WorldWideScience

Sample records for wano

  1. WANO. Development, programs, challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haferburg, Manfred

    2011-01-01

    In the wake of the accident at the Soviet RBMK reactor unit 4 in Chernobyl the nuclear industry founded the World Association of Nuclear Operators (WANO). To this day, the purpose of the organization has been to enhance worldwide cooperation of nuclear industry and, in this way, strengthen the safety and availability of nuclear power plants. Following some first steps after 1986, the charter of the organization was signed at the WANO constituent assembly in Moscow on May 15 and 16, 1989. The member companies thus committed themselves to support WANO's mission. WANO was established for these purposes: ''The mission of WANO is to maximize the safety and reliability of nuclear power plants worldwide by working together to assess, benchmark and improve performance through mutual support, exchange of information, and emulation of best practices.'' The WANO programs developed speedily thereafter. The focus was on peer reviews. In 2000, the first interim objective had been reached: Fifty percent of all member nuclear power plants had undergone peer reviews. In addition, plant-related peer reviews were extended throughout all operator organizations, and corporate peer reviews were developed. The other WANO programs as well, i.e. exchanges of experience, technical support, and performance indicators, exerted more and more influence on industry. Peer reviews covered entire operator organizations, and corporate peer reviews were developed. The worldwide paradigm shift in evaluating the use of nuclear power, and the associated construction programs for new nuclear power plants already in their implementation phase, assigned a new quality to the work of WANO. The organization is preparing a long-term strategy in the face of the challenges to be expected. The ultimate objective of these efforts is to support member organizations from the first preparations of a nuclear power plant project to the end of commercial operation. (orig.)

  2. WANO peer review. Organization and benefits as seen by WANO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haferburg, Manfred

    2010-01-01

    The World Association of Nuclear Operators (WANO) was founded in May 1989. 144 enterprises operating nuclear power plants signed the WANO Charter in Moscow as a response of industry to the Chernobyl disaster. The Association now comprises the operators of more than 430 nuclear power plants in more than 32 countries. WANO performs its activities through regional centers in Atlanta, Moscow, Paris, and Tokyo. The Coordination Center of WANO is located in London. Each regional WANO Center handles the four most important programs: - Peer Reviews, - exchanges of operating experience, - specialized and technical development, - technical service and exchange. The technical support and exchange program comprises proven processes, such as performance indicators, operator networks, technical support missions. WANO peer reviews are conducted on a voluntary basis and upon request by the licensees. By the end of 2008, WANO had run 388 peer reviews in 31 countries. Peer reviews serve to compare the practical operation of a nuclear power plant with the best international standards. This in-depth examination is carried out by an international, independent team of experts on an optimized objective basis. Peer reviews are conducted not only to examine compliance with all pertinent rules and regulations, but also to strive for excellent performance results. (orig.)

  3. WANO peer review. Organization and benefits as seen by WANO; WANO Peer Review. Durchfuehrung und Nutzen aus Sicht der WANO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haferburg, Manfred [WANO-Paris Centre, Neuilly sur Seine (France)

    2010-02-15

    The World Association of Nuclear Operators (WANO) was founded in May 1989. 144 enterprises operating nuclear power plants signed the WANO Charter in Moscow as a response of industry to the Chernobyl disaster. The Association now comprises the operators of more than 430 nuclear power plants in more than 32 countries. WANO performs its activities through regional centers in Atlanta, Moscow, Paris, and Tokyo. The Coordination Center of WANO is located in London. Each regional WANO Center handles the four most important programs: - Peer Reviews, - exchanges of operating experience, - specialized and technical development, - technical service and exchange. The technical support and exchange program comprises proven processes, such as performance indicators, operator networks, technical support missions. WANO peer reviews are conducted on a voluntary basis and upon request by the licensees. By the end of 2008, WANO had run 388 peer reviews in 31 countries. Peer reviews serve to compare the practical operation of a nuclear power plant with the best international standards. This in-depth examination is carried out by an international, independent team of experts on an optimized objective basis. Peer reviews are conducted not only to examine compliance with all pertinent rules and regulations, but also to strive for excellent performance results. (orig.)

  4. Worldwide WANO biennial in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vrubelova, A.

    2010-01-01

    At the turn of January and February 2010, there was an annual general conference of the World Association of Nuclear Operators - WANO held in Delhi, India. One of the representatives, participating on behalf of Slovenske elektrarne, was also Mr. Robert Guns, a former Director of Bohunice Nuclear Power Plant. After his return from India, he was approached by Anna Vrubelova. (author)

  5. IAEA and WANO Sign New Memorandum of Understanding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    Full text: The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the World Association of Nuclear Operators (WANO) have signed a new Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) to reflect increased cooperation between the two organisations following the Fukushima Daiichi accident of March 2011. The new agreement enables the two organisations to work more closely together to support the safe and reliable operation of nuclear power plants worldwide, and to enhance information exchange on operating experience and other relevant areas. Through the IAEA's Nuclear Safety Action Plan, IAEA Member States urged the IAEA and WANO to strengthen their MoU to enhance information exchange. WANO member operators also recommended stronger collaboration. Through the new agreement, the two organisations are adopting a more coordinated approach to their respective activities, in order to help prevent further accidents and mitigate the consequences should an accident occur. Plans are now in place to coordinate the timing of IAEA Operational Safety Review Team (OSART) missions and WANO peer reviews, and to arrange periodic meetings of WANO and Agency staff to discuss major safety-related activities. The two organisations will also cooperate and coordinate work on their respective performance indicator programmes and will work towards exchanging information and support in the event of a serious event at a nuclear power plant or fuel cycle facility. In addition to this, the IAEA and WANO will supply staff to each other's review teams when appropriate, and will regularly exchange documents relating to operating experience. Yukiya Amano, Director General of the IAEA, said: ''The IAEA's Action Plan on Nuclear Safety emphasises the importance of working more closely with WANO and other international organisations, so that we can all better address the demands of the future. This agreement is an important step in strengthening that cooperation and enhancing the flow of information on nuclear safety issues

  6. WANO Actions to Reinforce the Operators’ Safety Culture Worldwide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Regaldo, J., E-mail: jacques.regaldo@edf.fr [WANO, London (United Kingdom)

    2014-10-15

    Full text: WANO’s mission is to maximize the safety and reliability of nuclear power plants worldwide by working together to assess, to benchmark and improve performance through mutual support, exchange of information and emulation of best practices. Fukushima accident strongly impacted the nuclear community and it also brought WANO to question its positioning and scope of activities. Five strategic actions have hence been decided to strengthen WANO’s role, aiming to bring a more consistent, transparent and integrated response to the nuclear operators. WANO peer review process, which constitutes its core-business, has been intensified including corporate and pre start up peer reviews and, for Japanese plants, restart reviews. WANO also decided to expand its scope of activity to include elements of design, based on the principle that the role of a nuclear operator is not only to operate safely, but also to be sure that the plant he is operating is safe. WANO aims to cooperate strongly at both regional and international levels with all international safety organizations, being convinced that trust can be recovered with a strong safety commitment and credibility of both regulators and operators. All operators, without exception, are WANO members; if membership is voluntary, members have to fulfil strict obligations. Safety supposes that no operator feels isolated, or refuses openness and permanent self-questioning; it requests as well for WANO to ensure that cultural and sometimes political barriers do not hinder safety culture – the accident of Fukushima is from this perspective rich in teachings. In WANO, we believe that management system and practices are at the centre of safety culture, and a full involvement of top management (CEOs) of our members is absolutely requested. Through its commitments and rules, WANO pressures its members and help them reaching the highest possible standard of safety. We consider that we rely on each other to improve safety

  7. Fire protection assessment in a WANO peer review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vella, R.

    1998-01-01

    The peer review programme is becoming the key programme of WANO. The reviews are conducted to assess the performance of plant personnel, the conditions of systems and equipment, the quality of programmes and procedures, and the effectiveness of plant management. The review team consists of highly qualified staff from other WANO members throughout the world who have extensive practical experience in the area the review. At the request of Paris Centre Members, the fire protection area has been added to the scope of WANO peer reviews. Relevant performance objectives and criteria have been developed to cover this area, these are written guidances upon which review of plant performance can be based. They are supported by criteria, more narrow in scope, to help further define what attributes of the fire protection management area contribute to the achievement of the associated performance objective. (author)

  8. Preparing for the future by improving the performance of today's nuclear stations: The WANO perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsutsumi, R.

    1999-01-01

    The World Association of Nuclear Operators, (WANO) was established in 1989 in the aftermath of the Chernobyl accident with the mission of maximizing the safety and reliability of nuclear power plants by exchanging information and encouraging communication, comparison and emulation among its members. All nuclear power stations in the world are WANO members. WANO conducted an Internal Review in 1997 and its report issued this January confirms that the WANO mission is still valid. As a result of the Internal Review, WANO is taking actions to further improve its programmes. WANO's effort to keep members conscious of safety culture in their daily work at plants is a key element for improving operational safety. WANO will be able to contribute to the future of the nuclear industry by encouraging members to actively participate in WANO programmes which are aimed at improving nuclear safety and plant performance. (author)

  9. Wano peer review in Santa Maria de Garona NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Blas, J. M.

    1998-01-01

    WANO (World Association of Nuclear Operators) implemented a program known as PEER REVIEW at the Santa Maria de Garona NPP in 1996. It was as follows, an international team consisting of professionals with experience in nuclear power plants observed different activities in the plant, hold interviews and meetings, and finally they checked all the information during three weeks, in order to compare the plant with the WANO's Excellence Criteria at work. The result was that the plant was in a good state and most of the implemented activities and practices of work were done properly, further the usual demands and rules. However it was noticed that some of the activities could be improved, If we compare them with the optimum practices. The plant started a work plan defined as an objective in the COMPANY PROJECT it self, in order to implement the corrective actions which could resolve the proposed improvements by WANO. Following the PEER REVIEW program, approximately one year and a half later, a WANO team came back to the plan for a week in June 1998, they came back to implement what is known as a FOLLOW UP, that is today, a control resting on the monitoring of facts of the fulfillment level for the improvements which had been recommended. After finishing this monitoring work, the result of the FOLLOW UP was that the plant has attained a very remarkable implantation of the recommendations showed in the PEER REVIEW. (Author)

  10. WANO Activities Related to Identifying and Reducing the Likelihood for Recurring Events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Llewellyn, Michael

    2003-01-01

    Since its inception, WANO has encouraged members to share operating experience and events information through the WANO Operating Experience Programme. Preventing recurring events is a prime reason for sharing events information. Over 2500 events have been shared through WANO since 1989. However, a review of WANO activities in 1997 identified that this information was not being used very well by WANO members, and that WANO was not adding much 'value' to the events sharing process. At the time, WANO only provided the 'postal exchange' function for events sharing, and was not reviewing events across WANO to help members focus on the really important issues. Often, these very important issues involve recurring events. As a result of the 1997 review of the WANO operating experience process, WANO re-sourced and developed new analysis capabilities and began producing new types of reports for its members. The resource commitment includes four seconded engineers (one from each WANO Regional Centre) brought to Paris to staff a WANO Operating Experience Central Team. This team analyses events across WANO, writes WANO event reports, provides operating experience-related training, and provides technical support to members to improve their use of operating experience information. One focus area for events analysis by WANO is the identification and subsequent industry notification of recurring events. As a result of the 1997 review of WANO activities, in 1998 WANO began production of several new types of event-based reports to communicate significant industry events to our members. A key focus of analysis of these significant events is whether they are recurring events (that is, very similar to previous events either at that NPP or another NPP in the industry). The reports are called Significant Operating Experience Reports (SOERs) and Significant Event Reports (SERs). Significant Operating Experience Reports (SOERs) are written by WANO when several event reports indicate that

  11. Treatment of operational experience of nuclear power plants in WANO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibanez, M.

    2013-01-01

    The article describes the activities associated to the Operating Experience Programme of the World Association of Nuclear Operators. The programme manages the event reports submitted by the nuclear power plants to the WANO database for the preparation by the Operating Experience Central Team of some documents like the significant Operating Experience Reports and Significant Event Reports that help the stations to avoid similar events. (Author)

  12. WANO ready to begin 'multi-year effort' to expand operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalton, David [NucNet, Brussels (Belgium)

    2016-01-15

    Ten of the 12 major projects established by the World Association of Nuclear Operators (WANO) following the Fukushima-Daiichi nuclear accident in 2011 have been completed. WANO chief executive officer Ken Ellis said that the closure of the projects means WANO had correct shortfalls that contributed to its inability to identify and direct the global industry support necessary to have prevented the Fukushima-Daiichi accident.

  13. How WANO is tackling the realities of a new nuclear era

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraev, Kamen [NucNet, Brussels (Belgium)

    2016-07-15

    Rapid new build initiatives and post-Fukushima safety concerns mean the World Association of Nuclear Operators (WANO) is dealing with the prospect of a considerable increase in the demand for its services. Chief executive officer Peter Prozesky spoke to NucNet about the critical work the organisation is facing. Ten of the 12 projects established by WANO following the Fukushima-Daiichi accident have already progressed to the point where WANO was comfortable with closing them down. Two projects concerning design safety fundamentals and emergency support to remain open. WANO is an independent nuclear oversight organisation and has no remit to promote nuclear power.

  14. Operational safety system performance alternative to the WANO's indicator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyra, Moacir

    2002-01-01

    One of the operational safety performance indicators recommended by the World Association of Nuclear Operators (WANO) and adopted by Electronuclear is the reliability of the safety systems. The parameter selected to represent this indicator is the average unavailability of the trains of the concerned system. This parameter would be universally representative of the reliability for comparison purpose only if all nuclear power plants were designed within the same redundancy criteria. Considering the diversity of design criteria of the power plants in operation and based on a probabilistic approach, this paper proposes new performance indicators which are comparable regardless the redundancy criteria of the system. A case example applied to a system of the Angra 2 nuclear power plant shows that, even though with the plant in the infancy phase, the performance of the system in the period is very good. (author)

  15. Safety goals and safety culture opening plenary. 1. WANO's Role in Maintaining and Improving Safety Culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsutsumi, Ryosuke

    2001-01-01

    Over the past several years, operators of the world's nuclear plants have compiled an increasingly impressive record of operational performance. Among the many factors that have led to this improvement are the unprecedented cooperation and information exchange among the world's nuclear operators. This paper presents the World Association of Nuclear Operators (WANO) operating experience program and WANO peer review program as examples of the kinds of interaction that are occurring around the globe to maintain and improve the nuclear safety culture. In addition, some unique features of WANO are discussed. WANO has established four programs to help its members communicate effectively with each other. These include the exchange of operating experiences, voluntary peer reviews, professional and technical development, and technical support and exchange. The operating experience program alerts members to events that have occurred at other NPPs and enables members to take appropriate actions to prevent event recurrence. When an event occurs at a plant, management at that plant analyses the event and completes an event report, which is then sent to the WANO regional center to which the plant belongs. After a regional center review and necessary iteration, the report is posted onto the WANO Web site to make it available to all WANO members. By the end of 2000, more than 1500 event reports had been posted. The WANO Peer Review Program is a unique opportunity for members to learn and share the best worldwide insights into safe and reliable nuclear operations. The peer review program has become one of WANO's most important activities containing all essential elements of WANO's mission. A WANO peer review team consists of 15 to 16 people with NPP experience; most team members are from countries outside the one that they are visiting. These teams of peers from plants around the world visit host plants upon request to identify strengths and areas for improvement, with a strong

  16. IAEA and WANO Mark Anniversary of Fukushima Accident, Increase Cooperation, 5 March 2012, Vienna/London

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    Full text: Next Sunday, 11 March 2012, marks the first anniversary of the devastating earthquake and tsunami that struck the east coast of Japan. One year on, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the World Association of Nuclear Operators (WANO) are increasing their mutual cooperation to maximise nuclear safety efforts around the globe. The two organisations are revising their Memorandum of Understanding in light of the lessons learned from the Fukushima accident, and will be stepping up their efforts to share expertise and knowledge between operators and governments. There will be greater coordination between WANO peer reviews and IAEA OSART missions, in which international experts assess the safety of individual nuclear power plants, and discussions are under way to examine further areas to improve information sharing. This is in addition to the other work each organisation is doing to reinforce nuclear safety worldwide. IAEA Director General, Yukiya Amano said: 'The IAEA is delighted to strengthen its coordination and cooperation with WANO. One of the lessons of Fukushima is the need for strong and effective communication between governments, regulators and nuclear operators. The IAEA's Action Plan on Nuclear Safety underlines the need for all stakeholders to work together to put these lessons into practice as tangibly and swiftly as possible, to deliver concrete results. By working more closely together, we can help to ensure that practical experience is properly shared to reinforce nuclear safety everywhere'. Laurent Stricker, Chairman of WANO, commented: 'While the terrible events of last year had a major lasting impact on the industry, they have also served as the catalyst for huge change. WANO has shifted from primarily focusing on accident prevention, to an emphasis on both prevention and mitigation, and has redoubled its efforts to promote excellence in nuclear safety in each and every plant across the world. All nuclear plants have carefully

  17. WANO to increase focus on new nuclear as industry's centre of gravity shifts towards Asia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraev, Kamen [NucNet The Independent Global Nuclear News Agency, Brussels (Belgium)

    2018-02-15

    The World Association of Nuclear Operators (WANO) intends to focus more on new nuclear units coming into operation around the world as the ''centre of gravity'' in the industry shifts from the US and Europe to the Middle East and Asia. The organisation's chief executive officer, Peter Prozesky, told NucNet that new-build projects in China, India, Turkey and the United Arab Emirates are giving WANO the opportunity to make sure those countries start the operational life of their new units ''in a very positive way''. In supporting countries with new units beginning operation, WANO is working more closely with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). One of the IAEA's tasks is to help emerging nuclear countries develop the infrastructure and capability they need to have nuclear power as part of their energy mix.

  18. Results for WANO indicators for Swedish nuclear power plants 1998-2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flodin, Yngve; Loennblad, Christer

    2004-01-01

    The objective of the SKI indicator project is to introduce safety performance indicators as a complement to the inspections carried out at the swedish nuclear facilities. The Performance Indicators defined by WANO are proven by the industry and should be included in a future indicator system. From the set of WANO-indicators, six have been chosen for evaluation in the project. The chosen indicators are: Collective Radiation Exposure (CRE), Fuel Reliability Index (FRI), Safety System Performance (SP1/2/5), Unplanned Automatic Scrams (UA7), Unit Capability Factor (UCF) and Unplanned Capability Loss Factor (UCL). The resulting indicator values for all the swedish nuclear power plants are presented in graphs for a 5-year period, 1998-2002. Data for the BWR and PWR-collectives are included for comparison. The type of graph used, a combined bar and curve chart, is considered to give the best representation of the data. As a guide when evaluating the results, explanations are provided for individual indicator values that deviate significantly from normal levels

  19. Growing electricity demand and role of nuclear power in Asia. WANO Tokyo Center summarizes Asian Nuclear Power Atlas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1997-01-01

    Present status of the activities of World Association of Nuclear Operations (WANO) in Asia was briefly summarized here. The WANO Tokyo Center is the hub for WANO's activities having a member ship of 17 operators from six countries and territories. The center conducts a variety of activities designed to enhance the safety and reliability of nuclear power plants (NPPs) in Asia. Asian economy is expanding now in spite of the stagnation of recent world economy. The economic development has been paralleled by population growth in Asia and the 21st century may become the 'age of Asia'. Despite this remarkable economic growth, some parts of Asia are still at the developing stage in terms of electric power infrastructure. Demand for electric power is expected to increase dramatically from now on, making the development of electric power plants an urgent priority. Nuclear power has thus become the focus of increasing interest in Asia. At present, 17 operators in six countries of Asia operate 79 units at 32 power stations with a total capacity of approximately 60 GW, or equivalent to around 17% of the total capacity of all WANO members. China's massive NPP construction program and Indonesia's nuclear power program are expected to boost total capacity in future. (M.N.)

  20. Technologies for improving current and future light water reactor operation and maintenance: Development on the basis of O and M experiences - the WANO perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, M.J.

    2000-01-01

    World Association of Nuclear Operators (WANO) plays a role of promoting safety and reliability to nuclear industry after Chernobyl accident. Four programmes or so called cornerstones, operating experience, peer review, professional and technical development, and technical support and exchange have significantly promoted the nuclear operating performance in the past years. A WANO biennial general meeting was recently held in Victoria, Canada, which disclosed apparent achievements on higher unit capability factor, lower unplanned automatic scram per 7000 hours critical, lower collective radiation exposure and lower industrial safety accident rate. In more practical, exchange visits to learn good practices and measures in operation, maintenance, and management have shown benefits among WANO members. Recurring events can be minimized when members learn lessons from significant operating experience reports, significant event reports, and those events have posted on the WANO Web site. Particularly, plant managers' meetings that Tokyo Centre host have created an environment, which allows plant management to exchange ideas by such a face-to-face channel. WANO aims at nuclear safety and reliability. Economic and public acceptance are regarded as pillars to support WANO's mission as well. (author)

  1. Energies and media Nr 38 - Always improving safety: the intervention of 'peers'; IAEA, its OSART, etc.; WANO must be known

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baschwitz, Robert

    2012-06-01

    The first part of this issue comments the 'peer review' as a promising approach to avoid nuclear accidents and incidents to occur again. Such a review or inspection could be performed by international experts at regular intervals. In order to outline the interest of this approach, the authors describe who used to be in charge of safety before 2010-2011, i.e. what was the mission of the operator, what was the role of the national nuclear safety authority, what were the missions of the IAEA. It notably addresses the role of its OSARTs (Operational Safety Review Teams) by briefly describing how these teams were built up and operated. It also describes the role of WANO (World Association of Nuclear Operators) and its 'peer reviews'. It evokes the activities of this association (number of studied events, of inspection missions, of published reports). Then, the authors describe the evolution since 2010 and Fukushima (March 2011): planned evolutions within WANO by 2015, evolutions within the IAEA and its OSARTs (notably design reviews), and within the safety authorities

  2. Proceedings of the joint WANO/OECD-NEA workshop on pre-stress loss in NPP containments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    This joint WANO/OECD-NEA workshop on pre-stress loss in NPP containments started with Opening Remarks (by OECD and EDF) and two presentations on 'Creep and Shrinkage of Concrete: Physical Origins, Practical Measurements', and 'Past, Present and Future Techniques for Predicting Creep and Shrinkage of Concrete'. It was then followed by papers and presentations from 12 countries, which titles are: Assessment of Creep Methodologies for Predicting Prestressing Forces Losses in Nuclear Power Plant Containments; Prestress Behaviour in Belgian NPP Containments; Presentation of Gentilly 2 NPP Containment (abstract only); Containment Structure Monitoring and Prestress Losses; Experience from Daya Bay Nuclear Power Plant (China); Prestress losses in NPP containments - the EDF experience; Prestress Force Monitoring on the THTR Prestressed Concrete Reactor Vessel During 19 Years; NPP Containment Design: Evolution and Indian Experience; In-Service Inspections and R and D of PCCVs in Japan; Comparison of Grouted and Un-grouted Tendons in NPP Containments; Prestress Losses in Containment of VVER 1000 Units; Prestressing in Nuclear Power Plants; Anchor Lift-off Measuring System for 37 T 15 Tendons; Monitoring of Stressed-Strained State and Forces in Reinforcing Cables of Prestressed Containment Shells of Nuclear Power Plants; Long-Term In-Service Monitoring of Pre-stressing in Magnox Pre-stressed Concrete Pressure Vessels; The Measurement of Un-bonded Tendon Loads in PCPV and Primary Containment Buildings; The Long Term In-service Performance of Corrosion Protection to Prestressing Tendons in AGR Prestressed Concrete Pressure Vessels; Prestress Force Losses in Containments of U.S. Nuclear Power Plants. Discussions and a synthesis are also presented

  3. Study on a program for support of women nuclear experts exchange and mutual utilization between WANO Korea and WANO Global

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Haecho; No, Inyoung; Min, Byungju

    2010-12-01

    - Nuclear energy, unlike other international human and material essential to mutual understanding, exchange of information and technology-intensive industries as required by an active technical cooperation and information exchange between countries is very important - WiN-Global Women's Domestic Nuclear specialists and professionals between countries belonging to the network for women through nuclear technology and nuclear power expansion opportunities to exchange information to secure a variety of communication

  4. Profile of nuclear power, its future prospects in India and the role of WANO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jain, Shreyans Kumar

    2008-01-01

    India, however, had limited reserves to support the country's development to the present level. But on comparing the economic status it is seen that in spite of being the fifth largest electricity producing nation the per capita consumption is only around 600 units against a world average of 2500 units. The dependence on import is on the increase. Now that the country is headed for a sustained economic growth of about 10% GDP over the next few years, it is a challenge to provide the energy to fuel this growth. The Government of India has published an Integrated Energy Policy document, which projects the energy requirement for the next 25 years and stipulates the contribution from various resources. Although coal will continue to be the primary source, there is going to be a larger share of renewable in the energy mix. This is aimed at reducing dependence on imports and also to address the issue of global warming in an organized way. Policy makers have reiterated that reducing energy requirements and increasing efficiency are two very important measures to increase energy security. It has also been recognized that India's growing dependence on energy imports will make it more vulnerable to world price shocks and uncertainties. Hence, the thrust is to expand the use of domestic energy resources to the maximum. In this energy mix, Nuclear and Renewable energy sources are likely to gain popularity, like elsewhere in the world. India's foray in the nuclear energy started in 1969 when the two units at Tarapur started generating. These BWR units at Tarapur were set up on a Turnkey basis by General Electric, USA

  5. Operational experience feedback in the World Association of Nuclear Operators (WANO)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Revuelta, Ramon

    2004-01-01

    Operators in high-risk industries need to be learning organisations, learning from themselves and from the others. This presentation will describe how the nuclear industry is dealing in an integrated manner with the feedback of operating experience (OE), both internal and external, to increase the safety and reliability of power plants; it will describe how it: - investigates events; - reports events and analyses trends; - shares information to prevent recurrence; - performs corrective action and training; - performs assessments to verify effectiveness. The plants have achieved great improvements in performance overall, and to improve further, the industry is evolving. Instead of just learning from past events (reactive) it is now focusing on lower level indications of problems (precursors) through low level events reporting, trending and analysis. A hallmark of the industry is its desire to be self-critical. Emphasis is placed on improving the bottom quartile performing plants

  6. Six new species of the genus Exocelina Broun, 1886 from Wano Land, New Guinea (Coleoptera, Dytiscidae, Copelatinae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Shaverdo

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Six new species of New Guinea Exocelina Broun, 1886 are described in this paper: E. iratoi sp. n., E. likui sp. n., E. pui sp. n., E. pulukensis sp. n., E. tomhansi sp. n., and E. wigodukensis sp. n. Although different morphologically, together with Exocelina ascendens (Balke, 1998, E. bagus (Balke & Hendrich, 2001, and E. ransikiensis Shaverdo, Panjaitan & Balke, 2016, they are found to form a monophyletic clade and be closely related to representatives of the E. ekari-group, based on preliminary analysis of sequence data. An identification key to the species is provided, and important diagnostic characters are illustrated. The present data on the species’ distribution show that most of them are local endemics.

  7. International cooperation - a way to improve reliability and safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    John, A.

    1998-01-01

    The mission of the World Association of Nuclear Operators (WANO) is highlighted, and WANO's Peer Review programme is described. At the Dukovany nuclear power plant, a Peer Review was undertaken in December 1997. The results gave evidence of a good level of safety, reliability and culture of operation of the plant. (P.A.)

  8. Peer Reviews: a voluntary means of enhancing operating culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vella, R.

    1996-01-01

    In the nuclear energy industry, and also in other fields, excellent experience has been gained from the regular accumulation of expert evidence of power station operation through external organizations or teams. In 1991, the World Association of Nuclear Operations (WANO) initiated a pilot programme for voluntary 'Peer Reviews'. The success of this first exercise in gathering expert evidence led to the introduction of the 'Peer Review' programme in 1993 as one of the standard programmes of WANO. The object was to increase the safety and reliability of nuclear power stations throughout the world. WANO Peer Reviews are voluntary and are carried out at the request of a member. They are oriented towards special WANO performance objectives and criteria, which have been established by the management of WANO. (orig.) [de

  9. East/West cooperation on the safety of USSR-designed nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spencer, P.H.

    1991-01-01

    In the aftermath of the accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power station in the Soviet Union, nuclear power plant operators throughout the world came together in May 1989 to form the World Association of Nuclear Operators (WANO). When it became clear that the operators of plants of an early design supplied by the USSR needed assistance in the upgrading of the safety of these units, WANO was uniquely placed to assist and facilitate in this. In July 1990, WANO took the decision to form a special project to assist the operators of the VVER 440/230 plants in their efforts to increase the safety standards for these units. The work performed by this special project team is described

  10. International nuclear energy organizations; Internationale Organisationen auf dem Gebiet der Kernenergie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-12-15

    The publication on International nuclear energy organizations describes the scope of work of the following organizations: IAEA, EURATOM, OECD-NEA, ENSREG, WANO, INSCEAR and ICRO. The issues covered by the organizations include nuclear electricity generation, radiation protection, nuclear safeguards, nuclear liability, public information, reactor safety, radioactive waste management, non-proliferation, marketing, safety technology, utility requirements, effects of nuclear radiation.

  11. International co-operation for reactor safety: the World Association of Nuclear Operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eckered, T.

    1989-01-01

    On 5 and 6 October 1987, senior representatives of most of the world's nuclear operators met in Paris with Lord Marshall of the UK Central Electricity Generating Board (CEGB) as Chairman. They resolved to strengthen the existing links and co-operation among nuclear operators by setting up the World Association of Nuclear Operators (Wano). The mission of the association is to be: 'to maximize the safety and reliability of the operation of nuclear power stations by exchanging information, encouraging comparison and stimulating emulation among nuclear power station operators.' The formation of Wano presents some information technology problems of a rather special kind that have to be solved before Wano can begin operation. The representatives at the Paris meeting therefore appointed a steering committee under Lord Marshall's chairmanship to formulate detailed proposals. The leaders of the world's nuclear operators will meet again in Moscow on 15-17 May 1989 in order to ratify the steering committee proposals and appoint the first Wano Board of Governors. A small interim secretariat is already working in London. (author)

  12. ENS PIME '98: 10th international workshop on nuclear public information in practice. Transactions. Case studies, discussion documents, posters, videos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    This proceedings includes papers dealing with public acceptance of nuclear power, young generation project; descriptions of visitor centres; internet usage in advertising and public information; role of nuclear power under market deregulation circumstances; waste issues; role of WANO and WIN (Women in nuclear) organizations in public education and/or information; political aspects; dealing with environmentalists and opponents; education and motivation of 'nuclear' workers

  13. Development of the NPP Kozloduy informational system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katsarov, Y; Manchev, B [Risk Engineering Ltd., Sofia (Bulgaria)

    1996-12-31

    A unified computer system to be implemented in the Kozloduy NPP is described. It allows to generate all general indicators and documents for plant operation needed according to the national regulation and WANO Performance Indicators. The system combines multi-purpose data collection with probabilistic analysis, evaluation of the human factor and optimization of the regulated verification of the equipment. 3 refs.

  14. Nuclear power plants management from Chernobyl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanc, P.

    1996-01-01

    The Three mile island and Chernobyl accidents developed a change for the operation and management of nuclear power plants. The present articles studies the state of the art the management of NPPs, the foundation of INPO and WANO and the future of operation in NPPs

  15. IAEA workshop on the year 2000 issue (Y2K)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The document gives the highlights of the workshop conducted by the IAEA from 12 to 16 July 1999 to assist its Member States on the challenge that the Year 2000 issue (Y2K) presents to operators and regulators of nuclear power plants. The workshop was attended by 52 participants and lecturers from 21 countries and from the World Association of Nuclear Operators (WANO)

  16. Main conclusions of a seminar on managing technical resources in a changing nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Storey, P.D.

    2000-01-01

    The author recapitulates the different points from I Mech E Conference (Managing Technical resources in a changing Nuclear Industry -London, 29 September 1999), as following: UK position, BNFL Magnox and AEAT, UK view from BEGL, view from WANO, UK view from UKAEA, USA view from PECO Energy, and view from OECD NEA

  17. ENS PIME '98: 10th international workshop on nuclear public information in practice. Transactions. Case studies, discussion documents, posters, videos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-07-01

    This proceedings includes papers dealing with public acceptance of nuclear power, young generation project; descriptions of visitor centres; internet usage in advertising and public information; role of nuclear power under market deregulation circumstances; waste issues; role of WANO and WIN (Women in nuclear) organizations in public education and/or information; political aspects; dealing with environmentalists and opponents; education and motivation of 'nuclear' workers.

  18. Response and capacity evaluation of unit 1-2, Kozloduy NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostov, M.; Stefanov, D.; Boncheva, H.

    1993-01-01

    Investigation described in this presentation was performed within the WANO Program for seismic safety assessment of Kozloduy NPP. The investigation is imposed by the necessity of seismic upgrading of the structures and equipment of the plant for the new design basic earthquake. Term of reference for this study was elaborated by experts of IAEA

  19. Improving the Sharing and Use of Operating Experience Among Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Llewellyn, Michael D.

    1998-01-01

    Effective use of operating experience is an essential and fundamental aspect of the business of improving safety and reliability of nuclear power plant. Operating experience is considered of such importance, that it is embedded as a fundamental element in the WANO mission statement: 'To maximise the safety and reliability of operation of nuclear power plants by exchanging information and encouraging communication, comparison, and emulation amongst its members'. The exchange of information on plant operating experience and lessons learned from events is at the core of our WANO mission and is an essential element of effective operating experience use. Recognizing this, WANO - AC has joined together with Canadian PHWR operators in a cooperative effort to further strengthen the sharing of the event information, and to facilitate communication of PHWR operating experience worldwide. The content of the paper is: 1. Discussion; 2. Expectation; 3. Improving use of operating experience; 4. Internalizing operating experience; 5. Summary; 6. Attachments. The three attachments deal with: - WANO event reporting guidelines; - Root cause investigation guidelines; - Example prevent events briefing sheet. The paper is completed with the five slides used in the oral presentation

  20. The value of peer reviews to nuclear plant safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subalusky, W.T. Jr.

    1994-01-01

    On a global basis, the nuclear utility industry has clearly demonstrated the value of peer reviews for improving nuclear safety and overall plant performance. Peer reviews are conducted by small teams of technical experts who review various aspects of plant operation, recognize strengths and recommend improvements, thereby stimulating a positive response to the recommendations. U.S. nuclear utilities initiated the operator-to-operator peer review process first through the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO). Now, voluntary peer reviews are an important activity of the World Association of Nuclear Operators (WANO). Formed just five years ago. WANO has made significant progress in its key activities of the operator-to-operator exchanges, operating experience exchange, monitoring of plant performance indicators and sharing of good practices worldwide. A fifth activity, peer review on a strictly voluntary basis, is pertinent to this paper

  1. TMI 2 and safety culture. Lessons still to be learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werdine, H.

    1998-01-01

    This paper will deal with some concerns related to the actual ''status-quo'' of the nuclear industry related to nuclear safety. It is well understood that incredible progresses have been made in this subject not only by the industries, but mainly by the International Organisations such as INPO, WANO, IAEA and others. Of course, there could be some misunderstanding and corrections here and there, and now I am talking about the WANO Mission last year in Chernobyl. But this subject is not the objective of my paper. This paper deals with a concern. I am worried with the actual status of a ''potential relative'' complacency with some very important safety principles that could be permeating throughout the nuclear industry. I will try to develop this idea and propose some actions to counteract the facts; what we did at Angra 1 and within ELETRONUCLEAR to face those challenges. (author)

  2. The Hatch-Smolensk exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sproles, A.

    1993-01-01

    During summer 1992, the World Association of Nuclear Operators (WANO) sponsored an exchange visit between Georgia Power Company's Edwin I. Hatch nuclear plant, a two-unit boiling water reactor site, and the Smolensk atomic energy station, a three-unit RBMK (graphite-moderated and light-water-cooled) plant located 350 km west of Moscow, in Desnogorsk, Russia. The Plant Hatch team included Glenn Goode, manager of engineering support; Curtis Coggin, manager of training and emergency preparedness; Wayne Kirkley, manager of health physics and chemistry; John Lewis, manager of operations; Ray Baker, coordinator of nuclear fuels and contracts; and Bruce McLeod, manager of nuclear maintenance support. Also traveling with the team was Jerald Towgood, of WANO's Atlanta Centre. The Hatch team visited the Smolensk plant during the week of July 27, 1992

  3. Seismic analysis of the safety related piping and PCLS of the WWER-440 NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berkovski, A.M.; Kostarev, V.V.; Schukin, A.J.; Boiadjiev, Z.; Kostov, M.

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents the results of seismic analysis of Safety Related Piping Systems of the typical WWER-440 NPP. The methodology of this analysis is based on WANO Terms of Reference and ASME BPVC. The different possibilities for seismic upgrading of Primary Coolant Loop System (PCLS) were considered. The first one is increasing of hydraulic snubber units and the second way is installation of limited number of High Viscous Dampers (HVD). (author)

  4. International co-operation: a condition for further development of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quenet, P.

    1994-01-01

    For two main reasons, loss of confidence in nuclear energy and loss of competitiveness, nuclear programmes are in recession, although the very high level of safety and reliability of NPP operation. Efficient co-operation among nuclear operators world wide in order to reach the highest possible standard everywhere. The mission of WANO is to maximize the safety and reliability of the operation of NPPs by exchanging information and encouraging comparison, emulation and communication among its members. (author)

  5. Application of grey incidence analysis to connection between human errors and root cause

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren Yinxiang; Yu Ren; Zhou Gang; Chen Dengke

    2008-01-01

    By introducing grey incidence analysis, the relatively important impact of root cause upon human errors was researched in the paper. On the basis of WANO statistic data and grey incidence analysis, lack of alternate examine, bad basic operation, short of theoretical knowledge, relaxation of organization and management and deficiency of regulations are the important influence of root cause on human err ors. Finally, the question to reduce human errors was discussed. (authors)

  6. Opening address; Allocution d`ouverture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carle, R

    1996-12-31

    In this opening address the president of WANO underlines the relative isolation of the Kozloduy NPP from the international nuclear community due to the lack of information and contacts. The need for eliminating the isolation is stressed and the following measures are proposed: to make the Kozloduy NPP an active member of the international community; to improve and maintain the safety level; to contribute to the electricity exchange system of Southeastern Europe.

  7. The economic and energy-economic development of Armenia - new strategies in matters of energy policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chitechian, V.I.

    1996-01-01

    For geopolitical, economic, technical and structural reasons, Armenia's power generating capacity, which formerly was 3500 megawatts, is now, at the beginning of the nineties, a mere 650 megawatts. Consequently, the Armenian government in 1993 decided to rebuild unit 2 of the Mesamor nuclear power station in order for it to become operational in 1995. Armenia is a member of the IAEO and WANO. (DG) [de

  8. Nuclear energetics all over the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wojcik, T.

    2000-01-01

    The actual state and tendencies of nuclear power further development for different world regions have been presented and discussed. The problem of safety of energetic nuclear reactors, radioactive waste management and related problems have been discussed in respect of regulations in different countries. The economical aspects of nuclear energetics in comparison with different fossil fuel power plants exploitation costs has been presented as well. The official state of international organizations (IAEA, WANO, HASA etc.) have been also shown in respect to subject presented

  9. Improving the international system for operating experience feedback. INSAG-23. A report by the International Nuclear Safety Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    The operational safety performance of nuclear facilities has, in general, improved notably over time throughout the world. This has been achieved, in part, through operating experience feedback (OEF) and the introduction of new technology. While the continued strong safety performance by operators is encouraging, safety significant events continue to recur in nuclear installations. This indicates that operators are not learning and applying the lessons that experience can teach us. This report focuses on systems that are operated by intergovernmental organizations with close contacts to national regulatory authorities. These systems provide an alternative network to the worldwide system employed by the operators of nuclear facilities known as the World Association of Nuclear Operators (WANO). The WANO system is restricted to its members, who have concluded that keeping the information exchanged confidential improves its usefulness. INSAG recognizes the merits of this approach, particularly in light of the primary responsibility of licensed operators for the safety of their facilities. Nevertheless, INSAG encourages WANO to share key safety lessons with national regulatory authorities and intergovernmental organization

  10. Statement to World Association of Nuclear Operators Biennial General Meeting, 24 October 2011, Shenzhen, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amano, Y.

    2011-01-01

    I am grateful for the opportunity to address this important gathering, which is taking place at a crucial time for the nuclear energy sector. I greatly value the experience and expertise of the World Association of Nuclear Operators and I welcome your decision to devote this biennial general meeting to the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant in Japan. Together, WANO and the IAEA will play a key role in ensuring that the right lessons are learned from the accident and that the necessary improvements in nuclear operating safety are actually put into practice everywhere. We have been good partners since WANO was created in 1989. In the aftermath of Fukushima Daiichi, I believe our partnership must be deepened and intensified. Since the Fukushima Daiichi accident, the IAEA has worked hard to help Japan bring the situation at the site under control and to mitigate the consequences of the accident. The Agency's view is that all of the crippled reactors are now generally stable. The Japanese authorities are doing their utmost to achieve cold shutdown of all of them by the end of the year. I visited Japan a number of times for consultations with the Prime Minister and government ministers and went to the site of the accident in July. I dispatched international expert teams to assist in areas such as radiological monitoring and food safety. The Agency helped to channel international technical assistance to Japan and we also provided independent and factual reports on the situation to our Member States. We conducted a number of fact-finding missions, most recently on environmental remediation and related waste management issues. I convened a special IAEA Ministerial Conference on Nuclear Safety, devoted to the Fukushima Daiichi accident, which took place in Vienna in June. The Conference adopted a Ministerial Declaration aimed at strengthening nuclear safety, emergency preparedness, and radiation protection of people and the environment worldwide. That

  11. What is the value of performance indicators for the nuclear industry?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johann Popp

    2006-01-01

    WANO is an Association of all Operators of Nuclear Power Plants worldwide. This association is promoting and running for their members 4 programmes which are Operating Experience, Peer Reviews, Professional and Technical Development and Technical Support and Exchange. The Technical Support and Exchange programme comprises Good Practices, Performance Indicators, Operator-to-Operator Exchanges and Technical Support Missions. This paper explains the Performance Indicator programme. WANO is collecting significant NPP nuclear power plant data and is computing indicators according to selected criteria for the only purpose of comparing or benchmarking plant performance of all types and different designs. All effective organisations measure their performance in order to know, how well they are doing and in order to identify opportunities for improvement. Indicators are central to the monitoring and reporting of progress towards sustainable development in all areas. Indicators are mainly derived from statistical data in order to exhibit weaknesses and strengths of programs. There are many hundreds of commercial and technical indicators known. WANO is tracing just ten significant indicators out of the many available, and only for the purpose of comparing plant performance. The first set of three indicators is more related to productivity and exhibit, how well management is planning, staff is maintaining and operators are conducting the plants. The second set of two indicators is related to safety systems, how well they are maintained and how reliable they are. The next set of two is material related and the last two indicators are related to human resources. Indicators are reflecting the current industrial standard and allow the positioning of a plant with regard to the 'state of the art'. They pinpoint to weaknesses and strengths of different designs/fleets

  12. Chemistry indices for long term plant health management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galt, K.J.; Cerisier, S.D.M.; Caris, N.B.

    1998-01-01

    Eskom's Koeberg Nuclear Power Station has maintained and reported on the WANO Chemistry Performance Index for a number of years. Because of the masking effects of multiple averaging, the value of the Index was questionable. The modified WANO Chemistry Performance Indicator, introduced recently, was considered an improvement. However, it was felt that it is too general to adequately address the long-term plant health management needs of a specific plant; a more tailored, plant-specific indicator is needed. A system of indices for measuring and managing long-term plant health at Eskom's 10 large fossil-fired power stations had been developed in 1996. The major success of these indices in improving plant performance management lay in their inclusion in station performance contracts. The Fossil Chemistry Index was based on the original WANO Chemistry Performance Index and suffered from the same shortcomings. Consequently, a major revision of this index was initiated to address these deficiencies. The objectives set for the revised common indicator were that target and limit values from Eskom Chemistry Standards should be incorporated, that the masking effect of multiple averaging be minimised or eliminated, that weighting factors be introduced to reflect the relative importance of selected parameters, that conditioning chemical effectiveness be monitored, and that ranges of values be accommodated. In tandem with this revision, there was requirement to include Koeberg in the reporting of long term plant health indicators. Instead of developing completely separate chemistry indicators for fossil and nuclear plant. A commonality of approach to Long Term Plant Health indicators was sought. This has resulted in a single indicator determination, with parameter selection, limit values, and target values providing the required plant specificity. (J.P.N.)

  13. Performances of nuclear installations in the world; Performances des installations nucleaires dans le monde

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pate, Z.T. [World Association of Nuclear Operators (WANO), 75 - Paris (France)

    1999-01-01

    During the last years the operators of nuclear power plants in the world, have realized numerous improvements. This success is imputable to several factors, especially an important data exchange. The Chernobyl accident, in 1986, provoked the creation of the World Association of Nuclear Operators (W.A.N.O.). It allowed to exchange information and to develop cooperation in order to go beyond cultural barriers, linguistics and policies. Then, operators in the world have brought important improvements in matter of safety, reliability. (N.C.)

  14. Dukovany NPP operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlcek, Jaroslav

    2010-01-01

    The topics discussed include: Dukovany NPP among CEZ Group power plants; International missions at the plant; Plant operation results; and Strategic goals and challenges. Historical data are presented in the graphical form, such as the unit capacity factor, unplanned capability loss factor, unplanned automatic scrams, fuel reliability, industrial safety accident rate, collective radiation exposure, WANO index, power generation data, and maximum achievable power by the end of year. Also discussed were the company culture and human resources, maintenance, power uprate, and related phenomena. (P.A.)

  15. Plant infrastructure development and life management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellis, K. [World Association of Nuclear Operators (United Kingdom)

    2014-07-01

    This presentation by the World Association of Nuclear Operators (WANO) MD Ken Ellis's will focus on the growing need for electricity and the role of nuclear energy in fulfilling this. This will include looking at the nuclear industry at large and the impact of Fukushima on the development of the nuclear industry. As MD of an organisation dealing primarily with ensuring nuclear safety, Mr. Ellis will stress the importance of ensuring that safety must permeate all aspects of the nuclear industry and its necessity to secure public confidence. (author)

  16. The big interview - Fukushima: 'Collectively, the international nuclear security system has failed'; Grand entretien - Fukushima 'Collectivement, le systeme de surete nucleaire international a failli...'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niel, J.C. [Autorite de surete nucleaire - ASN, 6, place du Colonel Bourgoin, 75012 Paris (France); ASN, 10, Route du Panorama 92266 Fontenay-aux-Roses cedex (France); Seillan, Hubert

    2011-11-15

    In an interview the ASN (the French Nuclear Safety Authority) manager summarizes his professional career, describes the ASN missions and outlines the independence of this institution as it is defined and practically exists, gives his opinion and analysis on the Fukushima accident, evokes the meaning of stress tests, discusses the information obtained through inspections of the French nuclear power plants, evokes the desirable evolutions at the international level, explains why terrorism has not been integrated in the stress test procedure, comments the implications of the European level on French safety studies. Some actors are briefly presented: the CEA, AREVA, EDF, the World association of nuclear operators (WANO)

  17. Performances of nuclear installations in the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pate, Z.T.

    1999-01-01

    During the last years the operators of nuclear power plants in the world, have realized numerous improvements. This success is imputable to several factors, especially an important data exchange. The Chernobyl accident, in 1986, provoked the creation of the World Association of Nuclear Operators (W.A.N.O.). It allowed to exchange information and to develop cooperation in order to go beyond cultural barriers, linguistics and policies. Then, operators in the world have brought important improvements in matter of safety, reliability. (N.C.)

  18. Challenges and opportunities in managing design basis knowledge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waddington, J.G.

    2013-01-01

    Conclusions: • DBKM is a very large task in terms of: – the amount and variety of data; – the variety of the form of the data; – the number of places in which it is held; – the tools needed to handle it. • Worldwide, it is not handled well: • There are some fundamental barriers which must be addressed if improvements are to be made. •The IAEA can provide a forum to address these barriers. • A TECDOC may help. • Other fora for utilities to develop workable systems are essential. • WANO, INPO and the new safety construct initiative should discuss these issues

  19. NS [Nuclear Safety] update. Current safety and security activities and developments taking place in the Department of Nuclear Safety and Security, Issue no. 15, February 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-02-01

    The current issue presents information about the following topics: Supporting radiation protection in medicine. Wano's pre-startup support. One stop for incident and emergency communications. Emergency preparedness in IAEA Member States. Sophisticated On-Site Nuclide Identification (RanidSONNI). Over land, sea and air: safe and secure transport of radioactive material. INES at 20: Success from simplicity. IAEA and Ibero-American Forum - strengthening ties. Highlights of the 54th IAEA General Conference, 20-24 September 2010. Highlights of the International conference on Challenges faced by TSOs. Department of Nuclear Safety programme highlights

  20. Safety and upgrading of nuclear power plants with WWER-440/V-230; Voprosy bezopasnosti i modernizatsii AEhS s WWER-440 (V-230)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melnikov, N [Opytno-Konstruktorskoe Byuro Gidropress, Podol` sk (Russian Federation)

    1996-12-31

    Modernization of WWER-440/V-230 reactors is considered according to the WANO project `Proposal for reconstruction of WWER-440/V-230 reactors` (1990). The main technical measures to be taken relate to: 1. Expanding the considered spectrum of design basis accidents; 2. Provision of first loop integrity; 3. Safety system structure and components reliability enhancement; 4. Reduction o initiating events probability; 5. Enhancement of hermeticity and integrity of the area surrounding the first loop; 6. Fire fighting system upgrade; 7. Radiation control system upgrade; 8. Provision of seismic resistance. Details of the recommended technical steps for some NPPs are presented. 1 tab.

  1. Autoevaluation process at SNN SA-CNE PROD Cernavoda

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Florescu, N.

    2005-01-01

    Implementation of the autoevaluation process requires identification of the activities carried with performance under the limits imposed by international standards. The following activity areas were established for autoevaluation at Cernavoda NPP: 1. General activities; 2. Operation activities; 3. Work control; 4. Maintenance activities; 5. Preparing activities; 6. Technical activities; 7. Radioprotection activities; 8. Emergency plans; 9. Environment control activities; 10. Chemical control; 11. Materials control; 12. Physical protection; 13. Document control; 14. Fuel manipulation. In order to improve the performances at Cernavoda NPP the WANO autoevaluation model was adopted

  2. Common issues found in operating safety peer review of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Meijing; Zhang Fengping

    2004-01-01

    The 3rd stage of the safety culture promotion in a Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) is characterized by establishing learning organization and continuous self-improvement. Peer Review was used as an effective tool by a lot of NPPs to improve the overall management and performance. This Paper provided the WANO Peer Review Methodology, the common issues found, the recommendation or suggestions to correct the area for improvement. It may be beneficial to other NPP which planning to have Peer Review or Self Evaluation. (authors)

  3. Shutdown Safety in NEK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gluhak, Mario; Senegovic, Marko

    2014-01-01

    Industry performance analysis since 2004 has revealed that 23% of the events reported to WANO occurred during outage periods. Given the fact that a plant is in the outage only 5 percent of the time, this emphasizes the importance of shutdown safety and measures station staffs undertake to maintain effective barriers to safety margins during the outage. Back in 1990s, the industry adopted guidance to meet safety requirements by focusing on safety functions. Both WANO and INPO released various documents, reports and guidelines to help accomplish those requirements. However, in the last decade inadequate 'defence in depth' has led to several events affecting shutdown safety and challenging one of the most important nuclear safety principles: 'The special characteristics of nuclear technology are taken into account in all decisions and actions. Reactivity control, continuity of core cooling, and integrity of fission product barriers are valued as essential, distinguishing attributes of nuclear station work environment'. NEK has recognized the importance of 'defence in depth'Industry performance analysis since 2004 has revealed that 23% of the events reported to WANO occurred during outage periods. Given the fact that a plant is in the outage only 5 percent of the time, this emphasizes the importance of shutdown safety and measures station staffs undertake to maintain effective barriers to safety margins during the outage. Back in 1990s, the industry adopted guidance to meet safety requirements by focusing on safety functions. Both WANO and INPO released various documents, reports and guidelines to help accomplish those requirements. However, in the last decade inadequate 'defence in depth' has led to several events affecting shutdown safety and challenging one of the most important nuclear safety principles: 'The special characteristics of nuclear technology are taken into account in all decisions and actions. Reactivity

  4. The big interview - Fukushima: 'Collectively, the international nuclear security system has failed'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niel, J.C.; Seillan, Hubert

    2011-01-01

    In an interview the ASN (the French Nuclear Safety Authority) manager summarizes his professional career, describes the ASN missions and outlines the independence of this institution as it is defined and practically exists, gives his opinion and analysis on the Fukushima accident, evokes the meaning of stress tests, discusses the information obtained through inspections of the French nuclear power plants, evokes the desirable evolutions at the international level, explains why terrorism has not been integrated in the stress test procedure, comments the implications of the European level on French safety studies. Some actors are briefly presented: the CEA, AREVA, EDF, the World association of nuclear operators (WANO)

  5. Activities of OECD NEA CSNI PWG3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, A.

    1998-01-01

    Activities of OECD NEA are connected with IAEA-IWG LMNPP, IAEA Nuclear safety, CEC-JRC, CEC-DG XI, CEC-DG XII and utilities UNIPEDE and WANO. The Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations (CSNI) acts through working groups on Fuel Cycle safety; Operating Experiences and Human Factors; Coolant System Behaviour; Integrity of Components and Structures; Confinement of Accidental Radioactive Releases and Risk Assessment. Korea, Mexico, Hungary and Czech Republic are now members of OECD NEA, and the non OECD Countries like Russia, Ukraine, Slovakia, Lithuania can participate in workshops but not in regular committee meetings

  6. Reports by the Parliamentary Office for scientific and technological assessments. Tuesday, May 31, 2011. Hearing opened to the press on the organization of nuclear safety; Comptes rendus de l' Office Parlementaire d'Evaluation des Choix Scientifiques et Technologiques. Mardi 31 mai 2011. Audition, ouverte a la presse, sur l'organisation de la securite nucleaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-05-15

    Members of the French Parliament, and representatives of the French nuclear safety authority (ASN), of the European Nuclear Safety Regulators Group (ENSREG), of the IAEA, of the World Association of Nuclear Operators (WANO), of the French institute for radiation protection and nuclear safety (IRSN) first address the international dimension of nuclear safety control. They describe, comment and discuss the situation of the Fukushima nuclear plant, the impact of this accident on France (cooperation with Japan, atmospheric measurement in France), the different national approaches to nuclear safety, the specifications for the audit of the French nuclear power plants and the security assessments foreseen for the European nuclear stock, the issue of international standard elaboration, the activity of the WANO in the field of international cooperation. In a second part, members of Parliament and representatives of the ASN, the IRSN, EDF, and AREVA and of the French committee of certification of companies for the training and monitoring of personnel working under ionizing radiation (CEFRI) describe, comment and discuss the nuclear safety modalities in France

  7. Implementation of Industry Experience at Nuclear Power Plant Krsko

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heruc, Z.; Kavsek, D.

    2002-01-01

    Being a standalone comparatively small unit NPP Krsko has adopted a business philosophy to incorporate industry experience into its daily operations. The continuos and safe operation of the unit is supported through feedback from other utilities (lessons learned) and equipment vendors and manufacturers. A permanent proactive approach in monitoring the international nuclear technology practices, standards changes and improvements, and upon feasibility review, introducing them into processes and equipment upgrades, is applied. As a member of the most important international integrations, NPP Krsko has benefited from the opportunity of sharing its experience with others (World Association of Nuclear Operators -WANO, Institute of Nuclear Power Operations - INPO, International Atomic Energy Agency - IAEA, Nuclear Operations Maintenance Information Service - NOMIS, Nuclear Maintenance Experience Exchange - NUMEX, Electric Power Research Institute - EPRI, Westinghouse Owners Group - WOG, etc.). Voluntary activities and good practices related to safety are achieved by international missions (IAEA Assessment of Safety Significant Events Team - ASSET, IAEA Operational Safety Review Team - OSART, WANO Peer Review, International Commission for Independent Safety Analysis - ICISA) and operating experience exchange programs through international organizations. These missions are promoting the highest levels of excellence in nuclear power plant operation, maintenance and support. With time, the practices described in this paper presented themselves as most contributing to safe and reliable operation of our power plant and at the same time supporting cost optimization making it a viable and reliable source of electrical energy in the more and more deregulated market. (author)

  8. Nuclear industry: no danger of over-reacting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, David.

    1996-01-01

    The chairman of the governing body of the World Association of Nuclear Operators (WANO) has recently commented on the hold-up of improvements to east European reactors due to delays in the provision of funding by western nations. At Chernobyl, two of the four reactors are still in operation. The main defects which led to the disaster in 1986 have been corrected in these and all similar RBMKs. But desirable improvements remain to be carried out to eliminate the risk of minor accidents. The west is criticized for committing too much funding to western engineering studies. The emphasis should now be on enabling eastern operators to buy and install new equipment. Technology transfer is also important so that equipment can be made locally and more cheaply. WANO is increasingly concerned by conditions attached to grants from 67 countries which are administered by the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development. The Bank is singled out for criticism over delays in funding safety improvements to older reactors. (UK)

  9. Reports by the Parliamentary Office for scientific and technological assessments. Tuesday, May 31, 2011. Hearing opened to the press on the organization of nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-05-01

    Members of the French Parliament, and representatives of the French nuclear safety authority (ASN), of the European Nuclear Safety Regulators Group (ENSREG), of the IAEA, of the World Association of Nuclear Operators (WANO), of the French institute for radiation protection and nuclear safety (IRSN) first address the international dimension of nuclear safety control. They describe, comment and discuss the situation of the Fukushima nuclear plant, the impact of this accident on France (cooperation with Japan, atmospheric measurement in France), the different national approaches to nuclear safety, the specifications for the audit of the French nuclear power plants and the security assessments foreseen for the European nuclear stock, the issue of international standard elaboration, the activity of the WANO in the field of international cooperation. In a second part, members of Parliament and representatives of the ASN, the IRSN, EDF, and AREVA and of the French committee of certification of companies for the training and monitoring of personnel working under ionizing radiation (CEFRI) describe, comment and discuss the nuclear safety modalities in France

  10. 15 years of production of electric energy of the Laguna Verde power plant, its plans and future; 15 anos de produccion de energia electrica de la Central Laguna Verde, sus planes y futuro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivera C, A [CFE, Central Laguna Verde, Km. 42.5 Carretera Cardel-Nautla, Veracruz (Mexico)

    2005-07-01

    In the year 2005 Laguna Verde power plant reaches 15 years of producing electric power in Mexico arriving to but of 100 million Megawatts-hour from their beginning of commercial activities. The Unit 1 that entered at July 29, 1990 and the Unit 2 at April 10, 1995, obtaining the Disposability Factors from their origin is: 84.63% in Unit 1 and 83.67% in Unit 2. The march of the X XI century gives big challenges of competition to the Laguna Verde Central, with the possible opening of the electric market to private investment, for their Goals and Objectives of a world class company, taking the evaluation system and qualification of the World Association of Nuclear Operators (WANO) that promotes the Excellence in the operation of the nuclear power stations in all their partners. This Association supports the development of programs that allow the monitoring of the behavior in Safety Culture, Human fulfilment, Equipment reliability, Industrial Safety, Planning, Programming and Control, Personalized Systematic Training, and the use of the Operational experience in the daily tasks. The present work tries to explain the system of evaluation/qualification of WANO, the definition of Goals and Objectives to reach the excellence and of the programs, it will present the Program of the Reliability of Equipment with its main actions the productivity. (Author)

  11. 15 years of production of electric energy of the Laguna Verde power plant, its plans and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivera C, A.

    2005-01-01

    In the year 2005 Laguna Verde power plant reaches 15 years of producing electric power in Mexico arriving to but of 100 million Megawatts-hour from their beginning of commercial activities. The Unit 1 that entered at July 29, 1990 and the Unit 2 at April 10, 1995, obtaining the Disposability Factors from their origin is: 84.63% in Unit 1 and 83.67% in Unit 2. The march of the X XI century gives big challenges of competition to the Laguna Verde Central, with the possible opening of the electric market to private investment, for their Goals and Objectives of a world class company, taking the evaluation system and qualification of the World Association of Nuclear Operators (WANO) that promotes the Excellence in the operation of the nuclear power stations in all their partners. This Association supports the development of programs that allow the monitoring of the behavior in Safety Culture, Human fulfilment, Equipment reliability, Industrial Safety, Planning, Programming and Control, Personalized Systematic Training, and the use of the Operational experience in the daily tasks. The present work tries to explain the system of evaluation/qualification of WANO, the definition of Goals and Objectives to reach the excellence and of the programs, it will present the Program of the Reliability of Equipment with its main actions the productivity. (Author)

  12. Safety assessment, safety performance indicators at the Paks Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baji, C.; Vamos, G.; Toth, J.

    2001-01-01

    The Paks Nuclear Power Plant has been using different methods of safety assessment (event analysis, self-assessment, probabilistic safety analysis), including performance indicators characterizing both operational and safety performance since the early years of operation of the plant. Regarding the safety performance, the indicators include safety system performance, number of scrams, release of radioactive materials, number of safety significant events, industrial safety indicator, etc. The Paks NPP also reports a set of ten indicators to WANO Performance Indicator Programme which, among others, include safety related indicators as well. However, a more systematic approach to structuring and trending safety indicators is needed so that they can contribute to the enhancement of the operational safety. A more comprehensive set of indicators and a systematic evaluation process was introduced in 1996. The performance indicators framework proposed by the IAEA was adapted to Paks in this year to further improve the process. Safety culture assessment and characterizing safety culture is part of the assessment process. (author)

  13. The performance trends of nuclear power plants worldwide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glorian, D. [Electricite de France (EDF), 93 - Saint-Denis (France)

    2001-07-01

    Looking back to the worldwide operating experience feedback, which performance trends and conclusions could be drawn up? What is the specific situation of the French nuclear units, in comparison with the average worldwide performance? The performance of a unit or group of facilities is measured not only in technical terms (safety, availability, load control capability), but also from an economic and financial standpoint (operating and maintenance costs, fuel costs, etc). Performance in terms of radiological protection and on-the-job safety, as well as environmental protection, is also monitored in order to give the broadest possible overview of nuclear power plant performance. The main technical results are presented on the basis of selected performance indicators. The results obtained by French units are benchmarked against those of other PWR facilities in operation around the world, in accordance with comparisons made by the World Association of Nuclear Operators (WANO). (author)

  14. The performance trends of nuclear power plants worldwide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glorian, D.

    2001-01-01

    Looking back to the worldwide operating experience feedback, which performance trends and conclusions could be drawn up? What is the specific situation of the French nuclear units, in comparison with the average worldwide performance? The performance of a unit or group of facilities is measured not only in technical terms (safety, availability, load control capability), but also from an economic and financial standpoint (operating and maintenance costs, fuel costs, etc). Performance in terms of radiological protection and on-the-job safety, as well as environmental protection, is also monitored in order to give the broadest possible overview of nuclear power plant performance. The main technical results are presented on the basis of selected performance indicators. The results obtained by French units are benchmarked against those of other PWR facilities in operation around the world, in accordance with comparisons made by the World Association of Nuclear Operators (WANO). (author)

  15. Daya Bay Nuclear Power Station five-year business plan and operating results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Shanming

    2000-01-01

    Guangdong Nuclear Power Joint Venture Company, Ltd. first 5-Year Business Plan (hereinafter referred to as 5-Year Business Plan) serves as guidance of both the operations and management of the company. Continuous performance improvement of the nuclear power station has been achieved through the fulfillment of goals and improvement plan defined by the 5-Year Business Plan, and through standard and systematic management. Daya Bay Nuclear Power Station (GNPS) has made great contributions to sustainable economic developments of both Guangdong and Hong Kong since its commercial operation in 1994. As of the end of 1999, the cumulative off-take electricity generated by GNPS had reached 69.9 billion kWh. Of the WANO indicators universally applied by nuclear power industry throughout the world, 6 indicators of Daya Bay performance entered the world top quartile while 9 the medium level

  16. Interactive analysis of human error factors in NPP operation events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Li; Zou Yanhua; Huang Weigang

    2010-01-01

    Interactive of human error factors in NPP operation events were introduced, and 645 WANO operation event reports from 1999 to 2008 were analyzed, among which 432 were found relative to human errors. After classifying these errors with the Root Causes or Causal Factors, and then applying SPSS for correlation analysis,we concluded: (1) Personnel work practices are restricted by many factors. Forming a good personnel work practices is a systematic work which need supports in many aspects. (2)Verbal communications,personnel work practices, man-machine interface and written procedures and documents play great roles. They are four interaction factors which often come in bundle. If some improvements need to be made on one of them,synchronous measures are also necessary for the others.(3) Management direction and decision process, which are related to management,have a significant interaction with personnel factors. (authors)

  17. Execution and results of the National Peer Reviews 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grauf, E.

    2000-01-01

    In 1998, the operators of German nuclear power plants initiated a 'National Peer Review' pilot project as a program for self-assessment. The project serves to collect data about the status of plant operation of German facilities, and to analyze whether a tool of this kind lends itself to optimizing plant operations management. The national program supplements the international efforts by WANO and IAEA, also with a view to a more effective exchange of operating experience among German plants. Even before the end of the pilot phase, and with three process reviews still to be completed, the results of the reviews conducted up until 2000 have proved this to be an effective tool, as is discussed in this article. The findings are fully accepted by the staff and serve for the preparation of a planned future general self-assessment of German nuclear power plants, where they will be employed as a permanent tool. (orig.) [de

  18. Methodology for identifying boundaries of systems important to safety in CANDU nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Therrien, S.; Komljenovic, D.; Therrien, P.; Ruest, C.; Prevost, P.; Vaillancourt, R.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a methodology developed to identify the boundaries of the systems important to safety (SIS) at the Gentilly-2 Nuclear Power Plant (NPP), Hydro-Quebec. The SIS boundaries identification considers nuclear safety only. Components that are not identified as important to safety are systematically identified as related to safety. A global assessment process such as WANO/INPO AP-913 'Equipment Reliability Process' will be needed to implement adequate changes in the management rules of those components. The paper depicts results in applying the methodology to the Shutdown Systems 1 and 2 (SDS 1, 2), and to the Emergency Core Cooling System (ECCS). This validation process enabled fine tuning the methodology, performing a better estimate of the effort required to evaluate a system, and identifying components important to safety of these systems. (author)

  19. Proceedings of SES International Conference on Can Slovakia secure energy supply and sustainable development without nuclear? Go Nuke Slovakia!

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    The Conference proceedings included 28 papers. The Conference included the following sessions: (I): International views; (II): National views; (III): Industry views. Focused in its objective, the is aimed to send a clear, hard-hitting message to decision-makers. This is that: Slovakia cannot secure future energy supply, if it does not complete its partially built reactors and if it closes its safe and effective ones. Nuclear has to remain an indispensable part of the country's future energy mix. The event was opened with invited presentations by officials at the highest level of organisations such as the IAEA, the IEA, OECD/NEA, the NEI, the WNA and WANO, as well as the European Commission and Parliament. This line-up was followed by a host of speakers from the political and nuclear industrial arenas in Slovakia, the Czech Republic, Finland, Hungary and the Russian Federation

  20. INPO Perspectives and Activities to Enhance Supplier Human Performance and Safety Culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duncan, R. J.

    2016-01-01

    Within their own organizations, utilities have made significant improvements in human performance and safety culture, supported by a strong community of practice through INPO and WANO. In recent years, utilities have been making increasing use of suppliers for design, construction, inspection and maintenance services in support of their NPPs. Many of these suppliers do not have the benefit of being members of a community of practice when it comes to human performance and safety culture. To help the supplier community make improvements similar to what the utilities have achieved, INPO has recently expanded its Supplier Participant program to address the issue of human performance and safety culture in the supplier community. The intent of this paper will be to share the INPO’s perspectives and activities in helping suppliers of services and products to NPPs enhance their human performance and safety culture. (author)

  1. The first Summer Institute of the World Nuclear University - a personal record

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denk, W.; Fischer, C.; Seidl, M.

    2005-01-01

    The first World Nuclear University Summer Institute was held at Idaho Falls, USA, between July 9 and August 20, 2005. The event was hosted by the Institute of Nuclear Science and Engineering of Idaho State University (ISU) and by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), which has been planned to be the central nuclear technology research institution in the United States. The World Nuclear University (WNU) was founded in 2003 by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD-NEA), the World Association of Nuclear Operators (WANO), and the World Nuclear Association (WNA) as a global association fo scientific and educational institutions in the nuclear field. The first WNU Summer Institute was designed at IAEA in Vienna in the course of the following year and planned by the WNU Coordinating Centre in London. The six weeks of lectures and presentations arranged by the World nuclear University in Idaho Falls are described in detail from the participants' perspective. (orig.)

  2. Fission product release modelling for application of fuel-failure monitoring and detection - An overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, B.J., E-mail: lewibre@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Royal Military College of Canada, Kingston, Ontario, K7K 7B4 (Canada); Chan, P.K.; El-Jaby, A. [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Royal Military College of Canada, Kingston, Ontario, K7K 7B4 (Canada); Iglesias, F.C.; Fitchett, A. [Candesco Division of Kinectrics Inc., 26 Wellington Street East, 3rd Floor, Toronto, Ontario M5E 1S2 (Canada)

    2017-06-15

    A review of fission product release theory is presented in support of fuel-failure monitoring analysis for the characterization and location of defective fuel. This work is used to describe: (i) the development of the steady-state Visual-DETECT code for coolant activity analysis to characterize failures in the core and the amount of tramp uranium; (ii) a generalization of this model in the STAR code for prediction of the time-dependent release of iodine and noble gas fission products to the coolant during reactor start-up, steady-state, shutdown, and bundle-shifting manoeuvres; (iii) an extension of the model to account for the release of fission products that are delayed-neutron precursors for assessment of fuel-failure location; and (iv) a simplification of the steady-state model to assess the methodology proposed by WANO for a fuel reliability indicator for water-cooled reactors.

  3. Operational safety performance indicator system - a management tool for the self assessment of safety and reliability of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anil Kumar; Mandowara, S.L.; Mittal, S.

    2006-01-01

    Operational Safety Performance Indicator system is one of the self assessment tools for station management to monitor safety and reliability of nuclear power plants. It provides information to station management about the performance of various areas of the plants by means of different colours of relevant performance indicators. Such systems have been implemented at many nuclear power plants in the world and have been considered as strength during WANO Peer Review. IAEA had a Coordinated Research Programme (CRP) on this with several countries participating including India. In NPCIL this system has been implemented in KAPS about a year back and found very useful in identifying areas which needs to be given more attention. Based on the KAPS feedback Implementation of this system has been taken up in RAPS-3 and 4 and KGS-l and 2. (author)

  4. Environmental management and business profitability - a case study of NPCIL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagh, P.M.; Singh, Jitendra

    2002-01-01

    Nuclear Power Corporation of India Limited (NPCIL) is responsible for the design, construction, commissioning and operation of nuclear power plants in India for electricity generation. NPCIL presently has fourteen units in commercial operation. Over the last few years, the performance of Indian nuclear power plants have registered a marked improvement. This has been achieved through sustained and systematic efforts to upgrade all aspects of the plant activities on one hand and on the other, development and implementation of latest tools, techniques and management systems to further enhance their effectiveness. In addition, development and implementation of International Standards on Environmental, Safety and Quality Management have been institutionalized for continual improvement. WANO (World Association of Nuclear Operators) Peer Reviews are also being conducted. The present paper is an attempt to present a case study of Nuclear Power Corporation of India Limited in view of the changing perceptions on environmental management and overall business plan. (author)

  5. Resin intrusion into the primary circuit of NPP Jaslovske Bohunice V-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grezdo, O.; Mraz, V.

    2005-01-01

    During the refueling at the first unit of Bohunice NPP in 2005 a lot of sediment was found on the upper storage rack. This sediment was identification as a filter resin. Resin was found in most of the fuel assemblies, pipes and tanks of the primary circuit and his auxiliary systems. Resin producer and WANO network was contacted in order to get information about similar events. Management of Bohunice NPP made a decision that primary circuit, fuel assemblies and auxiliary systems have to be cleaned. Subsequent cleaning extended outage by 31 days. This paper summarizes causes, existing consequences and corrective actions. Accent was put on the hydraulic characteristics of the primary circuit measurement, power distribution core monitoring and the primary circuit water quality verification (Authors)

  6. Developing Nuclear Safety Culture within a Supplier Organization: An Insight from AREVA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    L’Epinois, B. de

    2016-01-01

    AREVA is present throughout the entire nuclear cycle, from uranium mining to used fuel recycling, including nuclear reactor design, equipment delivery and operating services. AREVA is recognised by utilities around the world for its expertise, its skills in cutting-edge technologies, and its dedication to the highest level of safety. This presentation will focus on the ways the safety culture applies to the supplier missions, along with the traditional focus on quality, costs and schedule. It will develop how the safety culture traits developed for nuclear operators by, for example, WANO or the IAEA, can be adequately be imported and embedded into the supply industry. This will be illustrated with some examples in this field. (author)

  7. Seismic safety review mission for the follow-up of the seismic upgrading of Kozloduy NPP (Units 1-4). Sofia, Bulgaria, 16-20 November 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David, M.; Shibata, H.; Stevenson, J.D.; Godoy, A.; Gurpinar, A.

    1992-11-01

    A Seismic Safety Review Mission for the follow-up of the design and implementation of the seismic upgrading of Kozloduy NPP was performed in Sofia from 16-20 November 1992. This mission continued the second task of the follow-up activities of the design and implementation of the seismic upgrading (Phases 1 and 2), which is being carried out in Units 1 and 2 of the NPP. Thus the objectives of the mission was to assist the Bulgarian authorities in the technical evaluation of the design tasks defined for Phases 1 and 2 item HB of WANO 6 Month Programme, as follows: anchorage upgrades of low seismic capacity components; list of seismic safety related systems and components; detailed walkdown to assess seismic capacity of components and define priorities for the upgrading; determination of seismic structural capacity of pump house, diesel generator building and turbine building and design of required upgrades; liquefaction potential evaluation. Tabs

  8. Preparation of Long Term Operation in Dukovany NPP, Czech Republic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krivanek, R.; Sabata, M.

    2012-01-01

    Dukovany NPP in the south-east of the Czech Republic operates four VVER 440/213 type units. The first unit was commissioned in 1985 and the last one in 1987. The operational results of the whole NPP have been excellent and NPP permanently belongs between the first quartile of the best operated NPPs in the world in accordance with WANO factors. Large safety improvement programme have been implemented in last 15 years. The original design lifetime of main components is 30 years which means till 2015 and it is understandable that NPP is preparing for long-term operation (LTO). The paper is describing activities carried out and planned for safe and successful LTO. (author)

  9. Application of balanced score card in the development of performance indicator system in nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Shuguang; Huang Fang; Fang Zhaoxia

    2013-01-01

    Performance indicator, which is one of ten performance monitoring tools recommended by WANO performance improvement model, has become an effective tool for performance improvement of nuclear power plant. At present, performance indicator system has been built in nuclear power plant. However, how to establish the performance indicator system that is reasonable and applicable for plant is still a question to be discussed. Performance indictor is closely tied to the strategic direction of a corporation by a balanced score card, and the performance indicator system is established from the point of performance management and strategic development. The performance indicator system of nuclear power plant is developed by introducing the balanced score card, and can be as a reference for other domestic nuclear power plants. (authors)

  10. Contribution of IAEA, FNRBA and ANNuR as Networking in Developing and Maintaining Capacity Building for a nuclear power programme: Comparative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osman, Omer E.

    2014-01-01

    It is increasingly recognised that the mobilization and exchange of knowledge between different sectors (such as academia, policymakers, Regulators and practitioners) and regions or global can be of paramount importance in the field of Capacity Building for a nuclear power programme. As a result, the number of knowledge networks in this field has risen dramatically in recent years. Some of these networks bring together actors within a specific region, such as European Nuclear Safety Regulators Group (ENSREG), Western European Nuclear Regulators Association (WENRA), The Arab Network of Nuclear Regulators (ANNuR). Still others cover entire continents such as Asian Nuclear Safety Network (ANSN), Asia Pacific Safeguards Network (APSN) and Forum of Nuclear Regulatory Bodies in Africa (FNRBA). Or even operate worldwide and globally, like IAEA Special Support Services, Global Nuclear Safety and Security Network (GNSSN), World Organization of Nuclear Operators (WANO) and International Nuclear Regulators Association (INRA)

  11. Proceedings of the specialist meeting on safety performance indicators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-05-28

    In 1998, the OECD/NEA committee on Nuclear Regulatory Activities (CNRA) initiated an activity with the objective of advancing the discussion on how to enhance and measure regulatory effectiveness in relation to nuclear installations. One of the outcome of this activity was to establish a Task group to develop internal (direct) performance indicators which would be used to monitor regulatory efficiency. On the initiative of the NEA/CSNI Working Group on Operating Experience the Spanish CSN hosted a workshop (Madrid, 2000) to review the state of the art on Safety Performance Indicators. This workshop, which was co-sponsored by the IAEA and WANO was attended by 73 participants from 19 countries, representing the industry, regulators, service companies as well as international organisations. The conclusions were: 1. there is considerable development effort on performance indicators in many countries; 2. utilities continue to rely on the WANO Performance indicators system which consists of indicators in 8 key areas and receives data from virtually all commercial NPP's in the world; 3. Regulators do not have a common set of performance indicators. This document gathers the 25 presentations given during this workshop. After this workshop, a joint CNRA/CSNI task group was launched in December 2000 to exchange information and develop external (indirect) indicators to measure regulatory effectiveness, i.e. impact on licensee's safety performance. These external indicators are, in other words, the traditional plant performance indicators (PI's). The task force consisted of regulators, organisations which have a performance indicators system in operation or under testing. The task force met in Paris on February 19-20, 2001 and the work performed by the group is summarized in a report (NEA-CSNI-R--2001-11) attached in appendix to these proceedings.

  12. Proceedings of the specialist meeting on safety performance indicators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    In 1998, the OECD/NEA committee on Nuclear Regulatory Activities (CNRA) initiated an activity with the objective of advancing the discussion on how to enhance and measure regulatory effectiveness in relation to nuclear installations. One of the outcome of this activity was to establish a Task group to develop internal (direct) performance indicators which would be used to monitor regulatory efficiency. On the initiative of the NEA/CSNI Working Group on Operating Experience the Spanish CSN hosted a workshop (Madrid, 2000) to review the state of the art on Safety Performance Indicators. This workshop, which was co-sponsored by the IAEA and WANO was attended by 73 participants from 19 countries, representing the industry, regulators, service companies as well as international organisations. The conclusions were: 1. there is considerable development effort on performance indicators in many countries; 2. utilities continue to rely on the WANO Performance indicators system which consists of indicators in 8 key areas and receives data from virtually all commercial NPP's in the world; 3. Regulators do not have a common set of performance indicators. This document gathers the 25 presentations given during this workshop. After this workshop, a joint CNRA/CSNI task group was launched in December 2000 to exchange information and develop external (indirect) indicators to measure regulatory effectiveness, i.e. impact on licensee's safety performance. These external indicators are, in other words, the traditional plant performance indicators (PI's). The task force consisted of regulators, organisations which have a performance indicators system in operation or under testing. The task force met in Paris on February 19-20, 2001 and the work performed by the group is summarized in a report (NEA-CSNI-R--2001-11) attached in appendix to these proceedings

  13. Strategic planning 2007-2011, an opportunity for quality, competitiveness and excellence of the Laguna Verde Central

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivera C, A.

    2007-01-01

    The reason is to give to know to the nuclear community in Mexico the good results that it located in the 2006 to the Laguna Verde Nucleo electric Central in the classification of the World Association of Nuclear Operators (WANO) like one of the best in the worldwide scale, and their Strategic Plan 2007-2011 like an opportunity to continue improving the Quality, the Competitiveness and the Excellency in their Generating Units. It stands out that the fuel reloads are carried out in systemic form in less than 30 days, and also other achievements like it is the certificate granted by PROFEPA of Clean Industry, the renovation of the Certifications of the ISO-9001 and the ISO-14001, as well as the accredit of the Laboratories, and they will give data of the project of the increment of power that their power rose in 15%. For those results in the Strategic Planning 2007-2011 are pointed out that the Laguna Verde Central is a highly viable option in Mexico, when continuing with reloads that will allow a capacity factor up of 90%, and the other concepts that will give the obtaining of the qualification level 1 of WANO in this strategic period. Finally I will conclude with the good news for the Nuclear Industry in Mexico that published the Reforma newspaper at November 01, 2006: 'To the president of Mexico, Felipe Calderon, interests him to impel during his command the alternating energy sources to the hydrocarbons, known it is that the hydrocarbons (petroleum, coal or natural gas) they are finite, while the appetite of the world for the energy is infinite. As you they know, Mexico possesses a nuclear plant that generates energy starting from enriched uranium: the famous Laguna Verde Thermonuclear Central. He declared that Mexico can and it should advance for the one on the way to the energy generation for the nuclear road.' (Author)

  14. Strategic planning 2007-2011, an opportunity for quality, competitiveness and excellence of the Laguna Verde Central; Planeacion estrategica 2007-2011, una oportunidad para la calidad, competitividad y excelencia de la Central Laguna Verde

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivera C, A. [CFE, Central Laguna Verde, Kilometro 42.5 Cardel Nautla, Veracruz (Mexico)]. e-mail: arr99999@cfe.gob.mx

    2007-07-01

    The reason is to give to know to the nuclear community in Mexico the good results that it located in the 2006 to the Laguna Verde Nucleo electric Central in the classification of the World Association of Nuclear Operators (WANO) like one of the best in the worldwide scale, and their Strategic Plan 2007-2011 like an opportunity to continue improving the Quality, the Competitiveness and the Excellency in their Generating Units. It stands out that the fuel reloads are carried out in systemic form in less than 30 days, and also other achievements like it is the certificate granted by PROFEPA of Clean Industry, the renovation of the Certifications of the ISO-9001 and the ISO-14001, as well as the accredit of the Laboratories, and they will give data of the project of the increment of power that their power rose in 15%. For those results in the Strategic Planning 2007-2011 are pointed out that the Laguna Verde Central is a highly viable option in Mexico, when continuing with reloads that will allow a capacity factor up of 90%, and the other concepts that will give the obtaining of the qualification level 1 of WANO in this strategic period. Finally I will conclude with the good news for the Nuclear Industry in Mexico that published the Reforma newspaper at November 01, 2006: 'To the president of Mexico, Felipe Calderon, interests him to impel during his command the alternating energy sources to the hydrocarbons, known it is that the hydrocarbons (petroleum, coal or natural gas) they are finite, while the appetite of the world for the energy is infinite. As you they know, Mexico possesses a nuclear plant that generates energy starting from enriched uranium: the famous Laguna Verde Thermonuclear Central. He declared that Mexico can and it should advance for the one on the way to the energy generation for the nuclear road.' (Author)0.

  15. Draft Workshop Summary and Presentations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houssin, Didier; ); Tam, Cecilia; ); Cameron, Ron; ); Paillere, Henri; ); Lisann, Beth; Ehlert, Andreas; Kaufer, Barry; Decobert, Veronique; Beutier, Didier; Crepin, Anne; Aurela, Jorma; Baritaud, Manuel; ); Rooke, Oliver; Blundell, Neil; ); Shropshire, David; Noren, Bjarne; Blundell, Neil; ); Dujardin, Thierry; )

    2014-01-01

    the electricity market reform in the UK); Session 4: Nuclear regulation and safety (Regulation for new build and new comer countries and Fukushima Safety Action Plan; WANO's contribution to strengthen nuclear safety worldwide; Strengthening Good Practice within Nuclear Safety post Fukushima-Daiichi); Session 5: Key Message for the Road-map update (Outline current status of nuclear technology development and need for additional R and D to address increased safety requirements; Provide an updated vision for nuclear energy's role in a low carbon energy system; Identify barriers and actions needed to accelerate the development and deployment of nuclear technologies to meet the Road-map vision; Identify and share lessons learned and best practices in nuclear regulation, front and back end fuel cycle practices, construction and financing. This document brings together the available presentations (slides) given at this workshop: 1 - Road-map overview and role of nuclear in IEA scenarios (Cecilia Tam, IEA); 2 - The Direction Of The 2014 Nuclear Road-map (Ron Cameron, OECD/NEA); 3 - Technology development needs for nuclear energy, 1.a: Reactor technology (Henri Paillere, OECD/NEA); 4 - IEA/NEA Nuclear Technology Road-map Update (Beth Lisann, US-DoE); 5 - Update of the Nuclear Energy Technology Road-map - Nuclear Decommissioning (Andreas Ehlert, E-On); 6 - Overcoming barriers to nuclear build - other than financing (Veronique Decobert, Westinghouse); 7 - Development of the supply chain: relying on local industrial involvement (Didier Beutier, Areva); 8 - Training and capacity development needs (Jorma Aurela, Finnish Ministry of Employment and the Economy); 9 - Key conditions for successful Nuclear new build financing (Anne Crepin, Areva); 10 - Regulation for New Build and Newcomers, IAEA Nuclear Safety Action Plan (David Shropshire, IAEA); 11 - WANO's contribution to strengthen nuclear safety worldwide (Bjarne Noren, WANO); 12 - Strengthening Good Practice within Nuclear Safety

  16. Radiological protection in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zorrilla R, S.

    2008-12-01

    This presentation sharing experiences which correspond to the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde. This nuclear power plant is located at level 2 of four possible, in the classification performance of the World Association of Nuclear Operators (WANO), which means the mexican nuclear power plant is classified in terms of its performance indicators and above the average achieved by their counterparts americans and canadians. In the national context, the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde has also been honored with several awards such as the National Quality Award, the Clean Industry Certificate, the distinction of Environmental Excellence and others of similar importance. For the standards of WANO, the basic idea is that there are shortcomings in one of nuclear power plant concern to all partners. The indicators used for the classification will always go beyond more compliance with regulations, which are assumed, and rather assume come or a path to excellence. Among the most important indicators are: the collective dose, the percentage of areas declared as contaminated, the number, type and tendency of contamination personal cases, the number of dosimetry alarms, the number of unplanned exposures, loss control of high radiation areas and the release of contaminated material outside the restricted areas. Furthermore, as already indicated, nuclear power plants are of special care situations, such as, carrying out work in areas with radiation fields of more than 15 mSv h -1 , the movement of spent fuel in the reload floor. The consideration of the minimum total effective dose equivalent as a criterion for prescribing tools that reduce exposures, but may increase the external cases of contaminated casualties, the experience in portals such as workers subject to radiology, where exposure in industrial radiography, and so on. Special mention deserve the conditions generated during fuel reload stops, which causes a massive personnel movement, working simultaneously on

  17. Radiation protection in Bohunice NPP. Description of present status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobis, L.

    2001-01-01

    Radiation protection (RP) at Bohunice NPP has reached the high international standard. The fact was approved by several independent international missions (OSART , WANO, WENRA, ...). A lot of modifications have been done in order to improve the standard of radiation protection. All the BSS requirements have been implemented into the plant regulations before the State Law No 290/1996 and 470/2000 came into the force. Internal audits are regularly performed at NPP in order to reveal potential deficiencies. In 2001 there were 4 such audits focused on quality assurance, software operation, LBB concept and limits and condition of safe operation. State Health Institute, the regulatory body in the radiation protection, performs the inspection at least ones a month. Good relationship with the inspectors of State Health Institute also contributes to the safe operation of the NPP. There were not any radiation accident. All anomalies or radiation events are investigated at a plant level. The results of root cause analysis and proposal of corrective actions are provided to IAEA and WANO databases for the distribution. The Radiation protection department of Bohunice NPP cooperates with the other Czech and Slovak NPPs. Regular meetings on radiation protection and lately also on emergency preparedness are organized. The cooperation is excellent. Occupational exposure is reviewed also with respect of ISOE data. Bohunice NPP (even with high dose burden caused by reconstruction of V1 NPP) can be found in the first half of world PWR speaking about the collective exposure per reactor. V2 NPP itself reaches the lowest collective exposure in the world. All doses are below the limits and kept ALARA. ALARA system has been established already in 1997 at Bohunice NPP and its results are obvious for example looking at dose results during the reconstruction works at V1 NPP. The operation of Bohunice NPP has negligible influence to its surroundings. The values of gas and liquid effluents move

  18. SFEN Annual Convention 2012 - The nuclear energy one year after Fukushima. Proceedings; Convention SFEN 2012 - Le nucleaire un an apres Fukushima. Recueil des presentations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-03-15

    This document brings together the available presentations given at the 2012 edition of the Annual Convention of the French society of nuclear energy (SFEN) on the topic of nuclear energy one year after Fukushima. Twenty four presentations (slides) are compiled in this document: 1 - Presentation and introduction of the Annual Convention (Luc Oursel - SFEN President); 2 - Status of onsite/offsite remedial actions, key lessons learned (Akira Omoto, Tokyo univ., Japan Atomic Energy Commission); 3 - Complementary Safety Assessments (CSA) of the French NPP fleet (Dominique Miniere, EDF); 4 - Speech of M. Francois Fillon - Prime Minister; 5 - CSA of the fuel cycle facilities (Philippe Knoche, Areva); 6 - CSA of the EPR (Bertrand de l'Epinois, Areva; Jean-Luc Foret, EDF CNEN); 7 - The collective responsibility of the operators: the action of WANO (Laurent Stricker, WANO); 8 - Conclusions of French Nuclear Safety Authority (ASN) - Safety measures to be strengthened; 9 - Opinion no. 2012-AV-013 from January 3, 2012 of the French Nuclear Safety Authority - ASN (Sophie Mourlon, ASN; Caroline Lavarenne, IRSN); 10 - Nuclear energy: an energy for the future (Bernard Bigot, CEA); 11 - The nuclear phaseout in Germany from the view of German industry (Eberhard von Rottenburg, BDI); 12 - Prospects in China (Wei Lu, CGNP Europe); 13 - Industry Current Status and its Prospects in the United States (J. Spina, CENG); 14 - Nuclear energy prospects in France: recommendations of the Commission 'Energy 2050' (Jacques Percebois, Creden); 15 - Electrical generation system efficiency and economy (Yves Giraud, EDF); 16 - Electrical generation systems and distribution networks (Herve Mignon, Rte); 17 - Prospects in the UK (Tim Stone, DECC/OND, Senior Adviser to the Secretary of State); 18 - Climatic changes and energy policy (Laura Cozzi, IEA); 19 - The young nuclear professionals network (Boris Supiot, SFEN Young Generation Group); 20 - Socio-economic impacts of the nuclear power

  19. Mitigation of organically bound sulphate from water treatment plants at Bruce NGS and impact on steam generator secondary side chemistry control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nashiem, R.; Davloor, R.; Harper, B.; Smith, K. [Bruce Power, Tiverton, Ontario (Canada); Gauthier, C. [CTGIX Services Inc., Burlington, Ontario (Canada); Schexnailder, S. [GE Water and Process Technologies, Dallas, Texas (United States)

    2010-07-01

    Bruce Power is the source of more than 20 per cent of Ontario's electricity and currently operates six reactor units at the Bruce Nuclear Generating Station A (two units) and B (four units) stations located on Lake Huron. This paper discusses the challenges faced and operating experience (OPEX) gained in meeting WANO 1.0 chemistry performance objectives for steam generator secondary side chemistry control, particularly with control of steam generator sulphates. A detailed sampling and analysis program conducted as part of this study concluded that a major contributor to steam generator (SG) elevated sulphates is Organically Bound Sulphate (OBS) in Water Treatment Plants (WTP) effluent. The Bruce A and B WTPs consist of clarification with downstream sand and carbon filtration for Lake Water pre-treatment, which are followed by conventional Ion Exchange (IX) demineralization. Samples taken from various locations in the process stream were analyzed for a variety of parameters including both organic bound and inorganic forms of sulphate. The results are inconclusive with respect to finding the definitive source of OBS. This is primarily due to the condition that the OBS in the samples, which are in relatively low levels, are masked during chemical analysis by the considerably higher inorganic sulphate background. Additionally, it was also determined that on-line Total Organic Carbon (TOC) levels at different WTP locations did not always correlate well with OBS levels in the effluent, such that TOC could not be effectively used as a control parameter to improve OBS performance of the WTP operation. Improvement efforts at both plants focused on a number of areas including optimization of clarifier operation, replacement of IX resins, addition of downstream mobile polishing trailers, testing of new resins and adsorbents, pilot-scale testing with a Reverse Osmosis (RO) rig, review of resin regeneration and backwashing practices, and operating procedure improvements

  20. Safety culture in nuclear installations. Management of safety and safety culture in Indian NPPs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rawal, S.C.

    2002-01-01

    culture is being used and continuously being upgraded in: Training, Work procedure, Work practice, Internal information exchange Seminars/workshops/event analysis reports sharing between various units in the country. International information exchange programme through IAEA and WANO programmes Information exchange through c-network of IAEA/WANO

  1. SFEN Annual Convention 2012 - The nuclear energy one year after Fukushima. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-03-01

    This document brings together the available presentations given at the 2012 edition of the Annual Convention of the French society of nuclear energy (SFEN) on the topic of nuclear energy one year after Fukushima. Twenty four presentations (slides) are compiled in this document: 1 - Presentation and introduction of the Annual Convention (Luc Oursel - SFEN President); 2 - Status of onsite/offsite remedial actions, key lessons learned (Akira Omoto, Tokyo univ., Japan Atomic Energy Commission); 3 - Complementary Safety Assessments (CSA) of the French NPP fleet (Dominique Miniere, EDF); 4 - Speech of M. Francois Fillon - Prime Minister; 5 - CSA of the fuel cycle facilities (Philippe Knoche, Areva); 6 - CSA of the EPR (Bertrand de l'Epinois, Areva; Jean-Luc Foret, EDF CNEN); 7 - The collective responsibility of the operators: the action of WANO (Laurent Stricker, WANO); 8 - Conclusions of French Nuclear Safety Authority (ASN) - Safety measures to be strengthened; 9 - Opinion no. 2012-AV-013 from January 3, 2012 of the French Nuclear Safety Authority - ASN (Sophie Mourlon, ASN; Caroline Lavarenne, IRSN); 10 - Nuclear energy: an energy for the future (Bernard Bigot, CEA); 11 - The nuclear phaseout in Germany from the view of German industry (Eberhard von Rottenburg, BDI); 12 - Prospects in China (Wei Lu, CGNP Europe); 13 - Industry Current Status and its Prospects in the United States (J. Spina, CENG); 14 - Nuclear energy prospects in France: recommendations of the Commission 'Energy 2050' (Jacques Percebois, Creden); 15 - Electrical generation system efficiency and economy (Yves Giraud, EDF); 16 - Electrical generation systems and distribution networks (Herve Mignon, Rte); 17 - Prospects in the UK (Tim Stone, DECC/OND, Senior Adviser to the Secretary of State); 18 - Climatic changes and energy policy (Laura Cozzi, IEA); 19 - The young nuclear professionals network (Boris Supiot, SFEN Young Generation Group); 20 - Socio-economic impacts of the nuclear power industry in

  2. Developing Effective Corrective Action Plan in Krsko NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bach, Bruno; Cizmek, Rudi; Bozin, Bojan

    2014-01-01

    Experience shows that many events could have been prevented if lessons had been learned from previous incidents. Event reporting thus has become an increasingly important aspect of the operation and regulation of all safety-related and public health industries. Different industries such as aeronautics, chemicals, transport and of course nuclear depend on Operating Experience (OE) feedback programs to provide lessons learned about safety. The information available under an OE programme for these organizations comprises internal event reports and analysis and external operating experience including reports on low level events and near misses and other relevant operating performance information. The worldwide OE programme (such as WANO OE) in nuclear power plants provides opportunity to learn from events at other plants. In particular, it alerts plants to mistakes or events that have occurred at other nuclear power plants and enables them to take corrective actions to prevent similar occurrences at their own plant. The intent of the effective and efficient OE program is therefore to improve personnel/plant safety, reliability and commercial performance of the operating nuclear power plants. Such a programme ensures that operating experience is analysed, events important to safety are reviewed in depth, lessons learned are disseminated to the staff and to the relevant national and international organizations and corrective actions are effectively implemented. Learning and applying the lessons from operating experience is an integral part of station safety culture and is encouraged by managers throughout the top plant administrative programs and procedures. Krsko NPP is developed its own OE program by using the most relevant INPO/WANO/IAEA guidelines as well as its own knowledge, skills an operating practice. The OE is a part of the Corrective Action Program (CAP), which is among top management programs. The purpose of this article is to present a part of the Krško NPP

  3. Mitigation of organically bound sulphate from water treatment plants at Bruce NGS and impact on steam generator secondary side chemistry control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nashiem, R.; Davloor, R.; Harper, B.; Smith, K.; Gauthier, C.; Schexnailder, S.

    2010-01-01

    Bruce Power is the source of more than 20 per cent of Ontario's electricity and currently operates six reactor units at the Bruce Nuclear Generating Station A (two units) and B (four units) stations located on Lake Huron. This paper discusses the challenges faced and operating experience (OPEX) gained in meeting WANO 1.0 chemistry performance objectives for steam generator secondary side chemistry control, particularly with control of steam generator sulphates. A detailed sampling and analysis program conducted as part of this study concluded that a major contributor to steam generator (SG) elevated sulphates is Organically Bound Sulphate (OBS) in Water Treatment Plants (WTP) effluent. The Bruce A and B WTPs consist of clarification with downstream sand and carbon filtration for Lake Water pre-treatment, which are followed by conventional Ion Exchange (IX) demineralization. Samples taken from various locations in the process stream were analyzed for a variety of parameters including both organic bound and inorganic forms of sulphate. The results are inconclusive with respect to finding the definitive source of OBS. This is primarily due to the condition that the OBS in the samples, which are in relatively low levels, are masked during chemical analysis by the considerably higher inorganic sulphate background. Additionally, it was also determined that on-line Total Organic Carbon (TOC) levels at different WTP locations did not always correlate well with OBS levels in the effluent, such that TOC could not be effectively used as a control parameter to improve OBS performance of the WTP operation. Improvement efforts at both plants focused on a number of areas including optimization of clarifier operation, replacement of IX resins, addition of downstream mobile polishing trailers, testing of new resins and adsorbents, pilot-scale testing with a Reverse Osmosis (RO) rig, review of resin regeneration and backwashing practices, and operating procedure improvements

  4. Radiological protection in nuclear power plants; La proteccion radiologica en las centrales nucleares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zorrilla R, S. [CFE. Central Laguna Verde, Km. 42.5 Carretera Cardel-Nautla, Veracruz (Mexico)

    2008-12-15

    This presentation sharing experiences which correspond to the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde. This nuclear power plant is located at level 2 of four possible, in the classification performance of the World Association of Nuclear Operators (WANO), which means the mexican nuclear power plant is classified in terms of its performance indicators and above the average achieved by their counterparts americans and canadians. In the national context, the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde has also been honored with several awards such as the National Quality Award, the Clean Industry Certificate, the distinction of Environmental Excellence and others of similar importance. For the standards of WANO, the basic idea is that there are shortcomings in one of nuclear power plant concern to all partners. The indicators used for the classification will always go beyond more compliance with regulations, which are assumed, and rather assume come or a path to excellence. Among the most important indicators are: the collective dose, the percentage of areas declared as contaminated, the number, type and tendency of contamination personal cases, the number of dosimetry alarms, the number of unplanned exposures, loss control of high radiation areas and the release of contaminated material outside the restricted areas. Furthermore, as already indicated, nuclear power plants are of special care situations, such as, carrying out work in areas with radiation fields of more than 15 mSv h{sup -1}, the movement of spent fuel in the reload floor. The consideration of the minimum total effective dose equivalent as a criterion for prescribing tools that reduce exposures, but may increase the external cases of contaminated casualties, the experience in portals such as workers subject to radiology, where exposure in industrial radiography, and so on. Special mention deserve the conditions generated during fuel reload stops, which causes a massive personnel movement, working simultaneously on

  5. Which energies for tomorrow? The perspectives of development of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sicard, Bruno; Regaldo, Jacques; Salvatores, Stephano; Bigot, Bernard; Billot, Philippe; Kert, Christian; Blisson, Yves; Beslu, Pierre

    2016-03-01

    This document first proposes a brief synthesis of opening speeches and of contributions, and then Power Point presentations of these contributions. These interventions proposed an overview of development perspectives and safety challenges for nuclear energy in the world (current evolution of the world nuclear fleet, international cooperation, role and mission of the World Association of Nuclear Operators or WANO, new tools, a first assessment 5 years after the Fukushima accident), an overview of perspectives on the medium and long terms for EDF nuclear fleet in view of a fourth decennial inspection of 900 MWe reactors (continuous improvement of safety in the operated fleet, orientations proposed for the fourth decennial inspections in terms of conformity control and of peculiarities for this safety re-assessment with respect to different accidents and threats), an overview according the CEA of what is at stake for research as far as tomorrow's energies are concerned (CEA global strategy, CEA missions in the field of civil nuclear, R and D on reactors of second and third generation, industrial challenges of R and D, R and D as a support to reactor lifetime extension, presentation of various research platforms and projects)

  6. Technical cooperation with Central and Eastern European countries with special focus on engineering aspects of lifetime optimisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trampus, P.

    2002-01-01

    A regional Technical Cooperation project for Central and Eastern European countries was established and funded by the IAEA as a response to the region's need. Majority of these countries are now in the process of establishing/strengthening their infrastructure for assessment of structural integrity of primary circuit components for an appropriate level of safety and reliability. Moreover, extension of the operational life of the WWER nuclear power plants (NPPs) became part of the generation strategy in most of these countries. The overall objective of the project is to improve long term integrity of primary circuit components as a fundamental technical prerequisite to ensure plant operation until and beyond the design lifetime. In a series of workshops and technical meetings issues relevant to primary circuit component structural integrity with special regard to operational life optimization have been being addressed. The works under the project are coordinated with the European Commission's integrity related assistance projects, and some of the activities are jointly organized with the WANO Moscow Center. Main conclusions of the central topics are summarized in this paper

  7. Project for qualification of the Kozloduy confinement system; Proyecto de cualificacion del sistema de confinamiento de Kozloduy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montes Rodriguez, J L [Empresarios Agrupados, A.I.E., Madrid (Spain)

    1993-12-15

    One of the projects awarded to Empresarios Agrupados within the Six-Month WANO Programme for Kozloduy NPP, financed through the European Community's PHARE Programme, relates to the first tasks of plant confinement system qualification. Development of this project - the results of which will serve as a reference for other power plants with VVER-440/230 models - aroused considerable interest in the Bulgarian nuclear community as well as in international entities which render assistance to Eastern power plants. In fact, this is one of the few projects in the programme which takes into account hardware-oriented activities to be carried out urgently in the plant. The VVER-440/230 confinement system performs functions parallel to the containment system of Western PWR reactors. However, it differs significantly in its criteria and operation details. These important differences form the basis for a rational and prudent application of the essence of Western codes and standards relating to the qualification of these systems. The criteria which are developed to make this application viable constitute the most challenging and, at the same time, most risky part of this job. The project will be in its final stages when the 18th Annual Meeting of the Spanish Nuclear Society is held; it is therefore likely that this paper will advance the results and conclusions expected. (author)

  8. Project for qualification of the Kozloduy confinement system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montes Rodriguez, J.L.

    1993-01-01

    One of the projects awarded to Empresarios Agrupados within the Six-Month WANO Programme for Kozloduy NPP, financed through the European Community's PHARE Programme, relates to the first tasks of plant confinement system qualification. Development of this project - the results of which will serve as a reference for other power plants with VVER-440/230 models - aroused considerable interest in the Bulgarian nuclear community as well as in international entities which render assistance to Eastern power plants. In fact, this is one of the few projects in the programme which takes into account hardware-oriented activities to be carried out urgently in the plant. The VVER-440/230 confinement system performs functions parallel to the containment system of Western PWR reactors. However, it differs significantly in its criteria and operation details. These important differences form the basis for a rational and prudent application of the essence of Western codes and standards relating to the qualification of these systems. The criteria which are developed to make this application viable constitute the most challenging and, at the same time, most risky part of this job. The project will be in its final stages when the 18th Annual Meeting of the Spanish Nuclear Society is held; it is therefore likely that this paper will advance the results and conclusions expected. (author)

  9. The World Bank mission in Bulgaria with the objective of estimating the possibility to increase the safety of the Kozloduy NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laaksonen, J.

    1992-01-01

    This is a report of the World Bank mission in Bulgaria held from 22 March to 31 April 1992. The author considers the present state of the safety level of all Kozloduy NPP reactors with emphasis of the units 1-4 which are of the WWER-440/230 type. Three main factors are discussed in detail: 1) design inherent safety; 2) equipment protection from accidental events connected with the equipment quality; 3) quality and culture of operation and quantitative evaluation of the safety. The areas requiring special attention in view of the safety enhancing are: safety goal policy; creation of national safety culture; planning and implementation of the improvement programme; assuring the equipment reliability; updating and protection the existing systems; furnishing the plant with new systems. A review of all on-going and proposed projects of the national authorities, IAEA, EC, WANO and BEQE is made. Some remarks are given also about the WWER-1000 type units 5 and 6. The estimated cost of all necessary measures for equipment improvement is $100-200 million and of the annual investment after the main reconstruction and innovation of the reactors - about $10 million which should be included in the normal operational expenses of the plant. A new approach to the responsibility role of the Bulgarian specialists should be created. A new and well grounded proposal for modifications in the equipment should be made from the National Electrical Company including economical evaluations. Another expert assessment will be requested from the foreign banks before financing

  10. Performance indicators at Embalse NPP: PSA and safety system indicators based on PSA models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fornero, D.A.

    2001-01-01

    Several indicators have been implemented at Embalse NPP. The objective was selecting some representative parameters to evaluate the performance of both the plant and the personnel activities, important for safety. A first set of indicators was defined in accordance with plant technical staff criteria. A complementary set of them was addressed later based on WANO guidance. This report presents the set of indicators used at Embalse NPP, centering the description to related to safety systems performance indicators (SSPI). Some considerations are done about the calculation methods, the need for aligning and updating their values following Embalse Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) development, and some pros and cons of using the PSA model for getting systems indicators. Owing to the fact that PSA ownership by utilities is also a subject of the meeting, some characteristics of the organization of the PSA Project are described at the beginning of the report. At Embalse NPP a Level 1 PSA has been developed under the responsibility of its own plant and with an important contribution from the IAEA. PSA was developed at the site, conducting this to a study strongly interactive with the station staff. (author)

  11. KHNP special safety review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Tae-Ho; Lee, Bang-Jin; Lee, Soung-Hee; Park, Goon-Cherl

    2009-01-01

    Commemorating the 30 year anniversary of commercial nuclear power plant operation in KOREA, Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd. (KHNP) has conducted a Special Safety Review (SSR) of its 20 operating units to understand their safety performance and to identify any areas that need improvement. The SSR reviewed all 20 operating units for 2 weeks per site. Areas that were reviewed are Safety Margins, Plant Performance, Employee Safety, Employee Performance and Performance Improvement Process. Each review team consisted of international and domestic members. The international reviewers were from IAEA, WANO and INPO. The domestic reviewers consisted of professors, Engineering Company, Research Institute and KHNP experts. The review confirmed safe and reliable operations of the 20 nuclear units. The common understanding resulted from the SSR is as follows. Firstly, KHNP corporate and its plants confirmed and shared mutual understanding on recurring areas for improvements, especially in the areas of Organizational Effectiveness, Industrial Safety, Human Performance, Configuration Management, Operations, Equipment Performance and Material Condition. Secondly, KHNP understood that plant and department level performances are directly related to the leadership and competency of the management team including supervisors. Thirdly, the strengths of individual stations that consistently have produced good results need to be shared with the other KHNP stations. Finally, KHNP learned that strong corporate leadership and support are needed to resolve most of the areas for improvement since they are common to all KHNP stations. (author)

  12. Atoms for the Future. Conference proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-11-15

    Under the management of Silvain Ikazaki who organised Atoms for the Future 2011, the conferences have taken place in Paris, at ENSTA Paris Tech engineering school. It was Isabelle Tanchou, ENSTA, Deen of Education and Research who opened the two days of conferences of Atoms for the Future 2011 on the fuel cycle in front of more than a hundred young professionals coming from all Europe, Sri Lanka, Japan.. Then Laurent Stricker, chairman of WANO detailed the consequences of the Fukushima accident on nuclear industry and safety and which role the WANO was playing in this current situation. Jean-Pierre Gros, Areva executive vice-president of recycling business unit and CEO of MELOX facility, explained the reprocessing and recycling of used fuels through La Hague and MELOX operation. He specified that 96% of a used fuel is recyclable although most of used fuel is today stored in pools. This presentation was completed by the operator point of view of the nuclear fuel cycle given by Michel Pays, EDF director of strategy and risks at the nuclear fuel department. Georges Capus, Areva vice president marketing Frond End, explained the strategic, economic and political considerations of this activity. The afternoon conferences continued with the intervention of Bernard Boullis, CEA director nuclear fuel cycle back-end programs. He gave us an overview of the future nuclear fuel cycles detailing fast reactors examples such as ASTRID, ALLEGRO.. Radioactive materials need a safe, secure and efficient transport: it was the theme Michel Hartenstein, World Nuclear Transport Institute director. He illustrated his presentation with a very impressive video of the different qualification tests a canister has to undergo. The first day of lectures was closed by Gerald Ouzounian, ANDRA director of International Division. He exposed the radioactive waste management in France, describing the classification of those wastes depending on the radioactivity level, the existing sites, the current

  13. The four ''Ps'' of outage management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuehn, S.E.

    1996-01-01

    This article describes how planning, partnering, preparation and people prevent poor outage performance. Boasting the best production costs in a decade, the US fleet of nuclear reactors is performing better than ever. Industry wide, production costs fell 7% to $20.02 per net megawatt hour (MWh) and output climbed 3% to 634million MWh. It doesn't take a nuclear physicists to realize that when base-loaded nuclear units are operated for long periods of time, near their technical potential, costs will fall and relative performance improves. Statistics for 1994 compiled by the Institute of Nuclear Operations (INPO) and the World Association of Nuclear Operators (WANO) showed the industry has steadily improved in most of the 10 industry-recognized categories. In 1994, Unit Capability Factor (the percentage of maximum energy generation a plant can supply to the grid) reached just under 82%, beating the 1995 goal and proving just how far the industry has come (62.7% in 1980) when improving plant operations

  14. Experiences in the implementation of the Coaching project in the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde (NPP-L V); Experiencias en la implementacion del proyecto Coaching en la Central Nucleoelectrica Laguna Verde (CNLV)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendez M, H. I., E-mail: hugo.mendez01@cfe.gob.mx [Comision Federal de Electricidad, Central Nucleoelectrica Laguna Verde, Departamento del Centro de Entrenamiento, Carretera Cardel-Nautla Km 42.5, Alto Lucero, Veracruz (Mexico)

    2012-10-15

    This document has the purpose of to share acquired experiences during the implementation of the Coaching project focused the training of supervisors and directive personnel of the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde (NPP-L V). Derived of the improvement areas identified by the supervisor organization of the nuclear power stations WANO (World Association Nuclear of Operators) and of the auto-evaluations realized by the expert personnel of the same power station that based on external experiences carried out through the Benchmarking (comparison with other power stations) they have reflected the necessity to activate a training process in Coaching with a practical focus toward the directive and supervisor personnel in the power station. By means of the observation of the personnel's acting so much in the control rooms like in different areas, three focus areas have been identified for the training in Coaching, these are the personnel's motivation, the organizational communication so much in vertical form as horizontal and the perception of confidence lack among directive, supervisors, operators and technicians. The plan focused in the abilities training of Coaching with practical sense was development, supported with an evaluation of 360 grades as tool of competitions development through a computer application e-Coaching. The use of application and Coaching following techniques facilitated the conformation of the practical focus, same that are of continuous use starting from the training of the supervisor and directive personnel. (Author)

  15. The Inspector General's report on Nuclear Safety and Radiation Protection 2016

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-01-01

    This report, written for the Chairman of EDF, gives the Inspector General's assessment of nuclear safety and radiation protection within the EDF Group. The report is also intended for all those in the company who contribute in any way to nuclear safety and radiation protection through their day-to-day actions and decisions. It also aims to identify any early warning signs and recommend areas for improvement. It therefore focuses on difficulties and weaknesses rather than strengths and progress. It is based on information gathered and observations made during the year, both in France and the UK, whether from workers in the field, or during visits to plants and meetings with the main stakeholders: managers, staff representatives, members of the medical profession, chairmen of local information commissions in France and of Site stakeholder groups (British equivalent of the French Local Information Commissions) in the UK, and contractors. It also makes use of visits and comparisons with other international players on the nuclear scene, and of dialogue with WANO (World Association of Nuclear Operators) and the nuclear safety authorities. Content: 1 - the Inspector General's view of 2016; 2 - Operational safety: encouraging results; 3 - High-profile focus on safety; 4 - Risk prevention: effort must be intensified; 5 - Team skills and commitment; 6 - Simplification; 7 - Maintenance quality; 8 - Nuclear fuel; 9 - New build; 10 - Protection against site security threats; 11 - Appendices

  16. Experiences in the implementation of the Coaching project in the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde (NPP-L V)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendez M, H. I.

    2012-10-01

    This document has the purpose of to share acquired experiences during the implementation of the Coaching project focused the training of supervisors and directive personnel of the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde (NPP-L V). Derived of the improvement areas identified by the supervisor organization of the nuclear power stations WANO (World Association Nuclear of Operators) and of the auto-evaluations realized by the expert personnel of the same power station that based on external experiences carried out through the Benchmarking (comparison with other power stations) they have reflected the necessity to activate a training process in Coaching with a practical focus toward the directive and supervisor personnel in the power station. By means of the observation of the personnel's acting so much in the control rooms like in different areas, three focus areas have been identified for the training in Coaching, these are the personnel's motivation, the organizational communication so much in vertical form as horizontal and the perception of confidence lack among directive, supervisors, operators and technicians. The plan focused in the abilities training of Coaching with practical sense was development, supported with an evaluation of 360 grades as tool of competitions development through a computer application e-Coaching. The use of application and Coaching following techniques facilitated the conformation of the practical focus, same that are of continuous use starting from the training of the supervisor and directive personnel. (Author)

  17. Towards a sound nuclear energy future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syrota, J.

    1998-01-01

    Operators of the world's nuclear plants have compiled an impressive record of improvement over the past several years. This success is due to many factors, one of which is an unprecedented level of information exchange. The Chernobyl accident in 1986, which led to the formation of World Association of Nuclear Operators (WANO), underscored the need for nuclear utilities worldwide to exchange information and cooperate in a way that transcends cultural, language and political boundaries. While the world's nuclear operators have achieved significant improvements in nuclear safety and reliability, it is an unfortunate reality that the memories of the accidents at Three Mile Island and even Chernobyl fade over time. Complacency can be the natural result of progress and success. If nuclear power is to continue to play a significant role in the world's energy mix, the positive trends of performance improvement must be sustained and enhanced - and that can best be achieved through continued mutual cooperation, and the will to avoid a natural trend toward complacency. (author)

  18. Cooperation ability of Japan to China in nuclear power industries. Present status and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, Tomoko

    2006-01-01

    Japan is superior to China in the field of LWR plant operation and maintenance, FBR cycle included operation and control of reactor and reprocessing facility, and measures of safeguards and non-proliferation of all commercial nuclear power facilities from the point of view that Japanese technologies are better than the other countries and China needs the technologies. It is important that Japanese electric power companies, plant makers, fuel industries and research organizations developed their business in China in the above fields on the basis of their knowledge, strategies and/or trough network of negotiation of two governments such as forum for nuclear cooperation in Asia (FNCA)·Generation IV International Forum (GIF), and World Association of Nuclear Operators (WANO)·World Nuclear Association (WNA). Outline of finding new market and technical cooperation in the industry and future of nuclear power industry in China are stated. As the supplementary materials, table of operating, building and planning nuclear power plants, estimation of demand for uranium enrichment on the basis of estimation and plans of expansion of power plant facilities, and results of calculation of Separative Work Unit (SWU) from demand for uranium are illustrated. (S.Y.)

  19. Experience with the export of nuclear plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huettl, A.

    1991-01-01

    Licensing and regulatory aspects represent an important issue during the definition and implementation phase of a nuclear power project. Strict adherence to the principles 'licensability in country of origin' and 'reference plant as built' may prove to be counterproductive on account of the differences in licensing infrastructure in vendor's and buyer's countries and of the difficulty in striking a balance between proven and up-to-date designs. In order to repeat good experience in safety, consistency of the applicable rules and regulations is important when performing the necessary adaptations to local requirements. The use of an internationally accepted body of rules such as NUSS as a yardstick for safety evaluation helps to identify special requirements in vendor's country, thus minimizing distortions in evaluation of competing bids. Benefitting from ongoing efforts to improve transparency and mutual understanding of the national safety approaches through bodies and missions like INSAG, WANO, OSART, a graded approach for implementing safety review during construction and operation is suggested, matching it to the scope of a national program of NPP construction. Together with efficient project control this will minimize the demands on resources - both human and financial - required for a successful launch of a nuclear power plant. (orig.)

  20. International outage coding system for nuclear power plants. Results of a co-ordinated research project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-05-01

    The experience obtained in each individual plant constitutes the most relevant source of information for improving its performance. However, experience of the level of the utility, country and worldwide is also extremely valuable, because there are limitations to what can be learned from in-house experience. But learning from the experience of others is admittedly difficult, if the information is not harmonized. Therefore, such systems should be standardized and applicable to all types of reactors satisfying the needs of the broad set of nuclear power plant operators worldwide and allowing experience to be shared internationally. To cope with the considerable amount of information gathered from nuclear power plants worldwide, it is necessary to codify the information facilitating the identification of causes of outages, systems or component failures. Therefore, the IAEA established a sponsored Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) on the International Outage Coding System to develop a general, internationally applicable system of coding nuclear power plant outages, providing worldwide nuclear utilities with a standardized tool for reporting outage information. This TECDOC summarizes the results of this CRP and provides information for transformation of the historical outage data into the new coding system, taking into consideration the existing systems for coding nuclear power plant events (WANO, IAEA-IRS and IAEA PRIS) but avoiding duplication of efforts to the maximum possible extent

  1. Operational safety performance and economical efficiency evaluation for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yachun; Zou Shuliang

    2012-01-01

    The economical efficiency of nuclear power includes a series of environmental parameters, for example, cleanliness. Nuclear security is the precondition and guarantee for its economy, and both are the direct embodiment of the social benefits of nuclear power. Through analyzing the supervision and management system on the effective operation of nuclear power plants, which has been put forward by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), the World Association of Nuclear Operators (WANO), the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and other organizations, a set of indexs on the safety performance and economical efficiency of nuclear power are explored and established; Based on data envelopment analysis, a DEA approach is employed to evaluate the efficiency of the operation performance of several nuclear power plants, Some primary conclusion are achieved on the basis of analyzing the threshold parameter's sensitivity and relativity which affected operational performance. To address the conflicts between certain security and economical indicators, a multi-objective programming model is established, where top priority is given to nuclear safety, and the investment behavior of nuclear power plant is thereby optimized. (authors)

  2. National Peer Reviews. Self-assessment programs of German nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grauf, E.

    2000-01-01

    Preliminary experience seems to indicate that the concept of national peer reviews is a useful tool capable of improving and harmonizing the standards of operation in German plants. However, a final evaluation is possible only after completion of the program, i.e. probably by the end 2000. The internal national peer reviews do not replace existing reviews, such as the WANO peer reviews or the IAEA OSART missions, but rather supplement them. As a major element of self-assessment, they mainly serve to exchange effectively among German plants know-how and experience, to harmonize standards of plant operation, eliminate any weak spots identified, and generally counteract blindness to one's own faults. Whether the envisaged objective of standardized plant operations will be achieved in the end depends very much on the way in which the results of the reviews will be handled. In particular, it will be interesting to see to what extent there is willingness to take on board any recommendations and proposals made and/or introduce what is called good operating practice. (orig.) [de

  3. IAEA/SiP senior managers workshop on international promotion of safety culture for the NPPs with RBMK reactors. Working material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The IAEA/SiP Senior Managers Workshop on International Promotion of Safety Culture for the NPPs with RMBK reactors was organized in the frame of the IAEA Technical Cooperation Regional Project RER/9/035 and the IAEA Extrabudgetary Project on WWER and RBMK Safety in co-operation with Swedish International Project Nuclear Safety (SiP). It took place at the Forsmark NPP, Sweden, from 1 to 4 October 1996. The objectives of the workshop were to provide a forum for senior managers to exchange national and international experience on factors influencing safety culture, to better understand these factors and to further enhance promotion of safety culture. Twenty-three specialists participated in the workshop from six countries (Canada, Lithuania, Russian Federation, Sweden, Ukraine and USA) and from two international organizations (WANO, EC-G24 coordination). Participants were from regulatory bodies, ministries and operational organizations of respective countries. The INSAG-4 definition of safety culture was taken as a starting point for the discussions, but at the start of the workshop participants did not seem to have the same understanding of what is contained in the safety culture context. Specifically the difference between measures taken to improve safety and establishing a proper safety culture level was discussed with useful results. Some participants proposed quantitative safety culture indicators, but there was no agreement at this stage about how to define them. Refs

  4. IAEA/SiP senior managers workshop on international promotion of safety culture for the NPPs with RBMK reactors. Working material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    The IAEA/SiP Senior Managers Workshop on International Promotion of Safety Culture for the NPPs with RMBK reactors was organized in the frame of the IAEA Technical Cooperation Regional Project RER/9/035 and the IAEA Extrabudgetary Project on WWER and RBMK Safety in co-operation with Swedish International Project Nuclear Safety (SiP). It took place at the Forsmark NPP, Sweden, from 1 to 4 October 1996. The objectives of the workshop were to provide a forum for senior managers to exchange national and international experience on factors influencing safety culture, to better understand these factors and to further enhance promotion of safety culture. Twenty-three specialists participated in the workshop from six countries (Canada, Lithuania, Russian Federation, Sweden, Ukraine and USA) and from two international organizations (WANO, EC-G24 coordination). Participants were from regulatory bodies, ministries and operational organizations of respective countries. The INSAG-4 definition of safety culture was taken as a starting point for the discussions, but at the start of the workshop participants did not seem to have the same understanding of what is contained in the safety culture context. Specifically the difference between measures taken to improve safety and establishing a proper safety culture level was discussed with useful results. Some participants proposed quantitative safety culture indicators, but there was no agreement at this stage about how to define them. Refs.

  5. Review of methodologies for analysis of safety incidents at NPPs. Final report of a co-ordinated research project 1998-2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-03-01

    The safe operation of nuclear power plants around the world and the prevention of incidents in these installations remain key concerns for the nuclear community. In this connection, the feedback of operating experience plays a major role: every nuclear power plant or nuclear utility needs to have a system in place for collecting information on unusual events, whether these are incidents or merely deviations from normal operation. Reporting to the regulatory body of important events and lessons learned is normally carried out through the national reporting schemes based on regulatory reporting requirements. The most important lessons learned are further shared internationally, through, for example, the Joint IAEA/NEA Incident Reporting System (IRS) or the event information exchange of the World Association of Nuclear Operators (WANO). In order to properly assess the event, an adequate event investigation methodology has to be applied, which leads to the identification of correct root causes. Once these root causes have been ascertained, appropriate corrective actions can be established and corresponding lessons can be drawn. The overall goal of root cause analysis is the prevention of events or their recurrence and thus the overall improvement in plant safety. In 1998, the IAEA established a co-ordinated research project with the objective of exploring root cause methodologies and techniques currently in use in Member States, evaluating their strengths and limitations and developing criteria for appropriate event investigation methodologies. This report is the outcome of four years of co-ordinated research which involved 15 national and international research organizations

  6. Managing human resources in the nuclear power industry: Lessons learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-08-01

    This report is intended for senior and middle level managers in nuclear operating organizations. Its objectives are to facilitate the recognition of priority issues with respect to managing human resources, and to provide pragmatic ideas regarding improvements. The human resource issues addressed in this report, if not managed effectively, can result in significant performance problems at nuclear power plants. About 10 years ago the IAEA initiated an effort to identify such management issues and to find effective practices to deal with them. This information was provided in IAEA Technical Reports Series No. 369, Management for Excellence in Nuclear Power Plant Performance - A Manual (1994). This report builds upon the information in the subject manual. In the past 10 years there have been significant changes in the nuclear power industry resulting primarily from more competitive energy markets and privatization of nuclear power plant operating organizations. In general, the industry has responded positively to these changes, as indicated by IAEA/WANO performance indicators that show both improved operational and safety performance. This report provides examples of approaches to managing human resources that have been effective in responding to these changes. This report was produced through a series of meetings, where meeting participants were asked to share information regarding effective practices in their organizations with respect to managing human resources. The information provided through these meetings was supplemented with good practices in this area identified through IAEA Operational Safety Review Teams (OSARTs) conducted during the past 10 years

  7. 7th Expert meeting radiation protection. International developments, waste management, challenges for the radiation protection in aging nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    The proceedings of the 7th Expert meeting on radiation protection include contributions to the following topics: nuclear power and public opinion, IAEA safety standards, ISOE - information system on occupational exposure, European harmonization of the radiation protection education, WANO - challenges and results, CTBTO's global radiation measurement network, state of final radioactive waste disposal in Germany and worldwide, radioactive waste management and disposal in French NPPs, preparedness for final waste disposal in Schacht Konrad, actualization of the transport study Konrad, transport of NPPs' operational radioactive waste and waste from decommissioned reactor demolition to the final repository Konrad, qualification of radioactive waste casks for the final repository Konrad, radioactive waste disposal management concept in Switzerland, aging management and radiation protection, decontamination as effective measure for dose rate reduction - long-term and sustainable dose rate reduction by primary circuit decontamination, system and component decontamination for individual and collective dose reduction - practical examples, radiation protection map - electronic assistance for work planning, EPR dismantling already today? radiation protection register 2002-2010 - knowledge based on a decade of radiation monitoring, actual information on radiation protection in medicine, mobile telecommunication - actual research results.

  8. Research and development activity at ENEL for next generation reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fornaciari, P.

    1992-01-01

    Italy, a world leader in nuclear electricity production in the mid sixties, became the only large industrialized country which renounced nuclear energy; a fact hardly understandable for a country that, in addition has a worrisome dependence on imported foreign energy. The paper reports the political events that brought Italy to a condition not easy to be sustained in the long run, citing in particular: the so-called 'reconversion' of the Alto Lazio nuclear plant into a fossil fuelled plant, the closure of the Caorso plant after the encouraging outcome of an IAEA inspection, and finally, the contrasting resolutions voted on the matter by the two Parliament chambers. The paper then deals with the issues which need to be solved to allow a nuclear renaissance in Italy. The research program on future reactor designs has been carried out by ENEL (the Italian National Electricity Board) in the framework of a wide international co-operation with the ambitious goal to demonstrate that, even in the case of a severe accident, no population evacuation, nor any long term limitation as to ground utilization is to be planned. On this important issue a large international consensus is growing worldwide. The willingness of ENEL to remain part of the nuclear community has been also proved by its adhesion to the World Association of Nuclear Operators (WANO), created to enhance the operational safety of nuclear plants worldwide

  9. Toward a System of Global Accountability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cameron, J.

    2016-01-01

    Post-Fukushima, the public expects and demands that nuclear regulators and operators worldwide have used lessons learned to identify and implement important actions and measures to prevent a similar event from happening again. Considerable work has been done at the national and international levels to achieve this. However, verifying the adequacy and appropriateness of measures taken in each country requires an enhanced level of global accountability that does not presently exist. The current global nuclear regulatory safety framework is based on the principle of national sovereignty and the result is that the world lacks a forum for publicizing safety concerns, beyond the national regulator, to the highest levels of government within member states. This runs the risk of significant deficiencies or non-compliance with internationally approved practices continuing unchecked even though some parties are aware of them. This also applies to flagging cases of insufficiently independent regulators or identifying inadequately prepared regulators in new nuclear countries. There are many vehicles for enhancing this transparency, e.g., WANO/INPO, regional regulatory fora, and international organizations including the OECD/NEA and IAEA. The world has never been more interconnected and it is time that the nuclear sector leverages this reality and adopts a system of global accountability for nuclear safety. (author)

  10. Radiation protection databases of nuclear safety regulatory authority

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janzekovic, H.; Vokal, B.; Krizman, M.

    2003-01-01

    Radiation protection and nuclear safety of nuclear installations have a common objective, protection against ionising radiation. The operational safety of a nuclear power plant is evaluated using performance indicators as for instance collective radiation exposure, unit capability factor, unplanned capability loss factor, etc. As stated by WANO (World Association of Nuclear Operators) the performance indicators are 'a management tool so each operator can monitor its own performance and progress, set challenging goals for improvement and consistently compare performance with that of other plants or industry'. In order to make the analysis of the performance indicators feasible to an operator as well as to regulatory authorities a suitable database should be created based on the data related to a facility or facilities. Moreover, the international bodies found out that the comparison of radiation protection in nuclear facilities in different countries could be feasible only if the databases with well defined parameters are established. The article will briefly describe the development of international databases regarding radiation protection related to nuclear facilities. The issues related to the possible development of the efficient radiation protection control of a nuclear facility based on experience of the Slovenian Nuclear Safety Administration will be presented. (author)

  11. Considerations to the nuclear safety in Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salas M, B.

    2006-01-01

    The uncertain future of the hydrocarbons like main source of energy, force us to think on the nuclear energy as the suitable substitute that we can inherit to those future generations. Mexico therefore should multiply the number of nuclear power centrals and to be in this way prepared for the new challenges, however, it is necessary and advisable, to restate the mexican nuclear plan that includes mainly the transparency. The 'WANO Report' (World Association of Nuclear Operators - for their initials in English), result of a technical audit to the Nuclear Power station of Laguna Verde (CNLV), it is a polemic topic, because in accordance with David Lochbaum of 'The Union of Concerned Scientists' of the United States of America and of John Large of 'Large and Associates' of the Great Britain, the security in the CNLV is questionable. The pronouncements of concern of Abel J. Gonzalez and Ken E. Brockman, high officials of the International Atomic Energy Agency who took knowledge of diverse irregularities in the CNLV, should be analysis reason for to take actions in pro of the future of the nuclear energy in Mexico. (Author)

  12. Considerations to the nuclear safety in Mexico; Consideraciones a la seguridad nuclear en Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salas M, B. [UNAM, Facultad de Ciencias, Departamento de Fisica, Laboratorio de Analisis Radiologicos de Muestras Ambientales, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)]. e-mail: salasmarb@yahoo.com.mx

    2006-07-01

    The uncertain future of the hydrocarbons like main source of energy, force us to think on the nuclear energy as the suitable substitute that we can inherit to those future generations. Mexico therefore should multiply the number of nuclear power centrals and to be in this way prepared for the new challenges, however, it is necessary and advisable, to restate the mexican nuclear plan that includes mainly the transparency. The 'WANO Report' (World Association of Nuclear Operators - for their initials in English), result of a technical audit to the Nuclear Power station of Laguna Verde (CNLV), it is a polemic topic, because in accordance with David Lochbaum of 'The Union of Concerned Scientists' of the United States of America and of John Large of 'Large and Associates' of the Great Britain, the security in the CNLV is questionable. The pronouncements of concern of Abel J. Gonzalez and Ken E. Brockman, high officials of the International Atomic Energy Agency who took knowledge of diverse irregularities in the CNLV, should be analysis reason for to take actions in pro of the future of the nuclear energy in Mexico. (Author)

  13. Perspectives of the central Laguna Verde after Fukushima for the period 2012 at the 2015 in operation and maintenance; Perspectivas de la central Laguna Verde despues de Fukushima para el periodo 2012 al 2015 en operacion y mantenimiento

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivera C, A., E-mail: arr99999@cfe.gob.mx [Comision Federal de Electricidad, Central Nucleoelectrica Laguna Verde, Carretera Cardel-Nautla Km 42.5, Veracruz (Mexico)

    2012-10-15

    The Nuclear Power Plants Management of the Federal Commission of Electricity in Mexico by means an internal analysis confronts the threat to the nuclear industry of the event of Fukushima that affected the public opinion, and the emission of new regulations. This situation demands to improve the results of the operation and maintenance of the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde, to contribute value with their excellence in the acting to the nuclear option in Mexico. The internal analysis defined with clarity the perspectives based on weaknesses and strengths of the operation (monitoring and control of on-line parameters), and in the maintenance (sustained by the planning), enriched with the external experiences emitted by the institutes INPO and WANO for the nuclear industry, with all this strategic objectives 2012 to 2015 were presented and the initiatives as the extension of the useful life to 20 years more, as well as the focused actions to diminish the threat that the event of Fukushima influenced negatively in the public opinion, by means the diffusion of the good results that can be obtained in the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde between 2012 and 2015, taking advantage of its modernized power of 810 MW-hour for each generating unit, doing visible that the Project of Extended Power Increase is a generation reality of 120% of the original value, to be able to enter at the excellence levels of the nuclear world. (Author)

  14. Perspectives of the central Laguna Verde after Fukushima for the period 2012 at the 2015 in operation and maintenance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivera C, A.

    2012-10-01

    The Nuclear Power Plants Management of the Federal Commission of Electricity in Mexico by means an internal analysis confronts the threat to the nuclear industry of the event of Fukushima that affected the public opinion, and the emission of new regulations. This situation demands to improve the results of the operation and maintenance of the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde, to contribute value with their excellence in the acting to the nuclear option in Mexico. The internal analysis defined with clarity the perspectives based on weaknesses and strengths of the operation (monitoring and control of on-line parameters), and in the maintenance (sustained by the planning), enriched with the external experiences emitted by the institutes INPO and WANO for the nuclear industry, with all this strategic objectives 2012 to 2015 were presented and the initiatives as the extension of the useful life to 20 years more, as well as the focused actions to diminish the threat that the event of Fukushima influenced negatively in the public opinion, by means the diffusion of the good results that can be obtained in the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde between 2012 and 2015, taking advantage of its modernized power of 810 MW-hour for each generating unit, doing visible that the Project of Extended Power Increase is a generation reality of 120% of the original value, to be able to enter at the excellence levels of the nuclear world. (Author)

  15. A Case Study of the Global Group for Sharing Knowledge and Efforts in Human Resources within the Nuclear Industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, C.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: One of the main conclusions from the IAEA’s HRD Conference in 2014 was that people and organisations in the global nuclear industry could cooperate more in sharing information and efforts. This was an inspiring conclusion, and there seemed an especially great opportunity for such sharing of information and efforts related to the attraction, recruitment, development and retention of people within the nuclear workforce. Founding members include people from the IAEA, WNA, WANO, EDF and OPG amongst others, the global working group for Human Resource matters aimed at “Building and Sustaining a Competent Nuclear Workforce” was established. This global working group is free to join and is open to anyone concerned with Building and Sustaining a Competent NuclearWorkforce. The objectives of the group are to share useful information, find others with similar objectives to cooperate with, ask questions, share opinions and crucially to avoid unnecessary duplication of efforts. The group already has 160 members from more than 15 countries and is currently hosted as a group on the LinkedIn website. The vision for the group is that it will become an invaluable resource for people across the world in the nuclear industry for sharing information and efforts. (author

  16. Atoms for the Future. Conference proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-11-01

    Under the management of Silvain Ikazaki who organised Atoms for the Future 2011, the conferences have taken place in Paris, at ENSTA Paris Tech engineering school. It was Isabelle Tanchou, ENSTA, Deen of Education and Research who opened the two days of conferences of Atoms for the Future 2011 on the fuel cycle in front of more than a hundred young professionals coming from all Europe, Sri Lanka, Japan.. Then Laurent Stricker, chairman of WANO detailed the consequences of the Fukushima accident on nuclear industry and safety and which role the WANO was playing in this current situation. Jean-Pierre Gros, Areva executive vice-president of recycling business unit and CEO of MELOX facility, explained the reprocessing and recycling of used fuels through La Hague and MELOX operation. He specified that 96% of a used fuel is recyclable although most of used fuel is today stored in pools. This presentation was completed by the operator point of view of the nuclear fuel cycle given by Michel Pays, EDF director of strategy and risks at the nuclear fuel department. Georges Capus, Areva vice president marketing Frond End, explained the strategic, economic and political considerations of this activity. The afternoon conferences continued with the intervention of Bernard Boullis, CEA director nuclear fuel cycle back-end programs. He gave us an overview of the future nuclear fuel cycles detailing fast reactors examples such as ASTRID, ALLEGRO.. Radioactive materials need a safe, secure and efficient transport: it was the theme Michel Hartenstein, World Nuclear Transport Institute director. He illustrated his presentation with a very impressive video of the different qualification tests a canister has to undergo. The first day of lectures was closed by Gerald Ouzounian, ANDRA director of International Division. He exposed the radioactive waste management in France, describing the classification of those wastes depending on the radioactivity level, the existing sites, the current

  17. Summary report on the use of plant safety performance indicators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-09-01

    In 1998, the OECD/NEA committee on Nuclear Regulatory Activities (CNRA) initiated an activity with the objective of advancing the discussion on how to enhance and measure regulatory effectiveness in relation to nuclear installations. One of the outcome of this activity was to establish a Task group to develop internal (direct) performance indicators which would be used to monitor regulatory efficiency. In parallel, a joint CNRA/CSNI group was launched in December 2000 to exchange information and develop external (indirect) indicators to measure regulatory effectiveness, i.e. impact on licensee's safety performance. These external indicators are, in other words, the traditional plant performance indicators (PI's) and these are the ones that this report deals with. This report presents the work performed by the joint CNRA/CSNI task group mentioned above. It provides a summary of the sets of PI's being used by different regulatory bodies and WANO, it describes the national practices on the use of PI's and proposes a set of PI's that could be used nationally describing regulatory effectiveness and also as a basis for an international system. The task force consisted of regulators, organisations which have a performance indicators system in operation or under testing. The task force met in Paris on February 19-20, 2001. Each participant provided a brief description of the PI System at his organisation and its usage. The group identified a list of PI's that are recommended to be used nationally by regulators. This paper has been elaborated based on the information exchanged and discussions held in the February meeting. The participating countries (Spain, Finland, US, Sweden) and WANO were asked to provide an overview of systems in use. The presently used Performance Indicators were reviewed in a three steps process. 1. First indicators used in at least two agencies were identified. 2. The second step was to identify the most used indicators. 3. The third step was to

  18. Design change management in regulation of nuclear fleets: World nuclear association's working groups on Cooperation in Reactor Design Evaluation and Licensing (CORDEL)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swinburn, R.; Borysova, I.; Waddington, J.; Head, J. G.; Raidis, Z.

    2012-01-01

    The 60 year life of a reactor means that a plant will undergo change during its life. To ensure continuing safety, changes must be made with a full understanding of the design intent. With this aim, regulators require that each operating organisation should have a formally designated entity responsible for complete design knowledge in regard to plant safety. INSAG-19 calls such an entity 'Design Authority'. This requirement is difficult to achieve, especially as the number of countries and utilities operating plants increases. Some of these operating organisations will be new, and some will be small. For Gen III plants sold on a turnkey basis, it is even more challenging for the operating company to develop and retain the full knowledge needed for this role. CORDEL's Task Force entitled 'Design Change Management' is investigating options for effective design change management with the aim to support design standardization throughout a fleet's lifetime by means of enhanced international cooperation within industry and regulators. This paper starts with considering the causes of design change and identifies reasons for the increased beneficial involvement of the plant's original vendor in the design change process. A key central theme running through the paper is the definition of responsibilities for design change. Various existing mechanisms of vendor-operator interfaces over design change and how they are managed in different organisational and regulatory environments around the world are considered, with the functionality of Owners Groups and Design Authority being central. The roles played in the design change process by vendors, utilities, regulators, owners' groups and other organisations such as WANO are considered The aerospace industry approach to Design Authority has been assessed to consider what lessons might be learned. (authors)

  19. Managing ageing of Karachi nuclear power plant (KANUPP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoda, M. Qamrul; Jamal-ur-Rahman

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Karachi Nuclear power Plant (KANUPP), a 137 MWe CANDU plant, was built on a turn-key basis by the Canadian General Electric (CGE) in the late sixties. The plant with a design life of thirty years went into commercial operation in October, 1972. After nearly three decades of operation, KANUPP like all other plants has faced the problem of equipment ageing and obsolescence. KANUPP has been striving hard to combat these problems with the assistance from IAEA, COG and WANO. During early eighties IAEA expert missions were called at KANUPP on various safety issues and on their recommendations various projects such as Safe Operation of KANUPP, Technical Upgradation Project, Balancing, Modernization and Rehabilitation project were initiated to combat equipment ageing and obsolescence. KANUPP has made substantial progress in the implementation of the tasks under these projects and the operating life of the plant is expected to be extended by 15 years. Three IAEA expert missions were invited at KANUPP during 1999-2000 to carry out assessment of the ongoing activities related to plant ageing management. On the basis of their recommendations an ageing Management Programme has been formally established at KANUPP to manage age-related degradation of plant systems, structures and components important to safety and to ensure that the required safety functions are available for the extended life of the plant. Being close to completion of its nominal design life in October 2002, KANUPP has already applied to Pakistan Nuclear Regulatory Authority for renewal of operating license. This paper briefly describes the activities related to ageing management of KANUPP to fulfil the requirement for its continued operation beyond its design life. (author)

  20. Equipment Reliability Program in NPP Krsko

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skaler, F.; Djetelic, N.

    2006-01-01

    Operation that is safe, reliable, effective and acceptable to public is the common message in a mission statement of commercial nuclear power plants (NPPs). To fulfill these goals, nuclear industry, among other areas, has to focus on: 1 Human Performance (HU) and 2 Equipment Reliability (EQ). The performance objective of HU is as follows: The behaviors of all personnel result in safe and reliable station operation. While unwanted human behaviors in operations mostly result directly in the event, the behavior flaws either in the area of maintenance or engineering usually cause decreased equipment reliability. Unsatisfied Human performance leads even the best designed power plants into significant operating events, which can be found as well-known examples in nuclear industry. Equipment reliability is today recognized as the key to success. While the human performance at most NPPs has been improving since the start of WANO / INPO / IAEA evaluations, the open energy market has forced the nuclear plants to reduce production costs and operate more reliably and effectively. The balance between these two (opposite) goals has made equipment reliability even more important for safe, reliable and efficient production. Insisting on on-line operation by ignoring some principles of safety could nowadays in a well-developed safety culture and human performance environment exceed the cost of electricity losses. In last decade the leading USA nuclear companies put a lot of effort to improve equipment reliability primarily based on INPO Equipment Reliability Program AP-913 at their NPP stations. The Equipment Reliability Program is the key program not only for safe and reliable operation, but also for the Life Cycle Management and Aging Management on the way to the nuclear power plant life extension. The purpose of Equipment Reliability process is to identify, organize, integrate and coordinate equipment reliability activities (preventive and predictive maintenance, maintenance

  1. Optimization of reloading Laguna Verde Central U1/U2, Federal Electricity Commission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espinosa G, J.M.

    2006-01-01

    The Laguna Verde Central from the beginning of the commercial operation settled down as maximum priority 'the total safety in its operation' taking in consideration the so much experience of the good operation and of multiple recharges made in a sure and reliable way, and without separate us of the safety mystic of the CLV, but looking for to be better every day a new challenge it settled down 'to compare us with the best plants in the world' and certainly to work to classify us like one of them. For this we established a 4.0 year old plan (2003/2006) for the effectiveness all the processes in the power station that allowed us to measure our acting with the same parameters that settle down at international level (nuclear safety, industrial safety, radiological safety, capacity factor, readiness factor, cleaning of the power station, attachment to procedures, attention to the detail and certainly to be competitive in the economic aspect, summing up means to be good in all the aspects). All the above mentioned would allow us to qualify us as level 1 of WANO (world proprietors association of nuclear centrals) at the end of the year 2006 and to pass to be part of this select group. After analyzing the acting record of the power station, evaluating our technical and economic capacity, the location of the installation besides revising the international experiences was defined that one of the concepts that impact considerably so much to the capacity factors and availability besides the dose and production cost is the duration of the recharge periods, for this reason the present work is elaborated. (Author)

  2. The Inspector General's report on Nuclear Safety and Radiation Protection 2017

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2018-01-01

    This report, written for the Chairman of EDF, gives the Inspector General's assessment of nuclear safety and radiation protection within the EDF Group. The report is also intended for all those in the company who contribute in any way to nuclear safety and radiation protection through their day-to-day actions and decisions. It also aims to identify any early warning signs and recommend areas for improvement. It therefore focuses on difficulties and weaknesses rather than strengths and progress. It is based on information gathered and observations made during the year, both in France and the UK, whether from workers in the field, or during visits to plants and meetings with the main stakeholders: managers, staff representatives, members of the medical profession, chairmen of local information commissions in France and of Site stakeholder groups (British equivalent of the French Local Information Commissions) in the UK, and contractors. It also makes use of visits and comparisons with other international players on the nuclear scene, and of dialogue with WANO (World Association of Nuclear Operators) and the nuclear safety authorities. Content: 1 - the Inspector General's view of 2017; 2 - Nuclear safety results; 3 - Nuclear safety priority affirmed; 4 - Risk prevention: important to remain vigilant; 5 - Adapting people skills; 6 - Operating experience: contrasting approaches; 7 - Operations fundamentals to be reaffirmed; 8 - Importance of working closely with contract partners; 9 - Engineering support for the French fleet and new-build projects; 10 - Spares: an area for greater engagement by owners on-site; 11 - Appendices

  3. The World Nuclear University and its Summer Institute

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borysova, Irina [World Nuclear Association - WNA, Summer Institute of the World Nuclear University - WNU, 22a Saint James' s Sq., SW1Y 4JH London (United Kingdom)

    2008-07-01

    The World Nuclear University is a global partnership committed to enhancing international education and leadership in the peaceful applications of nuclear science and technology. The central elements of the WNU partnership are: - The global organizations of the nuclear industry: WNA and WANO; - The inter-governmental nuclear agencies: IAEA and OECD-NEA; - Leading institutions of nuclear learning in some thirty countries. The WNU was inaugurated in 2003 as a non-profit corporation. Operationally, the WNU is a public-private partnership. On the public side, the WNUCC's multinational secretariat is composed mainly of nuclear professionals supplied by governments; the IAEA further assists with financial support for certain WNU activities. On the private side, the nuclear industry provides administrative, logistical and financial support via the WNA. WNU activities fall into six programmatic categories: 1. Facilitate Multinational Academic Cooperation. 2. Build Nuclear Leadership. 3. Foster Policy Consensus on Institutional and Technological Innovation. 4. Enhance Public Understanding. 5. Shape Scientific and Regulatory Consensus on Issues Affecting Nuclear Operations. 6. Strengthen International Workforce Professionalism. This presentation will describe the WNU programmes addressed to young professionals. Among such programmes, the flagship of the WNU is the WNU Summer Institute. This unique six-week course occurs in a different country each year, offering an inspiring career opportunity for some 100 outstanding young nuclear professionals and academics from around the world. The WNU-SI programme combines an extensive series of 'big picture' presentations from world-class experts with daily team-building exercises. In the process, WNU Fellows become part of a global network of future nuclear leaders. Other WNU programmes for younger generation in the nuclear industry will also be briefly covered in this presentation. (author)

  4. World Nuclear Association Design Change Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waddington, John Geoffrey

    2013-01-01

    This presentation treats of design change management in the regulation of nuclear fleets. It covers activities of the WNA/CORDEL/Design Change Management Task Force, including views on the roles of vendors, owner's groups, utility and design authority, WANO and the regulators. The presentation highlights differences of capabilities between large utilities with strong technical staff and smaller utilities that require support and expertise from others. It also notes the current expectation that licensees are solely responsible for the safety of the design and operation of their plants and for maintaining a full understanding and knowledge of the design within licensee's own organization in an internal entity called design authority. It encourages regulators to re-examine this expectation for design changes, arguing that while large utilities maybe be able to deal with design changes, the smaller utilities may be challenged due to their small size and lack of appropriate expertise. It further notes that the original designer must be involved in the management of design changes. In addition, the presentation emphasizes benefits of standardization in design and regulatory expectations internationally, including the benefits of increasing safety and economy. The author provides that the CORDEL Working Group uses international standardization to mean that each vendor's design can be built by a vendor, and ordered by a utility, in every country and be able to meet national regulations without significant changes other than adaptations to meet site requirements. In this discussion, he highlights the aircraft industry as an example and notes the need for internationally agreed mechanisms for design change as well as the need for formal, agreed (internationally) role for the designer to play throughout the fleet lifetime

  5. Optimization of reloading Laguna Verde Central U1/U2, Federal Electricity Commission; Optimizacion de recargas Central Laguna Verde U1/U2, Comision Federal de Electricidad

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espinosa G, J.M. [Central Nucleoelectrica Laguna Verde, Carretera Cardel-Nautla Km. 45.5, Municipio de Alto Lucero, Veracruz (Mexico)

    2006-07-01

    The Laguna Verde Central from the beginning of the commercial operation settled down as maximum priority 'the total safety in its operation' taking in consideration the so much experience of the good operation and of multiple recharges made in a sure and reliable way, and without separate us of the safety mystic of the CLV, but looking for to be better every day a new challenge it settled down 'to compare us with the best plants in the world' and certainly to work to classify us like one of them. For this we established a 4.0 year old plan (2003/2006) for the effectiveness all the processes in the power station that allowed us to measure our acting with the same parameters that settle down at international level (nuclear safety, industrial safety, radiological safety, capacity factor, readiness factor, cleaning of the power station, attachment to procedures, attention to the detail and certainly to be competitive in the economic aspect, summing up means to be good in all the aspects). All the above mentioned would allow us to qualify us as level 1 of WANO (world proprietors association of nuclear centrals) at the end of the year 2006 and to pass to be part of this select group. After analyzing the acting record of the power station, evaluating our technical and economic capacity, the location of the installation besides revising the international experiences was defined that one of the concepts that impact considerably so much to the capacity factors and availability besides the dose and production cost is the duration of the recharge periods, for this reason the present work is elaborated. (Author)

  6. Cernavoda NPP Unit 1: Operating experience program and plant specific performance indicators (level 2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teodor, Vasile; Popa, Viorel

    1998-01-01

    The basis for the Operating Experience Program was set in place since early stages of the commissioning phase (1993), when a system based on the Canadian approach was implemented for reporting, reviewing, assessing and establishing of the necessary corrective action for unplanned events. This system provided excellent opportunity to train staff in unplanned event assessment methodology, and prepare the station for the formal reporting process following criticality in accordance with the licensing requirements. The formal process, set in place after criticality is described in Station Instruction Procedure SI-01365-P13 'Unplanned Event Report' and was developed under the supervision of Safety and Compliance Department. In parallel, a program for information exchange and trending of performance indicators was developed by Technical Services Department. The WANO recommendations following August 1997 Peer Review provided the opportunity for a better understanding and reconsideration of the Operating Experience Program. As a result, all the activities related to this topic were assigned to a new structure, within Safety and Compliance Department. As such an Operating Experience Group was created and a new program is now being developed in an integrated and centralized manner. The content of the paper is the following: - Overview; - Operating Experience Program; - Event Analysis (Unplanned Events Assessment System - UEIR Process- and Systematic Analysis of Operational Events - ACR Process); - Information Exchange Program; - Monitoring of Operating Experience - Plant Specific Performance Indicators; - Purpose; - Level 2 Performance Indicators. Four appendices are added containing: - A. Station performance indicators/targets (Level 2); - B. SPI (Station Performance Indicators - Level 2) - Graphics; - C. UEIR, LRS (Safety and Licensing Review Sheet), UEFR (Unplanned Event Follow-up Report), ACR and OPEX forms. (authors)

  7. The Inspector General's report on Nuclear Safety and Radiation Protection 2014

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    This report, written for the Chairman of EDF, gives the Inspector General's assessment of nuclear safety and radiation protection within the EDF Group. The report is also intended for all those in the company who contribute in any way to nuclear safety and radiation protection through their day-to-day actions and decisions. It also aims to identify any early warning signs and recommend areas for improvement. It therefore focuses on difficulties and weaknesses rather than strengths and progress. It is based on information gathered and observations made during the year, both in France and the UK, whether from workers in the field, or during visits to plants and meetings with the main stakeholders: managers, staff representatives, members of the medical profession, chairmen of local information commissions in France and of Site stakeholder groups (British equivalent of the French Local Information Commissions) in the UK, and contractors. It also makes use of visits and comparisons with other international players on the nuclear scene, and of dialogue with WANO (World Association of Nuclear Operators) and the nuclear safety authorities. Content: 1 - the Inspector General's view of 2014; 2- Contrasting trends in nuclear safety in different sets of plants; 3 - Making safety culture central to management; 4 - Towards an integrated approach to risk management; 5 - Relying on professional unified operations; 6 - The quest for robust maintenance; 7 - Nuclear engineering: a major asset for the operator; 8 - Nuclear managers - confidence builders; 9 - on course for reactor operation beyond 40 years in France; 10 - Service life challenges in the UK; 11 - Preparing the future: from the EPR to other new models; 12 - Noteworthy operational events; 13- Appendices: Results for the nuclear fleets (EDF SA, EDF Energy; Maps of the nuclear power plants(EDF SA, EDF Energy); Key dates for the nuclear units (EDF SA, EDF Energy); Abbreviations

  8. Safety upgrading of the PAKS Nuclear Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vamos, G.; Vigassy, J.

    1993-01-01

    In the last several years the net electricity from the Paks NPP represents almost half of the Hungarian total. The 4 units of Paks belong to the latest generation of the VVER-440 units, the small-sized Russian designed PWRs. Reviewing the main design features of them, the safety merits and safety concerns are summarized. Due to the conservative design and the extensive operating experience the safety merits appear to be more significant than generally believed. The VVER-440 type has two models, the 230 and 213, which have a large number of distinctive safety features. These are highlighted in the section comparisons. A quality assurance program was initiated in Paks very early. A long-term safety upgrading program was also initiated, originating from vendor recommendations, regulatory decisions, in-house operating experience and safety concerns, and independent reviews. The main areas and some examples of the measures are described. This program, like all other activities related to nuclear safety, has been under regulatory control. The specific features of the Hungarian regulatory system are described. For advanced, general and new evaluation of the safety of the units in Paks in accordance with the internationally recommended criteria of the 90's, the project AGNES has been launched with international participation. The scope of this project is summarized. International efforts as the IAEA Regional Project on safety assessment of VVER-440/213 and VVER-440/230 units are underway. Since safety is not only a question of design, but it can be significantly influenced by operations and maintenance practices, the Paks NPP has invited LAEA's OSART and ASSET missions, WANO's Pilot Peer Review

  9. International technical assistance example. Consortium action in Bulgaria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattei, J.M.; Milhem, J.L.

    1993-03-01

    The safety status achieved last year at the Kozloduy Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) and the capability of the Bulgarian Nuclear Safety Authority (BNSA) to assess the safety of the plant and the adequacy of proposed improvements have been matters of international concern. However, the Kozloduy NPP contributes 35-40 per cent of the electrical generating capacity in Bulgaria. For further operation of the plants, it is therefore, essential that safety is improved. In july 1991, the Commission of the European Communities (CEC) instituted a Six Months Emergency Action Programme for Bulgaria under the PHARE regional nuclear safety programme. The programme consisted of three parts: - an industrial emergency programme supporting the utility of the Kozloduy NPP, - a study to evaluate Bulgaria's electricity needs, - technical assistance for reinforcement of the Bulgarian Nuclear Safety Authority. For the third part, complementary to the industrial emergency programme carried out by the WANO (World Association of Nuclear Operators), a Consortium of expert institutions and regulatory from EC member states was established by CEC for assistance to BNSA. The Consortium consisted of: - Institut de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire (IPSN), France, technical support of the French regulatory body, - Gesellschaft fur Anlagen und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) mbH, Germany, an organization in safety engineering, technical support of governmental regulatory body, - AIB-Vincotte Nuclear (AVN), Belgium, the organization authorized by the Belgian Government for licensing and inspection of nuclear power plants, - UK Atomic Energy Authority (AEA Technology), an independent UK Government owned nuclear R and D and consultancy organization, - Nuclear Installations Inspectorate (NII) of the Health and Safety Executive, United Kingdom, the nuclear regulatory body for the United Kingdom

  10. Financing arrangements for nuclear power projects - Past and present experience, future expectations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Troncuta, Mariana; Vatamanu, Maria; Ispas, Gheorghe

    2003-01-01

    Nuclear energy is a clean, safe, and economical industrial electricity source, with many environmental benefits. It does not emit greenhouse gases that contribute to climate change, or combustion by-products and acid gases that cause air, water resource and land pollution. Nuclear energy has also many benefits in the areas of medicine, industry, agriculture, and research. Moreover, the results are revealing. Over the past 12 years, from 1900 to 2002, the global 'energy availability factor' - representing the percentage of time that nuclear power plants worldwide were up and running - increased from 72.9% to 83.4%. At the same time, based on statistics gathered by the World Association of Nuclear Operators - WANO, the number of industrial accidents has gone down, radiation exposure has dropped sharply and the annual volume of radioactive waste produced has been reduced substantially. In other words, the safety, performance and economic competitiveness of the nuclear industry are at an all time high, reflecting a mature and vibrant enterprise. These are several reasons why a prospective host nation and other nations around the world may be attracted by nuclear power generation. Nuclear power can be and has been financed by world capital markets. The crucial question is whether host governments and interested utilities are willing to take the steps required to attract investment with reasonable assurance of success, and whether the nuclear industry is willing and able to become competitive in increasingly deregulated financial and electricity markets. The present paper will have the following structure: the first part will refer to general financing guidelines, and the second part will present a case study. The latter will treat the past experience as provided by the financing scheme of Cernavoda NPP Unit 1, the present experience, i.e. ongoing financing issues for Cernavoda NPP Unit 2 and potential future shared contribution to financing Cernavoda NPP Unit 3, 4 and 5

  11. Nuclear safety infrastructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moffitt, R.L.

    2010-01-01

    The introduction of nuclear power in any country requires the early establishment of a long term nuclear safety infrastructure. This is necessary to ensure that the siting, design, construction, commissioning, operation and dismantling of the nuclear power plant and any other related installations, as well as the long term management of radioactive waste and spent fuel, are conducted in a safe and secure manner. The decision to undertake a nuclear power program is a major commitment requiring strict attention to nuclear safety. This commitment is a responsibility to not only the citizens of the country developing such a program, but also a responsibility to the international community. Nobody can take on this responsibility or make the critical decisions except the host country. It is important to make sure that the decision making process and the development activities are done in as open a manner as possible allowing interested stakeholders the opportunity to review and comment on the actions and plans. It cannot be overemphasized that everyone involved in a program to develop nuclear power carries a responsibility for ensuring safety. While it is clear that the key decisions and activities are the responsibility of the host country, it is also very important to recognize that help is available. The IAEA, OECD-NEA, WANO and other international organizations along with countries with established nuclear power programs are available to provide information and assistance. In particular, the IAEA and OECD-NEA have published several documents regarding the development of a nuclear power program and they have been and continue to support many meetings and seminars regarding the development of nuclear power programs

  12. Rest lifetime evaluation and ageing management in NPP 'Kozloduy' unit 1-4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erve, M.; Heck, R.; Schmidt, J.; Daum, G.; Bataklieva, L.; Stoev, M.

    1999-01-01

    In 1992 as a result of an IAEA SRM review the 'WANO 6-month program' has been issued to improve operation, maintenance nad safety culture for the four WWER 440/230 units at the NPP 'Kozloduy' Siemens has awarded 3 contracts related to RTL evaluation of the main equipment, integrity of reactor pressure vessel and to the leak-before-break behaviour of the main piping od unit 2. It is pursuit an overall strategy that allows to: implement on the basis of RTL evaluation a long term ageing management program (AMAP) for Kozloduy's units 1-4 to assure their operation until the end of their design life; identify those components and equipment for which from the safety point of view urgent and immediate actions have to be performed; increase step by step the safety and reliability according to the Western standards and to internationally accepted safety culture; keep open the possibility of life extension as far as this would be technically feasible and acceptable and economically reasonable. Under the technical leadership of Siemens studies have been performed related to the subject of integrity and RTL, such as: reirradiation of RPV samples from Unit 1 and 2; evaluation of PV embrittlement of Unit 1; transfer of the results of LBB assessment of Unit 2 to Units 1, 3 and 4; transfer of results of RTL evaluation of Unit 2 to Units 1, 3 and 4; PTS analysis of RPV of Unit 1, 2,3 and 4. The main remarkable results are: no life-limiting mechanisms detected, requiring immediate actions, except for RPVs; residual lifetime determined for RPVs on reliable basis of advanced modern PTS analysis and sample testing; necessary activities in monitoring of ageing and in-service inspection clearly identified successful proof of lBB for main primary piping after slight modification of supports; international experts agreement reached (e.g. Risk Audit, successful IAEA experts meetings and OSART missions)

  13. Top level risk study for units 1 to 4 at NPP Kozloduy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shishkova, I.

    1997-01-01

    The first Top Level Study of NPP Kozloduy Units 1/4 was started in 1991 and completed in March 1992 by BEQE. The Primary objective of the project was to provide in a short term a tool for quantified comparison of the relative risk benefits that various design or operational modifications would have if implemented on NPP Kozloduy Units 1/4. This original version of the Study was reviewed by the IAEA who agreed in general with the conclusions indicating that the report provides valuable insights which should be used in the decision making process. The IAEA made suggestion for some changes. These comments were taken into account in the subsequent version. In early 1994 the new version was issued. The objective of this second project, in addition to revising the original study to reflect the IAEA comments, was to address the potential benefits from further improvements at NPP Kozloduy. The work on the second version was going on in parallel with the activities carried out in the mainframe of several NPP Kozloduy Units 1/4 Upgrading Program (WANO Six-Month Program, Program for the NPP Kozloduy Units 1-4 Upgrading, Twinning Program, etc.). And at last, a Top-Level Probabilistic Safety Study was carried out by EQE - Bulgaria and completed early in 1995 at the request of NPP Kozloduy. The objective of the project was the contribution of the different activities performed in the mainframe of the Program for the NPP Kozloduy Units 1-4 Safety Upgrading in the overall safety improvement to be assessed. 3 figs, 1 tab

  14. A study of the state of the art on the determination of the threshold values of the performance indicators for safety systems and initiating events of nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, D. I.; Kim, K. Y.; Hwang, M. J.; Park, J. H.; Ha, J. J

    2004-02-01

    The threshold values of Korean Institute of Nuclear Safety (KINS) Performance Indicators (PIs)' determining the safety class of initiating events and safety systems can not sufficiently reflect the operating experience and PSA results of domestic NPPs. Therefore, the state of arts on the PI study of domestic and foreign countries is analyzed in order to reflect the operating experience and PSA results of domestic NPPs in the determination of the threshold values of the PIs for safety systems and initiating events of domestic NPPs. We identified the state of arts of PIs through reviewing the objectives and types of WANO, IAEA, NRC, OECD/NEA and domestic PIs, and the technical issues of the threshold values of SECY 99-007 and NUREG-1753. We also, identified the current status of recently developed MSPI (Mitigating System Performance Index) and IIIEI (Integrated Industry Initiating Event Indicator). From this study of the state of the arts on the PIs, we expect that if the NRC's MSPI and a PI similar to NRC's IIIEI would be introduced into the KINS, it is not necessary to determine the threshold values of PIs applied to the safety systems and initiating events of entire domestic NPPs. Otherwise the threshold values of PIs applied to the individual NPP should be developed using PSA models of typical reactor types. For the active development and use of the risk informed PIs for the domestic NPPs, we expect that the system and component reliability analysis and initiating events analysis for the domestic NPPs, MSPI, IIIEI, and PSA requirements for the PIs be further studied.

  15. Progress report on the management of the NEA ISOE system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazo, E. [OECD Nuclear Energy Agency, Issy-les-Moulineaux (France)

    1995-03-01

    The Information System on Occupational Exposure (ISOE) was launched by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) on 1 January, 1992, to facilitate the communication of dosimetric and ALARA implementation data among nuclear utilities around the world. After two years of operation the System has become a mature interactive network for transfer of data and experience. Currently, 37 utilities from 12 countries, representing 289 power plants, and 12 national regulatory authorities participate in ISOE. Agreements for cooperation also exist between the NEA and the Commission of the European Communities (CEC), and the Paris Center of the WOrld Association of Nuclear Operators (WANO-PC). In addition, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) is acting as a co-sponsor of ISOE for the participation of non-NEA member countries. Three Regional Technical Centres, Europe, Asia, and Non-NEA member countries, serve to administer the system. The ISOE Network is comprised of three data bases and a communications network at several levels. The three ISOE data bases include the following types of information: NEA1 - annual plant dosimetric information; NEA2 - plant operational characteristics for dose and dose rate reduction; and NEA3 - job specific ALARA practices and experiences. The ISOE communications network has matured greatly during 1992 and 1993. In addition to having access to the above mentioned data bases, participants may now solicit information on new subjects, through the Technical Centres, from all other participants on a real-time basis. Information Sheets on these studies are produced for distribution to all participants. In addition, Topical Reports on areas of interest are produced, and Topical Meetings are held annually.

  16. Assessment of Safety Culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilic Zabric, T.; Kavsek, D.

    2006-01-01

    A strong safety culture leads to more effective conduct of work and a sense of accountability among managers and employees, who should be given the opportunity to expand skills by training. The resources expended would thus result in tangible improvements in working practices and skills, which encourage further improvement of safety culture. In promoting an improved safety culture, NEK has emphasized both national and organizational culture with an appropriate balance of behavioural sciences and quality management systems approaches. In recent years there has been particular emphasis put on an increasing awareness of the contribution that human behavioural sciences can make to develop good safety practices. The purpose of an assessment of safety culture is to increase the awareness of the present culture, to serve as a basis for improvement and to keep track of the effects of change or improvement over a longer period of time. There is, however, no single approach that is suitable for all purposes and which can measure, simultaneously, all the intangible aspects of safety culture, i.e. the norms, values, beliefs, attitudes or the behaviours reflecting the culture. Various methods have their strengths and weaknesses. To prevent significant performance problems, self-assessment is used. Self-assessment is the process of identifying opportunities for improvement actively or, in some cases, weaknesses that could cause more serious errors or events. Self-assessments are an important input to the corrective action programme. NEK has developed questionnaires for safety culture self-assessment to obtain information that is representative of the whole organization. Questionnaires ensure a greater degree of anonymity, and create a less stressful situation for the respondent. Answers to questions represent the more apparent and conscious values and attitudes of the respondent. NEK proactively co-operates with WANO, INPO, IAEA in the areas of Safety Culture and Human

  17. International technical assistance example. Consortium action in Bulgaria; Exemple d`assistance internationale. Cas de la Bulgarie, action du consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattei, J M; Milhem, J L [CEA Centre d` Etudes de Fontenay-aux-Roses, 92 (France). Inst. de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire; Heuser, F W; Kelm, P [Gesellschaft fuer Reaktorsicherheit mbH (GRS), Koeln (Germany)

    1993-03-01

    The safety status achieved last year at the Kozloduy Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) and the capability of the Bulgarian Nuclear Safety Authority (BNSA) to assess the safety of the plant and the adequacy of proposed improvements have been matters of international concern. However, the Kozloduy NPP contributes 35-40 per cent of the electrical generating capacity in Bulgaria. For further operation of the plants, it is therefore, essential that safety is improved. In july 1991, the Commission of the European Communities (CEC) instituted a Six Months Emergency Action Programme for Bulgaria under the PHARE regional nuclear safety programme. The programme consisted of three parts: - an industrial emergency programme supporting the utility of the Kozloduy NPP, - a study to evaluate Bulgaria`s electricity needs, - technical assistance for reinforcement of the Bulgarian Nuclear Safety Authority. For the third part, complementary to the industrial emergency programme carried out by the WANO (World Association of Nuclear Operators), a Consortium of expert institutions and regulatory from EC member states was established by CEC for assistance to BNSA. The Consortium consisted of: - Institut de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire (IPSN), France, technical support of the French regulatory body, - Gesellschaft fur Anlagen und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) mbH, Germany, an organization in safety engineering, technical support of governmental regulatory body, - AIB-Vincotte Nuclear (AVN), Belgium, the organization authorized by the Belgian Government for licensing and inspection of nuclear power plants, - UK Atomic Energy Authority (AEA Technology), an independent UK Government owned nuclear R and D and consultancy organization, - Nuclear Installations Inspectorate (NII) of the Health and Safety Executive, United Kingdom, the nuclear regulatory body for the United Kingdom.

  18. Overview of Cernavoda NPP training programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valache, Cornelia

    2005-01-01

    Full text: The paper presents a general assessment of Cernavoda NPP personnel training programme, highlighting the role of training in human performance improvement. Cernavoda NPP Personnel Training and Authorization Department (PTAD) is the one responsible for the training of Unit 1 and 2 staff. PTAD is structured in such a manner as to support and respond to all Cernavoda NPP training, qualification and authorization requirements. The training of personnel is continuously adapted based on IAEA Guides and INPO/WANO recommendations, to keep with world standards, based on the internal and external reviews. At Cernavoda NPP the Training Concept and the Training Programmes are based on SAT - Systematic Approach to Training. The Training Concept is established on a set of training documents (RD's, SI's, IDP's), which address all the SAT phases: Analysis, Design, Development, Implementation and Evaluation. The Training Programmes are structured on the initial and continuing personnel training. Their content and goals respond to the training specific needs for each plant major job family. In order to successfully support NPP training programmes, CNPP training center has upgraded classrooms with new presentation facilities and there are plans to expand the space of the building, to develop additional operator and maintenance skills facilities. There are also a number of general areas for improvement of PTAD activity, such as operators and maintenance training, initial and continuing training of both Unit 1 and 2 staff. By responding in a timely and completely manner to all plant training requirements PTAD will help in rising human performance of Cernavoda NPP personnel, supporting the safe, efficient and cost effective production of power. (author)

  19. The Inspector General's report on Nuclear Safety and Radiation Protection 2015

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    This report, written for the Chairman of EDF, gives the Inspector General's assessment of nuclear safety and radiation protection within the EDF Group. The report is also intended for all those in the company who contribute in any way to nuclear safety and radiation protection through their day-to-day actions and decisions. It also aims to identify any early warning signs and recommend areas for improvement. It therefore focuses on difficulties and weaknesses rather than strengths and progress. It is based on information gathered and observations made during the year, both in France and the UK, whether from workers in the field, or during visits to plants and meetings with the main stakeholders: managers, staff representatives, members of the medical profession, chairmen of local information commissions in France and of Site stakeholder groups (British equivalent of the French Local Information Commissions) in the UK, and contractors. It also makes use of visits and comparisons with other international players on the nuclear scene, and of dialogue with WANO (World Association of Nuclear Operators) and the nuclear safety authorities. Content: 1 - the Inspector General's view of 2015; 2 - Operational safety: mixed results; 3 - Nuclear safety clearly prioritised; 4 - Risk prevention: progress in France; 5 - Reinforced emergency preparedness post-Fukushima; 6 - Fire prevention: still a weak link; 7 - Continuous investment in training and careers; 8 - Using maintenance to leverage improved operational quality; 9 - Chemistry in France: a transition in need of strong support; 10 - Decommissioning projects are progressing; 11 - EPRs in China, France and the UK; 12 - Preparing for the future; 13 - A window on the world; 14 - Appendices: Results for the nuclear fleets (EDF SA, EDF Energy; Maps of the nuclear power plants(EDF SA, EDF Energy); Key dates for the nuclear units (EDF SA, EDF Energy); Abbreviations

  20. The preliminary success of ALARA implementation in Daya Bay NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Maochun; Chen Degan

    2000-01-01

    Based on the practical condition of the plant and in reference to advanced management experiences worldwide, Daya Bay Nuclear Power Plant has established its own peculiar management system for radiation protection management and ALARA implementation. The characteristics of the system are: radiation protection training to all workers, active involvement of all managers and staffs, and whole process safety control to maintenance activities. The management philosophy of 'workers are responsible for their own radiation safety' is adopted in the plant. A strict, formalized and systematic whole staff radiation protection training, evaluation, authorization and periodically refreshing mechanism had been established and executed in the plant. In the organizational point of view, the responsibilities of line managers were specified in plant procedures, ALARA coordination organization on plant level and for specific activities were established. Meanwhile, the plant highlighted the defining, following up, controlling and advertising of radiation protection targets. All these measures made radiation protection management be the responsibilities of a safety network in which whole staffs are involved. In the practical radiation protection activities, the plant focuses on works of high radiation risk and performs whole process control. In addition, professional radiation protection staff played an important and active role in technical advisory and control of radiation protection. Satisfactory results have been achieved in Daya Bay NPP in radiation protection in the past years. The collective dose including that of contractors per unit and year have been declining from 0.99 man·Sv/Unit·Year in 1995 to 0.667 man·Sv/Unit·Year in 1998, which were consistently lower than the best quartile result of PWR plants in WANO reports each year. Individual dose was also controlled at a very low level, no one was overexposed in the past years

  1. ETSON proposal on the European operational experience feedback system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maqua, Michael; Bertrand, Remy; Gelder, Pieter de

    2007-01-01

    The new IAEA Safety Fundamentals states regarding the operating experience feedback: The feedback of operating experience from facilities and activities - and, where relevant, from elsewhere - is a key means of enhancing safety. Processes must be put in place for the feedback and analysis of operating experience, including initiating events, accident precursors, near misses, accidents and unauthorized acts, so that lessons may be learned, shared and acted upon. This presentation deals with the proposal of the ETSON (European TSO Network) to optimize the European operating experiences feedback (OEF). It is generally recognized that the efficiency of nuclear safety supervision by public authorities is based on two key requirements: - the existence of a competent authority at national level, benefiting from an appropriate legislative and regulatory basis, from adequate (quantitatively and qualitatively) human resources, particularly for inspection purposes, - the availability of resources devoted to highly specialised independent technical expertise, in order to provide competent authorities with pertinent technical opinions on: -- the safety files provided by operators, for the purpose of licensing corresponding activities, -- the exploitation for regulatory purposes of the operating experience feed back from licensed nuclear installations. There are two worldwide systems intended to learn lessons from experience: the WANO (World Association of Nuclear Operators) system established by the licensees with access restricted to operating organizations and the IRS system jointly operated by IAEA and OECD/NEA accessible to regulators and to some other users nominated by the regulators in their countries. The IRS itself is dedicated to the analysis of safety significant operating events. NEA/CNRA runs a permanent working group on operating experience (WGOE). WGOE provides among other things also generic reports on safety concerns related to operating experiences and

  2. The Inspector General's report on Nuclear Safety and Radiation Protection 2013

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    This report, written for the Chairman of EDF, gives the Inspector General's assessment of nuclear safety and radiation protection within the EDF Group. The report is also intended for all those in the company who contribute in any way to nuclear safety and radiation protection through their day-to-day actions and decisions. It also aims to identify any early warning signs and recommend areas for improvement. It therefore focuses on difficulties and weaknesses rather than strengths and progress. It is based on information gathered and observations made during the year, both in France and the UK, whether from workers in the field, or during visits to plants and meetings with the main stakeholders: managers, staff representatives, members of the medical profession, chairmen of local information commissions in France and of Site stakeholder groups (British equivalent of the French Local Information Commissions) in the UK, and contractors. It also makes use of visits and comparisons with other international players on the nuclear scene, and of dialogue with WANO (World Association of Nuclear Operators) and the nuclear safety authorities. Content: 1 - the Inspector General's view of 2013 2 - Safety in operation: good standing of results; 3 - Management of safety priority; 4 - Occupational safety: managers mobilization is necessary in France; 5 - Radiation protection: a new dynamics to initiate; 6 - Maintenance: regaining the essentials for the great careening; 7 - Fostering occupations to improve safety; 8 - A new momentum to the EPRs; 9 - Nuclear fuel, a major contribution to safety; 10 - Research-development: a lever to anticipate; 11 - Japan: safety under reconstruction; 12 - Noteworthy operational events; 13- Appendices: Results for the nuclear fleets (EDF SA, EDF Energy; Maps of the nuclear power plants(EDF SA, EDF Energy); Key dates for the nuclear units (EDF SA, EDF Energy); Abbreviations

  3. Progress report on the management of the NEA ISOE system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazo, E.

    1995-01-01

    The Information System on Occupational Exposure (ISOE) was launched by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) on 1 January, 1992, to facilitate the communication of dosimetric and ALARA implementation data among nuclear utilities around the world. After two years of operation the System has become a mature interactive network for transfer of data and experience. Currently, 37 utilities from 12 countries, representing 289 power plants, and 12 national regulatory authorities participate in ISOE. Agreements for cooperation also exist between the NEA and the Commission of the European Communities (CEC), and the Paris Center of the WOrld Association of Nuclear Operators (WANO-PC). In addition, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) is acting as a co-sponsor of ISOE for the participation of non-NEA member countries. Three Regional Technical Centres, Europe, Asia, and Non-NEA member countries, serve to administer the system. The ISOE Network is comprised of three data bases and a communications network at several levels. The three ISOE data bases include the following types of information: NEA1 - annual plant dosimetric information; NEA2 - plant operational characteristics for dose and dose rate reduction; and NEA3 - job specific ALARA practices and experiences. The ISOE communications network has matured greatly during 1992 and 1993. In addition to having access to the above mentioned data bases, participants may now solicit information on new subjects, through the Technical Centres, from all other participants on a real-time basis. Information Sheets on these studies are produced for distribution to all participants. In addition, Topical Reports on areas of interest are produced, and Topical Meetings are held annually

  4. Proceedings of the CSNI/IAEA workshop on maintaining oversight of licensee safety culture - methods and approaches. Held from 21 to 23 May 2007 in Chester, UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    Weaknesses in safety culture have contributed to a number of high profile events in the nuclear and other high hazard sectors. The nuclear industry also faces challenges such as deregulation, out-sourcing, phase-out, upgrading and new builds which, if not properly planned and implemented, have the potential to make a negative impact on safety culture. These factors have fostered an increasing awareness of the need for licensees to develop a strong safety culture to support successful and sustainable nuclear safety performance. Regulatory bodies are taking a growing interest in this issue, and several are actively working to develop and implement approaches to maintaining oversight of licensee safety culture. However, these approaches are not yet well-established, and it was considered prudent to share experiences and developing methodologies in order to disseminate good practices and avoid potential pitfalls. An NEA/CSNI/IAEA workshop was therefore held in Chester, UK, in May 2007 in order to explore and discuss the approaches that different regulatory bodies are taking to maintain oversight of licensee safety culture. It was organised by the UK Nuclear Installations Inspectorate on behalf of the CSNI's Working Group on Human and Organisational Factors. This report sets out the findings of the Chester workshop. The workshop was attended by 50 representatives of nuclear regulatory bodies in 20 countries plus IAEA, WANO, EU and NEA. It included both specialists in safety culture and site/resident inspectors, whose attendance was facilitated by the CNRA's Working Group on Inspection Practices. The workshop comprised structured discussion sessions, in which a set of issues were explored by small discussion groups and then discussed in plenary, complemented by short presentations on national regulatory positions. The workshop revealed a broad consensus that nuclear regulators should have processes in place to maintain oversight of licensee safety culture. The approaches

  5. The Safety Assessment of Long term Interim Storage at Sellafield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchan, Andrew B.

    2014-01-01

    The Sellafield site comprises a wide range of nuclear facilities, including operating facilities associated with the Magnox reprocessing programme, the Thermal Oxide Reprocessing Plant (THORP) and a range of waste treatment plants. The operational life of some of the site facilities currently extends to 2120, requiring the retrieval, treatment, consolidation and safe extended storage of a variety of radioactive materials. Sellafield has utilised its existing safety assessment processes to inform and prioritise studies into beyond design basis events and resilience evaluation required following Fukushima by UK regulators and industry bodies such as WANO. There are significant differences between NPPs, for which the ENSREG 'stress tests' were originally intended, and the Sellafield site which is instead centered around two reprocessing facilities (Magnox and THORP), with a supporting infrastructure of waste processing and storage facilities, coupled with a legacy of high hazard older facilities. In the former case the consequences of a catastrophic failure are promptly realised, leading to significant problems such as fuel failure / meltdown in AGRs and LWRs respectively in the event of complete loss of cooling. At Sellafield, the processes are carried out at comparatively low temperatures and pressures with relatively low rates of change following any loss of cooling. Instead the consequences of catastrophic failure at Sellafield are more directly related to the very large inventories of radioactive materials, including high level liquid wastes and unprocessed fuels, present in specific plants and to the condition of the ageing assets, holding legacy wastes. The paper will consider how a number of analysis techniques have been used to establish a safety case for fault and accident conditions, i.e. design basis analysis (DBA), probabilistic safety analysis (PSA) and severe accident analysis (SAA) DBA is focused on the key safety measures for those initiating faults

  6. An Enhancement of Campaign Posters for Human Error Prevention in NPPs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Yong Hee; Lee, Yong Hee; Kwon, Soon Il

    2010-01-01

    Accidents in high reliability systems such as nuclear power plants (NPPs) give rise to not only a loss of property and life, but also social problems. One of the most frequently used techniques to grasp the current situation for hazard factors in the NPPs is an event investigation analysis based on the INPO's Human Performance Enhancement System (HPES), and the Korean Human Performance Enhancement System (K-HPES) in Korea, respectively. There are many methods and approaches for an HE assessment that is valuable for investigating the causes of undesirable events and counter-plans to prevent their recurrence in the NPPs. They differ from each other according to the objectives of the analysis; the explanation of the event, the investigation of the causes, the allocation of the responsibility, and the establishment of the counter-plan. Event databases include their own events and information from various sources such as the IAEA, regulatory bodies, and also from the INPO and WANO. As many as 111 reactor trips have occurred in the past 5 years ('01∼'05), and 26 cases of them have occurred due to HE. The trend of human error rate didn't decrease in 2004, so the KHNP started to make efforts to decrease HEs. The KHNP created as many as 40 posters for human performance improvement in 2006. The INPO has been using a traditional form of poster; additionally, the Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI) developed a type of caution report. The caution report is comprised of a poster name, a serial number, a figure, work situations, the point at issue, and a countermeasure. The preceding posters which KHNP developed in 2006 give a message about specific information related to HE events. However, it is not enough to arouse interest in the effectiveness of the posters because most people are favorably disposed toward a simple poster with many illustrations. Therefore, we stressed the need for worker's receptiveness rather than notification of information

  7. A chance to avoid mistakes human error

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amaro, Pablo; Obeso, Eduardo; Gomez, Ruben

    2010-01-01

    Trying to give an answer to the lack of public information in the industry, in relationship with the different tools that are managed in the nuclear industry for minimizing the human error, a group of workers from different sections of the St. Maria de Garona NPP (Quality Assurance/ Organization and Human Factors) decided to embark on a challenging and exciting project: 'Write a book collecting all the knowledge accumulated during their daily activities, very often during lecture time of external information received from different organizations within the nuclear industry (INPO, WANO...), but also visiting different NPP's, maintaining meetings and participating in training courses related de Human and Organizational Factors'. Main objective of the book is presenting to the industry in general, the different tools that are used and fostered in the nuclear industry, in a practical way. In this way, the assimilation and implementation in others industries could be possible and achievable in and efficient context. One year of work, and our project is a reality. We have presented and abstract during the last Spanish Nuclear Society meeting in Sevilla, last October...and the best, the book is into the market for everybody in web-site: www.bubok.com. The book is structured in the following areas: 'Errare humanum est': Trying to present what is the human error to the reader, its origin and the different barriers. The message is that the reader see the error like something continuously present in our lives... even more frequently than we think. Studying its origin can be established aimed at barriers to avoid or at least minimize it. 'Error's bitter face': Shows the possible consequences of human errors. What better that presenting real experiences that have occurred in the industry. In the book, accidents in the nuclear industry, like Tree Mile Island NPP, Chernobyl NPP, and incidents like Davis Besse NPP in the past, helps to the reader to make a reflection about the

  8. Analysing Fukushima: to carry on with the the exploitation and the development of a safe nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machenaud, Herve

    2011-01-01

    the plant's surroundings, reactions have been global. It stresses the need to enhance international cooperation among States under the authority of the IAEA and between nuclear safety authorities towards homogeneous safety standards. As for the operators, improving cooperation relies on a higher cross-commitment among them as a community and on a better visibility of the World Association of Nuclear Operators (WANO) as a professional authority. (author)

  9. The Inspector General's report on Nuclear Safety and Radiation Protection 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    This report, written for the Chairman of EDF, gives the Inspector General's assessment of nuclear safety and radiation protection within the EDF Group. The report is also intended for all those in the company who contribute in any way to nuclear safety and radiation protection through their day-to-day actions and decisions. It also aims to identify any early warning signs and recommend areas for improvement. It therefore focuses on difficulties and weaknesses rather than strengths and progress. It is based on information gathered and observations made during the year, both in France and the UK, whether from workers in the field, or during visits to plants and meetings with the main stakeholders: managers, staff representatives, members of the medical profession, chairmen of local information commissions in France and of Site stakeholder groups (British equivalent of the French Local Information Commissions) in the UK, and contractors. It also makes use of visits and comparisons with other international players on the nuclear scene, and of dialogue with WANO (World Association of Nuclear Operators) and the nuclear safety authorities. Content: 1 - the Inspector General's analysis and conclusions at the end of 2008; 2 - Nuclear safety management; 3 - Radiation protection; 4 - A changing relationship with the nuclear safety authority; 5 - Support for the nuclear plants in service; 6 - Succeeding with the EPR; 7 - Operating the installations for longer; 8 - Further opening up to the outside world; 9 - Renewal of skills; 10 - Labour relations; 11 - The driving forces of cultural change; 12 - Promote change and regulate its pace; 13 - The contribution of the medical staff; 14 - Relations with contractors; 15 - The fire hazard; 16 - Nuclear fuel; 17 - Decommissioning; 18 - Emergency response management; 19 - Events at EDF; 19.1 - The Tricastin nuclear power plant fuel assemblies; 19.2 - Steam generator behaviour; 19.3 - Reactor building evacuation; 20 - Visits

  10. Feedback of operation and maintenance experience into evolutionary plant design (HWRs)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hedges, K.R.; Sanatkumar, A.; Kwon, Oh-Cheol

    1999-01-01

    . Feedback from COG and WANO reports is also available. All this experience has been appropriately ploughed back into design of 500 MWe PHWR. This paper discusses the feedback process and some specific features of the current CANDU and other PHWR designs. (author)

  11. Technologies for improving the availability of current and future light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedersen, T.

    2000-01-01

    Construction of nuclear power plants involves large investments, much larger than for most alternatives for large-scale energy production. This is in particular valid when compared with the capital needed for building gas-fired power plants in areas or countries with an established infrastructure for distribution of natural gas. On the other hand, the fuel costs for a nuclear power plant are very low compared to the costs for natural gas and other alternatives, which means that the generation costs per kWhe of well performing nuclear power plants can be fully competitive. To this end, nuclear power plant owners and operators have been looking carefully at ways and means to achieve improvements with respect to power generation reliability and costs by equipment modernisation and/or modified procedures. In some countries, this has resulted in significant re-investments of revenues for modernisation programmes. In recent years, many such programmes have slowed down or been postponed due to reduced revenues in the wake of dramatic drop in electricity prices following deregulation. Typical areas of modernisation range from replacement of components or equipment to modification of system arrangements and structures, as well as introduction of new I and C systems and technology, for single functions or systems, or for the whole plant. Operating experience from well performing plants is compiled by utility organisations such as WANO (World Association of Nuclear Operators), EPRI (Electric Power Research Institute) and the EUR (European Utility Requirements) group, and also by the different nuclear vendors to serve as input for modifications and improvements in operating plants, and also as guidance for the design of new plants. A number of measures taken to overcome observed deficiencies and difficulties, suggestions for future improvements, and also implementation of specific design features were presented at the IAEA Technical Committee Meeting at Argonne National

  12. Self-Assessment at Krsko Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strucic, M.; Kavsek, D.; Novak, J.; Dudas, M.

    2006-01-01

    Self-assessment program in NPP Krsko is based on plant effort to identify areas for improvements, as well as strengths in various processes. The highest level tool of that program is Inter-disciplinary Self-assessment. Extensive experience in methodology from many Peer Reviews worldwide, where NPP Krsko personnel were involved, was essential contributor for successful development and implementation of Inter-disciplinary Self-assessment. Every Inter-disciplinary Self-assessment, performed by experienced NEK people, results in highly efficient and constructive action plan. It is achieved by professional approach and positive attitude of team leader and members. Typical team composition includes members from different NEK departments including their managers. They are experienced in area being assessed, as well as in Cause analysis techniques. People involved in previous Internal or Inter-discipline Self-assessments and international peer reviews are indispensable part of the team and usually team leader is one of them. Inter-disciplinary Self-assessments are planned well in advance and are approved by NEK management board. NEK directors are also involved through sponsorship. Often, they are counterparts in the interviews sessions of assessment. Methodology of carrying out Self-assessment is developed using WANO Peer reviews experience and techniques. Areas for assessment are mostly identified through Corrective action or trending processes, Internal self-assessments or Performance Indicators. Field observations, interviews with workers in the field and their superiors are reason for frequent team meetings. That process is often iterative and results in clear and precise observation reports which are separately analyzed and at the end confirmed by owner of the process. Based on analysis described in observation reports, team defines areas where generic problems are found. Team members are dedicated for particular areas, usually where they are more educated and

  13. Nuclear power: An evolving scenario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElBaradei, Mohamed

    2004-01-01

    The past two years have found the IAEA often in the spotlight - primarily because of our role as the world's 'nuclear watchdog', as we are sometimes referred to on the evening news. The most visible, and often controversial, peaceful nuclear application is the generation of electricity, the focus of this article largely from a European perspective. At the end of last year there were 440 nuclear power units operating worldwide. Together, they supply about 16% of the world's electricity. That percentage has remained relatively steady for almost 20 years. Expansion and growth prospects for nuclear power are centred in Asia. Of the 31 units under construction worldwide, 18 are located in India, Japan, South Korea and China, including Taiwan. Twenty of the last 29 reactors to be connected to the grid are also in the Far East and South Asia. That is probably more active construction than most Europeans would guess, given how little recent growth has occurred in the West. For Western Europe and North America, nuclear construction has been a frozen playing field - the last plant to be completed being Civaux-2 in France in 1999. That should raise a question: with little to no new construction, how has nuclear power been able to keep up with other energy sources, to maintain its share of electricity generation? Interestingly enough, the answer is tied directly to efforts to improve safety performance. The accident at Chernobyl in 1986 prompted the creation of the World Association of Nuclear Operators (WANO), and revolutionized the IAEA approach to nuclear power plant safety. Some analysts believe the case for new nuclear construction in Europe is gaining new ground, for a number of reasons: efforts to limit greenhouse gas emissions and reduce the risk of climate change; security of energy supply; Comparative Public Health Risk; different set of variables when choosing Each country's and region energy strategy. Looking to the future, certain key challenges are, of direct

  14. Stress test of the nuclear power plants performed in Taiwan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, C.H.; Teng, W.C.; Chang, S.; Chen, Y.B. [Atomic Energy Council, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2014-07-01

    In the wake of Japan's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plants event, the Atomic Energy Council (AEC) has asked Taiwan's Nuclear Power Plant operator (TPC) to re-examine and re-evaluate the vulnerabilities of its nuclear units, and furthermore, take possible countermeasures against extreme natural disasters, including earthquake, tsunami and rock-and-mud slide. The evaluation process should be based on both within and beyond Design Basis Accidents, by reference to the actions recommended by the world nuclear authorities and groups, namely, IAEA, USNRC, NEI, ENSREG and WANO. Taiwan is a very densely populated region of the world. Furthermore, like Japan, due to its geophysical position, Taiwan is prone to large scale earthquakes, and although historically rare, Taiwan also faces the potential risk of tsunamis. AEC also asked TPC to perform the stress test following the specification given by WENRA (later ENSREG) and conducted in all the EU's nuclear reactors. After completion of the stress test for all the nuclear power plants, AEC was trying to have the reports peer reviewed by international organizations, as EU did. The OECD/NEA accepted AEC's request and formed a review team specific to the review of Taiwan's National Report for the Stress Test. There were 18 follow-up items after the NEA's review. Based on these items, AEC developed five orders to require TPC further enhancing their capabilities to cope with extreme natural hazards. The ENSREG also formed a nine-expert review team for Taiwan's Stress Test in response to AEC's request almost at the same time as the OECD/NEA. The ENSREG review team began their works in June 2013 by desktop review, and ended in early October 2013 by country visit to Taiwan. While the assessment of post-Fukushima evaluation reveals neither immediate nuclear safety concerns nor threats to the public health and safety, AEC requested that TPC focus on strengthening its re-evaluation on design

  15. Stress test of the nuclear power plants performed in Taiwan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, C.H.; Teng, W.C.; Chang, S.; Chen, Y.B.

    2014-01-01

    In the wake of Japan's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plants event, the Atomic Energy Council (AEC) has asked Taiwan's Nuclear Power Plant operator (TPC) to re-examine and re-evaluate the vulnerabilities of its nuclear units, and furthermore, take possible countermeasures against extreme natural disasters, including earthquake, tsunami and rock-and-mud slide. The evaluation process should be based on both within and beyond Design Basis Accidents, by reference to the actions recommended by the world nuclear authorities and groups, namely, IAEA, USNRC, NEI, ENSREG and WANO. Taiwan is a very densely populated region of the world. Furthermore, like Japan, due to its geophysical position, Taiwan is prone to large scale earthquakes, and although historically rare, Taiwan also faces the potential risk of tsunamis. AEC also asked TPC to perform the stress test following the specification given by WENRA (later ENSREG) and conducted in all the EU's nuclear reactors. After completion of the stress test for all the nuclear power plants, AEC was trying to have the reports peer reviewed by international organizations, as EU did. The OECD/NEA accepted AEC's request and formed a review team specific to the review of Taiwan's National Report for the Stress Test. There were 18 follow-up items after the NEA's review. Based on these items, AEC developed five orders to require TPC further enhancing their capabilities to cope with extreme natural hazards. The ENSREG also formed a nine-expert review team for Taiwan's Stress Test in response to AEC's request almost at the same time as the OECD/NEA. The ENSREG review team began their works in June 2013 by desktop review, and ended in early October 2013 by country visit to Taiwan. While the assessment of post-Fukushima evaluation reveals neither immediate nuclear safety concerns nor threats to the public health and safety, AEC requested that TPC focus on strengthening its re-evaluation on design

  16. Market conditions in Hungary, central europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagy, S.

    2000-01-01

    Paks Nuclear Power Plant is the only nuclear power plant in Hungary covering 38% of electricity consumption in the country. The nuclear electricity production of the four VVER440/213 type units in the year of 1999 was 14096 GWh, the second best result in the history of the company. After very detailed safety analyses Paks NPP started a safety upgrading program in 1996, and today the CDF values of the reactor units reached an internationally accepted value. The operational and safety culture and the level of safety was evaluated and reviewed by different international organizations like the IAEA, WENRA, WANO. Based on the conclusions of these international organizations the Paks plant w111 be ready for EU accession after the completion of the ongoing safety upgrading program. Capacity enhancement as a part of the preparation for the market conditions resulted a power upgrade around 20 MW for all four units. This way a relatively small investment in comparison with new installations resulted more efficient to market nuclear capacity. Last year the cost of a generated 1 kWh electricity was 5.98 Ft, which is still to be decreased in 2000. To upgrade the competitiveness of nuclear generation lots of efforts were done in the areas of plant management cost reduction, man-power efficiency upgrade. Un-bundling of activities not directly related to electricity generation in one hand, and more efficient cooperation with other VVER operators and the Hungarian Power Companies Ltd. in certain areas on the other hand are good examples for efficient steps in economic improvement. The company as one of the electricity producers also should follow the capabilities of producers in the neighboring countries like Slovakia and Ukraine, where electricity production is with government subsidiary. To find the right balance between the necessary investments and the market induced cost reduction is one of the most important task in Hungary in Eastern-Europe especially when the nuclear energy

  17. Historical event: the best reload of CLV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivera C, A.

    2006-01-01

    The present work will describe how the Laguna Verde Central advances to achieve the excellence in the evaluations of WANO, in one of their two important concepts that have to improve to aspire to that qualification, in Collective Dose of the Personnel and in the duration of the periods of the fuel reloads. The result of the 11th Fuel reload of the Unit 1 that begins September 11, 2005 and concludes on October 10, 2005, came out in 29.5 days, being the best in the history of the CLV. It critical route (most large duration activities) it was the bigger maintenance of the main generator, having like challenge that if the program was completed or decreased the time, the Laguna Verde Central it would be placed in the threshold of the qualification of Excellency. With this vision the technicians of the Power station in previous meetings, determined to improve the maneuvers recommended by the manufacturing Mitsubishi (Japanese Company) for the disassembly and assembly of the rotor that it has a weight of 120 tons, same that for their great weight make difficult the maneuver. This maintenance is carried out every five years, highlighting that in its previous maintenance it was in reload of 17 hours in its retirement, same that it was to improve. The changes to the instructions of Mitsubishi for the retirement of the rotor are: the use of synthetic slings instead of steel strobes that needed to use of neoprene and wooden staves to protect the rotor and a system of pulleys instead of differential of chain, being 3 hours in the retirement of the rotor, instead of 17 hours that it lasted previously. It is also excellent that it decreased of six necessary people for the movement of the rotor, to a one person. The reduction of effort was shown in pictures, like instead of the chain differential, they put on steel strobes with pulleys. To give the force of the movement it was used a hoisting machine. The two fixed support points were changed in supports with simple pulleys

  18. Barsebaeck NPP in Sweden - Decommissioning Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hakan, Lorentz

    2009-01-01

    Barsebaeck 1 and 2, type BWR (Boiling Water Reactor) with a capacity of 615 MWe was closed down permanently on 30 November 1999 respective 31 May 2005 due to political decision. Both units together have been in Service operation (Care and maintenance) since 1 December 2006. Barsebaeck NPP will stay in Service operation until beginning of 2018 when Dismantling operation begins with the aim of a free-realized site in the beginning of 2025. That means that the remaining buildings, including equipment should be declared free-released or dismantled. It would then be up to the owner, E.ON Kaernkraft Sverige AB (EKS) to decide what is to be done with the site in the future. There was a re-organisation at Barsebaeck Kraft AB (BKAB) in 1 January 2007 and the company is organised in the following areas of function: site service operation, decommissioning planning, new business and BO replacement. The Organisation at BKAB has gone down from 450 during operation of Barsebaeck 1 and 2 to 50 employees (2009-01-01) involved in Service operation of both units. But still there are in total 250 persons placed at Barsebaeck NPP with different kinds of job assignments. A lot of activities have been carried out since 2000 and up to now for example: - All nuclear fuel has been transported away to interim storage at CLAB in Oskarshamn. - BKAB have built up contact nets and competence by taking part in different kinds of national and international organisations (SKB, IAEA, OECD/NEA TAG, WNA, ENISS, WANO, EPRI etc) commissions. - The Electrical and operational systems have been rebuilt for the actual demands and requirements for the Service operation. - The central control room is unattended since 17 December 2007 and the supervision of the Service operation is handled by a system of VDI (duty engineers) and LOP (alarm operators). - Full system decontamination on unit 1 and 2. Barsebaeck's approach today and for the future dismantling are: - Safer; - Faster; - Cost effective. BKAB

  19. Nuclear Oversight Function at Krsko NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bozin, B.; Kavsek, D.

    2010-01-01

    The nuclear oversight function is used at the Krsko NPP constructively to strengthen safety and improve performance. Nuclear safety is kept under constant examination through a variety of monitoring techniques and activities, some of which provide an independent review. The nuclear oversight function at the Krsko NPP is accomplished by Quality and Nuclear Oversight Division (SKV). SKV has completed its mission through a combination of compliance, performance and effectiveness-based assessments. The performance-based assessment is an assessment using various techniques (observations, interviews, walk-downs, document reviews) to assure compliance with standards and regulations, obtain insight into performance, performance trends and also to identify opportunities to improve effectiveness of implementation. Generally, the performance-based approach to oversight function is based on some essential elements. The most important one which is developed and implemented is an oversight program (procedure). The program focuses on techniques, activities and objectives commensurate with their significance to plant operational safety. These techniques and activities are: self-assessments, assessments, audits, performance indicators, monitoring of corrective action program (CAP), industry independent reviews (such as IAEA's OSART and WANO Peer Review), industry benchmarking etc. Graded approach is an inherent product of a performance based program and ranking process. It is important not only to focus on the highest ranked performance based attributes but to lead to effective utilization of an oversight program. The attributes selected for oversight need to be based on plant specific experience, current industry operating experience, supplier's performance and quality issues. Collaboration within the industry and effective utility oversight of processes and design activities are essential for achieving good plant performance. So the oversight program must integrate relevant

  20. Daya Bay Nuclear Power Station operation and management indicators system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang Chunfa

    2000-01-01

    Ever since the commercial operation of Daya Bay Nuclear Power Station (GNPS), dynamic objective management concept that features modern enterprises has been adopted by the station to manage all operational activities with the guidance of business plan. And some quantitative indicators have been employed in order to measure effectively the progress status of these operational activities. After several years' evolvement, a hierarchical and standard performance indicators system has been developed and is playing an active part in the plant's efforts towards top quartile of world nuclear power industry. Structured hierarchically with higher levels resolving into lower levels and lower levels committing to higher levels, the indicator system represents the corporate vision, WANO (World Association of Nuclear Operators) performance indicators, plant integrated indicators and departmental key indicators, covering such areas as safety, production, environment, human resource and cost control. The indicator system not only reflects performance-centered management concept, but also shows the controllability of the whole operational process of the station. Indicators of a certain level serve as both early warnings to superior indicators (lagging indicators in this case) and effects to inferior indicators (leading indicators in this case). The dynamic status of these indicators, numbered more than 230, will eventually be fed back to the business plan and realized through daily work of every branch, and even every member of the workforce. With the indicator system as a quantitative management tool, and an effective tracking system, GNPS has achieved great success in self-assessment, objective definition, improvement follow up, resource re-allocation, and management-staff communication. Periodic plant performance assessment is performed through spider chart and other pictorial diagrams. Indicators are displayed at the plant entrance, offices, Main Control Room and SIS network

  1. Protecting nuclear material and facilities: Is a new approach needed?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinhausler, F.; Bunn, G.

    2002-01-01

    acquisition' of nuclear, radiological and other materials relating to weapons of mass destruction. The third principle of the partnership is to 'develop and maintain effective physical protection measures' and to 'provide assistance to states lacking sufficient resources to protect their facilities'. Other principles relate to illicit trafficking, export and border controls and disposition of stocks no longer required for defense purposes. The initial G-8 focus will be on projects in Russia, but its principles are to be applied globally. We propose a Global Physical Protection Initiative consisting of six elements in addition to what the IAEA is now doing to improve PP practices around the world: Establish a Global List of Physical Protection Priorities beyond those already agreed. The IAEA International Physical Protection Assistance Programme (IPPAS) has collected information from many countries on needs for better protection and it could prepare an initial list of priorities in cooperation with IAEA safeguards inspectors, with the World Association of Nuclear Operators (WANO) and the Institute of Nuclear Plant Operators (INPO); Create a Multilateral Security Cooperation System calling for bilateral and multilateral cooperation among those responsible for implementing PP standards. This could start with a more detailed survey of national regulatory standards and practices than those issued by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency, and with meetings of regulators from various countries to share experiences; Create an International Nuclear Threat Protection Task Force that would focus on improving cooperation between PP regulators and the police and intelligence agents expected to respond to alarms relating to sabotage or theft of nuclear and radiological materials. This collaboration could range from sharing intelligence on illicit trafficking to identifying links between organized crime and nuclear terrorism; Establish an International Radioactive Material Tracking Centre that

  2. Developing and Strengthening of Safety Culture at Ukrainian NPPs: Experience of NNEGC “Energoatom”

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheyko, Y.; Kotin, P.

    2016-01-01

    , including: • Self evaluation of safety culture; • Questioning the staff; • Independent audits of safety culture. NAEC “Energoatom” seeks to take into account international experience, and to participate in conferences (such as this one), seminars and workshops held under the auspices of the IAEA, as well as to follow the guidelines and standards of the IAEA in the organization of activities to improve the safety culture. Other sources of international experience in this field are the EU-funded projects of “soft” assistance and guidance of other authorised international nuclear industry organizations such as WANO. In this regard, it should be mentioned WANO guidance document GL 2002-02 “Principles of effective personnel organization” that identifies five fundamental principles relating to human factors, and important for the development of a sustainable safety culture in the organization: • Even the best experts make mistakes; • A situation fraught with errors is predictable, manageable and preventable; • Human behavior is determined by organizational processes and values; • Highest efficiency operation is achieved through the promotion and support; • Violations can be avoided by understanding the causes of errors and implementing lessons learned. Within the framework of the international programs of EC “soft” aid in recent years, the projects that contribute to the development of a safety culture in the NAEC “Energoatom” have been either carried out or are ongoing. These projects include the solution of certain problems (for example, in the area of human factor—the task of “no punishment for error” approach establishment), as well as more common tasks of improving overall safety culture, such as: • Implementation of programs to inform senior staff and management, including the essential features needed to create a strong culture of safety; creating conditions for the improvement of the organizational and managerial impact on the

  3. Implementing and measuring safety goals and safety culture. 2. Extensive Efforts to Learn Lessons from Overseas Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maki, Nobuo

    2001-01-01

    The transfer of nuclear power plant (NPP) operating experiences is one of the important measures for the safe operation of NPPs. The Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO),World Association of Nuclear Operators (WANO), and Nuclear Information Center of Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry are the organizations providing Japanese utilities with useful information on incidents and accidents that have occurred at foreign NPPs. The Kansai Electric Power Company (KEPCO) has established two organizations to make extensive efforts to learn lessons from overseas NPPs: One is the Nuclear Power Plant Maintenance Training Center (MTC), and the other is the Institute of Nuclear Safety System (INSS). This paper describes the function of these organizations in transferring knowledge and expertise to ensure the safe operation of Japanese NPPs as well as recent outcomes. MTC was set up in October 1983. Before its establishment, expertise on NPP maintenance was mainly transferred on an on-the-job basis through daily maintenance work. However, after various NPP incidents and accidents, the importance of off-site training for maintenance personnel was emphasized. MTC possesses full-sized or nearly full sized mockups of Mihama NPP Unit 3 and Takahama NPP Unit 3. Furthermore, many kinds of mechanical, electrical, and instrumental equipment are furnished for training. In 1999, more than 2400 (man/day) maintenance personnel in total had training at MTC. In the tube rupture accident of a steam generator of KEPCO's Mihama Unit 2 on February 9, 1991, the emergency core cooling system actuated for the first time in the history of NPP operation in Japan. The cause of the accident was a fault in the manufacturing process of the steam generator, which was not detected until the accident. After an in-depth evaluation of the accident, many corrective actions were taken to prevent the recurrence of a similar accident. As a part of the actions, KEPCO established INSS in March

  4. Implementing and measuring safety goals and safety culture. 4. Utility's Activities for Better Safety Culture After the JCO Accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omoto, Akira

    2001-01-01

    The criticality accident at the JCO plant prompted the Government to enact a law for nuclear emergency preparedness. The nuclear industry established NSnet to facilitate opportunities for peer review among its members. This paper describes the activities by NSnet and TEPCO's Kashiwazaki-Kariwa nuclear power station (NPS) for a better safety culture. Created as a voluntary organization by the nuclear industry in 1999, NSnet has 35 members and is assisted by CRIEPI and NUPEC for its activities relevant to human factors. Given the fact that nuclear facility operators not belonging to WANO had no institutional system available for exchange of experiences and good practices for better safety among themselves, NSnet's activities focus on peer review by member organizations and onsite seminars. Starting April 2000 with visits to three fuel fabricators, NSnet intends to have 23 peer-review visits in 2 yr (Ref. 1). The six-member review team stays on-site for 4 days, during which time they review-using guidelines available from WANO and IAEA-OSART-six areas: organization/management, emergency preparedness, education/training, operation/ maintenance, protection against occupational radiation exposure, and prevention of accidents. A series of on-site seminars is held at members' nuclear facilities, to which NSnet dispatches experts for lectures. NSnet plans to hold such seminars twice per month. Other activities include information-sharing through a newsletter, a Web site (www. nsnet.gr.jp), and others. Although considerable differences exist in the design and the practices in operation/maintenance between power reactors and JCO, utilities can extract lessons from the accident that will be worth consideration for their own facilities in the areas of safety culture, education and training, and interface between design and operation. This thinking prompted the Nuclear Safety Promotion Center at Kashiwazaki-Kariwa NPS, to which the author belonged at that time, to launch the

  5. Technologies for improving current and future light water reactor operation and maintenance: Development on the basis of experience. Proceedings of a technical committee meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-09-01

    experienced in nuclear power plant operation and maintenance. Worldwide, the average energy availability factor has increased from approximately 70 percent in 1989 to 79 percent' in 1998, with some utilities achieving significantly higher values. This is being achieved through integrated programmes, including personnel training and quality assurance, from improvements implemented in plant systems and components, and from improvements in outage duration for maintenance, refuelling, and other scheduled shutdowns, as well as forced outages. International co-operation is a key role in this success. The various programmes of the World Association of Nuclear Operators (WANO) to exchange information and encourage communication of experience, and the activities of the IAEA including projects in nuclear power plant performance assessment and feedback, effective quality management, and information exchange meetings on technology advances, are important examples of international co-operation to improve the performance of nuclear power plants. This IAEA Technical Committee meeting (TCM) was convened to provide a forum for information exchange on technologies for improving plant operation and maintenance which can contribute to enhanced economic competitiveness of LWRs, and on on-going or planned technology development expected to achieve further improvements. Information exchange of recent positive experience on development and/or implementation of technologies that have resulted in reduced operation and maintenance costs of LWRs, and information on on-going or planned activities, was strongly encouraged

  6. EDF - The Inspector General's report on Nuclear Safety and Radiation Protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tandonnet, Jean

    2012-01-01

    This report is destined for the President of EDF with the purpose of informing him of the judgement the Inspector General has about the nuclear safety and radiation protection within the EDF Group. It is also intended for all who, in any way, play a role at EDF in improving nuclear safety. It may also prove useful to those outside the company who work in the nuclear field or indeed any branch of industry where there are risks to be managed and who wish to participate in the debate. It also contributes to the pool of information shared with the other nuclear operators under the auspices of WANO. The continuous improvement of nuclear safety results is a fundamental commitment of the EDF Group. This is notably reflected in a policy of transparency, whether in France, Britain, America or China. This document constitutes an example of this, offering an independent view of the operational situation. It is based on facts and findings derived in EDF's contacts with field staff and meetings with the decision makers, managers, medical personnel and players on both sides of this industry as well as outside stakeholders, especially contractor companies. The resulting snapshot of the situation in the field is particularly instructive. This report therefore concentrates more on problems and weaknesses rather than strengths and progress, except as concerns happenings outside France, where the focus is more on good practices than difficulties. Contents: 1 - The view from the Inspector General of EDF about the nuclear safety in the EDF group; 2 - A panorama of 2011: The management, The state of the installations, Maintenance of the French nuclear power plants, Relations with the French nuclear safety authority (ASN), The EPR projects, The players in the fields of health and safety, Radiation protection, Fire prevention and fire fighting, Increasing nuclear power plant security, Decommissioning; 3 - Nuclear safety management; 4 - The Fukushima Daiichi accident; 5 - Training to

  7. Industry Operating Experience Process at Krsko NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bach, B.; Bozin, B.; Cizmek, R.

    2012-01-01

    Experience has shown that number of minor events and near misses, usually without immediate or significant impact to plant safety and reliability, are precursors of significant or severe events due to the same or similar root or apparent cause(s). It is therefore desirable to identify and analyze weaknesses of the precursor problems (events) in order to prevent occurrence of significant events. Theoretically, significant events could be prevented from occurring if the root cause(s) of these precursor problems could be identified and eliminated. The Operating Experience Program identifies such event precursors and by reporting them to the industry, plant specific corrective actions can be taken to prevent events at other operational plants. The intent of the Operating Experience Program is therefore to improve nuclear power plant safety and reliability of the operating nuclear power plants. Each plant develops its own Operating Experience Program in order to learn from the in-house operating experience as well as from the world community of nuclear plants. The effective use of operating experience includes analyzing both plant and industry events in order to identify fundamental weaknesses and then determining appropriate plant-specific actions that will minimize the likelihood of similar events. Learning and applying the lessons from operating experience is an integral part of station safety culture and is encouraged by managers throughout the top plant administrative programs and procedures. Krsko NPP is developed it own Operating Experience Program by using the most relevant INPO/WANO/IAEA guidelines as well as its own knowledge, skills an operating practice. The Operating Experience Program is a part of the Corrective Action Program, which is among top management programs, thus program is strongly encouraged by top management. The purpose of Operating Experience Program is to provide guidance for using, sharing, and evaluating operating experience information

  8. Technologies for improving current and future light water reactor operation and maintenance: Development on the basis of experience. Proceedings of a technical committee meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-09-01

    experienced in nuclear power plant operation and maintenance. Worldwide, the average energy availability factor has increased from approximately 70 percent in 1989 to 79 percent' in 1998, with some utilities achieving significantly higher values. This is being achieved through integrated programmes, including personnel training and quality assurance, from improvements implemented in plant systems and components, and from improvements in outage duration for maintenance, refuelling, and other scheduled shutdowns, as well as forced outages. International co-operation is a key role in this success. The various programmes of the World Association of Nuclear Operators (WANO) to exchange information and encourage communication of experience, and the activities of the IAEA including projects in nuclear power plant performance assessment and feedback, effective quality management, and information exchange meetings on technology advances, are important examples of international co-operation to improve the performance of nuclear power plants. This IAEA Technical Committee meeting (TCM) was convened to provide a forum for information exchange on technologies for improving plant operation and maintenance which can contribute to enhanced economic competitiveness of LWRs, and on on-going or planned technology development expected to achieve further improvements. Information exchange of recent positive experience on development and/or implementation of technologies that have resulted in reduced operation and maintenance costs of LWRs, and information on on-going or planned activities, was strongly encouraged.

  9. Ocena poziomu lęku i depresji u rodziców dzieci z zespołem nerczycowym – sposoby radzenia sobie z nimi i metody wsparcia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Pawlak-Bratkowska

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Wstęp i cele pracy: Idiopatyczny zespół nerczycowy w wieku rozwojowym przebiega nawrotowo i trwale zmie‑ nia życie dzieci oraz ich rodziców. Celem badania była ocena poziomu lęku i depresji u rodziców dzieci z zespo‑ łem nerczycowym. Materiał i metodyka: Badanie zaplanowano jako przekrojową próbę kliniczną wśród rodzi‑ ców dzieci chorujących na zespół nerczycowy w odniesieniu do rodziców dzieci zdrowych. Wszyscy badani (46 rodziców wypełniali: ankietę dotyczącą przebiegu choroby u dziecka, kwestionariusz STAI (Inwentarz stanu i cechy lęku, kwestionariusz Skali depresji Becka, kwestionariusz Skali kontroli emocji (CECS. Grupę kontrolną stanowiło 20 rodziców dzieci zdrowych. Wyniki: Rodzice dzieci z zespołem nerczycowym charakteryzowali się istotnie wyższym poziomem depresji (Skala depresji Becka 8,7 vs 4,9, t = 2,18, p < 0,05. U ojców zaobserwo‑ wano wyższe subiektywne uczucie kontrolowania własnych reakcji w porównaniu z matkami – wyższy wynik CECS, suma u ojców (55,1 vs 47,2, t = 2,53, p < 0,05. U matek odnotowano wyższe wskaźniki zarówno w ska‑ lach mierzących poziom lęku jako cechy (STAI – cecha 45,7 vs 36,1, t = 3,19, p < 0,05 i stanu (STAI – stan 42,8 vs 33,4, t = 2,8, p < 0,05, jak i w kwestionariuszu badającym poziom depresji (10,62 vs 4,86, t = 2,66, p < 0,05. Rodzice, którzy wykazywali tendencję do obwiniania się o chorobę dziecka, podczas jej pierwszego epizodu uzyskali statystycznie istotny wyższy wynik w testach badających poziom depresji. Wnioski: Rodzice dzieci cierpiących na zespół nerczycowy charakteryzowali się istotnie wyższym poziomem depresji niż rodzice dzieci zdrowych. Ważne wydaje się objęcie szczególną opieką matek, mającą na celu obniżenie poziomu lęku i objawów depresji, oraz ojców skłonnych do tłumienia przeżywanych emocji.

  10. Kozloduy nuclear power plant. Units 1-4. Status of safety assessment activities. Rev. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents the results of the status of safety assessment activities carried out by the Kozloduy Nuclear Power Plant (KNPP) in order to evaluate the current status of the safety of its reactor units 1-4. The steam supply system of this units is based of the reactor WWER-440/ B-230, which is a PWR of Russian design developed according to the safety standards in force in USSR in late 60-s. Now a days 10 reactor units of this type are in operation in four NPPs. Despite of efforts of the different plants to implement safety improvements measures during first 10-15 years of operation of this type of reactor its major safety problems were not eliminated and were a subject of international concern. The systematic evaluation of the deficiencies of the original design of this type of reactors have been initiated by IAEA in the beginning of 1990 and brought to developing a comprehensive list of safety problems which required urgent implementation of safety measures in all plants. To solve this problems in 1991 KNPP initiated implementation of so called 'short term' safety improvement program, developed with the help of WANO under agreement with Bulgarian Nuclear Safety Authority (BNSA) and consortium RISKAUDIT. The program was based on a stage approach and was foreseen to be implemented by tree stages in very tight time schedule in order to achieve significant and rapid improvements of the level of safety in operation of the units. The Short Tenn Program was implemented between the years 1991 and 1997 thanks of the strong safety commitment of NEK and KNPP staff and the broad international cooperation and financial support. Important part of resources were supplied under PHARE program of CEC, EBRD grant agreement and EDF support. The plant current safety level analysis has been performed using IAEA analytical methodology according to 50-SG-O12 standard 'Periodic safety review of operational nuclear power plants'. The approach and criteria for acceptable safety level

  11. Kozloduy nuclear power plant. Units 1-4. Status of safety improvements. Rev. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents the results of the safety improvements activities carried out by the Kozloduy Nuclear Power Plant (KNPP) within the period 1990-1998. The steam supply system of this units is based of the reactor WWER-440/ B-230, which is a PWR of russian design developed according to the safety standards in force in USSR in late sixties. Up to now 10 reactor units of this type are in operation in four NPPs. Despite of efforts of the different plants to implement safety improvements measures during first 10-15 years of operation of this type of reactor its major safety problems were not eliminated and were a subject of international concern. The systematic evaluation of the deficiencies of the original design of this type of reactors have been initiated by IAEA in the beginning of 1990 and brought to developing a comprehensive list of safety problems which required urgent implementation of safety measures in all plants. To solve this problems in 1991 KNPP initiated implementation of so called 'short term' safety improvement program, developed with the help of WANO under agreement with Bulgarian Nuclear Safety Authority (BNSA) and consortium RISKAUDIT. The program was based on a stage approach and was foreseen to be implemented by tree stages in very tight time schedule in order to achieve significant and rapid improvements of the level of safety in operation of the units. The Short term program was implemented between from 1991 to 1997 owing to strong safety commitment of NEC and KNPP staff as well as broad international cooperation and financial support. Important part of resources were supplied under PHARE program of CEC, EBRD grant agreement and EDF support. In parallel a special assessment process started in 1995 in order to evaluate the level of safety, achieved by Short Term Program, according to current safety standards and to define the measures, which should be implemented by the Utility to complete the process of improving the safety in future

  12. Chemistry evaluation in French EDF Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacquier, Hervé

    2014-01-01

    The Nuclear Production Division of EDF is comprised of 19 power stations (58 PWR reactors) and 2 national engineering organisations. Nuclear Inspection (IN) is an internal assessment unit of the EDF Nuclear Production Directorate. At the request of the Directorate, it carries out periodic evaluations of all the units of the division. The evaluation of the nuclear sites (EGE: Overall Excellence Assessment) is carried out every 4 years, an intermediate evaluation is also carried out between each EGE. These evaluations are independent of the WANO and IAEA evaluations. Exchanges are carried out between Nuclear Inspection and the other international operators (for example, USA (INPO), England, China...) to share site evaluation methods. These evaluations are carried out by a team of 30 inspectors, reinforced during each evaluation by 10 peers who come from the various French nuclear sites. Nuclear Inspection produces a performance standards document for each FUNCTIONAL AREA, which is based on the requirements of the company. On the whole, 13 areas are evaluated during each inspection, in particular: Management, Operations, Maintenance, Engineering and Chemistry. The area of reactor plant chemistry has been evaluated since 2009. The Chemistry performance standards document is written from the EDF internal requirements and international references. During site evaluations, all the performance standards are assessed for compliance. The Chemistry performance standards document is comprised of 3 topics: Management of plant chemistry, The respect of the chemical and radiochemical specifications, The condition of the laboratories and the sampling lines, measuring equipment, and chemical products. The evaluations carried out make it possible to define strengths and weaknesses which the sites must address. After each evaluation, the assessment is presented to the site management and to the director of EDF Nuclear Production. For 4 years these evaluations have allowed progress to

  13. NPP containment pre-stress loss - summary statement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    Principal Working Group 3 of the CSNI deals with the integrity of structures and components, and has three sub-groups, dealing with the integrity of metal structures and components, ageing of concrete structures, and the seismic behaviour of structures. A status report on the ageing of concrete structures was prepared during 1995 by a task group to initiate activities in this field under PWG3. Tendon prestress loss was the first topic addressed by the group, with a workshop organised jointly by IPSN and EDF, and sponsored jointly by WANO and OECD-NEA. RILEM, FIB and IASMiRT also co-sponsored the workshop. Present experience suggests that the current methods for the prediction of the loss of tendon prestress are generally satisfactory. The nuclear industry has adopted regulatory and codified methods for predicting the loss of prestress in nuclear power plant (NPP) prestressed concrete containments from international and national standards that are not necessarily specific to nuclear design. The application of the different methods to a specific case is likely to lead to significant differences in the predicted losses. Theoretical and experimental research have established the importance of understanding how chemical, hygro, mechanical and thermal factors influence the short term and long term behaviour of prestressed concrete. Improved and simplified simulations of creep and shrinkage phenomena that can account for the environment and loading history of prestressed concrete containments and pressure vessels will assist: the development of design regulations/standards; the choice of concrete mix; the development of relevant monitoring programmes, and ageing management including plant life extension. Prestressed concrete containments and pressure vessels use both grouted (bonded) tendons and un-grouted (un-bonded) tendons. The workshop considered the relative merits of both systems. Experience presented at the workshop indicates that comprehensive and regular

  14. Welcoming remark - International Conference on Nuclear Knowledge Management, 7-10 September 2004, Saclay, France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nigon, J.-L.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Ladies and Gentlemen, on behalf of the World Nuclear University, I am pleased to welcome you to this important IAEA Conference on Knowledge Management. What is the WNU? The World Nuclear University was inaugurated one year ago in London as a partnership of the world's leading institutions of nuclear learning. This partnership, spanning some 30 countries, has four 'Founding Supporters'. Two of the WNU's Founding Supporters are inter-governmental organisations: the IAEA and the NEA. Two are global associations of the industry: WANO and the World Nuclear Association. Underpinning the WNU partnership will be financial support from the industry's most forward-looking companies and, where appropriate, from the technical assistance programme of the IAEA. The WNU's essential aim is to foster inter-institutional cooperation to enhance nuclear coursework worldwide and to establish widely accepted global standards in academic and professional qualification. Our goal is nothing less than to help prepare the nuclear profession for an age of globalisation in which nuclear energy must play a central role if our world is to reconcile economic development with environmental preservation. A major activity of the WNU partnership will be the conduct of an annual WNU Summer Institute, which will comprise 6 weeks of intense training to develop and inspire future world leaders in nuclear technology. The first WNU Summer Institute will be held in July and August of 2005 at the Idaho Nuclear Laboratory, the designated headquarters of the American nuclear renaissance. We anticipate working with the IAEA to generate an attendance of some 60 talented students and young professionals from as many as 30 countries. For some people, the WNU idea has been difficult to grasp, and not surprisingly because it is unfamiliar. When we think of a university, we tend to envisage a campus with an institutional identity and a large enrolment of students pursuing degrees from that institution. The

  15. Proceedings of the workshop on how to prevent recurring events more effectively

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    papers were presented at the workshop in the presence of 38 participants. These papers discussed recent current events, processes and systems used to identify and investigate recurring events, and actions being taken or planned to reduce the likelihood for recurrence of events. The workshop also included two breakout sessions. This was to allow working groups to explore causes for recurring events and to discuss possible actions that can be taken by NPP, regulatory, and research staff to better identify and respond in a focused manner when an event with actual or potential safety significance recurs. Summaries from each breakout session along with breakout session facilitators guides are included below. Important points identified by the workshop participants concerning recurring events include the following: - Specific definition of 'what is a recurring event' is an important foundation needed for responding to recurring events. Definition of the term is necessary to be able to identify when a recurring event occurs. Additionally, a widely accepted definition across all NPPs and regulatory bodies is desirable such that consistent identification of recurring events are made from country to country. It was generally agreed that a widely accepted definition of a recurring event could then be further revised at a local NPP or regulatory body level to more restrictive criteria to meet local requirements. - NPPs should be expected to review events from other NPPs, both domestically and internationally, to identify and implement lessons learned from others. The definition of a recurring event at any one NPP should encompass domestic or international events at other NPPs. Here, one has to take into account if it is reasonable to expect that the NPP was aware of the event at another installation that is the event was shared via IRS or WANO event reporting systems. - Normal event investigation procedures and processes currently used by some NPPs and regulatory bodies may not

  16. Challenges and Enhancements to Defence-in-Depth (DiD) in Light of the Fukushima Daiichi NPP Accident. Proceedings of a Joint CNRA/CSNI Workshop, Paris, France, 5 June 2013

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niel, Jean-Christophe; Autorite de surete nucleaire - ASN; ); Echavarri, Luis; ); Schneider, Thierry; ); Borchardt, Bill; Wanner, Hans; Park, Youn Won; Glenn, Tracy; Regaldo, Jacques; Fuketa, Toyoshi; Repussard, Jacques; Bolshov, Leonid; Chevet, Pierre Frank

    2014-01-01

    An international Workshop on Challenges and Enhancements to Defence in Depth (DiD) in Light of the Fukushima Daiichi Accident was jointly organised by the NEA Committee on Nuclear Regulatory Activities (CNRA) and the NEA Committee on the Safety on Nuclear Installations (CSNI), with input from the NEA Committee on Radiation Protection and Public Health (CRPPH), on 5 June 2013 in Paris. About 100 participants from NEA member countries, India, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), the World Association of Nuclear Operators (WANO) and Eurelectric held in-depth discussions on the defence-in-depth concept and its implementation in the post-Fukushima context. They also considered additional steps to be taken at the national and international levels to address the challenges identified and to make further enhancements to nuclear safety, along with future NEA activities in support of these processes. The concept of DiD - of multiple levels of protection - has been developed and refined by the nuclear safety community over many years. The concept is based on the experience and practice of high hazard industry in general as well as developments within the nuclear industry. The accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station in Japan on the 11 March 2011 demonstrated the importance of the concept of DiD, how these multiple levels of protection can operate and how some can be challenged. Just as with the nuclear accidents at Three Mile Island and Chernobyl and accidents from other industries (e.g. chemical, aerospace, oil and gas), the NEA felt it important that lessons learned are used to further develop the concept and implementation of Defence-in-Depth to help ensure and enhance the safe operation of nuclear power plants around the world. The NEA has therefore looked at the concept and implementation of Defence-in-Depth and possible challenges and enhancements. It was noted that a great deal of interest has been shown in this area, particularly in the

  17. Proceedings of the international workshop on building the new HRA: errors of commission - from research to application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    confusion matrix approach to identifying errors of commission resulting from inaccurate plant instrumentation and, subsequently, operator entry into incorrect procedures. Harold Blackman of INEEL/USA provided an update to the SPAR HRA screening method under development at the US NRC. David Gertman, INEEL/USA, discussed the role of latent maintenance errors in plant events. J. W. Kim of KAERI/Korea showed the development of a new human error analysis procedure for emergency tasks. Leopold Antolin, WANO Paris Centre, provided analysis of the effects of the fidelity of the training simulator on HRA. John Forester, Sandia National Laboratory/USA, reviewed HRA for fire assessments and highlighted needed improvements in HRA quantification of errors of commission. Bruce Hallbert, INEEL/USA, presented profiles of human performance identified through the analysis of operating events. David Gertman, INEEL/USA, provided technical basis and considerations for considering management and organisation factors in PSA. Ali Mosleh, University of Maryland/USA, discussed the topics of model-informed data collection and commission errors in the telephone industry. John Wreathall, John Wreathall and Co./USA, presented a timely overview of the issues involved in selecting a satisfactory HRA method. Gareth Parry, US NRC, discussed needed developments in HRA from a regulatory perspective. Erik Hollnagel, University of Linkoping/Sweden, discussed errors, error mechanisms, and the relationship to systemic performance. US industry and regulatory research plans were discussed as well. George Loignon from the V.C. Summer Power Station discussed the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) program for the HRA/PRA Tools Users Group, and Nathan Siu, US NRC, reviewed the NRC Program in Human Reliability Analysis

  18. From Corpus to Dictionary: A Hybrid Prescriptive, Descriptive and Proscriptive Undertaking Okulondoola engeli Eitu ly'Olusoga bwe Linaatuusibwa mu Iwanika: Omutindo ogulaga Olulimi bwe luli, bwe luteekwa okuba oba bwe lube lutwalibwe.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minah Nabirye

    2012-01-01

    obundi bwetaagamu okwegendeleza nga wano mubaamu enkola y'okulaga nga olulimi bwe luli. Ate bwo obuzibu obundi bwandyetaagisa abawandiisi b'amawanika okuwaayo obudhulizi obusinziilwaku endowooza dhaibwe edhitagobelela mitendela giliwo nga balaga olulimi bwe lube lutwalibwe waile nga kino kyandiba nga kikontana n'amateeka g'olulimi agaliwo.

    LUSOGA KEYWORDS:

    Ebigambo ebikulu: olusoga; uganda; walifu; empandiika; eitu ly'olusoga; endhogela; okuwanula olusoga; ebigambo ebilamba; ebigambo ebigaitilile; ennamula ku bigambo ebyawukana; ebigambo ebyeyazike; emitendela gy'obutongole; ennhunga ya naliina; olulimi bwe luteekwa okuba; olulimi bwe luli; olulimi bwe lube lutwalibwe

  19. The World Nuclear University - A pillar of the nuclear renaissance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nigon, Jean-Louis [World Nuclear University Working Groups, Carlton House, 22a St. James' s Square, London SW1Y 4JH (United Kingdom)

    2006-07-01

    The World Nuclear University was founded with the support of four leading international nuclear institutions - two of them inter-governmental organisations (IAEA and OECD/NEA), the other two bodies serving the industry and its operators (WNA and WANO). Inaugurated in September 2003 on the 50. anniversary of President Eisenhower's Atoms for Peace speech, the WNU started working a year later upon the arrival of the first staff members. Today there is a tremendous disparity in the nuclear industry between the pace of the unfolding nuclear renaissance, which is gathering momentum by the day, and the slower pace at which we are educating a new generation of nuclear scientists and engineers. The WNU aims to be instrumental in creating a network of leading institutions of nuclear learning in order to help fill this gap. The emerging worldwide partnership aims to: - Enhance nuclear education amongst its members, - Establish globally accepted standards in academic and professional qualification, and - Elevate the prestige of the nuclear profession. Prior to the establishment of WNU, many leading educational institutions of nuclear learning had already launched cooperation on a regional basis, as follows (country or region/network): United States/NEDHO (Nuclear Engineering Department Head Organization); Canada/UNENE (University Network of Excellence in Nuclear Engineering in Canada); Asia/ANENT (Asian Network for Education in Nuclear Technology); Europe/ENEN (European Nuclear Education Network); Russia/WNU Russian Branch. Thus the WNU can be seen to a certain extent as a 'network of networks', although it should be stressed that many of the current WNU members did not belong to already existing networks. By creating a global network, the WNU avoids the duplication of efforts and limits the total number of staff required. The WNU does not lose sight of the fact, however, that local problems should be solved locally. Ten Working Groups share between them the

  20. Chapter No.11. Public information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    by presentations of UJD leaders on TV and radio. UJD leaders came up 4 times to TV with their contributions and gave the Slovak Radio 4 interviews and journals and daily newspapers 5 important interviews. Last year, UJD Information Centre was providing the thematic documents and consulting activities and securing the everyday exchange of information, fax, e-mail communication and documents between Bratislava and Trnava. Up-to-date information from STORIN Agency and NucNet and WANO were processed daily via PC network and forwarded to UJD leaders. Three UJD Bulletins on domestic and foreign UJD activities were elaborated and issued. Press was monitored daily and the information presented on boards in Trnava and Bratislava were also updated daily. Four photographic files (boards and albums) from the important UJD events and important domestic and foreign visits of UJD were prepared and presented in 2001. Two meetings of UJD employees were organised over the year. The participants were informed on the fulfilment of tasks concerning the respective workstations over the forgone period and on the amendments to legislation, changes of safety at work, amendments to Civil Code etc

  1. Балканските војни и проекциите за Македонија (македонски поглед

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Билјана [Biljana] Ристовска-Јосифовска [Ristovska-Josifovska

    2015-08-01

    ądów politycznych, opinii i interpretacji wydarzeń politycznych, jak również reakcji na decyzje wielkich mocarstw – podjęto zagadnienia związane z okresem wojen bał­kańskich 1912–1913 i ukazano macedońską perspektywę kwestii macedońskiej. Zaprezento­wano też ważne problemy odnoszące się do sposobu traktowania spraw narodowych i sposobu artykułowania stanowisk wobec następstw tych wojen. Uwaga Macedończyków, nawet po wybuchu I wojny światowej, kierowała się niemal wyłącznie na kwestie narodowe i wojny bałkańskie. Ich zaangażowanie sprowadzało się do poszukiwania rozwiązań spraw narodu macedońskiego i prób urzeczywistnienia idei wła­snego państwa. Środowiska emigrantów prezentowały przed rosyjską opinią publiczną swoje rozumienie zachodzących wydarzeń politycznych, by zapobiec podziałowi terytorium, a jed­nocześnie poszukiwać wsparcia dla koncepcji utworzenia państwa macedońskiego. Macedońska kwestia narodowa, podejmowana przez pozostającą na emigracji inteligencję macedońską, pozostawała na marginesie zainteresowań wielkich mocarstw europejskich lub była wykorzystywana instrumentalnie do rozwiązywania innych problemów politycznych. Apele intelektualistów macedońskich nie wywarły wpływu na sytuację międzynarodową. Macedończycy przystąpili do I wojny światowej z wszystkimi tego konsekwencjami – za­twierdzonymi granicami podzielonego terytorium. Ten trudny i skomplikowany okres trwał aż do utworzenia państwa narodowego w czasie II wojny światowej na obszarze obecnej Re­publiki Macedonii.

  2. Recurring events - Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-04-01

    The feedback of operating experience from nuclear power plants (NPP) is intended to help avoid occurrence or recurrence of safety significant events. Regulatory bodies, and utilities operating nuclear power plants, have established operating experience feedback systems since the beginning of commercial nuclear power production. Well-established operating experience feedback systems exist on national and international level. An example of an international system is the Incident Reporting System (IRS) jointly operated by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA). There also are systems maintained by the operating organizations, including the World Association of Nuclear Operators (WANO), and owner groups of different NPP vendors. Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations (CSNI) Working Group on Operating Experience (WGOE; formerly Principal Working Group No. 1, PWG1) carried out a study on recurring events some years ago. This report, published in 1999, highlighted some areas of safety significance involving recurrent events in different NPPs around the world. Based on the important findings of this report, CSNI requested two additional studies: 1. first an international workshop should be organized and second, 2. a task group should be established to develop a second report on the topic and to evaluate the findings of the workshop. The workshop, hosted by the Swiss Regulatory Authority, HSK, was held in Switzerland in March 2002. It was attended by 32 experts representing the regulatory, nuclear power plant, vendor, and international agency communities. Several insights and recommendations were presented and are integrated in this report with respect to causes of recurring events: - Operating experience feedback processes had not always been effective, that is, the existing operating experiences had not been effectively applied, - Actions to be taken were not implemented in a timely manner, - The root cause was not

  3. The World Nuclear University - A pillar of the nuclear renaissance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nigon, Jean-Louis

    2006-01-01

    The World Nuclear University was founded with the support of four leading international nuclear institutions - two of them inter-governmental organisations (IAEA and OECD/NEA), the other two bodies serving the industry and its operators (WNA and WANO). Inaugurated in September 2003 on the 50. anniversary of President Eisenhower's Atoms for Peace speech, the WNU started working a year later upon the arrival of the first staff members. Today there is a tremendous disparity in the nuclear industry between the pace of the unfolding nuclear renaissance, which is gathering momentum by the day, and the slower pace at which we are educating a new generation of nuclear scientists and engineers. The WNU aims to be instrumental in creating a network of leading institutions of nuclear learning in order to help fill this gap. The emerging worldwide partnership aims to: - Enhance nuclear education amongst its members, - Establish globally accepted standards in academic and professional qualification, and - Elevate the prestige of the nuclear profession. Prior to the establishment of WNU, many leading educational institutions of nuclear learning had already launched cooperation on a regional basis, as follows (country or region/network): United States/NEDHO (Nuclear Engineering Department Head Organization); Canada/UNENE (University Network of Excellence in Nuclear Engineering in Canada); Asia/ANENT (Asian Network for Education in Nuclear Technology); Europe/ENEN (European Nuclear Education Network); Russia/WNU Russian Branch. Thus the WNU can be seen to a certain extent as a 'network of networks', although it should be stressed that many of the current WNU members did not belong to already existing networks. By creating a global network, the WNU avoids the duplication of efforts and limits the total number of staff required. The WNU does not lose sight of the fact, however, that local problems should be solved locally. Ten Working Groups share between them the activities of the