WorldWideScience

Sample records for wards patient staff

  1. Incidence, staff awareness and mortality of patients at risk on general wards

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuhrmann, L.; Lippert, A.; Perner, A.;

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the incidence, staff awareness and subsequent mortality of patients with abnormal vital signs on general wards in a Danish university hospital.......The aim of this study was to estimate the incidence, staff awareness and subsequent mortality of patients with abnormal vital signs on general wards in a Danish university hospital....

  2. Investigation into the acceptability of door locking to staff, patients, and visitors on acute psychiatric wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muir-Cochrane, Eimear; van der Merwe, Marie; Nijman, Henk; Haglund, Kristina; Simpson, Alan; Bowers, Len

    2012-02-01

    There is disagreement among psychiatric professionals about whether the doors of acute psychiatric wards should be kept locked to prevent patients from leaving and harming themselves or others. This study explored patient, staff, and visitor perceptions about the acceptability of locking the ward door on acute psychiatric inpatient wards. Interviews were conducted with 14 registered nurses, 15 patients, and six visitors from three different acute wards. Findings revealed commonalities across all groups, with general agreement that locking the door reduced absconding. Staff expressed feelings of guilt, embarrassment, and fear of being blamed when a patient absconded. Staff also reported that open wards created anxious vigilance to prevent an abscond and increased workload in allocating staff to watch the door, whereas staff on partially-locked doors also perceived an increased workload in letting people in and out of the ward. Patients had mixed feelings about the status of the door, expressing depression, a sense of stigma, and low self-esteem when the door was locked. The issue of balancing safety and security on acute psychiatric wards against the autonomy of patients is not easily resolved, and requires focused research to develop innovative nursing practices. © 2011 The Authors. International Journal of Mental Health Nursing © 2011 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  3. Comparison Patients and Staffs Satisfaction in General Versus Special Wards of Hospitals of Jahrom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taheri, Leila; Kargar Jahromi, Marzieh; Hojat, Mohsen

    2015-04-02

    Patient satisfaction is the most important indicator of high-quality health care and is used for the assessment and planning of health care. Also, Job satisfaction is an important factor on prediction and perception of organizational manner. The aim of this study is to identify and compare patient and staff satisfaction in general versus special wards. In order to identify the various indicators of satisfaction and dissatisfaction, a descriptive study (cross sectional) was done to assess patients' satisfaction with in-patient care at Jahrom University of Medical Science hospitals. The sample size was 600 patients that selected by sequential random sampling technique and are close to their discharge from the hospital. Patients were asked to indicate the scale point which best reflected their level of satisfaction with the treatment or service. Also we assess the staff satisfaction (sample size was 408 staffs) in general ward using a researcher made questionnaire. It should be noted that the participants were anonymous and there was no obligation to participation. We tried to set a secure and comfortable environment for filling out the questionnaire. Among 600 patients, 239 (n=38.67%) were men and 368 (61.33%) were female. Number of nurses was 408, of which 135 (33.08%) were men and 273 (66.92%) female. There was a significant correlation between working experience and professional factors of personnel. The mean total patient satisfaction in general and special wards is (2.75±.35, 3.03±.53) respectively. Differences of patient satisfaction in domains such respect, care and confidence in general wards versus special ward were statistically significant, but there was no difference in expect time of patients in these wards. Differences Between the mean patient and staff satisfaction in the general wards versus special wards were statistically significant using independent t-tests (p=.018, p=.029). Spearman test showed a statistically significant correlation between

  4. The ward atmosphere important for the psychosocial work environment of nursing staff in psychiatric in-patient care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wann-Hansson Christine

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The nursing staff working in psychiatric care have a demanding work situation, which may be reflected in how they view their psychosocial work environment and the ward atmosphere. The aims of the present study were to investigate in what way different aspects of the ward atmosphere were related to the psychosocial work environment, as perceived by nursing staff working in psychiatric in-patient care, and possible differences between nurses and nurse assistants. Methods 93 nursing staff working at 12 general psychiatric in-patient wards in Sweden completed two questionnaires, the Ward Atmosphere Scale and the QPSNordic 34+. Data analyses included descriptive statistics, the Mann-Whitney U-test, Spearman rank correlations and forward stepwise conditional logistic regression analyses. Results The data revealed that there were no differences between nurses and nurse assistants concerning perceptions of the psychosocial work environment and the ward atmosphere. The ward atmosphere subscales Personal Problem Orientation and Program Clarity were associated with a psychosocial work environment characterized by Empowering Leadership. Program Clarity was related to the staff's perceived Role Clarity, and Practical Orientation and Order and Organization were positively related to staff perceptions of the Organizational Climate. Conclusions The results from the present study indicate that several ward atmosphere subscales were related to the nursing staff's perceptions of the psychosocial work environment in terms of Empowering Leadership, Role Clarity and Organizational Climate. Improvements in the ward atmosphere could be another way to accomplish improvements in the working conditions of the staff, and such improvements would affect nurses and nurse assistants in similar ways.

  5. Effects of staff education and standardizing dosing and collection times on vancomycin trough appropriateness in ward patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hammond DA

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Many institutions have guidelines for initiation and monitoring, but not timing, of vancomycin. Objective: Our objective was to evaluate vancomycin trough collection appropriateness before and after an initiative to change the dosing and trough collection times in ward patients. Methods: A retrospective cohort study of ward patients from May 2014-16 who received scheduled intravenous vancomycin was performed. Nurse managers and pharmacists provided staff education. Differences between pre- and post-intervention groups were compared using student's t-test for continuous data and chi-square test for categorical data. Results: Baseline characteristics were similar between the pre-intervention (n=124 and post-intervention (n=122 groups except for weight-based maintenance dose (15.3 mg/kg vs. 16.5 mg/kg, p=0.03 and percentage of troughs collected with morning labs (14% vs. 87%, p<0.001. Patients in the pre- and post-intervention groups received a similar frequency of loading doses (14.5% vs. 16%, p=0.68. There was no significant difference in percentage of vancomycin troughs collected appropriately at 30 (40% vs. 42%, p=0.72, 60 (57% vs. 63%, p=0.35, or 75 (60% vs. 68%, p=0.22 minutes from the scheduled time of the next dose. Conclusion: Staff education and standardizing collection of vancomycin troughs with morning blood collections did not affect the percentage of appropriately collected vancomycin troughs.

  6. How nurse managers in Japanese hospital wards manage patient violence toward their staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Kana; Yumoto, Yoshie; Fukahori, Hiroki

    2016-03-01

    This study explores nurse managers' experiences in dealing with patient/family violence toward their staff. Studies and guidelines have emphasised the responsibility of nurse managers to manage violence directed at their staff. Although studies on nursing staff have highlighted the ineffectiveness of strategies used by nurse managers, few have explored their perspectives on dealing with violence. This qualitative study adopted a grounded theory approach to explore the experiences of 26 Japanese nurse managers. The nurse managers made decisions using internalised ethical values, which included maintaining organisational functioning, keeping staff safe, advocating for the patient/family and avoiding moral transgressions. They resolved internal conflicts among their ethical values by repeating a holistic assessment and simultaneous approach consisting of damage control and dialogue. They facilitated the involved persons' understanding, acceptance and sensemaking of the incident, which contributed to a resolution of the internal conflicts among their ethical values. Nurse managers adhere to their ethical values when dealing with patient violence toward nurses. Their ethical decision-making process should be acknowledged as an effective strategy to manage violence. Organisational strategies that support and incorporate managers' ethical decision-making are needed to prevent and manage violence toward nurses. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Attitudes of parents and staff towards medical students on the paediatric wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duignan, A; Kennedy, C; Canas-Martinez, A; Gildea, D; Jamaludin, M A; Moore, M; Meehan, J; Nadeem, M

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates attitudes of parents and staff to medical students on paediatric wards in a Dublin teaching hospital. We invited 100 parents of patients and 30 staff involved in the care of children on the paediatric wards to participate. The majority of parents agreed or strongly agreed that they would be happy for a student to interview them (n = 87; (87%)), interview their child (80%) or examine their child (74%). Of 30 staff, 12 (40%) staff agreed that the presence of medical students on the ward increased their job satisfaction, 13 (43%) agreed or strongly agreed that medical student presence encouraged them to keep up to date with recent medical developments and 6 (20%) felt that it increased the quality of patient care. Attitudes of both parents and staff to medical students on paediatric wards are positive with both emphasising the need for professional behaviour.

  8. Effectiveness of team nursing compared with total patient care on staff wellbeing when organizing nursing work in acute care wards: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Allana; Long, Lesley; Lisy, Karolina

    2015-11-01

    The organization of the work of nurses, according to recognized models of care, can have a significant impact on the wellbeing and performance of nurses and nursing teams. This review focuses on two models of nursing care delivery, namely, team and total patient care, and their effect on nurses' wellbeing. To examine the effectiveness of team nursing compared to total patient care on staff wellbeing when organizing nursing work in acute care wards. Participants were nurses working on wards in acute care hospitals.The intervention was the use of a team nursing model when organizing nursing work. The comparator was the use of a total patient care model.This review considered quantitative study designs for inclusion in the review.The outcome of interest was staff wellbeing which was measured by staff outcomes in relation to job satisfaction, turnover, absenteeism, stress levels and burnout. The search strategy aimed to find both published and unpublished studies from 1995 to April 21, 2014. Quantitative papers selected for retrieval were assessed by two independent reviewers for methodological validity prior to inclusion in the review using standardized critical appraisal instruments from the Joanna Briggs Institute. Data was extracted from papers included in the review using the standardized data extraction tool from the Joanna Briggs Institute. The data extracted included specific details about the interventions, populations, study methods and outcomes of significance to the review question and its specific objectives. Due to the heterogeneity of the included quantitative studies, meta-analysis was not possible. Results have been presented in a narrative form. The database search returned 10,067 records. Forty-three full text titles were assessed, and of these 40 were excluded, resulting in three studies being included in the review. Two of the studies were quasi experimental designs and the other was considered an uncontrolled before and after experimental study

  9. The relationship between leadership, teamworking, structure, burnout and attitude to patients on acute psychiatric wards

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bowers, L.; Nijman, H.L.I.; Simpson, A.; Jones, J.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Conflict (aggression, substance use, absconding, etc.) and containment (coerced medication, manual restraint, etc.) threaten the safety of patients and staff on psychiatric wards. Previous work has suggested that staff variables may be significant in explaining differences between wards

  10. Ward management: education for senior staff nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Sarah

    2008-04-01

    The key professional challenges for senior staff nurses relate to managerial rather than clinical issues, but there appears to be a lack of educational preparation for the managerial roles expected of them. An educational service was developed, implemented and evaluated in a specialist paediatric unit to address senior staff nurses' concerns related to managerial aspects of their role. An organisational development model was used to negotiate a work-based learning programme that incorporated practice competencies. This was undertaken at an Agenda for Change implementation site, which enabled the Knowledge and Skills Framework (KSF) to be trialled in practice. The educational programme was evaluated positively and practice competency evaluations highlighted how the KSF dimensions provided a usable and relevant breakdown of managerial and leadership issues. The framework provided a professional development tool for staff wishing to progress their managerial knowledge and skills while under supervision.

  11. Design in mind: eliciting service user and frontline staff perspectives on psychiatric ward design through participatory methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csipke, Emese; Papoulias, Constantina; Vitoratou, Silia; Williams, Paul; Rose, Diana; Wykes, Til

    2016-01-01

    Psychiatric ward design may make an important contribution to patient outcomes and well-being. However, research is hampered by an inability to assess its effects robustly. This paper reports on a study which deployed innovative methods to capture service user and staff perceptions of ward design. User generated measures of the impact of ward design were developed and tested on four acute adult wards using participatory methodology. Additionally, inpatients took photographs to illustrate their experience of the space in two wards. Data were compared across wards. Satisfactory reliability indices emerged based on both service user and staff responses. Black and minority ethnic (BME) service users and those with a psychosis spectrum diagnosis have more positive views of the ward layout and fixtures. Staff members have more positive views than service users, while priorities of staff and service users differ. Inpatient photographs prioritise hygiene, privacy and control and address symbolic aspects of the ward environment. Participatory and visual methodologies can provide robust tools for an evaluation of the impact of psychiatric ward design on users.

  12. A staff questionnaire study of MRSA infection on ENT and general surgical wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, P S; Golagani, A K; Malik, A; Payne, F B

    2010-09-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphyloccocus aureus (MRSA) infection has received much attention in both the medical and non-medical press. However, it is not widely encountered on ENT wards, given the profile of short-stay, relatively well patients, although its impact seems to be increasing. We wished to explore the knowledge and attitudes towards MRSA on general surgical and ENT wards, and see if there were any significant differences between specialties, or between doctors and nurses. A 13-item questionnaire with a Likert scale response with six knowledge questions and seven attitude questions was prepared. It was completed anonymously by all nursing and medical staffs on the ENT and general surgical wards of a large District General Hospital. ENT doctors displayed the lowest knowledge and attitude scores; however, this only attained significance in terms of the knowledge of the difference between infection and colonization. Overall, nurses displayed significantly more positive attitudes towards MRSA patients than doctors, but knowledge scores were not significantly different between professions. The study suggests a lack of knowledge about and preponderance of negative attitudes towards MRSA amongst ENT doctors. The difference between colonization and infection is not well understood. Reasons for this may include the relative rarity of MRSA cases on ENT wards.

  13. Adverse incidents, patient flow and nursing workforce variables on acute psychiatric wards: the Tompkins Acute Ward Study

    OpenAIRE

    Bowers, L.; Allan, T.; Simpson, A.; Nijman, H; Warren, J.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Adverse incidents (violence, self-harm and absconding) can cause significant harm to patients and staff, are difficult to predict, and are driving an increase in security measures and defensive practice.\\ud \\ud Aims: To explore the relationship between adverse incidents on acute psychiatric wards, admissions and nursing workforce variables.\\ud \\ud Methods: A retrospective analysis of officially collected data covering a period of 30 months on 14 acute wards at three hospitals. Thi...

  14. Respiratory rates measured by a standardised clinical approach, ward staff, and a wireless device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granholm, A; Pedersen, N E; Lippert, A; Petersen, L F; Rasmussen, L S

    2016-11-01

    Respiratory rate is among the first vital signs to change in deteriorating patients. The aim was to investigate the agreement between respiratory rate measurements by three different methods. This prospective observational study included acutely admitted adult patients in a medical ward. Respiratory rate was measured by three methods: a standardised approach over 60 s while patients lay still and refrained from talking, by ward staff and by a wireless electronic patch (SensiumVitals). The Bland-Altman method was used to compare measurements and three breaths per minute (BPM) was considered a clinically relevant difference. We included 50 patients. The mean difference between the standardised approach and the electronic measurement was 0.3 (95% CI: -1.4 to 2.0) BPM; 95% limits of agreement were -11.5 (95% CI: -14.5 to -8.6) and 12.1 (95% CI: 9.2 to 15.1) BPM. Removal of three outliers with huge differences lead to a mean difference of -0.1 (95% CI: -0.7 to 0.5) BPM and 95% limits of agreement of -4.2 (95% CI: -5.3 to -3.2) BPM and 4.0 (95% CI: 2.9 to 5.0) BPM. The mean difference between staff and electronic measurements was 1.7 (95% CI: -0.5 to 3.9) BPM; 95% limits of agreement were -13.3 (95% CI: -17.2 to -9.5) BPM and 16.8 (95% CI: 13.0 to 20.6) BPM. A concerning lack of agreement was found between a wireless monitoring system and a standardised clinical approach. Ward staff's measurements also seemed to be inaccurate. © 2016 The Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Respiratory rates measured by a standardised clinical approach, ward staff, and a wireless device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Granholm, A; Pedersen, N E; Lippert, A.

    2016-01-01

    in a medical ward. Respiratory rate was measured by three methods: a standardised approach over 60 s while patients lay still and refrained from talking, by ward staff and by a wireless electronic patch (SensiumVitals). The Bland-Altman method was used to compare measurements and three breaths per minute (BPM......) was considered a clinically relevant difference. RESULTS: We included 50 patients. The mean difference between the standardised approach and the electronic measurement was 0.3 (95% CI: -1.4 to 2.0) BPM; 95% limits of agreement were -11.5 (95% CI: -14.5 to -8.6) and 12.1 (95% CI: 9.2 to 15.1) BPM. Removal...... of three outliers with huge differences lead to a mean difference of -0.1 (95% CI: -0.7 to 0.5) BPM and 95% limits of agreement of -4.2 (95% CI: -5.3 to -3.2) BPM and 4.0 (95% CI: 2.9 to 5.0) BPM. The mean difference between staff and electronic measurements was 1.7 (95% CI: -0.5 to 3.9) BPM; 95% limits...

  16. Patient safety culture lives in departments and wards: Multilevel partitioning of variance in patient safety culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hofoss Dag

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aim of study was to document 1 that patient safety culture scores vary considerably by hospital department and ward, and 2 that much of the variation is across the lowest level organizational units: the wards. Setting of study: 500-bed Norwegian university hospital, September-December 2006. Methods Data collected from 1400 staff by (the Norwegian version of the generic version of the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire (SAQ Short Form 2006. Multilevel analysis by MLwiN version 1.10. Results Considerable parts of the score variations were at the ward and department levels. More organization level variation was seen at the ward level than at the department level. Conclusions Patient safety culture improvement efforts should not be limited to all-hospital interventions or interventions aimed at entire departments, but include involvement at the ward level, selectively aimed at low-scoring wards. Patient safety culture should be studied as closely to the patient as possible. There may be such a thing as "hospital safety culture" and the variance across hospital departments indicates the existence of department safety cultures. However, neglecting the study of patient safety culture at the ward level will mask important local variations. Safety culture research and improvement should not stop at the lowest formal level of the hospital (wards, out-patient clinics, ERs, but proceed to collect and analyze data on the micro-units within them.

  17. Patient safety culture lives in departments and wards: Multilevel partitioning of variance in patient safety culture

    OpenAIRE

    Hofoss Dag; Deilkås Ellen

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Aim of study was to document 1) that patient safety culture scores vary considerably by hospital department and ward, and 2) that much of the variation is across the lowest level organizational units: the wards. Setting of study: 500-bed Norwegian university hospital, September-December 2006. Methods Data collected from 1400 staff by (the Norwegian version of) the generic version of the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire (SAQ Short Form 2006). Multilevel analysis by MLwiN vers...

  18. Exploration of staff attitudes and experiences towards mixed- and single-sex wards in the National Secure Forensic Service for Young People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crutchley, Michael; O'Brien, Aileen

    2012-10-01

    Mixed-sex wards in adult forensic secure services have been abolished and replaced by single-sex services. The National Secure Forensic Service for Young People (NSFSYP) continues to use a mixture of single-sex male and mixed-sex wards. This study aimed to explore staff experiences and attitudes towards placing young people in mixed- or single-sex wards in the NSFSYP. Mixed methodology was adopted in the form of focus groups (qualitative) and questionnaires (semi-quantitative). Content analyses of the qualitative data revealed five themes: care of female patients, normalization, safety, commissioning and social representation of women. The questionnaire was developed from the qualitative findings and comprised 22 statements measuring attitudes towards mixed- and single-sex wards. One hundred and forty-five questionnaires were returned: a 44% total response rate. Overall, the responses to the questionnaire confirmed the focus group data. There were statistically significant differences in responses between staff working on mixed- and single-sex wards. Staff working on mixed-sex wards felt that mixing genders on wards is a crucial part of adolescent forensic inpatient treatment. For them, mixed wards provide a more developmentally appropriate environment for young people. The needs of female patients broaden the debate beyond segregating and mixing gender.

  19. Adverse incidents, patient flow and nursing workforce variables on acute psychiatric wards: the Tompkins Acute Ward Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, Len; Allan, Teresa; Simpson, Alan; Nijman, Henk; Warren, Jonathan

    2007-01-01

    Adverse incidents (violence, self-harm and absconding) can cause significant harm to patients and staff, are difficult to predict, and are driving an increase in security measures and defensive practice. To explore the relationship between adverse incidents on acute psychiatric wards, admissions and nursing workforce variables. A retrospective analysis of officially collected data covering a period of 30 months on 14 acute wards at three hospitals. This data included 69 serious untoward incidents. Adverse incidents were more likely during and after weeks of high numbers of male admissions, during weeks when other incidents also occurred, and during weeks of high regular staff absence through leave and vacancy. It may be possible to predict adverse incidents. Careful staff management and deployment may reduce the risks.

  20. [Intercommunication and information flow. An explorative study about ward rounds and patients' documentation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, Uwe; Fotuhi, Parwis; Seele, Anja; Nikolic, Djordje

    2008-07-01

    In modern patient interprofessional communication is an impor tant factor of good outcome. The aim of this study was to analyse the intercommunication during ward rounds and information passed by patients' documentation on an internal and geriatric medicine ward. Beside frequent interruptions the ward rounds showed a restricted flow of information that is based and targeted on the chief physician Nursing staff felt excluded from the informational flow. Regarding patients' documentation staff complained about lack of information and illegible notes. Availability of written information was found to be problematic. A team-orientated approach could help to improve interprofessional communication in the future. Besides the importance of carefully performed documentation as a reliable form of communication, communicative contribution of the nursing staff has to be upvalued.

  1. Nosocomial candidemia in patients admitted to medicine wards compared to other wards: a multicentre study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luzzati, Roberto; Merelli, Maria; Ansaldi, Filippo; Rosin, Chiara; Azzini, Annamaria; Cavinato, Silvia; Brugnaro, Pierluigi; Vedovelli, Claudio; Cattelan, Annamaria; Marina, Busetti; Gatti, Giuseppe; Concia, Ercole; Bassetti, Matteo

    2016-12-01

    Risk factors for nosocomial candidemia, severity of sepsis, treatment, and outcome were compared between patients admitted to medicine wards and those to surgical and intensive care units (ICUs). Data were retrospectively collected from patients belonging to six referral hospitals in Italy between January 2011 and December 2013. Risk factors for 30-day mortality were evaluated in the whole patient population. A total of 686 patients (mean age 70 ± 15 years) with candidemia were included. 367 (53.5 %) patients were in medicine wards, and 319 in surgery and ICUs. Host-related risk factors for candidemia were more common in medicine patients whereas healthcare-related factors in surgery/ICU patients. These patients showed severe sepsis and septic shock more commonly (71.7 %) than medicine patients (59.9 %) (p 0.003). The latter underwent central venous catheter (CVC) removal and adequate antifungal therapy less frequently than surgery/ICU patients. 149 (40.6 %) patients died with candidemia in medicine wards and 69 (21.6 %) in other wards (p candidemia was different between medicine patients and those in other wards. Despite the lower severity of candidemia in medicine patients, their mortality turned out to be higher than in surgery or ICU patients. Awareness of the best management of candidemia should be pursued, especially in medicine wards.

  2. Overcrowding in hospital wards as a predictor of antidepressant treatment among hospital staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virtanen, Marianna; Pentti, Jaana; Vahtera, Jussi; Ferrie, Jane E; Stansfeld, Stephen A; Helenius, Hans; Elovainio, Marko; Honkonen, Teija; Terho, Kirsi; Oksanen, Tuula; Kivimäki, Mika

    2008-11-01

    This report assessed whether hospital ward overcrowding predicts antidepressant use among hospital staff. The extent of hospital ward overcrowding was determined using administrative records of monthly bed occupancy rates between 2000 and 2004 in 203 somatic illness wards in 16 Finnish hospitals providing specialized health care. Information on job contracts for personnel was obtained from the employers' registers. Comprehensive daily data on purchased antidepressant prescriptions (World Health Organization's Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical classification code N06A) for nurses (N=6,699) and physicians (N=641) was derived from national registers. Cox proportional hazards models were used to examine the association between bed occupancy rate and subsequent antidepressant treatment. Monthly bed occupancy rates were used as a time-dependent exposure that could change in value over the course of observation. Hazard ratios were adjusted for sex, age, occupation, type and length of employment contract, hospital district, specialty, and calendar year. Exposure over 6 months to an average bed occupancy rate over 10% in excess of the recommended limit was associated with new antidepressant treatment. This association followed a dose-response pattern, with increasing bed occupancy associated with an increasing likelihood of antidepressant use. There was no evidence of reverse causality; antidepressant treatment among employees did not predict subsequent excess bed occupancy. The increased risk of antidepressant use observed in this study suggests that overcrowding in hospital wards may have an adverse effect on the mental health of staff.

  3. Patients Light Preferences in Hospital Wards

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stidsen, Lone; Bjerrum, H. S.; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning;

    2011-01-01

    it can have a positive influence on the recovery process. The present paper introduces the human perspective and the Danish cultural approach in illuminating homes and how it can contribute to innovative lighting design at hospitals. The importance of having a holistic approach to lighting design...... is introduced based on the theory by Gernot Böhmes i.e. “concept of atmosphere” dealing with the effect of experiencing atmosphere. The aim of this study for design of a lighting concept for wards is to get qualified information on patients light preferences for light atmosphere by studying the everyday use...... of light in homes. This explorative study displays the preferred light atmosphere in Danish homes in the age group of 60-85 years old people. With an anthropologically approach to the subject using semi structured interviews, the goal is to explore preferences for light atmosphere when the user...

  4. On Hospital Wards, Patient Crises May Have 'Domino Effect'

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_162758.html On Hospital Wards, Patient Crises May Have 'Domino Effect' When ... should serve as a wake-up call for hospital-based physicians," study author Dr. Matthew Churpek, an ...

  5. Ergonomics in the psychiatric ward towards workers or patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvana, Salerno; Laura, Forcella; Ursula, Di Fabio; Irene, Figà Talamanca; Paolo, Boscolo

    2012-01-01

    Patient's aggressive behavior is one of the major problem in the psychiatric ward. Here we present the preliminary results of a psychiatric ward case-study, of a public hospital in the Chieti province, in order to plan ergonomic improvement. We applied the Method of Organizational Congruencies in the psychiatric ward in order to study the relationship between organized hospital work and nurses wellbeing in a 24 hour shifts. We observed 58 main phases in the three work shifts. The technical actions are mainly those of any hospital wards (shift briefing, preparing and administering drugs, recording data on clinical charts, etc.). We found important differences mainly due to the nurses overcontrol activities on the patients behavior (preventing suicides or self destructive behavior), the occurrence of restraint procedure towards patients, the pollution due to patient's cigarette smoke. The fear of patient's self destructive behavior or other aggressive behaviour are the main cognitive and social aspects of this hospital ward. Nurses working in this psychiatric ward have to accept: locked doors, poor and polluted environment, restraint procedure with high risk of aggression and no availability of mental health care programs. A new interdisciplinary concept for ergonomics in psychiatry setting may represent a challenge for both nurses and patients and the community.

  6. Barriers to nurse-patient communication in cardiac surgery wards: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafipour, Vida; Mohammad, Eesa; Ahmadi, Fazlollah

    2014-08-15

    An appropriate and effective nurse-patient communication is of the most important aspect of caring. The formation and continuation of such a relationship depends on various factors such as the conditions and context of communication and a mutual understanding between the two. A review of the literature shows that little research is carried out on identification of such barriers in hospital wards between the patients and the healthcare staff. The present study was therefore conducted to explore the experiences of nurses and patients on communication barriers in hospital cardiac surgery wards. This qualitative research was carried out using a content analysis method (Graneheim & Lundman, 2004). The participants were selected by a purposeful sampling and consist of 10 nurses and 11 patients from the cardiac surgery wards of three teaching hospitals in Tehran, Iran. Data was gathered by unstructured interviews. All interviews were audio-taped and transcribed verbatim. Findings were emerged in three main themes including job dissatisfaction (with the sub-themes of workload tension and decreased motivation), routine-centered care (with the sub-themes of habitual interventions, routinized and technical interventions, and objective supervision), and distrust in competency of nurses (with the sub-themes of cultural contrast, less responsible nurses, and their apathy towards the patients). Compared to other studies, our findings identified different types of communication barriers depending on the nursing settings. These findings can be used by the ward clinical nursing managers at cardiac surgery wards to improve the quality of nursing care.

  7. Improving the communication between teams managing boarded patients on a surgical specialty ward

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puvaneswaralingam, Shobitha; Ross, Daniella

    2016-01-01

    Transferring patients from the ward of their specialty or consultant is described as boarding. 1 Boarding patients is becoming increasingly prevalent due to greater pressure on hospital capacity. This practice compromises patient safety through delayed investigations, prolonged hospital stays, and increased risk of hospital-acquired infections. 1 2 We evaluated how regularly boarded patients were reviewed, and how effectively information regarding their management was communicated from their primary specialty to ward staff. We aimed to improve the frequency of patient reviews by ensuring that each patient was reviewed every weekday and increase communication between primary specialty, and medical and nursing teams by 20% from baseline during the data collection period. The project was based in the Otolaryngology ward in Ninewells Hospital, Dundee, where there was a high prevalence of boarded patients. Baseline data showed a clear deficit in communication between the primary specialty and ward staff with only 31% of patient reviews being communicated to ward doctors. We designed and implemented a communication tool, in the form of a sticker, to be inserted into patients' medical notes for use by the primary specialty. Implementation of the sticker improved communication between teams as stickers were completed in 93% of instances. In 88% of patient reviews, the junior doctor was informed of the management plan, showing a large increase from baseline. Through PDSA cycles, we aimed to increase the sustainability and reliability of the sticker; however, we faced challenges with sustainability of sticker insertion. We aim to engage more stakeholders to raise awareness of the problem, brainstorm solutions together, and review the production and implementation of stickers with senior hospital management to discuss the potential use of this tool within practice. There is potentially a large scope for utilisation of this communication tool on a local level, which we hope

  8. Improving the communication between teams managing boarded patients on a surgical specialty ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puvaneswaralingam, Shobitha; Ross, Daniella

    2016-01-01

    Transferring patients from the ward of their specialty or consultant is described as boarding. 1 Boarding patients is becoming increasingly prevalent due to greater pressure on hospital capacity. This practice compromises patient safety through delayed investigations, prolonged hospital stays, and increased risk of hospital-acquired infections. 1 2 We evaluated how regularly boarded patients were reviewed, and how effectively information regarding their management was communicated from their primary specialty to ward staff. We aimed to improve the frequency of patient reviews by ensuring that each patient was reviewed every weekday and increase communication between primary specialty, and medical and nursing teams by 20% from baseline during the data collection period. The project was based in the Otolaryngology ward in Ninewells Hospital, Dundee, where there was a high prevalence of boarded patients. Baseline data showed a clear deficit in communication between the primary specialty and ward staff with only 31% of patient reviews being communicated to ward doctors. We designed and implemented a communication tool, in the form of a sticker, to be inserted into patients' medical notes for use by the primary specialty. Implementation of the sticker improved communication between teams as stickers were completed in 93% of instances. In 88% of patient reviews, the junior doctor was informed of the management plan, showing a large increase from baseline. Through PDSA cycles, we aimed to increase the sustainability and reliability of the sticker; however, we faced challenges with sustainability of sticker insertion. We aim to engage more stakeholders to raise awareness of the problem, brainstorm solutions together, and review the production and implementation of stickers with senior hospital management to discuss the potential use of this tool within practice. There is potentially a large scope for utilisation of this communication tool on a local level, which we hope

  9. Implementation and Evaluation of a Ward-Based eLearning Program for Trauma Patient Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Kate; Wiseman, Taneal; Kennedy, Belinda; Kourouche, Sarah; Goldsmith, Helen

    2016-01-01

    The majority of trauma nursing education is focused on the emergency phases of care. We describe the development and evaluation of a trauma eLearning module for the ward environment. The module was developed using adult learning principles and implemented in 2 surgical wards. There were 3 phases of evaluation: (1) self-efficacy of nurses; (2) relevance and usability of the module and; (3) application of knowledge learnt. The majority indicated they had applied new knowledge, particularly when performing a physical assessment (85.7%), communicating (91.4%), and identifying risk of serious illness (90.4%). Self-efficacy relating to confidence in caring for patients, communication, and escalating clinical deterioration improved (p = .023). An eLearning trauma patient assessment module for ward nursing staff improves nursing knowledge and self-efficacy.

  10. Identifying Patients With Sepsis on the Hospital Wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharjee, Poushali; Edelson, Dana P; Churpek, Matthew M

    2017-04-01

    Sepsis contributes to up to half of all deaths in hospitalized patients, and early interventions, such as appropriate antibiotics, have been shown to improve outcomes. Most research has focused on early identification and treatment of patients with sepsis in the ED and the ICU; however, many patients acquire sepsis on the general wards. The goal of this review is to discuss recent advances in the detection of sepsis in patients on the hospital wards. We discuss data highlighting the benefits and limitations of the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) criteria for screening patients with sepsis, such as its low specificity, as well as newly described scoring systems, including the proposed role of the quick sepsis-related organ failure assessment (qSOFA) score. Challenges specific to detecting sepsis on the wards are discussed, and future directions that use big data approaches and automated alert systems are highlighted. Copyright © 2016 American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Closing an open psychiatric ward: organizational change and its effect on staff uncertainty, self-efficacy, and professional functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnikov, Semyon; Shor, Razya; Kigli-Shemesh, Ronit; Gun Usishkin, Monica; Kagan, Ilya

    2013-04-01

    Converting an open psychiatric ward to a closed one can be threatening and stressful for the medical and nursing staff involved. This study describes the effects of this change, in particular the before-after correlation among self-efficacy, professional functioning, and uncertainty. Forty-four staff participated, completing pre-/poststructured questionnaires. Uncertainty was higher before the conversion than after the conversion. Professional functioning declined after the conversion. Self-efficacy was positively correlated with pre- and postconversion functioning, but negatively correlated with postconversion uncertainty. It is important to prepare staff for this significant organizational change. Suggestions for prechange interventions are offered. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. The effect of multi-professional education on the recognition and outcome of patients at risk on general wards

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuhrmann, L.; Perner, A.; Klausen, T.W.

    2009-01-01

    at Herlev Hospital, Denmark. In the pre-intervention period (June-July 2006) and post-intervention period (November-December 2007), all patients on the wards had vital signs measured in the evening by study personnel, who also asked nursing staff questions about patients with abnormal vital signs...

  13. Caring for Acutely Ill Patients in General Wards: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeddian, Ali Reza; Lindenmeyer, Antje; Marshall, Tom; Rashidian, Arash; Sayadi, Leila; Jafari, Nazila

    2016-09-01

    The number of acutely ill patients has risen in general wards due to the aging population, more advanced and complicated therapeutic methods, economic changes in the health system, therapeutic choices and shortage of intensive care unit beds. This may lead to adverse events and outcomes with catastrophic results. The purpose of this study was to describe the conditions of acutely ill patients, from the perspective of caregivers. The study was conducted in Tehran University of Medical Sciences and its two affiliated general teaching hospitals. Ten nurses and physicians participated in interviews, which were analyzed using qualitative content analysis methods. Four main categories of difficulties in caring for acutely ill patients in general wards were described: problems in identifying acutely ill patients, problems in clinical management of acutely ill patients, inappropriate use of Intensive Care Unit (ICU) beds, and poor structure for mortality control. The staff do not appropriately diagnose the signs of deterioration. There are problems with the appropriate management of acutely ill patients, even if they are considered to be acutely ill and in need of special attention in general wards. Many shortcomings exist caring for acutely ill patients, ranging from identification to clinical management; there are also structural and contextual problems. An immediate plan is necessary to circumvent the challenges and to improve the care for acutely ill patients. These challenges highlight the need for changes in current levels of care for acutely ill patients, as well as the need for appropriate support systems.

  14. Staff and patient perceptions of noise in SA hospitals – a pilot study

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Reenen, Coralie A

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available hospital context, noise can negatively influence patient and staff outcomes, such as patient recovery time and staff burn-out,3 and should be monitored and controlled. The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends an equivalent continuous sound...BA in wards. Few hospitals world-wide comply with the WHO recommendations.6,7 In South Africa, little research has been done regarding noise levels in hospitals. Findings show that neonatal intensive care units (ICUs) exceed Staff and patient perceptions...

  15. Recognition of Radiological Protection of Ward Staff after Brachytherapy for Malignant Tumor with Radioiodine Seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HU Shu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Through radiation measurement of the patients after brachytherapy with radioiodine seeds for malignant tumor at different distances and shielding condition, the importance, optimization and individualization of the radiological protection are well recognized. The 35 patients were randomly selected in the minimally invasive interventional ward of Peking University Shenzhen Hospital who underwent brachytherapy for malignant tumor with radioiodine seeds. Within 2 hours after the brachytherapy, the radiation of the patients without shielding, with 0.25 mmPb and 0.5 mmPb shielding were detected by an x-γ ray detector at different distances (equivalent dose rate. The results were analysed by SPSS19.0 t test. Annual equivalent dose was calculated by the average close contact time (two hours everyone per day. The average annual equivalent dose of the 35 patients without shielding was below 20 mSv at 0.5 meter, close to the public limit 1 mSv at 2 meters and equivalent to the background at 4 meters. Under 0.25 mmPb shielding, 6 patients’ radiation was still above the pubic limit, although the average radiation of the 35 patients was below the pubic limit; under 0.5 mmPb shielding, all patients’ radiation was nearly equivalent to the background at 0 meter. The results showed that among the time, distance and shielded protection, the individual radiological protection was especially important. The 0.25 mmPb lead cushion was the most commonly used shield. The 0.5 mmPb lead cushion also should be used in case of the large number of radioiodine seeds implantation and/or more superficial implant site, so as to ensure the individualization and optimization in radiological protection.

  16. Prevalence of delirium among patients at a cancer ward

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grandahl, Mia Gall; Nielsen, Svend Erik; Kørner, Ejnar Alex;

    2016-01-01

    Background Delirium is a frequent psychiatric complication to cancer, but rarely recognized by oncologists. Aims 1. To estimate the prevalence of delirium among inpatients admitted at an oncological cancer ward 2. To investigate whether simple clinical factors predict delirium 3. To examine...... the value of cognitive testing in the assessment of delirium. Methods On five different days, we interviewed and assessed patients admitted to a Danish cancer ward. The World Health Organization International Classification of Diseases Version 10, WHO ICD-10 Diagnostic System and the Confusion Assessment...... Method (CAM) were used for diagnostic categorization. Clinical information was gathered from medical records and all patients were tested with Mini Cognitive Test, The Clock Drawing Test, and the Digit Span Test. Results 81 cancer patients were assessed and 33% were diagnosed with delirium. All delirious...

  17. Delirium in elderly patients hospitalized in internal medicine wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortini, Alberto; Morettini, Alessandro; Tavernese, Giuseppe; Facchini, Sofia; Tofani, Lorenzo; Pazzi, Maddalena

    2014-06-01

    A prospective observational study was conducted to evaluate the impact of delirium on geriatric inpatients in internal medical wards and to identify predisposing factors for the development of delirium. The study included all patients aged 65 years and older, who were consecutively admitted to the internal medicine wards of two public hospitals in Florence, Italy. On admission, 29 baseline risk factors were examined, cognitive impairment was evaluated by Short Portable Mental Status Questionnaire, and prevalent delirium cases were diagnosed by Confusion Assessment Method (CAM). Enrolled patients were evaluated daily with CAM to detect incident delirium cases. Among the 560 included patients, 19 (3 %) had delirium on admission (prevalent) and 44 (8 %) developed delirium during hospitalization (incident). Prevalent delirium cases were excluded from the statistical analysis. Incident delirium was associated with increased length of hospital stay (p delirium during hospitalization. Results show that delirium impact is relevant to older patients hospitalized in internal medicine wards. The present study confirms cognitive impairment as a risk factor for incident delirium. The cognitive evaluation proved to be an important instrument to improve identification of patients at high risk for delirium. In this context, our study may contribute to improve application of preventive strategies.

  18. Utility of Ward-Based Retinal Photography in Stroke Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Shaun; Brown, Michael; Stirling, Verity; Vignarajan, Janardhan; Prentice, David; Kanagasingam, Yogesan

    2017-03-01

    Improvements in acute care of stroke patients have decreased mortality, but survivors are still at increased risk of future vascular events and mitigation of this risk requires thorough assessment of the underlying factors leading to the stroke. The brain and eye share a common embryological origin and numerous similarities exist between the small vessels of the retina and brain. Recent population-based studies have demonstrated a close link between retinal vascular changes and stroke, suggesting that retinal photography could have utility in assessing underlying stroke risk factors and prognosis after stroke. Modern imaging equipment can facilitate precise measurement and monitoring of vascular features. However, use of this equipment is a challenge in the stroke ward setting as patients are frequently unable to maintain the required seated position, and pupil dilatation is often not feasible as it could potentially obscure important neurological signs of stroke progression. This small study investigated the utility of a novel handheld, nonmydriatic retinal camera in the stroke ward and explored associations between retinal vascular features and stroke risk factors. This camera circumvented the practical limitations of conducting retinal photography in the stroke ward setting. A positive correlation was found between carotid disease and both mean width of arterioles (r = .40, P = .00571) and venules (r = .30, P = .0381). The results provide further evidence that retinal vascular features are clinically informative about underlying stroke risk factors and demonstrate the utility of handheld retinal photography in the stroke ward. Copyright © 2017 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Training residents and nurses to work as a patient-centered care team on a medical ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laird-Fick, Heather S; Solomon, David; Jodoin, Christine; Dwamena, Francesca C; Alexander, Kim; Rawsthorne, Larry; Banker, Tammy; Gourineni, Nandu; Aloka, Feras; Frankel, Richard M; Smith, Robert C

    2011-07-01

    To train medical residents and nurses to work together as a patient-centered care (PCC) team on a medical ward and test its feasibility, nurses' learning, and patient outcomes. Working with administrative leadership, we consolidated residents' patients on one 32-bed ward. Already training residents in an evidence-based patient-centered method, we now trained 5 nurse leaders similarly, and they then trained all staff nurses. A national consultant visited twice. Specific team-building activities for nurses and residents fostered ward interactions. We used a retrospective pre/post/6-month post-design to evaluate nurses' knowledge and self-efficacy of patient-centered skills. Patients were assigned non-randomly to our unit or comparison units from our emergency room; using a post-test only design, the primary endpoint was patient satisfaction. 28 trained nurses showed improvement in knowledge (p=0.02) and self-efficacy (p=0.001). 81 treatment patients showed no improvement in satisfaction (p=0.44). Training nurses in patient-centered practices were effective. Unique in this country, we also trained nurses and residents together as a PCC team on a medical ward and showed it was feasible and well accepted. We provide a template for team training and urge that others explore this important new area and contribute to its further development. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Nurse health-related quality of life: associations with patient and ward characteristics in Japanese general acute care wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyama, Yumiko; Yonekura, Yuki; Fukahori, Hiroki

    2015-09-01

    To investigate the factors affecting nurse health-related quality of life (HRQOL) by considering the patient characteristics and ward characteristics. Nurse health-related quality of life is an important health outcome, and should be promoted for quality nursing care. This cross-sectional study was conducted on nurses who work in general acute care wards in three university hospitals in metropolitan Japan. Multilevel analysis was conducted to investigate possible factors related to nurse health-related quality of life. Nurses who worked at a ward had a significantly lower physical health score (β = -0.13, P characteristics. Further large-scale studies are needed in order to investigate the effect of hospital characteristics on nurse health-related quality of life. Increasing the number of nurses' aides and delegating assistance with ADL to them could support nurse health-related quality of life in the acute care setting. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Multidisciplinary case management for patients at high risk of hospitalization: comparison of virtual ward models in the United kingdom, United States, and Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Geraint; Wright, Lorraine; Vaithianathan, Rhema

    2012-10-01

    Virtual wards are a model for delivering multidisciplinary case management to people who are at high predicted risk of unplanned acute care hospitalization. First introduced in Croydon, England, in 2006, this concept has since been adopted and adapted by health care organizations in other parts of the United Kingdom and internationally. In this article, the authors review the model of virtual wards as originally described-with its twin pillars of (1) using a predictive model to identify people who are at high risk of future emergency hospitalization, and (2) offering these individuals a period of intensive, multidisciplinary preventive care at home using the systems, staffing, and daily routines of a hospital ward. The authors then describe how virtual wards have been modified and implemented in 6 sites in the United Kingdom, United States, and Canada where they are subject to formal evaluation. Like hospital wards, virtual wards vary in terms of patient selection, ward configuration, staff composition, and ward processes. Policy makers and researchers should be aware of these differences when considering the evaluation results of studies investigating the cost-effectiveness of virtual wards.

  2. Ward round documentation in a major trauma centre: can we improve patient safety?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Gemma; Aframian, Arash; Bernard, Jason

    2014-01-01

    Our objective was to improve documentation and patient safety in a major trauma centre. A retrospective audit was undertaken in March 2014. Ward round entries for each orthopaedic patients on three dates were assessed against standards and analysed. The audit was repeated in April 2014, and again in August 2014. Thorough documentation is paramount in a major trauma centre. It forms a useful record of the patients hospital stay, is a legal document and is highlighted in national guidelines. It provides a basis for good handover, ensuring continuation of care and maintaining patient safety. Resultant poor compliance with Royal College guidelines in the initial audit led to the production of a new electronic based note keeping system. A meeting was held with all staff prior to introduction. Our initial results gained 75 entries, and none showed full compliance. Mean compliance per entry was 59% (0-81%). The second attempt gained 90 entries, with 30 from the weekend. Mean compliance per entry 97%. Third attempt received 61 entries, with 27 from the weekend. Mean compliance was 96%, meaning that the improvement was being maintained. Recent distressing reports regarding patient highlighted the importance of patient. Our initial audit proved there were many areas lacking in our documentation and improvement was necessary. Prior to introducing electronic systems, the implemented change has produced improvement in documentation, and provides a useful handover tool for staff.

  3. Medication communication between nurses and patients during nursing handovers on medical wards: a critical ethnographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Manias, Elizabeth; Gerdtz, Marie

    2012-08-01

    Communication is central to safe medication management. Handover is a routine communication forum where nurses provide details about how patients' medications are managed. Previous studies have investigated handover processes as general communication forums without specific focus on medication information exchange. The effects of social, environmental and organisational contexts on handover communication and medication safety have not been explored. To examine dominant and submissive forms of communication and power relations surrounding medication communication among nurses, and between nurses and patients during handover. A critical ethnographic approach was utilised to unpack the social and power struggles embedded in handover practices. The study was conducted in two medical wards of a metropolitan teaching hospital in Melbourne, Australia from January to November 2010. All registered nurses employed in the medical wards during the study time were eligible for participation. Patients were eligible if they were able to communicate with nurses about how their medications were managed. In total, 76 nurses and 27 patients were recruited for the study after giving written consent for participation. Participant observations, field interviews, video-recordings and video reflexive focus groups were conducted. Fairclough's critical discourse analytic framework guided data analysis. Nurse coordinators' group handovers in private spaces prioritised organisational and biomedical discourses, with little emphasis on evaluating the effectiveness of medication treatment. The ward spatial structure provided an added complexity to how staff allocation occurred. Handovers involving patients in the public spaces at the bedside facilitated a partnership model in medication communication. Nurses exercised discretion during bedside handovers by discussing sensitive information away from the bedside. Handovers across different wards during patient transfers caused communication

  4. Hybrid Patient Record – Supporting Hybrid Interaction in Clinical Wards

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Houben, Steven; Schmidt, Mathias; Frost, Mads

    2015-01-01

    Despite the widespread dissemination of the electronic health record, the paper medical record remains an important central artefact in modern clinical work. A number of new technological solutions have been proposed to mitigate some of the configuration, mobility and awareness problems that emerge...... when using this dual record setup. In this paper, we present one such technology, the HyPR device, in which a paper record is augmented with an electronic sensing platform that is designed to reduce the configuration overhead, provide awareness cues and support mobility across the patient ward. Our...... demo will show the HyPR device and setup in order for conference attendees to experience the technology `in action'....

  5. Caring for cancer patients on non-specialist wards.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gill, Finola

    2012-02-01

    As cancer is the leading cause of death worldwide, every nurse will be required to care for patients with the condition at some point in his\\/her career. However, non-specialized oncology nurses are often ill-prepared to nurse patients suffering from cancer. This literature review aims to provide an overview of current trends and developments in cancer care nursing in an attempt to identify the range of previous research pertaining to caring for patients with cancer on non-specialist wards. The review finds that non-specialized cancer nurses report a lack of education and training with regard to cancer care and cancer treatments, which acts as a barrier to providing quality nursing care. Emotional and communication issues with patients and their families can also cause non-specialist nurses significant distress. International research has shown that specialist oncology nurses make a considerable difference to physical and psychosocial patient care. It is therefore paramount that non-speciality nurses\\' educational needs are met to develop clinical competence and to provide supportive holistic care for both patients and their families.

  6. A virtual psychiatric ward for orientating patients admitted for the first time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Wai-Chi; Choi, Kup-Sze; Chung, Wai-Yee

    2010-12-01

    Misconceptions about psychiatric wards frequently cause newly admitted mental patients to stay away from these wards despite their need for treatment. Although ward orientation is typically conducted by nurses in an attempt to help patients to adapt to the new environment, it is considered time-consuming, and the method of orientation and the explanations given may vary among different nurses. This situation calls for a more effective and standardized approach to orientating mental patients on their first admission. To this end, a computer-based interactive virtual environment was developed based on a real psychiatric ward by using virtual reality (VR) technologies. It enables the patient to navigate around to gain understanding about the ward through a virtual guided tour. The effectiveness of this VR orientation approach was investigated by a randomized controlled trial with consecutive sampling. Fifty-four Chinese participants were randomly assigned to undergo ward orientation by either using the VR-based approach or reading text-based electronic information sheets about the ward with a computer. Subjective and objective measures were obtained respectively using the Chinese version of the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory questionnaire and the heart-rate variability measurement before and after the intervention. In addition, a test on the level of understanding about the ward was administered at the end of the session. The results showed that the VR orientation approach is helpful in reducing patients' anxiety while also improving their level of understanding about the ward.

  7. Causes of institutionalism: patient and staff perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirt, G L

    1999-01-01

    Institutionalism is a pattern of passive, dependent behavior observed among psychiatric inpatients, characterized by hospital attachment and resistance to discharge. Survey research was conducted with 211 staff and 47 "institutionalized" patients in a public psychiatric hospital to determine their beliefs on the causes of institutionalism. Four explanatory models of institutionalism were investigated: the predisposition model, the total institution model, the asylum model, and the symptoms model. Patients and staff differed on all models. Responses indicated acceptance of multiple causes for the phenomenon, with patients and staff showing highest agreement on the need for hospitalization as asylum from the world. Patients and staff differed most on the role of the institution in promoting institutionalism. Job classification of staff also resulted in significant differences in beliefs on all models except the asylum model.

  8. Developing an holistic assessment protocol on a hospice inpatient ward: staff engagement and my role as a practice development facilitator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Lansdell

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: In 2014 I received the Richard Tompkins Nurse Development Scholarship, granted through the Foundation of Nursing Studies and including attendance at a five-day International Practice Development Collaborative practice development school, followed by a year’s mentorship. The scholarship aims to foster the delivery of person-centred care, which I hoped to achieve by enhancing holistic nursing assessment on a hospice inpatient ward. Aims: This article is a critical reflection on my learning through the scholarship, specifically related to staff engagement and my role as a practice development facilitator. Conclusions: While the project has not yet reached its conclusion, the learning has been invaluable. I have deepened my understanding of the need for collaboration, inclusion and participation to foster engagement and cultural change. More fundamentally, understanding how different aspects of my role enable change has proved both challenging and constructive, resulting in greater self-awareness and confidence. I remain committed to refining holistic nursing assessment to allow a greater degree of person-centred care in the hospice. Implications for practice: Practice development combines a variety of approaches to realise a shared vision; collaboration, inclusion and participation are central to fostering engagement Balancing different elements of a role (for instance, leader-manager-facilitator has the potential to be confusing and contradictory; awareness of how these elements interrelate promotes effectiveness when introducing change Individuals in a practice development role must ensure they have good sources of support

  9. [Reasons for Hospital Treatment of Psychiatric Patients before and after the Opening of a Satellite Ward].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebhardt, R P; Schmidt-Michel, P O

    2002-04-01

    A satellite ward is a psychiatric ward at a general hospital settled within the catchment area that is administered by a psychiatric hospital. The objective of the satellite model is to approach community treatment on the one hand and somatic medicine on the other hand, consequently diminishing the threshold for hospital treatment. This study investigated whether the diagnostic, psychopathologic and social reasons for admissions changed from this catchment area due to the lower threshold of a satellite ward. The results were controlled with another catchment area's admissions to the 30 km distant psychiatric hospital. The opening of the satellite ward was followed by an 81 % increase of admissions. In particular, admissions of patients with neuroses and personality disorders were more frequent. There was no change of the severity code of psychopathology at admission. From the catchment area of the satellite ward less patients were admitted involuntarily whereas more admissions happened due to social reasons and after patients' own decision.

  10. With such an NHS staff shortfall, who will work on the 'mothballed' wards?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chilver, Karen

    2016-03-01

    I was interested to read your article about Lord Carter of Coles' report on saving the NHS £5 billion a year (analysis, February 17). However, the article and Lord Carter's report fail to mention the £4.5 billion wasted on the NHS internal market, which adds nothing to patient care according to independent and parliamentary reports into the NHS since 2010.

  11. Investigation on awareness of pulmonary infection prevention among nursing staff in geriatric wards%老年病区护理人员对预防肺部感染相关知识调查分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    牛娜; 董喆; 黄颖; 丁志平

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the knowledge of nursing staff in geriatric wards related to pneumonia prevention in order to improve the quality of clinical care. METHODS A total of 90 nursing staffs of different levels in geriatric wards were investigated by questionnaires designed for pulmonary care knowledge. RESULTS Since there were many elderly patients with long-term bed rest in geriatric wards, standing up, buckling back and suction operation were highly used in daily nursing, and scores for those items were higher than inhalation and vibration meter expectoration in both terms of basic knowledge and clinical skills. CONCLUSION The pulmonary infection prevention associated knowledge need to be strengthened among the nursing staff and it will help the nursing personnels in geriatric wards to grasp and apply in the nursing work.%目的 了解老年病区护理人员对预防肺部感染相关知识的掌握,以提高临床护理质量.方法 采用自行设计的肺部护理知识问卷调查表,对医院老年病房90名不同层次的护理人员进行调查.结果 老年病房中高龄长期卧床患者较多,翻身、扣背、吸痰在日常护理中操作率较高,在调查问卷中得分显著高于雾化吸人和振动排痰仪得分.结论 需要加强预防肺部感染相关知识的宣教,使高龄老年病房护理人员掌握其相关知识,并应用于护理工作中.

  12. Costs of terminal patients who receive palliative care or usual care in different hospital wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoens, Steven; Kutten, Betty; Keirse, Emmanuel; Berghe, Paul Vanden; Beguin, Claire; Desmedt, Marianne; Deveugele, Myriam; Léonard, Christian; Paulus, Dominique; Menten, Johan

    2010-11-01

    In addition to the effectiveness of hospital care models for terminal patients, policy makers and health care payers are concerned about their costs. This study aims to measure the hospital costs of treating terminal patients in Belgium from the health care payer perspective. Also, this study compares the costs of palliative and usual care in different types of hospital wards. A multicenter, retrospective cohort study compared costs of palliative care with usual care in acute hospital wards and with care in palliative care units. The study enrolled terminal patients from a representative sample of hospitals. Health care costs included fixed hospital costs and charges relating to medical fees, pharmacy and other charges. Data sources consisted of hospital accountancy data and invoice data. Six hospitals participated in the study, generating a total of 146 patients. The findings showed that palliative care in a palliative care unit was more expensive than palliative care in an acute ward due to higher staffing levels in palliative care units. Palliative care in an acute ward is cheaper than usual care in an acute ward. This study suggests that palliative care models in acute wards need to be supported because such care models appear to be less expensive than usual care and because such care models are likely to better reflect the needs of terminal patients. This finding emphasizes the importance of the timely recognition of the need for palliative care in terminal patients treated in acute wards.

  13. Evaluation of clinical pharmacist's interventions in an infectious diseases ward and impact on patient's direct medication cost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalili, Hossein; Karimzadeh, Iman; Mirzabeigi, Parastoo; Dashti-Khavidaki, Simin

    2013-04-01

    A clinical pharmacist is a key member of the antimicrobial multidisciplinary team involved in patients' pharmacotherapy monitoring. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency and type of medication errors, the type of clinical pharmacy interventions, acceptance of pharmacist interventions by health-care provider team, nursing staff satisfaction with clinical pharmacy services, and the probable impact of clinical pharmacy interventions on decreasing direct medication costs at an infectious diseases ward in Iran. All clinical pharmacist interventions such as preventing medication errors were recorded in a previously designed pharmacotherapy monitoring forms. Direct medication cost of patients admitted during the study period was compared with that of subjects hospitalized at the same ward during the year before the intervention period to determine the impact of clinical pharmacy interventions on direct medication costs. The 3 most frequent medication error types were incorrect dose (35.5%), omission error (24.3%), and incorrect medication (14.3%). The mean number of clinical pharmacist intervention per patient was 3.2. Forty percent of clinical pharmacists' interventions are moderate to major clinical significant. Thirty nine percent of clinical pharmacist's interventions had moderate to major financial benefits in present study. The direct medication cost per patient was decreased about 3.8% following clinical pharmacist's interventions. Our data demonstrated that incorrect dose was the most frequent medication error in the infectious diseases ward. Major portion of clinical pharmacist interventions were accepted by physicians and nursing staff. Clinical pharmacist interventions non-significantly decreased the direct medication cost of patients. Copyright © 2012 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Impact of the physical environment of psychiatric wards on the use of seclusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaaf, P.S. van der; Dusseldorp, E.; Keuning, F.M.; Janssen, W.A.; Noorthoorn, E.O.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The physical environment is presumed to have an effect on aggression and also on the use of seclusion on psychiatric wards. Multicentre studies that include a broad variety of design features found on psychiatric wards and that control for patient, staff and general ward characteristics

  15. The relationship between substance use and exit security on psychiatric wards

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simpson, A.; Bowers, L.; Allan, T.; Haglund, K.; Muir-Cochrane, E.; Nijman, H.L.I.; Merwe, M. van der

    2011-01-01

    Aim. In this paper we report on the rates of drug/alcohol use on acute psychiatric wards in relation to levels and intensity of exit security measures. Background. Many inpatient wards have become permanently locked, with staff concerned about the risk of patients leaving the ward and harming

  16. The impact of facility relocation on patients' perceptions of ward atmosphere and quality of received forensic psychiatric care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexiou, Eirini; Degl' Innocenti, Alessio; Kullgren, Anette; Wijk, Helle

    2016-08-01

    In recent years, large groups of forensic psychiatric patients have been relocated into new medium- and maximum-security forensic psychiatric facilities in Sweden, where a psychosocial care approach is embedded. From this perspective and on the assumption that physical structures affect the therapeutic environment, a prospective longitudinal study was designed to investigate the impact of the facility relocation of three forensic psychiatric hospitals on patients' perceptions of ward atmosphere and quality of received forensic psychiatric care. Participants were patients over 18 years of age sentenced to compulsory forensic psychiatric treatment. Data were obtained by validated questionnaires. Overall, 58 patients (78%) answered the questionnaires at baseline with a total of 25 patients (34%) completing follow-up 1 at six months and 11 patients (15%) completing follow-up 2, one year after relocation. Approximately two-thirds of the participants at all time-points were men and their age range varied from 18 to 69. The results of this study showed that poor physical environment features can have a severe impact on care quality and can reduce the possibilities for person-centered care. Furthermore, the study provides evidence that the patients' perceptions of person-centered care in forensic psychiatric clinics are highly susceptible to factors in the physical and psychosocial environment. Future work will explore the staff's perception of ward atmosphere and the possibilities to adapt a person-centered approach in forensic psychiatric care after facility relocation.

  17. Self-management for patients with inflammatory bowel disease in a gastroenterology ward in China: a best practice implementation project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ruo-Bing

    2016-11-01

    Globally, there is an increasing incidence of inflammatory bowel disease. It is very important for patients to be involved with self-management that can optimize personal heath behavior to control the disease. The aim of this project was to increase nursing staff knowledge of inflammatory bowel disease discharge guidance, and to improve the quality of education for discharged patients, thereby improving their self-management. A baseline audit was conducted by interviewing 30 patients in the gastroenterology ward of Huadong Hospital, Fudan University. The project utilized the Joanna Briggs Institute's Practical Application of Clinical Evidence System and Getting Research Into Practice audit tools for promoting quality of education and self-management of patients with inflammatory bowel disease. Thirty patients were provided with written materials, which included disease education and information regarding self-management. A post-implementation audit was conducted. There was improvement of education prior to discharge and dietary consultancy in the gastroenterology ward. Self-management plans utilizing written materials only were not sufficient for ensuring sustainability of the project. Comprehensive self-management education can make a contribution to improving awareness of the importance of self-management for patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

  18. Staff and patient views on intentional rounding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, Rebecca; Norton, Christine

    Intentional rounding is controversial, with growing evidence questioning its effectiveness. This article describes the planning stage of a quality improvement project to develop rounding undertaken by a London trust. Through a survey, interviews, observations and an audit, it was found that neither patients nor staff believed intentional rounding was effective in improving patient care. The system was not carried out as indicated by trust policy, and patients interviewed questioned the need for rounding. It is suggested that nurses and patients work together to develop a new model of inpatient care provision, with emphasis placed on an effective nurse-patient relationship.

  19. Advanced cancer patients' self-assessed physical and emotional problems on admission and discharge from hospital general ward - a questionnaire study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sølver, Lisbeth; Østergaard, Birte; Rydahl Hansen, Susan;

    2012-01-01

    SOELVER L., OESTERGAARD B., RYDAHL-HANSEN S. & WAGNER L. (2012) European Journal of Cancer Care21, 667-676 Advanced cancer patients' self-assessed physical and emotional problems on admission and discharge from hospital general wards - a questionnaire study Most cancer patients receiving life......-prolonging or palliative treatment are offered non-specialist palliative services. There is a lack of knowledge about their problem profile. The aim of this article is to describe the incidence of patient-reported physical and emotional problems on admission and discharge from general hospital wards and health staff......-reported problems and reported intervention for physical function, pain, constipation and loss of appetite. Palliative cancer patients' self-reported problem profile on admission and discharge from hospital has not previously been described and the results indicate a need to focus on improvements to palliative...

  20. Audit of a ward-based patient-controlled epidural analgesia service in Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tan, T

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Ward-based patient-controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA) for postoperative pain control was introduced at our institution in 2006. We audited the efficacy and safety of ward-based PCEA from January 2006 to December 2008. METHOD: Data were collected from 928 patients who received PCEA in general surgical wards for postoperative analgesia using bupivacaine 0.125% with fentanyl 2 mug\\/mL. RESULTS: On the first postoperative day, the median visual analogue pain score was 2 at rest and 4 on activity. Hypotension occurred in 21 (2.2%) patients, excessive motor blockade in 16 (1.7%), high block in 5 (0.5%), nausea in 5 (0.5%) and pruritus in only 1 patient. Excessive sedation occurred in two (0.2%) patients but no intervention was required. There were no serious complications such as epidural abscess, infection or haematoma. CONCLUSION: Effective and safe postoperative analgesia can be provided with PCEA in a general surgical ward without recourse to high-dependency supervision.

  1. Patients' experiences of postoperative intermediate care and standard surgical ward care after emergency abdominal surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Thordis; Vester-Andersen, Morten; Nielsen, Martin Vedel

    2015-01-01

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To elicit knowledge of patient experiences of postoperative intermediate care in an intensive care unit and standard postoperative care in a surgical ward after emergency abdominal surgery. BACKGROUND: Emergency abdominal surgery is common, but little is known about how patie...

  2. Analysis of Outcomes of the NRS 2002 in Patients Hospitalized in Nephrology Wards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulina Borek

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Malnutrition is a common problem among hospitalized patients. In chronic kidney disease, it affects up to 50% of the population. Undernourishment has an adverse effect on prognosis and prolongs convalescence. The aim of the study was to test the effectiveness of NRS (Nutrition Risk Screening -2002 in the assessment of risk of malnutrition for patients hospitalized in nephrology wards. The aim was to develop clinical characteristics of malnourished patients and to assess the relationship between nutritional status and patient outcome. Methods: The analysis included 292 patients, consecutively admitted to nephrology wards. NRS-2002 was assessed in comparison to subjective global assessment. Associations with patient characteristics and outcome were evaluated. Results: Out of all the respondents, 119 patients (40% suffered from malnutrition. The NRS-2002 showed a very strong relationship with Subjective Global Assessment (SGA (p < 0.0001. Malnourished patients were older, were characterized by a significantly lower body mass index (BMI, and had a much longer hospitalization duration. In multiple regression analysis, the presence of malnutrition proved to be an independent predictor of the duration of hospital stay. CONCLUSIONS: Malnutrition is highly prevalent among patients hospitalized in nephrology wards, and it affects the length of hospitalization. Identification of malnourished patients and patients at serious risk of malnutrition progression allows the implementation of appropriate nutritional intervention.

  3. Potentially pathogenic free-living amoebae isolated from hospital wards with immunodeficient patients in Tehran, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasjerdi, Zohreh; Niyyati, Maryam; Haghighi, Ali; Shahabi, Saed; Biderouni, Farid Tahvildar; Taghipour, Niloofar; Eftekhar, Mohamad; Nazemalhosseini Mojarad, Ehsan

    2011-09-01

    This study investigated the occurrence of free-living amoebae (FLA) in immunodeficiency wards of hospitals in Tehran, Iran. A total of 70 dust and biofilm samples from wards serving transplant, pediatric (malignancies), HIV, leukemia and oncology patients of five university hospitals were collected and examined for the presence of FLA using culturing and molecular approaches. Based on the morphology of the amoebae in plate cultures, primer sets were applied for molecular identification of Acanthamoeba, vahlkampfiid amoebae and Hartmannella. Out of 70 samples, 37 (52.9%) were positive for FLA. Acanthamoeba belonged to the T4 genotype was the most prevalent isolate. Presence of the T4 genotype on medical instruments, including an oxygen mask in an isolation room of an immunodeficiency pediatric ward, should be of concern for health authorities. Acanthamoeba T5 genotypes, Hartmannella vermiformis, and Vahlkampfia avara were also present. These results highlight a clear need for greater attention to improved disinfection, especially where susceptible patients, such as those who are immune-suppressed, are served. To our knowledge, this is the first report of these FLA in immunodeficiency wards in Iran, and also the first to identify Acanthamoeba T5, Hartmannella, and Vahlkampfia in moist habitats, such as biofilms, in this country.

  4. Development of an adhesive surgical ward round checklist: a technique to improve patient safety.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Dhillon, P

    2012-02-01

    Checklists have been shown to improve patient outcomes. Checklist use is seen in the pre-operative to post-operative phases of the patient pathway. An adhesive checklist was developed for ward rounds due to the positive impact it could have on improving patient safety. Over an eight day period data were collected from five consultant-led teams that were randomly selected from the surgical department and divided into sticker groups and control groups. Across the board percentage adherence to the Good Surgical Practice Guidelines (GSPG) was markedly higher in the sticker study group, 1186 (91%) in comparison with the control group 718 (55%). There was significant improvement of documentation across all areas measured. An adhesive checklist for ward round note taking is a simple and cost-effective way to improve documentation, communication, hand-over, and patient safety. Successfully implemented in a tertiary level centre in Dublin, Ireland it is easily transferable to other surgical departments globally.

  5. A multi-center prospective cohort study of patient transfers from the intensive care unit to the hospital ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stelfox, Henry T; Leigh, Jeanna Parsons; Dodek, Peter M; Turgeon, Alexis F; Forster, Alan J; Lamontagne, Francois; Fowler, Rob A; Soo, Andrea; Bagshaw, Sean M

    2017-08-29

    To provide a 360-degree description of ICU-to-ward transfers. Prospective cohort study of 451 adults transferred from a medical-surgical ICU to a hospital ward in 10 Canadian hospitals July 2014-January 2016. Transfer processes documented in the medical record. Patient (or delegate) and provider (ICU/ward physician/nurse) perspectives solicited by survey 24-72 h after transfer. Medical records (100%) and survey responses (ICU physicians-80%, ICU nurses-80%, ward physicians-46%, ward nurses-64%, patients-74%) were available for most transfers. The median time from initiation to completion of transfer was 25 h (IQR 6-52). ICU physicians and nurses reported communicating with counterparts via telephone (78 and 75%) when transfer was requested (82 and 24%) or accepted (31 and 59%) and providing more elements of clinical information than ward physicians (mean 4.7 vs. 3.9, p transfer when they received more information (OR 1.32, 95% CI 1.18-1.48), had their questions addressed (OR 3.96, 95% CI 1.33-11.84), met the ward physician prior to transfer (OR 4.61, 95% CI 2.90-7.33), and were assessed by a nurse within 1 h of ward arrival (OR 4.70, 95% CI 2.29-9.66). Recommendations for improvement included having a documented care plan travel with the patient (all stakeholders), standardized face-to-face handover (physicians), avoiding transfers at shift change (nurses) and informing patients about pending transfers in advance (patients). ICU-to-ward transfers are characterized by failures of patient flow and communication; experienced differently by patients, ICU/ward physicians and nurses, with distinct suggestions for improvement.

  6. Inappropriate use of urinary catheters in patients admitted to medical wards in a university hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Ruiz, Mario; Calvo, Beatriz; Vara, Rebeca; Villar, Rocío N; Aguado, José María

    2013-10-01

    The prevalence and predisposing factors were determined for inappropriate urinary catheterization (UC) among inpatients in medical wards. A cross-sectional study was conducted including all patients aged ≥ 18 years admitted to medical wards in a 1300-bed tertiary-care centre, and who had a urinary catheter in place on the day of the survey. Of 380 patients observed, 46 (12.1%) had a urinary catheter in place. Twelve of them (26.1%) were inappropriately catheterized. The most common indication for inappropriate UC was urine output monitoring in a cooperative, non-critically ill patient. Inappropriateness was associated with increased age, poor functional status, urinary incontinence, dementia, and admission from a long-term care facility. Further educational efforts should be focused on improving catheterization prescribing practices by physicians. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  7. Transmission of Pneumocystis carinii from patients to hospital staff

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundgren, Bettina; Elvin, K; Rothman, L P

    1997-01-01

    rooms in departments of infectious diseases managing patients with P carinii pneumonia (PCP), suggesting the airborne route of transmission. Exposure of staff to P carinii may occur in hospital departments treating patients with PCP. METHODS: Exposure to P carinii was detected by serological responses...... to human P carinii by ELISA, Western blotting, and indirect immunofluorescence in 64 hospital staff with and 79 staff without exposure to patients with PCP from Denmark and Sweden. DNA amplification of oropharyngeal washings was performed on 20 Danish staff with and 20 staff without exposure to patients...... with PCP. RESULTS: There was no significant difference in the frequency or level of antibodies to P carinii between staff exposed and those unexposed to patients with PCP. None of the hospital staff had detectable P carinii DNA in oropharyngeal washings. CONCLUSIONS: There is no difference in antibodies...

  8. Pressure ulcers in palliative ward patients: hyponatremia and low blood pressure as indicators of risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternal, Danuta; Wilczyński, Krzysztof; Szewieczek, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Background Prevention strategies for pressure ulcer formation remain critical in patients with an advanced illness. We analyzed factors associated with the development of pressure ulcers in patients hospitalized in a palliative care ward setting. Patients and methods This study was a retrospective analysis of 329 consecutive patients with a mean age (± standard deviation) of 70.4±11.8 years (range: 30–96 years, median 70.0 years; 55.3% women), who were admitted to the Palliative Care Department between July 2012 and May 2014. Results Patients were hospitalized for mean of 24.8±31.4 days (1–310 days, median 14 days). A total of 256 patients (77.8%) died in the ward and 73 patients (22.2%) were discharged. Two hundred and six patients (62.6%) did not develop pressure ulcers during their stay in the ward, 84 patients (25.5%) were admitted with pressure ulcers, and 39 patients (11.9%) developed pressure ulcers in the ward. Four factors assessed at admission appear to predict the development of pressure ulcers in the multivariate logistic regression model: Waterlow score (odds ratio [OR] =1.140, 95% confidence interval [CI] =1.057–1.229, P=0.001), transfer from other hospital wards (OR =2.938, 95% CI =1.339–6.448, P=0.007), hemoglobin level (OR =0.814, 95% CI =0.693–0.956, P=0.012), and systolic blood pressure (OR =0.976, 95% CI =0.955–0.997, P=0.023). Five other factors assessed during hospitalization appear to be associated with pressure ulcer development: mean evening body temperature (OR =3.830, 95% CI =1.729–8.486, P=0.001), mean Waterlow score (OR =1.194, 95% CI =1.092–1.306, P<0.001), the lowest recorded sodium concentration (OR =0.880, 95% CI =0.814–0.951, P=0.001), mean systolic blood pressure (OR =0.956, 95% CI =0.929–0.984, P=0.003), and the lowest recorded hemoglobin level (OR =0.803, 95% CI =0.672–0.960, P=0.016). Conclusion Hyponatremia and low blood pressure may contribute to the formation of pressure ulcers in patients with an

  9. Pressure ulcers in palliative ward patients: hyponatremia and low blood pressure as indicators of risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternal, Danuta; Wilczyński, Krzysztof; Szewieczek, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Prevention strategies for pressure ulcer formation remain critical in patients with an advanced illness. We analyzed factors associated with the development of pressure ulcers in patients hospitalized in a palliative care ward setting. This study was a retrospective analysis of 329 consecutive patients with a mean age (± standard deviation) of 70.4±11.8 years (range: 30-96 years, median 70.0 years; 55.3% women), who were admitted to the Palliative Care Department between July 2012 and May 2014. Patients were hospitalized for mean of 24.8±31.4 days (1-310 days, median 14 days). A total of 256 patients (77.8%) died in the ward and 73 patients (22.2%) were discharged. Two hundred and six patients (62.6%) did not develop pressure ulcers during their stay in the ward, 84 patients (25.5%) were admitted with pressure ulcers, and 39 patients (11.9%) developed pressure ulcers in the ward. Four factors assessed at admission appear to predict the development of pressure ulcers in the multivariate logistic regression model: Waterlow score (odds ratio [OR] =1.140, 95% confidence interval [CI] =1.057-1.229, P=0.001), transfer from other hospital wards (OR =2.938, 95% CI =1.339-6.448, P=0.007), hemoglobin level (OR =0.814, 95% CI =0.693-0.956, P=0.012), and systolic blood pressure (OR =0.976, 95% CI =0.955-0.997, P=0.023). Five other factors assessed during hospitalization appear to be associated with pressure ulcer development: mean evening body temperature (OR =3.830, 95% CI =1.729-8.486, P=0.001), mean Waterlow score (OR =1.194, 95% CI =1.092-1.306, Ppressure (OR =0.956, 95% CI =0.929-0.984, P=0.003), and the lowest recorded hemoglobin level (OR =0.803, 95% CI =0.672-0.960, P=0.016). Hyponatremia and low blood pressure may contribute to the formation of pressure ulcers in patients with an advanced illness.

  10. Legal awareness and responsibilities of nursing staff in administration of patient care in a trust hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Hemant; Gokhale; Jain, Kalpana; Mathur, D R

    2013-12-01

    The enactment of various legal provisions like Consumer Protection Act, Right to Information Act and standardization of procedures and practices have brought nursing care under legal ambit. Needless to say, the level of legal awareness amidst nursing staff in India is abysmally low. Present study was undertaken to assess the level of legal awareness and responsibilities of nursing staff in administration of patient care at a trust hospital. An open ended questionnaire was prepared to assess the level of legal awareness among the nursing staff. The GNM and ANM nursing staff deployed at the nursing home and general wards only were randomly screened and specialty nurses were exempted. The knowledge on various legal provisions, as was applicable to nursing, across all categories of nurses which were under review, was found to be poor. The nursing staff had poor knowledge on patients' rights and also on their legal obligations towards patients. The GNM nurses fared better than ANM nurses. However, 46.67 % of nurses were found to be aware about cases of omission or commission. This study substantiated the fact that nurses had poor knowledge on the law that governed their profession and that in days to come, it would become increasingly difficult for them to avoid law suits which were prepared against them, unless remedial actions were taken.

  11. How staff and patient experience shapes our perception of spiritual care in a psychiatric setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raffay, Julian

    2014-10-01

    To explore how our understanding of care practice is shaped by the extent of our engagement with staff and patient experience. In spite of the fact that service users desire good spiritual care and that government guidelines recognize its importance, frontline staff in psychiatric settings often find current spiritual assessment tools hard to use and the concept of spirituality difficult to comprehend. A database search was conducted, the grey literature analysed, spirituality assessment tools were explored, and an approach based on user experience was considered. Each of these four perspectives resulted in different perceptions of care. By engaging patient and staff experience, we begin to see spiritual care very differently. There may be rich opportunities for research into the lived experience of the support systems that service users create for each other on wards when they experience staff as inaccessible. Deeper engagement with patients and staff and their concerns is likely to result in breakthroughs in both the understanding and the practice of spiritual care as well as potentially other areas of nursing care. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Optimization of hospital ward resources with patient relocation using Markov chain modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Anders Reenberg; Nielsen, Bo Friis; Reinhardt, Line Blander

    2017-01-01

    Overcrowding of hospital wards is a well-known and often revisited problem in the literature, yet it appears in many different variations. In this study, we present a mathematical model to solve the problem of ensuring sufficient beds to hospital wards by re-distributing beds that are already...... that patient occupancy is reflected by our Markov chain model, and that a local optimum can be derived within a reasonable runtime.Using a Danish hospital as our case study, the Markov chain model is statistically found to reflect occupancy of hospital beds by patients as a function of how hospital beds...... are distributed. Furthermore, our heuristic is found to efficiently derive the optimal solution. Applying our model to the hospital case, we found that relocation of daily arrivals can be reduced by 11.7% by re-distributing beds that are already available to the hospital....

  13. [When should a patient with abdominal pain be referred to the emergency ward?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Saussure, Wassila Oulhaci; Andereggen, Elisabeth; Sarasin, François

    2010-08-25

    When should a patient with abdominal pain be referred to the emergency ward? The following goals must be achieved upon managing patients with acute abdominal pain: 1) identify vital emergency situations; 2) detect surgical conditions that require emergency referral without further diagnostic procedures; 3) in "non surgical acute abdomen patients" perform appropriate diagnostic procedures, or in selected cases delay tests and reevaluate the patient after an observation period, after which a referral decision is made. Clues from the history and physical examination are critical to perform this evaluation. A good knowledge of the most frequent acute abdominal conditions, and identifying potential severity criteria allow an appropriate management and decision about emergency referral.

  14. Talking therapy groups on acute psychiatric wards: patients' experience of two structured group formats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radcliffe, Jonathan; Bird, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Aims and method We report the results of a clinical audit of patients' reactions to two types of talking therapy groups facilitated by assistant psychologists and psychology graduates on three acute wards. Patients' experiences of problem-solving and interpersonal group formats were explored via focus groups and structured interviews with 29 group participants. Results Both group formats generated high satisfaction ratings, with benefits related mostly to generic factors. Clinical implications Adequately trained and supported assistant psychologists and psychology graduates can provide supportive talking groups that patients find helpful. PMID:27512586

  15. Staff attitudes towards patients with schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vendsborg, Per; Bratbo, Johanne; Dannevang, Anders

    2013-01-01

    Stigmatizing attitudes have been reported in international studies among staff in psychiatry. The authors wanted to investigate if this was the case in Denmark.......Stigmatizing attitudes have been reported in international studies among staff in psychiatry. The authors wanted to investigate if this was the case in Denmark....

  16. A preliminary study of Patient Dignity Inventory validation among patients hospitalized in an acute psychiatric ward

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Lorenzo, Rosaria; Cabri, Giulio; Carretti, Eleonora; Galli, Giacomo; Giambalvo, Nina; Rioli, Giulia; Saraceni, Serena; Spiga, Giulia; Del Giovane, Cinzia; Ferri, Paola

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the perception of dignity among patients hospitalized in a psychiatric setting using the Patient Dignity Inventory (PDI), which had been first validated in oncologic field among terminally ill patients. Patients and methods After having modified two items, we administered the Italian version of PDI to all patients hospitalized in a public psychiatric ward (Service of Psychiatric Diagnosis and Treatment of a northern Italian town), who provided their consent and completed it at discharge, from October 21, 2015 to May 31, 2016. We excluded minors and patients with moderate/severe dementia, with poor knowledge of Italian language, who completed PDI in previous hospitalizations and/or were hospitalized for Depression and Anxiety, Global Assessment of Functioning and Health of the Nation Outcome Scales) to analyze the PDI concurrent validity. Results With a response rate of 93%, we obtained a mean PDI score of 48.27 (±19.59 SD) with excellent internal consistency (Cronbach’s alpha coefficient =0.93). The factorial analysis showed the following three factors with eigenvalue >1 (Kaiser’s criterion), which explained >80% of total variance with good internal consistency: 1) “Loss of self-identity and social role”, 2) “Anxiety and uncertainty for future” and 3) “Loss of personal autonomy”. The PDI and the three-factor scores were statistically significantly positively correlated with the Hamilton Scales for Depression and Anxiety but not with other scale scores. Conclusion Our preliminary research suggests that PDI can be a reliable tool to assess patients’ dignity perception in a psychiatric setting, until now little investigated, helping professionals to improve quality of care and patients to accept treatments. PMID:28182110

  17. Patients' characteristics and healthcare providers' perceived workload in French hospital emergency wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenenberger, Sandrine; Moulin, Pierre; Brangier, Eric; Gilibert, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this research is to understand how patients' characteristics increase healthcare providers' perceived workload. Patients' characteristics and dependency, technical and relational complexities of care seem to increase healthcare providers' workload. As workload is multidimensional, we examine which dimensions are affected by patients' characteristics. Our methodology is based on 121 patients assessed with the NASA task load index (NASA-TLX) and a questionnaire filled in by 57 health providers in 2 emergency wards in French hospital settings, to evaluate their attitudes to different patients' characteristics. Our results show that physical demand is the dimension most affected by patients' behaviour and characteristics. Next, we observe that workload increases more due to patients' behaviour than their social characteristics. We propose that a regulation mechanism be taken into account in further research, using methodology based on observations to identify how healthcare providers might adapt their activities to compensate for workload variations caused by patients.

  18. Tracheostomy patients on the ward: multiple benefits from a multidisciplinary team?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Mihae

    2010-01-01

    Patients requiring tracheostomies tend to have a longer length of stay due to their underlying disease. After a thorough literature search, Garrubba and colleagues found only three studies assessing the impact of multidisciplinary teams (MDTs) on tracheostomy patients on the ward. One consistent observation was the decreased time to decannulation after institution of MDT care when compared with historical controls. Although a large prospective randomized trial is desirable before MDT is recommended, many institutions may have already formed a team approach to provide coordinated care resulting in improved outcome and length of stay.

  19. A preliminary study of Patient Dignity Inventory validation among patients hospitalized in an acute psychiatric ward

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Lorenzo R

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Rosaria Di Lorenzo,1 Giulio Cabri,2 Eleonora Carretti,3 Giacomo Galli,4 Nina Giambalvo,4 Giulia Rioli,4 Serena Saraceni,4 Giulia Spiga,4 Cinzia Del Giovane,5 Paola Ferri6 1Mental Health Department, Service of Psychiatric Diagnosis and Treatment in NOCSAE General Hospital, 2Private Accredited Psychiatric Hospital villa Igea, Modena, 3Nursing Home of Rubiera, Reggio Emilia, 4Department of Diagnostic, Clinical and Public Health Medicine, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, 5PhD Statistics Unit, Department of Diagnostic, Clinical and Public Health Medicine, 6Department of Diagnostic, Clinical and Public Health Medicine, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena, Italy Purpose: To investigate the perception of dignity among patients hospitalized in a psychiatric setting using the Patient Dignity Inventory (PDI, which had been first validated in oncologic field among terminally ill patients. Patients and methods: After having modified two items, we administered the Italian version of PDI to all patients hospitalized in a public psychiatric ward (Service of Psychiatric Diagnosis and Treatment of a northern Italian town, who provided their consent and completed it at discharge, from October 21, 2015 to May 31, 2016. We excluded minors and patients with moderate/severe dementia, with poor knowledge of Italian language, who completed PDI in previous hospitalizations and/or were hospitalized for <72 hours. We collected the demographic and clinical variables of our sample (n=135. We statistically analyzed PDI scores, performing Cronbach’s alpha coefficient and principal factor analysis, followed by orthogonal and oblique rotation. We concomitantly administered to our sample other scales (Hamilton Rating Scales for Depression and Anxiety, Global Assessment of Functioning and Health of the Nation Outcome Scales to analyze the PDI concurrent validity. Results: With a response rate of 93%, we obtained a mean PDI score of 48.27 (±19.59 SD with

  20. Effects of neuromuscular electrostimulation in patients with heart failure admitted to ward

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Araújo Carlos José Soares

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neuromuscular electrostimulation has become a promising issue in cardiovascular rehabilitation. However there are few articles published in the literature regarding neuromuscular electrostimulation in patients with heart failure during hospital stay. Methods This is a randomized controlled pilot trial that aimed to investigate the effect of neuromuscular electrostimulation in the walked distance by the six-minute walking test in 30 patients admitted to ward for heart failure treatment in a tertiary cardiology hospital. Patients in the intervention group performed a conventional rehabilitation and neuromuscular electrostimulation. Patients underwent 60 minutes of electrostimulation (wave frequency was 20 Hz, pulse duration of 20 us two times a day for consecutive days until hospital discharge. Results The walked distance in the six-minute walking test improved 75% in the electrostimulation group (from 379.7 ± 43.5 to 372.9 ± 46.9 meters to controls and from 372.9 ± 62.4 to 500 ± 68 meters to electrostimulation, p Conclusion The neuromuscular electrostimulation group showed greater improvement in the walked distance in the six-minute walking test in patients admitted to ward for compensation of heart failure.

  1. Surveying Substance Abuse Frequency in Hospitalized Patients in Psychiatric Ward of Farshchian Hospital in Hamadan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ghaleiha

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Substance abuse is believed to be one of the greatest social, economical ,and cultural problems all over the world and it is commonly observed among all social classes especially among mental disorder patients. Substance abuse can influence on the receptive-mental states such as mood and on the external visible activities such as behaviors. The aim of this study is to survey the frequency of Substance abuse in hospitalized mental-psychic patients in psychiatric ward of Farshchian hospital in Hamadan. Materials & Methods: In this descriptive and retrospective study, available sampling method was used along with examining filed records in which the records of 400 hospitalized patients (293 men and 107 women from September 2000 to 2001 were checked and required data such as demographic information, infliction duration, substance abuse duration, psychiatric diagnosis were extracted and registered. The data were analyzed with descriptive statistical methods.Results: About half of the hospitalized patients in the psychiatric ward had simultaneous substance abuse. Men had substance abuse more than women and the youths aged 20-39 more than the other groups. The study showed that widowing had positive relationship and higher education negative relationship with substance abuse.Conclusion: Mood disorders with 90.53%, schizophrenia with 8.29%, and other diagnostics with 1.18% were observed in persons with substance abuse and these diagnostics in non substance abuse persons were 79.22% ,11.26% and 9.52% respectively.

  2. Supporting Information Access in a Hospital Ward by a Context-Aware Mobile Electronic Patient Record

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, Mikael B.; Høegh, Rune Thaarup

    2006-01-01

    Ward is to support nurses in conducting morning procedures in a hospital ward. MobileWard is context-aware as it is able to discover and react autonomously according to changes in the environment and since it integrates the ability to provide information and services to the user where the relevancy depends...

  3. A multi-component patient-handling intervention improves attitudes and behaviors for safe patient handling and reduces aggression experienced by nursing staff

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risør, Bettina Wulff; Casper, Sven Dalgas; Andersen, Lars L.

    2017-01-01

    This study evaluated an intervention for patient-handling equipment aimed to improve nursing staffs' use of patient handling equipment and improve their general health, reduce musculoskeletal problems, aggressive episodes, days of absence and work-related accidents. As a controlled before......-after study, questionnaire data were collected at baseline and 12-month follow-up among nursing staff at intervention and control wards at two hospitals. At 12-month follow-up, the intervention group had more positive attitudes towards patient-handling equipment and increased use of specific patient-handling...... attitudes and behaviours for safe patient-handling and less physically aggressive episodes. However, this did not translate into improved health of the staff during the 12-month study period....

  4. Patients' approaches to students' learning at a clinical education ward--an ethnographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manninen, Katri; Henriksson, Elisabet Welin; Scheja, Max; Silén, Charlotte

    2014-07-02

    It is well known that patients' involvement in health care students' learning is essential and gives students opportunities to experience clinical reasoning and practice clinical skills when interacting with patients. Students encounter patients in different contexts throughout their education. However, looking across the research providing evidence about learning related to patient-student encounters reveals a lack of knowledge about the actual learning process that occurs in encounters between patients and students. The aim of this study was to explore patient-student encounters in relation to students' learning in a patient-centered health-care setting. An ethnographic approach was used to study the encounters between patients and students. The setting was a clinical education ward for nursing students at a university hospital with eight beds. The study included 10 observations with 11 students and 10 patients. The observer followed one or two students taking care of one patient. During the fieldwork observational and reflective notes were taken. After each observation follow-up interviews were conducted with each patient and student separately. Data were analyzed using an ethnographic approach. The most striking results showed that patients took different approaches in the encounters with students. When the students managed to create a good atmosphere and a mutual relationship, the patients were active participants in the students' learning. If the students did not manage to create a good atmosphere, the relationship became one-way and the patients were passive participants, letting the students practice on their bodies but without engaging in a dialogue with the students. Patient-student encounters, at a clinical education ward with a patient-centred pedagogical framework, can develop into either a learning relationship or an attending relationship. A learning relationship is based on a mutual relationship between patients and students resulting in patients

  5. Incidence of nutritional support complications in patient hospitalized in wards. multicentric study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria María Agudelo Ochoa

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Nutritional support generates complications that must be detected and treated on time. Objective: To estimate the incidence of some complications of nutritional support in patients admitted to general hospital wards who received nutritional support in six high-complexity institutions. Methods: Prospective, descriptive and multicentric study in patients with nutritional support; the variables studied were medical diagnosis, nutritional condition, nutritional support duration, approach, kind of formula, and eight complications. Results: A total of 277 patients were evaluated; 83% received enteral nutrition and 17% received parenteral nutrition. Some 69.3% presented risk of malnourishment or severe malnourishment at admittance. About 35.4% of those receiving enteral nutrition and 39.6% of the ones who received parenteral nutrition had complications; no significant difference per support was found (p = 0.363. For the enteral nutrition, the most significant complication was the removal of the catheter (14%, followed by diarrhea (8.3%; an association between the duration of the enteral support with diarrhea, constipation and removal of the catheter was found (p < 0.05. For parenteral nutrition, hyperglycemia was the complication of highest inci­dence (22.9%, followed by hypophosphatemia (12.5%; all complications were associated with the duration of the support (p < 0.05. Nutritional support was suspended in 24.2% of the patients. Conclusions: Complications with nutritional support in hospital-ward patients were frequent, with the removal of the catheter and hyperglycemia showing the highest incidence. Duration of the support was the variable that revealed an asso­ciation with complications. Strict application of protocols could decrease the risk for complications and boost nutritional support benefits.

  6. Social climate of acute old age psychiatry inpatient units: staff perceptions within the context of patient aggression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCann, T; Baird, J; Muir-Cochrane, E C

    2015-03-01

    Patient aggression occurs in old age psychiatry and is contrary to their recovery and to the well-being of staff. A favourable social climate can contribute to a reduction in aggression. The aim of this study was to examine the perceptions of clinical staff about the social climate of acute old age psychiatry inpatient units. Eighty-five clinicians were recruited from these facilities. They completed a survey questionnaire about the social climate or ward atmosphere of inpatient units. The findings showed that, to some extent, respondents' perceived patient cohesion and mutual support were evident, units were perceived somewhat positively as safe environments for patients and staff, and the ward climate helped meet patients' therapeutic needs. Overall, clinicians were somewhat positive about the social climate of the units, and this has implications for the perception of aggression in old age psychiatry inpatient settings. As there is a direct relationship between social climate and aggression, clinicians should consider adopting a broad-based, person-centred approach to the promotion of a favourable social climate in old age psychiatry inpatient settings.

  7. Cultural Construction of Military Patients Ward%谈军人病区文化建设

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    闫军峰; 周文斌; 李丹

    2014-01-01

    More and more attentions have been paid to the military grassroots culture and hospital culture . As a special unit of military hospital serving the army , military patients ward focused on building culture , promoting the physical and mental health of patients and a speedy recovery , ensuring battle effectiveness, increasing the mili-tary patients’satisfaction.%部队基层文化和医院文化都受到越来越多的重视。军人病区作为部队医院为部队服务的一个特殊单元,建设军人病区文化,促进伤病员的身心健康和早日康复,保障部队战斗力,提高部队满意度,本院作了一些初步的尝试和探索。

  8. Four Simple Ward Based Initiatives to Reduce Unnecessary In-Hospital Patient Stay: A Quality Improvement Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabbir, Asad; Wali, Gorav; Steuer, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Prolonged hospital stay not only increases financial stress on the National Health Service but also exposes patients to an unnecessarily high risk of adverse ward events. Each day accumulates approximately £225 in bed costs with additional risks of venousthromboembolism, hospital acquired infections, prescription errors, and falls. Despite being medically fit for discharge (MFFD), patients awaiting care packages with prolonged length of stay (LoS) have poorer outcomes and experience increased rates of mortality as a result. A six cycle prospective audit was carried out to investigate if four simple ward based initiatives could optimise patient flow through a medical ward and reduce LoS of inpatients awaiting social packages and placement. The four daily initiatives were: A morning board round between nurses and doctors to prioritise new or sick patients for early review.A post ward round meeting between the multidisciplinary team to expedite rehabilitation and plan discharges early.An evening board round to highlight which patients needed discharge paperwork for the next day to alleviate the wait for pharmacy.A ‘computer on wheels’ on ward rounds so investigations could be ordered and reviewed at the bedside allowing more time to address patient concerns. A control month in August 2013 and five intervention cycles were completed between September 2013 and January 2014. Prior to intervention, mean time taken for patients to be discharged with a package of care, once declared MFFD, was 25 days. With intervention this value dropped to 1 day. The total LoS fell from 46 days to 16 days. It was also found that the time taken from admission to MFFD status was reduced from 21 days to 15 days. In conclusion this data shows that with four simple modifications to ward behaviour unnecessary inpatient stay can be significantly reduced. PMID:26734432

  9. Four Simple Ward Based Initiatives to Reduce Unnecessary In-Hospital Patient Stay: A Quality Improvement Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabbir, Asad; Wali, Gorav; Steuer, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Prolonged hospital stay not only increases financial stress on the National Health Service but also exposes patients to an unnecessarily high risk of adverse ward events. Each day accumulates approximately £225 in bed costs with additional risks of venousthromboembolism, hospital acquired infections, prescription errors, and falls. Despite being medically fit for discharge (MFFD), patients awaiting care packages with prolonged length of stay (LoS) have poorer outcomes and experience increased rates of mortality as a result. A six cycle prospective audit was carried out to investigate if four simple ward based initiatives could optimise patient flow through a medical ward and reduce LoS of inpatients awaiting social packages and placement. The four daily initiatives were: A morning board round between nurses and doctors to prioritise new or sick patients for early review.A post ward round meeting between the multidisciplinary team to expedite rehabilitation and plan discharges early.An evening board round to highlight which patients needed discharge paperwork for the next day to alleviate the wait for pharmacy.A 'computer on wheels' on ward rounds so investigations could be ordered and reviewed at the bedside allowing more time to address patient concerns. A control month in August 2013 and five intervention cycles were completed between September 2013 and January 2014. Prior to intervention, mean time taken for patients to be discharged with a package of care, once declared MFFD, was 25 days. With intervention this value dropped to 1 day. The total LoS fell from 46 days to 16 days. It was also found that the time taken from admission to MFFD status was reduced from 21 days to 15 days. In conclusion this data shows that with four simple modifications to ward behaviour unnecessary inpatient stay can be significantly reduced.

  10. Nurse Level of Education, Quality of Care and Patient Safety in the Medical and Surgical Wards in Malaysian Private Hospitals: A Cross-sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul Rahman, Hamzah; Jarrar, Mu'taman; Don, Mohammad Sobri

    2015-04-23

    Nursing knowledge and skills are required to sustain quality of care and patient safety. The numbers of nurses with Bachelor degrees in Malaysia are very limited. This study aims to predict the impact of nurse level of education on quality of care and patient safety in the medical and surgical wards in Malaysian private hospitals. A cross-sectional survey by questionnaire was conducted. A total 652 nurses working in the medical and surgical wards in 12 private hospitals were participated in the study. Multistage stratified simple random sampling performed to invite nurses working in small size (less than 100 beds), medium size (100-199 beds) and large size (over than 200) hospitals to participate in the study. This allowed nurses from all shifts to participate in this study. Nurses with higher education were not significantly associated with both quality of care and patient safety. However, a total 355 (60.9%) of respondents participated in this study were working in teaching hospitals. Teaching hospitals offer training for all newly appointed staff. They also provide general orientation programs and training to outline the policies, procedures of the nurses' roles and responsibilities. This made the variances between the Bachelor and Diploma nurses not significantly associated with the outcomes of care. Nursing educational level was not associated with the outcomes of care in Malaysian private hospitals. However, training programs and the general nursing orientation programs for nurses in Malaysia can help to upgrade the Diploma-level nurses. Training programs can increase their self confidence, knowledge, critical thinking ability and improve their interpersonal skills. So, it can be concluded that better education and training for a medical and surgical wards' nurses is required for satisfying client expectations and sustaining the outcomes of patient care.

  11. Factors Influencing communication between the patients with cancer and their nurses in oncology wards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahid Zamanzadeh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the factors influencing nurse-patient communication in cancer care in Iran. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted with a qualitative conventional content analysis approach in oncology wards of hospitals in Tabriz. Data was collected through purposive sampling by semi-structured deep interviews with nine patients, three family members and five nurses and analyzed simultaneously. Robustness of data analysis was evaluated by the participants and external control. Results: The main theme of the research emerged as "three-factor effects" that demonstrates all the factors related to the patient, nurse, and the organization and includes three categories of "Patient as the center of communication", "Nurse as a human factor", and "Organizational structures". The first category consists of two sub-categories of "Imposed changes by the disease" and "the patient′s particular characteristics". The second category includes sub-categories of "sense of vulnerability" and "perception of professional self: Pre-requisite of patient-centered communication". The third category consists of the sub-categories of "workload and time imbalance", "lack of supervision", and "impose duties in context of neglecting nurse and patient needs". Characteristics of the patients, nurses, and care environment seemed to be the influential factors on the communication. Conclusions: In order to communicate with cancer patients effectively, changes in philosophy and culture of the care environment are essential. Nurses must receive proper trainings which meet their needs and which focus on holistic and patient-centered approach.

  12. Effective dose estimation to patients and staff during urethrography procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sulieman, A. [Prince Sattam bin Abdulaziz University, College of Applied Medical Sciences, Radiology and Medical Imaging Department, P. O- Box 422, Alkharj 11942 (Saudi Arabia); Barakat, H. [Neelain University, College of Science and Technology, Medical Physics Department, Khartoum (Sudan); Alkhorayef, M.; Babikir, E. [King Saud University, College of Applied Sciences, Radiological Sciences Department, P. O. Box 10219, Riyadh 11433 (Saudi Arabia); Dalton, A.; Bradley, D. [University of Surrey, Centre for Nuclear and Radiation Physics, Department of Physics, Surrey, GU2 7XH Guildford (United Kingdom)

    2015-10-15

    Medical-related radiation is the largest source of controllable radiation exposure to humans and it accounts for more than 95% of radiation exposure from man-made sources. Few data were available worldwide regarding patient and staff dose during urological ascending urethrography (ASU) procedure. The purposes of this study are to measure patient and staff entrance surface air kerma dose (ESAK) during ASU procedure and evaluate the effective doses. A total of 243 patients and 145 staff (Urologist) were examined in three Hospitals in Khartoum state. ESAKs were measured for patient and staff using thermoluminescent detectors (TLDs). Effective doses (E) were calculated using published conversion factors and methods recommended by the national Radiological Protection Board (NRPB). The mean ESAK dose for patients and staff dose were 7.79±6.7 mGy and 0.161±0.30 mGy per procedures respectively. The mean and range of the effective dose was 1.21 mSv per procedure. The radiation dose in this study is comparable with previous studies except Hospital C. It is obvious that high patient and staff exposure is due to the lack of experience and protective equipment s. Interventional procedures remain operator dependent; therefore continuous training is crucial. (Author)

  13. staff/bed and staff/patient ratios in south african public sector mental ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    service levels; numbers of psychiatric beds; and numbers of patients who attend ... staff at all levels of public sector health care in South Africa. The information ..... distribution,''3 have been a cause of concern in recent South. African mental ...

  14. Effect of early achievement of physiologic resuscitation goals in septic patients admitted from the ward on the kidneys.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kiers, H.D.; Griesdale, D.E.; Litchfield, A.; Reynolds, S.; Gibney, R.T.; Chittock, D.; Pickkers, P.; Sweet, D.D.

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: The aim of the study was to evaluate if early achievement of physiologic goals of resuscitation in critically ill septic patients admitted from the ward may prevent acute kidney injury (AKI). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) with a diagnosis of sepsi

  15. House Staff Communication Training and Patient Experience Scores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oladoyin A Oladeru MPH

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess whether communication training for house staff via role-playing exercises (1 is well received and (2 improves patient experience scores in house staff clinics. Methods: We conducted a pre–post study in which the house staff for 3 adult hospital departments participated in communication training led by trained faculty in small groups. Sessions centered on a published 5-step strategy for opening patient-centered interviews using department-specific role-playing exercises. House staff completed posttraining questionnaires. For 1 month prior to and 1 month following the training, patients in the house staff clinics completed surveys with Clinician and Group Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (CG-CAHPS questions regarding physician communication, immediately following clinic visits. Preintervention and postintervention results for top-box scores were compared. Results: Forty-four of a possible 45 house staff (97.8% participated, with 31 (70.5% indicating that the role-playing exercise increased their perception of the 5-step strategy. No differences in patient responses to CG-CAHPS questions were seen when comparing 63 preintervention surveys to 77 postintervention surveys. Conclusion: Demonstrating an improvement in standard patient experience surveys in resident clinics may require ongoing communication coaching and investigation of the “hidden curriculum” of training.

  16. Patient risk factors for developing a drug-related problem in a cardiology ward

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urbina O

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Olatz Urbina,1 Olivia Ferrández,1 Sònia Luque,1 Santiago Grau,1,2 Sergi Mojal,3 Rosa Pellicer,1 Marta Riu,4 Esther Salas,1 Josep Comin-Colet5 1Pharmacy Department, Hospital Universitari del Mar, Barcelona, Spain; 2Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain; 3Department of Statistics, Institut Hospital del Mar d’Investigacions Mèdiques, Barcelona, Spain; 4Department of Epidemiology and Health Services Evaluation, CIBER de Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP, Hospital Universitari del Mar, Barcelona, Spain; 5Heart Failure Unit, Cardiology Department, Hospital Universitari del Mar, Barcelona, Spain Background: Because of the high incidence of drug-related problems (DRPs among hospitalized patients with cardiovascular diseases and their potential impact on morbidity and mortality, it is important to identify the most susceptible patients, who therefore require closer monitoring of drug therapy.Purpose: To identify the profile of patients at higher risk of developing at least one DRP during hospitalization in a cardiology ward.Method: We consecutively included all patients hospitalized in the cardiology ward of a teaching hospital in 2009. DRPs were identified through a computerized warning system designed by the pharmacy department and integrated into the electronic medical record.Results: A total of 964 admissions were included, and at least one DRP was detected in 29.8%. The variables associated with a higher risk of these events were polypharmacy (odds ratio [OR]=1.228; 95% confidence interval [CI]=1.153–1.308, female sex (OR=1.496; 95% CI=1.026–2.180, and first admission (OR=1.494; 95% CI=1.005–2.221.Conclusion: Monitoring patients through a computerized warning system allowed the detection of at least one DRP in one-third of the patients. Knowledge of the risk factors for developing these problems in patients admitted to hospital for cardiovascular problems helps in identifying the most susceptible patients. Keywords

  17. Anatomy of the ward round.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Hare, James A

    2008-07-01

    The ward round has been a central activity of hospital life for hundreds of years. It is hardly mentioned in textbooks. The ward round is a parade through the hospital of professionals where most decision making concerning patient care is made. However the traditional format may be intimidating for patients and inadequate for communication. The round provides an opportunity for the multi-disciplinary team to listen to the patient\\'s narrative and jointly interpret his concerns. From this unfolds diagnosis, management plans, prognosis formation and the opportunity to explore social, psychological, rehabilitation and placement issues. Physical examination of the patient at the bedside still remains important. It has been a tradition to discuss the patient at the bedside but sensitive matters especially of uncertainty may better be discussed elsewhere. The senior doctor as round leader must seek the input of nursing whose observations may be under-appreciated due to traditional professional hierarchy. Reductions in the working hours of junior doctors and shortened length of stay have reduced continuity of patient care. This increases the importance of senior staff in ensuring continuity of care and the need for the joint round as the focus of optimal decision making. The traditional round incorporates teaching but patient\\'s right to privacy and their preferences must be respected. The quality and form of the clinical note is underreported but the electronic record is slow to being accepted. The traditional multi-disciplinary round is disappearing in some centres. This may be regrettable. The anatomy and optimal functioning of the ward round deserves scientific scrutiny and experimentation.

  18. The locked psychiatric ward: hotel or detention camp for people with dual diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terkelsen, Toril Borch; Larsen, Inger Beate

    2013-10-01

    The concepts of autonomy and liberty are established goals in mental health care; however, involuntary commitment is used towards people with mental health and substance abuse problems (dual diagnosis). To explore how patients and staff act in the context of involuntary commitment, how interactions are described and how they might be interpreted. Ethnographic methodology in a locked psychiatric ward in Norway. Two parallel images emerged: (a) The ward as a hotel. Several patients wanted a locked ward for rest and safety, even when admission was classified as involuntary. The staff was concerned about using the ward for real treatment of motivated people, rather than merely as a comfortable hotel for the unmotivated. (b) The ward as a detention camp. Other patients found involuntary commitment and restrictions in the ward as a kind of punishment, offending them as individuals. Contrary, the staff understood people with dual diagnoses more like a generalized group in need of their control and care. Patients and staff have different perceptions of involuntary commitment. Based on the patients' points of view, mental health care ought to be characterized by inclusion and recognition, treating patients as equal citizens comparable to guests in a hotel.

  19. Effects of antidiabetes drugs on functional independence measure on a subacute rehabilitation ward for stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kose, E; Toyoshima, M; Tachi, T; Teramachi, H; Kawakubo, T; Hayashi, H

    2015-07-01

    It has been reported that the improvement of activities of daily living (ADL) by rehabilitation affects glycemic control. However, there are no reports about antidiabetes drugs as factors affecting the outcomes of rehabilitation. Therefore, we investigated the effects of antidiabetes drugs on functional independence measure (FIM) [total (T), motor (M), and cognition (C) items] in stroke patients with diabetes who were discharged from the subacute rehabilitation ward. We chose the frequently used antidiabetes drugs [sulfonylurea (SU), dipeptidyl peptidase-IV inhibitors (DPP-IVIs), and α-glycosidase inhibitors (α-GIs)] as the basis for categorizing the patients. We compared the patients' background features and laboratory data among the three groups. As a result, when SU was used in stroke patients with diabetes, it is difficult to obtain significant FIM-M gain, FIM-C gain, FIM-M efficiency, and FIM-C efficiency compared with of-GIs. As a reason for this, we hypothesize the possibility of the involvement of insulin resistance. Therefore, we consider that insulin resistance should be determined early and that it is important to reduce insulin resistance comprehensively by involving experts.

  20. Anatomy of the ward round.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hare, James A

    2008-07-01

    The ward round has been a central activity of hospital life for hundreds of years. It is hardly mentioned in textbooks. The ward round is a parade through the hospital of professionals where most decision making concerning patient care is made. However the traditional format may be intimidating for patients and inadequate for communication. The round provides an opportunity for the multi-disciplinary team to listen to the patient's narrative and jointly interpret his concerns. From this unfolds diagnosis, management plans, prognosis formation and the opportunity to explore social, psychological, rehabilitation and placement issues. Physical examination of the patient at the bedside still remains important. It has been a tradition to discuss the patient at the bedside but sensitive matters especially of uncertainty may better be discussed elsewhere. The senior doctor as round leader must seek the input of nursing whose observations may be under-appreciated due to traditional professional hierarchy. Reductions in the working hours of junior doctors and shortened length of stay have reduced continuity of patient care. This increases the importance of senior staff in ensuring continuity of care and the need for the joint round as the focus of optimal decision making. The traditional round incorporates teaching but patient's right to privacy and their preferences must be respected. The quality and form of the clinical note is underreported but the electronic record is slow to being accepted. The traditional multi-disciplinary round is disappearing in some centres. This may be regrettable. The anatomy and optimal functioning of the ward round deserves scientific scrutiny and experimentation.

  1. Patient care and nursing practice when staff requirements exceed staff availability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloney, J P; Allanach, B C; Bartz, C; Peterson, S L

    1993-08-01

    This study examined the Workload Management System for Nurses at a tertiary-care Army hospital to determine the incongruence between recommended nursing care hours and actual nursing care hours provided. The purpose of the study was to describe patient care and nursing practice when calculated staff requirements exceed actual staff availabilty. The findings of the study indicated that basic nursing care tasks were accomplished; however, professional development activities were sacrificed. The data reveal that nurses do not have the time to grow professionally through research or education, and they are reduced to assembly-line mentality as they go from task to task without being able to care for a patient as a person.

  2. The ethical landscape of professional care in everyday practice as perceived by staff: A qualitative content analysis of ethical diaries written by staff in child and adolescent psychiatric in-patient care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pelto-Piri Veikko

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although there has been some empirical research on ethics concerning the attitudes and approaches of staff in relation to adult patients, there is very little to be found on child and adolescent psychiatric care. In most cases researchers have defined which issues are important, for instance, coercive care. The aim of this study was to provide a qualitative description of situations and experiences that gave rise to ethical problems and considerations as reported by staff members on child and adolescent psychiatric wards, although they were not provided with a definition of the concept. Methods The study took place in six child and adolescent psychiatric wards in Sweden. All staff members involved with patients on these wards were invited to participate. The staff members were asked to keep an ethical diary over the course of one week, and data collection comprised the diaries handed in by 68 persons. Qualitative content analysis was used in order to analyse the diaries. Results In the analysis three themes emerged; 1 good care 2 loyalty and 3 powerlessness. The theme ‘good care’ contains statements about the ideal of commitment but also about problems living up to the ideal. Staff members emphasized the importance of involving patients and parents in the care, but also of the need for professional distance. Participants seldom perceived decisions about coercive measures as problematic, in contrast to those about pressure and restrictions, especially in the case of patients admitted for voluntary care. The theme ‘loyalty’ contains statements in which staff members perceived contradictory expectations from different interested parties, mainly parents but also their supervisor, doctors, colleagues and the social services. The theme ‘powerlessness’ contains statements about situations that create frustration, in which freedom of action is perceived as limited and can concern inadequacy in relation to patients and

  3. The ethical landscape of professional care in everyday practice as perceived by staff: A qualitative content analysis of ethical diaries written by staff in child and adolescent psychiatric in-patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelto-Piri, Veikko; Engström, Karin; Engström, Ingemar

    2012-07-09

    Although there has been some empirical research on ethics concerning the attitudes and approaches of staff in relation to adult patients, there is very little to be found on child and adolescent psychiatric care. In most cases researchers have defined which issues are important, for instance, coercive care. The aim of this study was to provide a qualitative description of situations and experiences that gave rise to ethical problems and considerations as reported by staff members on child and adolescent psychiatric wards, although they were not provided with a definition of the concept. The study took place in six child and adolescent psychiatric wards in Sweden. All staff members involved with patients on these wards were invited to participate. The staff members were asked to keep an ethical diary over the course of one week, and data collection comprised the diaries handed in by 68 persons. Qualitative content analysis was used in order to analyse the diaries. In the analysis three themes emerged; 1) good care 2) loyalty and 3) powerlessness. The theme 'good care' contains statements about the ideal of commitment but also about problems living up to the ideal. Staff members emphasized the importance of involving patients and parents in the care, but also of the need for professional distance. Participants seldom perceived decisions about coercive measures as problematic, in contrast to those about pressure and restrictions, especially in the case of patients admitted for voluntary care. The theme 'loyalty' contains statements in which staff members perceived contradictory expectations from different interested parties, mainly parents but also their supervisor, doctors, colleagues and the social services. The theme 'powerlessness' contains statements about situations that create frustration, in which freedom of action is perceived as limited and can concern inadequacy in relation to patients and violations in the workplace. The ethical considerations described by

  4. The impact on the workload of the Ward Manager with the introduction of administrative assistants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locke, Rachel; Leach, Camilla; Kitsell, Fleur; Griffith, Jacki

    2011-03-01

    To evaluate the impact on the workload of the Ward Manager (WM) with the introduction of administrative assistants into eight trusts in the South of England in a year-long pilot. Ward Managers are nurse leaders who are responsible for ward management and delivering expert clinical care to patients. They have traditionally been expected to achieve this role without administrative assistance. Meeting the workload demands of multiple roles and overload has meant the leadership and clinical role has suffered, presenting issues of low morale among existing WMs and issues of recruiting the next generation of WMs. Sixty qualitative interviews were carried out with 16 WMs, 12 Ward Manager Assistants (WMAs), and six senior nurse executives about the impact of the introduction of the WMA post. Quantitative data to measure change in WM workload and ward activity was supplied by 24 wards. Ward Managers reported spending reduced time on administrative tasks and having increased time available to spend on the ward with patients and leading staff. With the introduction of WMAs, there was also improvement in key performance measures (the maintenance of quality under service pressures) and increased staff motivation. There was overwhelming support for the introduction of administrative assistants from participating WMs. The WMAs enabled WMs to spend more time with patients and, more widely, to provide greater support to ward teams. The success of the pilot is reflected in wards working hard to be able to extend contracts of WMAs. The extent of the success is reflected in wards that were not participants in the pilot, observing the benefits of the post, having worked to secure funding to recruit their own WMAs. The widespread introduction of administrative assistance could increase ward productivity and provide support for clinical leaders. Continuing professional development for WMs needs to incorporate training about management responsibilities and how to best use administrative

  5. Narcissism in patients admitted to psychiatric acute wards: its relation to violence, suicidality and other psychopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svindseth, Marit F; Nøttestad, Jim Aage; Wallin, Juliska; Roaldset, John Olav; Dahl, Alv A

    2008-02-27

    The objective was to examine various aspects of narcissism in patients admitted to acute psychiatric wards and to compare their level of narcissism to that of an age- and gender-matched sample from the general population (NORM). This cross-sectional study interviewed 186 eligible acute psychiatric patients with the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS) and the Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF). The patients filled in the Narcissistic Personality Inventory-21 item version (NPI-21), The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale. High and low narcissism was defined by the median of the total NPI-21 score. An age- and gender-matched control sample from the general population also scored the NPI-21 (NORM). Being male, involuntary admitted, having diagnosis of schizophrenia, higher self-esteem, and severe violence were significantly associated with high narcissism, and so were also low levels of suicidality, depression, anxiety and GAF scores. Severe violence and high self-esteem were significantly associated with high narcissism in multivariable analyses. The NPI-21 and its subscales showed test-retest correlations >/=0.83, while the BPRS and the HADS showed lower correlations, confirming the trait character of the NPI-21. Depression and suicidality were negatively associated with the NPI-21 total score and all its subscales, while positive association was observed with grandiosity. No significant differences were observed between patients and NORM on the NPI-21 total score or any of the NPI subscales. Narcissism in the psychiatric patients was significantly associated with violence, suicidality and other symptoms relevant for management and treatment planning. Due to its trait character, use of the NPI-21 in acute psychiatric patients can give important clinical information. The similar level of narcissism found in patients and NORM is in need of further examination.

  6. Narcissism in patients admitted to psychiatric acute wards: its relation to violence, suicidality and other psychopathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svindseth, Marit F; Nøttestad, Jim Aage; Wallin, Juliska; Roaldset, John Olav; Dahl, Alv A

    2008-01-01

    Background The objective was to examine various aspects of narcissism in patients admitted to acute psychiatric wards and to compare their level of narcissism to that of an age- and gender-matched sample from the general population (NORM). Methods This cross-sectional study interviewed 186 eligible acute psychiatric patients with the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS) and the Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF). The patients filled in the Narcissistic Personality Inventory-21 item version (NPI-21), The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale. High and low narcissism was defined by the median of the total NPI-21 score. An age- and gender-matched control sample from the general population also scored the NPI-21 (NORM). Results Being male, involuntary admitted, having diagnosis of schizophrenia, higher self-esteem, and severe violence were significantly associated with high narcissism, and so were also low levels of suicidality, depression, anxiety and GAF scores. Severe violence and high self-esteem were significantly associated with high narcissism in multivariable analyses. The NPI-21 and its subscales showed test-retest correlations ≥0.83, while the BPRS and the HADS showed lower correlations, confirming the trait character of the NPI-21. Depression and suicidality were negatively associated with the NPI-21 total score and all its subscales, while positive association was observed with grandiosity. No significant differences were observed between patients and NORM on the NPI-21 total score or any of the NPI subscales. Conclusion Narcissism in the psychiatric patients was significantly associated with violence, suicidality and other symptoms relevant for management and treatment planning. Due to its trait character, use of the NPI-21 in acute psychiatric patients can give important clinical information. The similar level of narcissism found in patients and NORM is in need of further examination. PMID:18304339

  7. Analysis of Clostridium difficile infections in patients hospitalized at the nephrological ward in Poland

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    Agata Kujawa-Szewieczek

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Few studies have evaluated the incidence and risk factors of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI in the adult Polish population, in particular in solid organ recipients hospitalized at the nephrological ward.Aim: The aim of this study was to analyze Clostridium difficile infections (CDI among patients hospitalized in the Department of Nephrology, Transplantation and Internal Medicine, Medical University of Silesia in Katowice.Material/Methods: Thirty-seven patients with Clostridium difficile infection diagnosed between October 2011 and November 2013 (26 months, identified among a total of 3728 patients hospitalized in this department during this period, were included in this retrospective, single-center study. The CDI definition was based on the current recommendations of the European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases.Results: The observation period was divided into two 13-month intervals. Increased incidence (of borderline significance of CDI in the second period compared to the first period was observed (1.33% vs 0.65% respectively; p=0.057. Patients after kidney (n=11, kidney and pancreas (n=2 and liver (n=5 transplantation represented 48% of the analyzed CDI patients, and in half of these patients (50% CDI symptoms occurred within the first 3 months after transplantation. Clostridium difficile infection leads to irreversible deterioration of graft function in 38% of kidney recipients. Most incidents of CDI (70% were identified as nosocomial infection.Conclusions: 1. Clostridium difficile infection is particularly common among patients in the early period after solid organ transplantation. 2. Clostridium difficile infection may lead to irreversible deterioration of transplanted kidney function.

  8. Narcissism in patients admitted to psychiatric acute wards: its relation to violence, suicidality and other psychopathology

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    Wallin Juliska

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The objective was to examine various aspects of narcissism in patients admitted to acute psychiatric wards and to compare their level of narcissism to that of an age- and gender-matched sample from the general population (NORM. Methods This cross-sectional study interviewed 186 eligible acute psychiatric patients with the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS and the Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF. The patients filled in the Narcissistic Personality Inventory-21 item version (NPI-21, The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS and the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale. High and low narcissism was defined by the median of the total NPI-21 score. An age- and gender-matched control sample from the general population also scored the NPI-21 (NORM. Results Being male, involuntary admitted, having diagnosis of schizophrenia, higher self-esteem, and severe violence were significantly associated with high narcissism, and so were also low levels of suicidality, depression, anxiety and GAF scores. Severe violence and high self-esteem were significantly associated with high narcissism in multivariable analyses. The NPI-21 and its subscales showed test-retest correlations ≥0.83, while the BPRS and the HADS showed lower correlations, confirming the trait character of the NPI-21. Depression and suicidality were negatively associated with the NPI-21 total score and all its subscales, while positive association was observed with grandiosity. No significant differences were observed between patients and NORM on the NPI-21 total score or any of the NPI subscales. Conclusion Narcissism in the psychiatric patients was significantly associated with violence, suicidality and other symptoms relevant for management and treatment planning. Due to its trait character, use of the NPI-21 in acute psychiatric patients can give important clinical information. The similar level of narcissism found in patients and NORM is in need of further examination.

  9. Exploring the experiences of young people nursed on adult wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Linda; Black, Sharon

    This paper reports on a study of experiences of young people aged 14 to 18 years who were nursed on acute adult hospital wards in NHS hospitals in England. In spite of British government guidelines, young people from 14 years of age continue to be admitted to adult wards in the UK. Although much has been written about the transition of the young person to adult services, there is little research about the experiences of young people who are nursed on adult wards. Hermeneutic phenomenology was used to explore the lived experiences of eight young people who had been nursed on adult wards between 2004 and 2010. Data were collected in 2010. In-depth interviews were recorded, transcribed and analysed using Colaizzi's framework ( Colaizzi, 1978 ). Themes explored included expectations of what the experience may be like, young people's first impressions of the ward environment, the feelings of the young person while in hospital, the attitudes of people towards them including, both staff and other patients, and future admissions and how they would cope with readmissions. Better provision needs to be made for young people including appropriately trained staff, adolescent-friendly environments and areas in adult wards that are dedicated to adolescents.

  10. [Patient dissatisfaction following prolonged stay in the post-anesthesia care unit due to unavailable ward bed in a tertiary hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolkart, Oleg; Amar, Eyal; Weisman, Daniela; Flaishon, Ron; Weinbroum, Avi A

    2013-08-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate subjective reactions of post-surgery and anesthesia patients who stay in post-anesthesia care units (PACU) longer than necessary medically, due to administrative causes. We interviewed consenting postoperative patients during an 18-month period. All patients who remained in the PACU twice our obligatory PACU length of stay (> 4 hours) due to lack of an available bed in the appropriate hospital ward, were interviewed at the time of discharge. The study group consisted of those who remained > 4 hours after surgery and a control group of patients who were discharged within 4 hours. The questions were chosen from different sources, including generic and condition-specific questionnaires. A total of 67 patients stayed > 4 hours and 63 Irritability due to lack of independence were statistically higher, and satisfaction rates were lower in patients who stayed > 12 hours compared to those who were discharged after 4-12 hours (P irritate the patient. Patients' irate behavior may distract the medical staff from effectively performing their duties and interferes with optimal medical care in the PACU.

  11. Care of severe head injury patients in the Sarawak General Hospital: intensive care unit versus general ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, S K; Lim, S L; Lee, H K; Liew, D; Wong, A

    2011-06-01

    Intensive care for severe head injury patients is very important in the prevention and treatment of secondary brain injury. However, in a resources constraint environment and limited availability of Intensive Care Unit (ICU) beds in the hospitals, not all severe head injury patients will receive ICU care. This prospective study is aimed to evaluate the outcome of severe head injured patients who received ICU and general ward care in Sarawak General Hospital (SGH) over a 6-month period. A total of thirty five severe head injury patients were admitted. Twenty three patients (65.7%) were ventilated in general ward whereas twelve patients (34.3%) were ventilated in ICU. Overall one month mortality in this study was 25.7%. Patients who received ICU care had a lower one month mortality than those who received general ward care (16.7% vs 30.4%), although it was not statistically different. Multivariate analysis revealed only GCS on admission (OR 0.731; 95% CI 0.460 to 0.877; P=0.042) as the independent predictive factor for one month mortality in this study.

  12. Improving patient care through leadership engagement with frontline staff: a Department of Veterans Affairs case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Sara J; Rivard, Peter E; Hayes, Jennifer E; Shokeen, Priti; Gaba, David; Rosen, Amy

    2013-08-01

    Leveraging Frontline Expertise (LFLE) is a patient safety intervention for engaging senior managers with the work-systems challenges faced by frontline workers and ensuring follow-up and accountability for systemic change. A study was conducted to assess the ability to refine, implement, and demonstrate the effectiveness of LFLE, which was designed for and tested in private-sector hospitals, in a Department of Veterans Affairs medical center (VAMC), typically a more hierarchical setting. LFLE was pilot tested in an urban, East coast-based VAMC, which implemented LFLE in its emergency department and operating room, with the medical/surgical ward and ICU serving as controls. A 20-month multimethod evaluation involved interviews, observation, data-tracking forms, and surveys to measure participant perceptions of the program, operational benchmarks of effectiveness, and longitudinal change in safety climate. Implementation showed fidelity to program design. Participating units identified 22 improvement opportunities, 16 (73%) of which were fully or partially resolved. Senior managers' attitudes toward LFLE were more positive than those of frontline staff, whose attitudes were mixed. Perceptions of safety climate deteriorated during the study period in the implementation units relative to controls. LFLE can be implemented in the VA, yield work-system improvements, and increase alignment of improvement aims and actions across hierarchical levels. Yet the results also warn against dangers inherent in adapting improvement programs to new settings. Findings suggest the need for active listening and learning from frontline staff by senior managers and trust building across hierarchical

  13. Patient-Staff Interactions and Mental Health in Chronic Dialysis Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swartz, Richard D.; Perry, Erica; Brown, Stephanie; Swartz, June; Vinokur, Amiram

    2008-01-01

    Chronic dialysis imposes ongoing stress on patients and staff and engenders recurring contact and long-term relationships. Thus, chronic dialysis units are opportune settings in which to investigate the impact of patients' relationships with staff on patient well-being. The authors designed the present study to examine the degree to which…

  14. Characterization of colonizing Staphylococcus aureus isolated from surgical wards' patients in a Nigerian university hospital.

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    Deboye O Kolawole

    Full Text Available In contrast to developed countries, only limited data on the prevalence, resistance and clonal structure of Staphylococcus aureus are available for African countries. Since S. aureus carriage is a risk factor for postoperative wound infection, patients who had been hospitalized in surgical wards in a Nigerian University Teaching Hospital were screened for S. aureus carriage. All S. aureus isolates were genotyped (spa, agr and assigned to multilocus sequence types (MLST. Species affiliation, methicillin-resistance, and the possession of pyrogenic toxin superantigens (PTSAg, exfoliative toxins (ETs and Panton-Valentine Leukocidin (PVL were analyzed. Of 192 patients screened, the S. aureus carrier rate was 31.8 % (n = 61. Of these isolates, 7 (11.5% were methicillin-resistant (MRSA. The isolates comprised 24 spa types. The most frequent spa types were t064, t084, t311, and t1931, while the most prevalent MLST clonal complexes were CC5 and CC15. The most frequent PTSAg genes detected were seg/sei (41.0% followed by seb (29.5%, sea (19.7%, seh (14.7% and sec (11.5. The difference between the possession of classical and newly described PTSAg genes was not significant (63.9% versus 59.0% respectively; P = 0.602. PVL encoding genes were found in 39.3% isolates. All MRSA isolates were PVL negative, SCCmec types I and VI in MLST CC 5 and CC 30, respectively. Typing of the accessory gene regulator (agr showed the following distribution: agr group 1 (n = 20, group II (n = 17, group III (n = 14 and group IV (n = 10. Compared to European data, enterotoxin gene seb and PVL-encoding genes were more prevalent in Nigerian methicillin-susceptible S. aureus isolates, which may therefore act as potential reservoir for PVL and PTSAg genes.

  15. An observational study in psychiatric acute patients admitted to General Hospital Psychiatric Wards in Italy

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    Margari Francesco

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives this Italian observational study was aimed at collecting data of psychiatric patients with acute episodes entering General Hospital Psychiatric Wards (GHPWs. Information was focused on diagnosis (DSM-IV, reasons of hospitalisation, prescribed treatment, outcome of aggressive episodes, evolution of the acute episode. Methods assessments were performed at admission and discharge. Used psychometric scales were the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS, the Modified Overt Aggression Scale (MOAS and the Nurses' Observation Scale for Inpatient Evaluation (NOSIE-30. Results 864 adult patients were enrolled in 15 GHPWs: 728 (320 M; mean age 43.6 yrs completed both admission and discharge visits. A severe psychotic episode with (19.1% or without (47.7% aggressive behaviour was the main reason of admission. Schizophrenia (42.8% at admission and 40.1% at discharge and depression (12.9% at admission and 14.7% at discharge were the predominant diagnoses. The mean hospital stay was 12 days. The mean (± SD total score of MOAS at admission, day 7 and discharge was, respectively, 2.53 ± 5.1, 0.38 ± 2.2, and 0.21 ± 1.5. Forty-four (6.0% patients had episodes of aggressiveness at admission and 8 (1.7% at day 7. A progressive improvement in each domain/item vs. admission was observed for MOAS and BPRS, while NOSIE-30 did not change from day 4 onwards. The number of patients with al least one psychotic drug taken at admission, in the first 7 days of hospitalisation, and prescribed at discharge, was, respectively: 472 (64.8%, 686 (94.2% and 676 (92.9%. The respective most frequently psychotic drugs were: BDZs (60.6%, 85.7%, 69.5%, typical anti-psychotics (48.3%, 57.0%, 49.6%, atypical anti-psychotics (35.6%, 41.8%, 39.8% and antidepressants (40.9%, 48.8%, 43.2%. Rates of patients with one, two or > 2 psychotic drugs taken at admission and day 7, and prescribed at discharge, were, respectively: 24.8%, 8.2% and 13.5% in mono-therapy; 22.0%, 20

  16. A reflection on choosing practice development as a framework to explore music as a therapeutic method to reduce anxiety in patients living with dementia in a ward setting

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    Alasdair Pithie

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: As a student nurse I chose to write my fourth year dissertation on the use of music as a therapeutic method to reduce anxiety in patients living with dementia. Music has been shown to have a positive effect on patients’ anxiety levels and improve their quality of life. A music therapy intervention could be beneficial but I realised I would need a framework that would enable me to implement the intervention in a ward setting, while offering practitioners and other participants a reasonable level of control and ownership. Discussion: Practice development was chosen because it is a person-centred framework, encouraging the learning of all those involved as well as those facilitating. It is inclusive and allows staff to adapt to the way new practices are introduced in a project. Change management theory was also considered as a framework but lacked many of the person-centred qualities required. Conclusions and implications for practice: Practice development provides the required characteristics for a project to introduce music into a care setting. Given that the methods of the project rely heavily on the involvement of staff and patients’ families, it is important to offer them a sense of ownership and control as an encouragement to take an interest and pride in its success. Furthermore, student nurses can benefit from being introduced to practice development because it will offer them a change theory that is person centred and inclusive.

  17. Food hygiene on the wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steuer, Walter

    2007-09-13

    A PROBLEM THAT IS OFTEN OVERLOOKED OR SIMPLY NOT GIVEN ENOUGH ATTENTION: the food served to patients from the kitchen is not sterile. If food is allowed to stand at room temperature for a long time, both in the case of food cooked for lunch and of food intended for supper which has been previously chilled, there is the possibility of massive spore germination or of dangerous toxin formation. Therefore regulations on how to handle food and beverages (e.g. tea) must be set out in the infection control policy, and checks carried out to monitor compliance with the rules relating to temperature checks, duration and type of storage, need for reheating, etc. Making staff aware of the issues involved is of paramount importance. These include monitoring hygiene standards in the ward kitchen, formulation of a cleaning policy, periodic bacteriological checks (not only of workstations but also of the dishwasher results), whenever possible the use of disposable cloths for working surfaces and equipment, changing cleaning cloths at least once daily and hygienic hand disinfection before and after handing out food. Foodstuffs brought in by visitors represent a special hygienic and organizational problem because in many cases they already have a high baseline microbial count. Visitors must be made aware that, for example, slices of cake left in the patient's room and often eaten only hours later can pose a risk of infection.In summary, the following principles of food hygiene must be observed on the wards:Maintenance of the cold-hot chainNot only reheat food, but ensure it is well heated throughout Avoid situations giving rise to spore germination in foodstuffs brought in by visitorsCleanliness and minimal contamination of kitchen worktopsCleanliness of crockery and kitchen towels Do not allow food to stand at room temperature for a long time, in particular desserts and confectionery A standard policy must be enforced to define the hygienic status and organization for food

  18. Improving patient education by an in-service communication training for health care providers at a cancer ward: communication climate, patient satisfaction and the need of lasting implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, Adriaan; Wysmans, Michel

    2010-03-01

    To show the effects of an in-service communication training for health care providers at a cancer ward, to improve the quality and quantity of the patient education, and patient satisfaction with the care received. A 3-year in-service communication training was held at a cancer ward. Pre- and post-data were collected about the quality and quantity of the communication of nurses, physicians and other health care providers (HCPs) towards patients and colleagues (n=22) as well as the satisfaction of the patients with the quality of care (n=90). The communication training raised significantly the quality and quantity of the communication towards patients and with colleagues. Also patient satisfaction with the quality of care increased. However, the long-term implementation of the benefits was proved disappointing. In-service communication training is an important means for the long-term improvement of the quality of patient education at nursing departments in hospitals. Lasting implementation of the benefits however requires attention to organizational obstacles, budgetary conditions, leadership factors at the ward, and the application of an organizationally oriented theoretical framework. Improvement of patient education at nursing wards does not only require educational means, organizational facilities and professional training, but can be improved too by in-service communication training, which increases the quality of the patient-centered care. An organizational oriented change-strategy is needed to ensure the implementation produces lasting effects. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Continue to Vaccinate Patients and Staff Against the Flu

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-02-08

    This podcast is a reminder to health care providers about the importance of annual flu vaccination—it’s not too late! Health care providers should get their flu vaccine and continue offering and encouraging flu vaccination among their staff, colleagues, and patients.  Created: 2/8/2012 by National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD).   Date Released: 2/14/2012.

  20. Relationships with clinical staff after a diagnosis of breast cancer are associated with patients' experience of care and abuse in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmon, Peter; Holcombe, Christopher; Clark, Louise; Krespi, Rita; Fisher, Jean; Hill, Jonathan

    2007-09-01

    Patients experiencing the crisis of the diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer need to form trusting and supportive relationships with clinical staff. However, adverse childhood experiences damage the ability to form supportive relationships as adults. We tested the prediction that women recalling childhood abuse and lack of parental care would experience poorer support from clinical staff caring for them around the time of diagnosis and surgical treatment of breast cancer. Two to 4 days after surgery, women with primary breast cancer (N=355) self-reported: childhood sexual, physical, and emotional abuse and parental care; perceived social support; support experienced from the surgeon and breast and ward nurses; and current emotional distress. Logistic regression analyses and covariance structure modeling tested the dependence of perceived professional support on childhood abuse and care and on current social support, controlling for emotional distress and age. Women who reported feeling fully supported by clinical staff were more likely to recall no abuse and good parental care. The influence of parental care, but not abuse, was explained by its association with experiencing good social support generally, which was itself associated with feeling fully supported by clinical staff. These relationships were independent of current emotional distress. Patients' ability to feel fully supported by clinical staff reflects not only how much support staff make available but also patients' experience of close relationships in childhood. We suggest that, whereas lack of parental care compromises adult supportive relationships in general, abuse specifically reduces support from clinical staff.

  1. Training intervention for health care staff in the provision of existential support to patients with cancer: a randomized, controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henoch, Ingela; Danielson, Ella; Strang, Susann; Browall, Maria; Melin-Johansson, Christina

    2013-12-01

    When a patient receives a cancer diagnosis, existential issues become more compelling. Throughout the illness trajectory, patients with cancer are cared for in oncology wards, by home care teams or in hospices. Nurses working with these patients are sometimes aware of the patients' existential needs but do not feel confident when discussing these issues. To determine the effects of a training intervention, where the focus is on existential issues and nurses' perceived confidence in communication and their attitude toward caring for dying patients. This was a randomized, controlled trial with a training intervention comprising theoretical training in existential issues combined with individual and group reflection. In total, 102 nurses in oncology and hospice wards and in palliative home care teams were randomized to a training or non-training group. Primary outcomes, confidence in communication, and attitude toward the care of dying patients were measured at baseline, immediately after the training, and five to six months later. Confidence in communication improved significantly in the training group from baseline (before the training) to both the first and second follow-up, that is, immediately after the training and five months later. The attitude toward caring for the dying did not improve in the training group. This study shows that short-term training with reflection improves the confidence of health care staff when communicating, which is important for health care managers with limited resources. Further studies are needed to explore how patients experience the communication skills of health care staff after such training. Copyright © 2013 U.S. Cancer Pain Relief Committee. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Optimizing Lighting Design for Hospital Wards by Defining User Zones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thuesen, Niels; Stidsen, Lone; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning

    2011-01-01

    of lighting design in private and public settings are often not similar. The purpose of this article is therefore present a approach dividing the hospital ward in 3 user zones for patients, staff and visitors. The main user of the zone should be in control of the light scenario and thereby a refining......Studying Standard and recommendations for lighting in hospital environment its often suggest a uniform light distribution to facilitate the needs of the staff. At the same time the standards recommend a lighting design supporting the patients feeling a homely and pleasant atmosphere, and point out...... that the light should not be disrupting the patients wellbeing. These two approaches are not necessarily consistent because the right quality and quantity of light in wards is highly depending on the functionality of the space and the wished and expected lighting atmosphere of the space, and a comparison...

  3. [Validation of the Polish version of The Authentic Leadership Questionnaire for the of evaluation purpose of nursing management staff in national hospital wards].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierpińska, Lidia

    2013-09-01

    The Authentic Leadership Questionnaire (ALQ) is a standardized research instrument for the evaluation of individual elements of leader's conduct which contribute to the authentic leadership. The application of this questionnaire in Polish conditions required to carry out the validation process. The aim of the study was to evaluate of validity and reliability of the Polish version of the American research instrument for the needs of evaluation of authenticity of leadership of the nursing management in Polish hospitals. The study covered 286 nurses (143 head nurses and 143 of their subordinates) employed in 45 hospitals in Poland. Theoretical validity of the instrument was evaluated using Fisher's transformation (r-Person correlation coefficient), while the criterion validity of the ALQ was evaluated using rho-Spearman correlation coefficient and the BOHIPSZO questionnaire. The reliability of the ALQ was assessed by means of the Cronbach-alpha coefficient. The ALQ questionnaire applied for the evaluation of authenticity of leadership of the nursing management in Polish hospital wards shows an acceptable theoretical and criterion validity and reliability (Cronbach-alpha coefficient 0.80). The Polish version of the ALQ is valid and reliable, and may be applied in studies concerning the evaluation of authenticity of leadership of the nursing management in Polish hospital wards.

  4. Evaluation of the effect of music on anxiety level of patients hospitalized in cardiac wards before angiography

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    Zahra Pourmovahed

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patients experience high levels of anxiety before angiography, which is mostly associated with irreparable effects on health status of such individuals. Use of alternative medicine to reduce stress and anxiety is of paramount importance. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the effect of music on anxiety level of patients hospitalized in cardiac wards before angiography. Methods: This clinical trial was conducted on 70 patients admitted to cardiac wards before angiography in three selected hospitals of Shiraz, Iran in 2015. Samples were selected through randomized and available sampling and divided into two groups of control (n=35 and intervention (n=35. In this study, the intervention group received one hour of music before angiography for 20 minutes, whereas the usual care of ward was provided for the control group. Data was collected using the state-trait anxiety inventory (STAI by Spielberger one hour before angiography (immediately before the intervention and 20 minutes after angiography (immediately after the intervention through interviews with all the participants. Data analysis was performed in SPSS version 22 using descriptive statistics, Chi-square, as well as paired and independent-tests. Results: In this study, mean anxiety scores of patients in the intervention and control groups before the intervention were 48.45±6.63 and 48.25±6.63, respectively. After the intervention, these scores were changed to 44.28±5.21 and 49.02±7.74 in the intervention (P=0.004 and control (P=0.90 groups, respectively. Therefore, a significant difference was observed between the groups after the intervention (P=0.008. Conclusion: According to the results of this study, music before angiography could lead to a significant decrease in anxiety level of patients. Therefore, this approach could be used as an effective method to alleviate anxiety in patients.

  5. Evaluation of the effect of music on anxiety level of patients hospitalized in cardiac wards before angiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pourmovahed Zahra

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Patients experience high levels of anxiety before angiography, which is mostly associated with irreparable effects on health status of such individuals. Use of alternative medicine to reduce stress and anxiety is of paramount importance. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the effect of music on anxiety level of patients hospitalized in cardiac wards before angiography. Materials and Method: This clinical trial was conducted on 70 patients admitted to cardiac wards before angiography in three selected hospitals of Shiraz, Iran in 2015. Samples were randomized convenience sampling and divided into two groups of control (n=35 and intervention (n=35. In this study, the intervention group received one hour of music before angiography for 20 minutes, whereas the usual care of ward was provided for the control group. Data was collected using the state-trait anxiety inventory (STAI by Spielberger one hour before angiography (immediately before the intervention and 20 minutes after angiography (immediately after the intervention through interviews with all the participants. Data analysis was performed in SPSS version 22 using descriptive statistics, Chi-square, as well as paired and independent-tests. Results: In this study, mean anxiety scores of patients in the intervention and control groups before the intervention were 48.45±6.63 and 48.25±6.63, respectively. After the intervention, these scores were changed to 44.28±5.21 and 49.02±7.74 in the intervention (P=0.004 and control (P=0.90 groups, respectively. Therefore, a significant difference was observed between the groups after the intervention (P=0.008. Conclusion: According to the results of this study, music before angiography could lead to a significant decrease in anxiety level of patients. Therefore, this approach could be used as an effective method to alleviate anxiety in patients.

  6. Perceptions of nursing students trained in a new model teaching ward in Malawi

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    Thokozani Bvumbwe

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate the perceptions of nursing students trained in a new model teaching ward in Malawi. A total of 90students from five nursing colleges were randomly assigned to one model ward and two ordinary wards in a single teaching hospital. The students were administered a revised version of the Student Evaluation of Clinical Education Environment questionnaire. Significant differences among the three wards were found in all items in the communication/feedback subscale, with the exception of the item “nursing staff provided constructive feedback” (P=0.162. Within the learning opportunities subscale all items showed significant differences among the three wards, whereas 50% of the items in the learning support/assistance subscale had significantly different responses among the three wards. Within the department atmosphere subscale, no significant differences were found in the items assessing whether an adequate number and variety of patients were present in the ward (P=0.978. The strategies that are being implemented to improve the educational environment showed positive results. Students scored the model teaching ward highly. Students who underwent precepting in the model teaching wards reported having more learning opportunities and a positive learning environment.

  7. Experiences of patients with acute abdominal pain in the ED or acute surgical ward --a qualitative comparative study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schultz, Helen; Qvist, Niels; Backer Mogensen, Christian

    2013-01-01

    was that the ED included a multidisciplinary team with nurses, who mainly had interactions with the patients before surgical assessment. In all, it resulted in fragmentation of care and a patient experience of repetition. In ASW, focus was on assessment by a senior physician, only, and the nurses' interaction......The Danish health care system is currently establishing emergency departments (EDs) with an observation unit nationwide. The aim of the study was to investigate patients with acute abdominal pain and their experiences upon arrival and stay in an acute surgical ward (ASW) versus an ED...... with the patients took place after surgical assessment. In all, patients experienced long waiting times. The study shows a need to define the roles of the professionals in units receiving patients with acute abdominal pain in order to fulfil the medical as well as the experienced needs of the acute patient....

  8. A multi-component patient-handling intervention improves attitudes and behaviors for safe patient handling and reduces aggression experienced by nursing staff: A controlled before-after study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risør, Bettina Wulff; Casper, Svend Dalgas; Andersen, Lars Louis

    2017-01-01

    This study evaluated an intervention for patient-handling equipment aimed to improve nursing staffs' use of patient handling equipment and improve their general health, reduce musculoskeletal problems, aggressive episodes, days of absence and work-related accidents. As a controlled before......-after study, questionnaire data were collected at baseline and 12-month follow-up among nursing staff at intervention and control wards at two hospitals. At 12-month follow-up, the intervention group had more positive attitudes towards patient-handling equipment and increased use of specific patient-handling...... attitudes and behaviours for safe patient-handling and less physically aggressive episodes. However, this did not translate into improved health of the staff during the 12-month study period....

  9. Geriatric intervention in elderly patients with hip fracture in an orthopedic ward

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Else Marie Damsgaard

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hip fracture is a common cause of long hospital stay in the elderly. Approximately one third of these patients die within the first year. As a consequence geriatric and orthopedic collaboration (orthogeriatrics has been organized in different ways. The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficiency of a multidisciplinary geriatric in-hospital intervention on patient outcome. METHODS: A total of 495 elderly hip fracture patients consecutively admitted to orthopedic surgery, were followed. Data were based on medical records. The intervention group (n=233 was compared to a historical cohort group (n=262 receiving traditional orthopedic treatment. Intervention program was based on initial physical and mental screening and evaluation, geriatric-focused care, and early discharge planning. The intervention was provided by a multidisciplinary geriatric team. After discharge, follow-up home-visits by a physiotherapist were performed, except for patients discharged to nursing homes, due to a 24-hour staff and easy access to the GP. RESULTS: Median length of stay was reduced from 15 to 13 days. More patients began treatment with calcium/vitamin-D and bisphosphonate (p=sig. There was no difference in hemoglobin variation between the time of admission and three to six months post admission, and no difference in three-month readmissions (odds ratio (OR = 1.09 [95%CI: 0.71;1.67]. Discharge destination was unchanged (OR=0.93 [95%CI: 0.52; 1.65]. In-hospital mortality was 8% in the intervention group vs. 6% (p=0.48, in the control group. Three-month mortality was 16% in the intervention group vs. 15% (p=0.39, in the control group. In the intervention group, residents from nursing homes had a higher three-month mortality (OR=2.37 [95% CI: 0.99; 5.67], and the risk of new fractures within two years decreased from 9.5% to 7.7%, though not statistically significant. CONCLUSION: Our study indicates that co-management of hip fracture patients by

  10. BED OCCUPANCY RATE AND LENGTH OF STAY OF PATIENTS IN MEDICAL AND ALLIED WARDS OF A TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usman, Gulzar; Memon, Khalida Naz; Shaikh, Shazia

    2015-01-01

    A good hospital management includes an effective allocative planning for beds in a hospital. Bed-occupancy rates and length of stay are the measures that reflect the functional ability of a hospital. A cross sectional study of two months' duration was carried out in eight medical and allied wards of Liaquat University Hospital (LUH) Jamshoro with objective to estimate the bed occupancy rate and the average length of stay of patients. Data was collected by filling a predesigned check list and bed occupancy rate and average length of stay were computed. Associations were analysed by using SPSS version 16. The p-value 50.05 Was taken as level of significance. One hundred & seven admissions were recorded against 235 available beds. Average bed occupancy rate was 51.33%. The 51.4% of the patients in medical wards except paediatrics ward were of the age >50 years; the mean age was 45 years and standard deviation +/-6.4 years. Mean age in paediatrics was 3.89 years and standard deviation of +/-0.8 years. 55.1% patients had infectious diseases. The 32.7% patients stayed in hospital for up to 3 days showing significant association between nature of diseases and duration of stay (p=0.03). There was male preponderance, i.e., 54.2% males against 45.8% females. Showing significant association between gender and length of stay (p=0.01). Bed occupancy rate and average stay in hospital were found within recommended range; more improvement may be brought by doing further research on this issue.

  11. 'Real life' clinical learning on an interprofessional training ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeth, D; Reeves, S; Goreham, C; Parker, P; Haynes, S; Pearson, S

    2001-07-01

    This paper describes the multi-method evaluation of an interprofessional training ward placement for medical, nursing, occupational therapy and physiotherapy students. Unique in the UK, and an extension of pioneering work in Sweden (Wahlström et al. 1997, Wahlstroöm & Sandén 1998), this interprofessional clinical placement allowed senior pre-qualifying students, under the supervision of practitioners, to plan and deliver interprofessional care for a group of orthopaedic and rheumatology patients. This responsibility enabled students to develop both their profession-specific skills in a real-world setting and the quality of their interprofessional teamwork. Student teams were supported by facilitators who led reflective sessions and acted as a resource for the students' problem-based learning. The training ward was evaluated by a multi-method approach, incorporating interviews, observations and questionnaires with students, patients and clinical staff. The evaluation findings have been grouped into a number of themes which offer an insight into the varying perspectives of training ward students, patients and staff. This paper pays particular attention to the nursing perspective of the interprofessional training ward pilot.

  12. The A-test: Reliability of functional recovery assessment during early rehabilitation of patients in an orthopedic ward

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vukomanović Aleksandra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. There are few tests for evaluation of functional abilities of patients surgically treated for hip fractures or osteoarthritis during early rehabilition period. The aim of this study was to investigate reliability (interobserver reproducibility and internal consistency of the A-test, an original test for functional recovery evaluation during early rehabilitation of patients in an orthopedic ward. Methods. The investigation included 105 patients (55 patients with hip osteoarthritis that underwent arthroplasty and 50 surgically treated patients with hip fracture. It was conducted in an orthopedic ward during early inpatient rehabilitation (from 1st to 5th day. For their functional recovery evaluation during early rehabilitation we used the A-test, a performance-based test with 10 items for assessing basic activities by six level ordinal scale (0-5. For internal consistency of the test the Cronbach coefficient alpha was calculated for the A-test results collected during early rehabilitation for all patients (105 patients x 5 days = 525 measures and separately for the results of patients with hip osteoarthritis (275 measures and hip fracture (250 measures. Values of this coefficient > 0.7 imply good internal consistency of the test. Interobserver reproducibility was estimated as follows: two physiotherapists together conducted physical therapy with the patients, and then, separately, rated the performance of each activity from the test (78 measures. The agreement between their estimations was expressed by the linear weighted kappa coefficient (for very good agreement values of kappa coefficient have to be in the range 0.81-1. Results. The Cronbach coefficient alpha was 0.98 (the results of all the patients and the results of the patients with hip osteoarthritis and 0.97 (the results of the patients with hip fracture. The values of kappa coefficient were in the range 0.81-0.92 for all items. Conclusion. The A-test is a reliable

  13. Prevalence of delirium among patients at a cancer ward: Clinical risk factors and prediction by bedside cognitive tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandahl, Mia Gall; Nielsen, Svend Erik; Koerner, Ejnar Alex; Schultz, Helga Holm; Arnfred, Sidse Marie

    2016-08-01

    Background Delirium is a frequent psychiatric complication to cancer, but rarely recognized by oncologists. Aims 1. To estimate the prevalence of delirium among inpatients admitted at an oncological cancer ward 2. To investigate whether simple clinical factors predict delirium 3. To examine the value of cognitive testing in the assessment of delirium. Methods On five different days, we interviewed and assessed patients admitted to a Danish cancer ward. The World Health Organization International Classification of Diseases Version 10, WHO ICD-10 Diagnostic System and the Confusion Assessment Method (CAM) were used for diagnostic categorization. Clinical information was gathered from medical records and all patients were tested with Mini Cognitive Test, The Clock Drawing Test, and the Digit Span Test. Results 81 cancer patients were assessed and 33% were diagnosed with delirium. All delirious participants were CAM positive. Poor performance on the cognitive tests was associated with delirium. Medical records describing CNS metastases, benzodiazepine or morphine treatment were associated with delirium. Conclusions Delirium is prevalent among cancer inpatients. The Mini Cognitive Test, The Clock Drawing Test, and the Digit Span Test can be used as screening tools for delirium among inpatients with cancer, but even in synergy, they lack specificity. Combining cognitive testing and attention to nurses' records might improve detection, yet further studies are needed to create a more detailed patient profile for the detection of delirium.

  14. Healthcare Staff Wellbeing, Burnout, and Patient Safety: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Louise H.; Johnson, Judith; Watt, Ian; Tsipa, Anastasia; O’Connor, Daryl B.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine whether there is an association between healthcare professionals’ wellbeing and burnout, with patient safety. Design Systematic research review. Data Sources PsychInfo (1806 to July 2015), Medline (1946 to July 2015), Embase (1947 to July 2015) and Scopus (1823 to July 2015) were searched, along with reference lists of eligible articles. Eligibility Criteria for Selecting Studies Quantitative, empirical studies that included i) either a measure of wellbeing or burnout, and ii) patient safety, in healthcare staff populations. Results Forty-six studies were identified. Sixteen out of the 27 studies that measured wellbeing found a significant correlation between poor wellbeing and worse patient safety, with six additional studies finding an association with some but not all scales used, and one study finding a significant association but in the opposite direction to the majority of studies. Twenty-one out of the 30 studies that measured burnout found a significant association between burnout and patient safety, whilst a further four studies found an association between one or more (but not all) subscales of the burnout measures employed, and patient safety. Conclusions Poor wellbeing and moderate to high levels of burnout are associated, in the majority of studies reviewed, with poor patient safety outcomes such as medical errors, however the lack of prospective studies reduces the ability to determine causality. Further prospective studies, research in primary care, conducted within the UK, and a clearer definition of healthcare staff wellbeing are needed. Implications This review illustrates the need for healthcare organisations to consider improving employees’ mental health as well as creating safer work environments when planning interventions to improve patient safety. Systematic Review Registration PROSPERO registration number: CRD42015023340. PMID:27391946

  15. Healthcare Staff Wellbeing, Burnout, and Patient Safety: A Systematic Review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise H Hall

    Full Text Available To determine whether there is an association between healthcare professionals' wellbeing and burnout, with patient safety.Systematic research review.PsychInfo (1806 to July 2015, Medline (1946 to July 2015, Embase (1947 to July 2015 and Scopus (1823 to July 2015 were searched, along with reference lists of eligible articles.Quantitative, empirical studies that included i either a measure of wellbeing or burnout, and ii patient safety, in healthcare staff populations.Forty-six studies were identified. Sixteen out of the 27 studies that measured wellbeing found a significant correlation between poor wellbeing and worse patient safety, with six additional studies finding an association with some but not all scales used, and one study finding a significant association but in the opposite direction to the majority of studies. Twenty-one out of the 30 studies that measured burnout found a significant association between burnout and patient safety, whilst a further four studies found an association between one or more (but not all subscales of the burnout measures employed, and patient safety.Poor wellbeing and moderate to high levels of burnout are associated, in the majority of studies reviewed, with poor patient safety outcomes such as medical errors, however the lack of prospective studies reduces the ability to determine causality. Further prospective studies, research in primary care, conducted within the UK, and a clearer definition of healthcare staff wellbeing are needed.This review illustrates the need for healthcare organisations to consider improving employees' mental health as well as creating safer work environments when planning interventions to improve patient safety.PROSPERO registration number: CRD42015023340.

  16. Which Medication Is the Patient Taking at Admission to the Emergency Ward? Still Unclear Despite the Swedish Prescribed Drug Register.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ida Engqvist

    Full Text Available Correct information on patients' medication is crucial for diagnosis and treatment in the Emergency Department. The aim of this study was to investigate the concordance between the admission chart and two other records of the patient's medication.This cohort study includes data on 168 patients over 18 years admitted to the Emergency Ward between September 1 and 30, 2008. The record kept by the general practitioner and the patient record of dispensed drugs in the Swedish Prescribed Drug Register were compared to the admission chart record.Drug record discrepancies of potential clinical significance between the admission chart record and the Swedish Prescribed Drug Register or general practitioner record were present in 79 and 82 percent, respectively. For 63 percent of the studied patients the admission chart record did not include all drugs registered in the Swedish Prescribed Drug Register. For 62 percent the admission chart record did not include all drugs registered in the general practitioner record. In addition, for 32 percent of the patients the admission chart record included drugs not registered in the Swedish Prescribed Drug Register and for 52 percent the admission chart record included drugs not found in the general practitioner record. The most discordant drug classes were cardiovascular and CNS-active drugs. Clinically significant drug record discrepancies were more frequent in older patients with multiple medication and caregivers.The apparent absence of an accurate record of the patient's drugs at admission to the Emergency Ward constitutes a potential patient safety hazard. The available sources in Sweden, containing information on the drugs a particular patient is taking, do not seem to be up to date. These results highlight the importance of an accurate list of currently used drugs that follows the patient and can be accessed upon acute admission to the hospital.

  17. Cost-effectiveness of ward-based pharmacy care in surgical patients: protocol of the SUREPILL (Surgery & Pharmacy In Liaison study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuks Paul F

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Preventable adverse drug events (pADEs are widely known to be a health care issue for hospitalized patients. Surgical patients are especially at risk, but prevention of pADEs in this population is not demonstrated before. Ward-based pharmacy interventions seem effective in reducing pADEs in medical patients. The cost-effectiveness of these preventive efforts still needs to be assessed in a comparative study of high methodological standard and also in the surgical population. For these aims the SUREPILL (Surgery & Pharmacy in Liaison study is initiated. Methods/Design A multi-centre controlled trial, with randomisation at ward-level and preceding baseline assessments is designed. Patients admitted to the surgical study wards for elective surgery with an expected length of stay of more than 48 hours will be included. Patients admitted to the intervention ward, will receive ward-based pharmacy care from the clinical pharmacy team, i.e. pharmacy practitioners and hospital pharmacists. This ward-based pharmacy intervention includes medication reconciliation in consultation with the patient at admission, daily medication review with face-to-face contact with the ward doctor, and patient counselling at discharge. Patients admitted in the control ward, will receive standard pharmaceutical care. The primary clinical outcome measure is the number of pADEs per 100 elective admissions. These pADEs will be measured by systematic patient record evaluation using a trigger tool. Patient records positive for a trigger will be evaluated on causality, severity and preventability by an independent expert panel. In addition, an economic evaluation will be performed from a societal perspective with the costs per preventable ADE as the primary economic outcome. Other outcomes of this study are: severity of pADEs, number of patients with pADEs per total number of admissions, direct (non-medical costs and indirect non-medical costs, extra costs per

  18. Care practices of older people with dementia in the surgical ward: A questionnaire survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Hynninen

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The objective of this study was to describe the care practices of nursing staff caring older people with dementia in a surgical ward. Methods: The data were collected from nursing staff (n = 191 working in surgical wards in one district area in Finland during October to November 2015. Data were collected using a structured questionnaire and analyzed statistically. The instrument consists of a total number of 141 items and four dimensions. The dimensions were as follows: background information (12 of items, specific characteristics of older people with dementia in a surgical ward (24 of items, specific characteristics of their care in a surgical ward (66 of items and use of physical restraints and alternative models for use of restraints for people with dementia (39 of items. Results: The questions which measure the nursing staff’s own assessment of care practices when caring for people with dementia in surgical wards were selected: counseling people with dementia, reaction when a surgical patient with dementia displays challenging behavior and use of alternative approach instead of physical restraints. Most commonly the nursing staff pay attention to patient’s state of alertness before counseling older people with dementia. Instead of using restraints, nursing staff gave painkillers for the patient and tried to draw patients’ attention elsewhere. The nursing staff with longer work experience estimate that they can handle the patients’ challenging behavior. They react by doing nothing more often than others. They pretend not to hear, see or notice anything. Conclusion: The findings of this study can be applied in nursing practice and in future studies focusing on the care practices among older people with dementia in acute care environment. The results can be used while developing patient treatments process in surgical ward to meet future needs.

  19. Cause analysis and preventive measures of conflict between nurse and patient in wards%病房内护患冲突原因分析及防范措施

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李湘

    2016-01-01

    The main reasons for the conflict between the nurse and patient in the ward include the weak of nursing service concept,the lack of standardized nursing service,nursing service operation errors,the hospital environment facilities,the lack of nursing staff and patient expectations exist deviation.In order to effectively reduce the emergence of nurse patient conflict in the ward,nurses should enhance service awareness,change the concept of nursing,standardize the service process,seriously serve the practice,strengthen the nurse patient communication and so on.%目的:诱发病房内护患冲突的主要原因包括护理服务观念淡薄、护理服务欠缺规范、护理服务操作差错、医院环境设施落后,护理人员编制不足和患者期望存在偏差。为有效减少病房内护患冲突的出现,护士应提升服务意识,转变护理理念,规范服务流程,认真服务实践,加强护患沟通等。

  20. Nurses' experience of collaboration with relatives of frail elderly patients in acute hospital wards: a qualitative study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindhardt, Tommi Bo; Hallberg, I.R.; Poulsen, Ingrid

    2008-01-01

    . OBJECTIVE: To illuminate nurses' experience of collaboration with relatives of frail elderly patients in acute hospital wards, and of the barriers and promoters for collaboration. DESIGN AND SETTING: The design was descriptive. Three acute units in a large Danish university hospital participated....... PARTICIPANTS: Six registered nurses and two auxiliary nurses in charge of discharge planning for the patients were included. METHOD: Open interviews using an interview guide. Manifest and latent content analysis was applied. RESULT: The main theme Encountering relatives-to be caught between ideals and practice...... reflected the nurses' two sets of conflicting attitudes towards collaboration with relatives, one in accordance with professional nursing values, the other reflecting the values of every day practice. The dual attitudes were reflected in two themes The coincidental encounter-the collaboration and Relatives...

  1. Nurses' experience of collaboration with relatives of frail elderly patients in acute hospital wards: A qualitative study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tove, Lindhardt; Hallberg, Ingalill Rahm; Poulsen, Ingrid

    2008-01-01

    . OBJECTIVE: To illuminate nurses' experience of collaboration with relatives of frail elderly patients in acute hospital wards, and of the barriers and promoters for collaboration. DESIGN AND SETTING: The design was descriptive. Three acute units in a large Danish university hospital participated....... PARTICIPANTS: Six registered nurses and two auxiliary nurses in charge of discharge planning for the patients were included. METHOD: Open interviews using an interview guide. Manifest and latent content analysis was applied. RESULT: The main theme Encountering relatives-to be caught between ideals and practice...... reflected the nurses' two sets of conflicting attitudes towards collaboration with relatives, one in accordance with professional nursing values, the other reflecting the values of every day practice. The dual attitudes were reflected in two themes The coincidental encounter-the collaboration and Relatives...

  2. Vitamin D deficiency in patients admitted to the general ward with breast, lung, and colorectal cancer in Buenos Aires, Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre, Marina; Manzano, Natalia; Salas, Yésica; Angel, Martín; Díaz-Couselo, Fernando A; Zylberman, Marcelo

    2016-01-01

    A high prevalence of hypovitaminosis D has been reported in cancer patients. Low levels of 25-(OH)-vitamin D were found in 158 of 162 (97.5%) inpatients with breast, lung, and colorectal cancer under active treatment, with severe deficiency (prevalence of vitamin D deficiency has been reported in cancer patients. Nevertheless, vitamin D serum levels have been checked in few patients. Information about the frequency of hypovitaminosis D in cancer patients in Argentina is unknown. The aim of the study was to assess the frequency of vitamin D deficiency in patients with breast, lung, and colorectal cancer. A prospective observational study was designed for cancer patients admitted to the general ward in 2014. The patients included had breast, lung, and colorectal cancer. All of them were under active treatment. The serum level of 25-(OH)-vitamin D [25-(OH)-D] was measured and categorized as sufficiency (>30 ng/ml), mild deficiency (20-30 ng/ml), and severe deficiency (colorectal cancer patients. The study found a high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in hospitalized cancer patients under active treatment. Many authors have recommended dosing vitamin D levels in this population; normalizing serum levels is difficult.

  3. Heterogeneous models for an early discrimination between sepsis and non-infective SIRS in medical ward patients: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mearelli, Filippo; Fiotti, Nicola; Altamura, Nicola; Zanetti, Michela; Fernandes, Giovanni; Burekovic, Ismet; Occhipinti, Alessandro; Orso, Daniele; Giansante, Carlo; Casarsa, Chiara; Biolo, Gianni

    2014-10-01

    The objective of the study was to determine the accuracy of phospholipase A2 group II (PLA2-II), interferon-gamma-inducible protein 10 (IP-10), angiopoietin-2 (Ang-2), and procalcitonin (PCT) plasma levels in early ruling in/out of sepsis among systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) patients. Biomarker levels were determined in 80 SIRS patients during the first 4 h of admission to the medical ward. The final diagnosis of sepsis or non-infective SIRS was issued according to good clinical practice. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) for sepsis diagnosis were assessed. The optimal biomarker combinations with clinical variables were investigated by logistic regression and decision tree (CART). PLA2-II, IP-10 and PCT, but not Ang-2, were significantly higher in septic (n = 60) than in non-infective SIRS (n = 20) patients (P ≤ 0.001, 0.027, and 0.002, respectively). PLA2-II PPV and NPV were 88 and 86%, respectively. The corresponding figures were 100 and 31% for IP-10, and 93 and 35% for PCT. Binary logistic regression model had 100% PPV and NPV, while manual and software-generated CART reached an overall accuracy of 95 and 98%, respectively, both with 100% NPV. PLA2-II and IP-10 associated with clinical variables in regression or decision tree heterogeneous models may be valuable biomarkers for sepsis diagnosis in SIRS patients admitted to medical ward (MW). Further studies are needed to introduce them into clinical practice.

  4. Characteristics of immigrant and non-immigrant patients in a dual-diagnosis psychiatric ward and treatment implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Sophie D; Blass, David; Bensimon-Braverman, Meital; Barak, Lee Topaz; Delayahu, Yael

    2014-12-01

    Two studies were conducted among patients in a male dual diagnosis (severe mental illness [SMI] with substance use) ward. The research examined the following questions: (1) Do immigrant and non-immigrant dual diagnosis patients exhibit similar or different socio-demographic, clinical and criminological characteristics? (2) What are the implications for treatment of immigrant (and non-immigrant) patients? Study one analyzed computerized hospital records of 413 male patients; Study two examined patient files of a subgroup of 141 (70 immigrant) male patients. Alongside similarities, non-immigrant patients reported higher numbers of repeat and involuntary hospitalizations and more drug use while immigrants showed longer hospitalizations, more suicide attempts, more violent suicide attempts, more violent offenses and more alcohol use. Among non-immigrants significant relationships were found between severity of SMI and crime/violence while among immigrants a significant relationship was found between suicidality and crime/violence. Implications for treatment include need for awareness of suicide risk among immigrant dual-diagnosis patients and an understanding of the differential relationship with crime/violence for the two populations.

  5. Characteristics of patients frequently subjected to pharmacological and mechanical restraint--a register study in three Norwegian acute psychiatric wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knutzen, Maria; Bjørkly, Stål; Eidhammer, Gunnar; Lorentzen, Steinar; Mjøsund, Nina Helen; Opjordsmoen, Stein; Sandvik, Leiv; Friis, Svein

    2014-01-30

    This retrospective study from three catchment-area-based acute psychiatric wards showed that of all the pharmacologically and mechanically restrained patients (n=373) 34 (9.1%) had been frequently restrained (6 or more times). These patients accounted for 39.2% of all restraint episodes during the two-year study period. Adjusted binary logistic regression analyses showed that the odds for being frequently restrained were 91% lower among patients above 50 years compared to those aged 18-29 years; a threefold increase (OR=3.1) for those admitted 3 times or more compared to patients with only one stay; and, finally, a threefold increase (OR=3.1) if the length of stay was 16 days or more compared to those admitted for 0-4 days. Among frequently restrained patients, males (n=15) had significantly longer stays than women (n=19), and 8 of the females had a diagnosis of personality disorder, compared to none among males. Our study showed that being frequently restrained was associated with long inpatient stay, many admissions and young age. Teasing out patient characteristics associated with the risk of being frequently restraint may contribute to reduce use of restraint by developing alternative interventions for these patients.

  6. Assessment of risk factors for candidemia in non-neutropenic patients hospitalized in Internal Medicine wards: A multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcone, M; Tiseo, G; Tascini, C; Russo, A; Sozio, E; Raponi, G; Rosin, C; Pignatelli, P; Carfagna, P; Farcomeni, A; Luzzati, R; Violi, F; Menichetti, F; Venditti, M

    2017-06-01

    An increasing prevalence of candidemia has been reported in Internal Medicine wards (IMWs). The aim of our study was to identify risk factors for candidemia among non-neutropenic patients hospitalized in IMWs. A multicenter case-control study was performed in three hospitals in Italy. Patients developing candidemia (cases) were compared to patients without candidemia (controls) matched by age, time of admission and duration of hospitalization. A logistic regression analysis identified risk factors for candidemia, and a new risk score was developed. Validation was performed on an external cohort of patients. Overall, 951 patients (317 cases of candidemia and 634 controls) were included in the derivation cohort, while 270 patients (90 patients with candidemia and 180 controls) constituted the validation cohort. Severe sepsis or septic shock, recent Clostridium difficile infection, diabetes mellitus, total parenteral nutrition, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, concomitant intravenous glycopeptide therapy, presence of peripherally inserted central catheter, previous antibiotic therapy and immunosuppressive therapy were factors independently associated with candidemia. The new risk score showed good area under the curve (AUC) values in both derivation (AUC 0.973 95% CI 0.809-0.997, pcandidemia. A new risk score with a good performance could facilitate the identification of candidates to early antifungal therapy. Copyright © 2017 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Unexplained Falls Are Frequent in Patients with Fall-Related Injury Admitted to Orthopaedic Wards: The UFO Study (Unexplained Falls in Older Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mussi Chiara

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the incidence of unexplained falls in elderly patients affected by fall-related fractures admitted to orthopaedic wards, we recruited 246 consecutive patients older than 65 (mean age 82±7 years, range 65–101. Falls were defined “accidental” (fall explained by a definite accidental cause, “medical” (fall caused directly by a specific medical disease, “dementia-related” (fall in patients affected by moderate-severe dementia, and “unexplained” (nonaccidental falls, not related to a clear medical or drug-induced cause or with no apparent cause. According to the anamnestic features of the event, older patients had a lower tendency to remember the fall. Patients with accidental fall remember more often the event. Unexplained falls were frequent in both groups of age. Accidental falls were more frequent in younger patients, while dementia-related falls were more common in the older ones. Patients with unexplained falls showed a higher number of depressive symptoms. In a multivariate analysis a higher GDS and syncopal spells were independent predictors of unexplained falls. In conclusion, more than one third of all falls in patients hospitalized in orthopaedic wards were unexplained, particularly in patients with depressive symptoms and syncopal spells. The identification of fall causes must be evaluated in older patients with a fall-related injury.

  8. Unexplained Falls Are Frequent in Patients with Fall-Related Injury Admitted to Orthopaedic Wards: The UFO Study (Unexplained Falls in Older Patients).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiara, Mussi; Gianluigi, Galizia; Pasquale, Abete; Alessandro, Morrione; Alice, Maraviglia; Gabriele, Noro; Paolo, Cavagnaro; Loredana, Ghirelli; Giovanni, Tava; Franco, Rengo; Giulio, Masotti; Gianfranco, Salvioli; Niccolò, Marchionni; Andrea, Ungar

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the incidence of unexplained falls in elderly patients affected by fall-related fractures admitted to orthopaedic wards, we recruited 246 consecutive patients older than 65 (mean age 82 ± 7 years, range 65-101). Falls were defined "accidental" (fall explained by a definite accidental cause), "medical" (fall caused directly by a specific medical disease), "dementia-related" (fall in patients affected by moderate-severe dementia), and "unexplained" (nonaccidental falls, not related to a clear medical or drug-induced cause or with no apparent cause). According to the anamnestic features of the event, older patients had a lower tendency to remember the fall. Patients with accidental fall remember more often the event. Unexplained falls were frequent in both groups of age. Accidental falls were more frequent in younger patients, while dementia-related falls were more common in the older ones. Patients with unexplained falls showed a higher number of depressive symptoms. In a multivariate analysis a higher GDS and syncopal spells were independent predictors of unexplained falls. In conclusion, more than one third of all falls in patients hospitalized in orthopaedic wards were unexplained, particularly in patients with depressive symptoms and syncopal spells. The identification of fall causes must be evaluated in older patients with a fall-related injury.

  9. Effect of Nursing Home Staff Training on Quality of Patient Survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linn, Margaret W.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Assessed effects of nursing home staff training in care for the dying on quality of life of 306 terminally ill patients in 5 pairs of matched nursing homes assigned randomly to trained and not trained staff groups. Patients in trained homes had less depression and greater satisfaction with care than patients in control homes at 1 and 3 months.…

  10. Care of the comatose patient: building mutual staff values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, P B; Smoot, F L

    1985-05-01

    Recognizing individuals' value differences is important to the success of health teams that care for comatose patients, since decisions to withhold or withdraw life-support treatment may lead to conflicts among team members. Such conflicts can adversely affect professional and family relationships. For example, health care personnel cannot work together in harmony or help the family effectively if they disagree about treatment decisions. Although institutional procedures for "do not resuscitate" orders, the treatment of incompetent patients, and other complex issues are helpful, they rarely address value conflicts, which inevitably influence a problem's resolution. Staff members therefore must acknowledge and confront differences they have faced. Such reflection enables catharsis as well as reconciliation of unresolved conflict and permits the group to develop guidelines for future situations. A fictional case also may be used to help work groups gain an understanding of the need for community. Ideally, the team members will sharpen their decision-making skills and gain the confidence to make tough choices in an imperfect, unpredictable world.

  11. Assessment of post-operative pain management among acutely and electively admitted patients - a Swedish ward perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magidy, Mahnaz; Warrén-Stomberg, Margareta; Bjerså, Kristofer

    2016-04-01

    Swedish health care is regulated to involve the patient in every intervention process. In the area of post-operative pain, it is therefore important to evaluate patient experience of the quality of pain management. Previous research has focused on mapping this area but not on comparing experiences between acutely and electively admitted patients. Hence, the aim of this study was to investigate the experiences of post-operative pain management quality among acutely and electively admitted patients at a Swedish surgical department performing soft-tissue surgery. A survey study design was used as a method based on a multidimensional instrument to assess post-operative pain management: Strategic and Clinical Quality Indicators in Postoperative Pain Management (SCQIPP). Consecutive patients at all wards of a university hospital's surgical department were included. Data collection was performed at hospital discharge. In total, 160 patients participated, of whom 40 patients were acutely admitted. A significant difference between acutely and electively admitted patients was observed in the SCQIPP area of environment, whereas acute patients rated the post-operative pain management quality lower compared with those who were electively admitted. There may be a need for improvement in the areas of post-operative pain management in Sweden, both specifically and generally. There may also be a difference in the experience of post-operative pain quality between acutely and electively admitted patients in this study, specifically in the area of environment. In addition, low levels of the perceived quality of post-operative pain management among the patients were consistent, but satisfaction with analgesic treatment was rated as good. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. The permeable institution: an ethnographic study of three acute psychiatric wards in London.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quirk, Alan; Lelliott, Paul; Seale, Clive

    2006-10-01

    In Asylums, Goffman [1961. Asylums. London: Penguin] identified some permeable features of the old mental hospitals but presented them as exceptions to the rule and focused on their impermeable aspects. We argue that this emphasis is no longer valid and offer an alternative ideal type that better represents the reality of everyday life in contemporary 'bricks and mortar' psychiatric institutions. We call this the "permeable institution". The research involved participant observation of between 3 and 4 months and interviews with patients, patient advocates and staff on 3 psychiatric wards. Evidence for permeability includes that ward membership is temporary and changes rapidly (patients tend to have very short stays and staff turnover is high); patients maintain contact with the outside world during their stay; and institutional identities are blurred to the point where visitors or new patients can easily mistake staff and patients for one another. Permeability has both positive consequences (e.g., reduced risk of institutionalism), and negative consequences (e.g., unwanted people coming into hospital to cause trouble, and illicit drug use among patients). Staff employ various methods to regulate their ward's permeability, within certain parameters. The metaphor of the total/closed institution remains valuable, but it fails to capture the highly permeable nature of the psychiatric institutions we studied. Analysts may therefore find the permeable institution a more helpful reference point or ideal type against which to examine and compare empirical cases. Perhaps most helpful is to conceptualise a continuum of institutional permeability with total and permeable institutions at each extreme.

  13. Effectiveness of a Web-Based Simulation in Improving Nurses' Workplace Practice With Deteriorating Ward Patients: A Pre- and Postintervention Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liaw, Sok Ying; Wong, Lai Fun; Lim, Eunice Ya Ping; Ang, Sophia Bee Leng; Mujumdar, Sandhya; Ho, Jasmine Tze Yin; Mordiffi, Siti Zubaidah; Ang, Emily Neo Kim

    2016-02-19

    Nurses play an important role in detecting patients with clinical deterioration. However, the problem of nurses failing to trigger deteriorating ward patients still persists despite the implementation of a patient safety initiative, the Rapid Response System. A Web-based simulation was developed to enhance nurses' role in recognizing and responding to deteriorating patients. While studies have evaluated the effectiveness of the Web-based simulation on nurses' clinical performance in a simulated environment, no study has examined its impact on nurses' actual practice in the clinical setting. The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of Web-based simulation on nurses' recognition of and response to deteriorating patients in clinical settings. The outcomes were measured across all levels of Kirkpatrick's 4-level evaluation model with clinical outcome on triggering rates of deteriorating patients as the primary outcome measure. A before-and-after study was conducted on two general wards at an acute care tertiary hospital over a 14-month period. All nurses from the two study wards who undertook the Web-based simulation as part of their continuing nursing education were invited to complete questionnaires at various time points to measure their motivational reaction, knowledge, and perceived transfer of learning. Clinical records on cases triggered by ward nurses from the two study wards were evaluated for frequency and types of triggers over a period of 6 months pre- and 6 months postintervention. The number of deteriorating patients triggered by ward nurses in a medical general ward increased significantly (Pnurses reported positively on the transfer of learning (mean 3.89, SD 0.49) from the Web-based simulation to clinical practice. A significant increase (Pnurses also perceived positively their motivation (mean 3.78, SD 0.56) to engage in the Web-based simulation. This study provides evidence on the effectiveness of Web-based simulation in improving

  14. Validation of the "Activity and participation" component of ICF Core Sets for stroke patients in Japanese rehabilitation wards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinoshita, Shoji; Abo, Masahiro; Miyamura, Kohei; Okamoto, Takatsugu; Kakuda, Wataru; Kimura, Ikuo; Urabe, Hiroshi

    2016-10-12

    To validate the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) Core Set for stroke in the assessment of functional status and disability in Japanese stroke patients. The study included stroke patients admitted to the Kaifukuki (convalescent) rehabilitation wards. The comprehensive ICF Core Set for neurological conditions for post-acute care and the ICF rehabilitation set were evaluated with qualifiers assessed by the physiatrists at admission. The "activity and participation" (d) component was divided to sub-components (cognition-related activity, motor-related activity and participation). The correlations between numbers of problem categories in the entire "d" component and these sub-components in each ICF Core Set and the Functional Independence Measure (FIM) score were assessed using Spearman's correlation coefficient. A total of 117 post-stroke patients (mean age 70.1 ± 14.2 years, 53 women) were included. Correlation analysis identified significant and strong correlations between the values of the entire "d" component and sub-components (cognition-related activity and motor-related activity) of the 2 ICF Core Sets and FIM score. A significant, but weak, correlation between FIM and the participation sub-component was identified. The "d" component of these 2 ICF Core Sets reflects functional status and disability and could be a valid measure in post-acute stroke patients in the rehabilitation setting.

  15. Epidemiologic Evaluation of Ocular Trauma in Patients Admitted to Ophthalmology Ward of Farshchian Hospital in Hamadan in 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Bazzazi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Ocular trauma is one of the important reasons of visual loss which can cause multiple damages to eyelid, eyeball and adenexal tissues. Furthermore, ocular trauma is one of the major causes of unilateral blindness and the third leading cause of hospi-talization in ophthalmology wards. The aim of this study is to determine the prevalence and characteristics of eye trauma at Farshchian hospital in Hamadan in 2012. Material & Methods: In this cross-sectional descriptive study, 70 patients with ocular trauma, admitted to Farshchian hospital, were studied. We assessed the age, sex, job , educational level, location, cause of trauma, its type and site of injury. The data was analyzed by SPSS 16 software and t, ?2 statistical tests. Results: The mean age of patients in this study was 24.01 years (SD= 16.04. Among 70 pa-tients, 58 people (82.1% were males and 12 patients (17.1% were females. The most com-mon cause of trauma was observed in 19 patients (27.1%. The most common location of the trauma in this study was homing, seen in 28 patients (40%. Among the 70 patients, 29 peo-ple (41.4% had open globe injuries, 25 people had (35.7% closed globe injuries, 5 patients (7.1% had burning and 11 patients (15.7% had adenexal injury. Conclusions: The results showed that most ocular traumas occur in the early ages and in males. The most common type of them is open globe injury and the most common cause is a sharp object. (Sci J Hamadan Univ Med Sci 2014; 21 (1:25-31

  16. AGGRESSION IN PSYCHIATRY - A QUALITATIVE STUDY FOCUSING ON THE CHARACTERIZATION AND PERCEPTION OF PATIENT AGGRESSION BY NURSES WORKING ON PSYCHIATRIC-WARDS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    FINNEMA, EJ; DASSEN, T; HALFENS, R

    The present study focuses on the characterization and perception of patient aggression by nurses working in a psychiatric hospital in The Netherlands. Data have been collected by interviewing nurses working on open and closed wards. The results have been compared and related to the existing

  17. On-ward participation of a hospital pharmacist in a Dutch intensive care unit reduces prescribing errors and related patient harm: an intervention study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klopotowska, J.E.; Kuiper, R.; van Kan, H.J.; de Pont, A.C.; Dijkgraaf, M.G.; Lie-A-Huen, L.; Vroom, M.B.; Smorenburg, S.M.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Patients admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU) are at high risk for prescribing errors and related adverse drug events (ADEs). An effective intervention to decrease this risk, based on studies conducted mainly in North America, is on-ward participation of a clinical pharmacist in an

  18. Outcome of bacteraemia in patients admitted to the adult medical wards of the UKM hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrick, P; Kong, N C T; Nordiah, A J; Cheong, I K S; Tamil, M A

    2007-10-01

    The clinical outcome of bacteraemic patients is influenced by many factors. It is vital to know one's own local hospital epidemiological data so as to provide optimal care to the affected patients. This was a prospective, observational study carried out in the said patient population over a period of four months in the year 2005. One hundred and ninety one patients presented with bacteraemia over the study period. Fifty-two (27%) of the patients died. Mechanical ventilation, inappropriate empirical antibiotic usage, Chinese ethnicity and low serum albumin levels independently affected prognosis. These factors should alert physicians to those patients who require more intensive monitoring and care.

  19. Views on respiratory tract symptoms and antibiotics of Dutch general practitioners, practice staff and patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Duijn, HJ; Kuyvenhoven, MA; Schellevis, FG; Verheij, TJM

    2006-01-01

    Objectives: To explore views on respiratory tract symptoms (cough, sore throat and earache) and antibiotics of GPs, practice staff, and patients. Methods: In a nationwide study, 181 GPs, 204 practice staff members and 1250 patients from 90 practices participated by answering 14 items relating to vie

  20. Nonpharmacological Interventions Targeted at Delirium Risk Factors, Delivered by Trained Volunteers (Medical and Psychology Students), Reduced Need for Antipsychotic Medications and the Length of Hospital Stay in Aged Patients Admitted to an Acute Internal Medicine Ward: Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorski, Stanislaw; Piotrowicz, Karolina; Rewiuk, Krzysztof; Halicka, Monika; Kalwak, Weronika; Rybak, Paulina; Grodzicki, Tomasz

    2017-01-01

    Purpose. Effectiveness of nonpharmacological multicomponent prevention delivered by trained volunteers (medical and psychology students), targeted at delirium risk factors in geriatric inpatients, was assessed at an internal medicine ward in Poland. Patients and Methods. Participants were recruited to intervention and control groups at the internal medicine ward (inclusion criteria: age ≥ 75, acute medical condition, basic orientation, and logical contact on admission; exclusion criteria: life expectancy internal medicine ward.

  1. Substance abuse in patients admitted voluntarily and involuntarily to acute psychiatric wards: a national cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Opsal

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Substance abuse and mental disorder comorbidity is high among patients admitted to acute psychiatric wards. The aim of the study was to identify this co-occurrence as a reason for involuntary admission and if specific substance use-related diagnoses were associated with such admissions.Methods: The study was a part of a multicentre, cross-sectional national study carried out during 2005-2006 within a research network of acute mental health services. Seventy-five percent of Norwegian hospitals providing acute in-patient treatment participated. Substance use was measured using the Clinician Rating Scale and the ICD-10 diagnoses F10-19. Diagnostic assessments were performed by the clinicians during hospital stay.Results: Overall, 33.2% (n=1,187 of the total patient population (3,506 were abusing alcohol or drugs prior to admission according to the Clinician Rating Scale. No difference in the overall prevalence of substance abuserelated diagnoses between the two groups was found. Overall, 310 (26% of the admissions, 216 voluntarily and 94 involuntarily admitted patients received a double diagnosis. Frequent comorbid combinations among voluntarily admitted patients were; a combination of alcohol and either mood disorder (40% or multiple mental disorders (29%. Among involuntarily admitted patients, a combination of poly drug use and schizophrenia was most frequent (47%. Substance abusing patients diagnosed with mental and behavioral disorders due to the use of psychoactive stimulant substances had a significantly higher risk of involuntary hospitalization (OR 2.3.Conclusion: Nearly one third of substance abusing patients are involuntarily admitted to mental hospitals, in particular stimulant drug use was associated with involuntarily admissions.

  2. The Patient Participation Culture Tool for healthcare workers (PaCT-HCW) on general hospital wards: A development and psychometric validation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malfait, S; Eeckloo, K; Van Daele, J; Van Hecke, A

    2016-09-01

    Patient participation is an important subject for modern healthcare. In order to improve patient participation on a ward, the ward's culture regarding patient participation should first be measured. In this study a measurement tool for patient participation culture from the healthcare worker's perspective, the Patient Participation Culture Tool for healthcare workers (PaCT-HCW), was developed and psychometrically evaluated. The aim of this study was to develop and validate a tool that measures the healthcare worker-related factors of patient participation and information sharing and dialogue in patient participation from the healthcare worker's perspective in order to represent the patient participation culture on general and university hospital wards. A four-phased validation study was conducted: (1) defining the construct of the PaCT-HCW, (2) development of the PaCT-HCW, (3) content validation, and (4) psychometric evaluation. The Belgian Federal Government invited all Flemish general and university hospitals by e-mail to distribute the PaCT-HCW in their organization. Fifteen general hospitals took part in the study. Units for surgery, general medicine, medical rehabilitation, geriatric and maternal care were included. Intensive care-units, emergency room-units, psychiatric units and units with no admitted patients (e.g. radiology) were excluded. The respondents had to be caregivers, with hands-on patient contact, who worked on the same ward for more than six months. Nursing students and other healthcare workers with short-time internship on the ward were excluded. The tool was completed by 1329 respondents on 163 wards. The PaCT-HCW was psychometrically evaluated by use of an exploratory factor analysis and calculation of the internal consistency. A model containing eight components was developed through a literature review, individual interviews, and focus interviews. The developed model showed high sampling adequacy and the Bartlett's test of sphericity was

  3. Prevention and management of aggression training and violent incidents on U.K. Acute psychiatric wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, Len; Nijman, Henk; Allan, Teresa; Simpson, Alan; Warren, Jonathan; Turner, Lynny

    2006-07-01

    Reports of violence and injuries to staff and patients in acute psychiatric inpatient settings have led to the development and implementation of training courses in the Prevention and Management of Violence and Aggression (PMVA). The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between PMVA training of acute psychiatric ward nursing staff and officially reported violent incident rates. A retrospective analysis was conducted of training records (312 course attendances) and violent incident rates (684 incidents) over two-and-a-half years on 14 acute admission psychiatric wards (5,384 admissions) at three inner-city hospitals in the United Kingdom as part of the Tompkins Acute Ward Study. A positive association was found between training and rates of violent incidents. There was weak evidence that increased rates of aggressive incidents prompted course attendance, no evidence that course attendance reduced violence, and some evidence that attendance of briefer update courses triggered small short-term rises in rates of physical aggression. Course attendance was associated with a rise in physical and verbal aggression while staff were away from the ward. The failure to find a drop in incident rates after training, coupled with the small increases in incidents detected, raises concerns about the training course's efficacy as a preventive strategy. Alternatively, the results are consistent with a threshold effect, indicating that once adequate numbers of staff have been trained, further training keeps incidents at a low rate.

  4. The Use of Humor in Forensic Mental Health Staff-Patient Interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hounsgaard, Lise; Alkier Gildberg, Frederik; Bradley, S. K.;

    2014-01-01

    Humor utilized in the practice of forensic mental health nursing might seem somehow inappropriate, given the serious circumstances surrounding most forensic mental health patients. However, some recent research has pointed to the use of humor as an important component in staff interactions...... with forensic mental health patients. This study reviews the existing international forensic mental health research literature on humor to investigate (a) what characterizes forensic mental health staff-patient use of humor and (b) what significance humor holds within the forensic mental health setting...... identified: (a) "humor as staff skill," showing that staff found humor to be important as an interpersonal ability; (b) "humor as a relational tool" with the purpose of establishing and maintaining staff-patient interactions; and (c) "the impact of humor on patients," describing impacts on conflicts...

  5. Comparing the monitoring of patients transferred from a critical care unit to hospital wards at after-hours with day transfers: an exploratory, prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Sally D; Coster, Samantha; Norman, Ian

    2014-12-01

    To investigate possible factors related to patient monitoring to explain the higher mortality rates associated with after-hours transfers compared with daytime transfers from critical care units to the wards. International research suggests that patients transferred from critical care units after-hours have a higher mortality rate than transfers during daytime, although the reasons remain unknown. A prospective exploratory study. Twenty-nine patients transferred from a UK critical care unit to a ward within the same hospital after-hours for 10 weeks beginning April 2009 were compared with 29 transfers during daytime hours matched on potentially confounding characteristics. UK Critical Care Unit transfer guidelines have remained unchanged since data collection. Outcomes were as follows: (i) frequency of nursing observations; (ii) time periods from transfer to first medical review; (iii) time period from transfer to first clinical observations; (iv) frequency of transfer to an inappropriate ward; (v) delayed transfers from Critical Care Unit to ward. Using Wilcoxon's Rank test (two tail) to compare paired data from the matched groups, observations were recorded significantly less frequently within the first 12 hours for after-hours transfers. Time from transfer to first clinical observations was significantly longer for after-hour transfer patients. The delay from when the patient was ready for ward care and actual transfer was also longer for the after-hours transfer group. Surveillance differences, including time to the first set of observations and frequency of observations in the first 12 hours, are potential factors that may explain the differential mortality associated with after-hours transfers. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Empowerment in intensive care: patient experiences compared to next of kin and staff beliefs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wåhlin, Ingrid; Ek, Anna-Christina; Idvall, Ewa

    2009-12-01

    Experiences of critically ill patients are an important aspect of the quality of care in intensive care units. If next of kin and staff try to empower the patient, this is probably performed in accordance with their beliefs about what patients experience as empowering. As intensive care patients often have difficulties communicating, staff and next of kin need to interpret their wishes, but there is limited knowledge about how correct picture next of kin and staff have of the intensive care patient's experiences. The aim of this study was to compare intensive care patients' experiences of empowerment with next of kin and staff beliefs. Interviews with 11 intensive care patients, 12 next of kin and 12 staff were conducted and analysed using a content analysis method. The findings showed that the main content is quite similar between patient experiences, next of kin beliefs and staff beliefs, but a number of important differences were identified. Some of these differences were regarding how joy of life and the will to fight were generated, the character of relationships, teamwork, humour, hope and spiritual experiences. Staff and next of kin seemed to regard the patient as more unconscious than the patient him/herself did.

  7. Nutritional status influences the length of stay and clinical outcomes in hospitalized patients in internal medicine wards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Manuela Ordoñez

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between the nutritional status (NS and clinical outcome and length of stay (LOS among patients admitted to the internal medicine ward. Methods: This is a retrospective observational study performed with the data of clinical patients collected during a one year period. The NS was assessed using: subjective global assessment (SGA, body mass index (BMI, triceps skinfold thickness (TST, muscle arm circumference (MAC and combined tools. Statistical analysis was performed with a confidence interval of 95% (p < 0.05. For categories comparison the chi-square test was used. To examine the association between length of stay and variables related to the NS Mann-Whitney and Kruskal-Wallis tests was used with multiple comparisons. Results: 396 patients were included in the study, 42.2% were over 60 years of age, what was associated with the presence of hypertension (p < 0.001, diabetes mellitus (p = 0.003 and required diet with modifications consistency (p = 0.003. According to combined diagnostic tools, 45.7% of patients were malnourished. Decreased food intake (p = 0.01, malnutrition according to SGA (p = 0.02 and MAC (p = 0.03 were associated with increased mortality. Patients with tertiary level of care (p = 0.01, decreased food intake (p = 0.001, who died (p = 0.004 and diagnosed with malnutrition by SGA (p = 0.001 and by the combined tools (p = 0.001 had a longer LOS. Conclusions: Patients who were malnourished by SGA and who presented decrease food intake at admission had longer LOS and poorer clinical outcomes (highest number of deaths. The diagnosis of malnutrition by MAC was also related to higher mortality.

  8. Staff and patient experiences of decision-making about continuous observation in psychiatric hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnicot, Kirsten; Insua-Summerhayes, Bryony; Plummer, Emily; Hart, Alice; Barker, Chris; Priebe, Stefan

    2017-04-01

    Continuous observation of psychiatric inpatients aims to protect those who pose an acute risk of harm to self or others, but involves intrusive privacy restrictions. Initiating, conducting and ending continuous observation requires complex decision-making about keeping patients safe whilst protecting their privacy. There is little published guidance about how to balance privacy and safety concerns, and how staff and patients negotiate this in practice is unknown. To inform best practice, the present study, therefore, aimed to understand how staff and patients experience negotiating the balance between privacy and safety during decision-making about continuous observation. Thematic analysis of qualitative interviews with thirty-one inpatient psychiatric staff and twenty-eight inpatients. Most patients struggled with the lack of privacy but valued feeling safe during continuous observation. Staff and patients linked good decision-making to using continuous observation for short periods and taking positive risks, understanding and collaborating with the patient, and working together as a supportive staff team. Poor decision-making was linked to insufficient consideration of observation's iatrogenic potential, insufficient collaboration with patients, and the stressful impact on staff of conducting observations and managing risk. Best practice in decision-making about continuous observation may be facilitated by making decisions in collaboration with patients, and by staff supporting each-other in positive risk-taking. To achieve truly patient-centred decision-making, decisions about observation should not be influenced by staff's own stress levels. To address the negative impact of staff stress on decision-making, it may be helpful to improve staff training, education and support structures.

  9. Optimization of hospital ward resources with patient relocation using Markov chain modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Anders Reenberg; Nielsen, Bo Friis; Reinhardt, Line Blander

    2017-01-01

    that patient occupancy is reflected by our Markov chain model, and that a local optimum can be derived within a reasonable runtime.Using a Danish hospital as our case study, the Markov chain model is statistically found to reflect occupancy of hospital beds by patients as a function of how hospital beds...

  10. Candidemia in Patients with Body Temperature Below 37°C and Admitted to Internal Medicine Wards: Assessment of Risk Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tascini, Carlo; Falcone, Marco; Bassetti, Matteo; De Rosa, Francesco G; Sozio, Emanuela; Russo, Alessandro; Sbrana, Francesco; Ripoli, Andrea; Merelli, Maria; Scarparo, Claudio; Carmassi, Franco; Venditti, Mario; Menichetti, Francesco

    2016-12-01

    An increasing number of candidemia episodes has been reported in patients cared for in internal medicine wards. These usually older and frail patients may not be suspected as having candidemia because they lack fever at the onset of the episode. To identify the risk factors associated with the lack of fever at the onset of candidemia (ie, the collection of the first positive blood culture for Candida spp.) in patients cared for in internal medicine wards, we compared 2 group of patients with or without fever. We retrospectively review data charts from 3 tertiary care, university hospitals in Italy, comparing patients with or without fever at onset of candidemia. Consecutive candidemic episodes in afebrile patients and matched febrile controls were identified during the 3-year study period. Patient baseline characteristics and several infection-related variables were examined. Random forest analysis was used, given the number of predictors to be considered and the potential complexity of their relations with the onset of fever. We identified 147 candidemic episodes without fever at onset and 147 febrile candidemia episodes. Factors associated with the lack of fever at onset of candidemia were diabetes, Clostridium difficile infection, and a shorter delta time from internal medicine wards admission to the onset of candidemia. The only variable associated with fever was the use of intravascular devices. Quite unexpectedly, antifungal therapy was administered more frequently to patients without fever, and no differences on 30-day mortality rate were documented in the 2 study groups. Clinicians should be aware that an increasing number of patients with invasive candidiasis cared for in internal medicine wards may lack fever at onset, especially those with diabetes and C. difficile infection. Candidemia should be suspected in patients with afebrile systemic inflammatory response syndrome or in worsening clinical condition: blood cultures should be taken, and a timely

  11. The level of risk of transmission of human immunodeficiency virus between patients and dental staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scully, C; Porter, S

    1991-02-09

    Almost a decade into the epidemic of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) there is adequate evidence to address the concerns of dental staff about possible transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) between patient and staff. This paper reviews that evidence and demonstrates that the risk of HIV transmission to health care workers is extremely low. Worldwide there are no reported proven cases of occupational transmission of HIV to dental staff.

  12. Impact of Polypharmacy on the Rehabilitation Outcome of Japanese Stroke Patients in the Convalescent Rehabilitation Ward

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eiji Kose

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. A risk factor associated with stroke onset is chronic kidney disease (CKD. To prevent stroke reoccurrence, it is necessary to strictly manage blood pressure, lipids, and plasma glucose. Therefore, some cases are forced to polypharmacy, elderly patients in particular. Polypharmacy often leads to adverse drug reactions and has the potential to negatively affect the rehabilitation of stroke patients. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of polypharmacy using a functional independence measure (FIM. Methods. A total of 144 stroke patients with CKD were included in the present analysis. We divided stroke patients into those taking six or more drugs (polypharmacy group and those taking less than six drugs (nonpolypharmacy group upon admission. Patient background features, laboratory data, and FIM scores were compared. Results. FIM-Motor (FIM-M efficiency, age, and diabetes mellitus were positively associated with polypharmacy. FIM-M efficiency in the polypharmacy group was significantly lower than in the nonpolypharmacy group. Conclusion. Polypharmacy interferes with the effect of rehabilitation in stroke patients with CKD. Pharmacists and doctors should make efforts to optimize medications to be able to respond to the outcome of each patient.

  13. Procalcitonin in early rule-in/rule-out of sepsis in SIRS patients admitted to a medical ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiotti, Nicola; Mearelli, Filippo; Ruscio, Maurizio; Altamura, Nicola; Vinci, Pierandrea; Fernandes, Giovanni; De Nardo, Margherita; Lombardi, Jacopo; Mamolo, Lorenza; Chendi, Enrico; Breglia, Andrea; Peretti, Alberto; Peric, Daniele; Orso, Daniele; Pivetti, Giulia; Biolo, Gianni

    2014-10-01

    A relevant amount of patients with clinical suspect of sepsis is admitted and treated in medical wards (MW). These patients have a better prognosis but are older and with more comorbidities compared to those admitted to intensive care units (ICU). Procalcitonin (PCT) is extensively used in emergency departments for the diagnosis of sepsis, but its accuracy in the setting of a MW has not been thoroughly investigated. Predicted low PCT levels also call for the comparison of immunomagnetic-chemiluminescent (L-PCT) and time-resolved amplified cryptate emission (TRACE, K-PCT) technologies, in PCT determination. In 80 patients with systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) diagnostic criteria and suspect of sepsis newly admitted to a MW, PCT was determined with L- and K-PCT method. Sixty patients were diagnosed as sepsis (20 microbiologically and 40 clinically proven) and 20 with non-infective SIRS. The sepsis group had significantly higher levels of both PCTs, with no differences between the clinically and microbiologically proven subgroups. The areas under ROC curves for L- and K-PCT were 0.72 and 0.78 (p<0.001 for each), respectively. Based on MW customized cut-off values of 0.150 (L-PCT) and 0.143 ng/mL (K-PCT), overall accuracies were 66.8 (95% CI 58.7-78.9) and 78.2% (69.8-87.2), respectively, compared to the 55% (44.2-66) of 0.5 ng/mL canonical cut-off. Neither PCT-L nor -K held prognostic value on survival. In MW patients, customized PCT cut-off levels provide better accuracy than customary levels adopted from ICU, and TRACE technology seems to offer a wider analysis range.

  14. A critical assessment of monitoring practices, patient deterioration, and alarm fatigue on inpatient wards: a review

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Curry, J Paul; Jungquist, Carla R

    2014-01-01

    ... acute healthcare system. Leading up to this Century, it was common for most hospitalized patients and their families to believe that being surrounded by well-trained nurses and physicians assured their safety...

  15. [Clinical psychopathological research on late-onset schizophrenia--mainly patients with schizophrenia from a hospital psychiatric ward].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, Manabu; Kato, Satoshi

    2009-01-01

    In the field of clinical psychiatry, cases of late-onset schizophrenia are often observed in the population of 40 years or older. Female patients seem to significantly predominate those diagnosed with late-onset schizophrenia. Generally, paranoid delusions of reference with family members, neighbors, and friends are observed as clinical features of such late-onset schizophrenia conditions. Medical treatment for such a condition is often effective and considered to improve the prognosis. The authors conducted clinical research at Jichi Medical University Hospital psychiatric ward involving 38 late-onset schizophrenia patients (7 males; 31 females) diagnosed over the age of 40 using DSM-IV-TR diagnostic criteria. Subjects were selected from 316 schizophrenia patients (164 males; 152 females) admitted to the hospital for schizophrenia treatment at some time during the 13 years from April 1, 1993 to March 31, 2006. Also, another 14 late-onset schizophrenia patients diagnosed over the age of 40 (1 male; 13 females), with additional investigation, were selected from 130 cases (50 males; 80 females) treated in related facilities at some time during the 2 years from April 1, 2004 to March 31, 2006. The investigation revealed the following results: (1) Cases showing an onset after the age of 40 comprised 12% of the total population. Female cases comprised 20.4%, being significantly higher than that of male cases (4.3%). Within the psychiatric ward, cases showing an onset after 40 made up 10.8% of the total population. Female cases comprised 16.3%, being significantly higher than that of male cases (2.0%). (2) The paranoid type comprised 55.3% of the total population of late-onset cases, being significantly higher than in early-onset cases younger than 40 years old. A total of 55.3% of late-onset cases also showed depressive symptoms, being significantly higher than in early-onset cases. (3) For late-onset, 55.3% of patients showed an introverted premorbid character, while

  16. The Norwegian version of Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview (M.I.N.I.): Feasibility, patient acceptability and test-retest reliability in an acute psychiatric ward.

    OpenAIRE

    Gundersen, Øystein

    2007-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI) is a structured psychiatric diagnostic interview. Feasibility, patient acceptability, reliability and validity of MINI have been tested in other countries, but not yet in Norway. Objective: The aim of the present study was to test the feasibility, patient acceptability and test-retest reliability of the Norwegian MINI version in an acute psychiatric ward. Methods: From August 2006 to February 2007 3...

  17. Geriatric Intervention in Elderly Patients with Hip Fracture in an Orthopaedic Ward

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Merete; Damsgaard, Else Marie Skjøde; Hougaard, Kjeld

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Hip fracture is a common cause of long hospital stay in the elderly. Approximately one third of these patients die within the first year. As a consequence geriatric and orthopedic col-laboration (orthogeriatrics) has been organized in different ways. The aim of this study is to eva......-luate the efficiency of a multidisciplinary geriatric in-hospital intervention on patient outcome. Methods: A total of 495 elderly hip fracture patients consecutively admitted to orthopedic surgery, were followed. Data were based on medical records. The intervention group (n=233) was com-pared to a historical cohort...... group (n=262) receiving traditional orthopedic treatment. Intervention program was based on initial physical and mental screening and evaluation, geriatric-focused care, and early discharge planning. The intervention was provided by a multidisciplinary geriatric team. After discharge, follow-up home...

  18. Nurses Exploring the Spirituality of Their Patients With Cancer: Participant Observation on a Medical Oncology Ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Meurs, Jacqueline; Smeets, Wim; Vissers, Kris C P; Groot, Marieke; Engels, Yvonne

    2017-07-19

    Attention for spirituality should be an integral part of professionals' caregiving. Particularly, nurses caring for patients with cancer might have opportunities to give attention to this dimension. The aim of this study was to gain insight in the way and extent to which nurses during daily caregiving observe and explore spiritual issues of hospitalized patients with cancer. We performed an ethnographic study with participant observation. Data were collected in 2015 during 4 shifts at the medical oncology department of a university hospital. The researcher, a spiritual care provider (chaplain) wearing the same kind of uniform as the nurses, observed the nurses, participated in their actions, and interviewed them after the shift. Although the patients did send many implicit and explicit messages concerning spiritual issues, the nurses did not explore them. If noticed, 3 barriers for exploring spiritual issues were mentioned by the nurses: lack of time, conflict with their mindset, and being reserved to talk about such issues. During their daily caregiving to patients with a life-threatening illness, nurses have many opportunities to explore spiritual issues, but they do not often recognize them. If they do, they tend not to explore the spiritual issues. Communication training for nurses is necessary to develop skills for exploring the spiritual dimension in patients with cancer. In such training, attention to the misconception that such a conversation requires a lot of time and for recognizing signals from patients inviting an exploration of their concerns is necessary.This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives License 4.0 (CCBY-NC-ND), where it is permissible to download and share the work provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be changed in any way or used commercially without permission from the journal.

  19. Assessment of drug-drug interactions among renal failure patients of nephrology ward in a south Indian tertiary care hospital

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    Mylapuram Rama

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Polypharmacy is common in drug prescriptions of chronic kidney disease patients. A study of the prescription patterns of drugs with potential interactions would be of interest to prevent drug related adverse events. A prospective observational study of six months (Dec 2009-May 2010 was carried out among the chronic kidney disease patients admitted to the nephrology ward of a South Indian tertiary care hospital. The pattern and rates of drug-drug interactions seen in the prescriptions of these patients was studied. Among the 205 prescriptions included, a total of 474 interactions were reported, making 2.7 interactions per prescription with incidence rates of 76.09%. Around 19.62% of interactions were of major severity. Most common interactions were found between ascorbic acid and cyanocobalamine (12.45%, clonidine and metoprolol (3.80% respectively. Hypo or hypertension (31.65%, decreased drug efficacy (29.11% and hypo or hyperglycemia (14.14%, were the most commonly reported clinical outcomes of the drug interactions. Cardiovascular drugs (calcium channel blockers and beta blockers; 52% constitute the major class of drugs involved in interactions. As most of the interactions had a delayed onset, long term follow-up is essential to predict the clinically significant outcomes of these interactions. Hence, drug interactions are commonly seen in the prescriptions of chronic kidney disease patients which can lead to serious adverse events if not detected early. Need for collaboration with a clinical pharmacist and electronic surveillance, which are absent in developing countries like India, is emphatic.

  20. Geriatric Intervention in Elderly Patients with Hip Fracture in an Orthopaedic Ward

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Merete; Damsgaard, Else Marie Skjøde; Hougaard, Kjeld

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Hip fracture is a common cause of long hospital stay in the elderly. Approximately one third of these patients die within the first year. As a consequence geriatric and orthopedic col-laboration (orthogeriatrics) has been organized in different ways. The aim of this study is to eva-...

  1. Very low levels of physical activity in older patients during hospitalization at an acute geriatric ward

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villumsen, Morten; Jørgensen, Martin; Andreasen, Jane;

    2015-01-01

    Lack of activity during hospitalization may contribute to functional decline. The purpose of this study was to investigate (1) the time spent walking during hospitalization by geriatric patients referred to physical and/or occupational therapy and (2) the development in time spent walking during......; nonetheless, the physical activity level increased significantly during hospitalization....

  2. Drug utilization study in postoperative patients in obstetrics and gynaecology ward of tertiary care hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajeshwari Neela

    2016-04-01

    Conclusions: The present study provides valuable insight about the overall pattern of drug used in postoperative patients. The study is useful in decreasing the irrational prescription, which helps to decrease the morbidity and health care burden in the society. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2016; 5(2.000: 329-334

  3. [Factor models of the Beck Depression Inventory-II. Validation with coronary patients and a critique of Ward's model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Pino Pérez, Antonio; Ibáñez Fernández, Ignacio; Bosa Ojeda, Francisco; Dorta González, Ruth; Gaos Miezoso, María Teresa

    2012-02-01

    The objective of this study was to validate in a sample of 205 coronary patients a factor model for the BDI-II, especially a model that would allow for modeling of depressive symptoms after explicitly removing bias related to somatic symptoms of depression that would overlap those of heart disease. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses for ordinal data were conducted. A one-factor model, six correlated two-factor models and, derivatives thereof, seven models with a single General Depression factor and two uncorrelated factors, were analyzed. Exploratory analysis extracted two factors, Somatic-affective and Cognitive. Confirmatory factor analyses showed the worst fit for the one-factor model. Two-factor models were surpassed in goodness of fit by the models of general-factor and group factors. Among these, the General, Somatic-affective and Cognitive (G-Sa-C) model of Beck with students is noteworthy. The reduced General, Somatic and Cognitive (G-S-C) model of Ward showed the worst goodness of fit. Our model surpasses the cutoff criteria of all fit indexes. We conclude that the inclusion of a general-factor and group factors in all the models surpasses the results of G-S-C model and, therefore, questions it. The G-Sa-C model is strengthened.

  4. Lighting quality in hospital wards - State of the art

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stidsen, Lone; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning; Fisker, Anna Marie

    and a multitude of users with many different needs and requirements. It is a public domain with many references to the design of homes in the private sphere. The aim of the report is to display the existing research in the area of lighting design in hospital wards, and to present new lighting design strategies......When constructing and designing hospitals for the future, patients, staff and guests are in focus. Designing a healing hospital environment is a very important factor when planning new hospitals. How can aspects such as design, architecture, arts, lights, sounds and materials support and improve......, the furnishing, the acoustics and light are essential in evaluating of the experience of an environment. The light is crucial for the physical and psychological experience of wellbeing and the feeling of safety. The ward is a complex and interesting architectural space to design. It has a wide range of functions...

  5. A critical assessment of monitoring practices, patient deterioration, and alarm fatigue on inpatient wards: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curry, J Paul; Jungquist, Carla R

    2014-01-01

    Approximately forty million surgeries take place annually in the United States, many of them requiring overnight or lengthier post operative stays in the over five thousand hospitals that comprise our acute healthcare system. Leading up to this Century, it was common for most hospitalized patients and their families to believe that being surrounded by well-trained nurses and physicians assured their safety. That bubble burst with the Institute of Medicine's 1999 report: To Err Is Human, followed closely by its 2001 report: Crossing the Quality Chasm. This review article discusses unexpected, potentially lethal respiratory complications known for being difficult to detect early, especially in postoperative patients recovering on hospital general care floors (GCF). We have designed our physiologic explanations and simplified cognitive framework to give our front line clinical nurses a thorough, easy-to-recall understanding of just how these events evolve, and how to detect them early when most amenable to treatment. Our review will also discuss currently available practices in general care floor monitoring that can both improve patient safety and significantly reduce monitor associated alarm fatigue.

  6. Improving patient safety through education: how visual recognition skills may reduce medication errors on surgical wards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher R. Davis

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Medication errors compromise patient safety and cost £500m per annum in the UK. Patients who forget the name of their medication may describe the appearance to the doctor. Nurses use recognition skills to assist in safe administration of medications. This study quantifies healthcare professionals’ accuracy in visually identifying medications. Members of the multidisciplinary team were asked to identify five commonly prescribed medications. Mean recognition rate (MRR was defined as the percentage of correct responses. Dunn’s multiple comparison tests quantified inter-professional variation. Fifty-six participants completed the study (93% response rate. MRRs were: pharmacists 61%; nurses 35%; doctors 19%; physiotherapists 11%. Pharmacists’ MRR were significantly higher than both doctors and physiotherapists (P<0.001. Nurses’ MRR was statistically comparable to pharmacists (P>0.05. The majority of healthcare professionals cannot accurately identify commonly prescribed medications on direct visualization. By increasing access to medication identification resources and improving undergraduate education and postgraduate training for all healthcare professionals, errors may be reduced and patient safety improved.

  7. Quality of Care of Nursing from Brain Death Patient in ICU Wards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyedeh Toktam Masoumian Hoseini

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Nowadays, Intensive Care Unit (ICU nurses play a significant and key role in the care of brain dead patients and their families, therefore their Practice extremely important to the success of organ donation. To assess ICU nurse's practice in relation to nurse's role in the organ donation process from brain dead patients in Iran. Materials and Methods:In a cross-sectional analytical study 90 ICU nurses in Ghaem and Imam Reza Hospitals in Mashhad through stratified random sampling allocation method were selected. Data collection tools included a questionnaire on demographic information, factors influencing nurse's practice during the organ donation process and surveying "nurse's practice in relation to their roles in the organ donation process." Results: 90 nurses participated in this study. (70.0% of the research subjects had spoken with their own families about organ donation, and (20.0% had organ donation cards. Practice scores were calculated on a scale of 100. The mean score of nurses' practice was (6.04± 3.66. 96.7% of nurses’ weak practice in terms of their roles in the organ donation process. Conclusion: As a result, they do not have adequate practice regard nurse's role in organ donation process and in relation to brain death patient and their families. Therefore it is suggested to include nursing courses in the organ donation process and organ transplantation as well as educational programs to acquaint nurses with their roles in the process to improve their practice by different training methods.

  8. Epidemiology and resistance features of Acinetobacter baumannii isolates from the ward environment and patients in the burn ICU of a Chinese hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Yali; Shen, Xiaodong; Huang, Guangtao; Zhang, Cheng; Luo, Xiaoqiang; Yin, Supeng; Wang, Jing; Hu, Fuquan; Peng, Yizhi; Li, Ming

    2016-08-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is an important opportunistic pathogen that causes severe nosocomial infections, especially in intensive care units (ICUs). Over the past decades, an everincreasing number of hospital outbreaks caused by A. baumannii have been reported worldwide. However, little attention has been directed toward the relationship between A. baumannii isolates from the ward environment and patients in the burn ICU. In this study, 88 A. baumannii isolates (26 from the ward environment and 62 from patients) were collected from the burn ICU of the Southwest Hospital in Chongqing, China, from July through December 2013. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing results showed that drug resistance was more severe in isolates from patients than from the ward environment, with all of the patient isolates being fully resistant to 10 out of 19 antimicrobials tested. Isolations from both the ward environment and patients possessed the β-lactamase genes bla OXA-51, bla OXA-23, bla AmpC, bla VIM, and bla PER. Using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multi-locus sequence typing (MLST), these isolates could be clustered into 4 major PFGE types and 4 main sequence types (ST368, ST369, ST195, and ST191) among which, ST368 was the dominant genotype. Epidemiologic and molecular typing data also revealed that a small-scale outbreak of A. baumannii infection was underway in the burn ICU of our hospital during the sampling period. These results suggest that dissemination of β-lactamase genes in the burn ICU might be closely associated with the high-level resistance of A. baumannii, and the ICU environment places these patients at a high risk for nosocomial infection. Cross-contamination should be an important concern in clinical activities to reduce hospitalacquired infections caused by A. baumannii.

  9. An Integrated Model of Patient and Staff Satisfaction Using Queuing Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komashie, Alexander; Mousavi, Ali; Clarkson, P John; Young, Terry

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates the connection between patient satisfaction, waiting time, staff satisfaction, and service time. It uses a variety of models to enable improvement against experiential and operational health service goals. Patient satisfaction levels are estimated using a model based on waiting (waiting times). Staff satisfaction levels are estimated using a model based on the time spent with patients (service time). An integrated model of patient and staff satisfaction, the effective satisfaction level model, is then proposed (using queuing theory). This links patient satisfaction, waiting time, staff satisfaction, and service time, connecting two important concepts, namely, experience and efficiency in care delivery and leading to a more holistic approach in designing and managing health services. The proposed model will enable healthcare systems analysts to objectively and directly relate elements of service quality to capacity planning. Moreover, as an instrument used jointly by healthcare commissioners and providers, it affords the prospect of better resource allocation.

  10. Knowledge of carbohydrate counting and insulin dose calculations among hospital staff in a regional general paediatrics unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Gorman, Jennifer R; O'Leary, Orla; Finner, Natalie; Quinn, Anne; O'Gorman, Clodagh S

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the carbohydrate and insulin knowledge of the staff at Children's Ark at the University Hospital, Limerick. Carbohydrate counting and insulin dose calculations based on carbohydrates and blood sugars are integral to intensive insulin management of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). The PedCarbQuiz, a validated questionnaire, was modified, and applied to the staff on our general paediatrics ward. 48/70 eligible staff responded (rate 68 %). Overall knowledge was good: 75.5 % was the average score for correctly identifying foods containing carbohydrate. However, poor scores were obtained for calculating multiple items and meal values (average score 29 %), and exact values of insulin required (average score 38 %). These results highlight the need for re-education among staff on a general paediatrics ward, to empower ward staff to contribute effectively to the education and management of patients with T1DM.

  11. Exploring ward nurses' perceptions of continuing education in clinical settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govranos, Melissa; Newton, Jennifer M

    2014-04-01

    Health care systems demand that nurses are flexible skilful workers who maintain currency and competency in order to deliver safe effective patient centered care. Nurses must continually build best practice into their care and acquire lifelong learning. Often this learning is acquired within the work environment and is facilitated by the clinical nurse educator. Understanding clinical nurses' values and needs of continuing education is necessary to ensure appropriate education service delivery and thus enhance patient care. To explore clinical ward-based nurses' values and perceptions towards continuing education and what factors impact on continuing education in the ward. A case study approach was utilized. A major teaching hospital in Melbourne, Australia. A range of clinical nursing staff (n=23). Four focus groups and six semi-structured individual interviews were undertaken. Focus group interviews explored participants' values and perceptions on continuing education through a values clarification tool. Thematic analysis of interviews was undertaken to identify themes and cluster data. Three central themes: 'culture and attitudes', 'what is learning?' and 'being there-being seen', emerged reflecting staffs' values and perceptions of education and learning in the workplace. Multiple factors influence ward nurses' ability and motivation to incorporate lifelong learning into their practice. Despite variance in nurses' values and perceptions of CE in clinical environments, CE was perceived as important. Nurses yearned for changes to facilitate lifelong learning and cultivate a learning culture. Clinical nurse educators need to be cognizant of adult learners' characteristics such as values, beliefs, needs and potential barriers, to effectively facilitate support in a challenging and complex learning environment. Organizational support is essential so ward managers in conjunction with educational departments can promote and sustain continuing education, lifelong

  12. Noise at night in hospital general wards: a mapping of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fillary, Julie; Chaplin, Hema; Jones, Gill; Thompson, Angela; Holme, Anita; Wilson, Patricia

    English NHS inpatient surveys consistently identify that noise at night in hospitals and its impact on patients' sleep is a persisting problem that needs addressing. To identify how noise at night in hospital affects patients on general wards and the range of interventions aimed at reducing the problem, a systematic mapping of the literature was undertaken. All primary studies and relevant literature published January 2003-July 2013 were included. Key issues identified in the literature included noise levels and causes, impact on patient experience, and lack of staff awareness. Interventions to reduce noise were targeted at staff education, behaviour modification, care organisation and environmental solutions. The scoping suggested that when compared with specialist units, there is little evidence on effective interventions reducing disturbance from night-time noise on general wards. The available evidence suggests a whole systems approach should be adopted to aid quality sleep and promote recovery.

  13. Radiation protection measures for reduction of incorporations of iodine-131 by the staff of a radionuclide therapy ward; Strahlenschutzmassnahmen zur Verringerung der Inkorporation von JOD-131 beim Personal einer Radionuklidtherapiestation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petzold, J.; Meyer, K.; Lincke, T.; Sabri, O. [Universitaetsklinikum Leipzig (Germany); Alborzi, H. [LfULG Sachsen (Germany); Lorenz, J. [SMUL Sachsen (Germany); Schoenmuth, T. [VKTA Rossendorf (Germany); Keller, A. [Strahlenschutzseminar Thueringen e.V. (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    The air in patient's rooms with thyroid therapies is loaded with iodine 131, which is to be seen as a cause for the incorporation of iodine 131 by the staff. The patients exhale a part of the iodine applied for their intended radionuclide therapy. The activity is concentrated in the saliva and, thereby, the breath air is moistened and iodine reaches the exhaled and compartment air. The detection of iodine in the form of contaminations and/or incorporations with the staff succeeds only after a longer stay in the patient's room. With this, a clear relation between the particular type of work performed in the room and therapy of malignant thyroid disease with high amounts of radioactivity can be found. The measured values of incorporations, obtained with an whole-body counter, are in the range of up to 400Bq. The activity concentration in the compartment air some hours after application of the therapeutic activity reaches a maximum and then decreases with a half-life of about 15 hours. As a protection measure we asked the patients wearing a mask up to 30 hours after application to (orig.)

  14. Nursing staff's communication modes in patient transfer before and after an educational intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kindblom-Rising, Kristina; Wahlstrom, Rolf; Ekman, Sirkka-Liisa; Buer, Nina; Nilsson-Wikmar, Lena

    2010-10-01

    The objective was to explore and describe nursing staff's body awareness and communication in patient transfers and evaluate any changes made after an educational intervention to promote staff competence in guiding patients to move independently. In total, 63 nursing staff from two hospitals wrote weekly notes before and after the intervention. The topics were: A) reflect on a transfer during the last week that you consider was good and one that was poor; B) reflect on how your body felt during a good and a poor transfer. The notes were analysed with content analysis. The results showed five different communication modes connected with nursing staff's physical and verbal communication. These communication modes changed after 1 year to a more verbal communication, focusing on the patient's mobility. The use of instructions indicated a new or different understanding of patient transfer, which may contribute to a development of nursing staff's competence. STATEMENT OF RELEVANCE: The present findings indicate that patient transfer consists of communication. Therefore, verbal and bodily communication can have an integral part of training in patient transfer; furthermore, the educational design of such programmes is important to reach the goal of developing new understanding and enhancing nursing staff's competence in patient transfer.

  15. The 'Releasing Time to Care--the Productive Ward' programme: participants' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Jacqueline; Adams, John

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the perceptions of nursing staff concerning the implementation of the 'Releasing Time to Care - the Productive Ward' programme in a specialist cardiothoracic hospital. The 'Releasing Time to Care - the Productive Ward' programme uses the 'lean' philosophy originally developed in the Japanese motor industry to improve the efficiency of hospital wards. Its aim is to increase the proportion of time that nurses are able to spend in direct patient care. This study used a descriptive qualitative method with a sample size of four nurses and two health-care support workers. Thematic analysis of the interview transcripts was undertaken using the procedure developed by Burnard. Thematic content analysis identified five major themes: starting to implement the programme, anxiety and defensiveness, the importance of leadership and communication, challenges, and learning and personal development. Overall, the programme had a positive impact on both the wards studied. Challenges that were identified included the need to sustain momentum once the initial enthusiasm had waned. This study highlighted the importance of key transformational leadership skills at ward manager level, such as the ability to inspire nurses to approach old problems in new ways, in the implementation of the 'Releasing Time to Care - the Productive Ward' programme. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  16. Dealing with conflict - The role of the ward sister

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.M. Cremer

    1980-09-01

    Full Text Available In the course of her duties, the ward sister has to contend with many forms of conflict, discord and dissension. These involve conflict of the intrapersonal, interpersonal and intergroup varieties. Conflict is in the main, disruptive and dysfunctional. Skilful management, however, embodying cooperative effort in its reduction can produce constructive and positive results. Conflict management strategies are therefore either restrictive or constructive. Persons in serious conflict suffer varied degrees of personality disequilibrium, which necessitates emotional first aid or crisis intervention. Such primary preventive care is applicable to patients, their relatives, and members of the nursing staff in such need.

  17. Nursing staff induced repositionings and immobile patients' spontaneous movements in nursing care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Källman, Ulrika; Bergstrand, Sara; Ek, Anna-Christina; Engström, Maria; Lindgren, Margareta

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate nursing staff induced repositionings and the patients' spontaneous movements during the day and night among older immobile patients in nursing care. Furthermore, the aim was to identify factors associated with the nursing staff induced repositionings and the patients' spontaneous movement frequency. An observational cross-sectional design was used. Spontaneous movements among patients (n = 52) were registered continuously using the MovinSense monitoring system. The nursing staff documented each time they repositioned the patient. Patients spontaneous movements were compared with nursing staff induced repositionings. There were large variations in the patients' spontaneous repositioning frequency during both days and nights, which shows that, although immobilised, some patients frequently reposition themselves. Analgesics were positively related to the movement frequency and psycholeptics were negatively related. The nursing staff more often repositioned the patients who were assessed as high risk than those assessed as low risk, but the patients' spontaneous movement frequency was not correlated to the risk score. This may be important when planning repositioning schedules. A monitoring system may be useful in decision making with regard to planning repositioning and positions used in the prevention of pressure ulcers among elderly immobile patients.

  18. Staff and patient's perceptions of each other's interpersonal style: relationship with severity of personality disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daffern, Michael; Duggan, Conor; Huband, Nick; Thomas, Stuart

    2010-08-01

    Extreme and varied reactions are often encountered when working with patients with personality disorders. Similarly, patients with personality disorder may also hold polarised opinions of the staff involved in their treatment. This study explored the relationship between severity of personality disorder and interpersonal style in patients admitted for treatment to a secure psychiatric unit. Up to four nurses rated each patient's interpersonal style using the Impact Message Inventory, a self-report transactional inventory. Patients then rated the interpersonal style of these same staff. Contrary to expectations, severity of personality disorder was not associated with patients' interpersonal style or to variance in nurses' assessments of patients' interpersonal style. However, patients with more severe personality disorder tended to show greater variability in their assessment of nurses' interpersonal style, specifically their appraisal of staff members' interpersonal dominance. Implications for the assessment of offenders admitted for treatment of their personality disorder are discussed.

  19. Implementing Electronic Patient Record and VIPS in medical hospital wards: Evaluating change in quantity and quality of nursing documentation by using the audit instrument Cat-ch-Ing

    OpenAIRE

    Rykkje, Linda

    2009-01-01

    Aim: The study examines the effectiveness of implementation of electronic nursing documentation and the nursing documentation system VIPS at the Department of Medicine, and also aims to improve our understanding of content and quality in nursing documentation. Background: After introducing Electronic Patient Record (EPR) and VIPS to medical wards, change in the quantity and quality of nursing documentation was evaluated by using the audit instrument Cat-ch-Ing. Method: Cat-ch-Ing ...

  20. Ward leadership: balancing the clinical and managerial roles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firth, Kate

    2002-04-01

    This qualitative study investigated ward managers' experiences of combining a clinical leadership role with the managerial and administrative parts of their job. Ward managers saw their main task as one of developing their staff and improving the quality of their service, yet found balancing their different roles problematic.

  1. Assessment of Measurement Tools of Observation Rate of Nursing Handover Standards in Clinical Wards of Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saadi Amini

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives : In health centers, clinical information of patient is transferred among care staffs regularly. One of the common cases in information transferring is during the time of nurses’ handover in hospital which performing it correctly will help schedule patient care, providing safety and facilitating exact transferring of information. The aim of this study is investigating validity and reliability of assessment of observance rate of shift handover in clinical wards checklist. Material and Methods : In order to determine the reliability of checklist, two experts panel meetings were held with the presence of 10 experts in clinical field that in those meetings the reliability was investigated with discussion and consensus of participants. Checklist validity was investigated through pilot study in 4 wards of 4 hospitals and calculated by Kronbach- alpha method with 28 cases of shifts handover in morning, noon, and night shift. Results : In studying reliability, the primary checklist was divided into two checklists: patient handover, equipments and ward handover that included 27 and 72 items, respectively. The reliability of patient handover checklist was verified with 0.9155 Kronbach-alpha and that of equipments and ward handover was verified with 0.8779 Kronbach-alpha. Conclusion : Verifying checklists by mentioned scientific and statistical methods showed that these are very powerful instruments that can be used as one of the assessment tools of shift handover in clinical wards to be used towards promoting received services by customers of healthcare system.

  2. Patients Hospitalized in General Wards via the Emergency Department: Early Identification of Predisposing Factors for Death or Unexpected Intensive Care Unit Admission—A Historical Prospective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thierry Boulain

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. To identify, upon emergency department (ED admission, predictors of unexpected death or unplanned intensive care/high dependency units (ICU/HDU admission during the first 15 days of hospitalization on regular wards. Methods. Prospective cohort study in a medical-surgical adult ED in a teaching hospital, including consecutive patients hospitalized on regular wards after ED visit, and identification of predictors by logistic regression and Cox proportional hazards model. Results. Among 4,619 included patients, 77 (1.67% target events were observed: 32 unexpected deaths and 45 unplanned transfers to an ICU/HDU. We identified 9 predictors of the target event including the oxygen administration on the ED, unknown current medications, and use of psychoactive drug(s. All predictors put the patients at risk during the first 15 days of hospitalization. A logistic model for hospital mortality prediction (death of all causes still comprised oxygen administration on the ED, unknown current medications, and the use of psychoactive drug(s as risk factors. Conclusion. The “use of oxygen therapy on the ED,” the “current use of psychoactive drug(s”, and the “lack of knowledge of current medications taken by the patients” were important predisposing factors to severe adverse events during the 15 days of hospitalization on regular wards following the ED visit.

  3. Characteristics and clinical management of patients admitted to cholera wards in a regional referral hospital during the 2012 epidemic in Sierra Leone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blacklock, Alexander; Sesay, Andrew; Kamara, Abdul; Kamara, Mamud; Blacklock, Claire

    2015-01-01

    In 2012, Sierra Leone suffered a nationwide cholera epidemic which affected the capital Freetown and also the provinces. This study aims to describe the characteristics and clinical management of patients admitted to cholera isolation wards of the main referral hospital in the Northern Province and compare management with standard guidelines. All available clinical records of patients from the cholera isolation wards were reviewed retrospectively. There was no active case finding. The following data were collected from the clinical records after patients had left the ward: date of admission, demographics, symptoms, dehydration status, diagnoses, tests and treatments given, length of stay, and outcomes. A total of 798 patients were admitted, of whom 443 (55.5%) were female. There were 18 deaths (2.3%). Assessment of dehydration status was recorded in 517 (64.8%) of clinical records. An alternative or additional diagnosis was made for 214 patients (26.8%). Intravenous (IV) fluids were prescribed to 767 patients (96.1%), including 95% of 141 patients who had documentation of being not severely dehydrated. A history of vomiting was documented in 92.1% of all patients. Oral rehydration solution (ORS) was given to 629 (78.8%) patients. Doxycycline was given to 380 (47.6%) patients, erythromycin to 34 (4.3%), and other antibiotics were used on 247 occasions. Zinc was given to 209 (26.2%). This retrospective study highlights the need for efforts to improve the quality of triage, adherence to clinical guidance, and record keeping. Data collection and analysis of clinical practices during an epidemic situation would enable faster identification of those areas requiring intervention and improvement.

  4. Characteristics and clinical management of patients admitted to cholera wards in a regional referral hospital during the 2012 epidemic in Sierra Leone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Blacklock

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: In 2012, Sierra Leone suffered a nationwide cholera epidemic which affected the capital Freetown and also the provinces. This study aims to describe the characteristics and clinical management of patients admitted to cholera isolation wards of the main referral hospital in the Northern Province and compare management with standard guidelines. Design: All available clinical records of patients from the cholera isolation wards were reviewed retrospectively. There was no active case finding. The following data were collected from the clinical records after patients had left the ward: date of admission, demographics, symptoms, dehydration status, diagnoses, tests and treatments given, length of stay, and outcomes. Results: A total of 798 patients were admitted, of whom 443 (55.5% were female. There were 18 deaths (2.3%. Assessment of dehydration status was recorded in 517 (64.8% of clinical records. An alternative or additional diagnosis was made for 214 patients (26.8%. Intravenous (IV fluids were prescribed to 767 patients (96.1%, including 95% of 141 patients who had documentation of being not severely dehydrated. A history of vomiting was documented in 92.1% of all patients. Oral rehydration solution (ORS was given to 629 (78.8% patients. Doxycycline was given to 380 (47.6% patients, erythromycin to 34 (4.3%, and other antibiotics were used on 247 occasions. Zinc was given to 209 (26.2%. Discussion: This retrospective study highlights the need for efforts to improve the quality of triage, adherence to clinical guidance, and record keeping. Conclusions: Data collection and analysis of clinical practices during an epidemic situation would enable faster identification of those areas requiring intervention and improvement.

  5. Light atmosphere in hospital wards

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stidsen, Lone Mandrup

    Sociocultural aspects of light are important for the user experience of the atmosphere in a ward. According to the Danish Regulation for light in hospitals (DS703, 1983), a home-like feeling is required to support the patients, as they needa pleasant environment for their recovery. The term ‘Light...... Atmosphere' is the focal point developed through the study. Primarily, the model frames the study and serves as a design tool for creating the light atmosphere in hospital wards. First, brain storming is used to open up the field supported by theoretical aspects based on Gernot Böhmes' concept of atmosphere...

  6. Evaluating the intervening factors in patient safety: focusing on hospital nursing staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Meneses Oliveira

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE To evaluate intervening factors in patient safety, focusing on hospital nursing staff. METHOD The study is descriptive, with qualitative approach, excerpt from a larger study with analytical nature. It was undertaken in a public hospital in Fortaleza, CE, Brazil, between January and June 2013, with semi-structured interviews to 70 nurses, using Thematic Content Analysis. RESULTS The principal intervening factors in patient safety related to hospital nursing staff were staff dimensioning and workload, professional qualification and training, team work, being contracted to the institution, turnover and lack of job security, and bad practice/disruptive behaviors. These aspects severely interfere with the establishment of a safety culture in the hospital analyzed. CONCLUSION It is necessary for managers to invest in nursing staff, so that these workers may be valued as fundamental in the promotion of patient safety, making it possible to develop competences for taking decisions with focus on the improvement of quality care.

  7. Exploring Factors Affecting Emergency Medical Services Staffs' Decision about Transporting Medical Patients to Medical Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimian, Abbasali; Seyedin, Hesam; Jamshidi-Orak, Roohangiz; Masoumi, Gholamreza

    2014-01-01

    Transfer of patients in medical emergency situations is one of the most important missions of emergency medical service (EMS) staffs. So this study was performed to explore affecting factors in EMS staffs' decision during transporting of patients in medical situations to medical facilities. The participants in this qualitative study consisted of 18 EMS staffs working in prehospital care facilities in Tehran, Iran. Data were gathered through semistructured interviews. The data were analyzed using a content analysis approach. The data analysis revealed the following theme: "degree of perceived risk in EMS staffs and their patients." This theme consisted of two main categories: (1) patient's condition' and (2) the context of the EMS mission'. The patent's condition category emerged from "physical health statuses," "socioeconomic statuses," and "cultural background" subcategories. The context of the EMS mission also emerged from two subcategories of "characteristics of the mission" and EMS staffs characteristics'. EMS system managers can consider adequate technical, informational, financial, educational, and emotional supports to facilitate the decision making of their staffs. Also, development of an effective and user-friendly checklist and scoring system was recommended for quick and easy recognition of patients' needs for transportation in a prehospital situation.

  8. Poverty and violence, frustration and inventiveness: hospital ward life in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaman, Shahaduz

    2004-11-01

    An ethnographic exploration was done in an orthopaedic ward of a government teaching hospital in Bangladesh to understand the nature of hospital culture in the context of Bangladeshi society at large. Life and work in the ward result in a culture that is simultaneously created by its inhabitants and the conditions in which they are situated. The study shows that biomedicine is a product of particular social conditions and that the hospital reflects features of its society. Behind the injuries and broken limbs in the ward are stories of violence, crime, and intolerance occurring in a society where masses of people fight over limited resources. In the ward people interact in an extremely hierarchical manner. The patients, who are mainly from poor economic backgrounds, remain at the bottom of the hierarchy. Doctors and other staff members are often professionally frustrated. Strikes related to hospital staff's various professional demands hamper the regular flow of work in the ward. Family members are engaged in nursing and provide various kinds of support to their hospitalized relatives. Patients give small bribes to ward boys and cleaners to obtain their day-to-day necessities. Patients joke with each other and mock senior doctors. Thus, they neutralize their powerlessness and drive away the monotony of their stay. Doctors develop 'indigenous' solutions to orthopaedic problems. Instead of using high-tech devices, they employ instruments made of bamboo, bricks, and razor blades. This study shows how medical practice takes shape in an understaffed, under-resourced and poorly financed hospital operating in a low-income country.

  9. 'Poppets and parcels': the links between staff experience of work and acutely ill older peoples' experience of hospital care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maben, Jill; Adams, Mary; Peccei, Riccardo; Murrells, Trevor; Robert, Glenn

    2012-06-01

    Few empirical studies have directly examined the relationship between staff experiences of providing healthcare and patient experience. Present concerns over the care of older people in UK acute hospitals - and the reported attitudes of staff in such settings - highlight an important area of study. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES. To examine the links between staff experience of work and patient experience of care in a 'Medicine for Older People' (MfOP) service in England. A mixed methods case study undertaken over 8 months incorporating a 149-item staff survey (66/192 - 34% response rate), a 48-item patient survey (26/111 - 23%), 18 staff interviews, 18 patient and carer interviews and 41 hours of non-participant observation. Variation in patient experience is significantly influenced by staff work experiences. A high-demand/low-control work environment, poor staffing, ward leadership and co-worker relationships can each add to the inherent difficulties staff face when caring for acutely ill older people. Staff seek to alleviate the impact of such difficulties by finding personal satisfaction from caring for 'the poppets'; those patients they enjoy caring for and for whom they feel able to 'make a difference'. Other patients - noting dehumanising aspects of their care - felt like 'parcels'. Patients are aware of being seen by staff as 'difficult' or 'demanding' and seek to manage their relationships with nursing staff accordingly. The work experiences of staff in a MfOP service impacted directly on patient care experience. Poor ward and patient care climates often lead staff to seek job satisfaction through caring for 'poppets', leaving less favoured - and often more complex patients - to receive less personalised care. Implications for practice. Investment in staff well-being and ward climate is essential for the consistent delivery of high-quality care for older people in acute settings. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  10. Determinants of Length of Stay in Surgical Ward after Coronary Bypass Surgery: Glycosylated Hemoglobin as a Predictor in All Patients, Diabetic or Non-Diabetic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi Najafi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Reports on the determinants of morbidity in coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CABG have focused on outcome measures such as length of postoperative stay in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU. We proposed that major comorbidities in the ICU hampered the prognostic effect of other weaker but important preventable risk factors with effect on patients’ length of hospitalization. So we aimed at evaluating postoperative length of stay in the ICU and surgical ward separately.Methods: We studied isolated CABG candidates who were not dialysis dependent. Preoperative, operative, and postoperative variables as well as all classic risk factors of coronary artery disease were recorded. Using multivariate analysis, we determined the independent predictors of length of stay in the ICU and in the surgical ward.Results: Independent predictors of extended length of stay in the surgical ward ( > 3 days were a history of peripheral vascular disease, total administered insulin during a 24-hour period after surgery, glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c, last fasting blood sugar of the patients before surgery, and inotropic usage after cardiopulmonary bypass. The area under the Receiver Operating Characteristic Curve (AUC was found to be 0.71 and Hosmer-Lemeshow (HL goodness of fit statistic p value was 0.88. Independent predictors of extended length of stay in the ICU ( > 48 hours were surgeon category, New York Heart Association functional class, intra-aortic balloon pump, postoperative arrhythmias, total administered insulin during a 24-hour period after surgery, and mean base excess of the first 6 postoperative hours (AUC = 0.70, HL p value = 0.94 .Conclusion: This study revealed that the indices of glycemic control were the most important predictors of length of stay in the ward after cardiac surgery in all patients, diabetic or non-diabetic. However, because HbA1c level did not change under the influence of perioperative events, it could be deemed a

  11. Psychiatric wards: places of safety?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, J; Nolan, P; Bowers, L; Simpson, A; Whittington, R; Hackney, D; Bhui, K

    2010-03-01

    In recent years, the purpose and quality of provision delivered in acute inpatient psychiatric settings have been increasingly questioned. Studies from a service user perspective have reported that while some psychiatric inpatients feel safe and cared for, others feel their time in hospital is neither safe nor therapeutic. This paper explores the experiences of service users on acute inpatient psychiatric wards in England, with a particular focus on their feelings of safety and security. Interviews were conducted with 60 psychiatric inpatients in England. The majority of service users felt safe in hospital and felt supported by staff and other service users. However, anything that threatened their sense of security such as aggression, bullying, theft, racism and the use of alcohol and drugs on the ward, made some respondents feel insecure and unsafe. Psychiatric wards are still perceived by many as volatile environments, where service users feel forced to devise personal security strategies in order to protect themselves and their property. It would appear that there remains much to do before research findings and policies are implemented in ways that facilitate all service users to derive the maximum benefit from their inpatient experience.

  12. The effect of a virtual ward program on emergency services utilization and quality of life in frail elderly patients after discharge: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leung DYP

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Doris Y P Leung,1 Diana Tze-Fan Lee,1 Iris F K Lee,1 Lai-Wah Lam,1 Susanna W Y Lee,2 May W M Chan,3 Yin-Ming Lam,4 Siu-Hung Leung,5 Pui-Chi Chiu,6 Nelly K F Ho,7 Ming-Fai Ip,8 May My Hui8 1The Nethersole School of Nursing, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, Hong Kong; 2Hospital Authority Head Office, 3Kowloon West Cluster, 4New Territories West Cluster, 5Kowloon East Cluster, 6United Christian Hospital, 7Kowloon Hospital, 8Tuen Mun Hospital, Hong Kong Hospital Authority, Kowloon, Hong Kong Introduction: Attendance at emergency departments and unplanned hospital readmissions are common for frail older patients after discharge from hospitals. A virtual ward service was piloted to deliver “hospital-at-home” services by community nurses and geriatricians to frail older patients immediately after their discharge from hospital to reduce emergency services utilization.Objectives: This study examined the impacts of the virtual ward service on changes in the patients’ emergency attendance and medical readmissions, and their quality of life (QOL.Methods: A matched-control quasi-experimental study was conducted at four hospitals, with three providing the virtual ward service (intervention and one providing the usual community nursing care (control. Subjects in the intervention group were those who are at high risk of readmission and who are supported by home carers recruited from the three hospitals providing the virtual ward service. Matched control patients were those recruited from the hospital providing usual care. Outcome measures include emergency attendance and medical readmission in the past 90 days as identified from medical records, and patient-reported QOL as measured by the modified Quality-of-Life Concerns in the End of Life Questionnaire (Chinese version. Wilcoxon signed-rank tests compared the changes in the outcome variables between groups.Results: A total of 39 patients in each of the two groups were recruited. The virtual

  13. Patient and Staff (doctors and nurses) Experiences of Abdominal Hysterectomy in Accelerated Recovery Programme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagner, Lis; Carlslund, Anne Mette; Møller, Charlotte

    2004-01-01

    the experiences of the women operated and the staff involved. Material and methods: The study is exploratory and descriptive, using qualitative methods. Seventeen women, with good health status, were consecutively selected from August to September 2001. The women were observed and ten were interviewed twice...... of information relay and dialogue between staff and patients/family members. A nursing care ambulatory unit is recommended to support with information for women prior to and following hysterectomy in the ARP....

  14. 无菌层流病房护理人员倦怠调查及对策%Investigation in job burnout of nursing staff in sterile laminar flow wards and countermeasures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李文娟; 丁小萍

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the job burnout of the nurses in sterile laminar flow wards and offer proposals for improvements.Methods Forty nurses in sterile laminar flow wards were surveyed with MBI-GS.Results The scores of emotional exhaustion,cynicism,job inefficiency were higher after working in sterile laminar flow wards for 3 months than those working in general wards for 3 months.Conclusions The nurses in laminar flow wards are prone to have job burnout.Standardized training,humanized management and positive psvchological intervention can improve the job burnout of the nurses in laminar flow wards.%目的 分析、评价层流病房护理人员工作倦怠的状态,并提出相应的改善对策.方法 选取血液科和器官移植科层流病房护理人员40名,采用Maslach工作倦怠量表(MBI-GS)对其工作倦怠状况进行评价.结果 40名护理人员在层流病房工作3个月后,情绪耗竭、消极怠慢、专业低效能感的得分均高于普通病房连续工作3个月后的测评状态.结论 层流病房护理人员更易产生工作倦怠状态;通过加强层流病房护理规范培训、人性化管理及积极的心理干预可以舒缓工作倦怠状态.

  15. Design Proposal for Pleasurable Light Atmosphere in Hospital Wards

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stidsen, Lone; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning; Fisker, Anna Marie

    2010-01-01

    When constructing and designing Danish hospitals for the future, patients, staff and guests are in focus. It is found important to have a starting point in healing architecture and create an environment with knowledge of users sensory and functionally needs and looks at how hospital wards can...... support patients’ experience or maybe even have a positive influence on the recovery process. Thus at a general level, it is a crucial task to investigate how aspects such as the design of the environment, arts, lights, sounds can support and improve the patients’ recovery rate and the satisfaction...... of staff and guests in the future hospital. This paper introduce the concept of atmosphere based on the theory of Gernot Böhmes and it is dealing with the effect of light in experiencing atmosphere, looking at the importance having a holistic approach to lighting design. The paper displays important design...

  16. Restructuring a rehabilitation program for older adults: effects on patient outcomes and staff perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Jennifer; Hopper, Tammy

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this mixed-methods research study was to examine the impact of organizational change on patient outcomes and staff experiences in a rehabilitation program for older adults. Program restructuring focused on reducing patient length of stay and increasing admissions to the rehabilitation program. Study findings revealed that patients admitted after restructuring, as compared to the time period just prior, experienced shorter lengths of stay yet made similar progress towards rehabilitation goals. The average discharge Functional Independence Measure (FIM) scores between the two time periods were not significantly different. Yet FIM efficiency scores improved after the restructuring. With this reorganization, rehabilitation staff reported working harder to help patients achieve satisfactory outcomes, although initially staff reported lower morale. Findings extend the current literature and have practical implications for health care professionals interested in facilitating successful organizational change.

  17. The use of humor in forensic mental health staff-patient interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gildberg, Frederik A; Bradley, Stephen K; Paaske, Kristian J; Hounsgaard, Lise

    2014-01-01

    Humor utilized in the practice of forensic mental health nursing might seem somehow inappropriate, given the serious circumstances surrounding most forensic mental health patients. However, some recent research has pointed to the use of humor as an important component in staff interactions with forensic mental health patients. This study reviews the existing international forensic mental health research literature on humor to investigate (a) what characterizes forensic mental health staff-patient use of humor and (b) what significance humor holds within the forensic mental health setting. The search was conducted in June 2013. Scopus, CINAHL, PubMed, and PsychINFO were searched using keywords relevant to the study. Articles were categorized using a literature matrix and analyzed using thematic analysis. Twelve research articles were reviewed and included in the analysis. Three themes were identified: (a) "humor as staff skill," showing that staff found humor to be important as an interpersonal ability; (b) "humor as a relational tool" with the purpose of establishing and maintaining staff-patient interactions; and (c) "the impact of humor on patients," describing impacts on conflicts, dimensions of health, and motivation. The results of the analysis are however limited because of the dearth of published articles on the subject.

  18. House staff nonverbal communication skills and standardized patient satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Charles H; Wilson, John F; Langer, Shelby; Haist, Steven A

    2003-03-01

    To examine the association of physician nonverbal communication with standardized patient (SP) satisfaction in the context of the "quality" of the interview (i.e., information provided and collected, communication skills). Observational. One university-based internal medicine residency program. Fifty-nine internal medicine residents. INTERVIEWING: The 59 residents were recruited to participate in 3 SP encounters. The scenarios included: 1) a straightforward, primarily "medical" problem (chest pain); 2) a patient with more psychosocial overlay (a depressed patient with a history of sexual abuse); and 3) a counseling encounter (HIV risk factor reduction counseling). Trained SPs rated physician nonverbal behaviors (body lean, open versus closed body posture, eye contact, smiling, tone of voice, nod, facial expressivity) in the 3 encounters. Multiple regression approaches were used to investigate the association of physician nonverbal behavior with patient satisfaction in the context of the "quality" of the interview (SP checklist performance, measures of verbal communication skills), controlling for physician characteristics (gender, postgraduate year). Nonverbal communication skills was an independent predictor of standardized patient satisfaction for all 3 patient stations. The effect sizes were substantial, with nonverbal communication predicting 32% of the variance in patient satisfaction for the chest pain station, 23% of the variance for the depression-sexual abuse station, and 19% of the variance for the HIV counseling station. Better nonverbal communication skills are associated with significantly greater patient satisfaction in a variety of different types of clinical encounters with standardized patients. Formal instruction in nonverbal communication may be an important addition to residency.

  19. Smoking behavior among patients and staff: a snapshot from a major metropolitan hospital in Melbourne, Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahman MA

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Muhammad Aziz Rahman,1,2 Andrew M Wilson,2–4 Rhonda Sanders,3 David Castle,2–4 Karen Daws,3 David R Thompson,2 Chantal F Ski,2 Sarah Matthews,3 Christine Wright,2 Linda Worrall-Carter1–31St Vincent's Centre for Nursing Research (SVCNR, Australian Catholic University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia; 2The Cardiovascular Research Centre (CvRC, Australian Catholic University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia; 3St Vincent's Hospital, Melbourne, VIC, Australia; 4The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC, AustraliaBackground: A cross-sectional study was conducted to provide a snapshot of smoking behavior among staff and patients at a major metropolitan hospital in Melbourne.Methods: Patients and staff were surveyed using a questionnaire exploring demographics, nicotine dependence (Fagerstrom test, readiness to quit, and preference for smoking cessation options.Results: A total of 1496 people were screened within 2 hours; 1,301 participated (1,100 staff, 199 patients. Mean age was 42 years, 68% were female. There were 113 (9% current smokers and 326 (25% ex-smokers. Seven percent of the staff were current smokers compared with 19% of the patients. The Fagerstrom test showed that 47% of patients who smoked were moderately nicotine dependent compared with 21% of staff. A third of the staff who smoked did not anticipate health problems related to smoking. Most patients (79% who smoked disagreed that their current health problems were related to smoking. Although more than half of the current smokers preferred pharmacotherapy, one in two of them did not prefer behavior counseling; with consistent results among staff and patients. Multivariate analyses showed that patients were three times more likely (odds ratio 3.0, 95% confidence interval 1.9–4.7 to smoke than staff.Conclusion: This study reports lower prevalence of smoking among hospital staff compared with national data. It also indicates an under-appreciation of health effects of smoking, and a

  20. Is culture associated with patient safety in the emergency department? A study of staff perspectives.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbeek-van Noord, I.; Wagner, C.; Dyck, C. van; Twisk, J.W.R.; Bruijne, M.C. de

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To describe the patient safety culture of Dutch emergency departments (EDs), to examine associations between safety culture dimensions and patient safety grades as reported by ED staff and to compare these associations between nurses and physicians. DESIGN: Cross-sectional survey conducte

  1. Classifying nursing organization in wards in Norwegian hospitals: self-identification versus observation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helgeland Jon

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The organization of nursing services could be important to the quality of patient care and staff satisfaction. However, there is no universally accepted nomenclature for this organization. The objective of the current study was to classify general hospital wards based on data describing organizational practice reported by the ward nurse managers, and then to compare this classification with the name used in the wards to identify the organizational model (self-identification. Methods In a cross-sectional postal survey, 93 ward nurse managers in Norwegian hospitals responded to questions about nursing organization in their wards, and what they called their organizational models. K-means cluster analysis was used to classify the wards according to the pattern of activities attributed to the different nursing roles and discriminant analysis was used to interpret the solutions. Cross-tabulation was used to validate the solutions and to compare the classification obtained from the cluster analysis with that obtained by self-identification. The bootstrapping technique was used to assess the generalizability of the cluster solution. Results The cluster analyses produced two alternative solutions using two and three clusters, respectively. The three-cluster solution was considered to be the best representation of the organizational models: 32 team leader-dominated wards, 23 primary nurse-dominated wards and 38 wards with a hybrid or mixed organization. There was moderate correspondence between the three-cluster solution and the models obtained by self-identification. Cross-tabulation supported the empirical classification as being representative for variations in nursing service organization. Ninety-four per cent of the bootstrap replications showed the same pattern as the cluster solution in the study sample. Conclusions A meaningful classification of wards was achieved through an empirical cluster solution; this was, however, only

  2. Patient and Staff Perceptions of Intradialytic Exercise before and after Implementation: A Qualitative Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah M L Young

    Full Text Available Despite guidance and evidence for the beneficial effects of intradialytic exercise (IDE, such programmes are rarely adopted within practice and little is known about how they may best be sustained. The Theoretical Domains Framework (TDF was used to guide the understanding of the barriers and facilitators to initial and ongoing IDE participation and to understand how these are influential at each stage.Focus groups explored patient (n=24 and staff (n=9 perceptions of IDE prior to the introduction of a programme and, six months later, face to face semi-structured interviews captured exercising patients (n=11 and staffs' (n=8 actual experiences. Data were collected at private and NHS haemodialysis units within the UK. All data were audio-recorded, translated where necessary, transcribed verbatim and subject to framework analysis.IDE initiation can be facilitated by addressing the pre-existing beliefs about IDE through the influence of peers (for patients and training (for staff. Participation was sustained through the observation of positive outcomes and through social influences such as teamwork and collaboration. Despite this, environment and resource limitations remained the greatest barrier perceived by both groups.Novel methods of staff training and patient education should enhance engagement. Programmes that clearly highlight the benefits of IDE should be more successful in the longer term. The barrier of staff workload needs to be addressed through specific guidance that includes recommendations on staffing levels, roles, training and skill mix.

  3. [Exploring life-experience of the staff and volunteers assisting pediatric patients in end-of-life situations] [Article in Italian] • I vissuti dello staff e dei volontari che assistono pazienti pediatrici terminali

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosapia Lauro Grotto

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The development of guidelines for palliative care in the paediatric settings is judged to be still incomplete and characterized by many controversial issues; in order to explore the life-experience of individual health care professionals, we proposed a semi-structured questionnaire with open questions on end-of-life procedures to the staff members of the Paediatric Onco-hematology Ward of the University of Padua, of the Oncology Ward and in the Home Assistance Module of the Giannetta Gaslini Hospital, Genoa, both in Italy. This paper will focus on the responses provided to the third question: “In your opinion, can inducing the suspension of the state of consciousness be counted among end-of-life procedures? If so, how and when?”. Staff members were found to face challenging interactions at at least three levels: within the professional team, with respect to the parents and with respect to the adolescent patients. Among the most complex issues raised by the participants we found the moral distress sometimes experienced by nurses with respect to the decisions assumed by doctors, as stated by a nurse: “Everything is subjective in those 24 hours  (… and you are to do or not do certain things and it makes you feel distressed”. Second, it emerged that the relationship with the parents becomes very challenging when the two are not in agreement: “The father wants to give the morphine, but the mother secretly closes the drip”. Finally, the relationship of trust with the adolescent patients is under threat when they ‘want to know’ while parents seem to be unable to tolerate this degree of painful but essential self-consciousness in their ‘child’: “He locked me in the room and asked, ‘Am I dying?’, and I wanted to die at that point…”. Our study shows that health care professionals require not just guidelines but a tailor-made training and support which integrate much deeply the therapeutic as well as the moral and

  4. House staff communication training and patient experience scores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oladeru, Oladoyin A; Hamadu, Musleehat; Cleary, Paul D; Hittelman, Adam B; Bulsara, Ketan R; Laurans, Maxwell SH; DiCapua, Daniel B; Marcolini, Evie G; Moeller, Jeremy J; Khokhar, Babar; Hodge, Jeannette W; Fortin, Auguste H; Hafler, Janet P; Bennick, Michael C; Hwang, David Y

    2017-01-01

    Objective To assess whether communication training for housestaff via role-playing exercises (1) is well-received and (2) improves patient experience scores in housestaff clinics. Methods We conducted a pre-post study in which the housestaff for 3 adult hospital departments participated in communication trainingled by trained faculty in small groups . Sessions centered on a published 5-step strategy for opening patient-centered interviews using department-specific role-playing exercises. Housestaff completed post-training questionnaires. For one month prior to and one month following the training, patients in the housestaff clinics completed surveys with CG-CAHPS questions regarding physician communication, immediately following clinic visits. Pre-and post -intervention results for top-box scores were compared. Results Forty -four of a possible 45 housestaff (97.8%) participated, with 31 (70.5%) indicating that the role-playing exercise increased their perception of the 5-step strategy. No differences on patient responses to CG-CAHPS questions were seen when comparing 63 pre-intervention patients surveys to 77 post-intervention surveys. Conclusion Demonstrating an improvement in standard patient experience surveys in resident clinics may require ongoing communication coaching and investigation of the “hidden curriculum” of training.

  5. On-ward participation of a hospital pharmacist in a Dutch intensive care unit reduces prescribing errors and related patient harm: an intervention study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klopotowska, Joanna E; Kuiper, Rob; van Kan, Hendrikus J; de Pont, Anne-Cornelie; Dijkgraaf, Marcel G; Lie-A-Huen, Loraine; Vroom, Margreeth B; Smorenburg, Susanne M

    2010-01-01

    Patients admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU) are at high risk for prescribing errors and related adverse drug events (ADEs). An effective intervention to decrease this risk, based on studies conducted mainly in North America, is on-ward participation of a clinical pharmacist in an ICU team. As the Dutch Healthcare System is organized differently and the on-ward role of hospital pharmacists in Dutch ICU teams is not well established, we conducted an intervention study to investigate whether participation of a hospital pharmacist can also be an effective approach in reducing prescribing errors and related patient harm (preventable ADEs) in this specific setting. A prospective study compared a baseline period with an intervention period. During the intervention period, an ICU hospital pharmacist reviewed medication orders for patients admitted to the ICU, noted issues related to prescribing, formulated recommendations and discussed those during patient review meetings with the attending ICU physicians. Prescribing issues were scored as prescribing errors when consensus was reached between the ICU hospital pharmacist and ICU physicians. During the 8.5-month study period, medication orders for 1,173 patients were reviewed. The ICU hospital pharmacist made a total of 659 recommendations. During the intervention period, the rate of consensus between the ICU hospital pharmacist and ICU physicians was 74%. The incidence of prescribing errors during the intervention period was significantly lower than during the baseline period: 62.5 per 1,000 monitored patient-days versus 190.5 per 1,000 monitored patient-days, respectively (P Medication Error Reporting and Prevention severity categories E and F) were reduced from 4.0 per 1,000 monitored patient-days during the baseline period to 1.0 per 1,000 monitored patient-days during the intervention period (P = 0.25). Per monitored patient-day, the intervention itself cost €3, but might have saved €26 to €40 by preventing

  6. Transmission of Pneumocystis carinii from patients to hospital staff

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundgren, Bettina; Elvin, K; Rothman, L P;

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: An extrahuman reservoir of human pathogenic Pneumocystis carinii remains unknown. Host to host transmission has been described in animal studies and in cluster cases among immunodeficient patients. P carinii DNA has recently been detected in air filters from inpatient and outpatient r...

  7. “These patients look lost” – Community pharmacy staff's identification and support of patients with limited health literacy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koster, Ellen S.; Philbert, Daphne; Blom, Lyda; Bouvy, Marcel L.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To date, routine use of health literacy assessment in clinical settings is limited. The objective of this study was to explore if community pharmacy staff can identify patients with limited health literacy, how they identify patients and how they support patients to improve medication

  8. “These patients look lost” – Community pharmacy staff's identification and support of patients with limited health literacy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koster, Ellen S.; Philbert, Daphne; Blom, Lyda; Bouvy, Marcel L.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To date, routine use of health literacy assessment in clinical settings is limited. The objective of this study was to explore if community pharmacy staff can identify patients with limited health literacy, how they identify patients and how they support patients to improve medication use

  9. Nosocomial klebsiellas. II. Transfer in a hospital ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haverkorn, M J; Michel, M F

    1979-04-01

    During a 6-month period an epidemiological survey of the carriage of Klebsiella was conducted in a hospital ward where no outbreak of nosocomial infection occurred. In this endemic situation the regular sampling of several sites of patients, members of the nursing staff, and the environment, and the biotyping of Klebsiella made it possible to analyse the patterns of transmission between sites. There was abundant evidence for striking transmission of Klebsiella between the throat, hands, and faeces of patients. Transmission between patients seemed to be mainly through hands. The role of nurses' hands in transmission was not evident from this survey, probably due to the relatively long interval (a week) between samplings. Through the hands of patients, wash stands and the surrounding floor were contaminated with Klebsiella. The biotyping of Klebsiella facilitated the epidemiological analysis of the results.

  10. Radiant Ceiling Panels Combined with Localized Methods for Improved Thermal Comfort of Both Patient and Medical Staff in Patient Room

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mori, Sakura; Barova, Mariya; Bolashikov, Zhecho Dimitrov;

    2012-01-01

    The objectives were to identify whether ceiling installed radiant heating panels can provide thermal comfort to the occupants in a patient room, and to determine a method for optimal thermal environment to both patient and medical staff simultaneously. The experiments were performed in a climate...... mattress were used to provide local heating for the patient. The effects of the methods were identified by comparing the manikin based equivalent temperatures. The optimal thermal comfort level for both patient and medical staff would obtained when two conventional cotton blankets were used with extra...

  11. Implementation of Releasing Time to Care - the productive ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Gwyneth

    2009-07-01

    This paper describes the implementation of the NHS Institute for Innovation and Improvement Productive Ward - releasing time to care programme. It will discuss the benefits and key successes and provides advice for those wishing to implement the programme. In Lord Darzi's Next Stage Review, he advocates an ambitious vision of patient centred - clinician led, locally driven NHS. The Releasing Time to Care programme is a unique opportunity for everyone working within the NHS to improve effectiveness, safety and reliability of the services we provide. Whilst being situated within a National Health Service policy environment learning from this work can be translated nationally and internationally, as the principles underpin the provision of high quality care. Evaluation is currently in relation to each of the 15 modules rather than as the programme as a whole. It uses various methods including audit, observation, activity follow through, satisfaction surveys and process mapping. Each month data is colated for each of the 11 metrics which has shown a reduction in falls, drug administration errors and improvement in the recording of patient observations. One of the key issues is that an essential component for the success of the programme lies in the tangible support of the Trust Board/Board of Directors. Evidence shows that this programme improves patient satisfaction as it enables the provision of an increase in direct patient care by staff and subsequently improved clinical and safety outcomes. Ward Sister/Charge Nurse development includes Leadership, Project management and Lean Methodology techniques. The Releasing Time to Care programme is a key component of the Next Stage Review. It will create productive organisations by being a catalyst for the transformation of Trust services, enabling staff to spend more time caring for patients and users. This release in time will result in better outcomes and subsequent improvement with patient and staff satisfaction and

  12. 品管圈在提高产科病房病人交接班完整率中的应用%Application and effect of the maternity ward patients shift integrity rate of quality control circle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐静

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To improve application and effect of the maternity ward patients shift integrity rate of quality control circle. Methods:From external and internal instructor of obstetric nurses were trained coil operation, extraction of backbone 14 nurses in group rings, to determine the "improve the maternity ward patient handover complete rate" as the theme, the team members brainstorming dis-cussion, make handover document outline 68, 2013. 06. 21 - 7. 04 in two weeks to check. In 940 cases, the average rate of complete 53. 38%, combined with the ability to improve the circle, determine the target value of 87. 29% points, in accordance with the fishbone diagram analysis for five reasons, establish four countermeasures countermeasures integrity rate of 91. 94% after the group. Results:Im-prove the maternity ward patient handover complete rate, the handover guide had been widely used in obstetric ward. Conclusion:The quality control circle could fully exploit the nursing staff's personal potential, strengthen the nursing team cohesion, enable nurses to better implement the core system, to ensure the safety of nursing care;at the same time, the safety management of the hospital, establish a good image.%目的::探讨品管圈在提高产科病房病人交接班完整率中的应用与效果。方法:由外部及内部辅导员对产科护士进行品管圈运作的系统培训,抽取产科骨干护士14名组圈,确定“提高产科病房病人交接班完整率”为活动主题,经组员脑力激荡讨论,制定交班文件大纲68项,2013年6月21日~7月4日2周内共查检了940例,平均完整率53.38%,结合圈能力,改善重点确定目标值为87.29%,依鱼骨图解析选出5大主因,建立4大对策群组,实施对策后完整率91.94%。结果:提高了产科病房病人交接班的完整率,目前交接班指南手册已在产科病房广泛应用。结论:品管圈充分发掘了护理人员的个人潜能,加强了护理团队的凝聚力,

  13. Radiation exposure in gastroenterology: improving patient and staff protection.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ho, Immanuel K H

    2014-08-01

    Medical imaging involving the use of ionizing radiation has brought enormous benefits to society and patients. In the past several decades, exposure to medical radiation has increased markedly, driven primarily by the use of computed tomography. Ionizing radiation has been linked to carcinogenesis. Whether low-dose medical radiation exposure will result in the development of malignancy is uncertain. This paper reviews the current evidence for such risk, and aims to inform the gastroenterologist of dosages of radiation associated with commonly ordered procedures and diagnostic tests in clinical practice. The use of medical radiation must always be justified and must enable patients to be exposed at the lowest reasonable dose. Recommendations provided herein for minimizing radiation exposure are based on currently available evidence and Working Party expert consensus.

  14. Effects of nursing care and staff skill mix on patient outcomes within acute care nursing units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Patricia; Davis, Nancy

    2011-01-01

    This article presents the findings from a study that evaluates the relationships between staffing indicators and patient outcomes at the hospital unit level. Nursing administrators should not only evaluate the impact staffing decisions have on patient outcomes at the hospital level but also examine these relationships at the unit level. The findings from this study have implications for nursing practice in the areas of staff orientation, education, and patient outcome monitoring.

  15. Stress of Conscience among psychiatric nursing staff in relation to environmental and individual factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuvesson, Hanna; Eklund, Mona; Wann-Hansson, Christine

    2012-03-01

    The present study aimed at investigating the relationship between environmental and individual factors and Stress of Conscience among nursing staff in psychiatric in-patient care. A questionnaire involving six different instruments measuring Stress of Conscience, the ward atmosphere, the psychosocial work environment, Perceived Stress, Moral Sensitivity, and Mastery was answered by 93 nursing staff at 12 psychiatric in-patient wards in Sweden. The findings showed that Sense of Moral Burden, Mastery, Control at Work and Angry and Aggressive Behavior were related to Stress of Conscience. We conclude that Mastery and Control at Work seemed to work as protective factors, while Sense of Moral Burden and perceptions of Angry and Aggressive Behavior made the nursing staff more vulnerable to Stress of Conscience. Future research should investigate whether measures to increase the level of perceived control and being part of decision making will decrease the level of Stress of Conscience among the staff.

  16. Assessment of the MSF triage system, separating patients into different wards pending Ebola virus laboratory confirmation, Kailahun, Sierra Leone, July to September 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, Florian; Fitzpatrick, Gabriel; Patten, Gabriela; van den Bergh, Rafael; Stinson, Kathryn; Pandolfi, Luigi; Squire, James; Decroo, Tom; Declerck, Hilde; Van Herp, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Prevention of nosocomial Ebola virus (EBOV) infection among patients admitted to an Ebola management centre (EMC) is paramount. Current Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) guidelines recommend classifying admitted patients at triage into suspect and highly-suspect categories pending laboratory confirmation. We investigated the performance of the MSF triage system to separate patients with subsequent EBOV-positive laboratory test (true-positive admissions) from patients who were initially admitted on clinical grounds but subsequently tested EBOV-negative (false-positive admissions). We calculated standard diagnostic test statistics for triage allocation into suspect or highly-suspect wards (index test) and subsequent positive or negative laboratory results (reference test) among 433 patients admitted into the MSF EMC Kailahun, Sierra Leone, between 1 July and 30 September 2014. 254 (59%) of admissions were classified as highly-suspect, the remaining 179 (41%) as suspect. 276 (64%) were true-positive admissions, leaving 157 (36.3%) false-positive admissions exposed to the risk of nosocomial EBOV infection. The positive predictive value for receiving a positive laboratory result after being allocated to the highly-suspect ward was 76%. The corresponding negative predictive value was 54%. Sensitivity and specificity were 70% and 61%, respectively. Results for accurate patient classification were unconvincing. The current triage system should be changed. Whenever possible, patients should be accommodated in single compartments pending laboratory confirmation. Furthermore, the initial triage step on whether or not to admit a patient in the first place must be improved. What is ultimately needed is a point-of-care EBOV diagnostic test that is reliable, accurate, robust, mobile, affordable, easy to use outside strict biosafety protocols, providing results with quick turnaround time.

  17. A national programme for patient and staff dose monitoring in interventional cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, R; Vano, E; Fernández, J M; Sotil, J; Carrera, F; Armas, J; Rosales, F; Pifarre, X; Escaned, J; Angel, J; Diaz, J F; Bosa, F; Saez, J R; Goicolea, J

    2011-09-01

    A national programme on patient and staff dose evaluation in interventional cardiology made in cooperation with the haemodynamic section of the Spanish Society of Cardiology has recently been launched. Its aim is to propose a set of national diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) for patients as recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection and to initiate several optimisation actions to improve radiological protection of both patients and staff. Six hospitals have joined the programme and accepted to submit their data to a central database. First to be acquired were the quality control data of the X-ray systems and radiation doses of patients and professionals. The results from 9 X-ray systems, 1467 procedures and staff doses from 43 professionals were gathered. Provisional DRLs resulted in 44 Gy cm(2) for coronary angiography and 78 Gy cm(2) for interventions. The X-ray systems varied up to a factor of 5 for dose rates in reference conditions. Staff doses showed that 50 % of interventional cardiologists do not use their personal dosemeters correctly.

  18. Risk assessment of the Manual Handling of Patients in remedial wards of Qazvin hospitals and its relationship with incidence of musculoskeletal disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalantari Reza

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objectives : Approximately one third of all reported work-related incidents are triggered by manual handling. The proportion of incidents associated with manual handling in health and social care is 38%. Lifting and transferring patients is the task that is most often cited as a cause of manual handling incidents and of back injury in the healthcare sector. The aim of this study is to determine the MAPO index for remedial hospital wards of Qazvin and considering its relationship with incidence and intensity of musculoskeletal disorders among servers whose main task is manual handling of patients . Methods : In this cross sectional study, 54 cases of servers from 23 wards of 4 Hospitals was considered. The data was collected using the demographic characteristic questionnaire, the Verbal pain intensity scale, the Nordic questionnaire and the MAPO checklist. Statistical Analysis of collected data was performed with SPSS 22. Results : One year prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders was 75.9% and this amount during performing this study was reported 53.7%. Regarding to different levels of MAPO score, just 5.5% of surveyed personnel were in safe zone. 18.5% of them exposed to moderate risk of musculoskeletal disorders and 76 % were at high risk. Also prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders incidents and pain intensity had significantly associated with the MAPO index score. Conclusion : Regarding to association between MAPO index score and prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders, to reducing incidences risk, improvement of MAPO index parameters to reducing its amount will be effective.

  19. Effects of the implementation of the web-based patient support system on staff's attitudes towards computers and IT use: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koivunen, Marita; Välimäki, Maritta; Patel, Anita; Knapp, Martin; Hätönen, Heli; Kuosmanen, Lauri; Pitkänen, Anneli; Anttila, Minna; Katajisto, Jouko

    2010-09-01

    Utilisation of information technology (IT) in the treatment of people with severe mental health problems is an unknown area in Europe. Use of IT and guiding patients to relevant sources of health information requires that nursing staff have positive attitudes toward computers and accept IT use as a part of daily practises. The aim of the study was to assess the effects of the implementation of a web-based patient support system on staff's attitudes towards computers and IT use on psychiatric wards. Hundred and forty-nine nurses in two psychiatric hospitals in Finland were randomised to two groups to deliver patient education for patients with schizophrenia and psychosis with a web-based system (n = 76) or leaflets (n = 73). After baseline nurses were followed-up for 18 months after the introduction of the system. The primary outcome was nurses' motivation to utilise computers, and the secondary outcomes were nurses' beliefs in and satisfaction with computers, and use of computer and internet. There were no statistically significant differences between study groups in attitudes towards computers (motivation p = 0.936, beliefs p = 0.270, satisfaction p = 0.462) and internet use (p = 0.276). However, nurses' general computer use (p = 0.029) increased more in the leaflet group than in the IT intervention group. We can conclude that IT has promise as an alternative method in patient education, as the implementation of the web-based patient support system in daily basis did not have a negative effect on nurses' attitudes towards IT. © 2010 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2010 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  20. The assessment and management of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting among cancer patients in a chemotherapy ward: a best practice implementation project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Lingli; Li, Jing

    2016-03-01

    Chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) are considered to be two of the most distressing side-effects of chemotherapy. They have a negative impact on a patient's quality of life and can influence the continuance of treatment. Owing to the lack of effective management of CINV, regular assessment and management of CINV is recommended for patients undergoing chemotherapy. The aim of this project was to integrate the available evidence on the assessment and management of CINV into practice, and implement strategies to improve compliance with evidence-based practice. The project carried out a pre- and post-implementation audit procedure using the Joanna Briggs Institute Practical Application of Clinical Evidence System and Getting Research into Practice programs. Five audit criteria were established according to the best available evidence on the assessment and management of CINV. The program was divided into three phases and conducted over four months in the chemotherapy ward, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Shanghai, China. Sixty patients and 14 oncology nurses were involved in this project. The results of the follow-up cycle showed that the compliance rates regarding patient education, risk factors evaluation and non-pharmacologic managements were 100%, 100% and 80%, respectively. The rate of validated tools being used by patients and nurses improved by 93% and 97%, respectively. This project demonstrated that the use of pre- and post-best practice audits is an effective method for incorporating evidence into practice in a chemotherapy ward. The practice of assessing and managing CINV was significantly improved. The next step is to develop strategies for sustaining the new procedures of CINV assessment and management.

  1. [Impact of comorbid psychiatric disorders on the length of stay and the cost of medical treatment among geriatric patients treated on internal medicine wards].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebestyén, Gábor; Hamar, Mátyás; Bíró, László; Kovács, Gábor; Gazdag, Gábor

    2006-01-01

    Coexistence of psychiatric comorbidity is very common in patients hospitalized with somatic problems. Several studies have shown that comorbid dementia increases the length of stay (LOS) in hospitals. The literature is more contradictory in the case of anxiety disorders, substance-related disorders, mood disorders and delirium. Our aim was to explore the influence of psychiatric comorbidity on the average length of hospital stay and the related costs among geriatric patients treated in internal wards. The examination was conducted on two departments of internal medicine for 3 months on all admitted patients above 65 years. Four psychometric tests were carried out in the first three days after hospitalization as a screen for psychiatric comorbidity. In the whole study group the incidence of a depression syndrome of various severity reached 56%. We have not identified any difference in LOS when the depressive and non-depressive groups were compared. 59% of the patients showed some degree of cognitive impairment. Mean LOS was 7.4 days longer among patient suffering in severe dementia than in the group showing no cognitive deficit. Our results have demonstrated that of the investigated psychiatric comorbid conditions, an increased LOS is connected only with dementia. The degree of the cognitive impairment shows a positive correlation with the length of stay and the cost of medical treatment. Given the high incidence rate of affective syndromes, it can be assumed that comorbid depression increases the chance of admission to an internal medicine ward with some somatic complaints. This can be attributed to a larval stage of depression manifesting as somatic symptoms.

  2. The patient care development programme: organisational development through user and staff involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, P; O'Grady, A; Millar, B; Boswell, K

    2000-01-01

    A number of approaches have been developed in recent years to try effectively to engage service users in the process of planning and delivering health-care services. The consumerist methodology for the strategy described in this paper was designed to maximise staff involvement in capturing user views, in order to develop services at a district general hospital. This strategy--the Patient Care Development Programme (PCDP)--provides a framework for both staff and patient involvement in shaping and influencing the development of health-care services. Uses the findings from applying the strategy to modify care packages, roles, skills, layouts, protocols and procedures, in response to both the "shortfalls" and the service strengths that the patient's view uncovers. Discusses the results of an evaluation of the programme which has been replicated in another part of the UK. The PCDP now forms part of a clinical governance framework and is being used to develop multi-agency integrated care pathways.

  3. Patient and Staff (doctors and nurses) Experiences of Abdominal Hysterectomy in Accelerated Recovery Programme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagner, Lis; Carlslund, Anne Mette; Møller, Charlotte

    2004-01-01

    Introduction: The accelerated recovery programme (ARP) is becoming commonplace in surgical specialties and has also been introduced to hysterectomy patients. Diagnostic, prognostic and other clinical indicators are well described. The aim of this article is to relay knowledge about the ARP, throu...... of information relay and dialogue between staff and patients/family members. A nursing care ambulatory unit is recommended to support with information for women prior to and following hysterectomy in the ARP....... the experiences of the women operated and the staff involved. Material and methods: The study is exploratory and descriptive, using qualitative methods. Seventeen women, with good health status, were consecutively selected from August to September 2001. The women were observed and ten were interviewed twice...... themselves as being good girls but expressed that when the hospital's ARP had expired the attention from the staff declined. The staff continued to be concerned about whether the women received the information and psychological care they needed but claimed that the ARP proved better for the women than...

  4. Nonpharmacological Interventions Targeted at Delirium Risk Factors, Delivered by Trained Volunteers (Medical and Psychology Students), Reduced Need for Antipsychotic Medications and the Length of Hospital Stay in Aged Patients Admitted to an Acute Internal Medicine Ward: Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piotrowicz, Karolina; Rewiuk, Krzysztof; Halicka, Monika; Kalwak, Weronika; Rybak, Paulina

    2017-01-01

    Purpose. Effectiveness of nonpharmacological multicomponent prevention delivered by trained volunteers (medical and psychology students), targeted at delirium risk factors in geriatric inpatients, was assessed at an internal medicine ward in Poland. Patients and Methods. Participants were recruited to intervention and control groups at the internal medicine ward (inclusion criteria: age ≥ 75, acute medical condition, basic orientation, and logical contact on admission; exclusion criteria: life expectancy delirium episodes, and antipsychotic prescriptions were assessed retrospectively from medical documentation. Results. 130 patients (38.4% males) participated in the study, with 65 in the intervention group. Antipsychotic medications were initiated less frequently in the intervention group compared to the control group. There was a trend towards a shorter hospitalization time and a not statistically significant decrease in deaths in the intervention group. Conclusion. Nonpharmacological multicomponent intervention targeted at delirium risk factors effectively reduced length of hospitalization and need for initiating antipsychotic treatment in elderly patients at the internal medicine ward. PMID:28164113

  5. The effects of chocolates given by patients on the well-being of nurses and their support staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, S T

    2003-01-01

    Chocolate has a number of extremely appealing sensory qualities, and often are given by patients to those working in hospital wards as a token of their gratitude. This study examines whether this has any harmful effects. Eighty nine qualified nurses, 21 ward assistants, and 18 nursing students completed a structured questionnaire, showing that on average 5.4 chocolates were eaten each day. About 2/3 of the recipients ate 1-5 chocolates a day, while a few (3%) ate more than 20 per day. The most common reason given for eating them was simply because they were there. However, a quarter felt that a healthier alternative would be an adequate alternative gift. Around a third of those surveyed felt that the chocolates had a detrimental effect on their well-being. It is unlikely that chocolates will ever be scarce on hospital wards because there is a never-ending supply from grateful patients. Consequently, it will be difficult to restructure the chocolate-eating habits of those working on hospital wards.

  6. Impact of imaging room environment: staff job stress and satisfaction, patient satisfaction, and willingness to recommend.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Xiaobo; Joseph, Anjali; Ensign, Janet C

    2012-01-01

    The built environment significantly affects the healthcare experiences of patients and staff. Healthcare administrators and building designers face the opportunity and challenge of improving healthcare experience and satisfaction through better environmental design. The purpose of the study was to evaluate how a novel environmental intervention for imaging rooms, which integrated multiple elements of healing environments including positive distractions and personal control over environment, affects the perceptions and satisfactions of its primary users-patients and staff. Anonymous questionnaire surveys were conducted to compare patient and staff perceptions of the physical environment, satisfaction, and stress in two types of imaging rooms: imaging rooms with the intervention installed (intervention rooms) and traditionally designed rooms without the intervention (comparison rooms). Imaging technologists and patients perceived the intervention rooms to be significantly more pleasant-looking. Patients in the intervention rooms reported significantly higher levels of environmental control and were significantly more willing to recommend the intervention rooms to others. The environmental intervention was effective in improving certain aspects of the imaging environment: pleasantness and environmental control. Further improvement of the imaging environment is needed to address problematic areas such as noise.

  7. The A-test: Assessment of functional recovery during early rehabilitation of patients in an orthopedic ward - content, criterion and construct validity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vukomanović Aleksandra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. The A-test was designed for assessment of functional recovery during early rehabilitation of patients in an orthopedic ward. This performance-based test consists of 10 items for assessing basic activities by a six level ordinal scale (0-5. Total scores can range from 0 to 50, i.e. from inability to perform any activity despite the help of therapists to complete independence and safety in performing all activities. The aim of this study was to examine the A-test validity. Methods. This prospective study was conducted in an orthopedic ward and included 120 patients [60 patients with hip osteoarthritis that underwent arthroplasty and 60 surgically treated patients with hip fracture (HF] during early inpatient rehabilitation (1st-5th day. Validity was examined through 3 aspects: content validity - floor and ceiling effect, range, skewness; criterion validity - concurrent validity [correlation with the University of Iowa Level of Assistance Scale (ILAS for patients with hip osteoarthritis, and with the Cumulated Ambulation Score (CAS for patients with HF, Spearman rank correlation] and predictive validity [the New Mobility Score (NMS 4 weeks after surgery, Mann-Whitney U test]; construct validity - 4 hypotheses: 1 on the fifth day of rehabilitation in patients underwent arthroplasty due to hip osteoarthritis, the A-test results will strongly correlate with those of ILAS, while the correlation with the Harris hip score will be less strong; 2 in patients with HF, the A-test results will be significantly better in those with allowed weight bearing as compared to patients whom weight bearing is not allowed while walking; 3 results of the A-test will be significantly better in patients with hip osetoarthritis than in those with HF; 4 the A-test results will be significantly better in patients younger than 65 years than in those aged 65 years and older. Results. The obtained results were: low floor (1% and ceiling (2% effect, range 0

  8. Proposed Reference Model for Guiding Teachers to Perform Ward Round Teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís Alberto Corona Martínez

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Ward round teaching is an essential professional medical activity as an organizational form of teaching in undergraduate medical education. Its great importance for shaping a professional "personality" is well recognized by the faculty; as well as its extremely complex implementation and development of the necessary skills. The problem to be solved in this paper is related to the need to help younger clinical teachers in undergraduate medical education to develop the skills to conduct ward round teaching; which would be achieved through appropriate guidance on how to perform this activity. Based on this, the teaching staff in the Department of Clinical Sciences of the Dr. Raúl Dorticós Torrado Faculty of Medical Sciences in Cienfuegos has designed a model or representation of ward round teaching to be used as a guide. The main results include the development of a model with two variants, according to the care provided to a recently admitted patient or an already known patient; and the definition of conditions, both in practical and educational areas, which should be considered for the proper implementation of the activity. The model is not a complete representation of the ward round teaching, thus the proposal is open to review and improvement; and its use is based on its adaptation to the particularities of the different disciplines and learning scenarios.

  9. Nursing handover from ICU to cardiac ward: Standardised tools to reduce safety risks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graan, Sher Michael; Botti, Mari; Wood, Beverley; Redley, Bernice

    2016-08-01

    Standardising handover processes and content, and using context-specific checklists are proposed as solutions to mitigate risks for preventable errors and patient harm associated with clinical handovers. Adapt existing tools to standardise nursing handover from the intensive care unit (ICU) to the cardiac ward and assess patient safety risks before and after pilot implementation. A three-stage, pre-post interrupted time-series design was used. Data were collected using naturalistic observations and audio-recording of 40 handovers and focus groups with 11 nurses. In Stage 1, examination of existing practice using observation of 20 handovers and a focus group interview provided baseline data. In Stage 2, existing tools for high-risk handovers were adapted to create tools specific to ICU-to-ward handovers. The adapted tools were introduced to staff using principles from evidence-based frameworks for practice change. In Stage 3, observation of 20 handovers and a focus group with five nurses were used to verify the design of tools to standardise handover by ICU nurses transferring care of cardiac surgical patients to ward nurses. Stage 1 data revealed variable and unsafe ICU-to-ward handover practices: incomplete ward preparation; failure to check patient identity; handover located away from patients; and information gaps. Analyses informed adaptation of process, content and checklist tools to standardise handover in Stage 2. Compared with baseline data, Stage 3 observations revealed nurses used the tools consistently, ward readiness to receive patients (10% vs 95%), checking patient identity (0% vs 100%), delivery of handover at the bedside (25% vs 100%) and communication of complete information (40% vs 100%) improved. Clinician adoption of tools to standardise ICU-to-ward handover of cardiac surgical patients reduced handover variability and patient safety risks. The study outcomes provide context-specific tools to guide handover processes and delivery of verbal

  10. SDS-PAGE Analysis of the Outer Membrane Proteins of Uropathogenic Escherichia coli Isolated from Patients in Different Wards of Nemazee Hospital, Shiraz, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behzad Dehghani

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Outer membrane proteins (OMPs constitute the main structure and about half of the cell wall of Gram-negative bacteria. The OMPs of Escherichia coli (E. coli play an important role in its drug resistance. Previous studies have shown that the OMPs of E. coli enhance its pathogenic effects by helping the bacterium to evade the immune defense and promote its adsorption to host cells. We sought to compare E. coli isolates collected from different hospital wards and to perform a primary investigation of the association between the serotypes and profiles of their OMPs. We also aimed to detect the diversity of the E. coli isolates from the hospitalized patients. Methods: A total of 115 isolates of E. coli were collected from patients hospitalized in Nemazee Hospital, Shiraz, Iran. After biochemical and serological tests, OMPs were extracted by using glass beads and N-Lauroylsarcosine sodium. OMP typing was done by 10% SDS-PAGE and Coomassie brilliant blue staining. In terms of the number of protein bands, OMP-I was detected with 2 bands, OMP-α with 3 bands, and OMP-β with1 band. Results: Of the 115 isolates, 103 were OMP-I and 12 were OMP-α; none of the isolates belonged to OMP-β. Our statistical analyses showed a relationship between OMP patterns and other factors, including hospital wards and source of samples. Serotyping showed that the majority of the isolates were O128. Conclusion: Our results demonstrated some similarities between the OMP band patterns of the analyzed groups of E. coli. Of all the OMPs in the isolates from the hospitalized and outpatient department patients, OmpA and OmpC were the most prevalent proteins in the outer membrane of the studied uropathogenic E. coli.

  11. [Euthanasia of patients in coma vigil. Results on German medical staff attitudes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böttger-Kessler, G; Beine, K H

    2007-07-01

    An examination was made concerning doctors' and nursing staff's attitudes towards active euthanasia of patients suffering from coma vigil (2652 doctors and 5785 nursing staff were interviewed). This investigation made clear that most of the persons asked about this group of patients voted for a change in German laws following the Dutch example. There were noticeable differences observed between the professional groups. A majority (64.79%) were convinced that under certain circumstances it is justified to end intentionally the life of persons in a coma vigil. Of the nursing staff, 70.38% were in favour of this attitude, and 51.53% of the doctors share this opinion. Certain groups supported the question of active euthanasia more clearly than others. These were young participants in the investigation, first-time employees, nondenominational interviewees, those who are dissatisfied with their job situation, who are from the newly-formed German states, and who are divorced. The attitudes expressed by all these people originate in many different motives: thoughts about the patients, aspects concerning jobs, and personal aspects had an influence on results of the investigation. This single investigation which was restricted to patients suffering from coma vigil and to employees of the public health service, does not prove that the total population has generally changed its attitude toward active euthanasia. It is impossible to justify the necessity of new laws about euthanasia based on the above results.

  12. Applying the Integrated Practice Unit Concept to a Modified Virtual Ward Model of Care for Patients at Highest Risk of Readmission: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Matthew Joo Ming; Balasubramaniam, Kanchana; Towle, Rachel Marie

    2017-01-01

    Background Emerging evidence from the virtual ward care model showed that multidisciplinary case management are inadequate to reduce readmissions or death for high risk patients. There is consensus that interventions should encompass both pre-hospital discharge and post-discharge transitional care to be effective. Integrated practice units (IPU) had been proposed as an approach of restructuring the organization and work processes of multidisciplinary teams to achieve value in healthcare. Our primary objective is to evaluate if the novel application of the IPU concept to organize a modified virtual ward model incorporating pre-hospital discharge transitional care can reduce readmissions of patients at highest risk for readmission. Methods We conducted an open label, assessor blinded randomized controlled trial on patients with one or more unscheduled readmissions in the prior 90 days and LACE score ≥ 10. 840 patients were randomized in 1:1 ratio and blocks of 6 to the intervention program (n = 420) or control (n = 420). Allocation concealment was effected via an off-site telephone service maintained by a hospital administrator. Intervention patients received discharge planning, medication reconciliation, coaching on self-management of chronic diseases using standardized action plans and an individualized care plan complete with written discharge instructions, appointments schedule, medication changes and the contact information of the outpatient VW nurse before discharge. At discharge, care is handed over to the outpatient VW team. Patients were closely monitored in the VW for three months that included a telephone review within 72 hours of discharge, home assessment, regular telephone reviews to identify early complications and early review clinics for patients who destabilize. The VW meet daily to discuss new patients and review care plans for patients. Control patients received standard hospital care that included a standardized patient copy of the hospital

  13. Can patients with moderate to severe acute respiratory failure from COPD be treated safely with noninvasive mechanical ventilation on the ward?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yalcinsoy M

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Murat Yalcinsoy,1 Cuneyt Salturk,2 Selahattin Oztas,2 Sinem Gungor,2 Ipek Ozmen,2 Feyyaz Kabadayi,2 Aysem Askim Oztim,2 Emine Aksoy,2 Nalan Adıguzel,2 Ozlem Oruc,2 Zuhal Karakurt2 1Department of Pulmonary Medicine, Inonu University Medical Faculty, Turgut Ozal Medical Center, Malatya, 2Department of Pulmonary Medicine, Sureyyapaşa Chest Diseases and Thoracic Surgery Training and Research Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey Purpose: Noninvasive mechanical ventilation (NIMV usage outside of intensive care unit is not recommended in patients with COPD for severe acute respiratory failure (ARF. We assessed the factors associated with failure of NIMV in patients with ARF and severe acidosis admitted to the emergency department and followed on respiratory ward.Patients and methods: This is a retrospective observational cohort study conducted in a tertiary teaching hospital specialized in chest diseases and thoracic surgery between June 1, 2013 and May 31, 2014. COPD patients who were admitted to our emergency department due to ARF were included. Patients were grouped according to the severity of acidosis into two groups: group 1 (pH=7.20–7.25 and group 2 (pH=7.26–7.30.Results: Group 1 included 59 patients (mean age: 70±10 years, 30.5% female and group 2 included 171 patients (mean age: 67±11 years, 28.7% female. On multivariable analysis, partial arterial oxygen pressure to the inspired fractionated oxygen (PaO2/FiO2 ratio <200, delta pH value <0.30, and pH value <7.31 on control arterial blood gas after NIMV in the emergency room and peak C-reactive protein were found to be the risk factors for NIMV failure in COPD patients with ARF in the ward.Conclusion: NIMV is effective not only in mild respiratory failure but also with severe forms of COPD patients presenting with severe exacerbation. The determination of the failure criteria of NIMV and the expertise of the team is critical for treatment success. Keywords: noninvasive mechanical ventilation

  14. Building A Competitive advantage Through Staff And Patients` Satisfaction - Improving Performance In A Hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Lukosiute, Zivile

    2008-01-01

    Performance improvement of a hospital or any organization cannot be achieved without having a winning strategy and an improvement of a sustainable competitive advantage. I look at patients` and staff satisfaction as a source of a competitive advantage that has to be maintained and improved constantly. Results of satisfaction surveys allow comparing the performance of a hospital to other hospitals and to seek an improvement in a hospital performance which is dependant on the ability of leaders...

  15. Pediatric patient and staff dose measurements in barium meal fluoroscopic procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filipov, D.; Schelin, H. R.; Denyak, V.; Paschuk, S. A.; Porto, L. E.; Ledesma, J. A.; Nascimento, E. X.; Legnani, A.; Andrade, M. E. A.; Khoury, H. J.

    2015-11-01

    This study investigates patient and staff dose measurements in pediatric barium meal series fluoroscopic procedures. It aims to analyze radiographic techniques, measure the air kerma-area product (PKA), and estimate the staff's eye lens, thyroid and hands equivalent doses. The procedures of 41 patients were studied, and PKA values were calculated using LiF:Mg,Ti thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) positioned at the center of the patient's upper chest. Furthermore, LiF:Mg,Cu,P TLDs were used to estimate the equivalent doses. The results showed a discrepancy in the radiographic techniques when compared to the European Commission recommendations. Half of the results of the analyzed literature presented lower PKA and dose reference level values than the present study. The staff's equivalent doses strongly depends on the distance from the beam. A 55-cm distance can be considered satisfactory. However, a distance decrease of ~20% leads to, at least, two times higher equivalent doses. For eye lenses this dose is significantly greater than the annual limit set by the International Commission on Radiological Protection. In addition, the occupational doses were found to be much higher than in the literature. Changing the used radiographic techniques to the ones recommended by the European Communities, it is expected to achieve lower PKA values ​​and occupational doses.

  16. Conflicting priorities: evaluation of an intervention to improve nurse-parent relationships on a Tanzanian paediatric ward

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manongi, Rachel N; Nasuwa, Fortunata R; Mwangi, Rose

    2009-01-01

    on a paediatric ward in a busy regional hospital in Tanzania. METHODS: The intervention consisted of six workshops, attended by 29 of 31 trained nurses and nurse attendants working on the paediatric ward. Parental satisfaction with nursing care was measured with 288 parents before and six weeks after......BACKGROUND: Patient, or parent/guardian, satisfaction with health care provision is important to health outcomes. Poor relationships with health workers, particularly with nursing staff, have been reported to reduce satisfaction with care in Africa. Participatory research approaches...... outcome of the intervention was not met. The priorities of the intervention--to improve nurse-parent relationships--did not match the priorities of the nursing staff. Development of awareness and empathy was not enough to provide care that was satisfactory to clients in the context of working conditions...

  17. The synergy professional practice model and its patient characteristics tool: a staff empowerment strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacPhee, Maura; Wardrop, Andrea; Campbell, Cheryl; Wejr, Patricia

    2011-10-01

    Nurse leaders can positively influence practice environments through a number of empowerment strategies, among them professional practice models. These models encompass the philosophy, structures and processes that support nurses' control over their practice and their voice within healthcare organizations. Nurse-driven professional practice models can serve as a framework for collaborative decision-making among nursing and other staff. This paper describes a provincewide pilot project in which eight nurse-led project teams in four healthcare sectors worked with the synergy professional practice model and its patient characteristics tool. The teams learned how the model and tool can be used to classify patients' acuity levels and make staffing assignments based on a "best fit" between patient needs and staff competencies. The patient characteristics tool scores patients' acuities on eight characteristics such as stability, vulnerability and resource availability. This tool can be used to make real-time patient assessments. Other potential applications for the model and tool are presented, such as care planning, team-building and determining appropriate staffing levels. Our pilot project evidence suggests that the synergy model and its patient characteristics tool may be an empowerment strategy that nursing leaders can use to enhance their practice environments.

  18. Patient satisfaction with nursing staff in bone marrow transplantation and hematology units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piras, A; Poddigue, M; Angelucci, E

    2010-01-01

    Several validated questionnaires for assessment of hospitalized patient satisfaction have been reported in the literature. Many have been designed specifically for patients with cancer. User satisfaction is one indicator of service quality and benefits. Thus, we conducted a small qualitative survey managed by nursing staff in our Bone Marrow Transplantation Unit and Acute Leukemia Unit, with the objectives of assessing patient satisfaction, determining critical existing problems, and developing required interventions. The sample was not probabilistic. A questionnaire was developed using the Delphi method in a pilot study with 30 patients. Analysis of the data suggested a good level of patient satisfaction with medical and nursing staffs (100%), but poor satisfaction with food (48%), services (38%), and amenities (31%). Limitations of the study were that the questionnaire was unvalidated and the sample was small. However, for the first time, patient satisfaction was directly measured at our hospital. Another qualitative study will be conducted after correction of the critical points that emerged during this initial study, in a larger sample of patients.

  19. The Impact of Increasing Staff Resources on Patient Flow in a Psychiatric Emergency Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chepenik, Lara; Pinker, Edieal

    2017-05-01

    The study illustrates the use of approaches based on queuing theory to understand bottlenecks in patient flow. A queuing simulation was used to predict the potential benefits of additional clinical personnel on patient flow through a psychiatric emergency service (PES). A discrete-event simulation model was calibrated on the basis of two months of data collected in a PES. This model examined the effects of adding between .5 (half-time) and three additional providers to the 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. shift. The model showed that an addition of a half-time clinician produced the biggest change in patient flow metrics. Average length of stay was predicted to drop from 38.1 hours to 33.2 hours for patients who were awaiting hospitalization and from 13.7 to 9.0 hours for patients who were eventually discharged. The number of patients waiting to see a provider decreased by two-thirds between 8 a.m. and 4 p.m., and it decreased by one-half during the rest of the day, even though the number of clinical staff remained the same. Adding more providers failed to reduce these numbers much further. Adding more than a half-time provider also failed to significantly reduce boarding (remaining in the PES while awaiting hospitalization). Queuing simulation predicted a dramatic benefit to patient flow with a fairly small addition in clinician time, a benefit that persisted beyond the time during which the additional staff was on duty, especially when this staff was added during a period of high demand.

  20. Severe exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: management with noninvasive ventilation on a general medicine ward

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sirio Fiorino

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Recent evidence suggests that, with a well-trained staff, severe exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD with moderate respiratory acidosis (pH > 7.3 can be successfully treated with noninvasive mechanical ventilation (NIMV on a general respiratory care ward. We conducted an open prospective study to evaluate the efficacy of this approach on a general medicine ward. Material and methods: This study population consisted in 27 patients admitted to a general medicine ward (median nurse:patient ratio 1:12 December 1, 2004 May 31, 2006 for acute COPD exacerbation with hypercapnic respiratory failure and acidosis (arterial pH < 7.34, PaC02 > 45 mmHg. All received assist-mode NIMV (average 12 h / day via oronasal masks (inspiratory pressure 10-25 cm H2O, expiratory pressure 4-6 cm H2O to maintain O2 saturation at 90-95%. Treatment was supervised by an experienced pulmonologist, who had also provided specific training in NIMV for medical and nursing staffs (90-day course followed by periodic refresher sessions. Arterial blood pressure, O2 saturation, and respiratory rate were continuously monitored during NIMV. Based on baseline arterial pH, the COPD was classified as moderate (7.25-7.34 or severe (< 7.25. Results: In patients with moderate and severe COPD, significant improvements were seen in arterial pH after 2 (p < 0.05 and 24 h (p< 0.05 of NIMV and in the PaC02 after 24 hours (p < 0.05. Four (15% of the 27 patients died during the study hospitalization (in-hospital mortality 15%, in 2 cases due to NIMV failure. For the other 23, mean long-term survival was 14.5 months (95% CI 10.2 to 18.8, and no significant differences were found between the moderate and severe groups. Over half (61% the patients were alive 1 year after admission. Conclusions: NIMV can be a cost-effective option for management of moderate or severe COPD on a general medicine ward. Its proper use requires: close monitoring of ventilated subjects

  1. Attitudes of Malaysian general hospital staff towards patients with mental illness and diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Midin Marhani

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The context of the study is the increased assessment and treatment of persons with mental illness in general hospital settings by general health staff, as the move away from mental hospitals gathers pace in low and middle income countries. The purpose of the study was to examine whether general attitudes of hospital staff towards persons with mental illness, and extent of mental health training and clinical experience, are associated with different attitudes and behaviours towards a patient with mental illness than towards a patients with a general health problem - diabetes. Methods General hospital health professionals in Malaysia were randomly allocated one of two vignettes, one describing a patient with mental illness and the other a patient with diabetes, and invited to complete a questionnaire examining attitudes and health care practices in relation to the case. The questionnaires completed by respondents included questions on demographics, training in mental health, exposure in clinical practice to people with mental illness, attitudes and expected health care behaviour towards the patient in the vignette, and a general questionnaire exploring negative attitudes towards people with mental illness. Questionnaires with complete responses were received from 654 study participants. Results Stigmatising attitudes towards persons with mental illness were common. Those responding to the mental illness vignette (N = 356 gave significantly lower ratings on care and support and higher ratings on avoidance and negative stereotype expectations compared with those responding the diabetes vignette (N = 298. Conclusions Results support the view that, in the Malaysian setting, patients with mental illness may receive differential care from general hospital staff and that general stigmatising attitudes among professionals may influence their care practices. More direct measurement of clinician behaviours than able to be implemented

  2. Coping with Violence in Mental Health Care Settings: Patient and Staff Member Perspectives on De-escalation Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berring, Lene Lauge; Pedersen, Liselotte; Buus, Niels

    2016-10-01

    This multiple case study explored de-escalation processes in threatening and violent situations based on patients and staff members perspectives. Our post hoc analysis indicated that de-escalation included responsive interactions influenced by the perspectives of both patients and staff members. We assembled their perspectives in a mental model consisting of three interdependent stages: (1) memories and hope, (2) safety and creativity and (3) reflective moments. The data indicated that both patients and staff strived for peaceful solutions and that a dynamic and sociological understanding of de-escalation can foster shared problem solving in violent and threatening situations.

  3. Improving Patient Outcomes: Effectively Training Healthcare Staff in Psychological Practice Skills: A Mixed Systematic Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garzonis, Katherine; Mann, Eryn; Wyrzykowska, Aleksandra; Kanellakis, Pavlo

    2015-08-01

    Training is an important part of modern European healthcare services and is often cited as a way to improve care quality. To date, various training methods have been used to impart skills relevant to psychological practice in a variety of mental health professionals. However, patient outcomes are rarely used in evaluating the effectiveness of the different training methods used, making it difficult to assess true utility. In the present review, we consider methods of training that can effectively impact trainee and patient outcomes. To do so, PubMed, PsycNET, Scopus, CENTRAL and ERIC were searched for studies on training of healthcare staff in psychological practice approaches. In total, 24 studies were identified (16 quantitative and 8 qualitative). For the most part, group, individual, and web-based training was used. A variety of health professionals were trained in skills including 'communication', 'diagnosis', and 'referral' to name but a few. In the majority of studies staff skill level improved. These findings hold implications for the design, implementation, and evaluation of training for mental healthcare staff.

  4. Spica cast care: a collaborative staff-led education initiative for improved patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Cynthia; Carroll, Lee; Baccari, Susan; Shermont, Herminia

    2011-01-01

    One of the most challenging aspects for nurses caring for incontinent children in spica casts is maintaining healthy skin integrity. Noting an increase in the number of phone calls from parents of discharged children in spica casts concerning diaper rash and skin breakdown, inpatient orthopedics staff nurses lead an interdisciplinary quality improvement and educational initiative. They standardized pediatric spica cast care and education by creating an intranet narrated PowerPoint presentation for staff and parents of children with spica casts. A take-home DVD of this education module is now produced and given to parents, reinforcing nursing discharge teaching and giving parents the opportunity to review these new skills at home as needed. The purpose of this article is to share this experience of improving patient outcomes and empowering other orthopedics nurses to develop creative educational solutions.

  5. Development of an Inventory for Health-Care Office Staff to Self-Assess Their Patient-Centered Cultural Sensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolyn M. Tucker

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patient-centered culturally sensitive health care (PC-CSHC is a best practice approach for improving health-care delivery to culturally diverse populations and reducing health disparities. Despite patients’ report that cultural sensitivity by health-care office staff is an important aspect of PC-CSHC, the majority of available research on PC-CSHC focuses exclusively on health-care providers. This may be due in part to the paucity of instruments available to assess the cultural sensitivity of health-care office staff. The objective of the present study is to determine the psychometric properties of the Tucker-Culturally Sensitive Health Care Office Staff Inventory-Self-Assessment Form (T-CSHCOSI-SAF. This instrument is designed to enable health-care office staff to self-assess their level of agreement that they display behaviors and attitudes that culturally diverse patients have identified as office staff cultural sensitivity indicators. Methods: A sample of 510 health-care office staff were recruited at 67 health-care sites across the United States. These health-care office staff anonymously completed the T-CSHCOSI-SAF and a demographic data questionnaire. Results and Level of Evidence: Confirmatory factor analyses of the T-CSHCOSI-SAF revealed that this inventory has 2 factors with high internal consistency reliability (Cronbach’s αs= .916 and .912. Conclusion and Implications: The T-CSHCOSI-SAF is a useful inventory for health-care office staff to assess their own level of patient-centered cultural sensitivity. Such self-assessment data can be used in the development and implementation of trainings to promote patient-centered cultural sensitivity of health-care office staff and to help draw the attention of these staff to displaying patient-centered cultural sensitivity.

  6. Development of an Inventory for Health-Care Office Staff to Self-Assess Their Patient-Centered Cultural Sensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolyn M. Tucker

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patient-centered culturally sensitive health care (PC-CSHC is a best practice approach for improving health-care delivery to culturally diverse populations and reducing health disparities. Despite patients’ report that cultural sensitivity by health-care office staff is an important aspect of PC-CSHC, the majority of available research on PC-CSHC focuses exclusively on health-care providers. This may be due in part to the paucity of instruments available to assess the cultural sensitivity of health-care office staff. The objective of the present study is to determine the psychometric properties of the Tucker-Culturally Sensitive Health Care Office Staff Inventory-Self-Assessment Form (T-CSHCOSI-SAF. This instrument is designed to enable health-care office staff to self-assess their level of agreement that they display behaviors and attitudes that culturally diverse patients have identified as office staff cultural sensitivity indicators. Methods: A sample of 510 health-care office staff were recruited at 67 health-care sites across the United States. These health-care office staff anonymously completed the T-CSHCOSI-SAF and a demographic data questionnaire. Results and Level of Evidence: Confirmatory factor analyses of the T-CSHCOSI-SAF revealed that this inventory has 2 factors with high internal consistency reliability (Cronbach’s αs= .916 and .912. Conclusion and Implications: The T-CSHCOSI-SAF is a useful inventory for health-care office staff to assess their own level of patient-centered cultural sensitivity. Such self-assessment data can be used in the development and implementation of trainings to promote patient-centered cultural sensitivity of health-care office staff and to help draw the attention of these staff to displaying patient-centered cultural sensitivity.

  7. "They can do whatever they want": Meanings of receiving psychiatric care based on a common staff approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enarsson, Per; Sandman, Per-Olof; Hellzén, Ove

    2011-02-04

    This study deepens our understanding of how patients, when cared for in a psychiatric ward, experience situations that involve being handled according to a common staff approach. Interviews with nine former psychiatric in-patients were analyzed using a phenomenological-hermeneutic method to illuminate the lived experience of receiving care based on a common staff approach. The results revealed several meanings: discovering that you are as subjected to a common staff approach, becoming aware that no one cares, becoming aware that your freedom is restricted, being afflicted, becoming aware that a common staff approach is not applied by all staff, and feeling safe because someone else is responsible. The comprehensive understanding was that the patient's understanding of being cared for according to a common staff approach was to be seen and treated in accordance with others' beliefs and valuations, not in line with the patients' own self-image, while experiencing feelings of affliction.

  8. A quantitative comparison of ward-based clinical pharmacy activities in 7 acute UK hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onatade, Raliat; Miller, Gavin; Sanghera, Inderjit

    2016-12-01

    Background Several clinical pharmacy activities are common to UK hospitals. It is not clear whether these are provided at similar levels, and whether they take similar amounts of time to carry out. Objective To quantify and compare clinical pharmacist ward activities between different UK hospitals. Setting Seven acute hospitals in the Greater London area (UK). Methods A list of common ward activities was developed. On five consecutive days, pharmacists visiting hospital wards documented total time spent and how many of each activity they undertook. Results were analysed by hospital. The range and number of activities per 100 occupied bed days, and per 24 beds were compared. Main outcome measure Time spent on wards and numbers of each activity undertaken. Results Pharmacists logged a total of 2291 h carrying out 40,000 activities. 4250 changes to prescriptions were made or recommended. 5901 individual medication orders were annotated for clarity or safety. For every 24 beds visited, mean time spent was 230 min-seeing 6.2 new patients, carrying out 3.9 calculations and 1.3 patient consultations, checking and authorising 1.8 discharge prescriptions, and providing staff with information twice. Other activities varied significantly, not all could be explained by differences in hospital specialties or Information Technology systems. Conclusion This is the first detailed comparison of clinical pharmacy ward activities between different hospitals. There are some typical levels of activities carried out. Wide variations in other activities could not always be explained. Despite a large number of contacts, pharmacists reported very few consultation sessions with patients.

  9. Develop high quality nursing service and normalize management of neonatal ward

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua YANG

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To tamp basic neonatal care, provide high quality nursing service, improve the quality of neonatal care, guarantee the safety of nursing care, achieve satisfactory project. Methods:Adjust the staff of the neonatal ward , optimize schedule; strengthen the training and knowledge; strengthen the supervision and ensure the basic nursing; the nursing quality management group work out the rate of incidence of high quality nursing service, the incidence rate of hospital infection of the newborn as well as the satisfaction of their families. Results: The different data between the control group and observation group was statistically significant ( P < 0.05 . Conclusion: Develop the neonatal ward of high quality nursing service, ensure the basic nursing implement, significantly improve the quality of nursing, reduce nursing adverse events and neonatal hospital infection incidence to" zero defects and zero tolerance", and that ensures nursing safety, and achieve the goal of " quality care demonstration project" --- patient satisfaction, social satisfaction, and government satisfaction.

  10. ICU病人转到康复过渡病房家属心理状况变化调查分析%Investigation on the psychological change of ICU patients' family after the patients transported to rehabilitation ward

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈锡珊; 吴爱霞; 钱孝言

    2012-01-01

    Objective To analyze the psychological change of ICU patients'family after the patients were transported to rehabilitation ward. Methods 76 cases of ICU patients'family were selected and divided into observation group,these patients were transported to rehabilitation ward.73 families without the patients being transported selected and divided into control group.Their psychological changes were observed.Results The scores of subjective well - being and life quality in observation group were significantly higher than those in control group ( P < 0.05 ) ; the scores of HAMD and HAMA of observation group were lower than those of control group ( P < 0.05 ).Conclusions The psychological status of ICU patients' family was improved significantly after the patients were transported to the rehabilitation ward.%目的 分析ICU病人转到康复过渡病房家属心理状况的变化.方法 取2008至2012年76例转入康复过渡病房的患者家属作为观察组,同期未转入康复过渡病房的73例患者家属作为对照组,观察两组心理状态变化.结果 观察组对象的主观幸福感及生活质量评分明显高于对照组(P<0.05);转运后,观察组的HAMD评分(25.21±3.32)、HAMA评分(19.45 ±2.23)明显低于对照组(P<0.05).结论 ICU患者转入康复过渡病房后其家属的心理状态明显改善.

  11. 不同阶段心理干预对层流病房患者的影响%The influence of patients in different stage of psychological intervention in laminar ward.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴玉梅

    2011-01-01

    目的:通过对入住层流病房患者在不同时期恐惧、焦虑、睡眠等心理状况分析并开展针对性的心理干预,以达到早日康复的目的.方法:对27例入住层流病房患者分别于入住前、入住后3 d和出层流病房前应用自制恐惧自评量表、焦虑自评量表、睡眠自评量表评估患者心理状况并针对性进行心理干预.结果:恐惧量表评分中,患者出层流病房前评分明显低于入住层流病房前、入住层流病房后3 d,同时入住层流病房后3日低于入住层流病房前.焦虑量表评分中,患者于出层流病房前评分明显低于入住层流病房前、入住层流病房后3 d,但入住层流病房前与入住层流病房后3 d之间无明显统计学差异.睡眠量表评分,患者入住层流病房后3 d评分明显高于入住层流病房前及出层流病房前,存在统计学差异,而入住层流病房前评分高于出层流病房前,存在统计学差异.结论:不同时期层流病房患者有不同的心理特征及心理变化,开展针对性心理干预是促进康复的重要手段之一.%Objective:Through the check - in laminar ward in different periods of patients with fear, anxiety, and sleeping psychological condition analysis and carrying out the pertinence psychological intervention,to achieve the purpose of recover at an early date. Methods:Apply the scale of fear, anxiety, and sleeping to assess the 27 patients' psychological condition and carrying out the pertinence psychological intervention before check in, in 3 days and out of the laminar ward before. Results:In fear rating scale,patients in the ward score was significantly lower than the laminar before check - in laminar ward and stay in 3 days,significant differences exist. In anxiety rating scale,patients out of the laminar ward before score was significantly lower than the laminar before check - in laminar ward and stay in 3 days,but there was no significant differences between before check

  12. Profile of antimicrobial susceptibility isolated microorganisms from hospitalized patients in PICU ward and detection of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and ESBL-producing bacteria by phenotypic methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahla Abbas Poor

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hospital-acquired infections are a major challenge to patient. A range of gram-negative organisms are responsible for hospital-acquired infections, the Enterobacteriaceae family being the most commonly identified group overall. Infections by ESBL producers are associated with severe adverse clinical outcomes that have led to increased mortality, prolonged hospitalization, and rising medical costs. The aim of this study was to survey profile of antimicrobial susceptibility isolated microorganisms from hospitalized patients in PICU ward and detection of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and ESBL-producing bacteria by phenotypic methods. Material and Methods: In this study participants were patients hospitalized in PICU part of Bahrami Hospital, Tehran, with attention to involved organ. For isolation of bacteria from patient’s samples, culture performed on different selective and differential media. After confirmation of bacteria by biochemical tests, susceptibility testing was performed by disc diffusion method. Phenotypic detection of MRSA strains was performed using cefoxcitin disc. ESBL producing strains were detected by ceftazidime (CAZ and ceftazidime/clavulanic acid (CAZ/CLA discs. Results: Among all isolated organisms from clinical samples, the most common isolated organisms were Escherichia coli (24 cases, Pseudomonas areoginosa (9 cases and Staphylococcus aureus (8 cases, respectively. Among eight MRSA isolated strains from different clinical samples, six strains (75% were MRSA. Among 52 isolated gram negative organisms, 5 strains (9/6% were ESBL. Conclusion: Standard interventions to prevent the transmission of antimicrobial resistance in health care facilities include hand hygiene, using barrier precautions in the care of colonized and infected patients, using dedicated instruments and equipment for these patients. The colonized or infected patients should be isolated in single rooms, multibed rooms or areas

  13. Investigating patient safety culture across a health system: multilevel modelling of differences associated with service types and staff demographics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gallego, Blanca; Westbrook, Mary T; Dunn, Adam G; Braithwaite, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    To use multilevel modelling to compare the patient safety cultures of types of services across a health system and to determine whether differences found can be accounted for by staffs' professions...

  14. Post-traumatic stress disorder following patient assaults among staff members of mental health hospitals: a prospective longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Dirk; Berger, Klaus

    2006-04-10

    Violence by patients against staff members in mental health institutions has become an important challenge. Violent attacks may not only cause bodily injuries but can also have posttraumatic consequences with high rates of stress for mental health staff. This study prospectively assessed posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in employees who were severely assaulted by patients in nine German state mental health institutions. During the study period of six months 46 assaulted staff members were reported. Each staff member was interviewed three times after the violent incident, using the Impact of Event Scale-Revised (IES-R), a widely used PTSD research tool, as well as the Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Checklist--Civilian (PCL-C). In the baseline assessment following an assault by a patient, eight subjects (17%) met the criteria for PTSD. After two and six months, three and four subjects respectively still met diagnosis criteria. A small minority of assaulted employees suffer from PTSD for several months after a patient assault.

  15. Nonpharmacological Interventions Targeted at Delirium Risk Factors, Delivered by Trained Volunteers (Medical and Psychology Students, Reduced Need for Antipsychotic Medications and the Length of Hospital Stay in Aged Patients Admitted to an Acute Internal Medicine Ward: Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanislaw Gorski

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Effectiveness of nonpharmacological multicomponent prevention delivered by trained volunteers (medical and psychology students, targeted at delirium risk factors in geriatric inpatients, was assessed at an internal medicine ward in Poland. Patients and Methods. Participants were recruited to intervention and control groups at the internal medicine ward (inclusion criteria: age ≥ 75, acute medical condition, basic orientation, and logical contact on admission; exclusion criteria: life expectancy < 24 hours, surgical hospitalization, isolation due to infectious disease, and discharge to other medical wards. Every day trained volunteers delivered a multicomponent standardized intervention targeted at risk factors of in-hospital complications to the intervention group. The control group, selected using a retrospective individual matching strategy (1 : 1 ratio, regarding age, gender, and time of hospitalization, received standard care. Outcome Measures. Hospitalization time, deaths, falls, delirium episodes, and antipsychotic prescriptions were assessed retrospectively from medical documentation. Results. 130 patients (38.4% males participated in the study, with 65 in the intervention group. Antipsychotic medications were initiated less frequently in the intervention group compared to the control group. There was a trend towards a shorter hospitalization time and a not statistically significant decrease in deaths in the intervention group. Conclusion. Nonpharmacological multicomponent intervention targeted at delirium risk factors effectively reduced length of hospitalization and need for initiating antipsychotic treatment in elderly patients at the internal medicine ward.

  16. PATIENTS WITH END STAGE CANCER: LIFE HISTORY, PSYCHO-EMOTIONAL ASPECTS, RELATIONSHIP WITH THE NURSING STAFF.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanete Ribeiro do Nascimento

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is one of the cancers most feared by women for its high incidence and its psychological effects that affect the perception of sexuality and self-image. Objective: To identify the difficulties of nursing professionals in the treatment of patients with cancer, from the standpoint of a terminally ill patient of breast cancer. Methodology: This is a case study of a patient who is in the terminal stages of breast cancer. We carried out the survey of literature in journals indexed the databases LILACS and SciELO Open Access and English, on terminally ill cancer. Results: Feelings of loneliness and sadness were softened and smoothed by the attitude and disposition of nursing professionals. In moments of intervention needs of physical care, nursing care was provided. Conclusion: The nursing staff has always demonstrated skills in treating patients with cancer, providing quality care, humane and comprehensive, meeting all your needs biopsicoespiritual.

  17. Working with anxious or fearful patients: a training tool for the medical practice staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hills, Laura Sachs

    2007-01-01

    Every medical practice must work with at least some patients who are fearful or anxious. This article explores the seven most common root causes of patient fear and anxiety and offers practical suggestions for avoiding or minimizing these fears. It addresses, in particular, the patient's fear of the unknown, of being humiliated, of reenacting a medical legend or horror story, and of being vulnerable and helpless. It also explores the patient's fear of high medical fees or being unable to pay, a poor or disappointing clinical outcome, and being in a hospital-like environment. The author suggests that the medica lpractice staff may wish to seek training in fear control and includes practical how-to strategies for minimizing fear when working with children.

  18. HEMATOLOGIC FINDINGS IN OPERATING ROOM STAFFS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H SOLTANI

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Long term exposure to trace amounts of anesthetic vapors and gases may produce hematologic and hepatic disorders in human. Since operating room (OR staffs are exposed to these agents, we decided to study their hematopoietic and hepatic systems in comparison with ordinary ward staffs. Methods. Seventy staffs from OR were compared with a matched similar number of ward staffs about their hematologic and hepatic laboratory findings in a historical cohort study. Findings. Mean of leukocyte and platelet counts were significantly lower in OR staffs, but in normal range. Mean of monocyte count was significantly higher in OR staffs. No significant differences were found between two groups for other hepatic and hematologic tests. Fatigue and headache were reported in OR staffs more than others. Conclusion. These findings may warn a risk to OR staffs but, it is not clear and requires further controlled studies.

  19. PCA在“无痛病房”创建中的应用研究%Application of Patient-controlled Analgesia in the Establishment of "Painless Ward"

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赖红燕; 李军; 徐武敏

    2016-01-01

    Objective To explore the application of Patient-controlled Analgesia (PCA) in the establishment of "painless ward" in the department of orthopedics.Methods A total of 400 patients with limb fractures meeting the criteria were selected and randomly divided into experimental group and control group. The control group adopted the traditional pain care model, and the experimental group adopted PCA and intervention of painless ward philosophy. Numeric rating scale (NRS) was used to evaluate postoperative resting NRS score and postoperative exercise NRS score. Sleep rate and cases of sleep disruption caused by pain were recorded. In addition, satisfaction level of pain control were recorded.Results Compared with the control group, the experimental group had lower resting NRS scores at each measuring point except 2h after surgery; Exercise NRS scores of the experimental group at each measuring point were lower than that of the control group. At the first postoperative night, patients of the experimental group had higher sleep disruption rate and lower sleep rate than patients of the control group. The satisfaction level of the experimental group was significantly higher than that of the control group, the differences were statistically significant.Conclusions Establishment of painless ward with PCA is a feasible, effective and safe way to help reduce the pain level, carry out rehabilitation exercises and improve quality of life, which is worth to be further applied.%目的探讨自控镇痛泵(PCA)在创伤骨科“无痛病房”创建中的应用效果。方法选择符合条件的肢体骨折患者400例,并随机分为实验组和对照组,对照组采用传统疼痛护理模式,实验组给予PCA及无痛病房理念干预。采用疼痛数字评分量表(NRS)进行术后静息NRS评分、运动NRS评分。记录患者有无因疼痛而致夜间睡眠中断和睡眠率,并记录患者对疼痛控制的满意程度。结果与对照组相比,

  20. Castle Ward, County Down

    OpenAIRE

    Fisher, Jonathan

    2008-01-01

    Fisher was a painter and engraver in Ireland, working after the Dutch and Italian landscape painting tradition. He is best known by engravings after his designs, of which a large number were produced during his career.[notes from Irish Paintings in the `National Gallery of Ireland?, 2001]The present painting depicts Castle Ward in the distance, an 18th century dwelling famed for its mix of Classical and Gothic architecture.

  1. Emotional impact of patient safety incidents on family physicians and their office staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Beirne, Maeve; Sterling, Pam; Palacios-Derflingher, Luz; Hohman, Stacey; Zwicker, Karen

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the emotional responses and coping strategies that family physicians and their office staff reported in response to a patient safety incident. Two questions contained in a patient safety incident report developed for a study of patient safety in family practice were analyzed. The questions asked reporters to indicate their emotional response to a patient safety incident and how they coped with it. A total of 264 confidential patient safety incident reports collected from September 2007 to August 2010 were analyzed. An emotional response was reported on 82.4% of reports. Of those reports on which an emotional response was reported, a coping strategy was reported on 62.8%. The top 4 reported emotional responses were frustration (48.3%), embarrassment (31.5%), anger (12.6%), and guilt (10.1%). Physicians reported an emotional response more often than clinic staff. An emotional response was reported more often when there was a possibility of harm. Coping strategies were reported as follows: 52% talked to someone about the incident, 37.2% did nothing in response to the incident, 17.9% told the patient about the incident, and 3.6% did something else. Female physicians reported using coping strategies less often than male physicians. A coping strategy was reported more often when there was a possibility of harm. All members of the health care team report experiencing emotions related to patient safety incidents in their practice. Incidents with minor or no harm still invoked emotional responses from the providers. It is important to understand the impact that patient safety incidents have on the medical clinic as a whole.

  2. Expectations and needs of persons with family members in an intensive care unit as opposed to a general ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foss, K R; Tenholder, M F

    1993-04-01

    The positive effect of family support on the outcome from serious illness that requires intensive care has been recognized by clinicians for decades. We have all seen that family visitation and an intensive care environment more similar to that of a general ward (sunlight, radio, television) can benefit patients with psychosis related to intensive care. The severity of illness of the individual patient exerts a powerful stress on the family unit, but it has been difficult to measure this effect. We used a 40-question family needs survey with a degree of importance scale to compare the intensive care unit (ICU) with the general ward in terms of impact on the family. Five needs were found to discriminate these two environments. The family members of patients in an ICU considered it very important (1) for staff to give directions on what to do at the bedside, (2) to receive more support from their own family unit, (3) to have a place to be alone as a family unit in the hospital, (4) to be informed in advance of any transfer plan, and (5) to have flexibility in the time allowed for visitation. Family members are willing to accept decreased visitation time if the physicians and nurses can equate this decrease with the complexity of care in the ICU. The results of this survey have helped us modify and individualize our approach based on family expectations especially when patients are transferred from the general ward to the ICU or from the ICU to the ward.

  3. “They can do whatever they want”: Meanings of receiving psychiatric care based on a common staff approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Per Enarsson

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available This study deepens our understanding of how patients, when cared for in a psychiatric ward, experience situations that involve being handled according to a common staff approach. Interviews with nine former psychiatric in-patients were analyzed using a phenomenological–hermeneutic method to illuminate the lived experience of receiving care based on a common staff approach. The results revealed several meanings: discovering that you are as subjected to a common staff approach, becoming aware that no one cares, becoming aware that your freedom is restricted, being afflicted, becoming aware that a common staff approach is not applied by all staff, and feeling safe because someone else is responsible. The comprehensive understanding was that the patient's understanding of being cared for according to a common staff approach was to be seen and treated in accordance with others’ beliefs and valuations, not in line with the patients’ own self-image, while experiencing feelings of affliction.

  4. Designed sound and music environment in postanaesthesia care units--a multicentre study of patients and staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorgaard, Per; Ertmann, Ellen; Hansen, Vibeke; Noerregaard, Anni; Hansen, Vibeke; Spanggaard, Lene

    2005-08-01

    A multicentre study in five postanaesthesia care units (PACUs) was performed to investigate patient and staff opinion of a specially designed music environment (DME), related to geographical location. Patients (325) and staff (91) described their opinion by means of a questionnaire-anonymously in the case of staff. Patients were not asked beforehand for permission to play music. Amongst patients 267 (83%) found the sound environment with DME pleasant or very pleasant, 26 (6%) found it unpleasant, whereas 32 (11%) answered "no opinion". The opinion of the patients did not differ significantly with geographical location. A strong correlation (P<0.05) between a positive attitude towards DME and degree of relaxation and satisfaction with stay was found. The staff had an equally positive attitude towards the DME; but theirs varied significantly with location. The opinion of the staff was more similar concerning the beneficial effect on working conditions and distress, but varied still significantly. The opinion of the staff had no demonstrable impact on that of the patients.

  5. A tailored relocation stress intervention programme for family caregivers of patients transferred from a surgical intensive care unit to a general ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seul; Oh, HyunSoo; Suh, YeonOk; Seo, WhaSook

    2017-03-01

    To develop and examine a relocation stress intervention programme tailored for the family caregivers of patients scheduled for transfer from a surgical intensive care unit to a general ward. Family relocation stress syndrome has been reported to be similar to that exhibited by patients, and investigators have emphasised that nurses should make special efforts to relieve family relocation stress to maximise positive contributions to the well-being of patients by family caregivers. A nonequivalent control group, nonsynchronised pretest-post-test design was adopted. The study subjects were 60 family caregivers of patients with neurosurgical or general surgical conditions in the surgical intensive care unit of a university hospital located in Incheon, South Korea. Relocation stress and family burden were evaluated at three times, that is before intervention, immediately after transfer and four to five days after transfer. This relocation stress intervention programme was developed for the family caregivers based on disease characteristics and relocation-related needs. In the experimental group, relocation stress levels significantly and continuously decreased after intervention, whereas in the control group, a slight nonsignificant trend was observed. Family burden levels in the control group increased significantly after transfer, whereas burden levels in the experimental group increased only marginally and nonsignificantly. No significant between-group differences in relocation stress or family burden levels were observed after intervention. Relocation stress levels of family caregivers were significantly decreased after intervention in the experimental group, which indicates that the devised family relocation stress intervention programme effectively alleviated family relocation stress. The devised intervention programme, which was tailored to disease characteristics and relocation-related needs, may enhance the practicality and efficacy of relocation stress

  6. The effect of ward rounds making by the operation president of the hospital to improve hand hygiene compliance of the medical staff%业务院长查房对提高医务人员手卫生依从性的效果

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘晖; 罗龙金; 周裕梅

    2015-01-01

    目的:探讨业务院长查房对基层医院医务人员手卫生依从性、医院感染发生率影响,统计快速手消毒剂、洗手液每床每日消耗量。方法医院感染管理科和其他职能部门负责人在业务院长的带领下每天上午参加一个住院病区的业务查房,医院感染管理科将医务人员手卫生依从性作为查房监管的重点,对医务人员手卫生依从性进行观察并记录,在总结会上现场反馈;将业务院长查房前的2012年1-6月设为对照组,业务院长查房后的2013年1-6月设为试验组,比较对照组与试验组手卫生用品消耗量、医院感染例次率、医务人员的洗手依从率。结果医院感染管理科参与业务院长查房后,医务人员手卫生依从性较查房前明显提高,医师由33.10%提高至61.04%,护士由51.86%提高至79.20%,差异有统计学意义( P<0.01);临床科室快速手消毒剂、洗手液每床每日消耗量从查房前的1.88、7.03ml分别提高至5.38、11.51ml,消耗量明显提高;医院感染率由2.01%降低至1.50%,差异有统计学意义( P<0.05);护士手卫生依从性高于医师,各科室手卫生依从性由高到低依次为儿科、妇产科、外科、内科。结论将手卫生纳入业务院长查房内容,取得院领导的重视,可明显提高医务人员手卫生依从性,降低医院感染发生率。%OBJECTIVE To investigate the influence of the ward rounds making by the hospital operation president on hand hygiene compliance and the incidence rate of hospital infection of the medical staff in grass‐roots hospitals , the consumption of the daily use of rapid hand disinfectant and liquid soap for each bed was counted .METHODS The management department of hospital infections and other functional departments participated in a hospital ward rounds with the hospital operation president .The compliance of hand

  7. Management of patient and staff radiation dose in interventional radiology: current concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartal, Gabriel; Vano, Eliseo; Paulo, Graciano; Miller, Donald L

    2014-04-01

    The increasing complexity and numbers of interventional fluoroscopy procedures have led to increasing patient doses of radiation and to increasing concern over staff doses. Hybrid rooms incorporate multiple imaging modalities and are used by multidisciplinary teams in interventional fluoroscopy suites and operating theaters. These rooms present additional radiation protection challenges. The new low annual exposure limit for the lens of the eye also requires specific measures to prevent cataracts in operators. The traditional attitude of radiation protection must be changed to one of proactive management of radiation dose and image quality. Incorporation of a comprehensive dose management program into the departmental quality assurance program is now essential. Physicians, radiographers, and medical physicists play an essential role in the safe use of fluoroscopy in medical practice. Efficient use of all imaging modalities (e.g., fluoroscopy, digital subtraction angiography, cone-beam CT) requires knowledge of the effects of different equipment settings on patient and staff doses as well as the skill and competence to optimize these settings for each procedure and patient. Updates and recommendations on radiation protection and dose management programs, including aspects of education and training, are presented.

  8. Comparing the predictive accuracy of frailty, comorbidity, and disability for mortality: a 1-year follow-up in patients hospitalized in geriatric wards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritt, Martin; Ritt, Julia Isabel; Sieber, Cornel Christian; Gaßmann, Karl-Günter

    2017-01-01

    Background Studies evaluating and comparing the power of frailty, comorbidity, and disability instruments, together and in parallel, for predicting mortality are limited. Objective This study aimed to evaluate and compare the measures of frailty, comorbidity, and disability in predicting 1-year mortality in geriatric inpatients. Design Prospective cohort study. Patients and setting A total of 307 inpatients aged ≥65 years in geriatric wards of a general hospital participated in the study. Measurements The patients were evaluated in relation to different frailty, comorbidity, and disability instruments during their hospital stays. These included three frailty (the seven-category Clinical Frailty Scale [CFS-7], a 41-item frailty index [FI], and the FRAIL scale), two comorbidity (the Cumulative Illness Rating Scale for Geriatrics [CIRS-G] and the comorbidity domain of the FI [Comorbidity-D-FI]), and two disability instruments (disability in basic activities of daily living [ADL-Katz] and the instrumental and basic activities of daily living domains of the FI [IADL/ADL-D-FI]). The patients were followed-up over 1 year. Results Using FI, CIRS-G, Comorbidity-D-FI, and ADL-Katz, this study identified a patient group with a high (≥50%) 1-year mortality rate in all of the patients and the two patient subgroups (ie, patients aged 65–82 years and ≥83 years). The CFS-7, FI, FRAIL scale, CIRS-G, Comorbidity-D-FI, and IADL/ADL-D-FI (analyzed as full scales) revealed useful discriminative accuracy for 1-year mortality (ie, an area under the curve >0.7) in all the patients and the two patient subgroups (all P<0.001). Thereby, CFS-7 (in all patients and the two patient subgroups) and FI (in the subgroup of patients aged ≥83 years) showed greater discriminative accuracy for 1-year mortality compared to other instruments (all P<0.05). Conclusion All the different instruments emerged as suitable tools for risk stratification in geriatric inpatients. Among them, CFS-7, and in

  9. Outcome at three months of COPD patients with acute hypercapnic respiratory failure treated with NPPV in an Acute Medicine Ward

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrizio Vincenti

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Non invasive positive pressure ventilation (NPPV is increasingly used for patients with hypercapnic respiratory failure secondary to acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. NPPV has been shown to improve arterial blood gas tensions and dyspnoea and to prevent the need for intubation in patients admitted to hospital with an exacerbation of COPD associated with respiratory acidosis. Although advantages of NPPV over conventional treatment have been convincingly documented in the short period, there are fewer data as to the outcomes following hospital discharge. We have undertaken a prospective descriptive study to obtain comprehensive data on the in hospital and 3 month outcomes of a cohort of 57 COPD patients treated with NPPV for acute hypercapnic respiratory failure as a first intervention in addition to usual medical care. Patients with a COPD exacerbation had better outcomes than patients with COPD complicated by other acute conditions. Pneumonia was specifically associated with a higher inhospital risk of death. In our series about one in four patients with an indicator of previous severe respiratory disease (past admission for acute respiratory failure, previous use of NPPV, long term oxygen therapy or home NPPV was dead at three months after discharge and almost one in two was dead or had been readmitted. On the contrary, patients without indicators of previous severe respiratory disease benefited from NPPV during an acute episode of respiratory failure and had a chance of approximately 80% of being alive and free from recurrence at three months.

  10. Clinical profile of geriatric patients in medical wards at a rural tertiary care hospital in South India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reddy APK

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Health problems associated with ageing are multiple and sparse data are available on this topic from India. Methods: We carried out an observational study in 200 of geriatric patients (age 60 years at our medical college teaching hospital at Kuppam, Andhra Pradesh during the period November 2012 and October 2013. Results: Most patients (31% were in age group 65-69 years. The most common disease conditions noted were hypertension (49%, diabetes mellitus (47%, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (37%. Majority of the patients (82.5% had more than one co-morbid condition. Conclusions: Cardiovascular and respiratory diseases are important causes for hospital admission in geriatric patients. The majority of cases had three or more diagnoses necessitating admission contributing to higher disease burden in the elderly.

  11. Intensive care survivors' experiences of ward-based care: Meleis' theory of nursing transitions and role development among critical care outreach services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsay, Pam; Huby, Guro; Thompson, Andrew; Walsh, Tim

    2014-03-01

    To explore the psychosocial needs of patients discharged from intensive care, the extent to which they are captured using existing theory on transitions in care and the potential role development of critical care outreach, follow-up and liaison services. Intensive care patients are at an increased risk of adverse events, deterioration or death following ward transfer. Nurse-led critical care outreach, follow-up or liaison services have been adopted internationally to prevent these potentially avoidable sequelae. The need to provide patients with psychosocial support during the transition to ward-based care has also been identified, but the evidence base for role development is currently limited. Twenty participants were invited to discuss their experiences of ward-based care as part of a broader study on recovery following prolonged critical illness. Psychosocial distress was a prominent feature of their accounts, prompting secondary data analysis using Meleis et al.'s mid-range theory on experiencing transitions. Participants described a sense of disconnection in relation to profound debilitation and dependency and were often distressed by a perceived lack of understanding, indifference or insensitivity among ward staff to their basic care needs. Negotiating the transition between dependence and independence was identified as a significant source of distress following ward transfer. Participants varied in the extent to which they were able to express their needs and negotiate recovery within professionally mediated boundaries. These data provide new insights into the putative origins of the psychosocial distress that patients experience following ward transfer. Meleis et al.'s work has resonance in terms of explicating intensive care patients' experiences of psychosocial distress throughout the transition to general ward-based care, such that the future role development of critical care outreach, follow-up and liaison services may be more theoretically informed

  12. Light atmosphere in hospital wards

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stidsen, Lone Mandrup

    Sociocultural aspects of light are important for the user experience of the atmosphere in a ward. According to the Danish Regulation for light in hospitals (DS703, 1983), a home-like feeling is required to support the patients, as they needa pleasant environment for their recovery. The term ‘Light...... the requirements. What does it mean to create a 'home-like' and 'pleasant or appealing' light in this context? Does the composition of CRI and degree of Kelvin tell it all? Is it enough information to provide a proper illumination in which the patient can have a homely and pleasant experience? The 'Model of Light...... from the Danish interior design magazine BO BEDRE.The findings show that the placement of light atmosphere in Denmark are determined as three horizontal light zones: 'High Lighting Zone', 'Center Lighting Zone' and 'Low Lighting Zone' An experimental study evaluates the experience of the atmosphere...

  13. Comorbid depression in dementia on psychogeriatric nursing home wards: which symptoms are prominent?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verkaik, R.; Francke, A.L.; Meijel, B. van; Ribbe, M.W.; Bensing, J.M.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To provide insight into the prevalence and clinically relevant symptoms of comorbid depression among dementia patients in psychogeriatric nursing home wards, to enhance depression recognition. DESIGN: Cross-sectional analyses of multicenter diagnostic data. SETTING: Psychogeriatric wards

  14. Art to Heart: The Effects of Staff- Created Art on the Postoperative Rehabilitation of Cardiovascular Surgery Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Mary Gwyn; Wells, Nancy L; Dietrich, Mary S; Sandlin, Victoria

    2015-01-01

    Postoperative ambulation is important for reducing complications following surgery. The type of art patients view on the ambulation route may influence the distance patients walk. In this study, patients ambulated greater distances when staff-created art was placed on hallway walls.

  15. Genetics Home Reference: Romano-Ward syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2 MalaCards: scn5a-related romano ward syndrome Merck Manual Consumer Version: Long QT Syndrome My46 Trait Profile Orphanet: Familial long QT syndrome Patient Support and Advocacy Resources (3 links) National Organization for Rare Disorders Resource List from the University ...

  16. Physical examination skills training: Faculty staff vs. patient instructor feedback-A controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krautter, Markus; Diefenbacher, Katja; Schultz, Jobst-Hendrik; Maatouk, Imad; Herrmann-Werner, Anne; Koehl-Hackert, Nadja; Herzog, Wolfgang; Nikendei, Christoph

    2017-01-01

    Standardized patients are widely used in training of medical students, both in teaching and assessment. They also frequently lead complete training sessions delivering physical examination skills without the aid of faculty teaching staff-acting as "patient instructors" (PIs). An important part of this training is their ability to provide detailed structured feedback to students which has a strong impact on their learning success. Yet, to date no study has assessed the quality of physical examination related feedback by PIs. Therefore, we conducted a randomized controlled study comparing feedback of PIs and faculty staff following a physical examination assessed by students and video assessors. 14 PIs and 14 different faculty staff physicians both delivered feedback to 40 medical students that had performed a physical examination on the respective PI while the physicians observed the performance. The physical examination was rated by two independent video assessors to provide an objective performance standard (gold standard). Feedback of PI and physicians was content analyzed by two different independent video assessors based on a provided checklist and compared to the performance standard. Feedback of PIs and physicians was also rated by medical students and video assessors using a questionnaire consisting of 12 items. There was no statistical significant difference concerning overall matching of physician or PI feedback with gold standard ratings by video assessment (p = .219). There was also no statistical difference when focusing only on items that were classified as major key steps (p = .802), mistakes or parts that were left out during physical examination (p = .219) or mistakes in communication items (p = .517). The feedback of physicians was significantly better rated than PI feedback both by students (p = .043) as well as by video assessors (p = .034). In summary, our study demonstrates that trained PIs are able to provide feedback of equal quantitative

  17. Study of patterns of prescribing antibiotics in geriatric patients admitted to the medical wards in a tertiary care hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ankita Bist

    2016-02-01

    Conclusions: Polypharmacy is commonly observed practice in geriatric patients. Apart from increasing the cost of treatment it also promotes irrational prescription of drugs. Most of the prescriptions were in adherence with the WHO's Essential Medicine List but antibiotics were mainly prescribed empirically. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2016; 5(1.000: 155-158

  18. Profile of inpatient falls in patients with dementia: A prospective comparative study between 100% single rooms and traditional multibedded wards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Knight

    2016-09-01

    Conclusion: Patients with dementia were at an increased risk of recurrent IF in single rooms compared with MB-Ws. Recurrent IF could be correlated with longer LoS but it is difficult to establish the cause and effect due to the low power of the study. There was no significant difference in terms of injury or mortality between the two settings.

  19. New Short Tandem Repeat-Based Molecular Typing Method for Pneumocystis jirovecii Reveals Intrahospital Transmission between Patients from Different Wards.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maud Gits-Muselli

    Full Text Available Pneumocystis pneumonia is a severe opportunistic infection in immunocompromised patients caused by the unusual fungus Pneumocystis jirovecii. Transmission is airborne, with both immunocompromised and immunocompetent individuals acting as a reservoir for the fungus. Numerous reports of outbreaks in renal transplant units demonstrate the need for valid genotyping methods to detect transmission of a given genotype. Here, we developed a short tandem repeat (STR-based molecular typing method for P. jirovecii. We analyzed the P. jirovecii genome and selected six genomic STR markers located on different contigs of the genome. We then tested these markers in 106 P. jirovecii PCR-positive respiratory samples collected between October 2010 and November 2013 from 91 patients with various underlying medical conditions. Unique (one allele per marker and multiple (more than one allele per marker genotypes were observed in 34 (32% and 72 (68% samples, respectively. A genotype could be assigned to 55 samples (54 patients and 61 different genotypes were identified in total with a discriminatory power of 0.992. Analysis of the allelic distribution of the six markers and minimum spanning tree analysis of the 61 genotypes identified a specific genotype (Gt21 in our hospital, which may have been transmitted between 10 patients including six renal transplant recipients. Our STR-based molecular typing method is a quick, cheap and reliable approach to genotype Pneumocystis jirovecii in hospital settings and is sensitive enough to detect minor genotypes, thus enabling the study of the transmission and pathophysiology of Pneumocystis pneumonia.

  20. Splitting Ward identity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Safari, Mahmoud [Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences (IPM), School of Particles and Accelerators, P.O. Box 19395-5531, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-04-15

    Within the background-field framework we present a path integral derivation of the splitting Ward identity for the one-particle irreducible effective action in the presence of an infrared regulator, and make connection with earlier works on the subject. The approach is general in the sense that it does not rely on how the splitting is performed. This identity is then used to address the problem of background dependence of the effective action at an arbitrary energy scale. We next introduce the modified master equation and emphasize its role in constraining the effective action. Finally, application to general gauge theories within the geometric approach is discussed. (orig.)

  1. Impact of patient suicide on front-line staff in Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gaffney, Paul

    2009-08-01

    Research and anecdotal evidence suggests that coming to terms with the suicide of a patient can be extremely distressing for front-line professionals. Some research also suggests that exposure to such situations can undermine professionals\\' functioning and feelings of competence, cause them to question their professional standing and ultimately contribute to burnout. A survey of 447 front-line professionals\\' experiences of patient suicide was undertaken to further explore these issues. Thematic analysis of open-ended questionnaire items revealed that concerns for the bereaved family, feelings of responsibility for the death and having a close therapeutic relationship with the client are key factors that influence the adjustment and coping of a health professional in the aftermath of the death of a client by suicide. The results are discussed with a focus on the impact of suicide on front-line staff, the need for ongoing support and training and the development of specific post-suicide protocols.

  2. Right to know: reducing risks of fecal pathogen exposure for ED patients and staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaney, Molly Bridget

    2014-07-01

    The purpose of this article is to review the literature regarding the multiple challenges that contribute to ED bedside toileting and examine best practices that will reduce fecal exposure, cross-contamination among patients, and employee splash injuries. We searched the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, MEDLINE, and Cochrane database for information about the multiple challenges involved in bedside toileting, using the following search terms: bedside toileting, gastroenteritis, macerator, sluice machine, fecal pathogen exposure, and splash injury. In addition, costs and benefits of reusable versus disposable bedside toileting equipment were compared and contrasted. Emergency departments have a higher exposure rate to fecal pathogens with current methods of bedside toileting. Short incubation periods may not allow the proper lead time needed for patients to access primary care providers. As a result, emergency departments and urgent care centers become a likely point of entry into the health care system. Although most inpatient rooms have built-in bathrooms, most emergency departments and outpatient examination rooms do not. Although many patients are ambulatory, restrictive monitoring equipment is required. For safety reasons, staff must bring toileting equipment to the bedsides of both ambulatory and non-ambulatory patients. Hopper dependence creates longer walking distances and delays. These delays may lead to incontinence events, skin breakdown, more frequent bed changes, and higher linen and labor costs. Reusable bedside toileting equipment is associated with at-risk behaviors. Examples are procrastination and sanitization shortcuts. These behaviors risk cross-contamination of patients especially when urgent situations require equipment to be reused in the interim. ED patients and staff are 5 times more likely to undergo fecal exposure. The 5 phases of ED bedside toileting at which risks occur are as follows: equipment setup, transport

  3. Study of the effect of humanistic nursing care model wards in Children Caring Ward School on the nurses' caring ability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiao He

    2016-03-01

    Conclusions: The humanistic nursing care model wards in CCWS has a positive effect on the nurses' caring ability, not only to help build great relationships between nurses and patients but also to enhance the patients' satisfaction.

  4. Etiological study of fever of unknown origin in patients admitted to medicine ward of a teaching hospital of Eastern India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dipanjan Bandyopadhyay

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In a developing country, infectious disease remains the most important cause of fever, but the noncommunicable diseases, like malignancy, are fast becoming important differential diagnoses. An important clinical problem is the cases labeled as fever of unknown origin (FUO, which often evade diagnosis. Objective: The present study was undertaken to find the cause of FUO in a tertiary care hospital of eastern India. Materials and Methods: This is a prospective study of inpatients, with regard to both clinical signs and investigations. Results: The main diagnosis in the end was tuberculosis, closely followed by hematological malignancy. A substantial number of cases remained undiagnosed despite all investigations. The provisional diagnosis matched with the final in around two thirds of the cases. While for younger patients leukemia was a significant diagnosis, for older ones, extra-pulmonary tuberculosis was a main concern. Interpretation: In India, infectious disease still remains the most important cause of fever. Thus the initial investigations should always include tests for that purpose in a case of FUO. Conclusion: Geographic variations and local infection profiles should always be considered when investigating a case of FUO. However, some of the cases always elude diagnosis, although the patients may respond to empirical therapy.

  5. Usability, acceptability, and adherence to an electronic self-monitoring system in patients with major depression discharged from inpatient wards

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritsen, Lise; Andersen, Louise; Olsson, Emilia

    2017-01-01

    , and were followed for four weeks. User satisfaction was assessed using semiqualitative questionnaires and the System Usability Scale (SUS). Patients were interviewed at baseline and at endpoint with the Hamilton depression rating scale (HAM-D17), the Major Depression Inventory (MDI), and the 5-item World...... from 27.1 (SD 13.1) to 22.1 (SD 12.7; P=.006), and in quality of life on the WHO-5 from 31.3 (SD 22.9) to 43.4 (SD 22.1; Pscales, but not on self-assessed mood (P=.08). Mood and sleep parameters were highly variable from day-to-day. Sleep-offset was significantly delayed from baseline, averaging...... and clinicians. Patients were phoned weekly to discuss their data entries. The primary outcomes were usability, acceptability, and adherence to the system. The secondary outcomes were changes in: the electronically self-assessed mood, sleep, and activity scores; and scores from the HAM-D17, MDI, and WHO-5 scales...

  6. Functional behavioral analysis and social scripting for the older patient with schizophrenia: a staff development program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markwick, Laura; Smith, Charlene; Mick, Diane

    2014-11-01

    Executive functioning is the ability to plan, strategize, organize, and focus on details. Impaired executive functioning plays a significant role in behavior disturbances. Lack of inhibition, impaired abstract reasoning, thought perseverance, rigidity in routine, and lack of insight disrupt social skills and daily life. Autism and schizophrenia present some similar behaviors, including impaired executive functioning, often resulting in pharmacological management as many healthcare professionals receive limited training in executive functioning. Non-pharmacological tools used in autism for behavior management include functional behavioral analysis and social scripting, which help to identify causes of behavior and teach more appropriate behavioral responses. Described here is an educational program for healthcare workers in a long-term care skilled nursing facility, to help them understand the basis for behaviors in individuals with impaired executive function, to use these same tools for behavioral modification techniques, and to help patients learn more appropriate social skills. Program evaluation suggested the educational program was successful in increasing the staff's knowledge and comfort level in addressing the behavioral issues that arise with this population and staff also reported less use of medication as first-line treatment for behavioral issues.

  7. Bridging the gap: an innovative dementia learning program for healthcare assistants in hospital wards using facilitator-led discussions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Alan; Law, Shirley

    2009-04-01

    Nursing a person with dementia in a ward setting can be stressful and a challenge for staff and patients alike. Healthcare assistants are identified as requiring a specific training program. They form part of the front-line workforce and yet have the least access to training but often most contact with patients. The program in this study focused on person-centered care and used six self-study workbooks. Experienced registered nurses are trained to be facilitators of 12 group discussions in the ward setting. The training program viewed the facilitator as playing a key role in empowering the healthcare assistant but also in promoting reflective practice. The outcomes to date have been positive and showed a development in confidence and competence of the healthcare assistants involved.

  8. Patient satisfaction in the outpatients' chemotherapy unit of Marmara University, Istanbul, Turkey: a staff survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karamanoglu Ayla

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We conducted a survey to find out how patients feel about the care they receive in the outpatient chemotherapy unit of Marmara University Hospital. Methods The American College of Physicians Patient Satisfaction survey translated into Turkish was used. A meeting was held with all involved staff, before conducting the survey, to review the purpose and determine the process. The study was conducted with 100 random patients. Results Consistent with cancer frequency, most patients had either lung, colorectal or breast cancer. Their insurance was government sponsored in close to 90%. The educational levels were above Turkish median but consistent with the area the hospital is serving. They were coming to the unit on average 8.5 months. The responses were not influenced by the surveyed diagnosis, age, sex or educational status (p > 0,05. Particularly health care team's attention, trust and courtesy came forward as strong points. The weaknesses noted as difficulties in booking an outpatient doctor visit appointment because the phone line was busy or the secretary was not courteous, the excessive amount of time and effort it required to get laboratory and radiology results. Conclusion The health care system is basically a service based industry and customer satisfaction is at utmost importance just as in other service-oriented sectors. We hope this study will shed light in that area and Turkish health care providers will pay closer attention to how their patients feel about the services that they are getting.

  9. The derivation and validation of a simple model for predicting in-hospital mortality of acutely admitted patients to internal medicine wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakhnini, Ali; Saliba, Walid; Schwartz, Naama; Bisharat, Naiel

    2017-06-01

    Limited information is available about clinical predictors of in-hospital mortality in acute unselected medical admissions. Such information could assist medical decision-making.To develop a clinical model for predicting in-hospital mortality in unselected acute medical admissions and to test the impact of secondary conditions on hospital mortality.This is an analysis of the medical records of patients admitted to internal medicine wards at one university-affiliated hospital. Data obtained from the years 2013 to 2014 were used as a derivation dataset for creating a prediction model, while data from 2015 was used as a validation dataset to test the performance of the model. For each admission, a set of clinical and epidemiological variables was obtained. The main diagnosis at hospitalization was recorded, and all additional or secondary conditions that coexisted at hospital admission or that developed during hospital stay were considered secondary conditions.The derivation and validation datasets included 7268 and 7843 patients, respectively. The in-hospital mortality rate averaged 7.2%. The following variables entered the final model; age, body mass index, mean arterial pressure on admission, prior admission within 3 months, background morbidity of heart failure and active malignancy, and chronic use of statins and antiplatelet agents. The c-statistic (ROC-AUC) of the prediction model was 80.5% without adjustment for main or secondary conditions, 84.5%, with adjustment for the main diagnosis, and 89.5% with adjustment for the main diagnosis and secondary conditions. The accuracy of the predictive model reached 81% on the validation dataset.A prediction model based on clinical data with adjustment for secondary conditions exhibited a high degree of prediction accuracy. We provide a proof of concept that there is an added value for incorporating secondary conditions while predicting probabilities of in-hospital mortality. Further improvement of the model performance

  10. Conversation Between ward Nurse and Patient%英语会话及医院常用词汇

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@ 病房护士和病人对话 Before an Operation 手术前 Nurse:Good moming, Mr. Li. How are you feeling today? 早安,李先生,今天你好吗? Patient:Not too bad. Did they tell you that Dr Zhang, head of the Surgery Department had decided to perform gastrectomy on me? 还不错.他们有没有告诉你外科张主任决定要给我 做胃切除术? N: Yes. I took part in the discussion on your treatment. It was de cided that you should undergo surgery. I was afraid that you would worry about it,so I'll come to put you at ease. 是的.我参加了有关你的治疗方案的讨论.现已决 定你应该手术治疗.我担心你会紧张的.所以我来 解除你的顾虑.

  11. The effect of additional training on motor outcomes at discharge from recovery phase rehabilitation wards: a survey from multi-center stroke data bank in Japan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nariaki Shiraishi

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study was to examine the potential benefits of additional training in patients admitted to recovery phase rehabilitation ward using the data bank of post-stroke patient registry.Subjects were 2507 inpatients admitted to recovery phase rehabilitation wards between November 2004 and November 2010. Participants were retrospectively divided into four groups based upon chart review; patients who received no additional rehabilitation, patients who were added with self-initiated off hours training, patients who were added with off hours training by ward staff, patients who received both self-initiated training and training by ward staff. Parameters for assessing outcomes included length of stay, motor/cognitive subscales of functional independent measures (FIM and motor benefit of FIM calculated by subtracting the score at admission from that at discharge.Participants were stratified into three groups depending on the motor FIM at admission (≦28, 29∼56, 57≦ for comparison. Regarding outcome variables, significant inter-group differences were observed in all items examined within the subgroup who scored 28 or less and between 29 and 56. Meanwhile no such trends were observed in the group who scored 57 or more compared with those who scored less. In a decision tree created based upon Exhaustive Chi-squared Automatic Interaction Detection method, variables chosen were the motor FIM at admission (the first node additional training (the second node, the cognitive FIM at admission(the third node.Overall the results suggest that additional training can compensate for the shortage of regular rehabilitation implemented in recovery phase rehabilitation ward, thus may contribute to improved outcomes assessed by motor FIM at discharge.

  12. Psychotropic drug prescription in nursing home patients with dementia : influence of environmental correlates and staff distress on physicians' prescription behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuidema, Sytse U; de Jonghe, Jos F M; Verhey, Frans R J; Koopmans, Raymond T C M

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of the study was to examine whether staff distress and aspects of the nursing home environment were associated with psychotropic drug use (PDU) in patients with dementia. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study of 1289 nursing home patients with dementia from 56 Dementia Specia

  13. The importance of staff in the facial plastic surgical practice: dynamic staff interface with patients in support of the surgeon's objectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patseavouras, Louie L

    2008-05-01

    This article addresses how staff can support surgeons in practical terms, making a business more efficient, seamless, and less costly (in terms of emotional and time components). This article addresses (1) using staff as a first line of defense against misperceptions, false expectations, and general problems; (2) recognizing that effective staff are highly intuitive and can be trained to troubleshoot and intervene; (3) encouraging staff to rely on gut instinct; (4) learning that body language and the nonverbal are powerful indicators; (5) training staff concerning nonverbal communication; and (6) realizing that a great deal of communication is within surgeon and staff control.

  14. Design Parameters for Evaluating Light Settings and Light Atmosphere in Hospital Wards

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stidsen, Lone; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning; Fisker, Anna Marie

    2010-01-01

    When constructing and designing Danish hospitals for the future, patients, staff and guests are in focus. It is found important to have a starting point in healing architecture and create an environment with knowledge of users sensory and functionally needs and looks at how hospital wards can...... support patients’ experience or maybe even have a positive influence on the recovery process. Thus at a general level, it is a crucial task to investigate how aspects such as the design of the environment, arts, lights, sounds can support and improve the patients’ recovery rate and the satisfaction...... of staff and guests in the future hospital. This paper is based on Böhmes G. concept of atmosphere dealing with the effect of light in experiencing atmosphere, and the importance having a holistic approach when designing a pleasurable light atmosphere. It shows important design parameters for pleasurable...

  15. Minimizing radiation dose to patient and staff during fluoroscopic, nasoenteral tube insertions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudin, S.; Bednarek, D.R. (New York Univ., NY (United States). School of Medicine)

    1992-02-01

    Since the fluoroscopic image during nasoenteral tube placements is used for guidance and not for diagnosis, a lower contrast image with increased quantum mottle can be easily tolerated. The three methods to reduce the radiation dose rate investigated consisted of removing camera from the image intensifier output phosphor, and setting the fluoroscopic mA to the minimum value so that the kVp could be maximized. Fluoroscopic frozen video frames of a clinical tube insertion comparing the images with and without the dose-saving techniques are presented. Measurements of the radiation dose rates using a Plexiglas phantom show that the dose for patient and staff during fluoroscopic-guided nasoenteral tube placements can be reduced by over a factor of 10 without significantly adversely affecting the actual placement procedure. (author).

  16. Comparing the predictive accuracy of frailty, comorbidity, and disability for mortality: a 1-year follow-up in patients hospitalized in geriatric wards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritt M

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Martin Ritt,1,2 Julia Isabel Ritt,2 Cornel Christian Sieber,1,3 Karl-Günter Gaßmann1,2 1Institute for Biomedicine of Ageing (IBA, Friedrich-Alexander Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU, Nürnberg, 2Department of Internal Medicine III (Medicine of Ageing, Geriatrics Centre Erlangen, Hospital of the Congregation of St Francis Sisters of Vierzehnheiligen, Erlangen, 3Department of Internal Medicine and Geriatrics, Hospital of the Order of St John of God, Regensburg, Germany Background: Studies evaluating and comparing the power of frailty, comorbidity, and disability instruments, together and in parallel, for predicting mortality are limited.Objective: This study aimed to evaluate and compare the measures of frailty, comorbidity, and disability in predicting 1-year mortality in geriatric inpatients.Design: Prospective cohort study.Patients and setting: A total of 307 inpatients aged ≥65 years in geriatric wards of a general hospital participated in the study.Measurements: The patients were evaluated in relation to different frailty, comorbidity, and disability instruments during their hospital stays. These included three frailty (the seven-category Clinical Frailty Scale [CFS-7], a 41-item frailty index [FI], and the FRAIL scale, two comorbidity (the Cumulative Illness Rating Scale for Geriatrics [CIRS-G] and the comorbidity domain of the FI [Comorbidity-D-FI], and two disability instruments (disability in basic activities of daily living [ADL-Katz] and the instrumental and basic activities of daily living domains of the FI [IADL/ADL-D-FI]. The patients were followed-up over 1 year.Results: Using FI, CIRS-G, Comorbidity-D-FI, and ADL-Katz, this study identified a patient group with a high (≥50% 1-year mortality rate in all of the patients and the two patient subgroups (ie, patients aged 65–82 years and ≥83 years. The CFS-7, FI, FRAIL scale, CIRS-G, Comorbidity-D-FI, and IADL/ADL-D-FI (analyzed as full scales revealed useful

  17. Physical examination skills training: Faculty staff vs. patient instructor feedback—A controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diefenbacher, Katja; Schultz, Jobst-Hendrik; Maatouk, Imad; Herrmann-Werner, Anne; Koehl-Hackert, Nadja; Herzog, Wolfgang; Nikendei, Christoph

    2017-01-01

    Background Standardized patients are widely used in training of medical students, both in teaching and assessment. They also frequently lead complete training sessions delivering physical examination skills without the aid of faculty teaching staff–acting as “patient instructors” (PIs). An important part of this training is their ability to provide detailed structured feedback to students which has a strong impact on their learning success. Yet, to date no study has assessed the quality of physical examination related feedback by PIs. Therefore, we conducted a randomized controlled study comparing feedback of PIs and faculty staff following a physical examination assessed by students and video assessors. Methods 14 PIs and 14 different faculty staff physicians both delivered feedback to 40 medical students that had performed a physical examination on the respective PI while the physicians observed the performance. The physical examination was rated by two independent video assessors to provide an objective performance standard (gold standard). Feedback of PI and physicians was content analyzed by two different independent video assessors based on a provided checklist and compared to the performance standard. Feedback of PIs and physicians was also rated by medical students and video assessors using a questionnaire consisting of 12 items. Results There was no statistical significant difference concerning overall matching of physician or PI feedback with gold standard ratings by video assessment (p = .219). There was also no statistical difference when focusing only on items that were classified as major key steps (p = .802), mistakes or parts that were left out during physical examination (p = .219) or mistakes in communication items (p = .517). The feedback of physicians was significantly better rated than PI feedback both by students (p = .043) as well as by video assessors (p = .034). Conclusions In summary, our study demonstrates that trained PIs are able

  18. The importance of worker, staff and patient participation in hospital evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotaka, F; Manildo, F

    1999-01-01

    Considering the frequent changes that occur in hospitals and the necessity to find methods and techniques that help their evaluation, this study's objective is to investigate the extents and the limitations of workers and users participation in hospitals' evaluation. Surveys were carried out in Hospital-A and B, applying Post Occupancy Evaluation (POE) methods and techniques, using questionnaires, that were applied to all personnel and regular staff of Hospital-A and Hospital-B, as well as to 300 patients of Hospital-B. Both are general hospitals and are situated in São Paulo State, in Brazil. Hospital-A has 180 beds, 9,000 m2 of area constructed, 550 personnel. Hospital-B, 150 beds, 13,000 m2 of area constructed, 720 personnel. In Hospital-A, 68.7% of the personnel answered the questionnaires, in Hospital-B, 64.4% of the personnel and 61.3% of the patients answered the questionnaire. The results of the study as outlined in this paper will indicate that hospital evaluation by personnel and patients demonstrates the applicability and sensitivity of their participation. The authors, as a consequence, recommend that personnel and patients be consulted in hospital evaluation programmes which would act as a source of feedback for renovating existing as well as designing of new hospitals.

  19. Aggression in Psychiatric Wards

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvidhjelm, Jacob; Sestoft, Dorte; Skovgaard, Lene Theil

    2016-01-01

    Health care workers are often exposed to violence and aggression in psychiatric settings. Short-term risk assessments, such as the Brøset Violence Checklist (BVC), are strong predictors of such aggression and may enable staff to take preventive measures against aggression. This study evaluated...

  20. Dynamic isolation technologies in negative pressure isolation wards

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Zhonglin

    2017-01-01

    This book presents novel design principles and technologies for dynamic isolation based on experimental studies. These approaches have now become the local standard in Beijing and are currently being promoted for use nationwide. Further, the book provides details of measures and guidelines for the design process. Departing from the traditional understanding that isolation wards should be designed with high negative pressure, airtight doors and fresh air, it establishes the basis for designing biological clean rooms, including isolation wards, using a simple and convenient scientific approach. This book is intended for designers, engineers, researchers, hospital management staff and graduate students in heating ventilation air conditioning (HVAC), air cleaning technologies and related areas.

  1. Exploring the Legacies of Filmed Patient Narratives: The Interpretation and Appropriation of Patient Films by Health Care Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Mary; Robert, Glenn; Maben, Jill

    2015-09-01

    We trace the legacies of filmed patient narratives that were edited and screened to encourage engagement with a participatory quality improvement project in an acute hospital setting in England. Using Gabriel's theory of "narrative contract," we examine the initial success of the films in establishing common grounds for participatory project and later, and more varied, interpretations of the films. Over time, the films were interpreted by staff as either useful sources of learning by critical reflection, dubious (invalid or unreliable) representations of patient experience, or as "closed" items available as auditable evidence of completed quality improvement work. We find these interpretations of the films to be shaped by the effect of social distance, the differential outcomes of project work, and changing organizational agendas. We consider the wider conditions of patient narrative as a form of quality improvement knowledge with immediate potency and fragile or fluid legitimacy over time.

  2. What Determines the Surgical Patient Experience? Exploring the Patient, Clinical Staff, and Administration Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazurenko, Olena; Zemke, Dina; Lefforge, Noelle; Shoemaker, Stowe; Menachemi, Nir

    2015-01-01

    Hospitals are increasingly concerned with enhancing surgical patient experience given that Medicare reimbursements are now tied in part to patient satisfaction. Surgical patients' experience may be influenced by several factors (e.g., integration of care, technical aspects of care), which are ranked differently in importance by clinicians and patients. Strategies designed to improve patient experience can be informed by our research, which examines the determinants of the surgical patient experience from the perspective of multiple healthcare team members. We conducted 12 focus groups with surgical patients, family members, physicians, nurses, and hospital administrators at one acute care, for-profit hospital in a western state and analyzed the content for determinants of the overall surgical patient experience. Specifically, we analyzed the content of the conversations to determine how frequently participants discussed the determinants of the surgical patient experience and how positive, negative, or neutral the comments were. The study's findings suggest that surgical patients and members of the healthcare team have similar views regarding the most important factors in the patient experience-namely, interdisciplinary relationships, technical infrastructure, and staffing. The study results will be used to improve care in this facility and can inform the development of initiatives aimed at improving the surgical patient experience elsewhere. Our study could serve as a model for how other facilities can analyze the surgical patient experience from the perspectives of different stakeholders and improve their performance on the basis of data directly relevant to their organization.

  3. Observation af kritisk syge patienter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuhrmann, Lone; Hesselfeldt, Rasmus; Lippert, Anne

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate to which extent patients with abnormal vital signs on general wards had their vital signs monitored and documented and to establish if staff concern for patients influenced the level of monitoring and was predictive of increased mortality....

  4. 特需病房优质护理服务探讨%High Quality Nursing Serviceof Special Wards

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹小丽

    2016-01-01

    Special wards is hospital in order to meet the needs of special treatment,and set up a special ward,many kinds of diseases. Patients with high quality,in order to improve the quality of nursing in our hospital ward,to carry out high quality nursing service mode in special wards,through perfect the rules and regulations of the department,make abundant nursing content and target,strengthen the nursing staff's professional knowledge and professional skil s training,pay attention to patients' end-of-life care measures,make the special wards of holistic nursing quality and patient satisfaction has been significantly improved,effectively reduce the incidence of nursing mistakes and accidents.%特需病房是医院为了满足特殊治疗需要而专门设置的病区,疾病种类较多,患者素质较高,为了提高我院特需病房护理质量,在特需病房率先开展优质护理服务工作模式,通过完善科室相关规章制度,制定丰富的护理内容及目标,加强护理人员的专业知识和专科操作技能培训,注重患者临终护理等措施,使特需病房整体护理质量和患者满意度得到大幅提升,有效降低护理差错事故发生率。

  5. Electronic Printed Ward Round Proformas: Freeing Up Doctors' Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Darren; Eneje, Philip

    2017-01-01

    The role of a junior doctor involves preparing for the morning ward round. At a time when there are gaps on rotas and doctors' time is more stretched, this can be a source of significant delay and thus a loss of working time. We therefore looked at ways in which we could make the ward round a more efficient place by introducing specific electronic, printed ward round proformas. We used the average time taken to write proformas per patient and the average time taken per patient on the ward round. This would then enable us to make fair comparisons with future changes that were made using the plan, do, study, and act principles of quality improvement. Our baseline measurement found that the average time taken to write up the proforma for each patient was 1 minute 9 seconds and that the average time taken per patient on the ward round was 8 minutes 30 seconds. With the changes we made during our 3 PDSA cycles and the implementation of an electronic, printed ward round proforma, we found that we were able to reduce the average time spent per patient on the ward round to 6 minutes 32 seconds, an improvement of 1 min 58 seconds per patient. The project has thus enabled us to reduce the time taken per patient during the ward round. This improved efficiency will enable patients to be identified earlier for discharge. It will also aid in freeing up the time of junior doctors, allowing them to complete discharge letters sooner, order investigations earlier and enable them to complete their allocated tasks within contracted hours. PMID:28352467

  6. Are you willing to treat patients with HIV/AIDS? An anonymous survey among staff and students of dental institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayalaxmi, Nimma; Reddy, Lavanya; Swapna, Lingam Amara; Reddy, Sudhakara; Ramesh, T; Padmareddy, M

    2014-09-01

    India is one of the largest and most populated country in the world, with over one billion inhabitants. Of this number, it is estimated that around 23.9 lakh people are currently suffering with HIV. People living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) require increasingly competent and compassionate health care, including oral health care. The present study was conducted with the objective of evaluating the response of dental health care professionals (staff and students) in willingness to provide treatment to HIV/AIDS patients and whether the training and education provided to them is sufficient to handle such patients, or whether there is necessity for advanced curriculum to be implemented. An anonymous survey with the permission from ethical committee of dental institution was conducted with the use self-administered questionnaire eliciting information on self-rated HIV/AIDS knowledge, attitudes, infection control practices, occupational risk perception and willingness to treat HIV/AIDS patients. An increase in level of knowledge was observed with the increase in year of study from first BDS to post graduation and MDS staff. It was observed that interns and post graduate students were willing to treat patients with HIV/AIDS. Staff of the institution showed greater concern to undergo training to provide efficient treatment to patients with HIV/AIDS. It was concluded that there was a positive attitude and willingness of staff and students to treat a patient suffering with HIV/AIDS. Also, there was willingness and interest of the staff and students of the dental institution to participate in training programmes to provide better and more efficient treatment to HIV/AIDS patients.

  7. Census of Ligurian Internal Medicine Wards of non-teaching hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Micaela La Regina

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available What is the future of internal medicine in Italy? Which competencies? Which potentialities? To this aim Ligurian FADOI Regional Society performed a census among 18 Internal Medicine Wards (IMWs in non-teaching Ligurian Hospital. We administered, by email, a questionnaire to the heads of IMWs. Data about staffing, equipment, skills, competencies and productivity during 2011 were collected from 1st to 31st November 2012. A total of 15/18 (83.3% chiefs answered to the questionnaire. The number of beds was largely variable among the wards. In 2011, mean diagnosis-related group (DRG-weight was 1.09 (range 0.91-1.6 and that revenues/costs ratio much higher than 1.5. Staff was quite adequate to standards defined by current law, only 33% has got a doctor:patients ratio superior to 1:6.4. However, annual hospitalizations exceed the availability of beds in medicine and the complexity of the patients would require a lower doctor:patients ratio, at least for a group of patients. In fact, 4 wards have a progressive care organization with a defined area for more seriously ill patients. Mean length of stay was 10 days. Expertise was wide, covering almost all medical sub-specialties. Acquired skills such as abdominal, heart and vascular ultrasounds, invasive procedures and their comprehensive knowledge make internists complete and cost-effective specialists. IMWs, as a concentrate of medical knowledge and skills, are the natural destination of current patients with co-morbidities. Staffing and number of beds should be revised according to this new demand. Their revenues/costs ratio resulted favorable and their global approach to patients and not to disease can be useful for resource rationalization. Wider and further studies are needed to improve the awareness of stakeholders about Internal Medicine.

  8. The Aggression Observation Short Form Identified Episodes Not Reported on the Staff Observation Aggression Scale-Revised

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvidhjelm, Jacob; Sestoft, Dorte; Bjørner, Jakob Bue

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the underreporting of violence and aggression on the Staff Observation Aggression Scale-Revised (SOAS-R) when compared to a simpler assessment: the Aggression Observation Short Form (AOS). During a period of one year, two open and two closed wards gathered...... for open wards and for patients with short admission lengths. Standard instruments such as the SOAS-R underreport aggressive episodes by 45% or more. Underreporting can be reduced by introducing shorter instruments, but it cannot be completely eliminated....

  9. 探讨病房护士与患者的沟通方法%On patients with ward nurses and communication methods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐巍巍

    2015-01-01

    随着医疗的进步与转变,人们对自我的保健意识普遍提高,所以,人们对医疗的服务质量要求也大幅度增高。护士处在临床的第一线,因为与病人接触的较为密切,其服务的质量好坏通畅关系着患者的满意程度与临床效果。为了给病人提供优质的护理,护理人员要有丰富的护理知识,能够具有独到的沟通技巧是为关键。%with the progress of medical and shift,rise to self health care consciousness of common people,so the people of medical service quality also increased significantly.The first line of the nurse in clinical because of relatively close contact with patients,its service quality stand or fall of unobstructed rela-tionship with patient satisfaction and clinical effect.In order to provide quality care to patients,nursing staff should have knowledge of nursing,has its unique communication skills is to for the key.

  10. The Impact of Cannabis Use on the Dosage of Antipsychotic Drugs in Patients Admitted on the Psychiatric Ward at the University Hospital of the West Indies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Thomas

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the impact of cannabis use on the efficacy of antipsychotic drugs in male subjects presenting to the University Hospital of the West Indies (UHWI with psychotic episodes. Methods: Male subjects, 18–40 years old, admitted to the psychiatric ward of the UHWI between February 2013 and May 2013, diagnosed with schizophrenia, schizophreniform disorder and who tested positive for ∆9-tetrahydrocannabinol were recruited for the study. On day one, consenting subjects were assessed using the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS. Patients were prescribed seven days of an oral antipsychotic medication (haloperidol, chlorpromazine, risperidone, quetiapine, olanzapine. Medicated subjects were then reassessed using the BPRS on days three and seven. Statistical analysis involved the use of Student’s t-test and repeated measure analysis of variance. Results: In total, 20 subjects were recruited (mean age = 26.00 ± 5.96 years. Subjects were grouped based on the daily chlorpromazine equivalent (CPZE dose given on day one into CPZE1 (CPZE dose of 100–300mg; n = 8 and CPZE2 (CPZE dose of 400–1250 mg; n = 12. There was no significant difference in the total BPRS score between the groups on day one (CPZE1 = 41.38 ± 16.47 versus CPZE2 = 49.42 ± 25.58; p = 0.44; similar findings were obtained for the positive (26.75 ± 9.27 versus 31.83 ± 17.30; p = 0.46 and negative (14.63 ± 7.73 versus 17.58 ± 9.74; p = 0.48 symptom component on the BPRS. For subjects in CPZE1, there was no significant decrease in total BPRS score [F(2,21 = 0.07, p = 0.93] over the study period. For CPZE2, significant reduction in total BPRS scores was achieved [F(2,33 =7.12, p = 0.01], contributed by significant decrease in the positive [F(2,33 = 5.64, p = 0.02 and negative [F(2,33 = 7.53, p = 0.01 symptom components of the BPRS. Conclusion: The findings of this study purport that male cannabis users presenting with psychotic disorders may not achieve optimal

  11. A novel system for providing compatible blood to patients during surgery: "self-service" electronic blood banking by nursing staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, G; Chiu, D S; Chung, A S; Wong, H F; Chan, M W; Lui, Y K; Choy, F M; Chan, J C; Chan, A H; Lam, S T; Fan, T C

    1996-04-01

    A good blood bank must be able to provide compatible blood units promptly to operating room patients with minimal wastage. A "self-service" by nursing staff blood banking system that is safe, efficient, and well-accepted has been developed. Specific blood units are no longer assigned to surgical patients who have a negative pretransfusion antibody screen, irrespective of the type of surgery. A computer-generated list of the serial numbers of all group-identical blood units currently in the blood bank inventory is provided for each patient. The units themselves are not labeled with a patient's name. The group O list will be provided for group O patients, the group A list for group A patients, and so forth. Should the patient require transfusion during surgery, the operating room nurses go to the refrigerator, remove any group-identical unit, and check the serial number of the unit against the serial numbers on the patient's list. If the serial number is on that list, the blood bank will accept responsibility for compatibility. The system was implemented in 1995. Since implementation, a total of 2154 patients have undergone operations at this hospital. Thirty-two patients received more than 10 units of red cells each. There were no transfusion errors. The crossmatch-to-transfusion ratio was reduced from 1.67 to 1.12. Turnaround time for supplying additional or urgent units to patients in operating room was shortened from 33 to 2.5 minutes. There was no incidence of a blood unit's serial number not being on the list. Work by nurses and technical staff was reduced by nearly 50 percent. The "self-service" (by nursing staff) blood banking system described is safe and efficient. It saves staff time and can be easily set up.

  12. Bacteria contamination of touch surfaces in Polish hospital wards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Różańska

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: The objective of the study has been to evaluate the pathogenic bacteria contamination of touch surfaces in hospital wards. Material and Methods: Samples were taken from frequently touched surfaces in the hospital environment in 13 units of various types. Culturing was carried out on solid blood agar and in growth broth (tryptic soy broth – TSB. Species identification was performed using the analytical profile index (API biochemical testing and confirmed with matrix assisted laser desorption ionization time-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS system. Results: The total of 161 samples were taken for the study. Fifty-two of them, after 24 h of culture on a solid medium, demonstrated bacterial growth and further 60 samples had growth after prior multiplication in TSB. Overall, 69.6% of samples exhibited growth of 19 bacterial species. Pathogenic species – representing indicator organisms of efficiency of hospital cleaning – was demonstrated by 21.4% of samples. Among them Acinetobacter spp., Enterocococci spp. and Staphylococcus aureus were identified. Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS were predominant. The proportion of various groups of bacteria significantly varied in respective hospitals, and in various types of wards. Disturbing observation is a large proportion of resistance of isolated CNS strains as a potential reservoir of resistance genes. Conclusions: The results show that touch surfaces in hospital units are contaminated by both potentially pathogenic and pathogenic bacterial species. In connection with the reported, also in Poland, frequent omission or incorrect execution of hand hygiene by hospital staff, and probably patients, touch surfaces still constitute important reservoir of pathogenic bacteria. Improving hand hygiene compliance of health-care workers with recommendations is necessary for increasing biological safety of hospital environment. Med Pr 2017;68(3:459–467

  13. Total dose incurred by patients and staff from BMD measurement using a new 2D digital bone densitometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudousq, V; Kotzki, P O; Dinten, J M; Barrau, C; Robert-Coutant, C; Thomas, E; Goulart, D Mariano

    2003-05-01

    Dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) is a widely used and precise technique for non-invasive assessment of bone mineral density. The DXA systems have evolved from pencil X-ray beam (single detector) to fan beam (linear array detector) and recently cone beam densitometers (bi-dimensional detector), allowing for an examination to occur without any scanning and with a short acquisition time. The purpose of this study was to evaluate patient and staff dose from a new cone beam densitometer, the DMS Lexxos. Measurements were performed on a DMS Lexxos bone densitometer prototype. An anthropomorphic phantom and thermoluminescent dosimeters were used to evaluate the effective dose. Ionization chambers and electronic personal dosimeters were used to evaluate the staff dose. The effective dose is 8.4 micro Sv for an anteroposterior spine examination and 4.8 micro Sv for a femoral neck in standard mode. The averaged scattered dose rate (ambient dose equivalent) at 1 m from the beam is evaluated at 226 micro Sv/h. Assuming six patients per hour with two views per patient, the time averaged dose rate is evaluated at 2.9 micro Sv/h. By the personal dosimeter, the staff dose (Hp 10) at 1 m from the beam is evaluated at 0.23 micro Sv per examination. For one examination, patient and staff dose from this new technology remains low: in the same range as the fan-beam densitometer.

  14. TU-E-201-00: Eye Lens Dosimetry for Patients and Staff

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2015-06-15

    Madan M. Rehani, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston Methods for Eye Lens Dosimetry and Studies On Lens Opacities with Interventionalists Radiation induced cataract is a major threat among staff working in interventional suites. Nearly 16 million interventional procedures are performed annually in USA. Recent studies by the principal investigator’s group, primarily among interventional cardiologists, on behalf of the International Atomic Energy Agency, show posterior subcapsular (PSC) changes in the eye lens in 38–53% of main operators and 21–45% of support staff. These changes have potential to lead to cataract in future years, as per information from A-Bomb survivors. The International Commission on Radiological Protection has reduced dose limit for staff by a factor of 7.5 (from 150 mSv/y to 20 mSv/y). With increasing emphasis on radiation induced cataracts and reduction in threshold dose for eye lens, there is a need to implement strategies for estimating eye lens dose. Unfortunately eye lens dosimetry is at infancy when it comes to routine application. Various approaches are being tried namely direct measurement using active or passive dosimeters kept close to eyes, retrospective estimations and lastly correlating patient dose in interventional procedures with staff eye dose. The talk will review all approaches available and ongoing active research in this area, as well as data from surveys done in Europe on status of eye dose monitoring in interventional radiology and nuclear medicine. The talk will provide update on how good is Hp(10) against Hp(3), estimations from CTDI values, Monte Carlo based simulations and current status of eye lens dosimetry in USA and Europe. The cataract risk among patients is in CT examinations of the head. Since radiation induced cataract predominantly occurs in posterior sub-capsular (PSC) region and is thus distinguishable from age or drug related cataracts and is also preventable, actions on

  15. Substance Abuse, Relapse, and Treatment Program Evaluation in Malaysia: Perspective of Rehab Patients and Staff Using the Mixed Method Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chie, Qiu Ting; Tam, Cai Lian; Bonn, Gregory; Dang, Hoang Minh; Khairuddin, Rozainee

    2016-01-01

    This study examined reasons for substance abuse and evaluated the effectiveness of substance treatment programs in Malaysia through interviews with rehab patients and staff. Substance rehab patients (aged 18-69 years; n = 30) and staff (ages 30-72 years; n = 10) participated in semi-structured interviews covering a range of topics, including family and peer relationships, substance use and treatment history, factors for substance use and relapse, motivation for entering treatment, work experience, job satisfaction, treatment evaluation, and patient satisfaction. Most patients did not demonstrate the substance progression trend and had normal family relationships. Most patients reported having peers from normal family backgrounds as well. Various environmental and personal factors was cited as contributing to substance abuse and relapse. There was no significant difference between patient and staff program evaluation scores although the mean score for patients was lower. A holistic treatment approach with a combination of cognitive-behavioral, medical, social, and spiritual components was favored by patients. Suggestions for improving existing programs include better tailoring treatment to individual needs, and providing more post-treatment group support.

  16. Substance Abuse, Relapse, and Treatment Program Evaluation in Malaysia: Perspective of Rehab Patients and Staff Using the Mixed Method Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chie, Qiu Ting; Tam, Cai Lian; Bonn, Gregory; Dang, Hoang Minh; Khairuddin, Rozainee

    2016-01-01

    This study examined reasons for substance abuse and evaluated the effectiveness of substance treatment programs in Malaysia through interviews with rehab patients and staff. Substance rehab patients (aged 18–69 years; n = 30) and staff (ages 30–72 years; n = 10) participated in semi-structured interviews covering a range of topics, including family and peer relationships, substance use and treatment history, factors for substance use and relapse, motivation for entering treatment, work experience, job satisfaction, treatment evaluation, and patient satisfaction. Most patients did not demonstrate the substance progression trend and had normal family relationships. Most patients reported having peers from normal family backgrounds as well. Various environmental and personal factors was cited as contributing to substance abuse and relapse. There was no significant difference between patient and staff program evaluation scores although the mean score for patients was lower. A holistic treatment approach with a combination of cognitive–behavioral, medical, social, and spiritual components was favored by patients. Suggestions for improving existing programs include better tailoring treatment to individual needs, and providing more post-treatment group support. PMID:27303313

  17. Occurrence of hypoxia in the wards of a teaching hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virendra Singh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective : Appearance of hypoxia in a patient may be an indicator of a serious medical condition that can have grave consequences. Clinical evaluation fails to detect majority of the patients of hypoxia, and therefore, it may remain unnoticed in the wards. We planned to assess the magnitude of hypoxia in different wards of our tertiary care hospital. Materials and Methods: We studied all the patients admitted in various medical and surgical wards during 1 week of study. Oxygen saturation (SpO 2 was measured with the help of a pulse oximeter in all the patients who remained admitted for at least 24 h. Hypoxia was diagnosed in a patient when he had SpO 2 less than 90%. Results: During the study period, 1167 patients were admitted in various wards of the hospital. Hypoxia was detected in 121 patients (10.36%. Among them, 7 (0.59% patients were already having a diagnosis of respiratory failure, but were not on oxygen therapy while 5 (0.42% patients were having SpO 2 less than 90% despite of oxygen therapy. In 109 (9.34% patients, hypoxia was detected incidentally. Conclusion: Unnoticed hypoxia was detected in a significant number of the patients admitted in the wards of the hospital. Therefore, it is concluded that oxygen saturation measurements should be included with other vital parameters like pulse, temperature, and blood pressure, in the monitoring chart of all the admitted patients.

  18. 规范化护理查房在护理质量管理中的作用%Effect of standardized nursing ward round in the nursing quality management

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴建芳

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To explore the effect of standardized nursing ward round in the nursing quality management.Methods:20 patients were given standardized nursing ward round.Results:After nursing ward round,19 cases(95% ) patients grasped the disease knowledge.19 patients were satisfied,the satisfaction was 95% .After the implementation of standardized nursing ward round,the emergency ability,doctor-patient communication ability,professional skill master degree,team cooperation ability and nursing documents writing standards degree of nursing staff were significantly higher than those before standardized nursing ward round(P<0.05).Conclusion:The implementation of standardized nursing ward round obviously improves the disease cognition and satisfaction of patients,and improves the comprehensive quality of nursing staff.%目的:探讨规范化护理查房在护理质量管理中的作用。方法:20例患者给予规范化护理查房。结果:经过护理查房,掌握疾病知识19例(95.0%),满意19例,满意度95.0%。实施规范化护理查房后,护理人员应急能力、医患沟通能力、专业技术熟练掌握程度、团队合作能力和护理文书书写规范程度明显高于规范化护理查房前(P<0.05)。结论:实施规范化护理查房明显提高了患者对疾病的认知程度和满意度,提高了护理人员的综合素质。

  19. Patient Safety Culture Status From The Perspective Medical Staff Of Yasuj Hospitals In 2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Rezaean

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & aim: One of the most important problems in the health sector, particularly in clinical centers, is the quality of healthcare. Patient safety is one of the most important elements in creating health care quality due to the fact that it is a critical component to the quality of health care and many errors are present in patient care and treatment practices..                                                               Thus, the aim of the present study was to determine the status of the patient safety culture and its relationship with events reported in Yasuj hospitals. Methods: The present descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted on 361 medical staff of Yasuj hospitals. The data were collected through a hospital survey on patient safety culture. The collected data were analyzed by using SPSS statistics soft ware version 21, using Descriptive methods, Pearson Coefficient, ANOVA, and T-Test. Results: The results of the present study revealed that the teamwork among hospital units (71/89percent, with expectations and management measures (66/38% in the case of safety obtained the most score and non-punitive response to errors (48/79% and manager support (55/88 percent obtained the least score. 73/7% of employees of three hospitals in the past 12 months did not report any event. In addition, there was a meaningful statistical relationship between the total score of safety culture and reporting the events. In this study, 15.5 % of respondents assess their safety culture in work as good, 44.3 % as acceptable and 30.5 percent reported poor. The overall safety culture among the three studied hospitals was 61.81 %. Results confirmed that the culture safety of patient in studied hospitals was average. Conclusions: The hospitals may rely on their strong points in terms of patient safety culture and try to remove their weak points to form a safe environment and appropriate

  20. [Nursing Education Utilizing Experiences in a Virtual Hospital Ward].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, Keiko; Matsumoto, Maki; Takai, Kiyako; Kodama, Hiromi; Hagiwara, Tomoko; Iwata, Naomi

    2015-06-01

    Environmental design should be required at medical facilities for conducting medical practice safely and for making hospitalization comfortable. Many medical nursing students cannot imagine medical facilities, especially hospital wards, when they study medical environments in a basic nursing lecture. As a result, they cannot connect well with patient assistance. We employed a computer assisted designing software, "3D My Home Designer" (Mega Soft Company) that runs on Windows 8, and considered the usefulness of it for lectures on environmental design showing how to design a hospital ward for patients' optimal hospital stay. We drew a medical facility in 2-D first, transformed it into 3D images, and then created movies of a virtual hospital ward in which a patient walked around. These movies consisted of 3 kinds: a) hospital room with changeable wall color, b) different allocations of hospital room and nurse station, and c) a blurred ward which corresponded to how a patient with poor eyesight (cataract) would see a ward. We prepared as controls: a') still images of a hospital room, b') still images of ward, and c') a documentation on how a ward is seen by a patient with a cataract. We gave a questionnaire to students and nurses about these movies and still images (controls). In a) and b), there were no differences between the movies and still images in both students and nurses. In c), both students and nurses had a viewpoint from the patient with poor eyesight. From these results, we consider that the students, who have fewer experiences in a hospital, may understand the environments well by movies and the application of a virtual movie ward to nursing education may be useful in a lecture, depending on the readiness of the students.

  1. Gentle persuasive approaches: introducing an educational program on an orthopaedic unit for staff caring for patients with dementia and delirium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzacalla, Anne; Montemuro, Maureen; Coker, Esther; Martin, Lori Schindel; Gillies, Leslie; Robinson, Karen; Pepper, Heather; Benner, Jeff; Gusciora, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    Gentle Persuasive Approaches in Dementia Care (GPA), a curriculum originally designed for long-term care, was introduced into an acute care setting. This person-centered approach to supporting and responding to persons with behaviors associated with dementia was shown to be applicable for staff on an orthopaedic surgery unit where they had reported significant challenges and care burdens when faced with behaviors such as shouting, explosiveness, and resistance to care. Staff confidence in their ability to care for persons with behaviors increased after attending the 1-day GPA workshop, and they reported being highly satisfied with the curriculum, found it to be applicable to their practice, indicated that it was also useful for patients with delirium, and would recommend it to others. Some of the staff on the orthopaedic unit became certified GPA coaches. The passion of those champions, along with demonstrated success of the program on their unit, contributed to its spread to other units, including rehabilitation and acute medicine.

  2. Ward identity in noncommutative QED

    OpenAIRE

    Mariz, T.; Pires, C. A. de S.; R F Ribeiro

    2002-01-01

    Although noncommutative QED presents a nonabelian structure, it does not present structure constants. In view of this we investigate how Ward identity is satisfied in pair annihilation process and $\\gamma \\gamma \\to \\gamma \\gamma$ scattering in noncommutative QED.

  3. Patient and staff perspective of a nurse-led support programme for patients waiting for cardiac surgery: participant perspective of a cardiac support programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Helen; Davison, June; Preedy, Michael; Peters, Emma; Waters, Phillip; Persaud-Rai, Bibi; Shuldham, Caroline; Pepper, John; Cowie, Martin R

    2009-03-01

    A nurse-led support and education programme for patients waiting for coronary artery bypass surgery was evaluated in a randomised controlled trial of 188 patients at a tertiary centre in the UK. To add a qualitative perspective to the evaluation by exploring patients' experience while taking part in the trial and staff views of the patients' experience and the intervention. A purposive sample of 19 patients was interviewed and the transcriptions read to staff during focus groups. They discussed what they learned from the stories and their own experience of the programme. The patients appreciated support from the nurses but felt communication and physical assessment could be improved. The patients varied in their understanding of the programme and their degree of motivation to improve their health. The staff varied in their approach to preparing patients for surgery. External factors influencing the intervention's impact were length of time on the waiting list and the increasing contribution of local rehabilitation services. Staff need to improve communication both between themselves and with the patients. Patients appreciate physical and psychological preparation for surgery, but the waiting period is not the optimal time to address their risk factors for coronary disease.

  4. Pharmaceutical interventions by collaboration between staff pharmacists and clinical pharmacists and implementation of Joint Commission International Accreditation Standards on medication use may optimize pharmacotherapy in geriatric patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen M

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Meng Chen, Quan Zhou Department of Pharmacy, The Second Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang Province, People’s Republic of ChinaWe read with great interest the prospective study by Cortejoso et al,1 which describes the characteristics of pharmaceutical interventions in two geriatric wards (orthogeriatric ward and geriatric day unit of a general teaching hospital. We strongly agree with their finding that shows the importance of clinical pharmacist involvement in the optimization of pharmacotherapy in elderly patients. Furthermore, we especially appreciate their new and interesting findings that the clinical pharmacist was more frequently requested by physicians and nurses for information about the pharmacotherapy of the patients on the geriatric day unit, compared with the orthogeriatric ward at admission and discharge (5.7% vs 1.2% and 1.7%, respectively, P<0.05, and that the pharmacist asked for more confirmation of the physician orders on the geriatric day unit rather than the orthogeriatric ward (19.8% vs 1.8% and 15.7% at admission and discharge, respectively, P<0.05. We are from a Joint Commission International (JCI-accredited academic medical center hospital with 3200 beds in China. Safe medication management and use are pivotal to patient safety and quality of care on which the state-of-the-art standards of the Joint Commission focus. We would like to share our perspectives in the following paragraphs.View original paper by Cortejoso and colleagues. 

  5. Psychosocial Work Environment, Stress Factors and Individual Characteristics among Nursing Staff in Psychiatric In-Patient Care

    OpenAIRE

    Tuvesson Hanna; Eklund Mona

    2014-01-01

    The psychosocial work environment is an important factor in psychiatric in-patient care, and knowing more of its correlates might open up new paths for future workplace interventions. Thus, the aims of the present study were to investigate perceptions of the psychosocial work environment among nursing staff in psychiatric in-patient care and how individual characteristics—Mastery, Moral Sensitivity, Perceived Stress, and Stress of Conscience—are related to different aspects of the psychosoc...

  6. Patient Safety Culture Based on Medical Staff Attitudes in Khorasan Razavi Hospitals, Northeastern Iran.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rozita Davoodi

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Since establishing a safety culture in an organization is considered as the first step in patient safety improvement, there is always a need for updated field evaluation to better plan future decisions.We performed a cross-sectional, analytic-descriptive study in 25 hospitals related to Mashhad University of Medical Sciences (MUMS during a 3-month period from April to June 2012. A questionnaire, designed by previous patient safety culture studies with confirmed validity and reliability, was used and distributed among a sample of 922 staff, chosen randomly from the mentioned hospitals. Data were analyzed by SPSS software version 16."Organizational learning - continuous improvement" and "teamwork within unit" had the highest percentage of positive results as 79.85 ± 12.03% and 71.92 ± 17.08%, respectively; whereas "non-punitive response" to errors (21.57 ± 6.42 and "staffing" (26.36 ± 16.84 came out as the least important factors. There were no meaningful statistical relation between general features of the understudy hospitals including the number of beds, educational level or proficiency status with the general safety culture score.Most of the safety culture aspects were reported as low to moderate in terms of importance. If something needs to be modified interventionally in this respect, "the approach to confront errors" would be a wise choice. This could be achieved by establishing an atmosphere of open communication and continuous learning through elimination of the fear for reporting errors and installing a more acceptable approach in hospitals.

  7. Patient Safety Culture Based on Medical Staff Attitudes in Khorasan Razavi Hospitals, Northeastern Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davoodi, Rozita; Mohammadzadeh Shabestari, Mahmoud; Takbiri, Afsaneh; Soltanifar, Azadeh; Sabouri, Golnaz; Rahmani, Shaghayegh; Moghiman, Toktam

    2013-11-01

    Since establishing a safety culture in an organization is considered as the first step in patient safety improvement, there is always a need for updated field evaluation to better plan future decisions. We performed a cross-sectional, analytic-descriptive study in 25 hospitals related to Mashhad University of Medical Sciences (MUMS) during a 3-month period from April to June 2012. A questionnaire, designed by previous patient safety culture studies with confirmed validity and reliability, was used and distributed among a sample of 922 staff, chosen randomly from the mentioned hospitals. Data were analyzed by SPSS software version 16. "Organizational learning - continuous improvement" and "teamwork within unit" had the highest percentage of positive results as 79.85 ± 12.03% and 71.92 ± 17.08%, respectively; whereas "non-punitive response" to errors (21.57 ± 6.42) and "staffing" (26.36 ± 16.84) came out as the least important factors. There were no meaningful statistical relation between general features of the understudy hospitals including the number of beds, educational level or proficiency status with the general safety culture score. Most of the safety culture aspects were reported as low to moderate in terms of importance. If something needs to be modified interventionally in this respect, "the approach to confront errors" would be a wise choice. This could be achieved by establishing an atmosphere of open communication and continuous learning through elimination of the fear for reporting errors and installing a more acceptable approach in hospitals.

  8. Impact of the introduction of electronic prescribing on staff perceptions of patient safety and organizational culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, James; Pucher, Philip H; Ibrahim, Heba; Stubbs, Ben

    2017-05-15

    Electronic prescribing (EP) systems are online technology platforms by which medicines can be prescribed, administered, and stock controlled. The actual impact of EP on patient safety is not truly understood. This study seeks to assess the impact of the implementation of an EP system on safety culture, as well as assessing differences between clinical respondent groups and considering their implications. Staff completed a modified Safety Attitudes Questionnaire survey, 6 weeks following the introduction of EP across surgical services in a hospital in Dorset, England. Responses were assessed and differences between respondent groups compared. Rates of self-reported adverse events were compared before and after implementation. Overall response rate was 34.5%. There was no significant difference between usage patterns and previous experience with EP between user groups. Overall safety was felt to have been reduced by the introduction of EP. Significant differences between clinician and nonclinicians were seen in ability to discuss errors (3.23 ± 0.5 versus 2.8 ± 0.69, P = 0.004), drug chart access, and ease of medication prescribing. Regression analysis did not identify any confounding factors. Despite a significant reduction in the adverse event rate in other divisions of the hospital that did not implement EP at the same time, this same reduction was not seen in the surgical department. This is the first study to assess the impact of EP on safety culture using a validated assessment tool (Safety Attitudes Questionnaire). Overall safety culture deteriorated following introduction of EP. Problems with system usability/intuitiveness, nonstandardized implementation, and competence assessment strategies may have all contributed to this result. Centers seeking to implement EP in future must consider these factors to ensure a positive impact on patient safety and outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Staff perceptions on patient motives for attending GP-led urgent care centres in London: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenfield, Geva; Ignatowicz, Agnieszka; Gnani, Shamini; Bucktowonsing, Medhavi; Ladbrooke, Tim; Millington, Hugh; Car, Josip; Majeed, Azeem

    2016-01-14

    General practitioner (GP)-led urgent care centres were established to meet the growing demand for urgent care. Staff members working in such centres are central in influencing patients' choices about which services they use, but little is known about staff perceptions of patients' motives for attending urgent care. We hence aimed to explore their perceptions of patients' motives for attending such centres. A phenomenological, qualitative study, including semistructured interviews. The interviews were analysed using thematic content analysis. 2 GP-led urgent care centres in 2 academic hospitals in London. 15 staff members working at the centres including 8 GPs, 5 emergency nurse practitioners and 2 receptionists. We identified 4 main themes: 'Confusion about choices', 'As if increase of appetite had grown; By what it fed on', 'Overt reasons, covert motives' and 'A question of legitimacy'. The participants thought that the centres introduce convenient and fast access for patients. So convenient, that an increasing number of patients use them as a regular alternative to their community GP. The participants perceived that patients attend the centres because they are anxious about their symptoms and view them as serious, cannot get an appointment with their GP quickly and conveniently, are dissatisfied with the GP, or lack self-care skills. Staff members perceived some motives as legitimate (an acute health need and difficulties in getting an appointment), and others as less legitimate (convenience, minor illness, and seeking quicker access to hospital facilities). The participants perceived that patients attend urgent care centres because of the convenience of access relative to primary care, as well as sense of acuity and anxiety, lack self-care skills and other reasons. They perceived some motives as more legitimate than others. Attention to unmet needs in primary care can help in promoting balanced access to urgent care. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited

  10. Implementing lean in a surgical ward

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edwards, Kasper; Nielsen, Anders Paarup; Jacobsen, Peter

    Using the well-known principles from lean management in an orthopedic surgical ward at a major Danish hospital reorganized their work-flow and processes. The ward has ten operating rooms and performs the complete range of the orthopedic procedures ranging from patients that need simple standard...... for productivity improvement. Lean management has its origins in industrial production, but it is now being transferred to many other sectors, e.g., health care. Two important prerequisites exist for implementing lean management: Firstly, stable and standardized processes and secondly leveling of production...... be planned in advance and meet the prerequisites for lean management. Two of ten operating rooms have been allocated to this flow. Selected surgeons, nurses and porters have been allocated to the two operating rooms and they remain in the sterile environment for the duration of the workday. The effect...

  11. Attitudes of Malaysian general hospital staff towards patients with mental illness and diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Minas, H.; Zamzam, R; Midin, M; Cohen, A

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background The context of the study is the increased assessment and treatment of persons with mental illness in general hospital settings by general health staff, as the move away from mental hospitals gathers pace in low and middle income countries. The purpose of the study was to examine whether general attitudes of hospital staff towards persons with mental illness, and extent of mental health training and clinical experience, are associated with different attitudes and behaviours...

  12. Musculoskeletal injuries among hospital patient care staff before and after implementation of patient lift and transfer equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenfisch, Ashley L; Lipscomb, Hester J; Pompeii, Lisa A; Myers, Douglas J; Dement, John M

    2013-01-01

    Using an observational research design and robust surveillance data, we evaluated rates of musculoskeletal (MS) injuries, days away from work, and restricted work days among patient care staff at a medical center and community hospital in the United States over 13 years, during which time a "minimal manual lift" policy and mechanical lift equipment were implemented. Workers' compensation claims data were linked to human resources data to define outcomes of interest and person-time at risk to calculate rates. Poisson and negative binomial regression with lagging were used to compare outcome rates in different windows of time surrounding the intervention. Patterns of MS injuries associated with patient-handling were contrasted to patterns of other MS injuries that would not be affected by the use of mechanical lift equipment. At the medical center, no change in the patient-handling MS injury rate followed the intervention. A 44% decrease was observed at the community hospital. At both hospitals, the rate of days away declined immediately - before it was reasonable for the intervention to have been adopted. Institutional-level changes at the time of the intervention likely influenced observed results with findings only partially consistent with an intervention effect. Observational studies can be useful in assessing effectiveness of safety interventions in complex work environments. Such studies should consider the process of intervention implementation, the time needed for intervention adoption, and the dynamic nature of work environments.

  13. Study of the effect of humanistic nursing care model wards in Children Caring Ward School on the nurses' caring ability

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiao He; De-Ying Hu; Yi-Lan Liu; Li-Fen Wu; Lian Liu

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To understand the effect of humanistic nursing care model wards in Children Caring Ward School (CCWS) on the nurses' caring ability. Methods: Questionnaire 25 nurses of humanistic nursing care model wards in CCWS using the Nkongho Caring Ability Inventory (CAI) before and after implement the humanistic nursing care model, including reform the systems of nursing care, introduce humanistic care model, implement the humanistic care, to measure the nurses' caring ability. Results: The nurses' caring ability had significantly developed on total, cognition dimension, courage dimension and patience dimension after all measures considered (p Conclusions: The humanistic nursing care model wards in CCWS has a positive effect on the nurses' caring ability, not only to help build great relationships between nurses and patients but also to enhance the patients' satisfaction.

  14. Developing skills in clinical leadership for ward sisters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenton, Katherine; Phillips, Natasha

    The Francis report has called for a strengthening of the ward sister's role. It recommends that sisters should operate in a supervisory capacity and should not be office bound. Effective ward leadership has been recognised as being vital to high-quality patient care and experience, resource management and interprofessional working. However, there is evidence that ward sisters are ill equipped to lead effectively and lack confidence in their ability to do so. University College London Hospitals Foundation Trust has recognised that the job has become almost impossible in increasingly large and complex organisations. Ward sisters spend less than 40% of their time on clinical leadership and the trust is undertaking a number of initiatives to support them in this role.

  15. Patients' silence towards the healthcare system after ethical transgressions by staff: associations with patient characteristics in a cross-sectional study among Swedish female patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brüggemann, A Jelmer; Swahnberg, Katarina

    2012-01-01

    To identify which patient characteristics are associated with silence towards the healthcare system after experiences of abusive or ethically wrongful transgressive behaviour by healthcare staff. Cross-sectional questionnaire study using the Transgressions of Ethical Principles in Health Care Questionnaire. A women's clinic in the south of Sweden. Selection criteria were: consecutive female patients coming for an outpatient appointment, ≥18-year-old, with the ability to speak and understand the Swedish language, and a known address. Questionnaires were answered by 534 women (60%) who had visited the clinic, of which 293 were included in the present study sample. How many times the respondent remained silent towards the healthcare system relative to the number of times the respondent spoke up. Associations were found between patients' silence towards the healthcare system and young age as well as lower self-rated knowledge of patient rights. Both variables showed independent effects on patients' silence in a multivariate model. No associations were found with social status, country of birth, health or other abuse. The results offer opportunities for designing interventions to stimulate patients to speak up and open up the clinical climate, for which the responsibility lies in the hands of staff; but more research is needed.

  16. Radiation-induced noncancer risks in interventional cardiology: optimisation of procedures and staff and patient dose reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhonghua; AbAziz, Aini; Yusof, Ahmad Khairuddin Md

    2013-01-01

    Concerns about ionizing radiation during interventional cardiology have been increased in recent years as a result of rapid growth in interventional procedure volumes and the high radiation doses associated with some procedures. Noncancer radiation risks to cardiologists and medical staff in terms of radiation-induced cataracts and skin injuries for patients appear clear potential consequences of interventional cardiology procedures, while radiation-induced potential risk of developing cardiovascular effects remains less clear. This paper provides an overview of the evidence-based reviews of concerns about noncancer risks of radiation exposure in interventional cardiology. Strategies commonly undertaken to reduce radiation doses to both medical staff and patients during interventional cardiology procedures are discussed; optimisation of interventional cardiology procedures is highlighted.

  17. Radiation-Induced Noncancer Risks in Interventional Cardiology: Optimisation of Procedures and Staff and Patient Dose Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khairuddin Md Yusof, Ahmad

    2013-01-01

    Concerns about ionizing radiation during interventional cardiology have been increased in recent years as a result of rapid growth in interventional procedure volumes and the high radiation doses associated with some procedures. Noncancer radiation risks to cardiologists and medical staff in terms of radiation-induced cataracts and skin injuries for patients appear clear potential consequences of interventional cardiology procedures, while radiation-induced potential risk of developing cardiovascular effects remains less clear. This paper provides an overview of the evidence-based reviews of concerns about noncancer risks of radiation exposure in interventional cardiology. Strategies commonly undertaken to reduce radiation doses to both medical staff and patients during interventional cardiology procedures are discussed; optimisation of interventional cardiology procedures is highlighted. PMID:24027768

  18. Fostering interprofessional communication through case discussions and simulated ward rounds in nursing and medical education: A pilot project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wershofen, Birgit

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Poor communication between physicians and nursing staff could result in inadequate interprofessional collaboration with negative effects on patient health. In order to ensure optimal health care for patients, it is important to strengthen interprofessional communication and collaboration between physicians and nurses during their education. Aim: The aim of this project is to foster communication for medical and nursing students through interprofessional case discussions and simulated ward rounds as a form of training.Method: In 2013-15 a total of 39 nursing students and 22 medical students participated in eight seminars, each covering case discussions and simulated ward rounds. The seminar was evaluated based on student assessment of the educational objectives.Results: Students who voluntarily signed up for the seminar profited from the interprofessional interaction and gathered positive experiences working in a team.Conclusion: Through practicing case discussions and ward rounds as a group, interprofessional communication could be fostered between medical and nursing students. Students took advantage of the opportunity to ask those from other profession questions and realized that interprofessional interaction can lead to improved health care.

  19. Implementation of supported conversation for communication between nursing staff and in-hospital patients with aphasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lise Randrup; Løvholt, Annelise P.; Sørensen, Inger

    2015-01-01

    access has prompted speech-language therapists to direct intervention at contextual factors, including communication partner training (Simmons-Mackie, Raymer, Armstrong, Holland, & Cherney, 2010). Aims: An implementation project is described in which supported conversation for adults with aphasia (SCA......-methods design (Clarke, 2009) was used to measure changes pre- and post-training for nursing staff, including assessment of quantitative and qualitative outcomes. All nurses and nursing assistants received a questionnaire before and after their participation in an SCA workshop, and seven members from the nursing...... staff also participated in individual semi-structured interviews about their experiences with using the SCA method. Outcomes and Results: Questionnaires from 31 nursing staff members showed that they rated their understanding of aphasia higher after the workshop and they perceived communication...

  20. Prevalence of delirium in hospitalized internal medicine and surgical adult patients in Shohadaye ashayer hospital of Khoram abad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    raheleh Asaee

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Asaee R1, Nasari H2,Hoseini S3 1. Assistant professor, Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine, Lorestanl University of Medical Sciences, Khorramabad, Iran 1. Assistant professor, Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, Lorestanl University of Medical Sciences, Khorramabad, Iran 2. G.P, Khorramabad, Iran Abstract Background: Delirium is common in elderly persons and in hospitalized patients especially after surgical procedures. But many of them are undetected and don’t receive treatment so they involve with increased mortality and morbidity, adverse outcomes, length of hospital stay and mental disability sequels. Unfortunetly , despite the importance of this syndrom , physicians and staff are able to diagnose only one thirth of the patients. Material and methods: In this cross sectional study, 240 inpatiants (120 from surgery ward and 120 from miernal medicine ward from Shohadaye Ashayer hospital of Khorramabad were selected randomly. The diagnostic criteria for delirium were Mini-Mental state examination (MMSE questionnaire, and patients daily examination for 4 days by MMSE. Results: Delirium was observed in 37 (30.8% of the patients of internal medicine ward and 25 (20.8% of the patients of surgery ward. 27 (22.5% of the patients of internal medicine ward and 37 (30.8% of the patients of surgery ward were suspicious for delirium. In age group of 58-77 years in surgery ward and patients over 77 years in internal medicine ward had the most frequency of delirium. There was significant relationship (p=0.01 between two sex in surgery ward. But there was not significant difference (p=0.92 between two sex in internal medicine ward for delirium. Conclusion: Reading the results of this study and frequency of delirum in surgery and internal medicine wards, presence of a psychiatrist in mentioned wards is necessary of early diagnosis and control of delirium.

  1. Trends in pharmacy staff's perception of patient safety in Swedish community pharmacies after re-regulation of conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kälvemark Sporrong, Sofia; Nordén-Hägg, Annika

    2014-10-01

    All changes in the regulation of pharmacies have an impact on the work carried out in pharmacies and also on patient safety, regardless of whether this is the intention or not. To compare staff apprehension regarding some aspects of patient safety and quality in community pharmacies prior to and after the 2009 changes in regulation of the Swedish community pharmacy market. Questionnaires targeted at pharmacy staff before and after the changes in regulation (in 2008, 2011/12, and 2012/13 respectively) used four identical items, making comparisons of some aspects possible. All four items demonstrated a significant decrease in the first survey after the changes as compared to before. In the second survey significant differences were found on the two items representing safety climate whereas the items representing team climate and management showed no significant differences. The comparison carried out in this study indicates a negative effect in Swedish community pharmacies on safety and quality issues, as experienced by pharmacy staff. It is recommended that the possible effects of healthcare reforms are assessed before implementation, in order to counteract conceivable decline in factors including patient safety and working conditions.

  2. Confidentiality and the telephone in family practice: a qualitative study of the views of patients, clinicians and administrative staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinstry, Brian; Watson, Philip; Pinnock, Hilary; Heaney, David; Sheikh, Aziz

    2009-10-01

    Confidentiality is considered a cornerstone of the medical consultation. However, the telephone, previously used mainly to negotiate appointments, has become increasingly employed as a means of consultation and may pose new problems in respect to maintaining confidentiality. As part of a qualitative investigation into the views of patients, doctors, nurses and administrative staff on the use of telephone consulting in general practice, we set out to explore the impact of the use of this medium on perceptions of confidentiality. We used focus groups of purposively selected patients, clinicians and administrative staff in urban and rural areas. Fifteen focus groups comprising 91 individuals were convened. Participants concerns centred on overheard conversations, the receptionist role in triage, difficulty of maintaining confidentiality in small close-knit communities, errors in identification, third party conversations and answering machines. Telephone consulting, depending on the circumstances, could pose a risk or offer a solution to maintaining confidentiality. Many of the concerns that patients and health care staff have around confidentiality breaches both on the telephone and face to face are amenable to careful management. Although rare, identification error or fraud can be a potentially serious problem and further thought needs to be given to the problem of misidentification on the telephone and the use of passwords considered.

  3. A cloud-based home health care information sharing system to connect patients with home healthcare staff -A case report of a study in a mountainous region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomoto, Shinichi; Utsumi, Momoe; Sasayama, Satoshi; Dekigai, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    We have developed a cloud system, the e-Renraku Notebook (e-RN) for sharing of home care information based on the concept of "patient-centricity". In order to assess the likelihood that our system will enhance the communication and sharing of information between home healthcare staff members and home-care patients, we selected patients who were residing in mountainous regions for inclusion in our study. We herein report the findings.Eighteen staff members from 7 medical facilities and 9 patients participated in the present study.The e-RN was developed for two reasons: to allow patients to independently report their health status and to have staff members view and respond to the information received. The patients and staff members were given iPads with the pre-installed applications and the information being exchanged was reviewed over a 54-day period.Information was mainly input by the patients (61.6%), followed by the nurses who performed home visits (19.9%). The amount of information input by patients requiring high-level nursing care and their corresponding staff member was significantly greater than that input by patients who required low-level of nursing care.This patient-centric system in which patients can independently report and share information with a member of the healthcare staff provides a sense of security. It also allows staff members to understand the patient's health status before making a home visit, thereby giving them a sense of security and confidence. It was also noteworthy that elderly patients requiring high-level nursing care and their staff counterpart input information in the system significantly more frequently than patients who required low-level care.

  4. Does staff-patient agreement on needs for care predict a better mental health outcome? A 4-year follow-up in a community service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasalvia, A; Bonetto, C; Tansella, M; Stefani, B; Ruggeri, M

    2008-01-01

    Patients treated in primary care settings report better mental outcomes when they agree with practitioners about the nature of their core presenting problems. However, no study has examined the impact of staff-patient agreement on treatment outcomes in specialist mental health services. We investigated whether a better staff-patient agreement on needs for care predicts more favourable outcome in patients receiving community-based psychiatric care. A 3-month prevalence cohort of 188 patients with the full spectrum of psychiatric conditions was assessed at baseline and at 4 years using the Camberwell Assessment of Need (CAN), both staff (CAN-S) and patient versions (CAN-P), and a set of standardized outcome measures. Baseline staff-patient agreement on needs was included among predictors of outcome. Both clinician-rated (psychopathology, social disability, global functioning) and patient-rated (subjective quality of life and satisfaction with services) outcomes were considered. Controlling for the effect of sociodemographics, service utilization and changes in clinical status, better staff-patient agreement makes a significant additional contribution in predicting treatment outcomes not only on patient-rated but also on clinician-rated measures. Mental health care should be provided on the basis of a negotiation process involving both professionals and service users to ensure effective interventions; every effort should be made by services to implement strategies aiming to increase consensus between staff and patients.

  5. Interventions following a high violence risk assessment score: a naturalistic study on a Finnish psychiatric admission ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaunomäki, Jenni; Jokela, Markus; Kontio, Raija; Laiho, Tero; Sailas, Eila; Lindberg, Nina

    2017-01-11

    Patient aggression and violence against staff members and other patients are common concerns in psychiatric units. Many structured clinical risk assessment tools have recently been developed. Despite their superiority to unaided clinical judgments, staff has shown ambivalent views towards them. A constant worry of staff is that the results of risk assessments would not be used. The aims of the present study were to investigate what were the interventions applied by the staff of a psychiatric admission ward after a high risk patient had been identified, how frequently these interventions were used and how effective they were. The data were collected in a naturalistic setting during a 6-month period in a Finnish psychiatric admission ward with a total of 331 patients with a mean age of 42.9 years (SD 17.39) suffering mostly from mood, schizophrenia-related and substance use disorders. The total number of treatment days was 2399. The staff assessed the patients daily with the Dynamic Appraisal of Situational Aggression (DASA), which is a structured violence risk assessment considering the upcoming 24 h. The interventions in order to reduce the risk of violence following a high DASA total score (≥4) were collected from the patients' medical files. Inductive content analysis was used. There were a total of 64 patients with 217 observations of high DASA total score. In 91.2% of cases, at least one intervention aiming to reduce the violence risk was used. Pro re nata (PRN)-medication, seclusion and focused discussions with a nurse were the most frequently used interventions. Non-coercive and non-pharmacological interventions like daily activities associated significantly with the decrease of perceived risk of violence. In most cases, a high score in violence risk assessment led to interventions aiming to reduce the risk. Unfortunately, the most frequently used methods were psychopharmacological or coercive. It is hoped that the findings will encourage the staff to use

  6. Development of a hospital reiki training program: training volunteers to provide reiki to patients, families, and staff in the acute care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Julie; Reilly, Patricia M; Buchanan, Teresa M

    2014-01-01

    Creating a healing and healthy environment for patients, families, and staff is an ongoing challenge. As part of our hospital's Integrative Care Program, a Reiki Volunteer Program has helped to foster a caring and healing environment, providing a means for patients, family, and staff to reduce pain and anxiety and improve their ability to relax and be present. Because direct care providers manage multiple and competing needs at any given time, they may not be available to provide Reiki when it is needed. This program demonstrates that a volunteer-based program can successfully support nurses in meeting patient, family, and staff demand for Reiki services.

  7. Nursing staff's experiences of working in an evidence-based designed ICU patient room-An interview study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundberg, Fredrika; Olausson, Sepideh; Fridh, Isabell; Lindahl, Berit

    2017-06-05

    It has been known for centuries that environment in healthcare has an impact, but despite this, environment has been overshadowed by technological and medical progress, especially in intensive care. Evidence-based design is a concept concerning integrating knowledge from various research disciplines and its application to healing environments. The aim was to explore the experiences of nursing staff of working in an evidence-based designed ICU patient room. Interviews were carried out with eight critical care nurses and five assistant nurses and then subjected to qualitative content analysis. The experience of working in an evidence-based designed intensive care unit patient room was that the room stimulates alertness and promotes wellbeing in the nursing staff, fostering their caring activities but also that the interior design of the medical and technical equipment challenges nursing actions. The room explored in this study had been rebuilt in order to create and evaluate a healing environment. This study showed that the new environment had a great impact on the caring staffs' wellbeing and their caring behaviour. At a time when turnover in nurses is high and sick leave is increasing, these findings show the importance of interior design ofintensive care units. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Psychosocial work environment, stress factors and individual characteristics among nursing staff in psychiatric in-patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, Tuvesson; Mona, Eklund

    2014-01-20

    The psychosocial work environment is an important factor in psychiatric in-patient care, and knowing more of its correlates might open up new paths for future workplace interventions. Thus, the aims of the present study were to investigate perceptions of the psychosocial work environment among nursing staff in psychiatric in-patient care and how individual characteristics--Mastery, Moral Sensitivity, Perceived Stress, and Stress of Conscience--are related to different aspects of the psychosocial work environment. A total of 93 nursing staff members filled out five questionnaires: the QPSNordic 34+, Perceived Stress Scale, Stress of Conscience Questionnaire, Moral Sensitivity Questionnaire, and Mastery scale. Multivariate analysis showed that Perceived Stress was important for Organisational Climate perceptions. The Stress of Conscience subscale Internal Demands and Experience in current units were indicators of Role Clarity. The other Stress of Conscience subscale, External Demands and Restrictions, was related to Control at Work. Two types of stress, Perceived Stress and Stress of Conscience, were particularly important for the nursing staff's perception of the psychosocial work environment. Efforts to prevent stress may also contribute to improvements in the psychosocial work environment.

  9. 日间病房癌症患者和家属健康教育需求调查%Investigation on demands of health education on cancer patients and families in intra day ward

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    骆惠玉; 刘爱琴; 张莹娟

    2011-01-01

    目的 探讨日间病房癌症患者和家属的健康教育需求。方法 采用自行设计的量表对105例日间病房化疗患者和家属进行调查。结果 日间病房癌症患者和家属对护理健康教育有广泛的需求,但是需求程度有所不同。院外紧急情况指导迫切需要最为突出,其次是药物不良反应指导、用药指导、饮食、休息和功能锻炼、心理指导等方面。在健康教育形式上,最受欢迎的健康教育形式是医院自行编制的针对日间病房的科普手册、与医护人员交谈和病友交流。结论 日间病房癌症患者和家属有着广泛的护理健康教育需求,应采取针对性的护理健康教育,提高癌症患者的自理能力及生活质量。%Objective To discuss the demands of health education on cancer patients and faimilies in intra day ward.Methods By self-designed questionnaire 105 cancer patients and their families were investigated.Results Nursing health education was comprehensively demanded by cancer patients and families in intra day ward.However, the urgent degree of each demand was different.Outside hospital emergency instruction was demanded most urgently, followed by drug adverse reaction instruction, drug usage instruction, diet instruction, rest and exercises instruction, psychological counseling.Most welcomed health education methods included special propaganda handbooks, interviews with doctors and nurses and communication with fellow patients.Conclusions Nursing health education was comprehensively and especially demanded by cancer patients and families in intra day ward.The argeted nursing health education should be adopted to enhance cancer patients'self-care ability and quality of life.

  10. The Impact of Organizational Innovations in Nursing Homes on Staff Perceptions: A Secondary Data Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Joost; Verbeek, Hilde; Zwakhalen, Sandra M G

    2017-01-01

    The shift in nursing home care for patients with dementia from traditional task-driven environments towards patient-centered small-scale environments has implications for nursing practice. Information about its implications for nursing staff is lacking, and only a few studies have addressed staff perceptions. We sought to explore staff perceptions of required skills and to determine differences in job satisfaction, motivation, and job characteristics of staff working in both care settings. A secondary data analysis was conducted. The data source used was drawn from a larger study testing the effects of small-scale living (Verbeek et al., 2009). Nursing staff working on a permanent basis and who were directly involved in care were eligible to participate in the study. Data on job satisfaction, motivation, and job characteristics of nursing staff working in typical small-scale and traditional care environments were derived using a questionnaire. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics. Differences between nursing staff job satisfaction, motivation, and job characteristics were tested using multilinear regression analysis. In total, 138 staff members were included (81 staff members working in traditional nursing home wards and 57 staff members working in small-scale nursing home wards). The findings showed that in typical small-scale nursing homes, job satisfaction and job motivation were significantly higher compared to those in typical traditional nursing homes. Job autonomy and social support were also significantly higher, while job demands were significantly lower in these small-scale nursing homes. Social support was found to be the most significant predictor of job motivation and job satisfaction in both types of typical nursing homes. Nursing staff working in traditional care environments more often expressed the intention to switch to small-scale environments. Based on the findings of this study, it can be concluded that nursing homes environments

  11. 'I believe that the staff have reduced their closeness to patients': an exploratory study on the impact of HIV/AIDS on staff in four rural hospitals in Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Namaganda Grace

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Staff shortages could harm the provision and quality of health care in Uganda, so staff retention and motivation are crucial. Understanding the impact of HIV/AIDS on staff contributes to designing appropriate retention and motivation strategies. This research aimed 'to identify the influence of HIV/AIDS on staff working in general hospitals at district level in rural areas and to explore support required and offered to deal with HIV/AIDS in the workplace'. Its results were to inform strategies to mitigate the impact of HIV/AIDS on hospital staff. Methods A cross-sectional study with qualitative and quantitative components was implemented during two weeks in September 2005. Data were collected in two government and two faith-based private not-for-profit hospitals purposively selected in rural districts in Uganda's Central Region. Researchers interviewed 237 people using a structured questionnaire and held four focus group discussions and 44 in-depth interviews. Results HIV/AIDS places both physical and, to some extent, emotional demands on health workers. Eighty-six per cent of respondents reported an increased workload, with 48 per cent regularly working overtime, while 83 per cent feared infection at work, and 36 per cent reported suffering an injury in the previous year. HIV-positive staff remained in hiding, and most staff did not want to get tested as they feared stigmatization. Organizational responses were implemented haphazardly and were limited to providing protective materials and the HIV/AIDS-related services offered to patients. Although most staff felt motivated to work, not being motivated was associated with a lack of daily supervision, a lack of awareness on the availability of HIV/AIDS counselling, using antiretrovirals and working overtime. The specific hospital context influenced staff perceptions and experiences. Conclusion HIV/AIDS is a crucially important contextual factor, impacting on working conditions

  12. An observational study of hand hygiene compliance in paediatric wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randle, Jacqueline; Firth, Joseph; Vaughan, Natalie

    2013-09-01

    To measure healthcare workers', children's and visitors' hand hygiene compliance in a paediatric oncology ward and a paediatric respiratory ward in an English hospital. Children are especially vulnerable to healthcare-associated infections, yet few studies have reported on hand hygiene compliance in paediatric clinical areas. This was an observational study. We measured hand hygiene compliance over an eight-hour period in two hospital wards using the 'five moments of hand hygiene' observation tool. We monitored a total of 407 hand hygiene opportunities. Overall opportunities for compliance were 74% for healthcare workers (n = 315) and children and visitors 23% (n = 92). Compliance was 84% for allied health professionals, 81% for doctors, 75% for nurses and 73% for ancillary and other staff. Hand hygiene compliance varied depending on which of the five moments of hygiene healthcare workers were undertaking (p hygiene compliance, and for visitors to the oncology ward, hand hygiene compliance was higher (p hygiene compliance; however, visitors' compliance was low. Among healthcare workers, levels of compliance were higher compared with previous reported estimates. Visitors had the lowest level of compliance yet owing to the nature of the clinical environments, nearly a quarter of care is delivered by them rather than healthcare workers, and so, this offers opportunities for specific future interventions aimed at families and carers. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. Workplace learning: an analysis of students' expectations of learning on the ward in the Department of Internal Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhl-Hackert, Nadja; Krautter, Markus; Andreesen, Sven; Hoffmann, Katja; Herzog, Wolfgang; Jünger, Jana; Nikendei, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    Learning on the ward as a practice-oriented preparation for the future workplace plays a crucial role in the medical education of future physicians. However, students' ward internship is partially problematic due to condensed workflows on the ward and the high workload of supervising physicians. For the first time in a German-speaking setting, students' expectations and concerns about their internship on the ward are examined in a qualitative analysis regarding their internal medicine rotation within clinical medical education. Of a total of 168 medical students in their 6th semester at the Medical Faculty of Heidelberg, 28 students (m=8, f=20, Ø 23.6 years) took part in focus group interviews 3 to 5 days prior to their internship on the internal medicine ward within their clinical internal medicine rotation. Students were divided into four different focus groups. The protocols were transcribed and a content analysis was conducted based on grounded theory. We gathered a total of 489 relevant individual statements. The students hope for a successful integration within the ward team, reliable and supportive supervisors and supervision in small groups. They expect to face the most common diseases, to train the most important medical skills, to assume full responsibility for their own patients and to acquire their own medical identity. The students fear an insufficient time frame to achieve their aims. They are also concerned they will have too little contact with patients and inadequate supervision. For the development and standardization of effective student internships, the greatest relevance should be attributed to guidance and supervision by professionally trained and well-prepared medical teachers, entailing a significant increase in staff and costs. A structural framework is required in order to transfer the responsibility for the treatment of patients to the students at an early stage in medical education and in a longitudinal manner. The data suggest that the

  14. Workplace Learning: An analysis of students' expectations of learning on the ward in the Department of Internal Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhl-Hackert, Nadja; Krautter, Markus; Andreesen, Sven; Hoffmann, Katja; Herzog, Wolfgang; Jünger, Jana; Nikendei, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    Background: Learning on the ward as a practice-oriented preparation for the future workplace plays a crucial role in the medical education of future physicians. However, students’ ward internship is partially problematic due to condensed workflows on the ward and the high workload of supervising physicians. For the first time in a German-speaking setting, students’ expectations and concerns about their internship on the ward are examined in a qualitative analysis regarding their internal medicine rotation within clinical medical education. Methods: Of a total of 168 medical students in their 6th semester at the Medical Faculty of Heidelberg, 28 students (m=8, f=20, Ø 23.6 years) took part in focus group interviews 3 to 5 days prior to their internship on the internal medicine ward within their clinical internal medicine rotation. Students were divided into four different focus groups. The protocols were transcribed and a content analysis was conducted based on grounded theory. Results: We gathered a total of 489 relevant individual statements. The students hope for a successful integration within the ward team, reliable and supportive supervisors and supervision in small groups. They expect to face the most common diseases, to train the most important medical skills, to assume full responsibility for their own patients and to acquire their own medical identity. The students fear an insufficient time frame to achieve their aims. They are also concerned they will have too little contact with patients and inadequate supervision. Conclusion: For the development and standardization of effective student internships, the greatest relevance should be attributed to guidance and supervision by professionally trained and well-prepared medical teachers, entailing a significant increase in staff and costs. A structural framework is required in order to transfer the responsibility for the treatment of patients to the students at an early stage in medical education and in a

  15. Prolonged clonal spreading and dynamic changes in antimicrobial resistance of Escherichia coli ST68 among patients who stayed in a respiratory care ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chih-Ming; Ke, Se-Chin; Li, Chia-Ru; Chiou, Chien-Shun; Chang, Chao-Chin

    2014-11-01

    From 2007 to 2009, we collected a total of 83 bacteraemic isolates of Escherichia coli with reduced susceptibility or resistance to third-generation cephalosporins (TGCs). Isolates were genotyped by PFGE and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). The PFGE patterns revealed two highly correlated clusters (cluster E: nine isolates; cluster G: 22 isolates) associated with this prolonged clonal spreading. Compared with cluster E isolates, cluster G isolates were significantly more likely to harbour aac(6')-Ib-cr (Pcoli cases caused by cluster E and G isolates were significantly associated with having stayed in our hospital's respiratory care ward (Pcoli ST68 associated with a stay in a long-term care facility. Using epidemiological investigations and PFGE and MLST analyses, we have identified long-term clonal spreading caused by E. coli ST68, with extra antimicrobial-resistance genes possibly acquired during the prolonged spreading period.

  16. [The home palliative care transition manual for the regional cooperation from the general ward at Shizuoka Red Cross Hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraishi, Ko

    2007-12-01

    Recently, a home palliative care has been recommended for terminal stage cancer patients. However, a few clinics are available providing a home palliative care. As a result of that, there have been many cases of the terminal stage cancer patients who could not receive a peace of mind care and die peacefully at home. Home palliative care has been promoted in Shizuoka City by starting Shizuoka city regional cooperation conference of cancer management with a help from Shizuoka city medical association and the general hospital. It is important to have the knowledge and technique put into practice by clinics and home visiting nurses for a further improvement of the palliative care. In order to transfer patient smoothly, the palliative care team conference is held in the general ward and the homecare transition manual is used at the hospital. An application of homecare insurance, the visiting doctor and nurse are arranged in parallel to management of physical and psychological symptoms of the patient, the visiting doctor and nurse are arranged. Before a patient is discharged from the hospital, the meeting will be held among the ward staff, visiting nurse and the patient's family. We intervened 8 cases from April to July 2007. Six out of 8 cases were transferred to home, and 2 patients were died at home. The home care transition manual will be shared with other hospitals from now on.

  17. 一日病房脊柱微创手术患者围手术期的心理护理%Preoperative psychological nursing of patients in minimally invasive spine surgery in one-day hospital ward

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张有皓; 徐淑娟; 蒋爱庭

    2011-01-01

    Objective To explore the specific model of preoperative psychological nursing of patients in minimally invasive spine surgery in one-day hospital ward. Methods The characteristics of preoperative psychological nursing of 584 patients in minimally invasive spine surgery in one-day hospital ward were summarized and effective psychological nursing were performed on them. Results Patients under the local anesthesia could initiatively cooperate in the surgery, recognize the outcomes of operations and accept training at home after surgery. Conclusions Good perioperative psychological nursing can effectively promote the surgical safety, help patients to build confidence, improve their initiative in the operation and surgical efficacy, increase patients' satisfaction.%目的 探讨一日病房脊柱微创手术患者围手术期心理护理的具体模式.方法 总结584例一日病房脊柱微创手术患者的围手术期心理护理特点,实施有效心理护理措施.结果 本组患者在局麻下积极配合手术治疗,认可手术效果,接受手术后回家修养.结论 优质的围手术期心理护理可以有效地促进手术患者的手术安全.能帮助患者树立信心,提高其参与手术的积极性,提高疗效,增加患者的满意度.

  18. An Outbreak of SARS in a Diabetes Room of a General Hospital without Infected Medical Staff

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the epidemiologic features of an outbreak of SARS that occurred in a single diabetes room of a general hospital in Beijing in late March 2003. Methods Field investigation was carried out in the ward, the nursing log and the hospitalization medical record of correlative patients were consulted. SARS-CoV in serum specimen from SARS patient was detected by PCR. Results The room where SARS outbreak occurred was on the 13th lfoor of the 16-story main ward building. There were 6 beds in the room, living with 6 female patients (aged 45-67) who were all hospitalized due to type 2 diabetes. On March 24, 2003, Patient 1 began to have a fever and cough, chest X-ray showed pneumonia. Five and six days later, Patient 2 and Patient 3 began to have a fever, respectively. Finally, all of these 3 patients died. Their beds were all at the same side of the room, and the other 3 patients at the opposite side were not infected. Serum SARS CoV-RNA of the Patient 3 was positive by nest-PCR. The daughter-in-law of Patient 1 who accompanied Patient 1 by the bedside several days, mainly near the window, upwind of Patient 1, was not infected. Medical staff, family members and visitors of the 6 patients were not infected. Conclusions This outbreak was not transmitted by aerosol. The distance droplets travels could be up to 3.43 meters. Droplet spread has direction, and the droplets direction of propagation is closely related with the wind direction and speed. Those at the downwind position of SARS patients were susceptible to be infected. Medical staff wore face masks and good natural ventilation of this ward building may be important reasons for the prevention of infection.

  19. 内科住院患者营养不足、营养风险和营养支持状况%Malnutrition, nutritional risk and nutritional support in hospitalized patients in medical wards

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨子艳; 王璐; 李长平; 丁丽丽; 程博; 汪明芳; 陈艳波

    2012-01-01

    目的 调查内科住院患者营养不足、营养风险和营养支持应用状况.方法 采用定点连续抽样,选择内科系统住院患者398例,采用欧洲肠外肠内营养学会推荐的营养风险筛查工具NRS2002做营养不足和营养风险筛查,NRS2002≥3分为有营养风险,体质量指数(BMI) <18.5 kg/m2并结合临床一般情况差判定为营养不足.同时调查患者住院期间的肠内肠外营养支持情况.结果 398例内科住院患者营养不足和营养风险发生率分别为14.1%和33.7%;营养不足发生率居前两位的是消化内科(19.6%)和肿瘤内科(16.9%);免疫科(8.6%)发生率低.营养风险发生率占前3位的是肿瘤内科(47.5%),消化内科(42.9%)和神经内科(41.7%),内分泌科(21.4%),免疫科(13.8%)发生率低.398例患者中,31例应用肠内营养(EN),92例应用肠外营养(PN),8例同时应用肠内肠外营养,PN∶EN =3∶1;有营养风险患者营养支持率为70.9%,无营养风险患者营养支持率为13.6%;有营养不足患者营养支持率为96.4%,无营养不足患者营养支持率为22.5%.结论 消化内科、肿瘤内科、神经内科营养不足或营养风险发生率较高.建议重视肠内营养支持,提高肠内营养应用比例.%Objective To investigate the prevalence of malnutrition, nutritional risk and application of nutritional support in hospitalized patients in medical wards. Methods 398 adult patients in medical wards of Beijing Hospital from April to June in 2011 were consecutively enrolled. The patients were screened using Nutritional Risk screening 2002 (NRS2002) on admission NRS2002 score>3 was classified as nutritional risk of BMI < 18. 5 kg/m2 with impaired general condition was defined as malnutrition. The nutritional support application during hospital stay was recorded. Results The prevalence of malnutrition was 14. 1% and the nutritional risk was 33.7% in all 398 patients. The prevalences of

  20. Prevalence and related factors of post-traumatic stress disorder among medical staff members exposed to H7N9 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liling Tang

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: The PTSD level of doctors and nurses after their exposure to H7N9 patients was high, which warrant further research. Health and medical institutions should pay attention to the physical and psychological health of these staff members.

  1. Perspectives of Cardiac Care Unit Nursing Staff about Developing Hospice Services in Iran for Terminally ill Cardiovascular Patients: A Qualitative Study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Azami-Aghdash, Saber; Ghojazadeh, Morteza; Naghavi-Behzad, Mohammad; Imani, Shahin; Aghaei, Mir Hossein

    2015-01-01

    The present study was conducted aiming to determine the points of view of cardiac care units' nursing staff about designing and providing Hospice services in Iran for cardiovascular patients in the final stages of life...

  2. Perspectives of staff nurses of the reasons for and the nature of patient-initiated call lights: an exploratory survey study in four USA hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzeng Huey-Ming

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little research has been done on patient call light use and staff response time, which were found to be associated with inpatient falls and satisfaction. Nurses' perspectives may moderate or mediate the aforementioned relationships. This exploratory study intended to understand staff's perspectives about call lights, staff responsiveness, and the reasons for and the nature of call light use. It also explored differences among hospitals and identified significant predictors of the nature of call light use. Methods This cross-sectional, multihospital survey study was conducted from September 2008 to January 2009 in four hospitals located in the Midwestern region of the United States. A brief survey was used. All 2309 licensed and unlicensed nursing staff members who provide direct patient care in 27 adult care units were invited to participate. A total of 808 completed surveys were retrieved for an overall response rate of 35%. The SPSS 16.0 Window version was used. Descriptive and binary logistic regression analyses were conducted. Results The primary reasons for patient-initiated calls were for toileting assistance, pain medication, and intravenous problems. Toileting assistance was the leading reason. Each staff responded to 6 to 7 calls per hour and a call was answered within 4 minutes (estimated. 49% of staff perceived that patient-initiated calls mattered to patient safety. 77% agreed that that these calls were meaningful. 52% thought that these calls required the attention of nursing staff. 53% thought that answering calls prevented them from doing the critical aspects of their role. Staff's perceptions about the nature of calls varied across hospitals. Junior staff tended to overlook the importance of answering calls. A nurse participant tended to perceive calls as more likely requiring nursing staff's attention than a nurse aide participant. Conclusions If answering calls was a high priority among nursing tasks, staff

  3. Modelling of coughed droplets in a hospital ward

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sadrizadeh, Sasan; Nielsen, Peter Vilhelm

    2016-01-01

    Coughing and its importance for spreading respiratory infectious diseases has been confirmed in many previous studies. The dispersion process of respiratory droplets released by the coughing of a patient in a hospital ward was studied using computational fluid dynamics simulation. Two relatively...... realistic three-dimensional thermal mannequins with a parallel bed arrangement simulated the patients. The maximum dispersion distances in time under ward ventilation conditions were studied. A velocity profile simulated a time-dependent cough with total duration of 0.4 s. The results indicated...

  4. Preventive measures and nursing care of patients with ventilator associated pneumonia in ICU ward%ICU病房呼吸机相关性肺炎的预防措施与护理

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴兰花

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the preventive measures and nursing care of patients with ventilator associated pneumonia in ICU ward.Methods:40 patients with mechanical ventilation in ICU ward were selected.They were randomly divided into the two groups on average.All patients were given routine artificial airway care.On this basis,the observation group was strictly enforced sterilization management,oral care,respiratory tract care,airway humidification of nursing,nutrition nursing.The effect of two interventions on ventilator associated pneumonia were compared.Results:In the observation group after the application of prevention and nursing measures,the incidence of ventilator associated pneumonia was significantly less than that of the control group,which had statistical difference(P<0.05).Conclusion:The prevention and nursing measures of ventilator associated pneumonia in ICU ward can effectively reduce the ventilator associated pneumonia.%目的:探讨 ICU 病房呼吸机相关性肺炎的预防措施与护理。方法:收治 ICU 病房接受机械通气患者40例,随机平分为两组,均予以常规人工气道护理,观察组则在此基础上,应用严格执行灭菌消毒管理、口腔护理、呼吸道护理、气道湿化护理、营养护理,对比两种干预措施对呼吸机相关性肺炎的影响。结果:观察组在应用预防与护理措施后,其发生呼吸机相关性肺炎患者明显少于对照组,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05)。结论:ICU病房积极实施呼吸机相关性肺炎预防及护理措施,可有效减少呼吸机相关性肺炎发生。

  5. Frequency and severity of aggressive incidents in acute psychiatric wards in Switzerland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fischer Joachim E

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aggression and violence and negative consequences thereof are a major concern in acute psychiatric inpatient care globally. Variations in study designs, settings, populations, and data collection methods render comparisons of the incidence of aggressive behaviour in high risk settings difficult. Objective To describe the frequency and severity of aggressive incidents in acute psychiatric wards in the German speaking part of Switzerland. Methods We conducted a prospective multicentre study on 24 acute admission wards in 12 psychiatric hospitals in the German speaking part of Switzerland. Aggressive incidents were recorded by the revised Staff Observation Aggression Scale (SOAS-R and we checked the data collection for underreporting. Our sample comprised 2344 treatment episodes of 2017 patients and a total of 41'560 treatment days. Results A total of 760 aggressive incidents were registered. We found incidence rates per 100 treatment days between 0.60 (95% CI 0.10–1.78 for physical attacks and 1.83 (1.70–1.97 for all aggressive incidents (including purely verbal aggression. The mean severity was 8.80 ± 4.88 points on the 22-point SOAS-R-severity measure; 46% of the purely verbally aggression was classified as severe (≥ 9 pts.. 53% of the aggressive incidents were followed by a coercive measure, mostly seclusion or seclusion accompanied by medication. In 13% of the patients, one ore more incidents were registered, and 6.9% of the patients were involved in one ore more physical attack. Involuntary admission (OR 2.2; 1.6–2.9, longer length of stay (OR 2.7; 2.0–3.8, and a diagnosis of schizophrenia (ICH-10 F2 (OR 2.1; 1.5–2.9 was associated with a higher risk for aggressive incidents, but no such association was found for age and gender. 38% of the incidents were registered within the first 7 days after admission. Conclusion Aggressive incidents in acute admission wards are a frequent and serious problem. Due to the

  6. Evaluation of Patients' Rights Observance According to Patients' Rights Charter in Educational Hospitals Affiliated to Mashhad University of Medical Sciences: Medical Staffs' Views.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabzevari, Alireza; Kiani, Mohammad Ali; Saeidi, Masumeh; Jafari, Seyed Ali; Kianifar, Hamidreza; Ahanchian, Hamid; Jarahi, Lida; Zakerian, Mohsen

    2016-10-01

    To supply quality services and healthcare, it is evident that medical ethics and patients' rights, while providing medical and healthcare services need to be observed. This study was conducted to evaluate observance of the Patients' Rights Charter among medical staff of educational hospitals affiliated to Mashhad University of Medical Sciences. This cross-sectional study was conducted in four educational hospitals in Mashhad on eighty physicians, nurses, nurse aids and medical students. Data were collected using a two-part inventory of patients' rights, including demographic data and inventory of patients' rights observance. Data analysis was conducted using SPSS-16 as well as descriptive statistics, independent t-test, chi-square, Spearman correlation coefficient and Pearson correlation. Mean age of subjects was 36.3±8.3. Observance of human rights was perfect by 84.4 percent of subjects. The highest amount of observance of patients' rights was related to the area of respecting patients' privacy and observing the principle of confidentiality, which was evaluated to be perfect by all subjects (100%). The lowest value of patients' rights observance was related to presenting appropriate and adequate information for patients, which was perfect among 48.1% of subjects. There was no significant relation between personal details (age, gender, education and career) and observance of patients' rights (p>0.05). Although in this study, the observance of patients' rights by medical staff is optimal in most areas, the area of providing appropriate and adequate information needs to be promoted. Therefore, it is suggested that more stringent regulatory policies be compiled and implemented to the items of Patients' Rights Charter along with training courses, to strengthen medical staff's awareness in this regard.

  7. Structured smoking cessation training for health professionals on cardiology wards: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raupach, Tobias; Falk, Jan; Vangeli, Eleni; Schiekirka, Sarah; Rustler, Christa; Grassi, Maria Caterina; Pipe, Andrew; West, Robert

    2014-07-01

    Smoking is a major cardiovascular risk factor, and smoking cessation is imperative for patients hospitalized with a cardiovascular event. This study aimed to evaluate a systems-based approach to helping hospitalized smokers quit and to identify implementation barriers. Prospective intervention study followed by qualitative analysis of staff interviews. The prospective intervention study assessed the effects of implementing standard operating procedures (SOPs) for the provision of counselling and pharmacotherapy to smokers admitted to cardiology wards on counselling frequency. In addition, a qualitative analysis of staff interviews was undertaken to examine determinants of physician and nurse behaviour; this sought to understand barriers in terms of motivation, capability, and/or opportunity. A total of 150 smoking patients were included in the study (75 before and 75 after SOP implementation). Before the implementation of SOPs, the proportion of patients reporting to have received cessation counselling from physicians and nurses was 6.7% and 1.3%, respectively. Following SOP implementation, these proportions increased to 38.7% (p motivation, e.g. role incongruence, appeared to be a major barrier. Introduction of a set of standard operating procedures for smoking cessation advice was effective with physicians but not nurses. Analysis of barriers to implementation highlighted lack of motivation rather than capability or opportunity as a major factor that would need to be addressed. © The European Society of Cardiology 2012.

  8. Implementing lean in a surgical ward

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edwards, Kasper; Nielsen, Anders Paarup; Jacobsen, Peter

    of the lean implementation has been a 33% increase in patient throughput. The second flow is unchanged and concerned with non-standard and emergency procedures, e.g.., major hip surgery on old people or surgery on traffic victims. The surgeries within this flow are non-routine, unpredictable and cannot....... Stable and standardized processes ensure quality and predictability (e.g. process time). Leveling of production is essential for production planning. Based on the results of the case study of the surgical ward this paper will discuss three issues or challenges that emerged from the implementation of lean...... procedures to patients in need of complex emergency procedures. The primary result of the lean project has been to split the flow of patients in two. The first flow is concerned with highly standardized and non-emergency procedures, e.g. minor knee surgery. These surgeries are routine, predictable and can...

  9. [Effects of Ward Interventions on Repeated Critical Incidents in Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Inpatient Care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulke, Christine; Klein, Annette M; von Klitzing, Kai

    2014-01-01

    Effects of Ward Interventions on Repeated Critical Incidents in Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Inpatient Care. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of several ward interventions (transition to an open ward concept, individualized treatment plans, tiered crisis-management, staff training, quality control) on repeated critical incidents, non-restrictive and restrictive measures. The outcome variables were compared in two time periods, 2007 and 2011. The study included 74 critical incident reports of 51 child and adolescent inpatients that had at least one hospital stay and one critical incident in the selected time periods. Aggressive, self-harming, and absconding incidents were included. The quantitative results suggest that ward interventions can contribute to a reduction of repeated critical incidents and restrictive measures. The qualitative evaluation suggests a cultural change of crisis management.

  10. Panoptic power and mental health nursing-space and surveillance in relation to staff, patients, and neutral places.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salzmann-Erikson, Martin; Eriksson, Henrik

    2012-08-01

    Mental health nurses use manifest and latent approaches for surveillance and observation of patients in the context of mental health care. Patient spaces in mental health organizations are subtly linked to these different means of surveillance. This article investigates these approaches, focusing in particular on the variety of spaces patients occupy and differences in the intensity of observation that can be carried out in them. The aim is to elaborate on space and surveillance in relation to the patients' and nurses' environment in psychiatric nursing care. Places where patients were observed were operationalized and categorized, yielding three spaces: those for patients, those for staff, and neutral areas. We demonstrate that different spaces produce different practices in relation to the exercise of panoptic power and that there is room for maneuvering and engaging in alternatives to "keeping an eye on patients" for nurses in mental health nursing. Some spaces offer asylum from panoptic observations and the viewing eyes of psychiatric nurses, but the majority of spaces in mental health nursing serve as a field of visibility within which the patient is constantly watched.

  11. Implementation of a campus-wide Irish hospital smoking ban in 2009: prevalence and attitudinal trends among staff and patients in lead up.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fitzpatrick, Patricia

    2012-02-01

    We report the evidence base that supported the decision to implement the first campus-wide hospital smoking ban in the Republic of Ireland with effect from 1 January 2009. Three separate data sources are utilized; surveillance data collected from patients and staff in 8 surveys between 1997 and 2006, a 1-week observational study to assess smoker behaviour in designated smoking shelters and an attitudinal interview with 28 smoker patients and 30 staff on the implications of the 2004 indoors workplace smoking ban, conducted in 2005. The main outcome measures were trends in prevalence of smoking over time according to age, sex and occupational groups and attitudes to the 2004 ban and a projected outright campus ban. Smoking rates among patients remained steady, 24.2% in 1997\\/98 and 22.7% in 2006. Staff smoking rates declined from 27.4% to 17.8%, with a strong occupational gradient. Observational evidence suggested a majority of those using smoking shelters in 2005 were women and health-care workers rather than patients. Attitudes of patients and staff were positive towards the 2004 ban, but with some ambivalence on the effectiveness of current arrangements. Staff particularly were concerned with patient safety issues associated with smoking outdoors. The 2004 ban was supported by 87.6% of patients and 81.3% of staff in 2006 and a majority of 58.6% of patients and 52.4% of staff agreed with an outright campus ban being implemented. These findings were persuasive in instigating a process in 2007\\/08 to go totally smoke-free by 2009, the stages for which are discussed.

  12. Psychosocial Work Environment, Stress Factors and Individual Characteristics among Nursing Staff in Psychiatric In-Patient Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuvesson Hanna

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The psychosocial work environment is an important factor in psychiatric in-patient care, and knowing more of its correlates might open up new paths for future workplace interventions. Thus, the aims of the present study were to investigate perceptions of the psychosocial work environment among nursing staff in psychiatric in-patient care and how individual characteristics—Mastery, Moral Sensitivity, Perceived Stress, and Stress of Conscience—are related to different aspects of the psychosocial work environment. A total of 93 nursing staff members filled out five questionnaires: the QPSNordic 34+, Perceived Stress Scale, Stress of Conscience Questionnaire, Moral Sensitivity Questionnaire, and Mastery scale. Multivariate analysis showed that Perceived Stress was important for Organisational Climate perceptions. The Stress of Conscience subscale Internal Demands and Experience in current units were indicators of Role Clarity. The other Stress of Conscience subscale, External Demands and Restrictions, was related to Control at Work. Two types of stress, Perceived Stress and Stress of Conscience, were particularly important for the nursing staff’s perception of the psychosocial work environment. Efforts to prevent stress may also contribute to improvements in the psychosocial work environment.

  13. Etiology of nosocomial infections in NICU patients and its correlation with ward environment%NICU患者医院感染的病原学类型与病房环境的关系

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    元艺; 于垚; 许亚茹; 王淑娟; 刘顺利; 关毅

    2012-01-01

    目的 研究神经内科重症监护病房(NICU)发生医院感染的病原学与病房环境因素的关系,为有效切断致病菌的传播途径提供依据.方法 选取2010年9月-2011年9月唐山市某三甲医院NICU住院患者为监测对象,监测其医院感染的发生情况,同时监测发生感染患者室内空气及床单位(枕头、被服)等环境.结果 224例住院患者中有65例发生医院感染,感染率为29.02%,感染部位以下呼吸道为主,占90.24%;感染病原菌中革兰阴性杆菌占77.01%,主要为铜绿假单胞菌和肺炎克雷伯菌,革兰阳性球菌占16.67%,主要为金黄色葡萄球菌,真菌占6.32%;感染患者病房环境主要以革兰阳性球菌为主.结论 铜绿假单胞菌、肺炎克雷伯菌、金黄色葡萄球菌等是引发NICU医院感染的主要病原菌,病房空气或床单位等环境因素是这些致病菌的重要传播途径之一,因此应加强病房环境和病床单位的消毒,以防止医院感染的传播.%OBJECTIVE To analyze the type of etiology of nosocomial infections and its relationship with the environmental factors of the ward in the neurological intensive care unit (NICU) and to provide the basis for hospital infection control. METHODS The patients in the NICU of a hospital in Tangshan from Sep 2010 to Oct 2011 were selected as the objects of this study. The incidence of nosocomial infection was monitored, and the indoor air and bed units (pillows, bedding and clothing) environment of patients with nosocomial infection were monitored as well. RESULTS There were 65 cases of nosocomial infections in 224 patients. The infection rate was 29. 02%. Lower respiratory tract was the main site of infections and the constituent ratio was 90. 24%. The gram-negative bacilli were the main pathogens and the constituent ratio was 16. 67% . They were mainly Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Klebsiella pneumoniae. The gram-positive cocci accounted for 16. 67% ,and mainly Staphylococcus

  14. Donor-derived tuberculosis after solid organ transplantation in two patients and a staff member.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucher, J N; Schoenberg, M B; Freytag, I; Lange, U; Hofmann-Thiel, S; Guba, M O; Werner, J; Eder, A; Schelling, G; Stangl, M

    2016-06-01

    Because of global mobility and migration resulting in a growing diversity of the donor pool, the risk for donor-derived tuberculosis in solid organ transplant recipients becomes more and more relevant, even in countries with a low overall tuberculosis incidence. Here, we describe a case series of donor-derived tuberculosis in 2 of 3 solid organ transplant recipients and one medical staff member in Germany resulting in the death of one recipient. This case series highlights the relevance of this topic to clinicians. It advocates for a better communication between organ procurement organizations and transplant centers regarding donor information and transplant recipient outcome. Furthermore, it underpins the necessity for a standardized critical incident reporting system in the german transplant system to improve short- and long-term recipient's safety, health and survival.

  15. Staff Association

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2014-01-01

    Remove of the staff association office   The Staff Association offices are going to be renovated during the coming four months, February to May 2014. The physical move from our current premises 64/R-002 to our temporary office in  510/R-010 will take place on Friday January 31st, so the Secretariat will be closed on that day. Hence, from Monday February 3rd until the end of May 2014 the Staff Association Secretariat will be located in 510/R-010 (entrance just across the CERN Printshop).    

  16. Ideal ward round making in neurosurgical practice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pathak A

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available The success of a perfect ward round lies in the role of the consultant leading the ′round making group′ (RMG as well as the hallmark of effective questioning and participation of each member. Twelve senior consultants with more than 10 years′ experience in neurosurgical practice at three different university hospitals were observed during round making by a participant observer. Observations were made on the group climate of the RMG, the leadership pattern and language expressed by the clinician conducting the round and the effectiveness in his performance as a leader during clinical discussions. The group climate showed evidence of good productivity and flexibility with 92% and 75% consultants, pleasantness of climate was above average with only 50% (6/12 and poor objectivity with 42% (5/12 consultants. Forty two percent of the consultants were not always very well comprehensible, while only 50% (6/12 spoke exactly fitting the occasion. Only 33% (4/12 of the consultants used humour effectively, while 42% (5/12 spoke unnecessarily in between discussion and were poor in introducing the problems of patient to the round making group. Ward round making in neurosurgical practice needs a holistic approach with motivation, planning, leadership skills and structured curriculum to fulfill its objectives.

  17. ICU护士与病人亲属对病人家庭需要重要性认识的调查分析%Comparative Study on the Family Needs for Nurses and Patients' Relatives in ICU Wards

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王文茹; 李小妹; 高睿

    2001-01-01

    In order to investigate the family needs for the ICU nurses and patients' relatives in ICU wards, Molter family need scale for emergent and severe patients was applied to comparatively analyze 50 relatives of ICU patients and 50 ICU nurses. The results showed that the relatives of the ICU patients and ICU nurses all considered that the needs closely related with the life and benefit of the patients was the most important, but there was a significant difference in the scores between the relatives of the ICU patients and ICU nurses (P<0.05). It was suggested that ICU nurses should pay attention to the needs of the ICU patients, immediately provide information and fully understand the need of the relatives of the patients to help the patients' family act on the emergent status of the patients and maintain the physical and mental health of the patients and their relatives.%为了解病人在ICU接受监护时,其亲属及ICU护士对病人家庭需要重要性的认识,应用Molter“急危重病人家庭需要量表”对50名ICU病人亲属及50名ICU护士进行调查。结果ICU病人亲属及ICU护士均认为与病人生命及利益密切相关的需要最重要,但其得分比较,差异有显著性意义(P<0.05)。提示ICU护士必须充分认识ICU病人需要的重要性,及时提供各种信息,并充分认识其亲属的需要,以帮助病人家庭应对其危机状态,维护病人及亲属的身心健康。

  18. Acid-base balance, serum electrolytes and need for non-invasive ventilation in patients with hypercapnic acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease admitted to an internal medicine ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiavo, Alfonso; Renis, Maurizio; Polverino, Mario; Iannuzzi, Arcangelo; Polverino, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    Hypoventilation produces or worsens respiratory acidosis in patients with hypercapnia due to acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD). In these patients acid-base and hydroelectrolite balance are closely related. Aim of the present study was to evaluate acid-base and hydroelectrolite alterations in these subjects and the effect of non-invasive ventilation and pharmacological treatment. We retrospectively analysed 110 patients consecutively admitted to the Internal Medicine ward of Cava de' Tirreni Hospital for acute exacerbation of hypercapnic chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. On admission all patients received oxygen with a Venturi mask to maintain arterial oxygen saturation at least >90 %, and received appropriate pharmacological treatment. Non-Invasive Ventilation (NIV) was started when, despite optimal therapy, patients had severe dyspnea, increased work of breathing and respiratory acidosis. Based on Arterial Blood Gas (ABG) data, we divided the 110 patients in 3 groups: A = 51 patients with compensated respiratory acidosis; B = 36 patients with respiratory acidosis + metabolic alkalosis; and C = 23 patients with respiratory acidosis + metabolic acidosis. 55 patients received only conventional therapy and 55 had conventional therapy plus NIV. The use of NIV support was lower in the patients belonging to group B than in those belonging to group A and C (25 %, vs 47 % and 96 % respectively; p respiratory acidosis due to AECOPD, differently from previous studies, the metabolic alkalosis is not a negative prognostic factor neither determines greater NIV support need, whereas the metabolic acidosis in addition to respiratory acidosis is an unfavourable element, since it determines an increased need of NIV and invasive mechanical ventilation support.

  19. Observation af kritisk syge patienter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuhrmann, Lone; Hesselfeldt, Rasmus; Lippert, Anne

    2009-01-01

    . MATERIAL AND METHODS: Prospective observational study at Herlev Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark. Study personnel measured vital signs on all patients present on five wards during the evening and night and interviewed nursing staff about patients with abnormal vital signs. Subsequently, patient records were...... vital signs measured by study personnel. A total of 77% of patients had vital signs documented in their records on the day of the observation. The previous day, vital signs were documented in 70% of records and on the day after in 66%. The documentation of vital signs was significantly higher when staff...

  20. Creating a simulated Mental Health Ward: lessons learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossetti, Jeanette; Musker, Kathleen; Smyth, Siobhan; Byrne, Evelyn; Maney, Catherine; Selig, Kristen; Jones-Bendel, Trish

    2014-10-01

    The future of psychiatric-mental health nursing depends on the preparation of nurses who will meet the mental health care needs of society. The current article discusses the development of the "Mental Health Ward," a simulated mental health experience that was offered for the first time to undergraduate baccalaureate nursing students at a Midwestern university in the United States. The Mental Health Ward is an innovative simulated hospital environment that includes the use of standardized patients and role play scenarios, resulting in a full mission simulation whereby students learn various psychiatric diagnoses and practice various pertinent skills, including nursing assessments, admission and discharge processes, medication administration, and therapeutic communication. Lessons learned by faculty and students in formulating the Mental Health Ward are presented.

  1. Insider action research and the microsystem of a Danish surgical ward

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paltved, Charlotte; Mørcke, Anne Mette; Musaeus, Peter

    2015-01-01

    This insider action research project aimed to improve interprofessional team performance at a surgical ward. The purpose of the project was (1) to critically appraise potential deficiencies in staffs’ identification, clinical judgment, and management of deteriorating ward patients, (2) to develop...

  2. Door locking and exit security measures on acute psychiatric admission wards

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijman, H.L.I.; Bowers, L.; Haglund, K.; Muir-Cochrane, E.; Simpson, A.; Merwe, M. van der

    2011-01-01

    Locking the exit doors of psychiatric wards is believed to reduce the risk of patients absconding. The aims of the study were to investigate both the prevalence of door locking and other exit security measures on UK admission wards, as well as whether door locking appears to be effective in keeping

  3. Authenticity in Learning--Nursing Students' Experiences at a Clinical Education Ward

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manninen, Katri; Henriksson, Elisabet Welin; Scheja, Max; Silen, Charlotte

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to explore and understand first year nursing students' experiences of learning at a clinical education ward. Design/methodology/approach: The setting is a clinical education ward for nursing students at a department of infectious diseases. A qualitative study was carried out exploring students' encounters with patients,…

  4. Noise pollution on an acute surgical ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaren, Emma; Maxwell-Armstrong, Charles

    2008-03-01

    This study was undertaken to measure and analyse noise levels over a 24-h period on five general surgical wards. Noise levels were measured on three wards with four bays of six beds each (wards A, B and C), one ward of side-rooms only (ward D) and a surgical high dependency unit (ward E) of eight beds. Noise levels were measured for 15 min at 4-hourly intervals over a period of 24 h midweek. The maximum sound pressure level, baseline sound pressure level and the equivalent continuous level (LEq) were recorded. Peak levels and LEq were compared with World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines for community noise. Control measurements were taken elsewhere in the hospital and at a variety of public places for comparison. The highest peak noise level recorded was 95.6 dB on ward E, a level comparable to a heavy truck. This exceeded all control peak readings except that recorded at the bus stop. Peak readings frequently exceeded 80 dB during the day on all wards. Each ward had at least one measurement which exceeded the peak sound level of 82.5 dB recorded in the supermarket. The highest peak measurements on wards A, B, C and E also exceeded peak readings at the hospital main entrance (83.4 dB) and coffee shop (83.4 dB). Ward E had the highest mean peak reading during the day and at night - 83.45 dB and 81.0 dB, respectively. Ward D, the ward of side-rooms, had the lowest day-time mean LEq (55.9 dB). Analysis of the LEq results showed that readings on ward E were significantly higher than readings on wards A, B and C as a group (P = 0.001). LEq readings on ward E were also significantly higher than readings on ward D (P < 0.001). Day and night levels differ significantly, but least so on the high dependency unit. The WHO guidelines state that noise levels on wards should not exceed 30 dB LEq (day and night) and that peak noise levels at night should not exceed 40 dB. Our results exceed these guidelines at all times. It is likely that these findings will translate to

  5. Environmental and nursing-staff factors contributing to aggressive and violent behaviour of patients in mental health facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evalina van Wijk

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Aggressive and violent behaviour of inpatients in mental health facilities disrupts the therapeutic alliance and hampers treatment.Objectives: The aim of the study was to describe patients’ perceptions of the possible environmental and staff factors that might contribute to their aggressive and violent behaviour after admission to a mental health facility; and to propose strategies to prevent and manage such behaviour.Research design: A qualitative, phenomenological study was utilised, in which purposefully sampled inpatients were interviewed over a six-month period. Inpatients were invited to participate if they had been admitted for at least seven days and were in touch with reality.Method: Forty inpatients in two mental health facilities in Cape Town participated in face-to-face, semi-structured interviews over a period of six months. Tesch’s descriptive method of open coding formed the framework for the data analysis and presentation of the results. Trustworthiness was ensured in accordance with the principles of credibility, confirmability, transferability and dependability.Results: Analysis of the data indicates two central categories in the factors contributing to patients’ aggressive and violent behaviour, namely, environmental factors and the attitude and behaviour of staff. Conclusion: From the perspective of the inpatients included in this study, aggressive and violent episodes are common and require intervention. Specific strategies for preventing such behaviour are proposed and it is recommended that these strategies be incorporated into the in-service training programmes of the staff of mental health facilities. These strategies could prevent, or reduce, aggressive and violent behaviour in in-patient facilities.

  6. Accounting for Inpatient Wards When Developing Master Surgical Schedules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanberkel, Peter T.; Boucherie, Richard J.; Hans, Erwin W.; Hurink, Johann L.; Lent, van Wineke A.M.; Harten, van Wim H.

    2011-01-01

    Background:As the demand for health care services increases, the need to improve patient flow between departments has likewise increased. Understanding how the master surgical schedule (MSS) affects the inpatient wards and exploiting this relationship can lead to a decrease in surgery cancellations,

  7. Accounting for Inpatient Wards when developing Master Surgical Schedules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanberkel, P.T.; Boucherie, Richardus J.; Hans, Elias W.; Hurink, Johann L.; van Lent, W.A.M.; van Harten, Willem H.; van Harten, Wim H.

    BACKGROUND: As the demand for health care services increases, the need to improve patient flow between departments has likewise increased. Understanding how the master surgical schedule (MSS) affects the inpatient wards and exploiting this relationship can lead to a decrease in surgery

  8. Accounting for Inpatient Wards when developing Master Surgical Schedules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanberkel, P.T.; Boucherie, Richardus J.; Hans, Elias W.; Hurink, Johann L.; van Lent, W.A.M.; van Harten, Willem H.; van Harten, Wim H.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: As the demand for health care services increases, the need to improve patient flow between departments has likewise increased. Understanding how the master surgical schedule (MSS) affects the inpatient wards and exploiting this relationship can lead to a decrease in surgery cancellations

  9. Light Atmosphere in Hospital Wards

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stidsen, Lone Mandrup

    . The four key aspects are: ‘Light’, ‘Space’, ‘Users’ and ‘Time’. The ‘Light’ aspect describes, as shown in (Fig 0.6), the character of the light, light information and light effect i.e. function, aesthetics or symbolism. The ‘Space’ aspect looks into the dimension of the space, geographical orientation...... in Denmark are lastly an investigation on light zones at the hospital ward defined in order to optimize the illumination. The third cycle of iteration is an experimental study testing a lighting concept developed and grounded in the knowledge gained through the first and second cycle. The fourth cycle...

  10. Ward Identities for Hall Transport

    CERN Document Server

    Hoyos, Carlos; Oz, Yaron

    2014-01-01

    We derive quantum field theory Ward identities based on linear area preserving and conformal transformations in 2+1 dimensions. The identities relate Hall viscosities, Hall conductivities and the angular momentum. They apply both for relativistic and non relativistic systems, at zero and at finite temperature. We consider systems with or without translation invariance, and introduce an external magnetic field and viscous drag terms. A special case of the identities yields the well known relation between the Hall conductivity and half the angular momentum density.

  11. Attitudes of patients and staff to research in a specialist palliative care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Catriona; Cornbleet, Mike

    2003-09-01

    Many randomized trials in specialist palliative care (SPC) have failed to recruit sufficient numbers of patients. A questionnaire was designed to assess the attitudes of inpatients of a SPC unit to taking part in research. Only 50% of patients were considered physically and mentally fit for interview. Forty patients and 13 nurses were asked to indicate their willingness to take part, or for their patients to take part, in research in general and then in three hypothetical trials. Reasons for their responses were analysed. The patients were generally agreeable to trial participation (66% 'quite happy' or 'very happy'). The nurses were strongly in favour of research participation for the same group of patients (92% 'quite happy' or 'very happy'). The most invasive study involving venepuncture and random drug allocation had the least favourable response (46% of patients and 54% of nurses 'quite happy' or 'very happy'). A trial of reflexology attracted 77% of patients, while 62% were happy to take part in a study involving mood assessment and interview. Factors deterring willingness to participate included the need for record keeping by the patient and concern about potential emotional strain. The nurses correctly identified some of the factors deterring patients, but often their willingness for trial participation did not match that of the patient. Although there is support for research among the small number of potential trial entrants in specialist palliative care units, their limited physical and emotional reserves make careful attention to appropriate trial design essential to the success of future studies.

  12. Improving patient satisfaction through the consistent use of scripting by the nursing staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustard, Lewis W

    2003-09-01

    An exploratory developmental model proposes a new method for responding to patient satisfaction on the basis of the hospital nurse obtaining subjective patient information at the patient's bedside during the first 24 hours of hospital admission and the day before discharge. The personal interview by the nurse uses a guided script, the Voice of the Patient (Figure 1), which is the front sheet in the medical record and a part of the critical medical care documents common to all hospital medical records. The information recorded in the Voice of the Patient actually comprises one-sentence quotes from the patient used by the hospital caregivers in responding to patient satisfaction during hospitalization, when care flaws can be corrected.

  13. Effectiveness of a Multimodal Intervention Program for Restraint Prevention in an Acute Spanish Psychiatric Ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzman-Parra, Jose; Aguilera Serrano, Carlos; García-Sánchez, Juan A; Pino-Benítez, Isabel; Alba-Vallejo, Mercedes; Moreno-Küstner, Berta; Mayoral-Cleries, Fermin

    2016-05-01

    International recommendations have called to implement strategies to reduce the use of coercion in psychiatric settings. However, in Spain there is a lack of research about intervention programs to reduce mechanical restraint in acute psychiatric units. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a multimodal intervention program based on the principles of six core strategies to reduce the frequency of use of mechanical restraint in an acute psychiatric ward. The design was a retrospective analysis of the frequency and duration of episodes of mechanical restraint prior to the intervention program (2012) and during the intervention program (2013) in one acute psychiatric ward. The intervention was governed by four strategies: (1) leadership and organizational changes, (2) registration and monitoring of risk patients, (3) staff training, and (4) involving patients in the treatment program. There was a significant difference between the mean number of monthly episodes of mechanical restraint per 1,000 patient days, pre-intervention (18.54 ± 8.78) compared with postintervention (8.53 ± 7.00; p = .005). We found the probability that mechanical restraint would occur in a hospital admission decreased after performing the intervention (odds ratio = .587; confidence interval = 0.411-0.838; p = .003) after adjusting for confounding variables. The total percentage of restrained patients fell from 15.07% to 9.74%. The main implication of the study is to support the effectiveness of specific intervention programs based on different measures to reduce mechanical restraint and without contemplating all the strategies that are considered effective. © The Author(s) 2016.

  14. The Importance of a Role-Specific, In-Hospital Ward Clerk Education Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Maggie

    2016-01-01

    Ward clerks are essential members of the healthcare team, providing administrative and organizational support to acute care units and clinics. This role influences such matters as nurses' direct patient-care time, timeliness of patient discharges, and patient safety. To support ward clerks in the varying responsibilities and complex scope of this role, a formal orientation and ongoing education program is imperative. Whereas corporate orientation informs new employees of overall organizational processes, a ward clerk-specific workplace education program prepares individuals for the demands of the position, ultimately supporting the healthcare team and patient safety.

  15. CCU病房突发室颤患者急救中的启示%Revelation of first aids of patients with sudden ventricular fibrillation in CCU ward

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    任艳琴; 郭任维; 吕晓春

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the characteristics of ventricular fibrillation and rescue success factors.Methods The type of illness,age,sex,symptoms,ventricular fibrillation occurred,defibrillation number,successful cardiopulmonary resuscitation time,recurrent ventricular fibrillation and laboratory examination of 36 patients with ventricular fibrillation were analyzed.Results The incidence and rescue success factors of ventricular fibrillation of patients with acute myocardial infarction in CCU ward were high.Within 4 hours of onset,particularly patients with frequent episodes of chest pain,anxiety,irritability had high incidence of ventricular fibrillation.Defibrillation and cardiopulmonmary resuscitation for more than 20 minutes there was still the probability of success of ventricular fibrillation.Conclusions Patients with coronary artery disease has high rescue success rate of ventricular fibrillation.Early identification and defibrillation is the key to successful treatment.CCU ward doctor should have persistent belief in rescuing patients with sudden cardiac death in particular ventricular fibrillation.%目的 探讨室颤患者的特点及抢救成功因素.方法 对36例室颤患者的疾病种类、年龄、性别、症状、室颤发生时间、除颤次数、心肺复苏成功时间、再发室颤情况及实验室检查等进行分析.结果 CCU病房急性心肌梗死患者室颤发生率高且抢救成功率高.在发病4h内,尤其频繁发作胸痛、焦虑、烦躁者发生室颤几率高,电击除颤及心肺复苏时间超过20 min仍有较高的抢救成功几率.结论 冠心病患者发生室颤抢救成功率高,尽快识别并进行电击除颤是抢救成功的关键.CCU病房医师对于心源性猝死尤其室颤患者的抢救应该有坚持不懈的信念.

  16. A Comparative Study on Effective Factors in Patient Safety Culture from the Nursing Staff Points of View

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalil Alimohammadzadeh

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Patient safety and its requirements fulfillment are today one of the useful valuation indicators in healthcare organizations. Thus, patient safety culture and its promotion are referred to as one of the most important issues raised in the country. The present study aims to examine the effective factors (personal and organizational in patient safety culture from the point of view of nursing staff in Bahman and Parsian private hospitals. Method: The study has an analytical cross-sectional design and is an applied research. HSOPSC (with Cronbach’s alpha coefficient was 0.82 and researcher-devised questionnaires (with Cronbach’s Alpha equal to 0.912 were the only data collection tools. Statistical population includes nursing staff of Bahman and Parsian private hospitals in north-west Tehran. A sample consisting of 150 nurse shift supervisors and head nurses was selected from the population. Necessary data for completing questionnaires were collected by interview. Data were analyzed using SPSS16 software. Given the levels of measurement for the variables, valid measures of central tendency (mean, standard deviation, correlation tests, Chi-square, t- test, and ANOVA were used. Results: The findings showed us that such factors as organizational commitment, error reporting system, management support, reward system, and employee empowerment equipment distribution have important roles in patient safety. Their P-values are reported <0.001 for all of them. Patient safety was not significantly associated with age (P=0.964, educational level (P=0.154, and work experience (P=0.888 There is no low awareness about safety culture in any hospital and their mean awareness about patient safety culture was equal to 3.13 ±0.478 and 3.68 ±0.587 in Parsian and Bahman hospitals, respectively (P<0.001. Conclusion: Error reporting system and organizational commitment respectively have the most and the least effect on promoting patient safety culture

  17. A qualitative study of the attitudes of patients and staff to the use of mobile phone technology for recording and gathering asthma data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleland, Jennifer; Caldow, Jan; Ryan, Dermot

    2007-01-01

    Linking mobile phone technology with electronic data collection may facilitate the research experience and improve compliance. We conducted a qualitative interview study using a purposeful sample of 10 patients with asthma and two research staff. Patient diary information was collected twice a day using an electronic peak flow meter linked to a mobile phone with an interactive screen to record current asthma symptoms transmitted to, and stored in, a server. An analysis of the interview data identified key technological adjustments and support factors which would improve the application of the technology in future clinical trials. Patients and staff believed that mobile phone technology would be useful in clinical practice as well as research. Its main uses were seen as identifying poor control more quickly and facilitating communication with healthcare professionals without the need for face-to-face consultation. There was a high degree of acceptability to both patients and staff.

  18. "We'll Get to You When We Get to You": Exploring Potential Contributions of Health Care Staff Behaviors to Patient Perceptions of Discrimination and Satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajeu, Gabriel S; Cherrington, Andrea L; Andreae, Lynn; Prince, Candice; Holt, Cheryl L; Halanych, Jewell H

    2015-10-01

    We qualitatively assessed patients' perceptions of discrimination and patient satisfaction in the health care setting specific to interactions with nonphysician health care staff. We conducted 12 focus-group interviews with African American and European American participants, stratified by race and gender, from June to November 2008. We used a topic guide to facilitate discussion and identify factors contributing to perceived discrimination and analyzed transcripts for relevant themes using a codebook. We enrolled 92 participants: 55 African Americans and 37 European Americans, all of whom reported perceived discrimination and lower patient satisfaction as a result of interactions with nonphysician health care staff. Perceived discrimination was associated with 2 main characteristics: insurance or socioeconomic status and race. Both verbal and nonverbal communication style on the part of nonphysician health care staff were related to individuals' perceptions of how they were treated. The behaviors of nonphysician health care staff in the clinical setting can potentially contribute to patients' perceptions of discrimination and lowered patient satisfaction. Future interventions to reduce health care discrimination should include a focus on staff cultural competence and customer service skills.

  19. Is it possible to strengthen psychiatric nursing staff's clinical supervision?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gonge, Henrik; Buus, Niels

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To test the effects of a meta-supervision intervention in terms of participation, effectiveness and benefits of clinical supervision of psychiatric nursing staff. BACKGROUND: Clinical supervision is regarded as a central component in developing mental health nursing practices, but the evidence...... on individuals or wards already actively engaged in clinical supervision, which suggested that individuals and wards without well-established supervision practices may require more comprehensive interventions targeting individual and organizational barriers to clinical supervision....

  20. The effect of routine rounding by nursing staff on patient satisfaction on a cardiac telemetry unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobaski, Tanya; Abraham, Merline; Fillmore, Rhonda; McFall, Dawn E; Davidhizar, Ruth

    2008-01-01

    Patients' perception of their care is affected by the attention they receive while hospitalized. It has become a popular metric for improving the quality of care delivered. Rounding is believed to be the key to patients' perception of the care they receive. In this study, nursing administration wanted to increase patient's perception of how well their needs were being met. Regular scheduled rounding provided an opportunity for nursing to interact with patients on a regular schedule. All nursing care categories measured exceeded the goal of 90% in the first month after implementation, with the largest increase of averaged percentages being "attention to special or personal needs.

  1. Stuck in tradition - A qualitative study on barriers for implementation of evidence-based nutritional care perceived by nursing staff

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O Connell, Malene Barfod; Jensen, Pia Søe; Andersen, Signe Lindgård

    2017-01-01

    AIM: To explore the barriers for nutritional care as perceived by nursing staff at an acute orthopedic ward, aiming to implement evidence-based nutritional care. BACKGROUND: Previous studies indicate that nurses recognize nutritional care as important, but interventions are often lacking....... These studies show that a range of barriers influence the attempt to optimize nutritional care. Before the implementation of evidence-based nutritional care, we examined barriers for nutritional care among the nursing staff. DESIGN: Qualitative study. METHODS: Four focus groups with thirteen members...... treatment and Struggling with existing resources. The nursing staff was lacking both knowledge and common practice regarding nutritional care. They felt they protected patient autonomy by accepting patient's reluctance to eat or getting a feeding tube. The lack of nutritional focus from doctors decreased...

  2. Studying patient safety culture from the viewpoint of staffs in educational hospitals in Tehran City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Mohebi Far

    2015-04-01

    Conclusion: It should be noted that paying more attention to the patient safety culture can lead to improve hospitals condition, as a whole, and to have a patient-friendly environment. Special attention should be paid to dimensions with the lowest mean score in order to strengthen them.

  3. Evaluating the Imbalance Between Increasing Hemodialysis Patients and Medical Staff Shortage After the Great East Japan Earthquake: Report From a Hemodialysis Center Near the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshiba, Takaaki; Nishiuchi, Takamitsu; Akaihata, Hidenori; Haga, Nobuhiro; Kojima, Yoshiyuki; Kubo, Hajime; Kasahara, Masato; Hayashi, Masayuki

    2016-04-01

    The Great East Japan Earthquake in 2011 caused an unprecedented imbalance between an increasing number of hemodialysis patients and medical staff shortage in the Sousou area, the site of the Fukushima nuclear power plants. In 2014, capacity of our hemodialysis center reached a critical limit due to such an imbalance. We attempted to evaluate the effort of medical staff to clarify to what extent their burden had increased post-disaster. The ratio of total dialysis sessions over total working days of medical staff was determined as an approximate indicator of effort per month. The mean value of each year was compared. Despite fluctuations of the ratio, the mean value did not differ from 2010 to 2013. However, the ratio steadily increased in 2014, and there was a significant increase in the mean value. This proposed indicator of the effort of medical staff appears to reflect what we experienced, although its validity must be carefully examined in future studies.

  4. The effect of subcutaneous injection duration on bruising due to Clexane (enoxaparin injection in patients with ACS hospitalized in CCU and Post CCU wards in Vali-e Asrhospital of Fasain 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bijani M.

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to compare the duration of subcutaneous injection of Clexane on the bruising caused by the same. The sample included 80 patients with ACS under treatment with Clexanein CCU and Post CCU wards. For each patient, two 10-second subcutaneous injections (experimental group and a 30-second injection (control group of Clexane were performed in the abdominal area. The interval between injections was 12 hours and the bruising was measured using a flexible plastic ruler 48 and 60 hours after each injection. The size of bruising caused by 30-sec. injections was significantly less than that of 10-second injections. The average size of bruising for30-second injections in 48 and 60 hours after injection was 15.65 ±10.67 and 12.98 ± 8.12respectively. No bruising conditions observed 48 and 60 hours after 30-second injections were significantly lower than after 10- second injections. In most cases, bruising after 10- and 30-second injections was significantly higher in women than in men. There was no significant difference between bruising and age. It is suggested that the subcutaneous injection duration be increased to 30 seconds to enhance the quality of care and minimize the unpleasant and stressful experience for patients.

  5. The ward of ultraviolet germicidal irradiation to reduce cerebral hemorrhage patients with postoperative infection%病房紫外线照射消毒对降低脑出血患者术后感染的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王作珍

    2012-01-01

    目的:探讨病房紫外线照射消毒对降低脑出血患者术后感染的影响,为临床实践提供参考.方法:对60例脑出血患者术后未行病房紫外线照射消毒和行病房紫外线照射进行对比研究,以评价2种不同方法的临床效果.结果:病房紫外线照射消毒(2次/天)与未行病房紫外线照射消毒患者感染率的比较(P<0.05),有统计学意义.%Objective Investigate the influence of ward ultraviolet irradiation sterilization to reducing postoperative infection in patients with cerebral hemorrhage, provide a reference for clinical practice. Method Comparative study of 60 cases of cerebral hemorrhage patients whether use UV disinfection unit or not, to evaluating Two different methods of clinical results. Results Ultraviolet radiation disinfection unit (2 times / day) with no line UV disinfection unit comparison of patients with infection (P<0.05), was statistically significant.

  6. Leadership support for ward managers in acute mental health inpatient settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonner, Gwen; McLaughlin, Sue

    2014-05-01

    This article shares findings of work undertaken with a group of mental health ward managers to consider their roles through workshops using an action learning approach. The tensions between the need to balance the burden of administrative tasks and act as clinical role models, leaders and managers are considered in the context of providing recovery-focused services. The group reviewed their leadership styles, broke down the administrative elements of their roles using activity logs, reviewed their working environments and considered how recovery focused they believed their wards to be. Findings support the notion that the ward manager role in acute inpatient settings is at times unmanageable. Administration is one aspect of the role for which ward managers feel unprepared and the high number of administrative tasks take them away from front line clinical care, leading to frustration. Absence from clinical areas reduces opportunities for role modeling good clinical practice to other staff. Despite the frustrations of administrative tasks, overall the managers thought they were supportive to their staff and that their wards were recovery focused.

  7. Orthopedic Perioperative Care: viewpoint of the patient, nursing staff and medical residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josilaine Porfírio da Silva

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to identify the actions of perioperative care taken with the orthopedic surgical patient in view of the surgical team and the patient. Qualitative descriptive and exploratory research, conducted with 20 professionals, in the period from October 2009 to July 2011. Data collection took place by means of a semi-structured interview addressing issues related to care and self-care to patients undergoing orthopedic surgery. Results were arranged into three categories: (a Meanings of perioperative care: covered integral assistance, prevention of damage and care subjective; (b patients' needs perceived by health team: evidenced basic and specific human needs; (c Actions of care: surgical indication, evaluation revealed the wait, use of special materials and surgical risk. From the perceived needs is that care happens, its meaning is dynamic and timeless. This study showed that the meaning of care remained related to the health-disease process.

  8. Clinical characteristics of very old patients hospitalized in internal medicine wards for heart failure: a sub-analysis of the FADOI-CONFINE Study Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Biagi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The incidence and prevalence of chronic heart failure are increasing worldwide, as is the number of very old patients (>85 years affected by this disease. The aim of this sub-analysis of the multicenter, observational CONFINE study was to detect clinical and therapeutic peculiarities in patients with chronic heart failure aged >85 years. We recruited patients admitted with a diagnosis of chronic heart failure and present in the hospital in five index days, in 91 Units of Internal Medicine. The patients’ clinical characteristics, functional and cognitive status, and the management of the heart failure were analyzed. A total of 1444 subjects were evaluated, of whom 329 (23.1% were over 85 years old. Signs and symptoms of chronic heart failure were more common in very old patients, as were severe renal insufficiency, anemia, disability and cognitive impairment. The present survey found important age-related differences (concomitant diseases, cognitive status among patients with chronic heart failure, as well as different therapeutic strategies and clinical outcome for patients over 85 years old. Since these patients are usually excluded from clinical trials and their management remains empirical, specific studies focused on the treatment of very old patients with chronic heart failure are needed.

  9. The Effects of L-Asparaginase on Blood Triglycerides, Glucose, and Albumin Levels and Coagulation State in ALL Patients in Pediatric Ward

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heydarian Farhad

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Asparaginase is one of the most important agents in the treatment of ALL. However, it has some side effects including dislipidemia, hyperglycemia, coagulopathy and hepatotoxicity. We studied its side ef-fects on our patients. The effects of L-asparaginase were assessed on 25 new ALL patients (case group and 25 patients with known ALL who had completed their treatment before. Sixty two percent of cases were male and remainder was female. The mean age of patients was 7.2 ± 3.8 years. In our patients, there was a rise in triglycerides (TG was seen following L- asparaginase administration (P = 0.02. Also, PT prolongation (P = 0.02 and hypoalbominemia (P = 0.002 were detected which could PT prolongation and hypoalbuminemia may be seen with L-asparaginase therapy that can be prevented with transfusion of FFP. Hypertriglyceridemia is often asymptomatic with no need for therapy.

  10. Effect of a spiritual care training program for staff on patient outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Grace Meijuan; Tan, Yung Ying; Cheung, Yin Bun; Lye, Weng Kit; Lim, Sock Hui Amy; Ng, Wan Ru; Puchalski, Christina; Neo, Patricia Soek Hui

    2017-08-01

    Physicians and nurses do not assess spirituality routinely, even though spiritual care is a vital part of palliative care for patients with an advanced serious illness. The aim of our study was to determine whether a training program for healthcare professionals on spirituality and the taking of a spiritual history would result in improved patient quality of life (QoL) and spiritual well-being. This was a cluster-controlled trial of a spiritual care training program for palliative care doctors and nurses. Three of seven clinical teams (clusters) received the intervention, while the other four served as controls. Included patients were newly referred to the palliative care service, had an estimated survival of more than one month, and were aware of their diagnosis and prognosis. The primary outcome measure was the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Spiritual Well-Being (FACIT-Sp) patient-reported questionnaire, which patients completed at two timepoints. Total FACIT-Sp score includes the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-General (FACT-G) questionnaire, which measures overall quality of life, as well as a spiritual well-being score. Some 144 patients completed the FACIT-Sp at both timepoints-74 in the control group and 70 in the intervention group. The change in overall quality of life, measured by change in FACT-G scores, was 3.89 points (95% confidence interval [CI 95%] = -0.42 to 8.19, p = 0.076) higher in the intervention group than in the control group. The difference between the intervention and control groups in terms of change in spiritual well-being was 0.32 (CI 95% = -2.23 to 2.88, p = 0.804). A brief spiritual care training program can possibly help bring about enhanced improvement of global patient QoL, but the effect on patients' spiritual well-being was not as evident in our participants. Further study with larger sample sizes is needed to allow for more definite conclusions to be drawn.

  11. 普通外科住院患者营养风险筛查及营养支持应用情况%Nutritional risk screening and application of nutritional support for hospitalized patients in general surgical wards

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张海鸣; 周科军; 潘瑞蓉; 王涛涛; 周晶晶; 夏松; 王宏星

    2015-01-01

    目的 调查普通外科住院患者营养风险、营养不良发生率及营养支持应用情况,评价营养支持的合理性.方法 普通外科住院患者1 236例,采用营养风险评估法(NRS 2002)进行营养风险筛查,对存在营养风险患者进行营养不良评估,并分析患者营养风险发生率及营养支持比例. 结果 共1 156名患者完成NRS 2002筛查,完成率93.5%,其中肝胆胰疾病患者521例,胃肠疾病患者635例. 营养风险总发生率为39.1%,营养不良发生率为52.7%;胃肠疾病患者的营养风险及营养不良发生率(43.0%、26.5%)均高于肝胆胰疾病患者(34.4%、13.4%) ( P<0.05);有营养风险且营养不良患者、有营养风险但无营养不良患者以及无营养风险且无营养不良患者行营养支持者分别占64.7%、66.8%、16.9%,所有患者肠外和肠内营养的应用比例为3.1 :1. 结论 普通外科住院患者存在明显的营养风险或营养不足,不同疾病的营养风险及营养不良发生率不同,应注意分病种筛查和评估;有营养风险患者给予营养支持率不足,肠内肠外营养应用存在明显不合理性.%Objective To investigate the incidences of nutritional risk and malnutrition,and the application of nutrition support among hospitalized patients in general surgical wards, and to evaluate the rationality of nutrition support.Methods A nutritional risk screening was performed in 1 236 hospitalized patients in the general surgery ward with nutritional risk screening 2002 ( NRS2002 ) .The assessment on the condition of malnutrition was conducted in the patients with nutritional risk.The incidence of nutritional risk and the proportion of the patients accepting nutrition support were analyzed.Results A total of 1 156 patients were involved in the NRS2002 screening,with the response rate of 93.5%.There were 521 patients with liver,gallbladder and pancreas diseases,and 635 patients with gastrointestinal diseases.The overall incidence of

  12. [Conditioning of community nurse duties towards the patient treated by family doctor--the opinion of family doctor staff members].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogala-Pawelczyk, Grazyna

    2002-01-01

    The team of family doctor is the main link in the basic health care. It consists of community nurses who work according to the plan specifying the health needs of patients. Community nurses fulfil the needs of patients of various age and health conditions. The paper presents a part of studies on the area and activities of community nurses working in the team of family doctor. An attempt was made to answer the following questions: what are the duties of community nurse, what factors make it easy to fulfil the duties and what factors make the work more difficult? The study comprised a few dozen of community nurses and family doctors all over the country. It was carried out from January to April 2001. Two questionnaires were used for community nurses and for family doctors. Medical documentation was also analysed. It gave answers to problem questions: duties of community nurses include: co-operation in diagnosing and treatment, health promotion and education, fulfilment of therapeutic and nursing programme, factors which help to realise the programme include: qualifications, clearly stated duties, equipment, factors which make the work difficult comprise: lack of staff, poor salary, legislation problems, difficulties in self-development, lack of co-operation from patients and their families. No differences in the opinion of both groups on the duties of community nurses were noticed.

  13. 探讨老年病房护患间有效沟通技巧%Explore effective communication skills between nurses and patients in the elderly ward

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谭晓娟

    2015-01-01

    探讨护士与老年住院患者的沟通技巧,通过多种沟通方式让护士的人文关怀理念在老年患者中得到实现,建立一种相互平等、相互尊重的护患关系,让老年患者充分信任护士,融洽护患关系,提高老年患者的理解能力和接受能力,从而有利于老年患者疾病的治疗,提高患者对护理工作的满意度.%Discuss the communication skills of nurses to elderly inpatients.Through a variety of communication methods to make the concept of humanistic care of nurses realized in the hearts of every elderly patients.To establish a mutual equality,mutual respect nurse-patient relationship,let the elderly patients fully trust the nurses,make a harmonious relationship between nurses and patients,improve understanding and acceptance of elderly patients,which will contribute to the treatment of diseases in elderly patients and improve patient satisfaction to nursing service.

  14. Key role of staff competencies for patient and donor safety in a bone marrow transplantation unit: design and implementation of an accredited training and self-assessment program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamanna, C; Baroni, M; Bisin, S; Gianassi, S; Bambi, F; Caselli, D; Aricò, M

    2010-01-01

    Human resources represent at the moment the most critical factor in an hospital setting characterized by a high rate of staff turnover. It is important to ensure a consistent level of expertise and knowledge of professionals who work in health care facilities to provide quality services and simultaneously support the implementation of strategies for patient safety. Unfortunately, the development of effective interventions for training newly added staff and self-evaluation of skills possessed by trained staff are closely related to understanding critical aspects of the organization. At the new Center for Bone Marrow Transplantation and Blood Transfusion Service in Meyer Hospital, during the last year, a group of professional nurses and technicians completed a specific plan to train new staff and, at the same time, a program of self-assessment of skills for experienced staff. The main purpose of this project was to promote skills development by newly added as well as experienced staff, to identify areas of weaknesses, and to correct them with training (organized by the hospital, departmental, or individual) designed to improve performance. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The Johns Hopkins Hospital Ward-Nutrition Communication Application

    OpenAIRE

    Ardolino, Margaret K.; Kahane, Stephen N.; Nichols, Karen; Richmond, Debra W.

    1987-01-01

    Communicating patient-specific diet information at any large medical institution is a complex process. The Johns Hopkins Hospital has chosen to automate the manual method of communicating this information. The development of the “Ward-Nutrition Communication Application” will allow users on an inpatient Nursing unit to order patient diets and other nutritional needs utilizing a multi-windowed, menu-based and mouse driven environment. This, and other applications, will run on high performance,...

  16. Students' Perceptions on an Interprofessional Ward Round Training – A Qualitative Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikendei, C.

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Ward rounds are an essential activity for interprofessional teams in hospital settings and represent complex tasks requiring not only medical knowledge but also communication skills, clinical technical skills, patient management skills and team-work skills. The present study aimed to analyse final year students’, nurses’ as well as physiotherapists’ views on a simulation-based interprofessional ward round training.Methods: In two successive passes a total number of 29 final year students, nursing students and physiotherapy students (16 in the first run, 13 in the second volunteered to participate in two standardized patient ward round scenarios: (1 patient with myocardial infarction, and (2 patient with poorly controlled diabetes. Views on the interprofessional ward round training were assessed using focus groups.Results: Focus group based feedback contained two main categories (A ward round training benefits and (B difficulties. Positive aspects enfolded course preparation, setting of the training, the involvement of the participants during training and the positive learning atmosphere. Difficulties were seen in the flawed atmosphere and realization of ward rounds in the daily clinical setting with respect to inter-professional aspects, and course benefit for the different professional groups.Conclusion: The presented inter-professional ward round training represents a well received and valuable model of interprofessional learning. Further research should assess its effectiveness, processes of interprofessional interplay and transfer into clinical practice.

  17. RFID-based Information System for Patients and Medical Staff Identification and Tracking

    OpenAIRE

    Cerlinca, Tudor Ioan; Turcu, Cristina; Turcu, Cornel; Cerlinca, Marius

    2010-01-01

    RFID applications can provide significant benefits to the healthcare industry to ensure patient safety and also to improve supply chain efficiency. In fact, healthcare is predicted to be one of the major growth areas for RFID. An analysis (Frost & Sullivan, 2005) estimates that the RFID in healthcare and pharmaceutical applications markets will reach $2318.7 million in 2011. This chapter presents some applications that integrate RFID technology in healthcare domain. It also presents an RFID-b...

  18. Call 4 Concern: patient and relative activated critical care outreach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odell, Mandy; Gerber, Karin; Gager, Melanie

    Patients can experience unexpected deterioration in their physiological condition that can lead to critical illness, cardiac arrest, admission to the intensive care unit and death. While ward staff can identify deterioration through monitoring physiological signs, these signs can be missed, interpreted incorrectly or mismanaged. Rapid response systems using early warning scores can fail if staff do not follow protocols or do not notice or manage deterioration adequately. Nurses often notice deterioration intuitively because of their knowledge of individual patients. Patients and their relatives have the greatest knowledge of patients, and can often pick up subtle signs physiological deterioration before this is identified by staff or monitoring systems. However, this ability has been largely overlooked. Call 4 Concern (C4C) is a scheme where patients and relatives can call critical care teams directly if they are concerned about a patient's condition- it is believed to be the first of its kind in the UK. A C4C feasibility project ran for six months, covering patients being transferred from the intensive care unit to general wards. C4C has the potential to prevent clinical deterioration and is valued by patients and relatives. Concerns of ward staff could be managed through project management. As it is relatively new, this field offers further opportunities for research.

  19. 某医院传染科老年肺结核患者孤独感的原因分析%The Causes of Loneliness in Elderly Patients with Pulmonary Tuberculosis by Environmental Stress of Infectious Diseases Ward

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邬梅珍; 杨敏; 康明芬

    2011-01-01

    [目的]分析老年肺结核患者在传染科病房特定环境下所产生的压力因素,进一步探讨导致状态孤独感心理体验的原因,并提出对策.[方法]采用质性研究的方法对37名老年肺结核患者进行深入访谈、现场记录,并进行资料整理,提炼主题.[结果]传染科老年肺结核患者产生状态孤独感的环境压力因素来自三方面.(1)自然环境压力:有个人空间的改变、物理居住环境的改变、方位空间的隔离;(2)社会环境压力:有社会支持不足、经济条件不富裕、家属对疾病认知偏差;(3)个体因素压力:有特定的人格特点和行为方式、患者对疾病认知程度.[结论]护理人员应正确认识老年肺结核患者在特定环境所产生的压力而导致的孤独感心理,为患者提供有效的应对援助.提供舒适的物理环境、适宜的个人空间、正确对待空间隔离,提高社会支持及利用度、指导应用正确的减压策略.%[Objective] To identify the stress factors in elderly patients with pulmonary tuberculosis patients in specific circumstances of infectious diseases ward, to further explore the causes of psychological experience of loneliness and to propose relative solutions. [ Methods ] Using qualitative research methods, 37 cases of elderly patients with pulmonary tuberculosis patients were interviewed with field recording and followed by data consolidation. [ Results ] Infectious diseases ward elderly patients with pulmonary tuberculosis patients undertake environmental stressors were identified from 1) natural stressors: personal space changes and living environment space isolation; 2)socio-environmental stressors: lack of social support, poor economic conditions and, cognitive biases for their illness from family members; 3) individual factors: specific personality/behavior andpersonal cognition of disease. [ Conclusion ] The loneliness of elderly patients with pulmonary tuberculosis patients under

  20. Evaluation of the alcohol use disorders identification test and the drug use disorders identification test among patients at a Norwegian psychiatric emergency ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundersen, Oystein Hoel; Mordal, Jon; Berman, Anne H; Bramness, Jørgen G

    2013-01-01

    High rates of substance use disorders (SUD) among psychiatric patients are well documented. This study explores the usefulness of the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT) and the Drug Use Disorders Identification Test (DUDIT) in identifying SUD in emergency psychiatric patients. Of 287 patients admitted consecutively, 256 participants (89%) were included, and 61-64% completed the questionnaires and the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI), used as the reference standard. Both AUDIT and DUDIT were valid (area under the curve above 0.92) and reliable (Cronbach's alpha above 0.89) in psychotic and nonpsychotic men and women. The suitable cutoff scores for AUDIT were higher among the psychotic than nonpsychotic patients, with 12 versus 10 in men and 8 versus 5 in women. The suitable cutoff scores for DUDIT were 1 in both psychotic and nonpsychotic women, and 5 versus 1 in psychotic and nonpsychotic men, respectively. This study shows that AUDIT and DUDIT may provide precise information about emergency psychiatric patients' problematic alcohol and drug use.

  1. Case management for at-risk elderly patients in the English integrated care pilots: observational study of staff and patient experience and secondary care utilisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Roland

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In 2009, the English Department of Health appointed 16 integrated care pilots which aimed to provide better integrated care. We report the quantitative results from a multi-method evaluation of six of the demonstration projects which used risk profiling tools to identify older people at risk of emergency hospital admission, combined with intensive case management for people identified as at risk. The interventions focused mainly on delivery system redesign and improved clinical information systems, two key elements of Wagner's Chronic Care Model.Methods: Questionnaires to staff and patients. Difference-in-differences analysis of secondary care utilisation using data on 3,646 patients and 17,311 matched controls, and changes in overall secondary care utilisation.Results: Most staff thought that care for their patients had improved. More patients reported having a care plan but they found it significantly harder to see a doctor or nurse of their choice and felt less involved in decisions about their care. Case management interventions were associated with a 9% increase in emergency admissions. We found some evidence of imbalance between cases and controls which could have biased this estimate, but simulations of the possible effect of unobserved confounders showed that it was very unlikely that the sites achieved their goal of reducing emergency admissions. However, we found significant reductions of 21% and 22% in elective admissions and outpatient attendance in the six months following an intervention, and overall inpatient and outpatient costs were significantly reduced by 9% during this period. Area level analyses of whole practice populations suggested that overall outpatient attendances were significantly reduced by 5% two years after the start of the case management schemes.Conclusion: Case management may result in improvements in some aspects of care and has the potential to reduce secondary care costs. However, to improve

  2. Case management for at-risk elderly patients in the English integrated care pilots: observational study of staff and patient experience and secondary care utilisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Roland

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In 2009, the English Department of Health appointed 16 integrated care pilots which aimed to provide better integrated care. We report the quantitative results from a multi-method evaluation of six of the demonstration projects which used risk profiling tools to identify older people at risk of emergency hospital admission, combined with intensive case management for people identified as at risk. The interventions focused mainly on delivery system redesign and improved clinical information systems, two key elements of Wagner's Chronic Care Model. Methods: Questionnaires to staff and patients. Difference-in-differences analysis of secondary care utilisation using data on 3,646 patients and 17,311 matched controls, and changes in overall secondary care utilisation. Results: Most staff thought that care for their patients had improved. More patients reported having a care plan but they found it significantly harder to see a doctor or nurse of their choice and felt less involved in decisions about their care. Case management interventions were associated with a 9% increase in emergency admissions. We found some evidence of imbalance between cases and controls which could have biased this estimate, but simulations of the possible effect of unobserved confounders showed that it was very unlikely that the sites achieved their goal of reducing emergency admissions. However, we found significant reductions of 21% and 22% in elective admissions and outpatient attendance in the six months following an intervention, and overall inpatient and outpatient costs were significantly reduced by 9% during this period. Area level analyses of whole practice populations suggested that overall outpatient attendances were significantly reduced by 5% two years after the start of the case management schemes. Conclusion: Case management may result in improvements in some aspects of care and has the potential to reduce secondary care costs. However, to improve

  3. Agreement between venous and arterial blood gas analysis of acid-base status in critical care and ward patients: a retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Claudio M; Priestap, Fran

    2017-08-23

    To determine whether the use of venous blood gases can be a suitable alternative to arterial sampling to evaluate acid-base status. The database of the clinical laboratory in a large academic hospital was searched for records of venous blood gas analysis and an arterial sample taken within ten minutes from the same patient. Bland-Altman analyses of pH, pCO2, and lactate were performed for samples obtained from patients separately from within and outside the intensive care unit (ICU). In 2,296 paired arterial-venous samples from 351 ICU patients, the bias was 0.044, -6.2 mmHg, and -0.07 mEq·L(-1) for pH, pCO2, and lactate, respectively. The range of agreement centred on this bias (upper minus lower level of agreement) was 0.134, 16.7 mmHg, and 1.35 mEq·L(-1) for pH, pCO2, and lactate, respectively. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) were 0.79, 0.76, and 0.99 for pH, pCO2, and lactate, respectively, indicating excellent agreement. Multiple samples obtained from the same patient had a median standard deviation of 0.02, 2.77 mmHg, and 0.18 mEq·L(-1) for pH, pCO2, and lactate, respectively. Similar agreement was observed in samples from patients outside the ICU, although the ICC was only 0.53 for pCO2. Venous gases are suitable for initial evaluation of acid-base status in critically ill patients. Based on clinical evaluation, an arterial sample may then be considered for confirmation, and thereafter, venous blood gases could be sufficient for monitoring response to treatment.

  4. Benefits of automated surface decontamination of a radioiodine ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westcott, Eliza; Broadhurst, Alicia; Crossley, Steven; Lee, Lloyd; Phan, Xuyen; Scharli, Rainer; Xu, Yan

    2012-02-01

    A floor-washing robot has been acquired to assist physicists with decontamination of radioiodine therapy ward rooms after discharge of the patient at Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital. The effectiveness of the robot in decontaminating the ward has been evaluated. A controlled experiment was performed by deliberately contaminating a polyvinyl chloride flooring offcut with 131I followed by automated decontamination with the robot. The extent of fixed and removable contamination was assessed before and after decontamination by two methods: (1) direct Geiger-Mueller counting and (2) beta-counting wipe tests. Surface contamination was also assessed in situ on the ward by Geiger-Mueller counting and wipe testing. Contamination maps confirmed that contamination was removed rather than spread around by the robot. Wipe testing revealed that the robot was successful in clearing approximately 60-80% of removable contamination. The robotic floor-washing device was considered suitable to provide effective automated decontamination of the radioiodine ward. In addition, the robot affords other benefits: the time spent by the physicists decontaminating the room is greatly reduced offering financial and occupational safety and health benefits. The robot has also found utility in other decontamination applications in the healthcare environment.

  5. Adaption, implementation and evaluation of collaborative service improvements in the testing and result communication process in primary care from patient and staff perspectives: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litchfield, Ian J; Bentham, Louise M; Lilford, Richard J; McManus, Richard J; Hill, Ann; Greenfield, Sheila

    2017-08-30

    Increasing numbers of blood tests are being ordered in primary care settings and the swift and accurate communication of test results is central to providing high quality care. The process of testing and result communication is complex and reliant on the coordinated actions of care providers, external groups in laboratory and hospital settings, and patients. This fragmentation leaves it vulnerable to error and the need to improve an apparently fallible system is apparent. However, primary care is complex and does not necessarily adopt change in a linear and prescribed manner influenced by a range of factors relating to practice staff, patients and organisational factors. To account for these competing perspectives, we worked in conjunction with both staff and patients to develop and implement strategies intended to improve patient satisfaction and increase efficiency of existing processes. The study applied the principles of 'experience-based co-design' to identify key areas of weakness and source proposals for change from staff and patients. The study was undertaken within two primary practices situated in South Birmingham (UK) of contrasting size and socio-economic environment. Senior practice staff were involved in the refinement of the interventions for introduction. We conducted focus groups singly constituted of staff and patients at each practice to determine suitability, applicability and desirability alongside the practical implications of their introduction. At each practice four of the six proposals for change were implemented these were increased access to phlebotomy, improved receptionist training, proactive communication of results, and increased patient awareness of the tests ordered and the means of their communication. All were received favourably by both patients and staff. The remaining issues around the management of telephone calls and the introduction of electronic alerts for missing results were not addressed due to constraints of time and

  6. Software for the estimation of foetal radiation dose to patients and staff in diagnostic radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osei, E K [Department of Radiation Physics, Princess Margaret Hospital, 610 University Avenue, Toronto ON M5G 2M9 (Canada); Darko, J B [Department of Radiation Physics, Princess Margaret Hospital, 610 University Avenue, Toronto ON M5G 2M9 (Canada); Faulkner, K [Quality Assurance Centre, Newcastle General Hospital, Westgate Road, Newcastle Upon Tyne NE4 6BE (United Kingdom); Kotre, C J [Regional Medical Physics Department, Newcastle General Hospital, Westgate Road, Newcastle Upon Tyne NE4 6BE (United Kingdom)

    2003-06-01

    Occasionally, it is clinically necessary to perform a radiological examination(s) on a woman who is known to be pregnant or an examination is performed on a woman who subsequently discovers that she was pregnant at the time. In radiological examinations, especially of the lower abdomen and pelvis area, the foetus is directly irradiated. It is therefore important to be able to determine the absorbed dose to the foetus in diagnostic radiology for pregnant patients as well as the foetal dose from occupational exposure of the pregnant worker. The determination of the absorbed dose to the unborn child in diagnostic radiology is of interest as a basis for risk estimates from medical exposure of the pregnant patient and occupational exposure of the pregnant worker. In this paper we describe a simple computer program, FetDose, which calculates the dose to the foetus from both medical and occupational exposures of the pregnant woman. It also calculates the risks of in utero exposure, compares calculated doses with published data in the literature and provides information on the natural spontaneous risks. The program will be a useful tool for the medical and paramedical personnel who are involved with foetal dose (and hence risks) calculations and counselling of pregnant women who may be concerned about in utero exposure of their foetuses.

  7. Invited article: Managing disruptive physician behavior: impact on staff relationships and patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenstein, Alan H; O'Daniel, Michelle

    2008-04-22

    Disruptive behavior can have a significant impact on care delivery, which can adversely affect patient safety and quality outcomes of care. Disruptive behavior occurs across all disciplines but is of particular concern when it involves physicians and nurses who have primary responsibility for patient care. There is a higher frequency of disruptive behavior in neurologists compared to most other nonsurgical specialties. Disruptive behavior causes stress, anxiety, frustration, and anger, which can impede communication and collaboration, which can result in avoidable medical errors, adverse events, and other compromises in quality care. Health care organizations need to be aware of the significance of disruptive behaviors and develop appropriate policies, standards, and procedures to effectively deal with this serious issue and reinforce appropriate standards of behavior. Having a better understanding of what contributes to, incites, or provokes disruptive behaviors will help organizations provide appropriate educational and training programs that can lessen the likelihood of occurrence and improve the overall effectiveness of communication among the health care team.

  8. "SEND IN THE CLOWNS!", OR THE IMAGINATION AT WORK: THE NARRATIVES OF THREE PEDIATRIC WARD CLOWNS

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Francesca Gobbo

    2014-01-01

      The article presents an interpretation of three narratives collected from three young professionals who volunteer as clowns for the young patients of a pediatric ward in a northern Italian hospital...

  9. Do User-Applied Safety Labels on Medication Syringes Reduce the Incidence of Medication Errors During Rapid Medical Response Intervention for Deteriorating Patients on Wards? A Systematic Search and Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhail, John; Grantham, Hugh; King, Lindy

    2017-09-01

    Intravenous medication errors (MEs) occur during medical emergency situations. An initiative, not yet in common practice, that could address these errors is safety labeling. The aim of this review was to identify and appraise research evidence related to the impact of user-applied medication safety labeling on reducing the incidence of MEs during rapid medical response intervention for patient deterioration in the ward setting. A systematic search and review framework was used to conduct the review. A comprehensive database search was conducted of BioMed Central, Clinical Trials, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Expanded Academic ASAP, Joanna Briggs Institute, MEDLINE, OVID, ProQuest Central, PubMed, Wiley Online Library, and World Health Organization Library. The Young and Solomon (2009) critical appraisal tool was used to critically appraise the identified research articles. Each article was then analyzed using a thematic network strategy to identify commonality. Four primary themes were identified; they were as follows: MEs occur during medical emergency responses (MERs); MEs occur throughout the medication administration process; MERs are stressful and are associated with MEs; and role of medication labeling in reducing MEs during MERs. Greater vigilance is required by health professionals during the medication administration process. The implementation of specific medication safety labeling into the MER could be beneficial in reducing the overall incidence of MEs. Further research is required to validate the merits of a MER medication safety labeling system.

  10. Effective teamwork in primary healthcare through a structured patient-sorting system - a qualitative study on staff members' conceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maun, Andy; Engström, Miriam; Frantz, Anna; Brämberg, Elisabeth Björk; Thorn, Jörgen

    2014-11-28

    Primary healthcare meets increased demands from an aging population concerning quality and availability while concurrently dealing with a growing shortage of general practitioners and imperfect efficiency in healthcare processes. Reorganization and team development can improve quality and performance but projects in primary care frequently do not attain the targeted results. By developing and introducing a structured patient-sorting system a primary healthcare centre in Western Sweden increased its access rate significantly and employed its medical professionals more efficiently. The aim of this study was to explore staff members' conceptions of the structured patient-sorting system in order to gain an inside perspective on this project. In this qualitative study 16 interviews were conducted over a period of two years and data was analysed using a phenomenographic approach to identify the various conceptions of the eleven participants. Three categories of description were identified: The system was conceptualized as 1) a framework for the development of patient-centred processes that were clear and consistent, 2) a promotor of professional development and a shared ideal of cooperative practice and 3) a common denominator and catalyst in conflict management. This study demonstrates that the introduction of a structured patient-sorting system makes it possible for several important change processes to take place concurrently: improvement of healthcare processes, empowerment of professionals and team development. It therefore indicates the importance of an appropriate, contextualized framework to support multiple concomitant quality improvement processes. Knowledge from this study can be used to assist and improve future implementations in primary healthcare centres.

  11. Methadone Overdose and Its Complications in Patients Admitted to the Toxicology Emergency Ward of Baharloo Hospital of Tehran in 2011-2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behnam Behnoush

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: To date, studies on methadone overdose in adults have not been reported in Iran. Hence, this study was performed to determine the frequency of methadone overdose and its associated complications in Baharloo Hospital of Tehran between August 2011 and August 2012. Methods: This cross-sectional study was done on 390 cases. All patients with methadone overdoses and positive urine screen test for methadone were included in this case study through census method. Demographic data and overdose complications, such as loss of consciousness, respiratory complications, arrhythmia, hemodynamic disturbances, and QTC interval, were recorded in the questionnaire. Data were analyzed by SPSS software and Kolmogorov Smirnov, t-test, and Chi-square tests were used for data analysis. Results: Overall, 84.1% of the samples were male and the mean age of the samples was 35.53±11.25 years (range: 15-84 years. Mean of the methadone dose used in current admissions was 96.13±52.34 mg. Concomitant drug abuse and concomitant uses of medications were seen in 25.9% and 36.9% of the patients, respectively. Respiratory depression, pulmonary edema, pneumonia, aspiration, and arrhythmia were seen in 87.9%, 26.2%, 3.3%, 7.4%, and 15.4% of the patients, respectively. There were significant differences between concomitant medications, duration of methadone use, and QTc interval prolongation and arrhythmia (P<0.05. Conclusion: Based on the findings of the present study, initial screening of ECG changes and QT interval prolongation as well as arrhythmias should be considered in patients on methadone therapy and concurrent drug abuse and co-administration of medications that lead to QT prolongation should be avoided in them.

  12. The risk managements for patients with Alzheimer's disease in wards%老年痴呆患者住院期间的风险管理

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈韵; 朱风英; 陈良英

    2009-01-01

    痴呆病人记忆力差,生活活动能力减退,且可出现行为错乱等情况,护理中潜在很大的风险,本文通过老年病人痴呆患者的观察要点为患者提供安全、有序、优良的护理服务,预防老年性痴呆的健康教育指导等方面来加强老年痴呆患者住院期间的风险管理.%The typical symptoms of Alzheimer's disease include auditory hallucination and visual hallucination.These symptoms always cause pain and troubles to patients and his family.Furthermore,because of the memory disorders and the activity deficits,patients with Alzheimer's disease would manifest behavior disorders as well.All these factors would enhance the risks in the care.Hence,we should develop a nice relationship to his family,and it would help to develop a better communication and minimize the confusion And the safety of care for patients with Alzheimer's disease is one of the important parts in the managements of care risks.As well as it has become a basic requirement for elevating the quality of care.

  13. Using in situ simulation to identify and resolve latent environmental threats to patient safety: case study involving a labor and delivery ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamman, William R; Beaudin-Seiler, Beth M; Beaubien, Jeffrey M; Gullickson, Amy M; Gross, Amy C; Orizondo-Korotko, Krystyna; Fuqua, Wayne; Lammers, Richard

    2009-09-01

    Since the publication of To Err is Human, health care professionals have looked to high-reliability industries such as commercial aviation for guidance on improving system safety. One of the most widely adopted aviation-derived approaches is simulation-based team training, also known as crew resource management (CRM) training. In the health care domain, CRM training often takes place in custom-built simulation laboratories that are designed to replicate operating rooms or labor and delivery rooms. Unlike these traditional CRM training programs, in situ simulation occurs on actual patient care units, involves actual health care team members, and uses actual organization processes to train and assess team performance. During the past 24 months, our research team has conducted nearly 40 in situ simulations. In this paper, we present the results from one such simulation: a patient who experienced a difficult labor and delivery resulting in an emergency caesarean section and a hysterectomy. During the simulation, a number of latent environmental threats to safety were identified. The following article presents not only the latent threats but also the steps that the hospital has taken to remedy them. Results from clinical simulations in operational health care settings can help identify and resolve latent environmental threats to patient safety.

  14. Home‐care nursing staff in self‐directed teams are more satisfied with their job and perceive more autonomy over patient care. A nationwide survey.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maurits, E.E.M.; Veer, A.J.E. de; Groenewegen, P.P.; Francke, A.L.

    2017-01-01

    Aims: (1) To examine whether working in a self-directed team is related to home-care nursing staff's job satisfaction; (2) To assess the mediating effect of self-perceived autonomy over patient care; (3) To investigate the moderating effect of educational level on the association between autonomy ov

  15. Behind-the-scenes of patient-centered care: content analysis of electronic messaging among primary care clinic providers and staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiles, Renée A; Deppen, Stephen A; Figaro, M Kathleen; Gregg, William M; Jirjis, Jim N; Rothman, Russell L; Johnston, Philip E; Miller, Randolph A; Dittus, Robert S; Speroff, Theodore

    2007-12-01

    Transitions to patient-centered health care, the increasing complexity of care, and growth in self-management have all increased the frequency and intensity of clinical services provided outside office settings and between visits. Understanding how electronic messaging, which is often used to coordinate care, affects care is crucial. A taxonomy for codifying clinical text messages into standardized categories could facilitate content analysis of work performed or enhanced via electronic messaging. To codify electronic messages exchanged among the primary care providers and the staff managing diabetes patients at an academic medical center. Retrospective analysis of 27,061 electronic messages exchanged among 578 providers and staff caring for a cohort of 639 adult primary care patients with diabetes between April 1, 2003 and October 31, 2003. Providers and staff using locally developed electronic messaging in an academic medical center's adult primary care clinic. Raw data included clinical text message content, message ID, thread ID, and user ID. Derived measures included user job classification, 35 flags codifying message content, and a taxonomy grouping the flags. Messages contained diverse content: communications with patients, families, and other providers (47.2%), diagnoses (25.4%), documentation (33%), logistics and support functions (29.6%), medications (32.9%), and treatments (28.9%). All messages could be classified; 59.5% of messages addressed 2 or more content areas. Systematic content analysis of provider and staff electronic messages yields specific insight regarding clinical and administrative work carried out via electronic messaging.

  16. How practice contributes to trolley food waste. A qualitative study among staff involved in serving meals to hospital patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofei, K T; Holst, M; Rasmussen, H H; Mikkelsen, B E

    2014-12-01

    This study investigated the generation of trolley food waste at the ward level in a hospital in order to provide recommendations for how practice could be changed to reduce food waste. Three separate focus group discussions were held with four nurses, four dietitians and four service assistants engaged in food service. Furthermore, single qualitative interviews were conducted with a nurse, a dietitian and two service assistants. Observations of procedures around trolley food serving were carried out during lunch and supper for a total of 10 weekdays in two different wards. All unserved food items discarded as waste were weighed after each service. Analysis of interview and observation data revealed five key themes. The findings indicate that trolley food waste generation is a practice embedded within the limitations related to the procedures of meal ordering. This includes portion size choices and delivery, communication, tools for menu information, portioning and monitoring of food waste, as well as the