WorldWideScience

Sample records for warfare bioterrorism biodefence

  1. Biological warfare, bioterrorism, and biocrime

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, H. J.; Breeveld, F. J.; Stijnis, C.; Grobusch, M. P.

    2014-01-01

    Biological weapons achieve their intended target effects through the infectivity of disease-causing infectious agents. The ability to use biological agents in warfare is prohibited by the Biological and Toxin Weapon Convention. Bioterrorism is defined as the deliberate release of viruses, bacteria

  2. Biological warfare, bioterrorism, and biocrime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, H J; Breeveld, F J; Stijnis, C; Grobusch, M P

    2014-06-01

    Biological weapons achieve their intended target effects through the infectivity of disease-causing infectious agents. The ability to use biological agents in warfare is prohibited by the Biological and Toxin Weapon Convention. Bioterrorism is defined as the deliberate release of viruses, bacteria or other agents used to cause illness or death in people, but also in animals or plants. It is aimed at creating casualties, terror, societal disruption, or economic loss, inspired by ideological, religious or political beliefs. The success of bioterroristic attempts is defined by the measure of societal disruption and panic, and not necessarily by the sheer number of casualties. Thus, making only a few individuals ill by the use of crude methods may be sufficient, as long as it creates the impact that is aimed for. The assessment of bioterrorism threats and motives have been described before. Biocrime implies the use of a biological agent to kill or make ill a single individual or small group of individuals, motivated by revenge or the desire for monetary gain by extortion, rather than by political, ideological, religious or other beliefs. The likelihood of a successful bioterrorist attack is not very large, given the technical difficulties and constraints. However, even if the number of casualties is likely to be limited, the impact of a bioterrorist attack can still be high. Measures aimed at enhancing diagnostic and therapeutic capabilities and capacities alongside training and education will improve the ability of society to combat 'regular' infectious diseases outbreaks, as well as mitigating the effects of bioterrorist attacks. © 2014 The Authors Clinical Microbiology and Infection © 2014 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases.

  3. History of biological warfare and bioterrorism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barras, V; Greub, G

    2014-06-01

    Bioterrorism literally means using microorganisms or infected samples to cause terror and panic in populations. Bioterrorism had already started 14 centuries before Christ, when the Hittites sent infected rams to their enemies. However, apart from some rare well-documented events, it is often very difficult for historians and microbiologists to differentiate natural epidemics from alleged biological attacks, because: (i) little information is available for times before the advent of modern microbiology; (ii) truth may be manipulated for political reasons, especially for a hot topic such as a biological attack; and (iii) the passage of time may also have distorted the reality of the past. Nevertheless, we have tried to provide to clinical microbiologists an overview of some likely biological warfare that occurred before the 18th century and that included the intentional spread of epidemic diseases such as tularaemia, plague, malaria, smallpox, yellow fever, and leprosy. We also summarize the main events that occurred during the modern microbiology era, from World War I to the recent 'anthrax letters' that followed the World Trade Center attack of September 2001. Again, the political polemic surrounding the use of infectious agents as a weapon may distort the truth. This is nicely exemplified by the Sverdlovsk accident, which was initially attributed by the authorities to a natural foodborne outbreak, and was officially recognized as having a military cause only 13 years later. © 2014 The Authors Clinical Microbiology and Infection © 2014 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases.

  4. [Bioterrorism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oren, Meir

    2002-05-01

    The terror attacks of the September 11, 2001 in the U.S.A followed by the proliferation of anthrax using mail in some US cities and abroad, demonstrated the complex, devastating and harmful nature of terror activity. The use of weapons of mass destruction (WMD) in terrorist activities is a reality as is the use of biological weapons (BW) in bioterrorism. Cyberterrorism is another form of non-conventional terrorism. The health care system throughout all its different components and layers--public health, primary care, hospitals, first responders etc., must be prepared. The complete network must have a comprehensive contingency plan for any possible BW scenario. The health care system must cope successfully with the challenge of early diagnosis of extraordinary illness or outbreak of disease, having the ability to define any bioterror event and to conduct appropriate risk assessments. It is of great importance to prepare in advance a comprehensive coordinated plan with all other governmental ministries and agencies. In order to succeed it is crucial that the top decision makers--the Prime Minister and government members and top ranking officials at the Ministry of Health, be committed, and continuously proactive in the complicated and lengthy process of preparing the health care system for a bioterrorism event.

  5. Bioterrorism and Biological Warfare, from Past to the Present: A classic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Zare Bidaki

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Bioterrorism is defined as any terrorist action of intentional release or dissemination of highly pathogenic biological agents, including a variety of microorganisms or biological toxins. With the growing threat of terrorism, is necessary that the potential danger of various microorganisms – as a powerful tool of aggression and threat- to be taken seriously. This review tries to explain the concept of biological weapons and their historical development process with an emphasis on efforts to control the proliferation of these types of weapons over the last century. Potential impact of infectious diseases on people and armed forces was known from since 600 BC. Using the victims of the plague as a weapon in medieval warfare and spread of smallpox as a weapon during the war against the Indians when initially America was discovered, the development of biological weapons during the World War I, World War II and the Cold War, and even since the beginning of the third millennium, all show the strategic importance of pathogenic microorganisms as a deterrent power for the superiority of some governments and cults. Historical attempts to use infectious diseases as biological weapons reveal that the distinction between a natural outbreak of an infectious disease and that of a deliberate biological attack is very difficult. Abusing this characteristic of infectious diseases has made it possible for the purposes of superiority. International agreements to control the development of biological weapons, such as “the 1925 Geneva Protocol” and “the Convention on the Prohibition of the Development, Production and Stockpiling of Biological and Toxic Weapons” have not been able to control the development and using of biological warfare.  The current paper is a classic review (Overview article aiming at increasing the knowledge and awareness of people especially of health authorities and government officials.

  6. Guerra biológica, bioterrorismo e saúde pública Biological warfare, bioterrorism and public health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Jacintho da Silva

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available O uso de agentes biológicos como arma não é novidade para a humanidade. Durante séculos, até a atualidade, a guerra biológica tem sido objeto de muita pesquisa e especulação, mas de pouca ação. O medo de efeitos contrários e dúvidas sobre sua eficiência como armas devem ter limitado seu uso. Recentemente, se verificou uma nova forma de terrorismo, empregando agentes infecciosos, devagar e sem muito alarde, até as ocorrências recentes com o Bacillus anthracis nos Estados Unidos. A varíola é possivelmente o mais devastador desses agentes. Menos de 25 anos passados desde sua erradicação, a saúde pública tem que lidar com a possibilidade de sua re-introdução. O cenário da re-introdução da varíola no Brasil é discutido.Biological agents as weapons are not new to mankind. For centuries and into the present, biological warfare has been the subject of much research and speculation, but little action. Their limited use has probably been due to fear of unexpected counter-effects and doubts about their efficiency as weapons. Recently a new form of terrorism employing infectious agents has emerged slowly and without much fanfare, until the recent events with Bacillus anthracis in the United States. Smallpox is potentially the most devastating of these agents. Less than 25 years after the eradication of smallpox, the public health field is now forced to deal with the possibility of its re-introduction. The author discusses the scenario of smallpox re-introduction into Brazil.

  7. The impact of "omic" and imaging technologies on assessing the host immune response to biodefence agents

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tree, Julia A; Flick-Smith, Helen; Elmore, Michael J; Rowland, Caroline A

    2014-01-01

    ...; and biophotonic imaging for visualising the infectious disease process. All of these technologies hold great promise for important breakthroughs in the rational development of vaccines and therapeutics for biodefence agents.

  8. Pathogens for war: biological weapons, Canadian life scientists, and North American biodefence

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Avery, Donald; Plummer, Francis A

    2013-01-01

    ... and natural disease pandemics. Avery emphasizes the crucially important activities of Canadian biodefence scientists - beginning with Nobel Laureate Frederick Banting - at both the national level and through cooperative projects...

  9. From biodefence to biosecurity: the Obama administration's strategy for countering biological threats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koblentz, Gregory D

    2012-01-01

    The Seventh Review Conference of the Biological Weapons Convention (BWC), the first international treaty to outlaw an entire class of weapons, was held in Geneva in December 2011. On 7 December, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton became the highest-ranking US government official to address a BWC meeting. Secretary Clinton told the assembled delegation that ‘we view the risk of bioweapons attack as both a serious national security challenge and a foreign policy priority’. At the same time, she warned that a large-scale disease outbreak ‘could cripple an already fragile global economy’. Secretary Clinton's speech reflected a new understanding that the range of biological threats to international security has expanded from state-sponsored biological warfare programmes to include biological terrorism, dual-use research and naturally occurring infectious diseases such as pandemics. Recognizing these changes, President Barack Obama released a new national strategy for countering biological threats in 2009. This strategy represents a shift in thinking away from the George W. Bush administration's focus on biodefence, which emphasized preparing for and responding to biological weapon attacks, to the concept of biosecurity, which includes measures to prevent, prepare for and respond to naturally occurring and man-made biological threats. The Obama administration's biosecurity strategy seeks to reduce the global risk of naturally occurring and deliberate disease outbreaks through prevention, international cooperation, and maximizing synergies between health and security. The biosecurity strategy is closely aligned with the Obama administration's broader approach to foreign policy, which emphasizes the pragmatic use of smart power, multilateralism and engagement to further the national interest. This article describes the Obama administration's biosecurity strategy; highlights elements of continuity and change from the policies of the Bush administration; discusses

  10. History of Bioterrorism: Botulism

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Bioterrorism" Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir This video describes the Category A diseases: smallpox, anthrax, botulism, plague, tularemia, and viral hemorrhagic ...

  11. History of Bioterrorism: Botulism

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for taking care of yourself Information on Specific Types of Emergencies Situation Awareness ... Emergencies Chemical Emergencies Bioterrorism Information for Specific Groups ...

  12. Biological warfare agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duraipandian Thavaselvam

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The recent bioterrorist attacks using anthrax spores have emphasized the need to detect and decontaminate critical facilities in the shortest possible time. There has been a remarkable progress in the detection, protection and decontamination of biological warfare agents as many instrumentation platforms and detection methodologies are developed and commissioned. Even then the threat of biological warfare agents and their use in bioterrorist attacks still remain a leading cause of global concern. Furthermore in the past decade there have been threats due to the emerging new diseases and also the re-emergence of old diseases and development of antimicrobial resistance and spread to new geographical regions. The preparedness against these agents need complete knowledge about the disease, better research and training facilities, diagnostic facilities and improved public health system. This review on the biological warfare agents will provide information on the biological warfare agents, their mode of transmission and spread and also the detection systems available to detect them. In addition the current information on the availability of commercially available and developing technologies against biological warfare agents has also been discussed. The risk that arise due to the use of these agents in warfare or bioterrorism related scenario can be mitigated with the availability of improved detection technologies.

  13. History of Bioterrorism: Botulism

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Situation Awareness Hurricanes Wildfire Flooding Earthquakes Volcanos Winter Weather Recent Outbreaks and Incidents 2016 2015 2014 2013 ... 2009 2008 2007 2006 Natural Disasters and Severe Weather 2016 Hurricane Matthew Radiation Emergencies Chemical Emergencies Bioterrorism ...

  14. History of Bioterrorism: Botulism

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Radiation Emergencies Chemical Emergencies Bioterrorism Information for Specific Groups Older Adults Information for Pregnant Women Children and ... Drug Administration (FDA), and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 1999. File Formats Help: How ...

  15. History of Bioterrorism: Botulism

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is Doing Blog: Public Health Matters Video: "The History of Bioterrorism" Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... as bioterrorist weapons. Watch the Complete Program "The History of Bioterroism" (26 min 38 sec) Watch Specific ...

  16. History of Bioterrorism: Botulism

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is Doing Blog: Public Health Matters Video: "The History of Bioterrorism" Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... as bioterrorist weapons. Watch the Complete Program "The History of Bioterroism" (26 min 38 sec) Watch Specific ...

  17. History of Bioterrorism: Botulism

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and Severe Weather 2016 Hurricane Matthew Radiation Emergencies Chemical Emergencies Bioterrorism Information for Specific Groups Older Adults ... co-produced by the United States Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases (USAMRIID), the Food and ...

  18. History of Bioterrorism: Botulism

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... About CDC.gov . Emergency Preparedness and Response Natural Disasters and Severe Weather Bioterrorism Chemical Emergencies Recent Outbreaks and Incidents Radiation Emergencies Clinicians Coping with Disaster Crisis & Risk Communication Health Alert Network (HAN) Laboratory ...

  19. History of Bioterrorism: Botulism

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Information Social Media Zombie Apocalypse What’s New Video: "The History of Bioterrorism" Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share ... or can be used as bioterrorist weapons. Watch the Complete Program "The History of Bioterroism" (26 min ...

  20. History of Bioterrorism: Botulism

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... What CDC is Doing Blog: Public Health Matters Video: "The History of Bioterrorism" Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir This video describes the Category A diseases: smallpox, anthrax, botulism, ...

  1. History of Bioterrorism: Botulism

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... CDC A-Z SEARCH A B C D E F G H I J K L M ... Network (HAN) Laboratory Information Social Media Zombie Apocalypse What’s New Video: "The History of Bioterrorism" Recommend on ...

  2. History of Bioterrorism: Botulism

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Chemical Emergencies Bioterrorism Information for Specific Groups Older Adults Expectant and New Parents Evacuees Children and Their ... Specific Groups Resources for Emergency Health Professionals Training & Education Social Media What’s New Preparation & Planning More on ...

  3. History of Bioterrorism: Botulism

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Preparedness What CDC is Doing Blog: Public Health Matters Video: "The History of Bioterrorism" Recommend on Facebook ... Preparedness What CDC is Doing Blog: Public Health Matters File Formats Help: How do I view different ...

  4. History of Bioterrorism: Botulism

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Information on Specific Types of Emergencies Situation Awareness Hurricanes Wildfire Flooding Earthquakes Volcanos Winter Weather Recent Outbreaks ... 2007 2006 Natural Disasters and Severe Weather 2016 Hurricane Matthew Radiation Emergencies Chemical Emergencies Bioterrorism Information for ...

  5. History of Bioterrorism: Botulism

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Social Media Zombie Apocalypse What’s New Video: "The History of Bioterrorism" Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... as bioterrorist weapons. Watch the Complete Program "The History of Bioterroism" (26 min 38 sec) Watch Specific ...

  6. History of Bioterrorism: Botulism

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and Severe Weather 2016 Hurricane Matthew Radiation Emergencies Chemical Emergencies Bioterrorism Information for Specific Groups Older Adults ... 2007 Page last updated: October 7, 2014 Content source: Office of Public Health Preparedness and Response (OPHPR) ...

  7. History of Bioterrorism: Botulism

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 2009 2008 2007 2006 Natural Disasters and Severe Weather 2016 Hurricane Matthew Radiation Emergencies Chemical Emergencies Bioterrorism Information for Specific Groups Older Adults Expectant and New Parents Children and Their Caregivers People with Disabilities ...

  8. History of Bioterrorism: Botulism

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... CDC is Doing Blog: Public Health Matters Video: "The History of Bioterrorism" Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share ... or can be used as bioterrorist weapons. Watch the Complete Program "The History of Bioterroism" (26 min ...

  9. History of Bioterrorism: Botulism

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Laboratory Information Social Media Zombie Apocalypse What’s New Video: "The History of Bioterrorism" Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir This video describes the Category A diseases: smallpox, anthrax, botulism, ...

  10. [Practical strategies against bioterrorism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Tetsuya

    2007-12-01

    Bioterrorism is terrorism by intentional release of viruses, bacteria, toxins or other agents to cause illness or death in people. Especially, anthrax, smallpox, plague, botulism, tularemia, and viral hemorrhagic fevers are important illness due to biological agents with a high potential for adverse public health impact. These biological agents can be spread through the air, through water, or in food and may cause disasters in the society. Furthermore, difficulties in detection and identification of the bioterrorism agents may result in immense harm. Then we need to take actions for the preparation for unexpected events to keep the damage to a minimum.

  11. History of Bioterrorism: Botulism

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Information Social Media Zombie Apocalypse What’s New Video: "The History of Bioterrorism" Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir This ... or can be used as bioterrorist weapons. Watch the Complete Program "The History of Bioterroism" (26 min ...

  12. History of Bioterrorism: Botulism

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Specific Groups Resources for Emergency Health Professionals Training & Education Social Media What’s New Preparation & Planning More on Preparedness What CDC is Doing Blog: Public Health Matters Video: "The History of Bioterrorism" Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ...

  13. History of Bioterrorism: Botulism

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... with a Disaster or Traumatic Event Resources for Families Helping Children Cope Resources for Leaders Resources for ... were adapted from "Biological Warfare and Terrorism: The Military and Public Health Response," co-produced by the ...

  14. The Impact of “Omic” and Imaging Technologies on Assessing the Host Immune Response to Biodefence Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia A. Tree

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the interactions between host and pathogen is important for the development and assessment of medical countermeasures to infectious agents, including potential biodefence pathogens such as Bacillus anthracis, Ebola virus, and Francisella tularensis. This review focuses on technological advances which allow this interaction to be studied in much greater detail. Namely, the use of “omic” technologies (next generation sequencing, DNA, and protein microarrays for dissecting the underlying host response to infection at the molecular level; optical imaging techniques (flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy for assessing cellular responses to infection; and biophotonic imaging for visualising the infectious disease process. All of these technologies hold great promise for important breakthroughs in the rational development of vaccines and therapeutics for biodefence agents.

  15. History of Bioterrorism: Botulism

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... were adapted from "Biological Warfare and Terrorism: The Military and Public Health Response," co-produced by the United States Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases (USAMRIID), the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and the Centers for Disease Control and ...

  16. History of Bioterrorism: Botulism

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... from "Biological Warfare and Terrorism: The Military and Public Health Response," co-produced by the United States Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases (USAMRIID), the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and the Centers for Disease Control and ...

  17. History of Bioterrorism: Botulism

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... from "Biological Warfare and Terrorism: The Military and Public Health Response," co-produced by the United States Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases (USAMRIID), the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 1999. Are ...

  18. Biodefense and Bioterrorism - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Biodefense and Bioterrorism URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/biodefenseandbioterrorism.html Other topics A-Z Expand Section ...

  19. Metabolic network analysis-based identification of antimicrobial drug targets in category A bioterrorism agents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Yeol Ahn

    Full Text Available The 2001 anthrax mail attacks in the United States demonstrated the potential threat of bioterrorism, hence driving the need to develop sophisticated treatment and diagnostic protocols to counter biological warfare. Here, by performing flux balance analyses on the fully-annotated metabolic networks of multiple, whole genome-sequenced bacterial strains, we have identified a large number of metabolic enzymes as potential drug targets for each of the three Category A-designated bioterrorism agents including Bacillus anthracis, Francisella tularensis and Yersinia pestis. Nine metabolic enzymes- belonging to the coenzyme A, folate, phosphatidyl-ethanolamine and nucleic acid pathways common to all strains across the three distinct genera were identified as targets. Antimicrobial agents against some of these enzymes are available. Thus, a combination of cross species-specific antibiotics and common antimicrobials against shared targets may represent a useful combinatorial therapeutic approach against all Category A bioterrorism agents.

  20. Bureaucracy versus Bioterrorism: Countering a Globalized Threat

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    AIR UNIVERSITY AIR WAR COLLEGE Bureaucracy versus Bioterrorism Countering a Globalized Threat STEPHEN G. HOFFMAN...DATES COVERED 00-00-2012 to 00-00-2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Bureaucracy versus Bioterrorism: Countering a Globalized Threat 5a. CONTRACT...Bioterrorism: Countering a Globalized Threat Lt Col Stephen G. Hoffman, USAF Two things are certain—death and taxes! Or maybe just taxes. Scientists are

  1. Governing Warfare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harste, Gorm

    its origins in a - some say 1st - generation of warfare, where armies were concentrated and could be controlled by political masters who were also acclaimed as warfare "geniuses". With subsequent generations of warfare, however, the control of war cannot be replaced by a control of military...... administration. While organisation systems continue to make some kind of political control possible, this is not the case in relation to wars. The organisation system is the in-between that should mediatise politics and war but is not functionally equivalent to just and unjust wars. The paper investigates...... the risks of lacking unity and displays the organisational trap to the fatal political myth of controlled warfare: Does it come from the military organisation system itself, from political ideologies of goal-rational governance, or from the chameleonic logic of wars?  ...

  2. Hybrid Warfare

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    military vocabulary to describe these observed phenomena. After an intense focus on large-scale conventional conflicts during the Cold War, with episodic...requiring the mastery of both grammars.85 It follows that hybrid warfare requires the blending of both grammars. The Theoretical Lineage of

  3. Bioterrorism

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... was contributed by: familydoctor.org editorial staff Categories: Crisis Situations, Prevention and Wellness, Staying HealthyTags: Critcal Care, diarrhea, emergency medicine, fever, Nausea and Vomiting, Skin Infections, skin rash, ...

  4. Bureaucracy vs. Bioterrorism: Countering a Globalized Threat

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-16

    AIR WAR COLLEGE AIR UNIVERSITY BUREAUCRACY VS. BIOTERRORISM: COUNTERING A GLOBALIZED THREAT by Stephen G. Hoffman, Lt Col, USAF...DATES COVERED 00-00-2011 to 00-00-2011 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Bureaucracy vs. Bioterrorism: Countering a Globalized Threat 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER...and novel biothreats to our adversaries. Globalization and the increasing availability of knowledge required to develop biothreats coupled with

  5. Millennial Warfare

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-09

    www.cbsnews.com/news/the-echo-boomers-01-10-2004. 37 Andrew Hanna, “The Global Youth Unemployment Crisis: Exploring Successful Initiatives and Partnering with...SSP/seminars/wed_archives06spring/habeck.html Hanna, Andrew. “The Global Youth Unemployment Crisis: Exploring Successful Initiatives and Partnering...ISIL cause . The millennials within ISILs global insurgency are the drivers of these changes. The current Irregular Warfare literature does not account

  6. Air Warfare

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-03-01

    to a halt in its usual medium of travel. A certain minimum of speed is essen- tial to sustentation , for the whole phenomenon of flight 36 AIR WARFARE...3,000 pounds, has a wing area of 287 square feet, while the bomber with its weight of 12,000 pounds requires some 1,121 square feet for its sustentation ...the resistance offered by the other parts of the airplane, which, since they play no part in sustentation , are known as “parasite” resistances. But the

  7. THE BIOTERRORISM THREAT: TECHNOLOGICAL AND POLITICAL CONSIDERATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. F. PILAT

    2000-03-01

    Bioterrorism--along with biowarfare, from which it may not always be distinguishable in practice--will be a feature of the strategic landscape in the 21st century and is high on the US national security agenda. Bioterrorism poses a potential threat to the US population, agriculture, interests, friends and allies, and military forces (asymmetric threats). Yet these possibilities have not been widely pursued or realized by terrorists. The perceived threat is far worse than anything experienced to date, and is largely technologically driven.

  8. The Nature of the Bioterrorism Threat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Regens, J. L.

    2003-02-25

    This analysis provides an overview of the nature of the bioterrorism threat. It identifies potential CDC Class A biological agents that are likely candidates for use in a terrorist incident and describes the known sources of vulnerability. The paper also summarizes S&T resources/needs and assesses response options for achieving effective biodefense against terrorist threats.

  9. Bioterrorism and disaster preparedness among medical specialties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Joshua E; Dimick, Jacob; Syrax, Michael; Bhandary, Madhusudan; Rudy, Bruce S

    2012-01-01

    A core priority of all medical specialties includes information for members regarding inherent priorities and principles. The authors sought to investigate the priority and contribution of various medical specialties to the fields of bioterrorism, terrorism, disaster preparedness, and emergency preparedness. A mixed study design (quantitative and qualitative) was used to identify pertinent characteristics of various medical specialties. A scored survey analysis of resources available from the representative organizations and/or societies of the primary medical specialties and select subspecialties was examined and scored based on availability, ease of accessibility, updated status, and content. A MEDLINE search completed through PubMed using the medical subject headings bioterrorism, terrorism, disaster preparedness, and emergency preparedness coupled with specific medical specialties was conducted to assess the involvement and contribution of each to the medical literature. The primary study outcome was to evaluate the priority of and existing resources available to members for bioterrorism/terrorism and disaster/emergency preparedness among various medical specialties as reflected by their representative organizations and scientific publication. The search of individual medical specialties and of the medical literature (2000-2010) revealed that these topics (via keywords bioterrorism, terrorism, disaster preparedness, and emergency preparedness) are indeed a priority topic for the majority of medical specialties. A number of specialties with expectant priority in these topics were confirmed. All seven primary care specialties demonstrated a core priority of these topics and offered resources. The MEDLINE (PubMed) search yielded 7,228 articles published from 2000 to 2010. Bioterrorism/terrorism and disaster/ emergency preparedness are priority topics of most medical specialties. This core priority is demonstrated by both the medical specialty resources in addition

  10. Drone warfare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gusterson, Hugh

    2017-11-01

    Crude drones existed as early as World War I, but the technology matured in the Yugoslav Wars of the 1990s and the current wars around the Middle East. The U.S. first used a weaponized drone in late 2001, in Afghanistan. Drones may cause more or less civilian casualties depending on the targeting protocols employed by their operators. There is an inherent ambiguity in determining who is an insurgent from several thousand feet, but civilian casualties are likely to be higher if targeters emphasize "signature strikes" over "personality strikes," if they engage in "double-tap strikes," if they rely too much on local informants, and if they rely too heavily on cellphone identification in the absence of corroboration from other intelligence sources. The legality of drone warfare is fairly clear in established battle zones such as Afghanistan, but is more problematic in terms of both international and domestic law when it comes to drone strikes in countries such as Yemen, Pakistan and Somalia with which the U.S. is not at war. Looking to the future, the U.S. would be well advised to sponsor negotiations for an international drone convention that might establish clear international rules for the use of drones, ban autonomous smart drones, and establish adjudicatory procedures to handle allegations of war crimes.

  11. Particulate delivery systems for vaccination against bioterrorism agents and emerging infectious pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yuchen; Moon, James J.

    2016-01-01

    Bioterrorism agents that can be easily transmitted with high mortality rates and cause debilitating diseases pose major threats to national security and public health. The recent Ebola virus outbreak in West Africa and ongoing Zika virus outbreak in Brazil, now spreading throughout Latin America, are case examples of emerging infectious pathogens that have incited widespread fear and economic and social disruption on a global scale. Prophylactic vaccines would provide effective countermeasures against infectious pathogens and biological warfare agents. However, traditional approaches relying on attenuated or inactivated vaccines have been hampered by their unacceptable levels of reactogenicity and safety issues, whereas subunit antigen-based vaccines suffer from suboptimal immunogenicity and efficacy. In contrast, particulate vaccine delivery systems offer key advantages, including efficient and stable delivery of subunit antigens, co-delivery of adjuvant molecules to bolster immune responses, low reactogenicity due to the use of biocompatible biomaterials, and robust efficiency to elicit humoral and cellular immunity in systemic and mucosal tissues. Thus, vaccine nanoparticles and microparticles are promising platforms for clinical development of biodefense vaccines. In this review, we summarize the current status of research efforts to develop particulate vaccine delivery systems against bioterrorism agents and emerging infectious pathogens. PMID:27038091

  12. Future Of Privatized Warfare

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-26

    support roles like base support and sustainment . In contrast, nearly seventeen percent of private contractors in Iraq and Afghanistan performed...numerous others in their works. 48 Jan Glete, “Warfare, Entrepreneurship , and the Fiscal-Military State,” in European Warfare: 1350-1750, eds. Frank...Pirates, and Sovereigns, 21. 50 Glete, “Warfare, Entrepreneurship , and the Fiscal-Military State,” 301. 51 Tallett and Trim, “Then Was Then and Now

  13. Hybrid Warfare and Lawfare

    OpenAIRE

    Bachmann, Sascha-Dominik; Mosquera, Andres B Munoz

    2015-01-01

    Hybrid Warfare as a method of war is not new. The change today appears to be that Hybrid Warfare “has the potential to transform the strategic calculations of potential belligerents [it has become] increasingly sophisticated and deadly”. This short paper presents Hybrid Warfare and one of its methods, lawfare. For this, we provide a current, comprehensive definition of hybrid warfare and examine different areas where law has been/is being used as a method of war. This paper focuses on the fol...

  14. Flying Electronic Warfare Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Provides NP-3D aircraft host platforms for Effectiveness of Navy Electronic Warfare Systems (ENEWS) Program antiship missile (ASM) seeker simulators used...

  15. Bioterrorism and Smallpox: Policies, Practices, and Implications for Social Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackelprang, Romel W.; Mackelprang, Romel D.; Thirkill, Ashley D.

    2005-01-01

    Terrorist acts and the fear of terrorism have become a part of everyday life in the early 21st century. Among the threats most feared is bioterrorism, including the intentional release of smallpox. With the invasion of Iraq and toppling of the Saddam Hussein regime, acute bioterrorism fears have abated; however, an ongoing threat remains. This…

  16. Information Warfare and Ethics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.J. Warren

    2001-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the ethics of the practice of information warfare at both the national and corporate levels. Initially examining the present and past actions of individual hackers, it moves to the more organised, future military and economic warfare scenarios. It examines the lack of legal or policy initiatives in this area.

  17. Bio-Terrorism Threat and Casualty Prevention

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NOEL,WILLIAM P.

    2000-01-01

    The bio-terrorism threat has become the ''poor man's'' nuclear weapon. The ease of manufacture and dissemination has allowed an organization with only rudimentary skills and equipment to pose a significant threat with high consequences. This report will analyze some of the most likely agents that would be used, the ease of manufacture, the ease of dissemination and what characteristics of the public health response that are particularly important to the successful characterization of a high consequence event to prevent excessive causalities.

  18. Lasers in Electronic Warfare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manke, Gerald C.

    2014-10-01

    The use of lasers for Electronic Warfare applications will be discussed and reviewed. Specific examples of deployed EW systems which include lasers will be presented along with a discussion of their most salient features.

  19. Hybrid Warfare and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    was developed as an alternative to the Western teleological approach, while operational design is based on epistemology. In contrast to EBO...and the Ethics of Warfare,” presentation to the Joint Services FORUM | Systems versus Classical Approach to Warfare Conference on Professional... Ethics , 2006, School of Advanced Military Studies, Fort Leavenworth, KS. 23 Cited in Avi Kober, “The Israel Defense Forces in the Second Lebanon War

  20. Biosensors for security and bioterrorism applications

    CERN Document Server

    Nikoleli, Georgia-Paraskevi

    2016-01-01

    This book offers comprehensive coverage of biomarker/biosensor interactions for the rapid detection of weapons of bioterrorism, as well as current research trends and future developments and applications. It will be useful to researchers in this field who are interested in new developments in the early detection of such. The authors have collected very valuable and, in some aspects indispensable experience in the area i.e. in the development and application of portable biosensors for the detection of potential hazards. Most efforts are centered on the development of immunochemical assays including flow-lateral systems and engineered antibodies and their fragments. In addition, new approaches to the detection of enzyme inhibitors, direct enzymatic and microbial detection of metabolites and nutrients are elaborated. Some realized prototypes and concept devices applicable for the further use as a basis for the cooperation programs are also discussed. There is a particular focus on electrochemical and optical det...

  1. Chemical warfare agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijayaraghavan R

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Among the Weapons of Mass Destruction, chemical warfare (CW is probably one of the most brutal created by mankind in comparison with biological and nuclear warfare. Chemical weapons are inexpensive and are relatively easy to produce, even by small terrorist groups, to create mass casualties with small quantities. The characteristics of various CW agents, general information relevant to current physical as well as medical protection methods, detection equipment available and decontamination techniques are discussed in this review article. A brief note on Chemical Weapons Convention is also provided.

  2. Planning the bioterrorism response supply chain: learn and live.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandeau, Margaret L; Hutton, David W; Owens, Douglas K; Bravata, Dena M

    2007-01-01

    Responses to bioterrorism require rapid procurement and distribution of medical and pharmaceutical supplies, trained personnel, and information. Thus, they present significant logistical challenges. On the basis of a review of the manufacturing and service supply chain literature, the authors identified five supply chain strategies that can potentially increase the speed of response to a bioterrorism attack, reduce inventories, and save money: effective supply chain network design; effective inventory management; postponement of product customization and modularization of component parts; coordination of supply chain stakeholders and appropriate use of incentives; and effective information management. The authors describe how concepts learned from published evaluations of manufacturing and service supply chains, as well as lessons learned from responses to natural disasters, naturally occurring outbreaks, and the 2001 US anthrax attacks, can be applied to design, evaluate, and improve the bioterrorism response supply chain. Such lessons could also be applied to the response supply chains for disease outbreaks and natural and manmade disasters.

  3. Biological and Chemical Warfare

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    civilian population. (k) The history of research, trial and use of germ warfare continues to the present day. North Korea claimed dirty tricks were used by the USA during the Korean war in 1952, when American POW's confessed to drop- ping germ bombs including infected foun- tain pens. This was supposedly confirmed.

  4. Countermine Warfare Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-06-01

    PASSED) ENEMY DEFENSE POSITION DEFENSIVE ENGAGEMENT CANAIZaE SECURE AN ENEMY MANEUVER OPFN Fl.AhK PORCE ENEMY AVENUES Or APROACH REAR AREAS II XVIE’NFOFSE...Sidorenko, A. A., "The Offensive - A Soviet View," Translated and Published by the US Air Force, 1970 Simpkin, Brigadier Richard, "Tank Warfare," With

  5. The Physics of Warfare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordano, Gerardo

    2015-01-01

    Recently, I was tasked with the creation and execution of a new themed general education physics class called The Physics of Warfare. In the past, I had used the theme of a class, such as the physics of sports medicine, as a way to create homework and in-class activities, generate discussions, and provide an application to demonstrate that physics…

  6. Changing Face of Warfare

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-12

    1862 to his mother in Goldsboro, NC. Southern Historical Collection, University Archives, Southern Folk Life Collection, Louis Round Wilson Special...carnage" that "no human tongue or pen can adequately describe" was not new to warfare.20 What was new and different were the numbers of wounded

  7. Bioterrorism education effect on knowledge and attitudes of nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahid Aghaei

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: The most important way against bioterrorism is reinforcement of knowledge of health and medical team to diagnose and rapid reaction during these events. Aims: To assess the effect of bioterrorism education on knowledge and attitudes of nurses. Settings and Design: the setting of study was one of the infectious disease wards, emergency rooms or internal wards of the hospitals under supervision of Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences. Materials and Methods: In this pre-experimental study, 65 nurses who had all inclusion criteria are selected by accessible sampling method. Data on nurses knowledge and attitudes toward bioterrorism were collected using a self-administered questionnaire before and after two two-h sessions education. After a month of education, the units responded to questionnaire again. Statistical Analysis Used: A descriptive statistics Wilcoxon tests and Spearman correlation coefficient were used. Results: Before education, the majority of units (96.9% had low knowledge about bioterrorism (0-33.3% score of 100%,whereas after education, the majority of them (100% had good knowledge(well done (66.7-100% score of 100%. And majority of units (96.9% before education had indifferent attitude toward bioterrorism (33.4-66.6% score of 100%, whereas a majority of them (98.5% after education had positive attitude (66.7-100% score of 100%. Conclusions: The education has a positive effect on nurses′ knowledge and attitudes and it can be a guideline for administrators of the Ministry of Health and medicine for planning to achieve the goals of preventive and defense against bioterrorism.

  8. Network Centric Warfare Implementation and Assessment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Braunlinger, Thomas K

    2005-01-01

    ...) Are the military services implementing the network-centric warfare concept?, and (3) Is the network-centric warfare concept a new theory of warfare or rather a modification or extension of previous theories...

  9. Hybrid Warfare: the 21st Century Russian Way of Warfare

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-25

    images is not permissible. iii Abstract Hybrid Warfare: The 21st Century Russian Way of Warfare, by MAJ Amos C. Fox, US Army, 73 pages. In...echelons far above a tactical battalion. Robert Leonhard suggests, “As the Cold War receded into the history books , the day-to-day reality of...Russian brand of hybrid warfare. Furthermore, Leonhard’s definition has more far-reaching applicability than other definitions analyzed, making it usable

  10. The considerations on informational warfare

    OpenAIRE

    Agata Popescu

    2015-01-01

    Strictly military information warfare can be defined as all informational operations at tactical, operational and strategic level, in peacetime, crisis and conflict escalation, with the common goals of achieving or influencing certain targets. Information warfare has a military component, command and control warfare which has the following meaning according to NATO: "integrated use of all military capabilities including operations security, deception, psychological operations, electronic warf...

  11. Electronic Warfare Signature Measurement Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Electronic Warfare Signature Measurement Facility contains specialized mobile spectral, radiometric, and imaging measurement systems to characterize ultraviolet,...

  12. Dehumanization and Irregular Warfare

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    1997). French , John and Raven , Bertram. “The Bases of Social Power.” Studies in Social Power, 1959 . Galula, David. Counterinsurgency Warfare Theory...of the threats depend on both the 109 John R. P. French and Bertram Raven , “The Bases of Social...police to bring about better security. 112 French and Raven , “The Bases of Social Power,” 167. 38 Ramadan, as I described in the Introduction. It

  13. Neurologists and the threat of bioterrorism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaghy, Michael

    2006-11-01

    Neurologists are most likely to become involved in primarily diagnosing those bioterrorist attacks utilising botulinum toxin. Oral ingestion, or possibly inhalation, are likely routes of delivery. The characteristic descending paralysis starts in the extraocular and bulbar muscles, with associated autonomic features. Repetitive nerve stimulation usually shows an incremental muscle response. Treatment is supportive. The differential diagnosis is from naturally occurring paralysing illnesses such as Guillain-Barré syndrome, myasthenic crisis or diphtheria, from paralysing seafood neurotoxins (tetrodotoxin, saxitoxin), snake envenomation, and from chemical warfare poisoning by organophosphates. Primary neurological infections are less feasible for use as bioweapons. There are theoretical possibilities of Venezuelan equine encephalitis transmission by inhalation and secondary zoonotic transmission cycles sustained by horses and mosquitoes. Severe haemorrhagic meningitis regularly occurs in anthrax, usually in the aftermath of severe systemic disease likely to have been transmitted by spore inhalation. Panic and psychologically determined 'me-too' symptomatology are likely to pose the biggest diagnostic and management burden on neurologists handling bioterrorist attack on an institution or a random civilian population. Indeed civilian panic and disablement of institutional operations are likely to be prominent intentions of any bioterrorist attack.

  14. Cyber warfare and electronic warfare integration in the operational environment of the future: cyber electronic warfare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askin, Osman; Irmak, Riza; Avsever, Mustafa

    2015-05-01

    For the states with advanced technology, effective use of electronic warfare and cyber warfare will be the main determining factor of winning a war in the future's operational environment. The developed states will be able to finalize the struggles they have entered with a minimum of human casualties and minimum cost thanks to high-tech. Considering the increasing number of world economic problems, the development of human rights and humanitarian law it is easy to understand the importance of minimum cost and minimum loss of human. In this paper, cyber warfare and electronic warfare concepts are examined in conjunction with the historical development and the relationship between them is explained. Finally, assessments were carried out about the use of cyber electronic warfare in the coming years.

  15. Establishing Cyber Warfare Doctrine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew M. Colarik

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the past several decades, advances in technology have transformed communications and the ability to acquire, disseminate, and utilize information in a range of environments. Modern societies and their respective militaries have taken advantage of a robust information space through network-centric systems. Because military and commercial operations have increasingly converged, communication and information infrastructures are now high-priority military objectives in times of war. This article examines the theoretical underpinning of current cyber warfare research, what we have learned so far about its application, and some of the emerging themes to be considered; it also postulates the development of a (national cyber warfare doctrine (CWD. An endeavor of this scale requires lots of considerations and preparation for its development if it is to be cooperatively embraced. This article considers why information technology systems and their supporting infrastructures should be considered legitimate military targets in conflicts, and offers several events that support this supposition. In addition, it identifies the various forms of doctrine that will become the basis for developing a CWD, discusses a CWD's possible components, and proposes a national collaborative and discussion framework for obtaining a nation's stakeholder buy-in for such an endeavor.

  16. Implications drawn from a military bioterror exercise in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Tamar; Fogel, Itay; Poles, Lion; Aran, Adi Avniel; Shental, Omri; Kassirer, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Orange Flame is an Israeli preparedness build-up project, conducted by the Ministry of Health, that is aimed at improving national readiness and preparedness for unusual biological events. The project is intended for both medical and nonmedical organizations, and, since 2011, the exercise has also included operational units outside the medical corps. This has provided valuable insights into the consequences of bioterror or naturally occurring outbreaks for operative functionality and for the unique medical, logistical, and administrative efforts required from the armed forces in such an event. The 2-day drill reported on here executed a notional scenario in which category A bioterror agents were dispersed, causing civil and military casualties. Military personnel observed and assessed the performances of all participating organizations and observed the employment of emergency protocols during the drill. Military sustainment and operative capabilities were significantly affected by the occurrence of an unusual biological event. Comprehensive actions to be executed during such a scenario included quarantining military bases, considering postponement of military operations, and transferring on-call missions to other bases. Logistic consequences included the need for manpower and equipment reinforcement, as well as food and water supplies in cases of suspected source contamination. The project unveiled many operational and logistic quandaries and exposed various potential effects of a bioterror attack in the military. Lessons learned were used to revise preevent national and military doctrine for unusual biological events.

  17. The ethics of information warfare

    CERN Document Server

    Floridi, Luciano

    2014-01-01

    This book offers an overview of the ethical problems posed by Information Warfare, and of the different approaches and methods used to solve them, in order to provide the reader with a better grasp of the ethical conundrums posed by this new form of warfare.The volume is divided into three parts, each comprising four chapters. The first part focuses on issues pertaining to the concept of Information Warfare and the clarifications that need to be made in order to address its ethical implications. The second part collects contributions focusing on Just War Theory and its application to the case of Information Warfare. The third part adopts alternative approaches to Just War Theory for analysing the ethical implications of this phenomenon. Finally, an afterword by Neelie Kroes - Vice President of the European Commission and European Digital Agenda Commissioner - concludes the volume. Her contribution describes the interests and commitments of the European Digital Agenda with respect to research for the developme...

  18. An assessment of bioterrorism competencies among health practitioners in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canyon, Dv

    2009-01-01

    Public health and medical professionals are expected to be well prepared for emergencies, as they assume an integral role in any response. They need to be aware of planning issues, be able to identify their roles in emergency situations, and show functional competence. However, media perceptions and non-empirical publications often lack an evidence base when addressing this topic. This study attempted to assess the competencies of various health professionals by obtaining quantitative data on the state of bioterrorism preparedness and response competencies in Australia using an extensive set of competencies developed by Kristine Gebbie from the Columbia University School of Nursing Center for Health Policy with funding from the US Centres for Disease Control and Prevention. These competencies reflect the knowledge, capabilities, and skills that are necessary for best practice in public health. Sufficient data were collected to enable comparison between public health leaders, communicable disease specialists, clinicians (with and without medical degrees), and environmental health professionals. All health professionals performed well. However, the primary finding of this study was that clinicians consistently self-assessed themselves as lower in competence, and clinicians with medical degrees self-assessed themselves as the lowest in bioterrorism competence. This has important implications for health professional training, national benchmarks, standards, and competencies for the public health workforce.

  19. The ethics of drone warfare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatić Aleksandar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper investigates the compatibility of the modern technologies of warfare, specifically the use of offensive drones, with traditional military ethics and suggests that the new technologies radically change the value system of the military in ways which make large parts of the traditional military ethics inapplicable. The author suggests that Agamben’s concept of ‘effectivity’ through ‘special actions’ which mark one’s belonging to a particular community or profession is a useful conceptual strategy to explore the compatibility of drone warfare with traditional military ethics; this strategy shows mixed results at best.

  20. Coalition Warfare: the Leadership Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-19

    multinational operations, leadership challenges, leadership attributes, unity of command. 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: UNCLASSIFIED 17. LIMITATION OF...Approved for Public Release; Distribution is Unlimited Coalition Warfare: The leadership challenges A Monograph by Colonel Mark J Thornhill...The leadership challenges. 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Colonel Mark J. Thornhill

  1. The American Way of Warfare

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-17

    an overview of Shy’s theory of history and learning is required. Shy challenged the practice of interpreting warfare through the lens of the...necessary for victory. The military planners of Operation NEPTUNE during World War II felt that overwhelming superiority was a necessity in establishing a

  2. The Anatomy of Counterinsurgency Warfare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mouritsen, Lars; Pedersen, Kenneth; Thruelsen, Peter Dahl

    Since the beginning of the new millennium, the West has been increasingly involved in a tiresome and rather particular type of conflict: insurgency warfare. The bloody and shocking terrorist attacks on New York and Washington in September 2001 marked the beginning of a new era, and the introducti...

  3. [Bioterrorism: the role of veterinarians in detection and prevention].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Balogh, K K I M; Schouten, M C W; Lipman, L J A

    2002-10-15

    The fear of terrorist attacks has increased since the events of 11 September 2001 in New York. In the weeks following the terrorist attack, letters containing anthrax spores were received at various locations in the USA. This shows that bioterrorism is possible and that is necessary to be prepared for the potential release of biological agents. Such agents can be distributed not only via the air and drinking water but also via household pets. The aim of terrorist attacks, namely, the disruption of society and daily life, can be achieved in three ways, ways which are of importance to practising veterinarians, namely, via pets, via contamination of pet foods of animal origin, and by the spread of infectious animal diseases that have far-reaching economic consequences. These ways are discussed in this article, together with possible ways in which veterinarians can act to diminish the consequences of such an event.

  4. The bioterrorism threat by non-state actors hype or horror?

    OpenAIRE

    Thompson, Christopher M.

    2006-01-01

    This thesis provides a capabilities-based approach to assessing the bioterrorism threat from non-state actors. Through comparative case study, prior bioterrorism attacks are analyzed to assess capability in the three areas necessary to complete a biological weapons attack: obtaining or isolating a pathogen, weaponizing the agent, and employing or disseminating the weapon. The three cases are the Rajneeshee cult in 1984, the Aum Shinrikyo cult in the early 1990's, and the United States Posta...

  5. Bioterrorism--a health emergency: do physicians believe there is a threat and are they prepared for it?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Switala, Claudia A; Coren, Joshua; Filipetto, Frank A; Gaughan, John P; Ciervo, Carman A

    2011-01-01

    To determine whether bioterrorism training provided increased awareness and understanding of bioterrorism and to assess physicians' beliefs about the threat of bioterrorism and how it impacts on preparedness. This is a retrospective review of data obtained from a bioterrorism training grant. Data were obtained from a postevaluation form completed by trainees with an 80 percent return rate. The Institutional Review Board approved this study. Informed consent was not required as data were deidentified and demographic information regarding study subjects was not used. The Department of Family Medicine within the University of Medicine and and Dentistry of New Jersey, School of Osteopathic Medicine in Stratford, NJ, conducted the training and follow-up study. The bioterrorism preparedness training was targeted to physicians, residents, and third- and fourth-year medical students in New Jersey. There were 578 trainees; however, responses to each question were varied. Trainees were asked to complete an evaluation form. Specific questions were selected from the form. Frequency statistics were used to describe responses to the questions. Ninety-four percent of the respondents agreed that the bioterrorism training increased their awareness and/or understanding of bioterrorism; however, only 49 percent believe there is a high probability that a bioterrorism event or other health emergency will occur in the near future in New Jersey, and 42 percent considered themselves prepared to respond as a healthcare professional to a bioterrorism event. Physicians in New Jersey increased their awareness and understanding of bioterrorism through training. However, concerns remain that a physician's belief in a low threat of bioterrorism translates into a low need for bioterrorism preparedness training.

  6. Global Survey of Research and Capabilities in Genetically Engineered Organisms That Could be Used in Biological Warfare or Bioterrorism

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-01

    human testing to verify increased human susceptibility to a GMO with genes that supposedly reduce human immunocompetence adds a degree of complexity...Hospital de Bellvitge, Universidad de Barcelona • Unidad de Medicina Tropical, Servicio de Enfermedades Infecciosas, Hospital Ramon y Cajal, Madrid

  7. MEANS AND METHODS OF CYBER WARFARE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan-Iulian VOITAȘEC

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available According to the Declaration of Saint Petersburg of 1868 “the only legitimate object which States should endeavor to accomplish during war is to weaken the military forces of the enemy”. Thus, International Humanitarian Law prohibits or limits the use of certain means and methods of warfare. The rapid development of technology has led to the emergence of a new dimension of warfare. The cyber aspect of armed conflict has led to the development of new means and methods of warfare. The purpose of this paper is to study how the norms of international humanitarian law apply to the means and methods of cyber warfare.

  8. Cyber warfare building the scientific foundation

    CERN Document Server

    Jajodia, Sushil; Subrahmanian, VS; Swarup, Vipin; Wang, Cliff

    2015-01-01

    This book features a wide spectrum of the latest computer science research relating to cyber warfare, including military and policy dimensions. It is the first book to explore the scientific foundation of cyber warfare and features research from the areas of artificial intelligence, game theory, programming languages, graph theory and more. The high-level approach and emphasis on scientific rigor provides insights on ways to improve cyber warfare defense worldwide. Cyber Warfare: Building the Scientific Foundation targets researchers and practitioners working in cyber security, especially gove

  9. Air Power and Maneuver Warfare

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-07-01

    the Germans fully understand the extent of the revolution that they had wrought in warfare, and only then did blitzkrieg receive its name . Meanwhile...Macmillan, 1969), 1166 , on the development of the Allied plans. 58. Michael Garder, La Guerre Secrete des Services speciaux francaises , 1939-1945 (Paris...to protect the proletarian revolution by possessing an industrial base capable of producing the new weapons ofwar was perhaps the major motivator

  10. Special Warfare: A Selected Bibliography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-10-01

    145. Smith, Robert M. The Revolutionary Doctrine of Comunist China . Thesis, American University, 1971. Ann Arbor: University Microfilms, 1972. (UA835...JC328.5 .L43) 99. Liu, Chi-aing. Lessons from China (Kiansi, 1934) and a Strategy for Counter-Insurgency (Viet Nam, 1966). Taipei: N.p., 1966...O’Ballance, Edgar. The Indo- China War. 1945-1954: A Study in Guerrilla Warfare. London: Faber and Faber, 1964. (DS550 0 3) 8 123. Organization of

  11. Political Warfare and Contentious Politics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    provides a definition of political warfare, offers strategy approaches with associated actions, and develops analytical tools to evaluate PW actions...McAdam, Tarrow, and Tilly, Dynamics of Contention, 12. 21 the interests of at least one of the claimants. Roughly translated, the definition refers...indicates the effect of broad social processes on organizational strength. Broad social processes like migration or overpopulation provide an increase

  12. Undersea Warfare Academic Group Home Page

    OpenAIRE

    1997-01-01

    Collected from the Internet Archive "Wayback machine". The Undersea Warfare Curriculum educates officers in the engineering fundamentals, physical principles and analytical concepts that govern operational employment of undersea warfare (USW) sensors and weapons systems. Program is interdisciplinary and integrates; mathematics, physics, acoustics, electrical engineering, oceanography, operations analysis, human factors, computer science and meteorology.

  13. The Information Warfare Life Cycle Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brett van Niekerk

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Information warfare (IW is a dynamic and developing concept, which constitutes a number of disciplines. This paper aims to develop a life cycle model for information warfare that is applicable to all of the constituent disciplines. The model aims to be scalable and applicable to civilian and military incidents where information warfare tactics are employed. Existing information warfare models are discussed, and a new model is developed from the common aspects of these existing models. The proposed model is then applied to a variety of incidents to test its applicability and scalability. The proposed model is shown to be applicable to multiple disciplines of information warfare and is scalable, thus meeting the objectives of the model.

  14. Bio-terrorism: still interesting or concerning nowadays?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudiu E. Sbârcea

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Bio-terrorism involves using biological agents/toxins with the intent to intimidate or coerce a government or civilian population to further political or social objectives, usually leading to deaths or illnesses of humans but also of plants/animals. Their use would probably initially be considered as a natural or unintentional event, especially in case of live biological agents. Moreover, a natural occurring disease outbreak could have the same destructive outcome as an efficient biological weapon. There is a need for proper differentiation between natural and intentional events although in the first stages the medical response should be similar; however, the course of incident management would take different paths later on. Biological agents’ investigation of dangerous pathogens, from natural unusual outbreaks or bioterrorist attacks/other intentional use, imply the collaboration of different institutions with responsibilities in public health but also in national security and defense. The National Security and the Defense System institutions think mainly in security terms while national health care system institutions think principally` in medical care/prevention terms. These two ways of acting have to be combined in order to deal properly with hazardous biological agents.

  15. Striking against bioterrorism with advanced proteomics and reference methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armengaud, Jean

    2017-01-01

    The intentional use by terrorists of biological toxins as weapons has been of great concern for many years. Among the numerous toxins produced by plants, animals, algae, fungi, and bacteria, ricin is one of the most scrutinized by the media because it has already been used in biocrimes and acts of bioterrorism. Improving the analytical toolbox of national authorities to monitor these potential bioweapons all at once is of the utmost interest. MS/MS allows their absolute quantitation and exhibits advantageous sensitivity, discriminative power, multiplexing possibilities, and speed. In this issue of Proteomics, Gilquin et al. (Proteomics 2017, 17, 1600357) present a robust multiplex assay to quantify a set of eight toxins in the presence of a complex food matrix. This MS/MS reference method is based on scheduled SRM and high-quality standards consisting of isotopically labeled versions of these toxins. Their results demonstrate robust reliability based on rather loose scheduling of SRM transitions and good sensitivity for the eight toxins, lower than their oral median lethal doses. In the face of an increased threat from terrorism, relevant reference assays based on advanced proteomics and high-quality companion toxin standards are reliable and firm answers. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Training Future Physicians about Weapons of Mass Destruction: Report of the Expert Panel on Bioterrorism Education for Medical Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Association of American Medical Colleges, Washington, DC.

    The Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) convened a multidisciplinary group of experts to share their insights about the learning objectives and educational experiences that they would recommend for the training of future physicians about bioterrorism. The expert panel broadened the scope of their discussion beyond bioterrorism to…

  17. WARFARE IN THE INFORMATION AGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurian GHERMAN

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper is focused on changes occurred in military organizations in Information Age. During Industrial Age the military structure of forces evolved according with principles of decomposition, specialization, hierarchy, optimization, deconfliction, centralized planning, and decentralized execution. But now the solutions based upon Industrial Age assumptions and practices will break down and fail in the Information Age. This will happen no matter how well intentioned, hardworking, or dedicated the leadership and the force are. Two key force capabilities needed by Information Age militaries are interoperability and agility. Both interoperability and agility are provided by Network centric warfare theory of war.

  18. Information warfare technologies in political discourse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karpova Anna Yu.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We attempt to examine the technology of «information warfare» in this paper. The dominant theme of the paper is that the outcome of the information warfare is important not only for the future of a state itself but for the future of the world balance of forces. The main task of geopolitical actors in information warfare is to introduce ideas corresponding to their interests into mass consciousness. All participants of political conflicts have common features in technologies of Information warfare. The information anomie is the indicator of the great geopolitical actors’ personified interests on the stage of «information warfare» - the process resulted in destroying the communicative line: report-information understanding and disrupting the social order in society. In this paper authors describe the following Information Warfare technologies: "Political volcano" technology; "SPIN" technology; "Widening media resource" technology; "specific gravity" technology; "Cold War 2.0" technology and Information cleaningup technology. It is assumed that in the future there will be new instructions on applying technologies of information warfare. To impart perspective to the paper we consider examples, opinions and trends.

  19. Cyber-Enabled Unconventional Warfare: The Convergence of Cyberspace, Social Mobilization, and Special Warfare

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    cyber warfare, cyber terrorism, DDoS attacks, department of defense, hackers, hacktivists, hybrid warfare, information warfare, insurgency...INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK xv LIST OF ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS CBI China, Burma, and India (theater in WWII) CIA Central Intelligence Agency DDoS ...as a distributed denial of service ( DDoS ) attack. By pushing too much data to a computer, site, or server, these types of attacks effectively

  20. Topic modelling in the information warfare domain

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    De

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the authors provide context to Topic Modelling as an Information Warfare technique. Topic modelling is a technique that discovers latent topics in unstructured and unlabelled collection of documents. The topic structure can be searched...

  1. Guiding Warfare to Reach Sustainable Peace

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestenskov, David; Drewes, Line

    The conference report Guiding Warfare to Reach Sustainable Peace constitutes the primary outcome of the conference It is based on excerpts from the conference presenters and workshop discussions. Furthermore, the report contains policy recommendations and key findings, with the ambition of develo......The conference report Guiding Warfare to Reach Sustainable Peace constitutes the primary outcome of the conference It is based on excerpts from the conference presenters and workshop discussions. Furthermore, the report contains policy recommendations and key findings, with the ambition...

  2. A Comprehensive Evaluation System for Military Hospitals' Response Capability to Bio-terrorism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; Jiang, Nan; Shao, Sicong; Zheng, Tao; Sun, Jianzhong

    2015-05-01

    The objective of this study is to establish a comprehensive evaluation system for military hospitals' response capacity to bio-terrorism. Literature research and Delphi method were utilized to establish the comprehensive evaluation system for military hospitals' response capacity to bio-terrorism. Questionnaires were designed and used to survey the status quo of 134 military hospitals' response capability to bio-terrorism. Survey indicated that factor analysis method was suitable to for analyzing the comprehensive evaluation system for military hospitals' response capacity to bio-terrorism. The constructed evaluation system was consisted of five first-class and 16 second-class indexes. Among them, medical response factor was considered as the most important factor with weight coefficient of 0.660, followed in turn by the emergency management factor with weight coefficient of 0.109, emergency management consciousness factor with weight coefficient of 0.093, hardware support factor with weight coefficient of 0.078, and improvement factor with weight coefficient of 0.059. The constructed comprehensive assessment model and system are scientific and practical.

  3. Kairos as Indeterminate Risk Management: The Pharmaceutical Industry's Response to Bioterrorism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, J. Blake

    2006-01-01

    The pharmaceutical industry's response to the threat of bioterrorism following 9-11 invoked the rhetorical notion of kairos as an urgent and ongoing opportunity not only to protect the nation but also to improve the industry's reputation and fortify its political power. Yet the notion of kairos as seizing an advantage--grounded in modernist…

  4. 75 FR 50730 - Public Health Security and Bioterrorism Preparedness and Response Act of 2002: Biennial Review...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES 42 CFR Part 73 RIN 0920-AA34 Public Health Security and Bioterrorism Preparedness and...: Extension of public comment period. SUMMARY: On July 21, 2010, the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) published an Advanced Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (ANPRM) requesting public comment on the...

  5. 75 FR 42363 - Public Health Security and Bioterrorism Preparedness and Response Act of 2002; Biennial Review...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-21

    ... HUMAN SERVICES 42 CFR Part 73 RIN 0920-AA34 Public Health Security and Bioterrorism Preparedness and...: Advance notice of proposed rulemaking and request for comments. SUMMARY: The Public Health Security and... soliciting public comment on the current HHS list of select agents and toxins, including whether any...

  6. 76 FR 61227 - Agricultural Bioterrorism Protection Act of 2002; Biennial Review and Republication of the Select...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-03

    ... Explosives (ATF) when enforcing the Gun Control Act of 1968. Because the purpose of the Select Agent Program differs from ATF's enforcement actions under the Gun Control Act, we do not believe that these terms must be defined exactly the same. The Gun Control Act regulates access to firearms, while the Bioterrorism...

  7. Gray Zone Warfare: German and Russian Political Warfare, 1935-1939, and 2001

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-09

    Irregular Warfare, Unconventional Warfare, Hybrid, and 107 John Chambers , Countering Gray-Zone...111 Chambers , 5. Diplomatic, Information, Military, and Economic variables refers to the U.S. Army analytical framework. 112 Dickey et al. 113...media under German control reported, “ bloody terror, unleashed mobs, massacre and looting,” with reports of widespread murder of Sudeten Germans.193

  8. On the Probability of Predicting and Mapping Traditional Warfare Measurements to the Cyber Warfare Domain

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Grobler, M

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Cyber warfare is a contentious topic, with no agreement on whether this is a real possibility or an unrealistic extension of the physical battlefield. This article will not debate the validity and legality of the concept of cyber warfare...

  9. US Army Special Warfare. Its Origins: Psychological and Unconventional Warfare, 1941-1952

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-01-01

    Saul K. Padover and Harold D. Lasswell , "Psychological Warfare," Headline Series, no. 86 (20 March 1951), pp. 14f.; Daugherty and Janowitz, Casebook...of the North African Theater of Operations, National Archives. 41. Padover and Lasswell , "Psychological Warfare," p. 16. 42. Military Intelligence

  10. Nucleic acid approaches for detection and identification of biological warfare and infectious disease agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivnitski, Dmitri; O'Neil, Daniel J; Gattuso, Anthony; Schlicht, Roger; Calidonna, Michael; Fisher, Rodney

    2003-10-01

    Biological warfare agents are the most problematic of the weapons of mass destruction and terror. Both civilian and military sources predict that over the next decade the threat from proliferation of these agents will increase significantly. In this review we summarize the state of the art in detection and identification of biological threat agents based on PCR technology with emphasis on the new technology of microarrays. The advantages and limitations of real-time PCR technology and a review of the literature as it applies to pathogen and virus detection are presented. The paper covers a number of issues related to the challenges facing biological threat agent detection technologies and identifies critical components that must be overcome for the emergence of reliable PCR-based DNA technologies as bioterrorism countermeasures and for environmental applications. The review evaluates various system components developed for an integrated DNA microchip and the potential applications of the next generation of fully automated DNA analyzers with integrated sample preparation and biosensing elements. The article also reviews promising devices and technologies that are near to being, or have been, commercialized.

  11. Towards a framework for a network warfare capability

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Veerasamy, N

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Information warfare has surfaced as an emerging concept that affects not only military institutions but ordinary organisations as well. Information warfare in itself consists of various components ranging from its electronic and psychological...

  12. Hybrid Warfare – A Form of Asymmetric Conflict

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Laura-Maria Herța

    2017-01-01

    ... century features novel aspects. Several concepts have been coined in order to describe the nature and dynamic of warfare in a post-clausewitzian/post-conventional era, such as new wars, Fourth Generation Warfare, compound wars...

  13. Recognizing and Adapting to Unrestricted Warfare Practices by China

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-15

    the areas of Lawfare , Economic Warfare, and Cyber-Warfare. Although the U.S. has made improvements to identify and respond to some key URW... lawfare ) to undermine the spirit and ideological commitment of an adversary before and during a conflict, weaken international support for the...paragraphs, I will discuss potential examples of Chinese URW practices in the areas of Lawfare , Economic Warfare, and Network Warfare and let the

  14. "Beyond-the-Box" Thinking on Future War: The Art and Science of Unrestricted Warfare

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-04-01

    chemical Warfare Intelligence Warfare Resources Warfare Ecological Warfare Psycological Warfare Economic Aid Warfare Space Warfare Smuggling Warfare...state adjust to the prospect of URW? As seen before, state actors no longer have a monopoly over the catastrophic use of violence . The...civilianization of warfare is a natural consequence of URW, and the democratization of violence allows virtually everyone to 21 AU/ACSC/1172/AY09 join the

  15. Social Media and Its Dual Use in Biopreparedness: Communication and Visualization Tools in an Animal Bioterrorism Incident

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjöberg, Elisabeth; Barker, Gary C.; Landgren, Jonas

    2013-01-01

    This article focuses on social media and interactive challenges for emergency organizations during a bioterrorism or agroterrorism incident, and it outlines the dual-use dilemma of social media. Attackers or terrorists can use social media as their modus of operandi, and defenders, including emer...... in stream graphs and networks showing clusters of Twitter and Facebook users. The visualization of social media can be an important preparedness tool in the response to bioterrorism and agroterrorism....

  16. Cyber Attacks, Information Attacks, and Postmodern Warfare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valuch Jozef

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to evaluate and differentiate between the phenomena of cyberwarfare and information warfare, as manifestations of what we perceive as postmodern warfare. We describe and analyse the current examples of the use the postmodern warfare and the reactions of states and international bodies to these phenomena. The subject matter of this paper is the relationship between new types of postmodern conflicts and the law of armed conflicts (law of war. Based on ICJ case law, it is clear that under current legal rules of international law of war, cyber attacks as well as information attacks (often performed in the cyberspace as well can only be perceived as “war” if executed in addition to classical kinetic warfare, which is often not the case. In most cases perceived “only” as a non-linear warfare (postmodern conflict, this practice nevertheless must be condemned as conduct contrary to the principles of international law and (possibly a crime under national laws, unless this type of conduct will be recognized by the international community as a “war” proper, in its new, postmodern sense.

  17. Bio-terrorism, human security and public health: can international law bring them together in an age of globalization?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aginam, Obijiofor

    2005-09-01

    Bio-terrorism, the use of a microorganism with the deliberate intent of causing infection, before and since the anthrax attacks in the United States in October 2001, has emerged as a real medical and public health threat. The link between bio-terrorism, human security and public health raises complex questions on the normative trajectories of international law, the mandates of international organizations, and global health governance. In May 2001, the World Health Assembly of the World Health Organization (WHO) passed a resolution entitled "Global Health Security: Epidemic Alert and Response" which inter alia, urged WHO member states to participate actively in the verification and validation of surveillance data and information concerning health emergencies of international concern. This article explores the links between bio-terrorism, human security and public health, and investigates the effectiveness of international legal mechanisms that link them in an age of globalization of public health. The article explores the interaction of WHO's 'soft-law' approaches to global health security, and the 'moribund' negotiations of the verification and monitoring protocol to the Biological Weapons Convention 1972. Can international law link bio-terrorism, public health and human security? Does the WHO collaborate with other international organizations within and outside the United Nations system to develop effective legal and governance approaches to bio-terrorism and global health security? The article concludes that the globalization of public health threats like bio-terrorism requires globalized legal approaches.

  18. ISIL's Hybrid Warfare in Syria & Iraq

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Heine

    2016-01-01

    The case study specifically seeks to answer the following problem statement: Does ISIL qualify as an actor using hybrid warfare and if so what characterizes their particular use of this type of warfare? Based on an analysis of ISIL’s warfare from August 2012 to August 2016 the chapter argues......, that it is possible to answer the first part of the problem statement in an affirmative way. Hence, ISIL is not only theoretically prone to hybridity by organizational setup, and by the people comprising the organization, but has in fact continuously acted according to a hybrid logic in its prioritization...... of and ability to synchronize various instruments of power with a view to achieving their end-state. With regards to the second part of the problem statement, the analysis demonstrates how ISIL employed horizontal escalation and ambiguity initially, but later on turned to vertical escalation, within the military...

  19. Survey on Urban Warfare Augmented Reality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiong You

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Urban warfare has become one of the main forms of modern combat in the twenty-first century. The main reason why urban warfare results in hundreds of casualties is that the situational information of the combatant is insufficient. Accessing information via an Augmented Reality system can elevate combatants’ situational awareness to effectively improve the efficiency of decision-making and reduce the injuries. This paper begins with the concept of Urban Warfare Augmented Reality (UWAR and illuminates the objectives of developing UWAR, i.e., transparent battlefield, intuitional perception and natural interaction. Real-time outdoor registration, information presentation and natural interaction are presented as key technologies of a practical UWAR system. Then, the history and current research state of these technologies are summarized and their future developments are highlighted from three perspectives, i.e., (1 Better integration with Geographic Information System and Virtual Geographic Environment; (2 More intelligent software; (3 More powerful hardware.

  20. Bioterrorism preparedness--Part II. Smallpox vaccination in a hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Lenworth M; Emanuelsen, Kathy; McKay, Charles; Burns, Karyl

    2004-01-01

    The threat of using smallpox as an agent for bioterrorism resulted in a directive for the creation of smallpox response teams. In Connecticut, The Commissioner of the Department of Public Health convened public health and hospital leadership to plan for the vaccination of these teams. The purpose of this paper is to provide a description of the vaccination program at Hartford Hospital, a Center of Excellence for Bioterrorism Preparedness, and to report the results of a survey of the vaccinees regarding the vaccination experience. Ninety persons were vaccinated. Six individuals experienced low-grade fever and 10 had axillary node swelling. One individual experienced significant fatigue. A total of six persons lost time from work. Four lost one day and two persons lost between four to five days of work. There was no autoinoculation, transfer inoculation, vaccinia or any other significant complication. Survey results indicate that most vaccinees felt positive about the experience.

  1. Inhalational anthrax after bioterrorism exposure: spectrum of imaging findings in two surviving patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earls, James P; Cerva, Donald; Berman, Elise; Rosenthal, Jonathan; Fatteh, Naaz; Wolfe, Pierre P; Clayton, Ronald; Murphy, Cecele; Pauze, Denis; Mayer, Thom; Bersoff-Matcha, Susan; Urban, Bruce

    2002-02-01

    The radiographic and computed tomographic (CT) findings in two patients with documented inhalational anthrax resulting from bioterrorism exposure are presented. Chest radiographs demonstrated mediastinal widening, adenopathy, pleural effusions, and air-space disease. Chest CT images revealed enlarged hyperattenuating mediastinal and hilar lymph nodes and edema of mediastinal fat. Chest CT findings are helpful for making the initial diagnosis. To the authors' knowledge, the spectrum and follow-up of CT findings have not been previously described.

  2. The Bioethicist Who Cried "Synthetic Biology": An Analysis of the Function of Bioterrorism Predictions in Bioethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, Søren

    2017-04-01

    This article analyzes a specter that has haunted bioethics almost since its inception, namely the specter of the misuse of biotechnology by maleficent agents bent on mass destruction, or the complete eradication of human kind and life as we know it. The article provides a general account of why bioethicists cry "catastrophic bioterrorism potential" when new biotechnologies emerge, and an analysis of the arguments that flow from the prediction, especially in relation to synthetic biology.

  3. Nurses' intentions to respond to bioterrorism and other infectious disease emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimes, Deanna E; Mendias, Elnora P

    2010-01-01

    Although nurses historically have responded to natural disasters, little is known about nurses' intentions to respond during bioterrorism and other infectious disease emergencies where they and their families may be at risk. To investigate that question, we surveyed nurses following their participation in a class on bioterrorism. Participants (N = 292) completed a Personal/Professional Profile (PPP), Test of Bioterrorism Knowledge (BT Knowledge), and an Intention to Respond (IR) instrument. IR was measured by participants' scores on their likelihood to care for patients (0 = extremely unlikely, 10 = extremely likely) for each of 10 infectious disease scenarios reflecting different infection risk. We calculated scores for each scenario, totaled them, and examined the total IR related to the participant's PPP and scores on BT Knowledge. Additionally, we examined participants' written comments explaining the reasons for their IR. Total IR scores ranged from 8-100 (mean and median of 70). The IR was higher in scenarios where the infection risk was lower. Overall IR scores were positively related to BT Knowledge and having had previous emergency and disaster experience. Those less likely to respond had dependent children and more years in nursing. Results indicate that nurses differentiated risks associated with different infectious disease situations and may decide to respond during a real emergency based on such information. Implications for nursing administrators and nursing educators are discussed. Copyright 2010 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Cognitive systems in electronic warfare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulpa, Krzysztof; Szczepankiewicz, Michał; Żywek, Marcin; Malanowski, Mateusz; Misiurewicz, Jacek; Samczyński, Piotr

    2017-04-01

    Electronic warfare (EW) techniques were invented 70 years ago and are still being developed, all the time with a key role played by their operators. However, a human operator responds far too slowly for the on-going needs since to be adequate to current threats the EW system reaction should be within 1 ms or less. Too slow reaction defers an achievement of the objectives, and generally may lead to disclosure of the applied strategy and to waste of resources. Developing the adequate response to the threat is a multifaceted matter that requires considerable experience and knowledge on the one hand, and thorough observation of outcomes of the applied strategy on the other hand. Such action requires the use of not only intelligence but also more complex algorithms for automatic control than the classical ones, and it heavily builds on the experience. It is therefore a cognitive task in its nature, and a human operator acts naturally this way. Consequently, a proper training and experience gained are what really matters. As a result of tests and actions in EW the operator builds his own knowledge base, thus, gains a capability of responding to the known threats in a balanced way. New threats, however, are much more challenging since they should be handled as fast as possible but in a fresh and creative manner. To this end, adapting the algorithms of radar jamming protection for the new conditions of the battlefield is an example of such challenging tasks. At present, such adjustments are done in a long feedback loop when the operator, after recognizing the problem, notifies the equipment manufacturers, and then, their engineers work on required solutions accordingly. Thus, the reaction time is counted in years, not a single milliseconds or seconds. Speeding up the response time is therefore the key issue, and a solution to it would be feasible only when cognitive systems were used. A concept of such cognitive system is presented in this paper.

  5. On Cyber Warfare Command and Control Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-06-01

    network defense management system are sometimes used to describe systems that are used for the remote management of firewalls, intrusion detection...different. Certainly, the remote management of firewalls and intrusion detection systems, etc. should be part of a cyber warfare command and control

  6. Chemical and Biological Warfare: A Selected Bibliography

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-04-01

    WORLD ARMA - MENTS AND DISARMAMENT. SIPRI Yearbook 1990. New York: Oxford University Press, 1990. (REF JX1974 S775 1990) Pp. 107-133: "Chemical and...Report. Norton D. Zinder, Chairman. Washington: National Academy Press, 1984. (UG447 N33 1984) LEGACY OF CHEMICAL AND BIOLOGICA !L WARFARE Some 20th

  7. Warfare tourism experiences and national identity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gieling, Joost; Ong, Chin Ee

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines through an analysis of Dutch warfare tourism whether there is a relationship between the subjective perceived salience of Dutch identity and heritage tourists’ motives, emotions and overall satisfaction. Using a social identity theory framework, this study provides a view of

  8. Unconventional Warfare: A Mission Metamorphosis for the 21st Century?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-06-01

    brigadier general and publish several more noted works on Mao and revolutionary warfare. See Samuel B. Giffith, Mao Tse-Tung on Guerrilla Warfare (New...and propagators of the faith. The bibles (in English translation) are Mao Tse-tung on Guerrilla Warfare by Brigadier General Samuel B. Griffith...Barnett, B. Hugh Tovar , and Richard H. Schultz eds., Special Operations in US Strategy (Washington, D.C.: US Government Printing Office, 1984), 2. 58

  9. Chemical Warfare Agent Decontaminant Solution Using Quaternary Ammonium Complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-12-11

    warfare agents, which include a variety of organophosphorus and organosulfur compounds, are known in the art. 15 However, these known methods use...chemical warfare agents, and works particularly well for neutralization of organosulfur agents such as mustard gas (HD), and organophosphorus agents such...detoxifying/neutralizing a variety of chemical warfare agents, including organosulfur agents such as mustard gas (HD), and organophosphorus agents such as

  10. Book Review: Composite warfare: the conduct of successful ground ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Book Title: Composite warfare: the conduct of successful ground force operations in Africa. Book Author: Eeben Barlow. Pinetown: 30 Degrees South Publishers. 2015, 576 pages. ISBN 9781928211761.

  11. Handbook of toxicology of chemical warfare agents

    CERN Document Server

    2010-01-01

    This groundbreaking book covers every aspect of deadly toxic chemicals used as weapons of mass destruction and employed in conflicts, warfare and terrorism. Including findings from experimental as well as clinical studies, this one-of-a-kind handbook is prepared in a very user- friendly format that can easily be followed by students, teachers and researchers, as well as lay people. Stand-alone chapters on individual chemicals and major topics allow the reader to easily access required information without searching through the entire book. This is the first book that offers in-depth coverage of individual toxicants, target organ toxicity, major incidents, toxic effects in humans, animals and wildlife, biosensors, biomarkers, on-site and laboratory analytical methods, decontamination and detoxification procedures, prophylactic, therapeutic and countermeasures, and the role of homeland security. Presents a comprehensive look at all aspects of chemical warfare toxicology in one reference work. This saves research...

  12. Computational models of intergroup competition and warfare.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Letendre, Kenneth (University of New Mexico); Abbott, Robert G.

    2011-11-01

    This document reports on the research of Kenneth Letendre, the recipient of a Sandia Graduate Research Fellowship at the University of New Mexico. Warfare is an extreme form of intergroup competition in which individuals make extreme sacrifices for the benefit of their nation or other group to which they belong. Among animals, limited, non-lethal competition is the norm. It is not fully understood what factors lead to warfare. We studied the global variation in the frequency of civil conflict among countries of the world, and its positive association with variation in the intensity of infectious disease. We demonstrated that the burden of human infectious disease importantly predicts the frequency of civil conflict and tested a causal model for this association based on the parasite-stress theory of sociality. We also investigated the organization of social foraging by colonies of harvester ants in the genus Pogonomyrmex, using both field studies and computer models.

  13. Drone Warfare : Visual Primacy as a Weapon

    OpenAIRE

    Lee-Morrison, Lila

    2015-01-01

    This paper articulates drone warfare through a critical analysis of an actual drone operation and a study into its developing technologies. The first chapter moves through a discussion of the intervening role of the camera as described by Walter Benjamin and societal perspective of visual reproduction technology. This discussion then departs from the mechanical to the digital realm of realtime video, utilizing theory of Paul Virilio. The second chapter focuses on developing technologies withi...

  14. Hybrid Warfare: Implications for CAF Force Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    Scientific Terms (TEST) and that thesaurus identified. If it is not possible to select indexing terms which are Unclassified, the classification of...the assumption, almost universally cited by much hybrid warfare literature, that intervention in failed and fragile state scenarios is an automatic ...CONTROL DATA (Security markings for the title, abstract and indexing annotation must be entered when the document is Classified or Designated) 1

  15. Animal plant warfare and secondary metabolite evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Wöll, Steffen; Kim, Sun Hee; Greten, Henry Johannes; Efferth, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The long-lasting discussion, why plants produce secondary metabolites, which are pharmacologically and toxicologically active towards mammals traces back to the eminent role of medicinal plants in the millennia-old history of manhood. In recent years, the concept of an animal plant warfare emerged, which focused on the co-evolution between plants and herbivores. As a reaction to herbivory, plants developed mechanical defenses such as thorns and hard shells, which paved the way for ad...

  16. Cyber-Warfare: Jus Post Bellum

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    states take to ethically end wars and transition to peace. Immanuel Kant is the first philosopher thought of as the founder of viewing warfare as...in Stahn, 2006, p. 935). Kant also expressed in his Toward Perpetual Peace, as translated and publish by Yale University Press, that states involved...in armed conflict should not conduct acts that will prohibit them from being able to reach peace ( Kant , 2006). As an example, Kant (2006) believed

  17. Finding Lawrence: Recruiting Talent for Unconventional Warfare

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    Velky, ―Special Forces Assessment and Selection,‖ Special Warfare 3, no. 1 (1990): 12–15; Alan Vick, Snakes in the Eagles nest: A History of Ground...skills at BUD/S. They also learn SEAL heritage, history, military bearing, ethics, the SEAL Ethos, mental toughness, nutrition , stretching and... nutrition , and the nature of a SEAL career. The website even provides a forum on which young men can discuss their preparations with each other and

  18. Modeling the Thermal Destruction of Chemical Warfare ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symposium Paper In the event of a terrorist attack with chemical warfare agents (CWAs), large quantities of materials, both indoor and outdoor, may be treated with thermal incineration during the site remediation process. This paper reports on a study to examine the thermal decomposition of surrogate CWAs and formation of decomposition by-products bound in model building materials (in this case, ceiling tile) in a pilot-scale rotary kiln incinerator simulator.

  19. A program against bacterial bioterrorism: improved patient management and acquisition of new knowledge on infectious diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, Michael; Dargis, Rimtas; Andresen, Keld; Christensen, Jens Jørgen E

    2012-06-01

    In 2002 it was decided to establish laboratory facilities in Denmark for diagnosing agents associated with bioterrorism in order to make an immediate appropriate response to the release of such agents possible. Molecular assays for detection of specific agents and molecular and proteomic techniques for identification of bacteria were introduced as part of the program. All assays and techniques were made accessible for use in diagnosing patients, even when an intentional release was not suspected. Medical expertise on different diseases was established at the department as an integrated part of the program. The analyses included PCR assays for specific bacteria, identification of isolated bacteria by DNA sequencing, detection and identification of bacteria in clinical sample material by universal bacterial PCR and DNA sequencing, and identification of bacteria by mass spectrometry. The established analyses formed a basis on which a series of further developments was built. In addition to reducing the time for obtaining diagnoses and improving the accuracy of diagnosis of individual infected patients, the analyses provided new knowledge on the frequency and distribution of some bacterial infections, including Q fever, tularemia, trench fever, brucellosis, and melioidosis. The implementation of an antibioterrorism program in a clinical diagnostic setting improved the diagnostic possibilities for patients in Denmark and provided new epidemiologic information. It also introduced a number of diagnostic assays for bacterial infections not associated with bioterrorism that are difficult to culture or identify.

  20. Knowledge, perceived need for education, and willingness to participate in bioterrorism preparedness among students in an indian dental institute: A questionnaire study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumeet Bhatt

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: An act of bioterrorism may compromise the local medical system and require whole of the healthcare workforce. The purpose of the present study was to assess the knowledge, perceived need for education, and willingness to participate in bioterrorism management among students in an Indian dental institute. Materials and Methods: A total of 231 dental students, including undergraduates and postgraduates, participated in this study conducted in the year 2014. Dental students' knowledge, perceived need, and willingness were assessed using a self-administered questionnaire. Results: More than 90% of both undergraduate and postgraduate students were willing to provide care during a bioterrorism attack. The actual knowledge was observed to be very low in both groups. Perceived knowledge as well as actual knowledge was statistically higher in the postgraduate group (P < 0.05. Most of the participants were of the opinion that they need more education regarding bioterrorism and that it should be added to dental curriculum. The majority of the participants showed willingness to attend continuing education programs on bioterrorism. Conclusions: The dental students demonstrated low knowledge but high willingness to provide care. A policy-driven approach to include bioterrorism management in dental education and organization of more continuing education programs is recommended to improve knowledge and develop necessary skills. This will help develop a workforce efficient in providing care during a possible act of bioterrorism.

  1. The Chinese People’s Liberation Army and Information Warfare

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-01

    information warfare concepts as a barometer of how the PLA approached the concept, by 2007 the threads of integrated network electronic warfare... water filtration systems” against the chaos that could result from successful cyber attacks.75 PLA Lieutenant General Liu Jixian, of the PLA’s

  2. Employing U.S. Information Operations Against Hybrid Warfare Threats

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    leadership .60 Why Adversaries Will Use Hybrid Warfare Desert Storm, operations in former Yugoslavia, as well as Afghanistan and Iraq, demonstrated...February 26, 2013). 128 Manwaring, The Complexity of Modern Asymmetric Warfare, 130-131 129 Ben Sherwood , President of ABC News, discussion with author

  3. Containment 2.0: U.S. Political Warfare

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    emphasized dismal living conditions and blamed the Soviet Union for shortages of fuel, vegetables , and dairy. They also reported on widespread arrests and...a more traditional form of warfare. Special operations leaders agree that SOF’s proficiency in special warfare in “low-visibility, small- footprint

  4. Anti-Air Warfare Research for Naval Forces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bloemen, A.A.F.; Witberg, R.

    2000-01-01

    AAW is a warfare area with wide-spread spectrum. Command and Control Systems, sensors, effectors and electronic warfare are integrated to a system, they influence each other and must eventually be effective in coordinated action. This complexity asks for Operations Research methods to measure

  5. Relevance of information warfare models to critical infrastructure ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article illustrates the relevance of information warfare models to critical infrastructure protection. Analogies of information warfare models to those of information security and information systems were used to deconstruct the models into their fundamental components and this will be discussed. The models were applied ...

  6. Hybrid Warfare Studies and Russia’s Example in Crimea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Seyfettin EROL

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Although Hybrid Warfare is an old concept, theoretical studies in the western countries mainly began in the post-Col War era, focusing on asymmetrical threats against conventional superiority of western countries such as USA or Israel. September 11th attacks and 2006 Israel-Lebanon war played important roles for the evolution of hybrid warfare theories. However, there has not any consensus among scholars on a exact or unique definition of hybrid warfare. Hybrid warfare became one of the main security issues for the West and especially for NATO after the Russia-Ukraine crisis. Russian military strategies, called “hybrid warfare” by the western countries, resulted in the successful annexation of Crimea and, caused a serious security problem for the West resulting important structural and functional changes for the military system of NATO. Russian activities, which have been based on surprise, ambiguity and deniability, presented a unique example for hybrid warfare studies.

  7. Accidental and deliberate microbiological contamination in the feed and food chains — How biotraceability may improve the response to bioterrorism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knutsson, Rickard; van Rotterdam, Bart; Fach, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    A next frontier of the global food safety agenda has to consider a broad spectrum of bio-risks, such as accidental and intentional contaminations in the food and feed chain. In this article, the background for the research needs related to biotraceability and response to bioterrorism incidents ar...

  8. Axial Vircator for Electronic Warfare Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Drazan

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with a high power microwave generator with virtual cathode – vircator in axial release for electronic warfare applications. The classification of directed energy weapons microwave (DEWM is introduced together with basic block diagrams of a particular class of DEWM. In the paper, methods for designing vircator pulsed power supply, axial vircator structure, measurement methods and experimental results are presented. The vircator in electromagnetic ammunition is powered by magneto-cumulative generator and in weapons for defense of objects (WDO, it is powered by Marx generator. The possible applications of a vircator in the DEWM area are discussed.

  9. Electronic warfare receivers and receiving systems

    CERN Document Server

    Poisel, Richard A

    2014-01-01

    Receivers systems are considered the core of electronic warfare (EW) intercept systems. Without them, the fundamental purpose of such systems is null and void. This book considers the major elements that make up receiver systems and the receivers that go in them.This resource provides system design engineers with techniques for design and development of EW receivers for modern modulations (spread spectrum) in addition to receivers for older, common modulation formats. Each major module in these receivers is considered in detail. Design information is included as well as performance tradeoffs o

  10. Microwave receivers with electronic warfare applications

    CERN Document Server

    Tsui, James

    2005-01-01

    This book by the author of Digital Techniques for Wideband Receivers willbe like no other one on your book shelf as the definitive word on electronicwarfare (EW) receiver design and performance. Whether you are an EWscientist involved in the test and evaluation of EW receivers or a designerof RWR's and other EW-related receivers, Microwave Receivers withElectronic Warfare Applications is a handy reference through which you canperfect your technical art. Lucidly written, this book is a treatise on EWreceivers that is relevant to you if you are just looking for a top-levelinsight into EW receive

  11. History of chemical and biological warfare agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szinicz, L

    2005-10-30

    Chemical and biological warfare agents constitute a low-probability, but high-impact risk both to the military and to the civilian population. The use of hazardous materials of chemical or biological origin as weapons and for homicide has been documented since ancient times. The first use of chemicals in terms of weapons of mass destruction goes back to World War I, when on April 22, 1915 large amounts of chlorine were released by German military forces at Ypres, Belgium. Until around the 1970s of the 20th century, the awareness of the threat by chemical and biological agents had been mainly confined to the military sector. In the following time, the development of increasing range delivery systems by chemical and biological agents possessors sensitised public attention to the threat emanating from these agents. Their proliferation to the terrorists field during the 1990s with the expanding scale and globalisation of terrorist attacks suggested that these agents are becoming an increasing threat to the whole world community. The following article gives a condensed overview on the history of use and development of the more prominent chemical and biological warfare agents.

  12. Lifelong learning for public health practice education: a model curriculum for bioterrorism and emergency readiness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Debra; Hoeppner, Mary; Larson, Susan; Ehrenberg, Anne; Leitheiser, Agnes T

    2008-01-01

    In 2002, the University of Minnesota School of Public Health (UMNSPH) adopted an approach that supports basic, advanced, and continuing education curricula to train current and future public health workers. This model for lifelong learning for public health practice education allows for the integration of competency domains from the Council on Linkages Between Academia and Public Health Practice's core public health workforce competency levels and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Bioterrorism and Emergency Readiness Competencies. This article describes how UMNSPH has implemented the model through coordination with state planning efforts and needs assessments in the tristate region of Minnesota, North Dakota, and Wisconsin. In addition, we discuss methods used for credentialing practitioners who have achieved competency at various levels of performance to enhance the capacity of the public health preparedness systems.

  13. Summary and results of the joint WMD-DAC/Alameda County bioterrorism response plan exercise.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manley, Dawn Kataoka; Lipkin, Joel; West, Todd H.; Tam, Ricky; Hirano, Howard H.; Ammerlahn, Heidi R.

    2003-11-01

    On June 12,2003, the Alameda County Public Health Department and Sandia National Laboratories/CA jointly conducted an exercise that used a Weapons of Mass Destruction-Decision Analysis Center (WMD-DAC) bioterrorism attack simulation to test the effectiveness of the county's emergency response plan. The exercise was driven by an assumed release (in the vicinity of the Berkeley Marina), and subsequent spread, of a small quantity of aerosolized, weapons-grade anthrax spores. The simulation used several key WMD-DAC capabilities, namely: (1) integration with an atmospheric dispersion model to calculate expected dose levels in the affected areas, (2) a individual-tracking capability for both infected and non-infected persons as they made decisions, sought treatment, and received prophylaxis drugs, and (3) a user interface that allows exercise participants to affect the scenario evolution and outcome. The analysis of the county's response plan included documenting and reviewing the decisions made by participants during the exercise. Twenty-six local and regional officials representing the health care system, emergency medical services and law enforcement were involved in responding to the simulated attack. The results of this joint effort include lessons learned both by the Alameda County officials regarding implementation of their bioterrorism response plan and by the Sandia representatives about conducting exercises of this type. These observations are reviewed in this report, and they form a basis for providing a better understanding of group/individual decision processes and for identifying effective communication options among decision makers.

  14. Managing the Double Edged Sword of Network-Centric Warfare

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wells, David

    2003-01-01

    Network Centric Warfare can tend to collapse the operational level war by allowing information to flow around or past hierarchical staff structures and directly between tactical and strategic level decision makers...

  15. The Cycle of Warfare - Analysis of an Analytical Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Mikkel Storm

    2016-01-01

    The abstract has the title: “The Cycle of Warfare - Analysis of an Analytical Model” The Cycle of Warfare is an analytical model designed to illustrate the coherence between the organization, doctrine and technology of a military entity and the influence of the surrounding society as expressed...... by its economic, political and ideological characteristics. With the single assumption of economic rationality in human behaviour, Cycle of Warfare is not only coherent, it is applicable to all entities engaged in competition anywhere in the world at any point in history. The Cycle of Warfare can be used...... both retrospectively and predictively. As a tool for historians the model can help to identify decisive factors in developments and outcomes. As a tool for intelligence analysts, it can be used predictively to identify likely possible outcomes or unknown elements in analysed entities....

  16. Information Warfare: Defining the Legal Response to An Attack

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pottorff, James

    1999-01-01

    This paper discusses the difficulty in determining whether an information warfare attack, such as a computer virus, can be treated as an "armed attack" for purposes of national defense under the United Nations charter. As the U.S...

  17. Irregular Warfare: Impact on Future Professional Military Education

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Paschal, David G

    2006-01-01

    ... to operate effectively in an irregular warfare environment. The utility of a decisive war between nation states continues to decline and will eventually reach critical mass based upon the extreme imbalance of military power and a U.S. monopoly...

  18. Design and implementation of intelligent electronic warfare decision making algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Hsin-Hsien; Chen, Chang-Kuo; Hsueh, Chi-Shun

    2017-05-01

    Electromagnetic signals and the requirements of timely response have been a rapid growth in modern electronic warfare. Although jammers are limited resources, it is possible to achieve the best electronic warfare efficiency by tactical decisions. This paper proposes the intelligent electronic warfare decision support system. In this work, we develop a novel hybrid algorithm, Digital Pheromone Particle Swarm Optimization, based on Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO), Ant Colony Optimization (ACO) and Shuffled Frog Leaping Algorithm (SFLA). We use PSO to solve the problem and combine the concept of pheromones in ACO to accumulate more useful information in spatial solving process and speed up finding the optimal solution. The proposed algorithm finds the optimal solution in reasonable computation time by using the method of matrix conversion in SFLA. The results indicated that jammer allocation was more effective. The system based on the hybrid algorithm provides electronic warfare commanders with critical information to assist commanders in effectively managing the complex electromagnetic battlefield.

  19. Hybrid Warfare and the Changing Character of Conflict

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bastian Giegerich

    2016-01-01

      The idea that international conflict might be seeing more hybrid warfare and hybrid threats has animated debate among security and defense establishments in the run-up to NATO's 2016 Warsaw Summit...

  20. Hybrid warfare of the USA in South America

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    A. V. Budaev

    2015-01-01

    Washington’s hybrid warfare in Latin American region differs by its inventive and sophisticated methods and in fact represents a complex and multidimensional phenomenon including symbiosis of the “soft” and “hard...

  1. Trends in electro-optical electronic warfare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Carl R.; Grasso, Robert; Pledger, Jack; Murarka, Naveen

    2012-09-01

    Protection of military aircraft from hostile threats is paramount to ensure the survivability of aircrews, platforms, and mission success. While the threat environment continues to become more complex, shrinking defense budgets places new challenges on the development of electronic warfare (EW) systems. This paper presents the trends in electro-optical EW system development including 1) features, 2) affordability, 3) open architecture, 4) multi-functionality, 5) integrated avionics survivability equipment, and 6) enabling technologies for sensors, and optical sources. While these system attributes are not new, they have grown in importance in the design of EW systems. And, if treated correctly can have a beneficial symbiotic relationship to each other and to the airframe they support.

  2. Information Warfare, Threats and Information Security

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitriy Nikolaevich Bespalov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the opposite, but dependent on each other's reality - Revolutionary War information,information security goals and objectives of their study within the scheme "challenge-response", methodological and analytical support, the role of elites and the information society in promoting information security. One of the features of contemporaneityis the global spread of ICT, combined with poor governance and other difficulties in the construction of innovation infrastructures that are based on them in some countries. This leads to the reproduction of threats, primarily related to the ability to use ICT for purposes that are inconsistent with the objectives of maintaining international peace and security, compliance with the principles of non-use of force, non-interference in the internal affairs of states, etc. In this regard, include such terms as "a threat of information warfare", "information terrorism" and so forth. Information warfare, which stay in the policy declared the struggle for existence, and relationships are defined in terms of "friend-enemy", "ours-foreign". Superiority over the opponent or "capture of its territory" is the aim of political activity. And information security, serving activities similar process of political control, including a set of components, is a technology until their humanitarian. From the context and the decision itself is the ratio of the achieved results of information and political influence to the target - a positive image of Russia. Bringing its policy in line with the demands of a healthy public opinion provides conductivity of theauthorities initiatives in the country and increases the legitimacy of the Russian Federation actions in the world.

  3. Patients' request for and emergency physicians' prescription of antimicrobial prophylaxis for anthrax during the 2001 bioterrorism-related outbreak

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aber Robert C

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inappropriate use of antibiotics by individuals worried about biological agent exposures during bioterrorism events is an important public health concern. However, little is documented about the extent to which individuals with self-identified risk of anthrax exposure approached physicians for antimicrobial prophylaxis during the 2001 bioterrorism attacks in the United States. Methods We conducted a telephone survey of randomly selected members of the Pennsylvania Chapter of the American College of Emergency Physicians to assess patients' request for and emergency physicians' prescription of antimicrobial agents during the 2001 anthrax attacks. Results Ninety-seven physicians completed the survey. Sixty-four (66% respondents had received requests from patients for anthrax prophylaxis; 16 (25% of these physicians prescribed antibiotics to a total of 23 patients. Ten physicians prescribed ciprofloxacin while 8 physicians prescribed doxycycline. Conclusion During the 2001 bioterrorist attacks, the majority of the emergency physicians we surveyed encountered patients who requested anthrax prophylaxis. Public fears may lead to a high demand for antibiotic prophylaxis during bioterrorism events. Elucidation of the relationship between public health response to outbreaks and outcomes would yield insights to ease burden on frontline clinicians and guide strategies to control inappropriate antibiotic allocation during bioterrorist events.

  4. Accidental and deliberate microbiological contamination in the feed and food chains--how biotraceability may improve the response to bioterrorism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knutsson, Rickard; van Rotterdam, Bart; Fach, Patrick; De Medici, Dario; Fricker, Martina; Löfström, Charlotta; Agren, Joakim; Segerman, Bo; Andersson, Gunnar; Wielinga, Peter; Fenicia, Lucia; Skiby, Jeffrey; Schultz, Anna Charlotte; Ehling-Schulz, Monika

    2011-03-01

    A next frontier of the global food safety agenda has to consider a broad spectrum of bio-risks, such as accidental and intentional contaminations in the food and feed chain. In this article, the background for the research needs related to biotraceability and response to bioterrorism incidents are outlined. Given the current scale of international trade any response need to be considered in an international context. Biotraceability (e.g. the ability to use downstream information to point to processes or within a particular food chain that can be identified as the source of undesirable agents) is crucial in any food-born outbreak and particular in the response to bioterrorism events. In the later case, tested and proven biotraceability improves the following: (i) international collaboration of validated tracing tools and detection methods, (ii) multi-disciplinary expertise and collaboration in the field of food microbiology and conceptual modeling of the food chain, (iii) sampling as a key step in biotracing (iv) optimized sample preparation procedures, including laboratory work in Biosafety level 3 (BSL-3) laboratories, (v) biomarker discovery for relevant tracing and tracking applications, and (vi) high-throughput sequencing using bio-informatic platforms to speed up the characterization of the biological agent. By applying biotraceability, the response phase during a bioterrorism event may be shortened and is facilitated for tracing the origin of biological agent contamination. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Social media and its dual use in biopreparedness: communication and visualization tools in an animal bioterrorism incident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjöberg, Elisabeth; Barker, Gary C; Landgren, Jonas; Griberg, Isaac; Skiby, Jeffrey E; Tubbin, Anna; von Stapelmohr, Anne; Härenstam, Malin; Jansson, Mikael; Knutsson, Rickard

    2013-09-01

    This article focuses on social media and interactive challenges for emergency organizations during a bioterrorism or agroterrorism incident, and it outlines the dual-use dilemma of social media. Attackers or terrorists can use social media as their modus operandi, and defenders, including emergency organizations in law enforcement and public and animal health, can use it for peaceful purposes. To get a better understanding of the uses of social media in these situations, a workshop was arranged in Stockholm, Sweden, to raise awareness about social media and animal bioterrorism threats. Fifty-six experts and crisis communicators from international and national organizations participated. As a result of the workshop, it was concluded that emergency organizations can collect valuable information and monitor social media before, during, and after an outbreak. In order to make use of interactive communication to obtain collective intelligence from the public, emergency organizations must adapt to social networking technologies, requiring multidisciplinary knowledge in the fields of information, communication, IT, and biopreparedness. Social network messaging during a disease outbreak can be visualized in stream graphs and networks showing clusters of Twitter and Facebook users. The visualization of social media can be an important preparedness tool in the response to bioterrorism and agroterrorism.

  6. Understanding the elementary considerations in a network warfare environment: an introductory framework

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Veerasamy, N

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Information warfare has surfaced as an emerging concept that affects not only military institutions but ordinary organisations as well. Information warfare in itself consists of various components ranging from its electronic and psychological...

  7. Nuclear, biological and chemical warfare. Part I: Medical aspects of nuclear warfare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasthuri, A S; Pradhan, A B; Dham, S K; Bhalla, I P; Paul, J S

    1990-04-01

    Casualties in earlier wars were due much more to diseases than to weapons. Mention has been made in history of the use of biological agents in warfare, to deny the enemy food and water and to cause disease. In the first world war chemical agents were used to cause mass casualties. Nuclear weapons were introduced in the second world war. Several countries are now involved in developing nuclear, biological and chemical weapon systems, for the mass annihilation of human beings, animals and plants, and to destroy the economy of their enemies. Recently, natural calamities and accidents in nuclear, chemical and biological laboratories and industries have caused mass instantaneous deaths in civilian population. The effects of future wars will not be restricted to uniformed persons. It is time that physicians become aware of the destructive potential of these weapons. Awareness, immediate protective measures and first aid will save a large number of persons. This series of articles will outline the medical aspects of nuclear, biological and chemical weapon systems in three parts. Part I will deal with the biological effects of a nuclear explosion. The short and long term effects due to blast, heat and associated radiation are highlighted. In Part II, the role of biological agents which cause commoner or new disease patterns is mentioned. Some of the accidents from biological warfare laboratories are a testimony to its potential deleterious effects. Part III deals with medical aspects of chemical warfare agents, which in view of their mass effects can overwhelm the existing medical resources, both civilian and military.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. Game theory of pre-emptive vaccination before bioterrorism or accidental release of smallpox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, Chai; Earn, David J D

    2015-06-06

    Smallpox was eradicated in the 1970s, but new outbreaks could be seeded by bioterrorism or accidental release. Substantial vaccine-induced morbidity and mortality make pre-emptive mass vaccination controversial, and if vaccination is voluntary, then there is a conflict between self- and group interests. This conflict can be framed as a tragedy of the commons, in which herd immunity plays the role of the commons, and free-riding (i.e. not vaccinating pre-emptively) is analogous to exploiting the commons. This game has been analysed previously for a particular post-outbreak vaccination scenario. We consider several post-outbreak vaccination scenarios and compare the expected increase in mortality that results from voluntary versus imposed vaccination. Below a threshold level of post-outbreak vaccination effort, expected mortality is independent of the level of response effort. A lag between an outbreak starting and a response being initiated increases the post-outbreak vaccination effort necessary to reduce mortality. For some post-outbreak vaccination scenarios, even modest response lags make it impractical to reduce mortality by increasing post-outbreak vaccination effort. In such situations, if decreasing the response lag is impossible, the only practical way to reduce mortality is to make the vaccine safer (greater post-outbreak vaccination effort leads only to fewer people vaccinating pre-emptively). © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  9. The germs of terror – Bioterrorism and science communication after September 11 (Italian original version

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Chiara Montani

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available The attacks of September 11 2001 and in particular, the sending of letters containing anthrax spores the following October had a profound effect on society, and at the same time on science and its communicative mechanisms. Through a quanto-qualitative analysis of articles taken from four publications: two daily newspapers, the Corriere della Sera from Italy and the New York Times from the United States and two science magazines, Science and Nature, we have shown how the aforementioned events provoked the emergence of media attention regarding bioterrorism. A closer reading of the articles shows that today, science – including that found in science magazines – is closely related to politics, economics and the debate over the freedom to practice communicate. The very mechanisms of communication between scientists were changed as a result of this debate, as can be seen from the signing of the Denver Declaration in February 2003, which brought about the preventative self-censorship of publication of biomedical research findings.

  10. The germs of terror – Bioterrorism and science communication after September 11

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Chiara Montani

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available The attacks of September 11 2001 and in particular, the sending of letters containing anthrax spores the following October had a profound effect on society, and at the same time on science and its communicative mechanisms. Through a quanto-qualitative analysis of articles taken from four publications: two daily newspapers, the Corriere della Sera from Italy and the New York Times from the United States and two science magazines, Science and Nature, we have shown how the aforementioned events provoked the emergence of media attention regarding bioterrorism. A closer reading of the articles shows that today, science – including that found in science magazines – is closely related to politics, economics and the debate over the freedom to practice communicate. The very mechanisms of communication between scientists were changed as a result of this debate, as can be seen from the signing of the Denver Declaration in February 2003, which brought about the preventative self-censorship of publication of biomedical research findings.

  11. Numerical simulation of RCS for carrier electronic warfare airplanes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Kuizhi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the radar cross section (RCS of carrier electronic warfare airplanes. Under the typical naval operations section, the mathematical model of the radar wave’s pitch angle incidence range analysis is established. Based on the CATIA software, considering dynamic deflections of duck wing leading edge flaps, flaperons, horizontal tail, and rudder, as well as aircraft with air-to-air missile, anti-radiation missile, electronic jamming pod, and other weapons, the 3D models of carrier electronic warfare airplanes Model A and Model B with weapons were established. Based on the physical optics method and the equivalent electromagnetic flow method, by the use of the RCSAnsys software, the characteristics of carrier electronic warfare airplanes’ RCS under steady and dynamic flights were simulated under the UHF, X, and S radar bands. This paper researches the detection probability of aircraft by radars under the condition of electronic warfare, and completes the mathematical statistical analysis of the simulation results. The results show that: The Model A of carrier electronic warfare airplane is better than Model B on stealth performance and on discover probability by radar detection effectively.

  12. Chemical Warfare Agent Degradation and Decontamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talmage, Sylvia Smith [ORNL; Watson, Annetta Paule [ORNL; Hauschild, Veronique [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency; Munro, Nancy B [ORNL; King, J. [U.S. Army Environmental Center

    2007-02-01

    The decontamination of chemical warfare agents (CWA) from structures, environmental media, and even personnel has become an area of particular interest in recent years due to increased homeland security concerns. In addition to terrorist attacks, scenarios such as accidental releases of CWA from U.S. stockpile sites or from historic, buried munitions are also subjects for response planning. To facilitate rapid identification of practical and effective decontamination approaches, this paper reviews pathways of CWA degradation by natural means as well as those resulting from deliberately applied solutions and technologies; these pathways and technologies are compared and contrasted. We then review various technologies, both traditional and recent, with some emphasis on decontamination materials used for surfaces that are difficult to clean. Discussion is limited to the major threat CWA, namely sulfur mustard (HD, bis(2-chloroethyl)sulfide), VX (O-ethyl S-(2-diisopropylaminoethyl) methylphosphonothioate), and the G-series nerve agents. The principal G-agents are GA (tabun, ethyl N,N-dimethylphosphoramidocyanidate), GB (sarin, isopropyl methylphosphonofluoridate), and GD (soman, pinacolyl methylphosphonofluoridate). The chemical decontamination pathways of each agent are outlined, with some discussion of intermediate and final degradation product toxicity. In all cases, and regardless of the CWA degradation pathway chosen for decontamination, it will be necessary to collect and analyze pertinent environmental samples during the treatment phase to confirm attainment of clearance levels.

  13. IMS software developments for the detection of chemical warfare agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klepel, ST.; Graefenhain, U.; Lippe, R.; Stach, J.; Starrock, V.

    1995-01-01

    Interference compounds like gasoline, diesel, burning wood or fuel, etc. are presented in common battlefield situations. These compounds can cause detectors to respond as a false positive or interfere with the detector's ability to respond to target compounds such as chemical warfare agents. To ensure proper response of the ion mobility spectrometer to chemical warfare agents, two special software packages were developed and incorporated into the Bruker RAID-1. The programs suppress interferring signals caused by car exhaust or smoke gases resulting from burning materials and correct the influence of variable sample gas humidity which is important for detection and quantification of blister agents like mustard gas or lewisite.

  14. Hybrid warfare of the USA in South America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Budaev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Washington’s hybrid warfare in Latin American region differs by its inventive and sophisticated methods and in fact represents a complex and multidimensional phenomenon including symbiosis of the “soft” and “hard” power as well as their combination in the form of the “smart power”. The increasing importance of hybrid warfare technologies in the US foreign policy in Latin America predetermines the necessity of thorough studies and analysis of this phenomenon for providing Russian interests.

  15. Theory of information warfare: basic framework, methodology and conceptual apparatus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Олександр Васильович Курбан

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available It is conducted a comprehensive theoretical study and determine the basic provisions of the modern theory of information warfare in on-line social networks. Three basic blocks, which systematized the theoretical and methodological basis of the topic, are established. There are information and psychological war, social off-line and on-line network. According to the three blocks, theoretical concepts are defined and methodological substantiation of information processes within the information warfare in the social on-line networks is formed

  16. Hybrid Warfare: an Orientating or Misleading Concept in Analysing Russia’s Military Actions in Ukraine?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kilinskas Kęstutis

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Hybrid warfare is perhaps the most frequently used concept in seeking to explain and define Russia‘s military actions in Ukraine. This article thoroughly analyses the development of the theory of hybrid warfare and circumstances of its formation, draws a line between hybrid warfare and hybrid threats, and discusses the perception of hybrid warfare in the armies of Western states and Russia. Actions of the Russian army in Crimea are analysed on the grounds of the provisions of the theory of hybrid warfare formulated by Frank Hoffman through revealing the impact on a military operation not only of the changing warfare tendencies but also of political, cultural, demographic and military conditions that existed on the Crimean peninsula. The article ends with an assessment of the capability of the hybrid warfare theory, as an analytical category, to explain Russia’s military actions in Crimea.

  17. Multi-pathogens sequence containing plasmids as positive controls for universal detection of potential agents of bioterrorism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    La Scola Bernard

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The limited circulation of many of the agents that are likely to be used in a bioterrorism attack precludes the ready availability of positive controls. This means that only specialized laboratories can screen for the presence of these agents by nucleic amplification assays. Calibrated controls are also necessary for quantitative measurements. Primers and probes to be used in both conventional and real-time PCR assays were designed for the detection of agents likely to be used by a bioterrorist. Three plasmids, each of which contains 4 to 6 specific sequences from agents on the CDC Category A and B list (excluding RNA viruses were constructed. Two plasmids incorporate the sequences of Category A and B agents, respectively. The third plasmid incorporates sequences from Variola major and organisms that cause rash-like illnesses that may be clinically confused with smallpox. An "exogenic sequence", introducing a NotI restriction site was incorporated in the native sequences of the bioterrorism agents inserted in plasmids. The designed molecular system for detection of bioterrorism agents was tested on each of these agents (except Monkeypox virus, Smallpox virus and 2 Burkholderia species for which no native DNA was available and a collection of 50 isolates of C. burnetii using constructed plasmids as positive controls. Results Designed primers and probes allowed molecular detection, in either single or multiplex assays, of agent-specific targets with analytical sensitivities of between 1 and 100 DNA copies. The plasmids could be used as positive controls. False-positive results due to contamination by the positive control were easily detected by sequencing and eliminated by digestion with NotI. Conclusion Plasmid A and B can be used as positive controls in molecular assays for the detection of bioterrorism agents in clinical specimens or environmental samples. Plasmid C can be used as a positive control in differentiation of

  18. Biological warfare in a historical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roffey, R; Tegnell, A; Elgh, F

    2002-08-01

    There are some early examples of biological warfare (BW), but in modern times it was used first for sabotage by Germany during WWI. Development of biological weapons on a military significant scale was initiated in several countries in the period between the world wars. During WWII, several countries had active programs such as the USA, UK, Canada, Germany, Japan and the Soviet Union. It was only Japan that on a fairly large scale used BW. The US program continued until 1969, when President Nixon took a decision to end it in connection with signing the BTWC. The Soviet Union had also continued its program after the war, and this was enhanced after signing the BTWC: in the 1980s the program consisted of around fifty facilities and involved around 60,000 people. The Soviet Union produced and maintained a large stockpile of BW-agents. After the collapse of the Soviet Union, and due to pressure from USA and UK, President Yeltsin issued a decree in 1992 banning continued offensive BW activity. However, there are still concerns of residual activity in Russia. Another program of concern is the Iraqi BW-program. After 10 years of UN inspections that were stopped in 1998, there are still many unanswered questions concerning the BW program. There was also a covert BW-program in South Africa that was terminated around 1993. There have also been a number of allegations of alleged use or possession. In addition, there are indications that 10-12 states are now trying to acquire BW, and this assessment is based on intelligence information, mainly from the USA. For example Iraq, North Korea, Iran, Syria, Sudan and Libya. Another aspect is the strong driving force of technology developments to promote this type of program, opening new risks for future potential military misuse.

  19. Manoeuvre warfare analysis of South Africa's 1914-1915 German ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The article consists of two parts: the theory of manoeuvre warfare and the history of the 1914-1915 South African campaign in German South West Africa (GSWA). The GSWA campaign has been described in many ways as a secondary theatre within the greater geostrategic chess game of the First World War. The objective ...

  20. relevance of information warfare models to critical infrastructure

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ismith

    information security and information systems were used to deconstruct the models into their fundamental components and this .... emptive strikes on communications and logistics may be conducted using computer- based information warfare or physical ..... and risk to infrastructure. Preventing an aggressor from acquiring ...

  1. Environmental assessments of sea dumped chemical warfare agents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanderson, Hans; Fauser, Patrik

    This is a report on the information gathered during work related to sea dumped chemical warfare agents. It mainly reviews the work conducted in relation to the installation of the two Nord Stream gas pipeline from 2008-2012. The focus was on the weight-of-evidence risk assessment of disturbed CWA...

  2. Surface Warfare, Concept to Reality November/December 1997

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sabalos, Nicholas

    1997-01-01

    ... Navy will require tomorrow. From an overview of Network-Centric Warfare to a detailed look at modeling and simulation, we examine the broad spectrum of effort and intellectual capital being invested in the future of the Navy and Marine Corps...

  3. US and UK Military Cultural Relevance for Future Warfare

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-01

    thinking from ‘heavy metal ’, armour oriented manoeuvre warfare thinking to more agile and intellectual military actions then those adjectives serve their...flourish the power distance and excess testosterone needs to be reduced. A similar problem of Power Distance exists in the British Army but is perhaps less

  4. Biomonitoring of exposure to chemical warfare agents: A review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noort, D.; Benschop, H.P.; Black, R.M.

    2002-01-01

    In this report an overview of the methods currently available for detection of exposure to a number of chemical warfare agents (CWA), i.e., sulfur mustard, lewisite and nerve agents, is presented. Such methods can be applied for various purposes, e.g., diagnosis and dosimetry of exposure of

  5. Command and Control for Large-Scale Hybrid Warfare Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-05

    warfare have included couriers on horseback, sig- nal flags, encryption and code breaking, telegraph , wire- less radio, aerial reconnaissance and...Leavenworth, KS, 1990). [18] P. C. Niedfeldt, B. T. Carroll, J. A. Howard, R. W. Beard, B. S. Morse , and S. Pledgie, Enhanced UAS surveillance using a

  6. Public Discussion of Nuclear Warfare: A Time for Hope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Martha

    Anti-nuclear discourse, which peaked in 1981-82, signaled an emergence of public discourse on the nuclear warfare issue. During the development of the original atomic bomb, public discussion of the issue was severely restricted, but immediately after the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, discourse on the subject increased. During the Cold War…

  7. The political economy of warfare in nineteeth century Benin kingdom ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper examines how the interactions of politics and economy influenced the changing perspective on warfare in nineteenth century Benin Kingdom. The study investigates how the combined political and economic behaviour of Benin affected the rebuilding of military power as instrument of political policy in furtherance ...

  8. Composite warfare : the conduct of successful ground force ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    COMPOSITE WARFARE: THE CONDUCT OF. SUCCESSFUL GROUND FORCE. OPERATIONS IN AFRICA. Eeben Barlow. Abel Esterhuyse, PhD. Stellenbosch University. Pinetown: 30 Degrees South Publishers. 2015, 576 pages. ISBN 9781928211761. Africa is still one of the most conflict-ridden places on earth – from ...

  9. The Enemy Below: Preparing Ground Forces for Subterranean Warfare

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-01

    underground structure through social media. Social media such as Facebook , Twitter, Instagram , and YouTube are this generation’s leaflet technology for...66 E . TUNNEL WARFARE DURING THE VIETNAM WAR (1966) ..............67 1. Introduction...89 d. Indicators and Detection of Subterranean Activity ...............90 e . Alternate Approaches

  10. Management information systems for electronic warfare command and decision support

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Niekerk, B

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available information to allow them to manage their own spectrum, to identify threats, and to deny adversaries’ use of the spectrum. In this paper, the concepts of integrated electronic warfare and spectrum battle management are introduced, and the relevant information...

  11. Simulating cyber warfare and cyber defenses: information value considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stytz, Martin R.; Banks, Sheila B.

    2011-06-01

    Simulating cyber warfare is critical to the preparation of decision-makers for the challenges posed by cyber attacks. Simulation is the only means we have to prepare decision-makers for the inevitable cyber attacks upon the information they will need for decision-making and to develop cyber warfare strategies and tactics. Currently, there is no theory regarding the strategies that should be used to achieve objectives in offensive or defensive cyber warfare, and cyber warfare occurs too rarely to use real-world experience to develop effective strategies. To simulate cyber warfare by affecting the information used for decision-making, we modify the information content of the rings that are compromised during in a decision-making context. The number of rings affected and value of the information that is altered (i.e., the closeness of the ring to the center) is determined by the expertise of the decision-maker and the learning outcome(s) for the simulation exercise. We determine which information rings are compromised using the probability that the simulated cyber defenses that protect each ring can be compromised. These probabilities are based upon prior cyber attack activity in the simulation exercise as well as similar real-world cyber attacks. To determine which information in a compromised "ring" to alter, the simulation environment maintains a record of the cyber attacks that have succeeded in the simulation environment as well as the decision-making context. These two pieces of information are used to compute an estimate of the likelihood that the cyber attack can alter, destroy, or falsify each piece of information in a compromised ring. The unpredictability of information alteration in our approach adds greater realism to the cyber event. This paper suggests a new technique that can be used for cyber warfare simulation, the ring approach for modeling context-dependent information value, and our means for considering information value when assigning cyber

  12. The use of animals as a surveillance tool for monitoring environmental health hazards, human health hazards and bioterrorism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neo, Jacqueline Pei Shan; Tan, Boon Huan

    2017-05-01

    This review discusses the utilization of wild or domestic animals as surveillance tools for monitoring naturally occurring environmental and human health hazards. Besides providing early warning to natural hazards, animals can also provide early warning to societal hazards like bioterrorism. Animals are ideal surveillance tools to humans because they share the same environment as humans and spend more time outdoors than humans, increasing their exposure risk. Furthermore, the biologically compressed lifespans of some animals may allow them to develop clinical signs more rapidly after exposure to specific pathogens. Animals are an excellent channel for monitoring novel and known pathogens with outbreak potential given that more than 60 % of emerging infectious diseases in humans originate as zoonoses. This review attempts to highlight animal illnesses, deaths, biomarkers or sentinel events, to remind human and veterinary public health programs that animal health can be used to discover, monitor or predict environmental health hazards, human health hazards, or bioterrorism. Lastly, we hope that this review will encourage the implementation of animals as a surveillance tool by clinicians, veterinarians, ecosystem health professionals, researchers and governments. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. History of the Chemical Warfare Service in World War II. Biological Warfare Research in the United States, Volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    1947-11-01

    Hired Commission for the Reduction of Arma - ments (A. 16. 1924.. H), Geneva, 30 Jul 1924., pp. 29-30. In Hist files. Extracts from this League...Department of Agriculture in Kay 1942, several rice pathogens were considered as potential biologica warfare agents, one of «rich »as Hel

  14. Psychological and Unconventional Warfare, 1941-1952: Origins of a Special Warfare Capability for the United States Army

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-11-01

    over the conferral of First Special Service and Ranger unit colors , lineage, and honors to the Army’s Special Forces. Looking back upon that scene...Against E-e y, n D_:2a to VE-V1. New York: George. W. Stewart, Inc., 1949. Linebarger, Paul M. A. Psichological Warfare, New York: ]>jell, Sloan and Pearce

  15. Viral bioterrorism: Learning the lesson of Ebola virus in West Africa 2013-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cenciarelli, Orlando; Gabbarini, Valentina; Pietropaoli, Stefano; Malizia, Andrea; Tamburrini, Annalaura; Ludovici, Gian Marco; Carestia, Mariachiara; Di Giovanni, Daniele; Sassolini, Alessandro; Palombi, Leonardo; Bellecci, Carlo; Gaudio, Pasquale

    2015-12-02

    Among the potential biological agents suitable as a weapon, Ebola virus represents a major concern. Classified by the CDC as a category A biological agent, Ebola virus causes severe hemorrhagic fever, characterized by high case-fatality rate; to date, no vaccine or approved therapy is available. The EVD epidemic, which broke out in West Africa since the late 2013, has got the issue of the possible use of Ebola virus as biological warfare agent (BWA) to come to the fore once again. In fact, due to its high case-fatality rate, population currently associates this pathogen to a real and tangible threat. Therefore, its use as biological agent by terrorist groups with offensive purpose could have serious repercussions from a psychosocial point of view as well as on closely sanitary level. In this paper, after an initial study of the main characteristics of Ebola virus, its potential as a BWA was evaluated. Furthermore, given the spread of the epidemic in West Africa in 2014 and 2015, the potential dissemination of the virus from an urban setting was evaluated. Finally, it was considered the actual possibility to use this agent as BWA in different scenarios, and the potential effects on one or more nation's stability. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. The Law Governing Aerospace Warfare in the Twenty-First Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-07-01

    Yet, there are currently no treaties dealing specifically with the law of armed conflict in the air and space environments. Chapter 1 describes the...evolution to date of the law governing aerospace warfare. Chapter II analyzes the relevance of military interventions in Iraq and Yugoslavia (Bosnia...Kosovo) to the law of air and space warfare. Chapter III discusses the impact of humanitarian intervention’ on the law of aerospace warfare. Chapters IV

  17. Stuxnet and Cyber-Warfare (2/2)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    The first part of the lecture is devoted to the description of the Stuxnet worm, the first cyber-weapon whose existence has been made public, discovered in 2010 and targeting a specific industrial control system; the worm is responsible for the damaging of many centrifuges at an uranium enrichment facility, with the goal of sabotaging Iran's nuclear program. In the second part, the main features of cyber-warfare in conflict and pre-conflict activities will be discussed and compared to the conventional warfare domains, with also a general view at the international political debate on this topic.   Check the http://pugwash.org web site, an organisation that seeks a world free of nuclear weapons and other weapons of mass destruction. The lecturer invites comments via email to Gian.Piero.Siroli@cern.ch NB! All Academic Training lectures are recorded and are publicly available. There is no live webcast.

  18. Stuxnet and Cyber-Warfare (1/2)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    The first part of the lecture is devoted to the description of the Stuxnet worm, the first cyber-weapon whose existence has been made public, discovered in 2010 and targeting a specific industrial control system; the worm is responsible for the damaging of many centrifuges at an uranium enrichment facility, with the goal of sabotaging Iran's nuclear program. In the second part, the main features of cyber-warfare in conflict and pre-conflict activities will be discussed and compared to the conventional warfare domains, with also a general view at the international political debate on this topic. Check the http://pugwash.org web site, an organisation that seeks a world free of nuclear weapons and other weapons of mass destruction.   NB! All Academic Training lectures are recorded and are publicly available. There is no live webcast.

  19. Heterogeneity in the long term health effects of warfare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbulut-Yuksel, Mevlude; Yuksel, Mutlu

    2017-11-01

    This paper estimates the long-term heterogeneous legacies of exposures to war in utero and during early childhood on height in adulthood. Using a novel dataset on the regional WWII destruction in Germany, combined with the German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP), we find that individuals who experienced warfare in utero and during childhood are an average of 2cm shorter as adults, suggesting that the negative scarring effect of WWII dominated the positive effect coming from a selection. Among war survivors, children from less privileged families who resided in highly destroyed regions, particularly girls, suffered the greatest health consequences of warfare. Our analyses also show that wartime children who lost their parents during the war years are an average of 1.3cm shorter as adults. However, the father's conscription during WWII had no long-term effect on adult height. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Cultural diversity in the integration of disaster mental health and public health: a case study in response to bioterrorism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Anthony T

    2005-01-01

    Disaster leads to severe disruptions of the coping capacities of the community. Terrorism, and in particular bioterrorism, has tremendous impact on the community that is affected Cultural groups present unique issues that need to be appreciated for the effective integration of disaster mental health services with public health. The following paper identifies unique issues and challenges of cultural groups in disaster. It highlights issues such as language, cultural interpretation and expression of grief, and help-seeking behavior, as well as inherent cultural resources that can promote resilience. The implications of these cultural issues are illustrated in a potential bioterrorist event, addressing the areas of surge capacity, mass quarantine, and risk communication. Next steps are identified in promoting greater cultural competency in the integration of disaster mental health and public health, thus building greater community resilience.

  1. Fighting Networks: The Defining Challenge of Irregular Warfare

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    ambush is a form of offensive attack that utilizes principles of the defense and relies on deception. Jon Latimer describes the ambush and “…the use...of lures to draw the enemy into them…” as fundamental aspects of irregular and guerrilla warfare; Jon Latimer , Deception in War (New York: Overlook...Theory of Intelligence,” in Intelligence Theory, 10. 296 Latimer , Deception in War, 272. 297 Organizationally, fusion provides a structural framework

  2. A Study of Combined Arms Warfare by Alexander the Great.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-06-05

    Arms Warfare by Alexander the Great Approved by: ^§FC ^ohn T. Broom, Ph.D. ^c^. Thesis Committee Chairman y v^X^; ■-. ■SA: Gary J. Bjorge ...research. Dr. Bjorge and LTC Clay have provided technical advice and copy editing for much of this thesis. Special acknowledgment is due LTC David...objective to destroy or disrupt the enemy forces. Additionally, ancient armies did not have the communication ability that the modern army possess

  3. Theoretical, Legal and Ethical Impact of Robots on Warfare

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-30

    with the Theory of War Carl von Clausewitz believed that there were certain laws and principles of warfare but that they tended to exist at the... Carl von Clausewitz ,” Parameters (Spring 2006): 83-84. 47 Peter Paret, ed. Makers of Modern Strategy from Machiavelli to the Nuclear Age...Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1986), 193. 48 Paret, 107. 49 Michael Howard and Peter Paret, ed and trans, Carl Von Clausewitz : On War

  4. Numerical simulation of RCS for carrier electronic warfare airplanes

    OpenAIRE

    Yue, Kuizhi; Liu, Wenlin; Li, Guanxiong; Ji, Jinzu; Yu, Dazhao

    2015-01-01

    This paper studies the radar cross section (RCS) of carrier electronic warfare airplanes. Under the typical naval operations section, the mathematical model of the radar wave’s pitch angle incidence range analysis is established. Based on the CATIA software, considering dynamic deflections of duck wing leading edge flaps, flaperons, horizontal tail, and rudder, as well as aircraft with air-to-air missile, anti-radiation missile, electronic jamming pod, and other weapons, the 3D models of carr...

  5. Nodes and Codes: The Reality of Cyber Warfare

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-17

    Agency that claimed Stuxnet infected over one thousand Chinese industrial computer networks, including the Three Gorges Dam hydroelectric facility...infrastructure. Three case studies evaluate cyber policy, discourse, and procurement in the US, Russia, and China before and after Stuxnet to illustrate their...similar, yet unique, realities of cyber warfare. Evidence suggests that all three nations are taking extraordinary measures to build cyber armies

  6. Sub state Unconventional Warfare: Expanding United States Military Political Options

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-26

    de Colombia FID Foreign Internal Defense FM Field Manual GVN Government of South Vietnam ICP Indochinese Communist Party ISIL Islamic State of Iraq...abound throughout the world. Hezbollah, Hamas, ISIL, and the Taliban in the Middle East, the Fuerzas Armadas Revolucionarias de Colombia (FARC) in South...describing what UW consists of, and how it is applied, in FM 31-21 (1969). “Unconventional warfare consists of military, political, psychological , or

  7. Friction in the U.S. Army During Irregular Warfare

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-22

    32Nic Fields and Peter Dennis, Boudicca’s Rebellion AD 60-61: The Britons Rise up against Rome (Long Island City, NY: Osprey Publication, 2011), 47–51...Colonial Pacification in Tonkin and Madagascar , 1885-1900, 2013, 13. 19 validated entrenched ideas of traditional warfare codified in General...counterinsurgency operation. The Philippine-American War, the unintended result of purchasing the island chain from Spain after a naval victory at

  8. Major General George Crook's Use of Counterinsurgency Compound Warfare during the Great Sioux War of 1876-77

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pirkle, Wesley M

    2008-01-01

    ... implementing the concept of counterinsurgency compound warfare. Counterinsurgency Compound Warfare is the simultaneous use of a regular or conventional force and an irregular, indigenous force in unison against a common enemy...

  9. Biowarfare, bioterrorism, and animal diseases as bioweapons: Chapter 6 in Disease emergence and resurgence: The wildlife-human connection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friend, Milton

    2006-01-01

    Linkages between disease in humans and the maladies of animals continue to be a focus for those concerned with disease effects on human health. References to animal diseases, particularly zoonoses such as rabies and glanders, are found in the writings of Greek (Hippocrates, Democritus, Aristotle, Galen, Dioscorides), Byzantine (Oribasius, Actius of Amida), and Roman (Pliny the Elder, Celsus) physicians and naturalists.3 Also, early advances in disease knowledge were closely associated with the study of contagions in animals to the extent that “The most complete ancient accounts of the concepts of contagion and contamination are found in treatises on veterinary medicine.”4,5Opportunities for disease transfer between animals and humans have increased during modern times, partly because of advances in animal husbandry and intensive agriculture that result in increased contacts among humans, domestic animals, and wildlife. Infectious pathogens exploit these contacts, and must be considered in this era of increased world tensions and international terrorism (Fig. 6.1).Disease emergence and resurgence are generally associated with natural processes and unanticipated outcomes related to human behavior and actions. That perspective has been broadened by recent acts of bioterrorism. A new category of deliberately emerging diseases contains emerging microbes that are developed by humans, usually for nefarious use.211 Included are naturally occurring microbial agents and those altered by bioengineering.This chapter highlights the wildlife component of the pathogen-host-environment triad to focus attention on the potential for bioterrorists to use wildlife as a means for infectious disease attacks against society. The value of this focus is that the underlying causes of disease emergence and the optimal prevention or control response frequently differ for disease emergence, resurgence, and deliberately emerging diseases.211 Differences also exist relative to the potential

  10. Predicting Response to Reassurances and Uncertainties in Bioterrorism Communications for Urban Populations in New York and California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, Elaine; Tinker, Tim L.; Truman, Benedict I.; Edelson, Paul; Morse, Stephen S.

    2015-01-01

    Recent national plans for recovery from bioterrorism acts perpetrated in densely populated urban areas acknowledge the formidable technical and social challenges of consequence management. Effective risk and crisis communication is one priority to strengthen the U.S.’s response and resilience. However, several notable risk events since September 11, 2001, have revealed vulnerabilities in risk/crisis communication strategies and infrastructure of agencies responsible for protecting civilian populations. During recovery from a significant biocontamination event, 2 goals are essential: (1) effective communication of changing risk circumstances and uncertainties related to cleanup, restoration, and reoccupancy; and (2) adequate responsiveness to emerging information needs and priorities of diverse populations in high-threat, vulnerable locations. This telephone survey study explored predictors of public reactions to uncertainty communications and reassurances from leaders related to the remediation stage of an urban-based bioterrorism incident. African American and Hispanic adults (N = 320) were randomly sampled from 2 ethnically and socioeconomically diverse geographic areas in New York and California assessed as high threat, high vulnerability for terrorism and other public health emergencies. Results suggest that considerable heterogeneity exists in risk perspectives and information needs within certain sociodemographic groups; that success of risk/crisis communication during recovery is likely to be uneven; that common assumptions about public responsiveness to particular risk communications need further consideration; and that communication effectiveness depends partly on preexisting values and risk perceptions and prior trust in leaders. Needed improvements in communication strategies are possible with recognition of where individuals start as a reference point for reasoning about risk information, and comprehension of how this influences subsequent

  11. The Evolving Field of Biodefence: Therapeutic Developments and Diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-04-01

    stool; Culture; immunoassay; Anaerobe; catalase negative; lipase respiratory secretions. mouse neutralization production on egg yolk agar; 150-kDa...the pharmaceutical industry will be required. It is an accepted fact that the industry is adept at translational research — that is, rapidly and...effectively converting potential therapies into approved drugs. However, incentives will need to be put in place to encourage the pharmaceutical industry

  12. ALR-46 Computer Graphics System for the Robins Air Force Base Electronic Warfare Division Engineering Branch Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-12-01

    Warfare EWAISF Electronic Warfare Avionics Integration Support Facility EWOLS Electronic Warfare Open Loop Simulator GRA Graphics Command HIPO ...Softech’s Structured Analysis and Design Technique (SADT)(Ref 16). and IBM’s Hierarchical Input-Process-Output ( HIPO ) diagrams (Ref 8). Structured

  13. Sugar-Coated PPE's, Novel Nanomaterial's and Sensing Modules for Disease and Bioterrorism Related Threats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bunz, Uwe [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2003-11-21

    The detection and sensing of biological warfare agents (ricin, anthrax toxin), of disease agents (cholera, botulinum, and tetnus toxins, influenza virus, etc.) and of biologically active species important for national security and disease control.

  14. Procurements by the Non-Acoustic Anti-Submarine Warfare Program Through the Environmental Technologies Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-06-14

    General, DoD, on contract offloading, including Report No. 93-068, " Procurement of Services for the Non-Acoustic Anti-Submarine Warfare Program...contract administration in response to Audit Report No. 93-042. Report No. 93-068, " Procurement of Services for the Non-Acoustic Anti- Submarine Warfare

  15. Metal organic frameworks for the catalytic detoxification of chemical warfare nerve agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hupp, Joseph T.; Farha, Omar K.; Katz, Michael J.; Mondloch, Joseph E.

    2017-04-18

    A method of using a metal organic framework (MOF) comprising a metal ion and an at least bidendate organic ligand to catalytically detoxify chemical warfare nerve agents including exposing the metal-organic-framework (MOF) to the chemical warfare nerve agent and catalytically decomposing the nerve agent with the MOF.

  16. Proctoring the Joint Force: Networks, Hierarchy, and 21st Century Warfare

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-06-01

    PROCTORING THE JOINT FORCE: NETWORKS, HIERARCHY, AND 21ST CENTURY WARFARE BY MAJOR DANIEL W. TIPPETT A THESIS PRESENTED...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Proctoring the Joint Force: Networks, Hierarchy, and 21st Century Warfare 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c

  17. Cyber Warfare: China’s Strategy to Dominate in Cyber Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-10

    Revolution.‖ 64Jason Fritz, ―How China will use cyber warfare to leapfrog in military competitiveness,‖ Culture Mandala : The Bulletin of the Centre for East...cyber warfare to leapfrog in military competitiveness.‖ Culture Mandala : The Bulletin of the Centre for East-West Culture and Economic Studies 8 no. 1

  18. Status of dental health in chemical warfare victims: The case of Isfahan, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Mottaghi

    2012-01-01

    Conclusion: Chemical warfare victims have relatively poor dental/oral health. Chemical injury might cause a dysfunction in saliva secretion, with decrease in saliva secretion increasing the risk for tooth decay and periodontal disorders. Further research is required to find out the exact underlying mechanisms and the factors associated with poor dental/oral health in chemical warfare victims.

  19. Bioinformatic tools for using whole genome sequencing as a rapid high resolution diagnostic typing tool when tracing bioterror organisms in the food and feed chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segerman, Bo; De Medici, Dario; Ehling Schulz, Monika; Fach, Patrick; Fenicia, Lucia; Fricker, Martina; Wielinga, Peter; Van Rotterdam, Bart; Knutsson, Rickard

    2011-03-01

    The rapid technological development in the field of parallel sequencing offers new opportunities when tracing and tracking microorganisms in the food and feed chain. If a bioterror organism is deliberately spread it is of crucial importance to get as much information as possible regarding the strain as fast as possible to aid the decision process and select suitable controls, tracing and tracking tools. A lot of efforts have been made to sequence multiple strains of potential bioterror organisms so there is a relatively large set of reference genomes available. This study is focused on how to use parallel sequencing for rapid phylogenomic analysis and screen for genetic modifications. A bioinformatic methodology has been developed to rapidly analyze sequence data with minimal post-processing. Instead of assembling the genome, defining genes, defining orthologous relations and calculating distances, the present method can achieve a similar high resolution directly from the raw sequence data. The method defines orthologous sequence reads instead of orthologous genes and the average similarity of the core genome (ASC) is calculated. The sequence reads from the core and from the non-conserved genomic regions can also be separated for further analysis. Finally, the comparison algorithm is used to visualize the phylogenomic diversity of the bacterial bioterror organisms Bacillus anthracis and Clostridium botulinum using heat plot diagrams. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Motivation and requirements for determining a Network Warfare Capability

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Veerasamy, N

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available technology for their day-to-day operation (Panda, Giordano 1999). A report by the Defense Science Board in the United States of America (USA) explains that challenges in the present age include information assurance, and that this requires new...", International Journal of Information Security, vol. 1, no. 1, pp. 3-13. Munro, N. 1996, "Sketching a national Information Warfare defense plan", Communications of the ACM, vol. 39, no. 11, pp. 15-17. Panda, B. & Giordano, J. 1999, "Defensive Information...

  1. Lawfare in Hybrid Wars: The 21st Century Warfare

    OpenAIRE

    Mosquera, A.; Bachmann, Sascha-Dominik

    2016-01-01

    In the context of ‘Hybrid Warfare’ as 21st Century’s threat to peace and security, this paper intends to address the role of Lawfare. The use of law as a weapon, Lawfare,1can have a tangible impact on democratic States when their adversaries use it in an exploitative way. Lawfare can be used in the context of Hybrid War.2 Examples of Hybrid Warfare as witnessed in the Russian/Ukrainian conflict of 2014/2015 and the ongoing conflict with Daesh are particularly sensitive to Lawfare due to an ap...

  2. Russian Military Thinking – A New Generation of Warfare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mattsson Peter A.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with how Russian warfighting is described and discussed in contemporary Russian military theory. The approach has been studies, analyses and interpretations of primarily Russian sources as prominent Russian journals, but also Western analyses and interpretations of contemporary Russian warfighting discussions. Theoretical considerations are limited to the period from the 1980s to the present day - 2014. Mainly Russian experts on military theory (Bogdanov, Chekinov, Gareev, Kiselyov, Kuralenko, Morozov, Slipchenko, Vinogradov, Vladimirov, Vorobyov have been studied, but also sources from some prominent Western experts on Russian warfare (FitzGerald, Gileotti, Kipp, McDermott.

  3. Cybersecurity protecting critical infrastructures from cyber attack and cyber warfare

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, Thomas A

    2015-01-01

    The World Economic Forum regards the threat of cyber attack as one of the top five global risks confronting nations of the world today. Cyber attacks are increasingly targeting the core functions of the economies in nations throughout the world. The threat to attack critical infrastructures, disrupt critical services, and induce a wide range of damage is becoming more difficult to defend against. Cybersecurity: Protecting Critical Infrastructures from Cyber Attack and Cyber Warfare examines the current cyber threat landscape and discusses the strategies being used by governments and corporatio

  4. Effectiveness of E-learning Compared to Classroom Learning in the Diagnostic Approach to Bioterrorism and Chemical Terrorism for Emergency Physicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Alavi-Moghaddam

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and purpose: Emergency physicians play an important role in the immediate diagnosis of bioterrorism activities. The present study was conducted with the purpose of comparing the effectiveness of e-learning and classroom learning in approach to bioterrorism and chemical terrorism for emergency physicians.Methods: This was a semi-empirical study, which was conducted via testing knowledge before and after the educational intervention in the field of bioterrorism and chemical terrorism on the emergency physicians in Tehran. The external validity of the questionnaire was confirmed by two academic experts in order to determine the ability to detect bioterrorist and chemical terrorist diseases. In this study, education was done in both virtual and classroom forms. The education regarded 6 bioterrorist diseases in group A (anthrax, plague, viral hemorrhagic fever, tularemia, smallpox, and 5 chemical terrorist diseases (nerve gas, mustard, lewisite, phosgene, chlorine.Results: 160 doctors participated in this study. 96 people (60% were men and 64 people (40% were women. The average age of the participants was 36.2±5.5 years. In e-learning method, the pre-test scores average was (30.6%, while the post-test scores average was (81.6% (p=0.001. In classroom learning method, the pre-test scores average was (41.9%, while the post-test scores average was (72.9%, which the pre-test and post-test scores average differences in both cases are significant (p<0.001. In e-learning method, the difference was (51%, and in the classroom method it was (31%, which these two represent a 20% difference between methods. From statistical point of view, this difference indicates that the e-learning method being more effective (p=0.02.Conclusions: Based on the study results, it seems that in comparison to the classroom learning, e-learning method is more effective in helping emergency physicians to diagnose bioterrorism or chemical terrorism factors.Keywords: E

  5. China's Use of Cyber Warfare: Espionage Meets Strategic Deterrence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magnus Hjortdal

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This article presents three reasons for states to use cyber warfare and shows that cyberspace is—and will continue to be—a decisive element in China's strategy to ascend in the international system. The three reasons are: deterrence through infiltration of critical infrastructure; military technological espionage to gain military knowledge; and industrial espionage to gain economic advantage. China has a greater interest in using cyberspace offensively than other actors, such as the United States, since it has more to gain from spying on and deterring the United States than the other way around. The article also documents China's progress in cyber warfare and shows how it works as an extension of its traditional strategic thinking and the current debate within the country. Several examples of cyber attacks traceable to China are also presented. This includes cyber intrusions on a nuclear arms laboratory, attacks on defense ministries (including the Joint Strike Fighter and an airbase and the U.S. electric grid, as well as the current Google affair, which has proved to be a small part of a broader attack that also targeted the U.S. Government. There are, however, certain constraints that qualify the image of China as an aggressive actor in cyberspace. Some believe that China itself is the victim of just as many attacks from other states. Furthermore, certain actors in the United States and the West have an interest in overestimating China's capabilities in cyberspace in order to maintain their budgets.

  6. Evaluation Report on Management Controls at the Disbursing Office, Naval Surface Warfare Center, Dahlgren, Virginia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lane, F

    1997-01-01

    On September 19, 1996, the Defense Criminal Investigative Service requested assistance from the Assistant Inspector General for Auditing, DoD, in an investigation at the Naval Surface Warfare Center, Dahlgren, Virginia...

  7. The Data Warehouse in Service Oriented Architectures and Network Centric Warfare

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lenahan, Jack

    2005-01-01

    Since Network Centric Warfare (NCW) theory stresses shared understanding, command dispersal, and improved situational awareness does it not follow then, that data availability, mining, and superior analytics must be available at all...

  8. Measuring the Operational Readiness of an Air Force Network Warfare Squadron

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Orth, Paul H

    2008-01-01

    As part of its squadron activation, the 315th Network Warfare Squadron (NWS) requested assistance from the Air Force Institute of Technology in developing criteria for declaring Initial Operational Capability (IOC...

  9. The Third World War? In The Cyberspace. Cyber Warfare in the Middle East.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to provide a brief and comprehensive introduction to the issue of cyber warfare and to display the recent development in this area. Geographically, it focuses on the Middle East region, since the vast majority of the most important recent cyber attacks appeared just in there or were connected to it. The first part of the article tries to define the key notion of cyber warfare, compares it to the standard warfare and presents different types of cyber weapons that are known today. The second part points out examples of the most striking recent cyber attacks and uses them as evidences to demonstrate today's importance and dissemination of cyber warfare. Finally, the article sums up pros and cons of the cyber weapons and, in view of these, predicts a significant increase in their use in any future war conflicts.

  10. Nathanael Greene's Implementation of Compound Warfare during the Southern Campaign of the American Revolution

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Johnson, Todd J

    2007-01-01

    This monograph is an analysis of Major General Nathanael Greene's implementation of compound warfare in the Southern Department from December 1780 until the British surrender at Yorktown in October 1781...

  11. The Rapier or the Club: The Relationship between Attrition and Maneuver Warfare

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Springman, Jeffrey A

    2006-01-01

    ...? This project compares the relationship between attrition and maneuver warfare. The study considers whether there are times when wars of attrition should be fought, and whether there are conditions that force wars of attrition...

  12. "No practical capabilities": American biological and chemical warfare programs during the Korean war.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crane, Conrad C

    2002-01-01

    Much controversy still surrounds accusations that American forces in the Far East during the Korean War used biological warfare against North Korea and China. An analysis of recently declassified documents reveals that, although the United States attempted to accelerate its development and acquisition of such weapons during that period, its efforts to create a viable biological warfare capability were unsuccessful. Plans to similarly expand chemical warfare stocks and capabilities were also frustrated. Technological difficulties, personnel shortages, bureaucratic battles between the armed services, and policy limitations combined to hold back advances in American chemical and biological warfare. In light of the recent fears of terrorist attacks with such weapons, this analysis highlights the great difficulties involved in developing, acquiring, and delivering such capabilities.

  13. An Assessment of China's View an the Revolution in Military Affairs and Future Warfare

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Christian, Paul

    1998-01-01

    China's explosive economy has financed her recent modernization program. Not only is China modernizing her armed forces but many of her senior military authors are advocating a RMA and expounding on its potential value to future warfare...

  14. Combinatorial Auction Theory Applied to the Selection of Surface Warfare Officer Retention Incentives

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Denmond, Constance M; Johnson, Derek N; Lewis, Chavius G; Zegley, Christopher R

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this project is to investigate the potential retention and cost impacts of offering combinations of retention base incentives to members of the Surface Warfare Officer (SWO) community...

  15. Optimizing Armed Forces Capabilities for Hybrid Warfare – New Challenge for Slovak Armed Forces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter PINDJÁK

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the optimization of military capabilities of the Slovak Armed Forces for conducting operations in a hybrid conflict, which represents one of the possible scenarios of irregular warfare. Whereas in the regular warfare adversaries intend to eliminate the centers of gravity of each other, most often command and control structures, in irregular conflicts, the center of gravity shifts towards the will and cognitive perception of the target population. Hybrid warfare comprises a thoroughly planned combination of conventional military approaches and kinetic operations with subversive, irregular activities, including information and cyber operations. These efforts are often accompanied by intensified activities of intelligence services, special operation forces, and even mercenary and other paramilitary groups. The development of irregular warfare capabilities within the Slovak Armed Forces will require a progressive transformation process that may turn the armed forces into a modern and adaptable element of power, capable of deployment in national and international crisis management operations.

  16. Optimizing Armed Forces Capabilities for Hybrid Warfare - New Challenge for Slovak Armed Forces

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Peter Pindják

    2015-01-01

      The paper deals with the optimization of military capabilities of the Slovak Armed Forces for conducting operations in a hybrid conflict, which represents one of the possible scenarios of irregular warfare...

  17. 75 FR 69032 - Naval Surface Warfare Center, Potomac River, Dahlgren, VA; Danger Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-10

    ... CONTACT: Mr. David Olson, Headquarters, Operations and Regulatory Community of Practice, Washington, DC at..., Dahlgren to Baber Point; and thence west along the Upper Machodoc Creek shore of Naval Surface Warfare...

  18. Global Trends and Future Warfare (Strategic Insights. Special Issue, October 2011)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-01

    Watching Hainan, Remembering Murmansk : Cold War Analogies, Maritime Access, and the Future of Warfare Adam Grissom 78 10 Irregular Warfare and Future War...77 Betz The Mystique of "Cyberwar" and the Strategic Latency of Networked Social Movements 9. Watching Hainan, Remembering Murmansk Cold War...issues. Strategic Insights • October 2011 Volume 10, Special Issue 79 Grissom Watching Hainan, Remembering Murmansk : Cold War Analogies, Maritime

  19. Past and Potential Theory for Special Warfare Operational Art: People’s War and Contentious Politics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-04

    for a constructivist perspective of social movement theory that emphasized the role of subjective interpretation and meaning in causing and sustaining...Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Past and Potential Theory for Special Warfare Operational Art: People’s War and...Potential Theory for Special Warfare Operational Art: People’s War and Contentious Politics 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM

  20. The effect of graduate education timing on the retention of surface warfare officers

    OpenAIRE

    Clark, Eric S.

    2016-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited This thesis examines the effect of the timing of graduation education attainment on retention of officers within the Surface Warfare community. Navy Surface Warfare Officers (SWOs) commissioned between fiscal years 1999 and 2003 were classified as having no graduate degree, or earning their master’s prior to service, before five years of service, between five and 10 years of service, and after 10 years of service. Differential bivariat...

  1. Electronic Warfare Closed Loop Laboratory (EWCLL) Antenna Motor Software and Hardware Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Electronic Warfare Closed Loop Laboratory (EWCLL) Antenna Motor Software and Hardware Development by Neal Tesny Sensors and Electron Devices Directorate...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Electronic Warfare Closed Loop Laboratory (EWCLL) Antenna Motor Software and Hardware Development 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b...14. ABSTRACT Software and hardware were developed to control the rotation of the 6 double-ridged waveguide horn antennas that are used in the

  2. FY 15/16 Warfare Innovation Continuum "Creating Asymmetric Warfighting Advantages" executive summary

    OpenAIRE

    Kline, Jeff; O’Neal, Carol

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the Warfare Innovation Continuum is to coordinate and execute a series of cross‐campus educational and research activities synchronized by the Chair of Systems Engineering Analysis with a central theme of exploring the creation of asymmetric warfighting advantages across all domains. The focus will be on leveraging unmanned systems to enhance cross domain operations and developing the Electromagnetic Maneuver Warfare (EMW) concept by extending research in electro...

  3. Estimated Chemical Warfare Agent Surface Clearance Goals for Remediation Pre-Planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dolislager, Frederick [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Bansleben, Dr. Donald [U.S. Department of Homeland Security; Watson, Annetta Paule [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    Health-based surface clearance goals, in units of mg/cm2, have been developed for the persistent chemical warfare agents sulfur mustard (HD) and nerve agent VX as well as their principal degradation products. Selection of model parameters and critical receptor (toddler child) allow calculation of surface residue estimates protective for the toddler child, the general population and adult employees of a facilty that has undergone chemical warfare agent attack.

  4. A Survey of Game Theoretic Approaches to Modelling Decision-Making in Information Warfare Scenarios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn Merrick

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Our increasing dependence on information technologies and autonomous systems has escalated international concern for information- and cyber-security in the face of politically, socially and religiously motivated cyber-attacks. Information warfare tactics that interfere with the flow of information can challenge the survival of individuals and groups. It is increasingly important that both humans and machines can make decisions that ensure the trustworthiness of information, communication and autonomous systems. Subsequently, an important research direction is concerned with modelling decision-making processes. One approach to this involves modelling decision-making scenarios as games using game theory. This paper presents a survey of information warfare literature, with the purpose of identifying games that model different types of information warfare operations. Our contribution is a systematic identification and classification of information warfare games, as a basis for modelling decision-making by humans and machines in such scenarios. We also present a taxonomy of games that map to information warfare and cyber crime problems as a precursor to future research on decision-making in such scenarios. We identify and discuss open research questions including the role of behavioural game theory in modelling human decision making and the role of machine decision-making in information warfare scenarios.

  5. RELATIONAL APPROACHES REGARDING FOCUSED LOGISTICS IN MODERN WARFARE JOINT OPERATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gheorghe MINCULETE

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The military joint operations of the future are characterized by large concentrations of forces and conventional means on the directions that permit the exploitation of the technological superiority and the manifestation of the offensive spirit of the commanders of the joint operation force groups. Having in mind the fact that the relation between the combatant forces and the logistic ones will shift more and more in favour of the latter, the aforementioned operations will be usually supported by modern flexible logistic structures. The constituted force groups will have a significant joint force character, ensuring superior quality of the troops’ combat training, both at individual level and collective level of units and large units. The current article presents innovative aspects of focused logistics, adapted for the modern warfare, which should be designed and achieved in order to increase the operational potential of the joint force groups.

  6. Biological warfare training: infectious disease outbreak differentiation criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noah, D L; Sobel, A L; Ostroff, S M; Kildew, J A

    1998-04-01

    The threat of biological terrorism and warfare may increase as the availability of weaponizable agents increases, the relative production costs of these agents decrease, and, most importantly, there exist terrorist groups willing to use them. Therefore, an important consideration during the current period of heightened surveillance for emerging infectious diseases is the ability to differentiate between natural and intentional outbreaks. Certain attributes of a disease outbreak, although perhaps not pathognomonic for a biological attack when considered singly, may combine to provide convincing evidence of intentional causation. These potentially differentiating criteria include proportion of combatants at risk, temporal patterns of illness onset, number of cases, clinical presentation, strain/variant, economic impact, geographic location, morbidity/mortality, antimicrobial resistance patterns, seasonal distribution, zoonotic potential, residual infectivity/toxicity, prevention/therapeutic potential, route of exposure, weather/climate conditions, incubation period, and concurrence with belligerent activities of potential adversaries.

  7. Biological warfare training. Infectious disease outbreak differentiation criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noah, D L; Sobel, A L; Ostroff, S M; Kildew, J A

    1999-01-01

    The threat of biological terrorism and warfare may increase as the availability of weaponizable agents increase, the relative production costs of these agents decrease, and, most importantly, there exist terrorist groups willing to use them. Therefore, an important consideration during the current emphasis of heightened surveillance for emerging infectious diseases is the capability to differentiate between natural and intentional outbreaks. Certain attributes of a disease outbreak, while perhaps not pathognomic for a biological attack when considered singly, may in combination with other attributes provide convincing evidence for intentional causation. These potentially differentiating criteria include proportion of combatants at risk, temporal patterns of illness onset, number of cases, clinical presentation, strain/variant, economic impact, geographic location, morbidity/mortality, antimicrobial resistance patterns, seasonal distribution, zoonotic potential, residual infectivity/toxicity, prevention/therapeutic potential, route of exposure, weather/climate conditions, incubation period, and concurrence with belligerent activities of potential adversaries.

  8. Information Warfare on Social Media: A Brand Management Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalpokas Ignas

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Employing a perspective informed by brand management, this article aims at understanding information warfare operations in social media. The state, seen as brand, must project an image of itself to both internal and foreign audiences to unite the domestic audience and/or attract global support. However, in constructing a brand, states are vulnerable to ‘sofa warriors’ – ordinary individuals who have been unwittingly recruited by hostile actors to disseminate (over social media or other platforms a counter-brand, harmful to the state concerned. These new threats are investigated in light of recent tendencies in online branding, elucidating their status as a national security threat, with the potential to significantly disrupt life in political communities.

  9. Book Review: Conquest in Cyberspace: National Security and Information Warfare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary C. Kessler

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Libicki, M.C. (2007. Conquest in Cyberspace: National Security and Information Warfare. New York: Cambridge University Press. 323 pages, ISBN: 978-0-521-69214-4 (paper, US$80Reviewed by Gary C. Kessler (gary.kessler@champlain.eduMany books -- and even movies ("Live Free or Die Hard" -- are based upon the premise of an impending information war. In these scenarios -- made all too plausible by the increased frequency with which we read about and experience major information security incidents -- a Bad Guy exploits known computer security vulnerabilities in order to control major national infrastructures via the Internet so as to reap financial, economic, and/or personal power.(see PDF for full review

  10. Development of a comparative risk ranking system for agents posing a bioterrorism threat to human or animal populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomuzia, Katharina; Menrath, Andrea; Frentzel, Hendrik; Filter, Matthias; Weiser, Armin A; Bräunig, Juliane; Buschulte, Anja; Appel, Bernd

    2013-09-01

    Various systems for prioritizing biological agents with respect to their applicability as biological weapons are available, ranging from qualitative to (semi)quantitative approaches. This research aimed at generating a generic risk ranking system applicable to human and animal pathogenic agents based on scientific information. Criteria were evaluated and clustered to create a criteria list. Considering availability of data, a number of 28 criteria separated by content were identified that can be classified in 11 thematic areas or categories. Relevant categories contributing to probability were historical aspects, accessibility, production efforts, and possible paths for dispersion. Categories associated with impact are dealing with containment measures, availability of diagnostics, preventive and treatment measures in human and animal populations, impact on society, human and veterinary public health, and economic and ecological consequences. To allow data-based scoring, each criterion was described by at least 1 measure that allows the assignment of values. These values constitute quantities, ranges, or facts that are as explicit and precise as possible. The consideration of minimum and maximum values that can occur due to natural variations and that are often described in the literature led to the development of minimum and maximum criteria and consequently category scores. Missing or incomplete data, and uncertainty resulting therefrom, were integrated into the scheme via a cautious (but not overcautious) approach. The visualization technique that was used allows the description and illustration of uncertainty on the level of probability and impact. The developed risk ranking system was evaluated by assessing the risk originating from the bioterrorism threat of the animal pathogen bluetongue virus, the human pathogen Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7, the zoonotic Bacillus anthracis, and Botulinum neurotoxin.

  11. Military medicine and the ethics of war: British colonial warfare during the Seven Years War (1756-63)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Charters, Erica

    2010-01-01

    This article examines 18th-century European warfare, tracing the first formal codifications of conventions of war, frequently introduced by military physicians and initially regarding the treatment...

  12. Toxins as weapons of mass destruction. A comparison and contrast with biological-warfare and chemical-warfare agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, J M

    2001-09-01

    Toxins are toxic chemical compounds synthesized in nature by living organisms. Classifiable by molecular weight, source, preferred targets in the body, and mechanism of action, they include the most potent poisons on the planet, although considerations of production, weaponization, delivery, environmental stability, and host factors place practical limits on their use as WMD. The two most important toxin threats on the battlefield or in bioterrorism are probably botulinum toxin (a series of seven serotypes, of which botulinum toxin A is the most toxic for humans) and SEB, an incapacitating toxin. Ricin and the trichothecene mycotoxins, including T-2 mycotoxin, are of lesser concern but are still potential threats. Botulinum toxin is a neurotoxin, ricin and trichothecene mycotoxins are membrane-damaging proteins, and SEB is a superantigen capable of massive nonspecific activation of the immune system. The clinical intoxications resulting from exposure to and absorption (usually by inhalation) of these agents reflect their underlying pathophysiology. Because of the hybrid nature of toxins, they have sometimes been considered CW agents and sometimes BW agents. The current trend seems to be to emphasize their similarities to living organisms and their differences from CW agents, but examination of all three groups relative to a number of factors reveals both similarities and differences between toxins and each of the other two categories of non-nuclear unconventional WMD. The perspective that groups toxins with BW agents is logical and very useful for research and development and for administrative and treaty applications, but for medical education and casualty assessment, there are real advantages in clinician use of assessment techniques that emphasize the physicochemical behavior of these nonliving, nonreplicating, intransmissible chemical poisons.

  13. Passive front-ends for wideband millimeter wave electronic warfare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jastram, Nathan Joseph

    This thesis presents the analysis, design and measurements of novel passive front ends of interest to millimeter wave electronic warfare systems. However, emerging threats in the millimeter waves (18 GHz and above) has led to a push for new systems capable of addressing these threats. At these frequencies, traditional techniques of design and fabrication are challenging due to small size, limited bandwidth and losses. The use of surface micromachining technology for wideband direction finding with multiple element antenna arrays for electronic support is demonstrated. A wideband tapered slot antenna is first designed and measured as an array element for the subsequent arrays. Both 18--36 GHz and 75--110 GHz amplitude only and amplitude/phase two element direction finding front ends are designed and measured. The design of arrays using Butler matrix and Rotman lens beamformers for greater than two element direction finding over W band and beyond using is also presented. The design of a dual polarized high power capable front end for electronic attack over an 18--45 GHz band is presented. To combine two polarizations into the same radiating aperture, an orthomode transducer (OMT) based upon a new double ridge waveguide cross section is developed. To provide greater flexibility in needed performance characteristics, several different turnstile junction matching sections are tested. A modular horn section is proposed to address flexible and ever changing operational requirements, and is designed for performance criteria such as constant gain, beamwidth, etc. A multi-section branch guide coupler and low loss Rotman lens based upon the proposed cross section are also developed. Prototyping methods for the herein designed millimeter wave electronic warfare front ends are investigated. Specifically, both printed circuit board (PCB) prototyping of micromachined systems and 3D printing of conventionally machined horns are presented. A 4--8 GHz two element array with

  14. Guerilla Warfare & Law Enforcement: Combating the 21st Century Terrorist Cell within the U.S.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Major Richard Hughbank

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Both domestic and international terrorist organizations employ guerrilla warfare tactics, techniques, and procedures. Thus, the ability to identify and defeat the members of these organizations, cripple their infrastructures, and disrupt their financial resources lies in the understanding of modern guerrilla warfare as it develops in the twenty-first century within the United States.3 The forms of asymmetric warfare4 adopted by domestic and international terrorist groups alike is no longer intended to gain simple media exposure or governmental manipulation; they want to make an overpowering impact by causing massive loss of life and severe damage to infrastructure and are often motivated by religious imperatives and political goals. As terrorism analyst Stephen Flynn has observed, "Throughout the 20th century [Americans] were able to treat national security as essentially an out-of-body experience. When confronted by threats, [America] dealt with them on the turf of our allies or our adversaries. Aside from the occasional disaster and heinous crime, civilian life [in the United States] has been virtually terror-free." With the turn of the twenty-first century, terrorist operations have become more prevalent in the United States and are taking shape in the form of modern guerrilla warfare, thus creating new challenges for federal, state, and local law enforcement agencies. After reviewing the origin and nature of these challenges, this article will offer some suggestions for countering guerilla warfare in the United States.

  15. 75 FR 3901 - Notice of Availability of Record of Decision for the Naval Surface Warfare Center Panama City...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-25

    ... Panama City Division Mission Activities AGENCY: Department of the Navy, DoD. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The... proposed action, announces its decision to improve the Naval Surface Warfare Center Panama City Division's.... Carmen Ferrer, Naval Surface Warfare Center Panama City Division, Code CX06, 110 Vernon Avenue, Panama...

  16. Microbiological, biological, and chemical weapons of warfare and terrorism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenfield, Ronald A; Brown, Brent R; Hutchins, James B; Iandolo, John J; Jackson, Rhett; Slater, Leonard N; Bronze, Michael S

    2002-06-01

    Microbiological, biological, and chemical toxins have been employed in warfare and in terrorist attacks. In this era, it is imperative that health care providers are familiar with illnesses caused by these agents. Botulinum toxin produces a descending flaccid paralysis. Staphylococcal enterotoxin B produces a syndrome of fever, nausea, and diarrhea and may produce a pulmonary syndrome if aerosolized. Clostridium perfringens epsilon-toxin could possibly be aerosolized to produce acute pulmonary edema. Ricin intoxication can manifest as gastrointestinal hemorrhage after ingestion, severe muscle necrosis after intramuscular injection, and acute pulmonary disease after inhalation. Nerve agents inhibit acetylcholinesterase and thus produce symptoms of increased cholinergic activity. Ammonia, chlorine, vinyl chloride, phosgene, sulfur dioxide, and nitrogen dioxide, tear gas, and zinc chloride primarily injure the upper respiratory tract and the lungs. Sulfur mustard (and nitrogen mustard) are vesicant and alkylating agents. Cyanide poisoning ranges from sudden-onset headache and drowsiness to severe hypoxemia, cardiovascular collapse, and death. Health care providers should be familiar with the medical consequences of toxin exposure, and understand the pathophysiology and management of resulting illness.

  17. Drone Warfare: Twenty-First Century Empire and Communications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Howley

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper, part of a larger project that examines drones from a social-construction of technology perspective, considers drone warfare in light of Harold Innis’s seminal work on empire and communication. Leveraging leading-edge aeronautics with advanced optics, data processing, and networked communication, drones represent an archetypal “space-biased” technology. Indeed, by allowing remote operators and others to monitor, select, and strike targets from half a world away, and in real-time, these weapon systems epitomize the “pernicious neglect of time” Innis sought to identify and remedy in his later writing. With Innis’s time-space dialectic as a starting point, then, the paper considers drones in light of a longstanding paradox of American culture: the impulse to collapse the geographical distance between the United States and other parts of the globe, while simultaneously magnifying the cultural difference between Americans and other peoples and societies. In the midst of the worldwide proliferation of drones, this quintessentially sublime technology embodies this (disconnect in important, profound, and ominous ways.

  18. Lessons learned from the former Soviet biological warfare program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Debra A.

    The purpose of this doctoral project was to develop the most credible educational tool openly available to enhance the understanding and the application of biological weapons threat analysis. The theory governing the effectiveness of biological weapons was integrated from publications, lectures, and seminars primarily provided by Kenneth Alibek and William C. Patrick III, the world's foremost authorities on the topic. Both experts validated the accuracy of the theory compiled from their work and provided forewords. An exercise requiring analysis of four national intelligence estimates of the former Soviet biological warfare program was included in the form of educational case studies to enhance retention, experience, and confidence by providing a platform against which the reader can apply the newly learned theory. After studying the chapters on BW theory, the reader can compare his/her analysis of the national intelligence estimates against the analysis provided in the case studies by this researcher. This training aid will be a valuable tool for all who are concerned with the threat posed by biological weapons and are therefore seeking the most reliable source of information in order to better understand the true nature of the threat.

  19. Back to the future: aerial warfare in Libya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Paulo Nunes Vicente

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available A century after the first air bomb mission, a new intervention in the same geographic space has made evident the changes in Airpower. The Aerial Warfare in Libya has radically changed the civil war, complying with a UN mission to protect Libyan population, imposing a no-fly zone and an arms embargo. Therefore, Operation Unified Protector became one of the most successful campaigns in the history of NATO. We aim to assess the operational efficiency of Airpower in the conflict in Libya, focusing on the challenges of a War essentially Aerial. Despite the military results and the fact that some political objectives were met, we can identify some concerning trends that, if not shifted, may negatively influence future NATO operations. We do not aim to draw general and universal conclusions on the strategic value of Airpower based on the analysis of a specific case. Above all, we focus on identifying some lessons which have influenced OUP operational efficiency. Thus, we must analyze some factors, such as the scope of objectives, the type of opposing action and aerial strategy used by the coalition and then focus on the challenges arising from the OUP.

  20. The enemy as animal: Symmetric dehumanization during asymmetric warfare.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emile Bruneau

    Full Text Available Historically, dehumanization has enabled members of advantaged groups to 'morally disengage' from disadvantaged group suffering, thereby facilitating acts of intergroup aggression such as colonization, slavery and genocide. But is blatant dehumanization exclusive to those at the top 'looking down', or might disadvantaged groups similarly dehumanize those who dominate them? We examined this question in the context of intergroup warfare in which the disadvantaged group shoulders a disproportionate share of casualties and may be especially likely to question the humanity of the advantaged group. Specifically, we assessed blatant dehumanization in the context of stark asymmetric conflict between Israelis (Study 1; N = 521 and Palestinians (Study 2; N = 354 during the 2014 Gaza war. We observed that (a community samples of Israelis and Palestinians expressed extreme (and comparable levels of blatant dehumanization, (b blatant dehumanization was uniquely associated with outcomes related to outgroup hostility for both groups, even after accounting for political ideologies known to strongly predict outgroup aggression, and (c the strength of association between blatant dehumanization and outcomes was similar across both groups. This study illuminates the striking potency and symmetry of blatant dehumanization among those on both sides of an active asymmetric conflict.

  1. The United States and biological warfare: secrets from the early cold war and Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruwer, A

    2001-01-01

    The United States and Biological Warfare is about accusations that the United States resorted to bacteriological warfare at a time of great military stress during the Korean War. In December 1951, the then US Secretary of Defense ordered early readiness for offensive use of biological weapons. Soon afterwards, the North Korean and Chinese armies accused the United States of starting a large-scale biological warfare experiment in Korea. The US State Department denied the accusation. Both parties to the dispute maintain their positions today. The authors spent 20 years researching the accusations in North America, Europe and Japan. They were the first foreigners to be given access to Chinese classified documents. The reader is also introduced to the concept of 'plausible denial', an official US policy which allowed responsible governmental representatives to deny knowledge of certain events. The authors hope that their work will contribute to the understanding of a time when modern war expanded into a new type of violence.

  2. SiGe-based re-engineering of electronic warfare subsystems

    CERN Document Server

    Lambrechts, Wynand

    2017-01-01

    This book equips readers with a thorough understanding of the applicability of new-generation silicon-germanium (SiGe) electronic subsystems for the military purposes of electronic warfare and defensive countermeasures. The theoretical and technical background is extensively explained and all aspects of the integration of SiGe as an enabling technology for maritime, land, and airborne (including space) electronic warfare are addressed, including research, design, development, and implementation. The coverage is supported by mathematical derivations, informative illustrations, practical examples, and case studies. While SiGe technology provides speed, performance, and price advantages in many markets, sharing of information on its use in electronic warfare systems has to date been limited, especially in developing nations. This book will therefore be warmly welcomed as an engineering guideline that focuses especially on the speed and reliability of current-generation SiGe circuits and highlights emerging innov...

  3. Fear as a medium of communication in asymmetric forms of warfare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harste, Gorm

    2011-01-01

    of fear evolves in asymmetric warfare. Asymmetric war induces fear in both parties, but in a communicative form that leads to very different experiences of fear. Fear is observed and analysed with Niklas Luhmann’s theory of self-referential systems of communication and well as his theory of risk......Fear is defined as the distinction between risk and danger, a distinction that operates in communicative forms. War is always also warfare about the form of war. The article describes how fear in warfare becomes a symbolically generalized medium of communication, mainly focusing on how the form....... Following Luhmann and in continuation of Clausewitz’ conceptual tools, yet with other means, the article proposes to observe war as a system that can de-ontologize itself and thereby concern moving centres of gravity such as communication lines, motivation, public fear as well as perceptions of risk...

  4. An evolutionary theory of large-scale human warfare: Group-structured cultural selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zefferman, Matthew R; Mathew, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    When humans wage war, it is not unusual for battlefields to be strewn with dead warriors. These warriors typically were men in their reproductive prime who, had they not died in battle, might have gone on to father more children. Typically, they are also genetically unrelated to one another. We know of no other animal species in which reproductively capable, genetically unrelated individuals risk their lives in this manner. Because the immense private costs borne by individual warriors create benefits that are shared widely by others in their group, warfare is a stark evolutionary puzzle that is difficult to explain. Although several scholars have posited models of the evolution of human warfare, these models do not adequately explain how humans solve the problem of collective action in warfare at the evolutionarily novel scale of hundreds of genetically unrelated individuals. We propose that group-structured cultural selection explains this phenomenon. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. THE CYBER DIMENSION OF MODERN HYBRID WARFARE AND ITS RELEVANCE FOR NATO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorin DUCARU

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The technological development and the instant communication possibilities advanced not only economic and social developments, but also evolving threats from those who exploit the vulnerabilities of communication and information systems. The cyber threat landscape points to a significant increase of the frequency, intensity, duration and sophistication of cyber-attacks. One of the new and concerning trends is the use of cyber capabilities in relation with military of hybrid operations – the so-called cyber dimension of hybrid warfare. NATO’s strategy on countering hybrid warfare is based on the triad: prepare-deter-defend, which also applies to cyber. Nations represent the first line of defence in countering hybrid strategies. International cooperation is also a key factor in this sense. It is in this context that NATO’s response to cyber-attacks in the context of hybrid warfare must be further refined.

  6. Particle Swarm Social Adaptive Model for Multi-Agent Based Insurgency Warfare Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui, Xiaohui [ORNL; Potok, Thomas E [ORNL

    2009-12-01

    To better understand insurgent activities and asymmetric warfare, a social adaptive model for modeling multiple insurgent groups attacking multiple military and civilian targets is proposed and investigated. This report presents a pilot study using the particle swarm modeling, a widely used non-linear optimal tool to model the emergence of insurgency campaign. The objective of this research is to apply the particle swarm metaphor as a model of insurgent social adaptation for the dynamically changing environment and to provide insight and understanding of insurgency warfare. Our results show that unified leadership, strategic planning, and effective communication between insurgent groups are not the necessary requirements for insurgents to efficiently attain their objective.

  7. Electronic Warfare M-on-N Digital Simulation Logging Requirements and HDF5: A Preliminary Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-12

    beamwidth  entity, sensor  entity, time, mode  entity, time, x, y, z  entity, time,  image   After processing the logging stream the tables will have...E. Jarvis Electronic Warfare M-on-N Digital Simulation Logging Requirements and HDF5: A Preliminary Analysis Advanced Techniques Branch Tactical...12-04-2017 NRL Memorandum Report Electronic Warfare M-on-N Digital Simulation Logging Requirements and HDF5: A Preliminary Analysis Donald E

  8. Efikasnost sistema PVO u uslovima elektronskih dejstava / Efficiency of antiaircraft system in electronic warfare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir V. Šepec

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available U radu je primenjena teorija masovnog opsluživanja u analizi efikasnosti sistema protivvazduhoplovne odbrane (sistema PVO u uslovima elektronskih dejstava protivnika. Prikazan je model za ocenu efikasnosti sistema PVO i predstavljeni su izrazi za procenu efikasnosti sistema PVO u uslovima elektronskih dejstava. / In this article the theory of mass servicing is used in the analysis of efficiency of antiaircraft system in the conditions of electronic warfare. The model for analysis of the antiaircraft system efficiency has been shown and formulas for qualitative analysis of antiaircraft system efficiency have been presented in the conditions of electronic warfare.

  9. History of Bioterrorism: Botulism

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  2. Bioterrorism Agents/Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Mercury (Organic) Case Definition: Mercury (Inorganic) Case Definition: Mercury (Elemental) Methyl bromide Case Definition: Methyl Bromide Poisoning Methyl isocyanate Case Definition: Methyl Isocyanate Poisoning Mustard ...

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  3. Radiation Technology Against Bioterrorism

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    2004-10-25

    Bacillus pumilus 1.83 – 2.92 Bacillus sphaericus 2.56 – 3.87 Bacillus anthracis 2.38 – 5.50 Spore-forming anaerobes Clostridium perfringe 1.75 – 2.15...vegetative species. The anaerobic spore formers like Clostridium (D10 values ~ 2.2 – 3.4 kGy) are more radioresistant than aerobic Bacillus spores (D10...factor. Experiments with dry spores of Bacillus megaterium shows that the sensitivity is constant between -268°C and -148°C, increasing temperature

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  13. History of Bioterrorism: Botulism

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    Full Text Available ... Populations Health Alert Network (HAN) Laboratory Information Social Media Zombie Apocalypse What’s New Are You Prepared? Coping ... Resources for Emergency Health Professionals Training & Education Social Media What’s New Preparation & Planning More on Preparedness What ...

  14. History of Bioterrorism: Botulism

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and Response Are You Prepared? Shelter In Place Coping with a Disaster or Traumatic Event Resources for ... Media Zombie Apocalypse What’s New Are You Prepared? Coping with a Disaster or Traumatic Event Information on ...

  15. History of Bioterrorism: Botulism

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... smallpox, anthrax, botulism, plague, tularemia, and viral hemorrhagic fevers. If these germs were used to intentionally infect ... Program Overview Anthrax Plague Smallpox Botulism Viral Hemorrhagic Fevers Tularemia Note: Parts of this video were adapted ...

  16. The history and threat of biological warfare and terrorism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noah, Donald L; Huebner, Kermit D; Darling, Robert G; Waeckerle, Joseph F

    2002-05-01

    The inevitable conclusion is that the availability of biological warfare agents and supporting technologic infrastructure, coupled with the fact that there are many people motivated to do harm to the United States, means that America must be prepared to defend her homeland against biological agents. Some have argued to the contrary, that the threat and risks from a biological weapon attack are not to be considered serious, because [39]: They've not been used yet on a large scale so they probably won't be in the near future. Their use is so morally repugnant that they probably won't be used at all. The technologic hurdles associated with isolating, growing, purifying, weaponizing, and disseminating adequate quantities of pathologic agents are so high that only the most advanced laboratories could attempt the process. Similar to a 'nuclear winter,' the aftermath of a biological attack is so unthinkable that none would attempt it. Unfortunately, the trends associated with biotechnology globalization, terrorist group dynamics, and global/regional politics render these beliefs untenable and inappropriate, as recent events have underscored. To that end, the United States has accelerated its program of defense against biological weapons, as it must. Biological weapons are such dreadful weapons of uniqueness and complexity that a specific defense strategy is paramount. Elements of this program include pharmaceutical stockpiles, heightened surveillance systems, energized vaccine development programs, and comprehensive training initiatives. Although the depth and breadth of these efforts are unprecedented, above all these efforts is the absolute necessity for medical and public health care professionals to be educated and actively involved. These professionals are the sine qua non of future defensive readiness. This is just the start; unfortunately, there is no end yet in sight.

  17. An Empirical Examination of the Warfare Metaphor with Respect to Pre-Service Elementary Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobern, William W.; Loving, Cathleen C.; Davis, Edward B.; Terpstra, Jeff

    2013-01-01

    Since its origination in the late nineteenth century, the warfare metaphor has been used to characterize the relationship between science and religion, especially orthodox Christianity. Though thoroughly discredited by historians of science, the ideological descendants of Thomas Huxley, who spoke of science in quasi-religious terms, have kept the…

  18. Diagnosis of exposure to chemical warfare agents: An essential tool to counteract chemical terrorism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noort, D.; Schans, M.J. van der; Bikker, F.J.; Benschop, H.P.

    2009-01-01

    Methods to analyze chemical warfare agents (CW-agents) and their decomposition products in environmental samples were developed over the last decades. In contrast herewith, procedures for analysis in biological samples have only recently been developed. Retrospective detection of exposure to

  19. A statistical analysis of the effect of warfare on the human secondary sex ratio

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graffelman, J.; Hoekstra, R.F.

    2000-01-01

    Many factors have been hypothesized to affect the human secondary sex ratio (the annual percentage of males among all live births), among them race, parental ages, and birth order. Some authors have even proposed warfare as a factor influencing live birth sex ratios. The hypothesis that during and

  20. A Proficiency-Based Cost Estimate of Surface Warfare Officer On-the-Job Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    for “better schooling, and a surface warfare pin equivalent to the dolphins worn by submariners or the wings by the aviators” (Robinson, 2008...Historical Perspective from World War II to 2008. Fort Leavenworth: U.S. Army Command and General Staff College. Rocci, R. (2003). A Cognitive and

  1. (Review of) Reno, William. 2011. Warfare in Independent Africa. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hagmann, Tobias

    2013-01-01

    Warfare in Independent Africa is Reno’s bold attempt to analyze the modern history of African insurgencies. The book tackles this task through the prism of five generations of rebel, which left their mark on the continent; anti-colonial rebels, majority rule rebels, reform rebels, warlord rebels...

  2. Electronic Warfare: Rethinking the Importance of Its Role In Military Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-10

    mindset devalues EW, and how its effect on EW employment will negatively impact control of the information domain. Before discussing IO, EW, JEMSO...electronic warfare support (ES). Electronic attack utilizes the radiation or re- radiation of electromagnetic energy, directed energy, electromagnetic ... electromagnetic energy, directed energy, or anti- radiation weapons to attack enemy personnel or facilities in order to degrade or destroy his

  3. The influence of the Ratel infantry fighting vehicle on mobile warfare ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article traces the story of how the author and a number of daring young commanders and soldiers had cast aside military textbooks in developing their own military doctrine for mobile warfare, South African style. It is clear that the Ratel infantry fighting vehicle had wielded huge influence on the development and ...

  4. French Ground Force Organizational Development for Counterrevolutionary Warfare between 1945 and 1962

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-06-17

    the major counterinsurgent wars in Indochina and Algeria. The first facet of study is the French experience and organizational development up to the... organizational development in Algeria is studied as the penultimate example of the French model. Derived from previous colonial warfare experience

  5. Military medicine and the ethics of war: British colonial warfare during the Seven Years War (1756-63).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charters, Erica

    2010-01-01

    This article examines 18th-century European warfare, tracing the first formal codifications of conventions of war, frequently introduced by military physicians and initially regarding the treatment of the sick and wounded. It outlines to what extent these conventions were followed in practice, particularly in the challenging environment of American irregular warfare, with a focus on the most well-known incident of "biological warfare" in the period: the deliberate spread of smallpox by British officers among Amerindians in 1763. More broadly, it demonstrates that the history of military medicine provides a fruitful method with which to uncover assumptions about the ethics of war.

  6. Evolution of war and cyber attacks in the concept of conventional warfare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huseyin Kuru

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Humanity have witnessed many confrontations of states whose interests challenge at some points and their struggle to neutralize problems in battlefield. While war was perceived as a way of eliminating deadlocks for some parties, some considered it as one of the international policy materials. The definition and content of conventional warfare have been subject to change for centuries, while the new weapons and technologies have been developed by human beings that it has brought constant change in the law of war and at the same time more lethal and devastating consequences. The struggle for superiority in international relations played an impulsive role in the development of weapons used in the battlefield. Countries have used their labor and financial resources to improve their military skills. Beginning with stones and sticks in the battlefield, this struggle has reached the point of using the next generation satellite controlled unmanned and armed aircrafts and having nuclear weapons has become more deterrent than using them. The struggle between strong countries and the limited countries in terms of technology and armed groups that do not have enough technology and skills completely changed the definition of conventional warfare. This fight has led Asymmetric warfare born which can turn commercial airline planes full of innocent people into a weapon like September-11 attacks. In this study, the historical development and the change in the content of the warfare were briefly explained and then cyber-attacks in the concept of the fourth generation warfare was analyzed taking into account of prominent attacks.

  7. Dynamics of positional warfare malaria: Finland and Korea compared.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huldén, Lena; Huldén, Larry

    2008-09-08

    A sudden outbreak of vivax malaria among Finnish troops in SE-Finland and along the front line in Hanko peninsula in the southwest occurred in 1941 during World War II. The common explanation has been an invasion of infective Anopheles mosquitoes from the Russian troops crossing the front line between Finland and Soviet Union. A revised explanation is presented based on recent studies of Finnish malaria. The exact start of the epidemic and the phenology of malaria cases among the Finnish soldiers were reanalyzed. The results were compared with the declining malaria in Finland. A comparison with a corresponding situation starting in the 1990's in Korea was performed. The malaria cases occurred in July in 1941 when it was by far too early for infective mosquitoes to be present. The first Anopheles mosquitoes hatched at about the same time as the first malaria cases were observed among the Finnish soldiers. It takes about 3-6 weeks for the completion of the sporogony in Finland. The new explanation is that soldiers in war conditions were suddenly exposed to uninfected mosquitoes and those who still were carriers of hypnozoites developed relapses triggered by these mosquitoes. It is estimated that about 0.5% of the Finnish population still were carriers of hypnozoites in the 1940's. A corresponding outbreak of vivax malaria in Korea in the 1990's is similarly interpreted as relapses from activated hypnozoites among Korean soldiers. The significance of the mosquito induced relapses is emphasized by two benefits for the Plasmodium. There is a synchronous increase of gametocytes when new mosquitoes emerge. It also enables meiotic recombination between different strains of the Plasmodium. The malaria peak during the positional warfare in the 1940's was a short outbreak during the last phase of declining indigenous malaria in Finland. The activation of hypnozoites among a large number of soldiers and subsequent medication contributed to diminishing the reservoir of malaria

  8. Dynamics of positional warfare malaria: Finland and Korea compared

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huldén Larry

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A sudden outbreak of vivax malaria among Finnish troops in SE-Finland and along the front line in Hanko peninsula in the southwest occurred in 1941 during World War II. The common explanation has been an invasion of infective Anopheles mosquitoes from the Russian troops crossing the front line between Finland and Soviet Union. A revised explanation is presented based on recent studies of Finnish malaria. Methods The exact start of the epidemic and the phenology of malaria cases among the Finnish soldiers were reanalyzed. The results were compared with the declining malaria in Finland. A comparison with a corresponding situation starting in the 1990's in Korea was performed. Results and discussion The malaria cases occurred in July in 1941 when it was by far too early for infective mosquitoes to be present. The first Anopheles mosquitoes hatched at about the same time as the first malaria cases were observed among the Finnish soldiers. It takes about 3 – 6 weeks for the completion of the sporogony in Finland. The new explanation is that soldiers in war conditions were suddenly exposed to uninfected mosquitoes and those who still were carriers of hypnozoites developed relapses triggered by these mosquitoes. It is estimated that about 0.5% of the Finnish population still were carriers of hypnozoites in the 1940's. A corresponding outbreak of vivax malaria in Korea in the 1990's is similarly interpreted as relapses from activated hypnozoites among Korean soldiers. The significance of the mosquito induced relapses is emphasized by two benefits for the Plasmodium. There is a synchronous increase of gametocytes when new mosquitoes emerge. It also enables meiotic recombination between different strains of the Plasmodium. Conclusion The malaria peak during the positional warfare in the 1940's was a short outbreak during the last phase of declining indigenous malaria in Finland. The activation of hypnozoites among a large number of

  9. How Agent Based Models can be Utilized to Explore and Exploit Non-Linearity and Intangibles Inherent in Guerrilla Warfare

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ipekci, Arif

    2002-01-01

    ...) to explore non-linearity and intangibles inherent in guerrilla warfare. An infiltration scenario is developed based on the author's experiences fighting guerrillas in the mountains of Southeast Turkey...

  10. Developmental Toxic Effects of Exposure to Chemical Warfare Nerve Agents in Rats: Effects on Brain and Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    Yourick D (2009) Analyzing large data sets acquired through telemetry from rats exposed to organophosphorus compounds: an EEG study. J Neurosci Methods...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-2-0082 TITLE: Developmental Toxic Effects of Exposure to Chemical Warfare Nerve Agents in Rats : Effects on Brain and...2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Developmental Toxic Effects of Exposure to Chemical Warfare Nerve Agents in Rats : Effects on Brain

  11. Sources of Occupational Stress and Prevalence of Burnout and Clinical Distress Among U.S. Air Force Cyber Warfare Operators

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    AFRL-SA-WP-TR-2013-0006 Sources of Occupational Stress and Prevalence of Burnout and Clinical Distress Among U.S. Air Force Cyber Warfare... Burnout and Clinical Distress Among U.S. Air Force Cyber Warfare Operators 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6...the prevalence of occupational burnout and clinical distress among this critical workforce. The purpose of this study is to identify the main

  12. Simultaneous Detection of CDC Category "A" DNA and RNA Bioterrorism Agents by Use of Multiplex PCR & RT-PCR Enzyme Hybridization Assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly J. Henrickson

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Assays to simultaneously detect multiple potential agents of bioterrorism are limited. Two multiplex PCR and RT-PCR enzyme hybridization assays (mPCR-EHA, mRT-PCR-EHA were developed to simultaneously detect many of the CDC category “A” bioterrorism agents. The “Bio T” DNA assay was developed to detect: Variola major (VM, Bacillus anthracis (BA, Yersinia pestis (YP, Francisella tularensis (FT and Varicella zoster virus (VZV. The “Bio T” RNA assay (mRT-PCR-EHA was developed to detect: Ebola virus (Ebola, Lassa fever virus (Lassa, Rift Valley fever (RVF, Hantavirus Sin Nombre species (HSN and dengue virus (serotypes 1-4. Sensitivity and specificity of the 2 assays were tested by using genomic DNA, recombinant plasmid positive controls, RNA transcripts controls, surrogate (spiked clinical samples and common respiratory pathogens. The analytical sensitivity (limit of detection (LOD of the DNA asssay for genomic DNA was 1×100~1×102 copies/mL for BA, FT and YP. The LOD for VZV whole organism was 1×10-2 TCID50/mL. The LOD for recombinant controls ranged from 1×102~1×103copies/mL for BA, FT, YP and VM. The RNA assay demonstrated LOD for RNA transcript controls of 1×104~1×106 copies/mL without extraction and 1×105~1×106 copies/mL with extraction for Ebola, RVF, Lassa and HSN. The LOD for dengue whole organisms was ~1×10-4 dilution for dengue 1 and 2, 1×104 LD50/mL and 1×102 LD50/mL for dengue 3 and 4. The LOD without extraction for recombinant plasmid DNA controls was ~1×103 copies/mL (1.5 input copies/reaction for Ebola, RVF, Lassa and HSN. No cross-reactivity of primers and probes used in both assays was detected with common respiratory pathogens or between targeted analytes. Clinical sensitivity was estimated using 264 surrogate clinical samples tested with the BioT DNA assay and 549 samples tested with the BioT RNA assay. The clinical specificity is 99.6% and 99.8% for BioT DNA assay and BioT RNA assay, respectively. The

  13. New studies disputing allegations of bacteriological warfare during the Korean War.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolicka, M

    1995-03-01

    In the television series Korea the Unknown War produced jointly by Thames Television (London) and WGBH (Boston) in 1990, General Matthew Ridgway, Commander in Chief of United Nations forces during the Korean War, called the accusations that the United States waged bacteriological warfare "black propaganda." The charges discredited the United States and, despite denials and many international discussions, have not been completely refuted until new. Following studies in archives previously not available for research and after uncovering new sources, many specific examples of black propaganda were discovered that contained false information and lies discrediting the United States. The mechanism of lies, which convinced the Korean population that bacteriological warfare was going on and that the only way not to become victims of the United States' inhuman cruelty was to fight, are shown in this paper.

  14. MOFwich: Sandwiched Metal-Organic Framework-Containing Mixed Matrix Composites for Chemical Warfare Agent Removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Gregory W; Lu, Annie X; Hall, Morgan G; Browe, Matthew A; Tovar, Trenton; Epps, Thomas H

    2018-02-13

    This work describes a new strategy for fabricating mixed matrix composites containing layered metal-organic framework (MOF)/polymer films as functional barriers for chemical warfare agent protection. Through the use of mechanically robust polymers as the top and bottom encasing layers, a high-MOF-loading, high-performance-core layer can be sandwiched within. We term this multifunctional composite "MOFwich". We found that the use of elastomeric encasing layers enabled core layer reformation after breakage, an important feature for composites and membranes alike. The incorporation of MOFs into the core layer led to enhanced removal of chemical warfare agents while simultaneously promoting moisture vapor transport through the composite, showcasing the promise of these composites for protection applications.

  15. The Military-Entertainment Complex: A New Facet of Information Warfare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Muir

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The second Gulf War will become synonymous with the emergence of fully-fledged information warfare where the military-entertainment complex has so influenced strategic and logistic possibilities that it becomes apparent that the war was waged as entertainment. This is entertainment not as an amusement or diversion but utilising the techniques and tropes of the burgeoning entertainment industry as a means to achieve military objectives. This paper offers a short history of the military-entertainment complex as reality and simulation become fused in the practices of the US military machine. The paper then briefly explores three central aspects of this phenomenon evident in recent developments: the military function of computer games; the role of the Hollywood scenario and the blurring between news and reality TV. Finally the suggestion is made that subverting, co-opting and reconstructing the military-entertainment complex provides new possibilities for alternative strategies of information warfare.

  16. Clinical recognition and management of patients exposed to biological warfare agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, D R; Jahrling, P B; Friedlander, A M; McClain, D J; Hoover, D L; Bryne, W R; Pavlin, J A; Christopher, G W; Eitzen, E M

    1997-08-06

    Concern regarding the use of biological agents--bacteria, viruses, or toxins--as tools of warfare or terrorism has led to measures to deter their use or, failing that, to deal with the consequences. Unlike chemical agents, which typically lead to violent disease syndromes within minutes at the site of exposure, diseases resulting from biological agents have incubation periods of days. Therefore, rather than a paramedic, it will likely be a physician who is first faced with evidence of the results of a biological attack. We provide here a primer on 10 classic biological warfare agents to increase the likelihood of their being considered in a differential diagnosis. Although the resultant diseases are rarely seen in many countries today, accepted diagnostic and epidemiologic principles apply; if the cause is identified quickly, appropriate therapy can be initiated and the impact of a terrorist attack greatly reduced.

  17. How Power-Laws Re-Write The Rules Of Cyber Warfare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David L. Bibighaus

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available All warfare contains and element of randomness. This article will argue that, the kind uncertainty encountered in cyber warfare (Power-Law randomness is fundamentally different from the uncertainty the military has evolved to deal with in the physical world (Gaussian-Randomness. The article will explain the difference between these two kinds of randomness, and how cyber weapons appear to operate under Power-Law randomness. It then will show how in cyberspace, key aspects of strategic thought are based on a flaws assumption of randomness. Finally, this article shall argue that if the American military is going to be effective in cyberspace, it must re-examine the way the military assumes risk, recruits is forces, plans for war and maintains the peace.

  18. The Three Warfares: PLA Soft Power Aspirations Along the Cognitive Dimension

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    Michael Pillsbury, "Strategic Acupuncture ," Foreign Policy, no. 41 (1980), 53. 43 Blasko, The Chinese Army Today: Tradition and Transformation for the...2002), 60. 59 Pillsbury, Strategic Acupuncture , 57–58. 60 Ibid., 54. 61 Ibid., 54. 62 Shambaugh, Modernizing China’s Military: Progress... efficiency of the whole operational system” of warfare would help prevent the PRC from being in a similar disadvantageous position in a future

  19. Hybrid Warfare Dilemmas in the Middle Colonies during the American Revolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-25

    Hybrid Warfare Dilemmas in the Middle Colonies during the American Revolution A Monograph by MAJ William C. Murray II US Army...in the Middle Colonies during the American Revolution 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) MAJ ...OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON MAJ William C. Murray a. REPORT b. ABSTRACT c. THIS PAGE 19b. PHONE NUMBER (include area code) (U) (U) (U) (U) 43 Standard

  20. Toward a Theory of Hybrid Warfare: The Russian Conduct of War During Peace

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Warfare CIS Commonwealth of Independent States DDOS Distributed Denial of Service DIME-FIL Diplomacy, Information, Military, Economics, Finance...for over a week, Estonian government and financial institutions were subjected to a wave of distributed denial of service ( DDoS ) attacks, supposedly...Using a now familiar mix of non-attributable government cyber security organizations and independent hackers, Russia conducted botnet and DDoS attacks

  1. Integrated Non-kinetic Operations: The Frontier of Warfare in Search of Doctrine

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    as Operation GLADIATOR PHOENIX, the operation to operate in and defend the global information grid (GIG), for introducing new strategies to confront...information technology’s vulnerabilities. Thanks to the emphasis of non-kinetic warfare in Operation GLADIATOR PHOENIX, the Navy has outlined a...army has also embraced the benefits of Operation GLADIATOR PHOENIX and the establishment of a unified command dedicated to cyberspace. General

  2. Deterrence in the Human Domain: A COIN Framework to Deterring Unconventional Warfare in Shaping Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-25

    problems of conflicts that impact the human domain, focusing largely on government-to-government relations or shaping military operational conditions .35...Deterrence in the Human Domain: A COIN Framework to Deterring Unconventional Warfare in Shaping Operations A Monograph by MAJ Matthew P...YYYY) 05-25-2017 2. REPORT TYPE Master’s Thesis 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) JUN 2016 – MAY 2017 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Deterrence in the Human

  3. [War and medicine in a culture of peace. 3. Synopsis of chemical warfare agents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piérard, G E

    2002-01-01

    A variety of chemical components can be used as warfare threats directly targeting humans. They can be classified according to their main biological effects as nerve agents, vesicants, lung damaging agents, cyanogen agents and incapacitants. Other chemical agents are water and food contaminants. Still other less aggressive compounds are mainly used to control riots. Smokes, flame materials and herbicides belong to other classes of chemical agents of the warlike armamentum exhibiting a direct effect on man.

  4. Lawfare and hybrid warfare-how Russia is using the law as a weapon

    OpenAIRE

    Mosquera, A.; Bachmann, Sascha-Dominik

    2015-01-01

    This short paper introduces the reader to the mutating military concept of hybrid warfare and one of its implementing methods, the use of law as a weapon. We aim to provide a current, comprehensive definition of the terms “hybrid warfare” and “lawfare”. This submission focuses on the following areas: where law has been/is being used as a method of war, namely the Jus ad bellum, the jus in bello and the law of treaties in international relations.

  5. Determination of Chemical Warfare Agents in Water Samples by Solid Phase Microextraction and GC-FID

    OpenAIRE

    Hussain, Fatima

    2007-01-01

    The Norwegian Defence Research Establishment (FFI) is presently developing a mobile laboratory for the identification of chemical warfare agents (CWA) and related compounds. The laboratory will be used in the field, and it is therefore advantageous that the analytical methods give a high priority to low solvent consumption and minimal need for sample preparation. Solid phase microextraction (SPME) meets these requirements, since the technique is based on automatic extraction and concentration...

  6. Equipping Network Warfare: Industrial-Era Bureaucracies for Information-Era Weapons

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-04-01

    to operational shortfalls. Clearly, there are benefits in following known methods in organizing the cyberspace mission and its capabilities...sid26_gci853845,00.html (accessed 15 December 2008). 9 BX.com Terminology Reference, “Web Year,” http://www.bx.com/dictionary/ ecommerce /Web_year.cfm... benefits of the process, while amplifying the negative aspects of the bureaucracy. Network warfare capabilities are much more vulnerable to

  7. Heme-Containing Metal-Organic Frameworks for the Oxidative Degradation of Chemical Warfare Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-14

    coordinate cobaltous porphyrin site in a metal – organic framework: structural , EPR, and O, Inorg. Chem. Front., (04 2016): 536. doi: 10.1039...SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: This project sought to employ heme-containing metal - organic framework (MOF) materials to carry out the oxidative...15-Apr-2015 14-Jan-2016 Final Report: Heme-Containing Metal - Organic Frameworks for the Oxidative Degradation of Chemical Warfare Agents The views

  8. Acquisition streamlining efforts within the space and Naval Warfare Systems Command.

    OpenAIRE

    McKeever, Michelle Cecille

    1987-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited In 1986, Deputy Secretary of Defense W. H. Taft IV, established an "Acquisition Streamlining Initiative** (ASI) which addresses and attempts to "streamline" the acquisition process and mandated requirements. This research reviews efforts of one Hardware Systems Command—the Space and Naval Warfare Systems Command (SPAWAR) —to implement AS I . In reviewing the five major programs streamlined thus far at -SPAUAR, it w...

  9. Assessing the Role of Surgical Strike Operations in Support of a Special Warfare Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-09

    Penguin Book, 2013), 161. 20 Eric T. Olson, “A Balanced Approach to Irregular Warfare,” The Journal of International Security Affairs (2009): 4-6...volatile Uruzgon district of Chora. The district of Chora is mainly composed of inhospitable desert and steep mountains . The majority of the... mountain passes. Again, SOTF-SE assisted through the employment of the 8th Commando Kandak to disrupt enemy forces through targeted raids and clearing

  10. Advances in toxicology and medical treatment of chemical warfare nerve agents

    OpenAIRE

    Moshiri, Mohammd; Darchini-Maragheh, Emadodin; Balali-Mood, Mahdi

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Organophosphorous (OP) Nerve agents (NAs) are known as the deadliest chemical warfare agents. They are divided into two classes of G and V agents. Most of them are liquid at room temperature. NAs chemical structures and mechanisms of actions are similar to OP pesticides, but their toxicities are higher than these compounds. The main mechanism of action is irreversible inhibition of Acetyl Choline Esterase (AChE) resulting in accumulation of toxic levels of acetylcholine (ACh) at the ...

  11. Air University Research Paper: Asymmetric Warfare - Exposing America’s Weaknesses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-04-01

    AU/ACSC/ 03-1261R/2003-04 AIR COMMAND AND STAFF COLLEGE AIR UNIVERSITY AIR UNIVERSITY RESEARCH PAPER ASYMMETRIC WARFARE - EXPOSING AMERICA’S...Air University Research Paper : Asymmetric Wafare - Exposing America’s Weaknesses 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER...Std Z39-18 Disclaimer The views expressed in this academic research paper are those of the author(s) and do not reflect the official policy or

  12. Aerospace Power in Urban Warfare: Beware the Hornet’s Nest

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-05-01

    Board Task Force on Military Operations in Built-Up Areas ( MOBA )," (Washington, DC: Office of the Undersecretary of Defense for Acquisition and...Smithsonian Institute Press, 1999), 130. 45 Vick, et al., 120. 46 Rebecca A. Grant, "The Radar Game ," Air Force Magazine, February 1999, 52-60. Grant...University Press, 1962. Grant, Rebecca A. "The Radar Game ." Air Force Magazine, February 1999, 52-60. Hawkins, William R. Putting Urban Warfare in

  13. General George Crooks Development as a Practitioner of Irregular Warfare During the Indian Wars

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-09

    SCIENCE Military History by NICHOLAS J. CRUZ, MAJOR, U.S. MARINE CORPS B.A., North Carolina Central University, Durham, North Carolina...interconnectivity the internet would soon provide, the impact of social media, the proliferation of unmanned aerial vehicle technology, and the...continue to prepare, train, and equip for large-scale peer or near-peer conventional warfare, the breadth of the republic’s history teaches that Irregular

  14. Development of Nanocrystalline Zeolite Materials for the Decontamination of Chemical Warfare Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-11-17

    intermediates. Bellamy also found that HD could be decontaminated by 13X zeolites .(10) These previous studies suggest that nanomaterials may have unique...REPORT Development of Nanocrystalline Zeolite Materials for the Decontamination of Chemical Warfare Agents 14. ABSTRACT 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF...The main objective of this research is to use novel nanocrystalline zeolite materials synthesized in our laboratories for the decontamination of

  15. Cyberspace as a Complex Adaptive System and the Policy and Operational Implications for Cyber Warfare

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-22

    accessed 13 February 2014). 66Teresa Degenhard “Between War and Crime: The Overlap between War and Crime: Unpacking Foucault and Agamben’s Studies...Article-2-Revision- for- Foucault -and-Agamben-Degenhardt-July-2013.pdf (accessed 5 April 2014). 26... Foucault and Agamben’s Studies within the Context of the War on Terror.”, 34. 68US Department of Defense, Electronic Warfare, Joint Publication 3-13, I-2

  16. The Rollback of South Africa’s Chemical and Biological Warfare Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-04-01

    chemical and biological warfare plant that received outside aid from South Africa. In assisting Rhodesia, South African researchers continued to...with South African involvement, planted anthrax spores in grain fed to cattle in guerrilla-held areas and caused an anthrax epidemic that struck...ricin and botulinum. Reportedly, they had acquired anthrax, Plague, cholera, E. coli, staph, necrotizing fasciitis , ricin, botulinum, gas gangrene, anti

  17. The association between self-perceived proficiency of personal protective equipment and objective performance: An observational study during a bioterrorism simulation drill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogel, Itay; David, Osant; Balik, Chaya H; Eisenkraft, Arik; Poles, Lion; Shental, Omri; Kassirer, Michael; Brosh-Nissimov, Tal

    2017-11-01

    The recent Ebola virus disease outbreak emphasized the potential misuse of personal protective equipment (PPE) by health care workers (HCWs) during such an event. We aimed to compare self-perceived proficiency of PPE use and objective performance, and identify predictors of low compliance and PPE misuse. An observational study combined with subjective questionnaires were carried out during a bioterror simulation drill. Forty-two observers evaluated performance under PPE. Mistakes were recorded and graded using a structured observational format and were correlated with the subjective questionnaires and with demographic parameters. One hundred seventy-eight HCWs from community clinics and hospitals were included. The mean self-perceived proficiency was high (6.1 out of 7), mean level of comfort was moderate (4.0 out of 7), and mean objective performance was intermediate (9.5 out of 13). There was no correlation between comfort and objective performance scores. Self-perceived proficiency was in correlation with donning and continuous performance with PPE but not with doffing. Clinic personnel performed better than personnel in hospitals (40.3% vs 67.8% with 3 or more mistakes, respectively; P = .001). Demographic characteristics had no correlation with objective or self-perceived performance. Self-perceived proficiency is a poor predictor of appropriate PPE use. The results suggest poor awareness of the possibility of PPE misuse. Copyright © 2017 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Destruction of chemical warfare surrogates using a portable atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Škoro, Nikola; Puač, Nevena; Živković, Suzana; Krstić-Milošević, Dijana; Cvelbar, Uroš; Malović, Gordana; Petrović, Zoran Lj.

    2018-01-01

    Today's reality is connected with mitigation of threats from the new chemical and biological warfare agents. A novel investigation of cold plasmas in contact with liquids presented in this paper demonstrated that the chemically reactive environment produced by atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) is potentially capable of rapid destruction of chemical warfare agents in a broad spectrum. The decontamination of three different chemical warfare agent surrogates dissolved in liquid is investigated by using an easily transportable APPJ. The jet is powered by a kHz signal source connected to a low-voltage DC source and with He as working gas. The detailed investigation of electrical properties is performed for various plasmas at different distances from the sample. The measurements of plasma properties in situ are supported by the optical spectrometry measurements, whereas the high performance liquid chromatography measurements before and after the treatment of aqueous solutions of Malathion, Fenitrothion and Dimethyl Methylphosphonate. These solutions are used to evaluate destruction and its efficiency for specific neural agent simulants. The particular removal rates are found to be from 56% up to 96% during 10 min treatment. The data obtained provide basis to evaluate APPJ's efficiency at different operating conditions. The presented results are promising and could be improved with different operating conditions and optimization of the decontamination process.

  19. Operational advantages of using Cyber Electronic Warfare (CEW) in the battlefield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasar, Nurgul; Yasar, Fatih M.; Topcu, Yucel

    2012-06-01

    While cyberspace is emerging as a new battlefield, conventional Electronic Warfare (EW) methods and applications are likely to change. Cyber Electronic Warfare (CEW) concept which merges cyberspace capabilities with traditional EW methods, is a new and enhanced form of the electronic attack. In this study, cyberspace domain of the battlefield is emphazised and the feasibility of integrating Cyber Warfare (CW) concept into EW measures is researched. The SWOT (Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats) analysis method is used to state the operational advantages of using CEW concept in the battlefield. The operational advantages of CEW are assessed by means of its effects on adversary air defense systems, communication networks and information systems. Outstanding technological and operational difficulties are pointed out as well. As a result, a comparison of CEW concept and conventional EW applications is presented. It is concluded that, utilization of CEW concept is feasible at the battlefield and it may yield important operational advantages. Even though the computers of developed military systems are less complex than normal computers, they are not subjected to cyber threats since they are closed systems. This concept intends to show that these closed systems are also open to the cyber threats. As a result of the SWOT analysis, CEW concept provides Air Forces to be used in cyber operations effectively. On the other hand, since its Collateral Damage Criteria (CDC) is low, the usage of cyber electronic attack systems seems to grow up.

  20. International humanitarian law applied to cyber-warfare: Precautions, proportionality and the notion of ‘attack’ under the humanitarian law of armed conflict

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gill, T.D.; Tsagourias, N.; Buchan, R.

    2015-01-01

    This chapter examines the application of international humanitarian law to cyber warfare in the sense of rising to the level of an armed conflict. Building upon the work of the Tallinn Manual on the Application of International Law to Cyber Warfare, it places particular emphasis on the application

  1. Enfrentando el bioterrorismo: aspectos epidemiológicos, clínicos y preventivos de la viruela Confronting bioterrorism: epidemiologic, clinical, and preventive aspects of smallpox

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Franco-Paredes

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Uno de los grandes logros de la salud pública mundial, la erradicación de la viruela, puede verse mermado por el posible riesgo de bioterrorismo. El debate acerca de la destrucción de los restos del virus en los dos laboratorios de referencia de la Organización Mundial de la Salud ha cambiado diametralmente debido a los eventos terroristas y a la dispersión intencional de Bacillus anthracis ocurridos en poblaciones civiles en Estados Unidos de América en el año 2001. La liberación del virus Variola con fines terroristas constituye un riesgo mínimo no cuantificable, pero desafortunadamente real. El impacto podría ser devastador debido a la elevada morbimortalidad de la enfermedad aunada al pánico y a la desestabilización social que podría ocasionar. Es por ello que el establecimiento de un plan de respuesta, sumado a disponibilidad de vacuna para ser utilizada pos-exposición, es importante dentro de los planes de contingencia contra el bioterrorismo. El reiniciar un programa limitado de vacunación contra la viruela, como parte de dicho plan, ha sido recientemente recomendado por el Comité Asesor de Vacunación, del Centro para el Control de las Enfermedades, pero la vacuna disponible puede causar complicaciones graves e incluso la muerte, por lo que dicha recomendación no ha sido universalmente aceptada. No obstante, el personal médico y de salud pública requiere de información actualizada sobre la viruela y su prevención, ya que ellos son la primera línea de defensa en caso de un posible brote a consecuencia de un ataque bioterrorista. El presente artículo presenta una revisión dirigida a proporcionar al personal de salud un enfoque clínico, epidemiológico y preventivo sobre la viruela.The worldwide eradication of smallpox, a major achievement in public health, is currently threatened by the risk of bioterrorism. The debate on the destruction of the Variola virus in the two reference laboratories of the World Health

  2. Quality of life in chemical warfare survivors with ophthalmologic injuries: the first results form Iran Chemical Warfare Victims Health Assessment Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soroush Mohammad

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Iraq used chemical weapons extensively against the Iranians during the Iran-Iraq war (1980–1988. The aim of this study was to assess the health related quality of life (HRQOL in people who had ophthalmologic complications due to the sulfur mustard gas exposure during the war. Methods The Veterans and Martyrs Affair Foundation (VMAF database indicated that there were 196 patients with severe ophthalmologic complications due to chemical weapons exposure. Of these, those who gave consent (n = 147 entered into the study. Quality of life was measured using the 36-item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36 and scores were compared to those of the general public. In addition logistic regression analysis was performed to indicate variables that contribute to physical and mental health related quality of life. Results The mean age of the patients was 44.8 (SD = 8.7 ranging from 21 to 75 years. About one-third of the cases (n= 50 reported exposure to chemical weapons more than once. The mean exposure duration to sulfur mustard gas was 21.6 years (SD = 1.2. The lowest scores on the SF-36 subscales were found to be: the role physical and the general health. Quality of life in chemical warfare victims who had ophthalmologic problems was significantly lower than the general public (P Conclusion The study findings suggest that chemical warfare victims with ophthalmologic complications suffer from poor health related quality of life. It seems that the need for provision of health and support for this population is urgent. In addition, further research is necessary to measure health related quality of life in victims with different types of disabilities in order to support and enhance quality of life among this population.

  3. Mass Spectrometry Applications for the Identification and Quantitation of Biomarkers Resulting from Human Exposure to Chemical Warfare Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J. Richard; Capacio, Benedict R.

    In recent years, a number of analytical methods using biomedical samples such as blood and urine have been developed for the verification of exposure to chemical warfare agents. The majority of methods utilize gas or liquid chromatography in conjunction with mass spectrometry. In a small number of cases of suspected human exposure to chemical warfare agents, biomedical specimens have been made available for testing. This chapter provides an overview of biomarkers that have been verified in human biomedical samples, details of the exposure incidents, the methods utilized for analysis, and the biomarker concentration levels determined in the blood and/or urine.

  4. U.S. Army Land Warfare Laboratory. Volume 1. Project Report, Appendix A. Documentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-06-01

    A B Corporation , Anywhere, USA DATE OF LETTER OF ACkNOWLEDGMENT: 8 February 1972 SUSPENSE DATE FOR FINAL REPLY: 9 March 1972 REVIEW GROUPS CCI$ENTS...A B Corporation Anywhere, U. S. A. Dear Sir: Your unsolicited proposal No. 123 entitled "ABC System," submitted by your letter of 2 February 1972...RDLW- i-RAO 6 March 1972 A B Corporation Anywhere, U. S. A. Dear Sir: The US Army Land Warfare Laboratory s in-house investigation pertaining to the

  5. Unconventional War and Warfare in the Gray Zone. The New Spectrum of Modern Conflicts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslaw Banasik

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Experiences of the last couple of years indicate that political objectives are increasingly achieved without official declarations of war. Armed forces are used in untraditional ways and the so-called substitute troops begin to play an increasingly bigger part. The article aims to characterize the conflicts of alternative nature below the level of open war that are on the border between war and peace. The content of the article presents the theory of unconventional warfare and its description, and familiarizes the reader with the concept of grey zone conflicts. It further shows the challenges linked to rivalry for influence zones and security provisions.

  6. Design of a channel board used in an electronic warfare target simulator

    OpenAIRE

    Andersson, Peter

    2006-01-01

    A channel board was designed for a DRFM circuit. The DRFM is implemented in a Virtex-4 FPGA from Xilinx. In the future a similar channel board is intended to be used for target echo generation in ELSI which is an electronic warfare simulator at Saab Bofors Dynamics in Linköping. Besides the DRFM circuit the channel board consists of analog-to-digital converters, digital-to-analog converters, Ethernet plug-in board with a microcontroller, voltage regulators, FPGA configuration memory, voltage ...

  7. Information warfare as ICT influence on public consciousness and public opinion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. H. Stadnyk

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The article defines the key aspects of the merits and impact of information warfare on public consciousness and public opinion. In the article, we review the information war not as an auxiliary mechanism for real war, but as a mechanism of affecting the public opinion. The public opinion can not be formed completely (while there is information content, public opinion changes constantly because the information in the hands of the media acts as a real weapon aimed at the mass consciousness. The article discusses in detail the four main factors that determine the effectiveness of the impact of information: 1 information warfare agents that affect the population, mass consciousness, public opinion; 2 information weapon of war; 3 the content itself, the content that is broadcast during the information war; 4 the specifics of mass awareness in different countries, the formation and functioning of their public opinion. And how much information war characteristic of the crisis (as an example to Ukraine since the beginning of the Maidan in 2013, the presentation of information aimed at manipulating public consciousness and, accordingly, the public opinion as the outward expression of consciousness.

  8. Consumer of concern early entry program (C-CEEP): protecting against the biological suicidal warfare host

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fish, Janet D.

    2014-05-01

    Man has used poisons for assassination purposes ever since the dawn of civilization, not only against individual enemies but also occasionally against armies. According to (Frischknecht, 2003)11 article on the History of Biological Warfare, during the past century, more than 500 million people died of infectious diseases. Several tens of thousands of these deaths were due to the deliberate release of pathogens or toxins. Two international treaties outlawed biological weapons in 1925 and 1972, but they have largely failed to stop countries from conducting offensive weapons research and large-scale production of biological weapons. Before the 20th century, biological warfare took on three main forms: (1) deliberate poisoning of food and water with infectious material, (2) use of microorganisms or toxins in some form of weapon system, and (3) use of biologically inoculated fabrics (Dire, 2013)8. This action plan is aimed at the recognition of the lack of current processes in place under an unidentified lead agency to detect, identify, track, and contain biological agents that can enter into the United States through a human host. This action plan program has been identified as the Consumer of Concern Early Entry Program or a simpler title is C-CEEP.

  9. Academic Training Lectures | Stuxnet and Cyber-Warfare | 13-14 January 2016

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    Please note that the next series of Academic Training Lectures will take place on 13 and 14 January 2016. The lectures will be given by Gian Piero Siroli (Università e INFN, Bologna (IT))   Stuxnet and Cyber-Warfare (1/2)​ on Wednesday, 13 January from 11 a.m. to 12 p.m. http://indico.cern.ch/event/438525/ Stuxnet and Cyber-Warfare (2/2) on Thursday, 14 January from 11 a.m. to 12 p.m. http://indico.cern.ch/event/438526/ at CERN, Council Chamber (503-1-001)  Description: The first part of the lecture is devoted to the description of the Stuxnet worm, the first cyber-weapon whose existence has been made public, discovered in 2010 and targeting a specific industrial control system; the worm is responsible for the damaging of many centrifuges at an uranium enrichment facility, with the goal of sabotaging Iran&...

  10. Computational enzymology for degradation of chemical warfare agents: promising technologies for remediation processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Chemical weapons are a major worldwide problem, since they are inexpensive, easy to produce on a large scale and difficult to detect and control. Among the chemical warfare agents, we can highlight the organophosphorus compounds (OP, which contain the phosphorus element and that have a large number of applications. They affect the central nervous system and can lead to death, so there are a lot of works in order to design new effective antidotes for the intoxication caused by them. The standard treatment includes the use of an anticholinergic combined to a central nervous system depressor and an oxime. Oximes are compounds that reactivate Acetylcholinesterase (AChE, a regulatory enzyme responsible for the transmission of nerve impulses, which is one of the molecular targets most vulnerable to neurotoxic agents. Increasingly, enzymatic treatment becomes a promising alternative; therefore, other enzymes have been studied for the OP degradation function, such as phosphotriesterase (PTE from bacteria, human serum paraoxonase 1 (HssPON1 and diisopropyl fluorophosphatase (DFPase that showed significant performances in OP detoxification. The understanding of mechanisms by which enzymes act is of extreme importance for the projection of antidotes for warfare agents, and computational chemistry comes to aid and reduce the time and costs of the process. Molecular Docking, Molecular Dynamics and QM/MM (quantum-mechanics/molecular-mechanics are techniques used to investigate the molecular interactions between ligands and proteins.

  11. Investigating the Relationship Between Drone Warfare and Civilian Casualties in Gaza

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Ann Rogers

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs, better known as drones, are increasingly touted as ‘humanitarian’ weapons that contribute positively to fighting just wars and saving innocent lives. At the same time, civilian casualties have become the most visible and criticized aspect of drone warfare. It is argued here that drones contribute to civilian casualties not in spite of, but because of, their unique attributes. They greatly extend war across time and space, pulling more potential threats and targets into play over long periods, and because they are low-risk and highly accurate, they are more likely to be used. The assumption that drones save lives obscures a new turn in strategic thinking that sees states such as Israel and the US rely on large numbers of small, highly discriminating attacks applied over time to achieve their objectives. This examination of Israel’s 2014 war in Gaza argues that civilian casualties are not an unexpected or unintended consequence of drone warfare, but an entirely predictable outcome.

  12. Zirconium doped nano-dispersed oxides of Fe, Al and Zn for destruction of warfare agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stengl, Vaclav, E-mail: stengl@uach.cz [Institute of Inorganic Chemistry AS CR v.v.i., 250 68 Rez (Czech Republic); Houskova, Vendula; Bakardjieva, Snejana; Murafa, Nataliya; Marikova, Monika [Institute of Inorganic Chemistry AS CR v.v.i., 250 68 Rez (Czech Republic); Oplustil, Frantisek; Nemec, Tomas [Military Technical Institute of Protection Brno, Veslarska 230, 628 00 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2010-11-15

    Zirconium doped nano dispersive oxides of Fe, Al and Zn were prepared by a homogeneous hydrolysis of the respective sulfate salts with urea in aqueous solutions. Synthesized metal oxide hydroxides were characterized using Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area and Barrett-Joiner-Halenda porosity (BJH), X-ray diffraction (XRD), infrared spectroscopy (IR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDX). These oxides were taken for an experimental evaluation of their reactivity with sulfur mustard (HD or bis(2-chloroethyl)sulfide), soman (GD or (3,3'-Dimethylbutan-2-yl)-methylphosphonofluoridate) and VX agent (S-[2-(diisopropylamino)ethyl]-O-ethyl-methylphosphonothionate). The presence of Zr{sup 4+} dopant can increase both the surface area and the surface hydroxylation of the resulting doped oxides, decreases their crystallites' sizes thereby it may contribute in enabling the substrate adsorption at the oxide surface thus it can accelerate the rate of degradation of warfare agents. Addition of Zr{sup 4+} converts the product of the reaction of ferric sulphate with urea from ferrihydrite to goethite. We found out that doped oxo-hydroxides Zr-FeO(OH) - being prepared by a homogeneous hydrolysis of ferric and zirconium oxo-sulfates mixture in aqueous solutions - exhibit a comparatively higher degradation activity towards chemical warfare agents (CWAs). Degradation of soman or VX agent on Zr-doped FeO(OH) containing ca. 8.3 wt.% of zirconium proceeded to completion within 30 min.

  13. The challenges experienced by Iranian war veterans living with chemical warfare poisoning: a descriptive, exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassankhani, Hadi; Taleghani, Fariba; Mills, Jane; Birks, Melanie; Francis, Karen; Ahmadi, Fazlolah

    2010-06-01

    This exploratory, descriptive study investigates the experiences of Iranian war veterans living with chronic disease acquired as a result of chemical warfare. Sulphur mustard (SM) is considered one of the most important agents of chemical warfare and was widely used during the Iran-Iraq conflict in 1980-1988. There are approximately 100 000 Iranian SM casualties who suffer from serious long-term progressive health problems involving their respiratory organs, eyes and skin. Seventeen male Iranian war veterans aged between 30 and 59 years and four victims' family members participated in the study. Data was generated during individual in-depth interviews that used open-ended questions. Grounded theory techniques, including the constant comparative method of concurrent data generation and analysis, were employed in the analysis of data. Preliminary results indicate two main thematic categories: social isolation and physical disability. It is argued that a lack of knowledge about the outcomes of SM poisoning, physical restrictions and difficulty in adjusting socially decreases war veterans' functional capacity and levels of independence.

  14. Next Generation Non-particulate Dry Nonwoven Pad for Chemical Warfare Agent Decontamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramkumar, S S; Love, A; Sata, U R; Koester, C J; Smith, W J; Keating, G A; Hobbs, L; Cox, S B; Lagna, W M; Kendall, R J

    2008-05-01

    New, non-particulate decontamination materials promise to reduce both military and civilian casualties by enabling individuals to decontaminate themselves and their equipment within minutes of exposure to chemical warfare agents or other toxic materials. One of the most promising new materials has been developed using a needlepunching nonwoven process to construct a novel and non-particulate composite fabric of multiple layers, including an inner layer of activated carbon fabric, which is well-suited for the decontamination of both personnel and equipment. This paper describes the development of a composite nonwoven pad and compares efficacy test results for this pad with results from testing other decontamination systems. The efficacy of the dry nonwoven fabric pad was demonstrated specifically for decontamination of the chemical warfare blister agent bis(2-chloroethyl)sulfide (H or sulfur mustard). GC/MS results indicate that the composite fabric was capable of significantly reducing the vapor hazard from mustard liquid absorbed into the nonwoven dry fabric pad. The mustard adsorption efficiency of the nonwoven pad was significantly higher than particulate activated carbon (p=0.041) and was similar to the currently fielded US military M291 kit (p=0.952). The nonwoven pad has several advantages over other materials, especially its non-particulate, yet flexible, construction. This composite fabric was also shown to be chemically compatible with potential toxic and hazardous liquids, which span a range of hydrophilic and hydrophobic chemicals, including a concentrated acid, an organic solvent and a mild oxidant, bleach.

  15. Modern sample preparation techniques for gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of environmental markers of chemical warfare agents use

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terzic, O.; de Voogt, P.; Banoub, J.

    2014-01-01

    The chapter introduces problematics of on-site chemical analysis in the investigations of past chemical warfare agents (CWA) events. An overview of primary environmental degradation pathways of CWA leading to formation of chemical markers of their use is given. Conventional and modern sample

  16. Chemical and biological warfare: Biology, chemistry, and toxicology. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-11-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the physiological effects, physicochemical effects, and toxicology of chemical and biological warfare agents. Citations discuss toxic chemicals, chemical agent simulants, detoxification and decontamination, environmental toxicity, and land pollution. Detection techniques and warning systems are examined in a separate bibliography. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  17. Boyd and the Past: A Look at the Utility of Ancient History in the Development of Modern Theories of Warfare

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-23

    developed while studying air-to-air combat.44 When Boyd looked at the works of armor pioneer Heinz Guderian , he found historical references with... Guderian , Tukhachevsky, Fuller and later Boyd are all adherents of the maneuver warfare as practiced by the Mongols. Boyd went beyond his

  18. Harsh Climates, Poor Transportation, And Irregular Warfare: Logistical Difficulties From Napoleon To The Soviet - Afghan War That Affect Operational Campaigns

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    AU/ACSC/CALDWELL/AY14 AIR COMMAND AND STAFF COLLEGE AIR UNIVERSITY HARSH CLIMATES, POOR TRANSPORTAION , AND IRREGULAR WARFARE: LOGISTICAL...2012. http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-16929522 ( accessed October 24, 2013). Elting, John R. Swords Around a Throne: Napoleon’s Grande Armee. New

  19. Warfare tourism experiences and national identity: The case of Airborne Museum ‘Hartenstein’ in Oosterbeek, the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gieling, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines through an analysis of Dutch warfare tourism whether there is a relationship between the subjective perceived salience of Dutch identity and heritage tourists' motives, emotions and overall satisfaction. Using a social identity theory framework, this study provides a view of

  20. Warfare has changed - so should have methods: Ammunition and weapon performance induced operational risk and safety issues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhagen, T.L.A.; Voorde, M.J. van de

    2010-01-01

    Warfare has changed. Out-of-area operations have increased the awareness that we are unfamiliar with the performance of the current conventional medium and large calibre ammunitions in day-to-day practice. Current ammunition is primarily developed and procured to defeat the traditional ‘steel’

  1. Reevaluation of 1999 Health-Based Environmental Screening Levels (HBESLs) for Chemical Warfare Agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, Annetta Paule [ORNL; Dolislager, Fredrick G [ORNL

    2007-05-01

    This report evaluates whether new information and updated scientific models require that changes be made to previously published health-based environmental soil screening levels (HBESLs) and associated environmental fate/breakdown information for chemical warfare agents (USACHPPM 1999). Specifically, the present evaluation describes and compares changes that have been made since 1999 to U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) risk assessment models, EPA exposure assumptions, as well as to specific chemical warfare agent parameters (e.g., toxicity values). Comparison was made between screening value estimates recalculated with current assumptions and earlier health-based environmental screening levels presented in 1999. The chemical warfare agents evaluated include the G-series and VX nerve agents and the vesicants sulfur mustard (agent HD) and Lewisite (agent L). In addition, key degradation products of these agents were also evaluated. Study findings indicate that the combined effect of updates and/or changes to EPA risk models, EPA default exposure parameters, and certain chemical warfare agent toxicity criteria does not result in significant alteration to the USACHPPM (1999) health-based environmental screening level estimates for the G-series and VX nerve agents or the vesicant agents HD and L. Given that EPA's final position on separate Tier 1 screening levels for indoor and outdoor worker screening assessments has not yet been released as of May 2007, the study authors find that the 1999 screening level estimates (see Table ES.1) are still appropriate and protective for screening residential as well as nonresidential sites. As such, risk management decisions made on the basis of USACHPPM (1999) recommendations do not require reconsideration. While the 1999 HBESL values are appropriate for continued use as general screening criteria, the updated '2007' estimates (presented below) that follow the new EPA protocols currently under development

  2. The Venus "Shell-over-Star" hieroglyph and Maya warfare: An examination of the interpretation of a Mayan symbol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voit, Claudia Ann

    For decades, Maya scholars have associated the Mayan "Shell-Star" (also referred to as "Star-War") hieroglyph with Maya warfare. Put forward by scholars such as Floyd Lounsbury and David Kelley, and later advanced by Linda Schele, David Freidel, Ian Graham, Peter Matthews, Anthony Aveni and others, there are now dozens of published articles and chapters relating the hieroglyph to Venus and warfare. Venus is one of the most notable celestial objects outside of the Sun and Moon and was highly visible to the inhabitants of the Maya world. The Dresden Codex (an astronomical almanac) contains important information about the planet Venus, and the calendar section was deciphered by the librarian and mathematician, Ernst Förstemann in the late 1800s. In his decipherment, he deduced that the numbers contained in the tables must be connected to the orbital period of the planet. There is no other planet with the same orbital period 3 as Venus. Förstemann suggested that the decoded astronomy tables were used by the Maya to determine when to wage war. This interpretation, along with others, like Floyd Lounsbury`s study of Venus and the Long Count date at Bonampak were the seeds that have led to methodological errors that first began to take root in Maya research. The idea of the Venus association with warfare took hold and continues to propagate. Many scholars continue to assert that the "shell-star" glyph is related to warfare events. Others, like Gerardo Aldana, and Stanley Guenter, have recently come forward to reexamine and question the hieroglyph and its relationship, if any, to Maya warfare. I suggest, further, that methodological errors may have occurred along the way. I propose that these errors include data lost in translation, and inaccurate translations. In addition, the statistical analysis of Venus cycles has weak points. If this identification of the errors is correct, we need to re-evaluate the weakened foundation on which we are building our assertions about

  3. Technical Report for DE-FG02-03ER46029 Sugar-Coated PPEs, Novel Nanomaterials and Sensing Modules for Disease and Bioterrorism Related Threats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uwe Bunz

    2003-08-27

    The detection and sensing of biological warfare agents (Ricin, Anthrax toxin), of disease agents (cholera, botulinum and tetanus toxins, influenza virus etc) and of biologically active species is important for national security and disease control. A premiere goal would be the simple colorimetric or fluorimetric detection of such toxins by a dipstick test. It would be desirable to sense 5,000-10,000 toxin molecules, i.e. 10-100 fg of a toxin contained 1-5 mL of sample. Fluorescent conjugated polymers should be particularly interesting in this regard, because they can carry multiple identical and/or different recognition units. Such an approach is particularly valuable for the detection of lectin toxins, because these bind to oligomeric carbohydrate displays. Lectins bind multivalently to sugars, i.e. several covalently connected sugar moieties have to be exposed to the lectin at the same time to obtain binding. The requirement of multivalency of the lectin-sugar interactions should allow a very sensitive detection of lectins with sugar coated conjugated polymers in an agglutination type assay, where the fluorescence of the PPEs disappears upon binding to the lectins. High molecular weights of the used PPEs would mean high sensitivity. Herein we present our progress towards that goal up to date.

  4. Quality of life in chemical warfare survivors with ophthalmologic injuries: the first results form Iran Chemical Warfare Victims Health Assessment Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousavi, Batool; Soroush, Mohammad Reza; Montazeri, Ali

    2009-01-01

    Background Iraq used chemical weapons extensively against the Iranians during the Iran-Iraq war (1980–1988). The aim of this study was to assess the health related quality of life (HRQOL) in people who had ophthalmologic complications due to the sulfur mustard gas exposure during the war. Methods The Veterans and Martyrs Affair Foundation (VMAF) database indicated that there were 196 patients with severe ophthalmologic complications due to chemical weapons exposure. Of these, those who gave consent (n = 147) entered into the study. Quality of life was measured using the 36-item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) and scores were compared to those of the general public. In addition logistic regression analysis was performed to indicate variables that contribute to physical and mental health related quality of life. Results The mean age of the patients was 44.8 (SD = 8.7) ranging from 21 to 75 years. About one-third of the cases (n= 50) reported exposure to chemical weapons more than once. The mean exposure duration to sulfur mustard gas was 21.6 years (SD = 1.2). The lowest scores on the SF-36 subscales were found to be: the role physical and the general health. Quality of life in chemical warfare victims who had ophthalmologic problems was significantly lower than the general public (P < 0.001). The results obtained from logistic regression analysis indicated that those who did not participate in sport activities suffer from a poorer physical health (OR = 2.93, 95% CI = 1.36 to 6.30, P = 0.006). The analysis also showed that poor mental health was associated with longer time since exposure (OR = 1.58, 95% CI = 1.04 to 2.39, P = 0.03) and lower education (OR = 3.03, 95% CI = 1.21 to 7.56, P = 0.01). Conclusion The study findings suggest that chemical warfare victims with ophthalmologic complications suffer from poor health related quality of life. It seems that the need for provision of health and support for this population is urgent. In addition, further research

  5. Transmission Loss and Frequency-Angle-Time Spread: Issues and Model Analysis for the Littoral Warfare Advanced Development Focused Technology Experiment 96-1

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yang, T

    1997-01-01

    ...) sponsored by the Littoral Warfare Advanced Development (LWAD) program. Specifically, the BSDS directional projector was used as the source, an echo repeater was used to simulate the target, and the MUF (multiple frequency...

  6. The Rise and Fall of the Brown Water Navy: Changes in the United States Navy Riverine Warfare Capabilities from the Vietnam War to Operation Iraqi Freedom

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    Gary J. Bjorge , Ph.D. , Member Mark T. Gerges, M.A. , Member Brian J. Gerling, M.S. Accepted this 17th day of June 2005...niche in the special warfare community . This migration is largely undocumented. Finally, although the war in Iraq has brought riverine warfare back...craft of the Dinassauts maintained control of the vital lines of communication over the inland waterways. The actual craft and numbers assigned

  7. Surface-enhanced Raman as a water monitor for warfare agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Kevin M.; Sylvia, James M.; Clauson, Susan L.; Janni, James A.

    2002-02-01

    The threat of chemical warfare agents being released upon civilian and military personnel continues to escalate. One aspect of chemical preparedness is to analyze and protect the portable water supply for the military. Chemical nerve, blister, and choking agents, as well as biological threats must all be analyzed and low limits of detection must be verified. For chemical agents, this generally means detection down to the low ppb levels. Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS) is a spectroscopic technique that can detect trace levels of contaminants directly in the aqueous environment. In this paper, results are presented on the use of SERS to detect chemical and biological agent simulants with an end goal of creating a Joint Service Agent Water Monitor. Detection of cyanide, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide, phosphonates, Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria using SERS has been performed and is discussed herein. Aspects of transferring laboratory results to an unattended field instrument are also discussed.

  8. [Toxicological effects of weapons of mass destruction and noxious agents in modern warfare and terrorism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vucemilović, Ante

    2010-06-01

    Weapons of mass destruction (WMD) best portray the twisted use of technological achievements against the human species. Despite arm control efforts, WMD threat continues to exist and even proliferate. This in turn calls for improvement in defensive measures against this threat. The modern soldier is exposed to a number of chemical, biological, and radiological agents in military and peace operations, while civilians are mainly exposed to terrorist attacks. Regardless of origin or mode of action, WMDs and other noxious agents aim for the same - to make an organism dysfunctional. Because their effects are often delayed, these agents are hard to spot on time and treat. This review presents a biomedical aspect of agents used in warfare and terrorism, including polonium-210, depleted uranium, salmonella, anthrax, genetically modified bacteria, cobweb-like polymer fibre, sarin, and mustard gas.

  9. NETWORK-CENTRIC WARFARE AND SOME PARTICULAR ASPECTS OF LOGISTICS BASED ON NETWORKING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrişor JALBĂ

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Within the framework of the current revolution in military affairs, at the End of the Cold War a new concept was born: the concept of War Based on Computer Networking or NCW Network Centric-Warfare which was established as a central element of modern military operations. Determined by theprogress recorded in the field of communication systems of all types, technology of information (HI-Tech, IT, war based on computer networking brings a change in the war paradigm and its inherent components In this respect, logistics based on computer networking represents one of the ways in which the reality of the battlefield is preserved which enhances the joint perspective upon the military forces.

  10. A war psychiatry approach to warfare in the Middle Byzantine period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ntafoulis, Pavlos

    2016-12-01

    Combat stress cases were traced in historical texts and military manuals on warfare from the Middle Byzantine period; they were mainly labelled as cowardice. Soldiers suffered from nostalgia or exhaustion; officers looked stunned, or could not speak during the battle. Cruel punishments were often enforced. Suicide and alcohol abuse were rarely mentioned. The Byzantines' evacuation system for battle casualties was well organized. Psychological operations were conducted and prisoners-of-war were usually part of them. The Byzantine army had 'parakletores', officers assigned to encourage soldiers before combat. The leaders dealt with combat stress by using their rhetoric skills and emphasizing religious faith in eternal life. The treatment of the 'cowards' was rather similar to modern war psychiatry principles of treatment. No description of PTSD was found. © The Author(s) 2016.

  11. Symptoms of Gulf War veterans possibly exposed to organophosphate chemical warfare agents at Khamisiyah, Iraq.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCauley, L A; Rischitelli, G; Lambert, W E; Lasarev, M; Sticker, D L; Spencer, P S

    2001-01-01

    During the 1991 Gulf War, some Allied troops were potentially exposed to sarin/cyclosarin as the result of the destruction of Iraqi munitions at Khamisiyah. To evaluate the prevalence of past and current symptoms known to be associated with exposure to these chemical warfare agents, the authors conducted a computer-assisted telephone survey of 2,918 U.S. Gulf War veterans. Veterans who had participated in or witnessed the demolition in 1991 were more likely to report historical or extant symptoms than were veterans from other military units. These results should be viewed cautiously because they are based on symptoms recalled nine years after the event without precise characterization of exposure. Nonetheless, the findings suggest that symptoms consistent with low-level sarin exposure may have initially occurred, and health effects may have persisted in the veterans who were nearest to the demolition activity. Further research is warranted.

  12. Love-Wave Sensors Combined with Microfluidics for Fast Detection of Biological Warfare Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Matatagui

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The following paper examines a time-efficient method for detecting biological warfare agents (BWAs. The method is based on a system of a Love-wave immunosensor combined with a microfluidic chip which detects BWA samples in a dynamic mode. In this way a continuous flow-through of the sample is created, promoting the reaction between antigen and antibody and allowing a fast detection of the BWAs. In order to prove this method, static and dynamic modes have been simulated and different concentrations of BWA simulants have been tested with two immunoreactions: phage M13 has been detected using the mouse monoclonal antibody anti-M13 (AM13, and the rabbit immunoglobulin (Rabbit IgG has been detected using the polyclonal antibody goat anti-rabbit (GAR. Finally, different concentrations of each BWA simulants have been detected with a fast response time and a desirable level of discrimination among them has been achieved.

  13. Fate of chemical warfare agents and toxic indutrial chemicals in landfills

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartelt-Hunt, D.L.; Barlaz, M.A.; Knappe, D.R.U.

    2006-01-01

    One component of preparedness for a chemical attack is planning for the disposal of contaminated debris. To assess the feasibility of contaminated debris disposal in municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills, the fate of selected chemical warfare agents (CWAs) and toxic industrial chemicals (TICs......], and two TICs [furan and carbon disulfide] were studied. The effects of both infiltration (climate) and contaminant biodegradability on fate predictions were assessed. Model results showed that hydrolysis and gas-phase advection were the principal fate pathways for CWAs and TICs, respectively. Apart from...... CX and the TICs, none of the investigated compounds was predicted to persist in a landfill for more than 5 years. Climate had little impact on CWA/TIC fate, and biodegradability was only important for compounds with long hydrolysis halflives. Monte Carlo simulations were performed to assess...

  14. Naval electronic warfare simulation for effectiveness assessment and softkill programmability facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lançon, F.

    2011-06-01

    The Anti-ship Missile (ASM) threat to be faced by ships will become more diverse and difficult. Intelligence, rules of engagement constraints, fast reaction-time for effective softkill solution require specific tools to design Electronic Warfare (EW) systems and to integrate it onboard ship. SAGEM Company provides decoy launcher system [1] and its associated Naval Electronic Warfare Simulation tool (NEWS) to permit softkill effectiveness analysis for anti-ship missile defence. NEWS tool generates virtual environment for missile-ship engagement and counter-measure simulator over a wide spectrum: RF, IR, EO. It integrates EW Command & Control (EWC2) process which is implemented in decoy launcher system and performs Monte-Carlo batch processing to evaluate softkill effectiveness in different engagement situations. NEWS is designed to allow immediate EWC2 process integration from simulation to real decoy launcher system. By design, it allows the final operator to be able to program, test and integrate its own EWC2 module and EW library onboard, so intelligence of each user is protected and evolution of threat can be taken into account through EW library update. The objectives of NEWS tool are also to define a methodology for trial definition and trial data reduction. Growth potential would permit to design new concept for EWC2 programmability and real time effectiveness estimation in EW system. This tool can also be used for operator training purpose. This paper presents the architecture design, the softkill programmability facility concept and the flexibility for onboard integration on ship. The concept of this operationally focused simulation, which is to use only one tool for design, development, trial validation and operational use, will be demonstrated.

  15. Postural Stability of Special Warfare Combatant-Craft Crewmen With Tactical Gear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Paul M; Williams, Valerie J; Sell, Timothy C

    The US Naval Special Warfare's Special Warfare Combatant-Craft Crewmen (SWCC) operate on small, high-speed boats while wearing tactical gear (TG). The TG increases mission safety and success but may affect postural stability, potentially increasing risk for musculoskeletal injury. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine the effects of TG on postural stability during the Sensory Organization Test (SOT). Eight SWCC performed the SOT on NeuroCom's Balance Manager with TG and with no tactical gear (NTG). The status of gear was performed in randomized order. The SOT consisted of six different conditions that challenge sensory systems responsible for postural stability. Each condition was performed for three trials, resulting in a total of 18 trials. Overall performance, each individual condition, and sensory system analysis (somatosensory, visual, vestibular, preference) were scored. Data were not normally distributed therefore Wilcoxon signed-rank tests were used to compare each variable (ρ = .05). No significant differences were found between NTG and TG tests. No statistically significant differences were detected under the two TG conditions. This may be due to low statistical power, or potentially insensitivity of the assessment. Also, the amount and distribution of weight worn during the TG conditions, and the SWCC's unstable occupational platform, may have contributed to the findings. The data from this sample will be used in future research to better understand how TG affects SWCC. The data show that the addition of TG used in our study did not affect postural stability of SWCC during the SOT. Although no statistically significant differences were observed, there are clinical reasons for continued study of the effect of increased load on postural stability, using more challenging conditions, greater surface perturbations, dynamic tasks, and heavier loads. 2016.

  16. A Program Against Bacterial Bioterrorism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kemp, Michael; Dargis, Rimtas; Andresen, Keld

    2012-01-01

    for identification of bacteria were introduced as part of the program. All assays and techniques were made accessible for use in diagnosing patients, even when an intentional release was not suspected. Medical expertise on different diseases was established at the department as an integrated part of the program...... fever, tularemia, trench fever, brucellosis, and melioidosis. The implementation of an antibioterrorism program in a clinical diagnostic setting improved the diagnostic possibilities for patients in Denmark and provided new epidemiologic information. It also introduced a number of diagnostic assays...

  17. Detecting Bioterrorism: Is Chemistry Enough?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omberg, Kristin M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-03-13

    This slide shows how most bioaerosol detection systems work. There is a lot of concern in the biothreat community, and in the federal government, about a large-scale aerosolized attack. Because of that, we’ve implemented environmental monitoring programs that use aerosol collectors to continuously monitor for the presence of threat agents in the air. Air samples are usually analyzed using PCR, which is one of the most effective analytical techniques we have for identifying DNA. Experiments and modeling have shown these systems are effective, and can warn public health of an impending crisis in time to mount an effective response.

  18. New England Bioterrorism Preparedness Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-04-04

    Cell in a Fiber-optic Microwell Single Yeast ( Saccharomyces cerevisiae ) Cells Array Calcofluor White 360/440White light SEM images of Single Yeast...anthracis, perform motility test* Growth throughout medium (motile) Growth only near original inoculation stab (non-motile) AustinCC *Minimal...LINK Cartridge Works with Varied Samples • LINK detection from: – Portal Shield air-to-liquid samples seeded with vegetative bacteria – Untreated

  19. Ebola virus: bioterrorism for humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pramodkumar Pyarelal Gupta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ebola virus disease is a severe, often fatal, zoonotic infection caused by a virus of the Filoviridae family (genus Ebolavirus. Ebola virus (EBOV spreads by human to human transmission through contacts with body fluids from infected patients. Initial stages of EBOV are non-specific which makes the differential diagnosis broad. Here in this review article we focused on to show the details of EBOV, from its first case right up to the possible targets to cure this lethal disease. In this study we have shown the statistical survey, epidemiology, disease ontology, different genes coding for different proteins in EBOV and future aspects of it.

  20. Bioterrorism Preparedness for Infectious Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    dispersion would depend on the wind speed and turbulence. They could use vectors, such as fleas and mosquitoes, or rodents. They could choose bombs...medical robotics . Dr. Mogel, a Diplomate of the American Board of Radiology, received his medical training at the University of Pennsylvania after

  1. Nuclear warfare

    CERN Multimedia

    Broda

    1981-01-01

    Le Prof.Broda a étudié à Vienne et Berlin et a travaillé pendant la dernière guerre mondiale en Grande Bretagne pour le conseil de la recherche médicale, notamment sur la chimie de la vision. Il est maintenant Prof. de la chimie, physique et radiochimie à l'Université de Vienne, où il concentre ses travaux sur les méchanisme de transport d'énergie à travers les cellules de membranes.

  2. Toxic Warfare

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-02-01

    suicide squad from the LTTE sea ______________ 34See “FARC Allegedly Using Acid, Tar, Feces to Make Bombs,” El Tiempo , September 6, 2001, accessed from...Program and ser - vices provided by the University of Texas A&M Emergency Re- sponder Training Program. Three interactive training CD-ROMs for the emergency...Bombs,” El Tiempo , September 6, 2001, accessed from FBIS-LAP-20010906000034. “FBI Starts Nationwide Records Check on HAZMAT Truckers,” CNN Online

  3. Electronic Warfare

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-08

    nuclear burst. A high-altitude electromagnetic pulse ( HEMP ) can generate significant disruptive field strengths over a continental-size area. The...portion of the EMS most affected by EMP and HEMP is the radio spectrum. Planning for communications system protection is significant when the potential...international law (e.g., Protocol IV of the 1980 Convention on Certain Conventional Weapons that prohibits the use of laser weapons with a combat function to

  4. Prehistoric Warfare in the American Southwest, by Stephen A. LeBlanc. University of Utah Press, 1999

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard B. Woodbury

    2000-05-01

    Full Text Available The history of archaeology has often, not surprisingly, bene mainly concerned with sites, their excava­tors, and what they found. But of equal importance are the attitudes, beliefs, and assumptions that shape the interpretation of archaeological data. LeBlanc, in Prehistoric Warfare in American Southwest, argues that the long held belief in the essential peacefulness of the prehistoric Anasazi and other South­ western peoples can be shown to be wholly incorrect, and therefore much that has been written about the prehistoric Southwest needs extensive rethinking. Warfare was an important feature of the ancient Southwest, and he presents carefully marshalled evidence, in great details, to uphold his conclusions.

  5. A Comparison of Neutron-Based Non-Destructive Assessment Methods for Chemical Warfare Materiel and High Explosives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E.H. Seabury; D.L. Chichester; C.J. Wharton; A.J. Caffrey

    2008-08-01

    Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis (PGNAA) systems employ neutrons as a probe to interrogate items, e.g. chemical warfare materiel-filled munitions. The choice of a neutron source in field-portable systems is determined by its ability to excite nuclei of interest, operational concerns such as radiological safety and ease-of-use, and cost. Idaho National Laboratory’s PINS Chemical Assay System has traditionally used a Cf-252 isotopic neutron source, but recently a Deuterium-Tritium (DT) Electronic Neutron Generator (ENG) has been tested as an alternate neutron source. This paper presents the results of using both of these neutron sources to interrogate chemical warfare materiel (CWM) and high explosive (HE) filled munitions.

  6. Modeling and Optimal Control of a Class of Warfare Hybrid Dynamic Systems Based on Lanchester (n,1 Attrition Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangyong Chen

    2014-01-01

    hybrid dynamic systems is established based on Lanchester equation in a (n,1 battle, where a heterogeneous force of n different troop types faces a homogeneous force. This model can be characterized by the interaction of continuous-time models (governed by Lanchester equation, and discrete event systems (described by variable tactics. Furthermore, an expository discussion is presented on an optimal variable tactics control problem for warfare hybrid dynamic system. The optimal control strategies are designed based on dynamic programming and differential game theory. As an example of the consequences of this optimal control problem, we take the (2, 1 case and solve the optimal strategies in a (2, 1 case. Simulation results show the feasibility of warfare hybrid system model and the effectiveness of the optimal control strategies designed.

  7. The Logic of Hybrid Warfare: How the Concepts of Depth and Vulnerability Still Shape Russian Operational Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-15

    case further publication or sale of copyrighted images is not permissible iii Abstract The Logic of Hybrid Warfare: How the Concepts of Depth...four conflicts. Further, the Moldovan and Ukrainian conflicts book -ended those in Chechnya and Georgia – begging the question of whether Russian...recent action in Ukraine indicates a brand new operational approach for future operations. This work cautions against such a view. Given this

  8. An examination of the collateral psychological and political damage of drone warfare in the FATA region of Pakistan

    OpenAIRE

    Dengler, Judson J.

    2013-01-01

    CHDS State/Local This research will examine the collateral psychological and political damage of the United States drone warfare program on Pakistani society in the Federally Administered Tribal Areas (FATA), to determine if this is an effective, proactive homeland defense tactic. The use of drone aircraft by the United States government has increased worldwide since this evolving technology was first utilized in 2001. Each drone strike impacts militants, noncombatants, and ordinary civili...

  9. Space and Naval Warfare Systems Command and Overall Navy Needs to Improve Management of Waiver and Deferral Requests

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-08

    system reliability were not, or were not projected to be, satisfied. As a result, the DTS entered and completed IOT &E with unresolved deficiencies...2016-003 ( Project No. D2015-D000AE-0157.000) │ i Results in Brief Space and Naval Warfare Systems Command and Overall Navy Needs to Improve...not request waivers when the program did not meet the certification criteria needed to enter initial operational test and evaluation ( IOT &E

  10. Models, Analysis, and Recommendations Pertaining to the Retention of Naval Special Warfare s Mid-Level Officers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-01

    drawdown for Afghanistan nearing, opportunities to forge an officer corps through actual combat experience are diminishing.”10 B. A CALL FOR...The Analytic Hierarch/Network Process,” in Rev. R. Acad. Cien. Serie A. Mat (RACSAM), submitted by Francisco Javier Giron (Real Academia de Ciencias ...Academia de Ciencias : Spain. Scott, Nathan. Naval Special Warfare Officer Retention Survey. Monterey, CA: NPS Press, September 2013. Whittenberger

  11. A hybrid method for protection against threats to a network infrastructure for an electronic warfare management system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byłak, Michał; RóŻański, Grzegorz

    2017-04-01

    The article presents the concept of ensuring the security of network information infrastructure for the management of Electronic Warfare (EW) systems. The concept takes into account the reactive and proactive tools against threats. An overview of the methods used to support the safety of IT networks and information sources about threats is presented. Integration of mechanisms that allow for effective intrusion detection and rapid response to threats in a network has been proposed. The architecture of the research environment is also presented.

  12. Virtual Warfare: Masculinity, Sexuality, and Propaganda in the Russo-Ukrainian War

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryna Romanets

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the intersection of sexual and political discourses as a particular aspect of the body politics that Russia has employed, among other strategies, in its massive propaganda offensive during the hybrid warfare against Ukraine.While recognizing sexuality as one of the mainstream concepts in political analysis, the paper draws on sexually explicit imagery and idiom used in Russian social media, and public discursive space in general, as propaganda techniques, and maps their “genealogy” within wider sociocultural and political contexts. Being conceptualized in terms of Russian hegemonic masculinity in relation to subordinated femininity and non-hegemonic masculinities of its adversarial others, these setups reveal how sexuality constitutes uneven and contradictory nexuses of power once being co-opted by Putin’s propaganda machine. It is noteworthy that Russia’s neo-imperial discursive tactics of homologizing sexual and political dominance—when supplemented with the official rhetoric of restituting Russia as a great power, Orthodox Christian fundamentalism as an integral part of Russian unique “state-civilization,” state-sanctioned homophobia, and traditional macho gender ideology—contribute quite effectively to sustaining public support in Russia for aggression against Ukraine in the process of Russian reimperialization of the former Soviet space.

  13. Reactions of psychiatric inpatients to the threat of biological and chemical warfare in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strous, Rael D; Ofir, Dana; Brodsky, Ori; Yakirevitch, Janna; Drannikov, Angela; Navo, Nadav; Kotler, Moshe

    2004-04-01

    In the months before the Second Gulf War, the threat of biological and chemical warfare led many Israelis to experience significant stress and mood changes. In this study, we investigated whether this threat affected the subjective mood and behavior of inpatients with schizophrenia and compared the results with effects noted in their clinical staff. Subjects were evaluated at two points in time-2 months before the war and on day 1 of the war-with a specially designed questionnaire and with the Spielberger Scale for Trait Anxiety. Although the responses of the two groups did not differ radically before the war, on the first day of war, significant differences were noted, with patients demonstrating increases in anxiety and level of concern. Both groups reported similar effects on their mood. Patients were more concerned about the potential for the outbreak of World War III, whereas staff were more concerned about economic effects. Female subjects in both groups demonstrated greater anxiety and mood changes after the outbreak of war compared with before the war. Effects observed on the patients may be related to the decreased coping threshold resulting from their illness, which renders psychotic patients more vulnerable to any acute stressor; however, effects on the staff members should not be ignored.

  14. Transmissivity and storage coefficient estimates from slug tests, Naval Air Warfare Center, West Trenton, New Jersey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiore, Alex R.

    2014-01-01

    Slug tests were conducted on 56 observation wells open to bedrock at the former Naval Air Warfare Center (NAWC) in West Trenton, New Jersey. Aquifer transmissivity (T) and storage coefficient (S) values for most wells were estimated from slug-test data using the Cooper-Bredehoeft-Papadopulos method. Test data from three wells exhibited fast, underdamped water-level responses and were analyzed with the Butler high-K method. The range of T at NAWC was approximately 0.07 to 10,000 square feet per day. At 11 wells, water levels did not change measurably after 20 minutes following slug insertion; transmissivity at these 11 wells was estimated to be less than 0.07 square feet per day. The range of S was approximately 10-10 to 0.01, the mode being 10-10. Water-level responses for tests at three wells fit poorly to the type curves of both methods, indicating that these methods were not appropriate for adequately estimating T and S from those data.

  15. Descriptive Epidemiology of Musculoskeletal Injuries in Naval Special Warfare Sea, Air, and Land Operators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovalekar, Mita; Abt, John P; Sell, Timothy C; Wood, Dallas E; Lephart, Scott M

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this analysis was to describe medical chart reviewed musculoskeletal injuries among Naval Special Warfare Sea, Air, and Land Operators. 210 Operators volunteered (age: 28.1 ± 6.0 years, height: 1.8 ± 0.1 m, weight: 85.4 ± 9.3 kg). Musculoskeletal injury data were extracted from subjects' medical charts, and injuries that occurred during 1 year were described. Anatomic location of injury, cause of injury, activity when injury occurred, and injury type were described. The frequency of injuries was 0.025 per Operator per month. Most injuries involved the upper extremity (38.1% of injuries). Frequent anatomic sublocations for injuries were the shoulder (23.8%) and lumbopelvic region of the spine (12.7%). Lifting was the cause of 7.9% of injuries. Subjects were participating in training when 38.1% of injuries occurred and recreational activity/sports when 12.7% of injuries occurred. Frequent injury types were strain (20.6%), pain/spasm/ache (19.0%), fracture (11.1%), and sprain (11.1%). The results of this analysis underscore the need to investigate the risk factors, especially of upper extremity and physical activity related injuries, in this population of Operators. There is a scope for development of a focused, customized injury prevention program, targeting the unique injury profile of this population. Reprint & Copyright © 2016 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  16. Deep sea habitats in the chemical warfare dumping areas of the Baltic Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czub, Michał; Kotwicki, Lech; Lang, Thomas; Sanderson, Hans; Klusek, Zygmunt; Grabowski, Miłosz; Szubska, Marta; Jakacki, Jaromir; Andrzejewski, Jan; Rak, Daniel; Bełdowski, Jacek

    2018-03-01

    The Baltic Sea is a severely disturbed marine ecosystem that has previously been used as a dumping ground for Chemical Warfare Agents (CW). The presence of unexploded underwater ordnance is an additional risk factor for offshore activities and an environmental risk for the natural resources of the sea. In this paper, the focus is on descriptions of the marine habitat based on the observations arising from studies linked to the CHEMSEA, MODUM and DAIMON projects. Investigated areas of Bornholm, Gotland and Gdańsk Deeps are similarly affected by the Baltic Sea eutrophication, however, at depths greater than 70m several differences in local hydrological regimes and pore-water heavy metal concentrations between those basins were observed. During the lifespan of presented studies, we were able to observe the effects of Major Baltic Inflow, that started in December 2014, on local biota and their habitats, especially in the Bornholm Deep area. Reappearance of several meiofauna taxa and one macrofauna specimen was observed approximately one year after this phenomenon, however it's ecological effects already disappeared in March 2017. According to our findings and to the EUNIS Habitat Classification, the three reviewed areas should be characterized as Deep Sea Muddy Sands, while the presence of suspicious bomb-like objects both beneath and on top of the sediments confirms their CW dumpsite status. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Extraordinary Measures: Drone Warfare, Securitization, and the “War on Terror”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romaniuk Scott Nicholas

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The use of unmanned aerial vehicles or “drones,” as part of the United States’ (US targeted killing (TK program dramatically increased after the War on Terror (WoT was declared. With the ambiguous nature and parameters of the WoT, and stemming from the postulation of numerous low-level, niche-, and other securitizations producing a monolithic threat, US drone operations now constitute a vital stitch in the extensive fabric of US counterterrorism policy. This article employs the theories of securitization and macrosecuritization as discussed by Buzan (1991, 2006, and Buzan and Wæver (2009 to understand targeted killing, by means of weaponized drones, as an extraordinary measure according to the Copenhagen School’s interpretation. An overarching securitization and the use of the “security” label warrants the emergency action of targeted killing through the use of drones as an extraordinary measure. We argue that the WoT serves as a means of securitizing global terrorism as a threat significant enough to warrant the use of drone warfare as an extraordinary use of force. By accepting the WoT as a securitization process we can reasonably accept that the US’ response(s against that threat are also securitized and therefore become extraordinary measures.

  18. Hollow fiber-mediated liquid-phase microextraction of chemical warfare agents from water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, D K; Pardasani, Deepak; Gupta, A K; Palit, Meehir; Kanaujia, Pankaj K; Tak, Vijay

    2006-02-24

    Unambiguous detection and identification of chemical warfare agents (CWAs) and related compounds are of paramount importance from verification point of view of Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC). It requires development of fast, reliable, simple and reproducible sample preparation of CWAs from water which is likely to be contaminated during deliberate or inadvertent spread of CWAs. This work describes development of hollow fiber liquid-phase microextraction (HF-LPME) method for efficient extraction of CWAs (such as sarin, sulfur mustard and their analogues) from water followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometric analysis. Extraction parameters, such as organic solvent, agitation, extraction time, and salt concentration were optimized. Best recoveries of target analytes were achieved using 1 microL trichloroethylene as extracting solvent, 1000 rpm stirring rate, 15 min extraction time, and 30% NaCl. Excellent precision was observed with less than 7.6% RSD. The limit of detection by HF-LPME was achieved up to 0.1 microg/L at 30% salt concentration.

  19. Chemical warfare agent detection in complex environments with comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichenbach, Stephen E.; Ni, Mingtian; Kottapalli, Visweswara; Visvanathan, Arvind; Ledford, Edward B., Jr.; Oostdijk, John; Trap, Henk C.

    2003-08-01

    Comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GCxGC) is an emerging technology for chemical separation that provides an order-of-magnitude increase in separation capacity over traditional gas chromatography. GCxGC separates chemical species with two capillary columns interfaced by two-stage thermal desorption. Because GCxGC is comprehensive and has high separation capacity, it can perform multiple traditional analytical methods with a single analysis. GCxGC has great potential for a wide variety of environmental sensing applications, including detection of chemical warfare agents (CWA) and other harmful chemicals. This paper demonstrates separation of nerve agents sarin and soman from a matrix of gasoline and diesel fuel. Using a combination of an initial column separating on the basis of boiling point and a second column separating on the basis of polarity, GCxGC clearly separates the nerve agents from the thousands of other chemicals in the sample. The GCxGC data is visualized, processed, and analyzed as a two-dimensional digital image using a software system for GCxGC image processing developed at the University of Nebraska - Lincoln.

  20. Global physics: from percolation to terrorism, guerilla warfare and clandestine activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galam, Serge

    2003-12-01

    The September 11 attack on the US has revealed an unprecedented terrorism with worldwide range of destruction. It is argued to result from the first worldwide percolation of passive supporters. They are people sympathetic to the terrorism cause but without being involved with it. They just do not oppose it in case they could. This scheme puts suppression of the percolation as the major strategic issue in the fight against terrorism. Acting on the population is shown to be useless. Instead a new strategic scheme is suggested to increase the terrorism percolation threshold and in turn suppress the percolation. The relevant associated space is identified as a multi-dimensional social space including both the ground earth surface and all various independent flags displayed by the terrorist group. Some hints are given on how to shrink the geographical spreading of terrorism threat. The model apply to a large spectrum of clandestine activities including guerilla warfare as well as tax evasion, corruption, illegal gambling, illegal prostitution and black markets.

  1. Raman Spectroscopic Detection for Simulants of Chemical Warfare Agents Using a Spatial Heterodyne Spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Guangxiao; Xiong, Wei; Luo, Haiyan; Shi, Hailiang; Li, Zhiwei; Shen, Jing; Fang, Xuejing; Xu, Biao; Zhang, Jicheng

    2018-01-01

    Raman spectroscopic detection is one of the suitable methods for the detection of chemical warfare agents (CWAs) and simulants. Since the 1980s, many researchers have been dedicated to the research of chemical characteristic of CWAs and simulants and instrumental improvement for their analysis and detection. The spatial heterodyne Raman spectrometer (SHRS) is a new developing instrument for Raman detection that appeared in 2011. It is already well-known that SHRS has the characteristics of high spectral resolution, a large field-of-view, and high throughput. Thus, it is inherently suitable for the analysis and detection of these toxic chemicals and simulants. The in situ and standoff detection of some typical simulants of CWAs, such as dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP), diisopropyl methylphosphonate (DIMP), triethylphosphate (TEP), diethyl malonate (DEM), methyl salicylate (MES), 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES), and malathion, were tried. The achieved results show that SHRS does have the ability of in situ analysis or standoff detection for simulants of CWAs. When the laser power was set to as low as 26 mW, the SHRS still has a signal-to-noise ratio higher than 5 in in situ detection. The standoff Raman spectra detection of CWAs simulants was realized at a distance of 11 m. The potential feasibility of standoff detection of SHRS for CWAs simulants has been proved.

  2. Ultra-Fast Degradation of Chemical Warfare Agents Using MOF-Nanofiber Kebabs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Junjie; Lee, Dennis T; Yaga, Robert W; Hall, Morgan G; Barton, Heather F; Woodward, Ian R; Oldham, Christopher J; Walls, Howard J; Peterson, Gregory W; Parsons, Gregory N

    2016-10-10

    The threat associated with chemical warfare agents (CWAs) motivates the development of new materials to provide enhanced protection with a reduced burden. Metal-organic frame-works (MOFs) have recently been shown as highly effective catalysts for detoxifying CWAs, but challenges still remain for integrating MOFs into functional filter media and/or protective garments. Herein, we report a series of MOF-nanofiber kebab structures for fast degradation of CWAs. We found TiO 2 coatings deposited via atomic layer deposition (ALD) onto polyamide-6 nanofibers enable the formation of conformal Zr-based MOF thin films including UiO-66, UiO-66-NH 2 , and UiO-67. Cross-sectional TEM images show that these MOF crystals nucleate and grow directly on and around the nanofibers, with strong attachment to the substrates. These MOF-functionalized nanofibers exhibit excellent reactivity for detoxifying CWAs. The half-lives of a CWA simulant compound and nerve agent soman (GD) are as short as 7.3 min and 2.3 min, respectively. These results therefore provide the earliest report of MOF-nanofiber textile composites capable of ultra-fast degradation of CWAs. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. The possible role of intravenous lipid emulsion in the treatment of chemical warfare agent poisoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arik Eisenkraft

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Organophosphates (OPs are cholinesterase inhibitors that lead to a characteristic toxidrome of hypersecretion, miosis, dyspnea, respiratory insufficiency, convulsions and, without proper and early antidotal treatment, death. Most of these compounds are highly lipophilic. Sulfur mustard is a toxic lipophilic alkylating agent, exerting its damage through alkylation of cellular macromolecules (e.g., DNA, proteins and intense activation of pro-inflammatory pathways. Currently approved antidotes against OPs include the peripheral anticholinergic drug atropine and an oxime that reactivates the inhibited cholinesterase. Benzodiazepines are used to stop organophosphate-induced seizures. Despite these approved drugs, efforts have been made to introduce other medical countermeasures in order to attenuate both the short-term and long-term clinical effects following exposure. Currently, there is no antidote against sulfur mustard poisoning. Intravenous lipid emulsions are used as a source of calories in parenteral nutrition. In recent years, efficacy of lipid emulsions has been shown in the treatment of poisoning by fat-soluble compounds in animal models as well as clinically in humans. In this review we discuss the usefulness of intravenous lipid emulsions as an adjunct to the in-hospital treatment of chemical warfare agent poisoning.

  4. Healthcare and warfare. Medical space, mission and apartheid in twentieth century northern Namibia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nord, Catharina

    2014-07-01

    In the year 1966, the first government hospital, Oshakati hospital, was inaugurated in northern South-West Africa. It was constructed by the apartheid regime of South Africa which was occupying the territory. Prior to this inauguration, Finnish missionaries had, for 65 years, provided healthcare to the indigenous people in a number of healthcare facilities of which Onandjokwe hospital was the most important. This article discusses these two agents' ideological standpoints. The same year, the war between the South-West African guerrillas and the South African state started, and continued up to 1988. The two hospitals became involved in the war; Oshakati hospital as a part of the South African war machinery, and Onandjokwe hospital as a 'terrorist hospital' in the eyes of the South Africans. The missionary Onandjokwe hospital was linked to the Lutheran church in South-West Africa, which became one of the main critics of the apartheid system early in the liberation war. Warfare and healthcare became intertwined with apartheid policies and aggression, materialised by healthcare provision based on strategic rationales rather than the people's healthcare needs. When the Namibian state took over a ruined healthcare system in 1990, the two hospitals were hubs in a healthcare landscape shaped by missionary ambitions, war and apartheid logic.

  5. Between Female Dialogics and Traces of Essentialism: Gender and Warfare in Christa Wolf's Major Writings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine Wilke

    1993-06-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between memory, writing, and the question of how we define ourselves as gendered subjects is at the center of Christa Wolf's work. Her literary production, starting in the late fifties with a rather naive and un-selfconscious love story, has undergone a dramatic shift. In her more recent texts, Wolf sets out to rewrite classical mythology to make us aware of those intersections in the history of Western civilization at which women were made economically and psychologically into objects. The present essay seeks to locate Christa Wolf's evolving conception of gender and warfare within the contemporary theoretical discussion on identity and the subject sketched briefly above. While of late there has been a wealth of studies into the construction of gender in particular works by Wolf, no scholarly contribution has yet addressed the range of answers regarding those questions in her overall oeuvre. I will argue that whereas Wolf's earlier works present a dialogic conception of gender, her later narratives more and more expound a notion of the essentially more peaceful female subject that is counterposed to the essentially warloving male. In these works "female subjectivity is taken to be capable of articulating itself fully in its radical otherness outside of male discourse," which seems to support ideas of an ontological essence of "woman."

  6. Trade, Diplomacy, and Warfare: The Quest for Elite Rhizobia Inoculant Strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Checcucci, Alice; DiCenzo, George C; Bazzicalupo, Marco; Mengoni, Alessio

    2017-01-01

    Rhizobia form symbiotic nitrogen-fixing nodules on leguminous plants, which provides an important source of fixed nitrogen input into the soil ecosystem. The improvement of symbiotic nitrogen fixation is one of the main challenges facing agriculture research. Doing so will reduce the usage of chemical nitrogen fertilizer, contributing to the development of sustainable agriculture practices to deal with the increasing global human population. Sociomicrobiological studies of rhizobia have become a model for the study of the evolution of mutualistic interactions. The exploitation of the wide range of social interactions rhizobia establish among themselves, with the soil and root microbiota, and with the host plant, could constitute a great advantage in the development of a new generation of highly effective rhizobia inoculants. Here, we provide a brief overview of the current knowledge on three main aspects of rhizobia interaction: trade of fixed nitrogen with the plant; diplomacy in terms of communication and possible synergistic effects; and warfare, as antagonism and plant control over symbiosis. Then, we propose new areas of investigation and the selection of strains based on the combination of the genetic determinants for the relevant rhizobia symbiotic behavioral phenotypes.

  7. Social networks as a new tool of information warfare in the modern world

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. W. Kovalevych

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available With the rapid development of information technologies, especially the Internet, people are becoming increasingly dependent on information that surrounds them. And social networks, where a person spends most of their time, become the ideal instruments of influence on the people consciousness and information warfare. Due to psychological factors ( such as ‘spiral of silence’, the herd instinct, the entire credibility of published information, opinion leaders, the desire for self­realization or replacement of reality that influence the human behavior in the network and the use of models of influence (model of network attack, model of involving users as volunteers, total block model, social networks become a platform for the dissemination of political ideas, ideologies and implementation of the ‘color revolutions’. However, social media play a positive role, especially in the establishment of civil society and the free flow of information. Positive or negative impact of networks primary depends on the purpose of use of social networking tools.

  8. Medical effects of internal contamination with actinides: further controversy on depleted uranium and radioactive warfare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durakovic, Asaf

    2016-05-01

    The Nuclear Age began in 1945 with testing in New Mexico, USA, and the subsequent bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Regardless of attempts to limit the development of nuclear weapons, the current world arsenal has reached the staggering dimensions and presents a significant concern for the biosphere and mankind. In an explosion of a nuclear weapon, over 400 radioactive isotopes are released into the biosphere, 40 of which pose potential dangers including iodine, cesium, alkaline earths, and actinides. The immediate health effects of nuclear explosions include thermal, mechanical, and acute radiation syndrome. Long-term effects include radioactive fallout, internal contamination, and long-term genotoxicity. The current controversial concern over depleted uranium's somatic and genetic toxicity is still a subject of worldwide sustained research. The host of data generated in the past decades has demonstrated conflicting findings, with the most recent evidence showing that its genotoxicity is greater than previously considered. Of particular concern are the osteotropic properties of uranium isotopes due to their final retention in the crystals of exchangeable and nonexchangeable bone as well as their proximity to pluripotent stem cells. Depleted uranium remains an unresolved issue in both warfare and the search for alternative energy sources.

  9. China’s Three Warfares Strategy Mitigates Fallout From Cyber Espionage Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilio Iasiello

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available China is engaged in longstanding cyber espionage against the U.S., as well as other nations, to collect sensitive public and private information in support of national objectives laid out in its 12th Five Year Plan. Foreign governments citing China’s malfeasance have rebuked these activities, a claim vehemently denied by Beijing. In response, China is leveraging the “Three Warfares” an integrated three-prong information warfare strategy to combat these accusations by leveraging Media, Legal, and Psychological components designed to influence the international community. While the United States has threatened the imposition of economic sanctions, Beijing has successfully parried consequential actions by arresting U.S.-identified hackers, thereby demonstrating its commitment toward preserving a stable and peaceful cyberspace. These interrelated “Three Warfares” disciplines have targeted the cognitive processes of the U.S. leadership, as well as the international public’s perception of China as a global threat, thereby having successfully forestalled the implementation of any effective punitive or economic deterrence strategy to include the imposition of cyber sanctions.

  10. Effects of lactoferrin derived peptides on simulants of biological warfare agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sijbrandij, Tjitske; Ligtenberg, Antoon J; Nazmi, Kamran; Veerman, Enno C I; Bolscher, Jan G M; Bikker, Floris J

    2017-01-01

    Lactoferrin (LF) is an important immune protein in neutrophils and secretory fluids of mammals. Bovine LF (bLF) harbours two antimicrobial stretches, lactoferricin and lactoferampin, situated in close proximity in the N1 domain. To mimic these antimicrobial domain parts a chimeric peptide (LFchimera) has been constructed comprising parts of both stretches (LFcin17-30 and LFampin265-284). To investigate the potency of this construct to combat a set of Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria which are regarded as simulants for biological warfare agents, the effect on bacterial killing, membrane permeability and membrane polarity were determined in comparison to the constituent peptides and the native bLF. Furthermore we aimed to increase the antimicrobial potency of the bLF derived peptides by cationic amino acid substitutions. Overall, the bactericidal activity of the peptides could be related to membrane disturbing effects, i.e. membrane permeabilization and depolarization. Those effects were most prominent for the LFchimera. Arginine residues were found to be crucial for displaying antimicrobial activity, as lysine to arginine substitutions resulted in an increased antimicrobial activity, affecting mostly LFampin265-284 whereas arginine to lysine substitutions resulted in a decreased bactericidal activity, predominantly in case of LFcin17-30.

  11. Metabolic Syndrome in Chemical Warfare Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahrzad M. Lari

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available   Introduction: Sulfur mustard (SM, a toxic alkylating gas, can cause serious long-term pulmonary complications such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. Metabolic syndrome (MetS is one of the important comorbidities of COPD. This study was designed to evaluate the frequency of metabolic syndrome in Iranian chemical warfare patients (CWPs with COPD. Materials and Methods: Thirty CWPs with a mean age of 46.93± 6.8 were enrolled in this study. The following parameters were studied in: complete pulmonary function tests, health-related quality of life, serum triglycerides (TG, high density lipoprotein (HDL and fasting blood sugar (FBS levels. Additionally, 32 COPD patients and 56 healthy persons were considered as control groups who were matched to CWPs. Results: We found a statistically significant difference in the frequency of MetS between the COPD patients and the healthy control group (p=0.04. Additionally, we observed a statistically significant difference in the mean HDL levels among these groups (p=

  12. First-line rescue system of Chinese army in non-warfare military operations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei ZHAO

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In the 21st century, non traditional security threats have become increasingly prominent, non warfare military activity has become general trend of global military development, and it has become the main activities of the peacetime arm forces in all countries. Therefore, to carry out and strengthen the medical support in non-war military operations is a long-term strategic task of Chinese Army medical service. The concept about non-war military activities and characteristics of medical support, and the existing problems, and measures of establishment of first-line rescue system are presented in this paper. Under the reformation of military affairs, the front-line ambulance system in non-war military action will work closely around the key security such as disaster relief, peacekeeping operations, public health emergencies and major events. It is necessary to learn the advanced experience from developed countries, and continuously deepen medical security work in non-war military operations on the basis of "non-combat" and "war"-oriented concept. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2016.01.17

  13. COPD assessment test (CAT): simple tool for evaluating quality of life of chemical warfare patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lari, Shahrzad M; Ghobadi, Hassan; Attaran, Davood; Mahmoodpour, Afsoun; Shadkam, Omid; Rostami, Maryam

    2014-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is one of the serious late pulmonary complications caused by sulphur mustard exposure. Health status evaluations of chemical warfare patients with COPD are important to the management of these patients. The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy of the COPD assessment test (CAT) in evaluating the health-related quality of life (HRQOL) of chemical warfare patients with COPD. Eighty-two consecutive patients with stable COPD were enrolled in this study. All subjects were visited by one physician, and the HRQOL was evaluated by the CAT and St. George Respiratory Questionnaires (SGRQs). In addition, a standard spirometry test, 6-min walk distance test and pulse oxymetry were conducted. The severity of the COPD was determined using Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) staging and the body mass index, obstruction, dyspnoea and exercise (BODE) index. The mean age of the patients was 47.30 ± 7.08 years. The mean CAT score was 26.03 ± 8.28. Thirty-five (43%) patients were in CAT stage 3. There were statistically significant correlations between the CAT and the SGRQ (r = 0.70, P = 0.001) and the BODE index (r = 0.70, P = 0.001). A statistically significant inverse correlation was found between the CAT score and the forced expiratory volume in 1 s (r = -0.30, P = 0.03). Our results demonstrated that the CAT is a simple and valid tool for assessment of HRQOL in chemical warfare patients with COPD and can be used in clinical practice. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Identification of vapor-phase chemical warfare agent simulants and rocket fuels using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stearns, Jaime A.; McElman, Sarah E.; Dodd, James A.

    2010-05-01

    Application of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) to the identification of security threats is a growing area of research. This work presents LIBS spectra of vapor-phase chemical warfare agent simulants and typical rocket fuels. A large dataset of spectra was acquired using a variety of gas mixtures and background pressures and processed using partial least squares analysis. The five compounds studied were identified with a 99% success rate by the best method. The temporal behavior of the emission lines as a function of chamber pressure and gas mixture was also investigated, revealing some interesting trends that merit further study.

  15. Heat exchange during encapsulation in a Chemical-Warfare Agent Protective Patient Wrap in four hot environments. Technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephenson, L.A.; Kolka, M.A.; Allan, A.E.; Santee, W.R.

    1987-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine safe encapsulation time limits in four hot environments including a simulated solar heat load and thereby generate an equation predicting safe time limits for hot environments. Eight male subjects were studied during encapsulation in a Chemical Warfare Agent Protective Patient Wrap in each of four environments. Rectal temperature, mean skin temperature, mean body temperature air temperature and dew point temperature within the wrap and wrap temperature were measured every minute. Metabolic rate was measured during encapsulation by partitional calorimetry. The data shows that safe encapsulation time is severely limited in Hot/Dry and Hot/Wet environments when a solar heat load is included.

  16. Chemical Warfare Materiel in Sediment at a Deep-Water Discarded Military Munitions Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, C. W.; Bissonnette, M. C.; Edwards, M.; Shjegstad, S. M.

    2016-12-01

    Understanding the release and transformation of chemical agent (CA) at underwater discarded military munitions (DMM) sites is essential to determine the potential risk to human health and impact on the ocean environment; yet few studies have been conducted at sites in excess of 250 m, the depth at which most U.S. CA munitions were disposed. Maritime construction workers installing cables or pipelines at a CA DMM site, as well as fishermen and scientific researchers deploying bottom-contact gear, represent possible exposure pathways to human receptors. The Hawai`i Undersea Military Munitions Assessment (HUMMA) sought to characterize a historic munitions sea-disposal site at depths between 400-650 m. During the 2014 HUMMA Sampling Survey, the Jason 2 remotely operated vehicle was used to collect sediments within two meters of suspected World War II chemical munitions, confirmed to be 100-lb M47 series bombs containing sulfur mustard. When environmental media was brought to the surface, samples were screened for distilled sulfur mustard (HD) and related agent breakdown products (ABP) (collectively referred to as chemical warfare materiel [CWM]). Detectable concentrations of HD and/or its ABP 1,4-dithiane were found in sediments collected at all CA DMM sites; HD was also detected at two control sites. The location and extent of munitions casing deterioration strongly influenced the distribution and level of CWM in sediment. The interior of the casing contained levels of CWM orders of magnitudes higher than that observed in the surrounding sediment at one meter distance, indicating the majority of the CWM is hydrolyzed as it is released from the munitions casing and a fraction of the fill materiel persists in the environment for decades following disposal. Although the potential for future site users to become exposed to CWA in recovered sediments and debris exists, the level of risk is significantly mitigated by the depth and location of the sea-disposal site.

  17. Tuning Mobility Separation Factors of Chemical Warfare Agent Degradation Products via Selective Ion-Neutral Clustering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwantwi-Barima, Pearl; Ouyang, Hui; Hogan, Christopher J; Clowers, Brian H

    2017-11-21

    Combining experimental data with computational modeling, we illustrate the capacity of selective gas-phase interactions using neutral gas vapors to yield an additional dimension of gas-phase ion mobility separation. Not only are the mobility shifts as a function of neutral gas vapor concentration reproducible, but also the selective alteration of mobility separation factors is closely linked to existing chemical functional groups. Such information may prove advantageous in elucidating chemical class and resolving interferences. Using a set of chemical warfare agent simulants with nominally the same reduced mobility values as a test case, we illustrate the ability of the drift-gas doping approach to achieve separation of these analytes. In nitrogen, protonated forms of dimethyl methyl phosphonate (DMMP) and methyl phosphonic acid (MPA) exhibit the reduced mobility values of 1.99 ± 0.01 cm2 V-1s-1 at 175 °C. However, when the counter current drift gas of the system is doped with 2-propanol at 20 μL/h, full baseline resolution of the two species is possible. By varying the concentration of the neutral modifier, the separation factor of the respective clusters can be adjusted. For the two species examined and at a 2-propanol flow rate of 160 μL/h, MPA demonstrated the greatest shift in mobility (1.58 cm2V-1s-1) compared the DMMP monomer (1.63 cm2V-1s-1). Meanwhile, the DMMP dimer experienced no change in mobility (1.45 cm2V-1s-1). The enhancement of separation factors appears to be brought about by the differential clustering of neutral modifiers onto different ions and can be explained by a model which considers the transient binding of a single 2-propanol molecule during mobility measurements. Furthermore, the application of the binding models not only provides a thermodynamic foundation for the results obtained but also creates a predictive tool toward a quantitative approach.

  18. Advances in toxicology and medical treatment of chemical warfare nerve agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moshiri, Mohammd; Darchini-Maragheh, Emadodin; Balali-Mood, Mahdi

    2012-11-28

    Organophosphorous (OP) Nerve agents (NAs) are known as the deadliest chemical warfare agents. They are divided into two classes of G and V agents. Most of them are liquid at room temperature. NAs chemical structures and mechanisms of actions are similar to OP pesticides, but their toxicities are higher than these compounds. The main mechanism of action is irreversible inhibition of Acetyl Choline Esterase (AChE) resulting in accumulation of toxic levels of acetylcholine (ACh) at the synaptic junctions and thus induces muscarinic and nicotinic receptors stimulation. However, other mechanisms have recently been described. Central nervous system (CNS) depression particularly on respiratory and vasomotor centers may induce respiratory failure and cardiac arrest. Intermediate syndrome after NAs exposure is less common than OP pesticides poisoning. There are four approaches to detect exposure to NAs in biological samples: (I) AChE activity measurement, (II) Determination of hydrolysis products in plasma and urine, (III) Fluoride reactivation of phosphylated binding sites and (IV) Mass spectrometric determination of cholinesterase adducts. The clinical manifestations are similar to OP pesticides poisoning, but with more severity and fatalities. The management should be started as soon as possible. The victims should immediately be removed from the field and treatment is commenced with auto-injector antidotes (atropine and oximes) such as MARK I kit. A 0.5% hypochlorite solution as well as novel products like M291 Resin kit, G117H and Phosphotriesterase isolated from soil bacterias, are now available for decontamination of NAs. Atropine and oximes are the well known antidotes that should be infused as clinically indicated. However, some new adjuvant and additional treatment such as magnesium sulfate, sodium bicarbonate, gacyclidine, benactyzine, tezampanel, hemoperfusion, antioxidants and bioscavengers have recently been used for OP NAs poisoning.

  19. Advances in toxicology and medical treatment of chemical warfare nerve agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moshiri Mohammd

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Organophosphorous (OP Nerve agents (NAs are known as the deadliest chemical warfare agents. They are divided into two classes of G and V agents. Most of them are liquid at room temperature. NAs chemical structures and mechanisms of actions are similar to OP pesticides, but their toxicities are higher than these compounds. The main mechanism of action is irreversible inhibition of Acetyl Choline Esterase (AChE resulting in accumulation of toxic levels of acetylcholine (ACh at the synaptic junctions and thus induces muscarinic and nicotinic receptors stimulation. However, other mechanisms have recently been described. Central nervous system (CNS depression particularly on respiratory and vasomotor centers may induce respiratory failure and cardiac arrest. Intermediate syndrome after NAs exposure is less common than OP pesticides poisoning. There are four approaches to detect exposure to NAs in biological samples: (I AChE activity measurement, (II Determination of hydrolysis products in plasma and urine, (III Fluoride reactivation of phosphylated binding sites and (IV Mass spectrometric determination of cholinesterase adducts. The clinical manifestations are similar to OP pesticides poisoning, but with more severity and fatalities. The management should be started as soon as possible. The victims should immediately be removed from the field and treatment is commenced with auto-injector antidotes (atropine and oximes such as MARK I kit. A 0.5% hypochlorite solution as well as novel products like M291 Resin kit, G117H and Phosphotriesterase isolated from soil bacterias, are now available for decontamination of NAs. Atropine and oximes are the well known antidotes that should be infused as clinically indicated. However, some new adjuvant and additional treatment such as magnesium sulfate, sodium bicarbonate, gacyclidine, benactyzine, tezampanel, hemoperfusion, antioxidants and bioscavengers have recently been used for OP NAs poisoning.

  20. Heat exchange during encapsulation in a chemical warfare agent protective patient wrap in four hot environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephenson, L.A.; Kolka, M.A.; Allan, A.E.; Santee, W.R.

    1988-04-01

    Tolerable encapsulation time in a Chemical Warfare Agent Protective Patient Wrap (dry insulative value = 1.44 clo; permeability index = 0.25) was determined in four hot environments including a simulated solar heat load (1152 W.m-2) for eight males. Mean body temperature (Tb), evaporative heat loss (EHL), dry heat gain (R + C), metabolic rate (M), and net heat flow (Msk) were measured or calculated from the heat balance equation. The ambient temperature (Ta) ranged from 54.7 degrees C (I) to 35.7 degrees C (IV) and the relative humidity ranged from 17% (I) to 63% (IV). EHL ranged from 173.5 W.m-2 (IV) to 277.8 W.m-2 (I) at min 30 of encapsulation. R + C ranged from -129 W.m-2 (IV) to -230 W.m-2 (I) at that time and Tb averaged 37.6(+/- 0.3) degrees C (IV) and 38.1(+/- 0.2) degrees C (I). The average time of encapsulation ranged from 61.8(+/- 0.2) degrees C (I). The average time of encapsulation ranged from 61.8(+/- 13.2) min (IV) to 38.4(+/- 5.0) min (I). A multiple linear regression equation to predict tolerable encapsulation was developed. These data show that tolerable encapsulation is severely limited in hot environments which have a marked solar heat load. A preliminary study (n = 2) indicated that encapsulation time in 54.7 degrees C/17%rh could be extended by some 23 min by covering the WRAP with wetted towels, thereby decreasing body heat storage by enhancing EHL from the surface of the WRAP.

  1. Developmental Testing of Liquid and Gaseous/Vaporous Decontamination on Bacterial Spores and Other Biological Warfare Agents on Military Relevant Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-11

    Vaporous Decontamination on Bacterial Spores and Other Biological Warfare Agents on Military-Relevant Surfaces 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT...biological decontamination protocol to analyze the efficacy of liquid and gaseous/vaporous decontaminants on military-relevant surfaces. The...acquisition program, and are not intended for operational testing. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Decontaminant ; spore-forming; vegetative; virus

  2. System architecture and operational analysis of medium displacement unmanned surface vehicle sea hunter as a surface warfare component of distributed lethality

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-01

    NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA THESIS Approved for public release. Distribution is unlimited. SYSTEM ARCHITECTURE ...TITLE AND SUBTITLE SYSTEM ARCHITECTURE AND OPERATIONAL ANALYSIS OF MEDIUM DISPLACEMENT UNMANNED SURFACE VEHICLE SEA HUNTER AS A SURFACE WARFARE...traceability, requirements and capabilities while determining the architecture framework in accordance with the Department of Defense Architectural

  3. The United States Navy’s Ability to Counter the Diesel and Nuclear Submarine Threat With Long-Range Antisubmarine Warfare Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-05-31

    patrol have a future? U.S. Naval Institute Proceedings, April, 74-77. Knowles , John. 1998. Out of the blue: Airborne maritime patrol goes littoral...Naval Intelligence, 13 April. _________. 1999b. Submarine warfare in the 21st century. Statement of Rear Admiral Malcom I. Fages, USN, Director of

  4. Proceedings of the 4th Workshop on ICT Uses in Warfare and the Safeguarding of Peace 2012 (IWSP 2012), Protea Hotel Balalaika, Sandton, 16 August 2012

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Niekerk, B

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available been developed by South Africans in order to meet the challenges delivered by globalisation in terms of information security. The workshop will be hosted by the CSIR Defence, Peace, Safety and Security s (DPSS) Command, Control, and Information Warfare...

  5. Impact of psychological problems in chemical warfare survivors with severe ophthalmologic complication, a cross sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghaedi Gholamhosein

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sulfur mustard (SM has been used as a chemical warfare agent since the early twentieth century. Despite the large number of studies that have investigated SM induced ocular injuries, few of those studies have also focused on the psychological health status of victims. This study has evaluated the most prominent influences on the psychological health status of patients with severe SM induced ocular injuries. Methods This descriptive study was conducted on 149 Iranian war veterans with severe SM induced eye injuries. The psychological health status of all patients was assessed using the Iranian standardized Symptom Check List 90-Revised (SCL90-R questionnaire. The results of patients' Global Severity Index (GSI were compared with the optimal cut-off point of 0.4 that has previously been calculated for GSI in Iranian community. The Mann-Whitney U test, T tests and effect sizes (using Cohen's d were employed as statistical methods. Data were analyzed using SPSS software. Results The mean age of patients was 44.86 (SD = 8.7 and mean duration of disease was 21.58 (SD = 1.20 years. Rate of exposure was once in 99 (66.4% cases. The mean GSI (1.46 of the study group was higher compared to standardized cut off point (0.4 of the Iranian community. The results of this study showed that the mean of total GSI score was higher in participants with lower educational levels (effect size = 0.507, unemployment (effect size = 0.464 and having more than 3 children (effect size = 0.62. Among the participants, 87 (58.4% cases had a positive psychological history for hospitalization or receiving outpatient cares previously and 62 (41.6% cases had a negative psychological history. In addition, the mean of GSI in participants with negative psychological history was lower than those with positive psychological history (Mean Change Difference = -0.621 with SD = 0.120. There was a significant difference between positive and negative psychological history

  6. Exposures recorded for participants in the UK Chemical Warfare Agent Human Research Programme, 1941-1989.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keegan, T J; Walker, S A S; Brooks, C; Langdon, T; Linsell, L; Maconochie, N E S; Doyle, P; Fletcher, T; Nieuwenhuijsen, M J; Carpenter, L M; Venables, K M

    2009-01-01

    This study describes exposures to military veterans who participated between 1941 and 1989 in British research at Porton Down on the effects of exposure to chemical warfare agents and to defences against those agents. The study is part of a programme of epidemiological research initiated in response to service veterans' concerns about possible long-term health effects of their participation. All entries in 97 books held in the Porton Down historical experimental archive covering the years 1939-1989 were reviewed. For tests between April 1941 and December 1989, data were abstracted on chemicals used, with additional detail abstracted for tests involving vesicants and nerve agents. For tests recorded during 1939-1941, similar data were abstracted for a representative sample of tests. Historical data were abstracted for 17 303 veterans included in the cohort study of 18,276 servicemen who took part in tests at Porton Down between 1941 and 1989. The median number of days per veteran on which tests were carried out was 2 days. The median difference between the last and first day of testing was 4 days. A large number of chemicals were tested over this period (n = 492). The type of chemical tested varied over time. Exposures were often modified by respirator use or use of protective clothing or protective equipment. It was possible to assign a quantitative measure of cumulative exposure to 73% of veterans exposed to the vesicant sulphur mustard--3491 (34%) of exposed veterans had cumulative exposures > or =10.63 mg and for 70% of veterans exposed to the nerve agent sarin--658 (29%) of exposed veterans had cumulative exposures > or =15.0 mg min m(-3). Ninety-three per cent of veterans exposed to sulphur mustard were classified to a semi-quantitative scale of dermal effect--3771 (37%) had a vesicle or necrosed area, and 69% of veterans exposed to sarin could be categorized by change in blood cholinesterase activity--1033 (31%) had a depression in cholinesterase activity of

  7. Anthropogenic landforms of warfare origin and their ecological significance: the Verdun Forest, NE France

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Matos Machado, Rémi; Amat, Jean-Paul; Arnaud-Fassetta, Gilles; Bétard, François; Bilodeau, Clélia; Jacquemot, Stéphanie; Toumazet, Jean-Pierre

    2017-04-01

    By its unprecedented industrial character, the First World War marked landscapes like no other conflict in the world. As a result of artillery bombardment and building facilities, the relief suffered major disturbances giving rise to millions anthropogenic landforms of warfare origin on the Western front: shell craters, trenches, shelters and gun sites. This landscape made of bumps and holes that dominated the lands of West Flanders and North-eastern France during the four years of war took chaotic aspects on the great battle sites. In some areas, substrate crushing by repeated bombings resulted in a field lowering of several metres. Although these geomorphological legacies of war are still present on these scarred lands, their effects on local environment and on present-day biodiversity patterns are not fully understood. On the battlefield of Verdun, where a huge number and range of conflict-induced landforms may be observed, special attention is being paid to the ecological significance of these anthropogenic landforms in a current landscape matrix dominated by forest. In 2013, an airborne LiDAR mission conducted over the battlefield has brought to light the relief inherited from the fighting that was until now concealed by the Verdun forest planted in the 1930's. Through a digital terrain model (DTM) with centimetre level accuracy, it is now possible to observe the smallest traces of the fighting. A first programmatic mapping work allowed to inventory and to locate these reliefs on the whole 10,000 hectares covered by the DTM. Also, the calculation of their geometry enabled us to quantify the erosion rate due to the military activities on the battlefield. On the basis of these morphometric measurements, a typology was developed to better appreciate the morphological diversity of conflict-induced landforms. The results show that these anthropogenic landforms are generally hollow. Because of this particular morphology, the conflict-induced landforms provide

  8. Estimating areas threatened by contamination from leaking chemical warfare agents dumped into the Baltic Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakacki, Jaromir; Przyborska, Anna; Andrzejewski, Jan

    2017-04-01

    Approximately 60,000 tons of chemical munitions were dumped into the Baltic Sea after World War II (the exact amount is unknown and some sources estimate it as more than 200,000 tons). Dumped munitions still pose a risk of leakage caused by erosion and corrosion, and it is important to know the danger areas. Because of wide dispersion of the dumped munitions, modelling is only one tool that could provide wide image of physical state of the sea at all locations and which could also be used for analysing contamination during a potential leakage. Obviously, it is possible to take samples at each dumpsite, but modelling also allows to develop possible scenarios of leakages under specific physical conditions. For the purpose of analysis of potential leakage a high-resolution model (HRM) of the contamination will be embedded in the hydrodynamic model (HM) of the Baltic Sea. The HRM will use data from general circulation model results of estimated resolution of nearly 2 km. The Parallel Ocean Program will be implemented as the HM for the whole Baltic Sea. Atmospheric data from regional implementation of the Weather Research and Forecasting System (WRF) have been used as the top boundary conditions of the HM, and sea level data from Gothenburg had been included into model barotropic equation as lateral boundary conditions. Passive tracer will represent the contamination in the HRM and horizontal resolution of the HRM will be close to 50 meters. Passive tracers will also be implemented in the HM - for comparison of the results. For proper representation of potential leakage of chemical warfare agents the HRM will have included diffusion and advection processes. The results from the HM are going to be interpolated into the HRM domain and then integration will be performed. Based on the implemented simulations, estimated contaminated area and its comparison from the HRM as well as from the HM will be presented. The research work was fund by the European Union (European

  9. Coalition Warfare Program (CWP): secure policy controlled information query and dissemination over a Bices network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toth, Andrew; Pham, Tien; Karr, Todd; Bent, Graham; Harries, Dominic; Knox, Alan

    2013-05-01

    In 2006, the US Army Research Laboratory (ARL) and the UK Ministry of Defence (MoD) established a collaborative research alliance with academia and industry, called the International Technology Alliance (ITA) to address fundamental issues concerning Network and Information Sciences. Under the ITA research program, a US-UK transition project on "ITA Policy Controlled Information Query and Dissemination" was funded in 2011 by OSD's Coalition Warfare Program (CWP). The goal of this CWP project is to develop an extensible capability of performing distributed federated query and information dissemination across a coalition network of distributed disparate data/information sources with access­ controlled policies. The CWP project is lead by US Army Research Laboratory (ARL) and UK Defence Science Technology Laboratory (Dstl) with software development by IBM UK and IBM US. The CWP project exploits two key technology components developed within the ITA, namely the Gaian Database and integrated Access Policy Decision and Enforcement mechanisms. The Gaian Database (GaianDB) is a Dynamic Distributed Federated Database (DDFD) that addresses a need to share information among coalition members by providing a means for policy-controlled access to data across a network of heterogeneous data sources. GaianDB implements a SQL-compliant Store-Locally-Query-Anywhere (SLQA) approach providing software applications with global access to data from any node in the database network via standard SQL queries. Security policy is stored locally and enforced at the database node level, reducing potential for unauthorized data access and waste of network bandwidth. A key metric of success for a CWP project is the transition of coalition-related technology from TRL-3 or 4 to TRL-6 or higher. Thus, the end goal of this CWP project was to demonstrate the GaianDB and policy technology within an operational environment at the NATO Intelligence Fusion Centre (NIFC) at Molesworth RAF. An initial

  10. Capillary zone electrophoresis analysis and detection of mid-spectrum biological warfare agents. Suffield memorandum No. 1463

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boulet, C.A.

    1995-12-31

    Mid-spectrum biological warfare agents such as proteins, peptides, and toxins are often difficult to analyze and often require individually developed assay methods for detection and identification. In this regard, capillary electrophoresis is an important, emerging technique for separation and quantitation of peptides and proteins, providing separation efficiencies up to two orders of magnitude greater than high performance liquid chromatography. The technique can also analyze a broad range of compounds, has a simple instrument design which can be automated, and has low sample volume requirements. In this study, a highly efficient and reproducible capillary zone electrophoresis method was developed to separate and identify a series of nine peptides of defense interest including bradykinin, leucine enkephalin, and oxytocin. The paper demonstrates three strategies which could be used in a fully automated field detection and identification system for unknown peptides.

  11. NATO Advanced Research Workshop on Fluorescence and other Optical Properties of Biological Particles for Biological Warfare Agent Sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Hoekstra, Alfons; Videen, Gorden; Optics of Biological Particles

    2007-01-01

    This book covers the optics of single biological particles, both theory and experiment, with emphasis on Elastic Light Scattering and Fluorescence. It deals with the optics of bacteria (bio-aerosols), marine particles (selected phytoplankton communities) and red and white blood cells. Moreover, there are dedicated chapters on a general theory for scattering by a cell, and modelling and simulation of scattering by inhomogeneous biological cells. Finally, one chapter is dedicated to astro-biological signatures, discussing the possibilities for detecting non-terrestrial biological material. The volume has up-to-date discussions on new experimental and numerical techniques, and many examples of applications of these techniques in real-life systems, as used to detect and characterize e.g. biological warfare agents or human blood cells.

  12. Discrimination of chemical warfare simulants via multiplex coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering and multivariate statistical analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, John J.; Farrell, Mikella E.; Pellegrino, Paul M.

    2014-02-01

    Multiplex coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (MCARS) is used to detect several chemical warfare simulants, such as dimethyl methylphosphonate and 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide, with high specificity. The spectral bandwidth of the femtosecond laser pulse used in these studies is sufficient to coherently and simultaneously drive all the vibrational modes in the molecule of interest. Evidence shows that MCARS is capable of overcoming common sensitivity limitations of spontaneous Raman scattering, thus allowing for the detection of the target material in milliseconds with standard, uncooled universal serial bus spectrometers as opposed to seconds with cooled, intensified CCD-based spectrometers. In addition, the obtained MCARS spectrum of the investigated sample provides multiple unique signatures. These signatures are used in an off-line multivariate statistical analysis allowing for the material's discrimination with high fidelity.

  13. Biological warfare warriors, secrecy and pure science in the Cold War: how to understand dialogue and the classifications of science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bud, Robert

    2014-01-01

    This paper uses a case study from the Cold War to reflect on the meaning at the time of the term 'Pure Science'. In 1961, four senior scientists from Britain's biological warfare centre at Porton Down visited Moscow both attending an International Congress and visiting Russian microbiological and biochemical laboratories. The reports of the British scientists in talking about a limited range of topics encountered in the Soviet Union expressed qualities of openness, sociologists of the time associated with pure science. The paper reflects on the discourses of "Pure Science", secrecy and security in the Cold War. Using Bakhtin's approach, I suggest the cordial communication between scientists from opposing sides can be seen in terms of the performance, or speaking, of one language among several at their disposal. Pure science was the language they were allowed to share outside their institutions, and indeed political blocs.

  14. Wearable Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Fabrics Produced by Knitting Flexible Wire Electrodes for the Decontamination of Chemical Warfare Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Heesoo; Seo, Jin Ah; Choi, Seungki

    2017-01-01

    One of the key reasons for the limited use of atmospheric pressure plasma (APP) is its inability to treat non-flat, three-dimensional (3D) surface structures, such as electronic devices and the human body, because of the rigid electrode structure required. In this study, a new APP system design—wearable APP (WAPP)—that utilizes a knitting technique to assemble flexible co-axial wire electrodes into a large-area plasma fabric is presented. The WAPP device operates in ambient air with a fully enclosed power electrode and grounded outer electrode. The plasma fabric is flexible and lightweight, and it can be scaled up for larger areas, making it attractive for wearable APP applications. Here, we report the various plasma properties of the WAPP device and successful test results showing the decontamination of toxic chemical warfare agents, namely, mustard (HD), soman (GD), and nerve (VX) agents.

  15. PSYCHOLOGICAL PROBLEMS AND STRESS FACED BY SOLDIERS WHO OPERATE IN ASYMMETRIC WARFARE ENVIRONMENTS: EXPERIENCES IN THE FIELD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe CAFORIO

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with the problems of anxiety, stress and psychological discomfort that can affect soldiers sent on asymmetric warfare operations. It is based on secondary analysis of the data of two important field researches whose results have recently (2013 been published. Although the two researches adopted different methodologies, the testimonies are fully comparable and show that soldiers from different countries and cultures display common or similar reactions when they are placed in the stress conditions that the asymmetric environment involves. The approach of the paper is drawn up in such a way as to make the reader a participating observer of the reality of such missions. It is therefore centered on the personal testimonies of the soldiers interviewed in the two researches, testimonies reported just as they are, in their simplicity and, often, drama, with comments by the author kept to a minimum in order to give readers ample opportunity to evaluate and interpret the reported texts on their own. The research data, drawn from the declarations of those directly concerned, reveal the existence of a problem of psychological distress resulting from deployment in asymmetric warfare situations that is in part different in the causes of the problems resulting from deployment in traditional combat and affects percentages of participating soldiers that are not high but definitely significant. The highest incidence appears to be constituted by problems relating to reintegration into normal social and working life upon returning from the mission. This is followed in percentage terms by anxiety situations relating to life far from the family, due in large part to a sense of powerlessness for the scant possibility of managing family situations that may have cropped up or already existed beforehand.

  16. “John A. MacMillan: Pioneer Missionary of Spiritual Warfare and the Believer’s Authority”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul King

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Many people associate teaching on spiritual warfare and the authority of the believer from charismatic or Word of Faith sources, especially like Kenneth Hagin. However, the original source of teaching on this doctrine comes from classic holiness roots in the Higher Life and Keswick movements, especially from John A. MacMillan, a missionary, writer, editor, and professor with the Christian and Missionary Alliance. In 1932 he wrote a series of articles entitled “The Authority of the Believer,” eventually published in book form, distributed widely and republished in other periodicals. MacMillan had a remarkable and extensive ministry in the exercise of the authority of the believer and spiritual warfare spanning more than thirty years. His experiences include divine protection, healing, divine intervention, power encounters with demonic forces, and teaching on territorial spirits and generational bondages. Numerous evangelical and charismatic leaders have quoted or referred to his teachings and principles.Banyak orang mengasosiasikan pengajaran peperangan rohani dan otoritas orang percaya dari karismatik atau sumber Firman Iman, terutama seperti Kenneth Hagin. Namun, sumber asli dari pengajaran doktrin ini berasal dari akar kekudusan klasik dalam gerakan Higher Life dan Keswick, terutama dari John A. MacMillan, seorang misionaris, penulis, editor, dan profesor dengan Christian and Missionary Alliance. Pada tahun 1932 ia menulis serangkaian artikel yang berjudul “Otoritas orang percaya,” akhirnya diterbitkan dalam bentuk buku, didistribusikan secara luas dan diterbitkan di majalah lainnya. MacMillan memiliki pelayanan yang luar biasa dan luas dalam pelaksanaan otoritas orang percaya dan peperangan rohani yang lebih dari tiga puluh tahun. Pengalamannya termasuk perlindungan ilahi, penyembuhan, campur tangan ilahi, pertemuan kuasa dengan kekuatan jahat, dan pengajaran tentang roh teritorial dan perbudakan generasi. Banyak pemimpin injili dan

  17. Mode Theory of Multi-Armed Spiral Antennas and Its Application to Electronic Warfare Antennas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radway, Matthew J.

    Since their invention about 55 years ago, spiral antennas have earned a reputation for providing stable impedance and far-field patterns over multi-decade frequency ranges. For the first few decades these antennas were researched for electronic warfare receiving applications, primarily in the 2-18 GHz range. This research was often done under conditions of secrecy, and often by private contractors who did not readily share their research, and now have been defunct for decades. Even so, the body of literature on the two-armed variant of these antennas is rich, often leading non-specialists to the misconception that these antennas are completely understood. Furthermore, early work was highly experimental in nature, and was conducted before modern data collection and postprocessing capabilities were widespread, which limited the range of the studies. Recent research efforts have focused on extending the application of spirals into new areas, as well as applying exotic materials to `improve' their performance and reduce their size. While interesting results have been obtained, in most instances these were incomplete, often compromising the frequency independent nature of these antennas. This thesis expands the role of the multi-armed spiral outside of its traditional niche of receive-only monopulse direction finding. As a first step, careful study of the spiral-antenna mode theory is undertaken with particular attention paid to the concepts of mode filtering and modal decomposition. A technique for reducing the modal impedance of high arm-count spirals is introduced. The insights gained through this theoretical study are first used to improve the far-field performance of the coiled-arm spiral antenna. Specifically, expanding the number of arms on a coiled arm spiral from two to four while providing proper excitation enables dramatically improved broadside axial ratio and azimuthal pattern uniformity. The multiarming technique is then applied to the design of an antenna

  18. How Do I Know? A Guide to the Selection of Personal Protective Equipment for Use in Responding to A Release of Chemical Warfare Agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foust, C.B.

    1999-05-01

    An incident involving chemical warfare agents requires a unique hazardous materials (HAZMAT) response. As with an HAZMAT event, federal regulations prescribe that responders must be protected from exposure to the chemical agents. But unlike other HAZMAT events, special considerations govern selection of personal protective equipment (PPE). PPE includes all clothing, respirators and monitoring devices used to respond to a chemical release. PPE can differ depending on whether responders are military or civilian personnel.

  19. Should the Concept of Network-Centric Warfare Form a Central Pillar of the Australian Army’s Transformation, as Articulated in the Hardened and Networked Army Concept?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-05-08

    Clausewitz Kantian philosophic framework for war, which contends that due to the inherent nature of war, it cannot be predicted or controlled by man. The...the key themes identified within Clausewitz On War has identified that NCW could be considered the anti-thesis of Clausewitz Kantian study of warfare...industries and centers of population remote from the surface forces. While not discussing the ethical implication of legitimizing the attack of civilian

  20. A New Approach to Organization and Implementation of Military Medical Treatment in Response to Military Reform and Modern Warfare in the Chinese Army.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Yang; Song, Yue; Yu, Min

    2017-11-01

    Recent system reforms within the People's Liberation Army (PLA) have led to establishment of 5 theatre commands and a general joint logistics command. These reforms have presented new challenges to the organization and implementation of medical services. The medical service of the PLA must keep pace with these reforms by applying innovative theories to establish appropriate organizational guidelines and structures. The medical service must also adapt to the modern and future eras of information warfare. We review the existing structure and features of the military medical service of the PLA, highlighting issues related to ongoing reform within the PLA and the characteristics of modern and future information warfare. Reflection on current rules for medical evacuation and treatment of war-related injuries were made, and related organizational and structural innovations were proposed. Recent reforms and the characteristics of modern information warfare have rendered the current medical service and medical evacuation system of the PLA inefficient. The scale of the echelon configuration should be adjusted to establish a more focused, effective, and intelligent medical service. Resource allocation and general joint logistics should be optimized to establish a new well-rounded, three-dimensional medical evacuation system, and the "stabilize before healing" rule should be applied at all levels of the medical service. These changes should help to create a modern, effective, and responsive medical service within the PLA. This article explores how the military medical service of the PLA could adapt to system reform in order to implement efficient treatment of war injuries, reduce mortality and morbidity rates, and maintain combat readiness in the modern era of information warfare. Reprint & Copyright © 2017 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.