. We compared cycloplegic refraction and higher-order aberration measurements of the EM with those obtained with a fogging lens. Methods Twenty-six, young, participants (15F, 25 ± 5 years, range: 18–35 years, SE: +0.25 D and −3.50 D) with good ocular health were recruited. Five independent measurements of on- and off-axis refraction and higher-order aberrations were recorded across the horizontal visual field, under two conditions: non-cycloplegic measurements with +1.00 D fogging lens and cycloplegia, always in the same sequence. The contralateral eye was occluded during the measurements. Two drops of 1% Tropicamide delivered within 5 min facilitated cycloplegic measurements. All participants were refracted 30 min after installation of the second drop. Results Mean spherical equivalent measures of the non-cycloplegic condition were significantly more myopic than their cycloplegic counterparts (p < 0.05); approximately by 0.50 D centrally, increasing to 1.00 D towards the periphery. The horizontal astigmatic component, J180, demonstrated small but statistically significant differences between the test conditions. Differences were predominant for eccentricities greater than 30°, in both nasal and temporal meridians. The oblique astigmatic component, J45, was not significantly different between the test conditions. The primary spherical aberration coefficient C(4, 0) was significantly less positive for the non-cycloplegic state than its cycloplegic counterpart. This result held true across the entire horizontal visual field. The horizontal coma and trefoil coefficients C(3, 1) and C(3, 3) were not significantly different between the two conditions. Conclusions The use of +1.00 D fogging lens without cycloplegia did not provide complete relaxation of accommodation. The discrepancies between cycloplegic and non

  2. Global Warming: Lessons from Ozone Depletion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobson, Art

    2010-01-01

    My teaching and textbook have always covered many physics-related social issues, including stratospheric ozone depletion and global warming. The ozone saga is an inspiring good-news story that's instructive for solving the similar but bigger problem of global warming. Thus, as soon as students in my physics literacy course at the University of…

  3. Strategies for mitigation of global warming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, Niels I

    2009-01-01

    The paper analyses the international negotions on climate change leading up to COP15 in Copenhagen. Supplementary policies for mitigation of global warming are proposed.......The paper analyses the international negotions on climate change leading up to COP15 in Copenhagen. Supplementary policies for mitigation of global warming are proposed....

  4. Exploring the Sociopolitical Dimensions of Global Warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadler, Troy D.; Klosterman, Michelle L.

    2009-01-01

    The authors present an activity to help high school students conceptualize the sociopolitical complexity of global warming through an exploration of varied perspectives on the issue. They argue that socioscientific issues such as global warming present important contexts for learning science and that the social and political dimensions of these…

  5. Awareness And Perception of Global Warming Among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUND: Increase in the emission of green house gases and the attendant climatic changes have led to the phenomenon of global warming with all its catastrophic consequences. OBJECTIVE: To assess knowledge and perception of the concept of global warming among undergraduate medical students

  6. National Security Implications of Global Warming Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    Although numerous historical examples demonstrate how actual climate change has contributed to the rise and fall of powers, global warming , in and of...become convinced that global warming is universally bad and humans are the primary cause, political leaders may develop ill-advised policies restricting

  7. Warming of Water in a Glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulins, Paulis; Krauze, Armands; Ozolinsh, Maris; Muiznieks, Andris

    2016-01-01

    The article focuses on the process of water warming from 0 °C in a glass. An experiment is performed that analyzes the temperature in the top and bottom layers of water during warming. The experimental equipment is very simple and can be easily set up using devices available in schools. The temperature curves obtained from the experiment help us…

  8. Global warming: Evidence from satellite observations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Prabhakara, C; Iacovazzi, R; Yoo, J.‐M; Dalu, G

    2000-01-01

    ...‐weighted global‐mean temperature of the atmosphere, with a peak weight near the mid troposphere, warmed at the rate of 0.13±0.05 Kdecade −1 during 1980 to 1999. The global warming deduced from conventional meteorological data that have been corrected for urbanization effects agrees reasonably with this satellite‐deduced result.

  9. Global Warming: How Much and Why?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanouette, William

    1990-01-01

    Summarizes the history of the study of global warming and includes a discussion of the role of gases, like carbon dioxide, methane, and chlorofluorocarbon (CFC). Discusses modern research on the global warming, including computer modelling and the super-greenhouse effect. (YP)

  10. Turkish Students' Ideas about Global Warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilinc, Ahmet; Stanisstreet, Martin; Boyes, Edward

    2008-01-01

    A questionnaire was used to explore the prevalence of ideas about global warming in Year 10 (age 15-16 years) school students in Turkey. The frequencies of individual scientific ideas and misconceptions about the causes, consequences and "cures" of global warming were identified. In addition, several general findings emerged from this…

  11. Global warming and nuclear power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodgson, P.E. [Nuclear and Particle Physics Laboratory, Department of Physics, Oxford Univ., Oxford (United Kingdom)

    1999-09-01

    The concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere is steadily increasing and it is widely believed that this will lead to global warming that will have serious consequences for life on earth. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change has estimated that the temperature of the earth will increase by between 1 and 3.5 degrees in the next century. This will melt some of the Antarctic ice cap, raise the sea level and flood many low-lying countries, and also produce unpredictable changes in the earth's climate. The possible ways of reducing carbon dioxide emission are discussed. It is essential to reduce the burning of fossil fuels, but then how are we to obtain the energy we need? We can try to reduce energy use, but we will still need to generate large amounts energy. Some possible ways of doing this are by using wind and solar generators, by hydroelectric and tidal plants, and also by nuclear power. These possibilities will be critically examined. (author)

  12. Warm antibody autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalfa, Theodosia A

    2016-12-02

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is a rare and heterogeneous disease that affects 1 to 3/100 000 patients per year. AIHA caused by warm autoantibodies (w-AIHA), ie, antibodies that react with their antigens on the red blood cell optimally at 37°C, is the most common type, comprising ∼70% to 80% of all adult cases and ∼50% of pediatric cases. About half of the w-AIHA cases are called primary because no specific etiology can be found, whereas the rest are secondary to other recognizable underlying disorders. This review will focus on the postulated immunopathogenetic mechanisms in idiopathic and secondary w-AIHA and report on the rare cases of direct antiglobulin test-negative AIHA, which are even more likely to be fatal because of inherent characteristics of the causative antibodies, as well as because of delays in diagnosis and initiation of appropriate treatment. Then, the characteristics of w-AIHA associated with genetically defined immune dysregulation disorders and special considerations on its management will be discussed. Finally, the standard treatment options and newer therapeutic approaches for this chronic autoimmune blood disorder will be reviewed. © 2016 by The American Society of Hematology. All rights reserved.

  13. Secure Threat Information Exchange across the Internet of Things for Cyber Defense in a Fog Computing Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihai-Gabriel IONITA

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Threat information exchange is a critical part of any security system. Decisions regarding security are taken with more confidence and with more results when the whole security context is known. The fog computing paradigm enhances the use cases of the already used cloud computing systems by bringing all the needed resources to the end-users towards the edge of the network. While fog decentralizes the cloud, it is very important to correlate security events which happen in branch offices around the globe for correct and timely decisions. In this article, we propose an infrastructure based on custom locally installed OSSEC agents which communicate with a central AlienVault deployment for event correlation. The agents are based on a neural network which takes actions based on risk assessment inspired by the human immune system. All of the threat information is defined by STIX expressions and a TAXII server can share this information with foreign organizations. The proposed implementation can successfully be implemented in an IoT scenario, with added security for the “brownfiled” devices.

  14. On the origin and meaning of the German word Luft and some meteorological terms concerning atmospheric water, especially fog

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Möller, Detlev

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The English and French word “air” is derived from the Latin aer, which comes from the Greek άήρ. In contrast, the German word “Luft” is a common Proto-Germanic word; in Old English “ lift” and “ lyft”. The word Luft (also Danish, Swedish and Norwegian is associated with brightness; the German Licht (light, an air (in an atmospheric sense without fog or clouds. Air and water were originally “elements” in ancient Greek and were transmutable; they represented two kinds of the “ layer of mist” (atmosphere. Dark or thick air was mist or cloud, hiding the gods (who lived in the upper air or sky; the aether. Different terms are presented that describe fog and clouds in connection with the history of the process of understanding. Finally, the word Luft (air as a term for gaseous chemical compounds (“kinds of gases” is discussed. In addition to the German, all terms are given in Greek, Latin, English and French .

  15. Cross stratum resources protection in fog-computing-based radio over fiber networks for 5G services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Shaoyong; Shao, Sujie; Wang, Yao; Yang, Hui

    2017-09-01

    In order to meet the requirement of internet of things (IoT) and 5G, the cloud radio access network is a paradigm which converges all base stations computational resources into a cloud baseband unit (BBU) pool, while the distributed radio frequency signals are collected by remote radio head (RRH). A precondition for centralized processing in the BBU pool is an interconnection fronthaul network with high capacity and low delay. However, it has become more complex and frequent in the interaction between RRH and BBU and resource scheduling among BBUs in cloud. Cloud radio over fiber network has been proposed in our previous work already. In order to overcome the complexity and latency, in this paper, we first present a novel cross stratum resources protection (CSRP) architecture in fog-computing-based radio over fiber networks (F-RoFN) for 5G services. Additionally, a cross stratum protection (CSP) scheme considering the network survivability is introduced in the proposed architecture. The CSRP with CSP scheme can effectively pull the remote processing resource locally to implement the cooperative radio resource management, enhance the responsiveness and resilience to the dynamic end-to-end 5G service demands, and globally optimize optical network, wireless and fog resources. The feasibility and efficiency of the proposed architecture with CSP scheme are verified on our software defined networking testbed in terms of service latency, transmission success rate, resource occupation rate and blocking probability.

  16. Effect of cerium conversion of A3xx.x/SiCp composites surfaces on salt fog corrosion behaviour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pardo, A.; Merino, M.C.; Arrabal, R.; Viejo, F.; Carboneras, M.; Coy, A.E. [Departamento de Ciencia de Materiales, Facultad de Quimica, Universidad Complutense, 28040, Madrid (Spain); Merino, S. [Departamento de Tecnologia Industrial, Universidad Alfonso X El Sabio, 28691, Villanueva de la Canada, Madrid (Spain)

    2004-07-01

    A study of the effect of cerium conversion treatment on surface of four composites (A360/SiC/10p, A360/SiC/20p, A380/SiC/10p, A380/SiC/20p) on their salt fog corrosion behaviour was performed. The conversion treatment was carried out using thermal activated full immersion in Ce(III) aqueous solutions. The matrix of A360/SiC/xxp composites is virtually free of Cu while the A380/SiC/xxp matrix contains 1.39-1.44 wt.%Ni and 3.13-3.45 wt.%Cu. Conversion performance was evaluated in neutral salt fog environment according to ASTM B117. The kinetics of the corrosion process were studied on the basis of gravimetric tests. The influence of SiCp proportion and matrix composition was evaluated and the nature of corrosion products was analysed by SEM and low angle XRD before and after accelerated testing to determine the influence of microstructural changes on corrosion behaviour during exposure to the corrosive environment. The Ce(III) precipitates on the cathodic sites, mainly on the intermetallic compounds, decreased both the cathodic current density and the corrosion rate of the composites tested. The presence of Cu in the matrix composition increased the corrosion rate, due to the galvanic couple Al/Cu. (authors)

  17. Functional traits variation explains the distribution of Aextoxicon punctatum (Aextoxicaceae in pronounced moisture gradients within fog-dependent forest fragments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz eSalgado-Negret

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Climate change and fragmentation are major threats to world forests. Understanding how functional traits related to drought tolerance change across small-scale, pronounced moisture gradients in fragmented forests is important to predict species’ responses to these threats. In the case of Aextoxicon punctatum, a dominant canopy tree in fog-dependent rain forest patches in semiarid Chile, we explored how the magnitude, variability and correlation patterns of leaf and xylem vessel traits and hydraulic conductivity varied across soil moisture gradients established within and among forest patches of different size, which are associated with differences in tree establishment and mortality patterns. Leaf traits varied across soil-moisture gradients produced by fog interception. Trees growing at drier leeward edges showed higher LMA (leaf mass per area, trichome and stomatal density than trees from the wetter core and windward zones. In contrast, xylem vessel traits (vessels diameter and density did not vary producing loss of hydraulic conductivity at drier leeward edges. We also detected higher levels of phenotypic integration and variability at leeward edges. The ability of A. punctatum to modify leaf traits in response to differences in soil moisture availability established over short distances (<500 m facilitates its persistence in contrasting microhabitats within forest patches. However, xylem anatomy showed limited plasticity, which increases cavitation risk at leeward edges. Greater patch fragmentation, together with fluctuations in irradiance and soil moisture in small patches, could result in higher risk of drought-related tree mortality, with profound impacts on hydrological balances at the ecosystem scale.

  18. Relative roles of differential SST warming, uniform SST warming and land surface warming in determining the Walker circulation changes under global warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Li, Tim

    2017-02-01

    Most of CMIP5 models projected a weakened Walker circulation in tropical Pacific, but what causes such change is still an open question. By conducting idealized numerical simulations separating the effects of the spatially uniform sea surface temperature (SST) warming, extra land surface warming and differential SST warming, we demonstrate that the weakening of the Walker circulation is attributed to the western North Pacific (WNP) monsoon and South America land effects. The effect of the uniform SST warming is through so-called "richest-get-richer" mechanism. In response to a uniform surface warming, the WNP monsoon is enhanced by competing moisture with other large-scale convective branches. The strengthened WNP monsoon further induces surface westerlies in the equatorial western-central Pacific, weakening the Walker circulation. The increase of the greenhouse gases leads to a larger land surface warming than ocean surface. As a result, a greater thermal contrast occurs between American Continent and equatorial Pacific. The so-induced zonal pressure gradient anomaly forces low-level westerly anomalies over the equatorial eastern Pacific and weakens the Walker circulation. The differential SST warming also plays a role in driving low-level westerly anomalies over tropical Pacific. But such an effect involves a positive air-sea feedback that amplifies the weakening of both east-west SST gradient and Pacific trade winds.

  19. Herbivory enables marine communities to resist warming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordas, Rebecca L; Donohue, Ian; Harley, Christopher D G

    2017-10-01

    Climate change can influence ecosystems via both direct effects on individual organisms and indirect effects mediated by species interactions. However, we understand little about how these changes will ripple through ecosystems or whether there are particular ecological characteristics that might make ecosystems more susceptible-or more resistant-to warming. By combining in situ experimental warming with herbivore manipulations in a natural rocky intertidal community for over 16 months, we show that herbivory regulates the capacity of marine communities to resist warming. We found that limpet herbivores helped to preserve trophic and competitive interactions under experimental warming, dampening the impact of warming on overall community composition. The presence of limpets facilitated the survival of the main habitat modifier (barnacles) under warmer conditions, which, in turn, facilitated the presence of a consumer guild. When limpets were removed, environmental warming altered trophic, competitive, and facilitative interactions, with cascading impacts on community succession and stability. We conclude that conserving trophic structure and the integrity of interaction networks is vitally important as Earth continues to warm.

  20. Evaluating the capabilities and uncertainties of droplet measurements for the fog droplet spectrometer (FM-100

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. K. Spiegel

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Droplet size spectra measurements are crucial to obtain a quantitative microphysical description of clouds and fog. However, cloud droplet size measurements are subject to various uncertainties. This work focuses on the error analysis of two key measurement uncertainties arising during cloud droplet size measurements with a conventional droplet size spectrometer (FM-100: first, we addressed the precision with which droplets can be sized with the FM-100 on the basis of the Mie theory. We deduced error assumptions and proposed a new method on how to correct measured size distributions for these errors by redistributing the measured droplet size distribution using a stochastic approach. Second, based on a literature study, we summarized corrections for particle losses during sampling with the FM-100. We applied both corrections to cloud droplet size spectra measured at the high alpine site Jungfraujoch for a temperature range from 0 °C to 11 °C. We showed that Mie scattering led to spikes in the droplet size distributions using the default sizing procedure, while the new stochastic approach reproduced the ambient size distribution adequately. A detailed analysis of the FM-100 sampling efficiency revealed that particle losses were typically below 10% for droplet diameters up to 10 μm. For larger droplets, particle losses can increase up to 90% for the largest droplets of 50 μm at ambient wind speeds below 4.4 m s−1 and even to >90% for larger angles between the instrument orientation and the wind vector (sampling angle at higher wind speeds. Comparisons of the FM-100 to other reference instruments revealed that the total liquid water content (LWC measured by the FM-100 was more sensitive to particle losses than to re-sizing based on Mie scattering, while the total number concentration was only marginally influenced by particle losses. Consequently, for further LWC measurements with the FM-100 we strongly recommend to consider (1 the

  1. On the influence of atmospheric super-saturation layer on China's heavy haze-fog events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jizhi; Yang, Yuanqin; Zhang, Xiaoye; Liu, Hua; Che, Huizheng; Shen, Xiaojing; Wang, Yaqiang

    2017-12-01

    With the background of global change, the air quality in Earth's atmosphere has significantly decreased. The North China Plain (NCP), Yangtze River Delta (YRD), Pearl River Delta (PRD) and Si-Chuan Basin (SCB) are the major areas suffering the decreasing air quality and frequent pollution events in recent years. Studying the effect of meteorological conditions on the concentration of pollution aerosols in these pollution sensitive regions is a hot focus now. This paper analyses the characteristics of atmospheric super-saturation and the corresponding H_PMLs (height of supersaturated pollution mixing layer), investigating their contribution to the frequently-seen heavy haze-fog weather. The results suggest that: (1) in the above-mentioned pollution sensitive regions in China, super-saturated layers repeatedly appear in the low altitude and the peak value of supersaturation S can reach 6-10%, which makes pollution particles into the wet adiabatic uplift process in the stable-static atmosphere. After low-level atmosphere reaches the super-saturation state below the H_PMLs, meteorological condition contributes to humidification and condensation of pollution particles. (2) Caculation of condensation function Fc, one of PLAM sensetive parameter, indicates that super-saturation state helps promote condensation, beneficial to the formation of Condensational Kink (CK) in the pollution sensitive areas. This favors the formation of new aerosol particles and intensities the cumulative growth of aerosol concentration. (3) By calculating the convective inhibition energy on average │CIN│ > 1.0 × 104 J kg-1, we found the value is about 100 times higher than the stable critical value. The uplifting diffusion of the particles is inhibited by the ambient airflow. So, this is the important reason for the aggravation and persistence of aerosol pollutants in local areas. (4) H_PMLs is negatively correlated to the pollution meteorological condition index PLAM which can describe the

  2. Urban warming reduces aboveground carbon storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meineke, Emily; Youngsteadt, Elsa; Dunn, Robert Roberdeau

    2016-01-01

    sequestration (carbon stored per year) of mature trees. Urban warming increased herbivorous arthropod abundance on trees, but these herbivores had negligible effects on tree carbon sequestration. Instead, urban warming was associated with an estimated 12% loss of carbon sequestration, in part because...... photosynthesis was reduced at hotter sites. Ecosystem service assessments that do not consider urban conditions may overestimate urban tree carbon storage. Because urban and global warming are becoming more intense, our results suggest that urban trees will sequester even less carbon in the future....

  3. Common Warm Dust Temperatures Around Main Sequence Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Farisa; Rieke, George; Werner, Michael; Stapelfeldt, Karl; Bryden, Geoffrey; Su, Kate

    2011-01-01

    We compare the properties of warm dust emission from a sample of main-sequence A-type stars (B8-A7) to those of dust around solar-type stars (F5-KO) with similar Spitzer Space Telescope Infrared Spectrograph/MIPS data and similar ages. Both samples include stars with sources with infrared spectral energy distributions that show evidence of multiple components. Over the range of stellar types considered, we obtain nearly the same characteristic dust temperatures (∼ 190 K and ∼60 K for the inner and outer dust components, respectively)-slightly above the ice evaporation temperature for the inner belts. The warm inner dust temperature is readily explained if populations of small grains are being released by sublimation of ice from icy planetesimals. Evaporation of low-eccentricity icy bodies at ∼ 150 K can deposit particles into an inner/warm belt, where the small grains are heated to dust Temperatures of -190 K. Alternatively, enhanced collisional processing of an asteroid belt-like system of parent planetesimals just interior to the snow line may account for the observed uniformity in dust temperature. The similarity in temperature of the warmer dust across our B8-KO stellar sample strongly suggests that dust-producing planetesimals are not found at similar radial locations around all stars, but that dust production is favored at a characteristic temperature horizon.

  4. Global Warming in the 21st Century: An Alternate Scenario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, James E.; Sato, Makiko; Ruedy, Reto; Lacis, Andrew; Oinas, Valdar

    2000-01-01

    A common view is that the current global warming rate will continue or accelerate. But we argue that rapid warming in recent decades has been driven by non-CO2 greenhouse gases (GHGs), such as CFCs, CH4 and N2O, not by the products of fossil fuel burning, CO2 and aerosols, whose positive and negative climate forcings are partially offsetting. The growth rate of non-CO2 GHGs has declined in the past decade. If sources of CH4 and O3 precursors were reduced in the future, the change of climate forcing by non-CO2 GHGs In the next 50 years could be near zero. Combined with a reduction of black carbon emissions and plausible success in slowing CO2 emissions, this could lead to a decline in the rate of global warming, reducing the danger of dramatic climate change. Such a focus on air pollution has practical benefits that unite the interests of developed and developing countries. However, assessment of ongoing and future climate change requires composition-specific longterm global monitoring of aerosol properties.

  5. Experimental warming differentially affects microbial structure and activity in two contrasted moisture sites in a Sphagnum-dominated peatland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delarue, Frédéric; Buttler, Alexandre; Bragazza, Luca; Grasset, Laurent; Jassey, Vincent E J; Gogo, Sébastien; Laggoun-Défarge, Fatima

    2015-04-01

    Several studies on the impact of climate warming have indicated that peat decomposition/mineralization will be enhanced. Most of these studies deal with the impact of experimental warming during summer when prevalent abiotic conditions are favorable to decomposition. Here, we investigated the effect of experimental air warming by open-top chambers (OTCs) on water-extractable organic matter (WEOM), microbial biomasses and enzymatic activities in two contrasted moisture sites named Bog and Fen sites, the latter considered as the wetter ones. While no or few changes in peat temperature and water content appeared under the overall effect of OTCs, we observed that air warming smoothed water content differences and led to a decrease in mean peat temperature at the warmed Bog sites. This thermal discrepancy between the two sites led to contrasting changes in microbial structure and activities: a rise in hydrolytic activity at the warmed Bog sites and a relative enhancement of bacterial biomass at the warmed Fen sites. These features were not associated with any change in WEOM properties namely carbon and sugar contents and aromaticity, suggesting that air warming did not trigger any shift in OM decomposition. Using various tools, we show that the use of single indicators of OM decomposition can lead to fallacious conclusions. Lastly, these patterns may change seasonally as a consequence of complex interactions between groundwater level and air warming, suggesting the need to improve our knowledge using a high time-resolution approach. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Generation and characterisation of warm dense matter with intense lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, D.

    2018-01-01

    In this paper I discuss the subject of warm dense matter (WDM), which, apart from being of academic interest and relevant to inertial fusion capsules, is a subject of importance to those who wish to understand the formation and structure of planetary interiors and other astrophysical bodies. I broadly outline some key properties of WDM and go on to discuss various methods of generating samples in the laboratory using large laser facilities and outline some common techniques of diagnosis. It is not intended as a comprehensive review but rather a brief outline for scientists new to the field and those with an interest but not working in the field directly.

  7. Ground ULV and thermal fog applications against Phlebotomine sand fly vectors of Leishmania in a hot arid environment in western Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phlebotomine sand fly vectors of Leishmania continue to threaten US military operations in Africa, Southwest Asia, and the Middle East. Ultra-low volume (ULV) and/or thermal fog pesticide dispersal are potentially effective against sand flies, but operational guidance is thinly based on mosquito con...

  8. Evaluation of ultra low volume and thermal fog pesticide applications against Old World Phlebotomine sand fly vectors of Leishmania in Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    One component of the Department of Defense (DoD) pest management system is ultra-low volume (ULV) and/or thermal fog aerosol pesticide application. Despite widespread implementations of this and other components of the system, such as use of repellents and permethrin, US military operations in hot-a...

  9. Methods for Assessing the Impact of Fog Oil Smoke on Availability, Palatability, & Food Quality of Relevant Life Stages of Insects for Threatened and Endangered Species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Driver, Crystal J.; Strenge, Dennis L.; Su, Yin-Fong; Cullinan, Valerie I.; Herrington, Ricky S.; Saunders, Danielle L.; Rogers, Lee E.

    2007-04-01

    A methodology for quantifying population dynamics and food source value of insect fauna in areas subjected to fog oil smoke was developed. Our approach employed an environmentally controlled re-circulating wind tunnel outfitted with a high-heat vaporization and re-condensation fog oil generator that has been shown to produce aerosols of comparable chemistry and droplet-size distribution as those of field releases of the smoke. This method provides reproducible exposures of insects under realistic climatic and environmental conditions to fog oil aerosols that duplicate chemical and droplet-size characteristics of field releases of the smoke. The responses measured take into account reduction in food sources due to death and to changes in availability of relevant life stages of insects that form the prey base for the listed Threatened and Endangered Species. The influence of key environmental factors, wind speed and canopy structure on these responses were characterized. Data generated using this method was used to develop response functions related to particle size, concentration, wind speed, and canopy structure that will allow military personnel to assess and manage impacts to endangered species from fog oil smoke used in military training.

  10. Reconciling controversies about the 'global warming hiatus'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medhaug, Iselin; Stolpe, Martin B; Fischer, Erich M; Knutti, Reto

    2017-05-03

    Between about 1998 and 2012, a time that coincided with political negotiations for preventing climate change, the surface of Earth seemed hardly to warm. This phenomenon, often termed the 'global warming hiatus', caused doubt in the public mind about how well anthropogenic climate change and natural variability are understood. Here we show that apparently contradictory conclusions stem from different definitions of 'hiatus' and from different datasets. A combination of changes in forcing, uptake of heat by the oceans, natural variability and incomplete observational coverage reconciles models and data. Combined with stronger recent warming trends in newer datasets, we are now more confident than ever that human influence is dominant in long-term warming.

  11. Effects of Global Warming on Vibrio Ecology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vezzulli, Luigi; Pezzati, Elisabetta; Brettar, Ingrid; Höfle, Manfred; Pruzzo, Carla

    2015-01-01

    .... Rise in global sea surface temperature (SST), which is approximately 1 °C higher now than 140 years ago and is one of the primary physical impacts of global warming, has been linked to such increases...

  12. Global Surface Warming Hiatus Analysis Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data were used to conduct the study of the global surface warming hiatus, an apparent decrease in the upward trend of global surface temperatures since 1998....

  13. Palaeoclimate: Volcanism caused ancient global warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meissner, Katrin J.; Bralower, Timothy J.

    2017-08-01

    A study confirms that volcanism set off one of Earth's fastest global-warming events. But the release of greenhouse gases was slow enough for negative feedbacks to mitigate impacts such as ocean acidification. See Letter p.573

  14. A review of warm mix asphalt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-01

    Warm Mix Asphalt (WMA) technology, recently developed in Europe, is gaining strong interest in the US. By : lowering the viscosity of asphalt binder and/or increasing the workability of mixture using minimal heat, WMA : technology allows the mixing, ...

  15. Ecological stability in response to warming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fussmann, Katarina E.; Schwarzmueller, Florian; Brose, Ulrich; Jousset, Alexandre|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/370632656; Rall, Bjoern C.

    That species' biological rates including metabolism, growth and feeding scale with temperature is well established from warming experiments(1). The interactive influence of these changes on population dynamics, however, remains uncertain. As a result, uncertainty about ecological stability in

  16. Teaching cases on transportation and global warming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    This project developed a series of three teaching cases that explore the implications of global : warming for transportation policy in the United States. The cases are intended to be used in : graduate and undergraduate courses on transportation poli...

  17. A Scientific Look at Global Warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glanz, Peter

    2007-10-01

    Scientists like we should ask ``Where's the Beef?'' when a global warming discussion comes up. Current issues like melting glaciers, rising sea levels, disappearing polar bears and increasing tornado activity (among many) are put to the WTB test.

  18. Chamberless residential warm air furnace design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godfree, J. [Product Design consultant, Pugwash (Canada)

    1996-07-01

    This brief paper is an introduction to the concept of designing residential warm air furnaces without combustion chambers. This is possible since some small burners do not require the thermal support of a combustion chamber to complete the combustion process.

  19. Global temperatures and the global warming ``debate''

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubrecht, Gordon

    2009-04-01

    Many ordinary citizens listen to pronouncements on talk radio casting doubt on anthropogenic global warming. Some op-ed columnists likewise cast doubts, and are read by credulous citizens. For example, on 8 March 2009, the Boston Globe published a column by Jeff Jacoby, ``Where's global warming?'' According to Jacoby, ``But it isn't such hints of a planetary warming trend that have been piling up in profusion lately. Just the opposite.'' He goes on to write, ``the science of climate change is not nearly as important as the religion of climate change,'' and blamed Al Gore for getting his mistaken views accepted. George Will at the Washington Post also expressed denial. As a result, 44% of U.S. voters, according to the January 19 2009 Rasmussen Report, blame long-term planetary trends for global warming, not human beings. Is there global cooling, as skeptics claim? We examine the temperature record.

  20. Enhanced Decadal Warming of the Southeast Indian Ocean During the Recent Global Surface Warming Slowdown

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuanlong; Han, Weiqing; Zhang, Lei

    2017-10-01

    The rapid Indian Ocean warming during the early-21th century was a major heat sink for the recent global surface warming slowdown. Analysis of observational data and ocean model experiments reveals that during 2003-2012 more than half of the increased upper Indian Ocean heat content was concentrated in the southeast Indian Ocean (SEIO), causing a warming "hot spot" of 0.8-1.2 K decade-1 near the west coast of Australia. This SEIO warming was primarily induced by the enhancements of the Pacific trade winds and Indonesian throughflow associated with the Interdecadal Pacific Oscillation's (IPO) transition to its negative phase, and to a lesser degree by local atmospheric forcing within the Indian Ocean. Large-ensemble climate model simulations suggest that this warming event was likely also exacerbated by anthropogenic forcing and thus unprecedentedly strong as compared to previous IPO transition periods. Climate model projections suggest an increasing possibility of such strong decadal warming in future.

  1. Power Engineering and Global Climate Warming

    OpenAIRE

    Канило, П. М.

    2016-01-01

    Presently, three ecological problems are in the focus of humanities concern: the global climate warming on Earth, the future of the ozone layer and the circularity of global bio-geo-chemical cycles (the concept of biotic regulation of the environment). Further climate warming can result in adverse consequences such as enhanced evaporation of World Ocean water and intensification of the greenhouse effect, stratosphere cooling and respective thinning of the protective ozone screen, a rising lev...

  2. Should we be concerned about global warming?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, James H

    2006-01-01

    Accurate scientific predictions of the true human health outcomes of global climate change are significantly confounded by several effect modifiers that cannot be adjusted for analytically. Nevertheless, with the documented increase in average global surface temperature of 0.6 C. since 1975, there is uniform consensus in the international scientific community that the earth is warming from a variety of climatic effects, including cyclical re-warming and the cascading effects of greenhouse gas emissions to support human activities.

  3. Book ReviewL Global Warming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia Astriani

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Global Warming is part of Greenhaven’s Contemporary Issues Companion series published by, Thomson Gale on 2005. Each volume of the anthologyseries focuses on a topic of current interest, presenting informative and thought-provoking selection written from wide-variety viewpoints. It is an ideal launching point for research on a particular topic. Each anthology in the series is composed of readings taken from an extensive gamut of resources, including periodical, newspapers, books, governmentdocuments, the publications of private and public organization an internet website. Readers will find factual support suitable for use in reports, debate, speeches and research papers. In understanding Environmental Law, student must understand the environmental issues first. Global warming is the latest issue in Environmental Law field, it has been discuss for more than a decade. It is hard for law student, who don’t have any scientific background to understand this issue. That’s why this anthology series is perfect start for student to understanding Global Warming Issue. This book consist of three part, namely: Understanding Global Warming, The Consequences of Global warming and Solving the Global warming Problem. Each chapter contains 6-7 articles.

  4. Global warming and nuclear power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, L., LLNL

    1998-07-10

    -fold reduction might be attained. Even the first such halving of carbon intensivity of stationary-source energy production world-wide might permit continued slow power-demand growth in the highly developed countries and rapid development of the other 80% of the world, both without active governmental suppression of fossil fuel usage - while also stabilizing carbon input-rates into the Earth`s atmosphere. The second two-fold reduction might obviate most global warming concerns.

  5. Study on an Air Quality Evaluation Model for Beijing City Under Haze-Fog Pollution Based on New Ambient Air Quality Standards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Li

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Since 2012, China has been facing haze-fog weather conditions, and haze-fog pollution and PM2.5 have become hot topics. It is very necessary to evaluate and analyze the ecological status of the air environment of China, which is of great significance for environmental protection measures. In this study the current situation of haze-fog pollution in China was analyzed first, and the new Ambient Air Quality Standards were introduced. For the issue of air quality evaluation, a comprehensive evaluation model based on an entropy weighting method and nearest neighbor method was developed. The entropy weighting method was used to determine the weights of indicators, and the nearest neighbor method was utilized to evaluate the air quality levels. Then the comprehensive evaluation model was applied into the practical evaluation problems of air quality in Beijing to analyze the haze-fog pollution. Two simulation experiments were implemented in this study. One experiment included the indicator of PM2.5 and was carried out based on the new Ambient Air Quality Standards (GB 3095-2012; the other experiment excluded PM2.5 and was carried out based on the old Ambient Air Quality Standards (GB 3095-1996. Their results were compared, and the simulation results showed that PM2.5 was an important indicator for air quality and the evaluation results of the new Air Quality Standards were more scientific than the old ones. The haze-fog pollution situation in Beijing City was also analyzed based on these results, and the corresponding management measures were suggested.

  6. Study on an air quality evaluation model for Beijing City under haze-fog pollution based on new ambient air quality standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li; Liu, Dong-Jun

    2014-08-28

    Since 2012, China has been facing haze-fog weather conditions, and haze-fog pollution and PM2.5 have become hot topics. It is very necessary to evaluate and analyze the ecological status of the air environment of China, which is of great significance for environmental protection measures. In this study the current situation of haze-fog pollution in China was analyzed first, and the new Ambient Air Quality Standards were introduced. For the issue of air quality evaluation, a comprehensive evaluation model based on an entropy weighting method and nearest neighbor method was developed. The entropy weighting method was used to determine the weights of indicators, and the nearest neighbor method was utilized to evaluate the air quality levels. Then the comprehensive evaluation model was applied into the practical evaluation problems of air quality in Beijing to analyze the haze-fog pollution. Two simulation experiments were implemented in this study. One experiment included the indicator of PM2.5 and was carried out based on the new Ambient Air Quality Standards (GB 3095-2012); the other experiment excluded PM2.5 and was carried out based on the old Ambient Air Quality Standards (GB 3095-1996). Their results were compared, and the simulation results showed that PM2.5 was an important indicator for air quality and the evaluation results of the new Air Quality Standards were more scientific than the old ones. The haze-fog pollution situation in Beijing City was also analyzed based on these results, and the corresponding management measures were suggested.

  7. One-year delayed effect of fog on malaria transmission: a time-series analysis in the rain forest area of Mengla County, south-west China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goggins William B

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malaria is a major public health burden in the tropics with the potential to significantly increase in response to climate change. Analyses of data from the recent past can elucidate how short-term variations in weather factors affect malaria transmission. This study explored the impact of climate variability on the transmission of malaria in the tropical rain forest area of Mengla County, south-west China. Methods Ecological time-series analysis was performed on data collected between 1971 and 1999. Auto-regressive integrated moving average (ARIMA models were used to evaluate the relationship between weather factors and malaria incidence. Results At the time scale of months, the predictors for malaria incidence included: minimum temperature, maximum temperature, and fog day frequency. The effect of minimum temperature on malaria incidence was greater in the cool months than in the hot months. The fog day frequency in October had a positive effect on malaria incidence in May of the following year. At the time scale of years, the annual fog day frequency was the only weather predictor of the annual incidence of malaria. Conclusion Fog day frequency was for the first time found to be a predictor of malaria incidence in a rain forest area. The one-year delayed effect of fog on malaria transmission may involve providing water input and maintaining aquatic breeding sites for mosquitoes in vulnerable times when there is little rainfall in the 6-month dry seasons. These findings should be considered in the prediction of future patterns of malaria for similar tropical rain forest areas worldwide.

  8. Study on an Air Quality Evaluation Model for Beijing City Under Haze-Fog Pollution Based on New Ambient Air Quality Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li; Liu, Dong-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Since 2012, China has been facing haze-fog weather conditions, and haze-fog pollution and PM2.5 have become hot topics. It is very necessary to evaluate and analyze the ecological status of the air environment of China, which is of great significance for environmental protection measures. In this study the current situation of haze-fog pollution in China was analyzed first, and the new Ambient Air Quality Standards were introduced. For the issue of air quality evaluation, a comprehensive evaluation model based on an entropy weighting method and nearest neighbor method was developed. The entropy weighting method was used to determine the weights of indicators, and the nearest neighbor method was utilized to evaluate the air quality levels. Then the comprehensive evaluation model was applied into the practical evaluation problems of air quality in Beijing to analyze the haze-fog pollution. Two simulation experiments were implemented in this study. One experiment included the indicator of PM2.5 and was carried out based on the new Ambient Air Quality Standards (GB 3095-2012); the other experiment excluded PM2.5 and was carried out based on the old Ambient Air Quality Standards (GB 3095-1996). Their results were compared, and the simulation results showed that PM2.5 was an important indicator for air quality and the evaluation results of the new Air Quality Standards were more scientific than the old ones. The haze-fog pollution situation in Beijing City was also analyzed based on these results, and the corresponding management measures were suggested. PMID:25170682

  9. Warming shifts 'worming': effects of experimental warming on invasive earthworms in northern North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenhauer, Nico; Stefanski, Artur; Fisichelli, Nicholas A; Rice, Karen; Rich, Roy; Reich, Peter B

    2014-11-03

    Climate change causes species range shifts and potentially alters biological invasions. The invasion of European earthworm species across northern North America has severe impacts on native ecosystems. Given the long and cold winters in that region that to date supposedly have slowed earthworm invasion, future warming is hypothesized to accelerate earthworm invasions into yet non-invaded regions. Alternatively, warming-induced reductions in soil water content (SWC) can also decrease earthworm performance. We tested these hypotheses in a field warming experiment at two sites in Minnesota, USA by sampling earthworms in closed and open canopy in three temperature treatments in 2010 and 2012. Structural equation modeling revealed that detrimental warming effects on earthworm densities and biomass could indeed be partly explained by warming-induced reductions in SWC. The direction of warming effects depended on the current average SWC: warming had neutral to positive effects at high SWC, whereas the opposite was true at low SWC. Our results suggest that warming limits the invasion of earthworms in northern North America by causing less favorable soil abiotic conditions, unless warming is accompanied by increased and temporally even distributions of rainfall sufficient to offset greater water losses from higher evapotranspiration.

  10. Warming shifts `worming': effects of experimental warming on invasive earthworms in northern North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenhauer, Nico; Stefanski, Artur; Fisichelli, Nicholas A.; Rice, Karen; Rich, Roy; Reich, Peter B.

    2014-11-01

    Climate change causes species range shifts and potentially alters biological invasions. The invasion of European earthworm species across northern North America has severe impacts on native ecosystems. Given the long and cold winters in that region that to date supposedly have slowed earthworm invasion, future warming is hypothesized to accelerate earthworm invasions into yet non-invaded regions. Alternatively, warming-induced reductions in soil water content (SWC) can also decrease earthworm performance. We tested these hypotheses in a field warming experiment at two sites in Minnesota, USA by sampling earthworms in closed and open canopy in three temperature treatments in 2010 and 2012. Structural equation modeling revealed that detrimental warming effects on earthworm densities and biomass could indeed be partly explained by warming-induced reductions in SWC. The direction of warming effects depended on the current average SWC: warming had neutral to positive effects at high SWC, whereas the opposite was true at low SWC. Our results suggest that warming limits the invasion of earthworms in northern North America by causing less favorable soil abiotic conditions, unless warming is accompanied by increased and temporally even distributions of rainfall sufficient to offset greater water losses from higher evapotranspiration.

  11. A Practical Evaluation of a High-Security Energy-Efficient Gateway for IoT Fog Computing Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castedo, Luis

    2017-01-01

    Fog computing extends cloud computing to the edge of a network enabling new Internet of Things (IoT) applications and services, which may involve critical data that require privacy and security. In an IoT fog computing system, three elements can be distinguished: IoT nodes that collect data, the cloud, and interconnected IoT gateways that exchange messages with the IoT nodes and with the cloud. This article focuses on securing IoT gateways, which are assumed to be constrained in terms of computational resources, but that are able to offload some processing from the cloud and to reduce the latency in the responses to the IoT nodes. However, it is usually taken for granted that IoT gateways have direct access to the electrical grid, which is not always the case: in mission-critical applications like natural disaster relief or environmental monitoring, it is common to deploy IoT nodes and gateways in large areas where electricity comes from solar or wind energy that charge the batteries that power every device. In this article, how to secure IoT gateway communications while minimizing power consumption is analyzed. The throughput and power consumption of Rivest–Shamir–Adleman (RSA) and Elliptic Curve Cryptography (ECC) are considered, since they are really popular, but have not been thoroughly analyzed when applied to IoT scenarios. Moreover, the most widespread Transport Layer Security (TLS) cipher suites use RSA as the main public key-exchange algorithm, but the key sizes needed are not practical for most IoT devices and cannot be scaled to high security levels. In contrast, ECC represents a much lighter and scalable alternative. Thus, RSA and ECC are compared for equivalent security levels, and power consumption and data throughput are measured using a testbed of IoT gateways. The measurements obtained indicate that, in the specific fog computing scenario proposed, ECC is clearly a much better alternative than RSA, obtaining energy consumption reductions of up

  12. A Practical Evaluation of a High-Security Energy-Efficient Gateway for IoT Fog Computing Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez-Albela, Manuel; Fernández-Caramés, Tiago M; Fraga-Lamas, Paula; Castedo, Luis

    2017-08-29

    Fog computing extends cloud computing to the edge of a network enabling new Internet of Things (IoT) applications and services, which may involve critical data that require privacy and security. In an IoT fog computing system, three elements can be distinguished: IoT nodes that collect data, the cloud, and interconnected IoT gateways that exchange messages with the IoT nodes and with the cloud. This article focuses on securing IoT gateways, which are assumed to be constrained in terms of computational resources, but that are able to offload some processing from the cloud and to reduce the latency in the responses to the IoT nodes. However, it is usually taken for granted that IoT gateways have direct access to the electrical grid, which is not always the case: in mission-critical applications like natural disaster relief or environmental monitoring, it is common to deploy IoT nodes and gateways in large areas where electricity comes from solar or wind energy that charge the batteries that power every device. In this article, how to secure IoT gateway communications while minimizing power consumption is analyzed. The throughput and power consumption of Rivest-Shamir-Adleman (RSA) and Elliptic Curve Cryptography (ECC) are considered, since they are really popular, but have not been thoroughly analyzed when applied to IoT scenarios. Moreover, the most widespread Transport Layer Security (TLS) cipher suites use RSA as the main public key-exchange algorithm, but the key sizes needed are not practical for most IoT devices and cannot be scaled to high security levels. In contrast, ECC represents a much lighter and scalable alternative. Thus, RSA and ECC are compared for equivalent security levels, and power consumption and data throughput are measured using a testbed of IoT gateways. The measurements obtained indicate that, in the specific fog computing scenario proposed, ECC is clearly a much better alternative than RSA, obtaining energy consumption reductions of up to

  13. The Brahea edulis palm forest in Guadalupe Island: A North American fog oasis? El palmar de Brahea edulis de Isla Guadalupe: ¿Un oasis de niebla en Norteamérica?

    OpenAIRE

    PEDRO P GARCILLÁN; ERNESTO VEGA; CARLOS MARTORELL

    2012-01-01

    Fog is a factor that affects deeply the structure of vegetation of coastal deserts. Guadalupe is an oceanic island located 260 km off the coast of Baja California, and is one of the few places of the Sonoran Desert coasts with scarped coastal topography and frequent fog. With the aim to identify the effect of fog on the community of the palm forest (palmar) of Brahea edulis located in the northern tip of the island: (1) we analyzed the richness and composition of vascular plants in the palmar...

  14. Progress towards an ab initio real-time treatment of warm dense matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baczewski, Andrew; Cangi, Attila; Hansen, Stephanie; Jensen, Daniel

    2017-10-01

    Time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) provides an accurate description of equilibrium properties of warm dense matter, such as the dynamic structure factor (Baczewski et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 116(11), 2016). While non-equilibrium properties, such as stopping power, have also been demonstrated to be within the grasp of TDDFT, the ultrafast isochoric heating of condensed matter into the warm dense state, enabled by recent advances in XFELs, remains beyond its capabilities. In this talk, we will describe the successes of and continuing challenges for TDDFT for warm dense matter, and present progress towards a more complete ab initio treatment of isochoric x-ray heating. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-mission laboratory managed and operated by National Technology and Engineering Solutions of Sandia, LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Honeywell International, Inc., for the DOE's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-NA0003525.

  15. Can Global Warming be Stopped?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luria, M.

    2013-12-01

    Earlier this year, the CO2 levels exceeded the 400 ppm level and there is no sign that the 1-2 ppm annual increase is going to slow down. Concerns regarding the danger of global warming have been reported in numerous occasions for more than a generation, ever since CO2 levels reached the 350 ppm range in the mid 1980's. Nevertheless, all efforts to slow down the increase have showed little if any effect. Mobile sources, including surface and marine transportation and aviation, consist of 20% of the global CO2 emission. The only realistic way to reduce the mobile sources' CO2 signature is by improved fuel efficiency. However, any progress in this direction is more than compensated by continuous increased demand. Stationary sources, mostly electric power generation, are responsible for the bulk of the global CO2 emission. The measurements have shown, that the effect of an increase in renewable sources, like solar wind and geothermal, combined with conversion from coal to natural gas where possible, conservation and efficiency improvement, did not compensate the increased demand mostly in developing countries. Increased usage of nuclear energy can provide some relief in carbon emission but has the potential of even greater environmental hazard. A major decrease in carbon emission can be obtained by either significant reduction in the cost of non-carbon based energy sources or by of carbon sequestration. The most economical way to make a significant decrease in carbon emission is to apply carbon sequestration technology at large point sources that use coal. Worldwide there are about 10,000 major sources that burn >7 billion metric tons of coal which generate the equivalent of 30 trillion kwh. There is a limited experience in CO2 sequestration of such huge quantities of CO2, however, it is estimated that the cost would be US$ 0.01-0.1 per kwh. The cost of eliminating this quantity can be estimated at an average of 1.5 trillion dollars annually. The major emitters, US

  16. Fog over Virtualized IoT: New Opportunity for Context-Aware Networked Applications and a Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola G. V. Naranjo

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we discuss the most significant application opportunities and outline the challenges in real-time and energy-efficient management of the distributed resources available in mobile devices and at the Internet-to-Data Center. We also present an energy-efficient adaptive scheduler for Vehicular Fog Computing (VFC that operates at the edge of a vehicular network, connected to the served Vehicular Clients (VCs through an Infrastructure-to-Vehicular (I2V over multiple Foglets (Fls. The scheduler optimizes the energy by leveraging the heterogeneity of Fls, where the Fl provider shapes the system workload by maximizing the task admission rate over data transfer and computation. The presented scheduling algorithm demonstrates that the resulting adaptive scheduler allows scalable and distributed implementation.

  17. Comparison of regenerated bamboo and cotton performance in warm environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina Solorio-Ferrales

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Different materials have been used to fabricate summer (warm environment clothing, such as cotton, nylon, neoprene, polyester and 100% synthetic fibers. However, because of their mechanical and thermal properties, nylon and polyester cloth has a tendency to rot and chafe in damp conditions. In addition, close-fitting synthetic fibers and neoprene make some wearers feel uncomfortable because of the rapidly occurring body skin sweat. However, bamboo and cotton have demonstrated to have low thermal conductivity. Hence, they are excellent materials to fabricate summer clothing. In this study, a theoretical analysis complemented with practical measurements of thermal properties of three different rib knitted structures produced from a 30 tex yarn of three blends of fibers (100% regenerated bamboo, 100% cotton and 50:50 regenerated bamboo: cotton was realized to compare bamboo and cotton performance in warm environment. Obtained results show that garment thickness and heat storage rate in the human body can significantly be reduced by using 100% regenerated bamboo, without compromising comfort.

  18. Using Remotely Piloted Aircraft System to Study the Evolution of the Boundary Layer Related to Fog Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, G. C.; Cayez, G.; Ronflé-Nadaud, C.; Albrand, M.; Dralet, J. P.; Momboisse, G.; Nicoll, K.; Seity, Y.; Bronz, M.; Hattenberger, G.; Gorraz, M.; Bustico, A.

    2014-12-01

    Over the past decade, the scientific community has embraced the use of RPAS (remotely piloted aircraft system) as a tool to improve observations of the Earth's surface and atmospheric phenomena. The use of small RPAS (Remotely Piloted Aircraft System) in atmospheric research has increased because of their relative low-cost, compact size and ease of operation. Small RPAS are especially adapted for observing the atmospheric boundary layer processes at high vertical and temporal resolution. To this end, CNRM, ENAC, and ENM have developed the VOLTIGE (Vecteurs d'Observation de La Troposphere pour l'Investigation et la Gestion de l'Environnement) program to study the life cycle of fog with multiple, small RPAS. The instrumented RPAS flights have successfully observed the evolution of the boundary layer and dissipation of fog events. In addition, vertical profiles from the RPAS have been compared with Météo France forecast models, and the results suggest that forecast models may be improved using high resolution and frequent in-situ measurements. Within the VOLTIGE project, a flying-wing RPAS with four control surfaces was developed to separate elevator and aileron controls in order to reduce the pitch angle envelope and improve turbulence and albedo measurements. The result leads to a small RPAS with the capability of flying up to two hours with 150 grams of payload, while keeping the hand-launch capability as a constraint for regular atmospheric research missions. High frequency data logging has been integrated into the main autopilot in order to synchronize navigation and payload measurements, as well as allowing an efficient sensor-based navigation. The VOLTIGE program also encourages direct participation of students on the advancement of novel observing systems for atmospheric sciences, and provides a step towards deploying small RPAS in an operational network. VOLTIGE is funded by the Agence Nationale de Recherche (ANR-Blanc 2012) and supported by Aerospace

  19. Fogging the issue of HIV - barriers for HIV testing in a migrated population from Ethiopia and Eritrea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindkvist, Pille; Johansson, Eva; Hylander, Ingrid

    2015-02-05

    The outcome of HIV treatment has dramatically improved since the introduction of antiretroviral therapy. Studies confirm that if treatment of HIV is initiated when the immune system is not severely affected by the virus the prognosis for the outcome is significantly better. There is also evidence that many immigrants come late for their first HIV test. If found to be HIV positive, and if the immune system is already significantly affected, this will compromise the treatment outcome. This study was performed in an attempt to understand the barriers for early HIV testing in a migrant population from Ethiopia and Eritrea in Stockholm, Sweden. Participants were theoretically sampled and consisted of individuals who had immigrated from Ethiopia and Eritrea. Data were collected using 14 focus group discussions and seven semi-structured interviews. The analysis was performed according to a Grounded Theory approach using the paradigm model. Denial and fear of knowing one's HIV status dominated all aspects of behavior in relation to HIV. The main strategy was a "fogging" of the issue of HIV. People were said to not want to know because this would bring social isolation and exclusion, and it was often believed that treatment did not help. This attitude had strong roots in their culture and past experiences that were brought along to the new country and maintained within the immigrant community. The length of time spent in Sweden seemed to be an important factor affecting the "fogging of the HIV issue". In bridging the gap between the two cultures, Swedish authorities need to find ways to meet the needs of both earlier and newly arrived immigrants as well as the second generation of immigrants. This will require adjusting and updating the information that is given to these different sub-groups of Ethiopian and Eritrean immigrants. Appropriate access to healthcare for a diverse population obviously requires more than simply providing the healthcare services.

  20. Assessment of the WRF-ARW model during fog conditions in a coastal arid region using different PBL schemes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temimi, Marouane; Chaouch, Naira; Weston, Michael; Ghedira, Hosni

    2017-04-01

    This study covers five fog events reported in 2014 at Abu Dhabi International Airport in the United Arab Emirates (UAE). We assess the performance of WRF-ARW model during fog conditions and we intercompare seven different PBL schemes and assess their impact on the performance of the simulations. Seven PBL schemes, namely, Yonsei University (YSU), Mellor-Yamada-Janjic (MYJ), Moller-Yamada Nakanishi and Niino (MYNN) level 2.5, Quasi-Normal Scale Elimination (QNSE-EDMF), Asymmetric Convective Model (ACM2), Grenier-Bretherton-McCaa (GBM) and MYNN level 3 were tested. Radiosonde data from the Abu Dhabi International Airport and surface measurements of relative humidity (RH), dew point temperature, wind speed, and temperature profiles were used to assess the performance of the model. All PBL schemes showed comparable skills with relatively higher performance with the QNSE scheme. The average RH Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) and BIAS for all PBLs were 15.75 % and -9.07 %, respectively, whereas the obtained RMSE and BIAS when QNSE was used were 14.65 % and -6.3 % respectively. Comparable skills were obtained for the rest of the variables. Local PBL schemes showed better performance than non-local schemes. Discrepancies between simulated and observed values were higher at the surface level compared to high altitude values. The sensitivity to lead time showed that best simulation performances were obtained when the lead time varies between 12 and 18 hours. In addition, the results of the simulations show that better performance is obtained when the starting condition is dry.

  1. Effects of Aridity and Fog Deposition on C3/CAM Photosynthesis and N-cycling in Welwitschia mirabilis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soderberg, K.; Henschel, J.; Macko, S. A.

    2008-12-01

    Environmental controls on photosynthesis and N-cycling in Welwitschia mirabilis are evaluated through δ13C and δ15N analyses of leaf material from 26 individuals in the southermost population of this long-lived gymnosperm, which is endemic to the Namib Desert. The coastal Namib Desert in southwestern Africa is hyperarid in terms of rainfall, but receives up to 100 days of fog each year. This climate regime leads to interesting water relations in the Namib flora and fauna. Among many enigmatic characteristics, photosynthesis in W. mirabilis has puzzled researchers since the 1970's. Although it is predominantly a C3 plant, δ13C ranges from -17.5 to -23.5‰ in natural habitats, and can be as enriched as -14.4‰ under artificial growing conditions. Recently the CAM pathway has been confirmed, but the driver for CAM utilization has not been identified. In this study we incorporate new δ13C compositions for plants in the middle of the 100 km aridity gradient which spans the natural distribution of W. mirabilis. Initial results show an enriched δ13C signal (-20‰) in the more exposed individuals compared with those in a sandy drainage depression (-22‰). In addition, the documented correlation between rainfall and δ15N found in Kalahari C3 plants (Swap et al. 2004) is used to interpret the δ15N values in this W. mirabilis population. Initial results indicate that the fog deposition may significantly affect the nutrition of these unusual plants from the Namib Desert.

  2. Annual Removal of Aboveground Plant Biomass Alters Soil Microbial Responses to Warming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Xue

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Clipping (i.e., harvesting aboveground plant biomass is common in agriculture and for bioenergy production. However, microbial responses to clipping in the context of climate warming are poorly understood. We investigated the interactive effects of grassland warming and clipping on soil properties and plant and microbial communities, in particular, on microbial functional genes. Clipping alone did not change the plant biomass production, but warming and clipping combined increased the C4 peak biomass by 47% and belowground net primary production by 110%. Clipping alone and in combination with warming decreased the soil carbon input from litter by 81% and 75%, respectively. With less carbon input, the abundances of genes involved in degrading relatively recalcitrant carbon increased by 38% to 137% in response to either clipping or the combined treatment, which could weaken long-term soil carbon stability and trigger positive feedback with respect to warming. Clipping alone also increased the abundance of genes for nitrogen fixation, mineralization, and denitrification by 32% to 39%. Such potentially stimulated nitrogen fixation could help compensate for the 20% decline in soil ammonium levels caused by clipping alone and could contribute to unchanged plant biomass levels. Moreover, clipping tended to interact antagonistically with warming, especially with respect to effects on nitrogen cycling genes, demonstrating that single-factor studies cannot predict multifactorial changes. These results revealed that clipping alone or in combination with warming altered soil and plant properties as well as the abundance and structure of soil microbial functional genes. Aboveground biomass removal for biofuel production needs to be reconsidered, as the long-term soil carbon stability may be weakened.

  3. Global warming without global mean precipitation increase?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salzmann, Marc

    2016-06-01

    Global climate models simulate a robust increase of global mean precipitation of about 1.5 to 2% per kelvin surface warming in response to greenhouse gas (GHG) forcing. Here, it is shown that the sensitivity to aerosol cooling is robust as well, albeit roughly twice as large. This larger sensitivity is consistent with energy budget arguments. At the same time, it is still considerably lower than the 6.5 to 7% K(-1) decrease of the water vapor concentration with cooling from anthropogenic aerosol because the water vapor radiative feedback lowers the hydrological sensitivity to anthropogenic forcings. When GHG and aerosol forcings are combined, the climate models with a realistic 20th century warming indicate that the global mean precipitation increase due to GHG warming has, until recently, been completely masked by aerosol drying. This explains the apparent lack of sensitivity of the global mean precipitation to the net global warming recently found in observations. As the importance of GHG warming increases in the future, a clear signal will emerge.

  4. Warm eyes provide superior vision in swordfishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritsches, Kerstin A; Brill, Richard W; Warrant, Eric J

    2005-01-11

    Large and powerful ocean predators such as swordfishes, some tunas, and several shark species are unique among fishes in that they are capable of maintaining elevated body temperatures (endothermy) when hunting for prey in deep and cold water . In these animals, warming the central nervous system and the eyes is the one common feature of this energetically costly adaptation . In the swordfish (Xiphias gladius), a highly specialized heating system located in an extraocular muscle specifically warms the eyes and brain up to 10 degrees C-15 degrees C above ambient water temperatures . Although the function of neural warming in fishes has been the subject of considerable speculation , the biological significance of this unusual ability has until now remained unknown. We show here that warming the retina significantly improves temporal resolution, and hence the detection of rapid motion, in fast-swimming predatory fishes such as the swordfish. Depending on diving depth, temporal resolution can be more than ten times greater in these fishes than in fishes with eyes at the same temperature as the surrounding water. The enhanced temporal resolution allowed by heated eyes provides warm-blooded and highly visual oceanic predators, such as swordfishes, tunas, and sharks, with a crucial advantage over their agile, cold-blooded prey.

  5. Greenland warming of 1920-1930 and 1995-2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chylek, Petr; Dubey, M. K.; Lesins, G.

    2006-06-01

    We provide an analysis of Greenland temperature records to compare the current (1995-2005) warming period with the previous (1920-1930) Greenland warming. We find that the current Greenland warming is not unprecedented in recent Greenland history. Temperature increases in the two warming periods are of a similar magnitude, however, the rate of warming in 1920-1930 was about 50% higher than that in 1995-2005.

  6. Thermal stability of warm-rolled tungsten

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alfonso Lopez, Angel

    , and recrystallization fitted to JMAK recrystallization kinetics, which in turn allowed thecalculation of recrystallization activation energies. Much faster recovery and recrystallizationkinetics were found for the plate warm-rolled to 90% thickness reduction, as compared to the platewarm-rolled to 67% thickness...... and recrystallization occur in tungsten, and quantifying the kinetics and microstructuralaspects of these restoration processes. Two warm-rolled tungsten plates are annealed attemperatures between 1100 °C and 1350 °C, under vacuum conditions or argon atmosphere. Theeffects of annealing on the microstructure...... reduction. An initial incubation time before recrystallization wasfound for both plates warm-rolled to 67% and 90% thickness reductions. The different Avramiexponents found for the two plates were explained microstructurally in terms of nucleation. The microstructural evolution during recovery...

  7. Wetting and self-cleaning properties of artificial superhydrophobic surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fürstner, Reiner; Barthlott, Wilhelm; Neinhuis, Christoph; Walzel, Peter

    2005-02-01

    The wetting and the self-cleaning properties (the latter is often called the "Lotus-Effect") of three types of superhydrophobic surfaces have been investigated: silicon wafer specimens with different regular arrays of spikes hydrophobized by chemical treatment, replicates of water-repellent leaves of plants, and commercially available metal foils which were additionally hydrophobized by means of a fluorinated agent. Water droplets rolled off easily from those silicon samples which had a microstructure consisting of rather slender spikes with narrow pitches. Such samples could be cleaned almost completely from artificial particulate contaminations by a fog consisting of water droplets (diameter range, 8-20 microm). Some metal foils and some replicates had two levels of roughening. Because of this, a complete removal of all particles was not possible using artificial fog. However, water drops with some amount of kinetic impact energy were able to clean these surfaces perfectly. A substrate where pronounced structures in the range below 5 microm were lacking could not be cleaned by means of fog because this treatment resulted in a continuous water film on the samples.

  8. Experimental warming alters migratory caribou forage quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamin, Tara J; Côté, Steeve D; Tremblay, Jean-Pierre; Grogan, Paul

    2017-10-01

    Global declines in caribou and reindeer (Rangifer) populations have drawn attention to the myriad of stressors that these Arctic and boreal forest herbivores currently face. Arctic warming has resulted in increased tundra shrub growth and therefore Rangifer forage quantity. However, its effects on forage quality have not yet been addressed although they may be critical to Rangifer body condition and fecundity. We investigated the impact of 8 yrs of summer warming on the quality of forage available to the Bathurst caribou herd using experimental greenhouses (n = 5) located in mesic birch hummock tundra in the central Canadian Low Arctic. Leaf forage quality and digestibility characteristics associated with nutrients (nitrogen and phosphorus), phenolics, and fiber were measured on the deciduous shrub Betula glandulosa (an important Rangifer diet component) at six time points through the growing season, and on five other very common vascular plant and lichen species in late summer. Experimental warming reduced B. glandulosa leaf nitrogen concentrations by ~10% in both late June and mid-July, but not afterwards. It also reduced late summer forage quality of the graminoid Eriophorum vaginatum by increasing phenolic concentrations 38%. Warming had mixed effects on forage quality of the lichen Cetraria cucullata in that it increased nutrient concentrations and tended to decrease fiber contents, but it also increased phenolics. Altogether, these warming-induced changes in forage quality over the growing season, and response differences among species, highlight the importance of Rangifer adaptability in diet selection. Furthermore, the early season reduction in B. glandulosa nitrogen content is a particular concern given the importance of this time for calf growth. Overall, our demonstration of the potential for significant warming impacts on forage quality at critical times for these animals underscores the importance of effective Rangifer range conservation to ensure

  9. Sulfate Formation Enhanced by a Cocktail of High NOx, SO2, Particulate Matter, and Droplet pH during Haze-Fog Events in Megacities in China: An Observation-Based Modeling Investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Jian; Yuan, Zibing; Griffith, Stephen M; Yu, Xin; Lau, Alexis K H; Yu, Jian Zhen

    2016-07-19

    In recent years in a few Chinese megacities, fog events lasting one to a few days have been frequently associated with high levels of aerosol loading characterized by high sulfate (as high as 30 μg m(-3)), therefore termed as haze-fog events. The concomitant pollution characteristics include high gas-phase mixing ratios of SO2 (up to 71 ppbv) and NO2 (up to 69 ppbv), high aqueous phase pH (5-6), and smaller fog droplets (as low as 2 μm), resulting from intense emissions from fossil fuel combustion and construction activities supplying abundant Ca(2+). In this work, we use an observation-based model for secondary inorganic aerosols (OBM-SIA) to simulate sulfate formation pathways under conditions of haze-fog events encountered in Chinese megacities. The OBM analysis has identified, at a typical haze-fogwater pH of 5.6, the most important pathway to be oxidation of S(IV) by dissolved NO2, followed by the heterogeneous reaction of SO2 on the aerosol surface. The aqueous phase oxidation of S(IV) by H2O2 is a very minor formation pathway as a result of the high NOx conditions suppressing H2O2 formation. The model results indicate that the unique cocktail of high fogwater pH, high concentrations of NO2, SO2, and PM, and small fog droplets are capable of greatly enhancing sulfate formation. Such haze-fog conditions could lead to rapid sulfate production at night and subsequently high PM2.5 in the morning when the fog evaporates. Sulfate formation is simulated to be highly sensitive to fogwater pH, PM, and precursor gases NO2 and SO2. Such insights on major contributing factors imply that reduction of road dust and NOx emissions could lessen PM2.5 loadings in Chinese megacities during fog events.

  10. Forecasting effects of global warming on biodiversity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Botkin, D.B.; Saxe, H.; Araújo, M.B.

    2007-01-01

    The demand for accurate forecasting of the effects of global warming on biodiversity is growing, but current methods for forecasting have limitations. In this article, we compare and discuss the different uses of four forecasting methods: (1) models that consider species individually, (2) niche...... and theoretical ecological results suggest that many species could be at risk from global warming, during the recent ice ages surprisingly few species became extinct. The potential resolution of this conundrum gives insights into the requirements for more accurate and reliable forecasting. Our eight suggestions...

  11. A real-time Global Warming Index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haustein, K; Allen, M R; Forster, P M; Otto, F E L; Mitchell, D M; Matthews, H D; Frame, D J

    2017-11-13

    We propose a simple real-time index of global human-induced warming and assess its robustness to uncertainties in climate forcing and short-term climate fluctuations. This index provides improved scientific context for temperature stabilisation targets and has the potential to decrease the volatility of climate policy. We quantify uncertainties arising from temperature observations, climate radiative forcings, internal variability and the model response. Our index and the associated rate of human-induced warming is compatible with a range of other more sophisticated methods to estimate the human contribution to observed global temperature change.

  12. Global warming potential impact of bioenergy systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tonini, Davide; Hamelin, L.; Wenzel, H.

    environmental consequences related to land use changes. In this study the global warming potential impact associated with six alternative bioenergy systems based on willow and Miscanthus was assessed by means of life-cycle assessment. The results showed that bioenergy production may generate higher global...... warming impacts than the reference fossil fuel system, when the impacts from indirect land use changes are accounted for. In a life-cycle perspective, only highly-efficient co-firing with fossil fuel achieved a (modest) GHG emission reduction....

  13. Climate change lessons from a warm world

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowsett, Harry J.

    2010-01-01

    In the early 1970’s to early 1980’s Soviet climatologists were making comparisons to past intervals of warmth in the geologic record and suggesting that these intervals could be possible analogs for 21st century “greenhouse” conditions. Some saw regional warming as a benefit to the Soviet Union and made comments along the lines of “Set fire to the coal mines!” These sentiments were alarming to some, and the United States Geological Survey (USGS) leadership thought they could provide a more quantitative analysis of the data the Soviets were using for the most recent of these warm intervals, the Early Pliocene.

  14. CAGE BREEDING OF WARM WATER FRESHWATER FISH SPECIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman Safner

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available In the 1970s, Croatia became actively involved in the contemporary trend of breeding fish in floating cages. In addition to various species of marine fishes, breeding was attempted with trout, carp, catfish, cisco and salmon. Of the above freshwater fish species, specific standards were established only for the cage breeding of rainbow trout. Cage breeding of the remaining species remained at the level of occasional attempts, with more of an experimental than a commercial character. The regular attempts to master this technique for cage breeding of warm water freshwater fish species were aimed at achieving the known benefits of such breeding, such as simplicity of implementing technological measures, easier establishment of the breeding system, simpler manipulation, the possibility of denser colonies per unit volume with a high level of product