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Sample records for wall vessel bioreactor

  1. Bioreactor rotating wall vessel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    The NASA Bioreactor provides a low turbulence culture environment which promotes the formation of large, three-dimensional cell clusters. Due to their high level of cellular organization and specialization, samples constructed in the bioreactor more closely resemble the original tumor or tissue found in the body. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators. Cell constructs grown in a rotating bioreactor on Earth (left) eventually become too large to stay suspended in the nutrient media. In the microgravity of orbit, the cells stay suspended. Rotation then is needed for gentle stirring to replenish the media around the cells.

  2. Bioreactor rotating wall vessel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    The NASA Bioreactor provides a low turbulence culture environment which promotes the formation of large, three-dimensional cell clusters. Due to their high level of cellular organization and specialization, samples constructed in the bioreactor more closely resemble the original tumor or tissue found in the body. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators. Cell constructs grown in a rotating bioreactor on Earth (left) eventually become too large to stay suspended in the nutrient media. In the microgravity of orbit, the cells stay suspended. Rotation then is needed for gentle stirring to replenish the media around the cells.

  3. Numerical Simulation of Microcarrier Motion in a Rotating Wall Vessel Bioreactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHI-HAO JU; TIAN-QING LIU; XUE-HU MA; ZHAN-FENG CUI

    2006-01-01

    Objective To analyze the forces of rotational wall vessel (RWV) bioreactor on small tissue pieces or microcarrier particles and to determine the tracks of microcarrier particles in RWV bioreactor. Methods The motion of the microcarrier in the rotating wall vessel (RWV) bioreactor with both the inner and outer cylinders rotating was modeled by numerical simulation. Results The continuous trajectory of microcarrier particles, including the possible collision with the wall was obtained. An expression between the minimum rotational speed difference of the inner and outer cylinders and the microcarrier particle or aggregate radius could avoid collisions with either wall. The range of microcarrier radius or tissue size, which could be safely cultured in the RWV bioreactor, in terms of shear stress level, was determined. Conclusion The model works well in describing the trajectory of a heavier microcarrier particle in rotating wall vessel.

  4. Culturing and applications of rotating wall vessel bioreactor derived 3D epithelial cell models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radtke, Andrea L; Herbst-Kralovetz, Melissa M

    2012-04-03

    Cells and tissues in the body experience environmental conditions that influence their architecture, intercellular communications, and overall functions. For in vitro cell culture models to accurately mimic the tissue of interest, the growth environment of the culture is a critical aspect to consider. Commonly used conventional cell culture systems propagate epithelial cells on flat two-dimensional (2-D) impermeable surfaces. Although much has been learned from conventional cell culture systems, many findings are not reproducible in human clinical trials or tissue explants, potentially as a result of the lack of a physiologically relevant microenvironment. Here, we describe a culture system that overcomes many of the culture condition boundaries of 2-D cell cultures, by using the innovative rotating wall vessel (RWV) bioreactor technology. We and others have shown that organotypic RWV-derived models can recapitulate structure, function, and authentic human responses to external stimuli similarly to human explant tissues (1-6). The RWV bioreactor is a suspension culture system that allows for the growth of epithelial cells under low physiological fluid shear conditions. The bioreactors come in two different formats, a high-aspect rotating vessel (HARV) or a slow-turning lateral vessel (STLV), in which they differ by their aeration source. Epithelial cells are added to the bioreactor of choice in combination with porous, collagen-coated microcarrier beads (Figure 1A). The cells utilize the beads as a growth scaffold during the constant free fall in the bioreactor (Figure 1B). The microenvironment provided by the bioreactor allows the cells to form three-dimensional (3-D) aggregates displaying in vivo-like characteristics often not observed under standard 2-D culture conditions (Figure 1D). These characteristics include tight junctions, mucus production, apical/basal orientation, in vivo protein localization, and additional epithelial cell-type specific properties

  5. Erythroid cell growth and differentiation in vitro in the simulated microgravity environment of the NASA rotating wall vessel bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sytkowski, A. J.; Davis, K. L.

    2001-01-01

    Prolonged exposure of humans and experimental animals to the altered gravitational conditions of space flight has adverse effects on the lymphoid and erythroid hematopoietic systems. Although some information is available regarding the cellular and molecular changes in lymphocytes exposed to microgravity, little is known about the erythroid cellular changes that may underlie the reduction in erythropoiesis and resultant anemia. We now report a reduction in erythroid growth and a profound inhibition of erythropoietin (Epo)-induced differentiation in a ground-based simulated microgravity model system. Rauscher murine erythroleukemia cells were grown either in tissue culture vessels at 1 x g or in the simulated microgravity environment of the NASA-designed rotating wall vessel (RWV) bioreactor. Logarithmic growth was observed under both conditions; however, the doubling time in simulated microgravity was only one-half of that seen at 1 x g. No difference in apoptosis was detected. Induction with Epo at the initiation of the culture resulted in differentiation of approximately 25% of the cells at 1 x g, consistent with our previous observations. In contrast, induction with Epo at the initiation of simulated microgravity resulted in only one-half of this degree of differentiation. Significantly, the growth of cells in simulated microgravity for 24 h prior to Epo induction inhibited the differentiation almost completely. The results suggest that the NASA RWV bioreactor may serve as a suitable ground-based microgravity simulator to model the cellular and molecular changes in erythroid cells observed in true microgravity.

  6. Three-dimensional Expansion: In Suspension Culture of SD Rat's Osteoblasts in a Rotating Wall Vessel Bioreactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KE-DONG SONG; TIAN-QING LIU; XIANG-QIN LI; ZHAN-FENG CUI; XIANG-YU SUN; XUE-HU MA

    2007-01-01

    Objective To study large-scale expansion of SD (Sprague-Dawley) rat's osteoblasts in suspension culture in a rotating wall vessel bioreactor (RWVB). Methods The bioreactor rotation speeds were adjusted in the range of 0 to 20 rpm,which could provide low shear on the microcarriers around 1 dyn/cm2. The cells were isolated via sequential digestions of neonatal (less than 3 days old) SD rat calvaria. After the primary culture and several passages, the cells were seeded onto the microcarriers and cultivated in T-flask, spinner flask and RWVB respectively. During the culture period, the cells were counted and observed under the inverted microscope for morphology every 12 h. After 7 days, the cells were evaluated with scanning electron microscope (SEM) for histological examination of the aggregates. Also, the hematoxylin-eosin (HE) staining and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) staining were performed. Moreover, von-Kossa staining and Alizarin Red S staining were carried out for mineralized nodule formation. Results The results showed that in RWVB, the cells could be expanded by more than ten times and they presented better morphology and vitality and stronger ability to form bones. Conclusions The developed RWVB can provide the culture environment with a relatively low shear force and necessary three-dimensional (3D)interactions among cells and is suitable for osteopath expansion in vitro.

  7. Lymphocyte trafficking and HIV infection of human lymphoid tissue in a rotating wall vessel bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolis, L. B.; Fitzgerald, W.; Glushakova, S.; Hatfill, S.; Amichay, N.; Baibakov, B.; Zimmerberg, J.

    1997-01-01

    The pathogenesis of HIV infection involves a complex interplay between both the infected and noninfected cells of human lymphoid tissue, the release of free viral particles, the de novo infection of cells, and the recirculatory trafficking of peripheral blood lymphocytes. To develop an in vitro model for studying these various aspects of HIV pathogenesis we have utilized blocks of surgically excised human tonsils and a rotating wall vessel (RWV) cell culture system. Here we show that (1) fragments of the surgically excised human lymphoid tissue remain viable and retain their gross cytoarchitecture for at least 3 weeks when cultured in the RWV system; (2) such lymphoid tissue gradually shows a loss of both T and B cells to the surrounding growth medium; however, this cellular migration is reversible as demonstrated by repopulation of the tissue by labeled cells from the growth medium; (3) this cellular migration may be partially or completely inhibited by embedding the blocks of lymphoid tissue in either a collagen or agarose gel matrix; these embedded tissue blocks retain most of the basic elements of a normal lymphoid cytoarchitecture; and (4) both embedded and nonembedded RWV-cultured blocks of human lymphoid tissue are capable of productive infection by HIV-1 of at least three various strains of different tropism and phenotype, as shown by an increase in both p24 antigen levels and free virus in the culture medium, and by the demonstration of HIV-1 RNA-positive cells inside the tissue identified by in situ hybridization. It is therefore reasonable to suggest that gel-embedded and nonembedded blocks of human lymphoid tissue, cocultured with a suspension of tonsillar lymphocytes in an RWV culture system, constitute a useful model for simulating normal lymphocyte recirculatory traffic and provide a new tool for testing the various aspects of HIV pathogenesis.

  8. The fluid dynamic and shear environment in the NASA/JSC rotating-wall perfused-vessel bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begley, C. M.; Kleis, S. J.

    2000-01-01

    The rotating-wall perfused-vessel (RWPV) bioreactor, used for both microgravity and Earth-based cell science experiments, is characterized in terms of the fluid dynamic and fluid shear stress environment. A numerical model of the flow field is developed and verified with laser Doppler velocimeter measurements. The effects of changes in operating conditions, including rotation rates and fluid perfusion rates, are investigated with the numerical model. The operating conditions typically used for ground-based experiments (equal rotation of the inner and outer cylinders) leads to flow patterns with relatively poor mass distribution characteristics. Approximately 50% of the inlet-perfused fluid bypasses the bulk of the fluid volume and flows to the perfusion exit. For operating conditions typical in microgravity, small differential rotation rates between the inner and outer cylinders lead to greatly improved flow distribution patterns and very low fluid shear stress levels over a large percentage of the fluid volume. Differences in flow patterns for the different operating conditions are explored. Large differences in the hydrodynamic environments for operating conditions typical of true microgravity and ground-based "microgravity simulations" are demonstrated.

  9. Impact of scaffold micro and macro architecture on Schwann cell proliferation under dynamic conditions in a rotating wall vessel bioreactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valmikinathan, Chandra M.; Hoffman, John [Department of Chemistry, Chemical Biology and Biomedical Engineering, Stevens Institute of Technology, Hoboken, NJ, 07030 (United States); Yu, Xiaojun, E-mail: xyu@stevens.edu [Department of Chemistry, Chemical Biology and Biomedical Engineering, Stevens Institute of Technology, Hoboken, NJ, 07030 (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Over the last decade tissue engineering has emerged as a powerful alternative to regenerate lost tissues owing to trauma or tumor. Evidence shows that Schwann cell containing scaffolds have improved performance in vivo as compared to scaffolds that depend on cellularization post implantation. However, owing to limited supply of cells from the patients themselves, several approaches have been taken to enhance cell proliferation rates to produce complete and uniform cellularization of scaffolds. The most common approach is the application of a bioreactor to enhance cell proliferation rate and therefore reduce the time needed to obtain sufficiently significant number of glial cells, prior to implantation. In this study, we show the application of a rotating wall bioreactor system for studying Schwann cell proliferation on nanofibrous spiral shaped scaffolds, prepared by solvent casting and salt leaching techniques. The scaffolds were fabricated from polycaprolactone (PCL), which has ideal mechanical properties and upon degradation does not produce acidic byproducts. The spiral scaffolds were coated with aligned or random nanofibers, produced by electrospinning, to provide a substrate that mimics the native extracellular matrix and the essential contact guidance cues. At the 4 day time point, an enhanced rate of cell proliferation was observed on the open structured nanofibrous spiral scaffolds in a rotating wall bioreactor, as compared to static culture conditions. However, the cell proliferation rate on the other contemporary scaffolds architectures such as the tubular and cylindrical scaffolds show reduced cell proliferation in the bioreactor as compared to static conditions, at the same time point. Moreover, the rotating wall bioreactor does not alter the orientation or the phenotype of the Schwann cells on the aligned nanofiber containing scaffolds, wherein, the cells remain aligned along the length of the scaffolds. Therefore, these open structured spiral

  10. Formation of three-dimensional cell/polymer constructs for bone tissue engineering in a spinner flask and a rotating wall vessel bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikavitsas, Vassilios I.; Bancroft, Gregory N.; Mikos, Antonios G.; McIntire, L. V. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of the cell culture conditions of three-dimensional polymer scaffolds seeded with rat marrow stromal cells (MSCs) cultured in different bioreactors concerning the ability of these cells to proliferate, differentiate towards the osteoblastic lineage, and generate mineralized extracellular matrix. MSCs harvested from male Sprague-Dawley rats were culture expanded, seeded on three-dimensional porous 75:25 poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) biodegradable scaffolds, and cultured for 21 days under static conditions or in two model bioreactors (a spinner flask and a rotating wall vessel) that enhance mixing of the media and provide better nutrient transport to the seeded cells. The spinner flask culture demonstrated a 60% enhanced proliferation at the end of the first week when compared to static culture. On day 14, all cell/polymer constructs exhibited their maximum alkaline phosphatase activity (AP). Cell/polymer constructs cultured in the spinner flask had 2.4 times higher AP activity than constructs cultured under static conditions on day 14. The total osteocalcin (OC) secretion in the spinner flask culture was 3.5 times higher than the static culture, with a peak OC secretion occurring on day 18. No considerable AP activity and OC secretion were detected in the rotating wall vessel culture throughout the 21-day culture period. The spinner flask culture had the highest calcium content at day 14. On day 21, the calcium deposition in the spinner flask culture was 6.6 times higher than the static cultured constructs and over 30 times higher than the rotating wall vessel culture. Histological sections showed concentration of cells and mineralization at the exterior of the foams at day 21. This phenomenon may arise from the potential existence of nutrient concentration gradients at the interior of the scaffolds. The better mixing provided in the spinner flask, external to the outer surface of the scaffolds, may explain the

  11. Formation of three-dimensional cell/polymer constructs for bone tissue engineering in a spinner flask and a rotating wall vessel bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikavitsas, Vassilios I.; Bancroft, Gregory N.; Mikos, Antonios G.; McIntire, L. V. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of the cell culture conditions of three-dimensional polymer scaffolds seeded with rat marrow stromal cells (MSCs) cultured in different bioreactors concerning the ability of these cells to proliferate, differentiate towards the osteoblastic lineage, and generate mineralized extracellular matrix. MSCs harvested from male Sprague-Dawley rats were culture expanded, seeded on three-dimensional porous 75:25 poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) biodegradable scaffolds, and cultured for 21 days under static conditions or in two model bioreactors (a spinner flask and a rotating wall vessel) that enhance mixing of the media and provide better nutrient transport to the seeded cells. The spinner flask culture demonstrated a 60% enhanced proliferation at the end of the first week when compared to static culture. On day 14, all cell/polymer constructs exhibited their maximum alkaline phosphatase activity (AP). Cell/polymer constructs cultured in the spinner flask had 2.4 times higher AP activity than constructs cultured under static conditions on day 14. The total osteocalcin (OC) secretion in the spinner flask culture was 3.5 times higher than the static culture, with a peak OC secretion occurring on day 18. No considerable AP activity and OC secretion were detected in the rotating wall vessel culture throughout the 21-day culture period. The spinner flask culture had the highest calcium content at day 14. On day 21, the calcium deposition in the spinner flask culture was 6.6 times higher than the static cultured constructs and over 30 times higher than the rotating wall vessel culture. Histological sections showed concentration of cells and mineralization at the exterior of the foams at day 21. This phenomenon may arise from the potential existence of nutrient concentration gradients at the interior of the scaffolds. The better mixing provided in the spinner flask, external to the outer surface of the scaffolds, may explain the

  12. Osteocytes Mechanosensing in NASA Rotating Wall Bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spatz, Jordan; Sibonga, Jean; Wu, Honglu; Barry, Kevin; Bouxsein, Mary; Pajevic, Paola Divieti

    2010-01-01

    Osteocyte cells are the most abundant (90%) yet least understood bone cell type in the human body. Osteocytes are theorized to be the mechanosensors and transducers of mechanical load for bones, yet the biological mechanism of this action remains elusive. However, recent discoveries in osteocyte cell biology have shed light on their importance as key mechanosensing cells regulating bone remodeling and phosphate homeostasis. The aim of this project was to characterize gene expression patterns and protein levels following exposure of MLO-Y4, a very well characterized murine osteocyte-like cell line, to simulated microgravity using the NASA Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV) Bioreactor. To determine mechanistic pathways of the osteocyte's gravity sensing ability, we evaluated in vitro gene and protein expression of osteocytes exposed to simulated microgravity. Improved understanding of the fundamental mechanisms of mechano transduction at the osteocyte cellular level may lead to revolutionary treatment otions to mitigate the effects of bone loss encountered by astronauts on long duration space missions and provide tailored treatment options for maintaining bone strength of immobilized/partially paralyzed patients here on Earth.

  13. Simulated Microgravity Regulates Gene Transcript Profiles of 2T3 Preosteoblasts: Comparison of the Random Positioning Machine and the Rotating Wall Vessel Bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Mamta J.; Liu, Wenbin; Sykes, Michelle C.; Ward, Nancy E.; Risin, Semyon A.; Risin, Diana; Hanjoong, Jo

    2007-01-01

    Microgravity of spaceflight induces bone loss due in part to decreased bone formation by osteoblasts. We have previously examined the microgravity-induced changes in gene expression profiles in 2T3 preosteoblasts using the Random Positioning Machine (RPM) to simulate microgravity conditions. Here, we hypothesized that exposure of preosteoblasts to an independent microgravity simulator, the Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV), induces similar changes in differentiation and gene transcript profiles, resulting in a more confined list of gravi-sensitive genes that may play a role in bone formation. In comparison to static 1g controls, exposure of 2T3 cells to RWV for 3 days inhibited alkaline phosphatase activity, a marker of differentiation, and downregulated 61 genes and upregulated 45 genes by more than two-fold as shown by microarray analysis. The microarray results were confirmed with real time PCR for downregulated genes osteomodulin, bone morphogenic protein 4 (BMP4), runx2, and parathyroid hormone receptor 1. Western blot analysis validated the expression of three downregulated genes, BMP4, peroxiredoxin IV, and osteoglycin, and one upregulated gene peroxiredoxin I. Comparison of the microarrays from the RPM and the RWV studies identified 14 gravi-sensitive genes that changed in the same direction in both systems. Further comparison of our results to a published database showing gene transcript profiles of mechanically loaded mouse tibiae revealed 16 genes upregulated by the loading that were shown to be downregulated by RWV and RPM. These mechanosensitive genes identified by the comparative studies may provide novel insights into understanding the mechanisms regulating bone formation and potential targets of countermeasure against decreased bone formation both in astronauts and in general patients with musculoskeletal disorders.

  14. Design and Use of a Novel Bioreactor for Regeneration of Biaxially Stretched Tissue-Engineered Vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Angela Hai; Lee, Yong-Ung; Calle, Elizabeth A; Boyle, Michael; Starcher, Barry C; Humphrey, Jay D; Niklason, Laura E

    2015-08-01

    Conventional bioreactors are used to enhance extracellular matrix (ECM) production and mechanical strength of tissue-engineered vessels (TEVs) by applying circumferential strain, which is uniaxial stretching. However, the resulting TEVs still suffer from inadequate mechanical properties, where rupture strengths and compliance values are still very different from native arteries. The biomechanical milieu of native arteries consists of both circumferential and axial loading. Therefore, to better simulate the physiological stresses acting on native arteries, we built a novel bioreactor system to enable biaxial stretching of engineered arteries during culture. This new bioreactor system allows for independent control of circumferential and axial stretching parameters, such as displacement and beat rate. The assembly and setup processes for this biaxial bioreactor system are reliable with a success rate greater than 75% for completion of long-term sterile culture. This bioreactor also supports side-by-side assessments of TEVs that are cultured under three types of mechanical conditions (static, uniaxial, and biaxial), all within the same biochemical environment. Using this bioreactor, we examined the impact of biaxial stretching on arterial wall remodeling of TEVs. Biaxial TEVs developed the greatest wall thickness compared with static and uniaxial TEVs. Unlike uniaxial loading, biaxial loading led to undulated collagen fibers that are commonly found in native arteries. More importantly, the biaxial TEVs developed the most mature elastin in the ECM, both qualitatively and quantitatively. The presence of mature extracellular elastin along with the undulated collagen fibers may contribute to the observed vascular compliance in the biaxial TEVs. The current work shows that biaxial stretching is a novel and promising means to improve TEV generation. Furthermore, this novel system allows us to optimize biomechanical conditioning by unraveling the interrelationships among the

  15. The Fluid Mechanics of a Wavy-Wall Bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sucosky, Philippe; Bilgen, Bahar; Aleem, Alexander; Neitzel, Paul; Barabino, Gilda

    2004-11-01

    Bioreactors are devices used for the production of mammalian tissue in vitro. Although mixing has been shown to stimulate the growth of cartilage constructs, high shear-stress levels can damage the cells. In order to enhance mixing while minimizing shear, a wavy-wall bioreactor (WWB) featuring a sinusoidal internal profile has been designed. The turbulent hydrodynamic environment produced in this device is investigated experimentally using particle-image velocimetry. A model bioreactor made of acrylic and filled with an index-matching solution of zinc iodide is used to compensate for the refraction of light at the walls. The flow observed in different planes is shown to be periodic, spatially dependent, and dominated by mean-shear rather than Reynolds stresses in the vicinity of constructs. Finally, a comparison between the mean-shear stresses obtained in the WWB and in a standard spinner flask reveals similar stress levels near the construct walls.

  16. Long term organ culture of human prostate tissue in a NASA-designed rotating wall bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolis, L.; Hatfill, S.; Chuaqui, R.; Vocke, C.; Emmert-Buck, M.; Linehan, W. M.; Duray, P. H.

    1999-01-01

    PURPOSE: To maintain ex vivo integral prostatic tissue including intact stromal and ductal elements using the NASA-designed Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV) which maintains colocalized cells in an environment that promotes both three-dimensional cellular interactions together with the uniform mass transfer of nutrients and metabolic wastes. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Samples of normal prostate were obtained as a byproduct of transurethral prostatectomy or needle biopsy. Prostatic tissue dissected into small 1 x 1 mm. blocks was cultured in the Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV) Bioreactor for various time periods and analyzed using histological, immunochemical, and total cell RNA assays. RESULTS: We report the long term maintenance of benign explanted human prostate tissue grown in simple culture medium, under the simulated microgravity conditions afforded by the RWV bioreactor. Mesenchymal stromal elements including blood vessels and architecturally preserved tubuloglandular acini were maintained for a minimum of 28 days. Cytokeratins, vimentin and TGF-beta2 receptor and ligand were preserved through the entire culture period as revealed by immunocytochemistry. Prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) was continuously expressed during the culture period, although somewhat decreased. Prostatic specific antigen (PSA) and its transcript were down regulated over time of culture. Prostatic carcinoma cells from the TSU cell line were able to invade RWV-cultured benign prostate tissue explants. CONCLUSIONS: The RWV bioreactor represents an additional new technology for culturing prostate tissue for further investigations concerning the basic physiology and pathobiology of this clinically important tissue.

  17. Hematopoietic Stem Cells Expansion in Rotating Wall Vessel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang LIU; Tian-Qing LIU; Xiu-Bo FAN; Dan GE; Zhan-Feng CUI; Xue-Hu MA

    2005-01-01

    @@ 1 Introduction Clinical trials have demonstrated that ex vivo expanded hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and progenitors offer great promise in reconstituting in vivo hematopoiesis in patients who have undergone intensive chemotherapy.It is therefore necessary to develop a clinical-scale culture system to provide the expanded HSCs and progenitors.Static culture systems such as T-flasks and gas-permeable blood bags are the most widely used culture devices for expanding hematopoietic cells. But they reveal several inherent limitations: ineffective mixing, lack of control options for dissolved oxygen and pH and difficulty in continuous feeding, which restricts the usefulness of static systems. Several advanced bioreactors have been used in the field of HSCs expansion. But hematopoietic cells are extremely sensitive to shear, so cells in bioreactors such as stirred and perfusion culture systems may suffer physical damage. This problem will be improved by applying the rotating wall vessel (RWV) bioreactor in clinic because of its low shear and unique structure. In this research, cord blood (CB) HSCs were expanded by means of a cell-dilution feeding protocol in RWV.

  18. Mass transport in a microchannel bioreactor with a porous wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiao Bing; Sui, Yi; Lee, Heow Pueh; Bai, Hui Xing; Yu, Peng; Winoto, S H; Low, Hong Tong

    2010-06-01

    A two-dimensional flow model has been developed to simulate mass transport in a microchannel bioreactor with a porous wall. A two-domain approach, based on the finite volume method, was implemented. For the fluid part, the governing equation used was the Navier-Stokes equation; for the porous medium region, the generalized Darcy-Brinkman-Forchheimer extended model was used. For the porous-fluid interface, a stress jump condition was enforced with a continuity of normal stress, and the mass interfacial conditions were continuities of mass and mass flux. Two parameters were defined to characterize the mass transports in the fluid and porous regions. The porous Damkohler number is the ratio of consumption to diffusion of the substrates in the porous medium. The fluid Damkohler number is the ratio of the substrate consumption in the porous medium to the substrate convection in the fluid region. The concentration results were found to be well correlated by the use of a reaction-convection distance parameter, which incorporated the effects of axial distance, substrate consumption, and convection. The reactor efficiency reduced with reaction-convection distance parameter because of reduced reaction (or flux), and smaller local effectiveness factor due to the lower concentration in Michaelis-Menten type reactions. The reactor was more effective, and hence, more efficient with the smaller porous Damkohler number. The generalized results could find applications for the design of bioreactors with a porous wall.

  19. Role of arginase in vessel wall remodeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William eDurante

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Arginase metabolizes the semi-essential amino acid L-arginine to L-ornithine and urea. There are two distinct isoforms of arginase, arginase I and II, which are encoded by separate genes and display differences in tissue distribution, subcellular localization, and molecular regulation. Blood vessels express both arginase I and II but their distribution appears to be cell-, vessel-, and species-specific. Both isoforms of arginase are induced by numerous pathologic stimuli and contribute to vascular cell dysfunction and vessel wall remodeling in several diseases. Clinical and experimental studies have documented increases in the expression and/or activity of arginase I or II in blood vessels following arterial injury and in pulmonary and arterial hypertension, aging, and atherosclerosis. Significantly, pharmacological inhibition or genetic ablation of arginase in animals ameliorates abnormalities in vascular cells and normalizes blood vessel architecture and function in all of these pathological states. The detrimental effect of arginase in vascular remodeling is attributable to its ability to stimulate vascular smooth muscle cell and endothelial cell proliferation, and collagen deposition by promoting the synthesis of polyamines and L-proline, respectively. In addition, arginase adversely impacts arterial remodeling by directing macrophages towards an inflammatory phenotype. Moreover, the proliferative, fibrotic, and inflammatory actions of arginase in the vasculature are further amplified by its capacity to inhibit nitric oxide synthesis by competing with nitric oxide synthase for substrate, L-arginine. Pharmacologic or molecular approaches targeting specific isoforms of arginase represent a promising strategy in treating obstructive fibroproliferative vascular disease.

  20. 2D Fast Vessel Visualization Using a Vessel Wall Mask Guiding Fine Vessel Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sotirios Raptis

    2010-01-01

    and then try to approach the ridges and branches of the vasculature's using fine detection. Fine vessel screening looks into local structural inconsistencies in vessels properties, into noise, or into not expected intensity variations observed inside pre-known vessel-body areas. The vessels are first modelled sufficiently but not precisely by their walls with a tubular model-structure that is the result of an initial segmentation. This provides a chart of likely Vessel Wall Pixels (VWPs yielding a form of a likelihood vessel map mainly based on gradient filter's intensity and spatial arrangement parameters (e.g., linear consistency. Specific vessel parameters (centerline, width, location, fall-away rate, main orientation are post-computed by convolving the image with a set of pre-tuned spatial filters called Matched Filters (MFs. These are easily computed as Gaussian-like 2D forms that use a limited range sub-optimal parameters adjusted to the dominant vessel characteristics obtained by Spatial Grey Level Difference statistics limiting the range of search into vessel widths of 16, 32, and 64 pixels. Sparse pixels are effectively eliminated by applying a limited range Hough Transform (HT or region growing. Major benefits are limiting the range of parameters, reducing the search-space for post-convolution to only masked regions, representing almost 2% of the 2D volume, good speed versus accuracy/time trade-off. Results show the potentials of our approach in terms of time for detection ROC analysis and accuracy of vessel pixel (VP detection.

  1. Intracranial vessel wall imaging at 7.0 tesla MRI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Kolk, A.G.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/341732958

    2014-01-01

    Intracranial atherosclerosis is one of the main causes of ischemic stroke. Current conventional imaging techniques assessing intracranial arterial disease in vivo only visualize the vessel wall lumen instead of the pathological vessel wall itself. Therefore, not much is known about the imaging

  2. Intracranial vessel wall imaging at 7.0 tesla MRI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Kolk, A.G.

    2014-01-01

    Intracranial atherosclerosis is one of the main causes of ischemic stroke. Current conventional imaging techniques assessing intracranial arterial disease in vivo only visualize the vessel wall lumen instead of the pathological vessel wall itself. Therefore, not much is known about the imaging chara

  3. Design of ITER vacuum vessel in-wall shielding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, X., E-mail: xiaoyu.wang@iter.org [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Ioki, K. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Morimoto, M. [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, 1-1, Wadasaki-cho 1-chome, Hyogo-ku, Kobe (Japan); Choi, C.H.; Utin, Y.; Sborchia, C. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); TaiLhardat, O. [Assystem EOS, ZAC SAINT MARTIN, 23 rue Benjamin Franklin, 84120 Pertuis (France); Mille, B.; Terasawa, A.; Gribov, Y.; Barabash, V.; Polunovskiy, E.; Dani, S. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Pathak, H.; Raval, J. [ITER-India, Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar 382025 (India); Liu, S.; Lu, M.; Du, S. [Institute of Plasma Physics, China Academy of Sciences, Shushanhu Road 350, Hefei (China)

    2014-10-15

    The ITER vacuum vessel is a torus-shaped, double wall structure. The space between the double walls of the VV is filled with in-wall shielding (IWS) and cooling water. The main purpose of the in-wall shielding is to provide neutron shielding together with the blanket and VV shells and water during ITER plasma operation and to reduce the ripple of the Toroidal magnetic field. Based on ITER vacuum vessel structure and related requirements, in-wall shielding are designed as about 8900 individual blocks with different sizes and several different materials distributed over nine vessel sectors and nine field joints of vessel sectors. This paper presents the design of the IWS, considering loads, structural stresses and assembly method, and also shows neutron shielding effect and TF ripple reduced by the IWS.

  4. Redistribution of metals on the JET vessel wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehrenberg, J.; Behrisch, R.; Martinelli, A.P.; Coad, J.P.; De Kock, L.; Goodall, D.H.J.; McCracken, G.M.

    1987-02-01

    Wall long term samples (LTS) which were exposed during the 1984 and 1985 operational periods of JET have been investigated by means of surface analysis techniques. The results indicate that deposition of wall material (Fe, Cr, Ni) and its distribution on the vessel wall were strongly affected by wall erosion on bellows protection plates during unstable discharge phases. Erosion sources and deposition sinks are spatially correlated indicating that most of the eroded material is deposited close to its source.

  5. Growth of Steptomyces hygroscopicus in rotating-wall bioreactor under simulated microgravity inhibits rapamycin production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, A.; Pierson, D. L.; Mishra, S. K.; Demain, A. L.

    2000-01-01

    Growth of Streptomyces hygroscopicus under conditions of simulated microgravity in a rotating-wall bioreactor resulted in a pellet form of growth, lowered dry cell weight, and inhibition of rapamycin production. With the addition of Teflon beads to the bioreactor, growth became much less pelleted, dry cell weight increased but rapamycin production was still markedly inhibited. Growth under simulated microgravity favored extracellular production of rapamycin, in contrast to a greater percentage of cell-bound rapamycin observed under normal gravity conditions.

  6. Growth of Streptomyces Hygroscopicus in Rotating-Wall Bioreactor Under Simulated Microgravity Inhibits Rapamycin Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, A.; Pierson, D. L.; Mishra, S. K.; Demain, A. L.

    2000-01-01

    Growth of Streptomyces hygroscopicus under conditions of simulated microgravity in a rotating-wall bioreactor resulted in a pellet form of growth, lowered dry cell weight, and inhibition of rapamycin production. With the addition of Teflon beads to the bioreactor, growth became much less pelleted, dry cell weight increased but rapamycin production was still markedly inhibited. Growth under simulated microgravity favored extracellular production of rapamycin in contrast to a greater percentage of cell-bound rapamycin observed under normal gravity conditions.

  7. Bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    The NASA Bioreactor provides a low turbulence culture environment which promotes the formation of large, three-dimensional cell clusters. Due to their high level of cellular organization and specialization, samples constructed in the bioreactor more closely resemble the original tumor or tissue found in the body. NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues currently being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators

  8. NASA Bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    Bioreactor Demonstration System (BDS) comprises an electronics module, a gas supply module, and the incubator module housing the rotating wall vessel and its support systems. Nutrient media are pumped through an oxygenator and the culture vessel. The shell rotates at 0.5 rpm while the irner filter typically rotates at 11.5 rpm to produce a gentle flow that ensures removal of waste products as fresh media are infused. Periodically, some spent media are pumped into a waste bag and replaced by fresh media. When the waste bag is filled, an astronaut drains the waste bag and refills the supply bag through ports on the face of the incubator. Pinch valves and a perfusion pump ensure that no media are exposed to moving parts. An Experiment Control Computer controls the Bioreactor, records conditions, and alerts the crew when problems occur. The crew operates the system through a laptop computer displaying graphics designed for easy crew training and operation. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators. See No. 0101825 for a version with major elements labeled, and No. 0103180 for an operational schematic. 0101816

  9. NASA Bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    Bioreactor Demonstration System (BDS) comprises an electronics module, a gas supply module, and the incubator module housing the rotating wall vessel and its support systems. Nutrient media are pumped through an oxygenator and the culture vessel. The shell rotates at 0.5 rpm while the irner filter typically rotates at 11.5 rpm to produce a gentle flow that ensures removal of waste products as fresh media are infused. Periodically, some spent media are pumped into a waste bag and replaced by fresh media. When the waste bag is filled, an astronaut drains the waste bag and refills the supply bag through ports on the face of the incubator. Pinch valves and a perfusion pump ensure that no media are exposed to moving parts. An Experiment Control Computer controls the Bioreactor, records conditions, and alerts the crew when problems occur. The crew operates the system through a laptop computer displaying graphics designed for easy crew training and operation. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators. See No. 0101825 for a version with major elements labeled, and No. 0103180 for an operational schematic. 0101816

  10. Cavitation distribution within large phantom vessel and mechanical damage formed on surrounding vessel wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Yangzi; Yin, Hui; Li, Zhaopeng; Wan, Mingxi

    2013-11-01

    Blood vessel is one of the most important targets encountered during focused ultrasound (FU) therapy. The lasting high temperature caused by continuous FU can result in structural modification of small vessel. For the vessel with a diameter larger than 2mm, convective cooling can significantly weaken the thermal effect of FU. Meanwhile, the continued presence of ultrasound will cause repetitive cavitation and acoustic microstreaming, making comprehension of continuous wave induced cavitation effect in large vessels necessary. The Sonoluminescence (SL) method, mechanical damage observation and high-speed camera were used in this study to investigate the combination effect of ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) and continuous FU in large phantom vessels with a diameter of 10mm without consideration of thermal effect. When the focus was positioned at the proximal wall, cylindrical hole along the acoustic axis opposite the ultrasound wave propagation direction was observed at the input power equal to or greater than 50 W. When the focus was located at the distal wall, only small tunnels can be found. The place where the cylindrical hole formed was corresponding to where bubbles gathered and emitted brilliant light near the wall. Without UCAs neither such bright SL nor cylindrical hole can be found. However, the UCAs concentration had little influence on the SL distribution and the length of cylindrical hole. The SL intensity near the proximal vessel wall and the length of the cylindrical hole both increased with the input power. It is suggested that these findings need to be considered in the large vessel therapy and UCAs usage.

  11. Molecular magnetic resonance imaging of atherosclerotic vessel wall disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noerenberg, Dominik [Charite - University Medicine Berlin, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); University of Munich - Grosshadern, Department of Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany); Ebersberger, Hans U. [Heart Center Munich-Bogenhausen, Department of Cardiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Munich (Germany); Diederichs, Gerd; Hamm, Bernd [Charite - University Medicine Berlin, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); Botnar, Rene M. [King' s College London, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, London (United Kingdom); Makowski, Marcus R. [Charite - University Medicine Berlin, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); King' s College London, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, London (United Kingdom)

    2016-03-15

    Molecular imaging aims to improve the identification and characterization of pathological processes in vivo by visualizing the underlying biological mechanisms. Molecular imaging techniques are increasingly used to assess vascular inflammation, remodeling, cell migration, angioneogenesis and apoptosis. In cardiovascular diseases, molecular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers new insights into the in vivo biology of pathological vessel wall processes of the coronary and carotid arteries and the aorta. This includes detection of early vascular changes preceding plaque development, visualization of unstable plaques and assessment of response to therapy. The current review focuses on recent developments in the field of molecular MRI to characterise different stages of atherosclerotic vessel wall disease. A variety of molecular MR-probes have been developed to improve the non-invasive detection and characterization of atherosclerotic plaques. Specifically targeted molecular probes allow for the visualization of key biological steps in the cascade leading to the development of arterial vessel wall lesions. Early detection of processes which lead to the development of atherosclerosis and the identification of vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques may enable the early assessment of response to therapy, improve therapy planning, foster the prevention of cardiovascular events and may open the door for the development of patient-specific treatment strategies. (orig.)

  12. Relief from glucose interference in microcin B17 biosynthesis by growth in a rotating-wall bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, A; Pierson, D L; Mishra, S K; Demain, A L

    2000-07-01

    Glucose interference in production of microcin B17 by Escherichia coli ZK650 was decreased sevenfold by growth in a ground-based rotating-wall bioreactor operated in the simulated microgravity mode as compared with growth in flasks. When cells were grown in the bioreactor in the normal gravity mode, relief from glucose interference was even more dramatic, amounting to a decrease in glucose interference of over 100-fold.

  13. Three-Dimensional Rotating Wall Vessel-Derived Cell Culture Models for Studying Virus-Host Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jameson K. Gardner

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The key to better understanding complex virus-host interactions is the utilization of robust three-dimensional (3D human cell cultures that effectively recapitulate native tissue architecture and model the microenvironment. A lack of physiologically-relevant animal models for many viruses has limited the elucidation of factors that influence viral pathogenesis and of complex host immune mechanisms. Conventional monolayer cell cultures may support viral infection, but are unable to form the tissue structures and complex microenvironments that mimic host physiology and, therefore, limiting their translational utility. The rotating wall vessel (RWV bioreactor was designed by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA to model microgravity and was later found to more accurately reproduce features of human tissue in vivo. Cells grown in RWV bioreactors develop in a low fluid-shear environment, which enables cells to form complex 3D tissue-like aggregates. A wide variety of human tissues (from neuronal to vaginal tissue have been grown in RWV bioreactors and have been shown to support productive viral infection and physiological meaningful host responses. The in vivo-like characteristics and cellular features of the human 3D RWV-derived aggregates make them ideal model systems to effectively recapitulate pathophysiology and host responses necessary to conduct rigorous basic science, preclinical and translational studies.

  14. Subclavian vein aneurysm secondary to a benign vessel wall hamartoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warren, Patrick [Nationwide Children' s Hospital, Section of Pediatric Interventional Radiology, Columbus, OH (United States); Spaeth, Maya [Nationwide Children' s Hospital, Section of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Columbus, OH (United States); Prasad, Vinay [Nationwide Children' s Hospital, Section of Pediatric Pathology, Columbus, OH (United States); McConnell, Patrick [Nationwide Children' s Hospital, Section of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Columbus, OH (United States)

    2013-11-15

    Venous aneurysms are rare clinical entities, particularly in children, and their presentation and natural history often depend on the anatomical location and underlying etiology. We present a single case of a 12-year-old girl who presented with a palpable right supraclavicular mass. Imaging evaluation with CT, conventional venography, MRI and sonography revealed a large fusiform subclavian vein aneurysm with an unusual, mass-like fibrofatty component incorporated into the vessel wall. The girl ultimately required complete resection of the right subclavian vein with placement of a synthetic interposition graft. This case provides a radiology/pathology correlation of an entity that has not previously been described as well as an example of the utility of multiple imaging modalities to aid diagnosis and preoperative planning. (orig.)

  15. Subclavian vein aneurysm secondary to a benign vessel wall hamartoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Patrick; Spaeth, Maya; Prasad, Vinay; McConnell, Patrick

    2013-11-01

    Venous aneurysms are rare clinical entities, particularly in children, and their presentation and natural history often depend on the anatomical location and underlying etiology. We present a single case of a 12-year-old girl who presented with a palpable right supraclavicular mass. Imaging evaluation with CT, conventional venography, MRI and sonography revealed a large fusiform subclavian vein aneurysm with an unusual, mass-like fibrofatty component incorporated into the vessel wall. The girl ultimately required complete resection of the right subclavian vein with placement of a synthetic interposition graft. This case provides a radiology/pathology correlation of an entity that has not previously been described as well as an example of the utility of multiple imaging modalities to aid diagnosis and preoperative planning.

  16. Morphological Differentiation of Colon Carcinoma Cell Lines in Rotating Wall Vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jessup, J. M.

    1994-01-01

    The objectives of this project were to determine whether (1) microgravity permits unique, three-dimensional cultures of neoplastic human colon tissues and (2) this culture interaction produces novel intestinal growth and differentiation factors. The initial phase of this project tested the efficacy of simulated microgravity for the cultivation and differentiation of human colon carcinoma in rotating wall vessels (RWV's) on microcarrier beads. The RWV's simulate microgravity by randomizing the gravity vector in an aqueous medium under a low shear stress environment in unit gravity. This simulation achieves approximately a one-fifth g environment that allows cells to 'float' and form three-dimensional relationships with less shear stress than in other stirred aqueous medium bioreactors. In the second phase of this project we assessed the ability of human colon carcinoma lines to adhere to various substrates because adhesion is the first event that must occur to create three-dimensional masses. Finally, we tested growth factor production in the last phase of this project.

  17. Shear stress enhances microcin B17 production in a rotating wall bioreactor, but ethanol stress does not

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Q.; Fang, A.; Pierson, D. L.; Mishra, S. K.; Demain, A. L.

    2001-01-01

    Stress, including that caused by ethanol, has been shown to induce or promote secondary metabolism in a number of microbial systems. Rotating-wall bioreactors provide a low stress and simulated microgravity environment which, however, supports only poor production of microcin B17 by Escherichia coli ZK650, as compared to production in agitated flasks. We wondered whether the poor production is due to the low level of stress and whether increasing stress in the bioreactors would raise the amount of microcin B17 formed. We found that applying shear stress by addition of a single Teflon bead to a rotating wall bioreactor improved microcin B17 production. By contrast, addition of various concentrations of ethanol to such bioreactors (or to shaken flasks) failed to increase microcin B17 production. Ethanol stress merely decreased production and, at higher concentrations, inhibited growth. Interestingly, cells growing in the bioreactor were much more resistant to the growth-inhibitory and production-inhibitory effects of ethanol than cells growing in shaken flasks.

  18. Shear stress enhances microcin B17 production in a rotating wall bioreactor, but ethanol stress does not.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Q; Fang, A; Pierson, D L; Mishra, S K; Demain, A L

    2001-08-01

    Stress, including that caused by ethanol, has been shown to induce or promote secondary metabolism in a number of microbial systems. Rotating-wall bioreactors provide a low stress and simulated microgravity environment which, however, supports only poor production of microcin B17 by Escherichia coli ZK650, as compared to production in agitated flasks. We wondered whether the poor production is due to the low level of stress and whether increasing stress in the bioreactors would raise the amount of microcin B17 formed. We found that applying shear stress by addition of a single Teflon bead to a rotating wall bioreactor improved microcin B17 production. By contrast, addition of various concentrations of ethanol to such bioreactors (or to shaken flasks) failed to increase microcin B17 production. Ethanol stress merely decreased production and, at higher concentrations, inhibited growth. Interestingly, cells growing in the bioreactor were much more resistant to the growth-inhibitory and production-inhibitory effects of ethanol than cells growing in shaken flasks.

  19. Plasma discharge in ferritic first wall vacuum vessel of the Hitachi Tokamak HT-2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abe, Mitsushi; Nakayama, Takeshi; Asano, Katsuhiko; Otsuka, Michio [Hitachi Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-11-01

    A tokamak discharge with ferritic material first wall was tried successfully. The Hitachi Tokamak HT-2 had a stainless steel SUS304 vacuum vessel and modified to have a ferritic plate first wall for experiments to investigate the possibility of ferritic material usage in magnetic fusion devices. The achieved vacuum pressure and times used for discharge cleaning was roughly identical with the stainless steel first wall or the original HT-2. We concluded that ferritic material vacuum vessel is possible for tokamaks. (author)

  20. Intracranial Vessel Wall MRI: An Emerging Technique With a Multitude of Uses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaafsma, Joanna D; Mikulis, David J; Mandell, Daniel M

    2016-04-01

    Intracranial vessel wall magnetic resonance imaging (VW-MRI) can be a useful diagnostic technique in patients with ischemic stroke and subarachnoid hemorrhage. Unlike conventional vascular imaging that depicts only the vessel lumen, VW-MRI allows visualization of pathology in the arterial wall itself. The ability to image the arterial wall is useful, as many pathological processes reside within the wall and only secondarily affect the lumen. In this review, we will present 6 clinical uses for intracranial wall imaging to highlight the versatility of this technique.

  1. Evaluation of carotid vessel wall enhancement with image subtraction after gadobenate dimeglumine-enhanced MR angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sardanelli, Francesco [Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences, University of Milan School of Medicine, via Morandi 30, 20097 San Donato Milanese, Milan (Italy); Unit of Radiology, IRCCS Policlinico San Donato, via Morandi 30, 20097 San Donato Milanese, Milan (Italy)], E-mail: f.sardanelli@grupposandonato.it; Di Leo, Giovanni [Unit of Radiology, IRCCS Policlinico San Donato, via Morandi 30, 20097 San Donato Milanese, Milan (Italy)], E-mail: gianni.dileo77@virgilio.it; Aliprandi, Alberto [Unit of Radiology, IRCCS Policlinico San Donato, via Morandi 30, 20097 San Donato Milanese, Milan (Italy)], E-mail: a.aliprandi@grupposandonato.it; Flor, Nicola [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University of Milan School of Medicine, San Paolo Hospital, via di Rudini 8, 20142 Milan (Italy)], E-mail: flornic@hotmail.com; Papini, Giacomo D.E. [Unit of Radiology, IRCCS Policlinico San Donato, via Morandi 30, 20097 San Donato Milanese, Milan (Italy)], E-mail: giacomo.papini@fastwebnet.it; Roccatagliata, Luca [Unit of Radiology, IRCCS Policlinico San Donato, via Morandi 30, 20097 San Donato Milanese, Milan (Italy); Department of Neuroscience, Ophthalmology and Genetics, University of Genoa, via De Toni 5, 16132 Genoa (Italy)], E-mail: lroccatagliata@neurologia.unige.it; Cotticelli, Biagio [Unit of Radiology, IRCCS Policlinico San Donato, via Morandi 30, 20097 San Donato Milanese, Milan (Italy)], E-mail: neurobiagio@tiscali.it; Nano, Giovanni [Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences, University of Milan School of Medicine, via Morandi 30, 20097 San Donato Milanese, Milan (Italy); Unit of Vascular Surgery, IRCCS Policlinico San Donato, via Morandi 30, 20097 Milan (Italy)], E-mail: gianni.nano@libero.it; Cornalba, Gianpaolo [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University of Milan School of Medicine, San Paolo Hospital, via di Rudini 8, 20142 Milan (Italy)], E-mail: gianpaolo.cornalba@unimi.it

    2009-06-15

    Objectives: This study was aimed at testing the value of image subtraction for evaluating carotid vessel wall enhancement in contrast-enhanced MR angiography (MRA). Materials and methods: IRB approval was obtained. The scans of 81 consecutive patients who underwent carotid MRA with 0.1 mmol/kg of gadobenate dimeglumine were reviewed. Axial carotid 3D T1-weighted fast low-angle shot sequence before and 3 min after contrast injection were acquired and subtracted (enhanced minus unenhanced). Vessel wall enhancement was assigned a four-point score using native or subtracted images from 0 (no enhancement) to 3 (strong enhancement). Stenosis degree was graded according to NASCET. Results: With native images, vessel wall enhancement was detected in 20/81 patients (25%) and in 20/161 carotids (12%), and scored 2.0 {+-} 0.6 (mean {+-} standard deviation); with subtracted images, in 21/81 (26%) and 22/161 (14%), and scored 2.5 {+-} 0.6, respectively (P < 0.001, Sign test). The overall stenosis degree distribution was: mild, 41/161 (25%); moderate, 77/161 (48%); severe, 43/161 (27%). Carotids with moderate stenosis showed vessel wall enhancement with a frequency (17/77, 22%) significantly higher than that observed in carotids with mild stenosis (1/41, 2%) (P = 0.005, Fisher exact test) and higher, even though with borderline significance (P = 0.078, Fisher exact test), than that observed in carotids with severe stenosis (4/43, 9%). Conclusion: Roughly a quarter of patients undergoing carotid MRA showed vessel wall enhancement. Image subtraction improved vessel wall enhancement conspicuity. Vessel wall enhancement seems to be an event relatively independent from the degree of stenosis. Further studies are warranted to define the relation between vessel wall enhancement and histopathology, inflammatory status, and instability.

  2. Correlating hemodynamic magnetic resonance imaging with high-field intracranial vessel wall imaging in stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langdon, Weston; Donahue, Manus J; van der Kolk, Anja G; Rane, Swati; Strother, Megan K

    2014-06-01

    Vessel wall magnetic resonance imaging at ultra-high field (7 Tesla) can be used to visualize vascular lesions noninvasively and holds potential for improving stroke-risk assessment in patients with ischemic cerebrovascular disease. We present the first multi-modal comparison of such high-field vessel wall imaging with more conventional (i) 3 Tesla hemodynamic magnetic resonance imaging and (ii) digital subtraction angiography in a 69-year-old male with a left temporal ischemic infarct.

  3. Detection of coronary plaques using MR coronary vessel wall imaging: validation of findings with intravascular ultrasound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerretsen, Suzanne; Engelshoven, Jos M.A. van; Kooi, M.E. [Maastricht University Medical Centre, Department of Radiology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Maastricht University, Cardiovascular Research Institute Maastricht (CARIM), Maastricht (Netherlands); Kessels, Alfons G. [Maastricht University Medical Centre, Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Medical Technical Assessment, Maastricht (Netherlands); Nelemans, Patty J. [Maastricht University, Department of Epidemiology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Dijkstra, Jouke; Reiber, Johan H.C.; Geest, Rob J. van der [Leiden University Medical Centre, Department of Radiology, Division of image processing (LKEB), Leiden (Netherlands); Katoh, Marcus [HELIOS Clinic, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Krefeld (Germany); Waltenberger, Johannes [University of Muenster, Department of Cardiology and Angiology, Muenster (Germany); Botnar, Rene M. [King' s College, Imaging Sciences Division, London (United Kingdom); Leiner, Tim [Maastricht University Medical Centre, Department of Radiology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Maastricht University, Cardiovascular Research Institute Maastricht (CARIM), Maastricht (Netherlands); Utrecht University Medical Centre, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2013-01-15

    Compared with X-ray coronary angiography (CAG), magnetic resonance imaging of the coronary vessel wall (MR-CVW) may provide more information about plaque burden and coronary remodelling. We compared MR-CVW with intravascular ultrasound (IVUS), the standard of reference for coronary vessel wall imaging, with regard to plaque detection and wall thickness measurements. In this study 17 patients with chest pain, who had been referred for CAG, were included. Patients underwent IVUS and MR-CVW imaging of the right coronary artery (RCA). Subsequently, the coronary vessel wall was analysed for the presence and location of coronary plaques. Fifty-two matching RCA regions of interest were available for comparison. There was good agreement between IVUS and MR-CVW for qualitative assessment of presence of disease, with a sensitivity of 94% and specificity of 76%. Wall thickness measurements demonstrated a significant difference between mean wall thickness on IVUS and MR-CVW (0.48 vs 1.24 mm, P < 0.001), but great heterogeneity between wall thickness measurements, resulting in a low correlation between IVUS and MR-CVW. MR-CVW has high sensitivity for the detection of coronary vessel wall thickening in the RCA compared with IVUS. However, the use of MRI for accurate absolute wall thickness measurements is not supported when a longitudinal acquisition orientation is used. (orig.)

  4. Comparisons of optically monitored small-scale stirred tank vessels to optically controlled disposable bag bioreactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brorson Kurt A

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Upstream bioprocesses are extremely complex since living organisms are used to generate active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs. Cells in culture behave uniquely in response to their environment, thus culture conditions must be precisely defined and controlled in order for productivity and product quality to be reproducible. Thus, development culturing platforms are needed where many experiments can be carried out at once and pertinent scale-up information can be obtained. Results Here we have tested a High Throughput Bioreactor (HTBR as a scale-down model for a lab-scale wave-type bioreactor (CultiBag. Mass transfer was characterized in both systems and scaling based on volumetric oxygen mass transfer coefficient (kLa was sufficient to give similar DO trends. HTBR and CultiBag cell growth and mAb production were highly comparable in the first experiment where DO and pH were allowed to vary freely. In the second experiment, growth and mAb production rates were lower in the HTBR as compared to the CultiBag, where pH was controlled. The differences in magnitude were not considered significant for biological systems. Conclusion Similar oxygen delivery rates were achieved in both systems, leading to comparable culture performance (growth and mAb production across scales and mode of mixing. HTBR model was most fitting when neither system was pH-controlled, providing an information-rich alternative to typically non-monitored mL-scale platforms.

  5. Assessing the performance of vessel wall tracking algorithms: the importance of the test phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramnarine, K. V.; Kanber, B.; Panerai, R. B.

    2004-01-01

    There is widespread clinical interest in assessing the mechanical properties of tissues and vessel walls. This study investigated the importance of the test phantom in providing a realistic assessment of clinical wall tracking performance for a variety of ultrasound modalities. B-mode, colour Doppler and Tissue Doppler Imaging (TDI) cineloop images were acquired using a Philips HDI5000 scanner and L12-5 probe. In-vivo longitudinal sections of 30 common carotid arteries and in-vitro images of pulsatile flow of a blood mimicking fluid through walled and wall-less tissue and vessel mimicking flow phantoms were analysed. Vessel wall tracking performance was assessed for our new probabilistic B-mode algorithm (PROBAL), and 3 different techniques implemented by Philips Medical Systems, based on B-mode edge detection (LDOT), colour Doppler (CVIQ) and TDI (TDIAWM). Precision (standard deviation/mean) of the peak systole dilations for respective PROBAL, LDOT, CVIQ and TDIAWM techniques were: 15.4 +/- 8.4%, 23 +/- 12.7%, 10 +/- 10% and 10.3 +/- 8.1% for the common carotid arteries; 6.4%, 22%, 11.6% and 34.5% for the wall-less flow phantom, 5.3%, 9.8%, 23.4% and 2.7% for the C-flex walled phantom and 3.9%, 2.6%, 1% and 3.2% for the latex walled phantom. The test phantom design and construction had a significant effect on the measurement of wall tracking performance.

  6. Bioreactor principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    Cells cultured on Earth (left) typically settle quickly on the bottom of culture vessels due to gravity. In microgravity (right), cells remain suspended and aggregate to form three-dimensional tissue. The NASA Bioreactor provides a low turbulence culture environment which promotes the formation of large, three-dimensional cell clusters. The Bioreactor is rotated to provide gentle mixing of fresh and spent nutrient without inducing shear forces that would damage the cells. Due to their high level of cellular organization and specialization, samples constructed in the bioreactor more closely resemble the original tumor or tissue found in the body. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators.

  7. Bioreactor principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    Cells cultured on Earth (left) typically settle quickly on the bottom of culture vessels due to gravity. In microgravity (right), cells remain suspended and aggregate to form three-dimensional tissue. The NASA Bioreactor provides a low turbulence culture environment which promotes the formation of large, three-dimensional cell clusters. The Bioreactor is rotated to provide gentle mixing of fresh and spent nutrient without inducing shear forces that would damage the cells. Due to their high level of cellular organization and specialization, samples constructed in the bioreactor more closely resemble the original tumor or tissue found in the body. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators.

  8. Construction of 3-Dimensional Printed Ultrasound Phantoms With Wall-less Vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikitichev, Daniil I; Barburas, Anamaria; McPherson, Kirstie; Mari, Jean-Martial; West, Simeon J; Desjardins, Adrien E

    2016-06-01

    Ultrasound phantoms are invaluable as training tools for vascular access procedures. We developed ultrasound phantoms with wall-less vessels using 3-dimensional printed chambers. Agar was used as a soft tissue-mimicking material, and the wall-less vessels were created with rods that were retracted after the agar was set. The chambers had integrated luer connectors to allow for fluid injections with clinical syringes. Several variations on this design are presented, which include branched and stenotic vessels. The results show that 3-dimensional printing can be well suited to the construction of wall-less ultrasound phantoms, with designs that can be readily customized and shared electronically. © 2016 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  9. High-resolution intracranial vessel wall MRI in an elderly asymptomatic population: comparison of 3T and 7T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harteveld, Anita A.; Kolk, Anja G. van der; Dieleman, Nikki; Siero, Jeroen C.W.; Luijten, Peter R.; Zwanenburg, Jaco J.M.; Hendrikse, Jeroen [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Postbox 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); Worp, H.B. van der; Frijns, Catharina J.M. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery, Brain Center Rudolf Magnus, Utrecht (Netherlands); Kuijf, Hugo J. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Image Sciences Institute, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2017-04-15

    Several intracranial vessel wall sequences have been described in recent literature, with either 3-T or 7-T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In the current study, we compared 3-T and 7-T MRI in visualising both the intracranial arterial vessel wall and vessel wall lesions. Twenty-one elderly asymptomatic volunteers were scanned by 3-T and 7-T MRI with an intracranial vessel wall sequence, both before and after contrast administration. Two raters scored image quality, and presence and characteristics of vessel wall lesions. Vessel wall visibility was equal or significantly better at 7 T for the studied arterial segments, even though there were more artefacts hampering assessment. The better visualisation of the vessel wall at 7 T was most prominent in the proximal anterior cerebral circulation and the posterior cerebral artery. In the studied elderly asymptomatic population, 48 vessel-wall lesions were identified at 3 T, of which 7 showed enhancement. At 7 T, 79 lesions were identified, of which 29 showed enhancement. Seventy-one percent of all 3-T lesions and 59 % of all 7-T lesions were also seen at the other field strength. Despite the large variability in detected lesions at both field strengths, we believe 7-T MRI has the highest potential to identify the total burden of intracranial vessel wall lesions. (orig.)

  10. Morphologic differentiation of colon carcinoma cell lines HT-29 and HT-29KM in rotating-wall vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, T. J.; Jessup, J. M.; Wolf, D. A.

    1992-01-01

    A new low shear stress microcarrier culture system has been developed at NASA's Johnson Space Center that permits three-dimensional tissue culture. Two established human colon adenocarcinoma cell lines, HT-29, an undifferentiated, and HT-29KM, a stable, moderately differentiated subline of HT-29, were grown in new tissue culture bioreactors called Rotating-Wall Vessels (RWVs). RWVs are used in conjunction with multicellular cocultivation to develop a unique in vitro tissue modeling system. Cells were cultivated on Cytodex-3 microcarrier beads, with and without mixed normal human colonic fibroblasts, which served as the mesenchymal layer. Culture of the tumor lines in the absence of fibroblasts produced spheroidlike growth and minimal differentiation. In contrast, when tumor lines were co-cultivated with normal colonic fibroblasts, initial growth was confined to the fibroblast population until the microcarriers were covered. The tumor cells then commenced proliferation at an accelerated rate, organizing themselves into three-dimensional tissue masses that achieved 1.0- to 1.5-cm diameters. The masses displayed glandular structures, apical and internal glandular microvilli, tight intercellular junctions, desmosomes, cellular polarity, sinusoid development, internalized mucin, and structural organization akin to normal colon crypt development. Differentiated samples were subjected to transmission and scanning electron microscopy and histologic analysis, revealing embryoniclike mesenchymal cells lining the areas around the growth matrices. Necrosis was minimal throughout the tissue masses. These data suggest that the RWV affords a new model for investigation and isolation of growth, regulatory, and structural processes within neoplastic and normal tissue.

  11. Recovery process of wall condition in KSTAR vacuum vessel after temporal machine-vent for repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kwang Pyo, E-mail: kpkim@nfri.er.ke; Hong, Suk-Ho; Lee, Hyunmyung; Song, Jae-in; Jung, Nam-Yong; Lee, Kunsu; Chu, Yong; Kim, Hakkun; Park, Kaprai; Oh, Yeong-Kook

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Efforts have been made to obtain vacuum condition that is essential for the plasma experiments. • For example, the vacuum vessel should be vented to repair in-vessel components such as diagnostic shutter, and PFC damaged by high energy plasma. • Here, we present the recovery process of wall condition in KSTAR after temporal machine-vent for repair. • It is found that an acceptable vacuum condition has been achieved only by plasma based wall conditioning techniques such as baking, GDC, and boronization. • This study was that the proper recovering method of the vacuum condition should be developed according to the severity of the accident. - Abstract: Efforts have been made to obtain vacuum condition that is essential for the plasma experiments. Under certain situations, for example, the vacuum vessel should be vented to repair in-vessel components such as diagnostic shutter, exchange of window for diagnostic equipment, and PFC damaged by high energy plasma. For the quick restart of the campaign, a recovery process was established to make the vacuum condition acceptable for the plasma experiment. In this paper, we present the recovery process of wall condition in KSTAR after temporal machine-vent for repair. It is found that an acceptable vacuum condition has been achieved only by plasma based wall conditioning techniques such as baking, GDC, and boronization. This study was that the proper recovering method of the vacuum condition should be developed according to the severity of the accident.

  12. Coronary magnetic resonance angiography and vessel wall imaging in children with Kawasaki disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greil, Gerald F.; Hofbeck, Michael; Sieverding, Ludger [University of Tuebingen, Department of Pediatric Cardiology, Children' s Hospital, Tuebingen (Germany); Seeger, Achim; Miller, Stephan; Claussen, Claus D. [University of Tuebingen, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Botnar, Rene M. [Technical University Munich, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Cardiovascular Division, Munich (Germany)

    2007-07-15

    In patients with Kawasaki disease (KD) serial evaluation of the distribution and size of coronary artery aneurysms (CAA) is necessary for risk stratification and therapeutic management. To apply whole-heart coronary MR angiography (CMRA) and black-blood coronary vessel wall imaging in children with KD. Six children (mean age 4.6 years, range 2.5-7.8 years) with KD underwent CMRA using a free-breathing, T2-prepared, three-dimensional steady-state free-precession (3D-SSFP), whole-heart approach with navigator gating and tracking. Vessel walls were imaged with an ECG-triggered and navigator-gated double inversion recovery (DIR) black-blood segmented turbo spin-echo sequence. There was complete agreement between CMRA and conventional angiography (n=6) in the detection of CAA (n=15). Excellent agreement was found between the two techniques in determining the maximal diameter (mean difference 0.2{+-}0.7 mm), length (mean difference 0.1{+-}0.8 mm) and distance from the ostium (mean difference -0.8{+-}2.1 mm) of the CAAs. In all subjects with a CAA, abnormally thickened vessel walls were found (2.5{+-}0.5 mm). CMRA accurately defines CAA in free-breathing sedated children with KD using the whole-heart approach and detects abnormally thickened vessel walls. This technique may reduce the need for serial X-ray coronary angiography, and improve risk stratification and monitoring of therapy. (orig.)

  13. High-resolution Magnetic Resonance Vessel Wall Imaging for Intracranial Arterial Stenosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xian-Jin Zhu; Wu Wang; Zun-Jing Liu

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To discuss the feasibility and clinical value of high-resolution magnetic resonance vessel wall imaging (HRMR VWI) for intracranial arterial stenosis.Date Sources:We retrieved information from PubMed database up to December 2015,using various search terms including vessel wall imaging (VWI),high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging,intracranial arterial stenosis,black blood,and intracranial atherosclerosis.Study Selection:We reviewed peer-reviewed articles printed in English on imaging technique of VWI and characteristic findings of various intracranial vasculopathies on VWI.We organized this data to explain the value of VWI in clinical application.Results:VWI with black blood technique could provide high-quality images with submillimeter voxel size,and display both the vessel wall and lumen of intracranial artery simultaneously.Various intracranial vasculopathies (atherosclerotic or nonatherosclerotic) had differentiating features including pattern of wall thickening,enhancement,and vessel remodeling on VWI.This technique could be used for determining causes of stenosis,identification of stroke mechanism,risk-stratifying patients,and directing therapeutic management in clinical practice.In addition,a new morphological classification based on VWI could be established for predicting the efficacy of endovascular therapy.Conclusions:This review highlights the value of HRMR VWI for discrimination of different intracranial vasculopathies and directing therapeutic management.

  14. Pulsatile flow characterization in a vessel phantom with elastic wall using ultrasonic particle image velocimetry technique: the impact of vessel stiffness on flow dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Ming; Niu, Lili; Wong, Kelvin Kian Loong; Abbott, Derek; Zhou, Qifa; Zheng, Hairong

    2014-09-01

    This study aims to experimentally investigate the impact of vessel stiffness on the flow dynamics of pulsatile vascular flow. Vessel phantoms with elastic walls were fabricated using polyvinyl alcohol cryogel to result in stiffness ranging from 60.9 to 310.3 kPa and tested with pulsatile flows using a flow circulation set-up. Two-dimensional instantaneous and time-dependent flow velocity and shear rate vector fields were measured using ultrasonic particle image velocimetry (EchoPIV). The waveforms of peak velocities measured by EchoPIV were compared with the ultrasonic pulse Doppler spectrum, and the measuring accuracy was validated. The cyclic vessel wall motion and flow pressure were obtained as well. The results showed that vessel stiffening influenced the waveforms resulting from vessel wall distension and flow pressure, and the fields of flow velocity and shear rate. The stiffer vessel had smaller inner diameter variation, larger pulse pressure and median pressure. The velocity and shear rate maximized at peak systole for all vessels. The results showed a decrease in wall shear stress for a stiffer vessel, which can initiate the atherosclerotic process. Our study elucidates the impact of vessel stiffness on several flow dynamic parameters, and also demonstrates the EchoPIV technique to be a useful and powerful tool in cardiovascular research.

  15. Qualitative Evaluation of a High-Resolution 3D Multi-Sequence Intracranial Vessel Wall Protocol at 3 Tesla MRI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dieleman, Nikki; Yang, Wenjie; van der Kolk, Anja G; Abrigo, Jill; Lee, Ka Lok; Chu, Winnie Chiu Wing; Zwanenburg, Jaco J M; Siero, Jeroen C. W.; Wong, Ka Sing; Hendrikse, Jeroen; Chen, Fiona Xiang Yan

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Intracranial vessel wall imaging using MRI has great potential as a clinical method for assessing intracranial atherosclerosis. The purpose of the current study was to compare three 3T MRI vessel wall sequences with different contrast weightings (T1w, PD, T2w) and dedicated s

  16. A comparison of bioreactors for culture of fetal mesenchymal stem cells for bone tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhi-Yong; Teoh, Swee Hin; Teo, Erin Yiling; Khoon Chong, Mark Seow; Shin, Chong Woon; Tien, Foo Toon; Choolani, Mahesh A; Chan, Jerry K Y

    2010-11-01

    Bioreactors provide a dynamic culture system for efficient exchange of nutrients and mechanical stimulus necessary for the generation of effective tissue engineered bone grafts (TEBG). We have shown that biaxial rotating (BXR) bioreactor-matured human fetal mesenchymal stem cell (hfMSC) mediated-TEBG can heal a rat critical sized femoral defect. However, it is not known whether optimal bioreactors exist for bone TE (BTE) applications. We systematically compared this BXR bioreactor with three most commonly used systems: Spinner Flask (SF), Perfusion and Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV) bioreactors, for their application in BTE. The BXR bioreactor achieved higher levels of cellularity and confluence (1.4-2.5x, p bioreactors operating in optimal settings. BXR bioreactor-treated scaffolds experienced earlier and more robust osteogenic differentiation on von Kossa staining, ALP induction (1.2-1.6×, p bioreactor-treated grafts, but not with the other three. BXR bioreactor enabled superior cellular proliferation, spatial distribution and osteogenic induction of hfMSC over other commonly used bioreactors. In addition, we developed and validated a non-invasive quantitative micro CT-based technique for analyzing neo-tissue formation and its spatial distribution within scaffolds.

  17. "Sausage-string" appearance of arteries and arterioles can be caused by an instability of the blood vessel wall

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Jens Christian Brings; Beierholm, Ulrik; Mikkelsen, Rene

    2002-01-01

    in vascular wall tension. Despite much research, the mechanisms underlying the sausage pattern have remained unknown. Here we present an anisotropic model of the vessel wall and show that the sausage pattern can arise because of an instability of the vessel wall. The model reproduces many of the key features...... phenomenon. Experimental data suggest that the structural changes induced by the instability may cause secondary damage to the wall of small arteries and arterioles in the form of endothelial hyperpermeability followed by local fibrinoid necrosis of the vascular wall....

  18. Vessel wall temperature estimation for novel short term thermal balloon angioplasty: study of thermal environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Kenji; Nakatani, Eriko; Futami, Hikaru; Ogawa, Yoshifumi; Arai, Tsunenori; Fukui, Masaru; Shimamura, Satoshi; Kawabata, Takashi

    2005-01-01

    We have been proposing novel thermal balloon angioplasty, photo-thermo dynamic balloon angioplasty (PT-DBA). PTDBA realized thermal injury and low pressure dilatation that can prevent restenosis in chronic phase. We aim to determine the most efficient heating condition suit to individual symptom with pre-operation thermal simulation. We analyzed the flow dynamics and heat convection inside the balloon, and investigated heat conduction of balloon film to establish the temperature estimation method among vessel wall. Compared with ex vivo temperature measurement experiment, we concluded that the factors need to be considered for the establishment would be the heat conduction of the flow inside PTDB, heat conduction at the balloon film, and contact thermal resistance between the balloon film and vessel wall.

  19. Regional calcium distribution and ultrasound images of the vessel wall in human carotid arteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szikszai, Z.; Kertész, Zs.; Uzonyi, I.; Szíki, G. Á.; Magyar, M. T.; Molnár, S.; Ida, Y.; Csiba, L.

    2005-04-01

    Arterial calcification can take place at two sites in the vessel wall: the intima and the media. Intimal calcification occurs exclusively within atherosclerotic plaques, while medial calcification may develop independently. Extensive calcified plaques in the carotid arteries can be easily detected by B-mode ultrasonic imaging. The calcium content might correlate with the ultrasound reflectance of the vessel wall, and could be a surrogate marker for arteriosclerosis. In this study, segments of human carotid arteries collected at autopsy were examined by ultrasonography in vitro and calcium distributional maps of sections from the same segments were determined by particle induced X-ray emission. Our aim was to make a first step towards investigating the relationship between the calcium distributional maps and the respective ultrasound images.

  20. Gadolinium Enhanced MR Coronary Vessel Wall Imaging at 3.0 Tesla

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Kelle

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. We evaluated the influence of the time between low-dose gadolinium (Gd contrast administration and coronary vessel wall enhancement (LGE detected by 3T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI in healthy subjects and patients with coronary artery disease (CAD. Materials and Methods. Four healthy subjects (4 men, mean age 29  ±  3 years and eleven CAD patients (6 women, mean age 61±10 years were studied on a commercial 3.0 Tesla (T whole-body MR imaging system (Achieva 3.0 T; Philips, Best, The Netherlands. T1-weighted inversion-recovery coronary magnetic resonance imaging (MRI was repeated up to 75 minutes after administration of low-dose Gadolinium (Gd (0.1 mmol/kg Gd-DTPA. Results. LGE was seen in none of the healthy subjects, however in all of the CAD patients. In CAD patients, fifty-six of 62 (90.3% segments showed LGE of the coronary artery vessel wall at time-interval 1 after contrast. At time-interval 2, 34 of 42 (81.0% and at time-interval 3, 29 of 39 evaluable segments (74.4% were enhanced. Conclusion. In this work, we demonstrate LGE of the coronary artery vessel wall using 3.0 T MRI after a single, low-dose Gd contrast injection in CAD patients but not in healthy subjects. In the majority of the evaluated coronary segments in CAD patients, LGE of the coronary vessel wall was already detectable 30–45 minutes after administration of the contrast agent.

  1. Drug effects on platelet adherence to collagen and damaged vessel walls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packham, M A; Cazenave, J P; Kinlough-Rathbone, R L; Mustard, J F

    1978-01-01

    The interaction of platelets with damaged vessel walls leads to the formation of platelet-fibrin thrombi and may also contribute to the development of atherosclerotic lesions because platelets adherent to exposed collagen release a mitogen that stimulates smooth muscle cell proliferation. The first step in thrombus formation, platelet adherence to an injured vessel wall, can be studied quantitatively by the use of platelets labeled with 51chromium. In these investigations, rabbit aortas were damaged by passage of a balloon catheter and segments of the aortas were everted on probes that were rotated in platelet suspensions. Collagen-coated glass cylinders were also used. Adherence was measured in a medium containing approximately physiologic concentrations of calcium, magnesium, protein and red blood cells. Conditions of testing influence the effect of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, sulfinpyrazone, and dipyridamole on platelet adherence. Aspirin and sulfinpyrazone were not inhibitory when tested in a medium with a 40% hematocrit; this indicates that products formed by platelets from arachidonate probably do not play a major part in the adherence of the first layer of platelets to the surface, although they may be involved in thrombus formation. Indomethacin, dipyridamole, prostaglandin E1, methylprednisolone and penicillin G and related antibiotics did inhibit platelet adherence although the concentrations required were higher than would likely be achieved in vivo upon administration to human patients. None of the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs inhibited the release of granule contents from adherent platelets. Pretreatment of the damaged vessel wall with aspirin increased platelet adherence, presumably because it prevented the formation of PGI2 by the vessel wall. Platelet adherence to undamaged or damaged vessel walls was enhanced by prior exposure of the wall to thrombin. Platelet reactions with aggregating agents and platelet survival can be

  2. Vessel wall enhancement in the diagnosis and management of primary angiitis of the central nervous system in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, Koyo; Saito, Yoshiaki; Kurata, Hirofumi; Saiki, Yusuke; Ohtahara, Hiroko; Yoshioka, Hiroki; Yamashita, Eijiro; Fujii, Shinya; Maegaki, Yoshihiro

    2016-08-01

    We describe two cases of primary angiitis of the central nervous system in children (cPACNS) diagnosed by vessel wall contrast enhancement on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Both patients developed acute cerebral infarction after fever and malaise. In patient 1, a 7-month-old boy, MRI revealed extensive cerebral infarction in the right middle cerebral artery (MCA) area and stenosis at the M1 portion of the right MCA. Oral glucocorticoid therapy was initiated. Vessel wall enhancement was ameliorated 3months after onset, and stenosis was mostly restored. Patient 2, a 5-year-old boy, suffered from cerebral infarction in the left MCA area, and stenosis was identified in the left internal carotid artery, left MCA, and left posterior cerebral artery. Although vessel wall enhancement was reduced after glucocorticoid therapy, vessel wall enhancement of left MCA re-emerged, accompanied by increased erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and, decreased cerebral blood flow (CBF) in the affected hemisphere. Intravenous methylprednisolone therapy followed by oral glucocorticoid and mycophenolate mofetil resulted in resolution of these findings. Vessel wall enhancement is a promising finding in the diagnosis of cPACNS. Disease flares occur rarely in medium-to-large vessel cPACNS during dose tapering. Vessel wall enhancement, ESR, and CBF may be useful for the assessment of the activity of angiitis.

  3. Cerebral amyloid angiopathy in the elderly: vessel walls changes and relationship with dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zekry, Dina; Duyckaerts, Charles; Belmin, Joël; Geoffre, Caroline; Moulias, Robert; Hauw, Jean-Jacques

    2003-10-01

    Abeta peptide deposits are observed in brain cortical and leptomeningeal microvessels in a few families, in patients with Alzheimer's disease and in cognitively normal elderly subjects. These deposits, which cause Abeta amyloid angiopathy, are usually associated with other lesions induced by Abeta peptide and tau pathologies. To investigate the consequences of cerebral amyloid angiopathy on arterial morphology and search for correlations with the degree of cognitive impairment, we carried out a prospective clinicopathological and morphometric study in 29 institutionalized elderly patients cognitively normal or affected with sporadic dementia associated with Alzheimer-type lesions, cerebral infarcts or both. We measured the external and internal diameters of arteries 40-120 microm wide, containing moderate or severe Abeta deposits, and of unaffected arteries in the temporal and frontal lobes. We found no differences in the mean external diameters. In contrast, the mean internal diameters of vessels with moderate Abeta deposits were smaller than those of unaffected vessels. Conversely, the internal diameters of severely affected vessels were larger than those of unaffected vessels. This suggests that arterial walls become thicker during the early stages of amyloid angiopathy, and the diameter of the lumen decreases, whereas during advanced stages, the walls become thinner and the lumen becomes larger. In addition, we assessed the overall severity of amyloid angiopathy. This showed that thinner arterial walls and the severity of amyloid angiopathy were correlated to dementia. In a multivariate model that integrates the other macroscopic and microscopic lesions that may be implied in the mechanism of cognitive impairment, the severity of amyloid angiopathy per se explained 10% of the variability in the cognitive impairment.

  4. SPR salt wall leaching experiments in lab-scale vessel : data report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webb, Stephen Walter; O' Hern, Timothy John; Hartenberger, Joel David

    2010-10-01

    During cavern leaching in the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR), injected raw water mixes with resident brine and eventually interacts with the cavern salt walls. This report provides a record of data acquired during a series of experiments designed to measure the leaching rate of salt walls in a labscale simulated cavern, as well as discussion of the data. These results should be of value to validate computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models used to simulate leaching applications. Three experiments were run in the transparent 89-cm (35-inch) ID diameter vessel previously used for several related projects. Diagnostics included tracking the salt wall dissolution rate using ultrasonics, an underwater camera to view pre-installed markers, and pre- and post-test weighing and measuring salt blocks that comprise the walls. In addition, profiles of the local brine/water conductivity and temperature were acquired at three locations by traversing conductivity probes to map out the mixing of injected raw water with the surrounding brine. The data are generally as expected, with stronger dissolution when the salt walls were exposed to water with lower salt saturation, and overall reasonable wall shape profiles. However, there are significant block-to-block variations, even between neighboring salt blocks, so the averaged data are considered more useful for model validation. The remedial leach tests clearly showed that less mixing and longer exposure time to unsaturated water led to higher levels of salt wall dissolution. The data for all three tests showed a dividing line between upper and lower regions, roughly above and below the fresh water injection point, with higher salt wall dissolution in all cases, and stronger (for remedial leach cases) or weaker (for standard leach configuration) concentration gradients above the dividing line.

  5. Positive association between increased popliteal artery vessel wall thickness and generalized osteoarthritis: is OA also part of the metabolic syndrome?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kornaat, Peter R.; Sharma, Ruby; Geest, Rob J. van der; Lamb, Hildo J.; Bloem, Johan L.; Watt, Iain [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Leiden (Netherlands); Kloppenburg, Margreet [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Rheumatology, Leiden (Netherlands); Hellio le Graverand, Marie-Pierre [Pfizer Global Research and Development, New London, CT (United States)

    2009-12-15

    The purpose of the study was to determine if a positive association exists between arterial vessel wall thickness and generalized osteoarthritis (OA). Our hypothesis is that generalized OA is another facet of the metabolic syndrome. The medical ethical review board of our institution approved the study. Written informed consent was obtained from each patient prior to the study. Magnetic resonance (MR) images of the knee were obtained in 42 patients who had been diagnosed with generalized OA at multiple joint sites. Another 27 MR images of the knee were obtained from a matched normal (non-OA) reference population. Vessel wall thickness of the popliteal artery was quantitatively measured by dedicated software. Linear regression models were used to investigate the association between vessel wall thickness and generalized OA. Adjustments were made for age, sex, and body mass index (BMI). Confidence intervals (CI) were computed at the 95% level and a significance level of {alpha} = 0.05 was used. Patients in the generalized OA population had a significant higher average vessel wall thickness than persons from the normal reference population (p {<=} {alpha}), even when correction was made for sex, age, and BMI. The average vessel wall thickness of the popliteal artery was 1.09 mm in patients with generalized OA, and 0.96 mm in the matched normal reference population. The association found between increased popliteal artery vessel wall thickness and generalized osteoarthritis suggests that generalized OA might be another facet of the metabolic syndrome. (orig.)

  6. Spinning Disk Confocal Microscopy of Calcium Signalling in Blood Vessel Walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Mark; Ledoux, Jonathan; Taylor, Mark; Bonev, Adrian; Hannah, Rachael; Solodushko, Viktoriya; Shui, Bo; Tallini, Yvonne; Kotlikoff, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Spinning disk confocal laser microscopy systems can be used for observing fast events occurring in a small volume when they include a sensitive electron-multiplying CCD camera. Such a confocal system was recently used to capture the first pictures of intracellular calcium signalling within the projections of endothelial cells to the adjacent smooth muscle cells in the blood vessel wall. Detection of these calcium signals required high spatial and temporal resolution. A newly developed calcium ion (Ca2+) biosensor was also used. This exclusively expressed in the endothelium and fluoresced when Ca2+ concentrations increased during signalling. This work gives insights into blood vessel disease because Ca2+ signalling is critical for blood flow and pressure regulation. PMID:22506097

  7. Bioreactor Mass Transport Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleis, Stanley J.; Begley, Cynthia M.

    1997-01-01

    The objectives of the proposed research efforts were to develop both a simulation tool and a series of experiments to provide a quantitative assessment of mass transport in the NASA rotating wall perfused vessel (RWPV) bioreactor to be flown on EDU#2. This effort consisted of a literature review of bioreactor mass transport studies, the extension of an existing scalar transport computer simulation to include production and utilization of the scalar, and the evaluation of experimental techniques for determining mass transport in these vessels. Since mass transport at the cell surface is determined primarily by the relative motion of the cell assemblage and the surrounding fluid, a detailed assessment of the relative motion was conducted. Results of the simulations of the motion of spheres in the RWPV under microgravity conditions are compared with flight data from EDU#1 flown on STS-70. The mass transport across the cell membrane depends upon the environment, the cell type, and the biological state of the cell. Results from a literature review of cell requirements of several scalars are presented. As a first approximation, a model with a uniform spatial distribution of utilization or production was developed and results from these simulations are presented. There were two candidate processes considered for the experimental mass transport evaluations. The first was to measure the dissolution rate of solid or gel beads. The second was to measure the induced fluorescence of beads as a stimulant (for example hydrogen peroxide) is infused into the vessel. Either technique would use video taped images of the process for recording the quantitative results. Results of preliminary tests of these techniques are discussed.

  8. Surface water waves interaction in a circular vessel with oscillating walls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denissenko, Petr; Hsieh, Din-Yu

    1998-11-01

    Surface water waves appeared in a circular elastic vessel (modelled after the Chinese antique "Dragon Wash") are studied experimentally. Interaction of different wave modes are investigated. For small amplitude of wall oscillations, only the axisymmetric capillary wave mode, which is hardly visible to naked eyes, exists. When the amplitude is increased, half-frequency circumferential wave appears. Further increase of amplitude leads to chaotic behavior of surface waves. For large amplitudes, water drops jumping from edge regions are observed. Then, excitation of different modes of low frequency axisymmetric gravity waves may be obtained. Conditions for appearance of these gravity waves are investigated. Optical methods were applied for water surface diagnostics.

  9. Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene expression changes during rotating wall vessel suspension culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johanson, Kelly; Allen, Patricia L.; Lewis, Fawn; Cubano, Luis A.; Hyman, Linda E.; Hammond, Timothy G.

    2002-01-01

    This study utilizes Saccharomyces cerevisiae to study genetic responses to suspension culture. The suspension culture system used in this study is the high-aspect-ratio vessel, one type of the rotating wall vessel, that provides a high rate of gas exchange necessary for rapidly dividing cells. Cells were grown in the high-aspect-ratio vessel, and DNA microarray and metabolic analyses were used to determine the resulting changes in yeast gene expression. A significant number of genes were found to be up- or downregulated by at least twofold as a result of rotational growth. By using Gibbs promoter alignment, clusters of genes were examined for promoter elements mediating these genetic changes. Candidate binding motifs similar to the Rap1p binding site and the stress-responsive element were identified in the promoter regions of differentially regulated genes. This study shows that, as in higher order organisms, S. cerevisiae changes gene expression in response to rotational culture and also provides clues for investigations into the signaling pathways involved in gravitational response.

  10. Cross-linking density alters early metabolic activities in chondrocytes encapsulated in poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogels and cultured in the rotating wall vessel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villanueva, Idalis; Klement, Brenda J; von Deutsch, Daniel; Bryant, Stephanie J

    2009-03-01

    In designing a tissue engineering strategy for cartilage repair, selection of both the bioreactor, and scaffold is important to the development of a mechanically functional tissue. The hydrodynamic environment associated with many bioreactors enhances nutrient transport, but also introduces fluid shear stress, which may influence cellular response. This study examined the combined effects of hydrogel cross-linking and the hydrodynamic environment on early chondrocyte response. Specifically, chondrocytes were encapsulated in poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogels having two different cross-linked structures, corresponding to a low and high cross-linking density. Both cross-linked gels yielded high water contents (92% and 79%, respectively) and mesh sizes of 150 and 60 A respectively. Cell-laden PEG hydrogels were cultured in rotating wall vessels (RWV) or under static cultures for up to 5 days. Rotating cultures yielded low fluid shear stresses (production, and matrix deposition for glycosaminoglycans (GAG). In static cultures, gel cross-linking had no effect on DNA content, NO production, or GAG production; although GAG production increased with culture time for both cross-linked gels. In rotating cultures, DNA content increased, NO production decreased, and overall GAG production decreased when compared to static controls for the low cross-linked gels. For the high cross-linked gels, the hydrodynamic environment had no effect on DNA content, but exhibited similar results to the low cross-linked gel for NO production, and matrix production. Our findings demonstrated that at early culture times, when there is limited matrix production, the hydrodynamic environment dramatically influences cell response in a manner dependent on the gel cross-linking, which may impact long-term tissue development.

  11. Ultrasonic quantitative detection of elasticity of jugular vessel wall of female pilots and its application value

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Long-fang ZHANG

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective To observe the elasticity of the jugular vessel wall of female aerotransport pilots on active duty,provide a reference for the selection of female pilots,and the prevention and therapy of cardiovascular diseases in female pilots.Methods Using the Echo-Tracking technique,the elastic parameters of the carotid artery were quantitatively detected in nineteen female pilots who were first selected as female astronauts.Twenty male pilots who were selected as astronauts were randomly chosen as the control group.No statistical difference in age and blood pressure between the two groups was found.No history of cardiovascular diseases was recorded,and no abnormal signs were revealed in the results of the physical examination.Electrocardiogram,chest radiography,hepatic and kidney function,and biochemical examination showed normal results.The factors affecting the elasticity of the artery could possibly be avoided for the male pilots except for the fighter pilots or the smokers.Results No statistical difference was found in the clinical and biochemical data between the pilot groups(P > 0.05.As for carotid artery elastic parameters,no statistical difference between the left and right sides of the artery was indicated.The elastic modulus,arterial stiffness index,and pulse wave velocity of the carotid artery wall of the female pilots were significantly lower than those of the male pilots(P < 0.05,and the arterial compliance was significantly higher than that of the male pilots(P < 0.05.Conclusion All of the elastic parameters of the vessel wall of female pilots were better than those of the male pilots.

  12. Long term project in ASDEX upgrade: Implementation of ferritic steel as in vessel wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zammuto, I., E-mail: irene.zammuto@ipp.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, D-85740 Garching (Germany); Giannone, L. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, D-85740 Garching (Germany); Houben, A. [Institute of Energy and Climate Research, Plasma Physics, Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Trilateral Euregio Cluster, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Herrmann, A.; Kallenbach, A. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, D-85740 Garching (Germany)

    2015-10-15

    A long term project is started at the ASDEX Upgrade (AUG) tokamak aimed at the exploration of the compatibility of reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel (RAFM) with fusion devices. The topic is oriented toward the preparation of future experiments such as ITER with its test blanket modules and DEMO with its first wall designed with RAFM. The goal of the project is to gather experience with ferromagnetic materials inside the vacuum vessel, dealing with magnetic perturbations, both in plasma and magnetic probes, and facing up the additional magnetic forces acting on the supporting structures. The project envisages a stepwise replacement of the traditional graphite tiles with ferritic steel. For the time being, the main AUG actor is the inner heat shield (IHS), but further development can be imagined in the future. Since 2013, two of the 15 tile rows of the IHS have been replaced with ferritic steel and since now the experimental campaign has not suffered any particular problem related to the perturbation field induced by the steel tiles, as predicted by the calculation. In the present paper, the preliminary study accomplished for the first phase for the evaluation of the forces and magnetic perturbation is reported, together with the further calculations required for the extension of the steel wall.

  13. Distinct defects in collagen microarchitecture underlie vessel-wall failure in advanced abdominal aneurysms and aneurysms in Marfan syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lindeman, J.H.N.; Ashcroft, B.A.; Beenakker, J.-W.M.; Es, M. van; Koekkoek, N.B.R.; Prins, F.A.; Tielemans, J.F.; Abdul-Hussien, H.; Bank, R.A.; Oosterkamp, T.H.

    2010-01-01

    An aneurysm of the aorta is a common pathology characterized by segmentalweakeningof the artery.Althoughit isgenerally accepted that the vessel-wall weakening is caused by an impaired collagen metabolism, a clear association has been demonstrated only for rare syndromes such as the vascular type

  14. Nature and origin of the neointima in whole vessel wall organ culture of the human saphenous vein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slomp, J.; Gittenberger - Groot, A.C. de; Munsteren, J.C. van; Huysmans, H.A.; Bockel, J.H. van; Hinsbergh, V.W.M. van; Poelmann, R.E.

    1996-01-01

    Intimal proliferation is a characteristic feature of arteriosclerosis. Whole vessel wall organ culture systems have been developed to study the early stages of neointima formation. We have cultured a large number of explants of human saphenous vein specimens for several weeks, and have identified th

  15. Distinct defects in collagen microarchitecture underlie vessel-wall failure in advanced abdominal aneurysms and aneurysms in Marfan syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lindeman, J.H.N.; Ashcroft, B.A.; Beenakker, J.-W.M.; Es, M. van; Koekkoek, N.B.R.; Prins, F.A.; Tielemans, J.F.; Abdul-Hussien, H.; Bank, R.A.; Oosterkamp, T.H.

    2010-01-01

    An aneurysm of the aorta is a common pathology characterized by segmentalweakeningof the artery.Althoughit isgenerally accepted that the vessel-wall weakening is caused by an impaired collagen metabolism, a clear association has been demonstrated only for rare syndromes such as the vascular type Ehl

  16. Automated registration of multispectral MR vessel wall images of the carotid artery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klooster, R. van ' t; Staring, M.; Reiber, J. H. C.; Lelieveldt, B. P. F.; Geest, R. J. van der, E-mail: rvdgeest@lumc.nl [Department of Radiology, Division of Image Processing, Leiden University Medical Center, 2300 RC Leiden (Netherlands); Klein, S. [Department of Radiology and Department of Medical Informatics, Biomedical Imaging Group Rotterdam, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam 3015 GE (Netherlands); Kwee, R. M.; Kooi, M. E. [Department of Radiology, Cardiovascular Research Institute Maastricht, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht 6202 AZ (Netherlands)

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: Atherosclerosis is the primary cause of heart disease and stroke. The detailed assessment of atherosclerosis of the carotid artery requires high resolution imaging of the vessel wall using multiple MR sequences with different contrast weightings. These images allow manual or automated classification of plaque components inside the vessel wall. Automated classification requires all sequences to be in alignment, which is hampered by patient motion. In clinical practice, correction of this motion is performed manually. Previous studies applied automated image registration to correct for motion using only nondeformable transformation models and did not perform a detailed quantitative validation. The purpose of this study is to develop an automated accurate 3D registration method, and to extensively validate this method on a large set of patient data. In addition, the authors quantified patient motion during scanning to investigate the need for correction. Methods: MR imaging studies (1.5T, dedicated carotid surface coil, Philips) from 55 TIA/stroke patients with ipsilateral <70% carotid artery stenosis were randomly selected from a larger cohort. Five MR pulse sequences were acquired around the carotid bifurcation, each containing nine transverse slices: T1-weighted turbo field echo, time of flight, T2-weighted turbo spin-echo, and pre- and postcontrast T1-weighted turbo spin-echo images (T1W TSE). The images were manually segmented by delineating the lumen contour in each vessel wall sequence and were manually aligned by applying throughplane and inplane translations to the images. To find the optimal automatic image registration method, different masks, choice of the fixed image, different types of the mutual information image similarity metric, and transformation models including 3D deformable transformation models, were evaluated. Evaluation of the automatic registration results was performed by comparing the lumen segmentations of the fixed image and

  17. Effect of Heat Flux on Creep Stresses of Thick-Walled Cylindrical Pressure Vessels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mosayeb Davoudi Kashkoli

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Assuming that the thermo-creep response of the material is governed by Norton’s law, an analytical solution is presented for the calculation of time-dependent creep stresses and displacements of homogeneous thick-walled cylindrical pressure vessels. For the stress analysis in a homogeneous pressure vessel, having material creep behavior, the solutions of the stresses at a time equal to zero (i.e. the initial stress state are needed. This corresponds to the solution of materials with linear elastic behavior. Therefore, using equations of equilibrium, stress-strain and strain-displacement, a differential equation for displacement is obtained and then the stresses at a time equal to zero are calculated. Using Norton’s law in the multi-axial form in conjunction with the above-mentioned equations in the rate form, the radial displacement rate is obtained and then the radial, circumferential and axial creep stress rates are calculated. When the stress rates are known, the stresses at any time are calculated iteratively. The analytical solution is obtained for the conditions of plane strain and plane stress. The thermal loading is as follows: inner surface is exposed to a uniform heat flux, and the outer surface is exposed to an airstream. The heat conduction equation for the one-dimensional problem in polar coordinates is used to obtain temperature distribution in the cylinder. The pressure, inner radius and outer radius are considered constant. Material properties are considered as constant. Following this, profiles are plotted for the radial displacements, radial stress, circumferential stress and axial stress as a function of radial direction and time.

  18. Rotating wall vessel exposure alters protein secretion and global gene expression in Staphylococcus aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosado, Helena; O'Neill, Alex J.; Blake, Katy L.; Walther, Meik; Long, Paul F.; Hinds, Jason; Taylor, Peter W.

    2012-04-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is routinely recovered from air and surface samples taken aboard the International Space Station (ISS) and poses a health threat to crew. As bacteria respond to the low shear forces engendered by continuous rotation conditions in a Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV) and the reduced gravitational field of near-Earth flight by altering gene expression, we examined the effect of low-shear RWV growth on protein secretion and gene expression by three S. aureus isolates. When cultured under 1 g, the total amount of protein secreted by these strains varied up to fourfold; under continuous rotation conditions, protein secretion by all three strains was significantly reduced. Concentrations of individual proteins were differentially reduced and no evidence was found for increased lysis. These data suggest that growth under continuous rotation conditions reduces synthesis or secretion of proteins. A limited number of changes in gene expression under continuous rotation conditions were noted: in all isolates vraX, a gene encoding a polypeptide associated with cell wall stress, was down-regulated. A vraX deletion mutant of S. aureus SH1000 was constructed: no differences were found between SH1000 and ΔvraX with respect to colony phenotype, viability, protein export, antibiotic susceptibility, vancomycin kill kinetics, susceptibility to cold or heat and gene modulation. An ab initio protein-ligand docking simulation suggests a major binding site for β-lactam drugs such as imipenem. If such changes to the bacterial phenotype occur during spaceflight, they will compromise the capacity of staphylococci to cause systemic infection and to circumvent antibacterial chemotherapy.

  19. Space Bioreactor Science Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Dennis R. (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    The first space bioreactor has been designed for microprocessor control, no gaseous headspace, circulation and resupply of culture medium, and a slow mixing in very low shear regimes. Various ground based bioreactors are being used to test reactor vessel design, on-line sensors, effects of shear, nutrient supply, and waste removal from continuous culture of human cells attached to microcarriers. The small (500 ml) bioreactor is being constructed for flight experiments in the Shuttle middeck to verify systems operation under microgravity conditions and to measure the efficiencies of mass transport, gas transfer, oxygen consumption, and control of low shear stress on cells. Applications of microcarrier cultures, development of the first space bioreactor flight system, shear and mixing effects on cells, process control, and methods to monitor cell metabolism and nutrient requirements are among the topics covered.

  20. Preliminary electromagnetic, thermal and mechanical design for first wall and vacuum vessel of FAST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucca, F., E-mail: Flavio.Lucca@LTCalcoli.it [LT Calcoli srl, Piazza Prinetti 26/B, 23807 Merate, LC (Italy); Bertolini, C. [LT Calcoli srl, Piazza Prinetti 26/B, 23807 Merate, LC (Italy); Crescenzi, F.; Crisanti, F. [C.R. ENEA Frascati – UT FUS, Via E. Fermi 45, IT-00044 Frascati, RM (Italy); Di Gironimo, G. [CREATE, Università di Napoli Federico II, P.le Tecchio 80, 80125 Napoli (Italy); Labate, C. [CREATE, Università di Napoli Parthenope, Via Acton 38, 80133 Napoli (Italy); Manzoni, M.; Marconi, M.; Pagani, I. [LT Calcoli srl, Piazza Prinetti 26/B, 23807 Merate, LC (Italy); Ramogida, G. [C.R. ENEA Frascati – UT FUS, Via E. Fermi 45, IT-00044 Frascati, RM (Italy); Renno, F. [CREATE, Università di Napoli Federico II, P.le Tecchio 80, 80125 Napoli (Italy); Roccella, M. [LT Calcoli srl, Piazza Prinetti 26/B, 23807 Merate, LC (Italy); Roccella, S. [C.R. ENEA Frascati – UT FUS, Via E. Fermi 45, IT-00044 Frascati, RM (Italy); Viganò, F. [LT Calcoli srl, Piazza Prinetti 26/B, 23807 Merate, LC (Italy)

    2015-10-15

    The fusion advanced study torus (FAST), with its compact design, high toroidal field and plasma current, faces many of the problems met by ITER, and at the same time anticipates much of the DEMO relevant physics and technology. The conceptual design of the first wall (FW) and the vacuum vessel (VV) has been defined on the basis of FAST operative conditions and of “Snow Flakes” (SF) magnetic topology, which is also relevant for DEMO. The EM loads are one of the most critical load components for the FW and the VV during plasma disruptions and a first dimensioning of these components for such loads is mandatory. During this first phase of R&D activities the conceptual design of the FW and VV have been assessed estimating, by means of FE simulations, the EM loads due to a typical vertical disruption event (VDE) in FAST. EM loads were then transferred on a FE mechanical model of the FAST structures and the mechanical response of the FW and VV design for the analyzed VDE event was assessed. The results indicate that design criteria are not fully satisfied by the current drawing of the VV and FW components. The most critical regions have been individuated and the effect of some geometrical and material changes has been checked in order to improve the structure.

  1. Cell culture for three-dimensional modeling in rotating-wall vessels: an application of simulated microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, R. P.; Goodwin, T. J.; Wolf, D. A.

    1992-01-01

    High-density, three-dimensional cell cultures are difficult to grow in vitro. The rotating-wall vessel (RWV) described here has cultured BHK-21 cells to a density of 1.1 X 10(7) cells/ml. Cells on microcarriers were observed to grow with enhanced bridging in this batch culture system. The RWV is a horizontally rotated tissue culture vessel with silicon membrane oxygenation. This design results in a low-turbulence, low-shear cell culture environment with abundant oxygenation. The RWV has the potential to culture a wide variety of normal and neoplastic cells.

  2. Identifying new components participating in the secondary cell wall formation of vessel elements in zinnia and Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Satoshi; Pesquet, Edouard; Yamaguchi, Masatoshi; Tashiro, Gen; Sato, Mayuko; Toyooka, Kiminori; Nishikubo, Nobuyuki; Udagawa-Motose, Makiko; Kubo, Minoru; Fukuda, Hiroo; Demura, Taku

    2009-04-01

    Xylem vessel elements are hollow cellular units that assemble end-to-end to form a continuous vessel throughout the plant body; the xylem vessel is strengthened by the xylem elements' reinforced secondary cell walls (SCWs). This work aims to unravel the contribution of unknown actors in xylem vessel differentiation using the model in vitro cell culture system of Zinnia elegans differentiating cell cultures and the model in vivo system of Arabidopsis thaliana plants. Tracheary Element Differentiation-Related6 (TED6) and TED7 were selected based on an RNA interference (RNAi) screen in the Zinnia system. RNAi reduction of TED6 and 7 delayed tracheary element (TE) differentiation and co-overexpression of TED6 and 7 increased TE differentiation in cultured Zinnia cells. Arabidopsis TED6 and 7 were expressed preferentially in differentiating vessel elements in seedlings. Aberrant SCW formation of root vessel elements was induced by transient RNAi of At TED7 alone and enhanced by inhibition of both TED6 and 7. Protein-protein interactions were demonstrated between TED6 and a subunit of the SCW-related cellulose synthase complex. Our strategy has succeeded in finding two novel components in SCW formation and has opened the door for in-depth analysis of their molecular functions.

  3. Bobbin-Tool Friction-Stir Welding of Thick-Walled Aluminum Alloy Pressure Vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalder, E C; Pastrnak, J W; Engel, J; Forrest, R S; Kokko, E; Ternan, K M; Waldron, D

    2007-06-06

    It was desired to assemble thick-walled Al alloy 2219 pressure vessels by bobbin-tool friction-stir welding. To develop the welding-process, mechanical-property, and fitness-for-service information to support this effort, extensive friction-stir welding-parameter studies were conducted on 2.5 cm. and 3.8 cm. thick 2219 Al alloy plate. Starting conditions of the plate were the fully-heat-treated (-T62) and in the annealed (-O) conditions. The former condition was chosen with the intent of using the welds in either the 'as welded' condition or after a simple low-temperature aging treatment. Since preliminary stress-analyses showed that stresses in and near the welds would probably exceed the yield-strength of both 'as welded' and welded and aged weld-joints, a post-weld solution-treatment, quenching, and aging treatment was also examined. Once a suitable set of welding and post-weld heat-treatment parameters was established, the project divided into two parts. The first part concentrated on developing the necessary process information to be able to make defect-free friction-stir welds in 3.8 cm. thick Al alloy 2219 in the form of circumferential welds that would join two hemispherical forgings with a 102 cm. inside diameter. This necessitated going to a bobbin-tool welding-technique to simplify the tooling needed to react the large forces generated in friction-stir welding. The bobbin-tool technique was demonstrated on both flat-plates and plates that were bent to the curvature of the actual vessel. An additional issue was termination of the weld, i.e. closing out the hole left at the end of the weld by withdrawal of the friction-stir welding tool. This was accomplished by friction-plug welding a slightly-oversized Al alloy 2219 plug into the termination-hole, followed by machining the plug flush with both the inside and outside surfaces of the vessel. The second part of the project involved demonstrating that the welds were fit for the intended

  4. Nafazatrom (BAY g 6575), a potent stimulator of prostacyclin release from cardiac and renal vessel wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klitzke, A K

    1984-10-01

    The enhancement of prostacyclin (PGI2) formation in the cardiac and renal vessel wall by nafazatrom (BAY g 6575) and the vascular effects of this drug were studied in a series of experiments on perfused isolated rat hearts and kidneys. A dose-dependent increase of prostacyclin release (measured as 6-Keto-PGF1 alpha levels, delta % of control) from the vascular endothelium was achieved when nafazatrom was applied in concentrations ranging from 5 X 10(-7) to 10(-5) g/ml. In the heart, the minimal effective dose of nafazatrom was 5 X 10(-7) g/ml causing a 23 delta % increase of PGI2 release; maximal stimulation of PGI2 was 276 delta % at 5 X 10(-6) g/ml nafazatrom. In the kidney, only at the highest concentration of 10(-5) g/ml an increase of PGI2 to 192 delta % was found. Concomitant to the PGI2 release, in both organs, a reduction of perfusion pressure (delta % of control) was observed. Minimal vasodilation in the heart was - 9.6 delta % (5 X 10(-6) g/ml nafazatrom); the maximal effect was - 25.7 delta % (5 X 10(-6) g/ml nafazatrom). In the kidney, the only observed reduction of perfusion pressure was - 12 delta % at 10(-5) g/ml nafazatrom. The cyclooxygenase inhibitor indomethacin (10(-5) g/ml) blocked vasodilation produced by nafazatrom (5 X 10(-6) g/ml); delta P % was 0.5 + 1.

  5. Exact and Numerical Elastic Analysis for the FGM Thick-Walled Cylindrical Pressure Vessels with Exponentially-Varying Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nejad M. Zamani

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Assuming exponential-varying properties in the radial direction and based on the elasticity theory, an exact closed-form analytical solution is obtained to elastic analysis of FGM thick-walled cylindrical pressure vessels in the plane strain condition. Following this, radial distribution of radial displacement, radial stress, and circumferential stress are plotted for different values of material inhomogeneity constant. The displacements and stresses distributions are compared with the solutions of the finite element method (FEM.

  6. Computerized flow and vessel wall analyses of coronary arteries for detection of non-calcified plaques in coronary CT angiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Jun; Zhou, Chuan; Chan, Heang-Ping; Chughtai, Aamer; Agarwal, Prachi; Hadjiiski, Lubomir; Kazerooni, Ella

    2016-03-01

    The buildup of non-calcified plaques (NCP) that are vulnerable to rupture in coronary arteries is a risk for myocardial infarction. We are developing a computer-aided detection (CADe) system to assist radiologists in detecting NCPs in cCTA. A major challenge of NCP detection is the large number of false positives (FPs) caused by the small sized coronary arteries, image noise and artifacts. In this study, our purpose is to design new image features to reduce FPs. A data set of 98 cCTA scans was retrospectively collected from patient files. We first used vessel wall analysis, in which topological features were extracted from vessel wall and fused with a support-vector machine, to identify the NCP candidates from the segmented coronary tree. Computerized flow dynamic (CFD) features that characterize the change in blood flow due to the presence of plaques and a vascular cross-sectional (VCS) feature that quantifies the presence of low attenuation region at the vessel wall were designed for FP reduction. Using a leave-one-out resampling method, a support vector machine classifier was trained to merge the features into a NCP likelihood score using the vessel wall features alone or in combination with the new CDF and VCS features. The performance of the new features in classification of true NCPs and FPs was evaluated by the area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC). Without the new CFD and VCS features, the test AUC was 0.84+/-0.01. The AUC was improved to 0.88+/-0.01 with the addition of the new features. The improvement was statistically significant (p < 0.001). The study indicated that the new flow dynamic and vascular cross-sectional features were useful for differentiation of NCPs from FPs in cCTA.

  7. Characterizaton of the Vessel Geometry, Flow Mechanics and Wall Shear Stress in the Great Arteries of Wildtype Prenatal Mouse

    OpenAIRE

    Choon Hwai Yap; Xiaoqin Liu; Kerem Pekkan

    2014-01-01

    Characterizaton of the Vessel Geometry, Flow Mechanics and Wall Shear Stress in the Great Arteries of Wildtype Prenatal Mouse Choon Hwai Yap1, Xiaoqin Liu2, Kerem Pekkan3* 1 Department of Biomedical Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore, Singapore, 2 Department of Developmental Biology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States of America, 3 Department of Biomedical Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh...

  8. PEG-albumin supraplasma expansion is due to increased vessel wall shear stress induced by blood viscosity shear thinning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sriram, Krishna; Tsai, Amy G; Cabrales, Pedro; Meng, Fantao; Acharya, Seetharama A; Tartakovsky, Daniel M; Intaglietta, Marcos

    2012-06-15

    We studied the extreme hemodilution to a hematocrit of 11% induced by three plasma expanders: polyethylene glycol (PEG)-conjugated albumin (PEG-Alb), 6% 70-kDa dextran, and 6% 500-kDa dextran. The experimental component of our study relied on microelectrodes and cardiac output to measure both the rheological properties of plasma-expander blood mixtures and nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability in vessel walls. The modeling component consisted of an analysis of the distribution of wall shear stress (WSS) in the microvessels. Our experiments demonstrated that plasma expansion with PEG-Alb caused a state of supraperfusion with cardiac output 40% above baseline, significantly increased NO vessel wall bioavailability, and lowered peripheral vascular resistance. We attributed this behavior to the shear thinning nature of blood and PEG-Alb mixtures. To substantiate this hypothesis, we developed a mathematical model of non-Newtonian blood flow in a vessel. Our model used the Quemada rheological constitutive relationship to express blood viscosity in terms of both hematocrit and shear rate. The model revealed that the net effect of the hemodilution induced by relatively low-viscosity shear thinning PEG-Alb plasma expanders is to reduce overall blood viscosity and to increase the WSS, thus intensifying endothelial NO production. These changes act synergistically, significantly increasing cardiac output and perfusion due to lowered overall peripheral vascular resistance.

  9. Vessel Wall Enhancement and Blood-Cerebrospinal Fluid Barrier Disruption After Mechanical Thrombectomy in Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renú, Arturo; Laredo, Carlos; Lopez-Rueda, Antonio; Llull, Laura; Tudela, Raúl; San-Roman, Luis; Urra, Xabier; Blasco, Jordi; Macho, Juan; Oleaga, Laura; Chamorro, Angel; Amaro, Sergio

    2017-03-01

    Less than half of acute ischemic stroke patients treated with mechanical thrombectomy obtain permanent clinical benefits. Consequently, there is an urgent need to identify mechanisms implicated in the limited efficacy of early reperfusion. We evaluated the predictors and prognostic significance of vessel wall permeability impairment and its association with blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier (BCSFB) disruption after acute stroke treated with thrombectomy. A prospective cohort of acute stroke patients treated with stent retrievers was analyzed. Vessel wall permeability impairment was identified as gadolinium vessel wall enhancement (GVE) in a 24- to 48-hour follow-up contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging, and severe BCSFB disruption was defined as subarachnoid hemorrhage or gadolinium sulcal enhancement (present across >10 slices). Infarct volume was evaluated in follow-up magnetic resonance imaging, and clinical outcome was evaluated with the modified Rankin Scale at day 90. A total of 60 patients (median National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score, 18) were analyzed, of whom 28 (47%) received intravenous alteplase before mechanical thrombectomy. Overall, 34 (57%) patients had GVE and 27 (45%) had severe BCSFB disruption. GVE was significantly associated with alteplase use before thrombectomy and with more stent retriever passes, along with the presence of severe BCSFB disruption. GVE was associated with poor clinical outcome, and both GVE and severe BCSFB disruption were associated with increased final infarct volume. These findings may support the clinical relevance of direct vessel damage and BCSFB disruption after acute stroke and reinforce the need for further improvements in reperfusion strategies. Further validation in larger cohorts of patients is warranted. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  10. HIV-1 and recombinant gp120 affect the survival and differentiation of human vessel wall-derived mesenchymal stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasquinelli Gianandrea

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV infection elicits the onset of a progressive immunodeficiency and also damages several other organs and tissues such as the CNS, kidney, heart, blood vessels, adipose tissue and bone. In particular, HIV infection has been related to an increased incidence of cardiovascular diseases and derangement in the structure of blood vessels in the absence of classical risk factors. The recent characterization of multipotent mesenchymal cells in the vascular wall, involved in regulating cellular homeostasis, suggests that these cells may be considered a target of HIV pathogenesis. This paper investigated the interaction between HIV-1 and vascular wall resident human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs. Results MSCs were challenged with classical R5 and X4 HIV-1 laboratory strains demonstrating that these strains are able to enter and integrate their retro-transcribed proviral DNA in the host cell genome. Subsequent experiments indicated that HIV-1 strains and recombinant gp120 elicited a reliable increase in apoptosis in sub-confluent MSCs. Since vascular wall MSCs are multipotent cells that may be differentiated towards several cell lineages, we challenged HIV-1 strains and gp120 on MSCs differentiated to adipogenesis and endotheliogenesis. Our experiments showed that the adipogenesis is increased especially by upregulated PPARγ activity whereas the endothelial differentiation induced by VEGF treatment was impaired with a downregulation of endothelial markers such as vWF, Flt-1 and KDR expression. These viral effects in MSC survival and adipogenic or endothelial differentiation were tackled by CD4 blockade suggesting an important role of CD4/gp120 interaction in this context. Conclusions The HIV-related derangement of MSC survival and differentiation may suggest a direct role of HIV infection and gp120 in impaired vessel homeostasis and in genesis of vessel damage observed in HIV-infected patients.

  11. Development of automated welding process for field fabrication of thick walled pressure vessels. Fourth quarter technical progress report for period ending September 30, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1979-01-01

    Progress in developing an automated welding process for the field fabrication of thick walled pressure vessels is reported. Plans for the demonstration facility, for nondestructive testing, and for the procurement of materials are discussed. (LCL)

  12. Immobilized contrast-enhanced MRI: Gadolinium-based long-term MR contrast enhancement of the vein graft vessel wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsouras, Dimitris; Vemula, Praveen Kumar; Yu, Peng; Tao, Ming; Nguyen, Binh T; Campagna, Christina M; Karp, Jeffrey M; Mulkern, Robert V; Ozaki, C Keith; Rybicki, Frank J

    2011-01-01

    An implantable MR contrast agent that can be covalently immobilized on tissue during surgery has been developed. The rationale is that a durable increase in tissue contrast using an implantable contrast agent can enhance postsurgical tissue differentiation using MRI. For small-vessel (e.g., vein graft) MRI, the direct benefit of such permanent "labeling" of the vessel wall by modification of its relaxation properties is to achieve more efficient imaging. This efficiency can be realized as either increased contrast leading to more accurate delineation of vessel wall and lesion tissue boundaries, or, faster imaging without penalizing contrast-to-noise ratio, or a combination thereof. We demonstrate, for the first time, stable long-term MRI enhancement using such an exogenous contrast mechanism based on immobilizing a modified diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid gadolinium(3+) dihydrogen complex on a human vein using a covalent amide bond. Signal enhancement due to the covalently immobilized contrast agent is demonstrated for excised human vein specimens imaged at 3 T, and its long-term stability is demonstrated during a 4-month incubation period.

  13. Experimental Study on Tissue Engineered Small-Diameter Blood Vessel Walls Using Adipose Derived Stem Cells%应用脂肪干细胞构建组织工程化小口径血管平滑肌层的实验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王琛; 郭芳芳; 张昀; 巩伦礼; 崔磊

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the feasibility of constructing tissue engineered blood vessel walls in bioreactor using adipose derived stem cells. Methods Adipose derived stem cells (ADSCs) were obtained from fresh human lipoaspirates, and under the induction of TGF-31 and BMP4, hADSCs were differentiated into smooth muscle cells, and then the differentiated hADSCs were collected and seeded onto PGA mesh to form cell-PGA constructs. Thereafter, the cell/PGA constructs were cultivated in a bioreactor with the pulsatile radial stress (pulse rate: 75/min, radical distension <5%) for 8 weeks. New small diameter blood vessel walls was formed, the constructs were examined histologically and biomechanically and compared with normal blood vessels. Results With induction of TGF-β1 and BMP4 together, hADSCs acquired a SMC morphology, and grew in a "hill and valley" pattern similar to what was observed in primary isolated hUASMCs, with the expression of smooth muscle-specific contractile proteins including α- SMA, SM22α, calponin, and SM-MHC. An elastic small diameter vessel wall (4 mm in diameter) with improved biomechanical strength and well-organized collagenous fibers were engineered by in vitro culture of SMC -differentiated hADSCs on the PGA scaffold in a blood vessel bioreactor. Conclusion hADSCs can serve as a new cell source for SMCs in blood vessel engineering, and an elastic small diameter vessel wall could be engineered in a bioreactor. It is a promising candidate for treating cardiovascular diseases and for blood vessel engineering purposes.%目的 探索利用脂肪干细胞在生物反应器内构建组织工程血管平滑肌层的可行性.方法 用抽吸的脂肪获取脂肪干细胞,在生长因子TGF-β1和BMP4作用下诱导成平滑肌细胞,然后将诱导的平滑肌细胞接种于PGA上,将细胞-材料复合物置于生物反应器内进行培养,在模拟胚胎发育血流动力学的刺激下(搏动频率:75次/分;扩展量<5%),构建小口径

  14. Characterization of the vessel geometry, flow mechanics and wall shear stress in the great arteries of wildtype prenatal mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choon Hwai Yap

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Abnormal fluid mechanical environment in the pre-natal cardiovascular system is hypothesized to play a significant role in causing structural heart malformations. It is thus important to improve our understanding of the prenatal cardiovascular fluid mechanical environment at multiple developmental time-points and vascular morphologies. We present such a study on fetal great arteries on the wildtype mouse from embryonic day 14.5 (E14.5 to near-term (E18.5. METHODS: Ultrasound bio-microscopy (UBM was used to measure blood velocity of the great arteries. Subsequently, specimens were cryo-embedded and sectioned using episcopic fluorescent image capture (EFIC to obtain high-resolution 2D serial image stacks, which were used for 3D reconstructions and quantitative measurement of great artery and aortic arch dimensions. EFIC and UBM data were input into subject-specific computational fluid dynamics (CFD for modeling hemodynamics. RESULTS: In normal mouse fetuses between E14.5-18.5, ultrasound imaging showed gradual but statistically significant increase in blood velocity in the aorta, pulmonary trunk (with the ductus arteriosus, and descending aorta. Measurement by EFIC imaging displayed a similar increase in cross sectional area of these vessels. However, CFD modeling showed great artery average wall shear stress and wall shear rate remain relatively constant with age and with vessel size, indicating that hemodynamic shear had a relative constancy over gestational period considered here. CONCLUSION: Our EFIC-UBM-CFD method allowed reasonably detailed characterization of fetal mouse vascular geometry and fluid mechanics. Our results suggest that a homeostatic mechanism for restoring vascular wall shear magnitudes may exist during normal embryonic development. We speculate that this mechanism regulates the growth of the great vessels.

  15. NASA Bioreactor Schematic

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    The schematic depicts the major elements and flow patterns inside the NASA Bioreactor system. Waste and fresh medium are contained in plastic bags placed side-by-side so the waste bag fills as the fresh medium bag is depleted. The compliance vessel contains a bladder to accommodate pressure transients that might damage the system. A peristolic pump moves fluid by squeezing the plastic tubing, thus avoiding potential contamination. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators.

  16. NASA Bioreactor Schematic

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    The schematic depicts the major elements and flow patterns inside the NASA Bioreactor system. Waste and fresh medium are contained in plastic bags placed side-by-side so the waste bag fills as the fresh medium bag is depleted. The compliance vessel contains a bladder to accommodate pressure transients that might damage the system. A peristolic pump moves fluid by squeezing the plastic tubing, thus avoiding potential contamination. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators.

  17. Association between proximal internal carotid artery steno-occlusive disease and diffuse wall thickening in its petrous segment: a magnetic resonance vessel wall imaging study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xiaoyi; Li, Dongye [Capital Medical University and Beijing Institute for Brain Disorders, Center for Brain Disorders Research, Beijing (China); Tsinghua University School of Medicine, Center for Biomedical Imaging Research, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Beijing (China); Zhao, Huilin [Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Department of Radiology, Renji Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); Chen, Zhensen; Qiao, Huiyu; He, Le; Li, Rui [Tsinghua University School of Medicine, Center for Biomedical Imaging Research, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Beijing (China); Cui, Yuanyuan [PLA General Hospital, Department of Radiology, Beijing (China); Zhou, Zechen [Philips Research China, Healthcare Department, Beijing (China); Yuan, Chun [Tsinghua University School of Medicine, Center for Biomedical Imaging Research, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Beijing (China); University of Washington, Department of Radiology, Seattle, WA (United States); Zhao, Xihai [Tsinghua University School of Medicine, Center for Biomedical Imaging Research, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Beijing (China); Beijing Institute for Brain Disorders, Center for Stroke, Beijing (China)

    2017-05-15

    Significant stenosis or occlusion in carotid arteries may lead to diffuse wall thickening (DWT) in the arterial wall of downstream. This study aimed to investigate the correlation between proximal internal carotid artery (ICA) steno-occlusive disease and DWT in ipsilateral petrous ICA. Symptomatic patients with atherosclerotic stenosis (>0%) in proximal ICA were recruited and underwent carotid MR vessel wall imaging. The 3D motion sensitized-driven equilibrium prepared rapid gradient-echo (3D-MERGE) was acquired for characterizing the wall thickness and longitudinal extent of the lesions in petrous ICA and the distance from proximal lesion to the petrous ICA. The stenosis degree in proximal ICA was measured on the time-of-flight (TOF) images. In total, 166 carotid arteries from 125 patients (mean age 61.0 ± 10.5 years, 99 males) were eligible for final analysis and 64 showed DWT in petrous ICAs. The prevalence of severe DWT in petrous ICA was 1.4%, 5.3%, 5.9%, and 80.4% in ipsilateral proximal ICAs with stenosis category of 1%-49%, 50%-69%, 70%-99%, and total occlusion, respectively. Proximal ICA stenosis was significantly correlated with the wall thickness in petrous ICA (r = 0.767, P < 0.001). Logistic regression analysis showed that proximal ICA stenosis was independently associated with DWT in ipsilateral petrous ICA (odds ratio (OR) = 2.459, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.896-3.189, P < 0.001). Proximal ICA steno-occlusive disease is independently associated with DWT in ipsilateral petrous ICA. (orig.)

  18. Distribution and natural course of intracranial vessel wall lesions in patients with ischemic stroke or TIA at 7.0 tesla MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolk, Anja G. van der; Luijten, Peter R.; Hendrikse, Jeroen [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Postbox 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); Zwanenburg, Jaco J.M. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Postbox 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); University Medical Center Utrecht, Image Sciences Institute, Utrecht (Netherlands); Brundel, Manon; Biessels, Geert Jan [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Neurology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Visser, Fredy [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Postbox 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); Philips Healthcare, Best (Netherlands)

    2015-06-01

    Previous studies using intracranial vessel wall MRI techniques showed that over 50 % of patients with ischemic stroke or TIA had one or more intracranial vessel wall lesions. In the current study, we assessed the preferential location of these lesions within the intracranial arterial tree and their potential changes over time in these patient groups. Forty-nine patients with ischemic stroke (n = 25) or TIA (n = 24) of the anterior cerebral circulation underwent 7.0 T MRI, including a T{sub 1}-weighted magnetization-preparation inversion recovery turbo-spin-echo (MPIR-TSE) sequence within one week and approximately one month after symptom onset. Intracranial vessel wall lesions were scored for multiple locations within the arterial tree and differences between one-week and one-month images. At baseline, 132 intracranial vessel wall lesions were found in 41 patients (84 %), located primarily in the anterior cerebral circulation (74 %), with a preferential location in the distal internal carotid artery and M1 and M2 segments of the middle cerebral artery. During follow-up, presence or enhancement patterns changed in 14 lesions (17 %). A large burden of intracranial vessel wall lesions was found in both the anterior and posterior cerebral circulation. Most lesions were found to be relatively stable, possibly indicating a more generalized atherosclerotic process. (orig.)

  19. Imaging the Intracranial Atherosclerotic Vessel Wall Using 7T MRI : Initial Comparison with Histopathology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Kolk, A. G.; Zwanenburg, J. J. M.; Denswil, N. P.; Vink, A.; Spliet, W. G. M.; Daemen, M. J. A. P.; Visser, F.; Klomp, D. W. J.; Luijten, P. R.; Hendrikse, J.

    2015-01-01

    In this preliminary study, 7T imaging was capable of identifying not only intracranial wall thickening but different plaque components such as foamy macrophages and collagen. Signal heterogeneity was typical of advanced atherosclerotic disease. BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Several studies have attempted

  20. 1-Dimensional simulation of thermal annealing in a commercial nuclear power plant reactor pressure vessel wall section

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakos, J.T.; Rosinski, S.T.; Acton, R.U.

    1994-11-01

    The objective of this work was to provide experimental heat transfer boundary condition and reactor pressure vessel (RPV) section thermal response data that can be used to benchmark computer codes that simulate thermal annealing of RPVS. This specific protect was designed to provide the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) with experimental data that could be used to support the development of a thermal annealing model. A secondary benefit is to provide additional experimental data (e.g., thermal response of concrete reactor cavity wall) that could be of use in an annealing demonstration project. The setup comprised a heater assembly, a 1.2 in {times} 1.2 m {times} 17.1 cm thick [4 ft {times} 4 ft {times} 6.75 in] section of an RPV (A533B ferritic steel with stainless steel cladding), a mockup of the {open_quotes}mirror{close_quotes} insulation between the RPV and the concrete reactor cavity wall, and a 25.4 cm [10 in] thick concrete wall, 2.1 in {times} 2.1 in [10 ft {times} 10 ft] square. Experiments were performed at temperature heat-up/cooldown rates of 7, 14, and 28{degrees}C/hr [12.5, 25, and 50{degrees}F/hr] as measured on the heated face. A peak temperature of 454{degrees}C [850{degrees}F] was maintained on the heated face until the concrete wall temperature reached equilibrium. Results are most representative of those RPV locations where the heat transfer would be 1-dimensional. Temperature was measured at multiple locations on the heated and unheated faces of the RPV section and the concrete wall. Incident heat flux was measured on the heated face, and absorbed heat flux estimates were generated from temperature measurements and an inverse heat conduction code. Through-wall temperature differences, concrete wall temperature response, heat flux absorbed into the RPV surface and incident on the surface are presented. All of these data are useful to modelers developing codes to simulate RPV annealing.

  1. 1-Dimensional simulation of thermal annealing in a commercial nuclear power plant reactor pressure vessel wall section

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakos, J.T.; Rosinski, S.T.; Acton, R.U.

    1994-11-01

    The objective of this work was to provide experimental heat transfer boundary condition and reactor pressure vessel (RPV) section thermal response data that can be used to benchmark computer codes that simulate thermal annealing of RPVS. This specific protect was designed to provide the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) with experimental data that could be used to support the development of a thermal annealing model. A secondary benefit is to provide additional experimental data (e.g., thermal response of concrete reactor cavity wall) that could be of use in an annealing demonstration project. The setup comprised a heater assembly, a 1.2 in {times} 1.2 m {times} 17.1 cm thick [4 ft {times} 4 ft {times} 6.75 in] section of an RPV (A533B ferritic steel with stainless steel cladding), a mockup of the {open_quotes}mirror{close_quotes} insulation between the RPV and the concrete reactor cavity wall, and a 25.4 cm [10 in] thick concrete wall, 2.1 in {times} 2.1 in [10 ft {times} 10 ft] square. Experiments were performed at temperature heat-up/cooldown rates of 7, 14, and 28{degrees}C/hr [12.5, 25, and 50{degrees}F/hr] as measured on the heated face. A peak temperature of 454{degrees}C [850{degrees}F] was maintained on the heated face until the concrete wall temperature reached equilibrium. Results are most representative of those RPV locations where the heat transfer would be 1-dimensional. Temperature was measured at multiple locations on the heated and unheated faces of the RPV section and the concrete wall. Incident heat flux was measured on the heated face, and absorbed heat flux estimates were generated from temperature measurements and an inverse heat conduction code. Through-wall temperature differences, concrete wall temperature response, heat flux absorbed into the RPV surface and incident on the surface are presented. All of these data are useful to modelers developing codes to simulate RPV annealing.

  2. Optimizing of Culture Conditionin Horizontal Rotating Bioreactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    1 IntroductionBioreactor is the most important equipment in tissue engineering. It can mimic the micro-environment of cell growth in vitro. At present, horizontal rotating bioreactor is the most advanced equipment for cell culture in the world. 2 Rotating bioreactors2.1 Working principleThere are two kinds of horizontal rotating bioreactor: HARV(high aspect ratio vessel) and RCCS (rotary cell culture system). It is drived by step motor with horizontal rotation, the culture medium and cell is filled between ...

  3. Distribution and Viability of Fetal and Adult Human Bone Marrow Stromal Cells in a Biaxial Rotating Vessel Bioreactor after Seeding on Polymeric 3D Additive Manufactured Scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leferink, Anne M; Chng, Yhee-Cheng; van Blitterswijk, Clemens A; Moroni, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    One of the conventional approaches in tissue engineering is the use of scaffolds in combination with cells to obtain mechanically stable tissue constructs in vitro prior to implantation. Additive manufacturing by fused deposition modeling is a widely used technique to produce porous scaffolds with defined pore network, geometry, and therewith defined mechanical properties. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are promising candidates for tissue engineering-based cell therapies due to their multipotent character. One of the hurdles to overcome when combining additive manufactured scaffolds with MSCs is the resulting heterogeneous cell distribution and limited cell proliferation capacity. In this study, we show that the use of a biaxial rotating bioreactor, after static culture of human fetal MSCs (hfMSCs) seeded on synthetic polymeric scaffolds, improved the homogeneity of cell and extracellular matrix distribution and increased the total cell number. Furthermore, we show that the relative mRNA expression levels of indicators for stemness and differentiation are not significantly changed upon this bioreactor culture, whereas static culture shows variations of several indicators for stemness and differentiation. The biaxial rotating bioreactor presented here offers a homogeneous distribution of hfMSCs, enabling studies on MSCs fate in additive manufactured scaffolds without inducing undesired differentiation.

  4. Distribution and viability of fetal and adult human bone marrow stromal cells in a biaxial rotating vessel bioreactor after seeding on polymeric 3D additive manufactured scaffolds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne eLeferink

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available One of the conventional approaches in tissue engineering is the use of scaffolds in combination with cells to obtain mechanically stable tissue constructs in vitro prior to implantation. Additive manufacturing by fused deposition modeling is a widely used technique to produce porous scaffolds with defined pore network, geometry, and therewith defined mechanical properties. Bone marrow derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs are promising candidates for tissue engineering based cell therapies due to their multipotent character. One of the hurdles to overcome when combining additive manufactured scaffolds with MSCs is the resulting heterogeneous cell distribution and limited cell proliferation capacity. In this study, we show that the use of a biaxial rotating bioreactor, after static culture of human fetal MSCs (hfMSCs seeded on synthetic polymeric scaffolds, improved the homogeneity of cell and extracellular matrix (ECM distribution and increased the total cell number. Furthermore, we show that the relative mRNA expression levels of indicators for stemness and differentiation are not significantly changed upon this bioreactor culture, whereas static culture shows variations of several indicators for stemness and differentiation. The biaxial rotating bioreactor presented here offers a homogeneous distribution of hfMSCs, enabling studies on MSCs fate in additive manufactured scaffolds without inducing undesired differentiation.

  5. Repair weld induced residual stresses in thick-walled steel pressure vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, G.C.; Holz, P.P.

    1978-06-01

    If a flaw requiring corrective action were to be found in an operating nuclear pressure vessel, there would be considerable safety and economic implications. Should such a flaw be found, one possible corrective action would be an in situ repair weld. A repair of this type would presumably involve grinding away material in a region encompassing the flaw and then filling the resulting cavity with weld metal. Thermal stress relieving under those conditions could lead to serious difficulties associated with thermal expansion and warpage and would therefore most likely be avoided. Such a departure from normal procedure raises questions relating to residual stresses and material toughness levels which would have to be assessed before a repair could be recommended or approved. The residual stress measurements reported are intended to provide baseline information to aid in an assessment should such a repair ever have to be seriously considered.

  6. Assessment of myocardial segmental function with coronary artery stenosis in multi-vessel coronary disease patients with normal wall motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, M-Y; Lv, Q; Wang, J; Yin, J-B

    2016-04-01

    To discover the impact of the various degrees of coronary artery stenosis (CAD) on the left ventricular systolic dysfunction in steady state with quantitative analysis of the regional systolic myocardium in longitudinal, radial and circumferential direction in patients with coronary artery disease by two-dimensional speckle tracking imaging (STI). Forty-three normal wall motion-multi vessel coronary artery disease (NWM-MVD) patients labeled as the experimental groups and forty-two subjects with little risk of CAD marked as the control group were enrolled in this study. The two-dimensional STI was obtained in the apical long axis and three levels of the short axis of the left ventricle. The left ventricular wall was divided into 18 segments. The affected myocardia were divided into three groups: group B (coronary stenosis degree ≤50%), group C (coronary stenosis degree 50%-99%)and group D (coronary stenosis degree ≥99%). Using the Q-analysis software, the longitudinal, radial and circumferential systolic strain (SL, SR, SC) and strain ratio (SrL, SrR, SrC) of the myocardium were analyzed. The bradycardia in the NWM-MVD group is greater than that in the control group (16/43 vs. 7/42, p coronary stenosis degree ≤50%), group C (coronary stenosis degree 50%-99%)and group D (coronary stenosis degree ≥99%), especially the longitudinal and radial systolic function, even though they had normal wall motion. The SrL equaled 1.085 for the cut-off value, and the sums (1.348) of sensitivity (0.673) and specificity (0.675) were the greatest. Bradycardia might be a compensatory mechanism in NWM-MVD patients.

  7. Controlled-Turbulence Bioreactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, David A.; Schwartz, Ray; Trinh, Tinh

    1989-01-01

    Two versions of bioreactor vessel provide steady supplies of oxygen and nutrients with little turbulence. Suspends cells in environment needed for sustenance and growth, while inflicting less damage from agitation and bubbling than do propeller-stirred reactors. Gentle environments in new reactors well suited to delicate mammalian cells. One reactor kept human kidney cells alive for as long as 11 days. Cells grow on carrier beads suspended in liquid culture medium that fills cylindrical housing. Rotating vanes - inside vessel but outside filter - gently circulates nutrient medium. Vessel stationary; magnetic clutch drives filter cylinder and vanes. Another reactor creates even less turbulence. Oxygen-permeable tubing wrapped around rod extending along central axis. Small external pump feeds oxygen to tubing through rotary coupling, and oxygen diffuses into liquid medium.

  8. Protein-bound uremic toxins stimulate crosstalk between leukocytes and vessel wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pletinck, Anneleen; Glorieux, Griet; Schepers, Eva; Cohen, Gerald; Gondouin, Bertrand; Van Landschoot, Maria; Eloot, Sunny; Rops, Angelique; Van de Voorde, Johan; De Vriese, An; van der Vlag, Johan; Brunet, Philippe; Van Biesen, Wim; Vanholder, Raymond

    2013-12-01

    Leukocyte activation and endothelial damage both contribute to cardiovascular disease, a major cause of morbidity and mortality in CKD. Experimental in vitro data link several protein-bound uremic retention solutes to the modulation of inflammatory stimuli, including endothelium and leukocyte responses and cardiovascular damage, corroborating observational in vivo data. However, the impact of these uremic toxins on the crosstalk between endothelium and leukocytes has not been assessed. This study evaluated the effects of acute and continuous exposure to uremic levels of indoxylsulfate (IS), p-cresylsulfate (pCS), and p-cresylglucuronide (pCG) on the recruitment of circulating leukocytes in the rat peritoneal vascular bed using intravital microscopy. Superfusion with IS induced strong leukocyte adhesion, enhanced extravasation, and interrupted blood flow, whereas pCS caused a rapid increase in leukocyte rolling. Superfusion with pCS and pCG combined caused impaired blood flow and vascular leakage but did not further enhance leukocyte rolling over pCS alone. Intravenous infusion with IS confirmed the superfusion results and caused shedding of heparan sulfate, pointing to disruption of the glycocalyx as the mechanism likely mediating IS-induced flow stagnation. These results provide the first clear in vivo evidence that IS, pCS, and pCG exert proinflammatory effects that contribute to vascular damage by stimulating crosstalk between leukocytes and vessels.

  9. Hydrostatic pressure and shear stress affect endothelin-1 and nitric oxide release by endothelial cells in bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vozzi, Federico; Bianchi, Francesca; Ahluwalia, Arti; Domenici, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    Abundant experimental evidence demonstrates that endothelial cells are sensitive to flow; however, the effect of fluid pressure or pressure gradients that are used to drive viscous flow is not well understood. There are two principal physical forces exerted on the blood vessel wall by the passage of intra-luminal blood: pressure and shear. To analyze the effects of pressure and shear independently, these two stresses were applied to cultured cells in two different types of bioreactors: a pressure-controlled bioreactor and a laminar flow bioreactor, in which controlled levels of pressure or shear stress, respectively, can be generated. Using these bioreactor systems, endothelin-1 (ET-1) and nitric oxide (NO) release from human umbilical vein endothelial cells were measured under various shear stress and pressure conditions. Compared to the controls, a decrease of ET-1 production by the cells cultured in both bioreactors was observed, whereas NO synthesis was up-regulated in cells under shear stress, but was not modulated by hydrostatic pressure. These results show that the two hemodynamic forces acting on blood vessels affect endothelial cell function in different ways, and that both should be considered when planning in vitro experiments in the presence of flow. Understanding the individual and synergic effects of the two forces could provide important insights into physiological and pathological processes involved in vascular remodeling and adaptation.

  10. Development of automated welding process for field fabrication of thick walled pressure vessels. Fourth quarter technical progress report for period ending September 28, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-01-01

    Progress is reported in research aimed at optimizing an automated welding process for the field fabrication of thick-walled pressure vessels and for evaluating the welded joints. Information is included on the welding equipment, mechanical control of the process, joint design, filler wire optimization, in-process nondestructive testing of welds, and repair techniques. (LCL)

  11. Prevalence and Risk Factors of Carotid Vessel Wall Inflammation in Coronary Artery Disease Patients FDG-PET and CT Imaging Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Bucerius; R. Duivenvoorden; V. Mani; C. Moncrieff; J.H.F. Rudd; C. Calcagno; J. Machac; V. Fuster; M.E. Farkouh; Z.A. Fayad

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES We investigated the prevalence and clinical risk factors of carotid vessel wall inflammation by means of (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) in a population consisting of coronary artery disease (CAD) patients. BACKGROUND The atherosclerotic disease process is

  12. Evaluation of a dedicated dual phased-array surface coil using a black-blood FSE sequence for high resolution MRI of the carotid vessel wall

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Ouhlous (Mohamed); F. Lethimonnier; D.W.J. Dippel (Diederik); M.R.H.M. van Sambeek (Marc); L.C.J. van Heerebeek (Lambertus C.); P.M.T. Pattynama (Peter); A. van der Lugt (Aad)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractPurpose: To investigate the ability of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to visualize the carotid vessel wall using a phased-array coil and a black-blood (BB) fast spin-echo (FSE) sequence. Materials and Methods: The phased-array coil was compared with a three-inch coil. Images from volun

  13. [Morphological signs of mitochondrial cytopathy in skeletal muscles and micro-vessel walls in a patient with cerebral artery dissection associated with MELAS syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakharova, A V; Kalashnikova, L A; Chaĭkovskaia, R P; Mir-Kasimov, M F; Nazarova, M A; Pykhtina, T N; Dobrynina, L A; Patrusheva, N L; Patrushev, L I; Protskiĭ, S V

    2012-01-01

    Skin and muscles biopsy specimens of a patient harboring A3243G mutation in mitochondrial DNA, with dissection of internal carotid and vertebral arteries, associated with MELAS were studied using histochemical and electron-microscopy techniques. Ragged red fibers, regional variability of SDH histochemical reaction, two types of morphologically atypical mitochondria and their aggregation were found in muscle. There was correlation between SDH histochemical staining and number of mitochondria revealed by electron microscopy in muscle tissue. Similar mitochondrial abnormality, their distribution and cell lesions followed by extra-cellular matrix mineralization were found in the blood vessel walls. In line with generalization of cytopathy process caused by gene mutation it can be supposed that changes found in skin and muscle microvessels also exist in large cerebral vessels causing the vessel wall "weakness", predisposing them to dissection.

  14. Structural Alterations of the Glomerular Wall And Vessels in Early Stages of Diabetes Mellitus: Light and Transmission Electron Microscopic Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dkhil MA

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The capillary changes at the initial stage of diabetes may show an angioarchitecture clearly different from those of later stages and,/or very severe glomerular change. However, the onset of alterations in the early phases is unclear. This study attempts to determine the functional and structural alterations of the glomerular wall and vesicles in the early stage of diabetes.Material and Methods: Twenty-five adult rats were used in this study. They were divided into two groups: the first group of five was used as a control .The second group of 20 (the experimental group was injected intraperitoneally by a single dose of streptozotocin to induce hyperglycemia. Rats were sacrificed after ten days, two months, and four months.Five rats at two months of age with hyperglycemia were treated with insulin for eight weeks. Renal tissues were prepared by routine technique for light and transmission electron microscopic evaluation. Results: By light microscopy after ten days of induced hyperglycemia, there were no structural modifications detected either in renal glomerular fine vessels or in the glomerular basement membrane of the glomerular capillaries. After two months, there was a moderate glomerular enlargement and dilatation of glomerular capillaries, afferent, and efferent arterioles. After four months, glomerular basement membrane thickening was the only structural alteration observed. Recovery of the glomerular alterations was observed after two months of treatment with insulin. Conclusion: In early stages of diabetes mellitus in rats, there was an increase in the diameter of glomerular vessels. In later stages of the disease, the reverse was seen, but insulin treatment had a positive role in reversing these changes in the study subjects.

  15. Compliant model of a coupled sequential coronary arterial bypass graft: effects of vessel wall elasticity and non-Newtonian rheology on blood flow regime and hemodynamic parameters distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabinejadian, Foad; Ghista, Dhanjoo N

    2012-09-01

    We have recently developed a novel design for coronary arterial bypass surgical grafting, consisting of coupled sequential side-to-side and end-to-side anastomoses. This design has been shown to have beneficial blood flow patterns and wall shear stress distributions which may improve the patency of the CABG, as compared to the conventional end-to-side anastomosis. In our preliminary computational simulation of blood flow of this coupled sequential anastomoses design, the graft and the artery were adopted to be rigid vessels and the blood was assumed to be a Newtonian fluid. Therefore, the present study has been carried out in order to (i) investigate the effects of wall compliance and non-Newtonian rheology on the local flow field and hemodynamic parameters distribution, and (ii) verify the advantages of the CABG coupled sequential anastomoses design over the conventional end-to-side configuration in a more realistic bio-mechanical condition. For this purpose, a two-way fluid-structure interaction analysis has been carried out. A finite volume method is applied to solve the three-dimensional, time-dependent, laminar flow of the incompressible, non-Newtonian fluid; the vessel wall is modeled as a linearly elastic, geometrically non-linear shell structure. In an iteratively coupled approach the transient shell equations and the governing fluid equations are solved numerically. The simulation results indicate a diameter variation ratio of up to 4% and 5% in the graft and the coronary artery, respectively. The velocity patterns and qualitative distribution of wall shear stress parameters in the distensible model do not change significantly compared to the rigid-wall model, despite quite large side-wall deformations in the anastomotic regions. However, less flow separation and reversed flow is observed in the distensible models. The wall compliance reduces the time-averaged wall shear stress up to 32% (on the heel of the conventional end-to-side model) and somewhat

  16. NASA Bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    Biotechnology Specimen Temperature Controller (BSTC) will cultivate cells until their turn in the bioreactor; it can also be used in culturing experiments that do not require the bioreactor. The BSTC comprises four incubation/refrigeration chambers individually set at 4 to 50 deg. C (near-freezing to above body temperature). Each chamber holds three rugged tissue chamber modules (12 total), clear Teflon bags holding 30 ml of growth media, all positioned by a metal frame. Every 7 to 21 days (depending on growth rates), an astronaut uses a shrouded syringe and the bags' needleless injection ports to transfer a few cells to a fresh media bag, and to introduce a fixative so that the cells may be studied after flight. The design also lets the crew sample the media to measure glucose, gas, and pH levels, and to inspect cells with a microscope. The controller is monitored by the flight crew through a 23-cm (9-inch) color computer display on the face of the BSTC. This view shows the BTSC with the front panel open. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators.

  17. Neutron fluence at the reactor pressure vessel wall - a comparison of French and German procedures and strategies in PWRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tricot, N. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, IRSN/DES/SECCA, 92 - Fontenay aux Roses (France); Jendrich, U. [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) mbH, Garching (Germany)

    2003-01-01

    While the neutrons within the core may take part in the chain reaction, those neutrons emitted from the core are basically lost for the energy production. This 'neutron leakage' represents a loss of fuel efficiency and causes neutron embrittlement of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) wall. The latter raises safety concerns, needs to be monitored closely and may necessitate mitigating measures. There are different strategies to deal with these two undesirable effects: The neutron emission may be reduced to some extent all around the core or just at the 'hot spots' of RPV embrittlement by tailored core loading patterns. A higher absorption rate of neutrons may also be achieved by a larger water gap between the core and the RPV. In this paper the inter-relations between the distribution of neutron flux, core geometry, core loading strategy, RPV embrittlement and its surveillance are discussed at first. Then the different strategies followed by the German and French operators are described. Finally the conclusions will highlight the communalities and differences between these strategies as different approaches to the same problem of safety as well as economy. (authors)

  18. T2‐Weighted intracranial vessel wall imaging at 7 Tesla using a DANTE‐prepared variable flip angle turbo spin echo readout (DANTE‐SPACE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viessmann, Olivia; Li, Linqing; Benjamin, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To optimize intracranial vessel wall imaging (VWI) at 7T for sharp wall depiction and high boundary contrast. Methods A variable flip angle turbo spin echo scheme (SPACE) was optimized for VWI. SPACE provides black‐blood contrast, but has less crushing effect on cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). However, a delay alternating with nutation for tailored excitation (DANTE) preparation suppresses the signal from slowly moving spins of a few mm per second. Therefore, we optimized a DANTE‐preparation module for 7T. Signal‐to‐noise ratio (SNR), contrast‐to‐noise ratio (CNR), and signal ratio for vessel wall, CSF, and lumen were calculated for SPACE and DANTE‐SPACE in 11 volunteers at the middle cerebral artery (MCA). An exemplar MCA stenosis patient was scanned with DANTE‐SPACE. Results The 7T‐optimized SPACE sequence improved the vessel wall point‐spread function by 17%. The CNR between the wall and CSF was doubled (12.2 versus 5.6) for the DANTE‐SPACE scans compared with the unprepared SPACE. This increase was significant in the right hemisphere (P = 0.016), but not in the left (P = 0.090). The CNR between wall and lumen was halved, but remained at a high value (24.9 versus 56.5). Conclusion The optimized SPACE sequence improves VWI at 7T. Additional DANTE preparation increases the contrast between the wall and CSF. Increased outer boundary contrast comes at the cost of reduced inner boundary contrast. Magn Reson Med 77:655–663, 2017. © 2016 The Authors Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. PMID:26890988

  19. In vivo bioreactors for mandibular reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatara, A M; Wong, M E; Mikos, A G

    2014-12-01

    Large mandibular defects are difficult to reconstruct with good functional and aesthetic outcomes because of the complex geometry of craniofacial bone. While the current gold standard is free tissue flap transfer, this treatment is limited in fidelity by the shape of the harvested tissue and can result in significant donor site morbidity. To address these problems, in vivo bioreactors have been explored as an approach to generate autologous prefabricated tissue flaps. These bioreactors are implanted in an ectopic site in the body, where ossified tissue grows into the bioreactor in predefined geometries and local vessels are recruited to vascularize the developing construct. The prefabricated flap can then be harvested with vessels and transferred to a mandibular defect for optimal reconstruction. The objective of this review article is to introduce the concept of the in vivo bioreactor, describe important preclinical models in the field, summarize the human cases that have been reported through this strategy, and offer future directions for this exciting approach.

  20. Assessing the feasibility of a high-temperature, helium-cooled vacuum vessel and first wall for the Vulcan tokamak conceptual design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnard, H.S., E-mail: hbar@mit.edu [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Hartwig, Z.S.; Olynyk, G.M.; Payne, J.E. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2012-03-15

    The Vulcan conceptual design (R = 1.2 m, a = 0.3 m, B{sub 0} = 7 T), a compact, steady-state tokamak for plasma-material interaction (PMI) science, must incorporate a vacuum vessel capable of operating at 1000 K in order to replicate the temperature-dependent physical chemistry that will govern PMI in a reactor. In addition, the Vulcan divertor must be capable of handling steady-state heat fluxes up to 10 MW m{sup -2} so that integrated materials testing can be performed under reactor-relevant conditions. A conceptual design scoping study has been performed to assess the challenges involved in achieving such a configuration. The Vulcan vacuum system comprises an inner, primary vacuum vessel that is thermally and mechanically isolated from the outer, secondary vacuum vessel by a 10 cm vacuum gap. The thermal isolation minimizes heat conduction between the high-temperature helium-cooled primary vessel and the water-cooled secondary vessel. The mechanical isolation allows for thermal expansion and enables vertical removal of the primary vessel for maintenance or replacement. Access to the primary vessel for diagnostics, lower hybrid waveguides, and helium coolant is achieved through {approx}1 m long intra-vessel pipes to minimize temperature gradients and is shown to be commensurate with the available port space in Vulcan. The isolated primary vacuum vessel is shown to be mechanically feasible and robust to plasma disruptions with analytic calculations and finite element analyses. Heat removal in the first wall and divertor, coupled with the ability to perform in situ maintenance and replacement of divertor components for scientific purposes, is achieved by combining existing helium-cooled techniques with innovative mechanical attachments of plasma facing components, either in plate-type helium-cooled modules or independently bolted, helium-jet impingement-cooled tiles. The vacuum vessel and first wall design enables a wide range of potential PFC materials and

  1. Bioreactor Technology in Cardiovascular Tissue Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertsching, H.; Hansmann, J.

    Cardiovascular tissue engineering is a fast evolving field of biomedical science and technology to manufacture viable blood vessels, heart valves, myocar-dial substitutes and vascularised complex tissues. In consideration of the specific role of the haemodynamics of human circulation, bioreactors are a fundamental of this field. The development of perfusion bioreactor technology is a consequence of successes in extracorporeal circulation techniques, to provide an in vitro environment mimicking in vivo conditions. The bioreactor system should enable an automatic hydrodynamic regime control. Furthermore, the systematic studies regarding the cellular responses to various mechanical and biochemical cues guarantee the viability, bio-monitoring, testing, storage and transportation of the growing tissue.

  2. Studies on the effect of administration of DDAVP in patients with cerebrovascular occlusive diseases from the viewpoint of blood coagulation-fibrinolysis in vessel walls

    OpenAIRE

    Arai, Hiroyuki; Miyakawa, Teruo; Sakuragawa, Nobuo

    1985-01-01

    To clarify the pathogenesis of cerebral thrombosis and to estimate the effectiveness of fibrinolytic treatment by administration of urokinase from the viewpoint of coagulation-fibrinolysis in vessel walls, changes of blood coagulation were investigated by intravenous administration of 1-deamino-8-D-arginine vasopressin (DDAVP) to 10 healthy volunteers and to 14 patients with cerebrovascular occlusive diseases. Results were as follows: 1) After the administration of DDAVP to normal controls, a...

  3. Utility of birefringence changes due to collagen thermal denaturation rate process analysis: vessel wall temperature estimation for new short term heating balloon angioplasty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Kenji; Shimazaki, Natsumi; Gotoh, Maya; Nakatani, Eriko; Arai, Tsunenori

    2007-02-01

    Our photo thermal reaction heating architecture balloon realizes less than 10 s short term heating that can soften vessel wall collagen without damaging surrounding tissue thermally. New thermal balloon angioplasty, photo-thermo dynamic balloon angioplasty (PTDBA) has experimentally shown sufficient opening with 2 atm low pressure dilation and prevention of chronic phase restenosis and acute phase thrombus in vivo. Even though PTDBA has high therapeutic potential, the most efficient heating condition is still under study, because relationship of treatment and thermal dose to vessel wall is not clarified yet. To study and set the most efficient heating condition, we have been working on establishment of temperature history estimation method from our previous experimental results. Heating target of PTDBA, collagen, thermally denatures following rate process. Denaturation is able to be quantified with measured collagen birefringence value. To express the denaturation with equation of rate process, the following ex vivo experiments were performed. Porcine extracted carotid artery was soaked in two different temperature saline baths to enforce constant temperature heating. Higher temperature bath was set to 40 to 80 degree Celsius and soaking duration was 5 to 40 s. Samples were observed by a polarizing microscope and a scanning electron microscope. The birefringence was measured by polarizing microscopic system using Brace-Koehler compensator 1/30 wavelength. The measured birefringence showed temperature dependency and quite fit with the rate process equation. We think vessel wall temperature is able to be estimated using the birefringence changes due to thermal denaturation.

  4. Bioreactor landfill

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Hao; XING Kai; Anthony Adzomani

    2004-01-01

    Following the population expansion, there is a growing threat brought by municipal solid waste (MSW) against environment and human health. Sanitary landfill is the most important method of MSW disposal in China. In contrast to the conventional landfill, this paper introduces a new technique named bioreactor landfill (BL). Mechanisms, operation conditions as well as the advantages and disadvantages of BL are also discussed in this paper.

  5. Transgenic bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jänne, J; Alhonen, L; Hyttinen, J M; Peura, T; Tolvanen, M; Korhonen, V P

    1998-01-01

    Since the generation of the first transgenic mice in 1980, transgene technology has also been successfully applied to large farm animals. Although this technology can be employed to improve certain production traits of livestock, this approach has not been very successful so far owing to unwanted effects encountered in the production animals. However, by using tissue-specific targeting of the transgene expression, it is possible to produce heterologous proteins in the extracellular space of large transgenic farm animals. Even though some recombinant proteins, such as human hemoglobin, have been produced in the blood of transgenic pigs, in the majority of the cases mammary gland targeted expression of the transgene has been employed. Using production genes driven by regulatory sequences of milk protein genes a number of valuable therapeutic proteins have been produced in the milk of transgenic bioreactors, ranging from rabbits to dairy cattle. Unlike bacterial fermentors, the mammary gland of transgenic bioreactors appear to carry out proper postsynthetic modifications of human proteins required for full biological activity. In comparison with mammalian cell bioreactors, transgenic livestock with mammary gland targeted expression seems to be able to produce valuable human therapeutic proteins at very low cost. Although not one transgenically produced therapeutic protein is yet on the market, the first such proteins have recently entered or even completed clinical trials required for their approval.

  6. Heat-Induced, Pressure-Induced and Centrifugal-Force-Induced Exact Axisymmetric Thermo-Mechanical Analyses in a Thick-Walled Spherical Vessel, an Infinite Cylindrical Vessel, and a Uniform Disk Made of an Isotropic and Homogeneous Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vebil Yıldırım

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Heat-induced, pressure-induced, and centrifugal force-induced axisymmetric exact deformation and stresses in a thick-walled spherical vessel, a cylindrical vessel, and a uniform disk are all determined analytically at a specified constant surface temperature and at a constant angular velocity. The inner and outer pressures are both included in the formulation of annular structures made of an isotropic and homogeneous linear elastic material. Governing equations in the form of Euler-Cauchy differential equation with constant coefficients are solved and results are presented in compact forms. For disks, three different boundary conditions are taken into account to consider mechanical engineering applications. The present study is also peppered with numerical results in graphical forms.

  7. Oscillating Cell Culture Bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freed, Lisa E.; Cheng, Mingyu; Moretti, Matteo G.

    2010-01-01

    To better exploit the principles of gas transport and mass transport during the processes of cell seeding of 3D scaffolds and in vitro culture of 3D tissue engineered constructs, the oscillatory cell culture bioreactor provides a flow of cell suspensions and culture media directly through a porous 3D scaffold (during cell seeding) and a 3D construct (during subsequent cultivation) within a highly gas-permeable closed-loop tube. This design is simple, modular, and flexible, and its component parts are easy to assemble and operate, and are inexpensive. Chamber volume can be very low, but can be easily scaled up. This innovation is well suited to work with different biological specimens, particularly with cells having high oxygen requirements and/or shear sensitivity, and different scaffold structures and dimensions. The closed-loop changer is highly gas permeable to allow efficient gas exchange during the cell seeding/culturing process. A porous scaffold, which may be seeded with cells, is fixed by means of a scaffold holder to the chamber wall with scaffold/construct orientation with respect to the chamber determined by the geometry of the scaffold holder. A fluid, with/without biological specimens, is added to the chamber such that all, or most, of the air is displaced (i.e., with or without an enclosed air bubble). Motion is applied to the chamber within a controlled environment (e.g., oscillatory motion within a humidified 37 C incubator). Movement of the chamber induces relative motion of the scaffold/construct with respect to the fluid. In case the fluid is a cell suspension, cells will come into contact with the scaffold and eventually adhere to it. Alternatively, cells can be seeded on scaffolds by gel entrapment prior to bioreactor cultivation. Subsequently, the oscillatory cell culture bioreactor will provide efficient gas exchange (i.e., of oxygen and carbon dioxide, as required for viability of metabolically active cells) and controlled levels of fluid

  8. Tissue grown in space in NASA Bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    Dr. Lisa E. Freed of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and her colleagues have reported that initially disc-like specimens of cartilage tend to become spherical in space, demonstrating that tissues can grow and differentiate into distinct structures in microgravity. The Mir Increment 3 (Sept. 16, 1996 - Jan. 22, 1997) samples were smaller, more spherical, and mechanically weaker than Earth-grown control samples. These results demonstrate the feasibility of microgravity tissue engineering and may have implications for long human space voyages and for treating musculoskeletal disorders on earth. Constructs grown on Mir (A) tended to become more spherical, whereas those grown on Earth (B) maintained their initial disc shape. These findings might be related to differences in cultivation conditions, i.e., videotapes showed that constructs floated freely in microgravity but settled and collided with the rotating vessel wall at 1g (Earth's gravity). In particular, on Mir the constructs were exposed to uniform shear and mass transfer at all surfaces such that the tissue grew equally in all directions, whereas on Earth the settling of discoid constructs tended to align their flat circular areas perpendicular to the direction of motion, increasing shear and mass transfer circumferentially such that the tissue grew preferentially in the radial direction. A and B are full cross sections of constructs from Mir and Earth groups shown at 10-power. C and D are representative areas at the construct surfaces enlarged to 200-power. They are stained red with safranin-O. NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). Photo credit: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

  9. Monitoring of gadolinium-BOPTA uptake into the vessel wall during magnetic resonance (MR)-guided angioplasty of the peripheral arteries with a paclitaxel/gadolinium-BOPTA-coated balloon. An experimental study at 3 Tesla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neizel, M.; Kelm, M. [University Hospital Duesseldorf (Germany). Dept. of Cardiology, Pneumology and Angiology; Ruebben, A.; Weiss, N. [Aachen Resonance, Aachen (Germany); Guenther, R.W. [University Hospital Aachen (Germany). Dept. of Radiology; Krombach, G.A. [University Hospital Giessen (Germany). Dept. of Radiology

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: The success of paclitaxel distribution within the vessel wall during paclitaxel-coated balloon angioplasty to prevent restenosis cannot be monitored under X-ray guidance. The aim of this pilot study was to demonstrate the feasibility of monitoring Gadolinium-BOPTA delivery within the vessel wall during magnetic resonance (MR)-guided paclitaxel/Gadolinium-BOPTA-coated balloon angioplasty of the peripheral arteries. Materials and methods: 6 pigs (47 ± 2 kg) were investigated. All experiments were performed using a 3 Tesla MR scanner. MR-guided bilaterial angioplasty of the iliac arteries was performed using a paclitaxel/MR contrast agent-coated balloon catheter. The feasibility of monitoring the delivery of Gadolinium-BOPTA to the vessel was assessed in 4 animals. In two additional animals, bilateral stenosis was surgically induced in the iliac arteries. Delivery of paclitaxel to the vessel wall was monitored using a 3 D T1-weighted gradient echo (GE) sequence for delineation of the vessel wall. Normalized signal intensity (SI) of the vessel wall was measured before and repeatedly after the intervention for 45 min. in all animals. Results: Paclitaxel/gadolinium-BOPTA-coated balloon angioplasty was successfully accomplished in all iliac arteries (n = 12). In animals with stenosis MR-angiography demonstrated successful dilatation (n = 4). The normalized SI of the vessel wall on T1-weighted GE images significantly increased after the intervention in all animals with and without stenosis for more than 45 min. (p < 0.001). Conclusion: Monitoring of Gadolinium-BOPTA into the vessel wall during MR-guided coated balloon angioplasty is feasible. This is a first step towards providing a tool for the online control of homogenous drug delivery after paclitaxel-coated balloon angioplasty. (orig.)

  10. Comparative survival study of glial cells and cells composing walls of blood vessels in crustacean ventral nerve cord after photodynamic treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolosov, Mikhail S.; Shubina, Elena

    2015-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy is a prospective treatment modality of brain cancers. It is of importance to have information about relative survival rate of different cell types in nerve tissue during photodynamic treatment. Particularly, for development of sparing strategy of the photodynamic therapy of brain tumors, which pursuits both total elimination of malignant cells, which are usually of glial origin, and, at the same time, preservation of normal blood circulation as well as normal glial cells in the brain. The aim of this work was to carry out comparative survival study of glial cells and cells composing walls of blood vessels after photodynamic treatment, using simple model object - ventral nerve cord of crustacean.

  11. RWPV bioreactor mass transport: earth-based and in microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begley, Cynthia M.; Kleis, Stanley J.

    2002-01-01

    Mass transport and mixing of perfused scalar quantities in the NASA Rotating Wall Perfused Vessel bioreactor are studied using numerical models of the flow field and scalar concentration field. Operating conditions typical of both microgravity and ground-based cell cultures are studied to determine the expected vessel performance for both flight and ground-based control experiments. Results are presented for the transport of oxygen with cell densities and consumption rates typical of colon cancer cells cultured in the RWPV. The transport and mixing characteristics are first investigated with a step change in the perfusion inlet concentration by computing the time histories of the time to exceed 10% inlet concentration. The effects of a uniform cell utilization rate are then investigated with time histories of the outlet concentration, volume average concentration, and volume fraction starved. It is found that the operating conditions used in microgravity produce results that are quite different then those for ground-based conditions. Mixing times for microgravity conditions are significantly shorter than those for ground-based operation. Increasing the differential rotation rates (microgravity) increases the mixing and transport, while increasing the mean rotation rate (ground-based) suppresses both. Increasing perfusion rates enhances mass transport for both microgravity and ground-based cases, however, for the present range of operating conditions, above 5-10 cc/min there are diminishing returns as much of the inlet fluid is transported directly to the perfusion exit. The results show that exit concentration is not a good indicator of the concentration distributions in the vessel. In microgravity conditions, the NASA RWPV bioreactor with the viscous pump has been shown to provide an environment that is well mixed. Even when operated near the theoretical minimum perfusion rates, only a small fraction of the volume provides less than the required oxygen levels

  12. Development of automated welding process for field fabrication of thick walled pressure vessels. Fourth quarter, FY 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-12-19

    Progress is reported in research on the automated welding of heavy steel plate for the fabrication of pressure vessels. Information is included on: torch and shield adaptation; mechanical control of the welding process; welding parameters; joint design; filler wire optimizaton; nondestructive testing of welds; and weld repair. (LCL)

  13. Bioreactors addressing diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minteer, Danielle M; Gerlach, Jorg C; Marra, Kacey G

    2014-11-01

    The concept of bioreactors in biochemical engineering is a well-established process; however, the idea of applying bioreactor technology to biomedical and tissue engineering issues is relatively novel and has been rapidly accepted as a culture model. Tissue engineers have developed and adapted various types of bioreactors in which to culture many different cell types and therapies addressing several diseases, including diabetes mellitus types 1 and 2. With a rising world of bioreactor development and an ever increasing diagnosis rate of diabetes, this review aims to highlight bioreactor history and emerging bioreactor technologies used for diabetes-related cell culture and therapies.

  14. The Deformation Rate of Smooth Muscle Cells in Vessel Walls After Short-Duration Heating Dilatation in a Porcine Model Ex Vivo and In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunio, Mie; Arai, Tsunenori

    2012-09-01

    We have proposed a novel short-duration thermal angioplasty with uniform temperature distribution. Although the dilatation mechanism of our short-duration heating dilatation was reported in our previous study, the influences on smooth muscle cells (SMCs) are not sufficiently understood. We studied the influences on SMCs in terms of shape change and discussed the relationship between the SMCs' shape change and dilatation mechanism ex vivo and in vivo. We found that the SMCs were fixed in the stretched condition after our short-duration heating dilatation both ex vivo and in vivo. The deformation rate of SMCs' shape, measured by the cells' nuclei, was increased with rising balloon maximum temperature (T(balloon)), and the same tendency was observed for the arterial dilatation rate. We hypothesize that the SMCs were fixed in the stretched condition because the arterial dilatation with our short-duration heating dilatation was performed without any plastic deformations of the vessel wall, causing the vessel wall itself to be stretched. We also prospect that the reasons for the positive correlation between the deformation rate of SMCs' shape and T(balloon) are that (i) the area heated over 60 °C was expanded with rising T(balloon), and (ii) the arterial dilatation rate was also increased with rising T(balloon).

  15. Inner and outer coronary vessel wall segmentation from CCTA using an active contour model with machine learning-based 3D voxel context-aware image force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivalingam, Udhayaraj; Wels, Michael; Rempfler, Markus; Grosskopf, Stefan; Suehling, Michael; Menze, Bjoern H.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we present a fully automated approach to coronary vessel segmentation, which involves calcification or soft plaque delineation in addition to accurate lumen delineation, from 3D Cardiac Computed Tomography Angiography data. Adequately virtualizing the coronary lumen plays a crucial role for simulating blood ow by means of fluid dynamics while additionally identifying the outer vessel wall in the case of arteriosclerosis is a prerequisite for further plaque compartment analysis. Our method is a hybrid approach complementing Active Contour Model-based segmentation with an external image force that relies on a Random Forest Regression model generated off-line. The regression model provides a strong estimate of the distance to the true vessel surface for every surface candidate point taking into account 3D wavelet-encoded contextual image features, which are aligned with the current surface hypothesis. The associated external image force is integrated in the objective function of the active contour model, such that the overall segmentation approach benefits from the advantages associated with snakes and from the ones associated with machine learning-based regression alike. This yields an integrated approach achieving competitive results on a publicly available benchmark data collection (Rotterdam segmentation challenge).

  16. Monolithic Continuous-Flow Bioreactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephanopoulos, Gregory; Kornfield, Julia A.; Voecks, Gerald A.

    1993-01-01

    Monolithic ceramic matrices containing many small flow passages useful as continuous-flow bioreactors. Ceramic matrix containing passages made by extruding and firing suitable ceramic. Pores in matrix provide attachment medium for film of cells and allow free movement of solution. Material one not toxic to micro-organisms grown in reactor. In reactor, liquid nutrients flow over, and liquid reaction products flow from, cell culture immobilized in one set of channels while oxygen flows to, and gaseous reaction products flow from, culture in adjacent set of passages. Cells live on inner surfaces containing flowing nutrient and in pores of walls of passages. Ready access to nutrients and oxygen in channels. They generate continuous high yield characteristic of immobilized cells, without large expenditure of energy otherwise incurred if necessary to pump nutrient solution through dense biomass as in bioreactors of other types.

  17. Effects of Simulated Microgravity on Otolith Growth of Larval Zebrafish using a Rotating-Wall Vessel: Appropriate Rotation Speed and Fish Developmental Stage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoyan; Anken, Ralf; Liu, Liyue; Wang, Gaohong; Liu, Yongding

    2017-02-01

    Stimulus dependence is a general feature of developing animal sensory systems. In this respect, it has extensively been shown earlier that fish inner ear otoliths can act as test masses as their growth is strongly affected by altered gravity such as hypergravity obtained using centrifuges, by (real) microgravity achieved during spaceflight or by simulated microgravity using a ground-based facility. Since flight opportunities are scarce, ground-based simulators of microgravity, using a wide variety of physical principles, have been developed to overcome this shortcoming. Not all of them, however, are equally well suited to provide functional weightlessness from the perspective of the biosystem under evaluation. Therefore, the range of applicability of a particular simulator has to be extensively tested. Earlier, we have shown that a Rotating-Wall Vessel (RWV) can be used to provide simulated microgravity for developing Zebrafish regarding the effect of rotation on otolith development. In the present study, we wanted to find the most effective speed of rotation and identify the appropriate developmental stage of Zebrafish, where effects are the largest, in order to provide a methodological basis for future in-depth analyses dedicated to the physiological processes underlying otolith growth at altered gravity. Last not least, we compared data on the effect of simulated microgravity on the size versus the weight of otoliths, since the size usually is measured in related studies due to convenience, but the weight more accurately approximates the physical capacity of an otolith. Maintaining embryos at 10 hours post fertilization for three days in the RWV, we found that 15 revolutions per minute (rpm) yielded the strongest effects on otolith growth. Maintenance of Zebrafish staged at 10 hpf, 1 day post fertilization (dpf), 4 dpf, 7 dpf and 14 dpf for three days at 15 rpm resulted in the most prominent effects in 7 dpf larvae. Weighing versus measuring the size of otoliths

  18. Effects of Simulated Microgravity on Otolith Growth of Larval Zebrafish using a Rotating-Wall Vessel: Appropriate Rotation Speed and Fish Developmental Stage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoyan; Anken, Ralf; Liu, Liyue; Wang, Gaohong; Liu, Yongding

    2016-10-01

    Stimulus dependence is a general feature of developing animal sensory systems. In this respect, it has extensively been shown earlier that fish inner ear otoliths can act as test masses as their growth is strongly affected by altered gravity such as hypergravity obtained using centrifuges, by (real) microgravity achieved during spaceflight or by simulated microgravity using a ground-based facility. Since flight opportunities are scarce, ground-based simulators of microgravity, using a wide variety of physical principles, have been developed to overcome this shortcoming. Not all of them, however, are equally well suited to provide functional weightlessness from the perspective of the biosystem under evaluation. Therefore, the range of applicability of a particular simulator has to be extensively tested. Earlier, we have shown that a Rotating-Wall Vessel (RWV) can be used to provide simulated microgravity for developing Zebrafish regarding the effect of rotation on otolith development. In the present study, we wanted to find the most effective speed of rotation and identify the appropriate developmental stage of Zebrafish, where effects are the largest, in order to provide a methodological basis for future in-depth analyses dedicated to the physiological processes underlying otolith growth at altered gravity. Last not least, we compared data on the effect of simulated microgravity on the size versus the weight of otoliths, since the size usually is measured in related studies due to convenience, but the weight more accurately approximates the physical capacity of an otolith. Maintaining embryos at 10 hours post fertilization for three days in the RWV, we found that 15 revolutions per minute (rpm) yielded the strongest effects on otolith growth. Maintenance of Zebrafish staged at 10 hpf, 1 day post fertilization (dpf), 4 dpf, 7 dpf and 14 dpf for three days at 15 rpm resulted in the most prominent effects in 7 dpf larvae. Weighing versus measuring the size of otoliths

  19. wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irshad Kashif

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Maintaining indoor climatic conditions of buildings compatible with the occupant comfort by consuming minimum energy, especially in a tropical climate becomes a challenging problem for researchers. This paper aims to investigate this problem by evaluating the effect of different kind of Photovoltaic Trombe wall system (PV-TW on thermal comfort, energy consumption and CO2 emission. A detailed simulation model of a single room building integrated with PV-TW was modelled using TRNSYS software. Results show that 14-35% PMV index and 26-38% PPD index reduces as system shifted from SPV-TW to DGPV-TW as compared to normal buildings. Thermal comfort indexes (PMV and PPD lie in the recommended range of ASHARE for both DPV-TW and DGPV-TW except for the few months when RH%, solar radiation intensity and ambient temperature were high. Moreover PVTW system significantly reduces energy consumption and CO2 emission of the building and also 2-4.8 °C of temperature differences between indoor and outdoor climate of building was examined.

  20. Mechanobiologic Research in a Microgravity Environment Bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidi, A.; Dubini, G.; Tominetti, F.; Raimondi, M.

    Rotating Wall Vessel developed by NASA, and originally designed to protect cell culture from the high shear forces generated during the launch and the landing of the Space Shuttle. A Bioreactor that is used both for ground and flight experiments provides the additional benefit of isolating dependent variable of gravity. This continuity will provide a means to compare results to a control experiment.

  1. In-vessel calibration of the imaging diagnostics for the real-time protection of the JET ITER-like wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huber, V., E-mail: V.Huber@fz-juelich.de [Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Supercomputing Centre, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Huber, A.; Mertens, Ph.; Sergienko, G. [Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Institut für Energie- und Klimaforschung—Plasmaphysik, Partner of the Trilateral Euregio Cluster (TEC), 52425 Jülich (Germany); Kinna, D.; Balboa, I.; Collins, S.; Conway, N.; Maggi, C. F.; Matthews, G. F.; Meigs, A. G.; Price, M.; Silburn, S.; Zastrow, K.-D. [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Drewelow, P. [MPI für Plasmaphysik, Greifswald (Germany); Wynn, A. [York Plasma Institute, University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom)

    2016-11-15

    The in situ absolute calibration of the JET real-time protection imaging system has been performed for the first time by means of radiometric light source placed inside the JET vessel and operated by remote handling. High accuracy of the calibration is confirmed by cross-validation of the near infrared (NIR) cameras against each other, with thermal IR cameras, and with the beryllium evaporator, which lead to successful protection of the JET first wall during the last campaign. The operation temperature ranges of NIR protection cameras for the materials used on JET are Be 650-1600 °C, W coating 600-1320 °C, and W 650-1500 °C.

  2. An Update to Space Biomedical Research: Tissue Engineering in Microgravity Bioreactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abolfazl Barzegari

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The severe need for constructing replacement tissues in organ transplantation has necessitated the development of tissue engineering approaches and bioreactors that can bring these approaches to reality. The inherent limitations of conventional bioreactors in generating realistic tissue constructs led to the devise of the microgravity tissue engineering that uses Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV bioreactors initially developed by NASA. Methods: In this review article, we intend to highlight some major advances and accomplishments in the rapidly-growing field of tissue engineering that could not be achieved without using microgravity. Results: Research is now focused on assembly of 3 dimensional (3D tissue fragments from various cell types in human body such as chondrocytes, osteoblasts, embryonic and mesenchymal stem cells, hepatocytes and pancreas islet cells. Hepatocytes cultured under microgravity are now being used in extracorporeal bioartificial liver devices. Tissue constructs can be used not only in organ replacement therapy, but also in pharmaco-toxicology and food safety assessment. 3D models of various cancers may be used in studying cancer development and biology or in high-throughput screening of anticancer drug candidates. Finally, 3D heterogeneous assemblies from cancer/immune cells provide models for immunotherapy of cancer. Conclusion: Tissue engineering in (simulated microgravity has been one of the stunning impacts of space research on biomedical sciences and their applications on earth.

  3. An Update to Space Biomedical Research: Tissue Engineering in Microgravity Bioreactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barzegari, Abolfazl; Saei, Amir Ata

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The severe need for constructing replacement tissues in organ transplanta-tion has necessitated the development of tissue engineering approaches and bioreactors that can bring these approaches to reality. The inherent limitations of conventional bioreactors in generating realistic tissue constructs led to the devise of the microgravity tissue engineering that uses Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV) bioreactors initially developed by NASA. Methods In this review article, we intend to highlight some major advances and accomplishments in the rapidly-growing field of tissue engineering that could not be achieved without using microgravity. Results Research is now focused on assembly of 3 dimensional (3D) tissue fragments from various cell types in human body such as chon-drocytes, osteoblasts, embryonic and mesenchymal stem cells, hepatocytes and pancreas islet cells. Hepatocytes cultured under microgravity are now being used in extracorporeal bioartificial liver devices. Tissue constructs can be used not only in organ replacement therapy, but also in pharmaco-toxicology and food safety assessment. 3D models of vari-ous cancers may be used in studying cancer development and biology or in high-throughput screening of anticancer drug candidates. Finally, 3D heterogeneous assemblies from cancer/immune cells provide models for immunotherapy of cancer. Conclusion Tissue engineering in (simulated) microgravity has been one of the stunning impacts of space research on biomedical sciences and their applications on earth. PMID:23678438

  4. Disposable bioreactors for inoculum production and protein expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eibl, Regine; Löffelholz, Christian; Eibl, Dieter

    2014-01-01

    Disposable bioreactors have been increasingly implemented over the past ten years. This relates to both R & D and commercial manufacture, in particular, in animal cell-based processes. Among the numerous disposable bioreactors which are available today, wave-mixed bag bioreactors and stirred bioreactors are predominant. Whereas wave-mixed bag bioreactors represent the system of choice for inoculum production, stirred systems are often preferred for protein expression. For this reason, the authors present protocols instructing the reader how to use the wave-mixed BIOSTAT CultiBag RM 20 L for inoculum production and the stirred UniVessel SU 2 L for recombinant protein production at benchtop scale. All methods described are based on a Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) suspension cell line expressing the human placental secreted alkaline phosphatase (SEAP).

  5. Upflow bioreactor with septum and pressure release mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Conly L.; Hansen, Carl S.; Pack, Kevin; Milligan, John; Benefiel, Bradley C.; Tolman, C. Wayne; Tolman, Kenneth W.

    2010-04-20

    An upflow bioreactor includes a vessel having an inlet and an outlet configured for upflow operation. A septum is positioned within the vessel and defines a lower chamber and an upper chamber. The septum includes an aperture that provides fluid communication between the upper chamber and lower chamber. The bioreactor also includes means for releasing pressure buildup in the lower chamber. In one configuration, the septum includes a releasable portion having an open position and a closed position. The releasable portion is configured to move to the open position in response to pressure buildup in the lower chamber. In the open position fluid communication between the lower chamber and the upper chamber is increased. Alternatively the lower chamber can include a pressure release line that is selectively actuated by pressure buildup. The pressure release mechanism can prevent the bioreactor from plugging and/or prevent catastrophic damage to the bioreactor caused by high pressures.

  6. Blood Vessel Matrix Seeded with Cells: A Better Alternative for Abdominal Wall Reconstruction—A Long-Term Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maciej Nowacki

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The aim of this study was to present abdominal wall reconstruction using a porcine vascular graft seeded with MSC (mesenchymal stem cells on rat model. Material and Methods. Abdominal wall defect was prepared in 21 Wistar rats. Acellular porcine-vascular grafts taken from aorta and prepared with Triton X were used. 14 aortic grafts were implanted in place, of which 7 grafts were seeded with rat MSC cells (Group I, and 7 were acellular grafts (Group II. As a control, 7 standard polypropylene meshes were used for defect augmentation (Group III. The assessment method was performed by HE and CD31 staining after 6 months. The mechanical properties have been investigated by Zwick&Roell Z0.5. Results. The strongest angiogenesis and lowest inflammatory response were observed in Group I. Average capillaries density was 2.75, 0.75, and 1.53 and inflammatory effect was 0.29, 1.39, and 2.72 for Groups I, II, and III, respectively. The means of mechanical properties were 12.74±1.48, 7.27±1.56, and 14.4±3.7 N/cm in Groups I and II and control, respectively. Conclusions. Cell-seeded grafts have better mechanical properties than acellular grafts but worse than polypropylene mesh. Cells improved mechanical and physiological properties of decellularized natural scaffolds.

  7. Human cell culture in a space bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Dennis R.

    1988-01-01

    Microgravity offers new ways of handling fluids, gases, and growing mammalian cells in efficient suspension cultures. In 1976 bioreactor engineers designed a system using a cylindrical reactor vessel in which the cells and medium are slowly mixed. The reaction chamber is interchangeable and can be used for several types of cell cultures. NASA has methodically developed unique suspension type cell and recovery apparatus culture systems for bioprocess technology experiments and production of biological products in microgravity. The first Space Bioreactor was designed for microprocessor control, no gaseous headspace, circulation and resupply of culture medium, and slow mixing in very low shear regimes. Various ground based bioreactors are being used to test reactor vessel design, on-line sensors, effects of shear, nutrient supply, and waste removal from continuous culture of human cells attached to microcarriers. The small Bioreactor is being constructed for flight experiments in the Shuttle Middeck to verify systems operation under microgravity conditions and to measure the efficiencies of mass transport, gas transfer, oxygen consumption and control of low shear stress on cells.

  8. Component test for validation of the design life of reactor vessel wall of the fast breeder reactor SNR 300 regarding creep-fatigue. Modellversuch zur Absicherung der Auslegung der Reaktortankwand des SNR 300 hinsichtlich Kriechermuedung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lohse, U. (Interatom GmbH, Bergisch Gladbach (Germany)); Laue, H. (Interatom GmbH, Bergisch Gladbach (Germany)); Rathjen, P. (Interatom GmbH, Bergisch Gladbach (Germany)); Maile, K. (Staatliche Materialpruefungsanstalt, Stuttgart (Germany)); Eckert, W. (Staatliche Materialpruefungsanstalt, Stuttgart (Germany)); Purper, H. (Staatliche Materialpruefungsanstalt, Stuttgart (Germany))

    1991-01-01

    The design of the reactor vessel wall is tested under a long-term creep-fatigue stress, with the aid of a similar components test. For this purpose, the results of calculation are compared with the experimental results concerning deformation depending on point and time, and damage depending on the initial state of material, point and time. (orig./HP)

  9. Coronary atherosclerosis and dilation in hyper IgE syndrome patients: Depiction by magnetic resonance vessel wall imaging and pathological correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd-Elmoniem, Khaled Z; Ramos, Nadine; Yazdani, Saami K; Ghanem, Ahmed M; Holland, Steven M; Freeman, Alexandra F; Gharib, Ahmed M

    2017-03-01

    Autosomal dominant hyper-IgE (AD-HIES) is a primary immunodeficiency caused by mutations in STAT3. Elevated levels of IgE, an ineffective immune response, connective tissue abnormalities, and coronary arterial dilation and tortuosity characterize AD-HIES. To date, coronary artery evaluation in AD-HIES patients has been limited to lumenography measurements. Direct in vivo coronary vessel wall (VW) imaging may allow for better interrogation of coronary vessel abnormalities. The goal of this prospective study was to evaluate the coronary VW of AD-HIES patients using Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and histology. VW image findings were compared in healthy subjects and subjects with coronary atherosclerotic disease (CAD). A total of 28 subjects (10 with AD-HIES, 8 healthy, 10 with CAD) were studied by coronary VW MRI imaging. Additionally, a post-mortem coronary artery from one VW imaged AD-HIES patient was examined. Coronary VW in AD-HIES was thicker than in healthy controls but not significantly different from VW thickness in CAD subjects. AD-HIES coronaries showed increased VW area compared to healthy controls and CAD subjects. On histology, the AD-HIES coronary artery had findings consistent with atherosclerotic plaque, but had minimal luminal narrowing, deficient adventitia thickening and absence of both internal and external elastic laminae. This is the first study to demonstrate subclinical coronary atherosclerosis in AD-HIES patients on VW imaging by MRI. Histologic evaluation confirmed the presence of atherosclerosis with lack of supportive adventitial thickening and elastic components. These findings suggest mechanisms for coronary dilation in AD-HIES and thereby help direct clinical management. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Breast arterial calcification and risk of carotid atherosclerosis: Focusing on the preferentially affected layer of the vessel wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sedighi, Nahid, E-mail: nsedighi@sina.tums.ac.ir [Department of Radiology, Shariati Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences. North Kargar Ave., Tehran 14114 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Radmard, Amir Reza, E-mail: radmard@ams.ac.ir [Department of Radiology, Shariati Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences. North Kargar Ave., Tehran 14114 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Radmehr, Ali, E-mail: radmehr@sina.tums.ac.ir [Department of Radiology, Shariati Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences. North Kargar Ave., Tehran 14114 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hashemi, Pari, E-mail: phtums@yahoo.com [Department of Radiology, Shariati Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences. North Kargar Ave., Tehran 14114 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hajizadeh, Abdolmahmoud, E-mail: mroomezi@yahoo.com [Department of Radiology, Shariati Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences. North Kargar Ave., Tehran 14114 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Taheri, Amir Pejman Hashemi, E-mail: hashemip@sina.tums.ac.ir [Department of Radiology, Shariati Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences. North Kargar Ave., Tehran 14114 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-08-15

    Objective: To assess the relationship between breast arterial calcification (BAC) detected on screening mammography and atherosclerosis of carotid arteries considering the most likely involved layer of the arterial wall. Materials and methods: A total of 537 consecutive women who underwent screening mammography were enrolled in this study. Seventy-nine subjects having BAC, aged 46-75 years, and 125 age-matched controls from those without BAC were selected for ultrasound examination of carotid arteries assessing intima-media thickness (IMT) and plaque presence. Participants were divided into three groups of risk including, low-risk: IMT < 0.6 mm without plaque, medium-risk: 0.6 mm {<=} IMT {<=} 0.8 mm without plaque and high-risk: IMT > 0.8 mm and/or plaque. Risk factors for atherosclerosis were obtained from medical records for independent effects. Results: BAC was present in 14.7% of mammograms. According to multivariable logistic regression analyses, significant association was identified between the carotid atherosclerosis risk and presence of BAC. Compared to women with IMT < 0.6 mm, those with 0.6 mm {<=} IMT{<=} 0.8 mm and IMT > 0.8 mm had OR (95% CI) of 4.88 (1.47-16.16) and 23.36 (4.54-120.14), respectively. The OR (95% CI) for carotid plaque was 3.13 (1.3-7.57). There was no interaction between IMT category and plaque. Significant associations were also detected with postmenopausal duration (P = 0.02) and hypertension (P = 0.004). Conclusion: The risk of carotid atherosclerosis increases with the presence of BAC. Women with BAC are more likely to have thicker IMT than plaque, which could be attributed to the preferentially similar affected layer of media causing thick IMT rather than plaque.

  11. Tamoxifen up-regulates catalase production, inhibits vessel wall neutrophil infiltration, and attenuates development of experimental abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigoryants, Vladimir; Hannawa, Kevin K; Pearce, Charles G; Sinha, Indranil; Roelofs, Karen J; Ailawadi, Gorav; Deatrick, Kristopher B; Woodrum, Derek T; Cho, Brenda S; Henke, Peter K; Stanley, James C; Eagleton, Matthew J; Upchurch, Gilbert R

    2005-01-01

    controls on day 7 (P = .05). Administration of the direct catalase inhibitor AT to tamoxifen-treated rats partially reversed the aneurysm inhibitory effect of tamoxifen by nearly 30% (P = .02). In contrast, catalase administration inhibited AAA formation by 44% (P = .002). The selective estrogen receptor modulator tamoxifen inhibits the development of AAAs in male rats in association with an up-regulation of catalase and inhibition of aortic wall neutrophil infiltration.

  12. Age determination of vessel wall hematoma in spontaneous cervical artery dissection: A multi-sequence 3T Cardiovascular Magnetic resonance study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Habs Maximilian

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previously proposed classifications for carotid plaque and cerebral parenchymal hemorrhages are used to estimate the age of hematoma according to its signal intensities on T1w and T2w MR images. Using these classifications, we systematically investigated the value of cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR in determining the age of vessel wall hematoma (VWH in patients with spontaneous cervical artery dissection (sCAD. Methods 35 consecutive patients (mean age 43.6 ± 9.8 years with sCAD received a cervical multi-sequence 3T CMR with fat-saturated black-blood T1w-, T2w- and TOF images. Age of sCAD was defined as time between onset of symptoms (stroke, TIA or Horner's syndrome and the CMR scan. VWH were categorized into hyperacute, acute, early subacute, late subacute and chronic based on their signal intensities on T1w- and T2w images. Results The mean age of sCAD was 2.0, 5.8, 15.7 and 58.7 days in patients with acute, early subacute, late subacute and chronic VWH as classified by CMR (p Conclusions Signal intensities of VWH in sCAD vary over time and multi-sequence CMR can help to determine the age of an arterial dissection. Furthermore, findings of this study suggest that the time course of carotid hematomas differs from that of cerebral hematomas.

  13. In Vivo Clearance of Alpha-1 Acid Glycoprotein Is Influenced by the Extent of Its N-Linked Glycosylation and by Its Interaction with the Vessel Wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa R. McCurdy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Alpha-1 acid glycoprotein (AGP is a highly glycosylated plasma protein that exerts vasoprotective effects. We hypothesized that AGP’s N-linked glycans govern its rate of clearance from the circulation, and followed the disappearance of different forms of radiolabeled human AGP from the plasma of rabbits and mice. Enzymatic deglycosylation of human plasma-derived AGP (pdAGP by Peptide: N-Glycosidase F yielded a mixture of differentially deglycosylated forms (PNGase-AGP, while the introduction of five Asn to Gln mutations in recombinant Pichia pastoris-derived AGP (rAGP-N(5Q eliminated N-linked glycosylation. PNGase-AGP was cleared from the rabbit circulation 9-fold, and rAGP-N(5Q, 46-fold more rapidly than pdAGP, primarily via a renal route. Pichia pastoris-derived wild-type rAGP differed from pdAGP in expressing mannose-terminated glycans, and, like neuraminidase-treated pdAGP, was more rapidly removed from the rabbit circulation than rAGP-N(5Q. Systemic hyaluronidase treatment of mice transiently decreased pdAGP clearance. AGP administration to mice reduced vascular binding of hyaluronic acid binding protein in the liver microcirculation and increased its plasma levels. Our results support a critical role of N-linked glycosylation of AGP in regulating its in vivo clearance and an influence of a hyaluronidase-sensitive component of the vessel wall on its transendothelial passage.

  14. 3D rotating wall vessel and 2D cell culture of four veterinary virus pathogens: A comparison of virus yields, portions of infectious particles and virus growth curves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malenovská, Hana

    2016-02-01

    Only very few comparative studies have been performed that evaluate general trends of virus growth under 3D in comparison with 2D cell culture conditions. The aim of this study was to investigate differences when four animal viruses are cultured in 2D and 3D. Suid herpesvirus 1 (SuHV-1), Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSIV), Bovine adenovirus (BAdV) and Bovine parainfluenza 3 virus (BPIV-3) were cultivated in 3D rotating wall vessels (RWVs) and conventional 2D cultures. The production of virus particles, the portion of infectious particles, and the infectious growth curves were compared. For all viruses, the production of virus particles (related to cell density), including the non-infectious ones, was lower in 3D than in 2D culture. The production of only infectious particles was significantly lower in BAdV and BPIV-3 in 3D cultures in relation to cell density. The two cultivation approaches resulted in significantly different virus particle-to-TCID50 ratios in three of the four viruses: lower in SuHV-1 and BPIV-3 and higher in BAdV in 3D culture. The infectious virus growth rates were not significantly different in all viruses. Although 3D RWV culture resulted in lower production of virus particles compared to 2D systems, the portion of infectious particles was higher for some viruses.

  15. Chemical Composition of Hypodermal and Endodermal Cell Walls and Xylem Vessels Isolated from Clivia miniata (Identification of the Biopolymers Lignin and Suberin).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeier, J.; Schreiber, L.

    1997-01-01

    The occurrence of the biopolymers lignin and suberin was investigated with hypodermal (HCW) and endodermal cell walls (ECW) and xylem vessels (XV) isolated from Clivia miniata Reg. roots. Both biopolymers were detected in HCW and ECW, whereas in XV, typical aliphatic suberin monomers were missing and only representative lignin monomers such as guaiacyl (G) and syringyl (S) units could be detected. The absolute amounts of lignin were about one order of magnitude higher compared with suberin in both HCW and ECW. The ratios of the two aromatic lignin units (G/S) decreased from 39 in XV and 10 in HCW to about 1 in ECW, indicating significant differences in lignin structure and function between the three investigated samples. Additionally, compared with the detectable lignin-derived aromatic units G and S, significantly higher amounts of esterified p-coumaric acid-derived aromatic monomers were obtained with HCW, but not with ECW. This is interpreted as a functional adaption of HCW toward pathogen defense at the root/soil interface. The final aim of this study was to provide a thorough chemical characterization of the composition of HCW, ECW, and XV, which in turn will form the basis for a better understanding of the relevant barriers toward the passive, radial, and apoplastic diffusion of solutes from the soil across the root cortex into the root cylinder. PMID:12223670

  16. [The indicators of alteration of functional activity of vessel wall as new diagnostic criteria of development of initial stages of chronic lymphatic leukemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jevak, T N; Chesnokova, N P; Shelekhova, T I

    2015-03-01

    The role of endothelium dysfunction in pathogenesis of B-cell mode of chronic lymphatic leukemia is still uncovered. However, detection of disorders of functional activity of vessel wall at early stages of development of this disease permits to widen actual diagnostic criteria of its initiation and thereafter to make more objective diagnostic itself. The study was targeted to establish the role of endothelium dysfunction in pathogenesis of initial stages (0-1 stages according classification Rai K. et al. 1975) of B-cell mode of chronic lymphatic leukemia. The article presents results of clinical laboratory examination of 30 patients with initial stages of B-cell mode of chronic lymphatic leukemia. The content of classic markers of endothelium dysfunction in blood serum were detected using one time solid-phase enzymoimmunoassay at the moment of admission to hospital before initiation of treatment. In patients with chronic lymphatic leukemia blood serum characterized by increasing of level of E-selectin. ICAM-1, endothelin-1, metabolites of nitrogen nitrite, angiotensin II. At the same time, content of protein C decreased at the stage 0-1 of mentioned pathology. Hence, it is recommended to apply determining in blood serum the content of markers of endothelium dysfunction as additional diagnostic criteria of development of paraneoplastic disorders at initial stages of chronic lymphatic leukemia. These markers include molecules of adhesion (E-selectin, ICAM-I), metabolites of nitrogen nitrite, endothelin-1, protein C. angiotensin II and homocysteine.

  17. NASA Bioreactor Demonstration System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Leland W. K. Chung (left), Director, Molecular Urology Therapeutics Program at the Winship Cancer Institute at Emory University, is principal investigator for the NASA bioreactor demonstration system (BDS-05). With him is Dr. Jun Shu, an assistant professor of Orthopedics Surgery from Kuming Medical University China. The NASA Bioreactor provides a low turbulence culture environment which promotes the formation of large, three-dimensional cell clusters. Due to their high level of cellular organization and specialization, samples constructed in the bioreactor more closely resemble the original tumor or tissue found in the body. The Bioreactor is rotated to provide gentle mixing of fresh and spent nutrient without inducing shear forces that would damage the cells. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators. Credit: Emory University.

  18. Hydrofocusing Bioreactor for Three-Dimensional Cell Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonda, Steve R.; Spaulding, Glenn F.; Tsao, Yow-Min D.; Flechsig, Scott; Jones, Leslie; Soehnge, Holly

    2003-01-01

    The hydrodynamic focusing bioreactor (HFB) is a bioreactor system designed for three-dimensional cell culture and tissue-engineering investigations on orbiting spacecraft and in laboratories on Earth. The HFB offers a unique hydrofocusing capability that enables the creation of a low-shear culture environment simultaneously with the "herding" of suspended cells, tissue assemblies, and air bubbles. Under development for use in the Biotechnology Facility on the International Space Station, the HFB has successfully grown large three-dimensional, tissuelike assemblies from anchorage-dependent cells and grown suspension hybridoma cells to high densities. The HFB, based on the principle of hydrodynamic focusing, provides the capability to control the movement of air bubbles and removes them from the bioreactor without degrading the low-shear culture environment or the suspended three-dimensional tissue assemblies. The HFB also provides unparalleled control over the locations of cells and tissues within its bioreactor vessel during operation and sampling.

  19. Anaerobic electrochemical membrane bioreactor and process for wastewater treatment

    KAUST Repository

    Amy, Gary

    2015-07-09

    An anaerobic electrochemical membrane bioreactor (AnEMBR) can include a vessel into which wastewater can be introduced, an anode electrode in the vessel suitable for supporting electrochemically active microorganisms (EAB, also can be referred to as anode reducing bacteria, exoelectrogens, or electricigens) that oxidize organic compounds in the wastewater, and a cathode membrane electrode in the vessel, which is configured to pass a treated liquid through the membrane while retaining the electrochemically active microorganisms and the hydrogenotrophic methanogens (for example, the key functional microbial communities, including EAB, methanogens and possible synergistic fermenters) in the vessel. The cathode membrane electrode can be suitable for catalyzing the hydrogen evolution reaction to generate hydro en.

  20. Bioreactor Yields Extracts for Skin Cream

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Johnson Space Flight Center researchers created a unique rotating-wall bioreactor that simulates microgravity conditions, spurring innovations in drug development and medical research. Renuèll Int'l Inc., based in Aventure, Florida, licensed the technology and used it to produce a healing skin care product, RE`JUVEL. In a Food and Drug Administration test, RE`JUVEL substantially increased skin moisture and elasticity while reducing dark blotches and wrinkles.

  1. An Optical Oxygen Sensor for Long-Term Continuous Monitoring of Dissolved Oxygen in Perfused Bioreactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, F. G.; Jeevarajan, A. S.; Anderson, M. M.

    2002-01-01

    acquire data. Two HOXY sensors with a single calibration were employed to continuously monitor the DO in GTSF-2 medium during a Baby Hamster Kidney (BHK-21) cell culture in a Rotating Wall Perfused Vessel (RWPV) bioreactor for 90 days. HOXY sensors were located at the inlet to and outlet from the bioreactor. One of the sensors was placed between an oxygenator and the inlet to the bioreactor. The dissolved oxygen concentrations determined by both sensors were compared with those measured regularly with the BGA reference. The cell culture was maintained for 110 days. Sensor output was found to correlate well with the BGA data throughout the experiment, where the DO of the medium ranged between 25 and 50 mmHg at the bioreactor outlet and 90-130 mmHg at the bioreactor inlet. Measuring DO with the HOXY sensors versus the BGA reference indicated bias values of -2 mmHg and -15 mmHg, and precision values of +/-3mmHg and +/-16 mmHg at the bioreactor inlet and outlet, respectively.

  2. Estimation of PSD Shifts for High-Resolution Metrology of Thickness Micro-Changes with Possible Applications in Vessel Walls and Biological Membrane Characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abelardo Ruiz

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Achieving accurate measurements of inflammation levels in tissues or thickness changes in biological membranes (e.g., amniotic sac, parietal pleura and thin biological walls (e.g., blood vessels from outside the human body, is a promising research line in the medical area. It would provide a technical basis to study the options for early diagnosis of some serious diseases such as hypertension, atherosclerosis or tuberculosis. Nevertheless, achieving the aim of non-invasive measurement of those scarcely-accessible parameters on patient internal tissues, currently presents many difficulties. The use of high-frequency ultrasonic transducer systems appears to offer a possible solution. Previous studies using conventional ultrasonic imaging have shown this, but the spatial resolution was not sufficient so as to permit a thickness evaluation with clinical significance, which requires an accuracy of a few microns. In this paper a broadband ultrasonic technique, that was recently developed by the authors to address other non-invasive medical detection problems (by integrating a piezoelectric transducer into a spectral measuring system, is extended to our new objective; the aim is its application to the thickness measurement of sub-millimeter membranes or layers made of materials similar to some biological tissues (phantoms. The modeling and design rules of such a transducer system are described, and various methods of estimating overtones location in the power spectral density (PSD are quantitatively assessed with transducer signals acquired using piezoelectric systems and also generated from a multi-echo model. Their effects on the potential resolution of the proposed thickness measuring tool, and their capability to provide accuracies around the micron are studied in detail. Comparisons are made with typical tools for extracting spatial parameters in laminar samples from echo-waveforms acquired with ultrasonic transducers. Results of this advanced

  3. Estimation of PSD Shifts for High-Resolution Metrology of Thickness Micro-Changes with Possible Applications in Vessel Walls and Biological Membrane Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Antonio; Bazán, Ivonne; Negreira, Carlos; Brum, Javier; Gómez, Tomás; Calás, Héctor; Ruiz, Abelardo; de la Rosa, José Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Achieving accurate measurements of inflammation levels in tissues or thickness changes in biological membranes (e.g., amniotic sac, parietal pleura) and thin biological walls (e.g., blood vessels) from outside the human body, is a promising research line in the medical area. It would provide a technical basis to study the options for early diagnosis of some serious diseases such as hypertension, atherosclerosis or tuberculosis. Nevertheless, achieving the aim of non-invasive measurement of those scarcely-accessible parameters on patient internal tissues, currently presents many difficulties. The use of high-frequency ultrasonic transducer systems appears to offer a possible solution. Previous studies using conventional ultrasonic imaging have shown this, but the spatial resolution was not sufficient so as to permit a thickness evaluation with clinical significance, which requires an accuracy of a few microns. In this paper a broadband ultrasonic technique, that was recently developed by the authors to address other non-invasive medical detection problems (by integrating a piezoelectric transducer into a spectral measuring system), is extended to our new objective; the aim is its application to the thickness measurement of sub-millimeter membranes or layers made of materials similar to some biological tissues (phantoms). The modeling and design rules of such a transducer system are described, and various methods of estimating overtones location in the power spectral density (PSD) are quantitatively assessed with transducer signals acquired using piezoelectric systems and also generated from a multi-echo model. Their effects on the potential resolution of the proposed thickness measuring tool, and their capability to provide accuracies around the micron are studied in detail. Comparisons are made with typical tools for extracting spatial parameters in laminar samples from echo-waveforms acquired with ultrasonic transducers. Results of this advanced measurement

  4. Vessel Operating Units (Vessels)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains data for vessels that are greater than five net tons and have a current US Coast Guard documentation number. Beginning in1979, the NMFS...

  5. Curved and conformal high-pressure vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Croteau, Paul F.; Kuczek, Andrzej E.; Zhao, Wenping

    2016-10-25

    A high-pressure vessel is provided. The high-pressure vessel may comprise a first chamber defined at least partially by a first wall, and a second chamber defined at least partially by the first wall. The first chamber and the second chamber may form a curved contour of the high-pressure vessel. A modular tank assembly is also provided, and may comprise a first mid tube having a convex geometry. The first mid tube may be defined by a first inner wall, a curved wall extending from the first inner wall, and a second inner wall extending from the curved wall. The first inner wall may be disposed at an angle relative to the second inner wall. The first mid tube may further be defined by a short curved wall opposite the curved wall and extending from the second inner wall to the first inner wall.

  6. Tapered bed bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Charles D.; Hancher, Charles W.

    1977-01-01

    A vertically oriented conically shaped column is used as a fluidized bed bioreactor wherein biologically catalyzed reactions are conducted in a continuous manner. The column utilizes a packing material a support having attached thereto a biologically active catalytic material.

  7. BIOREACTOR WITH LID FOR EASY ACCESS TO INCUBATION CAVITY

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    There is provided a bioreactor which is provided with a lid (13) that facilitates access to the incubation cavity. Specifically the end wall of the incubation cavity is constituted by the lid (13) so that removal of the cap renders the incubation cavity fully accessible.......There is provided a bioreactor which is provided with a lid (13) that facilitates access to the incubation cavity. Specifically the end wall of the incubation cavity is constituted by the lid (13) so that removal of the cap renders the incubation cavity fully accessible....

  8. Bioreactor Transient Exposure Activates Specific Neurotrophic Pathway in Cortical Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmitti, V.; Benedetti, E.; Caracciolo, V.; Sebastiani, P.; Di Loreto, S.

    2010-02-01

    Altered gravity forces might influence neuroplasticity and can provoke changes in biochemical mechanisms. In this contest, neurotrophins have a pivotal role, particularly nerve growth factor (NGF) and brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). A suspension of dissociated cortical cells from rat embryos was exposed to 24 h of microgravity before plating in normal adherent culture system. Expression and transductional signalling pathways of NGF and BDNF were assessed at the end of maturational process (8-10 days in vitro). Rotating wall vessel bioreactor (RWV) pre-exposition did not induce changes in NGF expression and its high affinity receptor TrkA. On the contrary both BDNF expression and its high affinity receptor TrkB were strongly up-regulated, inducing Erk-5, but not Erk-1/2 activation and, in turn, MEF2C over-expression and activation. According to our previous and present results, we postulate that relatively short microgravitational stimuli, applied to neural cells during the developmental stage, exert a long time activation of specific neurotrophic pathways.

  9. Transient maintenance in bioreactor improves health of neuronal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Loreto, Silvia; Sebastiani, Pierluigi; Benedetti, Elisabetta; Zimmitti, Vincenzo; Caracciolo, Valentina; Amicarelli, Fernanda; Cimini, Annamaria; Adorno, Domenico

    2006-01-01

    To examine whether a neuronal cell suspension can be held in vitro for a relatively short period without compromising survival rates and functionality, we have set up an experimental protocol planning 24 h of suspension culture in a rotary wall vessel (RWV) bioreactor before plating in a conventional adherent system. Apoptosis measurement and activated caspase-8, -9, and -3 detection have demonstrated that survey of the cells was not affected. The activity of major antioxidant enzymes (AOE), superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), and catalase (CAT), was significantly decreased in RWV-maintained cells. A significant decrease of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) is coupled with a level of activated nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) protein significantly lower in RVW cells than in the control. On the contrary, the level of IL-6 expression did not change between the test and the control. A significant up-regulation of growth-associated protein-43 (GAP-43), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-beta/delta (PPARbeta/delta), and acyl-CoA synthetase 2 (ACS2) in RWV cells has been detected. We provide the evidence that primary neuronal cells, at an early stage of development, can be maintained in a suspension condition before adherent plating. This experimental environment does not induce detrimental effects but may have an activator role, leading cells to development and maturation in a tridimensional state.

  10. Growth of Intracranial Aneurysms Arised from Curved Vessels under the Influence of Elevated Wall Shear Stress ─ A Computer Simulation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yixiang; Wada, Shigeo; Tsubota, Ken-Ichi; Yamaguchi, Takami

    Recent studies have suggested that long standing elevated wall shear stress might degenerate the arterial wall and be involved in the pathogenesis of intracranial aneurysm formation and development. The present study focuses on the interplay between the hemodynamic stresses, arterial wall degeneration and deformation. By constructing a computational model and examining the hypotheses that govern the rules to grow an intracranial aneurysm, we simulate the formation and development of intracranial aneurysms. The high wall shear stress is found to propagate towards the proximal and distal end of the formed aneurysm, which becomes the key factor for the expansion of wall degeneration and aneurysm progression. The development of aneurysm is influenced by the wall shear stress threshold, the Reynolds number and the rate of wall degeneration. Our preliminary results indicate that computer simulation can be used in the study of aneurysm mechanics and yields new insight into the mechanism of aneurysm pathophysiology.

  11. Bioreactors and bioseparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Siliang; Cao, Xuejun; Chu, Ju; Qian, Jiangchao; Zhuang, Yingping

    2010-01-01

    Along with the rapid development of life science, great attention has been increasingly given to the biotechnological products of cell cultivation technology. In the course of industrialization, bioreactor and bioproduct separation techniques are the two essential technical platforms. In this chapter, the current situation and development prospects of bioreactor techniques in China are systematically discussed, starting with the elucidation of bioreactor processes and the principle of process optimization. Separation technology for biological products is also briefly introduced.At present, a series of bioreactors made by Chinese enterprises have been widely used for laboratory microbial cultivation, process optimization studies, and large-scale production. In the course of bioprocess optimization studies, the complicated bioprocesses in a bioreactor could be resolved into different reaction processes on three scales, namely genetic, cellular, and bioreactor scales. The structural varieties and nonlinear features of various scales of bioprocess systems was discussed through considering the mutual effects of different scale events, namely material flux, energy flux, and information flux, and the optimization approach for bioprocesses was proposed by taking the analysis of metabolic flux and multiscale consideration as a core strategy.In order to realize such an optimization approach, a bioreactor system based on association analysis of multiscale parameters was elaborated, and process optimization of many biological products were materialized, which resulted in great improvement in production efficiency. In designing and manufacturing large-scale bioreactors, the principle of scaling up a process incorporated with flow field study and physiological features in a bioreactor was suggested according to the criterion for the scale-up of cellular physiological and metabolic traits. The flow field features of a bioreactor were investigated through computational fluid

  12. NASA Classroom Bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scully, Robert

    2004-01-01

    Exploration of space provides a compelling need for cell-based research into the basic mechanisms that underlie the profound changes that occur in terrestrial life that is transitioned to low gravity environments. Toward that end, NASA developed a rotating bioreactor in which cells are cultured while continuously suspended in a cylinder in which the culture medium rotates with the cylinder. The randomization of the gravity vector accomplished by the continuous rotation, in a low shear environment, provides an analog of microgravity. Because cultures grown in bioreactors develop structures and functions that are much closer to those exhibited by native tissue than can be achieved with traditional culture methods, bioreactors have contributed substantially to advancing research in the fields of cancer, diabetes, infectious disease modeling for vaccine production, drug efficacy, and tissue engineering. NASA has developed a Classroom Bioreactor (CB) that is built from parts that are easily obtained and assembled, user-friendly and versatile. It can be easily used in simple school settings to examine the effect cultures of seeds or cells. An educational brief provides assembly instructions and lesson plans that describes activities in science, math and technology that explore free fall, microgravity, orbits, bioreactors, structure-function relationships and the scientific method.

  13. NASA Classroom Bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scully, Robert

    2004-01-01

    Exploration of space provides a compelling need for cell-based research into the basic mechanisms that underlie the profound changes that occur in terrestrial life that is transitioned to low gravity environments. Toward that end, NASA developed a rotating bioreactor in which cells are cultured while continuously suspended in a cylinder in which the culture medium rotates with the cylinder. The randomization of the gravity vector accomplished by the continuous rotation, in a low shear environment, provides an analog of microgravity. Because cultures grown in bioreactors develop structures and functions that are much closer to those exhibited by native tissue than can be achieved with traditional culture methods, bioreactors have contributed substantially to advancing research in the fields of cancer, diabetes, infectious disease modeling for vaccine production, drug efficacy, and tissue engineering. NASA has developed a Classroom Bioreactor (CB) that is built from parts that are easily obtained and assembled, user-friendly and versatile. It can be easily used in simple school settings to examine the effect cultures of seeds or cells. An educational brief provides assembly instructions and lesson plans that describes activities in science, math and technology that explore free fall, microgravity, orbits, bioreactors, structure-function relationships and the scientific method.

  14. Bioprocess kinetics in a horizontal rotating tubular bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivancić, M; Santek, B; Novak, S; Horvat, P; Marić, V

    2004-04-01

    A horizontal rotating tubular bioreactor (HRTB) is a plug flow bioreactor whose interior is provided with O-ring-shaped partition walls that serve as carriers for microbial biomass. During this investigation, microbial biomass was grown in suspension and on the bioreactor inner surface as a microbial biofilm with average mass that was considerably higher than suspended biomass. The dynamics of bioprocess in HRTB was studied by different combinations of process parameters (bioreactor rotation speed and mean residence time) and it was monitored by withdrawing the samples from five positions along the bioreactor. During this investigation it was also observed that mean residence time had a more pronounced effect on the bioprocess dynamics than bioreactor rotation speed. For the description of bioprocess kinetics in HRTB an unstructured kinetic model was established that defines biomass growth, product formations and substrate consumption rate by using a modified Monod (Levenspiel) model. This kinetic model defines changes in suspension and in microbial biofilm, and it shows relatively good agreement with experimental data.

  15. NASA Bioreactor tissue culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    Dr. Lisa E. Freed of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and her colleagues have reported that initially disc-like specimens tend to become spherical in space, demonstrating that tissues can grow and differentiate into distinct structures in microgravity. The Mir Increment 3 (Sept. 16, 1996 - Jan. 22, 1997) samples were smaller, more spherical, and mechanically weaker than Earth-grown control samples. These results demonstrate the feasibility of microgravity tissue engineering and may have implications for long human space voyages and for treating musculoskeletal disorders on earth. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators.

  16. NASA Bioreactor tissue culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    Dr. Lisa E. Freed of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and her colleagues have reported that initially disc-like specimens tend to become spherical in space, demonstrating that tissues can grow and differentiate into distinct structures in microgravity. The Mir Increment 3 (Sept. 16, 1996 - Jan. 22, 1997) samples were smaller, more spherical, and mechanically weaker than Earth-grown control samples. These results demonstrate the feasibility of microgravity tissue engineering and may have implications for long human space voyages and for treating musculoskeletal disorders on earth. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators.

  17. Basic bioreactor design.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riet, van 't K.; Tramper, J.

    1991-01-01

    Based on a graduate course in biochemical engineering, provides the basic knowledge needed for the efficient design of bioreactors and the relevant principles and data for practical process engineering, with an emphasis on enzyme reactors and aerated reactors for microorganisms. Includes exercises.

  18. Basic bioreactor design.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riet, van 't K.; Tramper, J.

    1991-01-01

    Based on a graduate course in biochemical engineering, provides the basic knowledge needed for the efficient design of bioreactors and the relevant principles and data for practical process engineering, with an emphasis on enzyme reactors and aerated reactors for microorganisms. Includes exercises.

  19. Cascades of bioreactors.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gooijer, de C.D.

    1995-01-01

    In this thesis a common phenomenon in bioprocess engineering is described : the execution of a certain bioprocess in more than one bioreactor. Chapter 1, a review, classifies bioprocesses by means of a number of characteristics :i) processes with a variable stoichiometry ,ii) processes with a consta

  20. Cascades of bioreactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gooijer, de C.D.

    1995-01-01

    In this thesis a common phenomenon in bioprocess engineering is described : the execution of a certain bioprocess in more than one bioreactor. Chapter 1, a review, classifies bioprocesses by means of a number of characteristics :
    i) processes with a variable

  1. A versatile modular bioreactor platform for Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuerlein, Sebastian; Schwarz, Thomas; Krziminski, Steffan; Gätzner, Sabine; Hoppensack, Anke; Schwedhelm, Ivo; Schweinlin, Matthias; Walles, Heike; Hansmann, Jan

    2017-02-01

    Tissue Engineering (TE) bears potential to overcome the persistent shortage of donor organs in transplantation medicine. Additionally, TE products are applied as human test systems in pharmaceutical research to close the gap between animal testing and the administration of drugs to human subjects in clinical trials. However, generating a tissue requires complex culture conditions provided by bioreactors. Currently, the translation of TE technologies into clinical and industrial applications is limited due to a wide range of different tissue-specific, non-disposable bioreactor systems. To ensure a high level of standardization, a suitable cost-effectiveness, and a safe graft production, a generic modular bioreactor platform was developed. Functional modules provide robust control of culture processes, e.g. medium transport, gas exchange, heating, or trapping of floating air bubbles. Characterization revealed improved performance of the modules in comparison to traditional cell culture equipment such as incubators, or peristaltic pumps. By combining the modules, a broad range of culture conditions can be achieved. The novel bioreactor platform allows using disposable components and facilitates tissue culture in closed fluidic systems. By sustaining native carotid arteries, engineering a blood vessel, and generating intestinal tissue models according to a previously published protocol the feasibility and performance of the bioreactor platform was demonstrated. © 2017 The Authors. Biotechnology Journal published by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. An in vivo pilot study of a microporous thin film nitinol-covered stent to assess the effect of porosity and pore geometry on device interaction with the vessel wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Youngjae; Kealey, Colin P; Levi, Daniel S; Rigberg, David A; Chen, Yanfei; Tillman, Bryan W; Mohanchandra, K P; Shayan, Mahdis; Carman, Gregory P

    2017-03-01

    Sputter-deposited thin film nitinol constructs with various micropatterns were fabricated to evaluate their effect on the vessel wall in vivo when used as a covering for commercially available stents. Thin film nitinol constructs were used to cover stents and deployed in non-diseased swine arteries. Swine were sacrificed after approximately four weeks and the thin film nitinol-covered stents were removed for histopathologic evaluation. Histopathology revealed differences in neointimal thickness that correlated with the thin film nitinol micropattern. Devices covered with thin film nitinol with a lateral × vertical length = 20 × 40 µm diamond pattern had minimal neointimal growth with well-organized cell architecture and little evidence of ongoing inflammation. Devices covered with thin film nitinol with smaller fenestrations exhibited a relatively thick neointimal layer with inflammation and larger fenestrations showed migration of inflammatory and smooth muscle cells through the micro fenestrations. This "proof-of-concept" study suggests that there may be an ideal thin film nitinol porosity and pore geometry to encourage endothelialization and incorporation of the device into the vessel wall. Future work will be needed to determine the optimal pore size and geometry to minimize neointimal proliferation and in-stent stenosis.

  3. Research vessels

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, P.S.

    The role of the research vessels as a tool for marine research and exploration is very important. Technical requirements of a suitable vessel and the laboratories needed on board are discussed. The history and the research work carried out...

  4. NASA Bioreactors Advance Disease Treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) is falling. This is no threat to the astronauts onboard, however, because falling is part of the ISS staying in orbit. The absence of gravity beyond the Earth s atmosphere is actually an illusion; at the ISS s orbital altitude of approximately 250 miles above the surface, the planet s gravitational pull is only 12-percent weaker than on the ground. Gravity is constantly pulling the ISS back to Earth, but the space station is also constantly traveling at nearly 18,000 miles per hour. This means that, even though the ISS is falling toward Earth, it is moving sideways fast enough to continually miss impacting the planet. The balance between the force of gravity and the ISS s motion creates a stable orbit, and the fact that the ISS and everything in it including the astronauts are falling at an equal rate creates the condition of weightlessness called microgravity. The constant falling of objects in orbit is not only an important principle in space, but it is also a key element of a revolutionary NASA technology here on Earth that may soon help cure medical ailments from heart disease to diabetes. In the mid-1980s, NASA researchers at Johnson Space Center were investigating the effects of long-term microgravity on human tissues. At the time, the Agency s shuttle fleet was grounded following the 1986 Space Shuttle Challenger disaster, and researchers had no access to the microgravity conditions of space. To provide a method for recreating such conditions on Earth, Johnson s David Wolf, Tinh Trinh, and Ray Schwarz developed that same year a horizontal, rotating device called a rotating wall bioreactor that allowed the growth of human cells in simulated weightlessness. Previously, cell cultures on Earth could only be grown two-dimensionally in Petri dishes, because gravity would cause the multiplying cells to sink within their growth medium. These cells do not look or function like real human cells, which grow three-dimensionally in

  5. Upflow bioreactor having a septum and an auger and drive assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Carl S.; Hansen, Conly L.

    2007-11-06

    An upflow bioreactor includes a vessel having an inlet and an outlet configured for upflow operation. A septum is positioned within the vessel and defines a lower chamber and an upper chamber. The septum includes an aperture that provides fluid communication between the upper chamber and lower chamber. The bioreactor also includes an auger positioned in the aperture of the septum. The vessel includes an opening in the top for receiving the auger. The auger extends from a drive housing, which is position over the opening and provides a seal around the opening. The drive housing is adjustable relative to the vessel. The position of the auger in the aperture can be adjusted by adjusting the drive housing relative to the vessel. The auger adjustment mechanism allows the auger to be accurately positioned within the aperture. The drive housing can also include a fluid to provide an additional seal around the shaft of the auger.

  6. Fluid-structure interaction analysis on the effect of vessel wall hypertrophy and stiffness on the blood flow in carotid artery bifurcation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Hoon; Choi, Hyoung Gwon; Yoo, Jung Yul

    2012-11-01

    The effect of artery wall hypertrophy and stiffness on the flow field is investigated using three-dimensional finite element method for simulating the blood flow. To avoid the complexity due to the necessity of additional mechanical constraints, we use the combined formulation which includes both the fluid and structural equations of motion into single coupled variational equation. A P2P1 Galerkin finite element method is used to solve the Navier-Stokes equations for fluid flow and arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian formulation is used to achieve mesh movement. The Newmark method is employed for solving the dynamic equilibrium equations for linear elastic solid mechanics. The pulsatile, incompressible flows of Newtonian fluids constrained in the flexible wall are analyzed with Womersley velocity profile at the inlet and constant pressure at the outlet. The study shows that the stiffness of carotid artery wall affects significantly the flow phenomena during the pulse cycle. Similarly, it is found that the flow field is also strongly influenced by wall hypertrophy. This work was supported by Mid-career Researcher Program and Priority Research Centers Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Ministry of Education, Science and Technology (2009-0079936 & 2011-0029613).

  7. Estimate of radiation-induced steel embrittlement in the BWR core shroud and vessel wall from reactor-grade MOX/UOX fuel for the nuclear power plant at Laguna Verde, Veracruz, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickers, Lisa Rene

    The government of Mexico has expressed interest to utilize the Laguna Verde boiling water reactor (BWR) nuclear power plant for the disposition of reprocessed spent uranium oxide (UOX) fuel in the form of reactor-grade mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel. MOX fuel would replace spent UOX fuel as a fraction in the core from 18--30% depending on the fuel loading cycle. MOX fuel is expected to increase the neutron fluence, flux, fuel centerline temperature, reactor core pressure, and yield higher energy neutrons. There is concern that a core with a fraction of MOX fuel (i.e., increased 239Pu wt%) would increase the radiation-induced steel embrittlement within the core shroud and vessel wall as compared to only conventional, enriched UOX fuel in the core. The evaluation of radiation-induced steel embrittlement within the core shroud and vessel wall is a concern because of the potentially adverse affect to plant and public safety, environment, and operating life of the reactor. This dissertation provides computational results of the neutron fluence, flux, energy spectrum, and radiation damage displacements per atom per second (dpa-s-1) in steel within the core shroud and vessel wall of the Laguna Verde Unit 1 BWR. The results were computed using the nuclear data processing code NJOY99 and the continuous energy Monte Carlo Neutral Particle transport code MCNP4B. The MCNP4B model of the reactor core was for maximum core loading fractions of ⅓ MOX and ⅔ UOX reactor-grade fuel in an equilibrium core. The primary conclusion of this dissertation was that the addition of the maximum fraction of ⅓ MOX fuel to the LV1 BWR core did significantly accelerate the radiation-induced steel embrittlement such that without mitigation of steel embrittlement by periodic thermal annealing or reduction in operating parameters such as, neutron fluence, core temperature and pressure, it posed a potentially adverse affect to the plant and public safety, environment, and operating life of the reactor.

  8. Design challenges for space bioreactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seshan, P. K.; Petersen, G. R.

    1989-01-01

    The design of bioreactors for operation under conditions of microgravity presents problems and challenges. Absence of a significant body force such as gravity can have profound consequences for interfacial phenomena. Marangoni convection can no longer be overlooked. Many speculations on the advantages and benefits of microgravity can be found in the literature. Initial bioreactor research considerations for space applications had little regard for the suitability of the designs for conditions of microgravity. Bioreactors can be classified in terms of their function and type of operation. The complex interaction of parameters leading to optimal design and operation of a bioreactor is illustrated by the JSC mammalian cell culture system. The design of a bioreactor is strongly dependent upon its intended use as a production unit for cell mass and/or biologicals or as a research reactor for the study of cell growth and function. Therefore a variety of bioreactor configurations are presented in rapid summary. Following this, a rationale is presented for not attempting to derive key design parameters such as the oxygen transfer coefficient from ground-based data. A set of themes/objectives for flight experiments to develop the expertise for design of space bioreactors is then proposed for discussion. These experiments, carried out systematically, will provide a database from which engineering tools for space bioreactor design will be derived.

  9. Blood Vessel Tension Tester

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-01-01

    In the photo, a medical researcher is using a specially designed laboratory apparatus for measuring blood vessel tension. It was designed by Langley Research Center as a service to researchers of Norfolk General Hospital and Eastern Virginia Medical School, Norfolk, Virginia. The investigators are studying how vascular smooth muscle-muscle in the walls of blood vessels-reacts to various stimulants, such as coffee, tea, alcohol or drugs. They sought help from Langley Research Center in devising a method of measuring the tension in blood vessel segments subjected to various stimuli. The task was complicated by the extremely small size of the specimens to be tested, blood vessel "loops" resembling small rubber bands, some only half a millimeter in diameter. Langley's Instrumentation Development Section responded with a miniaturized system whose key components are a "micropositioner" for stretching a length of blood vessel and a strain gage for measuring the smooth muscle tension developed. The micropositioner is a two-pronged holder. The loop of Mood vessel is hooked over the prongs and it is stretched by increasing the distance between the prongs in minute increments, fractions of a millimeter. At each increase, the tension developed is carefully measured. In some experiments, the holder and specimen are lowered into the test tubes shown, which contain a saline solution simulating body fluid; the effect of the compound on developed tension is then measured. The device has functioned well and the investigators say it has saved several months research time.

  10. Perfusion Bioreactor Module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Dennis R.

    1990-01-01

    Perfusion bioreactor module, self-contained, closed-loop cell-culture system that operates in microgravity or on Earth. Equipment supports growth or long-term maintenance of cultures of human or other fragile cells for experiments in basic cell biology or process technology. Designed to support proliferation (initially at exponential rates of growth) of cells in complex growth medium and to maintain confluent cells in defined medium under conditions optimized to permit or encourage selected functions of cells, including secretion of products of cells into medium.

  11. Functional study on two artificial liver bioreactors with collagen gel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    XU Bing

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo improve the hollow fiber bioreactor of artificial liver. MethodsRat hepatocytes mixed with collagen solution were injected into the external cavity of a hollow fiber reactor to construct a bioreactor of hepatocytes suspended in collagen gel (group Ⅰ. Other rat hepatocytes suspended in solution were injected into the external cavity of a hollow fiber reactor with a layer of collagen on the wall of the external cavity to construct a bioreactor of collagen layer and hepatocytes (group Ⅱ. For each group, the culture solution circulated through the internal cavity of the hollow fiber bioreactor; the bioreactor was put in a culture box for 9 d, and the culture solution in the internal cavity was exchanged for new one every 24 h; the concentrations of albumin (Alb, urea, and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH in the culture solution samples were measured to examine the hepatocyte function of the bioreactor. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS 130. Continuous data were expressed as mean±SD, and comparison between groups was made by paired t test. ResultsFor groups Ⅰ and Ⅱ, Alb levels reached peak values on day 3 of culture (1.41±0.08 g/L and 0.65±0.05 g/L; from day 3 to 9, group I had a significantly higher Alb level than group Ⅱ (t>7.572, P<0.01. For groups Ⅰ and Ⅱ, urea levels reached peak values on days 3 and 5 of culture (1.73±0.14 mmol/L and 1.56±0.18 mmol/L; from days 5 to 9, group I had a significantly higher urea level than group Ⅱ (t>8.418, P<0.01. For groups Ⅰ and Ⅱ, LDH levels reached peak values on day 9 of culture (32.03±9.13 U/L and 70.17±25.28 U/L; from days 1 to 9, group I had a significantly lower LDH level than group Ⅱ(t>5.633, P<0.01. Therefore, the bioreactor of hepatocytes suspended in collagen gel (group Ⅰ showed a better hepatocyte function and less hepatic enzyme leakage compared with the bioreactor of collagen layer and hepatocytes (group Ⅱ. Conclusion

  12. Bioreactors as Engineering Support to Treat Cardiac Muscle and Vascular Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Massai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the Western World. The inability of fully differentiated, load-bearing cardiovascular tissues to in vivo regenerate and the limitations of the current treatment therapies greatly motivate the efforts of cardiovascular tissue engineering to become an effective clinical strategy for injured heart and vessels. For the effective production of organized and functional cardiovascular engineered constructs in vitro, a suitable dynamic environment is essential, and can be achieved and maintained within bioreactors. Bioreactors are technological devices that, while monitoring and controlling the culture environment and stimulating the construct, attempt to mimic the physiological milieu. In this study, a review of the current state of the art of bioreactor solutions for cardiovascular tissue engineering is presented, with emphasis on bioreactors and biophysical stimuli adopted for investigating the mechanisms influencing cardiovascular tissue development, and for eventually generating suitable cardiovascular tissue replacements.

  13. Three-Dimensional Modelling inside a Differential Pressure Laminar Flow Bioreactor Filled with Porous Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgit Weyand

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics- (CFD- model based on a differential pressure laminar flow bioreactor prototype was developed to further examine performance under changing culture conditions. Cell growth inside scaffolds was simulated by decreasing intrinsic permeability values and led to pressure build-up in the upper culture chamber. Pressure release by an integrated bypass system allowed continuation of culture. The specific shape of the bioreactor culture vessel supported a homogenous flow profile and mass flux at the scaffold level at various scaffold permeabilities. Experimental data showed an increase in oxygen concentration measured inside a collagen scaffold seeded with human mesenchymal stem cells when cultured in the perfusion bioreactor after 24 h compared to static culture in a Petri dish (dynamic: 11% O2 versus static: 3% O2. Computational fluid simulation can support design of bioreactor systems for tissue engineering application.

  14. Numerical simulation of fluid field and in vitro three-dimensional fabrication of tissue-engineered bones in a rotating bioreactor and in vivo implantation for repairing segmental bone defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Kedong; Wang, Hai; Zhang, Bowen; Lim, Mayasari; Liu, Yingchao; Liu, Tianqing

    2013-03-01

    In this paper, two-dimensional flow field simulation was conducted to determine shear stresses and velocity profiles for bone tissue engineering in a rotating wall vessel bioreactor (RWVB). In addition, in vitro three-dimensional fabrication of tissue-engineered bones was carried out in optimized bioreactor conditions, and in vivo implantation using fabricated bones was performed for segmental bone defects of Zelanian rabbits. The distribution of dynamic pressure, total pressure, shear stress, and velocity within the culture chamber was calculated for different scaffold locations. According to the simulation results, the dynamic pressure, velocity, and shear stress around the surface of cell-scaffold construction periodically changed at different locations of the RWVB, which could result in periodical stress stimulation for fabricated tissue constructs. However, overall shear stresses were relatively low, and the fluid velocities were uniform in the bioreactor. Our in vitro experiments showed that the number of cells cultured in the RWVB was five times higher than those cultured in a T-flask. The tissue-engineered bones grew very well in the RWVB. This study demonstrates that stress stimulation in an RWVB can be beneficial for cell/bio-derived bone constructs fabricated in an RWVB, with an application for repairing segmental bone defects.

  15. Cells growing in NASA Bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    For 5 days on the STS-70 mission, a bioreactor cultivated human colon cancer cells, which grew to 30 times the volume of control specimens grown on Earth. This significant result was reproduced on STS-85 which grew mature structures that more closely match what are found in tumors in humans. Shown here, clusters of cells slowly spin inside a bioreactor. On Earth, the cells continually fall through the buffer medium and never hit bottom. In space, they are naturally suspended. Rotation ensures gentle stirring so waste is removed and fresh nutrient and oxygen are supplied. The NASA Bioreactor provides a low turbulence culture environment which promotes the formation of large, three-dimensional cell clusters. Due to their high level of cellular organization and specialization, samples constructed in the bioreactor more closely resemble the original tumor or tissue found in the body. The Bioreactor is rotated to provide gentle mixing of fresh and spent nutrient without inducing shear forces that would damage the cells. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators.

  16. Cells growing in NASA Bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    For 5 days on the STS-70 mission, a bioreactor cultivated human colon cancer cells, which grew to 30 times the volume of control specimens grown on Earth. This significant result was reproduced on STS-85 which grew mature structures that more closely match what are found in tumors in humans. Shown here, clusters of cells slowly spin inside a bioreactor. On Earth, the cells continually fall through the buffer medium and never hit bottom. In space, they are naturally suspended. Rotation ensures gentle stirring so waste is removed and fresh nutrient and oxygen are supplied. The NASA Bioreactor provides a low turbulence culture environment which promotes the formation of large, three-dimensional cell clusters. Due to their high level of cellular organization and specialization, samples constructed in the bioreactor more closely resemble the original tumor or tissue found in the body. The Bioreactor is rotated to provide gentle mixing of fresh and spent nutrient without inducing shear forces that would damage the cells. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators.

  17. Model test of reactor vessel wall. Pt. 2. Test performance, measurement and partial evaluation; Modellkoerperversuch zur Reaktortankwand. T. 2; Versuchsdurchfuehrung, Messung und Teilauswertung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maile, K.; Eckert, W.; Theofel, H.; Purper, H.

    1992-07-01

    Due to test interruption because of cut promotion means, the original objective of the project - verification of reactor wall design - could not be achieved because by that point in time the slabs had not yet failed (DIN 1.4948 = X 6 CrNi 18 11). Considering, however, the elongation curve, in particular that of the faulty slab, failure at an earlier stress cycle value than calculated is highly probable. (orig./HP) [Deutsch] Aufgrund des foerderungsbedingten Abbruchs der Versuche konnte die urspruengliche Zielsetzung des Vorhabens - Verifizierung der Auslegung der Reaktorwand - nicht erreicht werden, da ein Versagen der Platten bis zu diesem Zeitpunkt noch nicht vorlag (DIN 1.4948 = X 6 CrNi 18 11). Betrachtet man jedoch den Dehnungsverlauf insbesondere in der Platte mit Fehlern ist zu vermuten, dass ein Versagen zu einer frueheren Lastspielzahl als berechnet sehr wahrscheinlich ist. (orig./HP)

  18. Spaceflight bioreactor studies of cells and tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freed, Lisa E; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2002-01-01

    Studies of the fundamental role of gravity in the development and function of biological organisms are a central component of the human exploration of space. Microgravity affects numerous physical phenomena relevant to biological research, including the hydrostatic pressure in fluid filled vesicles, sedimentation of organelles, and buoyancy-driven convection of flow and heat. These physical phenomena can in turn directly and indirectly affect cellular morphology, metabolism, locomotion, secretion of extracellular matrix and soluble signals, and assembly into functional tissues. Studies aimed at distinguishing specific effects of gravity on biological systems require the ability to: (i) control and systematically vary gravity, e.g. by utilizing the microgravity environment of space in conjunction with an in-flight centrifuge; and (ii) maintain constant all other factors in the immediate environment, including in particular concentrations and exchange rates of biochemical species and hydrodynamic shear. The latter criteria imply the need for gravity-independent mechanisms to provide for mass transport between the cells and their environment. Available flight hardware has largely determined the experimental design and scientific objectives of spaceflight cell and tissue culture studies carried out to date. Simple culture vessels have yielded important quantitative data, and helped establish in vitro models of cell locomotion, growth and differentiation in various mammalian cell types including embryonic lung cells [6], lymphocytes [2,8], and renal cells [7,31]. Studies done using bacterial cells established the first correlations between gravity-dependent factors such as cell settling velocity and diffusional distance and the respective cell responses [12]. The development of advanced bioreactors for microgravity cell and tissue culture and for tissue engineering has benefited both research areas and provided relevant in vitro model systems for studies of astronaut

  19. Design, characterization and application of the Multiple Air-lift Loop bioreactor.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, W.A.M.

    1995-01-01

    A new bioreactor is introduced: the Multiple Air-lift Loop reactor (MAL). The MAL consists of a series of air-lift loop reactors within one vessel. With the MAL, a new type of geometry for air-lift reactors with an internal loop is introduced. This new geometry was characterized with respect to hydr

  20. Design, characterization and application of the multiple air-lift loop bioreactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, W.A.M.

    1995-01-01

    A new bioreactor is introduced: the Multiple Air-lift Loop reactor (MAL). The MAL consists of a series of air-lift loop reactors within one vessel. With the MAL, a new type of geometry for air-lift reactors with an internal loop is introduced. This new geometry was characterized with

  1. Spiral vane bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Dennis R. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A spiral vane bioreactor of a perfusion type is described in which a vertical chamber, intended for use in a microgravity condition, has a central rotating filter assembly and has flexible membranes disposed to rotate annularly about the filter assembly. The flexible members have end portions disposed angularly with respect to one another. A fluid replenishment medium is input from a closed loop liquid system to a completely liquid filled chamber containing microcarrier beads, cells and a fluid medium. Output of spent medium is to the closed loop. In the closed loop, the output and input parameters are sensed by sensors. A manifold permits recharging of the nutrients and pH adjustment. Oxygen is supplied and carbon dioxide and bubbles are removed and the system is monitored and controlled by a microprocessor.

  2. [Transgenic animals bioreactors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gou, Ke-Mian; An, Xiao-Rong; Tian, Jian-Hui; Chen, Yong-Fu

    2002-01-01

    The production of human recombinant proteins in milk of transgenic farm animals offers a safe, very cost-effective source of commercially important proteins that cannot be produced as efficiently in adequate quantities by other methods. This review has summarized the current status of gene selection, vector construct, transgenic methods, economics, and obvious potential in transgenic animals bioreactors. Recently, a more powerful approach was adopted in the transgenic animals founded on the application of nuclear transfer. As we will illustrate, this strategy presents a breakthrough in the overall efficiency of generating transgenic farm animals, product consistency, and time of product development. The successful adaptation of Cre-/lox P-mediated site-specific DNA recombination systems in farm animals will offer unprecedented possibilities for generating transgenic animals.

  3. Fast multipoint immobilized MOF bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wan-Ling; Wu, Cheng-You; Chen, Chien-Yu; Singco, Brenda; Lin, Chia-Her; Huang, Hsi-Ya

    2014-07-14

    An enzyme-NBD@MOF bioreactor with exemplary proteolytic performance, even after successive reuse and storage, was produced through a novel, rapid and simple multipoint immobilization technique without chemical modification of the solid support. Enzyme loading and distribution could be directly monitored from the fluorescence emission of the bioreactor. The dye molecular dimension plays a role in its overall performance. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Integrating human stem cell expansion and neuronal differentiation in bioreactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Costa Eunice M

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human stem cells are cellular resources with outstanding potential for cell therapy. However, for the fulfillment of this application, major challenges remain to be met. Of paramount importance is the development of robust systems for in vitro stem cell expansion and differentiation. In this work, we successfully developed an efficient scalable bioprocess for the fast production of human neurons. Results The expansion of undifferentiated human embryonal carcinoma stem cells (NTera2/cl.D1 cell line as 3D-aggregates was firstly optimized in spinner vessel. The media exchange operation mode with an inoculum concentration of 4 × 105 cell/mL was the most efficient strategy tested, with a 4.6-fold increase in cell concentration achieved in 5 days. These results were validated in a bioreactor where similar profile and metabolic performance were obtained. Furthermore, characterization of the expanded population by immunofluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry showed that NT2 cells maintained their stem cell characteristics along the bioreactor culture time. Finally, the neuronal differentiation step was integrated in the bioreactor process, by addition of retinoic acid when cells were in the middle of the exponential phase. Neurosphere composition was monitored and neuronal differentiation efficiency evaluated along the culture time. The results show that, for bioreactor cultures, we were able to increase significantly the neuronal differentiation efficiency by 10-fold while reducing drastically, by 30%, the time required for the differentiation process. Conclusion The culture systems developed herein are robust and represent one-step-forward towards the development of integrated bioprocesses, bridging stem cell expansion and differentiation in fully controlled bioreactors.

  5. 厚壁压力容器近表面 TOFD 检测研究%Research on TOFD Detection of the Near-surface of Thick-walled Pressure Vessel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘畅; 张国福

    2015-01-01

    From perspective of thick-walled pressure vessel near-surface defect detection rate and accuracy of defect size positioning and quantifying,upper tier detection experiment on 205mm thick-walled test block was carried out by using time of flight diffraction (TOFD) technology. The reliability of methods of changing probe centre separation and angle of incidence to decrease the dead zone in the upper surface was verified combined with whole-body imaging result of the upper tier. The experimental result shows that TOFD has strong ability to independently detect the defect in the upper surface dead zone, but it can not accurately determine flaw depth and height. However combined with the phased array technique, its near-surface detection effect can be effectively improved.%从厚壁压力容器近表面缺陷的检出率和缺陷尺寸定位定量的精准性角度出发,开展205 mm 厚壁试块超声波衍射时差法(TOFD)上分区检测实验,结合上分区的整体成像结果,验证理论计算得出的通过改变探头间距和入射角来减小上表面盲区的方法是否可靠。实验结果表明,TOFD 具有很强的独立发现上表面盲区内缺陷的能力,但无法获得缺陷自身深度和高度的精确定量,结合相控阵技术则可以有效提高近表面检测效果。

  6. Novel disposable flexible bioreactor for Escherichia coli culture in orbital shaking incubator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ting; Huang, Yue; Han, Zhiqiang; Liu, Huitao; Zhang, Rui; Xu, Yuming

    2013-10-01

    Erlenmeyer flask or conical flask, usually made of glass, is widely used for laboratory scale suspension culture of microorganism, such as Escherichia Coli and yeast. Due to being non-disposable culture vessel, it has to be cleaned, packaged and sterilized prior to use, which are time, labor and energy consuming work, and has the potential risk of cross-contamination. Despite the rigid plastic conical flasks are possible for single use, they are not economically effective and produce more waste. To overcome these drawbacks, here we successfully developed a novel disposable flexible bioreactor with a plastic film through a thermo-fusion technique. With a triangular pyramid shape, the bioreactor enabled itself to keep a three-dimensional internal space without needing air inflation and well adapted to the commercial available orbital shaker. Unlike the conventional rigid conical flasks and other reported flexible flasks, which had to be fixed in the shaker, the flexible bioreactor could keep sitting on the silicone pad-carpeted platform of the orbital shaker steadily without any fixation needed at the shaking speeds below 250 rpm, thus making it simple to handle. Compared with the traditional conical glass flasks, the innovative flexible bioreactors achieved a significant higher efficiency in bacteria growth and oxygen transfer rates. In conclusion, the novel flexible bioreactor is an ideal disposable culture vessel for microorganism suspension culture at laboratory scale and holds a promising potential to replace the glass flask and rigid plastic flask in the future.

  7. Bioreactors Drive Advances in Tissue Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    It was an unlikely moment for inspiration. Engineers David Wolf and Ray Schwarz stopped by their lab around midday. Wolf, of Johnson Space Center, and Schwarz, with NASA contractor Krug Life Sciences (now Wyle Laboratories Inc.), were part of a team tasked with developing a unique technology with the potential to enhance medical research. But that wasn t the focus at the moment: The pair was rounding up colleagues interested in grabbing some lunch. One of the lab s other Krug engineers, Tinh Trinh, was doing something that made Wolf forget about food. Trinh was toying with an electric drill. He had stuck the barrel of a syringe on the bit; it spun with a high-pitched whirr when he squeezed the drill s trigger. At the time, a multidisciplinary team of engineers and biologists including Wolf, Schwarz, Trinh, and project manager Charles D. Anderson, who formerly led the recovery of the Apollo capsules after splashdown and now worked for Krug was pursuing the development of a technology called a bioreactor, a cylindrical device used to culture human cells. The team s immediate goal was to grow human kidney cells to produce erythropoietin, a hormone that regulates red blood cell production and can be used to treat anemia. But there was a major barrier to the technology s success: Moving the liquid growth media to keep it from stagnating resulted in turbulent conditions that damaged the delicate cells, causing them to quickly die. The team was looking forward to testing the bioreactor in space, hoping the device would perform more effectively in microgravity. But on January 28, 1986, the Space Shuttle Challenger broke apart shortly after launch, killing its seven crewmembers. The subsequent grounding of the shuttle fleet had left researchers with no access to space, and thus no way to study the effects of microgravity on human cells. As Wolf looked from Trinh s syringe-capped drill to where the bioreactor sat on a workbench, he suddenly saw a possible solution to both

  8. Anaerobic membrane bioreactor under extreme conditions (poster)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Munoz Sierra, J.D.; De Kreuk, M.K.; Spanjers, H.; Van Lier, J.B.

    2013-01-01

    Membrane bioreactors ensure biomass retention by the application of micro or ultrafiltration processes. This allows operation at high sludge concentrations. Previous studies have shown that anaerobic membrane bioreactors is an efficient way to retain specialist microorganisms for treating wastewater

  9. 小口径生物型人工血管移植后的血管壁重构%Experiment study of vessel wall reconstruction after a novel biological small-diameter vascular graft

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许益民; 漆松涛; 林绿标; 曾绍文; 李伟秋; 庄冰容

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Compared with human vessels, vascular prosthesis has the greastest advantage for its rich source. Besides, its characteristics are similar to the human vessel, and vascular prosthesis has high histocompatibility after graft.OBJECTIVE: To observe the survival and life status, graft histocompatibility and histopathological changes of the reconstructed vascular wall in experimental dogs within eighteen months following the implantation of biological small-diameter vascular graft.METHODS: By crosslinking fixation, removing antigen, covalent bonding with heparin and coupling with specific polypetide capable of sticking and enriching growth factors, a kind of highly anticoagulant biological artificial vessel with the diameter of 3.5 to 4.5 mm was prepared. Artificial vascular grafts were implanted end-to-end by a continuous suture in the common carotid artery of the experimental dogs. Sample procedure was performed at different time for postoperative eighteen months, for histopathological examination.RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: Only a little adhesion between the artificial artery and the surounding tissue was found during sampling procedure. Eight weeks after grafting, the host tissue penetrated the poros of grafts and protruded into the lumen, forming the neointima of the graft vessel. Twelve weeks after grafting, endothelial cells were sparsely distributed throughout the neointima near the stoma. Six months after grafting, endothelial cells were present on the whole surface of the patent graft lumen.Twelve months after grafting, VG staining of the graft wall revealed that the graft stent had been replaced by a large amount of newly grown collagen fibers and blood capillaries. The previous graft stent was partly replaced by the host vascular tissue.Eighteen months after grafting, the previous graft stent was mostly replaced by the host vascular tissue. All of the above proves that the novel biological small-diameter vascular graft has early and intact formation

  10. Numerical Simulation of Mass Transfer and Three-Dimensional Fabrication of Tissue-Engineered Cartilages Based on Chitosan/Gelatin Hybrid Hydrogel Scaffold in a Rotating Bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yanxia; Song, Kedong; Jiang, Siyu; Chen, Jinglian; Tang, Lingzhi; Li, Siyuan; Fan, Jiangli; Wang, Yiwei; Zhao, Jiaquan; Liu, Tianqing

    2017-01-01

    Cartilage tissue engineering is believed to provide effective cartilage repair post-injuries or diseases. Biomedical materials play a key role in achieving successful culture and fabrication of cartilage. The physical properties of a chitosan/gelatin hybrid hydrogel scaffold make it an ideal cartilage biomimetic material. In this study, a chitosan/gelatin hybrid hydrogel was chosen to fabricate a tissue-engineered cartilage in vitro by inoculating human adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) at both dynamic and traditional static culture conditions. A bioreactor that provides a dynamic culture condition has received greater applications in tissue engineering due to its optimal mass transfer efficiency and its ability to simulate an equivalent physical environment compared to human body. In this study, prior to cell-scaffold fabrication experiment, mathematical simulations were confirmed with a mass transfer of glucose and TGF-β2 both in rotating wall vessel bioreactor (RWVB) and static culture conditions in early stage of culture via computational fluid dynamic (CFD) method. To further investigate the feasibility of the mass transfer efficiency of the bioreactor, this RWVB was adopted to fabricate three-dimensional cell-hydrogel cartilage constructs in a dynamic environment. The results showed that the mass transfer efficiency of RWVB was faster in achieving a final equilibrium compared to culture in static culture conditions. ADSCs culturing in RWVB expanded three times more compared to that in static condition over 10 days. Induced cell cultivation in a dynamic RWVB showed extensive expression of extracellular matrix, while the cell distribution was found much more uniformly distributing with full infiltration of extracellular matrix inside the porous scaffold. The increased mass transfer efficiency of glucose and TGF-β2 from RWVB promoted cellular proliferation and chondrogenic differentiation of ADSCs inside chitosan/gelatin hybrid hydrogel scaffolds. The

  11. Progress in bioreactors of bioartiifcial livers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng-Bo Yu; Xiao-Ping Pan; Lan-Juan Li

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Bioartiifcial liver support systems are becoming an effective therapy for hepatic failure. Bioreactors, as key devices in these systems, can provide a favorable growth and metabolic environment, mass exchange, and immunological isolation as a platform. Currently, stagnancy in bioreactor research is the main factor restricting the development of bioartiifcial liver support systems. DATA SOURCES: A PubMed database search of English-language literature was performed to identify relevant articles using the keywords "bioreactor", "bioartiifcial liver", "hepatocyte", and "liver failure". More than 40 articles related to the bioreactors of bioartiifcial livers were reviewed. RESULTS: Some progress has been made in the improvement of structures, functions, and modiifed macromolecular materials related to bioreactors in recent years. The current data on the improvement of bioreactor conifgurations for bioartiifcial livers or on the potential of the use of certain scaffold materials in bioreactors, combined with the clinical efifcacy and safety evaluation of cultured hepatocytesin vitro, indicate that the AMC (Academic Medical Center) BAL bioreactor and MELS (modular extracorporeal liver support) BAL bioreactor system can partly replace the synthetic and metabolic functions of the liver in phaseⅠ clinical studies. In addition, it has been indicated that the microlfuidic PDMS (polydimethylsiloxane) bioreactor, or SlideBioreactor, and the microfabricated grooved bioreactor are appropriate for hepatocyte culture, which is also promising for bioartiifcial livers. Similarly, modiifed scaffolds can promote the adhesion, growth, and function of hepatocytes, and provide reliable materials for bioreactors.CONCLUSIONS: Bioreactors, as key devices in bioartiifcial livers, play an important role in the therapy for liver failure both now and in the future. Bioreactor conifgurations are indispensable for the development of bioartiifcial livers used for liver

  12. Following an Optimal Batch Bioreactor Operations Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibarra-Junquera, V.; Jørgensen, Sten Bay; Virgen-Ortíz, J.J.;

    2012-01-01

    The problem of following an optimal batch operation model for a bioreactor in the presence of uncertainties is studied. The optimal batch bioreactor operation model (OBBOM) refers to the bioreactor trajectory for nominal cultivation to be optimal. A multiple-variable dynamic optimization of fed-b...

  13. Membrane bioreactor for waste gas treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reij, M.W.

    1997-01-01

    Summary

    This thesis describes the design and testing of a membrane bioreactor (MBR) for removal of organic pollutants from air. In such a bioreactor for biological gas treatment pollutants are degraded by micro-organisms. The membrane bioreactor is an alternative to other types of

  14. Preliminary Study on Airlift Membran—Bioreactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUNong; XINGWeihong; 等

    2002-01-01

    A new type of membrane bioreactor named “airlift membrane-bioreactor”is discussed.For municipal wastewater reclamation,the preliminary study on airlift membrane-bioreactor shows its good performance such as high flux and lower energy consumption.The airlift membrane-bioreactor is potentially applicable in bioengineering and environmental protection fields.

  15. Scale-up impacts on mass transfer and bioremediation of suspended naphthalene particles in bead mill bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuching; Riess, Ryan; Nemati, Mehdi; Hill, Gordon; Headley, John

    2008-11-01

    Scale-up effects on mass transfer and bioremediation of suspended naphthalene particles have been studied in 20 and 58L bead mill bioreactors and compared to data generated earlier with a laboratory scaled bioreactor. The bead mill bioreactor performance with respect to naphthalene mass transfer rate was dependent on the size and loading of the inert particles, as well as the rotational speed of the roller apparatus. The optimum operating conditions were found to be 15mm glass beads at a loading of 50% (total volume of particles/working volume of bioreactor: v/v%) and a bioreactor rotational speed of 50rpm. The highest naphthalene mass transfer coefficients obtained in the large scale system under these optimum conditions (19.6 and 22.4h(-1) for 20 and 58L vessels, respectively) were higher than those determined previously in a 2.5L bead mill bioreactor (0.7h(-1)). The acute toxicity tests indicated that the bioreactor effluent was less toxic than the untreated naphthalene suspension. Biodegradation rates obtained in these large scale bead mill bioreactors under optimum conditions (36-37.4mgL(-1)h(-1)) were higher than those achieved in the control bioreactors of similar sizes (11.4 and 11.6mgL(-1)h(-1)) but were slower than those previously determined in a 2.5L bead mill bioreactor (59-61.5mgL(-1)h(-1)). The limitation of oxygen in the large scale systems and damage of the bacterial cells due to the crushing effects of the large beads are likely contributing factors in the lower observed biodegradation rates. The optimum conditions with respect to naphthalene mass transfer might not necessarily translate to optimum performance with regard to bioremediation.

  16. Tissue grown in NASA Bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    Cells from kidneys lose some of their special features in conventional culture but form spheres replete with specialized cell microvilli (hair) and synthesize hormones that may be clinically useful. Ground-based research studies have demonstrated that both normal and neoplastic cells and tissues recreate many of the characteristics in the NASA bioreactor that they display in vivo. Proximal kidney tubule cells that normally have rich apically oriented microvilli with intercellular clefts in the kidney do not form any of these structures in conventional two-dimensional monolayer culture. However, when normal proximal renal tubule cells are cultured in three-dimensions in the bioreactor, both the microvilli and the intercellular clefts form. This is important because, when the morphology is recreated, the function is more likely also to be rejuvenated. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC).

  17. Tissue grown in NASA Bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    Cells from kidneys lose some of their special features in conventional culture but form spheres replete with specialized cell microvilli (hair) and synthesize hormones that may be clinically useful. Ground-based research studies have demonstrated that both normal and neoplastic cells and tissues recreate many of the characteristics in the NASA bioreactor that they display in vivo. Proximal kidney tubule cells that normally have rich apically oriented microvilli with intercellular clefts in the kidney do not form any of these structures in conventional two-dimensional monolayer culture. However, when normal proximal renal tubule cells are cultured in three-dimensions in the bioreactor, both the microvilli and the intercellular clefts form. This is important because, when the morphology is recreated, the function is more likely also to be rejuvenated. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC).

  18. Rheological properties and mechanical stability of new gel-entrapment systems applied in bioreactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vogelsang, C.; Wijffels, R.H.; Ostgaard, K.

    2000-01-01

    The mechanical stability of gels applied for entrapment and retention of biocatalysts in bioreactors is of crucial importance for successful scale-up applications. Gel abrasion in agitated reactors will depend on liquid shear, bubble shear, and wall shear, as well as collisions between the gel parti

  19. Sulfur formation and recovery in a thiosulfate-oxidizing bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Sánchez, A; Meulepas, R; Revah, S

    2008-08-01

    This work describes the design and performance of a thiosulfate-oxidizing bioreactor that allowed high elemental sulfur production and recovery efficiency. The reactor system, referred to as a Supernatant-Recycling Settler Bioreactor (SRSB), consisted of a cylindrical upflow reactor and a separate aeration vessel. The reactor was equipped with an internal settler and packing material (structured corrugated PVC sheets) to facilitate both cell retention and the settling of the formed elemental sulfur. The supernatant from the reactor was continuously recirculated through the aerator. An inlet thiosulfate concentration of 100 mmol l(-1) was used. The reactor system was fed with 89 mmol l(-1) d(-1) thiosulfate reaching 98 to 100% thiosulfate conversion with an elemental sulfur yield of 77%. Ninety-three percent of the produced sulfur was harvested from the bottom of the reactor as sulfur sludge. The dry sulfur sludge contained 87% elemental sulfur. The inclusion of an internal settler and packing material in the reactor system resulted in an effective retention of sulfur and biomass inside the bioreactor, preventing the oxidation of thiosulfate and elemental sulfur to sulfate in the aerator and, therefore, improving the efficiency of elemental sulfur formation and recovery.

  20. 3D Printed Vascular Networks Enhance Viability in High-Volume Perfusion Bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Owen; Nguyen, Bao-Ngoc B; Placone, Jesse K; Fisher, John P

    2016-12-01

    There is a significant clinical need for engineered bone graft substitutes that can quickly, effectively, and safely repair large segmental bone defects. One emerging field of interest involves the growth of engineered bone tissue in vitro within bioreactors, the most promising of which are perfusion bioreactors. Using bioreactor systems, tissue engineered bone constructs can be fabricated in vitro. However, these engineered constructs lack inherent vasculature and once implanted, quickly develop a necrotic core, where no nutrient exchange occurs. Here, we utilized COMSOL modeling to predict oxygen diffusion gradients throughout aggregated alginate constructs, which allowed for the computer-aided design of printable vascular networks, compatible with any large tissue engineered construct cultured in a perfusion bioreactor. We investigated the effect of 3D printed macroscale vascular networks with various porosities on the viability of human mesenchymal stem cells in vitro, using both gas-permeable, and non-gas permeable bioreactor growth chamber walls. Through the use of 3D printed vascular structures in conjunction with a tubular perfusion system bioreactor, cell viability was found to increase by as much as 50% in the core of these constructs, with in silico modeling predicting construct viability at steady state.

  1. Use Alkalinity Monitoring to Optimize Bioreactor Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Christopher S; Kult, Keegan J

    2016-05-01

    In recent years, the agricultural community has reduced flow of nitrogen from farmed landscapes to stream networks through the use of woodchip denitrification bioreactors. Although deployment of this practice is becoming more common to treat high-nitrate water from agricultural drainage pipes, information about bioreactor management strategies is sparse. This study focuses on the use of water monitoring, and especially the use of alkalinity monitoring, in five Iowa woodchip bioreactors to provide insights into and to help manage bioreactor chemistry in ways that will produce desirable outcomes. Results reported here for the five bioreactors show average annual nitrate load reductions between 50 and 80%, which is acceptable according to established practice standards. Alkalinity data, however, imply that nitrous oxide formation may have regularly occurred in at least three of the bioreactors that are considered to be closed systems. Nitrous oxide measurements of influent and effluent water provide evidence that alkalinity may be an important indicator of bioreactor performance. Bioreactor chemistry can be managed by manipulation of water throughput in ways that produce adequate nitrate removal while preventing undesirable side effects. We conclude that (i) water should be retained for longer periods of time in bioreactors where nitrous oxide formation is indicated, (ii) measuring only nitrate and sulfate concentrations is insufficient for proper bioreactor operation, and (iii) alkalinity monitoring should be implemented into protocols for bioreactor management.

  2. Optimizing {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT imaging of vessel wall inflammation: the impact of {sup 18}F-FDG circulation time, injected dose, uptake parameters, and fasting blood glucose levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bucerius, Jan [Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Translational and Molecular Imaging Institute, One Gustave L. Levy Place, P.O. Box 1234, New York, NY (United States); Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Maastricht (Netherlands); Maastricht University Medical Center, Cardiovascular Research Institute Maastricht (CARIM), Maastricht (Netherlands); University Hospital, RWTH Aachen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Aachen (Germany); Mani, Venkatesh; Fayad, Zahi A. [Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Translational and Molecular Imaging Institute, One Gustave L. Levy Place, P.O. Box 1234, New York, NY (United States); Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Department of Cardiology, Zena and Michael A. Weiner Cardiovascular Institute and Marie-Josee and Henry R. Kravis Cardiovascular Health Center, New York, NY (United States); Moncrieff, Colin [Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Translational and Molecular Imaging Institute, One Gustave L. Levy Place, P.O. Box 1234, New York, NY (United States); Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Machac, Josef [Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Fuster, Valentin [Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Department of Cardiology, Zena and Michael A. Weiner Cardiovascular Institute and Marie-Josee and Henry R. Kravis Cardiovascular Health Center, New York, NY (United States); The Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Cardiovasculares (CNIC), Madrid (Spain); Farkouh, Michael E. [Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Department of Cardiology, Zena and Michael A. Weiner Cardiovascular Institute and Marie-Josee and Henry R. Kravis Cardiovascular Health Center, New York, NY (United States); Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Cardiovascular Imaging Clinical Trials Unit, New York, NY (United States); Tawakol, Ahmed [Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard University, Cardiac MR PET CT Program, Boston, MA (United States); Rudd, James H.F. [Cambridge University, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2014-02-15

    {sup 18}F-FDG PET is increasingly used for imaging of vessel wall inflammation. However, limited data are available on the impact of methodological variables, i.e. prescan fasting glucose, FDG circulation time and injected FDG dose, and of different FDG uptake parameters, in vascular FDG PET imaging. Included in the study were 195 patients who underwent vascular FDG PET/CT of the aorta and the carotids. Arterial standardized uptake values ({sub mean}SUV{sub max}), target-to-background ratios ({sub mean}TBR{sub max}) and FDG blood-pool activity in the superior vena cava (SVC) and the jugular veins (JV) were quantified. Vascular FDG uptake values classified according to the tertiles of prescan fasting glucose levels, the FDG circulation time, and the injected FDG dose were compared using ANOVA. Multivariate regression analyses were performed to identify the potential impact of all variables described on the arterial and blood-pool FDG uptake. Tertile analyses revealed FDG circulation times of about 2.5 h and prescan glucose levels of less than 7.0 mmol/l, showing a favorable relationship between arterial and blood-pool FDG uptake. FDG circulation times showed negative associations with aortic{sub mean}SUV{sub max} values as well as SVC and JV FDG blood-pool activity, but positive correlations with aortic and carotid{sub mean}TBR{sub max} values. Prescan glucose levels were negatively associated with aortic and carotid{sub mean}TBR{sub max} and carotid{sub mean}SUV{sub max} values, but were positively correlated with SVC blood-pool uptake. The injected FDG dose failed to show any significant association with vascular FDG uptake. FDG circulation times and prescan blood glucose levels significantly affect FDG uptake in the aortic and carotid walls and may bias the results of image interpretation in patients undergoing vascular FDG PET/CT. The injected FDG dose was less critical. Therefore, circulation times of about 2.5 h and prescan glucose levels less than 7.0 mmol

  3. Hematopoietic Stem Cells Expansionin Rotating Wall Vessel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    1 IntroductionClinical trials have demonstrated that ex vivo expanded hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and progenitors offer great promise in reconstituting in vivo hematopoiesis in patients who have undergone intensive chemotherapy. It is therefore necessary to develop a clinical-scale culture system to provide the expanded HSCs and progenitors. Static culture systems such as T-flasks and gas-permeable blood bags are the most widely used culture devices for expanding hematopoietic cells. But they reveal sev...

  4. Suspension cell culture in microgravity and development of a space bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Dennis R.

    1987-01-01

    NASA has methodically developed unique suspension type cell and recovery apparatus culture systems for bioprocess technology experiments and production of biological products in microgravity. The first space bioreactor has been designed for microprocessor control, no gaseous headspace, circulation and resupply of culture medium, and slow mixing in very low shear regimes. Various ground based bioreactors are being used to test reactor vessel design, on-line sensors, effects of shear, nutrient supply, and waste removal from continuous culture of human cells attached to microcarriers. The small (500 ml) bioreactor is being constructed for flight experiments in the Shuttle middeck to verify systems operation under microgravity conditions and to measure the efficiencies of mass transport, gas transfer, oxygen consumption, and control of low shear stress on cells.

  5. Two new disposable bioreactors for plant cell culture: The wave and undertow bioreactor and the slug bubble bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrier, Bénédicte; Courtois, Didier; Hénault, Nicolas; Cuvier, Arnaud; Bastin, Maryse; Aknin, Aziz; Dubreuil, Julien; Pétiard, Vincent

    2007-04-01

    The present article describes two novel flexible plastic-based disposable bioreactors. The first one, the WU bioreactor, is based on the principle of a wave and undertow mechanism that provides agitation while offering convenient mixing and aeration to the plant cell culture contained within the bioreactor. The second one is a high aspect ratio bubble column bioreactor, where agitation and aeration are achieved through the intermittent generation of large diameter bubbles, "Taylor-like" or "slug bubbles" (SB bioreactor). It allows an easy volume increase from a few liters to larger volumes up to several hundred liters with the use of multiple units. The cultivation of tobacco and soya cells producing isoflavones is described up to 70 and 100 L working volume for the SB bioreactor and WU bioreactor, respectively. The bioreactors being disposable and pre-sterilized before use, cleaning, sterilization, and maintenance operations are strongly reduced or eliminated. Both bioreactors represent efficient and low cost cell culture systems, applicable to various cell cultures at small and medium scale, complementary to traditional stainless-steel bioreactors.

  6. 33 CFR Appendix I to Subpart A of... - Vessel Dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... alongside the lock wall. The limits in the block diagram are based on vessels with a maximum allowable beam... limits of the block diagram (measured with the vessel alongside the lock wall), a special permission to... Subpart A of Part 401 Navigation and Navigable Waters SAINT LAWRENCE SEAWAY DEVELOPMENT...

  7. Reactor vessel

    OpenAIRE

    Makkee, M.; Kapteijn, F.; Moulijn, J.A

    1999-01-01

    A reactor vessel (1) comprises a reactor body (2) through which channels (3) are provided whose surface comprises longitudinal inwardly directed parts (4) and is provided with a catalyst (6), as well as buffer bodies (8, 12) connected to the channels (3) on both sides of the reactor body (2) and comprising connections for supplying (9, 10, 11) and discharging (13, 14, 15) via the channels (3) gases and/or liquids entering into a reaction with each other and substances formed upon this reactio...

  8. PRACTICE REVIEW OF FIVE BIOREACTOR/RECIRCULATION LANDFILLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Six bioreactor landfills were analyzed to provide a perspective of current practice and technical issues that differentiate bioreactor landfills from conventional landfills. Five of the bioreactor landfills were anaerobic and one was aerated. In one case, nearly identical cells e...

  9. Bioreactor design and optimization – a future perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gernaey, Krist

    2011-01-01

    Bioreactor design and optimisation are essential in translating the experience gained from lab or pilot scale experiments to efficient production processes in industrial scale bioreactors. This article gives a future perspective on bioreactor design and optimisation, where it is foreseen...

  10. Denitrification 'Woodchip' Bioreactors for Productive and Sustainable Agricultural Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christianson, L. E.; Summerfelt, S.; Sharrer, K.; Lepine, C.; Helmers, M. J.

    2014-12-01

    Growing alarm about negative cascading effects of reactive nitrogen in the environment has led to multifaceted efforts to address elevated nitrate-nitrogen levels in water bodies worldwide. The best way to mitigate N-related impacts, such as hypoxic zones and human health concerns, is to convert nitrate to stable, non-reactive dinitrogen gas through the natural process of denitrification. This means denitrification technologies need to be one of our major strategies for tackling the grand challenge of managing human-induced changes to our global nitrogen cycle. While denitrification technologies have historically been focused on wastewater treatment, there is great interest in new lower-tech options for treating effluent and drainage water from one of our largest reactive nitrogen emitters -- agriculture. Denitrification 'woodchip' bioreactors are able to enhance this natural N-conversion via addition of a solid carbon source (e.g., woodchips) and through designs that facilitate development of anoxic conditions required for denitrification. Wood-based denitrification technologies such as woodchip bioreactors and 'sawdust' walls for groundwater have been shown to be effective at reducing nitrate loads in agricultural settings around the world. Designing these systems to be low-maintenance and to avoid removing land from agricultural production has been a primary focus of this "farmer-friendly" technology. This presentation provides a background on woodchip bioreactors including design considerations, N-removal performance, and current research worldwide. Woodchip bioreactors for the agricultural sector are an accessible new option to address society's interest in improving water quality while simultaneously allowing highly productive agricultural systems to continue to provide food in the face of increasing demand, changing global diets, and fluctuating weather.

  11. Dissolution vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natsume, Tomohiro; Fujioka, Tsunaaki

    1998-05-22

    A basket for containing sheared fuel pieces of spent fuel assemblies in a dissolving vessel main body has many apertures for keeping the concentration of a dissolving liquid at the inner side and the outer side of the basket uniformly. Secured neutron absorbers such as boron stainless and hafnium are appended to one or both surfaces of the basket. Partitioning members are disposed in the basket, and the partitioning members are formed in a lattice-like shape. The partitioning members are also made of secured neutron absorbers such as boron stainless and hafnium. The inside dimension of each division (lattice distance) is determined to about 15cm. Then, it is no more necessary to add soluble neutron absorbers such as gadolinium nitrate to a dissolution solution such as nitric acid thereby enabling to reduce the amount of radioactive wastes. (I.N.)

  12. Methane production in simulated hybrid bioreactor landfill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qiyong; Jin, Xiao; Ma, Zeyu; Tao, Huchun; Ko, Jae Hac

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this work was to study a hybrid bioreactor landfill technology for landfill methane production from municipal solid waste. Two laboratory-scale columns were operated for about ten months to simulate an anaerobic and a hybrid landfill bioreactor, respectively. Leachate was recirculated into each column but aeration was conducted in the hybrid bioreactor during the first stage. Results showed that leachate pH in the anaerobic bioreactor maintained below 6.5, while in the hybrid bioreactor quickly increased from 5.6 to 7.0 due to the aeration. The temporary aeration resulted in lowering COD and BOD5 in the leachate. The volume of methane collected from the hybrid bioreactor was 400 times greater than that of the anaerobic bioreactor. Also, the methane production rate of the hybrid bioreactor was improved within a short period of time. After about 10 months' operation, the total methane production in the hybrid bioreactor was 212 L (16 L/kgwaste).

  13. Advanced methods for bioreactor characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lübbert, A

    1992-08-01

    Bioreactors are characterized by the transport capacities they provide to optimally supply the microorganisms during production process. The transport is performed by flows induced in their cultivation media. In order to understand the extremely complex mixing, mass and heat transfer phenomena encountered, and to perceive their influences on bioreactor performance, sophisticated measuring techniques are required. This review compiles the developments currently in progress to surmount today's shortage of reliable measuring techniques. Measuring techniques are distinguished which can be used on different scales and their application spectra are illustrated by recently obtained results. Several new measuring techniques, which can be employed to resolve the flow structures, are discussed in detail. Only those techniques are considered which can be used to advantage during real cultivations in industrial-scale reactors.

  14. Review of nonconventional bioreactor technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turick, C.E.; Mcllwain, M.E.

    1993-09-01

    Biotechnology will significantly affect many industrial sectors in the future. Industrial sectors that will be affected include pharmaceutical, chemical, fuel, agricultural, and environmental remediation. Future research is needed to improve bioprocessing efficiency and cost-effectiveness in order to compete with traditional technologies. This report describes recent advances in bioprocess technologies and bioreactor designs and relates them to problems encountered in many industrial bioprocessing operations. The primary focus is directed towards increasing gas and vapor transfer for enhanced bioprocess kinetics as well as unproved by-product separation and removal. The advantages and disadvantages of various conceptual designs such as hollow-fiber, gas-phase, hyperbaric/hypobaric, and electrochemical bioreactors are also discussed. Specific applications that are intended for improved bioprocesses include coal desulfurization, coal liquefaction, soil bioremediation, biomass conversion to marketable chemicals, biomining, and biohydrometallurgy as well as bioprocessing of gases and vapors.

  15. Hydrofocusing Bioreactor Produces Anti-Cancer Alkaloids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonda, Steve R.; Valluri, Jagan V.

    2011-01-01

    A methodology for growing three-dimensional plant tissue models in a hydrodynamic focusing bioreactor (HFB) has been developed. The methodology is expected to be widely applicable, both on Earth and in outer space, as a means of growing plant cells and aggregates thereof under controlled conditions for diverse purposes, including research on effects of gravitation and other environmental factors upon plant growth and utilization of plant tissue cultures to produce drugs in quantities greater and at costs lower than those of conventional methodologies. The HFB was described in Hydro focus - ing Bioreactor for Three-Dimensional Cell Culture (MSC-22358), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 27, No. 3 (March 2003), page 66. To recapitulate: The HFB offers a unique hydrofocusing capability that enables the creation of a low-shear liquid culture environment simultaneously with the herding of suspended cells and tissue assemblies and removal of unwanted air bubbles. The HFB includes a rotating cell-culture vessel with a centrally located sampling port and an internal rotating viscous spinner attached to a rotating base. The vessel and viscous spinner can be made to rotate at the same speed and direction or different speeds and directions to tailor the flow field and the associated hydrodynamic forces in the vessel in order to obtain low-shear suspension of cells and control of the locations of cells and air bubbles. For research and pharmaceutical-production applications, the HFB offers two major benefits: low shear stress, which promotes the assembly of cells into tissue-like three-dimensional constructs; and randomization of gravitational vectors relative to cells, which affects production of medicinal compounds. Presumably, apposition of plant cells in the absence of shear forces promotes cell-cell contacts, cell aggregation, and cell differentiation. Only gentle mixing is necessary for distributing nutrients and oxygen. It has been postulated that inasmuch as cells in the simulated

  16. Motional Effect on Wall Shear Stresses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kock, Samuel Alberg; Torben Fründ, Ernst; Yong Kim, Won

    Atherosclerosis is the leading cause of death and severe disability. Wall Shear Stress (WSS), the stress exerted on vessel walls by the flowing blood is a key factor in the development of atherosclerosis. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) is widely used for WSS estimations. Most CFD simulations...... are based on static models to ease computational burden leading to inaccurate estimations. The aim of this work was to estimate the effect of vessel wall deformations (expansion and bending) on WSS levels....

  17. Simulation of In-Vessel Corium Retention through External Reactor Vessel Cooling for SMART using SIMPLE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Jin-Sung; Son, Donggun; Park, Rae-Joon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Thermal load analysis from the corium pool to the outer reactor vessel in the lower plenum of the reactor vessel is necessary to evaluate the effect of the IVR-ERVC during a severe accident for SMART. A computational code called SIMPLE (Sever Invessel Melt Progression in Lower plenum Environment) has been developed for analyze transient behavior of molten corium in the lower plenum, interaction between corium and coolant, and heat-up and ablation of reactor vessel wall. In this study, heat load analysis of the reactor vessel for SMART has been conducted using the SIMPLE. Transient behavior of the molten corium in the lower plenum and IVR-ERVC for SMART has been simulated using SIMPLE. Heat flux from the corium pool to the outer reactor vessel is concentrated in metallic layer by the focusing effect. As a result, metallic layer shows higher temperature than the oxidic layer. Also, vessel wall of metallic layer has been ablated by the high in-vessel temperature. Ex-vessel temperature of the metallic layer was maintained 390 K and vessel thickness was maintained 14 cm. It means that the reactor vessel integrity is maintained by the IVR-ERVC.

  18. Role of 3.0 T MR vessel wall imaging for identifying the activity of Takayasu arteritis%3.0 T高分辨率MR血管壁成像对大动脉炎活动性判断的价值

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘晓晟; 许建荣; 赵辉林; 成芳; 路青; 姚秋英

    2010-01-01

    Objective To analyze and explore the value of 3 T high resolution magnetic resonance vessel wall imaging for identifying the activity of Takayasu arteritis. Methods Twenty-six consecutive patients with Takayasu arteritis underwent 3.0 T high resolution MR vessel wall imaging on supraortic vessels (according to the classification of Lupi-Herrea , type Ⅰ and Ⅲ were included). Sixteen patients were in active phase and 10 in inactive phase based on the Kerr criteria. The MR vessel wall imaging appearances of Takayasu arteritis were compared between the active phase and inactive phase cases. Results Wall thickening was demonstrated in all involved arteries. There were statistically significant differences between active phase and inactive phase cases in MR appearances including multi-ring thickening of vessel wall (75/80 and 18/50), arterial inner wail enhancement (50/80 and 19/50), obscurity of perivascular fat (55/80 and 18/50,X=50.39,7.41,13.40,P<0.01). There was also a statistically significant difference in the thickness of carotid artery wall between the two groups [ (3.8±0.2) mm vs (2.5±0.8) mm]. Conclusion 3 T high resolution MR vessel wall imaging is valuable for identifying the activity of Takayasu arteritis.%目的 探讨3.0 T高分辨率MR血管壁成像对大动脉炎活动性判断的价值.方法 26例确诊为大动脉炎的患者(根据Lupi-Herrea分类,为Ⅰ和Ⅲ型,均累及主动脉弓及其主要大分支)接受了颈部及上胸部MR血管壁成像,其中处于病情活动期16例,非活动期10例.分析并比较了2组患者受累动脉管壁的MRI表现特征.采用X~2检验对2组患者的血管壁形态进行统计学分析.结果 所有受累动脉的血管壁均有不同程度的环形增厚.活动期组患者的管壁厚度较非活动期组患者增厚明显[分别为(3.8±0.2)和(2.5±0.8) mm];比较2组增厚的血管壁形态,管壁呈多环征(分别为75/80和18/50)、内壁明显强化(分别为50/80和19/50)、血管

  19. Effect of the in- and ex-vessel dual cooling on the retention of an internally heated melt pool in a hemispherical vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, K.I.; Kim, B.S.; Kim, D.H. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Inst., Thermal Hydraulic Safety Research, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-07-01

    A concept of in-vessel melt retention (IVMR) by in-vessel reflooding and/or reactor cavity flooding has been considered as one of severe accident management strategies and intensive researches to be performed worldwide. This paper provides some results of analytical investigations on the effect of both in- / ex-vessel cooling on the retention of an internally heated molten pool confined in a hemispherical vessel and the related thermal behavior of the vessel wall. For the present analysis, a scale-down reactor vessel for the KSNP reactor design of 1000 MWe (a large dry PWR) is utilized for a reactor vessel. Aluminum oxide melt simulant is also utilized for a real corium pool. An internal power density in the molten pool is determined by a simple scaling analysis that equates the heat flux on the the scale-down vessel wall to that estimated from KSNP. Well-known temperature-dependent boiling heat transfer curves are applied to the in- and ex-vessel cooling boundaries and radiative heat transfer has been only considered in the case of dry in-vessel. MELTPOOL, which is a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code developed at KAERI, is applied to obtain the time-varying heat flux distribution from a molten pool and the vessel wall temperature distributions with angular positions along the vessel wall. In order to gain further insights on the effectiveness of in- and ex-vessel dual cooling on the in-vessel corium retention, four different boundary conditions has been considered: no water inside the vessel without ex-vessel cooling, water inside the vessel without ex-vessel cooling, no water inside the vessel with ex-vessel cooling, and water inside the vessel with ex-vessel cooling. (authors)

  20. Bioreactors for Plant Embryogenesis and Beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fei, Liwen; Weathers, Pamela

    2016-01-01

    A variety of different bioreactors have been developed for use in initiating and cultivating somatic embryos. The various designs for embryogenesis and culture are critically evaluated here. Bioreactor optimization and operation methods are also described along with recommendations for use based on desired outcome.

  1. Membrane bioreactors for waste gas treatment.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reij, M.W.; Keurentjes, J.T.F.; Hartmans, S.

    1998-01-01

    This review describes the recent development of membrane reactors for biological treatment of waste gases. In this type of bioreactor gaseous pollutants are transferred through a membrane to the liquid phase, where micro-organisms degrade the pollutants. The membrane bioreactor combines the

  2. BIOREACTOR DESIGN - OUTER LOOP LANDFILL, LOUISVILLE, KY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bioreactor field demonstration projects are underway at the Outer Loop Landfill in Louisville, KY, USA. The research effort is a cooperative research effort between US EPA and Waste Management Inc. Two primary kinds of municipal waste bioreactors are under study at this site. ...

  3. A study of the Coriolis effect on the fluid flow profile in a centrifugal bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detzel, Christopher J; Thorson, Michael R; Van Wie, Bernard J; Ivory, Cornelius F

    2009-01-01

    Increasing demand for tissues, proteins, and antibodies derived from cell culture is necessitating the development and implementation of high cell density bioreactors. A system for studying high density culture is the centrifugal bioreactor (CCBR), which retains cells by increasing settling velocities through system rotation, thereby eliminating diffusional limitations associated with mechanical cell retention devices. This article focuses on the fluid mechanics of the CCBR system by considering Coriolis effects. Such considerations for centrifugal bioprocessing have heretofore been ignored; therefore, a simpler analysis of an empty chamber will be performed. Comparisons are made between numerical simulations and bromophenol blue dye injection experiments. For the non-rotating bioreactor with an inlet velocity of 4.3 cm/s, both the numerical and experimental results show the formation of a teardrop shaped plume of dye following streamlines through the reactor. However, as the reactor is rotated, the simulation predicts the development of vortices and a flow profile dominated by Coriolis forces resulting in the majority of flow up the leading wall of the reactor as dye initially enters the chamber, results are confirmed by experimental observations. As the reactor continues to fill with dye, the simulation predicts dye movement up both walls while experimental observations show the reactor fills with dye from the exit to the inlet. Differences between the simulation and experimental observations can be explained by excessive diffusion required for simulation convergence, and a slight density difference between dyed and un-dyed solutions. Implications of the results on practical bioreactor use are also discussed.

  4. Vessel Activity Record

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Vessel Activity Record is a bi-weekly spreadsheet that shows the status of fishing vessels. It records whether fishing vessels are fishing without an observer...

  5. Vessel Operator System

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Operator cards are required for any operator of a charter/party boat and or a commercial vessel (including carrier and processor vessels) issued a vessel permit from...

  6. Clinical uses of ligasure vessel sealing system(LVSS) in surgery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bimal Kumar Sah; Jianjun Yang; Guantian Yang; Xiaowen Zhang

    2008-01-01

    This article provides the efficacy of the new device, Ligasure Vessel Sealing System(LVSS) for achieving hemostasis. LVSS is an alternative to suture ligatures, hemoclips, staplers, for ligating vessels and tissue bundles. This new device seals the vessels up to 7 mm in diameter by denaturing collagen and elastin within vessel wall and surrounding connective tissue.

  7. Cell Cycle Progression of Human Cells Cultured in Rotating Bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, Kelsey

    2009-01-01

    Space flight has been shown to alter the astronauts immune systems. Because immune performance is complex and reflects the influence of multiple organ systems within the host, scientists sought to understand the potential impact of microgravity alone on the cellular mechanisms critical to immunity. Lymphocytes and their differentiated immature form, lymphoblasts, play an important and integral role in the body's defense system. T cells, one of the three major types of lymphocytes, play a central role in cell-mediated immunity. They can be distinguished from other lymphocyte types, such as B cells and natural killer cells by the presence of a special receptor on their cell surface called T cell receptors. Reported studies have shown that spaceflight can affect the expression of cell surface markers. Cell surface markers play an important role in the ability of cells to interact and to pass signals between different cells of the same phenotype and cells of different phenotypes. Recent evidence suggests that cell-cycle regulators are essential for T-cell function. To trigger an effective immune response, lymphocytes must proliferate. The objective of this project is to investigate the changes in growth of human cells cultured in rotating bioreactors and to measure the growth rate and the cell cycle distribution for different human cell types. Human lymphocytes and lymphoblasts will be cultured in a bioreactor to simulate aspects of microgravity. The bioreactor is a cylindrical culture vessel that incorporates the aspects of clinostatic rotation of a solid fluid body around a horizontal axis at a constant speed, and compensates gravity by rotation and places cells within the fluid body into a sustained free-fall. Cell cycle progression and cell proliferation of the lymphocytes will be measured for a number of days. In addition, RNA from the cells will be isolated for expression of genes related in cell cycle regulations.

  8. Cell Cycle Progression of Human Cells Cultured in Rotating Bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, Kelsey

    2009-01-01

    Space flight has been shown to alter the astronauts immune systems. Because immune performance is complex and reflects the influence of multiple organ systems within the host, scientists sought to understand the potential impact of microgravity alone on the cellular mechanisms critical to immunity. Lymphocytes and their differentiated immature form, lymphoblasts, play an important and integral role in the body's defense system. T cells, one of the three major types of lymphocytes, play a central role in cell-mediated immunity. They can be distinguished from other lymphocyte types, such as B cells and natural killer cells by the presence of a special receptor on their cell surface called T cell receptors. Reported studies have shown that spaceflight can affect the expression of cell surface markers. Cell surface markers play an important role in the ability of cells to interact and to pass signals between different cells of the same phenotype and cells of different phenotypes. Recent evidence suggests that cell-cycle regulators are essential for T-cell function. To trigger an effective immune response, lymphocytes must proliferate. The objective of this project is to investigate the changes in growth of human cells cultured in rotating bioreactors and to measure the growth rate and the cell cycle distribution for different human cell types. Human lymphocytes and lymphoblasts will be cultured in a bioreactor to simulate aspects of microgravity. The bioreactor is a cylindrical culture vessel that incorporates the aspects of clinostatic rotation of a solid fluid body around a horizontal axis at a constant speed, and compensates gravity by rotation and places cells within the fluid body into a sustained free-fall. Cell cycle progression and cell proliferation of the lymphocytes will be measured for a number of days. In addition, RNA from the cells will be isolated for expression of genes related in cell cycle regulations.

  9. Vascular smooth muscle progenitor cells: building and repairing blood vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majesky, Mark W; Dong, Xiu Rong; Regan, Jenna N; Hoglund, Virginia J

    2011-02-04

    Molecular pathways that control the specification, migration, and number of available smooth muscle progenitor cells play key roles in determining blood vessel size and structure, capacity for tissue repair, and progression of age-related disorders. Defects in these pathways produce malformations of developing blood vessels, depletion of smooth muscle progenitor cell pools for vessel wall maintenance and repair, and aberrant activation of alternative differentiation pathways in vascular disease. A better understanding of the molecular mechanisms that uniquely specify and maintain vascular smooth muscle cell precursors is essential if we are to use advances in stem and progenitor cell biology and somatic cell reprogramming for applications directed to the vessel wall.

  10. Reactor vessel lower head integrity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubin, A.M.

    1997-02-01

    On March 28, 1979, the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) nuclear power plant underwent a prolonged small break loss-of-coolant accident that resulted in severe damage to the reactor core. Post-accident examinations of the TMI-2 reactor core and lower plenum found that approximately 19,000 kg (19 metric tons) of molten material had relocated onto the lower head of the reactor vessel. Results of the OECD TMI-2 Vessel Investigation Project concluded that a localized hot spot of approximately 1 meter diameter had existed on the lower head. The maximum temperature on the inner surface of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) in this region reached 1100{degrees}C and remained at that temperature for approximately 30 minutes before cooling occurred. Even under the combined loads of high temperature and high primary system pressure, the TMI-2 RPV did not fail. (i.e. The pressure varied from about 8.5 to 15 MPa during the four-hour period following the relocation of melt to the lower plenum.) Analyses of RPV failure under these conditions, using state-of-the-art computer codes, predicted that the RPV should have failed via local or global creep rupture. However, the vessel did not fail; and it has been hypothesized that rapid cooling of the debris and the vessel wall by water that was present in the lower plenum played an important role in maintaining RPV integrity during the accident. Although the exact mechanism(s) of how such cooling occurs is not known, it has been speculated that cooling in a small gap between the RPV wall and the crust, and/or in cracks within the debris itself, could result in sufficient cooling to maintain RPV integrity. Experimental data are needed to provide the basis to better understand these phenomena and improve models of RPV failure in severe accident codes.

  11. Hydrodynamic characteristics of UASB bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Siby; Tare, Vinod

    2011-10-01

    The hydrodynamic characteristics of UASB bioreactors operated under different organic loading and hydraulic loading rates were studied, using three laboratory scale models treating concocted sucrose wastewater. Residence time distribution (RTD) analysis using dispersion model and tanks-in-series model was directed towards the characterization of the fluid flow pattern in the reactors and correlation of the hydraulic regime with the biomass content and biogas production. Empty bed reactors followed a plug flow pattern and the flow pattern changed to a large dispersion mixing with biomass and gas production. Effect of increase in gas production on the overall hydraulics was insignificant.

  12. A Good Neighborhood for Cells: Bioreactor Demonstration System (BDS-05)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Leland W. K.; Goodwin, Thomas J. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Good neighborhoods help you grow. As with a city, the lives of a cell are governed by its neighborhood connections Connections that do not work are implicated in a range of diseases. One of those connections - between prostate cancer and bone cells - will be studied on STS-107 using the Bioreactor Demonstration System (BDS-05). To improve the prospects for finding novel therapies, and to identify biomarkers that predict disease progression, scientists need tissue models that behave the same as metastatic or spreading cancer. This is one of several NASA-sponsored lines of cell science research that use the microgravity environment of orbit in an attempt to grow lifelike tissue models for health research. As cells replicate, they "self associate" to form a complex matrix of collagens, proteins, fibers, and other structures. This highly evolved microenvironment tells each cell who is next door, how it should grow arid into what shapes, and how to respond to bacteria, wounds, and other stimuli. Studying these mechanisms outside the body is difficult because cells do not easily self-associate outside a natural environment. Most cell cultures produce thin, flat specimens that offer limited insight into how cells work together. Ironically, growing cell cultures in the microgravity of space produces cell assemblies that more closely resemble what is found in bodies on Earth. NASA's Bioreactor comprises a miniature life support system and a rotating vessel containing cell specimens in a nutrient medium. Orbital BDS experiments that cultured colon and prostate cancers have been highly promising.

  13. Biological conversion of synthesis gas. Topical report: Bioreactor studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basu, R.; Klasson, K.T.; Clausen, E.C.; Gaddy, J.L.

    1993-09-01

    The purpose of the proposed research is to develop a technically and economically feasible process for biologically producing H{sub 2} from synthesis gas while, at the same time, removing harmful sulfur gas compounds. Six major tasks are being studied: culture development, where the best cultures are selected and conditions optimized for simultaneous hydrogen production and sulfur gas removal; mass transfer and kinetic studies in which equations necessary for process design are developed; bioreactor design studies, where the cultures chosen in Task 1 are utilized in continuous reaction vessels to demonstrate process feasibility and define operating conditions; evaluation of biological synthesis gas conversion under limiting conditions in preparation for industrial demonstration studies; process scale-up where laboratory data are scaled to larger-size units in preparation for process demonstration in a pilot-scale unit; and economic evaluation, where process simulations are used to project process economics and identify high cost areas during sensitivity analyses. The purpose of this report is to present results from bioreactor studies involving H{sub 2} production by water gas shift and H{sub 2}S removal to produce elemental sulfur. Many of the results for H{sub 2} production by Rhodospirillum rubrum have been presented during earlier contracts. Thus, this report concentrates mainly on H{sub 2}S conversion to elemental sulfur by R. rubrum.

  14. Mathematical modelling of cell layer growth in a hollow fibre bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Lloyd A C; Whiteley, Jonathan P; Byrne, Helen M; Waters, Sarah L; Shipley, Rebecca J

    2017-04-07

    Generating autologous tissue grafts of a clinically useful volume requires efficient and controlled expansion of cell populations harvested from patients. Hollow fibre bioreactors show promise as cell expansion devices, owing to their potential for scale-up. However, further research is required to establish how to specify appropriate hollow fibre bioreactor operating conditions for expanding different cell types. In this study we develop a simple model for the growth of a cell layer seeded on the outer surface of a single fibre in a perfused hollow fibre bioreactor. Nutrient-rich culture medium is pumped through the fibre lumen and leaves the bioreactor via the lumen outlet or passes through the porous fibre walls and cell layer, and out via ports on the outer wall of the extra-capillary space. Stokes and Darcy equations for fluid flow in the fibre lumen, fibre wall, cell layer and extra-capillary space are coupled to reaction-advection-diffusion equations for oxygen and lactate transport through the bioreactor, and to a simple growth law for the evolution of the free boundary of the cell layer. Cells at the free boundary are assumed to proliferate at a rate that increases with the local oxygen concentration, and to die and detach from the layer if the local fluid shear stress or lactate concentration exceed critical thresholds. We use the model to predict operating conditions that maximise the cell layer growth for different cell types. In particular, we predict the optimal flow rate of culture medium into the fibre lumen and fluid pressure imposed at the lumen outlet for cell types with different oxygen demands and fluid shear stress tolerances, and compare the growth of the cell layer when the exit ports on the outside of the bioreactor are open with that when they are closed. Model simulations reveal that increasing the inlet flow rate and outlet fluid pressure increases oxygen delivery to the cell layer and, therefore, the growth rate of cells that are

  15. Evaluation of a Multi-Parameter Sensor for Automated, Continuous Cell Culture Monitoring in Bioreactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappas, D.; Jeevarajan, A.; Anderson, M. M.

    2004-01-01

    Compact and automated sensors are desired for assessing the health of cell cultures in biotechnology experiments in microgravity. Measurement of cell culture medium allows for the optirn.jzation of culture conditions on orbit to maximize cell growth and minimize unnecessary exchange of medium. While several discrete sensors exist to measure culture health, a multi-parameter sensor would simplify the experimental apparatus. One such sensor, the Paratrend 7, consists of three optical fibers for measuring pH, dissolved oxygen (p02), dissolved carbon dioxide (pC02) , and a thermocouple to measure temperature. The sensor bundle was designed for intra-arterial placement in clinical patients, and potentially can be used in NASA's Space Shuttle and International Space Station biotechnology program bioreactors. Methods: A Paratrend 7 sensor was placed at the outlet of a rotating-wall perfused vessel bioreactor system inoculated with BHK-21 (baby hamster kidney) cells. Cell culture medium (GTSF-2, composed of 40% minimum essential medium, 60% L-15 Leibovitz medium) was manually measured using a bench top blood gas analyzer (BGA, Ciba-Corning). Results: A Paratrend 7 sensor was used over a long-term (>120 day) cell culture experiment. The sensor was able to track changes in cell medium pH, p02, and pC02 due to the consumption of nutrients by the BHK-21. When compared to manually obtained BGA measurements, the sensor had good agreement for pH, p02, and pC02 with bias [and precision] of 0.02 [0.15], 1 mm Hg [18 mm Hg], and -4.0 mm Hg [8.0 mm Hg] respectively. The Paratrend oxygen sensor was recalibrated (offset) periodically due to drift. The bias for the raw (no offset or recalibration) oxygen measurements was 42 mm Hg [38 mm Hg]. The measured response (rise) time of the sensor was 20 +/- 4s for pH, 81 +/- 53s for pC02, 51 +/- 20s for p02. For long-term cell culture measurements, these response times are more than adequate. Based on these findings , the Paratrend sensor could

  16. CFD Study of Full-Scale Aerobic Bioreactors: Evaluation of Dynamic O2 Distribution, Gas-Liquid Mass Transfer and Reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Humbird, David; Sitaraman, Hariswaran; Stickel, Jonathan; Sprague, Michael A.; McMillan, Jim

    2016-11-18

    If advanced biofuels are to measurably displace fossil fuels in the near term, they will have to operate at levels of scale, efficiency, and margin unprecedented in the current biotech industry. For aerobically-grown products in particular, scale-up is complex and the practical size, cost, and operability of extremely large reactors is not well understood. Put simply, the problem of how to attain fuel-class production scales comes down to cost-effective delivery of oxygen at high mass transfer rates and low capital and operating costs. To that end, very large reactor vessels (>500 m3) are proposed in order to achieve favorable economies of scale. Additionally, techno-economic evaluation indicates that bubble-column reactors are more cost-effective than stirred-tank reactors in many low-viscosity cultures. In order to advance the design of extremely large aerobic bioreactors, we have performed computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of bubble-column reactors. A multiphase Euler-Euler model is used to explicitly account for the spatial distribution of air (i.e., gas bubbles) in the reactor. Expanding on the existing bioreactor CFD literature (typically focused on the hydrodynamics of bubbly flows), our simulations include interphase mass transfer of oxygen and a simple phenomenological reaction representing the uptake and consumption of dissolved oxygen by submerged cells. The simulations reproduce the expected flow profiles, with net upward flow in the center of column and downward flow near the wall. At high simulated oxygen uptake rates (OUR), oxygen-depleted regions can be observed in the reactor. By increasing the gas flow to enhance mixing and eliminate depleted areas, a maximum oxygen transfer (OTR) rate is obtained as a function of superficial velocity. These insights regarding minimum superficial velocity and maximum reactor size are incorporated into NREL's larger techno-economic models to supplement standard reactor design equations.

  17. Tissue grown in space in NASA Bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    For 5 days on the STS-70 mission, a bioreactor cultivated human colon cancer cells, such as the culture section shown here, which grew to 30 times the volume of control specimens grown on Earth. This significant result was reproduced on STS-85 which grew mature structures that more closely match what are found in tumors in humans. The two white circles within the tumor are part of a plastic lattice that helped the cells associate. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). The NASA Bioreactor provides a low turbulence culture environment which promotes the formation of large, three-dimensional cell clusters. Due to their high level of cellular organization and specialization, samples constructed in the bioreactor more closely resemble the original tumor or tissue found in the body. NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators.

  18. Tubular membrane bioreactors for biotechnological processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Christoph; Beutel, Sascha; Scheper, Thomas

    2013-02-01

    This article is an overview of bioreactors using tubular membranes such as hollow fibers or ceramic capillaries for cultivation processes. This diverse group of bioreactor is described here in regard to the membrane materials used, operational modes, and configurations. The typical advantages of this kind of system such as environments with low shear stress together with high cell densities and also disadvantages like poor oxygen supply are summed up. As the usage of tubular membrane bioreactors is not restricted to a certain organism, a brief overview of various applications covering nearly all types of cells from prokaryotic to eukaryotic cells is also given here.

  19. Spatial Experiment Technologies Suitable for Unreturnable Bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tao; Zheng, Weibo; Tong, Guanghui

    2016-07-01

    The system composition and main function of the bioreactor piggybacked on TZ cargo transport spacecraft are introduced briefly in the paper.The spatial experiment technologies which are suitable for unreturnable bioreactor are described in detail,including multi-channel liquid transportion and management,multi-type animal cells circuit testing,dynamic targets microscopic observation in situ etc..The feasibility and effectiveness of these technologies which will be used in space experiment in bioreactor are verified in tests and experiments on the ground.

  20. Development of Fundamental Technologies for Micro Bioreactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Kiichi; Kitamori, Takehiko

    This chapter reviews the development of fundamental technologies required for microchip-based bioreactors utilizing living mammalian cells and pressure driven flow. The most important factor in the bioreactor is the cell culture. For proper cell culturing, continuous medium supply from a microfluidic channel and appropriate modification of the channel surface to accommodate cell attachment is required. Moreover, the medium flow rate should be chosen carefully, because shear stress affects cell activity. The techniques presented here could be applied to the development of micro bioreactors such as microlivers, pigment production by plant cells, and artificial insemination.

  1. In silico multi-scale model of transport and dynamic seeding in a bone tissue engineering perfusion bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, T J; Hidalgo-Bastida, L A; Cartmell, S H; Halliday, I; Care, C M

    2013-04-01

    Computer simulations can potentially be used to design, predict, and inform properties for tissue engineering perfusion bioreactors. In this work, we investigate the flow properties that result from a particular poly-L-lactide porous scaffold and a particular choice of perfusion bioreactor vessel design used in bone tissue engineering. We also propose a model to investigate the dynamic seeding properties such as the homogeneity (or lack of) of the cellular distribution within the scaffold of the perfusion bioreactor: a pre-requisite for the subsequent successful uniform growth of a viable bone tissue engineered construct. Flows inside geometrically complex scaffolds have been investigated previously and results shown at these pore scales. Here, it is our aim to show accurately that through the use of modern high performance computers that the bioreactor device scale that encloses a scaffold can affect the flows and stresses within the pores throughout the scaffold which has implications for bioreactor design, control, and use. Central to this work is that the boundary conditions are derived from micro computed tomography scans of both a device chamber and scaffold in order to avoid generalizations and uncertainties. Dynamic seeding methods have also been shown to provide certain advantages over static seeding methods. We propose here a novel coupled model for dynamic seeding accounting for flow, species mass transport and cell advection-diffusion-attachment tuned for bone tissue engineering. The model highlights the timescale differences between different species suggesting that traditional homogeneous porous flow models of transport must be applied with caution to perfusion bioreactors. Our in silico data illustrate the extent to which these experiments have the potential to contribute to future design and development of large-scale bioreactors.

  2. Two Devices for Removing Sludge From Bioreactor Wastewater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, Shivaun; Hitchens, G. DUncan; Jabs, Harry; Cross, Jennifer; Pilkinton, Michelle; Taylor, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Two devices a magnetic separator and a special filter denoted a self-regenerating separator (SRS) have been developed for separating sludge from the stream of wastewater from a bioreactor. These devices were originally intended for use in microgravity, but have also been demonstrated to function in normal Earth gravity. The magnetic separator (see Figure 1) includes a thin-walled nonmagnetic, stainless-steel cylindrical drum that rotates within a cylindrical housing. The wastewater enters the separator through a recirculation inlet, and about 80 percent of the wastewater flow leaves through a recirculation outlet. Inside the drum, a magnet holder positions strong permanent magnets stationary and, except near a recirculation outlet, close to the inner drum surface. To enable magnetic separation, magnetite (a ferromagnetic and magnetically soft iron oxide) powder is mixed into the bioreactor wastewater. The magnetite becomes incorporated into the sludge by condensation, onto the powder particles, of microbe flocks that constitute the sludge. As a result, the magnets inside the drum magnetically attract the sludge onto the outer surface of the drum.

  3. Application of Computational Physics: Blood Vessel Constrictions and Medical Infuses

    CERN Document Server

    Suprijadi,; Subekti, Petrus; Viridi, Sparisoma

    2013-01-01

    Application of computation in many fields are growing fast in last two decades. Increasing on computation performance helps researchers to understand natural phenomena in many fields of science and technology including in life sciences. Computational fluid dynamic is one of numerical methods which is very popular used to describe those phenomena. In this paper we propose moving particle semi-implicit (MPS) and molecular dynamics (MD) to describe different phenomena in blood vessel. The effect of increasing the blood pressure on vessel wall will be calculate using MD methods, while the two fluid blending dynamics will be discussed using MPS. Result from the first phenomenon shows that around 80% of constriction on blood vessel make blood vessel increase and will start to leak on vessel wall, while from the second phenomenon the result shows the visualization of two fluids mixture (drugs and blood) influenced by ratio of drugs debit to blood debit. Keywords: molecular dynamic, blood vessel, fluid dynamic, movin...

  4. An innovative membrane bioreactor for methane biohydroxylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pen, N; Soussan, L; Belleville, M-P; Sanchez, J; Charmette, C; Paolucci-Jeanjean, D

    2014-12-01

    In this study, a membrane bioreactor (MBR) was developed for efficient, safe microbial methane hydroxylation with Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b. This innovative MBR, which couples a bioreactor with two gas/liquid macroporous membrane contactors supplying the two gaseous substrates (methane and oxygen) was operated in fed-batch mode. The feasibility and the reproducibility of this new biohydroxylation process were first demonstrated. The mass transfer within this MBR was twice that observed in a batch reactor in similar conditions. The productivity reached with this MBR was 75±25mgmethanol(gdrycell)(-1)h(-1). Compared to the literature, this value is 35times higher than that obtained with the only other fed-batch membrane bioreactor reported, which was run with dense membranes, and is comparable to those obtained with bioreactors fed by bubble-spargers. However, in the latter case, an explosive gas mixture can be formed, a problem that is avoided with the MBR.

  5. Bioreactor Design for Tendon/Ligament Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Gardiner, Bruce S.; Lin, Zhen; Rubenson, Jonas; Kirk, Thomas B.; Wang, Allan; Xu, Jiake

    2013-01-01

    Tendon and ligament injury is a worldwide health problem, but the treatment options remain limited. Tendon and ligament engineering might provide an alternative tissue source for the surgical replacement of injured tendon. A bioreactor provides a controllable environment enabling the systematic study of specific biological, biochemical, and biomechanical requirements to design and manufacture engineered tendon/ligament tissue. Furthermore, the tendon/ligament bioreactor system can provide a suitable culture environment, which mimics the dynamics of the in vivo environment for tendon/ligament maturation. For clinical settings, bioreactors also have the advantages of less-contamination risk, high reproducibility of cell propagation by minimizing manual operation, and a consistent end product. In this review, we identify the key components, design preferences, and criteria that are required for the development of an ideal bioreactor for engineering tendons and ligaments. PMID:23072472

  6. BIOASSAY VESSEL FAILURE ANALYSIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vormelker, P

    2008-09-22

    Two high-pressure bioassay vessels failed at the Savannah River Site during a microwave heating process for biosample testing. Improper installation of the thermal shield in the first failure caused the vessel to burst during microwave heating. The second vessel failure is attributed to overpressurization during a test run. Vessel failure appeared to initiate in the mold parting line, the thinnest cross-section of the octagonal vessel. No material flaws were found in the vessel that would impair its structural performance. Content weight should be minimized to reduce operating temperature and pressure. Outer vessel life is dependent on actual temperature exposure. Since thermal aging of the vessels can be detrimental to their performance, it was recommended that the vessels be used for a limited number of cycles to be determined by additional testing.

  7. Energy efficiency in membrane bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barillon, B; Martin Ruel, S; Langlais, C; Lazarova, V

    2013-01-01

    Energy consumption remains the key factor for the optimisation of the performance of membrane bioreactors (MBRs). This paper presents the results of the detailed energy audits of six full-scale MBRs operated by Suez Environnement in France, Spain and the USA based on on-site energy measurement and analysis of plant operation parameters and treatment performance. Specific energy consumption is compared for two different MBR configurations (flat sheet and hollow fibre membranes) and for plants with different design, loads and operation parameters. The aim of this project was to understand how the energy is consumed in MBR facilities and under which operating conditions, in order to finally provide guidelines and recommended practices for optimisation of MBR operation and design to reduce energy consumption and environmental impacts.

  8. Thin film bioreactors in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes-Fulford, M.; Scheld, H. W.

    1989-01-01

    Studies from the Skylab, SL-3 and D-1 missions have demonstrated that biological organisms grown in microgravity have changes in basic cellular functions such as DNA, mRNA and protein synthesis, cytoskeleton synthesis, glucose utilization, and cellular differentiation. Since microgravity could affect prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells at a subcellular and molecular level, space offers an opportunity to learn more about basic biological systems with one inmportant variable removed. The thin film bioreactor will facilitate the handling of fluids in microgravity, under constant temperature and will allow multiple samples of cells to be grown with variable conditions. Studies on cell cultures grown in microgravity would make it possible to identify and quantify changes in basic biological function in microgravity which are needed to develop new applications of orbital research and future biotechnology.

  9. Thin film bioreactors in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes-Fulford, M.; Scheld, H. W.

    Studies from the Skylab, SL-3 and D-1 missions have demonstrated that biological organisms grown in microgravity have changes in basic cellular functions such as DNA, mRNA and protein synthesis, cytoskeleton synthesis, glucose utilization and cellular differentiation. Since microgravity could affect prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells at a subcellular and molecular level, space offers us an opportunity to learn more about basic biological systems with one important variable removed. The thin film bioreactor will facilitate the handling of fluids in microgravity, under constant temperature and will allow multiple samples of cells to be grown with variable conditions. Studies on cell cultures grown in microgravity would enable us to identify and quantify changes in basic biological function in microgravity which are needed to develop new applications of orbital research and future biotechnology.

  10. Heart tissue grown in NASA Bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    Lisa Freed and Gordana Vunjak-Novakovic, both of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), have taken the first steps toward engineering heart muscle tissue that could one day be used to patch damaged human hearts. Cells isolated from very young animals are attached to a three-dimensional polymer scaffold, then placed in a NASA bioreactor. The cells do not divide, but after about a week start to cornect to form a functional piece of tissue. Functionally connected heart cells that are capable of transmitting electrical signals are the goal for Freed and Vunjak-Novakovic. Electrophysiological recordings of engineered tissue show spontaneous contractions at a rate of 70 beats per minute (a), and paced contractions at rates of 80, 150, and 200 beats per minute respectively (b, c, and d). The NASA Bioreactor provides a low turbulence culture environment which promotes the formation of large, three-dimensional cell clusters. The Bioreactor is rotated to provide gentle mixing of fresh and spent nutrient without inducing shear forces that would damage the cells. Due to their high level of cellular organization and specialization, samples constructed in the bioreactor more closely resemble the original tumor or tissue found in the body. NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). Credit: NASA and MIT.

  11. Colon tumor cells grown in NASA Bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    These photos compare the results of colon carcinoma cells grown in a NASA Bioreactor flown on the STS-70 Space Shuttle in 1995 flight and ground control experiments. The cells grown in microgravity (left) have aggregated to form masses that are larger and more similar to tissue found in the body than the cells cultured on the ground (right). The principal investigator is Milburn Jessup of the University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center. The NASA Bioreactor provides a low turbulence culture environment which promotes the formation of large, three-dimensional cell clusters. Due to their high level of cellular organization and specialization, samples constructed in the bioreactor more closely resemble the original tumor or tissue found in the body. NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators. Cell constructs grown in a rotating bioreactor on Earth (left) eventually become too large to stay suspended in the nutrient media. In the microgravity of orbit, the cells stay suspended. Rotation then is needed for gentle stirring to replenish the media around the cells. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). Credit: NASA and University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center.

  12. A Novel Modular Bioreactor to In Vitro Study the Hepatic Sinusoid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illa, Xavi; Vila, Sergi; Yeste, Jose; Peralta, Carmen; Gracia-Sancho, Jordi; Villa, Rosa

    2014-01-01

    We describe a unique, versatile bioreactor consisting of two plates and a modified commercial porous membrane suitable for in vitro analysis of the liver sinusoid. The modular bioreactor allows i) excellent control of the cell seeding process; ii) cell culture under controlled shear stress stimulus, and; iii) individual analysis of each cell type upon completion of the experiment. The advantages of the bioreactor detailed here are derived from the modification of a commercial porous membrane with an elastomeric wall specifically moulded in order to define the cell culture area, to act as a gasket that will fit into the bioreactor, and to provide improved mechanical robustness. The device presented herein has been designed to simulate the in vivo organization of a liver sinusoid and tested by co-culturing endothelial cells (EC) and hepatic stellate cells (HSC). The results show both an optimal morphology of the endothelial cells as well as an improvement in the phenotype of stellate cells, most probably due to paracrine factors released from endothelial cells. This device is proposed as a versatile, easy-to-use co-culture system that can be applied to biomedical research of vascular systems, including the liver. PMID:25375141

  13. Removal of Cr, Mn, and Co from textile wastewater by horizontal rotating tubular bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeiner, Michaela; Rezić, Tonci; Santek, Bozidar; Rezić, Iva; Hann, Stephan; Stingeder, Gerhard

    2012-10-01

    Environmental pollution by industrial wastewaters polluted with toxic heavy metals is of great concern. Various guidelines regulate the quality of water released from industrial plants and of surface waters. In wastewater treatment, bioreactors with microbial biofilms are widely used. A horizontal rotating tubular bioreactor (HRTB) is a combination of a thin layer and a biodisc reactor with an interior divided by O-ring shaped partition walls as carriers for microbial biomass. Using a biofilm of heavy metal resistant bacteria in combination with this special design provides various advantages for wastewater treatment proven in a pilot study. In the presented study, the applicability of HRTB for removing metals commonly present in textile wastewaters (chromium, manganese, cobalt) was investigated. Artificial wastewaters with a load of 125 mg/L of each metal underwent the bioreactor treatment. Different process parameters (inflow rate, rotation speed) were applied for optimizing the removal efficiency. Samples were drawn along the bioreactor length for monitoring the metal contents on site by UV-vis spectrometry. The metal uptake of the biomass was determined by ICP-MS after acidic microwave assisted digestion. The maximum removal rates obtained for chromium, manganese, and cobalt were: 100%, 94%, and 69%, respectively.

  14. Bioreactor Scalability: Laboratory-Scale Bioreactor Design Influences Performance, Ecology, and Community Physiology in Expanded Granular Sludge Bed Bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connelly, Stephanie; Shin, Seung G; Dillon, Robert J; Ijaz, Umer Z; Quince, Christopher; Sloan, William T; Collins, Gavin

    2017-01-01

    Studies investigating the feasibility of new, or improved, biotechnologies, such as wastewater treatment digesters, inevitably start with laboratory-scale trials. However, it is rarely determined whether laboratory-scale results reflect full-scale performance or microbial ecology. The Expanded Granular Sludge Bed (EGSB) bioreactor, which is a high-rate anaerobic digester configuration, was used as a model to address that knowledge gap in this study. Two laboratory-scale idealizations of the EGSB-a one-dimensional and a three- dimensional scale-down of a full-scale design-were built and operated in triplicate under near-identical conditions to a full-scale EGSB. The laboratory-scale bioreactors were seeded using biomass obtained from the full-scale bioreactor, and, spent water from the distillation of whisky from maize was applied as substrate at both scales. Over 70 days, bioreactor performance, microbial ecology, and microbial community physiology were monitored at various depths in the sludge-beds using 16S rRNA gene sequencing (V4 region), specific methanogenic activity (SMA) assays, and a range of physical and chemical monitoring methods. SMA assays indicated dominance of the hydrogenotrophic pathway at full-scale whilst a more balanced activity profile developed during the laboratory-scale trials. At each scale, Methanobacterium was the dominant methanogenic genus present. Bioreactor performance overall was better at laboratory-scale than full-scale. We observed that bioreactor design at laboratory-scale significantly influenced spatial distribution of microbial community physiology and taxonomy in the bioreactor sludge-bed, with 1-D bioreactor types promoting stratification of each. In the 1-D laboratory bioreactors, increased abundance of Firmicutes was associated with both granule position in the sludge bed and increased activity against acetate and ethanol as substrates. We further observed that stratification in the sludge-bed in 1-D laboratory

  15. 两类药物洗脱支架药物释放曲线对血管壁内药物浓度影响的数值研究%Numerical Study on the Effects of Drug Release Profile of Two Drug -eluting Stents on the Drug Concentration within the Vessel Wall

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴昊; 蒋文涛; 晏菲; 陈宇; 樊瑜波

    2013-01-01

    研究两类药物释放曲线对血管壁中药物浓度分布的影响,为药物洗脱支架(DES)的优化设计提供依据;建立三维支架-血管模型,采用数值方法分析了雷帕霉素和紫杉醇两种药物释放曲线下血管壁中药物的浓度分布;初始药物释放率的增大会导致初始血管壁内药物浓度的增大,但随着时间的增加,血管壁中的药物浓度均趋于平稳。两种药物释放曲线下血管壁中的药物浓度均是随着时间的变化先增加后减少的,相比来说,雷帕霉素血管壁中的药物浓度随着时间变化的趋势要比紫杉醇血管壁中的药物浓度随着时间变化的趋势平稳,并且雷帕霉素血管壁中的药物浓度分布要比紫杉醇中血管壁中的药物浓度分布均匀。血管壁中药物浓度变化趋势的平稳性以及药物浓度分布的均匀性表明,雷帕霉素药物释放曲线要优于紫杉醇药物释放曲线。%To study the effects of two drug release profiles on the drug concentration for better design of drug -eluting stents (DES).A 3D virtual drug -eluting -vessel stent was modeled,and numerical simulation was used to investigate the drug concentration within the vessel wall at the drug release profile of rapamycin and paclitaxel,The initial drug concentration was increased with initial drug release rate increasing,but over time the drug concentration in the vessel wall would be stabilized.The drug concentrations pro-duced by both drug release profiles were first increased and then decreased with time,and compared with the concentration variation trend of paclitaxel,the concentration variation trend of rapamycin was steadier.In addition,the rapamycin concentration distribution in the vessel wall was more uniform than the paclitaxel concentration distribution.The stability of the drug concentration variation trend and the uniformity of drug concentration within the vessel wall show that rapamycin release profile is

  16. Vessel Arrival Info - Legacy

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Vessel Arrival Info is a spreadsheet that gets filled out during the initial stage of the debriefing process by the debriefer. It contains vessel name, trip...

  17. Guam Abandoned Vessel Inventory

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA Abandoned Vessel Project Data for Guam. Abandoned vessels pose a significant threat to the NOAA Trust resources through physical destruction of coral habitats...

  18. Florida Abandoned Vessel Inventory

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA Abandoned Vessel Project Data for Florida. Abandoned vessels pose a significant threat to the NOAA Trust resources through physical destruction of coral...

  19. Probabilistic retinal vessel segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chang-Hua; Agam, Gady

    2007-03-01

    Optic fundus assessment is widely used for diagnosing vascular and non-vascular pathology. Inspection of the retinal vasculature may reveal hypertension, diabetes, arteriosclerosis, cardiovascular disease and stroke. Due to various imaging conditions retinal images may be degraded. Consequently, the enhancement of such images and vessels in them is an important task with direct clinical applications. We propose a novel technique for vessel enhancement in retinal images that is capable of enhancing vessel junctions in addition to linear vessel segments. This is an extension of vessel filters we have previously developed for vessel enhancement in thoracic CT scans. The proposed approach is based on probabilistic models which can discern vessels and junctions. Evaluation shows the proposed filter is better than several known techniques and is comparable to the state of the art when evaluated on a standard dataset. A ridge-based vessel tracking process is applied on the enhanced image to demonstrate the effectiveness of the enhancement filter.

  20. Advanced microscale bioreactor system: a representative scale-down model for bench-top bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Wei-Ting; Aulakh, Rigzen P S; Traul, Donald L; Yuk, Inn H

    2012-12-01

    In recent years, several automated scale-down bioreactor systems have been developed to increase efficiency in cell culture process development. ambr™ is an automated workstation that provides individual monitoring and control of culture dissolved oxygen and pH in single-use, stirred-tank bioreactors at a working volume of 10-15 mL. To evaluate the ambr™ system, we compared the performance of four recombinant Chinese hamster ovary cell lines in a fed-batch process in parallel ambr™, 2-L bench-top bioreactors, and shake flasks. Cultures in ambr™ matched 2-L bioreactors in controlling the environment (temperature, dissolved oxygen, and pH) and in culture performance (growth, viability, glucose, lactate, Na(+), osmolality, titer, and product quality). However, cultures in shake flasks did not show comparable performance to the ambr™ and 2-L bioreactors.

  1. ALICE HMPID Radiator Vessel

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    View of the radiator vessels of the ALICE/HMPID mounted on the support frame. Each HMPID module is equipped with 3 indipendent radiator vessels made out of neoceram and fused silica (quartz) windows glued together. The spacers inside the vessel are needed to stand the hydrostatic pressure. http://alice-hmpid.web.cern.ch/alice-hmpid

  2. Tubular bioreactor and its application; Tubular bioreactor to sono tekiyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Endo, I.; Nagamune, T. [The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan). Faculty of Engineering; Yuki, K. [Nikka Whisky Distilling Co. Ltd. Tokyo (Japan); Inaba, H. [Sumitomo Heavy Industries, Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1994-09-05

    The loop type tubular bioreactor (TBR) was developed where biocatalysts are trapped in the reactor by membrane module. A UF membrane or MF membrane and crossflow filtration were adopted for the membrane module, and the reactor loop was composed of four membrane modules. The reactor was operated at 2-4 m/s in membrane surface velocity and 300-400 kPa in filtration pressure. As the result of the high-density culture of lactic acid bacteria and yeast, a biomass concentration was more than 10 times that in batch culture, suggesting the remarkable enhancement of a production efficiency. As the result of the continuous fermentation of cider, the fast fermentation more than 60 times that in conventional ones was obtained together with the same quality as conventional ones. Such a fast fermentation was probably achieved by yeast suspended in the fermenter of TBR, by yeast hardly affected physico-chemically as compared with immobilized reactors, and by small effect of mass transfer on reaction systems. 4 refs., 6 figs.

  3. Denitrifying bioreactor clogging potential during wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christianson, Laura E; Lepine, Christine; Sharrer, Kata L; Summerfelt, Steven T

    2016-11-15

    Chemoheterotrophic denitrification technologies using woodchips as a solid carbon source (i.e., woodchip bioreactors) have been widely trialed for treatment of diffuse-source agricultural nitrogen pollution. There is growing interest in the use of this simple, relatively low-cost biological wastewater treatment option in waters with relatively higher total suspended solids (TSS) and chemical oxygen demand (COD) such as aquaculture wastewater. This work: (1) evaluated hydraulic retention time (HRT) impacts on COD/TSS removal, and (2) assessed the potential for woodchip clogging under this wastewater chemistry. Four pilot-scale woodchip denitrification bioreactors operated for 267 d showed excellent TSS removal (>90%) which occurred primarily near the inlet, and that COD removal was maximized at lower HRTs (e.g., 56% removal efficiency and 25 g of COD removed per m(3) of bioreactor per d at a 24 h HRT). However, influent wastewater took progressively longer to move into the woodchips likely due to a combination of (1) woodchip settling, (2) clogging due to removed wastewater solids and/or accumulated bacterial growth, and (3) the pulsed flow system pushing the chips away from the inlet. The bioreactor that received the highest loading rate experienced the most altered hydraulics. Statistically significant increases in woodchip P content over time in woodchip bags placed near the bioreactor outlets (0.03 vs 0.10%P2O5) and along the bioreactor floor (0.04 vs. 0.12%P2O5) confirmed wastewater solids were being removed and may pose a concern for subsequent nutrient mineralization and release. Nevertheless, the excellent nitrate-nitrogen and TSS removal along with notable COD removal indicated woodchip bioreactors are a viable water treatment technology for these types of wastewaters given they are used downstream of a filtration device. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  4. Optimizing of Culture Condition in Horizontal Rotating Bioreactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan-Fang ZHANG; Huai-Qing CHEN; Hua HUANG

    2005-01-01

    @@ 1 Introduction Bioreactor is the most important equipment in tissue engineering. It can mimic the micro-environment of cell growth in vitro. At present, horizontal rotating bioreactor is the most advanced equipment for cell culture in the world.

  5. Inhibition of aortic vessel adenosine diphosphate degradation by cadmium and mercury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Togna, G; Dolci, N; Caprino, L

    1984-01-01

    The effects of cadmium and mercury on ADP breakdown by vessel walls were investigated. These metals reduce the ADP clearance promoted by arterial tissue. This effect could be attributed to the inhibition of vessel wall ADP-ase enzyme, which plays an important role in the genesis of thrombotic phenomena.

  6. Baking results of KSTAR vacuum vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, S. T.; Kim, Y. J.; Kim, K. M.; Im, D. S.; Joung, N. Y.; Yang, H. L.; Kim, Y. S.; Kwon, M. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-05-15

    The Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) is an advanced superconducting tokamak designed to establish a scientific and technological basis for an attractive fusion reactor. The fusion energy in the tokamak device is released through fusion reactions of light atoms such as deuterium or helium in hot plasma state, of which temperature reaches several hundreds of millions Celsius. The high temperature plasma is created in the vacuum vessel that provides ultra high vacuum status. Accordingly, it is most important for the vacuum condition to keep clean not only inner space but also surface of the vacuum vessel to make high quality plasma. There are two methods planned to clean the wall surface of the KSTAR vacuum vessel. One is surface baking and the other is glow discharge cleaning (GDC). To bake the vacuum vessel, De-Ionized (DI) water is heated to 130 .deg. C and circulated in the passage between double walls of the vacuum vessel (VV) in order to bake the surface. The GDC operation uses hydrogen and inert gas discharges. In this paper, general configuration and brief introduction of the baking result will be reported.

  7. Open source software to control Bioflo bioreactors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A Burdge

    Full Text Available Bioreactors are designed to support highly controlled environments for growth of tissues, cell cultures or microbial cultures. A variety of bioreactors are commercially available, often including sophisticated software to enhance the functionality of the bioreactor. However, experiments that the bioreactor hardware can support, but that were not envisioned during the software design cannot be performed without developing custom software. In addition, support for third party or custom designed auxiliary hardware is often sparse or absent. This work presents flexible open source freeware for the control of bioreactors of the Bioflo product family. The functionality of the software includes setpoint control, data logging, and protocol execution. Auxiliary hardware can be easily integrated and controlled through an integrated plugin interface without altering existing software. Simple experimental protocols can be entered as a CSV scripting file, and a Python-based protocol execution model is included for more demanding conditional experimental control. The software was designed to be a more flexible and free open source alternative to the commercially available solution. The source code and various auxiliary hardware plugins are publicly available for download from https://github.com/LibourelLab/BiofloSoftware. In addition to the source code, the software was compiled and packaged as a self-installing file for 32 and 64 bit windows operating systems. The compiled software will be able to control a Bioflo system, and will not require the installation of LabVIEW.

  8. Open source software to control Bioflo bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdge, David A; Libourel, Igor G L

    2014-01-01

    Bioreactors are designed to support highly controlled environments for growth of tissues, cell cultures or microbial cultures. A variety of bioreactors are commercially available, often including sophisticated software to enhance the functionality of the bioreactor. However, experiments that the bioreactor hardware can support, but that were not envisioned during the software design cannot be performed without developing custom software. In addition, support for third party or custom designed auxiliary hardware is often sparse or absent. This work presents flexible open source freeware for the control of bioreactors of the Bioflo product family. The functionality of the software includes setpoint control, data logging, and protocol execution. Auxiliary hardware can be easily integrated and controlled through an integrated plugin interface without altering existing software. Simple experimental protocols can be entered as a CSV scripting file, and a Python-based protocol execution model is included for more demanding conditional experimental control. The software was designed to be a more flexible and free open source alternative to the commercially available solution. The source code and various auxiliary hardware plugins are publicly available for download from https://github.com/LibourelLab/BiofloSoftware. In addition to the source code, the software was compiled and packaged as a self-installing file for 32 and 64 bit windows operating systems. The compiled software will be able to control a Bioflo system, and will not require the installation of LabVIEW.

  9. 爬波检测技术在厚壁压力容器TOFD检测中的工艺与应用研究%Research Process and Application of Creeping Wave Detection Technology in TOFD of Thick Wall Pressure Vessel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘礼良

    2016-01-01

    The creeping wave testing technique is applied to the research and test of the thick walled pressure vessel of TOFD detection surface blind detection for that creeping wave testing process. Experimental study and field test results showed that creeping wave testing level in the 0-40 mm internal energy effective detection of thick wall pressure vessel surface and near surface defect, with the increase of the horizontal distance found ability to reduce the surface and near surface defect and in a certain depth range of TOFD detection to the detection of the auxiliary effect, so climbed wave detection technology can be regarded as a TOFD surface area and effective detection methods to solve.%本文通过对爬波检测技术应用于厚壁压力容器TOFD检测中表面盲区检测的研究与试验,得出爬波检测工艺。试验研究和现场检测结果表明:爬波检测水平范围在0~40mm内能有效的检出厚壁压力容器表面及近表面缺陷,随着水平距离的增加,发现表面及近表面缺陷的能力降低,且在一定深度范围内对TOFD检测起到辅助检测的效果,因此爬波检测技术不失为一种解决TOFD表面盲区有效的补充检测方法。

  10. Design, characterization and application of the Multiple Air-lift Loop bioreactor.

    OpenAIRE

    Bakker, W.A.M.

    1995-01-01

    A new bioreactor is introduced: the Multiple Air-lift Loop reactor (MAL). The MAL consists of a series of air-lift loop reactors within one vessel. With the MAL, a new type of geometry for air-lift reactors with an internal loop is introduced. This new geometry was characterized with respect to hydrodynamics, mixing and oxygen transfer. The hydrodynamics were described by an existing model. Hydrodynamics, mixing and oxygen transfer in the new reactor configuration were comparable to that in c...

  11. Disposable orbitally shaken TubeSpin bioreactor 600 for Sf9 cell cultivation in suspension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteil, Dominique T; Shen, Xiao; Tontodonati, Giulia; Baldi, Lucia; Hacker, David L; Wurm, Florian M

    2016-07-15

    Disposable orbitally shaken TubeSpin bioreactor 600 tubes (TS600s) were recently developed for the bench-scale cultivation of animal cells in suspension. Here we compared batch cultures of Sf9 insect cells in TS600s, spinner flasks, and shake flasks. Superior cell growth was observed in TS600s and shake flasks as compared with spinner flasks, and more favorable oxygen-enriched cell culture conditions were observed in TS600s as compared with either spinner or shake flasks. The results demonstrated the suitability of TS600s as a disposable vessel for the cultivation of Sf9 cells in suspension.

  12. Wall Shear Rates in Taylor Vortex Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Sobolik

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Wall shear rate and its axial and azimuthal components were evaluated in stable Taylor vortices. The measurements were carried out in a broad interval of Taylor numbers (52-725 and several gap width (R1/R2 = 0.5 – 0.8 by two three-segment electrodiffusion probes and three single probes flush mounted in the wall of the outer fixed cylinder. The axial distribution of wall shear rate components was obtained by sweeping the vortices along the probes using a slow axial flow. The experimental results were verified by CFD simulations. The knowledge of local wall shear rates and its fluctuations is of primordial interest for industrial applications like tangential filtration, membrane reactors and bioreactors containing shear sensitive cells.

  13. 一般边界条件下球形压力容器钢壁中氚和氦-3的浓度变化规律研究%Research on tritium and helium-3 content distributions in steel wall of spherical pressure vessel under general boundary condition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘远东; 尹益辉; 谭云

    2012-01-01

    In order to understand the changes of mechanical properties of the wall materials and the carrying capacity of vessel which contains high pressure tritium,the spatiotemporal changes of tritium and helium-3 content in the wall should be studied during tritium storage.Talcing into consideration the case that the outer surface of the vessel is with general mass transfer boundary condition and the tritium inside the vessel is van der Waals gas,and also taking into account both decay and permeation of tritium inside the vessel and decay and diffusion of tritium in the wall material,the analytical theoretical models of tritium and helium-3 content in the wall are developed and solved,and relevant theoretical formulas are deduced.Through analytical calculations,the curves of tritium and helium-3 content in the wall versus mass transfer coefficient of the outer surface,storage time and the spatial positions are plotted. Through analysis,a law called 2β1 +β2/2 time law of helium-3 content is put forward,whereβ1 andβ2 are the coefficients which are related to van der Waals constant of tritium.The law is proposed:helium-3 content in the wall of the spherical high pressure vessel storing tritium which is in an open space rises along the radius from outer to inner,and the content radial gradient increases with storage time.If storage time is long enough,the helium-3 content at any point will approach to its final value,that is,a maximal value at a relevant point.The ratio of the maximum helium-3 content to the related initial tritium content is 2β1 +β2/2 at the inner surface.The obtained formulas and understandings can be used as a premise of the safety assessment of tritium stored vessel.%为了认识储氚高压容器壁材料的力学性能变化及其导致的容器承载能力变化,必须研究储氚期间,容器壁中氚和氦-3浓度的空间分布和随时间的变化.针对容器外表面为一般传质边界条件和容器内部氚为范德瓦尔斯气

  14. Instability and "Sausage-String" Appearance in Blood Vessels during High Blood Pressure

    CERN Document Server

    Alstrøm, P; Colding-Jorgensen, M; Gustafsson, F; Holstein-Rathlou, N H; Alstrom, Preben; Eguiluz, Victor M.; Colding-Jorgensen, Morten; Gustafsson, Finn; Holstein-Rathlou, Niels-Henrik

    1999-01-01

    A new Rayleigh-type instability is proposed to explain the `sausage-string' pattern of alternating constrictions and dilatations formed in blood vessels under influence of a vasoconstricting agent. Our theory involves the nonlinear elasticity characteristics of the vessel wall, and provides predictions for the conditions under which the cylindrical form of a blood vessel becomes unstable.

  15. Modeling Of Blood Vessel Constriction In 2-D Case Using Molecular Dynamics Method

    CERN Document Server

    Rendi, Mohamad; Viridi, Sparisoma

    2013-01-01

    Blood vessel constriction is simulated with particle-based method using a molecular dynamics authoring software known as Molecular Workbench (WM). Blood flow and vessel wall, the only components considered in constructing a blood vessel, are all represented in particle form with interaction potentials: Lennard-Jones potential, push-pull spring potential, and bending spring potential. Influence of medium or blood plasma is accommodated in plasma viscosity through Stokes drag force. It has been observed that pressure p is increased as constriction c is increased. Leakage of blood vessel starts at 80 % constriction, which shows existence of maximum pressure that can be overcome by vessel wall.

  16. Hydrodynamics research of wastewater treatment bioreactors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REN Nan-qi; ZHANG Bing; ZHOU Xue-fei

    2009-01-01

    To optimize the design and improve the performance of wastewater treatment bioreactors, the review concerning the hydrodynamics explored by theoretical equations, process experiments, modeling of the hydrody-namics and flow field measurement is presented. Results of different kinds of experiments show that the hydro-dynamic characteristics can affect sludge characteristics, mass transfer and reactor performance significantly. A-long with the development of theoretical equations, turbulence models including large eddy simulation models and Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) models are widely used at present. Standard and modified k-ε models are the most widely used eddy viscosity turbulence models for simulating flows in bioreactors. Numericalsimulation of hydrodynamics is proved to be efficient for optimizing design and operation. The development of measurement techniques with high accuracy and low intrusion enables the flow filed in the bioreactors to be transparent. Integration of both numerical simulation and experimental measurement can describe the hydrody-namics very well.

  17. Cryosurgical effects on growing vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladd, A P; Rescorla, F J; Baust, J G; Callahan, M; Davis, M; Grosfeld, J L

    1999-07-01

    Cryosurgical treatment of unresectable hepatic malignancies has proven beneficial in adults. Concerns regarding its use in children include the effect on growth and the risk of injury to adjacent structures. To test the effect of cryoablation on adjacent vascular structures in a growing animal, liquid nitrogen cryoablation was performed on a juvenile murine model. Sprague Dawley rats underwent double freeze-thaw cryoablation of the abdominal aorta with interposed liver tissue. Serial sacrifices were performed over 120 days. Comparisons were made with sham-operated controls. Overall, animal growth paralleled that of sham controls through all time points. Gross examination of aortic diameter also showed similar growth in vessel size between the groups. Histologic analysis demonstrated injury after cryoablation with smooth muscle cell vacuolization, followed by cell death. Aortic media layer collapse resulted from cellular loss, however, elastin fiber composition was maintained. Aortic patency was preserved despite evidence of cellular injury and aortic wall remodeling. An associated thermal sink effect on the opposing wall was identified. After cryoablation adjacent to the abdominal aorta in adolescent rats, vascular patency is maintained and animal growth and structural function is preserved, despite cellular injury and wall compression. These observations suggest that cryoablation may be a useful treatment adjunct in young subjects.

  18. Bioreactor and methods for producing synchronous cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmstetter, Charles E. (Inventor); Thornton, Maureen (Inventor); Gonda, Steve (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    Apparatus and methods are directed to a perfusion culture system in which a rotating bioreactor is used to grow cells in a liquid culture medium, while these cells are attached to an adhesive-treated porous surface. As a result of this arrangement and its rotation, the attached cells divide, with one cell remaining attached to the substrate, while the other cell, a newborn cell is released. These newborn cells are of approximately the same age, that are collected upon leaving the bioreactor. The populations of newborn cells collected are of synchronous and are minimally, if at all, disturbed metabolically.

  19. Pressure vessel design manual

    CERN Document Server

    Moss, Dennis R

    2013-01-01

    Pressure vessels are closed containers designed to hold gases or liquids at a pressure substantially different from the ambient pressure. They have a variety of applications in industry, including in oil refineries, nuclear reactors, vehicle airbrake reservoirs, and more. The pressure differential with such vessels is dangerous, and due to the risk of accident and fatality around their use, the design, manufacture, operation and inspection of pressure vessels is regulated by engineering authorities and guided by legal codes and standards. Pressure Vessel Design Manual is a solutions-focused guide to the many problems and technical challenges involved in the design of pressure vessels to match stringent standards and codes. It brings together otherwise scattered information and explanations into one easy-to-use resource to minimize research and take readers from problem to solution in the most direct manner possible. * Covers almost all problems that a working pressure vessel designer can expect to face, with ...

  20. Environmental Control in Flow Bioreactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serena Giusti

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The realization of physiologically-relevant advanced in vitro models is not just related to the reproduction of a three-dimensional multicellular architecture, but also to the maintenance of a cell culture environment in which parameters, such as temperature, pH, and hydrostatic pressure are finely controlled. Tunable and reproducible culture conditions are crucial for the study of environment-sensitive cells, and can also be used for mimicking pathophysiological conditions related with alterations of temperature, pressure and pH. Here, we present the SUITE (Supervising Unit for In Vitro Testing system, a platform able to monitor and adjust local environmental variables in dynamic cell culture experiments. The physical core of the control system is a mixing chamber, which can be connected to different bioreactors and acts as a media reservoir equipped with a pH meter and pressure sensors. The chamber is heated by external resistive elements and the temperature is controlled using a thermistor. A purpose-built electronic control unit gathers all data from the sensors and controls the pH and hydrostatic pressure by regulating air and CO2 overpressure and flux. The system’s modularity and the possibility of imposing different pressure conditions were used to implement a model of portal hypertension with both endothelial and hepatic cells. The results show that the SUITE platform is able to control and maintain cell culture parameters at fixed values that represent either physiological or pathological conditions. Thus, it represents a fundamental tool for the design of biomimetic in vitro models, with applications in disease modelling or toxicity testing.

  1. Maury Journals - German Vessels

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — German vessels observations, after the 1853 Brussels Conference that set International Maritime Standards, modeled after Maury Marine Standard Observations.

  2. NCSX Vacuum Vessel Fabrication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viola, M. E.; Brown, T.; Heitzenroeder, P.; Malinowski, F.; Reiersen, W.; Sutton, L.; Goranson, P.; Nelson, B.; Cole, M.; Manuel, M.; McCorkle, D.

    2005-10-07

    The National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX) is being constructed at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) in conjunction with the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The goal of this experiment is to develop a device which has the steady state properties of a traditional stellarator along with the high performance characteristics of a tokamak. A key element of this device is its highly shaped Inconel 625 vacuum vessel. This paper describes the manufacturing of the vessel. The vessel is being fabricated by Major Tool and Machine, Inc. (MTM) in three identical 120º vessel segments, corresponding to the three NCSX field periods, in order to accommodate assembly of the device. The port extensions are welded on, leak checked, cut off within 1" of the vessel surface at MTM and then reattached at PPPL, to accommodate assembly of the close-fitting modular coils that surround the vessel. The 120º vessel segments are formed by welding two 60º segments together. Each 60º segment is fabricated by welding ten press-formed panels together over a collapsible welding fixture which is needed to precisely position the panels. The vessel is joined at assembly by welding via custom machined 8" (20.3 cm) wide spacer "spool pieces." The vessel must have a total leak rate less than 5 X 10-6 t-l/s, magnetic permeability less than 1.02μ, and its contours must be within 0.188" (4.76 mm). It is scheduled for completion in January 2006.

  3. A temporary immersion plant propagation bioreactor with decoupled gas and liquid flows for enhanced control of gas phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florez, Sergio L; Curtis, Matthew S; Shaw, Sydney E; Hamaker, Nathaniel K; Larsen, Jeffrey S; Curtis, Wayne R

    2016-03-01

    Temporary immersion bioreactors (TIBs) are being used to propagate superior plant species on a commercial scale. We demonstrate a new TIB design, a Hydrostatic-driven TIB (Hy-TIB), where periodic raising and lowering the media reservoir maintains the advantages of temporary immersion of plant tissues without requiring large amounts of gas to move the media that is a characteristic of other TIB designs. The advantage of utilizing low volumes of gas mixtures (that are more expensive than air) is shown by a doubling of the growth rate of plant root cultures under elevated (40%) oxygen in air, and with CO2 supplementation showing improved phototrophic and photomixotrophic growth of seedless watermelon meristem cultures. The development of this bioreactor system involved overcoming contamination issues associated with utilizing very low gas flow rates and included utilizing microchip pressure sensors to diagnose unexpected changes in internal bioreactor pressure (± 20 Pa ∼0.0002 atm) caused by flexing of non-rigid plastic bag vessels. The overall design seeks to achieve versatility, scalability and minimum cost such that bioreactor technology can play an increasing role in the critical need to improve plant productivity in the face of increasing demand for food, reduced resources, and environmental degradation. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 32:337-345, 2016. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  4. Sulfate-reducing bacteria in anaerobic bioreactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oude Elferink, S.J.W.H.

    1998-01-01

    The treatment of industrial wastewaters containing high amounts of easily degradable organic compounds in anaerobic bioreactors is a well-established process. Similarly, wastewaters which in addition to organic compounds also contain sulfate can be treated in this way. For a long time, the

  5. Engineering skeletal muscle tissue in bioreactor systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    An Yang; Li Dong

    2014-01-01

    Objective To give a concise review of the current state of the art in tissue engineering (TE) related to skeletal muscle and kinds of bioreactor environment.Data sources The review was based on data obtained from the published articles and guidelines.Study selection A total of 106 articles were selected from several hundred original articles or reviews.The content of selected articles is in accordance with our purpose and the authors are authorized scientists in the study of engineered muscle tissue in bioreactor.Results Skeletal muscle TE is a promising interdisciplinary field which aims at the reconstruction of skeletal muscle loss.Although numerous studies have indicated that engineering skeletal muscle tissue may be of great importance in medicine in the near future,this technique still represents a limited degree of success.Since tissue-engineered muscle constructs require an adequate connection to the vascular system for efficient transport of oxygen,carbon dioxide,nutrients and waste products.Moreover,functional and clinically applicable muscle constructs depend on adequate neuromuscular junctions with neural calls.Third,in order to engineer muscle tissue successfully,it may be beneficial to mimic the in vivo environment of muscle through association with adequate stimuli from bioreactors.Conclusion Vascular system and bioreactors are necessary for development and maintenance of engineered muscle in order to provide circulation within the construct.

  6. LANDFILL BIOREACTOR PERFORMANCE, SECOND INTERIM REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    A bioreactor landfill is a landfill that is operated in a manner that is expected to increase the rate and extent of waste decomposition, gas generation, and settlement compared to a traditional landfill. This Second Interim Report was prepared to provide an interpretation of fie...

  7. MONITORING APPROACHES FOR BIOREACTOR LANDFILLS - Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Experimental bioreactor landfill operations at operating Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) landfills can be approved under the research development and demonstration (RD&D) provisions of 30CFR 258.4. To provide a basis for consistent data collection for future decision-making in suppor...

  8. Anaerobic membrane bioreactors: Are membranes really necessary?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Davila, M.; Kassab, G.; Klapwijk, A.; Lier, van J.B.

    2008-01-01

    Membranes themselves represent a significant cost for the full scale application of anaerobic membrane bioreactors (AnMBR). The possibility of operating an AnMBR with a self-forming dynamic membrane generated by the substances present in the reactor liquor would translate into an important saving. A

  9. Sulfate-reducing bacteria in anaerobic bioreactors.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oude Elferink, S.J.W.H.

    1998-01-01

    The treatment of industrial wastewaters containing high amounts of easily degradable organic compounds in anaerobic bioreactors is a well-established process. Similarly, wastewaters which in addition to organic compounds also contain sulfate can be treated in this way. For a long time, the occurrenc

  10. Bioreactor Studies and Computational Fluid Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, H.; Hutmacher, D. W.

    The hydrodynamic environment “created” by bioreactors for the culture of a tissue engineered construct (TEC) is known to influence cell migration, proliferation and extra cellular matrix production. However, tissue engineers have looked at bioreactors as black boxes within which TECs are cultured mainly by trial and error, as the complex relationship between the hydrodynamic environment and tissue properties remains elusive, yet is critical to the production of clinically useful tissues. It is well known in the chemical and biotechnology field that a more detailed description of fluid mechanics and nutrient transport within process equipment can be achieved via the use of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) technology. Hence, the coupling of experimental methods and computational simulations forms a synergistic relationship that can potentially yield greater and yet, more cohesive data sets for bioreactor studies. This review aims at discussing the rationale of using CFD in bioreactor studies related to tissue engineering, as fluid flow processes and phenomena have direct implications on cellular response such as migration and/or proliferation. We conclude that CFD should be seen by tissue engineers as an invaluable tool allowing us to analyze and visualize the impact of fluidic forces and stresses on cells and TECs.

  11. Vortex breakdown in a truncated conical bioreactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balci, Adnan; Brøns, Morten; Herrada, Miguel A.

    2015-01-01

    This numerical study explains the eddy formation and disappearance in a slow steady axisymmetric air–water flow in a vertical truncated conical container, driven by the rotating top disk. Numerous topological metamorphoses occur as the water height, Hw, and the bottom-sidewall angle, α, vary. It ...... are of fundamental interest and can be relevant for aerial bioreactors....

  12. MONITORING APPROACHES FOR BIOREACTOR LANDFILLS - Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Experimental bioreactor landfill operations at operating Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) landfills can be approved under the research development and demonstration (RD&D) provisions of 30CFR 258.4. To provide a basis for consistent data collection for future decision-making in suppor...

  13. LANDFILL BIOREACTOR PERFORMANCE, SECOND INTERIM REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    A bioreactor landfill is a landfill that is operated in a manner that is expected to increase the rate and extent of waste decomposition, gas generation, and settlement compared to a traditional landfill. This Second Interim Report was prepared to provide an interpretation of fie...

  14. Establishing Liver Bioreactors for In Vitro Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebelo, Sofia P; Costa, Rita; Sousa, Marcos F Q; Brito, Catarina; Alves, Paula M

    2015-01-01

    In vitro systems that can effectively model liver function for long periods of time are fundamental tools for preclinical research. Nevertheless, the adoption of in vitro research tools at the earliest stages of drug development has been hampered by the lack of culture systems that offer the robustness, scalability, and flexibility necessary to meet industry's demands. Bioreactor-based technologies, such as stirred tank bioreactors, constitute a feasible approach to aggregate hepatic cells and maintain long-term three-dimensional cultures. These three-dimensional cultures sustain the polarity, differentiated phenotype, and metabolic performance of human hepatocytes. Culture in computer-controlled stirred tank bioreactors allows the maintenance of physiological conditions, such as pH, dissolved oxygen, and temperature, with minimal fluctuations. Moreover, by operating in perfusion mode, gradients of soluble factors and metabolic by-products can be established, aiming at resembling the in vivo microenvironment. This chapter provides a protocol for the aggregation and culture of hepatocyte spheroids in stirred tank bioreactors by applying perfusion mode for the long-term culture of human hepatocytes. This in vitro culture system is compatible with feeding high-throughput screening platforms for the assessment of drug elimination pathways, being a useful tool for toxicology research and drug development in the preclinical phase.

  15. Continuous-Flow Gas-Phase Bioreactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Donald L.; Trantolo, Debra J.

    1994-01-01

    Continuous-flow gas-phase bioreactors proposed for biochemical, food-processing, and related industries. Reactor contains one or more selected enzymes dehydrated or otherwise immobilized on solid carrier. Selected reactant gases fed into reactor, wherein chemical reactions catalyzed by enzyme(s) yield product biochemicals. Concept based on discovery that enzymes not necessarily placed in traditional aqueous environments to function as biocatalysts.

  16. Vortex breakdown in a truncated conical bioreactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balci, Adnan; Brøns, Morten; Herrada, Miguel A.;

    2015-01-01

    This numerical study explains the eddy formation and disappearance in a slow steady axisymmetric air–water flow in a vertical truncated conical container, driven by the rotating top disk. Numerous topological metamorphoses occur as the water height, Hw, and the bottom-sidewall angle, α, vary. It ...... are of fundamental interest and can be relevant for aerial bioreactors....

  17. Denitrifying bioreactor clogging potential during wastewater treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemoheterotrophic denitrification technologies using woodchips as a solid carbon source (i.e., woodchip bioreactors) have been widely trialed for treatment of diffuse-source agricultural nitrogen pollution. There is growing interest in the use of this simple, relatively low-cost biological wastewat...

  18. PRESSURE-RESISTANT VESSEL

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beukers, A.; De Jong, T.

    1997-01-01

    Abstract of WO 9717570 (A1) The invention is directed to a wheel-shaped pressure-resistant vessel for gaseous, liquid or liquefied material having a substantially rigid shape, said vessel comprising a substantially continuous shell of a fiber-reinforced resin having a central opening, an inner l

  19. Bioreactors in tissue engineering - principles, applications and commercial constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansmann, Jan; Groeber, Florian; Kahlig, Alexander; Kleinhans, Claudia; Walles, Heike

    2013-03-01

    Bioreactor technology is vital for tissue engineering. Usually, bioreactors are used to provide a tissue-specific physiological in vitro environment during tissue maturation. In addition to this most obvious application, bioreactors have the potential to improve the efficiency of the overall tissue-engineering concept. To date, a variety of bioreactor systems for tissue-specific applications have been developed. Of these, some systems are already commercially available. With bioreactor technology, various functional tissues of different types were generated and cultured in vitro. Nevertheless, these efforts and achievements alone have not yet led to many clinically successful tissue-engineered implants. We review possible applications for bioreactor systems within a tissue-engineering process and present basic principles and requirements for bioreactor development. Moreover, the use of bioreactor systems for the expansion of clinically relevant cell types is addressed. In contrast to cell expansion, for the generation of functional three-dimensional tissue equivalents, additional physical cues must be provided. Therefore, bioreactors for musculoskeletal tissue engineering are discussed. Finally, bioreactor technology is reviewed in the context of commercial constraints.

  20. Wonderful Walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenman, Jim

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author emphasizes the importance of "working" walls in children's programs. Children's programs need "working" walls (and ceilings and floors) which can be put to use for communication, display, storage, and activity space. The furnishings also work, or don't work, for the program in another sense: in aggregate, they serve as…

  1. Ambiguous walls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mody, Astrid

    2012-01-01

    The introduction of Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) in the built environment has encouraged myriad applications, often embedded in surfaces as an integrated part of the architecture. Thus the wall as responsive luminous skin is becoming, if not common, at least familiar. Taking into account how wall...

  2. Light and electron microscopic observations of blood vessels in neurilemoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasantikul, V; Glick, A D; Netsky, M G

    1979-12-01

    A study of 105 cases of neurilemoma disclosed frequent alterations of blood vessels, including hyalinized walls. Many vascular walls were formed by tumor cells. Two cases were analyzed by electron microscopy, and showed fenestrae, patent interendothelial gap junctions, and leakage of RBCs. The presence of erythrocytes in the gap junction and outside vessels is a factor acounting for xanthochromia of the CSF, and serum leakage for the frequent increase in CSF protein in cases of neurilemoma. Attenuation of endothelial cells increases the liability of vessels to bleed within the tumor. Massive bleeding may cause subarachnoid hemorrhage on rare occasions. Hyalinized vessels and dense collagen are features contributing to the relative infrequence of major hemorrhage. Evidence is presented that Schwann and perineural cells are similar.

  3. Confinement Vessel Dynamic Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. Robert Stevens; Stephen P. Rojas

    1999-08-01

    A series of hydrodynamic and structural analyses of a spherical confinement vessel has been performed. The analyses used a hydrodynamic code to estimate the dynamic blast pressures at the vessel's internal surfaces caused by the detonation of a mass of high explosive, then used those blast pressures as applied loads in an explicit finite element model to simulate the vessel's structural response. Numerous load cases were considered. Particular attention was paid to the bolted port connections and the O-ring pressure seals. The analysis methods and results are discussed, and comparisons to experimental results are made.

  4. Towards a continuous two-phase partitioning bioreactor for xenobiotic removal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomei, M.Concetta, E-mail: tomei@irsa.cnr.it [Water Research Institute, C.N.R., Via Salaria km 29.300, CP 10, 00015 Monterotondo Stazione, Rome (Italy); Mosca Angelucci, Domenica [Water Research Institute, C.N.R., Via Salaria km 29.300, CP 10, 00015 Monterotondo Stazione, Rome (Italy); Daugulis, Andrew J. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Queen’s University, Kingston, Ontario K7 L 3N6 (Canada)

    2016-11-05

    Highlights: • A prototype of a continuous two-phase partitioning bioreactor was investigated. • The bioreactor contained coiled tubing of a selected extruded polymer, Hytrel 8206. • Mass transfer and removal of a xenobiotic, 4-cholorophenol, were investigated. • Removal efficiencies in the tubing wastewater stream were always ≥ 96%. • Presence of polymer tubing buffered increasing in organic load to the hybrid system. - Abstract: The removal of a xenobiotic (4-chlorophenol) from contaminated water was investigated in a simulated continuous two-phase partitioning bioreactor (C-TPPB), fitted with coiled tubing comprised of a specifically-selected extruded polymer, Hytrel 8206. Wastewater flowed inside the tubing, the pollutant diffused through the tubing wall, and was removed in the aqueous bioreactor phase at typical biological removal rates in the C-TTPB simulated by varying aqueous phase throughput to the reactor. Operating over a range of influent substrate concentrations (500–1500 mg L{sup −1}) and hydraulic retention times in the tubing (4–8 h), overall mass transfer coefficients were 1.7–3.5 × 10{sup −7} m s{sup −1}, with the highest value corresponding to the highest tubing flow rate. Corresponding mass transfer rates are of the same order as biological removal rates, and thus do not limit the removal process. The C-TPPB showed good performance over all organic and hydraulic loading ranges, with removal efficiencies of 4CP in the tubing wastewater stream always ≥96%. Additionally, the presence of the Hytrel tubing was able to buffer increases in organic loading to the hybrid system, enhancing overall process stability. Biological testing of the C-TPPB confirmed the abiotic test results demonstrating even higher 4-chlorophenol removal efficiency (∼99%) in the tubing stream.

  5. Design and evaluation of a bioreactor with application to forensic burial environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunphy, Melissa A; Weisensee, Katherine E; Mikhailova, Elena A; Harman, Melinda K

    2015-12-01

    Existing forensic taphonomic methods lack specificity in estimating the postmortem interval (PMI) in the period following active decomposition. New methods, such as the use of citrate concentration in bone, are currently being considered; however, determining the applicability of these methods in differing environmental contexts is challenging. This research aims to design a forensic bioreactor that can account for environmental factors known to impact decomposition, specifically temperature, moisture, physical damage from animals, burial depth, soil pH, and organic matter content. These forensically relevant environmental variables were characterized in a soil science context. The resulting metrics were soil temperature regime, soil moisture regime, slope, texture, soil horizon, cation exchange capacity, soil pH, and organic matter content. Bioreactor chambers were constructed using sterilized thin-walled polystyrene boxes housed in calibrated temperature units. Gravesoil was represented using mineral soil (Ultisols), and organic soil proxy for Histosols, horticulture mix. Gravesoil depth was determined using mineral soil horizons A and Bt2 to simulate surface scatter and shallow grave burial respectively. A total of fourteen different environmental conditions were created and controlled successfully over a 90-day experiment. These results demonstrate successful implementation and control of forensic bioreactor simulating precise environments in a single research location, rather than site-specific testing occurring in different geographic regions. Bone sections were grossly assessed for weathering characteristics, which revealed notable differences related to exposure to different temperature regimes and soil types. Over the short 90-day duration of this experiment, changes in weathering characteristics were more evident across the different temperature regimes rather than the soil types. Using this methodology, bioreactor systems can be created to replicate many

  6. Vessel discoloration detection in malarial retinopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agurto, C.; Nemeth, S.; Barriga, S.; Soliz, P.; MacCormick, I.; Taylor, T.; Harding, S.; Lewallen, S.; Joshi, V.

    2016-03-01

    Cerebral malaria (CM) is a life-threatening clinical syndrome associated with malarial infection. It affects approximately 200 million people, mostly sub-Saharan African children under five years of age. Malarial retinopathy (MR) is a condition in which lesions such as whitening and vessel discoloration that are highly specific to CM appear in the retina. Other unrelated diseases can present with symptoms similar to CM, therefore the exact nature of the clinical symptoms must be ascertained in order to avoid misdiagnosis, which can lead to inappropriate treatment and, potentially, death. In this paper we outline the first system to detect the presence of discolored vessels associated with MR as a means to improve the CM diagnosis. We modified and improved our previous vessel segmentation algorithm by incorporating the `a' channel of the CIELab color space and noise reduction. We then divided the segmented vasculature into vessel segments and extracted features at the wall and in the centerline of the segment. Finally, we used a regression classifier to sort the segments into discolored and not-discolored vessel classes. By counting the abnormal vessel segments in each image, we were able to divide the analyzed images into two groups: normal and presence of vessel discoloration due to MR. We achieved an accuracy of 85% with sensitivity of 94% and specificity of 67%. In clinical practice, this algorithm would be combined with other MR retinal pathology detection algorithms. Therefore, a high specificity can be achieved. By choosing a different operating point in the ROC curve, our system achieved sensitivity of 67% with specificity of 100%.

  7. Automated measurement of retinal blood vessel tortuosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Vinayak; Reinhardt, Joseph M.; Abramoff, Michael D.

    2010-03-01

    Abnormalities in the vascular pattern of the retina are associated with retinal diseases and are also risk factors for systemic diseases, especially cardiovascular diseases. The three-dimensional retinal vascular pattern is mostly formed congenitally, but is then modified over life, in response to aging, vessel wall dystrophies and long term changes in blood flow and pressure. A characteristic of the vascular pattern that is appreciated by clinicians is vascular tortuosity, i.e. how curved or kinked a blood vessel, either vein or artery, appears along its course. We developed a new quantitative metric for vascular tortuosity, based on the vessel's angle of curvature, length of the curved vessel over its chord length (arc to chord ratio), number of curvature sign changes, and combined these into a unidimensional metric, Tortuosity Index (TI). In comparison to other published methods this method can estimate appropriate TI for vessels with constant curvature sign and vessels with equal arc to chord ratios, as well. We applied this method to a dataset of 15 digital fundus images of 8 patients with Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD), and to the other publically available dataset of 60 fundus images of normal cases and patients with hypertensive retinopathy, of which the arterial and venous tortuosities have also been graded by masked experts (ophthalmologists). The method produced exactly the same rank-ordered list of vessel tortuosity (TI) values as obtained by averaging the tortuosity grading given by 3 ophthalmologists for FSHD dataset and a list of TI values with high ranking correlation with the ophthalmologist's grading for the other dataset. Our results show that TI has potential to detect and evaluate abnormal retinal vascular structure in early diagnosis and prognosis of retinopathies.

  8. Hollow fiber bioreactor technology for tissue engineering applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eghbali, Hadis; Nava, Michele M; Mohebbi-Kalhori, Davod; Raimondi, Manuela T

    2016-01-01

    Hollow fiber bioreactors are the focus of scientific research aiming to mimic physiological vascular networks and engineer organs and tissues in vitro. The reason for this lies in the interesting features of this bioreactor type, including excellent mass transport properties. Indeed, hollow fiber bioreactors allow limitations to be overcome in nutrient transport by diffusion, which is often an obstacle to engineer sizable constructs in vitro. This work reviews the existing literature relevant to hollow fiber bioreactors in organ and tissue engineering applications. To this purpose, we first classify the hollow fiber bioreactors into 2 categories: cylindrical and rectangular. For each category, we summarize their main applications both at the tissue and at the organ level, focusing on experimental models and computational studies as predictive tools for designing innovative, dynamic culture systems. Finally, we discuss future perspectives on hollow fiber bioreactors as in vitro models for tissue and organ engineering applications.

  9. Cell Separations in Microgravity and Development of a Space Bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, D. R.

    1985-01-01

    A bioreactor optimized for operations in space is now being developed. The current research is focused on determining the optimum cell-bead ratios, medium content and proper maintenance conditions required to keep living cell specimens alive and healthy for the entire flight. The bioreactor development project has recently added a microprocessor/computer to the JSC prototype for control and data analysis. Appropriate new technology is being combined with the current bioreactor designs and tested to determine what specific features must be included in the fabrication of a bioreactor designed to operate for STS demonstration tests. Considerations include: (1) circulation and resupply of culture media; (2) sensors required to monitor temperature, cell growth, mass transport, and oxygen consumption; and (3) inflight control of shear stress on cells, gas transfer in microgravity, diffusion, and intracellular transport. These data and results from the JSC prototype bioreactor test will be used for the design and construction of a small space bioreactor for the Orbiter middeck.

  10. [Structure of the interalveolar wall].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senelar, R

    1975-01-01

    The wall, which unites as well as separates two contiguous pulmonary alveoli is composed of: - a conjuntival partition, the veritable skeleton of the wall, which is occupied, to the largest extent, by capillary blood vessels. Between the capillaries, conjunctival cells are dispursed: fibrocytes, fibroblasts and histiocytes, of which some can be mobilised, transformed into macrophages, and penetrate into the alveolar lumen; - modified epithelial cells, whose very thin, vast expansions cover the conjunctival partition; - a liquid film, 0.2 mu in thickness, which separates the epithelial cells, or pneumocytes from the alveolar air. Numerous physiological implications result from this organisation.

  11. ON WALL SHEAR STRESS OF ARTERY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Zhao-rong; Liu Bao-yu; Qin Kai-rong

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, a method was proposed that the wall shear stress of artery could be determined by measuring the centerline axial velocity and radial motion of arterial wall simultaneously.The method is simple in application and can get higher precision when it is used to determine the shear stress of arterial wall in vivo.As an example, the shear stress distribution in periodic oscillatory flow of human carotid was calculated and discussed.The computed results show that the shear stress distribution at any given instant is almost uniform and will be zero at the centerline and tends to maximum at the vessel wall.

  12. Flow-sensitive in-vivo 4D MR imaging at 3T for the analysis of aortic hemodynamics and derived vessel wall parameters; Die Analyse aortaler Haemodynamik und Gefaesswandparameter mittels fluss-sensitiver in-vivo 4D-MRT bei 3 Tesla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frydrychowicz, A.; Markl, M.; Stalder, A.F.; Bock, J.; Bley, T.A.; Berger, A.; Russe, M.F.; Hennig, J.; Langer, M. [Freiburg Univ. (Germany). Abt. Roentgendiagnostik; Harloff, A. [Freiburg Univ. (Germany). Abt. Klinische Neurologie und Neurophysiologie; Schlensak, C. [Freiburg Univ. (Germany). Abt. Herz- und Gefaesschirurgie

    2007-05-15

    Modern phase contrast MR imaging at 3 Tesla allows the depiction of 3D morphology as well as the acquisition of time-resolved blood flow velocities in 3 directions. In combination with state-of-the-art visualization and data processing software, the qualitative and quantitative analysis of hemodynamic changes associated with vascular pathologies is possible. The 4D nature of the acquired data permits free orientation within the vascular system of interest and offers the opportunity to quantify blood flow and derived vessel wall parameters at any desired location within the data volume without being dependent on predefined 2D slices. The technique has the potential of overcoming the limitations of current diagnostic strategies and of implementing new diagnostic parameters. In light of the recent discussions regarding the influence of the wall shear stress and the oscillatory shear index on the genesis of arteriosclerosis and dilatative vascular processes, flow-sensitive 4D MRI may provide the missing diagnostic link. Instead of relying on experience-based parameters such as aneurysm size, new hemodynamic considerations can deepen our understanding of vascular pathologies. This overview reviews the underlying methodology at 3T, the literature on time-resolved 3D MR velocity mapping, and presents case examples. By presenting the pre- and postoperative assessment of hemodynamics in a thoracic aortic aneurysm and the detailed analysis of blood flow in a patient with coarctation we underline the potential of time-resolved 3D phase contrast MR at 3T for hemodynamic assessment of vascular pathologies, especially in the thoracic aorta. (orig.)

  13. Automatic detection of plaques with severe stenosis in coronary vessels of CT angiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinesh, M. S.; Devarakota, Pandu; Kumar, Jitendra

    2010-03-01

    Coronary artery disease is the end result of the accumulation of atheromatous plaques within the walls of coronary arteries and is the leading cause of death worldwide. Computed tomography angiography (CTA) has been proved to be very useful for accurate noninvasive diagnosis and quantification of plaques. However, the existing methods to measure the stenosis in the plaques are not accurate enough in mid and distal segments where the vessels become narrower. To alleviate this, we propose a method that consists of three stages namely, automatic extraction of coronary vessels; vessels straightening; lumen extraction and stenosis evaluation. In the first stage, the coronary vessels are segmented using a parametric approach based on circular vessel model at each point on the centerline. It is assumed that centerline information is available in advance. Vessel straightening in the second stage performs multi-planar reformat (MPR) to straighten the curved vessels. MPR view of a vessel helps to visualize and measure the plaques better. On the straightened vessel, lumen and vessel wall are segregated using a nearest neighbor classification. To detect the plaques with severe stenosis in the vessel lumen, we propose a "Diameter Luminal Stenosis" method for analyzing the smaller segments of the vessel. Proposed measurement technique identifies the segments that have plaques and reports the top three severely stenosed segments. Proposed algorithm is applied on 24 coronary vessels belonging to multiple cases acquired from Sensation 64 - slice CT and initial results are promising.

  14. Cheboygan Vessel Base

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Cheboygan Vessel Base (CVB), located in Cheboygan, Michigan, is a field station of the USGS Great Lakes Science Center (GLSC). CVB was established by congressional...

  15. 2013 Tanker Vessel Density

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Automatic Identification Systems (AIS) are a navigation safety device that transmits and monitors the location and characteristics of many vessels in U.S. and...

  16. 2013 Passenger Vessel Density

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Automatic Identification Systems (AIS) are a navigation safety device that transmits and monitors the location and characteristics of many vessels in U.S. and...

  17. High Performance Marine Vessels

    CERN Document Server

    Yun, Liang

    2012-01-01

    High Performance Marine Vessels (HPMVs) range from the Fast Ferries to the latest high speed Navy Craft, including competition power boats and hydroplanes, hydrofoils, hovercraft, catamarans and other multi-hull craft. High Performance Marine Vessels covers the main concepts of HPMVs and discusses historical background, design features, services that have been successful and not so successful, and some sample data of the range of HPMVs to date. Included is a comparison of all HPMVs craft and the differences between them and descriptions of performance (hydrodynamics and aerodynamics). Readers will find a comprehensive overview of the design, development and building of HPMVs. In summary, this book: Focuses on technology at the aero-marine interface Covers the full range of high performance marine vessel concepts Explains the historical development of various HPMVs Discusses ferries, racing and pleasure craft, as well as utility and military missions High Performance Marine Vessels is an ideal book for student...

  18. 2011 Cargo Vessel Density

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Automatic Identification Systems (AIS) are a navigation safety device that transmits and monitors the location and characteristics of many vessels in U.S. and...

  19. 2011 Tanker Vessel Density

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Automatic Identification Systems (AIS) are a navigation safety device that transmits and monitors the location and characteristics of many vessels in U.S. and...

  20. 2011 Vessel Density

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Automatic Identification Systems (AIS) are a navigation safety device that transmits and monitors the location and characteristics of many vessels in U.S. and...

  1. 2011 Fishing Vessel Density

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Automatic Identification Systems (AIS) are a navigation safety device that transmits and monitors the location and characteristics of many vessels in U.S. and...

  2. 2011 Passenger Vessel Density

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Automatic Identification Systems (AIS) are a navigation safety device that transmits and monitors the location and characteristics of many vessels in U.S. and...

  3. 2013 Vessel Density

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Automatic Identification Systems (AIS) are a navigation safety device that transmits and monitors the location and characteristics of many vessels in U.S. and...

  4. 2013 Cargo Vessel Density

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Automatic Identification Systems (AIS) are a navigation safety device that transmits and monitors the location and characteristics of many vessels in U.S. and...

  5. Blood Vessels in Allotransplantation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Abrahimi, P; Liu, R; Pober, J. S

    2015-01-01

    Pober and colleagues present an overview of the various roles played by graft blood vessels in transplantation, including how they function to maintain graft health, how they participate in and are...

  6. Maury Journals - US Vessels

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — U.S. vessels observations, after the 1853 Brussels Conference that set International Maritime Standards, modeled after Maury Marine Standard Observations.

  7. 2013 Fishing Vessel Density

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Automatic Identification Systems (AIS) are a navigation safety device that transmits and monitors the location and characteristics of many vessels in U.S. and...

  8. Coastal Logbook Survey (Vessels)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains catch (landed catch) and effort for fishing trips made by vessels that have been issued a Federal permit for the Gulf of Mexico reef fish,...

  9. Radon diffusion in polymer vessels using CR-39 solid state nuclear track detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carneiro, Andre Cavalcanti; Menezes, Maria Angela de B.C.; Rocha, Zildete; Pereira, Marcio Tadeu, E-mail: andreccarneiro@gmail.com, E-mail: menezes@cdtn.br, E-mail: zildete@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Santos, Talita de Oliveira; Lara, Evelise Gomes; Braga, Mario Roberto Martins S.S., E-mail: mariomartins@gmail.com, E-mail: evelise.lara@gmail.com, E-mail: talitaolsantos@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    At CDTN/CNEN, the method to determine {sup 226}Ra in several matrices by gamma spectrometry is already established; however, the method should be improved. This paper is about the first step of this improvement. Several polymer vessels were studied verifying the effect of radiolysis on the walls of the vessel. A test about the diffusion of {sup 222}Rn through the walls was carried out using the CR-39 solid state nuclear track detector. The results pointed out that the vessel made up by acrylic material is the best candidate to replace the vessel actually used. (author)

  10. LANL Robotic Vessel Scanning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webber, Nels W. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-11-25

    Los Alamos National Laboratory in J-1 DARHT Operations Group uses 6ft spherical vessels to contain hazardous materials produced in a hydrodynamic experiment. These contaminated vessels must be analyzed by means of a worker entering the vessel to locate, measure, and document every penetration mark on the vessel. If the worker can be replaced by a highly automated robotic system with a high precision scanner, it will eliminate the risks to the worker and provide management with an accurate 3D model of the vessel presenting the existing damage with the flexibility to manipulate the model for better and more in-depth assessment.The project was successful in meeting the primary goal of installing an automated system which scanned a 6ft vessel with an elapsed time of 45 minutes. This robotic system reduces the total time for the original scope of work by 75 minutes and results in excellent data accumulation and transmission to the 3D model imaging program.

  11. Catalytic bioreactors and methods of using same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Worden, Robert Mark; Liu, Yangmu Chloe

    2017-07-25

    Various embodiments provide a bioreactor for producing a bioproduct comprising one or more catalytically active zones located in a housing and adapted to keep two incompatible gaseous reactants separated when in a gas phase, wherein each of the one or more catalytically active zones may comprise a catalytic component retainer and a catalytic component retained within and/or thereon. Each of the catalytically active zones may additionally or alternatively comprise a liquid medium located on either side of the catalytic component retainer. Catalytic component may include a microbial cell culture located within and/or on the catalytic component retainer, a suspended catalytic component suspended in the liquid medium, or a combination thereof. Methods of using various embodiments of the bioreactor to produce a bioproduct, such as isobutanol, are also provided.

  12. Design and validation of a corneal bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Elissa K; Pai, Vincent H; Amberg, Philip; Gardner, Jens; Orwin, Elizabeth J

    2012-12-01

    Mechanical strain is an important signal that influences the behavior and properties of cells in a wide variety of tissues. Physiologically similar mechanical strain can revert cultured cells to a more normal phenotype. Here, we have demonstrated that 3% equibiaxial (EB) and uniaxial strains confer favorable protein expression in cultured rabbit corneal fibroblasts (RCFs), with approximately 35% and 65% reduction in expression of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), respectively. We have designed a novel bioreactor that is capable of imparting up to 7% EB strain and up to 6% EB strain using a cornea-shaped post. Additional features of the bioreactor include the application of shear stress to cells in culture and the ability to image cells using optical coherence microscopy (OCM) without being removed from the system. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Bioreactor and process design for biohydrogen production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Show, Kuan-Yeow; Lee, Duu-Jong; Chang, Jo-Shu

    2011-09-01

    Biohydrogen is regarded as an attractive future clean energy carrier due to its high energy content and environmental-friendly conversion. It has the potential for renewable biofuel to replace current hydrogen production which rely heavily on fossil fuels. While biohydrogen production is still in the early stage of development, there have been a variety of laboratory- and pilot-scale systems developed with promising potential. This work presents a review of advances in bioreactor and bioprocess design for biohydrogen production. The state-of-the art of biohydrogen production is discussed emphasizing on production pathways, factors affecting biohydrogen production, as well as bioreactor configuration and operation. Challenges and prospects of biohydrogen production are also outlined.

  14. Wall Turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanratty, Thomas J.

    1980-01-01

    This paper gives an account of research on the structure of turbulence close to a solid boundary. Included is a method to study the flow close to the wall of a pipe without interferring with it. (Author/JN)

  15. Oxygen transfer in a pressurized airlift bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campani, Gilson; Ribeiro, Marcelo Perencin Arruda; Horta, Antônio Carlos Luperni; Giordano, Roberto Campos; Badino, Alberto Colli; Zangirolami, Teresa Cristina

    2015-08-01

    Airlift bioreactors (ALBs) offer advantages over conventional systems, such as simplicity of construction, reduced risk of contamination, and efficient gas-liquid dispersion with low power consumption. ALBs are usually operated under atmospheric pressure. However, in bioprocesses with high oxygen demand, such as high cell density cultures, oxygen limitation may occur even when operating with high superficial gas velocity and air enriched with oxygen. One way of overcoming this drawback is to pressurize the reactor. In this configuration, it is important to assess the influence of bioreactor internal pressure on the gas hold-up, volumetric oxygen transfer coefficient (k(L)a), and volumetric oxygen transfer rate (OTR). Experiments were carried out in a concentric-tube airlift bioreactor with a 5 dm(3) working volume, equipped with a system for automatic monitoring and control of the pressure, temperature, and inlet gas flow rate. The results showed that, in disagreement with previous published results for bubble column and external loop airlift reactors, overpressure did not significantly affect k(L)a within the studied ranges of pressure (0.1-0.4 MPa) and superficial gas velocity in the riser (0.032-0.065 m s(-1)). Nevertheless, a positive effect on OTR was observed: it increased up to 5.4 times, surpassing by 2.3 times the oxygen transfer in a 4 dm(3) stirred tank reactor operated under standard cultivation conditions. These results contribute to the development of non-conventional reactors, especially pneumatic bioreactors operated using novel strategies for oxygen control.

  16. Enhanced Denitrification in Roadside Ditches with Bioreactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pluer, W.; Schneider, R.; Walter, M. T.

    2016-12-01

    Nitrate (NO3) pollution remains a water quality problem in agriculture-dominated watersheds despite decades of research and concerted efforts. Excess NO3 causes eutrophication in estuarine and marine ecosystems far downstream of the pollution source. Denitrification reduces NO3 to inert dinitrogen gas; this process occurs naturally in saturated areas of the landscape but this rate cannot keep up with the runoff rate due to fertilizer and manure applications. Researchers developed denitrifying bioreactors as a solution to encourage denitrification at the field level. Denitrifying bioreactors remove NO3 at a significantly higher rate (>2 g N m-2 d-1) than natural systems such as wetlands (<0.5 g N m-2 d-1). Most current designs of denitrifying bioreactors necessitate connection with tile drainage as the inflow source of water and NO3. It also requires a portion of farmland (typically <1% of field area is needed) which farmers can be reluctant to relinquish. Meanwhile, road ditches commonly run along agricultural fields, channeling runoff and NO3 to surface water. Because the ditches are designed to avoid flooding, they channel water rapidly and minimize time and contact with soil microbes for denitrification (denitrification rates in ditches are typically <0.1 g N m-2 d-1). Modified denitrifying bioreactors placed in road ditches could provide high NO3 removal in already marginal land, especially at baseflow conditions. A pilot study of this shows instantaneous NO3 removal rates up to 110 g N m-2 d-1 in the first year. Continued results similar to this pilot study and wider application could significantly increase ditch denitrification and help mitigate NO3 pollution.

  17. Estimation of Heat Loss in a Closed Vessel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. A. Parate

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Power cartridges are designed and developed for use in military aircraft in association withHigh Energy Materials Research Laboratory, Pune. During development, the cartridge is firedin a closed vessel to generate basic design parameters. When the cartridge is fired, the heat islost to the walls of the vessel due to conduction, convection, radiation, and to some extent, byexpansion of the vessel. An attempt has been made to estimate the heat loss from the vesseland the surrounding. The aim of this study was to lay down the technical results theoreticallyand their validation through experiments.

  18. Vessel Enhancement and Segmentation of 4D CT Lung Image Using Stick Tensor Voting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, Tan; Hao, Yang; Jingli, Shi; Xuan, Yang

    2016-12-01

    Vessel enhancement and segmentation plays a significant role in medical image analysis. This paper proposes a novel vessel enhancement and segmentation method for 4D CT lung image using stick tensor voting algorithm, which focuses on addressing the vessel distortion issue of vessel enhancement diffusion (VED) method. Furthermore, the enhanced results are easily segmented using level-set segmentation. In our method, firstly, vessels are filtered using Frangi's filter to reduce intrapulmonary noises and extract rough blood vessels. Secondly, stick tensor voting algorithm is employed to estimate the correct direction along the vessel. Then the estimated direction along the vessel is used as the anisotropic diffusion direction of vessel in VED algorithm, which makes the intensity diffusion of points locating at the vessel wall be consistent with the directions of vessels and enhance the tubular features of vessels. Finally, vessels can be extracted from the enhanced image by applying level-set segmentation method. A number of experiments results show that our method outperforms traditional VED method in vessel enhancement and results in satisfied segmented vessels.

  19. Studies on in-vessel debris coolability in ALPHA program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maruyama, Yu; Yamano, Norihiro; Moriyama, Kiyofumi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Ibaraki-ken (Japan)] [and others

    1997-02-01

    In-vessel debris coolability experiments have been performed in ALPHA Program at JAERI. Aluminum oxide (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) produced by a thermite reaction was applied as a debris simulant. Two scoping experiments using approximately 30 kg or 50 kg of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} were conducted. In addition to post-test observations, temperature histories of the debris simulant and the lower head experimental vessel were evaluated. Rapid temperature reduction observed on the outer surface of the experimental vessel may imply that water penetration into a gap between the solidified debris and the experimental vessel occurred resulting in an effective cooling of once heated vessel wall. Preliminary measurement of a gap width was made with an ultrasonic device. Signals to show the existence of gaps, ranging from 0.7 mm to 1.4 mm, were detected at several locations.

  20. Influence of biologic factor on the velocity of propagation of pulse waves in vessels of living organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumets, Pavel

    2012-11-01

    In this work there has been examined a mathematical model illustrating propagation of a pulse wave, with biological activity of a blood vessel's walls taken into consideration. The influence of the biological factor was allowed for in the equations connecting stresses and deformations of the vessel's walls among themselves. There has been deduced a formula defining the pulse wave propagation velocity in an orthotropic resilient blood-filled vessel, influenced by the biological factor. The obtained results allow us to make a conclusion that stimulation of muscle fibers of the vessel's wall brings on an increase in the pulse wave propagation velocity.

  1. Aujeszky's disease virus production in disposable bioreactor

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    I Slivac; V Gaurina Srček; K Radošević; I Kmetič; Z Kniewald

    2006-09-01

    A novel, disposable-bag bioreactor system that uses wave action for mixing and transferring oxygen was evaluated for BHK 21 C13 cell line growth and Aujeszky’s disease virus (ADV) production. Growth kinetics of BHK 21 C13 cells in the wave bioreactor during 3-day period were determined. At the end of the 3-day culture period and cell density of 1.82 × 106 cells ml–1, the reactor was inoculated with 9 ml of gE- Bartha K-61 strain ADV suspension (105.9 TCID50) with multiplicity of infection (MOI) of 0.01. After a 144 h incubation period, 400 ml of ADV harvest was obtained with titre of 107.0 TCID50 ml–1, which corresponds to 40,000 doses of vaccine against AD. In conclusion, the results obtained with the wave bioreactor using BHK 21 C13 cells showed that this system can be considered as suitable for ADV or BHK 21 C13 cell biomass production.

  2. Replaceable Sensor System for Bioreactor Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayo, Mike; Savoy, Steve; Bruno, John

    2006-01-01

    A sensor system was proposed that would monitor spaceflight bioreactor parameters. Not only will this technology be invaluable in the space program for which it was developed, it will find applications in medical science and industrial laboratories as well. Using frequency-domain-based fluorescence lifetime technology, the sensor system will be able to detect changes in fluorescence lifetime quenching that results from displacement of fluorophorelabeled receptors bound to target ligands. This device will be used to monitor and regulate bioreactor parameters including glucose, pH, oxygen pressure (pO2), and carbon dioxide pressure (pCO2). Moreover, these biosensor fluorophore receptor-quenching complexes can be designed to further detect and monitor for potential biohazards, bioproducts, or bioimpurities. Biosensors used to detect biological fluid constituents have already been developed that employ a number of strategies, including invasive microelectrodes (e.g., dark electrodes), optical techniques including fluorescence, and membrane permeable systems based on osmotic pressure. Yet the longevity of any of these sensors does not meet the demands of extended use in spacecraft habitat or bioreactor monitoring. It was therefore necessary to develop a sensor platform that could determine not only fluid variables such as glucose concentration, pO2, pCO2, and pH but can also regulate these fluid variables with controlled feedback loop.

  3. Degradation of Refuse in Hybrid Bioreactor Landfill

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN LONG; Yu-YANG LONG; HAI-CHUN LIU; DONG-SHENG SHEN

    2009-01-01

    Objectivess To explore the process of refuse decomposition in hybrid bioreactor landfill. Methods The bioreactor landfill was operated in sequencing of facultative-anaerobic and aerobic conditions with leachate recireulation, pH, COD, and ammonia in the leachate and pH, biodegradable organic matter (BDM), and cation exchange capacity (CEC) in refuse were detected. Results CEC increased gradually with the degradation of refuse, which was negatively correlad, With BDM. COD and ammonia in the leachate was declined to 399.2 mg L-1 and 20.6 mg N L-1, respectively, during the 357-day operation. The respective concentrations of ammonia and COD were below the second and the third levels of current discharge standards in China. Conclusion The refuse is relatively stable at the end of hybrid bioreactor landfill operation. Most of the readily biodegradable organic matter is mineralized in the initial phase of refuse degradation, whereas the hard-biodegradable organic matter is mainly humidified in the maturity phase of refuse degradation.

  4. Customizable engineered blood vessels using 3D printed inserts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinnock, Cameron B; Meier, Elizabeth M; Joshi, Neeraj N; Wu, Bin; Lam, Mai T

    2016-04-15

    Current techniques for tissue engineering blood vessels are not customizable for vascular size variation and vessel wall thickness. These critical parameters vary widely between the different arteries in the human body, and the ability to engineer vessels of varying sizes could increase capabilities for disease modeling and treatment options. We present an innovative method for producing customizable, tissue engineered, self-organizing vascular constructs by replicating a major structural component of blood vessels - the smooth muscle layer, or tunica media. We utilize a unique system combining 3D printed plate inserts to control construct size and shape, and cell sheets supported by a temporary fibrin hydrogel to encourage cellular self-organization into a tubular form resembling a natural artery. To form the vascular construct, 3D printed inserts are adhered to tissue culture plates, fibrin hydrogel is deposited around the inserts, and human aortic smooth muscle cells are then seeded atop the fibrin hydrogel. The gel, aided by the innate contractile properties of the smooth muscle cells, aggregates towards the center post insert, creating a tissue ring of smooth muscle cells. These rings are then stacked into the final tubular construct. Our methodology is robust, easily repeatable and allows for customization of cellular composition, vessel wall thickness, and length of the vessel construct merely by varying the size of the 3D printed inserts. This platform has potential for facilitating more accurate modeling of vascular pathology, serving as a drug discovery tool, or for vessel repair in disease treatment.

  5. 女飞行员颈部血管壁弹性的超声定量检测及其应用价值%Ultrasonic quantitative detection of elasticity of jugular vessel wall of female pilots and its application value

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张龙方; 刘晶; 姚克纯; 李文秀; 刘淑萍; 李利

    2011-01-01

    目的 测定现役运输机女飞行员血管壁弹性功能,为女性招飞及女飞行员心血管疾病的防治提供参考.方法 采用血管回声跟踪技术(ET)对首批参加女航天员选拔的19名现役女运输机飞行员颈动脉血管弹性参数进行定量检测,并随机选择参加选拔的20名男飞行员(除外歼击机飞行员及吸烟者,以避免可能存在的影响动脉弹性的因素)作为对照,两组间年龄、血压配对比较无统计学差异,且均无心血管疾病史,体格检查无阳性体征,心电图、胸片、肝肾功能、生化全项检查等无异常.结果 男女两组飞行员临床资料及生化指标比较差异无统计学意义(P>0.05),组内两侧颈动脉血管壁弹性参数差异无统计学意义(P>0.05).女飞行员颈动脉血管壁的弹性模量(Ep)、僵硬度(β)、脉搏波速度(PWVβ)均低于男飞行员(P<0.05),而动脉顺应性(AC)高于男飞行员(P<0.05).结论 女飞行员血管壁各项弹性参数均优于男飞行员.%Objective To observe the elasticity of the jugular vessel wall of female aerotransport pilots on active duty, provide a reference for the selection of female pilots, and the prevention and therapy of cardiovascular diseases in female pilots. Methods Using the Echo-Tracking technique, the elastic parameters of the carotid artery were quantitatively detected in nineteen female pilots who were first selected as female astronauts. Twenty male pilots who were selected as astronauts were randomly chosen as the control group. No statistical difference in age and blood pressure between the two groups was found. No history of cardiovascular diseases was recorded, and . No abnormal signs were revealed in the results of the physical examination. Electrocardiogram, chest radiography, hepatic and kidney function, and biochemical examination showed normal results. The factors affecting the elasticity of the artery could possibly be avoided for the male pilots except for

  6. Trajectory planning of tokamak flexible in-vessel inspection robot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hesheng [Department of Automation, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 200240 Shanghai (China); Key Laboratory of System Control and Information Processing, Ministry of Education of China, 200240 Shanghai (China); Chen, Weidong, E-mail: wdchen@sjtu.edu.cn [Department of Automation, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 200240 Shanghai (China); Key Laboratory of System Control and Information Processing, Ministry of Education of China, 200240 Shanghai (China); Lai, Yinping; He, Tao [Department of Automation, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 200240 Shanghai (China); Key Laboratory of System Control and Information Processing, Ministry of Education of China, 200240 Shanghai (China)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • A tokamak flexible in-vessel inspection robot is designed. • Two trajectory planning methods are used to ensure the full coverage of the first wall scanning. • The method is tested on a simulated platform of EAST with the flexible in-vessel inspection robot. • Experimental results show the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm. - Abstract: Tokamak flexible in-vessel inspection robot is mainly designed to carry a camera for close observation of the first wall of the vacuum vessel, which is essential for the maintenance of the future tokamak reactor without breaking the working condition of the vacuum vessel. A tokamak flexible in-vessel inspection robot is designed. In order to improve efficiency of the remote maintenance, it is necessary to design a corresponding trajectory planning algorithm to complete the automatic full coverage scanning of the complex tokamak cavity. Two different trajectory planning methods, RS (rough scanning) and FS (fine scanning), according to different demands of the task, are used to ensure the full coverage of the first wall scanning. To quickly locate the damage position, the first trajectory planning method is targeted for quick and wide-ranging scan of the tokamak D-shaped section, and the second one is for careful observation. Furthermore, both of the two different trajectory planning methods can ensure the full coverage of the first wall scanning with an optimal end posture. The method is tested on a simulated platform of EAST (Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak) with the flexible in-vessel inspection robot, and the results show the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm.

  7. A double chamber rotating bioreactor for enhanced tubular tissue generation from human mesenchymal stem cells: a promising tool for vascular tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefani, I; Asnaghi, M A; Cooper-White, J J; Mantero, S

    2016-10-24

    Cardiovascular diseases represent a major global health burden, with high rates of mortality and morbidity. Autologous grafts are commonly used to replace damaged or failing blood vessels; however, such approaches are hampered by the scarcity of suitable graft tissue, donor site morbidity and poor long-term stability. Tissue engineering has been investigated as a means by which exogenous vessel grafts can be produced, with varying levels of success to date, a result of mismatched mechanical properties of these vessel substitutes and inadequate ex vivo vessel tissue genesis. In this work, we describe the development of a novel multifunctional dual-phase (air/aqueous) bioreactor, designed to both rotate and perfuse small-diameter tubular scaffolds and encourage enhanced tissue genesis throughout such scaffolds. Within this novel dynamic culture system, an elastomeric nanofibrous, microporous composite tubular scaffold, composed of poly(caprolactone) and acrylated poly(lactide-co-trimethylene-carbonate) and with mechanical properties approaching those of native vessels, was seeded with human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) and cultured for up to 14 days in inductive (smooth muscle) media. This scaffold/bioreactor combination provided a dynamic culture environment that enhanced (compared with static controls) scaffold colonization, cell growth, extracellular matrix deposition and in situ differentiation of the hMSCs into mature smooth muscle cells, representing a concrete step towards our goal of creating a mature ex vivo vascular tissue for implantation. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Combined Visualization of Wall Thickness and Wall Shear Stress for the Evaluation of Aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaßer, Sylvia; Lawonn, Kai; Hoffmann, Thomas; Skalej, Martin; Preim, Bernhard

    2014-12-01

    For an individual rupture risk assessment of aneurysms, the aneurysm's wall morphology and hemodynamics provide valuable information. Hemodynamic information is usually extracted via computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulation on a previously extracted 3D aneurysm surface mesh or directly measured with 4D phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging. In contrast, a noninvasive imaging technique that depicts the aneurysm wall in vivo is still not available. Our approach comprises an experiment, where intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) is employed to probe a dissected saccular aneurysm phantom, which we modeled from a porcine kidney artery. Then, we extracted a 3D surface mesh to gain the vessel wall thickness and hemodynamic information from a CFD simulation. Building on this, we developed a framework that depicts the inner and outer aneurysm wall with dedicated information about local thickness via distance ribbons. For both walls, a shading is adapted such that the inner wall as well as its distance to the outer wall is always perceivable. The exploration of the wall is further improved by combining it with hemodynamic information from the CFD simulation. Hence, the visual analysis comprises a brushing and linking concept for individual highlighting of pathologic areas. Also, a surface clustering is integrated to provide an automatic division of different aneurysm parts combined with a risk score depending on wall thickness and hemodynamic information. In general, our approach can be employed for vessel visualization purposes where an inner and outer wall has to be adequately represented.

  9. The Interaction between Fluid Wall Shear Stress and Solid Circumferential Strain Affects Endothelial Gene Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaya, Ronny; Pierides, Alexis; Tarbell, John M

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial cells lining the walls of blood vessels are exposed simultaneously to wall shear stress (WSS) and circumferential stress (CS) that can be characterized by the temporal phase angle between WSS and CS (stress phase angle - SPA). Regions of the circulation with highly asynchronous hemodynamics (SPA close to -180°) such as coronary arteries are associated with the development of pathological conditions such as atherosclerosis and intimal hyperplasia whereas more synchronous regions (SPA closer to 0°) are spared of disease. The present study evaluates endothelial cell gene expression of 42 atherosclerosis-related genes under asynchronous hemodynamics (SPA=-180 °) and synchronous hemodynamics (SPA=0 °). This study used a novel bioreactor to investigate the cellular response of bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAECS) exposed to a combination of pulsatile WSS and CS at SPA=0 or SPA=-180. Using a PCR array of 42 genes, we determined that BAECS exposed to non-reversing sinusoidal WSS (10±10 dyne/cm2) and CS (4 ± 4%) over a 7 hour testing period displayed 17 genes that were up regulated by SPA = -180 °, most of them pro-atherogenic, including NFκB and other NFκB target genes. The up regulation of NFκB p50/p105 and p65 by SPA =-180° was confirmed by Western blots and immunofluorescence staining demonstrating the nuclear translocation of NFκB p50/p105 and p65. These data suggest that asynchronous hemodynamics (SPA=-180 °) can elicit proatherogenic responses in endothelial cells compared to synchronous hemodynamics without shear stress reversal, indicating that SPA may be an important parameter characterizing arterial susceptibility to disease.

  10. The Interaction between Fluid Wall Shear Stress and Solid Circumferential Strain Affects Endothelial Gene Expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronny Amaya

    Full Text Available Endothelial cells lining the walls of blood vessels are exposed simultaneously to wall shear stress (WSS and circumferential stress (CS that can be characterized by the temporal phase angle between WSS and CS (stress phase angle - SPA. Regions of the circulation with highly asynchronous hemodynamics (SPA close to -180° such as coronary arteries are associated with the development of pathological conditions such as atherosclerosis and intimal hyperplasia whereas more synchronous regions (SPA closer to 0° are spared of disease. The present study evaluates endothelial cell gene expression of 42 atherosclerosis-related genes under asynchronous hemodynamics (SPA=-180 ° and synchronous hemodynamics (SPA=0 °. This study used a novel bioreactor to investigate the cellular response of bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAECS exposed to a combination of pulsatile WSS and CS at SPA=0 or SPA=-180. Using a PCR array of 42 genes, we determined that BAECS exposed to non-reversing sinusoidal WSS (10±10 dyne/cm2 and CS (4 ± 4% over a 7 hour testing period displayed 17 genes that were up regulated by SPA = -180 °, most of them pro-atherogenic, including NFκB and other NFκB target genes. The up regulation of NFκB p50/p105 and p65 by SPA =-180° was confirmed by Western blots and immunofluorescence staining demonstrating the nuclear translocation of NFκB p50/p105 and p65. These data suggest that asynchronous hemodynamics (SPA=-180 ° can elicit proatherogenic responses in endothelial cells compared to synchronous hemodynamics without shear stress reversal, indicating that SPA may be an important parameter characterizing arterial susceptibility to disease.

  11. Microbial community analysis of a full-scale DEMON bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Martinez, Alejandro; Rodriguez-Sanchez, Alejandro; Muñoz-Palazon, Barbara; Garcia-Ruiz, Maria-Jesus; Osorio, Francisco; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M; Gonzalez-Lopez, Jesus

    2015-03-01

    Full-scale applications of autotrophic nitrogen removal technologies for the treatment of digested sludge liquor have proliferated during the last decade. Among these technologies, the aerobic/anoxic deammonification process (DEMON) is one of the major applied processes. This technology achieves nitrogen removal from wastewater through anammox metabolism inside a single bioreactor due to alternating cycles of aeration. To date, microbial community composition of full-scale DEMON bioreactors have never been reported. In this study, bacterial community structure of a full-scale DEMON bioreactor located at the Apeldoorn wastewater treatment plant was analyzed using pyrosequencing. This technique provided a higher-resolution study of the bacterial assemblage of the system compared to other techniques used in lab-scale DEMON bioreactors. Results showed that the DEMON bioreactor was a complex ecosystem where ammonium oxidizing bacteria, anammox bacteria and many other bacterial phylotypes coexist. The potential ecological role of all phylotypes found was discussed. Thus, metagenomic analysis through pyrosequencing offered new perspectives over the functioning of the DEMON bioreactor by exhaustive identification of microorganisms, which play a key role in the performance of bioreactors. In this way, pyrosequencing has been proven as a helpful tool for the in-depth investigation of the functioning of bioreactors at microbiological scale.

  12. Schisandra lignans production regulated by different bioreactor type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szopa, Agnieszka; Kokotkiewicz, Adam; Luczkiewicz, Maria; Ekiert, Halina

    2017-04-10

    Schisandra chinensis (Chinese magnolia vine) is a rich source of therapeutically relevant dibenzocyclooctadiene lignans with anticancer, immunostimulant and hepatoprotective activities. In this work, shoot cultures of S. chinensis were grown in different types of bioreactors with the aim to select a system suitable for the large scale in vitro production of schisandra lignans. The cultures were maintained in Murashige-Skoog (MS) medium supplemented with 3mg/l 6-benzylaminopurine (BA) and 1mg/l 1-naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA). Five bioreactors differing with respect to cultivation mode were tested: two liquid-phase systems (baloon-type bioreactor and bubble-column bioreactor with biomass immobilization), the gas-phase spray bioreactor and two commercially available temporary immersion systems: RITA(®) and Plantform. The experiments were run for 30 and 60 days in batch mode. The harvested shoots were evaluated for growth and lignan content determined by LC-DAD and LC-DAD-ESI-MS. Of the tested bioreactors, temporary immersion systems provided the best results with respect to biomass production and lignan accumulation: RITA(®) bioreactor yielded 17.86g/l (dry weight) during 60 day growth period whereas shoots grown for 30 days in Plantform bioreactor contained the highest amount of lignans (546.98mg/100g dry weight), with schisandrin, deoxyschisandrin and gomisin A as the major constituents (118.59, 77.66 and 67.86mg/100g dry weight, respectively). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Expression Systems and Species Used for Transgenic Animal Bioreactors

    OpenAIRE

    Yanli Wang; Sihai Zhao; Liang Bai; Jianglin Fan; Enqi Liu

    2013-01-01

    Transgenic animal bioreactors can produce therapeutic proteins with high value for pharmaceutical use. In this paper, we compared different systems capable of producing therapeutic proteins (bacteria, mammalian cells, transgenic plants, and transgenic animals) and found that transgenic animals were potentially ideal bioreactors for the synthesis of pharmaceutical protein complexes. Compared with other transgenic animal expression systems (egg white, blood, urine, seminal plasma, and silkworm ...

  14. Sulfur formation and recovery in a thiosulfateoxidizing bioreactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gonzalez-Sanchez, A.; Meulepas, R.J.W.; Revah, S.

    2008-01-01

    This work describes the design and Performance of a thiosulfate-oxidizing bioreactor that allowed high elemental sulfur production and recovery efficiency. The reactor system, referred to as a Supernatant-Recycling Settler Bioreactor (SRSB), consisted of a cylindrical upflow reactor and a separate

  15. Evaluation of woodchip bioreactors for improved water quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodchip bioreactors are gaining popularity with farmers because of their edge-of-field nitrate removal capabilities, which do not require changes in land management practices. However, limited research has been conducted to study the potential of these bioreactors to also reduce downstream transpor...

  16. Expression Systems and Species Used for Transgenic Animal Bioreactors

    OpenAIRE

    Yanli Wang; Sihai Zhao; Liang Bai; Jianglin Fan; Enqi Liu

    2013-01-01

    Transgenic animal bioreactors can produce therapeutic proteins with high value for pharmaceutical use. In this paper, we compared different systems capable of producing therapeutic proteins (bacteria, mammalian cells, transgenic plants, and transgenic animals) and found that transgenic animals were potentially ideal bioreactors for the synthesis of pharmaceutical protein complexes. Compared with other transgenic animal expression systems (egg white, blood, urine, seminal plasma, and silkworm ...

  17. Denitrifying bioreactors for nitrate removal from tile drained cropland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denitrification bioreactors are a promising technology for mitigation of nitrate-nitrogen (NO3-N) losses in subsurface drainage water. Bioreactors are constructed with carbon substrates, typically wood chips, to provide a substrate for denitrifying microorganisms. Researchers in Iowa found that for ...

  18. Sulfur formation and recovery in a thiosulfateoxidizing bioreactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gonzalez-Sanchez, A.; Meulepas, R.J.W.; Revah, S.

    2008-01-01

    This work describes the design and Performance of a thiosulfate-oxidizing bioreactor that allowed high elemental sulfur production and recovery efficiency. The reactor system, referred to as a Supernatant-Recycling Settler Bioreactor (SRSB), consisted of a cylindrical upflow reactor and a separate a

  19. A Microfluidic Bioreactor with in Situ SERS Imaging for the Study of Controlled Flow Patterns of Biofilm Precursor Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesse Greener

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available A microfluidic bioreactor with an easy to fabricate nano-plasmonic surface is demonstrated for studies of biofilms and their precursor materials via Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS. The system uses a novel design to induce sheath flow confinement of a sodium citrate biofilm precursor stream against the SERS imaging surface to measure spatial variations in the concentration profile. The unoptimised SERS enhancement was approximately 2.5 × 104, thereby improving data acquisition time, reducing laser power requirements and enabling a citrate detection limit of 0.1 mM, which was well below the concentrations used in biofilm nutrient solutions. The flow confinement was observed by both optical microscopy and SERS imaging with good complementarity. We demonstrate the new bioreactor by growing flow-templated biofilms on the microchannel wall. This work opens the way for in situ spectral imaging of biofilms and their biochemical environment under dynamic flow conditions.

  20. Energy Consumption in Terms of Shear Stress for Two Types of Membrane Bioreactors used for Municipal Wastewater Treatment Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ratkovich, Nicolas Rios; Bentzen, Thomas Ruby; Rasmussen, Michael R.

    2012-01-01

    Two types of submerged membrane bioreactors (MBR): hollow fiber (HF) and hollow sheet (HS), have been studied and compared in terms of energy consumption and average shear stress over the membrane wall. The analysis of energy consumption was made using the correlation to determine the blower power...... of 11% was found. This work uses an empirical relationship to determine the shear stress based on the ratio of aeration blower power to tank volume. This relationship is used in bubble column reactors and it is extrapolate to determine shear stress on MBR systems. This relationship proved...... to be overestimated by 28% compared to experimental measurements and CFD results. Therefore, a corrective factor is included in the relationship in order to account for the membrane placed inside the bioreactor....

  1. Increasing Vero viable cell densities for yellow fever virus production in stirred-tank bioreactors using serum-free medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattos, Diogo A; Silva, Marlon V; Gaspar, Luciane P; Castilho, Leda R

    2015-08-20

    In this work, changes in Vero cell cultivation methods have been employed in order to improve cell growth conditions to obtain higher viable cell densities and to increase viral titers. The propagation of the 17DD yellow fever virus (YFV) in Vero cells grown on Cytodex I microcarriers was evaluated in 3-L bioreactor vessels. Prior to the current changes, Vero cells were repeatedly displaying insufficient microcarrier colonization. A modified cultivation process with four changes has resulted in higher cell densities and higher virus titers than previously observed for 17DD YFV.

  2. STATE OF THE PRACTICE FOR BIOREACTOR LANDFILLS - SUMMARY OF USEPA WORKSHOP ON BIOREACTOR LANDFILLS: SUMMARY

    Science.gov (United States)

    This is a summary of the Workshop on Landfill Bioreactors, held 9/6-7/2000 in Arlington, VA. The purpose of the workshop was to provide a forum to EPA, state and local governments, solid waste industry, and academic research representatives to exchange information and ideas on b...

  3. STATE OF THE PRACTICE FOR BIOREACTOR LANDFILLS - SUMMARY OF USEPA WORKSHOP ON BIOREACTOR LANDFILLS: SUMMARY

    Science.gov (United States)

    This is a summary of the Workshop on Landfill Bioreactors, held 9/6-7/2000 in Arlington, VA. The purpose of the workshop was to provide a forum to EPA, state and local governments, solid waste industry, and academic research representatives to exchange information and ideas on b...

  4. Wastewater treatments by membrane bioreactors (MBR); Bioreactores de membrana (MBR) para la depuracion de aguas residuales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guardino Ferre, R.

    2001-07-01

    Wastewater treatments by membrane bioreactors (MBR), are a good alternative of treatment to the conventional processes when wish to obtain very high quality of the treated water or to try high load contaminants in low flow. Simultaneously, the article explains the significant reduction of the wastewater treatment plant space, eliminating the secondary septic tank. (Author) 7 refs.

  5. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: the interrelation of disarray, fibrosis, and small vessel disease

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Varnava, A M; Elliott, P M; Sharma, S; McKenna, W J; Davies, M J

    2000-01-01

    ... (resulting in death or heart transplantation). The presence of scarring, atrial dilatation, and a mitral valve impact lesion were noted, and heart weight, wall thickness, per cent disarray, per cent fibrosis, and per cent small vessel disease...

  6. Photoacoustic removal of occlusions from blood vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visuri, Steven R.; Da Silva, Luiz B.; Celliers, Peter M.; London, Richard A.; Maitland, IV, Duncan J.; Esch, Victor C.

    2002-01-01

    Partial or total occlusions of fluid passages within the human body are removed by positioning an array of optical fibers in the passage and directing treatment radiation pulses along the fibers, one at a time, to generate a shock wave and hydrodynamics flows that strike and emulsify the occlusions. A preferred application is the removal of blood clots (thrombin and embolic) from small cerebral vessels to reverse the effects of an ischemic stroke. The operating parameters and techniques are chosen to minimize the amount of heating of the fragile cerebral vessel walls occurring during this photo acoustic treatment. One such technique is the optical monitoring of the existence of hydrodynamics flow generating vapor bubbles when they are expected to occur and stopping the heat generating pulses propagated along an optical fiber that is not generating such bubbles.

  7. The ITER in-vessel system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lousteau, D.C.

    1994-09-01

    The overall programmatic objective, as defined in the ITER Engineering Design Activities (EDA) Agreement, is to demonstrate the scientific and technological feasibility of fusion energy for peaceful purposes. The ITER EDA Phase, due to last until July 1998, will encompass the design of the device and its auxiliary systems and facilities, including the preparation of engineering drawings. The EDA also incorporates validating research and development (R&D) work, including the development and testing of key components. The purpose of this paper is to review the status of the design, as it has been developed so far, emphasizing the design and integration of those components contained within the vacuum vessel of the ITER device. The components included in the in-vessel systems are divertor and first wall; blanket and shield; plasma heating, fueling, and vacuum pumping equipment; and remote handling equipment.

  8. Reduced-Gravity Experiments Conducted to Help Bioreactor Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niederhaus, Charles E.; Nahra, Henry K.; Kizito, John P.

    2004-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center and the NASA Johnson Space Center are collaborating on fluid dynamic investigations for a future cell science bioreactor to fly on the International Space Station (ISS). Project Manager Steven Gonda from the Cellular Biotechnology Program at Johnson is leading the development of the Hydrodynamic Focusing Bioreactor--Space (HFB-S) for use on the ISS to study tissue growth in microgravity. Glenn is providing microgravity fluid physics expertise to help with the design and evaluation of the HFB-S. These bioreactors are used for three-dimensional tissue culture, which cannot be done in ground-based labs in normal gravity. The bioreactors provide a continual supply of oxygen for cell growth, as well as periodic replacement of cell culture media with nutrients. The bioreactor must provide a uniform distribution of oxygen and nutrients while minimizing the shear stresses on the tissue culture.

  9. Wall reflection modeling for charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (CXRS) measurements on Textor and ITER

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Banerjee, S.; Vasu, P.; von Hellermann, M.; Jaspers, R. J. E.

    2010-01-01

    Contamination of optical signals by reflections from the tokamak vessel wall is a matter of great concern. For machines such as ITER and future reactors, where the vessel wall will be predominantly metallic, this is potentially a risk factor for quantitative optical emission spectroscopy. This is, i

  10. Wall reflection modeling for charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (CXRS) measurements on Textor and ITER

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Banerjee, S.; Vasu, P.; von Hellermann, M.; Jaspers, R. J. E.

    2010-01-01

    Contamination of optical signals by reflections from the tokamak vessel wall is a matter of great concern. For machines such as ITER and future reactors, where the vessel wall will be predominantly metallic, this is potentially a risk factor for quantitative optical emission spectroscopy. This is, i

  11. Wall Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGinley, Connie Q.

    2004-01-01

    The author of this article, an art teacher at Monarch High School in Louisville, Colorado, describes how her experience teaching in a new school presented an exciting visual challenge for an art teacher--monotonous brick walls just waiting for decoration. This school experienced only minimal instances of graffiti, but as an art teacher, she did…

  12. Modeling and measurement of the motion of the DIII-D vacuum vessel during vertical instabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reis, E.; Blevins, R.D.; Jensen, T.H.; Luxon, J.L.; Petersen, P.I.; Strait, E.J.

    1991-11-01

    The motions of the D3-D vacuum vessel during vertical instabilities of elongated plasmas have been measured and studied over the past five years. The currents flowing in the vessel wall and the plasma scrapeoff layer were also measured and correlated to a physics model. These results provide a time history load distribution on the vessel which were input to a dynamic analysis for correlation to the measured motions. The structural model of the vessel using the loads developed from the measured vessel currents showed that the calculated displacement history correlated well with the measured values. The dynamic analysis provides a good estimate of the stresses and the maximum allowable deflection of the vessel. In addition, the vessel motions produce acoustic emissions at 21 Hertz that are sufficiently loud to be felt as well as heard by the D3-D operators. Time history measurements of the sounds were correlated to the vessel displacements. An analytical model of an oscillating sphere provided a reasonable correlation to the amplitude of the measured sounds. The correlation of the theoretical and measured vessel currents, the dynamic measurements and analysis, and the acoustic measurements and analysis show that: (1) The physics model can predict vessel forces for selected values of plasma resistivity. The model also predicts poloidal and toroidal wall currents which agree with measured values; (2) The force-time history from the above model, used in conjunction with an axisymmetric structural model of the vessel, predicts vessel motions which agree well with measured values; (3) The above results, input to a simple acoustic model predicts the magnitude of sounds emitted from the vessel during disruptions which agree with acoustic measurements; (4) Correlation of measured vessel motions with structural analysis shows that a maximum vertical motion of the vessel up to 0.24 in will not overstress the vessel or its supports. 11 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Pressurized Vessel Slurry Pumping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pound, C.R.

    2001-09-17

    This report summarizes testing of an alternate ''pressurized vessel slurry pumping'' apparatus. The principle is similar to rural domestic water systems and ''acid eggs'' used in chemical laboratories in that material is extruded by displacement with compressed air.

  14. Very Versatile Vessel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-01

    data. This source provides information on aluminum hydrofoil vessels without the added weight of foil structures. The composite armor around the...to Powerboats. New York: International Marine/Ragged Mountain P, 2002. 8. [Asset/ Hydrofoil Advanced Surface Ship Evaluation Tool Module User Manual

  15. GOLD PRESSURE VESSEL SEAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, A.E.

    1963-11-26

    An improved seal between the piston and die member of a piston-cylinder type pressure vessel is presented. A layer of gold, of sufficient thickness to provide an interference fit between the piston and die member, is plated on the contacting surface of at least one of the members. (AEC)

  16. Graywater Discharges from Vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-01

    addition, based on personal contact with the shipping company, storing graywater in ballast tanks while in port can limit vessel stability considering...enters the treatment system and mixes with the aerated liquid already in the aeration chamber. EPDM Air diffuser injects air near the bottom of the

  17. Modified Blalock clamp: a single-hand autostatic device for pulmonary vessel occlusion during lung cancer resection

    OpenAIRE

    Petrella, Francesco; Solli, Piergiorgio; Borri, Alessandro; Spaggiari, Lorenzo

    2011-01-01

    Vascular clamping during lung cancer resection may be difficult in patients with short vessels or large neoplasms preventing adequate and safe exposure. In addition, the physiological vicinity of some vessels to rigid structures like the bronchi may interfere with ideal clamp positioning even in ordinary procedures. We have modified the original Blalock clamp to facilitate the control of pulmonary vessels and physiologically compress the vessel walls, thereby allowing optimal vascular resecti...

  18. Distribution and quantitative study of inflammatory cells infiltration in vessel wall of chronic venous insufficiency in lower limbs%下肢慢性静脉功能不全血管壁炎性细胞浸润分布和定量研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈智年; 李凤臣; 王国华; 李泽宇; 张桂凌; 任洁

    2012-01-01

    目的 探讨淋巴细胞、单核-巨噬细胞和肥大细胞在血管壁中的浸润与下肢慢性静脉功能不全( chronic venous insufficiency of low limbs,CVI)之间的关系.方法 收集不同临床分期下肢慢性静脉功能不全的主干(中段)标本,C2 ~ C3级20例,C4~C6级17例,对照组(正常静脉)7例.采用免疫组织化学染色LCA,CD68和甲苯胺蓝特殊染色分别检测淋巴细胞、单核-巨噬细胞和肥大细胞表达.结果 C2 ~ C3级、C4~C6级标本中单核-巨噬细胞表达与正常对照组差异有统计学意义(F=3.56,P<0.05);C2 ~ C3级、C4 ~ C6级标本中肥大细胞表达与正常对照组差异有统计学意义(F =5.13,P<0.05).结论 单核-巨噬细胞和肥大细胞在血管壁的浸润可能是慢性静脉功能不全的一个重要病因.%Objective To investigate the relationship between infiltration of lymphocytes,monocyte-macrophage and mast cells in vessel wall and chronic venous insufficiency of low limbs.Methods The bole specimens (midpiece) of chronic venous insufficiency in low limbs in different clinical stages were collected,20 cases of C2- C3,17 cases of C4- C6 and 7 cases of normal venous tissue.Immunohistochemical staining and toluidine bluestaining were used to detect the expression of lymphocyte,monocyte-macrophage and mast cells.Results There were significant differences in the expression levels of monocyte-macrophage cells between C2- C3,C4- C6 specimens and normal control group ( F =3.56,P < 0.05 ) ; there were significant differences in the expression levels of mast cells between C2- C3,C4- C6 specimen and normal control group ( F =5.13,P < 0.05 ).Conclusions Infiltration of monocyte-macrophages and mast cells in vessel wall could be an important cause of chronic venous insufficiency.

  19. Calibrating a large slab vessel: A battle of the bulge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, I.R. [Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Co., Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Safeguards and Security Section

    1993-12-31

    The accurate measurement of volume in slab vessels can be difficult because slab vessels expand--in spite of internal or external supports--as they are filled. One form of bulging is elastic deflection, a gradual expansion of the vessel wall resulting from an increased weight of contained solution. As part of an upgrade to the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant, slab tanks were proposed as accountability measurement vessels. A 1960 liter slab tank prototype was set up for preliminary calibrations. Two series of calibrations were conducted: the first using water, and the second using aluminum nitrate. It was conjectured that the increased weight of aluminum nitrate would cause the vessel walls to deflect more than they did for an equal level of water, resulting in a greater volume. As expected, a significant expansion was observed with the aluminum nitrate, but some of the deflection proved to be permanent rather than elastic. The consequence is that considerably more effort will be required to calibrate slab vessels for uranium accountability. Not only must a calibration curve (or family of curves) be developed giving volume as a function of both liquid level and density, but, if possible, a determination must be made as to when the deflection is no longer temporary.

  20. Bioreactor Engineering of Stem Cell Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tandon, Nina; Marolt, Darja; Cimetta, Elisa; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2013-01-01

    Stem cells hold promise to revolutionize modern medicine by development of new therapies, disease models and drug screening systems. Standard cell culture systems have limited biological relevance because they do not recapitulate the complex 3-dimensional interactions and biophysical cues that characterize the in vivo environment. In this review, we discuss the current advances in engineering stem cell environments using novel biomaterials and bioreactor technologies. We also reflect on the challenges the field is currently facing with regard to translation of stem cell based therapies into the clinic. PMID:23531529

  1. Stirred bioreactors for the expansion of adult pancreatic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra, Margarida; Brito, Catarina; Leite, Sofia B; Gorjup, Erwin; von Briesen, Hagen; Carrondo, Manuel J T; Alves, Paula M

    2009-01-01

    Adult pluripotent stem cells are a cellular resource representing unprecedented potential for cell therapy and tissue engineering. Complementary to this promise, there is a need for efficient bioprocesses for their large scale expansion and/or differentiation. With this goal in mind, our work focused on the development of three-dimensional (3-D) culture systems for controlled expansion of adult pancreatic stem cells (PSCs). For this purpose, two different culturing strategies were evaluated, using spinner vessels: cell aggregated cultures versus microcarrier technology. The use of microcarrier supports (Cytodex 1 and Cytodex 3) rendered expanded cell populations which retained their self-renewal ability, cell marker, and the potential to differentiate into adipocytes. This strategy surmounted the drawbacks of aggregates in culture which were demonstrably unfeasible as cells clumped together did not proliferate and lost PSC marker expression. Furthermore, the results obtained showed that although both microcarriers tested here were suitable for sustaining cell expansion, Cytodex 3 provided a better substrate for the promotion of cell adherence and growth. For the latter approach, the potential of bioreactor technology was combined with the efficient Cytodex 3 strategy under controlled environmental conditions (pH-7.2, pO2-30% and temperature-37 degrees C); cell growth was more efficient, as shown by faster doubling time, higher growth rate and higher fold increase in cell concentration, when compared to spinner cultures. This study describes a robust bioprocess for the controlled expansion of adult PSC, representing an efficient starting point for the development of novel technologies for cell therapy.

  2. Coupling of mixing and microbial kinetics for evaluating the performance of bioreactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bajpai, R.K.; Reuss, M.

    1982-06-01

    The effect of the dynamics of the mixing process in mechanically stirred bioreactors upon their performance has been investigated by using a circulation-model for flow of fluid and a two-environment- model to account for the extent of micromixing in the vessel. With the help of an empirical kinetic model to depict the oxidative and the fermentative growth of bakers' yeast, experimentally observed effects of initial sugar concentrations upon critical dilution rates in continuous cultures of this system could be explained. Effect of different scales of operation upon productivities of fed-batch cultures of bakers' yeast could also be satisfactory predicted. A discrete simulation procedure was found to be a convenient tool in coupling the two-environment circulation-model of mixing with kinetics of microbial reactions. (Refs. 31).

  3. CLIMBING WALL

    CERN Multimedia

    1999-01-01

    The FIRE AND RESCUE Group of TIS Commission informs that the climbing wall in the yard of the Fire-fighters Station, is intended for the sole use of the members of that service, and recalls that access to this installation is forbidden for safety reasons to all persons not belonging to the Service.CERN accepts no liability for damage or injury suffered as a result of failure to comply with this interdiction.TIS/DI

  4. Dynamic global sensitivity analysis in bioreactor networks for bioethanol production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochoa, M P; Estrada, V; Di Maggio, J; Hoch, P M

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic global sensitivity analysis (GSA) was performed for three different dynamic bioreactor models of increasing complexity: a fermenter for bioethanol production, a bioreactors network, where two types of bioreactors were considered: aerobic for biomass production and anaerobic for bioethanol production and a co-fermenter bioreactor, to identify the parameters that most contribute to uncertainty in model outputs. Sobol's method was used to calculate time profiles for sensitivity indices. Numerical results have shown the time-variant influence of uncertain parameters on model variables. Most influential model parameters have been determined. For the model of the bioethanol fermenter, μmax (maximum growth rate) and Ks (half-saturation constant) are the parameters with largest contribution to model variables uncertainty; in the bioreactors network, the most influential parameter is μmax,1 (maximum growth rate in bioreactor 1); whereas λ (glucose-to-total sugars concentration ratio in the feed) is the most influential parameter over all model variables in the co-fermentation bioreactor.

  5. Disposable Bioreactors for Plant Micropropagation and Mass Plant Cell Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducos, Jean-Paul; Terrier, Bénédicte; Courtois, Didier

    Different types of bioreactors are used at Nestlé R&D Centre - Tours for mass propagation of selected plant varieties by somatic embryogenesis and for large scale culture of plants cells to produce metabolites or recombinant proteins. Recent studies have been directed to cut down the production costs of these two processes by developing disposable cell culture systems. Vegetative propagation of elite plant varieties is achieved through somatic embryogenesis in liquid medium. A pilot scale process has recently been set up for the industrial propagation of Coffea canephora (Robusta coffee). The current production capacity is 3.0 million embryos per year. The pre-germination of the embryos was previously conducted by temporary immersion in liquid medium in 10-L glass bioreactors. An improved process has been developed using a 10-L disposable bioreactor consisting of a bag containing a rigid plastic box ('Box-in-Bag' bioreactor), insuring, amongst other advantages, a higher light transmittance to the biomass due to its horizontal design. For large scale cell culture, two novel flexible plastic-based disposable bioreactors have been developed from 10 to 100 L working volumes, validated with several plant species ('Wave and Undertow' and 'Slug Bubble' bioreactors). The advantages and the limits of these new types of bioreactor are discussed, based mainly on our own experience on coffee somatic embryogenesis and mass cell culture of soya and tobacco.

  6. Disposable polymeric cryogel bioreactor matrix for therapeutic protein production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Era; Kumar, Ashok

    2013-05-01

    Low cost and high efficiency make disposable bioreactors feasible for small-scale therapeutic development and initial clinical trials. We have developed a cryogel-based disposable bioreactor matrix, which has been used for production of protein therapeutics such as urokinase and monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). The protocol discusses the application of a cryogel bioreactor for mAb production. Cryogels composed of either polyacrylamide (PAAm) coupled to gelatin or semi-interpenetrating PAAm-chitosan are synthesized by free-radical polymerization at -12 °C. Hybridoma cells are immobilized over the cryogel bioreactor and incubated for 48 h. Medium is circulated thereafter at 0.2 ml min(-1) and bioreactors can be run continuously for 60 d. The cryogel-based packed-bed bioreactor can be formulated as a monolith or as beads; it also has an efficiency four times what can be obtained using a tissue-culture flask, a high surface-to-volume ratio and effective nutrient transport. After incubation, the bioreactor setup will take about 60 min using a pre-prepared sterilized cryogel.

  7. Landfill leachate treatment in assisted landfill bioreactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Pin-jing; QU Xian; SHAO Li-ming; LEE Duu-jong

    2006-01-01

    Landfill is the major disposal route of municipal solid waste(MSW) in most Asian countries. Leachate from landfill presents a strong wastewater that needs intensive treatment before discharge. Direct recycling was proposed as an effective alternative for leachate treatment by taking the landfill as a bioreactor. This process was proved not only considerably reducing the pollution potential of leachate, but also enhancing organic degradation in the landfill. However, as this paper shows, although direct leachate recycling was effective in landfilled MSW with low food waste fraction (3.5%, w/w), it failed in MSW containing 54% food waste, as normally noted in Asian countries. The initial acid stuck would inhibit methanogenesis to build up, hence strong leachate was yielded from landfill to threaten the quality of receiving water body. We demonstrated the feasibility to use an assisted bioreactor landfill, with a well-decomposed refuse layer as ex-situ anaerobic digester to reducing COD loading in leachate. By doing so, the refuse in simulated landfill column (2.3 m high) could be stabilized in 30 weeks while the COD in leachate reduced by 95%(61000 mg/L to 3000 mg/L). Meanwhile, the biogas production was considerably enhanced, signaling by the much greater amount and much higher methane content in the biogas.

  8. Novel Hydrogen Bioreactor and Detection Apparatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollin, Joseph A; Ye, Xinhao; Del Campo, Julia Martin; Adams, Michael W W; Zhang, Y-H Percival

    2016-01-01

    In vitro hydrogen generation represents a clear opportunity for novel bioreactor and system design. Hydrogen, already a globally important commodity chemical, has the potential to become the dominant transportation fuel of the future. Technologies such as in vitro synthetic pathway biotransformation (SyPaB)-the use of more than 10 purified enzymes to catalyze unnatural catabolic pathways-enable the storage of hydrogen in the form of carbohydrates. Biohydrogen production from local carbohydrate resources offers a solution to the most pressing challenges to vehicular and bioenergy uses: small-size distributed production, minimization of CO2 emissions, and potential low cost, driven by high yield and volumetric productivity. In this study, we introduce a novel bioreactor that provides the oxygen-free gas phase necessary for enzymatic hydrogen generation while regulating temperature and reactor volume. A variety of techniques are currently used for laboratory detection of biohydrogen, but the most information is provided by a continuous low-cost hydrogen sensor. Most such systems currently use electrolysis for calibration; here an alternative method, flow calibration, is introduced. This system is further demonstrated here with the conversion of glucose to hydrogen at a high rate, and the production of hydrogen from glucose 6-phosphate at a greatly increased reaction rate, 157 mmol/L/h at 60 °C.

  9. MEMBRANE BIOREACTOR FOR TREATMENT OF RECALCITRANT WASTEWATERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suprihatin Suprihatin

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The low biodegradable wastewaters remain a challenge in wastewater treatment technology. The performance of membrane bioreactor systems with submerged hollow fiber micro- and ultrafiltration membrane modules were examined for purifying recalcitrant wastewaters of leachate of a municipal solid waste open dumping site and effluent of pulp and paper mill. The use of MF and UF membrane bioreactor systems showed an efficient treatment for both types wastewaters with COD reduction of 80-90%. The membrane process achieved the desirable effects of maintaining reasonably high biomass concentration and long sludge retention time, while producing a colloid or particle free effluent. For pulp and paper mill effluent a specific sludge production of 0.11 kg MLSS/kg COD removed was achieved. A permeate flux of about 5 L/m²h could be achieved with the submerged microfiltration membrane. Experiments using ultrafiltration membrane produced relatively low permeate fluxes of 2 L/m²h. By applying periodical backwash, the flux could be improved significantly. It was indicated that the particle or colloid deposition on membrane surface was suppressed by backwash, but reformation of deposit was not effectively be prevented by shear-rate effect of aeration. Particle and colloid started to accumulate soon after backwash. Construction of membrane module and operation mode played a critical role in achieving the effectiveness of aeration in minimizing deposit formation on the membrane surface.

  10. LTCC based bioreactors for cell cultivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartsch, H.; Welker, T.; Welker, K.; Witte, H.; Müller, J.

    2016-01-01

    LTCC multilayers offer a wide range of structural options and flexibility of connections not available in standard thin film technology. Therefore they are considered as material base for cell culture reactors. The integration of microfluidic handling systems and features for optical and electrical capturing of indicators for cell culture growth offers the platform for an open system concept. The present paper assesses different approaches for the creation of microfluidic channels in LTCC multilayers. Basic functions required for the fluid management in bioreactors include temperature and flow control. Both features can be realized with integrated heaters and temperature sensors in LTCC multilayers. Technological conditions for the integration of such elements into bioreactors are analysed. The temperature regulation for the system makes use of NTC thermistor sensors which serve as real value input for the control of the heater. It allows the adjustment of the fluid temperature with an accuracy of 0.2 K. The tempered fluid flows through the cell culture chamber. Inside of this chamber a thick film electrode array monitors the impedance as an indicator for the growth process of 3-dimensional cell cultures. At the system output a flow sensor is arranged to monitor the continual flow. For this purpose a calorimetric sensor is implemented, and its crucial design parameters are discussed. Thus, the work presented gives an overview on the current status of LTCC based fluid management for cell culture reactors, which provides a promising base for the automation of cell culture processes.

  11. Automatic Segmentation of Vessels in In-Vivo Ultrasound Scans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tamimi-Sarnikowski, Philip; Brink-Kjær, Andreas; Moshavegh, Ramin

    2017-01-01

    Ultrasound has become highly popular to monitor atherosclerosis, by scanning the carotid artery. The screening involves measuring the thickness of the vessel wall and diameter of the lumen. An automatic segmentation of the vessel lumen, can enable the determination of lumen diameter. This paper...... presents a fully automatic segmentation algorithm, for robustly segmenting the vessel lumen in longitudinal B-mode ultrasound images. The automatic segmentation is performed using a combination of B-mode and power Doppler images. The proposed algorithm includes a series of preprocessing steps, and performs...... a vessel segmentation by use of the marker-controlled watershed transform. The ultrasound images used in the study were acquired using the bk3000 ultrasound scanner (BK Ultrasound, Herlev, Denmark) with two transducers ”8L2 Linear” and ”10L2w Wide Linear” (BK Ultrasound, Herlev, Denmark). The algorithm...

  12. DESIGN OF THE ITER IN-VESSEL COILS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neumeyer, C; Bryant, L; Chrzanowski, J; Feder, R; Gomez, M; Heitzenroeder, P; Kalish, M; Lipski, A; Mardenfeld, M; Simmons, R; Titus, P; Zatz, I; Daly, E; Martin, A; Nakahira, M; Pillsbury, R; Feng, J; Bohm, T; Sawan, M; Stone, H; Griffiths, I

    2010-11-27

    The ITER project is considering the inclusion of two sets of in-vessel coils, one to mitigate the effect of Edge Localized Modes (ELMs) and another to provide vertical stabilization (VS). The in-vessel location (behind the blanket shield modules, mounted to the vacuum vessel inner wall) presents special challenges in terms of nuclear radiation (~3000 MGy) and temperature (100oC vessel during operations, 200oC during bakeout). Mineral insulated conductors are well suited to this environment but are not commercially available in the large cross section required. An R&D program is underway to demonstrate the production of mineral insulated (MgO or Spinel) hollow copper conductor with stainless steel jacketing needed for these coils. A preliminary design based on this conductor technology has been developed and is presented herein.

  13. For-Hire Vessel Directory

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Vessel Directory is maintained as the sample frame for the For-Hire Survey. I contains data on for-hire vessels on the Atlantic and Gulf coasts. Data include...

  14. American Samoa Abandoned Vessel Inventory

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA Abandoned Vessel Project Data for American Samoa. Abandoned vessels pose a significant threat to the NOAA Trust resources through physical destruction of coral...

  15. CNMI Abandoned Vessel Inventory, Tinian

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA Abandoned Vessel Project Data for Tinian. Abandoned vessels pose a significant threat to the NOAA Trust resources through physical destruction of coral habitats...

  16. Hawaii Abandoned Vessel Inventory, Oahu

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA Abandoned Vessel Project Data for Oahu, Hawaii. Abandoned vessels pose a significant threat to the NOAA Trust resources through physical destruction of coral...

  17. Puerto Rico Abandoned Vessel Inventory

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA Abandoned Vessel Project Data for Puerto Rico. Abandoned vessels pose a significant threat to the NOAA Trust resources through physical destruction of coral...

  18. Hawaii Abandoned Vessel Inventory, Maui

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA Abandoned Vessel Project Data for Maui. Abandoned vessels pose a significant threat to the NOAA Trust resources through physical destruction of coral habitats...

  19. CNMI Abandoned Vessel Inventory, Rota

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA Abandoned Vessel Project Data for Rota. Abandoned vessels pose a significant threat to the NOAA Trust resources through physical destruction of coral habitats...

  20. CNMI Abandoned Vessel Inventory, Saipan

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA Abandoned Vessel Project Data for Saipan. Abandoned vessels pose a significant threat to the NOAA Trust resources through physical destruction of coral habitats...

  1. Hawaii Abandoned Vessel Inventory, Kauai

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA Abandoned Vessel Project Data for Kauai. Abandoned vessels pose a significant threat to the NOAA Trust resources through physical destruction of coral habitats...

  2. Hawaii Abandoned Vessel Inventory, Molokai

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA Abandoned Vessel Project Data for Molokai, Hawaii. Abandoned vessels pose a significant threat to the NOAA Trust resources through physical destruction of coral...

  3. Vessels in Transit - Web Tool

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — A web tool that provides real-time information on vessels transiting the Saint Lawrence Seaway. Visitors may sort by order of turn, vessel name, or last location in...

  4. Hawaii Abandoned Vessel Inventory, Lanai

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA Abandoned Vessel Project Data for Lanai. Abandoned vessels pose a significant threat to the NOAA Trust resources through physical destruction of coral habitats...

  5. Negative Effects of Sludge Bulking in Membrane Bio-Reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Ying; HUANG Zhi; REN Nanqi; MENG Qingjuan

    2006-01-01

    Sludge bulking property of membrane bio-reactor was investigated in this study through contrast research. When the sludge bulking appeared, the removal efficiency of COD in membrane bio-reactor increased slightly through the function of filamentous bacteria. However, the negative effects of the higher net water-head differential pressures, the high block rate of membrane pore and the great quantity of filamentous bacteria at the external surface presented at the same time. Thus, plenty of methods should be performed to control sludge bulking once it happened in membrane bio-reactor.

  6. Fundamentals of membrane bioreactors materials, systems and membrane fouling

    CERN Document Server

    Ladewig, Bradley

    2017-01-01

    This book provides a critical, carefully researched, up-to-date summary of membranes for membrane bioreactors. It presents a comprehensive and self-contained outline of the fundamentals of membrane bioreactors, especially their relevance as an advanced water treatment technology. This outline helps to bring the technology to the readers’ attention, and positions the critical topic of membrane fouling as one of the key impediments to its more widescale adoption. The target readership includes researchers and industrial practitioners with an interest in membrane bioreactors.

  7. Optimal Branching Structure of Fluidic Networks with Permeable Walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinicius R. Pepe

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Biological and engineering studies of Hess-Murray’s law are focused on assemblies of tubes with impermeable walls. Blood vessels and airways have permeable walls to allow the exchange of fluid and other dissolved substances with tissues. Should Hess-Murray’s law hold for bifurcating systems in which the walls of the vessels are permeable to fluid? This paper investigates the fluid flow in a porous-walled T-shaped assembly of vessels. Fluid flow in this branching flow structure is studied numerically to predict the configuration that provides greater access to the flow. Our findings indicate, among other results, that an asymmetric flow (i.e., breaking the symmetry of the flow distribution may occur in this symmetrical dichotomous system. To derive expressions for the optimum branching sizes, the hydraulic resistance of the branched system is computed. Here we show the T-shaped assembly of vessels is only conforming to Hess-Murray’s law optimum as long as they have impervious walls. Findings also indicate that the optimum relationship between the sizes of parent and daughter tubes depends on the wall permeability of the assembled tubes. Our results agree with analytical results obtained from a variety of sources and provide new insights into the dynamics within the assembly of vessels.

  8. Confinement Vessel Assay System: Design and Implementation Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frame, Katherine C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bourne, Mark M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Crooks, William J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Evans, Louise [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mayo, Douglas R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gomez, Cipriano D. [Retired CMR-OPS: OPERATIONS; Miko, David K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Salazar, William R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stange, Sy [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Vigil, Georgiana M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-18

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has a number of spherical confinement vessels remaining from tests involving nuclear materials. These vessels have an inner diameter of 6 feet with 1- to 2-inch thick steel walls. The goal of the Confinement Vessel Disposition (CVD) project is to remove debris and reduce contamination inside the vessels. We have developed a neutron assay system for the purposes of Materials Control and Accountability (MC&A) measurements of the vessel prior to and after cleanout. We present our approach to confronting the challenges in designing, building, and testing such a system. The system was designed to meet a set of functional and operational requirements. A Monte Carlo model was developed to aid in optimizing the detector design as well as to predict the systematic uncertainty associated with confinement vessel measurements. Initial testing was performed to optimize and determine various measurement parameters, and then the system was characterized using {sup 252}Cf placed a various locations throughout the measurement system. Measurements were also performed with a {sup 252}Cf source placed inside of small steel and HDPE shells to study the effect of moderation. These measurements compare favorably with their MCNPX model equivalent, making us confident that we can rely on the Monte Carlo simulation to predict the systematic uncertainty due to variations in response to material that may be localized at different points within a vessel.

  9. The evaluation of pressure effects on the ex-vessel cooling for KNGR with MELCOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jong Hwa; Park, Soo Yong; Kim, Dong Ha

    2001-03-01

    In this report, the effect of external vessel cooling on debris coolability and vessel integrity for the KNGR were examined from the two typical pressure range of high(170 bar) and low(5 bar)case using the lower plenum model in MELCOR1.8.4. As the conditions of these calculations, 80 ton of debris was relocated simultaneously into the lower vessel head and the debris relocation temperature from the core region was 2700 K. The decay heat has been assumed to be that of one hour after reactor shutdown. The creep failure of the vessel wall was simulated with 1-D model, which can consider the rapid temperature gradient over the wall thickness during the ex-vessel cooling. From the calculation results, both the coolant temperature and the total amount of coolant mass injected into the cavity are known to be the important factors in determining the time period to keep the external vessel cool. Therefore, a long-term strategy to keep the coolant temperature subcooled throughout the transient is suggested to sustain or prolong the effect of external vessel cooling. Also, it is expected that to keep the primary side at low pressure and to perform the ex-vessel flooding be the essential conditions to sustain the vessel integrity. From MELCOR, the penetration failure always occurs after relocation regardless of the RCS pressure or availability of the external vessel cooling. Therefore, It is expected that the improvement of the model for the penetration tube failure will be necessary.

  10. Fractal structures in stenoses and aneurysms in blood vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schelin, Adriane B; Károlyi, György; de Moura, Alessandro P S; Booth, Nuala A; Grebogi, Celso

    2010-12-28

    Recent advances in the field of chaotic advection provide the impetus to revisit the dynamics of particles transported by blood flow in the presence of vessel wall irregularities. The irregularity, being either a narrowing or expansion of the vessel, mimicking stenoses or aneurysms, generates abnormal flow patterns that lead to a peculiar filamentary distribution of advected particles, which, in the blood, would include platelets. Using a simple model, we show how the filamentary distribution depends on the size of the vessel wall irregularity, and how it varies under resting or exercise conditions. The particles transported by blood flow that spend a long time around a disturbance either stick to the vessel wall or reside on fractal filaments. We show that the faster flow associated with exercise creates widespread filaments where particles can get trapped for a longer time, thus allowing for the possible activation of such particles. We argue, based on previous results in the field of active processes in flows, that the non-trivial long-time distribution of transported particles has the potential to have major effects on biochemical processes occurring in blood flow, including the activation and deposition of platelets. One aspect of the generality of our approach is that it also applies to other relevant biological processes, an example being the coexistence of plankton species investigated previously.

  11. Energy Consumption in Terms of Shear Stress for Two Types of Membrane Bioreactors Used for Municipal Wastewater Treatment Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ratkovich, Nicolas Rios; Bentzen, Thomas Ruby; Bérube, P.R.

    2011-01-01

    Two types of submerged membrane bioreactors (MBR): Hollow Fiber (HF) and Hollow Sheet (HS), have been studied and compared in terms of energy consumption and average shear stress over the membrane wall. The analysis of energy consumption was made using the correlation to determine the blower power...... that the CFD results for the HS MBR were accurate. A linear empirical correlation between the average shear stress and the blower power per unit of permeate was made. This relationship includes: the air flow rate, the geometrical dimensions of the MBR, the permeate flux and the membrane area and can be used...

  12. Design and implementation of visual inspection system handed in tokamak flexible in-vessel robot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hesheng; Xu, Lifei [Department of Automation, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Key Laboratory of System Control and Information Processing, Ministry of Education of China (China); Chen, Weidong, E-mail: wdchen@sjtu.edu.cn [Department of Automation, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Key Laboratory of System Control and Information Processing, Ministry of Education of China (China)

    2016-05-15

    In-vessel viewing system (IVVS) is a fundamental tool among the remote handling systems for ITER, which is used to providing information on the status of the in-vessel components. The basic functional requirement of in-vessel visual inspection system is to perform a fast intervention with adequate optical resolution. In this paper, we present the software and hardware solution, which is designed and implemented for tokamak in-vessel viewing system that installed on end-effector of flexible in-vessel robot working under vacuum and high temperature. The characteristic of our in-vessel viewing system consists of two parts: binocular heterogeneous vision inspection tool and first wall scene emersion based augment virtuality. The former protected with water-cooled shield is designed to satisfy the basic functional requirement of visual inspection system, which has the capacity of large field of view and high-resolution for detection precision. The latter, achieved by overlaying first wall tiles images onto virtual first wall scene model in 3D virtual reality simulation system, is designed for convenient, intuitive and realistic-looking visual inspection instead of viewing the status of first wall only by real-time monitoring or off-line images sequences. We present the modular division of system, each of them in smaller detail, and go through some of the design choices according to requirements of in-vessel visual inspection task.

  13. Modelling across bioreactor scales: methods, challenges and limitations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gernaey, Krist

    Scale-up and scale-down of bioreactors are very important in industrial biotechnology, especially with the currently available knowledge on the occurrence of gradients in industrial-scale bioreactors. Moreover, it becomes increasingly appealing to model such industrial scale systems, considering...... that it is challenging and expensive to acquire experimental data of good quality that can be used for characterizing gradients occurring inside a large industrial scale bioreactor. But which model building methods are available? And how can one ensure that the parameters in such a model are properly estimated? And what...... are the limitations of different types of mod - els? This paper will provide examples of models that have been published in the literature for use across bioreactor scales, including computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and population balance models. Furthermore, the importance of good modeling practice...

  14. Hairy root culture: bioreactor design and process intensification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiles, Amanda R; Liu, Chun-Zhao

    2013-01-01

    The cultivation of hairy roots for the production of secondary metabolites offers numerous advantages; hairy roots have a fast growth rate, are genetically stable, and are relatively simple to maintain in phytohormone free media. Hairy roots provide a continuous source of secondary metabolites, and are useful for the production of chemicals for pharmaceuticals, cosmetics, and food additives. In order for hairy roots to be utilized on a commercial scale, it is necessary to scale-up their production. Over the last several decades, significant research has been conducted on the cultivation of hairy roots in various types of bioreactor systems. In this review, we discuss the advantages and disadvantages of various bioreactor systems, the major factors related to large-scale bioreactor cultures, process intensification technologies and overview the mathematical models and computer-aided methods that have been utilized for bioreactor design and development.

  15. Efficiency evaluation of three fluidised aerobic bioreactor based ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dil

    2013-04-24

    Apr 24, 2013 ... bioreactor based sewage treatment plants in Kashmir ... systems: a physical and a biological purification steps. In ... in Germany, Netherlands, Europe and Canada successfully. This ..... treatment of meat industry wastewater.

  16. The Potential for Microalgae as Bioreactors to Produce Pharmaceuticals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Na; Fan, Chengming; Chen, Yuhong; Hu, Zanmin

    2016-06-17

    As photosynthetic organisms, microalgae can efficiently convert solar energy into biomass. Microalgae are currently used as an important source of valuable natural biologically active molecules, such as carotenoids, chlorophyll, long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, phycobiliproteins, carotenoids and enzymes. Significant advances have been achieved in microalgae biotechnology over the last decade, and the use of microalgae as bioreactors for expressing recombinant proteins is receiving increased interest. Compared with the bioreactor systems that are currently in use, microalgae may be an attractive alternative for the production of pharmaceuticals, recombinant proteins and other valuable products. Products synthesized via the genetic engineering of microalgae include vaccines, antibodies, enzymes, blood-clotting factors, immune regulators, growth factors, hormones, and other valuable products, such as the anticancer agent Taxol. In this paper, we briefly compare the currently used bioreactor systems, summarize the progress in genetic engineering of microalgae, and discuss the potential for microalgae as bioreactors to produce pharmaceuticals.

  17. Microbial Bioreactor Development in the ALS NSCORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Cary; Whitaker, Dawn; Banks, M. Katherine; Heber, Albert J.; Turco, Ronald F.; Nies, Loring F.; Alleman, James E.; Sharvelle, Sybil E.; Li, Congna; Heller, Megan

    The NASA Specialized Center of Research and Training in Advanced Life Support (the ALS NSCORT), a partnership of Alabama A & M, Howard, and Purdue Universities, was established by NASA in 2002 to develop technologies that will reduce the Equivalent System Mass (ESM) of regenerative processes within future space life-support systems. A key focus area of NSCORT research has been the development of efficient microbial bioreactors for treatment of human, crop, and food-process wastes while enabling resource recovery. The approach emphasizes optimizing the energy-saving advantages of hydrolytic enzymes for biomass degradation, with focus on treatment of solid wastes including crop residue, paper, food, and human metabolic wastes, treatment of greywater, cabin air, off-gases from other treatment systems, and habitat condensate. This summary includes important findings from those projects, status of technology development, and recommendations for next steps. The Plant-based Anaerobic-Aerobic Bioreactor-Linked Operation (PAABLO) system was developed to reduce crop residue while generating energy and/or food. Plant residues initially were added directly to the bioreactor, and recalcitrant residue was used as a substrate for growing plants or mushrooms. Subsequently, crop residue was first pretreated with fungi to hydrolyze polymers recalcitrant to bacteria, and leachate from the fungal beds was directed to the anaerobic digester. Exoenzymes from the fungi pre-soften fibrous plant materials, improving recovery of materials that are more easily biodegraded to methane that can be used for energy reclamation. An Autothermal Thermophilic Aerobic Digestion (ATAD) system was developed for biodegradable solid wastes. Objectives were to increase water and nutrient recovery, reduce waste volume, and inactivate pathogens. Operational parameters of the reactor were optimized for degradation and resource recovery while minimizing system requirements and footprint. The start-up behavior

  18. Start-up Strategy for Continuous Bioreactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.C. da Costa

    1997-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract - The start-up of continuous bioreactors is solved as an optimal control problem. The choice of the dilution rate as the control variable reduces the dimension of the system by making the use of the global balance equation unnecessary for the solution of the optimization problem. Therefore, for systems described by four or less mass balance equations, it is always possible to obtain an analytical expression for the singular arc as a function of only the state variables. The steady state conditions are shown to satisfy the singular arc expression and, based on this knowledge, a feeding strategy is proposed which leads the reactor from an initial state to the steady state of maximum productivity

  19. Vortex breakdown in a truncated conical bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balci, Adnan; Brøns, Morten; Herrada, Miguel A.; Shtern, Vladimir N.

    2015-12-01

    This numerical study explains the eddy formation and disappearance in a slow steady axisymmetric air-water flow in a vertical truncated conical container, driven by the rotating top disk. Numerous topological metamorphoses occur as the water height, Hw, and the bottom-sidewall angle, α, vary. It is found that the sidewall convergence (divergence) from the top to the bottom stimulates (suppresses) the development of vortex breakdown (VB) in both water and air. At α = 60°, the flow topology changes eighteen times as Hw varies. The changes are due to (a) competing effects of AMF (the air meridional flow) and swirl, which drive meridional motions of opposite directions in water, and (b) feedback of water flow on AMF. For small Hw, the AMF effect dominates. As Hw increases, the swirl effect dominates and causes VB. The water flow feedback produces and modifies air eddies. The results are of fundamental interest and can be relevant for aerial bioreactors.

  20. Platelet bioreactor-on-a-chip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazutis, Linas; Wu, Stephen; Sylman, Joanna L.; Ehrlicher, Allen; Machlus, Kellie R.; Feng, Qiang; Lu, Shijiang; Lanza, Robert; Neeves, Keith B.; Weitz, David A.; Italiano, Joseph E.

    2014-01-01

    Platelet transfusions total >2.17 million apheresis-equivalent units per year in the United States and are derived entirely from human donors, despite clinically significant immunogenicity, associated risk of sepsis, and inventory shortages due to high demand and 5-day shelf life. To take advantage of known physiological drivers of thrombopoiesis, we have developed a microfluidic human platelet bioreactor that recapitulates bone marrow stiffness, extracellular matrix composition, micro-channel size, hemodynamic vascular shear stress, and endothelial cell contacts, and it supports high-resolution live-cell microscopy and quantification of platelet production. Physiological shear stresses triggered proplatelet initiation, reproduced ex vivo bone marrow proplatelet production, and generated functional platelets. Modeling human bone marrow composition and hemodynamics in vitro obviates risks associated with platelet procurement and storage to help meet growing transfusion needs. PMID:25606631

  1. Influence of cerebral blood vessel movements on the position of perivascular synapses

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeFelipe, Javier

    2017-01-01

    Synaptic activity is regulated and limited by blood flow, which is controlled by blood vessel dilation and contraction. Traditionally, the study of neurovascular coupling has mainly focused on energy consumption and oxygen delivery. However, the mechanical changes that blood vessel movements induce in the surrounding tissue have not been considered. We have modeled the mechanical changes that movements of blood vessels cause in neighboring synapses. Our simulations indicate that synaptic densities increase or decrease during vascular dilation and contraction, respectively, near the blood vessel walls. This phenomenon may alter the concentration of neurotransmitters and vasoactive substances in the immediate vicinity of the vessel wall and thus may have an influence on local blood flow. PMID:28199396

  2. Conformable pressure vessel for high pressure gas storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simmons, Kevin L.; Johnson, Kenneth I.; Lavender, Curt A.; Newhouse, Norman L.; Yeggy, Brian C.

    2016-01-12

    A non-cylindrical pressure vessel storage tank is disclosed. The storage tank includes an internal structure. The internal structure is coupled to at least one wall of the storage tank. The internal structure shapes and internally supports the storage tank. The pressure vessel storage tank has a conformability of about 0.8 to about 1.0. The internal structure can be, but is not limited to, a Schwarz-P structure, an egg-crate shaped structure, or carbon fiber ligament structure.

  3. Fabrication of toroidal composite pressure vessels. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dodge, W.G.; Escalona, A.

    1996-11-24

    A method for fabricating composite pressure vessels having toroidal geometry was evaluated. Eight units were fabricated using fibrous graphite material wrapped over a thin-walled aluminum liner. The material was wrapped using a machine designed for wrapping, the graphite material was impregnated with an epoxy resin that was subsequently thermally cured. The units were fabricated using various winding patterns. They were hydrostatically tested to determine their performance. The method of fabrication was demonstrated. However, the improvement in performance to weight ratio over that obtainable by an all metal vessel probably does not justify the extra cost of fabrication.

  4. Performance of a partially packed charcoal pellet bioreactor for acetic acid fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horiuchi, J; Ando, K; Watanabe, S; Tada, K; Kobayashi, M; Kanno, T

    2001-01-01

    The performance of a partially packed charcoal pellet bioreactor was compared to that of a fully packed bioreactor for aerobic acetic acid production. In the fully packed charcoal pellet bioreactor, it was considered that the shortening of an actual retention time of the culture broth limited the bioreactor performance under high dilution rate and high aeration conditions. By reducing the filling ratio of charcoal pellets to 44%, which increased the actual retention time of the culture broth, the maximum productivity increased from 3.9 g/l/h in the fully packed bed bioreactor to 5.7 g/l/h in the partially packed bioreactor without affecting the operational stability.

  5. Vessel enhancing diffusion: a scale space representation of vessel structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manniesing, Rashindra; Viergever, Max A; Niessen, Wiro J

    2006-12-01

    A method is proposed to enhance vascular structures within the framework of scale space theory. We combine a smooth vessel filter which is based on a geometrical analysis of the Hessian's eigensystem, with a non-linear anisotropic diffusion scheme. The amount and orientation of diffusion depend on the local vessel likeliness. Vessel enhancing diffusion (VED) is applied to patient and phantom data and compared to linear, regularized Perona-Malik, edge and coherence enhancing diffusion. The method performs better than most of the existing techniques in visualizing vessels with varying radii and in enhancing vessel appearance. A diameter study on phantom data shows that VED least affects the accuracy of diameter measurements. It is shown that using VED as a preprocessing step improves level set based segmentation of the cerebral vasculature, in particular segmentation of the smaller vessels of the vasculature.

  6. ANALYSIS OF OSCILLATORY BLOOD FLOW IN VARYING-AREA ELASTIC VESSEL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gong Ke-qin; Sun Hui; Liu Zhao-rong

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, by solving the fundamental equations of periodically oscillatory blood flow, the distributions of pressure gradient and blood velocity in varying-area elastic vessel were obtained, and then the wall shear stress and its gradient were calculated. As an example, the pulsatile blood flow in human carotid was analyzed and the effects of vessel taper angle on the distribution of wall shear stress and its gradient were discussed in detail. Numercial results show that the wall shear stress will enlarge when the taper angle increases. Meantime, no matter whether the vessel is converging or diverging, with the increase of the absolute value of taper angle, the amplitude of wall shear stress gradient will enlarge significantly.

  7. Vessel enhancing diffusion: a scale space representation of vessel

    OpenAIRE

    Manniesing, Rashindra; Viergever, M.A.; Niessen, Wiro

    2006-01-01

    textabstractA method is proposed to enhance vascular structures within the framework of scale space theory. We combine a smooth vessel filter which is based on a geometrical analysis of the Hessian's eigensystem, with a non-linear anisotropic diffusion scheme. The amount and orientation of diffusion depend on the local vessel likeliness. Vessel enhancing diffusion (VED) is applied to patient and phantom data and compared to linear, regularized Perona-Malik, edge and coherence enhancing diffus...

  8. Wall shear stress measurement method based on parallel flow model near vascular wall in echography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Motochika; Tanaka, Tomohiko; Okada, Takashi; Seki, Yoshinori; Nishiyama, Tomohide

    2017-07-01

    A high-risk vessel of arteriosclerosis is detected by assessing wall shear stress (WSS), which is calculated from the distribution of velocity in a blood flow. A novel echographic method for measuring WSS, which aims to distinguish a normal vessel from a high-risk vessel, is proposed. To achieve this aim, the measurement error should be less than 28.8%. The proposed method is based on a flow model for the area near a vascular wall under a parallel-flow assumption to avoid the influences of error factors. This was verified by an in vitro experiment in which the WSS of a carotid artery phantom was measured. According to the experimental results, the WSS measured by the proposed method correlated with the ground truth measured by particle image velocimetry; in particular, the correlation coefficient and measurement error between them were respectively 0.70 and 27.4%. The proposed method achieved the target measurement performance.

  9. An Optimized Structure Design of the HT-7U Vacuum Vessel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The vacuum vessel of the HT-7U superconducting tokamak will be a fully-welded structure with a double-wall. The space between the double-wall will be filled with borated water for neutron shielding. Non-circular cross-section is designed for plasma elongating. Horizontal and vertical ports are designed for diagnosing, vacuum pumping, plasma heating and plasma current driving, etc. The vacuum vessel consists of 16 segments. It will be baked out at 250 ℃ to obtain a clean wall. When the machine is in operation, both the hot wall (the wall temperature is around 100 ℃) and the cold wall ( wall temperature is in normal equilibrium) are considered. The stress caused by thermal deformation and the electromagnetic (EM) loads caused by 1.5 MA plasma disruption in 3.5 T magnetic field have to be taken into account in the design of the HT-7U vacuum vessel. Finite element method was employed for structure analysis of the vacuum vessel.

  10. Protective effect of urokinase on vascular walls of the affected vessels in rats with deep vein thrombosis%尿激酶对急性深静脉血栓大鼠受累血管管壁的保护作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王护国; 哈尔满·阿吉汗; 赛力克·马高维亚; 罗军

    2012-01-01

    目的:观察不同剂量尿激酶对急性深静脉血栓形成大鼠不同时期治疗后受累血管管壁的影响.方法:将96只SD大鼠制备急性深静脉血栓模型后,随机按血栓形成后的时间(1,3,7,14d)分期,均分为:Ⅰ,Ⅱ,Ⅲ,Ⅳ期;每期再均分为:模型组,尿激酶小剂量组[2万U/(kg·d)],尿激酶中剂量组[4万U/(kg·d)],尿激酶大剂量组[(8万U/(kg·d)].尿激酶每日以尾静脉注射,连续7d.实验结束后获取受累段血管,分别通过HE染色和苦味酸-天狼猩红染色观察各组血管内皮细胞数量和胶原含量的变化.结果:在Ⅰ,Ⅱ,Ⅲ期,尿激酶3个剂量组内皮细胞数量均明显高于模型组(均P<0.05),但尿激酶3个剂量组间差异无统计学意义(P>0.05);胶原阳性染色面积百分比均明显低于模型组(均P<0.05),且随着尿激酶剂量的增加而减少.在Ⅳ期,尿激酶3个剂量组内皮细胞数量与模型组比较均无统计学的差异(均P>0.05);但尿激酶3个剂量组胶原阳性染色面积百分比仍明显低于模型组(均P<0.05).结论:在血栓形成14d内,尿激酶对受累血管的内皮细胞有保护作用,对胶原增生均有抑制作用.在血栓形成14d后,尿激酶对内皮细胞无保护作用,但对胶原增生仍有抑制作用.%Objective: To observe the effects of different doses of urokinase, given at different times after thrombus formation, on the vascular wall of the affected vessels in rats with deep vein thrombosis (DVT). Methods: Ninety-six SD rats were equally randomized into stage Ⅰ, stage Ⅱ, stage Ⅲ and stage IV groups according to the time elapsed since thrombus formation (l, 3, 7, and 14 d) after the establishment of DVT model. The rats of each stage group were equally randomized again into model group, low-dose urokinase [20 000 U/(kg·d)] group, mid-dose [40 000 U/(kg·d)] urokinase group and high-dose [80 000 U/(kg.d)] urokinase group. Urokinase was administered by tail vein injection for 7 days

  11. Upgrade of the DIII-D vacuum vessel protection system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hollerbach, M.A.; Lee, R.L.; Smith, J.P.; Taylor, P.L.

    1993-10-01

    An upgrade of the General Atomics DIII-D tokamak armor protection system has been completed. The upgrade consisted of armoring the outer wall and the divertor gas baffle with monolithic graphite tiles and cleaning the existing floor, ceiling, and inner wall tiles to remove any deposited impurity layer from the tile surfaces. The new tiles replace the graphite tiles used as local armor for neutral beam shine through, three graphite poloidal back-up limiter bands, and miscellaneous Inconel protection tiles. The total number of tiles increased from 1636 to 3200 and corresponding vessel coverage from 40% to 90%. A new, graphite armored, toroidally continuous, gas baffle between the outer wall and the biased divertor ring was installed in order to accommodate the cryocondensation pump that was installed in parallel with the outer wall tiles. To eliminate a source of copper in the plasma, GRAFOIL gaskets replaced the copper felt metal gaskets previously used as a compliant heat transfer interface between the inertially cooled tiles and the vessel wall. GRAFOIL, an exfoliated, flexible graphite material from Union Carbide, Inc., was used between each tile and the vessel wall and also between each tile and its hold-down hardware. Testing was performed to determine the mechanical compliance, thermal conductance, and vacuum characteristics of the GRAFOIL material. To further decrease the quantity of high Z materials exposed to the plasma, the 1636 existing graphite tiles were identified, removed, and grit blasted to eliminate a thin layer of deposited metals which included nickel, chromium, and molybdenum. Prior to any processing, a selected set of tiles was tested for radioactivity, including tritium contamination. The tiles were grit blasted in a negative-pressure blasting cabinet using 37 {mu}m boron carbide powder as the blast media and dry nitrogen as the propellant.

  12. The vessel fluence; Fluence cuve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    This book presents the proceedings of the technical meeting on the reactors vessels fluence. They are grouped in eight sessions: the industrial context and the stakes of the vessels control; the organization and the methodology for the fluence computation; the concerned physical properties; the reference computation methods; the fluence monitoring in an industrial context; vessels monitoring under irradiation; others methods in the world; the research and development programs. (A.L.B.)

  13. EFFICIENT USE OF TEMPORARY IMMERSION BIOREACTOR (TIB ON PINEAPPLE (Ananas comosus L. MULTIPLICATION AND ROOTING ABILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biruk Ayenew

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Pineapple (Ananas comosus L. is one of the most potential fruit crop growing in Ethiopia due to suitable agro-ecology and economic importance. However, it is difficult to meet the demand for planting materials using the conventional propagation techniques due to production inefficiency and disease transmission. The experiment is laid in Completely Randomized Design with three treatments of vessels used along its media type, Temporary Immersion Bioreactor, TIB (RITA®, Vitropic, France , Glass jam jar and plastic jars , replicated six times on MS medium. A highly significant difference (p<0.001 was observed between culturing vessels with the same media supplement. From this study, it was found that pineapple explants cultured on TIB having full strength MS media supplemented with 2 mgl-1BA and 30gl–1 sucrose was found to be better which gave an average multiplication of 13.17 shoots per explant within six weeks of culture. Similarly plantlets cultured on TIB with half strength MS media supplemented with 3mgl-1 IBA and 40 g l-1 sucrose developed on average 16.33 roots having 6.27 cm length with well developed hairy root in four weeks of culture period that performed better in acclimatization facility and open field too.

  14. Combined Visualization of Vessel Deformation and Hemodynamics in Cerebral Aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meuschke, Monique; Voss, Samuel; Beuing, Oliver; Preim, Bernhard; Lawonn, Kai

    2017-01-01

    We present the first visualization tool that combines patient-specific hemodynamics with information about the vessel wall deformation and wall thickness in cerebral aneurysms. Such aneurysms bear the risk of rupture, whereas their treatment also carries considerable risks for the patient. For the patient-specific rupture risk evaluation and treatment analysis, both morphological and hemodynamic data have to be investigated. Medical researchers emphasize the importance of analyzing correlations between wall properties such as the wall deformation and thickness, and hemodynamic attributes like the Wall Shear Stress and near-wall flow. Our method uses a linked 2.5D and 3D depiction of the aneurysm together with blood flow information that enables the simultaneous exploration of wall characteristics and hemodynamic attributes during the cardiac cycle. We thus offer medical researchers an effective visual exploration tool for aneurysm treatment risk assessment. The 2.5D view serves as an overview that comprises a projection of the vessel surface to a 2D map, providing an occlusion-free surface visualization combined with a glyph-based depiction of the local wall thickness. The 3D view represents the focus upon which the data exploration takes place. To support the time-dependent parameter exploration and expert collaboration, a camera path is calculated automatically, where the user can place landmarks for further exploration of the properties. We developed a GPU-based implementation of our visualizations with a flexible interactive data exploration mechanism. We designed our techniques in collaboration with domain experts, and provide details about the evaluation.

  15. Americium behaviour in plastic vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Legarda, F.; Herranz, M. [Departamento de Ingenieria Nuclear y Mecanica de Fluidos, Escuela Tecnica Superior de Ingenieria de Bilbao, Universidad del Pais Vasco (UPV/EHU), Alameda de Urquijo s/n, 48013 Bilbao (Spain); Idoeta, R., E-mail: raquel.idoeta@ehu.e [Departamento de Ingenieria Nuclear y Mecanica de Fluidos, Escuela Tecnica Superior de Ingenieria de Bilbao, Universidad del Pais Vasco (UPV/EHU), Alameda de Urquijo s/n, 48013 Bilbao (Spain); Abelairas, A. [Departamento de Ingenieria Nuclear y Mecanica de Fluidos, Escuela Tecnica Superior de Ingenieria de Bilbao, Universidad del Pais Vasco (UPV/EHU), Alameda de Urquijo s/n, 48013 Bilbao (Spain)

    2010-07-15

    The adsorption of {sup 241}Am dissolved in water in different plastic storage vessels was determined. Three different plastics were investigated with natural and distilled waters and the retention of {sup 241}Am by these plastics was studied. The same was done by varying vessel agitation time, vessel agitation speed, surface/volume ratio of water in the vessels and water pH. Adsorptions were measured to be between 0% and 70%. The adsorption of {sup 241}Am is minimized with no water agitation, with PET or PVC plastics, and by water acidification.

  16. Coal gasification vessel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loo, Billy W.

    1982-01-01

    A vessel system (10) comprises an outer shell (14) of carbon fibers held in a binder, a coolant circulation mechanism (16) and control mechanism (42) and an inner shell (46) comprised of a refractory material and is of light weight and capable of withstanding the extreme temperature and pressure environment of, for example, a coal gasification process. The control mechanism (42) can be computer controlled and can be used to monitor and modulate the coolant which is provided through the circulation mechanism (16) for cooling and protecting the carbon fiber and outer shell (14). The control mechanism (42) is also used to locate any isolated hot spots which may occur through the local disintegration of the inner refractory shell (46).

  17. Falling walls

    CERN Multimedia

    It was 20 years ago this week that the Berlin wall was opened for the first time since its construction began in 1961. Although the signs of a thaw had been in the air for some time, few predicted the speed of the change that would ensue. As members of the scientific community, we can take a moment to reflect on the role our field played in bringing East and West together. CERN’s collaboration with the East, primarily through links with the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, JINR, in Dubna, Russia, is well documented. Less well known, however, is the role CERN played in bringing the scientists of East and West Germany together. As the Iron curtain was going up, particle physicists on both sides were already creating the conditions that would allow it to be torn down. Cold war historian Thomas Stange tells the story in his 2002 CERN Courier article. It was my privilege to be in Berlin on Monday, the anniversary of the wall’s opening, to take part in a conference entitled &lsquo...

  18. Anaerobic membrane bio-reactors for severe industrial effluents and urban spill waters: The AMBROSIUS project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Lier, J.B.; Ozgun, H.; Ersahin, M.E.; Dereli, R.K.

    2013-01-01

    With growing application experiences from aerobic membrane bioreactors, combination of membrane and anaerobic processes become more and more attractive and feasible. In anaerobic membrane bioreactors (AnMBRs), biomass and particulate organic matter are physically retained inside the reactor, providi

  19. Modular bioreactor for the remediation of liquid streams and methods for using the same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noah, Karl S.; Sayer, Raymond L.; Thompson, David N.

    1998-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a bioreactor system for the remediation of contaminated liquid streams. The bioreactor system is composed of at least one and often a series of sub-units referred to as bioreactor modules. The modular nature of the system allows bioreactor systems be subdivided into smaller units and transported to waste sites where they are combined to form bioreactor systems of any size. The bioreactor modules further comprises reactor fill materials in the bioreactor module that remove the contaminants from the contaminated stream. To ensure that the stream thoroughly contacts the reactor fill materials, each bioreactor module comprises means for directing the flow of the stream in a vertical direction and means for directing the flow of the stream in a horizontal direction. In a preferred embodiment, the reactor fill comprises a sulfate reducing bacteria which is particularly useful for precipitating metals from acid mine streams.

  20. Application of dynamic membranes in anaerobic membranes in anaerobic membrane bioreactor systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erşahin, M.E.

    2015-01-01

    Anaerobic membrane bioreactors (AnMBRs) physically ensure biomass retention by the application of a membrane filtration process. With growing application experiences from aerobic membrane bioreactors (MBRs), the combination of membrane and anaerobic processes has received much attention and become

  1. OBSERVATIONS ON VASCULAR PATTERN OF CHORIONIC BLOOD VESSELS OF PLACENTA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousuf Sarwar

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Placenta is a choriodecidual structure develops during pregnancy implanted on the uterine wall and car ries vital functions. It is connected to the foetus through umbilical cord. The branches of umbilical vessels that traverse along foetal surface of placenta are referred as chorionic vessels. There are two different patterns of chorionic vessels – Dispersa l and Magistral. In the dispersal type, the umbilical vessels undergo successive divisions with gradually diminishing caliber towards periphery while in magistral pattern the vessels traverse to the edge of placenta without appreciable decrease in diameter of vessels. The present study has been done for visualization of the pattern of chorionic vessels in placenta obtained from labour room of a tertiary care hospital in eastern Bihar, India. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of one hundred and fifty (150 fres h and intact placenta of full term pregnancies collected from Obstetrics & Gynaecology department were included in the study. After washing with distilled water, removal of blood clots were done with slight digital pressure applied over arteries and vein a nd later on by irrigation with saline. The cut end of the umbilical cord was carefully visualized to identify the umbilical arteries and vein. Dye was injected into umbilical vessels under normal physiological pressure and diameter of chorionic blood vesse ls were taken at the center and periphery. Ultimately each vessel was followed and examined to observe the dispersal and magistral pattern of chorionic blood vessels of placenta. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: Out of the total of one hundred and fifty (150 full term placenta obtained and examined in the Anatomy department during the study period, 64% Dispersal type & 36 % of Magistral type of arterial pattern of branching of chorionic vessels were observed. Vein and its tributaries presented Dispersal pattern in 60% and Magistral pattern in 40%. There is a significant

  2. Modelling of Heat Loss in Closed Vessels during propellant Burning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U.P. KulKarni

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available Closed vessel technique is essentially used to determine the force constant, vivacity and the burning rate of gun propellants. In fact, it is the only method to find out these three parameters experimentally. It is a well-known fact that however small the propellant burning time may be, there will be heat loss to the walls of the vessel due to conduction, convection, radiation and also due to the expansion of the vessel. This fact necessitates applying correction to the observed maximum pressure in the experiment. An analysis is presented in this paper as to how this heat loss can be modelled along with discussion about other models reported in this field.

  3. Relaxation oscillation model of hemodynamic parameters in the cerebral vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherevko, A. A.; Mikhaylova, A. V.; Chupakhin, A. P.; Ufimtseva, I. V.; Krivoshapkin, A. L.; Orlov, K. Yu

    2016-06-01

    Simulation of a blood flow under normality as well as under pathology is extremely complex problem of great current interest both from the point of view of fundamental hydrodynamics, and for medical applications. This paper proposes a model of Van der Pol - Duffing nonlinear oscillator equation describing relaxation oscillations of a blood flow in the cerebral vessels. The model is based on the patient-specific clinical experimental data flow obtained during the neurosurgical operations in Meshalkin Novosibirsk Research Institute of Circulation Pathology. The stability of the model is demonstrated through the variations of initial data and coefficients. It is universal and describes pressure and velocity fluctuations in different cerebral vessels (arteries, veins, sinuses), as well as in a laboratory model of carotid bifurcation. Derived equation describes the rheology of the ”blood stream - elastic vessel wall gelatinous brain environment” composite system and represents the state equation of this complex environment.

  4. Numerical model study of radio frequency vessel sealing thermodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, John

    2015-03-01

    Several clinically successful clinical radio frequency vessel-sealing devices are currently available. The dominant thermodynamic principles at work involve tissue water vaporization processes. It is necessary to thermally denature vessel collagen, elastin and their adherent proteins to achieve a successful fusion. Collagens denature at middle temperatures, between about 60 and 90 C depending on heating time and rate. Elastin, and its adherent proteins, are more thermally robust, and require temperatures in excess of the boiling point of water at atmospheric pressure to thermally fuse. Rapid boiling at low apposition pressures leads to steam vacuole formation, brittle tissue remnants and frequently to substantial disruption in the vessel wall, particularly in high elastin-content arteries. High apposition pressures substantially increase the equilibrium boiling point of tissue water and are necessary to ensure a high probability of a successful seal. The FDM numerical models illustrate the beneficial effects of high apposition pressures.

  5. Bronze Vessel with Silkworm Motif

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1995-01-01

    This artifact was a kind of sacrificial vessel used during the Shang and Zhou dynasties. Most patterns found on these pieces are the fierce and formidable faces of beasts or mysterious dragons, tigers and phoenixes. Rut the pattern on this vessel illustrates the life of a mulberry field.

  6. Wall to Wall Optimal Transport

    CERN Document Server

    Hassanzadeh, Pedram; Doering, Charles R

    2013-01-01

    The calculus of variations is employed to find steady divergence-free velocity fields that maximize transport of a tracer between two parallel walls held at fixed concentration for one of two constraints on flow strength: a fixed value of the kinetic energy or a fixed value of the enstrophy. The optimizing flows consist of an array of (convection) cells of a particular aspect ratio Gamma. We solve the nonlinear Euler-Lagrange equations analytically for weak flows and numerically (and via matched asymptotic analysis in the fixed energy case) for strong flows. We report the results in terms of the Nusselt number Nu, a dimensionless measure of the tracer transport, as a function of the Peclet number Pe, a dimensionless measure of the energy or enstrophy of the flow. For both constraints the maximum transport Nu_{MAX}(Pe) is realized in cells of decreasing aspect ratio Gamma_{opt}(Pe) as Pe increases. For the fixed energy problem, Nu_{MAX} \\sim Pe and Gamma_{opt} \\sim Pe^{-1/2}, while for the fixed enstrophy scen...

  7. Start-up of anaerobic ammonia oxidation bioreactor with nitrifying activated sludge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Ping; LIN Feng-mei; HU Bao-lan; CHEN Jian-song

    2004-01-01

    The anaerobic ammonia oxidation(Anammox) bioreactor was successfully started up with the nitrifying activated sludge. After anaerobically operated for 105 d, the bioreactor reached a good performance with removal percentage of both ammonia and nitrite higher high efficiency and stability because it held a large amount of biomass in the bioreactor.

  8. Vacuum vessel system design for the compact ignition tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reddan, W. (Ebasco Services Inc., Princeton, NJ (USA))

    1990-05-01

    The compact ignition tokamak (CIT) is envisioned to be the test bed for the study of self- sustained, or ignited, fusion plasmas. The design basis for CIT is a 11-T toroidal field, 12-MA plasma current and peak fusion power of 500 MW. A major portion of this project is the vacuum vessel system, which includes the vacuum chamber, the divertor, first wall, and the robotics systems necessary to maintain the in-vessel components. The vacuum chamber is 2.1 m major radius torus with a D-shaped cross section. For hydrogenic species the base pressure is 10{sup {minus}7} Torr, with a total pumping speed of 5000 l/s. It is designed to withstand the forces resulting from plasma disruptions and be bakeable to approximately 350 {degree}C. A swept divertor and fixed limiters are provided. Both are carbon based structures designed to accommodate heat fluxes as large as 40 MW/m{sup 2} during the 5 s pulse. Articulated booms and manipulators will be deployed for in-vessel maintenance tasks, such as first wall removal/replacement and leak checking. This paper summarizes the engineering considerations and design status. In addition, the unique organization of the project's national design team, led by the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, and the integration into this organization of the industrial consortium responsible for the design and fabrication of the vacuum vessel system is described.

  9. Hydrodynamics of an Electrochemical Membrane Bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ya-Zhou; Wang, Yun-Kun; He, Chuan-Shu; Yang, Hou-Yun; Sheng, Guo-Ping; Shen, Jin-You; Mu, Yang; Yu, Han-Qing

    2015-05-01

    An electrochemical membrane bioreactor (EMBR) has recently been developed for energy recovery and wastewater treatment. The hydrodynamics of the EMBR would significantly affect the mass transfers and reaction kinetics, exerting a pronounced effect on reactor performance. However, only scarce information is available to date. In this study, the hydrodynamic characteristics of the EMBR were investigated through various approaches. Tracer tests were adopted to generate residence time distribution curves at various hydraulic residence times, and three hydraulic models were developed to simulate the results of tracer studies. In addition, the detailed flow patterns of the EMBR were acquired from a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation. Compared to the tank-in-series and axial dispersion ones, the Martin model could describe hydraulic performance of the EBMR better. CFD simulation results clearly indicated the existence of a preferential or circuitous flow in the EMBR. Moreover, the possible locations of dead zones in the EMBR were visualized through the CFD simulation. Based on these results, the relationship between the reactor performance and the hydrodynamics of EMBR was further elucidated relative to the current generation. The results of this study would benefit the design, operation and optimization of the EMBR for simultaneous energy recovery and wastewater treatment.

  10. Bioreactor for acid mine drainage control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaluski, Marek H.; Manchester, Kenneth R.

    2001-01-01

    A bioreactor for reacting an aqueous heavy metal and sulfate containing mine drainage solution with sulfate reducing bacteria to produce heavy metal sulfides and reduce the sulfuric acid content of the solution. The reactor is an elongated, horizontal trough defining an inlet section and a reaction section. An inlet manifold adjacent the inlet section distributes aqueous mine drainage solution into the inlet section for flow through the inlet section and reaction section. A sulfate reducing bacteria and bacteria nutrient composition in the inlet section provides sulfate reducing bacteria that with the sulfuric acid and heavy metals in the solution to form solid metal sulfides. The sulfate reducing bacteria and bacteria nutrient composition is retained in the cells of a honeycomb structure formed of cellular honeycomb panels mounted in the reactor inlet section. The honeycomb panels extend upwardly in the inlet section at an acute angle with respect to the horizontal. The cells defined in each panel are thereby offset with respect to the honeycomb cells in each adjacent panel in order to define a tortuous path for the flow of the aqueous solution.

  11. [Production of ligninolytic enzymes in bioreactor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Da-wen; Wen, Xiang-hua; Qian, Yi

    2006-02-01

    Production of ligninolytic enzymes under nitrogen limited conditions(C/N = 56/2.2) was studied in a 5-L stirred tank bioreactor with a working volume of 2 L for obtaining higher production of ligninolytic enzymes by white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium BKM-F-1767 and its control strategy. Results show that the manganese peroxidase (MnP) and laccase (Lac) reached peak at the sixth day and the seventh day, respectively, and the variation of them with time in a batch cultivation are similar to the results by agitated Erlenmeyer flasks; however higher enzyme activity was not achieved by applying a fed-batch strategy, in which nitrogen limited medium was fed to the reactor. In addition, variation of pH during cultivation was related to the growth of P. chrysosporium and enzymes production during both batch and fed-batch cultivation. The pH value of liquid medium began to decline when the enzyme activity occurred in the system, and the decline became more and more slow along with the decrease of enzyme activity at the end of fermentation. So, pH would be as a control parameter to find out the growth of P. chrysosporium and enzymes production during incubating P. chrysosporium. However, fed-batch strategy still need further study.

  12. Vortex breakdown in a truncated conical bioreactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balci, Adnan; Brøns, Morten [DTU Compute, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Herrada, Miguel A [E.S.I, Universidad de Sevilla, Camino de los Descubrimientos s/n, E-41092 (Spain); Shtern, Vladimir N, E-mail: mobr@dtu.dk [Shtern Research and Consulting, Houston, TX 77096 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    This numerical study explains the eddy formation and disappearance in a slow steady axisymmetric air–water flow in a vertical truncated conical container, driven by the rotating top disk. Numerous topological metamorphoses occur as the water height, H{sub w}, and the bottom-sidewall angle, α, vary. It is found that the sidewall convergence (divergence) from the top to the bottom stimulates (suppresses) the development of vortex breakdown (VB) in both water and air. At α = 60°, the flow topology changes eighteen times as H{sub w} varies. The changes are due to (a) competing effects of AMF (the air meridional flow) and swirl, which drive meridional motions of opposite directions in water, and (b) feedback of water flow on AMF. For small H{sub w}, the AMF effect dominates. As H{sub w} increases, the swirl effect dominates and causes VB. The water flow feedback produces and modifies air eddies. The results are of fundamental interest and can be relevant for aerial bioreactors. (paper)

  13. Proteins causing membrane fouling in membrane bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyoshi, Taro; Nagai, Yuhei; Aizawa, Tomoyasu; Kimura, Katsuki; Watanabe, Yoshimasa

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the details of proteins causing membrane fouling in membrane bioreactors (MBRs) treating real municipal wastewater were investigated. Two separate pilot-scale MBRs were continuously operated under significantly different operating conditions; one MBR was a submerged type whereas the other was a side-stream type. The submerged and side-stream MBRs were operated for 20 and 10 days, respectively. At the end of continuous operation, the foulants were extracted from the fouled membranes. The proteins contained in the extracted foulants were enriched by using the combination of crude concentration with an ultrafiltration membrane and trichloroacetic acid precipitation, and then separated by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2D-PAGE). The N-terminal amino acid sequencing analysis of the proteins which formed intensive spots on the 2D-PAGE gels allowed us to partially identify one protein (OmpA family protein originated from genus Brevundimonas or Riemerella anatipestifer) from the foulant obtained from the submerged MBR, and two proteins (OprD and OprF originated from genus Pseudomonas) from that obtained from the side-stream MBR. Despite the significant difference in operating conditions of the two MBRs, all proteins identified in this study belong to β-barrel protein. These findings strongly suggest the importance of β-barrel proteins in developing membrane fouling in MBRs.

  14. Mechanisms and Effectivity of Sulfate Reducing Bioreactors ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mining-influenced water (MIW) is the main environmental challenges associated with the mining industry. Passive MIW remediation can be achieved through microbial activity in sulfate-reducing bioreactors (SRBRs), but their actual removal rates depend on different factors, one of which is the substrate composition. Chitinous materials have demonstrated high metal removal rates, particularly for the two recalcitrant MIW contaminants Zn and Mn, but their removal mechanisms need further study. We studied Cd, Fe, Zn, and Mn removal in bioactive and abiotic SRBRs to elucidate the metal removal mechanisms and the differences in metal and sulfate removal rates using a chitinous material as substrate. We found that sulfate-reducing bacteria are effective in increasing metal and sulfate removal rates and duration of operation in SRBRs, and that the main mechanism involved was metal precipitation as sulfides. The solid residues provided evidence of the presence of sulfides in the bioactive column, more specifically ZnS, according to XPS analysis. The feasibility of passive treatments with a chitinous substrate could be an important option for MIW remediation. Mining influenced water (MIW) remediation is still one of the top priorities for the agency because it addresses the most important environmental problem associated with the mining industry and that affects thousands of communities in the U.S. and worldwide. In this paper, the MIW bioremediation mechanisms are studied

  15. AUTOMATIC RETINAL VESSEL TORTUOSITY MEASUREMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nidhal Khdhair El Abbadi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Retinal vascular vessels have the role to indicate the retinal diseases and for systematic diseases when there are any abnormalities in retinal vascular pattern. A characteristic of the vascular pattern that is appreciated by clinicians is vascular tortuosity, i.e., how curved or kinked a blood vessel, either vein or artery, appears along its course. In this study we suggest a novel mask filter to track the blood vessel along its course and measuring the blood vessels tortuosity over the entire human retinal vessel network in fundus eye image, by using the arc to chord ratio. The suggested algorithm tested with straight and curve hand drawing lines and gives high accurate results.

  16. Strain Growth in Containment Vessels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Q; LI Q M; ZHENG J Y

    2006-01-01

    Strain growth is a phenomenon observed in containment vessels subjected to internal blast loading.The elastic response of the vessel may become larger in a later stage compared to its response during the initial stage.The dynamic responses of infinitely long cylindrical containment vessels subjected to uniformly-distributed internal blast loading are studied using LS-DYNA.The development of bending modes and the interaction between the breathing mode and bending modes are observed.The methodology developed for dynamic elastic buckling analysis is employed to study the strain growth phenomenon in explosion containment vessels.It is shown that the dynamic instable vibration of a containment vessel is the basic mechanism of strain growth.

  17. Pilot scale harvesting, separation and drying of microalgae biomass from compact photo-bioreactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardoso, Alberto Tadeu Martins; Luz Junior, Luiz Fernando de Lima [Dept. de Engenharia Quimica. Universidade Federal do Parana, Curitiba, PR (Brazil)], e-mail: luzjr@ufpr.br; Mariano, Andre Bellin; Ghidini, Luiz Francisco Correa; Gnoatto, Victor Eduardo; Locatelli Junior, Vilson; Mello, Thiago Carvalho de; Vargas, Jose Viriato Coelho [Nucleo de Pesquisa e Desenvolvimento em Energia Autossustentavel (NPDEAS). Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica. Universidade Federal do Parana, Curitiba (Brazil)], E-mail: jvargas@demec.ufpr.br

    2010-07-01

    Bio diesel produced from microalgae lipids is gaining a substantial ground in the search for renewable energy sources. In order to optimize the operating conditions of a continuous process, several experiments were realized, both in laboratory and pilot scale. The microalgae cultivation can be conducted in a photo-bioreactor, a closed system which allows parameters control and necessarily involves the aquatic environment. Because of that, the use of separation unit operations is required. The process starts in a proposed compact photo-bioreactor, which consist of a chain of transparent tubes with 6 cm of diameter arranged in parallel where the cultivation media circulate with the help of a pump. This arrangement offers a closed culture with less risk of contamination and maintains a minimum contact with the environment. The microalgae grow inside the pipes under incidence of ambient light. In this paper, harvesting, separation and drying were studied, as part of the processes of a sustainable energy plant under construction at UFPR, as shown in Fig. 1. To control the production in a photo-bioreactor in continuous system, it is necessary to monitor the concentration of microalgae growth in suspension. To measure the cell concentration in this equipment, an optic sensor has been developed. The microalgae biomass separation from the culture media is achieved by microalgae flocculation. Several cultivation situations have been tested with different NaOH concentrations, increasing the pH to 10. The system was kept under agitation during the addition by an air pump into the tank. Thereafter the system was maintained static. After a short time, it was observed that the microalgae coagulated and settled. The clarified part water was removed, remaining a concentrated microalgae suspension. Our results suggest that pH increase is a suitable methodology for microalgae separation from the growth suspension. The microalgae sedimentation time was recorded, which allowed the

  18. Pilot scale harvesting, separation and drying of microalgae biomass from compact photo-bioreactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardoso, Alberto Tadeu Martins; Luz Junior, Luiz Fernando de Lima [Dept. de Engenharia Quimica. Universidade Federal do Parana, Curitiba, PR (Brazil)], e-mail: luzjr@ufpr.br; Mariano, Andre Bellin; Ghidini, Luiz Francisco Correa; Gnoatto, Victor Eduardo; Locatelli Junior, Vilson; Mello, Thiago Carvalho de; Vargas, Jose Viriato Coelho [Nucleo de Pesquisa e Desenvolvimento em Energia Autossustentavel (NPDEAS). Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica. Universidade Federal do Parana, Curitiba (Brazil)], E-mail: jvargas@demec.ufpr.br

    2010-07-01

    Bio diesel produced from microalgae lipids is gaining a substantial ground in the search for renewable energy sources. In order to optimize the operating conditions of a continuous process, several experiments were realized, both in laboratory and pilot scale. The microalgae cultivation can be conducted in a photo-bioreactor, a closed system which allows parameters control and necessarily involves the aquatic environment. Because of that, the use of separation unit operations is required. The process starts in a proposed compact photo-bioreactor, which consist of a chain of transparent tubes with 6 cm of diameter arranged in parallel where the cultivation media circulate with the help of a pump. This arrangement offers a closed culture with less risk of contamination and maintains a minimum contact with the environment. The microalgae grow inside the pipes under incidence of ambient light. In this paper, harvesting, separation and drying were studied, as part of the processes of a sustainable energy plant under construction at UFPR, as shown in Fig. 1. To control the production in a photo-bioreactor in continuous system, it is necessary to monitor the concentration of microalgae growth in suspension. To measure the cell concentration in this equipment, an optic sensor has been developed. The microalgae biomass separation from the culture media is achieved by microalgae flocculation. Several cultivation situations have been tested with different NaOH concentrations, increasing the pH to 10. The system was kept under agitation during the addition by an air pump into the tank. Thereafter the system was maintained static. After a short time, it was observed that the microalgae coagulated and settled. The clarified part water was removed, remaining a concentrated microalgae suspension. Our results suggest that pH increase is a suitable methodology for microalgae separation from the growth suspension. The microalgae sedimentation time was recorded, which allowed the

  19. Passive Acoustic Vessel Localization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwal, Pasang Sherpa

    This thesis investigates the development of a low-cost passive acoustic system for localizing moving vessels to monitor areas where human activities such as fishing, snorkeling and poaching are restricted. The system uses several off-the-shelf sensors with unsynchronized clocks where the Time Difference of Arrival (TDOA) or time delay is extracted by cross-correlation of the signal between paired sensors. The cross-correlation function uses phase correlation or Phase Transform (PHAT) which whitens the cross-spectrum in order to de-emphasize dominant frequency components. Using the locations of pairs of sensors as foci, hyperbolic equations can be defined using the time delay between them. With three or more sensors, multiple hyperbolic functions can be calculated which intersect at a unique point: the boat's location. It is also found that increasing separation distances between sensors decreased the correlation between the signals. However larger separation distances have better localization capability than with small distances. Experimental results from the Columbia and Willamette Rivers are presented to demonstrate performance.

  20. Hosting the plant cells in vitro: recent trends in bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiev, Milen I; Eibl, Regine; Zhong, Jian-Jiang

    2013-05-01

    Biotechnological production of high-value metabolites and therapeutic proteins by plant in vitro systems has been considered as an attractive alternative of classical technologies. Numerous proof-of-concept studies have illustrated the feasibility of scaling up plant in vitro system-based processes while keeping their biosynthetic potential. Moreover, several commercial processes have been established so far. Though the progress on the field is still limited, in the recent years several bioreactor configurations has been developed (e.g., so-called single-use bioreactors) and successfully adapted for growing plant cells in vitro. This review highlights recent progress and limitations in the bioreactors for plant cells and outlines future perspectives for wider industrialization of plant in vitro systems as "green cell factories" for sustainable production of value-added molecules.

  1. Bioreactor droplets from liposome-stabilized all-aqueous emulsions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewey, Daniel C.; Strulson, Christopher A.; Cacace, David N.; Bevilacqua, Philip C.; Keating, Christine D.

    2014-08-01

    Artificial bioreactors are desirable for in vitro biochemical studies and as protocells. A key challenge is maintaining a favourable internal environment while allowing substrate entry and product departure. We show that semipermeable, size-controlled bioreactors with aqueous, macromolecularly crowded interiors can be assembled by liposome stabilization of an all-aqueous emulsion. Dextran-rich aqueous droplets are dispersed in a continuous polyethylene glycol (PEG)-rich aqueous phase, with coalescence inhibited by adsorbed ~130-nm diameter liposomes. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching and dynamic light scattering data indicate that the liposomes, which are PEGylated and negatively charged, remain intact at the interface for extended time. Inter-droplet repulsion provides electrostatic stabilization of the emulsion, with droplet coalescence prevented even for submonolayer interfacial coatings. RNA and DNA can enter and exit aqueous droplets by diffusion, with final concentrations dictated by partitioning. The capacity to serve as microscale bioreactors is established by demonstrating a ribozyme cleavage reaction within the liposome-coated droplets.

  2. Miniature Bioreactor System for Long-Term Cell Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonda, Steve R.; Kleis, Stanley J.; Geffert, Sandara K.

    2010-01-01

    A prototype miniature bioreactor system is designed to serve as a laboratory benchtop cell-culturing system that minimizes the need for relatively expensive equipment and reagents and can be operated under computer control, thereby reducing the time and effort required of human investigators and reducing uncertainty in results. The system includes a bioreactor, a fluid-handling subsystem, a chamber wherein the bioreactor is maintained in a controlled atmosphere at a controlled temperature, and associated control subsystems. The system can be used to culture both anchorage-dependent and suspension cells, which can be either prokaryotic or eukaryotic. Cells can be cultured for extended periods of time in this system, and samples of cells can be extracted and analyzed at specified intervals. By integrating this system with one or more microanalytical instrument(s), one can construct a complete automated analytical system that can be tailored to perform one or more of a large variety of assays.

  3. Enhancing inhibited fermentations through a dynamic electro-membrane bioreactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prado Rubio, Oscar Andres; Garde, Arvid; Rype, Jens-Ulrik

    its strong potential for increasing productivity and product yield has been verified. REED uses ion exchange membranes and electrical potential gradients to selectively separate the target ion. The main limitation of using membrane separation combined with bioreactors is membrane fouling. REED...... technology ensures long operation time by reversing periodically the polarity of the imposed electrical field to significantly reduce the influence of membrane fouling. The periodic nature of the electrically driven membrane separation process makes the membrane bioreactor operation non trivial....... This challenging operation is associated with different dynamic behaviors of the individual units plus their interaction. The purpose of this contribution is to show the results of experimental and model based efforts done in order to investigate the operation of a membrane bioreactor. From modeling point of view...

  4. Bioreactor technology in marine microbiology: from design to future application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Arends, Jan B A; Van de Wiele, Tom; Boon, Nico

    2011-01-01

    Marine micro-organisms have been playing highly diverse roles over evolutionary time: they have defined the chemistry of the oceans and atmosphere. During the last decades, the bioreactors with novel designs have become an important tool to study marine microbiology and ecology in terms of: marine microorganism cultivation and deep-sea bioprocess characterization; unique bio-chemical product formation and intensification; marine waste treatment and clean energy generation. In this review we briefly summarize the current status of the bioreactor technology applied in marine microbiology and the critical parameters to take into account during the reactor design. Furthermore, when we look at the growing population, as well as, the pollution in the coastal areas of the world, it is urgent to find sustainable practices that beneficially stimulate both the economy and the natural environment. Here we outlook a few possibilities where innovative bioreactor technology can be applied to enhance energy generation and food production without harming the local marine ecosystem.

  5. Development of a Laminar Flow Bioreactor by Computational Fluid Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meir Israelowitz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to improve the design of a bioreactor for growing bone and other three-dimensional tissues using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD software to simulate flow through a porous scaffold, and to recommend design changes based on the results. Basic requirements for CFD modeling were that the flow in the reactor should be laminar and any flow stagnation should be avoided in order to support cellular growth within the scaffold. We simulated three different designs with different permeability values of the scaffold and tissue. Model simulation addressed flow patterns in combination with pressure distribution within the bioreactor. Pressure build-up and turbulent flow within the reactor was solved by introduction of an integrated bypass system for pressure release. The use of CFD afforded direct feedback to optimize the bioreactor design.

  6. Bioreactor design for continuous dark fermentative hydrogen production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Kyung-Won; Kim, Dong-Hoon; Kim, Sang-Hyoun; Shin, Hang-Sik

    2011-09-01

    Dark fermentative H2 production (DFHP) has received increasing attention in recent years due to its high H2 production rate (HPR) as well as the versatility of the substrates used in the process. For most studies in this field, batch reactors have been applied due to their simple operation and efficient control; however, continuous DFHP operation is necessary from economical and practical points of view. Continuous systems can be classified into two categories, suspended and immobilized bioreactors, according to the life forms of H2 producing bacteria (HPB) used in the reactor. This paper reviews operational parameters for bioreactor design including pH, temperature, hydraulic retention time (HRT), and H2 partial pressure. Also, in this review, various bioreactor configurations and performance parameters including H2 yield (HY), HPR, and specific H2 production rate (SHPR) are evaluated and presented.

  7. Development of NRU reflector wall inspection system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumsden, R.H.; Luloff, B.V.; Zahn, N.; Simpson, N., E-mail: lumsdenr@aecl.ca [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    2013-06-15

    In 2009 May, the National Research Universal (NRU) calandria leaked. During the next year, the calandria was inspected with six new Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) techniques to determine the extent of the corrosion, repaired, and finally the repair was inspected with four additional new NDE techniques before the reactor was returned to service. The calandria is surrounded by a light-water reflector vessel fabricated from the same material as the calandria vessel. Concerns that the same corrosion mechanism had damaged the reflector vessel led to the development of a system to inspect the full circumference of the reflector wall for corrosion damage. The inspection region could only be accessed through 64 mm diameter ports, was 10 m below the port, and had to be inspected from the corroded surface. The ultrasonic technique was designed to produce a closely spaced wall thickness (WT) grid over an area of approximately 5 m2 on the corroded surface using a very small probe holder. This paper describes the Reflector Wall Inspection (RWI) development project and the system that resulted. (author)

  8. Streamlined bioreactor-based production of human cartilage tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonnarelli, B; Santoro, R; Adelaide Asnaghi, M; Wendt, D

    2016-05-27

    Engineered tissue grafts have been manufactured using methods based predominantly on traditional labour-intensive manual benchtop techniques. These methods impart significant regulatory and economic challenges, hindering the successful translation of engineered tissue products to the clinic. Alternatively, bioreactor-based production systems have the potential to overcome such limitations. In this work, we present an innovative manufacturing approach to engineer cartilage tissue within a single bioreactor system, starting from freshly isolated human primary chondrocytes, through the generation of cartilaginous tissue grafts. The limited number of primary chondrocytes that can be isolated from a small clinically-sized cartilage biopsy could be seeded and extensively expanded directly within a 3D scaffold in our perfusion bioreactor (5.4 ± 0.9 doublings in 2 weeks), bypassing conventional 2D expansion in flasks. Chondrocytes expanded in 3D scaffolds better maintained a chondrogenic phenotype than chondrocytes expanded on plastic flasks (collagen type II mRNA, 18-fold; Sox-9, 11-fold). After this "3D expansion" phase, bioreactor culture conditions were changed to subsequently support chondrogenic differentiation for two weeks. Engineered tissues based on 3D-expanded chondrocytes were more cartilaginous than tissues generated from chondrocytes previously expanded in flasks. We then demonstrated that this streamlined bioreactor-based process could be adapted to effectively generate up-scaled cartilage grafts in a size with clinical relevance (50 mm diameter). Streamlined and robust tissue engineering processes, as the one described here, may be key for the future manufacturing of grafts for clinical applications, as they facilitate the establishment of compact and closed bioreactor-based production systems, with minimal automation requirements, lower operating costs, and increased compliance to regulatory guidelines.

  9. Scanning electron microscopy of the dorsal vessel of Panstrongylus megistus (Burmeister, 1835 (Hemiptera: Reduviidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadir Francisca Sant'Anna Nogueira

    1991-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study we analyzed the microanatomy of the dorsal vessel of the triatomine Panstrongylus megistus. The organ is a tuble anatomically divided into an anterior aorta anad a posterior heart, connected to the body wall through 8 pairs of alary muscles. The heart is divided in 3 chambers by means of 2 pairs of cardiac valves. a pair of ostia can be observed in the lateral wall of each chamber. A bundle of nerve fibers was found outside the organ, running dorsally along its major axis. A group of longitudinal muscular fibers was found in the ventral portion of the vessel. The vessel was found to be lined both internally and externally by pericardial cells covered by a thin laminar membrane. Inseide the vessel the pericardial cells were disposed in layers and on the outside they formed clusters or rows.

  10. Southeast Region Headboat Survey-Vessel list/Vessel Directory

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This is a database of vessels that have been on the SRHS through time, their owners/operators, marinas/docks and their contact information. This assists in...

  11. BY FRUSTUM CONFINING VESSEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javad Khazaei

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Helical piles are environmentally friendly and economical deep foundations that, due to environmental considerations, are excellent additions to a variety of deep foundation alternatives available to the practitioner. Helical piles performance depends on soil properties, the pile geometry and soil-pile interaction. Helical piles can be a proper alternative in sensitive environmental sites if their bearing capacity is sufficient to support applied loads. The failure capacity of helical piles in this study was measured via an experimental research program that was carried out by Frustum Confining Vessel (FCV. FCV is a frustum chamber by approximately linear increase in vertical and lateral stresses along depth from top to bottom. Due to special geometry and applied bottom pressure, this apparatus is a proper choice to test small model piles which can simulate field stress conditions. Small scale helical piles are made with either single helix or more helixes and installed in fine grained sand with three various densities. Axial loading tests including compression and tension tests were performed to achieve pile ultimate capacity. The results indicate the helical piles behavior depends essentially on pile geometric characteristics, i.e. helix configuration and soil properties. According to the achievements, axial uplift capacity of helical model piles is about equal to usual steel model piles that have the helixes diameter. Helical pile compression bearing capacity is too sufficient to act as a medium pile, thus it can be substituted other piles in special geoenvironmental conditions. The bearing capacity also depends on spacing ratio, S/D, and helixes diameter.

  12. Sensor equipment for quantification of spatial heterogeneity in large bioreactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørregaard, Anders; Formenti, Luca Riccardo; Stocks, Stuart M.

    of sensors and in order to apply more sensor equipment the bioreactor has to be modified which is both costly and results in production downtime. The presence of three phases (gas, liquid, and solid), and the opaque nature of the fermentation broth together with the necessity of heat sterilization further...... of the bioreactor. The method leaves a minimal footprint and can be applied to running production to gather large scale fermentation data, without the need of dedicated experimental cultivations. Ultimately, data describing the spatial heterogeneity can be used to enhance existing process models and to create...

  13. ANAEROBIC MEMBRANE BIOREACTORS FOR DOMESTIC WASTEWATER TREATMENT. PRELIMINARY STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa Vera

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The operation of submerged anaerobic membrane bioreactors (SAnMBRs for domestic wastewaters treatment was studied in laboratory scale, with the objective to define sustainable filtration conditions of the suspensions along the process. During continuous experiments, the organic matter degradation by anaerobic way showed an average DQOT removal of 85% and 93%. Indeed, the degradation generated biogas after 12 days of operation and its relative methane composition was of 60% after 25 days of operation. Additionally, the comparison between membrane bioreactors (MBRs performance in aerobic and anaerobic conditions in filterability terms, reported that both systems behave similarly once reached the stationary state.

  14. Over-pressurized bioreactors: application to microbial cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Marlene; Belo, Isabel; Mota, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    In industrial biotechnology, microbial cultures are exposed to different local pressures inside bioreactors. Depending on the microbial species and strains, the increased pressure may have detrimental or beneficial effects on cellular growth and product formation. In this review, the effects of increased air pressure on various microbial cultures growing in bioreactors under moderate total pressure conditions (maximum, 15 bar) will be discussed. Recent data illustrating the diversity of increased air pressure effects at different levels in microbial cells cultivation will be presented, with particular attention to the effects of oxygen and carbon dioxide partial pressures on cellular growth and product formation, and the concomitant effect of oxygen pressure on antioxidant cellular defense mechanisms.

  15. Computer control of a microgravity mammalian cell bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, William A.

    1987-01-01

    The initial steps taken in developing a completely menu driven and totally automated computer control system for a bioreactor are discussed. This bioreactor is an electro-mechanical cell growth system cell requiring vigorous control of slowly changing parameters, many of which are so dynamically interactive that computer control is a necessity. The process computer will have two main functions. First, it will provide continuous environmental control utilizing low signal level transducers as inputs and high powered control devices such as solenoids and motors as outputs. Secondly, it will provide continuous environmental monitoring, including mass data storage and periodic data dumps to a supervisory computer.

  16. Reactor vessel support system. [LMFBR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, M.P.; Holley, J.C.

    1980-05-09

    A reactor vessel support system includes a support ring at the reactor top supported through a box ring on a ledge of the reactor containment. The box ring includes an annular space in the center of its cross-section to reduce heat flow and is keyed to the support ledge to transmit seismic forces from the reactor vessel to the containment structure. A coolant channel is provided at the outside circumference of the support ring to supply coolant gas through the keyways to channels between the reactor vessel and support ledge into the containment space.

  17. 46 CFR 298.11 - Vessel requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... reconditioning of a Vessel as a condition for issuance of the Letter Commitment. The estimated cost of the Vessel may include escalation for the anticipated construction period of the Vessel. We may contact...

  18. 78 FR 38101 - Passenger Vessels Accessibility Guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-25

    ... vessels. The proposed guidelines would afford these individuals equal opportunity to travel on passenger vessels for employment, transportation, public accommodation, and leisure. The proposed guidelines would... individuals equal opportunity to travel on passenger vessels for employment, transportation,...

  19. PPOOLEX experiments on wall condensation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laine, J.; Puustinen, M. (Lappeenranta Univ. of Technology, Nuclear Safety Research Unit (Finland))

    2009-08-15

    This report summarizes the results of the wall condensation experiments carried out in December 2008 and January 2009 with the scaled down PPOOLEX test facility designed and constructed at Lappeenranta University of Technology. Steam was blown into the dry well compartment and from there through a DN200 blowdown pipe to the condensation pool. Altogether five experiments, each consisting of several blows, were carried out. The main purpose of the experiment series was to study wall condensation phenomenon inside the dry well compartment while steam is discharged through it into the condensation pool and to produce comparison data for CFD calculations at VTT. The PPOOLEX test facility is a closed stainless steel vessel divided into two compartments, dry well and wet well. For the wall condensation experiments the test facility was equipped with a system for collecting and measuring the amount of condensate from four different wall segments of the dry well compartment. A thermo graphic camera was used in a couple of experiments for filming the outside surface of the dry well wall. The effect of the initial temperature level of the dry well structures and of the steam flow rate for the accumulation of condensate was studied. The initial temperature level of the dry well structures varied from 23 to 99 deg. C. The steam flow rate varied from 90 to 690 g/s and the temperature of incoming steam from 115 to 160 deg. C. During the initial phase of steam discharge the accumulation of condensate was strongly controlled by the temperature level of the dry well structures; the lower the initial temperature level was the more condensate was accumulated. As the dry well structural temperatures increased the condensation process slowed down. Most of the condensate usually accumulated during the first 200 seconds of the discharge. However, the condensation process never completely stopped because a small temperature difference remained between the dry well atmosphere and inner wall

  20. Multi-purpose deployer for ITER in-vessel maintenance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Chang-Hwan, E-mail: Chang-Hwan.CHOI@iter.org [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon-sur-Verdon, 13115 St Paul lez Durance (France); Tesini, Alessandro; Subramanian, Rajendran [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon-sur-Verdon, 13115 St Paul lez Durance (France); Rolfe, Alan; Mills, Simon; Scott, Robin; Froud, Tim; Haist, Bernhard; McCarron, Eddie [Oxford Technologies Ltd., 7 Nuffield Way, Abingdon, OXON (United Kingdom)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • ITER RH system called as the multi-purpose deployer (MPD) is introduced. • The MPD performs dust and tritium inventory control, in-service inspection. • The MPD performs leak localization, in-vessel diagnostics maintenance. • The MPD has nine degrees of freedom with a payload capacity up to 2 tons. - Abstract: The multi-purpose deployer (MPD) is a general purpose in-vessel remote handling (RH) system in the ITER RH system. The MPD provides the means for deployment and handling of in-vessel tools or components inside the vacuum vessel (VV) for dust and tritium inventory control, in-service inspection, leak localization, and in-vessel diagnostics. It also supports the operation of blanket first wall maintenance and neutral beam duct liner module maintenance operations. This paper describes the concept design of the MPD. The MPD is a cask based system, i.e. it stays in the hot cell building during the machine operation, and is deployed to the VV using the cask system for the in-vessel operations. The main part of the MPD is the articulated transporter which provides transportation and positioning of the in-vessel tools or components. The articulated transporter has nine degrees of freedom with a payload capacity up to 2 tons. The articulated transporter can cover the whole internal surface of the VV by switching between the four equatorial RH ports. Additionally it can use two non-RH equatorial ports to transfer large tools or components. A concept for in-cask tool exchange is developed which minimizes the cask transportation by allowing the MPD to stay in the VV during the tool exchange.