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Sample records for wards multi-method study

  1. Interactions between lean management and the psychosocial work environment in a hospital setting - a multi-method study.

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    Ulhassan, Waqar; von Thiele Schwarz, Ulrica; Thor, Johan; Westerlund, Hugo

    2014-10-22

    As health care struggles to meet increasing demands with limited resources, Lean has become a popular management approach. It has mainly been studied in relation to health care performance. The empirical evidence as to how Lean affects the psychosocial work environment has been contradictory. This study aims to study the interaction between Lean and the psychosocial work environment using a comprehensive model that takes Lean implementation information, as well as Lean theory and the particular context into consideration. The psychosocial work environment was measured twice with the Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire (COPSOQ) employee survey during Lean implementations on May-June 2010 (T1) (n = 129) and November-December 2011 (T2) (n = 131) at three units (an Emergency Department (ED), Ward-I and Ward-II). Information based on qualitative data analysis of the Lean implementations and context from a previous paper was used to predict expected change patterns in the psychosocial work environment from T1 to T2 and subsequently compared with COPSOQ-data through linear regression analysis. Between T1 and T2, qualitative information showed a well-organized and steady Lean implementation on Ward-I with active employee participation, a partial Lean implementation on Ward-II with employees not seeing a clear need for such an intervention, and deterioration in already implemented Lean activities at ED, due to the declining interest of top management. Quantitative data analysis showed a significant relation between the expected and actual results regarding changes in the psychosocial work environment. Ward-I showed major improvements especially related to job control and social support, ED showed a major decline with some exceptions while Ward-II also showed improvements similar to Ward-I. The results suggest that Lean may have a positive impact on the psychosocial work environment given that it is properly implemented. Also, the psychosocial work environment may even

  2. How do cynical employees serve their customers?: a multi-method study

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    Demerouti, E.; Xanthopoulou, D.; Bakker, A.B.

    2018-01-01

    In this multi-method study, we investigate how social job demands (i.e., social interruptions) and resources (i.e., colleague support) in the service context influence employee (negative) (re)actions to customers through cynicism towards the job. In addition, we investigate why customers are less

  3. Studying the Night Shift: A Multi-method Analysis of Overnight Academic Library Users

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    David Schwieder

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective – This paper reports on a study which assessed the preferences and behaviors of overnight library users at a major state university. The findings were used to guide the design and improvement of overnight library resources and services, and the selection of a future overnight library site. Methods – A multi-method design used descriptive and correlational statistics to analyze data produced by a multi-sample survey of overnight library users. These statistical methods included rankings, percentages, and multiple regression. Results – Results showed a strong consistency across statistical methods and samples. Overnight library users consistently prioritized facilities like power outlets for electronic devices, and group and quiet study spaces, and placed far less emphasis on assistance from library staff. Conclusions – By employing more advanced statistical and sampling procedures than had been found in previous research, this paper strengthens the validity of findings on overnight user preferences and behaviors. The multi-method research design can also serve to guide future work in this area.

  4. A multi-method approach toward de novo glycan characterization: a Man-5 case study.

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    Prien, Justin M; Prater, Bradley D; Cockrill, Steven L

    2010-05-01

    Regulatory agencies' expectations for biotherapeutic approval are becoming more stringent with regard to product characterization, where minor species as low as 0.1% of a given profile are typically identified. The mission of this manuscript is to demonstrate a multi-method approach toward de novo glycan characterization and quantitation, including minor species at or approaching the 0.1% benchmark. Recently, unexpected isomers of the Man(5)GlcNAc(2) (M(5)) were reported (Prien JM, Ashline DJ, Lapadula AJ, Zhang H, Reinhold VN. 2009. The high mannose glycans from bovine ribonuclease B isomer characterization by ion trap mass spectrometry (MS). J Am Soc Mass Spectrom. 20:539-556). In the current study, quantitative analysis of these isomers found in commercial M(5) standard demonstrated that they are in low abundance (2-aminobenzoic acid to detect and chromatographically resolve multiple M(5) isomers in bovine ribonuclease B. With this multi-method approach, we have the capabilities to comprehensively characterize a biotherapeutic's glycan array in a de novo manner, including structural isomers at >/=0.1% of the total chromatographic peak area.

  5. Respiratory support in oncology ward setting: a prospective descriptive study.

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    Mishra, Seema; Bhatnagar, Sushma; Gupta, Deepak; Goyal, Gaurav Nirvani; Agrawal, Ravi; Jain, Roopesh; Chauhan, Himanshu

    2009-01-01

    Mechanical ventilation in cancer patients is a critical issue The present prospective descriptive study was designed (1) to assess the patient population needing respirator support in ward setting at a premier state-run oncology institute in India, (2) to observe and analyze the course of their disease while on respirator, and (3) to coordinate better quality of life measures in cancer patients at the institute based on the present study's outcomes. Beginning from March 2005 to March 2006, all cancer patients who were connected to respirator in the wards were enrolled in the current study. Our anesthesiology department at the cancer institute also has primary responsibility for airway management and mechanical ventilation in high dependency units of oncology wards. Preventilation variables in cancer patients were assessed to judge the futility of mechanical ventilation in ward setting. Subsequently, patients were observed for disease course while on respirator. Final outcome with its etio-pathogenesis was correlated with predicted futility of mechanical ventilation. Over a period of 1 year, 132 (46 men and 86 women) cancer patients with median age 40 years (range 1-75 years) were connected to respirator in oncology wards. Based on the preventilation variables and indications for respirator support, right prediction of medical futility and hospital discharge was made in 77% of patients. Underestimation and overestimation of survival to hospital discharge was made in 10% cases and 13% cases, respectively. Based on preventilation variables, prediction of outcome in cancer patients needing respirator support can be made in 77% cases. This high probability of prediction can be used to educate patients, and their families and primary physicians, for well-informed and documented advance directives, formulated and regularly revised DNAR policies, and judicious use of respirator support for better quality-of-life outcomes.

  6. #JeSuisCharlie: Towards a Multi-Method Study of Hybrid Media Events

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    Johanna Sumiala

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This article suggests a new methodological model for the study of hybrid media events with global appeal. This model, developed in the project on the 2015 Charlie Hebdo attacks in Paris, was created specifically for researching digital media—and in particular, Twitter. The article is structured as follows. Firstly, the methodological scope is discussed against the theoretical context, e.g. the theory of media events. In the theoretical discussion, special emphasis is given to i disruptive, upsetting, or disintegrative media events and hybrid media events and ii the conditions of today’s heterogeneous and globalised media communication landscape. Secondly, the article introduces a multi-method approach developed for the analysis of hybrid media events. In this model, computational social science—namely, automated content analysis (ACA and social network analytics (SNA—are combined with a qualitative approach—specifically, digital ethnography. The article outlines three key phases for research in which the interplay between quantitative and qualitative approaches is played out. In the first phase, preliminary digital ethnography is applied to provide the outline of the event. In the second phase, quantitative social network analytics are applied to construct the digital field for research. In this phase, it is necessary to map a what is circulating on the websites and b where this circulation takes place. The third and final phase applies a qualitative approach and digital ethnography to provide a more nuanced, in-depth interpretation of what (substance/content is circulating and how this material connects with the ‘where’ in the digital landscape, hence constituting links and connections in the hybrid media landscape. In conclusion, the article reflects on how this multi-method approach contributes to understanding the workings of today’s hybrid media events: how they create and maintain symbolic battles over certain imagined

  7. Mania risk and creativity: a multi-method study of the role of motivation.

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    Ruiter, Margina; Johnson, Sheri L

    2015-01-01

    Substantial literature has linked bipolar disorder and risk for bipolar disorder with creative accomplishment, but few multimodal studies of creativity are available, and little is known about mechanisms. We use a multi-method approach to test the association of bipolar risk with several creativity measures, including creative accomplishments, creative personality traits, and a laboratory index of insight. We also examined whether multiple facets of motivation accounted for the links of bipolar risk with creativity. Among 297 undergraduates, mania risk, as measured with the Hypomanic Personality Scale was related to lifetime creativity and creative personality, but not to performance on the insight task. Motivational traits appeared to mediate the links of mania risk with both lifetime creative accomplishments and self-rated creativity. The study relied on a cross-sectional design and a convenience sample. Future studies would benefit from exploring motivation as a positive aspect of manic vulnerability that may foster greater creativity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Job stress among community health workers: a multi-method study from Pakistan

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    Iqbal Zafar

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In low income countries, the task of providing primary health care is often the responsibility of community health workers. In Pakistan, community workers called Lady Health Workers (LHW deliver basic health care at the doorstep in the rural areas and urban slums. Evaluations show that it is a successful programme but point out inconsistencies in the quality of service provided. In order achieve this, it would be important to obtain the workers' viewpoint on their job-description, the problems they face and the levels of stress they encounter. Methods We conducted a multi-method study to investigate the aforementioned issues. All LHWs from one typical rural sub-district in Rawalpindi were surveyed. Focus group discussions with a sub-set of these workers were also conducted. Results About a quarter of the LHWs were found to have significant occupational stress. Factors associated with stress included having low socio-economic status and having to travel long distances for work. Inconsistent medical supplies, inadequate stipends, lack of career structure and not being equipped to communicate effectively with families were the main factors for job dissatisfaction among these workers. Recommendations Improvement in remuneration, better administration of supplies and a structured career path should be ensured for better performance of community health workers. In addition, communication skills learning should be an essential part of their training programme.

  9. Alcohol Warning Label Awareness and Attention: A Multi-method Study.

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    Pham, Cuong; Rundle-Thiele, Sharyn; Parkinson, Joy; Li, Shanshi

    2018-01-01

    Evaluation of alcohol warning labels requires careful consideration ensuring that research captures more than awareness given that labels may not be prominent enough to attract attention. This study investigates attention of current in market alcohol warning labels and examines whether attention can be enhanced through theoretically informed design. Attention scores obtained through self-report methods are compared to objective measures (eye-tracking). A multi-method experimental design was used delivering four conditions, namely control, colour, size and colour and size. The first study (n = 559) involved a self-report survey to measure attention. The second study (n = 87) utilized eye-tracking to measure fixation count and duration and time to first fixation. Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) was utilized. Eye-tracking identified that 60% of participants looked at the current in market alcohol warning label while 81% looked at the optimized design (larger and red). In line with observed attention self-reported attention increased for the optimized design. The current study casts doubt on dominant practices (largely self-report), which have been used to evaluate alcohol warning labels. Awareness cannot be used to assess warning label effectiveness in isolation in cases where attention does not occur 100% of the time. Mixed methods permit objective data collection methodologies to be triangulated with surveys to assess warning label effectiveness. Attention should be incorporated as a measure in warning label effectiveness evaluations. Colour and size changes to the existing Australian warning labels aided by theoretically informed design increased attention. © The Author 2017. Medical Council on Alcohol and Oxford University Press. All rights reserved.

  10. A Multi-Method Approach to Studying the Relationship between Character Strengths and Vocational Interests in Adolescents

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    Proyer, Rene T.; Sidler, Nicole; Weber, Marco; Ruch, Willibald

    2012-01-01

    The relationship between character strengths and vocational interests was tested. In an online study, 197 thirteen to eighteen year-olds completed a questionnaire measuring character strengths and a multi-method measure for interests (questionnaire, nonverbal test, and objective personality tests). The main findings were that intellectual…

  11. Correlation between levels of conflict and containment on acute psychiatric wards: the city-128 study.

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    Bowers, Len; Stewart, Duncan; Papadopoulos, Chris; Iennaco, Joanne DeSanto

    2013-05-01

    OBJECTIVE Attainment of safe, calm inpatient psychiatric wards that are conducive to positive therapeutic care is crucial. On such wards, rates of coerced medication, seclusion, manual restraint and other types of containment are comparatively low, and, usually, rates of conflict-for example, aggression, substance use, and absconding-are also low. Sometimes, however, wards maintain low rates of containment even when conflict rates are high. This study investigated wards with the counterintuitive combination of low containment and high conflict or high containment and low conflict. METHODS The authors conducted a secondary analysis of cross-sectional data collected from 136 acute psychiatric wards across England in 2004-2005. The wards were categorized into four groups on the basis of median splits of containment and conflict rates: high conflict and high containment, high conflict and low containment, low conflict and low containment, and low conflict and high containment. Features significantly associated with these ward types were identified. RESULTS Among the variables significantly associated with the various typologies, some-for example, environmental quality-were changeable, and others-such as social deprivation of the area served-were fixed. High-conflict, low-containment wards had higher rates of male staff and lower-quality environments than other wards. Low-conflict, high-containment wards had higher numbers of beds. High-conflict, high-containment wards utilized more temporary staff as well as more unqualified staff. No overall differences were associated with low-conflict, low-containment wards. CONCLUSIONS Wards can make positive changes to achieve a low-containment, nonpunitive culture, even when rates of patient conflict are high.

  12. What scares patients to get admitted in a psychiatry ward? An exploratory study

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    Sushmita Bhattacharya

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: There has been very little focus on understanding the experiences of people suffering from mental illness during their treatment in the outpatient and inpatient treatment facilities. Majority of the decisions regarding their treatment are taken by the mental health professionals in consultation with the caregivers, and the patient remains a passive recipient of the services. It is commonly seen that patients refuse admission in the psychiatry ward even when clinical needs warrant admission. Aim: The aim of the current study was to explore the perception of patients regarding admission in the psychiatry ward and the fears associated with indoor treatment facility. Methodology: A semistructured interview schedule was administered to 110 patients undergoing treatment from outpatient services to study their attitude toward treatment in psychiatry ward. Results: A large number of patients perceived psychiatry ward as a hostile place with unfriendly atmosphere and dark and unsupportive environment. However, the patients who had been admitted in the past found it less scary and appreciated good and friendly behavior of the staff in the ward. Conclusion: Negative perception of inpatient treatment and psychiatry wards is still highly prevalent among the patients. With growing focus on reducing stigma about psychiatric illnesses, dispelling the myths related to treatment in wards is the need of the hour.

  13. Deployment and Dehumanization: A Multi-Method Study of Combat Soldiers’ Loss of Empathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brænder, Morten

    2015-01-01

    Studies in soldier motivation and socialization have shown that servicemen's level of compassion decreases following deployment to war. This may to some extent be explained by the transgressive nature of the combat soldier's service : the soldier puts himself in harm's way, and must if necessary...... kill the enemy. Hence, a certain 'emotional distance' may be required for him to cope with deployment life. To kill the enemy, it might be necessary for the soldier to deprive the enemy of his human capacities, to dehumanize him. However, by combining quantitative and qualitative methods, this study...... suggests that the enemy is not the only one who is dehumanized. The data analyzed were collected immediately before and after deployment of Danish combat soldiers to Helmand, Afghanistan. Quantitative findings show that the soldiers' empathetic motivation to serve civilians, compatriots and other soldiers...

  14. Learning from positively deviant wards to improve patient safety: an observational study protocol.

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    Baxter, Ruth; Taylor, Natalie; Kellar, Ian; Lawton, Rebecca

    2015-12-11

    Positive deviance is an asset-based approach to improvement which has recently been adopted to improve quality and safety within healthcare. The approach assumes that solutions to problems already exist within communities. Certain groups or individuals identify these solutions and succeed despite having the same resources as others. Within healthcare, positive deviance has previously been applied at individual or organisational levels to improve specific clinical outcomes or processes of care. This study explores whether the positive deviance approach can be applied to multidisciplinary ward teams to address the broad issue of patient safety among elderly patients. Preliminary work analysed National Health Service (NHS) Safety Thermometer data from 34 elderly medical wards to identify 5 'positively deviant' and 5 matched 'comparison' wards. Researchers are blinded to ward status. This protocol describes a multimethod, observational study which will (1) assess the concurrent validity of identifying positively deviant elderly medical wards using NHS Safety Thermometer data and (2) generate hypotheses about how positively deviant wards succeed. Patient and staff perceptions of safety will be assessed on each ward using validated surveys. Correlation and ranking analyses will explore whether this survey data aligns with the routinely collected NHS Safety Thermometer data. Staff focus groups and researcher fieldwork diaries will be completed and qualitative thematic content analysis will be used to generate hypotheses about the strategies, behaviours, team cultures and dynamics that facilitate the delivery of safe patient care. The acceptability and sustainability of strategies identified will also be explored. The South East Scotland Research Ethics Committee 01 approved this study (reference: 14/SS/1085) and NHS Permissions were granted from all trusts. Findings will be published in peer-reviewed, scientific journals, and presented at academic conferences. This study

  15. The survival time of chocolates on hospital wards: covert observational study.

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    Gajendragadkar, Parag R; Moualed, Daniel J; Nicolson, Phillip L R; Adjei, Felicia D; Cakebread, Holly E; Duehmke, Rudolf M; Martin, Claire A

    2013-12-14

    To quantify the consumption of chocolates in a hospital ward environment. Multicentre, prospective, covert observational study. Four wards at three hospitals (where the authors worked) within the United Kingdom. Boxes of Quality Street (Nestlé) and Roses (Cadbury) on the ward and anyone eating these chocolates. Observers covertly placed two 350 g boxes of Quality Street and Roses chocolates on each ward (eight boxes were used in the study containing a total of 258 individual chocolates). These boxes were kept under continuous covert surveillance, with the time recorded when each chocolate was eaten. Median survival time of a chocolate. 191 out of 258 (74%) chocolates were observed being eaten. The mean total observation period was 254 minutes (95% confidence interval 179 to 329). The median survival time of a chocolate was 51 minutes (39 to 63). The model of chocolate consumption was non-linear, with an initial rapid rate of consumption that slowed with time. An exponential decay model best fitted these findings (model R(2)=0.844, P<0.001), with a survival half life (time taken for 50% of the chocolates to be eaten) of 99 minutes. The mean time taken to open a box of chocolates from first appearance on the ward was 12 minutes (95% confidence interval 0 to 24). Quality Street chocolates survived longer than Roses chocolates (hazard ratio for survival of Roses v Quality Street 0.70, 95% confidence interval 0.53 to 0.93, P=0.014). The highest percentages of chocolates were consumed by healthcare assistants (28%) and nurses (28%), followed by doctors (15%). From our observational study, chocolate survival in a hospital ward was relatively short, and was modelled well by an exponential decay model. Roses chocolates were preferentially consumed to Quality Street chocolates in a ward setting. Chocolates were consumed primarily by healthcare assistants and nurses, followed by doctors. Further practical studies are needed.

  16. A multi-method exploratory study of stress, coping, and substance use among high school youth in private schools

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    Leonard, Noelle R.; Gwadz, Marya V.; Ritchie, Amanda; Linick, Jessica L.; Cleland, Charles M.; Elliott, Luther; Grethel, Michele

    2015-01-01

    There is growing awareness that students’ experiences of stress may impede academic success, compromise mental health, and promote substance use. We examined these factors in an under-studied population, private/independent high school students, using a multi-method (qualitative and quantitative), iterative data collection and analytic process. We first conducted qualitative interviews with faculty and staff at a number of highly competitive private schools, followed by an anonymous quantitative survey with 128 11th grade students from two of these settings. We then conducted a qualitative exploration of the quantitative results with a subset of students. Next, a set of Expert Panel members participated in qualitative interviews to reflect on and interpret study findings. Overall, we found students experienced high levels of chronic stress, particularly in relation to academic performance and the college admissions process. While students described a range of effective, adaptive coping strategies, they also commonly internalized these serious pressures and turned to alcohol and drugs to cope with chronic stress, although not typically at problematic levels. We discuss study implications for both schools and families derived from the Expert Panel. PMID:26257685

  17. Barriers to nurse-patient communication in cardiac surgery wards: a qualitative study.

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    Shafipour, Vida; Mohammad, Eesa; Ahmadi, Fazlollah

    2014-08-15

    An appropriate and effective nurse-patient communication is of the most important aspect of caring. The formation and continuation of such a relationship depends on various factors such as the conditions and context of communication and a mutual understanding between the two. A review of the literature shows that little research is carried out on identification of such barriers in hospital wards between the patients and the healthcare staff. The present study was therefore conducted to explore the experiences of nurses and patients on communication barriers in hospital cardiac surgery wards. This qualitative research was carried out using a content analysis method (Graneheim & Lundman, 2004). The participants were selected by a purposeful sampling and consist of 10 nurses and 11 patients from the cardiac surgery wards of three teaching hospitals in Tehran, Iran. Data was gathered by unstructured interviews. All interviews were audio-taped and transcribed verbatim. Findings were emerged in three main themes including job dissatisfaction (with the sub-themes of workload tension and decreased motivation), routine-centered care (with the sub-themes of habitual interventions, routinized and technical interventions, and objective supervision), and distrust in competency of nurses (with the sub-themes of cultural contrast, less responsible nurses, and their apathy towards the patients). Compared to other studies, our findings identified different types of communication barriers depending on the nursing settings. These findings can be used by the ward clinical nursing managers at cardiac surgery wards to improve the quality of nursing care.

  18. Mini outbreak of Kaposi′s varicelliform eruption in skin ward: A study of five cases

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    Rao GRR

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Kaposi`s varicelliform eruption (KVE represents widespread cutaneous herpes simplex virus (HSV infection in patients with preexisting dermatoses. Occasionally, this infection can present as a nosocomial infection in skin wards, if adequate bed-spacing and barrier nursing methods are not followed. We are reporting five cases of KVE; four cases acquired the infection in a makeshift ward after admission of the first case in May 2005, due to the renovation work of the regular skin ward. Aim: The purpose of this study is to create clinical awareness about this uncommon dermatologic entity and to stress upon the importance of bed-spacing and barrier nursing in skin wards. Methods: Five cases of KVE, three females and two males with different primary dermatoses (pemphigus foliaceus - one, pemphigus vulgaris - two, paraneoplastic pemphigus - one and toxic epidemal necrolysis - one were included in this study. Diagnosis was made clinically and supported with Tzanck smear and HSV serology. All the cases were treated with oral acyclovir. Results: Four out of five cases of KVE recovered with treatment, one case of extensive pemphigus vulgaris with KVE succumbed to death. Conclusion: Mini outbreaks of KVE can occur in skin wards with inadequate bed-spacing and overcrowding of patients. Therefore adequate bed-spacing, barrier nursing and isolation of suspected cases are mandatory to prevent such life-threatening infections.

  19. A multi-method study of health behaviours and perceived concerns of sexual minority females in Mumbai, India.

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    Bowling, Jessamyn; Dodge, Brian; Banik, Swagata; Bartelt, Elizabeth; Rawat, Shruta; Guerra-Reyes, Lucia; Hensel, Devon; Herbenick, Debby; Anand, Vivek

    2018-02-01

    This multi-method study explores the perceived health status and health behaviours of sexual minority (i.e. self-identifying with a sexual identity label other than heterosexual) females (i.e. those assigned female at birth who may or may not identify as women) in Mumbai, India, a population whose health has been generally absent in scientific literature. Using community-based participatory research approaches, this study is a partnership with The Humsafar Trust (HST). HST is India's oldest and largest LGBT-advocacy organisation. An online survey targeted towards sexual minority females was conducted (n=49), with questions about sexual identity, perceived health and wellbeing, physical and mental healthcare access and experiences, and health behaviours (including substance use). Additionally, photo-elicitation interviews in which participants' photos prompt interview discussion were conducted with 18 sexual minority females. Sexual minority females face obstacles in health care, mostly related to acceptability and quality of care. Their use of preventative health screenings is low. Perceived mental health and experiences with care were less positive than that for physical health. Participants in photo-elicitation interviews described bodyweight issues and caretaking of family members in relation to physical health. Substance use functioned as both a protective and a risk factor for their health. Our findings point to a need for more resources for sexual minority females. Education on screening guidelines and screening access for sexual minority females would also assist these individuals in increasing their rates of preventative health.

  20. Implementing service improvement projects within pre-registration nursing education: a multi-method case study evaluation.

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    Baillie, Lesley; Bromley, Barbara; Walker, Moira; Jones, Rebecca; Mhlanga, Fortune

    2014-01-01

    Preparing healthcare students for quality and service improvement is important internationally. A United Kingdom (UK) initiative aims to embed service improvement in pre-registration education. A UK university implemented service improvement teaching for all nursing students. In addition, the degree pathway students conducted service improvement projects as the basis for their dissertations. The study aimed to evaluate the implementation of service improvement projects within a pre-registration nursing curriculum. A multi-method case study was conducted, using student questionnaires, focus groups with students and academic staff, and observation of action learning sets. Questionnaire data were analysed using SPSS v19. Qualitative data were analysed using Ritchie and Spencer's (1994) Framework Approach. Students were very positive about service improvement. The degree students, who conducted service improvement projects in practice, felt more knowledgeable than advanced diploma students. Selecting the project focus was a key issue and students encountered some challenges in practice. Support for student service improvement projects came from action learning sets, placement staff, and academic staff. Service improvement projects had a positive effect on students' learning. An effective partnership between the university and partner healthcare organisations, and support for students in practice, is essential. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Parental Predictors of Children’s Shame and Guilt at Age 6 in a Multi-Method, Longitudinal Study

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    Parisette-Sparks, Alyssa; Bufferd, Sara J.; Klein, Daniel N.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Shame and guilt are self-conscious emotions that begin to develop early in life and are associated with various forms of psychopathology. However, little is known about the factors that contribute to these emotions in young children. Specifically, no longitudinal studies to date have examined a range of parent factors that shape the expression of children’s shame and guilt. The current multi-method, longitudinal study sought to determine whether parenting style, parental psychopathology, and parents’ marital satisfaction assessed when children were age 3 predict expressions of shame and guilt in children at age 6. Method A large community sample of families (N = 446; 87.4% Caucasian) with three-year-old children (45.7% female) was recruited through commercial mailing lists. Parent variables were assessed when children were age 3 with mother- and father-report questionnaires and a diagnostic interview. Children’s expressions of shame and guilt were observed in the laboratory at age 6. Results Fathers’, but not mothers’, history of depression and permissive parenting assessed when children were age 3 predicted children’s expressions of shame and guilt when children were age 6; parents’ marital dissatisfaction also predicted children’s shame and guilt. Conclusions These findings suggest that parents, and fathers in particular, contribute to expressions of self-conscious emotions in children. These data on emotional development may be useful for better characterizing the risk and developmental pathways of psychopathology. PMID:26538055

  2. Comparative study of the prevalence of sepsis in patients admitted to dermatology and internal medicine wards*

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    Almeida, Luiz Maurício Costa; Diniz, Michelle dos Santos; Diniz, Lorena dos Santos; Machado-Pinto, Jackson; Silva, Francisco Chagas Lima

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Sepsis is a common cause of morbidity and mortality among hospitalized patients. The prevalence of this condition has increased significantly in different parts of the world. Patients admitted to dermatology wards often have severe loss of skin barrier and use systemic corticosteroids, which favor the development of sepsis. OBJECTIVES To evaluate the prevalence of sepsis among patients admitted to a dermatology ward compared to that among patients admitted to an internal medicine ward. METHODS It is a cross-sectional, observational, comparative study that was conducted at Hospital Santa Casa de Belo Horizonte. Data were collected from all patients admitted to four hospital beds at the dermatology and internal medicine wards between July 2008 and July 2009. Medical records were analyzed for the occurrence of sepsis, dermatologic diagnoses, comorbidities, types of pathogens and most commonly used antibiotics. RESULTS We analyzed 185 medical records. The prevalence of sepsis was 7.6% among patients admitted to the dermatology ward and 2.2% (p = 0.10) among those admitted to the internal medicine ward. Patients with comorbidities, diabetes mellitus and cancer did not show a higher incidence of sepsis. The main agent found was Staphylococcus aureus, and the most commonly used antibiotics were ciprofloxacin and oxacillin. There was a significant association between sepsis and the use of systemic corticosteroids (p <0.001). CONCLUSION It becomes clear that epidemiological studies on sepsis should be performed more extensively and accurately in Brazil so that efforts to prevent and treat this serious disease can be made more effectively. PMID:24173179

  3. Safety and security in acute admission psychiatric wards in Ireland and London: a comparative study.

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    Cowman, Seamus; Bowers, Len

    2009-05-01

    The comparative element of this study is to describe safety and security measures in psychiatric acute admission wards in the Republic of Ireland and London; to describe differences and similarities in terms of safety and security patterns in the Republic of Ireland and London; and to make recommendations on safety and security to mental health services management and psychiatric nurses. Violence is a serious problem in psychiatric services and staff experience significant psychological reactions to being assaulted. Health and Safety Authorities in the UK and Ireland have expressed concern about violence and assault in healthcare, however, there remains a lack of clarity on matters of procedure and policy pertaining to safety and security in psychiatric hospitals. A descriptive survey research design was employed. Questionnaires were circulated to all acute wards in London and in Ireland and the resulting data compared. A total of 124 psychiatric wards from London and 43 wards from Ireland were included in this study and response rates of 70% (London) and 86% (Ireland) were obtained. Differences and similarities in safety and security practices were identified between London and Ireland, with Irish wards having generally higher and more intensive levels of security. There is a lack of coherent policy and procedure in safety and security measures across psychiatric acute admission wards in the Republic of Ireland and London. Given the trends in European Union (EU) regulation, there is a strong argument for the publication of acceptable minimum guidelines for safety and security in mental health services across the EU. There must be a concerted effort to ensure that all policy and procedure in safety and security is founded on evidence and best practice. Mental health managers must establish a review of work safety and security procedures and practices. Risk assessment and environmental audits of all mental health clinical environments should be mandatory.

  4. Does doctors’ workload impact supervision and ward activities of final-year students? A prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celebi Nora

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hospital doctors face constantly increasing workloads. Besides caring for patients, their duties also comprise the education of future colleagues. The aim of this study was to objectively investigate whether the workload arising from increased patient care interferes with student supervision and is associated with more non-medical activities of final-year medical students. Methods A total of 54 final-year students were asked to keep a diary of their daily activities over a three-week period at the beginning of their internship in Internal Medicine. Students categorized their activities – both medical and non-medical - according to whether they had: (1 only watched, (2 assisted the ward resident, (3 performed the activity themselves under supervision of the ward resident, or (4 performed the activity without supervision. The activities reported on a particular day were matched with a ward specific workload-index derived from the hospital information system, including the number of patients treated on the corresponding ward on that day, a correction factor according to the patient comorbidity complexity level (PCCL, and the number of admissions and discharges. Both students and ward residents were blinded to the study question. Results A total of 32 diaries (59 %, 442 recorded working days were handed back. Overall, the students reported 1.2 ± 1.3 supervised, 1.8 ±1.6 medical and 3.6 ± 1.7 non-medical activities per day. The more supervised activities were reported, the more the number of reported medical activities increased (p  Conclusions There was a significant association between ward doctors’ supervision of students and the number of medical activities performed by medical students. The workload had no significant effect on supervision or the number of medical or non-medical activities of final-year students.

  5. Do daily ward interviews improve measurement of hospital quality and safety indicators? A prospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkies, Mitchell N; Bowles, Kelly-Ann; Skinner, Elizabeth H; Haas, Romi; Mitchell, Deb; O'Brien, Lisa; May, Kerry; Ghaly, Marcelle; Ho, Melissa; Haines, Terry P

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine if the addition of daily ward interview data improves the capture of hospital quality and safety indicators compared with incident reporting systems alone. An additional aim was to determine the potential characteristics influencing under-reporting of hospital quality and safety indicators in incident reporting systems. A prospective, observational study was performed at two tertiary metropolitan public hospitals. Research assistants from allied health backgrounds met daily with the nurse in charge of the ward and discussed the occurrence of any falls, pressure injuries and rapid response medical team calls. Data were collected from four general medical wards, four surgical wards, an orthopaedic, neurosciences, plastics, respiratory, renal, sub-acute and acute medical assessment unit. An estimated total of 303 falls, 221 pressure injuries and 884 rapid response medical team calls occurred between 15 wards across two hospitals, over a period of 6 months. Hospital incident reporting systems underestimated falls by 30.0%, pressure injuries by 59.3% and rapid response medical team calls by 17.0%. The use of ward interview data collection in addition to hospital incident reporting systems improved data capture of falls by 23.8% (n = 72), pressure injuries by 21.7% (n = 48) and rapid response medical team calls by 12.7% (n = 112). Falls events were significantly less likely to be reported if they occurred on a Monday (P = 0.04) and pressure injuries significantly more likely to be reported if they occurred on a Wednesday (P = 0.01). Hospital quality and safety indicators (falls, pressure injuries and rapid response medical team calls) were under-reported in incident reporting systems, with variability in under-reporting between wards and the day of event occurrence. The use of ward interview data collection in addition to hospital incident reporting systems improved reporting of hospital quality and safety

  6. Ethical and despotic leadership, relationships with leader’s social responsibility, top management team effectiveness and subordinates’ optimism: A multi-method study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Hoogh, A.H.B.; den Hartog, D.N.

    2008-01-01

    In this multi-method study, we examined the relationships of leader's social responsibility with different aspects of ethical leadership (morality and fairness, role clarification, and power sharing) as well as with despotic leadership. We also investigated how these leadership behaviors relate to

  7. Ethical and despotic leadership, relationships with leader's social responsibility, top management team effectiveness and subordinates' optimism: A multi-method study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Hoogh, A.H.B.; den Hartog, D.N.

    2008-01-01

    In this multi-method study, we examined the relationships of leader's social responsibility with different aspects of ethical leadership (morality and fairness, role clarification, and power sharing) as well as with despotic leadership. We also investigated how these leadership behaviors relate to

  8. Nurses' personal and ward accountability and missed nursing care: A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srulovici, Einav; Drach-Zahavy, Anat

    2017-10-01

    Missed nursing care is considered an act of omission with potentially detrimental consequences for patients, nurses, and organizations. Although the theoretical conceptualization of missed nursing care specifies nurses' values, attitudes, and perceptions of their work environment as its core antecedents, empirical studies have mainly focused on nurses' socio-demographic and professional attributes. Furthermore, assessment of missed nursing care has been mainly based on same-source methods. This study aimed to test the joint effects of personal and ward accountability on missed nursing care, by using both focal (the nurse whose missed nursing care is examined) and incoming (the nurse responsible for the same patients at the subsequent shift) nurses' assessments of missed nursing care. A cross-sectional design, where nurses were nested in wards. A total of 172 focal and 123 incoming nurses from 32 nursing wards in eight hospitals. Missed nursing care was assessed with the 22-item MISSCARE survey using two sources: focal and incoming nurses. Personal and ward accountability were assessed by the focal nurse with two 19-item scales. Nurses' socio-demographics and ward and shift characteristics were also collected. Mixed linear models were used as the analysis strategy. Focal and incoming nurses reported occasional missed nursing care of the focal nurse (Mean=1.87, SD=0.71 and Mean=2.09, SD=0.84, respectively; r=0.55, ppersonal socio-demographic characteristics, higher personal accountability was significantly associated with decreased missed care (β=-0.29, p0.05). The interaction effect was significant (β=-0.31, ppersonal accountability and missed nursing care. Similar patterns were obtained for the incoming nurses' assessment of focal nurse's missed care. Use of focal and incoming nurses' missed nursing care assessments limited the common source bias and strengthened our findings. Personal and ward accountability are significant values, which are associated with

  9. Barriers to Nurse-Patient Communication in Cardiac Surgery Wards: A Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafipour, Vida; Mohammad, Eesa; Ahmadi, Fazlollah

    2014-01-01

    Background: An appropriate and effective nurse-patient communication is of the most important aspect of caring. The formation and continuation of such a relationship depends on various factors such as the conditions and context of communication and a mutual understanding between the two. A review of the literature shows that little research is carried out on identification of such barriers in hospital wards between the patients and the healthcare staff. Objectives: The present study was therefore conducted to explore the experiences of nurses and patients on communication barriers in hospital cardiac surgery wards. Design and Methods: This qualitative research was carried out using a content analysis method (Graneheim & Lundman, 2004). The participants were selected by a purposeful sampling and consist of 10 nurses and 11 patients from the cardiac surgery wards of three teaching hospitals in Tehran, Iran. Data was gathered by unstructured interviews. All interviews were audio-taped and transcribed verbatim. Results: Findings were emerged in three main themes including job dissatisfaction (with the sub-themes of workload tension and decreased motivation), routine-centered care (with the sub-themes of habitual interventions, routinized and technical interventions, and objective supervision), and distrust in competency of nurses (with the sub-themes of cultural contrast, less responsible nurses, and their apathy towards the patients). Conclusions: Compared to other studies, our findings identified different types of communication barriers depending on the nursing settings. These findings can be used by the ward clinical nursing managers at cardiac surgery wards to improve the quality of nursing care. PMID:25363126

  10. External equivalent type Ward aiming optimization studies in power systems; Equivalentes externos tipo Ward visando estudos de otimizacao em sistemas de potencia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nepomuceno, Leonardo

    1993-07-01

    The execution of functions such as contingency analysis, optimization, reactive dispatch, etc, at the control centers requires appropriate models representing the non-observable parts (external system). The classical external equivalents have been developed considering basically the contingency analysis. This work points out the performance of the Extended Ward Equivalent (W.E.), which currently represents the state of art concerning reduced circuit based models. the work analyzes the W.E. response to changes occurred in optimization studied. Moreover, a new model, named INTERNAL REACTIVE WARD (WRINT), resulting from an adaptation of the W.E. is proposed focusing on the improvement of the equivalent in case of changes occurs in optimization studies. The model's general idea is to reflect the equivalent's capacity of reactive response into the internal system. Comparative computational test results are shown. The details of routines implementation are also pointed out. (author)

  11. External equivalent type Ward aiming optimization studies in power systems; Equivalentes externos tipo Ward visando estudos de otimizacao em sistemas de potencia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nepomuceno, Leonardo

    1993-07-01

    The execution of functions such as contingency analysis, optimization, reactive dispatch, etc, at the control centers requires appropriate models representing the non-observable parts (external system). The classical external equivalents have been developed considering basically the contingency analysis. This work points out the performance of the Extended Ward Equivalent (W.E.), which currently represents the state of art concerning reduced circuit based models. the work analyzes the W.E. response to changes occurred in optimization studied. Moreover, a new model, named INTERNAL REACTIVE WARD (WRINT), resulting from an adaptation of the W.E. is proposed focusing on the improvement of the equivalent in case of changes occurs in optimization studies. The model's general idea is to reflect the equivalent's capacity of reactive response into the internal system. Comparative computational test results are shown. The details of routines implementation are also pointed out. (author)

  12. Medical ward round competence in internal medicine - an interview study towards an interprofessional development of an Entrustable Professional Activity (EPA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wölfel, Teresa; Beltermann, Esther; Lottspeich, Christian; Vietz, Elisa; Fischer, Martin R; Schmidmaier, Ralf

    2016-07-11

    The medical ward round is a central but complex activity that is of relevance from the first day of work. However, difficulties for young doctors have been reported. Instruction of ward round competence in medical curricula is hampered by the lack of a standardized description of the procedure. This paper aims to identify and describe physicians' tasks and relevant competences for conducting a medical ward round on the first day of professional work. A review of recent literature revealed known important aspects of medical ward rounds. These were used for the development of a semi-structured interview schedule. Medical ward round experts working at different hospitals were interviewed. The sample consisted of 14 ward physicians (M = 8.82 years of work experience) and 12 nurses (M = 14.55 years of work experience) working in different specializations of internal medicine. All interviews were audiotaped, fully transcribed, and analyzed using an inductive-deductive coding scheme. Nine fields of competences with 18 related sub-competences and 62 observable tasks were identified as relevant for conducting a medical ward round. Over 70 % of the experts named communication, collaborative clinical reasoning and organization as essential competences. Deeper analysis further unveiled the importance of self-management, management of difficult situations, error management and teamwork. The study is the first to picture ward round competences and related tasks in detail and to define an EPA "Conducting an internal medicine ward round" based on systematic interprofessional expert interviews. It thus provides a basis for integration of ward round competences in the medical curricula in an evidence based manner and gives a framework for the development of instructional intervention studies and comparative studies in other medical fields.

  13. Ontology, epistemology, and multi-methods

    OpenAIRE

    Chatterhee, Abhishek

    2009-01-01

    Enthusiasm for multi-methods research can possibly be ascribed to the prima facie promise it holds for moving beyond, if not resolving, seemingly intractable debates on the relative merits of “qualitative” (historical, interpretive, etc.) versus “quantitative” (i.e. inferential statistical) research methods. The justification of multi-methods rests on the claim that combining a few case studies with a larger inferential—and not descriptive—statistical study manages to capture the strengths of...

  14. Introducing the nurse practitioner into the surgical ward: an ethnographic study of interprofessional teamwork practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvarnström, Susanne; Jangland, Eva; Abrandt Dahlgren, Madeleine

    2017-08-22

    The first nurse practitioners in surgical care were introduced into Swedish surgical wards in 2014. Internationally, organisations that have adopted nurse practitioners into care teams are reported to have maintained or improved the quality of care. However, close qualitative descriptions of teamwork practice may add to existing knowledge of interprofessional collaboration when introducing nurse practitioners into new clinical areas. The aim was to report on an empirical study describing how interprofessional teamwork practice was enacted by nurse practitioners when introduced into surgical ward teams. The study had a qualitative, ethnographic research design, drawing on a sociomaterial conceptual framework. The study was based on 170 hours of ward-based participant observations of interprofessional teamwork practice that included nurse practitioners. Data were gathered from 2014 to 2015 across four surgical sites in Sweden, including 60 interprofessional rounds. The data were analysed with an iterative reflexive procedure involving inductive and theory-led approaches. The study was approved by a Swedish regional ethics committee (Ref. No.: 2014/229-31). The interprofessional teamwork practice enacted by the nurse practitioners that emerged from the analysis comprised a combination of the following characteristic role components: clinical leader, bridging team colleague and ever-present tutor. These role components were enacted at all the sites and were prominent during interprofessional teamwork practice. The participant nurse practitioners utilised the interprofessional teamwork practice arrangements to enact a role that may be described in terms of a quality guarantee, thereby contributing to the overall quality and care flow offered by the entire surgical ward team. © 2017 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  15. A Study about The Quality of Nursing Services a Hospitals’ Ward, Mojokerto

    OpenAIRE

    Muhith, Abdul; Nurwidji, Nurwidji

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Nowadays, the trend of hospital visits in Mojokerto is declining. It can caused by man (nurses), such as the quality of nursing services hasn’t been conducted optimally. This study was aimed to analyze the quality of nursing services at hospitals’ ward at Mojokerto. Method: This was explanatory research with survey method and cross sectional approach. The population were nurses and patients who undergo hospitalization minimally in three days at RSU. Dr. Wahidin Sudiro Husodo and...

  16. Supervisors' pedagogical role at a clinical education ward - an ethnographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manninen, Katri; Henriksson, Elisabet Welin; Scheja, Max; Silén, Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    Clinical practice is essential for health care students. The supervisor's role and how supervision should be organized are challenging issues for educators and clinicians. Clinical education wards have been established to meet these challenges and they are units with a pedagogical framework facilitating students' training in real clinical settings. Supervisors support students to link together theoretical and practical knowledge and skills. From students' perspectives, clinical education wards have shown potential to enhance students' learning. Thus there is a need for deeper understanding of supervisors' pedagogical role in this context. We explored supervisors' approaches to students' learning at a clinical education ward where students are encouraged to independently take care of patients. An ethnographic approach was used to study encounters between patients, students and supervisors. The setting was a clinical education ward for nursing students at a university hospital. Ten observations with ten patients, 11 students and five supervisors were included in the study. After each observation, individual follow-up interviews with all participants and a group interview with supervisors were conducted. Data were analysed using an ethnographic approach. Supervisors' pedagogical role has to do with balancing patient care and student learning. The students were given independence, which created pedagogical challenges for the supervisors. They handled these challenges by collaborating as a supervisory team and taking different acts of supervision such as allowing students their independence, being there for students and by applying patient-centredness. The supervisors' pedagogical role was perceived as to facilitate students' learning as a team. Supervisors were both patient- and student-centred by making a nursing care plan for the patients and a learning plan for the students. The plans were guided by clinical and pedagogical guidelines, individually adjusted and

  17. Xerostomia and medication: a cross-sectional study in long-term geriatric wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desoutter, A; Soudain-Pineau, M; Munsch, F; Mauprivez, C; Dufour, T; Coeuriot, J-L

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of xerostomia in old people living in long-term geriatric wards, and to measure the relationship between xerostomia and etiologic factors such as age and medication (total number of medications, xerogenic medications, anticholinergic medications and medications that induce hypersialorrhea). An observational retrospective, comparative, multicentre epidemiological study. Long-term geriatric wards, in Reims, France. 769 old people living in long-term geriatric wards. Prevalence of xerostomia assessed from age, total number of medications, xerogenic medications, anticholinergic medications and those that induce hypersialorrhea. Multivariable logistic regression was used to calculate Odds Ratios (OR) and their 95% Confidence Intervals (95% CI). Among 769 old people (average age 84.6±8.4 years old), 287 residents suffered from xerostomia (37.3%). Significant predictors of xerostomia were: resident's age OR=1.56, 95% CI (1.30-1.88), pxerostomia identified was medications that induce hypersialorrhea OR=0.81, 95% CI (0.67-0.98), p=0.03. The total number of medications and xerogenic medications did not play a significant role in xerostomia. Increasing Age and anticholinergic medications induce a dry mouth. Conversely, the total number of medications and xerogenic medications do not influence xerostomia. Medications that induce hypersialorrhea protect against the occurrence of dry mouth.

  18. Obese Japanese Patients with Stroke Have Higher Functional Recovery in Convalescent Rehabilitation Wards: A Retrospective Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishioka, Shinta; Wakabayashi, Hidetaka; Yoshida, Tomomi; Mori, Natsumi; Watanabe, Riko; Nishioka, Emi

    2016-01-01

    A protective effect of excessive body mass index (BMI) on mortality or functional outcome in patients with stroke is not well established in the Asian population. This study aimed to explore whether obese patients with stroke have advantages for functional improvement in Japanese rehabilitation wards. This retrospective cohort study included consecutive patients with stroke admitted and discharged from convalescent rehabilitation wards between 2011 and 2015. Demographic data, BMI, Functional Independence Measure (FIM) score, and nutritional status were analyzed. Participants were classified into 4 groups according to BMI (underweight stroke may have some advantages for functional recovery in rehabilitation wards. Copyright © 2015 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Interprofessional collaboration between junior doctors and nurses in the general ward setting: A qualitative exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Charmaine J; Zhou, Wen T; Chan, Sally W-C; Liaw, Sok Y

    2018-01-01

    To explore the collaboration experiences of junior physicians and nurses in the general ward setting. Junior physicians and nurses do not always work collaboratively and this could affect the quality of patient care. The understanding of the issues affecting junior physicians and nurses working together is needed to inform strategies to improve interprofessional collaboration. Nineteen junior physicians and nurses were interviewed in 2012 and 2013. Interviews were transcribed and analysed using thematic analysis. Junior physicians and nurses acknowledged the importance of working collaboratively to achieve better patient care, but they are struggling to cope due to heavy clinical workload, organisational constraints and differing power relationships. Nurses have to take on more responsibilities in the decision-making process of patients' care to foster effective interprofessional collaboration. The study calls for educational and organisational strategies to improve interprofessional collaboration between junior physicians and nurses. Nurse leaders should ensure that ward nurses are given a designated time to participate in ward rounds with physicians and have access to a communication tool that assists them in contributing proactively in the decision-making process of patient care. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Evaluation of a Digital Consultation and Self-Care Advice Tool in Primary Care: A Multi-Methods Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Cowie

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Digital services are often regarded as a solution to the growing demands on primary care services. Provision of a tool offering advice to support self-management as well as the ability to digitally consult with a General Practitioner (GP has the potential to alleviate some of the pressure on primary care. This paper reports on a Phase II, 6-month evaluation of eConsult, a web-based triage and consultation system that was piloted across 11 GP practices across Scotland. Through a multi-method approach the evaluation explored eConsult use across practices, exposing both barriers and facilitators to its adoption. Findings suggest that expectations that eConsult would offer an additional and alternative method of accessing GP services were largely met. However, there is less certainty that it has fulfilled expectations of promoting self-help. In addition, low uptake meant that evaluation of current effectiveness was difficult for practices to quantify. The presence of an eConsult champion(s within the practice was seen to be a significant factor in ensuring successful integration of the tool. A lack of patient and staff engagement, insufficient support and lack of protocols around processes were seen as barriers to its success.

  1. Balancing nurses' workload in hospital wards: study protocol of developing a method to manage workload.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Oetelaar, W F J M; van Stel, H F; van Rhenen, W; Stellato, R K; Grolman, W

    2016-11-10

    Hospitals pursue different goals at the same time: excellent service to their patients, good quality care, operational excellence, retaining employees. This requires a good balance between patient needs and nursing staff. One way to ensure a proper fit between patient needs and nursing staff is to work with a workload management method. In our view, a nursing workload management method needs to have the following characteristics: easy to interpret; limited additional registration; applicable to different types of hospital wards; supported by nurses; covers all activities of nurses and suitable for prospective planning of nursing staff. At present, no such method is available. The research follows several steps to come to a workload management method for staff nurses. First, a list of patient characteristics relevant to care time will be composed by performing a Delphi study among staff nurses. Next, a time study of nurses' activities will be carried out. The 2 can be combined to estimate care time per patient group and estimate the time nurses spend on non-patient-related activities. These 2 estimates can be combined and compared with available nursing resources: this gives an estimate of nurses' workload. The research will take place in an academic hospital in the Netherlands. 6 surgical wards will be included, capacity 15-30 beds. The study protocol was submitted to the Medical Ethical Review Board of the University Medical Center (UMC) Utrecht and received a positive advice, protocol number 14-165/C. This method will be developed in close cooperation with staff nurses and ward management. The strong involvement of the end users will contribute to a broader support of the results. The method we will develop may also be useful for planning purposes; this is a strong advantage compared with existing methods, which tend to focus on retrospective analysis. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence

  2. Prevalence of distressing symptoms in hospitalised patients on medical wards: A cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sigurdardottir Katrin

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many patients with advanced, serious, non-malignant disease belong to the population generally seen on medical wards. However, little research has been carried out on palliative care needs in this group. The aims of this study were to estimate the prevalence of distressing symptoms in patients hospitalised in a Department of Internal Medicine, estimate how many of these patients might be regarded as palliative, and describe their main symptoms. Methods Cross-sectional (point prevalence study. All patients hospitalised in the Departments of Internal Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine, and Cardiology were asked to do a symptom assessment by use of the Edmonton Symptom Assessment System (ESAS. Patients were defined as "palliative" if they had an advanced, serious, chronic disease with limited life expectancy and symptom relief as the main goal of treatment. Results 222 patients were registered in all. ESAS was completed for 160 patients. 79 (35.6% were defined as palliative and 43 of them completed ESAS. The patients in the palliative group were older than the rest, and reported more dyspnea (70% and a greater lack of wellbeing (70%. Other symptoms reported by this group were dry mouth (58%, fatigue (56%, depression (41%, anxiety (37%, pain at rest (30%, and pain on movement (42%. Conclusion More than one third of the patients in a Department of Internal Medicine were defined as palliative, and the majority of the patients in this palliative group reported severe symptoms. There is a need for skills in symptom control on medical wards.

  3. Blood sample collection and patient identification demand improvement: a questionnaire study of preanalytical practices in hospital wards and laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallin, Olof; Söderberg, Johan; Van Guelpen, Bethany; Stenlund, Hans; Grankvist, Kjell; Brulin, Christine

    2010-09-01

    Scand J Caring Sci; 2010; 24; 581-591 
 Blood sample collection and patient identification demand improvement: a questionnaire study of preanalytical practices in hospital wards and laboratories   Most errors in venous blood testing result from human mistakes occurring before the sample reach the laboratory.   To survey venous blood sampling (VBS) practices in hospital wards and to compare practices with hospital laboratories.   Staff in two hospitals (all wards) and two hospital laboratories (314 respondents, response rate 94%), completed a questionnaire addressing issues relevant to the collection of venous blood samples for clinical chemistry testing.   The findings suggest that instructions for patient identification and the collection of venous blood samples were not always followed. For example, 79% of the respondents reported the undesirable practice (UDP) of not always using wristbands for patient identification. Similarly, 87% of the respondents noted the UDP of removing venous stasis after the sampling is finished. Compared with the ward staff, a significantly higher proportion of the laboratory staff reported desirable practices regarding the collection of venous blood samples. Neither education nor the existence of established sampling routines was clearly associated with VBS practices among the ward staff.   The results of this study, the first of its kind, suggest that a clinically important risk of error is associated with VBS in the surveyed wards. Most important is the risk of misidentification of patients. Quality improvement of blood sample collection is clearly needed, particularly in hospital wards. © 2009 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2009 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  4. Predictive factors of adrenal insufficiency in patients admitted to acute medical wards: a case control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oboni Jean-Baptiste

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adrenal insufficiency is a rare and potentially lethal disease if untreated. Several clinical signs and biological markers are associated with glucocorticoid failure but the importance of these factors for diagnosing adrenal insufficiency is not known. In this study, we aimed to assess the prevalence of and the factors associated with adrenal insufficiency among patients admitted to an acute internal medicine ward. Methods Retrospective, case-control study including all patients with high-dose (250 μg ACTH-stimulation tests for suspected adrenal insufficiency performed between 2008 and 2010 in an acute internal medicine ward (n = 281. Cortisol values Results 32 patients (11.4% presented adrenal insufficiency; the others served as controls. Among all clinical and biological parameters studied, history of glucocorticoid withdrawal was the only independent factor significantly associated with patients with adrenal insufficiency (Odds Ratio: 6.71, 95% CI: 3.08 –14.62. Using a logistic regression, a model with four significant and independent variable was obtained, regrouping history of glucocorticoid withdrawal (OR 7.38, 95% CI [3.18 ; 17.11], p-value p-value 0.044, eosinophilia (OR 17.6, 95% CI [1.02; 302.3], p-value 0.048 and hyperkalemia (OR 2.41, 95% CI [0.87; 6.69], p-value 0.092. The AROC (95% CI was 0.75 (0.70; 0.80 for this model, with 6.3 (0.8 – 20.8 for sensitivity and 99.2 (97.1 – 99.9 for specificity. Conclusions 11.4% of patients with suspected adrenal insufficient admitted to acute medical ward actually do present with adrenal insufficiency, defined by an abnormal response to high-dose (250 μg ACTH-stimulation test. A history of glucocorticoid withdrawal was the strongest factor predicting the potential adrenal failure. The combination of a history of glucocorticoid withdrawal, nausea, eosinophilia and hyperkaliemia might be of interest to suspect adrenal insufficiency.

  5. Sarcopenia predicts readmission and mortality in elderly patients in acute care wards: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ming; Hu, Xiaoyi; Wang, Haozhong; Zhang, Lei; Hao, Qiukui; Dong, Birong

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this study is to assess the prevalence of sarcopenia and investigate the associations between sarcopenia and long-term mortality and readmission in a population of elderly inpatients in acute care wards. We conducted a prospective observational study in the acute care wards of a teaching hospital in western China. The muscle mass was estimated according to a previously validated anthropometric equation. Handgrip strength was measured with a handheld dynamometer, and physical performance was measured via a 4 m walking test. Sarcopenia was defined according to the recommended diagnostic algorithm of the Asia Working Group for Sarcopenia. The survival status and readmission information were obtained via telephone interviews at 12, 24, and 36 months during the 3 year follow-up period following the baseline investigation. Two hundred and eighty-eight participants (mean age: 81.1 ± 6.6 years) were included. Forty-nine participants (17.0%) were identified as having sarcopenia. This condition was similar in men and women (16.9% vs. 17.5%, respectively, P = 0.915). During the 3 year follow-up period, 49 men (22.7%) and 9 women (16.4%) died (P = 0.307). The mortality of sarcopenic participants was significantly increased compared with non-sarcopenic participants (40.8% vs. 17.1%, respectively, P sarcopenia was an independent predictor of 3 year mortality (adjusted hazard ratio: 2.49; 95% confidential interval: 1.25-4.95) and readmission (adjusted hazard ratio: 1.81; 95% confidential interval: 1.17-2.80). Sarcopenia, which is evaluated by a combination of anthropometric measures, gait speed, and handgrip strength, is valuable to predict hospital readmission and long-term mortality in elderly patients in acute care wards. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Cachexia, Sarcopenia and Muscle published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of the Society on Sarcopenia, Cachexia and Wasting Disorders.

  6. A multi-method assessment of study strategies in higher education students with an autism spectrum disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tops, Wim; Van Den Bergh, An; Noens, Ilse; Baeyens, Dieter

    2017-01-01

    Recent research shows that the number of students with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in higher education is increasing. However they seem to have lower academic success rates and lower chances of graduating from HE than their peer students. In this study we focused on the study skills and study

  7. Network Horizon and the Dynamics of Network Positions: A Multi-Method Multi-Level Longitudinal Study of Interfirm Networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.W. van Liere (Diederik)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractDiederik van Liere was born in Kortenhoef, the Netherlands, on February 18, 1978. He attended Herman Jordan Lyceum in Zeist, from which he received his Atheneum diploma in 1996. After high school, Diederik went on to study Business Administration at the Erasmus University Rotterdam, the

  8. The evaluation of a hostel ward. A controlled study using modified cost-benefit analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyde, C; Bridges, K; Goldberg, D; Lowson, K; Sterling, C; Faragher, B

    1987-12-01

    A controlled modified cost-benefit evaluation of a hostel ward caring for new long-stay patients is described and results are presented for the first two years. In some respects the residents of the hostel ward had fewer psychotic impairments than those remaining on the wards of the district general hospital, mainly because the latter seem to continue to acquire such defects, while the former have remained relatively unchanged. The hostel ward residents also develop superior domestic skills, use more facilities in the community, and are more likely to be engaged in constructive activities than controls. These advantages were not purchased at a price, since the cost of providing this form of care for these patients has cost less than care provided by the district general hospital.

  9. Managing visitor impacts in parks: A multi-method study of the effectiveness of alternative management practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, L.O.; Marion, J.L.; Manning, R.E.; Lawson, S.R.; Jacobi, C.

    2008-01-01

    How can recreation use be managed to control associated environmental impacts? What management practices are most effective and why? This study explored these and related questions through a series of experimental ?treatments? and associated ?controls? at the summit of Cadillac Mountain in Acadia National Park, a heavily used and environmentally fragile area. The treatments included five management practices designed to keep visitors on maintained trails, and these practices ranged from ?indirect? (information/education) to ?direct? (a fence bordering the trail). Research methods included unobtrusive observation of visitors to determine the percentage of visitors who walked off-trail and a follow-up visitor survey to explore why management practices did or didn?t work. All of the management practices reduced the percentage of visitors who walked off-trail. More aggressive applications of indirect practices were more effective than less aggressive applications, and the direct management practice of fencing was the most effective of all. None of the indirect management practices reduced walking off-trail to a degree that is likely to control damage to soil and vegetation at the study site. Study findings suggest that an integrated suite of direct and indirect management practices be implemented on Cadillac Mountain (and other, similar sites) that includes a) a regulation requiring visitors to stay on the maintained trail, b) enforcement of this regulation as needed, c) unobtrusive fencing along the margins of the trail, d) redesign of the trail to extend it, widen it in key places, and provide short spur trails to key ?photo points?, and e) an aggressive information/education program to inform visitors of the regulation to stay on the trail and the reasons for it. These recommendations are a manifestation of what may be an emerging principle of park and outdoor recreation management: intensive use requires intensive management.

  10. Patients’ approaches to students’ learning at a clinical education ward-an ethnographic study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background It is well known that patients’ involvement in health care students’ learning is essential and gives students opportunities to experience clinical reasoning and practice clinical skills when interacting with patients. Students encounter patients in different contexts throughout their education. However, looking across the research providing evidence about learning related to patient-student encounters reveals a lack of knowledge about the actual learning process that occurs in encounters between patients and students. The aim of this study was to explore patient-student encounters in relation to students’ learning in a patient-centered health-care setting. Methods An ethnographic approach was used to study the encounters between patients and students. The setting was a clinical education ward for nursing students at a university hospital with eight beds. The study included 10 observations with 11 students and 10 patients. The observer followed one or two students taking care of one patient. During the fieldwork observational and reflective notes were taken. After each observation follow-up interviews were conducted with each patient and student separately. Data were analyzed using an ethnographic approach. Results The most striking results showed that patients took different approaches in the encounters with students. When the students managed to create a good atmosphere and a mutual relationship, the patients were active participants in the students’ learning. If the students did not manage to create a good atmosphere, the relationship became one-way and the patients were passive participants, letting the students practice on their bodies but without engaging in a dialogue with the students. Conclusions Patient-student encounters, at a clinical education ward with a patient-centred pedagogical framework, can develop into either a learning relationship or an attending relationship. A learning relationship is based on a mutual relationship between

  11. Patients' approaches to students' learning at a clinical education ward--an ethnographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manninen, Katri; Henriksson, Elisabet Welin; Scheja, Max; Silén, Charlotte

    2014-07-02

    It is well known that patients' involvement in health care students' learning is essential and gives students opportunities to experience clinical reasoning and practice clinical skills when interacting with patients. Students encounter patients in different contexts throughout their education. However, looking across the research providing evidence about learning related to patient-student encounters reveals a lack of knowledge about the actual learning process that occurs in encounters between patients and students. The aim of this study was to explore patient-student encounters in relation to students' learning in a patient-centered health-care setting. An ethnographic approach was used to study the encounters between patients and students. The setting was a clinical education ward for nursing students at a university hospital with eight beds. The study included 10 observations with 11 students and 10 patients. The observer followed one or two students taking care of one patient. During the fieldwork observational and reflective notes were taken. After each observation follow-up interviews were conducted with each patient and student separately. Data were analyzed using an ethnographic approach. The most striking results showed that patients took different approaches in the encounters with students. When the students managed to create a good atmosphere and a mutual relationship, the patients were active participants in the students' learning. If the students did not manage to create a good atmosphere, the relationship became one-way and the patients were passive participants, letting the students practice on their bodies but without engaging in a dialogue with the students. Patient-student encounters, at a clinical education ward with a patient-centred pedagogical framework, can develop into either a learning relationship or an attending relationship. A learning relationship is based on a mutual relationship between patients and students resulting in patients

  12. Evidence-informed health policy 1 - synthesis of findings from a multi-method study of organizations that support the use of research evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavis, John N; Oxman, Andrew D; Moynihan, Ray; Paulsen, Elizabeth J

    2008-12-17

    Organizations have been established in many countries and internationally to support the use of research evidence by producing clinical practice guidelines, undertaking health technology assessments, and/or directly supporting the use of research evidence in developing health policy on an international, national, and state or provincial level. Learning from these organizations can reduce the need to 'reinvent the wheel' and inform decisions about how best to organize support for such organizations, particularly in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). We undertook a multi-method study in three phases - a survey, interviews, and case descriptions that drew on site visits - and in each of the second and third phases we focused on a purposive sample of those involved in the previous phase. We used the seven main recommendations that emerged from the advice offered in the interviews to organize much of the synthesis of findings across phases and methods. We used a constant comparative method to identify themes from across phases and methods. Seven recommendations emerged for those involved in establishing or leading organizations that support the use of research evidence in developing health policy: 1) collaborate with other organizations; 2) establish strong links with policymakers and involve stakeholders in the work; 3) be independent and manage conflicts of interest among those involved in the work; 4) build capacity among those working in the organization; 5) use good methods and be transparent in the work; 6) start small, have a clear audience and scope, and address important questions; and 7) be attentive to implementation considerations, even if implementation is not a remit. Four recommendations emerged for the World Health Organization (WHO) and other international organizations and networks: 1) support collaborations among organizations; 2) support local adaptation efforts; 3) mobilize support; and 4) create global public goods. This synthesis of

  13. Evidence-informed health policy 1 – Synthesis of findings from a multi-method study of organizations that support the use of research evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moynihan Ray

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Organizations have been established in many countries and internationally to support the use of research evidence by producing clinical practice guidelines, undertaking health technology assessments, and/or directly supporting the use of research evidence in developing health policy on an international, national, and state or provincial level. Learning from these organizations can reduce the need to 'reinvent the wheel' and inform decisions about how best to organize support for such organizations, particularly in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs. Methods We undertook a multi-method study in three phases – a survey, interviews, and case descriptions that drew on site visits – and in each of the second and third phases we focused on a purposive sample of those involved in the previous phase. We used the seven main recommendations that emerged from the advice offered in the interviews to organize much of the synthesis of findings across phases and methods. We used a constant comparative method to identify themes from across phases and methods. Results Seven recommendations emerged for those involved in establishing or leading organizations that support the use of research evidence in developing health policy: 1 collaborate with other organizations; 2 establish strong links with policymakers and involve stakeholders in the work; 3 be independent and manage conflicts of interest among those involved in the work; 4 build capacity among those working in the organization; 5 use good methods and be transparent in the work; 6 start small, have a clear audience and scope, and address important questions; and 7 be attentive to implementation considerations, even if implementation is not a remit. Four recommendations emerged for the World Health Organization (WHO and other international organizations and networks: 1 support collaborations among organizations; 2 support local adaptation efforts; 3 mobilize support; and 4 create

  14. Effects of pharmaceutical counselling on antimicrobial use in surgical wards: intervention study with historical control group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grill, Eva; Weber, Alexandra; Lohmann, Stefanie; Vetter-Kerkhoff, Cornelia; Strobl, Ralf; Jauch, Karl-Walter

    2011-07-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the impact of pharmaceutical consulting on the quality of antimicrobial use in a surgical hospital department in a prospective controlled intervention study. Patients receiving pharmaceutical intervention (intervention group, IG, n = 317) were compared with a historical control group (control group, CG, n = 321). During the control period, antimicrobial use was monitored without intervention. During the subsequent intervention period, a clinical pharmacist reviewed the prescriptions and gave advice on medication. Intervention reduced the length of antimicrobial courses (IG = 10 days, CG = 11 days, incidence rate ratio for i.v. versus o.p. = 0.88, 95% confidence interval 0.84 to 0.93) and shortened i.v. administration (IG = 8 days, CG = 10 days, hazard rate = 1.76 in favour of switch from i.v. to p.o., 95% confidence interval 1.23 to 2.52). Intervention also helped to avoid useless combination therapy and reduced total costs for antimicrobials. A clinical pharmacist who reviews prescriptions can promote an increase in efficiency, for example, by shortening the course of treatment. Counselling by ward-based clinical pharmacists was shown to be effective to streamline antimicrobial therapy in surgical units and to increase drug safety. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Nitrogen removal process optimization in New York City WPCPS: a case study of Wards Island WPCP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramalingam, K; Fillos, J; Musabyimana, M; Deur, A; Beckmann, K

    2009-01-01

    The New York City Department of Environmental Protection has been engaged in a continuous process to develop a nitrogen removal program to reduce the nitrogen mass discharge from its water pollution control plants, (WPCPs), from 49,158 kg/d to 20,105 kg/d by the year 2017 as recommended by the Long Island Sound Study. As part of the process, a comprehensive research effort was undertaken involving bench, pilot and full scale studies to identify the most effective way to upgrade and optimize the existing WPCPs. Aeration tank 13 (AT-13) at the Wards Island WPCP was particularly attractive as a full-scale research facility because its aeration tank with its dedicated final settling tanks and RAS pumps could be isolated from the remaining treatment facilities. The nitrogen removal performance of AT-13, which, at the time, was operated as a "basic step feed BNR Facility", was evaluated and concurrently nitrification kinetic parameters were measured using in-situ bench scale experiments. Additional bench scale experiments provided denitrification rates using different sources of carbon and measurement of the maximum specific growth rate of nitrifying bacteria. The combined findings were then used to upgrade AT-13 to a "full" BNR facility with carbon and alkalinity addition. This paper will focus on the combined bench and full scale results that were the basis for the consequent upgrade.

  16. A multi-method study to determine the effectiveness of, and student attitudes to, online instructional videos for teaching clinical nursing skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Mary; Lyng, Colette; McGrath, Mary; Cannon, Gerald

    2009-04-01

    E-learning is regularly promoted in higher education settings as a way of fostering more flexible approaches to learning. It has been argued however that the 'potential benefits of new information and communication technology instruments in education' have not been subjected to critical scrutiny (Debande, O., 2004. ICTs and the development of e-learning in Europe: the role of the public and private sectors. European Journal of Education 39 (2), 191-208, p. 192). This paper outlines a multi-method evaluation of an e-learning innovation designed to teach clinical skills to student nurses. Responding to the challenges of teaching clinical skills to large class sizes, we developed a set of instructional videos for one undergraduate skills-based module, which are now integral to the module and available online to students on a continuous basis. Evaluation suggests that students' performance outcomes are unchanged. The students view the flexible and self-management aspects of this method of learning positively, with some attitudinal differences between male and female, and mature and non-mature students. However, it is best used to complement rather than replace lecturer demonstration, lending support to a 'blended' model (Collis, B., van der Wende, M., 2002. Models of Technology and Change in Higher Education: An International Comparative Survey on The Current and Future Use of ICT in Higher Education, University of Twente, Center for Higher Education Policy Studies, The Netherlands).

  17. Superconformal Ward identities and the supertorus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grundberg, J.; Nakayama, R.

    1987-12-01

    We derive superconformal Ward identities in the context of superspace supergravity. From these Ward identities we extract operator product expansions and the case of a supertorus is studied in some detail. (orig.)

  18. Nursing performance and the auditory environment in nursing wards: an observational study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reinten, J.; Hornikx, M.; Kohlrausch, A.; Kort, H.S.M.

    Introduction: Communication is an essential part of nursing care. While conversations with patients mainly take place in patient rooms, the ward corridor is often used for communication between staff members and sometimes visiting family. As many patients suffer from hearing loss due to biological

  19. The effect of an active on-ward participation of hospital pharmacists in Internal Medicine teams on preventable Adverse Drug Events in elderly inpatients: protocol of the WINGS study (Ward-oriented pharmacy in newly admitted geriatric seniors)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klopotowska, J.E.; Wierenga, P.C.; de Rooij, S.E.; Stuijt, C.C.; Arisz, L.; Kuks, P.F.; Dijkgraaf, M.G.; Lie-A-Huen, L.; Smorenburg, S.M.

    2011-01-01

    The potential of clinical interventions, aiming at reduction of preventable Adverse Drug Events (preventable ADEs) during hospital stay, have been studied extensively. Clinical Pharmacy is a well-established and effective service, usually consisting of full-time on-ward participation of clinical

  20. Feasibility of implementing a practice guideline for fall prevention on geriatric wards: a multicentre study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milisen, Koen; Coussement, Joke; Arnout, Hanne; Vanlerberghe, Virginie; De Paepe, Leen; Schoevaerdts, Didier; Lambert, Margareta; Van Den Noortgate, Nele; Delbaere, Kim; Boonen, Steven; Dejaeger, Eddy

    2013-04-01

    About 40% of all adverse events in hospital are falls, but only about one in three Belgian hospitals have a fall prevention policy in place. The implementation of a national practice guideline is urgently needed. This multicentre study aimed to determine the feasibility of a previously developed guideline. SETTING, PARTICIPANTS AND METHOD: Seventeen geriatric wards, selected at random out of 40 Belgian hospitals who agreed to take part in the study, evaluated the fall prevention guideline. After the one-month test period, 49 healthcare workers completed a questionnaire on the feasibility of the guideline. At the end of the study, 512 geriatric patients had been assessed using the practice guideline. The average time spent per patient on case finding, multifactorial assessment and initiating a treatment plan was 5.1, 76.1 and 30.6 min, respectively. For most risk assessments and risk modifications, several disciplines considered themselves as being responsible and capable. The majority (more than 69%) of the respondents judged the practice guideline as useful, but only a small majority (62.3%) believed that the guideline could be successfully integrated into their daily practice over a longer period of time. Barriers for implementation included a large time investment (81.1%), lack of communication between the different disciplines (35.8%), lack of motivation of the patient (34.0%), lack of multidisciplinary teamwork (28.3%), and lack of interest from the hospital management (15.4%). Overall, the guideline was found useful, and for each risk factor (except for visual impairment), at least one discipline felt responsible and capable. Towards future implementation of the guideline, following steps should be considered: division of the risk-factor assessment duties and interventions among different healthcare workers; patient education; appointment of a fall prevention coordinator; development of a fall prevention policy with support from the management of the hospital

  1. Teens, Food Choice, and Health: How Can a Multi-Method Research Methodology Enhance the Study of Teen Food Choice and Health Messaging?

    OpenAIRE

    Wiseman, Kelleen

    2011-01-01

    This research report compares alternative approaches to analyzing the complex factors that influence teenagers' food choice. Specifically, a multi-method approach-which involves the integration of the qualitative and quantitative research methodoligies, data and analysis-is compared to a single methodological approach, which involves use of either a quantitative or qualitative methodology.

  2. A multi-method approach for groundwater resource assessment in coastal carbonate (karst) aquifers: the case study of Sierra Almijara (southern Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreo, B.; Barberá, J. A.; Mudarra, M.; Marín, A. I.; García-Orellana, J.; Rodellas, V.; Pérez, I.

    2018-02-01

    Understanding the transference of water resources within hydrogeological systems, particularly in coastal aquifers, in which groundwater discharge may occur through multiple pathways (through springs, into rivers and streams, towards the sea, etc.), is crucial for sustainable groundwater use. This research aims to demonstrate the usefulness of the application of conventional recharge assessment methods coupled to isotopic techniques for accurately quantifying the hydrogeological balance and submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) from coastal carbonate aquifers. Sierra Almijara (Southern Spain), a carbonate aquifer formed of Triassic marbles, is considered as representative of Mediterranean coastal karst formations. The use of a multi-method approach has permitted the computation of a wide range of groundwater infiltration rates (17-60%) by means of direct application of hydrometeorological methods (Thornthwaite and Kessler) and spatially distributed information (modified APLIS method). A spatially weighted recharge rate of 42% results from the most coherent information on physiographic and hydrogeological characteristics of the studied system. Natural aquifer discharge and groundwater abstraction have been volumetrically quantified, based on flow and water-level data, while the relevance of SGD was estimated from the spatial analysis of salinity, 222Rn and the short-lived radium isotope 224Ra in coastal seawater. The total mean aquifer discharge (44.9-45.9 hm3 year-1) is in agreement with the average recharged groundwater (44.7 hm3 year-1), given that the system is volumetrically equilibrated during the study period. Besides the groundwater resources assessment, the methodological aspects of this research may be interesting for groundwater management and protection strategies in coastal areas, particularly karst environments.

  3. A Study about The Quality of Nursing Services a Hospitals’ Ward, Mojokerto

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Muhith

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Nowadays, the trend of hospital visits in Mojokerto is declining. It can caused by man (nurses, such as the quality of nursing services hasn’t been conducted optimally. This study was aimed to analyze the quality of nursing services at hospitals’ ward at Mojokerto. Method: This was explanatory research with survey method and cross sectional approach. The population were nurses and patients who undergo hospitalization minimally in three days at RSU. Dr. Wahidin Sudiro Husodo and RS Reksa Waluyo Mojokerto. The data were collected by using questionnaire, and then will be analyzed by using regression statistical test. Result: 1 There was positive significance influence of nurses capability, hospital’s ethic, and leadership to the commitment of nurses; 2 There was significant influence of capability work (identification, significance, autonomy, and feedback to the improvement of nursing services quality; 3 There was significant influence of hospital’s ethics (communication, relatedness with industry, compulsion, and specification to the improvement of nursing services quality; 4 There was significant influence of leadership (challenger risk, socialization in vision and mission, supporter, guiding, and supporting to the improvement of nursing services quality; 5 There was significant influence of nurses’ commitment (sense of belonging, sense of linking, believable leader, and suitability of value to the improvement of nursing services quality. Discussion: It can be concluded that in order to improve the quality of nursing service, management of RSU Dr. Wahidin Sudiro Husodo and RS Rekso Waluyo Mojokerto should improve the ability of nurses, the enforcement of hospital ethics to all employees without exception, and develop hospital ethics that can represent various stakeholder interests, as well as maintain and improve leadership issue. Keywords: nurses, quality, services (tangibility, reliability, responsiveness, assurance

  4. What scares patients to get admitted in a psychiatry ward? An exploratory study

    OpenAIRE

    Sushmita Bhattacharya; Bir Singh Chavan

    2018-01-01

    Background: There has been very little focus on understanding the experiences of people suffering from mental illness during their treatment in the outpatient and inpatient treatment facilities. Majority of the decisions regarding their treatment are taken by the mental health professionals in consultation with the caregivers, and the patient remains a passive recipient of the services. It is commonly seen that patients refuse admission in the psychiatry ward even when clinical needs warrant ...

  5. An ethnographic study exploring the role of ward-based Advanced Nurse Practitioners in an acute medical setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Susan; Twelvetree, Timothy; Thompson, Jacqueline; Beaver, Kinta

    2012-07-01

    This article is a report of a study that aimed to examine the role of ward-based Advanced Nurse Practitioners and their impact on patient care and nursing practice. Revised doctor/nurse skill mix combined with a focus on improving quality of care while reducing costs has had an impact on healthcare delivery in the western world. Diverse advanced nursing practice roles have developed and their function has varied globally over the last decade. However, roles and expectations for ward-based Advanced Nurse Practitioners lack clarity, which may hinder effective contribution to practice. An ethnographic approach was used to explore the advanced nurse practitioner role. Participant observation and interviews of five ward-based Advanced Nurse Practitioners working in a large teaching hospital in the North West of England during 2009 were complemented by formal and informal interviews with staff and patients. Data were descriptive and broken down into themes, patterns and processes to enable interpretation and explanation. The overarching concept that ran through data analysis was that of Advanced Nurse Practitioners as a lynchpin, using their considerable expertise, networks and insider knowledge of health care not only to facilitate patient care but to develop a pivotal role facilitating nursing and medical practice. Sub-themes included enhancing communication and practice, acting as a role model, facilitating the patients' journey and pioneering the role. Ward-based Advanced Nurse Practitioners are pivotal and necessary for providing quality holistic patient care and their role can be defined as more than junior doctor substitutes. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. Therapeutic Body Wraps in Swiss public adult acute inpatient wards. A retrospective descriptive cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opsommer, E; Dubois, J; Bangerter, G; Panchaud, R; Martin, D; Skuza, K

    2016-04-01

    WHAT IS KNOWN ON THE SUBJECT?: Various expert opinions reported relational benefits and tranquilizing effects of therapeutic body wraps (TBW) in adults experiencing high anxiety in the context of psychosis. Yet, this tranquilizing effect was never investigated in larger samples and in the context of modern psychopharmacology. WHAT THIS PAPER ADDS TO EXISTING KNOWLEDGE?: This is the first study to establish descriptive statistics of this mind-body therapy in French-speaking Switzerland where TBWs are routinely used in two public psychiatric hospitals. It brings knowledge on patients nowadays treated with TBW. Moreover, it opens a new area of investigation on the potential of this nursing technique, which may contribute to reduce anxiolytic medication in severely ill patients. WHAT ARE THE IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE?: This study sheds light on a clinical practice in mental health nursing and upon nurses' specific contribution to psychiatric clinic. It investigates a potential for TBWs to reduce the use of anxiolytic medications by patients who agreed to have TBW as part of their treatment. It may help to inform the mental health nursing practice. Introduction Many patients suffering from serious mental illness experience severe anxiety and those with psychosis often report the feeling of their bodies falling apart. While it is believed that these patients benefit from therapeutic body wraps (TBWs), the use of this adjunct therapy has rarely been studied in adult patients. Aims The aim of this study was to obtain descriptive statistics on the clinical, social-demographic and institutional reality of TBW therapy in Swiss public adult inpatient wards. Methods Retrospective data related to a cohort of 172 adult inpatients were retrieved from records of two public hospitals. Correlations between TBW and the prescriptions of lorazepam were explored. Results TBWs were primarily used for patients diagnosed with either schizophrenia, schizotypal, delusional and other non

  7. Confidential conversations between supervisor and employee as a means for improving leadership: a quasi-experimental study in hospital wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kivimäki, M

    1996-11-01

    Although yearly confidential conversations between a supervisor and an employee have been recommended as a means for improving leadership, evidence on the actual effects of these conversations has been lacking. The present study therefore investigated whether confidential conversations improve perceptions of goal clarity, sufficiency of feedback and innovativeness, and elicit satisfaction with the supervisor's leadership style within the hospital setting. Nine wards were divided into one experimental group (3 wards) and two control groups (3 + 3 wards). A questionnaire on goal clarity, feedback, innovativeness and satisfaction was administered twice to every group (1st measurement: r = 186, 2nd measurement: n = 163). The experimental group began confidential conversations after the first measurement, control group 1 entered into conversations during both measurements, and control group 2 did not enter into conversations at the time of either measurement. Confidential conversations improved perceived feedback. In both measurements, the sufficiency of feedback was reported to be significantly better in the groups having conversations than in the other groups. In addition, there was a significant positive change in the perceived sufficiency of feedback in the experimental group but not in the other groups. Confidential conversations did not affect the perceptions of goal clarity and innovativeness or elicit satisfaction with the supervisor's management style.

  8. Priorities and strategies for improving disabled women's access to maternity services when they are affected by domestic abuse: a multi-method study using concept maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradbury-Jones, Caroline; Breckenridge, Jenna P; Devaney, John; Duncan, Fiona; Kroll, Thilo; Lazenbatt, Anne; Taylor, Julie

    2015-12-28

    Domestic abuse is a significant public health issue. It occurs more frequently among disabled women than those without a disability and evidence suggests that a great deal of domestic abuse begins or worsens during pregnancy. All women and their infants are entitled to equal access to high quality maternity care. However, research has shown that disabled women who experience domestic abuse face numerous barriers to accessing care. The aim of the study was to identify the priority areas for improving access to maternity services for this group of women; develop strategies for improved access and utilisation; and explore the feasibility of implementing the identified strategies. This multi-method study was the third and final part of a larger study conducted in the UK between 2012 and 2014. The study used a modified concept mapping approach and was theoretically underpinned by Andersen's model of healthcare use. Seven focus group interviews were conducted with a range of maternity care professionals (n = 45), incorporating quantitative and qualitative components. Participants ranked perceived barriers to women's access and utilisation of maternity services in order of priority using a 5-point Likert scale. Quantitative data exploration used descriptive and non-parametric analyses. In the qualitative component of each focus group, participants discussed the barriers and identified potential improvement strategies (and feasibility of implementing these). Qualitative data were analysed inductively using a framework analysis approach. The three most highly ranked barriers to women's access and utilisation of maternity services identified in the quantitative component were: 1) staff being unaware and not asking about domestic abuse and disability; 2) the impact of domestic abuse on women; 3) women's fear of disclosure. The top two priority strategies were: providing information about domestic abuse to all women and promoting non-judgemental staff attitude. These were

  9. Effects of Transferring to the Rehabilitation Ward on Long-Term Mortality Rate of First-Time Stroke Survivors: A Population-Based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chien-Min; Yang, Yao-Hsu; Chang, Chia-Hao; Chen, Pau-Chung

    2017-12-01

    To assess the long-term health outcomes of acute stroke survivors transferred to the rehabilitation ward. Long-term mortality rates of first-time stroke survivors during hospitalization were compared among the following sets of patients: patients transferred to the rehabilitation ward, patients receiving rehabilitation without being transferred to the rehabilitation ward, and patients receiving no rehabilitation. Retrospective cohort study. Patients (N = 11,419) with stroke from 2005 to 2008 were initially assessed for eligibility. After propensity score matching, 390 first-time stroke survivors were included. None. Cox proportional hazards regression model was used to assess differences in 5-year poststroke mortality rates. Based on adjusted hazard ratios (HRs), the patients receiving rehabilitation without being transferred to the rehabilitation ward (adjusted HR, 2.20; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.36-3.57) and patients receiving no rehabilitation (adjusted HR, 4.00; 95% CI, 2.55-6.27) had significantly higher mortality risk than the patients transferred to the rehabilitation ward. Mortality rate of the stroke survivors was affected by age ≥65 years (compared with age stroke (adjusted HR, 1.55), stroke severity (Stroke Severity Index [SSI] score≥20, compared with SSI scorestroke survivors transferred to the rehabilitation ward had a 5-year mortality rate 2.2 times lower than those who received rehabilitation without transfer to the rehabilitation ward and 4 times lower than those who received no rehabilitation. Copyright © 2016 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Lost in hospital: a qualitative interview study that explores the perceptions of NHS inpatients who spent time on clinically inappropriate hospital wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goulding, Lucy; Adamson, Joy; Watt, Ian; Wright, John

    2015-10-01

    Prior research suggests that the placement of patients on clinically inappropriate hospital wards may increase the risk of experiencing patient safety issues. To explore patients' perspectives of the quality and safety of the care received during their inpatient stay on a clinically inappropriate hospital ward. Qualitative study using semi-structured interviews. Nineteen patients who had spent time on at least one clinically inappropriate ward during their hospital stay at a large NHS teaching hospital in England. Patients would prefer to be treated on the correct specialty ward, but it is generally accepted that this may not be possible. When patients are placed on inappropriate wards, they may lack a sense of belonging. Participants commented on potential failings in communication, medical staff availability, nurses' knowledge and the resources available, each of which may contribute to unsafe care. Patients generally acknowledge the need for placement on inappropriate wards due to demand for inpatient beds, but may report dissatisfaction in terms of preference and belonging. Importantly, patients recount issues resulting from this placement that may compromise their safety. Hospital managers should be encouraged to appreciate this insight and potential threat to safe practice and where possible avoid inappropriate ward transfers and admissions. Where such admissions are unavoidable, staff should take action to address the gaps in safety of care that have been identified. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Re-establishing safer medical-circumcision-integrated initiation ceremonies for HIV prevention in a rural setting in Papua New Guinea. A multi-method acceptability study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clement Morris Manineng

    Full Text Available Efforts to stem the spread of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV in Papua New Guinea (PNG are hampered by multiple interrelated factors including limited health services, extreme diversities in culture and language and highly prevalent gender inequity, domestic violence and poverty. In the rural district of Yangoru-Saussia, a revival of previously ceased male initiation ceremonies (MICs is being considered for a comprehensive approach to HIV prevention. In this study, we explore the local acceptability of this undertaking including replacing traditional penile cutting practices with medical male circumcision (MMC.A multi-method study comprising three phases. Phase one, focus group discussions with male elders to explore locally appropriate approaches to HIV prevention; Phase two, interviews and a cross-sectional survey with community men and women to assess views on MICs that include MMC for HIV prevention; Phase three, interviews with cultural leaders and a cross sectional survey to assess the acceptability of replacing traditional penile bleeding with MMC.Cultural leaders expressed that re-establishing MICs was locally appropriate for HIV prevention given the focus on character building and cultural preservation. Most surveyed participants (81.5% supported re-establishing MICs and 92.2% supported adapting MICs with MMC. Changes to penile bleeding emerged as a contentious and contested issue given its cultural significance in symbolizing initiates' transition from childhood to adulthood. Participants were concerned about potential clash with modern education, introduced religious beliefs and limited government support in leadership and funding.Most people in this study in Yangoru-Saussia support re-establishing MICs and replacing traditional penile bleeding with MMC. This culturally-sensitive alignment of MMC (and HIV prevention with revived MICs responds to a national health priority in PNG and acts as an example of providing culturally

  12. Experiences During a Psychoeducational Intervention Program Run in a Pediatric Ward: A Qualitative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Magalhães

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Hospitalization, despite its duration, is likely to result in emotional, social, and academic costs to school-age children and adolescents. Developing adequate psychoeducational activities and assuring inpatients' own class teachers' collaboration, allows for the enhancement of their personal and emotional competences and the maintenance of a connection with school and academic life. These educational programs have been mainly designed for patients with long stays and/or chronic conditions, in the format of Hospital Schools, and typically in pediatric Hospitals. However, the negative effects of hospitalization can be felt in internments of any duration, and children hospitalized in smaller regional hospitals should have access to actions to maintain the connection with their daily life. Thus, this investigation aims to present a psychoeducational intervention program theoretically grounded within the self-regulated learning (SRL framework, implemented along 1 year in a pediatric ward of a regional hospital to all its school-aged inpatients, regardless of the duration of their stay. The program counts with two facets: the psychoeducational accompaniment and the linkage to school. All the 798 school-aged inpatients (Mage = 11.7; SDage = 3.71; Mhospital stay = 4 days participated in pedagogical, leisure nature, and SRL activities designed to train transversal skills (e.g., goal-setting. Moreover, inpatients completed assigned study tasks resulting from the linkage between the students' own class teachers and the hospital teacher. The experiences reported by parents/caregivers and class teachers of the inpatients enrolling in the intervention allowed the researchers to reflect on the potential advantages of implementing a psychoeducational intervention to hospitalized children and adolescents that is: individually tailored, focused on leisure playful theoretically grounded activities that allow learning to naturally occur, and designed to facilitate

  13. Experiences During a Psychoeducational Intervention Program Run in a Pediatric Ward: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalhães, Paula; Mourão, Rosa; Pereira, Raquel; Azevedo, Raquel; Pereira, Almerinda; Lopes, Madalena; Rosário, Pedro

    2018-01-01

    Hospitalization, despite its duration, is likely to result in emotional, social, and academic costs to school-age children and adolescents. Developing adequate psychoeducational activities and assuring inpatients' own class teachers' collaboration, allows for the enhancement of their personal and emotional competences and the maintenance of a connection with school and academic life. These educational programs have been mainly designed for patients with long stays and/or chronic conditions, in the format of Hospital Schools, and typically in pediatric Hospitals. However, the negative effects of hospitalization can be felt in internments of any duration, and children hospitalized in smaller regional hospitals should have access to actions to maintain the connection with their daily life. Thus, this investigation aims to present a psychoeducational intervention program theoretically grounded within the self-regulated learning (SRL) framework, implemented along 1 year in a pediatric ward of a regional hospital to all its school-aged inpatients, regardless of the duration of their stay. The program counts with two facets: the psychoeducational accompaniment and the linkage to school. All the 798 school-aged inpatients ( M age = 11.7; SD age = 3.71; M hospital stay = 4 days) participated in pedagogical, leisure nature, and SRL activities designed to train transversal skills (e.g., goal-setting). Moreover, inpatients completed assigned study tasks resulting from the linkage between the students' own class teachers and the hospital teacher. The experiences reported by parents/caregivers and class teachers of the inpatients enrolling in the intervention allowed the researchers to reflect on the potential advantages of implementing a psychoeducational intervention to hospitalized children and adolescents that is: individually tailored, focused on leisure playful theoretically grounded activities that allow learning to naturally occur, and designed to facilitate school re

  14. An observational study in psychiatric acute patients admitted to General Hospital Psychiatric Wards in Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margari Francesco

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives this Italian observational study was aimed at collecting data of psychiatric patients with acute episodes entering General Hospital Psychiatric Wards (GHPWs. Information was focused on diagnosis (DSM-IV, reasons of hospitalisation, prescribed treatment, outcome of aggressive episodes, evolution of the acute episode. Methods assessments were performed at admission and discharge. Used psychometric scales were the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS, the Modified Overt Aggression Scale (MOAS and the Nurses' Observation Scale for Inpatient Evaluation (NOSIE-30. Results 864 adult patients were enrolled in 15 GHPWs: 728 (320 M; mean age 43.6 yrs completed both admission and discharge visits. A severe psychotic episode with (19.1% or without (47.7% aggressive behaviour was the main reason of admission. Schizophrenia (42.8% at admission and 40.1% at discharge and depression (12.9% at admission and 14.7% at discharge were the predominant diagnoses. The mean hospital stay was 12 days. The mean (± SD total score of MOAS at admission, day 7 and discharge was, respectively, 2.53 ± 5.1, 0.38 ± 2.2, and 0.21 ± 1.5. Forty-four (6.0% patients had episodes of aggressiveness at admission and 8 (1.7% at day 7. A progressive improvement in each domain/item vs. admission was observed for MOAS and BPRS, while NOSIE-30 did not change from day 4 onwards. The number of patients with al least one psychotic drug taken at admission, in the first 7 days of hospitalisation, and prescribed at discharge, was, respectively: 472 (64.8%, 686 (94.2% and 676 (92.9%. The respective most frequently psychotic drugs were: BDZs (60.6%, 85.7%, 69.5%, typical anti-psychotics (48.3%, 57.0%, 49.6%, atypical anti-psychotics (35.6%, 41.8%, 39.8% and antidepressants (40.9%, 48.8%, 43.2%. Rates of patients with one, two or > 2 psychotic drugs taken at admission and day 7, and prescribed at discharge, were, respectively: 24.8%, 8.2% and 13.5% in mono-therapy; 22.0%, 20

  15. 'It's a matter of patient safety': understanding challenges in everyday clinical practice for achieving good care on the surgical ward - a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jangland, Eva; Nyberg, Berit; Yngman-Uhlin, Pia

    2017-06-01

    Surgical care plays an important role in the acute hospital's delivery of safe, high-quality patient care. Although demands for effectiveness are high in surgical wards quality of care and patient safety must also be secured. It is therefore necessary to identify the challenges and barriers linked to quality of care and patient safety with a focus on this specific setting. To explore situations and processes that support or hinder good safe patient care on the surgical ward. This qualitative study was based on a strategic sample of 10 department and ward leaders in three hospitals and six surgical wards in Sweden. Repeated reflective interviews were analysed using systematic text condensation. Four themes described the leaders' view of a complex healthcare setting that demands effectiveness and efficiency in moving patients quickly through the healthcare system. Quality of care and patient safety were often hampered factors such as a shift of care level, with critically ill patients cared for without reorganisation of nurses' competencies on the surgical ward. There is a gap between what is described in written documents and what is or can be performed in clinical practice to achieve good care and safe care on the surgical ward. A shift in levels of care on the surgical ward without reallocation of the necessary competencies at the patient's bedside show consequences for quality of care and patient safety. This means that surgical wards should consider reviewing their organisation and implementing more advanced nursing roles in direct patient care on all shifts. The ethical issues and the moral stress on nurses who lack the resources and competence to deliver good care according to professional values need to be made more explicit as a part of the patient safety agenda in the surgical ward. © 2016 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  16. Tracing the evolution of chiropractic students' confidence in clinical and patient communication skills during a clinical internship: a multi-methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecimovich, Mark; Volet, Simone

    2012-06-19

    Anecdotal evidence points to variations in individual students' evolving confidence in clinical and patient communication skills during a clinical internship. A better understanding of the specific aspects of internships that contribute to increasing or decreasing confidence is needed to best support students during the clinical component of their study. A multi-method approach, combining two large-scale surveys with 269 students and three in-depth individual interviews with a sub-sample of 29 students, was used to investigate the evolution of change in student confidence during a 10-month long internship. Change in levels of confidence in patient communication and clinical skills was measured and relationship to demographic factors were explored. The interviews elicited students' accounts and reflections on what affected the evolution of their confidence during the internship. At the start of their internship, students were more confident in their patient communication skills than their clinical skills but prior experience was significantly related to confidence in both. Initial confidence in patient communication skills was also related to age and prior qualification but not gender whilst confidence in clinical skills was related to gender but not age or prior qualification. These influences were maintained over time. Overall, students' levels of confidence in patient communication and clinical skills confidence increased significantly over the duration of the internship with evidence that change over time in these two aspects were inter-related. To explore how specific aspects of the internship contributed to changing levels of confidence, two extreme sub-groups of interviewees were identified, those with the least increase and those with the highest increase in professional confidence over time. A number of key factors affecting the development of confidence were identified, including among others, interactions with clinicians and patients, personal agency and

  17. Tracing the evolution of chiropractic students’ confidence in clinical and patient communication skills during a clinical internship: a multi-methods study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Anecdotal evidence points to variations in individual students’ evolving confidence in clinical and patient communication skills during a clinical internship. A better understanding of the specific aspects of internships that contribute to increasing or decreasing confidence is needed to best support students during the clinical component of their study. Methods A multi-method approach, combining two large-scale surveys with 269 students and three in-depth individual interviews with a sub-sample of 29 students, was used to investigate the evolution of change in student confidence during a 10-month long internship. Change in levels of confidence in patient communication and clinical skills was measured and relationship to demographic factors were explored. The interviews elicited students’ accounts and reflections on what affected the evolution of their confidence during the internship. Results At the start of their internship, students were more confident in their patient communication skills than their clinical skills but prior experience was significantly related to confidence in both. Initial confidence in patient communication skills was also related to age and prior qualification but not gender whilst confidence in clinical skills was related to gender but not age or prior qualification. These influences were maintained over time. Overall, students’ levels of confidence in patient communication and clinical skills confidence increased significantly over the duration of the internship with evidence that change over time in these two aspects were inter-related. To explore how specific aspects of the internship contributed to changing levels of confidence, two extreme sub-groups of interviewees were identified, those with the least increase and those with the highest increase in professional confidence over time. A number of key factors affecting the development of confidence were identified, including among others, interactions with clinicians

  18. Factors Influencing Participation of Rural Women in Zimbabwes 2013 Constitution Referendum A Case Study Of Ward 22 Gutu District

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbra Ncube

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Participation is the cornerstone of citizen engagement. In constitution making and other public policy formulation processes public participation typically involves preparing the public to participate through civic education and public information campaigns as well as consulting the public on issues such as how the process should take place and the contents of the constitution itself. This study sought to examine the factors that influence womens participation in constitution making processes specifically relating to voting in the constitution referendum in the case of rural women residing in ward 22 of Gutu district of Zimbabwe. Gutu District is the third largest district in Masvingo province. Ward 22 is located in the communal region of Gutu central. The people of ward 22 largely depend on subsistence farming and market gardening for their livelihoods. The objectives of the study were to ascertain to what extent media campaign and publicity efforts by womens civic groups and public interaction through public meetings and hearings were able to influence the participation of Zimbabwean women in the 2013 referendum in ward 22 Gutu district. Over and above these objectives the study sought to document the experiences and views of rural Zimbabwean women on the constitution making process. This study adopted a descriptive case study research design. Samples of 108 women from Ward 22 Gutu District were conveniently selected to participate in this study. Data was collected using a structured interview guide and questionnaires which were administered to the respondents. A focused group discussion was also carried out to verify the information gathered through these instruments. Findings and conclusions were derived by means of detailed comparative and inductive analysis of data. Descriptive statistics were employed in the presentation of the findings. Amongst the major findings are that rural women in ward 22 in Gutu district were in actual

  19. A Study of Causes of Readmission Patients Toxicological Ward of the Loghman Hakim Hospital, in Tehran in 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Ghasempour

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Readmission to hospital because of the impact on the cost and quality of hospital care and Impose an additional burden on the healthcare system, Is an important priority for hospital managers. The aim of Study Was causes of readmission patients toxicological ward of the loghman hakim hospital, Research in Tehran. Method: This is an applied cross-sectional retrospective study. Research community included Admissions in 1393 in toxicological ward of the loghman hakim hospital. Research Size based on Morgan is 300 clinical records. Sampling Method was simple randomly. Readmission in the present study in hospitalized form was more than one defined. Demographic data includes (age, gender, marital status, occupation, education and variables related to hospitalization (hospitalization Frequency, length of stay, and poisoning quality, discharge situation, referral and insurance by means of information form was extracted from records. In two level Descriptive statistics (frequency and percentage and inferential statistics (correlation chi-square test, dependent T test and Chi-square test were analyzed using SPSS21 software and hypothesis testing was done. Finding: During the study period300 readmission cases were hospitalized in toxicological ward of the loghman hakim hospital.13/4% patient was readmission. The readmission cause in 41/6% patient was related to family issues. It Can be named respectively emotional, spiritual, and addiction with regard to other topics. The total cost of treating patients was 206521754 Rials. The average cost of stay per patient 10256639 Rials, payment by patient 928136 Rials, and Subsidies health payment by health ministry was 1834370 Rials. Conclusion: The results of this study showed that, several factors may be involved in readmission to hospital patients poisons ,the most important of them can be mentioned in the four ares of family problems, emotional problems, mental problems and addiction.

  20. Medical students' opportunities to participate and learn from activities at an internal medicine ward: an ethnographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hägg-Martinell, A; Hult, H; Henriksson, P; Kiessling, A

    2017-02-14

    To optimise medical students' early clerkship is a complex task since it is conducted in a context primarily organised to take care of patients. Previous studies have explored medical students' perceptions of facilitation and hindrance of learning. However, the opportunities for medical student to learn within the culture of acute medicine care have not been fully investigated. This study aimed to explore how medical students approach, interact and socialise in an acute internal medicine ward context, and how spaces for learning are created and used in such a culture. Ethnographic observations were performed of medical students' interactions and learning during early clerkship at an acute internal medicine care ward. Field notes were taken, transcribed and analysed qualitatively. Data analysis was guided by Wenger's theory of communities of practice. 21 medical students and 30 supervisors participated. Two themes were identified: Nervousness and curiosity- students acted nervously and stressed, especially when they could not answer questions. Over time curiosity could evolve. Unexplored opportunities to support students in developing competence to judge and approach more complex patient-related problems were identified. Invited and involved -students were exposed to a huge variation of opportunities to learn, and to interact and to be involved. Short placements seemed to disrupt the learning process. If and how students became involved also depended on supervisors' activities and students' initiatives. This study shed light on how an acute internal medicine ward culture can facilitate medical students' possibilities to participate and learn. Medical students' learning situations were characterised by questions and answers rather than challenging dialogues related to the complexity of presented patient cases. Further, students experienced continuous transfers between learning situations where the potential to be involved differed in a wide variety of ways. Published

  1. Malnutrition in patients admitted to the medical wards of the Douala General Hospital: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luma, Henry Namme; Eloumou, Servais Albert Fiacre Bagnaka; Mboligong, Franklin Ngu; Temfack, Elvis; Donfack, Olivier-Tresor; Doualla, Marie-Solange

    2017-07-03

    Malnutrition is common in acutely ill patients occurring in 30-50% of hospitalized patients. Awareness and screening for malnutrition is lacking in most health institutions in sub-Saharan Africa. This study aimed at screening for malnutrition using anthropometric and laboratory indices in patients admitted to the internal medicine wards. A cross-sectional study. We screened for malnutrition in 251 consecutive patients admitted from January to March 2013 in the internal medicine wards. Malnutrition defined as body mass index (BMI) less than 18.5 kg/m 2 and/or mid upper arm circumference (MUAC) less than 22 cm in women and 23 cm in men. Weight loss greater than 10% in the last 6 months prior to admission, relevant laboratory data, diagnosis at discharge and length of hospital stay (LOS) were also recorded. Mean age was 47 (SD 16) years. 52.6% were male. Mean BMI was 24.44 (SD 5.79) kg/m 2 and MUAC was 27.8 (SD 5.0) cm. Median LOS was 7 (IQR 5-12) days. 42.4% of patients reported weight loss greater than 10% in the 6 months before hospitalization. MUAC and BMI correlated significantly (r = 0.78; p malnutrition by the two methods showed moderate agreement (κ = 0.56; p malnutrition was 19.34% (35/251). Blood albumin and hemoglobin were significantly lower in malnourished patients. Malnourished patients had a significantly longer LOS (p = 0.019) when compared to those with no malnutrition. Malnutrition was most common amongst patients with malignancy. Malnutrition is common in patients admitted to the medical wards of the Douala General Hospital. Nutritional screening and assessment should be integrated in the care package of all admitted patients.

  2. Development and Usability Evaluation of an Art and Narrative-Based Knowledge Translation Tool for Parents With a Child With Pediatric Chronic Pain: Multi-Method Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Kathy; Hartling, Lisa; Ali, Samina; Le, Anne; Norris, Allison; Scott, Shannon D

    2017-12-14

    Chronic pain in childhood is increasingly being recognized as a significant clinical problem for children and their families. Previous research has identified that families want information about the causes of their child's chronic pain, treatment options, and effective strategies to help their child cope with the pain. Unfortunately, parents have reported that finding this information can be challenging. The aim of this study was to actively work together with children attending a pediatric chronic pain clinic and their parents to develop, refine, and evaluate the usability of an art and narrative-based electronic book (e-book) for pediatric chronic pain. A multiphase, multi-method research design employing patient engagement techniques was used to develop, refine, and evaluate the usability of an art and narrative based e-book for pediatric chronic pain management to facilitate knowledge translation for parents with a child with chronic pain. The multiple phases included the following: (1) qualitative interviews to compile parents' narratives using qualitative interviews; (2) qualitative data analysis; (3) development of an e-book prototype; (4) expert clinician feedback; (5) parent usability evaluation, knowledge change, and confidence in knowledge responses using an electronic survey; (6) e-book refinement; and (7) dissemination of the e-book. A 48-page e-book was developed to characterize the experiences of a family living with a child with chronic pain. The e-book was a composite narrative of the parent interviews and encompassed descriptions of the effects the condition has on each member of the family. This was merged with the best available research evidence on the day-to-day management of pediatric chronic pain. The e-book was vetted for clinical accuracy by expert pediatric pain clinicians. All parents that participated in the usability evaluation (N=14) agreed or strongly agreed the content of the e-book was easy to understand and stated that they would

  3. Quantity and quality of interaction between staff and older patients in UK hospital wards: A descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Hannah Ruth; Griffiths, Peter; Mesa-Eguiagaray, Ines; Pickering, Ruth; Gould, Lisa; Bridges, Jackie

    2016-10-01

    The quality of staff-patient interactions underpins the overall quality of patient experience and can affect other important outcomes. However no studies have been identified that comprehensively explore both the quality and quantity of interactions in general hospital settings. To quantify and characterise the quality of staff-patient interactions and to identify factors associated with negative interaction ratings. Data were gathered at two acute English NHS hospitals between March and April 2015. Six wards for adult patients participated including medicine for older people (n=4), urology (n=1) and orthopaedics (n=1). Eligible patients on participating wards were randomly selected for observation. Staff-patient interactions were observed using the Quality of Interactions Schedule. 120h of care were observed with each 2h observation session determined from a balanced random schedule (Monday-Friday, 08:00-22:00h). Multilevel logistic regression models were used to determine factors associated with negative interactions. 1554 interactions involving 133 patients were observed. The median length of interaction was 36s with a mean of 6 interactions per patient per hour. Seventy three percent of interactions were categorized as positive, 17% neutral and 10% negative. Forty percent of patients had at least one negative interaction (95% confidence interval 32% to 49%). Interactions initiated by the patient (adjusted Odds Ratio [OR] 5.30), one way communication (adjusted OR 10.70), involving two or more staff (adjusted OR 5.86 for 2 staff, 6.46 for 3+ staff), having a higher total number of interactions (adjusted OR 1.09 per unit increase), and specific types of interaction content were associated with increased odds of negative interaction (pinteraction was associated with increased odds of negative interaction in a reduced model. There was no significant association with gender, age or cognitive impairment. There was substantially more variation at ward level (variance

  4. Vitamin "G"arden: a qualitative study exploring perception/s of horticultural therapy on a palliative care ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masel, Eva Katharina; Trinczek, Helena; Adamidis, Feroniki; Schur, Sophie; Unseld, Matthias; Kitta, Anna; Kirchheiner, Kathrin; Steininger, Birgit; Meixner-Katzmann, Karoline; Watzke, Herbert Hans

    2018-06-01

    In a palliative care setting, the preservation of quality of life is of particular importance. Horticultural therapy (HT) is reported as an excellent way to improve physical as well as psychological well-being, reduce levels of anxiety and depression, and promote social interaction. The use of horticultural interventions in palliative care has not yet been explored. The aim of this study was to explore the effects of HT in patients and team members on a palliative care ward. This study was based on a qualitative methodology, comprising 20 semistructured interviews with 15 advanced cancer patients participating in HT and with 5 members of the palliative care team. Interviews were analyzed using NVivo 10 software based on thematic analysis. The results revealed the following themes: (1) well-being, (2) variation of clinical routine, (3) creation, and (4) building relationships. Patients experienced positive stimulation through HT, were distracted from daily clinical routines, enjoyed creative work, and were able to build relationships with other patients. HT was also welcomed by the members of the palliative care team. Thirty-six percent of the patients did not meet the inclusion criteria, and 45% could not participate in the second or third HT session. Our study showed that the availability of HT was highly appreciated by the patients as well as by the palliative care team. Nevertheless, the dropout rate was high, and therefore, it might be more feasible to integrate green spaces into palliative care wards.

  5. Experiences of patients with acute abdominal pain in the ED or acute surgical ward --a qualitative comparative study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schultz, Helen; Qvist, Niels; Backer Mogensen, Christian

    2013-01-01

    The Danish health care system is currently establishing emergency departments (EDs) with an observation unit nationwide. The aim of the study was to investigate patients with acute abdominal pain and their experiences upon arrival and stay in an acute surgical ward (ASW) versus an ED with an obse......The Danish health care system is currently establishing emergency departments (EDs) with an observation unit nationwide. The aim of the study was to investigate patients with acute abdominal pain and their experiences upon arrival and stay in an acute surgical ward (ASW) versus an ED...... was that the ED included a multidisciplinary team with nurses, who mainly had interactions with the patients before surgical assessment. In all, it resulted in fragmentation of care and a patient experience of repetition. In ASW, focus was on assessment by a senior physician, only, and the nurses' interaction...... with the patients took place after surgical assessment. In all, patients experienced long waiting times. The study shows a need to define the roles of the professionals in units receiving patients with acute abdominal pain in order to fulfil the medical as well as the experienced needs of the acute patient....

  6. Study on energy efficiency in Vietnamese row house - case study of Tang Nhon Phu A Ward, District 9, HCMC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thao, H. T. P.; Nam, N. D.

    2018-04-01

    District 9 is a new urban development area which is well-known as an industrial city in the rear of Ho Chi Minh City. This area has special characteristics which are different from central downtown. The housing of district 9 is a new urban area so that it is easier to orient particular architectural style accordance with climatic conditions and other conditions. However, at present, these new residential areas are rising with no clear management of architectural form. That is the reason lead to shortcomings such as: increasing the use of electricity, affecting to climate change and creating urban heat island, increasing costs of energy use. Those problems will be difficult to overcome in the future if we don’t have the right attention on it. By using a combination of multiple methods such as: data collection, case study analysis method, GIS, research by design, etc., this research topic will pay attention on analysis the row house in Tang Nhon Phu A Ward of district 9 and trying to propose some solution and management criteria to local government. The analysis results will ensure that the conclusions reflect the realities of the situation, those also become the basis for the proposed solutions to deal with the existence problems. The result of research may become an application research platform for the related research topics.

  7. [Severe post-partum hemorrhage: descriptive study at the Robert-Debré Hospital maternity ward].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyal, F; Deffarges, J; Luton, D; Blot, P; Oury, J F; Sibony, O

    2002-06-01

    To analyze the prevalence, cause, treatment, and risk factors of severe post-partum hemorrhage (transfusion, surgery, radiology) observed at the maternity ward of the Robert-Debré Hospital, Paris. Method. This retrospective cohort was collected from a database including 19182 deliveries from 1992 to 1998. The entire medical file was reviewed in cases of severe hemorrhage. The prevalence of severe post-partum hemorrhage was 23 per 10,000 deliveries (44 patients). Transfusion was performed in 44/44 and hysterectomy in 3/44. Three patients were transferred to the intensive care unit. There were no deaths. At multivariate analysis, risk factors for severe post-partum hemorrhage were: abnormal placental insertion (OR=7.2; 95CI: 2.18-18.3), cesarean (OR=5.8; 95CI: 2.9-11.6), multiple pregnancy (OR=3.2; 95CI: 1.3-7.8), prematurity (OR=3, 95CI: 1.5-6.2), hypertension (OR=2.9; 95CI: 1.3-6.3). Twenty-six percent of the patients had no risk factors. The prevalence of severe pot-partum hemorrhage is low in our experience. The methodology used for this retrospective cohort does not enable an explanation. Intensive obstetrical care is necessary in case of abnormal placenta insertion. In 10 out of 44 cases, severe post-partum hemorrhage occurred in a context of insufficient monitoring, late or erroneous diagnosis, or incorrect treatment.

  8. Results of prospective multicenter study on heart failure on Campania Internal Medicine wards: the FASHION study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Gallucci

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Heart failure (HF is characterized by a high prevalence and hospitalization rate with considerable health and social impact; the knowledge of its epidemiological features remains the mainstay to assess adequacy of the health care needs. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of HF in Internal Medicine Units of the Campania region (Italy and patients’ characteristics. We recruited all patients with HF admitted between April 1 and June 30, 2014, in 23 Units of Internal Medicine: 975 patients (19.5% of 5000 admissions, 518 women and 457 men, mean age 76.9±9.9 (range 34-100 with 741 (76% older than 70 years. The mean age was higher in women than men; 35.8% of patients had atrial fibrillation, with higher prevalence in women than in men. Coronary artery disease represented the leading etiology while prevalence of non-ischemic heart failure was higher in women. New York Heart Association class was indicated in 926 patients. Left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF was measured in 503 patients; 18.4% of patients had a severely reduced LVEF<35%, mostly men (P=0.0001 and 67.4% presented a LVEF>40%. At least one hospital admission in the previous 12 months was registered in 39.6% of patients. One, two and more than two relevant comorbidities were present in 8.6%, 24.7% and 64.8% of patients, respectively. Arterial hypertension and coronary artery disease were more frequent in female. In conclusion, advanced age and clinical complexity were the main characteristics of HF patients hospitalized in the Internal Medicine Units in Campania. Gender differences also emerged from the analysis of demographic parameters and etiopathogenetic features. Some diagnostic and therapeutic aspects not in line with that recommended by the most recent HF international guidelines were registered.

  9. Very Low Levels of Physical Activity in Older Patients During Hospitalization at an Acute Geriatric Ward: A Prospective Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villumsen, Morten; Jorgensen, Martin Gronbech; Andreasen, Jane; Rathleff, Michael Skovdal; Mølgaard, Carsten Møller

    2015-10-01

    Lack of activity during hospitalization may contribute to functional decline. The purpose of this study was to investigate (1) the time spent walking during hospitalization by geriatric patients referred to physical and/or occupational therapy and (2) the development in time spent walking during hospitalization. In this observational study, 24-hr accelerometer data (ActivPal) were collected from inclusion to discharge in 124 patients at an acute geriatric ward. The median time spent walking was 7 min per day. During the first quartile of hospitalization, the patients spent 4 (IQR:1;11) min per day walking, increasing to 10 (IQR:1;29) min during the last quartile. Improvement in time spent walking was primarily observed in the group able to perform the Timed Up & Go task at admission. When walking only 7 min per day, patients could be classified as inactive and at risk for functional decline; nonetheless, the physical activity level increased significantly during hospitalization.

  10. Surfaces and Air Bacteriology of Selected Wards at a Referral Hospital, Northwest Ethiopia: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getachew, Hailu; Derbie, Awoke; Mekonnen, Daniel

    2018-01-01

    The hospital environment is a source of medically important pathogens that are mostly multidrug resistant (MDR) and posing a major therapeutic challenge. The aim of this study was to assess the surface and air bacteriology of selected wards at Felege Hiwot Referral Hospital (FHRH), Northwest Ethiopia. A cross-sectional study was carried out from 15th February to 30th April 2017. A total of 356 surface and air samples were collected from selected wards using 5% sheep blood agar (Oxoid, UK) and processed at FHRH microbiology laboratory following the standard bacteriological procedures. Pure isolates were tested against the recommended antibiotics using Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion methods, and the susceptibility profile was determined based on Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI). Data were entered and analyzed using SPSS version 23 for Windows. Of the total 356 samples processed, 274 were from surfaces and 82 were from air. Among these, 141 (39.6%) showed bacterial growth, yielding a total of 190 isolates. Gram-positive isolates were predominant at 81.6% ( n =155), while the gram negatives were at 18.4% ( n =35). The main isolates were coagulase negative staphylococci ( CoNs ), 44%, followed by S. aureus , 37.4%, and Klebsiella species at 11.6%. The bacterial load on surfaces and air was found beyond the standard limits. Besides, the antimicrobial susceptibility profile of the isolates showed that about 75% of the identified isolates were found resistant for two and more antimicrobial agents tested. This study showed high degree of bacterial load that is beyond the standard limits on both surfaces and air samples of the hospital. Furthermore, some 75% of the isolates were found multidrug resistant. Therefore, it is important to evaluate and strengthen the infection prevention practice of the hospital. Moreover, stakeholders should also reinforce actions to decrease the pressure of antimicrobial resistance in the studied area.

  11. Patient safety on psychiatric wards: A cross-sectional, multilevel study of factors influencing nurses' willingness to share power and responsibility with patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandewalle, Joeri; Malfait, Simon; Eeckloo, Kristof; Colman, Roos; Beeckman, Dimitri; Verhaeghe, Sofie; Van Hecke, Ann

    2018-04-01

    The World Health Organization highlights the need for more patient participation in patient safety. In mental health care, psychiatric nurses are in a frontline position to support this evolution. The aim of the present study was to investigate the demographic and contextual factors that influence the willingness of psychiatric nurses to share power and responsibility with patients concerning patient safety. The patient participation culture tool for inpatient psychiatric wards was completed by 705 nurses employed in 173 psychiatric wards within 37 hospitals. Multilevel modelling was used to analyse the self-reported data. The acceptance of a role wherein nurses share power and responsibility with patients concerning patient safety is influenced by the nurses' sex, age, perceived competence, perceived support, and type of ward. To support nurses in fulfilling their role in patient participation, patient participation-specific basic and continuing education should be provided. Managers and supervisors should recognize and fulfil their facilitating role in patient participation by offering support to nurses. Special attention is needed for young nurses and nurses on closed psychiatric wards, because these particular groups report being less willing to accept a new role. Ward characteristics that restrict patient participation should be challenged so that these become more patient participation stimulating. More research is needed to explore the willingness and ability of psychiatric nurses to engage in collaborative safety management with patients who have specific conditions, such as suicidal ideation and emotional harm. © 2017 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  12. Healthcare Quality Improvement and 'work engagement'; concluding results from a national, longitudinal, cross-sectional study of the 'Productive Ward-Releasing Time to Care' Programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Mark; Butterworth, Tony; Wells, John Sg

    2017-08-01

    Concerns about patient safety and reducing harm have led to a particular focus on initiatives that improve healthcare quality. However Quality Improvement (QI) initiatives have in the past typically faltered because they fail to fully engage healthcare professionals, resulting in apathy and resistance amongst this group of key stakeholders. Productive Ward: Releasing Time to Care (PW) is a ward-based QI programme created to help ward-based teams redesign and streamline the way that they work; leaving more time to care for patients. PW is designed to engage and empower ward-based teams to improve the safety, quality and delivery of care. The main objective of this study was to explore whether PW sustains the 'engagement' of ward-based teams by examining the longitudinal effect that the national QI programme had on the 'work-engagement' of ward-based teams in Ireland. Utilising the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale questionnaire (UWES-17), we surveyed nine PW (intervention) sites from typical acute Medical/Surgical, Rehabilitation and Elderly services (representing the entire cohort of a national phase of PW implementation in Ireland) and a cohort of matched control sites. The numbers surveyed from the PW group at T1 (up to 3 months after commencing the programme) totalled 253 ward-team members and 249 from the control group. At T2 (12 months later), the survey was repeated with 233 ward-team members from the PW sites and 236 from the control group. Overall findings demonstrated that those involved in the QI initiative had higher 'engagement' scores at T1 and T2 in comparison to the control group. Total 'engagement' score (TES), and its 3 dimensions, were all significantly higher in the PW group at T1, but only the Vigour dimension remained significantly higher at T2 (p = 0.006). Our results lend some support to the assertions of the PW initiative itself and suggest that when compared to a control group, ward-based teams involved in the QI programme are more likely

  13. The role of locally-designed organizational artifacts in supporting nurses’ work: an ethnographic study on the wards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talamo, Alessandra; Mellini, Barbara; Barbieri, Barbara

    2017-01-01

    This paper aims to describe how nurses' planning and coordination work is performed through the use of locally designed tools (i.e., diaries, planners, reminders, and organizers). These tools are investigated as the materialization of organizational work, thus offering a complementary perspective on nursing practice to that proposed by the professional mandate and supported by official artifacts in use. Ethnographic study. By analyzing locally designed artifacts, the rationale that enables nurses to make the flow of activities work is highlighted and explained. Evidence is provided by a description of how nurses' tacit knowledge is reified and embedded into objects produced by the nurses themselves. Implications for the design of digital systems supporting nursing practice are discussed. The analysis of these artifacts has allowed an understanding of practices used by the nurses to manage the workflow in the wards.

  14. Predictors of parent post-traumatic stress symptoms after child hospitalization on general pediatric wards: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franck, Linda S; Wray, Jo; Gay, Caryl; Dearmun, Annette K; Lee, Kirsty; Cooper, Bruce A

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify predictors of parental post-traumatic stress symptoms following child hospitalization. In this prospective cohort study, a sample of 107 parents completed questionnaires during their child's hospitalization on pediatric (non-intensive care) wards and again three months after discharge. Eligible parents had a child expected to be hospitalized for three or more nights. Standardized questionnaires were used to assess parent distress during the child's hospitalization, parent coping strategies and resources, and symptoms of post-traumatic stress after the hospitalization. Correlations and multiple regressions were used to determine whether parent distress during hospitalization and coping strategies and resources predicted post-traumatic stress symptoms three months after the child's discharge, while controlling for relevant covariates. Three months after the child's hospital discharge, 32.7% of parents (n=35) reported some degree of post-traumatic stress symptoms, and 21.5% (n=23) had elevated (≥34) scores consistent with a probable diagnosis of post-traumatic stress disorder. In the multivariable model, parent anxiety and uncertainty during hospitalization and use of negative coping strategies, such as denial, venting and self-blame, were associated with higher post-traumatic stress symptoms scores at three months post-discharge, even after controlling for the child's health status. Parental anxiety and depression during hospitalization moderated the relationship between negative coping strategies and post-traumatic stress symptoms. More than one quarter of parents of children hospitalized on pediatric (non-intensive care) wards experienced significant post-traumatic stress symptoms after their child's discharge. Parents' hospital-related anxiety, uncertainty and use of negative coping strategies are potentially modifiable factors that most strongly influenced post-traumatic stress symptoms. Further research is urgently needed

  15. An adolescent ward; 'in name only?'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutton, Alison

    2008-12-01

    The aim of the study was to explore how an adolescent ward was used by the two main users, nurses and adolescents, on a purpose-built adolescent ward. In Australia, caring for the adolescent is part of paediatric nursing and many Australian hospitals boast of 'adolescent-only facilities'. These wards are established on the premise that adolescent patients are a 'special' group deserving their own ward space. With the development of adolescent wards, set ideals around what this type of environment provides have also arisen. These ideals are increased privacy and independence for the patient, a chance for peer interaction, to be nursed by specially trained staff and to provide opportunities for adolescent patients to participate in their own care. This study used ethnography to gain a perspective of how ward space was used. Data were collected using participant observation and formal and informal interviews. Data were then analysed using the works of Lefebvre and Foucault. This study found that patient allocation, nursing observation and patient labels impact on how adolescent patients are nursed. Patients are expected to fit in, accepting all ministrations of nursing and staff. On this ward, nursing work was paramount. Nurses treated the adolescent patient like any other. In saying this, the adolescent patient still found ways to adapt to the ward space and its rules and routines; so in this sense, the ward still worked for them, even if nursing work was paramount. This study contributes to current discourse on the formation of specialized facilities in general, as it shows that no matter how a ward space is set up, if the space is not used in that way, then the purported purpose of that ward space will be lost.

  16. On-ward participation of a hospital pharmacist in a Dutch intensive care unit reduces prescribing errors and related patient harm: an intervention study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klopotowska, J.E.; Kuiper, R.; van Kan, H.J.; de Pont, A.C.; Dijkgraaf, M.G.; Lie-A-Huen, L.; Vroom, M.B.; Smorenburg, S.M.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Patients admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU) are at high risk for prescribing errors and related adverse drug events (ADEs). An effective intervention to decrease this risk, based on studies conducted mainly in North America, is on-ward participation of a clinical pharmacist in an

  17. On-ward participation of a hospital pharmacist in a Dutch intensive care unit reduces prescribing errors and related patient harm: an intervention study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klopotowska, Joanna E.; Kuiper, Rob; van Kan, Hendrikus J.; de Pont, Anne-Cornelie; Dijkgraaf, Marcel G.; Lie-A-Huen, Loraine; Vroom, Margreeth B.; Smorenburg, Susanne M.

    2010-01-01

    Patients admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU) are at high risk for prescribing errors and related adverse drug events (ADEs). An effective intervention to decrease this risk, based on studies conducted mainly in North America, is on-ward participation of a clinical pharmacist in an ICU team. As

  18. AGGRESSION IN PSYCHIATRY - A QUALITATIVE STUDY FOCUSING ON THE CHARACTERIZATION AND PERCEPTION OF PATIENT AGGRESSION BY NURSES WORKING ON PSYCHIATRIC-WARDS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    FINNEMA, EJ; DASSEN, T; HALFENS, R

    The present study focuses on the characterization and perception of patient aggression by nurses working in a psychiatric hospital in The Netherlands. Data have been collected by interviewing nurses working on open and closed wards. The results have been compared and related to the existing

  19. The evaluation of a framework for measuring the non-technical ward round skills of final year nursing students: An observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Kara; McKenzie, Karen; Kelleher, Michael

    2016-10-01

    The importance of non-technical skills (NTS) to patient outcomes is increasingly being recognised, however, there is limited research into how such skills can be taught and evaluated in student nurses in relation toward rounds. This pilot study describes an evaluation of a NTS framework that could potentially be used to measure ward round skills of student nurses. The study used an observational design. Potential key NTS were identified from existing literature and NTS taxonomies. The proposed framework was then used to evaluate whether the identified NTS were evident in a series of ward round simulations that final year general nursing students undertook as part of their training. Finally, the views of a small group of qualified nurse educators, qualified nurses and general nursing students were sought about whether the identified NTS were important and relevant to practice. The proposed NTS framework included seven categories: Communication, Decision Making, Situational Awareness, Teamwork and Task Management, Student Initiative and Responsiveness to Patient. All were rated as important and relevant to practice. The pilot study suggests that the proposed NTS framework could be used as a means of evaluating student nurse competencies in respect of many non-technical skills required for a successful ward round. Further work is required to establish the validity of the framework in educational settings and to determine the extent to which it is of use in a non-simulated ward round setting. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The FIM instrument to identify patients at risk of falling in geriatric wards: a 10-year retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petitpierre, Nicolas Julien; Trombetti, Andrea; Carroll, Iain; Michel, Jean-Pierre; Herrmann, François Richard

    2010-05-01

    the main objective was to evaluate if the admission functional independence measure (FIM) score could be used to predict the risk of falls in geriatric inpatients. a 10-year retrospective study was performed. the study was conducted in a 298-bed geriatric teaching hospital in Geneva, Switzerland. all patients discharged from the hospital from 1 January 1997 to 31 December 2006 were selected. measures used were FIM scores at admission using the FIM instrument and number of falls extracted from the institution's fall report forms. during the study period, there were 23,966 hospital stays. A total of 8,254 falls occurred. Of these, 7,995 falls were linked to 4,651 stays. Falls were recorded in 19.4% of hospital stays, with a mean incidence of 7.84 falls per 1,000 patients-days. Although there was a statistically significant relationship between total FIM score, its subscales, and the risk of falling, the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value obtained with receiver operating characteristic curves were insufficient to permit fall prediction. This might be due in part to a non-linear relationship between FIM score and fall risk. in this study, the FIM instrument was found to be unable to predict risk of falls in general geriatric wards.

  1. Psychometric properties of the Patient Dignity Inventory in an acute psychiatric ward: an extension study of the preliminary validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Lorenzo R

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Rosaria Di Lorenzo,1 Paola Ferri,2 Carlotta Biffarella,2 Giulio Cabri,3 Eleonora Carretti,4 Gabriella Pollutri,5 Ludovica Spattini,5 Cinzia Del Giovane,6 Harvey Max Chochinov7 1Psychiatric Intensive Treatment Facility, Mental Health Department, Azienda USL, Modena, Italy; 2Department of Diagnostic, Clinical and Public Health Medicine, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena, Italy; 3Service of Psychiatric Diagnosis and Treatment, Mental Health Department, Azienda USL, Modena, Italy; 4School of Nursing, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Italy; 5School of Specialization in Pscyhiatry, Faculty of Medicine, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Italy; 6Faculty of Medicine, Institute of Primary Care (BIHAM, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland; 7Department of Psychiatry, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada Background: During the last decades, dignity has been an emerging issue in mental health since its ethical and therapeutic implications became known. This study is an extension of the preliminary validation of the Patient Dignity Inventory (PDI in a psychiatric setting, originally designed for assessing perceived dignity in terminal cancer patients. Methods: From October 21, 2015 to December 31, 2016, we administered the Italian PDI to all patients hospitalized in an acute psychiatric ward, who provided their consent and completed it at discharge (n=165. We performed Cronbach’s alpha coefficient and principal factor analysis. We administered other scales concomitantly to analyze the concurrent validity of PDI. We applied stepwise multiple linear regression to identify the patients’ demographic and clinical variables related to the PDI score. Results: Our response rate was 93%, with excellent internal consistency (Cronbach’s alpha coefficient=0.94. The factorial analysis showed three factors with eigenvalue >1, which explained >80% of total variance: 1 “loss of self-identity and anxiety for the future”, 2

  2. An IBCLC in the Maternity Ward of a Mother and Child Hospital: A Pre- and Post-Intervention Study

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    Antonella Chiurco

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Published evidence on the impact of the integration of International Board Certified Lactation Consultants (IBCLCs for breastfeeding promotion is growing, but still relatively limited. Our study aims at evaluating the effects of adding an IBCLC for breastfeeding support in a mother and child hospital environment. We conducted a prospective study in the maternity ward of our maternal and child health Institute, recruiting 402 mothers of healthy term newborns soon after birth. The 18-month intervention of the IBCLC (Phase II was preceded (Phase I by data collection on breastfeeding rates and factors related to breastfeeding, both at hospital discharge and two weeks later. Data collection was replicated just before the end of the intervention (Phase III. In Phase III, a significantly higher percentage of mothers: (a received help to breastfeed, and also received correct information on breastfeeding and community support, (b started breastfeeding within two hours from delivery, (c reported a good experience with the hospital staff. Moreover, the frequency of sore and/or cracked nipples was significantly lower in Phase III. However, no difference was found in exclusive breastfeeding rates at hospital discharge or at two weeks after birth.

  3. Documenting pain as the fifth vital sign: a feasibility study in an oncology ward in Sarawak, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devi, B C R; Tang, T S

    2008-01-01

    Monitoring acute postoperative pain as the fifth vital sign is currently practiced in many developed countries. In Sarawak, pain is an important symptom as 70% of cancer patients present with advanced disease. As the existing validated pain assessment tools were found to be difficult to use, we studied the feasibility of modifying the use of a pain assessment tool, consisting of the short form of the Brief Pain Inventory and the Wong-Baker Faces Scale. This tool was used to document pain in all 169 patients who were admitted for pain control to the oncology ward between July 2000 and June 2001. Nurses were trained in the use of the modified scale before the start of the study. The method was easy to use, and the mean number of days to reduce pain was found to be 3.1 days (SD: 2.9; median: 2 days; range: 1-31 days). At discharge, none in the group with initially mild pain had pain, and the severity of pain for 98% of patients with moderate pain and 61% with severe pain was downgraded to mild pain. The staff found that the tool allowed continuous pain assessment in an objective manner. Copyright 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Working in a danger zone: A qualitative study of Taiwanese nurses' work experiences in a negative pressure isolation ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shu-Ling; Chen, Kuei-Ling; Lee, Li-Hung; Yang, Cheng-I

    2016-07-01

    Hospital nurses are frontline health care workers in controlling the spread of infectious diseases. It is not known if nurses working in negative pressure isolation wards (NPIWs) are better prepared than before to safely care for patients with common infectious diseases. For this qualitative descriptive study, 10 nurses were interviewed in depth about their experiences caring for patients in an NPIW. Tape recordings were transcribed verbatim and analyzed by qualitative content analysis. The following 5 themes were identified: (1) complexity of patient care, (2) dissatisfaction with the quantity and quality of protective equipment, (3) shortage of nursing staff, (4) continued worries about being infected, and (5) sensitivity to self-protection. Our participants' anxiety and uncertainty about being infected in the NPIW were increased by the complexity of patients' health problems and organizational factors. To protect themselves against infection before and during patient care, participants also developed sensitivity to, concepts about, and strategies to improve self-protection. NPIW administrators should pay more attention to nurses' concerns about improving the NPIW working environment, supply good quality protective equipment, and provide appropriate psychologic support and ongoing education to ensure that nurses feel safe while working. This ongoing education should refresh and update nurses' knowledge about disease transmission, therefore decreasing unnecessary anxiety based on misunderstandings about becoming infected. Copyright © 2016 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Destruction of urban greenary of Indian cities: A study of the two wards of Kolkata through GIS and remote sensing

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    Mondal Kanti Biraj

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available At present the rampant construction and poor compensatory plantation are taking a heavy toll on Kolkata’s environment. Now, Kolkata’s green cover stands at a dismal 5%, which is below the requirement of 15% for the Indian Metros. Last year Kolkata and its adjoining area have lost more than 5,000 trees to development projects, unauthorized chapping and natural causes. This has pushed up the carbon count by an alarming 5,500,000 kg. per year. The environmentalists feel that, the impact of this loss would be felt in the coming years. Thus, the rapid destruction of the urban greenery from the Indian city’s environs affects the urban ecology and causes environmental degradation. Therefore, an attempt has been made here to analyze the urban greenery or vegetation profile of Kolkata at micro level. Vegetation covers of ward 19 and 20 of Kolkata Municipal Corporation Area along with the search of its low existence (KMCA has been worked for the study. To speed up mapping and decision making, remotely sensed satellite data have been advocated and GIS technology has been used to represent the research work more advanced.

  6. Bringing Benefits and Warding off Blights in Due Commandment (Analytic Study Compared with the Jordanian Law)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Etoum, Niebal Mohd Ibrahim; Mowafi, Hanan Sami Mohammad; Al Zubaidi, Faraj Hamad Salem

    2016-01-01

    The study aims to highlight the benefits and blights of the due commandment (intestate law) under Jordanian law for the year (2010) in the article (279). The study came in two sections, the first one dealt with the concept of due commandment, its legitimacy, verdict and terms; in the second section, I've dealt with the persons entitled to due…

  7. Impact of IPMOE on nursing tasks in the medical ward: A time-motion study

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    Ming Leung

    2018-01-01

    Conclusion: Our study had shown the time motion observation could be applied to measure the impact of the IPMOE in a busy clinical setting. Through classification of activities, validation, objective measurement and longitudinal evaluation, the method could be applied in various systems as well as different clinical settings in measure efficiency.

  8. Patient ethnicity and three psychiatric intensive care units compared: the Tompkins Acute Ward Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bowers, L.; Simpson, A.; Nijman, H.L.I.; Hall, C.

    2008-01-01

    Psychiatric care units provide care to disturbed patients in a context of higher security and staffing levels. Although such units are numerous, few systematic comparisons have been made, and there are indications that ethnic minority groups may be over-represented. The aim of this study was to

  9. Everyday practices at the medical ward: a 16-month ethnographic field study

    OpenAIRE

    Wolf, Axel; Ekman, Inger; Dellenborg, Lisen

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Modern hospital care should ostensibly be multi-professional and person-centred, yet it still seems to be driven primarily by a hegemonic, positivistic, biomedical agenda. This study aimed to describe the everyday practices of professionals and patients in a coronary care unit, and analyse how the routines, structures and physical design of the care environment influenced their actions and relationships. Methods Ethnographic fieldwork was conducted over a 16-month period (...

  10. Nurses' Lived Experience of Working with Nursing Students in Clinical Wards: a Phenomenological Study

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    Kobra Parvan

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Despite being aware of the importance of nurses’ role in providing clinical training to nursing students, studies show that sufficient research has not yet been conducted on the experience of clinical nurses who are engaged in training nursing students outside their normal working hours. The present study aim to describe the experience of these nurses who are training outside their routine working hours. Methods: This study was conducted using descriptive-phenomenology method. Twelve nurses was participated in this research. Data were collected using purposive sampling method and face to face interviews based on nurses’ real life experience of students’ learning in clinical settings through answering open-ended questions. Spiegel burg analysis method was used to analyze the data. Results: The result of data analysis was the derivation of four themes and eight sub-themes. Themes included "nurses as teaching sources", "changes in the balance of doing routine tasks", "professional enthusiasm", and "nurses as students' professional socialization source of inspiration". Sub-themes included "efficient education", "poor education", "support", "interference in the role," "self-efficacy development", "inner satisfaction", "positive imaging" and "being a model". Conclusion: It is necessary that academic centers plan for teaching nurses working on a contractual basis in the field of the evaluation method and various methods of teaching. The findings also suggested the development of individual self-efficacy in clinical nurses who train students.

  11. Effect of a ward-based pharmacy team on preventable adverse drug events in surgical patients (SUREPILL study)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, M.; Boeker, E. B.; Ramrattan, M. A.; Kiewiet, J. J. S.; Ram, K.; Gombert-Handoko, K. B.; van Lent-Evers, N. A. E. M.; Kuks, P. F. M.; Mulder, W. M. C.; Breslau, P. J.; Oostenbroek, R. J.; Dijkgraaf, M. G. W.; Lie-A-Huen, L.; Boermeester, M. A.

    2015-01-01

    Surgical patients are at risk of adverse drug events (ADEs) causing morbidity and mortality. Much harm is preventable. Ward-based pharmacy interventions to reduce medication-related harm have not been evaluated in surgical patients. This multicentre prospective clinical trial evaluated a

  12. Facilitating the transition from physiology to hospital wards through an interdisciplinary case study of septic shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Albert S; Berger, Kenneth I; Schwartz, David R; Slater, William R; Goldfarb, David S

    2014-04-12

    In order to develop clinical reasoning, medical students must be able to integrate knowledge across traditional subject boundaries and multiple disciplines. At least two dimensions of integration have been identified: horizontal integration, bringing together different disciplines in considering a topic; and vertical integration, bridging basic science and clinical practice. Much attention has been focused on curriculum overhauls, but our approach is to facilitate horizontal and vertical integration on a smaller scale through an interdisciplinary case study discussion and then to assess its utility. An interdisciplinary case study discussion about a critically ill patient was implemented at the end of an organ system-based, basic sciences module at New York University School of Medicine. Three clinical specialists-a cardiologist, a pulmonologist, and a nephrologist-jointly led a discussion about a complex patient in the intensive care unit with multiple medical problems secondary to septic shock. The discussion emphasized the physiologic underpinnings behind the patient's presentation and the physiologic considerations across the various systems in determining proper treatment. The discussion also highlighted the interdependence between the cardiovascular, respiratory, and renal systems, which were initially presented in separate units. After the session students were given a brief, anonymous three-question free-response questionnaire in which they were asked to evaluate and freely comment on the exercise. Students not only took away physiological principles but also gained an appreciation for various thematic lessons for bringing basic science to the bedside, especially horizontal and vertical integration. The response of the participants was overwhelmingly positive with many indicating that the exercise integrated the material across organ systems, and strengthened their appreciation of the role of physiology in understanding disease presentations and guiding

  13. Implementation of evidence on the nurse-patient relationship in psychiatric wards through a mixed method design: study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Poyato, Antonio R; Delgado-Hito, Pilar; Suárez-Pérez, Raquel; Leyva-Moral, Juan M; Aceña-Domínguez, Rosa; Carreras-Salvador, Regina; Roldán-Merino, Juan F; Lluch-Canut, Teresa; Montesó-Curto, Pilar

    2017-01-01

    Psychiatric nurses are aware of the importance of the therapeutic relationship in psychiatric units. Nevertheless, a review of the scientific evidence indicates that theoretical knowledge alone is insufficient to establish an adequate therapeutic alliance. Therefore, strategies are required to promote changes to enhance the establishment of the working relationship. The aims of the study are to generate changes in how nurses establish the therapeutic relationship in acute psychiatric units, based on participative action research and to evaluate the effectiveness of the implementation of evidence through this method. The study will use a mixed method design. Qualitative methodology, through participative action research, will be employed to implement scientific evidence on the therapeutic relationship. A quasi-experimental, one-group, pre-test/post-test design will also be used to quantitatively measure the effectiveness of the implementation of the evidence. Participants will consist of nurses and patients from two psychiatric units in Barcelona. Nurses will be selected by theoretical sampling, and patients assigned to each nurses will be selected by consecutive sampling. Qualitative data will be gathered through discussion groups and field diaries. Quantitative data will be collected through the Working Alliance Inventory and the Interpersonal Reactivity Index. Qualitative data will be analysed through the technique of content analysis and quantitative data through descriptive and inferential statistics. This study will help to understand the process of change in a nursing team working in an inpatient psychiatric ward and will allow nurses to generate knowledge, identify difficulties, and establish strategies to implement change, as well as to assess whether the quality of the care they provide shows a qualitative improvement.

  14. Substance abuse in patients admitted voluntarily and involuntarily to acute psychiatric wards: a national cross-sectional study

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    Anne Opsal

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Substance abuse and mental disorder comorbidity is high among patients admitted to acute psychiatric wards. The aim of the study was to identify this co-occurrence as a reason for involuntary admission and if specific substance use-related diagnoses were associated with such admissions.Methods: The study was a part of a multicentre, cross-sectional national study carried out during 2005-2006 within a research network of acute mental health services. Seventy-five percent of Norwegian hospitals providing acute in-patient treatment participated. Substance use was measured using the Clinician Rating Scale and the ICD-10 diagnoses F10-19. Diagnostic assessments were performed by the clinicians during hospital stay.Results: Overall, 33.2% (n=1,187 of the total patient population (3,506 were abusing alcohol or drugs prior to admission according to the Clinician Rating Scale. No difference in the overall prevalence of substance abuserelated diagnoses between the two groups was found. Overall, 310 (26% of the admissions, 216 voluntarily and 94 involuntarily admitted patients received a double diagnosis. Frequent comorbid combinations among voluntarily admitted patients were; a combination of alcohol and either mood disorder (40% or multiple mental disorders (29%. Among involuntarily admitted patients, a combination of poly drug use and schizophrenia was most frequent (47%. Substance abusing patients diagnosed with mental and behavioral disorders due to the use of psychoactive stimulant substances had a significantly higher risk of involuntary hospitalization (OR 2.3.Conclusion: Nearly one third of substance abusing patients are involuntarily admitted to mental hospitals, in particular stimulant drug use was associated with involuntarily admissions.

  15. Relationships of multitasking, physicians' strain, and performance: an observational study in ward physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigl, Matthias; Müller, Andreas; Sevdalis, Nick; Angerer, Peter

    2013-03-01

    Simultaneous task performance ("multitasking") is common in hospital physicians' work and is implicated as a major determinant for enhanced strain and detrimental performance. The aim was to determine the impact of multitasking by hospital physicians on their self reported strain and performance. A prospective observational time-and-motion study in a Community Hospital was conducted. Twenty-seven hospital physicians (surgical and internal specialties) were observed in 40 full-shift observations. Observed physicians reported twice on their self-monitored strain and performance during the observation time. Associations of observed multitasking events and subsequent strain and performance appraisals were calculated. About 21% of the working time physicians were engaged in simultaneous activities. The average time spent in multitasking activities correlated significantly with subsequently reported strain (r = 0.27, P = 0.018). The number of instances of multitasking activities correlated with self-monitored performance to a marginally significant level (r = 0.19, P = 0.098). Physicians who engage in multitasking activities tend to self-report better performance but at the cost of enhanced psychophysical strain. Hence, physicians do not perceive their own multitasking activities as a source for deficient performance, for example, medical errors. Readjustment of workload, improved organization of work for hospital physicians, and training programs to improve physicians' skills in dealing with multiple clinical demands, prioritization, and efficient task allocation may be useful avenues to explore to reduce the potentially negative impact of simultaneous task performance in clinical settings.

  16. Everyday practices at the medical ward: a 16-month ethnographic field study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolf Axel

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Modern hospital care should ostensibly be multi-professional and person-centred, yet it still seems to be driven primarily by a hegemonic, positivistic, biomedical agenda. This study aimed to describe the everyday practices of professionals and patients in a coronary care unit, and analyse how the routines, structures and physical design of the care environment influenced their actions and relationships. Methods Ethnographic fieldwork was conducted over a 16-month period (between 2009 and 2011 by two researchers working in parallel in a Swedish coronary care unit. Observations, informal talks and formal interviews took place with registered nurses, assistant nurses, physicians and patients in the coronary care unit. The formal interviews were conducted with six registered nurses (five female, one male including the chief nurse manager, three assistant nurses (all female, two cardiologists and three patients (one female, two male. Results We identified the structures that either promoted or counteracted the various actions and relationships of patients and healthcare professionals. The care environment, with its minimalistic design, strong focus on routines and modest capacity for dialogue, restricted the choices available to both patients and healthcare professionals. This resulted in feelings of guilt, predominantly on the part of the registered nurses. Conclusions The care environment restricted the choices available to both patients and healthcare professionals. This may result in increased moral stress among those in multi-professional teams who work in the grey area between biomedical and person-centred care.

  17. Developing Evidence for Public Health Policy and Practice: The Implementation of a Knowledge Translation Approach in a Staged, Multi-Methods Study in England, 2007-09

    Science.gov (United States)

    South, Jane; Cattan, Mima

    2014-01-01

    Effective knowledge translation processes are critical for the development of evidence-based public health policy and practice. This paper reports on the design and implementation of an innovative approach to knowledge translation within a mixed methods study on lay involvement in public health programme delivery. The study design drew on…

  18. Multi-method investigation of cushion peatlands (

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbriger, M.; Schittek, K.; Höfle, B.; Siart, C.; Eitel, B.

    2012-04-01

    This study presents a multi-method and multi-proxy approach for palaeonvironmental investigations in the western andean cordillera of southern Peru (Lucanas province, 14° S) using cushion peatlands as terrestrial geoarchives. The region stretching between the Altiplano and the Peruvian desert in the lowland shares a long term settlement history, in which local cultures adapted to climate change in many different ways. Being one of the most outstanding human remains, the abri below Cerro Llamoca, 4.450 m a.s.l. in the uppermost ranges of the Llamoca peatland catchment area further reveals an occupation history of almost 10.000 years, as revealed by latest archaeological investigations. In remote and highly elevated regions such as the central Andes, cushion peatlands basically represent the only high resolution terrestrial archives suitable for geoarchaeological and palaeoenvironmental studies. Characterized by high accumulation rates, they ideally document environmental changes, particularly at small time intervals. Within the multidisciplinary project 'Andean Transect - Climate Sensitivity of pre-Columbian Man-Environment-Systems' several sediment cores with depths up to 11.5 m b.s. were recovered from the Llamoca peatland. Based on almost 100 AMS 14C-datings they provide a chronology of 8000 years and, thus, offer profound insights into climatic and environmental changes in the study area. While nearly homogeneous peat layers record stable environmental conditions, the heterogeneous granulometric composition of intercalated sediment layers documents several periods of intense geomorphodynamic activity. Due to high resolution geochemical analyses of peat layers (1 cm interval; humification degree, CNS measurements, XRF-scanning), the existence of slight and short-term trends of landscape development during these phases can be identified. Additional pollen, charred particles and plant macrofossil analyses confirm these findings and help reconstructing local

  19. Functional changes during hospital stay in older patients admitted to an acute care ward: a multicenter observational study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie L De Buyser

    Full Text Available Changes in physical performance during hospital stay have rarely been evaluated. In this study, we examined functional changes during hospital stay by assessing both physical performance and activities of daily living. Additionally, we investigated characteristics of older patients associated with meaningful in-hospital improvement in physical performance.The CRiteria to assess appropriate Medication use among Elderly complex patients project recruited 1123 patients aged ≥65 years, consecutively admitted to geriatric or internal medicine acute care wards of seven Italian hospitals. We analyzed data from 639 participating participants with a Mini Mental State Examination score ≥18/30. Physical performance was assessed by walking speed and grip strength, and functional status by activities of daily living at hospital admission and at discharge. Meaningful improvement was defined as a measured change of at least 1 standard deviation. Multivariable logistic regression models predicting meaningful improvement, included age, gender, type of admission (through emergency room or elective, and physical performance at admission.Mean age of the study participants was 79 years (range 65-98, 52% were female. Overall, mean walking speed and grip strength performance improved during hospital stay (walking speed improvement: 0.04±0.20 m/s, p<0.001; grip strength improvement: 0.43±5.66 kg, p = 0.001, no significant change was observed in activities of daily living. Patients with poor physical performance at admission had higher odds for in-hospital improvement.Overall, physical performance measurements show an improvement during hospital stay. The margin for meaningful functional improvement is larger in patients with poor physical function at admission. Nevertheless, most of these patients continue to have poor performance at discharge.

  20. The Productive Ward program™: a longitudinal multilevel study of nurse perceived practice environment, burnout, and nurse-reported quality of care and job outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Bogaert, Peter; Van heusden, Danny; Somers, Annemie; Tegenbos, Muriel; Wouters, Kristien; Van der Straeten, Johnny; Van Aken, Paul; Havens, Donna Sullivan

    2014-09-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the impact of The Productive Ward-Releasing Time to Care™ program implemented in a hospital transformation process on nurse perception related to practice environment, burnout, quality of care, and job outcomes. To address the continuously evolving complex challenges of patient care, high-performance nursing care is necessary. A longitudinal survey design was used to conduct a study in a 600-bed acute care university hospital with 3 measurement periods: T0: base line in 2006, T1 in 2011, and T2 in 2013. As part of the hospital transformation process, the productive ward program was introduced between T1 and T2. Relevant impact on nurse-physician relations, nurse management, hospital management-organizational support, nurse-reported quality of care, and job outcomes were identified. Hospital strategies and policies should be aligned with daily practices so that engaged and committed staff can promote excellent outcomes.

  1. Adaptation to Swedish and further development of the “Consequences of Screening – Breast Cancer” questionnaire: a multi-method study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bolejko, Anetta; Wann-Hansson, Christine; Zackrisson, Sophia

    2013-01-01

    Experiencing a false-positive screening mammography can cause considerable psychosocial distress. The Consequences of Screening - Breast Cancer questionnaire (COS-BC parts 1 and 2), recently developed in Denmark, is the only condition-specific questionnaire for measuring short- and long......-term psychosocial consequences of false-positive mammographic screening. Additional studies are needed to further test the COS-BC before use across cultures. Furthermore, studies have suggested that the consequences of false-positive screening results are partly common across cancer screening settings, although...

  2. Oral health and orofacial pain in people with dementia admitted to acute hospital wards: observational cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Rijt, Liza J M; Weijenberg, Roxane A F; Feast, Alexandra R; Vickerstaff, Victoria; Lobbezoo, Frank; Sampson, Elizabeth L

    2018-05-23

    Orofacial pain in people with dementia is difficult to detect, and often under-treated. Our aim was to investigate the prevalence of orofacial pain in people with dementia in acute hospitals in the UK. Secondary aims were to examine oral health status and explore associations between orofacial pain and oral health factors. This cross-sectional observational study was carried out in two UK hospitals. Using the Orofacial Pain Scale in Non-Verbal Individuals (OPS-NVI) to identify orofacial pain, 101 participants with dementia, admitted to acute medical wards, were observed for at least 3 min during rest and chewing. Verbal participants were then asked about presence of orofacial pain, using self-report pain scales. Finally, a brief oral assessment was performed. Orofacial pain, assessed with the OPS-NVI, was present in 11.9% (95% C.I. 5.9, 18.8) of participants at rest and 21.9% (95% C.I. 14.6, 31.3) whilst chewing. Participants who were no longer able to self-report pain were significantly more likely to experience orofacial pain. Oral health in both dentate and edentate participants was poor. Brush frequency, indication of chewing quality, consistency of the food, presence of extra-oral abnormalities, person who performed mouth care, and oral hygiene in dentate participants were significant predictors for the presence of orofacial pain. Improving oral care in acute hospital patients with dementia, particularly those who cannot self-report pain, may significantly reduce pain and suffering in this population.

  3. Instant availability of patient records, but diminished availability of patient information: A multi-method study of GP's use of electronic patient records

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grimsmo Anders

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In spite of succesful adoption of electronic patient records (EPR by Norwegian GPs, what constitutes the actual benefits and effects of the use of EPRs in the perspective of the GPs and patients has not been fully characterized. We wanted to study primary care physicians' use of electronic patient record (EPR systems in terms of use of different EPR functions and the time spent on using the records, as well as the potential effects of EPR systems on the clinician-patient relationship. Methods A combined qualitative and quantitative study that uses data collected from focus groups, observations of primary care encounters and a questionnaire survey of a random sample of general practitioners to describe their use of EPR in primary care. Results The overall availability of individual patient records had improved, but the availability of the information within each EPR was not satisfactory. GPs' use of EPRs were efficient and comprehensive, but have resulted in transfer of administrative work from secretaries to physicians. We found no indications of disturbance of the clinician-patient relationship by use of computers in this study. Conclusion Although GPs are generally satisfied with their EPRs systems, there are still unmet needs and functionality to be covered. It is urgent to find methods that can make a better representation of information in large patient records as well as prevent EPRs from contributing to increased administrative workload of physicians.

  4. Assessing an Intervention Focused on Enhancing Interpersonal Communication Skills and Humor: A Multi-Method Quasi-Experiential Study Among Medical Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karnieli-Miller, Orit; Michael, Keren; Segal, Oz; Steinberger, Aharon

    2017-10-23

    Teaching and applying interpersonal communication skills (ICS) and humor in medicine is challenging. The present study assessed an innovative course focused on enhancing ICS and humor based on the Four Habits Model and theater concepts. Medical students enrolled in the course (the study group) were assessed pre- and post-intervention, as well as compared with their peers (the control group) using quantitative methods to measure attitudes, self-efficacy, and behaviors. Qualitative methods were used to learn about students' change in perceptions related to ICS and humor following the course, as well as their experiences of developing these skills during the course. Post-intervention study group participants scored significantly higher on all ICS measurements and on humor behavior compared with pre-intervention, and significantly higher on all humor measurements compared with control group participants. Interviews indicated students' increased understanding and difficulties in learning these skills. Analyses showed how framing humor as one possible ICS and focusing on specific parts of the medical encounter can promote patient-centered care.

  5. The impact of a good practice manual on professional practice associated with psychotropic PRN in acute mental health wards: an exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, J A; Lovell, K; Harris, N

    2008-10-01

    As required or pro re nata (PRN) psychotropic medicines are frequently used in acute mental health wards. PRN is known to contribute to polypharmacy and high doses of antipsychotic medication. Few studies have attempted to improve clinician's use of these potentially harmful drugs. The objectives of the study were to determine the impact and acceptability of a good practice manual on prescribing and administration practices of PRN psychotropic medication in acute mental health wards. The study used a pre-post exploratory design with two acute mental health wards in the NW of England. Over the total trial period of 10 weeks, 28 of 35 patients received 484 doses of PRN. Patients had a mean of 3.6 prescriptions of 14 different PRN medications in 34 different dose combinations prescribed. Medication errors beyond poor quality of prescribing occurred in 23 of the 35 patients (65.7%). Prescription quality improved following the introduction of the intervention but quality of nursing notes reduced. Acceptability of the manual to both nursing and medical staff was high. The introduction of the manual appeared to influence some of the practices associated with the prescribing and administration of PRN psychotropic medications. Further, larger, more robust studies are required in this area. In particular research is required to identify the reasons why professionals continue to rely so heavily on using PRN medication.

  6. Assessment of selected quality fields of nursing care in neurosurgical wards: a prospective study of 530 people – multicenter studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ślusarz R

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Robert Ślusarz,1 Monika Biercewicz,2 Ewa Barczykowska,3 Beata Haor,4 Mariola Głowacka5 1Neurological and Neurosurgical Nursing Department, Collegium Medicum, Nicolaus Copernicus University, Bydgoszcz, 2Clinic of Geriatrics, 3Nursing Department, Collegium Medicum, Nicolaus Copernicus University, Torun, 4Faculty of Health Science, University of Humanities and Economics in Wloclawek, Wloclawek, 5Institute of Health Sciences, State School of Higher Professional Education in Plock, Plock, Poland Background: One of the elements influencing the assessment of nursing care quality is the assessment of the nurse’s functions that determine the nurse’s particular tasks. The aim of this work was to assess selected tasks involved in the nurse’s caring function, which influence nursing care quality on neurosurgical wards, on the basis of patients’ and nursing staff’s opinions.Materials and methods: The research was carried out on neurosurgical wards in Poland on a group of 455 patients and 75 nurses. In order to assess nursing care quality, an author’s original questionnaire (Questionnaire – Patient Satisfaction was used.Results: Statistically significant differences concerned particular groups (both patients and nurses in the assessment of selected issues: providing information about performed activities and operations (P=0.000 and P=0.040, respecting personal dignity and assuring discretion during the operations (P=0.000 and P=0.001, speed of response to patient’s requests (P=0.000 and P=0.000, time availability of nurses for the patient (P=0.000 and P=0.000, providing information about further self-care at home (P=0.032, P=0.008, and nurses’ attitude (kindness, courtesy, tenderness, care to patients (patient’s assessment only P=0.000.Conclusion: Selected tasks in the field of the caring function of nurses were assessed differently by particular groups. There were no statistically significant differences in the assessment of particular

  7. Effects of creative and social activity on the health and well-being of socially isolated older people: outcomes from a multi-method observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greaves, Colin J; Farbus, Lou

    2006-05-01

    Depression and social isolation affect one in seven people over 65 and there is increasing recognition that social isolation adversely affects long-term health. Research indicates that interventions, which promote active social contact, which encourage creativity, and which use mentoring, are more likely to positively affect health and well-being. The purpose of this study was to evaluate a complex intervention for addressing social isolation in older people, embodying these principles: The Upstream Healthy Living Centre. Mentors delivered a series of individually-tailored activities, with support tailing off over time. Two hundred and twenty-nine participants were offered the Geriatric Depression Scale, SF12 Health Quality of Life, and Medical Outcomes Social Support scale at baseline, then 6 months and 12 months post intervention. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 26 participants, five carers and four referring health professionals to provide a deeper understanding of outcomes. Data were available for 172 (75%) participants at baseline, 72 (53% of those eligible) at 6 months and 51 (55%) at 12 months. Baseline scores indicated social isolation and high morbidity for mental and physical health. The intervention was successful in engaging this population (80% of referrals were engaged in some form of activity). At 6 months, there were significant improvements in SF12 mental component, and depression scores, but not in perceived physical health or social support. At 12 months, there were significant improvements in depression and social support and a marginally significant improvement in SF12 physical component (p = 0.06), but the SF12 mental component change was not maintained. The qualitative data showed that the intervention was well-received by participants. The data indicated a wide range of responses (both physical and emotional), including increased alertness, social activity, self-worth, optimism about life, and positive changes in health

  8. Perbandingan Kinerja Metode Ward Dan K-means Dalam Menentukan Cluster Data Mahasiswa Pemohon Beasiswa (Studi Kasus : STMIK Pringsewu)

    OpenAIRE

    Satria, Fiqih; Aziz, R Z Abdul

    2016-01-01

    This research aims to determine the steps cluster analysis method with Ward method and K-Means method, and compare the results of the analysis of the two methods for clustering student data related decision-making to determine the students are eligible to receive a Peningkatan PrestasiAkademik (PPA) scholarship and Bantuan Biaya Akademik (BBA) scholarship in STMIK Pringsewu. Cluster analysis was performed using IBM SPSS Version 23. Cluster Analysis results of both methods were compared using ...

  9. Doctor Ward's Accidental Terrarium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hershey, David R.

    1996-01-01

    Presents the story of the accidental invention of the Wardian case, or terrarium, by Nathaniel Bagshaw Ward. Advocates the use of this story in teaching precollege biology as an illustration of how a chance event can lead to a major scientific advancement and as an example of the common occurrence of multiple discovery in botany. Contains 34…

  10. Becoming 'ward smart' medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Beth; Wallace, Deirdre; Mangera, Zaheer; Gill, Deborah

    2017-10-01

    A small number of medical students elect to work as health care assistants (HCAs) during or prior to their undergraduate training. There is a significant body of evidence in the literature regarding the impact of HCA experience on student nurses; however, little research has examined the effects of such experience on medical students. All fourth-year medical students with self-declared experience as HCAs from a single UK medical school were invited to participate in focus groups to explore their experiences and perceptions. Ten students from the year group took part. Participants felt that their experience as HCAs enhanced their learning in the workplace through becoming 'ward smart', helping them to become socialised into the world of health care, providing early meaningful and humanised patient interaction, and increasing their understanding of multidisciplinary team (MDT) members' roles. Little research has examined the effects of [HCA] experience on medical students DISCUSSION: Becoming 'ward smart' and developing a sense of belonging are central to maximising learning in, from and through work on the ward. Experience as a HCA provides a range of learning and social opportunities for medical students, and legitimises their participation within clinical communities. HCA experience also seems to benefit in the 'hard to reach' dimensions of medical training: empathy; humanisation of patient care; professional socialisation; and providing a sense of belonging within health care environments. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and The Association for the Study of Medical Education.

  11. Mortality pattern in otorhinolaryngology ward: A 5 years retrospective study at an urban tertiary health care center in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Vivek; Kumar, Satish; Chandra Sharma, Naresh; Kumar, Badal

    2017-10-01

    To recognize deaths in the otorhinolaryngology indoor wards, determine the reason behind the mortalities and recommend modifications for betterment of patient care and surgical outcomes. Data was collected from the mortality register, operation theatre registers, ward registers and case notes of patients declared dead at an urban tertiary health care center in India for a period of 5 years; from January 2012 to December 2016. The data included date of admission, age, sex, educational status, residence, and clinical diagnosis, course of hospital stay and medical cause of death. Data acquired was reviewed and statistically interpreted and presented in graphical and descriptive formats. 6157 admissions were made in otorhinolaryngology (ENT) ward in the 5 year period which included 3969 males and 2188 female patients. 58 deaths were recorded during this period which gives overall death per admission crude mortality rate of 9.42% at an average of about 12 (11.60) deaths per year. The major causes of death were malignancy and septicemia. The significance of health education, aggressive healthcare campaigns, enhancement of healthcare services and wide accessibility of healthcare services to remote areas has been emphasized. Role of structured study and protocols in the management of serious cases is highlighted along with the need for prompt referral and better interdepartmental cooperation. Copyright © 2017 Chang Gung University. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Ward nurses' knowledge of computed tomography scanning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majeed, M A; Nayeemuddin, M; Christie, M

    Patients benefit from and are reassured by advance information on procedures that they are to undergo. Ward nurses should have adequate knowledge of radiological investigations to ensure proper patient preparation and good interdepartmental communication to avoid delays and cancellations. This study was conducted to assess the ward nurses' knowledge of the process of computed tomography (CT) scanning. One hundred and twenty qualified nurses were asked to complete a questionnaire regarding CT scanning. The findings revealed a suboptimal level of awareness about the process. This is probably due to lack of formal teaching for nurses on the wards in regards the different radiological procedures and patient preparation. There is a strong case for better educational talks on rapidly changing radiological techniques for ward staff to ensure high-quality patient care.

  13. Nurse Level of Education, Quality of Care and Patient Safety in the Medical and Surgical Wards in Malaysian Private Hospitals: A Cross-sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul Rahman, Hamzah; Jarrar, Mu'taman; Don, Mohammad Sobri

    2015-04-23

    Nursing knowledge and skills are required to sustain quality of care and patient safety. The numbers of nurses with Bachelor degrees in Malaysia are very limited. This study aims to predict the impact of nurse level of education on quality of care and patient safety in the medical and surgical wards in Malaysian private hospitals. A cross-sectional survey by questionnaire was conducted. A total 652 nurses working in the medical and surgical wards in 12 private hospitals were participated in the study. Multistage stratified simple random sampling performed to invite nurses working in small size (less than 100 beds), medium size (100-199 beds) and large size (over than 200) hospitals to participate in the study. This allowed nurses from all shifts to participate in this study. Nurses with higher education were not significantly associated with both quality of care and patient safety. However, a total 355 (60.9%) of respondents participated in this study were working in teaching hospitals. Teaching hospitals offer training for all newly appointed staff. They also provide general orientation programs and training to outline the policies, procedures of the nurses' roles and responsibilities. This made the variances between the Bachelor and Diploma nurses not significantly associated with the outcomes of care. Nursing educational level was not associated with the outcomes of care in Malaysian private hospitals. However, training programs and the general nursing orientation programs for nurses in Malaysia can help to upgrade the Diploma-level nurses. Training programs can increase their self confidence, knowledge, critical thinking ability and improve their interpersonal skills. So, it can be concluded that better education and training for a medical and surgical wards' nurses is required for satisfying client expectations and sustaining the outcomes of patient care.

  14. Urinary catheterization in medical wards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nirmanmoh Bhatia

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims : The study aims to determine the: 1. frequency of inappropriate catheterization in medical wards and the reasons for doing it. 2. various risk factors associated with inappropriate catheterization, catheter associated urinary tract infections (CAUTI and bacterial colonization on Foley′s catheters (BCFC. Settings and Design: Hospital-based prospective study. Materials and Methods: One hundred and twenty five patients admitted consecutively in the medical wards of a tertiary care hospital, who underwent catheterization with a Foley′s catheter, at admission, have been included in the study. Patient profiles were evaluated using the following parameters: age, sex, diagnosis, functional status, mental status, indication, duration and place of catheterization, development of BCFC and CAUTI. Statistical tests used: Chi-square test. Results: Thirty-six out of 125 (28.8% patients included were inappropriately catheterized. BCFC developed in 52.8% and 22.4% were diagnosed with a CAUTI. The most frequent indication for inappropriate catheterization was urinary incontinence without significant skin breakdown (27.8%. The risk factors for inappropriate catheterization were female sex (RR=1.29, 95% CI=0.99, 1.69, P60 years (RR=0.65, 95% CI=0.48, 0.89, P3 days (RR=0.62, 95% CI=0.43, 0.89, P60 years (RR=0.47, 95% CI=0.25, 0.90, P3 days (RR=0.24, 95% CI=0.10, 0.58, P< 0.01. Conclusions : Inappropriate catheterization is highly prevalent in medical wards, especially in patients with urinary incontinence. The patients catheterized in the medical emergency and female patients in particular are at high risk. Careful attention to these factors can reduce the frequency of inappropriate catheterization and unnecessary morbidity.

  15. Multiple challenges of antibiotic use in a large hospital in Ethiopia - a ward-specific study showing high rates of hospital-acquired infections and ineffective prophylaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutema, Girma; Håkonsen, Helle; Engidawork, Ephrem; Toverud, Else-Lydia

    2018-05-03

    This project aims to study the use of antibiotics in three clinical wards in the largest tertiary teaching hospital in Ethiopia for a period of 1 year. The specific aims were to assess the prevalence of patients on antibiotics, quantify the antibiotic consumption and identify the main indications of use. The material was all the medical charts (n = 2231) retrieved from three clinical wards (internal medicine, gynecology/obstetrics and surgery) in Tikur Anbessa Specialized Hospital (TASH) in Addis Ababa between September 2013 and September 2014. Data collection was performed manually by four pharmacists. Each medical chart represented one patient. About 60% of the patients were admitted to internal medicine, 20% to each of the other two wards. The number of bed days (BD) was on average 16.5. Antibiotics for systemic use were prescribed to 73.7% of the patients (on average: 2.1 antibiotics/patient) of whom 86.6% got a third or fourth generation cephalosporin (mainly ceftriaxone). The average consumption of antibiotics was 81.6 DDD/100BD, varying from 91.8 in internal medicine and 71.6 in surgery to 47.6 in gynecology/obstetrics. The five most frequently occurring infections were pneumonia (26.6%), surgical site infections (21.5%), neutropenic fever (6.9%), sepsis (6.4%) and urinary tract infections (4.7%). About one fourth of the prescriptions were for prophylactic purposes. Hospital acquired infections occurred in 23.5% of the patients (353 cases of surgical site infection). The prescribing was based on empirical treatment and sensitivity testing was reported in only 3.8% of the cases. In the present study from three wards in the largest tertiary teaching hospital in Ethiopia, three out of four patients were prescribed antibiotics, primarily empirically. The mean antibiotic consumption was 81.6 DDD/100BD. Surgical site infections constituted a large burden of the infections treated in the hospital, despite extensive prescribing of prophylaxis. The findings show

  16. Nurses' experience of collaboration with relatives of frail elderly patients in acute hospital wards: A qualitative study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tove, Lindhardt; Hallberg, Ingalill Rahm; Poulsen, Ingrid

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Frail elderly people admitted to hospital often receive help from relatives in managing their daily lives. These relatives are likely to continue to feel responsible after admission, and to hold valuable knowledge, which may contribute to decision-making related to care and treatment....... OBJECTIVE: To illuminate nurses' experience of collaboration with relatives of frail elderly patients in acute hospital wards, and of the barriers and promoters for collaboration. DESIGN AND SETTING: The design was descriptive. Three acute units in a large Danish university hospital participated....... PARTICIPANTS: Six registered nurses and two auxiliary nurses in charge of discharge planning for the patients were included. METHOD: Open interviews using an interview guide. Manifest and latent content analysis was applied. RESULT: The main theme Encountering relatives-to be caught between ideals and practice...

  17. Nurses' experience of collaboration with relatives of frail elderly patients in acute hospital wards: a qualitative study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindhardt, Tommi Bo; Hallberg, I.R.; Poulsen, Ingrid

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Frail elderly people admitted to hospital often receive help from relatives in managing their daily lives. These relatives are likely to continue to feel responsible after admission, and to hold valuable knowledge, which may contribute to decision-making related to care and treatment....... OBJECTIVE: To illuminate nurses' experience of collaboration with relatives of frail elderly patients in acute hospital wards, and of the barriers and promoters for collaboration. DESIGN AND SETTING: The design was descriptive. Three acute units in a large Danish university hospital participated....... PARTICIPANTS: Six registered nurses and two auxiliary nurses in charge of discharge planning for the patients were included. METHOD: Open interviews using an interview guide. Manifest and latent content analysis was applied. RESULT: The main theme Encountering relatives-to be caught between ideals and practice...

  18. Splitting Ward identity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Safari, Mahmoud [Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences (IPM), School of Particles and Accelerators, P.O. Box 19395-5531, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-04-15

    Within the background-field framework we present a path integral derivation of the splitting Ward identity for the one-particle irreducible effective action in the presence of an infrared regulator, and make connection with earlier works on the subject. The approach is general in the sense that it does not rely on how the splitting is performed. This identity is then used to address the problem of background dependence of the effective action at an arbitrary energy scale. We next introduce the modified master equation and emphasize its role in constraining the effective action. Finally, application to general gauge theories within the geometric approach is discussed. (orig.)

  19. Splitting Ward identity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safari, Mahmoud

    2016-01-01

    Within the background-field framework we present a path integral derivation of the splitting Ward identity for the one-particle irreducible effective action in the presence of an infrared regulator, and make connection with earlier works on the subject. The approach is general in the sense that it does not rely on how the splitting is performed. This identity is then used to address the problem of background dependence of the effective action at an arbitrary energy scale. We next introduce the modified master equation and emphasize its role in constraining the effective action. Finally, application to general gauge theories within the geometric approach is discussed. (orig.)

  20. [The composition and antimicrobial resistance of isolates from lower respiratory tract and blood in hospitalized patients in respiratory ward: a multicenter national study in China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, X; Zhuo, C; Xu, Y C; Zhong, N S

    2018-04-12

    Objective: To investigate the species and antimicrobial resistance of bacterial pathogens isolated from hospitalized patients in respiratory ward in China. Methods: This was a multicenter retrospective study based on a national epidemiological network called China Antimicrobial Resistance Surveillance System (CARSS). The non-repetitive strains isolated from lower respiratory tract and blood samples in 91 hospitals from seven geographic regions of CARSS were reviewed. The distribution of specimen type, hospital level (secondary and tertiary hospital), patient age group [geriatric (>65 years old), adult (15 to 65 years old), pediatric (28 days to 14 years old ) and newborn group (≤28 days)] and ward type (respiratory intensive care unit and general respiratory ward) were analyzed for MRSA, PRSP, CREC, CRKP, CRPA, CRAB, ESBL-EC and ESBL-KP. The categorical variables were analyzed by chi-square test using SPSS 16.0 statistical software. P respiratory tract (LRT), 2 649 isolates from blood and 5 017 isolates from other samples (urine and secretions)] from 48 752 inpatients (without illness type information) were enrolled in the study. 90.2% (45 491/50 417) isolates were obtained from 63 tertiary hospitals. According to patients' age, all cases were divided into 4 groups, i. e. geriatric(46.0%, 23 177/50 417), adult(29.9%, 15 092/50 417), pediatric(24.0%, 12 112/50 417) and newborn group(0.0%, 36/50 417). All isolates were obtained from respiratory intensive care unit (6.2%, 3 129/50 417) or general respiratory wards (93.8%, 47 288/50 417). The majority of bacterial pathogens were isolated from lower respiratory and blood culture samples, which accounted for 90.0% of all the samples (45 400/50 417). Sputum accounted for 81.6% (41 131/50 417) of samples, and the leading 4 isolates were K . pneumonia (18.9%, 7 784/41 131), P . aeruginosa (13.6%, 5 580/41 131), A . baumanni (11.3%, 4 644/41 131) and S . pneumonia (11.1%, 4 564/41 131). Blood samples accounted for 5.3% (2

  1. Ward identities at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DOlivo, J.C.; Torres, M.; Tututi, E.

    1996-01-01

    The Ward identities for QED at finite temperature are derived using the functional real-time formalism. They are verified by an explicit one-loop calculation. An effective causal vertex is constructed which satisfy the Ward identity with the associated retarded self-energy. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  2. Microbiological assessment of indoor air of teaching hospital wards ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Thus, the objective of this study is to provide fundamental data related to the microbial quality of indoor air of Jimma University Specialized Hospital wards, to estimate the health hazard and to create standards for indoor air quality control. METHODS: The microbial quality of indoor air of seven wards of Jimma University ...

  3. The labour ward analgesic service at King Edward VIII Hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The labour ward analgesic service at King Edward VIII. Hospital, Durban. D. A. ROCKE, C. C. ROUT, H. D. RUSSELL, S. SINGH. Abstract The provision of analgesic services to the labour ward at King Edward VIII Hospital was studied during a I-week period. Of249 patients, 113 (45%) received no analgesia whatsoever.

  4. Prevention, detection, and response to anthrax outbreak in Northern Tanzania using one health approach: A case study of Selela ward in Monduli district

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elibariki R. Mwakapeje

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Anthrax is an infectious fatal zoonotic disease caused by Bacillus anthracis. Anthrax outbreak was confirmed in samples of wild animals following rumors of the outbreak in wild animals, livestock, and humans in Selela ward, Monduli district of Northern Tanzania. Therefore, a multi-sectorial team was deployed for outbreak response in the affected areas. Objectives: The aim of the response was to manage the outbreak in a One Health approach and specifically: (i To determine the magnitude of anthrax outbreak in humans, livestock, and wild animals in Selela ward, (ii to assess the outbreak local response capacity, (iii to establish mechanisms for safe disposal of animal carcasses in the affected areas, and (iv to mount effective control and preventive strategies using One Health approach in the affected areas. Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional field survey using: (i Active searching of suspected human cases at health facilities and community level, (ii physical counting and disposal of wild animal carcasses in the affected area, (iii collection of specimens from suspected human cases and animal carcasses for laboratory analysis, and (iv meetings with local animal and human health staff, political, and traditional leaders at local levels. We analyzed data by STATA software, and a map was created using Quantum GIS software. Results: A total of 21 humans were suspected, and most of them (62% being from Selela ward. The outbreak caused deaths of 10 cattle, 26 goats, and three sheep, and 131 wild animal carcasses were discarded the majority of them being wildebeest (83%. Based on laboratory results, three blood smears tested positive for anthrax using Giemsa staining while two wildebeest samples tested positive and five human blood samples tested negative for anthrax using quantitative polymerase chain reaction techniques. Clinical forms of anthrax were also observed in humans and livestock which suggest that wild animals may

  5. [Requirements and reality of the German ordinance for staff in psychiatric hospitals: results of a multi-moment study on a psychiatric ward for acute psychosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, M; Rieger, W

    2010-11-01

    The regulation of personnel in psychiatry (PsychPV) stipulates time requirements for all relevant activities in inpatient psychiatric care as a function of the degree of disease severity of the patients treated. The demands made on employees in psychiatric care have risen substantially in recent years. Our aim was to examine whether the standard requirements of the PsychPV cover the actual work load. With the help of a multi-moment study on a general psychiatric ward we examined which activities are performed to which extent by doctors and nurses. Physicians must spend an inordinate amount of time on documentation and the nursing staff on non-patient-related tasks. The causes are the higher number of external requests and higher clinical documentation requirements. This time is lost to the direct patient contact. The PsychPV requirements must be urgently adapted so that more time is again available for the direct patient contact.

  6. Pathway to care for drug resistant tuberculosis cases identified during a retrospective study conducted in high TB burden wards in Mumbai.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo, Eunice; Shah, Shimoni; Rangan, Sheela; Dholakia, Yatin; Mistry, Nerges

    2018-05-10

    Background: Mumbai is witnessing a rising incidence of all forms of drug resistant tuberculosis (DR-TB). Methods: A population-based, retrospective study was conducted between April and July 2014, in 15 high TB burden wards in Mumbai, to capture the patient pathways to TB care. A total of 23 DR-TB patients were identified and their pathways to access DR-TB care were recorded using semi-structured interviews. Results: The total DR-TB pathway time of new patients (who did not report any past episode of TB) (180 days; IQR 123,346) was found to be more than twice that of retreatment patients (who reported a past episode of TB) (69 days; IQR 42,128). Conclusions: The unacceptable delay for diagnosis and treatment of DR-TB in Mumbai advocates for consistent implementation of early screening of patients using rapid gene-based technologies.

  7. Relationship between healthcare worker surface contacts, care type and hand hygiene: an observational study in a single-bed hospital ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, M-F; Noakes, C J; Sleigh, P A; Bale, S; Waters, L

    2016-09-01

    This study quantifies the relationship between hand hygiene and the frequency with which healthcare workers (HCWs) touch surfaces in patient rooms. Surface contacts and hand hygiene were recorded in a single-bed UK hospital ward for six care types. Surface contacts often formed non-random patterns, but hygiene before or after patient contact depends significantly on care type (P=0.001). The likelihood of hygiene correlated with the number of surface contacts (95% confidence interval 1.1-5.8, P=0.002), but not with time spent in the room. This highlights that a potential subconscious need for hand hygiene may have developed in HCWs, which may support and help focus future hygiene education programmes. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  8. Pharmacotherapy for adverse events reduces the length of hospital stay in patients admitted to otolaryngology ward: a single arm intervention study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akio Suzuki

    Full Text Available To determine whether adverse events extend the duration of hospitalization, and to evaluate the effectiveness of medical intervention in ameliorating adverse events and reducing the prolonged hospital stay associated with adverse events.A single arm intervention study was conducted from October 2012 to March 2014 in the otolaryngology ward of a 614-bed, university-affiliated hospital. Adverse events were monitored daily by physicians, pharmacists and nurses, and recorded in the electronic medical chart for each patient. Appropriate drug management of adverse events was performed by physicians in liaison with pharmacists. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to assess the length of hospitalization of patients who underwent medical intervention for adverse events.Of 571 patients admitted to the otolaryngology ward in a year, 219 patients (38.4% experienced adverse events of grade ≥2. The duration of hospitalization was affected by the grade of adverse events, with a mean duration of hospital stay of 9.2, 17.2, 28.3 and 47.0 days for grades 0, 1, 2, and 3-4, respectively. Medical intervention lowered the incidence of grade ≥2 adverse events to 14.5%. The length of hospitalization was significantly shorter in patients who showed an improvement of adverse events after medical intervention than those who did not (26.4 days vs. 41.6 days, hazard ratio 1.687, 95% confidence interval: 1.260-2.259, P<0.001. A multivariate Cox proportional hazard analysis indicated that insomnia, constipation, nausea/vomiting, infection, non-cancer pain, oral mucositis, odynophagia and neutropenia were significant risk factors for prolongation of hospital stay.Patients who experienced adverse events are at high risk of prolonged hospitalization. Medical intervention for adverse events was found to be effective in reducing the length of hospital stay associated with adverse events.

  9. Exploring the transition from\\ud staff nurse to\\ud ward sister/manager –\\ud An exploratory case study

    OpenAIRE

    Enterkin, Judith

    2016-01-01

    Background\\ud The ward sister/manager figure has traditionally been considered the ward based\\ud clinical leader. This role has evolved over time in response to professional and\\ud political demands; despite or because of this, reports of role ambiguity exist and\\ud the ward sister/manager position has become increasingly difficult to recruit to,\\ud with nurses arguably looking to roles perceived to have greater influence and\\ud status, but less onerous managerial responsibility. Understandin...

  10. Summative Evaluation on the Hospital Wards. What Do Faculty Say to Learners?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasley, Peggy B.; Arnold, Robert M.

    2009-01-01

    No previous studies have described how faculty give summative evaluations to learners on the medical wards. The aim of this study was to describe summative evaluations on the medical wards. Participants were students, house staff and faculty at the University of Pittsburgh. Ward rotation evaluative sessions were tape recorded. Feedback was…

  11. Ward identities for conformal models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazzarini, S.; Stora, R.

    1988-01-01

    Ward identities which express the symmetry of conformal models are treated. Diffeomorphism invariance or locally holomorphic coordinate transformations are used. Diffeomorphism invariance is then understood in terms of Riemannian geometry. Two different sets of Ward identities expressing diffeomorphism invariance in a conformally invariant way are found for the free bosonic string. Using a geometrical argument, the correct invariance for a large class of conformal models is given

  12. Congenital cataract screening in maternity wards is effective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magnusson, Gunilla; Bizjajeva, Svetlana; Haargaard, Birgitte

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To study which eye-screening protocol prevails in Swedish maternity/neonatal wards, evaluate efficacy in a prospective study, and compare results with earlier Swedish retrospective results. METHODS: Surveys were sent in 2006 to maternity/neonatal and women's health departments regarding...... with earlier retrospective results was performed. RESULTS: Eye screening is routine protocol at a rate of 90% of Swedish maternity wards. Sixty-one children were included in the study. An increase was shown in case referrals from maternity wards compared to ten years ago (64% versus 50%). Detection...

  13. The Relationship between Therapeutic Alliance and Service User Satisfaction in Mental Health Inpatient Wards and Crisis House Alternatives: A Cross-Sectional Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, Angela; Fahmy, Sarah; Nolan, Fiona; Morant, Nicola; Fox, Zoe; Lloyd-Evans, Brynmor; Osborn, David; Burgess, Emma; Gilburt, Helen; McCabe, Rosemarie; Slade, Mike; Johnson, Sonia

    2014-01-01

    Background Poor service user experiences are often reported on mental health inpatient wards. Crisis houses are an alternative, but evidence is limited. This paper investigates therapeutic alliances in acute wards and crisis houses, exploring how far stronger therapeutic alliance may underlie greater client satisfaction in crisis houses. Methods and Findings Mixed methods were used. In the quantitative component, 108 crisis house and 247 acute ward service users responded to measures of satisfaction, therapeutic relationships, informal peer support, recovery and negative events experienced during the admission. Linear regressions were conducted to estimate the association between service setting and measures, and to model the factors associated with satisfaction. Qualitative interviews exploring therapeutic alliances were conducted with service users and staff in each setting and analysed thematically. Results We found that therapeutic alliances, service user satisfaction and informal peer support were greater in crisis houses than on acute wards, whilst self-rated recovery and numbers of negative events were lower. Adjusted multivariable analyses suggest that therapeutic relationships, informal peer support and negative experiences related to staff may be important factors in accounting for greater satisfaction in crisis houses. Qualitative results suggest factors that influence therapeutic alliances include service user perceptions of basic human qualities such as kindness and empathy in staff and, at service level, the extent of loss of liberty and autonomy. Conclusions and Implications We found that service users experience better therapeutic relationships and higher satisfaction in crisis houses compared to acute wards, although we cannot exclude the possibility that differences in service user characteristics contribute to this. This finding provides some support for the expansion of crisis house provision. Further research is needed to investigate why acute

  14. Nonpharmacological Interventions Targeted at Delirium Risk Factors, Delivered by Trained Volunteers (Medical and Psychology Students, Reduced Need for Antipsychotic Medications and the Length of Hospital Stay in Aged Patients Admitted to an Acute Internal Medicine Ward: Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanislaw Gorski

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Effectiveness of nonpharmacological multicomponent prevention delivered by trained volunteers (medical and psychology students, targeted at delirium risk factors in geriatric inpatients, was assessed at an internal medicine ward in Poland. Patients and Methods. Participants were recruited to intervention and control groups at the internal medicine ward (inclusion criteria: age ≥ 75, acute medical condition, basic orientation, and logical contact on admission; exclusion criteria: life expectancy < 24 hours, surgical hospitalization, isolation due to infectious disease, and discharge to other medical wards. Every day trained volunteers delivered a multicomponent standardized intervention targeted at risk factors of in-hospital complications to the intervention group. The control group, selected using a retrospective individual matching strategy (1 : 1 ratio, regarding age, gender, and time of hospitalization, received standard care. Outcome Measures. Hospitalization time, deaths, falls, delirium episodes, and antipsychotic prescriptions were assessed retrospectively from medical documentation. Results. 130 patients (38.4% males participated in the study, with 65 in the intervention group. Antipsychotic medications were initiated less frequently in the intervention group compared to the control group. There was a trend towards a shorter hospitalization time and a not statistically significant decrease in deaths in the intervention group. Conclusion. Nonpharmacological multicomponent intervention targeted at delirium risk factors effectively reduced length of hospitalization and need for initiating antipsychotic treatment in elderly patients at the internal medicine ward.

  15. Hand decontamination practices in paediatric wards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Jelly

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine and describe hand decontamination practices of health care professionals in the paediatric wards of an academic hospital in Johannesburg. The purpose was addressed within a survey design and through the use of descriptive and comparative methods. Data were collected through direct observation conducted with the use of a researcher-administered checklist. A sample of sixtysix health professionals was obtained through convenience sampling.

  16. Estimation of hand hygiene opportunities on an adult medical ward using 24-hour camera surveillance: validation of the HOW2 Benchmark Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diller, Thomas; Kelly, J William; Blackhurst, Dawn; Steed, Connie; Boeker, Sue; McElveen, Danielle C

    2014-06-01

    We previously published a formula to estimate the number of hand hygiene opportunities (HHOs) per patient-day using the World Health Organization's "Five Moments for Hand Hygiene" methodology (HOW2 Benchmark Study). HHOs can be used as a denominator for calculating hand hygiene compliance rates when product utilization data are available. This study validates the previously derived HHO estimate using 24-hour video surveillance of health care worker hand hygiene activity. The validation study utilized 24-hour video surveillance recordings of 26 patients' hospital stays to measure the actual number of HHOs per patient-day on a medicine ward in a large teaching hospital. Statistical methods were used to compare these results to those obtained by episodic observation of patient activity in the original derivation study. Total hours of data collection were 81.3 and 1,510.8, resulting in 1,740 and 4,522 HHOs in the derivation and validation studies, respectively. Comparisons of the mean and median HHOs per 24-hour period did not differ significantly. HHOs were 71.6 (95% confidence interval: 64.9-78.3) and 73.9 (95% confidence interval: 69.1-84.1), respectively. This study validates the HOW2 Benchmark Study and confirms that expected numbers of HHOs can be estimated from the unit's patient census and patient-to-nurse ratio. These data can be used as denominators in calculations of hand hygiene compliance rates from electronic monitoring using the "Five Moments for Hand Hygiene" methodology. Copyright © 2014 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The Role of Attention in Somatosensory Processing: A Multi-Trait, Multi-Method Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wodka, Ericka L.; Puts, Nicolaas A. J.; Mahone, E. Mark; Edden, Richard A. E.; Tommerdahl, Mark; Mostofsky, Stewart H.

    2016-01-01

    Sensory processing abnormalities in autism have largely been described by parent report. This study used a multi-method (parent-report and measurement), multi-trait (tactile sensitivity and attention) design to evaluate somatosensory processing in ASD. Results showed multiple significant within-method (e.g., parent report of different…

  18. A Multi-Method Investigation of Mathematics Motivation for Elementary Age Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linder, Sandra M.; Smart, Julie B.; Cribbs, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a multi-method study examining elementary students with high self-reported levels of mathematics motivation. Second- through fifth-grade students at a Title One school in the southeastern United States completed the Elementary Mathematics Motivation Instrument (EMMI), which examines levels of mathematics…

  19. Potential drug–drug interactions in pediatric wards of Gondar University Hospital, Ethiopia: A cross sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henok Getachew

    2016-06-01

    Conclusions: The study showed that most of the interactions had moderate severity followed by minor severity. Age and polypharmacy were found to show statistically significant association with the occurrence of PDDIs. Due to sensitive nature of pediatrics population, close monitoring is recommended for the detection and management of PDDIs to prevent its negative consequences.

  20. The impact of legislation on drug substances used off-label in paediatric wards--a nationwide study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haslund-Krog, Sissel; Mathiasen, René; Christensen, Hanne Rolighed; Holst, Helle

    2014-04-01

    This nationwide study is aimed at describing to what extent the European Paediatric Regulation has met therapeutic needs in children. Data for each drug substance in defined daily doses (DDD) were extracted from the national Danish data base. We evaluated if drug substances were used off-label and whether they had a paediatric investigation plan (PIP). This study did not include drug prescriptions for individual paediatric patients; thus, it was not possible to make use of all off-label categories previously used. Additionally, paediatric standard assortments (SA) were compared to the European survey on paediatric medicinal products. Thirteen percent of the 100 most used drug substances were determined as being used off-label, four of which had a PIP and one had a full waiver. Only one of the three drug substances used off-label most often, accounting for 85 % of such use, had a PIP. Neonates were included in one-third of PIPs and adolescents in 15. Nineteen out of 21 PIPs had a waiver and 14 PIPs were deferred. In line with the European survey, carbapenems, corticosteroids and proton pump inhibitors were frequent found in SAs. PIPs only cover a small proportion of the drugs found to be used off-label in this study. Despite waivers granted, drug substances were used nonetheless. Unmet regulatory needs are still considerable in some therapeutic areas in neonates as well as in children.

  1. Prevalence of malnutrition among older people in medical and surgical wards in hospital and quality of nutritional care: A multicenter, cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonetti, Loris; Terzoni, Stefano; Lusignani, Maura; Negri, Marina; Froldi, Marco; Destrebecq, Anne

    2017-12-01

    To determine and compare the prevalence of malnutrition in medical and surgical hospital units; to assess quality of nutritional care and patients' perception about quality of food and nutritional care. Hospital malnutrition in older people leads to increased mortality, length of stay, risk of infections and pressure ulcers. Several studies show that malnutrition is often caused by hospitalisation and related to poor nutritional care. Few studies report data on surgical older patients. A cross-sectional, multicenter study was conducted in 12 hospitals in northern Italy. Malnutrition prevalence was determined according to the Mini Nutritional Assessment full-version. Head nurses were interviewed in 80 units, through a validated questionnaire regarding quality of nutritional care. Semi-structured interviews were administered to a sample of patients, to investigate their perception about quality of food and nutritional care. Two hundred twenty-eight patients of 1,066 were malnourished (21.4%). Medical patients were at higher risk, so were women, patients aged 85 or more, with impaired autonomy, pressure ulcers or taking more than three drugs. The lack of personnel impacts on quality of care: in 55% of the units, no nutritional screening is performed; nutritional history is investigated in 48% only. No protocols for nutritional problems exist in 70% of the wards; hardly ever the intake is measured. Patients are mostly satisfied, even though they report that food has no taste and is not well presented. They remark the need for more personnel. Prevalence was high, as found in other studies. Medical patients were at higher risk. Nutritional care was inadequate, and often no measures were adopted to prevent malnutrition. Staffing should be increased during meals. These findings will provide indications on the strategies needed to overcome such barriers. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. The pattern of plasma sodium abnormalities in an acute elderly care ward: a cross-sectional study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connor, K A

    2012-02-03

    INTRODUCTION: The combination of ageing, illness, and medications can lead to hyponatraemia or hypernatraemia. AIMS: To describe the distribution of plasma sodium levels in older patients admitted to hospital. METHODS: We carried out a hospital based cross-sectional study examining 1,511 serum sodium concentrations ([Na+]) among 336 elderly patients and attempted to elucidate the cause(s) of the abnormal serum [Na+]. RESULTS: The study population had a mean age of 81.4. Ninety-two (27.4%) patients had hyponatraemia and seven patients (2.1%) had hypernatraemia during their hospitalisation. The distribution of [Na+] results was towards the lower end of the normal range. The mortality rate of patients with hyponatraemia was 14.1% and that of patients with normal serum [Na+] was 8.9%. Six patients with hypernatraemia died in hospital. Lower respiratory tract infection and medication accounted for the majority of cases. CONCLUSIONS: Deranged [Na+] is common among elderly patients admitted to hospital.

  3. The ward round--patient experiences and barriers to participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swenne, Christine Leo; Skytt, Bernice

    2014-06-01

    Patients' participation is essential to their well-being and sense of coherence, as well as to their understanding of and adherence to prescribed treatments. Ward rounds serve as a forum for sharing information between patient and caregiver. The purpose of the ward round is to obtain information and plan medical and nursing care through staff-patient communication. The aim and objective of this study was to investigate patients' experiences during the ward round and their ability to participate in their care. The study was qualitative and descriptive in design. Fourteen inpatients at a cardiovascular ward were interviewed. Qualitative content analysis was used for the analysis. The ethics of scientific work were adhered to. Each study participant gave his/her informed consent based on verbal and written information. The study was approved by the Research Ethics Committee at Uppsala University. The analysis revealed one theme and three subthemes related to patients' experiences of ward rounds. The main theme was handling of information from the daily ward round while waiting for private consultation. The subthemes were making the best of the short time spent on ward rounds; encountering traditional roles and taking comfort in staff competency; and being able to choose the degree to which one participates in the decision-making process. Several aspects of traditional ward round routines could be improved in regard to the two-way information exchange process between caregivers and patient. Patients' and caregivers' ability to communicate their goals and the environment in which the communication occurs are of great importance. The information provided by nurses is easier to understand than that provided by physicians. The atmosphere must be open; the patient should be treated with empathy by staff; and patients' right to participate must be acknowledged by all healthcare professionals involved. © 2013 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  4. Variables Associated with Adherence to Stress Ulcer Prophylaxis in Patients Admitted to the General Hospital Wards: A Prospective Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shadi Farsaei

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs composed of solid lipid and oil are a new generation of lipid nanoparticles which have exhibited some merits over traditional used lipid nanoparticles in fortifying food and beverages and nutraceuticals delivery systems such as liposomes and solid lipid nanoparticles. Methods: In this study, Precirol and Compritol as solid lipids, Miglyol and Octyloctanoat as liquid lipids, Tween80, Tween20 and Poloxamer407 as surfactants were used to prepare vitamin D3-loaded NLC dispersion using hot homogenization method. The particle size and size distribution for all formulations were evaluated by immediately after production and during a storage period of 60 days. Results: The Precirol-based NLC showed superiority over Compritol-based NLC in the point of physical stability. Results clearly suggested that an optimum concentration of 3% of Poloxamer407 or 2% of Tween20 was sufficient to cover the surface of nanoparticles effectively and prevent agglomeration during the homogenization process. Octyloctanoat was introduced for the first time as a good substituent for Miglyol in the preparation of NLC formulations. The vitamin D3 Intestinal absorption enhanced by the incorporating in NLCs. Conclusion: It was concluded that NLC showed a promising approach for fortifying beverages by lipophilic nutraceuticals such as vitamin D.

  5. Kids’ Perceptions toward Children’s Ward Healing Environments: A Case Study of Taiwan University Children’s Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeng-Chung Woo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper summarizes the opinions of experts who participated in designing the environment of a children’s hospital and reports the results of a questionnaire survey conducted among hospital users. The grounded theory method was adopted to analyze 292 concepts, 79 open codes, 25 axial codes, and 4 selective codes; in addition, confirmatory factor analysis and reliability analysis were performed to identify elements for designing a healing environment in a children’s hospital, and 21 elements from 4 dimensions, namely, emotions, space design, interpersonal interaction, and pleasant surroundings, were determined. Subsequently, this study examined the perceptions of 401 children at National Taiwan University Children’s Hospital. The results revealed that, regarding the children’s responses to the four dimensions and their overall perception, younger children accepted the healing environment to a significantly higher degree than did older children. The sex effect was significant for the space design dimension, and it was not significant for the other dimensions.

  6. (How) do we learn from errors? A prospective study of the link between the ward's learning practices and medication administration errors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drach-Zahavy, A; Somech, A; Admi, H; Peterfreund, I; Peker, H; Priente, O

    2014-03-01

    Attention in the ward should shift from preventing medication administration errors to managing them. Nevertheless, little is known in regard with the practices nursing wards apply to learn from medication administration errors as a means of limiting them. To test the effectiveness of four types of learning practices, namely, non-integrated, integrated, supervisory and patchy learning practices in limiting medication administration errors. Data were collected from a convenient sample of 4 hospitals in Israel by multiple methods (observations and self-report questionnaires) at two time points. The sample included 76 wards (360 nurses). Medication administration error was defined as any deviation from prescribed medication processes and measured by a validated structured observation sheet. Wards' use of medication administration technologies, location of the medication station, and workload were observed; learning practices and demographics were measured by validated questionnaires. Results of the mixed linear model analysis indicated that the use of technology and quiet location of the medication cabinet were significantly associated with reduced medication administration errors (estimate=.03, perrors (estimate=.04, plearning practices, supervisory learning was the only practice significantly linked to reduced medication administration errors (estimate=-.04, plearning were significantly linked to higher levels of medication administration errors (estimate=-.03, plearning was not associated with it (p>.05). How wards manage errors might have implications for medication administration errors beyond the effects of typical individual, organizational and technology risk factors. Head nurse can facilitate learning from errors by "management by walking around" and monitoring nurses' medication administration behaviors. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Handing over patients from the ICU to the general ward

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bunkenborg, Gitte; Bitsch Hansen, Tina; Hølge-Hazelton, Bibi

    2017-01-01

    AIM: To explore nursing practice and perception of engaging in communicative interaction when handing over multi-morbid patients from the ICU to general medical or surgical wards. BACKGROUND: Communication failures impose risks to patient safety. ICU and general ward nurses communicate in writing...... focused ethnography was applied to the study. METHODS: Participant observation of 22 clinical situations of handing over patients from the ICU to general wards was conducted in November and December 2015, followed by five focus group interviews, three interviews with general ward nurses and two with ICU...... towards patient status and the handing over process" emerged from observation notes. From transcribed focus group interviews, the theme "Balancing and negotiating when passing on, consuming and adapting knowledge" was identified. CONCLUSION: A lack of shared goals regarding handing over patients from...

  8. Ergonomics in the psychiatric ward towards workers or patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvana, Salerno; Laura, Forcella; Ursula, Di Fabio; Irene, Figà Talamanca; Paolo, Boscolo

    2012-01-01

    Patient's aggressive behavior is one of the major problem in the psychiatric ward. Here we present the preliminary results of a psychiatric ward case-study, of a public hospital in the Chieti province, in order to plan ergonomic improvement. We applied the Method of Organizational Congruencies in the psychiatric ward in order to study the relationship between organized hospital work and nurses wellbeing in a 24 hour shifts. We observed 58 main phases in the three work shifts. The technical actions are mainly those of any hospital wards (shift briefing, preparing and administering drugs, recording data on clinical charts, etc.). We found important differences mainly due to the nurses overcontrol activities on the patients behavior (preventing suicides or self destructive behavior), the occurrence of restraint procedure towards patients, the pollution due to patient's cigarette smoke. The fear of patient's self destructive behavior or other aggressive behaviour are the main cognitive and social aspects of this hospital ward. Nurses working in this psychiatric ward have to accept: locked doors, poor and polluted environment, restraint procedure with high risk of aggression and no availability of mental health care programs. A new interdisciplinary concept for ergonomics in psychiatry setting may represent a challenge for both nurses and patients and the community.

  9. Aggression in Psychiatric Wards

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvidhjelm, Jacob; Sestoft, Dorte; Skovgaard, Lene Theil

    2016-01-01

    Health care workers are often exposed to violence and aggression in psychiatric settings. Short-term risk assessments, such as the Brøset Violence Checklist (BVC), are strong predictors of such aggression and may enable staff to take preventive measures against aggression. This study evaluated...

  10. Inadequate environment, resources and values lead to missed nursing care: A focused ethnographic study on the surgical ward using the Fundamentals of Care framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jangland, Eva; Teodorsson, Therese; Molander, Karin; Muntlin Athlin, Åsa

    2018-06-01

    To explore the delivery of care from the perspective of patients with acute abdominal pain focusing on the contextual factors at system level using the Fundamentals of Care framework. The Fundamentals of Care framework describes several contextual and systemic factors that can impact the delivery of care. To deliver high-quality, person-centred care, it is important to understand how these factors affect patients' experiences and care needs. A focused ethnographic approach. A total of 20 observations were performed on two surgical wards at a Swedish university hospital. Data were collected using participant observation and informal interviews and analysed using deductive content analysis. The findings, presented in four categories, reflect the value patients place on the caring relationship and a friendly atmosphere on the ward. Patients had concerns about the environment, particularly the high-tempo culture on the ward and its impact on their integrity, rest and sleep, access to information and planning, and need for support in addressing their existential thoughts. The observers also noted that missed nursing care had serious consequences for patient safety. Patients with acute abdominal pain were cared for in the high-tempo culture of a surgical ward with limited resources, unclear leadership and challenges to patients' safety. The findings highlight the crucial importance of prioritising and valuing the patients' fundamental care needs for recovery. Nursing leaders and nurses need to take the lead to reconceptualise the value of fundamental care in the acute care setting. To improve clinical practice, the value of fundamentals of care must be addressed regardless of patient's clinical condition. Providing a caring relationship is paramount to ensure a positive impact on patient's well-being and recovery. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Institutional contexts contribute to the low priority given to developing self-care independence in a rehabilitation ward: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ling-Hui; Wang, Jye

    2013-06-01

    To examine the institutional contexts that contribute to the low priority given to the development of self-care independence in a rehabilitation ward. Research was guided by ethnographic principles of Martyn Hammersley and Paul Atkinson (2007). Individual in-depth interviews were completed. Participant observation was done daily during the rehabilitation stay of the patients. Six men and three women with neurological impairments and their caregivers. Patients' daily routines on a rehabilitation ward in Taiwan are described. Four prominent themes emerged from the data: (1) the attitudes of patients, caregivers, and staff facilitated extended rehabilitation stays within the first year after disability, (2) attending therapy sessions was the most important activity, (3) pragmatic considerations, such as 'faster and easier', outweighed the value of developing self-care independence, and (4) strategic organization of daily routines to keep therapy the priority was critical for daily activity. Multiple institutional factors jeopardize the development of self-care independence in a rehabilitation ward. The factors include the primacy of biomedical-oriented rehabilitation ideology, insurance reimbursement policies, and cultural values associated with family caregiving. They legitimize the low priority given to developing self-care independence. Therapists need to include a critical review of daily routines (what and how activities are carried out inside and outside of therapy clinics) as part of therapy regime to identify opportunities and institutional constraints to the development of self-care independence.

  12. Ward leadership styles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, G

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to devise a leadership style scale based in the authoritarian/democratic concept of leadership and to test it with a group of nurses. The working hypothesis was that nurses, working by primary nursing methods, would have a more democratic attitude to leadership than those nurses working in a traditional task allocation system. Recent papers such as that of Henry & Tuxill (1) plead for the caring professions to take on board the concept of the 'person'. Not only is the traditional model of nursing care seen as bad for the patient; it is seen also as harmful to the nurses. Fretwell (2) describes the task system as essentially an industrial model rather than a professional one which tends to satisfy the needs of the doctor rather than the patient or nurse. Kinston (3) describes nursing decision-making and work as Level I work (tradesmen). Current models of care that individualize the nurse's response to work and decision-making become Level II type (professional). Primary nursing fulfils the need for professionalizing nursing and meeting the need for more independence as well as respecting the patient as a 'person' with the organisation there to facilitate interaction between qualified nurse and patient. Changes in attitude and relationships are essential if work is to change from task to person-centred. Styles of leadership in nurses need to alter as our orientation to care issues change (4).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. Delivery of pharmaceutical services at ward level in a teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellack, N; Martins, V; Botha, N; Meyer, J C

    2009-03-01

    Poor management of pharmaceuticals could lead to wastage of financial resources and poor services in the public sector. The main aim of the study was to investigate the quality of pharmaceutical services at ward level in a teaching hospital. The design of the study was descriptive. Three data collection instruments were designed and pilot-tested prior to the actual data collection. Two structured questionnaires were used to interview the sister-in-charge of each ward and the stock and drug controller at the pharmacy. A checklist for the management of pharmaceuticals was completed for each ward. Descriptive statistics were used to describe and summarise the data. Sisters-in-charge of 30 wards and the stock and drug controller at the pharmacy participated in the study. The relationship with the pharmacy was perceived to be average by 54% (n = 30) of the sisters-in-charge of the wards. Communication with the pharmacy was mainly by telephone and 57% of the sisters-in-charge mentioned that they experienced difficulties in conveying messages to the pharmacy. Ten of the wards received regular ward visits by a pharmacist. Expiry dates were checked by all wards but at different intervals. The majority of the wards (90%) used patient cards, which refer to prescription charts, for stock control and ordering from the pharmacy. Fridge temperatures were checked and charted on a daily basis by 30% of the wards. Written standard operating procedures (SOPs) were used by the pharmacy for issuing ward stock. Although 83% of the wards indicated that they used SOPs, evidence of written SOPs was not available. The results indicated that the management of pharmaceutical services at ward level could be improved. Implementation of appropriate communication systems will enhance cooperation between the pharmacy and the wards. A uniform ward stock control system, either by computer or stock cards, should be introduced. Regular ward visits by a pharmacist to oversee ward stock management are

  14. The challenge of conceptual stretching in multi-method research

    OpenAIRE

    Ahram, Ariel

    2009-01-01

    Multi-method research (MMR) has gained enthusiastic support among political scientists in recent years. Much of the impetus for MMR has been based on the seemingly intuitive logic of convergent triangulation: two tests are better than one, since a hypothesis that had survived a series of tests with different methods would be regarded as more valid than a hypothesis tested only a single method. In their seminal Design-ing Social Inquiry, King, Keohane, and Verba (1994) argue that combining qu...

  15. Behavior observation of major noise sources in critical care wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Hui; Kang, Jian; Mills, Gary H

    2013-12-01

    This study aimed to investigate the behavior patterns of typical noise sources in critical care wards and relate their patterns to health care environment in which the sources adapt themselves in several different forms. An effective observation approach was designed for noise behavior in the critical care environment. Five descriptors have been identified for the behavior observations, namely, interval, frequency, duration, perceived loudness, and location. Both the single-bed and the multiple-bed wards at the selected Critical Care Department were randomly observed for 3 inconsecutive nights, from 11:30 pm to 7:00 am the following morning. The Matlab distribution fitting tool was applied afterward to plot several types of distributions and estimate the corresponding parameters. The lognormal distribution was considered the most appropriate statistical distribution for noise behaviors in terms of the interval and duration patterns. The turning of patients by staff was closely related to the increasing occurrences of noises. Among the observed noises, talking was identified with the highest frequency, shortest intervals, and the longest durations, followed by monitor alarms. The perceived loudness of talking in the nighttime wards was classified into 3 levels (raised, normal, and low). Most people engaged in verbal communication in the single-bed wards that occurred around the Entrance Zone, whereas talking in the multiple-bed wards was more likely to be situated in the Staff Work Zone. As expected, more occurrences of noises along with longer duration were observed in multiple-bed wards rather than single-bed wards. "Monitor plus ventilator alarms" was the most commonly observed combination of multiple noises. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Food hygiene on the wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steuer, Walter

    2007-09-13

    A PROBLEM THAT IS OFTEN OVERLOOKED OR SIMPLY NOT GIVEN ENOUGH ATTENTION: the food served to patients from the kitchen is not sterile. If food is allowed to stand at room temperature for a long time, both in the case of food cooked for lunch and of food intended for supper which has been previously chilled, there is the possibility of massive spore germination or of dangerous toxin formation. Therefore regulations on how to handle food and beverages (e.g. tea) must be set out in the infection control policy, and checks carried out to monitor compliance with the rules relating to temperature checks, duration and type of storage, need for reheating, etc. Making staff aware of the issues involved is of paramount importance. These include monitoring hygiene standards in the ward kitchen, formulation of a cleaning policy, periodic bacteriological checks (not only of workstations but also of the dishwasher results), whenever possible the use of disposable cloths for working surfaces and equipment, changing cleaning cloths at least once daily and hygienic hand disinfection before and after handing out food. Foodstuffs brought in by visitors represent a special hygienic and organizational problem because in many cases they already have a high baseline microbial count. Visitors must be made aware that, for example, slices of cake left in the patient's room and often eaten only hours later can pose a risk of infection.In summary, the following principles of food hygiene must be observed on the wards:Maintenance of the cold-hot chainNot only reheat food, but ensure it is well heated throughout Avoid situations giving rise to spore germination in foodstuffs brought in by visitorsCleanliness and minimal contamination of kitchen worktopsCleanliness of crockery and kitchen towels Do not allow food to stand at room temperature for a long time, in particular desserts and confectionery A standard policy must be enforced to define the hygienic status and organization for food

  17. Anatomy of the ward round.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Hare, James A

    2008-07-01

    The ward round has been a central activity of hospital life for hundreds of years. It is hardly mentioned in textbooks. The ward round is a parade through the hospital of professionals where most decision making concerning patient care is made. However the traditional format may be intimidating for patients and inadequate for communication. The round provides an opportunity for the multi-disciplinary team to listen to the patient\\'s narrative and jointly interpret his concerns. From this unfolds diagnosis, management plans, prognosis formation and the opportunity to explore social, psychological, rehabilitation and placement issues. Physical examination of the patient at the bedside still remains important. It has been a tradition to discuss the patient at the bedside but sensitive matters especially of uncertainty may better be discussed elsewhere. The senior doctor as round leader must seek the input of nursing whose observations may be under-appreciated due to traditional professional hierarchy. Reductions in the working hours of junior doctors and shortened length of stay have reduced continuity of patient care. This increases the importance of senior staff in ensuring continuity of care and the need for the joint round as the focus of optimal decision making. The traditional round incorporates teaching but patient\\'s right to privacy and their preferences must be respected. The quality and form of the clinical note is underreported but the electronic record is slow to being accepted. The traditional multi-disciplinary round is disappearing in some centres. This may be regrettable. The anatomy and optimal functioning of the ward round deserves scientific scrutiny and experimentation.

  18. Medically unexplained illness and the diagnosis of hysterical conversion reaction (HCR in women’s medicine wards of Bangladeshi hospitals: a record review and qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kendall Emily A

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Frequent reporting of cases of hysterical conversion reaction (HCR among hospitalized female medical patients in Bangladesh’s public hospital system led us to explore the prevalence of “HCR” diagnoses within hospitals and the manner in which physicians identify, manage, and perceive patients whom they diagnose with HCR. Methods We reviewed admission records from women’s general medicine wards in two public hospitals to determine how often and at what point during hospitalization patients received diagnoses of HCR. We also interviewed 13 physicians about their practices and perceptions related to HCR. Results Of 2520 women admitted to the selected wards in 2008, 6% received diagnoses of HCR. HCR patients had wide-ranging symptoms including respiratory distress, headaches, chest pain, convulsions, and abdominal complaints. Most doctors diagnosed HCR in patients who had any medically-unexplained physical symptom. According to physician reports, women admitted to medical wards for HCR received brief diagnostic evaluations and initial treatment with short-acting tranquilizers or placebo agents. Some were referred to outpatient psychiatric treatment. Physicians reported that repeated admissions for HCR were common. Physicians noted various social factors associated with HCR, and they described failures of the current system to meet psychosocial needs of HCR patients. Conclusions In these hospital settings, physicians assign HCR diagnoses frequently and based on vague criteria. We recommend providing education to increase general physicians’ awareness, skill, and comfort level when encountering somatization and other common psychiatric issues. Given limited diagnostic capacity for all patients, we raise concern that when HCR is used as a "wastebasket" diagnosis for unexplained symptoms, patients with treatable medical conditions may go unrecognized. We also advocate introducing non-physician hospital personnel to address

  19. Light Atmosphere in Hospital Wards

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stidsen, Lone Mandrup

    by the patients in the ward. The project is based on the Danish Regulation for light in hospitals (DS703), which is a supplement to the regulation of artificial lighting in workplaces (DS700). The kick-off to the project was reading the DS703, second paragraph, chapter 2 about general requirements for lighting...... group has quite diverse needs and preferences, while the staff needs task lighting and the patient a space experienced as homely and pleasant. Categories such as ‘pleasure’ and ‘activities’ are also a part of the user aspect. The space is divided into subcategories as ‘location of the space...

  20. Simulation for ward processes of surgical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pucher, Philip H; Darzi, Ara; Aggarwal, Rajesh

    2013-07-01

    The role of simulation in surgical education, initially confined to technical skills and procedural tasks, increasingly includes training nontechnical skills including communication, crisis management, and teamwork. Research suggests that many preventable adverse events can be attributed to nontechnical error occurring within a ward context. Ward rounds represent the primary point of interaction between patient and physician but take place without formalized training or assessment. The simulated ward should provide an environment in which processes of perioperative care can be performed safely and realistically, allowing multidisciplinary assessment and training of full ward rounds. We review existing literature and describe our experience in setting up our ward simulator. We examine the facilities, equipment, cost, and personnel required for establishing a surgical ward simulator and consider the scenario development, assessment, and feedback tools necessary to integrate it into a surgical curriculum. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Unexplained Falls Are Frequent in Patients with Fall-Related Injury Admitted to Orthopaedic Wards: The UFO Study (Unexplained Falls in Older Patients).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiara, Mussi; Gianluigi, Galizia; Pasquale, Abete; Alessandro, Morrione; Alice, Maraviglia; Gabriele, Noro; Paolo, Cavagnaro; Loredana, Ghirelli; Giovanni, Tava; Franco, Rengo; Giulio, Masotti; Gianfranco, Salvioli; Niccolò, Marchionni; Andrea, Ungar

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the incidence of unexplained falls in elderly patients affected by fall-related fractures admitted to orthopaedic wards, we recruited 246 consecutive patients older than 65 (mean age 82 ± 7 years, range 65-101). Falls were defined "accidental" (fall explained by a definite accidental cause), "medical" (fall caused directly by a specific medical disease), "dementia-related" (fall in patients affected by moderate-severe dementia), and "unexplained" (nonaccidental falls, not related to a clear medical or drug-induced cause or with no apparent cause). According to the anamnestic features of the event, older patients had a lower tendency to remember the fall. Patients with accidental fall remember more often the event. Unexplained falls were frequent in both groups of age. Accidental falls were more frequent in younger patients, while dementia-related falls were more common in the older ones. Patients with unexplained falls showed a higher number of depressive symptoms. In a multivariate analysis a higher GDS and syncopal spells were independent predictors of unexplained falls. In conclusion, more than one third of all falls in patients hospitalized in orthopaedic wards were unexplained, particularly in patients with depressive symptoms and syncopal spells. The identification of fall causes must be evaluated in older patients with a fall-related injury.

  2. Unexplained Falls Are Frequent in Patients with Fall-Related Injury Admitted to Orthopaedic Wards: The UFO Study (Unexplained Falls in Older Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mussi Chiara

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the incidence of unexplained falls in elderly patients affected by fall-related fractures admitted to orthopaedic wards, we recruited 246 consecutive patients older than 65 (mean age 82±7 years, range 65–101. Falls were defined “accidental” (fall explained by a definite accidental cause, “medical” (fall caused directly by a specific medical disease, “dementia-related” (fall in patients affected by moderate-severe dementia, and “unexplained” (nonaccidental falls, not related to a clear medical or drug-induced cause or with no apparent cause. According to the anamnestic features of the event, older patients had a lower tendency to remember the fall. Patients with accidental fall remember more often the event. Unexplained falls were frequent in both groups of age. Accidental falls were more frequent in younger patients, while dementia-related falls were more common in the older ones. Patients with unexplained falls showed a higher number of depressive symptoms. In a multivariate analysis a higher GDS and syncopal spells were independent predictors of unexplained falls. In conclusion, more than one third of all falls in patients hospitalized in orthopaedic wards were unexplained, particularly in patients with depressive symptoms and syncopal spells. The identification of fall causes must be evaluated in older patients with a fall-related injury.

  3. Canonical ward identities in generalized QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Ziping

    1995-01-01

    The canonical Ward identities for a system with singular higher-order Lagrangian are derived and some application to the generalized QCD are given. The new relations of the Ward identities for gauge ghost field proper vertices are obtained which differ from the usual Ward-Takahashi identities arising from BRS invariance. The expressions for PCAC and generalized PCAC of AVV vertices are also obtained

  4. Towards Multi-Method Research Approach in Empirical Software Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandić, Vladimir; Markkula, Jouni; Oivo, Markku

    This paper presents results of a literature analysis on Empirical Research Approaches in Software Engineering (SE). The analysis explores reasons why traditional methods, such as statistical hypothesis testing and experiment replication are weakly utilized in the field of SE. It appears that basic assumptions and preconditions of the traditional methods are contradicting the actual situation in the SE. Furthermore, we have identified main issues that should be considered by the researcher when selecting the research approach. In virtue of reasons for weak utilization of traditional methods we propose stronger use of Multi-Method approach with Pragmatism as the philosophical standpoint.

  5. Paper Prototyping: The Surplus Merit of a Multi-Method Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Bettina Linek

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This article describes a multi-method approach for usability testing. The approach combines paper prototyping and think-aloud with two supplemental methods: advanced scribbling and a handicraft task. The method of advanced scribbling instructs the participants to use different colors for marking important, unnecessary and confusing elements in a paper prototype. In the handicraft task the participants have to tinker a paper prototype of their wish version. Both methods deliver additional information on the needs and expectations of the potential users and provide helpful indicators for clarifying complex or contradictory findings. The multi-method approach and its surplus benefit are illustrated by a pilot study on the redesign of the homepage of a library 2.0. The findings provide positive evidence for the applicability of the advanced scribbling and the handicraft task as well as for the surplus merit of the multi-method approach. The article closes with a discussion and outlook. URN: http://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs150379

  6. Multi-Criteria Knapsack Problem for Disease Selection in an Observation Ward

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lurkittikul, N; Kittithreerapronchai, O

    2014-01-01

    The aging population and the introduction of Thailand universal healthcare have increased inpatients and outpatients to public hospitals, particularly to a hospital that provides special and comprehensive health services. Many inpatient wards have experienced large influx of inpatients as the hospitals have to admit all patients regardless their conditions. These overcrowding wards cause stress to medical staffs, block access between medical departments, hospital-acquired infections, and ineffective uses of resources. One way to manage such inundated inpatient is to select some patients whose conditions require less clinical attention or whose lengths of stay are predictable and short and, then, place them at an observation ward. This intermediate ward increases turnover of beds and reduces unnecessary paperwork as patients are considered to be outpatients. In this article, we studied inpatient data of a tertiary care hospital in which an observation ward was considered to alleviate the overcrowding problem at Internal Medicine Department. The analysis of data showed that the hospital can balance inpatient flow by managing a group of patients who is admitted because of treatments ordered by its special clinics. Having explored several alternatives, we suggested patient selection criteria and proposed a layout at an observation ward. The hospital should increase medical beds in a new building ward because the current observation ward can handle 27.3% of total short stay patients, while the observation ward is projected to handle 80% of total short stay patients

  7. Multi-Criteria Knapsack Problem for Disease Selection in an Observation Ward

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lurkittikul, N.; Kittithreerapronchai, O.

    2014-06-01

    The aging population and the introduction of Thailand universal healthcare have increased inpatients and outpatients to public hospitals, particularly to a hospital that provides special and comprehensive health services. Many inpatient wards have experienced large influx of inpatients as the hospitals have to admit all patients regardless their conditions. These overcrowding wards cause stress to medical staffs, block access between medical departments, hospital-acquired infections, and ineffective uses of resources. One way to manage such inundated inpatient is to select some patients whose conditions require less clinical attention or whose lengths of stay are predictable and short and, then, place them at an observation ward. This intermediate ward increases turnover of beds and reduces unnecessary paperwork as patients are considered to be outpatients. In this article, we studied inpatient data of a tertiary care hospital in which an observation ward was considered to alleviate the overcrowding problem at Internal Medicine Department. The analysis of data showed that the hospital can balance inpatient flow by managing a group of patients who is admitted because of treatments ordered by its special clinics. Having explored several alternatives, we suggested patient selection criteria and proposed a layout at an observation ward. The hospital should increase medical beds in a new building ward because the current observation ward can handle 27.3% of total short stay patients, while the observation ward is projected to handle 80% of total short stay patients.

  8. Study of the outcome of suicide attempts: characteristics of hospitalization in a psychiatric ward group, critical care center group, and non-hospitalized group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kemuyama Nobuo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The allocation of outcome of suicide attempters is extremely important in emergency situations. Following categorization of suicidal attempters who visited the emergency room by outcome, we aimed to identify the characteristics and potential needs of each group. Methods The outcomes of 1348 individuals who attempted suicide and visited the critical care center or the psychiatry emergency department of the hospital were categorized into 3 groups, "hospitalization in the critical care center (HICCC", "hospitalization in the psychiatry ward (HIPW", or "non-hospitalization (NH", and the physical, mental, and social characteristics of these groups were compared. In addition, multiple logistic analysis was used to extract factors related to outcome. Results The male-to-female ratio was 1:2. The hospitalized groups, particularly the HICCC group, were found to have biopsychosocially serious findings with regard to disturbance of consciousness (JCS, general health performance (GAS, psychiatric symptoms (BPRS, and life events (LCU, while most subjects in the NH group were women who tended to repeat suicide-related behaviors induced by relatively light stress. The HIPW group had the highest number of cases, and their symptoms were psychologically serious but physically mild. On multiple logistic analysis, outcome was found to be closely correlated with physical severity, risk factor of suicide, assessment of emergent medical intervention, and overall care. Conclusion There are different potential needs for each group. The HICCC group needs psychiatrists on a full-time basis and also social workers and clinical psychotherapists to immediately initiate comprehensive care by a medical team composed of multiple professionals. The HIPW group needs psychological education to prevent repetition of suicide attempts, and high-quality physical treatment and management skill of the staff in the psychiatric ward. The NH group subjects need a

  9. Dynamic isolation technologies in negative pressure isolation wards

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Zhonglin

    2017-01-01

    This book presents novel design principles and technologies for dynamic isolation based on experimental studies. These approaches have now become the local standard in Beijing and are currently being promoted for use nationwide. Further, the book provides details of measures and guidelines for the design process. Departing from the traditional understanding that isolation wards should be designed with high negative pressure, airtight doors and fresh air, it establishes the basis for designing biological clean rooms, including isolation wards, using a simple and convenient scientific approach. This book is intended for designers, engineers, researchers, hospital management staff and graduate students in heating ventilation air conditioning (HVAC), air cleaning technologies and related areas.

  10. Labour ward midwives' perceptions of stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackin, P; Sinclair, M

    1998-05-01

    This exploratory study set out to examine labour ward midwives' perceptions of stress. It utilized a combination of two self-report questionnaires, one devised by McGrath et al. and the GHQ12. Additional qualitative data were collected by asking midwives to produce narratives about recent stressful events. A convenience sample of the 43 midwives formed the study population and a response rate of 77% was achieved. Quantitative data were analysed using descriptive statistics and qualitative narratives were explored for content analysis. Midwives in this study demonstrated their awareness of stress in their working and personal lives and many took active steps to redress the negative effects with exercise, hobbies and talking with colleagues. However, the study revealed that 78% of the midwives indicated that having insufficient time to perform their duties was very stressful, paralleled by their perceived inability to influence work-based decisions. The study revealed that both medical and midwifery colleagues frustrated their endeavours to change an unsatisfactory condition. The GHQ12 revealed 30% of the midwives had scores above the threshold level of 2 indicating psychiatric morbidity and this is of major concern. The narratives revealed that lack of communication between the professionals about decision making was a major source of stress and as a result of this study efforts to improve multidisciplinary communication through the development of journal clubs and planned social activities is under consideration by the unit. Overall, the findings from this study highlight stress as a potential, occupational health problem in the working lives of some labour ward midwives.

  11. Influence of Parental Encouragement towards Health Care of Their Wards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sophia, R. Grace; Veliappan, A.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to explore how parents are encouraging towards health care of their wards. A "Survey Method" was used in the present study. A standardized "Agarwal Parental Encouragement Scale (APES)" was used to collect information from the students. The sample consists of thousand and ninety five higher…

  12. Modelling of coughed droplets in a hospital ward

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sadrizadeh, Sasan; Nielsen, Peter Vilhelm

    2016-01-01

    Coughing and its importance for spreading respiratory infectious diseases has been confirmed in many previous studies. The dispersion process of respiratory droplets released by the coughing of a patient in a hospital ward was studied using computational fluid dynamics simulation. Two relatively ...

  13. Developing non-technical ward-round skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Rachel; Mellanby, Edward; Dearden, Effie; Medjoub, Karima; Edgar, Simon

    2015-10-01

    Conducting clinical 'rounds' is one of the most onerous and important duties that every junior doctor is expected to perform. There is evidence that newly qualified doctors are not adequately prepared by their undergraduate experiences for this task. The aim of this study was to analyse the challenges pertaining to non-technical skills that students would face during ward rounds, and to create a model that facilitates the transition from medical student to doctor. A total of 217 final-year medical students completed a simulated ward round. Free-text responses were analysed using template analysis applying an a priori template developed from the literature by the research team. This drew on the generic categories of non-technical skills suggested by Flin et al. Ninety-seven per cent of students agreed or strongly agreed that the simulated ward round improved their insight into the challenges of ward rounds and their perceived ability to work efficiently as an active member of the ward round. The responding students (206) submitted written feedback describing the learning that they planned to use: 800 learning points were recorded, and all could be categorised into one of seven non-technical skills. Conducting clinical 'rounds' is one of the most onerous and important duties that every junior doctor is expected to perform We believe that improved task efficiency and insight into the challenges of the ward round gained by medical students will lead to an enhancement in performance during clinical rounds, and will have a positive impact on patient safety. We would suggest that undergraduate medical schools consider this model in the preparation for the clinical practice element of the curriculum. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Ward Identities for the 2PI effective action in QED

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinosa, Urko; Serreau, Julien

    2007-01-01

    We study the issue of symmetries and associated Ward-like identities in the context of two-particle-irreducible (2PI) functional techniques for abelian gauge theories. In the 2PI framework, the n-point proper vertices of the theory can be obtained in various different ways which, although equivalent in the exact theory, differ in general at finite approximation order. We derive generalized (2PI) Ward identities for these various n-point functions and show that such identities are exactly satisfied at any approximation order in 2PI QED. In particular, we show that 2PI-resummed vertex functions, i.e. field-derivatives of the so-called 2PI-resummed effective action, exactly satisfy standard Ward identities. We identify another set of n-point functions in the 2PI framework which exactly satisfy the standard Ward identities at any approximation order. These are obtained as field-derivatives of the two-point function φ, which defines the extremum of the 2PI effective action. We point out that the latter is not constrained by the underlying symmetry. As a consequence, the well-known fact that the corresponding gauge-field polarization tensor is not transverse in momentum space for generic approximations does not constitute a violation of (2PI) Ward identities. More generally, our analysis demonstrates that approximation schemes based on 2PI functional techniques respect all the Ward identities associated with the underlying abelian gauge symmetry. Our results apply to arbitrary linearly realized global symmetries as well

  15. Door locking and exit security measures on acute psychiatric admission wards

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijman, H.L.I.; Bowers, L.; Haglund, K.; Muir-Cochrane, E.; Simpson, A.; Merwe, M. van der

    2011-01-01

    Locking the exit doors of psychiatric wards is believed to reduce the risk of patients absconding. The aims of the study were to investigate both the prevalence of door locking and other exit security measures on UK admission wards, as well as whether door locking appears to be effective in keeping

  16. Evaluation of Pharmacists' Participation in Post-Admission Ward ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: The study evaluates pharmacist's perception of and participation in post-admission ward rounds, at the Lagos University Teaching Hospital (LUTH). Method: All the 60 pharmacists covering various units of pharmaceutical services were administered a forty-two element structured questionnaire. Fifty (83.3%) ...

  17. Clostridium Difficile Infection in the Nephrology Ward

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylwia Dudzicz

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile is currently the most frequently identified pathogen causing antibiotic-associated diarrhea and the main cause of nosocomial diarrhea. In recent years, increases incidence of infection, severe infection, recurrent infection and mortality from Clostridium difficile infection (CDI have been observed. This may be a consequence of excessive antibiotic use and spread of the hypervirulent epidemic BI/NAP1/027 strain of Clostridium difficile. The main risk factors for CDI are: antibiotic therapy, previous hospitalizations and number of comorbid conditions. Prevention of CDI mainly is focused in two directions: reducing the exposure of patients to the disease pathogen by intensifying hygiene measures, and reducing the impact of risk factors. A meta-analyses of clinical studies (observational, cohort and case control showed significantly higher risk of CDI and CDI recurrence in patients with chronic kidney disease and increased mortality risk in chronic kidney disease patients with CDI comparing those without CDI. Increased risk of CDI in patients with chronic kidney disease can be caused by: frequent antibiotic therapy associated with numerous infections resulting in intestinal microflora dysfunction, frequent hospitalizations, older age of the patients and an impaired immune system. Among preventative measures against CDI, the use of probiotics were also studied. In patients hospitalized in nephrology ward highly significant reduction of the CDI incidence was observed after the introduction of Lactobacillus plantarum 299v as CDI prophylaxis. Therefore, the use of Lactobacillus plantarum 299v seems to be a promising method of CDI prevention in chronic kidney disease patients hospitalized in nephrology ward.

  18. Second Order Ideal-Ward Continuity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bipan Hazarika

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of the paper is to introduce a concept of second order ideal-ward continuity in the sense that a function f is second order ideal-ward continuous if I-limn→∞Δ2f(xn=0 whenever I-limn→∞Δ2xn=0 and a concept of second order ideal-ward compactness in the sense that a subset E of R is second order ideal-ward compact if any sequence x=(xn of points in E has a subsequence z=(zk=(xnk of the sequence x such that I-limk→∞Δ2zk=0 where Δ2zk=zk+2-2zk+1+zk. We investigate the impact of changing the definition of convergence of sequences on the structure of ideal-ward continuity in the sense of second order ideal-ward continuity and compactness of sets in the sense of second order ideal-ward compactness and prove related theorems.

  19. Nursing on the medical ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Judith M

    2004-12-01

    This paper considers some issues confronting contemporary medical nursing and draws upon psychoanalytic theories to investigate some seemingly straightforward and taken-for-granted areas of medical nursing work. I am arguing that the everyday work of medical nurses in caring for patients is concerned with bringing order to and placing boundaries around inherently unsettled and destabilized circumstances. I am also arguing that how nurses manage and organize their work in this regard stems from traditional practices that tend to be taken for granted and not explicitly thought about. It is therefore difficult for nurses to consider changing these practices that often have negative consequences for the nurses. I want to examine the impact upon nurses of the consequences of three taken-for-granted nursing practices: (i) the tendency of nurses to confine their reactions to what is going on so as to present a caring self; (ii) the tendency of nurses in their everyday talk to patients to confine, limit and minimize meaning; and (iii) the tensions and ambiguities that emerge for nurses in the policing function they perform in confining patients to the bed or the ward. Negative consequences on nurses of these practices potentially include stress and confusion regarding their ability to care for patients; an undervaluing of nursing skills; and a deterioration in the nurse-patient relationship. Clinical supervision for medical nurses is proposed as a means of facilitating greater understanding of the nature of nurses' relationships with patients and the complex dimensions of their medical nursing role.

  20. Molecular epidemiology of Staphylococcus spp. contamination in the ward environment: study on mecA and femA genes in methicillin-resistant strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashimoto, A; Hamada, T; Adachi, A; Tanigawa, T; Tanaka, Y

    1995-01-01

    Staphylococcus spp. were isolated from the ward environment and antibiotic susceptibility tests were performed. Twenty-nine strains out of 274 isolates were S. aureus, and 41.4% of the S. aureus strains were methicillin resistant (MRSA). All 12 strains of MRSA were also resistant to oxacillin, ceftizoxime, ampicillin and clindamycin. Among the coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS), methicillin-resistant (MR) strains of S. epidermidis, S. capitis, S. warneri, S. haemolyticus, S. hominis, S. auricularis, S. saprophyticus and S. cohnii were isolated. Eight of the 10 S. Haemolyticus strains were methicillin resistant. The femA gene was detected in S. aureus (MSSA and MRSA), but not in CNS by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis and Southern blot analysis. The mecA gene was found in all the MRSA and MR-S. epidermidis strains tested, and one of the two MR-S. hominis strains, but not in MSSA, MS-S. epidermidis, MS-S. hominis, or MS-S. haemolyticus. DNA from one strain of MR-S. hominis and 2 strains of MR-S. haemolyticus was not amplified by PCR using the mecA gene primer, or hybridized by Southern blotting. The ambiguity that mecA was detected in some MR-CNS strains, but not in others is discussed.

  1. Analytic Study of Conflict between the Theory of Evolution and the Creation System from Keith Ward’s Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Forogh Rahimpoor

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available About the seventeenth century till nineteenth century, the world was witnessed the emersion of modern science, that challenged the principles of theism and prepare context of conflict between science and religion. In nineteenth century one of these scientific theories that inquietude the problem of belief in God, was Darwin’s theory of evolution.   In this research we are trying to mention on philosophic issue of the theory of evolution and among this consecequent, we worked conflict between the theory of evolution and belief in God according to Argument from design and then from the perspective of contemporary of philopher “Keith Ward”, we investigate the cause and the salvation this conflict.   In this subject Keith Ward as religious man who accepted theory of evolution tried to rectified perceive of religious people about the theory of evolution, specially the principle of Natural Selection and on the other hand, he wanted to show the mistake of biologist who imposed value of principle of evolution and with rectified of these mater, he try to solved the conflict between the theory of evolution and belief in God, more than any other theory, can prove the creation system based on theory of evolution.

  2. Airflow and Contaminant Distribution in Hospital Wards with a Displacement Ventililation System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qian, H.; Nielsen, Peter Vilhelm; Li, Y.

    2004-01-01

    Airflow and Contaminant Distribution in Hospital Wards with a Displacement Ventilalation System. The 2nd International Conference on Build Environment and Public Health, BEPH 2004, Shenzhen , China . ABSTRACT Displacement ventilation has not been considered to be an applicable system for hospital...... to accurately predict three-dimensional distribution of air velocity, temperature, and contaminant concentration in the ward. Indoor airflow in a displacement ventilation system involves a combination of different flow streams such as the gravity currents and thermal plumes. It is important to choose...... ventilation system in hospital wards. It is for this purpose that we study the performance of displacement ventilation in hospital wards as one of the steps to optimize the ventilation design. When the prospect of applying displacement ventilation system in a hospital ward is examined, it should be necessary...

  3. An outbreak of Burkholderia stabilis colonization in a nasal ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lijun; Wang, Mei; Zhang, Junyi; Wu, Wei; Lu, Yuan; Fan, Yanyan

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to describe an outbreak of Burkholderia stabilis colonization among patients in a nasal ward. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) was used for the molecular typing of B. stabilis isolates. Microbiological records were reviewed to delineate the colonization outbreak period. One hundred seventy-one cultures of environment and equipment samples from the nasal ward were performed to trace the source of contamination. Infection control measures were taken in order to end the outbreak. All B. stabilis isolates were identified as a new MLST type, ST821. A total of 53 patients carried this B. stabilis in the nasal ward between March and September 2013, which was defined as the outbreak period. The source of the colonization was not determined because all environment cultures were negative for Burkholderia cepacia complex. No further B. stabilis carriers have been found in the ward since the implementation of interventions. Attention must be paid to asymptomatic colonization in order to identify outbreaks early. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  4. Costs of terminal patients who receive palliative care or usual care in different hospital wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoens, Steven; Kutten, Betty; Keirse, Emmanuel; Berghe, Paul Vanden; Beguin, Claire; Desmedt, Marianne; Deveugele, Myriam; Léonard, Christian; Paulus, Dominique; Menten, Johan

    2010-11-01

    In addition to the effectiveness of hospital care models for terminal patients, policy makers and health care payers are concerned about their costs. This study aims to measure the hospital costs of treating terminal patients in Belgium from the health care payer perspective. Also, this study compares the costs of palliative and usual care in different types of hospital wards. A multicenter, retrospective cohort study compared costs of palliative care with usual care in acute hospital wards and with care in palliative care units. The study enrolled terminal patients from a representative sample of hospitals. Health care costs included fixed hospital costs and charges relating to medical fees, pharmacy and other charges. Data sources consisted of hospital accountancy data and invoice data. Six hospitals participated in the study, generating a total of 146 patients. The findings showed that palliative care in a palliative care unit was more expensive than palliative care in an acute ward due to higher staffing levels in palliative care units. Palliative care in an acute ward is cheaper than usual care in an acute ward. This study suggests that palliative care models in acute wards need to be supported because such care models appear to be less expensive than usual care and because such care models are likely to better reflect the needs of terminal patients. This finding emphasizes the importance of the timely recognition of the need for palliative care in terminal patients treated in acute wards.

  5. Does daily nurse staffing match ward workload variability? Three hospitals' experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabbay, Uri; Bukchin, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Nurse shortage and rising healthcare resource burdens mean that appropriate workforce use is imperative. This paper aims to evaluate whether daily nursing staffing meets ward workload needs. Nurse attendance and daily nurses' workload capacity in three hospitals were evaluated. Statistical process control was used to evaluate intra-ward nurse workload capacity and day-to-day variations. Statistical process control is a statistics-based method for process monitoring that uses charts with predefined target measure and control limits. Standardization was performed for inter-ward analysis by converting ward-specific crude measures to ward-specific relative measures by dividing observed/expected. Two charts: acceptable and tolerable daily nurse workload intensity, were defined. Appropriate staffing indicators were defined as those exceeding predefined rates within acceptable and tolerable limits (50 percent and 80 percent respectively). A total of 42 percent of the overall days fell within acceptable control limits and 71 percent within tolerable control limits. Appropriate staffing indicators were met in only 33 percent of wards regarding acceptable nurse workload intensity and in only 45 percent of wards regarding tolerable workloads. The study work did not differentiate crude nurse attendance and it did not take into account patient severity since crude bed occupancy was used. Double statistical process control charts and certain staffing indicators were used, which is open to debate. Wards that met appropriate staffing indicators prove the method's feasibility. Wards that did not meet appropriate staffing indicators prove the importance and the need for process evaluations and monitoring. Methods presented for monitoring daily staffing appropriateness are simple to implement either for intra-ward day-to-day variation by using nurse workload capacity statistical process control charts or for inter-ward evaluation using standardized measure of nurse workload intensity

  6. Comparison of the training status of medical students of pediatric ward based on their logbooks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MOZHGHAN ZAHMATKESHAN

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Logbooks show whether medical students have been exposed to a particular disease and whether they are able to perform particular practices or not. To evaluate the training status of the medical students in the pediatric ward of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, the data about the students’ knowledge of different diseases in different parts of the pediatric ward in 2011 was collected based on their logbooks and compared with similar data in 2005. Methods: In this descriptive study, medical students’ electronic notes were designed and completed by 90 medical students trained in the pediatric ward in 2011. Then the information was compared with the data of the previous study conducted in 2005. Results: In the pediatric outpatient clinic, neonatal emergency room, pediatric emergency room, and general pediatric ward, 50% of the diseases listed in the diaries were observed by the students. However, 19% of the patients were observed by the students in subspecialty wards. Conclusion: Using daily notes (logbooks is a useful method for educational evaluation of the students. It can show the education acquired by the students, and clarify the defects and inadequacies in education. It seems that using electronic diaries in data collection increases the students’ participation and facilitates training. In general, expansion and development of new wards facilitate the exposure of medical students to more diseases and this fact has been shown about pediatric neurology ward in the present study.

  7. Anomalous N=2 superconformal Ward identities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ketov, Sergei V.

    2000-01-01

    The N=2 superconformal Ward identities and their anomalies are discussed in N=2 superspace (including N=2 harmonic superspace), at the level of the low-energy effective action (LEEA) in four-dimensional N=2 supersymmetric field theories. The (first) chiral N=2 supergravity compensator is related to the known N=2 anomalous Ward identity in the N=2 (abelian) vector mulitplet sector. As regards the hypermultiplet LEEA given by the N=2 non-linear sigma-model (NLSM), a new anomalous N=2 superconformal Ward identity is found, whose existence is related to the (second) analytic compensator in N=2 supergravity. The celebrated solution of Seiberg and Witten is known to obey the (first) anomalous Ward identity in the Coulomb branch. We find a few solutions to the new anomalous Ward identity, after making certain assumptions about unbroken internal symmetries. Amongst the N=2 NLSM target space metrics governing the hypermultiplet LEEA are the SU(2)-Yang-Mills-Higgs monopole moduli-space metrics that can be encoded in terms of the spectral curves (Riemann surfaces), similarly to the Seiberg-Witten-type solutions. After a dimensional reduction to three spacetime dimensions (3d), our results support the mirror symmetry between the Coulomb and Higgs branches in 3d, N=4 gauge theories

  8. Investigation into the acceptability of door locking to staff, patients, and visitors on acute psychiatric wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muir-Cochrane, Eimear; van der Merwe, Marie; Nijman, Henk; Haglund, Kristina; Simpson, Alan; Bowers, Len

    2012-02-01

    There is disagreement among psychiatric professionals about whether the doors of acute psychiatric wards should be kept locked to prevent patients from leaving and harming themselves or others. This study explored patient, staff, and visitor perceptions about the acceptability of locking the ward door on acute psychiatric inpatient wards. Interviews were conducted with 14 registered nurses, 15 patients, and six visitors from three different acute wards. Findings revealed commonalities across all groups, with general agreement that locking the door reduced absconding. Staff expressed feelings of guilt, embarrassment, and fear of being blamed when a patient absconded. Staff also reported that open wards created anxious vigilance to prevent an abscond and increased workload in allocating staff to watch the door, whereas staff on partially-locked doors also perceived an increased workload in letting people in and out of the ward. Patients had mixed feelings about the status of the door, expressing depression, a sense of stigma, and low self-esteem when the door was locked. The issue of balancing safety and security on acute psychiatric wards against the autonomy of patients is not easily resolved, and requires focused research to develop innovative nursing practices. © 2011 The Authors. International Journal of Mental Health Nursing © 2011 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  9. Opening the black box in nursing work and management practice: the role of ward managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Keith; Wilkinson, Adrian; Kellner, Ashlea

    2015-03-01

    This paper aims to identify and explore key obstacles preventing ward managers from effectively performing the human resource management (HRM) responsibilities required in their role. In the context of increasing costs and the decentralisation of responsibility to ward level, the relevance of the ward manager role within the 'black box' between human resource management and firm performance is becoming increasingly pertinent. This paper presents an intensive case study including 37 interviews across all levels of a hospital where senior management attempted to shift to a high performance model of human resource management. The findings indicated that ward managers played a critical role in maintaining and improving employee performance, although they were restricted from effectively performing their responsibilities due to budget pressure and limited managerial skill development. Our findings support the contention that hospitals would benefit from focusing on the critical role of the ward manager as the central locus of influence in high performance human resource management (HPHRM) systems. Investment into high performance human resource management is discouraged if the hospital cannot adequately enable ward managers who are responsible for implementation. Introduction of managerial skills training to potential and existing ward managers is critical. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Holomorphic Vector Bundles Corresponding to some Soliton Solutions of the Ward Equation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Xiujuan, E-mail: yzzhuxiujuan@sina.com [Jiangsu Second Normal University, School of Mathematics and Information Technology (China)

    2015-12-15

    Holomorphic vector bundles corresponding to the static soliton solution of the Ward equation were explicitly presented by Ward in terms of a meromorphic framing. Bundles (for simplicity, “bundle” is to be taken throughout to mean “holomorphic vector bundle”) corresponding to all Ward k-soliton solutions whose extended solutions have only simple poles, and some Ward 2-soliton solutions whose extended solutions have only a second-order pole, were explicitly described by us in a previous paper. In this paper, we go on to present some bundles corresponding to soliton-antisoliton solutions of the Ward equation, and Ward 3-soliton solutions whose extended solutions have a simple pole and a double pole. To give some more interpretation of the bundles, we study the second Chern number of the corresponded bundles and find that it can be obtained directly from the patching matrices. We also point out some information about bundles corresponding to Ward soliton solutions whose extended solutions have general pole data at the end of the paper.

  11. Strengthening the role of the ward manager: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pegram, Anne M; Grainger, Michelle; Sigsworth, Janice; While, Alison E

    2014-09-01

    The role of the ward manager is integral to service delivery, however, they may lack the necessary authority and autonomy to achieve the organisation and delivery of patient care. To identify initiatives that have strengthened the ward manager role. A review of published literature was undertaken. Data included were drawn from a variety of sources, including policy, professional literature and research studies. Three policy initiatives were identified along with two innovations from ward managers and two recent professional organisation campaigns. One innovation was identified that could improve the process of care delivery thus empowering ward managers' decision making. The literature identified the need for a review of the role, and adequate administrative support and training for the role. The literature reviewed provided little evidence of initiatives to strengthen the role of the ward manager, highlighting the imperative to develop an evidence base. There was consensus on the importance of education and training before and during appointment to the position. The role of the ward manager remains pivotal in care delivery. The focus should be on how best to support ward managers in achieving their role within health-care systems. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Patients' feelings about ward nursing regimes and involvement in rule construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, J

    2006-10-01

    This study compared two acute psychiatric ward nursing regimes, focusing on ward rules as a means of investigating the relationship between the flexibility/inflexibility of the regimes and patient outcomes. Previous studies identified an association between ward rules and patient aggression. A link between absconding and nurses' attitudes towards rule enforcement has also been explored. However, an in-depth exploration of ward rules from the perspective of nurses and patients had not been undertaken previously. The study aimed to discover the content of rules within acute psychiatric wards; to explore patients' responses to the rules; to evaluate the impact of rules and rule enforcement on nurse-patient relationships and on ward events; and to investigate the relationship between ward rules, ward atmosphere and ward design. The relevance of sociological theory emerged from the data analysis. During this process, the results were moved up to another conceptual level to represent the meaning of lived experience at the level of theory. For example, nurses' descriptions of their feelings in relation to rule enforcement were merged as role ambivalence. This concept was supported by examples from the transcripts. Other possible explanations for the data and the connections between them were checked by returning to each text unit in the cluster and ensuring that it fitted with the emergent theory. The design centred on a comparative interview study of 30 patients and 30 nurses within two acute psychiatric wards in different hospitals. Non-participant observations provided a context for the interview data. Measures of the Ward Atmosphere Scale, the Hospital-Hostel Practices Profile, ward incidents and levels of as required (PRN) medication were obtained. The analysis of the quantitative data was assisted by spss, and the qualitative analysis by QSR *NUDIST. Thematic and interpretative phenomenological methods were used in the analysis of the qualitative data. A series of

  13. Numerical investigation of airborne infection in naturally ventilated hospital wards with central-corridor type

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Qi; Qian, Hua; Liu, Li

    2018-01-01

    Natural ventilation is believed to control airborne infection due to high ventilation rates while an undesired flow pattern may cause infection transmission in hospital wards. A computational fluid dynamics simulation was carried out in this study to investigate the impact of airflow pattern....... The results not only give direct evidence to strongly support World Health Organization’s recommendation but also suggest required amendment of the Chinese standard GB 51039-2014 to improve ventilation arrangement in general hospital wards in China. Our findings are useful for improving the future design...... of general hospital wards for airborne infection control....

  14. Drug dispensing errors in a ward stock system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Stig Ejdrup

    2010-01-01

    . Multivariable analysis showed that surgical and psychiatric settings were more susceptible to involvement in dispensing errors and that polypharmacy was a risk factor. In this ward stock system, dispensing errors are relatively common, they depend on speciality and are associated with polypharmacy......The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of drug dispensing errors in a traditional ward stock system operated by nurses and to investigate the effect of potential contributing factors. This was a descriptive study conducted in a teaching hospital from January 2005 to June 2007. In five....... These results indicate that strategies to reduce dispensing errors should address polypharmacy and focus on high-risk units. This should, however, be substantiated by a future trial....

  15. Positioning and change in a hospital ward

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærbeck, Susanne

    2017-01-01

    Purpose This paper focuses on communication about hygiene in a hospital ward and with the relevant infection control organization. The purpose of this paper is to examine the function of the hygiene coordinator as a key change agent and the communicative challenges and role conflicts implied in her...... practice. The author suggests strategies for improving communication on hygiene on ward level. Design/methodology/approach The empirical material consists of interviews and recordings of communicative events in relation to a breakout of dangerous bacteria in the ward. Change communication is used...... as a contextualizing frame of understanding, and positioning theory and analysis are applied to shed light upon the core challenges of communicating as a change agent when the coordinator's professional position and collegial relations do not support it. Findings It is shown how these challenges are connected...

  16. [Comment on “Ward Off?”] Ward Valley Report deserves better coverage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, George A.

    Eos, Transactions, AGU, which is bannered as “The Newspaper of the Geophysical Sciences,” carried an “In Brief” article in the issue of May 23 that does a serious disservice to the geophysical sciences. It was written in a flip editorial style that questioned the usefulness of the Ward Valley report (Secretary Babbitt found it useful enough to act decisively) and the integrity of the NAS/NRC committee members who wrote it.The 17 committee members, most of whom are AGU members, studied the issues as a public service at the request of the NAS in response to Babbitt's request. They documented the evidence and conclusions thoroughly in a report of over 200 pages. Surely, scientific input is needed for decisions about complex issues in our society.

  17. Geometrical formulation of the conformal Ward identity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kachkachi, M.

    2002-08-01

    In this paper we use deep ideas in complex geometry that proved to be very powerful in unveiling the Polyakov measure on the moduli space of Riemann surfaces and lead to obtain the partition function of perturbative string theory for 2, 3, 4 loops. Indeed, a geometrical interpretation of the conformal Ward identity in two dimensional conformal field theory is proposed: the conformal anomaly is interpreted as a deformation of the complex structure of the basic Riemann surface. This point of view is in line with the modern trend of geometric quantizations that are based on deformations of classical structures. Then, we solve the conformal Ward identity by using this geometrical formalism. (author)

  18. Developing a general ward nursing dashboard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Margot; Hogg, Maggie; Leach, Stuart; Penman, Mags; Friel, Susan

    2014-12-15

    The seventh and final article in the series on Leading Better Care explores some of the challenges in clinical practice relating to the use of data and making information meaningful to senior charge nurses and ward sisters. It describes the collaborative approach taken by NHS Lanarkshire, which involved nursing staff, programme leads and the eHealth team in the development of a general ward nursing dashboard as a means of ensuring safe, effective person-centred care. The article also illustrates how this web-based data-reporting programme is used to support clinical practice.

  19. Ward identities of higher order Virasoro algebra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zha Chaozeng; Dolate, S.

    1994-11-01

    The general formulations of primary fields versus quasi-primary ones in the context of high order Virasoro algebra (HOVA) and the corresponding Ward identity are explored. The primary fields of conformal spins up to 8 are given in terms of quasi-primary fields, and the general features of the higher order expressions are also discussed. It is observed that the local fields, either primary of quasi-primary, carry the same numbers of central charges, and not all the primary fields contribute to the anomalies in the Ward identities. (author). 6 refs

  20. Geriatric consultation services-are wards more effective than teams?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Ian D; Kurrle, Susan

    2013-02-22

    Geriatric consultation teams are one of the models for bringing comprehensive geriatric assessment to vulnerable and frail older people in the acute care hospital setting. While ward-based comprehensive geriatric assessment has been established as effective with reference to improving functional status and other outcomes, the team-based variant remains unproven for outcomes other than mortality in the medium term, as shown in a recent study published in BMC Medicine by Deschodt and colleagues. Further research might establish the effectiveness of the team-based model but, for current clinical practice, the emphasis should be on streaming older people with complex problems needing multidisciplinary assessment and treatment to ward-based models of comprehensive geriatric assessment.

  1. Occupational genetic risks for nurses at radiotherapy oncology wards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srb, V; Kubzova, E

    1985-05-31

    A lymphocyte chromosome analysis of short-term cultured whole peripheral blood of 14 nurses in the radiotherapy/oncology ward of the radiological clinic (working in health risk conditions for an average of 14 years) classified them into a high risk genetic group. They were found to have 4.7% cells with chromosomal aberrations as compared with 1.5% such cells in the control group. The said difference had a high statistical significance (p<0.001). Only aberrations of the structural type were evaluated.The mitotic activity of peripheral blood lymphocytes in the study group was also adversely affected (MI=1.8) compared with the control group (MI=2.9). Cytogenetic peripheral lymphocyte analysis used as a collective biological exposure test is being considered for incorporation in the system of preventive medical chec-kups of nurses working in radiotherapy/oncology wards.

  2. Occupational genetic risks for nurses at radiotherapy oncology wards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srb, V.; Kubzova, E.

    1985-01-01

    A lymphocyte chromosome analysis of short-term cultured whole peripheral blood of 14 nurses in the radiotherapy/oncology ward of the radiological clinic (working in health risk conditions for an average of 14 years) classified them into a high risk genetic group. They were found to have 4.7% cells with chromosomal aberrations as compared with 1.5% such cells in the control group. The said difference had a high statistical significance (p<0.001). Only aberrations of the structural type were evaluated.The mitotic activity of peripheral blood lymphocytes in the study group was also adversely affected (MI=1.8) compared with the control group (MI=2.9). Cytogenetic peripheral lymphocyte analysis used as a collective biological exposure test is being considered for incorporation in the system of preventive medical chec-kups of nurses working in radiotherapy/oncology wards. (author)

  3. Medical academia clinical experiences of Ward Round Teaching curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghani, Fariba; Arabshahi, Seyed Kamran Soltani; Bigdeli, Shoaleh; Alavi, Mousa; Omid, Athar

    2014-01-01

    Medical students spend most of their time in hospital wards and it is necessary to study clinical educational opportunities. This study was aimed to explore faculty members' experience on Ward Round Teaching content. This qualitative study was conducted by purposive sampling with the maximum variation of major clinical departments faculty members in Isfahan University of Medical Sciences (n = 9). Data gathering was based on deep and semi-structured interviews. Data gathering continued till data saturation. Data was analyzed through the Collaizzi method and validated. Strategies to ensure trustworthiness of data (credibility, dependability, conformability, transferability) were employed (Guba and Lincoln). Basic codes extracted from the analyzed data were categorized into two main themes and related subthemes, including (1) tangible teachings (analytic intelligence, technical intelligence, legal duties) and (2) implied teachings (professionalism, professional discipline, professional difficulties). Ward round teaching is a valuable opportunity for learners to learn not only patient care aspects but also ethical values. By appropriate planning, opportunities can be used to teach capabilities that are expected of general practitioners.

  4. Medical academia clinical experiences of Ward Round Teaching curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fariba Haghani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Medical students spend most of their time in hospital wards and it is necessary to study clinical educational opportunities. This study was aimed to explore faculty members′ experience on Ward Round Teaching content. Methods and Materials: This qualitative study was conducted by purposive sampling with the maximum variation of major clinical departments faculty members in Isfahan University of Medical Sciences (n = 9. Data gathering was based on deep and semi-structured interviews. Data gathering continued till data saturation.Data was analyzed through the Collaizzi method and validated. Strategies to ensure trustworthiness of data (credibility, dependability, conformability, transferability were employed (Guba and Lincoln. Results: Basic codes extracted from the analyzed data were categorized into two main themes and related subthemes, including (1 tangible teachings (analytic intelligence, technical intelligence, legal duties and (2 implied teachings (professionalism, professional discipline, professional difficulties. Conclusion: Ward round teaching is a valuable opportunity for learners to learn not only patient care aspects but also ethical values. By appropriate planning, opportunities can be used to teach capabilities that are expected of general practitioners.

  5. Design in mind: eliciting service user and frontline staff perspectives on psychiatric ward design through participatory methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csipke, Emese; Papoulias, Constantina; Vitoratou, Silia; Williams, Paul; Rose, Diana; Wykes, Til

    2016-01-01

    Psychiatric ward design may make an important contribution to patient outcomes and well-being. However, research is hampered by an inability to assess its effects robustly. This paper reports on a study which deployed innovative methods to capture service user and staff perceptions of ward design. User generated measures of the impact of ward design were developed and tested on four acute adult wards using participatory methodology. Additionally, inpatients took photographs to illustrate their experience of the space in two wards. Data were compared across wards. Satisfactory reliability indices emerged based on both service user and staff responses. Black and minority ethnic (BME) service users and those with a psychosis spectrum diagnosis have more positive views of the ward layout and fixtures. Staff members have more positive views than service users, while priorities of staff and service users differ. Inpatient photographs prioritise hygiene, privacy and control and address symbolic aspects of the ward environment. Participatory and visual methodologies can provide robust tools for an evaluation of the impact of psychiatric ward design on users.

  6. Theory of mind in schizophrenia: correlation with clinical symptomatology, emotional recognition and ward behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Woo Kyeong; Kim, Yong Kyu

    2013-09-01

    Several studies have suggested the presence of a theory of mind (ToM) deficit in schizophrenic disorders. This study examined the relationship of emotion recognition, theory of mind, and ward behavior in patients with schizophrenia. Fifty-five patients with chronic schizophrenia completed measures of emotion recognition, ToM, intelligence, Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) and Nurse's Observation Scale for Inpatient Evaluation (NOSIE). Theory of mind sum score correlated significantly with IQ, emotion recognition, and ward behavior. Ward behavior was linked to the duration of the illness, and even more so to theory of mind deficits. Theory of mind contributed a significant proportion of the amount of variance to explain social behavior on the ward. Considering our study results, impaired theory of mind contributes significantly to the understanding of social competence in patients with schizophrenia. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  7. Lernen durch aktive Partizipation in der klinischen Patientenversorgung - Machbarkeitsstudie einer internistischen PJ-Ausbildungsstation [Learning by active participation in clinical care - a feasibility study of a clinical education ward in internal medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tauschel, Diethard

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available [english] Background and aims: The final year of the undergraduate medical curriculum in Germany consists of three 16-week rotations including one hospital-based rotation in internal medicine. The final-year program is supposed to be oriented toward real-world practice and competency-based learning. A Clinical Education Ward (CEW was developed to promote contextual and self-directed learning among medical students during their final-year rotation in internal medicine. The goal of multisource evaluation is to analyze the implications of this model in terms of patient care, ward organization, and the learning progress of medical students. Prerequisites for a “learning organization” should be established. Methods: At the CEW, final-year medical students were acting as “doctors under supervision” and taking care of patients in a ward for internal medicine. Students were instructed and closely supervised by clinical tutors. All patients admitted to the CEW were surveyed using a questionnaire to assess the implications of student involvement in clinical care. Clinical staff members (physicians, nurses, therapists were asked about changes in terms of ward organization and interprofessional teamwork. Students assessed themselves at the beginning and at the end of the rotation in terms of clinical competencies, which were developed in cooperation with the students in preparation for the CEW.The project is part of the Integrated Studies of Anthroposophic Medicine program at the University of Witten/Herdecke (Germany, which aims to foster self-directed learning. Results: Fifty-six patients on the CEW were asked to complete a survey; 34 (60.7% responded. The majority (71% saw positive implications of student involvement in clinical care. Staff members (n = 28, return: 23 or 82% were in favor of the continued implementation of the CEW as a permanent institution. Medical students of the first two rotations (n = 9 self-assessed progress in all

  8. Hypoglycaemia monitoring in a medical receiving ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Ryan

    2015-01-01

    It has been suggested that current care for diabetes inpatients remains inadequate and that greater attention is required for high quality management. In this project the aspect of hypoglycaemia was studied in a busy medical receiving ward at the Glasgow Royal Infirmary. A large proportion of inpatients have diabetes and episodes of hypoglycaemia experienced by this population can delay discharge and indeed be detrimental to health. Thus it is important from both an organisational and patient perspective to manage this population well. In this project BM machine data was analysed to identify patients who were hypoglycaemic. These patients were then tracked down to study the subsequent management and compared this against recommended guidance. Following this an intervention was made to promote identification, management, documentation, and prevention of hypoglycaemia. This was deliberately a simple intervention involving discussions with staff and provision of basic documented guidance next to every BM machine. In the first phase 17 patients were identified and in a second and third phase 16 patients each time were further identified. Patients in the study were both type 1 and type 2 diabetics. Initial results in phase I were compared to results in phase II and III respectively. This intervention produced significant improvements in management with correct monitoring of low BMs (i.e. upon identification of low BM repeat within 1 hour) improving from 47% to 100% (for Phase II and III). Also, recording of preventative measures of hypoglycaemia improved from 35% to 88% and 94% with an improvement from 24% to 69% and 75% in recording of treatment given if needed. In conclusion, the study successfully demonstrated that simple measures can significantly improve the quality care of inpatient diabetic patients in relation to hypoglycaemia management.

  9. Shielding estimation for nuclear medicine therapy ward: our experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skopljak-Beganovic, A.; Kucukalic-Selimovic, E.; Beganovic, A.; Drljevic, A.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: The aim of this study was to calculate and estimate the shielding thickness for a new Nuclear Medicine Therapy Ward. Parameters available for shielding calculation were: ground plan of the ward, radionuclides planned for use, maximum administered activity of I-131, maximum delivered activity of I-131 to the ward per week, average time spent in the hospital after the treatment. The most hazardous and most commonly used radioisotope is I-131. The target dose that needs to be met for occupationally exposed workers is 0.3 mSv per year. There are several factors that could be changed in order to achieve this value: distance from the source, shielding thickness, angle of incidence, occupational and usage factors. The maximum dose rate at 1 meter from the thyroid gland of the patient was considered to be 100 mSv/h. The distances and incidence angles could not be changed since these vales were predetermined in the ground plan. Different usage and occupational factors were used for different rooms in the ward. We used occupational factor 1 for the bed and 1/6 for the bathroom, and usage factor 1 for nurses' room and patient room and 1/6 for the corridors, etc. The easiest way of calculating dose attenuation in material was by introducing the HVL and TVL for broad beams. TVL and HVL were taken from the graph.The results show that shielding thickness should be in the range of 3 mmPb for room doors to 30 mmPb for the wall adjacent to the nurse's office. Most of the walls are 20 mmPb thick. These values were calculated using conservative assumptions and are more then enough to protect staff, patients and public from external radiation. If the construction cannot support the weight of lead some rearrangements regarding patient positions could be made. (author)

  10. Robot Assisted Surgical Ward Rounds: Virtually Always There

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie M. Croghan

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Background:  While an explosion in technological sophistication has revolutionized surgery within the operating theatre, delivery of surgical ward-based care has seen little innovation.  Use of telepresence allowing off-site clinicians communicate with patients has been largely restricted to outpatient settings or use of complex, expensive, static devices.  We designed a prospective study to ascertain feasibility and face validity of a remotely controlled mobile audiovisual drone (LUCY to access inpatients.  This device is, uniquely, lightweight, freely mobile and emulates ‘human’ interaction by swiveling and adjusting height to patients’ eye-level.     Methods: Robot-assisted ward rounds(RASWR were conducted over 3 months. A remotely located consultant surgeon communicated with patients/bedside teams via encrypted audiovisual telepresence robot (DoubleRoboticstm, California USA.  Likert-scale satisfaction questionnaires, incorporating free-text sections for mixed-methods data collection, were disseminated to patient and staff volunteers following RASWRs.  The same cohort completed a linked questionnaire following conventional (gold-standard rounds, acting as control group. Data were paired, and non-parametric analysis performed.     Results: RASWRs are feasible (>90% completed without technical difficulty. The RASWR(n=52 observations demonstrated face validity with strong correlations (r>0.7; Spearman, p-value <0.05 between robotic and conventional ward rounds among patients and staff on core themes, including dignity/confidentiality/communication/satisfaction with management plan. Patients (96.08%, n=25 agreed RASWR were a satisfactory alternative when consultant physical presence was not possible. There was acceptance of nursing/NCHD cohort (100% (n=11 willing to regularly partake in RASWR.    Conclusion: RASWRs receive high levels of patient and staff acceptance, and offer a valid alternative to conventional ward rounds

  11. Robot Assisted Surgical Ward Rounds: Virtually Always There.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croghan, Stefanie M; Carroll, Paul; Reade, Sarah; Gillis, Amy E; Ridgway, Paul F

    2018-05-02

     While an explosion in technological sophistication has revolutionized surgery within the operating theatre, delivery of surgical ward-based care has seen little innovation.  Use of telepresence allowing off-site clinicians communicate with patients has been largely restricted to outpatient settings or use of complex, expensive, static devices.  We designed a prospective study to ascertain feasibility and face validity of a remotely controlled mobile audiovisual drone (LUCY) to access inpatients.  This device is, uniquely, lightweight, freely mobile and emulates 'human' interaction by swiveling and adjusting height to patients' eye-level.   METHODS: Robot-assisted ward rounds(RASWR) were conducted over 3 months. A remotely located consultant surgeon communicated with patients/bedside teams via encrypted audiovisual telepresence robot (DoubleRoboticstm, California USA).  Likert-scale satisfaction questionnaires, incorporating free-text sections for mixed-methods data collection, were disseminated to patient and staff volunteers following RASWRs.  The same cohort completed a linked questionnaire following conventional (gold-standard) rounds, acting as control group. Data were paired, and non-parametric analysis performed.  RESULTS: RASWRs are feasible (>90% completed without technical difficulty). The RASWR(n=52 observations) demonstrated face validity with strong correlations (r>0.7; Spearman, p-value <0.05) between robotic and conventional ward rounds among patients and staff on core themes, including dignity/confidentiality/communication/satisfaction with management plan. Patients (96.08%, n=25) agreed RASWR were a satisfactory alternative when consultant physical presence was not possible. There was acceptance of nursing/NCHD cohort (100% (n=11) willing to regularly partake in RASWR).  CONCLUSION: RASWRs receive high levels of patient and staff acceptance, and offer a valid alternative to conventional ward rounds when a consultant cannot be

  12. Exploring ward nurses' perceptions of continuing education in clinical settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govranos, Melissa; Newton, Jennifer M

    2014-04-01

    Health care systems demand that nurses are flexible skilful workers who maintain currency and competency in order to deliver safe effective patient centered care. Nurses must continually build best practice into their care and acquire lifelong learning. Often this learning is acquired within the work environment and is facilitated by the clinical nurse educator. Understanding clinical nurses' values and needs of continuing education is necessary to ensure appropriate education service delivery and thus enhance patient care. To explore clinical ward-based nurses' values and perceptions towards continuing education and what factors impact on continuing education in the ward. A case study approach was utilized. A major teaching hospital in Melbourne, Australia. A range of clinical nursing staff (n=23). Four focus groups and six semi-structured individual interviews were undertaken. Focus group interviews explored participants' values and perceptions on continuing education through a values clarification tool. Thematic analysis of interviews was undertaken to identify themes and cluster data. Three central themes: 'culture and attitudes', 'what is learning?' and 'being there-being seen', emerged reflecting staffs' values and perceptions of education and learning in the workplace. Multiple factors influence ward nurses' ability and motivation to incorporate lifelong learning into their practice. Despite variance in nurses' values and perceptions of CE in clinical environments, CE was perceived as important. Nurses yearned for changes to facilitate lifelong learning and cultivate a learning culture. Clinical nurse educators need to be cognizant of adult learners' characteristics such as values, beliefs, needs and potential barriers, to effectively facilitate support in a challenging and complex learning environment. Organizational support is essential so ward managers in conjunction with educational departments can promote and sustain continuing education, lifelong

  13. Limits of Freedom: The Ward Churchill Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Nell, Robert M.

    2006-01-01

    The University of Colorado's Ward Churchill is but the latest in a long line of professors whose volatile statements have created controversy for themselves and their universities. Specific personnel matters in the case have been meticulously addressed in Boulder, but several larger questions have been curiously neglected. One might well ask, for…

  14. Ward identities for amplitudes with reggeized gluons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartles, J.; Vacca, G.P.

    2012-05-01

    Starting from the effective action of high energy QCD we derive Ward identities for Green's functions of reggeized gluons. They follow from the gauge invariance of the effective action, and allow to derive new representations of amplitudes containing physical particles as well as reggeized gluons. We explicitly demonstrate their validity for the BFKL kernel, and we present a new derivation of the kernel.

  15. Health Service Quality Based On Dabholkar Dimension At Ward Room Of Internal Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Supriyanto, Stefanus; Rahmawati, Alfi Febriana

    2013-01-01

    The NDR average at ward room of internal disease of Bojonegoro General Hospital during 2009-2011 was 58,6 ‰ (more than standard < 25 ‰). This research was aimed to analyze the importance and satisfaction rating of health service quality based on Dabholkar dimension. It used observational approach with cross sectional design. Interview was conducted to 37 patients in internal disease ward room of Bojonegoro General Hospital which selected by simple random sampling. This study found some issues...

  16. Evaluation of fungal air contamination in selected wards of two tertiary hospitals in Tehran, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Kamali Sarwestani

    2017-07-01

    Conclusion: According to the results of this study, the frequency and diversity of fungal spores in hospital wards were different. In addition, since the fungal contamination in the hospital environment are affected by various environmental factors and the efficiency of ventilation systems, some of these wards require better ventilation system as well as regular monitoring to remove these fungal bioaerosols in order to maintain the health of patients and health care workers.

  17. Characterization of indoor bioaerosols from a hospital ward in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Characterization of indoor bioaerosols from a hospital ward in a tropical ... assessment of indoor air quality and determine pathogenic microorganisms due to particle fall-out. Key words: Indoor air, bioaerosols, hospital ward, tropical setting ...

  18. Malnutrition and nutritional care practices in hospital wards for older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderwee, Katrien; Clays, Els; Bocquaert, Ilse; Verhaeghe, Sofie; Lardennois, Miguel; Gobert, Micheline; Defloor, Tom

    2011-04-01

    This paper is a report of a study conducted to gain a better insight into the current nutritional care practices in Belgian hospital wards for older people, and to study the association between these practices and the prevalence of malnutrition. In 1999, the Council of Europe assessed nutritional care practices and support in 12 European countries and showed them to be sparse and inconsistent. At the time of research, no studies had described the association between nutritional care practices and malnutrition prevalence in Belgium. In 2007, a cross-sectional survey was carried out in a representative sample of Belgian hospital wards for older people. In total, 2094 patients from 140 wards for older people were included. The overall prevalence rate of malnutrition in wards for older people was 31.9%. Nutritional care practices such as nutritional screening and assessment, use of a standardized screening instrument and a nutritional protocol were suboptimal. Multilevel analysis revealed that ward characteristics explained for 9.1% whether a patient was malnourished or not. None of the registered nutritional care practices could explain a patient's individual risk. Malnutrition is a frequently occurring problem on hospital wards for older people. Increased consciousness among healthcare professionals and hospital policy makers of the importance of nutritional care will contribute to further improvement in care quality. © 2010 The Authors. Journal of Advanced Nursing © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. The effects of leadership and ward factors on job satisfaction in nursing homes: a multilevel approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havig, Anders K; Skogstad, Anders; Veenstra, Marijke; Romøren, Tor I

    2011-12-01

    To examine (1) the relationships between job satisfaction and task- and relationship-oriented leadership and (2) the direct and moderating effects on job satisfaction of three ward-level factors: workload, use of teams and staff stability. Job satisfaction in nursing homes is vital to meeting the challenges related to recruitment and turnover. Cross-sectional design. A multilevel analysis approach was used to recognise a hierarchal structure of determined factors and to capture variation in job satisfaction at the individual and ward level. A questionnaire was sent to 444 registered nurses, auxiliary nurses and unskilled nursing assistants. Structured interviews were administered to 40 ward managers and 13 directors, and 900 hours of field observations was conducted in 40 nursing home wards throughout Norway. We found a significant relationship between job satisfaction and task-oriented and relationship-oriented leadership styles, with a stronger effect for task orientation. The effect of the two leadership styles varied significantly across wards. Furthermore, staff stability had both a significant positive direct effect and a moderating effect on job satisfaction, whereas the two other ward-level predictors yielded no significant contributions. The relatively stronger effect of task-oriented leadership on job satisfaction, particularly in wards with low staff stability, is in contrast to most previous studies and suggests that there may be specific conditions in nursing homes that favour the use of this leadership style. The varying effect of both leadership styles indicates that staff in different nursing home wards could benefit from the use of different leadership styles. The study highlights the importance of using different leadership behaviour and the importance of high staff stability to ensure job satisfaction among nursing home personnel. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  20. Job satisfaction in mainland China: comparing critical care nurses and general ward nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Aihua; Tao, Hong; Ellenbecker, Carol Hall; Liu, Xiaohong

    2013-08-01

    To explore the level of nurses' job satisfaction and compare the differences between critical care nurses and general ward nurses in Mainland China. Hospitals continue to experience high nurse turnover. Job satisfaction is a key factor to retain skilled nurses. The differences in job satisfaction among critical care nurses and general ward nurses are unknown. A cross-sectional design was selected for this descriptive correlation study. Cross-sectional study of critical care nurses (n = 446) and general ward nurses (n = 1118) in 9 general hospitals by means of questionnaires that included the Chinese Nurses Job Satisfaction Scale and demographic scale. The data were collected from June 2010-November 2010. Chinese nurses had moderate levels of job satisfaction, were satisfied with co-workers and family/work balance; and dissatisfied with pay and professional promotion. Critical care nurses were younger; less educated and had less job tenure when compared with nurses working on general wards. Critical care nurses were significantly less satisfied than general ward nurses with many aspects of their job. Levels of nurses' job satisfaction can be improved. The lower job satisfaction of critical care nurses compared with general ward nurses should warn the healthcare administrators and managers of potentially increasing the critical care nurses turn over. Innovative and adaptable managerial interventions need to be taken to improve critical care nurse' job satisfaction and retain skilled nurse. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. Active learning on the ward: outcomes from a comparative trial with traditional methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo Prado, Hegla; Hannois Falbo, Gilliatt; Rodrigues Falbo, Ana; Natal Figueirôa, José

    2011-03-01

    Academic activity during internship is essentially practical and ward rounds are traditionally considered the cornerstone of clinical education. However, the efficacy and effectiveness of ward rounds for learning purposes have been under-investigated and it is necessary to assess alternative educational paradigms for this activity. This study aimed to compare the educational effectiveness of ward rounds conducted with two different learning methodologies. Student subjects were first tested on 30 true/false questions to assess their initial degree of knowledge on pneumonia and diarrhoea. Afterwards, they attended ward rounds conducted using an active and a traditional learning methodology. The participants were submitted to a second test 48hours later in order to assess knowledge acquisition and were asked to answer two questions about self-directed learning and their opinions on the two learning methodologies used. Seventy-two medical students taking part in a paediatric clinic rotation were enrolled. The active methodology proved to be more effective than the traditional methodology for the three outcomes considered: knowledge acquisition (33 students [45.8%] versus 21 students [29.2%]; p=0.03); self-directed learning (38 students [52.8%] versus 11 students [15.3%]; pmethods (61 students [84.7%] versus 38 students [52.8%]; ptraditional methodology in a ward-based context. This study seems to be valuable in terms of the new evidence it demonstrates on learning methodologies in the context of the ward round. © Blackwell Publishing Ltd 2011.

  2. 25 CFR 117.23 - Transactions between guardian and ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Transactions between guardian and ward. 117.23 Section... COMPETENCY § 117.23 Transactions between guardian and ward. Business dealings between the guardian and his ward involving the sale or purchase of any property, real or personal, by the guardian to or from the...

  3. Auditing Safety of Compounding and Reconstituting of Intravenous Medicines on Hospital Wards in Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suvikas-Peltonen, Eeva; Palmgren, Joni; Häggman, Verner; Celikkayalar, Ercan; Manninen, Raija; Airaksinen, Marja

    2017-01-01

    On the hospital wards in Finland, nurses generally reconstitute intravenous medicines, such as antibiotics, analgesics, and antiemetics prescribed by doctors. Medicine reconstitution is prone to many errors. Therefore, it is important to identify incorrect practices in the reconstitution of medicine to improve patient safety in hospitals. The aim of this study was to audit the compounding and reconstituting of intravenous medicines on hospital wards in a secondary-care hospital in Finland by using an assessment tool and microbiological testing for identifying issues posing patient safety risks. A hospital pharmacist conducted an external audit by using a validated 65-item assessment tool for safe-medicine compounding practices on 20 wards of the selected hospital. Also, three different microbiological samples were collected to assure the aseptics. Practices were evaluated using a four-point rating scale of "never performed," "rarely performed," "often performed," and "always performed," and were based on observation and interviews with nurses or ward pharmacists. In addition, glove-, settle plate-, and media fill-tests were collected. Associations between microbial sample results and audit-tool results were discussed. Altogether, only six out of the 65 items were fully implemented in all wards; these were related to logistic practices and quality assurance. More than half of the wards used incorrect practices ("rarely performed" or "never performed") for five items. Most of these obviated practices related to aseptic practices. All media-fill tests were clean but the number of colony forming units in glove samples and settle- plate samples varied from 0 to >100. More contamination was found in wards where environmental conditions were inadequate or the use of gloves was incorrect. Compounding practices were [mostly] quite well adapted, but the aseptic practices needed improvement. Attention should have been directed particularly to good aseptic techniques and

  4. Evaluation of bio-aerosols concentration in the different wards of three educational hospitals in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heshmatollah Nourmoradi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: The aim of this study was to evaluate the bioaerosols level in the various parts of three educational hospitals of Isfahan, Iran. Materials and Methods: The collection of bioaerosols (including bacterial and fungal microorganisms was carried out with one-stage Anderson sampler. The sampling was carried out at the height of 1.5 m from the floor of various hospitals wards (infectious, surgery, urology wards, and operating room. The volume of each sample was determined based on pre-tests carried and was about 50 L. After sampling, the samples were incubated and analyzed. The effect of various environmental conditions including humidity, temperature, and outdoor bioaerosol levels was also investigated. Results: The lowest numbers of fungal and bacterial concentration were obtained in operating rooms of the hospitals and the highest concentration was observed in infectious disease wards of hospital 1 and 2 and surgery ward of hospital 3. The bacterial concentration was observed to be higher in hospital wards than outdoor, except hospitals′ operating rooms. Conclusion: The findings showed that the bioaerosols level in the hospitals was relatively high. The higher levels of indoor bacteria than outdoor might be associated with the presence of patients, their activity, unsuitable ventilation, and disinfection. Therefore, environmental monitoring and control measures are required to improve hospital environmental quality especially in the wards with immune deficiency patients.

  5. Experiences of psychiatric nurses exposed to hostility from patients in a forensic ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tema, T R; Poggenpoel, M; Myburgh, C P H

    2011-10-01

    Hostile behaviour is becoming a way of life in South Africa. Hostility prevails at all settings, including in the health sector. In a forensic ward psychiatric nurses are subjected to hostile behaviour by the patients. The aim of the present study was to explore and describe the psychiatric nurses' experiences of hostile behaviour by patients in a forensic ward and make recommendations for nurse managers to empower these psychiatric nurses to cope with the patients' aggression. Qualitative, in-depth, phenomenological interviews were conducted with nine psychiatric nurses exposed to hostility from patients in a forensic ward. Recommendations were derived from the results from nurse managers to assist psychiatric nurses. It became apparent from the findings that psychiatric nurses in a forensic ward work in a stressful environment. Hostile behaviour in the forensic ward is consistently experienced by the psychiatric nurses as hindering therapeutic relationships. The psychiatric nurses experienced being disempowered. Psychiatric nurses experience hostile behaviour by patients in a forensic ward as disempowering. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSE MANAGEMENT: Nurse managers can facilitate psychiatric nurses' empowerment by providing them access to: information, support, resources, opportunity and growth. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. Ward-Takahashi identities in quantum electrodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishijima, K; Sasaki, R [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Physics

    1975-03-01

    The Ward-Takahashi identities are derived for connected Green's functions in quantum electrodynamics without recourse to equal-time commutation relations, field equations and the Feynman-Dyson perturbation expansions. The argument is based on the dispersion formulation of field theories and only finite expressions are used throughout this derivation. These identities are shown to be consequences of the subtraction conditions imposed upon the 2-, 3- and 4-point Green's functions.

  7. Ward Valley transfer stalled by Babbitt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1994-01-01

    Interior Secretary Bruce Babbitt announced on November 24 that he would not authorize the land transfer for the proposed low-level waste disposal site at Ward Valley, California, until a legal challenge to the facility's license and environmental impact statement is resolved. Even if the matter is resolved quickly, there exists the possibility that yet another hearing will be held on the project, even though state courts in California have stated flatly that no such hearings are required

  8. Ward Valley transfer stalled by Babbitt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-01-01

    Interior Secretary Bruce Babbitt announced on November 24 that he would not authorize the land transfer for the proposed low-level waste disposal site at Ward Valley, California, until a legal challenge to the facility's license and environmental impact statement is resolved. Even if the matter is resolved quickly, there exists the possibility that yet another hearing will be held on the project, even though state courts in California have stated flatly that no such hearings are required.

  9. Service audit of a forensic rehabilitation ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Susan; Gudjonsson, Gisli H; Needham-Bennett, Humphrey; Chick, Kay

    2009-10-01

    An open forensic rehabilitation ward provides an important link bridging the gap between secure and community provisions. This paper provides an audit of such a service by examining the records of an open forensic rehabilitation ward over a five-year period from 1 June 2000 until 31 May 2005. During the audit period there were 51 admissions, involving 45 different patients, and 50 discharges. The majority of the patients came from secure unit facilities, acute psychiatric wards or home. Thirty-nine patients were discharged either into hostels (66%) or their home (12%). The majority of patients (80%) had on admission a primary diagnosis of either schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder. Most had an extensive forensic history. The focus of their admission was to assess and treat their mental illness/disorder and offending behaviour and this was successful as the majority of patients were transferred to a community placement after a mean of 15 months. It is essential that there is a well-integrated care pathway for forensic patients, involving constructive liaison with generic services and a well-structured treatment programme which integrates the key principles of the 'recovery model' approach to care.

  10. Clinical characteristics of very old patients hospitalized in internal medicine wards for heart failure: a sub-analysis of the FADOI-CONFINE Study Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Biagi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The incidence and prevalence of chronic heart failure are increasing worldwide, as is the number of very old patients (>85 years affected by this disease. The aim of this sub-analysis of the multicenter, observational CONFINE study was to detect clinical and therapeutic peculiarities in patients with chronic heart failure aged >85 years. We recruited patients admitted with a diagnosis of chronic heart failure and present in the hospital in five index days, in 91 Units of Internal Medicine. The patients’ clinical characteristics, functional and cognitive status, and the management of the heart failure were analyzed. A total of 1444 subjects were evaluated, of whom 329 (23.1% were over 85 years old. Signs and symptoms of chronic heart failure were more common in very old patients, as were severe renal insufficiency, anemia, disability and cognitive impairment. The present survey found important age-related differences (concomitant diseases, cognitive status among patients with chronic heart failure, as well as different therapeutic strategies and clinical outcome for patients over 85 years old. Since these patients are usually excluded from clinical trials and their management remains empirical, specific studies focused on the treatment of very old patients with chronic heart failure are needed.

  11. How SEIPS can be used as a model for macroergonomic approach in subunit healthcare (Case study: The nurse perception of fatigue in surgery ward unit)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iftadi, Irwan; Astuti, Rahmaniyah Dwi; Pristiyana, Ardian Ade

    2017-11-01

    Occupational fatigue in healthcare nurses, which has multifaceted issues, is associated with decreased patient safety and the quality of nursing care. The aim of this study was to investigate the nurses fatigue problem in sub-unit healthcare based on their perceptual experience. Interviews were conducted and analyzed utilizing a direct qualitative content analysis approach using NVivo Software and guided by Model of System Engineering Initiative for Patient Safety (SEIPS). The findings of this research were a steering on what nurses perceive as contributing and preventing to fatigue which are likewise arranged in SEIPS model. It was shown that a macro ergonomic approach is valuable for understanding complexities of work systems, even though it is a small unit organization.

  12. Determinants of maternal near miss among women in public hospital maternity wards in Northern Ethiopia: A facility based case-control study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dejene Ermias Mekango

    Full Text Available In Ethiopia, 20,000 women die each year from complications related to pregnancy, childbirth and post-partum. For every woman that dies, 20 more experience injury, infection, disease, or disability. "Maternal near miss" (MNM, defined by the World Health Organization (WHO as a woman who nearly dies, but survives a complication during pregnancy, childbirth or within 42 days of a termination, is a proxy indicator of maternal mortality and quality of obstetric care. In Ethiopia, few studies have examined MNM. This study aims to identify determinants of MNM among a small population of women in Tigray, Ethiopia.Unmatched case-control study was conducted in hospitals in Tigray Region, Northern Ethiopia, from January 30-March 30, 2016. The sample included 103 cases and 205 controls recruited from among women seeking obstetric care at six (6 public hospitals. Clients with life-threatening obstetric complications, including hemorrhage, hypertensive diseases of pregnancy, dystocia, infection, and anemia or clinical signs of severe anemia (in women without hemorrhage were taken as cases and those with normal obstetric outcomes were controls. Cases were selected based on proportion to size allocation while systematic sampling was employed for controls. Binary and multiple variable logistic regression ("odds ratio" analyses were calculated at 95% CI.Roughly 90% of cases and controls were married and 25% experienced their first pregnancy before the age of 16 years. About two-thirds of controls and 45.6% of cases had gestational ages between 37-41 weeks. Among cases, severe obstetric hemorrhage (44.7%, hypertensive disorders (38.8%, dystocia (17.5%, sepsis (9.7% and severe anemia (2.9% were leading causes of MNM. Histories of chronic maternal medical problems like hypertension, diabetes were reported in 55.3% of cases and 33.2% of controls. Women with no formal education [AOR = 3.2;95%CI:1.24, 8.12], being less than 16 years of age at first pregnancy [AOR = 2

  13. Relationship between anticholinergic drug use and one-year outcome among elderly people hospitalised in medical wards via emergency department: the SAFES cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narbey, D; Jolly, D; Mahmoudi, R; Trenque, T; Blanchard, F; Novella, J-L; Dramé, M

    2013-09-01

    To investigate the relationship between anticholinergic drug use and one-year outcome of elderly patients hospitalised via the emergency department. Prospective, multicentre, cohort study of patients aged 75 years and older. Comprehensive geriatric evaluation was performed. We included in this analysis all patients for whom data on drug use was available. Anticholinergic drugs were coded using the online database "Thesorimed". One-year mortality and nursing home admission were analysed using a Cox model, with matching on the propensity to use anticholinergic drugs. In total, 1176 subjects were included in this analysis, average age 85±6 years, 65% women. Overall, 144 (12%) were taking at least one anticholinergic drug. Mortality and nursing home admission at one year were respectively 29% and 30% in the anticholinergic group, and 34% and 33% respectively in subjects not taking anticholinergic drugs. No significant relationship was observed between anticholinergic drug use and the main endpoints. Although we did not observed any statistically significant relationship between use of anticholinergic drugs and one-year outcome in elderly patients, the long-term use of anticholinergic drugs can have deleterious effects on memory and functional capacity, and therefore requires prescriptions to be reviewed regularly.

  14. "A small cog in a large wheel": an exploratory study into the experiences of porters, ward clerks and domestics working in an English Cancer Centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mack, Hazel; Froggatt, Katherine; McClinton, Pam

    2003-09-01

    The effect of working in an oncology environment on nurses has been widely researched but the experiences of non-clinical staff such as ancillary workers in the oncology environment have rarely been examined. This exploratory study had three aims: to explore ancillary workers' understandings of cancer, their experiences of working in a Cancer Centre and their training and support needs. Working within a naturalistic paradigm, a descriptive exploratory design was utilised employing in-depth interviews and drawing on aspects of grounded theory for data analysis. Findings indicated that these ancillary workers lacked an in-depth understanding of cancer. The experience of working in a Cancer Centre appeared to bring both costs and benefits to these ancillary workers. These ancillary workers enjoyed the level of contact they have with patients in a Cancer Centre and subsequently ascribed great value to their jobs. However, they felt that health-care professional colleagues did not always value their contribution to the care of patients. There are implications for nurses and other health-care staff working in oncology alongside these ancillary staff in terms of valuing and supporting them in the work that they do.

  15. Limitaciones de esfuerzos terapéuticos: Resultados de un registro prospectivo en una sala de clínica médica Limitation of life-sustaining treatment: A prospective study developed in a clinical ward

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abel Novillo

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo de este trabajo fue describir el proceso de limitación de los esfuerzos terapéuticos (LET en los pacientes internados en una sala general. Para ello se realizó un estudio prospectivo descriptivo, desarrollado en la sala de internación general de un hospital universitario. Fueron evaluados pacientes que tuviesen alguna LET, asistidos por el servicio de clínica médica en un período de 60 días consecutivos. Durante el mismo se hospitalizaron 402 pacientes, 62 (15% tuvieron algún tipo de LET. Este último grupo estaba compuesto por un 66% de mujeres, la mediana de edad fue de 86 años (78-90 y de la duración de hospitalización de 12 días (8-18. La mala calidad de vida fue la causa más frecuente de LET (69%. Se brindó información acerca de las limitaciones a 43 familias (69% y 8 pacientes (13%. En la decisión participaron el médico de cabecera (50%, médicos de planta (50%, residentes (40%, la familia (42% y los propios pacientes (11%. En 7 casos hubo constancia en la historia clínica (11%. Diecisiete pacientes (27% con LET fallecieron durante la internación, mientras que 44 (71% fueron dados de alta. En conclusión, la limitación de esfuerzos terapéuticos en nuestros pacientes constituyó un hecho frecuente. No se logró identificar un proceso uniforme o sistematizado para la toma de la decisión de LET. Resulta innegable la necesidad de normativas que guíen al equipo de salud en la toma de decisiones, tranquilicen a familiares y acompañen a los pacientes en sus reales necesidades.The purpose of this study is to describe the limiting life-sustaining treatment process of patients admitted to a general ward. A prospective descriptive study was designed. The setting was the general ward of universitary hospital. Study participants were patients assisted by the internal medicine department during a 60- consecutive days period who had limitations of life sustaining treatments. During the study period, 402 patients were

  16. Ward nurses' experiences of the discharge process between intensive care unit and general ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauppi, Wivica; Proos, Matilda; Olausson, Sepideh

    2018-05-01

    Intensive care unit (ICU) discharges are challenging practices that carry risks for patients. Despite the existing body of knowledge, there are still difficulties in clinical practice concerning unplanned ICU discharges, specifically where there is no step-down unit. The aim of this study was to explore general ward nurses' experiences of caring for patients being discharged from an ICU. Data were collected from focus groups and in-depth interviews with a total of 16 nurses from three different hospitals in Sweden. An inductive qualitative design was chosen. The analysis revealed three themes that reflect the challenges in nursing former ICU patients: a vulnerable patient, nurses' powerlessness and organizational structure. The nurses described the challenge of nursing a fragile patient based on several aspects. They expressed feeling unrealistic demands when caring for a fragile former ICU patient. The demands were related to their own profession and knowledge regarding how to care for this group of patients. The organizational structure had an impact on how the nurses' caring practice could be realized. This evoked ethical concerns that the nurses had to cope with as the organization's care guidelines did not always favour the patients. The structure of the organization and its leadership appear to have a significant impact on the nurses' ability to offer patients the care they need. This study sheds light on the need for extended outreach services and intermediate care in order to meet the needs of patients after the intensive care period. © 2018 British Association of Critical Care Nurses.

  17. Sleep quality and mood in mothers and fathers accommodated in the family-centred paediatric ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelhoff, Charlotte; Edéll-Gustafsson, Ulla; Mörelius, Evalotte

    2018-02-01

    To describe sleep quality and mood in parents accommodated with their sick child in a family-centred paediatric ward. Secondary aims were to compare mothers' and fathers' sleep quality and mood in the paediatric ward and to compare the parents' sleep quality and mood between the paediatric ward and in a daily-life home setting after discharge. Frequent interruptions, ward noise and anxiety affect parents' sleep quality and mood negatively when accommodated with their sick child in paediatric wards. Poor sleep quality and negative mood decrease the parents' ability to sustain attention and focus, and to care for their sick child. This was a prospective and descriptive study. Eighty-two parents (61 mothers and 21 fathers) with children (median age 6.25 years) admitted to six paediatric wards participated in the study. Uppsala Sleep Inventory, a sleep diary and the Mood Adjective Checklist were used to measure sleep quality and mood. The parents had a good sleep quality in the paediatric ward even though they had more nocturnal awakenings compared to home. Moreover, they were less alert, less interested and had reduced concentration, and were more tired, dull and passive in the hospital than at home after discharge. Vital sign checks, noises made by the staff and medical treatment were given reasons influencing sleep. Poor sleep quality correlated with negative mood. Parents' sleep quality in family-centred paediatric care is good. However, the habitual sleep efficacy before admittance to the hospital is lower than expected and needs to be further investigated. The healthcare professionals should acknowledge parents' sleep and mood when they are accommodated with their sick child. Further should care at night be scheduled and sleep promoted for the parents to maintain health and well-being in the family. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. The effect of multi-professional education on the recognition and outcome of patients at risk on general wards

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuhrmann, L.; Perner, A.; Klausen, T.W.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of multi-professional full-scale simulation-based education of staff on the mortality and staff awareness of patients at risk on general wards. DESIGN, SETTINGS AND PATIENTS: A prospective before-and-after study conducted on four general wards...... at Herlev Hospital, Denmark. In the pre-intervention period (June-July 2006) and post-intervention period (November-December 2007), all patients on the wards had vital signs measured in the evening by study personnel, who also asked nursing staff questions about patients with abnormal vital signs...

  19. Medical and surgical ward rounds in teaching hospitals of Kuwait University: students’ perceptions

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    AlMutar S

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Sara AlMutar,1 Lulwa AlTourah,1 Hussain Sadeq,2 Jumanah Karim,2 Yousef Marwan3 1Department of Medicine, 2Department of Pediatrics, Mubarak Al-Kabeer Hospital, 3Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Al-Razi Orthopedic Hospital, Kuwait City, Kuwait Background: Teaching sessions for medical students during ward rounds are an essential component of bedside teaching, providing students with the opportunity to regard patients as actual people, and to observe their physical conditions directly, allowing a better understanding of illnesses to be developed. We aim to explore medical students’ perceptions regarding medical and surgical ward rounds within the Faculty of Medicine at Kuwait University, and to evaluate whether this teaching activity is meeting the expectation of learners. Methods: A pretested questionnaire was used to collect data from 141 medical students during the 2012–2013 academic year. They were asked to provide their current and expected ratings about competencies that were supposed to be gained during ward rounds, on a scale from 1 (lowest to 5 (highest. Mean scores were calculated, and the Student t-test was used to compare results. P < 0.05 was the cut-off level for significance. Results: Only 17 students (12.1% declined to participate in the study. The students' current competency scores (for competencies taught within both disciplines – medical and surgical were significantly lower than the scores indicating students’ expectations (P < 0.001. The best-taught competency was bedside examination, in both medical (mean: 3.45 and surgical (mean: 3.05 ward rounds. However, medical ward rounds were better than surgical rounds in covering some competencies, especially the teaching of professional attitude and approach towards patients (P < 0.001. Conclusion: Both medical and surgical ward rounds were deficient in meeting the students’ expectations. Medical educators should utilize the available literature to improve the bedside

  20. The Design and Simulation of Natural Personalised Ventilation (NPV System for Multi-Bed Hospital Wards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zulfikar A. Adamu

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Adequate ventilation is necessary for thermal comfort and reducing risks from infectious bio-aerosols in hospital wards, but achieving this with mechanical ventilation has carbon and energy implications. Natural ventilation is often limited to window-based designs whose dilution/mixing effectiveness are subject to constraints of wind speed, cross ventilation, and in the case of hospital wards, proximity of patients to external walls. A buoyancy-driven natural ventilation system capable of achieving dilution/mixing was shown to be feasible in a preceding study of novel system called natural personalised ventilation (NPV. This system combined both architecture and airflow engineering principles of space design and buoyancy and was tested and validated (salt-bath experiment for a single bed ward. This research extends the previous work and is proof-of-concept on the feasibility of NPV system for multi-bed wards. Two different four-bed ward types were investigated of using computational fluid dynamics (CFD simulations under wind-neutral conditions. Results predict that NPV system could deliver fresh air to multiple patients, including those located 10 m away from external wall, with absolute flow rates of between 32 L·s−1 and 54 L·s−1 for each patient/bed. Compared to same wards simulated using window design, ingress of airborne contaminants into patients’ breathing zone and summer overheating potential were minimised, while overall ward dilution was maximised. Findings suggest the NPV has potentials for enabling architects and building service engineers to decouple airflow delivery from the visualisation and illumination responsibilities placed upon windows.

  1. Occurrence of airborne vancomycin- and gentamicin-resistant bacteria in various hospital wards in Isfahan, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirhoseini, Seyed Hamed; Nikaeen, Mahnaz; Khanahmad, Hossein; Hassanzadeh, Akbar

    2016-01-01

    Airborne transmission of pathogenic resistant bacteria is well recognized as an important route for the acquisition of a wide range of nosocomial infections in hospitals. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of airborne vancomycin and gentamicin (VM and GM) resistant bacteria in different wards of four educational hospitals. A total of 64 air samples were collected from operating theater (OT), Intensive Care Unit (ICU), surgery ward, and internal medicine ward of four educational hospitals in Isfahan, Iran. Airborne culturable bacteria were collected using all glass impingers. Samples were analyzed for the detection of VM- and GM-resistant bacteria. The average level of bacteria ranged from 99 to 1079 CFU/m(3). The highest level of airborne bacteria was observed in hospital 4 (628 CFU/m(3)) and the highest average concentration of GM- and VM-resistant airborne bacteria were found in hospital 3 (22 CFU/m(3)). The mean concentration of airborne bacteria was the lowest in OT wards and GM- and VM-resistant airborne bacteria were not detected in this ward of hospitals. The highest prevalence of antibiotic-resistant airborne bacteria was observed in ICU ward. There was a statistically significant difference for the prevalence of VM-resistant bacteria between hospital wards (P = 0.012). Our finding showed that the relatively high prevalence of VM- and GM-resistant airborne bacteria in ICUs could be a great concern from the point of view of patients' health. These results confirm the necessity of application of effective control measures which significantly decrease the exposure of high-risk patients to potentially airborne nosocomial infections.

  2. Choosing a commode for the ward environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballinger, C; Pain, H; Pascoe, J; Gore, S

    The choice of appropriate equipment to promote patient independence and enhance nursing care is of major concern to the nurse in the ward environment. This article reports on a recent evaluation of specialist commodes, (Ballinger et al, 1994), with reference to the programme funded by the Medical Devices Agency, Department of Health, under whose auspices the project was carried out. The results of user evaluations and technical tests of six mobile commodes are presented, the preferred model being the Mayfair commode supplied by Carters (J&A) Ltd. The article concludes by identifying a number of important considerations to bear in mind when selecting a commode.

  3. Quality assessment of emergency wards in Khorramabad public hospitals based on EFQM model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    mohammad hasan Imani-Nasab

    2012-12-01

    Conclusion: Findings show that quality of studied wards is less than the model standards and other similar studies considerably. From view point of the researcher the existing gap with external studies is logical and in comparison with internal studies is irrational. The studied wards acquired the most score in process criterion and the least score in policy and strategy criterion. Also ,findings shows a negative relation between results of assessment based on EFQM model and current evaluation system of the ministry of health, so it is suggested that the current system should be revised fundamenally.

  4. Assessment of Measurement Tools of Observation Rate of Nursing Handover Standards in Clinical Wards of Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saadi Amini

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives : In health centers, clinical information of patient is transferred among care staffs regularly. One of the common cases in information transferring is during the time of nurses’ handover in hospital which performing it correctly will help schedule patient care, providing safety and facilitating exact transferring of information. The aim of this study is investigating validity and reliability of assessment of observance rate of shift handover in clinical wards checklist. Material and Methods : In order to determine the reliability of checklist, two experts panel meetings were held with the presence of 10 experts in clinical field that in those meetings the reliability was investigated with discussion and consensus of participants. Checklist validity was investigated through pilot study in 4 wards of 4 hospitals and calculated by Kronbach- alpha method with 28 cases of shifts handover in morning, noon, and night shift. Results : In studying reliability, the primary checklist was divided into two checklists: patient handover, equipments and ward handover that included 27 and 72 items, respectively. The reliability of patient handover checklist was verified with 0.9155 Kronbach-alpha and that of equipments and ward handover was verified with 0.8779 Kronbach-alpha. Conclusion : Verifying checklists by mentioned scientific and statistical methods showed that these are very powerful instruments that can be used as one of the assessment tools of shift handover in clinical wards to be used towards promoting received services by customers of healthcare system.

  5. A multi-method approach to evaluate health information systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ping

    2010-01-01

    Systematic evaluation of the introduction and impact of health information systems (HIS) is a challenging task. As the implementation is a dynamic process, with diverse issues emerge at various stages of system introduction, it is challenge to weigh the contribution of various factors and differentiate the critical ones. A conceptual framework will be helpful in guiding the evaluation effort; otherwise data collection may not be comprehensive and accurate. This may again lead to inadequate interpretation of the phenomena under study. Based on comprehensive literature research and own practice of evaluating health information systems, the author proposes a multimethod approach that incorporates both quantitative and qualitative measurement and centered around DeLone and McLean Information System Success Model. This approach aims to quantify the performance of HIS and its impact, and provide comprehensive and accurate explanations about the casual relationships of the different factors. This approach will provide decision makers with accurate and actionable information for improving the performance of the introduced HIS.

  6. Multi-method automated diagnostics of rotating machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostyukov, A. V.; Boychenko, S. N.; Shchelkanov, A. V.; Burda, E. A.

    2017-08-01

    The automated machinery diagnostics and monitoring systems utilized within the petrochemical plants are an integral part of the measures taken to ensure safety and, as a consequence, the efficiency of these industrial facilities. Such systems are often limited in their functionality due to the specifics of the diagnostic techniques adopted. As the diagnostic techniques applied in each system are limited, and machinery defects can have different physical nature, it becomes necessary to combine several diagnostics and monitoring systems to control various machinery components. Such an approach is inconvenient, since it requires additional measures to bring the diagnostic results in a single view of the technical condition of production assets. In this case, we mean by a production facility a bonded complex of a process unit, a drive, a power source and lines. A failure of any of these components will cause an outage of the production asset, which is unacceptable. The purpose of the study is to test a combined use of vibration diagnostics and partial discharge techniques within the diagnostic systems of enterprises for automated control of the technical condition of rotating machinery during maintenance and at production facilities. The described solutions allow you to control the condition of mechanical and electrical components of rotating machines. It is shown that the functionality of the diagnostics systems can be expanded with minimal changes in technological chains of repair and operation of rotating machinery. Automation of such systems reduces the influence of the human factor on the quality of repair and diagnostics of the machinery.

  7. Multi-Method Provenance Analysis of Namibian Desert Sand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeesch, P.; Garzanti, E.

    2014-12-01

    Mineralogical, geochemical and geochronological provenance proxies each have their own strengths and weaknesses: a. Bulk geochemistry, framework petrography and heavy mineral compositions can differentiate between source areas characterised by different lithologies, but are sensitive to hydraulic sorting and chemical alteration. b. Detrital zircon U-Pb geochronology is insensitive to winnowing effects, but is 'blind' to lithologies devoid of zircon and cannot differentiate between first cycle and recycled sediments. c. Cosmogenic neon isotopes can be used to identify different generations of surface exposure while simultaneously tracking different magmatic sources. The challenge is then to combine these different proxies into a self consistent story, and do so in as objective a manner as possible. We here present a case study of Namibia's Namib Sand Sea and Skeleton Coast ergs, in which all the aforementioned methods have been combined using a three-way multidimensional scaling (aka INDividual Differences SCALing or INDSCAL) analysis: 1. Each of the datasets was represented by a 'dissimilarity matrix' of pairwise distances between samples. 2. The set of these matrices was fed into the INDSCAL algorithm, which produces two pieces of graphical output: the 'group configuration', which is a scatter plot or 'map' in which similar samples plot close together and dissimilar samples plot far apart, and the 'proxy weights', in which not the samples but the proxies are plotted according to the weight they attached to the 'group configuration' axes. The INDSCAL map of the Namibia dataset indicates that (a) long-shore drift of Orange River sediments dominates the coastal sediment compositions all along the Namibian coast until Angola, and (b) that light and heavy minerals tell complementary parts of the provenance story.

  8. Mental Health of General Practitioners in Emergency Wards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sepehrmanesh Z.1 PhD,

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims General practitioners have an essential role in patient care and are exposed to high levels of job stress. General practitioners’ mental health has effects on their functional abilities and medical managements.This study was carried out to evaluate the mental health of general practitioners in emergency wards in KashanUniversity of Medical Sciences, Iran. Materials & Methods In this cross-sectional study, all of General practitioners in emergency wards (n=87 were studied. The survey instruments includedtwo questionnaires: 1-demographic variables and 2- General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-28. Data were analyzed using SPSS 16 software and Chi square, Fisher exactand Mann-Whitney statistical tests. Findings The mean age of general practitioners was 36.11±5.67 years; 89.7% of them were married; 60.3% were male. 41% of the total general practitioners had mental health problems. The mean score of GHQ was 22.56±9.24. There were significant relationships between mental health and each age, employment situation, and number of children (p0.05. Conclusion The majority of employed general practitioners in emergency rooms do not have proper mental health statuses.

  9. Investigations of phosphate coatings of galvanized steel sheets by a surface-analytical multi-method approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bubert, H.; Garten, R.; Klockenkaemper, R.; Puderbach, H.

    1983-01-01

    Corrosion protective coatings on galvanized steel sheets have been studied by a combination of SEM, EDX, AES, ISS and SIMS. Analytical statements concerning such rough, poly-crystalline and contaminated surfaces of technical samples are quite difficult to obtain. The use of a surface-analytical multi-method approach overcomes, the intrinsic limitations of the individual method applied, thus resulting in a consistent picture of those technical surfaces. Such results can be used to examine technical faults and to optimize the technical process. (Author)

  10. Implementation of an Electronic Checklist to Improve Patient Handover From Ward to Operating Room

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Münter, Kristine H; Møller, Thea P; Østergaard, Doris

    2017-01-01

    risk factors. The aim of this study was to describe the implementation process and completion rate of a new preoperative, ward-to-OR checklist. Our goal was a 90% fulfillment. METHOD: This study is a prospective, observational study in a Danish University Hospital including all patients undergoing......OBJECTIVE: Research has identified numerous safety risks in perioperative patient handover. In handover from ward to operating room (OR), patients are often transferred by a third person. This adds to the risk of loss of important information and of caregivers in the OR not identifying possible...... surgery in 2013. The checklist was a screen page with 27 checkboxes of information relevant for a safe handover. The checklist should be completed in the ward before handover to the OR and should be checked in the OR before receiving the patient. The Plan-Do-Study-Act (PDSA) cycle method was used...

  11. Teaching cross-cultural communication skills online: a multi-method evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Amy L; Mader, Emily M; Morley, Christopher P

    2015-04-01

    Cultural competency education is an important and required part of undergraduate medical education. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether an online cross-cultural communication module could increase student use of cross-cultural communication questions that assess the patient's definition of the problem, the way the problem affects their life, their concerns about the problem, and what the treatment should be (PACT). We used multi-method assessment of students assigned to family medicine clerkship blocks that were randomized to receive online cultural competency and PACT training added to their standard curriculum or to a control group receiving the standard curriculum only. Outcomes included comparison, via analysis of variance, of number of PACT questions used during an observed Standardized Patient Exercise, end-of-year OSCE scores, and qualitative analysis of student narratives. Students (n=119) who participated in the online module (n=60) demonstrated increased use of cross-cultural communication PACT questions compared to the control group (n=59) and generally had positive themes emerge from their reflective writing. The module had the biggest impact on students who later went on to match in high communication specialties. Online teaching of cross-cultural communication skills can be effective at changing medical student behavior.

  12. The role of the ward manager in promoting patient safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinnock, David

    In this article the role of the ward manager in promoting patient safety is explored. The background to the development of the patient safety agenda is briefly discussed and the relationship between quality and safety is illustrated. The pivotal importance of the role of the ward manager in delivering services to patients is underlined and literature on patient safety is examined to identify what a ward manager can do to make care safer. Possible actions of the ward manager to improve safety discussed in the literature are structured around the Leadership Framework. This framework identifies seven domains for the leadership of service delivery. Ward managers use their personal qualities, and network and work within teams, while managing performance and facilitating innovation, change and measurement for improvement. The challenge of promoting patient safety for ward managers is briefly explored and recommendations for further research are made.

  13. Comparison of student learning in the out-patient clinic and ward round.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, M H; Dent, J A

    1994-05-01

    In undergraduate medical education there is a trend away from ward-based teaching towards out-patient and community-based teaching. To study the potential effects of this altered emphasis on student learning, a pilot group of final-year medical students at the University of Dundee was asked to keep individual structured log-books. These contained details of patients seen during their 3-week orthopaedic attachment in both a ward and out-patient setting. A comparison of perceived learning in the two settings showed that students learned more from attending an out-patient clinic than a ward round, but did not make full use of the learning potential of either. The setting did not particularly influence the balance of learning as categorized here but only the ward round supplied experience of surgical complications. The amount of learning taking place in an out-patient clinic was influenced by student ability, measured by examination performance, but not by clinic work-load. The implications of increased use of out-patient clinics and the advantages and disadvantages of the approach employed are discussed. It is concluded that in the situation studied student learning in the outpatient setting is as good as or superior to the ward setting but should not totally replace it.

  14. Measuring dynamic social contacts in a rehabilitation hospital: effect of wards, patient and staff characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duval, Audrey; Obadia, Thomas; Martinet, Lucie; Boëlle, Pierre-Yves; Fleury, Eric; Guillemot, Didier; Opatowski, Lulla; Temime, Laura

    2018-01-26

    Understanding transmission routes of hospital-acquired infections (HAI) is key to improve their control. In this context, describing and analyzing dynamic inter-individual contact patterns in hospitals is essential. In this study, we used wearable sensors to detect Close Proximity Interactions (CPIs) among patients and hospital staff in a 200-bed long-term care facility over 4 months. First, the dynamic CPI data was described in terms of contact frequency and duration per individual status or activity and per ward. Second, we investigated the individual factors associated with high contact frequency or duration using generalized linear mixed-effect models to account for inter-ward heterogeneity. Hospital porters and physicians had the highest daily number of distinct contacts, making them more likely to disseminate HAI among individuals. Conversely, contact duration was highest between patients, with potential implications in terms of HAI acquisition risk. Contact patterns differed among hospital wards, reflecting varying care patterns depending on reason for hospitalization, with more frequent contacts in neurologic wards and fewer, longer contacts in geriatric wards. This study is the first to report proximity-sensing data informing on inter-individual contacts in long-term care settings. Our results should help better understand HAI spread, parameterize future mathematical models, and propose efficient control strategies.

  15. Midwifery students learning experiences in labor wards: a grounded theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunstad, Anne; Hjälmhult, Esther

    2014-12-01

    The labor ward is an important and challenging learning area for midwifery students. It is there the students learn in authentic complex situations, in intimate situations, with potential risk for the life and health of mothers and their babies. The aim of this study was to explore the main concern expressed by midwifery students in labor wards and how they handled this concern. A longitudinal study based on grounded theory methodology was used. The participants were 10 postgraduate midwifery students, from a University College in Norway. Data were gathered and analyzed throughout the 2-year postgraduate program, in the students first, third and fourth semesters. Every student was interviewed three times in a total of 15 single and three focus-group sessions. The grounded theory of "building relationships" explains how students dealt with their main concern: "how to gain access to learning experiences". This theory consisted of three strategies; a) controlling vulnerability, b) cultivating trust and c) obtaining acceptance. Clarifying discussions involving midwives and students may facilitate the process of building relationships and contribute to confident learning. Students appreciate it when the midwives initiate discussions about acute situations and state that a novice may perceive labor and childbirth as more frightening than an experienced midwife would. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The transition from staff nurse to ward leader.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Caroline; Al-Sadoon, Tara; Hemmings, Laura; Jackson, Karen; Mulligan, Paul

    Moving from the staff nurse to ward sister role involves acquiring a range of skills to lead and motivate a team and ensure standards of care are high. Recognising new ward sisters' need for support, a trust developed a training programme to enable them to develop the necessary skills and provide mutual support. This article discusses the development of the programme and offers the reflections of three ward sisters who participated in it.

  17. The chiral Ward-Takahashi identity in the ladder approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kugo, Taichiro; Mitchard, M.G.

    1992-01-01

    We show that the ladder approximation to the Schwinger-Dyson and Bethe-Salpeter equations preserves the Ward-Takahashi identity for the axial vector vertex if and only if we use the gluon momentum as the argument of the running coupling constant. However, in the usual Landau gauge this is inconsistent with the vector Ward identity. We propose a new method for making the ladder approximation scheme consistent with both vector and axial vector Ward identities. (orig.)

  18. Optimizing Lighting Design for Hospital Wards by Defining User Zones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thuesen, Niels; Stidsen, Lone; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning

    2011-01-01

    of lighting design, so it has the ability to support the different users activity and behavior on the ward. By using RFID tracking and manual observations we have analyzed and evaluated the ward functionality as working environment for the staff. The method creates a higher understanding of the ward...... of lighting design in private and public settings are often not similar. The purpose of this article is therefore present a approach dividing the hospital ward in 3 user zones for patients, staff and visitors. The main user of the zone should be in control of the light scenario and thereby a refining...

  19. Predictors of suicide in the patient population admitted to a locked-door psychiatric acute ward.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roar Fosse

    Full Text Available No prior study appears to have focused on predictors of suicide in the general patient population admitted to psychiatric acute wards. We used a case-control design to investigate the association between suicide risk factors assessed systematically at admission to a locked-door psychiatric acute ward in Norway and subsequent death by suicide.From 2008 to 2013, patients were routinely assessed for suicide risk upon admission to the acute ward with a 17-item check list based on recommendations from the Norwegian Directorate of Health and Social Affairs. Among 1976 patients admitted to the ward, 40 patients, 22 men and 18 women, completed suicide within December 2014.Compared to a matched control group (n = 120, after correction for multiple tests, suicide completers scored significantly higher on two items on the check list: presence of suicidal thoughts and wishing to be dead. An additional four items were significant in non-corrected tests: previous suicide attempts, continuity of suicidal thoughts, having a suicide plan, and feelings of hopelessness, indifference, and/or aggression. A brief scale based on these six items was the only variable associated with suicide in multivariate regression analysis, but its predictive value was poor.Suicide specific ideations may be the most central risk markers for suicide in the general patient population admitted to psychiatric acute wards. However, a low predictive value may question the utility of assessing suicide risk.

  20. Prevalence of Nosocomial Infection in Different Wards of Ghaem Hospital, Mashhad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamal Falahi

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background The CDC defines a nosocomial infection as a localized or systemic condition caused by an adverse reaction to the presence of an infectious agent(s or its toxin(s. It is an infection that occurs between 48 to 72 hours after admission of patients in the hospital or as soon after the hospital discharge and on the admission time, patients don't have this infection. Objectives This study aimed to characterize the prevalence of nosocomial infection in Ghaem hospital, Mashhad, Iran. Methods This retrospective study was conducted in all wards of the Ghaem hospital, Mashhad during the 1 year period (2013; the data were collected from the wards records and HIS system and analyzed by the SPSS software (version16. Results In the present study, of total 35979 hospitalized patients in different wards of the Ghaem hospital was reported 1.1% of nosocomial infection. In the meantime, overall, the most prevalent organism was Acinetobacter baumannii with a prevalence of 37.2% and the minimum was linked to the Bacillus species with a prevalence 0.3%. The highest and lowest prevalence of the nosocomial infection was in the ICU and CCU with 49.9% and 0.3%, respectively. In general, among all wards of the mentioned hospital, the most frequent nosocomial infection was pneumonia (47.4% and the lowest belonged to CSF (2.3%. Conclusions In our study, the ICU ward was accounted for the highest rate of nosocomial infection, due to the critical importance of this ward. Preventive measures and survivelance system for reduction of nosocomial infections is needed.

  1. Care practices of older people with dementia in the surgical ward: A questionnaire survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Hynninen

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The objective of this study was to describe the care practices of nursing staff caring older people with dementia in a surgical ward. Methods: The data were collected from nursing staff (n = 191 working in surgical wards in one district area in Finland during October to November 2015. Data were collected using a structured questionnaire and analyzed statistically. The instrument consists of a total number of 141 items and four dimensions. The dimensions were as follows: background information (12 of items, specific characteristics of older people with dementia in a surgical ward (24 of items, specific characteristics of their care in a surgical ward (66 of items and use of physical restraints and alternative models for use of restraints for people with dementia (39 of items. Results: The questions which measure the nursing staff’s own assessment of care practices when caring for people with dementia in surgical wards were selected: counseling people with dementia, reaction when a surgical patient with dementia displays challenging behavior and use of alternative approach instead of physical restraints. Most commonly the nursing staff pay attention to patient’s state of alertness before counseling older people with dementia. Instead of using restraints, nursing staff gave painkillers for the patient and tried to draw patients’ attention elsewhere. The nursing staff with longer work experience estimate that they can handle the patients’ challenging behavior. They react by doing nothing more often than others. They pretend not to hear, see or notice anything. Conclusion: The findings of this study can be applied in nursing practice and in future studies focusing on the care practices among older people with dementia in acute care environment. The results can be used while developing patient treatments process in surgical ward to meet future needs.

  2. The iota(1440) and QCD ward identities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, P.G.

    1987-01-01

    Anomalous Ward identities for QCD are analyzed with contributions of all known pseudoscalar mesons, including the glueball candidate iota(1440). Implications for the standard resolution of the U/sub A/(1) problem are examined by imposing the important and crucial constraint of positivity for the topological susceptibility chi/sub t/. The pure Yang-Mills susceptibility chi/sub t//sup YM/ - a quantity relevant in quenched lattice calculations - is shown to increase quite considerably in the presence of the iota, while chi/sub t/ is reduced and may even vanish. Axial couplings are consistent with the suppression expected for a singlet glueball, and give a small width for iota → 2y less than 3 keV

  3. Superconformal Ward identities and their solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nirschl, M.; Osborn, H.

    2005-01-01

    Superconformal Ward identities are derived for the four point functions of chiral primary BPS operators for N=2,4 superconformal symmetry in four dimensions. Manipulations of arbitrary tensorial fields are simplified by introducing a null vector so that the four point functions depend on two internal R-symmetry invariants as well as two conformal invariants. The solutions of these identities are interpreted in terms of the operator product expansion and are shown to accommodate long supermultiplets with free scale dimensions and also short and semi-short multiplets with protected dimensions. The decomposition into R-symmetry representations is achieved by an expansion in terms of two variable harmonic polynomials which can be expressed also in terms of Legendre polynomials. Crossing symmetry conditions on the four point functions are also discussed

  4. Vacuum Ward identities for higher genera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zamolodchikov, A.B.

    1989-01-01

    The minimal models of two-dimensional conformal field theory are considered on surfaces with nontrivial topology. Due to degeneration of the vacuum module in these models, the stress tensor components satisfy special equations of motion - the vacuum Ward identities. It is shown that these identities can be written in the form of partial differential equations on the moduli space, satisfied by the partition function of the theory. Some examples are written down explicitly in the case of torus and g=2 surface, represented as a double-fold covering of a sphere. For the simplest minimal theory M(2/5), equations are closed on hyperelliptic surface of any genus and the situation is governed by the other minimal model M(3/10). (orig.)

  5. Nurse rostering at a Danish ward

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bæklund, Jonas

    2014-01-01

    This paper considers a nurse rostering problem from a ward at a Danish hospital.  The problem is highly constrained and comprises a large set of different constraints. A branch-and-price method for solving the problem exactly is proposed. The master problem is to assign schedules to the nurses......, and its linear relaxation is solved by means of column generation. The pricing sub-problem is to generate feasible schedules for the nurses and -- as a couple of different constraints including several special Danish regulations have to be observed -- is solved by constraint programming. A number...... of specific algorithms for handling these constraints are proposed. The method is very flexible regarding the rules a schedule should comply with, which is a key concern when creating solution methods for nurse rostering problems.  Computational tests show that optimal solutions can be found for instances...

  6. Poverty and violence, frustration and inventiveness: hospital ward life in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaman, Shahaduz

    2004-11-01

    An ethnographic exploration was done in an orthopaedic ward of a government teaching hospital in Bangladesh to understand the nature of hospital culture in the context of Bangladeshi society at large. Life and work in the ward result in a culture that is simultaneously created by its inhabitants and the conditions in which they are situated. The study shows that biomedicine is a product of particular social conditions and that the hospital reflects features of its society. Behind the injuries and broken limbs in the ward are stories of violence, crime, and intolerance occurring in a society where masses of people fight over limited resources. In the ward people interact in an extremely hierarchical manner. The patients, who are mainly from poor economic backgrounds, remain at the bottom of the hierarchy. Doctors and other staff members are often professionally frustrated. Strikes related to hospital staff's various professional demands hamper the regular flow of work in the ward. Family members are engaged in nursing and provide various kinds of support to their hospitalized relatives. Patients give small bribes to ward boys and cleaners to obtain their day-to-day necessities. Patients joke with each other and mock senior doctors. Thus, they neutralize their powerlessness and drive away the monotony of their stay. Doctors develop 'indigenous' solutions to orthopaedic problems. Instead of using high-tech devices, they employ instruments made of bamboo, bricks, and razor blades. This study shows how medical practice takes shape in an understaffed, under-resourced and poorly financed hospital operating in a low-income country.

  7. Doctors' and nurses' perceptions of a ward-based pharmacist in rural northern Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjölander, Maria; Gustafsson, Maria; Gallego, Gisselle

    2017-08-01

    Background This project is part of the prospective quasi experimental proof-of-concept investigation of clinical pharmacist intervention study to reduce drug-related problems among people admitted to a ward in a rural hospital in northern Sweden. Objective To explore doctors' and nurses' perceptions and expectations of having a ward-based pharmacist providing clinical pharmacy services. Setting Medical ward in a rural hospital in northern Sweden. Method Eighteen face-to-face semi-structured interviews were conducted with a purposive sample of doctors and nurses working on the ward where the clinical pharmacy service was due to be implemented. Semi-structured interviews were digitally recorded, transcribed and analysed using thematic analysis. Main outcome measure Perceptions and expectations of nurses and doctors. Results Doctors and nurses had limited experience of working with pharmacists. Most had a vague idea of what pharmacists can contribute within a ward setting. Participants, mainly nurses, suggested inventory and drug distribution roles, but few were aware of the pharmacists' skills and clinical competence. Different views were expressed on whether the new clinical pharmacy service would have an impact on workload. However, most participants took a positive view of having a ward-based pharmacist. Conclusion This study provided an opportunity to explore doctors' and nurses' expectations of the role of clinical pharmacists before a clinical pharmacy service was implemented. To successfully implement a clinical pharmacy service, roles, clinical competence and responsibilities should be clearly described. Furthermore, it is important to focus on collaborative working relationships between doctors, nurses and pharmacists.

  8. HIV infection, tuberculosis and workload in a general paediatric ward

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Journal of Child Health ... To describe the impact of HIV infection and tuberculosis on the workload of a general paediatric ward at Red Cross War Memorial Children's Hospital in 2007. Methods. Prospective descriptive surveillance of the patient composition of a general paediatric ward over a 1-year period.

  9. Views of pharmacists on involvement in ward rounds in selected ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Pharmacist participation in ward rounds is of increasing interest for better pharmaceutical care, yet most pharmacists do not engage in this activity. Objective: The objective was to obtain public sector pharmacistsf views and perceptions on their involvement in ward rounds. Method: A rapid assessment was ...

  10. Team Ward Rounds for Quality Improvement in Patient-Centred ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this paper we describe a clinical practice change for evaluation and continuous quality improvement of in-patient services in our ACE unit, such as daily geriatrics (multi disciplinary) team ward rounds preceding traditional ward rounds by other managing teams. The geriatrics team rounds enabled the identification of ...

  11. Pain in the nursing home: assessment and treatment on different types of care wards

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Achterberg, W.P.; Pot, A.M.; Scherder, E.J.A.; Ribbe, M.W.

    2007-01-01

    The assessment and management of pain in nursing homes have been shown to be suboptimal, but no study has evaluated differences in clinical setting within these homes. The prevalence and management of pain on different care wards (psychogeriatric, somatic, and rehabilitation) was studied on 562

  12. Transforming the slum: The case of Mumbai's M-Ward | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2016-12-13

    Dec 13, 2016 ... Mumbai, India's largest and wealthiest city, is a study in contrasts: it is rich and ... of state corruption and collusion with private sector developers. ... the Slum through Creation of Property Market: A Case Study of M-Ward in ...

  13. The management pattern carried out in a cataract surgery day ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jing; Fang, Xiaoqun; Wu, Suhong

    2013-06-01

    To evaluate the management practice and process of a cataract surgery day ward. From January to December in 2012, a portion of the cataract patients were evaluated for the pattern of day ward management. Methods were as follows: 1) Establish the cataract day ward. 2) Enroll the patients who met the following criteria: voluntary, local residents or outsiders who stayed in a hotel near the hospital, accompanied by family, and who had simple senile cataract without any systemic major diseases. 3) Establish the hospitalization process. 4) Analyze the nursing process. After cataract day surgery, the patients were followed for 2 hours and completed a questionnaire about their needs and sentiments. A total of 3971 cases were observed in this study; 49 cases were switched to a normal pattern of hospitalization because of operative complications, 1 case had a strong desire to switch to a normal pattern of hospitalization because of ocular discomfort, 8 cases went back to the hospital for treatment because of ocular pain, and 52 cases called on the phone to seek help. Overall, 3820 cases(96.2%) returned on time the next day to visit the doctor. No patients showed severe postoperative complications and 98% expressed great satisfaction with the day ward process. Only 200 cases expressed great concern about not knowing how to deal with postoperative pain, the changes in condition outside the hospital, the therapeutic effects, and the problem of expense reimburse-ment. Day ward cataract surgery is an efficient and safe mode, and has the potential to relieve the demand for inpatient beds and to ensure timely treatment of the patients. In addition, it helps the patients enjoy health care at public expense, reserving reimbursement for those who need to be hospitalized. Nurses should pay more attention to systemic evaluation of the patients, health education, and psychological guidance, and keep in close communication with doctors, which is the key to ensure the safety of day ward

  14. Nursing Education Trial Using a Virtual Nightingale Ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, Keiko; Iwata, Naomi; Kodama, Hiromi; Hagiwara, Tomoko; Takai, Kiyako; Sasaki, Yoko; Nagata, Yoshie; Matsumoto, Maki

    2017-01-01

    Nursing department students are expected to correctly grasp the entire concept of nursing through their education. The authors created a movie of a Nightingale ward (virtual ward, hereafter) with an architectural computer design software for education. The students' reaction to the virtual ward was categorized into three viewpoints: that of nurses, of patients, and of nurses and patients in common. Most of the reactions in each viewpoint were: "easy to observe patients" in the nurses' viewpoint; "no privacy" in the patients' viewpoint; and "wide room" in the common viewpoint, respectively. These reactions show the effectiveness of using a virtual ward in nursing education. Because these reactions are characteristics of a Nightingale ward, and even students, who have generally less experiences, recognized these characteristics from the both viewpoints of nurses and patients.

  15. Quantitative Risk Assessment of Patient Manual Handling in Wards of One of the Hospitals of Tehran using MAPO Method, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sajad Ataei

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Manual handling of disabled patients is one of the important and effective factors in acute low back pain among exposed nurses. The present study was conducted with the objective of quantitative risk assessment of patient manual handling among nurses in wards of one of the hospitals in Tehran using MAPO method. Methods: The present study was conducted as an analytical-cross-sectional study in 26 wards of one of the hospitals in Tehran city. Samples were selected by census method from nurses and paramedics of different wards of hospital. Data collection was performed using demographic information and MAPO checklist. Results: The highest score of MAPO were, respectively, related to wards of DI clinic (score, 14.7, men orthopedic (score, 6.3, and general operating room (score, 57. 53.8% of hospital wards were at the level 2 corrective action, which indicated that the risk of musculoskeletal disorder is 2.4 times higher than level 1 corrective action. Conclusion: Given that the proportion of disabled patient in cooperation and/or partial cooperation, lifting tools, auxiliary, wheelchair, and training have the most role among risk factors for above-mentioned wards, increasing the number of human resources and wheelchair, use of lifting and auxiliary tools and training reduce MAPO score and consequently the risk of musculoskeletal disorders.

  16. The ward atmosphere important for the psychosocial work environment of nursing staff in psychiatric in-patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuvesson, Hanna; Wann-Hansson, Christine; Eklund, Mona

    2011-06-16

    The nursing staff working in psychiatric care have a demanding work situation, which may be reflected in how they view their psychosocial work environment and the ward atmosphere. The aims of the present study were to investigate in what way different aspects of the ward atmosphere were related to the psychosocial work environment, as perceived by nursing staff working in psychiatric in-patient care, and possible differences between nurses and nurse assistants. 93 nursing staff working at 12 general psychiatric in-patient wards in Sweden completed two questionnaires, the Ward Atmosphere Scale and the QPSNordic 34+. Data analyses included descriptive statistics, the Mann-Whitney U-test, Spearman rank correlations and forward stepwise conditional logistic regression analyses. The data revealed that there were no differences between nurses and nurse assistants concerning perceptions of the psychosocial work environment and the ward atmosphere. The ward atmosphere subscales Personal Problem Orientation and Program Clarity were associated with a psychosocial work environment characterized by Empowering Leadership. Program Clarity was related to the staff's perceived Role Clarity, and Practical Orientation and Order and Organization were positively related to staff perceptions of the Organizational Climate. The results from the present study indicate that several ward atmosphere subscales were related to the nursing staff's perceptions of the psychosocial work environment in terms of Empowering Leadership, Role Clarity and Organizational Climate. Improvements in the ward atmosphere could be another way to accomplish improvements in the working conditions of the staff, and such improvements would affect nurses and nurse assistants in similar ways.

  17. The ward atmosphere important for the psychosocial work environment of nursing staff in psychiatric in-patient care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wann-Hansson Christine

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The nursing staff working in psychiatric care have a demanding work situation, which may be reflected in how they view their psychosocial work environment and the ward atmosphere. The aims of the present study were to investigate in what way different aspects of the ward atmosphere were related to the psychosocial work environment, as perceived by nursing staff working in psychiatric in-patient care, and possible differences between nurses and nurse assistants. Methods 93 nursing staff working at 12 general psychiatric in-patient wards in Sweden completed two questionnaires, the Ward Atmosphere Scale and the QPSNordic 34+. Data analyses included descriptive statistics, the Mann-Whitney U-test, Spearman rank correlations and forward stepwise conditional logistic regression analyses. Results The data revealed that there were no differences between nurses and nurse assistants concerning perceptions of the psychosocial work environment and the ward atmosphere. The ward atmosphere subscales Personal Problem Orientation and Program Clarity were associated with a psychosocial work environment characterized by Empowering Leadership. Program Clarity was related to the staff's perceived Role Clarity, and Practical Orientation and Order and Organization were positively related to staff perceptions of the Organizational Climate. Conclusions The results from the present study indicate that several ward atmosphere subscales were related to the nursing staff's perceptions of the psychosocial work environment in terms of Empowering Leadership, Role Clarity and Organizational Climate. Improvements in the ward atmosphere could be another way to accomplish improvements in the working conditions of the staff, and such improvements would affect nurses and nurse assistants in similar ways.

  18. Characteristics of aggression among psychiatric inpatients by ward type in Japan: Using the Staff Observation Aggression Scale - Revised (SOAS-R).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Makiko; Noda, Toshie; Sugiyama, Naoya; Yoshihama, Fumihiro; Miyake, Michi; Ito, Hiroto

    2017-12-01

    Aggressive behaviour by psychiatric patients is a serious issue in clinical practice, and adequate management of such behaviour is required, with careful evaluation of the factors causing the aggression. To examine the characteristics of aggressive incidents by ward type, a cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted for 6 months between April 2012 and June 2013 using the Staff Observation Aggression Scale - Revised, Japanese version (SOAS-R) in 30 wards across 20 Japanese psychiatric hospitals. Participating wards were categorized into three types based on the Japanese medical reimbursement system: emergency psychiatric, acute psychiatric, and standard wards (common in Japan, mostly treating non-acute patients). On analyzing the 443 incidents reported, results showed significant differences in SOAS-R responses by ward type. In acute and emergency psychiatric wards, staff members were the most common target of aggression. In acute psychiatric wards, staff requiring patients to take medication was the most common provocation, and verbal aggression was the most commonly used means. In emergency psychiatric wards, victims felt threatened. In contrast, in standard wards, both the target and provocation of aggression were most commonly other patients, hands were used, victims reported experiencing physical pain, and seclusion was applied to stop their behaviour. These findings suggest that ward environment was an important factor influencing aggressive behaviour. Ensuring the quality and safety of psychiatric care requires understanding the characteristics of incidents that staff are likely to encounter in each ward type, as well as implementing efforts to deal with the incidents adequately and improve the treatment environment. © 2016 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  19. Nursing safety management in onco-hematology pediatric wards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelle Miranda da Silva

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed at identifying how safety management is applied by nurses to manage the nursing care, and at analyzing their challenges in onco-hematology pediatric wards. Descriptive and qualitative research, conducted at the Instituto Estadual de Hematologia Arthur de Siqueira Cavalcanti, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, in August 2013. Six nurses were interviewed, and the content analysis was used. The key aspects relate to the importance of training and continuing education, teamwork, with the challenges in the care of hospitalized children and particularities of the disease, and the systematization, use of instruments and protocols. For child safety, the relationship between the administration and support is critical to the quality of care.

  20. As His Day in Court Arrives, Ward Churchill Is Depicted in Sharply Different Lights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Peter

    2009-01-01

    The trial in Ward Churchill's lawsuit against the University of Colorado got under way here last week with lawyers for the opposing sides painting starkly different pictures of both the controversial ethnic-studies professor and the circumstances surrounding his dismissal by the university in 2007. In delivering their opening remarks in a crowded…

  1. Knowledge and awareness of high blood pressure in Ward F, Ifako ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: In Nigeria, most people living with an elevated blood pressure are unaware of it until they suffer complications. The aim of this study was to determine levels of awareness of high blood pressure in Ward F, Ifako-Ijaiye local government area, Lagos, Nigeria. Design: A multistage sampling technique was used to ...

  2. HRM and strategic climates in hospitals: does the message come accross at the ward level?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veld, M.; Paauwe, J.; Boselie, J.P.P.E.F.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined how employees perceive intended strategic goals and HRM at the ward level, and if these perceptions generate the desired effects. The qualitative part of the research reveals that the hospital pursues two strategic goals (i.e. quality and safety). Analysis of the questionnaire

  3. Understanding thermal comfort perception of nurses in a hospital ward work environment.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Derks, M.T.H.; Mishra, A.K.; Loomans, M.G.L.C.; Kort, H.S.M.

    2018-01-01

    In indoor comfort research, thermal comfort of care-professionals in hospital environment is a little explored topic. To address this gap, a mixed methods study, with the nursing staff in hospital wards acting as participants, was undertaken. Responses were collected during three weeks in the summer

  4. Pattern of deaths in medical wards of a rurally situated tertiary health ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Analysis of data was carried out using the simple descriptive statistics with Statistical Packaging for Social Sciences (SPSS Inc. Chicago IL) SPSS version 16 software. Results: A total number of 1456 patients were admitted into the medical wards during the study period and 79 deaths were recorded. Male mortality was 94 ...

  5. Bacteria contamination of touch surfaces in Polish hospital wards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Różańska

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: The objective of the study has been to evaluate the pathogenic bacteria contamination of touch surfaces in hospital wards. Material and Methods: Samples were taken from frequently touched surfaces in the hospital environment in 13 units of various types. Culturing was carried out on solid blood agar and in growth broth (tryptic soy broth – TSB. Species identification was performed using the analytical profile index (API biochemical testing and confirmed with matrix assisted laser desorption ionization time-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS system. Results: The total of 161 samples were taken for the study. Fifty-two of them, after 24 h of culture on a solid medium, demonstrated bacterial growth and further 60 samples had growth after prior multiplication in TSB. Overall, 69.6% of samples exhibited growth of 19 bacterial species. Pathogenic species – representing indicator organisms of efficiency of hospital cleaning – was demonstrated by 21.4% of samples. Among them Acinetobacter spp., Enterocococci spp. and Staphylococcus aureus were identified. Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS were predominant. The proportion of various groups of bacteria significantly varied in respective hospitals, and in various types of wards. Disturbing observation is a large proportion of resistance of isolated CNS strains as a potential reservoir of resistance genes. Conclusions: The results show that touch surfaces in hospital units are contaminated by both potentially pathogenic and pathogenic bacterial species. In connection with the reported, also in Poland, frequent omission or incorrect execution of hand hygiene by hospital staff, and probably patients, touch surfaces still constitute important reservoir of pathogenic bacteria. Improving hand hygiene compliance of health-care workers with recommendations is necessary for increasing biological safety of hospital environment. Med Pr 2017;68(3:459–467

  6. Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Nurses Working in an Open Ward: Stress and Work Satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavoie-Tremblay, Mélanie; Feeley, Nancy; Lavigne, Geneviève L; Genest, Christine; Robins, Stéphanie; Fréchette, Julie

    2016-01-01

    There is some research on the impact of open-ward unit design on the health of babies and the stress experienced by parents and nurses in neonatal intensive care units. However, few studies have explored the factors associated with nurse stress and work satisfaction among nurses practicing in open-ward neonatal intensive care units. The purpose of this study was to examine what factors are associated with nurse stress and work satisfaction among nurses practicing in an open-ward neonatal intensive care unit. A cross-sectional correlational design was used in this study. Participants were nurses employed in a 34-bed open-ward neonatal intensive care unit in a major university-affiliated hospital in Montréal, Quebec, Canada. A total of 94 nurses were eligible, and 86 completed questionnaires (91% response rate). Descriptive statistics were computed to describe the participants' characteristics. To identify factors associated with nurse stress and work satisfaction, correlational analysis and multiple regression analyses were performed with the Nurse Stress Scale and the Global Work Satisfaction scores as the dependent variables. Different factors predict neonatal intensive care unit nurses' stress and job satisfaction, including support, family-centered care, performance obstacles, work schedule, education, and employment status. In order to provide neonatal intensive care units nurses with a supportive environment, managers can provide direct social support to nurses and influence the culture around teamwork.

  7. Inappropriate use of urinary catheters and its common complications in different hospital wards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parivash Davoodian

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Inappropriate use of indwelling urinary catheters (IUCs and their related complications is one of the most important problems in hospital wards. The aim of this study was to evaluate inappropriate use of IUCs and their complications among patients in Tehran, Iran. Two hundred and six consecutive patients hospitalized in the intensive care unit (ICU as well as medical and surgical wards at the Shahid Mohammadi Hospital in Bandarabbas from September 1 to 30, 2005 and in whom IUCs were used, were studied. Data collected included age of the patients, diagnoses, reason for use of IUC and the complications related to it. Overall, 164 patients (79.6% had IUCs used appropriately while 42 of them (20.6% were catheterized unjustifiably. Inappropriate use of IUCs in the ICU, medical and surgical wards was reported in 12 (18.5%, 16 (19.0% and 14 patients (24.6%, respectively. The most common complication of IUCs was urinary tract infection, which occurred in 91 patients (44.2% and hematuria, which was seen in 3.9% of the patients. Our study suggests that inappropriate use of IUCs is prevalent, particularly in the surgical wards, and the most common complication observed was catheter-associated urinary tract infection.

  8. Exploring positive hospital ward soundscape interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackrill, J; Jennings, P; Cain, R

    2014-11-01

    Sound is often considered as a negative aspect of an environment that needs mitigating, particularly in hospitals. It is worthwhile however, to consider how subjective responses to hospital sounds can be made more positive. The authors identified natural sound, steady state sound and written sound source information as having the potential to do this. Listening evaluations were conducted with 24 participants who rated their emotional (Relaxation) and cognitive (Interest and Understanding) response to a variety of hospital ward soundscape clips across these three interventions. A repeated measures ANOVA revealed that the 'Relaxation' response was significantly affected (n(2) = 0.05, p = 0.001) by the interventions with natural sound producing a 10.1% more positive response. Most interestingly, written sound source information produced a 4.7% positive change in response. The authors conclude that exploring different ways to improve the sounds of a hospital offers subjective benefits that move beyond sound level reduction. This is an area for future work to focus upon in an effort to achieve more positively experienced hospital soundscapes and environments. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  9. iPad use at the bedside: a tool for engaging patients in care processes during ward rounds?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baysari, M T; Adams, K; Lehnbom, E C; Westbrook, J I; Day, R O

    2014-10-01

    Previous work has examined the impact of technology on information sharing and communication between doctors and patients in general practice consultations, but very few studies have explored this in hospital settings. To assess if, and how, senior clinicians use an iPad to share information (e.g. patient test results) with patients during ward rounds and to explore patients' and doctors' experiences of information sharing events. Ten senior doctors were shadowed on ward rounds on general wards during interactions with 525 patients over 77.3 h, seven senior doctors were interviewed and 180 patients completed a short survey. Doctors reported that information sharing with patients is critical to the delivery of high-quality healthcare, but were not seen to use the iPad to share information with patients on ward rounds. Patients did not think the iPad had impacted on their engagement with doctors on rounds. Ward rounds were observed to follow set routines and patient interactions were brief. Although the iPad potentially creates new opportunities for information sharing and patient engagement, the ward round may not present the most appropriate context for this to be done. © 2014 The Authors; Internal Medicine Journal © 2014 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  10. Effectiveness of hospital-wide methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA infection control policies differs by ward specialty.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosemarie Sadsad

    Full Text Available Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA is a major cause of preventable nosocomial infections and is endemic in hospitals worldwide. The effectiveness of infection control policies varies significantly across hospital settings. The impact of the hospital context towards the rate of nosocomial MRSA infections and the success of infection control is understudied. We conducted a modelling study to evaluate several infection control policies in surgical, intensive care, and medical ward specialties, each with distinct ward conditions and policies, of a tertiary public hospital in Sydney, Australia. We reconfirm hand hygiene as the most successful policy and find it to be necessary for the success of other policies. Active screening for MRSA, patient isolation in single-bed rooms, and additional staffing were found to be less effective. Across these ward specialties, MRSA transmission risk varied by 13% and reductions in the prevalence and nosocomial incidence rate of MRSA due to infection control policies varied by up to 45%. Different levels of infection control were required to reduce and control nosocomial MRSA infections for each ward specialty. Infection control policies and policy targets should be specific for the ward and context of the hospital. The model we developed is generic and can be calibrated to represent different ward settings and pathogens transmitted between patients indirectly through health care workers. This can aid the timely and cost effective design of synergistic and context specific infection control policies.

  11. Analysis of Ward identities in supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Sajid; Bergner, Georg; Gerber, Henning; Montvay, Istvan; Münster, Gernot; Piemonte, Stefano; Scior, Philipp

    2018-05-01

    In numerical investigations of supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory on a lattice, the supersymmetric Ward identities are valuable for finding the critical value of the hopping parameter and for examining the size of supersymmetry breaking by the lattice discretisation. In this article we present an improved method for the numerical analysis of supersymmetric Ward identities, which takes into account the correlations between the various observables involved. We present the first complete analysis of supersymmetric Ward identities in N=1 supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory with gauge group SU(3). The results indicate that lattice artefacts scale to zero as O(a^2) towards the continuum limit in agreement with theoretical expectations.

  12. Factors impacting perceived safety among staff working on mental health wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines, Alina; Brown, Andrew; McCabe, Rhiannah; Rogerson, Michelle; Whittington, Richard

    2017-09-01

    Safety at work is a core issue for mental health staff working on in-patient units. At present, there is a limited theoretical base regarding which factors may affect staff perceptions of safety. This study attempted to identify which factors affect perceived staff safety working on in-patient mental health wards. A cross-sectional design was employed across 101 forensic and non-forensic mental health wards, over seven National Health Service trusts nationally. Measures included an online staff survey, Ward Features Checklist and recorded incident data. Data were analysed using categorical principal components analysis and ordinal regression. Perceptions of staff safety were increased by ward brightness, higher number of patient beds, lower staff to patient ratios, less dayroom space and more urban views. The findings from this study do not represent common-sense assumptions. Results are discussed in the context of the literature and may have implications for current initiatives aimed at managing in-patient violence and aggression. None. © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2017. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license.

  13. Transfers from intensive care unit to hospital ward: a multicentre textual analysis of physician progress notes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Kyla N; Leigh, Jeanna Parsons; Kamran, Hasham; Bagshaw, Sean M; Fowler, Rob A; Dodek, Peter M; Turgeon, Alexis F; Forster, Alan J; Lamontagne, Francois; Soo, Andrea; Stelfox, Henry T

    2018-01-28

    Little is known about documentation during transitions of patient care between clinical specialties. Therefore, we examined the focus, structure and purpose of physician progress notes for patients transferred from the intensive care unit (ICU) to hospital ward to identify opportunities to improve communication breaks. This was a prospective cohort study in ten Canadian hospitals. We analyzed physician progress notes for consenting adult patients transferred from a medical-surgical ICU to hospital ward. The number, length, legibility and content of notes was counted and compared across care settings using mixed-effects linear regression models accounting for clustering within hospitals. Qualitative content analyses were conducted on a stratified random sample of 32 patients. A total of 447 patient medical records that included 7052 progress notes (mean 2.1 notes/patient/day 95% CI 1.9-2.3) were analyzed. Notes written by the ICU team were significantly longer than notes written by the ward team (mean lines of text 21 vs. 15, p notes; mean agreement of patient issues was 42% [95% CI 31-53%]. Qualitative analyses identified eight themes related to focus (central point - e.g., problem list), structure (organization, - e.g., note-taking style), and purpose (intention - e.g., documentation of patient course) of the notes that varied across clinical specialties and physician seniority. Important gaps and variations in written documentation during transitions of patient care between ICU and hospital ward physicians are common, and include discrepancies in documentation of patient information.

  14. Improving the Quality of Ward-based Surgical Care With a Human Factors Intervention Bundle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Maximilian J; Arora, Sonal; King, Dominic; Darzi, Ara

    2018-01-01

    This study aimed to explore the impact of a human factors intervention bundle on the quality of ward-based surgical care in a UK hospital. Improving the culture of a surgical team is a difficult task. Engagement with stakeholders before intervention is key. Studies have shown that appropriate supervision can enhance surgical ward safety. A pre-post intervention study was conducted. The intervention bundle consisted of twice-daily attending ward rounds, a "chief resident of the week" available at all times on the ward, an escalation of care protocol and team contact cards. Twenty-seven junior and senior surgeons completed validated questionnaires assessing supervision, escalation of care, and safety culture pre and post-intervention along with interviews to further explore the impact of the intervention. Patient outcomes pre and postintervention were also analyzed. Questionnaires revealed significant improvements in supervision postintervention (senior median pre 5 vs post 7, P = 0.002 and junior 4 vs 6, P = 0.039) and senior surgeon approachability (junior 5 vs 6, P = 0.047). Both groups agreed that they would feel safer as a patient in their hospital postintervention (senior 3 vs 4.5, P = 0.021 and junior 3 vs 4, P = 0.034). The interviews confirmed that the safety culture of the department had improved. There were no differences in inpatient mortality, cardiac arrest, reoperation, or readmission rates pre and postintervention. Improving supervision and introducing clear protocols can improve safety culture on the surgical ward. Future work should evaluate the effect these measures have on patient outcomes in multiple institutions.

  15. The construct validity of the Spanish version of the ABQ using a multi-trait/multi-method approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas D. Raedeke

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to evaluate construct validity evidence associated with the Spanish version of the Athlete Burnout Questionnaire (ABQ using a multi-trait/multi-method (MTMM approach. The ABQ was administered to a sample of 302 Spanish athletes, along with two other questionnaires including the Maslach Burnout Inventory-General Survey (MBI-GS and the Depression, Anxiety, Stress Scale (DASS-21, which respectively measure burnout in organizational settings and indicators of ill being including depression, anxiety and stress. A structural equation modeling approach to a MTMM analysis was used. Results revealed by comparative analysis of four models that the Spanish version of ABQ has convergent and internal discriminant validity evident by high correlations between matching burnout subscales across two measures and lower correlations between non-matching dimensions. In addition, the burnout measures exhibited external discriminant validity as the correlations between burnout dimensions were higher than those seen between conceptually related, but unique, constructs.

  16. Developing skills in clinical leadership for ward sisters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenton, Katherine; Phillips, Natasha

    The Francis report has called for a strengthening of the ward sister's role. It recommends that sisters should operate in a supervisory capacity and should not be office bound. Effective ward leadership has been recognised as being vital to high-quality patient care and experience, resource management and interprofessional working. However, there is evidence that ward sisters are ill equipped to lead effectively and lack confidence in their ability to do so. University College London Hospitals Foundation Trust has recognised that the job has become almost impossible in increasingly large and complex organisations. Ward sisters spend less than 40% of their time on clinical leadership and the trust is undertaking a number of initiatives to support them in this role.

  17. audit of blood transfusion practices in the paediatric medical ward

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-01-01

    Jan 1, 2013 ... AUDIT OF BLOOD TRANSFUSION PRACTICES IN THE PAEDIATRIC MEDICAL WARD OF A TERTIARY ..... services and even where available, beneficiaries have ... due to lack of existence of quality assurance protocol.

  18. The N=2 supersymmetric Ward-identities on harmonic superspace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lhallabi, T.

    1986-09-01

    The quantization of N=2 supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory coupled to matter hypermultiplet has been done in the harmonic superspace, by requiring BRS and anti-BRS invariance. Also the corresponding Ward-identities have been derived. (author)

  19. Weather Augmented Risk Determination (WARD) System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niknejad, M.; Mazdiyasni, O.; Momtaz, F.; AghaKouchak, A.

    2017-12-01

    Extreme climatic events have direct and indirect impacts on society, economy and the environment. Based on the United States Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA) data, over one third of the U.S. GDP can be considered as weather-sensitive involving some degree of weather risk. This expands from a local scale concrete foundation construction to large scale transportation systems. Extreme and unexpected weather conditions have always been considered as one of the probable risks to human health, productivity and activities. The construction industry is a large sector of the economy, and is also greatly influenced by weather-related risks including work stoppage and low labor productivity. Identification and quantification of these risks, and providing mitigation of their effects are always the concerns of construction project managers. In addition to severe weather conditions' destructive effects, seasonal changes in weather conditions can also have negative impacts on human health. Work stoppage and reduced labor productivity can be caused by precipitation, wind, temperature, relative humidity and other weather conditions. Historical and project-specific weather information can improve better project management and mitigation planning, and ultimately reduce the risk of weather-related conditions. This paper proposes new software for project-specific user-defined data analysis that offers (a) probability of work stoppage and the estimated project length considering weather conditions; (b) information on reduced labor productivity and its impacts on project duration; and (c) probabilistic information on the project timeline based on both weather-related work stoppage and labor productivity. The software (WARD System) is designed such that it can be integrated into the already available project management tools. While the system and presented application focuses on the construction industry, the developed software is general and can be used for any application that involves

  20. Assessing metacognition of grade 2 and grade 4 students using an adaptation of multi-method interview approach during mathematics problem-solving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzle, A.

    2018-06-01

    The important role that metacognition plays as a predictor for student mathematical learning and for mathematical problem-solving, has been extensively documented. But only recently has attention turned to primary grades, and more research is needed at this level. The goals of this paper are threefold: (1) to present metacognitive framework during mathematics problem-solving, (2) to describe their multi-method interview approach developed to study student mathematical metacognition, and (3) to empirically evaluate the utility of their model and the adaptation of their approach in the context of grade 2 and grade 4 mathematics problem-solving. The results are discussed not only with regard to further development of the adapted multi-method interview approach, but also with regard to their theoretical and practical implications.

  1. Ward identities for scale and special conformal transformations in inflation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kundu, Nilay; Shukla, Ashish; Trivedi, Sandip P.

    2016-01-01

    We derive the general Ward identities for scale and special conformal transformations in theories of single field inflation. Our analysis is model independent and based on symmetry considerations alone. The identities we obtain are valid to all orders in the slow roll expansion. For special conformal transformations, the Ward identities include a term which is non-linear in the fields that arises due to a compensating spatial reparametrization. Some observational consequences are also discussed.

  2. Rolling out Productive Ward foundation modules across a hospital trust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Sam; Gordon, Pete; McSherry, Wilfred

    The Shrewsbury and Telford Hospitals NHS Trust has spent the last 12 months rolling out the Productive Ward foundation modules across the whole organisation. This has resulted in measurable increases in time spent on direct care, and reduced infection rates and ward non-pay (non-staffing) expenditure. This article discusses the initiative and looks at how problems with the hospital supply chain are being addressed.

  3. Comparative Assessment of Patients’ Rights Observance in the Hospitalization Wards of Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences’ Hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sharifi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patients are one of the most vulnerable social groups. Respecting patients’ rights will lead in advantages like “decrease in hospitalization time” and “increase in patients’ satisfaction”. This study is performed to assess the patients' rights observance in the hospitalization wards of educational hospitals of Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences. Methods: In this descriptive-cross sectional study 137 medical student (intern were selected by convenience sampling method. We used a questionnaire with 12 questions. Reliability of questionnaire was confirmed by experts of the field and validity was confirmed by Cronbach’s Alpha coefficient (81%. The obtained data were analyzed by SPSS (v21 using descriptive statistics, analysis of variance and Tukey test. Findings: In this study the observance rate of patients’ rights was at a good level in 41.6% of cases, at an average level in 55.5% of cases and at a low level in 2.9% of cases. There was a significant difference between several hospitalization wards in the observance rate of patients’ rights. (p = 0.001. The observance rate of patients’ rights in infectious disease ward and gynecology ward was at a lower level in comparison with other wards. Conclusion: The observance rate of patients’ rights was at an average to good level in most of hospitalization ward. However this observance rate is at a low level in some wards. More studies about the causes of these differences can help us in planning about improvement of patients’ rights observance.

  4. Identifying the nontechnical skills required of nurses in general surgical wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Dianne C; Finlayson, Mary P

    2018-04-01

    To identify the nontechnical skills (NTS) required of nurses in general surgical wards for safe and effective care. As the largest occupational group, nurses are in an ideal position to block the vulnerabilities of patient adverse events in a surgical ward. Previous studies in the surgical environment have identified the NTS required of nurses for safe care in operating rooms; however, these skills have not been identified for nurses in general surgical wards. A nonparticipant observational descriptive design was used. A purposive sample of 15 registered nurses was recruited from four surgical wards and observed for a full shift on a morning, afternoon or night shift. Nonparticipant observations were conducted using field notes to collect data. A coding frame was developed, and an inductive process was used to analyse the data. A taxonomy comprising seven NTS required of nurses in their roles in surgical ward teams emerged from the data analysis. They are communication, leadership and management, planning, decision-making, situation awareness, teamwork and patient advocacy. Patient care provided by general surgical nurses involved the seven identified key NTS. These particular NTS are an important component of safe nursing practice as they underpin the provision of safe and effective care for general surgical patients. Nurses block the trajectory of error by using NTS to address the vulnerabilities in the system that can lead to adverse patient events. Identifying general surgical nurses' NTS enables the development of teaching strategies that target the learning of those skills to achieve successful work outcomes and improve patient safety. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Nurses experiences regarding staffing patterns in the surgical wards of a private hospital in Gauteng South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moloko Malatji

    2017-12-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to explore and describe nurses' experiences regarding staffing patterns in the surgical wards of a private hospital in Gauteng in order to develop recommendations for staffing patterns in these wards. Methodology: A qualitative, exploratory, descriptive and contextual research design was used. Data was collected by means of in-depth semi structured individual interviews from a purposive sample of professional nurses working in the surgical wards of this hospital. Data was analysed using Tesch's method of qualitative thematic analysis. Principles of trustworthiness and ethical principles to ensure the protection of human rights were applied throughout the study. Results: The findings of the study revealed one central theme which reflected that participants experienced the staffing patterns of the surgical wards negatively. Two main themes emerged as, nurses had negative experiences in the surgical wards as well as negative emotional experiences related to the staffing patterns. Conclusion: It is evident from the findings of the study that nurses are experiencing staffing patterns negatively.

  6. Malnutrition and nutritional care practices in hospital wards for older people

    OpenAIRE

    Vanderwee, Katrien; Clays, Els; Bocquaert, Ilse; Verhaeghe, Sofie; Lardennois, Miguel; Gobert, Micheline; Defloor, Tom

    2010-01-01

    AIMS: This paper is a report of a study conducted to gain a better insight into the current nutritional care practices in Belgian hospital wards for older people, and to study the association between these practices and the prevalence of malnutrition. BACKGROUND: In 1999, the Council of Europe assessed nutritional care practices and support in 12 European countries and showed them to be sparse and inconsistent. At the time of research, no studies had described the association between nutritio...

  7. A Smartphone Application for Personalized and Multi-Method Interventions toward Energy Saving in Buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peeraya Inyim

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Occupant behavior is a significant contributor to energy waste in buildings. This research introduces an advanced smartphone application, developed based on the theoretical underpinnings of situational awareness theory, to effectively implement multi-method and personalized intervention to encourage energy conservation behaviors of building occupants. The new smart application provides several innovative features, such as energy saving points, customized feedback, and visualized user interface, which are implemented in the application to support multi-method interventions. The application was created using the Java language for Android devices. With the use of the Android platform, the app takes advantage of hardware technology from the user’s mobile device. Measurement of occupancy behavior is accomplished by making use of the device’s positional sensors. Orientation and geomagnetic field sensors serve to provide an accurate location of an occupant inside the building. The application can determine energy waste in a zone by using occupancy behavior. Moreover, the application offers real-time and projected future energy consumption based on occupants’ behaviors. This novel feature can significantly improve communication that can lead to prompt action for building energy reduction. Results show how the app can compile raw data on energy behavior and make it easy to understand for the user through the use of visuals and statistical algorithms.

  8. [Perceiving gender or profession: the practical experience of male nursing students in the obstetrics and gynecology ward].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ya-Fen; Yang, Yu-O; Tu, Chia-Ling

    2013-06-01

    The impact of general gender stereotypes on nursing is severe and influential, especially with regard to male nursing students working in obstetrics and gynecology wards. This study examined the experience of male nursing students in obstetrics and gynecology wards. We used a phenomenological qualitative research approach and a sample of 10 male nursing students currently studying at a nursing college in central Taiwan. All participants had obstetrics and gynecology ward experience. Individual interviews were transcribed into the procedural record. Colaizzi content analysis analyzed and categorized research data. Based on participants practical experiences in the obstetrics and gynecology ward, the main stages of participants professional development through their internship experience included: (1) Unbalanced self-role recognition; (2) being defined by the gender framework (gender stereotypes); (3) the difference between male doctor and male nurse; (4) learning appropriate communication techniques; (5) mutual and empathetic understanding of the female psychology during childbirth; (6) gaining sources for positive feedback; (7) releasing the shackles of gender and gaining full insight into and comprehension of nursing functions; and (8) given the opportunity to learn. Through ongoing examination and learning, participant internships in the obstetrics and gynecology wards were significant and essential learning experiences that validated their necessity. Nursing schools and internship institutions alike must realize the importance of gender-equality education to the nursing profession. Medical institutions are encouraged to offer equal learning opportunities to male and female nursing students and provide targeted assistance to males to help them master clinical nursing care practices in the obstetrics and gynecology department.

  9. Monitoring of airborne bacteria and aerosols in different wards of hospitals - Particle counting usefulness in investigation of airborne bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirhoseini, Seyed Hamed; Nikaeen, Mahnaz; Khanahmd, Hossein; Hatamzadeh, Maryam; Hassanzadeh, Akbar

    2015-01-01

    The presence of airborne bacteria in hospital environments is of great concern because of their potential role as a source of hospital-acquired infections (HAI). The aim of this study was the determination and comparison of the concentration of airborne bacteria in different wards of four educational hospitals, and evaluation of whether particle counting could be predictive of airborne bacterial concentration in different wards of a hospital. The study was performed in an operating theatre (OT), intensive care unit (ICU), surgery ward (SW) and internal medicine (IM) ward of four educational hospitals in Isfahan, Iran. A total of 80 samples were analyzed for the presence of airborne bacteria and particle levels. The average level of bacteria ranged from 75-1194 CFU/m (3) . Mean particle levels were higher than class 100,000 cleanrooms in all wards. A significant correlation was observed between the numbers of 1-5 µm particles and levels of airborne bacteria in operating theatres and ICUs. The results showed that factors which may influence the airborne bacterial level in hospital environments should be properly managed to minimize the risk of HAIs especially in operating theaters. Microbial air contamination of hospital settings should be performed by the monitoring of airborne bacteria, but particle counting could be considered as a good operative method for the continuous monitoring of air quality in operating theaters and ICUs where higher risks of infection are suspected.

  10. [Specificity of the anaerobic bacterial infections in the surgical and orthopedic wards].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kierzkowska, Marta; Majewska, Anna; Sawicka-Grzelak, Anna; Młynarczyk, Andrzej; Ładomirska-Pestkowska, Katarzvna; Młynarczyk, Grazyna

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the contribution strictly anaerobic bacteria in the etiology of infections in patients on surgery and orthopedic wards. We examined 159 samples taken from patients hospitalized in surgical wards and 179 clinical specimens taken from orthopedic patients. Clinical strains of obligate anaerobes were identified by API 20A biochemical tests (ATB Expression, bioMerieux S.A., France). Susceptibility of the clinical strains was examined by ATB ANA (bioMerieux S.A., France) system. The MIC values were determined by the gradient diffusion method, Etest (AB BIODISK, Sweden i bioMerieux S.A., France). Gram-negative bacteria predominant in the samples taken from surgical patients, Most frequently we isolated rods of the genus Bacteroides (26%): B. fragilis, B. ovatus/B. thetaiotaomicron, and B. distasonis. In 44 samples (28%) we identified only anaerobic bacteria. Multibacterial isolations, with the participation of anaerobic and aerobic flora, dominated among patients in the study. Overall 238 strictly anaerobic bacteria were cultured from patients hospitalized in orthopedic wards. Gram-positive bacteria accounted for 78%. The most frequently were isolated Peptostreptococcus (56%), Propionibacterium (10%) species. In this study all Bacteroides strains were resistant to penicillin G. Some species were resistant to clindamycin, as well. Overall 40% of Bacteroides strains taken from surgical and 50% isolated from orthopedic wards showed no sensitivity to this antibiotic. A similar phenomenon was observed among bacteria of the genus Prevotella. In samples taken from orthopedic patients we observed the predominance of Gram-positive anaerobic bacteria. Some of them were part of the normal flora but they should not be excluded as an etiology agents of infection. The specimens taken from patients treated in surgical wards showed the presence of a mixed microflora, which included aerobic and anaerobic bacteria, primarily Gram-negative rods

  11. Medication reconciliation and prescribing reviews by pharmacy technicians in a geriatric ward

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buck, Thomas Croft; Gronkjaer, Louise Smed; Duckert, Marie-Louise

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Incomplete medication histories obtained on hospital admission are responsible for more than 25% of prescribing errors. This study aimed to evaluate whether pharmacy technicians can assist hospital physicians' in obtaining medication histories by performing medication reconciliation an...... reconciliation and focused medication reviews. Further randomized, controlled studies including a larger number of patients are required to elucidate whether these observations are of significance and of importance for securing patient safety....... and prescribing reviews. A secondary aim was to evaluate whether the interventions made by pharmacy technicians could reduce the time spent by the nurses on administration of medications to the patients. METHODS: This observational study was conducted over a 7 week period in the geriatric ward at Odense...... University Hospital, Denmark. Two pharmacy technicians conducted medication reconciliation and prescribing reviews at the time of patients' admission to the ward. The reviews were conducted according to standard operating procedures developed by a clinical pharmacist and approved by the Head of the Geriatric...

  12. Senile anorexia in acute-ward and rehabilitations settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donini, L M; Savina, C; Piredda, M; Cucinotta, D; Fiorito, A; Inelmen, E M; Sergi, G; Domiguez, L J; Barbagallo, M; Cannella, C

    2008-10-01

    The most common pathological change in eating behaviour among older persons is anorexia, which accounts for a large percent of undernutrition in older adults. The main research aims are to determine, in a sample of acute and rehabilitation elderly subjects, the prevalence of anorexia of aging and the causes most impacting on senile anorexia. four different Units cooperated to this research study. Patients were recruited from geriatric acute and rehabilitation wards in Italy. Each Research Unit, for the estimation of the prevalence of anorexia in elderly subjects evaluated all the patients aged over 65 recruited from April 2006 to June 2007. Nutritional status, depression, social, functional and cognitive status, quality of life, health status, chewing, swallowing, sensorial functions were evaluated in anorexic patients and in a sample of "normal eating" elderly subjects. 96 anorexic subjects were selected in acute and rehabilitation wards (66 women; 81.5 +/- 7 years; 30 men: 81.8 +/- 8 years. The prevalence of anorexia in the sample was 33.3% in women and 26.7% in men. Anorexic subjects were older and more frequently needed help for shopping and cooking. A higher (although not statistically significant) level of comorbidity was present in anorexic subjects. These subjects reported constipation and epigastrium pain more frequently. Nutritional status parameters (MNA, anthropometry, blood parameters) were significantly worst in anorexic subjects whereas CRP was higher. Chewing and swallowing efficiencies were significantly impaired and eating patterns were different for anorexic subjects with a significant reduction of protein rich foods. consequences of anorexia can be extremely serious and deeply affect both patient's mobility, mortality and quality of life. Therefore, it is of utmost importance to perform a special evaluation of the nutritional risk, to constantly evaluate the nutritional status and feeding intake of older patients, to identify and treat the

  13. Pharmacy sales data versus ward stock accounting for the surveillance of broad-spectrum antibiotic use in hospitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Antibiotic consumption in hospitals is commonly measured using the accumulated amount of drugs delivered from the pharmacy to ward held stocks. The reliability of this method, particularly the impact of the length of the registration periods, has not been evaluated and such evaluation was aim of the study. Methods During 26 weeks, we performed a weekly ward stock count of use of broad-spectrum antibiotics - that is second- and third-generation cephalosporins, carbapenems, and quinolones - in five hospital wards and compared the data with corresponding pharmacy sales figures during the same period. Defined daily doses (DDDs) for antibiotics were used as measurement units (WHO ATC/DDD classification). Consumption figures obtained with the two methods for different registration intervals were compared by use of intraclass correlation analysis and Bland-Altman statistics. Results Broad-spectrum antibiotics accounted for a quarter to one-fifth of all systemic antibiotics (ATC group J01) used in the hospital and varied between wards, from 12.8 DDDs per 100 bed days in a urological ward to 24.5 DDDs in a pulmonary diseases ward. For the entire study period of 26 weeks, the pharmacy and ward defined daily doses figures for all broad-spectrum antibiotics differed only by 0.2%; however, for single wards deviations varied from -4.3% to 6.9%. The intraclass correlation coefficient, pharmacy versus ward data, increased from 0.78 to 0.94 for parenteral broad-spectrum antibiotics with increasing registration periods (1-4 weeks), whereas the corresponding figures for oral broad-spectrum antibiotics (ciprofloxacin) were from 0.46 to 0.74. For all broad-spectrum antibiotics and for parenteral antibiotics, limits of agreement between the two methods showed, according to Bland-Altman statistics, a deviation of ± 5% or less from average mean DDDs at 3- and 4-weeks registration intervals. Corresponding deviation for oral antibiotics was ± 21% at a 4-weeks interval

  14. Pharmacy sales data versus ward stock accounting for the surveillance of broad-spectrum antibiotic use in hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haug, Jon B; Myhr, Randi; Reikvam, Asmund

    2011-12-13

    Antibiotic consumption in hospitals is commonly measured using the accumulated amount of drugs delivered from the pharmacy to ward held stocks. The reliability of this method, particularly the impact of the length of the registration periods, has not been evaluated and such evaluation was aim of the study. During 26 weeks, we performed a weekly ward stock count of use of broad-spectrum antibiotics--that is second- and third-generation cephalosporins, carbapenems, and quinolones--in five hospital wards and compared the data with corresponding pharmacy sales figures during the same period. Defined daily doses (DDDs) for antibiotics were used as measurement units (WHO ATC/DDD classification). Consumption figures obtained with the two methods for different registration intervals were compared by use of intraclass correlation analysis and Bland-Altman statistics. Broad-spectrum antibiotics accounted for a quarter to one-fifth of all systemic antibiotics (ATC group J01) used in the hospital and varied between wards, from 12.8 DDDs per 100 bed days in a urological ward to 24.5 DDDs in a pulmonary diseases ward. For the entire study period of 26 weeks, the pharmacy and ward defined daily doses figures for all broad-spectrum antibiotics differed only by 0.2%; however, for single wards deviations varied from -4.3% to 6.9%. The intraclass correlation coefficient, pharmacy versus ward data, increased from 0.78 to 0.94 for parenteral broad-spectrum antibiotics with increasing registration periods (1-4 weeks), whereas the corresponding figures for oral broad-spectrum antibiotics (ciprofloxacin) were from 0.46 to 0.74. For all broad-spectrum antibiotics and for parenteral antibiotics, limits of agreement between the two methods showed, according to Bland-Altman statistics, a deviation of ± 5% or less from average mean DDDs at 3- and 4-weeks registration intervals. Corresponding deviation for oral antibiotics was ± 21% at a 4-weeks interval. There is a need for caution in

  15. Food work and feeding assistance on hospital wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaven, Ben; Bamford, Claire; May, Carl; Moynihan, Paula

    2013-05-01

    Approximately 60 per cent of UK patients aged 65 years or older are at risk of malnutrition or their situation worsening while in hospital. We report the results of a qualitative study embedded in research to prevent malnutrition in older people in hospital (the mappmal study). Our aim was to understand and describe processes that promote or inhibit nutrition in hospital. Throughout 2009 we examined meal services at four UK hospital sites across two regional locations, focusing on older patients admitted with dementia, for stroke or for fractured neck of femur. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews with National Health Service staff (n = 54), stakeholders (n = 6), and a focus group with former patients and carers (n = 5). We identified ward-based food work as a technical and interpersonal challenge in narratives around malnutrition. Food work constituted two overlapping spheres of activity: interpersonal engagement through feeding assistance and reassurance and the arrangement of resources that facilitate meals such as the preparation of food trolleys. Our analysis is framed by the literature on emotional labour, dirty work and the professionalisation of nursing. We demonstrate how food work is overlooked by being conceptualised as common sense and as one of the most mundane and elementary tasks in hospitals. © 2012 The Authors. Sociology of Health & Illness © 2012 Foundation for the Sociology of Health & Illness/Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  16. Patients' experiences of postoperative intermediate care and standard surgical ward care after emergency abdominal surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Thordis; Vester-Andersen, Morten; Nielsen, Martin Vedel

    2015-01-01

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To elicit knowledge of patient experiences of postoperative intermediate care in an intensive care unit and standard postoperative care in a surgical ward after emergency abdominal surgery. BACKGROUND: Emergency abdominal surgery is common, but little is known about how patie......, intermediate care patients felt hindered in doing so by continuous monitoring of vital signs. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: Intermediate care may increase patient perceptions of quality and safety of care.......AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To elicit knowledge of patient experiences of postoperative intermediate care in an intensive care unit and standard postoperative care in a surgical ward after emergency abdominal surgery. BACKGROUND: Emergency abdominal surgery is common, but little is known about how...... patients experience postoperative care. The patient population is generally older with multiple comorbidities, and the short-term postoperative mortality rate is 15-20%. Thus, vigilant surgeon and nursing attention is essential. The present study is a qualitative sub-study of a randomised trial evaluating...

  17. Knowledge and Prevention of Nosocomial Infection among Ward Nurses at Federal Medical Centre, Umuahia, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oti A. Aja

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This research was conducted for estimating the knowledge and prevention of nosocomial infection among ward nurses at Federal Medical Centre (FMC, Umuahia Abia state. Four objectives were set, and four questions were formulated. A descriptive survey research method was used for the study. A sample size of one hundred and fifty (150 nurses was drawn from eight wards (medical and surgical, at FMC, Umuahia. A self-developed questionnaire with seventeen (17 structured questions was the instrument of data collection. Data were collected, analyzed, and presented in tables, pie chart, bar chart, histogram, and percentages. The results revealed that the nurses were well knowledgeable about nosocomial infection, although little deficiencies existed in the area of infection control practice and compliance, such as hand washing frequency. This study therefore recommends continuing education/seminar/workshop for all health care givers, to sensitize them with the knowledge and practice of nosocomial infection.

  18. Integrating psychology and obstetrics for medical students: shared labour ward teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalmers, B E; McIntyre, J A

    1993-01-01

    Two studies relating to the inclusion of psycho-social issues in the training of obstetricians are reported here. The first reports on the extent to which currently practising obstetricians have received training in these aspects. The second explored the value of an innovative teaching approach combining psychological and obstetric training for medical students in the labour ward. A postal survey with responses from 220 obstetricians and paediatricians revealed that little information on psychological aspects of obstetric practice had been included in their undergraduate or postgraduate training or obtained from voluntary continuing education programmes. Experience was the primary source of training in these subjects. The second study explored the impact of joint psychological and obstetric teaching ward rounds for medical students. Students attending these integrated sessions reported being better prepared for the psycho-social aspects of obstetrics and showed a greater awareness of cross-cultural differences in needs of women during birth.

  19. Non-perturbative construction of the Luttinger-Ward functional

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.Potthoff

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available For a system of correlated electrons, the Luttinger-Ward functional provides a link between static thermodynamic quantities on the one hand and single-particle excitations on the other. The functional is useful in deriving several general properties of the system as well as in formulating the thermodynamically consistent approximations. Its original construction, however, is perturbative as it is based on the weak-coupling skeleton-diagram expansion. Here, it is shown that the Luttinger-Ward functional can be derived within a general functional-integral approach. This alternative and non-perturbative approach stresses the fact that the Luttinger-Ward functional is universal for a large class of models.

  20. Generalized on-shell ward identities in string theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jen-Chi

    1994-01-01

    It is demonstrated that an infinite set of string-tree level on-shell Ward identities, which are valid to all σ-model loop orders, can be systematically constructed without referring to the string field theory. As examples, bosonic massive scattering amplitudes are calculated explicitly up to the second massive excited states. Ward identities satisfied by these amplitudes are derived by using zero-norm states in the spectrum. In particular, the inter-particle Ward identity generated by the D 2 xD 2' zero-norm state at the second massive level is demonstrated. The four physical propagating states of this mass level are then shown to form a large gauge multiplet. This result justifies our previous consideration on higher inter-spin symmetry from the generalized worldsheet σ-model point of view. (author)

  1. Generalized ward identities for non-local transformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Ziping; Li Ruijie

    2002-01-01

    Based on the phase-space generating functional of Green function for a system with a singular higher-order Lagrangian, the generalized canonical Ward identities under the local and non-local transformation in phase space for such a system have been derived. Starting from the configuration-space generating functional for a gauge-invariant system, the generalized Ward identities were deduced under the local, non-local and global transformation, respectively. The applications to the non-Abelian Chern-Simons theories with higher derivatives were given. Some relationships among the proper vertices have been deduced, in which one does not need to carry out the integration over canonical momenta in phase-space generating functional. The Ward-Takahashi identities for BRS transformation are also obtained

  2. Ward Identity and Scattering Amplitudes for Nonlinear Sigma Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Ian; Yin, Zhewei

    2018-02-01

    We present a Ward identity for nonlinear sigma models using generalized nonlinear shift symmetries, without introducing current algebra or coset space. The Ward identity constrains correlation functions of the sigma model such that the Adler's zero is guaranteed for S -matrix elements, and gives rise to a subleading single soft theorem that is valid at the quantum level and to all orders in the Goldstone decay constant. For tree amplitudes, the Ward identity leads to a novel Berends-Giele recursion relation as well as an explicit form of the subleading single soft factor. Furthermore, interactions of the cubic biadjoint scalar theory associated with the single soft limit, which was previously discovered using the Cachazo-He-Yuan representation of tree amplitudes, can be seen to emerge from matrix elements of conserved currents corresponding to the generalized shift symmetry.

  3. Correlative degree and collective side ward flow of final state particles in high energy heavy ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Weigang

    1999-01-01

    A concept of correlative degree is proposed. Using the method of particle-group correlation's function, the effects of the particles with different correlative degrees on collective side ward flow are studied for 1.2A GeV Ar + Bal 2 collisions at the Bevalac stream chamber. The studies indicate that correlative degree is an important parameter on describing collective side ward flow properties. The minority of correlative particles (or fragments) with larger correlative degrees can produce the effect arising from the collective side ward flow, but the effect arising from high-order collective flow correlations can not be dominated by these minority of particles (or fragments). It is results from the collective contribution of the majority of collective particles (or fragments) with various correlative degrees

  4. Enabling coordination within medical settings: case of a maternity ward

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fouzi LEZZAR

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This study evaluates the planning process issues in healthcare institutions that can be considered as a high risk environment. Most recent healthcare research has focused on methods mainly based on communication, rather than collaboration supports. Material Methods: We followed then a collaborative-based planning approach which constitutes an evolution of planning environment toward new shared workspaces supporting collaboration. Our work led us first, to analyse the related tasks in an Algerian maternity ward in order to highlight the vital collaborative medical tasks that need to be modelled. Results: the paper summaries basic design concepts of our collaborative planning system that is designed to make group interaction support flexible for care coordination and continuity. Conclusion: after development and test of our collaborative planning system, we noticed that our collaborative and planning system can increase awareness and hence decrease coordination breakdowns, reduce costs of information collecting and sharing. All these factors constitute a crucial aspect of an efficient management of a hospital.

  5. Equations of motion as constraints: superselection rules, Ward identities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asorey, M. [Departamento de Física Teórica, Universidad de Zaragoza,C/Pedro Cerbuna 12, E-50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Balachandran, A.P. [Physics Department, Syracuse University,Physics Building Syracuse, NY 13244 (United States); Institute of Mathematical Sciences, C.I.T Campus,Taramani Chennai 600113 (India); Lizzi, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica “E. Pancini” Università di Napoli Federico II,Via Cintia, 80126 Napoli (Italy); INFN - Sezione di Napoli,Via Cintia, 80126 Napoli (Italy); Departament de Estructura i Constituents de la Matèria, Institut de Ciéncies del Cosmos,Universitat de Barcelona, Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain); Marmo, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica “E. Pancini” Università di Napoli Federico II,Via Cintia, 80126 Napoli (Italy); INFN - Sezione di Napoli,Via Cintia, 80126 Napoli (Italy)

    2017-03-27

    The meaning of local observables is poorly understood in gauge theories, not to speak of quantum gravity. As a step towards a better understanding we study asymptotic (infrared) transformations in local quantum physics. Our observables are smeared by test functions, at first vanishing at infinity. In this context we show that the equations of motion can be seen as constraints, which generate a group, the group of space and time dependent gauge transformations. This is one of the main points of the paper. Infrared nontrivial effects are captured allowing test functions which do not vanish at infinity. These extended operators generate a larger group. The quotient of the two groups generate superselection sectors, which differentiate different infrared sectors. The BMS group changes the superselection sector, a result long known for its Lorentz subgroup. It is hence spontaneously broken. Ward identities implied by the gauge invariance of the S-matrix generalize the standard results and lead to charge conservation and low energy theorems. Their validity does not require Lorentz invariance.

  6. Adverse incidents, patient flow and nursing variables on acute psychiatric wards: the Tompkins Acute Ward study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bowers, L.; Simpson, A.; Warren, J.; Allan, T.; Nijman, H.L.I.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Adverse incidents (violence, self-harm and absconding) can cause significant harm to patients and staff, are difficult to predict, and are driving an increase in security measures and defensive practice. Aims: To explore the relationship between adverse incidents on acute psychiatric

  7. Postoperative pneumonia-prevention program for the inpatient surgical ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wren, Sherry M; Martin, Molinda; Yoon, Jung K; Bech, Fritz

    2010-04-01

    Postoperative pneumonia can lead to increased morbidity, length of hospital stay, and costs. Pneumonia-prevention programs have been successfully implemented in ICU settings, but no program exists for surgical ward patients. A pilot prevention program was designed and implemented based on literature review. The program consisted of education of physicians and ward staff and a standardized postoperative electronic order set consisting of incentive spirometer, chlorhexidine oral hygiene, ambulation, and head-of-bed elevation. Quarterly staff meetings discussed the results of and compliance with the program. The intervention commenced in April 2007. Baseline incidence of inpatient ward pneumonia was calculated from the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database for fiscal year (FY) 2006 and FY 2007. Postintervention incidence was calculated in the same manner from FY 2007 through FY 2008. Any patient who contracted pneumonia in the ICU was excluded from analysis. There was a significant decrease in ward pneumonia incidence from 0.78% in the preintervention group compared with 0.18% in the postintervention group (p = 0.006), representing an 81% decrease in incidence from 2006 to 2008. The pneumonia-prevention program was very successful in diminishing postoperative pneumonia on the surgical ward. There was a highly statistically significant 4-fold decrease in pneumonia incidence after program implementation. The interventions were not costly but did require ongoing communication and cooperation between physician and nursing leadership to achieve compliance with the measures. This program has great potential for dissemination to hospital surgical wards and could decrease inpatient postoperative pneumonias. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Reviving post-take surgical ward round teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Force, Jade; Thomas, Ian; Buckley, Frances

    2014-04-01

    Learning in the clinical environment is an important feature of medical education. Ward-round teaching leads to relevant, applied and lasting learning of knowledge, skills and attitudes; however, on fast-paced ward rounds in specialties such as general surgery, the student experience is often suboptimal, and teaching can be overlooked. Clinical teaching fellows (CTFs) are postgraduate doctors ranging from foundation year-2 (FY2) level through to specialty trainees, who have elected to spend up to 2 years out of the programme to teach medical undergraduates. This article explores whether CTFs can successfully support the regular delivery of undergraduate medical teaching on the busy post-take surgical ward round (PTSWR). The CTFs at Raigmore Hospital, Inverness, planned and facilitated weekly, structured teaching sessions to accompany the PTSWR. This educational intervention was evaluated using pre- and post-intervention student questionnaires. The questionnaires focused on student enjoyment and depth of learning using Likert scales and free-text components. Students were also asked about barriers to learning on typical PTSWRs. The consultant surgeons leading on these rounds were issued separate questionnaires, to gauge their evaluation of CTF support. The main barrier to effective undergraduate ward round teaching was a lack of time on the part of clinical staff. Ward rounds accompanied by CTF support significantly increased student enjoyment (p student satisfaction, and was welcomed by clinical staff. CTF support could be widened to other busy ward rounds, e.g. acute medical takes, to enhance student learning and reduce the teaching burden on clinical faculty staff. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Ward Identities of W_{\\infty} Symmetry and Higher Genus Amplitudes in 2D String Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Hamada, Ken-ji

    1995-01-01

    The Ward identities of the $W_{\\infty}$ symmetry in two dimensional string theory in the tachyon background are studied in the continuum approach. We consider amplitudes different from 2D string ones by the external leg factor and derive the recursion relations among them. The recursion relations have non-linear terms which give relations among the amplitudes defined on different genus. The solutions agree with the matrix model results even in higher genus. We also discuss differences of role...

  10. Implementing ward based clinical pharmacy services in an Ethiopian University Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mekonnen AB

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Clinical pharmacy practice has developed internationally to expand the role of a pharmacist well beyond the traditional roles of compounding, dispensing and supplying drugs to roles more directly in caring for patients. Studies on the activities of the clinical pharmacist in an inpatient ward in resource constrained settings are scarce, however.Objective: To assess ward based clinical pharmacy services in an internal medicine ward of Jimma University Specialized Hospital. Methods: The study was carried out in the internal medicine ward from March to April, 2011 at Jimma University Specialized Hospital. The study design was a prospective observational study where pharmaceutical care services provided by clinical pharmacists for inpatients were documented over a period of two months. Interventions like optimization of rational drug use and physician acceptance of these recommendations were documented. Clinical significance of interventions was evaluated by an independent team (1 internist, 1 clinical pharmacologist using a standardized method for categorizing drug related problems (DRPs. Results: A total of 149 drug related interventions conducted for 48 patients were documented; among which 133(89.3% were clinical pharmacists initiated interventions and 16(10.7% interventions were initiated by other health care professionals. The most frequent DRPs underlying interventions were unnecessary drug therapy, 36(24.2%; needs additional drug therapy, 34(22.8% and noncompliance, 29(19.5%. The most frequent intervention type was change of dosage/instruction for use, 23(15.4%. Acceptance rate by physicians was 68.4%. Among the interventions that were rated as clinically significant, 46(48.9% and 25(26.6% had major and moderate clinical importance respectively. Conclusion: Involving trained clinical pharmacists in the healthcare team leads to clinically relevant and well accepted optimization of medicine use in a resource limited settings. This

  11. 'It teaches you what to expect in future . . . ': interprofessional learning on a training ward for medical, nursing, occupational therapy and physiotherapy students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, Scott; Freeth, Della; McCrorie, Peter; Perry, David

    2002-04-01

    This paper presents findings from a multimethod evaluation of an interprofessional training ward placement for medical, nursing, occupational therapy and physiotherapy students. Unique in the UK, and following the pioneering work at Linköping, the training ward allowed senior pre-qualification students, under the supervision of practitioners, to plan and deliver interprofessional care for a group of orthopaedic and rheumatology patients. This responsibility enabled students to develop profession-specific skills and competencies in dealing with patients. It also allowed them to enhance their teamworking skills in an interprofessional environment. Student teams were supported by facilitators who ensured medical care was optimal, led reflective sessions and facilitated students' problem solving. Data were collected from all groups of participants involved in the ward: students, facilitators and patients. Methods included questionnaires, interviews and observations. Findings are presented from each participating group, with a particular emphasis placed on the perspective of medicine. The study found that students valued highly the experiential learning they received on the ward and felt the ward prepared them more effectively for future practice. However, many encountered difficulties adopting an autonomous learning style during their placement. Despite enjoying their work on the ward, facilitators were concerned that the demands of their role could result in 'burn-out'. Patients enjoyed their ward experience and scored higher on a range of satisfaction indicators than a comparative group of patients. Participants were generally positive about the training ward. All considered that it was a worthwhile experience and felt the ward should recommence in the near future.

  12. Holographic Ward identities for symmetry breaking in two dimensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Argurio, Riccardo [Physique Théorique et Mathématique and International Solvay Institutes,Université Libre de Bruxelles,C.P. 231, 1050 Brussels (Belgium); Giribet, Gaston [Martin Fisher School of Physics, Brandeis University,Waltham, Massachusetts 02453 (United States); Physics Department, University of Buenos Aires FCEN-UBA and IFIBA-CONICET,Ciudad Universitaria, Pabellón I, 1428, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Marzolla, Andrea; Naegels, Daniel [Physique Théorique et Mathématique and International Solvay Institutes,Université Libre de Bruxelles,C.P. 231, 1050 Brussels (Belgium); Sierra-Garcia, J. Anibal [Department of Particle Physics and IGFAE, University of Santiago de Compostela,E-15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain)

    2017-04-03

    We investigate symmetry breaking in two-dimensional field theories which have a holographic gravity dual. Being at large N, the Coleman theorem does not hold and Goldstone bosons are expected. We consider the minimal setup to describe a conserved current and a charged operator, and we perform holographic renormalization in order to find the correct Ward identities describing symmetry breaking. This involves some subtleties related to the different boundary conditions that a vector can have in the three-dimensional bulk. We establish which is the correct prescription that yields, after renormalization, the same Ward identities as in higher dimensions.

  13. Medication Prescribing Pattern at a Pediatric Ward of an Ethiopian Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fitsum Sebsibe Teni

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: drug use in pediatric patients is a unique dilemma in the management and monitoring of disease. This study aimed at assessing medication prescribing in a pediatric ward of an  Ethiopian hospital. Materials and Methods: a retrospective cross-sectional study was done by reviewing the medical records of 249 patients among those admitted in the period between 11th of September 2007 and 10th of September 2008 to the pediatric ward of Gondar University Referral Hospital, Northwest Ethiopia. Data on characteristics like age, sex and weight; the diagnoses for which patients were admitted and medications prescribed to them during their stay in the ward was collected from the medical records of the patients. Results: an average of 3 diagnoses per patient with the most frequently diagnosed being malnutrition (29.23%, severe community acquired pneumonia (12.96% and underweight (8.86% were reported. A mean of 4.5 medications per patient with the most commonly prescribed being antibacterials namely penicillins which constituted 25.42%, other antibacterials making up 19.61% and medications used for correcting water, electrolyte and acid-base disturbances accounting for 17.19% of the total number of medications prescribed in the ward. The most common individual medications prescribed to the patients included crystalline penicillin, gentamicin and maintenance fluid constituting 9.22, 7.52 and 6.45 percentages respectively most of them in solution forms which were administered dominantly intravenously. Conclusion In this study the common prescription of antibacterials and those used for correcting water, electrolyte and acid-base disturbances was observed which went with the common diagnoses of malnutrition and pneumonia. 

  14. Development of an adhesive surgical ward round checklist: a technique to improve patient safety.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Dhillon, P

    2012-02-01

    Checklists have been shown to improve patient outcomes. Checklist use is seen in the pre-operative to post-operative phases of the patient pathway. An adhesive checklist was developed for ward rounds due to the positive impact it could have on improving patient safety. Over an eight day period data were collected from five consultant-led teams that were randomly selected from the surgical department and divided into sticker groups and control groups. Across the board percentage adherence to the Good Surgical Practice Guidelines (GSPG) was markedly higher in the sticker study group, 1186 (91%) in comparison with the control group 718 (55%). There was significant improvement of documentation across all areas measured. An adhesive checklist for ward round note taking is a simple and cost-effective way to improve documentation, communication, hand-over, and patient safety. Successfully implemented in a tertiary level centre in Dublin, Ireland it is easily transferable to other surgical departments globally.

  15. [The current aspects of hospital infections in maternity and neonatal wards].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribarova, N; Todorova, M; Khristov, Kh

    1994-01-01

    The epidemiologic, etiologic and clinical structure of HAI in the maternity and neonatal wards in the country for the 1982-1992 period has been specified. 934 women in child-birth and 2357 neonates acquire nosocomial infections at an average annually. A comparatively constant level in HAI epidemic process intensity is observed with inconsiderable diversions in the beginning and by the end of the studied period. Staphylococci like causative agents of HAI take up a leading place in both types of wards with especially marked incidence rate among the newborn children. The predominant clinical forms in the women in child-birth are the surgical wound infections, skin and genital infections and in the neonates--the staphylodermatites, upper respiratory airway infections, pulmonary and enteric infections.

  16. Measurement of air contamination in different wards of public sector hospital, Sukkur.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memon, Badaruddin AllahDino; Bhutto, Gul Hassan; Rizvi, Wajid Hussain

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate and assess the index of bacterial contamination in different wards of the Public Sector Hospital of Sukkur (Teaching) Pakistan; whether or not the air contamination was statistically different from the acceptable level using active and passive sampling. In addition to this main hypothesis, other investigations included: occurrence of the most common bacteria, whether or not the bacterial contamination in the wards was a persistent problem and identification of the effective antibiotics against the indentified bacteria. The evidence sought based on the One Sample T test suggests that there is a (statistically) significant difference between the observed (higher) than the acceptance level (pcontamination problem was persistent as there was no significant difference among observed contamination of all three visits at (p>0.01) and the result of antibiotic susceptibility test highlights sensitivity and resistance level of antibiotics for the indentified bacteria.

  17. From Paper to PDA: Design and Evaluation of a Clinical Ward Instruction on a Mobile Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanstrup, Anne Marie; Stage, Jan

    Mobile devices with small screens and minimal facilities for interaction are increasingly being used in complex human activities for accessing and processing information, while the user is moving. This paper presents a case study of the design and evaluation of a mobile system, which involved transformation of complex text and tables to digital format on a PDA. The application domain was an emergency medical ward, and the user group was junior registrars. We designed a PDA-based system for accessing information, focusing on the ward instruction, implemented a prototype and evaluated it for usability and utility. The evaluation results indicate significant problems in the interaction with the system as well as the extent to which the system is useful for junior registrars in their daily work.

  18. The effects of introducing a clinical pharmacist on orthopaedic wards in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buck, Thomas Croft; Brandstrup, Lene; Brandslund, Ivan

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the effects and cost effects of introducing clinical pharmacists on hospital wards. METHODS: Comparative prospective study on four orthopaedic surgical wards in two hospitals. The primary effect variables were 10 target areas widely considered to be indicators of good...... prescription practice. Prescriptions not following good practice in these intervention areas were defined as "sub-optimal prescriptions," and then discussed between a physician and a clinical pharmacist. The primary parameter was the difference in the number of days with a sub-optimal prescription (Mann......-Whitney test). RESULTS: On an average 20% of all the patients had a sub-optimal prescription. Of these, 70% were changed by the physician after intervention by the clinical pharmacist. There was a statistically significant difference in the duration of days in treatment with a sub-optimal prescription. Where...

  19. [The function of team-meetings for treatment teams on child and adolescent psychiatric wards].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branik, Emil; Meng, Heiner

    2006-01-01

    In the daily work of multidisciplinary teams on child and adolescent psychiatric wards team-meetings play a central role to coordinate various treatment activities. In medical literature studies on the topic are lacking, and only few articles were found. The authors explore by a descriptive-hermeneutic analysis the numerous functions of meetings for the treatment team. To them belong catharsis, containment, reflection, regulation and integration. Psychodynamic, group dynamical and institutional factors will be described regarding their influence on the therapy management. Issues of power in institutions will be comprised in the discussion. The dialectical tension between professionalism and emotionality in the work with patients especially from the borderline-spectrum as well as between unity and diversity within the treatment team in regard to the different roles of each and everyone team member will be presented. Hints at how to manage these tensions will be given to preserve the therapeutical milieu on the ward.

  20. Inappropriate use of urinary catheters in patients admitted to medical wards in a university hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Ruiz, Mario; Calvo, Beatriz; Vara, Rebeca; Villar, Rocío N; Aguado, José María

    2013-10-01

    The prevalence and predisposing factors were determined for inappropriate urinary catheterization (UC) among inpatients in medical wards. A cross-sectional study was conducted including all patients aged ≥ 18 years admitted to medical wards in a 1300-bed tertiary-care centre, and who had a urinary catheter in place on the day of the survey. Of 380 patients observed, 46 (12.1%) had a urinary catheter in place. Twelve of them (26.1%) were inappropriately catheterized. The most common indication for inappropriate UC was urine output monitoring in a cooperative, non-critically ill patient. Inappropriateness was associated with increased age, poor functional status, urinary incontinence, dementia, and admission from a long-term care facility. Further educational efforts should be focused on improving catheterization prescribing practices by physicians. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  1. Team climate and attitudes toward information and communication technology among nurses on acute psychiatric wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koivunen, Marita; Anttila, Minna; Kuosmanen, Lauri; Katajisto, Jouko; Välimäki, Maritta

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To describe the association of team climate with attitudes toward information and communication technology among nursing staff working on acute psychiatric wards. Background: Implementation of ICT applications in nursing practice brings new operating models to work environments, which may affect experienced team climate on hospital wards. Method: Descriptive survey was used as a study design. Team climate was measured by the Finnish modification of the Team Climate Inventory, and attitudes toward ICT by Burkes' questionnaire. The nursing staff (N = 181, n = 146) on nine acute psychiatric wards participated in the study. Results: It is not self-evident that experienced team climate associates with attitudes toward ICT, but there are some positive relationships between perceived team climate and ICT attitudes. The study showed that nurses' motivation to use ICT had statistically significant connections with experienced team climate, participative safety (p = 0.021), support for innovation (p = 0.042) and task orientation (p = 0.042). Conclusion: The results suggest that asserting team climate and supporting innovative operations may lead to more positive attitudes toward ICT. It is, in particular, possible to influence nurses' motivation to use ICT. More attention should be paid to psychosocial factors such as group education and co-operation at work when ICT applications are implemented in nursing.

  2. An evaluation of patients' experienced usability of a diabetes mHealth system using a multi-method approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgsson, Mattias; Staggers, Nancy

    2016-02-01

    mHealth systems are becoming more common to aid patients in their diabetes self-management, but recent studies indicate a need for thorough evaluation of patients' experienced usability. Current evaluations lack a multi-method design for data collection and structured methods for data analyses. The purpose of this study was to provide a feasibility test of a multi-method approach for both data collection and data analyses for patients' experienced usability of a mHealth system for diabetes type 2 self-management. A random sample of 10 users was selected from a larger clinical trial. Data collection methods included user testing with eight representative tasks and Think Aloud protocol, a semi-structured interview and a questionnaire on patients' experiences using the system. The Framework Analysis (FA) method and Usability Problem Taxonomy (UPT) were used to structure, code and analyze the results. A usability severity rating was assigned after classification. The combined methods resulted in a total of 117 problems condensed into 19 usability issues with an average severity rating of 2.47 or serious. The usability test detected 50% of the initial usability problems, followed by the post-interview at 29%. The usability test found 18 of 19 consolidated usability problems while the questionnaire uncovered one unique issue. Patients experienced most usability problems (8) in the Glucose Readings View when performing complex tasks such as adding, deleting, and exporting glucose measurements. The severity ratings were the highest for the Glucose Diary View, Glucose Readings View, and Blood Pressure View with an average severity rating of 3 (serious). Most of the issues were classified under the artifact component of the UPT and primary categories of Visualness (7) and Manipulation (6). In the UPT task component, most issues were in the primary category Task-mapping (12). Multiple data collection methods yielded a more comprehensive set of usability issues. Usability

  3. A safe place with space for learning: Experiences from an interprofessional training ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallin, Karin; Kiessling, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Interprofessional learning in a real ward context effectively increases collaborative and professional competence among students. However, less is known on the processes behind this. The aim of this study was to explore medical, nurse, physiotherapy, and occupational therapy students' perspectives on the process of their own learning at an interprofessional training ward (IPTW). We performed a qualitative content analysis on free-text answers of 333 student questionnaires from the years 2004 to 2011. Two main themes emerged: first, students found that the IPTW provided an enriching learning environment--a safe place with space. It included authentic and relevant patients, well-composed and functioning student teams, competent and supportive supervisors, and adjusted ward structures to support learning. Second, they developed an awareness of their own development with faith in the future--from chaos to clarity. It included personal, professional, and interprofessional development towards a comprehensive view of practice and a faith in their ability to work as professionals in the future. Our findings are discussed with a social constructivist perspective. This study suggests that when an IPTW provides a supportive and permissive learning environment with possibilities to interact with one another--a safe place with space--it enables students to move from insecurity to faith in their abilities--from chaos to clarity. However, if the learning environment is impaired, the students' development could be halted.

  4. [The relative's need of participation in the care plan in a general medicine ward].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artioli, Giovanna; Finotto, Stefano; Paverelli, Luisa; Carpanoni, Marika; Casadei, Elena Turroni

    2006-01-01

    All the scientific literature agrees on the fact that the shelter in hospital is a delicate moment for the patient. Also for relatives the shelter in hospital of their dear one is not of easy management, often they are excluded, insecure, alone and with a frankly uncertain role. The purpose of this study is to explore the role and the needs perceived from the relatives of an in-patient in a general medicine unit and to explore which role and which needs of the relatives are perceived from the nurses of a same ward. The sample of the study consisted of 49 relatives of in-patients in the ward of Medicina III dell'Azienda Ospedaliera di Reggio Emilia and of 18 nurses of the same ward. It was found that information is the most important need expressed by the relatives and that for the nurses is hard to satisfy it. Moreover, the nurses haven't a clear idea of the relative's role and they are inclined to exclude them from the care project.

  5. Nurses' role transition from the clinical ward environment to the critical care environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gohery, Patricia; Meaney, Teresa

    2013-12-01

    To explore the experiences of nurses moving from the ward environment to the critical care environment. Critical care areas are employing nurses with no critical care experience due to staff shortage. There is a paucity of literature focusing on the experiences of nurses moving from the ward environment to the critical care environment. A Heideggerian phenomenology research approach was used in this study. In-depth semi structured interviews, supported with an interview guide, were conducted with nine critical care nurses. Data analysis was guided by Van Manen (1990) approach to phenomenological analysis. Four main themes emerged: The highs and lows, you need support, theory-practice gap, struggling with fear. The participants felt ill prepared and inexperienced to work within the stressful and technical environment of critical care due to insufficient education and support. The study findings indicated that a variety of feelings and emotions are experienced by ward nurses who move into the stressful and technical environment of critical care due to insufficient skills and knowledge. More education and support is required to improve this transition process. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Determination of Noise Level and Its Sources in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit and Neonatal Ward

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi Jahangir Blourchian

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: In Neonatal intensive care units (NICU different sound intensities and frequencies are produced from different sources, which may exert undesirable physiological effects on the infants. The aim of this study was to determine the noise level and its sources in the NICU and neonatal ward of Al-Zahra Hospital of Rasht, Iran. Methods: In this descriptive cross-sectional study, the intensity of the sounds generated by the internal and external sources in the NICU and neonatal ward was measured using a sound level meter device. The sound produced by each of the sources was individually calculated. Data were analyzed performing descriptive and analytical statistics, using SPSS version 19. Results: The mean noise levels in six rooms and a hallway during morning, afternoon and night shifts with the electromechanical devices turned on were 61.67±4.5, 61.32±4.32 and 60.71±4.56 dB, respectively. Moreover, with the devices tuned off the mean noise levels during morning, afternoon and evening shifts were 64.97±2.6, 60.6±1.29 and 57.91±4.73 dB, respectively. The differences between the mean noise levels in the neonatal wards (standard noise level=45 dB during each shift with the electromechanical devices turned on and off were statistically significant (P=0.002 and P

  7. Raising adults as children? A report on milieu therapy in a psychiatric ward in Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oeye, Christine; Bjelland, Anne Karen; Skorpen, Aina; Anderssen, Norman

    2009-03-01

    Milieu therapy is widely used as a therapeutic approach in psychiatric wards in the Nordic countries, but few studies exist that report on what practices a milieu therapy approach implies as seen from an ethnographic perspective. Therefore, there is a need to obtain insight into how milieu therapy unfolds in a psychiatric ward setting. The present ethnographic study aims to explore this in a locked-up psychiatric ward that was tied to a psychodynamic-oriented milieu therapy approach. Metaphors from traditional nuclear family life were widely used. Patients were often understood as harmed children and were taught self-management skills; the staff aimed at providing a caring atmosphere; and the patients seemed to behave, sometimes, in a childlike manner. In a Foucaultian framework, milieu therapy can be seen as a therapeutic normalization technique used to produce self-governing individuals. Milieu therapy "raises" patients in order to transform patients' odd behaviour and nonconforming lifestyles. We see this "raising children" approach as a type of intervention that nicely connects to the national policy of normalization and integration politics towards persons with psychiatric diagnoses.

  8. Nursing ward managers' perceptions of pain prevalence at the aged-care facilities in Japan: a nationwide survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takai, Yukari; Yamamoto-Mitani, Noriko; Fukahori, Hiroki; Kobayashi, Sayuri; Chiba, Yumi

    2013-09-01

    This study aimed to examine nursing ward managers' perceptions of pain prevalence among older residents and the strategies of pain management at the Health Service Facilities for the Elderly Requiring Care (HSFERC) in Japan and to investigate the factors related to the prevalence. Nursing ward managers in 3,644 HSFERC were asked to participate in this study. Questionnaires were sent to them regarding pain prevalence among the older residents in their wards, their provisions for pain care, and other pain management strategies. The perceived pain prevalence factors were examined statistically. The final sample comprised 439 participants (12.0%). A total of 5,219 residents (22.3%) were recognized as suffering from pain on the investigation day. Only 8 wards (1.8%) used pain management guidelines or care manuals, and 14 (3.2%) used a standardized pain scale. The ward managers' age (p = .008) and nursing experience (p = .006) showed a significant negative association with pain prevalence estimation. Moreover, there was a significant association between the groups' pain prevalence estimation and the nursing managers' beliefs that older adults were less sensitive to pain (p = .01), that pain was common among older people (p = .007), and that the time to treat residents' pain was insufficient (p = .001). The ward managers' perceptions regarding pain prevalence varied; the perceived pain rates were possibly lower than the actual percentages. Insufficient pain management strategies at the HSFERC were also suggested. An appropriate pain management strategy for Japanese aged care and its dissemination are urgently required. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Fall prediction according to nurses' clinical judgment: differences between medical, surgical, and geriatric wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milisen, Koen; Coussement, Joke; Flamaing, Johan; Vlaeyen, Ellen; Schwendimann, René; Dejaeger, Eddy; Surmont, Kurt; Boonen, Steven

    2012-06-01

    To assess the value of nurses' clinical judgment (NCJ) in predicting hospital inpatient falls. Prospective multicenter study. Six Belgian hospitals. Two thousand four hundred seventy participants (mean age 67.6 ± 18.3; female, 55.7%) on four surgical (n = 812, 32.9%), eight geriatric (n = 666, 27.0%), and four general medical wards (n = 992, 40.1%) were included upon admission. All participants were hospitalized for at least 48 hours. Within 24 hours after admission, nurses gave their judgment on the question "Do you think your patient is at high risk for falling?" Nurses were not trained in assessing fall risk. Falls were documented on a standardized incident report form. During hospitalization, 143 (5.8%) participants experienced one or more falls, accounting for 202 falls and corresponding to an overall rate of 7.9 falls per 1,000 patient days. NCJ of participant's risk of falling had high sensitivity (78-92%) with high negative predictive value (94-100%) but low positive predictive value (4-17%). Although false-negative rates were low (8-22%) for all departments and age groups, false-positive rates were high (55-74%), except on surgical and general medical wards and in participants younger than 75. This analysis, based on multicenter data and a large sample size, suggests that NCJ can be recommended on surgical and general medical wards and in individuals younger than 75, but on geriatric wards and in participants aged 75 and older, NCJ overestimates risk of falling and is thus not recommended because expensive comprehensive fall-prevention measures would be implemented in a large number of individuals who do not need it. © 2012, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2012, The American Geriatrics Society.

  10. Accounting for Inpatient Wards when developing Master Surgical Schedules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanberkel, P.T.; Boucherie, Richardus J.; Hans, Elias W.; Hurink, Johann L.; van Lent, W.A.M.; van Harten, Willem H.; van Harten, Wim H.

    BACKGROUND: As the demand for health care services increases, the need to improve patient flow between departments has likewise increased. Understanding how the master surgical schedule (MSS) affects the inpatient wards and exploiting this relationship can lead to a decrease in surgery

  11. Design Proposal for Pleasurable Light Atmosphere in Hospital Wards

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stidsen, Lone; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning; Fisker, Anna Marie

    2010-01-01

    When constructing and designing Danish hospitals for the future, patients, staff and guests are in focus. It is found important to have a starting point in healing architecture and create an environment with knowledge of users sensory and functionally needs and looks at how hospital wards can sup...

  12. Enhancing the Leadership of Ward Councillors through Emotional ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article focuses on how emotional intelligence could be utilised to enhance the leadership skill of ward councillors in the Buffalo City Metropolitan Municipality. In this article, the concept of emotional intelligence is considered to include aspects such as self-awareness, motivation, self-management, social awareness, ...

  13. Ward Round - a boy with multiple joint swellings | Tickell | Malawi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ward Round - a boy with multiple joint swellings. D Tickell. Abstract. No Abstract Malawi Medical Journal Vol. 20 (3) 2008: pp. 99-100. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/mmj.v20i3.10968 · AJOL African Journals Online.

  14. Ward Round - Late Presentation of Acute Compartment Syndrome in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    following the course of ibuprofen mentioned. Twelve days after admission he started to complain of increasing pain and tightness in his left thigh. Sensation and motor function. Ward Round - Late Presentation of Acute. Compartment Syndrome in the Thigh. University of Malawi, College of Medicine, Department of Surgery,.

  15. Neuroinfection survey at a neurological ward in a Brazilian tertiary teaching hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo E Marchiori

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: This study was undertaken to characterize the neuroinfection profile in a tertiary neurological ward. INTRODUCTION: Neuroinfection is a worldwide concern and bacterial meningitis, tetanus and cerebral malaria have been reported as the commonest causes in developing countries. METHODS: From 1999 to 2007, all patients admitted to the Neurology Ward of Hospital das Clínicas, São Paulo University School of Medicine because of neuroinfection had their medical records reviewed. Age, gender, immunological status, neurological syndrome at presentation, infectious agent and clinical outcome were recorded. RESULTS: Three hundred and seventy four cases of neuroinfectious diseases accounted for 4.2% of ward admissions and the identification of infectious agent was successful in 81% of cases. Mean age was 40.5 + 13.4 years, 63.8% were male, 19.7% were immunocompromised patients and meningoencephalitis was the most common clinical presentation despite infectious agent. Viruses and bacteria were equally responsible for 29.4% of neuroinfectious diseases; parasitic, fungal and prion infections accounted for 28%, 9.6% and 3.5% respectively. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV, herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV1, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Treponema pallidum, Taenia solium, Schistosoma mansoni, Cryptococcus neoformans and Histoplasma capsulatum were the more common infectious pathogens in the patients. Infection mortality rate was 14.2%, of which 62.3% occurred in immunocompetent patients. CONCLUSION: Our institution appeared to share some results with developed and developing countries. Comparison with literature may be considered as quality control to health assistance.

  16. Ward identities and mass spectrum of N=1 Super Yang-Mills theory on the lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirchner, R.

    2000-11-01

    We study the lattice regularization of N=1 Super Yang-Mills theory. Projecting operators for the low-lying spectrum are discussed. We also consider a ''baryonic'' state consisting of three gluinos, and develop a numerical strategy to determine its mass in a Monte Carlo simulation. We present numerical results on the low-lying spectrum of SU(2) N=1 Super Yang-Mills theory with light dynamical gluinos. The lattice regularization of N=1 Super Yang-Mills theory breaks supersymmetry at any finite lattice spacing. We derive the form of the corresponding SUSY Ward identity and carry out renormalization. The ratios of the renormalization coefficients Z T /Z S and M R /Z S are determined non-perturbatively in a numerical simulation. The form of the renormalized SUSY Ward identity is confirmed numerically. We discuss how the SUSY Ward identity can be used to define a supersymmetric continuum limit, and how its approach can be monitored in numerical simulations. (orig.)

  17. Job satisfaction and intent to leave among psychiatric nurses: closed versus open wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, Alexander; Kagan, Ilya

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate: (a) the association between socio-demographic variables, job satisfaction and intent to leave among hospital psychiatric nurses, and (b) the differences in the above between psychiatric nurses working on closed and open wards. After receiving ethical approval, a convenience sample of 52 (70% of total nursing staff) was drawn from psychiatric nurses in a large Israeli psychiatric hospital (95% response rate). The sample completed anonymously a self-administered structured questionnaire. A negative correlation was found between job satisfaction and intent to leave and between age, all categories of seniority, and intent to leave. Closed-ward nurses reported a higher intent to leave psychiatric nursing. Nurses under 35 reported a significantly higher intent to leave psychiatric nursing than nurses over 35. Job satisfaction was significantly higher among full-time nurses than part-time. Psychiatric hospitals need to pay attention to all factors associated with workers' readiness to leave. Given the widespread shortage of nurses, it is especially important that they address the relatively low job satisfaction of both younger and part-time nurses, and the particular stresses that closed-ward nurses work under. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Acinetobacter baumannii on computer interface surfaces of hospital wards and association with clinical isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Ling

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Computer keyboards and mice are potential reservoirs of nosocomial pathogens, but routine disinfection for non-water-proof computer devices is a problem. With better hand hygiene compliance of health-care workers (HCWs, the impact of these potential sources of contamination on clinical infection needs to be clarified. Methods This study was conducted in a 1600-bed medical center of southern Taiwan with 47 wards and 282 computers. With education and monitoring program of hand hygiene for HCWs, the average compliance rate was 74% before our surveillance. We investigated the association of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii, three leading hospital-acquired pathogens, from ward computer keyboards, mice and from clinical isolates in non-outbreak period by pulsed field gel electrophoresis and antibiogram. Results Our results revealed a 17.4% (49/282 contamination rate of these computer devices by S. aureus, Acinetobacter spp. or Pseudomonas spp. The contamination rates of MRSA and A. baumannii in the ward computers were 1.1% and 4.3%, respectively. No P. aeruginosa was isolated. All isolates from computers and clinical specimens at the same ward showed different pulsotypes. However, A. baumannii isolates on two ward computers had the same pulsotype. Conclusion With good hand hygiene compliance, we found relatively low contamination rates of MRSA, P. aeruginosa and A. baumannii on ward computer interface, and without further contribution to nosocomial infection. Our results suggested no necessity of routine culture surveillance in non-outbreak situation.

  19. Micro-spatial distribution of malaria cases and control strategies at ward level in Gwanda district, Matabeleland South, Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manyangadze, Tawanda; Chimbari, Moses J; Macherera, Margaret; Mukaratirwa, Samson

    2017-11-21

    Although there has been a decline in the number of malaria cases in Zimbabwe since 2010, the disease remains the biggest public health threat in the country. Gwanda district, located in Matabeleland South Province of Zimbabwe has progressed to the malaria pre-elimination phase. The aim of this study was to determine the spatial distribution of malaria incidence at ward level for improving the planning and implementation of malaria elimination in the district. The Poisson purely spatial model was used to detect malaria clusters and their properties, including relative risk and significance levels at ward level. The geographically weighted Poisson regression (GWPR) model was used to explore the potential role and significance of environmental variables [rainfall, minimum and maximum temperature, altitude, Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI), Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), Normalized Difference Water Index (NDWI), rural/urban] and malaria control strategies [indoor residual spraying (IRS) and long-lasting insecticide-treated nets (LLINs)] on the spatial patterns of malaria incidence at ward level. Two significant clusters (p malaria cases were identified: (1) ward 24 south of Gwanda district and (2) ward 9 in the urban municipality, with relative risks of 5.583 and 4.316, respectively. The semiparametric-GWPR model with both local and global variables had higher performance based on AICc (70.882) compared to global regression (74.390) and GWPR which assumed that all variables varied locally (73.364). The semiparametric-GWPR captured the spatially non-stationary relationship between malaria cases and minimum temperature, NDVI, NDWI, and altitude at the ward level. The influence of LLINs, IRS and rural or urban did not vary and remained in the model as global terms. NDWI (positive coefficients) and NDVI (range from negative to positive coefficients) showed significant association with malaria cases in some of the wards. The IRS had a protection effect on

  20. Frequency of nursing tasks in medical and surgical wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farquharson, Barbara; Bell, Cheryl; Johnston, Derek; Jones, Martyn; Schofield, Pat; Allan, Julia; Ricketts, Ian; Morrison, Kenny; Johnston, Marie

    2013-09-01

    To explore the frequency of different nursing tasks in medical and surgical wards. The time nurses spend on direct patient care is important for both patients and nurses. However, little is known about the time nurses spend on various nursing tasks. A real-time, repeated measures design conducted amongst 67 (n = 39 medical, n = 28 surgical) UK hospital nurses. Between September 2011 and August 2012 participants completed an electronic diary version of a classification of nursing tasks (WOMBAT) during shifts. A total of 961 real-time measures of nursing task were obtained. Direct patient care [median = 37.5%, interquartile range = 27.8], indirect care (median = 11.1%, interquartile range = 19.4) and medication (median = 11.1%, interquartile range = 18.8) were most commonly reported. Participants were interrupted in 62% of entries (interquartile range = 35), reported adequate time in 78% (interquartile range = 31) and adequate resources in 89% (interquartile range = 36). Ward-related tasks were significantly more frequent on medical wards than surgical wards but otherwise there were no significant differences. Nurses spend the highest proportion of time in direct patient care and majority of this on core nursing activities. Interruptions to tasks are common. Nurses tend to report adequate time/resources. The frequency of nursing tasks is similar in medical and surgical wards. Nurse managers should review the level of interruptions to nurses' work and ensure appropriate levels of supervision. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. A multi-method high-resolution geophysical survey in the Machado de Castro museum, central Portugal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grangeia, Carlos; Matias, Manuel; Hermozilha, Hélder; Figueiredo, Fernando; Carvalho, Pedro; Silva, Ricardo

    2011-01-01

    Restoration of historical buildings is a delicate operation as they are often built over more ancient and important structures. The Machado de Castro Museum, Coimbra, Central Portugal, has suffered several interventions in historical times and lies over the ancient Roman forum of Coimbra. This building went through a restoration project. These works were preceded by an extensive geophysical survey that aimed at investigating subsurface stratigraphy, including archeological remains, and the internal structure of the actual walls. Owing to the needs of the project, geophysical data interpretation required not only integration but also high resolution. The study consisted of data acquisition over perpendicular planes and different levels that required detailed survey planning and integration of data from different locations that complement images of the surveyed area. Therefore a multi-method, resistivity imaging and a 3D ground probing radar (GPR), high-resolution geophysical survey was done inside the museum. Herein, radargrams are compared with the revealed stratigraphy so that signatures are interpreted, characterized and assigned to archeological structures. Although resistivity and GPR have different resolution capabilities, their data are overlapped and compared, bearing in mind the specific characteristics of this survey. It was also possible to unravel the inner structure of the actual walls, to establish connections between walls, foundations and to find older remains with the combined use and spatial integration of the GPR and resistivity imaging data

  2. Venous thromboprophylaxis in general surgery ward admissions: strategies for improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galante, Mariana; Languasco, Agustín; Gotta, Daniel; Bell, Soledad; Lancelotti, Tomás; Knaze, Viktoria; Saubidet, Cristián Lopez; Grand, Beatriz; Milberg, Matías

    2012-12-01

    To estimate the adherence to institutional venous thromboprophylaxis clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) in general surgery patients and to assess the effectiveness of a multi-strategy improvement intervention. A prospective before-after study. Two teaching hospitals located in the city of Buenos Aires, Argentina. Prescriptions belonging to patients admitted to the general surgery wards were evaluated. A multi-strategy intervention that included (i) simplification of institutional CPGs for venous thromboprophylaxis using a single drug at a single dose, based on the American College of Chest Physicians recommendations, (ii) distribution of pocket cards with an algorithm for the implementation of new recommendations to both, physicians and nurses, working in the general surgery units, (iii) educational talks, (iv) paper-based reminders and (v) audit and feedback. The adherence of the venous thromboprophylaxis prescription to the institutional recommendations. The prescriptions of 100 admitted patients before and 90 after the intervention were included in the analysis. The initial rate of adherence was 31%. After the intervention this rate rose to 71.1% (P< 0.001). The major improvement observed was the reduction in omitted prophylaxis in patients at risk of venous thromboembolism from 45 to 13.3% (P< 0.001). In the adjusted model, prescribing compliance with CPGs was five times more likely during the second stage than during the first stage (OR = 5.60, 95% CI = 2.92-10.74). Simple and economical interventions such as those described in this study can improve general surgeons compliance with the institutional and international guidelines, thus assuring patient safety and quality of health care.

  3. Neonatal abstinence syndrome: Diagnostic dilemmas in the maternity ward

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lazić-Mitrović Tanja

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS refers to a newborn neurological, gastrointestinal and/or respiratory disorder if a newborn was exposed to psychoactive substances in the intrauterine period. NAS is difficult to diagnose due to unreliability of the data on addictive substances use during pregnancy, limited possibilities of the prenatal exposure diagnosis and postnatal substance detection, which all lead to diagnostic dilemmas. Objective. The aim of this study was to indicate the problems in patients with early NAS diagnosis in the maternity ward and the importance of clinical presentation used as a guide toward the diagnosis. Methods. This retrospective study included five term eutrophic newborns with high Apgar score, good adaptation in the first day and with clinical presentation of NAS during the second day of life. The clinical presentation was dominated by irritability, increased wakefulness, increased muscle tone, shrilly crying, tremors, problems with accepting food, tachypnea, subfebrility and hyperhidrosis. Finnegan scale was introduced in order to diagnose NAS and apply the therapy. Single-medication therapy of phenobarbitone was applied in four cases and a combination of phenobarbitone and morphine in one case. For toxicological analysis newborns’ urine samples were used. Results. Conditions such as perinatal asphyxia, infection, hunger, polycythemia, hypoglycemia or hypocalcemia were excluded. Finnegan score implied that pharmacological treatment had to be administered. The discrepancy between the NAS anamnesis and toxicological analysis existed. Response to the treatment was positive in all cases. Conclusion. NAS is a multisystemic disorder and should be suspected when it is noticed that children exhibit characteristic signs. However, other pathological conditions have to be excluded. Quantification according to the adopted scales for NAS leads toward appropriate treatment and recovery of the newborns.

  4. Rationale for a home dialysis virtual ward: design and implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schachter, Michael E; Bargman, Joanne M; Copland, Michael; Hladunewich, Michelle; Tennankore, Karthik K; Levin, Adeera; Oliver, Matthew; Pauly, Robert P; Perl, Jeffrey; Zimmerman, Deborah; Chan, Christopher T

    2014-02-14

    Home-based renal replacement therapy (RRT) [peritoneal dialysis (PD) and home hemodialysis (HHD)] offers independent quality of life and clinical advantages compared to conventional in-center hemodialysis. However, follow-up may be less complete for home dialysis patients following a change in care settings such as post hospitalization. We aim to implement a Home Dialysis Virtual Ward (HDVW) strategy, which is targeted to minimize gaps of care. The HDVW Pilot Study will enroll consecutive PD and HHD patients who fulfilled any one of our inclusion criteria: 1. following discharge from hospital, 2. after interventional procedure(s), 3. prescription of anti-microbial agents, or 4. following completion of home dialysis training. Clinician-led telephone interviews are performed weekly for 2 weeks until VW discharge. Case-mix (modified Charlson Comorbidity Index), symptoms (the modified Edmonton Symptom Assessment Scale) and patient satisfaction are assessed serially. The number of VW interventions relating to eight pre-specified domains will be measured. Adverse events such as re-hospitalization and health-services utilization will be ascertained through telephone follow-up after discharge from the VW at 2, 4, 12 weeks. The VW re-hospitalization rate will be compared with a contemporary cohort (matched for age, gender, renal replacement therapy and co-morbidities). Our protocol has been approved by research ethics board (UHN: 12-5397-AE). Written informed consent for participation in the study will be obtained from participants. This report serves as a blueprint for the design and implementation of a novel health service delivery model for home dialysis patients. The major goal of the HDVW initiative is to provide appropriate and effective supports to medically complex patients in a targeted window of vulnerability. (NCT01912001).

  5. Ward based community road safety performance benchmarking, monitoring and intervention programmes in the City of Johannesburg

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ribbens, H

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available benchmarking, monitoring and intervention programme. Community road safety needs in the respective wards are articulated through the ward councillor. The rationale is that the community exactly knows where these problem areas are, because they suffer as a...

  6. Comorbid depression in dementia on psychogeriatric nursing home wards: which symptoms are prominent?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verkaik, R.; Francke, A.L.; Meijel, B. van; Ribbe, M.W.; Bensing, J.M.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To provide insight into the prevalence and clinically relevant symptoms of comorbid depression among dementia patients in psychogeriatric nursing home wards, to enhance depression recognition. DESIGN: Cross-sectional analyses of multicenter diagnostic data. SETTING: Psychogeriatric wards

  7. Is Ward Experience in Resuscitation Effort Related to the Prognosis of Unexpected Cardiac Arrest?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sen-Kuang Hou

    2007-09-01

    Conclusion: Hospital wards with more than 5 cardiac arrests per year have a better patient survival rate than those with fewer arrests. This is despite all ward staff receiving the same level of training.

  8. Differences in antimicrobial consumption, prescribing and isolation rate of multidrug resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii on surgical and medical wards.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Zivanovic

    Full Text Available In order to provide guidance data for clinically rational use of an antibiotics consuption, prescribing and prevalence of multidrug resistant (MDR Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii were monitored on the surgical (S and medical (M wards of the University Hospital Center "Dr. Dragisa Misovic-Dedinje" (Belgrade, Serbia, in the study period from 2012 to 2015. Appropriateness of antimicrobial use was evaluated using the Global-Prevalence Survey method designed by the University of Antwerp. The percentages of MDR pathogens relative to the total number of isolates of K. pneumoniae and P. aeruginosa were higher on the S (86.2% and 49.1% than on the M (63.2% and 36.9% wards. The percentage of MDR A. baumannii was not different between S (93.7% and M (79.5% wards. An overall antibiotics consumption (defined daily doses/100 bed-days during study was 369.7 and 261.5 on the S and M wards, respectively. A total of 225 prescriptions of antimicrobials were evaluated in138 adults admitted to wards on the day of the survey. The percentage of antimicrobials prescribed for prophylaxis on the M and S wards were 0% and 25%, respectively. Therapies were more frequently empiric (S, 86.8% and M, 80%. The percentages of medical errors on the S and M wards were 74.6% and 27.3%, respectively. The quality indicators for antibiotic prescribing on the S and M wards were as follows: the incorrect choice of antimicrobials (35.6% vs. 20.0%, inappropriate dose interval (70.6% vs. 16.9% or duration of therapy (72.5% vs. 23.1%, a non-documented stop/review data (73.6% vs. 16.9% and divergence from guidelines (71.9% vs. 23.1%. Treatment based on biomarkers was more common on the M wards as compared to the S wards. The increasing prevalence of MDR pathogens, a very high consumption and incorrect prescribing of antimicrobials need special attention, particularly on the S wards.

  9. Knowledge, Skills, and Abilities for Entry-Level Business Analytics Positions: A Multi-Method Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cegielski, Casey G.; Jones-Farmer, L. Allison

    2016-01-01

    It is impossible to deny the significant impact from the emergence of big data and business analytics on the fields of Information Technology, Quantitative Methods, and the Decision Sciences. Both industry and academia seek to hire talent in these areas with the hope of developing organizational competencies. This article describes a multi-method…

  10. Crossing borders: Trauma and resilience in young refugees : a multi-method study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sleijpen, M.J.T.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304348848

    2017-01-01

    Many adolescent refugees and asylum seekers have experienced traumatic events. They often suffer from intrusions of these events, and report avoidance behaviors, sleeping problems and hyperarousal. On top of that, they are dealing with many daily stressors caused by their new and marginal social

  11. A multi-method approach for the study of lanthanum speciation in coastal and estuarine sediments

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chakraborty, P.; Babu, P.V.R.; Sarma, V.V.

    ) in different fields (agricultural field, water treatment technology, nuclear industry, glass industry and medicine manufacturing industry) (Guo, 1987; Zhang et al. 1988; Eisenbud and Paschoa, 1989; Tribe et al. 1990; Buckingham et al. 1995) is expected... through the displacement or replacement of calcium in different cell functions and also its high affinity for phosphate groups of biological macromolecules. La 3+ ion usually prevents the influx of Ca 2+ ion and competes for available binding sites...

  12. Nurses' experience and attitudes towards inpatient aggression on psychiatric wards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Tomagová

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To determine the incidence rate of forms of inpatient aggression towards nurses who working on psychiatric wards; to identify their attitude to patient aggression, to the factors that condition the occurrence and management of aggression. To determine the differences between nurses in relation to educational training aimed at the issue of patient aggression. Design: Quantitative cross-sectional study. Methods: Selection of respondents was deliberate. The sample comprised 223 nurses with an average of 21.27 (± 11.41 years of clinical practice. Data collection was implemented by means of the self-assessment scales: Violence and Aggression of Patients Scale (VAPS, Attitude Towards Aggression Scale (ATAS, The Management of Aggression and Violence Attitude Scale-Likert (MAVAS-L. Results: 98.58% experienced inpatient aggression in the course of the previous year. Negative attitudes to patient aggression predominated in the sample. Nurses expressed strongest agreement with the idea that internal factors foster patient aggression. Regarding methods of aggression management, nurses expressed strongest agreement with the use of medical therapy and restraints. They held a neutral attitude towards the use of non-physical methods. The age of nurses had an effect on how strongly they agreed with the importance of internal factors in prompting patient aggression and with the use of medical therapy and restraints. Conclusion: A high percentage of nurses have had personal experience of various forms of patient aggression. Negative attitudes to aggression predominated in our sample of nurses, emphasizing the influence of internal factors. The attitude of nurses towards patient aggression influences the selection of aggression management strategies.

  13. Counterpoint: Practice versus Process--Rigidity of Reinforcement Requirements Results in Regressive Research: A Reply to Ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biederman, Gerald B.; Davey, Valerie A.

    1995-01-01

    This counterpoint responds to Phillip Ward's commentary on a study by Gerald Biederman and others which concluded that verbal reinforcement in combination with interactive modeling strategies may produce confusion in children with language/learning difficulties. The counterpoint argues that the commentary indicates problems with semantics and with…

  14. The OptD-multi method in LiDAR processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Błaszczak-Bąk, Wioleta; Sobieraj-Żłobińska, Anna; Kowalik, Michał

    2017-01-01

    New and constantly developing technology for acquiring spatial data, such as LiDAR (light detection and ranging), is a source for large volume of data. However, such amount of data is not always needed for developing the most popular LiDAR products: digital terrain model (DTM) or digital surface model. Therefore, in many cases, the number of contained points are reduced in the pre-processing stage. The degree of reduction is determined by the algorithm used, which should enable the user to obtain a dataset appropriate and optimal for the planned purpose. The aim of this article is to propose a new Optimum Dataset method (OptD method) in the processing of LiDAR point clouds. The OptD method can reduce the number of points in a dataset for the specified optimization criteria concerning the characteristics of generated DTM. The OptD method can be used in two variants: OptD-single (one criterion for optimization) and OptD-multi (two or more optimization criteria). The OptD-single method has been thoroughly tested and presented by Błaszczak-Bąk (2016 Acta Geodyn. Geomater . 13/4 379–86). In this paper the authors discussed the OptD-multi method. (paper)

  15. Pressure ulcers in palliative ward patients: hyponatremia and low blood pressure as indicators of risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternal, Danuta; Wilczyński, Krzysztof; Szewieczek, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Prevention strategies for pressure ulcer formation remain critical in patients with an advanced illness. We analyzed factors associated with the development of pressure ulcers in patients hospitalized in a palliative care ward setting. This study was a retrospective analysis of 329 consecutive patients with a mean age (± standard deviation) of 70.4±11.8 years (range: 30-96 years, median 70.0 years; 55.3% women), who were admitted to the Palliative Care Department between July 2012 and May 2014. Patients were hospitalized for mean of 24.8±31.4 days (1-310 days, median 14 days). A total of 256 patients (77.8%) died in the ward and 73 patients (22.2%) were discharged. Two hundred and six patients (62.6%) did not develop pressure ulcers during their stay in the ward, 84 patients (25.5%) were admitted with pressure ulcers, and 39 patients (11.9%) developed pressure ulcers in the ward. Four factors assessed at admission appear to predict the development of pressure ulcers in the multivariate logistic regression model: Waterlow score (odds ratio [OR] =1.140, 95% confidence interval [CI] =1.057-1.229, P =0.001), transfer from other hospital wards (OR =2.938, 95% CI =1.339-6.448, P =0.007), hemoglobin level (OR =0.814, 95% CI =0.693-0.956, P =0.012), and systolic blood pressure (OR =0.976, 95% CI =0.955-0.997, P =0.023). Five other factors assessed during hospitalization appear to be associated with pressure ulcer development: mean evening body temperature (OR =3.830, 95% CI =1.729-8.486, P =0.001), mean Waterlow score (OR =1.194, 95% CI =1.092-1.306, P pressure (OR =0.956, 95% CI =0.929-0.984, P =0.003), and the lowest recorded hemoglobin level (OR =0.803, 95% CI =0.672-0.960, P =0.016). Hyponatremia and low blood pressure may contribute to the formation of pressure ulcers in patients with an advanced illness.

  16. Pain in the nursing home: assessment and treatment on different types of care wards

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Achterberg, W.P.; Pot, A.M.; Scherder, E.J.A.; Ribbe, M.W.

    2007-01-01

    ). Patients on psychogeriatric wards who had pain received less pain medication, adjusted for frequency and intensity of pain (OR 0.37 [95% CI = 0.23–0.59]), compared to patients on somatic wards. We conclude that admission to a psychogeriatric care ward, independent of cognition, is associated with

  17. The relationship between substance use and exit security on psychiatric wards

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simpson, A.; Bowers, L.; Allan, T.; Haglund, K.; Muir-Cochrane, E.; Nijman, H.L.I.; Merwe, M. van der

    2011-01-01

    Aim.  In this paper we report on the rates of drug/alcohol use on acute psychiatric wards in relation to levels and intensity of exit security measures. Background.  Many inpatient wards have become permanently locked, with staff concerned about the risk of patients leaving the ward and harming

  18. 78 FR 14543 - Ward Transformer Superfund Site; Raleigh, Wake County, NC; Notice of Settlement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-06

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY [FRL 9788-2; CERCLA-04-2013-3754] Ward Transformer Superfund Site... Ward Transformer Superfund Site located in Raleigh, Wake County, North Carolina. Under the terms of the.... Submit your comments by Site name Ward Transformer Superfund Site by one of the following methods: [[Page...

  19. 75 FR 81269 - Ward Transformer Superfund Site Raleigh, Wake County, NC; Notice of Settlements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-27

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY [Docket EPA-RO4-SFUND-2010-1053, FRL-9243-2] Ward Transformer... entered into a five settlements for reimbursement of past response costs concerning the Ward Transformer... Docket ID No. EPA-RO4- SFUND-2010-1053 or Site name Ward Transformer Superfund Site by one of the...

  20. Nurses caring for ENT patients in a district general hospital without a dedicated ENT ward score significantly less in a test of knowledge than nurses caring for ENT patients in a dedicated ENT ward in a comparable district general hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foxton, C R; Black, D; Muhlschlegel, J; Jardine, A

    2014-12-01

    To assess whether there is a difference in ENT knowledge amongst nurses caring for patients on a dedicated ENT ward and nurses caring for ENT patients in a similar hospital without a dedicated ENT ward. A test of theoretical knowledge of ENT nursing care was devised and administered to nurses working on a dedicated ENT ward and then to nurses working on generic non-subspecialist wards regularly caring for ENT patients in a hospital without a dedicated ENT ward. The test scores were then compared. A single specialist ENT/Maxillo-Facial/Opthalmology ward in hospital A and 3 generic surgical wards in hospital B. Both hospitals are comparable district general hospitals in the south west of England. Nursing staff working in hospital A and hospital B on the relevant wards were approached during the working day. 11 nurses on ward 1, 10 nurses on ward 2, 11 nurses on ward 3 and 10 nurses on ward 4 (the dedicated ENT ward). Each individual test score was used to generate an average score per ward and these scores compared to see if there was a significant difference. The average score out of 10 on ward 1 was 6.8 (+/-1.6). The average score on ward two was 4.8 (+/-1.6). The average score on ward three was 5.5 (+/-2.1). The average score on ward 4, which is the dedicated ENT ward, was 9.7 (+/-0.5). The differences in average test score between the dedicated ENT ward and all of the other wards are statistically significant. Nurses working on a dedicated ENT ward have an average higher score in a test of knowledge than nurses working on generic surgical wards. This difference is statistically significant and persists despite banding or training. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Identification and characteristics of imipenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii in surgical wards in a Chinese university hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dalin; Ma, Linlin; Wu, Zhenyu; Li, Mingcheng; Li, Xiaohan; Zhang, Wei; Chen, Kun

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence and characteristics of imipenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumanni isolated from surgical wards in a university hospital, China. A total of 143 non-duplicate A. baumannii were isolated from 517 inpatients in surgery intensive care units (ICUs), burn wards, and general surgery wards. Of these, 102 isolates of A. baumannii (71.3%) were resistant to imipenem. Among imipenem-resistant isolates, all isolates were resistant to almost all antimicrobial agents except polymyxin E, all isolates were positive for blaOXA-23 and blaOXA-51 in addition to ISAba1, 52 (51%) were positive for blaOXA-58, 8 (7.8%) contained blaVIM-2, which co-harbored with blaOXA-58. Molecular typing revealed the presence of three clones among imipenem-resistant isolates. This study confirmed that A. baumannii strains harboring OXA or VIM type β-lactamases are widely distributed throughout the surgery wards. The data demonstrate that there was a high prevalence of imipenem-resistant A. baumannii infection in the region.

  2. Ward social workers' views of what facilitates or hinders collaboration with specialist palliative care team social workers: A grounded theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firn, Janice; Preston, Nancy; Walshe, Catherine

    2017-07-14

    Inpatient, generalist social workers in discharge planning roles work alongside specialist palliative care social workers to care for patients, often resulting in two social workers being concurrently involved in the same patient's care. Previous studies identifying components of effective collaboration, which impacts patient outcomes, care efficiency, professional job satisfaction, and healthcare costs, were conducted with nurses and physicians but not social workers. This study explores ward social workers' perceptions of what facilitates or hinders collaboration with palliative care social workers. Grounded theory was used to explore the research aim. In-depth qualitative interviews with masters trained ward social workers (n = 14) working in six hospitals located in the Midwest, United States were conducted between February 2014 and January 2015. A theoretical model of ward social workers' collaboration with palliative care social workers was developed. The emerging model of collaboration consists of: 1) trust, which is comprised of a) ability, b) benevolence, and c) integrity, 2) information sharing, and 3) role negotiation. Effective collaboration occurs when all elements of the model are present. Collaboration is facilitated when ward social workers' perceptions of trust are high, pertinent information is communicated in a time-sensitive manner, and a flexible approach to roles is taken. The theoretical model of collaboration can inform organisational policy and social work clinical practice guidelines, and may be of use to other healthcare professionals, as improvements in collaboration among healthcare providers may have a positive impact on patient outcomes.

  3. The acute pulmonary oedema in the intensive-care ward

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marciniak, R.; Aronski, A.

    1989-01-01

    760 patients suffering from acute pulmonary oedema were treated between 1980 and 1986 at the Institute of Anaesthesiology of the Medical Academy in Wroclaw. The radiological image of the pulmonary oedema was subdivided into three forms (hilar, hilar and perihilar, and hilar with massive plane-shaped infiltrates). In the treatment of acute pulmonary oedema in the intensive-care ward a thorough diagnostic programme is mandatory after the immediately necessary measures have been taken. (orig.) [de

  4. Ward identity for non-equilibrium Fermi systems

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Velický, B.; Kalvová, Anděla; Špička, Václav

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 77, č. 4 (2008), 041201/1-041201/4 ISSN 1098-0121 R&D Projects: GA ČR GC202/07/J051 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520; CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : non-equilibrium * Green’s functions * quantum transport equations * Ward identity Subject RIV: BE - Theoretical Physics Impact factor: 3.322, year: 2008

  5. The background scale Ward identity in quantum gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Percacci, Roberto [International School for Advanced Studies, Trieste (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Trieste, Trieste (Italy); Vacca, Gian Paolo [INFN, Sezione di Bologna, Bologna (Italy)

    2017-01-15

    We show that with suitable choices of parametrization, gauge fixing and cutoff, the anomalous variation of the effective action under global rescalings of the background metric is identical to the derivative with respect to the cutoff, i.e. to the beta functional, as defined by the exact RG equation. The Ward identity and the RG equation can be combined, resulting in a modified flow equation that is manifestly invariant under global background rescalings. (orig.)

  6. Comparing Mental Illness Stigma among Nurses in Psychiatric and Non-Psychiatric Wards in Tabriz University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebrahimi Hossein

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Stigma can complicate people’s mental health problems by affecting different sides of personal life, increasing negative attitudes, causing discriminatory behavior towards them, and reducing the chances of recovery and returning to normal life. This research aims to compare the stigma of mental illness among nurses working in psychiatric and non-psychiatric wards in Tabriz University of Medical Sciences. A total of 240 nurses participated in this descriptive and analytic study. The data were collected using a demographic questionnaire and the Community Attitudes towards the Mentally Ill (CAMI Scale, which is a 40-item self-report questionnaire. All data were analyzed using SPSS 13. The majority of nurses have a medium level of stigma toward people with mental illness, and there is no significant relation between the type of wards and mean stigma scores. After eliminating factors such as mental illness in nurses and their families, it seems that only working with people with mental illness in psychiatric wards is not enough to create a positive attitude toward them. Additionally, the less physical activity and taking advantage of legal benefits of work hardship for psychiatric nurses, low income, and stigma toward psychiatric nursing, probably may make a difference in inclining to work in psychiatry ward between the two groups in spite of relatively equal stigma scores.

  7. User Evaluation of Neonatology Ward Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trujillo, Juan Luis Higuera; Aviñó, Antoni Montañana I; Millán, Carmen Llinares

    2017-01-01

    The object of this article is to identify the set of affective and emotional factors behind users' assessments of a space in a neonatology unit and to propose design guidelines based on these. The importance of the neonatology service and the variety of users place great demands on the space at all levels. Despite the repercussions, the emotional aspects of the environment have received less attention. To avoid incurring limitations in the user mental scheme, this study uses two complementary methodologies: focus group and semantic differential. The (qualitative) focus group methodology provides exploratory information and concepts. The (quantitative) semantic differential methodology then uses these concepts to extract the conceptual structures that users employ in their assessment of the space. Of the total 175 subjects, 31 took part in focus groups and 144 in semantic differential. Five independent concepts were identified: privacy, functionality and professional nature, spaciousness, lighting, and cleanliness. In relation to the importance of the overall positive assessment of the space, the perception of privacy and sensations of dominance and pleasure are fundamental. Six relevant design aspects were also identified: provide spacious surroundings, facilitate sufficient separation between the different posts or cots, use different colors from those usually found in health-care centers, as some aversion was found to white and especially green, design areas with childhood themes, use warm artificial light, and choose user-friendly equipment. Results provide design recommendations of interest and show the possibilities offered by combining both systems to analyze user response.

  8. Hypoxaemia in the general surgical ward--a potential risk factor?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenberg, J

    1994-01-01

    After major operations, hypoxaemia is common in the late postoperative period in the surgical ward. Recent studies of humans after major operations showed that such hypoxaemia may be related to the development of myocardial ischaemia and cardiac arrhythmias, even in patients with no preoperative...... signs or symptoms of coronary artery disease. Experimental studies have shown an adverse effect of tissue hypoxia on wound healing and on resistance to bacterial wound infections. Finally, mental confusion and surgical delirium may be related to inadequate arterial oxygenation during the late...

  9. A multi-method and multi-scale approach for estimating city-wide anthropogenic heat fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Winston T. L.; Salamanca, Francisco; Georgescu, Matei; Mahalov, Alex; Milne, Jeffrey M.; Ruddell, Benjamin L.

    2014-12-01

    A multi-method approach estimating summer waste heat emissions from anthropogenic activities (QF) was applied for a major subtropical city (Phoenix, AZ). These included detailed, quality-controlled inventories of city-wide population density and traffic counts to estimate waste heat emissions from population and vehicular sources respectively, and also included waste heat simulations derived from urban electrical consumption generated by a coupled building energy - regional climate model (WRF-BEM + BEP). These component QF data were subsequently summed and mapped through Geographic Information Systems techniques to enable analysis over local (i.e. census-tract) and regional (i.e. metropolitan area) scales. Through this approach, local mean daily QF estimates compared reasonably versus (1.) observed daily surface energy balance residuals from an eddy covariance tower sited within a residential area and (2.) estimates from inventory methods employed in a prior study, with improved sensitivity to temperature and precipitation variations. Regional analysis indicates substantial variations in both mean and maximum daily QF, which varied with urban land use type. Average regional daily QF was ∼13 W m-2 for the summer period. Temporal analyses also indicated notable differences using this approach with previous estimates of QF in Phoenix over different land uses, with much larger peak fluxes averaging ∼50 W m-2 occurring in commercial or industrial areas during late summer afternoons. The spatio-temporal analysis of QF also suggests that it may influence the form and intensity of the Phoenix urban heat island, specifically through additional early evening heat input, and by modifying the urban boundary layer structure through increased turbulence.

  10. One particle properties in the 2D Coulomb problem. Luttinger-Ward variational approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agnihotri, M.P.

    2007-01-01

    In this work, we have studied the 2D Coulomb problem. We used the Luttinger-Ward variational principle to determine the self-energy Σ in ring approximation. The use of an ansatz for Σ enables us to perform the frequency sums (integrals as T → 0) analytically. Compared to the usual procedure of iterating the self consistency equation with free Green's function as starting points, the present approach is superior. It works for higher density parameter r s (low density) where the iteration already fails to converge. The motivation of the present work is the quantum Hall system at filling factor 1/2. The Luttinger-Ward procedure is a rather powerful method in particular if combined with an analytical ansatz for Σ. The computation performed here for 2DEG has to be seen as a first step: There, the experiment shows the features of a free Fermion system that is interpreted as a system of Composite Fermions. If one studies the self energy of the Composite Fermions in an conserved approximation that corresponds to the ring approximation, one encounters a self consistency equation. However, an iterative solution of this equation meets with a complication: Instead of the polarization part Π 00 , in the case of the Composite Fermion there appears the longitudinal polarization part Π LL that has an additional factor (2k + q) 2 under the k integral. This integral converges only after the frequency integral is performed. It is highly difficult to reproduce this numerically. Here, the Luttinger-Ward variational approach applied to the 2D Coulomb problem in the present work looks promising. For the 2D Coulomb problem, in the ring approximation for the LW thermodynamic potential, that already leads to a formidable integral equation that has to be studied numerically. (orig.)

  11. Protocol for an exploration of knowledge sharing for improved discharge from a mental health ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowley, Emma; Wright, Nicola; Waring, Justin; Gregoriou, Kyri; Chopra, Arun

    2014-10-01

    Strategies to reduce hospital admissions for mental health service users have received vast amounts of attention, yet the transfer of care from hospital to the community has been ignored. The discharge process is complex, messy, disjointed and inefficient, relying on cross-agency and organisational working. Focusing on one acute mental health admission ward, we will investigate whether the discharge process for people with severe mental health problems can be enhanced through the creation, implementation and utilisation of a knowledge sharing proforma that is used on their admission to the ward. The project uses qualitative interviews to understand the complex processes associated with being admitted and discharged from inpatient mental health wards. Practitioners will be asked to identify and map the relevant stakeholders involved in admission and discharge, and discuss any problems with the process. The study team will work with clinicians to develop a knowledge collection proforma, which will be piloted for 2 months. Qualitative interviews will be carried out to collect reflections on the experiences of using the tool, with data used for further refinement of the intervention. Baseline and repeat quantitative measures will be taken to illustrate any changes to length of stay and readmission rates achieved as a result of the study. A key issue is that participants are able to comment frankly on something that is a core part of their work, without fear or reprise. It is equally important that all participants are offered the opportunity to develop and coproduce the knowledge collection proforma, in order that the intervention produced is fit for purpose and usable in the real world, away from a research environment. The study has received ethical approval from Nottingham University Business School ethics committee, and has all appropriate National Health Service research governance clearances. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use

  12. Feasibility and acceptability of rapid HIV screening in a labour ward in Togo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekouevi, Didier K; Kariyiare, Benjamin G; Coffie, Patrick A; Jutand, Marthe-Aline; Akpadza, Koffi; Lawson-Evi, Annette; Tatagan, Albert; Dabis, François; Sibe, Mathieu; Pitche, Vincent P; Becquet, Renaud; David, Mireille

    2012-01-01

    Background HIV screening in a labour ward is the last opportunity to initiate an antiretroviral prophylaxis among pregnant women living with HIV to prevent mother-to-child HIV transmission. Little is known about the feasibility and acceptability of HIV screening during labour in West Africa. Findings A cross-sectional survey was conducted in the labour ward at the Tokoin Teaching Hospital in Lomé (Togo) between May and August 2010. Pregnant women admitted for labour were randomly selected to enter the study and were interviewed on the knowledge of their HIV status. Clinical and biological data were collected from the individual maternal health chart. HIV testing or re-testing was systematically proposed to all pregnant women. Among 1530 pregnant women admitted for labour, 508 (32.2%) were included in the study. Information on HIV screening was available in the charts of 359 women (71%). Overall, 467 women accepted HIV testing in the labour ward (92%). The HIV prevalence was 8.8% (95% confidence interval: 6.4 to 11.7%). Among the 41 women diagnosed as living with HIV during labour, 34% had not been tested for HIV during pregnancy and were missed opportunities. Antiretroviral prophylaxis had been initiated antenatally for 24 women living with HIV and 17 in the labour room. Conclusions This study is the first to show in West Africa that HIV testing in a labour room is feasible and well accepted by pregnant women. HIV screening in labour rooms needs to be routinely implemented to reduce missed opportunities for intervention aimed at HIV care and prevention, especially PMTCT. PMID:22905362

  13. One particle properties in the 2D Coulomb problem. Luttinger-Ward variational approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agnihotri, M.P.

    2007-04-27

    In this work, we have studied the 2D Coulomb problem. We used the Luttinger-Ward variational principle to determine the self-energy {sigma} in ring approximation. The use of an ansatz for {sigma} enables us to perform the frequency sums (integrals as T {yields} 0) analytically. Compared to the usual procedure of iterating the self consistency equation with free Green's function as starting points, the present approach is superior. It works for higher density parameter r{sub s} (low density) where the iteration already fails to converge. The motivation of the present work is the quantum Hall system at filling factor 1/2. The Luttinger-Ward procedure is a rather powerful method in particular if combined with an analytical ansatz for {sigma}. The computation performed here for 2DEG has to be seen as a first step: There, the experiment shows the features of a free Fermion system that is interpreted as a system of Composite Fermions. If one studies the self energy of the Composite Fermions in an conserved approximation that corresponds to the ring approximation, one encounters a self consistency equation. However, an iterative solution of this equation meets with a complication: Instead of the polarization part {pi}{sub 00}, in the case of the Composite Fermion there appears the longitudinal polarization part {pi}{sub LL} that has an additional factor (2k + q){sup 2} under the k integral. This integral converges only after the frequency integral is performed. It is highly difficult to reproduce this numerically. Here, the Luttinger-Ward variational approach applied to the 2D Coulomb problem in the present work looks promising. For the 2D Coulomb problem, in the ring approximation for the LW thermodynamic potential, that already leads to a formidable integral equation that has to be studied numerically. (orig.)

  14. Crisis management on surgical wards: a simulation-based approach to enhancing technical, teamwork, and patient interaction skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Sonal; Hull, Louise; Fitzpatrick, Maureen; Sevdalis, Nick; Birnbach, David J

    2015-05-01

    To establish the efficacy of simulation-based training for improving residents' management of postoperative complications on a surgical ward. Effective postoperative care is a crucial determinant of patient outcome, yet trainees learn this through the Halstedian approach. Little evidence exists on the efficacy of simulation in this safety-critical environment. A pre-/postintervention design was employed with 185 residents from 5 hospitals. Residents participated in 2 simulated ward-based scenarios consisting of a deteriorating postoperative patient. A debriefing intervention was implemented between scenarios. Resident performance was evaluated by calibrated, blinded assessors using the validated Global Assessment Toolkit for Ward Care. This included an assessment of clinical skills (checklist of 35 tasks), team-working skills (score range 1-6 per skill), and physician-patient interaction skills. Excellent interrater reliability was achieved in all assessments (reliability 0.89-0.99, P pre = 73.7% vs post = 94.8%, P pre = 21.1% vs post = 84.2% P pre = 42.1% vs post = 100%, P pre = 36.8% vs post = 89.8%, P pre = 1.75 vs post = 3.43), leadership (pre = 2.43 vs post = 4.20), and decision-making skills (pre = 2.20 vs post = 3.81, P < 0.001). Finally, residents improved in all elements of interaction with patients: empathy, organization, and verbal and nonverbal expression (Ps < 0.001). The study provides evidence for the efficacy of ward-based team training using simulation. Such exercises should be formally incorporated into training curricula to enhance patient safety in the high-risk surgical ward environment.

  15. Psychiatric wards with locked doors--advantages and disadvantages according to nurses and mental health nurse assistants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haglund, K; von Knorring, L; von Essen, L

    2006-04-01

    To describe nurses' and mental health nurse assistants' perceptions of advantages and disadvantages about working on a psychiatric ward with a locked entrance door. Psychiatric staff sometimes needs to protect patients from harming themselves or others. To keep the entrance door locked may help staff to achieve this goal. How locked entrance doors at psychiatric wards are experienced by staff, working on these wards, has been investigated to a very limited extent. The study was explorative and descriptive. Audio taped, semi-structured interviews with open-ended questions about advantages and disadvantages about working on a psychiatric ward with a locked entrance door, were conducted with 20 nurses and 20 mental health nurse assistants. Data were analyzed with content analysis. A content analysis revealed eight categories of advantages and 18 categories of disadvantages. Most advantages mentioned by nurses and mental health nurse assistants were categorized as providing staff with control over patients, providing patients with a secure and efficient care and protecting patients and staff against 'the outside'. Most disadvantages mentioned by nurses were categorized as causing extra work for staff, making patients feel confined, making patients feel dependent and creating a non-caring environment. Most disadvantages mentioned by mental health nurse assistants were categorized as causing extra work for staff, making patients feel confined, causing emotional problems for patients, making staff's power obvious and forcing patients to adapt to other patients' needs. Nurses and mental health nurse assistants mentioned more disadvantages than advantages and nurses mentioned more disadvantages than mental health nurse assistants. Nurses and mental health nurse assistants perceive a number of advantages and disadvantages for themselves, patients and significant others with a locked door at a psychiatric ward. Most of these concern patients' experiences. It is important for

  16. Ward's area location, physical activity, and body composition in 8- and 9-year-old boys and girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardadeiro, Graça; Baptista, Fátima; Zymbal, Vera; Rodrigues, Luís A; Sardinha, Luís B

    2010-11-01

    Bone strength is the result of its material composition and structural design, particularly bone mass distribution. The purpose of this study was to analyze femoral neck bone mass distribution by Ward's area location and its relationship with physical activity (PA) and body composition in children 8 and 9 years of age. The proximal femur shape was defined by geometric morphometric analysis in 88 participants (48 boys and 40 girls). Using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) images, 18 landmarks were digitized to define the proximal femur shape and to identify Ward's area position. Body weight, lean and fat mass, and bone mineral were assessed by DXA, PA by accelerometry, and bone age by the Tanner-Whitehouse III method. Warps analysis with Thin-Plate Spline software showed that the first axis explained 63% of proximal femur shape variation in boys and 58% in girls. Most of this variation was associated with differences in Ward's area location, from the central zone to the superior aspect of the femoral neck in both genders. Regression analysis demonstrated that body composition explained 4% to 7% of the proximal femur shape variation in girls. In boys, body composition variables explained a similar amount of variance, but moderate plus vigorous PA (MVPA) also accounted for 6% of proximal femur shape variation. In conclusion, proximal femur shape variation in children ages 8 and 9 was due mainly to differences in Ward's area position determined, in part, by body composition in both genders and by MVPA in boys. These variables were positively associated with a central Ward's area and thus with a more balanced femoral neck bone mass distribution. © 2010 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  17. Risk factors for delirium – characteristics of patients at risk of delirium in Geriatric Ward

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iwona Otremba

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background. Delirium is an acute cognitive disorder comorbid with impaired consciousness and psychomotor activity. It occurs in 30–50% of patients in geriatric wards. It is the most common and least recognized syndrome in geriatrics. Objectives. The aim of the study was to formulate the characteristics of the patient’s risk of developing delirium in the Geriatric Ward. Material and methods . The study included all patients admitted to the Ward from 15 June 2013 until 15 June 2014 (n = 788. In 5% (n = 41 diagnosed symptoms of delirium. Assessment of the need for care – by Barthel, independence by IADL, the pain by VAS or DOLOPLUS, mental status by MMSE, the risk of falling by the “get up and go” test, occurrence of delirium by CAM, depth of delirium by DOM, agitation-sedation by RASS. Results. In the group with symptoms of delirium (n = 41 there were 76% (n = 31 female and 24% (n = 10 male. In 90% (n = 37 the mobility was impaired. By the Barthel 41% (n = 20 had ≤ 40 points, by IADL 78% (n = 32 had ≤ 16 points. 85% (n = 35 has high risk of falling. By VAS 71% (n = 26, (n = 36 – ≥ 4 points, the pain by DOLOPLUS – 16.7 points (15% of the group (n = 5. By MMSE 66% (n = 27 had ≤ 18 points. Delirium in an interview – 61% (n = 24. 61% (n = 26 had used ≥ 5 drugs. Incontinence – 56% (n = 25, bladder catheterization – 27% (n = 11. 83% (n = 34 had ≥ 10 risk factors for delirium. Conclusions . The patient at risk of delirium is the patient with concomitant: dementia, delirium in the past, urinary incontinence, limited mobility and pain, patients taking drugs ≥ 5, involving ≥ 10 risk factors for delirium.

  18. Differences in selected medical care parameters in rheumatic disease ward patients of different ages of life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Pobrotyn

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : Rheumatic diseases are becoming more and more common in Poland with the ageing of the population. Nearly 18% of the total hospital admissions in Poland result from rheumatic diseases, which was equivalent to 350 thousand cases in the year 2008. These diseases tend to last for many decades, decreasing both the quality of life and income of the patients as well as increasing the medical institutions’ workload and society’s financial burden. The aim of the study was to determine whether the medical care parameters in a rheumatic disease hospital ward show any significant differences among different patient age groups – especially such that would support taking them into account as a basis for adjusting the financial coverage level of medical services. Material and methods : Data on hospitalizations at the Rheumatic Diseases Ward of Wroclaw University Hospital in Wroclaw in the years 2009–2015 were analyzed, taking into account the age groups, number of hospital admissions, their duration and causes. Relevant statistical data analysis was performed. Discussion: The study revealed that the number of old patients hospitalized at the rheumatic diseases ward increased over the last 6 years and that such statistically significant differences do exist: on average the old patients not only tend to stay much longer at the hospital, but also suffer from a different and more diverse spectrum of diseases in comparison to their younger counterparts. Conclusions : The detected differences in medical care parameters support the need for more individualized medical care and increased cost of the hospital stay in the case of older patients. Consequently, those factors justify the necessity to increase the value of medical services in the case of old patients, possibly also taking into account the variation between age subgroups.

  19. Severe exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: management with noninvasive ventilation on a general medicine ward

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sirio Fiorino

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Recent evidence suggests that, with a well-trained staff, severe exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD with moderate respiratory acidosis (pH > 7.3 can be successfully treated with noninvasive mechanical ventilation (NIMV on a general respiratory care ward. We conducted an open prospective study to evaluate the efficacy of this approach on a general medicine ward. Material and methods: This study population consisted in 27 patients admitted to a general medicine ward (median nurse:patient ratio 1:12 December 1, 2004 May 31, 2006 for acute COPD exacerbation with hypercapnic respiratory failure and acidosis (arterial pH < 7.34, PaC02 > 45 mmHg. All received assist-mode NIMV (average 12 h / day via oronasal masks (inspiratory pressure 10-25 cm H2O, expiratory pressure 4-6 cm H2O to maintain O2 saturation at 90-95%. Treatment was supervised by an experienced pulmonologist, who had also provided specific training in NIMV for medical and nursing staffs (90-day course followed by periodic refresher sessions. Arterial blood pressure, O2 saturation, and respiratory rate were continuously monitored during NIMV. Based on baseline arterial pH, the COPD was classified as moderate (7.25-7.34 or severe (< 7.25. Results: In patients with moderate and severe COPD, significant improvements were seen in arterial pH after 2 (p < 0.05 and 24 h (p< 0.05 of NIMV and in the PaC02 after 24 hours (p < 0.05. Four (15% of the 27 patients died during the study hospitalization (in-hospital mortality 15%, in 2 cases due to NIMV failure. For the other 23, mean long-term survival was 14.5 months (95% CI 10.2 to 18.8, and no significant differences were found between the moderate and severe groups. Over half (61% the patients were alive 1 year after admission. Conclusions: NIMV can be a cost-effective option for management of moderate or severe COPD on a general medicine ward. Its proper use requires: close monitoring of ventilated subjects

  20. Examining the Needs of Paediatric Nurses Caring for Children and Young People Presenting with Self-Harm/Suicidal Behaviour on General Paediatric Wards: Findings from a Small-Scale Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Gemma; Foster, Celeste

    2016-01-01

    This article reports on the process and findings from a small-scale qualitative research study. The study intended to develop an evidence-based care plan/pathway for children and young people in paediatric inpatient settings presenting with self-harm/suicidal behaviour. The article includes a critical review of unanticipated challenges of…

  1. [Withholding and withdrawing treatment in patients admitted in an Internal Medicine ward].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Caballero, R; Herreros, B; Real de Asúa, D; Alonso, R; Barrera, M M; Castilla, V

    2016-01-01

    Many of the patients admitted to a general medical ward have a compromised quality of life, or short life expectancy, so they are potential candidates for withhold/withdraw (WH/WD) treatment. The first objectif was to describe which measures were WH/WD among patients who died during their admission in a general medical ward from a tertiary hospital in Madrid. Secondly, to define the clinical characteristics of this population. A cross-sectional descriptive study during 6 months from 2011 and 2012 of all the patients dead while their admission in the Internal Medicine Department. 2007 patients were admitted, 211 died (10.5%). 121 (57%) were female, with 85±9 years of mean age. 103 (48.8%) came from a residential facility and 105 fulfilled terminality criteria (49.8%). One decision to WH/WD treatment was made in 182 patients (86.3%, CI 95%: 81.4-91.1), two in 99 cases (46.9%, CI 95%: 39.9-53.9) and 3 or more in 31 subjects (14.7%, CI 95%: 9.6-19.7). The most frequent decisions involved do-not-resuscitate orders (154, 73.0%), rejection of «aggressive treatment measures» (80, 38.0%), use of antibiotics (19, 9.0%), admission in ICU (18, 8.5%), and/or surgical treatment (11, 5.2%). WH/WD treatment is very frequent among patients who died in a general medical ward. The most frequent involved do-not-resuscitate orders and rejection of «aggressive treatment measures». WH/WD decisions are adopted in an elderly population, with extensive comorbidity and an elevated prevalence of advanced dementia and/or terminal disease. Copyright © 2015 SECA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  2. Air and surface contamination patterns of meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus on eight acute hospital wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creamer, E; Shore, A C; Deasy, E C; Galvin, S; Dolan, A; Walley, N; McHugh, S; Fitzgerald-Hughes, D; Sullivan, D J; Cunney, R; Coleman, D C; Humphreys, H

    2014-03-01

    Meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) can be recovered from hospital air and from environmental surfaces. This poses a potential risk of transmission to patients. To investigate associations between MRSA isolates recovered from air and environmental surfaces with those from patients when undertaking extensive patient and environmental sampling. This was a prospective observational study of patients and their environment in eight wards of a 700-bed tertiary care hospital during 2010 and 2011. Sampling of patients, air and surfaces was carried out on all ward bays, with more extended environmental sampling in ward high-dependency bays and at particular times of the day. The genetic relatedness of isolates was determined by DNA microarray profiling and spa typing. MRSA was recovered from 30/706 (4.3%) patients and from 19/132 (14.4%) air samples. On 9/132 (6.8%) occasions both patient and air samples yielded MRSA. In 32 high-dependency bays, MRSA was recovered from 12/161 (7.4%) patients, 8/32 (25%) air samples, and 21/644 (3.3%) environmental surface samples. On 10/132 (7.6%) occasions, MRSA was isolated from air in the absence of MRSA-positive patients. Patient demographic data combined with spa typing and DNA microarray profiling revealed four likely transmission clusters, where patient and environmental isolates were deemed to be very closely related. Air sampling yielded MRSA on frequent occasions, especially in high-dependency bays. Environmental and air sampling combined with patient demographic data, spa typing and DNA microarray profiling indicated the presence of clusters that were not otherwise apparent. Copyright © 2014 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Building a relationship: communications and relationships between staff and stroke patients on a rehabilitation ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, M; O'Neill, P; Waterman, H; Webb, C

    1997-07-01

    Communications among staff and patients on a stroke rehabilitation ward form the focus of this article, which reports on some aspects of a larger study using a grounded theory approach. Tape-recorded interviews were transcribed and analysed concurrently according to recommendations for the approach. A main theme entitled building a relationship was identified, and this process was found to occur in a context varying from participative at one end of a continuum to hierarchical at the other. Building a relationship was found to be influenced by role, personal qualities and organizational context. Appropriate relationships between role-holders were subject to negotiation, leading to a resulting congruence or incongruence between participants' expectations of each other and their roles. Personal qualities were brought into play in the process, with patients' views of staff and staff views of patients both being influential. Some of these views seemed to parallel what has been described in earlier literature as 'the sick role' and the labelling of patients as 'good' or 'bad'. Responses to personal qualities led to nurses ascribing meaning to patients' behaviour in terms of adjustment to their stroke, giving time to them to help them to adjust, and withdrawal and handing over to other staff if this strategy failed. Organizational context also had an influence on building a relationship, with time constraints being identified particularly by nurses, and the need to fit in the most essential aspects of care. Place was also important, in that nurses were confined to the ward as a work location, whereas other therapists and doctors worked in other places and sometimes had the facility to take patients off the ward to concentrate on therapy. The findings are discussed against the background of related literature and the conclusion is drawn that the crucial role of nurses in rehabilitation is not recognized and valued, and that shortages of resources-especially suitably

  4. Reported implementation lessons from a national quality improvement initiative; Productive Ward: Releasing Time to Care™. A qualitative, ward-based team perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Mark; Butterworth, Tony; Wells, John S G

    2017-10-01

    To explore the experiences of participants involved in the implementation of the Productive Ward: Releasing Time to Care™ initiative in Ireland, identifying key implementation lessons. A large-scale quality improvement programme Productive Ward: Releasing Time to Care™ was introduced nationwide into Ireland in 2011. We captured accounts from ward-based teams in an implementation phase during 2013-14 to explore their experiences. Semi-structured, in-depth interviews with a purposive sample of 24 members of ward-based teams from nine sites involved in the second national phase of the initiative were conducted. Interviews were analysed and coded under themes, using a seven-stage iterative process. The predominant theme identified was associated with the implementation and management of the initiative and included: project management; training; preparation; information and communication; and participant's negative experiences. The most prominent challenge reported related to other competing clinical priorities. Despite the structured approach of Productive Ward: Releasing Time to Care™, it appears that overstretched and busy clinical environments struggle to provide the right climate and context for ward-based teams to engage and interact actively with quality improvement tools, methods and activities. Findings highlight five key aspects of implementation and management that will help facilitate successful adoption of large-scale, ward-based quality improvement programmes such as Productive Ward: Releasing Time to Care™. Utilising pre-existing implementation or quality frameworks to assess each ward/unit for 'readiness' prior to commencing a quality improvement intervention such as Productive Ward: Releasing Time to Care™ should be considered. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Etiologies of Prolonged Unconjugated Hyperbilirubinemia in Neonates Admitted to Neonatal Wards

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    Mohammad Kazem Sabzehei

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Jaundice is a common condition among neonates. Prolonged unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia occurs when jaundice persists beyond two weeks in term neonates and three weeks in preterm neonates. This study aimed to determine the etiologies of prolonged unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia in infants admitted to the neonatal ward of Besat Hospital in Hamadan, Iran. Methods: This study was conducted on all infants diagnosed with prolonged unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia during 2007-2012 in the neonatal ward of Besat Hospital in Hamadan, Iran. Demographic characteristics of infants, physical examination and laboratory findings were collected and analyzed to determine the etiologies of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia. Results: In total, 100 infants diagnosed with neonatal hyperbilirubinemia were enrolled in this study, including 49 male and 51 female neonates with mean age of 20±1 days and mean bilirubin level of 17.5±4.0 mg/dL. Main causes of hyperbilirubinemia were urinary tract infection, ABO incompatibility, hypothyroidism and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency in 14%, 5%, 6% and 5% of neonates, respectively. Moreover, unknown etiologies, such as breastfeeding, were detected in 70% of the studied infants. Conclusion: According to the results of this study, determining the main causes of prolonged unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia in neonates is of paramount importance. In the majority of cases, neonatal hyperbilirubinemia is associated with physiological factors, such as breastfeeding.

  6. The Effects of Increasing the Capacity of Admission in Emergency Ward in increasing the Rate of Patient Acceptance at the Time of Crisis

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    S Geravandi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aim: The emergency ward at the time of a disaster is the most important ward for providing therapy service to the injured. The purpose of this research study was to study of the effects of increasing the capacity of admission in emergency ward in increasing the rate of patient acceptance at the time of crisis at Razi Educational Hospital, Ahvaz, Iran. Methods: The present interventional study was performed to determine role of the increase of capacity to emergency ward in increase rate of patient acceptance at the time of disaster. After one year a re-evaluation of the capacity of the emergency department was conducted. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics. Results: The results of this study showed that the capacity to accept patients was 16 injured in time of disasters at the emergency ward before reform measures. After performing reforms, this capacity increased to 42 patients. The findings also showed that the implementation of appropriate capacity building increased 2.6 times, thus led to increasing the readiness and service delivery in times of crisis and emergency department of the disaster. Conclusion: Based on the findings, it could be concluded that planning and action to be carried out in hospital emergency departments by the crisis committee increased the admission capacity of the injured during the crisis.

  7. Intensive care survivors' experiences of ward-based care: Meleis' theory of nursing transitions and role development among critical care outreach services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsay, Pam; Huby, Guro; Thompson, Andrew; Walsh, Tim

    2014-03-01

    To explore the psychosocial needs of patients discharged from intensive care, the extent to which they are captured using existing theory on transitions in care and the potential role development of critical care outreach, follow-up and liaison services. Intensive care patients are at an increased risk of adverse events, deterioration or death following ward transfer. Nurse-led critical care outreach, follow-up or liaison services have been adopted internationally to prevent these potentially avoidable sequelae. The need to provide patients with psychosocial support during the transition to ward-based care has also been identified, but the evidence base for role development is currently limited. Twenty participants were invited to discuss their experiences of ward-based care as part of a broader study on recovery following prolonged critical illness. Psychosocial distress was a prominent feature of their accounts, prompting secondary data analysis using Meleis et al.'s mid-range theory on experiencing transitions. Participants described a sense of disconnection in relation to profound debilitation and dependency and were often distressed by a perceived lack of understanding, indifference or insensitivity among ward staff to their basic care needs. Negotiating the transition between dependence and independence was identified as a significant source of distress following ward transfer. Participants varied in the extent to which they were able to express their needs and negotiate recovery within professionally mediated boundaries. These data provide new insights into the putative origins of the psychosocial distress that patients experience following ward transfer. Meleis et al.'s work has resonance in terms of explicating intensive care patients' experiences of psychosocial distress throughout the transition to general ward-based care, such that the future role development of critical care outreach, follow-up and liaison services may be more theoretically informed

  8. Words in Maternity Wards: An Aproximation to Perinatal Psychology

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    Alicia Oiberman

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The acknowledgment that just born babies interact with human and physical contexts originated changes in behaviors of health teems working in maternity wards settings. Concepts such as initial interactions, attachment, dyads, maternal vulnerability, behavioral competences of the just born babies and their applications to perinatal psychology, marked a transformation in different professionals involved in birth’s approaches. From one side, it can be said that medicalization of the birth act in Western societies had allowed to minimize risk factors. But this progress had been carried out without taking into account emotional expressions. The introduction of psychological interventions in neonatal periods is a new field of knowledge. History shows that in different periods and cultures there were amulets, potions and other elements associated with magic that were used to swear baby or mother’s death risk during childbirth. All these practices were taken the place of words, in a hard emotional moment: parturition. It was necessary to walk a long and difficult road for Perinatal Psycholy to recuperate the ancient place of old good women and incorporate words in maternity wards, knowing that the main scenery is first occupied by the mother’s body and then by the baby. Our daily job in a maternity ward, working together with pediatricians and neonatologists, allowed us to verify that words come out when psychologists themselves “include their body” as well as do mothers, babies and the medical teem. Words contribute to facilitate emotional expressions related to motherhood and place the baby in the family history, making able his or her “psychological birth”. 

  9. Arrival in the labour ward in second stage of labour--any prognostic significance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nkyekyer, K

    1998-05-01

    A comparative descriptive study was carried out to determine whether, in uncomplicated term pregnancies with the foetus in vertex presentation, there were any differences in maternal or foetal outcome between women who arrived in the labour ward in second stage of labour and those who arrived in early active phase. There were two hundred and seventeen women each in the study and comparison groups. There were no significant differences between the two groups as regards age, parity, marital status and level of education. Women in the comparison group were better antenatal clinic attendants. Those in the study group were more likely to have indicated that they had problems with transportation. They also had considerably shorter labours and all achieved spontaneous vaginal deliveries; a significant proportion (10.6%) of the comparison group had interventional deliveries. The incidence of episiotomies, lower genital tract injuries, manual removal of placenta and postpartum haemorrhage after vaginal delivery were not different between the two groups. Babies born to mothers in the study group were significantly lighter, by about 170 gms, and had a lower incidence of low one-minute Apgar scores. There were no significant differences in the rates of admission to the neonatal intensive care unit or in early neonatal deaths. Arrival in the labour ward in second stage of labour prognosticates non-interventional delivery without any increased risk of adverse outcome to the mother or her baby.

  10. A need for play specialists in Japanese children's wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Kyoko; Yoshikawa, Naomi; Kudo, Noriko; Negishi, Yoshie; Shimizu, Toshiaki; Hayata, Noriko

    2010-07-01

    The importance of distraction techniques and play therapy for sick children has long been recognised by nurses in the UK and other western countries. Although these techniques are not so well established in Japan there is growing interest in them. The authors conducted a survey and found that children's nurses in Japan appreciated the value of distraction techniques and play therapy. They argue that attitudes to using them on children's wards in Japan are changing, but there is still a lack of training and few play specialists.

  11. Lifshitz anomalies, Ward identities and split dimensional regularization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arav, Igal; Oz, Yaron; Raviv-Moshe, Avia [Raymond and Beverly Sackler School of Physics and Astronomy, Tel-Aviv University,55 Haim Levanon street, Tel-Aviv, 69978 (Israel)

    2017-03-16

    We analyze the structure of the stress-energy tensor correlation functions in Lifshitz field theories and construct the corresponding anomalous Ward identities. We develop a framework for calculating the anomaly coefficients that employs a split dimensional regularization and the pole residues. We demonstrate the procedure by calculating the free scalar Lifshitz scale anomalies in 2+1 spacetime dimensions. We find that the analysis of the regularization dependent trivial terms requires a curved spacetime description without a foliation structure. We discuss potential ambiguities in Lifshitz scale anomaly definitions.

  12. Hybrid Patient Record – Supporting Hybrid Interaction in Clinical Wards

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Houben, Steven; Schmidt, Mathias; Frost, Mads

    2015-01-01

    Despite the widespread dissemination of the electronic health record, the paper medical record remains an important central artefact in modern clinical work. A number of new technological solutions have been proposed to mitigate some of the configuration, mobility and awareness problems that emerge...... when using this dual record setup. In this paper, we present one such technology, the HyPR device, in which a paper record is augmented with an electronic sensing platform that is designed to reduce the configuration overhead, provide awareness cues and support mobility across the patient ward. Our...

  13. Dealing with conflict - The role of the ward sister

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    L.M. Cremer

    1980-09-01

    Full Text Available In the course of her duties, the ward sister has to contend with many forms of conflict, discord and dissension. These involve conflict of the intrapersonal, interpersonal and intergroup varieties. Conflict is in the main, disruptive and dysfunctional. Skilful management, however, embodying cooperative effort in its reduction can produce constructive and positive results. Conflict management strategies are therefore either restrictive or constructive. Persons in serious conflict suffer varied degrees of personality disequilibrium, which necessitates emotional first aid or crisis intervention. Such primary preventive care is applicable to patients, their relatives, and members of the nursing staff in such need.

  14. The educational value of ward rounds for junior trainees

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    Faidon-Marios Laskaratos

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The ward round (WR is a complex task and medical teachers are often faced with the challenge of finding a balance between service provision and clinical development of learners. The educational value of WRs is an under-researched area. This short communication aims to evaluate the educational role of WRs for junior trainees and provides insight into current practices. It also identifies obstacles to effective teaching/training in this setting and provides suggestions for improving the quality of WR teaching.

  15. Lifshitz anomalies, Ward identities and split dimensional regularization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arav, Igal; Oz, Yaron; Raviv-Moshe, Avia

    2017-01-01

    We analyze the structure of the stress-energy tensor correlation functions in Lifshitz field theories and construct the corresponding anomalous Ward identities. We develop a framework for calculating the anomaly coefficients that employs a split dimensional regularization and the pole residues. We demonstrate the procedure by calculating the free scalar Lifshitz scale anomalies in 2+1 spacetime dimensions. We find that the analysis of the regularization dependent trivial terms requires a curved spacetime description without a foliation structure. We discuss potential ambiguities in Lifshitz scale anomaly definitions.

  16. Caring for patients with cancer in non-specialist wards: the nurse experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, S; Wilkes, L M; Ogunsiji, O; Walker, A

    2005-07-01

    This study aims to describe the experiences of nurses caring for cancer patients in non-specialist wards. The study was conducted in a large (420 beds) and small (32 beds) hospital in an area health service with urban and rural populations in the west of Sydney. A qualitative descriptive approach was utilized to collect data from the nurses. Data were collected using a survey and in-depth interviews of nurses working in non-specialist cancer wards. Transcribed data were managed with Nudist Vivo software and analysed for common themes using process of constant comparison and contrast. Twenty-five surveys were returned and five nurses volunteered to be interviewed. The six major themes that emerged from analysis of data were: emotional nature of care, lack of time, lack of knowledge of cancer treatment, family support, environment not conducive to proper care and dealing with patient's non-acceptance of cancer diagnosis. The nurses in this study wished to provide quality supportive care for cancer patients and their families but the inconducive environment and inadequate relevant training hindered the nurses' efforts. This then presents further need of relevant training for nurses in cancer care and time management, to meet up with these challenges.

  17. Secondary hyperparathyroidism prevalence and profile, between diabetic and non-diabetic patients with stage 3 to 4 chronic kidney disease attended in internal medicine wards. MiPTH study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arévalo-Lorido, José Carlos; Carretero-Gómez, Juana; García-Sánchez, Francisco; Maciá-Botejara, Enrique; Ramiro-Lozano, José Manuel; Masero-Carretero, Antonio; Robles, Nicolás Roberto; Bureo-Dacal, Juan Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPTH) is a leading cause of renal osteodystrophy, and an independent risk factor for all-cause and cardiovascular mortality. Our aim is to establish differences in prevalence and profile of SHPTH, regarding diabetics or non-diabetics with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Cross-sectional multicenter study which included patients with stages 3 to 4 CKD. SHPTH was considered when the intact PTH levels (iPTH) were equal or higher than 70pg/ml. We divided the sample into two groups (diabetics and non-diabetics). We used robust statistical methods. 409 patients (214 diabetics) were studied. HPTH was found in 60.4% of diabetics vs 65% of non-diabetics (P=0.42). Diabetics with HPTH were younger (79.5 vs 82.3 years-old, P=0.005), and had more hypertension (P=0.0014), dyslipidemia (P=0.0001) and comorbidities. In multivariate analysis, we found a significant relationship in case of diabetics, with age (OR: 1.04, 95%CI 1.005-1.09 P=0.02 ), and with statins treatment (OR 2.3, 95%CI 1.17-4.54, P=0.01). The prevalence of SHPTH between the groups was similar, however, diabetics had more presence of hypertension and dyslipidemia, and SHPTH in this case was also related with moderate microalbuminuria and lower levels of vitamin D. An association with statins was also found in this group. Copyright © 2016 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Infection-free surgery: how to improve hand-hygiene compliance and eradicate methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus from surgical wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, C R

    2010-05-01

    Healthcare-associated infections cost the UK National Health Service 1 billion UK pounds per annum. Poor hand hygiene is the main route of transmission for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), leading to increased mortality and morbidity for infected patients. This study aims to quantify MRSA infection rates and compliance of alcohol gel application at the entrance to a surgical ward and assess how a simple intervention affects compliance. Compliance was assessed via a discretely positioned close-surveillance camera at the ward entrance. Footage was reviewed to monitor compliance of all persons entering the ward over a 12-month period. For the initial 6 months, mean alcohol gel compliance was 24% for all persons entering the ward. After this period, a conspicuous strip of bright red tape was positioned along the corridor approaching the ward entrance. The red line continued up the wall to an arrow head pointing to the two alcohol gel dispensers on the wall. Mean compliance over the subsequent 6 months significantly improved to 62% (P porters (21% - 67%, P 0.05). There were two cases of MRSA bacteraemia in the initial 6 months and no cases in the following 6 months with the red line in situ. This study demonstrates how a simple intervention significantly improves hand-hygiene compliance with associated eradication of MRSA.

  19. Understanding the modifiable health systems barriers to hypertension management in Malaysia: a multi-method health systems appraisal approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risso-Gill, Isabelle; Balabanova, Dina; Majid, Fadhlina; Ng, Kien Keat; Yusoff, Khalid; Mustapha, Feisul; Kuhlbrandt, Charlotte; Nieuwlaat, Robby; Schwalm, J-D; McCready, Tara; Teo, Koon K; Yusuf, Salim; McKee, Martin

    2015-07-03

    The growing burden of non-communicable diseases in middle-income countries demands models of care that are appropriate to local contexts and acceptable to patients in order to be effective. We describe a multi-method health system appraisal to inform the design of an intervention that will be used in a cluster randomized controlled trial to improve hypertension control in Malaysia. A health systems appraisal was undertaken in the capital, Kuala Lumpur, and poorer-resourced rural sites in Peninsular Malaysia and Sabah. Building on two systematic reviews of barriers to hypertension control, a conceptual framework was developed that guided analysis of survey data, documentary review and semi-structured interviews with key informants, health professionals and patients. The analysis followed the patients as they move through the health system, exploring the main modifiable system-level barriers to effective hypertension management, and seeking to explain obstacles to improved access and health outcomes. The study highlighted the need for the proposed intervention to take account of how Malaysian patients seek treatment in both the public and private sectors, and from western and various traditional practitioners, with many patients choosing to seek care across different services. Patients typically choose private care if they can afford to, while others attend heavily subsidised public clinics. Public hypertension clinics are often overwhelmed by numbers of patients attending, so health workers have little time to engage effectively with patients. Treatment adherence is poor, with a widespread belief, stemming from concepts of traditional medicine, that hypertension is a transient disturbance rather than a permanent asymptomatic condition. Drug supplies can be erratic in rural areas. Hypertension awareness and education material are limited, and what exist are poorly developed and ineffective. Despite having a relatively well funded health system offering good access to

  20. Assessment of Midwives’ Communication Skills at the Maternity Wards of Teaching Hospitals in Mashhad in 2014

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    Talate Khadivzadeh

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background & aim:The quality of communication between midwives and parturient women is a determinant of maternal satisfaction with midwifery care. Therefore, this study was conducted to determine the communication skills of midwives at maternity wards of Mashhad teaching hospitals in 2014.   Methods:In this descriptive study, 49 midwives, working at Mashhad teaching hospitals, were randomly selected. All midwives worked rotating shifts at the wards. The midwives’ communication skills were assessed by the researcher, using the self-structured  observation checklist of communicative performance.   Results: The mean age of midwives was 39.11±9.66 years and their mean work experience was 15.9±8.77 years. In total, 68.3% of the participants experienced childbirth themselves. 66.7% of midwives were moderately  keen on midwifery as a profession. The mean score of the checklist obtained by midwives was 67.9±10.7. There was no relationship between midwives’ communication skills and work experience, childbirth experience, age or interest in midwifery. Conclusion:Considering the inadequacy of midwives’ communication skills, which could be the major cause of maternal dissatisfaction with delivery care, it is recommended that in-service training courses be held by applying new teaching methods. Moreover, the educational needs of midwives, including communication skills, should be considered in these training programs .

  1. Glycemic control in the infectious diseases ward; role of clinical pharmacist interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farsaei, Shadi; Karimzadeh, Iman; Elyasi, Sepideh; Hatamkhani, Shima; Khalili, Hossein

    2014-04-15

    Hyperglycemia is one of the most frequent metabolic complications in hospitalized patients. Increased risk of infection following hyperglycemia has been reported in hospitalized patients and infections may also cause insulin resistance which complicates the control of blood glucose level. In this study the impact of the clinical pharmacist interventions on the glycemic control in patients admitted to infectious diseases ward has been evaluated. We conducted a prospective, pre-post interventional study among patients with hyperglycemia. The clinical pharmacist-led multidisciplinary team managed the glycemic profile of patients according to an established insulin protocol commonly used in internal wards. Clinical pharmacists reviewed patients' medical charts for proper insulin administration, evaluated nurses' technique for insulin injection and blood glucose measurement, and educated patients about symptoms of hypoglycemia and the importance of adherence to different aspects of their glycemic management. The percentage of controlled random blood sugar increased from 13.8% in the pre-intervention to 22.3% in the post-intervention group (p value percentage of controlled fasting blood sugars in the post-intervention group was non-significantly higher than in the pre-intervention group. Pharmacists and additional health care providers from other departments such as nursing and dietary departments need to be devoted to glycemic control service. Collaborative practice agreement between physicians is necessary to promote this service and help to increase the use of such services in different settings for diabetes control.

  2. Pediatric resident perceptions of shift work in ward rotations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Osamu; Mishina, Hiroki; Jasti, Harish; Sakai, Hirokazu; Ishiguro, Akira

    2017-10-01

    Although the long working hours of physicians are considered to be a social issue, no effective policies such as duty hour regulations have so far been proposed in Japan. We implemented an overnight call shift (OCS) system for ward rotations to improve the working environment for residents in a pediatric residency program. We later conducted a cross-sectional questionnaire asking the residents to compare this system with the traditional overnight call system. Forty-one pediatric residents participated in this survey. The residents felt that the quality of patient care improved (80.4% agreed). Most felt that there was less emphasis on education (26.8%) and more emphasis on service (31.7%). Overall, the residents reported that the OCS was beneficial (90.2%). In conclusion, the pediatric residents considered the OCS system during ward rotations as beneficial. Alternative solutions are vital to balance improvements in resident work conditions with the requirement for a high quality of education. © 2017 Japan Pediatric Society.

  3. ROMANO-WARD SYNDROME ASSOCIATED WITH TU ELECTRICAL ALTERNANS

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    DJAWAN

    1981-05-01

    Full Text Available A case o f the electrical alternans of t he TU wave and peri odic nega t ive U wave associated with c l ini cal symptoms , e lectrocardi ographic a nd postmortem findi ng s o f Romano- Ward Syndrome has been pres ented. No e lec ~ r o l y te d ist urbance was found t o be r esponsible for t his exceptional l y rare situation . Changes i n A-V conduct i on and left bu n• d Ie branch block could be a t tributed to the d i f f use c or onary s clero sis and s ubs equent i schemia in the myocardial c onduction t.issues . The e lectrical alternans of t he U wave or TU complex of the e lectrocardiogram i s an exceeding ly r are s i t uation without any clearly known mechanism for i ts appea rance . A case of thi s phenome no~ i n as soc iation with RomanoWard Syndrome has been presented whe rein an abnorma l ity i n A-V conduction and left bund le branch block cou ld be encountered .

  4. The Full Ward-Takahashi Identity for Colored Tensor Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Sánchez, Carlos I.

    2018-03-01

    Colored tensor models (CTM) is a random geometrical approach to quantum gravity. We scrutinize the structure of the connected correlation functions of general CTM-interactions and organize them by boundaries of Feynman graphs. For rank- D interactions including, but not restricted to, all melonic φ^4 -vertices—to wit, solely those quartic vertices that can lead to dominant spherical contributions in the large- N expansion—the aforementioned boundary graphs are shown to be precisely all (possibly disconnected) vertex-bipartite regularly edge- D-colored graphs. The concept of CTM-compatible boundary-graph automorphism is introduced and an auxiliary graph calculus is developed. With the aid of these constructs, certain U (∞)-invariance of the path integral measure is fully exploited in order to derive a strong Ward-Takahashi Identity for CTMs with a symmetry-breaking kinetic term. For the rank-3 φ^4 -theory, we get the exact integral-like equation for the 2-point function. Similarly, exact equations for higher multipoint functions can be readily obtained departing from this full Ward-Takahashi identity. Our results hold for some Group Field Theories as well. Altogether, our non-perturbative approach trades some graph theoretical methods for analytical ones. We believe that these tools can be extended to tensorial SYK-models.

  5. The impact on the workload of the Ward Manager with the introduction of administrative assistants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locke, Rachel; Leach, Camilla; Kitsell, Fleur; Griffith, Jacki

    2011-03-01

    To evaluate the impact on the workload of the Ward Manager (WM) with the introduction of administrative assistants into eight trusts in the South of England in a year-long pilot. Ward Managers are nurse leaders who are responsible for ward management and delivering expert clinical care to patients. They have traditionally been expected to achieve this role without administrative assistance. Meeting the workload demands of multiple roles and overload has meant the leadership and clinical role has suffered, presenting issues of low morale among existing WMs and issues of recruiting the next generation of WMs. Sixty qualitative interviews were carried out with 16 WMs, 12 Ward Manager Assistants (WMAs), and six senior nurse executives about the impact of the introduction of the WMA post. Quantitative data to measure change in WM workload and ward activity was supplied by 24 wards. Ward Managers reported spending reduced time on administrative tasks and having increased time available to spend on the ward with patients and leading staff. With the introduction of WMAs, there was also improvement in key performance measures (the maintenance of quality under service pressures) and increased staff motivation. There was overwhelming support for the introduction of administrative assistants from participating WMs. The WMAs enabled WMs to spend more time with patients and, more widely, to provide greater support to ward teams. The success of the pilot is reflected in wards working hard to be able to extend contracts of WMAs. The extent of the success is reflected in wards that were not participants in the pilot, observing the benefits of the post, having worked to secure funding to recruit their own WMAs. The widespread introduction of administrative assistance could increase ward productivity and provide support for clinical leaders. Continuing professional development for WMs needs to incorporate training about management responsibilities and how to best use administrative

  6. Multi-method laboratory user evaluation of an actionable clinical performance information system: Implications for usability and patient safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Benjamin; Balatsoukas, Panos; Williams, Richard; Sperrin, Matthew; Buchan, Iain

    2018-01-01

    questionnaires revealed PINGR is user-friendly, and that improved information prioritisation could further promote useful user action. Comparing our results with the wider usability literature we refine a previously published set of interface design recommendations for e-A&F. The implications for patient safety are significant regarding: user engagement; actionability; and information prioritisation. Our results also support adopting multi-method approaches in usability studies to maximise issue discovery and the credibility of findings. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Serum concentrations of psychotropic drugs in neonates as a PROgnOstic Factor for admission to the neonatology ward and withdrawal symptoms: PROOF-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparla, Shirley C A; Coppens, Hans; Evers, Inge M; Stramrood, Claire A I; Pasker-de Jong, Pieternel C M; van der Westerlaken, Monique M L; Hogeman, Paul H G; Malingré, Mirte M

    2017-05-01

    The aim is to determine whether serum drug concentrations obtained from the neonate's umbilical cord can be used as a prognostic factor for admission to the neonatology ward and the occurrence of withdrawal symptoms. A retrospective observational monocenter cohort study was carried out among pregnant women using psychotropic drugs and their baby. Binary logistic regression was used for the multivariate analysis. Of the 186 neonates included, 22.6% (n=42) were admitted to the neonatology ward, 6.5% (n=12) because of withdrawal. Among women with therapeutic concentrations of psychotropic medication, 22.0% (n=5) of the neonates had withdrawal symptoms. When comparing neonates with therapeutic versus undetectable drug concentrations, an odds ratio of 3.1 (95% confidence interval: 1.1-8.6) was found for admission to the neonatology ward and an odds ratio of 20.5 (95% confidence interval: 2.2-186.1) for the occurrence of withdrawal symptoms. Therapeutic concentrations of psychotropic drugs in neonates' umbilical cord blood correspond with higher odds for admission to the neonatology ward and the occurrence of withdrawal symptoms compared with neonates with undetectable drug concentrations. The measurement of drug concentrations in the neonate may contribute toward the general clinical assessment of the physician to predict the necessity of admission to the neonatology ward and the risk of withdrawal symptoms.

  8. [LONG-TERM SURVIVAL OF DUAL DISORDERS PATIENTS AFTER MIXED CARE IN DUAL DISORDERS AND STANDARD WARDS VERSUS CARE ONLY IN DUAL DISORDERS WARD].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimelfarb, Yuri; Wolf, Aviva; Ben-Tzarfati, Mashit

    2017-01-01

    Dual disorders (co-occurring mental illness and substance abuse disorders in the same person) are extremely common among patients receiving mental health services. Integrated treatment has been proposed as the standard of care and it describes a flexible combination of treatments from the mental health and addiction fields that are blended together in the therapy. Scientific evidence for survival of dual disorders patients (DDPs), who had integrated dual disorders inpatient care, is lacking. To determine the long term survival rates following integrated care (Integrated Dual Diagnosis Treatment Ward [IDDTW] only) versus mixed care (IDDTW and psychiatric wards) during the life-time of DDPs. The charts of 333 subjects admitted to IDDTW during the period January 2002 - June 2006 were assessed at least 8 years after the first admission. Psychiatric diagnoses have been established and grouped according to international classification of diseases and health-related problems -10th edition (ICD-10). The Kaplan-Meier survival analysis was used to estimate the cumulative survival rates in all the subpopulations, and the predictive values of different variables were assessed by Cox proportional-hazards regression model. The total all-cause 12-year, unadjusted mortality was 21.1% in integrated care versus 24.6% in mixed care (pintegrated care as a predictive factor for all-cause mortality. The findings showed that there was no consistent evidence to support integrated inpatient care over mixed care, as measured by long-term survival. More studies are required in order to address the challenges posed in the treatment of DDPs.

  9. Application of a multi-method approach in characterization of natural aquatic colloids from different sources along Huangpu River in Shanghai, China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Caixia [School of Geography and Environment, Key Laboratory of Poyang Lake Wetland and Watershed Research, Ministry of Education, Jiangxi Normal University, 99 Ziyang Road, Nanchang 330022 (China); Center for Environmental Nanoscience and Risk, Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, 921 Assembly Street, Columbia 29208 (United States); State Key Laboratory of Estuarine and Coastal Research, East China Normal University, 3663 North Zhongshan Road, Shanghai 200062 (China); Nie, Minghua [School of Geography and Environment, Key Laboratory of Poyang Lake Wetland and Watershed Research, Ministry of Education, Jiangxi Normal University, 99 Ziyang Road, Nanchang 330022 (China); Lead, Jamie R. [Center for Environmental Nanoscience and Risk, Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, 921 Assembly Street, Columbia 29208 (United States); Yang, Yi [State Key Laboratory of Estuarine and Coastal Research, East China Normal University, 3663 North Zhongshan Road, Shanghai 200062 (China); Key Laboratory of Geographic Information Science of the Ministry of Education, Department of Geosciences, East China Normal University, 3663 North Zhongshan Road, Shanghai, 200062 (China); Zhou, Junliang [State Key Laboratory of Estuarine and Coastal Research, East China Normal University, 3663 North Zhongshan Road, Shanghai 200062 (China); Merrifield, Ruth [Center for Environmental Nanoscience and Risk, Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, 921 Assembly Street, Columbia 29208 (United States); Baalousha, Mohammed, E-mail: MBAALOUS@mailbox.sc.edu [Center for Environmental Nanoscience and Risk, Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, 921 Assembly Street, Columbia 29208 (United States)

    2016-06-01

    Natural colloid properties and the impact of human activities on these properties are important considerations for studies seeking to understand the fate and transport of pollutants. In this study, the relationship between size and fluorescence properties of natural colloids from 4 different sources were quantified using a multi-method analytical approach including UV–visible and fluorescence spectroscopy, flow field flow fractionation (FlFFF) coupled online to fluorescence spectrometer, and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Results indicate that colloids from pristine natural river water have higher aromaticity and humification, higher fluorescent intensity, and smaller size compared to those from the rivers impacted by livestock. The majority of colloids are smaller than 10 nm in size as measured by AFM and FlFFF. Colloid size measured by FlFFF coupled to fluorescence spectroscopy increases in the order peak C (Ex/Em at 300–340/400–460 nm) < peak D (Ex/Em at 210–230/340–360 nm) < peak T (Ex/Em at 270–280/330–370 nm) < peak A (Ex/Em at 210–250/400–460 nm), revealing that optical properties such as fluorescence are correlated with size. This trend is confirmed by the principal component analysis, which demonstrates that the first principal component (PC1) reflecting colloid optical properties decrease with the increase in PC3 which is correlated to the colloid size. - Highlights: • Natural aquatic colloids from different sources were isolated using cross flow ultrafiltration. • Multi-method approach is applied for colloidal characterization. • Colloids in pristine natural river water showed higher aromaticity, humification, fluorescent intensity, and smaller sizes. • Optical properties of colloids are size-dependent.

  10. Evaluation of the decision support system for antimicrobial treatment, TREAT, in an acute medical ward of a university hospital

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arboe, Bente; Laub, Rasmus Rude; Kronborg, Gitte

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: TREAT, a decision support system for antimicrobial therapy, was implemented in an acute medical ward. METHODS: Patients admitted on suspicion of infection were included in the study. The evaluation of TREAT was done both retrospectively and prospectively. Coverage of empirical...... antimicrobial treatments was compared to recommendations from TREAT and the optimal use of local guidelines. RESULTS: Five hundred and eleven patients were included, of whom 162 had a microbiologically documented infection. In the retrospective part of the study, TREAT, physician, and guideline antimicrobial.......247). The coverage of TREAT advice for the bacteraemia patients was non-inferior to the physicians (p=1.00). CONCLUSIONS: TREAT can potentially improve the ecological costs of empirical antimicrobial therapy for patients in acute medical wards, but provided lower coverage than local guidelines....

  11. Estimating the intensity of ward admission and its effect on emergency department access block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Wei; Cao, Jiguo; Gallagher, Marcus; Wiles, Janet

    2013-07-10

    Emergency department access block is an urgent problem faced by many public hospitals today. When access block occurs, patients in need of acute care cannot access inpatient wards within an optimal time frame. A widely held belief is that access block is the end product of a long causal chain, which involves poor discharge planning, insufficient bed capacity, and inadequate admission intensity to the wards. This paper studies the last link of the causal chain-the effect of admission intensity on access block, using data from a metropolitan hospital in Australia. We applied several modern statistical methods to analyze the data. First, we modeled the admission events as a nonhomogeneous Poisson process and estimated time-varying admission intensity with penalized regression splines. Next, we established a functional linear model to investigate the effect of the time-varying admission intensity on emergency department access block. Finally, we used functional principal component analysis to explore the variation in the daily time-varying admission intensities. The analyses suggest that improving admission practice during off-peak hours may have most impact on reducing the number of ED access blocks. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Pattern and outcome of patients discharged from chest ward of a university hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruchi Sachdeva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To describe morbidity and mortality profile of patients discharged from chest ward of a university hospital. Materials and Methods: Prospectively selected information (age, gender, residence, length of stay, outcome and primary diagnosis of all consecutive in-patients was recorded for six month reference period. Results: Out of 967 patients, mean age was 50.64 years (±15.71; M:F = 3.5:1; 81.3% were from rural area. Primary diagnosis was tuberculosis/sequel among 528 (54.60% and non-TB among 439 (45.4% patients (chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases [COPD] - 20.3%; pneumonia - 15.8%; lung cancer - 5.0%; asthma - 1.6%; bronchiectasis - 0.9%, lung abscess - 0.8%, miscellaneous - 1.0%. Total deaths observed was 142 (14.7% of all discharges and 54.25% of deaths occurred within 48 hours of admission suggesting criticality/late presentation; time distribution of death was similar considering 8-hourly period of 24-h cycle. Average length of stay for all patients was 6.91 (±5.14 days while it was 7.38 (±4.98 days for discharge live and 4.19 (±5.21 days for expired patients. Conclusion: Study provides a snapshot of patients discharged from chest ward that may aid in decision making, improving quality of care and initiation of educational activities at primary level.

  13. [Cases of pertussis among healthcare workers in a maternity ward: management of a health alert].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanjak, D; Delaporte, M F; Bonmarin, I; Levardon, M; Fantin, B

    2006-03-01

    Pertussis is a highly contagious acute respiratory tract infection, with a poor prognosis in non-vaccinated new-borns. The authors had for aim to investigate an epidemic of 5 pertussis cases among health care workers (HCW) in our maternity ward with potential exposure of new-borns and to evaluate HCW compliance and experience gain. A retrospective study was made using a questionnaire with HCW on preventive measures taken (antibiotic prophylaxis with erythromycin and wearing a mask). Two hundred and thirty-eight patients were warned of a potential pertussis contamination. No nosocomial case was detected among patients or their new borns. Ten proved or probable cases were identified among 101 HCW having answered (N=101/210, 48%). Sixty percent of HCW people followed the antibiotic treatment and 85% wore a mask among whom 46% adequately. Non-compliance factors were mainly related to adverse effects (41%), delayed information (41%), and false vaccine protection (22%). Crisis communication was felt as unsatisfactory for 72% of HCW and recommendations not adapted for 39% of the staff. This survey points out the difficulty of managing a pertussis alert in a medical ward.

  14. Challenges of the ward round teaching based on the experiences of medical clinical teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamran Soltani Arabshahi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Holding educational sessions in a clinical environment is a major concern for faculty members because of its special difficulties and restrictions. This study attempts to recognize the challenges of the ward round teaching through investigating the experiences of clinical teachers in 2011. Materials and Methods: This qualitative research is carried out through purposive sampling with maximum variation from among the clinical teachers of major departments in Isfahan University of Medical Sciences (9 persons. The sampling continued until data saturation. Data were collected through semi-structured interview and analyzed through Collaizzi method. Data reliability and validity was confirmed through the four aspects of Lincoln and Guba method (credibility, conformability, transferability, and dependability. Results: Three major themes and their related sub-themes (minor themes were found out including the factors related to the triad of clinical teaching (patient, learner, and clinical teacher (concern about patient′s welfare, poor preparation, lack of motivation, ethical problems, factors related to the educational environment (stressful environment, humiliating environment and poor communication and the factors related to the educational system of the clinical environment (poor organizing and arrangement of resources, poor system′s monitoring, bad planning and inadequate resource. Conclusion: Ward round teaching has many concerns for teachers, and this should be recognized and resolved by authorities and teachers. If these problems are not resolved, it would affect the quality of clinical teaching.

  15. Teaching teamwork: an evaluation of an interprofessional training ward placement for health care students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morphet, Julia; Hood, Kerry; Cant, Robyn; Baulch, Julie; Gilbee, Alana; Sandry, Kate

    2014-01-01

    The establishment of interprofessional teamwork training in the preprofessional health care curriculum is a major challenge for teaching faculties. Interprofessional clinical placements offer an opportunity for teamwork education, as students in various professions can work and learn together. In this sequential, mixed-method study, focus group and survey techniques were used to evaluate students' educational experiences after 2-week ward-based interprofessional clinical placements. Forty-five senior nursing, medicine, and other health care students cared for patients in hospital wards under professional supervision, with nursing-medicine student "teams" leading care. Thirty-six students attended nine exit focus groups. Five central themes that emerged about training were student autonomy and workload, understanding of other professional roles, communication and shared knowledge, interprofessional teamwork/collaboration, and the "inner circle", or being part of the unit team. The learning environment was described as positive. In a postplacement satisfaction survey (n=38), students likewise rated the educational experience highly. In practicing teamwork and collaboration, students were able to rehearse their future professional role. We suggest that interprofessional clinical placements be regarded as an essential learning experience for senior preprofessional students. More work is needed to fully understand the effect of this interactive program on students' clinical learning and preparation for practice.

  16. Challenges of the ward round teaching based on the experiences of medical clinical teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arabshahi, Kamran Soltani; Haghani, Fariba; Bigdeli, Shoaleh; Omid, Athar; Adibi, Peyman

    2015-03-01

    Holding educational sessions in a clinical environment is a major concern for faculty members because of its special difficulties and restrictions. This study attempts to recognize the challenges of the ward round teaching through investigating the experiences of clinical teachers in 2011. This qualitative research is carried out through purposive sampling with maximum variation from among the clinical teachers of major departments in Isfahan University of Medical Sciences (9 persons). The sampling continued until data saturation. Data were collected through semi-structured interview and analyzed through Collaizzi method. Data reliability and validity was confirmed through the four aspects of Lincoln and Guba method (credibility, conformability, transferability, and dependability). Three major themes and their related sub-themes (minor themes) were found out including the factors related to the triad of clinical teaching (patient, learner, and clinical teacher) (concern about patient's welfare, poor preparation, lack of motivation, ethical problems), factors related to the educational environment (stressful environment, humiliating environment and poor communication) and the factors related to the educational system of the clinical environment (poor organizing and arrangement of resources, poor system's monitoring, bad planning and inadequate resource). Ward round teaching has many concerns for teachers, and this should be recognized and resolved by authorities and teachers. If these problems are not resolved, it would affect the quality of clinical teaching.

  17. A Case Study of M-ward in Mumbai

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Durgesh

    2016-03-25

    Mar 25, 2016 ... an unequal, often tension filled alliance between the British and the elites who .... The level of services in Ghatla today is fairly high, with individual water ... current resident of Cheeta Camp remembers the construction of a ...

  18. Mealtimes in a neurological ward: a phenomenological-hermeneutic study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beck, Malene; Martinsen, Bente; Poulsen, Ingrid

    2016-01-01

    : eating in a railway station, creating aesthetic mealtimes in an unaesthetic atmosphere and using familiar rituals in unfamiliar surroundings. RESULTS: The inclusion of aesthetic elements and familiarity was found to play an important role in the desire of patients to eat. However, these elements were...

  19. A multi-method approach to curriculum development for in-service training in China's newly established health emergency response offices.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yadong Wang

    Full Text Available To describe an innovative approach for developing and implementing an in-service curriculum in China for staff of the newly established health emergency response offices (HEROs, and that is generalisable to other settings.The multi-method training needs assessment included reviews of the competency domains needed to implement the International Health Regulations (2005 as well as China's policies and emergency regulations. The review, iterative interviews and workshops with experts in government, academia, the military, and with HERO staff were reviewed critically by an expert technical advisory panel.Over 1600 participants contributed to curriculum development. Of the 18 competency domains identified as essential for HERO staff, nine were developed into priority in-service training modules to be conducted over 2.5 weeks. Experts from academia and experienced practitioners prepared and delivered each module through lectures followed by interactive problem-solving exercises and desktop simulations to help trainees apply, experiment with, and consolidate newly acquired knowledge and skills.This study adds to the emerging literature on China's enduring efforts to strengthen its emergency response capabilities since the outbreak of SARS in 2003. The multi-method approach to curriculum development in partnership with senior policy-makers, researchers, and experienced practitioners can be applied in other settings to ensure training is responsive and customized to local needs, resources and priorities. Ongoing curriculum development should reflect international standards and be coupled with the development of appropriate performance support systems at the workplace for motivating staff to apply their newly acquired knowledge and skills effectively and creatively.

  20. A multi-method approach to curriculum development for in-service training in China's newly established health emergency response offices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yadong; Li, Xiangrui; Yuan, Yiwen; Patel, Mahomed S

    2014-01-01

    To describe an innovative approach for developing and implementing an in-service curriculum in China for staff of the newly established health emergency response offices (HEROs), and that is generalisable to other settings. The multi-method training needs assessment included reviews of the competency domains needed to implement the International Health Regulations (2005) as well as China's policies and emergency regulations. The review, iterative interviews and workshops with experts in government, academia, the military, and with HERO staff were reviewed critically by an expert technical advisory panel. Over 1600 participants contributed to curriculum development. Of the 18 competency domains identified as essential for HERO staff, nine were developed into priority in-service training modules to be conducted over 2.5 weeks. Experts from academia and experienced practitioners prepared and delivered each module through lectures followed by interactive problem-solving exercises and desktop simulations to help trainees apply, experiment with, and consolidate newly acquired knowledge and skills. This study adds to the emerging literature on China's enduring efforts to strengthen its emergency response capabilities since the outbreak of SARS in 2003. The multi-method approach to curriculum development in partnership with senior policy-makers, researchers, and experienced practitioners can be applied in other settings to ensure training is responsive and customized to local needs, resources and priorities. Ongoing curriculum development should reflect international standards and be coupled with the development of appropriate performance support systems at the workplace for motivating staff to apply their newly acquired knowledge and skills effectively and creatively.

  1. Implementation of Releasing Time to Care - the productive ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Gwyneth

    2009-07-01

    This paper describes the implementation of the NHS Institute for Innovation and Improvement Productive Ward - releasing time to care programme. It will discuss the benefits and key successes and provides advice for those wishing to implement the programme. In Lord Darzi's Next Stage Review, he advocates an ambitious vision of patient centred - clinician led, locally driven NHS. The Releasing Time to Care programme is a unique opportunity for everyone working within the NHS to improve effectiveness, safety and reliability of the services we provide. Whilst being situated within a National Health Service policy environment learning from this work can be translated nationally and internationally, as the principles underpin the provision of high quality care. Evaluation is currently in relation to each of the 15 modules rather than as the programme as a whole. It uses various methods including audit, observation, activity follow through, satisfaction surveys and process mapping. Each month data is colated for each of the 11 metrics which has shown a reduction in falls, drug administration errors and improvement in the recording of patient observations. One of the key issues is that an essential component for the success of the programme lies in the tangible support of the Trust Board/Board of Directors. Evidence shows that this programme improves patient satisfaction as it enables the provision of an increase in direct patient care by staff and subsequently improved clinical and safety outcomes. Ward Sister/Charge Nurse development includes Leadership, Project management and Lean Methodology techniques. The Releasing Time to Care programme is a key component of the Next Stage Review. It will create productive organisations by being a catalyst for the transformation of Trust services, enabling staff to spend more time caring for patients and users. This release in time will result in better outcomes and subsequent improvement with patient and staff satisfaction and

  2. Iota(1440), anomalous Ward identities, and topological susceptibility for QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, P.G.

    1986-01-01

    Anomalous Ward identities for QCD are comprehensively analyzed taking into account contributions of all known pseudoscalar mesons, including the iota(1440 MeV) which is a possible glueball candidate. Implications for the standard resolution of the U(1) problem are examined by imposing the important and crucial constraint of positivity for the topological susceptibility. The pure Yang-Mills susceptibility: a quantity relevant in quenched lattice calculations: is shown to increase quite considerably in the presence of the iota, while the total susceptibility is reduced and may even vanish. Allowed ranges for the axial couplings are delineated and two classes of solution emerge: one corresponding to an iota with suppressed singlet axial coupling; the other to a large eta'-like coupling. It may be possible to discriminate between these two alternatives by measurements of the branching ratio for iota→KK-barπ: values near 100% give suppressed couplings; values below 50% unsuppressed ones

  3. A Systematic Review of Early Warning Systems' Effects on Nurses' Clinical Performance and Adverse Events Among Deteriorating Ward Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ju-Ry; Kim, Eun-Mi; Kim, Sun-Aee; Oh, Eui Geum

    2018-04-25

    Early warning systems (EWSs) are an integral part of processes that aim to improve the early identification and management of deteriorating patients in general wards. However, the widespread implementation of these systems has not generated robust data regarding nurses' clinical performance and patients' adverse events. This review aimed to determine the ability of EWSs to improve nurses' clinical performance and prevent adverse events among deteriorating ward patients. The PubMed, CINAHL, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library databases were searched for relevant publications (January 1, 1997, to April 12, 2017). In addition, a grey literature search evaluated several guideline Web sites. The main outcome measures were nurses' clinical performance (vital sign monitoring and rapid response team notification) and patients' adverse events (in-hospital mortality, cardiac arrest, and unplanned intensive care unit [ICU] admission). The search identified 888 reports, although only five studies fulfilled the inclusion criteria. The findings of these studies revealed that EWSs implementation had a positive effect on nurses' clinical performance, based on their frequency of documenting vital signs that were related to the patient's clinical deterioration. In addition, postimplementation reductions were identified for cardiac arrest, unplanned ICU admission, and unexpected death. It seems that EWSs can improve nurses' clinical performance and prevent adverse events (e.g., in-hospital mortality, unplanned ICU admission, and cardiac arrest) among deteriorating ward patients. However, additional high-quality evidence is needed to more comprehensively evaluate the effects of EWSs on these outcomes.

  4. Workplace Violence Toward Mental Healthcare Workers Employed in Psychiatric Wards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele d'Ettorre

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Workplace violence (WPV against healthcare workers (HCWs employed in psychiatric inpatient wards is a serious occupational issue that involves both staff and patients; the consequences of WPV may include increased service costs and lower standards of care. The purpose of this review was to evaluate which topics have been focused on in the literature and which are new in approaching the concern of patient violence against HCWs employed in psychiatric inpatient wards, in the past 20 years. Methods: We searched for publications in PubMed and Web of Science using selected keywords. Each article was reviewed and categorized into one or more of the following four categories based on its subject matter: risk assessment, risk management, occurrence rates, and physical/nonphysical consequences. Results: Our search resulted in a total of 64 publications that matched our inclusion criteria. The topics discussed, in order of frequency (from highest to lowest, were as follows: “risk assessment,” “risk management,” “occurrence rates,” and “physical/nonphysical consequences.” Schizophrenia, young age, alcohol use, drug misuse, a history of violence, and hostile-dominant interpersonal styles were found to be the predictors of patients’ violence. Conclusion: Risk assessment of violence by patients appeared the way to effectively minimize the occurrence of WPV and, consequently, to better protect mental HCWs. We found paucity of data regarding psychologic sequelae of WPV. According to these findings, we suggest the need to better investigate the psychologic consequences of WPV, with the aim of checking the effective interventions to assist HCW victims of violence and to prevent psychologic illness. Keywords: assaults, psychiatric inpatients, risk assessment, risk management, violence

  5. Workplace Violence Toward Mental Healthcare Workers Employed in Psychiatric Wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    d'Ettorre, Gabriele; Pellicani, Vincenza

    2017-12-01

    Workplace violence (WPV) against healthcare workers (HCWs) employed in psychiatric inpatient wards is a serious occupational issue that involves both staff and patients; the consequences of WPV may include increased service costs and lower standards of care. The purpose of this review was to evaluate which topics have been focused on in the literature and which are new in approaching the concern of patient violence against HCWs employed in psychiatric inpatient wards, in the past 20 years. We searched for publications in PubMed and Web of Science using selected keywords. Each article was reviewed and categorized into one or more of the following four categories based on its subject matter: risk assessment, risk management, occurrence rates, and physical/nonphysical consequences. Our search resulted in a total of 64 publications that matched our inclusion criteria. The topics discussed, in order of frequency (from highest to lowest), were as follows: "risk assessment," "risk management," "occurrence rates," and "physical/nonphysical consequences." Schizophrenia, young age, alcohol use, drug misuse, a history of violence, and hostile-dominant interpersonal styles were found to be the predictors of patients' violence. Risk assessment of violence by patients appeared the way to effectively minimize the occurrence of WPV and, consequently, to better protect mental HCWs. We found paucity of data regarding psychologic sequelae of WPV. According to these findings, we suggest the need to better investigate the psychologic consequences of WPV, with the aim of checking the effective interventions to assist HCW victims of violence and to prevent psychologic illness.

  6. Cross-year peer tutoring on internal medicine wards: results of a qualitative focus group analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krautter, Markus; Andreesen, Sven; Köhl-Hackert, Nadja; Hoffmann, Katja; Herzog, Wolfgang; Nikendei, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    Peer-assisted learning (PAL) has become a well-accepted teaching method within medical education. However, descriptions of on-ward PAL programs are rare. A focus group analysis of a newly established PAL program on an internal medicine ward was conducted to provide insights into PAL teaching from a student perspective. To provide insights into students' experiences regarding their on-ward training with and without accompanying PAL tutors. A total of N=168 medical students in their sixth semester participated in the investigation (intervention group: N=88; control group: N=80). The intervention group took part in the PAL program, while the control group received standard on-ward training. There were seven focus groups with N=43 participants (intervention group: four focus groups, N=28 participants; control group: three focus groups, N=15 participants). The discussions were analyzed using content analysis. The intervention group emphasized the role of the tutors as competent and well-trained teachers, most beneficial in supervising clinical skills. Tutors motivate students, help them to integrate into the ward team, and provide a non-fear-based working relationship whereby students' anxiety regarding working on ward decreases. The control group had to rely on autodidactic learning strategies when neither supervising physicians nor final-year students were available. On-ward PAL programs represent a particularly valuable tool for students' support in training clinical competencies on ward. The tutor-student working alliance acts through its flat hierarchy. Nevertheless, tutors cannot represent an adequate substitute for experienced physicians.

  7. Junior staffing changes and the temporal ecology of adverse incidents in acute psychiatric wards

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bowers, L.; Jeffery, D.; Simpson, A.; Daly, C.; Warren, J.; Nijman, H.L.I.

    2007-01-01

    Aim. This paper reports in examination of the relationship between adverse incident rates, the arrival of new junior staff on wards, and days of the week oil acute Psychiatric wards. Background. Incidents of violence, absconding and self-harm in acute inpatient services pose risks to patients and

  8. 77 FR 10960 - Security Zone, East River and Bronx Kill; Randalls and Wards Islands, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-24

    ...'' W (Port Morris Stacks), and all waters of the Bronx Kill southeast of the Bronx Kill Rail Road...-AA87 Security Zone, East River and Bronx Kill; Randalls and Wards Islands, NY AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS... waters of the East River and Bronx Kill, in the vicinity of Randalls and Wards Islands, New York. This...

  9. Particle Removal Efficiency of the Portable HEPA Air Cleaner in a Simulated Hospital Ward

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qian, Hua; Li, Yuguo; Sun, Hequan

    2010-01-01

    of beds in an isolation ward is insufficient. An experiment was conducted in a full scale experimental ward with a dimension of 6.7 m × 6 m × 2.7 m and 6 beds to test these hypotheses for a portable HEPA filter. The removal efficiency for different size particles was measured at different locations...

  10. Controlled Confrontation: The Ward Grievance Procedure of the California Youth Authority. An Exemplary Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Inst. of Law Enforcement and Criminal Justice (Dept. of Justice/LEAA), Washington, DC.

    The Ward Grievance Procedure of the California Youth Authority is one of 17 programs that earned the National Institute's "Exemplary" label. This brochure provides the requisite practical information for those who wish to test or consider testing the ward grievance procedure. The program was developed as a way of dealing with the questions raised…

  11. Do-not-resuscitate policy on acute geriatric wards in Flanders, Belgium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gendt, de C.; Bilsen, J.J.; Stichele, van der R.; Lambert, M.; Noortgate, N. Den; Deliens, L.H.J.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To describe the historical development and status of a do-not-resuscitate (DNR) policy on acute geriatric wards in Flanders, Belgium, and to compare it with the international situation. DESIGN: Structured mail questionnaires. SETTING: All 94 acute geriatric wards in hospitals in Flanders

  12. [Nosocomial infection/colonization of the respiratory tract caused by Acinetobacter baumannii in an Internal Medicine ward].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas Coronas, J; Cabezas Fernández, T; Alvarez-Ossorio García de Soria, R; Rogado González, M C; Delgado Fernández, M; Díez García, F

    2002-10-01

    To present the epidemiology of the outbreak and the description of patients with infection or colonization of the respiratory tract caused by A. baumannii in an Internal Medicine ward. 20 consecutively patients hospitalized in the Internal Medicine ward were studied during 18 months with isolation of multiresistant A. baumanni in respiratory tract specimens with or without clinical signs of infection. Starting on an index case, that was a patient coming from other hospital with diagnosis of nosocomial Acinetobacter pneumonia, we detected 20 patients. The age of the patients ranged from 48 to 95 years, with a mean of 71.4 years. Eighty percent were males. The clinical features were similar: advanced age, with chronic diseases (35 percent diabetics, 45 percent with chronic lung diseases), and use of broad-spectrum antibiotics agents, fundamentally third generation cephalosporin (70 percent), clarithromycin (55 percent) and quinolones (30 percent). 75 percent of patients were in the same ward. Eight (40 percent) of the patients with chronic lung diseases were subjects with COPD, two with asthma and chronic glucocorticoids treatment, and one with a sleep apnea. In four cases the isolation was considered a colonization. The mean stay was 26.15 days, and the mortality 40 percent. The nosocomial infection caused by Acinetobacter baumannii is responsible of a high morbi-mortality between the patients hospitalized in an Internal Medicine ward, and produce an increase in length of stay. It is necessary a combination of control measures to prevent the transmission in the hospital and the outbreak of new multiresistant strains.

  13. Investigation of type and density of bio-aerosols in air samples from educational hospital wards of Kerman city, 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Malakootian

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Bio-aerosols in the air of hospital wards have an important role in the development of infections. It is important to make quantitative and qualitative estimations of microorganisms in the air of these wards as an index for environmental hygiene applicable to different hospital wards. The aim of the study was to investigate degrees of diversity and density of bio-aerosols in the education hospitals of Kerman city. Methods: This study applied a descriptive-cross-sectional methodology in the second half of 2014 in the education hospitals of Kerman city, with bed capacity of over 300. As many as 200 samples were collected from the air in different wards of each hospital using the standard method of the National Occupational Health and Safety Institute. Following collection, samples were placed in an incubator for 48 hours and then bio-aerosol detections were made for and resulting data reported as colonies/m3. Results: Results indicated that maximum and minimum degrees of bacterial density were observed in operation rooms and in the intensive care unit (ICU of Shafa hospital. Furthermore, comparison showedthat the operating room at Afzalipour hospital had the lowest level of fungal contamination, while ICU at Bahonar hospital had the highest level of fungal contamination. The emitted fungi of Aspergillus and Penicillium along with the bacteria, staphylococci and Acinetobacter had greater frequencies. The means of bacterial density and fungal density were not equal across the studied hospitals and significant statistical, difference was observed between means of bacterial and fungal density (P ≤ 0.001. Conclusion: Amounts of bacterial and fungal density were greater than those proposed in the American Industrial Health State Conference in 73.3% of the wards in the educational hospitals of Kerman city sampled in this study. Therefore it is suggested that implementation of some, necessary measures for continuous monitoring, promotion of

  14. [Hygiene and motivation factors of nursing work in a cardiology ward].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somense, Carolina Bueno; Duran, Erika Christiane Marocco

    2014-09-01

    The present study aimed to identify hygienic and motivational factors in the nursing work according to the Two-Factor Theory, as well as their relation with professional satisfaction/dissatisfaction. This exploratory-descriptive study involved nine nurses from the cardiology ward of a hospital in the interior of the State of São Paulo, between August and September 2013. A self-applied questionnaire was used, including open and closed questions. The data were categorized as hygienic and motivational. Results show the nurses' satisfaction with autonomy, work itself and teamwork, duties, content and responsibilities of the job. Dissatisfaction is related to career growth possibilities; work, political and administrative conditions at the institution, supervision and lack of institutional support. Satisfaction and dissatisfaction factors include relationships, acknowledgements and remuneration. Nurses' satisfaction is determined by multiple and often controversial factors.

  15. Predictors of length of stay in a ward for demented elderly: gender differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Toshiyuki; Tamai, Akira; Takeuchi, Daisuke; Tamai, Yuzuru; Iseki, Hidenori; Fukushima, Hiromi; Kasahara, Sumie

    2010-09-01

    In our previous studies, we found both gender differences among care recipients and predictors that influenced outcomes after discharge from a ward for demented elderly. Here, we investigate predictors that influence the length of stay for each sex. We studied the data of 390 patients with dementia who were hospitalized in a ward for demented elderly between 1 April 2000 and 31 March 2008, and treated until 31 March 2009. The patients were divided into groups classified by gender. We analyzed the gender differences of characteristics and evaluated the predictors that influenced the length of stay in the ward for demented elderly using Cox's proportional hazards model. A model using the initial scores of the Revised Hasegawa Dementia Scale (HDS-R), Assessment Scale for Symptoms of Dementia (ASSD) and Nishimura's activity of daily living scale (N-ADL), which were examined on admission, was named Model 1. In Model 1, we checked the effect of each patient's characteristics, except for complications and destinations, on their length of stay. Model 2 used the final scores of HDS-R, ASSD and N-ADL including complications and destinations. There was a clear gender difference in the length of stay. The length of stay of women was longer than that of men. It was difficult to predict the length of stay in Model 1. Age was the only predictor in women and no predictor was identified in men. In Model 2, complications and the final HDS-R and N-ADL scores were predictors of the length of stay in men. Age, complications and destinations were predictors of the length of stay in women. It was observed that there were gender differences among predictors of the length of stay. However, it was difficult to predict the length of stay on admission. Retrospectively, the length of stay was determined by physical and psychological conditions, not by the social variables in men. In women, it was supposed that the caregiver's wish to give care at home reduced the length of stay. Besides

  16. Estudo dos acidentes na infância em um pronto socorro pediátrico Estudio de los accidentes en la infancia y registrados en una unidad de urgencias pediátricas Study of accidents involving children assisted at an emergency ward

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Rocha Fodor Filócomo

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste estudo foi identificar os acidentes na infância registrados em um pronto socorro infantil. Os dados foram coletados entre janeiro e março de 1999, através de um questionário contendo dados sobre a identificação da criança e do acidente. A população constou de 942 crianças e a amostra ficou reduzida para 890. Principais resultados: a faixa etária mais atingida foi de 7-11 anos, sendo 56,1% do sexo masculino e 43,9% feminino, o tipo de acidente mais freqüente foi queda (46,9%, os pais estavam presentes em 43,4% dos casos. Em 95,7% das ocorrências a criança recebeu alta hospitalar após o atendimento.El objetivo de éste estudio fue el de identificar los accidentes infantiles registrados en una unidad de Urgencias Pediátricas (UUP. Los datos fueron recolectados en el periodo de Enero a Marzo de 1999, utilizando un cuestionario que contenía datos sobre la identificación del niño y del accidente. La población estuvo conformada por 942 niños y la muestra fue reducida para 890. Principales resultados: la faja etárea más afectada fue la de 7 a 11 anos, siendo 56,1% del sexo masculino y 43,9% femenino; el tipo de accidente más frecuente fue la caída (46,9%, los padres estaban presentes en 43,4% de los casos. En 95,7% de las ocurrencias, el niño recibió alta hospitalaria después de ser tendido.The aim of this study was identify cases of accidents victimizing children assisted at the emergence ward of a general hospital. Data were collected from January to March, 1999 through a protocol with variables related to the identification of the accidents as well as of the children. The sample in the study consisted of 890 children of whom 56.1% were males and 43.9% were females. The most prevalent accident was fall (46.9%, the age with a major incidence was between 7 and 11 years old, the parents were present to 43.4% of the cases. The children were discharged from hospital after being given care in 95.7% of the cases.

  17. Relationship Between Depression and Perception of Pain Severity in Patients Admitted to General Surgery Ward

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Samadzadeh

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background Depression is considered as the most common psychological problem in individuals. Patients with persistent pain usually suffer from depression, disturbance in interpersonal relations, fatigue, and reduced physical and psychological performance. Objectives The aim of this study was to survey the relationship between depression and perception of pain severity in patients admitted to general surgery ward. Methods This research was a cross-sectional descriptive study. The study population included patients admitted to general surgery ward at hospitals of Ardabil city during 2010 - 2011. The study sample consisted of 168 individuals (male and female who were selected by nonrandomized convenience sampling method. The data were collected using a questionnaire on demographic information, the Beck depression inventory (BDI, and Toren questionnaire on pain beliefs and perceptions. The SPSS software was used for statistical analysis. Results The highest frequency of participants had moderate depression (44.1% while the lowest frequency belonged to healthy individuals (4.2%. The score of depression was higher in men (23.21 ± 7.56 than women (19.19 ± 6.84 as the same as the score of pain perception (8.91 ± 2.34 vs. 7.95 ± 1.87, respectively. The results indicated that there was a positive significant relationship between depression and perception of pain severity (P ≤ 0.01. This means that patients who have a history of depression feel much more pain during hospitalization and after the surgery. Conclusions Depressed or anguished patients report more pain compared to healthy ones.

  18. Involvement in decisions about intravenous treatment for nursing home patients: nursing homes versus hospital wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klomstad, Kristin; Pedersen, Reidar; Førde, Reidun; Romøren, Maria

    2018-05-08

    Many of the elderly in nursing homes are very ill and have a reduced quality of life. Life expectancy is often hard to predict. Decisions about life-prolonging treatment should be based on a professional assessment of the patient's best interest, assessment of capacity to consent, and on the patient's own wishes. The purpose of this study was to investigate and compare how these types of decisions were made in nursing homes and in hospital wards. Using a questionnaire, we studied the decision-making process for 299 nursing home patients who were treated for dehydration using intravenous fluids, or for bacterial infections using intravenous antibiotics. We compared the 215 (72%) patients treated in nursing homes to the 84 (28%) nursing home patients treated in the hospital. The patients' capacity to consent was considered prior to treatment in 197 (92%) of the patients treated in nursing homes and 56 (67%) of the patients treated in hospitals (p nursing homes than in hospital (90% vs. 52%). Next of kin and other health personnel were also more rarely involved when the nursing home patient was treated in hospital. Whether advance care planning had been carried out, was more often unknown in the hospital (69% vs. 17% in nursing homes). Hospital doctors expressed more doubt about the decision to admit the patient to the hospital than about the treatment itself. This study indicates a potential for improvement in decision-making processes in general, and in particular when nursing home patients are treated in a hospital ward. The findings corroborate that nursing home patients should be treated locally if adequate health care and treatment is available. The communication between the different levels of health care when hospitalization is necessary, must be better. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01023763 (12/1/09) [The registration was delayed one month after study onset due to practical reasons].

  19. Design and validation of a questionnaire to assess organizational culture in French hospital wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saillour-Glénisson, F; Domecq, S; Kret, M; Sibe, M; Dumond, J P; Michel, P

    2016-09-17

    Although many organizational culture questionnaires have been developed, there is a lack of any validated multidimensional questionnaire assessing organizational culture at hospital ward level and adapted to health care context. Facing the lack of an appropriate tool, a multidisciplinary team designed and validated a dimensional organizational culture questionnaire for healthcare settings to be administered at ward level. A database of organizational culture items and themes was created after extensive literature review. Items were regrouped into dimensions and subdimensions (classification validated by experts). Pre-test and face validation was conducted with 15 health care professionals. In a stratified cluster random sample of hospitals, the psychometric validation was conducted in three phases on a sample of 859 healthcare professionals from 36 multidisciplinary medicine services: 1) the exploratory phase included a description of responses' saturation levels, factor and correlations analyses and an internal consistency analysis (Cronbach's alpha coefficient); 2) confirmatory phase used the Structural Equation Modeling (SEM); 3) reproducibility was studied by a test-retest. The overall response rate was 80 %; the completion average was 97 %. The metrological results were: a global Cronbach's alpha coefficient of 0.93, higher than 0.70 for 12 sub-dimensions; all Dillon-Goldstein's rho coefficients higher than 0.70; an excellent quality of external model with a Goodness of Fitness (GoF) criterion of 0.99. Seventy percent of the items had a reproducibility ranging from moderate (Intra-Class Coefficient between 50 and 70 % for 25 items) to good (ICC higher than 70 % for 33 items). COMEt (Contexte Organisationnel et Managérial en Etablissement de Santé) questionnaire is a validated multidimensional organizational culture questionnaire made of 6 dimensions, 21 sub-dimensions and 83 items. It is the first dimensional organizational culture questionnaire

  20. Pilot evaluation of a ward-based automated hand hygiene training system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Anarta; Ameling, Stefan; Zhou, Jiang; Lacey, Gerard; Creamer, Eilish; Dolan, Anthony; Sherlock, Orla; Humphreys, Hilary

    2013-04-01

    A novel artificial intelligence (AI) system (SureWash; GLANTA, Dublin, Ireland) was placed on a ward with 45 staff members for two 6-day periods to automatically assess hand hygiene technique and the potential effectiveness of the automated training system. Two human reviewers assessed videos from 50 hand hygiene events with an interrater reliability (IIR) of 88% (44/50). The IIR was 88% (44/50) for the human reviewers and 80% (40/50) for the software. This study also investigated the poses missed and the impact of feedback on participation (+113%), duration (+11%), and technique (+2.23%). Our findings showed significant correlation between the human raters and the computer, demonstrating for the first time in a clinical setting the potential use of this type of AI technology in hand hygiene training. Copyright © 2013 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Using Gamification Combined with Indoor Location to Improve Nurses' Hand Hygiene Compliance in an ICU Ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapão, Luís Velez; Marques, Rita; Gregório, João; Pinheiro, Fernando; Póvoa, Pedro; Mira da Silva, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Healthcare acquired infections are among the biggest unsolved problems in healthcare, implying an increasing number of deaths, extra-days of hospital stay and hospital costs. Performing hand hygiene is a simple and inexpensive prevention measure, but healthcare workers compliance with it is still far from optimal. Recognized hurdles are lack of time, forgetfulness, wrong technique and lack of motivation. This study aims at exploring gamification to promote nurses' HH compliance self-awareness and action. Real-time data collected from an indoor location system will provide feedback information to a group of nurses working in an ICU ward. In this paper both the research's motivation and methods is presented, along with the first round of results and its discussion.

  2. Dispersion of Exhalation Pollutants in a Two-bed Hospital Ward with a Downward Ventilation System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qian, Hua; Nielsen, Peter V.; Hyldgård, Carl-Erik

    2006-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has recommended the use of downward ventilation systems in isolation rooms to reduce the risk of cross-infection from airborne transmissible diseases. The expected airflow pattern of a downward ventilation design would supply cooler and slightly...... to investigate the airflow pattern and pollutant dispersion in the test ward. Based on both experimental and numerical results, the laminar airflow pattern was shown to be impossible to achieve due to turbulent flow mixing and flow entrainment into the supply air stream. The thermal plumes produced above people...... were found to induce flow mixing. We also studied the effects of the locations of the supply and extraction openings on both the flow pattern and pollutant exposure level in the occupied zone. A number of practical recommendations are suggested....

  3. Nutritional predictors of mortality after discharge in elderly patients on a medical ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buscemi, Silvio; Batsis, John A; Parrinello, Gaspare; Massenti, Fatima M; Rosafio, Giuseppe; Sciascia, Vittoria; Costa, Flavia; Pollina Addario, Sebastiano; Mendola, Serena; Barile, Anna M; Maniaci, Vincenza; Rini, Nadia; Caimi, Gregorio

    2016-07-01

    Malnutrition in elderly inpatients hospitalized on medical wards is a significant public health concern. The aim of this study was to investigate nutritional markers as mortality predictors following discharge in hospitalized medical elderly patients. This is a prospective observational cohort study with follow-up of 48 months. Two hundred and twenty-five individuals aged 60 and older admitted from the hospital emergency room in the past 48 h were investigated at the medical ward in the University hospital in Palermo (Italy). Anthropometric and clinical measurements, Mini-nutritional Assessment (MNA) questionnaire, bioelectrical (BIA) phase angle (PA), grip strength were obtained all within 48 h of admission. Mortality data were verified by means of mortality registry and analysed using Cox-proportional hazard models. Ninety (40%) participants died at the end of follow-up. There were significant relationships between PA, MNA score, age and gender on mortality. Patients in the lowest tertile of PA (< 4·6°) had higher mortality estimates [I vs II tertile: hazard ratio (HR) = 3·40; 95% confidence interval (CI): 2·01-5·77; II vs III tertile: HR = 3·83; 95% CI: 2·21-6·64; log-rank test: χ(2) = 43·6; P < 0·001]. Similarly, the survival curves demonstrated low MNA scores (< 22) were associated with higher mortality estimates (HR = 1·85; 95% CI: 1·22-2·81 χ(2) = 8·2; P = 0·004). The MNA and BIA-derived phase angle are reasonable tools to identify malnourished patients at high mortality risk and may represent useful markers in intervention trials in this high-risk subgroup. © 2016 Stichting European Society for Clinical Investigation Journal Foundation.

  4. Nature and frequency of medication errors in a geriatric ward: an Indonesian experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernawati DK

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Desak Ketut Ernawati,1,2 Ya Ping Lee,2 Jeffery David Hughes21Faculty of Medicine, Udayana University, Denpasar, Bali, Indonesia; 2School of Pharmacy and Curtin Health Innovation and Research Institute, Curtin University, Perth, WA, AustraliaPurpose: To determine the nature and frequency of medication errors during medication delivery processes in a public teaching hospital geriatric ward in Bali, Indonesia.Methods: A 20-week prospective study on medication errors occurring during the medication delivery process was conducted in a geriatric ward in a public teaching hospital in Bali, Indonesia. Participants selected were inpatients aged more than 60 years. Patients were excluded if they had a malignancy, were undergoing surgery, or receiving chemotherapy treatment. The occurrence of medication errors in prescribing, transcribing, dispensing, and administration were detected by the investigator providing in-hospital clinical pharmacy services.Results: Seven hundred and seventy drug orders and 7,662 drug doses were reviewed as part of the study. There were 1,563 medication errors detected among the 7,662 drug doses reviewed, representing an error rate of 20.4%. Administration errors were the most frequent medication errors identified (59%, followed by transcription errors (15%, dispensing errors (14%, and prescribing errors (7%. Errors in documentation were the most common form of administration errors. Of these errors, 2.4% were classified as potentially serious and 10.3% as potentially significant.Conclusion: Medication errors occurred in every stage of the medication delivery process, with administration errors being the most frequent. The majority of errors identified in the administration stage were related to documentation. Provision of in-hospital clinical pharmacy services could potentially play a significant role in detecting and preventing medication errors.Keywords: geriatric, medication errors, inpatients, medication delivery process

  5. Development of the Huddle Observation Tool for structured case management discussions to improve situation awareness on inpatient clinical wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edbrooke-Childs, Julian; Hayes, Jacqueline; Sharples, Evelyn; Gondek, Dawid; Stapley, Emily; Sevdalis, Nick; Lachman, Peter; Deighton, Jessica

    2018-05-01

    'Situation Awareness For Everyone' (SAFE) was a 3-year project which aimed to improve situation awareness in clinical teams in order to detect potential deterioration and other potential risks to children on hospital wards. The key intervention was the 'huddle', a structured case management discussion which is central to facilitating situation awareness. This study aimed to develop an observational assessment tool to assess the team processes occurring during huddles, including the effectiveness of the huddle. A cross-sectional observational design was used to psychometrically develop the 'Huddle Observation Tool' (HOT) over three phases using standardised psychometric methodology. Huddles were observed across four NHS paediatric wards participating in SAFE by five researchers; two wards within specialist children hospitals and two within district general hospitals, with location, number of beds and length of stay considered to make the sample as heterogeneous as possible. Inter-rater reliability was calculated using the weighted kappa and intraclass correlation coefficient. Inter - rater reliability was acceptable for the collaborative culture (weighted kappa=0.32, 95% CI 0.17 to 0.42), environment items (weighted kappa=0.78, 95% CI 0.52 to 1) and total score (intraclass correlation coefficient=0.87, 95% CI 0.68 to 0.95). It was lower for the structure and risk management items, suggesting that these were more variable in how observers rated them. However, agreement on the global score for huddles was acceptable. We developed an observational assessment tool to assess the team processes occurring during huddles, including the effectiveness of the huddle. Future research should examine whether observational evaluations of huddles are associated with other indicators of safety on clinical wards (eg, safety climate and incidents of patient harm), and whether scores on the HOT are associated with improved situation awareness and reductions in deterioration and adverse

  6. Anomalies in Ward identities revisited. Explicit calculation of the three point functions; Anomalias em identidades de Ward revisitadas. Calculo explicito das funcoes de tres pontos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalmolin, Fabricio Tronco

    2007-07-01

    others already performed within the same issue. In particular, in one of such investigation a pioneer and traditional reference has been revisited by using the alternative strategy mentioned above. In such study, a systematic treatment of purely fermionic one, two and three point functions, associated to scalar, pseudo-scalar, vector and axial-vector densities, has done. There, however, only the explicit expressions for one and two point functions were developed. The conclusions pointed out, in a very clear way, that the association between intrinsic ambiguities of the perturbative calculation and violations in symmetry properties is not consistent. At the same time, it was concluded that only in an investigation where the explicit forms for the three point functions involved are considered clean and sound conclusions can be extracted. This