WorldWideScience

Sample records for wall synthetic complexes

  1. Novel current driven domain wall dynamics in synthetic antiferromagnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, See-Hun

    It was reported that the domain walls in nanowires can be moved efficiently by electrical currents by a new type of torque, chiral spin torque (CST), the combination of spin Hall effect and Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction. Recently we domonstrated that ns-long current pulses can move domain walls at extraordinarily high speeds (up to ~750 m s -1) in synthetic antiferromagnetic (SAF) nanowires that have almost zero net magnetization, which is much more efficient compared with similar nanowires in which the sub-layers are coupled ferromagnetically (SF). This high speed is found to be due to a new type of powerful torque, exchange coupling torque (ECT) that is directly proportional to the strength of the antiferromagnetic exchange coupling between the two sub-layers, showing that the ECT is effective only in SAF not in SF. Moreover, it is found that the dependence of the wall velocity on the magnetic field applied along the nanowire is non-monotonic. Most recently we predict an Walker-breakdown-like domain wall precession in SAF nanowires in the presence of in-plane field based on the model we develop, and this extraordinary precession has been observed. In this talk I will discuss this in details by showing a unique characteristics of SAF sublayers' DW boost-and-drag mechanism along with CST and ECT. Novel current driven domain wall dynamics in synthetic antiferromagnets.

  2. [Synthetic fabrics in reparative surgery of the abdominal wall].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciurea, M; Copca, N; Moisescu, V; Calomfirescu, M

    1998-01-01

    Prosthesis use in surgical repair of abdominal wall is becoming nowadays a worldwide method, being imposed by its efficiency in solving the defects. The authors are speaking in the light of their experience gained with 100 patients that underwent the operation of prosthesis implant inside the abdominal wall between 1990 and 1996. There have been correlated the early and late postoperative results with some features of this surgical procedure (see below), to prove its efficacy. The authors discuss some principles of alloplastic treatment, which represent also the conclusions of the study: the moment of when a prosthesis is recommended, the choice of synthetic material, where and how is placed the prosthesis, some additional measures which contribute to therapeutic success.

  3. Performance of synthetic antiferromagnetic racetrack memory: domain wall versus skyrmion

    KAUST Repository

    Tomasello, R

    2017-06-20

    A storage scheme based on racetrack memory, where the information can be coded in a domain or a skyrmion, seems to be an alternative to conventional hard disk drive for high density storage. Here, we perform a full micromagnetic study of the performance of synthetic antiferromagnetic (SAF) racetrack memory in terms of velocity and sensitivity to defects by using experimental parameters. We find that, to stabilize a SAF skyrmion, the Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya interaction in the top and the bottom ferromagnet should have an opposite sign. The velocity of SAF skyrmions and SAF Néel domain walls are of the same order and can reach values larger than 1200 m s−1 if a spin–orbit torque from the spin-Hall effect with opposite sign is applied to both ferromagnets. The presence of disordered anisotropy in the form of randomly distributed grains introduces a threshold current for both SAF skyrmions and SAF domain walls motions.

  4. Turbulent channel flows over complex walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosti, Marco Edoardo; Brandt, Luca

    2017-11-01

    We perform numerical simulations of turbulent channel flows over porous walls and deformable hyper-elastic walls. The flow over porous walls is simulated using volume-averaged Navier ``Stokes equations within the porous layers, while the multiphase flow over deformable walls is solved with a one-continuum formulation which allows the use of a fully Eulerian formulation. New insights on the effect of these complex walls on the turbulent flows in terms of friction, statistics and flow structures are discussed using a number of post-processing techniques. The turbulent flow in the channel is affected by the porous and moving walls in a similar manner even at low values of porosity and elasticity due to the non-zero fluctuations of vertical velocity at the interface that influence the flow dynamics. The near-wall streaks and the associated quasi-streamwise vortices are strongly reduced near porous and deformable isotropic wall while the flow becomes more correlated in the spanwise direction. On the contrary, an opposite behavior is noticed in the case of anisotropic porous layers, with an increase of streamwise correlation due to a strengthening of the low- and high-speed streaks.

  5. A synthetic glycan microarray enables epitope mapping of plant cell wall glycan-directed antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruprecht, Colin; Bartetzko, Max P; Senf, Deborah

    2017-01-01

    In the last three decades, more than 200 monoclonal antibodies have been raised against most classes of plant cell wall polysaccharides by different laboratories world-wide. These antibodies are widely used to identify differences in plant cell wall components in mutants, organ and tissue types......, and developmental stages. Despite their importance and broad use, the precise binding epitope for only a few of these antibodies has been determined. Here, we use a plant glycan microarray equipped with 88 synthetic oligosaccharides to comprehensively map the epitopes of plant cell wall glycan-directed antibodies...... analyses, providing a framework to obtain structural information on plant cell wall glycans with unprecedented molecular precision....

  6. Complex vestibular macular anatomical relationships need a synthetic approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, M. D.

    2001-01-01

    Mammalian vestibular maculae are anatomically organized for complex parallel processing of linear acceleration information. Anatomical findings in rat maculae are provided in order to underscore this complexity, which is little understood functionally. This report emphasizes that a synthetic approach is critical to understanding how maculae function and the kind of information they conduct to the brain.

  7. Prenatal MRI evaluation of limb-body wall complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguirre-Pascual, Elisa [Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Department of Radiology, The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Hospital Universitario Doce de Octubre, Department of Radiology, Madrid (Spain); Epelman, Monica [Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Department of Radiology, The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Nemours Children' s Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging, Orlando, FL (United States); Johnson, Ann M.; Chauvin, Nancy A.; Coleman, Beverly G.; Victoria, Teresa [Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Department of Radiology, The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2014-11-15

    The sonographic (US) features of limb-body wall complex have been well documented; however the literature regarding the findings on MRI in limb-body wall complex is scant. To characterize the prenatal MRI features of limb-body wall complex. We performed a retrospective review of all MRI scans of fetuses diagnosed with limb-body wall complex at our institution from 2001 to 2011. Fetuses without correlating US scans or follow-up information were excluded. Three pediatric radiologists blinded to the specific US findings reviewed the prenatal MRIs. Images were evaluated for the organ location and attachment, the body part affected, characterization of the body wall defect, and spinal, limb and umbilical cord abnormalities. Ten subjects met inclusion criteria. MRI was able to detect and characterize the body part affected and associated abnormalities. All fetuses had ventral wall defects, a small thorax and herniated liver and bowel. The kidneys were extracorporeal in three cases. The extruded organs were attached to the placenta or the uterine wall in all cases. Abnormal spinal curvatures of various degrees of severity were present in all cases. Eight cases had a short, uncoiled cord. Limb anomalies were present in 6 of the 10 cases. We illustrate the common fetal MRI findings of limb-body wall complex. The prenatal diagnosis of limb-body wall complex and the differentiation of this defect from treatable abdominal wall defects are crucial to providing appropriate guidance for patient counseling and management. (orig.)

  8. Prenatal MRI evaluation of limb-body wall complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre-Pascual, Elisa; Epelman, Monica; Johnson, Ann M; Chauvin, Nancy A; Coleman, Beverly G; Victoria, Teresa

    2014-11-01

    The sonographic (US) features of limb-body wall complex have been well documented; however the literature regarding the findings on MRI in limb-body wall complex is scant. To characterize the prenatal MRI features of limb-body wall complex. We performed a retrospective review of all MRI scans of fetuses diagnosed with limb-body wall complex at our institution from 2001 to 2011. Fetuses without correlating US scans or follow-up information were excluded. Three pediatric radiologists blinded to the specific US findings reviewed the prenatal MRIs. Images were evaluated for the organ location and attachment, the body part affected, characterization of the body wall defect, and spinal, limb and umbilical cord abnormalities. Ten subjects met inclusion criteria. MRI was able to detect and characterize the body part affected and associated abnormalities. All fetuses had ventral wall defects, a small thorax and herniated liver and bowel. The kidneys were extracorporeal in three cases. The extruded organs were attached to the placenta or the uterine wall in all cases. Abnormal spinal curvatures of various degrees of severity were present in all cases. Eight cases had a short, uncoiled cord. Limb anomalies were present in 6 of the 10 cases. We illustrate the common fetal MRI findings of limb-body wall complex. The prenatal diagnosis of limb-body wall complex and the differentiation of this defect from treatable abdominal wall defects are crucial to providing appropriate guidance for patient counseling and management.

  9. Systems and synthetic biology approaches to alter plant cell walls and reduce biomass recalcitrance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalluri, Udaya C; Yin, Hengfu; Yang, Xiaohan; Davison, Brian H

    2014-12-01

    Fine-tuning plant cell wall properties to render plant biomass more amenable to biofuel conversion is a colossal challenge. A deep knowledge of the biosynthesis and regulation of plant cell wall and a high-precision genome engineering toolset are the two essential pillars of efforts to alter plant cell walls and reduce biomass recalcitrance. The past decade has seen a meteoric rise in use of transcriptomics and high-resolution imaging methods resulting in fresh insights into composition, structure, formation and deconstruction of plant cell walls. Subsequent gene manipulation approaches, however, commonly include ubiquitous mis-expression of a single candidate gene in a host that carries an intact copy of the native gene. The challenges posed by pleiotropic and unintended changes resulting from such an approach are moving the field towards synthetic biology approaches. Synthetic biology builds on a systems biology knowledge base and leverages high-precision tools for high-throughput assembly of multigene constructs and pathways, precision genome editing and site-specific gene stacking, silencing and/or removal. Here, we summarize the recent breakthroughs in biosynthesis and remodelling of major secondary cell wall components, assess the impediments in obtaining a systems-level understanding and explore the potential opportunities in leveraging synthetic biology approaches to reduce biomass recalcitrance. Published 2014. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA. Plant Biotechnology Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and The Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Synthetic ferrimagnet nanowires with very low critical current density for coupled domain wall motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepadatu, Serban; Saarikoski, Henri; Beacham, Robert; Benitez, Maria Jose; Moore, Thomas A; Burnell, Gavin; Sugimoto, Satoshi; Yesudas, Daniel; Wheeler, May C; Miguel, Jorge; Dhesi, Sarnjeet S; McGrouther, Damien; McVitie, Stephen; Tatara, Gen; Marrows, Christopher H

    2017-05-09

    Domain walls in ferromagnetic nanowires are potential building-blocks of future technologies such as racetrack memories, in which data encoded in the domain walls are transported using spin-polarised currents. However, the development of energy-efficient devices has been hampered by the high current densities needed to initiate domain wall motion. We show here that a remarkable reduction in the critical current density can be achieved for in-plane magnetised coupled domain walls in CoFe/Ru/CoFe synthetic ferrimagnet tracks. The antiferromagnetic exchange coupling between the layers leads to simple Néel wall structures, imaged using photoemission electron and Lorentz transmission electron microscopy, with a width of only ~100 nm. The measured critical current density to set these walls in motion, detected using magnetotransport measurements, is 1.0 × 10(11) Am(-2), almost an order of magnitude lower than in a ferromagnetically coupled control sample. Theoretical modelling indicates that this is due to nonadiabatic driving of anisotropically coupled walls, a mechanism that can be used to design efficient domain-wall devices.

  11. Substitution of the wall of the trachea by absorbable synthetic material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greve, H

    1988-02-01

    Synthetic, absorbable tissue proved to supply a valuable "interim support" for an orderly reconstruction of the wall of the trachea during the first three months following surgery. This is in general the result of experiments in which the use of implanted Polyglactin 910 as a substitute material for the tracheal wall of rats and rabbits was tested. Additionally the possibilities for satisfactory stabilization of the tracheal wall by means of Polydioxanon, another synthetic substance, which is absorbed more slowly, were investigated. The experiments were performed in a total of 30 rats and 70 rabbits. Initial attempts to substitute the entire circumference of the tracheal wall in the area of the neck by synthetics resulted in excessive difficulties post-surgically. Frequently substantial stenoses, obstructing respiration, developed. Consequently, patches of substitute material, covering more than half of the circumference of the trachea, were applied. The periods of survival of the animals ranged from one to 23 weeks. Following autopsy and macroscopical inspection, selected specimens were examined histologically by means of light microscopes and scanning electron microscopes. Evaluation of the samples showed progressive lining of the inner surface of the prosthetic patches with connective tissue and subsequent covering with squamous cell epithelium. On the average, approximately six weeks after surgery, ciliated columnar epithelium resembling normal respiratory mucosa developed. Gradually the synthetic fabric was replaced by dense connective tissue, which finally contained newly generated hyaline cartilage also. The very slow rate of dissolution of the polydioxanone material provided sufficient time for the formation of a new, stratified wall of the trachea, maintaining sufficient clearance in the tracheal lumen.

  12. A synthetic auxin (NAA) suppresses secondary wall cellulose synthesis and enhances elongation in cultured cotton fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Bir; Cheek, Hannah D; Haigler, Candace H

    2009-07-01

    Use of a synthetic auxin (naphthalene-1-acetic acid, NAA) to start (Gossypium hirsutum) ovule/fiber cultures hindered fiber secondary wall cellulose synthesis compared with natural auxin (indole-3-acetic acid, IAA). In contrast, NAA promoted fiber elongation and ovule weight gain, which resulted in larger ovule/fiber units. To reach these conclusions, fiber and ovule growth parameters were measured and cell wall characteristics were examined microscopically. The differences in fiber from NAA and IAA culture were underpinned by changes in the expression patterns of marker genes for three fiber developmental stages (elongation, the transition stage, and secondary wall deposition), and these gene expression patterns were also analyzed quantitatively in plant-grown fiber. The results demonstrate that secondary wall cellulose synthesis: (1) is under strong transcriptional control that is influenced by auxin; and (2) must be specifically characterized in the cotton ovule/fiber culture system given the many protocol variables employed in different laboratories.

  13. Characterising the cellulose synthase complexes of cell walls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mansoori Zangir, N.

    2012-01-01

    One of the characteristics of the plant kingdom is the presence of a structural cell wall. Cellulose is a major component in both the primary and secondary cell walls of plants. In higher plants cellulose is synthesized by so called rosette protein complexes with cellulose synthases (CESAs) as the

  14. Evaluation of a novel synthetic material for closure of large abdominal wall defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliabadi-Wahle, S; Choe, E U; Jacob-LaBarre, J; Flint, L M; Ferrara, J J

    1996-02-01

    This study was undertaken to compare the efficacy of a novel synthetic material (TMS-1) with polytetrafluoroethylene, polypropylene, and primary closure of experimentally fashioned clean and contaminated abdominal wounds. One square centimeter full-thickness abdominal wall defects were created in each of the four abdominal quadrants of anesthetized rats (n = 6). Patches of polytetrafluoroethylene, polypropylene, and a polyurethane-polypropylene composite material (TMS-1) were used to repair three of these defects; the fourth was primarily closed. A second group of rats (n = 9) underwent the same operative protocol; however, peritonitis was induced at the time of operation by using the fecal inoculation technique. Animals were killed 2 to 3 weeks later, and surface area and severity of formed adhesions were assessed. By all methods of assessment, primary closure proved significantly superior to all other methods of closure in clean and contaminated conditions. The three synthetic materials were equally matched for surface area involved in adhesion formation. When compared with the other synthetic materials, TMS-1 was associated with significantly milder adhesions in uninfected (p < 0.002) and in infected (p < 0.002) conditions. The clear superiority of TMS-1 over other nonabsorbable synthetic materials shown in this pilot study warrants further investigation relative to its use to close large abdominal wall defects.

  15. Exploring the emergence of complexity using synthetic replicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosikova, Tamara; Philp, Douglas

    2017-11-27

    A significant number of synthetic systems capable of replicating themselves or entities that are complementary to themselves have appeared in the last 30 years. Building on an understanding of the operation of synthetic replicators in isolation, this field has progressed to examples where catalytic relationships between replicators within the same network and the extant reaction conditions play a role in driving phenomena at the level of the whole system. Systems chemistry has played a pivotal role in the attempts to understand the origin of biological complexity by exploiting the power of synthetic chemistry, in conjunction with the molecular recognition toolkit pioneered by the field of supramolecular chemistry, thereby permitting the bottom-up engineering of increasingly complex reaction networks from simple building blocks. This review describes the advances facilitated by the systems chemistry approach in relating the expression of complex and emergent behaviour in networks of replicators with the connectivity and catalytic relationships inherent within them. These systems, examined within well-stirred batch reactors, represent conceptual and practical frameworks that can then be translated to conditions that permit replicating systems to overcome the fundamental limits imposed on selection processes in networks operating under closed conditions. This shift away from traditional spatially homogeneous reactors towards dynamic and non-equilibrium conditions, such as those provided by reaction-diffusion reaction formats, constitutes a key change that mimics environments within cellular systems, which possess obvious compartmentalisation and inhomogeneity.

  16. Development of a novel synthetic material to close abdominal wall defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cnota, M A; Aliabadi-Wahle, S; Choe, E U; Jacob, J T; Flint, L M; Ferrara, J J

    1998-05-01

    To compare the efficacy of a novel synthetic material (TMS-2) with polytetrafluoroethylene, polypropylene (Marlex), and primary closure of experimentally fashioned clean and contaminated abdominal wounds, 1-cm2 abdominal wall defects were created in each of the four abdominal quadrants of rats (n = 10). Patches of each material were used to repair three of these defects, the fourth being primarily closed. A second group of rats (n = 7) underwent the same operative protocol; however, peritonitis was induced at the time of surgery using a fecal inoculation technique. Animals were killed 2 weeks later, and surface area and severity of formed adhesions were assessed by a "blinded" observer. All closure techniques were successful insofar as none demonstrated fascial dehiscence. Compared with each synthetic material, the surface area of formed adhesions was smaller after primary closure in clean and in contaminated conditions; however, the three synthetic materials were equally matched regarding surface area of adhesions under both conditions. In the face of fecal contamination, TMS-2 proved identical to primary closure, each generating significantly (P < 0.02) milder adhesions than the other prosthetic materials. It is concluded that the TMS-2 may prove of clinical benefit to repair abdominal wall defects.

  17. Conserved molecular superlattices in a series of homologous synthetic mycobacterial cell-wall lipids forming interdigitated bilayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martin-Bertelsen, Birte; Yaghmur, Anan; Franzyk, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic analogues of the cell-wall lipid monomycoloyl glycerol (MMG) are promising as next-generation vaccine adjuvants. In the present study, the thermotropic phase behaviour of an array of synthetic MMG analogues was examined using simultaneous small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering under exc...... for the rational design of nanoparticulate adjuvants with specific and tailored structural features....

  18. How cell wall complexity influences saccharification efficiency in Miscanthus sinensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Souza, Amanda P.; Kamei, Claire L. Alvim; Torres, Andres F.; Pattathil, Sivakumar; Hahn, Michael G.; Trindade, Luisa M.; Buckeridge, Marcos S.

    2015-01-01

    The production of bioenergy from grasses has been developing quickly during the last decade, with Miscanthus being among the most important choices for production of bioethanol. However, one of the key barriers to producing bioethanol is the lack of information about cell wall structure. Cell walls are thought to display compositional differences that lead to emergence of a very high level of complexity, resulting in great diversity in cell wall architectures. In this work, a set of different techniques was used to access the complexity of cell walls of different genotypes of Miscanthus sinensis in order to understand how they interfere with saccharification efficiency. Three genotypes of M. sinensis displaying different patterns of correlation between lignin content and saccharification efficiency were subjected to cell wall analysis by quantitative/qualitative analytical techniques such as monosaccharide composition, oligosaccharide profiling, and glycome profiling. When saccharification efficiency was correlated negatively with lignin, the structural features of arabinoxylan and xyloglucan were found to contribute positively to hydrolysis. In the absence of such correlation, different types of pectins, and some mannans contributed to saccharification efficiency. Different genotypes of M. sinensis were shown to display distinct interactions among their cell wall components, which seem to influence cell wall hydrolysis. PMID:25908240

  19. Rolling up of Large-scale Laminar Vortex Ring from Synthetic Jet Impinging onto a Wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yang; Pan, Chong; Wang, Jinjun; Flow Control Lab Team

    2015-11-01

    Vortex ring impinging onto a wall exhibits a wide range of interesting behaviors. The present work devotes to an experimental investigation of a series of small-scale vortex rings impinging onto a wall. These laminar vortex rings were generated by a piston-cylinder driven synthetic jet in a water tank. Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) and Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) were used for flow visualization/quantification. A special scenario of vortical dynamic was found for the first time: a large-scale laminar vortex ring is formed above the wall, on the outboard side of the jet. This large-scale structure is stable in topology pattern, and continuously grows in strength and size along time, thus dominating dynamics of near wall flow. To quantify its spatial/temporal characteristics, Finite-Time Lyapunov Exponent (FTLE) fields were calculated from PIV velocity fields. It is shown that the flow pattern revealed by FTLE fields is similar to the visualization. The size of this large-scale vortex ring can be up to one-order larger than the jet vortices, and its rolling-up speed and entrainment strength was correlated to constant vorticity flux issued from the jet. This work was supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grants No.11202015 and 11327202).

  20. Use of tissue expanders in the repair of complex abdominal wall defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifton, Matthew S; Heiss, Kurt F; Keating, Jane J; Mackay, Greg; Ricketts, Richard R

    2011-02-01

    Closure of abdominal wall defects in children poses a challenge for pediatric surgeons. We describe a technique using tissue expanders placed either intraperitoneally or in the abdominal wall to aid in the reconstruction of a variety of complex abdominal wall defects. The tissue expanders are inserted under general anesthesia. Initial expansion is done in the operating room with attention to peak airway pressure, urine output, and end-tidal carbon dioxide. The expanders are inflated in the outpatient setting via percutaneous access until the calculated inflation volume is achieved. They are then removed; and definitive closure is accomplished using a combination of native tissue flaps, abdominal component separation techniques, biomaterials, and synthetic material. Six children underwent tissue expansion for treatment of abdominal wall defects (omphalocele, n = 3), trauma (n = 1), and thoracopagus twins (n = 1 pair). One to 4 expanders were used per patient, with all having a successful reconstruction of their abdominal walls. Two to 3 operations were required to restore abdominal domain and consisted of expander insertion, removal with reconstruction, and possible revision of the reconstruction. Tissue expanders possess a broad range of applications for abdominal wall reconstruction and can be used in patients of all ages. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Polarimetric synthetic aperture radar data and the complex Wishart distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Allan Aasbjerg; Conradsen, Knut; Skriver, Henning

    2003-01-01

    When working with multi-look fully polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data an appropriate way of representing the backscattered signal consists of the so-called covariance matrix. For each pixel this is a 3 by 3 Hermitian, positive definite matrix which follows a complex Wishart...... distribution. Based on this distribution a test statistic for equality of two such matrices and an associated asymptotic probability for obtaining a smaller value of the test statistic are given and applied to segmentation, change detection and edge detection in polarimetric SAR data. In a case study EMISAR L......-band data from 17 April 1998 and 20 May 1998 covering agricultural fields near Foulum, Denmark, are used....

  2. Multicellularity in green algae: Upsizing in a walled complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David S. Domozych

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Modern green algae constitute a large and diverse taxonomic assemblage that encompasses many multicellular phenotypes including colonial, filamentous and parenchymatous forms. In all multicellular green algae, each cell is surrounded by an extracellular matrix, most often in the form of a cell wall. Volvocalean taxa like Volvox have an elaborate, gel-like, hydroxyproline rich glycoprotein covering that contains the cells of the colony. In ulvophytes, uronic acid-rich and sulfated polysaccharides are the likely adhesion agents that maintain the multicellular habit. Charophytes also produce polysaccharide-rich cell walls and in late divergent taxa, pectin plays a critical role in cell-adhesion in the multicellular complex. Cell walls are products of coordinated interaction of membrane trafficking, cytoskeletal dynamics and the cell’s signal transduction machinery responding both to precise internal clocks and external environmental cues. Most often, these activities must be synchronized with the secretion, deposition and remodeling of the polymers of the extracellular matrix. Rapid advances in molecular genetics, cell biology and cell wall biochemistry of green algae will soon provide new insights into the evolution and subcellular processes leading to multicellularity.

  3. Multicellularity in green algae: upsizing in a walled complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domozych, David S; Domozych, Catherine E

    2014-01-01

    Modern green algae constitute a large and diverse taxonomic assemblage that encompasses many multicellular phenotypes including colonial, filamentous, and parenchymatous forms. In all multicellular green algae, each cell is surrounded by an extracellular matrix (ECM), most often in the form of a cell wall. Volvocalean taxa like Volvox have an elaborate, gel-like, hydroxyproline rich glycoprotein covering that contains the cells of the colony. In "ulvophytes," uronic acid-rich and sulfated polysaccharides are the likely adhesion agents that maintain the multicellular habit. Charophytes also produce polysaccharide-rich cell walls and in late divergent taxa, pectin plays a critical role in cell adhesion in the multicellular complex. Cell walls are products of coordinated interaction of membrane trafficking, cytoskeletal dynamics and the cell's signal transduction machinery responding both to precise internal clocks and external environmental cues. Most often, these activities must be synchronized with the secretion, deposition and remodeling of the polymers of the ECM. Rapid advances in molecular genetics, cell biology and cell wall biochemistry of green algae will soon provide new insights into the evolution and subcellular processes leading to multicellularity.

  4. Experimental investigation of influence of Reynolds number on synthetic jet vortex rings impinging onto a solid wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yang; He, GuoSheng; Kulkarni, Varun; Wang, JinJun

    2017-01-01

    Time-resolved particle image velocimetry was employed to study the effect of Reynolds number ( Re sj) on synthetic jet vortex rings impinging onto a solid wall. Four Reynolds numbers ranging from 166 to 664 were investigated for comparison while other parameters were kept constant. It is found that the Reynolds number has a significant impact on the spatial evolution of near-wall vortical structures of the impinging synthetic jet. Velocity triple decomposition reveals that periodic Reynolds shear stresses produced by both impinging and secondary vortex rings agree well with a four-quadrant-type distribution rule, and the random velocity fluctuations are strengthened as Re sj increases. For radial wall jet, radial velocity profiles exhibit a self-similar behavior for all Re sj, and this self-similar profile gradually deviates from the laminar solution as Re sj is increased. In particular, the self-similar profile for low Re sj (166) coincides with the laminar solution indicating that periodic velocity fluctuations produced by vortex rings have little effect on the velocity profile of the laminar wall jet. This also provides evidence that the impinging synthetic jet is more effective in mixing than the continuous jet for the laminar flow. For the high Re sj, the mean skin friction coefficient has a slower decay rate after reaching peak, and the radial momentum flux has a higher value at locations far away from the impingement region, both of these can be attributed to the enhanced random fluctuations.

  5. Structural Studies of Complex Carbohydrates of Plant Cell Walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darvill, Alan [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States); Hahn, Michael G. [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States); O' Neill, Malcolm A. [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States); York, William S. [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States)

    2015-02-17

    Most of the solar energy captured by land plants is converted into the polysaccharides (cellulose, hemicellulose, and pectin) that are the predominant components of the cell wall. These walls, which account for the bulk of plant biomass, have numerous roles in the growth and development of plants. Moreover, these walls have a major impact on human life as they are a renewable source of biomass, a source of diverse commercially useful polymers, a major component of wood, and a source of nutrition for humans and livestock. Thus, understanding the molecular mechanisms that lead to wall assembly and how cell walls and their component polysaccharides contribute to plant growth and development is essential to improve and extend the productivity and value of plant materials. The proposed research will develop and apply advanced analytical and immunological techniques to study specific changes in the structures and interactions of the hemicellulosic and pectic polysaccharides that occur during differentiation and in response to genetic modification and chemical treatments that affect wall biosynthesis. These new techniques will make it possible to accurately characterize minute amounts of cell wall polysaccharides so that subtle changes in structure that occur in individual cell types can be identified and correlated to the physiological or developmental state of the plant. Successful implementation of this research will reveal fundamental relationships between polysaccharide structure, cell wall architecture, and cell wall functions.

  6. Synthetic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Maria Manferdini

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally materials have been associated with a series of physical properties that can be used as inputs to production and manufacturing. Recently we witnessed an interest in materials considered not only as ‘true matter’, but also as new breeds where geometry, texture, tooling and finish are able to provoke new sensations when they are applied to a substance. These artificial materials can be described as synthetic because they are the outcome of various qualities that are not necessarily true to the original matter, but they are the combination of two or more parts, whether by design or by natural processes. The aim of this paper is to investigate the potential of architectural surfaces to produce effects through the invention of new breeds of artificial matter, using micro-scale details derived from Nature as an inspiration.

  7. Analyzing the complex machinery of cell wall biosynthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmers, J.F.P.

    2009-01-01

    The plant cell wall polymers make up most of the plant biomass and provide the raw material for many economically important products including food, feed, bio-materials, chemicals, textiles, and biofuel. This broad range of functions and applications make the biosynthesis of these polysaccharides a

  8. INSOLUBLE HYDROPHOBIN COMPLEXES IN THE WALLS OF SCHIZOPHYLLUM-COMMUNE AND OTHER FILAMENTOUS FUNGI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DEVRIES, OMH; FEKKES, MP; WOSTEN, HAB; WESSELS, JGH

    Two closely related cysteine-rich hydrophobic proteins, Sc3p and Sc4p, of the basidiomycete Schizophyllum commune are developmentally regulated and associated with the walls of aerial hyphae and fruit-body hyphae. They are present in the walls as hot-SDS-insoluble complexes which can be extracted

  9. A Supervised Classification Method for Levee Slide Detection Using Complex Synthetic Aperture Radar Imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramakalavathi Marapareddy

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The dynamics of surface and sub-surface water events can lead to slope instability, resulting in anomalies such as slough slides on earthen levees. Early detection of these anomalies by a remote sensing approach could save time versus direct assessment. We have implemented a supervised Mahalanobis distance classification algorithm for the detection of slough slides on levees using complex polarimetric Synthetic Aperture Radar (polSAR data. The classifier output was followed by a spatial majority filter post-processing step that improved the accuracy. The effectiveness of the algorithm is demonstrated using fully quad-polarimetric L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR imagery from the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory’s (JPL’s Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR. The study area is a section of the lower Mississippi River valley in the southern USA. Slide detection accuracy of up to 98 percent was achieved, although the number of available slides examples was small.

  10. Synthetic strategies for efficient conjugation of organometallic complexes with pendant protein reactive markers

    KAUST Repository

    Jantke, Dominik

    2013-11-01

    Site-directed conjugation of metal centers to proteins is fundamental for biological and bioinorganic applications of transition metals. However, methods for the site-selective introduction of metal centers remain scarce. Herein, we present broadly applicable synthetic strategies for the conjugation of bioactive molecules with a range of organometallic complexes. Following three different synthetic strategies, we were able to synthesize a small library of metal conjugated protein markers featuring different types of protein reactive sites (epoxides, phenylphosphonates, fluorosulfonates and fluorophosphonate groups) as well as different late transition metals (iron, ruthenium, rhodium, palladium and platinum). The products were isolated in moderate to excellent yields and high purity. Furthermore, X-ray diffraction of the metalated protein markers corroborates structural integrity of the metal complex and the protein reactive site. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Ultrasonographic diagnosis of limb-body wall complex: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goo, Dong Erk; Yoo, Shi Joon; Cho, Kyoung Sik; Choi, Kee Young; Kim, Am [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    1993-12-15

    Limb-body wall complex (LBWC) is a rare congenital process believed to result from early rupture of the amnion, possibly as a consequence of vascular disruption. Characteristic fetal deformities include limb defects, scoliosis, thoracoschisis and/or abdominoschisis, and severe craniofacial anomalies. This complex should be distinguished from other body-wall defect including omphalocele and gastroschisis since the prognosis of LBWC is uniformly poor. We report a case of LBWC which was diagnosed by prenatal ultrasonography in 26 weeks of gestation. Prenatal ultrasonograms are correlated with the gross pathologic findings. The present case demonstrates the superb capability of modern ultrasonography in the diagnosis of complex fetal anomalies

  12. Formation of wood secondary cell wall may involve two type cellulose synthase complexes in Populus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Wang; Song, Dongliang; Sun, Jiayan; Shen, Junhui; Li, Laigeng

    2017-03-01

    Cellulose biosynthesis is mediated by cellulose synthases (CesAs), which constitute into rosette-like cellulose synthase complexe (CSC) on the plasma membrane. Two types of CSCs in Arabidopsis are believed to be involved in cellulose synthesis in the primary cell wall and secondary cell walls, respectively. In this work, we found that the two type CSCs participated cellulose biosynthesis in differentiating xylem cells undergoing secondary cell wall thickening in Populus. During the cell wall thickening process, expression of one type CSC genes increased while expression of the other type CSC genes decreased. Suppression of different type CSC genes both affected the wall-thickening and disrupted the multilaminar structure of the secondary cell walls. When CesA7A was suppressed, crystalline cellulose content was reduced, which, however, showed an increase when CesA3D was suppressed. The CesA suppression also affected cellulose digestibility of the wood cell walls. The results suggest that two type CSCs are involved in coordinating the cellulose biosynthesis in formation of the multilaminar structure in Populus wood secondary cell walls.

  13. Linear solvation energy relationship for the adsorption of synthetic organic compounds on single-walled carbon nanotubes in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, H; Chen, C; Zhang, X

    2016-01-01

    The linear solvation energy relationship (LSER) was applied to predict the adsorption coefficient (K) of synthetic organic compounds (SOCs) on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). A total of 40 log K values were used to develop and validate the LSER model. The adsorption data for 34 SOCs were collected from 13 published articles and the other six were obtained in our experiment. The optimal model composed of four descriptors was developed by a stepwise multiple linear regression (MLR) method. The adjusted r(2) (r(2)adj) and root mean square error (RMSE) were 0.84 and 0.49, respectively, indicating good fitness. The leave-one-out cross-validation Q(2) ([Formula: see text]) was 0.79, suggesting the robustness of the model was satisfactory. The external Q(2) ([Formula: see text]) and RMSE (RMSEext) were 0.72 and 0.50, respectively, showing the model's strong predictive ability. Hydrogen bond donating interaction (bB) and cavity formation and dispersion interactions (vV) stood out as the two most influential factors controlling the adsorption of SOCs onto SWCNTs. The equilibrium concentration would affect the fitness and predictive ability of the model, while the coefficients varied slightly.

  14. Oxygen activation by mononuclear Mn, Co, and Ni centers in biology and synthetic complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiedler, Adam T; Fischer, Anne A

    2017-04-01

    The active sites of metalloenzymes that catalyze O2-dependent reactions generally contain iron or copper ions. However, several enzymes are capable of activating O2 at manganese or nickel centers instead, and a handful of dioxygenases exhibit activity when substituted with cobalt. This minireview summarizes the catalytic properties of oxygenases and oxidases with mononuclear Mn, Co, or Ni active sites, including oxalate-degrading oxidases, catechol dioxygenases, and quercetin dioxygenase. In addition, recent developments in the O2 reactivity of synthetic Mn, Co, or Ni complexes are described, with an emphasis on the nature of reactive intermediates featuring superoxo-, peroxo-, or oxo-ligands. Collectively, the biochemical and synthetic studies discussed herein reveal the possibilities and limitations of O2 activation at these three "overlooked" metals.

  15. Computational Complexity Reduction of Synthetic-aperture Focus in Ultrasound Imaging Using Frequency-domain Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghimirad, Elahe; Mahloojifar, Ali; Mohammadzadeh Asl, Babak

    2016-05-01

    A new frequency-domain implementation of a synthetic aperture focusing technique is presented in the paper. The concept is based on synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and sonar that is a developed version of the convolution model in the frequency domain. Compared with conventional line-by-line imaging, synthetic aperture imaging has a better resolution and contrast at the cost of more computational load. To overcome this problem, point-by-point reconstruction methods have been replaced by block-processing algorithms in radar and sonar; however, these techniques are relatively unknown in medical imaging. In this paper, we extended one of these methods called wavenumber to medical ultrasound imaging using a simple model of synthetic aperture focus. The model, derived here for monostatic mode, can be generalized to multistatic as well. The method consists of 4 steps: a 2D fast Fourier transform of the data, frequency shift of the data to baseband, interpolation to convert polar coordinates to rectangular ones, and returning the data to the spatial-domain using a 2D inverse Fourier transform. We have also used chirp pulse excitation followed by matched filtering and spotlighting algorithm to compensate the effect of differences in parameters between radar and medical imaging. Computational complexities of the two methods, wavenumber and delay-and-sum (DAS), have been calculated. Field II simulated point data have been used to evaluate the results in terms of resolution and contrast. Evaluations with simulated data show that for typical phantoms, reconstruction by the wavenumber algorithm is almost 20 times faster than classical DAS while retaining the resolution. © The Author(s) 2015.

  16. Limb body wall complex in a still born fetus: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plakkal, Nishad; John, Joseph; Jacob, Sajini Elizabeth; Chithira, J; Sampath, Sowmya

    2008-08-12

    We report the case of a male, low birth weight, stillborn fetus of 36 weeks gestation with limb body wall complex. An interesting and rare feature noted in the propositus was the absence of the left subclavian artery and complete absence of the left upper limb. These findings seem to favor the vascular theory in the pathogenesis of this condition.

  17. Limb body wall complex in a still born fetus: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Plakkal, Nishad; John, Joseph; Jacob, Sajini Elizabeth; Chithira, J; Sampath, Sowmya

    2008-01-01

    We report the case of a male, low birth weight, stillborn fetus of 36 weeks gestation with limb body wall complex. An interesting and rare feature noted in the propositus was the absence of the left subclavian artery and complete absence of the left upper limb. These findings seem to favor the vascular theory in the pathogenesis of this condition.

  18. wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irshad Kashif

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Maintaining indoor climatic conditions of buildings compatible with the occupant comfort by consuming minimum energy, especially in a tropical climate becomes a challenging problem for researchers. This paper aims to investigate this problem by evaluating the effect of different kind of Photovoltaic Trombe wall system (PV-TW on thermal comfort, energy consumption and CO2 emission. A detailed simulation model of a single room building integrated with PV-TW was modelled using TRNSYS software. Results show that 14-35% PMV index and 26-38% PPD index reduces as system shifted from SPV-TW to DGPV-TW as compared to normal buildings. Thermal comfort indexes (PMV and PPD lie in the recommended range of ASHARE for both DPV-TW and DGPV-TW except for the few months when RH%, solar radiation intensity and ambient temperature were high. Moreover PVTW system significantly reduces energy consumption and CO2 emission of the building and also 2-4.8 °C of temperature differences between indoor and outdoor climate of building was examined.

  19. Response of soybean plants to the application of synthetic and biodegradable Fe chelates and Fe complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Fernández, Clara; Solti, Ádám; Czech, Viktória; Kovács, Krisztina; Fodor, Ferenc; Gárate, Agustín; Hernández-Apaolaza, Lourdes; Lucena, Juan J

    2017-09-01

    The growing concern over the environmental risk of synthetic chelate application promotes the search for alternatives in Fe fertilization, such as biodegradable chelating agents and natural complexing agents. In this work, plant responses to the application of several Fe treatments (chelates and complexes) was analyzed to study their potential use in Fe fertilization under calcareous conditions. Thus, the root ferric chelate reductase (FCR) activity of soybean (Glycine max cv. Klaxon) plants was determined, and the effectiveness of the Fe chelates and complexes assessed in a pot experiment, by SPAD and fluorescence induction measurements, and the determination of Fe distribution in plant and soil. Additionally, (57)Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy was conducted to identify the Fe forms present in the soybean roots. The highest FCR activity was observed for the chelates EDDS/Fe(3+) and IDHA/Fe(3+); while no activity was observed when using complexes as Fe substrates. In contrast to the FCR data, the pot experiment confirmed that the o,oEDDHA/Fe(3+) is the most effective treatment, and the complexes LS/Fe(3+) and GA/Fe(3+) are able to alleviate Fe chlorosis, also indicated by SPAD data and the maximal quantum efficiency of photosystem II reaction centers as vitality parameters, and the enhanced plant uptake of Fe from natural sources. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Bis(dipyridophenazine)copper(II) complex as major groove directing synthetic hydrolase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Tarkeshwar; Dhar, Shanta; Nethaji, Munirathinam; Chakravarty, Akhil R

    2004-06-21

    The copper(II) complex [Cu(dppz)(2)Cl]Cl () has been prepared, structurally characterized and its DNA binding and cleavage properties studied (dppz, dipyridophenazine). Crystal structure of 1xdppzxH(2)O shows the presence of the monocationic copper(II) complex containing two dppz ligands and one chloride in the five coordinate structure. While one bidentate chelating dppz ligand occupies the basal plane, the other dppz ligand shows an axial/equatorial mode of bonding. The chloride ligand binds at the basal plane. The complex crystallizes with dppz and water as lattice molecules. The dppz moieties in the metal-bound and free forms are involved in pi-pi stacking interactions. The one-electron paramagnetic complex shows a visible spectral d-d band at 707 nm in DMF and displays quasireversible cyclic voltammetric response for the Cu(II)/Cu(I) couple near 0.1 V vs. SCE in DMF-0.1 M TBAP. The complex which is an avid binder to calf thymus DNA giving a binding constant (K(b)) value of 2.0 x 10(4) M(-1) in DMF-Tris buffer, cleaves supercoiled pUC19 DNA in an oxidative manner in the presence of mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) as a reducing agent or on photo irradiation at 312 nm. Control experiments show major groove binding and DNA cleavage via the formation of hydroxyl radical in the presence of MPA and by singlet oxygen in the photocleavage reaction. The complex exhibits significant hydrolytic cleavage of DNA in the dark in the absence of any additives at a rate of approximately 3.0 h(-1). The hydrolytic nature of the DNA cleavage is evidenced from the T4 ligase experiments converting the nicked circular form to its original supercoiled form quantitatively. Complex presents a rare example of copper-based major groove directing efficient synthetic hydrolase.

  1. Oxygen Requirements of the Food Spoilage Yeast Zygosaccharomyces bailii in Synthetic and Complex Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Fernando; Côrte-Real, Manuela; Leão, Cecília; van Dijken, Johannes P.; Pronk, Jack T.

    2001-01-01

    Most yeast species can ferment sugars to ethanol, but only a few can grow in the complete absence of oxygen. Oxygen availability might, therefore, be a key parameter in spoilage of food caused by fermentative yeasts. In this study, the oxygen requirement and regulation of alcoholic fermentation were studied in batch cultures of the spoilage yeast Zygosaccharomyces bailii at a constant pH, pH 3.0. In aerobic, glucose-grown cultures, Z. bailii exhibited aerobic alcoholic fermentation similar to that of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and other Crabtree-positive yeasts. In anaerobic fermentor cultures grown on a synthetic medium supplemented with glucose, Tween 80, and ergosterol, S. cerevisiae exhibited rapid exponential growth. Growth of Z. bailii under these conditions was extremely slow and linear. These linear growth kinetics indicate that cell proliferation of Z. bailii in the anaerobic fermentors was limited by a constant, low rate of oxygen leakage into the system. Similar results were obtained with the facultatively fermentative yeast Candida utilis. When the same experimental setup was used for anaerobic cultivation, in complex YPD medium, Z. bailii exhibited exponential growth and vigorous fermentation, indicating that a nutritional requirement for anaerobic growth was met by complex-medium components. Our results demonstrate that restriction of oxygen entry into foods and beverages, which are rich in nutrients, is not a promising strategy for preventing growth and gas formation by Z. bailii. In contrast to the growth of Z. bailii, anaerobic growth of S. cerevisiae on complex YPD medium was much slower than growth in synthetic medium, which probably reflected the superior tolerance of the former yeast to organic acids at low pH. PMID:11319090

  2. Oxygen requirements of the food spoilage yeast Zygosaccharomyces bailii in synthetic and complex media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, F; Côrte-Real, M; Leão, C; van Dijken, J P; Pronk, J T

    2001-05-01

    Most yeast species can ferment sugars to ethanol, but only a few can grow in the complete absence of oxygen. Oxygen availability might, therefore, be a key parameter in spoilage of food caused by fermentative yeasts. In this study, the oxygen requirement and regulation of alcoholic fermentation were studied in batch cultures of the spoilage yeast Zygosaccharomyces bailii at a constant pH, pH 3.0. In aerobic, glucose-grown cultures, Z. bailii exhibited aerobic alcoholic fermentation similar to that of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and other Crabtree-positive yeasts. In anaerobic fermentor cultures grown on a synthetic medium supplemented with glucose, Tween 80, and ergosterol, S. cerevisiae exhibited rapid exponential growth. Growth of Z. bailii under these conditions was extremely slow and linear. These linear growth kinetics indicate that cell proliferation of Z. bailii in the anaerobic fermentors was limited by a constant, low rate of oxygen leakage into the system. Similar results were obtained with the facultatively fermentative yeast Candida utilis. When the same experimental setup was used for anaerobic cultivation, in complex YPD medium, Z. bailii exhibited exponential growth and vigorous fermentation, indicating that a nutritional requirement for anaerobic growth was met by complex-medium components. Our results demonstrate that restriction of oxygen entry into foods and beverages, which are rich in nutrients, is not a promising strategy for preventing growth and gas formation by Z. bailii. In contrast to the growth of Z. bailii, anaerobic growth of S. cerevisiae on complex YPD medium was much slower than growth in synthetic medium, which probably reflected the superior tolerance of the former yeast to organic acids at low pH.

  3. Capture of unstable protein complex on the streptavidin-coated single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Zunfeng, E-mail: liuz2@chem.leidenuniv.nl; Voskamp, Patrick [Cell Observatory, Biophysical Structural Chemistry, Leiden Institute of Chemistry (Netherlands); Zhang Yue; Chu Fuqiang [Changzhou University, School of Pharmaceutical Engineering and Life Science (China); Abrahams, Jan Pieter, E-mail: abrahams@chem.leidenuniv.nl [Cell Observatory, Biophysical Structural Chemistry, Leiden Institute of Chemistry (Netherlands)

    2013-04-15

    Purification of unstable protein complexes is a bottleneck for investigation of their 3D structure and in protein-protein interaction studies. In this paper, we demonstrate that streptavidin-coated single-walled carbon nanotubes (Strep Bullet SWNT) can be used to capture the biotinylated DNA-EcoRI complexes on a 2D surface and in solution using atomic force microscopy and electrophoresis analysis, respectively. The restriction enzyme EcoRI forms unstable complexes with DNA in the absence of Mg{sup 2+}. Capturing the EcoRI-DNA complexes on the Strep Bullet SWNT succeeded in the absence of Mg{sup 2+}, demonstrating that the Strep Bullet SWNT can be used for purifying unstable protein complexes.

  4. Rapid precision casting for complex thin-walled aluminum alloy parts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuanpu DONG

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Based on Vacuum Differential Pressure Casting (VDPC precision forming technology and the Selective Laser Sintering (SLS Rapid Prototyping (RP technology, a rapid manufacturing method called Rapid Precision Casting (RPC process from computer three-dimensional solid models to metallic parts was investigated. The experimental results showed that the main advantage of RPC was not only its ability to cast higher internal quality and more accurate complex thin-walled aluminum alloy parts, but also the greatly-reduced lead time cycle from Selective Laser Sintering(SLS plastic prototyping to metallic parts. The key forming technology of RPC for complex thin-walled metallic parts has been developed for new casting production and Rapid Tooling (RT, and it is possible to rapidly manufacture high-quality and accurate metallic parts by means of RP in foundry industry.

  5. Complex Wishart distribution based analysis of polarimetric synthetic aperture radar data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Allan Aasbjerg; Skriver, Henning; Conradsen, Knut

    2007-01-01

    Multi-look, polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data are often worked with in the so-called covariance matrix representation. For each pixel this representation gives a 3x3 Hermitian, positive definite matrix which follows a complex Wishart distribution. Based on this distribution a test...... covering agricultural fields near Foulum, Denmark, are used. Soon the Japanese ALOS, the German TerraSAR-X and the Canadian RADARSAT-2 will acquire space-borne, polarimetric data making analysis based on these methods important....... statistic for equality of two such matrices and an associated asymptotic probability for obtaining a smaller value of the test statistic are given and applied to change detection, edge detection and segmentation in polarimetric SAR data. In a case study EMISAR L-band data from 17 April 1998 and 20 May 1998...

  6. Understanding Free and Complexed Enzyme Mechanisms and Factors Contributing to Cell Wall Recalcitrance (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Resch, M.; Donohoe, B.; Katahira, R.; Ashutosh, M.; Beckham, G.; Himmel, M.; Decker, S.

    2014-04-01

    Fungal free enzymes and bacterial complexed cellulosomes deconstruct biomass using different physical mechanisms. Free enzymes, which typically contain a large proportion of GH7 cellobiohydrolase, diffuse throughout the substrate and hydrolyze primarily from the cellulose reducing end, resulting in 'sharpened' macrofibrils. In contrast, complexed cellulosomes contain a diverse array of carbohydrate binding modules and multiple catalytic specificities leading to delamination and physical peeling of the cellulose macrofibril structures. To investigate how cellulose structure contributes to recalcitrance, we compared the deconstruction of cellulose I, II, and III; using free and complexed enzyme systems. We also evaluated both systems on Clean Fractionation and alkaline pretreated biomass, which remove much of the lignin, to determine the impact on enzyme loading reduction. Free fungal enzymes demonstrated a swelling of the outer surface of the plant cell walls while removing localized disruptions, resulting in a smooth surface appearance. Cellulosomes produced cell wall surfaces with localized areas of disruption and little surface layer swelling. These studies contribute to the overall understanding of biomass recalcitrance and how combining different enzymatic paradigms may lead to the formulation of new enzyme cocktails to reduce the cost of producing sugars from plant cell wall carbohydrates.

  7. A New Boundary Model for Simulating Complex and Flexible Wall Bounded Domain in Dissipative Particle Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeid Mokhtarian

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite extensive area of applications, simulation of complex wall bounded problems or any deformable boundary is still a challenge in a Dissipative Particle Dynamics simulation. This limitation is rooted in the soft force nature of DPD and the fact that we need to use an antipenetration model for escaped particles. In the present paper, we propose a new model of antipenetration which preserves the conservation of linear momentum on the boundaries and enables us to simulate complex and flexible boundaries. Finally by performing numerical simulations, we demonstrate the validity of our new model.

  8. Structural studies of complex carbohydrates of plant cell walls. Progress report, June 15, 1992--June 14, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darvill, A.G.

    1994-10-01

    This report contains the abstracts of fourteen papers published, in press, or in preparation reporting on research activities to investigate the structure, as well as the function of cell walls in plants. This document also contains research on methods to determine the structure of complex carbohydrates of the cell walls.

  9. A review of semi-synthetic biopolymer complexes: modified polysaccharide nano-carriers for enhancement of oral drug bioavailability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sithole, Mduduzi N; Choonara, Yahya E; du Toit, Lisa C; Kumar, Pradeep; Pillay, Viness

    2017-03-01

    Semi-synthetic biopolymer complexes (SSBCs) have potential as nano-carriers for oral drug delivery due to their exceptional properties obtained by merging the properties of synthetic (e.g. good thermal and mechanical properties) with natural polymers (e.g. biocompatibility); thus, forming a new class of biopolymer materials incorporating the best of both worlds. Despite development in drug delivery systems, oral administration of therapeutic agent is still preferred. Several nano-polymeric systems has been prepared and characterized based on both synthetic polymers and natural polymers, each with its limitations and advantages. Among natural polymers, alginate, chitosan, and hyaluronic acid (HA) have been studied broadly for the fabrication of nanoparticles systems. This review discusses a newly investigated class of polymer called SSBCs as oral drug nano-carriers. It also discusses certain significant structural and functional attributes or effects which are essential to be taken into consideration when an oral drug delivery system is developed. The review is aimed at describing complexation of few natural polymers (e.g. polysaccharides) with selected synthetic polymers or synthetic chemicals to indicate some of the factors that influence preparation, solubility, formation, and stability of these SSBCs.

  10. Targeting Synthetic Lethal Interactions between Myc and the eIF4F Complex Impedes Tumorigenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen-Ju Lin

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The energetically demanding process of translation is linked to multiple signaling events through mTOR-mediated regulation of eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF4F complex assembly. Disrupting mTOR constraints on eIF4F activity can be oncogenic and alter chemotherapy response, making eIF4F an attractive antineoplastic target. Here, we combine a newly developed inducible RNAi platform and pharmacological targeting of eIF4F activity to define a critical role for endogenous eIF4F in Myc-dependent tumor initiation. We find elevated Myc levels are associated with deregulated eIF4F activity in the prelymphomatous stage of the Eμ-Myc lymphoma model. Inhibition of eIF4F is synthetic lethal with elevated Myc in premalignant pre-B/B cells resulting in reduced numbers of cycling pre-B/B cells and delayed tumor onset. At the organismal level, eIF4F suppression affected a subset of normal regenerating cells, but this was well tolerated and rapidly and completely reversible. Therefore, eIF4F is a key Myc client that represents a tumor-specific vulnerability.

  11. Facile and Selective Synthetic Approach for Ruthenium Complexes Utilizing a Molecular Sieve Effect in the Supporting Ligand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dai Oyama

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available It is extremely important for synthetic chemists to control the structure of new compounds. We have constructed ruthenium-based mononuclear complexes with the tridentate 2,6-di(1,8-naphthyridin-2-ylpyridine (dnp ligand to investigate a new synthetic approach using a specific coordination space. The synthesis of a family of new ruthenium complexes containing both the dnp and triphenylphosphine (PPh3 ligands, [Ru(dnp(PPh3(X(L]n+ (X = PPh3, NO2−, Cl−, Br−; L = OH2, CH3CN, C6H5CN, SCN−, has been described. All complexes have been spectroscopically characterized in solution, and the nitrile complexes have also been characterized in the solid state through single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. Dnp in the present complex system behaves like a “molecular sieve” in ligand replacement reactions. Both experimental data and density functional theory (DFT calculations suggest that dnp plays a crucial role in the selectivity observed in this study. The results provide useful information toward elucidating this facile and selective synthetic approach to new transition metal complexes.

  12. Violation of the rectus complex is not a contraindication to component separation for abdominal wall reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvey, Patrick B; Bailey, Chad M; Baumann, Donald P; Liu, Jun; Butler, Charles E

    2012-02-01

    Component separation (CS) is an effective technique for reconstructing complex abdominal wall defects. Violation of the rectus abdominis complex is considered a contraindication for CS, but we hypothesized that patients have similar outcomes with or without rectus complex violation. We retrospectively studied all consecutive patients who underwent CS for abdominal wall reconstruction during 8 years and compared outcomes of patients with and without rectus violation. Primary outcomes measures included complications and hernia recurrence. Logistic regression analysis identified potential associations between patient, defect, and reconstructive characteristics and surgical outcomes. One hundred sixty-nine patients were included: 115 (68%) with and 54 (32%) without rectus violation. Mean follow-up was 21.3 ± 14.5 months. Patient and defect characteristics were similar, except for the rectus violation group having a higher body mass index. Overall complication rates were similar in the violation (24.3%) and nonviolation (24.0%) groups, as were the respective rates of recurrent hernia (7.8% vs 9.2%; p = 0.79), abdominal bulge (3.5% vs 5.6%; p = 0.71), skin dehiscence (20.0% vs 22.2%; p = 0.74), skin necrosis (6.1% vs 3.7%; p = 0.72), cellulitis (7.8% vs 9.2%; p = 0.75), and abscess (12.3% vs 9.2%; p = 0.58). Regression analysis demonstrated body mass index to be the only factor predictive of complications. CS surgical outcomes were similar whether or not the rectus complex was violated. To our knowledge, this study is the first to evaluate the effects of rectus violation on surgical outcomes in CS patients. Surgeons should not routinely avoid CS when the rectus complex is violated. Copyright © 2012 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Synthesis and Characterization of Hexahapto-Chromium Complexes of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    KAUST Repository

    Kalinina, Irina

    2016-12-17

    This chapter employs purified pristine single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and octadecylaminefunctionalized-SWNTs. These SWNTs are employed for investigate the potential of the SWNT sidewall to function as a hexahapto ligand for chromium (Cr), with in-depth characterization of the products using some of the techniques, such as thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Purified electric arc (EA)-produced SWNTs (P2-SWNT) and octadecylaminefunctionalized SWNTs were obtained from Carbon Solutions, Inc. The TEM images show the removal of the Cr particles from the outer surface of the SWNT bundles in the SWNT-Cr complexes after decomplexation; Cr attachment to the surface of the as-prepared complexes (η6-SWNT)Cr(CO)3 and (η6-SWNT-CONH(CH2)17CH3)Cr(CO)3 is clearly evident. The positions of the bands in the Raman spectra of SWNTs are sensitive to doping and thus the chapter examines the effect of complexation of the Cr(CO)3 and Cr(η6-benzene) units on the position of the G and 2D bands in the (η6-SWNT)Cr(CO)3 and (η6-SWNT)Cr(η6-benzene) complexes.

  14. Reconstitution of membrane protein complexes involved in pneumococcal septal cell wall assembly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjolaine Noirclerc-Savoye

    Full Text Available The synthesis of peptidoglycan, the major component of the bacterial cell wall, is essential to cell survival, yet its mechanism remains poorly understood. In the present work, we have isolated several membrane protein complexes consisting of the late division proteins of Streptococcus pneumoniae: DivIB, DivIC, FtsL, PBP2x and FtsW, or subsets thereof. We have co-expressed membrane proteins from S. pneumoniae in Escherichia coli. By combining two successive affinity chromatography steps, we obtained membrane protein complexes with a very good purity. These complexes are functional, as indicated by the retained activity of PBP2x to bind a fluorescent derivative of penicillin and to hydrolyze the substrate analogue S2d. Moreover, we have evidenced the stabilizing role of protein-protein interactions within each complex. This work paves the way for a complete reconstitution of peptidoglycan synthesis in vitro, which will be critical to the elucidation of its intricate regulation mechanisms.

  15. Complexity and health functionality of plant cell wall fibers from fruits and vegetables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padayachee, A; Day, L; Howell, K; Gidley, M J

    2017-01-02

    The prevalence of lifestyle-related diseases is increasing in developing countries with the causes for death starting to follow the same pattern in the developed world. Lifestyle factors including inadequate dietary intake of fruits and vegetables and over consumption of nutrient-poor processed foods, are considered to be major causal risk factors associated with increased susceptibility to developing certain diseases (Alldrick, 1998 ; Kiani, 2007 ). Recent epidemiological evidence confirms a strong association between dietary fiber and reduced all-cause mortality risk, as well as a risk reduction for a number of non-communicable diseases (Chuang et al., 2012 ). The relationship between dietary fiber and mortality has been described as "convincing observations that call for mechanistic investigations" (Landberg, 2012 ). In particular, the health protective roles played by dietary fibers of different origin are not well understood. Whilst Hippocrates was the earliest known physician to study the health benefits of fiber derived from grains (Burkitt, 1987 ), the functionality of fruit and vegetable fiber, especially in association with other compounds such as polyphenols and carotenoids, is an area of more recent interest. Hence the objective of this review is to assess the complexity and health-related functional role of plant cell wall (PCW) fibers from fruits and vegetables with a particular emphasis on interactions between cell walls and phytonutrients.

  16. Spatio-temporal diversification of the cell wall matrix materials in the developing stomatal complexes of Zea mays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannoutsou, E; Apostolakos, P; Galatis, B

    2016-11-01

    The matrix cell wall materials, in developing Zea mays stomatal complexes are asymmetrically distributed, a phenomenon appearing related to the local cell wall expansion and deformation, the establishment of cell polarity, and determination of the cell division plane. In cells of developing Zea mays stomatal complexes, definite cell wall regions expand determinately and become locally deformed. This differential cell wall behavior is obvious in the guard cell mother cells (GMCs) and the subsidiary cell mother cells (SMCs) that locally protrude towards the adjacent GMCs. The latter, emitting a morphogenetic stimulus, induce polarization/asymmetrical division in SMCs. Examination of immunolabeled specimens revealed that homogalacturonans (HGAs) with a high degree of de-esterification (2F4- and JIM5-HGA epitopes) and arabinogalactan proteins are selectively distributed in the extending and deformed cell wall regions, while their margins are enriched with rhamnogalacturonans (RGAs) containing highly branched arabinans (LM6-RGA epitope). In SMCs, the local cell wall matrix differentiation constitutes the first structural event, indicating the establishment of cell polarity. Moreover, in the premitotic GMCs and SMCs, non-esterified HGAs (2F4-HGA epitope) are preferentially localized in the cell wall areas outlining the cytoplasm where the preprophase band is formed. In these areas, the forthcoming cell plate fuses with the parent cell walls. These data suggest that the described heterogeneity in matrix cell wall materials is probably involved in: (a) local cell wall expansion and deformation, (b) the transduction of the inductive GMC stimulus, and (c) the determination of the division plane in GMCs and SMCs.

  17. Complex regional pain syndrome with associated chest wall dystonia: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schwartzman Robert J

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Patients with complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS often suffer from an array of associated movement disorders, including dystonia of an affected limb. We present a case of a patient with long standing CRPS after a brachial plexus injury, who after displaying several features of the movement disorder previously, developed painful dystonia of chest wall musculature. Detailed neurologic examination found palpable sustained contractions of the pectoral and intercostal muscles in addition to surface allodynia. Needle electromyography of the intercostal and paraspinal muscles supported the diagnosis of dystonia. In addition, pulmonary function testing showed both restrictive and obstructive features in the absence of a clear cardiopulmonary etiology. Treatment was initiated with intrathecal baclofen and the patient had symptomatic relief and improvement of dystonia. This case illustrates a novel form of the movement disorder associated with CRPS with response to intrathecal baclofen treatment.

  18. A Variable Stiffness Analysis Model for Large Complex Thin-Walled Guide Rail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Xiaolong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Large complex thin-walled guide rail has complicated structure and no uniform low rigidity. The traditional cutting simulations are time consuming due to huge computation especially in large workpiece. To solve these problems, a more efficient variable stiffness analysis model has been propose, which can obtain quantitative stiffness value of the machining surface. Applying simulate cutting force in sampling points using finite element analysis software ABAQUS, the single direction variable stiffness rule can be obtained. The variable stiffness matrix has been propose by analyzing multi-directions coupling variable stiffness rule. Combining with the three direction cutting force value, the reasonability of existing processing parameters can be verified and the optimized cutting parameters can be designed.

  19. Serial heart rhythm complexity changes in patients with anterior wall ST segment elevation myocardial infarction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Hung-Chih; Ma, Hsi-Pin; Lin, Chen; Lo, Men-Tzung; Lin, Lian-Yu; Wu, Cho-Kai; Chiang, Jiun-Yang; Lee, Jen-Kuang; Hung, Chi-Sheng; Wang, Tzung-Dau; Daisy Liu, Li-Yu; Ho, Yi-Lwun; Lin, Yen-Hung; Peng, Chung-Kang

    2017-03-01

    Heart rhythm complexity analysis has been shown to have good prognostic power in patients with cardiovascular disease. The aim of this study was to analyze serial changes in heart rhythm complexity from the acute to chronic phase of acute myocardial infarction (MI). We prospectively enrolled 27 patients with anterior wall ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) and 42 control subjects. In detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA), the patients had significantly lower DFAα2 in the acute stage (within 72 hours) and lower DFAα1 at 3 months and 12 months after MI. In multiscale entropy (MSE) analysis, the patients had a lower slope 5 in the acute stage, which then gradually increased during the follow-up period. The areas under the MSE curves for scale 1 to 5 (area 1-5) and 6 to 20 (area 6-20) were lower throughout the chronic stage. Area 6-20 had the greatest discriminatory power to differentiate the post-MI patients (at 1 year) from the controls. In both the net reclassification improvement and integrated discrimination improvement models, MSE parameters significantly improved the discriminatory power of the linear parameters to differentiate the post-MI patients from the controls. In conclusion, the patients with STEMI had serial changes in cardiac complexity.

  20. Control of linear modes in cylindrical resistive magnetohydrodynamics with a resistive wall, plasma rotation, and complex gain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brennan, D. P. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Finn, J. M. [Applied Mathematics and Plasma Physics, Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2014-10-15

    Feedback stabilization of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modes in a tokamak is studied in a cylindrical model with a resistive wall, plasma resistivity, viscosity, and toroidal rotation. The control is based on a linear combination of the normal and tangential components of the magnetic field just inside the resistive wall. The feedback includes complex gain, for both the normal and for the tangential components, and it is known that the imaginary part of the feedback for the former is equivalent to plasma rotation [J. M. Finn and L. Chacon, Phys. Plasmas 11, 1866 (2004)]. The work includes (1) analysis with a reduced resistive MHD model for a tokamak with finite β and with stepfunction current density and pressure profiles, and (2) computations with a full compressible visco-resistive MHD model with smooth decreasing profiles of current density and pressure. The equilibria are stable for β = 0 and the marginal stability values β{sub rp,rw} < β{sub rp,iw} < β{sub ip,rw} < β{sub ip,iw} (resistive plasma, resistive wall; resistive plasma, ideal wall; ideal plasma, resistive wall; and ideal plasma, ideal wall) are computed for both models. The main results are: (a) imaginary gain with normal sensors or plasma rotation stabilizes below β{sub rp,iw} because rotation suppresses the diffusion of flux from the plasma out through the wall and, more surprisingly, (b) rotation or imaginary gain with normal sensors destabilizes above β{sub rp,iw} because it prevents the feedback flux from entering the plasma through the resistive wall to form a virtual wall. A method of using complex gain G{sub i} to optimize in the presence of rotation in this regime with β > β{sub rp,iw} is presented. The effect of imaginary gain with tangential sensors is more complicated but essentially destabilizes above and below β{sub rp,iw}.

  1. Low-complexity stochastic modeling of wall-bounded shear flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zare, Armin

    Turbulent flows are ubiquitous in nature and they appear in many engineering applications. Transition to turbulence, in general, increases skin-friction drag in air/water vehicles compromising their fuel-efficiency and reduces the efficiency and longevity of wind turbines. While traditional flow control techniques combine physical intuition with costly experiments, their effectiveness can be significantly enhanced by control design based on low-complexity models and optimization. In this dissertation, we develop a theoretical and computational framework for the low-complexity stochastic modeling of wall-bounded shear flows. Part I of the dissertation is devoted to the development of a modeling framework which incorporates data-driven techniques to refine physics-based models. We consider the problem of completing partially known sample statistics in a way that is consistent with underlying stochastically driven linear dynamics. Neither the statistics nor the dynamics are precisely known. Thus, our objective is to reconcile the two in a parsimonious manner. To this end, we formulate optimization problems to identify the dynamics and directionality of input excitation in order to explain and complete available covariance data. For problem sizes that general-purpose solvers cannot handle, we develop customized optimization algorithms based on alternating direction methods. The solution to the optimization problem provides information about critical directions that have maximal effect in bringing model and statistics in agreement. In Part II, we employ our modeling framework to account for statistical signatures of turbulent channel flow using low-complexity stochastic dynamical models. We demonstrate that white-in-time stochastic forcing is not sufficient to explain turbulent flow statistics and develop models for colored-in-time forcing of the linearized Navier-Stokes equations. We also examine the efficacy of stochastically forced linearized NS equations and their

  2. Comparison of complex permittivities of isotonic colloids containing single-wall carbon nanotubes of varying chirality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Tejas; Symanowski, James T; Gach, H Michael

    2012-02-01

    The application of bio-compatible, conductive nanoparticles in combination with radiofrequency (RF) irradiation to raise tissue temperatures between 40 and 60 °C for hyperthermia and ablation spurred interest in the complex permittivities of isotonic nanoparticle-based colloids. Nanoparticles with large aspect ratios and high permittivities increase the bulk permittivity of the colloid and RF losses at the macroscopic scale. The complex permittivities of isotonic colloids with and without single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) containing either metallic, semiconducting, or mixed chiralities were measured from 20 MHz to 1 GHz at room temperature. The colloids were made with one of three different isotonic solvents: phosphate buffered saline (PBS), and Dulbecco's modified eagle medium (DMEM) with and without 0.5% weight/volume bovine serum albumin to simulate cytosol and blood, respectively. The concentration of elemental carbon from the SWCNTs in the colloids ranged from 16 to 17 mM. The permittivities were corrected for electrode polarization effects by fitting the data to the Cole-Cole relaxation model with a constant phase angle element. The presence of SWCNTs increased both the real and imaginary components of the permittivities of the colloids. For all three solvents, the direct current (DC) components of the real and imaginary permittivities were greatest for the colloids containing the mixed chirality SWCNTs, followed by the colloids with semiconducting SWCNTs, and then metallic SWCNTs. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Micro-Spectroscopic Imaging of Lignin-Carbohydrate Complexes in Plant Cell Walls and Their Migration During Biomass Pretreatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng, Yining; Zhao, Shuai; Wei, Hui; Tucker, Melvin P.; Johnson, David K.; Himmel, Michael E.; Mosier, Nathan S.; Meilan, Richard; Ding, Shi-You

    2015-04-27

    In lignocellulosic biomass, lignin is the second most abundant biopolymer. In plant cell walls, lignin is associated with polysaccharides to form lignin-carbohydrate complexes (LCC). LCC have been considered to be a major factor that negatively affects the process of deconstructing biomass to simple sugars by cellulosic enzymes. Here, we report a micro-spectroscopic approach that combines fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy and Stimulated Raman Scattering microscopy to probe in situ lignin concentration and conformation at each cell wall layer. This technique does not require extensive sample preparation or any external labels. Using poplar as a feedstock, for example, we observe variation of LCC in untreated tracheid poplar cell walls. The redistribution of LCC at tracheid poplar cell wall layers is also investigated when the chemical linkages between lignin and hemicellulose are cleaved during pretreatment. Our study would provide new insights into further improvement of the biomass pretreatment process.

  4. A relaxed fusion of information from real and synthetic images to predict complex behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Damian M.; Benjamin, D. Paul

    2011-05-01

    An important component of cognitive robotics is the ability to mentally simulate physical processes and to compare the expected results with the information reported by a robot's sensors. In previous work, we have proposed an approach that integrates a 3D game-engine simulation into the robot control architecture. A key part of that architecture is the Match-Mediated Difference (MMD) operation, an approach to fusing sensory data and synthetic predictions at the image level. The MMD operation insists that simulated and predicted scenes are similar in terms of the appearance of the objects in the scene. This is an overly restrictive constraint on the simulation since parts of the predicted scene may not have been previously viewed by the robot. In this paper we propose an extended MMD operation that relaxes the constraint and allows the real and synthetic scenes to differ in some features but not in (selected) other features. Image difference operations that allow a real image and synthetic image generated from an arbitrarily colored graphical model of a scene to be compared. Scenes with the same content show a zero difference. Scenes with varying foreground objects can be controlled to compare the color, size and shape of the foreground.

  5. Robotic Transversus Abdominis Release (TAR: is it possible to offer minimally invasive surgery for abdominal wall complex defects?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARIA VITÓRIA FRANÇA DO AMARAL

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT We describe the preliminary national experience and the early results of the use of robotic surgery to perform the posterior separation of abdominal wall components by the Transversus Abdominis Release (TAR technique for the correction of complex defects of the abdominal wall. We performed the procedures between 04/2/2015 and 06/15/2015 and the follow-up time was up to six months, with a minimum of two months. The mean surgical time was five hours and 40 minutes. Two patients required laparoscopic re-intervention, since one developed hernia by peritoneal migration of the mesh and one had mesh extrusion. The procedure proved to be technically feasible, with a still long surgical time. Considering the potential advantages of robotic surgery and those related to TAR and the results obtained when these two techniques are associated, we conclude that they seem to be a good option for the correction of complex abdominal wall defects.

  6. Revealing the Differences Between Free and Complexed Enzyme Mechanisms and Factors Contributing to Cell Wall Recalcitrance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Resch, M.

    2014-09-08

    Enzymatic depolymerization of polysaccharides is a key step in the production of fuels and chemicals from lignocellulosic biomass, and discovery of synergistic biomass-degrading enzyme paradigms will enable improved conversion processes. Historically, revealing insights into enzymatic saccharification mechanisms on plant cell walls has been hindered by uncharacterized substrates and low resolution imaging techniques. Also, translating findings between model substrates to intact biomass is critical for evaluating enzyme performance. Here we employ a fungal free enzyme cocktail, a complexed cellulosomal system, and a combination of the two to investigate saccharification mechanisms on cellulose I, II and III along with corn stover from Clean Fractionation (CF), which is an Organosolv pretreatment. The insoluble Cellulose Enriched Fraction (CEF) from CF contains mainly cellulose with minor amounts of residual hemicellulose and lignin, the amount of which depends on the CF pretreatment severity. Enzymatic digestions at both low and high-solids loadings demonstrate that CF reduces the amount of enzyme required to depolymerize polysaccharides relative to deacetylated, dilute acid pretreated corn stover. Transmission and scanning electron microscopy of the biomass provides evidence for the different mechanisms of enzymatic deconstruction between free and complexed enzyme systems, and reveals the basis for the synergistic relationship between the two enzyme paradigms on a process-relevant substrate for the first time. These results also demonstrate that the presence of lignin, rather than cellulose morphology, is more detrimental to cellulosome action than to free cellulases. As enzyme costs are a major economic driver for biorefineries, this study provides key inputs for the evaluation of CF as a pretreatment method for biomass conversion.

  7. A rare case of chronic traumatic diaphragmatic hernia requiring complex abdominal wall reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakula, Andrea; Jones, Amber; Syed, Javed; Skinner, Ruby

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic diaphragmatic hernia is a rare and often under recognized complication of penetrating and blunt trauma. These injuries are often missed or there is a delay in diagnosis which can lead to enlargement of the defect and the development of abdominal or respiratory symptoms. We report a case of an otherwise healthy 37 year old male who was involved in a motor vehicle accident at age twelve. He presented 25 years later with vague lower abdominal symptoms and was found to have a large chronic left sided diaphragmatic hernia involving the majority of his intra-abdominal contents. Repair of the defect with a biologic mesh was undertaken and the patient also required complex abdominal wall reconstruction due to loss of intra-abdominal domain from the chronicity of the hernia. A staged closure of the abdomen was performed first with placement of a Wittmann patch. Medical management of intra-abdominal hypertension was successful and the midline fascia was sequentially approximated at the bedside for three days. The final closure was performed with a component separation and implantation of a fenestrated biologic fetal bovine mesh to reinforce the closure. In addition, a lightweight Ultrapro mesh was placed for additional lateral reinforcement. The patient recovered well and was discharged home. These injuries are rare and diagnosis is challenging. Mechanism and CT scan characteristics can aid clinicians. Blunt diaphragmatic injury is rare and remains a diagnostic challenge. Depending on the chronicity of the injury, repair may require complex surgical decision making. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  8. Complex rectovaginal fistulas after pelvic organ prolapse repair with synthetic mesh: a multidisciplinary approach to evaluation and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Judy M; Nguyen, Vian; Khavari, Rose; Reeves, Keith; Snyder, Michael; Fletcher, Sophie G

    2012-01-01

    The use of synthetic mesh for transvaginal pelvic organ prolapse (POP) repair is associated with the rare complication of mesh erosion into hollow viscera. This study presents a single-institution series of complex rectovaginal fistulas (RVFs) after synthetic mesh-augmented POP repair, as well as strategies for identification and management. Institutional review board approval was obtained for this retrospective study. Data were collected and analyzed on all female patients undergoing RVF repair from 2000 to 2011 at our institution. Thirty-seven patients underwent RVF repair at our multidisciplinary center for restorative pelvic medicine. Of these, 10 (27.0%) were associated with POP repairs using mesh. The POP repairs resulting in RVF were transvaginal repair with mesh (n = 8), laparoscopic sacrocolpopexy with concomitant traditional posterior repair (n = 1), and robotic-assisted laparoscopic sacrocolpopexy (n = 1). Time to presentation was an average of 7.1 months after POP repair. Patients underwent a mean of 4.4 surgeries for definitive RVF repair, with 40% of patients requiring a bowel diversion (3 temporary ileostomies and 1 long-term colostomy). Mean follow-up time after last surgery was 9.2 months. On follow-up, 1 patient has a persistent fistula with vaginal mesh extrusion. One patient has persistent pelvic pain. This series highlights the significant impact of synthetic mesh complications in the posterior compartment. These complications should be cautionary for synthetic graft use by those with limited experience, particularly when an alternate choice of traditional repair is available. When symptoms of RVF are present, collaboration with a colon and rectal specialist should be initiated as soon as possible for evaluation and definitive repair.

  9. Novel heterometallic metal–azido complex synthesized by “one-step” reaction: synthetic strategy and magnetic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiao, Yong-Kun [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Tianjin University of Technology, Tianjin 300384 (China); Li, Xiu-Ping [Technical center for safety of industrial products of Tianjin entry-exit inspection and quarantine bureau, Tianjin 300201 (China); Zhao, Cui; Wang, Hai-Chao; Xue, Min [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Tianjin University of Technology, Tianjin 300384 (China); Zhao, Jiong-Peng, E-mail: horryzhao@yahoo.com [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Tianjin University of Technology, Tianjin 300384 (China); Liu, Fu-Chen, E-mail: fuchenliutj@yahoo.com [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Tianjin University of Technology, Tianjin 300384 (China); Lanzhou Petrochemical College of Vocational Technology, Lanzhou 730060 (China)

    2013-06-15

    A novel heterometallic complex, [Ni{sub 2}Mn(N{sub 3}){sub 2}(nic){sub 4}·(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}]{sub n} (1) (nic=nicotinate), was obtained by assembling MnCl{sub 2}·4H{sub 2}O, Ni(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}·6H{sub 2}O, NaN{sub 3} and nicotinic acid with a “one step” synthetic strategy—hydrothermal reaction. The 3D structure of the complex can be described as end-on (EO) azido and syn,syn carboxylates mixed bridged by alternate Ni–Mn–Ni trimers linked by the nicotinate. Dominant ferromagnetic interactions were observed between the Ni{sup II} and Mn{sup II} ions in the trimer. - Graphical abstract: A novel heterometallic 3D complex [Ni{sub 2}Mn(N{sub 3}){sub 2}(nic){sub 4}·(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}]{sub n} (1) (nic=nicotinate) was synthesized by hydrothermal reaction. This complex exhibits interesting structural and magnetic properties. - Highlights: • It is difficult to construct simple coordination complexes with azide as “ligands” to obtain heterometallic metal–azido compounds. • A “one-step” method—hydrothermal reaction— was introduced to avoid the disadvantages of azide mentioned above. • The magnetic property is different with the isostructural homometal–azido complex due to the changed metal center.

  10. Pea border cell maturation and release involve complex cell wall structural dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mravec, Jozef; Guo, Xiaoyuan; Hansen, Aleksander Riise

    2017-01-01

    of hydrolytic activities, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and immunolocalization of cell wall components. Using this integrated glycobiology approach, we identified multiple novel modes of cell wall structural and compositional rearrangement during root cap growth and the release of border cells. Our...

  11. The use of synthetic spectra to test the preparedness to evaluate and analyze complex gamma spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikkinen, M [Doletom OY (Finland)

    2001-10-01

    This is the report of two exercises that were run under the NKS BOK-1.1 sub-project. In these exercises synthetic gamma spectra were developed to exercise the analysis of difficult spectra typically seen after a severe nuclear accident. The spectra were analyzed twice; first, participants were given short time to give results to resemble an actual emergency preparedness situation, then a longer period of time was allowed to tune the laboratory analysis results for quality assurance purposes. The exercise did prove that it is possible to move measurement data from one laboratory to another if second opinion of the analysis is needed. It was also felt that this kind of exercise would enhance the experience the laboratories have in analyzing accident data. Participants expressed the need for additional exercises of this type, this is inexpensive and an easy way to exercise quick emergency response situations not normally seen in daily laboratory routines. (au)

  12. Enhanced solubilisation of six PAHs by three synthetic cyclodextrins for remediation applications: molecular modelling of the inclusion complexes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esmeralda Morillo

    Full Text Available Solubilisation of six polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs (acenaphthene, anthracene, fluoranthene, fluorene, phenanthrene and pyrene by three synthetic cyclodextrins (CDs (2-hydroxypropyl-β-CD, hydroxypropyl-γ-CD and randomly methylated-β-CD was investigated in order to select the CD which presents the greatest increase in solubility and better complexation parameters for its use in contaminated scenarios. The presence of the three cyclodextrins greatly enhanced the apparent water solubility of all the PAHs through the formation of inclusion complexes of 1:1 stoichiometry. Anthracene, fluoranthene, fluorene and phenanthrene clearly presented a higher solubility when β-CD derivatives were used, and especially the complexes with the randomly methylated-β-CD were favoured. On the contrary, pyrene presented its best solubility results when using 2-hydroxypropyl-γ-CD, but for acenaphthene the use of any of the three CDs gave the same results. Complementary to experimental phase-solubility studies, a more in-depth estimation of the inclusion process for the different complexes was carried out using molecular modelling in order to find a correlation between the degree of solubilisation and the fit of PAH molecules within the cavity of the different CDs and to know the predominant driving forces of the complexation.

  13. Towards Catalytic Ammonia Oxidation to Dinitrogen: A Synthetic Cycle by Using a Simple Manganese Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keener, Megan; Peterson, Madeline; Hernández Sánchez, Raúl; Oswald, Victoria F; Wu, Guang; Ménard, Gabriel

    2017-08-25

    Oxidation of the nucleophilic nitride, (salen)Mn≡N (1) with stoichiometric [Ar3 N][X] initiated a nitride coupling reaction to N2 , a major step toward catalytic ammonia oxidation (salen=N,N'-bis(salicylidene)-ethylenediamine dianion; Ar=p-bromophenyl; X=[SbCl6 ](-) or [B(C6 F5 )4 ](-) ). N2 production was confirmed by mass spectral analysis of the isotopomer, 1-(15) N, and the gas quantified. The metal products of oxidation were the reduced Mn(III) dimers, [(salen)MnCl]2 (2) or [(salen)Mn(OEt2 )]2 [B(C6 F5 )4 ]2 (3) for X=[SbCl6 ](-) or [B(C6 F5 )4 ](-) , respectively. The mechanism of nitride coupling was probed to distinguish a nitridyl from a nucleophilic/electrophilic coupling sequence. During these studies, a rare mixed-valent Mn(V) /Mn(III) bridging nitride, [(salen)Mn(V) (μ-N)Mn(III) (salen)][B(C6 F5 )4 ] (4), was isolated, and its oxidation-state assignment was confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies, perpendicular and parallel-mode EPR and UV/Vis/NIR spectroscopies, as well as superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometry. We found that 4 could subsequently be oxidized to 3. Furthermore, in view of generating a catalytic system, 2 can be re-oxidized to 1 in the presence of NH3 and NaOCl closing a pseudo-catalytic "synthetic" cycle. Together, the reduction of 1→2 followed by oxidation of 2→1 yield a genuine synthetic cycle for NH3 oxidation, paving the way to the development of a fully catalytic system by using abundant metal catalysis. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Prenatal sonographic diagnosis of limb-body wall complex: case series of a rare congenital anomaly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arshad Bhat, MBBS, DMRD

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Three case reports of a rare congenital anomaly “limb-body wall complex” also known as “body stalk syndrome” are presented with prenatal ultrasonographic diagnostic features, immediate after delivery evaluation, and histopathologic analysis.

  15. Synthetic bioactive novel ether based Schiff bases and their copper(II) complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabbir, Muhammad; Akhter, Zareen; Ismail, Hammad; Mirza, Bushra

    2017-10-01

    Novel ether based Schiff bases (HL1- HL4) were synthesized from 5-chloro-2-hydroxy benzaldehyde and primary amines (1-amino-4-phenoxybenzene, 4-(4-aminophenyloxy) biphenyl, 1-(4-aminophenoxy) naphthalene and 2-(4-aminophenoxy) naphthalene). From these Schiff bases copper(II) complexes (Cu(L1)2-Cu(L4)2)) were synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis and spectroscopic (FTIR, NMR) techniques. The synthesized Schiff bases and copper(II) complexes were further assessed for various biological studies. In brine shrimp assay the copper(II) complexes revealed 4-fold higher activity (LD50 3.8 μg/ml) as compared with simple ligands (LD50 12.4 μg/ml). Similar findings were observed in potato disc antitumor assay with higher activities for copper(II) complexes (IC50 range 20.4-24.1 μg/ml) than ligands (IC50 range 40.5-48.3 μg/ml). DPPH assay was performed to determine the antioxidant potential of the compounds. Significant antioxidant activity was shown by the copper(II) complexes whereas simple ligands have shown no activity. In DNA protection assay significant protection behavior was exhibited by simple ligand molecules while copper(II) complexes showed neutral behavior (neither protective nor damaging).

  16. Structure of the complex between teicoplanin and a bacterial cell-wall peptide: use of a carrier-protein approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Economou, Nicoleta J.; Zentner, Isaac J. [Drexel University College of Medicine, 245 North 15th Street, Philadelphia, PA 19102 (United States); Lazo, Edwin; Jakoncic, Jean; Stojanoff, Vivian [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Weeks, Stephen D.; Grasty, Kimberly C.; Cocklin, Simon; Loll, Patrick J. [Drexel University College of Medicine, 245 North 15th Street, Philadelphia, PA 19102 (United States)

    2013-04-01

    Using a carrier-protein strategy, the structure of teicoplanin bound to its bacterial cell-wall target has been determined. The structure reveals the molecular determinants of target recognition, flexibility in the antibiotic backbone and intrinsic radiation sensitivity of teicoplanin. Multidrug-resistant bacterial infections are commonly treated with glycopeptide antibiotics such as teicoplanin. This drug inhibits bacterial cell-wall biosynthesis by binding and sequestering a cell-wall precursor: a d-alanine-containing peptide. A carrier-protein strategy was used to crystallize the complex of teicoplanin and its target peptide by fusing the cell-wall peptide to either MBP or ubiquitin via native chemical ligation and subsequently crystallizing the protein–peptide–antibiotic complex. The 2.05 Å resolution MBP–peptide–teicoplanin structure shows that teicoplanin recognizes its ligand through a combination of five hydrogen bonds and multiple van der Waals interactions. Comparison of this teicoplanin structure with that of unliganded teicoplanin reveals a flexibility in the antibiotic peptide backbone that has significant implications for ligand recognition. Diffraction experiments revealed an X-ray-induced dechlorination of the sixth amino acid of the antibiotic; it is shown that teicoplanin is significantly more radiation-sensitive than other similar antibiotics and that ligand binding increases radiosensitivity. Insights derived from this new teicoplanin structure may contribute to the development of next-generation antibacterials designed to overcome bacterial resistance.

  17. A synthetic polyphosphoinositide headgroup surrogate in complex with SHIP2 provides a rationale for drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Stephen J; Persson, Camilla; Cozier, Gyles; Thomas, Mark P; Trésaugues, Lionel; Erneux, Christophe; Riley, Andrew M; Nordlund, Pär; Potter, Barry V L

    2012-05-18

    Phosphoinositides regulate many cellular processes, and cellular levels are controlled by kinases and phosphatases. SHIP2 (SH2 (Src homology 2)-domain-containing inositol-phosphatase-2) plays a critical role in phosphoinositide signaling, cleaving the 5-phosphate from phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate. SHIP2 is thought to be involved in type-2 diabetes and obesity, conditions that could therefore be open to pharmacological modulation of the enzyme. However, rational design of SHIP2 inhibitors has been limited by the absence of a high-resolution structure. Here, we present a 2.1 Å resolution crystal structure of the phosphatase domain of SHIP2 bound to the synthetic ligand biphenyl 2,3',4,5',6-pentakisphosphate (BiPh(2,3',4,5',6)P(5)). BiPh(2,3',4,5',6)P(5) is not a SHIP2 substrate but inhibits Ins(1,3,4,5)P(4) hydrolysis with an IC(50) of 24.8 ± 3.0 μM, (K(m) for Ins(1,3,4,5)P(4) is 215 ± 28 μM). Molecular dynamics simulations suggest that when BiPh(2,3',4,5',6)P(5) binds to SHIP2, a flexible loop folds over and encloses the ligand. Compounds targeting such a closed conformation might therefore deliver SHIP2-specific drugs.

  18. Single ventricle, bicuspid aorta and interatrial wall aneurysm as a rare complex adult congenital heart disease: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Berisha, Blerim; Krasniqi, Xhevdet; Thaqi, Agim; Gashi, Masar; Ko?inaj, Dardan

    2009-01-01

    Background Single ventricle, bicuspid aortic valve and interatrial wall aneurysm in adulthood are a rare and unique case in medical literature. This presented case with congenital heart disease has never been treated surgically and clinical consequences seriously presented in adulthood. Case presentation A 27 year old man with complex congenital heart disease presented. At the age of six, the single ventricle was ultrasonographly diagnosed, but at age 27 clinical consequences started to be se...

  19. Limb Body Wall Complex Associated with Placenta Accreta: A Mere Coincidence or a Sign of an Etiopathogenic Link?

    OpenAIRE

    Okido, Marcos Masaru; Berezowski, Aderson Tadeu; Carvalho, Sandra Regina Marques; Duarte, Geraldo; Cavalli, Ricardo de Carvalho; Marcolin, Alessandra Cristina

    2017-01-01

    Abstract A case was reported of a fetus with the anomaly of limb body wall complex associated with placenta accreta. To date, only one account of this condition has been published in the world literature. Due to the low frequency of both complications, the hypothesis has been raised that this association may have happened not by mere coincidence, but rather by a possible common etiopathogenic mechanism. For the first time, a study proposes the existence of a possible etiopathogenic connection...

  20. Thermodynamic stabilities of complexes of synthetic macrocyclic valinomycin mimics with alkali, barium, and guanidinium cations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grootenhuis, P.D.J.; van der Wal, Peter D.; Reinhoudt, David

    1987-01-01

    Association constants of the 1:1 complexes of a series of pyrido crown ethers 1 (n=0–6) and a number of large ring (27–33 ring atoms) benzo and dibenzo crown ethers 2,3 with alkali, barium and guanidinium chlorides have been determined potentiometrically in MeOH. For most of the ions besides a

  1. Synthetic, Crystallographic, and Computational Study of Copper(II) Complexes of Ethylenediaminetetracarboxylate Ligands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matovic, Zoran D.; Miletic, Vesna D.; Cendic, Marina; Meetsma, Auke; van Koningsbruggen, Petra J.; Deeth, Robert J.; Matović, Zoran D.; Miletić, Vesna D.; Ćendić, Marina

    2013-01-01

    Copper(II) complexes of hexadentate ethylenediaminetetracarboxylic acid type ligands H(4)eda3p and Rieddadp (H(4)eda3p = ethylenediamine-N-acetic-N,N',N'-tri-3-propionic acid; ateddadp = ethylenediamine-N,N'-diaceticN,N'-di-3-propionic acid) have been prepared. An octahedral trans(O-6) geometry (two

  2. MULTIMODALITY THERAPY FOR OSTEOSARCOMA OF THE STERNUM WITH RECONSTRUCTION OF COMPLEX CHEST WALL DEFECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. E. Ivanov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Osteosarcoma is a high-grade malignant bone tumor that accounts for up to 6 % of all bone neoplasms. There are only a few published cases of primary sternal osteosarcomas, reflecting the rarity of these tumors. Recently, there has been a growing interest in performing radical excisions of chest wall tumors followed by combined single-stage reconstruction of the rib cage with implants made of biologically compatible materials. Material and methods. We present the case of a 49-year-old woman diagnosed with osteosarcoma of the sternum. The patient received a combined modality treatment including chemotherapy, radiotherapy and surgery. Titanium nickelid implants were used for the reconstruction of chest wall defects. Results. The multimodality treatment with reconstruction of postoperative chest wall defects allowed the achievement of the optimal quality of life for 21 months in the patient with very poor prognosis. Conclusion. The chest wall reconstruction using biocompatible materials from titanium nickelid appeared to be an effective and safe technique for the treatment of chest wall tumors.

  3. Unwinding DNA and RNA with Synthetic Complexes: On the Way to Artificial Helicases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasiorek, Martin; Schneider, Hans-Jörg

    2015-12-07

    Synthetic helicases can be designed on the basis of ligands that bind more strongly to single-stranded nucleic acids than to double-stranded nucleic acids. This can be achieved with ligands containing phenyl groups, which intercalate into single strands, but due to their small size not into double strands. Moreover, two phenyl rings are combined with a distance that allows bis-intercalation with only single strands and not double strands. In this respect, such ligands also mimic single-strand binding (SSB) proteins. Exploration with more than 23 ligands, mostly newly synthesised, shows that the distance between the phenyl rings and between those and the linker influence the DNA unwinding efficiency, which can reach a melting point decrease of almost ΔTm =50 °C at much lower concentrations than that with any other known artificial helicases. Conformational pre-organisation of the ligand plays a decisive role in optimal efficiency. Substituents at the phenyl rings have a large effect, and increase, for example, in the order of H

  4. The Sinus Membrane-Maxillary Lateral Wall Complex: Histologic Description and Clinical Implications for Maxillary Sinus Floor Elevation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insua, Angel; Monje, Alberto; Urban, Istvan; Kruger, Laura G; Garaicoa-Pazmiño, Carlos; Sugai, James V; Wang, Hom-Lay

    Maxillary sinus floor elevation has been documented as a safe and predictable procedure for gaining vertical bone height in the atrophic posterior maxillae. Conversely, there is a lack of basic research on the characteristics of the union between the sinus membrane (SM) and the bone. Clinical implications of an impaired union in healthy or pathologic membranes remain unknown. The objective of this study was to present a comprehensive histologic and morphologic description of the sinus membrane-lateral bone wall complex. In 14 fresh cadaver heads, 28 lateral wall sinus augmentation procedures were performed to obtain SM samples. Samples were assessed using hematoxylin-eosin, Masson trichrome, and toluidine blue staining and immunofluorescence and immunohistochemistry procedures. Specimens were coded and studied by a trained examiner using an optical microscope at ×4, ×10, ×40, and ×100 objectives. Thickness and inflammation status were assessed in these samples. Overall SM thickness of the samples was 0.40 ± 0.12 mm and was positively correlated to the inflammatory condition of the membranes. Such low values are the consequence of limited inflammation. Most of the fibers and cells in the deeper layers of the SM ran in a horizontal direction, oriented parallel to the underlying bone wall. In the immunohistochemistry study, 3 out of 7 samples showed a certain degree of nestin expression, suggesting osteogenic potential in spite of the elderly specimens. Large variations in thickness across the SM were found. These were noted to be partially correlated to the SM inflammatory status. The vast majority of the fibers were oriented parallel to the maxillary lateral wall, and only a few isolated areas showed a stronger perpendicular attachment. This might indicate the surpassing importance of the SM inflammatory status, operator skill, and other anatomical factors over the sinus membrane-maxillary lateral wall complex interface. Moreover, about half of the SM

  5. Recognition and sensing of low-epitope targets via ternary complexes with oligonucleotides and synthetic receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kyung-Ae; Barbu, Mihaela; Halim, Marlin; Pallavi, Payal; Kim, Benjamin; Kolpashchikov, Dmitry M.; Pecic, Stevan; Taylor, Steven; Worgall, Tilla S.; Stojanovic, Milan N.

    2014-11-01

    Oligonucleotide-based receptors or aptamers can interact with small molecules, but the ability to achieve high-affinity and specificity of these interactions depends strongly on functional groups or epitopes displayed by the binding targets. Some classes of targets are particularly challenging: for example, monosaccharides have scarce functionalities and no aptamers have been reported to recognize, let alone distinguish from each other, glucose and other hexoses. Here we report aptamers that differentiate low-epitope targets such as glucose, fructose or galactose by forming ternary complexes with high-epitope organic receptors for monosaccharides. In a follow-up example, we expand this method to isolate high-affinity oligonucleotides against aromatic amino acids complexed in situ with a nonspecific organometallic receptor. The method is general and enables broad clinical use of aptamers for the detection of small molecules in mix-and-measure assays, as demonstrated by monitoring postprandial waves of phenylalanine in human subjects.

  6. Indirect complexometric determination of mercury(II in synthetic alloys and complexes using ethanethiol as a selective masking agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. KARTHIKEYAN

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Acomplexometric method for the determination of mercury(II in presence of other metal ions, based on the selective masking action of ethanethiol towards mercury(II is described. Mercury(II present in a given sample solution is first complexed with an excess of EDTAand the unreacted EDTAis titrated against zinc sulphate solution at pH 5–6 (hexamine buffer using xylenol orange as the indicator. An excess of a 0.3 % solution of ethanethiol is then added to displace EDTA from the Hg(II–EDTA complex. The released EDTAis titrated with a standard zinc sulphate solution. Reproducible and accurate results are obtained for 4–85 mg of mercury(II with a relative error of less than ± 0.46 % and coefficient of variation of not more than 0.47 %. The effects of the presence of various ions were studied. The method can be used for the analysis of mercury in its synthetic alloy mixtures and also in complexes.

  7. Setting up and validating a complex model for a simple homogeneous wall

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naveros, I.; Bacher, Peder; Ruiz, D. P.

    2014-01-01

    -box modelling based on statistical methods and known physical dynamic energy balance equations, related to the heat flux density through a simple and homogeneous wall. The experimental test was carried out in a hot-temperature climate for nine months. This study aims at proposing a dynamic method improving...... the regression averages method for estimation of parameters which describe the thermal behaviour of the wall. Solar irradiance and long-wave radiation balance terms are added in the heat balance equation besides modelling of wind speed effect to achieve a complete description of the relevant phenomena which...

  8. Interaction and Binding Modes of bis-Ruthenium(II Complex to Synthetic DNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasi Rani Barai

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available [μ-(linkerL2(dipyrido[3,2-a:2′,3′-c]phenazine2(phenanthroline2Ru(II2]2+ with linker: 1,3-bis-(4-pyridyl-propane, L: PF6 (bis-Ru-bpp was synthesized and their binding properties to a various polynucleotides were investigated by spectroscopy, including normal absorption, circular dichroism(CD, linear dichroism(LD, and luminescence techniques in this study. On binding to polynucleotides, the bis-Ru-bpp complex with poly[d(A-T2], and poly[d(I-C2] exhibited a negative LDr signal whose intensity was as large as that in the DNA absorption region, followed by a complicated LDr signal in the metal-to-ligand charge transfer region. Also, the emission intensity and equilibrium constant of the bis-Ru-bpp complex with poly[d(A-T2], and poly[d(I-C2] were enhanced. It was reported that both of dppz ligand of the bis-Ru-bpp complex intercalated between DNA base-pairs when bound to native, mixed sequence DNA. Observed spectral properties resemble to those observed for poly[d(A-T2] and poly[d(I-C2], led us to be concluded that both dppz ligands intercalate between alternated AT and IC bases-pairs In contrast when bis-Ru-bpp complex was bound to poly[d(G-C2], the magnitude of the LDr in the dppz absorption region, as well as the emission intensity, was half in comparison to that of bound to poly[d(A-T2], and poly[d(I-C2]. Therefore the spectral properties of the bis-Ru-bpp-poly[d(G-C2] complex suggested deviation from bis-intercalation model in the poly[d(G-C2] case. These results can be explained by a model whereby one of the dppz ligands is intercalated while the other is exposed to solvent or may exist near to phosphate. Also it is indicative that the amine group of guanine in the minor groove provides the steric hindrance for incoming intercalation binder and it also takes an important role in a difference in binding of bis-Ru-bpp bound to poly[d(A-T2] and poly[d(I-C2].

  9. Development of a Near-Field Bistatic Synthetic Aperture Radar for Complex Target Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David G. Johnson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper begins with a description of the design, construction, and characterization of a small electromagnetic anechoic chamber, developed specifically to house a bistatic ISAR system for the analysis of rock samples. Particular emphasis is given to the practicalities of construction, with the intention of assisting those in a similar position, wishing to build an anechoic chamber on a tight budget. The second part of the paper outlines efficient algorithms that may be applied to the tomographic and topographic reconstruction of complex targets within the viewing geometry of this ISAR system.

  10. State stiffness parameters of the vascular wall in hypertensive patients complex therapy cytoprotector and sartans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. P. Mikhin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A randomized study of the state of stiffness parameters arteries wall (CAVI — cardio-ankle vascular index, AI (augmentation index PEP (duration of the voltage of the left ventricle using «VaSera-1000» («Fukuda Denshi», Japan in primary hypertension patients (80 not treated with systemic antihypertensive therapy. The effect of long-term (3 months was be marketed. Losartan combined with Mexicor 300mg/day or mildronate 1000 mg/day for the specified parameters. It sets the initial reduction the properties of the arterial wall in patients with hypertension, in contrast to healthy individuals. Mexicor or mildronat accompanied by improvement east-cal properties of the arterial wall, reducing CAVI and AI in 3 months on 9.4% and 8.9%, 14.9% and 15.4%, respectively. In the control group-term change CAVI and AI no. Mexicor led to a more pronounced increase in PEP, than mildronate, respectively, on 23.7% and 18.9%. Losartan monotherapy results in a less pronounced decrease in the stiffness of the vessel wall.

  11. Revealing the Differences Between Free and Complexed Enzyme Mechanisms and Factors Contributing to Cell Wall Recalcitrance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Resch, Michael G.; Donohoe, Byron; Ciesielski, Peter; Nill, Jennifer; McKinney, Kellene; Mittal, Ashutosh; Katahira, Rui; Himmel, Michael; Biddy, Mary; Beckham, Gregg; Decker, Steve

    2014-09-08

    Enzymatic depolymerization of polysaccharides is a key step in the production of fuels and chemicals from lignocellulosic biomass, and discovery of synergistic biomass-degrading enzyme paradigms will enable improved conversion processes. Historically, revealing insights into enzymatic saccharification mechanisms on plant cell walls has been hindered by uncharacterized substrates and low resolution.

  12. Structure of the complex between teicoplanin and a bacterial cell-wall peptide: use of a carrier-protein approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Economou, Nicoleta J; Zentner, Isaac J; Lazo, Edwin; Jakoncic, Jean; Stojanoff, Vivian; Weeks, Stephen D; Grasty, Kimberly C; Cocklin, Simon; Loll, Patrick J

    2013-04-01

    Multidrug-resistant bacterial infections are commonly treated with glycopeptide antibiotics such as teicoplanin. This drug inhibits bacterial cell-wall biosynthesis by binding and sequestering a cell-wall precursor: a D-alanine-containing peptide. A carrier-protein strategy was used to crystallize the complex of teicoplanin and its target peptide by fusing the cell-wall peptide to either MBP or ubiquitin via native chemical ligation and subsequently crystallizing the protein-peptide-antibiotic complex. The 2.05 Å resolution MBP-peptide-teicoplanin structure shows that teicoplanin recognizes its ligand through a combination of five hydrogen bonds and multiple van der Waals interactions. Comparison of this teicoplanin structure with that of unliganded teicoplanin reveals a flexibility in the antibiotic peptide backbone that has significant implications for ligand recognition. Diffraction experiments revealed an X-ray-induced dechlorination of the sixth amino acid of the antibiotic; it is shown that teicoplanin is significantly more radiation-sensitive than other similar antibiotics and that ligand binding increases radiosensitivity. Insights derived from this new teicoplanin structure may contribute to the development of next-generation antibacterials designed to overcome bacterial resistance.

  13. Selection, characterisation and mapping of complex electrochemical processes at individual single-walled carbon nanotubes: the case of serotonin oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güell, Aleix G; Meadows, Katherine E; Dudin, Petr V; Ebejer, Neil; Byers, Joshua C; Macpherson, Julie V; Unwin, Patrick R

    2014-01-01

    The electrochemical (EC) oxidation of the neurotransmitter, serotonin, at individual single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) is investigated at high resolution using a novel platform that combines flow-aligned SWNTs with atomic force microscopy, Raman microscopy, electronic conductance measurements, individual SWNT electrochemistry and high-resolution scanning electrochemical cell microscopy (SECCM). SECCM has been used to visualise the EC activity along side-wall sections of metallic SWNTs to assess the extent to which side-walls promote the electrochemistry of this complex multi-step process. Uniform and high EC activity is observed that is consistent with significant reaction at the side-wall, rather than electrochemistry being driven by defects alone. By scanning forward and reverse (trace and retrace) over the same region of a SWNT, it is also possible to assess any blocking of EC activity by serotonin oxidation reaction products. At a physiologically relevant concentration (5 μM), there is no detectable blocking of SWNTs, which can be attributed, at least in part, to the high diffusion rate to an individual, isolated SWNT in the SECCM format. At higher serotonin concentration (2 mM), oligomer formation from oxidation products is much more significant and major blocking of the EC process is observed from line profiles recorded as the SECCM meniscus moves over an SWNT. The SECCM line profile morphology is shown to be highly diagnostic of whether blocking occurs during EC processes. The studies herein add to a growing body of evidence that various EC processes at SWNTs, from simple outer sphere redox reactions to complex multi-step processes, occur readily at pristine SWNTs. The platform described is of general applicability to various types of nanostructures and nanowires.

  14. Identifying Successive Eruption of Guntur Volcanic Complex Using Magnetic Susceptibility and Polarimetric Synthetic Aperture Radar (PolSAR) Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saepuloh, Asep; Bakker, Erwin

    2017-06-01

    Identifying distribution and stratigraphic of volcanic products are important not only for mitigating volcanic hazards, but also to know the characteristics of the successive eruptions. Guntur volcanic complex located in Garut, West Java, Indonesia was selected as study area because of the last eruption took place in 1847 and the volcanic activity has been dormant since then, however its seismicity is still active. During the period of July to October 2009, the hypocentre distribution of volcano tectonic earthquakes is mostly located at western flank of the volcano, beneath Guntur - Gandapura craters at the depth of less than 5 km. This study is aimed to identify distribution and succession of volcanic products based on their magnetic properties and backscattering signal of Polarimetric Synthetic Aperture Radar (PolSAR) data. The polarimetric decomposition method was used to identify the distribution of the volcanic products based on their scattering characteristics. Then, the field measurement using SM-30 magnetic susceptibility meter was performed to confirm the units of volcanic products and interpret their successions. According to the polarimetric decomposition method, we could identify fifteen successive eruptions formed Guntur Volcano Complex and termed as Khuluk and Gumuk in Indonesian standard. The successions were produced Gumuk Windu, Gumuk Malang, Gumuk Pulus, Gumuk Putrri, Khuluk Meungpeuk, Gumuk Cakra, Gumuk Gandapura, Gumuk Putri, Gumuk Gajah, Gumuk Batususun, Khuluk Pasirlaku, Gumuk Agung, Gumuk Picung, Gumuk Pasirmalang, Gumuk Masigit, Khuluk Kabuyutan and Khuluk Guntur. The magnetic susceptibility confirmed that the variations of magnetic susceptibility of rocks at each gumuk agreed with their stratigraphy.

  15. Management of Complex Abdominal Wall Defects Associated with Penetrating Abdominal Trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-09

    nurse specialist, microbiology, intensive care , the hos- pital medical director and the orthopaedic surgeons if there was concomitant bony or extremity...management of the abdominal wall was determined by a multidisciplinary team of general and plastic surgeons, intensivists and specialist nurses . The...timed to allow oedema to settle and sepsis to be controlled. Closure techniques include delayed primary closure with traction sutures, components

  16. Leaf-cutting ant fungi produce cell wall degrading pectinase complexes reminiscent of phytopathogenic fungi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiott, Morten; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina; Roepstorff, Peter

    2010-01-01

    with new garden substrate. Substantial quantities of pectinolytic enzymes are typically found in pathogenic fungi that attack live plant tissue, where they are known to breach the cell walls to allow the fungal mycelium access to the cell contents. As the leaf-cutting ant symbionts are derived from fungal...... clades that decompose dead plant material, our results suggest that their pectinolytic enzymes represent secondarily evolved adaptations that are convergent to those normally found in phytopathogens....

  17. Single ventricle, bicuspid aorta and interatrial wall aneurysm as a rare complex adult congenital heart disease: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berisha, Blerim; Krasniqi, Xhevdet; Thaqi, Agim; Gashi, Masar; Koçinaj, Dardan

    2009-01-31

    Single ventricle, bicuspid aortic valve and interatrial wall aneurysm in adulthood are a rare and unique case in medical literature. This presented case with congenital heart disease has never been treated surgically and clinical consequences seriously presented in adulthood. A 27 year old man with complex congenital heart disease presented. At the age of six, the single ventricle was ultrasonographly diagnosed, but at age 27 clinical consequences started to be seriously present. We explored his history, clinical course, physical examination, laboratory findings, medical treatments and actual patient condition. The possibilities for surgical evaluation are presented.

  18. Analysis of Complex Carbohydrate Composition in Plant Cell Wall Using Fourier Transformed Mid-Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badhan, Ajay; Wang, Yuxi; McAllister, Tim A

    2017-01-01

    Fourier transformed mid-infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) is a powerful tool for compositional analysis of plant cell walls (Acebes et al., Front Plant Sci 5:303, 2014; Badhan et al., Biotechnol Biofuels 7:1-15, 2014; Badhan et al., BioMed Res Int 2015: 562952, 2015; Roach et al., Plant Physiol 156:1351-1363, 2011). The infrared spectrum generates a fingerprint of a sample with absorption peaks corresponding to the frequency of vibrations between the bonds of the atoms making up the material. Here, we describe a method focused on the use of FTIR in combination with principal component analysis (PCA) to characterize the composition of the plant cell wall. This method has been successfully used to study complex enzyme saccharification processes like rumen digestion to identify recalcitrant moieties in low-quality forage which resist rumen digestion (Badhan et al., BioMed Res Int 2015: 562952, 2015), as well as to characterize cell wall mutant lines or transgenic lines expressing exogenous hydrolases (Badhan et al., Biotechnol Biofuels 7:1-15, 2014; Roach et al., Plant Physiol 156:1351-1363, 2011). The FTIR method described here facilitates high-throughput identification of the major compositional differences across a large set of samples in a low cost and nondestructive manner.

  19. Genetic complexity of miscanthus cell wall composition and biomass quality for biofuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Weijde, Tim; Kamei, Claire L Alvim; Severing, Edouard I; Torres, Andres F; Gomez, Leonardo D; Dolstra, Oene; Maliepaard, Chris A; McQueen-Mason, Simon J; Visser, Richard G F; Trindade, Luisa M

    2017-05-25

    Miscanthus sinensis is a high yielding perennial grass species with great potential as a bioenergy feedstock. One of the challenges that currently impedes commercial cellulosic biofuel production is the technical difficulty to efficiently convert lignocellulosic biomass into biofuel. The development of feedstocks with better biomass quality will improve conversion efficiency and the sustainability of the value-chain. Progress in the genetic improvement of biomass quality may be substantially expedited by the development of genetic markers associated to quality traits, which can be used in a marker-assisted selection program. To this end, a mapping population was developed by crossing two parents of contrasting cell wall composition. The performance of 182 F1 offspring individuals along with the parents was evaluated in a field trial with a randomized block design with three replicates. Plants were phenotyped for cell wall composition and conversion efficiency characters in the second and third growth season after establishment. A new SNP-based genetic map for M. sinensis was built using a genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS) approach, which resulted in 464 short-sequence uniparental markers that formed 16 linkage groups in the male map and 17 linkage groups in the female map. A total of 86 QTLs for a variety of biomass quality characteristics were identified, 20 of which were detected in both growth seasons. Twenty QTLs were directly associated to different conversion efficiency characters. Marker sequences were aligned to the sorghum reference genome to facilitate cross-species comparisons. Analyses revealed that for some traits previously identified QTLs in sorghum occurred in homologous regions on the same chromosome. In this work we report for the first time the genetic mapping of cell wall composition and bioconversion traits in the bioenergy crop miscanthus. These results are a first step towards the development of marker-assisted selection programs in miscanthus

  20. The structure-property relationship of oxovanadium(IV) complexes in the wall framework of PMOs and their catalytic applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Shijian [State Key Laboratory of Materials-Oriented Chemical Engineering, College of Chemical Engineering, Nanjing Tech University, Nanjing 210009 (China); Jiangsu National Synergetic Innovation Center for Advanced Materials (SICAM), Nanjing Tech University, Nanjing, 210009 Jiangsu (China); Wang, Bangbang; Gao, Shuying; Ding, Yun [State Key Laboratory of Materials-Oriented Chemical Engineering, College of Chemical Engineering, Nanjing Tech University, Nanjing 210009 (China); Kong, Yan, E-mail: kongy36@njtech.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Materials-Oriented Chemical Engineering, College of Chemical Engineering, Nanjing Tech University, Nanjing 210009 (China)

    2017-03-01

    Graphical abstract: In this work, oxovanadium(IV) species have been successfully incorporated into the wall framework of PMOs materials by the co-condensation of the silica source with oxovanadium organic complexes. The oxovanadium(IV) species are existed as the tetrahedral coordination and also be stable and well-dispersed in the framework of the PMOs materials. These as-prepared functional catalysts are proved to be effective in the oxidation of styrene, and high catalytic stabilities are obtained. - Highlights: • The oxovanadium complexes were directly incorporated into the wall framework of PMOs instead of the pore channels by one-step synthesis process, partly avoiding the destruction of the mesoporous channels. • The vanadium species in the framework of PMOs are highly stable as pseudotetrahedral monovanadate. • These as-prepared V-PMO catalysts display high catalytic activity and stability in the styrene oxidation reaction. - Abstract: Oxovanadium(IV) species could be considered as effective active sites in the catalytic oxidation reactions, but in the traditional vanadium-containing catalysts, the unstable and undispersible status of these active sites cause great limitation in their application. In this study, we present a novel approach to utilize the co-condensation of the silica source with oxovanadium organic complexes through the liquid-crystal templating (LCT) process introducing the vanadium species into the framework of periodically meosporous organosilicas (PMOs). Oxovanadium organic complexes are successfully obtained by the coordination effect between vanadium species and organic complexes. Thus the vanadium-containing PMOs catalysts are accordingly synthesized; the model structure of as-prepared catalysts is proposed and further verified by different characterization measurements. These vanadium-containing PMOs catalysts display the extremely stable and well-dispersed oxovanadium(IV) species in the framework, and due to this advanced

  1. The Cell Wall Teichuronic Acid Synthetase (TUAS Is an Enzyme Complex Located in the Cytoplasmic Membrane of Micrococcus luteus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingyi Lynn Deng

    2010-01-01

    composed of disaccharide repeating units [-4-β-D-ManNAcAp-(1→6α-D-Glcp−1-]n, which is covalently anchored to the peptidoglycan on the inner cell wall and extended to the outer surface of the cell envelope. An enzyme complex responsible for the TUA chain biosynthesis was purified and characterized. The 440 kDa enzyme complex, named teichuronic acid synthetase (TUAS, is an octomer composed of two kinds of glycosyltransferases, Glucosyltransferase, and ManNAcA-transferase, which is capable of catalyzing the transfer of disaccharide glycosyl residues containing both glucose and the N-acetylmannosaminuronic acid residues. TUAS displays hydrophobic properties and is found primarily associated with the cytoplasmic membrane. The purified TUAS contains carotinoids and lipids. TUAS activity is diminished by phospholipase digestion. We propose that TUAS serves as a multitasking polysaccharide assembling station on the bacterial membrane.

  2. Attraction of Chrysoperla carnea complex and Chrysopa spp. lacewings (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae) to aphid sex pheromone components and a synthetic blend of floral compounds in Hungary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koczor, Sándor; Szentkirályi, Ferenc; Birkett, Michael A; Pickett, John A; Voigt, Erzsébet; Tóth, Miklós

    2010-12-01

    The deployment of synthetic attractants for the manipulation of lacewing populations as aphid predators is currently used in integrated pest management. This study investigates a synthetic bait comprising floral compounds previously found to attract the Chrysoperla carnea complex, and, for the first time, the aphid sex pheromone components (1R,4aS,7S,7aR)-nepetalactol and (4aS,7S,7aR)-nepetalactone, in field experiments in Hungary, for their ability to manipulate lacewing populations. The synthetic floral bait attracted both sexes of the Chrysoperla carnea complex, and Chrysopa formosa Brauer showed minimal attraction. The aphid sex pheromone compounds alone attracted males of C. formosa and C. pallens (Rambur). When the two baits were combined, Chrysopa catches were similar to those with aphid sex pheromone baits alone, but carnea complex catches decreased significantly (by 85-88%). As the floral bait alone attracted both sexes of the carnea complex, it showed potential to manipulate the location of larval density via altering the site of oviposition. Aphid sex pheromone compounds alone attracted predatory males of Chrysopa spp. and can potentially be used to enhance biological control of aphids. For the carnea complex, however, a combination of both baits is not advantageous because of the decrease in adults attracted. Assumptions of intraguild avoidance underlying this phenomenon are discussed. Copyright © 2010 Society of Chemical Industry.

  3. Physicochemical properties of complex rhamnogalacturonan I from gelatinous cell walls of flax fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikshina, Polina V; Idiyatullin, Bulat Z; Petrova, Anna A; Shashkov, Alexander S; Zuev, Yuriy F; Gorshkova, Tatyana A

    2015-03-06

    The physicochemical properties of flax fiber cell wall rhamnogalacturonan I (RG-I) and its fragments, obtained after galactanase treatment (fraction G1), were characterized. RG-I retains its hydrodynamic volume after its molecular weight decreases by approximately half, as revealed by SEC. Two techniques, DLS and NMR, with different principles of diffusion experiment were used to establish the reasons for this property of RG-I. Three possible types of particles were revealed by DLS depending on the concentration of the RG-I and G1 solutions (2-2.5, 15-20, and 150-200 nm). It was determined by BPP-LED experiments that the backbone of the RG-I was 1.3-1.9-fold more mobile than the side chains. The obtained data suggest a novel type of pectin spatial organization-the formation of RG-I associates with the backbone at the periphery and the interaction between the side chains to form a core zone. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Conformational Mobility of GOx Coenzyme Complex on Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Kang

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available A critical issue in bioelectrochemical applications that use electrodes modified by Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes (SWCNTs is to ensure high activity of the catalytic site of an immobilized enzyme protein interacting with nanomaterials. Since Flavin Adenine Dinucleotide (FAD, a coenzyme of glucose oxidase (GOx, is the active center of the catalytic site, conformation of which could determine the activity of enzyme, it is important to understand the dynamic mechanism of its conformational mobility while GOx is adsorbed on SWCNTs with multiple orientations. However, this dynamic mechanism still remains unclear at the atomic level due to the coenzyme being embedded in the apo-GOx and the limitations of appropriate experimental methods. In this study, a molecular dynamics (MD simulation was performed to investigate the conformational mobility mechanism of the coenzyme. The trajectory and the interaction energy clearly indicate that the adsorption of GOx onto SWCNTs plays an important role in the conformational mobility of the coenzyme, and its mobility is greatly affected by the distribution of water molecules due to it being hydrophobic.

  5. Control of linear modes in cylindrical resistive magnetohydrodynamics with a resistive wall, plasma rotation, and complex gain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, D. P.; Finn, J. M.

    2014-10-01

    Feedback stabilization of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modes in a tokamak is studied in a cylindrical model with a resistive wall, plasma resistivity, viscosity, and toroidal rotation. The control is based on a linear combination of the normal and tangential components of the magnetic field just inside the resistive wall. The feedback includes complex gain, for both the normal and for the tangential components, and it is known that the imaginary part of the feedback for the former is equivalent to plasma rotation [J. M. Finn and L. Chacon, Phys. Plasmas 11, 1866 (2004)]. The work includes (1) analysis with a reduced resistive MHD model for a tokamak with finite β and with stepfunction current density and pressure profiles, and (2) computations with a full compressible visco-resistive MHD model with smooth decreasing profiles of current density and pressure. The equilibria are stable for β = 0 and the marginal stability values βrp,rw βrp,iw is presented. The effect of imaginary gain with tangential sensors is more complicated but essentially destabilizes above and below βrp,iw.

  6. Sloan Great Wall as a complex of superclusters with collapsing cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einasto, Maret; Lietzen, Heidi; Gramann, Mirt; Tempel, Elmo; Saar, Enn; Liivamägi, Lauri Juhan; Heinämäki, Pekka; Nurmi, Pasi; Einasto, Jaan

    2016-10-01

    Context. The formation and evolution of the cosmic web is governed by the gravitational attraction of dark matter and antigravity of dark energy (cosmological constant). In the cosmic web, galaxy superclusters or their high-density cores are the largest objects that may collapse at present or during the future evolution. Aims: We study the dynamical state and possible future evolution of galaxy superclusters from the Sloan Great Wall (SGW), the richest galaxy system in the nearby Universe. Methods: We calculated supercluster masses using dynamical masses of galaxy groups and stellar masses of galaxies. We employed normal mixture modelling to study the structure of rich SGW superclusters and search for components (cores) in superclusters. We analysed the radial mass distribution in the high-density cores of superclusters centred approximately at rich clusters and used the spherical collapse model to study their dynamical state. Results: The lower limit of the total mass of the SGW is approximately M = 2.5 × 1016 h-1 M⊙. Different mass estimators of superclusters agree well, the main uncertainties in masses of superclusters come from missing groups and clusters. We detected three high-density cores in the richest SGW supercluster (SCl 027) and two in the second richest supercluster (SCl 019). They have masses of 1.2 - 5.9 × 1015 h-1 M⊙ and sizes of up to ≈60 h-1 Mpc. The high-density cores of superclusters are very elongated, flattened perpendicularly to the line of sight. The comparison of the radial mass distribution in the high-density cores with the predictions of spherical collapse model suggests that their central regions with radii smaller than 8 h-1 Mpc and masses of up to M = 2 × 1015 h-1 M⊙ may be collapsing. Conclusions: The rich SGW superclusters with their high-density cores represent dynamically evolving environments for studies of the properties of galaxies and galaxy systems.

  7. Leaf-cutting ant fungi produce cell wall degrading pectinase complexes reminiscent of phytopathogenic fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boomsma Jacobus J

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Leaf-cutting (attine ants use their own fecal material to manure fungus gardens, which consist of leaf material overgrown by hyphal threads of the basidiomycete fungus Leucocoprinus gongylophorus that lives in symbiosis with the ants. Previous studies have suggested that the fecal droplets contain proteins that are produced by the fungal symbiont to pass unharmed through the digestive system of the ants, so they can enhance new fungus garden growth. Results We tested this hypothesis by using proteomics methods to determine the gene sequences of fecal proteins in Acromyrmex echinatior leaf-cutting ants. Seven (21% of the 33 identified proteins were pectinolytic enzymes that originated from the fungal symbiont and which were still active in the fecal droplets produced by the ants. We show that these enzymes are found in the fecal material only when the ants had access to fungus garden food, and we used quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis to show that the expression of six of these enzyme genes was substantially upregulated in the fungal gongylidia. These unique structures serve as food for the ants and are produced only by the evolutionarily advanced garden symbionts of higher attine ants, but not by the fungi reared by the basal lineages of this ant clade. Conclusions Pectinolytic enzymes produced in the gongylidia of the fungal symbiont are ingested but not digested by Acromyrmex leaf-cutting ants so that they end up in the fecal fluid and become mixed with new garden substrate. Substantial quantities of pectinolytic enzymes are typically found in pathogenic fungi that attack live plant tissue, where they are known to breach the cell walls to allow the fungal mycelium access to the cell contents. As the leaf-cutting ant symbionts are derived from fungal clades that decompose dead plant material, our results suggest that their pectinolytic enzymes represent secondarily evolved adaptations that are convergent to

  8. Leaf-cutting ant fungi produce cell wall degrading pectinase complexes reminiscent of phytopathogenic fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiøtt, Morten; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina; Roepstorff, Peter; Boomsma, Jacobus J

    2010-12-31

    Leaf-cutting (attine) ants use their own fecal material to manure fungus gardens, which consist of leaf material overgrown by hyphal threads of the basidiomycete fungus Leucocoprinus gongylophorus that lives in symbiosis with the ants. Previous studies have suggested that the fecal droplets contain proteins that are produced by the fungal symbiont to pass unharmed through the digestive system of the ants, so they can enhance new fungus garden growth. We tested this hypothesis by using proteomics methods to determine the gene sequences of fecal proteins in Acromyrmex echinatior leaf-cutting ants. Seven (21%) of the 33 identified proteins were pectinolytic enzymes that originated from the fungal symbiont and which were still active in the fecal droplets produced by the ants. We show that these enzymes are found in the fecal material only when the ants had access to fungus garden food, and we used quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis to show that the expression of six of these enzyme genes was substantially upregulated in the fungal gongylidia. These unique structures serve as food for the ants and are produced only by the evolutionarily advanced garden symbionts of higher attine ants, but not by the fungi reared by the basal lineages of this ant clade. Pectinolytic enzymes produced in the gongylidia of the fungal symbiont are ingested but not digested by Acromyrmex leaf-cutting ants so that they end up in the fecal fluid and become mixed with new garden substrate. Substantial quantities of pectinolytic enzymes are typically found in pathogenic fungi that attack live plant tissue, where they are known to breach the cell walls to allow the fungal mycelium access to the cell contents. As the leaf-cutting ant symbionts are derived from fungal clades that decompose dead plant material, our results suggest that their pectinolytic enzymes represent secondarily evolved adaptations that are convergent to those normally found in phytopathogens.

  9. Robotic Transversus Abdominis Release (TAR): is it possible to offer minimally invasive surgery for abdominal wall complex defects?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaral, Maria Vitória França DO; Guimarães, José Ricardo; Volpe, Paula; Oliveira, Flávio Malcher Martins DE; Domene, Carlos Eduardo; Roll, Sérgio; Cavazzola, Leandro Totti

    2017-01-01

    We describe the preliminary national experience and the early results of the use of robotic surgery to perform the posterior separation of abdominal wall components by the Transversus Abdominis Release (TAR) technique for the correction of complex defects of the abdominal wall. We performed the procedures between 04/2/2015 and 06/15/2015 and the follow-up time was up to six months, with a minimum of two months. The mean surgical time was five hours and 40 minutes. Two patients required laparoscopic re-intervention, since one developed hernia by peritoneal migration of the mesh and one had mesh extrusion. The procedure proved to be technically feasible, with a still long surgical time. Considering the potential advantages of robotic surgery and those related to TAR and the results obtained when these two techniques are associated, we conclude that they seem to be a good option for the correction of complex abdominal wall defects. RESUMO Descrevemos a experiência preliminar nacional na utilização da cirurgia robótica para realizar a separação posterior de componentes da parede abdominal pela técnica transversus abdominis release (TAR) na correção de defeitos complexos da parede abdominal e seus resultados precoces. As cirurgias foram realizadas entre 02/04/2015 e 15/06/2015 e o tempo de acompanhamento dos resultados foi de até seis meses, com tempo mínimo de dois meses. O tempo cirúrgico médio foi de cinco horas e 40 minutos. Dois pacientes necessitaram reintervenção por laparoscopia, pois um desenvolveu hérnia por migração peritoneal da tela e um teve escape da tela. A cirurgia provou ser factível do ponto de vista técnico, com um tempo cirúrgico ainda elevado. Tendo em vista as vantagens potenciais da cirurgia robótica e aquelas relacionadas ao TAR e os resultados obtidos ao se associar essas duas técnicas, conclui-se que elas parecem ser uma boa opção para a correção de defeitos complexos da parede abdominal.

  10. Synthetic Brainbows

    KAUST Repository

    Wan, Y.

    2013-06-01

    Brainbow is a genetic engineering technique that randomly colorizes cells. Biological samples processed with this technique and imaged with confocal microscopy have distinctive colors for individual cells. Complex cellular structures can then be easily visualized. However, the complexity of the Brainbow technique limits its applications. In practice, most confocal microscopy scans use different florescence staining with typically at most three distinct cellular structures. These structures are often packed and obscure each other in rendered images making analysis difficult. In this paper, we leverage a process known as GPU framebuffer feedback loops to synthesize Brainbow-like images. In addition, we incorporate ID shuffing and Monte-Carlo sampling into our technique, so that it can be applied to single-channel confocal microscopy data. The synthesized Brainbow images are presented to domain experts with positive feedback. A user survey demonstrates that our synthetic Brainbow technique improves visualizations of volume data with complex structures for biologists.

  11. Sarcopenia and sarcopenic obesity in patients with complex abdominal wall hernias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinaldi, John M; Geletzke, Abby K; Phillips, Brett E; Miller, Jamie; Dykes, Thomas M; Soybel, David I

    2016-11-01

    Chronic muscle wasting, or sarcopenia, has been associated with poor-health outcomes after major surgical procedures. Here, we explore the utility of CT-generated determinations of sarcopenia as markers of risk in patients undergoing evaluation for complex ventral hernia repair. In 148 successive patients being evaluated for complex ventral hernia repair, CT scans were analyzed retrospectively for attributes of the hernia and indices of core-muscle mass, correlating them with preoperative clinical/laboratory profiles and outcomes in 82 patients who had undergone surgery. Prevalence of sarcopenia, and sarcopenia corrected for obesity, was 26% and 20% respectively. Sarcopenia was associated with age, some laboratory indicators, and increased hospital length of stay but not with a higher likelihood of surgical site occurrence. Obesity may obscure the value of sarcopenia as a marker of metabolic disturbance and postoperative outcome. Image-based measurements of core-muscle mass should be used with caution as predictors of risk in similar surgical populations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Modeling synthetic lethality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Meur, Nolwenn; Gentleman, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Synthetic lethality defines a genetic interaction where the combination of mutations in two or more genes leads to cell death. The implications of synthetic lethal screens have been discussed in the context of drug development as synthetic lethal pairs could be used to selectively kill cancer cells, but leave normal cells relatively unharmed. A challenge is to assess genome-wide experimental data and integrate the results to better understand the underlying biological processes. We propose statistical and computational tools that can be used to find relationships between synthetic lethality and cellular organizational units. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we identified multi-protein complexes and pairs of multi-protein complexes that share an unusually high number of synthetic genetic interactions. As previously predicted, we found that synthetic lethality can arise from subunits of an essential multi-protein complex or between pairs of multi-protein complexes. Finally, using multi-protein complexes allowed us to take into account the pleiotropic nature of the gene products. Modeling synthetic lethality using current estimates of the yeast interactome is an efficient approach to disentangle some of the complex molecular interactions that drive a cell. Our model in conjunction with applied statistical methods and computational methods provides new tools to better characterize synthetic genetic interactions.

  13. Efficient gamma-aminobutyric acid bioconversion by employing synthetic complex between glutamate decarboxylase and glutamate/GABA antiporter in engineered Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Vo, Tam Dinh; Ko, Ji-seun; Park, Si Jae; Lee, Seung Hwan; Hong, Soon Ho

    2013-08-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is a precursor of one of the most promising heat-resistant biopolymers, Nylon-4, and can be produced by the decarboxylation of monosodium glutamate (MSG). In this study, a synthetic protein complex was applied to improve the GABA conversion in engineered Escherichia coli. Complexes were constructed by assembling a single protein-protein interaction domain SH3 to the glutamate decarboxylase (GadA and GadB) and attaching a cognate peptide ligand to the glutamate/GABA antiporter (GadC) at the N-terminus, C-terminus, and the 233rd amino acid residue. When GadA and GadC were co-overexpressed via the C-terminus complex, a GABA concentration of 5.65 g/l was obtained from 10 g/l MSG, which corresponds to a GABA yield of 93 %. A significant increase of the GABA productivity was also observed where the GABA productivity increased 2.5-fold in the early culture period due to the introduction of the synthetic protein complex. The GABA pathway efficiency and GABA productivity were enhanced by the introduction of the complex between Gad and glutamate/GABA antiporter.

  14. Risk-adjusted adverse outcomes in complex abdominal wall hernia repair with biologic mesh: A case series of 140 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latifi, Rifat; Samson, David; Haider, Ansab; Azim, Asad; Iftikhar, Hajira; Joseph, Bellal; Tilley, Elizabeth; Con, Jorge; Gashi, Saranda; El-Menyar, Ayman

    2017-07-01

    Biologic mesh is preferred for repair of complex abdominal wall hernias (CAWHs) in patients at high risk of wound infection. We aimed to identify predictors of adverse outcomes after complex abdominal wall hernia repair (CAWR) using biologic mesh with different placement techniques and under different surgical settings. A retrospective case series study was conducted on all patients who underwent CAWR with biologic mesh between 2010 and 2015 at a tertiary medical center. the study population included 140 patients with a mean age of 54 ± 14 years and a median follow up period 8.8 months. Mesh size ranged from 50 to 1225 cm2. Ninety percent of patients had undergone previous surgery. Type of surgery was classified as elective in 50.7%, urgent in 24.3% and emergent in 25.0% and a porcine mesh was implanted in 82.9%. The most common mesh placement technique was underlay (70.7%), followed by onlay (16.4%) and bridge (12.9%). Complications included wound complications (30.7%), reoperation (25.9%), hernia recurrence (20.7%), and mesh removal (10.0%). Thirty-two patients (23.0%) were admitted to the ICU and the mean hospital length of stay was 10.8 ± 17.5 days. Age-sex adjusted predictors of recurrence were COPD (OR 4.2; 95%CI 1.003-17.867) and urgent surgery (OR 10.5; 95%CI 1.856-59.469), whereas for reoperation, mesh size (OR 6.8; 95%CI 1.344-34.495) and urgent surgery (OR 5.2; 95%CI 1.353-19.723) were the predictors. Using biologic mesh, one-quarter and one-fifth of CAWR patients are complicated with reoperation or recurrence, respectively. The operation settings and comorbidity may play a role in these outcomes regardless of the mesh placement techniques. Copyright © 2017 IJS Publishing Group Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Selective electrochemical reduction of CO2 to CO with a cobalt chlorin complex adsorbed on multi-walled carbon nanotubes in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoi, Shoko; Mase, Kentaro; Ohkubo, Kei; Fukuzumi, Shunichi

    2015-06-25

    Electrocatalytic reduction of CO2 occurred efficiently using a glassy carbon electrode modified with a cobalt(II) chlorin complex adsorbed on multi-walled carbon nanotubes at an applied potential of -1.1 V vs. NHE to yield CO with a Faradaic efficiency of 89% with hydrogen production accounting for the remaining 11% at pH 4.6.

  16. Solvation properties of natural and synthetic ionophores. I. Stoichiometry of complexes with alkali and alkaline earth cations in aprotic organic solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsher, U

    1982-01-01

    Ion-solvent interactions play a very important role in the studies of stoichiometry, structure, and stability of complexes of cations with natural and synthetic ionophores. These compounds are extremely useful in study of the interaction of neutral salts with macromolecules and the mechanism of cation transport across biological membranes. Knowledge of the ionophore solvation properties enables one to choose a suitable solvent for complexation studies and to obtain detailed information on the solvent effect. We would like to present in this paper a very simple method of estimating the solvation properties of ionophores. We treat the ligand as an assembly of individual noninteracting binding sites. The solvation properties of solvents can be used to represent the solvation sites in natural and synthetic ligands. The solvation properties are represented by the Gutmann donor number (DN) of the model solvent. We can define the solvation ability of a ligand binding site be "donor number of binding site" (DN binding site), which in turn can be represented by the DN of the appropriate model solvent. The average DN of the ligand (DN average) is defined as [xi ni-1 (DN binding site)i]/n, where n is the number of the ligand binding sites. Comparison of the DN average with the DN solvent, together with the knowledge of the composition of the system, characterizes remarkably well the solvation properties of the ligand. This model explains (a) the stoichiometry of many alkali and alkaline earth cation complexes with natural and synthetic ligands in aprotic organic solvents, (b) the transport of alkali and alkaline earth cations across lipid bilayers, and (c) how polypeptides and proteins interact with neutral salts in solutions. PMID:7139034

  17. Synthetic LPETG-containing peptide incorporation in the Staphylococcus aureus cell-wall in a sortase A- and growth phase-dependent manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvie Hansenová Maňásková

    Full Text Available The majority of Staphylococcus aureus virulence- and colonization-associated surface proteins contain a pentapeptide recognition motif (LPXTG. This motif can be recognized and cleaved by sortase A (SrtA which is a membrane-bound transpeptidase. After cleavage these proteins are covalently incorporated into the peptidoglycan. Therefore, SrtA plays a key role in S. aureus virulence. We aimed to generate a substrate mimicking this SrtA recognition motif for several purposes: to incorporate this substrate into the S. aureus cell-wall in a SrtA-dependent manner, to characterize this incorporation and to determine the effect of substrate incorporation on the incorporation of native SrtA-dependent cell-surface-associated proteins. We synthesized substrate containing the specific LPXTG motif, LPETG. As a negative control we used a scrambled version of this substrate, EGTLP and a S. aureus srtA knockout strain. Both substrates contained a fluorescence label for detection by FACScan and fluorescence microscope. A spreading assay and a competitive Luminex assay were used to determine the effect of substrate treatment on native LPXTG containing proteins deposition in the bacterial cell-wall. We demonstrate a SrtA-dependent covalent incorporation of the LPETG-containing substrate in wild type S. aureus strains and several other Gram-positive bacterial species. LPETG-containing substrate incorporation in S. aureus was growth phase-dependent and peaked at the stationary phase. This incorporation negatively correlated with srtA mRNA expression. Exogenous addition of the artificial substrate did not result in a decreased expression of native SrtA substrates (e.g. clumping factor A/B and protein A nor induced a srtA knockout phenotype.

  18. Synthesis and Properties of Chelating N-Heterocyclic Carbene Rhodium(I) Complexes: Synthetic Experiments in Current Organometallic Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mata, Jose A.; Poyatos, Macarena; Mas-Marza, Elena

    2011-01-01

    The preparation and characterization of two air-stable Rh(I) complexes bearing a chelating N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) ligand is described. The synthesis involves the preparation of a Ag(I)-NHC complex and its use as carbene transfer agent to a Rh(I) precursor. The so obtained complex can be further reacted with carbon monoxide to give the…

  19. The Complex Cell Wall Composition of Syncytia Induced by Plant Parasitic Cyst Nematodes Reflects Both Function and Host Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Zhang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Plant–parasitic cyst nematodes induce the formation of specialized feeding structures, syncytia, within their host roots. These unique plant organs serve as the sole nutrient resource for development and reproduction throughout the biotrophic interaction. The multinucleate syncytium, which arises through local dissolution of cell walls and protoplast fusion of multiple adjacent cells, has dense cytoplasm containing numerous organelles, surrounded by thickened outer cell walls that must withstand high turgor pressure. However, little is known about how the constituents of the syncytial cell wall and their conformation support its role during nematode parasitism. We used a set of monoclonal antibodies, targeted to a range of plant cell wall components, to reveal the microstructures of syncytial cell walls induced by four of the most economically important cyst nematode species, Globodera pallida, Heterodera glycines, Heterodera avenae and Heterodera filipjevi, in their respective potato, soybean, and spring wheat host roots. In situ fluorescence analysis revealed highly similar cell wall composition of syncytia induced by G. pallida and H. glycines. Both consisted of abundant xyloglucan, methyl-esterified homogalacturonan and pectic arabinan. In contrast, the walls of syncytia induced in wheat roots by H. avenae and H. filipjevi contain little xyloglucan but are rich in feruloylated xylan and arabinan residues, with variable levels of mixed-linkage glucan. The overall chemical composition of syncytial cell walls reflected the general features of root cell walls of the different host plants. We relate specific components of syncytial cell walls, such as abundant arabinan, methyl-esterification status of pectic homogalacturonan and feruloylation of xylan, to their potential roles in forming a network to support both the strength and flexibility required for syncytium function.

  20. Synthetic Botany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehm, Christian R; Pollak, Bernardo; Purswani, Nuri; Patron, Nicola; Haseloff, Jim

    2017-07-05

    Plants are attractive platforms for synthetic biology and metabolic engineering. Plants' modular and plastic body plans, capacity for photosynthesis, extensive secondary metabolism, and agronomic systems for large-scale production make them ideal targets for genetic reprogramming. However, efforts in this area have been constrained by slow growth, long life cycles, the requirement for specialized facilities, a paucity of efficient tools for genetic manipulation, and the complexity of multicellularity. There is a need for better experimental and theoretical frameworks to understand the way genetic networks, cellular populations, and tissue-wide physical processes interact at different scales. We highlight new approaches to the DNA-based manipulation of plants and the use of advanced quantitative imaging techniques in simple plant models such as Marchantia polymorpha. These offer the prospects of improved understanding of plant dynamics and new approaches to rational engineering of plant traits. Copyright © 2017 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  1. An oligogalacturonide-derived molecular probe demonstrates the dynamics of calcium-mediated pectin complexation in cell walls of tip-growing structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mravec, Jozef; Kracun, Stjepan Kresimir; Rydahl, Maja Gro

    2017-01-01

    Pectic homogalacturonan (HG) is one of the main constituents of plant cell walls. When processed to low degrees of esterification, HG can form complexes with divalent calcium ions. These macromolecular structures (also called egg boxes) play an important role in determining the biomechanics of cell...... walls and in mediating cell-to-cell adhesion. Current immunological methods enable only steady-state detection of egg box formation in situ. Here we present a tool for efficient real-time visualisation of available sites for HG crosslinking within cell wall microdomains. Our approach is based on calcium...... thermodynamic model. Using defined carbohydrate microarrays, we show that the long OG probe binds exclusively to HG that has a very low degree of esterification and in the presence of divalent ions. We used this probe to study real-time dynamics of HG during elongation of Arabidopsis pollen tubes and root hairs...

  2. Synthetic Biomaterials to Rival Nature's Complexity-a Path Forward with Combinatorics, High-Throughput Discovery, and High-Content Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Douglas; Lee, Junmin; Kilian, Kristopher A

    2017-10-01

    Cells in tissue receive a host of soluble and insoluble signals in a context-dependent fashion, where integration of these cues through a complex network of signal transduction cascades will define a particular outcome. Biomaterials scientists and engineers are tasked with designing materials that can at least partially recreate this complex signaling milieu towards new materials for biomedical applications. In this progress report, recent advances in high throughput techniques and high content imaging approaches that are facilitating the discovery of efficacious biomaterials are described. From microarrays of synthetic polymers, peptides and full-length proteins, to designer cell culture systems that present multiple biophysical and biochemical cues in tandem, it is discussed how the integration of combinatorics with high content imaging and analysis is essential to extracting biologically meaningful information from large scale cellular screens to inform the design of next generation biomaterials. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. pBAM1: an all-synthetic genetic tool for analysis and construction of complex bacterial phenotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arévalo-Rodríguez Miguel

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since publication in 1977 of plasmid pBR322, many breakthroughs in Biology have depended on increasingly sophisticated vector platforms for analysis and engineering of given bacterial strains. Although restriction sites impose a certain format in the procedures for assembling cloned genes, every attempt thus far to standardize vector architecture and nomenclature has ended up in failure. While this state of affairs may still be tolerable for traditional one-at-a-time studies of single genes, the onset of systems and synthetic biology calls for a simplification -along with an optimization- of the currently unwieldy pool of genetic tools. Results The functional DNA sequences present in the natural bacterial transposon Tn5 have been methodically edited and refactored for the production of a multi-purpose genetic tool named pBAM1, which allows a range of manipulations in the genome of Gram-negative bacteria. This all-synthetic construct enhances the power of mini-transposon vectors for either de-construction or re-construction of phenotypes á la carte by incorporating features inspired in systems engineering: modularity, re-usability, minimization, and compatibility with other genetic tools. pBAM1 bears an streamlined, restriction site-freed and narrow-host range replication frame bearing the sequences of R6K oriV, oriT and an ampicillin resistance marker. These go along with a business module that contains a host-independent and hyperactive transposition platform for in vivo or in vitro insertion of desired DNA into the genome of the target bacterium. All functional sequences were standardized for a straightforward replacement by equivalent counterparts, if required. pBAM1 can be delivered into recipient cells by either mating or electroporation, producing transposon insertion frequencies of 1.8 × 10-3 and 1.02 × 10-7, respectively in the soil bacterium Pseudomonas putida. Analyses of the resulting clones revealed a 100% of

  4. Study on polymer fibers doped with phosphorescent Re(I) complex via electrospinning: synthetic strategy, structure, morphology and photophysical features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dejin, Wang; Qiang, Liu; Fei, Wang

    2014-01-01

    In the following paper, a Re(I) complex with electron-withdrawing oxadiazole group in its diamine ligand (denoted as N-N) was synthesized. Its single crystal structure analysis confirmed the successful synthesis of both ligand and complex. The central Re(I) ion localized in a traditional octahedral coordination environment. The diamine ligand 2-(pyridin-2-yl)-5-(p-tolyl)-1,3,4-oxadiazole (denoted as PPOZ) took a coplanar structure and the corresponding face-to-face π-π attraction between PPOZ ligands made the Re(I) complex molecules adjust a highly ordered arrangement which was positive to improve emissive performance. In order to repress the excited state geometric relaxation and further improve the emissive performance, the Re(I) complex was doped into a polymer host poly(vinylpyrrolidone) via electrospinning, resulting in composite fibers. The morphology of those composite fibers was analyzed by electron microscopy. The photophysical comparison between bulk sample and composite fibers indicated that the composite fibers showed emission blue shift, longer excited state lifetime and improved photostability. Further analysis suggested that the excited state geometric relaxation could be effectively repressed when the Re(I) complex molecules were immobilized in the polymer matrix, leading to above variations. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. An in situ study of metal complexation by an immobilized synthetic biopolymer using tapping mode liquid cell atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, T C; Kwak, E S; Howard, M E; Vanden Bout, D A; Holcombe, J A

    2001-09-01

    Near-field scanning optical microscopy and tapping mode, liquid cell atomic force microscopy were used to study the conformational changes in simple short-chain silica-immobilized biopolymer, poly(L-cysteine) (PLCys), as the polymer was exposed to reducing, metal-rich, and acidic environments, respectively, to simulate on-line metal preconcentration. In a reducing environment (0.01 M dithiothreitol in pH 7.0 ammonium acetate buffer), the PLCys features resembled islands on the surface of the glass, 36 +/- 7 nm in height and 251 +/- 60 nm in diameter. Upon exposure to metal (Cd2+ buffered at pH 7.0), the PLCys islands broke up into smaller metal binding clusters whose features were lower in height, 22 +/- 5 nm, and diameter, 213 +/- 53 nm. Exposure to 0.01 M HCl used for metal stripping resulted in protonation of the polymer chains and further reduction in the polymer height to 12 +/- 5 nm. These changes in molecular structure have given new insight into the mechanisms involved to achieve strong binding as well as rapid, quantitative release of bound metals to flexible short-chain synthetic biopolymers.

  6. Proteins, polysaccharides, and their complexes used as stabilizers for emulsions: alternatives to synthetic surfactants in the pharmaceutical field?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouyer, Eléonore; Mekhloufi, Ghozlene; Rosilio, Véronique; Grossiord, Jean-Louis; Agnely, Florence

    2012-10-15

    Emulsions are widely used in pharmaceutics for the encapsulation, solubilization, entrapment, and controlled delivery of active ingredients. In order to answer the increasing demand for clean label excipients, natural polymers can replace the potentially irritative synthetic surfactants used in emulsion formulation. Indeed, biopolymers are currently used in the food industry to stabilize emulsions, and they appear as promising candidates in the pharmaceutical field too. All proteins and some polysaccharides are able to adsorb at a globule surface, thus decreasing the interfacial tension and enhancing the interfacial elasticity. However, most polysaccharides stabilize emulsions simply by increasing the viscosity of the continuous phase. Proteins and polysaccharides may also be associated either through covalent bonding or electrostatic interactions. The combination of the properties of these biopolymers under appropriate conditions leads to increased emulsion stability. Alternative layers of oppositely charged biopolymers can also be formed around the globules to obtain multi-layered "membranes". These layers can provide electrostatic and steric stabilization thus improving thermal stability and resistance to external treatment. The novel biopolymer-stabilized emulsions have a great potential in the pharmaceutical field for encapsulation, controlled digestion, and targeted release although several challenging issues such as storage and bacteriological concerns still need to be addressed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. A synthetic workflow for coordinated direct observation and genetic tagging applied to a complex host-parasite interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, A T; Kuwata, C; Kuris, A M

    2015-05-01

    An important aspect influencing host specificity is a parasite's compatibility, or ability, to infect a potential host. Here, we examine the compatibility between different trematode genotypes of the same species and several host species. To execute this study, we developed a synthetic workflow which combines the use of a fluorescent dye and standard molecular techniques to study host-parasite interactions and host specificity. The utility of the fluorescent dye, BIODIPY FL C₁₂, was evaluated to label and track larval trematodes during experimental infections using the Cerithidea californica-trematode host-parasite system. Our results showed that low dye concentrations (200 nM) did not significantly affect survival or infectivity of Acanthoparyphium spinulosum and proved to be useful for labeling cercariae. Parasites were genotyped based on sequences from cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 (COI) and the nuclear internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) prior to labeling and experimental infections. Samples with low COI PCR product yield were reamplified using the M13 tails to obtain enough material for sequencing. Three parasite genotypes were recovered and results from experimental infections demonstrated varying levels of host specificity. Of the three host species used (C. californica, Polydora nuchalis, Tagelus californianus), genotype B was unable to infect P. nuchalis. Genotype A individuals were less likely to infect P. nuchalis than the other host species. Additionally, genotype C was unable to infect any host offered in this study. These findings reflect possible suboptimal pairings between parasite genotype and host species. Furthermore, the present study provides procedures that are useful for exploring parasite ecology at the molecular level.

  8. Thlaspi arvense binds Cu(II) as a bis-(L-histidinato) complex on root cell walls in an urban ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manceau, Alain; Simionovici, Alexandre; Lanson, Martine; Perrin, Jonathan; Tucoulou, Rémi; Bohic, Sylvain; Fakra, Sirine C; Marcus, Matthew A; Bedell, Jean-Philippe; Nagy, Kathryn L

    2013-12-01

    Root cell walls accumulate metal cations both during acquisition from the environment and removal from the protoplast to avoid toxicity, but molecular forms of the metals under field conditions remain elusive. We have identified how copper is bound to cell walls of intact roots of native Thlaspi arvense by combining synchrotron X-ray fluorescence and absorption techniques (XANES and EXAFS) at the nano-, micro-, and bulk scales. The plants grew naturally in sediment in a stormwater runoff basin at copper concentrations typical of urban ecosystems. About 90% of acquired copper is bound in vivo to cell walls as a unique five-coordinate Cu(II)-bis(L-histidinato) complex with one L-histidine behaving as a tridentate ligand (histamine-like chelate) and the other as a bidentate ligand (glycine-like chelate). Tridentate binding of Cu(II) would provide thermodynamic stability to protect cells against copper toxicity, and bidentate binding may enable kinetic lability along the cell wall through protein-protein docking with the non-bonded imidazole group of histidine residues. EXAFS spectra are provided as ESI to facilitate further identification of Cu-histidine and distinction of Cu-N from Cu-O bonds in biomolecules.

  9. Synthetic, spectroscopic, magnetic and thermal aspects of drug based metal complexes derived from 1st row transition metal ions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darshana A. Patel

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available A newly synthesized ligand, 5-((1H-indol-1-ylmethylquinolin-8-ol (L was characterized by 1H NMR, 13C NMR, DEPT-135 and IR spectroscopic techniques. The synthesized metal complexes were characterized using elemental analyses, (infrared, electronic and FAB mass spectra, magnetic measurements and thermogravimetric analyses. Kinetic parameters such as order of reaction (n and the energy of activation (Ea are reported using the Freeman–Carroll method. The pre-exponential factor (A, the activation entropy (ΔS#, the activation enthalpy (ΔH# and the free energy of activation (ΔG# were calculated. Metal complexes are also screened for their in vitro antibacterial activity against a range of Gram-positive and Gram-negative organisms.

  10. Diversity of total and functional microbiome of anammox reactors fed with complex and synthetic nitrogen-rich wastewaters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gülay, Arda; Pellicer i Nàcher, Carles; Mutlu, Ayten Gizem

    and biodiversity (Parrott 2010), but, not (Harris et al. 2012) in the anammox functional guild diversity (functional diversity term was used based on phylogenetic groups known to harbor the anammox metabolic pathway). Classifying the microbial structure of bioreactors according to substrate complexity using......There are few comparitive studies of microbial structure, composition and phylogenetic diversity of the anammox reactors as a function of substrate complexity exist, representing a large gap in the scientific literature. In this study, we applied 16S rRNA gene (rDNA) tag-based 454 pyrosequencing...... as a deep sequencing approach to 59 biomass samples from 24 different anammox bioreactors together with proper biological replication in order to compare their total and functional (wrt anaerobic ammonium oxidation) microbial diversity. Among 24 sampled bioreactors, 10 of them were full scale...

  11. Preparation of a N-Heterocyclic Carbene Nickel(II) Complex: Synthetic Experiments in Current Organic and Organometallic Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritleng, Vincent; Brenner, Eric; Chetcuti, Michael J.

    2008-01-01

    A four-part experiment that leads to the synthesis of a cyclopentadienyl chloro-nickel(II) complex bearing a N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) ligand is presented. In the first part, the preparation of 1,3-bis-(2,4,6-trimethylphenyl)imidazolium chloride (IMes[middle dot]HCl) in a one-pot procedure by reaction of 2,4,6-trimethylaniline with…

  12. Solid state and solution characterization of a new dinuclear nickel (II) complex: The search for synthetic models for urease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Adolfo; Fim, Luciana; Bortoluzzi, Adailton J.; Szpoganicz, Bruno; Silva, Marlon de S.; Novak, Miguel A.; Neto, Mario Benassi; Eberlin, Lívia Schiavinato; Catharino, Rodrigo Ramos; Eberlin, Marcos Nogueira; Fernandes, Christiane

    2006-09-01

    The X-ray molecular structure and, magnetic, and spectroscopic properties, as well as the analysis of the structural behavior in solution of a novel nickel (II) complex [Ni 2(HBPClNOL) 2(OAc)](ClO 4) 1 are reported. Complex 1 was prepared by the reaction between the ligand H 2BPClNOL ( N-(2-hydroxybenzyl)- N-(2-pyridylmethyl)[(3-chloro)(2-hydroxy)]propylamine), [Ni(H 2O) 6](ClO 4) 2 and sodium acetate. Magnetic measurements indicate the presence of a weak antiferromagnetic coupling between the Ni(II) ions in 1, resulting in J = -4.23 cm -1. Mass spectrometric characterization of the complex 1 was also performed via ESI-MS and ESI-MS/MS experiments and reveals that there are at least three different cations in solution, one mononuclear [Ni(H 2BPClNOL)(OAc)] + and two dinuclear [Ni 2(HBPClNOL) 2(OAc)] + and [Ni 2(HBPClNOL) 2(ClO 4)] + cations, as well as likely a fourth one [Ni(HBPClNOL)] +. Potentiometric titration experiments confirm that under acid conditions, the dinuclear unit is broken. However, under neutral/basic pH values the dinuclear unit is stable and shows the presence of two water molecules coordinated to the nickel ions, resulting in the cation [Ni 2(HBPClNOL) 2(H 2O) 2] 2+. This cation shows two protonation/deprotonation equilibriums with p Ka values of 9.68 and at 10.29, which are related to the aquo/hydroxo equilibrium associated with the water molecules coordinated to the metal ions.

  13. Transition metal diphenolate and dithiophenolate complexes as synthetic analogues of the active sites of nickel superoxide dismutase and galactose oxidase

    OpenAIRE

    Marshall, George

    2016-01-01

    This thesis describes the synthesis of diphenolate and dithiophenolate complexes of ZnII, NiII and CuII that derive inspiration from the natures of the active sites of the nickel-containing superoxide dismutase (NiSOD) and the copper-containing galactose oxidase (GO).\\ud Chapter One introduces the roles of transition metals in biology. The structures of the active sites of NiSOD and GO are described, together with a discussion of the proposed mechanisms of their action. A brief review of the ...

  14. Complex Reconstruction of a Massive Shoulder and Chest Wall Defect: De-Bone Appétit Flap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee GK

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available We report the use of a fillet of upper arm pedicled flap, which has not been previously reported in the literature. The fillet of upper arm flap follows the principle of “spare parts” surgery, and can provide vascularized soft tissue coverage for defects of the shoulder and the chest wall when the upper extremity cannot otherwise be salvaged, such as in cases of radical tumor excision.

  15. Complexities in D" anisotropy beneath the Caribbean: Evidence for a tilted symmetry axis of transversely isotropic media from data and synthetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnero, E. J.; Maupin, V.; Lay, T.; Fouch, M. J.

    2003-12-01

    The goal of this study is to evaluate detailed seismic anisotropy in D'' for a broad region beneath the Caribbean Ocean. Our dataset consists of broadband core-grazing and diffracted shear waves for deep South American earthquakes recorded by the Canadian National Seismic Network. The motivation for this work is to ultimately better constrain lowermost mantle dynamics and rheological properties. High quality data containing simple source-time functions and strong SH and SV energy are utilized, instrument-deconvolved to displacement, and rotated to the plane of the incident S wave using all 3 components to minimize any possible SV-P conversions. Finally, data are corrected for upper mantle anisotropy using either published or newly derived parameters. For most of our dataset, S and Sdiff phases exhibit differential lag times between the SH and SV components. Variations are generally simple, with SV energy arriving later relative to SH, but many records also show SV energy initiating with the wrong polarity compared to focal mechanism predictions. Small rotations in the plane of the incident S wavefield cause the precursory SV energy to dissipate in our cleanest data. This observation suggests the presence of anisotropy beyond the common assumption of transverse isotropy (TI) with a vertical axis of symmetry (VTI). To evaluate the complex nature of our observations, we have constructed synthetic seismograms for several end-member models of mantle seismic velocities, including (a) isotropy, (b) VTI, and (c) a simple anisotropic case: tilted TI. For case (c), SV behavior relative to SH depends heavily on the focal mechanism, azimuth of the incoming wavefield, and the tilt angle of the TI system. To first order, the eastern portion of our study area contains significantly more data that are incompatible with the simple VTI geometry. We will present data and synthetic comparisons, and the geographic distribution of data sampling locations best supported by either VTI or

  16. Subpolar addition of new cell wall is directed by DivIVA in mycobacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meniche, Xavier; Otten, Renee; Siegrist, M. Sloan; Baer, Christina E.; Murphy, Kenan C.; Bertozzi, Carolyn R.; Sassetti, Christopher M.

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacteria are surrounded by a complex multilayered envelope and elongate at the poles. The principles that organize the coordinated addition of chemically diverse cell wall layers during polar extension remain unclear. We show that enzymes mediating the terminal cytosolic steps of peptidoglycan, arabinogalactan, and mycolic acid synthesis colocalize at sites of cell growth or division. The tropomyosin-like protein, DivIVA, is targeted to the negative curvature of the pole, is enriched at the growing end, and determines cell shape from this site. In contrast, cell wall synthetic complexes are concentrated at a distinct subpolar location. When viewed at subdiffraction resolution, new peptidoglycan is deposited at this subpolar site, and inert cell wall covers the DivIVA-marked tip. The differentiation between polar tip and cell wall synthetic complexes is also apparent at the biochemical level. Enzymes that generate mycolate precursors interact with DivIVA, but the final condensation of mycolic acids occurs in a distinct protein complex at the site of nascent cell wall addition. We propose an ultrastructural model of mycobacterial polar growth where new cell wall is added in an annular zone below the cell tip. This model may be broadly applicable to other bacterial and fungal organisms that grow via polar extension. PMID:25049412

  17. Exciton-phonon bound complex in single-walled carbon nanotubes revealed by high-field magneto-optical spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Weihang; Nakamura, Daisuke; Takeyama, Shojiro, E-mail: takeyama@issp.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Institute for Solid State Physics, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5, Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8581 (Japan); Sasaki, Tatsuya; Saito, Hiroaki [Institute for Solid State Physics, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5, Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8581 (Japan); Department of Applied Physics, University of Tokyo, Hongo 113-8656 (Japan); Liu, Huaping [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Kataura, Hiromichi [Nanosystem Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8562 (Japan)

    2013-12-02

    High-field magneto-optical spectroscopy was performed on highly enriched (6,5) single-walled carbon nanotubes. Spectra of phonon sidebands in both 1st and 2nd sub-bands were unchanged by an external magnetic field up to 52 T. The dark K-momentum singlet (D-K-S) exciton, which plays an important role for the external quantum efficiency of the system for both sub-bands in the near-infrared and the visible light region, respectively, was clarified to be the origin of the phonon sidebands.

  18. First Complex Allotransplantation of Neck Organs: Larynx, Trachea, Pharynx, Esophagus, Thyroid, Parathyroid Glands, and Anterior Cervical Wall: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grajek, Maciej; Maciejewski, Adam; Giebel, Sebastian; Krakowczyk, Łukasz; Ulczok, Rafał; Szymczyk, Cezary; Wierzgon, Janusz; Szumniak, Ryszard; Dobrut, Miroslaw; Oleś, Krzysztof; Drozdowski, Piotr; Walczak, Dominik; Szpak-Ulczok, Sylwia; Poltorak, Stanislaw

    2017-08-01

    Evaluate the possibility of performing a complex vascular allotransplant of all neck organs including skin. There are 2 previous attempts described in the literature, none of them being that complex. The first one is nonfunctional due to chronic rejection, the second one is viable yet considerably limited in complexity (no parathyroids, no skin). The allotransplantation was performed simultaneously on 2 adjacent operating rooms, using microsurgical techniques. The patient's voice, breathing through mouth, swallowing, and endocrinal functions have been fully restored. Achieved results show clearly that such operations performed in selected patients can nearly fully restore functional and aesthetic effects in 1 single procedure.

  19. Post-synthetic modification of mesoporous zinc-adeninate framework with tris(2,2′-biprydine) ruthenium(II) complex and its electrochemiluminescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Ji Eun; Shin, Ik Soo [Dept. of Chemistry, Soongsil University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Hye Jae; An, Ji Hyun [Dept. of Chemistry Education, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    Herein we report a redox-active metal-organic framework (MOF) via post-synthetic cation exchange with tris(2,2′-biprydine) ruthenium(II) complex (Ru(bpy){sub 3}{sup 2+}). A porous anionic zinc-adeninate framework (bMOF-100) is spacious enough to easily entrap 2.43 of Ru(bpy){sub 3}{sup 2+} cations within the mesopore. The encapsulation supported the framework structure preventing any distortion from a rapid solvent evaporation under SEM observation. Ru(bpy){sub 3}{sup 2+}@bMOF-100 was then immobilized on the surface of glassy carbon electrode, and its electrocatalytic and electrochemiluminescent (ECL) properties were investigated in aqueous and organic solution. Especially, Ru(bpy){sub 3}{sup 2+}@bMOF-100 showed the excellent electrochemical properties of Ru(bpy){sub 3}{sup 2+}, but gradual decomposition of the MOF structure was observed under electrochemical measurements because of the sluggish oxidation of adeninate ligand.

  20. [Hemodynamic effects of the synthetic analogue of endogenous nitric oxide (II) donors a dinitrosyl iron complex in hypertensive patients with uncomplicated hypertensive crisis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosteev, A Iu; Zorin, A V; Rodnenkov, O V; Dragnev, A G; Chazov, E I

    2014-01-01

    To examine the antihypertensive effect of the synthetic analogue of the endogenous nitric oxide donors in patients with grades 2-3 hypertension and uncomplicated hypertensive crisis (HC). The study included 30 male patients aged 35 to 73 years (mean age 55.5 ± 10.8 years). All the patients had grades 2-3 essential or secondary hypertension. Thirteen (43.3%) patients were observed to have signs of HC; 17 (56.7%) patients had persistent blood pressure (BP) elevation. A dinitrosyl iron complex was injected in a dose of 1.5 or 3 mg per kg of body weight. The purpose of its administration was to lower BP by at least 20% of its baseline level. No significant side effects associated with the administration of the test drug were recorded when the clinical trial protocol was implemented. All the patients reported fever and facial hyperemia during and 10-20 minutes after injection. They all (100%) showed efficient blood pressure reduction of at least 20% of the baseline level. Blood pressure changes were similar when the agent was administered in doses of 1.5 or 3 mg/kg. At 6-8 minutes after the drug was injected, there was a maximal decrease in blood pressure, then its gradual rise and stabilization at a lower level than the baseline one within the following 8 hours. There were no significant differences in the magnitude of a blood pressure reduction after administration of 1.5 and 3 mg/kg. The findings suggest that the dinitrosyl iron complex is highly effective in treating uncomplicated HC. The antihypertensive effect of the drug persists for 8 hours after its injection, which is very important during prehospital therapy. The drug is well tolerated by patients and causes an insignificant number of side effects.

  1. Synthetic Astrobiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothschild, Lynn J.

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic biology - the design and construction of new biological parts and systems and the redesign of existing ones for useful purposes - has the potential to transform fields from pharmaceuticals to fuels. Our lab has focused on the potential of synthetic biology to revolutionize all three major parts of astrobiology: Where do we come from? Where are we going? and Are we alone? For the first and third, synthetic biology is allowing us to answer whether the evolutionary narrative that has played out on planet earth is likely to have been unique or universal. For example, in our lab we are re-evolving the biosynthetic pathways of amino acids in order to understand potential capabilities of an early organism with a limited repertoire of amino acids and developing techniques for the recovery of metals from spent electronics on other planetary bodies. And what about the limits for life? Can we create organisms that expand the envelope for life? In the future synthetic biology will play an increasing role in human activities both on earth, in fields as diverse as human health and the industrial production of novel bio-composites. Beyond earth, we will rely increasingly on biologically-provided life support, as we have throughout our evolutionary history. In order to do this, the field will build on two of the great contributions of astrobiology: studies of the origin of life and life in extreme environments.

  2. Antigenicity in sheep of synthetic peptides derived from stress-regulated Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis proteins and comparison with recombinant protein and complex native antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurung, Ratna B; Begg, Douglas J; Purdie, Auriol C; Whittington, Richard J

    2014-03-15

    Serum antibody enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay is the most commonly used test for diagnosis of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection in ruminants. However, the assay requires serum preabsorption with Mycobacterium phlei proteins to reduce cross reactions potentially contributed by the exposure of livestock to environmental mycobacteria. To trial the discovery of novel antigens which do not require serum absorption, synthetic MAP-specific peptides were selected based on in silico research to identify putative B cell epitopes. Four peptides from previously identified stress-regulated proteins were synthesized and evaluated using enzyme linked immunosorbent assay to detect Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis specific antibodies in sheep. Two peptides were from hypothetical MAP proteins (MAP3567 and MAP1168c) and two were from proteins with known function (MAP2698c, an acyl-acyl carrier protein desaturase-DesA2 and MAP2487c a carbonic anhydrase). The ability of each peptide to discriminate between unexposed and MAP exposed (infected and vaccinated) animals was similar to that of the parent recombinant MAP antigen, with area under receiver operating curve values of 0.86-0.93. Assays run with a combination of two peptides showed slightly higher reactivity than those of individual peptides. Peptides evaluated in this study had diagnostic potential similar to corresponding recombinant proteins but not superior to a complex native MAP antigen or a commercial assay. Further study is required to investigate other peptides for their diagnostic potential, and this may be simpler and cheaper than subunit protein-based research. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Propensity of a single-walled carbon nanotube-peptide to mimic a KK10 peptide in an HLA-TCR complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Mei; Bell, David R.; Zhou, Ruhong

    2017-12-01

    The application of nanotechnology to improve disease diagnosis, treatment, monitoring, and prevention is the goal of nanomedicine. We report here a theoretical study of a functionalized single-walled carbon nanotube (CNT) mimic binding to a human leukocyte antigen-T cell receptor (HLA-TCR) immune complex as a first attempt of a potential nanomedicine for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) vaccine development. The carbon nanotube was coated with three arginine residues to imitate the HIV type 1 immunodominant viral peptide KK10 (gag 263-272: KRWIILGLNK), named CNT-peptide hereafter. Through molecular dynamics simulations, we explore the CNT-peptide and KK10 binding to an important HLA-TCR complex. Our results suggest that the CNT-peptide and KK10 bind comparably to the HLA-TCR complex, but the CNT-peptide forms stronger interactions with the TCR. Desorption simulations highlight the innate flexibility of KK10 over the CNT-peptide, resulting in a slightly higher desorption energy required for KK10 over the CNT-peptide. Our findings indicate that the designed CNT-peptide mimic has favorable propensity to activate TCR pathways and should be further explored to understand therapeutic potential.

  4. The effect of magnetic domain walls on the complex permeability of bulk Z-type cobalt hexaferrite along both W and Y-phases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daró, Fábio R., E-mail: vonrho.colaborador@ieav.cta.br [Post Graduate Program, Aeronautics Institute of Technology (ITA), Praça Marechal Eduardo Gomes, 50, CEP 12228-900, São José Dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Migliano, Antonio Carlos C. [Applied Physics Division (EFA), Institute for Advanced Studies (IEAv), Trevo Coronel Aviador José Alberto Albano do Amarante, 1, CEP 12228-001, São José Dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Zanella, Glauco P.; Hirata, Anderson K. [Post Graduate Program, Aeronautics Institute of Technology (ITA), Praça Marechal Eduardo Gomes, 50, CEP 12228-900, São José Dos Campos, SP (Brazil); De Polli, Yasmara C. [Applied Physics Division (EFA), Institute for Advanced Studies (IEAv), Trevo Coronel Aviador José Alberto Albano do Amarante, 1, CEP 12228-001, São José Dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Salvadori, Maria Cecília B. [Thin Films Laboratory (LFF), Institute of Physics (IFUSP), University of São Paulo - USP, Rua do Matão, Travessa R, 187, CEP 05508-090, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2016-02-15

    We analyzed a bulk cobalt hexaferrite sample set with the same powder composition obtained by the solid–state reaction method, and made of the W, Y and Z-phases. Transmission/reflection method (TR) measurements of the complex impedance both in radio frequency (RF) and microwave (MW) spectra, as well as reflectance (RL) exhibited high absorption and small losses, still appearing similar to the pattern that is exhibited by the Z-type, even though the largest amount of W-phase. Magnetic force microscopy (MFM), in turn, revealed the existence of narrow magnetic domains consisting of 300–500 nm wide parallel stripes on the crystal basal plane and down to 100 nm wide parallel stripes aligned in parallel to stacked crystal layers that would not be easily perceived by other methods. These domains may contribute to the exhibited complex permeability, since in ferrite both domain wall resonance (DWR) and domain – or spin rotation – resonance (DR) are inversely proportional to the square root of domain width. Nevertheless, we concluded that several flux-pinning defects and impeding factors of the polycrystalline setup, such as charge carriers shown by TR, are probably more important than anisotropy isolated to determine domain setup, and how this acts on the complex magnetic permeability. - Highlights: • MFM detected small magnetic domains not easily perceived by other methods. • High ferromagnetic resonances are favored by narrow magnetic domains. • Electron hopping improves permittivity but is undesirable for permeability.

  5. Reconstrucción de defectos torácicos de espesor total: Presentación de 8 casos de especial complejidad Reconstruction of full thickness defects on the chest wall: Presentation of 8 complex cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.M. Lasso

    2009-12-01

    treatment require wide resection of the tumor or ischaemic or radiated tissue and control of the infection, but these principles could not be safely faced without the multiple reconstructive techniques that can afford the use of well vascularized, large or bulky tissues to reconstruct this anatomical area in combination with alloplastic materials, in order to give a solid stabilization. Thanks to these advances, we can actually perform our objectives in only one procedure. We present a selection of complex chest wall defects that have been operated in the last years by our surgical team. We will describe the solutions and the results obtained by means of a variety of possible flaps and synthetic materials.

  6. Rockfall source characterization at high rock walls in complex geological settings by photogrammetry, structural analysis and DFN techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agliardi, Federico; Riva, Federico; Galletti, Laura; Zanchi, Andrea; Crosta, Giovanni B.

    2016-04-01

    Rockfall quantitative risk analysis in areas impended by high, subvertical cliffs remains a challenge, due to the difficult definition of potential rockfall sources, event magnitude scenarios and related probabilities. For this reasons, rockfall analyses traditionally focus on modelling the runout component of rockfall processes, whereas rock-fall source identification, mapping and characterization (block size distribution and susceptibility) are over-simplified in most practical applications, especially when structurally complex rock masses are involved. We integrated field and remote survey and rock mass modelling techniques to characterize rock masses and detect rockfall source in complex geo-structural settings. We focused on a test site located at Valmadrera, near Lecco (Southern Alps, Italy), where cliffs up to 600 m high impend on a narrow strip of Lake Como shore. The massive carbonates forming the cliff (Dolomia Principale Fm), normally characterized by brittle structural associations due to their high strength and stiffness, are here involved in an ENE-trending, S-verging kilometre-scale syncline. Brittle mechanisms associated to folding strongly controlled the nature of discontinuities (bedding slip, strike-slip faults, tensile fractures) and their attributes (spacing and size), as well as the spatial variability of bedding attitude and fracture intensity, with individual block sizes up to 15 m3. We carried out a high-resolution terrestrial photogrammetric survey from distances ranging from 1500 m (11 camera stations from the opposite lake shore, 265 pictures) to 150 m (28 camera stations along N-S directed boat routes, 200 pictures), using RTK GNSS measurements for camera station geo-referencing. Data processing by Structure-from-Motion techniques resulted in detailed long-range (1500 m) and medium-range (150 to 800 m) point clouds covering the entire slope with maximum surface point densities exceeding 50 pts/m2. Point clouds allowed a detailed

  7. Cytotoxicity study of iron oxide nanoparticles, single-wall carbon nanotubes and their complexes applied to MCF7 breast cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mege, Karine

    Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) are radicals of great concern to biologists. Their role in several diseases---such as neurodegenerative disease, diabetes, premature aging and cancer---has been intensively investigated during the last decade. Since a major focus in cancer research is to better understand how it is induced and therefore how it can be cured, the study of the cytotoxic effects of ROS production within cancer cells is vital. Nanotechnology is an emerging field of science that promises great improvements in a number of disciplines. Nano medicine is one of its daughter fields. Various nanomaterials are used for diagnosis and disease detection, therapy and medical imaging, and many are already being used in oncology medicine. The two most frequently used nanomaterials in cancer research are Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs). They have been proven to play a significant role in the ROS production of various cancer cells. In this context, this thesis emphasizes the need to study the impact of nanoparticles, such as single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) and their complexes, on a human breast cancer cell line (MCF-7). To date, there have been very few studies assessing the effect on the oxidative stress activity of this cell line using these nanoparticles and their complexes.

  8. Natural - synthetic - artificial!

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter E

    2010-01-01

    The terms "natural," "synthetic" and "artificial" are discussed in relation to synthetic and artificial chromosomes and genomes, synthetic and artificial cells and artificial life.......The terms "natural," "synthetic" and "artificial" are discussed in relation to synthetic and artificial chromosomes and genomes, synthetic and artificial cells and artificial life....

  9. Synthetic Cannabinoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Brooke; Yepes, Andres; Nugent, Kenneth

    2015-07-01

    Synthetic cannabinoids (SCBs), also known under the brand names of "Spice," "K2," "herbal incense," "Cloud 9," "Mojo" and many others, are becoming a large public health concern due not only to their increasing use but also to their unpredictable toxicity and abuse potential. There are many types of SCBs, each having a unique binding affinity for cannabinoid receptors. Although both Δ-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and SCBs stimulate the same receptors, cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) and cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2), studies have shown that SCBs are associated with higher rates of toxicity and hospital admissions than is natural cannabis. This is likely due to SCBs being direct agonists of the cannabinoid receptors, whereas THC is a partial agonist. Furthermore, the different chemical structures of SCBs found in Spice or K2 may interact in unpredictable ways to elicit previously unknown, and the commercial products may have unknown contaminants. The largest group of users is men in their 20s who participate in polydrug use. The most common reported toxicities with SCB use based on studies using Texas Poison Control records are tachycardia, agitation and irritability, drowsiness, hallucinations, delusions, hypertension, nausea, confusion, dizziness, vertigo and chest pain. Acute kidney injury has also been strongly associated with SCB use. Treatment mostly involves symptom management and supportive care. More research is needed to identify which contaminants are typically found in synthetic marijuana and to understand the interactions between different SBCs to better predict adverse health outcomes.

  10. Synthetic chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, Daniel; Waldminghaus, Torsten

    2015-11-01

    What a living organism looks like and how it works and what are its components-all this is encoded on DNA, the genetic blueprint. Consequently, the way to change an organism is to change its genetic information. Since the first pieces of recombinant DNA have been used to transform cells in the 1970s, this approach has been enormously extended. Bigger and bigger parts of the genetic information have been exchanged or added over the years. Now we are at a point where the construction of entire chromosomes becomes a reachable goal and first examples appear. This development leads to fundamental new questions, for example, about what is possible and desirable to build or what construction rules one needs to follow when building synthetic chromosomes. Here we review the recent progress in the field, discuss current challenges and speculate on the appearance of future synthetic chromosomes. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Electrosorption of Os(III)-complex at single-wall carbon nanotubes immobilized on a glassy carbon electrode: Application to nanomolar detection of bromate, periodate and iodate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salimi, Abdollah [Department of Chemistry, University of Kurdistan, P.O. Box 416, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Research Center for Nanotechnology, University of Kurdistan, P.O. Box 416, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: absalimi@uok.ac.ir; Kavosi, Begard [Department of Chemistry, University of Kurdistan, P.O. Box 416, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Chemistry, Arak University, P.O. Box, 38156-879 Arak (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Babaei, Ali [Department of Chemistry, Arak University, P.O. Box, 38156-879 Arak (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hallaj, Rahman [Department of Chemistry, University of Kurdistan, P.O. Box 416, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2008-06-16

    A simple procedure was developed to prepare a glassy carbon electrode modified with single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and Os(III)-complex. The glassy carbon (GC) electrode modified with CNTs was immersed into Os(III)-complex solution (direct deposition) for a short period of time (60 s). 1,4,8,12-Tetraazacyclotetradecane osmium(III) chloride, (Os(III)LCl{sub 2}).ClO{sub 4}, irreversibly and strongly adsorbed on SWCNTs immobilized on the surface of GC electrode. Cyclic voltammograms of the Os(III)-complex-incorporated-SWCNTs indicate a pair of well defined and nearly reversible redox couple with surface confined characteristic at wide pH range (1-8). The surface coverage ({gamma}) and charge transfer rate constant (k{sub s}) of the immobilized Os-complex on SWCNTs were 3.07 x 10{sup -9} mol cm{sup -2}, 5.5 ({+-}0.2) s{sup -1}, 2.94 x 10{sup -9} mol cm{sup -2}, 7.3 ({+-}0.3) s{sup -1} at buffer solution with pH 2 and 7, respectively, indicate high loading ability of SWCNTs for Os(III) complex and great facilitation of the electron transfer between electroactive redox center and carbon nanotubes immobilized on the electrode surface. Modified electrodes showed higher electrocatalytic activity toward reduction of BrO{sub 3}{sup -}, IO{sub 3}{sup -} and IO{sub 4}{sup -} in acidic solutions. The catalytic rate constants for catalytic reduction bromate, periodate and iodate were 3.79 ({+-}0.2) x 10{sup 3}, 7.32 ({+-}0.2) x 10{sup 3} and 1.75 ({+-}0.2) x 10{sup 3} M{sup -1} s {sup -1}, respectively. The hydrodynamic amperometry of rotating modified electrode at constant potential (0.3 V) was used for nanomolar detection of selected analytes. Excellent electrochemical reversibility of the redox couple, good reproducibility, high stability, low detection limit, long life time, fast amperometric response time, wide linear concentration range, technical simplicity and possibility of rapid preparation are great advantage of this sensor.

  12. Synthetic murataite-3C, a complex form for long-term immobilization of nuclear waste. Crystal structure and its comparison with natural analogues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pakhomova, Anna S.; Krivovichev, Sergey V. [St. Petersburg State Univ. (Russian Federation). Dept. of Crystallography; Yudintsev, Sergey V. [Institute of Geology of Ore Deposits, Petrography, Mineralogy and Geochemistry, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Stefanovsky, Sergey V. [MosNPO Radon, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2013-03-01

    The structure of synthetic murataite-3C intended for long-term immobilization of high-level radioactive waste has been solved using crystals prepared by melting in an electric furnace at 1500 C. The material is cubic, F- anti 43m, a = 14.676(15) A, V = 3161.31(57) A{sup 3}. The structure is based upon a three-dimensional framework consisting of {alpha}-Keggin [Al{sup [4]}Ti{sub 12}{sup [6]}O{sub 40}] clusters linked by sharing the O5 atoms. The Keggin-cluster-framework interpenetrates with the metal-oxide substructure that can be considered as a derivative of the fluorite structure. The crystal chemical formula of synthetic murataite-3C derived from the obtained structure model can be written as {sup [8]}Ca{sub 6}{sup [8]}Ca{sub 4}{sup [6]}Ti{sub 12}{sup [5]}Ti{sub 4}{sup [4]}AlO{sub 42}. Its comparison with the natural murataite shows that the synthetic material has a noticeably less number of vacancies in the cation substructure and contains five instead of four symmetrically independent cation positions. The presence of the additional site essentially increases the capacity of synthetic murataite with respect to large heavy cations such as actinides, rare earth and alkaline earth metals in comparison with the material of natural origin. (orig.)

  13. Synthetic wisdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitcher, Philip

    2016-11-01

    Wisdom is a special kind of virtue. It is not to be identified with any outstanding cognitive ability-like having a prodigious memory or knowing a lot. Rather it consists in seeing what is most important and most valuable, either within a particular domain or in life as a whole. In the life of a wise person, that insight should be accompanied by traits of character, enabling the person to pursue what is seen as valuable. Viewing wisdom as a capacity for synthetic understanding, I argue for the need for philosophy, even at a time when all of us have much to learn from the sciences. © 2016 New York Academy of Sciences.

  14. Synthetic Plant Defense Elicitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasemin eBektas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To defend themselves against invading pathogens plants utilize a complex regulatory network that coordinates extensive transcriptional and metabolic reprogramming. Although many of the key players of this immunity-associated network are known, the details of its topology and dynamics are still poorly understood. As an alternative to forward and reverse genetic studies, chemical genetics-related approaches based on bioactive small molecules have gained substantial popularity in the analysis of biological pathways and networks. Use of such molecular probes can allow researchers to access biological space that was previously inaccessible to genetic analyses due to gene redundancy or lethality of mutations. Synthetic elicitors are small drug like molecules that induce plant defense responses, but are distinct from known natural elicitors of plant immunity. While the discovery of the some synthetic elicitors had already been reported in the 1970s, recent breakthroughs in combinatorial chemical synthesis now allow for inexpensive high-throughput screens for bioactive plant defense-inducing compounds. Along with powerful reverse genetics tools and resources available for model plants and crop systems, comprehensive collections of new synthetic elicitors will likely allow plant scientists to study the intricacies of plant defense signaling pathways and networks in an unparalleled fashion. As synthetic elicitors can protect crops from diseases, without the need to be directly toxic for pathogenic organisms, they may also serve as promising alternatives to conventional biocidal pesticides, which often are harmful for the environment, farmers and consumers. Here we are discussing various types of synthetic elicitors that have been used for studies on the plant immune system, their modes-of-action as well as their application in crop protection.

  15. Salt Damage on the Wall Paintings of the Festival Temple of Thutmosis III, Karnak Temples Complex, Upper Egypt. A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussein MAREY MAHMOUD

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The present study aims to characterize the main deterioration mechanisms affecting the wall painting of the festival temple of Thutmosis III, in the Karnak temples complex, Upper Egypt. Several salt encrustations were observed on the painted surfaces, exhibiting different degrees and forms of decay. The morphology and the microanalysis of the contained mineral phases were studied using scanning electron microscopy together with an energy dispersive X-ray analysis system (SEM-EDS. The mineralogical characterization was performed using the X-ray powder diffraction method (XRPD. The climatic conditions of the area play an important role in the crystallization/recrystallization cycles of salts, which exerts additional pressure, by producing cracking, powdering and flaking, in addition to pulverization of the pictorial layers. The results showed that sodium chloride (halite, NaCl is the predominant salt species affecting in the site. Furthermore, other salt minerals, such as sylvite (KCl, niter (KNO3, natron (Na2CO3·10H2O, thenardite (Na2SO4, gypsum (CaSO4·2H2O, anhydrite (CaSO4 and bassanite (CaSO4·0.5H2O were also found. The obtained results allowed us to determine the main deterioration factors and may be used when applying a conservation plan.

  16. Dispersion of single-wall carbon nanotubes with supramolecular Congo red – properties of the complexes and mechanism of the interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Jagusiak

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available A method of dispersion of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs in aqueous media using Congo red (CR is proposed. Nanotubes covered with CR constitute the high capacity system that provides the possibility of binding and targeted delivery of different drugs, which can intercalate into the supramolecular, ribbon-like CR structure. The study revealed the presence of strong interactions between CR and the surface of SWNTs. The aim of the study was to explain the mechanism of this interaction. The interaction of CR and carbon nanotubes was studied using spectral analysis of the SWNT–CR complex, dynamic light scattering (DLS, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC and microscopic methods: atomic force microscopy (AFM, transmission (TEM, scanning (SEM and optical microscopy. The results indicate that the binding of supramolecular CR structures to the surface of the nanotubes is based on the "face to face stacking". CR molecules attached directly to the surface of the nanotubes can bind further, parallel-oriented molecules and form supramolecular and protruding structures. This explains the high CR binding capacity of carbon nanotubes. The presented system – containing SWNTs covered with CR – offers a wide range of biomedical applications.

  17. Decreased Polysaccharide Feruloylation Compromises Plant Cell Wall Integrity and Increases Susceptibility to Necrotrophic Fungal Pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan T Reem

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The complexity of cell wall composition and structure determines the strength, flexibility, and function of the primary cell wall in plants. However, the contribution of the various components to cell wall integrity and function remains unclear. Modifications of cell wall composition can induce plant responses known as Cell Wall Integrity control. In this study, we used transgenic expression of the fungal feruloyl esterase AnFAE to examine the effect of post-synthetic modification of Arabidopsis and Brachypodium cell walls. Transgenic Arabidopsis plants expressing AnFAE showed a significant reduction of monomeric ferulic acid, increased amounts of wall-associated extensins, and increased susceptibility to Botrytis cinerea, compared with wild type. Transgenic Brachypodium showed reductions in monomeric and dimeric ferulic acids and increased susceptibility to Bipolaris sorokiniana. Upon infection, transgenic Arabidopsis and Brachypodium plants also showed increased expression of several defense-related genes compared with wild type. These results demonstrate a role, in both monocot and dicot plants, of polysaccharide feruloylation in plant cell wall integrity, which contributes to plant resistance to necrotrophic pathogens.

  18. Ambiguous walls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mody, Astrid

    2012-01-01

    of “ambiguous walls” as a more “critical” approach to design [1]. The concept of ambiguous walls refers to the diffuse status a lumious and possibly responsive wall will have. Instead of confining it can open up. Instead of having a static appearance, it becomes a context over time. Instead of being hard...... and flat, “ambiguous walls” combine softness, tectonics and three-dimensionality. The paper considers a selection of luminious surfaces and reflects on the extent of their ambiguous qualities. Initial ideas for new directions for the wall will be essayed through the discussion....

  19. Tissue Harmonic Synthetic Aperture Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Joachim

    The main purpose of this PhD project is to develop an ultrasonic method for tissue harmonic synthetic aperture imaging. The motivation is to advance the field of synthetic aperture imaging in ultrasound, which has shown great potentials in the clinic. Suggestions for synthetic aperture tissue...... system complexity compared to conventional synthetic aperture techniques. In this project, SASB is sought combined with a pulse inversion technique for 2nd harmonic tissue harmonic imaging. The advantages in tissue harmonic imaging (THI) are expected to further improve the image quality of SASB....... The first part of the scientific contribution investigates an implementation of pulse inversion for THI on the experimental ultrasound system SARUS. The technique is initially implemented for linear array transducers and then expanded for convex array transducers. The technique is evaluated based on spatial...

  20. Toward engineering synthetic microbial metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McArthur, George H; Fong, Stephen S

    2010-01-01

    The generation of well-characterized parts and the formulation of biological design principles in synthetic biology are laying the foundation for more complex and advanced microbial metabolic engineering. Improvements in de novo DNA synthesis and codon-optimization alone are already contributing to the manufacturing of pathway enzymes with improved or novel function. Further development of analytical and computer-aided design tools should accelerate the forward engineering of precisely regulated synthetic pathways by providing a standard framework for the predictable design of biological systems from well-characterized parts. In this review we discuss the current state of synthetic biology within a four-stage framework (design, modeling, synthesis, analysis) and highlight areas requiring further advancement to facilitate true engineering of synthetic microbial metabolism.

  1. Toward Engineering Synthetic Microbial Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George H. McArthur

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The generation of well-characterized parts and the formulation of biological design principles in synthetic biology are laying the foundation for more complex and advanced microbial metabolic engineering. Improvements in de novo DNA synthesis and codon-optimization alone are already contributing to the manufacturing of pathway enzymes with improved or novel function. Further development of analytical and computer-aided design tools should accelerate the forward engineering of precisely regulated synthetic pathways by providing a standard framework for the predictable design of biological systems from well-characterized parts. In this review we discuss the current state of synthetic biology within a four-stage framework (design, modeling, synthesis, analysis and highlight areas requiring further advancement to facilitate true engineering of synthetic microbial metabolism.

  2. Cell wall biology: perspectives from cell wall imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kieran J D; Marcus, Susan E; Knox, J Paul

    2011-03-01

    Polysaccharide-rich plant cell walls are important biomaterials that underpin plant growth, are major repositories for photosynthetically accumulated carbon, and, in addition, impact greatly on the human use of plants. Land plant cell walls contain in the region of a dozen major polysaccharide structures that are mostly encompassed by cellulose, hemicelluloses, and pectic polysaccharides. During the evolution of land plants, polysaccharide diversification appears to have largely involved structural elaboration and diversification within these polysaccharide groups. Cell wall chemistry is well advanced and a current phase of cell wall science is aimed at placing the complex polysaccharide chemistry in cellular contexts and developing a detailed understanding of cell wall biology. Imaging cell wall glycomes is a challenging area but recent developments in the establishment of cell wall molecular probe panels and their use in high throughput procedures are leading to rapid advances in the molecular understanding of the spatial heterogeneity of individual cell walls and also cell wall differences at taxonomic levels. The challenge now is to integrate this knowledge of cell wall heterogeneity with an understanding of the molecular and physiological mechanisms that underpin cell wall properties and functions.

  3. Thlaspi arvense binds Cu(II) as a bis-(L-histidinato) complex on root cell walls in an urban ecosystem

    OpenAIRE

    MANCEAU, Alain; SIMIONOVICI, Alexandre; LANSON, Martine; PERRIN, Jonathan; TUCOULOU, Rémi; BOHIC, Sylvain; BOHIC, Sylvain; FAKRA, Sirine C; MARCUS, Matthew A.; BEDELL, Jean-Philippe; NAGY KATHRYN, L.

    2013-01-01

    Root cell walls accumulate metal cations both during acquisition from the environment and removal from the protoplast to avoid toxicity, but molecular forms of the metals under field conditions remain elusive. We have identified how copper is bound to cell walls of intact roots of native Thlaspi arvense by combining synchrotron X-ray fluorescence and absorption techniques (XANES and EXAFS) at the nano-, micro-, and bulk scales. The plants grew naturally in sediment in a stormwater runoff basi...

  4. Synthetic collective intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solé, Ricard; Amor, Daniel R; Duran-Nebreda, Salva; Conde-Pueyo, Núria; Carbonell-Ballestero, Max; Montañez, Raúl

    2016-10-01

    Intelligent systems have emerged in our biosphere in different contexts and achieving different levels of complexity. The requirement of communication in a social context has been in all cases a determinant. The human brain, probably co-evolving with language, is an exceedingly successful example. Similarly, social insects complex collective decisions emerge from information exchanges between many agents. The difference is that such processing is obtained out of a limited individual cognitive power. Computational models and embodied versions using non-living systems, particularly involving robot swarms, have been used to explore the potentiality of collective intelligence. Here we suggest a novel approach to the problem grounded in the genetic engineering of unicellular systems, which can be modified in order to interact, store memories or adapt to external stimuli in collective ways. What we label as Synthetic Swarm Intelligence defines a parallel approach to the evolution of computation and swarm intelligence and allows to explore potential embodied scenarios for decision making at the microscale. Here, we consider several relevant examples of collective intelligence and their synthetic organism counterparts. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Complexity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rahul Pandit

    2008-10-31

    Oct 31, 2008 ... ”The more complex a thing is, the more you can talk about it.” - attributed to Giorgio Parisi. ▻ ”C'est magnifique, mais ce n'est pas de la science.” (It is magnificent, but not all of it is science.) - attributed ... Earliest examples: theoretical computer science, algorithmic complexity, etc. ▻ Rapid progress after the ...

  6. Experimental investigation into flow in an ejector with four synthetic jets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dančová Petra

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with experimental investigation into flow in an ejector with four synthetic jets. The aim of the synthetic jets is to excite the mixing layer in the ejector and intensify the mixing process. The cavities of the synthetic jet actuators are hidden in the mixing chamber wall and the synthetic jets are perpendicular to the ejector axis. CTA and pneumatic measuring method were used to investigate the influences of synthetic jets on flow inside the ejector.

  7. A synthetic GMPE based on deterministic simulated ground motion data obtained from dynamic rupture models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalguer, L. A.; Baumann, C.; Cauzzi, C.

    2013-12-01

    Empirical ground motion prediction in the very near-field and for large magnitudes is often based on extrapolation of ground motion prediction equations (GMPEs) outside the range where they are well constrained by recorded data. With empirical GMPEs it is also difficult to capture source-dominated ground motion patterns, such as the effects of velocity pulses induced by subshear and supershear rupture directivity, buried and surface-rupturing, hanging-wall and foot-wall, weak shallow layers, complex geometry faults and stress drop. A way to cope at least in part with these shortcomings is to augment the calibration datasets with synthetic ground motions. To this aim, physics-based dynamic rupture models - where the physical bases involved in the fault rupture are explicitly considered - appear to be a suitable approach to produce synthetic ground motions. In this contribution, we first perform an assessment of a database of synthetic ground motions generated by a suite of dynamic rupture simulations to verify compatibility of the peak ground amplitudes with current GMPEs. The synthetic data-set is composed by 360 earthquake scenarios with moment magnitudes in the range of 5.5-7, for three mechanisms of faulting (reverse, normal and strike-slip) and for both buried faults and surface rupturing faults. Second, we parameterise the synthetic dataset through a GMPE. For this purpose, we identify the basic functional forms by analyzing the variation of the synthetic peak ground motions and spectral ordinates as a function of different explanatory variables related to the earthquake source characteristics, in order to account for some of the source effects listed above. We argue that this study provides basic guidelines for the developments of future GMPEs including data from physics-based numerical simulations.

  8. Comparación entre redes de fibras sintéticas y redes de fibras de cáñamo para el refuerzo de muros de albañileria = Comparison between synthetic fiber networks and hemp fiber networks for the reinforcement of masonry walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Vilardi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available La existencia de una gran cantidad de edificios antiguos ha movilizado la investigación para estudiar nuevos sistemas de refuerzo a aquellas construcciones que sean dañadas por decadencia fisiológica o por terremoto. El presente documento demuestra la eficacia de un sistema de refuerzo innovador para los muros de mampostería, constituyentes los elementos estructurales de los edificios históricos. Se hace una comparación entre unas redes bidireccionales de fibras sintéticas tradicionales y las de fibras naturales, ambas pegadas a las dos fachadas del muro con matriz de mortero. El resultado muestra la aplicación de las fibras de cáñamo como refuerzo sísmico y una mayor compatibilidad de estas con el material que caracterizan los edificios antiguos. Abstract The existence of a large number of old buildings has mobilized research to study new systems of reinforcement to those buildings that are damaged by physiological decay or earthquake. This document demonstrates the effectiveness of an innovative reinforcement system for masonry walls, which are the structural elements of historic buildings. A comparison is made between bidirectional networks of traditional synthetic fibers and those of natural fibers, both glued to the two facades of the wall with mortar matrix. The result shows the application of hemp fibers as seismic reinforcement and a greater compatibility of these with the material that characterize the old buildings.

  9. Characterization of some synthetic Ru and Ir complexes by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lou, X.; Buijtenen, J. van; Bastiaansen, J.J.A.M.; Waal, B.F.M. de; Langeveld, B.M.W.; Dongen, J.L.J. van

    2005-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOFMS) was applied to the analysis of Ru(OCOCF 3)2(CO)(PPh3)2, Ru(OCOC 3F7)2(CO)(PPh3)2, Ir(tBuppy)3 and Ir(ppy)2(acac) complexes. A troublesome problem in the MALDI-TOFMS characterization of these metal complexes is

  10. Synthetic aspects, spectral, thermal studies and antimicrobial screening on bis(N,N-dimethyldithiocarbamato-S,S')antimony(III) complexes with oxo or thio donor ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, H P S; Carpenter, Jaswant; Joshi, Sapana

    2014-09-15

    The bis(N,N-dimethyldithiocarbamato-S,S')antimony(III) complexes have been obtained by the reaction of chloro bis(N,N-dimethyldithiocarbamato-S,S')antimony(III) with corresponding oxo or thio donor ligands such as sodium benzoate 1, sodium thioglycolate 2, phenol 3, sodium 1-propanethiolate 4, potassium thioacetate 5, sodium salicylate 6, ethane-1,2-dithiolate 7 and disodium oxalate 8. These complexes have been characterized by the physicochemical [melting point, molecular weight determination and elemental analysis (C, H, N, S and Sb)], spectral [UV-Visible, FT-IR, far IR, NMR (1H and 13C)], thermogravimetric (TG & DTA) analysis, ESI-Mass and powder X-ray diffraction studies. Thermogravimetric analysis of the complexes confirmed the final decomposition product as highly pure antimony sulfide (Sb2S3) and powder X-ray diffraction studies show that the complexes are in lower symmetry with monoclinic crystal lattice and nano-ranged particle size (11.51-20.82 nm). The complexes have also been screened against some bacterial and fungal strains for their antibacterial and antifungal activities and compared with standard drugs. These show that the complexes have greater activities against some human pathogenic bacteria and fungi than the activities of standard drugs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Synthetic biology and its promises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Manuel De Cózar Escalante

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Synthetic biology is a new science and emerging technology, or rather a technoscience, which converges with others such as nanotechnology, information technology, robotics, artificial intelligence and neuroscience. All have common features that could have highly concerning social and environmental impacts. With its ambitious goals of controlling complexity, redesigning and creating new living entities, synthetic biology perfectly exemplifies the new bioeconomic reality. This requires expanding the focus of the discussion beyond the limited comparative analysis of risks and benefits, to address uncertainties, reassign responsibilities and initiate a thorough social assessment of what is at stake.

  12. Wall Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGinley, Connie Q.

    2004-01-01

    The author of this article, an art teacher at Monarch High School in Louisville, Colorado, describes how her experience teaching in a new school presented an exciting visual challenge for an art teacher--monotonous brick walls just waiting for decoration. This school experienced only minimal instances of graffiti, but as an art teacher, she did…

  13. A synthetic lethal screen identifies a role for the cortical actin patch/endocytosis complex in the response to nutrient deprivation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Care, Alison; Vousden, Katherine A; Binley, Katie M; Radcliffe, Pippa; Trevethick, Janet; Mannazzu, Ilaria; Sudbery, Peter E

    2004-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae whi2Delta cells are unable to halt cell division in response to nutrient limitation and are sensitive to a wide variety of stresses. A synthetic lethal screen resulted in the isolation of siw mutants that had a phenotype similar to that of whi2Delta. Among these were mutations affecting SIW14, FEN2, SLT2, and THR4. Fluid-phase endocytosis is severely reduced or abolished in whi2Delta, siw14Delta, fen2Delta, and thr4Delta mutants. Furthermore, whi2Delta and siw14Delta mutants produce large actin clumps in stationary phase similar to those seen in prk1Delta ark1Delta mutants defective in protein kinases that regulate the actin cytoskeleton. Overexpression of SIW14 in a prk1Delta strain resulted in a loss of cortical actin patches and cables and was lethal. Overexpression of SIW14 also rescued the caffeine sensitivity of the slt2 mutant isolated in the screen, but this was not due to alteration of the phosphorylation state of Slt2. These observations suggest that endocytosis and the organization of the actin cytoskeleton are required for the proper response to nutrient limitation. This hypothesis is supported by the observation that rvs161Delta, sla1Delta, sla2Delta, vrp1Delta, ypt51Delta, ypt52Delta, and end3Delta mutations, which disrupt the organization of the actin cytoskeleton and/or reduce endocytosis, have a phenotype similar to that of whi2Delta mutants. PMID:15020461

  14. Synthetic and structural studies on copper 1 H-[1,10]-phenanthrolin-2-one coordination complexes: isolation of a novel intermediate during 1,10-phenanthroline hydroxylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szpakolski, Katherine B; Latham, Kay; Rix, Colin J; White, Jonathan M; Moubaraki, Boujemaa; Murray, Keith S

    2010-02-01

    The synthesis and crystal structure elucidation of a novel dinuclear heteroleptic copper(II) complex has led to an alternative mechanism in the formation of covalent hydrates. During further studies on the synthesis and properties of [Cu(2)(ophen)(2)] (1), a dinuclear complex of copper(I) with 1 H-[1,10]-phenanthrolin-2-one (Hophen), two intermediates/alternative products 2 and 3 were isolated. The dinuclear, antiferromagnetic complex [Cu(2)(ophen)(2)(phen)(2)](NO(3))(2)9H(2)O (3, phen=1,10-phenanthroline) contains two five-coordinate copper(II) ions, both with trigonal-bipyramidal coordination, which are bridged together through deprotonated hydroxyl groups with a Cu--Cu non-bonding distance of 3.100 A. Complex [Cu(phen)(2)(H(2)O)](NO(3))(2) (2) is a polymorph of a previously reported material. The occurrence of 2 and 3 has led us to propose a variation to the Gillard mechanism for the formation of covalent hydrates in bidentate N-heterocycles in which the attacking nucleophile may be the deprotonated form of 2, [Cu(phen)(2)(OH)](-), rather than free OH(-).

  15. Synthetic biology advancing clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folcher, Marc; Fussenegger, Martin

    2012-08-01

    The 'omics' era, with its identification of genetic and protein components, has combined with systems biology, which provided insights into network structures, to set the stage for synthetic biology, an emerging interdisciplinary life science that uses engineering principles. By capitalizing on an iterative design cycle that involves molecular and computational biology tools to assemble functional designer devices from a comprehensive catalogue of standardized biological components with predictable functions, synthetic biology has significantly advanced our understanding of complex control dynamics that program living systems. Such insights, collected over the past decade, are priming a variety of synthetic biology-inspired biomedical applications that have the potential to revolutionize drug discovery and production technologies, as well as treatment strategies for infectious diseases and metabolic disorders. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Comparison between results of detailed tectonic studies on borehole core vs microresistivity images of borehole wall from gas-bearing shale complexes, Baltic Basin, Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobek, Kinga; Jarosiński, Marek; Pachytel, Radomir

    2017-04-01

    Structural analysis of borehole core and microresistivity images yield an information about geometry of natural fracture network and their potential importance for reservoir stimulation. Density of natural fractures and their orientation in respect to the maximum horizontal stress has crucial meaning for hydraulic fractures propagation in unconventional reservoirs. We have investigated several hundred meters of continuous borehole core and corresponding microresistivity images (mostly XRMI) from six boreholes in the Pomeranian part of the Early Paleozoic Baltic Basin. In general, our results challenge the question about representatives of statistics based on structural analyses on a small shale volume represented by borehole core or borehole wall images and credibility of different sets of data. Most frequently, fractures observed in both XRMI and cores are steep, small strata-bound fractures and veins with minor mechanical aperture (0,1 mm in average). These veins create an orthogonal joint system, locally disturbed by fractures associated with normal or by gently dipping thrust faults. Mean fractures' height keeps in a range between 30-50 cm. Fracture density differs significantly among boreholes and Consistent Lithological Units (CLUs) but the most frequent means falls in a range 2-4 m-1. We have also payed an attention to bedding planes due to their expected coupling with natural fractures and their role as structural barriers for vertical fracture propagation. We aimed in construction for each CLU the so-called "mean brick", which size is limited by an average distance between two principal joint sets and between bedding fractures. In our study we have found out a discrepancy between structural profiles based on XRMI and core interpretation. For some CLUs joint fractures densities, are higher in cores than in XRMI. In this case, numerous small fractures were not recorded due to the limits of XRMI resolution. However, the most veins with aperture 0,1 mm

  17. Synthetic scope and DFT analysis of the chiral binap–gold(I complex-catalyzed 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition of azlactones with alkenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Martín-Rodríguez

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition between glycine-derived azlactones with maleimides is efficiently catalyzed by the dimeric chiral complex [(Sa-Binap·AuTFA]2. The alanine-derived oxazolone only reacts with tert-butyl acrylate giving anomalous regiochemistry, which is explained and supported by Natural Resonance Theory and Nucleus Independent Chemical Shifts calculations. The origin of the high enantiodiscrimination observed with maleimides and tert-butyl acrylate is analyzed using DFT computed at M06/Lanl2dz//ONIOM(b3lyp/Lanl2dz:UFF level. Several applications of these cycloadducts in the synthesis of new proline derivatives with a 2,5-trans-arrangement and in the preparation of complex fused polycyclic molecules are described.

  18. Immunization with a hemagglutinin-derived synthetic peptide formulated with a CpG-DNA-liposome complex induced protection against lethal influenza virus infection in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Won Rhee

    Full Text Available Whole-virus vaccines, including inactivated or live-attenuated influenza vaccines, have been conventionally developed and supported as a prophylaxis. These currently available virus-based influenza vaccines are widely used in the clinic, but the vaccine production takes a long time and a huge number of embryonated chicken eggs. To overcome the imperfection of egg-based influenza vaccines, epitope-based peptide vaccines have been studied as an alternative approach. Here, we formulated an efficacious peptide vaccine without carriers using phosphodiester CpG-DNA and a special liposome complex. Potential epitope peptides predicted from the hemagglutinin (HA protein of the H5N1 A/Viet Nam/1203/2004 strain (NCBI database, AAW80717 were used to immunize mice along with phosphodiester CpG-DNA co-encapsulated in a phosphatidyl-β-oleoyl-γ-palmitoyl ethanolamine (DOPE:cholesterol hemisuccinate (CHEMS complex (Lipoplex(O without carriers. We identified a B cell epitope peptide (hH5N1 HA233 epitope, 14 amino acids that can potently induce epitope-specific antibodies. Furthermore, immunization with a complex of the B cell epitope and Lipoplex(O completely protects mice challenged with a lethal dose of recombinant H5N1 virus. These results suggest that our improved peptide vaccine technology can be promptly applied to vaccine development against pandemic influenza. Furthermore our results suggest that potent epitopes, which cannot be easily found using proteins or a virus as an antigen, can be screened when we use a complex of peptide epitopes and Lipoplex(O.

  19. Wall Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-14

    Sydney, Australia. December 6, 1990. Lumley, J. L. A dynamical-systems-theory approach to the wall region. Environmental Engineering Laboratory, CSIRO...Nonlinear Science. Holmes, P. Editor in Chief, Nonlinear Scinece Today. Holmes, P. Reviewer for Physica D, J. Sound Vib., J. Phys., Q. Appl. Math, Phys...Spring, 1994; Organizing committee member. Holmes, P. Editorial Board Member: Archive for Rational Mechanics and Analysis; Journal of Nonlinear Scinece

  20. CLIMBING WALL

    CERN Multimedia

    1999-01-01

    The FIRE AND RESCUE Group of TIS Commission informs that the climbing wall in the yard of the Fire-fighters Station, is intended for the sole use of the members of that service, and recalls that access to this installation is forbidden for safety reasons to all persons not belonging to the Service.CERN accepts no liability for damage or injury suffered as a result of failure to comply with this interdiction.TIS/DI

  1. Synthetic assembly of novel avidin-biotin-GlcNAc (ABG) complex as an attractive bio-probe and its interaction with wheat germ agglutinin (WGA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Amrita; Koyama, Tetsuo; Hatano, Ken; Matsuoka, Koji

    2016-10-01

    A tetravalent GlcNAc pendant glycocluster was constructed with terminal biotin through C6 linker. To acquire the multivalent carbohydrate-protein interactions, we synthesized a glycopolymer of tetrameric structure using N-acetyl-d-glucosamine (GlcNAc) as the target carbohydrate by the use of 4-(4,6-dimethoxy-1,3,5-triazin-2-yl)-4-methylmorpholinium chloride (DMT-MM) as coupling reagent, followed by biotin-avidin complexation leading to the formation of glycocluster of avidin-biotin-GlcNAc conjugate (ABG complex). The dynamic light scattering (DLS) system was implied for size detection and to check the binding affinity of GlcNAc conjugate with a WGA lectin we use fluorometric assay by means of specific excitation of tryptophan at λex 295nm and it was found to be very high Ka∼1.39×10(7) M(-1) in case of ABG complex as compared to GlcNAc only Ka∼1.01×10(4) M(-1) with the phenomenon proven to be due to glycocluster effect. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Plant synthetic biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wusheng; Stewart, C Neal

    2015-05-01

    Plant synthetic biology is an emerging field that combines engineering principles with plant biology toward the design and production of new devices. This emerging field should play an important role in future agriculture for traditional crop improvement, but also in enabling novel bioproduction in plants. In this review we discuss the design cycles of synthetic biology as well as key engineering principles, genetic parts, and computational tools that can be utilized in plant synthetic biology. Some pioneering examples are offered as a demonstration of how synthetic biology can be used to modify plants for specific purposes. These include synthetic sensors, synthetic metabolic pathways, and synthetic genomes. We also speculate about the future of synthetic biology of plants. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Synthetic biology: programming cells for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hörner, Maximilian; Reischmann, Nadine; Weber, Wilfried

    2012-01-01

    The emerging field of synthetic biology is a novel biological discipline at the interface between traditional biology, chemistry, and engineering sciences. Synthetic biology aims at the rational design of complex synthetic biological devices and systems with desired properties by combining compatible, modular biological parts in a systematic manner. While the first engineered systems were mainly proof-of-principle studies to demonstrate the power of the modular engineering approach of synthetic biology, subsequent systems focus on applications in the health, environmental, and energy sectors. This review describes recent approaches for biomedical applications that were developed along the synthetic biology design hierarchy, at the level of individual parts, of devices, and of complex multicellular systems. It describes how synthetic biological parts can be used for the synthesis of drug-delivery tools, how synthetic biological devices can facilitate the discovery of novel drugs, and how multicellular synthetic ecosystems can give insight into population dynamics of parasites and hosts. These examples demonstrate how this new discipline could contribute to novel solutions in the biopharmaceutical industry.

  4. Sternal Cleft and Pectus Excavatum: A Combined Approach for the Correction of a Complex Anterior Chest Wall Malformation in a Teenager.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tocchioni, Francesca; Ghionzoli, Marco; Lo Piccolo, Roberto; Deaconu, Diana E; Facchini, Flavio; Milanez De Campos, Jose R; Messineo, Antonio

    2015-06-01

    Congenital sternal cleft is a rare chest wall malformation. Because of the flexibility of the chest in infants, surgical repair should be performed by primary closure in the neonatal period. In adolescents and adults, different techniques have been suggested to overcome the lack of sternal bone tissue. We describe a very rare case of an 18-year-old woman with a complete bifid sternum associated with pectus excavatum for whom a satisfactory cosmetic and functional result was obtained by adequate surgical planning, which entailed a combination of two standardized surgical techniques. Copyright © 2015 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Microfluidics with fluid walls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Edmond J; Feuerborn, Alexander; Wheeler, James H R; Tan, Ann Na; Durham, William M; Foster, Kevin R; Cook, Peter R

    2017-10-10

    Microfluidics has great potential, but the complexity of fabricating and operating devices has limited its use. Here we describe a method - Freestyle Fluidics - that overcomes many key limitations. In this method, liquids are confined by fluid (not solid) walls. Aqueous circuits with any 2D shape are printed in seconds on plastic or glass Petri dishes; then, interfacial forces pin liquids to substrates, and overlaying an immiscible liquid prevents evaporation. Confining fluid walls are pliant and resilient; they self-heal when liquids are pipetted through them. We drive flow through a wide range of circuits passively by manipulating surface tension and hydrostatic pressure, and actively using external pumps. Finally, we validate the technology with two challenging applications - triggering an inflammatory response in human cells and chemotaxis in bacterial biofilms. This approach provides a powerful and versatile alternative to traditional microfluidics.The complexity of fabricating and operating microfluidic devices limits their use. Walsh et al. describe a method in which circuits are printed as quickly and simply as writing with a pen, and liquids in them are confined by fluid instead of solid walls.

  6. Cell wall integrity, genotoxic injury and PCD dynamics in alfalfa saponin-treated white poplar cells highlight a complex link between molecule structure and activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paparella, Stefania; Tava, Aldo; Avato, Pinarosa; Biazzi, Elisa; Macovei, Anca; Biggiogera, Marco; Carbonera, Daniela; Balestrazzi, Alma

    2015-03-01

    In the present work, eleven saponins and three sapogenins purified from Medicago sativa were tested for their cytotoxicity against highly proliferating white poplar (Populus alba L.) cell suspension cultures. After preliminary screening, four saponins with different structural features in terms of aglycone moieties and sugar chains (saponin 3, a bidesmoside of hederagenin; saponins 4 and 5, monodesmoside and bidesmoside of medicagenic acid respectively, and saponin 10, a bidesmoside of zanhic acid) and different cytotoxicity were selected and used for further investigation on their structure-activity relationship. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) analyses provided for the first time evidence of the effects exerted by saponins on plant cell wall integrity. Exposure to saponin 3 and saponin 10 resulted into disorganization of the outer wall layer and the effect was even more pronounced in white poplar cells treated with the two medicagenic acid derivatives, saponins 4 and 5. Oxidative burst and nitric oxide accumulation were common hallmarks of the response of white poplar cells to saponins. When DNA damage accumulation and DNA repair profiles were evaluated by Single Cell Gel Electrophoresis, induction of single and double strand breaks followed by effective repair was observed within 24h. The reported data are discussed in view of the current issues dealing with saponin structure-activity relationship. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. A comparative synthetic, magnetic and theoretical study of functional M₄Cl₄ cubane-type Co(II) and Ni(II) complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghisolfi, Alessio; Monakhov, Kirill Yu; Pattacini, Roberto; Braunstein, Pierre; López, Xavier; de Graaf, Coen; Speldrich, Manfred; van Leusen, Jan; Schilder, Helmut; Kögerler, Paul

    2014-06-07

    We describe the synthesis, structures, and magnetochemistry of new M4Cl4 cubane-type cobalt(II) and nickel(II) complexes with the formula [M(μ3-Cl)Cl(HL·S)]4 (1: M = Co; 2: M = Ni), where HL·S represents a pyridyl-alcohol-type ligand with a thioether functional group, introduced to allow subsequent binding to Au surfaces. Dc and ac magnetic susceptibility data of 1 and 2 were modeled with a full spin Hamiltonian implemented in the computational framework CONDON 2.0. Although both coordination clusters 1 and 2 are isostructural, with each of their transition metal ions in a pseudo-octahedral coordination environment of four Cl atoms and N,O-donor atoms of one chelating HL·S ligand, the substantially different ligand field effects of Co(II) and Ni(II) results in stark differences in their magnetism. In contrast to compound 1 which exhibits a dominant antiferromagnetic intramolecular coupling (J = -0.14 cm(-1)), 2 is characterised by a ferromagnetic coupling (J = +10.6 cm(-1)) and is considered to be a single-molecule magnet (SMM), a feature of special interest for future surface deposition studies. An analysis based on density functional theory (DFT) was performed to explore possible magnetostructural correlations in these compounds. Using a two-J model Hamiltonian, it revealed that compound 1 has four positive and two (small) negative J(Co···Co) isotropic interactions leading to a S(HS) = 6 ground state. Taking into account the magnetic anisotropy, one would recover a M(S) = 0 ground state since D > 0 from computations. In 2, all the J constants are positive and, in this framework, the zero-field splitting energy characterising the axial anisotropy was estimated to be negative (D = -0.44 cm(-1)). The computational results are consistent with compound 2 being an SMM.

  8. Digital 'faces' of synthetic biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, Kathrin

    2013-06-01

    In silicio design plays a fundamental role in the endeavour to synthesise biological systems. In particular, computer-aided design software enables users to manage the complexity of biological entities that is connected to their construction and reconfiguration. The software's graphical user interface bridges the gap between the machine-readable data on the algorithmic subface of the computer and its human-amenable surface represented by standardised diagrammatic elements. Notations like the Systems Biology Graphical Notation (SBGN), together with interactive operations such as drag & drop, allow the user to visually design and simulate synthetic systems as 'bio-algorithmic signs'. Finally, the digital programming process should be extended to the wet lab to manufacture the designed synthetic biological systems. By exploring the different 'faces' of synthetic biology, I argue that in particular computer-aided design (CAD) is pushing the idea to automatically produce de novo objects. Multifaceted software processes serve mutually aesthetic, epistemic and performative purposes by simultaneously black-boxing and bridging different data sources, experimental operations and community-wide standards. So far, synthetic biology is mainly a product of digital media technologies that structurally mimic the epistemological challenge to take both qualitative as well as quantitative aspects of biological systems into account in order to understand and produce new and functional entities. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. A multi-analytical approach for the study of the pigments used in the wall paintings from a building complex on the Caelian Hill (Rome)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fermo, Paola; Piazzalunga, Andrea; de Vos, Mariette; Andreoli, Martina

    2013-12-01

    In the present study, shards from Roman wall paintings (from the end of the first century to the fourth century A.D.) decorating the domus below the Basilica of SS. John and Paul on the Caelian Hill (Rome), were analyzed in order to identify the pigments used. The analytical techniques employed for the characterization of the pigments were the scanning electron microscope coupled with an energy dispersive spectrometer (SEM-EDS) and infrared spectroscopy (ATR and micro ATR). While SEM-EDS allowed to perform a qualitative analysis of the material, by FT-IR chemical species have been identified. The pigments identified were those mentioned in the literature for the Imperial Roman fresco painting: different types of ochre (yellow and red), mixtures containing lead, green earths and precious pigments such as cinnabar and Egyptian blue. They were often used as mixtures and the use of the most valuable pigments (cinnabar and Egyptian blue) were found in the most ancient rooms.

  10. Modelling the defrost process in complex geometries – part 2: wall-function based coupling to a multi-region CFD solver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hertle Ellen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Presence of frost in air coolers reduces the performance and thus has to be removed frequently. A method commonly applied for frost removal is hot-gas defrosting. For the efficient design of this periodically performed operating sequence, a precise prediction of the process is essential. A CFD simulation is a capable tool for this evaluation. This paper presents an integration of a defrost model into a CFD solver of the software Open FOAM. The multi-region properties implemented in the existing code are adapted for the metal fin and tube structure and the air flow channel. The extension of the solver for evaluating the frost layer is accomplished by an interfacial wall function which models the frost characteristics and performs the thermal coupling. The extended solver is tested in a simplified environment, focusing on a fin-tube section. The simulated course of the defrost process and the total defrost time are discussed.

  11. Modelling the defrost process in complex geometries - part 2: wall-function based coupling to a multi-region CFD solver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertle, Ellen; van Buren, Simon; Figueiredo, Patric; Kneer, Reinhold; Rohlfs, Wilko

    2017-11-01

    Presence of frost in air coolers reduces the performance and thus has to be removed frequently. A method commonly applied for frost removal is hot-gas defrosting. For the efficient design of this periodically performed operating sequence, a precise prediction of the process is essential. A CFD simulation is a capable tool for this evaluation. This paper presents an integration of a defrost model into a CFD solver of the software Open FOAM. The multi-region properties implemented in the existing code are adapted for the metal fin and tube structure and the air flow channel. The extension of the solver for evaluating the frost layer is accomplished by an interfacial wall function which models the frost characteristics and performs the thermal coupling. The extended solver is tested in a simplified environment, focusing on a fin-tube section. The simulated course of the defrost process and the total defrost time are discussed.

  12. Mammalian synthetic biology for studying the cell

    OpenAIRE

    Mathur, Melina; Xiang, Joy S.; Smolke, Christina D.

    2017-01-01

    Synthetic biology is advancing the design of genetic devices that enable the study of cellular and molecular biology in mammalian cells. These genetic devices use diverse regulatory mechanisms to both examine cellular processes and achieve precise and dynamic control of cellular phenotype. Synthetic biology tools provide novel functionality to complement the examination of natural cell systems, including engineered molecules with specific activities and model systems that mimic complex regula...

  13. Modeling synthetic lethality

    OpenAIRE

    Le Meur, Nolwenn; Gentleman, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Background Synthetic lethality defines a genetic interaction where the combination of mutations in two or more genes leads to cell death. The implications of synthetic lethal screens have been discussed in the context of drug development as synthetic lethal pairs could be used to selectively kill cancer cells, but leave normal cells relatively unharmed. A challenge is to assess genome-wide experimental data and integrate the results to better understand the underlying biological processes. We...

  14. Evolvable synthetic neural system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Steven A. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    An evolvable synthetic neural system includes an evolvable neural interface operably coupled to at least one neural basis function. Each neural basis function includes an evolvable neural interface operably coupled to a heuristic neural system to perform high-level functions and an autonomic neural system to perform low-level functions. In some embodiments, the evolvable synthetic neural system is operably coupled to one or more evolvable synthetic neural systems in a hierarchy.

  15. [From synthetic biology to synthetic humankind].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouvel, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we propose an historical survey of the expression "synthetic biology" in order to identify its main philosophical components. The result of the analysis is then used to investigate the meaning of the notion of "synthetic man". It is shown that both notions share a common philosophical background that can be summed up by the short but meaningful assertion: "biology is technology". The analysis allows us to distinguish two notions that are often confused in transhumanist literature: the notion of synthetic man and the notion of renewed man. The consequences of this crucial distinction are discussed. Copyright © 2015 Académie des sciences. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Falling walls

    CERN Multimedia

    It was 20 years ago this week that the Berlin wall was opened for the first time since its construction began in 1961. Although the signs of a thaw had been in the air for some time, few predicted the speed of the change that would ensue. As members of the scientific community, we can take a moment to reflect on the role our field played in bringing East and West together. CERN’s collaboration with the East, primarily through links with the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, JINR, in Dubna, Russia, is well documented. Less well known, however, is the role CERN played in bringing the scientists of East and West Germany together. As the Iron curtain was going up, particle physicists on both sides were already creating the conditions that would allow it to be torn down. Cold war historian Thomas Stange tells the story in his 2002 CERN Courier article. It was my privilege to be in Berlin on Monday, the anniversary of the wall’s opening, to take part in a conference entitled &lsquo...

  17. Engineering Ecosystems and Synthetic Ecologies#

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mee, Michael T; Wang, Harris H

    2012-01-01

    Microbial ecosystems play an important role in nature. Engineering these systems for industrial, medical, or biotechnological purposes are important pursuits for synthetic biologists and biological engineers moving forward. Here, we provide a review of recent progress in engineering natural and synthetic microbial ecosystems. We highlight important forward engineering design principles, theoretical and quantitative models, new experimental and manipulation tools, and possible applications of microbial ecosystem engineering. We argue that simply engineering individual microbes will lead to fragile homogenous populations that are difficult to sustain, especially in highly heterogeneous and unpredictable environments. Instead, engineered microbial ecosystems are likely to be more robust and able to achieve complex tasks at the spatial and temporal resolution needed for truly programmable biology. PMID:22722235

  18. Synthetic microbial ecosystems for biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandhal, Jagroop; Noirel, Josselin

    2014-06-01

    Most highly controlled and specific applications of microorganisms in biotechnology involve pure cultures. Maintaining single strain cultures is important for industry as contaminants can reduce productivity and lead to longer "down-times" during sterilisation. However, microbes working together provide distinct advantages over pure cultures. They can undertake more metabolically complex tasks, improve efficiency and even expand applications to open systems. By combining rapidly advancing technologies with ecological theory, the use of microbial ecosystems in biotechnology will inevitably increase. This review provides insight into the use of synthetic microbial communities in biotechnology by applying the engineering paradigm of measure, model, manipulate and manufacture, and illustrate the emerging wider potential of the synthetic ecology field. Systems to improve biofuel production using microalgae are also discussed.

  19. Dyke complex of the East Pacific Rise exposed in the walls of Hess Deep and the structure of the upper oceanic crust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francheteau, J.; Armijo, R.; Cheminee, J. L.; Hekinian, R.; Lonsdale, P.; Blum, N.

    1992-06-01

    Detailed observations have been made of the extrusive and intrusive units of the uppermost crust emplaced at the axis of the East Pacific Rise during dives conducted with the submersible Nautile on the walls of Hess Deep. At four widely separated locations, the same sequence was found: an upper, thin (100-200 m) unit of extrusives (pillow lavas) underlain by a mixed zone of variable thickness (50-500 m, averaging 200 m) where extrusives are found and intrusives and massive subhorizontal layers which may represent sills. The mixed zone itself is underlain by a sheeted dyke unit, that may be up to 1200 m thick, where dykes are subvertical (i.e. untilted) and parallel to the East Pacific Rise fabric. This sequence may be a general feature of medium to fast-spreading crust because it is similar to that observed in Hole 504B of the Costa Rica Rift and is consistent with images of the upper oceanic crust derived from seismic experiments on the axis of the East Pacific Rise. Dyke thickness is a good measure of the depth to the roof of the axial magma chamber. The observed sections provide much needed "ground-truth" for East Pacific Rise crust. The thickness of the lava sequence and the overall thickness of Layer 2 (at most 1400 m) appear to have been overestimated in previous studies of the oceanic crust.

  20. Synthetic cornea: biocompatibility and optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parel, Jean-Marie A.; Kaminski, Stefan; Fernandez, Viviana; Alfonso, E.; Lamar, Peggy; Lacombe, Emmanuel; Duchesne, Bernard; Dubovy, Sander; Manns, Fabrice; Rol, Pascal O.

    2002-06-01

    Purpose. Experimentally find a method to provide a safe surgical technique and an inexpensive and long lasting mesoplant for the restoration of vision in patients with bilateral corneal blindness due to ocular surface and stromal diseases. Methods. Identify the least invasive and the safest surgical technique for synthetic cornea implantation. Identify the most compatible biomaterials and the optimal shape a synthetic cornea must have to last a long time when implanted in vivo. Results. Penetrating procedures were deemed too invasive, time consuming, difficult and prone to long term complications. Therefore a non-penetrating delamination technique with central trephination was developed to preserve the integrity of Descemet's membrane and the anterior segment. Even though this approach limits the number of indications, it is acceptable since the majority of patients only have opacities in the stroma. The prosthesis was designed to fit in the removed tissue plane with its skirt fitted under the delaminated stroma. To improve retention, the trephination wall was made conical with the smallest opening on the anterior surface and a hat-shaped mesoplant was made to fit. The skirt was perforated in its perimeter to allow passage of nutrients and tissues ingrowths. To simplify the fabrication procedure, the haptic and optic were made of the same polymer. The intrastromal biocompatibility of several hydrogels was found superior to current clinically used PMMA and PTFE materials. Monobloc mesoplants made of 4 different materials were implanted in rabbits and followed weekly until extrusion occurred. Some remained optically clear allowing for fundus photography. Conclusions. Hydrogel synthetic corneas can be made to survive for periods longer than 1 year. ArF excimer laser photoablation studies are needed to determine the refractive correction potential of these mesoplants. A pilot FDA clinical trial is needed to assess the mesoplant efficacy and very long-term stability.

  1. Synthetic Aperture Sequential Beamforming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kortbek, Jacob; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Gammelmark, Kim Løkke

    2008-01-01

    A synthetic aperture focusing (SAF) technique denoted Synthetic Aperture Sequential Beamforming (SASB) suitable for 2D and 3D imaging is presented. The technique differ from prior art of SAF in the sense that SAF is performed on pre-beamformed data contrary to channel data. The objective is to im...

  2. Modeling magnetically driven synthetic microcapsules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masoud, Hassan; Alexeev, Alexander

    2009-11-01

    Using computer simulations and theory, we examine how to design magnetically-responsive synthetic microcapsules that able to move in a steady manner in microfluidic channels. These compliant fluid-filled capsules encompass superparamagnetic nanoparticles in their solid shells and, thereby, can be manipulated by alternating magnetic forces. To model the magnetic capsules propelled in fluid-filled microchannels, we employ a hybrid computational method for fluid-structure interactions. This method integrates the lattice Boltzmann model for the fluid dynamics and the lattice spring model for the micromechanics of solids. We show that in circulating magnetic field the capsules propel along sticky microchannel walls. The direction of capsule motion depends on the relative location of the solid surface, whereas the propulsion speed can be regulated through the wall adhesiveness, amplitude and frequency of magnetic forces, and elasticity of capsule's shell. The results indicate that such mobile fluid-filled containers could find application in lab-on-chip systems for controlled delivery of minute amounts of fluidic samples.

  3. A Review of Double-Walled and Triple-Walled Carbon Nanotube Synthesis and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazunori Fujisawa

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Double- and triple-walled carbon nanotubes (DWNTs and TWNTs consist of coaxially-nested two and three single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs. They act as the geometrical bridge between SWNTs and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs, providing an ideal model for studying the coupling interactions between different shells in MWNTs. Within this context, this article comprehensively reviews various synthetic routes of DWNTs’ and TWNTs’ production, such as arc discharge, catalytic chemical vapor deposition and thermal annealing of pea pods (i.e., SWNTs encapsulating fullerenes. Their structural features, as well as promising applications and future perspectives are also discussed.

  4. Synthesis, characterization and catalytic oxidation properties of multi-wall carbon nanotubes with a covalently attached copper(II) salen complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salavati-Niasari, Masoud; Bazarganipour, Mehdi

    2009-06-01

    Hydroxyl functionalized copper(II) Schiff-base, N,N'-bis(4-hydroxysalicylidene)-ethylene-1,2-diaminecopper(II), [Cu((OH) 2-salen)], has been covalently anchored on modified MWCNTs. The new modified MWCNTs ([Cu((OH) 2-salen)]-MWCNTs) have been characterized by TEM, thermal analysis, XRD, XPS, UV-vis, DRS, FT-IR spectroscopy and elemental analysis. The modified copper(II) MWCNTs solid was used to affect the catalytic oxidation of ethylbenzene with tert-butylhydroperoxide as the oxidant at 333 K. The system is truly heterogeneous (no leaching observed) and reusable (no decrease in activity) in three consecutive runs. Acetophenone was the major product though small amounts of o- and p-hydroxyacetophenones were also formed revealing that C-H bond activation takes place both at benzylic and aromatic ring carbon atoms. Ring hydroxylation was more over the "neat" complexes than over the encapsulated complexes.

  5. Synthesis, characterization and catalytic oxidation properties of multi-wall carbon nanotubes with a covalently attached copper(II) salen complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salavati-Niasari, Masoud, E-mail: salavati@kashanu.ac.ir [Institute of Nano Science and Nano Technology, University of Kashan, Kashan, P.O. Box 87317-51167 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Chemistry, University of Kashan, Kashan, P.O. Box 87317-51167 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Bazarganipour, Mehdi [Department of Chemistry, University of Kashan, Kashan, P.O. Box 87317-51167 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2009-06-15

    Hydroxyl functionalized copper(II) Schiff-base, N,N'-bis(4-hydroxysalicylidene)-ethylene-1,2-diaminecopper(II), [Cu((OH){sub 2}-salen)], has been covalently anchored on modified MWCNTs. The new modified MWCNTs ([Cu((OH){sub 2}-salen)]-MWCNTs) have been characterized by TEM, thermal analysis, XRD, XPS, UV-vis, DRS, FT-IR spectroscopy and elemental analysis. The modified copper(II) MWCNTs solid was used to affect the catalytic oxidation of ethylbenzene with tert-butylhydroperoxide as the oxidant at 333 K. The system is truly heterogeneous (no leaching observed) and reusable (no decrease in activity) in three consecutive runs. Acetophenone was the major product though small amounts of o- and p-hydroxyacetophenones were also formed revealing that C-H bond activation takes place both at benzylic and aromatic ring carbon atoms. Ring hydroxylation was more over the 'neat' complexes than over the encapsulated complexes.

  6. Impact of Surgihoney Reactive Oxygen on surgical site infection (SSI after complex abdominal wall reconstruction (AWR of grade 3 and 4 ventral Hernias: A single arm pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sam Parker

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: This study will provide an assessment of methods and feasibility of recruiting and following up patients who are treated with SHRO. On the basis of this pilot trial, a full trial may be proposed in the future which will provide additional, robust evidence on the clinical and cost effectiveness of SHRO in wound management following AWR. This may act as a model for the management of wounds in complex patients undergoing AWR.

  7. Improvement of wall condensation modeling with suction wall functions for containment application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehmkuhl, Jan, E-mail: j.lehmkuhl@fz-juelich.de [RWTH Aachen University, Aachen (Germany); Kelm, Stephan, E-mail: s.kelm@fz-juelich.de [Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Jülich (Germany); Bucci, Matteo [Commissariat à l’énergie atomique et aux énergies alternatives, Paris (France); Allelein, Hans-Josef [RWTH Aachen University, Aachen (Germany); Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Jülich (Germany)

    2016-04-01

    Highlights: • Assessment of wall functions for single phase condensation models for large scale application. • Identification of modeling errors related to standard log-law due to buoyancy and wall normal mass transfer (suction). • Modeling of wall normal mass transfer by literature formulation (Sucec, 1999) and in-house approach (FIBULA). • Validation against isothermal Favre experimental data. • Comparison against reference fine grid solution for condensing conditions. - Abstract: To simulate wall condensation on containment scale with CFD methods at reasonable computational cost, a single phase approach has to be applied and wall functions have to be used. However, standard wall functions were derived for flows without heat and mass transfer and their fundamental simplifications are not appropriate to deal with condensation. This paper discusses the limitations of standard wall functions and proposes two wall functions for the momentum equation dealing with mass transfer normal to the sheared wall (suction). The first proposed suction wall function is an algebraic modification based on the standard wall function concept. The second proposed wall function is an in-house developed suction wall function with the potential to cover also heat and mass transfer effects by storing the complex solutions of the RANS-Equations in a lookup table. The wall function approaches are compared to experimental results for boundary layer flows with suction and to the reference results obtained using a refined grid in order to resolve the condensing boundary layer.

  8. Chemical Synthesis of Oligosaccharides related to the Cell Walls of Plants and Algae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kinnaert, Christine; Daugaard, Mathilde; Nami, Faranak

    2017-01-01

    Plant cell walls are composed of an intricate network of polysaccharides and proteins that varies during the developmental stages of the cell. This makes it very challenging to address the functions of individual wall components in cells, especially for highly complex glycans. Fortunately...... in good quantities and with high purity. This review contains an overview of those plant and algal polysaccharides, which have been elucidated to date. The majority of the content is devoted to detailed summaries of the chemical syntheses of oligosaccharide fragments of cellulose, hemicellulose, pectin......, and arabinogalactans, as well as glycans unique to algae. Representative synthetic routes within each class are discussed in detail and the progress in carbohydrate chemistry over recent decades is highlighted....

  9. Detection of synthetic speech for the problem of imposture

    OpenAIRE

    De Leon, P. L.; Hernaez, I.; Saratxaga, I.; Pucher, M.; Yamagishi, J

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we present new results from our research into the vulnerability of a speaker verification (SV) system to synthetic speech. We use a HMM-based speech synthesizer, which creates synthetic speech for a targeted speaker through adaptation of a background model and both GMM-UBM and support vector machine (SVM) SV systems. Using 283 speakers from the Wall-Street Journal (WSJ) corpus, our SV systems have a 0.35% EER. When the systems are tested with synthetic speech generated from spe...

  10. Synthetic cathinone abuse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Capriola M

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Michael Capriola Thomasville Medical Center, Thomasville, NC, USA Abstract: The abuse of synthetic cathinones, widely known as bath salts, has been increasing since the mid-2000s. These substances are derivatives of the naturally occurring compound cathinone, which is the primary psychoactive component of khat. The toxicity of synthetic cathinones includes significant sympathomimetic effects, as well as psychosis, agitation, aggression, and sometimes violent and bizarre behavior. Mephedrone and methylenedioxypyrovalerone are currently the predominantly abused synthetic cathinones. Keywords: designer drugs/chemistry, street drugs/pharmacology, substance-related disorders/epidemiology, alkaloids/poisoning

  11. Connective tissue alteration in abdominal wall hernia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, N A; Yadete, D H; Sørensen, Lars Tue

    2011-01-01

    The aetiology and pathogenesis of abdominal wall hernia formation is complex. Optimal treatment of hernias depends on a full understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms involved in their formation. The aim of this study was to review the literature on specific collagen alterations...... in abdominal wall hernia formation....

  12. Reliable complex abdominal wall hernia repairs with a narrow, well-fixed retrorectus polypropylene mesh: A review of over 100 consecutive cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanier, Steven T; Fligor, Jennifer E; Miller, Kyle R; Dumanian, Gregory A

    2016-12-01

    Our objective was to determine outcomes for complex ventral hernia repairs in a large cohort of patients utilizing an operative construct employing retrorectus placement of a narrow, macroporous polypropylene mesh with up to 45 suture fixation points for force distribution. No consensus exists on the optimal technique for repair of complex ventral hernias. Current trends emphasize large meshes with wide overlaps and minimal suture fixation, though reported complications and recurrence remain problematic. A retrospective review was performed for all patients undergoing ventral hernia repair with retrorectus placement of midweight, uncoated, soft polypropylene mesh by a single surgeon (GAD) between the years of 2010 and 2015. Patient characteristics, operative history, operative data, and postoperative course were reviewed. A total of 101 patients with a mean age of 56 years and a mean body mass index of 29 m/kg(2) (range 18-51 m/kg(2)) underwent hernia repair. Patients had a median of 3 prior abdominal operations (range 0-9), with 44 patients presenting with recurrent hernias. A total of 42 patients were Ventral Hernia Working Group grade 1, 40 grade 2, 17 grade 3, and 2 grade 4. There were no recurrences at a mean follow-up of almost 400 days for the 93 patients with long-term follow-up. The surgical site occurrence rate was 7.9% (3 surgical site infections, 2 seromas, 2 hematomas, and 4 instances of delayed wound healing in 8 patients). One patient required reoperation for hematoma drainage; 5 patients required readmission within 30 days. An operative construct employing a retrorectus placement of a narrow, macroporous polypropylene mesh with up to 45 suture fixation points for force distribution can achieve significantly better outcomes across a spectrum of Ventral Hernia Working Group grade, risk-stratified patients compared to rates reported in the literature for current strategies that employ wide meshes with minimal fixation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier

  13. Physical Characterization of Synthetic Phosphatidylinositol Dimannosides and Analogues in Binary Systems with Phosphatidylcholine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hubert, Madlen; Larsen, David S; Hayman, Colin M

    2014-01-01

    Native phosphatidylinositol mannosides (PIMs) from the cell wall of Mycobacterium bovis (M. bovis) and synthetic analogues have been identified to exert immunostimulatory activities. These activities have been investigated using particulate delivery systems containing native mannosylated lipids...

  14. Synthetic biology analysed tools for discussion and evaluation

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic biology is a dynamic, young, ambitious, attractive, and heterogeneous scientific discipline. It is constantly developing and changing, which makes societal evaluation of this emerging new science a challenging task, prone to misunderstandings. Synthetic biology is difficult to capture, and confusion arises not only regarding which part of synthetic biology the discussion is about, but also with respect to the underlying concepts in use. This book offers a useful toolbox to approach this complex and fragmented field. It provides a biological access to the discussion using a 'layer' model that describes the connectivity of synthetic or semisynthetic organisms and cells to the realm of natural organisms derived by evolution. Instead of directly reviewing the field as a whole, firstly our book addresses the characteristic features of synthetic biology that are relevant to the societal discussion. Some of these features apply only to parts of synthetic biology, whereas others are relevant to synthetic bi...

  15. Characterization of the Sclerotinia sclerotiorum cell wall proteome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Longzhou; Free, Stephen J

    2016-08-01

    We used a proteomic analysis to identify cell wall proteins released from Sclerotinia sclerotiorum hyphal and sclerotial cell walls via a trifluoromethanesulfonic acid (TFMS) digestion. Cell walls from hyphae grown in Vogel's glucose medium (a synthetic medium lacking plant materials), from hyphae grown in potato dextrose broth and from sclerotia produced on potato dextrose agar were used in the analysis. Under the conditions used, TFMS digests the glycosidic linkages in the cell walls to release intact cell wall proteins. The analysis identified 24 glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored cell wall proteins and 30 non-GPI-anchored cell wall proteins. We found that the cell walls contained an array of cell wall biosynthetic enzymes similar to those found in the cell walls of other fungi. When comparing the proteins in hyphal cell walls grown in potato dextrose broth with those in hyphal cell walls grown in the absence of plant material, it was found that a core group of cell wall biosynthetic proteins and some proteins associated with pathogenicity (secreted cellulases, pectin lyases, glucosidases and proteases) were expressed in both types of hyphae. The hyphae grown in potato dextrose broth contained a number of additional proteins (laccases, oxalate decarboxylase, peroxidase, polysaccharide deacetylase and several proteins unique to Sclerotinia and Botrytis) that might facilitate growth on a plant host. A comparison of the proteins in the sclerotial cell wall with the proteins in the hyphal cell wall demonstrated that sclerotia formation is not marked by a major shift in the composition of cell wall protein. We found that the S. sclerotiorum cell walls contained 11 cell wall proteins that were encoded only in Sclerotinia and Botrytis genomes. © 2015 The Authors. Molecular Plant Pathology published by British Society for Plant Pathology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. MKAD Synthetic Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Synthetic data used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the MKAD algorithm with respect to detecting anomalies in both the continuous numerical data and binary...

  17. Models for synthetic biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaznessis Yiannis N

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Synthetic biological engineering is emerging from biology as a distinct discipline based on quantification. The technologies propelling synthetic biology are not new, nor is the concept of designing novel biological molecules. What is new is the emphasis on system behavior. The objective is the design and construction of new biological devices and systems to deliver useful applications. Numerous synthetic gene circuits have been created in the past decade, including bistable switches, oscillators, and logic gates, and possible applications abound, including biofuels, detectors for biochemical and chemical weapons, disease diagnosis, and gene therapies. More than fifty years after the discovery of the molecular structure of DNA, molecular biology is mature enough for real quantification that is useful for biological engineering applications, similar to the revolution in modeling in chemistry in the 1950s. With the excitement that synthetic biology is generating, the engineering and biological science communities appear remarkably willing to cross disciplinary boundaries toward a common goal.

  18. Synthetic Vision Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prinzel, L.J.; Kramer, L.J.

    2009-01-01

    A synthetic vision system is an aircraft cockpit display technology that presents the visual environment external to the aircraft using computer-generated imagery in a manner analogous to how it would appear to the pilot if forward visibility were not restricted. The purpose of this chapter is to review the state of synthetic vision systems, and discuss selected human factors issues that should be considered when designing such displays.

  19. Hybridization with synthetic oligonucleotides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szostak, J.W.; Stiles, J.I.; Tye, B.K.; Sherman, F.; Wu, R.

    1978-01-01

    Procedures are described for the use of synthetic oligonucleotides for Southern blot experiments and gene bank screening, and the effect of various mismatches on the efficiency of hybridization is demonstrated. The following topics are discussed: sensitivity vs. specificity, hybridization of a 12-mer to the lambda endolysin gene; hybridization of oligonucleotide probes to the E. coli lac operator; hybridization of synthetic probes to the CYC1 gene of yeast; and cloning eucaryotic genes. (HLW)

  20. Synthetic xylan-binding modules for mapping of pulp fibres and wood sections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Geoffrey

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The complex carbohydrate composition of natural and refined plant material is not known in detail but a matter that is of both basic and applied importance. Qualitative assessment of complex samples like plant and wood tissues requires the availability of a range of specific probes. Monoclonal antibodies and naturally existing carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs have been used in the past to assess the presence of certain carbohydrates in plant tissues. However, the number of natural CBMs is limited and development of carbohydrate-specific antibodies is not always straightforward. We envisage the use of sets of very similar proteins specific for defined targets, like those developed by molecular evolution of a single CBM scaffold, as a suitable strategy to assess carbohydrate composition. An advantage of using synthetic CBMs lies in the possibility to study fine details of carbohydrate composition within non-uniform substrates like plant cell walls as made possible through minor differences in CBM specificity of the variety of binders that can be developed by genetic engineering. Results A panel of synthetic xylan-binding CBMs, previously selected from a molecular library based on the scaffold of CBM4-2 from xylanase Xyn10A of Rhodothermus marinus, was used in this study. The wild type CBM4-2 and evolved modules both showed binding to wood sections. However, differences were observed in the staining patterns suggesting that these modules have different xylan-binding properties. Also the staining stability varied between the CBMs, the most stable staining being obtained with one (X-2 of the synthetic modules. Treatment of wood materials resulted in altered signal intensities, thereby also demonstrating the potential application of engineered CBMs as analytical tools for quality assessment of diverse plant material processes. Conclusion In this study we have demonstrated the usefulness of synthetic xylan-binding modules as

  1. Synthetic Aperture Beamformation using the GPU

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jens Munk; Schaa, Dana; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2011-01-01

    A synthetic aperture ultrasound beamformer is implemented for a GPU using the OpenCL framework. The implementation supports beamformation of either RF signals or complex baseband signals. Transmit and receive apodization can be either parametric or dynamic using a fixed F-number, a reference...

  2. Innovative Composite Wall System for Sheathing Masonry Walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wendt, Robert L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Cavallo, James [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1997-09-25

    Existing Housing - Much of the older multifamily housing stock in the United States includes units in structures with uninsulated masonry walls. Included in this stock are two- and three-story walk-up apartments, larger apartment complexes, and public housing (both high- rise and townhouse). This older multifamily housing has seen years of heavy use that may have left the plaster wall marred or damaged. Long- term building settlement or movement may have cracked the plaster, sometimes severely. Moisture from invented kitchens and baths may have caused condensation on uninsulated exterior walls. At best this condensation has left stains on the paint or wallpaper. At worst it has supported mold and mildew growth, fouling the air and creating unhealthy living conditions. Deteriorating plaster and flaking paint also result from wet walls. The presence of flaking, lead-based paint in older (pre-1978) housing is a major public health concern. Children can suffer permanent mental handicaps and psychological disorders if they are subjected to elevated levels of lead, while adults can suffer hypertension and other maladies. Studies have found that, in some urban communities with older housing stocks, over 35% of children tested have elevated blood lead levels (Hastings, et al.: 1997). Nationally, nearly 22% of black, non-hispanic children living in pre-1946 housing were found to have elevated levels of lead in their blood (MWWR Article: February 21,1997). The deterioration of many of these walls is to the point that lead can freely enter the living space.

  3. The Synthetic Cannabinoids Phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karila, Laurent; Benyamina, Amine; Blecha, Lisa; Cottencin, Olivier; Billieux, Joël

    2016-01-01

    « Spice » is generally used to describe the diverse types of herbal blends that encompass synthetic cannabinoids on the market. The emergence of smokable herbal products containing synthetic cannabinoids, which mimic the effects of cannabis, appears to become increasingly popular, in the new psychoactive substances landscape. In 2014, the existence of 134 different types of synthetic cannabinoids were reported by the European Union Early Warning System. These drugs are mainly sold online as an alternative to controlled and regulated psychoactive substances. They appear to have a life cycle of about 1-2 years before being replaced by a next wave of products. Legislation controlling these designer drugs has been introduced in many countries with the objective to limit the spread of existing drugs and control potential new analogs. The majority of the synthetic cannabinoids are full agonists at the CB1 receptor and do not contain tobacco or cannabis. They are becoming increasingly popular in adolescents, students and clubbers as an abused substance. Relatively high incidence of adverse effects associated with synthetic cannabinoids use has been documented in the literature. Numerous fatalities linked with their use and abuse have been reported. In this paper, we will review the available data regarding the use and effects of synthetic cannabinoids in humans in order to highlight their impact on public health. To reach this objective, a literature search was performed on two representative databases (Pubmed, Google Scholar), the Erowid Center website (a US non-profit educational organization that provides information about psychoactive plants and chemicals), and various governmental websites. The terms used for the database search were: "synthetic cannabinoids", "spice", "new psychoactive substances", and/or "substance use disorder", and/or "adverse effects", and/or "fatalities". The search was limited to years 2005 to 2016 due to emerging scientific literature at

  4. Tools to Understand Structural Property Relationships for Wood Cell Walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph E. Jakes; Daniel J. Yelle; Charles R. Frihart

    2011-01-01

    Understanding structure-property relationships for wood cell walls has been hindered by the complex polymeric structures comprising these cell walls and the difficulty in assessing meaningful mechanical property measurements of individual cell walls. To help overcome these hindrances, we have developed two experimental methods: 1) two-dimensional solution state nuclear...

  5. Synthetic Metabolic Pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This volume outlines key steps associated with the design, building, and testing of synthetic metabolic pathways for optimal cell factory performance and robustness, and illustrates how data-driven learning from these steps can be used for rational cost-effective engineering of cell factories...... topics, lists of the necessary materials and reagents, step-by-step, readily reproducible laboratory protocols, and tips on troubleshooting and avoiding known pitfalls. Authoritative and practical, Synthetic Metabolic Pathways: Methods and Protocols aims to ensure successful results in the further study...

  6. Synthetic guide star generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Stephen A [Castro Valley, CA; Page, Ralph H [Castro Valley, CA; Ebbers, Christopher A [Livermore, CA; Beach, Raymond J [Livermore, CA

    2008-06-10

    A system for assisting in observing a celestial object and providing synthetic guide star generation. A lasing system provides radiation at a frequency at or near 938 nm and radiation at a frequency at or near 1583 nm. The lasing system includes a fiber laser operating between 880 nm and 960 nm and a fiber laser operating between 1524 nm and 1650 nm. A frequency-conversion system mixes the radiation and generates light at a frequency at or near 589 nm. A system directs the light at a frequency at or near 589 nm toward the celestial object and provides synthetic guide star generation.

  7. Grafted-double walled carbon nanotubes as electrochemical platforms for immobilization of antibodies using a metallic-complex chelating polymer: Application to the determination of adiponectin cytokine in serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojeda, Irene; Barrejón, Myriam; Arellano, Luis M; González-Cortés, Araceli; Yáñez-Sedeño, Paloma; Langa, Fernando; Pingarrón, José M

    2015-12-15

    An electrochemical immunosensor for adiponectin (APN) using screen printed carbon electrodes (SPCEs) modified with functionalized double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWCNTs) as platforms for immobilization of the specific antibodies is reported. DWCNTs were functionalized by treatment with 4-aminobenzoic acid (HOOC-Phe) in the presence of isoamylnitrite resulting in the formation of 4-carboxyphenyl-DWCNTs. The oriented binding of specific antibodies toward adiponectin was accomplished by using the metallic-complex chelating polymer Mix&Go™. The HOOC-Phe-DWCNTs-modified SPCEs were characterized by cyclic voltammetry and compared with HOOC-Phe-SWCNTs/SPCE. The different variables affecting the performance of the developed immunosensor were optimized. Under the selected conditions, a calibration plot for APN was constructed showing a range of linearity extending between 0.05 and 10.0 μg/mL which is adequate for the determination of the cytokine in real samples. A detection limit of 14.5 ng/mL was achieved. The so prepared immunosensor exhibited a good reproducibility for the APN measurements, excellent storage stability and selectivity, and a much shorter assay time than the available ELISA kits. The usefulness of the immunosensor for the analysis of real samples was demonstrated by analyzing human serum from female or male healthy patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Advanced high performance vertical hybrid synthetic jet actuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tian-Bing (Inventor); Jiang, Xiaoning (Inventor); Su, Ji (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    The present invention comprises a high performance, vertical, zero-net mass-flux, synthetic jet actuator for active control of viscous, separated flow on subsonic and supersonic vehicles. The present invention is a vertical piezoelectric hybrid zero-net mass-flux actuator, in which all the walls of the chamber are electrically controlled synergistically to reduce or enlarge the volume of the synthetic jet actuator chamber in three dimensions simultaneously and to reduce or enlarge the diameter of orifice of the synthetic jet actuator simultaneously with the reduction or enlargement of the volume of the chamber. The jet velocity and mass flow rate for the present invention will be several times higher than conventional piezoelectric synthetic jet actuators.

  9. Thermo-fluid-dynamic analysis of innovative synthetic jet devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvatore Greco, Carlo; Paolillo, Gerardo; Cardone, Gennaro

    2017-10-01

    Synthetic jets are largely used, especially in the field of electronic cooling; indeed their heat transfer performances have been widely investigated and some of the work performed at University of Naples Federico II is herein described. Heat transfer coefficients have been enhanced through the design of innovative synthetic jet devices; in particular, twin synthetic jets and multi orifice nozzles are considered. Obviously, the heat transfer performances of both the classic and innovative devices are strictly related to their impinging flow field on the surface to be cooled. In this work, the behaviour of innovative impinging synthetic jets is experimentally investigated by using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) and IR thermography leading to both time average and phase average flow velocity and heat transfer measurements. Three-dimensional coherent vortex structures, time-averaged and phase-averaged means, as well as turbulent statistics of flow fields and wall heat transfer data are presented and discussed.

  10. The major synthetic evolutionary transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solé, Ricard

    2016-08-19

    Evolution is marked by well-defined events involving profound innovations that are known as 'major evolutionary transitions'. They involve the integration of autonomous elements into a new, higher-level organization whereby the former isolated units interact in novel ways, losing their original autonomy. All major transitions, which include the origin of life, cells, multicellular systems, societies or language (among other examples), took place millions of years ago. Are these transitions unique, rare events? Have they instead universal traits that make them almost inevitable when the right pieces are in place? Are there general laws of evolutionary innovation? In order to approach this problem under a novel perspective, we argue that a parallel class of evolutionary transitions can be explored involving the use of artificial evolutionary experiments where alternative paths to innovation can be explored. These 'synthetic' transitions include, for example, the artificial evolution of multicellular systems or the emergence of language in evolved communicating robots. These alternative scenarios could help us to understand the underlying laws that predate the rise of major innovations and the possibility for general laws of evolved complexity. Several key examples and theoretical approaches are summarized and future challenges are outlined.This article is part of the themed issue 'The major synthetic evolutionary transitions'. © 2016 The Author(s).

  11. Synthetic growth reference charts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermanussen, Michael; Stec, Karol; Aßmann, Christian; Meigen, Christof; Van Buuren, Stef|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/074806777

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To reanalyze the between-population variance in height, weight, and body mass index (BMI), and to provide a globally applicable technique for generating synthetic growth reference charts. Methods: Using a baseline set of 196 female and 197 male growth studies published since 1831, common

  12. Mammalian synthetic biology for studying the cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathur, Melina; Xiang, Joy S; Smolke, Christina D

    2017-01-02

    Synthetic biology is advancing the design of genetic devices that enable the study of cellular and molecular biology in mammalian cells. These genetic devices use diverse regulatory mechanisms to both examine cellular processes and achieve precise and dynamic control of cellular phenotype. Synthetic biology tools provide novel functionality to complement the examination of natural cell systems, including engineered molecules with specific activities and model systems that mimic complex regulatory processes. Continued development of quantitative standards and computational tools will expand capacities to probe cellular mechanisms with genetic devices to achieve a more comprehensive understanding of the cell. In this study, we review synthetic biology tools that are being applied to effectively investigate diverse cellular processes, regulatory networks, and multicellular interactions. We also discuss current challenges and future developments in the field that may transform the types of investigation possible in cell biology. © 2017 Mathur et al.

  13. Charged Domain Walls

    OpenAIRE

    Campanelli, L.; Cea, P.; Fogli, G. L.; Tedesco, L.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we investigate Charged Domain Walls (CDW's), topological defects that acquire surface charge density $Q$ induced by fermion states localized on the walls. The presence of an electric and magnetic field on the walls is also discussed. We find a relation in which the value of the surface charge density $Q$ is connected with the existence of such topological defects.

  14. Carbon Nanotube-Based Synthetic Gecko Tapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhinojwala, Ali

    2008-03-01

    Wall-climbing geckos have unique ability to attach to different surfaces without the use of any viscoelastic glues. On coming in contact with any surface, the micron-size gecko foot-hairs deform, enabling molecular contact over large areas, thus translating weak van der Waals (vdW) interactions into enormous shear forces. We will present our recent results on the development of synthetic gecko tape using aligned carbon nanotubes to mimic the keratin hairs found on gecko feet. The patterned carbon nanotube-based gecko tape can support a shear stress (36 N/cm^2) nearly four times higher than the gecko foot and sticks to a variety of surfaces, including Teflon. Both the micron-size setae (replicated by nanotube bundles) and nanometer-size spatulas (individual nanotubes) are necessary to achieve macroscopic shear adhesion and to translate the weak vdW interactions into high shear forces. The carbon nanotube based tape offers an excellent synthetic option as a dry conductive reversible adhesive in microelectronics, robotics and space applications. The mechanism behind these large shear forces and self-cleaning properties of these carbon nanotube based synthetic gecko tapes will be discussed. This work was performed in collaboration with graduate students Liehui Ge, and Sunny Sethi, and collaborators from RPI; Lijie Ci and Professor Pulickel Ajayan.

  15. Abdominal wall fat pad biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amyloidosis - abdominal wall fat pad biopsy; Abdominal wall biopsy; Biopsy - abdominal wall fat pad ... method of taking an abdominal wall fat pad biopsy . The health care provider cleans the skin on ...

  16. Grass Cell Walls: A Story of Cross-Linking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatfield, Ronald D; Rancour, David M; Marita, Jane M

    2016-01-01

    Cell wall matrices are complex composites mainly of polysaccharides, phenolics (monomers and polymers), and protein. We are beginning to understand the synthesis of these major wall components individually, but still have a poor understanding of how cell walls are assembled into complex matrices. Valuable insight has been gained by examining intact components to understand the individual elements that make up plant cell walls. Grasses are a prominent group within the plant kingdom, not only for their important roles in global agriculture, but also for the complexity of their cell walls. Ferulate incorporation into grass cell wall matrices (C3 and C4 types) leads to a cross-linked matrix that plays a prominent role in the structure and utilization of grass biomass compared to dicot species. Incorporation of p-coumarates as part of the lignin structure also adds to the complexity of grass cell walls. Feruoylation results in a wall with individual hemicellulosic polysaccharides (arabinoxylans) covalently linked to each other and to lignin. Evidence strongly suggests that ferulates not only cross-link arabinoxylans, but may be important factors in lignification of the cell wall. Therefore, the distribution of ferulates on arabinoxylans could provide a means of structuring regions of the matrix with the incorporation of lignin and have a significant impact upon localized cell wall organization. The role of other phenolics in cell wall formation such as p-coumarates (which can have concentrations higher than ferulates) remains unknown. It is possible that p-coumarates assist in the formation of lignin, especially syringyl rich lignin. The uniqueness of the grass cell wall compared to dicot sepcies may not be so much in the gross composition of the wall, but how the distinctive individual components are organized into a functional wall matrix. These features are discussed and working models are provided to illustrate how changing the organization of feruoylation and p

  17. Synthetic Space Vector Modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    controller. The VSI controller has traditionally been operated by hardwired pulse-width modulation (PWM) or the use of a programmable microprocessor ...frequency. The primary difference between SVM and synthetic SVM is the implementation strategy of software versus inexpensive hardware, respectively. A...resistors and capacitors. There are no microcontrollers or FPGAs necessary to produce Alt-Rev SVM. F. DUAL OUTPUT VARIABLE FREQUENCY OSCILLATOR After

  18. Biopolymers Versus Synthetic Polymers

    OpenAIRE

    Florentina Adriana Cziple; António J. Velez Marques

    2008-01-01

    This paper present an overview of important synthetic and natural polymers with emphasis on polymer structure, the chemistry of polymer formation. an introduction to polymer characterization. The biodegradation process can take place aerobically and anaerobically with or without the presence of light. These factors allow for biodegradation even in landfill conditions which are normally inconducive to any degradation. The sheeting used to make these packages differs...

  19. Bio-inspired synthetic receptor molecules towards mimicry of vancomycin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monnee, M C; Brouwer, A J; Verbeek, L M; van Wageningen, A M; Liskamp, R M

    2001-06-18

    A 512-member library of bio-inspired synthetic receptor molecules was prepared featuring a triazacyclophane scaffold. The purpose of this scaffold was to orient three (identical) peptide 'binding arms' in order to mimic an antibiotic binding cavity as is present in the vancomycin antibiotics. The library was screened with D-Ala-D-Ala and D-Ala-D-Lac containing ligands, which are present in the cell wall precursors of pathogenic bacteria. Screening and validation led to identification of a synthetic receptor capable of binding these ligands.

  20. Synthetic biology: insights into biological computation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzoni, Romilde; Urrios, Arturo; Velazquez-Garcia, Silvia; de Nadal, Eulàlia; Posas, Francesc

    2016-04-18

    Organisms have evolved a broad array of complex signaling mechanisms that allow them to survive in a wide range of environmental conditions. They are able to sense external inputs and produce an output response by computing the information. Synthetic biology attempts to rationally engineer biological systems in order to perform desired functions. Our increasing understanding of biological systems guides this rational design, while the huge background in electronics for building circuits defines the methodology. In this context, biocomputation is the branch of synthetic biology aimed at implementing artificial computational devices using engineered biological motifs as building blocks. Biocomputational devices are defined as biological systems that are able to integrate inputs and return outputs following pre-determined rules. Over the last decade the number of available synthetic engineered devices has increased exponentially; simple and complex circuits have been built in bacteria, yeast and mammalian cells. These devices can manage and store information, take decisions based on past and present inputs, and even convert a transient signal into a sustained response. The field is experiencing a fast growth and every day it is easier to implement more complex biological functions. This is mainly due to advances in in vitro DNA synthesis, new genome editing tools, novel molecular cloning techniques, continuously growing part libraries as well as other technological advances. This allows that digital computation can now be engineered and implemented in biological systems. Simple logic gates can be implemented and connected to perform novel desired functions or to better understand and redesign biological processes. Synthetic biological digital circuits could lead to new therapeutic approaches, as well as new and efficient ways to produce complex molecules such as antibiotics, bioplastics or biofuels. Biological computation not only provides possible biomedical and

  1. Opportunities in plant synthetic biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Charis; Martin, Lisa; Bastow, Ruth

    2014-05-01

    Synthetic biology is an emerging field uniting scientists from all disciplines with the aim of designing or re-designing biological processes. Initially, synthetic biology breakthroughs came from microbiology, chemistry, physics, computer science, materials science, mathematics, and engineering disciplines. A transition to multicellular systems is the next logical step for synthetic biologists and plants will provide an ideal platform for this new phase of research. This meeting report highlights some of the exciting plant synthetic biology projects, and tools and resources, presented and discussed at the 2013 GARNet workshop on plant synthetic biology.

  2. Multicomponent magnetization in synthetic hematite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokking, Laura B.; Tauxe, Lisa

    We have investigated the directional properties of chemical remanent magnetization (CRM) carried by hematite synthesized in two successive generations in two distinct magnetic fields. Previously, we showed that the magnetization of hematite synthesized in a single generation under constant magnetic field conditions parallels the field in which it grew; we now demonstrate that hematite precipitated in two distinct magnetic fields carries a remanence that is far more complex. In the simplest of these two-field experiments, we precipitated hematite in one generation in the presence of a magnetic field ( B1) and in a second generation in zero field. The synthetic material acquired a single component of remanence approximately parallel to B1. We then precipitated hematite in two generations, but under constant magnetic field conditions. The resulting remanence was also uni-vectorial and paralleled the applied field. Finally, we synthesized hematite in two generations using perpendicular orientations of the applied field for the two generations. The resulting behavior of magnetic remanence was complex and samples recorded a variety of directions: both parallel and antiparallel to B1 and B2, as well as intermediate between the two fields. Four categories of behavior describe all observations. We suggest that the various types of behavior reflect the complexity inherent in the process of remanence acquisition by crystals precipitating from solution. The behavior of remanence can be explained in terms of a competition between the effect of the ambient magnetic field, the demagnetizing fields generated by pre-existing particles and possibly also exchange effects between the second-generation particles and first-generation particles used as seed crystals. A model that accurately predicts the behavior of remanence in a particular multigenerational experiment is difficult to conceive at present because of the complexity of the interplay of competing factors on the magnetization

  3. Green walls in Vancouver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharp, R. [Sharp and Diamond Landscape Architecture Inc., Vancouver, BC (Canada)

    2007-07-01

    With the renewed interest in design for microclimate control and energy conservation, many cities are implementing clean air initiatives and sustainable planning policies to mitigate the effects of urban climate and the urban heat island effect. Green roofs, sky courts and green walls must be thoughtfully designed to withstand severe conditions such as moisture stress, extremes in temperature, tropical storms and strong desiccating winds. This paper focused on the installation of green wall systems. There are 2 general types of green walls systems, namely facade greening and living walls. Green facades are trellis systems where climbing plants can grow vertically without attaching to the surface of the building. Living walls are part of a building envelope system where plants are actually planted and grown in a wall system. A modular G-SKY Green Wall Panel was installed at the Aquaquest Learning Centre at the Vancouver Aquarium in Stanley Park in September 2006. This green wall panel, which was originally developed in Japan, incorporates many innovative features in the building envelope. It provides an exterior wall covered with 8 species of plants native to the Coastal Temperate Rain Forest. The living wall is irrigated by rainwater collected from the roof, stored in an underground cistern and fed through a drip irrigation system. From a habitat perspective, the building imitates an escarpment. Installation, support systems, irrigation, replacement of modules and maintenance are included in the complete wall system. Living walls reduce the surface temperature of buildings by as much as 10 degrees C when covered with vegetation and a growing medium. The project team is anticipating LEED gold certification under the United States-Canada Green Building Council. It was concluded that this technology of vegetated building envelopes is applicable for acoustical control at airports, biofiltration of indoor air, greywater treatment, and urban agriculture and vertical

  4. SYNTHETIC STRANDS OF CARDIAC MUSCLE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purdy, Joyce E.; Lieberman, Melvyn; Roggeveen, Anne E.; Kirk, R. Gary

    1972-01-01

    Spontaneously active bundles of cardiac muscle (synthetic strands) were prepared from isolated cells of 11–13-day old embryonic chick hearts which were disaggregated with trypsin. Linear orientation of the cells was obtained by plating them on agar-coated culture dishes in which either grooves were cut in the agar film or a thin line of palladium was deposited over the agar. The influence of cell-to-cell and cell-to-substrate interactions was observed with time lapse cinematography and the formation of the synthetic strand was shown to involve both random and guided cell movements, enlargement of aggregates by accretion and coalescence, and the compact linear arrangement of cells along paths of preferential adhesion. Electron microscope investigations of these strands showed that a dispersed population of heart cells organized into an inner core of muscle cells and an outer sheath of fibroblast-like cells. The muscle cells contained well-developed, but widely spaced myofibrils, a developing sarcoplasmic reticulum associated in part with the myofibrils and in part with the sarcolemma, an abundance of nonmembrane bound ribosomes and glycogen, and a prominent Golgi complex. Numerous specialized contacts were observed between the muscle cells in the strand, e.g., fasciae adherentes, desmosomes, and nexuses. A distinct type of muscle cell characterized by its pale appearance was regularly observed in the strand and was noted to be similar to Purkinje cells described in the adult avian conduction system and in developing chick myocardium. The present findings were compared with other observations of the developing myocardium, in situ, and it was concluded that, by a number or criteria, the muscle cells of the strand were differentiating normally and suitably organized for electrophysiological studies. PMID:4656702

  5. Synthetic cannabinoids revealing adrenoleukodystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fellner, Avi; Benninger, Felix; Djaldetti, Ruth

    2016-02-01

    We report a 41-year-old man who presented with a first generalized tonic-clonic seizure after recent consumption of a synthetic cannabinoid. MRI showed extensive bilateral, mainly frontal, white matter lesions. Blood analysis for very long chain fatty acids was compatible with adrenoleukodystrophy, and a missense mutation in the ABCD1 gene confirmed the diagnosis. We hypothesize that cannabinoid use might have contributed to metabolic decompensation with subacute worsening of the underlying condition. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Biopolymers Versus Synthetic Polymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florentina Adriana Cziple

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper present an overview of important synthetic and natural polymers with emphasis on polymer structure, the chemistry of polymer formation. an introduction to polymer characterization. The biodegradation process can take place aerobically and anaerobically with or without the presence of light. These factors allow for biodegradation even in landfill conditions which are normally inconducive to any degradation. The sheeting used to make these packages differs significantly from other “degradable plastics” in the market as it does not attempt to replace the current popular materials but instead enhances them by rendering them biodegradable.

  7. Supersymmetric domain walls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergshoeff, Eric A.; Kleinschmidt, Axel; Riccioni, Fabio

    2012-01-01

    We classify the half-supersymmetric "domain walls," i.e., branes of codimension one, in toroidally compactified IIA/IIB string theory and show to which gauged supergravity theory each of these domain walls belong. We use as input the requirement of supersymmetric Wess-Zumino terms, the properties of

  8. Thin Wall Iron Castings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.F. Cuttino; D.M. Stefanescu; T.S. Piwonka

    2001-10-31

    Results of an investigation made to develop methods of making iron castings having wall thicknesses as small as 2.5 mm in green sand molds are presented. It was found that thin wall ductile and compacted graphite iron castings can be made and have properties consistent with heavier castings. Green sand molding variables that affect casting dimensions were also identified.

  9. Timber frame walls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ernst Jan de Place; Brandt, Erik

    2010-01-01

    A ventilated cavity is usually considered good practice for removing moisture behind the cladding of timber framed walls. Timber frame walls with no cavity are a logical alternative as they are slimmer and less expensive to produce and besides the risk of a two-sided fire behind the cladding...

  10. International Divider Walls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruis, A.; Sneller, A.C.W.(L.)

    2013-01-01

    The subject of this teaching case is the Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) system implementation at International Divider Walls, the world market leader in design, production, and sales of divider walls. The implementation in one of the divisions of this multinational company had been successful,

  11. Developments in the Tools and Methodologies of Synthetic Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelwick, Richard; MacDonald, James T.; Webb, Alexander J.; Freemont, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Synthetic biology is principally concerned with the rational design and engineering of biologically based parts, devices, or systems. However, biological systems are generally complex and unpredictable, and are therefore, intrinsically difficult to engineer. In order to address these fundamental challenges, synthetic biology is aiming to unify a “body of knowledge” from several foundational scientific fields, within the context of a set of engineering principles. This shift in perspective is enabling synthetic biologists to address complexity, such that robust biological systems can be designed, assembled, and tested as part of a biological design cycle. The design cycle takes a forward-design approach in which a biological system is specified, modeled, analyzed, assembled, and its functionality tested. At each stage of the design cycle, an expanding repertoire of tools is being developed. In this review, we highlight several of these tools in terms of their applications and benefits to the synthetic biology community. PMID:25505788

  12. Advanced high performance horizontal piezoelectric hybrid synthetic jet actuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tian-Bing (Inventor); Jiang, Xiaoning (Inventor); Su, Ji (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    The present invention comprises a high performance, horizontal, zero-net mass-flux, synthetic jet actuator for active control of viscous, separated flow on subsonic and supersonic vehicles. The present invention is a horizontal piezoelectric hybrid zero-net mass-flux actuator, in which all the walls of the chamber are electrically controlled synergistically to reduce or enlarge the volume of the synthetic jet actuator chamber in three dimensions simultaneously and to reduce or enlarge the diameter of orifice of the synthetic jet actuator simultaneously with the reduction or enlargement of the volume of the chamber. The present invention is capable of installation in the wing surface as well as embedding in the wetted surfaces of a supersonic inlet. The jet velocity and mass flow rate for the SJA-H will be several times higher than conventional piezoelectric actuators.

  13. Towards a whole-cell modeling approach for synthetic biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purcell, Oliver; Jain, Bonny; Karr, Jonathan R.; Covert, Markus W.; Lu, Timothy K.

    2013-06-01

    Despite rapid advances over the last decade, synthetic biology lacks the predictive tools needed to enable rational design. Unlike established engineering disciplines, the engineering of synthetic gene circuits still relies heavily on experimental trial-and-error, a time-consuming and inefficient process that slows down the biological design cycle. This reliance on experimental tuning is because current modeling approaches are unable to make reliable predictions about the in vivo behavior of synthetic circuits. A major reason for this lack of predictability is that current models view circuits in isolation, ignoring the vast number of complex cellular processes that impinge on the dynamics of the synthetic circuit and vice versa. To address this problem, we present a modeling approach for the design of synthetic circuits in the context of cellular networks. Using the recently published whole-cell model of Mycoplasma genitalium, we examined the effect of adding genes into the host genome. We also investigated how codon usage correlates with gene expression and find agreement with existing experimental results. Finally, we successfully implemented a synthetic Goodwin oscillator in the whole-cell model. We provide an updated software framework for the whole-cell model that lays the foundation for the integration of whole-cell models with synthetic gene circuit models. This software framework is made freely available to the community to enable future extensions. We envision that this approach will be critical to transforming the field of synthetic biology into a rational and predictive engineering discipline.

  14. In-vivo examples of synthetic aperture vector flow imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oddershede, Niels; Hansen, Kristoffer Lindskov; Nielsen, Michael Bachmann

    2007-01-01

    are processed, and movies of full vector flow images are generated. This paper presents still frames from different time instances of these movies. The movie from the femoral data tracks the accelerating velocity in the femoral artery during systole and a backwards flow at the end of the systole. A complex flow...... would be needed. Synthetic aperture vector flow imaging could potentially provide this. The purpose of this paper is to test the synthetic aperture vector flow imaging method on challenging in-vivo data. Two synthetic aperture in-vivo data sets are acquired using a commercial linear array transducer...

  15. Athena: Modular CAM/CAD Software for Synthetic Biology

    OpenAIRE

    Chandran, Deepak; Bergmann, Frank T; Sauro, Herbert M.

    2009-01-01

    Synthetic biology is the engineering of cellular networks. It combines principles of engineering and the knowledge of biological networks to program the behavior of cells. Computational modeling techniques in conjunction with molecular biology techniques have been successful in constructing biological devices such as switches, oscillators, and gates. The ambition of synthetic biology is to construct complex systems from such fundamental devices, much in the same way electronic circuits are bu...

  16. Solar Walls in tsbi3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wittchen, Kim Bjarne

    tsbi3 is a user-friendly and flexible computer program, which provides support to the design team in the analysis of the indoor climate and the energy performance of buildings. The solar wall module gives tsbi3 the capability of simulating solar walls and their interaction with the building....... This version, C, of tsbi3 is capable of simulating five types of solar walls say: mass-walls, Trombe-walls, double Trombe-walls, internally ventilated walls and solar walls for preheating ventilation air. The user's guide gives a description of the capabilities and how to simulate solar walls in tsbi3....

  17. Enzymatic formation of carbohydrate rings catalyzed by single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyun, Moon Seop; Park, Jong Pil; Seo, Dongkyun; Chang, Sung-Jin; Lee, Seok Jae; Lee, Sang Yup; Kwak, Kyungwon; Park, Tae Jung

    2016-05-01

    Macrocyclic carbohydrate rings were formed via enzymatic reactions around single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) as a catalyst. Cyclodextrin glucanotransferase, starch substrate and SWNTs were reacted in buffer solution to yield cyclodextrin (CD) rings wrapped around individual SWNTs. Atomic force microscopy showed the resulting complexes to be rings of 12-50 nm in diameter, which were highly soluble and dispersed in aqueous solution. They were further characterized by Raman and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and molecular simulation using density functional theory calculation. In the absence of SWNT, hydrogen bonding between glucose units determines the structure of maltose (the precursor of CD) and produces the curvature along the glucose chain. Wrapping SWNT along the short axis was preferred with curvature in the presence of SWNTs and with the hydrophobic interactions between the SWNTs and CD molecules. This synthetic approach may be useful for the functionalization of carbon nanotubes for development of nanostructures.

  18. Living GenoChemetics by hyphenating synthetic biology and synthetic chemistry in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sunil V; Tong, Xiaoxue; Pubill-Ulldemolins, Cristina; Cartmell, Christopher; Bogosyan, Emma J A; Rackham, Emma J; Marelli, Enrico; Hamed, Refaat B; Goss, Rebecca J M

    2017-08-09

    Marrying synthetic biology with synthetic chemistry provides a powerful approach toward natural product diversification, combining the best of both worlds: expediency and synthetic capability of biogenic pathways and chemical diversity enabled by organic synthesis. Biosynthetic pathway engineering can be employed to insert a chemically orthogonal tag into a complex natural scaffold affording the possibility of site-selective modification without employing protecting group strategies. Here we show that, by installing a sufficiently reactive handle (e.g., a C-Br bond) and developing compatible mild aqueous chemistries, synchronous biosynthesis of the tagged metabolite and its subsequent chemical modification in living culture can be achieved. This approach can potentially enable many new applications: for example, assay of directed evolution of enzymes catalyzing halo-metabolite biosynthesis in living cells or generating and following the fate of tagged metabolites and biomolecules in living systems. We report synthetic biological access to new-to-nature bromo-metabolites and the concomitant biorthogonal cross-coupling of halo-metabolites in living cultures.Coupling synthetic biology and chemical reactions in cells is a challenging task. The authors engineer bacteria capable of generating bromo-metabolites, develop a mild Suzuki-Miyaura cross-coupling reaction compatible with cell growth and carry out the cross-coupling chemistry in live cell cultures.

  19. Cells, walls, and endless forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monniaux, Marie; Hay, Angela

    2016-12-01

    A key question in biology is how the endless diversity of forms found in nature evolved. Understanding the cellular basis of this diversity has been aided by advances in non-model experimental systems, quantitative image analysis tools, and modeling approaches. Recent work in plants highlights the importance of cell wall and cuticle modifications for the emergence of diverse forms and functions. For example, explosive seed dispersal in Cardamine hirsuta depends on the asymmetric localization of lignified cell wall thickenings in the fruit valve. Similarly, the iridescence of Hibiscus trionum petals relies on regular striations formed by cuticular folds. Moreover, NAC transcription factors regulate the differentiation of lignified xylem vessels but also the water-conducting cells of moss that lack a lignified secondary cell wall, pointing to the origin of vascular systems. Other novel forms are associated with modified cell growth patterns, including oriented cell expansion or division, found in the long petal spurs of Aquilegia flowers, and the Sarracenia purpurea pitcher leaf, respectively. Another good example is the regulation of dissected leaf shape in C. hirsuta via local growth repression, controlled by the REDUCED COMPLEXITY HD-ZIP class I transcription factor. These studies in non-model species often reveal as much about fundamental processes of development as they do about the evolution of form. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Space Synthetic Biology Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, David; Roman, Monsi; Mansell, James (Matt)

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic biology is an effort to make genetic engineering more useful by standardizing sections of genetic code. By standardizing genetic components, biological engineering will become much more similar to traditional fields of engineering, in which well-defined components and subsystems are readily available in markets. Specifications of the behavior of those components and subsystems can be used to model a system which incorporates them. Then, the behavior of the novel system can be simulated and optimized. Finally, the components and subsystems can be purchased and assembled to create the optimized system, which most often will exhibit behavior similar to that indicated by the model. The Space Synthetic Biology project began in 2012 as a multi-Center effort. The purpose of this project was to harness Synthetic Biology principals to enable NASA's missions. A central target for application was to Environmental Control & Life Support (ECLS). Engineers from NASA Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC's) ECLS Systems Development Branch (ES62) were brought into the project to contribute expertise in operational ECLS systems. Project lead scientists chose to pursue the development of bioelectrochemical technologies to spacecraft life support. Therefore, the ECLS element of the project became essentially an effort to develop a bioelectrochemical ECLS subsystem. Bioelectrochemical systems exploit the ability of many microorganisms to drive their metabolisms by direct or indirect utilization of electrical potential gradients. Whereas many microorganisms are capable of deriving the energy required for the processes of interest (such as carbon dioxide (CO2) fixation) from sunlight, it is believed that subsystems utilizing electrotrophs will exhibit smaller mass, volume, and power requirements than those that derive their energy from sunlight. In the first 2 years of the project, MSFC personnel conducted modeling, simulation, and conceptual design efforts to assist the

  1. An environment-sensitive synthetic microbial ecosystem.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Hu

    Full Text Available Microbial ecosystems have been widely used in industrial production, but the inter-relationships of organisms within them haven't been completely clarified due to complex composition and structure of natural microbial ecosystems. So it is challenging for ecologists to get deep insights on how ecosystems function and interplay with surrounding environments. But the recent progresses in synthetic biology show that construction of artificial ecosystems where relationships of species are comparatively clear could help us further uncover the meadow of those tiny societies. By using two quorum-sensing signal transduction circuits, this research designed, simulated and constructed a synthetic ecosystem where various population dynamics formed by changing environmental factors. Coherent experimental data and mathematical simulation in our study show that different antibiotics levels and initial cell densities can result in correlated population dynamics such as extinction, obligatory mutualism, facultative mutualism and commensalism. This synthetic ecosystem provides valuable information for addressing questions in ecology and may act as a chassis for construction of more complex microbial ecosystems.

  2. Finding Hope in Synthetic Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takala, Tuija

    2017-04-01

    For some, synthetic biology represents great hope in offering possible solutions to many of the world's biggest problems, from hunger to sustainable development. Others remain fearful of the harmful uses, such as bioweapons, that synthetic biology can lend itself to, and most hold that issues of biosafety are of utmost importance. In this article, I will evaluate these points of view and conclude that although the biggest promises of synthetic biology are unlikely to become reality, and the probability of accidents is fairly substantial, synthetic biology could still be seen to benefit humanity by enhancing our ethical understanding and by offering a boost to world economy.

  3. Synthetic biology and occupational risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, John; Murashov, Vladimir; Schulte, Paul

    2017-03-01

    Synthetic biology is an emerging interdisciplinary field of biotechnology that involves applying the principles of engineering and chemical design to biological systems. Biosafety professionals have done an excellent job in addressing research laboratory safety as synthetic biology and gene editing have emerged from the larger field of biotechnology. Despite these efforts, risks posed by synthetic biology are of increasing concern as research procedures scale up to industrial processes in the larger bioeconomy. A greater number and variety of workers will be exposed to commercial synthetic biology risks in the future, including risks to a variety of workers from the use of lentiviral vectors as gene transfer devices. There is a need to review and enhance current protection measures in the field of synthetic biology, whether in experimental laboratories where new advances are being researched, in health care settings where treatments using viral vectors as gene delivery systems are increasingly being used, or in the industrial bioeconomy. Enhanced worker protection measures should include increased injury and illness surveillance of the synthetic biology workforce; proactive risk assessment and management of synthetic biology products; research on the relative effectiveness of extrinsic and intrinsic biocontainment methods; specific safety guidance for synthetic biology industrial processes; determination of appropriate medical mitigation measures for lentiviral vector exposure incidents; and greater awareness and involvement in synthetic biology safety by the general occupational safety and health community as well as by government occupational safety and health research and regulatory agencies.

  4. Life after the synthetic cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Steen

    2010-01-01

    Nature asked eight synthetic-biology experts about the implications for science and society of the “synthetic cell” made by the J. Craig Venter Institute (JCVI). The institute's team assembled, modified and implanted a synthesized genome into a DNA-free bacterial shell to make a self-replicating ......Nature asked eight synthetic-biology experts about the implications for science and society of the “synthetic cell” made by the J. Craig Venter Institute (JCVI). The institute's team assembled, modified and implanted a synthesized genome into a DNA-free bacterial shell to make a self...

  5. Transionospheric synthetic aperture imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Gilman, Mikhail; Tsynkov, Semyon

    2017-01-01

    This landmark monograph presents the most recent mathematical developments in the analysis of ionospheric distortions of SAR images and offers innovative new strategies for their mitigation. As a prerequisite to addressing these topics, the book also discusses the radar ambiguity theory as it applies to synthetic aperture imaging and the propagation of radio waves through the ionospheric plasma, including the anisotropic and turbulent cases. In addition, it covers a host of related subjects, such as the mathematical modeling of extended radar targets (as opposed to point-wise targets) and the scattering of radio waves off those targets, as well as the theoretical analysis of the start-stop approximation, which is used routinely in SAR signal processing but often without proper justification. The mathematics in this volume is clean and rigorous – no assumptions are hidden or ambiguously stated. The resulting work is truly interdisciplinary, providing both a comprehensive and thorough exposition of the field,...

  6. Variation and Synthetic Speech

    CERN Document Server

    Miller, C; Massey, N; Miller, Corey; Karaali, Orhan; Massey, Noel

    1997-01-01

    We describe the approach to linguistic variation taken by the Motorola speech synthesizer. A pan-dialectal pronunciation dictionary is described, which serves as the training data for a neural network based letter-to-sound converter. Subsequent to dictionary retrieval or letter-to-sound generation, pronunciations are submitted a neural network based postlexical module. The postlexical module has been trained on aligned dictionary pronunciations and hand-labeled narrow phonetic transcriptions. This architecture permits the learning of individual postlexical variation, and can be retrained for each speaker whose voice is being modeled for synthesis. Learning variation in this way can result in greater naturalness for the synthetic speech that is produced by the system.

  7. Evolutionary synthetic biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peisajovich, Sergio G

    2012-06-15

    Signaling networks process vast amounts of environmental information to generate specific cellular responses. As cellular environments change, signaling networks adapt accordingly. Here, I will discuss how the integration of synthetic biology and directed evolution approaches is shedding light on the molecular mechanisms that guide the evolution of signaling networks. In particular, I will review studies that demonstrate how different types of mutations, from the replacement of individual amino acids to the shuffling of modular domains, lead to markedly different evolutionary trajectories and consequently to diverse network rewiring. Moreover, I will argue that intrinsic evolutionary properties of signaling proteins, such as the robustness of wild type functions, the promiscuous nature of evolutionary intermediates, and the modular decoupling between binding and catalysis, play important roles in the evolution of signaling networks. Finally, I will argue that rapid advances in our ability to synthesize DNA will radically alter how we study signaling network evolution at the genome-wide level.

  8. Synthetic Aperture Ultrasound Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Nikolov, Svetoslav; Gammelmark, Kim Løkke

    2006-01-01

    The paper describes the use of synthetic aperture (SA) imaging in medical ultrasound. SA imaging is a radical break with today's commercial systems, where the image is acquired sequentially one image line at a time. This puts a strict limit on the frame rate and the possibility of acquiring...... of SA imaging. Due to the complete data set, it is possible to have both dynamic transmit and receive focusing to improve contrast and resolution. It is also possible to improve penetration depth by employing codes during ultrasound transmission. Data sets for vector flow imaging can be acquired using...... short imaging sequences, whereby both the correct velocity magnitude and angle can be estimated. A number of examples of both phantom and in-vivo SA images will be presented measured by the experimental ultrasound scanner RASMUS to demonstrate the many benefits of SA imaging....

  9. Canadian synthetic resins industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Margeson, J. [Industry Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2000-06-01

    The growth of the synthetic resin industry in Canada is described. In 1999 the industry had shipments totalling $6.3 billion and employed about 9,000 people in 105 establishments. The industry is concentrated in Alberta, Ontario and Quebec. Plants in Alberta produce commodity-grade thermoplastic resins from raw materials derived mainly from natural gas, whereas plants in Ontario and Quebec produce both thermoplastic and thermoset resins using raw materials derived from both crude oil and natural gas. Sixty-four per cent of the synthetic reins produced in Canada, worth about $4.1 billion, are exported. This is offset by imports of 68 per cent of domestic consumption, (valued at $5.0 billion) reflecting rationalization and specialization of the resin industry on a continental basis. Process and product technologies used in Canada are up-to-date and licensed from parent or other foreign chemical companies. Capital investment in the Canadian resin industry is lagging behind investment in the United States, however, this is expected to change once the impact of recent investments in the industry in Alberta is reflected in the statistics. A five to seven per cent real average annual growth in world-wide consumption is predicted over the next five years. Growth in North America is projected to be in the three to four per cent range. The Alberta-based component of the industry, being relatively new, is expected to improve its ability to compete globally in commodity thermoplastics. In contrast, the plants in Ontario and Quebec suffer from the fact that they were built prior to the Free Trade Agreement and were designed to satisfy domestic requirements. They are attempting to compensate for their lack of economics of scale by developing strategies to supply niche products. 8 figs.

  10. Small RNA changes in synthetic Brassica napus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Ying; Xiao, Meili; Yu, Huasheng; Mason, Annaliese S; Yin, Jiaming; Li, Jiana; Zhang, Dongqing; Fu, Donghui

    2016-09-01

    Small RNAs and microRNAs were found to vary extensively in synthetic Brassica napus and subsequent generations, accompanied by the activation of transposable elements in response to hybridization and polyploidization. Resynthesizing B. napus by hybridization and chromosome doubling provides an approach to create novel polyploids and increases the usable genetic variability in oilseed rape. Although many studies have shown that small RNAs (sRNAs) act as important factor during hybridization and polyploidization in plants, much less is known on how sRNAs change in synthetic B. napus, particularly in subsequent generations after formation. We performed high-throughput sequencing of sRNAs in S1-S4 generations of synthetic B. napus and in the homozygous B. oleracea and B. rapa parent lines. We found that the number of small RNAs (sRNAs) and microRNAs (miRNAs) doubled in synthetic B. napus relative to the parents. The proportions of common sRNAs detected varied from the S1 to S4 generations, suggesting sRNAs are unstable in synthetic B. napus. The majority of miRNAs (67.2 %) were non-additively expressed in the synthesized Brassica allotetraploid, and 33.3 % of miRNAs were novel in the resynthesized B. napus. The percentage of miRNAs derived from transposable elements (TEs) also increased, indicating transposon activation and increased transposon-associated miRNA production in response to hybridization and polyploidization. The number of target genes for each miRNA in the synthesized Brassica allotetraploid was doubled relative to the parents, enhancing the complexity of gene expression regulation. The potential roles of miRNAs and their targets are discussed. Our data demonstrate generational changes in sRNAs and miRNAs in synthesized B. napus.

  11. Timber frame walls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ernst Jan de Place; Brandt, Erik

    2010-01-01

    A ventilated cavity is usually considered good practice for removing moisture behind the cladding of timber framed walls. Timber frame walls with no cavity are a logical alternative as they are slimmer and less expensive to produce and besides the risk of a two-sided fire behind the cladding...... is reduced. To investigate the possibilities, full-size wall elements with wooden cladding and different cavity design, type of cladding and type of wind barrier were exposed to natural climate on the outside and to a humid indoor climate on the inside. During the exposure period parts of the vapour barrier...

  12. Synthetic Dataset To Benchmark Global Tomographic Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Yilong; Capdeville, Yann; Maupin, Valerie; Montagner, Jean-Paul

    2006-11-01

    A new set of global synthetic seismograms calculated in a three-dimensional (3-D), heterogeneous, anisotropic, anelastic model of the Earth using the spectral element method has been released by the European network SPICE (Seismic Wave Propagation and Imaging in Complex Media: a European Network). The set consists of 7424 three-component records with a minimum period of 32 seconds, a sampling rate of one second, and a duration of 10,500 seconds. The aim of this synthetic data set is to conduct a blind test of existing global tomographic methods based on long-period data, in order to test how current imaging techniques are limited by approximations in theory and by the inadequacy of data quality and coverage.

  13. Macrocyclic Drugs and Synthetic Methodologies toward Macrocycles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xufen Yu

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Macrocyclic scaffolds are commonly found in bioactive natural products and pharmaceutical molecules. So far, a large number of macrocyclic natural products have been isolated and synthesized. The construction of macrocycles is generally considered as a crucial and challenging step in the synthesis of macrocyclic natural products. Over the last several decades, numerous efforts have been undertaken toward the synthesis of complex naturally occurring macrocycles and great progresses have been made to advance the field of total synthesis. The commonly used synthetic methodologies toward macrocyclization include macrolactonization, macrolactamization, transition metal-catalyzed cross coupling, ring-closing metathesis, and click reaction, among others. Selected recent examples of macrocyclic synthesis of natural products and druglike macrocycles with significant biological relevance are highlighted in each class. The primary goal of this review is to summarize currently used macrocyclic drugs, highlight the therapeutic potential of this underexplored drug class and outline the general synthetic methodologies for the synthesis of macrocycles.

  14. Emotional Synthetic Forces

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Henninger, Amy

    2004-01-01

    .... To this end, researchers adopted an approach that promotes the emergence of behavior as a result of complex interactions between factors affecting emotions, integrated in a connectionist style model...

  15. Advanced technologies for plant cell wall evolution and diversity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fangel, Jonatan Ulrik

    Plant cell walls consist of polysaccharides, glycoproteins and phenolic polymers interlinked together in a highly complex network. The detailed analysis of cell walls is challenging because of their inherent complexity and heterogeneity. Also, complex carbohydrates, unlike proteins and nucleotides...... probes (monoclonal antibodies mAbs and carbohydrate binding modules, CBMs) to rapidly profile polysaccharides across a sample set. During my PhD I have further developed the CoMPP technique and used it for cell wall analysis within the context of a variety of applied and fundamental projects. The data...

  16. Anterior vaginal wall repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... may have you: Learn pelvic floor muscle exercises ( Kegel exercises ) Use estrogen cream in your vagina Try ... repair; Urinary incontinence - vaginal wall repair Patient Instructions Kegel exercises - self-care Self catheterization - female Suprapubic catheter ...

  17. Advanced walling systems

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    De Villiers, A

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The question addressed by this chapter is: How should advanced walling systems be planned, designed, built, refurbished, and end their useful lives, to classify as smart, sustainable, green or eco-building environments?...

  18. Imaging with Synthetic Aperture Radar

    CERN Document Server

    Massonnet, Didier

    2008-01-01

    Describing a field that has been transformed by the recent availability of data from a new generation of space and airborne systems, the authors offer a synthetic geometrical approach to the description of synthetic aperture radar, one that addresses physicists, radar specialists, as well as experts in image processing.  

  19. Computational design approaches and tools for synthetic biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, James T; Barnes, Chris; Kitney, Richard I; Freemont, Paul S; Stan, Guy-Bart V

    2011-02-01

    A proliferation of new computational methods and software tools for synthetic biology design has emerged in recent years but the field has not yet reached the stage where the design and construction of novel synthetic biology systems has become routine. To a large degree this is due to the inherent complexity of biological systems. However, advances in biotechnology and our scientific understanding have already enabled a number of significant achievements in this area. A key concept in engineering is the ability to assemble simpler standardised modules into systems of increasing complexity but it has yet to be adequately addressed how this approach can be applied to biological systems. In particular, the use of computer aided design tools is common in other engineering disciplines and it should eventually become centrally important to the field of synthetic biology if the challenge of dealing with the stochasticity and complexity of biological systems can be overcome.

  20. KETERASINGAN DALAM FILM WALL-E

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahmadya Putra Nugraha

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Modern society nowadays technological advances at first create efficiency in human life. Further development of the technology thus drown human in a routine and automation of work created. The State is to be one of the causes of man separated from fellow or the outside world and eventually experiencing alienation. The movie as a mass media function to obtain the movie and entertainment can be informative or educative function is contained, even persuasive. The purpose of this research was conducted to find out the alienation in the movie Wall E. The concepts used to analyze the movie Wall E this is communication, movie, and alienation. The concept of alienation of human alienation from covering its own products of human alienation from its activities, the human alienation from nature of his humanity and human alienation from each other. Paradigm used is a critical paradigm with type a descriptive research with qualitative approach. The method used is the analysis of semiotics Roland Barthes to interpretation the scope of social alienation and fellow humans in the movie.This writing research results found that alienation of humans with other humans influenced the development of the technology and how the human it self represented of technology, not from our fellow human beings. Masyarakat modern saat ini kemajuan teknologi pada awalnya membuat efisiensi dalam kehidupan manusia. Perkembangan selanjutnya teknologi justru menenggelamkan manusia dalam suatu rutinitas dan otomatisasi kerja yang diciptakan. Keadaan itulah yang menjadi salah satu penyebab manusia terpisah dari sesama atau dunia luar dan akhirnya mengalami keterasingan. Film sebagai media massa berfungsi untuk memperoleh hiburan dan dalam film dapat terkandung fungsi informatif maupun edukatif, bahkan persuasif. Tujuan Penelitian ini dilakukan untuk mengetahui Keterasingan dalam film Wall E. Konsep-konsep yang digunakan untuk menganalisis film Wall E ini adalah komunikasi, film, dan

  1. A preclinical evaluation of alternative synthetic biomaterials for fascial defect repair using a rat abdominal hernia model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Ulrich

    Full Text Available Fascial defects are a common problem in the abdominal wall and in the vagina leading to hernia or pelvic organ prolapse that requires mesh enhancement to reduce operation failure. However, the long-term outcome of synthetic mesh surgery may be unsatisfactory due to post-surgical complications. We hypothesized that mesh fabricated from alternative synthetic polymers may evoke a different tissue response, and provide more appropriate mechanical properties for hernia repair. Our aim was to compare the in vivo biocompatibility of new synthetic meshes with a commercial mesh.We have fabricated 3 new warp-knitted synthetic meshes from different polymers with different tensile properties polyetheretherketone (PEEK, polyamide (PA and a composite, gelatin coated PA (PA+G. The rat abdominal hernia model was used to implant the meshes (25 × 35 mm, n = 24/ group. After 7, 30, 60, 90 days tissues were explanted for immunohistochemical assessment of foreign body reaction and tissue integration, using CD31, CD45, CD68, alpha-SMA antibodies. The images were analysed using an image analysis software program. Biomechanical properties were uniaxially evaluated using an Instron Tensile® Tester.This study showed that the new meshes induced complex differences in the type of foreign body reaction over the time course of implantation. The PA, and particularly the composite PA+G meshes, evoked a milder early inflammatory response, and macrophages were apparent throughout the time course. Our meshes led to better tissue integration and new collagen deposition, particularly with the PA+G meshes, as well as greater and sustained neovascularisation compared with the PP meshes.PA, PA+G and PEEK appear to be well tolerated and are biocompatible, evoking an overlapping and different host tissue response with time that might convey mechanical variations in the healing tissue. These new meshes comprising different polymers may provide an alternative option for future treatment

  2. Towards a synthetic model of the photosynthetic water oxidizing complex: [Mn3O4(O2CMe)4(bpy)2] containing the [MnIV3(mu-O)4]4+ core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhaduri, Sumit; Pink, Maren; Christou, George

    2002-10-21

    The 3 MnIV title compound has been prepared and characterized by X-ray crystallography and magnetochemistry; the complex contains a [Mn(mu-O)2Mn(mu-O)2Mn]4+ core and possesses an S = 3/2 ground state.

  3. Engineering Synthetic Gene Circuits in Living Cells with CRISPR Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jusiak, Barbara; Cleto, Sara; Perez-Piñera, Pablo; Lu, Timothy K

    2016-07-01

    One of the goals of synthetic biology is to build regulatory circuits that control cell behavior, for both basic research purposes and biomedical applications. The ability to build transcriptional regulatory devices depends on the availability of programmable, sequence-specific, and effective synthetic transcription factors (TFs). The prokaryotic clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) system, recently harnessed for transcriptional regulation in various heterologous host cells, offers unprecedented ease in designing synthetic TFs. We review how CRISPR can be used to build synthetic gene circuits and discuss recent advances in CRISPR-mediated gene regulation that offer the potential to build increasingly complex, programmable, and efficient gene circuits in the future. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Systems Approaches for Synthetic Biology: A Pathway Toward Mammalian Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul eRekhi

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available We review methods of understanding cellular interactions through computation in order to guide the synthetic design of mammalian cells for translational applications, such as regenerative medicine and cancer therapies. In doing so, we argue that the challenges of engineering mammalian cells provide a prime opportunity to leverage advances in computational systems biology. We support this claim systematically, by addressing each of the principal challenges to existing synthetic bioengineering approaches—stochasticity, complexity, and scale—with specific methods and paradigms in systems biology. Moreover, we characterize a key set of diverse computational techniques, including agent-based modeling, Bayesian network analysis, graph theory, and Gillespie simulations, with specific utility towards synthetic biology. Lastly, we examine the mammalian applications of synthetic biology for medicine and health, and how computational systems biology can aid in the continued development of these applications.

  5. Synthetic Jet Actuator Performance Enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pikcilingis, Lucia; Housley, Kevin; Whalen, Ed; Amitay, Michael; Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Collaboration; Boeing Company Collaboration

    2014-11-01

    Over the last 20 years synthetic jets have been studied as a means for aerodynamic flow control. Specifically, synthetic jets provide momentum transfer with zero-net mass flux, which has been proven to be effective for controlling flow fields. A synthetic jet is created by the periodic formation of vortex rings at its orifice due to the periodic motion of a piezoelectric disk(s). The present study seeks to optimize the performance of a synthetic jet actuator by utilizing different geometrical parameters such as disk thickness, orifice width and length, cavity height and cavity diameter, and different input parameters such as voltage and frequency. Experiments were conducted using a synthetic jet apparatus designed for various geometrical parameters utilizing a dual disk configuration. Velocity and temperature measurements were acquired at the center of the synthetic jet orifice using a temperature compensated hotwire and thermocouple probe. The disk displacement was measured at the center of the disk with a laser displacement sensor. It was shown that the synthetic jet actuators are capable of exceeding peak velocities of 200 m/s with a relatively large orifice. Data suggests that jet velocities greater than 200 m/s are attainable.

  6. Spicing things up: synthetic cannabinoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaderna, Max; Addy, Peter H; D'Souza, Deepak Cyril

    2013-08-01

    Recently, products containing synthetic cannabinoids, collectively referred to as Spice, are increasingly being used recreationally. The availability, acute subjective effects-including self-reports posted on Erowid-laboratory detection, addictive potential, and regulatory challenges of the Spice phenomenon are reviewed. Spice is sold under the guise of potpourri or incense. Unlike delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol, the synthetic cannabinoids present in Spice are high-potency, high-efficacy, cannabinoid receptor full agonists. Since standard urine toxicology does not test for the synthetic cannabinoids in Spice, it is often used by those who want to avoid detection of drug use. These compounds have not yet been subjected to rigorous testing in humans. Acute psychoactive effects include changes in mood, anxiety, perception, thinking, memory, and attention. Adverse effects include anxiety, agitation, panic, dysphoria, psychosis, and bizarre behavior. Psychosis outcomes associated with Spice provide additional data linking cannabinoids and psychosis. Adverse events necessitating intervention by Poison Control Centers, law enforcement, emergency responders, and hospitals are increasing. Despite statutes prohibiting the manufacture, distribution, and sale of Spice products, manufacturers are replacing banned compounds with newer synthetic cannabinoids that are not banned. There is an urgent need for better research on the effects of synthetic cannabinoids to help clinicians manage adverse events and to better understand cannabinoid pharmacology in humans. The reported psychosis outcomes associated with synthetic cannabinoids contribute to the ongoing debate on the association between cannabinoids and psychosis. Finally, drug detection tests for synthetic cannabinoids need to become clinically available.

  7. Spicing thing up: Synthetic cannabinoids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaderna, Max; Addy, Peter H; D’Souza, Deepak Cyril

    2013-01-01

    Rationale Recently, products containing synthetic cannabinoids, collectively referred to as Spice, are increasingly being used recreationally. Objectives The availability, acute subjective effects—including self-reports posted on Erowid—laboratory detection, addictive potential, and regulatory challenges of the Spice phenomenon are reviewed. Results Spice is sold under the guise of potpourri or incense. Unlike THC, the synthetic cannabinoids present in Spice are high-potency, high-efficacy, cannabinoid-receptor full agonists. Since standard urine toxicology does not test for the synthetic cannabinoids in Spice, it is often used by those who want to avoid detection of drug use. These compounds have not yet been subjected to rigorous testing in humans. Acute psychoactive effects include changes in mood, anxiety, perception, thinking, memory, and attention. Adverse effects include anxiety, agitation, panic, dysphoria, psychosis, and bizarre behavior. Psychosis outcomes associated with Spice provide additional data linking cannabinoids and psychosis. Adverse events necessitating intervention by Poison Control Centers, law enforcement, emergency responders, and hospitals are increasing. Despite statutes prohibiting the manufacture, distribution, and sale of Spice products, manufacturers are replacing banned compounds with newer synthetic cannabinoids that are not banned. Conclusions There is an urgent need for better research on the effects of synthetic cannabinoids to help clinicians manage adverse events and to better understand cannabinoid pharmacology in humans. The reported psychosis outcomes associated with synthetic cannabinoids contribute to the ongoing debate on the association between cannabinoids and psychosis. Finally, drug-detection tests for synthetic cannabinoids need to become clinically available. PMID:23836028

  8. Paper-based Synthetic Gene Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardee, Keith; Green, Alexander A.; Ferrante, Tom; Cameron, D. Ewen; DaleyKeyser, Ajay; Yin, Peng; Collins, James J.

    2014-01-01

    Synthetic gene networks have wide-ranging uses in reprogramming and rewiring organisms. To date, there has not been a way to harness the vast potential of these networks beyond the constraints of a laboratory or in vivo environment. Here, we present an in vitro paper-based platform that provides a new venue for synthetic biologists to operate, and a much-needed medium for the safe deployment of engineered gene circuits beyond the lab. Commercially available cell-free systems are freeze-dried onto paper, enabling the inexpensive, sterile and abiotic distribution of synthetic biology-based technologies for the clinic, global health, industry, research and education. For field use, we create circuits with colorimetric outputs for detection by eye, and fabricate a low-cost, electronic optical interface. We demonstrate this technology with small molecule and RNA actuation of genetic switches, rapid prototyping of complex gene circuits, and programmable in vitro diagnostics, including glucose sensors and strain-specific Ebola virus sensors. PMID:25417167

  9. Agent-based modelling in synthetic biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorochowski, Thomas E

    2016-11-30

    Biological systems exhibit complex behaviours that emerge at many different levels of organization. These span the regulation of gene expression within single cells to the use of quorum sensing to co-ordinate the action of entire bacterial colonies. Synthetic biology aims to make the engineering of biology easier, offering an opportunity to control natural systems and develop new synthetic systems with useful prescribed behaviours. However, in many cases, it is not understood how individual cells should be programmed to ensure the emergence of a required collective behaviour. Agent-based modelling aims to tackle this problem, offering a framework in which to simulate such systems and explore cellular design rules. In this article, I review the use of agent-based models in synthetic biology, outline the available computational tools, and provide details on recently engineered biological systems that are amenable to this approach. I further highlight the challenges facing this methodology and some of the potential future directions. © 2016 The Author(s).

  10. Synthetic biology: putting synthesis into biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jing; Luo, Yunzi; Zhao, Huimin

    2011-01-01

    The ability to manipulate living organisms is at the heart of a range of emerging technologies that serve to address important and current problems in environment, energy, and health. However, with all its complexity and interconnectivity, biology has for many years been recalcitrant to engineering manipulations. The recent advances in synthesis, analysis, and modeling methods have finally provided the tools necessary to manipulate living systems in meaningful ways and have led to the coining of a field named synthetic biology. The scope of synthetic biology is as complicated as life itself--encompassing many branches of science and across many scales of application. New DNA synthesis and assembly techniques have made routine customization of very large DNA molecules. This in turn has allowed the incorporation of multiple genes and pathways. By coupling these with techniques that allow for the modeling and design of protein functions, scientists have now gained the tools to create completely novel biological machineries. Even the ultimate biological machinery--a self-replicating organism--is being pursued at this moment. The aim of this article is to dissect and organize these various components of synthetic biology into a coherent picture.

  11. Synthetic transitions: towards a new synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solé, Ricard

    2016-08-19

    The evolution of life in our biosphere has been marked by several major innovations. Such major complexity shifts include the origin of cells, genetic codes or multicellularity to the emergence of non-genetic information, language or even consciousness. Understanding the nature and conditions for their rise and success is a major challenge for evolutionary biology. Along with data analysis, phylogenetic studies and dedicated experimental work, theoretical and computational studies are an essential part of this exploration. With the rise of synthetic biology, evolutionary robotics, artificial life and advanced simulations, novel perspectives to these problems have led to a rather interesting scenario, where not only the major transitions can be studied or even reproduced, but even new ones might be potentially identified. In both cases, transitions can be understood in terms of phase transitions, as defined in physics. Such mapping (if correct) would help in defining a general framework to establish a theory of major transitions, both natural and artificial. Here, we review some advances made at the crossroads between statistical physics, artificial life, synthetic biology and evolutionary robotics.This article is part of the themed issue 'The major synthetic evolutionary transitions'. © 2016 The Author(s).

  12. Unusual Synthetic Pathway for an {Fe(NO)2}9 Dinitrosyl Iron Complex (DNIC) and Insight into DNIC Electronic Structure via Nuclear Resonance Vibrational Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Speelman, Amy L.; Zhang, Bo; Silakov, Alexey; Skodje, Kelsey M.; Alp, E. Ercan; Zhao, Jiyong; Hu, Michael Y.; Kim, Eunsuk; Krebs, Karsten; Lehnert, Nicolai

    2016-06-06

    Dinitrosyl iron complexes (DNICs) are among the most abundant NO-derived cellular species. Monomeric DNICs can exist in the {Fe(NO)2}9 or {Fe(NO)2}10 oxidation state (in the Enemark -Feltham notation). However, experimental studies of analogous DNICs in both oxidation states are rare, which prevents a thorough understanding of the di ff erences in the electronic structures of these species. Here, the {Fe(NO)2}9 DNIC [Fe(dmp)(NO)2](OTf) ( 1 ; dmp = 2,9-dimethyl-1,10- phenanthroline) is synthesized from a ferrous precursor via an unusual pathway, involving disproportionation of an {FeNO}7 complex to yield the {Fe(NO)2}9 DNIC and a ferric species, which is subsequently reduced by NO gas to generate a ferrous complex that re-enters the reaction cycle. In contrast to most {Fe(NO)2}9 DNICs with neutral N-donor ligands, 1 exhibits high solution stability and can be characterized structurally and spectroscopically. Reduction of 1 yields the corresponding {Fe(NO)2}10 DNIC [Fe(dmp)(NO)2](2). The Mo ssbauer isomer shift of 2 is 0.08 mm/s smaller than that of 1 , which indicates that the iron center is slightly more oxidized in the reduced complex. The nuclear resonance vibrational spectra (NRVS) of 1 and 2 are distinct and provide direct experimental insight into di ff erences in bonding in these complexes. In particular, the symmetric out-of-plane Fe -N - O bending mode is shifted to higher energy by 188 cm-1 in 2 in comparison to 1 . Using quantum chemistry centered normal coordinate analysis (QCC-NCA), this is shown to arise from an increase in Fe - NO bond order and a sti ff ening of the Fe(NO)2 unit upon reduction of 1 to 2 . DFT calculations demonstrate that the changes in bonding arise from an iron- centered reduction which leads to a distinct increase in Fe - NO π -back-bonding in

  13. Synthetic biology for therapeutic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abil, Zhanar; Xiong, Xiong; Zhao, Huimin

    2015-02-02

    Synthetic biology is a relatively new field with the key aim of designing and constructing biological systems with novel functionalities. Today, synthetic biology devices are making their first steps in contributing new solutions to a number of biomedical challenges, such as emerging bacterial antibiotic resistance and cancer therapy. This review discusses some synthetic biology approaches and applications that were recently used in disease mechanism investigation and disease modeling, drug discovery and production, as well as vaccine development and treatment of infectious diseases, cancer, and metabolic disorders.

  14. The Ethics of Synthetic Biology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Andreas

    The dissertation analyses and discusses a number of ethical issues that have been raised in connection with the development of synthetic biology. Synthetic biology is a set of new techniques for DNA-level design and construction of living beings with useful properties. The dissertation especially......) popular responsesto them succeed, and whether the objections are ultimately persuasive.2. Given that synthetic biology is a new technology, there is a certain degree of uncertainty about its ultimate effects, and many perceive the technology as risky. I discuss two common approaches in risk regulation...

  15. Electroweak bubble wall speed limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bödeker, Dietrich; Moore, Guy D.

    2017-05-01

    In extensions of the Standard Model with extra scalars, the electroweak phase transition can be very strong, and the bubble walls can be highly relativistic. We revisit our previous argument that electroweak bubble walls can "run away," that is, achieve extreme ultrarelativistic velocities γ ~ 1014. We show that, when particles cross the bubble wall, they can emit transition radiation. Wall-frame soft processes, though suppressed by a power of the coupling α, have a significance enhanced by the γ-factor of the wall, limiting wall velocities to γ ~ 1/α. Though the bubble walls can move at almost the speed of light, they carry an infinitesimal share of the plasma's energy.

  16. Sorption of volatile phenols by yeast cell walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nerea Jiménez-Moreno

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Nerea Jiménez-Moreno, Carmen Ancín-AzpilicuetaDepartment of Applied Chemistry, Universidad Pública de Navarra, Pamplona, SpainAbstract: Yeast walls can retain different wine compounds and so its use is interesting in order to eliminate harmful substances from the must which affect alcoholic fermentation (medium chain fatty acids or which affect wine quality in a negative way (ethyl phenols, ochratoxin A. The aim of this study was to examine the capacity of commercial yeast cell walls in eliminating volatile phenols (4-ethylphenol and 4-ethylguaiacol from a synthetic wine that contained 1 mg/L of each one of these compounds. The binding of these compounds to the wall was quite fast which would seem to indicate that the yeast wall-volatile compound union is produced in the outer surface layers of this enological additive. The cell walls used reduced the concentration of 4-ethylphenol and 4-ethylguaiacol, although it would seem that on modifying the matrix of the wine the number of free binding sites on the walls is also modified.Keywords: volatile phenols, yeast cell walls, wine, sorption

  17. Designing synthetic networks in silico

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smith, Robert W.; Sluijs, van Bob; Fleck, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Background: Evolution has led to the development of biological networks that are shaped by environmental signals. Elucidating, understanding and then reconstructing important network motifs is one of the principal aims of Systems & Synthetic Biology. Consequently, previous research has focused

  18. Programming languages for synthetic biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umesh, P; Naveen, F; Rao, Chanchala Uma Maheswara; Nair, Achuthsankar S

    2010-12-01

    In the backdrop of accelerated efforts for creating synthetic organisms, the nature and scope of an ideal programming language for scripting synthetic organism in-silico has been receiving increasing attention. A few programming languages for synthetic biology capable of defining, constructing, networking, editing and delivering genome scale models of cellular processes have been recently attempted. All these represent important points in a spectrum of possibilities. This paper introduces Kera, a state of the art programming language for synthetic biology which is arguably ahead of similar languages or tools such as GEC, Antimony and GenoCAD. Kera is a full-fledged object oriented programming language which is tempered by biopart rule library named Samhita which captures the knowledge regarding the interaction of genome components and catalytic molecules. Prominent feature of the language are demonstrated through a toy example and the road map for the future development of Kera is also presented.

  19. Building a Synthetic Transcriptional Oscillator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz-Schilling, Matthaeus; Kim, Jongmin; Cuba, Christian; Weitz, Maximilian; Franco, Elisa; Simmel, Friedrich C

    2016-01-01

    Reaction circuits mimicking genetic oscillators can be realized with synthetic, switchable DNA genes (so-called genelets), and two enzymes only, an RNA polymerase and a ribonuclease. The oscillatory behavior of the genelets is driven by the periodic production and degradation of RNA effector molecules. Here, we describe the preparation, assembly, and testing of a synthetic, transcriptional two-node negative-feedback oscillator, whose dynamics can be followed in real-time by fluorescence read-out.

  20. Structure and Function of Iron-Loaded Synthetic Melanin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yiwen; Xie, Yijun; Wang, Zhao; Zang, Nanzhi; Carniato, Fabio; Huang, Yuran; Andolina, Christopher M.; Parent, Lucas R.; Ditri, Treffly B.; Walter, Eric D.; Botta, Mauro; Rinehart, Jeffrey D.; Gianneschi, Nathan C.

    2016-11-22

    We describe a synthetic method for increasing and controlling the iron loading of synthetic melanin nanoparticles and use the resulting materials to perform a systematic quantitative investigation on their structure- property relationship. A comprehensive analysis by magnetometry, electron paramagnetic resonance, and nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion reveals the complexities of their magnetic behavior and how these intraparticle magnetic interactions manifest in useful material properties such as their performance as MRI contrast agents. This analysis allows predictions of the optimal iron loading through a quantitative modeling of antiferromagnetic coupling that arises from proximal iron ions. This study provides a detailed understanding of this complex class of synthetic biomaterials and gives insight into interactions and structures prevalent in naturally occurring melanins.

  1. Enzymatic Modification of Plant Cell Wall Polysaccharides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Øbro, Jens; Hayashi, Takahisa; Mikkelsen, Jørn Dalgaard

    2011-01-01

    Plant cell walls are intricate structures with remarkable properties, widely used in almost every aspect of our life. Cell walls consist largely of complex polysaccharides and there is often a need for chemical and biochemical processing before industrial use. There is an increasing demand...... for sustainable processes that replace chemical treatments with white biotechnology. Plants can contribute significantly to this sustainable process by producing plant or microbialenzymes in planta that are necessary for plant cell wall modification or total degradation. This will give rise to superior food...... fibres, hydrocolloids, paper,textile, animal feeds or biofuels. Classical microbial-based fermentation systems could in the future face serious competition from plant-based expression systems for enzyme production. Plant expressed enzymes can either be targeted to specific cellular compartments...

  2. Synthesis of plant cell wall oligosaccharides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Mads Hartvig

    Plant cell walls are structurally complex and contain a large number of diverse carbohydrate polymers. These plant fibers are a highly valuable bio-resource and the focus of food, energy and health research. We are interested in studying the interplay of plant cell wall carbohydrates with proteins...... for characterizing protein-carbohydrate binding. The presentation will highlight chemical syntheses of plant cell wall oligosaccharides from the group and provide examples from studies of their interactions with proteins....... such as enzymes, cell surface lectins, and antibodies. However, detailed molecular level investigations of such interactions are hampered by the heterogeneity and diversity of the polymers of interest. To circumvent this, we target well-defined oligosaccharides with representative structures that can be used...

  3. Chemical synthesis using synthetic biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carothers, James M; Goler, Jonathan A; Keasling, Jay D

    2009-08-01

    An immense array of naturally occurring biological systems have evolved that convert simple substrates into the products that cells need for growth and persistence. Through the careful application of metabolic engineering and synthetic biology, this biotransformation potential can be harnessed to produce chemicals that address unmet clinical and industrial needs. Developing the capacity to utilize biology to perform chemistry is a matter of increasing control over both the function of synthetic biological systems and the engineering of those systems. Recent efforts have improved general techniques and yielded successes in the use of synthetic biology for the production of drugs, bulk chemicals, and fuels in microbial platform hosts. Synthetic promoter systems and novel RNA-based, or riboregulator, mechanisms give more control over gene expression. Improved methods for isolating, engineering, and evolving enzymes give more control over substrate and product specificity and better catalysis inside the cell. New computational tools and methods for high-throughput system assembly and analysis may lead to more rapid forward engineering. We highlight research that reduces reliance upon natural biological components and point to future work that may enable more rational design and assembly of synthetic biological systems for synthetic chemistry.

  4. Generating realistic synthetic meteoroid orbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vida, Denis; Brown, Peter G.; Campbell-Brown, Margaret

    2017-11-01

    Context. Generating a synthetic dataset of meteoroid orbits is a crucial step in analysing the probabilities of random grouping of meteoroid orbits in automated meteor shower surveys. Recent works have shown the importance of choosing a low similarity threshold value of meteoroid orbits, some pointing out that the recent meteor shower surveys produced false positives due to similarity thresholds which were too high. On the other hand, the methods of synthetic meteoroid orbit generation introduce additional biases into the data, thus making the final decision on an appropriate threshold value uncertain. Aims. As a part of the ongoing effort to determine the nature of meteor showers and improve automated methods, it was decided to tackle the problem of synthetic meteoroid orbit generation, the main goal being to reproduce the underlying structure and the statistics of the observed data in the synthetic orbits. Methods. A new method of generating synthetic meteoroid orbits using the Kernel Density Estimation method is presented. Several types of approaches are recommended, depending on whether one strives to preserve the data structure, the data statistics or to have a compromise between the two. Results. The improvements over the existing methods of synthetic orbit generation are demonstrated. The comparison between the previous and newly developed methods are given, as well as the visualization tools one can use to estimate the influence of different input parameters on the final data.

  5. Freedom and Responsibility in Synthetic Genomics: The Synthetic Yeast Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sliva, Anna; Yang, Huanming; Boeke, Jef D.; Mathews, Debra J. H.

    2015-01-01

    First introduced in 2011, the Synthetic Yeast Genome (Sc2.0) Project is a large international synthetic genomics project that will culminate in the first eukaryotic cell (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) with a fully synthetic genome. With collaborators from across the globe and from a range of institutions spanning from do-it-yourself biology (DIYbio) to commercial enterprises, it is important that all scientists working on this project are cognizant of the ethical and policy issues associated with this field of research and operate under a common set of principles. In this commentary, we survey the current ethics and regulatory landscape of synthetic biology and present the Sc2.0 Statement of Ethics and Governance to which all members of the project adhere. This statement focuses on four aspects of the Sc2.0 Project: societal benefit, intellectual property, safety, and self-governance. We propose that such project-level agreements are an important, valuable, and flexible model of self-regulation for similar global, large-scale synthetic biology projects in order to maximize the benefits and minimize potential harms. PMID:26272997

  6. Freedom and Responsibility in Synthetic Genomics: The Synthetic Yeast Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sliva, Anna; Yang, Huanming; Boeke, Jef D; Mathews, Debra J H

    2015-08-01

    First introduced in 2011, the Synthetic Yeast Genome (Sc2.0) PROJECT is a large international synthetic genomics project that will culminate in the first eukaryotic cell (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) with a fully synthetic genome. With collaborators from across the globe and from a range of institutions spanning from do-it-yourself biology (DIYbio) to commercial enterprises, it is important that all scientists working on this project are cognizant of the ethical and policy issues associated with this field of research and operate under a common set of principles. In this commentary, we survey the current ethics and regulatory landscape of synthetic biology and present the Sc2.0 Statement of Ethics and Governance to which all members of the project adhere. This statement focuses on four aspects of the Sc2.0 PROJECT: societal benefit, intellectual property, safety, and self-governance. We propose that such project-level agreements are an important, valuable, and flexible model of self-regulation for similar global, large-scale synthetic biology projects in order to maximize the benefits and minimize potential harms. Copyright © 2015 by the Genetics Society of America.

  7. The role of geophysical ERT method to evaluate the leakproofness of diapragm wall of deep foundation trenches on the example of the construction of retail and office complex in Lublin, Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pacanowski Grzegorz

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the problem of assessing the leakproofness of the bottom of a deep foundation trench, secured by cavity wall, using geophysical methods of electrical resistivity tomography. The study was conducted on a large construction project in Lublin, in a place where there are complicated soil-water conditions: the groundwater level is above the proposed depth of foundation trench, the subsoil is heterogeneous, and there are karsted and weathered carbonate sediments with confined aquifer below the bottom of the trench. A hydraulic fracture occurred at the bottom of the trench during the engineering works, which caused the water flow into the trench. In order to recognize the soil-water conditions the first stage of geophysical measurements of electrical resistivity tomography (ERT was made. The applied methodology allowed to determine the extent of the hydraulic fracture zone within the bottom of foundation trench. In order to assess the leakproofness of Diaphragm Wall the geophysical ERT measurements were repeated (stage 2 A clear reduction in the value of the electrical resistivity of soils in the area of hydraulic fracture was caused by clay injection. The results of ERT measurements are discussed and graphically presented.

  8. WD40-Repeat Proteins in Plant Cell Wall Formation: Current Evidence and Research Prospects

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Guerriero, Gea; Hausman, Jean-Francois; Ezcurra, Inés

    2015-01-01

    The metabolic complexity of living organisms relies on supramolecular protein structures which ensure vital processes, such as signal transduction, transcription, translation and cell wall synthesis...

  9. [New materia medica project: synthetic biology based bioactive metabolites research in medicinal plant].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong

    2017-03-25

    In the last decade, synthetic biology research has been gradually transited from monocellular parts or devices toward more complex multicellular systems. The emerging plant synthetic biology is regarded as the "next chapter" of synthetic biology. The complex and diverse plant metabolism as the entry point, plant synthetic biology research not only helps us understand how real life is working, but also facilitates us to learn how to design and construct more complex artificial life. Bioactive compounds innovation and large-scale production are expected to be breakthrough with the redesigned plant metabolism as well. In this review, we discuss the research progress in plant synthetic biology and propose the new materia medica project to lift the level of traditional Chinese herbal medicine research.

  10. Synthetic Aperture Sequential Beamforming using Spatial Matched Filtering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Mikkel; di Ianni, Tommaso; Bouzari, Hamed

    2017-01-01

    Synthetic Aperture Sequential Beamforming (SASB) has shown to achieve a good resolution and high penetration depth. The low complexity at the transducer level of the beamformer makes it ideal for use with a handheld device. SASB with a low F# (≤ 0.5) can achieve even better resolution at the cost...

  11. Informing biological design by integration of systems and synthetic biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolke, Christina D; Silver, Pamela A

    2011-03-18

    Synthetic biology aims to make the engineering of biology faster and more predictable. In contrast, systems biology focuses on the interaction of myriad components and how these give rise to the dynamic and complex behavior of biological systems. Here, we examine the synergies between these two fields. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Moisture Research - Optimizing Wall Assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arena, Lois [Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB), Norwalk, CT (United States); Mantha, Pallavi [Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB), Norwalk, CT (United States)

    2013-05-01

    In this project, the Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) team evaluated several different configurations of wall assemblies to determine the accuracy of moisture modeling and make recommendations to ensure durable, efficient assemblies. WUFI and THERM were used to model the hygrothermal and heat transfer characteristics of these walls. Wall assemblies evaluated included code minimum walls using spray foam insulation and fiberglass batts, high R-value walls at least 12 in. thick (R-40 and R-60 assemblies), and brick walls with interior insulation.

  13. Synthetic histone code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischle, Wolfgang; Mootz, Henning D; Schwarzer, Dirk

    2015-10-01

    Chromatin is the universal template of genetic information in all eukaryotic cells. This complex of DNA and histone proteins not only packages and organizes genomes but also regulates gene expression. A multitude of posttranslational histone modifications and their combinations are thought to constitute a code for directing distinct structural and functional states of chromatin. Methods of protein chemistry, including protein semisynthesis, amber suppression technology, and cysteine bioconjugation, have enabled the generation of so-called designer chromatin containing histones in defined and homogeneous modification states. Several of these approaches have matured from proof-of-concept studies into efficient tools and technologies for studying the biochemistry of chromatin regulation and for interrogating the histone code. We summarize pioneering experiments and recent developments in this exciting field of chemical biology. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Targeted and non-targeted effects in cell wall polysaccharides from transgenetically modified potato tubers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huang, J.H.

    2016-01-01

    The plant cell wall is a chemically complex network composed mainly of polysaccharides. Cell wall polysaccharides surround and protect plant cells and are responsible for the stability and rigidity of plant tissue. Pectin is a major component of primary cell wall and the middle lamella of plants.

  15. Pectic arabinan side chains are essential for pollen cell wall integrity during pollen development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cankar, K.; Kortstee, A.J.; Toonen, M.A.J.; Wolters-Arts, M.; Houbein, R.; Mariani, C.; Ulvskov, P.; Jorgensen, B.; Schols, H.A.; Visser, R.G.F.; Trindade, L.M.

    2014-01-01

    Pectin is a complex polysaccharide and an integral part of the primary plant cell wall and middle lamella, contributing to cell wall mechanical strength and cell adhesion. To understand the structure–function relationships of pectin in the cell wall, a set of transgenic potato lines with altered

  16. Airfoil drag elimination and stall suppression via piezoelectric dynamic tangential synthetic jet actuators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barrett, R.; Corpening, J.; Reasonover, C.

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes a new method for drag elimination and stall suppression via tangential synthetic jet actuators. This boundary layer control (BLC) method is shown to perform as well as continuous and normal synthetic jet BLC methods but without fouling difficulties, system-level complexity or

  17. Integrated in silico analysis of pathway designs for synthetic photo-electro-autotrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Volpers, Michael; Claassens, Nico J.; Noor, Elad; Oost, van der John; Vos, de Willem M.; Kengen, Servé W.M.; Martins dos Santos, Vitor

    2016-01-01

    The strong advances in synthetic biology enable the engineering of novel functions and complex biological features in unprecedented ways, such as implementing synthetic autotrophic metabolism into heterotrophic hosts. A key challenge for the sustainable production of fuels and chemicals entails

  18. Production and short-term of synthetic seeds from encapsulated begonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Synthetic seeds were formed from in vitro grown Begonia (cvs ‘Sweetheart Mix’ and ‘Baby Wing White’) shoot tips using 3% sodium alginate in Murashige and Skoog (1962) medium (MS) salt solution as the gel matrix and 100 mM calcium chloride for complexation. Synthetic seed formation was achieved by re...

  19. High-R Walls for Remodeling: Wall Cavity Moisture Monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiehagen, J.; Kochkin, V.

    2012-12-01

    The focus of the study is on the performance of wall systems, and in particular, the moisture characteristics inside the wall cavity and in the wood sheathing. Furthermore, while this research will initially address new home construction, the goal is to address potential moisture issues in wall cavities of existing homes when insulation and air sealing improvements are made.

  20. High-R Walls for Remodeling. Wall Cavity Moisture Monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiehagen, J. [NAHB Research Center Industry Partnership, Upper Marlboro, MD (United States); Kochkin, V. [NAHB Research Center Industry Partnership, Upper Marlboro, MD (United States)

    2012-12-01

    The focus of the study is on the performance of wall systems, and in particular, the moisture characteristics inside the wall cavity and in the wood sheathing. Furthermore, while this research will initially address new home construction, the goal is to address potential moisture issues in wall cavities of existing homes when insulation and air sealing improvements are made.

  1. Chlorella vulgaris production enhancement with supplementation of synthetic medium in dairy manure wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jun; Pandey, Pramod K; Franz, Annaliese K; Deng, Huiping; Jeannotte, Richard

    2016-03-01

    To identify innovative ways for better utilizing flushed dairy manure wastewater, we have assessed the effect of dairy manure and supplementation with synthetic medium on the growth of Chlorella vulgaris. A series of experiments were carried out to study the impacts of pretreatment of dairy wastewater and the benefits of supplementing dairy manure wastewater with synthetic medium on C. vulgaris growth increment and the ultrastructure (chloroplast, starch, lipid, and cell wall) of C. vulgaris cells. Results showed that the biomass production of C. vulgaris in dairy wastewater can be enhanced by pretreatment and using supplementation with synthetic media. A recipe combining pretreated dairy wastewater (40 %) and synthetic medium (60 %) exhibited an improved growth of C. vulgaris. The effects of dairy wastewater on the ultrastructure of C. vulgaris cells were distinct compared to that of cells grown in synthetic medium. The C. vulgaris growth in both synthetic medium and manure wastewater without supplementing synthetic medium was lower than the growth in dairy manure supplemented with synthetic medium. We anticipate that the results of this study will help in deriving an enhanced method of coupling nutrient-rich dairy manure wastewater for biofuel production.

  2. Synthetic biology, metaphors and responsibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLeod, Carmen; Nerlich, Brigitte

    2017-08-29

    Metaphors are not just decorative rhetorical devices that make speech pretty. They are fundamental tools for thinking about the world and acting on the world. The language we use to make a better world matters; words matter; metaphors matter. Words have consequences - ethical, social and legal ones, as well as political and economic ones. They need to be used 'responsibly'. They also need to be studied carefully - this is what we want to do through this editorial and the related thematic collection. In the context of synthetic biology, natural and social scientists have become increasingly interested in metaphors, a wave of interest that we want to exploit and amplify. We want to build on emerging articles and books on synthetic biology, metaphors of life and the ethical and moral implications of such metaphors. This editorial provides a brief introduction to synthetic biology and responsible innovation, as well as a comprehensive review of literature on the social, cultural and ethical impacts of metaphor use in genomics and synthetic biology. Our aim is to stimulate an interdisciplinary and international discussion on the impact that metaphors can have on science, policy and publics in the context of synthetic biology.

  3. Cdc48 and cofactors Npl4-Ufd1 are important for G1 progression during heat stress by maintaining cell wall integrity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng-Ti Hsieh

    Full Text Available The ubiquitin-selective chaperone Cdc48, a member of the AAA (ATPase Associated with various cellular Activities ATPase superfamily, is involved in many processes, including endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation (ERAD, ubiquitin- and proteasome-mediated protein degradation, and mitosis. Although Cdc48 was originally isolated as a cell cycle mutant in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, its cell cycle functions have not been well appreciated. We found that temperature-sensitive cdc48-3 mutant is largely arrested at mitosis at 37°C, whereas the mutant is also delayed in G1 progression at 38.5°C. Reporter assays show that the promoter activity of G1 cyclin CLN1, but not CLN2, is reduced in cdc48-3 at 38.5°C. The cofactor npl4-1 and ufd1-2 mutants also exhibit G1 delay and reduced CLN1 promoter activity at 38.5°C, suggesting that Npl4-Ufd1 complex mediates the function of Cdc48 at G1. The G1 delay of cdc48-3 at 38.5°C is a consequence of cell wall defect that over-activates Mpk1, a MAPK family member important for cell wall integrity in response to stress conditions including heat shock. cdc48-3 is hypersensitive to cell wall perturbing agents and is synthetic-sick with mutations in the cell wall integrity signaling pathway. Our results suggest that the cell wall defect in cdc48-3 is exacerbated by heat shock, which sustains Mpk1 activity to block G1 progression. Thus, Cdc48-Npl4-Ufd1 is important for the maintenance of cell wall integrity in order for normal cell growth and division.

  4. Materials and techniques in chest wall reconstruction: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanna, Stefano; Brandolini, Jury; Pardolesi, Alessandro; Argnani, Desideria; Mengozzi, Marta; Dell'Amore, Andrea; Solli, Piergiorgio

    2017-01-01

    Extensive chest wall resection and reconstruction are a challenging procedure that requires a multidisciplinary approach, including input from thoracic surgeon, plastic surgeon and oncologist. In particular chest wall neoplastic pathology is associated with high surgical morbidity and can result in full thickness defects hard to reconstruct. The goals of a successful chest wall reconstruction are to restore the chest wall rigidity, preserve pulmonary mechanic and protect the intrathoracic organs minimizing the thoracic deformity. In case of large full thickness defects synthetic, biologic or composite meshes can be used, with or without titanium plate to restore thoracic cage rigidity as like as more recently the use of allograft to reconstruct the sternum. After skeletal stability is established full tissue coverage can be achieved using direct suture, skin graft or local advancement flaps, pedicled myocutaneous flaps or free flaps. The aim of this article is to illustrate the indications, various materials and techniques for chest wall reconstruction with the goal to obtain the best chest wall rigidity and soft tissue coverage.

  5. Green Walls as an Approach in Grey Water Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rysulova, Martina; Kaposztasova, Daniela; Vranayova, Zuzana

    2017-10-01

    Grey water contributes significantly to waste water parameters such as biochemical oxygen demand (BOD), chemical oxygen demand (COD), total suspended solids (TSS), total phosphorus (Ptotal), total nitrogen (Ntotal), ammonium, boron, metals, salts, surfactants, synthetic chemicals, oils and greases, xenobiotic substances and microorganisms. Concentration of these pollutants and the water quality highlights the importance of treatment process in grey water systems. Treatment technologies operating under low energy and maintenance are usually preferred, since they are more cost effective for users. Treatment technologies based on natural processes represent an example of such technology including vegetated wall. Main aim of this paper is to introduce the proposal of vegetated wall managing grey water and brief characteristic of proposed system. Is expected that prepared experiment will establish the purifying ability and the potential of green wall application as an efficient treatment technology.

  6. DIELECTRIC WALL ACCELERATOR TECHNOLOGY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sampayan, S; Caporaso, G; Chen, Y; Harris, J; Hawkins, S; Holmes, C; Nelson, S; Poole, B; Rhodes, M; Sanders, D; Sullivan, J; Wang, L; Watson, J

    2007-10-18

    The dielectric wall accelerator (DWA) is a compact pulsed power device where the pulse forming lines, switching, and vacuum wall are integrated into a single compact geometry. For this effort, we initiated a extensive compact pulsed power development program and have pursued the study of switching (gas, oil, laser induced surface flashover and photoconductive), dielectrics (ceramics and nanoparticle composites), pulse forming line topologies (asymmetric and symmetric Blumleins and zero integral pulse forming lines), and multilayered vacuum insulator (HGI) technology. Finally, we fabricated an accelerator cell for test on ETAII (a 5.5 MeV, 2 kA, 70 ns pulsewidth electron beam accelerator). We review our past results and report on the progress of accelerator cell testing.

  7. Partial domain wall partition functions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Foda, O; Wheeler, M

    2012-01-01

    We consider six-vertex model configurations on an (n × N) lattice, n ≤ N, that satisfy a variation on domain wall boundary conditions that we define and call partial domain wall boundary conditions...

  8. Scalable Resolution Display Walls

    KAUST Repository

    Leigh, Jason

    2013-01-01

    This article will describe the progress since 2000 on research and development in 2-D and 3-D scalable resolution display walls that are built from tiling individual lower resolution flat panel displays. The article will describe approaches and trends in display hardware construction, middleware architecture, and user-interaction design. The article will also highlight examples of use cases and the benefits the technology has brought to their respective disciplines. © 1963-2012 IEEE.

  9. Light shining through walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Redondo, Javier [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany); Ringwald, Andreas [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2010-11-15

    Shining light through walls? At first glance this sounds crazy. However, very feeble gravitational and electroweak effects allow for this exotic possibility. Unfortunately, with present and near future technologies the opportunity to observe light shining through walls via these effects is completely out of question. Nevertheless there are quite a number of experimental collaborations around the globe involved in this quest. Why are they doing it? Are there additional ways of sending photons through opaque matter? Indeed, various extensions of the standard model of particle physics predict the existence of new particles called WISPs - extremely weakly interacting slim particles. Photons can convert into these hypothetical particles, which have no problems to penetrate very dense materials, and these can reconvert into photons after their passage - as if light was effectively traversing walls. We review this exciting field of research, describing the most important WISPs, the present and future experiments, the indirect hints from astrophysics and cosmology pointing to the existence of WISPs, and finally outlining the consequences that the discovery of WISPs would have. (orig.)

  10. Designer Drugs: A Synthetic Catastrophe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fratantonio, James; Andrade, Lawrence; Febo, Marcelo

    Synthetic stimulants can cause hallucinations, aggressive behaviors, death and are sometimes legal. These substances are sold as plant food and bath salts that are "Not for Human Consumption", therefore skirting the 1986 Federal Analogue Act and giving a false pretense of safety. Studies have proved that these substances are toxic, have a high abuse potential, and are becoming extremely prevalent in the United States. This creates a dilemma for law enforcement agents, hospitals, and substance use disorder treatment centers. Urine Drug Testing is utilized as a clinical diagnostic tool in substance use disorder treatment centers, and the furious pace at which new synthetic stimulants are introduced to the black market are making the detection via urine increasingly difficult. This article will discuss the prevalence, pharmacology and difficulty developing laboratory assays to detect synthetic stimulants.

  11. Compounding in synthetic aperture imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, J. M.; Jensen, J. A.

    2012-01-01

    A method for obtaining compound images using synthetic aperture data is investigated using a convex array transducer. The new approach allows spatial compounding to be performed for any number of angles without reducing the frame rate or temporal resolution. This important feature is an intrinsic...... property of how the compound images are constructed using synthetic aperture data and an improvement compared with how spatial compounding is obtained using conventional methods. The synthetic aperture compound images are created by exploiting the linearity of delay-and-sum beamformation for data collected...... from multiple spherical emissions to synthesize multiple transmit and receive apertures, corresponding to imaging the tissue from multiple directions. The many images are added incoherently, to produce a single compound image. Using a 192-element, 3.5-MHz, λ-pitch transducer, it is demonstrated from...

  12. Microfluidic Technologies for Synthetic Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Kuk Lee

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Microfluidic technologies have shown powerful abilities for reducing cost, time, and labor, and at the same time, for increasing accuracy, throughput, and performance in the analysis of biological and biochemical samples compared with the conventional, macroscale instruments. Synthetic biology is an emerging field of biology and has drawn much attraction due to its potential to create novel, functional biological parts and systems for special purposes. Since it is believed that the development of synthetic biology can be accelerated through the use of microfluidic technology, in this review work we focus our discussion on the latest microfluidic technologies that can provide unprecedented means in synthetic biology for dynamic profiling of gene expression/regulation with high resolution, highly sensitive on-chip and off-chip detection of metabolites, and whole-cell analysis.

  13. Wall Street som kreationistisk forkynder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ekman, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    Artiklen gennemgår Karen Hos etnografi om Wall Street: "Liquidated: An ethnography of Wall Street" set i lyset af den offentlige debat vedrørende Goldman Sachs opkøb af Dong......Artiklen gennemgår Karen Hos etnografi om Wall Street: "Liquidated: An ethnography of Wall Street" set i lyset af den offentlige debat vedrørende Goldman Sachs opkøb af Dong...

  14. US Competitiveness in Synthetic Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gronvall, Gigi Kwik

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic biology is an emerging technical field that aims to make biology easier to engineer; the field has applications in strategically important sectors for the US economy. While the United States currently leads in synthetic biology R&D, other nations are heavily investing in order to boost their economies, which will inevitably diminish the US leadership position. This outcome is not entirely negative--additional investments will expand markets--but it is critical that the US government take steps to remain competitive: There are applications from which the US population and economy may benefit; there are specific applications with importance for national defense; and US technical leadership will ensure that US experts have a leading role in synthetic biology governance, regulation, and oversight. Measures to increase competitiveness in S&T generally are broadly applicable for synthetic biology and should be pursued. However, the US government will also need to take action on fundamental issues that will affect the field's development, such as countering anti-GMO (genetically modified organism) sentiments and anti-GMO legislation. The United States should maintain its regulatory approach so that it is the product that is regulated, not the method used to create a product. At the same time, the United States needs to ensure that the regulatory framework is updated so that synthetic biology products do not fall into regulatory gaps. Finally, the United States needs to pay close attention to how synthetic biology applications may be governed internationally, such as through the Nagoya Protocol of the Convention on Biological Diversity, so that beneficial applications may be realized.

  15. Bottom-up synthetic biology: engineering in a tinkerer's world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwille, Petra

    2011-09-02

    How synthetic can "synthetic biology" be? A literal interpretation of the name of this new life science discipline invokes expectations of the systematic construction of biological systems with cells being built module by module--from the bottom up. But can this possibly be achieved, taking into account the enormous complexity and redundancy of living systems, which distinguish them quite remarkably from design features that characterize human inventions? There are several recent developments in biology, in tight conjunction with quantitative disciplines, that may bring this literal perspective into the realm of the possible. However, such bottom-up engineering requires tools that were originally designed by nature's greatest tinkerer: evolution.

  16. A fast autofocus algorithm for synthetic aperture radar processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dall, Jørgen

    1992-01-01

    High-resolution synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging requires the motion of the radar platform to be known very accurately. Otherwise, phase errors are induced in the processing of the raw SAR data, and bad focusing results. In particular, a constant error in the measured along-track velocity...... or the cross-track acceleration leads to a phase error that varies quadratically over the synthetic aperture. The process of estimating this quadratic phase error directly from the radar data is termed autofocus. A novel autofocus algorithm with a computational complexity which is at least an order...

  17. Uncovering cis regulatory codes using synthetic promoter shuffling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Kinkhabwala

    Full Text Available Revealing the spectrum of combinatorial regulation of transcription at individual promoters is essential for understanding the complex structure of biological networks. However, the computations represented by the integration of various molecular signals at complex promoters are difficult to decipher in the absence of simple cis regulatory codes. Here we synthetically shuffle the regulatory architecture--operator sequences binding activators and repressors--of a canonical bacterial promoter. The resulting library of complex promoters allows for rapid exploration of promoter encoded logic regulation. Among all possible logic functions, NOR and ANDN promoter encoded logics predominate. A simple transcriptional cis regulatory code determines both logics, establishing a straightforward map between promoter structure and logic phenotype. The regulatory code is determined solely by the type of transcriptional regulation combinations: two repressors generate a NOR: NOT (a OR b whereas a repressor and an activator generate an ANDN: a AND NOT b. Three-input versions of both logics, having an additional repressor as an input, are also present in the library. The resulting complex promoters cover a wide dynamic range of transcriptional strengths. Synthetic promoter shuffling represents a fast and efficient method for exploring the spectrum of complex regulatory functions that can be encoded by complex promoters. From an engineering point of view, synthetic promoter shuffling enables the experimental testing of the functional properties of complex promoters that cannot necessarily be inferred ab initio from the known properties of the individual genetic components. Synthetic promoter shuffling may provide a useful experimental tool for studying naturally occurring promoter shuffling.

  18. Plant cell wall extensibility: connecting plant cell growth with cell wall structure, mechanics, and the action of wall-modifying enzymes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cosgrove, Daniel J.

    2015-11-25

    The advent of user-friendly instruments for measuring force/deflection curves of plant surfaces at high spatial resolution has resulted in a recent outpouring of reports of the ‘Young's modulus’ of plant cell walls. The stimulus for these mechanical measurements comes from biomechanical models of morphogenesis of meristems and other tissues, as well as single cells, in which cell wall stress feeds back to regulate microtubule organization, auxin transport, cellulose deposition, and future growth directionality. In this article I review the differences between elastic modulus and wall extensibility in the context of cell growth. Some of the inherent complexities, assumptions, and potential pitfalls in the interpretation of indentation force/deflection curves are discussed. Reported values of elastic moduli from surface indentation measurements appear to be 10- to >1000-fold smaller than realistic tensile elastic moduli in the plane of plant cell walls. Potential reasons for this disparity are discussed, but further work is needed to make sense of the huge range in reported values. The significance of wall stress relaxation for growth is reviewed and connected to recent advances and remaining enigmas in our concepts of how cellulose, hemicellulose, and pectins are assembled to make an extensible cell wall. A comparison of the loosening action of α-expansin and Cel12A endoglucanase is used to illustrate two different ways in which cell walls may be made more extensible and the divergent effects on wall mechanics.

  19. Domain walls on the brane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergshoeff, E; van der Schaar, JP; Papadopoulos, G

    1998-01-01

    We show that all branes admit worldvolume domain wall solutions. We find one class of solutions for which the tension of the brane changes discontinuously along the domain wall. These solutions are not supersymmetric. We argue that there is another class of domain wall solutions which is

  20. Build an Interactive Word Wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Julie

    2018-01-01

    Word walls visually display important vocabulary covered during class. Although teachers have often been encouraged to post word walls in their classrooms, little information is available to guide them. This article describes steps science teachers can follow to transform traditional word walls into interactive teaching tools. It also describes a…

  1. Molded Concrete Center Mine Wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, E. V.

    1987-01-01

    Proposed semiautomatic system forms concrete-foam wall along middle of coal-mine passage. Wall helps support roof and divides passage into two conduits needed for ventilation of coal face. Mobile mold and concrete-foam generator form sections of wall in place.

  2. Indoor climbing walls in Prague

    OpenAIRE

    Schwarzová, Veronika

    2012-01-01

    This work presents the indoor climbing walls in climbing centers for the public in Prague. It creates an overview of qualitative and quantitative characteristics of indoor climbing walls in Prague. Thesis allowing ordinary users and the general public interested in climbing easier selection of the appropriate climbing wall according on their level, the safety requirements, background, but also the place of residence.

  3. Screening and characterization of plant cell walls using carbohydrate microarrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sørensen, Iben; Willats, William G T

    2011-01-01

    Plant cells are surrounded by cell walls built largely from complex carbohydrates. The primary walls of growing plant cells consist of interdependent networks of three polysaccharide classes: cellulose, cross-linking glycans (also known as hemicelluloses), and pectins. Cellulose microfibrils are tethered together by cross-linking glycans, and this assembly forms the major load-bearing component of primary walls, which is infiltrated with pectic polymers. In the secondary walls of woody tissues, pectins are much reduced and walls are reinforced with the phenolic polymer lignin. Plant cell walls are essential for plant life and also have numerous industrial applications, ranging from wood to nutraceuticals. Enhancing our knowledge of cell wall biology and the effective use of cell wall materials is dependent to a large extent on being able to analyse their fine structures. We have developed a suite of techniques based on microarrays probed with monoclonal antibodies with specificity for cell wall components, and here we present practical protocols for this type of analysis.

  4. [Urethral substitution with synthetic material].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Silva, E A; Zungri Telo, E

    2000-03-01

    In spite of the numerous surgical techniques described, management of urethral stenosis continues to be an unresolved problem. Free graft urethroplasty is indicated in selected cases and several organic and synthetic materials have been described for this use. Our group reviews the synthetic alloplasts used for partial or total replacement of the male urethra. The search for an appropriate alloplast for urethral replacement has been rather frustrating. Complication rates are still too high to allow routine usage. The most encouraging results are those with new absorbable materials which cause minimal inflammatory reactions of a foreign body type. These are readily available and allow urethral replacement using tissues regenerated from removed ends.

  5. Synthetic biology: integrated gene circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandagopal, Nagarajan; Elowitz, Michael B

    2011-09-02

    A major goal of synthetic biology is to develop a deeper understanding of biological design principles from the bottom up, by building circuits and studying their behavior in cells. Investigators initially sought to design circuits "from scratch" that functioned as independently as possible from the underlying cellular system. More recently, researchers have begun to develop a new generation of synthetic circuits that integrate more closely with endogenous cellular processes. These approaches are providing fundamental insights into the regulatory architecture, dynamics, and evolution of genetic circuits and enabling new levels of control across diverse biological systems.

  6. Synthetic Phage for Tissue Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    So Young Yoo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Controlling structural organization and signaling motif display is of great importance to design the functional tissue regenerating materials. Synthetic phage, genetically engineered M13 bacteriophage has been recently introduced as novel tissue regeneration materials to display a high density of cell-signaling peptides on their major coat proteins for tissue regeneration purposes. Structural advantages of their long-rod shape and monodispersity can be taken together to construct nanofibrous scaffolds which support cell proliferation and differentiation as well as direct orientation of their growth in two or three dimensions. This review demonstrated how functional synthetic phage is designed and subsequently utilized for tissue regeneration that offers potential cell therapy.

  7. A research on Exterior Wall Coating Based on Environmental Protection and Automatic Spraying Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Hou Yixuan; Wu Jingrong

    2016-01-01

    As the main material for building facing decoration, building exterior wall coating can protect and decorate the building in the process of construction[1]. Exterior wall coating is characterized by low cost, convenient installation, rich colors and so on, so it has a wide application in building exterior walls. At present, due to the requirements for energy saving and environmental protection as well as the complexity of installation, application of exterior wall tiles is in decline[2]. Besi...

  8. Using synthetic biology to make cells tomorrow's test tubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Hernan G; Brewster, Robert C; Phillips, Rob

    2016-04-18

    The main tenet of physical biology is that biological phenomena can be subject to the same quantitative and predictive understanding that physics has afforded in the context of inanimate matter. However, the inherent complexity of many of these biological processes often leads to the derivation of complex theoretical descriptions containing a plethora of unknown parameters. Such complex descriptions pose a conceptual challenge to the establishment of a solid basis for predictive biology. In this article, we present various exciting examples of how synthetic biology can be used to simplify biological systems and distill these phenomena down to their essential features as a means to enable their theoretical description. Here, synthetic biology goes beyond previous efforts to engineer nature and becomes a tool to bend nature to understand it. We discuss various recent and classic experiments featuring applications of this synthetic approach to the elucidation of problems ranging from bacteriophage infection, to transcriptional regulation in bacteria and in developing embryos, to evolution. In all of these examples, synthetic biology provides the opportunity to turn cells into the equivalent of a test tube, where biological phenomena can be reconstituted and our theoretical understanding put to test with the same ease that these same phenomena can be studied in the in vitro setting.

  9. Design Constraints on a Synthetic Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgin, Tugce; Wagner, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    A metabolism is a complex network of chemical reactions that converts sources of energy and chemical elements into biomass and other molecules. To design a metabolism from scratch and to implement it in a synthetic genome is almost within technological reach. Ideally, a synthetic metabolism should be able to synthesize a desired spectrum of molecules at a high rate, from multiple different nutrients, while using few chemical reactions, and producing little or no waste. Not all of these properties are achievable simultaneously. We here use a recently developed technique to create random metabolic networks with pre-specified properties to quantify trade-offs between these and other properties. We find that for every additional molecule to be synthesized a network needs on average three additional reactions. For every additional carbon source to be utilized, it needs on average two additional reactions. Networks able to synthesize 20 biomass molecules from each of 20 alternative sole carbon sources need to have at least 260 reactions. This number increases to 518 reactions for networks that can synthesize more than 60 molecules from each of 80 carbon sources. The maximally achievable rate of biosynthesis decreases by approximately 5 percent for every additional molecule to be synthesized. Biochemically related molecules can be synthesized at higher rates, because their synthesis produces less waste. Overall, the variables we study can explain 87 percent of variation in network size and 84 percent of the variation in synthesis rate. The constraints we identify prescribe broad boundary conditions that can help to guide synthetic metabolism design. PMID:22768162

  10. Fast parametric beamformer for synthetic aperture imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolov, Svetoslav Ivanov; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Tomov, Borislav Gueorguiev

    2008-08-01

    This paper describes the design and implementation of a real-time delay-and-sum synthetic aperture beamformer. The beamforming delays and apodization coefficients are described parametrically. The image is viewed as a set of independent lines that are defined in 3D by their origin, direction, and inter-sample distance. The delay calculation is recursive and inspired by the coordinate rotation digital computer (CORDIC) algorithm. Only 3 parameters per channel and line are needed for their generation. The calculation of apodization coefficients is based on a piece- wise linear approximation. The implementation of the beamformer is optimized with respect to the architecture of a novel synthetic aperture real-time ultrasound scanner (SARUS), in which 4 channels are processed by the same set of field-programmable gate arrays (FPGA). In synthetic transmit aperture imaging, low-resolution images are formed after every emission. Summing all low-resolution images produces a perfectly focused high-resolution image. The design of the beamformer is modular, and a single beamformation unit can produce 4600 low-resolution images per second, each consisting of 32 lines and 1024 complex samples per line. In its present incarnation, 3 such modules fit in a single device. The summation of low-resolution images is performed internally in the FPGA to reduce the required bandwidth. The delays are calculated with a precision of 1/16th of a sample, and the apodization coefficients with 7-bit precision. The accumulation of low-resolution images is performed with 24-bit precision. The level of the side- and grating lobes, introduced by the use of integer numbers in the calculations and truncation of intermediate results, is below -86 dB from the peak.

  11. Left ventricular wall stress compendium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, L; Ghista, D N; Tan, R S

    2012-01-01

    Left ventricular (LV) wall stress has intrigued scientists and cardiologists since the time of Lame and Laplace in 1800s. The left ventricle is an intriguing organ structure, whose intrinsic design enables it to fill and contract. The development of wall stress is intriguing to cardiologists and biomedical engineers. The role of left ventricle wall stress in cardiac perfusion and pumping as well as in cardiac pathophysiology is a relatively unexplored phenomenon. But even for us to assess this role, we first need accurate determination of in vivo wall stress. However, at this point, 150 years after Lame estimated left ventricle wall stress using the elasticity theory, we are still in the exploratory stage of (i) developing left ventricle models that properly represent left ventricle anatomy and physiology and (ii) obtaining data on left ventricle dynamics. In this paper, we are responding to the need for a comprehensive survey of left ventricle wall stress models, their mechanics, stress computation and results. We have provided herein a compendium of major type of wall stress models: thin-wall models based on the Laplace law, thick-wall shell models, elasticity theory model, thick-wall large deformation models and finite element models. We have compared the mean stress values of these models as well as the variation of stress across the wall. All of the thin-wall and thick-wall shell models are based on idealised ellipsoidal and spherical geometries. However, the elasticity model's shape can vary through the cycle, to simulate the more ellipsoidal shape of the left ventricle in the systolic phase. The finite element models have more representative geometries, but are generally based on animal data, which limits their medical relevance. This paper can enable readers to obtain a comprehensive perspective of left ventricle wall stress models, of how to employ them to determine wall stresses, and be cognizant of the assumptions involved in the use of specific models.

  12. Synthetic mixed-signal computation in living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubens, Jacob R.; Selvaggio, Gianluca; Lu, Timothy K.

    2016-01-01

    Living cells implement complex computations on the continuous environmental signals that they encounter. These computations involve both analogue- and digital-like processing of signals to give rise to complex developmental programs, context-dependent behaviours and homeostatic activities. In contrast to natural biological systems, synthetic biological systems have largely focused on either digital or analogue computation separately. Here we integrate analogue and digital computation to implement complex hybrid synthetic genetic programs in living cells. We present a framework for building comparator gene circuits to digitize analogue inputs based on different thresholds. We then demonstrate that comparators can be predictably composed together to build band-pass filters, ternary logic systems and multi-level analogue-to-digital converters. In addition, we interface these analogue-to-digital circuits with other digital gene circuits to enable concentration-dependent logic. We expect that this hybrid computational paradigm will enable new industrial, diagnostic and therapeutic applications with engineered cells. PMID:27255669

  13. Nitrosyl complexes of Technetium

    OpenAIRE

    Ackermann, Janine

    2016-01-01

    The presented thesis describes syntheses and characterization of novel technetium nitrosyl compounds with various ligand systems. The main focus is the synthesis of low-valent technetium nitrosyl complexes with cyclopentadienyl ligands. In the first section, nitrosyltechnetium complexes with monodentate ligands and bidentate P,N chelators are discussed. The established synthetic route for the synthesis of [99mTc(NO)Cl4]- was adopted for the synthesis of this important precursor with the long-...

  14. Uranium hexakisamido complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, K.; Mindiola, D.J.; Baker, T.A.; Davis, W.M.; Cummins, C.C. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    2000-09-01

    Minimal structural changes accompany the oxidation of the paramagnetic uranium(V) anion [U(dbabh){sub 6}]{sup -} to the neutral, diamagnetic counterpart [U(dbabh){sub 6}] (see structure). These two T{sub h}-stmmetric complexes, which were synthetized starting from 2,3:5,6-dibenzo-7-azabicyclo[2.2.1]hepta-2,5-diene (Hdbabh), are the first isolable homoleptic hexakisamido complexes of uranium(V) and (VI). (orig.)

  15. Mammalian Synthetic Biology: Engineering Biological Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Joshua B; Perez-Pinera, Pablo; Gersbach, Charles A

    2017-06-21

    The programming of new functions into mammalian cells has tremendous application in research and medicine. Continued improvements in the capacity to sequence and synthesize DNA have rapidly increased our understanding of mechanisms of gene function and regulation on a genome-wide scale and have expanded the set of genetic components available for programming cell biology. The invention of new research tools, including targetable DNA-binding systems such as CRISPR/Cas9 and sensor-actuator devices that can recognize and respond to diverse chemical, mechanical, and optical inputs, has enabled precise control of complex cellular behaviors at unprecedented spatial and temporal resolution. These tools have been critical for the expansion of synthetic biology techniques from prokaryotic and lower eukaryotic hosts to mammalian systems. Recent progress in the development of genome and epigenome editing tools and in the engineering of designer cells with programmable genetic circuits is expanding approaches to prevent, diagnose, and treat disease and to establish personalized theranostic strategies for next-generation medicines. This review summarizes the development of these enabling technologies and their application to transforming mammalian synthetic biology into a distinct field in research and medicine.

  16. Spatial Cognition in Synthetic Environments.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, F.

    2011-01-01

    The current dissertation discussed the use of Virtual Reality in product design, referred to as the use of Synthetic Environments (SEs). The research of two basic and two case studies focused on investigating the effectiveness of SEs for the users. We expected that the users’ insight in the

  17. Synthetic Aperture Radar - Hardware Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Rosner

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Experimental real and synthetic aperture radar are developed from the base-band digital unit to the analogue RF parts, based on solid state units, using pulse compression for radar imaging. Proper QPSK code is found for matched filter.

  18. Broadband Synthetic Ground Motion Records

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The dataset contains broadband synthetic ground motion records for three events: 1) 1994 M6.7 Northridge, CA, 2) 1989 M7.0 Loma Prieta, CA, and 3) 1999 M7.5 Izmit,...

  19. Synthetic Aperture Vector Flow Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villagómez Hoyos, Carlos Armando

    The main objective of this project was to continue the development of a synthetic aperture vector flow estimator. This type of estimator is capable of overcoming two of the major limitations in conventional ultrasound systems: 1) the inability to scan large region of interest with high temporal r...

  20. Where Synthetic Biology Meets ET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothschild, Lynn J.

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic biology - the design and construction of new biological parts and systems and the redesign of existing ones for useful purposes - has the potential to transform fields from pharmaceuticals to fuels. Our lab has focused on the potential of synthetic biology to revolutionize all three major parts of astrobiology: Where do we come from? Where are we going? and Are we alone? For the first and third, synthetic biology is allowing us to answer whether the evolutionary narrative that has played out on planet earth is likely to have been unique or universal. For example, in our lab we are re-evolving the biosynthetic pathways of amino acids in order to understand potential capabilities of an early organism with a limited repertoire of amino acids and developing techniques for the recovery of metals from spent electronics on other planetary bodies. And what about the limits for life? Can we create organisms that expand the envelope for life? In the future synthetic biology will play an increasing role in human activities both on earth, in fields as diverse as human health and the industrial production of novel bio-composites. Beyond earth, we will rely increasingly on biologically-provided life support, as we have throughout our evolutionary history. In order to do this, the field will build on two of the great contributions of astrobiology: studies of the origin of life and life in extreme environments.

  1. Stereoscopy in cinematographic synthetic imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenmann, Jonathan; Parent, Rick

    2009-02-01

    In this paper we present experiments and results pertaining to the perception of depth in stereoscopic viewing of synthetic imagery. In computer animation, typical synthetic imagery is highly textured and uses stylized illumination of abstracted material models by abstracted light source models. While there have been numerous studies concerning stereoscopic capabilities, conventions for staging and cinematography in stereoscopic movies have not yet been well-established. Our long-term goal is to measure the effectiveness of various cinematography techniques on the human visual system in a theatrical viewing environment. We would like to identify the elements of stereoscopic cinema that are important in terms of enhancing the viewer's understanding of a scene as well as providing guidelines for the cinematographer relating to storytelling. In these experiments we isolated stereoscopic effects by eliminating as many other visual cues as is reasonable. In particular, we aim to empirically determine what types of movement in synthetic imagery affect the perceptual depth sensing capabilities of our viewers. Using synthetic imagery, we created several viewing scenarios in which the viewer is asked to locate a target object's depth in a simple environment. The scenarios were specifically designed to compare the effectiveness of stereo viewing, camera movement, and object motion in aiding depth perception. Data were collected showing the error between the choice of the user and the actual depth value, and patterns were identified that relate the test variables to the viewer's perceptual depth accuracy in our theatrical viewing environment.

  2. A SPICE synthetic dataset to benchmark global tomographic methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Y.; Capdeville, Y.; Maupin, V.; Montagner, J.

    2005-12-01

    The different existing global tomographic methods result in different models of the Earth. Within SPICE (Seismic wave Propagation and Imaging in Complex media: a European network), we have decided to perform a benchmark experiment of global tomographic techniques. A global model has been constructed. It includes 3D heterogeneities in velocity, anisotropy and attenuation, as well as topography of discontinuities. Simplified versions of the model will also be used. Synthetic seismograms will be generated at low frequency by the Spectral Element Method, for a realistic distribution of sources and stations. The synthetic seismograms will be made available to the scientific community at the SPICE website www.spice-rtn.org. Any group wishing to test his tomographic algorithm is encouraged to download the synthetic data.

  3. Cell-free synthetic biology for environmental sensing and remediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karig, David K

    2017-06-01

    The fields of biosensing and bioremediation leverage the phenomenal array of sensing and metabolic capabilities offered by natural microbes. Synthetic biology provides tools for transforming these fields through complex integration of natural and novel biological components to achieve sophisticated sensing, regulation, and metabolic function. However, the majority of synthetic biology efforts are conducted in living cells, and concerns over releasing genetically modified organisms constitute a key barrier to environmental applications. Cell-free protein expression systems offer a path towards leveraging synthetic biology, while preventing the spread of engineered organisms in nature. Recent efforts in the areas of cell-free approaches for sensing, regulation, and metabolic pathway implementation, as well as for preserving and deploying cell-free expression components, embody key steps towards realizing the potential of cell-free systems for environmental sensing and remediation. Copyright © 2017 The Author. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  4. Industrial systems biology and its impact on synthetic biology of yeast cell factories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Eugene; Krivoruchko, Anastasia; Nielsen, Jens

    2016-06-01

    Engineering industrial cell factories to effectively yield a desired product while dealing with industrially relevant stresses is usually the most challenging step in the development of industrial production of chemicals using microbial fermentation processes. Using synthetic biology tools, microbial cell factories such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae can be engineered to express synthetic pathways for the production of fuels, biopharmaceuticals, fragrances, and food flavors. However, directing fluxes through these synthetic pathways towards the desired product can be demanding due to complex regulation or poor gene expression. Systems biology, which applies computational tools and mathematical modeling to understand complex biological networks, can be used to guide synthetic biology design. Here, we present our perspective on how systems biology can impact synthetic biology towards the goal of developing improved yeast cell factories. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 1164-1170. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Industrial systems biology and its impact on synthetic biology of yeast cell factories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fletcher, Eugene; Krivoruchko, Anastasia; Nielsen, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Engineering industrial cell factories to effectively yield a desired product while dealing with industrially relevant stresses is usually the most challenging step in the development of industrial production of chemicals using microbial fermentation processes. Using synthetic biology tools......, microbial cell factories such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae can be engineered to express synthetic pathways for the production of fuels, biopharmaceuticals, fragrances, and food flavors. However, directing fluxes through these synthetic pathways towards the desired product can be demanding due to complex...... regulation or poor gene expression. Systems biology, which applies computational tools and mathematical modeling to understand complex biological networks, can be used to guide synthetic biology design. Here, we present our perspective on how systems biology can impact synthetic biology towards the goal...

  6. Mechanochemical Polarization of Contiguous Cell Walls Shapes Plant Pavement Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majda, Mateusz; Grones, Peter; Sintorn, Ida-Maria; Vain, Thomas; Milani, Pascale; Krupinski, Pawel; Zagórska-Marek, Beata; Viotti, Corrado; Jönsson, Henrik; Mellerowicz, Ewa J; Hamant, Olivier; Robert, Stéphanie

    2017-11-06

    The epidermis of aerial plant organs is thought to be limiting for growth, because it acts as a continuous load-bearing layer, resisting tension. Leaf epidermis contains jigsaw puzzle piece-shaped pavement cells whose shape has been proposed to be a result of subcellular variations in expansion rate that induce local buckling events. Paradoxically, such local compressive buckling should not occur given the tensile stresses across the epidermis. Using computational modeling, we show that the simplest scenario to explain pavement cell shapes within an epidermis under tension must involve mechanical wall heterogeneities across and along the anticlinal pavement cell walls between adjacent cells. Combining genetics, atomic force microscopy, and immunolabeling, we demonstrate that contiguous cell walls indeed exhibit hybrid mechanochemical properties. Such biochemical wall heterogeneities precede wall bending. Altogether, this provides a possible mechanism for the generation of complex plant cell shapes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Protease-sensitive synthetic prions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David W Colby

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Prions arise when the cellular prion protein (PrP(C undergoes a self-propagating conformational change; the resulting infectious conformer is designated PrP(Sc. Frequently, PrP(Sc is protease-resistant but protease-sensitive (s prions have been isolated in humans and other animals. We report here that protease-sensitive, synthetic prions were generated in vitro during polymerization of recombinant (rec PrP into amyloid fibers. In 22 independent experiments, recPrP amyloid preparations, but not recPrP monomers or oligomers, transmitted disease to transgenic mice (n = 164, denoted Tg9949 mice, that overexpress N-terminally truncated PrP. Tg9949 control mice (n = 174 did not spontaneously generate prions although they were prone to late-onset spontaneous neurological dysfunction. When synthetic prion isolates from infected Tg9949 mice were serially transmitted in the same line of mice, they exhibited sPrP(Sc and caused neurodegeneration. Interestingly, these protease-sensitive prions did not shorten the life span of Tg9949 mice despite causing extensive neurodegeneration. We inoculated three synthetic prion isolates into Tg4053 mice that overexpress full-length PrP; Tg4053 mice are not prone to developing spontaneous neurological dysfunction. The synthetic prion isolates caused disease in 600-750 days in Tg4053 mice, which exhibited sPrP(Sc. These novel synthetic prions demonstrate that conformational changes in wild-type PrP can produce mouse prions composed exclusively of sPrP(Sc.

  8. An Arabidopsis gene regulatory network for secondary cell wall synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor-Teeples, M; Lin, L; de Lucas, M; Turco, G; Toal, T W; Gaudinier, A; Young, N F; Trabucco, G M; Veling, M T; Lamothe, R; Handakumbura, P P; Xiong, G; Wang, C; Corwin, J; Tsoukalas, A; Zhang, L; Ware, D; Pauly, M; Kliebenstein, D J; Dehesh, K; Tagkopoulos, I; Breton, G; Pruneda-Paz, J L; Ahnert, S E; Kay, S A; Hazen, S P; Brady, S M

    2015-01-29

    The plant cell wall is an important factor for determining cell shape, function and response to the environment. Secondary cell walls, such as those found in xylem, are composed of cellulose, hemicelluloses and lignin and account for the bulk of plant biomass. The coordination between transcriptional regulation of synthesis for each polymer is complex and vital to cell function. A regulatory hierarchy of developmental switches has been proposed, although the full complement of regulators remains unknown. Here we present a protein-DNA network between Arabidopsis thaliana transcription factors and secondary cell wall metabolic genes with gene expression regulated by a series of feed-forward loops. This model allowed us to develop and validate new hypotheses about secondary wall gene regulation under abiotic stress. Distinct stresses are able to perturb targeted genes to potentially promote functional adaptation. These interactions will serve as a foundation for understanding the regulation of a complex, integral plant component.

  9. Association Mapping of Cell Wall Synthesis Regulatory Genes and Cell Wall Quality in Switchgrass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartley, Laura [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States). Dept. of Microbiology and Plant Biology; Wu, Y. [Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater, OK (United States); Zhu, L. [Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater, OK (United States); Brummer, E. C. [Noble Foundation, Ardmore, OK (United States); Saha, M. [Noble Foundation, Ardmore, OK (United States)

    2016-05-31

    transcription factors from the rice gene network. Eight of fifteen (53%) of these have not previously been examined for this function. Some of these may represent novel grass-diverged cell wall regulators, while others are likely to have this function across angiosperms. A parallel effort of this project to expand knowledge of enzymes that have evolved to function in grass cell wall synthesis, revealed that a grass-diverged enzyme in rice, OsAT5, ferulates monolignols that are naturally incorporated into grass cell walls. This finding opens potential natural selection avenues for improving biomass composition for downstream processing by weak base pretreatment. Thus, this project has significantly expanded knowledge of cell wall synthesis and regulation in rice, information that can be used in reverse genetics and synthetic biology approaches to re-engineer cell walls for improved production of biofuel and high-value products. To lay the foundation for translating these results directly for switchgrass improvement, the project employed a comparative phylogenetic analysis of the major group of cell wall transcription factors that have been found to function in cell wall regulation, the R2R3 MYBs. This analysis concluded that known cell wall regulators are largely conserved across switchgrass, rice, maize, poplar, and Arabidopsis. This interpretation is also largely consistent with the gene network analysis described above, though both approaches provide evidence that some co-orthologs of Arabidopsis regulators have diminished or increased in importance based on gene expression patterns. Also, several clades containing dicot cell wall regulators have expanded, consistent with the evolution of new cell wall regulators. This latter result is supported by functional analysis of the R2R3 MYB protein SWAM1 in a collaboration between this project and the DOE-funded group of Dr. S. Hazen at the University of

  10. Varieties of noise: analogical reasoning in synthetic biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knuuttila, Tarja; Loettgers, Andrea

    2014-12-01

    The picture of synthetic biology as a kind of engineering science has largely created the public understanding of this novel field, covering both its promises and risks. In this paper, we will argue that the actual situation is more nuanced and complex. Synthetic biology is a highly interdisciplinary field of research located at the interface of physics, chemistry, biology, and computational science. All of these fields provide concepts, metaphors, mathematical tools, and models, which are typically utilized by synthetic biologists by drawing analogies between the different fields of inquiry. We will study analogical reasoning in synthetic biology through the emergence of the functional meaning of noise, which marks an important shift in how engineering concepts are employed in this field. The notion of noise serves also to highlight the differences between the two branches of synthetic biology: the basic science-oriented branch and the engineering-oriented branch, which differ from each other in the way they draw analogies to various other fields of study. Moreover, we show that fixing the mapping between a source domain and the target domain seems not to be the goal of analogical reasoning in actual scientific practice.

  11. Compound imaging using Synthetic Aperture Sequential Beamformation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Casper Bo; Jensen, Jonas; Hemmsen, Martin Christian

    2011-01-01

    Synthetic Aperture Sequential Beamforming (SASB) is a technique with low complexity and the ability to yield a more uniform lateral resolution with range. However, the presence of speckle artifacts in ultrasound images degrades the contrast. In conventional imaging speckle is reduced by using...... spatial compounding at the cost of a reduced frame rate. The objective is to apply spatial compounding to SASB and evaluate if the images have a reduced speckle appearance and thereby an improved image quality in terms of contrast compared to ordinary SASB. Using the simulation software Field II, RF data...... detection the five second stage images are added to form the compounded image. Using a ProFocus scanner and the 8804 linear array transducer (BK Medical, Herlev, Denmark) measurements of a phantom containing water filled cysts are obtained to validate the simulation results. The setup is the same...

  12. Sonic Landau Levels and Synthetic Gauge Fields in Mechanical Metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbaszadeh, Hamed; Souslov, Anton; Paulose, Jayson; Schomerus, Henning; Vitelli, Vincenzo

    2017-11-01

    Mechanical strain can lead to a synthetic gauge field that controls the dynamics of electrons in graphene sheets as well as light in photonic crystals. Here, we show how to engineer an analogous synthetic gauge field for lattice vibrations. Our approach relies on one of two strategies: shearing a honeycomb lattice of masses and springs or patterning its local material stiffness. As a result, vibrational spectra with discrete Landau levels are generated. Upon tuning the strength of the gauge field, we can control the density of states and transverse spatial confinement of sound in the metamaterial. We also show how this gauge field can be used to design waveguides in which sound propagates with robustness against disorder as a consequence of the change in topological polarization that occurs along a domain wall. By introducing dissipation, we can selectively enhance the domain-wall-bound topological sound mode, a feature that may potentially be exploited for the design of sound amplification by stimulated emission of radiation (SASER, the mechanical analogs of lasers).

  13. Rectus Abdominis Muscle Malignant Fibrous Histiocytoma Causing a Large Abdominal Wall Defect: Reconstruction with Biological Mesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evangelos Falidas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Malignant fibrous histiocytoma (MFH is a common soft tissue sarcoma usually involving limbs and retroperitoneum. MFH of the rectus abdominis muscle is extremely rare. Surgery in similar cases leads to large abdominal wall defects needing reconstruction. Biological and synthetic laminar absorbable prostheses are available for the repair of hernia defects in the abdominal wall. They share the important feature of being gradually degraded in the host, resulting the formation of a neotissue. We herein report the case of an 84-year-old man with MFH of the rectus abdominis muscle which was resected and the large abdominal wall defect was successfully repaired with a biological mesh.

  14. Understanding Complex Construction Systems Through Modularity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Tor Clarke; Bekdik, Baris; Thuesen, Christian

    2014-01-01

    This paper develops a framework for understanding complexity in construction projects by combining theories of complexity management and modularization. The framework incorporates three dimensions of product, process, and organizational modularity with the case of gypsum wall elements. The analysis...

  15. Novel Enzymes for Targeted Hydrolysis of Algal Cell Walls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schultz-Johansen, Mikkel

    urchins are known algae-eaters and may therefore be inhabited by endosymbiotic bacteria that help in degradation of algal cell wall constituents. This thesis work investigated bacteria associated with seaweed, seagrass and sea urchins for their enzymatic activities against algal cell wall polysaccharides...... are incapable of breaking the complex polysaccharides found in seaweed cell walls. Therefore, new enzymes are needed for degradation of seaweed biomass. Bacteria that colonize the surfaces of seaweed secrete enzymes that allow them to degrade and utilize seaweed polysaccharides as energy. In addition, sea...

  16. Conceptual design of the INTOR first-wall system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, D.L.; Majumdar, S.; Mattas, R.F.; Turner, L.; Jung, J.; Abdou, M.A.; Bowers, D.; Trachsel, C.; Merrill, B.

    1981-10-01

    The design concept and performance characteristics of the first-wall design for the phase-1 INTOR (International Tokamak Reactor) study is described. The reference design consists of a water-cooled stainless steel panel. The major uncertainty regarding the performance of the bare stainless steel wall relates to the response of a thin-melt layer predicted to form on limited regions during a plasma disruption. A more-complex backup design, which incorporates radiatively cooled graphite tiles on the inboard wall, is briefly described.

  17. Architecture and Biosynthesis of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Cell Wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlean, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The wall gives a Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell its osmotic integrity; defines cell shape during budding growth, mating, sporulation, and pseudohypha formation; and presents adhesive glycoproteins to other yeast cells. The wall consists of β1,3- and β1,6-glucans, a small amount of chitin, and many different proteins that may bear N- and O-linked glycans and a glycolipid anchor. These components become cross-linked in various ways to form higher-order complexes. Wall composition and degree of cross-linking vary during growth and development and change in response to cell wall stress. This article reviews wall biogenesis in vegetative cells, covering the structure of wall components and how they are cross-linked; the biosynthesis of N- and O-linked glycans, glycosylphosphatidylinositol membrane anchors, β1,3- and β1,6-linked glucans, and chitin; the reactions that cross-link wall components; and the possible functions of enzymatic and nonenzymatic cell wall proteins. PMID:23135325

  18. Conspicuity and identifiability: efficient calibration tools for synthetic imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toet, Alexander; Hogervorst, Maarten A.; Bijl, Piet

    2004-08-01

    We argue that visual conspicuity and identifiability are two efficient task-related measures that can be deployed to calibrate synthetic imagery that is intended to be used for human visual search and detection tasks. The conspicuity of a target is operationally defined as the region around the center of the visual field where the target is capable to attract visual attention. Visual conspicuity predicts human visual search performance in realistic and military relevant complex scenario's. Conspicuity can easily and quickly be measured either in the field (in complex environments) or in the lab. This eliminates the need for costly and time consuming visual search experiments. The agreement between field and lab measurements implies that conspicuity can be used to validate synthetic imagery. Target identifiability is operationally defined as the amount of Gaussian blur that is required to reduce the target signature to its identification threshold. It is an efficient metric that can be used to gain insight into human identification performance without having to resort to elaborate and costly experiments. Identifiability is directly related to PID-performance, and is therefore well suited for comparing synthetic and realistic imagery. We conclude that synthetic imagery can be calibrated for human visual search and detection tasks by setting the conspicuity and identifiability of targets equal to those of their real world counterparts.

  19. Strategy revealing phenotypic differences among synthetic oscillator designs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomnitz, Jason G; Savageau, Michael A

    2014-09-19

    Considerable progress has been made in identifying and characterizing the component parts of genetic oscillators, which play central roles in all organisms. Nonlinear interaction among components is sufficiently complex that mathematical models are required to elucidate their elusive integrated behavior. Although natural and synthetic oscillators exhibit common architectures, there are numerous differences that are poorly understood. Utilizing synthetic biology to uncover basic principles of simpler circuits is a way to advance understanding of natural circadian clocks and rhythms. Following this strategy, we address the following questions: What are the implications of different architectures and molecular modes of transcriptional control for the phenotypic repertoire of genetic oscillators? Are there designs that are more realizable or robust? We compare synthetic oscillators involving one of three architectures and various combinations of the two modes of transcriptional control using a methodology that provides three innovations: a rigorous definition of phenotype, a procedure for deconstructing complex systems into qualitatively distinct phenotypes, and a graphical representation for illuminating the relationship between genotype, environment, and the qualitatively distinct phenotypes of a system. These methods provide a global perspective on the behavioral repertoire, facilitate comparisons of alternatives, and assist the rational design of synthetic gene circuitry. In particular, the results of their application here reveal distinctive phenotypes for several designs that have been studied experimentally as well as a best design among the alternatives that has yet to be constructed and tested.

  20. Original Synthetic Report: The peopling of the Americas: a complex ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Genetic distances and N-J dendrogram method are applied. Results and conclusions: Results and discussion have given to the following conclusions: 1) Pacific Ocean boat trips may have contributed to the HLA genetic American profile (or vice versa); 2) North West Canadian Athabaskans have had gene flow with close ...

  1. Synthetic cation-selective nanotube: permeant cations chaperoned by anions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilder, Tamsyn A; Gordon, Dan; Chung, Shin-Ho

    2011-01-28

    The ability to design ion-selective, synthetic nanotubes which mimic biological ion channels may have significant implications for the future treatment of bacteria, diseases, and as ultrasensitive biosensors. We present the design of a synthetic nanotube made from carbon atoms that selectively allows monovalent cations to move across and rejects all anions. The cation-selective nanotube mimics some of the salient properties of biological ion channels. Before practical nanodevices are successfully fabricated it is vital that proof-of-concept computational studies are performed. With this in mind we use molecular and stochastic dynamics simulations to characterize the dynamics of ion permeation across a single-walled (10, 10), 36 Å long, carbon nanotube terminated with carboxylic acid with an effective radius of 5.08 Å. Although cations encounter a high energy barrier of 7 kT, its height is drastically reduced by a chloride ion in the nanotube. The presence of a chloride ion near the pore entrance thus enables a cation to enter the pore and, once in the pore, it is chaperoned by the resident counterion across the narrow pore. The moment the chaperoned cation transits the pore, the counterion moves back to the entrance to ferry another ion. The synthetic nanotube has a high sodium conductance of 124 pS and shows linear current-voltage and current-concentration profiles. The cation-anion selectivity ratio ranges from 8 to 25, depending on the ionic concentrations in the reservoirs.

  2. Optimizing Synthetic Aperture Compound Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jens Munk; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2012-01-01

    Spatial compound images are constructed from synthetic aperture data acquired using a linear phased-array transducer. Compound images of wires, tissue, and cysts are created using a method, which allows both transmit and receive compounding without any loss in temporal resolution. Similarly...... to conventional imaging, the speckle reduction achieved by spatial compounding comes at the cost of a reduced detail resolution and a compromise must be made. Using a performance indicator, which can be measured from an image of a phantom without cysts, it is demonstrated how a compromise can be made, which...... is optimal for lesion detection. Synthetic aperture data are acquired from unfocused emissions and 154 compound images are constructed by synthesizing different aperture configurations with more or less compounding, all maintaining a constant resolution across depth corresponding to an f-number of 2...

  3. Synthetic biology character and impact

    CERN Document Server

    Pade, Christian; Wigger, Henning; Gleich, Arnim

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic Biology is already an object of intensive debate. However, to a great extent the discussion to date has been concerned with fundamental ethical, religious and philosophical questions. By contrast, based on an investigation of the field’s scientific and technological character, this book focuses on new functionalities provided by synthetic biology and explores the associated opportunities and risks. Following an introduction to the subject and a discussion of the most central paradigms and methodologies, the book provides an overview of the structure of this field of science and technology. It informs the reader about the current stage of development, as well as topical problems and potential opportunities in important fields of application. But not only the science itself is in focus. In order to investigate its broader impact, ecological as well as ethical implications will be considered, paving the way for a discussion of responsibilities in the context of a field at a transitional crossroads be...

  4. Design Automation in Synthetic Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appleton, Evan; Madsen, Curtis; Roehner, Nicholas; Densmore, Douglas

    2017-04-03

    Design automation refers to a category of software tools for designing systems that work together in a workflow for designing, building, testing, and analyzing systems with a target behavior. In synthetic biology, these tools are called bio-design automation (BDA) tools. In this review, we discuss the BDA tools areas-specify, design, build, test, and learn-and introduce the existing software tools designed to solve problems in these areas. We then detail the functionality of some of these tools and show how they can be used together to create the desired behavior of two types of modern synthetic genetic regulatory networks. Copyright © 2017 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  5. Droplet microfluidics for synthetic biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gach, Philip C; Iwai, Kosuke; Kim, Peter W; Hillson, Nathan J; Singh, Anup K

    2017-10-11

    Synthetic biology is an interdisciplinary field that aims to engineer biological systems for useful purposes. Organism engineering often requires the optimization of individual genes and/or entire biological pathways (consisting of multiple genes). Advances in DNA sequencing and synthesis have recently begun to enable the possibility of evaluating thousands of gene variants and hundreds of thousands of gene combinations. However, such large-scale optimization experiments remain cost-prohibitive to researchers following traditional molecular biology practices, which are frequently labor-intensive and suffer from poor reproducibility. Liquid handling robotics may reduce labor and improve reproducibility, but are themselves expensive and thus inaccessible to most researchers. Microfluidic platforms offer a lower entry price point alternative to robotics, and maintain high throughput and reproducibility while further reducing operating costs through diminished reagent volume requirements. Droplet microfluidics have shown exceptional promise for synthetic biology experiments, including DNA assembly, transformation/transfection, culturing, cell sorting, phenotypic assays, artificial cells and genetic circuits.

  6. Designer Drugs: A Synthetic Catastrophe

    OpenAIRE

    James Fratantonio; Lawrence Andrade; Marcelo Febo

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic stimulants can cause hallucinations, aggressive behaviors, death and are sometimes legal. These substances are sold as plant food and bath salts that are "Not for Human Consumption", therefore skirting the 1986 Federal Analogue Act and giving a false pretense of safety. Studies have proved that these substances are toxic, have a high abuse potential, and are becoming extremely prevalent in the United States. This creates a dilemma for law enforcement agents, hospitals, and substance...

  7. Near Wall Turbulence: an experimental view

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanislas, Michel

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this presentation is to summarize the understanding of the near wall turbulence phenomena obtained at Laboratoire de Mécanique de Lille using both hot wire anemometry and PIV. A wind tunnel was built in 1993 specifically designed for these two measurement techniques and aimed at large Reynolds numbers. Several experiments were performed since then in the frame of different PhDs and European projects, all aimed at evidencing turbulence organization in this region. These have fully benefited of the extraordinary development of PIV in that time frame, which has allowed entering visually and quantitatively inside the complex spatial and temporal structure of near wall turbulence. The presentation will try to emphasize the benefit of this approach in terms of understanding and modelling, illustrated by some representative results obtained. M. Stanislas particularly acknowledges the financial support of Region Nord Pas de Calais, unmissing during 25 years.

  8. Strengthening of Shear Walls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Christian Skodborg

    The theory for concrete structures strengthened with fiber reinforced polymer materials has been developing for approximately two decades, and there are at the present time numerous guidelines covering strengthening of many commonly encountered structural building elements. Strengthening of in......-plane loaded walls and disks is however not included in any guidelines, and only a small fraction of scientists have initiated research within this topic. Furthermore, studies of the principal behavior and response of a strengthened disk has not yet been investigated satisfactorily, and this is the principal...... that describes a unit width strip of a strengthened disk. The unit width strip is named a strengthened concrete tension member and contains a single tensile crack and four debonding cracks. Analysis of the member results in closed form expressions for the load-crack opening relationship. Further analysis...

  9. Cell microencapsulation with synthetic polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olabisi, Ronke M

    2015-02-01

    The encapsulation of cells into polymeric microspheres or microcapsules has permitted the transplantation of cells into human and animal subjects without the need for immunosuppressants. Cell-based therapies use donor cells to provide sustained release of a therapeutic product, such as insulin, and have shown promise in treating a variety of diseases. Immunoisolation of these cells via microencapsulation is a hotly investigated field, and the preferred material of choice has been alginate, a natural polymer derived from seaweed due to its gelling conditions. Although many natural polymers tend to gel in conditions favorable to mammalian cell encapsulation, there remain challenges such as batch to batch variability and residual components from the original source that can lead to an immune response when implanted into a recipient. Synthetic materials have the potential to avoid these issues; however, historically they have required harsh polymerization conditions that are not favorable to mammalian cells. As research into microencapsulation grows, more investigators are exploring methods to microencapsulate cells into synthetic polymers. This review describes a variety of synthetic polymers used to microencapsulate cells. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part A Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. 21 CFR 178.3500 - Glycerin, synthetic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Glycerin, synthetic. 178.3500 Section 178.3500 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Certain Adjuvants and Production Aids § 178.3500 Glycerin, synthetic. Synthetic glycerin may be safely...

  11. 21 CFR 175.250 - Paraffin (synthetic).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Paraffin (synthetic). 175.250 Section 175.250 Food... for Use as Components of Coatings § 175.250 Paraffin (synthetic). Synthetic paraffin may be safely... process from carbon monoxide and hydrogen, which are catalytically converted to a mixture of paraffin...

  12. Great Wall of China

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    This ASTER sub-image covers a 12 x 12 km area in northern Shanxi Province, China, and was acquired January 9, 2001. The low sun angle, and light snow cover highlight a section of the Great Wall, visible as a black line running diagonally through the image from lower left to upper right. The Great Wall is over 2000 years old and was built over a period of 1000 years. Stretching 4500 miles from Korea to the Gobi Desert it was first built to protect China from marauders from the north.This image is located at 40.2 degrees north latitude and 112.8 degrees east longitude.Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of International Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., is the U.S. Science team leader; Moshe Pniel of JPL is the project manager. ASTER is the only high resolution imaging sensor on Terra. The primary goal of the ASTER mission is to obtain high-resolution image data in 14 channels over the entire land surface, as well as black and white stereo images. With revisit time of between 4 and 16 days, ASTER will provide the capability for repeat coverage of changing areas on Earth's surface.The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER will provide scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats, monitoring potentially active volcanoes, identifying crop stress, determining cloud morphology and physical properties, wetlands Evaluation, thermal pollution monitoring, coral reef degradation, surface temperature mapping of soils and geology, and measuring surface

  13. Immobilization of [Cu(bpy){sub 2}]Br{sub 2} complex onto a glassy carbon electrode modified with {alpha}-SiMo{sub 12}O{sub 40}{sup 4-} and single walled carbon nanotubes: Application to nanomolar detection of hydrogen peroxide and bromate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salimi, Abdollah [Department of Chemistry, University of Kurdistan, P.O. Box 416, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Research Center for Nanotechnology, University of Kurdistan, P.O. Box 416, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: absalimi@uok.ac.ir; Korani, Aazam; Hallaj, Rahman; Khoshnavazi, Roshan [Department of Chemistry, University of Kurdistan, P.O. Box 416, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hadadzadeh, Hasan [Department of Chemistry, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2009-03-02

    A simple procedure has been used for preparation of modified glassy carbon electrode with carbon nanotubes and copper complex. Copper complex [Cu(bpy){sub 2}]Br{sub 2} was immobilized onto glassy carbon (GC) electrode modified with silicomolybdate, {alpha}-SiMo{sub 12}O{sub 40}{sup 4-} and single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs){sub .} Copper complex and silicomolybdate irreversibly and strongly adsorbed onto GC electrode modified with CNTs. Electrostatic interactions between polyoxometalates (POMs) anions and Cu-complex, cations mentioned as an effective method for fabrication of three-dimensional structures. The modified electrode shows three reversible redox couples for polyoxometalate and one redox couple for Cu-complex at wide range of pH values. The electrochemical behavior, stability and electron transfer kinetics of the adsorbed redox couples were investigated using cyclic voltammetry. Due to electrostatic interaction, copper complex immobilized onto GC/CNTs/{alpha}-SiMo{sub 12}O{sub 40}{sup 4-} electrode shows more stable voltammetric response compared to GC/CNTs/Cu-complex modified electrode. In comparison to GC/CNTs/Cu-complex the GC/CNTs/{alpha}-SiMo{sub 12}O{sub 40}{sup 4-} modified electrodes shows excellent electrocatalytic activity toward reduction H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and BrO{sub 3}{sup -} at more reduced overpotential. The catalytic rate constants for catalytic reduction hydrogen peroxide and bromate were 4.5({+-}0.2) x 10{sup 3} M{sup -1} s{sup -1} and 3.0({+-}0.10) x 10{sup 3} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}, respectively. The hydrodynamic amperommetry technique at 0.08 V was used for detection of nanomolar concentration of hydrogen peroxide and bromate. Detection limit, sensitivity and linear concentration range proposed sensor for bromate and hydrogen peroxide detection were 1.1 nM and 6.7 nA nM{sup -1}, 10 nM-20 {mu}M, 1 nM, 5.5 nA nM{sup -1} and 10 nM-18 {mu}M, respectively.

  14. Cell wall evolution and diversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonatan Ulrik Fangel

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Plant cell walls display a considerable degree of diversity in their compositions and molecular architectures. In some cases the functional significance of a particular cell wall type appears to be easy to discern: secondary cells walls are often heavy reinforced with lignin that provides the required durability; the thin cell walls of pollen tubes have particular compositions that enable their tip growth; lupin seed cell walls are characteristically thickened with galactan used as a storage polysaccharide. However, more frequently the evolutionary mechanisms and selection pressures that underpin cell wall diversity and evolution are unclear. The rapidly increasing availability of transcriptome and genome data sets, development of high-throughput methods for cell wall analyses, and expansion of molecular probe sets, are providing new insights into the diversity and occurrence of cell wall polysaccharides and associated biosynthetic genes. Such research is important for refining our understanding of some of the fundamental processes that enabled plants to colonise land and subsequently radiate so comprehensively. The study of cell wall structural diversity is also an important aspect of the industrial utilization of global polysaccharide bio-resources.

  15. Dendronization: A Useful Synthetic Strategy to Prepare Multifunctional Materials

    OpenAIRE

    Strumia, Miriam C.; Marisa Martinelli; Verónica Brunetti; Julieta I. Paez

    2012-01-01

    Dendronization is a synthetic methodology that offers important advantages. The resulting products, which are called dendronized materials, present new and specific properties. This review shows numerous examples in which individual dendrons are used as building blocks to prepare more complex arrays via covalent or non-covalent interactions. In particular, it points out how the structural information programmed into the dendritic architecture can be used in the dendronization process to gener...

  16. Joint Synthetic Battlespace (JSB) Technology and Infrastructure Consideration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-10-04

    simulation chosen for impractical for the Joint Synthetic Battlespace (JSB) due to GSTF , and it will become one of the enabling technologies the huge scope...the existing systems toward full realization of the GSTF development, JSB supports the DoD from the detailed vision. engineering level, entity level...integrated and complex GSTF . It is commonly simulations and the newly created JSB components in known that any integration efforts are greatly hampered by

  17. Improvement of Synthetic Biology Tools for DNA Editing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cavaleiro, Mafalda

    The unpredictability and complexity of biological systems limit the development of economically efficient bio-based production processes that rely on renewable carbon sources and are essential for biosustainability and environmental protection. Synthetic biology (synbio) aims at making biology ea...... of gene circuits, synthesis of whole genomes and natural product discovery. In line with this, it is also described in this thesis how discovery of new cytochromes P450 (CYPs) from marine bacteria could benefit industrial processes....

  18. Functional analysis of molecular interactions in synthetic auxin response circuits

    OpenAIRE

    Pierre-Jerome, Edith; Moss, Britney L.; Lanctot, Amy; Hageman, Amber; Nemhauser, Jennifer L.

    2016-01-01

    Auxin-regulated transcription plays a role in almost every aspect of plant growth and development. Recent structural studies of domains from auxin-activated transcription factors and auxin-degraded repressors have raised fundamental questions about the protein complexes required for auxin response. Here, we leverage the power of a synthetic yeast system to identify and systematically characterize the simplest auxin response unit in the absence of the potentially confounding influence of other...

  19. Synthetic biology: Emerging bioengineering in Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhandono, Sony

    2017-05-01

    The development of synthetic biology will shape the new era of science and technology. It is an emerging bioengineering technique involving genetic engineering which can alter the phenotype and behavior of the cell or the new product. Synthetic biology may produce biomaterials, drugs, vaccines, biosensors, and even a recombinant secondary metabolite used in herbal and complementary medicine, such as artemisinin, a malaria drug which is usually extracted from the plant Artemisia annua. The power of synthetic biology has encouraged scientists in Indonesia, and is still in early development. This paper also covers some research from an Indonesian research institute in synthetic biology such as observing the production of bio surfactants and the enhanced production of artemisinin using a transient expression system. Synthetic biology development in Indonesia may also be related to the iGEM competition, a large synthetic biology research competition which was attended by several universities in Indonesia. The application of synthetic biology for drug discovery will be discussed.

  20. Printability of Synthetic Papers by Electrophotography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rozália Szentgyörgyvölgyi

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the printability of synthetic papers by the electrophotography technique. Prints of cmyk colour fields from 20% to 100% raster tone values were printed on three types of synthetic papers (one film synthetic paper and two fiber synthetic papers. The investigation of the appearance included densitometric measurement of the cmyk prints. The results have shown differences in the optical density and optical tone value between cmyk prints made on various synthetic papers. The highest optical density and the increase of the optical tone value were observed on the film synthetic paper, where cmyk prints were more saturated. The highest abrasion resistance of cmyk prints was obtained from the fibre synthetic paper.

  1. Occupy Wall Street

    OpenAIRE

    Benítez,Francisca

    2011-01-01

    В статье рассматривается организованная антипотребительскими сообществами и направленная против негативных форм глобализации акция «Occupy Wall Street». Движение возникло осенью 2011 г. в США и стремительно распространилось по всему миру. Акции в поддержку движения были проведены еще в 82 странах. Автор, исследуя причины возникновения движения и источники его финансирования, приходит к выводу, что проект «Occupy Wall Street» может быть очередной уловкой глобалистов, цель которой «обезвредить»...

  2. Control of Wall Mounting Robot

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sloth, Christoffer; Pedersen, Rasmus

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a method for designing controllers for trajectory tracking with actuator constraints. In particular, we consider a joystick-controlled wall mounting robot called WallMo. In contrast to previous works, a model-free approach is taken to the control problem, where the path...

  3. Moisture Research - Optimizing Wall Assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arena, L.; Mantha, P.

    2013-05-01

    The Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) evaluated several different configurations of wall assemblies to determine the accuracy of moisture modeling and make recommendations to ensure durable, efficient assemblies. WUFI and THERM were used to model the hygrothermal and heat transfer characteristics of these walls.

  4. Bacterial cell-wall recycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jarrod W.; Fisher, Jed F.; Mobashery, Shahriar

    2012-01-01

    Many Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria recycle a significant proportion of the peptidoglycan components of their cell walls during their growth and septation. In many—and quite possibly all—bacteria, the peptidoglycan fragments are recovered and recycled. While cell-wall recycling is beneficial for the recovery of resources, it also serves as a mechanism to detect cell-wall–targeting antibiotics and to regulate resistance mechanisms. In several Gram-negative pathogens, anhydro-MurNAc-peptide cell-wall fragments regulate AmpC β-lactamase induction. In some Gram-positive organisms, short peptides derived from the cell wall regulate the induction of both β-lactamase and β-lactam-resistant penicillin-binding proteins. The involvement of peptidoglycan recycling with resistance regulation suggests that inhibitors of the enzymes involved in the recycling might synergize with cell-wall-targeted antibiotics. Indeed, such inhibitors improve the potency of β-lactams in vitro against inducible AmpC β-lactamase-producing bacteria. We describe the key steps of cell-wall remodeling and recycling, the regulation of resistance mechanisms by cell-wall recycling, and recent advances toward the discovery of cell-wall recycling inhibitors. PMID:23163477

  5. Pareto Optimal Design for Synthetic Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patanè, Andrea; Santoro, Andrea; Costanza, Jole; Carapezza, Giovanni; Nicosia, Giuseppe

    2015-08-01

    Recent advances in synthetic biology call for robust, flexible and efficient in silico optimization methodologies. We present a Pareto design approach for the bi-level optimization problem associated to the overproduction of specific metabolites in Escherichia coli. Our method efficiently explores the high dimensional genetic manipulation space, finding a number of trade-offs between synthetic and biological objectives, hence furnishing a deeper biological insight to the addressed problem and important results for industrial purposes. We demonstrate the computational capabilities of our Pareto-oriented approach comparing it with state-of-the-art heuristics in the overproduction problems of i) 1,4-butanediol, ii) myristoyl-CoA, i ii) malonyl-CoA , iv) acetate and v) succinate. We show that our algorithms are able to gracefully adapt and scale to more complex models and more biologically-relevant simulations of the genetic manipulations allowed. The Results obtained for 1,4-butanediol overproduction significantly outperform results previously obtained, in terms of 1,4-butanediol to biomass formation ratio and knock-out costs. In particular overproduction percentage is of +662.7%, from 1.425 mmolh⁻¹gDW⁻¹ (wild type) to 10.869 mmolh⁻¹gDW⁻¹, with a knockout cost of 6. Whereas, Pareto-optimal designs we have found in fatty acid optimizations strictly dominate the ones obtained by the other methodologies, e.g., biomass and myristoyl-CoA exportation improvement of +21.43% (0.17 h⁻¹) and +5.19% (1.62 mmolh⁻¹gDW⁻¹), respectively. Furthermore CPU time required by our heuristic approach is more than halved. Finally we implement pathway oriented sensitivity analysis, epsilon-dominance analysis and robustness analysis to enhance our biological understanding of the problem and to improve the optimization algorithm capabilities.

  6. Ultrasonography of chest wall lesion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Cheol Min; Kim, C. H.; Cha, I. H.; Chung, K. B.; Ser, W. H.; Choi, Y. H. [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1989-12-15

    Thirty-one patients with chest wall diseases were studied with ultrasound to evaluate its role in chest wall lesions. There were eight infectious conditions, 9 benign tumors, 11 malignant lesions and 3 miscellaneous cases. Diffuse chest wall thickening with heterogeneous echogenicity and obliteration of subcutaneous fat layer are findings of acute infection. In cases of tuberculous smpyema necessitates, pleural abnormality extended to the chest wall through intercostal space. Benign tumors were well demarcated, except in 4 cases of lipoma/lipomatosis. Malignant lesions showed irregular soft tissue masses, bone destruction, pleural effusion and subcutaneous invasion. Multiple enlarged lymph nodes were also shown. Ultrasound can demonstrate te internal structure, extent, depth and associated findings such as pleural effusion, bone destruction and peripheral lung involvement. Ultrasound is not only safe, non-invasive and an effective diagnostic imaging modality for chest wall disease, but can also guide aspiration or biopsy for pathologic diagnosis

  7. eWALL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kyriazakos, Sofoklis; Mihaylov, Mihail; Anggorojati, Bayu

    2016-01-01

    in a higher risk of fall and a higher vulnerability for cardiovascular and pulmonary diseases. With respect to cognitive functions, senior citizens may suffer from a decline of memory function, less ability to orientate and a declined ability to cope with complex situations. This is by itself a big societal...

  8. Dry wall Kras 2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domen Zupančič

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the modesty of hiska, they show a simple understanding of corbelling technique. One could say they are all examples of human landscape cultivation. Although there is no evident common line when comparing all types of hiska, the cunning eye may observe one shared feature: the positioning of the entrance. More or less all the documented shelters have south or south-western facing entrances. The burja is a cold northerly wind; from the south (Adriatic Sea the winds are warmer. When resting, the setting sun is taken as a sign of the ending of the working day and a reward for the whole day’s efforts. Entrances are the only openings to these structures, and they should serve as well as possible - to watch over the crops, to wait when hunting, to enjoy the calm of evening light, to breathe the sea wind.The syntax of the architectural language of layering stone and shaping the pattern of the landscape remain an inventive realisation of spatial ideas from the past until today. Not only ideas of shaping space - these ideas are basic interventions in the natural habitat which contribute to survival. Culture and an awareness of its values are the origins of local development and reasonable heritage preservation. The next step are tutorial days with workshops on how to build dry stone structures, walls and other stone architecture, as the DSWA organisation in the UK is doing.

  9. Channel Wall Landslides

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] The multiple landslides in this VIS image occur along a steep channel wall. Note the large impact crater in the context image. The formation of the crater may have initially weakened that area of the surface prior to channel formation. Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -2.7, Longitude 324.8 East (35.2 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution. Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  10. Synthetic Fourier transform light scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyeoreh; Kim, Hyeon-Don; Kim, Kyoohyun; Kim, Youngchan; Hillman, Timothy R; Min, Bumki; Park, Yongkeun

    2013-09-23

    We present synthetic Fourier transform light scattering, a method for measuring extended angle-resolved light scattering (ARLS) from individual microscopic samples. By measuring the light fields scattered from the sample plane and numerically synthesizing them in Fourier space, the angle range of the ARLS patterns is extended up to twice the numerical aperture of the imaging system with unprecedented sensitivity and precision. Extended ARLS patterns of individual microscopic polystyrene beads, healthy human red blood cells (RBCs), and Plasmodium falciparum-parasitized RBCs are presented.

  11. Synthetic Biology Guides Biofuel Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael R. Connor

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The advancement of microbial processes for the production of renewable liquid fuels has increased with concerns about the current fuel economy. The development of advanced biofuels in particular has risen to address some of the shortcomings of ethanol. These advanced fuels have chemical properties similar to petroleum-based liquid fuels, thus removing the need for engine modification or infrastructure redesign. While the productivity and titers of each of these processes remains to be improved, progress in synthetic biology has provided tools to guide the engineering of these processes through present and future challenges.

  12. Protease-Sensitive Synthetic Prions

    OpenAIRE

    Colby, David W.; Wain, Rachel; Baskakov, Ilia V.; Legname, Giuseppe; Palmer, Christina G.; Nguyen, Hoang-Oanh B.; Lemus, Azucena; Cohen, Fred E.; DeArmond, Stephen J.; Prusiner, Stanley B.

    2010-01-01

    Prions arise when the cellular prion protein (PrPC) undergoes a self-propagating conformational change; the resulting infectious conformer is designated PrPSc. Frequently, PrPSc is protease-resistant but protease-sensitive (s) prions have been isolated in humans and other animals. We report here that protease-sensitive, synthetic prions were generated in vitro during polymerization of recombinant (rec) PrP into amyloid fibers. In 22 independent experiments, recPrP amyloid preparations, but no...

  13. Synthetic carbonaceous fuels and feedstocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Meyer

    1980-01-01

    This invention relates to the use of a three compartment electrolytic cell in the production of synthetic carbonaceous fuels and chemical feedstocks such as gasoline, methane and methanol by electrolyzing an aqueous sodium carbonate/bicarbonate solution, obtained from scrubbing atmospheric carbon dioxide with an aqueous sodium hydroxide solution, whereby the hydrogen generated at the cathode and the carbon dioxide liberated in the center compartment are combined thermocatalytically into methanol and gasoline blends. The oxygen generated at the anode is preferably vented into the atmosphere, and the regenerated sodium hydroxide produced at the cathode is reused for scrubbing the CO.sub.2 from the atmosphere.

  14. Synthetic Biology Guides Biofuel Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connor, Michael R.; Atsumi, Shota

    2010-01-01

    The advancement of microbial processes for the production of renewable liquid fuels has increased with concerns about the current fuel economy. The development of advanced biofuels in particular has risen to address some of the shortcomings of ethanol. These advanced fuels have chemical properties similar to petroleum-based liquid fuels, thus removing the need for engine modification or infrastructure redesign. While the productivity and titers of each of these processes remains to be improved, progress in synthetic biology has provided tools to guide the engineering of these processes through present and future challenges. PMID:20827393

  15. Electrocoagulation of synthetic dairy wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smoczynski, Lech; Munska, Kamilla; Pierozynski, Boguslaw

    2013-01-01

    This study compares the effectiveness of pollutant removal from synthetic dairy wastewater electrocoagulated by means of aluminum and iron anodic dissolution. A method based on the cubic function (third degree polynomial) was proposed for electrocoagulant dosing. Mathematical methods for calculating the optimal electrocoagulant doses proved to be quite precise and useful for practical applications. The results of gravimetric measurements of electrocoagulant (electrode) consumption demonstrated that theoretical doses of Al determined based on Faraday's law were substantially lower than those produced by electrode weighing. The above phenomenon was also discussed in the light of the results of polarization resistance measurements for Al and Fe electrodes used in the study.

  16. PREFACE: Domain wall dynamics in nanostructures Domain wall dynamics in nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrows, C. H.; Meier, G.

    2012-01-01

    Domain structures in magnetic materials are ubiquitous and have been studied for decades. The walls that separate them are topological defects in the magnetic order parameter and have a wide variety of complex forms. In general, their investigation is difficult in bulk materials since only the domain structure on the surface of a specimen is visible. Cutting the sample to reveal the interior causes a rearrangement of the domains into a new form. As with many other areas of magnetism, the study of domain wall physics has been revitalised by the advent of nanotechnology. The ability to fabricate nanoscale structures has permitted the formation of simplified and controlled domain patterns; the development of advanced microscopy methods has permitted them to be imaged and then modelled; subjecting them to ultrashort field and current pulses has permitted their dynamics to be explored. The latest results from all of these advances are described in this special issue. Not only has this led to results of great scientific beauty, but also to concepts of great applicability to future information technologies. In this issue the reader will find the latest results for these domain wall dynamics and the high-speed processes of topological structures such as domain walls and magnetic vortices. These dynamics can be driven by the application of magnetic fields, or by flowing currents through spintronic devices using the novel physics of spin-transfer torque. This complexity has been studied using a wide variety of experimental techniques at the edge of the spatial and temporal resolution currently available, and can be described using sophisticated analytical theory and computational modelling. As a result, the dynamics can be engineered to give rise to finely controlled memory and logic devices with new functionality. Moreover, the field is moving to study not only the conventional transition metal ferromagnets, but also complex heterostructures, novel magnets and even other

  17. Cell Wall Metabolism in Response to Abiotic Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyacinthe Le Gall

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This review focuses on the responses of the plant cell wall to several abiotic stresses including drought, flooding, heat, cold, salt, heavy metals, light, and air pollutants. The effects of stress on cell wall metabolism are discussed at the physiological (morphogenic, transcriptomic, proteomic and biochemical levels. The analysis of a large set of data shows that the plant response is highly complex. The overall effects of most abiotic stress are often dependent on the plant species, the genotype, the age of the plant, the timing of the stress application, and the intensity of this stress. This shows the difficulty of identifying a common pattern of stress response in cell wall architecture that could enable adaptation and/or resistance to abiotic stress. However, in most cases, two main mechanisms can be highlighted: (i an increased level in xyloglucan endotransglucosylase/hydrolase (XTH and expansin proteins, associated with an increase in the degree of rhamnogalacturonan I branching that maintains cell wall plasticity and (ii an increased cell wall thickening by reinforcement of the secondary wall with hemicellulose and lignin deposition. Taken together, these results show the need to undertake large-scale analyses, using multidisciplinary approaches, to unravel the consequences of stress on the cell wall. This will help identify the key components that could be targeted to improve biomass production under stress conditions.

  18. Solar walls in tsbi3 user's guide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wittchen, K.B.

    tsbi3 is a user-friendly and flexible computer program, which provides support to the design team in the analysis of the indoor climate and the energy performance of buildings. The solar wall module gives tsbi3 the capability of simulating solar walls and their interaction with the building....... This version, C, of tsbi3 is capable of simulating five types of solar walls say: mass-walls, Trombe-walls, double Trombe-walls, internally ventilated walls and solar walls for preheating ventilation air. The user's guide gives a description of the capabilities and how to simulate solar walls in tsbi3....

  19. Solvent removal during synthetic and Nephila fiber spinning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojic, Nikola; Kojic, Milos; Gudlavalleti, Sauri; McKinley, Gareth

    2004-01-01

    The process by which spiders make their mechanically superior fiber involves removal of solvent (water) from a concentrated protein solution while the solution flows through a progressively narrowing spinning canal. Our aim was to determine a possible mechanism of spider water removal by using a computational model. To develop appropriate computational techniques for modeling of solvent removal during fiber spinning, a study was first performed using a synthetic solution. In particular, the effect of solvent removal during elongational flow (also exhibited in the spinning canal of the spider) on fiber mechanical properties was examined. The study establishes a model for solvent removal during dry spinning of synthetic fibers, assuming that internal diffusion governs solvent removal and that convective resistance is small. A variable internal solvent diffusion coefficient, dependent on solvent concentration, is also taken into account in the model. An experimental setup for dry (air) spinning was used to make fibers whose diameter was on the order of those made by spiders (approximately 1 microm). Two fibers of different thickness, corresponding to different spinning conditions, were numerically modeled for solvent removal and then mechanically tested. These tests showed that the thinner fiber, which lost more solvent under elongational flow, had 5-fold better mechanical properties (elastic modulus of 100 MPa and toughness of 15 MJ/m3) than the thicker fiber. Even though the mechanical properties were far from those of dragline spider silk (modulus of 10 GPa and toughness of 150 MJ/m3), the experimental methodology and numerical principles developed for the synthetic case proved to be valuable when establishing a model for the Nephila spinning process. In this model, an assumption of rapid convective water removal at the spinning canal wall was made, with internal diffusion of water through the fiber as the governing process. Then the diffusion coefficient of water

  20. Plant cell walls: New insights from ancient species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Iben; Willats, William George Tycho

    2008-01-01

    Cell walls are a defining feature of plants and have numerous crucial roles in growth and development. They are also the largest source of terrestrial biomass and have many important industrial applications - ranging from bulk products to functional food ingredients. There is considerable interest......-D-glucan is not unique to the Poales and is an abundant component of Equisetum arvense cell walls. Plant J 2008; 54:510-21....... in the structure and functions of cell walls, and in the evolution of their remarkably complex polysaccharide structures. The grasses and cereals (order Poales), have long been regarded as being unique in that their cell walls contain an unbranched homopolymer, (1¿3)(1¿4)-ß-D-glucan, in which short blocks of (1...

  1. Plant synthetic biology: a new platform for industrial biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fesenko, Elena; Edwards, Robert

    2014-05-01

    Thirty years after the production of the first generation of genetically modified plants we are now set to move into a new era of recombinant crop technology through the application of synthetic biology to engineer new and complex input and output traits. The use of synthetic biology technologies will represent more than incremental additions of transgenes, but rather the directed design of completely new metabolic pathways, physiological traits, and developmental control strategies. The need to enhance our ability to improve crops through new engineering capability is now increasingly pressing as we turn to plants not just for food, but as a source of renewable feedstocks for industry. These accelerating and diversifying demands for new output traits coincide with a need to reduce inputs and improve agricultural sustainability. Faced with such challenges, existing technologies will need to be supplemented with new and far-more-directed approaches to turn valuable resources more efficiently into usable agricultural products. While these objectives are challenging enough, the use of synthetic biology in crop improvement will face public acceptance issues as a legacy of genetically modified technologies in many countries. Here we review some of the potential benefits of adopting synthetic biology approaches in improving plant input and output traits for their use as industrial chemical feedstocks, as linked to the rapidly developing biorefining industry. Several promising technologies and biotechnological targets are identified along with some of the key regulatory and societal challenges in the safe and acceptable introduction of such technology.

  2. Tracking developmentally regulated post-synthetic processing of homogalacturonan and chitin using reciprocal oligosaccharide probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mravec, Jozef; Kračun, Stjepan K.; Rydahl, Maja G.

    2014-01-01

    Polysaccharides are major components of extracellular matrices and are often extensively modified post-synthetically to suit local requirements and developmental programmes. However, our current understanding of the spatiotemporal dynamics and functional significance of these modifications is lim...... and animal systems. We demonstrated their potential for providing new biological insights by using them to study homogalacturonan processing during Arabidopsis thaliana root cap development and by analyzing sites of chitosan deposition in fungal cell walls and arthropod exoskeletons....

  3. Microbial synthetic biology for human therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Aastha; Bhatia, Pooja; Chugh, Archana

    2012-06-01

    The emerging field of synthetic biology holds tremendous potential for developing novel drugs to treat various human conditions. The current study discusses the scope of synthetic biology for human therapeutics via microbial approach. In this context, synthetic biology aims at designing, engineering and building new microbial synthetic cells that do not pre-exist in nature as well as re-engineer existing microbes for synthesis of therapeutic products. It is expected that the construction of novel microbial genetic circuitry for human therapeutics will greatly benefit from the data generated by 'omics' approaches and multidisciplinary nature of synthetic biology. Development of novel antimicrobial drugs and vaccines by engineering microbial systems are a promising area of research in the field of synthetic biology for human theragnostics. Expression of plant based medicinal compounds in the microbial system using synthetic biology tools is another avenue dealt in the present study. Additionally, the study suggest that the traditional medicinal knowledge can do value addition for developing novel drugs in the microbial systems using synthetic biology tools. The presented work envisions the success of synthetic biology for human therapeutics via microbial approach in a holistic manner. Keeping this in view, various legal and socio-ethical concerns emerging from the use of synthetic biology via microbial approach such as patenting, biosafety and biosecurity issues have been touched upon in the later sections.

  4. Shape analysis of synthetic diamond

    CERN Document Server

    Mullan, C

    1997-01-01

    Two-dimensional images of synthetic industrial diamond particles were obtained using a camera, framegrabber and PC-based image analysis software. Various methods for shape quantification were applied, including two-dimensional shape factors, Fourier series expansion of radius as a function of angle, boundary fractal analysis, polygonal harmonics, and comer counting methods. The shape parameter found to be the most relevant was axis ratio, defined as the ratio of the minor axis to the major axis of the ellipse with the same second moments of area as the particle. Axis ratio was used in an analysis of the sorting of synthetic diamonds on a vibrating table. A model was derived based on the probability that a particle of a given axis ratio would travel to a certain bin. The model described the sorting of bulk material accurately but it was found not to be applicable if the shape mix of the feed material changed dramatically. This was attributed to the fact that the particle-particle interference was not taken int...

  5. Repurposing ribosomes for synthetic biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi; Kim, Do Soon; Jewett, Michael C

    2017-10-01

    The translation system is the cell's factory for protein biosynthesis, stitching together hundreds to thousands of amino acids into proteins, which are required for the structure, function, and regulation of living systems. The extraordinary synthetic capability of this system, which includes the ribosome and its associated factors required for polymerization, has driven extensive efforts to harness it for societal use in areas as diverse as energy, materials, and medicine. A powerful example is recombinant protein production, which has impacted the lives of patients through the synthesis of biopharmaceuticals such as insulin. In nature, however, only limited sets of monomers are utilized, thereby resulting in limited sets of biopolymers (i.e., proteins). Expanding nature's repertoire of ribosomal monomers could yield new classes of enzymes, therapeutics, materials, and chemicals with diverse, genetically encoded chemistry. Here, we discuss recent progress towards engineering ribosomes both in vivo and in vitro. These fundamental and technical breakthroughs open doors for advanced applications in biotechnology and synthetic biology. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Towards developing algal synthetic biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaife, Mark Aden; Smith, Alison Gail

    2016-06-15

    The genetic, physiological and metabolic diversity of microalgae has driven fundamental research into photosynthesis, flagella structure and function, and eukaryotic evolution. Within the last 10 years these organisms have also been investigated as potential biotechnology platforms, for example to produce high value compounds such as long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, pigments and antioxidants, and for biodiesel precursors, in particular triacylglycerols (TAGs). Transformation protocols, molecular tools and genome sequences are available for a number of model species including the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum, although for both species there are bottlenecks to be overcome to allow rapid and predictable genetic manipulation. One approach to do this would be to apply the principles of synthetic biology to microalgae, namely the cycle of Design-Build-Test, which requires more robust, predictable and high throughput methods. In this mini-review we highlight recent progress in the areas of improving transgene expression, genome editing, identification and design of standard genetic elements (parts), and the use of microfluidics to increase throughput. We suggest that combining these approaches will provide the means to establish algal synthetic biology, and that application of standard parts and workflows will avoid parallel development and capitalize on lessons learned from other systems. © 2016 The Author(s). published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  7. A screen for spore wall permeability mutants identifies a secreted protease required for proper spore wall assembly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuyuki Suda

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The ascospores of Saccharomyces cerevisiae are surrounded by a complex wall that protects the spores from environmental stresses. The outermost layer of the spore wall is composed of a polymer that contains the cross-linked amino acid dityrosine. This dityrosine layer is important for stress resistance of the spore. This work reports that the dityrosine layer acts as a barrier blocking the diffusion of soluble proteins out of the spore wall into the cytoplasm of the ascus. Diffusion of a fluorescent protein out of the spore wall was used as an assay to screen for mutants affecting spore wall permeability. One of the genes identified in this screen, OSW3 (RRT12/YCR045c, encodes a subtilisin-family protease localized to the spore wall. Mutation of the active site serine of Osw3 results in spores with permeable walls, indicating that the catalytic activity of Osw3 is necessary for proper construction of the dityrosine layer. These results indicate that dityrosine promotes stress resistance by acting as a protective shell around the spore. OSW3 and other OSW genes identified in this screen are strong candidates to encode enzymes involved in assembly of this protective dityrosine coat.

  8. Cell wall proteomics of crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Setsuko eKomatsu

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Cell wall proteins play key roles in cell structure and metabolism, cell enlargement, signal transduction, responses to environmental stress, and many other physiological events. Agricultural crops are often used for investigating stress tolerance because cultivars with differing degrees of tolerance are available. Abiotic and biotic stress factors markedly influence the geographical distribution and yields of many crop species. Crop cell wall proteomics is of particular importance for improving crop productivity, particularly under unfavorable environmental conditions. To better understand the mechanisms underlying stress response in crops, cell wall proteomic analyses are being increasingly utilized. In this review, the methods of purification and purity assays of cell wall protein fractions from crops are described, and the results of protein identification using gel-based and gel-free proteomic techniques are presented. Furthermore, protein composition of the cell walls of rice, wheat, maize and soybean are compared, and the role of cell wall proteins in crops under flooding and drought stress is discussed. This review will be useful for clarifying the role of the cell wall of crops in response to environmental stresses.

  9. Quantitative urine confirmatory testing for synthetic cannabinoids in randomly collected urine specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castaneto, Marisol S; Scheidweiler, Karl B; Gandhi, Adarsh; Wohlfarth, Ariane; Klette, Kevin L; Martin, Thomas M; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2015-06-01

    Synthetic cannabinoid intake is an ongoing health issue worldwide, with new compounds continually emerging, making drug testing complex. Parent synthetic cannabinoids are rarely detected in urine, the most common matrix employed in workplace drug testing. Optimal identification of synthetic cannabinoid markers in authentic urine specimens and correlation of metabolite concentrations and toxicities would improve synthetic cannabinoid result interpretation. We screened 20 017 randomly collected US military urine specimens between July 2011 and June 2012 with a synthetic cannabinoid immunoassay yielding 1432 presumptive positive specimens. We analyzed all presumptive positive and 1069 negative specimens with our qualitative synthetic cannabinoid liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method, which confirmed 290 positive specimens. All 290 positive and 487 randomly selected negative specimens were quantified with the most comprehensive urine quantitative LC-MS/MS method published to date; 290 specimens confirmed positive for 22 metabolites from 11 parent synthetic cannabinoids. The five most predominant metabolites were JWH-018 pentanoic acid (93%), JWH-N-hydroxypentyl (84%), AM2201 N-hydroxypentyl (69%), JWH-073 butanoic acid (69%), and JWH-122 N-hydroxypentyl (45%) with 11.1 (0.1-2,434), 5.1 (0.1-1,239), 2.0 (0.1-321), 1.1 (0.1-48.6), and 1.1 (0.1-250) µg/L median (range) concentrations, respectively. Alkyl hydroxy and carboxy metabolites provided suitable biomarkers for 11 parent synthetic cannabinoids; although hydroxyindoles were also observed. This is by far the largest data set of synthetic cannabinoid metabolites urine concentrations from randomly collected workplace drug testing specimens rather than acute intoxications or driving under the influence of drugs. These data improve the interpretation of synthetic cannabinoid urine test results and suggest suitable urine markers of synthetic cannabinoid intake. This article is a U

  10. Blue shade hues: a study of blue pigments used by\\ud Romano-British wall-painters

    OpenAIRE

    Clegg, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Following an earlier study of different coloured pigments used in Roman wall-plaster paintings, this research project investigates the use of the synthetic pigment commonly\\ud known as Egyptian Blue in Romano-British wall-plaster paintings. Samples of Egyptian Blue pellets were obtained from excavations at the Romano-British sites of Fishbourne\\ud Roman Palace, near Chichester, Piddington near Northampton, Turners Hall Farm, near St Albans, and from excavations at Verulamium (Roman St Albans)...

  11. Perpendicularly magnetized CoFeB multilayers with tunable interlayer exchange for synthetic ferrimagnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pirro, P., E-mail: ppirro@physik.uni-kl.de [Institut Jean Lamour, Université de Lorraine, UMR 7198 CNRS, 54506 Vandoeuvre-lés-Nancy (France); Hamadeh, A.; Lavanant-Jambert, M. [Institut Jean Lamour, Université de Lorraine, UMR 7198 CNRS, 54506 Vandoeuvre-lés-Nancy (France); Meyer, T. [Fachbereich Physik and Landesforschungszentrum OPTIMAS, Technische Universität Kaiserslautern, 67663 Kaiserslautern (Germany); Tao, B.; Rosario, E.; Lu, Y.; Hehn, M.; Mangin, S.; Petit Watelot, S. [Institut Jean Lamour, Université de Lorraine, UMR 7198 CNRS, 54506 Vandoeuvre-lés-Nancy (France)

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • MgO/CoFeB/Ta/CoFeB/MgO multilayers as synthetic ferrimagnets. • Comprehensive characterization by measurement of static and dynamic properties. • Different pinning for domain walls with different alignment of the individual layers. - Abstract: A study of the multilayer system MgO/CoFeB(1.1 nm)/Ta(t)/CoFeB(0.8 nm)/MgO is presented, where the two CoFeB layers are separated by a Ta interlayer of varying thickness t. The magnetization properties deduced from complementary techniques such as superconducting quantum interference magnetometry, ferromagnetic resonance frequency measurements and Brillouin light scattering spectroscopy can be tuned by changing the Ta thickness between t = 0.25 nm, 0.5 nm and 0.75 nm. For t = 0.5 nm, a ferromagnetic coupling is observed, whereas for t = 0.75 nm, the antiferromagnetic coupling needed to construct a synthetic ferrimagnet is realized. In the latter case, the shape of magnetic domain walls between two ferrimagnetic alignments or between a ferro- and a ferrimagnetic alignment is very different. This behavior can be interpreted as a result of the change in dipolar as well as interlayer exchange energy and domain wall pinning, which is an important conclusion for the realization of data storage devices based on synthetic ferri- and antiferromagnets.

  12. Domain walls riding the wave.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karapetrov, G.; Novosad, V.; Materials Science Division

    2010-11-01

    Recent years have witnessed a rapid proliferation of electronic gadgets around the world. These devices are used for both communication and entertainment, and it is a fact that they account for a growing portion of household energy consumption and overall world consumption of electricity. Increasing the energy efficiency of these devices could have a far greater and immediate impact than a gradual switch to renewable energy sources. The advances in the area of spintronics are therefore very important, as gadgets are mostly comprised of memory and logic elements. Recent developments in controlled manipulation of magnetic domains in ferromagnet nanostructures have opened opportunities for novel device architectures. This new class of memories and logic gates could soon power millions of consumer electronic devices. The attractiveness of using domain-wall motion in electronics is due to its inherent reliability (no mechanical moving parts), scalability (3D scalable architectures such as in racetrack memory), and nonvolatility (retains information in the absence of power). The remaining obstacles in widespread use of 'racetrack-type' elements are the speed and the energy dissipation during the manipulation of domain walls. In their recent contribution to Physical Review Letters, Oleg Tretiakov, Yang Liu, and Artem Abanov from Texas A&M University in College Station, provide a theoretical description of domain-wall motion in nanoscale ferromagnets due to the spin-polarized currents. They find exact conditions for time-dependent resonant domain-wall movement, which could speed up the motion of domain walls while minimizing Ohmic losses. Movement of domain walls in ferromagnetic nanowires can be achieved by application of external magnetic fields or by passing a spin-polarized current through the nanowire itself. On the other hand, the readout of the domain state is done by measuring the resistance of the wire. Therefore, passing current through the

  13. Synthetic Nano-Low Density Lipoprotein as Targeted Drug DeliveryVehicle for Glioblastoma Multiforme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikanjam, Mina; Blakely, Eleanor A.; Bjornstad, Kathleen A.; Shu,Xiao; Budinger, Thomas F.; Forte, Trudy M.

    2006-06-14

    This paper discribes a synthetic low density lipoprotein(LDL) made by complexing a 29 amino acid that consists of a lipid bindingdomain and the LDL receptor binding domain with a lipid microemulsion.The nano-LDL particles were intermdiate in size between LDL and HDL andbound to LDL receptors on GBM brain tumor cells. Synthetic nano-LDLuptake by GBM cells was LDL receptor specific and dependent on cellreceptor number. It is suggested that these synthetic particles can serveas a delivery vehicle for hydophobic anti-tumor drugs by targeting theLDL receptor.

  14. Word selection affects perceptions of synthetic biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Brianna; Snell, Sam; Bye-Nagel, Kyri; Tonidandel, Scott; Heyer, Laurie J; Campbell, A Malcolm

    2011-07-21

    Members of the synthetic biology community have discussed the significance of word selection when describing synthetic biology to the general public. In particular, many leaders proposed the word "create" was laden with negative connotations. We found that word choice and framing does affect public perception of synthetic biology. In a controlled experiment, participants perceived synthetic biology more negatively when "create" was used to describe the field compared to "construct" (p = 0.008). Contrary to popular opinion among synthetic biologists, however, low religiosity individuals were more influenced negatively by the framing manipulation than high religiosity people. Our results suggest that synthetic biologists directly influence public perception of their field through avoidance of the word "create".

  15. Word selection affects perceptions of synthetic biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tonidandel Scott

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Members of the synthetic biology community have discussed the significance of word selection when describing synthetic biology to the general public. In particular, many leaders proposed the word "create" was laden with negative connotations. We found that word choice and framing does affect public perception of synthetic biology. In a controlled experiment, participants perceived synthetic biology more negatively when "create" was used to describe the field compared to "construct" (p = 0.008. Contrary to popular opinion among synthetic biologists, however, low religiosity individuals were more influenced negatively by the framing manipulation than high religiosity people. Our results suggest that synthetic biologists directly influence public perception of their field through avoidance of the word "create".

  16. Creating biological nanomaterials using synthetic biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, MaryJoe K; Ruder, Warren C

    2014-02-01

    Synthetic biology is a new discipline that combines science and engineering approaches to precisely control biological networks. These signaling networks are especially important in fields such as biomedicine and biochemical engineering. Additionally, biological networks can also be critical to the production of naturally occurring biological nanomaterials, and as a result, synthetic biology holds tremendous potential in creating new materials. This review introduces the field of synthetic biology, discusses how biological systems naturally produce materials, and then presents examples and strategies for incorporating synthetic biology approaches in the development of new materials. In particular, strategies for using synthetic biology to produce both organic and inorganic nanomaterials are discussed. Ultimately, synthetic biology holds the potential to dramatically impact biological materials science with significant potential applications in medical systems.

  17. Wall Insulation; BTS Technology Fact Sheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Southface Energy Institute; Tromly, K.

    2000-11-07

    Properly sealed, moisture-protected, and insulated walls help increase comfort, reduce noise, and save on energy costs. This fact sheet addresses these topics plus advanced framing techniques, insulation types, wall sheathings, and steps for effective wall construction and insulation.

  18. Synthetic Lipoproteins as Carriers for Drug Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Gangliang; Liu, Yang; Huang, Hualiang

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic lipoprotein is an effective carrier of targeted delivery for drugs. It has the very small size, good biocompatibility, suitable half-life, and specific lipoprotein receptorbinding capacity. Compared with the traditional natural lipoprotein, synthetic lipoprotein not only retains the original biological characteristics and functions, but also exhibits the excellent characteristics in drug delivery. Herein, the advantages, development, applications, and prospect of synthetic lipoproteins as drug carriers were summarized.

  19. Synthetic drugs in Russia as a threat to national security

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleg Nikolaevich Korchagin

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective to examine the relevance of the problem and the features of crimes in the sphere of trafficking illegal drugs psychotropic substances and their analogues which is determined on the one hand by the complexity of identification detection investigation and prevention of the crimes in question and on the other hand by the increasing number of drug users and frequent cases of lethal intoxication. Methods ascent from the abstract to the concrete systemicstructural and comparative analysis historical method dynamic and statistical methods particularsociological methodology of rural crime assessment. Results The features are shown of the social danger of synthetic drugs in the Russian Federation and their consequences. Effective measures on perfection of counteraction to crimes under consideration are proposed. Scientific novelty In the article the authors examine the situation and crime trends in the sphere of illegal drugs trafficking. In particular they consider synthetic quotdesignerquot drugs which cause great damage to the state killing the young population of Russia. Effective measures of counteraction to the spreading of synthetic drugs in Russia are proposed in the paper. The authors show the complexity of the criminal situation in this area. The growth dynamics of the crimes in question is an objective reflection of unsatisfactory work of the law enforcement system in deterioration and prevention of these crimes. Practical value The research results show the severity of the social danger of crimes in the field of drug trafficking. nbsp

  20. Post-Synthetic Defucosylation of AGP by Aspergillus nidulans α-1,2-Fucosidase Expressed in Arabidopsis Apoplast Induces Compensatory Upregulation of α-1,2-Fucosyltransferases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gennady V Pogorelko

    Full Text Available Cell walls are essential components of plant cells which perform a variety of important functions for the different cell types, tissues and organs of a plant. Besides mechanical function providing cell shape, cell walls participate in intercellular communication, defense during plant-microbe interactions, and plant growth. The plant cell wall consists predominantly of polysaccharides with the addition of structural glycoproteins, phenolic esters, minerals, lignin, and associated enzymes. Alterations in the cell wall composition created through either changes in biosynthesis of specific constituents or their post-synthetic modifications in the apoplast compromise cell wall integrity and frequently induce plant compensatory responses as a result of these alterations. Here we report that post-synthetic removal of fucose residues specifically from arabinogalactan proteins in the Arabidopsis plant cell wall induces differential expression of fucosyltransferases and leads to the root and hypocotyl elongation changes. These results demonstrate that the post-synthetic modification of cell wall components presents a valuable approach to investigate the potential signaling pathways induced during plant responses to such modifications that usually occur during plant development and stress responses.

  1. Impact of cell wall composition on maize resistance to pests and diseases.

    OpenAIRE

    Malvar, Rosa A.; Rogelio Santiago; Jaime Barros-Rios

    2013-01-01

    In cereals, the primary cell wall is built of a skeleton of cellulosic microfibrils embedded in a matrix of hemicelluloses and smaller amounts of pectins, glycoproteins and hydroxycinnamates. Later, during secondary wall development, p-coumaryl, coniferyl and sinapyl alcohols are copolymerized to form mixed lignins. Several of these cell wall components show a determinative role in maize resistance to pest and diseases. However, defense mechanisms are very complex and vary among the same plan...

  2. Super Wall Graphics for Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Anne; Vlastos, George

    1985-01-01

    Steps for organizing and implementing a program that involves elementary students in beautifying their school with large-scale wall graphics are outlined. Sources of design, drawing hints, painting methods, application techniques, and follow-up activities are discussed. (RM)

  3. Restrained shrinkage of masonry walls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijl, G.P.A.G. van; Rots, J.G.

    1998-01-01

    State of the art computational rnechanics, in combination with experimental programmes have a lot to offer in providing insight, characterization of total behaviour and predictive ability of structural masonry. Here numerical research towards rationalizing masonry wall movement joint positioning and

  4. Veterans Affairs Suicide Prevention Synthetic Dataset

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The VA's Veteran Health Administration, in support of the Open Data Initiative, is providing the Veterans Affairs Suicide Prevention Synthetic Dataset (VASPSD). The...

  5. Synthetic Aperture Vector Flow Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oddershede, Niels

    2008-01-01

    Current ultrasonic blood flow velocity measurement systems are subject to a number of limitations, including limited frame rate, aliasing artifacts, and that only the velocity component along the ultrasound beam is estimated. This dissertation aims at solving some of these problems. The main part...... of the thesis considers a method for estimating the two-dimensional velocity vector within the image plane. This method, called synthetic aperture vector flow imaging, is first shortly reviewed. The main contribution of this work is partly an analysis of the method with respect to focusing effects, motion...... estimation. The method can be used for increasing the frame rate of color flow maps or alternatively for a new imaging modality entitled quadroplex imaging, featuring a color flow map and two independent spectrograms at a high frame rate. The second is an alternative method for ultrasonic vector velocity...

  6. Preparation of synthetic standard minerals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrick, C.C.; Bustamante, S.J.; Charls, R.W.; Cowan, R.E.; Hakkila, E.A.; Hull, D.E.; Olinger, B.W.; Roof, R.B.; Sheinberg, H.; Herrick, G.C.

    1978-01-01

    A number of techniques for synthetic mineral preparations have been examined. These techniques include hot-pressing in graphite dies at moderate pressures, high-pressure, high-temperature synthesis in a piston and cylinder apparatus, isostatic pressing under helium gas pressures, hydrous mineral preparations using water as the pressure medium, explosion-generated shock waves, and radiofrequency heating. Minerals suitable for equation-of-state studies (three-inch, high-density discs), for thermodynamic property determinations (low-density powders) and for microprobe standards (fusion-cast microbeads) have been prepared. Mechanical stress-strain calculations in the piston-cylinder apparatus have been initiated and their integration with thermal stress calculations is currently under investigation.

  7. Synthetic biology of antimicrobial discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakeri, Bijan; Lu, Timothy K

    2013-07-19

    Antibiotic discovery has a storied history. From the discovery of penicillin by Sir Alexander Fleming to the relentless quest for antibiotics by Selman Waksman, the stories have become like folklore used to inspire future generations of scientists. However, recent discovery pipelines have run dry at a time when multidrug-resistant pathogens are on the rise. Nature has proven to be a valuable reservoir of antimicrobial agents, which are primarily produced by modularized biochemical pathways. Such modularization is well suited to remodeling by an interdisciplinary approach that spans science and engineering. Herein, we discuss the biological engineering of small molecules, peptides, and non-traditional antimicrobials and provide an overview of the growing applicability of synthetic biology to antimicrobials discovery.

  8. Vibration improved the fluidity of aluminum alloys in thin wall ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Misrun is a term used to describe the incomplete filling of the mould cavity. It is a major defect in the investment casting process when used to produce turbine blades, impellers and impulse blades for turbo pumps which have complex profiles, thin walls and sharp edges. From the casting engineering point of view, poor ...

  9. Remote parallel rendering for high-resolution tiled display walls

    KAUST Repository

    Nachbaur, Daniel

    2014-11-01

    © 2014 IEEE. We present a complete, robust and simple to use hardware and software stack delivering remote parallel rendering of complex geometrical and volumetric models to high resolution tiled display walls in a production environment. We describe the setup and configuration, present preliminary benchmarks showing interactive framerates, and describe our contributions for a seamless integration of all the software components.

  10. The role of the cell wall in plant immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malinovsky, Frederikke Gro; Fangel, Jonatan Ulrik; Willats, William George Tycho

    2014-01-01

    features, others monitor physical changes caused by an infection attempt. Detection of microbes leads to activation of appropriate defense responses that then challenge the attack. Plant cell walls are formidable and dynamic barriers. They are constructed primarily of complex carbohydrates joined...... in studying these interactions, and briefly describe the analytical potential of molecular probes used in conjunction with carbohydrate microarray technology....

  11. Investigation of torsional vibrations in thick walled hollow poroelastic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. This paper deals with the study of torsional vibrations of thick walled hollow poroelastic cylinder using Biot's extension theory. Considering the boundaries to be stress free, the frequency equation is obtained in the presence of dissipation which is transcendental and complex valued in nature. In the special case of ...

  12. Investigation of torsional vibrations in thick walled hollow poroelastic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This paper deals with the study of torsional vibrations of thick walled hollow poroelastic cylinder using Biot's extension theory. Considering the boundaries to be stress free, the frequency equation is obtained in the presence of dissipation which is transcendental and complex valued in nature. In the special case of ...

  13. Vibration improved the fluidity of aluminum alloys in thin wall ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    Abstract. Misrun is a term used to describe the incomplete filling of the mould cavity. It is a major defect in the investment casting process when used to produce turbine blades, impellers and impulse blades for turbo pumps which have complex profiles, thin walls and sharp edges. From the casting engineering point of view, ...

  14. Through-wall image enhancement using fuzzy and QR decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riaz, Muhammad Mohsin; Ghafoor, Abdul

    2014-01-01

    QR decomposition and fuzzy logic based scheme is proposed for through-wall image enhancement. QR decomposition is less complex compared to singular value decomposition. Fuzzy inference engine assigns weights to different overlapping subspaces. Quantitative measures and visual inspection are used to analyze existing and proposed techniques.

  15. Method for remodeling cell wall polysaccharide structures in plant

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ulvskov, P.; Schols, H.A.; Visser, R.; Borkhardt, B.; Sorensen, S.O.; Oomen, R.; Vincken, J.P.

    2001-01-01

    Methods for providing transgenic plants and parts hereof that, relative to the wild type state, is modified in a complex cell wall polysaccharide structure including pectins and hemicelluloses, the modification being in the overall glycosidic linkage pattern or the monosaccharide profile, comprising

  16. Acute traumatic abdominal wall hernia

    OpenAIRE

    Hartog, Dennis; Tuinebreijer, Wim; Oprel, Pim; Patka, Peter

    2011-01-01

    textabstractAlthough blunt abdominal trauma is frequent, traumatic abdominal wall hernias (TAWH) are rare. We describe a large TAWH with associated intra-abdominal lesions that were caused by high-energy trauma. The diagnosis was missed by clinical examination but was subsequently revealed by a computed tomography (CT) scan. Repair consisted of an open anatomical reconstruction of the abdominal wall layers with reinforcement by an intraperitoneal composite mesh. The patient recovered well and...

  17. Microorganism Utilization for Synthetic Milk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morford, Megan A.; Khodadad, Christina L.; Caro, Janicce I.; Spencer, LaShelle E.; Richards, Jeffery T.; Strayer, Richard F.; Birmele, Michele N.; Wheeler, Raymond M.

    2014-01-01

    A desired architecture for long duration spaceflight, like aboard the International Space Station or for future missions to Mars, is to provide a supply of fresh food crops for the astronauts. However, some crops can create a high proportion of inedible plant waste. The main goal of the Synthetic Biology project, Cow in a Column, was to produce the components of milk (sugar, lipid, protein) from inedible plant waste by utilizing microorganisms (fungi, yeast, bacteria). Of particular interest was utilizing the valuable polysaccharide, cellulose, found in plant waste, to naturally fuel-through microorganism cellular metabolism- the creation of sugar (glucose), lipid (milk fat), and protein (casein) in order to produce a synthetic edible food product. Environmental conditions such as pH, temperature, carbon source, aeration, and choice microorganisms were optimized in the laboratory and the desired end-products, sugars and lipids, were analyzed. Trichoderma reesei, a known cellulolytic fungus, was utilized to drive the production of glucose, with the intent that the produced glucose would serve as the carbon source for milk fat production and be a substitute for the milk sugar lactose. Lipid production would be carried out by Rhodosporidium toruloides, yeast known to accumulate those lipids that are typically found in milk fat. Results showed that glucose and total lipid content were below what was expected during this phase of experimentation. In addition, individual analysis of six fatty acids revealed that the percentage of each fatty acid was lower than naturally produced bovine milk. Overall, this research indicates that microorganisms could be utilized to breakdown inedible solid waste to produce useable products. For future work, the production of the casein protein for milk would require the development of a genetically modified organism, which was beyond the scope of the original project. Additional trials would be needed to further refine the required

  18. Cell-free synthetic biology: Engineering in an open world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yuan

    2017-03-01

    Cell-free synthetic biology emerges as a powerful and flexible enabling technology that can engineer biological parts and systems for life science applications without using living cells. It provides simpler and faster engineering solutions with an unprecedented freedom of design in an open environment than cell system. This review focuses on recent developments of cell-free synthetic biology on biological engineering fields at molecular and cellular levels, including protein engineering, metabolic engineering, and artificial cell engineering. In cell-free protein engineering, the direct control of reaction conditions in cell-free system allows for easy synthesis of complex proteins, toxic proteins, membrane proteins, and novel proteins with unnatural amino acids. Cell-free systems offer the ability to design metabolic pathways towards the production of desired products. Buildup of artificial cells based on cell-free systems will improve our understanding of life and use them for environmental and biomedical applications.

  19. Cell-free synthetic biology: Engineering in an open world

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Lu

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Cell-free synthetic biology emerges as a powerful and flexible enabling technology that can engineer biological parts and systems for life science applications without using living cells. It provides simpler and faster engineering solutions with an unprecedented freedom of design in an open environment than cell system. This review focuses on recent developments of cell-free synthetic biology on biological engineering fields at molecular and cellular levels, including protein engineering, metabolic engineering, and artificial cell engineering. In cell-free protein engineering, the direct control of reaction conditions in cell-free system allows for easy synthesis of complex proteins, toxic proteins, membrane proteins, and novel proteins with unnatural amino acids. Cell-free systems offer the ability to design metabolic pathways towards the production of desired products. Buildup of artificial cells based on cell-free systems will improve our understanding of life and use them for environmental and biomedical applications.

  20. Oxide nanomaterials: synthetic developments, mechanistic studies, and technological innovations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patzke, Greta R; Zhou, Ying; Kontic, Roman; Conrad, Franziska

    2011-01-24

    Oxide nanomaterials are indispensable for nanotechnological innovations, because they combine an infinite variety of structural motifs and properties with manifold morphological features. Given that new oxide materials are almost reported on a daily basis, considerable synthetic and technological work remains to be done to fully exploit this ever increasing family of compounds for innovative nano-applications. This calls for reliable and scalable preparative approaches to oxide nanomaterials and their development remains a challenge for many complex nanostructured oxides. Oxide nanomaterials with special physicochemical features and unusual morphologies are still difficult to access by classic synthetic pathways. The limitless options for creating nano-oxide building blocks open up new technological perspectives with the potential to revolutionize areas ranging from data processing to biocatalysis. Oxide nanotechnology of the 21st century thus needs a strong interplay of preparative creativity, analytical skills, and new ideas for synergistic implementations. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. The Uncanny wall

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tinwell, Angela; Grimshaw, Mark Nicholas; Williams, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    This paper proposes that increasing technological sophistication in the creation of realism for human-like, virtual characters is matched by increasing technological discernment on the part of the viewer. One of the goals for achieving a realism that is believable for virtual characters...... is to overcome the Uncanny Valley where perceived strangeness or familiarity is rated against perceived human-likeness. Empirical evidence shows that the Uncanny can be applied to virtual characters, yet implies a more complex picture than the shape of a deep valley with a sharp gradient as depicted in Mori......'s original plot of the Uncanny Valley. Our results imply that: (1) perceived familiarity is dependent upon a wider range of variables other than appearance and behaviour and (2) for realistic, human-like characters, the Uncanny Valley is an impossible traverse, is not supported fully by empirical evidence...

  2. Biologically inspired synthetic gecko adhesive from hard polymer microfiber arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jongho

    Inspiration from nature and development of nano/micro-technology suggest new types of smart adhesives. Gecko's fast wall-climbing and upside-down-walking even on contaminated surfaces inspire the development of easily attachable and easily releasable, durable, self-cleaning synthetic adhesives. Advances in nano/micro-technology enable the fabrication of gecko-like nano/micro-structures. However, producing structures that exhibit a close resemblance to those of gecko is still challenging. This thesis explores achieving the key properties of the natural gecko adhesive with relatively simple nano/micro-structures consisting of synthetic materials. Hard material, comparable to the natural gecko structures, was used, and the surface geometry was modified to achieve novel adhesion properties. Important properties of the fabricated microfiber arrays were characterized and compared with the natural gecko adhesives using a custom-made force sensor apparatus. The high-aspect-ratio of the microfiber arrays showed similar novel properties, including easiness in attachment and release, durability, self-cleaning capability, and directional dependence of adhesion/friction properties, similar to natural gecko surfaces.

  3. Cell wall remodeling in mycorrhizal symbiosis: a way towards biotrophism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balestrini, Raffaella; Bonfante, Paola

    2014-01-01

    Cell walls are deeply involved in the molecular talk between partners during plant and microbe interactions, and their role in mycorrhizae, i.e., the widespread symbiotic associations established between plant roots and soil fungi, has been investigated extensively. All mycorrhizal interactions achieve full symbiotic functionality through the development of an extensive contact surface between the plant and fungal cells, where signals and nutrients are exchanged. The exchange of molecules between the fungal and the plant cytoplasm takes place both through their plasma membranes and their cell walls; a functional compartment, known as the symbiotic interface, is thus defined. Among all the symbiotic interfaces, the complex intracellular interface of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis has received a great deal of attention since its first description. Here, in fact, the host plasma membrane invaginates and proliferates around all the developing intracellular fungal structures, and cell wall material is laid down between this membrane and the fungal cell surface. By contrast, in ectomycorrhizae (ECM), where the fungus grows outside and between the root cells, plant and fungal cell walls are always in direct contact and form the interface between the two partners. The organization and composition of cell walls within the interface compartment is a topic that has attracted widespread attention, both in ecto- and endomycorrhizae. The aim of this review is to provide a general overview of the current knowledge on this topic by integrating morphological observations, which have illustrated cell wall features during mycorrhizal interactions, with the current data produced by genomic and transcriptomic approaches. PMID:24926297

  4. Effects of Moving Side Walls on Confined Granular Packings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ram Chand

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Granular materials have numerous industrial and geophysical applications. However, many phenomenon exhibited by granular media are not yet fully explained. Nowadays simulation has emerged as an important tool to investigate the complex properties exhibited by granular media. The influence of side walls movement of a granular column is investigated by discrete element, molecular dynamics simulations. The evolution of stress profile and deflection of vertical stresses is due to different bead sizes, coefficient of friction between grains and confining wall is investigated by using large-scale discrete element MD simulations in 3D. In such a configuration, it is found that apparent mass systemically increases with the increase in diameter of granules. As soon as the wall stops moving, the column attains equilibrium. The stress profiles are in good agreement with the Janssen form for high friction coefficient, while some deviations remain for smaller values of friction coefficient. The wall movement augments the number of particle-wall and particle-particle forces at the Coulomb criterion. The results indicate the variation in shielding of vertical stresses in granular column; it can be attributed to the fiction between the beads and the confining walls of the container.

  5. Persistent conductive footprints of 109o domain walls in bismuth ferrite films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stolichnov, I.; Iwanowska, M.; Colla, E.; Ziegler, B.; Gaponenko, I.; Paruch, P.; Huijben, Mark; Rijnders, Augustinus J.H.M.; Setter, N.

    2014-01-01

    Using conductive and piezoforce microscopy, we reveal a complex picture of electronic transport at weakly conductive 109° domain walls in bismuth ferrite films. Even once initial ferroelectric stripe domains are changed/erased, persistent conductive paths signal the original domain wall position.

  6. Study on the Microwave Permittivity of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaolai; Zhao, Donglin

    2009-01-01

    In this article, we studied the microwave permittivity of the complex of the single-walled carbon nanotube and paraffin in 2-18GHz. In the range, the dielectric loss of single-walled carbon nanotube is higher, and the real part and the imaginary part of the dielectric constant decrease with the increase of frequency, and the dielectric constant…

  7. The role of the hemicelluloses in the nanobiology of wood cell walls : a systems theoretic perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajai H. Atalla

    2005-01-01

    The hemicelluloses have not received adequate attention in studies of wood cell walls because the complexity of their structures does not admit easy interpretation within the paradigms of polymer science. Two-phase composite models of the cell wall have led many to view their primary function as one of coupling cellulose and lignin to enhance the mechanical properties...

  8. Proteomic analysis of cell walls of two developmental stages of alfalfa stems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian C Verdonk

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Cell walls are important for the growth and development of all plants. They are also valuable resources for feed and fiber, and more recently as a potential feedstock for bioenergy production. Cell wall proteins comprise only a fraction of the cell wall, but play important roles in establishing the walls and in the chemical interactions (e.g. crosslinking of cell wall components. This crosslinking provides structure, but restricts digestibility of cell wall complex carbohydrates, limiting available energy in animal and bioenergy production systems. Manipulation of cell wall proteins could be a strategy to improve digestibility. An analysis of the cell wall proteome of apical alfalfa stems (less mature, more digestible and basal alfalfa stems (more mature, less digestible was conducted using a recently developed low-salt/density gradient method for the isolation of cell walls. Walls were subsequently subjected to a modified extraction utilizing EGTA to remove pectins, followed by a LiCl extraction to isolate more tightly bound proteins. Recovered proteins were identified using shotgun proteomics. We identified 272 proteins in the alfalfa stem cell wall proteome, 153 of which had not previously been identified in cell wall proteomic analyses. Nearly 70% percent of the identified proteins were predicted to be secreted, as would be expected for most cell wall proteins, an improvement over previously published studies using traditional cell wall isolation methods. A comparison of our and several other cell wall proteomic studies indicates little overlap in identified proteins among them, which may be largely due to differences in the tissues used as well as differences in experimental approach.

  9. Nanoscale Origins of Ferroelastic Domain Wall Mobility in Ferroelectric Multilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hsin-Hui; Hong, Zijian; Xin, Huolin L; Su, Dong; Chen, Long-Qing; Huang, Guanzhong; Munroe, Paul R; Valanoor, Nagarajan

    2016-11-22

    The nanoscale origins of ferroelastic domain wall motion in ferroelectric multilayer thin films that lead to giant electromechanical responses are investigated. We present direct evidence for complex underpinning factors that result in ferroelastic domain wall mobility using a combination of atomic-level aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy and phase-field simulations in model epitaxial (001) tetragonal (T) PbZr x Ti 1-x O 3 (PZT)/rhombohedral (R) PbZr x Ti 1-x O 3 (PZT) bilayer heterostructures. The local electric dipole distribution is imaged on an atomic scale for a ferroelastic domain wall that nucleates in the R-layer and cuts through the composition breaking the T/R interface. Our studies reveal a highly complex polarization rotation domain structure that is nearly on the knife-edge at the vicinity of this wall. Induced phases, namely tetragonal-like and rhombohedral-like monoclinic were observed close to the interface, and exotic domain arrangements, such as a half-4-fold closure structure, are observed. Phase field simulations show this is due to the minimization of the excessive elastic and electrostatic energies driven by the enormous strain gradient present at the location of the ferroelastic domain walls. Thus, in response to an applied stimulus, such as an electric field, any polarization reorientation must minimize the elastic and electrostatic discontinuities due to this strain gradient, which would induce a dramatic rearrangement of the domain structure. This insight into the origins of ferroelastic domain wall motion will allow researchers to better "craft" such multilayered ferroelectric systems with precisely tailored domain wall functionality and enhanced sensitivity, which can be exploited for the next generation of integrated piezoelectric technologies.

  10. Philosophy of Systems and Synthetic Biology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Green, Sara

    2017-01-01

    philosophically interesting for their own sake. By pursuing ambitious aims such as the development of multiscale computational models and synthetic life forms, they uncover new ground for philosophical analysis. Systems and synthetic biology raise fundamental questions about how far research can be taken through...

  11. Characterization of Synthetic Peptides by Mass Spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prabhala, Bala K; Mirza, Osman; Højrup, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) is well suited for analysis of the identity and purity of synthetic peptides. The sequence of a synthetic peptide is most often known, so the analysis is mainly used to confirm the identity and purity of the peptide. Here, simple procedures are described for MALDI...

  12. Synergistic Synthetic Biology: Units In Concert

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Yves eTrosset

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Synthetic biology aims at translating the methods and strategies from engineering into biology in order to streamline the design and construction of biological devices through standardized parts. Modular synthetic biology devices are designed by means of an adequate elimination of cross-talk that makes circuits orthogonal and specific. To that end, synthetic constructs need to be adequately optimized through in silico modeling by choosing the right complement of genetic parts and by experimental tuning through directed evolution and craftsmanship. In this review, we consider an additional and complementary tool available to the synthetic biologist for innovative design and successful construction of desired circuit functionalities: biological synergies. Synergy is a prevalent emergent property in biological systems that arises from the concerted action of multiple factors producing an amplification or cancellation effect compared with individual actions alone. Synergies appear in domains as diverse as those involved in chemical and protein activity, polypharmacology, and metabolic pathway complementarity. In conventional synthetic biology designs, synergistic cross-talk between parts and modules is generally attenuated in order to verify their orthogonality. Synergistic interactions, however, can induce emergent behavior that might prove useful for synthetic biology applications, like in functional circuit design, multidrug treatment, or in sensing and delivery devices. Synergistic design principles are therefore complementary to those coming from orthogonal design and may provide added value to synthetic biology applications. The appropriate modeling, characterization, and design of synergies between biological parts and units will allow the discovery of yet unforeseeable, novel synthetic biology applications.

  13. Immunization with a synthetic robustoxin derivative lacking ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prakash

    Considerable effort has been devoted to employing synthetic peptides as vaccines (Lerner 1982; Arnon 1987; Fischer et al 2007). Attempts to use synthetic peptides to stimulate the production of antibodies that are protective in vivo have not always been successful because such peptides are often weak immunogens from ...

  14. Synthetic Biology in Health and Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Passel, van M.W.J.; Lam, C.M.C.; Martins dos Santos, V.A.P.; Suarez Diez, M.

    2014-01-01

    Synthetic biology draws on the understanding from genetics, biology, chemistry, physics, engineering, and computational sciences to (re-)design and (re-)engineer biological functions. Here we address how synthetic biology can be possibly deployed to promote health and tackle disease. We discuss how

  15. [Reconstruction of full-thickness chest wall defects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Lingli; Xing, Xin; Li, Junhui; Xue, Chunyu; Bi, Hongda; Li, Zhigang

    2011-12-01

    To investigate the surgical techniques and effectiveness for reconstruction of severe full-thickness chest wall defects. Between January 2006 and December 2010, 14 patients with full-thickness chest wall defects were treated, including 12 cases caused by giant chest wall malignant tumor excision, 1 case by thermocompression injury, and 1 case by radiation necrosis. There were 8 males and 6 females with an average age of 42 years (range, 23-65 years). The size of chest wall defects ranged from 8 cm x 5 cm to 26 cm x 14 cm. All patients complicated by rib defect (1-5 ribs), and 3 cases by sternum defect. Thoracic skeleton reconstruction was performed with Vicryl mesh or polytetrafluoroethylene mesh in 10 patients. Other 4 patients did not undergo thoracic skeleton reconstruction. The bilobed skin flaps, pectoralis major myocutaneous flap, latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap, and rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap were utilized for repairing soft tissue defects. The size of the dissected flaps ranged from 10 cm x 7 cm to 25 cm x 13 cm. The donor sites were sutured directly or were repaired by free skin graft. Poor healing of incision occurred in 2 cases, which was cured after debridement, myocutaneous flap transfer, and skin graft. The other wounds healed by first intention. All patients were followed up 6-36 months (mean, 8 months). No tumor recurrence during follow-up, except 1 patient with osteosarcoma who died of liver metastasis at 6 months after operation. Transient slight paradoxical respiration occurred in 1 patient who did not undergo thoracic skeleton reconstruction at 5 days after operation. Integrity of chest wall in other patients was restored without paradoxical respiration and dyspnea. Depending on the cause, the size, and the location of defect, single or combination flaps could be used to repair soft tissue defect, and thoracic skeleton reconstruction should be performed when defect is severe by means of synthetic materials.

  16. Abdominal wall closure in bladder exstrophy complex repair by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    shobha

    approximation of the pelvic floor towards the midline.[1]. Osteotomy has gained importance in the prevention of uterine prolapse and the overall functional outcome; despite this, the reconstructive methods used to close the pelvis in early childhood, the.

  17. Steel desulphurization with synthetic slag

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heput, T.

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Generally speaking, sulphur is considered a harmful element for steel quality, reason why all the technological steps are being taken in order to eliminate it from the metal bath. This paper deals with the influence of the chemical composition, on the slag quantity and of the bath stirring condition upon the desulphurization process in the casting ladle by treatment with synthetic slag. The experiments were made at an open-hearth plant with the steel tapping in two ladles (the desulphurization was made with synthetic slag at one ladle while the other one was considered standard and at the electric steel plant and for the synthetic slag formation a mix was used, made, according to several receipts, of: lime (50-75%, fluorine (0-17%, bauxite (0-32% and aluminous slag (8-22%. The data were processed in the calculation programs EXCEL and MATLAB, which resulted in a series of correlations between the desulphurization degree and the chemical composition of the slag, respectively the slag quantity both for the charges bubbled with Argon and the unbubbled ones.

    En general, el azufre es considerado un elemento nocivo para la calidad del acero y, por eso, en la práctica, se toman todas las medidas de orden tecnológico para su eliminación del baño metálico. En este trabajo se analiza la influencia de la composición química, de la cantidad de escoria y del estado de agitación del baño sobre el proceso de desulfuración en la cuchara para fundir por tratamiento con escoria sintética. Los experimentos se han realizado en una acería evacuando el acero en dos ollas (en una cuchara se efectuó la desulfuración con escoria sintética y a la otra se consideró como patrón y en un acería eléctrica y para la formación de la escoria sintética se utilizó una mezcla producida según muchas recetas, formada por: cal (50-75%, fluorina (0-17%, bauxita (0-32% y escoria aluminosa (8-22%. Los datos han sido procesados en los programas de c

  18. Investigation of Plant Cell Wall Properties: A Study of Contributions from the Nanoscale to the Macroscale Impacting Cell Wall Recalcitrance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowe, Jacob Dillon

    Biochemical conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to fuel ethanol is one of a few challenging, yet opportune technologies that can reduce the consumption of petroleum-derived transportation fuels, while providing parallel reductions in greenhouse gas emissions. Biomass recalcitrance, or resistance to deconstruction, is a major technical challenge that limits effective conversion of biomass to fermentable sugars, often requiring a costly thermochemical pretreatment step to improve biomass deconstruction. Biomass recalcitrance is imparted largely by the secondary cell wall, a complex polymeric matrix of cell wall polysaccharides and aromatic heteropolymers, that provides structural stability to cells and enables plant upright growth. Polymers within the cell wall can vary both compositionally and structurally depending upon plant species and anatomical fraction, and have varied responses to thermochemical pretreatments. Cell wall properties impacting recalcitrance are still not well understood, and as a result, the goal of this dissertation is to investigate structural features of the cell wall contributing to recalcitrance (1) in diverse anatomical fractions of a single species, (2) in response to diverse pretreatments, and (3) resulting from genetic modification. In the first study, feedstock cell wall heterogeneity was investigated in anatomical (stem, leaf sheaths, and leaf blades) and internode fractions of switchgrass at varying tissue maturities. Lignin content was observed as the key contributor to recalcitrance in maturing stem tissues only, with non-cellulosic substituted glucuronoarabinoxylans and pectic polysaccharides contributing to cell wall recalcitrance in leaf sheath and leaf blades. Hydroxycinnamate (i.e., saponifiable p-coumarate and ferulate) content along with xylan and pectin extractability decreased with tissue maturity, suggesting lignification is only one component imparting maturity specific cell wall recalcitrance. In the second study

  19. Velocity distribution in a turbulent flow near a rough wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korsun, A. S.; Pisarevsky, M. I.; Fedoseev, V. N.; Kreps, M. V.

    2017-11-01

    Velocity distribution in the zone of developed wall turbulence, regardless of the conditions on the wall, is described by the well-known Prandtl logarithmic profile. In this distribution, the constant, that determines the value of the velocity, is determined by the nature of the interaction of the flow with the wall and depends on the viscosity of the fluid, the dynamic velocity, and the parameters of the wall roughness.In extreme cases depending on the ratio between the thickness of the viscous sublayer and the size of the roughness the constant takes on a value that does not depend on viscosity, or leads to a ratio for a smooth wall.It is essential that this logarithmic profile is the result not only of the Prandtl theory, but can be derived from general considerations of the theory of dimensions, and also follows from the condition of local equilibrium of generation and dissipation of turbulent energy in the wall area. This allows us to consider the profile as a universal law of velocity distribution in the wall area of a turbulent flow.The profile approximation up to the maximum speed line with subsequent integration makes possible to obtain the resistance law for channels of simple shape. For channels of complex shape with rough walls, the universal profile can be used to formulate the boundary condition when applied to the calculation of turbulence models.This paper presents an empirical model for determining the constant of the universal logarithmic profile. The zone of roughness is described by a set of parameters and is considered as a porous structure with variable porosity.

  20. Synthetic biology: an emerging engineering discipline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Allen A; Lu, Timothy K

    2012-01-01

    Over the past decade, synthetic biology has emerged as an engineering discipline for biological systems. Compared with other substrates, biology poses a unique set of engineering challenges resulting from an incomplete understanding of natural biological systems and tools for manipulating them. To address these challenges, synthetic biology is advancing from developing proof-of-concept designs to focusing on core platforms for rational and high-throughput biological engineering. These platforms span the entire biological design cycle, including DNA construction, parts libraries, computational design tools, and interfaces for manipulating and probing synthetic circuits. The development of these enabling technologies requires an engineering mindset to be applied to biology, with an emphasis on generalizable techniques in addition to application-specific designs. This review aims to discuss the progress and challenges in synthetic biology and to illustrate areas where synthetic biology may impact biomedical engineering and human health.

  1. Practical Applications of Synthetic Aperture Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolov, Svetoslav Ivanov; Kortbek, Jacob; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2010-01-01

    Synthetic aperture imaging has been a focus of research for almost 3 decades. The research carried out at the Center for Fast Ultrasound Imaging has demonstrated that synthetic aperture focusing not only can be used in-vivo, but that it also yields superior B-mode and blood flow images. In the last...... years synthetic aperture focusing has moved from the lab to commercial products. The implementations vary in their scope and purpose. Some scanners use synthetic aperture imaging to improve the detail and contrast resolution of the system. Others to increase the image uniformity. Yet others use......, and multiple angle flash imaging are just a few of the names used to describe the commercial implementations of synthetic aperture focusing. Although they sound like different algorithms, they are the same in their core, as revealed in this paper....

  2. Using Piezoelectric Devices to Transmit Power through Walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherrit, Stewart; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Bao, Xiaoqi

    2008-01-01

    A method denoted wireless acoustic-electric feed-through (WAEF) has been conceived for transmitting power and/or data signals through walls or other solid objects made of a variety of elastic materials that could be electrically conductive or nonconductive. WAEF would make it unnecessary to use wires, optical fibers, tubes, or other discrete wall-penetrating signal-transmitting components, thereby eliminating the potential for structural weakening or leakage at such penetrations. Avoidance of such penetrations could be essential in some applications in which maintenance of pressure, vacuum, or chemical or biological isolation is required. In a basic WAEF setup, a transmitting piezoelectric transducer on one side of a wall would be driven at resonance to excite ultrasonic vibrations in the wall. A receiving piezoelectric transducer on the opposite side of the wall would convert the vibrations back to an ultrasonic AC electric signal, which would then be detected and otherwise processed in a manner that would depend on the modulation (if any) applied to the signal and whether the signal was used to transmit power, data, or both. An electromechanical-network model has been derived as a computationally efficient means of analyzing and designing a WAEF system. This model is a variant of a prior model, known in the piezoelectric-transducer art as Mason's equivalent-circuit model, in which the electrical and mechanical dynamics, including electromechanical couplings, are expressed as electrical circuit elements that can include inductors, capacitors, and lumped-parameter complex impedances. The real parts of the complex impedances are used to account for dielectric, mechanical, and coupling losses in all components (including all piezoelectric-transducer, wall, and intermediate material layers). In an application to a three-layer piezoelectric structure, this model was shown to yield the same results as do solutions of the wave equations of piezoelectricity and acoustic

  3. Properties of lead deposits in cell walls of radish (Raphanus sativus) roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Hiroshi; Fukuoka, Daisuke; Tatai, Yuri; Kamachi, Hiroyuki; Hayatsu, Manabu; Ono, Manami; Suzuki, Suechika

    2013-01-01

    Various mechanisms are involved in detoxification of heavy metals such as lead (Pb) in plant cells. Most of the Pb taken up by plants accumulates in their roots. However, the detailed properties of Pb complexes in roots remain unclear. We have investigated the properties of Pb deposits in root cell walls of radish (Raphanus sativus L.) seedlings grown on glass beads bed containing Pb pellets, which are the source of Pb-contamination in shooting range soils. Pb deposits were tightly bound to cell walls. Cell wall fragments containing about 50,000 ppm Pb were prepared from the roots. After extracting Pb from the cell wall fragments using HCl, Pb ions were recombined with the Pb-extracted cell wall fragments in a solution containing Pb acetate. When the cell wall fragments were treated with pectinase (E.C. 3.2.1.15) and were chemically modified with 1-ethyl-3-dimethylamino-propylcarboimide, the Pb-rebinding ability of the treated cell wall fragments decreased. When acid-treated cell wall fragments were incubated in a solution containing Pb(2+) and excess amounts of a chelating agent, Pb recombined with the cell wall fragments were measured to estimate the affinity between Pb(2+) and the cell wall fragments. Our data show that Pb(2+) binds to carboxyl groups of cell walls. The source of the carboxyl groups is suggested to be pectic compounds. A stability constant of the Pb-cell wall complex was estimated to be about 10(8). The role of root cell walls in the mechanism underlying heavy metal tolerance was discussed.

  4. MHD Electrode and wall constructions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Way, Stewart; Lempert, Joseph

    1984-01-01

    Electrode and wall constructions for the walls of a channel transmitting the hot plasma in a magnetohydrodynamic generator. The electrodes and walls are made of a plurality of similar modules which are spaced from one another along the channel. The electrodes can be metallic or ceramic, and each module includes one or more electrodes which are exposed to the plasma and a metallic cooling bar which is spaced from the plasma and which has passages through which a cooling fluid flows to remove heat transmitted from the electrode to the cooling bar. Each electrode module is spaced from and electrically insulated from each adjacent module while interconnected by the cooling fluid which serially flows among selected modules. A wall module includes an electrically insulating ceramic body exposed to the plasma and affixed, preferably by mechanical clips or by brazing, to a metallic cooling bar spaced from the plasma and having cooling fluid passages. Each wall module is, similar to the electrode modules, electrically insulated from the adjacent modules and serially interconnected to other modules by the cooling fluid.

  5. Functional domain walls in multiferroics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Dennis

    2015-11-25

    During the last decade a wide variety of novel and fascinating correlation phenomena has been discovered at domain walls in multiferroic bulk systems, ranging from unusual electronic conductance to inseparably entangled spin and charge degrees of freedom. The domain walls represent quasi-2D functional objects that can be induced, positioned, and erased on demand, bearing considerable technological potential for future nanoelectronics. Most of the challenges that remain to be solved before turning related device paradigms into reality, however, still fall in the field of fundamental condensed matter physics and materials science. In this topical review seminal experimental findings gained on electric and magnetic domain walls in multiferroic bulk materials are addressed. A special focus is put on the physical properties that emerge at so-called charged domain walls and the added functionality that arises from coexisting magnetic order. The research presented in this review highlights that we are just entering a whole new world of intriguing nanoscale physics that is yet to be explored in all its details. The goal is to draw attention to the persistent challenges and identify future key directions for the research on functional domain walls in multiferroics.

  6. The feasibility of removable prefab diaphragm walls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amaarouk, R.; De Gijt, J.G.; Braam, C.R.

    2013-01-01

    A diaphragm wall is a cast in-situ reinforced concrete retaining wall applied in, among others, quay walls. The main advantages of this type of retaining wall are that it can be made in almost every preferred length and that it can resist high structural loads. However, there are several

  7. Structural analysis of cell wall polysaccharides using PACE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mortimer, Jennifer C. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Joint BioEnergy Institute

    2017-01-01

    The plant cell wall is composed of many complex polysaccharides. The composition and structure of the polysaccharides affect various cell properties including cell shape, cell function and cell adhesion. Many techniques to characterize polysaccharide structure are complicated, requiring expensive equipment and specialized operators e.g. NMR, MALDI-MS. PACE (Polysaccharide Analysis using Carbohydrate gel Electrophoresis) uses a simple, rapid technique to analyze polysaccharide quantity and structure (Goubet et al. 2002). Whilst the method here describes xylan analysis, it can be applied (by use of the appropriate glycosyl hydrolase) to any cell wall polysaccharide.

  8. Disease, dysfunction, and synthetic biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, Sune

    2014-08-01

    Theorists analyzing the concept of disease on the basis of the notion of dysfunction consider disease to be dysfunction requiring. More specifically, dysfunction-requiring theories of disease claim that for an individual to be diseased certain biological facts about it must be the case. Disease is not wholly a matter of evaluative attitudes. In this paper, I consider the dysfunction-requiring component of Wakefield's hybrid account of disease in light of the artifactual organisms envisioned by current research in synthetic biology. In particular, I argue that the possibility of artifactual organisms and the case of oncomice and other bred or genetically modified strains of organism constitute a significant objection to Wakefield's etiological account of the dysfunction requirement. I then develop a new alternative understanding of the dysfunction requirement that builds on the organizational theory of function. I conclude that my suggestion is superior to Wakefield's theory because it (a) can accommodate both artifactual and naturally evolved organisms, (b) avoids the possibility of there being a conflict between what an organismic part is supposed to do and the health of the organism, and (c) provides a nonarbitrary and practical way of determining whether dysfunction occurs. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press, on behalf of the Journal of Medicine and Philosophy Inc. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Online professionalism: A synthetic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chretien, Katherine C; Tuck, Matthew G

    2015-04-01

    The rise of social media has increased connectivity and blurred personal and professional boundaries, bringing new challenges for medical professionalism. Whether traditional professionalism principles apply to the online social media space remains unknown. The purpose of this synthetic literature review was to characterize the original peer-reviewed research studies published between 1 January 2000-1 November 2014 on online professionalism, to assess methodologies and approaches used, and to provide insights to guide future studies in this area. The investigators searched three databases and performed manual searches of bibliographies to identify the 32 studies included. Most studies originated in the USA. Cross-sectional surveys and analyses of publicly available online content were the most common methodologies employed. Studies covered the general areas of use and privacy, assessment of unprofessional online behaviours, consensus-gathering of what constitutes unprofessional or inappropriate online behaviours, and education and policies. Studies were of variable quality; only around half of survey studies had response rates of 50% or greater. Medical trainees were the most common population studied. Future directions for research include public perspectives of online professionalism, impact on patient trust, and how to use social media productively as medical professionals.

  10. Turbine airfoil with outer wall thickness indicators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marra, John J; James, Allister W; Merrill, Gary B

    2013-08-06

    A turbine airfoil usable in a turbine engine and including a depth indicator for determining outer wall blade thickness. The airfoil may include an outer wall having a plurality of grooves in the outer surface of the outer wall. The grooves may have a depth that represents a desired outer surface and wall thickness of the outer wall. The material forming an outer surface of the outer wall may be removed to be flush with an innermost point in each groove, thereby reducing the wall thickness and increasing efficiency. The plurality of grooves may be positioned in a radially outer region of the airfoil proximate to the tip.

  11. High frame rate synthetic aperture vector flow imaging for transthoracic echocardiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villagómez-Hoyos, Carlos A.; Stuart, Matthias B.; Bechsgaard, Thor; Nielsen, Michael Bachmann; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2016-04-01

    This work presents the first in vivo results of 2-D high frame rate vector velocity imaging for transthoracic cardiac imaging. Measurements are made on a healthy volunteer using the SARUS experimental ultrasound scanner connected to an intercostal phased-array probe. Two parasternal long-axis view (PLAX) are obtained, one centred at the aortic valve and another centred at the left ventricle. The acquisition sequence was composed of 3 diverging waves for high frame rate synthetic aperture flow imaging. For verification a phantom measurement is performed on a transverse straight 5 mm diameter vessel at a depth of 100 mm in a tissue-mimicking phantom. A flow pump produced a 2 ml/s constant flow with a peak velocity of 0.2 m/s. The average estimated flow angle in the ROI was 86.22° +/- 6.66° with a true flow angle of 90°. A relative velocity bias of -39% with a standard deviation of 13% was found. In-vivo acquisitions show complex flow patterns in the heart. In the aortic valve view, blood is seen exiting the left ventricle cavity through the aortic valve into the aorta during the systolic phase of the cardiac cycle. In the left ventricle view, blood flow is seen entering the left ventricle cavity through the mitral valve and splitting in two ways when approximating the left ventricle wall. The work presents 2-D velocity estimates on the heart from a non-invasive transthoracic scan. The ability of the method detecting flow regardless of the beam angle could potentially reveal a more complete view of the flow patterns presented on the heart.

  12. Abdominal wall hernia and pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, K K; Henriksen, N A; Jorgensen, L N

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: There is no consensus as to the treatment strategy for abdominal wall hernias in fertile women. This study was undertaken to review the current literature on treatment of abdominal wall hernias in fertile women before or during pregnancy. METHODS: A literature search was undertaken in Pub......Med and Embase in combination with a cross-reference search of eligible papers. RESULTS: We included 31 papers of which 23 were case reports. In fertile women undergoing sutured or mesh repair, pain was described in a few patients during the last trimester of a subsequent pregnancy. Emergency surgery...... of incarcerated hernias in pregnant women, as well as combined hernia repair and cesarean section appears as safe procedures. No major complications were reported following hernia repair before or during pregnancy. The combined procedure of elective cesarean section and abdominal wall hernia repair was reported...

  13. Generation of a Spindle Checkpoint Arrest from Synthetic Signaling Assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Ivan; Leontiou, Ioanna; Amin, Priya; May, Karen M; Soper Ní Chafraidh, Sadhbh; Zlámalová, Eliška; Hardwick, Kevin G

    2017-01-09

    The spindle checkpoint acts as a mitotic surveillance system, monitoring interactions between kinetochores and spindle microtubules and ensuring high-fidelity chromosome segregation [1-3]. The checkpoint is activated by unattached kinetochores, and Mps1 kinase phosphorylates KNL1 on conserved MELT motifs to generate a binding site for the Bub3-Bub1 complex [4-7]. This leads to dynamic kinetochore recruitment of Mad proteins [8, 9], a conformational change in Mad2 [10-12], and formation of the mitotic checkpoint complex (MCC: Cdc20-Mad3-Mad2 [13-15]). MCC formation inhibits the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (Cdc20-APC/C), thereby preventing the proteolytic destruction of securin and cyclin and delaying anaphase onset. What happens at kinetochores after Mps1-dependent Bub3-Bub1 recruitment remains mechanistically unclear, and it is not known whether kinetochore proteins other than KNL1 have significant roles to play in checkpoint signaling and MCC generation. Here, we take a reductionist approach, avoiding the complexities of kinetochores, and demonstrate that co-recruitment of KNL1(Spc7) and Mps1(Mph1) is sufficient to generate a robust checkpoint signal and prolonged mitotic arrest. We demonstrate that a Mad1-Bub1 complex is formed during synthetic checkpoint signaling. Analysis of bub3Δ mutants demonstrates that Bub3 acts to suppress premature checkpoint signaling. This synthetic system will enable detailed, mechanistic dissection of MCC generation and checkpoint silencing. After analyzing several mutants that affect localization of checkpoint complexes, we conclude that spindle checkpoint arrest can be independent of their kinetochore, spindle pole, and nuclear envelope localization. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  14. Acalculous Diffuse Gallbladder Wall Thickening in Children

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Ji Haeng; No, Young Eun; Lee, Yeoun Joo; Hwang, Jae Yeon; Lee, Joon Woo; Park, Jae Hong

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Gallbladder (GB) wall thickening can be found in various conditions unrelated to intrinsic GB disease. We investigated the predisposing etiologies and the outcome of acalculous GB wall thickening in children. Methods We retrospectively analyzed 67 children with acalculous GB wall thickening who had visited our institute from June 2010 to June 2013. GB wall thickening was defined as a GB wall diameter >3.5 mm on abdominal ultrasound examination or computed tomography. Underlying diseas...

  15. [Left ventricle free wall rupture - a 10-year experience].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Rui; Gallego, J; Mendes, M; Serpa, C; Mendes, S; Roque, J; Guerra, N; Lemos, A; Pereira, Ricardo; Nobre, Angelo; Cravino, João

    2011-01-01

    The left ventricle free wall rupture is one of the most serious and lethal complications associated to myocardial infarction.The most common treatment in our days consists in direct closure of the rupture with pericardium or synthetic material, applied with the help of histoacryl glue, without extracorporeal circulation.Between January 2000 and September 2010, 35 consecutive patients underwent operation for left ventricle free wall rupture at our hospital.The mean age was 69,5 years and most of the patients were male ( 65,7 % ). 2,9 days was the mean time for rupture after infarction and the anterior and lateral wall were most frequently involved. 94,7 % of the patients were in shock. Surgery was performed without extracorporeal circulation using a patch of pericardium and/or Dacron Sauvage, with histoacryl glue in 85,7 % of cases.Mean time of ICU stay was 7,9 days, in-hospital global mortality 28,6 %. At 2,5 years follow-up, 86 % of the patients were alive.Despite the high morbidity and mortality associated to surgery, the procedure is now safer, simpler and quick allowing the treatment of a situation that conducted to a most certain death without management.

  16. Nonwoven polypropylene prosthesis in large abdominal wall defects in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Patrick dos Santos Barros dos; Chagas, Vera Lucia Antunes; Silva, Jéssica Marquet; Silva, Paulo Cesar; Jamel, Nelson; Schanaider, Alberto

    2012-10-01

    To evaluate, in large abdominal wall defects surgically shaped in rats, if a synthetic polypropylene nonwoven prosthesis could be used as a therapeutic option to conventional polypropylene mesh. Twenty four (24) Wistar rats were enrolled into three groups. Group 1 (Simulation group) with an abdominal wall defect of 3 X 3 left untreated and Groups 2 and 3, respectively treated with a conventional polypropylene mesh and a polypropylene nonwoven (NWV) prosthesis to cover the breach. At the 45th postoperatively day, adhesion (area and strength) and vascularization of Groups 2 and 3 were evaluated. The histological preparations with Hematoxylin-Eosin, Tricromium of Masson, Pricrosirius red and polarization with birefringence, and also the structural analysis of the prostheses carried on by Thermogravimetry and Differential Scanning Calorimetry were also assessed. There were no significant differences between the Groups 2 and 3. In rats, the polypropylene nonwoven prosthesis showed to be safe and has to be considered as an alternative to conventional mesh manufactured by weaving in the treatment of great defects of the abdominal wall.

  17. Copper isotope fractionation during equilibration with natural and synthetic ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Brooke M; Kirby, Jason K; Degryse, Fien; Scheiderich, Kathleen; McLaughlin, Mike J

    2014-01-01

    As copper (Cu) stable isotopes emerge as a tool for tracing Cu biogeochemical cycling, an understanding of how Cu isotopes fractionate during complexation with soluble organic ligands in natural waters and soil solutions is required. A Donnan dialysis technique was employed to assess the isotopic fractionation of Cu during complexation with the soluble synthetic ligands ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA), iminodiacetic acid (IDA) and desferrioxamine B (DFOB), as well as with Suwannee River fulvic acid (SRFA). The results indicated enrichment of the heavy isotope ((65)Cu) in the complexes, with Δ(65)Cu complex-free values ranging from +0.14 to +0.84‰. A strong linear correlation was found between the logarithms of the stability constants of the Cu complexes and the magnitudes of isotopic fractionation. These results show that complexation of Cu by organic ligands can affect the isotopic signature of the free Cu ion. This free Cu is considered the most bioavailable species, and hence, our results highlight the importance of understanding fractionation processes in the uptake medium when using Cu isotopes to study the uptake mechanisms of organisms. These data contribute a vital piece to the emerging picture of Cu isotope cycling in the natural environment, as organic complexation plays a key role in the Cu cycle.

  18. Design of computational retrobiosynthesis tools for the design of de novo synthetic pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadadi, Noushin; Hatzimanikatis, Vassily

    2015-10-01

    Designing putative metabolic pathways is of great interest in synthetic biology. Retrobiosynthesis is a discipline that involves the design, evaluation, and optimization of de novo biosynthetic pathways for the production of high-value compounds and drugs from renewable resources and natural or engineered enzymes. The best candidate pathways are then engineered within a metabolic network of microorganisms that serve as synthetic platforms for synthetic biology. The complexity of biological chemistry and metabolism requires computational approaches to explore the full possibilities of engineering synthetic pathways towards target compounds. Herein, we discuss recent developments in the design of computational tools for retrosynthetic biochemistry and outline the workflow and design elements for such tools. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. Ray synthetic seismograms: a useful tool in the International Data Center environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Firbas

    1994-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper some of the results of a feasibility study on ray synthetic seismograms usage are reported. A computational method, ways of composing synthetic traces, an application of the source wavelet and the radiation pattern and integration of such an approach into the Center for Seismic Studies (CSS revision 3.0 structure are outlined. Further on, results obtained for model examples, nuclear explosions, and earthquakes are presented. Conclusions of the undertaken feasibility study help to understand that ray synthetic seismograms represent a very fast tool (results in “no time” and simultaneously represent a complex tool with all needed features. The ray synthetic seismograms can be implemented in various ways: to be computed automatically and used within the Intelligent Monitoring System, to be computed automatically and provided to the analyst, to provide a database of master events, to be computed interactively by an analyst during routine daily analysis.

  20. Solar Walls for concrete renovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gramkow, Lotte; Vejen, Niels Kristian; Olsen, Lars

    1996-01-01

    This repport gives a short presentation of three full-scale testing solar walls, the construction including the architectural design, materials and components, transportation and storage of solar enegy, the effect on the construction behind, statics and practical experience.The results of the mea......This repport gives a short presentation of three full-scale testing solar walls, the construction including the architectural design, materials and components, transportation and storage of solar enegy, the effect on the construction behind, statics and practical experience.The results...