WorldWideScience

Sample records for warm emitter gas

  1. What is so super about super-emitters? Characterizing methane high emitters from natural gas infrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavala Araiza, D.; Lyon, D. R.; Alvarez, R.; Harriss, R. C.; Palacios, V.; Hamburg, S.

    2015-12-01

    Methane emissions across the natural gas supply chain are dominated at any one time by a few high-emitters (super-emitters or fat-tail of the distribution), often underrepresented in published datasets used to construct emission inventories. Characterization of high-emitters is essential for improving emission estimates based on atmospheric data (top-down) and emission inventories (bottom-up). The population of high-emitters (e.g. 10-20% of sites that account for 80-90% of the emissions) is temporally and spatially dynamic. As a consequence, it is challenging to design sampling methods and construct estimates that accurately represent their frequency and magnitude of emissions. We present new methods to derive facility-specific emission distribution functions that explicitly integrate the influence of the relatively rare super-emitters. These methods were applied in the Barnett Shale region to construct a custom emission inventory that is then compared to top-down emission estimates for the region. We offer a methodological framework relevant to the design of future sampling campaigns, in which these high-emitters are seamlessly incorporated to representative emissions distributions. This framework can be applied to heterogeneous oil and gas production regions across geographies to obtain accurate regional emission estimates. Additionally, we characterize emissions relative to the fraction of a facility's total methane throughput; an effective metric to identify sites with excess emissions resulting from avoidable operating conditions, such as malfunctioning equipment (defined here as functional super-emitters). This work suggests that identifying functional super-emitters and correcting their avoidable operating conditions would result in significant emission reductions. However, due to their spatiotemporal dynamic behavior, achieving and maintaining uniformly low emissions across the entire population of sites will require mitigation steps (e.g. leak detection

  2. Warm gas in protoplanetary disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Plas, Gerrit

    2010-12-01

    This thesis presents a study of warm CO, [OI] and H2 gas coming from the disks around Herbig Ae/Be stars. These various gas tracers are each a proxy for a different radial and vertical region of the PP disk surface. Our sample consists of disks whose shape (based on modeling of the the disk dust emission) can be divided into flaring and self-shadowed (flat). We find [1] evidence for the vertical decoupling of gas and dust in one disks (Chapter 2); [2] That disk geometry has a large influence on the spatial distribution and excitation mechanism of the CO emission (chapters 3,4); [3] Near-IR H 2 emission around 2 (out of 14) HAEBE stars, probably originating from large (±50AU) radii of the disk (chapter 5). In chapter 6 we investigate the trends between CO emission and disk geometry as noted in Chapter 3 and 4.

  3. Cool and warm hybrid white organic light-emitting diode with blue delayed fluorescent emitter both as blue emitter and triplet host

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Yong Joo; Yook, Kyoung Soo; Lee, Jun Yeob

    2015-01-01

    A hybrid white organic light-emitting diode (WOLED) with an external quantum efficiency above 20% was developed using a new blue thermally activated delayed fluorescent material, 4,6-di(9H-carbazol-9-yl)isophthalonitrile (DCzIPN), both as a blue emitter and a host for a yellow phosphorescent emitter. DCzIPN showed high quantum efficiency of 16.4% as a blue emitter and 24.9% as a host for a yellow phosphorescent emitter. The hybrid WOLEDs with the DCzIPN host based yellow emitting layer sandwiched between DCzIPN emitter based blue emitting layers exhibited high external quantum efficiency of 22.9% with a warm white color coordinate of (0.39, 0.43) and quantum efficiency of 21.0% with a cool white color coordinate of (0.31, 0.33) by managing the thickness of the yellow emitting layer. PMID:25598436

  4. Examining the Prevalence of Natural Gas "Super-emitters" in the Marcellus Shale Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, H.; Caulton, D.; Golston, L.; Lu, J.; Zondlo, M. A.; Wendt, L. P.; Pan, D.

    2015-12-01

    Natural gas has been touted as a "transition fuel" that can ease the Unites States' move towards a low-carbon economy. However, recent studies have shown natural gas leakage rates are larger than expected. High emission rates have the potential to minimize or entirely counteract the early climatic benefits of switching from coal because of the high global warming potential of methane, the primary component of natural gas. Several studies have noted that the distribution of well emissions seems to be skewed, or "fat tailed," with a small number of sites accounting for disproportionately large percentages of emissions. The subset of high-emitting wells, dubbed "super-emitters," is poorly understood and difficult to quantify in studies with small sample sizes. This study seeks to quantify natural gas leaks and understand the statistical significance of "super-emitters" within the Marcellus Shale region. During a field campaign in July 2015, we sampled 250 separate well pads in the Marcellus Region, with an ultimate goal of 1000 wells to be completed in subsequent campaigns in 2015 and 2016. A mobile lab was equipped with LICOR open-path sensors measuring CH4, CO2, and H2O mixing ratios as well as a GPS device. Well pad emissions are determined by isolating peaks and employing an inverse Gaussian plume method. The wind information necessary for these calculations is taken from NOAA READY archived meteorology modeling. Median emission rates of a data subset are 0.14 g CH4/s among emitting wells, which are comparable in order of magnitude with those in other basins. The preliminary distribution also exhibits skewed characteristics with about 10% of wells accounting for 75% of emissions. Data comparing the prevalence and relative emission strength of these 'super-emitters' will be presented. Further research will examine their prevalence, shared attributes, and implications for the Marcellus Shale natural gas industry.

  5. Warm Absorbing Gas in Cooling Flows

    OpenAIRE

    Buote, David A.

    2000-01-01

    We summarize the discovery of oxygen absorption and warm (10^5-10^6 K) gas in cooling flows. Special attention is given to new results for M87 for which we find the strongest evidence to date for ionized oxygen absorption in these systems. We briefly discuss implications for observations of cooling flows with Chandra and XMM.

  6. Warm Molecular Gas in Luminous Infrared Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Lu, N; Xu, C K; Gao, Y; Armus, L; Mazzarella, J M; Isaak, K G; Petric, A O; Charmandaris, V; Diaz-Santos, T; Evans, A S; Howell, J; Appleton, P; Inami, H; Iwasawa, K; Leech, J; Lord, S; Sanders, D B; Schulz, B; Surace, J; van der Werf, P P

    2014-01-01

    We present our initial results on the CO rotational spectral line energy distribution (SLED) of the $J$ to $J$$-$1 transitions from $J=4$ up to $13$ from Herschel SPIRE spectroscopic observations of 65 luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs) in the Great Observatories All-Sky LIRG Survey (GOALS). The observed SLEDs change on average from one peaking at $J \\le 4$ to a broad distribution peaking around $J \\sim\\,$6$-$7 as the IRAS 60-to-100 um color, $C(60/100)$, increases. However, the ratios of a CO line luminosity to the total infrared luminosity, $L_{\\rm IR}$, show the smallest variation for $J$ around 6 or 7. This suggests that, for most LIRGs, ongoing star formation (SF) is also responsible for a warm gas component that emits CO lines primarily in the mid-$J$ regime ($5 \\lesssim J \\lesssim 10$). As a result, the logarithmic ratios of the CO line luminosity summed over CO (5$-$4), (6$-$5), (7$-$6), (8$-$7) and (10$-$9) transitions to $L_{\\rm IR}$, $\\log R_{\\rm midCO}$, remain largely independent of $C(60/100)$, ...

  7. Test beam results of a low-pressure micro-strip gas chamber with a secondary-electron emitter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwan, S.; Anderson, D.F.; Zimmerman, J. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States); Sbarra, C. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Pisa (Italy); Salomon, M. [TRIUMF, Vancouver, BC (Canada)

    1994-10-01

    We present recent results, from a beam test, on the angular dependence of the efficiency and the distribution of the signals on the anode strips of a low-pressure microstrip gas chamber with a thick CsI layer as a secondary-electron emitter. New results of CVD diamond films as secondary-electron emitters are discussed.

  8. Net global warming potential and greenhouse gas intensity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Various methods exist to calculate global warming potential (GWP) and greenhouse gas intensity (GHG) as measures of net greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from agroecosystems. Little is, however, known about net GWP and GHGI that account for all sources and sinks of GHG emissions. Sources of GHG include...

  9. A highly efficient CMOS nanoplasmonic crystal enhanced slow-wave thermal emitter improves infrared gas-sensing devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pusch, Andreas; de Luca, Andrea; Oh, Sang S.; Wuestner, Sebastian; Roschuk, Tyler; Chen, Yiguo; Boual, Sophie; Ali, Zeeshan; Phillips, Chris C.; Hong, Minghui; Maier, Stefan A.; Udrea, Florin; Hopper, Richard H.; Hess, Ortwin

    2015-12-01

    The application of plasmonics to thermal emitters is generally assisted by absorptive losses in the metal because Kirchhoff’s law prescribes that only good absorbers make good thermal emitters. Based on a designed plasmonic crystal and exploiting a slow-wave lattice resonance and spontaneous thermal plasmon emission, we engineer a tungsten-based thermal emitter, fabricated in an industrial CMOS process, and demonstrate its markedly improved practical use in a prototype non-dispersive infrared (NDIR) gas-sensing device. We show that the emission intensity of the thermal emitter at the CO2 absorption wavelength is enhanced almost 4-fold compared to a standard non-plasmonic emitter, which enables a proportionate increase in the signal-to-noise ratio of the CO2 gas sensor.

  10. SOFIA Observations of S106: Dynamics of the Warm Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, R.; Schneider, N.; Stutzki, J.; Gusten, R.; Graf, U. U.; Hartogh, P.; Guan, X.; Staguhn, J. G.; Benford, D. J.

    2012-01-01

    Context The H II region/PDR/molecular cloud complex S106 is excited by a single O-star. The full extent of the warm and dense gas close to the star has not been mapped in spectrally resolved high-J CO or [C II] lines, so the kinematics of the warm. partially ionized gas, are unknown. Whether the prominent dark lane bisecting the hourglass-shaped nebula is due solely to the shadow cast by a small disk around the exciting star or also to extinction in high column foreground gas was an open question until now. Aims. To disentangle the morphology and kinematics of warm neutral and ionized gas close to the star, study their relation to the bulk of the molecular gas. and to investigate the nature of the dark lane. Methods. We use the heterodyne receiver GREAT on board SOFIA to observe velocity resolved spectral lines of [C II] and CO 11 yields 10 in comparison with so far unpublished submm continuum data at 350 micron (8HARC-Il) and complementary molecular line data. Results. The high angular and spectral resolution observations show a very complex morphology and kinematics of the inner S106 region, with many different components at different excitation conditions contributing to the observed emission. The [C II] lines are found to be bright and very broad. tracing high velocity gas close to the interface of molecular cloud and H II region. CO 11 yields 10 emission is more confined.. both spatially and in velocity, to the immediate surroundings of S 106 IR showing the presence of warm, high density (clumpy) gas. Our high angular resolution submm continuum observations rule out the scenario where the dark lane separating the two lobes is due solely to the shadow cast by a small disk close to the star. The lane is clearly seen also as warm, high column density gas at the boundary of the molecular cloud and H II region.

  11. Mathematical modeling of heat transfer in production premises heated by gas infrared emitters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maksimov Vyacheslav I.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of numerical modeling of the process of free convective heat transfer in the regime of turbulent convection in a closed rectangular region heated by an infrared radiator are presented. The system of Navier-Stokes equations in the Boussinesq approximation is solved, the energy equation for the gas and the heat conduction equations for the enclosing vertical and horizontal walls. A comparative analysis of the heat transfer regimes in the considered region for different Grashof numbers is carried out. The features of the formation of heated air flows relative to the infrared emitter located at some distance from the upper horizontal boundary of the region are singled out.

  12. Toward a Functional Definition of Methane Super-Emitters: Application to Natural Gas Production Sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavala-Araiza, Daniel; Lyon, David; Alvarez, Ramón A; Palacios, Virginia; Harriss, Robert; Lan, Xin; Talbot, Robert; Hamburg, Steven P

    2015-07-07

    Emissions from natural gas production sites are characterized by skewed distributions, where a small percentage of sites-commonly labeled super-emitters-account for a majority of emissions. A better characterization of super-emitters is needed to operationalize ways to identify them and reduce emissions. We designed a conceptual framework that functionally defines superemitting sites as those with the highest proportional loss rates (methane emitted relative to methane produced). Using this concept, we estimated total methane emissions from natural gas production sites in the Barnett Shale; functionally superemitting sites accounted for roughly three-fourths of total emissions. We discuss the potential to reduce emissions from these sites, under the assumption that sites with high proportional loss rates have excess emissions resulting from abnormal or otherwise avoidable operating conditions, such as malfunctioning equipment. Because the population of functionally superemitting sites is not expected to be static over time, continuous monitoring will likely be necessary to identify them and improve their operation. This work suggests that achieving and maintaining uniformly low emissions across the entire population of production sites will require mitigation steps at a large fraction of sites.

  13. Warm gas towards young stellar objects in Corona Australis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindberg, Johan; Jørgensen, Jes Kristian; D. Green, Joel;

    2014-01-01

    by an intermediate-mass young star. We study the effects on the warm gas and dust in a group of low-mass young stellar objects from the irradiation by the young luminous Herbig Be star R CrA. Herschel/PACS far-infrared datacubes of two low-mass star-forming regions in the R CrA dark cloud are presented...

  14. Warm Pressurant Gas Effects on the Liquid Hydrogen Bubble Point

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwig, Jason W.; McQuillen, John B.; Chato, David J.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents experimental results for the liquid hydrogen bubble point tests using warm pressurant gases conducted at the Cryogenic Components Cell 7 facility at the NASA Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio. The purpose of the test series was to determine the effect of elevating the temperature of the pressurant gas on the performance of a liquid acquisition device. Three fine mesh screen samples (325 x 2300, 450 x 2750, 510 x 3600) were tested in liquid hydrogen using cold and warm noncondensible (gaseous helium) and condensable (gaseous hydrogen) pressurization schemes. Gases were conditioned from 0 to 90 K above the liquid temperature. Results clearly indicate a degradation in bubble point pressure using warm gas, with a greater reduction in performance using condensable over noncondensible pressurization. Degradation in the bubble point pressure is inversely proportional to screen porosity, as the coarsest mesh demonstrated the highest degradation. Results here have implication on both pressurization and LAD system design for all future cryogenic propulsion systems. A detailed review of historical heated gas tests is also presented for comparison to current results.

  15. Replacing coal with natural gas would reduce warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Colin

    2012-08-01

    A debate has raged in the past couple of years as to whether natural gas is better or worse overall than coal and oil from a global warming perspective. The back-and-forth findings have been due to the timelines taken into consideration, the details of natural gas extraction, and the electricity-generating efficiency of various fuels. An analysis by Cathles, which focuses exclusively on potential warming and ignores secondary considerations, such as economic, political, or other environmental concerns, finds that natural gas is better for electricity generation than coal and oil under all realistic circumstances. To come to this conclusion, the author considered three different future fuel consumption scenarios: (1) a business-as-usual case, which sees energy generation capacity continue at its current pace with its current energy mix until the middle of the century, at which point the implementation of low-carbon energy sources dominates and fossil fuel-derived energy production declines; (2) a gas substitution scenario, where natural gas replaces all coal power production and any new oil-powered facilities, with the same midcentury shift; and (3) a low-carbon scenario, where all electricity generation is immediately and aggressively switched to non-fossil fuel sources such as solar, wind, and nuclear.

  16. Rotation of the Warm Molecular Gas Surrounding Ultracompact HII Regions

    CERN Document Server

    Klaassen, P D; Keto, E R; Zhang, Q

    2009-01-01

    We present molecular line and 1.4 mm continuum observations towards five massive star forming regions at arcsecond resolution using the Submillimeter Array (SMA). We find that the warm molecular gas surrounding each HII region (as traced by SO_2 and OCS) appears to be undergoing bulk rotation. From the molecular line emission and thermal component of the continuum emission, we independently derived gas masses for each region which are consistent with each other. From the free-free component of the continuum emission we estimate the minimum stellar mass required to power the HII region and find that this mass, when added to the derived gas mass, is a significant fraction of the dynamical mass for that region.

  17. Dynamics of warm Chaplygin gas inflationary models with quartic potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jawad, Abdul; Rani, Shamaila [COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Department of Mathematics, Lahore (Pakistan); Butt, Sadaf [Lahore Leads University, Department of Mathematics, Lahore (Pakistan); Kinnaird College for Women, Department of Mathematics, Lahore (Pakistan)

    2016-05-15

    Warm inflationary universe models in the context of the generalized Chaplygin gas, the modified Chaplygin gas, and the generalized cosmic Chaplygin gas are being studied. The dissipative coefficient of the form Γ ∝ T, and the weak and the strong dissipative regimes are being considered. We use the quartic potential, (λ{sub *}φ{sup 4})/(4), which is ruled out by current data in cold inflation but in our models by analysis it is seen to be in agreement with the WMAP9 and the latest Planck data. In these scenarios, the power spectrum, the spectral index, and the tensor-to-scalar ratio are being examined in the slow-roll approximation. We show the dependence of the tensor-scalar ratio r on the spectral index n{sub s} and observe that the range of the tensor-scalar ratio is r < 0.05 in the generalized Chaplygin gas, r < 0.15 in the modified Chaplygin gas, and r < 0.12 in the generalized cosmic Chaplygin gas models. Our results are in agreement with recent observational data like WMAP9 and the latest Planck data. (orig.)

  18. Enhanced greenhouse gas emissions from the Arctic with experimental warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voigt, Carolina; Lamprecht, Richard E.; Marushchak, Maija E.; Lind, Saara E.; Novakovskiy, Alexander; Aurela, Mika; Martikainen, Pertti J.; Biasi, Christina

    2017-04-01

    Temperatures in the Arctic are projected to increase more rapidly than in lower latitudes. With temperature being a key factor for regulating biogeochemical processes in ecosystems, even a subtle temperature increase might promote the release of greenhouse gases (GHGs) to the atmosphere. Usually, carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) are the GHGs dominating the climatic impact of tundra. However, bare, patterned ground features in the Arctic have recently been identified as hot spots for nitrous oxide (N2O). N2O is a potent greenhouse gas, which is almost 300 times more effective in its global warming potential than CO2; but studies on arctic N2O fluxes are rare. In this study we examined the impact of temperature increase on the seasonal GHG balance of all three important GHGs (CO2, CH4 and N2O) from three tundra surface types (vegetated peat soils, unvegetated peat soils, upland mineral soils) in the Russian Arctic (67˚ 03' N 62˚ 55' E), during the course of two growing seasons. We deployed open-top chambers (OTCs), inducing air and soil surface warming, thus mimicking predicted warming scenarios. We combined detailed CO2, CH4 and N2O flux studies with concentration measurements of these gases within the soil profile down to the active layer-permafrost interface, and complemented these GHG measurements with detailed soil nutrient (nitrate and ammonium) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) measurements in the soil pore water profile. In our study, gentle air warming (˜1.0 ˚ C) increased the seasonal GHG release of all dominant surface types: the GHG budget of vegetated peat and mineral soils, which together cover more than 80 % of the land area in our study region, shifted from a sink to a source of -300 to 144 g CO2-eq m-2 and from -198 to 105 g CO2-eq m-2, respectively. While the positive warming response was governed by CO2, we provide here the first in situ evidence that warming increases arctic N2O emissions: Warming did not only enhance N2O emissions from

  19. WARM IONIZED-GAS IN THE EDGE-ON GALAXIES NGC-4565 AND NGC-4631

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    RAND, RJ; KULKARNI, [No Value; HESTER, JJ

    1992-01-01

    We present H-alpha observations of two edge-on galaxies: NGC 4565 and NGC 4631. In contrast to NGC 891, which was studied in a previous paper, neither of these galaxies shows evidence for a smooth, vertically extended, diffuse, warm ionized medium. NGC 4565 is a weak H-alpha emitter, and shows no ev

  20. Simulation of electron beam formation and transport in a gas-filled electron-optical system with a plasma emitter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grishkov, A. A.; Kornilov, S. Yu.; Rempe, N. G.; Shidlovskiy, S. V.; Shklyaev, V. A.

    2016-07-01

    The results of computer simulations of the electron-optical system of an electron gun with a plasma emitter are presented. The simulations are performed using the KOBRA3-INP, XOOPIC, and ANSYS codes. The results describe the electron beam formation and transport. The electron trajectories are analyzed. The mechanisms of gas influence on the energy inhomogeneity of the beam and its current in the regions of beam primary formation, acceleration, and transport are described. Recommendations for optimizing the electron-optical system with a plasma emitter are presented.

  1. Simulation of electron beam formation and transport in a gas-filled electron-optical system with a plasma emitter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grishkov, A. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of High Current Electronics, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation); Kornilov, S. Yu., E-mail: kornilovsy@gmail.com; Rempe, N. G. [Tomsk State University of Control Systems and Radioelectronics (Russian Federation); Shidlovskiy, S. V. [Tomsk State University (Russian Federation); Shklyaev, V. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of High Current Electronics, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation)

    2016-07-15

    The results of computer simulations of the electron-optical system of an electron gun with a plasma emitter are presented. The simulations are performed using the KOBRA3-INP, XOOPIC, and ANSYS codes. The results describe the electron beam formation and transport. The electron trajectories are analyzed. The mechanisms of gas influence on the energy inhomogeneity of the beam and its current in the regions of beam primary formation, acceleration, and transport are described. Recommendations for optimizing the electron-optical system with a plasma emitter are presented.

  2. X-ray photoionized plasma diagnostics with Helium-like ions Application to Warm Absorber-Emitter in Active Galactic Nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Porquet, D; Porquet, Delphine

    2000-01-01

    We present He-like line ratios (resonance, intercombination and forbiddenlines) for totally and partially photoionized media. For solar plasmas, theseline ratios are already widely used for density and temperature diagnostics ofcoronal (collisional) plasmas. In the case of totally and partiallyphotoionized plasmas, He-like line ratios allow for the determination of theionization processes involved in the plasma (photoionization with or without anadditional collisional ionization process), as well as the density and theelectronic temperature. With the new generation of X-ray satellites,Chandra/AXAF, XMM and Astro-E, it will be feasible to obtain both high spectralresolution and high sensitivity observations. Thus in the coming years, theratios of these three components will be measurable for a large number ofnon-solar objects. In particular, these ratios could be applied to the WarmAbsorber-Emitter, commonly present in Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN). A betterunderstanding of the Warm Absorber connection to other...

  3. Two-stage plasma gun based on a gas discharge with a self-heating hollow emitter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vizir, A V; Tyunkov, A V; Shandrikov, M V; Oks, E M

    2010-02-01

    The paper presents the results of tests of a new compact two-stage bulk gas plasma gun. The plasma gun is based on a nonself-sustained gas discharge with an electron emitter based on a discharge with a self-heating hollow cathode. The operating characteristics of the plasma gun are investigated. The discharge system makes it possible to produce uniform and stable gas plasma in the dc mode with a plasma density up to 3x10(9) cm(-3) at an operating gas pressure in the vacuum chamber of less than 2x10(-2) Pa. The device features high power efficiency, design simplicity, and compactness.

  4. FIR line profiles as probes of warm gas dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betz, A. L.; Boreiko, R. T.

    1995-01-01

    Measurements of the shapes, velocities, and intensities of FIR lines all help to probe the dynamics, physical associations, and excitation conditions of warm gas in molecular clouds. With this in mind, we have observed the J=9-8, 12-11,14-13, and 16-15 lines of (12)CO and the 158 micron line of C II in a number of positions in 4 selected clouds. The data were obtained with a laser heterodyne spectrometer aboard NASA's Kuiper Airborne Observatory. Line measurements at 0.6 km/s resolution allow us to resolve the profiles completely, and thereby to distinguish between UV-and shock-heating mechanisms for the high-excitation gas. For CO, the high-J linewidths lie in the range of 4-20 km/s (FWHM), similar to those observed for low-J (J less than 4) transitions in these sources. This correspondence suggests that the hotter gas (T = 200-600 K) is dynamically linked to the quiescent gas component, perhaps by association with the UV-heated peripheries of the numerous cloud clumps. Much of the C II emission is thought to emanate from these cloud peripheries, but the line profiles generally do not match those seen in CO. None of the observed sources show any evidence in high-J (12)CO emission for shock-excitation (i.e., linewidths greater than 30 km/s).

  5. Quantifying, Assessing, and Mitigating Methane Emissions from Super-emitters in the Oil and Gas Supply Chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, David Richard

    Methane emissions from the oil and gas (O&G) supply chain reduce potential climate benefits of natural gas as a replacement for other fossil fuels that emit more carbon dioxide per energy produced. O&G facilities have skewed emission rate distributions with a small fraction of sites contributing the majority of emissions. Knowledge of the identity and cause of these high emission facilities, referred to as super-emitters or fat-tail sources, is critical for reducing supply chain emissions. This dissertation addresses the quantification of super-emitter emissions, assessment of their prevalence and relationship to site characteristics, and mitigation with continuous leak detection systems. Chapter 1 summarizes the state of the knowledge of O&G methane emissions. Chapter 2 constructs a spatially-resolved emission inventory to estimate total and O&G methane emissions in the Barnett Shale as part of a coordinated research campaign using multiple top-down and bottom-up methods to quantify emissions. The emission inventory accounts for super-emitters with two-phase Monte Carlo simulations that combine site measurements collected with two approaches: unbiased sampling and targeted sampling of super-emitters. More comprehensive activity data and the inclusion of super-emitters, which account for 19% of O&G emissions, produces a emission inventory that is not statistically different than top-down regional emission estimates. Chapter 3 describes a helicopter-based survey of over 8,000 well pads in seven basins with infrared optical gas imaging to assess high emission sources. Four percent of sites are observed to have high emissions with over 90% of observed sources from tanks. The occurrence of high emissions is weakly correlated to site parameters and the best statistical model explains only 14% of variance, which demonstrates that the occurrence of super-emitters is primarily stochastic. Chapter 4 presents a Gaussian dispersion model for optimizing the placement of

  6. Warming effects on greenhouse gas fluxes in peatlands are modulated by vegetation composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Susan E; Ostle, Nicholas J; Oakley, Simon; Quirk, Helen; Henrys, Peter A; Bardgett, Richard D

    2013-10-01

    Understanding the effects of warming on greenhouse gas feedbacks to climate change represents a major global challenge. Most research has focused on direct effects of warming, without considering how concurrent changes in plant communities may alter such effects. Here, we combined vegetation manipulations with warming to investigate their interactive effects on greenhouse gas emissions from peatland. We found that although warming consistently increased respiration, the effect on net ecosystem CO2 exchange depended on vegetation composition. The greatest increase in CO2 sink strength after warming was when shrubs were present, and the greatest decrease when graminoids were present. CH4 was more strongly controlled by vegetation composition than by warming, with largest emissions from graminoid communities. Our results show that plant community composition is a significant modulator of greenhouse gas emissions and their response to warming, and suggest that vegetation change could alter peatland carbon sink strength under future climate change.

  7. The Role of Sustainability Resources of Large Greenhouse Gas Emitters: The Case of Corporations in Alberta, Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marwa Hannouf

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available With the global challenge of climate change, it becomes crucial to understand the factors that can guide carbon intensive companies to comply with environmental regulations through significant reductions in greenhouse gas (GHG emissions. Using the natural-resource-based view, the argument in this paper is that focusing on sustainability-driven resources by companies is a way to meet environmental compliance and reduce GHG emissions while gaining differential competitive benefits. A specific analysis on Alberta case has discussed large GHG emitters’ environmental compliance mechanisms in the context of their sustainability resources. The aim is examining if large GHG emitters in Alberta related to corporations having sustainability resources are complying with the Specified Gas Emitters Regulation (SGER reduction requirement through cleaner-production driven internal mechanisms. The paper examines the existence of the sustainability resources in the reporting companies related to large GHG emitters responsible for 86% of total GHG reported by facilities with emissions above the threshold of 100 kilotonnes of GHG per year under SGER in Alberta. Corporations are found not using their sustainability resource potential to achieve internal reductions in GHG emissions throughout their facilities. Thus, some recommendations are presented for Alberta case as well as for environmental regulations in other jurisdictions that can potentially help policy makers improve their climate change regulations and achieve their global targets and enable companies to gain competitive advantage while meeting GHG reduction compliance.

  8. The gas phase emitter effect of lanthanum within ceramic metal halide lamps and its dependence on the La vapor pressure and operating frequency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruhrmann, C.; Hoebing, T.; Bergner, A.; Groeger, S.; Awakowicz, P.; Mentel, J. [Electrical Engineering and Plasma Technology, Ruhr University Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany); Denissen, C.; Suijker, J. [Philips Lighting, Category Professional Lamps, P.O. Box 80020, NL-5600JM Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2015-08-07

    The gas phase emitter effect increases the lamp lifetime by lowering the work function and, with it, the temperature of the tungsten electrodes of metal halide lamps especially for lamps in ceramic vessels due to their high rare earth pressures. It is generated by a monolayer on the electrode surface of electropositive atoms of certain emitter elements, which are inserted into the lamp bulb by metal iodide salts. They are vaporized, dissociated, ionized, and deposited by an emitter ion current onto the electrode surface within the cathodic phase of lamp operation with a switched-dc or ac-current. The gas phase emitter effect of La and the influence of Na on the emitter effect of La are studied by spatially and phase-resolved pyrometric measurements of the electrode tip temperature, La atom, and ion densities by optical emission spectroscopy as well as optical broadband absorption spectroscopy and arc attachment images by short time photography. An addition of Na to the lamp filling increases the La vapor pressure within the lamp considerably, resulting in an improved gas phase emitter effect of La. Furthermore, the La vapor pressure is raised by a heating of the cold spot. In this way, conditions depending on the La vapor pressure and operating frequency are identified, at which the temperature of the electrodes becomes a minimum.

  9. XMM-Newton discovery of O VII emission from warm gas in clusters of galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Kaastra, J S; Tamura, T; Paerels, F B S; Den Herder, J W A

    2003-01-01

    XMM-Newton recently discovered O VII line emission from ~2 million K gas near the outer parts of several clusters of galaxies. This emission is attributed to the Warm-Hot Intergalactic Medium. The original sample of clusters studied for this purpose has been extended and two more clusters with a soft X-ray excess have been found. We discuss the physical properties of the warm gas, in particular the density, spatial extent, abundances and temperature.

  10. Seepage from an arctic shallow marine gas hydrate reservoir is insensitive to momentary ocean warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Wei-Li; Torres, Marta E.; Carroll, Jolynn; Crémière, Antoine; Panieri, Giuliana; Yao, Haoyi; Serov, Pavel

    2017-06-01

    Arctic gas hydrate reservoirs located in shallow water and proximal to the sediment-water interface are thought to be sensitive to bottom water warming that may trigger gas hydrate dissociation and the release of methane. Here, we evaluate bottom water temperature as a potential driver for hydrate dissociation and methane release from a recently discovered, gas-hydrate-bearing system south of Spitsbergen (Storfjordrenna, ~380 m water depth). Modelling of the non-steady-state porewater profiles and observations of distinct layers of methane-derived authigenic carbonate nodules in the sediments indicate centurial to millennial methane emissions in the region. Results of temperature modelling suggest limited impact of short-term warming on gas hydrates deeper than a few metres in the sediments. We conclude that the ongoing and past methane emission episodes at the investigated sites are likely due to the episodic ventilation of deep reservoirs rather than warming-induced gas hydrate dissociation in this shallow water seep site.

  11. The warm molecular gas and dust of Seyfert galaxies: two different phases of accretion?

    CERN Document Server

    Mezcua, M; Fernández-Ontiveros, J A; Tristram, K; Neumayer, N

    2015-01-01

    The distribution of warm molecular gas (1000--3000 K), traced by the near-IR H$_2$ 2.12 $\\mu$m line, has been imaged with a resolution $<0.5$ arcsec in the central 1 kpc of seven nearby Seyfert galaxies. We find that this gas is highly concentrated towards the central 100 pc and that its morphology is often symmetrical. Lanes of warm H$_2$ gas are observed only in three cases (NGC\\,1068, NGC\\,1386 and Circinus) for which the morphology is much wider and extended than the dust filaments. We conclude that there is no one-to-one correlation between dust and warm gas. This indicates that, if the dust filaments and lanes of warm gas are radial streaming motions of fueling material, they must represent \\textit{two different phases of accretion}: the dust filaments represent a colder phase than the gas close to the nucleus (within $\\sim$100 pc). We predict that the morphology of the nuclear dust at these scales should resemble that of the cold molecular gas (e.g. CO at 10-40 K), as we show for CenA and NGC\\,1566 ...

  12. Overestimating climate warming-induced methane gas escape from the seafloor by neglecting multiphase flow dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stranne, C.; O'Regan, M.; Jakobsson, M.

    2016-08-01

    Continental margins host large quantities of methane stored partly as hydrates in sediments. Release of methane through hydrate dissociation is implicated as a possible feedback mechanism to climate change. Large-scale estimates of future warming-induced methane release are commonly based on a hydrate stability approach that omits dynamic processes. Here we use the multiphase flow model TOUGH + hydrate (T + H) to quantitatively investigate how dynamic processes affect dissociation rates and methane release. The simulations involve shallow, 20-100 m thick hydrate deposits, forced by a bottom water temperature increase of 0.03°C yr-1 over 100 years. We show that on a centennial time scale, the hydrate stability approach can overestimate gas escape quantities by orders of magnitude. Our results indicate a time lag of > 40 years between the onset of warming and gas escape, meaning that recent climate warming may soon be manifested as widespread gas seepages along the world's continental margins.

  13. Offsetting global warming-induced elevated greenhouse gas emissions from an arable soil by biochar application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamminger, Chris; Poll, Christian; Marhan, Sven

    2017-08-17

    Global warming will likely enhance greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from soils. Due to its slow decomposability, biochar is widely recognized as effective in long-term soil carbon (C) sequestration and in mitigation of soil GHG emissions. In a long-term soil warming experiment (+2.5 °C, since July 2008) we studied the effect of applying high-temperature Miscanthus biochar (0, 30 t/ha, since August 2013) on GHG emissions and their global warming potential (GWP) during 2 years in a temperate agroecosystem. Crop growth, physical and chemical soil properties, temperature sensitivity of soil respiration (Rs ), and metabolic quotient (qCO2 ) were investigated to yield further information about single effects of soil warming and biochar as well as on their interactions. Soil warming increased total CO2 emissions by 28% over 2 years. The effect of warming on soil respiration did not level off as has often been observed in less intensively managed ecosystems. However, the temperature sensitivity of soil respiration was not affected by warming. Overall, biochar had no effect on most of the measured parameters, suggesting its high degradation stability and its low influence on microbial C cycling even under elevated soil temperatures. In contrast, biochar × warming interactions led to higher total N2 O emissions, possibly due to accelerated N-cycling at elevated soil temperature and to biochar-induced changes in soil properties and environmental conditions. Methane uptake was not affected by soil warming or biochar. The incorporation of biochar-C into soil was estimated to offset warming-induced elevated GHG emissions for 25 years. Our results highlight the suitability of biochar for C sequestration in cultivated temperate agricultural soil under a future elevated temperature. However, the increased N2 O emissions under warming limit the GHG mitigation potential of biochar. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Simulation of gas production from hydrate reservoir by the combination of warm water flooding and depressurization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Gas production from hydrate reservoir by the combination of warm water flooding and depressurization is proposed,which can overcome the deficiency of single production method.Based on the combination production method,the physical and mathematical models are developed to simulate the hydrate dissociation.The mathematical model can be used to analyze the effects of the flow of multiphase fluid,the kinetic process of hydrate dissociation,the endothermic process of hydrate dissociation,ice-water phase equilibrium,the convection and conduction on the hydrate dissociation and gas and water production.The mechanism of gas production by the combination of warm water flooding and depressurization is revealed by the numerical simulation.The evolutions of such physical variables as pressure,temperature,saturations and gas and water rates are analyzed.Numerical results show that under certain conditions the combination method has the advantage of longer stable period of high gas rate than the single producing method.

  15. WARM GAS IN THE VIRGO CLUSTER. I. DISTRIBUTION OF Ly{alpha} ABSORBERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Joo Heon; Putman, Mary E.; Bryan, Greg L. [Department of Astronomy, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Thom, Christopher [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21211 (United States); Chen, Hsiao-Wen, E-mail: jhyoon@astro.columbia.edu [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics and Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States)

    2012-08-01

    The first systematic study of the warm gas (T = 10{sup 4-5} K) distribution across a galaxy cluster is presented using multiple background QSOs in and around the Virgo Cluster. We detect 25 Ly{alpha} absorbers (N{sub HI} = 10{sup 13.1-15.4} cm{sup -2}) in the Virgo velocity range toward 9 of 12 QSO sightlines observed with the Cosmic Origin Spectrograph, with a cluster impact parameter range of 0.36-1.65 Mpc (0.23-1.05 R{sub vir}). Including 18 Ly{alpha} absorbers previously detected by STIS or GHRS toward 7 of 11 background QSOs in and around the Virgo Cluster, we establish a sample of 43 absorbers toward a total of 23 background probes for studying the incidence of Ly{alpha} absorbers in and around the Virgo Cluster. With these absorbers, we find (1) warm gas is predominantly in the outskirts of the cluster and avoids the X-ray-detected hot intracluster medium (ICM). Also, Ly{alpha} absorption strength increases with cluster impact parameter. (2) Ly{alpha}-absorbing warm gas traces cold H I-emitting gas in the substructures of the Virgo Cluster. (3) Including the absorbers associated with the surrounding substructures, the warm gas covering fraction (100% for N{sub HI} > 10{sup 13.1} cm{sup -2}) is in agreement with cosmological simulations. We speculate that the observed warm gas is part of large-scale gas flows feeding the cluster both in the ICM and galaxies.

  16. Glitters of warm H2 in cold diffuse molecular gas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Falgarone, Edith; Beichman, Chaz; Boulanger, Francois; Combes, Francoise; Gry, Cecile; Helou, Georges; Laureijs, Rene; Pineau Des Forets, Guillaume; Valentijn, Edwin; Verstraete, Laurent

    2004-01-01

    Cold molecular hydrogen, a possibly dominant gas fraction in galaxies, does not radiate due to the symmetry and small moment of inertia of the molecule. The only tracers of cold H2, the rotational lines of CO and dust thermal emission operate only in metal-rich environments. By detecting the lowest

  17. What is the physical origin of strong Lya emission? II. Gas Kinematics and Distribution of Lya Emitters

    CERN Document Server

    Shibuya, Takatoshi; Nakajima, Kimihiko; Hashimoto, Takuya; Ono, Yoshiaki; Rauch, Michael; Gauthier, Jean-Rene; Shimasaku, Kazuhiro; Goto, Ryosuke; Mori, Masao; Umemura, Masayuki

    2014-01-01

    We present a statistical study of velocities of Lya, interstellar (IS) absorption, and nebular lines and gas covering fraction for Lya emitters (LAEs) at z~2. We make a sample of 22 LAEs with a large Lya equivalent width (EW) of > 50A based on our deep Keck/LRIS observations, in conjunction with spectroscopic data from the Subaru/FMOS program and the literature. We estimate the average velocity offset of Lya from a systemic redshift determined with nebular lines to be dv_Lya=234+-9 km s-1. Using a Kolmogorv-Smirnov test, we confirm the previous claim of Hashimoto et al. (2013) that the average dv_Lya of LAEs is smaller than that of LBGs. Our LRIS data successfully identify blue-shifted multiple IS absorption lines in the UV continua of four LAEs on an individual basis. The average velocity offset of IS absorption lines from a systemic redshift is dv_IS=204+-27 km s-1, indicating LAE's gas outflow with a velocity comparable to typical LBGs. Thus, the ratio, R^Lya_ IS = dv_Lya/dv_IS of LAEs, is around unity, su...

  18. Net global warming potential and greenhouse gas intensity affected by cropping sequence and nitrogen fertilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little information is available about management practice effects on the net global warming potential (GWP) and greenhouse gas intensity (GHGI) under dryland cropping systems. We evaluated the effects of cropping sequences (conventional-tillage malt barley [Hordeum vulgaris L.]–fallow [CTB-F], no-ti...

  19. OMVPE growth and gas-phase reactions of AlGaN for UV emitters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, J.; Figiel, J.J.; Crawford, M.H.; Banas, M.A.; Bartram, M.E.; Biefeld, R.M. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Song, Y.K.; Nurmikko, A.V. [Brown Univ., Providence, RI (United States). Div. of Engineering

    1998-06-01

    Gas-phase parasitic reactions among TMG, TMA, and NH3, are investigated by monitoring of the growth rate/incorporation efficiency of GaN and AlN using an in-situ optical reflectometer. It is suggested that gas phase adduct (TMA: NH{sub 3}) reactions not only reduce the incorporation efficiency of TMA but also affect the incorporation behavior of TMGa. The observed phenomena can be explained by either a synergistic gas-phase scavenging effect or a surface site-blocking effect. Relatively low reactor pressures (30--50 Torr) are employed to grow an AlGaN/GaN QW p-n diode structure. The UV emission at 354 nm (FWHM {approximately} 6 nm) represents the first report of LED operation from an indium-free GaN QW diode.

  20. Warm Gas in and Around Simulated Galaxy Clusters as Probed by Absorption Lines

    CERN Document Server

    Emerick, Andrew; Putman, Mary E

    2015-01-01

    Understanding gas flows into and out of the most massive dark matter structures in our Universe, galaxy clusters, is fundamental to understanding their evolution. Gas in clusters is well studied in the hot ($>$ 10$^{6}$ K) and cold ($<$ 10$^{4}$ K) regimes, but the warm gas component (10$^{4}$ - 10$^{6}$ K) is poorly constrained. It is challenging to observe directly, but can be probed through Ly$\\alpha$ absorption studies. We produce the first systematic study of the warm gas content of galaxy clusters through synthetic Ly$\\alpha$ absorption studies using cosmological simulations of two galaxy clusters produced with Enzo. We explore the spatial and kinematic properties of our cluster absorbers, and show that the majority of the identified absorbers are due to fast moving gas associated with cluster infall from IGM filaments. Towards the center of the clusters, however, the warm IGM filaments are no longer dominant and the absorbers tend to have higher column densities and metallicities, representing strip...

  1. Warm intermediate inflationary Universe model in the presence of a generalized Chaplygin gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrera, Ramon [Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Valparaiso, Instituto de Fisica, Valparaiso (Chile); Videla, Nelson [Universidad de Chile, Departamento de Fisica, FCFM, Santiago (Chile); Olivares, Marco [Universidad Diego Portales, Facultad de Ingenieria, Santiago (Chile)

    2016-01-15

    A warm intermediate inflationary model in the context of generalized Chaplygin gas is investigated. We study this model in the weak and strong dissipative regimes, considering a generalized form of the dissipative coefficient Γ = Γ(T,φ), and we describe the inflationary dynamics in the slow-roll approximation. We find constraints on the parameters in our model considering the Planck 2015 data, together with the condition for warm inflation T > H, and the conditions for the weak and strong dissipative regimes. (orig.)

  2. Super-emitters in natural gas infrastructure are caused by abnormal process conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavala-Araiza, Daniel; Alvarez, Ramón A.; Lyon, David R.; Allen, David T.; Marchese, Anthony J.; Zimmerle, Daniel J.; Hamburg, Steven P.

    2017-01-01

    Effectively mitigating methane emissions from the natural gas supply chain requires addressing the disproportionate influence of high-emitting sources. Here we use a Monte Carlo simulation to aggregate methane emissions from all components on natural gas production sites in the Barnett Shale production region (Texas). Our total emission estimates are two-thirds of those derived from independent site-based measurements. Although some high-emitting operations occur by design (condensate flashing and liquid unloadings), they occur more than an order of magnitude less frequently than required to explain the reported frequency at which high site-based emissions are observed. We conclude that the occurrence of abnormal process conditions (for example, malfunctions upstream of the point of emissions; equipment issues) cause additional emissions that explain the gap between component-based and site-based emissions. Such abnormal conditions can cause a substantial proportion of a site's gas production to be emitted to the atmosphere and are the defining attribute of super-emitting sites.

  3. Super-emitters in natural gas infrastructure are caused by abnormal process conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavala-Araiza, Daniel; Alvarez, Ramón A; Lyon, David R.; Allen, David T.; Marchese, Anthony J.; Zimmerle, Daniel J.; Hamburg, Steven P.

    2017-01-01

    Effectively mitigating methane emissions from the natural gas supply chain requires addressing the disproportionate influence of high-emitting sources. Here we use a Monte Carlo simulation to aggregate methane emissions from all components on natural gas production sites in the Barnett Shale production region (Texas). Our total emission estimates are two-thirds of those derived from independent site-based measurements. Although some high-emitting operations occur by design (condensate flashing and liquid unloadings), they occur more than an order of magnitude less frequently than required to explain the reported frequency at which high site-based emissions are observed. We conclude that the occurrence of abnormal process conditions (for example, malfunctions upstream of the point of emissions; equipment issues) cause additional emissions that explain the gap between component-based and site-based emissions. Such abnormal conditions can cause a substantial proportion of a site's gas production to be emitted to the atmosphere and are the defining attribute of super-emitting sites. PMID:28091528

  4. Warm Gas in the Virgo Cluster: I. Distribution of Lya Absorbers

    CERN Document Server

    Yoon, Joo Heon; Thom, Christopher; Chen, Hsiao-Wen; Bryan, Greg

    2012-01-01

    The first systematic study of the warm gas (T=10^4-5 K) distribution across a galaxy cluster is presented using multiple background QSOs to the Virgo Cluster. We detect 25 Lya absorbers (N_HI = 10^13.1-15.4 cm^-2) in the Virgo velocity range toward 9 of 12 QSO sightlines observed with COS, with a cluster impact parameter range of 0.25-1.15 Mpc (0.23-1.05Rvir). Including 18 previously STIS or GHRS detected Lya absorbers toward 7 of 11 background QSOs in and around the Virgo Cluster, we establish a sample of 43 absorbers towards a total of 23 background probes for studying the incidence of Lya absorbers in and around the Virgo Cluster. With these absorbers, we find: 1) Warm gas is predominantly in the outskirts of the cluster and avoids the X-ray detected hot ICM. Also, Lya absorption strength increases with a cluster impact parameter. 2) Lya absorbing warm gas traces cold HI emitting gas in the substructures of the Virgo Cluster. 3) Including the absorbers associated with the surrounding substructures, the war...

  5. Residual gas properties in a field emission device with ZnO emitters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Jin-Chan

    2013-01-01

    In this paper,a vacuum system is employed to compare the emission stabilities of the same ZnO cathode in a sealed field emission (FE) device and under ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) conditions.It is observed that the emission current is more stable under the UHV level than in the device.When all conditions except the ambient gases are kept unchanged,the emission current degradation is mainly caused by the residual gases in the sealed device.The quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) equipped on the vacuum system is used to investigate the residual gas components.Based on the obtained QMS data,the following conclusions can be drawn:the residual gases in ZnO-FE devices are H2,CH4,CO,Ar,and CO2.These residual gases can change the work function at the surface through adsorption or ion bombardment,thereby degrading the emission current of the cathode.

  6. Residual gas properties in a field emission device with ZnO emitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jin-Chan

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, a vacuum system is employed to compare the emission stabilities of the same ZnO cathode in a sealed field emission (FE) device and under ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) conditions. It is observed that the emission current is more stable under the UHV level than in the device. When all conditions except the ambient gases are kept unchanged, the emission current degradation is mainly caused by the residual gases in the sealed device. The quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) equipped on the vacuum system is used to investigate the residual gas components. Based on the obtained QMS data, the following conclusions can be drawn: the residual gases in ZnO-FE devices are H2, CH4, CO, Ar, and CO2. These residual gases can change the work function at the surface through adsorption or ion bombardment, thereby degrading the emission current of the cathode.

  7. Increasing insolation and greenhouse gas concentration trigger Bølling-Allerød warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obase, Takashi; Abe-Ouchi, Ayako

    2017-04-01

    During the last deglaciation, a major global warming was punctuated by several abrupt climate changes, likely related to Atlantic Meridional Overturning Curculation (AMOC) (Clark et al. 2012). Transient deglaciation experiments from the Last Glacial Maximum have been conducted by applying time-dependent insolation, greenhouse gas concentrations, and glacial meltwater forcing (Liu et al. 2009). They have showed that reduction in glacial meltwater discharge rate into North Atlantic induces abrupt recovery of AMOC, warming of Greenland and cooling of Antarctica (bipolar response) during the period of Bølling-Allerød (BA, 14.6 ka). We conduct a transient simulation from the Last Glacial Maximum to BA using an atmosphere-ocean coupled general circulation model (AOGCM) MIROC 4m (an IPCC-class Japanese community model). The model is initialized with the 21ka, and we change insolation, greenhouse gas concentrations and meltwater fluxes following the protocol of PMIP4 (Ivanovic et al. 2016). Glacial meltwater is derived from ice sheet reconstruction (ICE6g, Peltier et al. 2015). We assume the glacial meltwater due to ice sheet loss is uniformly applied to the area of 50-70N North Atlantic Ocean. We conduct additional experiments branched from 16 ka, where 50-80% of ICE6g meltwater fluxes are applied without reducing the meltwater fluxes before the BA. The model results show that abrupt resumption of AMOC and warming of Greenland occurred at around the period of BA even under hosing of 0.06 Sv. Transition from cold stadial mode to warm interstadial mode occurs in about 100 years, which is consistent with reconstructions (Buizert et al. 2014). The result implies that increasing summer insolation and greenhouse gas concentration trigger abrupt AMOC recovery and warming in the Northern Hemisphere, and large fluctuation of meltwater due to ice sheet melting may not be necessary.

  8. Ab Initio Quantum Monte Carlo Simulation of the Warm Dense Electron Gas in the Thermodynamic Limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dornheim, Tobias; Groth, Simon; Sjostrom, Travis; Malone, Fionn D.; Foulkes, W. M. C.; Bonitz, Michael

    2016-10-01

    We perform ab initio quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) simulations of the warm dense uniform electron gas in the thermodynamic limit. By combining QMC data with the linear response theory, we are able to remove finite-size errors from the potential energy over the substantial parts of the warm dense regime, overcoming the deficiencies of the existing finite-size corrections by Brown et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 146405 (2013)]. Extensive new QMC results for up to N =1000 electrons enable us to compute the potential energy V and the exchange-correlation free energy Fxc of the macroscopic electron gas with an unprecedented accuracy of |Δ V |/|V |,|Δ Fxc|/|F |xc˜10-3 . A comparison of our new data to the recent parametrization of Fxc by Karasiev et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 076403 (2014)] reveals significant deviations to the latter.

  9. The warming effect of the flare of natural gas on soil biological activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yevdokimov, Ilya; Yusupov, Irek; Shavnin, Sergey

    2017-04-01

    Simulation of global warming is one of the key issues of international efforts to study climatic changes. A number of manipulation experiments with soil warming have been established throughout the world in the last decades. We used warming with natural gas flare near the pine forest as a kind of manipulation experiment to assess the synergistic effect of drying and warming on plant-soil-microbial interactions. The experimental area is situated in a pine forest subzone of the forest zone of the Western Siberia near Pokachi, Yugra (61o73'N, 75o49'E). The experimental plots were established in a young Scotch pine forest on sandy podzolic soil at three distances of 70, 90 and 130 m from the flare of natural gas, with trees exposed to strong (S) moderate (M), and weak (W) impact, respectively. Increase of soil temperature in summer time were moderate: on average 0.7oC and 1.3oC for the plots M and S, respectively, compared to the plot W. The plot S demonstrated increase in CO2 efflux from the soil surface, mainly due to intensifying plant root respiration, by 18% compared to the plot W as well as increase in SOM content by 31%, with intensive accumulation of recalcitrant humus. By contrast, microbial biomass, labile SOM pool and basal respiration were higher in soil with weak flaring impact by 74%, 33% and 24%, respectively. Thus, three trends in plant-soil-microbe system exposed to warming and drying were revealed: i) SOM accumulation, ii) suppression of microbial activity, and iii) stimulation of root respiration. The research was supported by the Russian Science Foundation and Russian Foundation for Basic Researches.

  10. Greenhouse-gas emission targets for limiting global warming to 2 degrees C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinshausen, Malte; Meinshausen, Nicolai; Hare, William; Raper, Sarah C B; Frieler, Katja; Knutti, Reto; Frame, David J; Allen, Myles R

    2009-04-30

    More than 100 countries have adopted a global warming limit of 2 degrees C or below (relative to pre-industrial levels) as a guiding principle for mitigation efforts to reduce climate change risks, impacts and damages. However, the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions corresponding to a specified maximum warming are poorly known owing to uncertainties in the carbon cycle and the climate response. Here we provide a comprehensive probabilistic analysis aimed at quantifying GHG emission budgets for the 2000-50 period that would limit warming throughout the twenty-first century to below 2 degrees C, based on a combination of published distributions of climate system properties and observational constraints. We show that, for the chosen class of emission scenarios, both cumulative emissions up to 2050 and emission levels in 2050 are robust indicators of the probability that twenty-first century warming will not exceed 2 degrees C relative to pre-industrial temperatures. Limiting cumulative CO(2) emissions over 2000-50 to 1,000 Gt CO(2) yields a 25% probability of warming exceeding 2 degrees C-and a limit of 1,440 Gt CO(2) yields a 50% probability-given a representative estimate of the distribution of climate system properties. As known 2000-06 CO(2) emissions were approximately 234 Gt CO(2), less than half the proven economically recoverable oil, gas and coal reserves can still be emitted up to 2050 to achieve such a goal. Recent G8 Communiqués envisage halved global GHG emissions by 2050, for which we estimate a 12-45% probability of exceeding 2 degrees C-assuming 1990 as emission base year and a range of published climate sensitivity distributions. Emissions levels in 2020 are a less robust indicator, but for the scenarios considered, the probability of exceeding 2 degrees C rises to 53-87% if global GHG emissions are still more than 25% above 2000 levels in 2020.

  11. GAS ACCRETION IS DOMINATED BY WARM IONIZED GAS IN MILKY WAY MASS GALAXIES AT z {approx} 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joung, M. Ryan; Putman, Mary E.; Bryan, Greg L.; Fernandez, Ximena; Peek, J. E. G., E-mail: moo@astro.columbia.edu [Department of Astronomy, Columbia University, 550 West 120th Street, New York, NY 10027 (United States)

    2012-11-10

    We perform high-resolution hydrodynamic simulations of a Milky Way mass galaxy in a fully cosmological setting using the adaptive mesh refinement code, Enzo, and study the kinematics of gas in the simulated galactic halo. We find that the gas inflow occurs mostly along filamentary structures in the halo. The warm-hot (10{sup 5} K 10{sup 6} K) ionized gases are found to dominate the overall mass accretion in the system (with M-dot = 3-5 M {sub Sun} yr{sup -1}) over a large range of distances, extending from the virial radius to the vicinity of the disk. Most of the inflowing gas (by mass) does not cool, and the small fraction that manages to cool does so primarily close to the galaxy (R {approx}< 100 kpc, with more pronounced cooling at smaller R), perhaps comprising the neutral gas that may be detectable as, e.g., high-velocity clouds. The neutral clouds are embedded within larger, accreting filamentary flows, and represent only a small fraction of the total mass inflow rate. The inflowing gas has relatively low metallicity (Z/Z {sub Sun} < 0.2). The outer layers of the filamentary inflows are heated due to compression as they approach the disk. In addition to the inflow, we find high-velocity, metal-enriched outflows of hot gas driven by supernova feedback. Our results are consistent with observations of halo gas at low z.

  12. Constraining the abundance of high emitters is critical to mitigating the effect of abandoned oil and gas wells on methane emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend-Small, A.; Ferrara, T.; Fries, A. E.

    2016-12-01

    Recent studies have suggested that methane inventories may underrepresent emissions from the oil and gas supply chain, and this has led to an effort by several groups to assess whether abandoned wells are a significant source. Our work has shown that unplugged wells are a larger source than plugged wells, and that a small percentage of unplugged wells likely make up the majority of emissions. Preliminary work also suggests that the oldest oil and gas producing region, the Appalachian Basin, has the largest emitters. However, many of these wells are over 100 years old and state databases lack accurate plugging and location data. Our current work is focused on determining the proportion of high emitters among abandoned wells in the Appalachian basin of Ohio. We are also making component-level measurements of conventional oil and gas wells on federal land for comparison. Our methods include analysis of gas composition to identify the relative contributions of biogenic and thermogenic methane to emissions. Identifying the location and emission rate of abandoned wells will not only mitigate a potential regionally important methane source, but will also help prevent interactions of these older wells with new drilling for shale gas as well as groundwater.

  13. Uncertainties in the attribution of greenhouse gas warming and implications for climate prediction

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, Gareth S; Mitchell, John F B

    2016-01-01

    Using optimal detection techniques with climate model simulations, most of the observed increase of near surface temperatures over the second half of the twentieth century is attributed to anthropogenic influences. However, the partitioning of the anthropogenic influence to individual factors, such as greenhouse gases and aerosols, is much less robust. Differences in how forcing factors are applied, in their radiative influence and in models' climate sensitivities, substantially influence the response patterns. We find standard optimal detection methodologies cannot fully reconcile this response diversity. By selecting a set of experiments to enable the diagnosing of greenhouse gases and the combined influence of other anthropogenic and natural factors, we find robust detections of well mixed greenhouse gases across a large ensemble of models. Of the observed warming over the 20th century of 0.65K/century we find, using a multi model mean not incorporating pattern uncertainty, a well mixed greenhouse gas warm...

  14. Sorption Mechanisms for Mercury Capture in Warm Post-Gasification Gas Clean-Up Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jost Wendt; Sung Jun Lee; Paul Blowers

    2008-09-30

    The research was directed towards a sorbent injection/particle removal process where a sorbent may be injected upstream of the warm gas cleanup system to scavenge Hg and other trace metals, and removed (with the metals) within the warm gas cleanup process. The specific objectives of this project were to understand and quantify, through fundamentally based models, mechanisms of interaction between mercury vapor compounds and novel paper waste derived (kaolinite + calcium based) sorbents (currently marketed under the trade name MinPlus). The portion of the research described first is the experimental portion, in which sorbent effectiveness to scavenge metallic mercury (Hg{sup 0}) at high temperatures (>600 C) is determined as a function of temperature, sorbent loading, gas composition, and other important parameters. Levels of Hg{sup 0} investigated were in an industrially relevant range ({approx} 25 {micro}g/m{sup 3}) although contaminants were contained in synthetic gases and not in actual flue gases. A later section of this report contains the results of the complementary computational results.

  15. Absorption signatures of warm-hot gas at low redshift: Broad Lyman-Alpha Absorbers

    CERN Document Server

    Tepper-García, Thorsten; Schaye, Joop; Booth, Craig M; Vecchia, Claudio Dalla; Theuns, Tom

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the physical state of HI absorbing gas at low redshift (z=0.25) using a subset of cosmological, hydrodynamic simulations from the OWLS project, focusing in particular on broad (b_HI > 40 km/s) Lyman-Alpha absorbers (BLAs), which are believed to originate in shock-heated gas in the Warm-Hot Intergalactic Medium (WHIM). Our fiducial model, which includes radiative cooling by heavy elements and feedback by supernovae and active galactic nuclei, predicts that by z=0.25 nearly 60 per cent of the gas mass ends up at densities and temperatures characteristic of the WHIM and we find that half of this fraction is due to outflows. The standard HI observables (distribution of HI column densities N_HI, distribution of Doppler parameters b_HI, b_HI - N_HI correlation) and the BLA line number density predicted by our simulations are in remarkably good agreement with observations. BLAs arise in gas that is hotter, more highly ionised and more enriched than the gas giving rise to typical Lyman-Alpha forest abs...

  16. Comparison of net global warming potential and greenhouse gas intensity affected by management practices in two dryland cropping sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little is known about the effect of management practices on net global warming potential (GWP) and greenhouse gas intensity (GHGI) that account for all sources and sinks of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in dryland cropping systems. The objective of this study was to compare the effect of a combinat...

  17. The history and future trends of ocean warming-induced gas hydrate dissociation in the SW Barents Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadakkepuliyambatta, Sunil; Chand, Shyam; Bünz, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    The Barents Sea is a major part of the Arctic where the Gulf Stream mixes with the cold Arctic waters. Late Cenozoic uplift and glacial erosion have resulted in hydrocarbon leakage from reservoirs, evolution of fluid flow systems, shallow gas accumulations, and hydrate formation throughout the Barents Sea. Here we integrate seismic data observations of gas hydrate accumulations along with gas hydrate stability modeling to analyze the impact of warming ocean waters in the recent past and future (1960-2060). Seismic observations of bottom-simulating reflectors (BSRs) indicate significant thermogenic gas input into the hydrate stability zone throughout the SW Barents Sea. The distribution of BSR is controlled primarily by fluid flow focusing features, such as gas chimneys and faults. Warming ocean bottom temperatures over the recent past and in future (1960-2060) can result in hydrate dissociation over an area covering 0.03-38% of the SW Barents Sea.

  18. Halpha and [S II] emission from warm ionized gas in the Scutum-Centaurus Arm

    CERN Document Server

    Hill, Alex S; Haffner, L Matthew; Gostisha, Martin; Barger, Kathleen A

    2014-01-01

    We present Wisconsin H-Alpha Mapper [S II] {\\lambda}6716 and H{\\alpha} spectroscopic maps of the warm ionized medium (WIM) in the Scutum-Centaurus Arm at Galactic longitudes 310{\\deg} = 100 R. The line ratio is better correlated with H{\\alpha} intensity than with height above the plane, indicating that the physical conditions within the WIM vary systematically with electron density. We argue that the variation of the line ratio with height is a consequence of the decrease of electron density with height. Our results reinforce the well-established picture in which the diffuse H{\\alpha} emission is due primarily to emission from in situ photoionized gas, with scattered light only a minor contributor.

  19. Chinese Grade Eight Students' Understanding about the Concept of Global Warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jing

    2017-01-01

    China is one of the world's biggest greenhouse gas emitters. Chinese students' awareness and understanding about global warming have a significant impact on the future of mankind. This study, as an initial research of this kind in Mainland China, uses clinical interviews to survey 37 grade eight students on their understanding about global…

  20. Chinese Grade Eight Students' Understanding about the Concept of Global Warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jing

    2017-01-01

    China is one of the world's biggest greenhouse gas emitters. Chinese students' awareness and understanding about global warming have a significant impact on the future of mankind. This study, as an initial research of this kind in Mainland China, uses clinical interviews to survey 37 grade eight students on their understanding about global…

  1. Detection of two intervening Ne viii absorbers probing warm gas at z ˜ 0.6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pachat, Sachin; Narayanan, Anand; Khaire, Vikram; Savage, Blair D.; Muzahid, Sowgat; Wakker, Bart P.

    2017-10-01

    We report on the detection of two Ne viii absorbers, at z = 0.619 07 and 0.570 52 in the Hubble Space Telescope/Cosmic Origins Spectrograph spectrum of background quasars SDSS J080908.13 + 461925.6 and SBS 1122 + 594, respectively. The Ne viii 770 line is at ∼3σ significance. In both instances, the Ne viii is found to be tracing gas with T ≳ 105 K, predominantly collisionally ionized, with moderate densities of n_{H} ≲ 10^{-4} cm-3, sub-solar metallicities and total hydrogen column densities of N(H) ≳ 1019 cm-2. In the z = 0.619 07 absorber, the low, intermediate ions and O vi are consistent with origin in photoionized gas, with the O vi potentially having some contribution from the warm collisional phase traced by Ne viii. The z = 0.570 52 system has H I absorption in at least three kinematically distinct components, with one of them having b({H I}) = 49 {± } 11 km s-1. The intermediate-ionization lines, O vi and Ne viii, are coincident in velocity with this component. Their different line widths suggest warm temperatures of T = (0.5-1.5) × 105 K. Both absorbers are residing in regions where there are several luminous (≳L★) galaxies. The absorber at z = 0.570 52 is within the virial radius of a 2.6L★ galaxy, possibly associated with shock-heated circumgalactic material.

  2. Extended warm gas in Orion KL as probed by methyl cyanide

    CERN Document Server

    Bell, T A; Viti, S; Marcelino, N; Palau, Aina; Esplugues, G B; Tercero, B

    2014-01-01

    In order to study the temperature distribution of the extended gas within the Orion Kleinmann-Low nebula, we have mapped the emission by methyl cyanide (CH3CN) in its J=6_K-5_K, J=12_K-11_K, J=13_K-12_K, and J=14_K-13_K transitions at an average angular resolution of ~10 arcsec (22 arcsec for the 6_K-5_K lines), as part of a new 2D line survey of this region using the IRAM 30m telescope. These fully sampled maps show extended emission from warm gas to the northeast of IRc2 and the distinct kinematic signatures of the hot core and compact ridge source components. We have constructed population diagrams for the four sets of K-ladder emission lines at each position in the maps and have derived rotational excitation temperatures and total beam-averaged column densities from the fitted slopes. In addition, we have fitted LVG model spectra to the observations to determine best-fit physical parameters at each map position, yielding the distribution of kinetic temperatures across the region. The resulting temperature...

  3. Net global warming potential and greenhouse gas intensity influenced by irrigation, tillage, crop rotation, and nitrogen fertilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little information exists about sources and sinks of greenhouse gases (GHGs) affected by management practices to account for net emissions from agroecosystems. We evaluated the effects of irrigation, tillage, crop rotation, and N fertilization on net global warming potential (GWP) and greenhouse gas...

  4. Tentative detection of warm intervening gas towards PKS 0548-322 with XMM-Newton

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barcons, X.

    2005-03-17

    We present the results of a long ({approx} 93 ksec) XMM-Newton observation of the bright BL-Lac object PKS 0548-322 (z = 0.069). Our Reflection Grating Spectrometer (RGS) spectrum shows a single absorption feature at an observed wavelength {lambda} = 23.33 {+-} 0.01 {angstrom} which we interpret as OVI K{alpha} absorption at z = 0.058, i.e., {approx} 3000 km s{sup -1} from the background object. The observed equivalent width of the absorption line {approx} 30m {angstrom}, coupled with the lack of the corresponding absorption edge in the EPIC pn data, implies a column density N{sub OVI} {approx} 2 x 10{sup 16} cm{sup -2} and turbulence with a Doppler velocity parameter b > 100 km s{sup -1}. Within the limitations of our RGS spectrum, no OVII or OV K{alpha} absorption are detected. Under the assumption of ionization equilibrium by both collisions and the extragalactic background, this is only marginally consistent if the gas temperature is {approx} 2.5 x 10{sup 5} K, with significantly lower or higher values being excluded by our limits on OV or OVII. If confirmed, this would be the first X-ray detection of a large amount of intervening warm absorbing gas through OVI absorption. The existence of such a high column density absorber, much stronger than any previously detected one in OVI, would place stringent constraints on the large-scale distribution of baryonic gas in the Universe.

  5. Uncertainties in the attribution of greenhouse gas warming and implications for climate prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Gareth S.; Stott, Peter A.; Mitchell, John F. B.

    2016-06-01

    Using optimal detection techniques with climate model simulations, most of the observed increase of near-surface temperatures over the second half of the twentieth century is attributed to anthropogenic influences. However, the partitioning of the anthropogenic influence to individual factors, such as greenhouse gases and aerosols, is much less robust. Differences in how forcing factors are applied, in their radiative influence and in models' climate sensitivities, substantially influence the response patterns. We find that standard optimal detection methodologies cannot fully reconcile this response diversity. By selecting a set of experiments to enable the diagnosing of greenhouse gases and the combined influence of other anthropogenic and natural factors, we find robust detections of well-mixed greenhouse gases across a large ensemble of models. Of the observed warming over the twentieth century of 0.65 K/century we find, using a multimodel mean not incorporating pattern uncertainty, a well-mixed greenhouse gas warming of 0.87 to 1.22 K/century. This is partially offset by cooling from other anthropogenic and natural influences of -0.54 to -0.22 K/century. Although better constrained than recent studies, the attributable trends across climate models are still wide, with implications for observational constrained estimates of transient climate response. Some of the uncertainties could be reduced in future by having more model data to better quantify the simulated estimates of the signals and natural variability, by designing model experiments more effectively and better quantification of the climate model radiative influences. Most importantly, how model pattern uncertainties are incorporated into the optimal detection methodology should be improved.

  6. Brownian Emitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsekov, Roumen

    2016-06-01

    A Brownian harmonic oscillator, which dissipates energy either by friction or via emission of electromagnetic radiation, is considered. This Brownian emitter is driven by the surrounding thermo-quantum fluctuations, which are theoretically described by the fluctuation-dissipation theorem. It is shown how the Abraham-Lorentz force leads to dependence of the half-width on the peak frequency of the oscillator amplitude spectral density. It is found that for the case of a charged particle moving in vacuum at zero temperature, its root-mean-square velocity fluctuation is a universal constant, equal to roughly 1/18 of the speed of light. The relevant Fokker-Planck and Smoluchowski equations are also derived.

  7. Asymmetrical field emitter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, J.G.; Smith, B.K.

    1995-10-10

    A method is disclosed for providing a field emitter with an asymmetrical emitter structure having a very sharp tip in close proximity to its gate. One preferred embodiment of the present invention includes an asymmetrical emitter and a gate. The emitter having a tip and a side is coupled to a substrate. The gate is connected to a step in the substrate. The step has a top surface and a side wall that is substantially parallel to the side of the emitter. The tip of the emitter is in close proximity to the gate. The emitter is at an emitter potential, and the gate is at a gate potential such that with the two potentials at appropriate values, electrons are emitted from the emitter. In one embodiment, the gate is separated from the emitter by an oxide layer, and the emitter is etched anisotropically to form its tip and its asymmetrical structure. 17 figs.

  8. Greenhouse gas emissions from Swiss agriculture since 1990: implications for environmental policies to mitigate global warming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leifeld, Jens [AGROSCOPE, Swiss Federal Research Station for Agroecology and Agriculture, Air Pollution/Climate Group, Reckenholzstrasse 191, 8046 Zurich (Switzerland)]. E-mail: jens.leifeld@fal.admin.ch; Fuhrer, Juerg [AGROSCOPE, Swiss Federal Research Station for Agroecology and Agriculture, Air Pollution/Climate Group, Reckenholzstrasse 191, 8046 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2005-08-01

    Agricultural greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions contribute significantly to global warming, and environmental protection strategies have thus to integrate emission reduction measures from this source. In Switzerland, legislation together with monetary incentives has forced primarily integrated, and to a lesser extend organic farming, both covering nowadays more than 95% of the agriculturally useful area. Though reducing greenhouse gas emissions was not a primary intention of this reorganisation, the measures were successful in reducing the overall emissions of nitrous oxide and methane by 10% relative to 1990. A reduction of the animal herd, namely of dairy cattle, non-dairy cattle and swine, and decreasing inputs of mineral N are the main contributors to the achieved emission reduction. Crop productivity was not negatively affected and milk productivity even increased, referring to the ecological potential of agricultural reorganisation that has been tapped. Total meat production declined proportional to the animal herd. Stabilised animal numbers and fertiliser use during the last 4 years refer to an exhaustion of future reduction potentials without further legislative action because this stabilisation is most likely due to the adaptation to the production guidelines. A comparison of emission trends and carbon sequestration potentials in the broader context of the EU15 reveals that nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) and methane (CH{sub 4}) have been reduced more efficiently most probably due to the measures taken, but that sequestration potentials are smaller than in the EU15 mainly because of differences in the agricultural structure. The change from an intensified towards a more environmental sound integrated production has a significant reduction potential, but in any case, agriculture will remain a net GHG source in spite of emission mitigation and carbon sequestration.

  9. Development and Evaluation of Nanoscale Sorbents for Mercury Capture from Warm Fuel Gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raja A. Jadhav

    2006-05-31

    Several different types of nanocrystalline metal oxide sorbents were synthesized and evaluated for capture of mercury (Hg) from coal-gasifier warm fuel gas. Detailed experimental studies were carried out to understand the fundamental mechanism of interaction between mercury and nanocrystalline sorbents over a range of fuel gas conditions. The metal oxide sorbents evaluated in this work included those prepared by GTI's subcontractor NanoScale Materials, Inc. (NanoScale) as well as those prepared in-house. These sorbents were evaluated for mercury capture in GTI's Mercury Sorbent Testing System. Initial experiments were focused on sorbent evaluation for mercury capture in N{sub 2} stream over the temperature range 423-533 K. These exploratory studies demonstrated that NanoActive Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} along with its supported form was the most active of the sorbent evaluated. The capture of Hg decreased with temperature, which suggested that physical adsorption was the dominant mechanism of Hg capture. Desorption studies on spent sorbents indicated that a major portion of Hg was attached to the sorbent by strong bonds, which suggested that Hg was oxidized by the O atoms of the metal oxides, thus forming a strong Hg-O bond with the oxide. Initial screening studies also indicated that sulfided form of CuO/alumina was the most active for Hg capture, therefore was selected for detailed evaluation in simulated fuel gas (SFG). It was found that such supported CuO sorbents had high Hg-sorption capacity in the presence of H{sub 2}, provided the gas also contained H{sub 2}S. Exposure of supported CuO sorbent to H{sub 2}S results in the formation of CuS, which is an active sorbent for Hg capture. Sulfur atom in CuS forms a bond with Hg that results into its capture. Although thermodynamically CuS is predicted to form unreactive Cu{sub 2}S form when exposed to H{sub 2}, it is hypothesized that Cu atoms in such supported sorbents are in &apos

  10. Cold and warm atomic gas around the Perseus molecular cloud I: Basic Properties

    CERN Document Server

    Stanimirovic, Snezana; Lee, Min-Young; Heiles, Carl; Miller, Jesse

    2014-01-01

    (Abridged) Using the Arecibo Observatory we have obtained neutral hydrogen (HI) absorption and emission spectral pairs in the direction of 26 background radio continuum sources in the vicinity of the Perseus molecular cloud. Strong absorption lines were detected in all cases allowing us to estimate spin temperature (T_s) and optical depth for 107 individual Gaussian components along these lines of sight. Basic properties of individual HI clouds (spin temperature, optical depth, and the column density of the cold and warm neutral medium, CNM and WNM) in and around Perseus are very similar to those found for random interstellar lines of sight sampled by the Millennium HI survey. This suggests that the neutral gas found in and around molecular clouds is not atypical. However, lines of sight in the vicinity of Perseus have on average a higher total HI column density and the CNM fraction, suggesting an enhanced amount of cold HI relative to an average interstellar field. Our estimated optical depth and spin temper...

  11. Hα and [SII] Emission from Warm Ionized Gas in the Scutum-Centaurus Arm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Alex S.; Benjamin, Robert A.; Haffner, L. Matthew; Gostisha, Martin C.; Barger, Kathleen A.

    2014-06-01

    We present Wisconsin H-Alpha Mapper [SII] λ6716 and Hα spectroscopic maps of the warm ionized medium (WIM) in the Scutum-Centaurus Arm at Galactic longitudes 310° extinction-corrected Hα intensities (I_{{H} \\alpha }^c), we measure an exponential scale height of electron density squared in the arm of H_{n_e^2}= 0.30 \\, {kpc} (assuming a distance of 3.5 kpc), intermediate between that observed in the inner Galaxy and in the Perseus Arm. The [S II]/Hα line ratio is enhanced at large |z| and in sightlines with faint I_{{H} \\alpha }^c. We find that the [S II]/Hα line ratio has a power-law relationship with I_{{H} \\alpha }^c from a value of ≈1.0 at I_{{H} \\alpha }^creinforce the well-established picture in which the diffuse Hα emission is due primarily to emission from in situ photoionized gas, with scattered light only a minor contributor.

  12. Absorption signatures of warm-hot gas at low redshift: OVI

    CERN Document Server

    Tepper-Garcia, Thorsten; Schaye, Joop; Booth, C M; Vecchia, Claudio Dalla; Theuns, Tom; Wiersma, Robert P C

    2010-01-01

    [abridged] We investigate the origin and physical properties of OVI absorbers at low redshift (z = 0.25) using a subset of cosmological, hydrodynamical simulations from the OverWhelmingly Large Simulations (OWLS) project. Intervening OVI absorbers are believed to trace shock-heated gas in the Warm-Hot Intergalactic Medium (WHIM) and may thus play a key role in the search for the missing baryons in the present-day Universe. When compared to observations, the predicted distributions of the different OVI line parameters (column density, Doppler parameter, rest equivalent width) from our simulations exhibit a lack of strong OVI absorbers, a discrepancy that has also been found by Oppenheimer & Dave (2009b). This suggests that physical processes on sub-grid scales (e.g. turbulence) may strongly influence the observed properties of OVI systems. We find that the intervening OVI absorption arises in highly metal-enriched (10^{-1} < 10^2 and temperatures T =10^{5.3\\pm0.5} K. While the OVI resides in a similar ...

  13. {\\em Ab initio} Quantum Monte Carlo simulation of the warm dense electron gas in the thermodynamic limit

    CERN Document Server

    Dornheim, Tobias; Sjostrom, Travis; Malone, Fionn D; Foulkes, W M C; Bonitz, Michael

    2016-01-01

    We perform \\emph{ab initio} quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) simulations of the warm dense uniform electron gas in the thermodynamic limit. By combining QMC data with linear response theory we are able to remove finite-size errors from the potential energy over the entire warm dense regime, overcoming the deficiencies of the existing finite-size corrections by Brown \\emph{et al.}~[PRL \\textbf{110}, 146405 (2013)]. Extensive new QMC results for up to $N=1000$ electrons enable us to compute the potential energy $V$ and the exchange-correlation free energy $F_{xc}$ of the macroscopic electron gas with an unprecedented accuracy of $|\\Delta V|/|V|, |\\Delta F_{xc}|/|F|_{xc} \\sim 10^{-3}$. A comparison of our new data to the recent parametrization of $F_{xc}$ by Karasiev {\\em et al.} [PRL {\\bf 112}, 076403 (2014)] reveals significant inaccuracies of the latter.

  14. The simulation of gas production from oceanic gas hydrate reservoir by the combination of ocean surface warm water flooding with depressurization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hao Yang; Yu-Hu Bai; Qing-Ping Li

    2012-01-01

    A new method is proposed to produce gas from oceanic gas hydrate reservoir by combining the ocean surface warm water flooding with depressurization which can efficiently utilize the synthetic effects of thermal,salt and depressurization on gas hydrate dissociation.The method has the advantage of high efficiency,low cost and enhanced safety.Based on the proposed conceptual method,the physical and mathematical models are established,in which the effects of the flow of multiphase fluid,the kinetic process of hydrate dissociation,the endothermic process of hydrate dissociation,ice-water phase equilibrium,salt inhibition,dispersion,convection and conduction on the hydrate dissociation and gas and water production are considered.The gas and water rates,formation pressure for the combination method are compared with that of the single depressurization,which is referred to the method in which only depressurization is used.The results show that the combination method can remedy the deficiency of individual producing methods.It has the advantage of longer stable period of high gas rate than the single depressurization.It can also reduce the geologic hazard caused by the formation deformation due to the maintaining of the formation pressure by injected ocean warm water.

  15. Spin-resolved correlations in the warm-dense homogeneous electron gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Priya; Kumar, Krishan; Moudgil, R. K.

    2017-04-01

    We have studied spin-resolved correlations in the warm-dense homogeneous electron gas by determining the linear density and spin-density response functions, within the dynamical self-consistent mean-field theory of Singwi et al. The calculated spin-resolved pair-correlation function gσσ'(r) is compared with the recent restricted path-integral Monte Carlo (RPIMC) simulations due to Brown et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 146405 (2013)], while interaction energy Eint and exchange-correlation free energy Fxc with the RPIMC and very recent ab initio quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) simulations by Dornheim et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 117, 156403 (2016)]. g↑↓(r) is found to be in good agreement with the RPIMC data, while a mismatch is seen in g↑↑(r) at small r where it becomes somewhat negative. As an interesting result, it is deduced that a non-monotonic T-dependence of g(0) is driven primarily by g↑↓(0). Our results of Eint and Fxc exhibit an excellent agreement with the QMC study due to Dornheim et al., which deals with the finite-size correction quite accurately. We observe, however, a visible deviation of Eint from the RPIMC data for high densities ( 8% at rs = 1). Further, we have extended our study to the fully spin-polarized phase. Again, with the exception of high density region, we find a good agreement of Eint with the RPIMC data. This points to the need of settling the problem of finite-size correction in the spin-polarized phase also. Interestingly, we also find that the thermal effects tend to oppose spatial localization as well as spin polarization of electrons. Supplementary material in the form of one zip file available from the Journal web page at http://https://doi.org/10.1140/epjb/e2017-70532-y

  16. The JCMT Nearby Galaxies Legacy Survey II: Warm Molecular Gas and Star Formation in Three Field Spiral Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Warren, B E; Israel, F P; Serjeant, S; Bendo, G J; Brinks, E; Clements, D L; Irwin, J A; Knapen, J H; Leech, J; Matthews, H E; Mühle, S; Mortimer, A M J; Petitpas, G; Sinukoff, E; Spekkens, K; Tan, B K; Tilanus, R P J; Usero, A; van der Werf, P P; Vlahakis, C; Wiegert, T; Zhu, M

    2010-01-01

    We present the results of large-area CO J=3-2 emission mapping of three nearby field galaxies, NGC 628, NGC 3521, and NGC 3627, completed at the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope as part of the Nearby Galaxies Legacy Survey. These galaxies all have moderate to strong CO J=3-2 detections over large areas of the fields observed by the survey, showing resolved structure and dynamics in their warm/dense molecular gas disks. All three galaxies were part of the Spitzer Infrared Nearby Galaxies Survey sample, and as such have excellent published multi-wavelength ancillary data. These data sets allow us to examine the star formation properties, gas content, and dynamics of these galaxies on sub-kiloparsec scales. We find that the global gas depletion times for dense/warm molecular gas in these galaxies is consistent with other results for nearby spiral galaxies, indicating this may be independent of galaxy properties such as structures, gas compositions, and environments. Similar to the results from the THINGS HI survey,...

  17. Emittance Theory for Thin Film Selective Emitter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chubb, Donald L.; Lowe, Roland A.; Good, Brian S.

    1994-01-01

    Thin films of high temperature garnet materials such as yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) doped with rare earths are currently being investigated as selective emitters. This paper presents a radiative transfer analysis of the thin film emitter. From this analysis the emitter efficiency and power density are calculated. Results based on measured extinction coefficients for erbium-YAG and holmium-YAG are presented. These results indicated that emitter efficiencies of 50 percent and power densities of several watts/sq cm are attainable at moderate temperatures (less than 1750 K).

  18. Emittance exchange results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fliller, R.P., III; /Brookhaven; Koeth, T.; /Rutgers U., Piscataway

    2009-09-01

    The promise of next-generation light sources depends on the availability of ultra-low emittance electron sources. One method of producing low transverse emittance beams is to generate a low longitudinal emittance beam and exchange it with a large transverse emittance. Experiments are underway at Fermilab's A0 Photoinjector and ANL's Argonne Wakefield Accelerator using the exchange scheme of Kim and Sessler. The experiment at the A0 Photoinjector exchanges a large longitudinal emittance with a small transverse emittance. AWA expects to exchange a large transverse emittance with a small longitudinal emittance. In this paper we discuss recent results at A0 and AWA and future plans for these experiments.

  19. Emittance Exchange Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fliller III,R.; Koeth, T.

    2009-05-04

    The promise of next-generation light sources depends on the availability of ultra-low emittance electron sources. One method of producing low transverse emittance beams is to generate a low longitudinal emittance beam and exchange it with a large transverse emittance. Experiments are underway at Fermilab's A0 Photoinjector and ANL's Argonne Wakefield Accelerator using the exchange scheme of Kim and Sessler. The experiment at the A0 Photoinjector exchanges a large longitudinal emittance with a small transverse emittance. AWA expects to exchange a large transverse emittance with a small longitudinal emittance. In this paper we discuss recent results at A0 and AWA and future plans for these experiments.

  20. Aberration Corrected Emittance Exchange

    CERN Document Server

    Nanni, Emilio A

    2015-01-01

    Full exploitation of emittance exchange (EEX) requires aberration-free performance of a complex imaging system including active radio-frequency (RF) elements which can add temporal distortions. We investigate the performance of an EEX line where the exchange occurs between two dimensions with normalized emittances which differ by orders of magnitude. The transverse emittance is exchanged into the longitudinal dimension using a double dog-leg emittance exchange setup with a 5 cell RF deflector cavity. Aberration correction is performed on the four most dominant aberrations. These include temporal aberrations that are corrected with higher order magnetic optical elements located where longitudinal and transverse emittance are coupled. We demonstrate aberration-free performance of emittances differing by 4 orders of magnitude, i.e. an initial transverse emittance of $\\epsilon_x=1$ pm-rad is exchanged with a longitudinal emittance of $\\epsilon_z=10$ nm-rad.

  1. Thermophotovoltaic emitter material selection and design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saxton, P.C.; Moran, A.L.; Harper, M.J.; Lindler, K.W. [Naval Academy, Annapolis, MD (United States)

    1997-07-01

    Thermophotovoltaics (TPV) is a potentially attractive direct energy conversion technology. It reduces the need for complex machinery with moving parts and maintenance. TPV generators can be run from a variety of heat sources including waste heat for smaller scale operations. The US Naval Academy`s goal was to build a small experimental thermophotovoltaic generator powered by combustion gases from a General Electric T-58 helicopter gas turbine. The design of the generator imposes material limitations that directly affect emitter and structural materials selection. This paper details emitter material goals and requirements, and the methods used to select suitable candidate emitter materials for further testing.

  2. A global meta-analysis on the impact of management practices on net global warming potential and greenhouse gas intensity from cropland soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agricultural practices contribute significant amount of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, but little is known about their effects on net global warming potential (GWP) and greenhouse gas intensity (GHGI) that account for all sources and sinks of carbon dioxide emissions per unit area or crop yield. Se...

  3. Morphology and Kinematics of Warm Molecular Gas in the Nuclear Region of Arp 220 as Revealed by ALMA

    CERN Document Server

    Rangwala, Naseem; Wilson, Christine; Glenn, Jason; Kamenetzky, Julia; Spinoglio, Luigi

    2015-01-01

    We present Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) Cycle-0 observations of the CO J = 6-5 line in the advanced galaxy merger Arp 220. This line traces warm molecular gas, which dominates the total CO luminosity. The CO emission from the two nuclei is well resolved by the 0.39" x 0.22" beam and the exceptional sensitivity and spatial/spectral resolution reveal new complex features in the morphology and kinematics of the warm gas. The line profiles are asymmetric between the red and blue sides of the nuclear disks and the peak of the line emission is offset from the peak of the continuum emission in both nuclei by about 100 pc in the same direction. CO self-absorption is detected at the centers of both nuclei but it is much deeper in the eastern nucleus. We also clearly detect strong, highly redshifted CO absorption located near the southwest side of each nucleus. For the eastern nucleus, we reproduce the major line profile features with a simple kinematic model of a highly turbulent, rotating disk with a substan...

  4. \\emph{Ab initio} Quantum Monte Carlo simulation of the warm dense electron gas

    CERN Document Server

    Dornheim, Tobias; Malone, Fionn; Schoof, Tim; Sjostrom, Travis; Foulkes, W M C; Bonitz, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Warm dense matter is one of the most active frontiers in plasma physics due to its relevance for dense astrophysical objects as well as for novel laboratory experiments in which matter is being strongly compressed e.g. by high-power lasers. Its description is theoretically very challenging as it contains correlated quantum electrons at finite temperature---a system that cannot be accurately modeled by standard analytical or ground state approaches. Recently several breakthroughs have been achieved in the field of fermionic quantum Monte Carlo simulations. First, it was shown that exact simulations of a finite model system ($30 \\dots 100$ electrons) is possible that avoid any simplifying approximations such as fixed nodes [Schoof {\\em et al.}, Phys. Rev. Lett. {\\bf 115}, 130402 (2015)]. Second, a novel way to accurately extrapolate these results to the thermodynamic limit was reported by Dornheim {\\em et al.} [Phys. Rev. Lett. {\\bf 117}, 156403 (2016)]. As a result, now thermodynamic results for the warm dense...

  5. Minimization of steam requirements and enhancement of water-gas shift reaction with warm gas temperature CO2 removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siriwardane, Ranjani V; Fisher, II, James C

    2013-12-31

    The disclosure utilizes a hydroxide sorbent for humidification and CO.sub.2 removal from a gaseous stream comprised of CO and CO.sub.2 prior to entry into a water-gas-shift reactor, in order to decrease CO.sub.2 concentration and increase H.sub.2O concentration and shift the water-gas shift reaction toward the forward reaction products CO.sub.2 and H.sub.2. The hydroxide sorbent may be utilized for absorbtion of CO.sub.2 exiting the water-gas shift reactor, producing an enriched H.sub.2 stream. The disclosure further provides for regeneration of the hydroxide sorbent at temperature approximating water-gas shift conditions, and for utilizing H.sub.2O product liberated as a result of the CO.sub.2 absorption.

  6. SUBTASK 3.12 – GASIFICATION, WARM-GAS CLEANUP, AND LIQUID FUELS PRODUCTION WITH ILLINOIS COAL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanislowski, Joshua; Curran, Tyler; Henderson, Ann

    2014-06-30

    The goal of this project was to evaluate the performance of Illinois No. 6 coal blended with biomass in a small-scale entrained-flow gasifier and demonstrate the production of liquid fuels under three scenarios. The first scenario used traditional techniques for cleaning the syngas prior to Fischer–Tropsch (FT) synthesis, including gas sweetening with a physical solvent. In the second scenario, the CO2 was not removed from the gas stream prior to FT synthesis. In the third scenario, only warm-gas cleanup techniques were used, such that the feed gas to the FT unit contained both moisture and CO2. The results of the testing showed that the liquid fuels production from the FT catalyst was significantly hindered by the presence of moisture and CO2 in the syngas. Further testing would be needed to determine if this thermally efficient process is feasible with other FT catalysts. This subtask was funded through the EERC–U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Joint Program on Research and Development for Fossil Energy-Related Resources Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-08NT43291. Nonfederal funding was provided by the Illinois Clean Coal Institute.

  7. Volatile constraints on the magma supply, dynamics and plumbing system of a top-ranking basaltic gas emitter: Ambrym volcano, Vanuatu Arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allard, Patrick

    2016-04-01

    P. Allard1,2, A. Aiuppa3,4, P. Bani5, N. Métrich1,6, A. Bertagnini6, M. Burton7, P-J. Gauthier5, F. Parello3, H. Shinohara8, G. Sawyer9, E. Bagnato3, E. Garaebiti10 1IPGP, UMR7154 CNRS, Paris France; 2INGV, Sezione di Catania, Italy; 3DiSTEM, Palermo University, Italy; 4INGV, Sezione di Palermo, Italy; 5LMV-OPGC, Clermont-Ferrand, France; 6INGV, Sezione di Pisa, Italy; 7SEAES, University of Manchester, UK; 8Geological Survey of Japan, Tsukuba, Japan; 9Department of Geography, University of Cambridge, UK; 10GEOHAZARD, Port Vila, Vanuatu. Ambrym basaltic volcano (central Vanuatu arc) is one of the most active volcanic systems of the Southwest Pacific region, where recurrent lava lake activity sustains voluminous gas release from two main cones, Benbow and Marum, in a 12 km-wide summit caldera. In 2007-2008 we could perform the first detailed investigations of gas emissions from this very active but remote and hardly accessible intra-oceanic arc volcano, combining ground-based and airborne measurements and using both in situ and remote sensing tools. The degassing budget of major, minor, trace and radioactive volatile species reveals that Ambrym ranks amongst the three most powerful persistent emitters of magmatic volatiles at global scale [1]. Coupled with the analysis of dissolved volatiles in the feeding basalt (olivine-hosted melt inclusions), the gas emission rates imply a very high average magma supply/degassing rate of 25 m3/s - 6 times the rate at Mount Etna - from a reservoir emplaced at about 4 km depth beneath the caldera floor. The chemical composition of emitted volcanic gases is compatible with dominant closed-system ascent and degassing of the basalt, followed by open degassing at shallow depth as water exsolution becomes extensive. The modest time-averaged extrusion rate, estimated from caldera infilling over the past 2 ka, requires convective downward recycling of the denser degassed magma in conduits with diameter of order 10 m. High resolution OP

  8. Dense gas in the Galactic central molecular zone is warm and heated by turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Ginsburg, Adam; Ao, Yiping; Riquelme, Denise; Kauffmann, Jens; Pillai, Thushara; Mills, Elisabeth A C; Requena-Torres, Miguel A; Immer, Katharina; Testi, Leonardo; Ott, Juergen; Bally, John; Battersby, Cara; Darling, Jeremy; Aalto, Susanne; Stanke, Thomas; Kendrew, Sarah; Kruijssen, J M Diederik; Longmore, Steven; Dale, James; Guesten, Rolf; Menten, Karl M

    2016-01-01

    The Galactic center is the closest region in which we can study star formation under extreme physical conditions like those in high-redshift galaxies. We measure the temperature of the dense gas in the central molecular zone (CMZ) and examine what drives it. We mapped the inner 300 pc of the CMZ in the temperature-sensitive J = 3-2 para-formaldehyde (p-H$_2$CO) transitions. We used the $3_{2,1} - 2_{2,0} / 3_{0,3} - 2_{0,2}$ line ratio to determine the gas temperature in $n \\sim 10^4 - 10^5 $cm$^{-3}$ gas. We have produced temperature maps and cubes with 30" and 1 km/s resolution and published all data in FITS form. Dense gas temperatures in the Galactic center range from ~60 K to > 100 K in selected regions. The highest gas temperatures T_G > 100 K are observed around the Sgr B2 cores, in the extended Sgr B2 cloud, the 20 km/s and 50 km/s clouds, and in "The Brick" (G0.253+0.016). We infer an upper limit on the cosmic ray ionization rate ${\\zeta}_{CR} < 10^{-14}$ 1/s. The dense molecular gas temperature o...

  9. A jet-induced outflow of warm gas in 3C 293

    CERN Document Server

    Emonts, B H C; Tadhunter, C N; Oosterloo, T A; Holt, J; Van der Hulst, J M

    2005-01-01

    Using long slit emission-line spectra we detect a fast outflow of ionized gas, with velocities up to 1000 km/s, in the nearby powerful radio galaxy 3C 293 (z = 0.045). The fast outflow is located about 1 kpc east of the nucleus, in a region of enhanced radio emission due to the presence of a distorted radio jet. We present results that indicate that this fast outflow is caused by a jet-ISM interaction. The kinematics of the outflowing ionized gas are very similar to those of a fast outflow of neutral hydrogen gas in this galaxy, suggesting that both outflows are the result of the same driving mechanism. While the mass of the outflowing ionized gas is about 1 x 10e5 M_sun, the total HI mass involved in the neutral outflow is about 100 times higher (10e7 M_sun). This shows that, despite the high energies that must be involved in driving the outflow, most of the gas remains, or becomes again, neutral. Other outflows of ionized gas, although not as pronounced as in the region of the enhanced radio emission, are a...

  10. Unified first principles description from warm dense matter to ideal ionized gas plasma: electron-ion collisions induced friction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Jiayu; Hou, Yong; Yuan, Jianmin

    2010-06-18

    Electron-ion interactions are central to numerous phenomena in the warm dense matter (WDM) regime and at higher temperature. The electron-ion collisions induced friction at high temperature is introduced in the procedure of ab initio molecular dynamics using the Langevin equation based on density functional theory. In this framework, as a test for Fe and H up to 1000 eV, the equation of state and the transition of electronic structures of the materials with very wide density and temperature can be described, which covers a full range of WDM up to high energy density physics. A unified first principles description from condensed matter to ideal ionized gas plasma is constructed.

  11. Characterizing the drivers of seedling leaf gas exchange responses to warming and altered precipitation: indirect and direct effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Nicholas G.; Pold, Grace; Goranson, Carol; Dukes, Jeffrey S.

    2016-01-01

    Anthropogenic forces are projected to lead to warmer temperatures and altered precipitation patterns globally. The impact of these climatic changes on the uptake of carbon by the land surface will, in part, determine the rate and magnitude of these changes. However, there is a great deal of uncertainty in how terrestrial ecosystems will respond to climate in the future. Here, we used a fully factorial warming (four levels) by precipitation (three levels) manipulation experiment in an old-field ecosystem in the northeastern USA to examine the impact of climatic changes on leaf carbon exchange in five species of deciduous tree seedlings. We found that photosynthesis generally increased in response to increasing precipitation and decreased in response to warming. Respiration was less sensitive to the treatments. The net result was greater leaf carbon uptake in wetter and cooler conditions across all species. Structural equation modelling revealed the primary pathway through which climate impacted leaf carbon exchange. Net photosynthesis increased with increasing stomatal conductance and photosynthetic enzyme capacity (Vcmax), and decreased with increasing respiration of leaves. Soil moisture and leaf temperature at the time of measurement most heavily influenced these primary drivers of net photosynthesis. Leaf respiration increased with increasing soil moisture, leaf temperature, and photosynthetic supply of substrates. Counter to the soil moisture response, respiration decreased with increasing precipitation amount, indicating that the response to short- (i.e. soil moisture) versus long-term (i.e. precipitation amount) water stress differed, possibly as a result of changes in the relative amounts of growth and maintenance demand for respiration over time. These data (>500 paired measurements of light and dark leaf gas exchange), now publicly available, detail the pathways by which climate can impact leaf gas exchange and could be useful for testing assumptions in

  12. Characterizing the drivers of seedling leaf gas exchange responses to warming and altered precipitation: indirect and direct effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Nicholas G; Pold, Grace; Goranson, Carol; Dukes, Jeffrey S

    2016-01-01

    Anthropogenic forces are projected to lead to warmer temperatures and altered precipitation patterns globally. The impact of these climatic changes on the uptake of carbon by the land surface will, in part, determine the rate and magnitude of these changes. However, there is a great deal of uncertainty in how terrestrial ecosystems will respond to climate in the future. Here, we used a fully factorial warming (four levels) by precipitation (three levels) manipulation experiment in an old-field ecosystem in the northeastern USA to examine the impact of climatic changes on leaf carbon exchange in five species of deciduous tree seedlings. We found that photosynthesis generally increased in response to increasing precipitation and decreased in response to warming. Respiration was less sensitive to the treatments. The net result was greater leaf carbon uptake in wetter and cooler conditions across all species. Structural equation modelling revealed the primary pathway through which climate impacted leaf carbon exchange. Net photosynthesis increased with increasing stomatal conductance and photosynthetic enzyme capacity (Vcmax), and decreased with increasing respiration of leaves. Soil moisture and leaf temperature at the time of measurement most heavily influenced these primary drivers of net photosynthesis. Leaf respiration increased with increasing soil moisture, leaf temperature, and photosynthetic supply of substrates. Counter to the soil moisture response, respiration decreased with increasing precipitation amount, indicating that the response to short- (i.e. soil moisture) versus long-term (i.e. precipitation amount) water stress differed, possibly as a result of changes in the relative amounts of growth and maintenance demand for respiration over time. These data (>500 paired measurements of light and dark leaf gas exchange), now publicly available, detail the pathways by which climate can impact leaf gas exchange and could be useful for testing assumptions in

  13. Herschel SPIRE-FTS Observations of Excited CO and [CI] in the Antennae (NGC 4038/39): Warm and Cold Molecular Gas

    CERN Document Server

    Schirm, Maximilien R P; Parkin, Tara J; Kamenetzky, Julia; Glenn, Jason; Rangwala, Naseem; Spinoglio, Luigi; Pereira-Santaella, Miguel; Baes, Maarten; Barlow, Michael J; Clements, Dave L; Cooray, Asantha; De Looze, Ilse; Karczewski, Oskar Ł; Madden, Suzanne C; Rémy-Ruyer, Aurélie; Wu, Ronin

    2013-01-01

    We present Herschel SPIRE-FTS observations of the Antennae (NGC 4038/39), a well studied, nearby ($22$ Mpc) ongoing merger between two gas rich spiral galaxies. We detect 5 CO transitions ($J=4-3$ to $J=8-7$), both [CI] transitions and the [NII]$205\\mu m$ transition across the entire system, which we supplement with ground based observations of the CO $J=1-0$, $J=2-1$ and $J=3-2$ transitions, and Herschel PACS observations of [CII] and [OI]$63\\mu m$. Using the CO and [CI] transitions, we perform both a LTE analysis of [CI], and a non-LTE radiative transfer analysis of CO and [CI] using the radiative transfer code RADEX along with a Bayesian likelihood analysis. We find that there are two components to the molecular gas: a cold ($T_{kin}\\sim 10-30$ K) and a warm ($T_{kin} \\gtrsim 100$ K) component. By comparing the warm gas mass to previously observed values, we determine a CO abundance in the warm gas of $x_{CO} \\sim 5\\times 10^{-5}$. If the CO abundance is the same in the warm and cold gas phases, this abund...

  14. HIFI observations of warm gas in DR21 : Shock versus radiative heating

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ossenkopf, Volker; Roellig, M.; Simon, R.; Schneider, N.; Okada, Y.; Stutzki, J.; Gerin, M.; Akyilmaz, M.; Beintema, D; Benz, A. O.; Berne, O.; Boulanger, F.; Bumble, B.; Coeur-Joly, O.; Dedes, C.; Diez-Gonzalez, M. C.; France, K.; Fuente, A.; Gallego, J. D.; Goicoechea, J. R.; Guesten, R.; Harris, A.; Higgins, R.; Jackson, B.; Jarchow, C.; Joblin, C.; Klein, T.; Kramer, C.; Lord, S.; Martin, P.; Martin-Pintado, J.; Mookerjea, B.; Neufeld, D. A.; Phillips, T.; Rizzo, J. R.; van der Tak, F. F. S.; Teyssier, D.; Yorke, H.

    2010-01-01

    Context. The molecular gas in the DR21 massive star formation region is known to be affected by the strong UV field from the central star cluster and by a fast outflow creating a bright shock. The relative contribution of both heating mechanisms is the matter of a long debate. Aims. By better sampli

  15. Observations of warm molecular gas and kinematics in the disc around HD 100546

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Panic, O.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Hogerheijde, M. R.; Belloche, A.; Guesten, R.; Boland, W.; Barychev, Andrei

    Context. The disc around the Herbig Ae/Be star HD 100546 is one of the most extensively studied discs in the southern sky. Although there is a wealth of information about its dust content and composition, not much is known about its gas and large-scale kinematics. Many recent results have stressed

  16. Cold dust but warm gas in the unusual elliptical galaxy NGC 4125

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, C D; Foyle, K; Parkin, T J; Cooper, E Mentuch; Roussel, H; Sauvage, M; Smith, M W L; Baes, M; Bendo, G; Boquien, M; Boselli, A; Ciesla, L; Clements, D L; Cooray, A; De Looze, I; Galametz, M; Gear, W; Lebouteiller, V; Madden, S; Pereira-Santaella, M; Remy-Ruyer, A

    2013-01-01

    Data from the Herschel Space Observatory have revealed an unusual elliptical galaxy, NGC 4125, which has strong and extended submillimeter emission from cold dust but only very strict upper limits to its CO and HI emission. Depending on the dust emissivity, the total dust mass is 2-5x10^6 Msun. While the neutral gas-to-dust mass ratio is extremely low (= 10^4 K faster than the dust is evaporated. If galaxies like NGC 4125, where the far-infrared emission does not trace neutral gas in the usual manner, are common at higher redshift, this could have significant implications for our understanding of high redshift galaxies and galaxy evolution.

  17. Molecular gas in spiral galaxies a new warm phase at large galactocentric distances?

    CERN Document Server

    Papadopoulos, P P; Viti, S

    2002-01-01

    There is now strong evidence suggesting that the 12CO J = 1-0 transition, widely used to trace H2 gas, significantly underestimates its mass in metal-poor regions. In spiral disks such regions are found in large galactocentric distances where we show that any unaccounted H2 gas phase is likely to be diffuse (~5-20 cm^-3) and warmer (T(kin) ~ 50-100 K) than the cool (T(kin) ~ 15-20 K) CO-luminous one. Moreover we find that a high value of the H2 formation rate on grains, suggested by recent observational work, can compensate for the reduction of the available grain surface in the metal-poor part of typical galactic disks and thus enhance this CO-poor H2 component which may be contributing significantly to the mass and pressure of spiral disks beyond their optical radius.

  18. The injection of liquid cool CO2 in a warm depleted gas reservoir

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofstee, C.; Maas, J.H.; Loeve, D.

    2013-01-01

    The P18-4 compartment (operated by TAQA Energy B.V.) would be injected by CO2 at a minimum temperature of 12 degrees C. At these temperatures, the CO2 phase will either be a gas or a liquid. As the initial temperature of the reservoir is 120 oC, the CO2 will eventually be the gaseous or (at higher

  19. HIFI observations of warm gas in DR21: Shock versus radiative heating

    CERN Document Server

    Ossenkopf, V; Simon, R; Schneider, N; Okada, Y; Stutzki, J; Gerin, M; Akyilmaz, M; Beintema, D; Benz, A O; Berne, O; Boulanger, F; Bumble, B; Coeur-Joly, O; Dedes, C; Diez-Gonzalez, M C; France, K; Fuente, A; Gallego, J D; Goicoechea, J R; Güsten, R; Harris, A; Higgins, R; Jackson, B; Jarchow, C; Joblin, C; Klein, T; Kramer, C; Lord, S; Martin, P; Martin-Pintado, J; Mookerjea, B; Neufeld, D A; Phillips, T; Rizzo, J R; van der Tak, F F S; Teyssier, D; Yorke, H

    2010-01-01

    The molecular gas in the DR21 massive star formation region is known to be affected by the strong UV field from the central star cluster and by a fast outflow creating a bright shock. The relative contribution of both heating mechanisms is the matter of a long debate. By better sampling the excitation ladder of various tracers we provide a quantitative distinction between the different heating mechanisms. HIFI observations of mid-J transitions of CO and HCO+ isotopes allow us to bridge the gap in excitation energies between observations from the ground, characterizing the cooler gas, and existing ISO LWS spectra, constraining the properties of the hot gas. Comparing the detailed line profiles allows to identify the physical structure of the different components. In spite of the known shock-excitation of H2 and the clearly visible strong outflow, we find that the emission of all lines up to > 2 THz can be explained by purely radiative heating of the material. However, the new Herschel/HIFI observations reveal ...

  20. Extended Warm Gas in the ULIRG Mrk273: Galactic Outflows and Tidal Debris

    CERN Document Server

    Zaurin, Javier Rodriguez; Rupke, David S N; Veilleux, Sylvain; Spoon, Henrik W W; Chiaberge, Marco; Almeida, Cristina Ramos; Batcheldor, Dan; Sparks, William B

    2014-01-01

    We present new HST ACS medium- and narrow-band images and long-slit, optical (4000 - 7200A) spectra obtained using the Isaac Newton Telescope (INT) on La Palma, of the merging system Mrk273. The HST observations sample the [OIII]4959,5007 emission from the galaxy and the nearby continuum. The images show that the morphologies of the extended continuum and the ionised gas emission from the galaxy are decoupled, extending almost perpendicular to each other. In particular, we detect for the first time a spectacular structure of ionised gas in the form of filaments extending ~23 kpc to the east of the nuclear region. The quiescent ionised gas kinematics at these locations suggests that these filaments are tidal debris left over from a secondary merger event that are illuminated by an AGN in the nuclear regions. The images also reveal a complex morphology in the nuclear region of the galaxy for both the continuum and the [OIII] emission. Kinematic disturbance, in the form of broad (FWHM > 500 km s-1) and/or strong...

  1. FIR Spectroscopy of the Galactic Center: Hot and Warm Molecular Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goicoechea, Javier R.; Etxaluze, Mireya; Cernicharo, José; Gerin, Maryvonne; Pety, Jerome

    2017-01-01

    The angular resolution (~10'') achieved by the Herschel Space Observatory ~3.5 m telescope at FIR wavelengths allowed us to roughly separate the emission toward the inner parsec of the galaxy (the central cavity) from that of the surrounding circumnuclear disk (the CND). The FIR spectrum toward Sgr A* is dominated by intense [O III], [O I], [C II], [N III], [N II], and [C I] fine-structure lines (in decreasing order of luminosity) arising in gas irradiated by the strong UV field from the central stellar cluster. The high-J CO rotational line intensities observed at the interface between the inner CND and the central cavity are consistent with a hot isothermal component at T k ~ 103.1 K and n(H2)~ 104 cm-3. They are also consistent with a distribution of lower temperatures at higher gas density, with most CO at T k~300 K. The hot CO component (either the bulk of the CO column density or just a small fraction depending on the above scenario) likely results from a combination of UV and shock-driven heating. If UV-irradiated and heated dense clumps do not exist, shocks likely dominate the heating of the hot molecular gas component. Although this component is beam diluted in our FIR observations, it may be resolved at much higher angular resolution. An ALMA project using different molecular tracers to characterize UV-irradiated shocks in the innermost layers of the CND is ongoing.

  2. Complex Chemistry in Star-Forming Regions: An Expanded Gas-Grain Warm-up Chemical Model

    CERN Document Server

    Garrod, Robin T; Herbst, Eric

    2008-01-01

    Gas-phase processes were long thought to be the key formation mechanisms for complex organic molecules in star-forming regions. However, recent experimental and theoretical evidence has cast doubt on the efficiency of such processes. Grain-surface chemistry is frequently invoked as a solution, but until now there have been no quantitative models taking into account both the high degree of chemical complexity and the evolving physical conditions of star-forming regions. Here, we introduce a new gas-grain chemical network, wherein a wide array of complex species may be formed by reactions involving radicals. The radicals we consider (H, OH, CO, HCO, CH3, CH3O, CH2OH, NH and NH2) are produced primarily by cosmic ray-induced photodissociation of the granular ices formed during the colder, earlier stages of evolution. The gradual warm-up of the hot core is crucial to the formation of complex molecules, allowing the more strongly-bound radicals to become mobile on grain surfaces. This type of chemistry is capable o...

  3. Fighting global warming by greenhouse gas removal: destroying atmospheric nitrous oxide thanks to synergies between two breakthrough technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming, Tingzhen; de Richter, Renaud; Shen, Sheng; Caillol, Sylvain

    2016-04-01

    Even if humans stop discharging CO2 into the atmosphere, the average global temperature will still increase during this century. A lot of research has been devoted to prevent and reduce the amount of carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions in the atmosphere, in order to mitigate the effects of climate change. Carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) is one of the technologies that might help to limit emissions. In complement, direct CO2 removal from the atmosphere has been proposed after the emissions have occurred. But, the removal of all the excess anthropogenic atmospheric CO2 will not be enough, due to the fact that CO2 outgases from the ocean as its solubility is dependent of its atmospheric partial pressure. Bringing back the Earth average surface temperature to pre-industrial levels would require the removal of all previously emitted CO2. Thus, the atmospheric removal of other greenhouse gases is necessary. This article proposes a combination of disrupting techniques to transform nitrous oxide (N2O), the third most important greenhouse gas (GHG) in terms of current radiative forcing, which is harmful for the ozone layer and possesses quite high global warming potential. Although several scientific publications cite "greenhouse gas removal," to our knowledge, it is the first time innovative solutions are proposed to effectively remove N2O or other GHGs from the atmosphere other than CO2.

  4. Accurate exchange-correlation energies for the warm dense electron gas

    OpenAIRE

    Malone, FD; Blunt, NS; Brown, EW; Lee, DKK; Spencer, JS; Foulkes, WMC; Shepherd, JJ

    2016-01-01

    Density matrix quantum Monte Carlo (DMQMC) is used to sample exact-on-average $N$-body density matrices for uniform electron gas systems of up to 10$^{124}$ matrix elements via a stochastic solution of the Bloch equation. The results of these calculations resolve a current debate over the accuracy of the data used to parametrize finite-temperature density functionals. Exchange-correlation energies calculated using the real-space restricted path-integral formalism and the $k$-space configurati...

  5. Effects of viscous pressure on warm inflationary generalized cosmic Chaplygin gas model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharif, M.; Saleem, Rabia, E-mail: msharif.math@pu.edu.pk, E-mail: rabiasaleem1988@yahoo.com [Department of Mathematics, University of the Punjab, Quaid-e-Azam Campus, Lahore-54590 (Pakistan)

    2014-12-01

    This paper is devoted to study the effects of bulk viscous pressure on an inflationary generalized cosmic Chaplygin gas model using FRW background. The matter contents of the universe are assumed to be inflaton and imperfect fluid. We evaluate inflaton fields, potentials and entropy density for variable as well as constant dissipation and bulk viscous coefficients in weak as well as high dissipative regimes during intermediate era. In order to discuss inflationary perturbations, we evaluate entropy density, scalar (tensor) power spectra, their corresponding spectral indices, tensor-scalar ratio and running of spectral index in terms of inflaton which are constrained using recent Planck, WMAP7 and Bicep2 probes.

  6. The MASSIVE Survey. VI. The Spatial Distribution and Kinematics of Warm Ionized Gas in the Most Massive Local Early-type Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandya, Viraj; Greene, Jenny E.; Ma, Chung-Pei; Veale, Melanie; Ene, Irina; Davis, Timothy A.; Blakeslee, John P.; Goulding, Andy D.; McConnell, Nicholas J.; Nyland, Kristina; Thomas, Jens

    2017-03-01

    We present the first systematic investigation of the existence, spatial distribution, and kinematics of warm ionized gas as traced by the [O ii] 3727 Å emission line in 74 of the most massive galaxies in the local universe. All of our galaxies have deep integral-field spectroscopy from the volume- and magnitude-limited MASSIVE survey of early-type galaxies with stellar mass {log}({M}* /{M}ȯ )> 11.5 (M K sample, we detect warm ionized gas in 28, which yields a global detection fraction of 38 ± 6% down to a typical [O ii] equivalent width limit of 2 Å. MASSIVE fast rotators are more likely to have gas than MASSIVE slow rotators with detection fractions of 80 ± 10% and 28 ± 6%, respectively. The spatial extents span a wide range of radii (0.6–18.2 kpc; 0.1–4R e ), and the gas morphologies are diverse, with 17/28 ≈ 61 ± 9% being centrally concentrated, 8/28 ≈ 29 ± 9% exhibiting clear rotation out to several kiloparsecs, and 3/28 ≈ 11 ± 6% being extended but patchy. Three out of four fast rotators show kinematic alignment between the stars and gas, whereas the two slow rotators with robust kinematic measurements available exhibit kinematic misalignment. Our inferred warm ionized gas masses are roughly ∼105 M ⊙. The emission line ratios and radial equivalent width profiles are generally consistent with excitation of the gas by the old underlying stellar population. We explore different gas origin scenarios for MASSIVE galaxies and find that a variety of physical processes are likely at play, including internal gas recycling, cooling out of the hot gaseous halo, and gas acquired via mergers.

  7. FIR Spectroscopy of the Galactic Center: Hot and Warm Molecular Gas

    CERN Document Server

    Goicoechea, J R; Cernicharo, J; Gerin, M; Pety, J

    2016-01-01

    The angular resolution (~10") achieved by the Herschel Space Observatory ~3.5m telescope at FIR wavelengths allowed us to roughly separate the emission toward the inner parsec of the galaxy (the central cavity) from that of the surrounding circumnuclear disk (the CND). The FIR spectrum toward SgrA* is dominated by intense [Oiii], [Oi], [Cii], [Niii], [Nii], and [Ci] fine-structure lines (in decreasing order of luminosity) arising in gas irradiated by the strong UV field from the central stellar cluster. The high-J CO rotational line intensities observed at the interface between the inner CND and the central cavity are consistent with a hot isothermal component at T~10^{3.1} K and n(H_2)~10^4 cm^{-3}. They are also consistent with a distribution of lower temperatures at higher gas density, with most CO at T~300 K. The hot CO component (either the bulk of the CO column density or just a small fraction depending on the above scenario) likely results from a combination of UV and shock-driven heating. Although thi...

  8. The DIORAMA Neutron Emitter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terry, James Russell [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-05-05

    Emission of neutrons in a given event is modeled by the DioramaEmitterNeutron object, a subclass of the abstract DioramaEmitterModule object. The GenerateEmission method of this object is the entry point for generation of a neutron population for a given event. Shown in table 1, this method requires a number of parameters to be defined in the event definition.

  9. Warm gas in the rotating disk of the Red Rectangle: accurate models of molecular line emission

    CERN Document Server

    Bujarrabal, V

    2013-01-01

    We aim to study the excitation conditions of the molecular gas in the rotating disk of the Red Rectangle, the only post-Asymptotic-Giant-Branch object in which the existence of an equatorial rotating disk has been demonstrated. For this purpose, we developed a complex numerical code that accurately treats radiative transfer in 2-D, adapted to the study of molecular lines from rotating disks. We present far-infrared Herschel/HIFI observations of the 12CO and 13CO J=6-5, J=10-9, and J=16-15 transitions in the Red Rectangle. We also present our code in detail and discuss the accuracy of its predictions, from comparison with well-tested codes. Theoretical line profiles are compared with the empirical data to deduce the physical conditions in the disk by means of model fitting. We conclude that our code is very efficient and produces reliable results. The comparison of the theoretical predictions with our observations reveals that the temperature of the Red Rectangle disk is typically ~ 100-150 K, about twice as h...

  10. Accurate Exchange-Correlation Energies for the Warm Dense Electron Gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malone, Fionn D; Blunt, N S; Brown, Ethan W; Lee, D K K; Spencer, J S; Foulkes, W M C; Shepherd, James J

    2016-09-09

    The density matrix quantum Monte Carlo (DMQMC) method is used to sample exact-on-average N-body density matrices for uniform electron gas systems of up to 10^{124} matrix elements via a stochastic solution of the Bloch equation. The results of these calculations resolve a current debate over the accuracy of the data used to parametrize finite-temperature density functionals. Exchange-correlation energies calculated using the real-space restricted path-integral formalism and the k-space configuration path-integral formalism disagree by up to ∼10% at certain reduced temperatures T/T_{F}≤0.5 and densities r_{s}≤1. Our calculations confirm the accuracy of the configuration path-integral Monte Carlo results available at high density and bridge the gap to lower densities, providing trustworthy data in the regime typical of planetary interiors and solids subject to laser irradiation. We demonstrate that the DMQMC method can calculate free energies directly and present exact free energies for T/T_{F}≥1 and r_{s}≤2.

  11. The Use of Biofilter to Reduce Atmospheric Global Warming Gas (CH4) Eemissions from Landfills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, S.; Thomas, J. C.; Brown, K. W.; Sung, K.

    2001-12-01

    The emission of greenhouse gasses resulting from anthropogenic activities is increasing the atmospheric concentration of these gases, which can influence the climatic system by changing the temperature, precipitation, wind and other climate factors. Methane (CH4) is a very potent greenhouse gas and CH4 emission from landfills in US has been reported as 37% of total anthropogenic source of CH4 emission. Properly designed soil biofilters may reduce atmospheric CH4 emissions from landfills and help reduce the accumulation of greenhouse gasses in the atmosphere. Biofilter performance was tested under a variety of environmental and design conditions. The results showed that biofilters have the potential to reduce CH4 emissions from landfills by as much as 83%. A quadratic equation was developed to describe the dependence of methane oxidation rate in a sandy loam textured soil as a function of soil temperature, soil moisture and ammonium nitrogen concentration. Using this equation and the averaged soil temperature and moisture contents, and census data for the largest cities of each of the 48 contiguous states, oxidation rates was calculated. A methane emission model was also developed to estimate the methane emission from municipal waste landfills with different covers. Older landfills with soil covers emitted an average of 83% of the generated CH4. Landfills with RCRA covers emitted 90% of the generated CH4 without biofilters and only 10% with biofilters. Thus, the installation of properly sized biofilters should significantly reduce atmospheric CH4 emissions from landfills.

  12. The nearby interstellar medium toward α Leo. UV observations and modeling of a warm cloud within hot gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gry, Cecile; Jenkins, Edward B.

    2017-02-01

    Aims: Our aim is to characterize the conditions in the nearest interstellar cloud. Methods: We analyze interstellar absorption features in the full UV spectrum of the nearby (d = 24 pc) B8 IVn star α Leo (Regulus). Observations were obtained with STIS at high resolution and high signal-to-noise ratio by the HST ASTRAL Treasury program. We derive column densities for many key atomic species and interpret their partial ionizations. Results: The gas in front of α Leo exhibits two absorption components. The main one is kinematically identified as the local interstellar cloud (LIC) that surrounds the Sun. The second component is shifted by +5.6 km s-1 relative to the main component, in agreement with results for other lines of sight in this region of the sky, and shares its ionization and physical conditions. The excitation of the C II fine-structure levels and the ratio of Mg I to Mg II reveal a temperature T = 6500 (+750, -600) K and electron density n(e) = 0.11 (+0.025, -0.03) cm-3. Our investigation of the ionization balance yields the ion fractions for 10 different atoms and indicates that about 1/3 of the hydrogen atoms are ionized. Metals are significantly depleted onto grains, with sulfur showing [S/H] -0.27. N(H I) = 1.9 (+0.9, -0.6) × 1018 cm-3, which indicates that this partly neutral gas occupies only 2 to 8 parsecs (about 13%) of the space toward the star, with the remaining volume being filled with a hot gas that emits soft X-rays. We do not detect any absorption features from the highly ionized species that could be produced in an interface between the warm medium and the surrounding hot gas, possibly because of non-equilibrium conditions or a particular magnetic field orientation that reduces thermal conduction. Finally, the radial velocity of the LIC agrees with that of the Local Leo Cold Cloud, indicating that they may be physically related.

  13. Integrated Warm Gas Multicontaminant Cleanup Technologies for Coal-Derived Syngas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turk, Brian; Gupta, Raghubir; Sharma, Pradeepkumar; Albritton, Johnny; Jamal, Aqil

    2010-09-30

    One of the key obstacles for the introduction of commercial gasification technology for the production of power with Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) plants or the production of value added chemicals, transportation fuels, and hydrogen has been the cost of these systems. This situation is particularly challenging because the United States has ample coal resources available as raw materials and effective use of these raw materials could help us meet our energy and transportation fuel needs while significantly reducing our need to import oil. One component of the cost of these systems that faces strong challenges for continuous improvement is removing the undesirable components present in the syngas. The need to limit the increase in cost of electricity to < 35% for new coal-based power plants which include CO{sub 2} capture and sequestration addresses both the growing social concern for global climate change resulting from the emission of greenhouse gas and in particular CO{sub 2} and the need to control cost increases to power production necessary to meet this social objective. Similar improvements to technologies for trace contaminants are getting similar pressure to reduce environmental emissions and reduce production costs for the syngas to enable production of chemicals from coal that is cost competitive with oil and natural gas. RTI, with DOE/NETL support, has been developing sorbent technologies that enable capture of trace contaminants and CO{sub 2} at temperatures above 400 °F that achieve better capture performance, lower costs and higher thermal efficiency. This report describes the specific work of sorbent development for mercury (Hg), arsenic (As), selenium (Se), cadmium (Cd), and phosphorous (P) and CO{sub 2} removal. Because the typical concentrations of Hg, As, Se, Cd, and P are less than 10 ppmv, the focus has been on single-use sorbents with sufficient capacity to ensure replacement costs are cost effective. The research in this

  14. Integrated Warm Gas Multicontaminant Cleanup Technologies for Coal-Derived Syngas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turk, Brian; Gupta, Raghubir; Sharma, Pradeepkumar; Albritton, Johnny; Jamal, Aqil

    2010-09-30

    One of the key obstacles for the introduction of commercial gasification technology for the production of power with Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) plants or the production of value added chemicals, transportation fuels, and hydrogen has been the cost of these systems. This situation is particularly challenging because the United States has ample coal resources available as raw materials and effective use of these raw materials could help us meet our energy and transportation fuel needs while significantly reducing our need to import oil. One component of the cost of these systems that faces strong challenges for continuous improvement is removing the undesirable components present in the syngas. The need to limit the increase in cost of electricity to < 35% for new coal-based power plants which include CO{sub 2} capture and sequestration addresses both the growing social concern for global climate change resulting from the emission of greenhouse gas and in particular CO{sub 2} and the need to control cost increases to power production necessary to meet this social objective. Similar improvements to technologies for trace contaminants are getting similar pressure to reduce environmental emissions and reduce production costs for the syngas to enable production of chemicals from coal that is cost competitive with oil and natural gas. RTI, with DOE/NETL support, has been developing sorbent technologies that enable capture of trace contaminants and CO{sub 2} at temperatures above 400 °F that achieve better capture performance, lower costs and higher thermal efficiency. This report describes the specific work of sorbent development for mercury (Hg), arsenic (As), selenium (Se), cadmium (Cd), and phosphorous (P) and CO{sub 2} removal. Because the typical concentrations of Hg, As, Se, Cd, and P are less than 10 ppmv, the focus has been on single-use sorbents with sufficient capacity to ensure replacement costs are cost effective. The research in this

  15. Eutrophication effects on greenhouse gas fluxes from shallow-lake mesocosms override those of climate warming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Thomas A; Audet, Joachim; Svenning, Jens-Christian; Lauridsen, Torben L; Søndergaard, Martin; Landkildehus, Frank; Larsen, Søren E; Jeppesen, Erik

    2015-12-01

    Fresh waters make a disproportionately large contribution to greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, with shallow lakes being particular hot spots. Given their global prevalence, how GHG fluxes from shallow lakes are altered by climate change may have profound implications for the global carbon cycle. Empirical evidence for the temperature dependence of the processes controlling GHG production in natural systems is largely based on the correlation between seasonal temperature variation and seasonal change in GHG fluxes. However, ecosystem-level GHG fluxes could be influenced by factors, which while varying seasonally with temperature are actually either indirectly related (e.g. primary producer biomass) or largely unrelated to temperature, for instance nutrient loading. Here, we present results from the longest running shallow-lake mesocosm experiment which demonstrate that nutrient concentrations override temperature as a control of both the total and individual GHG flux. Furthermore, testing for temperature treatment effects at low and high nutrient levels separately showed only one, rather weak, positive effect of temperature (CH4 flux at high nutrients). In contrast, at low nutrients, the CO2 efflux was lower in the elevated temperature treatments, with no significant effect on CH4 or N2 O fluxes. Further analysis identified possible indirect effects of temperature treatment. For example, at low nutrient levels, increased macrophyte abundance was associated with significantly reduced fluxes of both CH4 and CO2 for both total annual flux and monthly observation data. As macrophyte abundance was positively related to temperature treatment, this suggests the possibility of indirect temperature effects, via macrophyte abundance, on CH4 and CO2 flux. These findings indicate that fluxes of GHGs from shallow lakes may be controlled more by factors indirectly related to temperature, in this case nutrient concentration and the abundance of primary producers. Thus, at ecosystem

  16. Net global warming potential and greenhouse gas intensity influenced by irrigation, tillage, crop rotation, and nitrogen fertilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sainju, Upendra M; Stevens, William B; Caesar-TonThat, Thecan; Liebig, Mark A; Wang, Jun

    2014-05-01

    Little information exists about how global warming potential (GWP) is affected by management practices in agroecosystems. We evaluated the effects of irrigation, tillage, crop rotation, and N fertilization on net GWP and greenhouse gas intensity (GHGI or GWP per unit crop yield) calculated by soil respiration (GWP and GHGI) and organic C (SOC) (GWP and GHGI) methods after accounting for CO emissions from all sources (irrigation, farm operations, N fertilization, and greenhouse gas [GHG] fluxes) and sinks (crop residue and SOC) in a Lihen sandy loam from 2008 to 2011 in western North Dakota. Treatments were two irrigation practices (irrigated vs. nonirrigated) and five cropping systems (conventional-till malt barley [ L.] with N fertilizer [CTBN], conventional-till malt barley with no N fertilizer [CTBO], no-till malt barley-pea [ L.] with N fertilizer [NTB-P], no-till malt barley with N fertilizer, and no-till malt barley with no N fertilizer [NTBO]). While CO equivalents were greater with irrigation, tillage, and N fertilization than without, NO and CH fluxes were 2 to 218 kg CO eq. ha greater in nonirrigated NTBN and irrigated CTBN than in other treatments. Previous year's crop residue and C sequestration rate were 202 to 9316 kg CO eq. ha greater in irrigated NTB-P than in other treatments. Compared with other treatments, GWP and GWP were 160 to 9052 kg CO eq. ha lower in irrigated and nonirrigated NTB-P. Similarly, GHGI and GHGI were lower in nonirrigated NTB-P than in other treatments. Regardless of irrigation practices, NTB-P may lower net GHG emissions more than other treatments in the northern Great Plains. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  17. Integrated evaluation of energy use, greenhouse gas emissions and global warming potential for sugar beet (Beta vulgaris) agroecosystems in Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousefi, Mohammad; Khoramivafa, Mahmud; Mondani, Farzad

    2014-08-01

    The main aim of this study was to determine and discuss the aggregate of energy use and greenhouse gas emission (CO2, N2O, and CH4) for sugar beet agroecosystems in western of Iran. For this propose data was collected by using questionnaires and face to face interview with 50 farmers. Results showed that total inputs and output energy were 49517.2 and 1095360.0 MJ ha-1, respectively. Energy use efficiency was 22.12. Total CO2, N2O and CH4 emissions due to chemical inputs were 2668.35, 22.92 and 3.49 kg, respectively. In sugar beet farms total global warming potential (GWPs) was 9847.77 kg CO2eq ha-1. In terms of CO2 equivalents, 27% of the GWPs come from CO2, 72% from N2O, and 1% from CH4. In this research input and output carbon were 29340.0 and 2678.6 kg C ha-1, respectively. Hence, carbon efficiency ratio was 10.95.

  18. Warm gas towards young stellar objects in Corona Australis - Herschel/PACS observations from the DIGIT key programme

    CERN Document Server

    Lindberg, Johan E; Green, Joel D; Herczeg, Gregory J; Dionatos, Odysseas; Evans, Neal J; Karska, Agata; Wampfler, Susanne F

    2013-01-01

    The effects of external irradiation on the chemistry and physics in the protostellar envelope around low-mass young stellar objects are poorly understood. The Corona Australis star-forming region contains the R CrA dark cloud, comprising several low-mass protostellar cores irradiated by an intermediate-mass young star. We study the effects on the warm gas and dust in a group of low-mass young stellar objects from the irradiation by the young luminous Herbig Be star R CrA. Herschel/PACS far-infrared datacubes of two low-mass star-forming regions in the R CrA dark cloud are presented. The distribution of CO, OH, H2O, [C II], [O I], and continuum emission is investigated. We have developed a deconvolution algorithm which we use to deconvolve the maps, separating the point-source emission from the extended emission. We also construct rotational diagrams of the molecular species. By deconvolution of the Herschel data, we find large-scale (several thousand AU) dust continuum and spectral line emission not associate...

  19. Differences in net global warming potential and greenhouse gas intensity between major rice-based cropping systems in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Zhengqin; Liu, Yinglie; Wu, Zhen; Zhang, Xiaolin; Liu, Pingli; Huang, Taiqing

    2015-12-02

    Double rice (DR) and upland crop-single rice (UR) systems are the major rice-based cropping systems in China, yet differences in net global warming potential (NGWP) and greenhouse gas intensity (GHGI) between the two systems are poorly documented. Accordingly, a 3-year field experiment was conducted to simultaneously measure methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions and changes in soil organic carbon (SOC) in oil rape-rice-rice and wheat-rice (representing DR and UR, respectively) systems with straw incorporation (0, 3 and 6 t/ha) during the rice-growing seasons. Compared with the UR system, the annual CH4, N2O, grain yield and NGWP were significantly increased in the DR system, though little effect on SOC sequestration or GHGI was observed without straw incorporation. Straw incorporation increased CH4 emission and SOC sequestration but had no significant effect on N2O emission in both systems. Averaged over the three study years, straw incorporation had no significant effect on NGWP and GHGI in the UR system, whereas these parameters were greatly increased in the DR system, i.e., by 108% (3 t/ha) and 180% (6 t/ha) for NGWP and 103% (3 t/ha) and 168% (6 t/ha) for GHGI.

  20. Greenhouse gas emissions and global warming potential of traditional and diversified tropical rice rotation systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weller, Sebastian; Janz, Baldur; Jörg, Lena; Kraus, David; Racela, Heathcliff S U; Wassmann, Reiner; Butterbach-Bahl, Klaus; Kiese, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    Global rice agriculture will be increasingly challenged by water scarcity, while at the same time changes in demand (e.g. changes in diets or increasing demand for biofuels) will feed back on agricultural practices. These factors are changing traditional cropping patterns from double-rice cropping to the introduction of upland crops in the dry season. For a comprehensive assessment of greenhouse gas (GHG) balances, we measured methane (CH4 )/nitrous oxide (N2 O) emissions and agronomic parameters over 2.5 years in double-rice cropping (R-R) and paddy rice rotations diversified with either maize (R-M) or aerobic rice (R-A) in upland cultivation. Introduction of upland crops in the dry season reduced irrigation water use and CH4 emissions by 66-81% and 95-99%, respectively. Moreover, for practices including upland crops, CH4 emissions in the subsequent wet season with paddy rice were reduced by 54-60%. Although annual N2 O emissions increased two- to threefold in the diversified systems, the strong reduction in CH4 led to a significantly lower (P < 0.05) annual GWP (CH4  + N2 O) as compared to the traditional double-rice cropping system. Measurements of soil organic carbon (SOC) contents before and 3 years after the introduction of upland crop rotations indicated a SOC loss for the R-M system, while for the other systems SOC stocks were unaffected. This trend for R-M systems needs to be followed as it has significant consequences not only for the GWP balance but also with regard to soil fertility. Economic assessment showed a similar gross profit span for R-M and R-R, while gross profits for R-A were reduced as a consequence of lower productivity. Nevertheless, regarding a future increase in water scarcity, it can be expected that mixed lowland-upland systems will expand in SE Asia as water requirements were cut by more than half in both rotation systems with upland crops.

  1. Global warming potential and greenhouse gas intensity in rice agriculture driven by high yields and nitrogen use efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoxu; Xu, Xin; Liu, Yinglie; Wang, Jinyang; Xiong, Zhengqin

    2016-05-01

    Our understanding of how global warming potential (GWP) and greenhouse gas intensity (GHGI) is affected by management practices aimed at food security with respect to rice agriculture remains limited. In the present study, a field experiment was conducted in China to evaluate the effects of integrated soil-crop system management (ISSM) on GWP and GHGI after accounting for carbon dioxide (CO2) equivalent emissions from all sources, including methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions, agrochemical inputs and farm operations and sinks (i.e., soil organic carbon sequestration). The ISSM mainly consisted of different nitrogen (N) fertilization rates and split, manure, Zn and Na2SiO3 fertilization and planting density for the improvement of rice yield and agronomic nitrogen use efficiency (NUE). Four ISSM scenarios consisting of different chemical N rates relative to the local farmers' practice (FP) rate were carried out, namely, ISSM-N1 (25 % reduction), ISSM-N2 (10 % reduction), ISSM-N3 (FP rate) and ISSM-N4 (25 % increase). The results showed that compared with the FP, the four ISSM scenarios significantly increased the rice yields by 10, 16, 28 and 41 % and the agronomic NUE by 75, 67, 35 and 40 %, respectively. In addition, compared with the FP, the ISSM-N1 and ISSM-N2 scenarios significantly reduced the GHGI by 14 and 18 %, respectively, despite similar GWPs. The ISSM-N3 and ISSM-N4 scenarios remarkably increased the GWP and GHGI by an average of 69 and 39 %, respectively. In conclusion, the ISSM strategies are promising for both food security and environmental protection, and the ISSM scenario of ISSM-N2 is the optimal strategy to realize high yields and high NUE together with low environmental impacts for this agricultural rice field.

  2. Global warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houghton, John

    2005-06-01

    'Global warming' is a phrase that refers to the effect on the climate of human activities, in particular the burning of fossil fuels (coal, oil and gas) and large-scale deforestation, which cause emissions to the atmosphere of large amounts of 'greenhouse gases', of which the most important is carbon dioxide. Such gases absorb infrared radiation emitted by the Earth's surface and act as blankets over the surface keeping it warmer than it would otherwise be. Associated with this warming are changes of climate. The basic science of the 'greenhouse effect' that leads to the warming is well understood. More detailed understanding relies on numerical models of the climate that integrate the basic dynamical and physical equations describing the complete climate system. Many of the likely characteristics of the resulting changes in climate (such as more frequent heat waves, increases in rainfall, increase in frequency and intensity of many extreme climate events) can be identified. Substantial uncertainties remain in knowledge of some of the feedbacks within the climate system (that affect the overall magnitude of change) and in much of the detail of likely regional change. Because of its negative impacts on human communities (including for instance substantial sea-level rise) and on ecosystems, global warming is the most important environmental problem the world faces. Adaptation to the inevitable impacts and mitigation to reduce their magnitude are both necessary. International action is being taken by the world's scientific and political communities. Because of the need for urgent action, the greatest challenge is to move rapidly to much increased energy efficiency and to non-fossil-fuel energy sources.

  3. Very bright, near-infrared single photon emitters in diamond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. W. M. Lau

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate activation of bright diamond single photon emitters in the near infrared range by thermal annealing alone, i.e., without ion implantation. The activation is crucially dependent on the annealing ambient. The activation of the single photon emitters is only observed when the sample is annealed in forming gas (4% H2 in Ar above temperatures of 1000 °C. By contrast, no emitters are activated by annealing in vacuum, oxygen, argon or deuterium. The emitters activated by annealing in forming gas exhibit very bright emission in the 730-760 nm wavelength range and have linewidths of ∼1.5-2.5 nm at room temperature.

  4. Warm Molecular Gas Traced with CO J=7->6 in the Galaxy's Central 2 Parsecs: Dynamical Heating of the Circumnuclear Disk

    CERN Document Server

    Bradford, C M; Nikola, T; Bolatto, A D; Jackson, J M; Savage, M L; Davidson, J A

    2005-01-01

    We present an 11 arcsec resolution map of the central two parsecs of the Galaxy in the CO J =7->6 rotational transition. The CO emission shows rotation about Sgr A*, but also evidence for non-circular turbulent motion and a clumpy morphology. We combine our dataset with available CO measurements to model the physical conditions in the disk. We find that the molecular gas in the region is both warm and dense, with T~200-300 K, n_H2~50,000-70,000 cm^-3. The mass of warm molecular gas we measure in the central two parsecs is at least 2000 M_solar, about 20 times the UV-excited atomic gas mass, ruling out an UV heating scenario for the molecular material. We compare the available spectral tracers with theoretical models and conclude that molecular gas is heated with magneto-hydrodynamic shocks with v~10-20 kms and B~0.3-0.5 mG. Using the conditions derived with the CO analysis, we include the other important coolants--neutral oxygen and molecular hydrogen--to estimate the total cooling budget of the molecular mat...

  5. Herschel-spire Fourier transform spectrometer observations of excited CO and [C I] in the antennae (NGC 4038/39): Warm and cold molecular gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schirm, Maximilien R. P.; Wilson, Christine D.; Parkin, Tara J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON L8S 4M1 (Canada); Kamenetzky, Julia; Glenn, Jason; Rangwala, Naseem [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy, 389-UCB, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80303 (United States); Spinoglio, Luigi; Pereira-Santaella, Miguel [Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali, INAF-IAPS, Via Fosso del Cavaliere 100, I-00133 Roma (Italy); Baes, Maarten; De Looze, Ilse [Sterrenkundig Observatorium, Universiteit Gent, Krijgslaan 281 S9, B-9000 Gent (Belgium); Barlow, Michael J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Clements, Dave L. [Astrophysics Group, Imperial College, Blackett Laboratory, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Cooray, Asantha [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Karczewski, Oskar Ł. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Sussex, Brighton BN1 9QH (United Kingdom); Madden, Suzanne C.; Rémy-Ruyer, Aurélie; Wu, Ronin, E-mail: schirmmr@mcmaster.ca, E-mail: wilson@physics.mcmaster.ca [CEA, Laboratoire AIM, Irfu/SAp, Orme des Merisiers, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2014-02-01

    We present Herschel Spectral and Photometric Imaging Receiver (SPIRE) Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS) observations of the Antennae (NGC 4038/39), a well-studied, nearby (22 Mpc), ongoing merger between two gas-rich spiral galaxies. The SPIRE-FTS is a low spatial ( FWHM ∼ 19''-43'') and spectral (∼1.2 GHz) resolution mapping spectrometer covering a large spectral range (194-671 μm, 450-1545 GHz). We detect five CO transitions (J = 4-3 to J = 8-7), both [C I] transitions, and the [N II] 205 μm transition across the entire system, which we supplement with ground-based observations of the CO J = 1-0, J = 2-1, and J = 3-2 transitions and Herschel Photodetecting Array Camera and Spectrometer (PACS) observations of [C II] and [O I] 63 μm. Using the CO and [C I] transitions, we perform both a local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) analysis of [C I] and a non-LTE radiative transfer analysis of CO and [C I] using the radiative transfer code RADEX along with a Bayesian likelihood analysis. We find that there are two components to the molecular gas: a cold (T {sub kin} ∼ 10-30 K) and a warm (T {sub kin} ≳ 100 K) component. By comparing the warm gas mass to previously observed values, we determine a CO abundance in the warm gas of x {sub CO} ∼ 5 × 10{sup –5}. If the CO abundance is the same in the warm and cold gas phases, this abundance corresponds to a CO J = 1-0 luminosity-to-mass conversion factor of α{sub CO} ∼ 7 M {sub ☉} pc{sup –2} (K km s{sup –1}){sup –1} in the cold component, similar to the value for normal spiral galaxies. We estimate the cooling from H{sub 2}, [C II], CO, and [O I] 63 μm to be ∼0.01 L {sub ☉}/M {sub ☉}. We compare photon-dominated region models to the ratio of the flux of various CO transitions, along with the ratio of the CO flux to the far-infrared flux in NGC 4038, NGC 4039, and the overlap region. We find that the densities recovered from our non-LTE analysis are consistent with a

  6. Carbon Nanotube Field Emitters

    OpenAIRE

    Zhbanov, Alexander; Pogorelov, Evgeny; Chang, Yia-Chung

    2010-01-01

    In this chapter we theoretically investigate the field emission from carbon nanotube field emitters in diode configuration between a flat anode and cathode. Exact analytical formulas of the electrical field, field enhancement factor, ponderomotive force, and field emission current are found. Applied voltage, height of the needle, radius of curvature on its top, and the work function are the parameters at our disposal. The field enhancement factor, total force and emission current, as well as ...

  7. Monolithic multinozzle emitters for nanoelectrospray mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Daojing; Yang, Peidong; Kim, Woong; Fan, Rong

    2011-09-20

    Novel and significantly simplified procedures for fabrication of fully integrated nanoelectrospray emitters have been described. For nanofabricated monolithic multinozzle emitters (NM.sup.2 emitters), a bottom up approach using silicon nanowires on a silicon sliver is used. For microfabricated monolithic multinozzle emitters (M.sup.3 emitters), a top down approach using MEMS techniques on silicon wafers is used. The emitters have performance comparable to that of commercially-available silica capillary emitters for nanoelectrospray mass spectrometry.

  8. A Pair of O VI and Broad Ly-alpha Absorbers Probing Warm Gas in a Galaxy Group Environment at z ~ 0.4

    CERN Document Server

    Pachat, Sachin; Muzahid, Sowgat; Khaire, Vikram; Srianand, Raghunathan; Wakker, Bart P; Savage, Blair D

    2016-01-01

    We report on the detection of two O VI absorbers separated in velocity by 710 km/s at z ~ 0.4 towards the background quasar SBS0957+599. Both absorbers are multiphase systems tracing substantial reservoirs of warm baryons. The low and intermediate ionization metals in the first absorber is consistent with an origin in photoionized gas. The O VI has a velocity structure different from other metal species. The Ly-alpha shows the presence of a broad feature. The line widths for O VI and the broad Ly-alpha suggest T = 7.1 x 10^5 K. This warm medium is probing a baryonic column which is an order of magnitude more than the total hydrogen in the cooler photoionized gas. The second absorber is detected only in H I and O VI. Here the temperature of 4.6 x 10^4 K supports O VI originating in a low-density photoionized gas. A broad component is seen in the Ly-alpha, offset from the O VI. The temperature in the broad Ly-alpha is T < 2.1 x 10^5 K. The absorbers reside in a galaxy overdensity region with 7 spectroscopica...

  9. Disgas, a new model for passive gas dispersion. Early applications for the warm gases emitted by Solfatara (Campi Flegrei, Italy)

    OpenAIRE

    D. Granieri; COSTA, A.; Macedonio, G.; Chiodini, G.(INFN Sezione di Lecce, Lecce, Italy); Bisson, M.; Avino, R.; Caliro, S

    2011-01-01

    A model to describe the cloud dispersion of gas denser than air is presented here. The dispersion of heavy gas is basically governed by the gravity but, when the density contrast (gas vs air) is not important the dispersion is controlled by the wind and atmospheric turbulence (so-called “passive dispersion”). DisGas is a model for dense gases which are dispersed under passive conditions, based on the full solution of the advection-diffusion equations for the gas concentration (Sankaranarayana...

  10. High-global warming potential F-gas emissions in California: comparison of ambient-based versus inventory-based emission estimates, and implications of refined estimates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Glenn; Zhan, Tao; Hsu, Ying-Kuang; Gupta, Pamela; Pederson, James; Croes, Bart; Blake, Donald R; Barletta, Barbara; Meinardi, Simone; Ashford, Paul; Vetter, Arnie; Saba, Sabine; Slim, Rayan; Palandre, Lionel; Clodic, Denis; Mathis, Pamela; Wagner, Mark; Forgie, Julia; Dwyer, Harry; Wolf, Katy

    2014-01-21

    To provide information for greenhouse gas reduction policies, the California Air Resources Board (CARB) inventories annual emissions of high-global-warming potential (GWP) fluorinated gases, the fastest growing sector of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions globally. Baseline 2008 F-gas emissions estimates for selected chlorofluorocarbons (CFC-12), hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFC-22), and hydrofluorocarbons (HFC-134a) made with an inventory-based methodology were compared to emissions estimates made by ambient-based measurements. Significant discrepancies were found, with the inventory-based emissions methodology resulting in a systematic 42% under-estimation of CFC-12 emissions from older refrigeration equipment and older vehicles, and a systematic 114% overestimation of emissions for HFC-134a, a refrigerant substitute for phased-out CFCs. Initial, inventory-based estimates for all F-gas emissions had assumed that equipment is no longer in service once it reaches its average lifetime of use. Revised emission estimates using improved models for equipment age at end-of-life, inventories, and leak rates specific to California resulted in F-gas emissions estimates in closer agreement to ambient-based measurements. The discrepancies between inventory-based estimates and ambient-based measurements were reduced from -42% to -6% for CFC-12, and from +114% to +9% for HFC-134a.

  11. Warm Molecular Gas Traced with CO J = 7 --> 6 in the Galaxy's Central 2 Parsecs: Dynamical Heating of the Circumnuclear Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradford, C. M.; Stacey, G. J.; Nikola, T.; Bolatto, A. D.; Jackson, J. M.; Savage, M. L.; Davidson, J. A.

    2005-01-01

    We present an 11" resolution map of the central 2 pc of the Galaxy in the CO J = 7 --> 6 rotational transition. The CO emission shows rotation about Sgr A* but also evidence for noncircular turbulent motion and a clumpy morphology. We combine our data set with available CO measurements to model the physical conditions in the disk. We find that the molecular gas in the region is both warm and dense, with T approx. 200-300 K and n(sub H2) approx. (5-7) x 10(exp 4) cm(exp -3). The mass of warm molecular gas we measure in the central 2 pc is at least 2000 M(solar), about 20 times the UV-excited atomic gas mass, ruling out a UV heating scenario for the molecular material. We compare the available spectral tracers with theoretical models and conclude that molecular gas is heated with magnetohydrodynamic shocks with v approx. 10-20 km s(exp -1) and B approx. 0.3- 0.5 mG. Using the conditions derived with the CO analysis, we include the other important coolants, neutral oxygen and molecular hydrogen, to estimate the total cooling budget of the molecular material. We derive a mass-to-luminosity ratio of approx. 2-3 M(solar)(L(solar)exp -1), which is consistent with the total power dissipated via turbulent decay in 0.1 pc cells with v(sub rms) approx. 15 kilometers per second. These size and velocity scales are comparable to the observed clumping scale and the velocity dispersion. At this rate, the material near Sgr A* is dissipating its orbital energy on an orbital timescale and cannot last for more than a few orbits. Our conclusions support a scenario in which the features near Sgr A* such as the circumnuclear disk and northern arm are generated by infalling clouds with low specific angular momentum.

  12. Cryogenic Thermal Emittance Measurements on Small-Diameter Stainless Steel Tubing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahromi, A. E.; Tuttle, J. G.; Canavan, E. R.

    2017-01-01

    The Mid Infrared Instrument aboard the James Webb Space Telescoep includes a mechanical cryocooler which cools its detectors to their 6 K operating temperature. The refrigerant flows through several meters of approximately 2 mm diameter 304L stainless steel tubing, with some sections gold plated, and some not, which are exposed to their environment. An issue of water freezing onto the tube surfaces is mitigated by a running a warm gas through the lines to sublimate the water. To model the effect of this process on nearby instruments, an accurate measure of the tube emittance is needed. Previously we reported the abosprtance of the gold plated stainless steel tubing as a function of source temperature (i.e. its environment). In this work the thermal emittance of the uncoated tubing is measured as a function of its temperature between 100 and 300 K. This value leads to an accurate prediction of the minimum length of time required to thermally recycle the system. We report the technique and present the results.

  13. Warm gas phase chemistry as possible origin of high HDO/H2O ratios in hot and dense gases: application to inner protoplanetary discs

    CERN Document Server

    Thi, Wing-Fai; Kamp, Inga

    2009-01-01

    The origin of Earth oceans is controversial. Earth could have acquired its water either from hydrated silicates (wet Earth scenario) or from comets (dry Earth scenario). [HDO]/[H2O] ratios are used to discriminate between the scenarios. High [HDO]/[H2O] ratios are found in Earth oceans. These high ratios are often attributed to the release of deuterium enriched cometary water ice, which was formed at low gas and dust temperatures. Observations do not show high [HDO]/[H2O] in interstellar ices. We investigate the possible formation of high [HDO]/[H2O] ratios in dense (nH> 1E6 cm^{-3}) and warm gas (T=100-1000 K) by gas-phase photochemistry in the absence of grain surface chemistry. We derive analytical solutions, taking into account the major neutral-neutral reactions for gases at T>100 K. The chemical network is dominated by photodissociation and neutral-neutral reactions. Despite the high gas temperature, deuterium fractionation occurs because of the difference in activation energy between deuteration enrich...

  14. Recent progress in understanding the hot and warm gas phases in the halos of star-forming galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Strickland, D K; Colbert, E J M; Hoopes, C G; Weaver, K A

    2002-01-01

    In this contribution we present a few selected examples of how the latest generation of space-based instrumentation -- NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory and the Far-Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) -- are finally answering old questions about the influence of massive star feedback on the warm and hot phases of the ISM and IGM. In particular, we discuss the physical origin of the soft thermal X-ray emission in the halos of star-forming and starburst galaxies, its relationship to extra-planar H-alpha emission, and plasma diagnostics using FUSE observations of O VI absorption and emission.

  15. Low-energy, high-current, ion source with cold electron emitter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vizir, A. V.; Oks, E. M. [High Current Electronics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Tomsk 634055 (Russian Federation); State University of Control Systems and Radioelectronics, Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation); Shandrikov, M. V.; Yushkov, G. Yu. [High Current Electronics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Tomsk 634055 (Russian Federation)

    2012-02-15

    An ion source based on a two-stage discharge with electron injection from a cold emitter is presented. The first stage is the emitter itself, and the second stage provides acceleration of injected electrons for gas ionization and formation of ion flow (<20 eV, 5 A dc). The ion accelerating system is gridless; acceleration is accomplished by an electric field in the discharge plasma within an axially symmetric, diverging, magnetic field. The hollow cathode electron emitter utilizes an arc discharge with cathode spots hidden inside the cathode cavity. Selection of the appropriate emitter material provides a very low erosion rate and long lifetime.

  16. High efficiency quasi-monochromatic infrared emitter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brucoli, Giovanni; Bouchon, Patrick; Haïdar, Riad; Besbes, Mondher; Benisty, Henri; Greffet, Jean-Jacques

    2014-02-01

    Incandescent radiation sources are widely used as mid-infrared emitters owing to the lack of alternative for compact and low cost sources. A drawback of miniature hot systems such as membranes is their low efficiency, e.g., for battery powered systems. For targeted narrow-band applications such as gas spectroscopy, the efficiency is even lower. In this paper, we introduce design rules valid for very generic membranes demonstrating that their energy efficiency for use as incandescent infrared sources can be increased by two orders of magnitude.

  17. Using IBEX data to constrain the heliosphere's large-scale structure: interstellar neutral gas and the Warm Breeze

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bzowski, Maciej; McComas, David; Galli, Andre; Kucharek, Harald; Wurz, Peter; Sokol, Justyna M.; Schwadron, Nathan; Heirtzler, David M.; Kubiak, M. Marzena A.; Möbius, Eberhard; Fuselier, Stephen; Swaczyna, Paweł; Leonard, Trevor; Park, Jeewoo

    2016-07-01

    The large-scale structure of the heliosphere is governed by the interaction of the partly ionized, magnetized interstellar gas and the magnetized, fully ionized solar wind, structured in heliolatitude. Determining factors of this interaction are the density and flow velocity of interstellar gas relative to the Sun, the Mach number of this flow and the strength and inclination of the interstellar magnetic field to the flow vector at the interstellar side, and the magnitude of dynamic pressure of solar wind and the strength of its embedded magnetic field at the solar side. As a result of charge exchange interactions operating in the boundary region between the heliosphere and interstellar matter, a new population of neutral atoms is created, in addition to the population of unperturbed interstellar neutral gas. Both of these populations penetrate deep inside the heliosphere, where they can be sampled by the first space probe dedicated to observations of the heliosphere and its immediate surroundings by means of neutral atoms: the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX). Due to distortion of the heliosphere from axial symmetry, the secondary population of interstellar neutrals, created via charge exchange between the plasma flowing past the heliopause and the unperturbed pristine neutral interstellar gas, appears to be coming from a different direction than the unperturbed interstellar neutral flow. These two directions should be coplanar with the plane defined by the local interstellar magnetic field and the flow direction of the unperturbed gas. IBEX provides an unprecedented opportunity to study and interpret these relations. The IBEX science team have recently accomplished important milestones in researching the primary and secondary populations of interstellar gas and their relation to the local interstellar magnetic fields. First, the temperature and velocity vector of the inflowing interstellar neutral gas has been determined with unprecedented robustness based

  18. Surface Analysis of LaB6 Single Crystal Thermionic Emitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakazawa, Masatoshi; Futamoto, Masaaki; Hosoki, Shigeyuki; Usami, Katuhisa

    1980-07-01

    Surface analysis of heated LaB6 thermionic emitter is made by means of Auger electron spectroscopy. Changes in surface state with changing emitter temperature and ambient oxygen pressure are investigated. The emitter temperature is varied from room temperature to 1700°C, and the oxygen pressure from 1× 10-5 Pa to 7× 10-3 Pa. With the increase of temperature the emitter surface passes through four states depending on oxygen pressure, before it reaches a clean state. Among them a state is particularly noteworthy that the emitter surface is covered with a layer of lanthanum oxide just before assuming the clean surface state. A surface state diagram is shown. The optimum conditions of emitter temperature and oxygen gas pressure to exhibit high emission properties are described.

  19. Origin of warm and hot gas emission from low-mass protostars: Herschel-HIFI observations of CO J = 16-15

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Lars Egstrøm; Van Dishoeck, E. F.; Mottram, J. C.

    2017-01-01

    not understood. Aims. We aim to shed light on the excitation and origin of the CO ladder observed toward protostars, and on the water abundance in different physical components within protostellar systems using spectrally resolved Herschel-HIFI data. Methods. Observations are presented of the highly excited CO...... line J = 16-15 (Eup/kB = 750 K) with the Herschel Heterodyne Instrument for the Far Infrared (HIFI) toward a sample of 24 low-mass protostellar objects. The sources were selected from the Herschel "Water in Star-forming regions with Herschel" (WISH) and "Dust, Ice, and Gas in Time" (DIGIT) key programs...... excitation components. The warm PACS component (300 K) is associated with the broad HIFI component, and the hot PACS component (700 K) is associated with the offset HIFI component. The former originates in either outflow cavity shocks or the disk wind, and the latter in irradiated shocks. The low water...

  20. Arctic climate change: Greenhouse warming unleashed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauritsen, Thorsten

    2016-04-01

    Human activity alters the atmospheric composition, which leads to global warming. Model simulations suggest that reductions in emission of sulfur dioxide from Europe since the 1970s could have unveiled rapid Arctic greenhouse gas warming.

  1. Modeling impacts of alternative practices on net global warming potential and greenhouse gas intensity from rice-wheat annual rotation in China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinyang Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Evaluating the net exchange of greenhouse gas (GHG emissions in conjunction with soil carbon sequestration may give a comprehensive insight on the role of agricultural production in global warming. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Measured data of methane (CH(4 and nitrous oxide (N(2O were utilized to test the applicability of the Denitrification and Decomposition (DNDC model to a winter wheat - single rice rotation system in southern China. Six alternative scenarios were simulated against the baseline scenario to evaluate their long-term (45-year impacts on net global warming potential (GWP and greenhouse gas intensity (GHGI. PRINCIPAL RESULTS: The simulated cumulative CH(4 emissions fell within the statistical deviation ranges of the field data, with the exception of N(2O emissions during rice-growing season and both gases from the control treatment. Sensitivity tests showed that both CH(4 and N(2O emissions were significantly affected by changes in both environmental factors and management practices. Compared with the baseline scenario, the long-term simulation had the following results: (1 high straw return and manure amendment scenarios greatly increased CH(4 emissions, while other scenarios had similar CH(4 emissions, (2 high inorganic N fertilizer increased N(2O emissions while manure amendment and reduced inorganic N fertilizer scenarios decreased N(2O emissions, (3 the mean annual soil organic carbon sequestration rates (SOCSR under manure amendment, high straw return, and no-tillage scenarios averaged 0.20 t C ha(-1 yr(-1, being greater than other scenarios, and (4 the reduced inorganic N fertilizer scenario produced the least N loss from the system, while all the scenarios produced comparable grain yields. CONCLUSIONS: In terms of net GWP and GHGI for the comprehensive assessment of climate change and crop production, reduced inorganic N fertilizer scenario followed by no-tillage scenario would be advocated for this specified

  2. Beta emitters and radiation protection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jødal, Lars

    2009-01-01

    , and 90Y, using data from a freely available database. Bremsstrahlung yields were calculated for 90Y shielded by lead, aluminium, or perspex. Bremsstrahlung spectrum from 90Y shielded by perspex was measured, and attenuation of spectrum by lead was calculated. Whole-body and finger doses to persons...... preparing 90Y-Zevalin were measured. CONCLUSIONS. Good laboratory practice is important to keep radiation doses low. To reduce bremsstrahlung, 90Y should not be shielded by lead but instead perspex (10 mm) or aluminium (5 mm). Bremsstrahlung radiation can be further reduced by adding a millimetre of lead......BACKGROUND. Beta emitters, such as 90Y, are increasingly being used for cancer treatment. However, beta emitters demand other precautions than gamma emitters during preparation and administration, especially concerning shielding. AIM. To discuss practical precautions for handling beta emitters...

  3. Nanodiamond Emitters of Single Photons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlasov I.I.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Luminescence properties of single color centers were studied in nanodiamonds of different origin. It was found that single photon emitters could be realized even in molecularsized diamond (less than 2 nm capable of housing stable luminescent center “silicon-vacancy.” First results on incorporation of single-photon emitters based on luminescent nanodiamonds in plasmonic nanoantennas to enhance the photon count rate and directionality, diminish the fluorescence decay time, and provide polarization selectivity are presented.

  4. Visible Spectrum Incandescent Selective Emitter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sonsight Inc.

    2004-04-30

    The purpose of the work performed was to demonstrate the feasibility of a novel bi-layer selective emitter. Selective emitters are incandescent radiant bodies with emissivities that are substantially larger in a selected part of the radiation spectrum, thereby significantly shifting their radiated spectral distribution from that of a blackbody radiating at the same temperature. The major research objectives involved answering the following questions: (1) What maximum VIS/NIR radiant power and emissivity ratios can be attained at 2650 K? (2) What is the observed emitter body life and how does its performance vary with time? (3) What are the design tradeoffs for a dual heating approach in which both an internally mounted heating coil and electrical resistance self-heating are used? (4) What are the quantitative improvements to be had from utilizing a bi-layer emitter body with a low emissivity inner layer and a partially transmissive outer layer? Two approaches to obtaining selective emissivity were investigated. The first was to utilize large optical scattering within an emitter material with a spectral optical absorption that is much greater within the visible spectrum than that within the NIR. With this approach, an optically thick emitter can radiate almost as if optically thin because essentially, scattering limits the distance below the surface from which significant amounts of internally generated radiation can emerge. The performance of thin emitters was also investigated (for optically thin emitters, spectral emissivity is proportional to spectral absorptivity). These emitters were fabricated from thin mono-layer emitter rods as well as from bi-layer rods with a thin emitter layer mounted on a substrate core. With an initially estimated energy efficiency of almost three times that of standard incandescent bulbs, a number of energy, economic and environmental benefits such as less energy use and cost, reduced CO{sub 2} emissions, and no mercury contamination

  5. Simulation of the gas-side heat input for the pre-calculation of the thermal behaviour and consumption in the warm-up of engines; Simulation des gasseitigen Waermeeintrags zur Vorausberechnung des thermischen Verhaltens und des Verbrauchs im Motorwarmlauf

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salbrechter, Sebastian; Wimmer, Andreas; Pirker, Gerhard [Technische Univ. Graz (Austria). Forschungsbereich LEC; Noest, Michael [Forschungsgesellschaft mbH, Graz (AT). Kompetenzzentrum ' ' Das virtuelle Fahrzeug' ' (VIF)

    2011-07-01

    In addition to the friction heat, the heat input resulting from the combustion process is the main determining factor for the warm-up behaviour of a combustion engine. In order to predict the fuel consumption during warm-up, an accurate reproduction of the gas-sided heat transfer inside the combustion chamber and in the exhaust port is of utmost importance in the simulation of the thermal behaviour of combustion engines. Since the relevant driving cycles cover a large area of the engine-map range and the application changes play a large role during warm-up, the formulation of the gas-sided heat transfer is very demanding. In this article, the procedure for deriving a heat-input model will be shown using the example of a gasoline engine with direct injection and variable valve train. (orig.)

  6. The effects of rape residue mulching on net global warming potential and greenhouse gas intensity from no-tillage paddy fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhi-Sheng; Cao, Cou-Gui; Guo, Li-Jin; Li, Cheng-Fang

    2014-01-01

    A field experiment was conducted to provide a complete greenhouse gas (GHG) accounting for global warming potential (GWP), net GWP, and greenhouse gas intensity (GHGI) from no-tillage (NT) paddy fields with different amounts of oilseed rape residue mulch (0, 3000, 4000, and 6000 kg dry matter (DM) ha(-1)) during a rice-growing season after 3 years of oilseed rape-rice cultivation. Residue mulching treatments showed significantly more organic carbon (C) density for the 0-20 cm soil layer at harvesting than no residue treatment. During a rice-growing season, residue mulching treatments sequestered significantly more organic C from 687 kg C ha(-1) season(-1) to 1654 kg C ha(-1) season(-1) than no residue treatment. Residue mulching significantly increased emissions of CO2 and N2O but decreased CH4 emissions. Residue mulching treatments significantly increased GWP by 9-30% but significantly decreased net GWP by 33-71% and GHGI by 35-72% relative to no residue treatment. These results suggest that agricultural economic viability and GHG mitigation can be achieved simultaneously by residue mulching on NT paddy fields in central China.

  7. Comparison greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and global warming potential (GWP) effect of energy use in different wheat agroecosystems in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousefi, Mohammad; Mahdavi Damghani, Abdolmajid; Khoramivafa, Mahmud

    2016-04-01

    The aims of this study were to determine energy requirement and global warming potential (GWP) in low and high input wheat production systems in western of Iran. For this purpose, data were collected from 120 wheat farms applying questionnaires via face-to-face interviews. Results showed that total energy input and output were 60,000 and 180,000 MJ ha(-1) in high input systems and 14,000 and 56,000 MJ ha(-1) in low input wheat production systems, respectively. The highest share of total input energy in high input systems recorded for electricity power, N fertilizer, and diesel fuel with 36, 18, and 13 %, respectively, while the highest share of input energy in low input systems observed for N fertilizer, diesel fuel, and seed with 32, 31, and 27 %. Energy use efficiency in high input systems (3.03) was lower than of low input systems (3.94). Total CO2, N2O, and CH4 emissions in high input systems were 1981.25, 31.18, and 1.87 kg ha(-1), respectively. These amounts were 699.88, 0.02, and 0.96 kg ha(-1) in low input systems. In high input wheat production systems, total GWP was 11686.63 kg CO2eq ha(-1) wheat. This amount was 725.89 kg CO2eq ha(-1) in low input systems. The results show that 1 ha of high input system will produce greenhouse effect 17 times of low input systems. So, high input production systems need to have an efficient and sustainable management for reducing environmental crises such as change climate.

  8. Net global warming potential and greenhouse gas intensity of conventional and conservation agriculture system in rainfed semi arid tropics of India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratibha, G.; Srinivas, I.; Rao, K. V.; Shanker, Arun K.; Raju, B. M. K.; Choudhary, Deepak K.; Srinivas Rao, K.; Srinivasarao, Ch.; Maheswari, M.

    2016-11-01

    Agriculture has been considered as one of the contributors to greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and it continues to increase with increase in crop production. Hence development of sustainable agro techniques with maximum crop production, and low global warming potential is need of the hour. Quantifying net global warming potential (NGWP) and greenhouse gas intensity (GHGI) of an agricultural activity is a method to assess the mitigation potential of the activity. But there is dearth of information on NGWP of conservation agriculture under rainfed conditions. Hence in this study two methods such as crop based (NGWPcrop) and soil based (NGWPsoil) were estimated from the data of the experiment initiated in 2009 in rainfed semiarid regions of Hyderabad, India with different tillage practices like conventional tillage (CT), reduced tillage (RT), zero tillage (ZT) and residue retention levels by harvesting at different heights which includes 0, 10 and 30 cm anchored residue in pigeonpea-castor systems. The results of the study revealed that under rainfed conditions CT recorded 24% higher yields over ZT, but CT and RT were on par with each other. However, the yield gap between the tillage treatments is narrowing down over 5 years of study. ZT and RT recorded 26 and 11% lower indirect GHG emissions (emissions from farm operations and input use) over CT, respectively. The percent contribution of CO2 eq. N2O emission is higher to total GHG emissions in both the crops. Both NGWPcrop, NGWPsoil, GHGIcrop, and GHGIsoil based were influenced by tillage and residue treatments. Further, castor grown on pigeonpea residue recorded 20% higher GHG emissions over pigeonpea grown on castor residues. The fuel consumption in ZT was reduced by 58% and 81% as compared to CT in pigeonpea and castor, respectively. Lower NGWP and GHGI based on crop and soil was observed with increase in crop residues and decrease in tillage intensity in both the crops. The results of the study indicate that, there

  9. The nearby interstellar medium towards alpha Leo -- UV observations and modeling of a warm cloud within hot gas

    CERN Document Server

    Gry, Cecile

    2016-01-01

    We analyze interstellar absorption features in the full UV spectrum of the nearby (d = 24 pc) B8 IVn star alpha Leo (Regulus) obtained at high resolution and high S/N by the HST ASTRAL Treasury program. We derive column densities for many key atomic species and interpret their partial ionizations. The gas in front of alpha Leo exhibits two absorption components, one of which coincides in velocity with the local interstellar cloud (LIC) that surrounds the Sun. The second, smaller, component is shifted by +5.6 km/s relative to the main component, in agreement with results for other lines of sight in this region of the sky. The excitation of the C II fine-structure levels and the ratio of Mg I to Mg II reveal a temperature T = 6500 (+750,-600)K and electron density n(e) = 0.11 (+0.025,-0.03) cm^-3. Our investigation of the ionization balance of all the available species indicates that about 1/3 of the hydrogen atoms are ionized and that metals are significantly depleted onto grains. We infer that N(H I) = 1.9 (+...

  10. ALMA Observations of Warm Dense Gas in NGC 1614 --- Breaking of Star Formation Law in the Central kpc

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, C K; Lu, N; Gao, Y; Diaz-Santos, T; Herrero-Illana, R; Meijerink, R; Privon, G; Zhao, Y -H; Evans, A S; König, S; Mazzarella, J M; Aalto, S; Appleton, P; Armus, L; Charmandaris, V; Chu, J; Haan, S; Inami, H; Murphy, E J; Sanders, D B; Schulz, B; van der Werf, P

    2014-01-01

    We present ALMA Cycle-0 observations of the CO (6-5) line emission and of the 435um dust continuum emission in the central kpc of NGC 1614, a local luminous infrared galaxy (LIRG) at a distance of 67.8 Mpc (1 arcsec = 329 pc). The CO emission is well resolved by the ALMA beam (0".26 x 0".20) into a circum-nuclear ring, with an integrated flux of f_{CO(6-5)} = 898 (+-153) Jy km/s, which is 63(+-12)% of the total CO(6-5) flux measured by Herschel. The molecular ring, located between 100pc < r < 350pc from the nucleus, looks clumpy and includes seven unresolved (or marginally resolved) knots with median velocity dispersion of 40 km/s. These knots are associated with strong star formation regions with \\Sigma_{SFR} 100 M_\\sun/yr/kpc^{2} and \\Sigma_{Gas} 1.0E4 M_\\sun/pc^{2}. The non-detections of the nucleus in both the CO (6-5) line emission and the 435um continuum rule out, with relatively high confidence, a Compton-thick AGN in NGC 1614. Comparisons with radio continuum emission show a strong deviation fro...

  11. Powerful H2 Line Cooling in Stephan’s Quintet. II. Group-wide Gas and Shock Modeling of the Warm H2 and a Comparison with [C II] 157.7 μm Emission and Kinematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appleton, P. N.; Guillard, P.; Togi, A.; Alatalo, K.; Boulanger, F.; Cluver, M.; Pineau des Forêts, G.; Lisenfeld, U.; Ogle, P.; Xu, C. K.

    2017-02-01

    We map for the first time the two-dimensional H2 excitation of warm intergalactic gas in Stephan's Quintet on group-wide (50 × 35 kpc2) scales to quantify the temperature, mass, and warm H2 mass fraction as a function of position using Spitzer. Molecular gas temperatures are seen to rise (to T > 700 K) and the slope of the power-law density–temperature relation flattens along the main ridge of the filament, defining the region of maximum heating. We also performed MHD modeling of the excitation properties of the warm gas, to map the velocity structure and energy deposition rate of slow and fast molecular shocks. Slow magnetic shocks were required to explain the power radiated from the lowest-lying rotational states of H2, and strongly support the idea that energy cascades down to small scales and low velocities from the fast collision of NGC 7318b with group-wide gas. The highest levels of heating of the warm H2 are strongly correlated with the large-scale stirring of the medium as measured by [C ii] spectroscopy with Herschel. H2 is also seen associated with a separate bridge that extends toward the Seyfert nucleus in NGC 7319, from both Spitzer and CARMA CO observations. This opens up the possibility that both galaxy collisions and outflows from active galactic nuclei can turbulently heat gas on large scales in compact groups. The observations provide a laboratory for studying the effects of turbulent energy dissipation on group-wide scales, which may provide clues about the heating and cooling of gas at high z in early galaxy and protogalaxy formation.

  12. Combustion powered thermophotovoltaic emitter system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McHenry, R.S. [Naval Academy, Annapolis, MD (United States). Naval Architecture, Ocean and Marine Engineering

    1995-07-01

    The US Naval Academy (USNA) has recently completed an engineering design project for a high temperature thermophotovoltaic (TPV) photon emitter. The final apparatus was to be portable, completely self contained, and was to incorporate cycle efficiency optimization such as exhaust stream recuperation. Through computer modeling and prototype experimentation, a methane fueled emitter system was designed from structural ceramic materials to fulfill the high temperature requirements necessary for high system efficiency. This paper outlines the engineering design process, discusses obstacles and solutions encountered, and presents the final design.

  13. Effects of a raised water table on greenhouse gas emissions and celery yield from agricultural peat under climate warming conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matysek, Magdalena; Zona, Donatella; Leake, Jonathan; Banwart, Steven

    2017-04-01

    Peatlands are globally important areas for carbon preservation: covering only 3% of world's land, they store 30% of total soil carbon. At the same time, peat soils are widely utilised in agriculture: in Europe 14% of peatland area is under cultivation, 40% of UK peatlands have been drained for agricultural use and 24% of deep peat area in England is being farmed. One of the most important regions for crop production on lowland peats in the UK are the East Anglian Fenlands (the Fens): an area of drained peatlands in East England. 88% of the Fenland area is cultivated, sustaining around 4000 farms and supplying 37% of total vegetable production in England. The soils of the area are fertile (89% of agricultural land being classified as grade 1 or 2) and so crops with high nutritional demands tend to dominate. It is estimated that Fenland peats store 41 Tg of Carbon, which is lost from the ecosystem at a rate of 0.4 Tg C/yr. The Fens are at risk due to continued drainage-induced volume loss of the peat layer via shrinkage, compaction and oxidation, which are estimated to result in wastage rate of 2.1 cm/yr. Cultivation of peat soil requires drainage as most crops are intolerant of root-zone anoxia: this leads to creation of oxic conditions in which organic matter becomes vulnerable to mineralisation by aerobic microorganisms. It is, therefore, crucial to find a water table level which would minimise peat loss and at the same time allow for economically viable crop growth. Despite the importance of preservation of agricultural peats, there is a lack of studies which attempt to find water table level that strikes a balance between crop yield and greenhouse gas production. The future of the Fens is overshadowed by another uncertainty: increases in temperature brought by the climate change. It is estimated that average global temperature increase expected by the end of this century (relative to 1986-2005) would be within the range of 0.3-4.8°C, depending on the scenario

  14. Warm Inflation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Øyvind Grøn

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available I show here that there are some interesting differences between the predictions of warm and cold inflation models focusing in particular upon the scalar spectral index n s and the tensor-to-scalar ratio r. The first thing to be noted is that the warm inflation models in general predict a vanishingly small value of r. Cold inflationary models with the potential V = M 4 ( ϕ / M P p and a number of e-folds N = 60 predict δ n s C ≡ 1 − n s ≈ ( p + 2 / 120 , where n s is the scalar spectral index, while the corresponding warm inflation models with constant value of the dissipation parameter Γ predict δ n s W = [ ( 20 + p / ( 4 + p ] / 120 . For example, for p = 2 this gives δ n s W = 1.1 δ n s C . The warm polynomial model with Γ = V seems to be in conflict with the Planck data. However, the warm natural inflation model can be adjusted to be in agreement with the Planck data. It has, however, more adjustable parameters in the expressions for the spectral parameters than the corresponding cold inflation model, and is hence a weaker model with less predictive force. However, it should be noted that the warm inflation models take into account physical processes such as dissipation of inflaton energy to radiation energy, which is neglected in the cold inflationary models.

  15. A HIFI preview of warm molecular gas around chi Cyg : first detection of H2O emission toward an S-type AGB star

    CERN Document Server

    Justtanont, K; Schoier, F L; Maercker, M; Olofsson, H; Bujarrabal, V; Marston, A P; Teyssier, D; Alcolea, J; Cernicharo, J; Dominik, C; de Koter, A; Melnick, G; Menten, K; Neufeld, D; Planesas, P; Schmidt, M; Szczerba, R; Waters, R; de Graauw, Th; Whyborn, N; Finn, T; Helmich, F; Siebertz, O; Schmulling, F; Ossenkopf, V; Lai, R

    2010-01-01

    A set of new, sensitive, and spectrally resolved, sub-millimeter line observations are used to probe the warm circumstellar gas around the S-type AGB star chi Cyg. The observed lines involve high rotational quantum numbers, which, combined with previously obtained lower-frequency data, make it possible to study in detail the chemical and physical properties of, essentially, the entire circumstellar envelope of chi Cyg. The data were obtained using the HIFI instrument aboard Herschel, whose high spectral resolution provides valuable information about the line profiles. Detailed, non-LTE, radiative transfer modelling, including dust radiative transfer coupled with a dynamical model, has been performed to derive the temperature, density, and velocity structure of the circumstellar envelope. We report the first detection of circumstellar H2O rotational emission lines in an S-star. Using the high-J CO lines to derive the parameters for the circumstellar envelope, we modelled both the ortho- and para-H2O lines. Our...

  16. The warm ionized gas in CALIFA early-type galaxies: 2D emission-line patterns and kinematics for 32 galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Gomes, J M; Kehrig, C; Vílchez, J M; Lehnert, M D; Sánchez, S F; Ziegler, B; Breda, I; Reis, S N dos; Iglesias-Páramo, J; Bland-Hawthorn, J; Galbany, L; Bomans, D J; Rosales-Ortega, F F; Fernandes, R Cid; Walcher, C J; Falcón-Barroso, J; García-Benito, R; Márquez, I; del Olmo, A; Masegosa, J; Mollá, M; Marino, R A; Delgado, R M González; López-Sánchez, Á R

    2015-01-01

    The morphological, spectroscopic and kinematical properties of the warm interstellar medium (wim) in early-type galaxies (ETGs) hold key observational constraints to nuclear activity and the buildup history of these massive, quiescent systems. High-quality integral field spectroscopy (IFS) data with a wide spectral and spatial coverage, such as those from the CALIFA survey, offer an unprecedented opportunity for advancing our understanding of the wim in ETGs. This article centers on a 2D investigation of the wim component in 32 nearby (<~150Mpc) ETGs from CALIFA, complementing a previous 1D analysis of the same sample (Papaderos et al. 2013; P13). We include here H\\alpha\\ intensity and equivalent width (EW) maps and radial profiles, diagnostic emission-line ratios, besides ionized-gas and stellar kinematics. This study is supplemented by \\tau-ratio maps as an efficient means to quantify the role of photoionization by pAGB stars, as compared to other mechanisms (e.g., AGN, low-level star formation). Additio...

  17. Analysis of the thin layer of Galactic warm ionized gas in the range 20 < l < 30 deg, -1.5 < b < +1.5 deg

    CERN Document Server

    Paladini, R; Davies, R D; Giard, M

    2005-01-01

    We present an analysis of the thin layer of Galactic warm ionized gas at an angular resolution ~ 10'. This is carried out using radio continuum data at 1.4 GHz, 2.7 GHz and 5 GHz in the coordinate region 20 < l < 30 deg, -1.5 < b < +1.5 deg. For this purpose, we evaluate the zero level of the 2.7 and 5 GHz surveys using auxiliary data at 2.3 GHz and 408 MHz. The derived zero level corrections are T_{zero}(2.7 GHz)=0.15 +/- 0.06 K and T_{zero}(5 GHz)=0.1 +/- 0.05 K. We separate the thermal (free-free) and non-thermal (synchrotron) component by means of a spectral analysis performed adopting an antenna temperature spectral index -2.1 for the free-free emission, a realistic spatial distribution of indices for the synchrotron radiation and by fitting, pixel-by-pixel, the Galactic spectral index. We find that at 5 GHz, for |b| = 0 deg, the fraction of thermal emission reaches a maximum value of 82%, while at 1.4 GHz, the corresponding value is 68%. In addition, for the thermal emission, the analysis in...

  18. Molecular Ro-vibrational Collision Rates for Infrared Modeling of Warm Interstellar Gas from Full-dimensional Quantum Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stancil, Phillip

    We propose to compute accurate collisional excitation rate coefficients for rovibrational transitions of CS, SiO, SO, NO, H_2O, and HCN due to H_2, He, or H impact. This extends our previous grant which focused on 3- and 4-atom systems to 4- and 5-atom collision complexes, with dynamics to be performed on 6-9 dimensional potential energy surfaces (PESs). This work, which uses fully quantum mechanical methods for inelastic scattering and incorporates full-dimensional PESs, pushes beyond the state-of-the-art for such calculations, as recently established by our group for rovibrational transitions in CO-H_2 in 6D. Many of the required PESs will be computed as part of this project using ab initio theory and basis sets of the highest level feasible and particular attention will be given to the long range form of the PESs. The completion of the project will result in 6 new global PESs and state-to-state rate coefficients for a large range of initial rovibrational levels for temperatures between 1 and 3000 K. The chosen collision systems correspond to cases where data are limited or lacking, are important coolants or diagnostics, and result in observable emission features in the infrared (IR). The final project results will be important for the analysis of a variety of interstellar and extragalactic environments in which the local conditions of gas density, radiation field, and/or shocks drive the level populations out of equilibrium. In such cases, collisional excitation data are critical to the accurate prediction and interpretation of observed molecular IR emission lines in protoplanetary disks, star-forming regions, planetary nebulae, embedded protostars, photodissociation regions, etc. The use of the proposed collisional excitation data will lead to deeper examination and understanding of the properties of many astrophysical environments, hence elevating the scientific return from the upcoming JWST, as well as from current (SOFIA, Herschel, HST) and past IR missions

  19. The state of the warm and cold gas in the extreme starburst at the core of the Phoenix galaxy cluster (SPT-CLJ2344-4243)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonald, Michael; Bautz, Marshall W. [Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, MIT, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Swinbank, Mark; Edge, Alastair C.; Hogan, Michael T. [Institute for Computational Cosmology, Department of Physics, Durham University, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Wilner, David J.; Bayliss, Matthew B. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Veilleux, Sylvain [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Benson, Bradford A. [Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics, University of Chicago, 5640 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Marrone, Daniel P. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); McNamara, Brian R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Waterloo, 200 University Avenue West, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada); Wei, Lisa H., E-mail: mcdonald@space.mit.edu [Atmospheric and Environmental Research, 131 Hartwell Avenue, Lexington, MA 02421 (United States)

    2014-03-20

    We present new optical integral field spectroscopy (Gemini South) and submillimeter spectroscopy (Submillimeter Array) of the central galaxy in the Phoenix cluster (SPT-CLJ2344-4243). This cluster was previously reported to have a massive starburst (∼800 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}) in the central, brightest cluster galaxy, most likely fueled by the rapidly cooling intracluster medium. These new data reveal a complex emission-line nebula, extending for >30 kpc from the central galaxy, detected at [O II]λλ3726, 3729, [O III]λλ4959, 5007, Hβ, Hγ, Hδ, [Ne III]λ3869, and He II λ4686. The total Hα luminosity, assuming Hα/Hβ = 2.85, is L {sub Hα} = 7.6 ± 0.4 ×10{sup 43} erg s{sup –1}, making this the most luminous emission-line nebula detected in the center of a cool core cluster. Overall, the relative fluxes of the low-ionization lines (e.g., [O II], Hβ) to the UV continuum are consistent with photoionization by young stars. In both the center of the galaxy and in a newly discovered highly ionized plume to the north of the galaxy, the ionization ratios are consistent with both shocks and active galactic nucleus (AGN) photoionization. We speculate that this extended plume may be a galactic wind, driven and partially photoionized by both the starburst and central AGN. Throughout the cluster we measure elevated high-ionization line ratios (e.g., He II/Hβ, [O III]/Hβ), coupled with an overall high-velocity width (FWHM ≳ 500 km s{sup –1}), suggesting that shocks are likely important throughout the interstellar medium of the central galaxy. These shocks are most likely driven by a combination of stellar winds from massive young stars, core-collapse supernovae, and the central AGN. In addition to the warm, ionized gas, we detect a substantial amount of cold, molecular gas via the CO(3-2) transition, coincident in position with the galaxy center. We infer a molecular gas mass of M{sub H{sub 2}} = 2.2 ± 0.6 × 10{sup 10} M {sub ☉}, which implies that

  20. Electric field distribution of electron emitter surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagawa, M.; Takenobu, S.; Ohmae, N.; Umeno, M.

    1987-03-01

    The electric field distribution of a tungsten field emitter surface and a LaB6 thermionic emitter surface has been studied. The computer simulation of electric field distribution on the emitter surface was carried out with a charge simulation method. The electric field distribution of the LaB6 thermionic emitter was experimentally evaluated by the Schottky plot. Two independent equations are necessary for obtaining local electric field and work function; the Fowler-Nordheim equation and the equation of total energy distribution of emitted electron being used to evaluate the electric field distribution of the tungsten field emitter. The experimental results agreed with the computer simulation.

  1. Net global warming potential and greenhouse gas intensity in rice agriculture driven by high yields and nitrogen use efficiency: a 5 year field study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X.; Zhou, Z.; Liu, Y.; Xu, X.; Wang, J.; Zhang, H.; Xiong, Z.

    2015-11-01

    Our understanding of how net global warming potential (NGWP) and greenhouse gas intensity (GHGI) is affected by management practices aimed at food security with respect to rice agriculture remains limited. In the present study, a 5 year field experiment was conducted in China to evaluate the effects of integrated soil-crop system management (ISSM) on NGWP and GHGI after accounting for carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from all sources (methane, CH4, and nitrous oxide, N2O, emissions, agrochemical inputs, Ei, and farm operations, Eo) and sinks (i.e., soil organic carbon, SOC, sequestration). For the improvement of rice yield and agronomic nitrogen use efficiency (NUE), four ISSM scenarios consisting of different nitrogen (N) fertilization rates relative to the local farmers' practice (FP) rate were carried out, namely, N1 (25 % reduction), N2 (10 % reduction), N3 (FP rate) and N4 (25 % increase). The results showed that compared with the FP, the four ISSM scenarios, i.e., N1, N2, N3 and N4, significantly increased the rice yields by 10, 16, 28 and 41 % and the agronomic NUE by 75, 67, 86 and 82 %, respectively. In addition, compared with the FP, the N1 and N2 scenarios significantly reduced the GHGI by 14 and 18 %, respectively, despite similar NGWPs. The N3 and N4 scenarios remarkably increased the NGWP and GHGI by an average of 67 and 36 %, respectively. In conclusion, the ISSM strategies are promising for both food security and environmental protection, and the ISSM scenario of N2 is the optimal strategy to realize high yields and high NUE together with low environmental impacts for this agricultural rice field.

  2. Net global warming potential and greenhouse gas intensity in a double cropping cereal rotation as affected by nitrogen and straw management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Huang

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The effects of nitrogen and straw management on global warming potential (GWP and greenhouse gas intensity (GHGI in a winter wheat–summer maize double-cropping system on the North China Plain were investigated. We measured nitrous oxide (N2O emissions and studied net GWP (NGWP and GHGI by calculating the net exchange of CO2 equivalent (CO2-eq from greenhouse gas emissions, agricultural inputs and management practices, and changes in soil organic carbon (SOC, based on a long-term field experiment established in 2006. The field experiment includes six treatments with three fertilizer N levels (zero-N control, optimum and conventional N and straw removal (i.e. N0, Nopt and Ncon or return (i.e. N0, Nopt and SNcon. Optimum N management (Nopt, SNopt saved roughly half of the fertilizer N compared to conventional agricultural practice (Ncon, SNcon with no significant effect on grain yields. Annual mean N2O emissions reached 3.90 kg N2O-N ha−1 in Ncon and SNcon, and N2O emissions were reduced by 46.9% by optimizing N management of Nopt and SNopt. Straw return increased annual mean N2O emissions by 27.9%. Annual SOC sequestration was 0.40–1.44 Mg C ha−1 yr−1 in plots with N application and/or straw return. Compared to the conventional N treatments the optimum N treatments reduced NGWP by 51%, comprising 25% from decreasing N2O emissions and 75% from reducing N fertilizer application rates. Straw return treatments reduced NGWP by 30% compared to no straw return because the GWP from increments of SOC offset the GWP from higher emissions of N2O, N fertilizer and fuel after straw return. The GHGI trends from the different nitrogen and straw management practices were similar to the NGWP. In conclusion, optimum N and straw return significantly reduced NGWP and GHGI and concomitantly achieved relatively high grain yields in this important winter wheat–summer maize double-cropping system.

  3. Impact of venous systemic oxygen persufflation supplemented with nitric oxide gas on cold-stored, warm ischemia-damaged experimental liver grafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Pramod Kadaba; Yagi, Shintaro; Doorschodt, Benedict; Nagai, Kazuyuki; Afify, Mamdouh; Uemoto, Shinji; Tolba, Rene

    2012-02-01

    The increasing shortage of donor organs has led to the increasing use of organs from non-heart-beating donors. We aimed to assess the impact of venous systemic oxygen persufflation (VSOP) supplemented with nitric oxide (NO) gas during the cold storage (CS) of warm ischemia (WI)-damaged experimental liver grafts. Rat livers (n = 5 per group) were retrieved after 30 minutes of WI induced by cardiac arrest (the WI group) and were thereafter preserved for 24 hours by CS in histidine tryptophan ketoglutarate solution. During CS, gaseous oxygen was insufflated via the caval vein with 40 ppm NO (the VSOP-NO group) or without NO (the VSOP group). Cold-stored livers without WI served as controls. Liver viability was assessed after the preservation period by normothermic isolated reperfusion for 45 minutes with oxygenated Krebs-Henseleit buffer. After 45 minutes of reperfusion, the VSOP-NO-treated livers showed significantly lower alanine aminotransferase values than the WI-damaged livers (10.2 ± 0.2 versus 78.2 ± 14.6 IU/L), whereas the control livers showed no differences from the VSOP-NO-treated livers. The mitochondrial enzyme release was lower in the VSOP-NO group (4.0 ± 0.7 IU/L) versus the WI group (18.2 ± 4.9 IU/L). An increased portal vein pressure was observed throughout reperfusion (45 minutes) in the WI group (21.7 ± 0.2 mm Hg) versus the VSOP-NO group (12.2 ± 0.8 mm Hg) and the control group (19.9 ± 0.4 mm Hg). Furthermore, the NO concentration in the perfusate after 5 minutes of reperfusion was highest in the VSOP-NO group. The release of malondialdehyde into the perfusate was significantly reduced in the VSOP-NO group (0.9 ± 0.1 nmol/mL) versus the WI group (31.3 ± 5.3 nmol/mL). In conclusion, the resuscitation of livers after 30 minutes of WI to a level comparable to that of nonischemically damaged livers is possible with VSOP supplemented with NO gas. Moreover, the application of VSOP with NO minimizes the extent of injuries caused by oxygen free

  4. Global warming potential and greenhouse gas emission under different soil nutrient management practices in soybean-wheat system of central India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenka, Sangeeta; Lenka, Narendra Kumar; Singh, Amar Bahadur; Singh, B; Raghuwanshi, Jyothi

    2017-02-01

    Soil nutrient management is a key component contributing to the greenhouse gas (GHG) flux and mitigation potential of agricultural production systems. However, the effect of soil nutrient management practices on GHG flux and global warming potential (GWP) is less understood in agricultural soils of India. The present study was conducted to compare three nutrient management systems practiced for nine consecutive years in a soybean-wheat cropping system in the Vertisols of India, in terms of GHG flux and GWP. The treatments were composed of 100% organic (ONM), 100% inorganic (NPK), and integrated nutrient management (INM) with 50% organic + 50% inorganic inputs. The gas samples for GHGs (CO2, CH4, and N2O) were collected by static chamber method at about 15-day interval during 2012-13 growing season. The change in soil organic carbon (SOC) content was estimated in terms of the changes in SOC stock in the 0-15 cm soil over the 9-year period covering 2004 to 2013. There was a net uptake of CH4 in all the treatments in both soybean and wheat crop seasons. The cumulative N2O and CO2 emissions were in the order of INM > ONM > NPK with significant difference between treatments (p < 0.05) in both the crop seasons. The annual GWP, expressed in terms of CH4 and N2O emission, also followed the same trend and was estimated to be 1126, 1002, and 896 kg CO2 eq ha(-1) year(-1) under INM, ONM, and NPK treatments, respectively. However, the change in SOC stock was significantly higher under ONM (1250 kg ha(-1) year(-1)) followed by INM (417 kg ha(-1) year(-1)) and least under NPK (198 kg ha(-1) year(-1)) treatment. The wheat equivalent yield was similar under ONM and INM treatments and was significantly lower under NPK treatment. Thus, the GWP per unit grain yield was lower under ONM followed by NPK and INM treatments and varied from 250, 261, and 307 kg CO2 eq Mg(-1) grain yield under ONM, NPK, and INM treatments, respectively.

  5. Beam emittance measurements at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wendt, Manfred; Eddy, Nathan; Hu, Martin; Scarpine, Victor; Syphers, Mike; Tassotto, Gianni; Thurman-Keup, Randy; Yang, Ming-Jen; Zagel, James; /Fermilab

    2008-01-01

    We give short overview of various beam emittance measurement methods, currently applied at different machine locations for the Run II collider physics program at Fermilab. All these methods are based on beam profile measurements, and we give some examples of the related instrumentation techniques. At the end we introduce a multi-megawatt proton source project, currently under investigation at Fermilab, with respect to the beam instrumentation challenges.

  6. Alpha particle emitters in medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, D.R.

    1989-09-01

    Radiation-induced cancer of bone, liver and lung has been a prominent harmful side-effect of medical applications of alpha emitters. In recent years, however, the potential use of antibodies labeled with alpha emitting radionuclides against cancer has seemed promising because alpha particles are highly effective in cell killing. High dose rates at high LET, effectiveness under hypoxic conditions, and minimal expectancy of repair are additional advantages of alpha emitters over antibodies labeled with beta emitting radionuclides for cancer therapy. Cyclotron-produced astatine-211 ({sup 211}At) and natural bismuth-212 ({sup 212}Bi) have been proposed and are under extensive study in the United States and Europe. Radium-223 ({sup 223}Ra) also has favorable properties as a potential alpha emitting label, including a short-lived daughter chain with four alpha emissions. The radiation dosimetry of internal alpha emitters is complex due to nonuniformly distributed sources, short particle tracks, and high relative specific ionization. The variations in dose at the cellular level may be extreme. Alpha-particle radiation dosimetry, therefore, must involve analysis of statistical energy deposition probabilities for cellular level targets. It must also account fully for nonuniform distributions of sources in tissues, source-target geometries, and particle-track physics. 18 refs., 4 figs.

  7. High quality boron-doped epitaxial layers grown at 200°C from SiF4/H2/Ar gas mixtures for emitter formation in crystalline silicon solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Léal, Ronan; Haddad, Farah; Poulain, Gilles; Maurice, Jean-Luc; Roca i Cabarrocas, Pere

    2017-02-01

    Controlling the doping profile in solar cells emitter and front/back surface field is mandatory to reach high efficiencies. In the current state of the art, these doped layers are made by dopant diffusion at around 900°C, which implies potential temperature induced damages in the c-Si absorber and for which a precise control of doping is difficult. An alternative solution based on boron-doped epitaxial silicon layers grown by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) from 200°C using SiF4/H2/Ar/B2H6 chemistry is reported. The structural properties of the doped and undoped epitaxial layers were assessed by spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The incorporation of boron has been studied via plasma profiling time of flight mass spectrometry (PP-TOFMS) and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) measurements. The boron-doped epitaxial layers revealed excellent structural and electrical properties even for high carrier concentrations (>1019cm-3). Sheet resistances between 100 and 130 Ω/sq can been obtained depending on the thickness and the doping concentration, which is within the range of targeted values for emitters in c-Si solar cells. Electrochemical capacitance voltage (ECV) revealed a uniform doping profile around 3.1019 cm-3 and by comparing with SIMS measurement a doping efficiency around 50% has been found.

  8. High quality boron-doped epitaxial layers grown at 200°C from SiF4/H2/Ar gas mixtures for emitter formation in crystalline silicon solar cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronan Léal

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Controlling the doping profile in solar cells emitter and front/back surface field is mandatory to reach high efficiencies. In the current state of the art, these doped layers are made by dopant diffusion at around 900°C, which implies potential temperature induced damages in the c-Si absorber and for which a precise control of doping is difficult. An alternative solution based on boron-doped epitaxial silicon layers grown by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD from 200°C using SiF4/H2/Ar/B2H6 chemistry is reported. The structural properties of the doped and undoped epitaxial layers were assessed by spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE, high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM and X-ray diffraction (XRD. The incorporation of boron has been studied via plasma profiling time of flight mass spectrometry (PP-TOFMS and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS measurements. The boron-doped epitaxial layers revealed excellent structural and electrical properties even for high carrier concentrations (>1019cm-3. Sheet resistances between 100 and 130 Ω/sq can been obtained depending on the thickness and the doping concentration, which is within the range of targeted values for emitters in c-Si solar cells. Electrochemical capacitance voltage (ECV revealed a uniform doping profile around 3.1019 cm-3 and by comparing with SIMS measurement a doping efficiency around 50% has been found.

  9. Greenhouse gas flux under warm-season perennial C4 grasses across different soil and climate gradients on the Islands of Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlowski, M. N.; Crow, S. E.; Sumiyoshi, Y.; Wells, J.; Kikkawa, H. R.

    2011-12-01

    Agricultural soils can serve as either a sink or a source for atmospheric carbon (C) and other greenhouse gases (GHG). This is particularly true for tropical soils where influences from climate and soil gradients are wide ranging. Current estimates of GHG flux from soil are often under or overestimated due to high variability in sample sites and inconsistencies in land use and vegetation type, making extrapolation to new study systems difficult. This work aimed to identify patterns of trace fluxes of carbon dioxide (CO2), nitrous oxide (N2O) and methane (CH4) across two soil types and three species of warm season perennial C4 grasses: Pennisetum purpureum (Napier grass), Panicum maximum (Guinea grass) and Saccharum officinarum (sugar cane) on the islands of Oahu and Maui in Hawaii. Multiple static vented chambers were installed into replicate plots for each species; flux measurements were made during the growth, fertilization and harvest cycles at set time intervals for one hour and analyzed by gas chromatography. Initial results from Oahu indicate no significant differences in CO2 flux between the P. maximum and P. purpureum species after fertilization or at full growth. We observed an average flux of 143 mg m-2 h-1 and 155 mg m-2 h-1 for P. maximum and P. purpureum respectively at full growth for CO2 and 1.7 μg m-2 h-1and 0.3 μg m-2 h-1 for N2O. Additionally, N2O rates sampled after a typical fertilizer application were significantly greater than at full growth (p=0.0005) with flux rates of 25.2 μg m2h-1 and 30.3 μg m2h-1 for P. maximum and P. purpureum respectively. With a global warming potential of 310 for N2O, even short-term spikes following fertilizer application can cause long lasting effects of GHG emission from agricultural soils. CH4 flux was negligible for all species on the Oahu plots during these sample periods. Globally, water limitation is a major factor influencing the potential productivity of agricultural crops and the sustainability of

  10. Committed warming inferred from observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauritsen, Thorsten; Pincus, Robert

    2017-09-01

    Due to the lifetime of CO2, the thermal inertia of the oceans, and the temporary impacts of short-lived aerosols and reactive greenhouse gases, the Earth’s climate is not equilibrated with anthropogenic forcing. As a result, even if fossil-fuel emissions were to suddenly cease, some level of committed warming is expected due to past emissions as studied previously using climate models. Here, we provide an observational-based quantification of this committed warming using the instrument record of global-mean warming, recently improved estimates of Earth’s energy imbalance, and estimates of radiative forcing from the Fifth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Compared with pre-industrial levels, we find a committed warming of 1.5 K (0.9-3.6, 5th-95th percentile) at equilibrium, and of 1.3 K (0.9-2.3) within this century. However, when assuming that ocean carbon uptake cancels remnant greenhouse gas-induced warming on centennial timescales, committed warming is reduced to 1.1 K (0.7-1.8). In the latter case there is a 13% risk that committed warming already exceeds the 1.5 K target set in Paris. Regular updates of these observationally constrained committed warming estimates, although simplistic, can provide transparent guidance as uncertainty regarding transient climate sensitivity inevitably narrows and the understanding of the limitations of the framework is advanced.

  11. Deep time evidence for climate sensitivity increase with warming:Climate Sensitivity Rise With Warming

    OpenAIRE

    Shaffer, Gary; Huber, Matthew; Rondanelli, Roberto; Pedersen, Jens Olaf Pepke

    2016-01-01

    Future global warming from anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions will depend on climate feedbacks, the effect of which is expressed by climate sensitivity, the warming for a doubling of atmospheric CO2 content. It is not clear how feedbacks, sensitivity, and temperature will evolve in our warming world, but past warming events may provide insight. Here we employ paleoreconstructions and new climate-carbon model simulations in a novel framework to explore a wide scenario range for the Paleoce...

  12. Deep time evidence for climate sensitivity increase with warming:Climate Sensitivity Rise With Warming

    OpenAIRE

    Shaffer, Gary; Huber, Matthew; Rondanelli, Roberto; Pedersen, Jens Olaf Pepke

    2016-01-01

    Future global warming from anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions will depend on climate feedbacks, the effect of which is expressed by climate sensitivity, the warming for a doubling of atmospheric CO2 content. It is not clear how feedbacks, sensitivity, and temperature will evolve in our warming world, but past warming events may provide insight. Here we employ paleoreconstructions and new climate-carbon model simulations in a novel framework to explore a wide scenario range for the Paleoce...

  13. A Global Meta-Analysis on the Impact of Management Practices on Net Global Warming Potential and Greenhouse Gas Intensity from Cropland Soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sainju, Upendra M

    2016-01-01

    Management practices, such as tillage, crop rotation, and N fertilization, may affect net global warming potential (GWP) and greenhouse gas intensity (GHGI), but their global impact on cropland soils under different soil and climatic conditions need further evaluation. Available global data from 57 experiments and 225 treatments were evaluated for individual and combined effects of tillage, cropping systems, and N fertilization rates on GWP and GHGI which accounted for CO2 equivalents from N2O and CH4 emissions with or without equivalents from soil C sequestration rate (ΔSOC), farm operations, and N fertilization. The GWP and GHGI were 66 to 71% lower with no-till than conventional till and 168 to 215% lower with perennial than annual cropping systems, but 41 to 46% greater with crop rotation than monocroppping. With no-till vs. conventional till, GWP and GHGI were 2.6- to 7.4-fold lower when partial than full accounting of all sources and sinks of greenhouse gases (GHGs) were considered. With 100 kg N ha-1, GWP and GHGI were 3.2 to 11.4 times greater with partial than full accounting. Both GWP and GHGI increased curvilinearly with increased N fertilization rate. Net GWP and GHGI were 70 to 87% lower in the improved combined management that included no-till, crop rotation/perennial crop, and reduced N rate than the traditional combined management that included conventional till, monocopping/annual crop, and recommended N rate. An alternative soil respiration method, which replaces ΔSOC by soil respiration and crop residue returned to soil in the previous year, similarly reduced GWP and GHGI by 133 to 158% in the improved vs. the traditional combined management. Changes in GWP and GHGI due to improved vs. traditional management varied with the duration of the experiment and inclusion of soil and climatic factors in multiple linear regressions improved their relationships. Improved management practices reduced GWP and GHGI compared with traditional management

  14. A Global Meta-Analysis on the Impact of Management Practices on Net Global Warming Potential and Greenhouse Gas Intensity from Cropland Soils.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Upendra M Sainju

    Full Text Available Management practices, such as tillage, crop rotation, and N fertilization, may affect net global warming potential (GWP and greenhouse gas intensity (GHGI, but their global impact on cropland soils under different soil and climatic conditions need further evaluation. Available global data from 57 experiments and 225 treatments were evaluated for individual and combined effects of tillage, cropping systems, and N fertilization rates on GWP and GHGI which accounted for CO2 equivalents from N2O and CH4 emissions with or without equivalents from soil C sequestration rate (ΔSOC, farm operations, and N fertilization. The GWP and GHGI were 66 to 71% lower with no-till than conventional till and 168 to 215% lower with perennial than annual cropping systems, but 41 to 46% greater with crop rotation than monocroppping. With no-till vs. conventional till, GWP and GHGI were 2.6- to 7.4-fold lower when partial than full accounting of all sources and sinks of greenhouse gases (GHGs were considered. With 100 kg N ha-1, GWP and GHGI were 3.2 to 11.4 times greater with partial than full accounting. Both GWP and GHGI increased curvilinearly with increased N fertilization rate. Net GWP and GHGI were 70 to 87% lower in the improved combined management that included no-till, crop rotation/perennial crop, and reduced N rate than the traditional combined management that included conventional till, monocopping/annual crop, and recommended N rate. An alternative soil respiration method, which replaces ΔSOC by soil respiration and crop residue returned to soil in the previous year, similarly reduced GWP and GHGI by 133 to 158% in the improved vs. the traditional combined management. Changes in GWP and GHGI due to improved vs. traditional management varied with the duration of the experiment and inclusion of soil and climatic factors in multiple linear regressions improved their relationships. Improved management practices reduced GWP and GHGI compared with traditional

  15. Effects of nitrogen application rates on net annual global warming potential and greenhouse gas intensity in double-rice cropping systems of the Southern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhongdu; Chen, Fu; Zhang, Hailin; Liu, Shengli

    2016-12-01

    The net global warming potential (NGWP) and net greenhouse gas intensity (NGHGI) of double-rice cropping systems are not well documented. We measured the NGWP and NGHGI including soil organic carbon (SOC) change and indirect emissions (IE) from double-crop rice fields with fertilizing systems in Southern China. These experiments with three different nitrogen (N) application rates since 2012 are as follows: 165 kgN ha(-1) for early rice and 225 kgN ha(-1) for late rice (N1), which was the local N application rates as the control; 135 kgN ha(-1) for early rice and 180 kgN ha(-1) for late rice (N2, 20 % reduction); and 105 kgN ha(-1) for early rice and 135 kgN ha(-1) for late rice (N3, 40 % reduction). Results showed that yields increased with the increase of N application rate, but without significant difference between N1 and N2 plots. Annual SOC sequestration rate under N1 was estimated to be 1.15 MgC ha(-1) year(-1), which was higher than those under other fertilizing systems. Higher N application tended to increase CH4 emissions during the flooded rice season and significantly increased N2O emissions from drained soils during the nonrice season, ranking as N1 > N2 > N3 with significant difference (P < 0.05). Two-year average IE has a huge contribution to GHG emissions mainly coming from the higher N inputs in the double-rice cropping system. Reducing N fertilizer usage can effectively decrease the NGWP and NGHGI in the double-rice cropping system, with the lowest NGHGI obtained in the N2 plot (0.99 kg CO2-eq kg(-1) yield year(-1)). The results suggested that agricultural economic viability and GHG mitigation can be simultaneously achieved by properly reducing N fertilizer application in double-rice cropping systems.

  16. A new method of emittance measurement for electron beams from the Micro-emitter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishizuka, Hiroshi [Fukuoka Inst. of Technology (Japan); Nakahara, Yuriko; Kawasaki, Sunao; Musyoki, Stephen; Shimizu, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Akihiko; Shiho, Makoto

    1994-03-01

    Recently a new type of cathode called Micro-emitter is in progress. This cathode is micro fabricated field emitter having the characteristics of very low emittance and high brightness. We can not measure the emittance of the cathode with conventional method like pepper-pot method. The reasons are ; 1. The angle between the electron orbit and the axis is very small. ; and 2. We can not focus the electron beam in the vacuum or on the surface of the material since the current density of the cathode is extremely high. For the emittance measurement for such low emittance and high brightness cathode, we need to expand the beam, and measure the beam cross section without any slits or apertures. We study and propose a new emittance measurement method for the Micro-emitter. (author).

  17. Hybrid emitter all back contact solar cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loscutoff, Paul; Rim, Seung

    2016-04-12

    An all back contact solar cell has a hybrid emitter design. The solar cell has a thin dielectric layer formed on a backside surface of a single crystalline silicon substrate. One emitter of the solar cell is made of doped polycrystalline silicon that is formed on the thin dielectric layer. The other emitter of the solar cell is formed in the single crystalline silicon substrate and is made of doped single crystalline silicon. The solar cell includes contact holes that allow metal contacts to connect to corresponding emitters.

  18. Emittance investigation of RF photo-injector

    CERN Document Server

    Yang Mao Rong; Li Zheng; Li Ming; Xu Zhou

    2002-01-01

    A high-power laser beam illuminates a photocathode surface placed on an end wall of an RF cavity. The emitted electrons are accelerated immediately to a relativistic energy by the strong RF find in the cavity. But space charge effect induces beam emittance growth especially near the cathode where the electrons are still nonrelativistic. The author analyzes the factors which lead the transverse emittance growth and method how to resolve this problem. After introducing solenoidal focusing near the photocathode, the beam emittance growth is suppressed dramatically. The beam emittance is given also after compensation and simulation results. The measurements show these results are coincident

  19. Minimum emittance in TBA and MBA lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Gang; Peng, Yue-Mei

    2015-03-01

    For reaching a small emittance in a modern light source, triple bend achromats (TBA), theoretical minimum emittance (TME) and even multiple bend achromats (MBA) have been considered. This paper derived the necessary condition for achieving minimum emittance in TBA and MBA theoretically, where the bending angle of inner dipoles has a factor of 31/3 bigger than that of the outer dipoles. Here, we also calculated the conditions attaining the minimum emittance of TBA related to phase advance in some special cases with a pure mathematics method. These results may give some directions on lattice design.

  20. Global warming

    CERN Document Server

    Hulme, M

    1998-01-01

    Global warming-like deforestation, the ozone hole and the loss of species- has become one of the late 20the century icons of global environmental damage. The threat, is not the reality, of such a global climate change has motivated governments. businesses and environmental organisations, to take serious action ot try and achieve serious control of the future climate. This culminated last December in Kyoto in the agreement for legally-binding climate protocol. In this series of three lectures I will provide a perspective on the phenomenon of global warming that accepts the scientific basis for our concern, but one that also recognises the dynamic interaction between climate and society that has always exited The future will be no different. The challenge of global warning is not to pretend it is not happening (as with some pressure groups), nor to pretend it threatens global civilisation (as with other pressure groups), and it is not even a challenge to try and stop it from happening-we are too far down the ro...

  1. Coupling single emitters to quantum plasmonic circuits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huck, Alexander; Andersen, Ulrik Lund

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, the controlled coupling of single-photon emitters to propagating surface plasmons has been intensely studied, which is fueled by the prospect of a giant photonic nonlinearity on a nanoscaled platform. In this article, we will review the recent progress on coupling single emitters...

  2. Low Emittance X-FEL Development

    CERN Document Server

    Li, K S B; Anghel, A; Bakker, R J; Böge, M; Candel, A E; Dehler, M; Ganter, R; Gough, C; Ingold, G; Leemann, S C; Pedrozzi, M; Raguin, J Y; Rivkin, L; Schlott, V; Streun, A; Wrulich, A F

    2005-01-01

    The Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) in Switzerland currently develops a Low-Emittance electron-Gun (LEG) based on field-emitter technology [1]. The target is a normalized transverse emittance of 5 10(-8) m rad or less. Such a source is particularly interesting for FELs that target wavelengths below 0.3 nm since it permits a reduction of the required beam-energy and hence, a reduction of the construction- and operational costs of X-ray FELs. That is, for the case that this initial low emittance can be maintained throughout the accelerator. Here we present a concept for a 0.1 nm X-FEL based on LEG, which can be located close to the Swiss Light Source (SLS). Special attention goes to the maintenance of the emittance during the process of acceleration and bunch-compression, in particular in the regimes where either space-charge forces or coherent-synchrotron radiation are of importance.

  3. Batch By Batch Longitudinal Emittance Blowup MD

    CERN Document Server

    Mastoridis, T; Butterworth, A; Jaussi, M; Molendijk, J

    2012-01-01

    The transverse bunch emittance increases significantly at 450 GeV from the time of injection till the ramp due to IBS. By selectively blowing up the longitudinal emittance of the incoming batch at each injection, it should be possible to reduce the transverse emittance growth rates due to IBS. An MD was conducted on April 22nd 2012 to test the feasibility and performance of the batch-by-batch longitudinal emittance blowup. There were three main goals during the MD. First, to test the developed hardware, firmware, and software for the batch-by-batch blowup. Then, to measure the transverse emittance growth rates of blown-up and "witness" batches to quantify any improvement, and finally to test the ALLInjectSequencer class, which deals with the complicated gymnastics of introducing or masking the new batch to various RF loops.

  4. Screen printed boron emitters for solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Recart, F.; Freire, I.; Perez, L.; Lago-Aurrekoetxea, R.; Jimeno, J.C.; Bueno, G. [Instituto de Tecnologia Microelectronica, Teknologia Mikroelektronikoaren Institutua UPV/EHU, Alda.Urquijo s/n, 48013 Bilbao (Spain)

    2007-06-15

    Screen printed (SP) boron emitters are presented as a useful option for the manufacturing of p-type emitters of solar cells. Details are provided on the diffusion process, including deposition, drying and firing steps, the latter performed in an infrared belt furnace. Besides their main dependences on the firing conditions, the sheet resistances and dopant profiles of the resulting emitters reveal the relevance of the drying step and the exhaustion limits of the doping source. A characterization of the recombination concludes that moderate emitter saturation currents (J{sub oe}<0.5 pA/cm{sup 2}) and acceptable bulk lifetimes ({tau}{sub B}>40 {mu}s) can be obtained on Czochralski silicon wafers. Finally, Cz n-type 0.7 {omega} cm solar cells are presented, which once again prove the feasibility of SP boron emitters and point to issues regarding their metallization. (author)

  5. Emittance measurements of the CLIO electron beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaput, R.; Devanz, G.; Joly, P.; Kergosien, B.; Lesrel, J.

    1997-02-01

    We have designed a setup to measure the transverse emittance at the CLIO accelerator exit, based on the "3 gradients" method. The beam transverse size is measured simply by scanning it with a steering coil across a fixed jaw and recording the transmitted current, at various quadrupole strengths. A code then performs a complete calculation of the emittance using the transfer matrix of the quadrupole instead of the usual classical lens approximation. We have studied the influence of various parameters on the emittance: Magnetic field on the e-gun and the peak current. We have also improved a little the emittance by replacing a mismatched pipe between the buncher and accelerating section to avoid wake-field effects; The resulting improvements of the emittance have led to an increase in the FEL emitted power.

  6. Warm Breeze

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    Middle-aged female painter Wang Yingchun is a first-grade artist at the Research Instituteof Chinese Painting. With a solid foundation in: Chinese painting, oil painting andsculpture she began to experiment in the early 1980s with stone carving, murals, folkart, landscapes, flowers and birds, cubism, expressionism and abstractionism. Living ina time of social transformation, she felt pressed to create her own artistic style. Aftervisiting South America, she produced a batch of works which drew the essence of theBeast Group and used a new technique, without sketching the contours of flowers, sothat the paintings look wild, romantic and exuberant. This painting Warm Breeze displaysWang’s style: While extensively studying the paintings of various schools, she makes hertraditional Chinese ink paintings tinted with modern color.

  7. Optimal Timing for Venous Systemic Oxygen Persufflation Supplemented with Nitric Oxide Gas in Cold-Stored, Warm Ischemia-Damaged Experimental Liver Grafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porschen, Anne; Kadaba Srinivasan, Pramod; Iwasaki, Junji; Afify, Mamdouh; Tolba, René H

    2016-01-01

    Worldwide shortage of donor organs has increased the use of donation after cardiac death (DCD). The aim of this study was to analyze the best time point for venous systemic oxygen persufflation (VSOP) supplemented with nitric oxide (NO) gas during the 1st and 24th hour of cold storage (CS) in warm ischemia (WI)-damaged experimental liver grafts. Liver grafts (n = 5) were retrieved after 30 min of WI induced by cardiac arrest and CS in histidine-tryptophan-ketoglutarate solution at 4°C. The 1st hour group was immediately persufflated with a VSOP plus NO (VSOP+NO) mixture for 1 h followed by 23 h of static CS (DCD+NO 1st hour). The 24th hour group entailed CS for 23 h followed by 1 h of VSOP+NO persufflation (DCD+NO 24th hour). CS livers without WI but with VSOP served as controls. CS livers with WI represented the fourth group (DCD). Viability of the liver grafts was assessed by normothermic isolated reperfusion for 45 min with oxygenated Krebs-Henseleit buffer. Data are presented as mean ± SEM (control vs. DCD vs. DCD+NO 1st hour vs. DCD+NO 24th hour). After 45 min of reperfusion, the DCD+NO 1st hour group showed significantly lower aspartate aminotransferase (13.4 ± 5.3, 63.2 ± 17.3, 25.6 ± 3.9, and 82.8 ± 27.3 U/l) and lactate dehydrogenase levels (289.4 ± 41.2, 2,139.4 ± 542.7, 577.2 ± 117.2, and 2,429 ± 221.6 U/l). Malondialdehyde levels were significantly abrogated (1.0 ± 0.3, 2.7 ± 1, 1.0 ± 0, and 3.9 ± 1.2 nmol/ml). Significantly higher levels of portal venous pressure were recorded in the DCD+NO 24th hour group (12.0 ± 1, 21.2 ± 3.1, 16.1 ± 1, and 23.2 ± 3.5 mm Hg). NO levels were recorded after 5 min of reperfusion (1.42 ± 0.17, 1.8 ± 0.2, 2.7 ± 0.2, and 2.6 ± 0.1 μmol/l). Bile production levels showed no statistical significance (23.2 ± 3.8, 27.3 ± 1.8, 43.5 ± 18, and 31 ± 2.5 μl/45 min). Our results present the beneficial effects of NO combined with VSOP during the 1st hour of CS of WI-damaged experimental liver grafts.

  8. Molecular hydrogen in Lyman Alpha Emitters

    CERN Document Server

    Vallini, Livia; Ferrara, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    We present a physically motivated model to estimate the molecular hydrogen (H2) content of high-redshift (z~5.7,6.6) Lyman Alpha Emitters (LAEs) extracted from a suite of cosmological simulations. We find that the H2 mass fraction, (f_H2), depends on three main LAE physical properties: (a) star formation rate, (b) dust mass, and (c) cold neutral gas mass. At z~5.7, the value of f_H2 peaks and ranges between 0.5-0.9 for intermediate mass LAEs with stellar mass M_* ~ 10^{9-10} solar mass, decreasing for both smaller and larger galaxies. However, the largest value of the H2 mass is found in the most luminous LAEs. These trends also hold at z\\sim6.6, although, due to a lower dust content, f_H2(z=6.6)\\sim0.5 f_H2(z=5.7) when averaged over all LAEs; they arise due to the interplay between the H2 formation/shielding controlled by dust and the intensity of the ultraviolet (UV) Lyman-Werner photo-dissociating radiation produced by stars. We then predict the carbon monoxide (CO) luminosities for such LAEs and check tha...

  9. Global Warming and the Microwave Background

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robitaille P.-M.

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available In the work, the importance of assigning the microwave background to the Earth is ad- dressed while emphasizing the consequences for global climate change. Climate mod- els can only produce meaningful forecasts when they consider the real magnitude of all radiative processes. The oceans and continents both contribute to terrestrial emis- sions. However, the extent of oceanic radiation, particularly in the microwave region, raises concerns. This is not only since the globe is covered with water, but because the oceans themselves are likely to be weaker emitters than currently believed. Should the microwave background truly be generated by the oceans of the Earth, our planet would be a much less efficient emitter of radiation in this region of the electromagnetic spectrum. Furthermore, the oceans would appear unable to increase their emissions in the microwave in response to temperature elevation, as predicted by Stefan’s law. The results are significant relative to the modeling of global warming.

  10. Microlensless interdigitated photoconductive terahertz emitters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Abhishek; Prabhu, S S

    2015-01-26

    We report here fabrication of interdigitated photoconductive antenna (iPCA) terahertz (THz) emitters based on plasmonic electrode design. Novel design of this iPCA enables it to work without microlens array focusing, which is otherwise required for photo excitation of selective photoconductive regions to avoid the destructive interference of emitted THz radiation from oppositely biased regions. Benefit of iPCA over single active region PCA is, photo excitation can be done at larger area hence avoiding the saturation effect at higher optical excitation density. The emitted THz radiation power from plasmonic-iPCAs is ~2 times more than the single active region plasmonic PCA at 200 mW optical excitation, which will further increase at higher optical powers. This design is expected to reduce fabrication cost of photoconductive THz sources and detectors.

  11. Low Emittance Electron Beam Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tikhoplav, Rodion [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States)

    2006-01-01

    We have studied the properties of a low emittance electron beam produced by laser pulses incident onto an rf gun photocathode. The experiments were carried out at the A0 photoinjector at Fermilab. Such beam studies are necessary for fixing the design of new Linear Colliders as well as for the development of Free Electron Lasers. An overview of the A0 photoinjector is given in Chapter 1. In Chapter 2 we describe the A0 photoinjector laser system. A stable laser system is imperative for reliable photoinjector operation. After the recent upgrade, we have been able to reach a new level of stability in the pulse-to-pulse fluctuations of the pulse amplitude, and of the temporal and transverse profiles. In Chapter 3 we present a study of transverse emittance versus the shape of the photo-cathode drive-laser pulse. For that purpose a special temporal profile laser shaping device called a pulse-stacker was developed. In Chapter 4 we discuss longitudinal beam dynamics studies using a two macro-particle bunch; this technique is helpful in analyzing pulse compression in the magnetic chicane, as well as velocity bunching effects in the rf-gun and the 9-cell accelerating cavity. In Chapter 5 we introduce a proposal for laser acceleration of electrons. We have developed a laser functioning on the TEM*01 mode, a mode with a longitudinal electric field component which is suitable for such a process. Using this technique at energies above 40 MeV, one would be able to observe laser-based acceleration.

  12. Theory of Carbon Nanotube (CNT-Based Electron Field Emitters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander V. Eletskii

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Theoretical problems arising in connection with development and operation of electron field emitters on the basis of carbon nanotubes are reviewed. The physical aspects of electron field emission that underlie the unique emission properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs are considered. Physical effects and phenomena affecting the emission characteristics of CNT cathodes are analyzed. Effects given particular attention include: the electric field amplification near a CNT tip with taking into account the shape of the tip, the deviation from the vertical orientation of nanotubes and electrical field-induced alignment of those; electric field screening by neighboring nanotubes; statistical spread of the parameters of the individual CNTs comprising the cathode; the thermal effects resulting in degradation of nanotubes during emission. Simultaneous consideration of the above-listed effects permitted the development of the optimization procedure for CNT array in terms of the maximum reachable emission current density. In accordance with this procedure, the optimum inter-tube distance in the array depends on the region of the external voltage applied. The phenomenon of self-misalignment of nanotubes in an array has been predicted and analyzed in terms of the recent experiments performed. A mechanism of degradation of CNT-based electron field emitters has been analyzed consisting of the bombardment of the emitters by ions formed as a result of electron impact ionization of the residual gas molecules.

  13. Theory of Carbon Nanotube (CNT)-Based Electron Field Emitters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocharov, Grigory S; Eletskii, Alexander V

    2013-07-17

    Theoretical problems arising in connection with development and operation of electron field emitters on the basis of carbon nanotubes are reviewed. The physical aspects of electron field emission that underlie the unique emission properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are considered. Physical effects and phenomena affecting the emission characteristics of CNT cathodes are analyzed. Effects given particular attention include: the electric field amplification near a CNT tip with taking into account the shape of the tip, the deviation from the vertical orientation of nanotubes and electrical field-induced alignment of those; electric field screening by neighboring nanotubes; statistical spread of the parameters of the individual CNTs comprising the cathode; the thermal effects resulting in degradation of nanotubes during emission. Simultaneous consideration of the above-listed effects permitted the development of the optimization procedure for CNT array in terms of the maximum reachable emission current density. In accordance with this procedure, the optimum inter-tube distance in the array depends on the region of the external voltage applied. The phenomenon of self-misalignment of nanotubes in an array has been predicted and analyzed in terms of the recent experiments performed. A mechanism of degradation of CNT-based electron field emitters has been analyzed consisting of the bombardment of the emitters by ions formed as a result of electron impact ionization of the residual gas molecules.

  14. Theory of Carbon Nanotube (CNT)-Based Electron Field Emitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocharov, Grigory S.; Eletskii, Alexander V.

    2013-01-01

    Theoretical problems arising in connection with development and operation of electron field emitters on the basis of carbon nanotubes are reviewed. The physical aspects of electron field emission that underlie the unique emission properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are considered. Physical effects and phenomena affecting the emission characteristics of CNT cathodes are analyzed. Effects given particular attention include: the electric field amplification near a CNT tip with taking into account the shape of the tip, the deviation from the vertical orientation of nanotubes and electrical field-induced alignment of those; electric field screening by neighboring nanotubes; statistical spread of the parameters of the individual CNTs comprising the cathode; the thermal effects resulting in degradation of nanotubes during emission. Simultaneous consideration of the above-listed effects permitted the development of the optimization procedure for CNT array in terms of the maximum reachable emission current density. In accordance with this procedure, the optimum inter-tube distance in the array depends on the region of the external voltage applied. The phenomenon of self-misalignment of nanotubes in an array has been predicted and analyzed in terms of the recent experiments performed. A mechanism of degradation of CNT-based electron field emitters has been analyzed consisting of the bombardment of the emitters by ions formed as a result of electron impact ionization of the residual gas molecules. PMID:28348342

  15. Intense Ion Beam for Warm Dense Matter Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coleman, Joshua Eugene [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2008-01-01

    The Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is exploring the physical limits of compression and focusing of ion beams for heating material to warm dense matter (WDM) and fusion ignition conditions. The NDCX is a beam transport experiment with several components at a scale comparable to an inertial fusion energy driver. The NDCX is an accelerator which consists of a low-emittance ion source, high-current injector, solenoid matching section, induction bunching module, beam neutralization section, and final focusing system. The principal objectives of the experiment are to control the beam envelope, demonstrate effective neutralization of the beam space-charge, control the velocity tilt on the beam, and understand defocusing effects, field imperfections, and limitations on peak intensity such as emittance and aberrations. Target heating experiments with space-charge dominated ion beams require simultaneous longitudinal bunching and transverse focusing. A four-solenoid lattice is used to tune the beam envelope to the necessary focusing conditions before entering the induction bunching module. The induction bunching module provides a head-to-tail velocity ramp necessary to achieve peak axial compression at the desired focal plane. Downstream of the induction gap a plasma column neutralizes the beam space charge so only emittance limits the focused beam intensity. We present results of beam transport through a solenoid matching section and simultaneous focusing of a singly charged K+ ion bunch at an ion energy of 0.3 MeV. The results include a qualitative comparison of experimental and calculated results after the solenoid matching section, which include time resolved current density, transverse distributions, and phase-space of the beam at different diagnostic planes. Electron cloud and gas measurements in the solenoid lattice and in the vicinity of intercepting diagnostics are also presented. Finally

  16. Evaluation of extremely small horizontal emittance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Okugi

    1999-02-01

    Full Text Available The KEK Accelerator Test Facility (KEK-ATF was constructed to develop technologies for producing a low-emittance beam which will be required by future linear colliders. The KEK-ATF consists of an injector linac, a damping ring, and a beam extraction line. The basic optical structure of the damping ring is a FOBO lattice, which reduces the horizontal dispersion at the center of the bending magnets and, as a consequence, can produce an extremely small emittance beam. To verify the performance of such a unique, low-emittance lattice, it is crucial to measure the horizontal emittance. The horizontal emittance was measured using wire scanners in the beam extraction line. Since the horizontal beam position was not stable, we established a method to correct the measured beam size for position fluctuation (“jitter” and we succeeded in the observation of the so far smallest horizontal emittance in any accelerator. The measured horizontal emittance was 1.37±0.03nm at a beam energy of 1.285 GeV and a bunch population of \\(3–5\\×10^{9}, in agreement with the design value of 1.27–1.34 nm at the beam energy and the bunch population.

  17. Comparative study of global warming effects during silicon nitride etching using C3F6O/O2 and C3F6/O2 gas mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ka Youn; Moon, Hock Key; Lee, Nae-Eung; Hong, Bo Han; Oh, Soo Ho

    2015-01-01

    C3F6 and C3F6 gases were investigated as replacement gases for SF6 used in display industry due to their low global warming potential and short lifetime. In the C3F6/O2 and C3F6/O2 capacitively coupled plasmas, Si3N4 etch conditions were varied by controlling process parameters. The global warming effects were quantified as million metric ton carbon equivalents (MMTCEs) obtained from the volumetric emission of by-product and etch gases. A lower MMTCE value and higher etch rate process with combination of high and low source frequencies, f HF (27.12 MHz)/ f LF (2 MHz), were observed for the C3F6/O2 chemistry than for the C3F6/O2 chemistry.

  18. Multinozzle Emitter Arrays for Nanoelectrospray Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mao, Pan; Wang, Hung-Ta; Yang, Peidong; Wang, Daojing

    2011-06-16

    Mass spectrometry (MS) is the enabling technology for proteomics and metabolomics. However, dramatic improvements in both sensitivity and throughput are still required to achieve routine MS-based single cell proteomics and metabolomics. Here, we report the silicon-based monolithic multinozzle emitter array (MEA), and demonstrate its proof-of-principle applications in high-sensitivity and high-throughput nanoelectrospray mass spectrometry. Our MEA consists of 96 identical 10-nozzle emitters in a circular array on a 3-inch silicon chip. The geometry and configuration of the emitters, the dimension and number of the nozzles, and the micropillar arrays embedded in the main channel, can be systematically and precisely controlled during the microfabrication process. Combining electrostatic simulation and experimental testing, we demonstrated that sharpened-end geometry at the stem of the individual multinozzle emitter significantly enhanced the electric fields at its protruding nozzle tips, enabling sequential nanoelectrospray for the high-density emitter array. We showed that electrospray current of the multinozzle emitter at a given total flow rate was approximately proportional to the square root of the number of its spraying-nozzles, suggesting the capability of high MS sensitivity for multinozzle emitters. Using a conventional Z-spray mass spectrometer, we demonstrated reproducible MS detection of peptides and proteins for serial MEA emitters, achieving sensitivity and stability comparable to the commercial capillary emitters. Our robust silicon-based MEA chip opens up the possibility of a fully-integrated microfluidic system for ultrahigh-sensitivity and ultrahigh-throughput proteomics and metabolomics.

  19. Global warming and obesity: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, R; Ji, M; Zhang, S

    2017-10-04

    Global warming and the obesity epidemic are two unprecedented challenges mankind faces today. A literature search was conducted in the PubMed, Web of Science, EBSCO and Scopus for articles published until July 2017 that reported findings on the relationship between global warming and the obesity epidemic. Fifty studies were identified. Topic-wise, articles were classified into four relationships - global warming and the obesity epidemic are correlated because of common drivers (n = 21); global warming influences the obesity epidemic (n = 13); the obesity epidemic influences global warming (n = 13); and global warming and the obesity epidemic influence each other (n = 3). We constructed a conceptual model linking global warming and the obesity epidemic - the fossil fuel economy, population growth and industrialization impact land use and urbanization, motorized transportation and agricultural productivity and consequently influences global warming by excess greenhouse gas emission and the obesity epidemic by nutrition transition and physical inactivity; global warming also directly impacts obesity by food supply/price shock and adaptive thermogenesis, and the obesity epidemic impacts global warming by the elevated energy consumption. Policies that endorse deployment of clean and sustainable energy sources, and urban designs that promote active lifestyles, are likely to alleviate the societal burden of global warming and obesity. © 2017 World Obesity Federation.

  20. Big emitters: how growth in consumption drives climate change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satterthwaite, David

    2009-12-15

    It seems obvious that the more people there are on the planet, the more the pressure on planetary resources and the larger the emissions of greenhouse gases. So it also seems obvious that population growth must be a major driver of global warming. But it is just as obvious that very poor households contribute very little to greenhouse gas emissions. So if most of the world's population growth is among very poor households, population growth is not the culprit. The greatest human driver of global warming is the number of consumers on the planet and their consumption level. Individuals and households contribute to global warming by consuming goods and services that cause greenhouse gas emissions – for instance, by owning a refrigerator or a car. Through this they are responsible for all the fossil fuels that go into making, distributing, advertising, selling, using and disposing of it.

  1. Origin of warm and hot gas emission from low-mass protostars: Herschel-HIFI observations of CO J = 16-15. I. Line profiles, physical conditions, and H2O abundance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristensen, L. E.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Mottram, J. C.; Karska, A.; Yıldız, U. A.; Bergin, E. A.; Bjerkeli, P.; Cabrit, S.; Doty, S.; Evans, N. J.; Gusdorf, A.; Harsono, D.; Herczeg, G. J.; Johnstone, D.; Jørgensen, J. K.; van Kempen, T. A.; Lee, J.-E.; Maret, S.; Tafalla, M.; Visser, R.; Wampfler, S. F.

    2017-09-01

    Context. Through spectrally unresolved observations of high-J CO transitions, Herschel Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer (PACS) has revealed large reservoirs of warm (300 K) and hot (700 K) molecular gas around low-mass protostars. The excitation and physical origin of this gas is still not understood. Aims: We aim to shed light on the excitation and origin of the CO ladder observed toward protostars, and on the water abundance in different physical components within protostellar systems using spectrally resolved Herschel-HIFI data. Methods: Observations are presented of the highly excited CO line J = 16-15 (Eup/kB = 750 K) with the Herschel Heterodyne Instrument for the Far Infrared (HIFI) toward a sample of 24 low-mass protostellar objects. The sources were selected from the Herschel "Water in Star-forming regions with Herschel" (WISH) and "Dust, Ice, and Gas in Time" (DIGIT) key programs. Results: The spectrally resolved line profiles typically show two distinct velocity components: a broad Gaussian component with an average FWHM of 20 km s-1 containing the bulk of the flux, and a narrower Gaussian component with a FWHM of 5 km s-1 that is often offset from the source velocity. Some sources show other velocity components such as extremely-high-velocity features or "bullets". All these velocity components were first detected in H2O line profiles. The average rotational temperature over the entire profile, as measured from comparison between CO J = 16-15 and 10-9 emission, is 300 K. A radiative-transfer analysis shows that the average H2O/CO column-density ratio is 0.02, suggesting a total H2O abundance of 2 × 10-6, independent of velocity. Conclusions: Two distinct velocity profiles observed in the HIFI line profiles suggest that the high-J CO ladder observed with PACS consists of two excitation components. The warm PACS component (300 K) is associated with the broad HIFI component, and the hot PACS component (700 K) is associated with the offset HIFI

  2. Laser wire emittance measurement line AT CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Garcia, H; Blair, G A; Aumeyr, T; Schulte, D; Stulle, F

    2011-01-01

    A precise measurement of the transverse beam size and beam emittances upstream of the final focus is essential for ensuring the full luminosity at future linear colliders. A scheme for the emittance measurements at the RTML line of the CLIC using laser-wire beam profile monitors is described. A lattice of the measurement line is discussed and results of simulations of statistical errors and of their impact on the accuracy of the emittance reconstruction are given. Laser wire systems suitable for CLIC and their main characteristics are discussed.

  3. Narrowband terahertz emitters using metamaterial films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Fabio; Kearney, Brian; Grbovic, Dragoslav; Karunasiri, Gamani

    2012-09-10

    In this article we report on metamaterial-based narrowband thermal terahertz (THz) emitters with a bandwidth of about 1 THz. Single band emitters designed to radiate in the 4 to 8 THz range were found to emit as high as 36 W/m(2) when operated at 400 °C. Emission into two well-separated THz bands was also demonstrated by using metamaterial structures featuring more complex unit cells. Imaging of heated emitters using a microbolometer camera fitted with THz optics clearly showed the expected higher emissivity from the metamaterial structure compared to low-emissivity of the surrounding aluminum.

  4. The discoveries of WASP-91b, WASP-105b and WASP-107b: Two warm Jupiters and a planet in the transition region between ice giants and gas giants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, D. R.; Collier Cameron, A.; Delrez, L.; Doyle, A. P.; Gillon, M.; Hellier, C.; Jehin, E.; Lendl, M.; Maxted, P. F. L.; Madhusudhan, N.; Pepe, F.; Pollacco, D.; Queloz, D.; Ségransan, D.; Smalley, B.; Smith, A. M. S.; Triaud, A. H. M. J.; Turner, O. D.; Udry, S.; West, R. G.

    2017-08-01

    We report the discoveries of three transiting exoplanets. WASP-91b is a warm Jupiter (1.34 MJup, 1.03 RJup) in a 2.8-day orbit around a metal-rich K3 star. WASP-105b is a warm Jupiter (1.8 MJup, 0.96 RJup) in a 7.9-day orbit around a metal-rich K2 star. WASP-107b is a warm super-Neptune/sub-Saturn (0.12 MJup, 0.94 RJup) in a 5.7-day orbit around a solar-metallicity K6 star. Considering that giant planets seem to be more common around stars of higher metallicity and stars of higher mass, it is notable that the hosts are all metal-rich, late-type stars. With orbital separations that place both WASP-105b and WASP-107b in the weak-tide regime, measurements of the alignment between the planets' orbital axes and their stars' spin axes may help us to understand the inward migration of short-period, giant planets. The mass of WASP-107b (2.2 MNep, 0.40 MSat) places it in the transition region between the ice giants and gas giants of the Solar System. Its radius of 0.94 RJup suggests that it is a low-mass gas giant with a H/He-dominated composition. The planet thus sets a lower limit of 2.2 MNep on the planetary mass above which large gaseous envelopes can be accreted and retained by proto-planets on their way to becoming gas giants. We may discover whether WASP-107b more closely resembles an ice giant or a gas giant by measuring its atmospheric metallicity via transmission spectroscopy, for which WASP-107b is a very good target. Based on observations made with: the WASP-South photometric survey instrument, the 0.6-m TRAPPIST robotic imager, and the EulerCam camera and the CORALIE spectrograph mounted on the 1.2-m Euler-Swiss telescope.The photometric time-series and radial-velocity data used in this work are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/604/A110

  5. Warming and Carbon Dioxide Enrichment Alter Plant Production and Ecosystem gas Exchange in a Semi-Arid Grassland Through Direct Responses to Global Change Factors and Indirect Effects on Water Relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, J. A.; Pendall, E.; Williams, D. G.; Bachman, S.; Dijkstra, F. A.; Lecain, D. R.; Follett, R.

    2007-12-01

    were highly species specific. Ecosystem-level gas exchange measurements indicated that interactions between watering and CO2 enrichment increased C cycling over a range of soil moisture conditions, although watering had a greater relative impact on C fluxes than CO2 enrichment. Results from the combined warming and CO2 enrichment experiment in 2007 indicate soil fluxes of CO2 increased with elevated CO2 and warming, but decreased with warming later in the year compared to un-heated controls. Soil CH4 uptake was enhanced by elevated CO2 but reduced by warming, particularly later in the year. Soil fluxes of N2O were unaffected by treatment. These preliminary results indicate potentially strong feedbacks between carbon cycling and warming are mediated by ecosystem processes in this semiarid rangeland.

  6. Beam emittance measurements on multicusp ion sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarstedt, M.; Lee, Y.; Leung, K.N.; Perkins, L.T.; Pickard, D.S.; Weber, M.; Williams, M.D.

    1995-08-01

    Multicusp ion sources are used for various applications. Presently, the implementation of this type of ion source is planned for the development of an ion beam lithography machine, which will be used for the projection of sub-0.2 micron patterns onto a wafer substrate. Since, for this application, a very good beam quality and a small ion energy spread are required, emittance measurements have been performed on a multicusp ion source for various source conditions. It is shown that the installation of proper capacitors between the extraction electrodes is necessary to avoid rf-pickup, which otherwise leads to a distortion of the beam emittance. The influence of the magnetic filter field on the beam emittance has been investigated, and the beam emittance of a dc filament-discharge plasma has also been compared to that of an rf-generated plasma.

  7. Beam emittance measurements on multicusp ion sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarstedt, M.; Lee, Y.; Leung, K.N. [and others

    1995-08-01

    Multicusp ion sources are used for various applications. Presently, the implementation of this type of ion source planned for the development of an ion beam lithography machine, which will be used for the projection of sub-0.2 {mu}m patterns onto a wafer substrate. Since, for this application, a very good beam quality and a small ion energy spread are required, emittance measurements have been performed on a multicusp ion source for various source conditions. It is shown that the installation of proper capacitors between the extraction electrodes is necessary to avoid rf-pickup, which otherwise leads to a distortion of the beam emittance. The influence of the magnetic filter field on the beam emittance has been investigated, and the beam emittance of a dc filament-discharge plasma has also been compared to that of an rf-generated plasma.

  8. Beam emittance measurements on multicusp ion sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarstedt, M.; Lee, Y.; Leung, K.N.; Perkins, L.T.; Pickard, D.S.; Weber, M.; Williams, M.D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    1996-03-01

    Multicusp ion sources are used for various applications. Presently, the implementation of this type of ion source is planned for the development of an ion beam lithography machine, which will be used for the projection of sub-0.2 {mu}m patterns onto a wafer substrate. Since, for this application, a very good beam quality and a small ion energy spread are required, emittance measurements have been performed on a multicusp ion source for various source conditions. It is shown that the installation of proper capacitors between the extraction electrodes is necessary to avoid rf pickup, which otherwise leads to a distortion of the beam emittance. The influence of the magnetic filter field on the beam emittance has been investigated, and the beam emittance of a dc filament-discharge plasma has also been compared to that of a rf-generated plasma. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  9. Beam emittance measurements on multicusp ion sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarstedt, M.; Lee, Y.; Leung, K. N.; Perkins, L. T.; Pickard, D. S.; Weber, M.; Williams, M. D.

    1996-03-01

    Multicusp ion sources are used for various applications. Presently, the implementation of this type of ion source is planned for the development of an ion beam lithography machine, which will be used for the projection of sub-0.2 μm patterns onto a wafer substrate. Since, for this application, a very good beam quality and a small ion energy spread are required, emittance measurements have been performed on a multicusp ion source for various source conditions. It is shown that the installation of proper capacitors between the extraction electrodes is necessary to avoid rf pickup, which otherwise leads to a distortion of the beam emittance. The influence of the magnetic filter field on the beam emittance has been investigated, and the beam emittance of a dc filament-discharge plasma has also been compared to that of a rf-generated plasma.

  10. Emitters of N-photon bundles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, C Sánchez; Del Valle, E; Tudela, A González; Müller, K; Lichtmannecker, S; Kaniber, M; Tejedor, C; Finley, J J; Laussy, F P

    2014-07-01

    Controlling the ouput of a light emitter is one of the basic tasks of photonics, with landmarks such as the laser and single-photon sources. The development of quantum applications makes it increasingly important to diversify the available quantum sources. Here, we propose a cavity QED scheme to realize emitters that release their energy in groups, or "bundles" of N photons, for integer N. Close to 100% of two-photon emission and 90% of three-photon emission is shown to be within reach of state of the art samples. The emission can be tuned with system parameters so that the device behaves as a laser or as a N-photon gun. The theoretical formalism to characterize such emitters is developed, with the bundle statistics arising as an extension of the fundamental correlation functions of quantum optics. These emitters will be useful for quantum information processing and for medical applications.

  11. Monochromatic gamma emitter for low energy quanta

    CERN Document Server

    Tomova, Z R; Mironova, S A

    2004-01-01

    The possibility of creating of a monochromatic gamma emitter of low energy quanta is analyzed. The idea is based on Daning's scheme. Except for purely scientific problems the monochromator is actual for therapy of wide range of diseases.

  12. Emittance growth in linear induction accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Ekdahl, C A; Schulze, M E; Carlson, C A; Frayer, D K; Mostrum, C; Thoma, C H

    2014-01-01

    The Dual-Axis Radiographic Hydrotest (DARHT) facility uses bremsstrahlung radiation source spots produced by the focused electron beams from two linear induction accelerators (LIAs) to radiograph large hydrodynamic experiments driven by high explosives. Radiographic resolution is determined by the size of the source spot, and beam emittance is the ultimate limitation to spot size. On the DARHT Axis-II LIA we measure an emittance higher than predicted by theoretical simulations, and even though this axis produces sub-millimeter source spots, we are exploring ways to improve the emittance. Some of the possible causes for the discrepancy have been investigated using particle-in-cell (PIC) codes, although most of these are discounted based on beam measurements. The most likely source of emittance growth is a mismatch of the beam to the magnetic transport, which can cause beam halo.

  13. Can Global Warming be Stopped?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luria, M.

    2013-12-01

    Earlier this year, the CO2 levels exceeded the 400 ppm level and there is no sign that the 1-2 ppm annual increase is going to slow down. Concerns regarding the danger of global warming have been reported in numerous occasions for more than a generation, ever since CO2 levels reached the 350 ppm range in the mid 1980's. Nevertheless, all efforts to slow down the increase have showed little if any effect. Mobile sources, including surface and marine transportation and aviation, consist of 20% of the global CO2 emission. The only realistic way to reduce the mobile sources' CO2 signature is by improved fuel efficiency. However, any progress in this direction is more than compensated by continuous increased demand. Stationary sources, mostly electric power generation, are responsible for the bulk of the global CO2 emission. The measurements have shown, that the effect of an increase in renewable sources, like solar wind and geothermal, combined with conversion from coal to natural gas where possible, conservation and efficiency improvement, did not compensate the increased demand mostly in developing countries. Increased usage of nuclear energy can provide some relief in carbon emission but has the potential of even greater environmental hazard. A major decrease in carbon emission can be obtained by either significant reduction in the cost of non-carbon based energy sources or by of carbon sequestration. The most economical way to make a significant decrease in carbon emission is to apply carbon sequestration technology at large point sources that use coal. Worldwide there are about 10,000 major sources that burn >7 billion metric tons of coal which generate the equivalent of 30 trillion kwh. There is a limited experience in CO2 sequestration of such huge quantities of CO2, however, it is estimated that the cost would be US$ 0.01-0.1 per kwh. The cost of eliminating this quantity can be estimated at an average of 1.5 trillion dollars annually. The major emitters, US

  14. Emittance Growth in Linear Induction Accelerators

    OpenAIRE

    Ekdahl, Carl

    2017-01-01

    The Dual-Axis Radiographic Hydrotest (DARHT) facility uses bremsstrahlung radiation source spots produced by the focused electron beams from two linear induction accelerators (LIAs) to radiograph large hydrodynamic experiments driven by high explosives. Radiographic resolution is determined by the size of the source spot, and beam emittance is the ultimate limitation to spot size. Some of the possible causes for the emittance growth in the DARHT LIA have been investigated using particle-in-ce...

  15. Alpha-emitters for medical therapy workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feinendegen, L.E.; McClure, J.J.

    1996-12-31

    A workshop on ``Alpha-Emitters for Medical Therapy`` was held May 30-31, 1996 in Denver Colorado to identify research goals and potential clinical needs for applying alpha-particle emitters and to provide DOE with sufficient information for future planning. The workshop was attended by 36 participants representing radiooncology, nuclear medicine, immunotherapy, radiobiology, molecular biology, biochemistry, radiopharmaceutical chemistry, dosimetry, and physics. This report provides a summary of the key points and recommendations arrived at during the conference.

  16. Anthropogenic Methane Emissions in California's San Joaquin Valley: Characterizing Large Point Source Emitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, F. M.; Duren, R. M.; Miller, C. E.; Aubrey, A. D.; Falk, M.; Holland, L.; Hook, S. J.; Hulley, G. C.; Johnson, W. R.; Kuai, L.; Kuwayama, T.; Lin, J. C.; Thorpe, A. K.; Worden, J. R.; Lauvaux, T.; Jeong, S.; Fischer, M. L.

    2015-12-01

    Methane is an important atmospheric pollutant that contributes to global warming and tropospheric ozone production. Methane mitigation could reduce near term climate change and improve air quality, but is hindered by a lack of knowledge of anthropogenic methane sources. Recent work has shown that methane emissions are not evenly distributed in space, or across emission sources, suggesting that a large fraction of anthropogenic methane comes from a few "super-emitters." We studied the distribution of super-emitters in California's southern San Joaquin Valley, where elevated levels of atmospheric CH4 have also been observed from space. Here, we define super-emitters as methane plumes that could be reliably detected (i.e., plume observed more than once in the same location) under varying wind conditions by airborne thermal infrared remote sensing. The detection limit for this technique was determined to be 4.5 kg CH4 h-1 by a controlled release experiment, corresponding to column methane enhancement at the point of emissions greater than 20% above local background levels. We surveyed a major oil production field, and an area with a high concentration of large dairies using a variety of airborne and ground-based measurements. Repeated airborne surveys (n=4) with the Hyperspectral Thermal Emission Spectrometer revealed 28 persistent methane plumes emanating from oil field infrastructure, including tanks, wells, and processing facilities. The likelihood that a given source type was a super-emitter varied from roughly 1/3 for processing facilities to 1/3000 for oil wells. 11 persistent plumes were detected in the dairy area, and all were associated with wet manure management. The majority (11/14) of manure lagoons in the study area were super-emitters. Comparing to a California methane emissions inventory for the surveyed areas, we estimate that super-emitters comprise a minimum of 9% of inventoried dairy emissions, and 13% of inventoried oil emissions in this region.

  17. Deep time evidence for climate sensitivity increase with warming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shaffer, Gary; Huber, Matthew; Rondanelli, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Future global warming from anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions will depend on climate feedbacks, the effect of which is expressed by climate sensitivity, the warming for a doubling of atmospheric CO2 content. It is not clear how feedbacks, sensitivity, and temperature will evolve in our warming...... world, but past warming events may provide insight. Here we employ paleoreconstructions and new climate-carbon model simulations in a novel framework to explore a wide scenario range for the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) carbon release and global warming event 55.8Ma ago, a possible future...... indicates climate sensitivity increase with global warming....

  18. 3D-FEM electrical-thermal-mechanical analysis and experiment of Si-based MEMS infrared emitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiang; Wang, Na; Chen, Ran-Bin; San, Hai-Sheng; Chen, Xu-Yuan

    2016-11-01

    Designs, simulations, and fabrications of silicon-based MEMS infrared (IR) emitters for gas sensing application are presented. A 3D finite element method (3D-FEM) was used to analyze the coupled electrical-thermal-mechanical properties of a bridge hotplate structure (BHS) IR emitter and closed hotplate structure (CHS) IR emitter using Joule heating and thermal expansion models of COMSOL™. The IR absorptions of n- and p-silicon were calculated for the design of self-heating structure. The BHS and CHS IR emitters were fabricated synchronously using micro-electromechanical systems technology for a direct performance comparison. Both types of IR emitters were characterized by electrical and optical measurements. The experimental results show that BHS IR emitters have higher radiation density, lower power consumption, and faster frequency-response than CHS IR emitters due to the use of a thermal isolation structure and self-heating structure. Meanwhile, the simulated results agree well with the corresponding measured results, which indicate that the 3D-FEM-model is effective and can be used in the optimal design of electro-thermal devices.

  19. Low Emittance Growth in a LEBT with Un-Neutralized Section

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prost, Lionel [Fermilab; Carneiro, Jean-Paul [Fermilab; Shemyakin, Alexander [Fermilab

    2016-06-01

    In a Low Energy Beam Transport line (LEBT), the emittance growth due to the beam's own space charge is typically suppressed by way of neutralization from either electrons or ions, which originate from ionization of the background gas. In cases where the beam is chopped, the neutralization pattern changes throughout the beginning of the pulse, causing the Twiss parameters to differ significantly from their steady state values, which, in turn, may result in beam losses downstream. For a modest beam perveance, there is an alternative solution, in which the beam is kept un-neutralized in the portion of the LEBT that contains the chopper. The emittance can be nearly preserved if the transition to the un-neutralized section occurs where the beam exhibits low transverse tails. This report discusses the experimental realization of such a scheme at Fermilab's PXIE, where low beam emittance dilution was demonstrated

  20. Highly flexible and robust N-doped SiC nanoneedle field emitters

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Shanliang

    2015-01-23

    Flexible field emission (FE) emitters, whose unique advantages are lightweight and conformable, promise to enable a wide range of technologies, such as roll-up flexible FE displays, e-papers and flexible light-emitting diodes. In this work, we demonstrate for the first time highly flexible SiC field emitters with low turn-on fields and excellent emission stabilities. n-Type SiC nanoneedles with ultra-sharp tips and tailored N-doping levels were synthesized via a catalyst-assisted pyrolysis process on carbon fabrics by controlling the gas mixture and cooling rate. The turn-on field, threshold field and current emission fluctuation of SiC nanoneedle emitters with an N-doping level of 7.58 at.% are 1.11 V μm-1, 1.55 V μm-1 and 8.1%, respectively, suggesting the best overall performance for such flexible field emitters. Furthermore, characterization of the FE properties under repeated bending cycles and different bending states reveal that the SiC field emitters are mechanically and electrically robust with unprecedentedly high flexibility and stabilities. These findings underscore the importance of concurrent morphology and composition controls in nanomaterial synthesis and establish SiC nanoneedles as the most promising candidate for flexible FE applications. © 2015 Nature Publishing Group All rights reserved.

  1. High-temperature plasmonic thermal emitter for thermophotovotaics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Jingjing; Guler, Urcan; Li, Wei

    2014-01-01

    We use titanium nitride (TiN) to demonstrate an ultra-thin plasmonic thermal emitter operating at high temperatures (830 K). The spectrally selective emitter exhibits a large emittance at around 2.5 μm and below, and suppresses emission at longer wavelengths.......We use titanium nitride (TiN) to demonstrate an ultra-thin plasmonic thermal emitter operating at high temperatures (830 K). The spectrally selective emitter exhibits a large emittance at around 2.5 μm and below, and suppresses emission at longer wavelengths....

  2. Emittance measurement of high-brightness microbeams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishizuka, Hiroshi; Nakahara, Yuriko (Fukuoka Inst. of Tech. (Japan)); Kawasaki, Sunao; Musyoki, S.; Shimizu, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Akihiko; Shiho, Makoto

    1994-09-01

    Arrays of microtriodes have recently become available due to the development of microfabricated field-emission electron sources. Computer simulation has shown that the brightness of beams emitted by them is significantly higher than that of the common microbeams, and possible application of the accelerated beam to free electron lasers has been discussed. Experimentation on beam generation has started, but methods for diagnosing the beam have not yet been established. Difficulty is predicted, because of the high brightness, in applying the conventional methods of emittance measurement. In this paper we propose a new method that determines the emittance without using apertures. The cross section of a converging beam is elongated by a quadrupole lens, and parameters of the emittance ellipse are obtained from the beam size on a screen when changing either the strength or the axial position of the quadrupole lens. (author).

  3. Solid-state single-photon emitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aharonovich, Igor; Englund, Dirk; Toth, Milos

    2016-10-01

    Single-photon emitters play an important role in many leading quantum technologies. There is still no 'ideal' on-demand single-photon emitter, but a plethora of promising material systems have been developed, and several have transitioned from proof-of-concept to engineering efforts with steadily improving performance. Here, we review recent progress in the race towards true single-photon emitters required for a range of quantum information processing applications. We focus on solid-state systems including quantum dots, defects in solids, two-dimensional hosts and carbon nanotubes, as these are well positioned to benefit from recent breakthroughs in nanofabrication and materials growth techniques. We consider the main challenges and key advantages of each platform, with a focus on scalable on-chip integration and fabrication of identical sources on photonic circuits.

  4. Fe(III) fertilization mitigating net global warming potential and greenhouse gas intensity in paddy rice-wheat rotation systems in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shuwei; Zhang, Ling; Liu, Qiaohui; Zou, Jianwen

    2012-05-01

    A complete accounting of net greenhouse gas balance (NGHGB) and greenhouse gas intensity (GHGI) affected by Fe(III) fertilizer application was examined in typical annual paddy rice-winter wheat rotation cropping systems in southeast China. Annual fluxes of soil carbon dioxide (CO(2)), methane (CH(4)) and nitrous oxide (N(2)O) were measured using static chamber method, and the net ecosystem exchange of CO(2) (NEE) was determined by the difference between soil CO(2) emissions (R(H)) and net primary production (NPP). Fe(III) fertilizer application significantly decreased R(H) without adverse effects on NPP of rice and winter wheat. Fe(III) fertilizer application decreased seasonal CH(4) by 27-44%, but increased annual N(2)O by 65-100%. Overall, Fe(III) fertilizer application decreased the annual NGHGB and GHGI by 35-47% and 30-36%, respectively. High grain yield and low greenhouse gas intensity can be reconciled by Fe(III) fertilizer applied at the local recommendation rate in rice-based cropping systems.

  5. O VI Emission Imaging of a Galaxy with the Hubble Space Telescope: a Warm Gas Halo Surrounding the Intense Starburst SDSS J115630.63+500822.1

    CERN Document Server

    Hayes, Matthew; Östlin, Göran; Scarlata, Claudia; Lehnert, Matthew D; Mannerström-Jansson, Gustav

    2016-01-01

    We report results from a new HST study of the OVI 1032,1038\\AA\\ doublet in emission around intensely star-forming galaxies. The programme aims to characterize the energy balance in starburst galaxies and gas cooling in the difficult-to-map coronal temperature regime of 2-5 x $10^5$K. We present the first resolved image of gas emission in the OVI line. Our target, SDSS J1156+5008, is very compact in the continuum but displays OVI emission to radii of 23 kpc. The surface brightness profile is well fit by an exponential with a scale of 7.5kpc. This is ten times the size of the photoionized gas, and we estimate that 1/6 the total OVI luminosity comes from resonantly scattered continuum radiation. Spectroscopy - which closely resembles a stacked sample of archival spectra - confirms the OVI emission, and determines the column density and outflow velocity from blueshifted absorption. The combination of measurements enables several new calculations with few assumptions. The OVI regions fill only ~$10^{-3}$ of the vo...

  6. Measurement of transverse emittance and coherence of double-gate field emitter array cathodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujino, Soichiro; Das Kanungo, Prat; Monshipouri, Mahta; Lee, Chiwon; Miller, R. J. Dwayne

    2016-12-01

    Achieving small transverse beam emittance is important for high brightness cathodes for free electron lasers and electron diffraction and imaging experiments. Double-gate field emitter arrays with on-chip focussing electrode, operating with electrical switching or near infrared laser excitation, have been studied as cathodes that are competitive with photocathodes excited by ultraviolet lasers, but the experimental demonstration of the low emittance has been elusive. Here we demonstrate this for a field emitter array with an optimized double-gate structure by directly measuring the beam characteristics. Further we show the successful application of the double-gate field emitter array to observe the low-energy electron beam diffraction from suspended graphene in minimal setup. The observed low emittance and long coherence length are in good agreement with theory. These results demonstrate that our all-metal double-gate field emitters are highly promising for applications that demand extremely low-electron bunch-phase space volume and large transverse coherence.

  7. Research on Radar Emitter Attribute Recognition Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    In order to solve emitter recognition problems in a practical reconnaissance environment, attribute mathematics is introduced. The basic concepts and theory of attribute set and attribute measure are described in detail. A new attribute recognition method based on attribute measure is presented in this paper. Application example is given, which demonstrates this new method is accurate and effective. Moreover, computer simulation for recognizing the emitter purpose is selected, and compared with classical statistical pattern recognition through simulation. The excellent experimental results demonstrate that this is a brand-new attribute recognition method as compared to existing statistical pattern recognition techniques.

  8. Quadrupole Transfer Function for Emittance Measurement

    CERN Document Server

    Cameron, Peter; Jansson, Andreas; Tan, Cheng-Yang

    2008-01-01

    Historically the use of the quadrupole moment measurement has been impeded by the requirement for large dynamic range, as well as measurement sensitivity to beam position. We investigate the use of the transfer function technique [1-3] in combination with the sensitivity and 160dB revolution line rejection of the direct diode detection analog front end [4] to open the possibility of an emittance diagnostic that may be implemented without operational complication, quasi- parasitic to the operation of existing tune measurement systems. Such a diagnostic would be particularly useful as an emittance monitor during acceleration ramp development in machines like RHIC and the LHC.

  9. Current Injection Pumping of Organic Light Emitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-09-28

    MOT-OOO1AF I Current Injection Pumping of Organic Light Emitters Prepared by DI Jeffrey C. Buchholz E L ri: 8 James P. Stec OCT C "t989 Mary C...Schutte Micro -Optics Technologies, Inc. 8608 University Green #5 Middleton, WI 53562 28 September 1989 D,:?UqflON SA2". N’.’ _ Disuibunon Uanu-ted Contract...Title Report Date Current Injection Pumping of Organic Light Emitters 28 September 1989 Authors Jeffrey C. Buchholz, James P. Stec, Mary C. Schutte

  10. Coupling single emitters to quantum plasmonic circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huck, Alexander; Andersen, Ulrik L.

    2016-09-01

    In recent years, the controlled coupling of single-photon emitters to propagating surface plasmons has been intensely studied, which is fueled by the prospect of a giant photonic nonlinearity on a nanoscaled platform. In this article, we will review the recent progress on coupling single emitters to nanowires towards the construction of a new platform for strong light-matter interaction. The control over such a platform might open new doors for quantum information processing and quantum sensing at the nanoscale and for the study of fundamental physics in the ultrastrong coupling regime.

  11. Coupling single emitters to quantum plasmonic circuits

    CERN Document Server

    Huck, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    In recent years the controlled coupling of single photon emitters to propagating surface plasmons has been intensely studied, which is fueled by the prospect of a giant photonic non-linearity on a nano-scaled platform. In this article we will review the recent progress on coupling single emitters to nano-wires towards the construction of a new platform for strong light-matter interaction. The control over such a platform might open new doors for quantum information processing and quantum sensing at the nanoscale, and for the study of fundamental physics in the ultra-strong coupling regime.

  12. Sudden Stratospheric Warming Compendium

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Sudden Stratospheric Warming Compendium (SSWC) data set documents the stratospheric, tropospheric, and surface climate impacts of sudden stratospheric warmings. This...

  13. Atmospheric gas-phase degradation and global warming potentials of 2-fluoroethanol, 2,2-difluoroethanol, and 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellevåg, Stig Rune; Nielsen, Claus J.; Søvde, Ole Amund; Myhre, Gunnar; Sundet, Jostein K.; Stordal, Frode; Isaksen, Ivar S. A.

    The vapour phase reactions of 2-fluoroethanol, 2,2-difluoroethanol, and 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol with OH radicals and Cl atoms were studied at 298 K and 1013 mbar using long-path FTIR detection. The following reaction rate coefficients were determined by the relative rate method: k298(OH+CH 2FCH 2OH)=(1.42±0.11)×10 -12, k298(OH+CHF 2CH 2OH)=(4.51±0.06)×10 -13, k298(OH+CF 3CH 2OH)=(1.23±0.06)×10 -13, k298(Cl+CH 2FCH 2OH)=(2.67±0.3)×10 -11, k298(Cl+CHF 2CH 2OH)=(3.12±0.06)×10 -12, and k298(Cl+CF 3CH 2OH)=(7.42±0.12)×10 -13 cm 3 molecule -1 s -1; the reported uncertainties represent 3σ from the statistical analyses and do not include any systematic errors or uncertainties in the reference rate coefficients. Quantitative infrared cross-sections of the title compounds at 298 K are reported in the 4000-50 cm -1 region. A 3D chemistry transport model was applied to calculate the atmospheric distributions and lifetimes of the title compounds; the global and yearly averaged lifetimes were calculated as 20 days for CH 2FCH 2OH, 40 days for CHF 2CH 2OH, and 117 days for CF 3CH 2OH. Radiative forcing calculations were carried out assuming either constant vertical profiles or the distribution derived from the chemistry transport model. The Global Warming Potentials for the title compounds are insignificant compared to, e.g. CFC-11 (CCl 3F).

  14. The properties of the extended warm ionised gas around low-redshift QSOs and the lack of extended high-velocity outflows

    CERN Document Server

    Husemann, B; Sánchez, S F; Jahnke, K

    2012-01-01

    (Abridged) We present a detailed analysis of a large sample of 31 low-redshift, mostly radio-quiet type 1 QSOs observed with integral field spectroscopy to study their extended emission-line regions (EELRs). We focus on the ionisation state of the gas, size and luminosity of extended narrow line regions (ENLRs), which corresponds to those parts of the EELR dominated by ionisation from the QSO, as well as the kinematics of the ionised gas. We detect EELRs around 19 of our 31 QSOs (61%) after deblending the unresolved QSO emission and the extended host galaxy light in the integral field data. We identify 13 EELRs to be entirely ionised by the QSO radiation, 3 EELRs are composed of HII regions and 3 EELRs display signatures of both ionisation mechanisms at different locations. The typical size of the ENLR is 10kpc at a median nuclear [OIII] luminosity of log(L([OIII])/[erg/s])=42.7+-0.15. We show that the ENLR sizes are least a factor of 2 larger than determined with HST, but are consistent with those of recentl...

  15. Emittance growth from electron beam modulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaskiewicz, M.

    2009-12-01

    In linac ring colliders like MeRHIC and eRHIC a modulation of the electron bunch can lead to a modulation of the beam beam tune shift and steering errors. These modulations can lead to emittance growth. This note presents simple formulas to estimate these effects which generalize some previous results.

  16. Longitudinal emittance measurements at REX-ISOLDE

    CERN Document Server

    Fraser, M A; Jones, R.M.; Jones, R M; Pasini, M; Posocco, P A; Voulot, D; Wenander, F

    2012-01-01

    We report on measurements of the longitudinal emittance at the Radioactive ion beam EXperiment (REX) at ISOLDE, CERN. The rms longitudinal emittance was measured as 0.34 ± 0.08 π ns keV/u at the output of the RFQ and as 0.36 ± 0.04π ns keV/u in front of the third 7-gap split-ring resonator (7G3) using the three-gradient technique; systematic errors are not included but are estimated at approximately 10%. The 86% emittance was measured a factor of approximately 4.4 times larger than the rms emittance at 1.48 ± 0.2 and 1.55 ± 0.12π ns keV/u at the RFQ and 7G3, respectively. The REX switchyard magnet was used as a spectrometer to analyse the energy spread of the beam as it was manipulated by varying the voltage of the rebuncher (ReB) and 7G3 cavities operating at non-accelerating phases. The transfer matrix for a multi-gap bunching cavity is derived and suitably truncated to allow for the accurate reconstruction of the beam parameters from measurement. The technique for measuring the energy spread was rig...

  17. Beam characterization for the field-emitter-array cathode-based low-emittance gun

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. C. Leemann

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available A 1   Å x-ray free electron laser can be operated at 6 GeV provided a very high brightness electron beam. Therefore, Paul Scherrer Institute has initiated development of the low-emittance gun based on field emission. A field-emitter array (FEA is expected to deliver high peak current while reducing the source emittance to levels close to the thermal limit. A 100 keV gun test stand has been designed in order to gain experience with electron bunches emitted by pulsed FEAs, investigate emittance compensation, and develop diagnostic procedures to characterize the beam. First FEA samples have been installed and pulsed in the gun; the emitted bunches have been accelerated and characterized. We present results acquired with the first FEA samples.

  18. Nanoelectrospray emitter arrays providing interemitter electric field uniformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Ryan T; Page, Jason S; Marginean, Ioan; Tang, Keqi; Smith, Richard D

    2008-07-15

    Arrays of electrospray ionization (ESI) emitters have been reported previously as a means of enhancing ionization efficiency or signal intensity. A key challenge when working with multiple, closely spaced ESI emitters is overcoming the deleterious effects caused by electrical interference among neighboring emitters. Individual emitters can experience different electric fields depending on their relative position in the array, such that it becomes difficult to operate all of the emitters optimally for a given applied potential. In this work, we have developed multi-nanoESI emitters arranged with a circular pattern, which enable the constituent emitters to experience a uniform electric field. The performance of the circular emitter array was compared to a single emitter and to a previously developed linear emitter array, which verified that improved electric field uniformity was achieved with the circular arrangement. The circular arrays were also interfaced with a mass spectrometer via a matching multicapillary inlet, and the results were compared with those obtained using a single emitter. By minimizing interemitter electric field inhomogeneities, much larger arrays having closer emitter spacing should be feasible.

  19. Emittance growth induced by electron cloud in proton storage rings

    CERN Document Server

    Benedetto, Elena; Coppa, G

    2006-01-01

    In proton and positron storage rings with many closely spaced bunches, a large number of electrons can accumulate in the beam pipe due to various mechanisms (photoemission, residual gas ionization, beam-induced multipacting). The so-formed electron cloud interacts with the positively charged bunches, giving rise to instabilities, emittance growth and losses. This phenomenon has been observed in several existing machines such as the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS), whose operation has been constrained by the electron-cloud problem, and it is a concern for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), under construction at CERN. The interaction between the beam and the electron cloud has features which cannot be fully taken into account by the conventional and known theories from accelerators and plasma physics. Computer simulations are indispensable for a proper prediction and understanding of the instability dynamics. The main feature which renders the beam-cloud interactions so peculiar is that the the electron cloud...

  20. Systematic Optimization of Boron Diffusion for Solar Cell Emitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi, P.; Kolahdouz, M.; Iraj, M.; Ganjian, M.; Aghababa, H.; Asl-Soleimani, E.; Radamson, Henry H.

    2017-02-01

    To achieve p-n junctions for n-type solar cells, we have studied BBr3 diffusion in an open tube furnace, varying parameters of the BBr3 diffusion process such as temperature, gas flows, and duration of individual process steps, i.e., predeposition and drive-in. Then, output parameters such as carrier lifetime, sheet resistance, and diffusion profile were measured and statistically analyzed to optimize the emitter characteristics. Statistical analysis (factorial design) was finally employed to systematically explore the effects of the set of input variables on the outputs. The effect of the interactions between inputs was also evaluated for each output, quantified using a two-level factorial method. Temperature and BBr3 flow were found to have the most significant effect on different outputs such as carrier lifetime, junction depth, sheet resistance, and final surface concentration.

  1. Nanocomposite plasmonic fluorescence emitters with core/shell configurations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miao, Xiaoyu; Brener, Igal; Luk, Ting Shan

    2010-07-16

    This paper is focused on the optical properties of nanocomposite plasmonic emitters with core/shell configurations, where a fluorescence emitter is located inside a metal nanoshell. Systematic theoretical investigations are presented for the influence of material type, core radius, shell thickness, and excitation wavelength on the internal optical intensity, radiative quantum yield, and fluorescence enhancement of the nanocomposite emitter. It is our conclusion that: (i) an optimal ratio between the core radius and shell thickness is required to maximize the absorption rate of fluorescence emitters, and (ii) a large core radius is desired to minimize the non-radiative damping and avoid significant quantum yield degradation of light emitters. Several experimental approaches to synthesize these nanocomposite emitters are also discussed. Furthermore, our theoretical results are successfully used to explain several reported experimental observations and should prove useful for designing ultra-bright core/shell nanocomposite emitters.

  2. Nanocomposite plasmonic fluorescence emitters with core/shell configurations.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brener, Igal; Luk, Ting Shan; Miao, Xiaoyu

    2010-06-01

    This paper is focused on the optical properties of nanocomposite plasmonic emitters with core/shell configurations, where a fluorescence emitter is located inside a metal nanoshell. Systematic theoretical investigations are presented for the influence of material type, core radius, shell thickness, and excitation wavelength on the internal optical intensity, radiative quantum yield, and fluorescence enhancement of the nanocomposite emitter. It is our conclusion that: (i) an optimal ratio between the core radius and shell thickness is required to maximize the absorption rate of fluorescence emitters, and (ii) a large core radius is desired to minimize the non-radiative damping and avoid significant quantum yield degradation of light emitters. Several experimental approaches to synthesize these nanocomposite emitters are also discussed. Furthermore, our theoretical results are successfully used to explain several reported experimental observations and should prove useful for designing ultra-bright core/shell nanocomposite emitters.

  3. The sulfur depletion problem: upper limits on the H2S2, HS2, and S2 gas-phase abundances toward the low-mass warm core IRAS16293-2422

    CERN Document Server

    Martín-Doménech, R; Caro, G M Muñoz; Müller, H S P; Occhiogrosso, A; Testi, L; Woods, P M; Viti, S

    2016-01-01

    A fraction of the missing sulfur in dense clouds and circumstellar regions could be in the form of three species not yet de- tected in the interstellar medium: H2S2, HS2, and S2 according to experimental simulations performed under astrophysically relevant conditions. These S-S bonded molecules can be formed by the energetic processing of H2S-bearing ice mantles on dust grains, and subsequently desorb to the gas phase. The detection of these species could partially solve the sulfur depletion problem, and would help to improve our knowledge of the poorly known chemistry of sulfur in the interstellar medium. To this purpose we performed dedicated ground-based observations toward the low-mass warm core IRAS16293-2422. Observations in the submillimeter regime were obtained with the APEX 12 m telescope during 15 hours of observation, targeting a wide selection of the predicted rotational transitions of the three molecules. The 1{\\sigma} noise rms values were extracted in the spectral regions where the targeted spe...

  4. Ghost signals in Allison emittance scanners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stockli, Martin P.; /SNS Project, Oak Ridge /Tennessee U.; Leitner, M.; /LBL, Berkeley; Moehs, D.P.; /Fermilab; Keller, R.; /LBL, Berkeley; Welton, R.F.; /SNS Project, Oak

    2004-12-01

    For over 20 years, Allison scanners have been used to measure emittances of low-energy ion beams. We show that scanning large trajectory angles produces ghost signals caused by the sampled beamlet impacting on an electric deflection plate. The ghost signal strength is proportional to the amount of beam entering the scanner. Depending on the ions, and their velocity, the ghost signals can have the opposite or the same polarity as the main beam signals. The ghost signals cause significant errors in the emittance estimates because they appear at large trajectory angles. These ghost signals often go undetected because they partly overlap with the real signals, are mostly below the 1% level, and often hide in the noise. A simple deflection plate modification is shown to reduce the ghost signal strength by over 99%.

  5. Computing Eigen-Emittances from Tracking Data

    CERN Document Server

    Alexahin, Y

    2014-01-01

    In a strongly nonlinear system the particle distribution in the phase space may develop long tails which contribution to the covariance (sigma) matrix should be suppressed for a correct estimate of the beam emittance. A method is offered based on Gaussian approximation of the original particle distribution in the phase space (Klimontovich distribution) which leads to an equation for the sigma matrix which provides efficient suppression of the tails and cannot be obtained by introducing weights. This equation is easily solved by iterations in the multi-dimensional case. It is also shown how the eigen-emittances and coupled optics functions can be retrieved from the sigma matrix in a strongly coupled system. Finally, the developed algorithm is applied to 6D ionization cooling of muons in HFOFO channel.

  6. An ultracold low emittance electron source

    CERN Document Server

    Xia, G; Murray, A J; Bellan, L; Bertsche, W; Appleby, R B; Mete, O; Chattopadhyay, S

    2014-01-01

    Ultracold atom-based electron sources have recently been proposed as an alternative to the conventional photo-injectors or thermionic electron guns widely used in modern particle accelerators. The advantages of ultracold atom-based electron sources lie in the fact that the electrons extracted from the plasma (created from near threshold photo-ionization of ultracold atoms) have a very low temperature, i.e. down to tens of Kelvin. Extraction of these electrons has the potential for producing very low emittance electron bunches. These features are crucial for the next generation of particle accelerators, including free electron lasers, plasma-based accelerators and future linear colliders. The source also has many potential direct applications, including ultrafast electron diffraction (UED) and electron microscopy, due to its intrinsically high coherence. In this paper, the basic mechanism of ultracold electron beam production is discussed and our new research facility for an ultracold, low emittance electron s...

  7. Computing Eigen-Emittances from Tracking Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexahin, Y. [Fermilab

    2014-09-18

    In a strongly nonlinear system the particle distribution in the phase space may develop long tails which contribution to the covariance (sigma) matrix should be suppressed for a correct estimate of the beam emittance. A method is offered based on Gaussian approximation of the original particle distribution in the phase space (Klimontovich distribution) which leads to an equation for the sigma matrix which provides efficient suppression of the tails and cannot be obtained by introducing weights. This equation is easily solved by iterations in the multi-dimensional case. It is also shown how the eigen-emittances and coupled optics functions can be retrieved from the sigma matrix in a strongly coupled system. Finally, the developed algorithm is applied to 6D ionization cooling of muons in HFOFO channel.

  8. Reverse Emittance Exchange for Muon Colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    V. Ivanov, A. Afanasev, C.M. Ankenbrandt, R.P. Johnson, G.M. Wang, S.A. Bogacz, Y.S. Derbenev

    2009-05-01

    Muon collider luminosity depends on the number of muons in the storage ring and on the transverse size of the beams in collision. Ionization cooling as it is currently envisioned will not cool the beam sizes sufficiently well to provide adequate luminosity without large muon intensities. Six-dimensional cooling schemes will reduce the longitudinal emittance of a muon beam so that smaller high frequency RF cavities can be used for later stages of cooling and for acceleration. However, the bunch length at collision energy is then shorter than needed to match the interaction region beta function. New ideas to shrink transverse beam dimensions by lengthening each bunch will help achieve high luminosity in muon colliders. Analytic expressions for the reverse emittance exchange mechanism were derived, including a new resonant method of beam focusing.

  9. FIrpic: archetypal blue phosphorescent emitter for electroluminescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranoff, Etienne; Curchod, Basile F E

    2015-05-14

    FIrpic is the most investigated bis-cyclometallated iridium complex in particular in the context of organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) because of its attractive sky-blue emission, high emission efficiency, and suitable energy levels. In this Perspective we review the synthesis, structural characterisations, and key properties of this emitter. We also survey the theoretical studies and summarise a series of selected monochromatic electroluminescent devices using FIrpic as the emitting dopant. Finally we highlight important shortcomings of FIrpic as an emitter for OLEDs. Despite the large body of work dedicated to this material, it is manifest that the understanding of photophysical and electrochemical processes are only broadly understood mainly because of the different environment in which these properties are measured, i.e., isolated molecules in solvent vs. device.

  10. Reliability Design and Electro-Thermal-Optical Simulation of Bridge-Style Infrared Thermal Emitters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Zhou

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Designs and simulations of silicon-based micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS infrared (IR thermal emitters for gas sensing application are presented. The IR thermal emitter is designed as a bridge-style hotplate (BSH structure suspended on a silicon frame for realizing a good thermal isolation between hotplate and frame. For investigating the reliability of BSH structure, three kinds of fillet structures were designed in the contact corner between hotplate and frame. A 3-dimensional finite element method (3D-FEM is used to investigate the electro-thermal, thermal-mechanical, and thermal-optical properties of BSH IR emitter using software COMSOLTM (COMSOL 4.3b, COMSOL Inc., Stockholm, Sweden. The simulation results show that the BSH with oval fillet has the lowest stress distribution and smoothest flows of stress streamlines, while the BSH with square fillet has the highest temperature and stress distribution. The thermal-optical and thermal-response simulations further indicate that the BSH with oval fillet is the optimal design for a reliable IR thermal emitter in spite of having slight inadequacies in emission intensity and modulation bandwidth in comparison with other two structures.

  11. M.H.D. Diagnostics - Gas Temperature and Emittance

    Science.gov (United States)

    1960-04-06

    Flames and Explosions of Gases - Lewis & Van Elbe - Academic Press Inc., New York 4. Experimental Temperature Measurement in Flames & Hot Gases - Volume...Goldberg K. Rice J. N. Groves R. A. Weise H. R. Koenig E. A. Luebke C. H. T. Pan MSVD R. H. Norris H. Robinson W. F. Ashley F. W. Staub M. J. Brunner G

  12. Emittance growths in resonance crossing at FFAGs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, K.Y.; /Fermilab; Pang, X.; Wang, F.; Wang, X.; Lee, S.Y.; /Indiana U.

    2007-10-01

    Scaling laws of the emittance growth for a beam crossing the 6th-order systematic space-charge resonances and the random-octupole driven 4th-order resonance are obtained by numerical multi-particle simulations. These laws can be important in setting the minimum acceleration rate and maximum tolerable resonance strength for the design of non-scaling fixed-field alternating gradient accelerators.

  13. Large-area lanthanum hexaboride electron emitter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goebel, D. M.; Hirooka, Y.; Sketchley, T. A.

    1985-09-01

    The characteristics of lanthanum-boron thermionic electron emitters are discussed, and a large-area, continuously operating cathode assembly and heater are described. Impurity production and structural problems involving the support of the LaB6 have been eliminated in the presented configuration. The performance of the cathode in a plasma discharge, where surface modification occurs by ion sputtering, is presented. Problem areas which affect lifetime and emission current capability are discussed.

  14. Studying Reionization with Ly-alpha Emitters

    CERN Document Server

    McQuinn, Matthew; Zaldarriaga, Matias; Dutta, Suvendra

    2007-01-01

    We show that observations of high-redshift Ly-alpha emitters (LAEs) have the potential to provide definitive evidence for reionization in the near future. Using 200 Mpc radiative transfer simulations, we calculate the effect that patchy reionization has on the line profile, on the luminosity function, and, most interestingly, on the clustering of emitters for several realistic models of reionization. Reionization increases the measured clustering of emitters, and we show that this enhancement would be essentially impossible to attribute to anything other than reionization. Our results motivate looking for the signature of reionization in existing LAE data. We find that for stellar reionization scenarios the angular correlation function of the 58 LAEs in the Subaru Deep Field z = 6.6 photometric sample is more consistent with a fully ionized universe (mean volume ionized fraction x_i = 1) than a universe with x_i 2-sigma confidence level. Measurements in the next year on Subaru will increase their z = 6.6 LAE ...

  15. Deep time evidence for climate sensitivity increase with warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, Gary; Huber, Matthew; Rondanelli, Roberto; Pepke Pedersen, Jens Olaf

    2016-06-01

    Future global warming from anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions will depend on climate feedbacks, the effect of which is expressed by climate sensitivity, the warming for a doubling of atmospheric CO2 content. It is not clear how feedbacks, sensitivity, and temperature will evolve in our warming world, but past warming events may provide insight. Here we employ paleoreconstructions and new climate-carbon model simulations in a novel framework to explore a wide scenario range for the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) carbon release and global warming event 55.8 Ma ago, a possible future warming analogue. We obtain constrained estimates of CO2 and climate sensitivity before and during the PETM and of the PETM carbon input amount and nature. Sensitivity increased from 3.3-5.6 to 3.7-6.5 K (Kelvin) into the PETM. When taken together with Last Glacial Maximum and modern estimates, this result indicates climate sensitivity increase with global warming.

  16. Emissivity Tuned Emitter for RTPV Power Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carl M. Stoots; Robert C. O' Brien; Troy M. Howe

    2012-03-01

    Every mission launched by NASA to the outer planets has produced unexpected results. The Voyager I and II, Galileo, and Cassini missions produced images and collected scientific data that totally revolutionized our understanding of the solar system and the formation of the planetary systems. These missions were enabled by the use of nuclear power. Because of the distances from the Sun, electrical power was produced using the radioactive decay of a plutonium isotope. Radioisotopic Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) used in the past and currently used Multi-Mission RTGs (MMRTGs) provide power for space missions. Unfortunately, RTGs rely on thermocouples to convert heat to electricity and are inherently inefficient ({approx} 3-7% thermal to electric efficiency). A Radioisotope Thermal Photovoltaic (RTPV) power source has the potential to reduce the specific mass of the onboard power supply by increasing the efficiency of thermal to electric conversion. In an RTPV, a radioisotope heats an emitter, which emits light to a photovoltaic (PV) cell, which converts the light into electricity. Developing an emitter tuned to the desired wavelength of the photovoltaic is a key part in increasing overall performance. Researchers at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) have built a Thermal Photovoltaic (TPV) system, that utilizes a simulated General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) from a MMRTG to heat a tantalum emitter. The GPHS is a block of graphite roughly 10 cm by 10 cm by 5 cm. A fully loaded GPHS produces 250 w of thermal power and weighs 1.6 kgs. The GRC system relies on the GPHS unit radiating at 1200 K to a tantalum emitter that, in turn, radiates light to a GaInAs photo-voltaic cell. The GRC claims system efficiency of conversion of 15%. The specific mass is around 167 kg/kWe. A RTPV power source that utilized a ceramic or ceramic-metal (cermet) matrix would allow for the combination of the heat source, canister, and emitter into one compact unit, and allow variation in size

  17. Artificial warming of arctic meadow under pollution stress: Experimental design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boreal and arctic terrestrial ecosystems are central to the climate change debate, notably because future warming is expected to be disproportionate as compared to world averages. Likewise, greenhouse gas (GHG) release from terrestrial ecosystems exposed to climate warming is expected to be the larg...

  18. Deep time evidence for climate sensitivity increase with warming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shaffer, Gary; Huber, Matthew; Rondanelli, Roberto;

    2016-01-01

    Future global warming from anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions will depend on climate feedbacks, the effect of which is expressed by climate sensitivity, the warming for a doubling of atmospheric CO2 content. It is not clear how feedbacks, sensitivity, and temperature will evolve in our warmin...

  19. Wavelength locking of single emitters and multi-emitter modules: simulation and experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanson, Dan; Rappaport, Noam; Peleg, Ophir; Berk, Yuri; Dahan, Nir; Klumel, Genady; Baskin, Ilya; Levy, Moshe

    2016-03-01

    Wavelength-stabilized high-brightness single emitters are commonly used in fiber-coupled laser diode modules for pumping Yb-doped lasers at 976 nm, and Nd-doped ones at 808 nm. We investigate the spectral behavior of single emitters under wavelength-selective feedback from a volume Bragg (or hologram) grating (VBG) in a multi-emitter module. By integrating a full VBG model as a multi-layer thin film structure with commercial raytracing software, we simulated wavelength locking conditions as a function of beam divergence and angular alignment tolerances. Good correlation between the simulated VBG feedback strength and experimentally measured locking ranges, in both VBG misalignment angle and laser temperature, is demonstrated. The challenges of assembling multi-emitter modules based on beam-stacked optical architectures are specifically addressed, where the wavelength locking conditions must be achieved simultaneously with high fiber coupling efficiency for each emitter in the module. It is shown that angular misorientation between fast and slow-axis collimating optics can have a dramatic effect on the spectral and power performance of the module. We report the development of our NEON-S wavelength-stabilized fiber laser pump module, which uses a VBG to provide wavelength-selective optical feedback in the collimated portion of the beam. Powered by our purpose-developed high-brightness single emitters, the module delivers 47 W output at 11 A from an 0.15 NA fiber and a 0.3 nm linewidth at 976 nm. Preliminary wavelength-locking results at 808 nm are also presented.

  20. On Global Warming

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Brad Franklin

    2010-01-01

    @@ There is a huge argument going on in the world these days and it is centered on the notion that our planet is warming up. It's celled global warming and it postulates1 that our use of fossil fuels such as coal and oil and our destruction of large areas of forest across the world have combined to create so-celled greenhouse gases.

  1. Keeping Warm Without Coal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Heat-pump technology offers a clean heating alternative to coal With no air conditioning or indoor heating, families in southeast Beijing’s Fangzhuang neighbor-hood still enjoy refreshing warm air all year round. The secret is in the pump technology. Heat pumps cool the homes in summer and warm them in winter just like a central air-conditioning system.

  2. Delay modeling of bipolar ECL/EFL (Emitter-Coupled Logic/Emitter-Follower-Logic) circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Andrew T.

    1986-08-01

    This report deals with the development of a delay-time model for timing simulation of large circuits consisting of Bipolar ECL(Emitter-Coupled Logic) and EFL (Emitter-Follower-Logic) networks. This model can provide adequate information on the performance of the circuits with a minimum expenditure of computation time. This goal is achieved by the use of proper circuit transient models on which analytical delay expressions can be derived with accurate results. The delay-model developed in this report is general enough to handle complex digital circuits with multiple inputs or/and multiple levels. The important effects of input slew rate are also included in the model.

  3. Radar Emitter Signal Recognition Based on Complexity Features

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张葛祥; 金炜东; 胡来招

    2004-01-01

    Intra-pulse characteristics of different radar emitter signals reflect on signal waveform by way of changing frequency, phase and amplitude. A novel approach was proposed to extract complexity features of radar emitter signals in a wide range of signal-to-noise ratio ( SNR), and radial basis probability neural network (RBPNN) was used to recognize different radar emitter signals. Complexity features, including Lempel-Ziv complexity (LZC) and correlation dimension (CD), can measure the complexity and irregularity of signals, which mirrors the intra-pulse modulation laws of radar emitter signals. In an experiment, LZC and CD features of 10 typical radar emitter signals were extracted and RBPNN was applied to identify the 10 radar emitter signals. Simulation results show that the proposed approach is effective and has good application values because average accurate recognition rate is high when SNR varies in a wide range.

  4. Correlated spontaneous emission of fluorescent emitters mediated by single plasmons

    CERN Document Server

    Bouchet, Dorian; Ithurria, Sandrine; Gulinatti, Angelo; Rech, Ivan; Carminati, Rémi; De Wilde, Yannick; Krachmalnicoff, Valentina

    2016-01-01

    Manipulating the spontaneous emission of a fluorescent emitter can be achieved by placing the emitter in a nanostructured environment. A privileged spot is occupied by plasmonic structures that provide a strong confinement of the electromagnetic field, which results in an enhancement of the emitter-environment interaction. While plasmonic nanostructures have been widely exploited to control the emission properties of single photon emitters, performing the coupling between quantum emitters with plasmons poses a huge challenge. In this Letter we report on a first crucial step towards this goal by the observation of correlated emission between a single CdSe/CdS/ZnS quantum dot exhibiting single photon statistics and a fluorescent nanobead located micrometers apart. This is accomplished by coupling both emitters to a silver nanowire. Single-plasmons are created on the latter from the quantum dot, and transfer energy to excite in turn the fluorescent nanobead.

  5. Coated nano-particle jamming of quantum emitters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arslanagic, Samel; Ziolkowski, Richard W.

    2012-01-01

    Spherical active coated nano-particles are examined analytically and numerically in the presence of one, two or four quantum emitters (electric Hertzian dipoles). The ability of the coated nano-particle to effectively cloak the emitters to a far-field observer is reported. This offers an interest...... an interesting route towards the jamming of quantum emitters/nano-antennas, for instance, in biological fluorescence assays....

  6. Thermal emittance measurements of a cesium potassium antimonide photocathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazarov, Ivan; Cultrera, Luca; Bartnik, Adam; Dunham, Bruce; Karkare, Siddharth; Li, Yulin; Liu, Xianghong; Maxson, Jared; Roussel, William

    2011-05-01

    Thermal emittance measurements of a CsK2Sb photocathode at several laser wavelengths are presented. The emittance is obtained with a solenoid scan technique using a high voltage dc photoemission gun. The thermal emittance is 0.56±0.03 mm mrad/mm(rms) at 532 nm wavelength. The results are compared with a simple photoemission model and found to be in a good agreement.

  7. Thermal emittance measurements of a cesium potassium antimonide photocathode

    CERN Document Server

    Bazarov, Ivan; Bartnik, Adam; Dunham, Bruce; Karkare, Siddharth; Li, Yulin; Liu, Xianghong; Maxson, Jared; Roussel, William

    2011-01-01

    Thermal emittance measurements of a CsK2Sb photocathode at several laser wavelengths are presented. The emittance is obtained with a solenoid scan technique using a high voltage dc photoemission gun. The thermal emittance is 0.56+/-0.03 mm-mrad/mm(rms) at 532 nm wavelength. The results are compared with a simple photoemission model and found to be in a good agreement.

  8. Intelligent Variable Emittance Panels Using New, ""True"" Solid Electrolyte Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This work further developed a highly promising Variable Emittance technology for spacecraft thermal control based on Conducting Polymer (CP) electrochromics...

  9. Efficient low-temperature thermophotovoltaic emitters from metallic photonic crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagpal, Prashant; Han, Sang Eon; Stein, Andreas; Norris, David J

    2008-10-01

    We examine the use of metallic photonic crystals as thermophotovoltaic emitters. We coat silica woodpile structures, created using direct laser writing, with tungsten or molybdenum. Optical reflectivity and thermal emission measurements near 650 degrees C demonstrate that the resulting structures should provide efficient emitters at relatively low temperatures. When matched to InGaAsSb photocells, our structures should generate over ten times more power than solid emitters while having an optical-to-electrical conversion efficiency above 32%. At such low temperatures, these emitters have promise not only in solar energy but also in harnessing geothermal and industrial waste heat.

  10. Minimum emittance in storage rings with uniform or nonuniform dipoles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-xi Wang

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available A simple treatment of minimum emittance theory in storage rings is presented, favoring vector and matrix forms for a more concise picture. Both conventional uniform dipoles and nonuniform dipoles with bending radius variation are treated. Simple formulas are given for computing the minimum emittance, optimal lattice parameters, as well as effects of nonoptimal parameters. For nonuniform dipoles, analytical results are obtained for a three-piece sandwich dipole model. Minimization of the effective emittance for light sources is given in detail. Usefulness of gradient and/or nonuniform dipoles for reducing the effective emittance is addressed.

  11. Fabrication of an infrared emitter using a generic integration platform based on wire bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröder, S.; Rödjegård, H.; Fischer, A. C.; Stemme, G.; Niklaus, F.

    2016-11-01

    This paper reports a novel approach for the fabrication of infrared (IR) emitters for non-dispersive IR gas sensing. The proposed concept enables the integration of superior resistive heater materials with microelectromechanical system structures. In this study, non-bondable filaments made of nickel chromium are attached to mechanical attachment structures using a fully automated state-of-the-art wire bonder. Formation of electrical contact between the integrated filaments and the electrical contact pattern on the substrate is performed using conventional gold stud bumping technology. The placement accuracy of the integrated filaments is evaluated using white-light interferometry, while the contact formation using stud bumping to embed the filaments is investigated using focused ion beam milled cross-sections. A proof-of-concept IR emitter has been successfully operated and heated up to {{960}\\circ}\\text{C} in continuous mode for 3 h.

  12. Accuracy of the Transverse Emittance Measurements of the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Roncarolo, Federico; Dehning, Bernd Dehning

    High energy accelerators and storage rings are designed to collide charged particle beams and study their collision products. The production rate of the collision products has to be maximized in order to reduce the statistical uncertainty of the produced events. Monitoring the transverse distribution of the accelerated species allows to measure and optimize the beam transverse emittance, which directly affects the secondary particles production rate. The beam transverse emittance is measured by a class of diagnostics, the transverse profile monitors, designed to observe the particles transverse distributions. This thesis work aims at determining the accuracy of two classes of profile monitors presently installed in the CERN accelerators and foreseen for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC): wire scanners and residual gas monitors. The explanation of the linear dynamics that characterize the particles transverse motion in an accelerator is followed by the description of the principles of operation of the studied mo...

  13. Warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Rakhi

    2015-06-01

    Warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is defined as the destruction of circulating red blood cells (RBCs) in the setting of anti-RBC autoantibodies that optimally react at 37°C. The pathophysiology of disease involves phagocytosis of autoantibody-coated RBCs in the spleen and complement-mediated hemolysis. Thus far, treatment is aimed at decreasing autoantibody production with immunosuppression or reducing phagocytosis of affected cells in the spleen. The role of complement inhibitors in warm AIHA has not been explored. This article addresses the diagnosis, etiology, and treatment of warm AIHA and highlights the role of complement in disease pathology.

  14. Southern Ocean warming delayed by circumpolar upwelling and equatorward transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, Kyle C.; Marshall, John; Scott, Jeffery R.; Donohoe, Aaron; Newsom, Emily R.

    2016-07-01

    The Southern Ocean has shown little warming over recent decades, in stark contrast to the rapid warming observed in the Arctic. Along the northern flank of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current, however, the upper ocean has warmed substantially. Here we present analyses of oceanographic observations and general circulation model simulations showing that these patterns--of delayed warming south of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current and enhanced warming to the north--are fundamentally shaped by the Southern Ocean's meridional overturning circulation: wind-driven upwelling of unmodified water from depth damps warming around Antarctica; greenhouse gas-induced surface heat uptake is largely balanced by anomalous northward heat transport associated with the equatorward flow of surface waters; and heat is preferentially stored where surface waters are subducted to the north. Further, these processes are primarily due to passive advection of the anomalous warming signal by climatological ocean currents; changes in ocean circulation are secondary. These findings suggest the Southern Ocean responds to greenhouse gas forcing on the centennial, or longer, timescale over which the deep ocean waters that are upwelled to the surface are warmed themselves. It is against this background of gradual warming that multidecadal Southern Ocean temperature trends must be understood.

  15. Muon Emittance Exchange with a Potato Slicer

    CERN Document Server

    Summers, D J; Acosta, J G; Cremaldi, L M; Oliveros, S J; Perera, L P; Neuffer, D V

    2015-01-01

    We propose a novel scheme for final muon ionization cooling with quadrupole doublets followed by emittance exchange in vacuum to achieve the small beam sizes needed by a muon collider. A flat muon beam with a series of quadrupole doublet half cells appears to provide the strong focusing required for final cooling. Each quadrupole doublet has a low beta region occupied by a dense, low Z absorber. After final cooling, normalized transverse, longitudinal, and angular momentum emittances of 0.100, 2.5, and 0.200 mm-rad are exchanged into 0.025, 70, and 0.0 mm-rad. A skew quadrupole triplet transforms a round muon bunch with modest angular momentum into a flat bunch with no angular momentum. Thin electrostatic septa efficiently slice the flat bunch into 17 parts. The 17 bunches are interleaved into a 3.7 meter long train with RF deflector cavities. Snap bunch coalescence combines the muon bunch train longitudinally in a 21 GeV ring in 55 microseconds, one quarter of a synchrotron oscillation period. A linear long ...

  16. Muon Emittance Exchange with a Potato Slicer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Summers, D. J. [Univ. of Mississippi, Oxford, MS (United States); Hart, T. L. [Univ. of Mississippi, Oxford, MS (United States); Acosta, J. G. [Univ. of Mississippi, Oxford, MS (United States); Cremaldi, L. M. [Univ. of Mississippi, Oxford, MS (United States); Oliveros, S. J. [Univ. of Mississippi, Oxford, MS (United States); Perera, L. P. [Univ. of Mississippi, Oxford, MS (United States); Neuffer, D. V. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2015-04-15

    We propose a novel scheme for final muon ionization cooling with quadrupole doublets followed by emittance exchange in vacuum to achieve the small beam sizes needed by a muon collider. A flat muon beam with a series of quadrupole doublet half cells appears to provide the strong focusing required for final cooling. Each quadrupole doublet has a low beta region occupied by a dense, low Z absorber. After final cooling, normalized transverse, longitudinal, and angular momentum emittances of 0.100, 2.5, and 0.200 mm-rad are exchanged into 0.025, 70, and 0.0 mm-rad. A skew quadrupole triplet transforms a round muon bunch with modest angular momentum into a flat bunch with no angular momentum. Thin electrostatic septa efficiently slice the flat bunch into 17 parts. The 17 bunches are interleaved into a 3.7 meter long train with RF deflector cavities. Snap bunch coalescence combines the muon bunch train longitudinally in a 21 GeV ring in 55 µs, one quarter of a synchrotron oscillation period. A linear long wavelength RF bucket gives each bunch a different energy causing the bunches to drift in the ring until they merge into one bunch and can be captured in a short wavelength RF bucket with a 13% muon decay loss and a packing fraction as high as 87 %.

  17. Therapeutic use of alpha-emitters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lassmann, M. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin der Univ. Wuerzburg (Germany)

    2005-07-01

    In recent years there is a growing interest in the therapeutic use of {alpha}-emitters for patient treatment, {alpha}-particles have much higher energy and their range is only a few cell diameters. Their high LET and the limited ability of cells to repair DNA damage from {alpha}-radiation explain their high relative biological effectiveness and cytotoxicity. Potential {alpha}-emitting isotopes for therapeutic applications are {sup 224}Ra, {sup 223}Ra, {sup 213}Bi and {sup 211}At. The treatment with {alpha}-particles is focused upon targeted cancer therapy using radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies, on palliation of bone metastases or upon pain relief in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Examples for targeted cancer therapy are the treatment of melanoma with {sup 213}Bi and non-Hodgkin lymphoma with {sup 211}At. For metastatic bone pain palliation {sup 223}Ra was applied in a phase I clinical trial. For amelioration of pain in AS-patients {sup 224}Ra-chloride is used. This radiopharmaceutical is licensed for this particular application in Germany. Today there are some potential clinical applications for {alpha}-emitters although most of them are in the state of scientific, non-routine investigations. In-vivo dosimetry for risk assessment associated with this treatment is even more difficult to perform than for therapies using beta-emitting radiopharmaceuticals. (orig.)

  18. Barium depletion in hollow cathode emitters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polk, James E., E-mail: james.e.polk@jpl.nasa.gov; Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91109 (United States); Capece, Angela M. [Graduate Aerospace Laboratories, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States)

    2016-01-14

    Dispenser hollow cathodes rely on a consumable supply of Ba released by BaO-CaO-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} source material in the pores of a tungsten matrix to maintain a low work function surface. The examination of cathode emitters from long duration tests shows deposits of tungsten at the downstream end that appear to block the flow of Ba from the interior. In addition, a numerical model of Ba transport in the cathode plasma indicates that the Ba partial pressure in the insert may exceed the equilibrium vapor pressure of the dominant Ba-producing reaction, and it was postulated previously that this would suppress Ba loss in the upstream part of the emitter. New measurements of the Ba depletion depth from a cathode insert operated for 8200 h reveal that Ba loss is confined to a narrow region near the downstream end, confirming this hypothesis. The Ba transport model was modified to predict the depletion depth with time. A comparison of the calculated and measured depletion depths gives excellent qualitative agreement, and quantitative agreement was obtained assuming an insert temperature 70 °C lower than measured beginning-of-life values.

  19. Warm and Cool Dinosaurs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannlein, Sally

    2001-01-01

    Presents an art activity in which first grade students draw dinosaurs in order to learn about the concept of warm and cool colors. Explains how the activity also helped the students learn about the concept of distance when drawing. (CMK)

  20. A highly efficient directional molecular white-light emitter driven by a continuous-wave laser diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosemann, Nils W.; Eußner, Jens P.; Beyer, Andreas; Koch, Stephan W.; Volz, Kerstin; Dehnen, Stefanie; Chatterjee, Sangam

    2016-06-01

    Tailored light sources have greatly advanced technological and scientific progress by optimizing the emission spectrum or color and the emission characteristics. We demonstrate an efficient spectrally broadband and highly directional warm-white-light emitter based on a nonlinear process driven by a cheap, low-power continuous-wave infrared laser diode. The nonlinear medium is a specially designed amorphous material composed of symmetry-free, diamondoid-like cluster molecules that are readily obtained from ubiquitous resources. The visible part of the spectrum resembles the color of a tungsten-halogen lamp at 2900 kelvin while retaining the superior beam divergence of the driving laser. This approach of functionalizing energy-efficient state-of-the-art semiconductor lasers enables a technology complementary to light-emitting diodes for replacing incandescent white-light emitters in high-brilliance applications.

  1. The effects of household management practices on the global warming potential of urban lawns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Chuanhui; Crane, John; Hornberger, George; Carrico, Amanda

    2015-03-15

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions are an important component of the greenhouse gas (GHG) budget for urban turfgrasses. A biogeochemical model DNDC successfully captured the magnitudes and patterns of N2O emissions observed at an urban turfgrass system at the Richland Creek Watershed in Nashville, TN. The model was then used to study the long-term (i.e. 75 years) impacts of lawn management practice (LMP) on soil organic carbon sequestration rate (dSOC), soil N2O emissions, and net Global Warming Potentials (net GWPs). The model simulated N2O emissions and net GWP from the three management intensity levels over 75 years ranged from 0.75 to 3.57 kg N ha(-1)yr(-1) and 697 to 2443 kg CO2-eq ha(-1)yr(-1), respectively, which suggested that turfgrasses act as a net carbon emitter. Reduction of fertilization is most effective to mitigate the global warming potentials of turfgrasses. Compared to the baseline scenario, halving fertilization rate and clipping recycle as an alternative to synthetic fertilizer can reduce net GWPs by 17% and 12%, respectively. In addition, reducing irrigation and mowing are also effective in lowering net GWPs. The minimum-maintenance LMP without irrigation and fertilization can reduce annual N2O emissions and net GWPs by approximately 53% and 70%, respectively, with the price of gradual depletion of soil organic carbon, when compared to the intensive-maintenance LMP. A lawn age-dependent best management practice is recommended: a high dose fertilizer input at the initial stage of lawn establishment to enhance SOC sequestration, followed by decreasing fertilization rate when the lawn ages to minimize N2O emissions. A minimum-maintained LMP with clipping recycling, and minimum irrigation and mowing, is recommended to mitigate global warming effects from urban turfgrass systems. Among all practices, clipping recycle may be a relatively malleable behavior and, therefore, a good target for interventions seeking to reduce the environmental impacts of lawn

  2. Compact Rare Earth Emitter Hollow Cathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Ronald; Goebel, Dan; Hofer, Richard

    2010-01-01

    A compact, high-current, hollow cathode utilizing a lanthanum hexaboride (LaB6) thermionic electron emitter has been developed for use with high-power Hall thrusters and ion thrusters. LaB6 cathodes are being investigated due to their long life, high current capabilities, and less stringent xenon purity and handling requirements compared to conventional barium oxide (BaO) dispenser cathodes. The new cathode features a much smaller diameter than previously developed versions that permit it to be mounted on axis of a Hall thruster ( internally mounted ), as opposed to the conventional side-mount position external to the outer magnetic circuit ("externally mounted"). The cathode has also been reconfigured to be capable of surviving vibrational loads during launch and is designed to solve the significant heater and materials compatibility problems associated with the use of this emitter material. This has been accomplished in a compact design with the capability of high-emission current (10 to 60 A). The compact, high-current design has a keeper diameter that allows the cathode to be mounted on the centerline of a 6- kW Hall thruster, inside the iron core of the inner electromagnetic coil. Although designed for electric propulsion thrusters in spacecraft station- keeping, orbit transfer, and interplanetary applications, the LaB6 cathodes are applicable to the plasma processing industry in applications such as optical coatings and semiconductor processing where reactive gases are used. Where current electrical propulsion thrusters with BaO emitters have limited life and need extremely clean propellant feed systems at a significant cost, these LaB6 cathodes can run on the crudest-grade xenon propellant available without impact. Moreover, in a laboratory environment, LaB6 cathodes reduce testing costs because they do not require extended conditioning periods under hard vacuum. Alternative rare earth emitters, such as cerium hexaboride (CeB6) can be used in this

  3. Group-III Nitride Field Emitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bensaoula, Abdelhak; Berishev, Igor

    2008-01-01

    Field-emission devices (cold cathodes) having low electron affinities can be fabricated through lattice-mismatched epitaxial growth of nitrides of elements from group III of the periodic table. Field emission of electrons from solid surfaces is typically utilized in vacuum microelectronic devices, including some display devices. The present field-emission devices and the method of fabricating them were developed to satisfy needs to reduce the cost of fabricating field emitters, make them compatible with established techniques for deposition of and on silicon, and enable monolithic integration of field emitters with silicon-based driving circuitry. In fabricating a device of this type, one deposits a nitride of one or more group-III elements on a substrate of (111) silicon or other suitable material. One example of a suitable deposition process is chemical vapor deposition in a reactor that contains plasma generated by use of electron cyclotron resonance. Under properly chosen growth conditions, the large mismatch between the crystal lattices of the substrate and the nitride causes strains to accumulate in the growing nitride film, such that the associated stresses cause the film to crack. The cracks lie in planes parallel to the direction of growth, so that the growing nitride film becomes divided into microscopic growing single-crystal columns. The outer ends of the fully-grown columns can serve as field-emission tips. By virtue of their chemical compositions and crystalline structures, the columns have low work functions and high electrical conductivities, both of which are desirable for field emission of electrons. From examination of transmission electron micrographs of a prototype device, the average column width was determined to be about 100 nm and the sharpness of the tips was determined to be characterized by a dimension somewhat less than 100 nm. The areal density of the columns was found to about 5 x 10(exp 9)/sq cm . about 4 to 5 orders of magnitude

  4. Global warming yearbook: 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arris, L. [ed.

    1999-02-01

    The report brings together a year`s worth of global warming stories - over 280 in all - in one convenient volume. It provides a one-stop report on the scientific, political and industrial implications of global warming. The report includes: detailed coverage of negotiations on the Kyoto Protocol; scientific findings on carbon sources and sinks, coral bleaching, Antarctic ice shelves, plankton, wildlife and tree growth; new developments on fuel economy, wind power, fuel cells, cogeneration, energy labelling and emissions trading.

  5. Polar Warming Drivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDunn, T. L.; Bougher, S. W.; Mischna, M. A.; Murphy, J. R.

    2012-12-01

    Polar warming is a dynamically induced temperature enhancement over mid-to-high latitudes that results in a reversed (poleward) meridional temperature gradient. This phenomenon was recently characterized over the 40-90 km altitude region [1] based on nearly three martian years of Mars Climate Sounder observations [2, 3]. Here we investigate which forcing mechanisms affect the magnitude and distribution of the observed polar warming by conducting simulations with the Mars Weather Research and Forecasting General Circulation Model [4, 5]. We present simulations confirming the influence topography [6] and dust loading [e.g., 7] have upon polar warming. We then present simulations illustrating the modulating influence gravity wave momentum deposition exerts upon polar warming, consistent with previous modeling studies [e.g., 8]. The results of this investigation suggest the magnitude and distribution of polar warming in the martian middle atmosphere is modified by gravity wave activity and that the characteristics of the gravity waves that most significantly affect polar warming vary with season. References: [1] McDunn, et al., 2012 (JGR), [2]Kleinböhl, et al., 2009 (JGR), [3] Kleinböhl, et al., 2011 (JQSRT), [4] Richardson, et al., 2007 (JGR), [5] Mischna, et al., 2011 (Planet. Space Sci.), [6] Richardson and Wilson, 2002 (Nature), [7] Haberle, et al., 1982 (Icarus), [8] Barnes, 1990 (JGR).

  6. Spectral beam combining of multi-single emitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Baohua; Guo, Weirong; Guo, Zhijie; Xu, Dan; Zhu, Jing; Zhang, Qiang; Yang, Thomas; Chen, Xiaohua

    2016-03-01

    Spectral beam combination expands the output power while keeps the beam quality of the combined beam almost the same as that of a single emitter. Spectral beam combination has been successfully achieved for high power fiber lasers, diode laser arrays and diode laser stacks. We have recently achieved the spectral beam combination of multiple single emitter diode lasers. Spatial beam combination and beam transformation are employed before beams from 25 single emitter diode lasers can be spectrally combined. An average output power about 220W, a spectral bandwidth less than 9 nm (95% energy), a beam quality similar to that of a single emitter and electro-optical conversion efficiency over 46% are achieved. In this paper, Rigorous Coupled Wave analysis is used to numerically evaluate the influence of emitter width, emitter pitch and focal length of transform lens on diffraction efficiency of the grating and spectral bandwidth. To assess the chance of catastrophic optical mirror damage (COMD), the optical power in the internal cavity of a free running emitter and the optical power in the grating external cavity of a wavelength locked emitter are theoretically analyzed. Advantages and disadvantages of spectral beam combination are concluded.

  7. Emitter space charge layer transit time in bipolar junction transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rustagi, S. C.; Chattopadhyaya, S. K.

    1981-04-01

    The charge defined emitter space charge layer transit times of double diffused transistors have been calculated using a regional approach, and compared with the corresponding base transit times. The results obtained for emitter space-charge layer transit times have been discussed with reference to the capacitance analysis of Morgan and Smit (1960) for graded p-n junctions.

  8. TOMOGRAPHIC MEASUREMENT OF LONGITUDINAL EMITTANCE GROWTH DUE TO STRIPPING FOILS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MONTAG, C.; AHRENS, L.; THIEBERGER, P.

    2005-05-16

    During beam acceleration in the Brookhaven accelerator complex, heavy ions are stripped of their electrons in several steps. Depending on the properties of the stripping foils, this process results in an increased energy spread and longitudinal emittance growth. A tomographic phase space reconstruction technique has been applied to measure the associated emittance growth for different stripping foil materials.

  9. Bunch transverse emittance increase in electron storage rings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Jie

    2009-01-01

    In this paper a theoretical framework to estimate the bunch transverse emittance growing in electron storage rings due to short range transverse wakefield of the machine is established. New equilibrium emittance equations are derived and applied to explain the experimentally obtained results in ATF damping ring. This equation will be useful for linear collider damping ring design.

  10. Electronic Warfare:Issues and Challenges for Emitter Classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manish Gupta

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Electronic warfare (EW is an important capability that provides advantage to defence forces over their adversaries. Defence forces gather tactical intelligence through EW sensors, which provide the means to counter hostile actions of enemy forces. Functions of an EW system is threat detection and the area surveillance so as to determine the identity of surrounding emitters. Emitter classification system identifies possible threats by analysing intercepted signals. Problem of identifying emitters based on its intercepted signal characteristics is a challenging problem in electronic warfare studies. Major issues and challenges for emitter classification such as drifting of emitter parameters due to aging, operational characteristic of an emitter, i.e., same emitter can operate on multiple bands and multiple pulse repetition frequencies (PRFs are highlighted. A novel approach based on some well-known statistical methods, e.g., regression analysis, hypothesis testing, and discriminent analysis is proposed. The effectiveness of the proposed approach has been tested over ELINT (Electronic Intelligence data and illustrated using simulation data. The proposed approach can play a solution for wide variety of problems in emitter classification in electronic warfare studies.Defence Science Journal, 2011, 61(3, pp.228-234, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.61.529

  11. Thermionic scanner pinpoints work function of emitter surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasor, N. S.

    1966-01-01

    In the electron tube testing, a thermionic scanner makes accurate spatial resolution measurements of the metallic surface work functions of emitters. The scanner determines the emitter function and its local departures from the mean value on a point-by-point basis for display on an oscilloscope.

  12. Studies of phosphorus Gaussian profile emitter silicon solar cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Stem

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Considering recent modifications on n-type highly doped silicon parameters, an emitter optimization was made based on one-dimensional models with analytical solutions. In order to get good accuracy, a fifth order approximation has been considered. Two kinds of emitters, homogeneous and non-homogeneous, with phosphorus Gaussian profile emitter solar cells were optimized. According to our results: homogeneous emitter solar cells show their maximum efficiencies (h @ 21.60-21.74%with doping levelsnus = 1x10(19 - 5x10(18 (cm-3 and (1.2-2.0 mum emitter thickness range. Non-homogeneous emitter solar cells provide a slightly higher efficiency (eta = 21.82-21.92%, with Ns = 1x10(20 (cm-3 with 2.0 mum thickness under metal-contacted surface and Ns = 1x10(19 - 5x10(18 (cm-3 with (1.2-2.0 mum thickness range, (sheet resistance range 90-100 W/ under passivated surface. Although non-homogeneous emitter solar cells have a higher efficiency than homogeneous emitter ones, the required technology is more complex and their overall interest for practical applications is questionable.

  13. Non-blinking single-photon emitters in silica

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rabouw, F.T.; Cogan, N.M.B.; Berends, Anne; van der Stam, Ward; Vanmaekelbergh, Daniel|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304829137; Koenderink, A.F.; Kraus, T.D.; de Mello-Donega, Celso|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/125593899

    2016-01-01

    Samples for single-emitter spectroscopy are usually prepared by spin-coating a dilute solution of emitters on a microscope cover slip of silicate based glass (such as quartz). Here, we show that both borosilicate glass and quartz contain intrinsic defect colour centres that fluoresce when excited at

  14. Timing the warm absorber in NGC 4051

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, C. V.; Uttley, P.; Costantini, E.

    2016-12-01

    We investigated, using spectral-timing analysis, the characterization of highly ionized outflows in Seyfert galaxies, the so-called warm absorbers. Here, we present our results of the extensive 600 ks of XMM-Newton archival observations of the bright and highly variable Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 4051 whose spectrum has revealed a complex multicomponent wind. Making use of both RGS and EPIC-pn data, we performed a detailed analysis through a time-dependent photoionization code in combination with spectral and Fourier spectral-timing techniques. The source light curves and the warm absorber parameters obtained from the data were used to simulate the response of the gas to variations in the ionizing flux of the central source. The resulting time variable spectra were employed to predict the effects of the warm absorber on the time lags and coherence of the energy dependent light curves. We have found that, in the absence of any other lag mechanisms, a warm absorber with the characteristics of the one observed in NGC 4051, is able to produce soft lags, up to 100 s, on timescales of hours. The time delay is associated with the response of the gas to changes in the ionizing source, either by photoionization or radiative recombination, which is dependent on its density. The range of radial distances that, under our assumptions, yield longer time delays are distances r 0.3-1.0 × 1016 cm, and hence gas densities n 0.4-3.0 × 107 cm-3. Since these ranges are comparable to the existing estimates of the location of the warm absorber in NGC 4051, we suggest that it is likely that the observed X-ray time lags may carry a signature of the warm absorber response time to changes in the ionizing continuum. Our results show that the warm absorber in NGC 4051 does not introduce lags on the short timescales associated with reverberation, but will likely modify the hard continuum lags seen on longer timescales, which in this source have been measured to be on the order of 50 s. Hence, these

  15. Power flow from a dipole emitter near an optical antenna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Kevin C Y; Jun, Young Chul; Seo, Min-Kyo; Brongersma, Mark L

    2011-09-26

    Current methods to calculate the emission enhancement of a quantum emitter coupled to an optical antenna of arbitrary geometry rely on analyzing the total Poynting vector power flow out of the emitter or the dyadic Green functions from full-field numerical simulations. Unfortunately, these methods do not provide information regarding the nature of the dominant energy decay pathways. We present a new approach that allows for a rigorous separation, quantification, and visualization of the emitter output power flow captured by an antenna and the subsequent reradiation power flow to the far field. Such analysis reveals unprecedented details of the emitter/antenna coupling mechanisms and thus opens up new design strategies for strongly interacting emitter/antenna systems used in sensing, active plasmonics and metamaterials, and quantum optics.

  16. Vacuum Rabi spectra of a single quantum emitter

    CERN Document Server

    Ota, Yasutomo; Kumagai, Naoto; Iwamoto, Satoshi; Arakawa, Yasuhiko

    2015-01-01

    We report the observation of the vacuum Rabi splitting of a single quantum emitter by measuring its direct spontaneous emission into free space. We used a semiconductor quantum dot inside a photonic crystal nanocavity, in conjunction with an appropriate cavity design and filtering with a polarizer and an aperture, enabling the extraction of the inherently-weak emitter's signal. The emitter's vacuum Rabi spectra exhibit clear differences to those measured by detecting the cavity photon leakage. Moreover, we observed an asymmetric vacuum Rabi spectrum induced by interference between the emitter and cavity detection channels. Our observations lay the groundwork for accessing various cavity quantum electrodynamics phenomena that manifest themselves only in the emitter's direct spontaneous emission.

  17. Superradiance of a subwavelength array of independent classical nonlinear emitters

    CERN Document Server

    Nefedkin, N E; Zyablovsky, A A; Pukhov, A A; Vinogradov, A P; Lisyansky, A A

    2015-01-01

    We suggest a mechanism for the emergence of a superradiance burst in a subwavelength array of nonlinear classical emitters. We assume that the emitters interact via their common field of radiative response and that they may have an arbitrary distribution of initially phases. We show that only if this distribution is not uniform, a non-zero field of radiative response arises leading to a superradiance burst. Although this field cannot synchronize the emitters, it forces fast oscillations of a classical nonlinear emitter to have long-period envelopes. Constructive interference in the envelopes creates a large dipole moment of the array which results in a superradiance pulse. The intensity of the superradiance is proportional to the squared number of the emitters, which envelopes participate in the fluctuation.

  18. Properties of nanolasers based on few discrete emitters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Anders Mølbjerg; Nielsen, Per Kær; Lorke, Michael

    2012-01-01

    to a high-Q optical cavity. This system has previously been studied for the one and two emitters case, see e.g. [1, 2]. The emitters and cavity are modelled as two-level systems and a harmonic oscillator, respectively. The coupled system is modelled using the Jaynes-Cummings Hamiltonian and the two......-level systems are pumped incoherently by a rate P. Solutions are found using the corresponding master equation. However, with cavity populations exceeding 100 and several emitters, the dimension of the Hilbert space of the system becomes too large to handle efficiently on a conventional computer. E.g. for four...... emitters and 100 photon states the density matrix has more than 2.5 × 106 elements. We have been able to simplify the problem significantly by adiabatically eliminating the photon-assisted polarizations and the correlations between emitters and cavity [3]. This results in a set of rate equations...

  19. Evaluations of carbon nanotube field emitters for electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakahara, Hitoshi; Kusano, Yoshikazu; Kono, Takumi; Saito, Yahachi

    2009-11-01

    Brightness of carbon nanotube (CNT) emitters was already reported elsewhere. However, brightness of electron emitter is affected by a virtual source size of the emitter, which strongly depends on electron optical configuration around the emitter. In this work, I- V characteristics and brightness of a CNT emitter are measured under a practical field emission electron gun (e-gun) configuration to investigate availability of CNT for electron microscopy. As a result, it is obtained that an emission area of MWNT is smaller than its tip surface area, and the emission area corresponds to a five-membered-ring with 2nd nearest six-membered-rings on the MWNT cap surface. Reduced brightness of MWNT is measured as at least 2.6×109 A/m 2 sr V. It is concluded that even a thick MWNT has enough brightness under a practical e-gun electrode configuration and suitable for electron microscopy.

  20. Evaluations of carbon nanotube field emitters for electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakahara, Hitoshi, E-mail: nakahara@nagoya-u.jp [Department of Quantum Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Kusano, Yoshikazu; Kono, Takumi; Saito, Yahachi [Department of Quantum Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan)

    2009-11-30

    Brightness of carbon nanotube (CNT) emitters was already reported elsewhere. However, brightness of electron emitter is affected by a virtual source size of the emitter, which strongly depends on electron optical configuration around the emitter. In this work, I-V characteristics and brightness of a CNT emitter are measured under a practical field emission electron gun (e-gun) configuration to investigate availability of CNT for electron microscopy. As a result, it is obtained that an emission area of MWNT is smaller than its tip surface area, and the emission area corresponds to a five-membered-ring with 2nd nearest six-membered-rings on the MWNT cap surface. Reduced brightness of MWNT is measured as at least 2.6x10{sup 9} A/m{sup 2} sr V. It is concluded that even a thick MWNT has enough brightness under a practical e-gun electrode configuration and suitable for electron microscopy.

  1. Theory and measurements of emittance preservation in plasma wakefield acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frederico, Joel

    2016-12-01

    In this dissertation, we examine the preservation and measurement of emittance in the plasma wakefield acceleration blowout regime. Plasma wakefield acceleration (PWFA) is a revolutionary approach to accelerating charged particles that has been demonstrated to have the potential for gradients orders of magnitude greater than traditional approaches. The application of PWFA to the design of a linear collider will make new high energy physics research possible, but the design parameters must first be shown to be competitive with traditional methods. Emittance preservation is necessary in the design of a linear collider in order to maximize luminosity. We examine the conditions necessary for circular symmetry in the PWFA blowout regime, and demonstrate that current proposals meet these bounds. We also present an application of beam lamentation which describes the process of beam parameter and emittance matching. We show that the emittance growth saturates as a consequence of energy spread in the beam. The initial beam parameters determine the amount of emittance growth, while the contribution of energy spread is negligible. We also present a model for ion motion in the presence of a beam that is much more dense than the plasma. By combining the model of ion motion and emittance growth, we find the emittance growth due to ion motion is minimal in the case of marginal ion motion. In addition, we present a simulation that validates the ion motion model, which is under further development to examine emittance growth of both marginal and pronounced ion motion. Finally, we present a proof-of-concept of an emittance measurement which may enable the analysis of emittance preservation in future PWFA experiments.

  2. Mesoscopic quantum emitters coupled to plasmonic nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mads Lykke

    This thesis reports research on quantum dots coupled to dielectric and plasmonic nano-structures by way of nano-structure fabrication, optical measurements, and theoretical modeling. To study light-matter interaction, plasmonic gap waveguides with nanometer dimensions as well as samples for studies...... of quantum dots in proximity to semiconductor/air and semiconductor/metal interfaces, were fabricated. We measured the decay dynamics of quantum dots near plasmonic gap waveguides and observed modied decay rates. The obtainable modications with the fabricated structures are calculated to be too small...... for the spontaneous emission of mesoscopic quantum emitters is developed. The light-matter interaction is in this model modied beyond the dipole expectancy and found to both suppress and enhance the coupling to plasmonic modes in excellent agreement with our measurements. We demonstrate that this mesoscopic effect...

  3. Global warming without global mean precipitation increase?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salzmann, Marc

    2016-06-01

    Global climate models simulate a robust increase of global mean precipitation of about 1.5 to 2% per kelvin surface warming in response to greenhouse gas (GHG) forcing. Here, it is shown that the sensitivity to aerosol cooling is robust as well, albeit roughly twice as large. This larger sensitivity is consistent with energy budget arguments. At the same time, it is still considerably lower than the 6.5 to 7% K(-1) decrease of the water vapor concentration with cooling from anthropogenic aerosol because the water vapor radiative feedback lowers the hydrological sensitivity to anthropogenic forcings. When GHG and aerosol forcings are combined, the climate models with a realistic 20th century warming indicate that the global mean precipitation increase due to GHG warming has, until recently, been completely masked by aerosol drying. This explains the apparent lack of sensitivity of the global mean precipitation to the net global warming recently found in observations. As the importance of GHG warming increases in the future, a clear signal will emerge.

  4. Physical electrostatics of small field emitter arrays/clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Richard G.

    2016-08-01

    This paper aims to improve qualitative understanding of electrostatic influences on apex field enhancement factors (AFEFs) for small field emitter arrays/clusters. Using the "floating sphere at emitter-plate potential" (FSEPP) model, it re-examines the electrostatics and mathematics of three simple systems of identical post-like emitters. For the isolated emitter, various approaches are noted. An adequate approximation is to consider only the effects of sphere charges and (for significantly separated emitters) image charges. For the 2-emitter system, formulas are found for charge-transfer ("charge-blunting") effects and neighbor-field effects, for widely spaced and for "sufficiently closely spaced" emitters. Mutual charge-blunting is always the dominant effect, with a related (negative) fractional AFEF-change δtwo. For sufficiently small emitter spacing c, |δtwo| varies approximately as 1/c; for large spacing, |δtwo| decreases as 1/c3. In a 3-emitter equispaced linear array, differential charge-blunting and differential neighbor-field effects occur, but differential charge-blunting effects are dominant, and cause the "exposed" outer emitters to have higher AFEF (γ0) than the central emitter (γ1). Formulas are found for the exposure ratio Ξ = γ0/γ1, for large and for sufficiently small separations. The FSEPP model for an isolated emitter has accuracy around 30%. Line-charge models (LCMs) are an alternative, but an apparent difficulty with recent LCM implementations is identified. Better descriptions of array electrostatics may involve developing good fitting equations for AFEFs derived from accurate numerical solution of Laplace's equation, perhaps with equation form(s) guided qualitatively by FSEPP-model results. In existing fitting formulas, the AFEF-reduction decreases exponentially as c increases, which is different from the FSEPP-model formulas. This discrepancy needs to be investigated, using systematic Laplace-based simulations and appropriate results

  5. Courant-Snyder invariant density screening method for emittance analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Ji-Lei; TANG Jing-Yu; JING Han-Tao

    2011-01-01

    Emittance is an important characteristic of describing charged particle beams.In hadron accelerators,we often meet irregular beam distributions that are not appropriately described by a single rms emittance or 95% emittance or total emittance.In this paper,it is pointed out that in many cases a beam halo should be described with very different Courant-Snyder parameters from the ones used for the beam core.A new method - the Courant-Snyder invariant density screening method - is introduced for analyzing emittance data clearly and accurately.The method treats the emittance data from both measurements and numerical simulations.The method uses the statistical distribution of the beam around each particle in phase space to mark its local density parameter,and then uses the density distribution to calculate the beam parameters such as the Courant-Snyder parameters and emittance for different beam boundary definitions.The method has been used in the calculations for.beams from different sources,and shows its advantages over other methods.An application code based on the method including the graphic interface has also been designed.

  6. Low-emittance tuning at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring

    CERN Document Server

    Shanks, James; Sagan, David

    2013-01-01

    In 2008 the Cornell Electron/Positron Storage Ring (CESR) was reconfigured from an electron/positron collider to serve as a testbed for the International Linear Collider (ILC) damping rings. One of the primary goals of the CESR Test Accelerator (CesrTA) project is to develop low emittance tuning techniques to achieve sub-10pm geometric vertical emittance at 2.085 GeV. This paper discusses the tuning methods used at CesrTA to achieve low-emittance conditions. A minimum vertical emittance of 8.7 +2.9/-3.4(sys) +/-0.2(stat) pm has been achieved at 2.085 GeV. In various configurations and beam energies the correction technique routinely achieves vertical emittance <15 pm after correction. Beam-based measurement and correction requires about 15 minutes. Simulations modeling the effects of magnet misalignments, BPM errors, and emittance correction algorithm suggest the residual vertical emittance measured at the conclusion of the tuning procedure is dominated by sources other than optics errors and misalignments...

  7. System for transporting an electron beam to the atmosphere for a gun with a plasma emitter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornilov, S. Yu.; Rempe, N. G.; Shidlovskiy, S. V.

    2016-06-01

    We report on the results of simulation of the gas flow in a gun with a plasma emitter and in the system for extracting the electron beam to the atmosphere, constructed on the basis of standard gasdynamic windows (GDWs). The design of the gun and GDWs is described. Calculations are performed for a pressure of about 10-3 Torr in the electron beam generation range. It is shown that the pressure drop to the atmospheric pressure in the system of electron beam extraction to the atmosphere can be ensured by two GDW stages evacuated by pumps with optimal performance.

  8. Mechanisms for stronger warming over drier ecoregions observed since 1979

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Liming; Chen, Haishan; Hua, Wenjian; Dai, Yongjiu; Wei, Nan

    2016-11-01

    Previous research found that the warming rate observed for the period 1979-2012 increases dramatically with decreasing vegetation greenness over land between 50°S and 50°N, with the strongest warming rate seen over the driest regions such as the Sahara desert and the Arabian Peninsula, suggesting warming amplification over deserts. To further this finding, this paper explores possible mechanisms for this amplification by analyzing observations, reanalysis data and historical simulations of global coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation models. We examine various variables, related to surface radiative forcing, land surface properties, and surface energy and radiation budget, that control the warming patterns in terms of large-scale ecoregions. Our results indicate that desert amplification is likely attributable primarily to enhanced longwave radiative forcing associated with a stronger water vapor feedback over drier ecoregions in response to the positive global-scale greenhouse gas forcing. This warming amplification and associated downward longwave radiation at the surface are reproduced by historical simulations with anthropogenic and natural forcings, but are absent if only natural forcings are considered, pointing to new potential fingerprints of anthropogenic warming. These results suggest a fundamental pattern of global warming over land that depend on the dryness of ecosystems in mid- and low- latitudes, likely reflecting primarily the first order large-scale thermodynamic component of global warming linked to changes in the water and energy cycles over different ecosystems. This finding may have important implications in interpreting global warming patterns and assessing climate change impacts.

  9. Dangerous effects of methane gas in atmosphere

    OpenAIRE

    Mohajan, Haradhan

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses the effects of methane gas which causes sever global warming in the atmosphere. Global warming becomes main issue in economics in the 21st century. Because global climate change becomes more dangerous and every nation realized that this is due to greenhouse gas emissions. Methane is dangerous greenhouse gas, since it is 21 times more global warming potential than carbon dioxide. All the nations talk about the reduction of only carbon dioxide and no nation stress on methan...

  10. Emittance Adapter for a Diffraction Limited Synchrotron Radiation Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chao, Alexander Wu; /SLAC; Raimondi, Pantaleo; /Frascati

    2012-03-01

    We investigate the possibility of reaching very small horizontal and vertical emittances inside an undulator in a storage ring, by means of a local exchange of the apparent horizontal and vertical emittances, performed with a combination of skew quadrupoles and one solenoid in a dedicated insertion line in the storage ring. The insertion leaves the ring parameters and its optical properties unaffected. This scheme could greatly relax the emittance requirements for a diffraction limited synchrotron light source. The lattice derivation and design is described.

  11. Design of a minimum emittance nBA lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S. Y.

    1998-04-01

    An attempt to design a minimum emittance n-bend achromat (nBA) lattice has been made. One distinct feature is that dipoles with two different lengths were used. As a multiple bend achromat, five bend achromat lattices with six superperiod were designed. The obtained emittace is three times larger than the theoretical minimum. Tunes were chosen to avoid third order resonances. In order to correct first and second order chromaticities, eight family sextupoles were placed. The obtained emittance of five bend achromat lattices is almost equal to the minimum emittance of five bend achromat lattice consisting of dipoles with equal length.

  12. Emittance Compensation in a Flat Beam RF Photoinjector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenzweig, J. B.; Anderson, S.; Colby, E.; Serafini, L.

    1997-05-01

    The beam dynamics of a flat beam rf photoinjector, which is intended to produce asymmetric emittances for linear collider applications, are analyzed, by both analytical and computational methods. The analytical model is a generalization of the recently developed theory of emittance compensation in round beams(L.Serafini, and J.B. Rosenzweig, submitted to Physical Review E.), in which a new mode of laminar flow beam dynamics, the invariant envelope, is found to give the ideal conditions for emittance minimization. Three-dimensional rf and beam dynamics simulations are used to iluminate the analytical results. abstract.

  13. New Low Emittance Lattice for the Super-B Accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biagini, M.E.; Boscolo, M.; Raimondi, P.; Tomassini, S.; Zobov, M.; /Frascati; Seeman, J.; Sullivan, M.; Wienands, U.; Wittmer, W.; /SLAC; Bettoni, S.; /CERN; Paoloni, E.; /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa; Bogomyagkov, A.; Koop, I.; Levichev, E.; Nikitin, S.; Piminov, P.; Shatilov, D.; /Novosibirsk, IYF

    2011-10-21

    New low emittance lattices have been designed for the asymmetric SuperB accelerator, aiming at a luminosity of 10{sup 36} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}. Main optics features are two alternating arc cells with different horizontal phase advance, decreasing beam emittance and allowing at the same time for easy chromaticity correction in the arcs. Emittance can be further reduced by a factor of two for luminosity upgrade. Spin rotation schemes for the e{sup -} beam have been studied to provide longitudinal polarization at the IP, and implementation into the lattice is in progress.

  14. Observation of picometer vertical emittance with a vertical undulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wootton, K P; Boland, M J; Dowd, R; Tan, Y-R E; Cowie, B C C; Papaphilippou, Y; Taylor, G N; Rassool, R P

    2012-11-09

    Using a vertical undulator, picometer vertical electron beam emittances have been observed at the Australian Synchrotron storage ring. An APPLE-II type undulator was phased to produce a horizontal magnetic field, which creates a synchrotron radiation field that is very sensitive to the vertical electron beam emittance. The measured ratios of undulator spectral peak heights are evaluated by fitting to simulations of the apparatus. With this apparatus immediately available at most existing electron and positron storage rings, we find this to be an appropriate and novel vertical emittance diagnostic.

  15. Direct Observation of Ultralow Vertical Emittance using a Vertical Undulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wootton, Kent

    2015-09-17

    In recent work, the first quantitative measurements of electron beam vertical emittance using a vertical undulator were presented, with particular emphasis given to ultralow vertical emittances [K. P. Wootton, et al., Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams, 17, 112802 (2014)]. Using this apparatus, a geometric vertical emittance of 0.9 ± 0.3 pm rad has been observed. A critical analysis is given of measurement approaches that were attempted, with particular emphasis on systematic and statistical uncertainties. The method used is explained, compared to other techniques and the applicability of these results to other scenarios discussed.

  16. Reality of Global Warming

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Global warming is today heard in the international arena as frequently and with the same brooding concern as terrorism, nuclear weapons and the Iraq war. Zou Ji, Vice Dean of the School of Environment, Renmin University of China in Beijing, has been a me

  17. Warm Absorber Diagnostics of AGN Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallman, Timothy

    Warm absorbers and related phenomena are observable manifestations of outflows or winds from active galactic nuclei (AGN) that have great potential value. Understanding AGN outflows is important for explaining the mass budgets of the central accreting black hole, and also for understanding feedback and the apparent co-evolution of black holes and their host galaxies. In the X-ray band warm absorbers are observed as photoelectric absorption and resonance line scattering features in the 0.5-10 keV energy band; the UV band also shows resonance line absorption. Warm absorbers are common in low luminosity AGN and they have been extensively studied observationally. They may play an important role in AGN feedback, regulating the net accretion onto the black hole and providing mechanical energy to the surroundings. However, fundamental properties of the warm absorbers are not known: What is the mechanism which drives the outflow?; what is the gas density in the flow and the geometrical distribution of the outflow?; what is the explanation for the apparent relation between warm absorbers and the surprising quasi-relativistic 'ultrafast outflows' (UFOs)? We propose a focused set of model calculations that are aimed at synthesizing observable properties of warm absorber flows and associated quantities. These will be used to explore various scenarios for warm absorber dynamics in order to answer the questions in the previous paragraph. The guiding principle will be to examine as wide a range as possible of warm absorber driving mechanisms, geometry and other properties, but with as careful consideration as possible to physical consistency. We will build on our previous work, which was a systematic campaign for testing important class of scenarios for driving the outflows. We have developed a set of tools that are unique and well suited for dynamical calculations including radiation in this context. We also have state-of-the-art tools for generating synthetic spectra, which are

  18. Improved Rare-Earth Emitter Hollow Cathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goebel, Dan M.

    2011-01-01

    An improvement has been made to the design of the hollow cathode geometry that was created for the rare-earth electron emitter described in Compact Rare Earth Emitter Hollow Cathode (NPO-44923), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 34, No. 3 (March 2010), p. 52. The original interior assembly was made entirely of graphite in order to be compatible with the LaB6 material, which cannot be touched by metals during operation due to boron diffusion causing embrittlement issues in high-temperature refractory materials. Also, the graphite tube was difficult to machine and was subject to vibration-induced fracturing. This innovation replaces the graphite tube with one made out of refractory metal that is relatively easy to manufacture. The cathode support tube is made of molybdenum or molybdenum-rhenium. This material is easily gun-bored to near the tolerances required, and finish machined with steps at each end that capture the orifice plate and the mounting flange. This provides the manufacturability and robustness needed for flight applications, and eliminates the need for expensive e-beam welding used in prior cathodes. The LaB6 insert is protected from direct contact with the refractory metal tube by thin, graphite sleeves in a cup-arrangement around the ends of the insert. The sleeves, insert, and orifice plate are held in place by a ceramic spacer and tungsten spring inserted inside the tube. To heat the cathode, an insulating tube is slipped around the refractory metal hollow tube, which can be made of high-temperature materials like boron nitride or aluminum nitride. A screw-shaped slot, or series of slots, is machined in the outside of the ceramic tube to constrain a refractory metal wire wound inside the slot that is used as the heater. The screw slot can hold a single heater wire that is then connected to the front of the cathode tube by tack-welding to complete the electrical circuit, or it can be a double slot that takes a bifilar wound heater with both leads coming out

  19. Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Global Warming Potential of Traditional and Diversified Tropical Rice Rotation Systems including Impacts of Upland Crop Management Practices i.e. Mulching and Inter-crop Cultivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janz, Baldur; Weller, Sebastian; Kraus, David; Wassmann, Reiner; Butterbach-Bahl, Klaus; Kiese, Ralf

    2016-04-01

    Paddy rice cultivation is increasingly challenged by irrigation water scarcity, while at the same time changes in demand (e.g. changes in diets or increasing demand for biofuels) will feed back on agricultural practices. These factors are changing traditional cropping patterns from flooded double-rice systems to the introduction of well-aerated upland crop systems in the dry season. Emissions of methane (CH4) are expected to decrease, while emissions of nitrous oxide (N2O) will increase and soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks will most likely be volatilized in the form of carbon dioxide (CO2). We measured greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions at the International Rice Research Institute (IRRI) in the Philippines to provide a comparative assessment of the global warming potentials (GWP) as well as yield scaled GWPs of different crop rotations and to evaluate mitigation potentials or risks of new management practices i.e. mulching and inter-crop cultivation. New management practices of mulching and intercrop cultivation will also have the potential to change SOC dynamics, thus can play the key role in contributing to the GWP of upland cropping systems. To present, more than three years of continuous measurement data of CH4 and N2O emissions in double-rice cropping (R-R) and paddy rice rotations diversified with either maize (R-M) or aerobic rice (R-A) in upland cultivation have been collected. Introduction of upland crops in the dry season reduced irrigation water use and CH4 emissions by 66-81% and 95-99%, respectively. Moreover, for practices including upland crops, CH4 emissions in the subsequent wet season with paddy rice were reduced by 54-60%. Although annual N2O emissions increased twice- to threefold in the diversified systems, the strong reduction of CH4 led to a significantly lower (psystem. Measurements of soil organic carbon contents before and three years after introduction of upland crop rotations indicated a SOC loss for the R-M system, while for the other

  20. Emittance measurement at the NSLS x-ray ring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Safranek, J.; Stefan, P.M.

    1996-12-31

    A pinhole camera for imaging x-ray synchrotron radiation from a dipole magnet is now in operation at the NSLS X-Ray Ring. The pinhole camera detector is a 0.5 mm thick YAG phosphor screen viewed by a video camera. Both the theoretical pinhole diffraction pattern and the measured modulation transfer function (MTF) of the phosphor and camera have been deconvolved from the measured profile in order to derive the true transverse profile of the electron beam. This profile was then fit to a 2-dimensional Gaussian. The electron beam emittance as a function of the phase space acceptance of the pinhole camera has been derived, so the horizontal and vertical electron emittances can be deduced from the major and minor sigmas of the fit Gaussian. In the X-Ray Ring, the vertical emittance is kept small to maximize the synchrotron radiation brightness. The ratio of the measured vertical to horizontal emittance is 0.001.

  1. CSR-induced emittance growth in achromats: Linear formalism revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venturini, M.

    2015-09-01

    We review the R-matrix formalism used to describe Coherent Synchrotron Radiation (CSR)-induced projected emittance growth in electron beam transport lines and establish the connection with a description in terms of the dispersion-invariant function.

  2. Design rules for core/shell nanowire resonant emitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Da-Som; Kim, Sun-Kyung

    2017-01-01

    We study design principles to boost the extraction of light from core/shell GaN nanowire optical emitters. A full-vectorial electromagnetic simulation reveals that the extraction efficiency of an emitter within a nanowire cavity depends strongly on its position; the efficiency becomes maximized as the emitter's location approaches the center of the structure. The total extraction of light is sinusoidally modulated by the nanowire diameter, which is directly correlated with optical resonances. The introduction of a conformal dielectric coating on a nanowire leads to a dramatic enhancement in the extraction efficiency, which results from an increase in side emission owing to an optical antenna effect. A simple high-refractive-index dielectric coating approximately doubles the total extraction efficiency of a nanowire LED. These numerical findings will be valuable in providing strategies for high-efficiency nanowire-based optical emitters.

  3. CSR-induced emittance growth in achromats: Linear formalism revisited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venturini, M.

    2015-09-11

    We review the R-matrix formalism used to describe Coherent Synchrotron Radiation (CSR)-induced projected emittance growth in electron beam transport lines and establish the connection with a description in terms of the dispersion-invariant function.

  4. Emittance Scanner Optimization for Low Energy Ion Beams

    CERN Document Server

    Stockli, Martin P

    2005-01-01

    Ion beam emittances are normally measured as two-dimensional distributions of the beam current fraction within a window dx centered at position coordinate x and a window dx' centered at trajectory angle x'. Unthresholded rms emittances evaluated from experimental data are very sensitive to noise, bias, and other undesired signals. Undesired signals occur when particles from outside the measured window dx*dx' contribute to the signal from the particles within the measured window. Increasing the window size increases the desired signal while most undesired contributions remain unchanged. However, the decreasing resolution causes an error in the emittance results, especially in the rms emittance. Using theoretical distributions we will present the tradeoff between resolution and accuracy.

  5. Emittance of TD-NiCr after simulated reentry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, R. K.; Dicus, D. L.; Lisagor, W. B.

    1978-01-01

    The effects of simulated reentry heating on the emittance of TD-NiCr were investigated. Groups of specimens with three different preconditioning treatments were exposed to 6, 24, and 30 half-hour simulated reentry exposure cycles in a supersonic arc tunnel at each of three conditions intended to produce surface temperatures of 1255, 1365, and 1475 K. Emittance was determined at 1300 K on specimens which were preconditioned only and specimens after completion of reentry simulation exposure. Oxide morphology and chemistry were studied by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis. A consistent relationship was established between oxide morphology and total normal emittance. Specimens with coarser textured oxides tended to have lower emittances than specimens with finer textured oxides.

  6. Transverse emittance measurement at REGAE via a solenoid scan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hachmann, Max

    2012-12-15

    The linear accelerator REGAE at DESY produces short and low charged electron bunches, on the one hand to resolve the excitation transitions of atoms temporally by pump probe electron diffraction experiments and on the other hand to investigate principal mechanisms of laser plasma acceleration. For both cases a high quality electron beam is required. A quantity to rate the beam quality is the beam emittance. In the course of this thesis transverse emittance measurements by a solenoid scan could be realized and beyond that an improved theoretical description of a solenoid was successful. The foundation of emittance measurements are constituted by theoretical models which describe the envelope of a beam. Two different models were derived. The first is an often used model to determine the transverse beam emittance without considering space charge effects. More interesting and challenging was the development of an envelope model taking space charge effects into account. It is introduced and cross checked with measurements and simulations.

  7. Localization of Narrowband Single Photon Emitters in Nanodiamonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bray, Kerem; Sandstrom, Russell; Elbadawi, Christopher; Fischer, Martin; Schreck, Matthias; Shimoni, Olga; Lobo, Charlene; Toth, Milos; Aharonovich, Igor

    2016-03-23

    Diamond nanocrystals that host room temperature narrowband single photon emitters are highly sought after for applications in nanophotonics and bioimaging. However, current understanding of the origin of these emitters is extremely limited. In this work, we demonstrate that the narrowband emitters are point defects localized at extended morphological defects in individual nanodiamonds. In particular, we show that nanocrystals with defects such as twin boundaries and secondary nucleation sites exhibit narrowband emission that is absent from pristine individual nanocrystals grown under the same conditions. Critically, we prove that the narrowband emission lines vanish when extended defects are removed deterministically using highly localized electron beam induced etching. Our results enhance the current understanding of single photon emitters in diamond and are directly relevant to fabrication of novel quantum optics devices and sensors.

  8. Nanostructure-induced distortion in single-emitter microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Lim, Kangmook; Fourkas, John; Shapiro, Benjamin; Waks, Edo

    2016-01-01

    Single-emitter microscopy has emerged as a promising method of imaging nanostructures with nanoscale resolution. This technique uses the centroid position of an emitters far-field radiation pattern to infer its position to a precision that is far below the diffraction limit. However, nanostructures composed of high-dielectric materials such as noble metals can distort the far-field radiation pattern. Nanoparticles also exhibit a more complex range of distortions, because in addition to introducing a high dielectric surface, they also act as efficient scatterers. Thus, the distortion effects of nanoparticles in single-emitter microscopy remains poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that metallic nanoparticles can significantly distort the accuracy of single-emitter imaging at distances exceeding 300 nm. We use a single quantum dot to probe both the magnitude and the direction of the metallic nanoparticle-induced imaging distortion and show that the diffraction spot of the quantum dot can shift by more than 35...

  9. Emitter Design and Numerical Simulation Based on the Extenics Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Fan

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In order to improve the performance of emitter, the extenics theory is introduced, whose divergent thinking is used to resolve the conflict of anti-clogging and energy dissipation and a new structure is proposed. The wide triangular areas are designed to reduce the flow rate behind of the each orifice and be easy to precipitation of impurities. The orifices are set to gradually decrease water kinetic energy and the flow channel is designed to be dismantle. The numerical simulation technology is used to analyze the internal flow field of emitter, the flow field results show that the improved emitter has great effect of energy dissipation and anti-clogging. As the same time, the structure of emitter is optimized and L1 = 31 mm, L2 = 21 mm, L3 = 8 mm and L4 = 5 mm are the optimization size values.

  10. Field emitters made of the contacted ytterbium and carbon nanolayers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.G. Sominski

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The operation of field emitters of a new type prepared from contacted nanolayers of ytterbium and carbon has been investigated. The performed calculations and experiments allowed to optimize the emission characteristics of the emitters. The calculations took into account the existence of a transition zone between the layers of Yb and C. Emission characteristics of the cathodes including up to 40 pairs of layers of carbon and ytterbium with optimum thicknesses of 5 and 2 nm respectively were measured. The created multilayered emitters provide the average emission current density over the surface of the emitter up to 10–20 A/cm2 and show promise for use in miniature electronic devices.

  11. Localization of narrowband single photon emitters in nanodiamonds

    CERN Document Server

    Bray, Kerem; Elbadawi, Christopher; Fischer, Martin; Schreck, Matthias; Shimoni, Olga; Lobo, Charlene; Toth, Milos; Aharonovich, Igor

    2016-01-01

    Diamond nanocrystals that host room temperature narrowband single photon emitters are highly sought after for applications in nanophotonics and bio-imaging. However, current understanding of the origin of these emitters is extremely limited. In this work we demonstrate that the narrowband emitters are point defects localized at extended morphological defects in individual nanodiamonds. In particular, we show that nanocrystals with defects such as twin boundaries and secondary nucleation sites exhibit narrowband emission that is absent from pristine individual nanocrystals grown under the same conditions. Critically, we prove that the narrowband emission lines vanish when extended defects are removed deterministically using highly localized electron beam induced etching. Our results enhance the current understanding of single photon emitters in diamond, and are directly relevant to fabrication of novel quantum optics devices and sensors.

  12. FXR LIA Optimization - Time-resolved OTR Emittance Measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacob, J; Ong, M; Wargo, P; LeSage, G

    2005-07-21

    The Flash X-Ray Radiography (FXR) facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory utilizes a high current, long pulse linear induction accelerator to produce high doses of x-ray radiation. Accurate characterization of the transverse beam emittance is required in order to facilitate accelerator modeling and tuning efforts and, ultimately, to optimize the final focus spot size, yielding higher resolution radiographs. In addition to conventional magnet scan, pepper-pot, and multiple screen techniques, optical transition radiation (OTR) has been proven as a useful emittance measurement diagnostic and is particularly well suited to the FXR accelerator. We shall discuss the time-resolved emittance characterization of an induction linac electron beam using OTR, and we will present our experimental apparatus and analysis software. We shall also develop the theoretical background of beam emittance and transition radiation.

  13. Optimization of Metamaterial Selective Emitters for Use in Thermophotovoltaic Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfiester, Nicole A.

    The increasing costs of fossil fuels, both financial and environmental, has motivated many to look into sustainable energy sources. Thermophotovoltaics (TPVs), specialized photovoltaic cells focused on the infrared range, offer an opportunity to achieve both primary energy capture, similar to traditional photovoltaics, as well as secondary energy capture in the form of waste heat. However, to become a feasible energy source, TPV systems must become more efficient. One way to do this is through the development of selective emitters tailored to the bandgap of the TPV diode in question. This thesis proposes the use of metamaterial emitters as an engineerable, highly selective emitter that can withstand the temperatures required to collect waste heat. Metamaterial devices made of platinum and a dielectric such as alumina or silicon nitride were initially designed and tested as perfect absorbers. High temperature robustness testing demonstrates the device's ability to withstand the rigors of operating as a selective emitter.

  14. Scanning Anode Field Emission Characterisation of Carbon Nanotube emitter arrays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berhanu, S.; Gröning, O.; Chen, Z.; Merikhi, J.; Bachmann, P.K.

    2011-01-01

    Scanning anode field emission microscopy (SAFEM) was used to characterise carbon nanotube (CNT) emitter arrays produced within Philips CediX-Technotubes' activities. Four different samples were investigated and compared. The field enhancement distributions were determined and the local field

  15. Beam Emittance Measurement for PLS-II Linac

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Byung-Joon; Park, Chong do; Chunjarean, SomJai; Kim, Changbum

    2016-01-01

    The PLS-II has a 100 MeV pre-injector for the 3 GeV Linac. A thermionic gun produces electron charge of 200 pC with a bunch duration of 500 ps by a 250 ps triggering pulser. At the pre-injector, one of the most important beam parameters to identify the beam quality is a transverse emittance of electron bunches. Therefore we measure the beam emittance and twiss functions at 100 MeV in order to match the beam optics to beam transport line and go through it to the storage ring. To get the transverse emittance measurement, well-known technique, quadrupole scan, is used at the pre-injector. The emittance were 0.591 mm-mrad in horizontal and 0.774 mm-mrad in vertical direction.

  16. Transverse Emittance Measurement and Preservation at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2082907

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN is a high energy storage ring that provides proton and heavy ion collisions to study fundamental particle physics. The luminosity production is closely linked to emittance preservation in the accelerator. The transverse emittance is the phase space density of the beam and should be conserved when the particle beam is transformed through the accelerator. Perturbing effects, however, can lead to emittance increase and hence luminosity degradation. Measuring the emittance growth is a complex task with high intensity beams and changing energies. The machine optics and the transverse beam size have to be measured as accurately as possible. Beta function measurements with k-modulation will be discussed. With this method the quadrupole focussing strength is varied and the resulting tune change is traced to determine the beta function at the quadrupole. A new k-modulation measurement tool was developed for the LHC. The fully automatic and online measurement system takes constra...

  17. Intelligent Variable Emittance Panels Using New, ?True? Solid Electrolyte Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This firm has, in ongoing work in collaboration with the Air Force, NASA and JPL, developed a unique Variable Emittance technology based on the electrochromism of...

  18. Attribute measure recognition approach and its applications to emitter recognition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUAN Xin; HE You; YI Xiao

    2005-01-01

    This paper studies the emitter recognition problem. A new recognition method based on attribute measure for emitter recognition is put forward. The steps of the method are presented. The approach to determining the weight coefficient is also discussed. Moreover, considering the temporal redundancy of emitter information detected by multi-sensor system, this new recognition method is generalized to multi-sensor system. A method based on the combination of attribute measure and D-S evidence theory is proposed. The implementation of D-S reasoning is always restricted by basic probability assignment function. Constructing basic probability assignment function based on attribute measure is presented in multi-sensor recognition system. Examples of recognizing the emitter purpose and system are selected to demonstrate the method proposed. Experimental results show that the performance of this new method is accurate and effective.

  19. Transverse emittance measurement at REGAE via a solenoid scan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hachmann, Max

    2012-12-15

    The linear accelerator REGAE at DESY produces short and low charged electron bunches, on the one hand to resolve the excitation transitions of atoms temporally by pump probe electron diffraction experiments and on the other hand to investigate principal mechanisms of laser plasma acceleration. For both cases a high quality electron beam is required. A quantity to rate the beam quality is the beam emittance. In the course of this thesis transverse emittance measurements by a solenoid scan could be realized and beyond that an improved theoretical description of a solenoid was successful. The foundation of emittance measurements are constituted by theoretical models which describe the envelope of a beam. Two different models were derived. The first is an often used model to determine the transverse beam emittance without considering space charge effects. More interesting and challenging was the development of an envelope model taking space charge effects into account. It is introduced and cross checked with measurements and simulations.

  20. Transverse emittance investigation of the ISOLDE target ion sources

    CERN Document Server

    Lettry, Jacques; Wenander, F

    2003-01-01

    In order to produce target-ion sources allowing for a high isotopic resolution in the separator, CERN/ISOLDE (Isotope Separator On Line) has purchased a commercial emittance metre, capable of measuring transverse phase-space emittances for ion-beam intensities down to approximately 1 nA. It was installed at the ISOLDE off-line separator where targets are tested with respect to material purity and the ion-source efficiencies are determined. Now, also the emittance and brightness are measured for different stable elements. An extensive programme has been launched aiming at a complete survey of the emittance dependence on the various ion-source parameters. Results from the measurements on the different ISOLDE ion-source types, with associated analysis, are presented.

  1. Two-photon interference from two blinking quantum emitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jöns, Klaus D.; Stensson, Katarina; Reindl, Marcus; Swillo, Marcin; Huo, Yongheng; Zwiller, Val; Rastelli, Armando; Trotta, Rinaldo; Björk, Gunnar

    2017-08-01

    We investigate the effect of blinking on the two-photon interference measurement from two independent quantum emitters. We find that blinking significantly alters the statistics in the Hong-Ou-Mandel second-order intensity correlation function g(2 )(τ ) and the outcome of two-photon interference measurements performed with independent quantum emitters. We theoretically demonstrate that the presence of blinking can be experimentally recognized by a deviation from the gD(2 )(0 ) =0.5 value when distinguishable photons from two emitters impinge on a beam splitter. Our findings explain the significant differences between linear losses and blinking for correlation measurements between independent sources and are experimentally verified using a parametric down-conversion photon-pair source. We show that blinking imposes a mandatory cross-check measurement to correctly estimate the degree of indistinguishability of photons emitted by independent quantum emitters.

  2. Analysis of measured radar data for specific emitter identification

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Conning, M

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available of emitters. The processes developed are pulse extraction, feature calculation, dimensionality reduction and classification. A pulse is detected whenever the phase changes from being random to being linear. Time domain features are then calculated from...

  3. Rare Earth Doped High Temperature Ceramic Selective Emitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chubb, Donald L.; Pal, AnnaMarie; Patton, Martin O.; Jenkins, Phillip P.

    1999-01-01

    As a result of their electron structure, rare earth ions in crystals at high temperature emit radiation in several narrow bands rather than in a continuous blackbody manner. This study develops a spectral emittance model for films of rare earth containing materials. Although there are several possible rare earth doped high temperature materials, this study was confined to rare earth aluminum garnets. Good agreement between experimental and theoretical spectral emittances was found for erbium, thulium and erbium-holmium aluminum garnets. Spectral emittances of these films are sensitive to temperature differences across the film. Emitter efficiency is also a sensitive function of temperature. For thulium aluminum garnet the efficiency is 0.38 at 1700 K but only 0.19 at 1262 K.

  4. Absolute beam emittance measurements at RHIC using ionization profile monitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minty, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Connolly, R [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Liu, C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Summers, T. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Tepikian, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.

    2014-08-15

    In the past, comparisons between emittance measurements obtained using ionization profile monitors, Vernier scans (using as input the measured rates from the zero degree counters, or ZDCs), the polarimeters and the Schottky detectors evidenced significant variations of up to 100%. In this report we present studies of the RHIC ionization profile monitors (IPMs). After identifying and correcting for two systematic instrumental errors in the beam size measurements, we present experimental results showing that the remaining dominant error in beam emittance measurements at RHIC using the IPMs was imprecise knowledge of the local beta functions. After removal of the systematic errors and implementation of measured beta functions, precise emittance measurements result. Also, consistency between the emittances measured by the IPMs and those derived from the ZDCs was demonstrated.

  5. Innovative energy efficient low-voltage electron beam emitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felis, Kenneth P.; Avnery, Tovi; Berejka, Anthony J.

    2002-03-01

    Advanced electron beams (AEB) has developed a modular, low voltage (80-125 keV), high beam current (up to 40 ma), electron emitter with typically 25 cm of beam width, that is housed in an evacuated, returnable chamber that is easy to plug in and connect. The latest in nanofabrication enables AEB to use an ultra-thin beam window. The power supply for AEB's emitter is based on solid-state electronics. This combination of features results in a remarkable electrical efficiency. AEB's electron emitter relies on a touch screen, computer control system. With 80 μm of unit density beam penetration, AEB's electron emitter has gained market acceptance in the curing of opaque, pigmented inks and coatings used on flexible substrates, metals and fiber composites and in the curing of adhesives in foil based laminates.

  6. Progress on the emitter wrap-through silicon solar cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gee, J. M.; Buck, M. E.; Schubert, W. K.; Basore, P. A.

    The Emitter Wrap-Through (EWT) solar cell is a back-contacted solar cell with a carrier-collection junction (emitter) on the front surface. Elimination of grids from the front surface allows for higher performance by eliminating grid-obscuration losses and reducing series resistance, while keeping an emitter on the front surface maintains high collection efficiency in solar-grade materials with modest diffusion lengths. The EWT cell uses laser-drilled vias to wrap the emitter diffusion on the front surface to interdigitated contacts on the back surface. We report on progress towards demonstration of two concepts for the EWT cell. The first EWT concept uses a fabrication sequence based on heavily diffused grooves and plated metallizations, and the second EWT concept uses a single furnace step and screen-printed metallizations. We also report on demonstration of double-sided carrier collection in the EWT cell.

  7. Beam dynamics in rf guns and emittance correction techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafini, Luca

    1994-02-01

    In this paper we present a general review of beam dynamics in a laser-driven rf gun. The peculiarity of such an accelerating structure versus other conventional multi-cell linac structures is underlined on the basis of the Panofsky-Wenzel theorem, which is found to give a theoretical background for the well known Kim's model. A basic explanation for some proposed methods to correct rf induced emittance growth is also derived from the theorem. We also present three emittance correction techniques for the recovery of space-charge induced emittance growth, namely the optimum distributed disk-like bunch technique, the use of rf spatial harmonics to correct spherical aberration induced by space charge forces and the technique of emittance filtering by clipping the electron beam. The expected performances regarding the beam quality achievable with different techniques, as predicted by scaling laws and simulations, are analyzed, and, where available, compared to experimental results.

  8. Novalike Cataclysmic Variables are Significant Radio Emitters

    CERN Document Server

    Coppejans, Deanne L; Miller-Jones, James C A; Rupen, Michael P; Knigge, Christian; Sivakoff, Gregory R; Groot, Paul J

    2015-01-01

    Radio emission from non-magnetic cataclysmic variables (CVs, accreting white dwarfs) could allow detailed studies of outflows and possibly accretion flows in these nearby, numerous and non-relativistic compact accretors. Up to now, however, very few CVs have been detected in the radio. We have conducted a VLA pilot survey of four close and optically-bright novalike CVs at 6 GHz, detecting three, and thereby doubling the number of radio detections of these systems. RW Sex, V603 Aql and the old nova TT Ari were detected in both of the epochs, while V1084 Her was not detected (to a $3\\sigma$ upper-limit of 7.8 $\\mu\\rm{Jy}\\,\\rm{beam}^{-1}$). These observations clearly show that the sensitivity of previous surveys was typically too low to detect these objects and that non-magnetic CVs can indeed be significant radio emitters. The three detected sources show a range of properties, including flaring and variability on both short ($\\sim$200 s) and longer-term (days) time-scales, as well as circular polarization level...

  9. Sources of Emittance in RF Photocathode Injectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dowell, David [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2016-12-11

    Advances in electron beam technology have been central to creating the current generation of x-ray free electron lasers and ultra-fast electron microscopes. These once exotic devices have become essential tools for basic research and applied science. One important beam technology for both is the electron source which, for many of these instruments, is the photocathode RF gun. The invention of the photocathode gun and the concepts of emittance compensation and beam matching in the presence of space charge and RF forces have made these high-quality beams possible. Achieving even brighter beams requires a taking a finer resolution view of the electron dynamics near the cathode during photoemission and the initial acceleration of the beam. In addition, the high brightness beam is more sensitive to degradation by the optical aberrations of the gun’s RF and magnetic lenses. This paper discusses these topics including the beam properties due to fundamental photoemission physics, space charge effects close to the cathode, and optical distortions introduced by the RF and solenoid fields. Analytic relations for these phenomena are derived and compared with numerical simulations.

  10. A Program to Generate a Particle Distribution from Emittance Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Bouma, DS; Lallement, JB

    2010-01-01

    We have written a program to generate a particle distribution based on emittance measurements in x-x’ and y-y’. The accuracy of this program has been tested using real and constructed emittance measurements. Based on these tests, the distribution generated by the program can be used to accurately simulate the beam in multi-particle tracking codes, as an alternative to a Gaussian or uniform distribution.

  11. Minimum emittance of isochronus rings for synchrotron light source

    CERN Document Server

    Shoji, Y

    1999-01-01

    Theoretically achievable minimum emittances of isochronus rings for synchrotron light source are calculated. The rings discussed in this paper consist of isochronus and achromatic bending cells, isochronus TBA (triple bend achromat) cells with negative dispersion, isochronus TBA cells with inverse bends or isochronus QBA (four bend achromat) cells. We show that the minimum emittances of these rings are roughly 2 or 3 times of those of the optimized non-isochronus rings.

  12. Bulk molybdenum field emitters by inductively coupled plasma etching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ningli; Cole, Matthew T; Milne, William I; Chen, Jing

    2016-12-07

    In this work we report on the fabrication of inductively coupled plasma (ICP) etched, diode-type, bulk molybdenum field emitter arrays. Emitter etching conditions as a function of etch mask geometry and process conditions were systematically investigated. For optimized uniformity, aspect ratios of >10 were achieved, with 25.5 nm-radius tips realised for masks consisting of aperture arrays some 4.45 μm in diameter and whose field electron emission performance has been herein assessed.

  13. Study of ultra-low emittance design for SPEAR3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, M. -H.; Huang, X.; Safranek, J.; /SLAC

    2015-09-17

    Since its 2003 construction, the SPEAR3 synchrotron light source at SLAC has continuously improved its performance by raising beam current, top-off injection, and smaller emittance. This makes SPEAR3 one of the most productive light sources in the world. Now, to further enhance the performance of SPEAR3, we are looking into the possibility of converting SPEAR3 to an ultra-low emittance storage ring within its site constraint.

  14. Emittance growth in the DARHT Axis-II Downstream Transport

    OpenAIRE

    Ekdahl, Carl; Schulze, Martin E.

    2017-01-01

    Using a particle-in-cell (PIC) code, we investigated the possibilities for emittance growth through the quadrupole magnets of the system used to transport the high-current electron beam from an induction accelerator to the bremsstrahlung converter target used for flash radiography. We found that even highly mismatched beams exhibited little emittance growth (< 6%), which we attribute to softening of their initial hard edge current distributions. We also used this PIC code to evaluate the accu...

  15. A Novel Depletion-Mode MOS Gated Emitter Shorted Thyristor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张鹤鸣; 戴显英; 张义门; 马晓华; 林大松

    2000-01-01

    A Novel MOS-gated thyristor, depletion-mode MOS gated emitter shorted thyristor (DMST),and its two structures are proposed. In DMST,the channel of depletion-mode MOS makes the thyristor emitter-based junction inherently short. The operation of the device is controlled by the interruption and recovery of the depletion-mode MOS P channel. The perfect properties have been demonstrated by 2-D numerical simulations and the tests on the fabricated chips.

  16. Internal emitter limits for iodine, radium and radon daughters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlenker, R.A.

    1984-08-15

    This paper identifies some of the issues which arise in the consideration of the derivation of new limits on exposure to internal emitters. Basic and secondary radiation protection limits are discussed. Terms are defined and applied to the limitation of risk from stochastic effects. Non-stochastic data for specific internal emitters (/sup 131/I and the radium isotopes) are presented. Emphasis is placed on the quantitative aspects of the limit setting problem. 65 references, 2 figures, 12 tables.

  17. Warm Springs pupfish recovery plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document gives a history of pupfish and focuses on the warm springs pupfish. The warm springs pupfish is endangered, and this is a plan to help recover the...

  18. Emittance minimization at the ELBE superconducting electron gun

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moeller, K.; Arnold, A.; Lu, P.; Murcek, P.; Teichert, J.; Vennekate, H.; Xiang, R.

    2014-07-01

    The transverse emittance is one of the most important quantities which characterize the quality of an electron source. For high quality experiments low beam emittance is required. By means of theoretical considerations and simulation calculations we have studied how the emittance of the Rossendorf superconducting radio-frequency photoelectron source (SRF gun) can be minimized. It turned out that neither a solenoid magnet nor the effect of space charge forces is needed to create a pronounced emittance minimum. The minimum appears by just adjusting the starting phase of the electron bunch with respect to the RF phase of the gun in a suitable way. Investigation of various correlations between the properties of the beam particles led to an explanation on how the minimum comes about. It is shown that the basic mechanism of minimization is the fact that the longitudinal properties of the particles (energy) are strongly influenced by the starting phase. Due to the coupling of the longitudinal and transverse degrees of freedom by the relativistic equation of motion the transverse degrees of freedom and thereby the emittance can be strongly influenced by the starting phase as well. The results obtained in this study will be applied to minimize the emittance in the commissioning phase of the SRF gun.

  19. Electromagnetic compatibility of implantable neurostimulators to RFID emitters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guag Joshua W

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The objective of this study is to investigate electromagnetic compatibility (EMC of implantable neurostimulators with the emissions from radio frequency identification (RFID emitters. Methods Six active implantable neurostimulators with lead systems were tested for susceptibility to electromagnetic fields generated by 22 RFID emitters. These medical devices have been approved for marketing in the U.S. for a number of intended uses that include: epilepsy, depression, incontinence, Parkinsonian tremor and pain relief. Each RFID emitter had one of the following carrier frequencies: 125 kHz, 134 kHz, 13.56 MHz, 433 MHz, 915 MHz and 2.45 GHz Results The test results showed the output of one of the implantable neurostimulators was inhibited by 134 kHz RFID emitter at separation distances of 10 cm or less. The output of the same implantable neurostimulator was also inhibited by another 134 kHz RFID emitter at separation distances of 10 cm or less and also showed inconsistent pulsing rate at a separation distance of 15 cm. Both effects occurred during and lasted through out the duration of the exposure. Conclusions The clinical significance of the effects was assessed by a clinician at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The effects were determined to be clinically significant only if they occurred for extended period of time. There were no observed effects from the other 5 implantable neurostimulators or during exposures from other RFID emitters.

  20. Electromagnetic compatibility of implantable neurostimulators to RFID emitters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantchenko, Oxana S; Seidman, Seth J; Guag, Joshua W; Witters, Donald M; Sponberg, Curt L

    2011-06-09

    The objective of this study is to investigate electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) of implantable neurostimulators with the emissions from radio frequency identification (RFID) emitters. Six active implantable neurostimulators with lead systems were tested for susceptibility to electromagnetic fields generated by 22 RFID emitters. These medical devices have been approved for marketing in the U.S. for a number of intended uses that include: epilepsy, depression, incontinence, Parkinsonian tremor and pain relief. Each RFID emitter had one of the following carrier frequencies: 125 kHz, 134 kHz, 13.56 MHz, 433 MHz, 915 MHz and 2.45 GHz. The test results showed the output of one of the implantable neurostimulators was inhibited by 134 kHz RFID emitter at separation distances of 10 cm or less. The output of the same implantable neurostimulator was also inhibited by another 134 kHz RFID emitter at separation distances of 10 cm or less and also showed inconsistent pulsing rate at a separation distance of 15 cm. Both effects occurred during and lasted through out the duration of the exposure. The clinical significance of the effects was assessed by a clinician at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The effects were determined to be clinically significant only if they occurred for extended period of time. There were no observed effects from the other 5 implantable neurostimulators or during exposures from other RFID emitters.

  1. Warm Little Inflaton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastero-Gil, Mar; Berera, Arjun; Ramos, Rudnei O; Rosa, João G

    2016-10-07

    We show that inflation can naturally occur at a finite temperature T>H that is sustained by dissipative effects, when the inflaton field corresponds to a pseudo Nambu-Goldstone boson of a broken gauge symmetry. Similar to the Little Higgs scenarios for electroweak symmetry breaking, the flatness of the inflaton potential is protected against both quadratic divergences and the leading thermal corrections. We show that, nevertheless, nonlocal dissipative effects are naturally present and are able to sustain a nearly thermal bath of light particles despite the accelerated expansion of the Universe. As an example, we discuss the dynamics of chaotic warm inflation with a quartic potential and show that the associated observational predictions are in very good agreement with the latest Planck results. This model constitutes the first realization of warm inflation requiring only a small number of fields; in particular, the inflaton is directly coupled to just two light fields.

  2. Warm Little Inflaton

    CERN Document Server

    Bastero-Gil, Mar; Ramos, Rudnei O; Rosa, Joao G

    2016-01-01

    We show that inflation can naturally occur at a finite temperature T>H that is sustained by dissipative effects, when the inflaton field corresponds to a pseudo-Nambu Goldstone boson of a broken gauge symmetry. Similarly to "Little Higgs" scenarios for electroweak symmetry breaking, the flatness of the inflaton potential is protected against both quadratic divergences and the leading thermal corrections. We show that, nevertheless, non-local dissipative effects are naturally present and are able to sustain a nearly-thermal bath of light particles despite the accelerated expansion of the Universe. As an example, we discuss the dynamics of chaotic warm inflation with a quartic potential and show that the associated observational predictions are in very good agreement with the latest Planck results. This model constitutes the first realization of warm inflation where the inflaton is directly coupled to only two light fields.

  3. Warm absorbers in active galactic nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Reynolds, C S; Reynolds, C S; Fabian, A C

    1995-01-01

    Recent {\\it ASCA} observations confirm the presence of X-ray absorption due to partially ionized gas in many Seyfert 1 galaxies; the so-called warm absorber. Constraints on the location of the warm material are presented with the conclusion that this material lies at radii coincident with, or just outside, the broad-line region. The stability of this warm material to isobaric perturbations under the assumptions of thermal and photoionization equilibrium is also studied. It is shown that there is a remarkably small range of ionization parameter, \\xi, for which the warm absorber state is stable. The robustness of this result to changes in the shape of the primary continuum, the assumed density and optical depth is investigated. Given the constraints on the location and the stability properties of the material, several models for the environments of Seyfert nuclei are discussed. These attempt to explain the presence of significant amounts of partially ionized material. In particular, various models of the broad-...

  4. The recent warming trend in North Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orsi, Anais J.; Kawamura, Kenji; Masson-Delmotte, Valerie; Fettweis, Xavier; Box, Jason E.; Dahl-Jensen, Dorthe; Clow, Gary D.; Landais, Amaelle; Severinghaus, Jeffrey P.

    2017-06-01

    The Arctic is among the fastest warming regions on Earth, but it is also one with limited spatial coverage of multidecadal instrumental surface air temperature measurements. Consequently, atmospheric reanalyses are relatively unconstrained in this region, resulting in a large spread of estimated 30 year recent warming trends, which limits their use to investigate the mechanisms responsible for this trend. Here we present a surface temperature reconstruction over 1982-2011 at NEEM (North Greenland Eemian Ice Drilling Project, 51°W, 77°N), in North Greenland, based on the inversion of borehole temperature and inert gas isotope data. We find that NEEM has warmed by 2.7 ± 0.33°C over the past 30 years, from the long-term 1900-1970 average of -28.55 ± 0.29°C. The warming trend is principally caused by an increase in downward longwave heat flux. Atmospheric reanalyses underestimate this trend by 17%, underlining the need for more in situ observations to validate reanalyses.

  5. Timing the warm absorber in NGC 4051

    CERN Document Server

    Silva, Catia; Costantini, Elisa

    2016-01-01

    We investigated, using spectral-timing analysis, the characterization of highly ionized outflows in Seyfert galaxies, the so-called warm absorbers. Here, we present our results on the extensive ~ 600 ks of XMM-Newton archival observations of the bright and highly variable Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 4051, whose spectrum has revealed a complex multicomponent wind. Making use of both RGS and EPIC-pn data, we performed a detailed analysis through a time-dependent photoionization code in combination with spectral and Fourier spectral-timing techniques. The source light curves and the warm absorber parameters obtained from the data were used to simulate the response of the gas due to variations in the ionizing flux of the central source. The resulting time variable spectra were employed to predict the effects of the warm absorber on the time lags and coherence of the energy dependent light curves. We have found that, in the absence of any other lag mechanisms, a warm absorber with the characteristics of the one observed ...

  6. Dynamical Analysis of the Global Warming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Tenreiro Machado

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Global warming is a major concern nowadays. Weather conditions are changing, and it seems that human activity is one of the main causes. In fact, since the beginning of the industrial revolution, the burning of fossil fuels has increased the nonnatural emissions of carbon dioxide to the atmosphere. Carbon dioxide is a greenhouse gas that absorbs the infrared radiation produced by the reflection of the sunlight on the Earth’s surface, trapping the heat in the atmosphere. Global warming and the associated climate changes are being the subject of intensive research due to their major impact on social, economic, and health aspects of human life. This paper studies the global warming trend in the perspective of dynamical systems and fractional calculus, which is a new standpoint in this context. Worldwide distributed meteorological stations and temperature records for the last 100 years are analysed. It is shown that the application of Fourier transforms and power law trend lines leads to an assertive representation of the global warming dynamics and a simpler analysis of its characteristics.

  7. Global Warming without Global Mean Precipitation Increase?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salzmann, Marc

    2017-04-01

    Global climate models simulate a robust increase of global mean precipitation of about 1.5 to 2% per kelvin surface warming in response to greenhouse gas (GHG) forcing. Here, it is shown the sensitivity to aerosol cooling is robust as well, albeit roughly twice as large (3-4% per kelvin). This larger sensitivity is consistent with energy budget arguments. At the same time, it is still considerably lower than the 6.5 to 7%K-1 decrease of the water vapor concentration with cooling from anthropogenic aerosol since the water vapor radiative feedback lowers the hydrological sensitivity to anthropogenic forcings. When GHG and aerosol forcings are combined, the climate models with a realistic 20th century warming indicate that the global mean hydrological response to GHG warming has until recently been completely masked by aerosol drying. This explains the apparent lack of sensitivity of the global mean precipitation to the net global warming recently found in observations. As the importance of GHGs increases in the future, a clear signal will emerge.

  8. Military Implications of Global Warming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    U.S. environmental issues also have important global implications. This paper analyzes current U.S. Policy as it pertains to global warming and climate...for military involvement to reduce global warming . Global warming and other environmental issues are important to the U.S. military. As the United

  9. From the warm magnetized atomic medium to molecular clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Hennebelle, P; Vázquez-Semadeni, E; Klessen, R; Audit, E

    2008-01-01

    {It has recently been proposed that giant molecular complexes form at the sites where streams of diffuse warm atomic gas collide at transonic velocities.} {We study the global statistics of molecular clouds formed by large scale colliding flows of warm neutral atomic interstellar gas under ideal MHD conditions. The flows deliver material as well as kinetic energy and trigger thermal instability leading eventually to gravitational collapse.} {We perform adaptive mesh refinement MHD simulations which, for the first time in this context, treat self-consistently cooling and self-gravity.} {The clouds formed in the simulations develop a highly inhomogeneous density and temperature structure, with cold dense filaments and clumps condensing from converging flows of warm atomic gas. In the clouds, the column density probability density distribution (PDF) peaks at $\\sim 2 \\times 10^{21} \\psc$ and decays rapidly at higher values; the magnetic intensity correlates weakly with density from $n \\sim 0.1$ to $10^4 \\pcc$, an...

  10. Silicon Carbide Emitter Turn-Off Thyristor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Wang

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel MOS-controlled SiC thyristor device, the SiC emitter turn-off thyristor (ETO is a promising technology for future high-voltage switching applications because it integrates the excellent current conduction capability of a SiC thyristor with a simple MOS-control interface. Through unity-gain turn-off, the SiC ETO also achieves excellent Safe Operation Area (SOA and faster switching speeds than silicon ETOs. The world's first 4.5-kV SiC ETO prototype shows a forward voltage drop of 4.26 V at 26.5 A/cm2 current density at room and elevated temperatures. Tested in an inductive circuit with a 2.5 kV DC link voltage and a 9.56-A load current, the SiC ETO shows a fast turn-off time of 1.63 microseconds and a low 9.88 mJ turn-off energy. The low switching loss indicates that the SiC ETO could operate at about 4 kHz if 100 W/cm2 conduction and the 100 W/cm2 turn-off losses can be removed by the thermal management system. This frequency capability is about 4 times higher than 4.5-kV-class silicon power devices. The preliminary demonstration shows that the SiC ETO is a promising candidate for high-frequency, high-voltage power conversion applications, and additional developments to optimize the device for higher voltage (>5 kV and higher frequency (10 kHz are needed.

  11. Global Warming And Meltwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bratu, S.

    2012-04-01

    In order to find new approaches and new ideas for my students to appreciate the importance of science in their daily life, I proposed a theme for them to debate. They had to search for global warming information and illustrations in the media, and discuss the articles they found in the classroom. This task inspired them to search for new information about this important and timely theme in science. I informed my students that all the best information about global warming and meltwater they found would be used in a poster that would help us to update the knowledge base of the Physics laboratory. I guided them to choose the most eloquent images and significant information. Searching and working to create this poster, the students arrived to better appreciate the importance of science in their daily life and to critically evaluate scientific information transmitted via the media. In the poster we created, one can find images, photos and diagrams and some interesting information: Global warming refers to the rising average temperature of the Earth's atmosphere and oceans and its projected evolution. In the last 100 years, the Earth's average surface temperature increased by about 0.8 °C with about two thirds of the increase occurring over just the last three decades. Warming of the climate system is unequivocal, and scientists are more than 90% certain most of it is caused by increasing concentrations of greenhouse gases produced by human activities such as deforestation and burning fossil fuel. They indicate that during the 21st century the global surface temperature is likely to rise a further 1.1 to 2.9 °C for the lowest emissions scenario and 2.4 to 6.4 °C for the highest predictions. An increase in global temperature will cause sea levels to rise and will change the amount and pattern of precipitation, and potentially result in expansion of subtropical deserts. Warming is expected to be strongest in the Arctic and would be associated with continuing decrease of

  12. On the warm absorber in AGN outflow

    CERN Document Server

    Adhikari, T P; Sobolewska, M; Czerny, B

    2016-01-01

    Warm absorber (WA) is an ionised gas present in the line of sight to the AGN central engine. The effect of the absorber is imprinted in the absorption lines observed in X-ray spectra of AGN. In this work, we model the WA in Seyfert 1 galaxy Mrk 509 using its recently published shape of broad band spectral energy distribution (SED) as a continuum illuminating the absorber. Using the photoionization code {\\sc Titan}, recently we have shown that the absorption measure distribution (AMD) found for this object can be successfully modelled as a single slab of gas in total pressure (radiation+gas) equilibrium, contrary to the usual models of constant density multiple slabs. We discuss the transmitted spectrum that would be recorded by an observer after the radiation from the nucleus passes through the WA.

  13. A search for HI and OH absorption in z > 3 CO emitters

    CERN Document Server

    Curran, S J; Whiting, M T; Sadler, E M; Combes, F; Pracy, M B; Bignell, C; Athreya, R

    2016-01-01

    We present the results of a survey for HI 21-cm and OH 18-cm absorption in seven strong CO emitters at z > 3. Despite reaching limits comparable to those required to detect 21-cm absorption at lower redshifts, we do not detect either transition in any of the objects searched. We believe that this is due to the high redshift selection causing all of our targets to have ultra-violet luminosities above the critical value, where all of the atomic gas in the host galaxy disk is suspected to be ionised. However, not only are all of our targets bright in CO emission, but detection of CO above the critical UV luminosity is generally not uncommon. This suggests that the molecular gas is shielded from the radiation or is physically remote from the source of the continuum emission, as it appears to be from CO observations of high redshift radio galaxies.

  14. Nanostructure-Induced Distortion in Single-Emitter Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Kangmook; Ropp, Chad; Barik, Sabyasachi; Fourkas, John; Shapiro, Benjamin; Waks, Edo

    2016-09-01

    Single-emitter microscopy has emerged as a promising method of imaging nanostructures with nanoscale resolution. This technique uses the centroid position of an emitters far-field radiation pattern to infer its position to a precision that is far below the diffraction limit. However, nanostructures composed of high-dielectric materials such as noble metals can distort the far-field radiation pattern. Nanoparticles also exhibit a more complex range of distortions, because in addition to introducing a high dielectric surface, they also act as efficient scatterers. Thus, the distortion effects of nanoparticles in single-emitter microscopy remains poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that metallic nanoparticles can significantly distort the accuracy of single-emitter imaging at distances exceeding 300 nm. We use a single quantum dot to probe both the magnitude and the direction of the metallic nanoparticle-induced imaging distortion and show that the diffraction spot of the quantum dot can shift by more than 35 nm. The centroid position of the emitter generally shifts away from the nanoparticle position, in contradiction to the conventional wisdom that the nanoparticle is a scattering object that will pull in the diffraction spot of the emitter towards its center. These results suggest that dielectric distortion of the emission pattern dominates over scattering. We also show that by monitoring the distortion of the quantum dot diffraction spot we can obtain high-resolution spatial images of the nanoparticle, providing a new method for performing highly precise, sub-diffraction spatial imaging. These results provide a better understanding of the complex near-field coupling between emitters and nanostructures, and open up new opportunities to perform super-resolution microscopy with higher accuracy.

  15. Emittance and Phase Space Tomography for the Fermilab Linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, F.G.G.; Johnstone, C.; Kobilarcik, T.; Koizumi, G.M.; Moore, C.D.; /Fermilab; Newhart, D.L.; /Fermilab

    2012-05-01

    The Fermilab Linac delivers a variable intensity, 400-MeV beam to the MuCool Test Area experimental hall via a beam line specifically designed to facilitate measurements of the Linac beam emittance and properties. A 10 m, dispersion-free and magnet-free straight utilizes an upstream quadrupole focusing triplet in combination with the necessary in-straight beam diagnostics to fully characterize the transverse beam properties. Since the Linac does not produce a strictly elliptical phase space, tomography must be performed on the profile data to retrieve the actual particle distribution in phase space. This is achieved by rotating the phase space distribution using different waist focusing conditions of the upstream triplet and performing a deconvolution of the profile data. Preliminary measurements using this diagnostic section are reported here. These data represent a first-pass measurement of the Linac emittance based on various techniques. It is clear that the most accurate representation of the emittance is given by the 3-profile approach. Future work will entail minimizing the beam spot size on MW5 to test and possibly improve the accuracy of the 2-profile approach. The 95% emittance is {approx} 18{pi} in the vertical and {approx} 13{pi} in the horizontal, which is especially larger than anticipated - 8-10{pi} was expected. One possible explanation is that the entire Linac pulse is extracted into the MTA beamline and during the first few microseconds, the feed forward and RF regulation are not stable. This may result in a larger net emittance observed versus beam injected into Booster, where the leading part of the Linac beam pulse is chopped. Future studies will clearly entail a measurement of the emittance vs. pulse length. One additional concern is that the Linac phase space is most likely aperture-defined and non-elliptical in nature. A non-elliptical phase-space determination would require a more elaborate analysis and provide another explanation of the

  16. Gas in Galaxies

    OpenAIRE

    Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Reynolds, R. J.

    2000-01-01

    The interstellar medium (ISM) can be thought of as the galactic atmosphere which fills the space between stars. When clouds within the ISM collapse, stars are born. When the stars die, they return their matter to the surrounding gas. Therefore the ISM plays a vital role in galactic evolution. The medium includes starlight, gas, dust, planets, comets, asteroids, fast moving charged particles (cosmic rays) and magnetic fields. The gas can be further divided into hot, warm and cold components, e...

  17. Transverse emittance measurement and preservation at the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuhn, Maria

    2016-06-20

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN is a high energy storage ring that provides proton and heavy ion collisions to study fundamental particle physics. The luminosity production is closely linked to emittance preservation in the accelerator. The transverse emittance is the phase space density of the beam and should be conserved when the particle beam is transformed through the accelerator. Perturbing effects, however, can lead to emittance increase and hence luminosity degradation. Measuring the emittance growth is a complex task with high intensity beams and changing energies. The machine optics and the transverse beam size have to be measured as accurately as possible. Beta function measurements with k-modulation are discussed. With this method the quadrupole focussing strength is varied and the resulting tune change is traced to determine the beta function at the quadrupole. A new k-modulation measurement tool was developed for the LHC. The fully automatic and online measurement system takes constraints of various systems such as tune measurement precision and powering limitations of the LHC superconducting circuits into account. With sinusoidal k-modulation record low beta function measurement uncertainties in the LHC have been reached. 2015 LHC beta function and β*, which is the beta function at the collision point, measurements with k-modulation will be presented. Wire scanners and synchrotron light monitors are presently used in the LHC to measure the transverse beam size. Accuracy and limitations of the LHC transverse profile monitors are discussed. During the 2012 LHC proton run it was found that wire scanner photomultiplier saturation added significant uncertainty on all measurements. A large discrepancy between emittances from wire scanners and luminosity was discovered but not solved. During Long Shutdown 1 the wire scanner system was upgraded with new photomultipliers. A thorough study of LHC wire scanner measurement precision in 2015 is presented

  18. Transverse emittance dilution due to coupler kicks in linear accelerators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandon Buckley

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available One of the main concerns in the design of low emittance linear accelerators (linacs is the preservation of beam emittance. Here we discuss one possible source of emittance dilution, the coupler kick, due to transverse electromagnetic fields in the accelerating cavities of the linac caused by the power coupler geometry. In addition to emittance growth, the coupler kick also produces orbit distortions. It is common wisdom that emittance growth from coupler kicks can be strongly reduced by using two couplers per cavity mounted opposite each other or by having the couplers of successive cavities alternate from above to below the beam pipe so as to cancel each individual kick. While this is correct, including two couplers per cavity or alternating the coupler location requires large technical changes and increased cost for superconducting cryomodules where cryogenic pipes are arranged parallel to a string of several cavities. We therefore analyze consequences of alternate coupler placements. We show here that alternating the coupler location from above to below compensates the emittance growth as well as the orbit distortions. For sufficiently large Q values, alternating the coupler location from before to after the cavity leads to a cancellation of the orbit distortion but not of the emittance growth, whereas alternating the coupler location from before and above to behind and below the cavity cancels the emittance growth but not the orbit distortion. We show that cancellations hold for sufficiently large Q values. These compensations hold even when each cavity is individually detuned, e.g., by microphonics. Another effective method for reducing coupler kicks that is studied is the optimization of the phase of the coupler kick so as to minimize the effects on emittance from each coupler. This technique is independent of the coupler geometry but relies on operating on crest. A final technique studied is symmetrization of the cavity geometry in the

  19. CURBING GLOBAL WARMING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The 1-trillion-yuan($134 billion)investment from the Chinese Government in reducing greenhouse gas emissions has resulted in the reduction of over 1.5 billion tons of carbon dioxide in the last 15 years.

  20. Capillary Electrophoresis-nanoelectrospray Ionization-selected Reaction Monitoring Mass Spectrometry Via A True Sheathless Metal-coated Emitter Interface For Robust And High Sensitivity Sample Quantification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Xuejiang; Fillmore, Thomas L.; Gao, Yuqian; Tang, Keqi

    2016-03-30

    A new sheathless CITP/CZE-MS interface, based on a commercially available capillary with an integrated metal coated ESI emitter, was developed in this study aiming at overcoming the reproducibility and ruggedness problems, suffered to a certain degree by almost all the available CE-MS interfaces, and pushing the CE-MS technology suitable for routine sample analysis with high sensitivity. The new CITP/CZE-MS interface allows the electric contact between ESI voltage power supply and the CE separation liquid by using a conductive liquid that comes in contact with the metal coated surface of the ESI emitter, making it a true sheathless CE-MS interface. Stable electrospray was established by avoiding the formation of gas bubbles from electro chemical reaction at the emitter tip or inside of the CE capillary. Crucial operating parameters, such as sample loading volume, flow rate, and separation voltage, were systematically evaluated for their effects on both CITP/CZE separation efficiency and MS detection sensitivity. Around one hundred CITP/CZE-MS analyses can be easily achieved by using the new sheathless CITP/CZE interface without a noticeable loss of metal coating on the ESI emitter surface, or degrading of the ESI emitter performance. The reproducibility in analyte migration time and quantitative performance of the new interface was experimentally evaluated to demonstrate a LOQ bellow 5 attomole.

  1. Obtaining the high-current low-energy electron beams in the systems with a plasma emitter

    CERN Document Server

    Devyatkov, V N; Shchanin, P M

    2001-01-01

    Using gas filled diodes with arc and glow-discharge base plasma emitters one investigated into generation and transfer of high-current electron beams. Using a diode with arc discharge base plasma emitter at 15 kV accelerating voltage one obtained a space charge compensated with up to 1 kA current compressed by proper magnetic field from 8 cm diameter up to 1 cm and transported at over 20 cm distance with 70% efficiency. Using a diode with a glow-discharge one obtained a 80 A current and up to 100 A/cm current density beam. In a weak axial magnetic field with B=0.015 T induction such a beam is transported at 30 cm distance

  2. Study of Abnormal Vertical Emittance Growth in ATF Extraction Line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alabau, M.; Faus-Golfe, A.; /Valencia U., IFIC; Alabau, M.; Bambade, P.; Brossard, J.; Le Meur, G.; Rimbault, C.; Touze, F.; /Orsay, LAL; Angal-Kalinin, D.; Jones, J.K.; /Daresbury; Appleby, R.; Scarfe, A.; /Manchester U.; Kuroda, S.; /KEK, Tsukuba; White, G.R.; Woodley, M.; /SLAC; Zimmermann, F.; /CERN

    2011-11-04

    Since several years, the vertical beam emittance measured in the Extraction Line (EXT) of the Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) at KEK, that will transport the electron beam from the ATF Damping Ring (DR) to the future ATF2 Final Focus beam line, is significantly larger than the emittance measured in the DR itself, and there are indications that it grows rapidly with increasing beam intensity. This longstanding problem has motivated studies of possible sources of this anomalous emittance growth. One possible contribution is non-linear magnetic fields in the extraction region experimented by the beam while passing off-axis through magnets of the DR during the extraction process. In this paper, simulations of the emittance growth are presented and compared to observations. These simulations include the effects of predicted non-linear field errors in the shared DR magnets and orbit displacements from the reference orbit in the extraction region. Results of recent measurements using closed orbit bumps to probe the relation between the extraction trajectory and the anomalous emittance growth are also presented.

  3. MONOBLOCK EMITTERS FOR MELTING OF SYNTHETIC FATTY ACIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. Cherepanov

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with usage of monoblock emitters for melting of synthetic fatty acids, which are delivered to plants in a solid state and are used in the production of detergents as liquids. In such emitters all lamps are arranged in a common case. Irradiation of the solid phase in the direction of the channel melting axis is done through an output quartz window. This method excludes the possibility of slowing down or stopping the process when one of the tubes is overheated. Halogen lamps are used as light sources, each one is placed in individual transparent body. Combined effect of thermal power supply and the light emission should provide a significant increase in the rate of the channel melting in the solid phase of the synthetic fatty acid. The results of evaluations for achievable rates of the channel melting in the solid phase of the synthetic fatty acids are presented. Melting of the channel with one meter depth can be reached in less than an hour when eight halogen lamps of 100 W power are used. To exclude the possibility of self-ignition of the liquid phase of synthetic fatty acid it is proposed to adjust the luminosity of the emitter and the surface temperature by selecting the number of lamps in the monoblock emitter cavity. The usage of cylindrical quartz tube as a case for monoblock emitter increases the diameter of the melting channel due to side effects of light on the solid and liquid phases.

  4. Electrical control of optical emitter relaxation pathways enabled by graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tielrooij, K. J.; Orona, L.; Ferrier, A.; Badioli, M.; Navickaite, G.; Coop, S.; Nanot, S.; Kalinic, B.; Cesca, T.; Gaudreau, L.; Ma, Q.; Centeno, A.; Pesquera, A.; Zurutuza, A.; de Riedmatten, H.; Goldner, P.; García de Abajo, F. J.; Jarillo-Herrero, P.; Koppens, F. H. L.

    2015-03-01

    Controlling the energy flow processes and the associated energy relaxation rates of a light emitter is of fundamental interest and has many applications in the fields of quantum optics, photovoltaics, photodetection, biosensing and light emission. Advanced dielectric, semiconductor and metallic systems have been developed to tailor the interaction between an emitter and its environment. However, active control of the energy flow from an emitter into optical, electronic or plasmonic excitations has remained challenging. Here, we demonstrate in situ electrical control of the relaxation pathways of excited erbium ions, which emit light at the technologically relevant telecommunication wavelength of 1.5 μm. By placing the erbium at a few nanometres distance from graphene, we modify the relaxation rate by more than a factor of three, and control whether the emitter decays into electron-hole pairs, emitted photons or graphene near-infrared plasmons, confined to control of the local density of optical states constitute a new paradigm for active (quantum) photonics and can be applied using any combination of light emitters and two-dimensional materials.

  5. Transverse emittance growth in staged laser-wakefield acceleration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Mehrling

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available We present a study on the emittance evolution of electron bunches, externally injected into laser-driven plasma waves using the three-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC code OSIRIS. Results show order-of-magnitude transverse emittance growth during the injection process, if the electron bunch is not matched to its intrinsic betatron motion inside the wakefield. This behavior is supported by analytic theory reproducing the simulation data to a percent level. The length over which the full emittance growth develops is found to be less than or comparable to the typical dimension of a single plasma module in current multistage designs. In addition, the analytic theory enables the quantitative prediction of emittance degradation in two consecutive accelerators coupled by free-drift sections, excluding this as a scheme for effective emittance-growth suppression, and thus suggests the necessity of beam-matching sections between acceleration stages with fundamental implications on the overall design of staged laser-wakefield accelerators.

  6. Study of Lower Emittance Lattices for SPEAR3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Xiaobiao; Nosochkov, Yuri; Safranek, James A.; Wang, Lanfa; /SLAC

    2011-11-08

    We study paths to significantly reduce the emittance of the SPEAR3 storage ring. Lattice possibilities are explored with the GLASS technique. New lattices are designed and optimized for practical dynamic aperture and beam lifetime. Various techniques are employed to optimize the nonlinear dynamics, including the Elegant-based genetic algorithm. Experimental studies are also carried out on the ring to validate the lattice design. The SPEAR3 storage ring is a third generation light source which has a racetrack layout with a circumference of 234.1 m. The requirement to maintain the photon beamline positions put a significant constraint on the lattice design. Consequently the emittance of SPEAR3 is not on par with some of the recently-built third generation light sources. The present operational lattice has an emittance of 10 nm. For the photon beam brightness of SSRL to remain competitive among the new or upgraded ring-based light sources, it is necessary to significantly reduce the emittance of SPEAR3. In this paper we report our ongoing effort to develop a lower emittance solution for SSRL. We first show the potential of the SPEAR3 lattice with results of the standard cell study using the GLASS technique. This is followed by a discussion of the design strategy for full-ring linear lattices. Several lattice options are compared. We then show the methods and results for dynamic aperture optimization. Experiments were also conducted on the SPEAR3 ring to implement the lattice and to measure the key lattice parameters.

  7. Photochemical aerosols in warm exoplanetary atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imanaka, Hiroshi; Smith, Mark A.; McKay, Christopher P.; Cruikshank, Dale P.; Marley, Mark S.

    2016-10-01

    Recent transit observations of exoplanets have demonstrated the possibility of a wide prevalence of haze/cloud layers at high altitudes. Hydrocarbon photochemical haze could be the candidate for such haze particles on warm sub-Neptunes, but the lack of evidence for methane poses a puzzle for such hydrocarbon photochemical haze. The CH4/CO ratios in planetary atmospheres vary substantially from their temperature and dynamics. We have conducted a series of laboratory simulations to investigate how atmospheric compositions, specifically CH4/CO ratios, affect the haze production rates and their optical properties. The mass production rates in the H2-CH4-CO gas mixtures are rather insensitive to the CH4/CO ratios larger than at 0.3. Significant formation of solid material is observed in a H2-CO gas mixture even without CH4. The complex refractive indices of the aerosol analogue from the H2-CO gas mixture show strong absorption at the visible/near-IR wavelengths. These experimental facts imply that substantial carbonaceous aerosols may be generated in warm H2-CO-CH4 exoplanetary atmospheres, and that it might be responsible for the observed dark albedos at the visible wavelengths.

  8. Warm Jupiters from Secular Planet–Planet Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrovich, Cristobal; Tremaine, Scott

    2016-10-01

    Most warm Jupiters (gas-giant planets with 0.1 {{au}}≲ a≲ 1 au) have pericenter distances that are too large for significant orbital migration by tidal friction. We study the possibility that the warm Jupiters are undergoing secular eccentricity oscillations excited by an outer companion (a planet or star) in an eccentric and/or mutually inclined orbit. In this model, the warm Jupiters migrate periodically, in the high-eccentricity phase of the oscillation, but are typically observed at lower eccentricities. We show that in this model the steady-state eccentricity distribution of the warm Jupiters is approximately flat, which is consistent with the observed distribution if we restrict the sample to warm Jupiters with detected outer planetary companions. The eccentricity distribution of warm Jupiters without companions exhibits a peak at e≲ 0.2 that must be explained by a different formation mechanism. Based on a population synthesis study, we find that high-eccentricity migration excited by an outer planetary companion (1) can account for ∼ 20 % of the warm Jupiters and most of the warm Jupiters with e≳ 0.4; and (2) can produce most of the observed population of hot Jupiters, with a semimajor axis distribution that matches the observations, but fails to account adequately for ∼ 60 % of hot Jupiters with projected obliquities ≲ 20^\\circ . Thus ∼ 20 % of the warm Jupiters and ∼ 60 % of the hot Jupiters can be produced by high-eccentricity migration. We also provide predictions for the expected mutual inclinations and spin-orbit angles of the planetary systems with hot and warm Jupiters produced by high-eccentricity migration.

  9. Greenhouse Warming Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Bent Erik

    2016-01-01

    The changing greenhouse effect caused by natural and anthropogenic causes is explained and efforts to model the behavior of the near-surface constituents of the Earth's land, ocean and atmosphere are discussed. Emissions of various substances and other aspects of human activity influence the gree......The changing greenhouse effect caused by natural and anthropogenic causes is explained and efforts to model the behavior of the near-surface constituents of the Earth's land, ocean and atmosphere are discussed. Emissions of various substances and other aspects of human activity influence...... the greenhouse warming, and the impacts of the warming may again impact the wellbeing of human societies. Thus physical modeling of the near-surface ocean-soil-atmosphere system cannot be carried out without an idea of the development of human activities, which is done by scenario analysis. The interactive...... nature of the natural and the human system calls for an extremely complex analysis, in order to predict the outcome of various proposed changes in human behavior. This includes halting activities that most influence the climate and finding workable alternatives to these activities, or adapting to climate...

  10. Cooperative behavior of quantum dipole emitters coupled to a zero-index nanoscale waveguide

    CERN Document Server

    Sokhoyan, Ruzan

    2015-01-01

    We study cooperative behavior of quantum dipole emitters coupled to a rectangular waveguide with dielectric core and silver cladding. We investigate cooperative emission and inter-emitter entanglement generation phenomena for emitters whose resonant frequencies are near the frequency cutoff of the waveguide, where the waveguide effectively behaves as zero-index metamaterial. We show that coupling emitters to a zero-index waveguide allows one to relax the constraint on precision positioning of emitters for observing inter-emitter entanglement generation and extend the spatial scale at which the superradiance can be observed.

  11. Hafnia-plugged microcavities for thermal stability of selective emitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Heon-Ju; Smyth, Katherine; Bathurst, Stephen; Chou, Jeffrey; Ghebrebrhan, Michael; Joannopoulos, John; Saka, Nannaji; Kim, Sang-Gook

    2013-06-01

    Two-dimensional arrays of micro-cavities effectively control photon motion and selectively emit radiation tailored to the preferred bandgap of photovoltaic (PV) cells, thus enhancing the efficiency of thermophotovoltaic energy conversion. At the high operating temperatures, however, the micro- and nano-patterned structures of the selective emitters quickly lose their integrity--obliterating the tight tolerances required for precise spectral control. Even if oxidation, recrystallization, and grain growth could be avoided with single-crystal tungsten (W) selective emitters with vacuum packaging, surface diffusion, evaporation, and re-condensation are not avoidable in long-term operation at high temperatures. The concept of a planar array of plugged micro-cavities to suppress the curvature-dependent thermal degradation modes is proposed and tested. Based on scale-accelerated failure tests of silicon devices, the lifetime of W selective emitters operating at 1100 K is estimated to be at least 30 yr.

  12. Fully tuneable, Purcell-enhanced solid-state quantum emitters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petruzzella, M., E-mail: m.petruzzella@tue.nl; Xia, T.; Pagliano, F.; Birindelli, S.; Zobenica, Z.; Fiore, A. [COBRA Research Institute, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, NL-5600MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Midolo, L. [Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Blegdamsvej 17, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Li, L. H.; Linfield, E. H. [School of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom)

    2015-10-05

    We report the full energy control over a semiconductor cavity-emitter system, consisting of single Stark-tunable quantum dots embedded in mechanically reconfigurable photonic crystal membranes. A reversible wavelength tuning of the emitter over 7.5 nm as well as an 8.5 nm mode shift are realized on the same device. Harnessing these two electrical tuning mechanisms, a single exciton transition is brought on resonance with the cavity mode at several wavelengths, demonstrating a ten-fold enhancement of its spontaneous emission. These results open the way to bring several cavity-enhanced emitters mutually into resonance and therefore represent a key step towards scalable quantum photonic circuits featuring multiple sources of indistinguishable single photons.

  13. Pro jected Shell Mo del Description for the Proton Emitters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卞宝安

    2016-01-01

    Proton radioactivity is an important decay mode for nuclei near the proton drip-line. Studies of this decay mode can reveal valuable information on exotic nuclear structure and provide important information on the stucture of nuclei in extreme conditions. The new experimental data can let us understand the interactions in exotic systems, which motivate further theoretical development. The most recent application of the projected shell model (PSM) for proton emitters is represented. We study the rotational bands of the deformed proton emitter 141Ho by using the PSM. The experimental data are well reproduced. Strongly suppressed γ transition from the low-lying Iπ= 3/2+ state makes this state isomeric. Variations in the dynamical moment of inertia are discussed due to band crossings using the band diagram. The calculated results for proton emitter 151Lu shows it is oblately deformed.

  14. Cooperative Lamb shift in a quantum emitter array

    CERN Document Server

    Meir, Ziv; Shahmoon, Ephraim; Oron, Dan; Ozeri, Roee

    2013-01-01

    Whenever several quantum light emitters are brought in proximity with one another, their interaction with common electromagnetic fields couples them, giving rise to cooperative shifts in their resonance frequency. Such collective line shifts are central to modern atomic physics, being closely related to superradiance on one hand and the Lamb shift on the other. Although collective shifts have been theoretically predicted more than fifty years ago, the effect has not been observed yet in a controllable system of a few isolated emitters. Here, we report a direct spectroscopic observation of the cooperative shift of an optical electric dipole transition in a system of up to eight Sr ions suspended in a Paul trap. We study collective resonance shift in the previously unexplored regime of far-field coupling, and provide the first observation of cooperative effects in an array of quantum emitters. These results pave the way towards experimental exploration of cooperative emission phenomena in mesoscopic systems.

  15. Emittance growth in the DARHT Axis-II Downstream Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ekdahl, Jr., Carl August [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Schulze, Martin E. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-04-14

    Using a particle-in-cell (PIC) code, we investigated the possibilities for emittance growth through the quadrupole magnets of the system used to transport the high-current electron beam from an induction accelerator to the bremsstrahlung converter target used for flash radiography. We found that even highly mismatched beams exhibited little emittance growth (< 6%), which we attribute to softening of their initial hard edge current distributions. We also used this PIC code to evaluate the accuracy of emittance measurements using a solenoid focal scan following the quadrupole magnets. If the beam is round after the solenoids, the simulations indicate that the measurement is highly accurate, but it is substantially inaccurate for elliptical beams

  16. DC-SC Photoinjector with Low Emittance at Peking University

    CERN Document Server

    Xiang Rong; Hao, J; Huang, Senlin; Lu Xiang Yang; Quan, Shengwen; Zhang, Baocheng; Zhao, Kui

    2005-01-01

    High average power Free Electron Lasers require the high quality electron beams with the low emittance and the sub-picosecond bunches. The design of DC-SC photoinjector, directly combining a DC photoinjector with an SRF cavity, can produce high average current beam with moderate bunch charge and high duty factor. Because of the DC gun, the emittance increases quickly at the beginning, so a carefully design is needed to control that. In this paper, the simulation of an upgraded design has been done to lower the normalized emittance below 1.5mm·mrad. The photoinjector consists of a DC gap and a 2+1/2-cell SRF cavity, and it is designed to produce 4.2 MeV electron beams at 100pC bunch charge and 81.25MHz repetition rate (8 mA average current).

  17. Hybrid genetic optimization for design of photonic crystal emitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rammohan, R. R.; Farfan, B. G.; Su, M. F.; El-Kady, I.; Reda Taha, M. M.

    2010-09-01

    A unique hybrid-optimization technique is proposed, based on genetic algorithms (GA) and gradient descent (GD) methods, for the smart design of photonic crystal (PhC) emitters. The photonic simulation is described and the granularity of photonic crystal dimensions is considered. An innovative sliding-window method for performing local heuristic search is demonstrated. Finally, the application of the proposed method on two case studies for the design of a multi-pixel photonic crystal emitter and the design of thermal emitter in thermal photovoltaic is demonstrated. Discussion in the report includes the ability of the optimal PhC structures designed using the proposed method, to produce unprecedented high emission efficiencies of 54.5% in a significantly long wavelength region and 84.9% at significantly short wavelength region.

  18. Field Emission from Lateral Multiwalled Carbon Nanotube Yarn Emitters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guohai Chen

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A field emission from a lateral emitter made by a multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT yarn was investigated. The lateral emitter showed an excellent field emission performance with a low turn-on electric field of 1.13 V/um at an emission current of 1 uA, high emission current of 0.2 mA at an applied voltage of 700 V, and long-time emission stability for over 20 h without any significant current decay under an initial emission current of about 0.10 mA. The lateral emitter also demonstrated a uniform line emission pattern. It is suggested that the field emission occurs from the outmost MWCNTs which are protruding out from the yarn surface.

  19. Field Emission from Lateral Multiwalled Carbon Nanotube Yarn Emitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guohai; Song, Yenan

    2016-10-01

    A field emission from a lateral emitter made by a multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) yarn was investigated. The lateral emitter showed an excellent field emission performance with a low turn-on electric field of 1.13 V/um at an emission current of 1 uA, high emission current of 0.2 mA at an applied voltage of 700 V, and long-time emission stability for over 20 h without any significant current decay under an initial emission current of about 0.10 mA. The lateral emitter also demonstrated a uniform line emission pattern. It is suggested that the field emission occurs from the outmost MWCNTs which are protruding out from the yarn surface.

  20. Emittance measurements for the Illinois/CEBAF polarized electron source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunham, B.M.; Cardman, L.S. [Illinois Univ., Urbana, IL (United States); Sinclair, C.K. [Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States)

    1995-01-01

    The transverse thermal properties of the electrons photoemitted from GaAs determine the intrinsic beam emittance, an important quantity in applications such as polarized electron sources and high-brightness sources. In this paper, emittance measurements using the Illinois/CEBAF polarized electron source are described. The emittance was measured as a function of both the laser beam spot size and laser wavelength at low currents. The data was used to infer the transverse thermal energy of the electrons photoemitted from GaAs for wavelengths between 514 and 840 nm. Near the bandgap the transverse energy is {approximately}34 meV, a factor of 3 lower than that of the beam from a typical thermionic electron gun. 8 refs., 2 figs.

  1. On the measurement of positron emitters with Ge detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peyres, Virginia, E-mail: virginia.peyres@ciemat.e [Ciemat, Laboratorio de Metrologia de Radiaciones Ionizantes, Avda. Complutense 22, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Garcia-Torano, Eduardo [Ciemat, Laboratorio de Metrologia de Radiaciones Ionizantes, Avda. Complutense 22, Madrid 28040 (Spain)

    2011-05-01

    This paper discusses the problems related to the measurement of positron emitters with germanium detectors. Five positron emitters with important applications in nuclear medicine ({sup 22}Na, {sup 18}F, {sup 11}C, {sup 13}N and {sup 68}Ga) have been studied. Measurements and Monte Carlo simulations have been used to determine the optimal conditions of measurement in gamma-ray spectrometry systems. The results obtained indicate that adding adequate absorbers, detection efficiencies are close to those of gamma emitters of similar energy measured in the same conditions, which allows a rapid calibration of a Ge-based spectrometry system. More accurate results are also presented using a detailed Monte Carlo simulation. Comparison to experimental data shows a good agreement.

  2. High efficiency and stable white OLED using a single emitter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jian [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States). School of Mechanical, Aerospace, Chemical and Materials Engineering

    2016-01-18

    The ultimate objective of this project was to demonstrate an efficient and stable white OLED using a single emitter on a planar glass substrate. The focus of the project is on the development of efficient and stable square planar phosphorescent emitters and evaluation of such class of materials in the device settings. Key challenges included improving the emission efficiency of molecular dopants and excimers, controlling emission color of emitters and their excimers, and improving optical and electrical stability of emissive dopants. At the end of this research program, the PI has made enough progress to demonstrate the potential of excimer-based white OLED as a cost-effective solution for WOLED panel in the solid state lighting applications.

  3. Laser Process for Selective Emitter Silicon Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Poulain

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Selective emitter solar cells can provide a significant increase in conversion efficiency. However current approaches need many technological steps and alignment procedures. This paper reports on a preliminary attempt to reduce the number of processing steps and therefore the cost of selective emitter cells. In the developed procedure, a phosphorous glass covered with silicon nitride acts as the doping source. A laser is used to open locally the antireflection coating and at the same time achieve local phosphorus diffusion. In this process the standard chemical etching of the phosphorous glass is avoided. Sheet resistance variation from 100 Ω/sq to 40 Ω/sq is demonstrated with a nanosecond UV laser. Numerical simulation of the laser-matter interaction is discussed to understand the dopant diffusion efficiency. Preliminary solar cells results show a 0.5% improvement compared with a homogeneous emitter structure.

  4. Global warming without global mean precipitation increase?

    OpenAIRE

    Salzmann, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Global climate models simulate a robust increase of global mean precipitation of about 1.5 to 2% per kelvin surface warming in response to greenhouse gas (GHG) forcing. Here, it is shown that the sensitivity to aerosol cooling is robust as well, albeit roughly twice as large. This larger sensitivity is consistent with energy budget arguments. At the same time, it is still considerably lower than the 6.5 to 7% K−1 decrease of the water vapor concentration with cooling from anthropogenic aeroso...

  5. Warming countermeasure law carries it out; Ondanka taisakuho ga seko

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-06-01

    Law about the promotion of the global warming countermeasure was enforced on April 8. And, a Cabinet meeting decided the basic policy related to the global warming countermeasure on April 9 as the government based on the same law. A country settled on an executive plan for five years, and included grappling with the promotion of saving energy, the development of the new energy and the collection of the fron to attain the goal for a greenhouse effect gas discharge reduction for which to decide it by Kyoto fixed calligraphy with a basic policy. A global warming countermeasure was concluded by law of world for the purpose of prevention of global warming in October, the 10th year of Heisei how to promote it. (translated by NEDO)

  6. Evaluating the dominant components of warming in Pliocene climate simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. J. Hill

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The Pliocene Model Intercomparison Project is the first coordinated climate model comparison for a warmer palaeoclimate with atmospheric CO2 significantly higher than pre-industrial concentrations. The simulations of the mid-Pliocene warm period show global warming of between 1.8 and 3.6 °C above pre-industrial surface air temperatures, with significant polar amplification. Here we perform energy balance calculations on all eight of the coupled ocean–atmosphere simulations within PlioMIP Experiment 2 to evaluate the causes of the increased temperatures and differences between the models. In the tropics simulated warming is dominated by greenhouse gas increases, with cloud albedo feedbacks enhancing the warming in most of the models, but by widely varying amounts. The responses to mid-Pliocene climate forcing in the Northern Hemisphere mid-latitudes are substantially different between the climate models, with the only consistent response being a warming due to increased greenhouse gases. In the high latitudes all the energy balance components become important, but the dominant warming influence comes from the clear sky albedo. This demonstrates the importance of specified ice sheet and high latitude vegetation boundary conditions and simulated sea ice and snow albedo feedbacks. The largest components in the overall uncertainty are associated with cloud albedo feedbacks in the tropics and polar clear sky albedo, particularly in sea ice regions. These simulations show that high latitude albedo feedbacks provide the most significant enhancements to Pliocene greenhouse warming.

  7. Optical characterization of OLED emitter properties by radiation pattern analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flaemmich, Michael

    2011-09-08

    Researches in both, academia and industry are investigating optical loss channels in OLED layered systems by means of optical simulation tools in order to derive promising concepts for a further enhancement of the overall device performance. Besides other factors, the prospects of success of such optimization strategies rely severely on the credibility of the optical input data. The present thesis provides a guideline to measure the active optical properties of OLED emitter materials in situ by radiation pattern analyses. Reliable and widely applicable methods are introduced to determine the internal electroluminescence spectrum, the profile of the emission zone, the dipole emitter orientation, and the internal luminescence quantum efficiency of emissive materials from the optical far field emission of OLEDs in electrical operation. The proposed characterization procedures are applied to sets of OLEDs containing both, fluorescent polymeric materials as well as phosphorescent small-molecular emitters, respectively. On the one hand, quite expected results are obtained. On the other hand, several novel and truly surprising results are found. Most importantly, this thesis contains the first report of a non-isotropic, mainly parallel emitter orientation in a phosphorescent small-molecular guest-host system (Ir(MDQ)2(acac) in a-NPD). Due to the latter result, emitter orientation based optimization of phosphorescent OLEDs seems to be within reach. Since parallel dipoles emit preferably into air, the utilization of smart emissive materials with advantageous molecular orientation is capable to boost the efficiency of phosphorescent OLEDs by 50%. Materials design, the influence of the matrix material and the substrate, as well as film deposition conditions are just a few parameters that need to be studied further in order to exploit the huge potential of the dipole emitter orientation in phosphorescent OLEDs.

  8. High-efficiency photonic crystal narrowband thermal emitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farfan, G. B.; Su, M. F.; Reda Taha, M. M.; El-Kady, I.

    2010-02-01

    Photonic crystals (PhC) are artificial structures fabricated with a periodicity in the dielectric function. This periodic electromagnetic potential results in creation of energy bandgaps where photon propagation is prohibited. PhC structures have promising use in thermal applications if optimized to operate at specific thermal emission spectrum. Here, novel utilization of optimized PhC's in thermal applications is presented. We demonstrate through numerical simulation the modification of the thermal emission spectrum by a metallic photonic crystal (PhC) to create high-efficiency multispectral thermal emitters. These emitters funnel radiation from a broad emission spectrum associated with a Plancklike distribution into a prescribed narrow emission band. A detailed quantitative evaluation of the spectral and power efficiencies of a PhC thermal emitter and its portability across infrared (IR) spectral bands are provided. We show an optimized tungsten PhC with a predominant narrow-band emission profile with an emitter efficiency that is more than double that of an ideal blackbody and ~65-75% more power-efficiency across the IR spectrum. We also report on using optimal three-dimensional Lincoln log photonic crystal (LL-PhC) emitters for thermophotovoltaic (TPV) generation as opposed to using a passive filtering approach to truncate the broadband thermal source emission to match the bandgap of a photovoltaic (PV) cell. The emitter performance is optimized for the 1-2μm PV band using different PhC materials, specifically copper, silver and gold. The use of the proposed PhC in TPV devices can produce significant energy savings not reported before. The optimal design of the PhC geometry is obtained by implementing a variety of optimization methods integrated with artificial intelligence (AI) algorithms.

  9. Assessing Rates of Global Warming Emissions from Port- Fuel Injection and Gasoline Direct Injection Engines in Light-Duty Passenger Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, D.; , D., Vi; Durbin, T.; Karavalakis, G.; Asa-Awuku, A. A.

    2013-12-01

    Passenger vehicles are known emitters of climate warming pollutants. CO2 from automobile emissions are an anthropogenic greenhouse gas (GHG) and a large contributor to global warming. Worldwide, CO2 emissions from passenger vehicles are responsible for 11% of the total CO2 emissions inventory. Black Carbon (BC), another common vehicular emission, may be the second largest contributor to global warming (after CO2). Currently, 52% of BC emissions in the U.S are from the transportation sector, with ~10% originating from passenger vehicles. The share of pollutants from passenger gasoline vehicles is becoming larger due to the reduction of BC from diesel vehicles. Currently, the majority of gasoline passenger vehicles in the United States have port- fuel injection (PFI) engines. Gasoline direct injection (GDI) engines have increased fuel economy compared to the PFI engine. GDI vehicles are predicted to dominate the U.S. passenger vehicle market in the coming years. The method of gasoline injection into the combustion chamber is the primary difference between these two technologies, which can significantly impact primary emissions from light-duty vehicles (LDV). Our study will measure LDV climate warming emissions and assess the impact on climate due to the change in U.S vehicle technologies. Vehicles were tested on a light- duty chassis dynamometer for emissions of CO2, methane (CH4), and BC. These emissions were measured on F3ederal and California transient test cycles and at steady-state speeds. Vehicles used a gasoline blend of 10% by volume ethanol (E10). E10 fuel is now found in 95% of gasoline stations in the U.S. Data is presented from one GDI and one PFI vehicle. The 2012 Kia Optima utilizes GDI technology and has a large market share of the total GDI vehicles produced in the U.S. In addition, The 2012 Toyota Camry, equipped with a PFI engine, was the most popular vehicle model sold in the U.S. in 2012. Methane emissions were ~50% lower for the GDI technology

  10. Polynomial cointegration tests of anthropogenic impact on global warming

    OpenAIRE

    M. Beenstock; Reingewertz, Y.; N. Paldor

    2012-01-01

    We use statistical methods for nonstationary time series to test the anthropogenic interpretation of global warming (AGW), according to which an increase in atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations raised global temperature in the 20th century. Specifically, the methodology of polynomial cointegration is used to test AGW since during the observation period (1880–2007) global temperature and solar irradiance are stationary in 1st differences, whereas greenhouse gas and aerosol forcings are st...

  11. Observation of negative differential transconductance in tunneling emitter bipolar transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Veenhuizen, Marc J.; Locatelli, Nicolas; Moodera, Jagadeesh; Chang, Joonyeon

    2009-08-01

    We report on measurement of negative differential transconductance (NDTC) of iron (Fe)/magnesium-oxide (MgO)/silicon tunneling emitter NPN bipolar transistors. Device simulations reveal that the NDTC is a consequence of an inversion layer at the tunneling-oxide/P-silicon interface for low base voltages. Electrons travel laterally through the inversion layer into the base and give rise to an increase in collector current. The NDTC results from the recombination of those electrons at the interface between emitter and base contact which is dependent on the base voltage. For larger base voltages, the inversion layer disappears marking the onset of normal bipolar transistor behavior.

  12. Emittance Measurements at the Langley Chemical Physics Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, B. W.

    1960-01-01

    Total hemispherical emittance measurements are made routinely for materials which may be heated by electrical resistance methods over the temperature range of 600 degrees to 2,000 F by using a black-body reference method. This employs a conical black body and a thermopile detector with a calcium fluoride lens. Emittance is obtained by measuring the radiant flux from the specimen strip and comparing it with the flux from an equal area of the black-body cone at the same temperature. The temperature measurements are made by use of thermocouples. It is planned to extend the temperature range of this type of measurement to temperatures above 2,000 F. Another technique has been investigated for measuring emittance of materials not amenable to electrical heating or thermocouple attachment. This method uses a black-body-cavity furnace similar to that used in reference 5 to measure emittance of transparent materials such as glass. The method employs a heated black-body cavity in which the semicircular specimen is allowed to come to the equilibrium temperature of the cavity and then is rotated in front of a water-cooled viewing port where a sensitive thermistor detector alternately views the specimen surface and the black-body cavity. The ratio of the two readings gives the specimen emittance directly, for the temperature of the black body. The detector output is recorded on a fast Brown self-balancing potentiometer. The furnace is provided with a water-cooled blackened shutter which may be inserted behind the specimen to eliminate any transmitted black-body radiation if the specimen is transparent. This apparatus is capable of measuring total normal emittance over the temperature range of 1,000 degrees to 2,000 F. Preliminary data for boron nitride specimens of two thicknesses are shown where total normal emittance is plotted against temperature for two experimental conditions: (1) black-body radiation incident on the back of the specimen and (2) no black-body radiation

  13. Beam emittance reduction during operation of Indus-2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fakhri, Ali Akbar, E-mail: fakhri@rrcat.gov.in; Kant, Pradeep; Ghodke, A. D.; Singh, Gurnam [Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore 452 013 (India)

    2015-11-15

    Indus-2 storage ring is a 2.5 GeV third generation synchrotron radiation source. This source was commissioned using a moderate optics. Beam injection was accomplished using an off momentum electron beam to avoid difficulties faced in storage of beam at 550 MeV. The injection procedure and relevant beam dynamical studies are discussed. The switch over from the moderate optics to low emittance optics is done at 2.5 GeV after storing the electron beam. The procedure evolved to reduce the beam emittance and its implementation during the operation is discussed.

  14. Spectrum of classes of point emitters of electromagnetic wave fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castañeda, Román

    2016-09-01

    The spectrum of classes of point emitters has been introduced as a numerical tool suitable for the design, analysis, and synthesis of non-paraxial optical fields in arbitrary states of spatial coherence. In this paper, the polarization state of planar electromagnetic wave fields is included in the spectrum of classes, thus increasing its modeling capabilities. In this context, optical processing is realized as a filtering on the spectrum of classes of point emitters, performed by the complex degree of spatial coherence and the two-point correlation of polarization, which could be implemented dynamically by using programmable optical devices.

  15. Carbon Nanotube Electron Emitter for X-ray Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung Su Kang

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The carbon nanotube field emitter array was grown on silicon substrate through a resist-assisted patterning (RAP process. The shape of the carbon nanotube array is elliptical with 2.0 × 0.5 mm2 for an isotropic focal spot size at anode target. The field emission properties with triode electrodes show a gate turn-on field of 3 V/µm at an anode emission current of 0.1 mA. The author demonstrated the X-ray source with triode electrode structure utilizing the carbon nanotube emitter, and the transmitted X-ray image was of high resolution.

  16. Epitaxial Growth of Germanium on Silicon for Light Emitters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengzhao Chen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the role of Ge as an enabler for light emitters on a Si platform. In spite of the large lattice mismatch of ~4.2% between Ge and Si, high-quality Ge layers can be epitaxially grown on Si by ultrahigh-vacuum chemical vapor deposition. Applications of the Ge layers to near-infrared light emitters with various structures are reviewed, including the tensile-strained Ge epilayer, the Ge epilayer with a delta-doping SiGe layer, and the Ge/SiGe multiple quantum wells on Si. The fundamentals of photoluminescence physics in the different Ge structures are discussed briefly.

  17. Recent progress of carbon nanotube field emitters and their application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seelaboyina, Raghunandan; Choi, Wonbong

    2007-01-01

    The potential of utilizing carbon nanotube field emission properties is an attractive feature for future vacuum electronic devices including: high power microwave, miniature x-ray, backlight for liquid crystal displays and flat panel displays. Their high emission current, nano scale geometry, chemical inertness and low threshold voltage for emission are attractive features for the field emission applications. In this paper we review the recent developments of carbon nanotube field emitters and their device applications. We also discuss the latest results on field emission current amplification achieved with an electron multiplier microchannel plate, and emission performance of multistage field emitter based on oxide nanowire operated in poor vacuum.

  18. Ultra-low emittance X-band photocathode RF gun

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Chuan-Xiang; LIU Xiao-Han

    2009-01-01

    In this paper,we present the simulation results of a 1.6 cell X-band photocathode RF gun for ultra-low emittance electron beams.It will work at 9.3 GHz.The emittance,bunch length,electron energy and energy spread at the gun exit are optimized at bunch charge of 1pC using PARMELA.Electron bunches type coupler is adopted in this gun and an initial simulation by MAFIA is also given in this paper.

  19. Ultra-Sensitivity Glucose Sensor Based on Field Emitters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Yinglin

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A new glucose sensor based on field emitter of ZnO nanorod arrays (ZNA was fabricated. This new type of ZNA field emitter-based sensor shows high sensitivity with experimental limit of detection of 1 nM glucose solution and a detection range from 1 nM to 50 μM in air at room temperature, which is lower than that of glucose sensors based on surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy, fluorescence signal transmission, and electrochemical signal transduction. The new glucose sensor provides a key technique for promising consuming application in biological system for detecting low levels of glucose on single cells or bacterial cultures.

  20. Coherent polarization locking of a diode emitter array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, S P; Phua, P B

    2009-07-01

    We present our work on the coherent combining of an array of diode emitters in a conventional diode bar configuration using the coherent polarization locking technique. An external laser cavity is designed so that the diode emissions from four diode emitters are spatially overlapped and passively phase locked via a series of birefringent walk-off crystals and a polarizing beam splitter. This concept was experimentally demonstrated up to 1030 mW of coherently combined power and was shown to increase the laser brightness of the diode bar by approximately 50 times.

  1. Thermal emittance and response time of a cesium antimonide photocathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cultrera, Luca; Bazarov, Ivan; Bartnik, Adam; Dunham, Bruce; Karkare, Siddharth; Merluzzi, Richard; Nichols, Matthew

    2011-10-01

    Measurements of the intrinsic emittance and response time of a Cs3Sb photocathode are presented. The emittance is obtained with a solenoid scan technique using a high voltage dc photoemission gun. Photoemission response time is evaluated using a RF deflecting cavity synchronized to a picosecond laser pulse train. We find that Cs3Sb has both small mean transverse energy, 160 ± 10 meV at 532 nm laser wavelength, and a prompt response time (below the resolution of our measurement) making it a suitable material for high brightness electron photoinjectors.

  2. Emittances Studies at the Fermilab/NICADD Photoinjector Laboratory

    CERN Document Server

    Tikhoplav, Rodion; Melissinos, A C; Regis-Guy Piot, Philippe

    2005-01-01

    The Fermilab/NICADD photoinjector incorporates an L-band rf-gun capable of generating 1-10 nC bunches. The bunches are then accelerated to 16 MeV with a TESLA superconducting cavity. In the present paper we present parametric studies of transverse emittances and energy spread for a various operating points of the electron source (RF-gun E-field, laser length and spot size, and solenoid settings). We especially study the impact, on transverse emittance, of Gaussian and Plateau temporal distribution of the photocathode drive-laser.

  3. Efficient Terahertz Photoconductive Emitters with Improved Electrode Structures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying-Xin Wang; Yi-Jie Niu; Wei Cheng; Zhi-Qiang Li; Zi-Ran Zhao

    2014-01-01

    We present the design, fabrication, and characterization of two new types of terahertz photoconductive emitters. One has an asymmetric four-contact electrode structure and the other has an arc-shaped electrode structure, which are all modified from a traditional strip line antenna. Numerical simulations and real experiments confirm the good performance of the proposed antennas. An amplitude increase of about 40% is experimentally observed for the terahertz signals generated from the new structures. The special electrode structure and its induced local bias field enhancement are responsible for this radiation efficiency improvement. Our work demonstrates the feasibility of developing highly efficient terahertz photoconductive emitters by optimizing the electrode structure.

  4. Radiation doses and risks from internal emitters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrison, John [Health Protection Agency, Radiation Protection Division, CRCE, Chilton, Didcot, Oxon OX11 0RQ (United Kingdom); Day, Philip [School of Chemistry, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)], E-mail: john.harrison@hpa.org.uk, E-mail: philip.day@manchester.ac.uk

    2008-06-01

    This review updates material prepared for the UK Government Committee Examining Radiation Risks from Internal Emitters (CERRIE) and also refers to the new recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and other recent developments. Two conclusions from CERRIE were that ICRP should clarify and elaborate its advice on the use of its dose quantities, equivalent and effective dose, and that more attention should be paid to uncertainties in dose and risk estimates and their implications. The new ICRP recommendations provide explanations of the calculation and intended purpose of the protection quantities, but further advice on their use would be helpful. The new recommendations refer to the importance of understanding uncertainties in estimates of dose and risk, although methods for doing this are not suggested. Dose coefficients (Sv per Bq intake) for the inhalation or ingestion of radionuclides are published as reference values without uncertainty. The primary purpose of equivalent and effective dose is to enable the summation of doses from different radionuclides and from external sources for comparison with dose limits, constraints and reference levels that relate to stochastic risks of whole-body radiation exposure. Doses are calculated using defined biokinetic and dosimetric models, including reference anatomical data for the organs and tissues of the human body. Radiation weighting factors are used to adjust for the different effectiveness of different radiation types, per unit absorbed dose (Gy), in causing stochastic effects at low doses and dose rates. Tissue weighting factors are used to take account of the contribution of individual organs and tissues to overall detriment from cancer and hereditary effects, providing a simple set of rounded values chosen on the basis of age- and sex-averaged values of relative detriment. While the definition of absorbed dose has the scientific rigour required of a basic physical quantity

  5. Global Warming on Triton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliot, J. L.; Hammel, H. B.; Wasserman, L. H.; Franz, O. G.; McDonald, S. W.; Person, M. J.; Olkin, C. B.; Dunham, E. J.; Spencer, J. R.; Stansberry, J. A.; Buie, M. W.; Pasachoff, J. M.; Babcock, B. A.; McConnochie, T. H.

    1998-01-01

    Triton, Neptune's largest moon, has been predicted to undergo significant seasonal changes that would reveal themselves as changes in its mean frost temperature. But whether this temperature should at the present time be increasing, decreasing or constant depends on a number of parameters (such as the thermal properties of the surface, and frost migration patterns) that are unknown. Here we report observations of a recent stellar occultation by Triton which, when combined with earlier results, show that Triton has undergone a period of global warming since 1989. Our most conservative estimates of the rate of temperature and surface-pressure increase during this period imply that the atmosphere is doubling in bulk every 10 years, significantly faster than predicted by any published frost model for Triton. Our result suggests that permanent polar caps on Triton play a c dominant role in regulating seasonal atmospheric changes. Similar processes should also be active on Pluto.

  6. Competent and Warm?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Karolina; Rakić, Tamara; Steffens, Melanie C

    2017-01-01

    Most research on ethnicity has focused on visual cues. However, accents are strong social cues that can match or contradict visual cues. We examined understudied reactions to people whose one cue suggests one ethnicity, whereas the other cue contradicts it. In an experiment conducted in Germany, job candidates spoke with an accent either congruent or incongruent with their (German or Turkish) appearance. Based on ethnolinguistic identity theory, we predicted that accents would be strong cues for categorization and evaluation. Based on expectancy violations theory we expected that incongruent targets would be evaluated more extremely than congruent targets. Both predictions were confirmed: accents strongly influenced perceptions and Turkish-looking German-accented targets were perceived as most competent of all targets (and additionally most warm). The findings show that bringing together visual and auditory information yields a more complete picture of the processes underlying impression formation.

  7. Boundary conditions on the plasma emitter surface in the presence of a particle counter flow: I. Ion emitter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Astrelin, V. T., E-mail: V.T.Astrelin@inp.nsk.su; Kotelnikov, I. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation)

    2017-02-15

    Emission of positively charged ions from a plasma emitter irradiated by a counterpropagating electron beam is studied theoretically. A bipolar diode with a plasma emitter in which the ion temperature is lower than the electron temperature and the counter electron flow is extracted from the ion collector is calculated in the one-dimensional model. An analog of Bohm’s criterion for ion emission in the presence of a counterpropagating electron beam is derived. The limiting density of the counterpropagating beam in a bipolar diode operating in the space-charge-limited-emission regime is calculated. The full set of boundary conditions on the plasma emitter surface that are required for operation of the high-current optics module in numerical codes used to simulate charged particle sources is formulated.

  8. Continuous-wave mid-infrared photonic crystal light emitters at room temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Binbin; Qiu, Jijun; Shi, Zhisheng

    2017-01-01

    Mid-infrared photonic crystal enhanced lead-salt light emitters operating under continuous-wave mode at room temperature were investigated in this work. For the device, an active region consisting of 9 pairs of PbSe/Pb0.96Sr0.04Se quantum wells was grown by molecular beam epitaxy method on top of a Si(111) substrate which was initially dry-etched with a two-dimensional photonic crystal structure in a pattern of hexagonal holes. Because of the photonic crystal structure, an optical band gap between 3.49 and 3.58 µm was formed, which matched with the light emission spectrum of the quantum wells at room temperature. As a result, under optical pumping, using a near-infrared continuous-wave semiconductor laser, the device exhibited strong photonic crystal band-edge mode emissions and delivered over 26.5 times higher emission efficiency compared to the one without photonic crystal structure. The output power obtained was up to 7.68 mW (the corresponding power density was 363 mW/cm2), and a maximum quantum efficiency reached to 1.2%. Such photonic crystal emitters can be used as promising light sources for novel miniaturized gas-sensing systems.

  9. Can galactic outflows explain the properties of Ly-alpha emitters?

    CERN Document Server

    Orsi, Alvaro; Baugh, Carlton M

    2011-01-01

    We study the properties of Ly-alpha emitters in a cosmological framework by computing the escape of Ly-alpha photons through galactic outflows. We combine the GALFORM semi-analytical model of galaxy formation with a Monte Carlo Ly-alpha radiative transfer code. The properties of Ly-alpha emitters at 0gas and a Wind ejecting material, both expanding at constant velocity. We characterise the differences in the Ly-alpha line profiles predicted by the two outflow geometries in terms of their width, asymmetry and shift from the line centre for a set of outflows with different hydrogen column densities, expansion velocities and metallicities. In general, the Ly-alpha line profile of the Shell geometry is broader and more asymmetric, and the Ly-alpha escape fraction is lower than with the Wind geometry for the same set of parameters. In order to implement the outflow geometries in the semi-analytical model GALFORM, a number of free parameters ...

  10. The Green Peas: Searching for LyC Emitters at Low Redshift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaskot, Anne; Oey, Sally

    The escape fraction of Lyman continuum (LyC) radiation from galaxies remains one of the primary uncertainties in studies of reionization. However, few LyC-emitting galaxies are known. The recently identified, low-redshift ``Green Pea'' (GP) galaxies exhibit a number of similarities with high-redshift galaxies, and their optical emission lines suggest they may be some of the elusive LyC emitters. Recent HST COS and ACS observations of four GPs suggest further evidence for LyC escape and give new insights into the origins of Lyα and low-ionization UV lines in high-redshift galaxies. The Lyα emission and low-ionization emission and absorption lines provide a coherent physical picture of the neutral gas distribution in the GPs and may identify LyC emitters at high redshift. The rare, low-redshift GPs hint at possible factors that may enable LyC and Lyα escape from high-redshift galaxies.

  11. Local warming: daily temperature change influences belief in global warming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ye; Johnson, Eric J; Zaval, Lisa

    2011-04-01

    Although people are quite aware of global warming, their beliefs about it may be malleable; specifically, their beliefs may be constructed in response to questions about global warming. Beliefs may reflect irrelevant but salient information, such as the current day's temperature. This replacement of a more complex, less easily accessed judgment with a simple, more accessible one is known as attribute substitution. In three studies, we asked residents of the United States and Australia to report their opinions about global warming and whether the temperature on the day of the study was warmer or cooler than usual. Respondents who thought that day was warmer than usual believed more in and had greater concern about global warming than did respondents who thought that day was colder than usual. They also donated more money to a global-warming charity if they thought that day seemed warmer than usual. We used instrumental variable regression to rule out some alternative explanations.

  12. Research on Greenhouse Gas Change of Main Driving Factor of Global Warming%全球变暖主要驱动因子温室气体变化研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭庆春; 孙珂; 张轩

    2012-01-01

    Greenhouse gas change has been becoming a hot and focal issue of global change research/The greenhouse gas concentration change increases the absorption of escapeing radiation, and probably cause climate change.%温室气体变化是全球变化研究的热点和焦点问题,温室气体浓度的变化增加了对逸出辐射的吸收,可能引起气候发生变化.

  13. Climate model and proxy data constraints on ocean warming across the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dunkley Jones, T.; Lunt, D.J.; Schmidt, D.N.; Ridgwell, A.; Sluijs, A.; Valdes, P.J.; Maslin, M.

    2013-01-01

    Constraining the greenhouse gas forcing, climatic warming and estimates of climate sensitivity across ancient large transient warming events is a major challenge to the palaeoclimate research community. Here we provide a new compilation and synthesis of the available marine proxy temperature data ac

  14. Anaerobic digestion and digestate use: accounting of greenhouse gases and global warming contribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Jacob; Boldrin, Alessio; Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    2009-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion (AD) of source-separated municipal solid waste (MSW) and use of the digestate is presented from a global warming (GW) point of view by providing ranges of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions that are useful for calculation of global warming factors (GWFs), i.e. the contribution to GW...

  15. The effects of emitter-tied field plates on lateral PNP ionizing radiation response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnaby, H.J.; Schrimpf, R.D.; Cirba, C.R. [Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States); Pease, R.L. [RLP Research, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Fleetwood, D.M. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Kosier, S.L. [VTC Inc., Bloomington, MN (United States)

    1998-03-01

    Radiation response comparisons of lateral PNP bipolar technologies reveal that device hardening may be achieved by extending the emitter contact over the active base. The emitter-tied field plate suppresses recombination of carriers with interface traps.

  16. Nonlocal effects: relevance for the spontaneous emission rates of quantum emitters coupled to plasmonic structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filter, Robert; Bösel, Christoph; Toscano, Giuseppe; Lederer, Falk; Rockstuhl, Carsten

    2014-11-01

    The spontaneous emission rate of dipole emitters close to plasmonic dimers are theoretically studied within a nonlocal hydrodynamic model. A nonlocal model has to be used since quantum emitters in the immediate environment of a metallic nanoparticle probe its electronic structure. Compared to local calculations, the emission rate is significantly reduced. The influence is mostly pronounced if the emitter is located close to sharp edges. We suggest to use quantum emitters to test nonlocal effects in experimentally feasible configurations.

  17. Achieving ultra-high temperatures with a resistive emitter array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielson, Tom; Franks, Greg; Holmes, Nicholas; LaVeigne, Joe; Matis, Greg; McHugh, Steve; Norton, Dennis; Vengel, Tony; Lannon, John; Goodwin, Scott

    2016-05-01

    The rapid development of very-large format infrared detector arrays has challenged the IR scene projector community to also develop larger-format infrared emitter arrays to support the testing of systems incorporating these detectors. In addition to larger formats, many scene projector users require much higher simulated temperatures than can be generated with current technology in order to fully evaluate the performance of their systems and associated processing algorithms. Under the Ultra High Temperature (UHT) development program, Santa Barbara Infrared Inc. (SBIR) is developing a new infrared scene projector architecture capable of producing both very large format (>1024 x 1024) resistive emitter arrays and improved emitter pixel technology capable of simulating very high apparent temperatures. During earlier phases of the program, SBIR demonstrated materials with MWIR apparent temperatures in excess of 1400 K. New emitter materials have subsequently been selected to produce pixels that achieve even higher apparent temperatures. Test results from pixels fabricated using the new material set will be presented and discussed. A 'scalable' Read In Integrated Circuit (RIIC) is also being developed under the same UHT program to drive the high temperature pixels. This RIIC will utilize through-silicon via (TSV) and Quilt Packaging (QP) technologies to allow seamless tiling of multiple chips to fabricate very large arrays, and thus overcome the yield limitations inherent in large-scale integrated circuits. Results of design verification testing of the completed RIIC will be presented and discussed.

  18. Auger Emitter Based Radiotherapy- A Possible New Treatment for Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fredericia, Pil; Groesser, Torsten; Severin, Gregory;

    2014-01-01

    damage produced by Low-LET radiation used in current radiotherapy (2-3) Considerable efforts have been made in the past twenty years to develop Auger emitter-based radiotherapy However, previous studies lack precise measurement of RBE, which is the fundamental factor defining the relationship between...

  19. Jamming of Quantum Emitters by Active Coated Nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arslanagic, Samel; Ziolkowski, Richard W.

    2013-01-01

    A spherical active coated nanoparticle consisting of a silica nanocore covered concentrically with a silver nanoshell is examined analytically and numerically in the presence of one, two, or four quantum emitters modeled by electric Hertzian dipoles. The ability of the active coated nanoparticle...

  20. Brightness limitations of cold field emitters caused by Coulomb interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cook, B.J.; Verduin, T.; Hagen, C.W.; Kruit, P.

    2010-01-01

    Emission theory predicts that high brightness cold field emitters can enhance imaging in the electron microscope. This (neglecting chromatic aberration) is because of the large (coherent) probe current available from a high brightness source and is based on theoretically determined values of reduced

  1. Calculation Of Extraction Optics For Ion System With Plazma Emitter

    CERN Document Server

    Frolov, B A

    2004-01-01

    The 2-D code for simulating of ion optics system of positive ion extraction from a plasma source is described. Example calculation of 100 kV optics for the extraction ion IHEP gun is presented. The trajectories of particles and emittance plots are resulted. The aberrations influ-ence strongly on ion optics for considered geometry.

  2. Magnetized Plasma Experiments Using Thermionic- Thermoelectronic Plasma Emitter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamori, Eiichirou; Cheng, C. Z.; Fujikawa, Nobuko; Lee, Jyun-Yi; Peng, Albert

    2008-11-01

    We are developing a magnetic mirror device, which is the first magnetized plasma device in Taiwan, to explore basic plasma sciences relevant to fusion, space and astrophysical plasmas. Our research subjects include electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT), Alfven wave physics, and plasma turbulence. A large diameter (> 200 mm) plasma emitter1, which utilizes thermionic- thermoelectronic emission from a mixture of LaB6 (Lanthanum-hexaboride) and beta-eucryptite (lithium type aluminosylicate) powders, is employed as a plasma source because of its production ability of fully ionized plasma and controllability of plasma emission rate. The plasma emitter has been installed recently and investigation of its characteristics will be started. The employment of beta-eucryptite in plasma emitter is the first experimental test because such investigation of beta-eucryptite has previously been used only for Li+-ion source2. Our plan for magnetized plasma experiments and results of the plasma emitter investigation will be presented. 1. K. Saeki, S. Iizuka, N. Sato, and Y. Hatta, Appl. Phys. Lett., 37, 1980, pp. 37-38. 2. M. Ueda, R. R. Silva, R. M. Oliveira, H. Iguchi, J. Fujita and K. Kadota, J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 30 1997, pp. 2711--2716.

  3. Development of High Intensity Beam Emittance Measurement Unit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Three sets of High Intensity Beam Emittance Measurement Units (HIBEMUs) are being developed at Peking University. They are HIBEMU-2 (slit-wire type, one direction), HIBEMU-3 (Allison scanner type, one direction) and HIBEMU-4 (slit-wire type, two directions). For HIBEMU-2 and HIBEMU-3, more recent work has been done on software redesign in order to measure beam emittance and to draw phase diagram more efficiently and precisely. Software for control and data processing of them were developed in Labveiw environment, trying to improve calculation rationality and to offer user-friendly interface. Mechanical modification was also done for HIBEMU-3, mainly concentrating on the protection of Faraday cups from being overheated by the high intensity beam and also from interference of secondary electrons. This paper will also cover the mechanical structure as well as the software development of HIBEMU-4, which is a two-direction emittance scanner newly designed and manufactured for the high energy beam transport (HEBT) of Peking University Neutron Imaging FaciliTY (PKUNIFTY). At the end of this paper, comparison and analysis of the three HIBEMUs are given to draw forth better design of the future emittance measurement facility.

  4. Emittance control and RF bunch compression in the NSRRC photoinjector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, W. K.; Hung, S. B.; Lee, A. P.; Chou, C. S.; Huang, N. Y.

    2011-05-01

    The high-brightness photoinjector being constructed at the National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center is for testing new accelerator and light-source concepts. It is the so-called split photoinjector configuration in which a short solenoid magnet is used for emittance compensation. The UV-drive laser pulses are also shaped to produce uniform cylindrical bunches for further reduction of beam emittance. However, limited by the available power from our microwave power system, the nominal accelerating gradient in the S-band booster linac is set at 18 MV/m. A simulation study with PARMELA shows that the linac operating at this gradient fails to freeze the electron beam emittance at low value. A background solenoid magnetic field is applied for beam emittance control in the linac during acceleration. A satisfactory result that meets our preliminary goal has been achieved with the solenoid magnetic field strength at 0.1 T. RF bunch compression as a means to achieve the required beam brightness for high-gain free-electron laser experiments is also examined. The reduction of bunch length to a few hundred femtoseconds can be obtained.

  5. Measurement of Transverse Emittance in the Fermilab Booster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, William Sproull

    A new beam profile monitor has been built and installed in the Fermilab Booster synchrotron. It nondestructively measures the beam's vertical density distribution on a fast turn-by-turn basis. This enables one to measure the beam's transverse emittance and to observe emittance growth as it occurs. For high intensities (>2 times 10^{12 } protons), the normalized 95% emittance was observed to grow from 6pi mm-mrad at injection to 16pi mm-mrad at extraction. The initial (beam losses are shown to be caused by the space charge tune shift onto integer and 1/2 integer resonance lines. The growth near injection accounts for approximately 40% of the observed emittance increase throughout the acceleration cycle. The remaining 60% is due to two factors: slow linear growth due to betatron-motion driven by noise in the rf system; and faster growth after the transition energy that is caused by coupling of the longitudinal beam motion into the transverse planes.

  6. Scanning Emitter Lifetime Imaging Microscopy for Spontaneous Emission Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frimmer, Martin; Chen, Yuntian; Koenderink, A. Femius

    2011-01-01

    We report an experimental technique to map and exploit the local density of optical states of arbitrary planar nanophotonic structures. The method relies on positioning a spontaneous emitter attached to a scanning probe deterministically and reversibly with respect to its photonic environment while...

  7. The brightest Ly α emitter: Pop III or black hole?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pallottini, A.; Ferrara, A.; Pacucci, F.; Gallerani, S.; Salvadori, S.; Schneider, R.; Schaerer, D.; Sobral, D.; Matthee, J.

    2015-01-01

    CR7 is the brightest z = 6.6 Ly α emitter (LAE) known to date, and spectroscopic follow-up by Sobral et al. suggests that CR7 might host Population (Pop) III stars. We examine this interpretation using cosmological hydrodynamical simulations. Several simulated galaxies show the same `Pop III wave' p

  8. Application of positron emitters to studies on plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishioka, N.S.; Matsuoka, H. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment; Sekine, T. [and others

    1998-10-01

    A newly developed positron emitting tracer imaging system enables us to study dynamically the physiological function of plants, although this system covers, at present, a limited area in a plant. Production of the positron emitters {sup 11}C, {sup 13}N, {sup 18}F and {sup 48}V for this application, using an AVF cyclotron, is described. (author)

  9. Submarine Slope Failure Primed and Triggered by Bottom Water Warming in Oceanic Hydrate-Bearing Deposits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae-Hyuk Kwon

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Many submarine slope failures in hydrate-bearing sedimentary deposits might be directly triggered, or at least primed, by gas hydrate dissociation. It has been reported that during the past 55 years (1955–2010 the 0–2000 m layer of oceans worldwide has been warmed by 0.09 °C because of global warming. This raises the following scientific concern: if warming of the bottom water of deep oceans continues, it would dissociate natural gas hydrates and could eventually trigger massive slope failures. The present study explored the submarine slope instability of oceanic gas hydrate-bearing deposits subjected to bottom water warming. One-dimensional coupled thermal-hydraulic-mechanical (T-H-M finite difference analyses were performed to capture the underlying physical processes initiated by bottom water warming, which includes thermal conduction through sediments, thermal dissociation of gas hydrates, excess pore pressure generation, pressure diffusion, and hydrate dissociation against depressurization. The temperature rise at the seafloor due to bottom water warming is found to create an excess pore pressure that is sufficiently large to reduce the stability of a slope in some cases. Parametric study results suggest that a slope becomes more susceptible to failure with increases in thermal diffusivity and hydrate saturation and decreases in pressure diffusivity, gas saturation, and water depth. Bottom water warming can be further explored to gain a better understanding of the past methane hydrate destabilization events on Earth, assuming that more reliable geological data is available.

  10. HYDRAULIC CHARACTERIZATIONS OF TORTUOUS FLOW IN PATH DRIP IRRIGATION EMITTER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yun-kai; YANG Pei-ling; REN Shu-mei; XU Ting-wu

    2006-01-01

    At present, the tortuous emitter has the most advanced performances in drip irrigation. But the theories and methods for designing its flow path have been strictly confidential and the researches on the function of practical guidance have seldom been published. Seven types of most representative tortuous emitting-pipes currently used in agricultural irrigation regions of China were chosen for investigating the geometric parameters of the flow path by means of combining high-precision microscope and AutoCAD technology. By the measurement platform developed by the authors for hydraulic performances of emitters, the free discharge rates from the 7 types of emitters were measured at 9 pressure levels of 1.5 m, 3.0 m, 5.0 m, 7.0 m, 9.0 m, 10.0 m, 11.0 m, 13.0 m and 15.0 m. Then the discharge-pressure relationship, manufacturing variation coefficient, average velocity on the cross-section of flow path and the critical Reynolds number for the flow regime transformation within the paths were analyzed in detail. The results show that both pressure-ascending work pattern and pressure-descending work pattern have some impacts on the discharge rates of tortuous emitters, but the impact level is not significant. The target pressure could be approached by repetitive applications of the two work patterns during pressure regulation. The operation under low pressures has some impacts on the hydraulic performances of emitters, but the impact level is also not significant. The classical model of the discharge-pressure relationship is suitable for the pressure range of 1.5 m -15.0 m. The Reynolds number for fluids within the 7 types of tortuous emitters ranges from =105 to =930. The critical Reynolds number for the flow regime transformation is smaller than that for the routine dimension flow path. The variation coefficient of emitter discharge rates is slightly fluctuating around a certain value within the whole pressure range.

  11. Emitter/absorber interface of CdTe solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Tao, E-mail: tsong241@gmail.com; Sites, James R. [Physics Department, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado 80523 (United States); Kanevce, Ana [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States)

    2016-06-21

    The performance of CdTe solar cells can be very sensitive to the emitter/absorber interface, especially for high-efficiency cells with high bulk lifetime. Performance losses from acceptor-type interface defects can be significant when interface defect states are located near mid-gap energies. Numerical simulations show that the emitter/absorber band alignment, the emitter doping and thickness, and the defect properties of the interface (i.e., defect density, defect type, and defect energy) can all play significant roles in the interface recombination. In particular, a type I heterojunction with small conduction-band offset (0.1 eV ≤ ΔE{sub C} ≤ 0.3 eV) can help maintain good cell efficiency in spite of high interface defect density, much like with Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} (CIGS) cells. The basic principle is that positive ΔE{sub C}, often referred to as a “spike,” creates an absorber inversion and hence a large hole barrier adjacent to the interface. As a result, the electron-hole recombination is suppressed due to an insufficient hole supply at the interface. A large spike (ΔE{sub C} ≥ 0.4 eV), however, can impede electron transport and lead to a reduction of photocurrent and fill-factor. In contrast to the spike, a “cliff” (ΔE{sub C} < 0 eV) allows high hole concentration in the vicinity of the interface, which will assist interface recombination and result in a reduced open-circuit voltage. Another way to mitigate performance losses due to interface defects is to use a thin and highly doped emitter, which can invert the absorber and form a large hole barrier at the interface. CdS is the most common emitter material used in CdTe solar cells, but the CdS/CdTe interface is in the cliff category and is not favorable from the band-offset perspective. The ΔE{sub C} of other n-type emitter choices, such as (Mg,Zn)O, Cd(S,O), or (Cd,Mg)Te, can be tuned by varying the elemental ratio for an optimal positive value of ΔE{sub C}. These

  12. Emitter/absorber interface of CdTe solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Tao [Physics Department, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado 80523, USA; Kanevce, Ana [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado 80401, USA; Sites, James R. [Physics Department, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado 80523, USA

    2016-06-17

    The performance of CdTe solar cells can be very sensitive to their emitter/absorber interfaces, especially for high-efficiency cells with improved bulk properties. When interface defect states are located at efficient recombination energies, performance losses from acceptor-type interface defects can be significant. Numerical simulations show that the emitter/absorber band alignment, the emitter doping and thickness, and the defect properties of the interface (i.e. defect density, defect type, and defect energy) can all play significant roles in the interface recombination. In particular, a type I heterojunction with small conduction-band offset (0.1 eV /= 0.4 eV), however, can impede electron transport and lead to a reduction of photocurrent and fill-factor. In contrast to the spike, a 'cliff' (.delta..EC < 0 eV) is likely to allow many holes in the vicinity of the interface, which will assist interface recombination and result in a reduced open-circuit voltage. In addition, a thin and highly-doped emitter can invert the absorber, form a large hole barrier, and decrease device performance losses due to high interface defect density. CdS is the most common emitter material used in CdTe solar cells, but the CdS/CdTe interface is in the cliff category and is not favorable from the band-offset perspective. Other n-type emitter choices, such as (Mg,Zn)O, Cd(S,O), or (Cd,Mg)Te, can be tuned by varying the elemental ratio for an optimal positive value of ..delta..EC. These materials are predicted

  13. National post-2020 greenhouse gas targets and diversity-aware leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinshausen, Malte; Jeffery, Louise; Guetschow, Johannes; Robiou Du Pont, Yann; Rogelj, Joeri; Schaeffer, Michiel; Höhne, Niklas; den Elzen, Michel; Oberthür, Sebastian; Meinshausen, Nicolai

    2015-12-01

    Achieving the collective goal of limiting warming to below 2 °C or 1.5 °C compared to pre-industrial levels requires a transition towards a fully decarbonized world. Annual greenhouse gas emissions on such a path in 2025 or 2030 can be allocated to individual countries using a variety of allocation schemes. We reanalyse the IPCC literature allocation database and provide country-level details for three approaches. At this stage, however, it seems utopian to assume that the international community will agree on a single allocation scheme. Here, we investigate an approach that involves a major-economy country taking the lead. In a bottom-up manner, other countries then determine what they consider a fair comparable target, for example, either a `per-capita convergence’ or `equal cumulative per-capita’ approach. For example, we find that a 2030 target of 67% below 1990 for the EU28, a 2025 target of 54% below 2005 for the USA or a 2030 target of 32% below 2010 for China could secure a likely chance of meeting the 2 °C target in our illustrative default case. Comparing those targets to post-2020 mitigation targets reveals a large gap. No major emitter can at present claim to show the necessary leadership in the concerted effort of avoiding warming of 2 °C in a diverse global context.

  14. Single-bunch emittance dilution in the perfect ILC main linac

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Dou; GAO Jie

    2011-01-01

    In the ILC(International Linear Collider)main linac, low emittance preservation is the most important issue for beam dynamics study. As the main sources of emittance dilution, the dispersive and wakefield effects were studied in this paper. The theoretical calculations and numerical simulations of these two effects on single-bunch emittance dilution, without any misalignment errors, are presented in detail.

  15. Using antennas separated in flight direction to avoid effect of emitter clock drift in geolocation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ormesher, Richard C.; Bickel, Douglas L

    2012-10-23

    The location of a land-based radio frequency (RF) emitter is determined from an airborne platform. RF signaling is received from the RF emitter via first and second antennas. In response to the received RF signaling, signal samples for both antennas are produced and processed to determine the location of the RF emitter.

  16. Low Emittance Guns for the ILC Polarized Electron Beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clendenin, J. E.; Brachmann, A.; Ioakeimidi, K.; Kirby, R. E.; Maruyama, T.; Miller, R. H.; Wang, J. W.; Zhou, F.

    2007-06-01

    Polarized electron beams generated by DC guns are routinely available at several accelerators including JLAB, Mainz and SLAC. These guns operate with a cathode bias on the order of -100 kV. To minimize space charge effects, relatively long bunches are generated at the gun and then compressed longitudinally external to the gun just before and during initial acceleration. For linear colliders, this compression is accomplished using a combination of rf bunchers. For the basic design of the International Linear Collider (ILC), a 120 kV DC photocathode gun is used to produce a series of nanosecond bunches that are each compressed by two sub-harmonic bunchers (SHBs) followed by an L-band buncher and capture section. The longitudinal bunching process results in a significantly higher emittance than produced by the gun alone. While high-energy experiments using polarized beams are not generally sensitive to the source emittance, there are several benefits to a lower source emittance including a simpler more efficient injector system and a lower radiation load during transport especially at bends as at the damping ring. For the ILC, the SHBs could be eliminated if the voltage of the gun is raised sufficiently. Simulations using the General Particle Tracer (GPT) package indicate that a cathode bias voltage of ⩾200 kV should allow both SHBs to be operated at 433 or even 650 MHz, while ⩾500 kV would be required to eliminate the SHBs altogether. Simulations can be used to determine the minimum emittance possible if the injector is designed for a given increased voltage. A possible alternative to the DC gun is an rf gun. Emittance compensation, routinely used with rf guns, is discussed for higher-voltage DC guns.

  17. Precise Half-Life Measurement of the Superallowed Beta+ Emitter 26Si

    CERN Document Server

    Iacob, V E; Banu, A; Chen, L; Golovko, V V; Goodwin, J; Horvat, V; Nica, N; Park, H I; Trache, L; Tribble, R E

    2010-01-01

    We have measured the half-life of the superallowed 0+ -to- 0+ beta+ emitter 26Si to be 2245.3(7) ms. We used pure sources of 26Si and employed a high-efficiency gas counter, which was sensitive to positrons from both this nuclide and its daughter 26mAl. The data were analyzed as a linked parent-daughter decay. To contribute meaningfully to any test of the unitarity of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) matrix, the ft value of a superallowed transition must be determined to a precision of 0.1% or better. With a precision of 0.03% the present result is more than sufficient to be compatable with that requirement. Only the branching ratio now remains to be measured precisely before a +/-0.1% ft value can be obtained for the superallowed transition from 26Si.

  18. Warm dense crystallography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenza, Ryan A.; Seidler, Gerald T.

    2016-03-01

    The intense femtosecond-scale pulses from x-ray free electron lasers (XFELs) are able to create and interrogate interesting states of matter characterized by long-lived nonequilibrium semicore or core electron occupancies or by the heating of dense phases via the relaxation cascade initiated by the photoelectric effect. We address here the latter case of "warm dense matter" (WDM) and investigate the observable consequences of x-ray heating of the electronic degrees of freedom in crystalline systems. We report temperature-dependent density functional theory calculations for the x-ray diffraction from crystalline LiF, graphite, diamond, and Be. We find testable, strong signatures of condensed-phase effects that emphasize the importance of wide-angle scattering to study nonequilibrium states. These results also suggest that the reorganization of the valence electron density at eV-scale temperatures presents a confounding factor to achieving atomic resolution in macromolecular serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX) studies at XFELs, as performed under the "diffract before destroy" paradigm.

  19. Phosphorus emitter and metal - grid optimization for homogeneous (n+p and double-diffused (n++n+p emitter silicon solar cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Cid Sánchez

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available This work focuses on studying two types of structure: homogeneous and double-diffused emitter silicon solar cells. The emitter collection efficiencies and the recombination current densities were studied for a wide range of surface dopant concentrations and thicknesses. The frontal metal-grid was optimized for each emitter, considering the dependence on the metal-semiconductor contact resistivity and on the emitter sheet resistance. The best efficiency for n+p structures, η≈ 25.5%, is found for emitters with thicknesses between (0.5-3 µm and surface doping concentrations in the range 2 x 10(19 cm-3- 4 x 10(18 cm-3; while the n++n+p structure a maximum efficiency of η≈ 26.0% was identified for an even wider range of emitter profiles.

  20. Emittance of short-pulsed high-current ion beams formed from the plasma of the electron cyclotron resonance discharge sustained by high-power millimeter-wave gyrotron radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razin, S.; Zorin, V.; Izotov, I.; Sidorov, A.; Skalyga, V.

    2014-02-01

    We present experimental results on measuring the emittance of short-pulsed (≤100 μs) high-current (80-100 mA) ion beams of heavy gases (Nitrogen, Argon) formed from a dense plasma of an ECR source of multiply charged ions (MCI) with quasi-gas-dynamic mode of plasma confinement in a magnetic trap of simple mirror configuration. The discharge was created by a high-power (90 kW) pulsed radiation of a 37.5-GHz gyrotron. The normalized emittance of generated ion beams of 100 mA current was (1.2-1.3) π mm mrad (70% of ions in the beams). Comparing these results with those obtained using a cusp magnetic trap, it was concluded that the structure of the trap magnetic field lines does not exert a decisive influence on the emittance of ion beams in the gas-dynamic ECR source of MCI.

  1. Warm Jupiters from secular planet-planet interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Petrovich, Cristobal

    2016-01-01

    Most warm Jupiters (gas-giant planets with $0.1~{\\rm AU}\\lesssim a \\lesssim1$ AU) have pericenter distances that are too large for significant orbital migration by tidal friction. We study the possibility that the warm Jupiters are undergoing secular eccentricity oscillations excited by an outer companion (a planet or star) in an eccentric and/or mutually inclined orbit. In this model the warm Jupiters migrate periodically, in the high-eccentricity phase of the oscillation when the pericenter distance is small, but are typically observed at much lower eccentricities. We show that the steady-state eccentricity distribution of the warm Jupiters migrating by this mechanism is approximately flat, which is consistent with the observed distribution if and only if we restrict the sample to warm Jupiters that have outer companions detected by radial-velocity surveys. The eccentricity distribution of warm Jupiters without companions exhibits a peak at low eccentricities ($e\\lesssim 0.2$) that must be explained by a di...

  2. Recent warming of lake Kivu.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergei Katsev

    Full Text Available Lake Kivu in East Africa has gained notoriety for its prodigious amounts of dissolved methane and dangers of limnic eruption. Being meromictic, it is also expected to accumulate heat due to rising regional air temperatures. To investigate the warming trend and distinguish between atmospheric and geothermal heating sources, we compiled historical temperature data, performed measurements with logging instruments, and simulated heat propagation. We also performed isotopic analyses of water from the lake's main basin and isolated Kabuno Bay. The results reveal that the lake surface is warming at the rate of 0.12°C per decade, which matches the warming rates in other East African lakes. Temperatures increase throughout the entire water column. Though warming is strongest near the surface, warming rates in the deep waters cannot be accounted for solely by propagation of atmospheric heat at presently assumed rates of vertical mixing. Unless the transport rates are significantly higher than presently believed, this indicates significant contributions from subterranean heat sources. Temperature time series in the deep monimolimnion suggest evidence of convection. The progressive deepening of the depth of temperature minimum in the water column is expected to accelerate the warming in deeper waters. The warming trend, however, is unlikely to strongly affect the physical stability of the lake, which depends primarily on salinity gradient.

  3. Effect of long range spatial correlations on the lifetime statistics of an emitter in a two-dimensional disordered lattice

    CERN Document Server

    de Sousa, N; García-Martín, A; Froufe-Pérez, L S; Marqués, M I

    2014-01-01

    The effect of spatial correlations on the Purcell effect in a bidimensional dispersion of resonant nanoparticles is analyzed. We perform extensive calculations of the fluorescence decay rate of a point emitter embedded in a system of nanoparticles statistically distributed according to a sim- ple 2D lattice-gas model near the critical point. For short range correlations (high temperature thermalization) the Purcell factors present a non-Gaussian long-tailed statistics which evolves to- wards a bimodal distribution as approaching the critical point where the spatial correlation length diverges. Our results suggest long range correlations as a possible origin of the large fluctuations of experimental decay rates in disordered metal films.

  4. A massive warm baryonic halo in the Coma cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Bonamente, M; Lieu, R

    2003-01-01

    Several deep PSPC observations of the Coma cluster reveal a very large-scale halo of soft X-ray emission, substantially in excess of the well known radiation from the hot intra-cluster medium. The excess emission, previously reported in the central region of the cluster using lower-sensitivity EUVE and ROSAT data, is now evident out to a radius of 2.6 Mpc, demonstrating that the soft excess radiation from clusters is a phenomenon of cosmological significance. The X-ray spectrum at these large radii cannot be modeled non-thermally, but is consistent with the original scenario of thermal emission from warm gas at ~ 10^6 K. The mass of the warm gas is on par with that of the hot X-ray emitting plasma, and significantly more massive if the warm gas resides in low-density filamentary structures. Thus the data lend vital support to current theories of cosmic evolution, which predict that at low redshift \\~30-40 % of the baryons reside in warm filaments converging at clusters of galaxies.

  5. Global warming: the complete briefing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houghton, J.

    1994-01-01

    The science of global warming, its impacts, and what action might be taken, are described in this book, in a way which the intelligent non-scientist can understand. It also examines ethical and moral issues of concern about global warming, considering mankind as stewards of the earth. Chapter headings of the book are: global warming and climate change; the greenhouse effect; the greenhouse gases; climates of the past; modelling the climate; climate change and business-as-usual; the impacts of climate change; why should we be concerned ; weighing the uncertainty; action to slow and stabilize climate change; energy and transport for the future; and the global village.

  6. Were sauropod dinosaurs responsible for the warm Mesozoic climate?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A.J.(Tom); van; Loon

    2012-01-01

    It was recently postulated that methane production by the giant Mesozoic sauropod dinosaurs was larger than the present-day release of this greenhouse gas by nature and man-induced activities jointly, thus contributing to the warm Mesozoic climate. This conclusion was reached by correct calculations, but these calculations were based on unrealistic assumptions:the researchers who postulated this dinosaur-induced warm climate did take into account neither the biomass production required for the sauropods’ food, nor the constraints for the habitats in which the dinosaurs lived, thus neglecting the palaeogeographic conditions. This underlines the importance of palaeogeography for a good understanding of the Earth’s geological history.

  7. Experimental study of coherent synchrotron radiation in the emittance exchange line at the A0-photoinjector

    CERN Document Server

    Thangaraj, Jayakar C T; Johnson, A; Lumpkin, A H; Edwards, H; Ruan, J; Santucci, J; Sun, Y E -; Church, M; Piot, P

    2012-01-01

    Next generation accelerators will require a high current, low emittance beam with a low energy spread. Such accelerators will employ advanced beam conditioning systems such as emittance exchangers to manipulate high brightness beams. One of the goals of the Fermilab A0 photoinjector is to investigate the transverse to longitudinal emittance exchange principle. Coherent synchrotron radiation could limit high current operation of the emittance exchanger. In this paper, we report on the preliminary experimental and simulation study of the coherent synchroton radiation (CSR) in the emittance exchange line at the A0 photoinjector.

  8. Cropping system innovation for coping with climatic warming in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aixing Deng

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available China is becoming the largest grain producing and carbon-emitting country in the world, with a steady increase in population and economic development. A review of Chinese experiences in ensuring food self-sufficiency and reducing carbon emission in the agricultural sector can provide a valuable reference for similar countries and regions. According to a comprehensive review of previous publications and recent field observations, China has experienced on average a larger and faster climatic warming trend than the global trend, and there are large uncertainties in precipitation change, which shows a non-significantly increasing trend. Existing evidence shows that the effects of climatic warming on major staple crop production in China could be markedly negative or positive, depending on the specific cropping region, season, and crop. However, historical data analysis and field warming experiments have shown that moderate warming, of less than 2.0 °C, could benefit crop production in China overall. During the most recent warming decades, China has made successful adaptations in cropping systems, such as new cultivar breeding, cropping region adjustment, and cropping practice optimization, to exploit the positive rather than to avoid the negative effects of climatic warming on crop growth. All of these successful adaptations have greatly increased crop yield, leading to higher resource use efficiency as well as greatly increased soil organic carbon content with reduced greenhouse gas emissions. Under the warming climate, China has not only achieved great successes in crop production but also realized a large advance in greenhouse gas emission mitigation. Chinese experiences in cropping system innovation for coping with climatic warming demonstrate that food security and climatic warming mitigation can be synergized through policy, knowledge, and technological innovation. With the increasingly critical status of food security and climatic warming

  9. Global Warming and Energy Transition: A Public Policy Imperative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, G. T.

    2006-12-01

    institutional commitment to energy conservation, energy efficiency, and renewable energy resources, colleges and universities must focus public and professional attention on the imperative for action and the means of reducing greenhouse gas emissions and countering global warming.

  10. Emittance Measurements from a Laser Driven Electron Injector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reis, David A

    2003-07-28

    The Gun Test Facility (GTF) at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center was constructed to develop an appropriate electron beam suitable for driving a short wavelength free electron laser (FEL) such as the proposed Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). For operation at a wavelength of 1.5 {angstrom}, the LCLS requires an electron injector that can produce an electron beam with approximately 1 {pi} mm-mrad normalized rms emittance with at least 1 nC of charge in a 10 ps or shorter bunch. The GTF consists of a photocathode rf gun, emittance-compensation solenoid, 3 m linear accelerator (linac), drive laser, and diagnostics to measure the beam. The rf gun is a symmetrized 1.6 cell, s-band high gradient, room temperature, photocathode structure. Simulations show that this gun when driven by a temporally and spatially shaped drive laser, appropriately focused with the solenoid, and further accelerated in linac can produce a beam that meets the LCLS requirements. This thesis describes the initial characterization of the laser and electron beam at the GTF. A convolved measurement of the relative timing between the laser and the rf phase in the gun shows that the jitter is less than 2.5 ps rms. Emittance measurements of the electron beam at 35 MeV are reported as a function of the (Gaussian) pulse length and transverse profile of the laser as well as the charge of the electron beam at constant phase and gradient in both the gun and linac. At 1 nC the emittance was found to be {approx} 13 {pi} mm-mrad for 5 ps and 8 ps long laser pulses. At 0.5 nC the measured emittance decreased approximately 20% in the 5 ps case and 40% in the 8 ps case. These measurements are between 40-80% higher than simulations for similar experimental conditions. In addition, the thermal emittance of the electron beam was measured to be 0.5 {pi} mm-mrad.

  11. Evolution of the spherical cavity radius generated around a subsurface drip emitter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Gil

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The emitter discharge in subsurface drip irrigation can be affected by soil properties. A positive pressure develops at the emitter outlet where a spherical cavity is assumed to form. In steady-state conditions, the pressure in the soil relates to soil hydraulic properties, the emitter discharge, and the cavity radius. This pressure in the soil is very sensitive to the cavity radius. In this paper, the development of the cavity around the emitter outlet was measured for various emitter discharges in laboratory tests carried out in containers with uniform loamy soils. A trend between soil pressure and emitter discharge was established that illustrates the performance of buried emitters in the field. Its application to the prediction of water distribution in subsurface drip irrigation units and its effect on the estimation of irrigation performance are also shown.

  12. A Warm and Cleaner Winter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Beijing municipal and district governments have taken measures to keep residents warm and the winter sky blue In a bungalow in Xisi North Fifth Alley in the Xicheng District of Beijing,Li has lived for nearly seven decades.

  13. Arctic dimension of global warming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. V. Alekseev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A brief assessment of the global warming in the Arctic climate system with the emphasis on sea ice is presented. The Arctic region is coupled to the global climate system by the atmosphere and ocean circulation that providesa major contribution to the Arctic energy budget. On this basis using of special indices it is shown that amplification of warming in the Arctic is associated with the increasing of meridional heat transport from the low latitudes.

  14. Impact of water temperature and structural parameters on the hydraulic labyrinth-channel emitter performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed I. Al-Amoud

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The effects of water temperature and structural parameters of a labyrinth emitter on drip irrigation hydraulic performance were investigated. The inside structural parameters of the trapezoidal labyrinth emitter include path width (W and length (L, trapezoidal unit numbers (N, height (H, and spacing (S. Laboratory experiments were conducted using five different types of labyrinth-channel emitters (three non-pressure compensating and two pressure-compensating emitters commonly used for subsurface drip irrigation systems. The water temperature effect on the hydraulic characteristics at various operating pressures was recorded and a comparison was made to identify the most effective structural parameter on emitter performance. The pressure compensating emitter flow exponent (x average was 0.014, while non-pressure compensating emitter’s values average was 0.456, indicating that the sensitivity of non-pressure compensating emitters to pressure variation is an obvious characteristic (p<0.001 of this type of emitters. The effects of water temperature on emitter flow rate were insignificant (p>0.05 at various operating pressures, where the flow rate index values for emitters were around one. The effects of water temperature on manufacturer’s coefficient of variation (CV values for all emitters were insignificant (p>0.05. The CV values of the non-pressure compensating emitters were lower than those of pressure compensating emitters. This is typical for most compensating models because they are manufactured with more elements than non-compensating emitters are. The results of regression analysis indicate that N and H are the essential factors (p<0.001 to affect the hydraulic performance.

  15. Media narratives of global warming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meisner, M. [Syracuse Univ., Syracuse, NY (United States)

    2000-06-01

    The way in which the North American print media are representing global warming was the focus of this paper. It was suggested that the way in which the media presents the issue and proposed responses to it, will influence how the public and decision-makers perceive and respond to the problem. This paper also presented examples demonstrating how nature and humanity's relationship to nature are being presented and what types of responses to global warming are being presented. The issue of who is responsible for acting to prevent or mitigate climate change was also discussed. It was shown that media narratives of global warming are not just stories of scientists debating the existence of global warming, but that they now largely accept global warming as a reality. However, the media continue to construct the problem in narrow technical, economic and anthropocentric terms. Mass media interpretation of global warming offer up a limited selection of problem definitions, reasons for acting and ways of addressing the problem. It was cautioned that this approach will likely promote futility, denial and apathy on the part of the public. 21 refs.

  16. Emittance Measurements of the SSRL Gun Test Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez, Michael; Clendenin, James; Fisher, Alan; Miller, Roger; Palmer, Dennis; Park, Sam; Schmerge, John; Weaver, Jim; Wiedemann, Helmut; Winick, Herman; Yeremian, Dian; /SLAC; Meyerhofer, David; Reis, David; /Rochester U.

    2011-09-01

    A photocathode RF gun test stand is under construction in the injector vault of the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory at SLAC. The goal of this facility is to produce an electron beam with a normalized emittance of 1-3[mm-mr], a longitudinal bunch duration of the order of 10[ps] FWHM and approximately 1[nC] of charge per bunch. The beam will be generated from a laser driven copper photocathode RF gun developed in collaboration with BNL, LBL and UCLA. The 3-5[MeV] beam from the gun will be accelerated using a SLAC three meter S-band accelerator section. The emittance of the electron beam will be measured through the use of quadrupole scans with phosphor screens and also a wire scanner. The details of the experimental setup will be discussed, and first measurements will be presented and compared with results from PARMELA simulations.

  17. Oxidation and emittance of superalloys in heat shield applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiedemann, K. E.; Clark, R. K.; Unnam, J.

    1986-01-01

    Recently developed superalloys that form alumina coatings have a high potential for heat shield applications for advanced aerospace vehicles at temperatures above 1095C. Both INCOLOY alloy MA 956 (of the Inco Alloys International, Inc.), an iron-base oxide-dispersion-strengthened alloy, and CABOT alloy No. 214 (of the Cabot Corporation), an alumina-forming nickel-chromium alloy, have good oxidation resistance and good elevated temperature strength. The oxidation resistance of both alloys has been attributed to the formation of a thin alumina layer (alpha-Al2O3) at the surface. Emittance and oxidation data were obtained for simulated Space Shuttle reentry conditions using a hypersonic arc-heated wind tunnel. The surface oxides and substrate alloys were characterized using X-ray diffraction and scanning and transmission electron microscopy with an energy-dispersive X-ray analysis unit. The mass loss and emittance characteristics of the two alloys are discussed.

  18. Measurement of ultra low transverse emittance at REGAE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hachmann, M., E-mail: max.hachmann@desy.de; Flöttmann, K.

    2016-09-01

    The linear accelerator REGAE at DESY produces short and low charged electron bunches, on the one hand to resolve the excitation transitions of atoms temporally by pump-probe electron diffraction experiments and on the other hand to investigate principal mechanisms of laser plasma acceleration. For both cases a high quality electron beam is required which can be identified with a small beam emittance. A standard magnet scan is used for the emittance measurement which is in case of a low charged bunch most sensitive to the beam size determination (RMS or 2nd central moment of a distribution). Therefore the diagnostic and a routine to calculate proper central moments of an arbitrary distribution will be introduced and discussed.

  19. Developments of fast emittance monitors for ion sources at RCNP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yorita, T.; Hatanaka, K.; Fukuda, M.; Shimada, K.; Yasuda, Y.; Saito, T.; Tamura, H.; Kamakura, K.

    2016-02-01

    Recently, several developments of low energy beam transport line and its beam diagnostic systems have been performed to improve the injection efficiency of ion beam to azimuthally varying field cyclotron at Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka University. One of those is the fast emittance monitor which can measure within several seconds for the efficient beam development and a Pepper-Pot Emittance Monitor (PPEM) has been developed. The PPEM consists of pepper-pot mask, multichannel plate, fluorescent screen, mirror, and CCD camera. The CCD image is taken via IEEE1394b to a personal computer and analyzed immediately and frequently, and then real time measurement with about 2 Hz has been achieved.

  20. Emittance preservation during bunch compression with a magnetized beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stratakis, Diktys

    2016-03-01

    The deleterious effects of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) on the phase-space and energy spread of high-energy beams in accelerator light sources can significantly constrain the machine design and performance. In this paper, we present a simple method to preserve the beam emittance by means of using magnetized beams that exhibit a large aspect ratio on their transverse dimensions. The concept is based in combining a finite solenoid field where the beam is generated with a special optics adapter. Numerical simulations of this new type of beam source show that the induced phase-space density growth from CSR can be notably suppressed to less than 1% for any bunch charge. This work elucidates the key parameters that are needed for emittance preservation, such as the required field and aspect ratio for a given bunch charge.

  1. Emittance preservation during bunch compression with a magnetized beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stratakis, Diktys [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-09-02

    The deleterious effects of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) on the phase-space and energy spread of high-energy beams in accelerator light sources can significantly constrain the machine design and performance. In this paper, we present a simple method to preserve the beam emittance by means of using magnetized beams that exhibit a large aspect ratio on their transverse dimensions. The concept is based on combining a finite solenoid field where the beam is generated together with a special optics adapter. Numerical simulations of this new type of beam source show that the induced phase-space density growth can be notably suppressed to less than 1% for any bunch charge. This work elucidates the key parameters that are needed for emittance preservation, such as the required field and aspect ratio for a given bunch charge.

  2. Intrinsic normalized emittance growth in laser-driven electron accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliorati, M.; Bacci, A.; Benedetti, C.; Chiadroni, E.; Ferrario, M.; Mostacci, A.; Palumbo, L.; Rossi, A. R.; Serafini, L.; Antici, P.

    2013-01-01

    Laser-based electron sources are attracting strong interest from the conventional accelerator community due to their unique characteristics in terms of high initial energy, low emittance, and significant beam current. Extremely strong electric fields (up to hundreds of GV/m) generated in the plasma allow accelerating gradients much higher than in conventional accelerators and set the basis for achieving very high final energies in a compact space. Generating laser-driven high-energy electron beam lines therefore represents an attractive challenge for novel particle accelerators. In this paper we show that laser-driven electrons generated by the nowadays consolidated TW laser systems, when leaving the interaction region, are subject to a very strong, normalized emittance worsening which makes them quickly unusable for any beam transport. Furthermore, due to their intrinsic beam characteristics, controlling and capturing the full beam current can only be achieved improving the source parameters.

  3. Coupling of individual quantum emitters to channel plasmons

    CERN Document Server

    Bermúdez-Ureña, Esteban; Geiselmann, Michael; Marty, Renaud; Radko, Ilya P; Holmgaard, Tobias; Alaverdyan, Yury; Moreno, Esteban; García-Vidal, Francisco J; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I; Quidant, Romain

    2015-01-01

    Efficient light-matter interaction lies at the heart of many emerging technologies that seek on-chip integration of solid-state photonic systems. Plasmonic waveguides, which guide the radiation in the form of strongly confined surface plasmon-polariton modes, represent a promising solution to manipulate single photons in coplanar architectures with unprecedented small footprints. Here we demonstrate coupling of the emission from a single quantum emitter to the channel plasmon polaritons supported by a V-groove plasmonic waveguide. Extensive theoretical simulations enable us to determine the position and orientation of the quantum emitter for optimum coupling. Concomitantly with these predictions, we demonstrate experimentally that 42% of a single nitrogen vacancy centre emission efficiently couples into the supported modes of the V-groove. This work paves the way towards practical realization of efficient and long distance transfer of energy for integrated solid-state quantum systems.

  4. Quantum Emitters near Layered Plasmonic Nanostructures: Decay Rate Contributions

    CERN Document Server

    Pors, Anders

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a numerical framework for calculating decay rate contributions when excited two-level quantum emitters are located near layered plasmonic nanostructures, particularly emphasizing the case of plasmonic nanostructures atop metal substrates where three decay channels exist: free space radiation, Ohmic losses, and excitation of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs). The calculation of decay rate contributions is based on Huygen's equivalence principle together with a near-field to far-field transformation of the local electric field, thereby allowing us to discern the part of the electromagnetic field associated with free propagating waves rather than SPPs. The methodology is applied to the case of an emitter inside and near a gap-plasmon resonator, emphasizing strong position and orientation dependencies of the total decay rate, contributions of different decay channels, radiation patterns, and directivity of SPP excitation.

  5. Review of Emittance and Stability Monitoring Using Synchrotron Radiation Monitors

    CERN Document Server

    Holldack, K; Peatman, W B

    2001-01-01

    Different techniques of emittance and stability monitoring using bend magnet and undulator radiation will be reviewed. Besides imaging methods for emittance monitoring , the problem of XBPM's used for the measurement of the centre of mass position of the undulator beams will be treated in detail. The key feature of these monitors is a careful electron optical design to take account of gap dependent changes of the shape and photon energy of the undulator beam as well as spurious signals from dipoles and high heat load. The reason for the fact that these monitors work well on low energy machines like BESSY II but often fail due in high energy machines will be demonstrated by experimental results obtained on different types of BESSY II insertion devices such as undulators, wavelength shifters, multipole wigglers and electromagnetic undulators. Experimental results of global and local orbit monitoring and a proof of principle of a XBPM-based local feedback will be shown.

  6. Waveguide coupled resonance fluorescence from on-chip quantum emitter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makhonin, Maxim N; Dixon, James E; Coles, Rikki J; Royall, Ben; Luxmoore, Isaac J; Clarke, Edmund; Hugues, Maxime; Skolnick, Maurice S; Fox, A Mark

    2014-12-10

    Resonantly driven quantum emitters offer a very promising route to obtain highly coherent sources of single photons required for applications in quantum information processing (QIP). Realizing this for on-chip scalable devices would be important for scientific advances and practical applications in the field of integrated quantum optics. Here we report on-chip quantum dot (QD) resonance fluorescence (RF) efficiently coupled into a single-mode waveguide, a key component of a photonic integrated circuit, with a negligible resonant laser background and show that the QD coherence is enhanced by more than a factor of 4 compared to off-resonant excitation. Single-photon behavior is confirmed under resonant excitation, and fast fluctuating charge dynamics are revealed in autocorrelation g((2)) measurements. The potential for triggered operation is verified in pulsed RF. These results pave the way to a novel class of integrated quantum-optical devices for on-chip quantum information processing with embedded resonantly driven quantum emitters.

  7. Refractory absorber/emitter using monolayer of ceramic microparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyachenko, P. N.; do Rosário, J. J.; Leib, E. W.; Petrov, A. Y.; Störmer, M.; Weller, H.; Vossmeyer, T.; Schneider, G. A.; Eich, M.

    2016-04-01

    We present a self-assembled refractory absorber/emitter without the necessity to structure the metallic surface itself, still retaining the feature of tailored optical properties for visible light emission and thermophotovoltaic (TPV) applications. We have demonstrated theoretically and experimentally that monolayers of zirconium dioxide (ZrO2) microparticles on a tungsten layer can be used as large area, efficient and thermally stable selective absorbers/emitters. The band edge of the absorption is based on critically coupled microsphere resonances. It can be tuned from visible to near-infrared range by varying the diameter of the microparticles. We demonstrated the optical functionality of the structure after annealing up to temperatures of 1000°C under vacuum conditions. In particular it opens up the route towards high efficiency TPV systems with emission matched to the photovoltaic cell.

  8. Electrically pumped single-defect light emitters in WSe$_2$

    CERN Document Server

    Schwarz, S; Withers, F; Maguire, J K; Foster, A P; Dufferwiel, S; Hague, L; Makhonin, M N; Wilson, L R; Geim, A K; Novoselov, K S; Tartakovskii, A I

    2016-01-01

    Recent developments in fabrication of van der Waals heterostructures enable new type of devices assembled by stacking atomically thin layers of two-dimensional materials. Using this approach, we fabricate light-emitting devices based on a monolayer WSe$_2$, and also comprising boron nitride tunnelling barriers and graphene electrodes, and observe sharp luminescence spectra from individual defects in WSe$_2$ under both optical and electrical excitation. This paves the way towards the realization of electrically-pumped quantum emitters in atomically thin semiconductors. In addition we demonstrate tuning by more than 1 meV of the emission energy of the defect luminescence by applying a vertical electric field. This provides an estimate of the permanent electric dipole created by the corresponding electron-hole pair. The light-emitting devices investigated in our work can be assembled on a variety of substrates enabling a route to integration of electrically pumped single quantum emitters with existing technologi...

  9. Electron Cloud at Low Emittance in CesrTA

    CERN Document Server

    Palmer, Mark; Billing, Michael; Calvey, Joseph; Conolly, Christopher; Crittenden, James; Dobbins, John; Dugan, Gerald; Eggert, Nicholas; Fontes, Ernest; Forster, Michael; Gallagher, Richard; Gray, Steven; Greenwald, Shlomo; Hartill, Donald; Hopkins, Walter; Kreinick, David; Kreis, Benjamin; Leong, Zhidong; Li, Yulin; Liu, Xianghong; Livezey, Jesse; Lyndaker, Aaron; Makita, Junki; McDonald, Michael; Medjidzade, Valeri; Meller, Robert; O'Connell, Tim; Peck, Stuart; Peterson, Daniel; Ramirez, Gabriel; Rendina, Matthew; Revesz, Peter; Rider, Nate; Rice, David; Rubin, David; Sagan, David; Savino, James; Schwartz, Robert; Seeley, Robert; Sexton, James; Shanks, James; Sikora, John; Smith, Eric; Strohman, Charles; Williams, Heather; Antoniou, Fanouria; Calatroni, Sergio; Gasior, Marek; Jones, Owain Rhodri; Papaphilippou, Yannis; Pfingstner, Juergen; Rumolo, Giovanni; Schmickler, Hermann; Taborelli, Mauro; Asner, David; Boon, Laura; Garfinkel, Arthur; Byrd, John; Celata, Christine; Corlett, John; De Santis, Stefano; Furman, Miguel; Jackson, Alan; Kraft, Rick; Munson, Dawn; Penn, Gregory; Plate, David; Venturini, Marco; Carlson, Benjamin; Demma, Theo; Dowd, Rohan; Flanagan, John; Jain, Puneet; Kanazawa, Ken-ichi; Kubo, Kiyoshi; Ohmi, Kazuhito; Sakai, Hiroshi; Shibata, Kyo; Suetsugu, Yusuke; Tobiyama, Makoto; Gonnella, Daniel; Guo, Weiming; Harkay, Katherine; Holtzapple, Robert; Jones, James; Wolski, Andrzej; Kharakh, David; Ng, Johnny; Pivi, Mauro; Wang, Lanfa; Ross, Marc; Tan, Cheng-Yang; Zwaska, Robert; Schachter, Levi; Wilkinson, Eric

    2010-01-01

    The Cornell Electron Storage Ring (CESR) has been reconfigured as a test accelerator (CesrTA) for a program of electron cloud (EC) research at ultra low emittance. The instrumentation in the ring has been upgraded with local diagnostics for measurement of cloud density and with improved beam diagnostics for the characterization of both the low emittance performance and the beam dynamics of high intensity bunch trains interacting with the cloud. A range of EC mitigation methods have been deployed and tested and their effectiveness is discussed. Measurements of the electron cloud’s effect on the beam under a range of conditions are discussed along with the simulations being used to quantitatively understand these results

  10. Developments of fast emittance monitors for ion sources at RCNP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yorita, T., E-mail: yorita@rcnp.osaka-u.ac.jp; Hatanaka, K.; Fukuda, M.; Shimada, K.; Yasuda, Y.; Saito, T.; Tamura, H.; Kamakura, K. [Research Center for Nuclear Physics (RCNP), Osaka University, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan)

    2016-02-15

    Recently, several developments of low energy beam transport line and its beam diagnostic systems have been performed to improve the injection efficiency of ion beam to azimuthally varying field cyclotron at Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka University. One of those is the fast emittance monitor which can measure within several seconds for the efficient beam development and a Pepper-Pot Emittance Monitor (PPEM) has been developed. The PPEM consists of pepper-pot mask, multichannel plate, fluorescent screen, mirror, and CCD camera. The CCD image is taken via IEEE1394b to a personal computer and analyzed immediately and frequently, and then real time measurement with about 2 Hz has been achieved.

  11. First observation of the exchange of transverse and longitudinal emittances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruan, J.; Johnson, A.S.; Lumpkin, A.H.; Thurman-Keup, R.; Edwards, H.; Fliller, R.P.; Koeth, T.; Sun, Y.-E; /Fermilab

    2011-02-01

    An experimental program to demonstrate a novel phase space manipulation in which the horizontal and longitudinal emittances of a particle beam are exchanged has been completed at the Fermilab A0 Photoinjector. A new beamline, consisting of a TM{sub 110} deflecting mode cavity flanked by two horizontally dispersive doglegs has been installed. We report on the first direct observation of transverse and longitudinal emittance exchange: {l_brace}{var_epsilon}{sub x}{sup n}, {var_epsilon}{sub y}{sup n}, {var_epsilon}{sub z}{sup n}{r_brace} = {l_brace} 2.9 {+-} 0.1, 2.4 {+-} 0.1, 13.1 {+-} 1.3{r_brace} {yields} {l_brace}11.3 {+-} 1.1, 2.9 {+-} 0.5, 3.1 {+-} 0.3{r_brace} mm-mrad.

  12. Crystalline silicon solar cells with high resistivity emitter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panek, P.; Drabczyk, K.; Zięba, P.

    2009-06-01

    The paper presents a part of research targeted at the modification of crystalline silicon solar cell production using screen-printing technology. The proposed process is based on diffusion from POCl3 resulting in emitter with a sheet resistance on the level of 70 Ω/□ and then, shaped by high temperature passivation treatment. The study was focused on a shallow emitter of high resistivity and on its influence on output electrical parameters of a solar cell. Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) has been employed for appropriate distinguishing the total donor doped profile. The solar cell parameters were characterized by current-voltage characteristics and spectral response (SR) methods. Some aspects playing a role in suitable manufacturing process were discussed. The situation in a photovoltaic industry with emphasis on silicon supply and current prices of solar cells, modules and photovoltaic (PV) systems are described. The economic and quantitative estimation of the PV world market is shortly discussed.

  13. A New SIMOX Emitter Switching Thyristor--BO-ECT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Bo; Alex Q.Huang

    2001-01-01

    SIMOX Emitter switching thyristor(SIMEST) is a new MOS-gated thyristor with highvoltage current saturation capability. In this paper,an improved SIMEST, the Buried-Oxide Emitter Controlled Thyristor (BO-ECT) is proposed. Comparing with the SIMEST, the BO-ECT not only has a simple gate and source metalization structure and is therefore easy for layout design, but it also has an improved high-voltage current saturation capability. The operational mechanism and the forward biased safe operating area (FBSOA) are analyzed. Two-dimensional simulation results indicate that the BO-ECT has a much lower forward voltage drop than that of the IGBT while at the same time has a wider or similar FBSOA as the IGBT.

  14. Electron Cloud at Low Emittance in CesrTA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmer, Mark; /Cornell U., CLASSE; Alexander, James; /Cornell U., CLASSE; Billing, Michael; /Cornell U., CLASSE; Calvey, Joseph; /Cornell U., CLASSE; Conolly, Christopher; /Cornell U., CLASSE; Crittenden, James; /Cornell U., CLASSE; Dobbins, John; /Cornell U., CLASSE; Dugan, Gerald; /Cornell U., CLASSE; Eggert, Nicholas; /Cornell U., CLASSE; Fontes, Ernest; /Cornell U., CLASSE; Forster, Michael; /Cornell U., CLASSE; Gallagher, Richard; /Cornell U., CLASSE; Gray, Steven; /Cornell U., CLASSE; Greenwald, Shlomo; /Cornell U., CLASSE; Hartill, Donald; /Cornell U., CLASSE; Hopkins, Walter; /Cornell U., CLASSE; Kreinick, David; /Cornell U., CLASSE; Kreis, Benjamin; /Cornell U., CLASSE; Leong, Zhidong; /Cornell U., CLASSE; Li, Yulin; /Cornell U., CLASSE; Liu, Xianghong; /Cornell U., CLASSE /Cornell U., CLASSE /Cornell U., CLASSE /Cornell U., CLASSE /Cornell U., CLASSE /Cornell U., CLASSE /Cornell U., CLASSE /Cornell U., CLASSE /Cornell U., CLASSE /Cornell U., CLASSE /Cornell U., CLASSE /Cornell U., CLASSE /Cornell U., CLASSE /Cornell U., CLASSE /Cornell U., CLASSE /Cornell U., CLASSE /Cornell U., CLASSE /Cornell U., CLASSE /Cornell U., CLASSE /Cornell U., CLASSE /Cornell U., CLASSE /Cornell U., CLASSE /Cornell U., CLASSE /Cornell U., CLASSE /Cornell U., CLASSE /Cornell U., CLASSE /CERN /CERN /CERN /CERN /CERN /CERN; /more authors..

    2012-07-06

    The Cornell Electron Storage Ring (CESR) has been reconfigured as a test accelerator (CesrTA) for a program of electron cloud (EC) research at ultra low emittance. The instrumentation in the ring has been upgraded with local diagnostics for measurement of cloud density and with improved beam diagnostics for the characterization of both the low emittance performance and the beam dynamics of high intensity bunch trains interacting with the cloud. A range of EC mitigation methods have been deployed and tested and their effectiveness is discussed. Measurements of the electron cloud's effect on the beam under a range of conditions are discussed along with the simulations being used to quantitatively understand these results.

  15. Electron Cloud at Low Emittance in CesrTA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexander, J. P.; Billing, M. G.; Calvey, J.; Crittenden, J. A.; Dugan, G.; Eggert, N.; Forster, M.; Greenwald, S.; Hartill, D. L.; Hopkins, W. H.; Kreinick, D. L.; Li, Y.; Liu, X.; Livezey, J. A.; Meller, R.; Peck, S.; Peterson, D. P.; Rice, D.; Rider, N.; Rubin, D.; Sagan, D.; Schwartz, R.; Shanks, J. P.; Sikora, J.; Harkay, K. C.; Antoniou, F.; Calatroni, S.; Gasior, M.; Papaphilippou, Y.; Pfingstner, J.; Rumolo, G.; Schmickler, H.; Taborelli, M.; Holtzapple, R.; Jones, J.; Wolski, A.; Tan, C.Y.; Zwaska, R. M; Flanagan, J. W.; Kanazawa, K.I.; Sakai, H.; Shibata, K.; Suetsugu, Y.; Byrd, J.; Corlett, J.; De Santis, S.; Furman, M.; Kraft, R.; Munson, D. V.; Penn, G.; Plate, D.; Venturini, M.; Pivi, M. T. F.; Wang, L.; Schachter, L.

    2010-05-23

    The Cornell Electron Storage Ring (CESR) has been reconfigured as a test accelerator (CesrTA) for a program of electron cloud (EC) research at ultra low emittance. The instrumentation in the ring has been upgraded with local diagnostics for measurement of cloud density and with improved beam diagnostics for the characterization of both the low emittance performance and the beam dynamics of high intensity bunch trains interacting with the cloud. A range of EC mitigation methods have been deployed and tested and their effectiveness is discussed. Measurements of the electron cloud's effect on the beam under a range of conditions are discussed along with the simulations being used to quantitatively understand these results.

  16. Lattice and emittance optimization techniques and the ALS brightness upgrade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steier, C.; Madur, A.; Nishimura, H.; Robin, D.; Sannibale, F.; Sun, C.; Wan, W.; Yang, L.

    2011-09-01

    An upgrade project is under way to further improve the brightness of the Advanced Light Source at Berkeley Lab by reducing its horizontal emittance from 6.3 to 2.2 nm (effective emittance in the straights from 6.4 to 2.5 nm). This will result in a brightness increase by a factor of three for bend magnet beamlines and at least a factor of two for insertion device beamlines and will keep the ALS competitive with newer sources. This paper presents an overview of the upgrade project with emphasis on the nonlinear beam dynamics simulations. It also discusses in a more general way the techniques used at LBNL for finding optimum lattices (e.g. the ones with maximum brightness) and optimizing the particle dynamics, thereby increasing beam lifetime and stability.

  17. Microfluidic White Organic Light-Emitting Diode Based on Integrated Patterns of Greenish-Blue and Yellow Solvent-Free Liquid Emitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Naofumi; Kasahara, Takashi; Edura, Tomohiko; Oshima, Juro; Ishimatsu, Ryoichi; Tsuwaki, Miho; Imato, Toshihiko; Shoji, Shuichi; Mizuno, Jun

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrated a novel microfluidic white organic light-emitting diode (microfluidic WOLED) based on integrated sub-100-μm-wide microchannels. Single-μm-thick SU-8-based microchannels, which were sandwiched between indium tin oxide (ITO) anode and cathode pairs, were fabricated by photolithography and heterogeneous bonding technologies. 1-Pyrenebutyric acid 2-ethylhexyl ester (PLQ) was used as a solvent-free greenish-blue liquid emitter, while 2,8-di-tert-butyl-5,11-bis(4-tert-butylphenyl)-6,12-diphenyltetracene (TBRb)-doped PLQ was applied as a yellow liquid emitter. In order to form the liquid white light-emitting layer, the greenish-blue and yellow liquid emitters were alternately injected into the integrated microchannels. The fabricated electro-microfluidic device successfully exhibited white electroluminescence (EL) emission via simultaneous greenish-blue and yellow emissions under an applied voltage of 100 V. A white emission with Commission Internationale de l’Declairage (CIE) color coordinates of (0.40, 0.42) was also obtained; the emission corresponds to warm-white light. The proposed device has potential applications in subpixels of liquid-based microdisplays and for lighting. PMID:26439164

  18. Voltage controlled optics of a monolayer semiconductor quantum emitter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Chitraleema; Goodfellow, Kenneth; Kinnischtzke, Laura; Vamivakas, Nick; University of Rochester Team

    2015-03-01

    Two-dimensional atomically thin materials are being actively investigated for next generation optoelectronic devices. Particularly exciting are transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDC) since these materials exhibit a band gap, and support valley specific exciton mediated optical transitions. In this work we report the observation of single photon emission in the TMDC tungsten diselenide. We present magneto-optical spectroscopy results and demonstrate voltage controlled photoluminescence of these localized quantum emitters.

  19. Compliance with High-Intensity Radiated Fields Regulations - Emitter's Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Statman, Joseph; Jamnejad, Vahraz; Nguyen, Lee

    2012-01-01

    NASA's Deep Space Network (DSN) uses high-power transmitters on its large antennas to communicate with spacecraft of NASA and its partner agencies. The prime reflectors of the DSN antennas are parabolic, at 34m and 70m in diameter. The DSN transmitters radiate Continuous Wave (CW) signals at 20 kW - 500 kW at X-band and S-band frequencies. The combination of antenna reflector size and high frequency results in a very narrow beam with extensive oscillating near-field pattern. Another unique feature of the DSN antennas is that they (and the radiated beam) move mostly at very slow sidereal rate, essentially identical in magnitude and at the opposite direction of Earth rotation.The DSN is in the process of revamping its documentation to provide analysis of the High Intensity Radiation Fields (HIRF) environment resulting from radio frequency radiation from DSN antennas for comparison to FAA regulations regarding certification of HIRF protection as outlined in the FAA regulations on HIRF protection for aircraft electrical and electronic systems (Title 14, Code of Federal Regulations (14 CFR) [section sign][section sign] 23.1308, 25.1317, 27.1317, and 29.1317).This paper presents work done at JPL, in consultation with the FAA. The work includes analysis of the radiated field structure created by the unique DSN emitters (combination of transmitters and antennas) and comparing it to the fields defined in the environments in the FAA regulations. The paper identifies areas that required special attention, including the implications of the very narrow beam of the DSN emitters and the sidereal rate motion. The paper derives the maximum emitter power allowed without mitigation and the mitigation zones, where required.Finally, the paper presents summary of the results of the analyses of the DSN emitters and the resulting DSN process documentation.

  20. Industrial application of electron sources with plasma emitters

    CERN Document Server

    Belyuk, S I; Rempe, N G

    2001-01-01

    Paper contains a description, operation, design and parameters of electron sources with plasma emitters. One presents examples of application of these sources as part of automated electron-beam welding lines. Paper describes application of such sources for electron-beam deposition of composite powders. Electron-beam deposition is used to rebuild worn out part and to increase strength of new parts of machines and tools. Paper presents some examples of rebuilding part and the advantages gained in this case