WorldWideScience

Sample records for wall surface characterization

  1. Multifractal characterization of single wall carbon nanotube thin films surface upon exposure to optical parametric oscillator laser irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ţălu, Ştefan; Marković, Zoran; Stach, Sebastian; Todorović Marković, B.; Ţălu, Mihai

    2014-01-01

    This study presents a multifractal approach, obtained with atomic force microscopy analysis, to characterize the structural evolution of single wall carbon nanotube thin films upon exposure to optical parametric oscillator laser irradiation at wavelength of 430 nm. Microstructure and morphological changes of carbon nanotube films deposited on different substrates (mica and TGX grating) were recorded by atomic force microscope. A detailed methodology for surface multifractal characterization, which may be applied for atomic force microscopy data, was presented. Multifractal analysis of surface roughness revealed that carbon nanotube films surface has a multifractal geometry at various magnifications. The generalized dimension D q and the singularity spectrum f(α) provided quantitative values that characterize the local scale properties of carbon nanotube films surface morphology at nanometer scale. Multifractal analysis provides different yet complementary information to that offered by traditional surface statistical parameters.

  2. Micro-/nano-characterization of the surface structures on the divertor tiles from JET ITER-like wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tokitani, M., E-mail: tokitani.masayuki@LHD.nifs.ac.jp [National Institute for Fusion Science, Oroshi, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Miyamoto, M. [Shimane University, Matsue, Shimane 690-8504 (Japan); Masuzaki, S. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Oroshi, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Fujii, Y. [Shimane University, Matsue, Shimane 690-8504 (Japan); Sakamoto, R. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Oroshi, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Oya, Y. [Shizuoka University, Shizuoka 422-8529 (Japan); Hatano, Y. [University of Toyama, Toyama 930-8555 (Japan); Otsuka, T. [Kindai University, Higashi-Osaka, Osaka, 577-8502 (Japan); Oyaidzu, M.; Kurotaki, H.; Suzuki, T.; Hamaguchi, D.; Isobe, K.; Asakura, N. [National Institute for Quantum and Radiological Science and Technology (QST), Rokkasho Aomori 039-3212 (Japan); Widdowson, A. [EUROfusion Consortium, JET, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Rubel, M. [Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), 100 44 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2017-03-15

    Highlights: • Micro-/nano-characterization of the surface structures on the divertor tiles from JET ITER-like wall were studied. • The stratified mixed-material deposition layer composed by W, C, O, Mo and Be with the thickness of ∼1.5 μm was formed on the apron of Tile 1. • The study revealed the micro- and nano-scale modification of the inner tile surface of the JET ILW. - Abstract: Micro-/nano-characterization of the surface structures on the divertor tiles used in the first campaign (2011–2012) of the JET tokamak with the ITER-like wall (JET ILW) were studied. The analyzed tiles were a single poloidal section of the tile numbers of 1, 3 and 4, i.e., upper, vertical and horizontal targets, respectively. A sample from the apron of Tile 1 was deposition-dominated. Stratified mixed-material layers composed of Be, W, Ni, O and C were deposited on the original W-coating. Their total thickness was ∼1.5 μm. By means of transmission electron microscopy, nano-size bubble-like structures with a size of more than 100 nm were identified in that layer. They could be related to deuterium retention in the layer dominated by Be. The surface microstructure of the sample from Tile 4 also showed deposition: a stratified mixed-material layer with the total thickness of 200–300 nm. The electron diffraction pattern obtained with transmission electron microscope indicated Be was included in the layer. No bubble-like structures have been identified. The surface of Tile 3, originally coated by Mo, was identified as the erosion zone. This is consistent with the fact that the strike point was often located on that tile during the plasma operation. The study revealed the micro- and nano-scale modification of the inner tile surface of the JET ILW. In particular, a complex mixed-material deposition layer could affect hydrogen isotope retention and dust formation.

  3. Synthesis, characterization and cytotoxicity of surface amino-functionalized water-dispersible multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vukovic, Goran; Marinkovic, Aleksandar [Faculty of Technology and Metallurgy, University of Belgrade, Karnegijeva 4, 11120 Belgrade (Serbia); Obradovic, Maja [Institute of Chemistry, Technology and Metallurgy, University of Belgrade, Njegoseva 12, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia); Radmilovic, Velimir [National Centre for Electron Microscopy, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Colic, Miodrag [Institute for Medical Research, Military Medical Academy, Crnotravska 17, 11002 Belgrade (Serbia); Aleksic, Radoslav [Faculty of Technology and Metallurgy, University of Belgrade, Karnegijeva 4, 11120 Belgrade (Serbia); Uskokovic, Petar S., E-mail: puskokovic@tmf.bg.ac.rs [Faculty of Technology and Metallurgy, University of Belgrade, Karnegijeva 4, 11120 Belgrade (Serbia)

    2009-06-30

    Surface functionalization of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), with amino groups via chemical modification of carboxyl groups introduced on the nanotube surface, using O-(7-azabenzotriazol-1-yl)-N,N,N',N'-tetramethyluronium hexafluorophosphate (N-HATU) and N,N-diisopropylethylamine (DIEA) is reported. The N-HATU coupling agent provides faster reaction rate and the reaction occurs at lower temperature compared to amidation and acylation-amidation chemistry. The amines, 1,6-hexanediamine (HDA), diethylenetriamine (DETA), triethylenetetramine (TETA) and 1,4-phenylenediamine (PDA) were used. The resulting materials were characterized with different techniques such as FTIR, XRD, elemental analysis, TGA, TEM, UV-vis spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry. MWCNTs functionalized with PDA posses the best dispersibility and electron transfer properties in comparison to the others amines. Functionalized MWCNTs, at the concentrations between 1 and 50 {mu}g ml{sup -1}, were not cytotoxic for the fibroblast L929 cell line. However, the concentrations of MWCNTs higher of 10 {mu}g ml{sup -1} reduced cell growth and this effect correlated positively with the degree of their uptake by L929 cells.

  4. Synthesis, characterization and cytotoxicity of surface amino-functionalized water-dispersible multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vukovic, Goran; Marinkovic, Aleksandar; Obradovic, Maja; Radmilovic, Velimir; Colic, Miodrag; Aleksic, Radoslav; Uskokovic, Petar S.

    2009-01-01

    Surface functionalization of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), with amino groups via chemical modification of carboxyl groups introduced on the nanotube surface, using O-(7-azabenzotriazol-1-yl)-N,N,N',N'-tetramethyluronium hexafluorophosphate (N-HATU) and N,N-diisopropylethylamine (DIEA) is reported. The N-HATU coupling agent provides faster reaction rate and the reaction occurs at lower temperature compared to amidation and acylation-amidation chemistry. The amines, 1,6-hexanediamine (HDA), diethylenetriamine (DETA), triethylenetetramine (TETA) and 1,4-phenylenediamine (PDA) were used. The resulting materials were characterized with different techniques such as FTIR, XRD, elemental analysis, TGA, TEM, UV-vis spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry. MWCNTs functionalized with PDA posses the best dispersibility and electron transfer properties in comparison to the others amines. Functionalized MWCNTs, at the concentrations between 1 and 50 μg ml -1 , were not cytotoxic for the fibroblast L929 cell line. However, the concentrations of MWCNTs higher of 10 μg ml -1 reduced cell growth and this effect correlated positively with the degree of their uptake by L929 cells.

  5. Effect of nano-scale morphology on micro-channel wall surface and electrical characterization in lead silicate glass micro-channel plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Hua; Li, Fangjun; Xu, Yanglei; Bo, Tiezhu; Zhou, Dongzhan; Lian, Jiao; Li, Qing; Cao, Zhenbo; Xu, Tao; Wang, Caili; Liu, Hui; Li, Guoen; Jia, Jinsheng

    2017-10-01

    Micro-channel plate (MCP) is a two dimensional arrays of microscopic channel charge particle multiplier. Silicate composition and hydrogen reduction are keys to determine surface morphology of micro-channel wall in MCP. In this paper, lead silicate glass micro-channel plates in two different cesium contents (0at%, 0.5at%) and two different hydrogen reduction temperatures (400°C,450°C) were present. The nano-scale morphology, elements content and chemical states of microporous wall surface treated under different alkaline compositions and reduction conditions was investigated by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), respectively. Meanwhile, the electrical characterizations of MCP, including the bulk resistance, electron gain and the density of dark current, were measured in a Vacuum Photoelectron Imaging Test Facility (VPIT).The results indicated that the granular phase occurred on the surface of microporous wall and diffuses in bulk glass is an aggregate of Pb atom derived from the reduction of Pb2+. In micro-channel plate, the electron gain and bulk resistance were mainly correlated to particle size and distribution, the density of dark current (DDC) went up with the increasing root-mean-square roughness (RMS) on the microporous wall surface. Adding cesiums improved the size of Pb atomic aggregation, lowered the relative concentration of [Pb] reduced from Pb2+ and decreased the total roughness of micro-channel wall surface, leading a higher bulk resistance, a lower electron gain and a less dark current. Increasing hydrogen reduction temperature also improved the size of Pb atomic aggregation, but enhanced the relative concentration of [Pb] and enlarged the total roughness of micro-channel wall surface, leading a higher bulk resistance, a lower electron gain and a larger dark current. The reasons for the difference of electrical characteristics were discussed.

  6. Characterization of the local layer structure of a broad wall in a surface stabilized ferroelectric liquid crystal using synchrotron X-ray micro-diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iida, Atsuo; Noma, Takashi; Miyata, Hirokatsu.

    1996-01-01

    The local layer structure of the broad wall of a zig-zag defect in a thin-surface stabilized ferroelectric liquid crystal cell was characterized using a synchrotron X-ray microbeam of less than 5 μm spatial resolution. By using a rocking curve measurement at the broad wall, multiple or broad peaks were observed between a pair of peaks due to a chevron structure. These new peaks are clear evidence of a modified pseudo-bookshelf structure at the wall. For 1.5 μm thick cells, a bookshelf layer is relatively flat, but is accompanied by small areas of inclined layer connecting the bookshelf and the chevron structures. For 10 μm thick cells, the pseudo-bookshelf structure bends or undulates both perpendicular and parallel to the rubbing direction. No appreciable change in the layer spacing was observed in the modified pseudo-bookshelf structure. The temperature dependence of the broad wall layer structure was also measured. (author)

  7. Characterization of the local layer structure of a broad wall in a surface stabilized ferroelectric liquid crystal using synchrotron X-ray micro-diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iida, Atsuo [National Lab. for High Energy Physics, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Noma, Takashi; Miyata, Hirokatsu

    1996-01-01

    The local layer structure of the broad wall of a zig-zag defect in a thin-surface stabilized ferroelectric liquid crystal cell was characterized using a synchrotron X-ray microbeam of less than 5 {mu}m spatial resolution. By using a rocking curve measurement at the broad wall, multiple or broad peaks were observed between a pair of peaks due to a chevron structure. These new peaks are clear evidence of a modified pseudo-bookshelf structure at the wall. For 1.5 {mu}m thick cells, a bookshelf layer is relatively flat, but is accompanied by small areas of inclined layer connecting the bookshelf and the chevron structures. For 10 {mu}m thick cells, the pseudo-bookshelf structure bends or undulates both perpendicular and parallel to the rubbing direction. No appreciable change in the layer spacing was observed in the modified pseudo-bookshelf structure. The temperature dependence of the broad wall layer structure was also measured. (author)

  8. Surface characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandla A. Tshabalala

    2005-01-01

    Surface properties of wood play an important role when wood is used or processed into different commodities such as siding, joinery, textiles, paper, sorption media or wood composites. Thus, for example, the quality and durability of a wood coating are determined by the surface properties of the wood and the coating. The same is true for wood composites, as the...

  9. CHARACTERIZATION OF TANK 18F WALL AND SCALE SAMPLES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hay, Michael; Click, Damon; Diprete, C.; Diprete, David

    2010-01-01

    Samples from the wall of Tank 18F were obtained to determine the associated source term using a special wall sampling device. Two wall samples and a scale sample were obtained and characterized at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). All the analyses of the Tank 18F wall and scale samples met the targeted detection limits. The upper wall samples show ∼2X to 6X higher concentrations for U, Pu, and Np on an activity per surface area basis than the lower wall samples. On an activity per mass basis, the upper and lower wall samples show similar compositions for U and Pu. The Np activity is still ∼2.5X higher in the upper wall sample on a per mass basis. The scale sample contains 2-3X higher concentrations of U, Pu, and Sr-90 than the wall samples on an activity per mass basis. The plutonium isotopics differ for all three wall samples (upper, lower, and scale samples). The Pu-238 appears to increase as a proportion of total plutonium as you move up the tank wall from the lowest sample (scale sample) to the upper wall sample. The elemental composition of the scale sample appears similar to other F-Area PUREX sludge compositions. The composition of the scale sample is markedly different than the material on the floor of Tank 18F. However, the scale sample shows elevated Mg and Ca concentrations relative to typical PUREX sludge as do the floor samples.

  10. Characterization of solid surfaces

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kane, Philip F; Larrabee, Graydon B

    1974-01-01

    .... A comprehensive review of surface analysis, this important volume surveys both principles and techniques of surface characterization, describes instrumentation, and suggests the course of future research...

  11. Surfaces electrons at dielectric plasma walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinisch, Rafael Leslie

    2013-01-01

    The concept of the electron surface layer introduced in this thesis provides a framework for the description of the microphysics of the surplus electrons immediately at the wall and thereby complements the modelling of the plasma sheath. In this work we have considered from a surface physics perspective the distribution and build-up of an electron adsorbate on the wall as well as the effect of the negative charge on the scattering of light by a spherical particle immersed in a plasma. In our electron surface layer model we treat the wall-bound electrons as a wall-thermalised electron distribution minimising the grand canonical potential and satisfying Poisson's equation. The boundary between the electron surface layer and the plasma sheath is determined by a force balance between the attractive image potential and the repulsive sheath potential and lies in front of the crystallographic interface. Depending on the electron affinity χ, that is the offset of the conduction band minimum to the potential in front of the surface, two scenarios for the wall-bound electrons are realised. For χ 0 electrons penetrate into the conduction band where they form an extended space charge. These different scenarios are also reflected in the electron kinetics at the wall which control the sticking coefficient and the desorption time. If χ -3 . For χ>0 electron physisorption takes place in the conduction band. For this case sticking coefficients and desorption times have not been calculated yet but in view of the more efficient scattering with bulk phonons, responsible for electron energy relaxation in this case, we expect them to be larger than for the case of χ 0 the electrons in the bulk of the particle modify the refractive index through their bulk electrical conductivity. In both cases the conductivity is limited by scattering with surface or bulk phonons. Surplus electrons lead to an increase of absorption at low frequencies and, most notably, to a blue-shift of an

  12. Photocatalytic surface reactions on indoor wall paint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salthammer, T; Fuhrmann, F

    2007-09-15

    The reduction of indoor air pollutants by air cleaning systems has received considerable interest, and a number of techniques are now available. So far, the method of photocatalysis was mainly applied by use of titanium dioxide (TiO2) in flow reactors under UV light of high intensity. Nowadays, indoor wall paints are equipped with modified TiO2 to work as a catalyst under indoor daylight or artificial light. In chamber experiments carried out under indoor related conditions itwas shown thatthe method works for nitrogen dioxide with air exchange and for formaldehyde without air exchange at high concentrations. In further experiments with volatile organic compounds (VOCs), a small effect was found for terpenoids with high kOH rate constants. For other VOCs and carbon monoxide there was no degradation at all or the surface acted as a reversible sink. Secondary emissions from the reaction of paint constituents were observed on exposure to light. From the results it is concluded that recipes of photocatalytic wall paints need to be optimized for better efficiency under indoor conditions.

  13. Experimental Assessment of Mechanical Night Ventilation on Inner Wall Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ji, Wenhui; Heiselberg, Per Kvols; Wang, Houhua

    2016-01-01

    The cooling potential of night ventilation largely depends on the heat exchange at the internal room surfaces. During night time, increased heat transfer on a vertical wall is expected due to cool supply air that flows along the internal wall surface from the top of the wall. This paper presents ...... an experimental study of the cooling of wall surfaces in a test room by mechanical night-time ventilation. Significant improvement of indoor thermal environment is presented resulting from the enhanced internal convection heat transfer....

  14. Optimization of multiplane ?PIV for wall shear stress and wall topography characterization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rossi, M.; Lindken, R.; Westerweel, J.

    2009-01-01

    Multiplane ?PIV can be utilized to determine the wall shear stress and wall topology from the measured flow over a structured surface. A theoretical model was developed to predict the measurement error for the surface topography and shear stress, based on a theoretical analysis of the precision in

  15. Mechanical response of wall-patterned GaAs surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Bourhis, E.; Patriarche, G.

    2005-01-01

    Wall-patterned GaAs surfaces have been elaborated by photolithography and dry etching. Different surfaces were produced in order to change the aspect ratio of the walls formed at the substrate surface. The mechanical behaviour of individual walls was investigated by nanoindentation and the responses were compared to that of a standard bulk reference (flat surface). Deviation from the bulk response is detected in a load range of 1-25 mN depending on the aspect ratio of the walls. A central plastic zone criterion is proposed in view of transmission electron microscopy images of indented walls and allows the prediction of the response deviation of a given wall if its width is known. The mechanical response of the different types of walls is further investigated in terms of stiffness, total penetration of indenter and apparent hardness, and is scanned in relation to the proximity of a wall side. Overall results show that contact stiffness remains almost unaffected by aspect ratio, while penetration drastically increases because of the free sides of the wall as compared to a flat surface (bulk substrate). The application of substrate patterning for optoelectronic devices is discussed in the perspective of eliminating residual dislocations appearing in mismatched structures

  16. Towards the mechanical characterization of abdominal wall by inverse analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simón-Allué, R; Calvo, B; Oberai, A A; Barbone, P E

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study is to characterize the passive mechanical behaviour of abdominal wall in vivo in an animal model using only external cameras and numerical analysis. The main objective lies in defining a methodology that provides in vivo information of a specific patient without altering mechanical properties. It is demonstrated in the mechanical study of abdomen for hernia purposes. Mechanical tests consisted on pneumoperitoneum tests performed on New Zealand rabbits, where inner pressure was varied from 0mmHg to 12mmHg. Changes in the external abdominal surface were recorded and several points were tracked. Based on their coordinates we reconstructed a 3D finite element model of the abdominal wall, considering an incompressible hyperelastic material model defined by two parameters. The spatial distributions of these parameters (shear modulus and non linear parameter) were calculated by inverse analysis, using two different types of regularization: Total Variation Diminishing (TVD) and Tikhonov (H 1 ). After solving the inverse problem, the distribution of the material parameters were obtained along the abdominal surface. Accuracy of the results was evaluated for the last level of pressure. Results revealed a higher value of the shear modulus in a wide stripe along the craneo-caudal direction, associated with the presence of linea alba in conjunction with fascias and rectus abdominis. Non linear parameter distribution was smoother and the location of higher values varied with the regularization type. Both regularizations proved to yield in an accurate predicted displacement field, but H 1 obtained a smoother material parameter distribution while TVD included some discontinuities. The methodology here presented was able to characterize in vivo the passive non linear mechanical response of the abdominal wall. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. HVI Ballistic Performance Characterization of Non-Parallel Walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohl, William; Miller, Joshua; Christiansen, Eric

    2012-01-01

    The Double-Wall, "Whipple" Shield [1] has been the subject of many hypervelocity impact studies and has proven to be an effective shield system for Micro-Meteoroid and Orbital Debris (MMOD) impacts for spacecraft. The US modules of the International Space Station (ISS), with their "bumper shields" offset from their pressure holding rear walls provide good examples of effective on-orbit use of the double wall shield. The concentric cylinder shield configuration with its large radius of curvature relative to separation distance is easily and effectively represented for testing and analysis as a system of two parallel plates. The parallel plate double wall configuration has been heavily tested and characterized for shield performance for normal and oblique impacts for the ISS and other programs. The double wall shield and principally similar Stuffed Whipple Shield are very common shield types for MMOD protection. However, in some locations with many spacecraft designs, the rear wall cannot be modeled as being parallel or concentric with the outer bumper wall. As represented in Figure 1, there is an included angle between the two walls. And, with a cylindrical outer wall, the effective included angle constantly changes. This complicates assessment of critical spacecraft components located within outer spacecraft walls when using software tools such as NASA's BumperII. In addition, the validity of the risk assessment comes into question when using the standard double wall shield equations, especially since verification testing of every set of double wall included angles is impossible.

  18. Chapter 8:Surface Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandla A. Tshabalala; Joseph Jakes; Mark R. VanLandingham; Shaoxia Wang; Jouko. Peltonen

    2013-01-01

    Surface properties of wood play an important role when wood is used or processed into different commodities such as siding, joinery, textiles, paper, sorption media, or wood composites. Thus, for example, the quality and durability of a wood coating are determined by the surface properties of the wood and the coating. The same is true for wood composites where the...

  19. Material surface modification for first wall protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, M.J.

    1979-01-01

    The elements and strategy of a program to develop low Z surfaces for tokamak reactors is described. The development of low Z coated limiters is selected as an interim goal. Candidate materials were selected from the elements: Be, B, Al, Ti, V, C, O, N and their compounds. The effect of low energy erosion on surface morphology is shown for Be, TiC and VBe 12 . The tradeoffs in coating design are described. Stress analysis results for TiB 2 coated POCO graphite limiters for ORNL's ISX-B tokamak are given

  20. Surface characterization of ceramic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Somorjai, G.A.; Salmeron, M.

    1976-01-01

    In recent years several techniques have become available to characterize the structure and chemical composition of surfaces of ceramic materials. These techniques utilize electron scattering and scattering of ions from surfaces. Low-energy electron diffraction is used to determine the surface structure, Auger electron spectroscopy and other techniques of electron spectroscopy (ultraviolet and photoelectron spectroscopies) are employed to determine the composition of the surface. In addition the oxidation state of surface atoms may be determined using these techniques. Ion scattering mass spectrometry and secondary ion mass spectrometry are also useful in characterizing surfaces and their reactions. These techniques, their applications and the results of recent studies are discussed. 12 figures, 52 references, 2 tables

  1. Through-the-wall high-resolution imaging of a human and experimental characterization of the transmission of wall materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, S.; Jänis, A.; Gustafsson, M.; Kjellgren, J.; Sume, Ain

    2008-10-01

    This paper describes the research efforts made at the Swedish Defence Research Agency (FOI) concerning through-the-wall imaging radar, as well as fundamental characterization of various wall materials. These activities are a part of two FOI-projects concerning security sensors in the aspects of Military Operations in Urban Terrain (MOUT) and Homeland Defence. Through-the-wall high resolution imaging of a human between 28-40 GHz has been performed at FOI. The UWB radar that was used is normally a member of the instrumentation of the FOI outdoor RCS test range Lilla Gåra. The armed test person was standing behind different kinds of walls. The radar images were generated by stepping the turntable in azimuth and elevation. The angular resolution in the near-field was improved by refocusing the parabolic antennas, which in combination with the large bandwidth (12 GHz) gave extremely high resolution radar images. A 3D visualization of the person even exposed the handgun tucked into one hip pocket. A qualitative comparison between the experimental results and simulation results (physical optics-based method) will also be presented. The second part of this paper describes results from activities at FOI concerning material characterization in the 2-110 GHz region. The transmission of building, packing and clothing materials has been experimentally determined. The wide-band measurements in free space were carried out with a scalar network analyzer. In this paper results from these characterizations will be presented. Furthermore, an experimental investigation will be reported of how the transmission properties for some moisted materials change as a function of water content and frequency. We will also show experimental results of how the transmission properties of a pine panel are affected when the surface is coated with a thin surface layer of water.

  2. Topographic characterization of glazed surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Froeberg, Linda; Hupa, Leena

    2008-01-01

    Detailed characterization of surface microstructure, i.e. phase composition and surface geometry, has become an important criterion of glazed ceramics. Topographic characterization is an important parameter in, e.g. estimating the influence of additional films on the average roughness of a surface. Also, the microscaled and nanoscaled roughnesses correlate with the cleanability and the self-cleaning properties of the surfaces. In this work the surface geometry of several matte glazes were described by topography and roughness as given by whitelight confocal microscopy and atomic force microscopy. Different measuring parameters were compared to justify the usefulness of the techniques in giving a comprehensive description of the surface microstructure. The results suggest that confocal microscopy is well suited for giving reliable topographical parameters for matte surfaces with microscaled crystals in the surfaces. Atomic force microscopy was better suited for smooth surfaces or for describing the local topographic parameters of closely limited areas, e.g. the surroundings of separate crystals in the surface

  3. Topographic characterization of glazed surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Froeberg, Linda [Process Chemistry Centre, Abo Akademi University, FI-20500 Turku (Finland)], E-mail: lfroberg@abo.fi; Hupa, Leena [Process Chemistry Centre, Abo Akademi University, FI-20500 Turku (Finland)

    2008-01-15

    Detailed characterization of surface microstructure, i.e. phase composition and surface geometry, has become an important criterion of glazed ceramics. Topographic characterization is an important parameter in, e.g. estimating the influence of additional films on the average roughness of a surface. Also, the microscaled and nanoscaled roughnesses correlate with the cleanability and the self-cleaning properties of the surfaces. In this work the surface geometry of several matte glazes were described by topography and roughness as given by whitelight confocal microscopy and atomic force microscopy. Different measuring parameters were compared to justify the usefulness of the techniques in giving a comprehensive description of the surface microstructure. The results suggest that confocal microscopy is well suited for giving reliable topographical parameters for matte surfaces with microscaled crystals in the surfaces. Atomic force microscopy was better suited for smooth surfaces or for describing the local topographic parameters of closely limited areas, e.g. the surroundings of separate crystals in the surface.

  4. Characterization of wall conditions in DIII-D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holtrop, K.L.; Jackson, G.L.; Kellman, A.G.; Lee, R.L.; West, W.P.; Wood, R.D.; Whyte, D.G.

    1996-10-01

    Wall conditioning in DIII-D is one of the most important factors in achieving reproducible high confinement discharges. For example, the very high confinement mode (VH-mode) was only discovered after boronization, a CVD technique to deposit a thin boron film over the entire surface of the tokamak. In order to evaluate wall conditions and provide a data base to correlate these wall conditions with tokamak discharge performance, a series of nominally identical reference VH-mode discharges (1.6 MA, 2.1 T, double-null diverted) were taken at various times during a series of experimental campaigns with evolving wall conditions. These reference discharges have allowed a quantitative determination of how the wall conditions have evolved. For instance, core carbon and oxygen levels in the VH-mode phase remains at historically low levels during the 1995 run year and there was also a steady decrease in the oxygen levels at plasma initiation during this period. The authors discuss the long term changes in low Z impurities and the effect of wall conditioning techniques such as boronization and baking on these impurities. In addition, the evolution of the deuterium recycling rates will be discussed

  5. Induced superhydrophobic and antimicrobial character of zinc metal modified ceramic wall tile surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özcan, Selçuk; Açıkbaş, Gökhan; Çalış Açıkbaş, Nurcan

    2018-04-01

    Hydrophobic surfaces are also known to have antimicrobial effect by restricting the adherence of microorganisms. However, ceramic products are produced by high temperature processes resulting in a hydrophilic surface. In this study, an industrial ceramic wall tile glaze composition was modified by the inclusion of metallic zinc powder in the glaze suspension applied on the pre-sintered wall tile bodies by spraying. The glazed tiles were gloss fired at industrially applicable peak temperatures ranging from 980 °C to 1100 °C. The fired tile surfaces were coated with a commercial fluoropolymer avoiding water absorption. The surfaces were characterized with SEM, EDS, XRD techniques, roughness, sessile water drop contact angle, surface energy measurements, and standard antimicrobial tests. The surface hydrophobicity and the antimicrobial activity results were compared with that of unmodified, uncoated gloss fired wall tiles. A superhydrophobic contact angle of 150° was achieved at 1000 °C peak temperature due to the formation of micro-structured nanocrystalline zinc oxide granules providing a specific surface topography. At higher peak temperatures the hydrophobicity was lost as the specific granular surface topography deteriorated with the conversion of zinc oxide granules to the ubiquitous willemite crystals embedded in the glassy matrix. The antimicrobial efficacy also correlated with the hydrophobic character.

  6. Interaction of flexible surface hairs with near-wall turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brücker, Ch

    2011-05-11

    The interaction of near-wall turbulence with hairy surfaces is investigated in a turbulent boundary layer flow along a flat plate in an oil channel at Re = 1.2 × 10⁶. The plate is covered locally with a dense carpet of elastomeric micro-hairs (length L = 1 mm, length in viscous units L( + ) = 30) which are arranged in a regular grid (60 × 30 hairs with a streamwise spacing Δx( + )≈15 and a spanwise spacing Δy( + )≈30). Instead of the micro-structures used in previous studies for sensory applications, the surface hairs are considerably larger and much more densely distributed with a spacing of S/D wall-normal directions. Near-wall high-frequency disturbances excited by the passage of turbulent sweeps are dampened over their course along the carpet. The cooperative action of the hairs leads to an energy transfer from small-scale motion to larger scales, thus increasing the coherence of the motion pattern in streamwise and spanwise directions. As a consequence of the specific arrangement of the micro-hairs in streamwise columns a reduced spanwise meandering and stabilization of the streamwise velocity streaks is achieved by promoting varicose waves and inhibiting sinusoidal waves. Streak stabilization is known to be a major contributor to turbulent drag reduction. Thus it is concluded that hairy surfaces may be of benefit for turbulent drag reduction as hypothesized by Bartenwerfer and Bechert (1991 Z. Flugwiss. Weltraumforsch. 15 19-26).

  7. Identification and characterization of the surface proteins of Clostridium difficile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dailey, D.C.

    1988-01-01

    Several clostridial proteins were detected on the clostridial cell surface by sensitive radioiodination techniques. Two major proteins and six minor proteins comprised the radioiodinated proteins on the clostridial cell surface. Cellular fractionation of surface radiolabeled C. difficile determined that the radioiodinated proteins were found in the cell wall fraction of C. difficile and surprisingly were also present in the clostridial membrane. Furthermore, an interesting phenomenon of disulfide-crosslinking of the cell surface proteins of C. difficile was observed. Disulfide-linked protein complexes were found in both the membrane and cell wall fractions. In addition, the cell surface proteins of C. difficile were found to be released into the culture medium. In attempts to further characterize the clostridial proteins recombinant DNA techniques were employed. In addition, the role of the clostridial cell surface proteins in the interactions of C. difficile with human PMNs was also investigated

  8. Interaction of flexible surface hairs with near-wall turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruecker, Ch

    2011-01-01

    The interaction of near-wall turbulence with hairy surfaces is investigated in a turbulent boundary layer flow along a flat plate in an oil channel at Re = 1.2 x 10 6 . The plate is covered locally with a dense carpet of elastomeric micro-hairs (length L = 1 mm, length in viscous units L + = 30) which are arranged in a regular grid (60 x 30 hairs with a streamwise spacing Δx + ∼15 and a spanwise spacing Δy + ∼30). Instead of the micro-structures used in previous studies for sensory applications, the surface hairs are considerably larger and much more densely distributed with a spacing of S/D < 5 such that they interact with each other by flow coupling. The non-fluctuating mean part of the flow forces a substantial pre-bending in the streamwise direction (reconfiguration). As a consequence, the hairs align with the streamwise direction, thus imposing anisotropic damping characteristics with regard to flow fluctuations in streamwise and spanwise or wall-normal directions. Near-wall high-frequency disturbances excited by the passage of turbulent sweeps are dampened over their course along the carpet. The cooperative action of the hairs leads to an energy transfer from small-scale motion to larger scales, thus increasing the coherence of the motion pattern in streamwise and spanwise directions. As a consequence of the specific arrangement of the micro-hairs in streamwise columns a reduced spanwise meandering and stabilization of the streamwise velocity streaks is achieved by promoting varicose waves and inhibiting sinusoidal waves. Streak stabilization is known to be a major contributor to turbulent drag reduction. Thus it is concluded that hairy surfaces may be of benefit for turbulent drag reduction as hypothesized by Bartenwerfer and Bechert (1991 Z. Flugwiss. Weltraumforsch. 15 19-26).

  9. Higher dimensional curved domain walls on Kähler surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akbar, Fiki T., E-mail: ftakbar@fi.itb.ac.id [Theoretical Physics Laboratory, Theoretical High Energy Physics and Instrumentation Research Group, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Jl. Ganesha no. 10 Bandung, 40132 (Indonesia); Gunara, Bobby E., E-mail: bobby@fi.itb.ac.id [Theoretical Physics Laboratory, Theoretical High Energy Physics and Instrumentation Research Group, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Jl. Ganesha no. 10 Bandung, 40132 (Indonesia); Radjabaycolle, Flinn C. [Theoretical Physics Laboratory, Theoretical High Energy Physics and Instrumentation Research Group, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Jl. Ganesha no. 10 Bandung, 40132 (Indonesia); Departement of Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Cendrawasih University, Jl. Kampwolker Kampus Uncen Baru Waena-Jayapura 99351 (Indonesia); Wijaya, Rio N. [Theoretical Physics Laboratory, Theoretical High Energy Physics and Instrumentation Research Group, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Jl. Ganesha no. 10 Bandung, 40132 (Indonesia)

    2017-03-15

    In this paper we study some aspects of curved BPS-like domain walls in higher dimensional gravity theory coupled to scalars where the scalars span a complex Kähler surface with scalar potential turned on. Assuming that a fake superpotential has a special form which depends on Kähler potential and a holomorphic function, we prove that BPS-like equations have a local unique solution. Then, we analyze the vacuum structure of the theory including their stability using dynamical system and their existence in ultraviolet-infrared regions using renormalization group flow.

  10. Higher dimensional curved domain walls on Kähler surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akbar, Fiki T.; Gunara, Bobby E.; Radjabaycolle, Flinn C.; Wijaya, Rio N.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we study some aspects of curved BPS-like domain walls in higher dimensional gravity theory coupled to scalars where the scalars span a complex Kähler surface with scalar potential turned on. Assuming that a fake superpotential has a special form which depends on Kähler potential and a holomorphic function, we prove that BPS-like equations have a local unique solution. Then, we analyze the vacuum structure of the theory including their stability using dynamical system and their existence in ultraviolet-infrared regions using renormalization group flow.

  11. XPS Protocol for the Characterization of Pristine and Functionalized Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosa, E. D.; Allada, R.; Huffman, C. B.; Arepalli, S.

    2009-01-01

    Recent interest in developing new applications for carbon nanotubes (CNT) has fueled the need to use accurate macroscopic and nanoscopic techniques to characterize and understand their chemistry. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) has proved to be a useful analytical tool for nanoscale surface characterization of materials including carbon nanotubes. Recent nanotechnology research at NASA Johnson Space Center (NASA-JSC) helped to establish a characterization protocol for quality assessment for single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). Here, a review of some of the major factors of the XPS technique that can influence the quality of analytical data, suggestions for methods to maximize the quality of data obtained by XPS, and the development of a protocol for XPS characterization as a complementary technique for analyzing the purity and surface characteristics of SWCNTs is presented. The XPS protocol is then applied to a number of experiments including impurity analysis and the study of chemical modifications for SWCNTs.

  12. Evaluation of Coating Removal and Aggressive Surface Removal Surface Technologies Applied to Concrete Walls, Brick Walls, and Concrete Ceilings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebadian, M.A.; Lagos, L.E.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to test and evaluate innovative and commercially available technologies for the surface decontamination of walls and ceilings. This investigation supports the DOE's objectives of reducing risks to human health and the environment through its restoration projects at FEMP and MEMP. This project was performed at the Hemispheric Center for Environmental Technology (HCET) at Florida International University (FIU), where one innovative and four commercially available decontamination technologies were evaluated under standard, non-nuclear testing conditions. The performance data generated by this project will assist DOE site managers in the selection of the safest, most efficient, and most cost-effective decontamination technologies to accomplish their remediation objectives

  13. Wall Turbulence with Designer Properties: Identification, Characterization and Manipulation of Energy Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-26

    AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2016-0108 Wall turbulence with designer properties Beverley Mckeon CALIFORNIA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY Final Report 02/26/2016... Wall turbulence with designer properties: Identification, characterization & manipulation of energy pathways 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER...identification, characterization and manipulation of energy pathways in wall turbulence . The objectives were pursued separately and collaboratively by the

  14. Surface segregation in binary alloy first wall candidate materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruen, D.M.; Krauss, A.R.; Mendelsohn, M.H.; Susman, S.; Argonne National Lab., IL

    1982-01-01

    We have been studying the conditions necessary to produce a self-sustaining stable lithium monolayer on a metal substrate as a means of creating a low-Z film which sputters primarily as secondary ions. It is expected that because of the toroidal field, secondary ions originating at the first wall will be returned and contribute little to the plasma impurity influx. Aluminum and copper have, because of their high thermal conductivity and low induced radioactivity, been proposed as first wall candidate materials. The mechanical properties of the pure metals are very poorly suited to structural applications and an alloy must be used to obtain adequate hardness and tensile strength. In the case of aluminum, mechanical properties suitable for aircraft manufacture are obtained by the addition of a few at% Li. In order to investigate alloys of a similar nature as candidate structural materials for fusion machines we have prepared samples of Li-doped aluminum using both a pyro-metallurgical and a vapor-diffusion technique. The sputtering properties and surface composition have been studied as a function of sample temperature and heating time, and ion beam mass. The erosion rate and secondary ion yield of both the sputtered Al and Li have been monitored by secondary ion mass spectroscopy and Auger analysis providing information on surface segregation, depth composition profiles, and diffusion rates. The surface composition ahd lithium depth profiles are compared with previously obtained computational results based on a regular solution model of segregation, while the partial sputtering yields of Al and Li are compared with results obtained with a modified version of the TRIM computer program. (orig.)

  15. Measurement and modification of first-wall surface composition in the Oak Ridge Tokamak (ORMAK)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clausing, R.E.; Emerson, L.C.; Heatherly, L.; Colchin, R.J.; Twichell, J.C.

    1975-01-01

    Impurities coming into the plasma from the walls of present-day toroidal plasma confinement devices modify plasma behavior substantially. Small fractions of high-Z ions in the plasma greatly decrease plasma temperatures and increase plasma energy losses. Impurities from the ''first-wall'' in ORMAK were studied. Auger electron spectroscopy, soft x-ray appearance potential spectroscopy, and other surface sensitive techniques were used to characterize the surface composition of the first wall and to develop methods to remove carbon and oxygen. Oxygen glow discharge cleaning has been shown, in the laboratory, to be an effective way of removing carbon from gold films (simulated ORMAK linear material) and the use of oxygen discharge cleaning in ORMAK has resulted in a decrease in plasma contamination, a 50 percent increase in plasma current and an accompanying increase in plasma temperature. In spite of these improvements the walls of ORMAK are far from clean. Substantial amounts of carbon, oxygen, iron and other elements remain. (auth)

  16. Characterization of plasma sprayed beryllium ITER first wall mockups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, R.G.; Vaidya, R.U.; Hollis, K.J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Material Science and Technology Div.

    1998-01-01

    ITER first wall beryllium mockups, which were fabricated by vacuum plasma spraying the beryllium armor, have survived 3000 thermal fatigue cycles at 1 MW/m{sup 2} without damage during high heat flux testing at the Plasma Materials Test Facility at Sandia National Laboratory in New Mexico. The thermal and mechanical properties of the plasma sprayed beryllium armor have been characterized. Results are reported on the chemical composition of the beryllium armor in the as-deposited condition, the through thickness and normal to the through thickness thermal conductivity and thermal expansion, the four-point bend flexure strength and edge-notch fracture toughness of the beryllium armor, the bond strength between the beryllium armor and the underlying heat sink material, and ultrasonic C-scans of the Be/heat sink interface. (author)

  17. Characterization of Plasma Sprayed Beryllium ITER First Wall Mockups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, Richard G.; Vaidya, Rajendra U.; Hollis, Kendall J.

    1997-10-01

    ITER first wall beryllium mockups, which were fabricated by vacuum plasma spraying the beryllium armor, have survived 3000 thermal fatigue cycles at 1 MW/sq m without damage during high heat flux testing at the Plasma Materials Test Facility at Sandia National Laboratory in New Mexico. The thermal and mechanical properties of the plasma sprayed beryllium armor have been characterized. Results are reported on the chemical composition of the beryllium armor in the as-deposited condition, the through thickness and normal to the through thickness thermal conductivity and thermal expansion, the four-point bend flexure strength and edge-notch fracture toughness of the beryllium armor, the bond strength between the beryllium armor and the underlying heat sink material, and ultrasonic C-scans of the Be/heat sink interface

  18. Simultaneous and long-lasting hydrophilization of inner and outer wall surfaces of polytetrafluoroethylene tubes by transferring atmospheric pressure plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Faze; Song, Jinlong; Huang, Shuai; Xu, Wenji; Sun, Jing; Liu, Xin; Xu, Sihao; Xia, Guangqing; Yang, Dezheng

    2016-01-01

    Plasma hydrophilization is a general method to increase the surface free energy of materials. However, only a few works about plasma modification focus on the hydrophilization of tube inner and outer walls. In this paper, we realize simultaneous and long-lasting plasma hydrophilization on the inner and outer walls of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) tubes by atmospheric pressure plasmas (APPs). Specifically, an Ar atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) is used to modify the PTFE tube’s outer wall and meanwhile to induce transferred He APP inside the PTFE tube to modify its inner wall surface. The optical emission spectrum (OES) shows that the plasmas contain many chemically active species, which are known as enablers for various applications. Water contact angle (WCA) measurements, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) are used to characterize the plasma hydrophilization. Results demonstrate that the wettability of the tube walls are well improved due to the replacement of the surface fluorine by oxygen and the change of surface roughness. The obtained hydrophilicity decreases slowly during more than 180 d aging, indicating a long-lasting hydrophilization. The results presented here clearly demonstrate the great potential of transferring APPs for surface modification of the tube’s inner and outer walls simultaneously. (paper)

  19. Optical Characterization and Applications of Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strano, Michael S.

    2005-03-01

    Recent advances in the dispersion and separation of single walled carbon nanotubes have led to new methods of optical characterization and some novel applications. We find that Raman spectroscopy can be used to probe the aggregation state of single-walled carbon nanotubes in solution or as solids with a range of varying morphologies. Carbon nanotubes experience an orthogonal electronic dispersion when in electrical contact that broadens (from 40 meV to roughly 80 meV) and shifts the interband transition to lower energy (by 60 meV). We show that the magnitude of this shift is dependent on the extent of bundle organization and the inter-nanotube contact area. In the Raman spectrum, aggregation shifts the effective excitation profile and causes peaks to increase or decrease, depending on where the transition lies, relative to the excitation wavelength. The findings are particularly relevant for evaluating nanotube separation processes, where relative peak changes in the Raman spectrum can be confused for selective enrichment. We have also used gel electrophoresis and column chromatography conducted on individually dispersed, ultrasonicated single-walled carbon nanotubes to yield simultaneous separation by tube length and diameter. Electroelution after electrophoresis is shown to produce highly resolved fractions of nanotubes with average lengths between 92 and 435 nm. Separation by diameter is concomitant with length fractionation, and nanotubes that have been cut shortest also possess the greatest relative enrichments of large-diameter species. The relative quantum yield decreases nonlinearly as the nanotube length becomes shorter. These findings enable new applications of nanotubes as sensors and biomarkers. Particularly, molecular detection using near infrared (n-IR) light between 0.9 and 1.3 eV has important biomedical applications because of greater tissue penetration and reduced auto-fluorescent background in thick tissue or whole blood media. Carbon nanotubes

  20. Characterization of the Sclerotinia sclerotiorum cell wall proteome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Longzhou; Free, Stephen J

    2016-08-01

    We used a proteomic analysis to identify cell wall proteins released from Sclerotinia sclerotiorum hyphal and sclerotial cell walls via a trifluoromethanesulfonic acid (TFMS) digestion. Cell walls from hyphae grown in Vogel's glucose medium (a synthetic medium lacking plant materials), from hyphae grown in potato dextrose broth and from sclerotia produced on potato dextrose agar were used in the analysis. Under the conditions used, TFMS digests the glycosidic linkages in the cell walls to release intact cell wall proteins. The analysis identified 24 glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored cell wall proteins and 30 non-GPI-anchored cell wall proteins. We found that the cell walls contained an array of cell wall biosynthetic enzymes similar to those found in the cell walls of other fungi. When comparing the proteins in hyphal cell walls grown in potato dextrose broth with those in hyphal cell walls grown in the absence of plant material, it was found that a core group of cell wall biosynthetic proteins and some proteins associated with pathogenicity (secreted cellulases, pectin lyases, glucosidases and proteases) were expressed in both types of hyphae. The hyphae grown in potato dextrose broth contained a number of additional proteins (laccases, oxalate decarboxylase, peroxidase, polysaccharide deacetylase and several proteins unique to Sclerotinia and Botrytis) that might facilitate growth on a plant host. A comparison of the proteins in the sclerotial cell wall with the proteins in the hyphal cell wall demonstrated that sclerotia formation is not marked by a major shift in the composition of cell wall protein. We found that the S. sclerotiorum cell walls contained 11 cell wall proteins that were encoded only in Sclerotinia and Botrytis genomes. © 2015 The Authors. Molecular Plant Pathology published by British Society for Plant Pathology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Evaluation of Coating Removal and Aggressive Surface Removal Surface Technologies Applied to Concrete Walls, Brick Walls, and Concrete Ceilings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagos, L.E.; Ebadian, M.A.

    1997-11-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to test and evaluate innovative and commercially available technologies for the surface decontamination of walls and ceilings. This investigation supports the DOE's objectives of reducing risks to human health and the environment through its restoration projects at FEMP and MEMP. This project was performed at the Hemispheric Center for Environmental Technology (HCET) at Florida International University (FIU), where one innovative and four commercially available decontamination technologies were evaluated under standard, non-nuclear testing conditions. The performance data generated by this project will assist DOE site managers in the selection of the safest, most efficient, and most cost-effective decontamination technologies to accomplish their remediation objectives.

  2. The role of cell walls and pectins in cation exchange and surface area of plant roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szatanik-Kloc, A; Szerement, J; Józefaciuk, G

    2017-08-01

    We aimed to assess role of cell walls in formation of cation exchange capacity, surface charge, surface acidity, specific surface, water adsorption energy and surface charge density of plant roots, and to find the input of the cell wall pectins to the above properties. Whole roots, isolated cell walls and the residue after the extraction of pectins from the cell walls of two Apiaceae L. species (celeriac and parsnip) were studied using potentiometric titration curves and water vapor adsorption - desorption isotherms. Total amount of surface charge, as well as the cation exchange capacity were markedly higher in roots than in their cell walls, suggesting large contribution of other cell organelles to the binding of cations by the whole root cells. Significantly lower charge of the residues after removal of pectins was noted indicating that pectins play the most important role in surface charge formation of cell walls. The specific surface was similar for all of the studied materials. For the separated cell walls it was around 10% smaller than of the whole roots, and it increased slightly after the removal of pectins. The surface charge density and water vapor adsorption energy were the highest for the whole roots and the lowest for the cell walls residues after removal of pectins. The results indicate that the cell walls and plasma membranes are jointly involved in root ion exchange and surface characteristics and their contribution depends upon the plant species. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  3. Chirality Characterization of Dispersed Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namkung, Min; Williams, Phillip A.; Mayweather, Candis D.; Wincheski, Buzz; Park, Cheol; Namkung, Juock S.

    2005-01-01

    Raman scattering and optical absorption spectroscopy are used for the chirality characterization of HiPco single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) dispersed in aqueous solution with the surfactant sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate. Radial breathing mode (RBM) Raman peaks for semiconducting and metallic SWNTs are identified by directly comparing the Raman spectra with the Kataura plot. The SWNT diameters are calculated from these resonant peak positions. Next, a list of (n, m) pairs, yielding the SWNT diameters within a few percent of that obtained from each resonant peak position, is established. The interband transition energies for the list of SWNT (n, m) pairs are calculated based on the tight binding energy expression for each list of the (n, m) pairs, and the pairs yielding the closest values to the corresponding experimental optical absorption peaks are selected. The results reveal that (1, 11), (4, 11), and (0, 11) as the most probable chiralities of the semiconducting nanotubes. The results also reveal that (4, 16), (6, 12) and (8, 8) are the most probable chiralities for the metallic nanotubes. Directly relating the Raman scattering data to the optical absorption spectra, the present method is considered the simplest technique currently available. Another advantage of this technique is the use of the E(sup 8)(sub 11) peaks in the optical absorption spectrum in the analysis to enhance the accuracy in the results.

  4. Surface characterization protocol for precision aspheric optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarepaka, RamaGopal V.; Sakthibalan, Siva; Doodala, Somaiah; Panwar, Rakesh S.; Kotaria, Rajendra

    2017-10-01

    In Advanced Optical Instrumentation, Aspherics provide an effective performance alternative. The aspheric fabrication and surface metrology, followed by aspheric design are complementary iterative processes for Precision Aspheric development. As in fabrication, a holistic approach of aspheric surface characterization is adopted to evaluate actual surface error and to aim at the deliverance of aspheric optics with desired surface quality. Precision optical surfaces are characterized by profilometry or by interferometry. Aspheric profiles are characterized by contact profilometers, through linear surface scans to analyze their Form, Figure and Finish errors. One must ensure that, the surface characterization procedure does not add to the resident profile errors (generated during the aspheric surface fabrication). This presentation examines the errors introduced post-surface generation and during profilometry of aspheric profiles. This effort is to identify sources of errors and is to optimize the metrology process. The sources of error during profilometry may be due to: profilometer settings, work-piece placement on the profilometer stage, selection of zenith/nadir points of aspheric profiles, metrology protocols, clear aperture - diameter analysis, computational limitations of the profiler and the software issues etc. At OPTICA, a PGI 1200 FTS contact profilometer (Taylor-Hobson make) is used for this study. Precision Optics of various profiles are studied, with due attention to possible sources of errors during characterization, with multi-directional scan approach for uniformity and repeatability of error estimation. This study provides an insight of aspheric surface characterization and helps in optimal aspheric surface production methodology.

  5. The Relationship Between Surface Curvature and Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Wall Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Galarreta, Sergio Ruiz; Cazón, Aitor; Antón, Raúl; Finol, Ender A

    2017-08-01

    The maximum diameter (MD) criterion is the most important factor when predicting risk of rupture of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs). An elevated wall stress has also been linked to a high risk of aneurysm rupture, yet is an uncommon clinical practice to compute AAA wall stress. The purpose of this study is to assess whether other characteristics of the AAA geometry are statistically correlated with wall stress. Using in-house segmentation and meshing algorithms, 30 patient-specific AAA models were generated for finite element analysis (FEA). These models were subsequently used to estimate wall stress and maximum diameter and to evaluate the spatial distributions of wall thickness, cross-sectional diameter, mean curvature, and Gaussian curvature. Data analysis consisted of statistical correlations of the aforementioned geometry metrics with wall stress for the 30 AAA inner and outer wall surfaces. In addition, a linear regression analysis was performed with all the AAA wall surfaces to quantify the relationship of the geometric indices with wall stress. These analyses indicated that while all the geometry metrics have statistically significant correlations with wall stress, the local mean curvature (LMC) exhibits the highest average Pearson's correlation coefficient for both inner and outer wall surfaces. The linear regression analysis revealed coefficients of determination for the outer and inner wall surfaces of 0.712 and 0.516, respectively, with LMC having the largest effect on the linear regression equation with wall stress. This work underscores the importance of evaluating AAA mean wall curvature as a potential surrogate for wall stress.

  6. Expression and characterization of a novel spore wall protein from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Microsporidia are obligate intracellular, eukaryotic, spore-forming parasites. The environmentally resistant spores, which harbor a rigid cell wall, are critical for their survival outside their host cells and host-to-host transmission. The spore wall comprises two major layers: the exospore and the endospore. In Nosema ...

  7. Characterizing phenolformaldehyde adhesive cure chemistry within the wood cell wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel J. Yelle; John Ralph

    2016-01-01

    Adhesive bonding of wood using phenol-formaldehyde remains the industrial standard in wood product bond durability. Not only does this adhesive infiltrate the cell wall, it also is believed to form primary bonds with wood cell wall polymers, particularly guaiacyl lignin. However, the mechanism by which phenol-formaldehyde adhesive intergrally interacts and bonds to...

  8. Quantifying the importance of galactofuranose in Aspergillus nidulans hyphal wall surface organization by atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Biplab C; El-Ganiny, Amira M; Abbas, Mariam; Kaminskyj, Susan G W; Dahms, Tanya E S

    2011-05-01

    The fungal wall mediates cell-environment interactions. Galactofuranose (Galf), the five-member ring form of galactose, has a relatively low abundance in Aspergillus walls yet is important for fungal growth and fitness. Aspergillus nidulans strains deleted for Galf biosynthesis enzymes UgeA (UDP-glucose-4-epimerase) and UgmA (UDP-galactopyranose mutase) lacked immunolocalizable Galf, had growth and sporulation defects, and had abnormal wall architecture. We used atomic force microscopy and force spectroscopy to image and quantify cell wall viscoelasticity and surface adhesion of ugeAΔ and ugmAΔ strains. We compared the results for ugeAΔ and ugmAΔ strains with the results for a wild-type strain (AAE1) and the ugeB deletion strain, which has wild-type growth and sporulation. Our results suggest that UgeA and UgmA are important for cell wall surface subunit organization and wall viscoelasticity. The ugeAΔ and ugmAΔ strains had significantly larger surface subunits and lower cell wall viscoelastic moduli than those of AAE1 or ugeBΔ hyphae. Double deletion strains (ugeAΔ ugeBΔ and ugeAΔ ugmAΔ) had more-disorganized surface subunits than single deletion strains. Changes in wall surface structure correlated with changes in its viscoelastic modulus for both fixed and living hyphae. Wild-type walls had the largest viscoelastic modulus, while the walls of the double deletion strains had the smallest. The ugmAΔ strain and particularly the ugeAΔ ugmAΔ double deletion strain were more adhesive to hydrophilic surfaces than the wild type, consistent with changes in wall viscoelasticity and surface organization. We propose that Galf is necessary for full maturation of A. nidulans walls during hyphal extension.

  9. Characterization of a surface dielectric barrier discharge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pemen, A.J.M.; Beckers, F.J.C.M.; Heesch, van E.J.M.

    2009-01-01

    A surface dielectric barrier discharge (SDBD) reactor provides a homogeneous plasma over a large surface area. This allows surface treatments of foils, textiles or fibers. Here we present results of a study to characterize the AC and pulsed performance of SDBD with regard to ozone production,

  10. Radioactive Ions for Surface Characterization

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The collaboration has completed a set of pilot experiments with the aim to develop techniques for using radioactive nuclei in surface physics. The first result was a method for thermal deposition of isolated atoms (Cd, In, Rb) on clean metallic surfaces. \\\\ \\\\ Then the diffusion history of deposited Cd and In atoms on two model surfaces, Mo(110) and Pd(111), was followed through the electric field gradients (efg) acting at the probe nuclei as measured with the Perturbed Angular Correlation technique. For Mo(110) a rather simple history of the adatoms was inferred from the experiments: Atoms initially landing at terrace sites diffuse from there to ledges and then to kinks, defects always present at real surfaces. The next stage is desorption from the surface. For Pd a scenario that goes still further was found. Following the kink stage the adatoms get incorporated into ledges and finally into the top surface layer. For all these five sites the efg's could be measured.\\\\ \\\\ In preparation for a further series o...

  11. Micro/Nanomechanical characterization of multi-walled carbon nanotubes reinforced epoxy composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Peng; Wang, Xinnan; Tangpong, X W

    2012-11-01

    In this paper, the mechanical properties of 1 wt.% multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) reinforced epoxy nanocomposites were characterized using a self-designed micro/nano three point bending tester that was on an atomic force microscope (AFM) to in situ observe MWCNTs movement on the sample surface under loading. The migration of an individual MWCNT at the surface of the nanocomposite was tracked to address the nanomechanical reinforcing mechanism of the nanocomposites. Through morphology analysis of the nanocomposite via scanning electron microscopy, AFM, and digital image correlation technique, it was found that the MWCNTs agglomerate and the bundles were the main factors for limiting the bending strength of the composites. The agglomeration/bundle effect was included in the Halpin-Tsai model to account for the elastic modulus of the nanocomposites.

  12. Formation of transition metal cluster adducts on the surface of single-walled carbon nanotubes: HRTEM studies

    KAUST Repository

    Kalinina, Irina V.

    2014-01-01

    We report the formation of chromium clusters on the outer walls of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). The clusters were obtained by reacting purified SWNTs with chromium hexacarbonyl in dibutyl ether at 100°C. The functionalized SWNTs were characterized by thermogravimetic analysis, XPS, and high-resolution TEM. The curvature of the SWNTs and the high mobility of the chromium moieties on graphitic surfaces allow the growth of the metal clusters and we propose a mechanism for their formation. © 2014 Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.

  13. Characterizing visible and invisible cell wall mutant phenotypes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carpita, Nicholas C.; McCann, Maureen C.

    2015-04-06

    About 10% of a plant's genome is devoted to generating the protein machinery to synthesize, remodel, and deconstruct the cell wall. High-throughput genome sequencing technologies have enabled a reasonably complete inventory of wall-related genes that can be assembled into families of common evolutionary origin. Assigning function to each gene family member has been aided immensely by identification of mutants with visible phenotypes or by chemical and spectroscopic analysis of mutants with ‘invisible’ phenotypes of modified cell wall composition and architecture that do not otherwise affect plant growth or development. This review connects the inference of gene function on the basis of deviation from the wild type in genetic functional analyses to insights provided by modern analytical techniques that have brought us ever closer to elucidating the sequence structures of the major polysaccharide components of the plant cell wall.

  14. Characterization of Thin Walled Mo Tubing produced by FBCVD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beaux, Miles Frank [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Usov, Igor Olegovich [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-01-21

    The goal of this report is to delineate the results of material characterization performed on Mo tubing produced via the fluidized bed chemical vapor deposition (FBCVD) method. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) imaging reveals that small randomly oriented grains are achieved in the Mo deposition, but do not persist throughout the entire thickness of the material. Energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) reveals the Mo tubes contain residual chlorine and oxygen. EDS measurements on the tube surfaces separated from glass and quartz substrates reveal substrate material adhered to this surface. X-ray diffraction (XRD) revealed the presence of carbon contaminant in the form of Mo2C and oxygen in the form of MoO2. Combustion infrared detection (CID) and inert gas fusion (IGF) performed at Luvak Inc. was used to quantify weight percentages of oxygen and carbon in the tubes produced. Hardness value of the FBCVD Mo was found to be comparable to low carbon arc cast molybdenum.

  15. Plasma surface engineering in first wall of tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Xiang; Xu Zengyu; Zhang Fu; Zhang Nianman

    2001-01-01

    The boronization, siliconization and lithium coating of the inner wall of HL-1M are introduced, the hydrogen recycling and the influence to impurities controlled and core radiation energy loss are discussed. Experiments prove that these wall treatments are very useful for the plasma confinement, a 4 s reproducible long pulse discharge is obtained for siliconized wall, but the plasma pulse length only achieves 2.1 s and its reproducibility is very poor for boronized wall. Lithium coating is the best method of the wall treatments for lowering hydrogen recycling and decreasing the impurities level. For the applications of HL-2A and the future fusion device, a series of B, Ti, Si-doped graphite and B 4 C-C/C composites have been developed, some experimental results about chemical sputtering, tritium retention and recycling, as well as high heat loads are reviewed. Meanwhile, SiC, TiC and B 4 C coating, and B 4 C-C, SiC-C, B 4 C-Cu, Mo-Cu and W-Cu functionally graded materials are also introduced

  16. Navier-Stokes Computations With One-Equation Turbulence Model for Flows Along Concave Wall Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chi R.

    2005-01-01

    This report presents the use of a time-marching three-dimensional compressible Navier-Stokes equation numerical solver with a one-equation turbulence model to simulate the flow fields developed along concave wall surfaces without and with a downstream extension flat wall surface. The 3-D Navier- Stokes numerical solver came from the NASA Glenn-HT code. The one-equation turbulence model was derived from the Spalart and Allmaras model. The computational approach was first calibrated with the computations of the velocity and Reynolds shear stress profiles of a steady flat plate boundary layer flow. The computational approach was then used to simulate developing boundary layer flows along concave wall surfaces without and with a downstream extension wall. The author investigated the computational results of surface friction factors, near surface velocity components, near wall temperatures, and a turbulent shear stress component in terms of turbulence modeling, computational mesh configurations, inlet turbulence level, and time iteration step. The computational results were compared with existing measurements of skin friction factors, velocity components, and shear stresses of the developing boundary layer flows. With a fine computational mesh and a one-equation model, the computational approach could predict accurately the skin friction factors, near surface velocity and temperature, and shear stress within the flows. The computed velocity components and shear stresses also showed the vortices effect on the velocity variations over a concave wall. The computed eddy viscosities at the near wall locations were also compared with the results from a two equation turbulence modeling technique. The inlet turbulence length scale was found to have little effect on the eddy viscosities at locations near the concave wall surface. The eddy viscosities, from the one-equation and two-equation modeling, were comparable at most stream-wise stations. The present one

  17. Aerodynamics of a thin airfoil flying over and in proximity to a wavy-wall surface. ; Lifting surface theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ando, S [Nagoya University, Nagoya (Japan); Ichikawa, M [Government Industrial Research Institute, Nagoya, Nagoya (Japan)

    1991-05-04

    Aerodynamic characteristics of a thin airfoil flying over and in proximity to a wavy-wall surface such as uneven ground or water surface were analyzed two-dimensionally by lifting surface theory in the simplest fundamental case only. The theoretical equation was simplified assuming that flow is inviscid and incompressible, all disturbances are sufficiently small, the wall surface is sinusoidal and rigid, and the wall moves in the same direction as free stream but with a constant velocity different from that of the stream. The equation was verified in the case where an airfoil with a constant angle-of-attack flies over a flat ground surface, and calculations were made with a set of important parameters such as mean airfoil height from the wall, wave length of the wall surface and the wall velocity. The whole effect of wavy wall proximity was divided into the first and second-order ground effects. The first one was just Kemp{prime}s upwash problem, and the second one was revealed through the present study which becomes significant for lower airfoil heights. 18 refs., 5 figs.

  18. Optical Characterization of Nanostructured Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feidenhans'l, Nikolaj Agentoft

    Micro- and nanostructured surfaces are interesting due to the unique properties they add to the bulk material. One example is structural colors, where the interaction between surface structures and visible light produce bright color effects without the use of paints or dyes. Several research groups...... modeling to evaluate the dimensions of subwavelength gratings, by correlating the reflected light measured from the structures with a database of simulations. A new method is developed and termed color scatterometry, since compared to typical spectroscopic scatterometry, which evaluates the full reflection...... spectrum; the new method only evaluates the color of the reflected light using a standard RGB color camera. Color scatterometry provides the combined advantages of spectroscopic scatterometry, which provides fast evaluations, and imaging scatterometry that provides an overview image from which small...

  19. Characterization of fluid dynamic behaviour and channel wall effects in microtube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Celata, G.P.; Cumo, M.; McPhail, S.; Zummo, G.

    2006-01-01

    Sometimes contradictory results available for fluid flow in micropipes show that much is yet to be verified in microfluid dynamics. In this study the influence of channel wall roughness and of channel wall hydrophobicity on adiabatic flow in circular microchannels is investigated, varying in diameter from 70 μm to 326 μm. The hydrodynamic behaviour of water in smooth tubes down to 30 μm inner diameter (ID) is also ascertained. Within the current experimental accuracy it is found that the classical Hagen-Poiseuille law for friction factor vs. Reynolds number is respected for all diameters measured and Re > 300. With degassed water, no effect of slip flow due to hydrophobic channel walls was noted even at 70 μm ID, which might suggest that the liquid slip flow phenomenon is associated with local desorption of dissolved gases on the hydrophobic surface, as reported elsewhere in the literature. For roughened glass channels, an increase in Darcy friction factor above 64/Re was observed only at the smallest diameter measured, 126 μm. Although the roughness levels of these channels were up to 10 times coarser than the untreated, smooth glass tubes, probably the higher factor was caused by actual deformation of channel circularity, rather than increased friction at the rougher wall, as similar behaviour was observed in a Teflon tube, also of imperfect circularity of cross-section. For all experiments, no anticipated transition to turbulent flow was observed, which means that the transitional Reynolds number was always found between Re ∼ 2000 and Re ∼ 3000. Finally, an introduction to the importance of viscous dissipation in microchannels is added, with quantitative indications of its influence on hydrodynamic properties. It is put forward as being an alternative to pressure measurements in the characterization of the behaviour of microscopic flow

  20. Purification and characterization of a soybean cell wall protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    San Francisco, S.; Tierney, M.L.

    1989-01-01

    Plant cell wall composition is thought to reflect cellular responses to developmental and environmental signals. We have purified a 33 kDa protein from cell wall extracts of soybean seedlings which is most abundant in extracts from the hook region of the hypocotyl and is rich in proline and hydroxypyroline. In vivo 3 H-proline labelling of hypocotyl tissues indicates that the hook tissue is the predominant site for synthesis of this protein. In unwounded hook, label is incorporated into a 33 kDa protein, while in wounded hook this and additional proteins rich in proline are synthesized. Similarly treated cell wall extracts analyzed by Western blot analysis, using a polyclonal antibody raised against this 33kD protein, showed that the 33 kDa protein is most abundant in cell wall extracts from the hook region of unwounded seedlings and does not increase upon wounding. An immunologically related 35kD protein is also apparent in extracts from wounded hooks and appears to co-migrate with one of the labelled proteins extractable from this tissue. These data indicate that there are two related, proline-rich cell wall proteins in the hook region of soybean seedlings, one of which (33 kDa) is prominent during seedling development and another (35 kDa) which is wound inducible

  1. Enhanced biocompatibility of multi-walled carbon nanotubes by surface modification: Future perspectives for drug delivery system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anandhi, C. M. S.; Asath, R. Mohamed; Mathavan, T.; Benial, A. Milton Franklin

    2017-05-01

    Surface modification of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) was carried out by introducing mixture of concentrated sulphuric acid and nitric acid by ultrasonication process. The pristine and surface modified MWCNTs were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR), Raman spectroscopy and Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) techniques. FT-IR spectra revealed that the presence of carboxylic acid functional groups on the surface of MWCNTs. The integrated intensity ratio of pristine and surface modified MWCNTs was calculated by Raman spectroscopic analysis. XRD patterns examines the crystallinity of the surface modified MWCNTs. SEM analysis investigates the change in morphology of the surface modified MWCNTs compared with that of pristine, which is due to the attachment of the carboxylic acid functional groups. Surface modified MWCNTs acts as precursors for further functionalization with various biomolecules, which improves the biocompatibility and initiates the implementation of MWCNTs in the field of nanomedicine and targeted drug delivery.

  2. [Study on Hollow Brick Wall's Surface Temperature with Infrared Thermal Imaging Method].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Ming-fang; Yin, Yi-hua

    2015-05-01

    To address the characteristic of uneven surface temperature of hollow brick wall, the present research adopts soft wares of both ThermaCAM P20 and ThermaCAM Reporter to test the application of infrared thermal image technique in measuring surface temperature of hollow brick wall, and further analyzes the thermal characteristics of hollow brick wall, and building material's impact on surface temperature distribution including hollow brick, masonry mortar, and so on. The research selects the construction site of a three-story-high residential, carries out the heat transfer experiment, and further examines the exterior wall constructed by 3 different hollow bricks including sintering shale hollow brick, masonry mortar and brick masonry. Infrared thermal image maps are collected, including 3 kinds of sintering shale hollow brick walls under indoor heating in winter; and temperature data of wall surface, and uniformity and frequency distribution are also collected for comparative analysis between 2 hollow bricks and 2 kinds of mortar masonry. The results show that improving heat preservation of hollow brick aid masonry mortar can effectively improve inner wall surface temperature and indoor thermal environment; non-uniformity of surface temperature decreases from 0. 6 to 0. 4 °C , and surface temperature frequency distribution changes from the asymmetric distribution into a normal distribution under the condition that energy-saving sintering shale hollow brick wall is constructed by thermal mortar replacing cement mortar masonry; frequency of average temperature increases as uniformity of surface temperature increases. This research provides a certain basis for promotion and optimization of hollow brick wall's thermal function.

  3. Low-Z material for limiters and wall surfaces in JET: beryllium and carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebut, P.H.; Hugon, M.; Booth, S.J.; Dean, J.R.; Dietz, K.J.; Sonnenberg, K.; Watkins, M.L.

    1985-01-01

    The relative merits of graphite and beryllium, as a low-Z material for limiters and wall surfaces in JET, are compared. A consideration of data on thermomechanical properties, retention of hydrogen and gettering action, indicates that beryllium offers the best prospects as a material for the JET belt limiters and walls. (U.K.)

  4. CHARACTERIZING PIPE WALL DEMAND: IMPLICATIONS FOR WATER QUALITY MODELING

    Science.gov (United States)

    It has become generally accepted that water quality can deteriorate in a distribution system through reactions in the bulk phase and/or at the pipe wall. These reactions may be physical, chemical or microbiological in nature. Perhaps one of the most serious aspects of water qua...

  5. Manipulation of near-wall turbulence by surface slip and permeability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-de-Segura, G.; Fairhall, C. T.; MacDonald, M.; Chung, D.; García-Mayoral, R.

    2018-04-01

    We study the effect on near-wall turbulence of tangential slip and wall-normal transpiration, typically produced by textured surfaces and other surface manipulations. For this, we conduct direct numerical simulations (DNSs) with different virtual origins for the different velocity components. The different origins result in a relative wall-normal displacement of the near-wall, quasi-streamwise vortices with respect to the mean flow, which in turn produces a change in drag. The objective of this work is to extend the existing understanding on how these virtual origins affect the flow. In the literature, the virtual origins for the tangential velocities are typically characterised by slip boundary conditions, while the wall-normal velocity is assumed to be zero at the boundary plane. Here we explore different techniques to define and implement the three virtual origins, with special emphasis on the wall-normal one. We investigate impedance conditions relating the wall-normal velocity to the pressure, and linear relations between the velocity components and their wall-normal gradients, as is typically done to impose slip conditions. These models are first tested to represent a smooth wall below the boundary plane, with all virtual origins equal, and later for different tangential and wall-normal origins. Our results confirm that the change in drag is determined by the offset between the origins perceived by mean flow and the quasi-streamwise vortices or, more generally, the near-wall turbulent cycle. The origin for the latter, however, is not set by the spanwise virtual origin alone, as previously proposed, but by a combination of the spanwise and wall-normal origins, and mainly determined by the shallowest of the two. These observations allow us to extend the existing expression to predict the change in drag, accounting for the wall-normal effect when the transpiration is not negligible.

  6. Integrated biomechanical and topographical surface characterization (IBTSC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Löberg, Johanna, E-mail: Johanna.Loberg@dentsply.com [Dentsply Implants, Box 14, SE-431 21 Mölndal (Sweden); Mattisson, Ingela [Dentsply Implants, Box 14, SE-431 21 Mölndal (Sweden); Ahlberg, Elisabet [Department of Chemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Gothenburg, SE-41296 Gothenburg (Sweden)

    2014-01-30

    In an attempt to reduce the need for animal studies in dental implant applications, a new model has been developed which combines well-known surface characterization methods with theoretical biomechanical calculations. The model has been named integrated biomechanical and topographical surface characterization (IBTSC), and gives a comprehensive description of the surface topography and the ability of the surface to induce retention strength with bone. IBTSC comprises determination of 3D-surface roughness parameters by using 3D-scanning electron microscopy (3D-SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM), and calculation of the ability of different surface topographies to induce retention strength in bone by using the local model. Inherent in this integrated approach is the use of a length scale analysis, which makes it possible to separate different size levels of surface features. The IBTSC concept is tested on surfaces with different level of hierarchy, induced by mechanical as well as chemical treatment. Sequential treatment with oxalic and hydrofluoric acid results in precipitated nano-sized features that increase the surface roughness and the surface slope on the sub-micro and nano levels. This surface shows the highest calculated shear strength using the local model. The validity, robustness and applicability of the IBTSC concept are demonstrated and discussed.

  7. Vacuum system II; surface study on vacuum wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chida, Katsuhisa; Mizobuchi, Akira; Miyahara, Akira.

    1982-01-01

    Ion scattering spectroscopy (ISS) was applied to observe surface of Al sample. Pulse counting by multi-scaling method was used for measurement of scattered ions. Reletion between outgassing treatment and cleanliness of surface is presented. (author)

  8. Characterization of bundled and individual triple-walled carbon nanotubes by resonant Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschmann, Thomas Ch; Araujo, Paulo T; Muramatsu, Hiroyuki; Zhang, Xu; Nielsch, Kornelius; Kim, Yoong Ahm; Dresselhaus, Mildred S

    2013-03-26

    The optical characterization of bundled and individual triple-walled carbon nanotubes was studied for the first time in detail by using resonant Raman spectroscopy. In our approach, the outer tube of a triple-walled carbon nanotube system protects the two inner tubes (or equivalently the inner double-walled carbon nanotube) from external environment interactions making them a partially isolated system. Following the spectral changes and line-widths of the radial breathing modes and G-band by performing laser energy dependent Raman spectroscopy, it is possible to extract important information as regards to the electronic and vibrational properties, tube diameters, wall-to-wall distances, radial breathing mode, and G-band resonance evolutions as well as high-curvature intertube interactions in isolated double- and triple-walled carbon nanotube systems.

  9. Genetic and biochemical characterization of the GH72 family of cell wall transglycosylases in Neurospora crassa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ao, Jie; Free, Stephen J

    2017-04-01

    The Neurospora crassa genome encodes five GH72 family transglycosylases, and four of these enzymes (GEL-1, GEL-2, GEL-3 and GEL-5) have been found to be present in the cell wall proteome. We carried out an extensive genetic analysis on the role of these four transglycosylases in cell wall biogenesis and demonstrated that the transglycosylases are required for the formation of a normal cell wall. As suggested by the proteomic analysis, we found that multiple transglycosylases were being expressed in N. crassa cells and that different combinations of the enzymes are required in different cell types. The combination of GEL-1, GEL-2 and GEL-5 is required for the growth of vegetative hyphae, while the GEL-1, GEL-2, GEL-3 combination is needed for the production of aerial hyphae and conidia. Our data demonstrates that the enzymes are redundant with partially overlapping enzymatic activities, which provides the fungus with a robust cell wall biosynthetic system. Characterization of the transglycosylase-deficient mutants demonstrated that the incorporation of cell wall proteins was severely compromised. Interestingly, we found that the transglycosylase-deficient mutant cell walls contained more β-1,3-glucan than the wild type cell wall. Our results demonstrate that the GH72 transglycosylases are not needed for the incorporation of β-1,3-glucan into the cell wall, but they are required for the incorporation of cell wall glycoprotein into the cell wall. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Wall conditioning and plasma surface interactions in DIII-D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, G.L.; Petersen, P.I.; Schaffer, M.S.; Taylor, P.L.; Taylor, T.S.; Doyle, B.L.; Walsh, D.S.; Hill, D.N.; Hsu, W.L.; Winter, J.

    1990-09-01

    Wall conditioning is used in DIII-D for both reduction of impurity influxes and particle control. The methods used include: baking, pulsed discharge cleaning, hydrogen glow cleaning, helium and neon glow conditioning, and carbonization. Helium glow wall conditioning applied before every tokamak discharge has been effective in impurity removal and particle control and has significantly expanded the parameter space in which DIII-D operates to include limiter and ohmic H-mode discharges and higher β T at low q. The highest values of divertor plasma current (3.0 MA) and stored energy (3.6 MJ) and peaked density profiles in H-mode discharges have been observed after carbonization. Divertor physics studies in DIII-D include sweeping the X-point to reduce peak heat loads, measurement of particle and heat fluxes in the divertor region, and erosion studies. The DIII-D Advanced Divertor has been installed and bias and baffle experiments will begin in the fall of 1991. 15 refs., 4 figs

  11. A fundamental study of fission product deposition on the wall surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishiguro, R.; Sakashita, H.; Sugiyama, K.

    1987-01-01

    Deposition of soluble matters on wall surfaces is studied in the present report for the purpose to understand a mechanism of fission product deposition on the wall surface in a molten salt reactor. Calcium carbonate solution is used to observe the fundamental mechanism of deposition. The experiments are performed under conditions of turbulent flow of the solution over a heated wall. According to the experimental results a model is proposed to estimate deposition rate. The model consists of two parts, one is the initial nucleus formation on a clean wall surface and the other is the constant increase of deposition succeeding to the first stage. The model is assessed by comparing it with the experimental results. Both results coincide well in some parameters, but not so well in others. (author)

  12. Mass spectrometry for characterizing plant cell wall polysaccharides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan eBauer

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Mass spectrometry is a selective and powerful technique to obtain identification and structural information on compounds present in complex mixtures. Since it requires only small sample amount it is an excellent tool for researchers interested in detecting changes in composition of complex carbohydrates of plants. This mini-review gives an overview of common mass spectrometry techniques applied to the analysis of plant cell wall carbohydrates. It presents examples in which mass spectrometry has been used to elucidate the structure of oligosaccharides derived from hemicelluloses and pectins and illustrates how information on sequence, linkages, branching and modifications are obtained from characteristic fragmentation patterns.

  13. Surface science tools for nanomaterials characterization

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    Fourth volume of a 40volume series on nano science and nanotechnology, edited by the renowned scientist Challa S.S.R. Kumar. This handbook gives a comprehensive overview about Surface Science Tools for Nanomaterials Characterization. Modern applications and state-of-the-art techniques are covered and make this volume an essential reading for research scientists in academia and industry.

  14. PREPARATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF POROUS WALLED HOLLOW GLASS MICROSPHERES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raszewski, F; Erich Hansen, E; Ray Schumacher, R; David Peeler, D

    2008-04-21

    Porous-walled hollow glass microspheres (PWHGMs) of a modified alkali borosilicate composition have been successfully fabricated by combining the technology of producing hollow glass microspheres (HGMs) with the knowledge associated with porous glasses. HGMs are first formed by a powder glass--flame process, which are then transformed to PWHGMs by heat treatment and subsequent treatment in acid. Pore diameter and pore volume are most influenced by heat treatment temperature. Pore diameter is increased by a factor of 10 when samples are heat treated prior to acid leaching; 100 {angstrom} in non-heat treated samples to 1000 {angstrom} in samples heat treated at 600 C for 8 hours. As heat treatment time is increased from 8 hours to 24 hours there is a slight shift increase in pore diameter and little or no change in pore volume.

  15. Lithium Wall Conditioning And Surface Dust Detection On NSTX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skinner, C.H.; Allain, J.P.; Bell, M.G.; Friesen, F.Q.L.; Heim, B.; Jaworski, M.A.; Kugel, H.; Maingi, R.; Rais, B.; Taylor, C.N.

    2011-01-01

    Lithium evaporation onto NSTX plasma facing components (PFC) has resulted in improved energy confinement, and reductions in the number and amplitude of edge-localized modes (ELMs) up to the point of complete ELM suppression. The associated PFC surface chemistry has been investigated with a novel plasma material interface probe connected to an in-vacuo surface analysis station. Analysis has demonstrated that binding of D atoms to the polycrystalline graphite material of the PFCs is fundamentally changed by lithium - in particular deuterium atoms become weakly bonded near lithium atoms themselves bound to either oxygen or the carbon from the underlying material. Surface dust inside NSTX has been detected in real-time using a highly sensitive electrostatic dust detector. In a separate experiment, electrostatic removal of dust via three concentric spiral-shaped electrodes covered by a dielectric and driven by a high voltage 3-phase waveform was evaluated for potential application to fusion reactors

  16. Control of first-wall surface conditions in the 2XIIB Magnetic Mirror Plasma Confinement experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simonen, T.C.; Bulmer, R.H.; Coensgen, F.H.

    1976-01-01

    The control of first-wall surface conditions in the 2XIIB Magnetic Mirror Plasma Confinement experiment is described. Before each plasma shot, the first wall is covered with a freshly gettered titanium surface. Up to 5 MW of neutral beam power has been injected into 2XIIB, resulting in first-wall bombardment fluxes of 10 17 atoms . cm -2 . s -1 of 13-keV mean energy deuterium atoms for several ms. The background gas flux is measured with a calibrated, 11-channel, fast-atom detector. Background gas levels are found to depend on surface conditions, injected beam current, and beam pulse duration. For our best operating conditions, an efective reflex coefficient of 0.3 can be inferred from the measurements. Experiments with long-duration and high-current beam injection are limited by charge exchange; however, experiments with shorter beam duration are not limited by first-wall surface conditions. It is concluded that surface effects will be reduced further with smoother walls. (Auth.)

  17. Thermal characteristics of thermobrachytherapy surface applicators for treating chest wall recurrence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arunachalam, K; Maccarini, P F; Craciunescu, O I; Stauffer, P R; Schlorff, J L

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate temperature and thermal dose distributions of thermobrachytherapy surface applicators (TBSAs) developed for concurrent or sequential high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy and microwave hyperthermia treatment of chest wall recurrence and other superficial diseases. A steady-state thermodynamics model coupled with the fluid dynamics of a water bolus and electromagnetic radiation of the hyperthermia applicator is used to characterize the temperature distributions achievable with TBSAs in an elliptical phantom model of the human torso. Power deposited by 915 MHz conformal microwave array (CMA) applicators is used to assess the specific absorption rate (SAR) distributions of rectangular (500 cm 2 ) and L-shaped (875 cm 2 ) TBSAs. The SAR distribution in tissue and fluid flow distribution inside the dual-input dual-output (DIDO) water bolus are coupled to solve the steady-state temperature and thermal dose distributions of the rectangular TBSA (R-TBSA) for superficial tumor targets extending 10-15 mm beneath the skin surface. Thermal simulations are carried out for a range of bolus inlet temperature (T b = 38-43 deg. C), water flow rate (Q b = 2-4 L min -1 ) and tumor blood perfusion (ω b = 2-5 kg m -3 s -1 ) to characterize their influence on thermal dosimetry. Steady-state SAR patterns of the R- and L-TBSA demonstrate the ability to produce conformal and localized power deposition inside the tumor target sparing surrounding normal tissues and nearby critical organs. Acceptably low variation in tissue surface cooling and surface temperature homogeneity was observed for the new DIDO bolus at a 2 L min -1 water flow rate. Temperature depth profiles and thermal dose volume histograms indicate bolus inlet temperature (T b ) to be the most influential factor on thermal dosimetry. A 42 deg. C water bolus was observed to be the optimal choice for superficial tumors extending 10-15 mm from the surface even under significant blood perfusion

  18. Scattered surface charge density: A tool for surface characterization

    KAUST Repository

    Naydenov, Borislav; Mantega, Mauro; Rungger, Ivan; Sanvito, Stefano; Boland, John J.

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate the use of nonlocal scanning tunneling spectroscopic measurements to characterize the local structure of adspecies in their states where they are significantly less perturbed by the probe, which is accomplished by mapping the amplitude and phase of the scattered surface charge density. As an example, we study single-H-atom adsorption on the n-type Si(100)-(4 × 2) surface, and demonstrate the existence of two different configurations that are distinguishable using the nonlocal approach and successfully corroborated by density functional theory. © 2011 American Physical Society.

  19. Scattered surface charge density: A tool for surface characterization

    KAUST Repository

    Naydenov, Borislav

    2011-11-28

    We demonstrate the use of nonlocal scanning tunneling spectroscopic measurements to characterize the local structure of adspecies in their states where they are significantly less perturbed by the probe, which is accomplished by mapping the amplitude and phase of the scattered surface charge density. As an example, we study single-H-atom adsorption on the n-type Si(100)-(4 × 2) surface, and demonstrate the existence of two different configurations that are distinguishable using the nonlocal approach and successfully corroborated by density functional theory. © 2011 American Physical Society.

  20. Preparation and characterization of bagasse/HDPE composites using multi-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashori, Alireza; Sheshmani, Shabnam; Farhani, Foad

    2013-01-30

    This article presents the preparation and characterization of bagasse/high density polyethylene (HDPE) composites. The effects of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), as reinforcing agent, on the mechanical and physical properties were also investigated. In order to increase the interphase adhesion, maleic anhydride grafted polyethylene (MAPE) was added as a coupling agent to all the composites studied. In the sample preparation, MWCNTs and MAPE contents were used as variable factors. The morphology of the specimens was characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) technique. The results of strength measurement indicated that when 1.5 wt% MWCNTs were added, tensile and flexural properties reached their maximum values. At high level of MWCNTs loading (3 or 4 wt%), increased population of MWCNTs lead to agglomeration and stress transfer gets blocked. The addition of MWCNTs filler slightly decreased the impact strength of composites. Both mechanical and physical properties were improved when 4 wt% MAPE was applied. SEM micrographs also showed that the surface roughness improved with increasing MAPE loading from 0 to 4 wt%. The improvement of physicomechanical properties of composites confirmed that MWCNTs have good reinforcement and the optimum synergistic effect of MWCNTs and MAPE was achieved at the combination of 1.5 and 4 wt%, respectively. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Broadband Spectroscopic Thermoacoustic Characterization of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel R. Bauer

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes have attracted interest as contrast agents for biomedical imaging because they strongly absorb electromagnetic radiation in the optical and microwave regions. This study applies thermoacoustic (TA imaging and spectroscopy to measure the frequency-dependent absorption profile of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT in the ranges of 2.7–3.1 GHz and 7–9 GHz using two tunable microwave sources. Between 7 and 9 GHz, the peak TA signal for solutions containing semiconducting and metallic SWNTs increased monotonically with a slope of 1.75 AU/GHz (R2=0.95 and 2.8 AU/GHz (R2=0.93, respectively, relative to a water baseline. However, after compensating for the background signal from water, it was revealed that the TA signal from metallic SWNTs increased exponentially within this frequency band. Results suggest that TA imaging and spectroscopy could be a powerful tool for quantifying the absorption properties of SWNTs and optimizing their performance as contrast agents for imaging or heat sources for thermal therapy.

  2. Synthesis and Characterization of Hexahapto-Chromium Complexes of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    KAUST Repository

    Kalinina, Irina

    2016-12-17

    This chapter employs purified pristine single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and octadecylaminefunctionalized-SWNTs. These SWNTs are employed for investigate the potential of the SWNT sidewall to function as a hexahapto ligand for chromium (Cr), with in-depth characterization of the products using some of the techniques, such as thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Purified electric arc (EA)-produced SWNTs (P2-SWNT) and octadecylaminefunctionalized SWNTs were obtained from Carbon Solutions, Inc. The TEM images show the removal of the Cr particles from the outer surface of the SWNT bundles in the SWNT-Cr complexes after decomplexation; Cr attachment to the surface of the as-prepared complexes (η6-SWNT)Cr(CO)3 and (η6-SWNT-CONH(CH2)17CH3)Cr(CO)3 is clearly evident. The positions of the bands in the Raman spectra of SWNTs are sensitive to doping and thus the chapter examines the effect of complexation of the Cr(CO)3 and Cr(η6-benzene) units on the position of the G and 2D bands in the (η6-SWNT)Cr(CO)3 and (η6-SWNT)Cr(η6-benzene) complexes.

  3. Ion chromatography characterization of polysaccharides in ancient wall paintings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombin, Maria Perla; Ceccarini, Alessio; Carmignani, Alessia

    2002-08-30

    An analytical procedure for the characterisation of polysaccharides and the identification of plant gums in old polychrome samples is described. The procedure is based on hydrolysis with 2 M trifluoroacetic acid assisted by microwaves (20 min, 120 degrees C, 500 W), clean-up of the hydrolysate by an ion-exchange resin, and analysis by high-performance anion-exchange chromatography with pulsed amperometric detection. Using this method the hydrolysis time was reduced to 20 min and the chromatographic separation of seven monosaccharides (fucose, rhamnose, arabinose, galactose, glucose, mannose, xylose) and two uronic acids (galacturonic and glucuronic) was achieved in 40 min. The whole analytical procedure allows sugar determination in plant gums at picomole levels, with an average recovery of 72% with an RSD of 8% as tested on arabic gum. The analytical procedure was tested with several raw gums, watercolour samples and reference painting specimens prepared according to old recipes at the Opificio delle Pietre Dure of Florence (Italian Ministry of Cultural Heritage, Italy). All the data collected expressed in relative sugar percentage contents were submitted to principal components analysis for gum identification: five groups were spatially separated and this enabled the identification of arabic, tragacanth, karaya, cherry+ghatty, and guar+locust bean gum. Wall painting samples from Macedonian tombs (Greece) of the 4th-3rd Centuries B.C., processed by the suggested method, showed the presence of a complex paint media mainly consisting of tragacanth and fruit tree gums. Moreover, starch had probably been added to plaster as highlighted by the presence of a huge amount of glucose.

  4. Surface characterization of Ag/Titania adsorbents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samokhvalov, Alexander; Nair, Sachin; Duin, Evert C.; Tatarchuk, Bruce J.

    2010-01-01

    The Ag/Titania adsorbent for selective removal of the desulfurization-refractive polycyclic aromatic sulfur heterocycles (PASHs) from liquid hydrocarbon fuels was prepared, its total and the Ag specific surface area were determined and the surface reaction sites in the sorbent that may be active in the adsorptive selective desulfurization were characterized by several spectroscopic and surface science techniques. The sorbent contains Ag, Ti, O and spurious C on its surface, as by the XPS measurements. Silver is present as an oxide, as judged by the XPS Auger parameter (AP). The complementary electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy confirms that the majority of Ag is present in the diamagnetic Ag 1+ form, with the minor concentration (∼0.1% of total Ag) present as Ag 2+ . The findings by XPS and ESR are confirmed by the XRD, UV-vis spectroscopy and thermodynamic considerations. The supported Ag is highly dispersed on the surface of the titania support, with the particle size of ∼30-60 A depending on Ag content, with an Ag specific surface area of ∼7-14 m 2 /g, vs. the total surface area of ∼114-58 m 2 /g.

  5. Study of the surface chemistry and morphology of single walled carbon nanotube-magnetite composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marquez-Linares, F.; Uwakweh, O.N.C.; Lopez, N.; Chavez, E.; Polanco, R.; Morant, C.; Sanz, J.M.; Elizalde, E.; Neira, C.; Nieto, S.; Roque-Malherbe, R.

    2011-01-01

    The study of the morphologies of the single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT), magnetite nanoparticles (MNP), and the composite based on them was carried with combined X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy (RS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). These techniques together with thermogravimetric analyses (TGA) and diffuse reflectance infrared transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) confirmed the production of pure single phases, and that the composite material consisted of MNP attached to the outer surface of the SWCNT. The Moessbauer spectroscopy (MS) research showed the presence of a large quantity of Lewis acid sites in the highly dispersed magnetite particles supported on the SWCNT outer surface. The DRIFTS carbon dioxide adsorption study of the composites revealed significant adsorption of carbon dioxide, fundamentally in the Lewis acid sites. Then, the Lewis acid sites were observed to be catalytically active. Further, the electron exchange between the Lewis acid sites and the basic or amphoteric adsorbed molecules could influence the magnetic properties of the magnetite. Consequently, together with this first ever use of MS in the study of Lewis acid sites, this investigation revealed the potential of the composites for catalytic and sensors applications. -- Graphical abstract: A large amount of Lewis acid sites were found in the highly dispersed magnetite which is supported on the SWCNT outer surface. Display Omitted Research highlights: → The obtained materials were completely characterized with XRD, Raman and SEM-TEM. → DRIFT, TGA and adsorption of the composites allowed understand the material formation. → This is the first report of a study of Lewis sites by Moessbauer spectroscopy.

  6. Optimization of Surface Roughness and Wall Thickness in Dieless Incremental Forming Of Aluminum Sheet Using Taguchi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamedon, Zamzuri; Kuang, Shea Cheng; Jaafar, Hasnulhadi; Azhari, Azmir

    2018-03-01

    Incremental sheet forming is a versatile sheet metal forming process where a sheet metal is formed into its final shape by a series of localized deformation without a specialised die. However, it still has many shortcomings that need to be overcome such as geometric accuracy, surface roughness, formability, forming speed, and so on. This project focus on minimising the surface roughness of aluminium sheet and improving its thickness uniformity in incremental sheet forming via optimisation of wall angle, feed rate, and step size. Besides, the effect of wall angle, feed rate, and step size to the surface roughness and thickness uniformity of aluminium sheet was investigated in this project. From the results, it was observed that surface roughness and thickness uniformity were inversely varied due to the formation of surface waviness. Increase in feed rate and decrease in step size will produce a lower surface roughness, while uniform thickness reduction was obtained by reducing the wall angle and step size. By using Taguchi analysis, the optimum parameters for minimum surface roughness and uniform thickness reduction of aluminium sheet were determined. The finding of this project helps to reduce the time in optimising the surface roughness and thickness uniformity in incremental sheet forming.

  7. Status of RF beryllium characterization for ITER Fist Wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupriyanov, I. B.; Nikolaev, G. N.; Roedig, M.; Gervash, A. А.; Linke, I. J.; Kurbatova, L. A.; Perevalov, S. I.; Giniyatulin, R. N.

    2011-10-01

    The status of RF R&D activities in production and characterization of TGP-56FW beryllium grade is presented. The results of metallographic studies of microstructure and cracks morphology are reported for full-scale Be tiles (56 × 56 × 10 mm) subjected to VDE simulation tests in TSEFEY-M testing facility (VDE-10 MJ/m 2 during 0.1 s, 1 shot ) and following low cycle thermal fatigue tests (500 thermal cycles at 1.5 MW/m 2). First results of plasma disruption tests ( E = 1.2-5 MJ/m 2, 5 ms), which were obtained during the realization of Thermal Shock/VDE Qualification program of RF beryllium in JUDITH-1 facility, are also discussed.

  8. Status of RF beryllium characterization for ITER Fist Wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kupriyanov, I.B.; Nikolaev, G.N.; Roedig, M.; Gervash, A.A.; Linke, I.J.; Kurbatova, L.A.; Perevalov, S.I.; Giniyatulin, R.N.

    2011-01-01

    The status of RF R and D activities in production and characterization of TGP-56FW beryllium grade is presented. The results of metallographic studies of microstructure and cracks morphology are reported for full-scale Be tiles (56 x 56 x 10 mm) subjected to VDE simulation tests in TSEFEY-M testing facility (VDE-10 MJ/m 2 during 0.1 s, 1 shot) and following low cycle thermal fatigue tests (500 thermal cycles at 1.5 MW/m 2 ). First results of plasma disruption tests (E = 1.2-5 MJ/m 2 , 5 ms), which were obtained during the realization of Thermal Shock/VDE Qualification program of RF beryllium in JUDITH-1 facility, are also discussed.

  9. The stochastic nature of the domain wall motion along high perpendicular anisotropy strips with surface roughness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    The domain wall dynamics along thin ferromagnetic strips with high perpendicular magnetocrystalline anisotropy driven by either magnetic fields or spin-polarized currents is theoretically analyzed by means of full micromagnetic simulations and a one-dimensional model, including both surface roughness and thermal effects. At finite temperature, the results show a field dependence of the domain wall velocity in good qualitative agreement with available experimental measurements, indicating a low field, low velocity creep regime, and a high field, linear regime separated by a smeared depinning region. Similar behaviors were also observed under applied currents. In the low current creep regime the velocity-current characteristic does not depend significantly on the non-adiabaticity. At high currents, where the domain wall velocity becomes insensitive to surface pinning, the domain wall shows a precessional behavior even when the non-adiabatic parameter is equal to the Gilbert damping. These analyses confirm the relevance of both thermal fluctuations and surface roughness for the domain wall dynamics, and that complete micromagnetic modeling and one-dimensional studies taking into account these effects are required to interpret the experimental measurements in order to get a better understanding of the origin, the role and the magnitude of the non-adiabaticity. (paper)

  10. Surface characterization of adsorbed asphaltene on a stainless steel surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdallah, W.A.; Taylor, S.D.

    2007-01-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to characterize a single layer of adsorbed asphaltene on a metallic surface. The deposits were created by immersing a stainless steel disc into a dilute asphaltene solution with either toluene or dichloromethane as the solvent, although the toluene solution allowed for better control of the adsorbed asphaltene layer and less atmospheric oxygen contamination. The analyses for C 1s, S 2p 3/2 , N 1s and O 1s photoemission peaks indicated that different functional groups are present in the asphaltene layer including carboxylic, pyrrolic, pyridininc, thiophenic and sulfite, with slight differences in their binding energies

  11. Characterizing the statistical properties of protein surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bak, Ji Hyun; Bitbol, Anne-Florence; Bialek, William

    Proteins and their interactions form the body of the signaling transduction pathway in many living systems. In order to ensure the accuracy as well as the specificity of signaling, it is crucial that proteins recognize their correct interaction partners. How difficult, then, is it for a protein to discriminate its correct interaction partner(s) from the possibly large set of other proteins it may encounter in the cell? An important ingredient of recognition is shape complementarity. The ensemble of protein shapes should be constrained by the need for maintaining functional interactions while avoiding spurious ones. To address this aspect of protein recognition, we consider the ensemble of proteins in terms of the shapes of their surfaces. We take into account the high-resolution structures of E.coli non-DNA-binding cytoplasmic proteins, retrieved from the Protein Data Bank. We aim to characterize the statistical properties of the protein surfaces at two levels: First, we study the intrinsic dimensionality at the level of the ensemble of the surface objects. Second, at the level of the individual surfaces, we determine the scale of shape variation. We further discuss how the dimensionality of the shape space is linked to the statistical properties of individual protein surfaces. Jhb and WB acknowledge support from National Science Foundation Grants PHY-1305525 and PHY-1521553. AFB acknowledges support from the Human Frontier Science Program.

  12. Characterization of electrochemically modified polycrystalline platinum surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krebs, L.C.; Ishida, Takanobu.

    1991-12-01

    The characterization of electrochemically modified polycrystalline platinum surfaces has been accomplished through the use of four major electrochemical techniques. These were chronoamperometry, chronopotentiommetry, cyclic voltammetry, and linear sweep voltammetry. A systematic study on the under-potential deposition of several transition metals has been performed. The most interesting of these were: Ag, Cu, Cd, and Pb. It was determined, by subjecting the platinum electrode surface to a single potential scan between {minus}0.24 and +1.25 V{sub SCE} while stirring the solution, that the electrocatalytic activity would be regenerated. As a consequence of this study, a much simpler method for producing ultra high purity water from acidic permanganate has been developed. This method results in water that surpasses the water produced by pyrocatalytic distillation. It has also been seen that the wettability of polycrystalline platinum surfaces is greatly dependent on the quantity of oxide present. Oxide-free platinum is hydrophobic and gives a contact angle in the range of 55 to 62 degrees. We have also modified polycrystalline platinum surface with the electrically conducting polymer poly-{rho}-phenylene. This polymer is very stable in dilute sulfuric acid solutions, even under applied oxidative potentials. It is also highly resistant to electrochemical hydrogenation. The wettability of the polymer modified platinum surface is severely dependent on the choice of supporting electrolyte chosen for the electrochemical polymerization. Tetraethylammonium tetrafluoroborate produces a film that is as hydrophobic as Teflon, whereas tetraethylammonium perchlorate produces a film that is more hydrophilic than oxide-free platinum.

  13. Characterization of electrochemically modified polycrystalline platinum surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krebs, Leonard C. [State Univ. of New York (SUNY), Stony Brook, NY (United States); Ishida, Takanobu [State Univ. of New York (SUNY), Stony Brook, NY (United States)

    1991-12-01

    The characterization of electrochemically modified polycrystalline platinum surfaces has been accomplished through the use of four major electrochemical techniques. These were chronoamperometry, chronopotentiommetry, cyclic voltammetry, and linear sweep voltammetry. A systematic study on the under-potential deposition of several transition metals has been performed. The most interesting of these were: Ag, Cu, Cd, and Pb. It was determined, by subjecting the platinum electrode surface to a single potential scan between -0.24 and +1.25 VSCE while stirring the solution, that the electrocatalytic activity would be regenerated. As a consequence of this study, a much simpler method for producing ultra high purity water from acidic permanganate has been developed. This method results in water that surpasses the water produced by pyrocatalytic distillation. It has also been seen that the wettability of polycrystalline platinum surfaces is greatly dependent on the quantity of oxide present. Oxide-free platinum is hydrophobic and gives a contact angle in the range of 55 to 62 degrees. We have also modified polycrystalline platinum surface with the electrically conducting polymer poly-ρ-phenylene. This polymer is very stable in dilute sulfuric acid solutions, even under applied oxidative potentials. It is also highly resistant to electrochemical hydrogenation. The wettability of the polymer modified platinum surface is severely dependent on the choice of supporting electrolyte chosen for the electrochemical polymerization. Tetraethylammonium tetrafluoroborate produces a film that is as hydrophobic as Teflon, whereas tetraethylammonium perchlorate produces a film that is more hydrophilic than oxide-free platinum.

  14. Production and characterization of nanocapsules encapsulated linalool by ionic gelation method using chitosan as wall material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuobing XIAO

    Full Text Available Abstract Linalool has been extensively applied in various fields, such as flavoring agent, perfumes, cosmetics and medical science. However, linalool is unstable, volatile and readily oxidizable. A sensitive substance can be encapsulated in a capsule, so encapsulation technology can solve these problems. In this paper, linalool-loaded nanocapsules (Lin-nanocapsules were prepared via the ionic gelation method and Lin-nanocapsules were characterized. The results of Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy (FTIR showed that linalool was successfully encapsulated in the wall materials. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM results demonstrated that the shapes of Lin-nanocapsules, with smooth surfaces, were nearly spherical. Lin-nanocapsule average particle size was 352 nm and its polydispersity index (PDI was proved to be 0.214 by the results of dynamic light scattering (DLC. Thermogravimetric results indicated that linalool loading capacity (LC was 15.17%, and encapsulation could decrease linalool release and increase linalool retaining time under the high temperature. Oscillatory shear and steady-state shear measurements of Lin-nanocapsule emulsions were systematically investigated. The results of steady-state shear showed that Lin-nanocapsule emulsion, which was Newtonian only for high shear rate, was non-Newtonian. It was proved by oscillatory shear that when oscillation frequency changed from low to high, Lin-nanocapsules emulsion changed from viscous into elastic.

  15. Substrate-Wrapped, Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Probes for Hydrolytic Enzyme Characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallmyer, Nathaniel E; Musielewicz, Joseph; Sutter, Joel; Reuel, Nigel F

    2018-04-17

    Hydrolytic enzymes are a topic of continual study and improvement due to their industrial impact and biological implications; however, the ability to measure the activity of these enzymes, especially in high-throughput assays, is limited to an established, few enzymes and often involves the measurement of secondary byproducts or the design of a complex degradation probe. Herein, a versatile single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT)-based biosensor that is straightforward to produce and measure is described. The hydrolytic enzyme substrate is rendered as an amphiphilic polymer, which is then used to solubilize the hydrophobic nanotubes. When the target enzyme degrades the wrapping, the SWNT fluorescent signal is quenched due to increased solvent accessibility and aggregation, allowing quantitative measurement of hydrolytic enzyme activity. Using (6,5) chiral SWNT suspended with polypeptides and polysaccharides, turnover frequencies are estimated for cellulase, pectinase, and bacterial protease. Responses are recorded for concentrations as low as 5 fM using a well-characterized protease, Proteinase K. An established trypsin-based plate reader assay is used to compare this nanotube probe assay with standard techniques. Furthermore, the effect of freeze-thaw cycles and elevated temperature on enzyme activity is measured, suggesting freezing to have minimal impact even after 10 cycles and heating to be detrimental above 60 °C. Finally, rapid optimization of enzyme operating conditions is demonstrated by generating a response surface of cellulase activity with respect to temperature and pH to determine optimal conditions within 2 h of serial scans.

  16. Global characterization of surface soil moisture drydowns

    Science.gov (United States)

    McColl, Kaighin A.; Wang, Wei; Peng, Bin; Akbar, Ruzbeh; Short Gianotti, Daniel J.; Lu, Hui; Pan, Ming; Entekhabi, Dara

    2017-04-01

    Loss terms in the land water budget (including drainage, runoff, and evapotranspiration) are encoded in the shape of soil moisture "drydowns": the soil moisture time series directly following a precipitation event, during which the infiltration input is zero. The rate at which drydowns occur—here characterized by the exponential decay time scale τ—is directly related to the shape of the loss function and is a key characteristic of global weather and climate models. In this study, we use 1 year of surface soil moisture observations from NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive mission to characterize τ globally. Consistent with physical reasoning, the observations show that τ is lower in regions with sandier soils, and in regions that are more arid. To our knowledge, these are the first global estimates of τ—based on observations alone—at scales relevant to weather and climate models.

  17. Heat transfer enhancement of free surface MHD-flow by a protrusion wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hulin Huang; Bo Li

    2010-01-01

    Due to the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) effect on the flow, which degrades heat transfer coefficients by pulsation suppression of external magnetic field on the flow, a hemispherical protrusion wall is applied to free surface MHD-flow system as a heat transfer enhancement, because the hemispherical protrusion wall has some excellent characteristics including high heat transfer coefficients, low friction factors and high overall thermal performances. So, the characteristics of the fluid flow and heat transfer of the free surface MHD-flow with hemispherical protrusion wall are simulated numerically and the influence of some parameters, such as protrusion height δ/D, and Hartmann number, are also discussed in this paper. It is found that, in the range of Hartmann number 30 ≤ Ha ≤ 70, the protrusion wall assemblies can achieve heat transfer enhancements (Nu/Nu 0 ) of about 1.3-2.3 relative to the smooth channel, while the friction loss (f/f 0 ) increases by about 1.34-1.45. Thus, the high Nusselt number can be obtained when the protrusion wall with a radically lower friction loss increase, which may help get much higher overall thermal performances.

  18. Preparation of ceramic materials for surface characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zipperian, D.C.

    1989-01-01

    This paper discusses how microstructural preparation permits a microscopic analysis of a material's internal structure, which is related to the physical properties of the material. Today, numerous microstructural quantitative and qualitative measurements are commonly utilized. Several of these include phase determination, phase hardness, phase distribution, grain size and shape, and porosity and size distribution. The most widely used surface characterization techniques are optical microscopy, electron microscopy, and x-ray microscopy. Optical microscopy includes both transmitted-and reflected-light techniques and requires a surface preparation prior to analysis. Transmitted-light microscopy samples require thinning and polishing of both sides of the sample, whereas reflected light techniques require polishing of only one side of the sample

  19. Nanoscale surface characterization using laser interference microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignatyev, Pavel S.; Skrynnik, Andrey A.; Melnik, Yury A.

    2018-03-01

    Nanoscale surface characterization is one of the most significant parts of modern materials development and application. The modern microscopes are expensive and complicated tools, and its use for industrial tasks is limited due to laborious sample preparation, measurement procedures, and low operation speed. The laser modulation interference microscopy method (MIM) for real-time quantitative and qualitative analysis of glass, metals, ceramics, and various coatings has a spatial resolution of 0.1 nm for vertical and up to 100 nm for lateral. It is proposed as an alternative to traditional scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) methods. It is demonstrated that in the cases of roughness metrology for super smooth (Ra >1 nm) surfaces the application of a laser interference microscopy techniques is more optimal than conventional SEM and AFM. The comparison of semiconductor test structure for lateral dimensions measurements obtained with SEM and AFM and white light interferometer also demonstrates the advantages of MIM technique.

  20. Experimental Investigation of Compliant Wall Surface Deformation in Turbulent Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jin; Agarwal, Karuna; Katz, Joseph

    2017-11-01

    On-going research integrates Tomographic PIV (TPIV) with Mach-Zehnder Interferometry (MZI) to measure the correlations between deformation of a compliant wall and a turbulent channel flow or a boundary layer. Aiming to extend the scope to two-way coupling, in the present experiment the wall properties have been designed, based on a theoretical analysis, to increase the amplitude of deformation to several μm, achieving the same order of magnitude as the boundary layer wall unit (5-10 μm). It requires higher speeds and a softer surface that has a Young's modulus of 0.1MPa (vs. 1Mpa before), as well as proper thickness (5 mm) that maximize the wall response to excitation at scales that fall within the temporal and spatial resolution of the instruments. The experiments are performed in a water tunnel extension to the JHU refractive index matched facility. The transparent compliant surface is made of PDMS molded on the tunnel window, and measurements are performed at friction velocity Reynolds numbers in the 1000-7000 range. MZI measures the 2D surface deformation as several magnifications. The time-resolved 3D pressure distribution is determined by calculating to spatial distribution of material acceleration from the TPIV data and integrating it using a GPU-based, parallel-line, omni-directional integration method. ONR.

  1. Decontamination efficiency of a sheet of vinyl wall paper as a surface material in radioisotope laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furukawa, Kazuhiko; Funadera, Kanako

    1989-01-01

    It has long been desired to prevent surface materials from cracking in a radioisotope laboratory. We applied a sheet of nonflammable wall paper, vinyl cloth, as a surface material to cover concrete wall. It was sufficiently resistant to the reinforced concrete wall cracking. The efficiency of the decontamination of the vinyl cloth was compared with those of stainless steel, iron and painted plates. The contamination and decontamination indices were determined in these surface materials after contamination with [ 32 P]orthophosphate (pH 3, 7 and 11) for 0 to 48 h. Both of the indices of the vinyl cloth were higher than those of the other materials. Further, it was confirmed that the vinyl cloth was resistant to acid and alkaline conditions and radioisotopes could not be permeable. The wipe off efficiency was also investigated in these materials by use of several decontamination detergents. In any reagents tested, the wipe of efficiency of the vinyl cloth was more than 80%. Thus, the vinyl cloth could be used for the surface material and is one of good surface materials in a radioisotope laboratory. (author)

  2. Study on electroactive and electrocatalytic surfaces of single walled carbon nanotube-modified electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salinas-Torres, David [Departamento de Quimica Fisica and Instituto Universitario de Materiales de Alicante, Universidad de Alicante, Apdo. de Correos 99, E-03080 Alicante (Spain); Huerta, Francisco [Departamento de Ingenieria Textil y Papelera, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Plaza Ferrandiz y Carbonell, 1. E-03801 Alcoy (Spain); Montilla, Francisco, E-mail: francisco.montilla@ua.e [Departamento de Quimica Fisica and Instituto Universitario de Materiales de Alicante, Universidad de Alicante, Apdo. de Correos 99, E-03080 Alicante (Spain); Morallon, Emilia [Departamento de Quimica Fisica and Instituto Universitario de Materiales de Alicante, Universidad de Alicante, Apdo. de Correos 99, E-03080 Alicante (Spain)

    2011-02-01

    An investigation of the electrocatalysis of single-walled carbon nanotubes modified electrodes has been performed in this work. Nanotube-modified electrodes present a surface area much higher than the bare glassy carbon surfaces as determined by capacitance measurements. Several redox probes were selected for checking the reactivity of specific sites at the carbon nanotube surface. The presence of carbon nanotubes on the electrode improves the kinetics for all the reactions studied compared with the bare glassy carbon electrode with variations of the heterogeneous electron transfer rate constant up to 5 orders of magnitude. The most important effects are observed for the benzoquinone/hydroquinone and ferrocene/ferricinium redox couples, which show a remarkable improvement of their electron transfer kinetics on SWCNT-modified electrodes, probably due to strong {pi}-{pi} interaction between the organic molecules and the walls of the carbon nanotubes. For many of the reactions studied, less than 1% of the nanotube-modified electrode surface is transferring charge to species in solution. This result suggests that only nanotube tips are active sites for the electron transfer in such cases. On the contrary, the electroactive surface for the reactions of ferrocene and quinone is higher indicating that the electron transfer is produced also from the nanotube walls.

  3. Study on electroactive and electrocatalytic surfaces of single walled carbon nanotube-modified electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salinas-Torres, David; Huerta, Francisco; Montilla, Francisco; Morallon, Emilia

    2011-01-01

    An investigation of the electrocatalysis of single-walled carbon nanotubes modified electrodes has been performed in this work. Nanotube-modified electrodes present a surface area much higher than the bare glassy carbon surfaces as determined by capacitance measurements. Several redox probes were selected for checking the reactivity of specific sites at the carbon nanotube surface. The presence of carbon nanotubes on the electrode improves the kinetics for all the reactions studied compared with the bare glassy carbon electrode with variations of the heterogeneous electron transfer rate constant up to 5 orders of magnitude. The most important effects are observed for the benzoquinone/hydroquinone and ferrocene/ferricinium redox couples, which show a remarkable improvement of their electron transfer kinetics on SWCNT-modified electrodes, probably due to strong π-π interaction between the organic molecules and the walls of the carbon nanotubes. For many of the reactions studied, less than 1% of the nanotube-modified electrode surface is transferring charge to species in solution. This result suggests that only nanotube tips are active sites for the electron transfer in such cases. On the contrary, the electroactive surface for the reactions of ferrocene and quinone is higher indicating that the electron transfer is produced also from the nanotube walls.

  4. Direct Observation of Domain-Wall Surface Tension by Deflating or Inflating a Magnetic Bubble

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xueying; Vernier, Nicolas; Zhao, Weisheng; Yu, Haiming; Vila, Laurent; Zhang, Yue; Ravelosona, Dafiné

    2018-02-01

    The surface energy of a magnetic domain wall (DW) strongly affects its static and dynamic behaviors. However, this effect is seldom directly observed, and some of the related phenomena are not well understood. Moreover, a reliable method to quantify the DW surface energy is still absent. Here, we report a series of experiments in which the DW surface energy becomes a dominant parameter. We observe that a semicircular magnetic domain bubble can spontaneously collapse under the Laplace pressure induced by DW surface energy. We further demonstrate that the surface energy can lead to a geometrically induced pinning when the DW propagates in a Hall cross or from a nanowire into a nucleation pad. Based on these observations, we develop two methods to quantify the DW surface energy, which can be very helpful in the estimation of intrinsic parameters such as Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interactions or exchange stiffness in magnetic ultrathin films.

  5. The wall as witness-surface or, the Reichstag graffiti and paradoxes of writing over history

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ella Chmielewska

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Wall writing occupies a conflicted position in the urban space and in the public discourse as a political act and as an aesthetic phenomenon. Ever more present in the contemporary visual and conceptual vocabulary, it is increasingly deployed by the world of high art and politics, commerce and academia. Torn off the wall, taken as a photogenic empty sign, its potent meanings abstracted from its material surface, wall writing becomes a powerful rhetorical tool. Paris graffiti of‘68, NewYork subway art of the 70s and the pre-89 writing on the Berlin wall combine into an amalgam of aesthetic protest, graphically raw and resolutely awkward idiom that transforms an image of writing into a potent new text. The messiness of its lines, the untamed styles and the rebellious attitude towards the material surface all conspire to create the graffiti’s myth of freedom and unrestrained individual expression, further extended to associations with democratic ambitions. Supported by the popularity of hip-hop culture and the contemporary urban cool, graffiti becomes a handy implement to evoke the individual voice, endorse place identity or authenticity.

  6. Characterization of counter-rotating streamwise vortices in flat rectangular channel with one-sided wavy wall

    KAUST Repository

    Bouremel, Yann; Mitsudharmadi, Hatsari; Budiman, Alexander C.; Winoto, Sonny H.

    2016-01-01

    Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) has been used to characterize the evolution of counter-rotating streamwise vortices in a rectangular channel with one sided wavy surface. The vortices were created by a uniform set of saw-tooth carved over the leading edge of a flat plate at the entrance of a flat rectangular channel with one-sided wavy wall. PIV measurements were taken over the spanwise and streamwise planes at different locations and at Reynolds number of 2500. Two other Reynolds numbers of 2885 and 3333 have also been considered for quantification purpose. Pairs of counter-rotating streamwise vortices have been shown experimentally to be centred along the spanwise direction at the saw-tooth valley where the vorticity ωz=0ωz=0. It has also been found that the vorticity ωzωz of the pairs of counter-rotating vortices decreases along the streamwise direction, and increases with the Reynolds number. Moreover, different quantifications of such counter-rotating vortices have been discussed such as their size, boundary layer, velocity profile and vorticity. The current study shows that the mixing due to the wall shear stress of counter-rotating streamwise vortices as well as their averaged viscous dissipation rate of kinetic energy decrease over flat and adverse pressure gradient surfaces while increasing over favourable pressure gradient surfaces. Finally, it was also demonstrated that the main direction of stretching is orientated at around 45° with the main flow direction.

  7. Characterization of counter-rotating streamwise vortices in flat rectangular channel with one-sided wavy wall

    KAUST Repository

    Bouremel, Yann

    2016-11-01

    Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) has been used to characterize the evolution of counter-rotating streamwise vortices in a rectangular channel with one sided wavy surface. The vortices were created by a uniform set of saw-tooth carved over the leading edge of a flat plate at the entrance of a flat rectangular channel with one-sided wavy wall. PIV measurements were taken over the spanwise and streamwise planes at different locations and at Reynolds number of 2500. Two other Reynolds numbers of 2885 and 3333 have also been considered for quantification purpose. Pairs of counter-rotating streamwise vortices have been shown experimentally to be centred along the spanwise direction at the saw-tooth valley where the vorticity ωz=0ωz=0. It has also been found that the vorticity ωzωz of the pairs of counter-rotating vortices decreases along the streamwise direction, and increases with the Reynolds number. Moreover, different quantifications of such counter-rotating vortices have been discussed such as their size, boundary layer, velocity profile and vorticity. The current study shows that the mixing due to the wall shear stress of counter-rotating streamwise vortices as well as their averaged viscous dissipation rate of kinetic energy decrease over flat and adverse pressure gradient surfaces while increasing over favourable pressure gradient surfaces. Finally, it was also demonstrated that the main direction of stretching is orientated at around 45° with the main flow direction.

  8. Surface condition effects on tritium permeation through the first wall of a water-cooled ceramic breeder blanket

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, H.-S. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 1126, Hefei (China); Xu, Y.-P.; Liu, H.-D. [Science Island Branch of Graduate School, University of Science and Technology of China, P.O. Box 1126, Hefei (China); Liu, F.; Li, X.-C.; Zhao, M.-Z.; Qi, Q.; Ding, F. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 1126, Hefei (China); Luo, G.-N., E-mail: gnluo@ipp.ac.cn [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 1126, Hefei (China); Science Island Branch of Graduate School, University of Science and Technology of China, P.O. Box 1126, Hefei (China); Hefei Center for Physical Science and Technology, P.O. Box 1126, Hefei (China); Hefei Science Center of Chinese Academy of Science, P.O. Box 1126, Hefei (China)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • We investigate surface effects on T transport through the first wall. • We solve transport equations with various surface conditions. • The RAFMs walls w/and w/o W exhibit different T permeation behavior. • Diffusion in W has been found to be the rate-limiting step. - Abstract: Plasma-driven permeation of tritium (T) through the first wall of a water-cooled ceramic breeder (WCCB) blanket may raise safety and other issues. In the present work, surface effects on T transport through the first wall of a WCCB blanket have been investigated by theoretical calculation. Two types of wall structures, i.e., reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steels (RAFMs) walls with and without tungsten (W) armor, have been analyzed. Surface recombination is assumed to be the boundary condition for both the plasma-facing side and the coolant side. It has been found that surface conditions at both sides can affect T permeation flux and inventory. For the first wall using W as armor material, T permeation is not sensitive to the plasma-facing surface conditions. Contamination of the surfaces will lead to higher T inventory inside the first wall.

  9. Particle desorption mass spectrometric surface characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Summers, W.R.

    1986-01-01

    The feasibility of utilizing 252 Cf-Particle Desorption Mass Spectrometry (PDMS) to characterize the surface region of solid samples has been evaluated. The PDMS experiment was adapted to an ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) environment and was configured so as to allow the analysis of thick as well as thin samples. This apparatus included an in situ sputter cleaning/depth profiling facility. The mass resolution was variable from 300 to 200 at 133 daltons by changing the drift length from 27 cm to 20 cm. Desorbed ions were focused by using either a dual grid assembly or an einzel lens. The overall instrumental transmission efficiency with the einzel lens operative was approximately 50%. The applicability of 252 Cf-PDMS to samples that were thick and insulating was demonstrated in the analysis of geological specimens. Pollucite, Microcline, Amblygonite, and Lepidolite were analyzed without complications associated with sample thickness or charge accumulation. Substitution occurring between the alkali metals in the environment was observed by PDMS and was corroborated by SIMS, XPS, and EMP analyses. The analysis of NBM SRM glasses addressed the suitability of combining the PDMS technique was sputter etching. This application demonstrated the ability of this technique to sense changes in the chemical environment brought about by sputter cleaning. The analysis of these samples also allowed the estimation of detection limits for lithium, rubidium, and cesium in a glass matrix as 300 ppm, 400 ppm, and 400 ppm, respectively. Sputter depth profiling combined with 252 Cf-PDMS analysis of an aluminum layer on a silicon substrate established the utility of the PDMS technique in surface characterization

  10. Inverse estimation for temperatures of outer surface and geometry of inner surface of furnace with two layer walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, C.-K.; Su, C.-R.

    2008-01-01

    This study provides an inverse analysis to estimate the boundary thermal behavior of a furnace with two layer walls. The unknown temperature distribution of the outer surface and the geometry of the inner surface were estimated from the temperatures of a small number of measured points within the furnace wall. The present approach rearranged the matrix forms of the governing differential equations and then combined the reversed matrix method, the linear least squares error method and the concept of virtual area to determine the unknown boundary conditions of the furnace system. The dimensionless temperature data obtained from the direct problem were used to simulate the temperature measurements. The influence of temperature measurement errors upon the precision of the estimated results was also investigated. The advantage of this approach is that the unknown condition can be directly solved by only one calculation process without initially guessed temperatures, and the iteration process of the traditional method can be avoided in the analysis of the heat transfer. Therefore, the calculation in this work is more rapid and exact than the traditional method. The result showed that the estimation error of the geometry increased with increasing distance between measured points and inner surface and in preset error, and with decreasing number of measured points. However, the geometry of the furnace inner surface could be successfully estimated by only the temperatures of a small number of measured points within and near the outer surface under reasonable preset error

  11. Surface characterization of graphene based materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisarek, M.; Holdynski, M.; Krawczyk, M.; Nowakowski, R.; Roguska, A.; Malolepszy, A.; Stobinski, L.; Jablonski, A.

    2016-12-01

    In the present study, two kind of samples were used: (i) a monolayer graphene film with a thickness of 0.345 nm deposited by the CVD method on Cu foil, (ii) graphene flakes obtained by modified Hummers method and followed by reduction of graphene oxide. The inelastic mean free path (IMFP), characterizing electron transport in graphene/Cu sample and reduced graphene oxide material, which determines the sampling depth of XPS and AES were evaluated from relative Elastic Peak Electron Spectroscopy (EPES) measurements with the Au standard in the energy range 0.5-2 keV. The measured IMFPs were compared with IMFPs resulting from experimental optical data published in the literature for the graphite sample. The EPES IMFP values at 0.5 and 1.5 keV was practically identical to that calculated from optical data for graphite (less than 4% deviation). For energies 1 and 2 keV, the EPES IMFPs for rGO were deviated up to 14% from IMFPs calculated using the optical data by Tanuma et al. [1]. Before EPES measurements all samples were characterized by various techniques like: FE-SEM, AFM, XPS, AES and REELS to visualize the surface morphology/topography and identify the chemical composition.

  12. Surface characterization of graphene based materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pisarek, M.; Holdynski, M.; Krawczyk, M.; Nowakowski, R.; Roguska, A.; Malolepszy, A.; Stobinski, L.; Jablonski, A.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Two kind of samples: commercial graphene on Cu substrate and rGO flakes. • EPES applied to measure the IMFPs in graphene based materials. • Characterization by various techniques like: FE-SEM, AFM, XPS, AES and REELS. • EPES IMFPs for rGO deviated up to 14% from IMFPs calculated using the optical data. - Abstract: In the present study, two kind of samples were used: (i) a monolayer graphene film with a thickness of 0.345 nm deposited by the CVD method on Cu foil, (ii) graphene flakes obtained by modified Hummers method and followed by reduction of graphene oxide. The inelastic mean free path (IMFP), characterizing electron transport in graphene/Cu sample and reduced graphene oxide material, which determines the sampling depth of XPS and AES were evaluated from relative Elastic Peak Electron Spectroscopy (EPES) measurements with the Au standard in the energy range 0.5–2 keV. The measured IMFPs were compared with IMFPs resulting from experimental optical data published in the literature for the graphite sample. The EPES IMFP values at 0.5 and 1.5 keV was practically identical to that calculated from optical data for graphite (less than 4% deviation). For energies 1 and 2 keV, the EPES IMFPs for rGO were deviated up to 14% from IMFPs calculated using the optical data by Tanuma et al. [1]. Before EPES measurements all samples were characterized by various techniques like: FE-SEM, AFM, XPS, AES and REELS to visualize the surface morphology/topography and identify the chemical composition.

  13. Surface characterization of graphene based materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pisarek, M., E-mail: mpisarek@ichf.edu.pl [Institute of Physical Chemistry, Polish Academy of Sciences, Kasprzaka 44/52, 01-224 Warsaw (Poland); Holdynski, M.; Krawczyk, M.; Nowakowski, R.; Roguska, A. [Institute of Physical Chemistry, Polish Academy of Sciences, Kasprzaka 44/52, 01-224 Warsaw (Poland); Malolepszy, A. [Faculty of Chemical and Process Engineering, Warsaw University of Technology, Warynskiego 1, 00-065 Warsaw (Poland); Stobinski, L. [Institute of Physical Chemistry, Polish Academy of Sciences, Kasprzaka 44/52, 01-224 Warsaw (Poland); Faculty of Chemical and Process Engineering, Warsaw University of Technology, Warynskiego 1, 00-065 Warsaw (Poland); Jablonski, A. [Institute of Physical Chemistry, Polish Academy of Sciences, Kasprzaka 44/52, 01-224 Warsaw (Poland)

    2016-12-01

    Highlights: • Two kind of samples: commercial graphene on Cu substrate and rGO flakes. • EPES applied to measure the IMFPs in graphene based materials. • Characterization by various techniques like: FE-SEM, AFM, XPS, AES and REELS. • EPES IMFPs for rGO deviated up to 14% from IMFPs calculated using the optical data. - Abstract: In the present study, two kind of samples were used: (i) a monolayer graphene film with a thickness of 0.345 nm deposited by the CVD method on Cu foil, (ii) graphene flakes obtained by modified Hummers method and followed by reduction of graphene oxide. The inelastic mean free path (IMFP), characterizing electron transport in graphene/Cu sample and reduced graphene oxide material, which determines the sampling depth of XPS and AES were evaluated from relative Elastic Peak Electron Spectroscopy (EPES) measurements with the Au standard in the energy range 0.5–2 keV. The measured IMFPs were compared with IMFPs resulting from experimental optical data published in the literature for the graphite sample. The EPES IMFP values at 0.5 and 1.5 keV was practically identical to that calculated from optical data for graphite (less than 4% deviation). For energies 1 and 2 keV, the EPES IMFPs for rGO were deviated up to 14% from IMFPs calculated using the optical data by Tanuma et al. [1]. Before EPES measurements all samples were characterized by various techniques like: FE-SEM, AFM, XPS, AES and REELS to visualize the surface morphology/topography and identify the chemical composition.

  14. Construction of Hydrophobic Wood Surface and Mechanical Property of Wood Cell Wall on Nanoscale Modified by Dimethyldichlorosilane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Rui; Wang, Siqun; Zhou, Dingguo; Zhang, Jie; Lan, Ping; Jia, Chong

    2018-01-01

    Dimethyldichlorosilane was used to improve the hydrophobicity of wood surface. The water contact angle of the treated wood surface increased from 85° to 143°, which indicated increased hydrophobicity. The nanomechanical properties of the wood cell wall were evaluated using a nanoindentation test to analyse the hydrophobic mechanism on the nano scale. The elastic modulus of the cell wall was significantly affected by the concentration but the influence of treatment time is insignificant. The hardness of the cell wall for treated samples was significantly affected by both treatment time and concentration. The interaction between treatment time and concentration was extremely significant for the elastic modulus of the wood cell wall.

  15. Scattering of atoms by solid surfaces: A CCGM theory of diffraction by a one-dimensional stationary periodic wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodman, F.O.; Scribani, L.

    1981-01-01

    The CCGM theory of elastic atom--surface scattering, proposed by Cabrera, Celli, Goodman, and Manson [Surf. Sci. 19, 67 (1970)], is applied to the now-popular corrugated wall model of the scattering. Instead of the original ''hard'' wall, a ''softer'' wall, with finite potential step height, is used. The CCGM soft-wall results are compared with corresponding exact hard-wall results, for corrugations of the sinusoidal type and of other types, for example those with nondifferentiable corrugation functions. It is concluded that the CCGM soft-wall results agree well with the exact hard-wall results provided that neither the dimensionless corrugation amplitude nor the dimensionless atom wave number is too large, although no explanation of the reason for this agreement is given. The results are important because a typical exact calculation may be far more time consuming than is a typical CCGM calculation, particularly for the ''nastier'' corrugation functions

  16. Surface chemistry of first wall materials - From fundamental data to modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linsmeier, Ch.; Reinelt, M.; Schmid, K.

    2011-01-01

    The application of different materials at the first wall of fusion devices, like beryllium, carbon, and tungsten in the case of ITER, unavoidably leads to the formation of compounds. These compounds are created dynamically during operation and depend on the local parameters like surface temperature, incoming particle energies and species. In dedicated, well-defined laboratory experiments, using mainly X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Rutherford backscattering analysis for qualitative and quantitative chemical surface analysis, the parameter space in relevant element combinations are investigated. These studies lead to a deep understanding of the reaction mechanisms under the applied conditions and to a quantitative description of reaction and diffusion processes. These data can be parameterized and integrated into a modeling approach which combines dynamic surface chemistry with the modeling of the transport in the plasma. Two different approaches for surface reaction modeling are compared and benchmarked with experimental data.

  17. Characterization of the anisotropic mechanical behavior of human abdominal wall connective tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astruc, Laure; De Meulaere, Maurice; Witz, Jean-François; Nováček, Vit; Turquier, Frédéric; Hoc, Thierry; Brieu, Mathias

    2018-06-01

    Abdominal wall sheathing tissues are commonly involved in hernia formation. However, there is very limited work studying mechanics of all tissues from the same donor which prevents a complete understanding of the abdominal wall behavior and the differences in these tissues. The aim of this study was to investigate the differences between the mechanical properties of the linea alba and the anterior and posterior rectus sheaths from a macroscopic point of view. Eight full-thickness human anterior abdominal walls of both genders were collected and longitudinal and transverse samples were harvested from the three sheathing connective tissues. The total of 398 uniaxial tensile tests was conducted and the mechanical characteristics of the behavior (tangent rigidities for small and large deformations) were determined. Statistical comparisons highlighted heterogeneity and non-linearity in behavior of the three tissues under both small and large deformations. High anisotropy was observed under small and large deformations with higher stress in the transverse direction. Variabilities in the mechanical properties of the linea alba according to the gender and location were also identified. Finally, data dispersion correlated with microstructure revealed that macroscopic characterization is not sufficient to fully describe behavior. Microstructure consideration is needed. These results provide a better understanding of the mechanical behavior of the abdominal wall sheathing tissues as well as the directions for microstructure-based constitutive model. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. A Computationally-Efficient Numerical Model to Characterize the Noise Behavior of Metal-Framed Walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arun Arjunan

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Architects, designers, and engineers are making great efforts to design acoustically-efficient metal-framed walls, minimizing acoustic bridging. Therefore, efficient simulation models to predict the acoustic insulation complying with ISO 10140 are needed at a design stage. In order to achieve this, a numerical model consisting of two fluid-filled reverberation chambers, partitioned using a metal-framed wall, is to be simulated at one-third-octaves. This produces a large simulation model consisting of several millions of nodes and elements. Therefore, efficient meshing procedures are necessary to obtain better solution times and to effectively utilise computational resources. Such models should also demonstrate effective Fluid-Structure Interaction (FSI along with acoustic-fluid coupling to simulate a realistic scenario. In this contribution, the development of a finite element frequency-dependent mesh model that can characterize the sound insulation of metal-framed walls is presented. Preliminary results on the application of the proposed model to study the geometric contribution of stud frames on the overall acoustic performance of metal-framed walls are also presented. It is considered that the presented numerical model can be used to effectively visualize the noise behaviour of advanced materials and multi-material structures.

  19. Characterization of Ancient Egyptian Wall Paintings, the Excavations of Cairo University at Saqqara

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussein MAREY MAHMOUD

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The present study aims at characterizing some Egyptian wall paintings discovered during the excavations of Cairo University (since 1988 and recently in 2005 at Saqqara area in the south of Cairo. There, a number of tombs dating back to the 19th dynasty (c.1293–1185 BC were discovered. The walls of these tombs are carved with bass and raised reliefs and painted with different colours. The characterization of the wall paintings was done by means of optical microscopy (OM, scanning electron microscopy (backscattered electron mode, BSE equipped with an energy dispersive X-ray detector (EDS, micro XRF spectrometry (µ-XRF, and X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD. The analysis of the examined samples indicated that the blue pigment is Egyptian blue (Cuprorivaite, the green pigment is Egyptian green, the red pigment is red ochre, and the yellow pigment is a blended layer of yellow ochre and orpiment (As2S3. The results will help in providing an image concerning some painting materials used during the new Kingdom in ancient Egypt

  20. Simple quantification of surface carboxylic acids on chemically oxidized multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Hyejin; Kim, Seong-Taek; Lee, Jong Doo; Yim, Sanggyu

    2013-02-01

    The surface of multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) was chemically oxidized using nitric acid and sulfuric-nitric acid mixtures. Thermogravimetric analysis, transmission electron microscopy and infrared spectroscopy revealed that the use of acid mixtures led to higher degree of oxidation. More quantitative identification of surface carboxylic acids was carried out using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and acid-base titration. However, these techniques are costly and require very long analysis times to promptly respond to the extent of the reaction. We propose a much simpler method using pH measurements and pre-determined pKa value in order to estimate the concentration of carboxylic acids on the oxidized MWCNT surfaces. The results from this technique were consistent with those obtained from XPS and titration, and it is expected that this simple quantification method can provide a cheap and fast way to monitor and control the oxidation reaction of MWCNT.

  1. Experiments on bubble dynamics between a free surface and a rigid wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, A. M.; Cui, P.; Wang, Y.

    2013-10-01

    Experiments were conducted where the underwater bubble oscillates between two boundaries, a free surface and a horizontal rigid wall. The motion features of both the bubble and the free surface were investigated, via the consideration of two key factors, i.e., the non-dimensional distances from the bubble to the two boundaries. To support the investigation, experiments were conducted in the first place where the bubble oscillates near only one of the two boundaries. Then the other boundary was inserted at different positions to observe the changes in the motion features, including the types, maximum speed and height of the water spike and skirt, the form and speed of the jets, and bubble shapes. Correspondence is found between the motion features of the free surface and different stages of bubble oscillation. Intriguing details such as gas torus around the jet, double jets, bubble entrapment, and microjet of the water spike, etc., are observed.

  2. Plasma Surface Interactions Common to Advanced Fusion Wall Materials and EUV Lithography - Lithium and Tin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruzic, D. N.; Alman, D. A.; Jurczyk, B. E.; Stubbers, R.; Coventry, M. D.; Neumann, M. J.; Olczak, W.; Qiu, H.

    2004-09-01

    Advanced plasma facing components (PFCs) are needed to protect walls in future high power fusion devices. In the semiconductor industry, extreme ultraviolet (EUV) sources are needed for next generation lithography. Lithium and tin are candidate materials in both areas, with liquid Li and Sn plasma material interactions being critical. The Plasma Material Interaction Group at the University of Illinois is leveraging liquid metal experimental and computational facilities to benefit both fields. The Ion surface InterAction eXperiment (IIAX) has measured liquid Li and Sn sputtering, showing an enhancement in erosion with temperature for light ion bombardment. Surface Cleaning of Optics by Plasma Exposure (SCOPE) measures erosion and damage of EUV mirror samples, and tests cleaning recipes with a helicon plasma. The Flowing LIquid surface Retention Experiment (FLIRE) measures the He and H retention in flowing liquid metals, with retention coefficients varying between 0.001 at 500 eV to 0.01 at 4000 eV.

  3. Cell wall structure suitable for surface display of proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuoka, Hiroyuki; Hashimoto, Kazuya; Saijo, Aki; Takada, Yuki; Kondo, Akihiko; Ueda, Mitsuyoshi; Ooshima, Hiroshi; Tachibana, Taro; Azuma, Masayuki

    2014-02-01

    A display system for adding new protein functions to the cell surfaces of microorganisms has been developed, and applications of the system to various fields have been proposed. With the aim of constructing a cell surface environment suitable for protein display in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the cell surface structures of cell wall mutants were investigated. Four cell wall mutant strains were selected by analyses using a GFP display system via a GPI anchor. β-Glucosidase and endoglucanase II were displayed on the cell surface in the four mutants, and their activities were evaluated. mnn2 deletion strain exhibited the highest activity for both the enzymes. In particular, endoglucanase II activity using carboxymethylcellulose as a substrate in the mutant strain was 1.9-fold higher than that of the wild-type strain. In addition, the activity of endoglucanase II released from the mnn2 deletion strain by Zymolyase 20T treatment was higher than that from the wild-type strain. The results of green fluorescent protein (GFP) and endoglucanase displays suggest that the amounts of enzyme displayed on the cell surface were increased by the mnn2 deletion. The enzyme activity of the mnn2 deletion strain was compared with that of the wild-type strain. The relative value (mnn2 deletion mutant/wild-type strain) of endoglucanase II activity using carboxymethylcellulose as a substrate was higher than that of β-glucosidase activity using p-nitrophenyl-β-glucopyranoside as a substrate, suggesting that the cell surface environment of the mnn2 deletion strain facilitates the binding of high-molecular-weight substrates to the active sites of the displayed enzymes. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. High Reynolds number rough wall turbulent boundary layer experiments using Braille surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Michael; Monty, Jason; Nova, Todd; Allen, James; Chong, Min

    2007-11-01

    This paper details smooth, transitional and fully rough turbulent boundary layer experiments in the New Mexico State high Reynolds number rough wall wind tunnel. The initial surface tested was generated with a Braille printer and consisted of an uniform array of Braille points. The average point height being 0.5mm, the spacing between the points in the span was 0.5mm and the surface consisted of span wise rows separated by 4mm. The wavelength to peak ratio was 8:1. The boundary layer thickness at the measurement location was 190mm giving a large separation of roughness height to layer thickness. The maximum friction velocity was uτ=1.5m/s at Rex=3.8 x10^7. Results for the skin friction co-efficient show that this surface follows a Nikuradse type inflectional curve and that Townsends outer layer similarity hypothesis is valid for rough wall flows with a large separation of scales. Mean flow and turbulence statistics will be presented.

  5. Development of a robot for decontamination of reactor well and maintenance pit wall surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyakawa, Minoru; Nozawa, Katsuro; Mizutani, Takeshi; Onozuka, Kazuaki; Morita, Isamu

    1984-03-01

    A robot has been developed at Hamaoka BWR Power Plant of Chubu Electric Power Company, Inc., which performs the decontamination of the wall surfaces of reactor wells and maintenance pits. The robot is controlled with a control box through a micro-computer. The mechanical structure and working principle of this robot is explained. One of the special features of this robot is that it perceives the steps on a wall, and washes the vertical and horizontal surfaces with two different types of brushes. As the material for the bristles of the brushes, nylon with alumina as abrasive (TAINEX-A made by Dupont Ltd.) was selected after some experience. The design specifications of the brushes were determined, based on the results of intensive performance test, which are shown in this report. The efficiency of this robot was proved by applying it to the decontamination of the reactor wells in the periodic inspection and maintenance of Unit 1 and Unit 2 in the Hamaoka BWR Power Plant. As the result of this decontamination, the contamination level was reduced from 10/sup 3/ ..mu..Ci/cm/sup 2/ to about 10/sup 5/ ..mu..Ci/cm/sup 2/. The measured results of contamination after the first and third decontamination works are listed for various parts of the well surfaces.

  6. Development of a robot for decontamination of reactor well and maintenance pit wall surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyakawa, Minoru; Nozawa, Katsuro; Mizutani, Takeshi; Onozuka, Kazuaki; Morita, Isamu

    1984-01-01

    A robot has been developed at Hamaoka BWR Power Plant of Chubu Electric Power Company, Inc., which performs the decontamination of the wall surfaces of reactor wells and maintenance pits. The robot is controlled with a control box through a micro-computer. The mechanical structure and working principle of this robot is explained. One of the special features of this robot is that it perceives the steps on a wall, and washes the vertical and horizontal surfaces with two different types of brushes. As the material for the bristles of the brushes, nylon with alumina as abrasive (TAINEX-A made by Dupont Ltd.) was selected after some experience. The design specifications of the brushes were determined, based on the results of intensive performance test, which are shown in this report. The efficiency of this robot was proved by applying it to the decontamination of the reactor wells in the periodic inspection and maintenance of Unit 1 and Unit 2 in the Hamaoka BWR Power Plant. As the result of this decontamination, the contamination level was reduced from about 10 -3 μCi/cm 2 to about 10 -5 μCi/cm 2 . The measured results of contamination after the first and third decontamination works are listed for various parts of the well surfaces. (Aoki, K.)

  7. A waveless two-dimensional flow in a channel against an inclined wall with surface tension effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merzougui, Abdelkrim; Mekias, Hocine; Guechi, Fairouz

    2007-01-01

    Surface tension effect on a two-dimensional channel flow against an inclined wall is considered. The flow is assumed to be steady, irrotational, inviscid and incompressible. The effect of surface tension is taken into account and the effect of gravity is neglected. Numerical solutions are obtained via series truncation procedure. The problem is solved numerically for various values of the Weber number α and for various values of the inclination angle β between the horizontal bottom and the inclined wall

  8. A waveless two-dimensional flow in a channel against an inclined wall with surface tension effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merzougui, Abdelkrim [Departement de Mathematiques, Faculte des sciences, Universite Mohamed Boudiaf, M' sila, 28000 (Algeria); Mekias, Hocine [Departement de Mathematiques, Faculte des sciences, Universite Farhat Abbas Setif 19000 (Algeria); Guechi, Fairouz [Departement de Mathematiques, Faculte des sciences, Universite Farhat Abbas Setif 19000 (Algeria)

    2007-11-23

    Surface tension effect on a two-dimensional channel flow against an inclined wall is considered. The flow is assumed to be steady, irrotational, inviscid and incompressible. The effect of surface tension is taken into account and the effect of gravity is neglected. Numerical solutions are obtained via series truncation procedure. The problem is solved numerically for various values of the Weber number {alpha} and for various values of the inclination angle {beta} between the horizontal bottom and the inclined wall.

  9. UCN storage experiment for the investigation of the anomalous interaction with wall surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawabata, Yuji; Utsuro, Masahiko; Steyerl, A.; Malik, S.S.; Geltenbort, P.; Neumair, S.; Nesvizhevsky, V.V.

    1997-01-01

    The UCN experiment for the investigation of the anomalous interaction with wall surfaces was performed in the ILL UCN source. UCN is monochromated by the gravity and stored in the spectrometer with rectangular trap which is the Fombrin-grease coated box of 67x67cm 2 cross section and 20cm height. The measured energy distribution of stored UCN shows the indication of 'initial micro-heating'. The order of energy gain is ∼ 10 -10 eV in the initial several 100sec of storage. (author)

  10. Control of neuronal network organization by chemical surface functionalization of multi-walled carbon nanotube arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jie; Bibari, Olivier; Marchand, Gilles; Benabid, Alim-Louis; Sauter-Starace, Fabien; Appaix, Florence; De Waard, Michel

    2011-01-01

    Carbon nanotube substrates are promising candidates for biological applications and devices. Interfacing of these carbon nanotubes with neurons can be controlled by chemical modifications. In this study, we investigated how chemical surface functionalization of multi-walled carbon nanotube arrays (MWNT-A) influences neuronal adhesion and network organization. Functionalization of MWNT-A dramatically modifies the length of neurite fascicles, cluster inter-connection success rate, and the percentage of neurites that escape from the clusters. We propose that chemical functionalization represents a method of choice for developing applications in which neuronal patterning on MWNT-A substrates is required.

  11. Control of neuronal network organization by chemical surface functionalization of multi-walled carbon nanotube arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Jie; Bibari, Olivier; Marchand, Gilles; Benabid, Alim-Louis; Sauter-Starace, Fabien [CEA, LETI-Minatec, 17 Rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Appaix, Florence; De Waard, Michel, E-mail: fabien.sauter@cea.fr, E-mail: michel.dewaard@ujf-grenoble.fr [Inserm U836, Grenoble Institute of Neuroscience, Site Sante la Tronche, Batiment Edmond J Safra, Chemin Fortune Ferrini, BP170, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 09 (France)

    2011-05-13

    Carbon nanotube substrates are promising candidates for biological applications and devices. Interfacing of these carbon nanotubes with neurons can be controlled by chemical modifications. In this study, we investigated how chemical surface functionalization of multi-walled carbon nanotube arrays (MWNT-A) influences neuronal adhesion and network organization. Functionalization of MWNT-A dramatically modifies the length of neurite fascicles, cluster inter-connection success rate, and the percentage of neurites that escape from the clusters. We propose that chemical functionalization represents a method of choice for developing applications in which neuronal patterning on MWNT-A substrates is required.

  12. Ion-surface interaction: simulation of plasma-wall interaction (ITER)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salou, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    The wall materials of magnetic confinement in fusion machines are exposed to an aggressive environment; the reactor blanket is bombarded with a high flux of particles extracted from the plasma, leading to the sputtering of surface material. This sputtering causes wall erosion as well as plasma contamination problems. In order to control fusion reactions in complex reactors, it is thus imperative to well understand the plasma-wall interactions. This work proposes the study of the sputtering of fusion relevant materials. We propose to simulate the charged particles influx by few keV single-charged ion beams. This study is based on the catcher method; to avoid any problem of pollution (especially in the case of carbon) we designed a new setup allowing an in situ Auger electron spectroscopy analysis. The results provide the evolution of the angular distribution of the sputtering yield as a function of the ion mass (from helium to xenon) and its energy (from 3 keV to 9 keV). (author) [fr

  13. Surface parameter characterization of surface vibrations in linear chains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majlis, N.; Selzer, S.; Puszkarski, H.; Diep-The-Hung

    1982-12-01

    We consider the vibrations of a linear monatomic chain with a complex surface potential defined by the surface pinning parameter a=Aesup(-i psi). It is found that in the case of a semi-infinite chain a is connected with the surface vibration wave number k=s+it by the exact relations: s=psi, t=lnA. We also show that the solutions found can be regarded as approximate ones (in the limit L>>1) for surface vibrations of a finite chain consisting of L atoms. (author)

  14. Wall shear stress characterization of a 3D bluff-body separated flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fourrié, Grégoire; Keirsbulck, Laurent; Labraga, Larbi

    2013-10-01

    Efficient flow control strategies aimed at reducing the aerodynamic drag of road vehicles require a detailed knowledge of the reference flow. In this work, the flow around the rear slanted window of a generic car model was experimentally studied through wall shear stress measurements using an electrochemical method. The mean and fluctuating wall shear stress within the wall impact regions of the recirculation bubble and the main longitudinal vortex structures which develop above the rear window are presented. Correlations allow a more detailed characterization of the recirculation phenomenon within the separation bubble. In the model symmetry plane the recirculation structure compares well with simpler 2D configurations; specific lengths, flapping motion and shedding of large-scale vortices are observed, these similarities diminish when leaving the middle plane due to the strong three-dimensionality of the flow. A specific attention is paid to the convection processes occurring within the recirculation: a downstream convection velocity is observed, in accordance with 2D recirculations from the literature, and an upstream convection is highlighted along the entire bubble length which has not been underlined in some previous canonical configurations.

  15. The Impact of Sonication on the Surface Quality of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Byumseok; Cheng, Wei

    2015-08-01

    Sonication process is regularly adopted for dispersing single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in an aqueous medium. This can be achieved by either covalent functionalization of SWCNTs with strong acid or by noncovalent functionalization using dispersants that adsorb onto the surface of SWCNTs during dispersion. Because the dispersion process is usually performed using sonication, unintentional free radical formation during sonication process may induce covalent modification of SWCNT surface. Herein, we have systematically investigated the status of SWCNT surface modification under various sonication conditions using Raman spectroscopy. Comparing ID /IG (Raman intensities between D and G bands) ratio of SWCNTs under various sonication conditions suggests that typical sonication conditions (1-6 h bath sonication with sonication power between 3 and 80 W) in aqueous media do not induce covalent modification of SWCNT surface. In addition, we confirm that SWCNT dispersion with single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) involves noncovalent adsorption of ssDNA onto the surface of SWCNTs, but not covalent linkage between ssDNA and SWCNT surface. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  16. Surface conditioning with Escherichia coli cell wall components can reduce biofilm formation by decreasing initial adhesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana C. Gomes

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation on food processing surfaces pose major risks to human health. Non-efficient cleaning of equipment surfaces and piping can act as a conditioning layer that affects the development of a new biofilm post-disinfection. We have previously shown that surface conditioning with cell extracts could reduce biofilm formation. In the present work, we hypothesized that E. coli cell wall components could be implicated in this phenomena and therefore mannose, myristic acid and palmitic acid were tested as conditioning agents. To evaluate the effect of surface conditioning and flow topology on biofilm formation, assays were performed in agitated 96-well microtiter plates and in a parallel plate flow chamber (PPFC, both operated at the same average wall shear stress (0.07 Pa as determined by computational fluid dynamics (CFD. It was observed that when the 96-well microtiter plate and the PPFC were used to form biofilms at the same shear stress, similar results were obtained. This shows that the referred hydrodynamic feature may be a good scale-up parameter from high-throughput platforms to larger scale flow cell systems as the PPFC used in this study. Mannose did not have any effect on E. coli biofilm formation, but myristic and palmitic acid inhibited biofilm development by decreasing cell adhesion (in about 50%. These results support the idea that in food processing equipment where biofilm formation is not critical below a certain threshold, bacterial lysis and adsorption of cell components to the surface may reduce biofilm buildup and extend the operational time.

  17. Characterization of atherosclerotic disease in thoracic aorta: A 3D, multicontrast vessel wall imaging study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Changwu [Center for Biomedical Imaging Research, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Tsinghua University School of Medicine, Beijing (China); Department of Radiology, The Second Clinical Medical College, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou (China); Qiao, Huiyu; He, Le [Center for Biomedical Imaging Research, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Tsinghua University School of Medicine, Beijing (China); Yuan, Chun [Center for Biomedical Imaging Research, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Tsinghua University School of Medicine, Beijing (China); Department of Radiology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Chen, Huijun; Zhang, Qiang; Li, Rui [Center for Biomedical Imaging Research, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Tsinghua University School of Medicine, Beijing (China); Wang, Wei; Du, Fang [Department of Radiology, The Second Clinical Medical College, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou (China); Li, Cheng, E-mail: cjr.licheng@vip.163.com [Department of Radiology, Zhongda Hospital, Medical School of Southeast University, Nanjing (China); Zhao, Xihai, E-mail: xihaizhao@tsinghua.edu.cn [Center for Biomedical Imaging Research, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Tsinghua University School of Medicine, Beijing (China)

    2016-11-15

    Purpose: To investigate the characteristics of plaque in the thoracic aorta using three dimensional multicontrast magnetic resonance imaging. Materials and methods: Elderly subjects (≥60 years) were recruited in this study. Thoracic aorta was imaged on a 3.0T MR scanner by acquiring multicontrast sequences. The plaque burden was evaluated by measuring lumen area, wall area, wall thickness, and normalized wall index. The presence or absence of plaque and intraplaque hemorrhage (IPH)/mural thrombus (MT) were identified. The characteristics of atherosclerosis among different thoracic aorta segments (AAO: ascending aorta; AOA: aortic arch, and DOA: descending aorta) were determined. Results: Of 66 recruited subjects (mean age 72.3 ± 6.2 years, 30 males), 55 (83.3%) had plaques in the thoracic aorta. The prevalence of plaque in AAO, AOA, and DAO was 5.4%, 72.7%, and 71.2%, respectively. In addition, 21.2% of subjects were found to have lesions with IPH/MT in the thoracic aorta. The prevalence of IPH/MT in segment of AAO, AOA and DAO was 0%, 13.6%, and 12.1%, respectively. The aortic wall showed the highest NWI in DAO (34.1% ± 4.8%), followed by AOA (31.2% ± 5%), and AAO (26.8% ± 3.3%) (p < 0.001). Conclusion: Three dimensional multicontrast MR imaging is capable of characterizing atherosclerotic plaques in the thoracic aorta. The findings of high prevalence of plaques and the presence of high risk plaques in the thoracic aorta suggest early screening for aortic vulnerable lesions in the elderly.

  18. Characterization of atherosclerotic disease in thoracic aorta: A 3D, multicontrast vessel wall imaging study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Changwu; Qiao, Huiyu; He, Le; Yuan, Chun; Chen, Huijun; Zhang, Qiang; Li, Rui; Wang, Wei; Du, Fang; Li, Cheng; Zhao, Xihai

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the characteristics of plaque in the thoracic aorta using three dimensional multicontrast magnetic resonance imaging. Materials and methods: Elderly subjects (≥60 years) were recruited in this study. Thoracic aorta was imaged on a 3.0T MR scanner by acquiring multicontrast sequences. The plaque burden was evaluated by measuring lumen area, wall area, wall thickness, and normalized wall index. The presence or absence of plaque and intraplaque hemorrhage (IPH)/mural thrombus (MT) were identified. The characteristics of atherosclerosis among different thoracic aorta segments (AAO: ascending aorta; AOA: aortic arch, and DOA: descending aorta) were determined. Results: Of 66 recruited subjects (mean age 72.3 ± 6.2 years, 30 males), 55 (83.3%) had plaques in the thoracic aorta. The prevalence of plaque in AAO, AOA, and DAO was 5.4%, 72.7%, and 71.2%, respectively. In addition, 21.2% of subjects were found to have lesions with IPH/MT in the thoracic aorta. The prevalence of IPH/MT in segment of AAO, AOA and DAO was 0%, 13.6%, and 12.1%, respectively. The aortic wall showed the highest NWI in DAO (34.1% ± 4.8%), followed by AOA (31.2% ± 5%), and AAO (26.8% ± 3.3%) (p < 0.001). Conclusion: Three dimensional multicontrast MR imaging is capable of characterizing atherosclerotic plaques in the thoracic aorta. The findings of high prevalence of plaques and the presence of high risk plaques in the thoracic aorta suggest early screening for aortic vulnerable lesions in the elderly.

  19. Identification and Characterization of Paramyosin from Cyst Wall of Metacercariae Implicated Protective Efficacy against Clonorchis sinensis Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Xiaoli; Tian, Yanli; Men, Jingtao; Zhang, Xifeng; Lei, Huali; Zhou, Chenhui; Lu, Fangli; Liang, Chi; Hu, Xuchu; Xu, Jin; Wu, Zhongdao; Li, Xuerong; Yu, Xinbing

    2012-01-01

    Human clonorchiasis has been increasingly prevalent in recent years and results in a threat to the public health in epidemic regions, motivating current strategies of vaccines to combat Clonorchis sinensis (C. sinensis). In this study, we identified C. sinensis paramyosin (CsPmy) from the cyst wall proteins of metacercariae by proteomic approaches and characterized the expressed recombinant pET-26b-CsPmy protein (101 kDa). Bioinformatics analysis indicated that full-length sequences of paramyosin are conserved in helminthes and numerous B-cell/T-cell epitopes were predicted in amino acid sequence of CsPmy. Western blot analysis showed that CsPmy was expressed at four life stages of C. sinensis, both cyst wall proteins and soluble tegumental components could be probed by anti-CsPmy serum. Moreover, immunolocalization results revealed that CsPmy was specifically localized at cyst wall and excretory bladder of metacercaria, as well as the tegument, oral sucker and vitellarium of adult worm. Both immunoblot and immunolocalization results demonstrated that CsPmy was highly expressed at the stage of adult worm, metacercariae and cercaria, which could be supported by real-time PCR analysis. Both recombinant protein and nucleic acid of CsPmy showed strong immunogenicity in rats and induced combined Th1/Th2 immune responses, which were reflected by continuous high level of antibody titers and increased level of IgG1/IgG2a subtypes in serum. In vaccine trials, comparing with control groups, both CsPmy protein and DNA vaccine exhibited protective effect with significant worm reduction rate of 54.3% (psinensis regarding its high immunogenicity and surface localization. PMID:22470461

  20. Investigation of thermal effect on exterior wall surface of building material at urban city area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Md Din, Mohd Fadhil; Dzinun, Hazlini; Ponraj, M.; Chelliapan, Shreeshivadasan; Noor, Zainura Zainun [Institute of Environmental Water Resources and Management (IPASA), Faculty of Civil Engineering, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 UTM Skudai, Johor (Malaysia); Remaz, Dilshah [Faculty of Built Environment, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 UTM Skudai, Johor (Malaysia); Iwao, Kenzo [Nagoya Institute of Technology, Nagoya (Japan)

    2012-07-01

    This paper describes the investigation of heat impact on the vertical surfaces of buildings based on their thermal behavior. The study was performed based on four building materials that is commonly used in Malaysia; brick, concrete, granite and white concrete tiles. The thermal performances on the building materials were investigated using a surface temperature sensor, data logging system and infrared thermography. Results showed that the brick had the capability to absorb and store heat greater than other materials during the investigation period. The normalized heat (total heat/solar radiation) of the brick was 0.093 and produces high heat (51% compared to granite), confirming a substantial amount of heat being released into the atmosphere through radiation and convection. The most sensitive material that absorbs and stores heat was in the following order: brick > concrete > granite > white concrete tiles. It was concluded that the type of exterior wall material used in buildings had significant impact to the environment.

  1. Surface tailored single walled carbon nanotubes as catalyst support for direct methanol fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kireeti, Kota V. M. K.; Jha, Neetu

    2017-10-01

    A strategy for tuning the surface property of Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes (SWNTs) for enhanced methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) and oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) along with methanol tolerance is presented. The surface functionality is tailored using controlled acid and base treatment. Acid treatment leads to the attachment of carboxylic carbon (CC) fragments to SWNT making it hydrophilic (P3-SWNT). Base treatment of P3-SWNT with 0.05 M NaOH reduces the CCs and makes it hydrophobic (P33-SWNT). Pt catalyst supported on the P3-SWNT possesses enhanced MOR whereas that supported on P33-SWNT not only enhances ORR kinetics but also possess good tolerance towards methanol oxidation as verified by the electrochemical technique.

  2. Surface topography and morphology characterization of PIII irradiated silicon surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Satinder K.; Barthwal, Sumit

    2008-01-01

    The effect of plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) treatment on silicon surfaces was investigated by micro-Raman and atomic force microscopy (AFM) technique. The surface damage was given by the implantation of carbon, nitrogen, oxygen and argon ions using an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) source at low pressure. AFM studies show that surface topography of the PIII treated silicon wafers depend on the physical and chemical nature of the implanted species. Micro-Raman spectra indicate that the significant reduction of intensity of Raman peak after PIII treatment. Plasma immersion ion implantation is a non-line-of-sight ion implantation method, which allows 3D treatment of materials. Therefore, PIII based surface modification and plasma immersion ion deposition (PIID) coatings are applied in a wide range of situations.

  3. Recent characterization of steel by surface analysis methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Shigeru

    1996-01-01

    Surface analysis methods, such as Auger electron spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, secondary ion mass spectrometry, glow discharge optical emission spectrometry and so on, have become indispensable to characterize surface and interface of many kinds of steel. Although a number of studies on characterization of steel by these methods have been carried out, several problems still remain in quantification and depth profiling. Nevertheless, the methods have provided essential information on the concentration and chemical state of elements at the surface and interface. Recent results on characterization of oxide layers, coated films, etc. on the surface of steel are reviewed here. (author). 99 refs

  4. Leachate characterization and assessment of surface and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The environment can be impacted negatively by leachates from these dumpsites if not properly managed. This study aimed at assessing the characteristics of municipal solid waste leachate and its contamination potential on surface and groundwater. Leachate, groundwater and surface water samples were collected from ...

  5. Egypt satellite images for land surface characterization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasager, Charlotte Bay

    images used for mapping the vegetation cover types and other land cover types in Egypt. The mapping ranges from 1 km resolution to 30 m resolution. The aim is to provide satellite image mapping with land surface characteristics relevant for roughness mapping.......Satellite images provide information on the land surface properties. From optical remote sensing images in the blue, green, red and near-infrared part of the electromagnetic spectrum it is possible to identify a large number of surface features. The report briefly describes different satellite...

  6. Characterization and H2-O2 reactivity of noble nano-metal tailored single wall nano-carbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    K Kaneko; T Itoh; E Bekyarova; H Kanoh; S Utsumi; H Tanaka; M Yudasaka; S Iijima; S Iijima

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Single wall carbon nano-tube (SWNT) and single wall carbon nano-horn (SWNH) have nano-spaces in their particles and the nano-spaces become open by oxidation. In particular, SWNH forms a unique colloidal structure which has micropores and meso-pores between the SWNH particles. Although non-treated SWNH colloids have quasi-one dimensional nano-pores [1], oxidized SWNH colloids have both of interstitial and internal nano-pores [2-5]. SWNH colloids show excellent supercritical methane storage ability [6], molecular sieving effect [7], and unique hydrogen adsorption characteristic [8]. Selective adsorptivity of SWNH colloids for H 2 and D 2 due to uncertainty principle of those molecules was shown [9-10]. As SWNH has no metallic impurities, we can study the effect of tailoring of metallic nano-particles on the surface activities of SWNH [11]. We tailored Pd or Pt nano-particles on SWNH and SWNH oxidized at 823 K (ox-SWNH) using poly[(2-oxo-pyrrolidine-1-yl)ethylene]. The oxidation of SWNH donates nano-scale windows to the single wall. The tailored metal amount was determined by TG analysis. TEM showed uniform dispersion of nano-metal particles of 2-3 nm in the diameter on SWNH. The nitrogen adsorption amount of SWNH oxidized decreases by tailoring, indicating that nano-particles are attached to the nano-scale windows. The electronic states of tailored metals were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The surface activities of Pd tailored SWNH and ox-SWNH were examined for the reaction of hydrogen and oxygen near room temperature. The catalytic reactivities of Pd tailored SWNH and ox-SWNH were 4 times greater than that of Pd-dispersed activated carbon. The temperature dependence of the surface activity will be discussed with the relevance to the tube porosity. References [1] T. Ohba et al, J. Phys. Chem. In press. [2] S. Utsumi et al, J. Phys. Chem. In press. [3] C.- Min Yang, et al. Adv. Mater. In press. [4]C.M. Yang, J

  7. Characterization of Pectin Nanocoatings at Polystyrene and Titanium Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gurzawska, Katarzyna; Dirscherl, Kai; Yihua, Yu

    2013-01-01

    . To characterize, compare and visualize the surface nanocoatings measurements of contact angle measurements and surface roughness with atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and confocal microscopy was performed. We found that, both unmodified and enzymatic modified RG-Is influenced surface...

  8. Investigation on the micromilled surface characterization through replica technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baruffi, Federico; Parenti, P.; Cacciatore, F.

    2016-01-01

    for the indirect measurement of micromilled surfaces, characterized by submicrometer roughness levels. The study assesses the performance of the replication method by measuring the surface roughness (in terms of Sa) of specifically designed micromilled flat surfaces. A 3D confocal optical microscope is employed...

  9. Characterizing heterogeneous dynamics at hydrated electrode surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willard, Adam P.; Limmer, David T.; Madden, Paul A.; Chandler, David

    2013-05-01

    In models of Pt 111 and Pt 100 surfaces in water, motions of molecules in the first hydration layer are spatially and temporally correlated. To interpret these collective motions, we apply quantitative measures of dynamic heterogeneity that are standard tools for considering glassy systems. Specifically, we carry out an analysis in terms of mobility fields and distributions of persistence times and exchange times. In so doing, we show that dynamics in these systems is facilitated by transient disorder in frustrated two-dimensional hydrogen bonding networks. The frustration is the result of unfavorable geometry imposed by strong metal-water bonding. The geometry depends upon the structure of the underlying metal surface. Dynamic heterogeneity of water on the Pt 111 surface is therefore qualitatively different than that for water on the Pt 100 surface. In both cases, statistics of this ad-layer dynamic heterogeneity responds asymmetrically to applied voltage.

  10. Characterizing heterogeneous dynamics at hydrated electrode surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willard, Adam P; Limmer, David T; Madden, Paul A; Chandler, David

    2013-05-14

    In models of Pt 111 and Pt 100 surfaces in water, motions of molecules in the first hydration layer are spatially and temporally correlated. To interpret these collective motions, we apply quantitative measures of dynamic heterogeneity that are standard tools for considering glassy systems. Specifically, we carry out an analysis in terms of mobility fields and distributions of persistence times and exchange times. In so doing, we show that dynamics in these systems is facilitated by transient disorder in frustrated two-dimensional hydrogen bonding networks. The frustration is the result of unfavorable geometry imposed by strong metal-water bonding. The geometry depends upon the structure of the underlying metal surface. Dynamic heterogeneity of water on the Pt 111 surface is therefore qualitatively different than that for water on the Pt 100 surface. In both cases, statistics of this ad-layer dynamic heterogeneity responds asymmetrically to applied voltage.

  11. Molecular dynamics for lateral surface adhesion and peeling behavior of single-walled carbon nanotubes on gold surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Pei-Hsing

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: ► Adhesion and peeling behaviors of SWCNTs are investigated by detailed, fully atomistic MD simulations. ► Adhesion energy of SWCNTs are discussed. ► Dynamical behaviors of SWCNTs in low temperature adhesion are analyzed. ► Adhesion strengths of SWCNTs obtained from MD simulations are compared with the predictions of Hamaker theory and JKR model. - Abstract: Functional gecko-inspired adhesives have attracted a lot of research attention in the last decade. In this work, the lateral surface adhesion and normal peeling-off behavior of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) on gold substrates are investigated by performing detailed, fully atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The effects of the diameter and adhered length of CNTs on the adhesive properties were systematically examined. The simulation results indicate that adhesion energies between the SWCNTs and the Au surface varied from 220 to 320 mJ m −2 over the reported chirality range. The adhesion forces on the lateral surface and the tip of the nanotubes obtained from MD simulations agree very well with the predictions of Hamaker theory and Johnson–Kendall–Roberts (JKR) model. The analyses of covalent bonds indicate that the SWCNTs exhibited excellent flexibility and extensibility when adhering at low temperatures (∼100 K). This mechanism substantially increases adhesion time compared to that obtained at higher temperatures (300–700 K), which makes SWCNTs promising for biomimetic adhesives in ultra-low temperature surroundings.

  12. Molecular dynamics for lateral surface adhesion and peeling behavior of single-walled carbon nanotubes on gold surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Pei-Hsing, E-mail: phh@mail.npust.edu.tw [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Pingtung University of Science and Technology, Pingtung 912, Taiwan (China)

    2011-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adhesion and peeling behaviors of SWCNTs are investigated by detailed, fully atomistic MD simulations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adhesion energy of SWCNTs are discussed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dynamical behaviors of SWCNTs in low temperature adhesion are analyzed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adhesion strengths of SWCNTs obtained from MD simulations are compared with the predictions of Hamaker theory and JKR model. - Abstract: Functional gecko-inspired adhesives have attracted a lot of research attention in the last decade. In this work, the lateral surface adhesion and normal peeling-off behavior of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) on gold substrates are investigated by performing detailed, fully atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The effects of the diameter and adhered length of CNTs on the adhesive properties were systematically examined. The simulation results indicate that adhesion energies between the SWCNTs and the Au surface varied from 220 to 320 mJ m{sup -2} over the reported chirality range. The adhesion forces on the lateral surface and the tip of the nanotubes obtained from MD simulations agree very well with the predictions of Hamaker theory and Johnson-Kendall-Roberts (JKR) model. The analyses of covalent bonds indicate that the SWCNTs exhibited excellent flexibility and extensibility when adhering at low temperatures ({approx}100 K). This mechanism substantially increases adhesion time compared to that obtained at higher temperatures (300-700 K), which makes SWCNTs promising for biomimetic adhesives in ultra-low temperature surroundings.

  13. Microbiological quality control of single-walled carbon-nanotubes-coated surfaces experimentally contaminated

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natalizi, T.; Frioni, A.; Passeri, D.; Pantanella, F.

    2013-01-01

    The emergence of new nanotechnologies involves the spreading of nanoparticles in various fields of human life. Nanoparticles in general and, more specifically, carbon nanotubes have been adopted for many practical approaches i.e.: coatings for medical devices, food process industry and drug delivery. Humans will be increasingly exposed to nanoparticles but the susceptibility of nanostructured materials to microbial colonization in process of manufacturing and storage has not been thoroughly considered. Therefore, the microbiological quality control of nanoparticles plays a pivotal role. Different analytical methods have been attempted for detecting bacterial population contaminating a surface, but no one can be considered fully appropriate. Here, BioTimer Assay (BTA) and conventional sonication followed by colony forming units method (S-CFU) were applied for microbiological quality control of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs)-coated surfaces experimentally contaminated with Streptococcus mutans and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Our results demonstrated that S-CFU is unreliable to actually determine the number of bacteria, contaminating abiotic surfaces, as it does not detach all adherent bacteria and kills part of the bacterial population. Instead, BTA is a reliable method to enumerate bacteria colonizing SWCNTs-coated surfaces and can be considered a useful tool for microbiological quality control of nanomaterials for human use.

  14. Characterization of the intrinsic density profiles for liquid surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chacon, Enrique; Tarazona, Pedro

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents recent advances in the characterization of the intrinsic structures in computer simulations of liquid surfaces. The use of operational definitions for the intrinsic surface, associated with each molecular configuration of a liquid slab, gives direct access to the intrinsic profile and to the wavevector dependent surface tension. However, the characteristics of these functions depend on the definition used for the intrinsic surface. We discuss the pathologies associated with a local Gibbs dividing surface definition, and consider the alternative definition of a minimal area surface, going though a set of surface pivots, self-consistently chosen to represent the first liquid layer

  15. Poiseuille, thermal transpiration and Couette flows of a rarefied gas between plane parallel walls with nonuniform surface properties in the transverse direction and their reciprocity relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doi, Toshiyuki

    2018-04-01

    Slow flows of a rarefied gas between two plane parallel walls with nonuniform surface properties are studied based on kinetic theory. It is assumed that one wall is a diffuse reflection boundary and the other wall is a Maxwell-type boundary whose accommodation coefficient varies periodically in the direction perpendicular to the flow. The time-independent Poiseuille, thermal transpiration and Couette flows are considered. The flow behavior is numerically studied based on the linearized Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook-Welander model of the Boltzmann equation. The flow field, the mass and heat flow rates in the gas, and the tangential force acting on the wall surface are studied over a wide range of the gas rarefaction degree and the parameters characterizing the distribution of the accommodation coefficient. The locally convex velocity distribution is observed in Couette flow of a highly rarefied gas, similarly to Poiseuille flow and thermal transpiration. The reciprocity relations are numerically confirmed over a wide range of the flow parameters.

  16. Characterization of graded iron / tungsten layers for the first wall of fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heuer, Simon

    2017-01-01

    The nuclear fusion has great potential to enable a CO 2 -neutral energy supply of future generations. The technical utilization of this energy source has hitherto been a challenge. In particular, high thermal loads and neutron-induced damage lead to extreme demands on the choice of materials for plasma-facing components (PFCs). These are therefore, as currently understood, made from a tungsten protective layer which is joined to a structure of low activation ferritic-martensitic (LAFM) steel. Due to the discrete transition of material properties at the LAFM-W joining zone as well as thermal loads, macroscopic stresses and plastic strains arise here. A feasible way to reduce this is to implement an intermediate layer with graded LAFM / W ratio, a so-called functional graded material (FGM). In the present work, macro-stresses and strains in the first wall of the fusion reactor DEMO are examined and evaluated by means of a finite element simulation. In this framework model components with and without graded interlayer are taken into account and the advantage of a FGM is emphasized. Parameter studies serve as a constructive guideline for the structural implementation of FGMs and components of the first wall. In addition, the feasibility of four methods (magnetron sputtering, liquid phase infiltration, modified atmospheric plasma spraying and electrodischarge sintering) with respect to the fabrication of FGMs is being studied. The resulting layers are microstructurally, thermo-physically and mechanically examined in detail. Based on this characterization and the finite element simulation, their suitability as a graded layer in the first wall of DEMO is evaluated and finally compared with alternative joining systems that are currently being tested in the research environment. [de

  17. Surface characterization of lignocellulosics for composite manufacture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Ananth V.

    The objectives of this research were to form moisture resistant wheat strawboards, either by altering the straw surface characteristics or by changing the chemistry of the polymeric 4, 4' diphenylmethane diisocyanate (PMDI)-based matrix and interface. Part I compared the surface characteristics of wheat, barley, oat, rice, kenaf, hemp and softwood particles. All cereal straws had two surfaces: epidermis and brittle-pith unlike one heterogeneous type observed for bast fibers and softwood particles. The epidermis of cereal straws was not wet by water or aqueous binders, whereas the pith surface allowed the penetration of water, but was not readily wetted by aqueous binders. Between the different surface treatments evaluated for wheat straw in Part II, NaOH selectively peeled-off the epidermis and pith layers. The treated straw particles were formable into strawboards using aqueous phenol-formaldehyde, urea-formaldehyde, and duroplastic acrylic acid binders with good internal bond strength (IBS) and adequate water resistance. In Part III it was shown that, decreasing straw particle sizes and bleaching worsened the mechanical properties of strawboards, but the moisture absorption properties of bleached strawboards were lower than the unbleached ones. Layering of straw particles in strawboards did not seem to affect their mechanical or moisture absorption properties. Part IV showed that the pith surface of wheat straw was fractured on curing with PMDI, providing hollow microcrevices for water accumulation. Furthermore, the cured PMDI formed a network polyurea/polyuretonimine/polycarbodiimide/polyisocyanurate polymer on straw surfaces whose properties dictated the properties of strawboards. Among the different mono-, bi-, and tri-functional alcohols, amines and carboxylic acids evaluated in Part V as H-donor substitutes to moisture for reaction with PMDI on straw surfaces, ethylene glycol, resorcinol, glycerin and citric acid provided IBS values greater than the ANSI

  18. Surface-subsurface turbulent interaction at the interface of a permeable bed: influence of the wall permeability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, T.; Blois, G.; Best, J.; Christensen, K. T.

    2017-12-01

    Coarse-gravel river beds possess a high degree of permeability. Flow interactions between surface and subsurface flow across the bed interface is key to a number of natural processes occurring in the hyporheic zone. In fact, it is increasingly recognized that these interactions drive mass, momentum and energy transport across the interface, and consequently control biochemical processes as well as stability of sediments. The current study explores the role of the wall permeability in surface and subsurface flow interaction under controlled experimental conditions on a physical model of a gravel bed. The present wall model was constructed by five layers of cubically arranged spheres (d=25.4mm, where d is a diameter) providing 48% of porosity. Surface topography was removed by cutting half of a diameter on the top layer of spheres to render the flow surface smooth and highlight the impact of the permeability on the overlying flow. An impermeable smooth wall was also considered as a baseline of comparison for the permeable wall flow. To obtain basic flow statistics, low-frame-rate high-resolution PIV measurements were performed first in the streamwise-wall-normal (x-y) plane and refractive-index matching was employed to optically access the flow within the permeable wall. Time-resolved PIV experiments in the same facility were followed to investigate the flow interaction across the wall interface in sptaio-temporal domain. In this paper, a detailed analysis of the first and second order velocity statistics as well as the amplitude modulation for the flow overlying the permeable smooth wall will be presented.

  19. The laboratory investigation of surface envelope solitons: reflection from a vertical wall and collisions of solitons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slunyaev, Alexey; Klein, Marco; Clauss, Günther F.

    2016-04-01

    Envelope soliton solutions are key elements governing the nonlinear wave dynamics within a simplified theory for unidirectional weakly modulated weakly nonlinear wave groups on the water surface. Within integrable models the solitons preserve their structure in collisions with other waves; they do not disperse and can carry energy infinitively long. Steep and short soliton-like wave groups have been shown to exist in laboratory tests [1] and, even earlier, in numerical simulations [2, 3]. Thus, long-living wave groups may play important role in the dynamics of intense sea waves and wave-structure interactions. The solitary wave groups may change the wave statistics and can be taken into account when developing approaches for the deterministic forecasting of dangerous waves, including so-called rogue waves. An experimental campaign has been conducted in the wave basin of the Technical University of Berlin on simulations of intense solitary wave groups. The first successful experimental observation of intense envelope solitons took place in this facility [1]. The new experiments aimed at following main goals: 1) to reproduce intense envelope solitons with different carrier wave lengths; 2) to estimate the rate of envelope soliton dissipation; 3) to consider the reflection of envelope solitons on a vertical wall; 4) to consider head-on collisions of envelope solitons, and 5) to consider overtaking interactions of envelope solitons. Up to 9 wave gauges were used in each experimental run, which enabled registration of the surface movement at different distances from the wavemaker, at different locations across the wave flume and near the wall. Besides surface displacements, the group envelope shapes were directly recorded, with use of phase shifts applied to the modulated waves generated by the wavemaker. [1] A. Slunyaev, G.F. Clauss, M. Klein, M. Onorato, Simulations and experiments of short intense envelope solitons of surface water waves. Phys. Fluids 25, 067105

  20. Synthesis, characterization, Hirshfeld surface and theoretical ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ALI HARCHANI

    2017-09-06

    Sep 6, 2017 ... disordered m-toluidine was refined in two distinct positions ... Multi-scan: Tmin = 0.172, Tmax = 1 ... View of the structure of compound 1. ... Hirshfeld surfaces mapped with dnorm (mapped over a fixed color scale of −0.744 ...

  1. On modeling biomolecular–surface nonbonded interactions: application to nucleobase adsorption on single-wall carbon nanotube surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akdim, B; Pachter, R; Day, P N; Kim, S S; Naik, R R

    2012-01-01

    In this work we explored the selectivity of single nucleobases towards adsorption on chiral single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) by density functional theory calculations. Specifically, the adsorption of molecular models of guanine (G), adenine (A), thymine (T), and cytosine (C), as well as of AT and GC Watson–Crick (WC) base pairs on chiral SWCNT C(6, 5), C(9, 1) and C(8, 3) model structures, was analyzed in detail. The importance of correcting the exchange–correlation functional for London dispersion was clearly demonstrated, yet limitations in modeling such interactions by considering the SWCNT as a molecular model may mask subtle effects in a molecular–macroscopic material system. The trend in the calculated adsorption energies of the nucleobases on same diameter C(6, 5) and C(9, 1) SWCNT surfaces, i.e. G > A > T > C, was consistent with related computations and experimental work on graphitic surfaces, however contradicting experimental data on the adsorption of single-strand short homo-oligonucleotides on SWCNTs that demonstrated a trend of G > C > A > T (Albertorio et al 2009 Nanotechnology 20 395101). A possible role of electrostatic interactions in this case was partially captured by applying the effective fragment potential method, emphasizing that the interplay of the various contributions in modeling nonbonded interactions is complicated by theoretical limitations. Finally, because the calculated adsorption energies for Watson–Crick base pairs have shown little effect upon adsorption of the base pair farther from the surface, the results on SWCNT sorting by salmon genomic DNA could be indicative of partial unfolding of the double helix upon adsorption on the SWCNT surface. (paper)

  2. A tri-continuous mesoporous material with a silica pore wall following a hexagonal minimal surface

    KAUST Repository

    Han, Yu

    2009-04-06

    Ordered porous materials with unique pore structures and pore sizes in the mesoporous range (2-50nm) have many applications in catalysis, separation and drug delivery. Extensive research has resulted in mesoporous materials with one-dimensional, cage-like and bi-continuous pore structures. Three families of bi-continuous mesoporous materials have been made, with two interwoven but unconnected channels, corresponding to the liquid crystal phases used as templates. Here we report a three-dimensional hexagonal mesoporous silica, IBN-9, with a tri-continuous pore structure that is synthesized using a specially designed cationic surfactant template. IBN-9 consists of three identical continuous interpenetrating channels, which are separated by a silica wall that follows a hexagonal minimal surface. Such a tri-continuous mesostructure was predicted mathematically, but until now has not been observed in real materials. © 2009 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  3. A tri-continuous mesoporous material with a silica pore wall following a hexagonal minimal surface

    KAUST Repository

    Han, Yu; Zhang, Daliang; Chng, Leng Leng; Sun, Junliang; Zhao, L. J.; Zou, Xiaodong; Ying, Jackie

    2009-01-01

    Ordered porous materials with unique pore structures and pore sizes in the mesoporous range (2-50nm) have many applications in catalysis, separation and drug delivery. Extensive research has resulted in mesoporous materials with one-dimensional, cage-like and bi-continuous pore structures. Three families of bi-continuous mesoporous materials have been made, with two interwoven but unconnected channels, corresponding to the liquid crystal phases used as templates. Here we report a three-dimensional hexagonal mesoporous silica, IBN-9, with a tri-continuous pore structure that is synthesized using a specially designed cationic surfactant template. IBN-9 consists of three identical continuous interpenetrating channels, which are separated by a silica wall that follows a hexagonal minimal surface. Such a tri-continuous mesostructure was predicted mathematically, but until now has not been observed in real materials. © 2009 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  4. Through-wall bio-radio location and characterization of human activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu, Lei; Gui, Yong-Sheng; Hu, Can-Ming

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a through-the-wall life detection system has been developed by using a broadband microwave technique. This system can not only determine and characterize human movement behind an obstacle but also determine the person’s position by employing the Fourier transform technique. The effectiveness of this system is shown by the experimental results where the presence of stationary and moving person behind an obstacle can be identified upto a distance of 17 and 30 m respectively. Since the movement of a human body is continuous, an averaged background subtraction technique has been developed which allows real time detection of human activities without requiring any prior knowledge of the environment, thus making the system suitable for practical applications. (paper)

  5. Purity and Defect Characterization of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes Using Raman Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasumitsu Miyata

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the purity and defects of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs produced by various synthetic methods including chemical vapor deposition, arc discharge, and laser ablation. The SWCNT samples were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA, and Raman spectroscopy. Quantitative analysis of SEM images suggested that the G-band Raman intensity serves as an index for the purity. By contrast, the intensity ratio of G-band to D-band (G/D ratio reflects both the purity and the defect density of SWCNTs. The combination of G-band intensity and G/D ratio is useful for a quick, nondestructive evaluation of the purity and defect density of a SWCNT sample.

  6. Tearing stability analysis of an axial surface flaw in thick-walled pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zahoor, A.; Ghassemi, B.B.

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents two fracture mechanics models for evaluation of an axial surface flaw in pressure vessels. The surface flaw is located on the outside surface of the vessel. The first model assumes yielding of the remaining ligament directly ahead of the flaw. The second model assumes contained yielding ahead of the flaw and uses a linear elastic fracture mechanics solution. The former model is suitable for cases where the combination of material toughness, flaw size, and load is such that initiation of flaw growth follows ligament yielding. The latter model is suitable for low-toughness materials where initiation of crack growth and potential tearing instability may occur prior to the yielding of the ligament. Both models are suitable for thick-walled vessels. The paper discusses the applicability regime for both models. The models are then applied to a test vessel and the predicted failure pressure is compared against the pressure attained in the test. Results show that both models can be applied successfully. In particular, the contained yielding model when used with the plane-stress assumption can give reasonable predictions even for cases that involve yielding of the ligament. (orig.)

  7. Tearing stability analysis of an axial surface flaw in thick-walled pressure vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zahoor, A.; Ghassemi, B.B. (NOVETECH Corp., Rockville, MD (USA))

    1991-04-01

    This paper presents two fracture mechanics models for evaluation of an axial surface flaw in pressure vessels. The surface flaw is located on the outside surface of the vessel. The first model assumes yielding of the remaining ligament directly ahead of the flaw. The second model assumes contained yielding ahead of the flaw and uses a linear elastic fracture mechanics solution. The former model is suitable for cases where the combination of material toughness, flaw size, and load is such that initiation of flaw growth follows ligament yielding. The latter model is suitable for low-toughness materials where initiation of crack growth and potential tearing instability may occur prior to the yielding of the ligament. Both models are suitable for thick-walled vessels. The paper discusses the applicability regime for both models. The models are then applied to a test vessel and the predicted failure pressure is compared against the pressure attained in the test. Results show that both models can be applied successfully. In particular, the contained yielding model when used with the plane-stress assumption can give reasonable predictions even for cases that involve yielding of the ligament. (orig.).

  8. Characterization and robust filtering of multifunctional surfaces using ISO standards

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Kasper Storgaard; Godi, Alessandro; De Chiffre, Leonardo

    2011-01-01

    Engineered surfaces containing lubrication pockets and directional surface texture can decrease wear and friction in sliding or rolling contacts. A new generation of multifunctional (MUFU) surfaces has been created by hard machining followed by robot-assisted polishing. The production method allows...... for a large degree of freedom in specifying surface topography defined by frequency, depth and volume of the lubricant retention valleys, as well as the amount of load bearing area and the surface roughness. The surfaces cannot readily be characterized by means of conventional roughness parameters due...

  9. Uptake of gaseous formaldehyde onto soil surfaces: a coated-wall flow tube study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guo; Su, Hang; Li, Xin; Meusel, Hannah; Kuhn, Uwe; Pöschl, Ulrich; Shao, Min; Cheng, Yafang

    2015-04-01

    Gaseous formaldehyde (HCHO) is an important intermediate molecule and source of HO2 radicals. However, discrepancies exist between model simulated and observed HCHO concentrations, suggesting missing sources or sinks in the HCHO budget. Multiphase processes on the surface of soil and airborne soil-derived particles have been suggested as an important mechanism for the production/removal of atmospheric trace gases and aerosols. In this work, the uptake of gaseous HCHO on soil surfaces were investigated through coated-wall flow tube experiments with HCHO concentration ranging from 10 to 40 ppbv. The results show that the adsorption of HCHO occurred on soil surfaces, and the uptake coefficient dropped gradually (i.e., by a factor of 5 after 1 hour) as the reactive surface sites were consumed. The HCHO uptake coefficient was found to be affected by the relative humidity (RH), decreasing from (2.4 ± 0.5) × 10-4 at 0% RH to (3.0 ± 0.08) × 10-5 at 70% RH, due to competition of water molecule absorption on the soil surface. A release of HCHO from reacted soil was also detected by applying zero air, suggesting the nature of reversible physical absorption and the existence of an equilibrium at the soil-gas interface. It implies that soil could be either a source or a sink for HCHO, depending on the ambient HCHO concentration. We also develop a Matlab program to calculate the uptake coefficient under laminar flow conditions based on the Cooney-Kim-Davis method.

  10. Analytical procedure for characterization of medieval wall-paintings by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry, laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and Raman spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syta, Olga; Rozum, Karol; Choińska, Marta; Zielińska, Dobrochna; Żukowska, Grażyna Zofia; Kijowska, Agnieszka; Wagner, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Analytical procedure for the comprehensive chemical characterization of samples from medieval Nubian wall-paintings by means of portable X-ray fluorescence (pXRF), laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICPMS) and Raman spectroscopy (RS) was proposed in this work. The procedure was used for elemental and molecular investigations of samples from archeological excavations in Nubia (modern southern Egypt and northern Sudan). Numerous remains of churches with painted decorations dated back to the 7th–14th century were excavated in the region of medieval kingdoms of Nubia but many aspects of this art and its technology are still unknown. Samples from the selected archeological sites (Faras, Old Dongola and Banganarti) were analyzed in the form of transfers (n = 26), small fragments collected during the excavations (n = 35) and cross sections (n = 15). XRF was used to collect data about elemental composition, LA-ICPMS allowed mapping of selected elements, while RS was used to get the molecular information about the samples. The preliminary results indicated the usefulness of the proposed analytical procedure for distinguishing the substances, from both the surface and sub-surface domains of the wall-paintings. The possibility to identify raw materials from the wall-paintings will be used in the further systematic, archeometric studies devoted to the detailed comparison of various historic Nubian centers. - Highlights: • The analytical procedure for examination of unique wall paintings was proposed. • Identification of pigments and supporting layers of wall-paintings was obtained. • Heterogeneous samples were mapped with the use of LA-ICPMS. • Anatase in the sub-surface regions of samples was detected by Raman spectroscopy

  11. Analytical procedure for characterization of medieval wall-paintings by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry, laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and Raman spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syta, Olga; Rozum, Karol; Choińska, Marta [Faculty of Chemistry, University of Warsaw, Pasteura 1, 02-093 Warsaw (Poland); Zielińska, Dobrochna [Institute of Archaeology, University of Warsaw, Krakowskie Przedmieście 26/28, 00-927 Warsaw (Poland); Żukowska, Grażyna Zofia [Chemical Faculty, Warsaw University of Technology, Noakowskiego 3, 00-664 Warsaw (Poland); Kijowska, Agnieszka [National Museum in Warsaw, Aleje Jerozolimskie 3, 00-495 Warsaw (Poland); Wagner, Barbara, E-mail: barbog@chem.uw.edu.pl [Faculty of Chemistry, University of Warsaw, Pasteura 1, 02-093 Warsaw (Poland)

    2014-11-01

    Analytical procedure for the comprehensive chemical characterization of samples from medieval Nubian wall-paintings by means of portable X-ray fluorescence (pXRF), laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICPMS) and Raman spectroscopy (RS) was proposed in this work. The procedure was used for elemental and molecular investigations of samples from archeological excavations in Nubia (modern southern Egypt and northern Sudan). Numerous remains of churches with painted decorations dated back to the 7th–14th century were excavated in the region of medieval kingdoms of Nubia but many aspects of this art and its technology are still unknown. Samples from the selected archeological sites (Faras, Old Dongola and Banganarti) were analyzed in the form of transfers (n = 26), small fragments collected during the excavations (n = 35) and cross sections (n = 15). XRF was used to collect data about elemental composition, LA-ICPMS allowed mapping of selected elements, while RS was used to get the molecular information about the samples. The preliminary results indicated the usefulness of the proposed analytical procedure for distinguishing the substances, from both the surface and sub-surface domains of the wall-paintings. The possibility to identify raw materials from the wall-paintings will be used in the further systematic, archeometric studies devoted to the detailed comparison of various historic Nubian centers. - Highlights: • The analytical procedure for examination of unique wall paintings was proposed. • Identification of pigments and supporting layers of wall-paintings was obtained. • Heterogeneous samples were mapped with the use of LA-ICPMS. • Anatase in the sub-surface regions of samples was detected by Raman spectroscopy.

  12. The surface modifications of multi-walled carbon nanotubes for multi-walled carbon nanotube/poly(ether ether ketone) composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, Zongshuang; Qiu, Li; Yang, Yongzhen; Chen, Yongkang; Liu, Xuguang

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Multi-walled carbon nanotube/poly(ether ether ketone) (MWCNT/PEEK) composites incorporating surface modified multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) as fillers were fabricated in a solution blending method in order to explore the dynamic mechanical and tribological properties of MWCNT/PEEK composites systematically. It is evident that surface modifications of MWCNTs have a significant impact on dispersibility of MWCNTs in PEEK, dynamic mechanical and tribological properties of MWCNT/PEEK composites. Typically, a clear effect of surface modifications of MWCNTs on tribological properties of MWCNT/PEEK composites was observed. A significant reduction in frictional coefficient of MWCNT/PEEK composites with the MWCNTs modified with ethanolamine has been achieved and the self-lubricating film on their worn surfaces was also observed. - Highlights: • The dispersibility of surface modified MWCNTs in PEEK has been studied. • MWCNTs modified with ethanolamine have showed a good dispersion in PEEK. • Surface modifications of MWCNTs have a significant impact on both dynamic mechanical and tribological properties of MWCNT/PEEK composites. - Abstract: The effects of surface modifications of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) on the morphology, dynamic mechanical and tribological properties of multi-walled carbon nanotube/poly(ether ether ketone) (MWCNT/PEEK) composites have been investigated. MWCNTs were treated with mixed acids to obtain acid-functionalized MWCNTs. Then the acid-functionalized MWCNTs were modified with ethanolamine (named e-MWCNTs). The MWCNT/PEEK composites were prepared by a solution-blending method. A more homogeneous distribution of e-MWCNTs within the composites was found with scanning electron microscopy. Dynamic mechanical analysis demonstrated a clear increase in the storage modulus of e-MWCNT/PEEK composites because of the improved interfacial adhesion strength between e-MWCNTs and PEEK. Furthermore, the presence of e

  13. The surface modifications of multi-walled carbon nanotubes for multi-walled carbon nanotube/poly(ether ether ketone) composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Zongshuang [Key Laboratory of Interface Science and Engineering in Advanced Materials, Ministry of Education, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Research Center of Advanced Material Science and Technology, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Qiu, Li [Key Laboratory of Interface Science and Engineering in Advanced Materials, Ministry of Education, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Yang, Yongzhen, E-mail: yyztyut@126.com [Key Laboratory of Interface Science and Engineering in Advanced Materials, Ministry of Education, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Research Center of Advanced Material Science and Technology, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Chen, Yongkang, E-mail: y.k.chen@herts.ac.uk [Key Laboratory of Interface Science and Engineering in Advanced Materials, Ministry of Education, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); University of Hertfordshire, School of Engineering and Technology, Hatfield, Hertfordshire AL10 9AB (United Kingdom); Liu, Xuguang [Key Laboratory of Interface Science and Engineering in Advanced Materials, Ministry of Education, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China)

    2015-10-30

    Graphical abstract: Multi-walled carbon nanotube/poly(ether ether ketone) (MWCNT/PEEK) composites incorporating surface modified multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) as fillers were fabricated in a solution blending method in order to explore the dynamic mechanical and tribological properties of MWCNT/PEEK composites systematically. It is evident that surface modifications of MWCNTs have a significant impact on dispersibility of MWCNTs in PEEK, dynamic mechanical and tribological properties of MWCNT/PEEK composites. Typically, a clear effect of surface modifications of MWCNTs on tribological properties of MWCNT/PEEK composites was observed. A significant reduction in frictional coefficient of MWCNT/PEEK composites with the MWCNTs modified with ethanolamine has been achieved and the self-lubricating film on their worn surfaces was also observed. - Highlights: • The dispersibility of surface modified MWCNTs in PEEK has been studied. • MWCNTs modified with ethanolamine have showed a good dispersion in PEEK. • Surface modifications of MWCNTs have a significant impact on both dynamic mechanical and tribological properties of MWCNT/PEEK composites. - Abstract: The effects of surface modifications of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) on the morphology, dynamic mechanical and tribological properties of multi-walled carbon nanotube/poly(ether ether ketone) (MWCNT/PEEK) composites have been investigated. MWCNTs were treated with mixed acids to obtain acid-functionalized MWCNTs. Then the acid-functionalized MWCNTs were modified with ethanolamine (named e-MWCNTs). The MWCNT/PEEK composites were prepared by a solution-blending method. A more homogeneous distribution of e-MWCNTs within the composites was found with scanning electron microscopy. Dynamic mechanical analysis demonstrated a clear increase in the storage modulus of e-MWCNT/PEEK composites because of the improved interfacial adhesion strength between e-MWCNTs and PEEK. Furthermore, the presence of e

  14. Surface characterization of silver and palladium modified glassy ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    WINTEC

    The morphology of metal coatings was characterized by ... face of sample containing the highest quantity of surface oxide complexes. It has been concluded that ..... Environment Protection of the Republic of Serbia for financial support.

  15. Formation and surface characterization of nanostructured Al2O3 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Page 1. Electronic Supplementary Material. Graphical abstract. Formation and surface characterization of nanostructured Al2O3–TiO2 coatings by Vairamuthu Raj and Mohamed Sirajudeen Mumjitha. (pp 1411–1418).

  16. Fabrication and Characterization of Waterborne Multi-wall Carbon Nanotube Paints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowty, Heather; Wang, Chyi-Shan

    2005-04-01

    The fabrication of water-borne polyurethane nanocomposites containing multi-wall nanotubes has presented a significant technological challenge to those in the polymer community. Such conductive polyurethanes are of great interest to the paint and coatings industry for use in electrical grounding and shielding. Currently, these materials are formed by strong acidic reflux of the nanotubes and subsequent dispersal in the polymer matrix. This treatment can result in significant shortening of the tubes and degradation of the resulting mechanical and electrical transport properties. Here we present an alternate technique in which various conductive and non-conductive water-soluble polymers are physi-adsorbed to the surface of the nanotube. These interactions with the nanotubes result in highly uniform suspensions of water-based urethane coatings and bulk materials. We will examine the polymer chemistry and morphologies of these nanostructured materials and the resulting thermal, electrical and mechanical properties.

  17. The functionalization and characterization of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdullah, Mohd Pauzi [School of Chemical Sciences and Food Technology, Faculty Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600, Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Center of Water Analysis and Research (ALIR), Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600, Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Zulkepli, Siti Aminah [School of Chemical Sciences and Food Technology, Faculty Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600, Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2015-09-25

    Functionalization is the process of introducing chemical functional groups on the surface of the material. In this study, a multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNTs) was functionalized by oxidation treatment using concentrated nitric acid. The functionalized and pristine MWCNTs were analyzed by using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR) and X-Ray Diffraction (XRD). The XRD patterns exhibit the graphitic properties for all samples. Besides, the XRD results also demonstrate that the percent of crystallinity of MWCNTs increases as the duration of acid treatment increases. The percent of crystallinity increases from 66% to 80% when the pristine MWCNT treated for 12 hours with additional 12 hours reflux process with nitric acid. The IR spectrum for the 12 hours-treated MWCNTs shows the formation of carboxyl functional group. Additional 12 hours reflux process with nitric acid on the 12 hours-treated MWCNTs have shown the loss of existing carboxyl group and only hydroxyl group formed.

  18. Topographic characterization of nanostructures on curved polymer surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feidenhans'l, Nikolaj Agentoft; Petersen, Jan C.; Taboryski, Rafael J.

    2014-01-01

    The availability of portable instrumentation for characterizing surface topography on the micro- and nanometer scale is very limited. Particular the handling of curved surfaces, both concave and convex, is complicated or not possible on current instrumentation. However, the currently growing use...... method with a portable instrument that can be used in a production environment, and topographically characterize nanometer-scale surface structures on both flat and curved surfaces. To facilitate the commercialization of injection moulded polymer parts featuring nanostructures, it is pivotal...... of injection moulding of polymer parts featuring nanostructured surfaces, requires an instrument that can characterize these structures to ensure replication-confidence between master structure and replicated polymer parts. This project concerns the development of a metrological traceable quality control...

  19. Bioactive surface modifications on inner walls of poly-tetra-fluoro-ethylene tubes using dielectric barrier discharge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Yong Ki [Department of Physics, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Heat Treatment and Surface Engineering R and D Group, Korea Institute of Industrial Technology, Incheon 406-840 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Daewon; Kim, Hoonbae [Department of Physics, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hyerim; Park, Heonyong [Department of Molecular Biology, Dankook University, Yongin 448-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hong Ja [Department of Internal Medicine, Dankook University, Cheonan 330-714 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Donggeun, E-mail: djung@skku.ac.kr [Department of Physics, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-03-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The surface modification of the inner walls of poly-tetra-fluoro-ethylene (PTFE) tubing was carried out to improve vascular grafts. • Focus was centered on the cell attachment of the inner wall of the PTFE by sequential processes of hydrogen plasma treatment, hydrocarbon deposition, and reactive plasma treatment using micro plasma discharge. - Abstract: Bioactive surface modification can be used in a variety of medical polymeric materials in the fields of biochips and biosensors, artificial membranes, and vascular grafts. In this study, the surface modification of the inner walls of poly-tetra-fluoro-ethylene (PTFE) tubing was carried out to improve vascular grafts, which are made of biocompatible material for the human body in the medical field. Focus was centered on the cell attachment of the inner wall of the PTFE by sequential processes of hydrogen plasma treatment, hydrocarbon deposition, and reactive plasma treatment on the PFTE surface using micro plasma discharge. Micro plasma was generated by a medium-frequency alternating current high-voltage generator. The preliminary modification of PTFE was conducted by a plasma of hydrogen and argon gases. The hydrocarbon thin film was deposited on modified PTFE with a mixture of acetylene and argon gases. The reactive plasma treatment using oxygen plasma was done to give biocompatible functionality to the inner wall surface. The hydrophobic surface of bare PTFE is made hydrophilic by the reactive plasma treatment due to the formation of carbonyl groups on the surface. The reactive treatment could lead to improved attachment of smooth muscle cells (SMCs) on the modified PTFE tubing. Fourier transform infrared absorption spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and water contact angle measurement were used for the analysis of the surface modification. The SMC-attached PTFE tube developed will be applicable to in vitro human vasculature

  20. Bioactive surface modifications on inner walls of poly-tetra-fluoro-ethylene tubes using dielectric barrier discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Yong Ki; Park, Daewon; Kim, Hoonbae; Lee, Hyerim; Park, Heonyong; Kim, Hong Ja; Jung, Donggeun

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The surface modification of the inner walls of poly-tetra-fluoro-ethylene (PTFE) tubing was carried out to improve vascular grafts. • Focus was centered on the cell attachment of the inner wall of the PTFE by sequential processes of hydrogen plasma treatment, hydrocarbon deposition, and reactive plasma treatment using micro plasma discharge. - Abstract: Bioactive surface modification can be used in a variety of medical polymeric materials in the fields of biochips and biosensors, artificial membranes, and vascular grafts. In this study, the surface modification of the inner walls of poly-tetra-fluoro-ethylene (PTFE) tubing was carried out to improve vascular grafts, which are made of biocompatible material for the human body in the medical field. Focus was centered on the cell attachment of the inner wall of the PTFE by sequential processes of hydrogen plasma treatment, hydrocarbon deposition, and reactive plasma treatment on the PFTE surface using micro plasma discharge. Micro plasma was generated by a medium-frequency alternating current high-voltage generator. The preliminary modification of PTFE was conducted by a plasma of hydrogen and argon gases. The hydrocarbon thin film was deposited on modified PTFE with a mixture of acetylene and argon gases. The reactive plasma treatment using oxygen plasma was done to give biocompatible functionality to the inner wall surface. The hydrophobic surface of bare PTFE is made hydrophilic by the reactive plasma treatment due to the formation of carbonyl groups on the surface. The reactive treatment could lead to improved attachment of smooth muscle cells (SMCs) on the modified PTFE tubing. Fourier transform infrared absorption spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and water contact angle measurement were used for the analysis of the surface modification. The SMC-attached PTFE tube developed will be applicable to in vitro human vasculature

  1. Helium ion microscopy based wall thickness and surface roughness analysis of polymer foams obtained from high internal phase emulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodenburg, C.; Viswanathan, P.; Jepson, M.A.E.; Liu, X.; Battaglia, G.

    2014-01-01

    Due to their wide range of applications, porous polymers obtained from high internal phase emulsions have been widely studied using scanning electron microscopy. However, due to their lack of electrical conductivity, quantitative information of wall thicknesses and surface roughness, which are of particular interest to tissue engineering, has not been obtained. Here, Helium Ion Microscopy is used to examine uncoated polymer foams and some very strong but unexpected contrast is observed, the origin of which is established here. Based on this analysis, a method for the measurement of wall thickness variations and wall roughness measurements has been developed, based on the modeling of Helium ion transmission. The results presented here indicate that within the walls of the void structure there exist small features with height variations of ∼30 nm and wall thickness variations from ∼100 nm to larger 340 nm in regions surrounding interconnecting windows within the structure. The suggested imaging method is applicable to other porous carbon based structures with wall thicknesses in the range of 40–340 nm. - Highlights: • The first helium ion microscopy image of uncoated structures formed from HIPEs is presented. • Unusually high contrast features that change with accelerating voltage are observed. • The origin of the observed contrast is determined to be mass thickness contrast. • A new method for quantitative wall thickness variation/roughness measurements is demonstrated

  2. Helium ion microscopy based wall thickness and surface roughness analysis of polymer foams obtained from high internal phase emulsion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodenburg, C., E-mail: c.rodenburg@sheffield.ac.uk [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Sheffield, Mappin Street, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom); Viswanathan, P. [Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Sheffield, Firth Court, Western Bank Sheffield, Sheffield S10 2 TN (United Kingdom); Jepson, M.A.E. [Department of Materials, Loughborough University, Loughborough, Leicestershire LE11 3TU (United Kingdom); Liu, X. [Carl Zeiss Microscopy GmbH, Carl-Zeiss-Strasse 22, 73447 Oberkochen (Germany); Battaglia, G. [Department of Chemistry University College London, 20 Gordon Street, London WC1H 0AJ (United Kingdom); The MRC/UCL Centre for Medical Molecular Virology, University College London, 20 Gordon Street, London WC1H 0AJ (United Kingdom)

    2014-04-01

    Due to their wide range of applications, porous polymers obtained from high internal phase emulsions have been widely studied using scanning electron microscopy. However, due to their lack of electrical conductivity, quantitative information of wall thicknesses and surface roughness, which are of particular interest to tissue engineering, has not been obtained. Here, Helium Ion Microscopy is used to examine uncoated polymer foams and some very strong but unexpected contrast is observed, the origin of which is established here. Based on this analysis, a method for the measurement of wall thickness variations and wall roughness measurements has been developed, based on the modeling of Helium ion transmission. The results presented here indicate that within the walls of the void structure there exist small features with height variations of ∼30 nm and wall thickness variations from ∼100 nm to larger 340 nm in regions surrounding interconnecting windows within the structure. The suggested imaging method is applicable to other porous carbon based structures with wall thicknesses in the range of 40–340 nm. - Highlights: • The first helium ion microscopy image of uncoated structures formed from HIPEs is presented. • Unusually high contrast features that change with accelerating voltage are observed. • The origin of the observed contrast is determined to be mass thickness contrast. • A new method for quantitative wall thickness variation/roughness measurements is demonstrated.

  3. Experimental Study of gas-liquid two-phase flow affected by wall surface wettability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takamasa, T.; Hazuku, T.; Hibiki, T.

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of wall surface wettability on the characteristics of upward gas-liquid two-phase flow in a vertical pipe, an experimental study was performed using three test pipes: an acrylic pipe, a hydrophilic pipe and a hydrophobic pipe. Basic flow characteristics such as flow patterns, pressure drop and void fraction were measured in these three pipes. In the hydrophilic pipe, a slug to churn flow transition boundary was shifted to a higher gas velocity at a given liquid velocity, whereas a churn to annular flow transition boundary was shifted to a lower gas velocity at a given liquid velocity. In the hydrophobic pipe, an inverted-churn flow regime was observed in the region where the churn flow regime was observed in the acrylic pipe, while a droplet flow regime was observed in the region where an annular flow regime was observed in the acrylic pipe. At a high gas flow rate, the mean void fraction in the hydrophobic pipe was higher than in the acrylic pipe. The effect of surface wettability on frictional pressure loss was confirmed to be insignificant under the present experimental conditions

  4. Simulation of surface cracks measurement in first walls by laser spot array thermography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pei, Cuixiang; Qiu, Jinxin; Liu, Haocheng; Chen, Zhenmao, E-mail: chenzm@mail.xjtu.edu.cn

    2016-11-01

    The inspection of surface cracks in first walls (FW) is very important to ensure the safe operation of the fusion reactors. In this paper, a new laser excited thermography technique with using laser spot array source is proposed for the surface cracks imaging and evaluation in the FW with an intuitive and non-contact measurement method. Instead of imaging a crack by scanning a single laser spot and superimposing the local discontinuity images with the present laser excited thermography methods, it can inspect a relatively large area at one measurement. It does not only simplify the measurement system and data processing procedure, but also provide a faster measurement for FW. In order to investigate the feasibility of this method, a numerical code based on finite element method (FEM) is developed to simulate the heat flow and the effect of the crack geometry on the thermal wave fields. An imaging method based on the gradient of the thermal images is proposed for crack measurement with the laser spot array thermography method.

  5. Correlations of Surface Deformation and 3D Flow Field in a Compliant Wall Turbulent Channel Flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jin; Zhang, Cao; Katz, Joseph

    2015-11-01

    This study focuses on the correlations between surface deformation and flow features, including velocity, vorticity and pressure, in a turbulent channel flow over a flat, compliant Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) wall. The channel centerline velocity is 2.5 m/s, and the friction Reynolds number is 2.3x103. Analysis is based on simultaneous measurements of the time resolved 3D velocity and surface deformation using tomographic PIV and Mach-Zehnder Interferometry. The volumetric pressure distribution is calculated plane by plane by spatially integrating the material acceleration using virtual boundary, omni-directional method. Conditional sampling based on local high/low pressure and deformation events reveals the primary flow structures causing the deformation. High pressure peaks appear at the interface between sweep and ejection, whereas the negative deformations peaks (dent) appear upstream, under the sweeps. The persistent phase lag between flow and deformations are presumably caused by internal damping within the PDMS. Some of the low pressure peaks and strong ejections are located under the head of hairpin vortices, and accordingly, are associated with positive deformation (bump). Others bumps and dents are correlated with some spanwise offset large inclined quasi-streamwise vortices that are not necessarily associated with hairpins. Sponsored by ONR.

  6. Synthesis, surface characterization and optical properties of 3

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    3-Thiopropionic acid (TPA) capped ZnS:Cu nanocrystals have been successfully synthesized by simple aqueous method. Powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies revealed the particle size to be 4.2 nm. Surface characterization of the nanocrystals by FTIR spectroscopy has been done and the structure for surface bound TPA ...

  7. A multi-analytical approach for the characterization of wall painting materials on contemporary buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magrini, Donata; Bracci, Susanna; Cantisani, Emma; Conti, Claudia; Rava, Antonio; Sansonetti, Antonio; Shank, Will; Colombini, MariaPerla

    2017-02-01

    Samples from Keith Haring's wall painting of the Necker Children Hospital in Paris were studied by a multi-analytical protocol. X-ray fluorescence (XRF), powder X-ray diffraction (XRDP), Electron microscope (SEM-EDS), Infrared and Raman spectroscopy (μ-FT-IR and μ-Raman) measurements were performed in order to characterize the materials and to identify the art technique used to produce this contemporary work. Materials from the mural suffered from severe detachments of materials and several fragments were found on the ground beneath. Some of these fragments, which were representative of the whole palette and stratigraphic sequence, were collected and studied. The fragments were sufficiently large to enable non-invasive measurements to be performed in order to characterize the materials. A comparison of the data of the techniques applied revealed that Haring's palette was composed of organic pigments such as Naphtol red, phthalocyanine blue and green and Hansa yellow, in accordance with those used previously by the artist in other painted murals.

  8. Anisotropic characterization of rock fracture surfaces subjected to profile analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, H.W.; Xie, H.

    2004-01-01

    The mechanical parameters of a rock fracture are dependent on its surface roughness anisotropy. In this Letter, we show how quantitatively describe the anisotropy of a rock fracture surface. A parameter, referred to as the index for the accumulation power spectral density psd*, is proposed to characterize the anisotropy of a rock fracture surface. Variation of psd*, with orientation angle θ of sampling, is also discussed

  9. Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling of Steam Condensation on Nuclear Containment Wall Surfaces Based on Semiempirical Generalized Correlations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavan K. Sharma

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In water-cooled nuclear power reactors, significant quantities of steam and hydrogen could be produced within the primary containment following the postulated design basis accidents (DBA or beyond design basis accidents (BDBA. For accurate calculation of the temperature/pressure rise and hydrogen transport calculation in nuclear reactor containment due to such scenarios, wall condensation heat transfer coefficient (HTC is used. In the present work, the adaptation of a commercial CFD code with the implementation of models for steam condensation on wall surfaces in presence of noncondensable gases is explained. Steam condensation has been modeled using the empirical average HTC, which was originally developed to be used for “lumped-parameter” (volume-averaged modeling of steam condensation in the presence of noncondensable gases. The present paper suggests a generalized HTC based on curve fitting of most of the reported semiempirical condensation models, which are valid for specific wall conditions. The present methodology has been validated against limited reported experimental data from the COPAIN experimental facility. This is the first step towards the CFD-based generalized analysis procedure for condensation modeling applicable for containment wall surfaces that is being evolved further for specific wall surfaces within the multicompartment containment atmosphere.

  10. Effect of subcooling and wall thickness on pool boiling from downward-facing curved surfaces in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Genk, M.S.; Glebov, A.G. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-09-01

    Quenching experiments were performed to investigate the effects of water subcooling and wall thickness on pool boiling from a downward-facing curved surface. Experiments used three copper sections of the same diameter (50.8 mm) and surface radius (148 mm), but different thickness (12.8, 20 and 30 mm). Local and average pool boiling curves were obtained at saturation and 5 K, 10 K, and 14 K subcooling. Water subcooling increased the maximum heat flux, but decreased the corresponding wall superheat. The minimum film boiling heat flux and the corresponding wall superheat, however, increased with increased subcooling. The maximum and minimum film boiling heat fluxes were independent of wall thickness above 20 mm and Biot Number > 0.8, indicating that boiling curves for the 20 and 30 thick sections were representative of quasi steady-state, but not those for the 12.8 mm thick section. When compared with that for a flat surface section of the same thickness, the data for the 12.8 mm thick section showed significant increases in both the maximum heat flux (from 0.21 to 0.41 MW/m{sup 2}) and the minimum film boiling heat flux (from 2 to 13 kW/m{sup 2}) and about 11.5 K and 60 K increase in the corresponding wall superheats, respectively.

  11. Surface modification and characterization Collaborative Research Center at ORNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    The Surface Modification and Characterization Collaborative Research Center (SMAC/CRC) is a unique facility for the alteration and characterization of the near-surface properties of materials. The SMAC/CRC facility is equipped with particle accelerators and high-powered lasers which can be used to improve the physical, electrical, and/or chemical properties of solids and to create unique new materials not possible to obtain with conventional ''equilibrium'' processing techniques. Surface modification is achieved using such techniques as ion implantation doping, ion beam mixing, laser mixing, ion deposition, and laser annealing

  12. Ultrasensitive Detection of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Using Surface Plasmon Resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Daeho; Na, Wonhwi; Kang, Minwook; Kim, Namjoon; Shin, Sehyun

    2016-01-05

    Because single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are known to be a potentially dangerous material, inducing cancers and other diseases, any possible leakage of SWNTs through an aquatic medium such as drinking water will result in a major public threat. To solve this problem, for the present study, a highly sensitive, quantitative detection method of SWNTs in an aqueous solution was developed using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) spectroscopy. For a highly sensitive and specific detection, a strong affinity conjugation with biotin-streptavidin was adopted on an SPR sensing mechanism. During the pretreatment process, the SWNT surface was functionalized and hydrophilized using a thymine-chain based biotinylated single-strand DNA linker (B-ssDNA) and bovine serum albumin (BSA). The pretreated SWNTs were captured on a sensing film, the surface of which was immobilized with streptavidin on biotinylated gold film. The captured SWNTs were measured in real-time using SPR spectroscopy. Specific binding with SWNTs was verified through several validation experiments. The present method using an SPR sensor is capable of detecting SWNTs of as low as 100 fg/mL, which is the lowest level reported thus far for carbon-nanotube detection. In addition, the SPR sensor showed a linear characteristic within the range of 100 pg/mL to 200 ng/mL. These findings imply that the present SPR sensing method can detect an extremely low level of SWNTs in an aquatic environment with high sensitivity and high specificity, and thus any potential leakage of SWNTs into an aquatic environment can be precisely monitored within a couple of hours.

  13. Immunocytochemical characterization of the cell walls of bean cell suspensions during habituation and dehabituation to dichlobenil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garcia-Angulo, P.; Willats, W. G. T.; Encina, A. E.

    2006-01-01

    The effects of the cellulose inhibitor dichlobenil on the cell wall composition and structure during the habituation/dehabituation process of suspension-cultured bean cells were assessed. A range of techniques were used including cell wall fractionation, sugar analysis, immunofluorescence...... and fluorochrome labelling of resin-embedded sections, and immunodot assays (IDAs) of cell wall fractions. The cell walls from bean cell suspensions with initial levels of habituation to dichlobenil had decreased levels of cellulose, but this effect lessened with increasing numbers of subcultures. All cell walls...

  14. Identification and characterization of paramyosin from cyst wall of metacercariae implicated protective efficacy against Clonorchis sinensis infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyun Wang

    Full Text Available Human clonorchiasis has been increasingly prevalent in recent years and results in a threat to the public health in epidemic regions, motivating current strategies of vaccines to combat Clonorchis sinensis (C. sinensis. In this study, we identified C. sinensis paramyosin (CsPmy from the cyst wall proteins of metacercariae by proteomic approaches and characterized the expressed recombinant pET-26b-CsPmy protein (101 kDa. Bioinformatics analysis indicated that full-length sequences of paramyosin are conserved in helminthes and numerous B-cell/T-cell epitopes were predicted in amino acid sequence of CsPmy. Western blot analysis showed that CsPmy was expressed at four life stages of C. sinensis, both cyst wall proteins and soluble tegumental components could be probed by anti-CsPmy serum. Moreover, immunolocalization results revealed that CsPmy was specifically localized at cyst wall and excretory bladder of metacercaria, as well as the tegument, oral sucker and vitellarium of adult worm. Both immunoblot and immunolocalization results demonstrated that CsPmy was highly expressed at the stage of adult worm, metacercariae and cercaria, which could be supported by real-time PCR analysis. Both recombinant protein and nucleic acid of CsPmy showed strong immunogenicity in rats and induced combined Th1/Th2 immune responses, which were reflected by continuous high level of antibody titers and increased level of IgG1/IgG2a subtypes in serum. In vaccine trials, comparing with control groups, both CsPmy protein and DNA vaccine exhibited protective effect with significant worm reduction rate of 54.3% (p<0.05 and 36.1% (p<0.05, respectively. In consistence with immune responses in sera, elevated level of cytokines IFN-γ and IL-4 in splenocytes suggested that CsPmy could induce combined cellular immunity and humoral immunity in host. Taken together, CsPmy could be a promising vaccine candidate in the prevention of C. sinensis regarding its high immunogenicity

  15. Micro- and nanoscale characterization of hydrophobic and hydrophilic leaf surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhushan, Bharat; Jung, Yong Chae

    2006-01-01

    Superhydrophobic surfaces as well as low adhesion and friction are desirable for various industrial applications. Certain plant leaves are known to be hydrophobic in nature due to their roughness and the presence of a thin wax film on the surface of the leaf. The purpose of this study is to fully characterize the leaf surfaces on the micro- and nanoscale while separating out the effects of the micro- and the nanobumps of hydrophobic leaves on the hydrophobicity. Hydrophilic leaves were also studied to better understand the role of wax and roughness. Furthermore, the adhesion and friction properties of hydrophobic and hydrophilic leaves were studied. Using an optical profiler and an atomic/friction force microscope (AFM/FFM), measurements were made to fully characterize the leaf surfaces. It is shown that the nanobumps play a more important role than the microbumps in the hydrophobic nature as well as friction of the leaf. This study will be useful in developing superhydrophobic surfaces

  16. The role of Listeria monocytogenes cell wall surface anchor protein LapB in virulence, adherence, and intracellular replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lmof2365_2117 is a Listeria monocytogenes putative cell wall surface anchor protein with a conserved domain found in collagen binding proteins. We constructed a deletion mutation in lmof2365_2117 in serotype 4b strain F2365, evaluated its virulence, and determined its ability to adhere and invade co...

  17. Modification of the large-scale features of high Reynolds number wall turbulence by passive surface obtrusions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monty, J.P.; Lien, K.; Chong, M.S. [University of Melbourne, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Parkville, VIC (Australia); Allen, J.J. [New Mexico State University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Las Cruces, NM (United States)

    2011-12-15

    A high Reynolds number boundary-layer wind-tunnel facility at New Mexico State University was fitted with a regularly distributed braille surface. The surface was such that braille dots were closely packed in the streamwise direction and sparsely spaced in the spanwise direction. This novel surface had an unexpected influence on the flow: the energy of the very large-scale features of wall turbulence (approximately six-times the boundary-layer thickness in length) became significantly attenuated, even into the logarithmic region. To the author's knowledge, this is the first experimental study to report a modification of 'superstructures' in a rough-wall turbulent boundary layer. The result gives rise to the possibility that flow control through very small, passive surface roughness may be possible at high Reynolds numbers, without the prohibitive drag penalty anticipated heretofore. Evidence was also found for the uninhibited existence of the near-wall cycle, well known to smooth-wall-turbulence researchers, in the spanwise space between roughness elements. (orig.)

  18. Synthesis and characterization of polyamidoamine dendrimer-coated multi-walled carbon nanotubes and their application in gene delivery systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Bifeng; Cui, Daxiang; Xu, Ping; Ozkan, Cengiz; Feng, Gao; Ozkan, Mihri; Huang, Tuo; Chu, Bingfeng; Li, Qing; He, Rong; Hu, Guohan

    2009-03-01

    With the aim of improving the amount and delivery efficiency of genes taken by carbon nanotubes into human cancer cells, different generations of polyamidoamine dendrimer modified multi-walled carbon nanotubes (dMNTs) were fabricated, and characterized by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis, revealing the presence of dendrimer capped on the surface of carbon nanotubes. The dMNTs fully conjugated with FITC-labeled antisense c-myc oligonucleotides (asODN), those resultant asODN-dMNTs composites were incubated with human breast cancer cell line MCF-7 cells and MDA-MB-435 cells, and liver cancer cell line HepG2 cells, and confirmed to enter into tumor cells within 15 min by laser confocal microscopy. These composites inhibited the cell growth in time- and dose-dependent means, and down-regulated the expression of the c-myc gene and C-Myc protein. Compared with the composites of CNT-NH2-asODN and dendrimer-asODN, no. 5 generation of dendrimer-modified MNT-asODN composites exhibit maximal transfection efficiencies and inhibition effects on tumor cells. The intracellular gene transport and uptake via dMNTs should be generic for the mammalian cell lines. The dMNTs have potentials in applications such as gene or drug delivery for cancer therapy and molecular imaging.

  19. Synthesis and characterization of polyamidoamine dendrimer-coated multi-walled carbon nanotubes and their application in gene delivery systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan Bifeng; Cui Daxiang; Xu Ping; Feng Gao; Huang Tuo; Li Qing; He Rong [Department of Bio-Nano-Science and Engineering, National Key Laboratory of Nano/Micro Fabrication Technology, Key Laboratory for Thin Film and Microfabrication of Ministry of Education, Institute of Micro-Nano Science and Technology, Shanghai JiaoTong University, 800 Dongchuan Road, Shanghai 200240 (China); Ozkan, Cengiz [Mechanical Engineering Department, University of California Riverside, 900 University Avenue-Riverside, CA 92521 (United States); Ozkan, Mihri [Electrical Engineering Department, University of California Riverside, 900 University Avenue, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States); Chu, Bingfeng [Department of Stomatology, General Hospital of PLA, 28 Fuxing Road, Beijing100853 (China); Hu Guohan [Department of Neurosurgery of Changzheng Hospital, 415 Fengyang Road, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai 20003 (China)], E-mail: dxcui@sjtu.edu.cn, E-mail: huguohan6504@sina.com

    2009-03-25

    With the aim of improving the amount and delivery efficiency of genes taken by carbon nanotubes into human cancer cells, different generations of polyamidoamine dendrimer modified multi-walled carbon nanotubes (dMNTs) were fabricated, and characterized by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis, revealing the presence of dendrimer capped on the surface of carbon nanotubes. The dMNTs fully conjugated with FITC-labeled antisense c-myc oligonucleotides (asODN), those resultant asODN-dMNTs composites were incubated with human breast cancer cell line MCF-7 cells and MDA-MB-435 cells, and liver cancer cell line HepG2 cells, and confirmed to enter into tumor cells within 15 min by laser confocal microscopy. These composites inhibited the cell growth in time- and dose-dependent means, and down-regulated the expression of the c-myc gene and C-Myc protein. Compared with the composites of CNT-NH{sub 2}-asODN and dendrimer-asODN, no. 5 generation of dendrimer-modified MNT-asODN composites exhibit maximal transfection efficiencies and inhibition effects on tumor cells. The intracellular gene transport and uptake via dMNTs should be generic for the mammalian cell lines. The dMNTs have potentials in applications such as gene or drug delivery for cancer therapy and molecular imaging.

  20. Synthesis and characterization of polyamidoamine dendrimer-coated multi-walled carbon nanotubes and their application in gene delivery systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan Bifeng; Cui Daxiang; Xu Ping; Feng Gao; Huang Tuo; Li Qing; He Rong; Ozkan, Cengiz; Ozkan, Mihri; Chu, Bingfeng; Hu Guohan

    2009-01-01

    With the aim of improving the amount and delivery efficiency of genes taken by carbon nanotubes into human cancer cells, different generations of polyamidoamine dendrimer modified multi-walled carbon nanotubes (dMNTs) were fabricated, and characterized by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis, revealing the presence of dendrimer capped on the surface of carbon nanotubes. The dMNTs fully conjugated with FITC-labeled antisense c-myc oligonucleotides (asODN), those resultant asODN-dMNTs composites were incubated with human breast cancer cell line MCF-7 cells and MDA-MB-435 cells, and liver cancer cell line HepG2 cells, and confirmed to enter into tumor cells within 15 min by laser confocal microscopy. These composites inhibited the cell growth in time- and dose-dependent means, and down-regulated the expression of the c-myc gene and C-Myc protein. Compared with the composites of CNT-NH 2 -asODN and dendrimer-asODN, no. 5 generation of dendrimer-modified MNT-asODN composites exhibit maximal transfection efficiencies and inhibition effects on tumor cells. The intracellular gene transport and uptake via dMNTs should be generic for the mammalian cell lines. The dMNTs have potentials in applications such as gene or drug delivery for cancer therapy and molecular imaging.

  1. Characterization of technical surfaces by structure function analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalms, Michael; Kreis, Thomas; Bergmann, Ralf B.

    2018-03-01

    The structure function is a tool for characterizing technical surfaces that exhibits a number of advantages over Fourierbased analysis methods. So it is optimally suited for analyzing the height distributions of surfaces measured by full-field non-contacting methods. The structure function is thus a useful method to extract global or local criteria like e. g. periodicities, waviness, lay, or roughness to analyze and evaluate technical surfaces. After the definition of line- and area-structure function and offering effective procedures for their calculation this paper presents examples using simulated and measured data of technical surfaces including aircraft parts.

  2. Characterization of xylan in the early stages of secondary cell wall formation in tobacco bright yellow-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Tadashi; Matsuoka, Keita; Ono, Hiroshi; Ohnishi-Kameyama, Mayumi; Yaoi, Katsuro; Nakano, Yoshimi; Ohtani, Misato; Demura, Taku; Iwai, Hiroaki; Satoh, Shinobu

    2017-11-15

    The major polysaccharides present in the primary and secondary walls surrounding plant cells have been well characterized. However, our knowledge of the early stages of secondary wall formation is limited. To address this, cell walls were isolated from differentiating xylem vessel elements of tobacco bright yellow-2 (BY-2) cells induced by VASCULAR-RELATED NAC-DOMAIN7 (VND7). The walls of induced VND7-VP16-GR BY-2 cells consisted of cellulose, pectic polysaccharides, hemicelluloses, and lignin, and contained more xylan and cellulose compared with non-transformed BY-2 and uninduced VND7-VP16-GR BY-2 cells. A reducing end sequence of xylan containing rhamnose and galaturonic acid- residues is present in the walls of induced, uninduced, and non-transformed BY-2 cells. Glucuronic acid residues in xylan from walls of induced cells are O-methylated, while those of xylan in non-transformed BY-2 and uninduced cells are not. Our results show that xylan changes in chemical structure and amounts during the early stages of xylem differentiation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Water experiment of high-speed, free-surface, plane jet along concave wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Hideo; Ida, Mizuho; Kato, Yoshio; Maekawa, Hiroshi; Itoh, Kazuhiro; Kukita, Yutaka

    1997-01-01

    In the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF), an intense 14 MeV neutron beam will be generated in the high-speed liquid lithium (Li) plane jet target flowing along concave wall in vacuum. As part of the conceptual design activity (CDA) of the IFMIF, the stability of the plane liquid jet flow was studied experimentally with water in a well-defined channel geometry for non-heating condition. A two-dimensional double-reducer nozzle being newly proposed for the IFMIF target successfully provided a high-speed (≤ 17 m/s) stable water jet with uniform velocity distribution at the nozzle exit without flow separation in the nozzle. The free surface of the jet was covered by two-dimensional and/or three-dimensional waves, the size of which did not change much over the tested jet length of ∼130 mm. The jet velocity profile changed around the nozzle exit from uniform to that of free-vortex flow where the product of the radius of stream line and local velocity is constant in the jet thickness. The jet thickness increased immediately after exiting the nozzle because of the velocity profile change. The predicted jet thickness by a modified one-dimensional momentum model agreed with the data well. (author)

  4. Investigation of some cleaning surface treatments for the fabrication of ITER first wall panels by HIP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frayssines, P.E.; Bucci, P. [CEA Grenoble (DRT/LITEN/DTH), 38 (France); Vito, E. de [CEA Grenoble (LITEN/DTH/LCPEM), 38 (France); Lorenzetto, P. [2EFDA, Garching (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: ITER First Wall (FW) panels are the innermost part of the ITER reactor. Metallic materials used for their manufacture are 316L(N)-IG stainless steel, a copper alloy and beryllium. Stainless steel material is a support structure for the copper alloy that serves as a heat sink material and also for the beryllium tiles that are a protective armour against the plasma. All these materials are bonded together by Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP). Thus, several types of joints (Cu/Cu, Cu/SS, SS/SS or Cu/Be) are present in a FW panels. Their manufacturing requires a very strict and advanced metallic surface preparation in order to eliminate most of the organic or oxide layers that could prevent the diffusion process between the facing materials. In this field, our laboratory practice enables to obtain sufficiently clean metallic surfaces and high strength joints are obtained when small mockups are made. However, the manufacture of a large number of FW panels in the future requires to find a new cleaning process that is industrially relevant without a strong reduction of the joint's mechanical properties. In this paper we present our investigations to find an industrial solution to clean efficiently copper alloy and stainless steel materials in order to manufacture high strength Cu/Cu, SS/SS or Cu/SS joints. Products investigated are mainly acid liquids proposed by chemical Company and a more advanced technique that uses a plasma process. HIP joints are tested mechanically by making impact toughness and tensile measurements. Results obtained with these solutions are compared to those obtained in our Laboratory by using our own cleaning route. Moreover, XPS analyses are performed on small specimens that have been submitted to the same cleaning treatments in order to better understand the mechanical results of our specimens. (authors)

  5. Investigation of some cleaning surface treatments for the fabrication of ITER first wall panels by HIP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frayssines, P.E.; Bucci, P.; Vito, E. de; Lorenzetto, P.

    2007-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: ITER First Wall (FW) panels are the innermost part of the ITER reactor. Metallic materials used for their manufacture are 316L(N)-IG stainless steel, a copper alloy and beryllium. Stainless steel material is a support structure for the copper alloy that serves as a heat sink material and also for the beryllium tiles that are a protective armour against the plasma. All these materials are bonded together by Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP). Thus, several types of joints (Cu/Cu, Cu/SS, SS/SS or Cu/Be) are present in a FW panels. Their manufacturing requires a very strict and advanced metallic surface preparation in order to eliminate most of the organic or oxide layers that could prevent the diffusion process between the facing materials. In this field, our laboratory practice enables to obtain sufficiently clean metallic surfaces and high strength joints are obtained when small mockups are made. However, the manufacture of a large number of FW panels in the future requires to find a new cleaning process that is industrially relevant without a strong reduction of the joint's mechanical properties. In this paper we present our investigations to find an industrial solution to clean efficiently copper alloy and stainless steel materials in order to manufacture high strength Cu/Cu, SS/SS or Cu/SS joints. Products investigated are mainly acid liquids proposed by chemical Company and a more advanced technique that uses a plasma process. HIP joints are tested mechanically by making impact toughness and tensile measurements. Results obtained with these solutions are compared to those obtained in our Laboratory by using our own cleaning route. Moreover, XPS analyses are performed on small specimens that have been submitted to the same cleaning treatments in order to better understand the mechanical results of our specimens. (authors)

  6. Preparation, characterization and properties of acid functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotube reinforced thermoplastic polyurethane nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar Barick, Aruna; Kumar Tripathy, Deba

    2011-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Highlights: → Preparation and characterization of TPU nanocomposite for tailor made applications. → The structural analyses were carried out by FTIR, WAXD, FESEM and HRTEM. → The thermal and dynamic mechanical properties were evaluated by TGA, DSC and DMA. → The dynamic rheological behavior was investigated by RPA in frequency sweep. → The frequency dependence of electrical properties was studied by LCR meter. - Abstract: The multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWNT) reinforced thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) nanocomposites were prepared through melt compounding method followed by compression molding. The spectroscopic study indicated that a strong interfacial interaction was developed between carbon nanotube (CNT) and the TPU matrix in the nanocomposites. The microscopic observation showed that the CNTs were homogeneously dispersed throughout the TPU matrix well apart from a few clusters. The results from thermal analysis indicated that the glass transition temperature (T g ) and storage modulus (E') of the nanocomposites were increased with increase in CNTs content and their thermal stability were also improved in comparison with pure TPU matrix. The rheological analysis showed the low frequency plateau of shear modulus and the shear thinning behavior of the nanocomposites. The electrical behaviors of the nanocomposites are increased with increase in weight percent (wt%) of CNT loading. The mechanical properties of nanocomposites were substantially improved by the incorporation of CNTs into the TPU matrix.

  7. Aligned multi-walled carbon nanotube-reinforced composites: processing and mechanical characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thostenson, Erik T.; Chou, Tsuwei

    2002-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes have been the subject of considerable attention because of their exceptional physical and mechanical properties. These properties observed at the nanoscale have motivated researchers to utilize carbon nanotubes as reinforcement in composite materials. In this research, a micro-scale twin-screw extruder was used to achieve dispersion of multi-walled carbon nanotubes in a polystyrene matrix. Highly aligned nanocomposite films were produced by extruding the polymer melt through a rectangular die and drawing the film prior to cooling. Randomly oriented nanocomposites were produced by achieving dispersion first with the twin-screw extruder followed by pressing a film using a hydraulic press. The tensile behaviour of the aligned and random nanocomposite films with 5 wt.{%} loading of nanotubes were characterized. Addition of nanotubes increased the tensile modulus, yield strength and ultimate strengths of the polymer films, and the improvement in elastic modulus with the aligned nanotube composite is five times greater than the improvement for the randomly oriented composite. (author)

  8. Characterization of nonderivatized plant cell walls using high-resolution solution-state NMR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel J. Yelle; John Ralph; Charles R. Frihart

    2008-01-01

    A recently described plant cell wall dissolution system has been modified to use perdeuterated solvents to allow direct in-NMR-tube dissolution and high-resolution solution-state NMR of the whole cell wall without derivatization. Finely ground cell wall material dissolves in a solvent system containing dimethylsulfoxide-d6 and 1-methylimidazole-d6 in a ratio of 4:1 (v/...

  9. Newly developed surface coil for endoluminal MRI, depiction of pig gastric wall layers and vascular architecture in ex vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Yoshinori; Kutsumi, Hiromu; Yoshinaka, Hayato; Matsuoka, Yuichiro; Kuroda, Kagayaki; Gotanda, Masakazu; Sekino, Naomi; Kumamoto, Etsuko; Yoshida, Masaru; Inokuchi, Hideto; Azuma, Takeshi

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to visualize the gastric wall layers and to depict the vascular architecture in vitro by using resected porcine stomachs studied with high-spatial resolution magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Normal dissected porcine stomach samples (n = 4) were examined with a 3 Tesla MR system using a newly developed surface coil. MR images were obtained by the surface coil as receiver and a head coil as transmitter. High-spatial-resolution spin-echo MR images were obtained with a field of view of 8 x 8 cm, a matrix of 256 x 128 and slice thicknesses of 3 and 5 mm. T1 and T2-weighted MR images clearly depicted the normal porcine gastric walls as consisting of four distinct layers. In addition, vascular architectures in proper muscle layers were also visualized, which were confirmed by histological examinations to correspond to blood vessels. High-spatial-resolution MR imaging using a surface coil placed closely to the gastric wall enabled the differentiation of porcine gastric wall layers and the depiction of the blood vessels in proper muscle layer in this experimental study.

  10. Newly developed surface coil for endoluminal MRI, depiction of pig gastric wall layers and vascular architecture in ex vivo study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morita, Yoshinori; Kutsumi, Hiromu; Yoshinaka, Hayato

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to visualize the gastric wall layers and to depict the vascular architecture in vitro by using resected porcine stomachs studied with high-spatial resolution magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Normal dissected porcine stomach samples (n=4) were examined with a 3 Tesla MR system using a newly developed surface coil. MR images were obtained by the surface coil as receiver and a head coil as transmitter. High-spatial-resolution spin-echo MR images were obtained with a field of view of 8 x 8 cm, a matrix of 256 x 128 and slice thicknesses of 3 and 5 mm. T1 and T2-weighted MR images clearly depicted the normal porcine gastric walls as consisting of four distinct layers. In addition, vascular architectures in proper muscle layers were also visualized, which were confirmed by histological examinations to correspond to blood vessels. High-spatial-resolution MR imaging using a surface coil placed closely to the gastric wall enabled the differentiation of porcine gastric wall layers and the depiction of the blood vessels in proper muscle layer in this experimental study. (author)

  11. Analysis of Material Removal and Surface Characteristics in Machining Multi Walled Carbon Nanotubes Filled Alumina Composites by WEDM Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annebushan Singh Meinam

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The reinforcement of ceramic materials with electrically conductive particles increases the overall conductivity of the ceramic material. This allows the ceramic material to be more readily machined using wire electrical discharge machining process. The current work is an approach to identify the machinability of multi walled carbon nanotubes filled alumina composites in wire electrical discharge machining process. Alumina samples of 5 vol. % and 10 vol. % multi walled carbon nanotubes are machined and analysed for material removal rate and the surface characteristics. An increase in material removal rate is observed with increase in filler concentrations. At the same time, better surface roughness is observed. The surface characteristics of composite alumina are further compared with Monel 400 alloy. It has been observed that spalling action is the dominating material removal mechanism for alumina composites, while melting and evaporation is for the Monel 400 alloy.

  12. Characterization of polymer surface structure and surface mechanical behaviour by sum frequency generation surface vibrational spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Opdahl, Aric; Koffas, Telly S; Amitay-Sadovsky, Ella; Kim, Joonyeong; Somorjai, Gabor A

    2004-01-01

    Sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM) have been used to study polymer surface structure and surface mechanical behaviour, specifically to study the relationships between the surface properties of polymers and their bulk compositions and the environment to which the polymer is exposed. The combination of SFG surface vibrational spectroscopy and AFM has been used to study surface segregation behaviour of polyolefin blends at the polymer/air and polymer/solid interfaces. SFG surface vibrational spectroscopy and AFM experiments have also been performed to characterize the properties of polymer/liquid and polymer/polymer interfaces, focusing on hydrogel materials. A method was developed to study the surface properties of hydrogel contact lens materials at various hydration conditions. Finally, the effect of mechanical stretching on the surface composition and surface mechanical behaviour of phase-separated polyurethanes, used in biomedical implant devices, has been studied by both SFG surface vibrational spectroscopy and AFM. (topical review)

  13. The Surface Reactivities of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes and Their Related Toxicities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Lei

    After 20 years of extensive exploration, people are more and more convinced on the great potentials of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in the applications of many different areas. On the other hand, the properties and toxicities have also been closely watched for the safe utilization. In this dissertation I focus on the surface properties of SWCNTs and their related toxicities. In chapter 2, we revealed the generation of peroxyl radical by the unmodified SWCNT and the poly(ethylene glycol) functionalized SWCNT in aqueous solution with capillary electrophoresis (CE) and a reactive oxygen species (ROS) indicator, 2,7-dichlorodihydrofluorescein (H2DCF). According to the results, we identified peroxyl radical, ROO• as the major ROS in our system. Peroxyl radical could be produced from the adsorption of oxygen on the SWCNT surface. In chapter 3, we studied oxidation of several biologically relevant reducing agents in the presence of SWCNTs in aqueous solutions. H2DCF and several small antioxidants (vitamin C, Trolox, and cysteine), and a high-molecular-weight ROS scavenger (bovine serum albumin (BSA)) were selected as reductants. We revealed that the unmodified or carboxylated SWCNT played duplex roles by acting as both oxidants and catalysts in the reaction. In chapter 4, we confirmed that SWCNTs bind to horseradish peroxidase (HRP) at a site proximate to the enzyme's activity center and participating in the ET process, enhancing the activity of (HRP) in the solution-based redox reaction. The capability of SWCNT in receiving electrons and the direct attachment of HRP to the surface of SWCNT strongly affected the enzyme activity due to the direct involvement of SWCNT in ET. In chapter 5, the toxicity of SWCNTs coated with different concentrations of BSA to a human fibroblast cell line was explored. The result indicates that the toxicity of SWCNTs decrease with the higher coating degree as assumed. Then we choose mitochondrion to study the interactions between

  14. Preparation of surface enhanced Raman substrate and its characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y.; Wang, J. Y.; Wang, J. Q.

    2017-10-01

    Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) is a fast, convenient and highly sensitive detection technique, and preparing the good effect and repeatable substrate is the key to realize the trace amount and quantitative detection in the field of food safety detection. In this paper, a surface enhanced Raman substrate based on submicrometer silver particles structure was prepared by chemical deposition method, and characterized its structure and optical properties.

  15. Characterization of complementary electric field coupled resonant surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hand, Thomas H.; Gollub, Jonah; Sajuyigbe, Soji; Smith, David R.; Cummer, Steven A.

    2008-11-01

    We present angle-resolved free-space transmission and reflection measurements of a surface composed of complementary electric inductive-capacitive (CELC) resonators. By measuring the reflection and transmission coefficients of a CELC surface with different polarizations and particle orientations, we show that the CELC only responds to in-plane magnetic fields. This confirms the Babinet particle duality between the CELC and its complement, the electric field coupled LC resonator. Characterization of the CELC structure serves to expand the current library of resonant elements metamaterial designers can draw upon to make unique materials and surfaces.

  16. Rough wall skin friction measurements using a high resolution surface balance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krogstad, Per-Age; Efros, Vladislav

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the design of a floating element friction balance which is based upon a commercially available micro force balance. The balance has a perfectly linear calibration function and was successfully applied to rough wall flows in a channel and a diffusor. Extrapolation of the turbulent shear stress measured by two component LDA to the wall matched very well the shear stress measured using the friction balance. Also, the wall shear stress obtained from the balance in the fully developed channel flow agreed with the stress that could be derived from the pressure gradient to within 3%.

  17. Investigation into the influence of laser energy input on selective laser melted thin-walled parts by response surface method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Zhang, Jian; Pang, Zhicong; Wu, Weihui

    2018-04-01

    Selective laser melting (SLM) provides a feasible way for manufacturing of complex thin-walled parts directly, however, the energy input during SLM process, namely derived from the laser power, scanning speed, layer thickness and scanning space, etc. has great influence on the thin wall's qualities. The aim of this work is to relate the thin wall's parameters (responses), namely track width, surface roughness and hardness to the process parameters considered in this research (laser power, scanning speed and layer thickness) and to find out the optimal manufacturing conditions. Design of experiment (DoE) was used by implementing composite central design to achieve better manufacturing qualities. Mathematical models derived from the statistical analysis were used to establish the relationships between the process parameters and the responses. Also, the effects of process parameters on each response were determined. Then, a numerical optimization was performed to find out the optimal process set at which the quality features are at their desired values. Based on this study, the relationship between process parameters and SLMed thin-walled structure was revealed and thus, the corresponding optimal process parameters can be used to manufactured thin-walled parts with high quality.

  18. Effect of polymer type on characterization and filtration performances of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT)-COOH-based polymeric mixed matrix membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengur-Tasdemir, Reyhan; Mokkapati, Venkata R S S; Koseoglu-Imer, Derya Y; Koyuncu, Ismail

    2018-05-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) can be used for the fabrication of mixed matrix polymeric membranes that can enhance filtration perfomances of the membranes by modifying membrane surface properties. In this study, detailed characterization and filtration performances of MWCNTs functionalized with COOH group, blended into polymeric flat-sheet membranes were investigated using different polymer types. Morphological characterization was carried out using atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and contact angle measurements. For filtration performance tests, protein, dextran, E. coli suspension, Xanthan Gum and real activated sludge solutions were used. Experimental data and analyses revealed that Polyethersulfone (PES) + MWCNT-COOH mixed matrix membranes have superior performance abilities compared to other tested membranes.

  19. Characterization of the solar climate in Malawi using NASA's surface ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    Characterization of the solar climate in Malawi using. NASA's surface meteorology and solar energy. (SSE) model. Senganimalunje, T. C.1 and Tenthani, C. M. 2*. 1Malawi Bureau of Standards, Metrology Services Department, Box 946, Blantyre, Malawi. 2Physics and Biochemical Sciences Department, Malawi Polytechnic, ...

  20. Bulk and surface characterization of novel photoresponsive polymeric systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkataramani, Shivshankar

    This dissertation presents a detailed characterization of two important classes of photoresponsive polymers-polydiacetylenes (PDAs) and azopolymers. Bulk and surface characterization techniques were used to evaluate the structure-property relationships of the PDAs and surface characterization, in particular-atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to characterize the azopolymers. PDAs from bis-alkylurethanes of 5,7 dodecadiyn 1,12-diol (viz.,) ETCD, IPUDO and PUDO are of particular interest in view of reports of reversible thermochromic and photochromic phase transitions in these materials. Thermochromism in the above PDAs is associated with a first order phase transition involving expansion of the crystallographic unit cell, the preservation of the urethane hydrogen bonding and possibly some relief of mechanical strain upon heating. Insights into thermochromism obtained from studies of nonthermochromic forms of PDA-ETCD are discussed. Some of the bulk characterization experiments reported In the literature are repeated. The motivation to investigate the surface morphology of the PDA single crystals using AFM was derived from Raman spectroscopy studies of various PDAs in which dispersion of the Raman spectrum indicating surface heterogeneity was observed. Micron scale as well as molecularly resolved images were obtained The micron scale images indicated a variable surface of the crystals. The molecularly resolved images showed a well defined 2-D lattice and are interpreted in terms of known crystallographic data. The surface parameters obtained from AFM measurements are similar to those determined from X-ray diffraction. During an attempt of AFM imaging of IPUDO crystals exposed to 254 nm ultraviolet light, it was observed that these crystals undergo a "macroscopic shattering". In the interest of rigorously defining conditions for photochromism, this research has undertaken a combined study of the surface morphology of the above mentioned PDA crystals by AFM and the

  1. Ambiguous walls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mody, Astrid

    2012-01-01

    The introduction of Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) in the built environment has encouraged myriad applications, often embedded in surfaces as an integrated part of the architecture. Thus the wall as responsive luminous skin is becoming, if not common, at least familiar. Taking into account how wall...

  2. Inclined-wall regular micro-pillar-arrayed surfaces covered entirely with an alumina nanowire forest and their improved superhydrophobicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dae-Ho; Lee, Dongyun; Cho, Chae-Ryong; Kim, Soo-Hyung; Lee, Deug-Woo; Kim, Jong-Man; Kim, Yongsung; Kang, Jae-Wook; Hong, Suck Won

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports a multiple-scale hierarchically structured superhydrophobic surface that is composed of inclined-wall regular micro-pillar arrays covered entirely with an alumina nanowire forest (ANF) to improve the surface wettability. The multiple-scaled structures were fabricated stably using a simple batch process based on an anisotropic chemical silicon etching process and a subsequent time-controlled anodic aluminum oxide technique. The surface wetting properties of the mono-roughened surfaces with inclined-wall micro-pillar arrays, which are normally in the Wenzel wetting regime, could be transitioned perfectly to the slippery Cassie mode and enhanced greatly in the Wenzel regime in cases of a high- and low-density of the micro-pillars, respectively, by easily amplifying the intrinsic contact angle through the entire coverage of the ANF on the micro-roughened surfaces. The wettability of the proposed multiple-scaled surfaces could also be predicted using analytic surface models and the experimental results agreed greatly with the wetting trends estimated theoretically due to the geometrical regularity of the base micro-structures

  3. Surface modification and characterization of magnesium hydroxide sulfate hydrate nanowhiskers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao Chuanhui [Key Laboratory of Marine Chemistry Theory and Technology, Ministry of Education, Ocean University of China, Qingdao 266100 (China); Li Xianguo, E-mail: chuanhuigao@foxmail.com [Key Laboratory of Marine Chemistry Theory and Technology, Ministry of Education, Ocean University of China, Qingdao 266100 (China); Feng Lijuan; Lu Shaoyan; Liu Jinyan [Key Laboratory of Marine Chemistry Theory and Technology, Ministry of Education, Ocean University of China, Qingdao 266100 (China)

    2010-03-01

    In order to enhance the compatibility with plastic polymers, magnesium hydroxide sulfate hydrate (MHSH) nanowhiskers were modified through grafting methyl methacrylate (MMA) on the surface of the nanowhiskers by emulsion polymerization. The influences of the reaction time, MMA monomer content, adding speed of monomer and the reaction temperature on the grafting ratio were investigated. Thermogravimetry (TG), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy and surface contact angle measurement were used to characterize the effect of surface modification. The results showed that the MHSH nanowhiskers were uniformly coated by polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA), and a well-defined core-shell hybrid structure of MHSH/PMMA was obtained. The surface contact angle of the hybrid whiskers increased to 87.32 deg. from 12.71 deg. and the whiskers surface was changed from hydrophilic to lipophilic.

  4. Progress in production and characterization of RF beryllium for ITER fist wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kupriyanov, I.B.; Nikolaev, G.N.; Khomutov, A.M.; Gervash, A.; Romanov, P.V.

    2007-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Beryllium was chosen as the armor material for the Fist Wall and Port Limiter of ITER. As results of ITER EDA activities the reference beryllium grade S-65C (USA, Brush Wellman) and the DshG-200 grade (RF, Bochvar Institute) were selected as materials for armor of ITER FW. The main criterion of a choice of given grades was their highest resistance against High Heat Flux loading shown by results of thermal fatigue/shock test experiments carried out earlier in SNL (USA) and FZ Juelich (Germany). Recently in RF the new Be grade TGP-56FW has been proposed, which is a modified analogue of DshG-200 grade with improved properties, and also a low-waste manufacturing process for production of Be tiles for armor of ITER FW has been developed. In comparison with DshG-200 grade the main advantage of TGP-56FW grade consists in higher level of strength properties and plasticity as well as higher uniformity of physical-mechanical properties in transverse and longitudinal directions relatively pressing axis. In this paper the results of RF R and D activities in production and characterization of TGP- 56FW beryllium grade for FW armor are presented. The results of HHF tests (thermal fatigue/disruption simulation) on TSEFEY-M testing facility for full-scale beryllium tiles produced from TGP-56FW grade are also reported. A new in-pile integrated test experiment for Be mock-ups that combines thermal cycling (2x10 4 cycles at 0.5 MW/m 2 ) and neutron irradiation (about 0.6 dpa) is discussed.(authors)

  5. Learning-based automated segmentation of the carotid artery vessel wall in dual-sequence MRI using subdivision surface fitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Shan; van 't Klooster, Ronald; Kitslaar, Pieter H; Coolen, Bram F; van den Berg, Alexandra M; Smits, Loek P; Shahzad, Rahil; Shamonin, Denis P; de Koning, Patrick J H; Nederveen, Aart J; van der Geest, Rob J

    2017-10-01

    The quantification of vessel wall morphology and plaque burden requires vessel segmentation, which is generally performed by manual delineations. The purpose of our work is to develop and evaluate a new 3D model-based approach for carotid artery wall segmentation from dual-sequence MRI. The proposed method segments the lumen and outer wall surfaces including the bifurcation region by fitting a subdivision surface constructed hierarchical-tree model to the image data. In particular, a hybrid segmentation which combines deformable model fitting with boundary classification was applied to extract the lumen surface. The 3D model ensures the correct shape and topology of the carotid artery, while the boundary classification uses combined image information of 3D TOF-MRA and 3D BB-MRI to promote accurate delineation of the lumen boundaries. The proposed algorithm was validated on 25 subjects (48 arteries) including both healthy volunteers and atherosclerotic patients with 30% to 70% carotid stenosis. For both lumen and outer wall border detection, our result shows good agreement between manually and automatically determined contours, with contour-to-contour distance less than 1 pixel as well as Dice overlap greater than 0.87 at all different carotid artery sections. The presented 3D segmentation technique has demonstrated the capability of providing vessel wall delineation for 3D carotid MRI data with high accuracy and limited user interaction. This brings benefits to large-scale patient studies for assessing the effect of pharmacological treatment of atherosclerosis by reducing image analysis time and bias between human observers. © 2017 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  6. The influence of wall orientation and exterior surface solar absorptivity on time lag and decrement factor in the Greek region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kontoleon, K.J.; Eumorfopoulou, E.A. [Department of Civil Engineering, Laboratory of Building Construction and Physics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki (A.U.Th.), Gr-541 24 Thessaloniki (Greece)

    2008-07-15

    The aim of this study is to determine how time lag and decrement factor are affected by wall orientation and exterior surface solar absorptivity, for specific climatic conditions. Their influence forms a non-sinusoidal periodical forcing function that simulates suitably the outdoor temperature fluctuations. This novel approach, allows the predictability of building's thermal response in an efficient way. The investigation is carried out for various insulated opaque wall formations comprising typical material elements, during the summer period in the mild Greek region. This study that allows proper building planning procedures, at the very early stages of the envelope design, presents great importance. The analysed configurations are assumed to have an orientation that corresponds to each compass point. In addition, the solar absorptivity of surface coatings is assumed to be varying from 0 to 1. The transient thermal analysis is obtained via a thermal circuit that models accurately the fundamental heat transfer mechanisms on both boundaries and through the multi-layered wall configurations. Moreover, the mathematical formulation and solution of this lumped model is achieved in discrete time steps by adopting the non-linear nodal method. The simulation results are focused on the single and combined effects of orientation and solar absorptivity on the dynamic thermal characteristics of various wall configurations. (author)

  7. Characterization of the damage produced on different materials surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dellavale Clara, Hector Damian

    2004-01-01

    In the present work the characterization techniques of surfaces ULOI and RIMAPS have been applied on laboratory samples made from aluminium, stainless steel and material based on fiberglass.The resultant surfaces of, chemical etching with corrosive agents Keller and Tucker, mechanic damage from the wear and tear of abrasive paper and sandrubbing with alumina particles, are analyzed to different level of damage.The systematic application of the above mentioned techniques is carried out with the objective of finding information, which allows to characterize the superficial damage, both in its incipient state as in the extreme situation revealed by the presence of etch pits. Important results have been obtained, in the characterization of the incipient stage of the chemical etching, using the curves of the normalized area.In addition, it was possible to verify the capacity of the techniques in the early detection of the preferential directions generated by the etch pits

  8. Exchange of Surfactant by Natural Organic Matter on the Surfaces of Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    The increasing production and applications of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) have elicited concerns regarding their release and potential adverse effects in the environment. To form stable aqueous MWCNTs suspensions, surfactants are often employed to facilitate dispersion...

  9. Characterizing material properties of cement-stabilized rammed earth to construct sustainable insulated walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rishi Gupta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Use of local materials can reduce the hauling of construction materials over long distances, thus reducing the greenhouse gas emissions associated with transporting such materials. Use of locally available soils (earth for construction of walls has been used in many parts of the world. Owing to the thermal mass of these walls and the potential to have insulation embedded in the wall section has brought this construction material/technology at the forefront in recent years. However, the mechanical properties of the rammed earth and the parameters required for design of steel reinforced walls are not fully understood. In this paper, the author presents a case study where full-scale walls were constructed using rammed earth to understand the effect of two different types of shear detailing on the structural performance of the walls. The mechanical properties of the material essential for design such as compressive strength of the material including effect of coring on the strength, pull out strength of different rebar diameters, flexural performance and out-of-plane bending on walls was studied. These results are presented in this case study.

  10. Staphylococcus aureus Colonization of the Mouse Gastrointestinal Tract Is Modulated by Wall Teichoic Acid, Capsule, and Surface Proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiki Misawa

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus colonizes the nose, throat, skin, and gastrointestinal (GI tract of humans. GI carriage of S. aureus is difficult to eradicate and has been shown to facilitate the transmission of the bacterium among individuals. Although staphylococcal colonization of the GI tract is asymptomatic, it increases the likelihood of infection, particularly skin and soft tissue infections caused by USA300 isolates. We established a mouse model of persistent S. aureus GI colonization and characterized the impact of selected surface antigens on colonization. In competition experiments, an acapsular mutant colonized better than the parental strain Newman, whereas mutants defective in sortase A and clumping factor A showed impaired ability to colonize the GI tract. Mutants lacking protein A, clumping factor B, poly-N-acetyl glucosamine, or SdrCDE showed no defect in colonization. An S. aureus wall teichoic acid (WTA mutant (ΔtagO failed to colonize the mouse nose or GI tract, and the tagO and clfA mutants showed reduced adherence in vitro to intestinal epithelial cells. The tagO mutant was recovered in lower numbers than the wild type strain in the murine stomach and duodenum 1 h after inoculation. This reduced fitness correlated with the in vitro susceptibility of the tagO mutant to bile salts, proteases, and a gut-associated defensin. Newman ΔtagO showed enhanced susceptibility to autolysis, and an autolysin (atl tagO double mutant abrogated this phenotype. However, the atl tagO mutant did not survive better in the mouse GI tract than the tagO mutant. Our results indicate that the failure of the tagO mutant to colonize the GI tract correlates with its poor adherence and susceptibility to bactericidal factors within the mouse gut, but not to enhanced activity of its major autolysin.

  11. Surface spectroscopic characterization of a model methane-activation catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, J.G.; Weisel, M.D.; Hoffmann, F.M.; Hall, R.B.

    1992-01-01

    In an effort to understand the details concerning the alkali-promoted selectivity for the oxidative coupling of methane, the authors have carried out a detailed characterization of a model K/NiO/Ni(100) catalyst under well-controlled, ultrahigh vacuum conditions. The authors' systematic approach involved the following procedures: detailed investigation of the formation and structure of NiO on a clean Ni(100) surface; spectroscopic characterization of K-doped NiO by in situ deposition of potassium onto well-characterized NiO/Ni(100) substrate; and determination of the reactivities of NiO/Ni(100) and K/NiO/Ni(100) towards H 2 and CH 4 . In this paper, the authors will use the model K/NiO/Ni(100) system as an example to demonstrate that a detailed, complementary characterization of the model catalyst could best be achieved by using a combination of a variety of surface techniques: The methods of HREELS, LEED, XPS and AES could be applied to obtain properties on and near the surface regions; the technique of FYNES, being a photon-in/photon-out method could be utilized to investigate the bulk properties up to 2000 Angstrom below the surface; the method of FTIR using CO as a probing molecule is, on the other hand, sensitive only to the properties of the top-most surface layer. The result is to be presented in this paper will be mainly those obtained by using the two vibrational spectroscopies (HREELS and FTIR). Results from other surface techniques will also be discussed or presented when they provide additional information to the vibrational data

  12. Bioactive surface modifications on inner walls of poly-tetra-fluoro-ethylene tubes using dielectric barrier discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Yong Ki; Park, Daewon; Kim, Hoonbae; Lee, Hyerim; Park, Heonyong; Kim, Hong Ja; Jung, Donggeun

    2014-03-01

    Bioactive surface modification can be used in a variety of medical polymeric materials in the fields of biochips and biosensors, artificial membranes, and vascular grafts. In this study, the surface modification of the inner walls of poly-tetra-fluoro-ethylene (PTFE) tubing was carried out to improve vascular grafts, which are made of biocompatible material for the human body in the medical field. Focus was centered on the cell attachment of the inner wall of the PTFE by sequential processes of hydrogen plasma treatment, hydrocarbon deposition, and reactive plasma treatment on the PFTE surface using micro plasma discharge. Micro plasma was generated by a medium-frequency alternating current high-voltage generator. The preliminary modification of PTFE was conducted by a plasma of hydrogen and argon gases. The hydrocarbon thin film was deposited on modified PTFE with a mixture of acetylene and argon gases. The reactive plasma treatment using oxygen plasma was done to give biocompatible functionality to the inner wall surface. The hydrophobic surface of bare PTFE is made hydrophilic by the reactive plasma treatment due to the formation of carbonyl groups on the surface. The reactive treatment could lead to improved attachment of smooth muscle cells (SMCs) on the modified PTFE tubing. Fourier transform infrared absorption spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and water contact angle measurement were used for the analysis of the surface modification. The SMC-attached PTFE tube developed will be applicable to in vitro human vasculature-mimetic model systems, and to medical vascular grafts.

  13. THz reflectometric imaging of medieval wall paintings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dandolo, Corinna Ludovica Koch; Jepsen, Peter Uhd

    2013-01-01

    Terahertz time-domain reflectometry has been applied to the investigation of a medieval Danish wall painting. The technique has been able to detect the presence of carbonblack layer on the surface of the wall painting and a buried insertion characterized by high reflectivity values has been found...

  14. Wall roughness induces asymptotic ultimate turbulence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhu, Xiaojue; Verschoof, Ruben Adriaan; Bakhuis, Dennis; Huisman, Sander Gerard; Verzicco, Roberto; Sun, Chao; Lohse, Detlef

    2018-01-01

    Turbulence governs the transport of heat, mass and momentum on multiple scales. In real-world applications, wall-bounded turbulence typically involves surfaces that are rough; however, characterizing and understanding the effects of wall roughness on turbulence remains a challenge. Here, by

  15. uleSIMS characterization of silver reference surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palitsin, V. V.; Dowsett, M. G.; Mata, B. Guzmán de la; Oloff, I. W.; Gibbons, R.

    2006-07-01

    Ultra low energy SIMS (uleSIMS) is a high sensitivity analytical technique that is normally used for ultra shallow profiling at a depth resolution of up to1 nm. This work describes the use of uleSIMS as both a spectroscopic and depth-profiling tool for the characterization of the early stages of corrosion formed on reference surfaces of silver. These samples are being developed to help with the characterization of tarnished surfaces in a cultural heritage context, and uleSIMS enables the tarnishing to be studied from its very earliest stages due to its high sensitivity (ppm-ppb) and surface specificity. We show that, uleSIMS can be used effectively to study the surface chemistry and aid the development of reference surfaces themselves. In particular, handling contaminants, surface dust, and residues from polishing are relatively easy to identify allowing them to be separated from the parts of the mass spectrum specific to the early stages of corrosion.

  16. The surface chemical properties of multi-walled carbon nanotubes modified by thermal fluorination for electric double-layer capacitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Min-Jung; Jeong, Euigyung; Lee, Young-Seak

    2015-08-01

    The surfaces of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were thermally fluorinated at various temperatures to enhance the electrochemical properties of the MWCNTs for use as electric double-layer capacitor (EDLC) electrodes. The fluorine functional groups were added to the surfaces of the MWCNTs via thermal fluorination. The thermal fluorination exposed the Fe catalyst on MWCNTs, and the specific surface area increased due to etching during the fluorination. The specific capacitances of the thermally fluorinated at 100 °C, MWCNT based electrode increased from 57 to 94 F/g at current densities of 0.2 A/g, respectively. This enhancement in capacitance can be attributed to increased polarization of the thermally fluorinated MWCNT surface, which increased the affinity between the electrode surface and the electrolyte ions.

  17. Graphene oxide/multi-walled carbon nanotubes as nanofeatured scaffolds for the assisted deposition of nanohydroxyapatite: characterization and biological evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Bruno Vm; Leite, Nelly Cs; Cavalcanti, Bruno das Neves; da Silva, Newton S; Marciano, Fernanda R; Corat, Evaldo J; Webster, Thomas J; Lobo, Anderson O

    2016-01-01

    Nanohydroxyapatite (nHAp) is an emergent bioceramic that shows similar chemical and crystallographic properties as the mineral phase present in bone. However, nHAp presents low fracture toughness and tensile strength, limiting its application in bone tissue engineering. Conversely, multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) have been widely used for composite applications due to their excellent mechanical and physicochemical properties, although their hydrophobicity usually impairs some applications. To improve MWCNT wettability, oxygen plasma etching has been applied to promote MWCNT exfoliation and oxidation and to produce graphene oxide (GO) at the end of the tips. Here, we prepared a series of nHAp/MWCNT-GO nanocomposites aimed at producing materials that combine similar bone characteristics (nHAp) with high mechanical strength (MWCNT-GO). After MWCNT production and functionalization to produce MWCNT-GO, ultrasonic irradiation was employed to precipitate nHAp onto the MWCNT-GO scaffolds (at 1-3 wt%). We employed various techniques to characterize the nanocomposites, including transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Raman spectroscopy, thermogravimetry, and gas adsorption (the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller method). We used simulated body fluid to evaluate their bioactivity and human osteoblasts (bone-forming cells) to evaluate cytocompatibility. We also investigated their bactericidal effect against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. TEM analysis revealed homogeneous distributions of nHAp crystal grains along the MWCNT-GO surfaces. All nanocomposites were proved to be bioactive, since carbonated nHAp was found after 21 days in simulated body fluid. All nanocomposites showed potential for biomedical applications with no cytotoxicity toward osteoblasts and impressively demonstrated a bactericidal effect without the use of antibiotics. All of the aforementioned properties make these materials very attractive for bone tissue engineering applications, either as a

  18. Bulk Building Material Characterization and Decontamination Using a Concrete Floor and Wall Contamination Profiling Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aggarwal, S.; Charters, G.; Blauvelt, D.

    2002-01-01

    The concrete profiling technology, RadPro(trademark) has four major components: a drill with a specialized cutting and sampling head, drill bits, a sample collection unit and a vacuum pump. The equipment in conjunction with portable radiometric instrumentation produces a profile of radiological or chemical contamination through the material being studied. The drill head is used under hammer action to penetrate hard surfaces. This causes the bulk material to be pulverized as the drill travels through the radioactive media efficiently transmitting to the sampling unit a representative sample of powdered bulk material. The profiling equipment is designed to sequentially collect all material from the hole. The bulk material samples are continuously retrieved by use of a specially designed vacuumed sample retrieval unit that prevents cross contamination of the clean retrieved samples. No circulation medium is required with this profiling process; therefore, the only by-product from drilling is the sample. The data quality, quantity, and representativeness may be used to produce an activity profile from the hot spot surface into the bulk building material. The activity data obtained during the profiling process is reduced and transferred to building drawings as part of a detailed report of the radiological problem. This activity profile may then be expanded to ultimately characterize the facility and expedite waste segregation and facility closure at a reduced cost and risk

  19. Screening for Glycosylphosphatidylinositol-Modified Cell Wall Proteins in Pichia pastoris and Their Recombinant Expression on the Cell Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Liang, Shuli; Zhou, Xinying; Jin, Zi; Jiang, Fengchun; Han, Shuangyan; Zheng, Suiping

    2013-01-01

    Glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored glycoproteins have various intrinsic functions in yeasts and different uses in vitro. In the present study, the genome of Pichia pastoris GS115 was screened for potential GPI-modified cell wall proteins. Fifty putative GPI-anchored proteins were selected on the basis of (i) the presence of a C-terminal GPI attachment signal sequence, (ii) the presence of an N-terminal signal sequence for secretion, and (iii) the absence of transmembrane domains in mature protein. The predicted GPI-anchored proteins were fused to an alpha-factor secretion signal as a substitute for their own N-terminal signal peptides and tagged with the chimeric reporters FLAG tag and mature Candida antarctica lipase B (CALB). The expression of fusion proteins on the cell surface of P. pastoris GS115 was determined by whole-cell flow cytometry and immunoblotting analysis of the cell wall extracts obtained by β-1,3-glucanase digestion. CALB displayed on the cell surface of P. pastoris GS115 with the predicted GPI-anchored proteins was examined on the basis of potential hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl butyrate. Finally, 13 proteins were confirmed to be GPI-modified cell wall proteins in P. pastoris GS115, which can be used to display heterologous proteins on the yeast cell surface. PMID:23835174

  20. Impact of the surface quality on the thermal shock performance of beryllium armor tiles for first wall applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spilker, B., E-mail: b.spilker@fz-juelich.de; Linke, J.; Pintsuk, G.; Wirtz, M.

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Different surface qualities of S-65 beryllium are tested under high heat flux conditions. • After 1000 thermal shocks, the loaded area exhibits a crucial destruction. • Stress accelerated grain boundary oxidation/dynamic embrittlement effects are linked to the thermal shock performance of beryllium. • Thermally induced cracks form between 1 and 10 pulses and grow wider and deeper between 10 and 100 pulses. • Thermally induced cracks form and propagate independently from surface grooves and the surface quality. - Abstract: Beryllium will be applied as first wall armor material in ITER. The armor has to sustain high steady state and transient power fluxes. For transient events like edge localized modes, these transient power fluxes rise up to 1.0 GW m{sup −2} with a duration of 0.5–0.75 ms in the divertor region and a significant fraction of this power flux is deposited on the first wall as well. In the present work, the reference beryllium grade for the ITER first wall application S-65 was prepared with various surface conditions and subjected to transient power fluxes (thermal shocks) with ITER relevant loading parameters. After 1000 thermal shocks, a crucial destruction of the entire loaded area was observed and linked to the stress accelerated grain boundary oxidation (SAGBO)/dynamic embrittlement (DE) effect. Furthermore, the study revealed that the majority of the thermally induced cracks formed between 1 and 10 pulses and then grew wider and deeper with increasing pulse number. The surface quality did not influence the cracking behavior of beryllium in any detectable way. However, the polished surface demonstrated the highest resistance against the observed crucial destruction mechanism.

  1. Surface characterization of self-assembled N-Cu nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cristina, Lucila J.; Moreno-Lopez, Juan C. [Laboratorio de Superficies e Interfaces, Instituto de Desarrollo Tecnologico para la Industria Quimica (CONICET-UNL), Gueemes 3450, (S3000GLN) Santa Fe (Argentina); Sferco, Silvano J. [Laboratorio de Superficies e Interfaces, Instituto de Desarrollo Tecnologico para la Industria Quimica (CONICET-UNL), Gueemes 3450, (S3000GLN) Santa Fe (Argentina); Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Bioquimica y Ciencias Biologicas, Universidad Nacional del Litoral, Ciudad Universitaria, C.C. 242, (S3000ZAA) Santa Fe (Argentina); Passeggi, Mario C.G.; Vidal, Ricardo A. [Laboratorio de Superficies e Interfaces, Instituto de Desarrollo Tecnologico para la Industria Quimica (CONICET-UNL), Gueemes 3450, (S3000GLN) Santa Fe (Argentina); Ferron, Julio, E-mail: jferron@intec.unl.edu.ar [Laboratorio de Superficies e Interfaces, Instituto de Desarrollo Tecnologico para la Industria Quimica (CONICET-UNL), Gueemes 3450, (S3000GLN) Santa Fe (Argentina); Departamento de Materiales, Facultad de Ingenieria Quimica, Universidad Nacional del Litoral, Santiago del Estero 2829,(S3000AOM) Santa Fe (Argentina)

    2012-01-01

    We report on the process of low energy N{sub 2}{sup +} implantation and annealing of a Cu(0 0 1) surface. Through AES we study the N diffusion process as a function of the substrate temperature. With STM and LEIS we characterize the surface morphology and the electronic structure is analyzed with ARUPS. Under annealing (500 < T < 700 K) N migrates to the surface and reacts forming a Cu{sub x}N compound that decomposes at temperatures above 700 K. LEIS measurements show that N locates on the four-fold hollow sites of the Cu(0 0 1) surface in a c(2 Multiplication-Sign 2) arrangement. Finally, a gap along the [0 0 1] azimuthal direction is determined by ARUPS. DFT calculations provide support to our conclusions.

  2. Surface Characterization of Nanoparticles: Critical Needs and Significant Challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baer, Donald R.

    2011-01-01

    There is a growing recognition that nanoparticles and other nanostructured materials are sometimes inadequately characterized and that this may limit or even invalidate some of the conclusions regarding particle properties and behavior. A number of international organizations are working to establish the essential measurement requirements that enable adequate understanding of nanoparticle properties for both technological applications and for environmental health issues. Our research on the interaction of iron metal-core oxide-shell nanoparticles with environmental contaminants and studies of the behaviors of ceria nanoparticles, with a variety of medical, catalysis and energy applications, have highlighted a number of common nanoparticle characterization challenges that have not been fully recognized by parts of the research community. This short review outlines some of these characterization challenges based on our research observations and using other results reported in the literature. Issues highlighted include: (1) the importance of surfaces and surface characterization, (2) nanoparticles are often not created equal - subtle differences in synthesis and processing can have large impacts; (3) nanoparticles frequently change with time having lifetime implications for products and complicating understanding of health and safety impacts; (4) the high sensitivity of nanoparticles to their environment complicates characterization and applications in many ways; (5) nanoparticles are highly unstable and easily altered (damaged) during analysis.

  3. Characterization and reactivity of sodium aluminoborosilicate glass fiber surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortiz Rivera, Lymaris, E-mail: luo105@psu.edu [Materials Research Institute, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Bakaev, Victor A.; Banerjee, Joy [Materials Research Institute, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Mueller, Karl T. [Department of Chemistry, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Pantano, Carlo G. [Materials Research Institute, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Highlights: • XPS revealed that these fiber surfaces contain sodium carbonate weathering products. • IGC–MS data confirms the products of acetic acid reaction with sodium carbonate. • NMR data shows two closely spaced, but distinct sodium carboxylate peaks. • Acetic acid reacts with both sodium in the glass and sodium in the sodium carbonate. - Abstract: Multicomponent complex oxides, such as sodium aluminoborosilicate glass fibers, are important materials used for thermal insulation in buildings and homes. Although the surface properties of single oxides, such as silica, have been extensively studied, less is known about the distribution of reactive sites at the surface of multicomponent oxides. Here, we investigated the reactivity of sodium aluminoborosilicate glass fiber surfaces for better understanding of their interface chemistry and bonding with acrylic polymers. Acetic acid (with and without a {sup 13}C enrichment) was used as a probe representative of the carboxylic functional groups in many acrylic polymers and adhesives. Inverse gas chromatography coupled to a mass spectrometer (IGC–MS), and solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), were used to characterize the fiber surface reactions and surface chemical structure. In this way, we discovered that both sodium ions in the glass surface, as well as sodium carbonate salts that formed on the surface due to the intrinsic reactivity of this glass in humid air, are primary sites of interaction with the carboxylic acid. Surface analysis by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) confirmed the presence of sodium carbonates on these surfaces. Computer simulations of the interactions between the reactive sites on the glass fiber surface with acetic acid were performed to evaluate energetically favorable reactions. The adsorption reactions with sodium in the glass structure provide adhesive bonding sites, whereas the reaction with the sodium carbonate consumes the acid to form sodium-carboxylate, H

  4. Preparation and characterization of silver nanoparticles immobilized on multi-walled carbon nanotubes by poly(dopamine) functionalization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Yi; Lu Yonglai; Zhang Liqun; Liu Li; Dai Yajie; Wang Wencai

    2012-01-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) functionalized with poly(dopamine) (PDA) were found to cause the immobilization of silver nanoparticles on the surface. The PDA functional layer not only improved the dispersion of MWNTs in aqueous solution, but also was used as a platform for subsequent silver nanoparticle immobilization. The surface morphology of the functionalized MWNTs was observed by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The results showed that PDA layers with controlled thickness on the nanometer scale were formed on MWNT surfaces by in situ spontaneous oxidative polymerization of dopamine, and that high-density of homogeneously dispersed spherical silver nanoparticles with sizes of 3–4 nm were immobilized on their outer surface. The space between spherical silver nanoparticles is less than 10 nm. Both X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction results showed that the Ag nanoparticles on the surface of hybrids exist in the zero valent state.

  5. Characterizing the effects of regolith surface roughness on photoemission from surfaces in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dove, A.; Horanyi, M.; Wang, X.

    2017-12-01

    Surfaces of airless bodies and spacecraft in space are exposed to a variety of charging environments. A balance of currents due to plasma bombardment, photoemission, electron and ion emission and collection, and secondary electron emission determines the surface's charge. Photoelectron emission is the dominant charging process on sunlit surfaces in the inner solar system due to the intense solar UV radiation. This can result in a net positive surface potential, with a cloud of photoelectrons immediately above the surface, called the photoelectron sheath. Conversely, the unlit side of the body will charge negatively due the collection of the fast-moving solar wind electrons. The interaction of charged dust grains with these positively and negatively charged surfaces, and within the photoelectron and plasma sheaths may explain the occurrence of dust lofting, levitation and transport above the lunar surface. The surface potential of exposed objects is also dependent on the material properties of their surfaces. Composition and particle size primarily affect the quantum efficiency of photoelectron generation; however, surface roughness can also control the charging process. In order to characterize these effects, we have conducted laboratory experiments to examine the role of surface roughness in generating photoelectrons in dedicated laboratory experiments using solid and dusty surfaces of the same composition (CeO2), and initial comparisons with JSC-1 lunar simulant. Using Langmuir probe measurements, we explore the measured potentials above insulating surfaces exposed to UV and an electric field, and we show that the photoemission current from a dusty surface is largely reduced due to its higher surface roughness, which causes a significant fraction of the emitted photoelectrons to be re-absorbed within the surface. We will discuss these results in context of similar situations on planetary surfaces.

  6. Evolution of the transfer function characterization of surface scatter phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, James E.; Pfisterer, Richard N.

    2016-09-01

    Based upon the empirical observation that BRDF measurements of smooth optical surfaces exhibited shift-invariant behavior when plotted versus    o , the original Harvey-Shack (OHS) surface scatter theory was developed as a scalar linear systems formulation in which scattered light behavior was characterized by a surface transfer function (STF) reminiscent of the optical transfer function (OTF) of modern image formation theory (1976). This shift-invariant behavior combined with the inverse power law behavior when plotting log BRDF versus log   o was quickly incorporated into several optical analysis software packages. Although there was no explicit smooth-surface approximation in the OHS theory, there was a limitation on both the incident and scattering angles. In 1988 the modified Harvey-Shack (MHS) theory removed the limitation on the angle of incidence; however, a moderate-angle scattering limitation remained. Clearly for large incident angles the BRDF was no longer shift-invariant as a different STF was now required for each incident angle. In 2011 the generalized Harvey-Shack (GHS) surface scatter theory, characterized by a two-parameter family of STFs, evolved into a practical modeling tool to calculate BRDFs from optical surface metrology data for situations that violate the smooth surface approximation inherent in the Rayleigh-Rice theory and/or the moderate-angle limitation of the Beckmann-Kirchhoff theory. And finally, the STF can be multiplied by the classical OTF to provide a complete linear systems formulation of image quality as degraded by diffraction, geometrical aberrations and surface scatter effects from residual optical fabrication errors.

  7. Fast Characterization of Moving Samples with Nano-Textured Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Morten Hannibal; Hansen, Poul-Erik; Zalkovskij, Maksim

    2015-01-01

    Characterization of structures using conventional optical microscopy is restricted by the diffraction limit. Techniques like atomic force and scanning electron microscopy can investigate smaller structures but are very time consuming. We show that using scatterometry, a technique based on optical...... diffraction, integrated into a commercial light microscope we can characterize nano-textured surfaces in a few milliseconds. The adapted microscope has two detectors, a CCD camera used to easily find an area of interest and a spectrometer for the measurements. We demonstrate that the microscope has...

  8. On-Surface Synthesis and Characterization of Honeycombene Oligophenylene Macrocycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Min; Shang, Jian; Wang, Yongfeng; Wu, Kai; Kuttner, Julian; Hilt, Gerhard; Hieringer, Wolfgang; Gottfried, J Michael

    2017-01-24

    We report the on-surface formation and characterization of [30]-honeycombene, a cyclotriacontaphenylene, which consists of 30 phenyl rings (C 180 H 120 ) and has a diameter of 4.0 nm. This shape-persistent, conjugated, and unsubstituted hexagonal hydrocarbon macrocycle was obtained by solvent-free synthesis on a silver (111) single-crystal surface, making solubility-enhancing alkyl side groups unnecessary. Side products include strained macrocycles with square, pentagonal, and heptagonal shape. The molecules were characterized by scanning tunneling microscopy and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. On the Ag(111) surface, the macrocycles act as molecular quantum corrals and lead to the confinement of surface-state electrons inside the central cavity. The energy of the confined surface state correlates with the size of the macrocycle and is well described by a particle-in-the-box model. Tunneling spectroscopy suggests conjugation within the planar rings and reveals influences of self-assembly on the electronic structure. While the adsorbed molecules appear to be approximately planar, the free molecules have nonplanar conformation, according to DFT.

  9. Material migration patterns and overview of first surface analysis of the JET ITER-like wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Widdowson, A; Ayres, C F; Baron-Wiechec, A; Matthews, G F; Alves, E; Catarino, N; Brezinsek, S; Coad, J P; Likonen, J; Heinola, K; Mayer, M; Rubel, M

    2014-01-01

    Following the first JET ITER-like wall operations a detailed in situ photographic survey of the main chamber and divertor was completed. In addition, a selection of tiles and passive diagnostics were removed from the vessel and made available for post mortem analysis. From the photographic survey and results from initial analysis, the first conclusions regarding erosion, deposition, fuel retention and material transport during divertor and limiter phases have been drawn. The rate of deposition on inner and outer base divertor tiles and remote divertor corners was more than an order of magnitude less than during the preceding carbon wall operations, as was the concomitant deuterium retention. There was however beryllium deposition at the top of the inner divertor. The net beryllium erosion rate from the mid-plane inner limiters was found to be higher than for the previous carbon wall campaign although further analysis is required to determine the overall material balance due to erosion and re-deposition. (paper)

  10. Characterization of triboelectrically charged particles deposited on dielectric surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesterov, A.; Löffler, F.; Cheng, Yun-Chien; Torralba, G.; König, K.; Hausmann, M.; Lindenstruth, V.; Stadler, V.; Bischoff, F. R.; Breitling, F.

    2010-04-01

    A device for the measurement of q/m-values and charge degradation of triboelectrically charged particles deposited on a surface was developed. The setup is based on the integration of currents, which are induced in a Faraday cage by insertion of a solid support covered with charged particles. The conductivity of different particle supports was taken into account. The 'blow-off' method, in which the particles are first deposited, and then blown off using an air stream, can be used for characterization of triboelectric properties of particles relative to different surfaces.

  11. Characterization of triboelectrically charged particles deposited on dielectric surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nesterov, A; Torralba, G; Hausmann, M; Lindenstruth, V [Kirchhoff Institute of Physics, In Neuenheimer Feld 227, Heidelberg (Germany); Loeffler, F; Cheng, Yun-Chien; Koenig, K; Stadler, V; Bischoff, F R [German Cancer Research Centre, In Neuenheimer Feld 280, Heidelberg (Germany); Breitling, F, E-mail: Frank.Breitling@KIT.ed, E-mail: alexander.nesterov-mueller@kit.ed [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institute for Microstructure Technology, Herrmann von Helmholtzplatz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

    2010-04-28

    A device for the measurement of q/m-values and charge degradation of triboelectrically charged particles deposited on a surface was developed. The setup is based on the integration of currents, which are induced in a Faraday cage by insertion of a solid support covered with charged particles. The conductivity of different particle supports was taken into account. The 'blow-off' method, in which the particles are first deposited, and then blown off using an air stream, can be used for characterization of triboelectric properties of particles relative to different surfaces.

  12. Electrochemical characterization of organosilane-functionalized nanostructured ITO surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pruna, R., E-mail: rpruna@el.ub.edu; Palacio, F.; López, M. [SIC, Departament d' Enginyeries: Electrònica, Universitat de Barcelona, C/ Martí i Franquès 1, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Pérez, J. [Nanobioengineering Group, Institute for Bioengineering of Catalonia (IBEC), Baldiri Reixac 15-21, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Mir, M. [Nanobioengineering Group, Institute for Bioengineering of Catalonia (IBEC), Baldiri Reixac 15-21, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red en Bioingeniería, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina (CIBER-BBN), Monforte de Lemos 3-5 Pabellón 11, E-28029 Madrid (Spain); Blázquez, O.; Hernández, S.; Garrido, B. [MIND-IN" 2UB, Departament d' Enginyeries: Electrònica, Universitat de Barcelona, C/ Martí i Franquès 1, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2016-08-08

    The electroactivity of nanostructured indium tin oxide (ITO) has been investigated for its further use in applications such as sensing biological compounds by the analysis of redox active molecules. ITO films were fabricated by using electron beam evaporation at different substrate temperatures and subsequently annealed for promoting their crystallization. The morphology of the deposited material was monitored by scanning electron microscopy, confirming the deposition of either thin films or nanowires, depending on the substrate temperature. Electrochemical surface characterization revealed a 45 % increase in the electroactive surface area of nanostructured ITO with respect to thin films, one third lower than the geometrical surface area variation determined by atomic force microscopy. ITO surfaces were functionalized with a model organic molecule known as 6-(ferrocenyl)hexanethiol. The chemical attachment was done by means of a glycidoxy compound containing a reactive epoxy group, the so-called 3-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxy-silane. ITO functionalization was useful for determining the benefits of nanostructuration on the surface coverage of active molecules. Compared to ITO thin films, an increase in the total peak height of 140 % was observed for as-deposited nanostructured electrodes, whereas the same measurement for annealed electrodes resulted in an increase of more than 400 %. These preliminary results demonstrate the ability of nanostructured ITO to increase the surface-to-volume ratio, conductivity and surface area functionalization, features that highly benefit the performance of biosensors.

  13. Surface characterization of modern resin composites: a multitechnique approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silikas, Nick; Kavvadia, Katerina; Eliades, George; Watts, David

    2005-04-01

    To characterize the surface properties of some modern resin composites employing a series of physicochemical methods. Specimens from three microhybrid (Palfique Estellite-PE, Z250 Filtek-ZF, Tetric Ceram-TC) and one nanofilled (Supreme Filtek-SF) conventionally photo-cured resin composites polished with Soflex disks were studied for the following properties: Surface chemical composition and degree of C=C conversion (FTIR), surface energetics (contact angles), surface texture (AFM), surface roughness (AFM, stylus profilometry) and gloss (60 degrees-, 20 degrees-angle specular gloss). Polar and non polar molecular groups were identified in all products including NH and CONH (SF, ZF, TC). SF and ZF demonstrated higher conversion than PE and TC (P 0.05) were found in critical surface tension, total work of adhesion and its polar and dispersion components, the latter being the highest in all products. AFM showed the smoothest surface texture in PE. The ranking of Sa, Sq, Ra and Rz roughness parameters was PEgloss measurements (PE, SF>ZF>TC, PTC, Pgloss differences. A positive correlation was found between Sa and Ra and a negative one between Sa and 20 degree-angle gloss.

  14. Electrochemical characterization of organosilane-functionalized nanostructured ITO surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pruna, R.; Palacio, F.; López, M.; Pérez, J.; Mir, M.; 2UB, Departament d'Enginyeries: Electrònica, Universitat de Barcelona, C/ Martí i Franquès 1, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain))" data-affiliation=" (MIND-IN2UB, Departament d'Enginyeries: Electrònica, Universitat de Barcelona, C/ Martí i Franquès 1, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain))" >Blázquez, O.; 2UB, Departament d'Enginyeries: Electrònica, Universitat de Barcelona, C/ Martí i Franquès 1, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain))" data-affiliation=" (MIND-IN2UB, Departament d'Enginyeries: Electrònica, Universitat de Barcelona, C/ Martí i Franquès 1, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain))" >Hernández, S.; 2UB, Departament d'Enginyeries: Electrònica, Universitat de Barcelona, C/ Martí i Franquès 1, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain))" data-affiliation=" (MIND-IN2UB, Departament d'Enginyeries: Electrònica, Universitat de Barcelona, C/ Martí i Franquès 1, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain))" >Garrido, B.

    2016-01-01

    The electroactivity of nanostructured indium tin oxide (ITO) has been investigated for its further use in applications such as sensing biological compounds by the analysis of redox active molecules. ITO films were fabricated by using electron beam evaporation at different substrate temperatures and subsequently annealed for promoting their crystallization. The morphology of the deposited material was monitored by scanning electron microscopy, confirming the deposition of either thin films or nanowires, depending on the substrate temperature. Electrochemical surface characterization revealed a 45 % increase in the electroactive surface area of nanostructured ITO with respect to thin films, one third lower than the geometrical surface area variation determined by atomic force microscopy. ITO surfaces were functionalized with a model organic molecule known as 6-(ferrocenyl)hexanethiol. The chemical attachment was done by means of a glycidoxy compound containing a reactive epoxy group, the so-called 3-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxy-silane. ITO functionalization was useful for determining the benefits of nanostructuration on the surface coverage of active molecules. Compared to ITO thin films, an increase in the total peak height of 140 % was observed for as-deposited nanostructured electrodes, whereas the same measurement for annealed electrodes resulted in an increase of more than 400 %. These preliminary results demonstrate the ability of nanostructured ITO to increase the surface-to-volume ratio, conductivity and surface area functionalization, features that highly benefit the performance of biosensors.

  15. Identification and characterization of smallest pore-forming protein in the cell wall of pathogenic Corynebacterium urealyticum DSM 7109.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdali, Narges; Younas, Farhan; Mafakheri, Samaneh; Pothula, Karunakar R; Kleinekathöfer, Ulrich; Tauch, Andreas; Benz, Roland

    2018-05-09

    Corynebacterium urealyticum, a pathogenic, multidrug resistant member of the mycolata, is known as causative agent of urinary tract infections although it is a bacterium of the skin flora. This pathogenic bacterium shares with the mycolata the property of having an unusual cell envelope composition and architecture, typical for the genus Corynebacterium. The cell wall of members of the mycolata contains channel-forming proteins for the uptake of solutes. In this study, we provide novel information on the identification and characterization of a pore-forming protein in the cell wall of C. urealyticum DSM 7109. Detergent extracts of whole C. urealyticum cultures formed in lipid bilayer membranes slightly cation-selective pores with a single-channel conductance of 1.75 nS in 1 M KCl. Experiments with different salts and non-electrolytes suggested that the cell wall pore of C. urealyticum is wide and water-filled and has a diameter of about 1.8 nm. Molecular modelling and dynamics has been performed to obtain a model of the pore. For the search of the gene coding for the cell wall pore of C. urealyticum we looked in the known genome of C. urealyticum for a similar chromosomal localization of the porin gene to known porH and porA genes of other Corynebacterium strains. Three genes are located between the genes coding for GroEL2 and polyphosphate kinase (PKK2). Two of the genes (cur_1714 and cur_1715) were expressed in different constructs in C. glutamicum ΔporAΔporH and in porin-deficient BL21 DE3 Omp8 E. coli strains. The results suggested that the gene cur_1714 codes alone for the cell wall channel. The cell wall porin of C. urealyticum termed PorACur was purified to homogeneity using different biochemical methods and had an apparent molecular mass of about 4 kDa on tricine-containing sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Biophysical characterization of the purified protein (PorACur) suggested indeed that cur_1714 is the gene

  16. Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube Coating on Alkali Treated TiO2 Nanotubes Surface for Improvement of Biocompatibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung-Eun Park

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to enhance the bioactivity of pure titanium using multiple surface treatments for the application of the implant. To form the biofunctional multilayer coating on pure titanium, anodization was conducted to make titanium dioxide nanotubes, then multi-walled carbon nanotubes were coated using a dipping method after an alkali treatment. The surface characteristics at each step were analyzed using a field emission scanning electron microscope and X-ray diffractometer. The effect of the multilayer coating on the biocompatibility was identified using immersion and cytotoxicity tests. Better hydroxyapatite formation was observed on the surface of multilayer-coated pure titanium compared to non-treated pure titanium after immersion in the simulated body fluid. Improvement of biocompatibility by multiple surface treatments was identified through various cytotoxicity tests using osteoblast cells.

  17. Wave propagation in fluid-conveying viscoelastic single-walled carbon nanotubes with surface and nonlocal effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhen, Ya-Xin

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, the transverse wave propagation in fluid-conveying viscoelastic single-walled carbon nanotubes is investigated based on nonlocal elasticity theory with consideration of surface effect. The governing equation is formulated utilizing nonlocal Euler-Bernoulli beam theory and Kelvin-Voigt model. Explicit wave dispersion relation is developed and wave phase velocities and frequencies are obtained. The effect of the fluid flow velocity, structural damping, surface effect, small scale effects and tube diameter on the wave propagation properties are discussed with different wave numbers. The wave frequency increases with the increase of fluid flow velocity, but decreases with the increases of tube diameter and wave number. The effect of surface elasticity and residual surface tension is more significant for small wave number and tube diameter. For larger values of wave number and nonlocal parameters, the real part of frequency ratio raises.

  18. Spinorial characterizations of surfaces into three-dimensional homogeneous manifolds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Julien

    2010-06-01

    We give spinorial characterizations of isometrically immersed surfaces into three-dimensional homogeneous manifolds with four-dimensional isometry group in terms of the existence of a particular spinor field. This generalizes works by Friedrich for R3 and Morel for S3 and H3. The main argument is the interpretation of the energy-momentum tensor of such a spinor field as the second fundamental form up to a tensor depending on the structure of the ambient space.

  19. Thermo-hydraulic characterization of a self-pumping corrugated wall heat exchanger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidmayer, Kevin; Kumar, Prashant; Lavieille, Pascal; Miscevic, Marc; Topin, Frédéric

    2017-01-01

    Compactness, efficiency and thermal control of the heat exchanger are of critical significance for many electronic industry applications. In this view, a new concept of heat exchanger at millimeter scale is proposed and numerically studied. It consists in dynamically deforming at least one of its walls by a progressive wave in order to create an active corrugated channel. Systematic studies were performed in single-phase flow on the different deformation parameters that allow obtaining the thermo-hydraulic characteristics of the system. It has been observed the dynamic wall deformation induces a significant pumping effect. Intensification of heat transfer remains very important even for highly degraded waveforms although the pumping efficiency is reduced in this case. The mechanical power applied on the upper wall to deform it dynamically is linked to the wave shape, amplitude, frequency and outlet-inlet pressure difference. The overall performance of the proposed system has been evaluated and compared to existing static channels. The performance of the proposed heat exchanger evolved in two steps for a given wall deformation. It declines slightly up to a critical value of mechanical power applied on the wall. When this critical value is exceeded, it deteriorates significantly, reaching the performance of existing conventional systems. - Highlights: • A new concept of heat exchanger within channel at millimeter scale is proposed. • Upper wall is deformed dynamically by applying external mechanical power. • Pumping effect is observed and is linked to the wave shape, amplitude and frequency. • Efficient proposed system in low Reynolds number range. • Overall performance is significantly high compared to static corrugated and straight channels.

  20. Stiffness Matrix of Thin-Walled Open Bar Subject to Bending, Bending Torsion and Shift of Cross Section Middle Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panasenko, N. N.; Sinelschikov, A. V.

    2017-11-01

    One of the main stages in the analysis of complex 3D structures and engineering constructions made of thin-walled open bars using FEM is a stiffness matrix developing. Taking into account middle surface shear deformation caused by the work of tangential stresses in the formula to calculate a potential energy of thin-walled open bars, the authors obtain an important correction at calculation of the bar deformation and fundamental frequencies. The results of the analysis of the free end buckling of a cantilever H-bar under plane bending differ from exact solution by 0.53%. In the course of comparison of the obtained results with the cantilever bar buckling regardless the middle surface shear deformation, an increase made 16.6%. The stiffness matrix of a thin-walled open bar developed in the present work can be integrated into any software suite using FEM for the analysis of complex 3-D structures and engineering constructions with n-freedoms.

  1. Mineralogical characterization of historical portuguese wall tiles of Sao Luis, Maranhao, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivas Mercury, J.M.; Vasconcelos, N.S.L.S.; Cabral, A.A.; Pereira, D.J. Costa; Angelica, R.S.

    2010-01-01

    Portuguese wall tiles from centuries, XVII, XVIII and XIX, found in Sao Luis Maranhao has been studied by X-ray diffraction, in order to interpret the possible raw material and burning temperature. The mineral phases, Quartz, Wollastonite, Calcite and Gehlenite were identified in all samples. Based on the results it is possible to affirm that the main raw materials used to manufacture this materials was probably mixtures of kaolinite clay and calcite. Based on the mineralogical information it was also possible to state that burning temperature of this wall tiles was lower than 1000 deg C. (author)

  2. Surface characterization of nickel titanium orthodontic arch wires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Manu; Seema, Saraswathy; Tiwari, Brijesh; Sharma, Himanshu S.; Londhe, Sanjay; Arora, Vimal

    2015-01-01

    Background Surface roughness of nickel titanium orthodontic arch wires poses several clinical challenges. Surface modification with aesthetic/metallic/non metallic materials is therefore a recent innovation, with clinical efficacy yet to be comprehensively evaluated. Methods One conventional and five types of surface modified nickel titanium arch wires were surface characterized with scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive analysis, Raman spectroscopy, Atomic force microscopy and 3D profilometry. Root mean square roughness values were analyzed by one way analysis of variance and post hoc Duncan's multiple range tests. Results Study groups demonstrated considerable reduction in roughness values from conventional in a material specific pattern: Group I; conventional (578.56 nm) > Group V; Teflon (365.33 nm) > Group III; nitride (301.51 nm) > Group VI (i); rhodium (290.64 nm) > Group VI (ii); silver (252.22 nm) > Group IV; titanium (229.51 nm) > Group II; resin (158.60 nm). It also showed the defects with aesthetic (resin/Teflon) and nitride surfaces and smooth topography achieved with metals; titanium/silver/rhodium. Conclusions Resin, Teflon, titanium, silver, rhodium and nitrides were effective in decreasing surface roughness of nickel titanium arch wires albeit; certain flaws. Findings have clinical implications, considering their potential in lessening biofilm adhesion, reducing friction, improving corrosion resistance and preventing nickel leach and allergic reactions. PMID:26843749

  3. Operation method for wall surface of pressure suppression chamber of reactor container and floating scaffold used for the method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuzaki, Tetsuo; Kounomaru, Toshimi; Saito, Koichi.

    1996-01-01

    A floating scaffold is provisionally disposed in adjacent with the wall surface of pool water of a pressure suppression chamber while being floated on the surface of the pool water before the drainage of the pool water from the pressure vessel. The floating scaffold has guide rollers sandwiching a bent tube of an existent facility so that the horizontal movement is restrained, and is movable only in a vertical direction depending on the change of water level of the pool water. In addition, a handrail for preventing dropping, and a provisional illumination light are disposed. When pool water in the pressure suppression chamber is drained, the water level of the pool water is lowered in accordance with the amount of drained water. The floating scaffold floating on the water surface is lowered while being guided by the bent tube, and the operation position is lowered. An operator riding on the floating scaffold inspects the wall surfaces of the pressure chamber and conducts optional repair and painting. (I.N.)

  4. Cell wall trapping of autocrine peptides for human G-protein-coupled receptors on the yeast cell surface.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Ishii

    Full Text Available G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs regulate a wide variety of physiological processes and are important pharmaceutical targets for drug discovery. Here, we describe a unique concept based on yeast cell-surface display technology to selectively track eligible peptides with agonistic activity for human GPCRs (Cell Wall Trapping of Autocrine Peptides (CWTrAP strategy. In our strategy, individual recombinant yeast cells are able to report autocrine-positive activity for human GPCRs by expressing a candidate peptide fused to an anchoring motif. Following expression and activation, yeast cells trap autocrine peptides onto their cell walls. Because captured peptides are incapable of diffusion, they have no impact on surrounding yeast cells that express the target human GPCR and non-signaling peptides. Therefore, individual yeast cells can assemble the autonomous signaling complex and allow single-cell screening of a yeast population. Our strategy may be applied to identify eligible peptides with agonistic activity for target human GPCRs.

  5. Achieving more efficient operation of the nozzle vane and rotor blade rows of gas turbines through using nonaxisymmetric end wall surfaces of interblade channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inozemtsev, A. A.; Samokhvalov, N. Yu.; Tikhonov, A. S.

    2012-09-01

    Results from a numerical study of three versions of the end-wall generatrix of the interblade channel used in the second-stage nozzle vanes of a prospective engine's turbine are presented. Recommendations for designing nonaxisymmetric end-wall surfaces are suggested based on the obtained data.

  6. Surface characterization and surface electronic structure of organic quasi-one-dimensional charge transfer salts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sing, M.; Schwingenschlögl, U.; Claessen, R.

    2003-01-01

    We have thoroughly characterized the surfaces of the organic charge-transfer salts TTF-TCNQ and (TMTSF)(2)PF6 which are generally acknowledged as prototypical examples of one-dimensional conductors. In particular x-ray-induced photoemission spectroscopy turns out to be a valuable nondestructive...

  7. Microstructural and Topochemical Characterization of Thermally Modified Poplar (Populus cathayaha Cell Wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhe Ling

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Although many studies have been conducted on the wood property and chemical changes caused by thermal modification, little has been reported on the microstructural and topochemical changes occurring in the cell wall during heat treatment. In this study, poplar (Populus cathayaha was treated within a temperature range from 180 to 220 °C for 4 h. Chemical analyses by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR indicated that heat treatment resulted in deacetylation of hemicelluloses and cleavage of lignin chains, thus generating new carbonyl and phenolic linkages. Transformation of matrix substances contributed to microstructural changes that appeared in clearly distorted and collapsed fiber and vessel walls along with the delamination of compound middle lamella (CML and secondary walls (S, which showed a reduced capability to resist deformation. It was also observed by fluorescence microscopy (FM and scanning electron microscope coupled with energy dispersive X-ray analysis (SEM-EDXA that the concentration of lignin increased, probably because of the degradation of hemicelluloses and the generation of new carbonyl groups. These results on cell wall microstructure and topochemistry can help explain the altered wood properties revealed by dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA and equilibrium moisture content (EMC testing after heat treatment.

  8. Statistical Characterization of Dispersed Single-Wall Carbon Nanotube Quantum Dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, M; Moriyama, S; Suzuki, M; Fuse, T; Homma, Y; Ishibashi, K

    2006-01-01

    Quantum dots have been fabricated in single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) simply by depositing metallic contacts on top of them. The fabricated quantum dots show different characteristics from sample to sample, which are even different in samples fabricated in the same chip. In this report, we study the statistical variations of the quantum dots fabricated with our method, and suggest their possible origin

  9. A simple surface treatment and characterization of AA 6061 aluminum alloy surface for adhesive bonding applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saleema, N.; Sarkar, D.K.; Paynter, R.W.; Gallant, D.; Eskandarian, M.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► A very simple surface treatment method to achieve excellent and durable aluminum adhesive bonding. ► Our method involves simple immersion of aluminum in very dilute NaOH solution at room temperature with no involvement of strong acids or multiple procedures. ► Surface analysis via various surface characterization techniques showed morphological and chemical modifications favorable for obtaining highly durable bond strengths on the treated surface. ► Safe, economical, reproducible and simple method, easily applicable in industries. - Abstract: Structural adhesive bonding of aluminum is widely used in aircraft and automotive industries. It has been widely noted that surface preparation of aluminum surfaces prior to adhesive bonding plays a significant role in improving the strength of the adhesive bond. Surface cleanliness, surface roughness, surface wettability and surface chemistry are controlled primarily by proper surface treatment methods. In this study, we have employed a very simple technique influencing all these criteria by simply immersing aluminum substrates in a very dilute solution of sodium hydroxide (NaOH) and we have studied the effect of varying the treatment period on the adhesive bonding characteristics. A bi-component epoxy adhesive was used to join the treated surfaces and the bond strengths were evaluated via single lap shear (SLS) tests in pristine as well as degraded conditions. Surface morphology, chemistry, crystalline nature and wettability of the NaOH treated surfaces were characterized using various surface analytical tools such as scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (SEM/EDX), optical profilometry, infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and contact angle goniometry. Excellent adhesion characteristics with complete cohesive failure of the adhesive were encountered on the NaOH treated surfaces that are comparable to the benchmark

  10. Characterization and modeling of magnetic domain wall dynamics using reconstituted hysteresis loops from Barkhausen noise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ducharne, B., E-mail: Benjamin.ducharne@insa-lyon.fr; Le, M.Q.; Sebald, G.; Cottinet, P.J.; Guyomar, D.; Hebrard, Y.

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • Barkhausen noise energy versus excitation field hysteresis cycles MBN{sub energy}(H). • Difference in the dynamics of the induction field B and of the MBN{sub energy}. • Dynamic behavior of MBN{sub energy}(H) cycles is first-order. • Dynamic behavior of B(H) cycles is non-entire order. - Abstract: By means of a post-processing technique, we succeeded in plotting magnetic Barkhausen noise energy hysteresis cycles MBN{sub energy}(H). These cycles were compared to the usual hysteresis cycles, displaying the evolution of the magnetic induction field B versus the magnetic excitation H. The divergence between these comparisons as the excitation frequency was increased gave rise to the conclusion that there was a difference in the dynamics of the induction field and of the MBN{sub energy} related to the domain wall movements. Indeed, for the MBN{sub energy} hysteresis cycle, merely the domain wall movements were involved. On the other hand, for the usual B(H) cycle, two dynamic contributions were observed: domain wall movements and diffusion of the magnetic field excitation. From a simulation point of view, it was demonstrated that over a large frequency bandwidth a correct dynamic behavior of the domain wall movement MBN{sub energy}(H) cycle could be taken into account using first-order derivation whereas fractional orders were required for the B(H) cycles. The present article also gives a detailed description of how to use the developed process to obtain the MBN{sub energy}(H) hysteresis cycle as well as its evolution as the frequency increases. Moreover, this article provides an interesting explanation of the separation of magnetic loss contributions through a magnetic sample: a wall movement contribution varying according to first-order dynamics and a diffusion contribution which in a lump model can be taken into account using fractional order dynamics.

  11. Surface characterization of low-temperature grown yttrium oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krawczyk, Mirosław; Lisowski, Wojciech; Pisarek, Marcin; Nikiforow, Kostiantyn; Jablonski, Aleksander

    2018-04-01

    The step-by-step growth of yttrium oxide layer was controlled in situ using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The O/Y atomic concentration (AC) ratio in the surface layer of finally oxidized Y substrate was found to be equal to 1.48. The as-grown yttrium oxide layers were then analyzed ex situ using combination of Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), elastic-peak electron spectroscopy (EPES) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) in order to characterize their surface chemical composition, electron transport phenomena and surface morphology. Prior to EPES measurements, the Y oxide surface was pre-sputtered by 3 kV argon ions, and the resulting AES-derived composition was found to be Y0.383O0.465C0.152 (O/Y AC ratio of 1.21). The SEM images revealed different surface morphology of sample before and after Ar sputtering. The oxide precipitates were observed on the top of un-sputtered Y oxide layer, whereas the oxide growth at the Ar ion-sputtered surface proceeded along defects lines normal to the layer plane. The inelastic mean free path (IMFP) characterizing electron transport was evaluated as a function of energy in the range of 0.5-2 keV from the EPES method. Two reference materials (Ni and Au) were used in these measurements. Experimental IMFPs determined for the Y0.383O0.465C0.152 and Y2O3 surface compositions, λ, were uncorrected for surface excitations and approximated by the simple function λ = kEp at electron energies E between 500 eV and 2000 eV, where k and p were fitted parameters. These values were also compared with IMFPs resulting from the TPP-2 M predictive equation for both oxide compositions. The fitted functions were found to be reasonably consistent with the measured and predicted IMFPs. In both cases, the average value of the mean percentage deviation from the fits varied between 5% and 37%. The IMFPs measured for Y0.383O0.465C0.152 surface composition were found to be similar to the IMFPs for Y2O3.

  12. Ambiguous walls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mody, Astrid

    2012-01-01

    The introduction of Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) in the built environment has encouraged myriad applications, often embedded in surfaces as an integrated part of the architecture. Thus the wall as responsive luminous skin is becoming, if not common, at least familiar. Taking into account how walls...... have encouraged architectural thinking of enclosure, materiality, construction and inhabitation in architectural history, the paper’s aim is to define new directions for the integration of LEDs in walls, challenging the thinking of inhabitation and program. This paper introduces the notion...... of “ambiguous walls” as a more “critical” approach to design [1]. The concept of ambiguous walls refers to the diffuse status a lumious and possibly responsive wall will have. Instead of confining it can open up. Instead of having a static appearance, it becomes a context over time. Instead of being hard...

  13. Surface and electrochemical characterization of electrodeposited PtRu alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richarz, Frank; Wohlmann, Bernd; Vogel, Ulrich; Hoffschulz, Henning; Wandelt, Klaus

    1995-07-01

    PtRu alloys of different compositions were electrodeposited on Au. Twelve alloys between 0% and 100% Pt were characterized with surface sensitive spectroscopies (XPS, LEIS) after transfer from an electrochemical cell to an ultra high vaccum chamber without contact to air. The composition of the thus prepared alloys showed a linear dependence on the concentrations of the deposition solution, but was Pt-enriched both in the bulk and (even more so) at the surface. During the electrochemical reduction of the metal cations, sulfur from the supporting electrolyte 1N H 2SO 4 was found to be incorporated into the electrodes. Cyclic voltammetry was used for the determination of the electrocatalytic activity of the electrodes for the oxidation of carbon monoxide. The highest activity for this oxidation as measured by the (peak) potential of the CO oxidation cyclovoltammograms was found for a surface concentration of ˜ 50%Pt. The asymmetry of this "activity curve" (oxidation potential versus Pt surface concentration) is tentatively explained in terms of a surface structural phase separation.

  14. Characterization of a Laser Surface-Treated Martensitic Stainless Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.R. Al-Sayed

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Laser surface treatment was carried out on AISI 416 machinable martensitic stainless steel containing 0.225 wt.% sulfur. Nd:YAG laser with a 2.2-KW continuous wave was used. The aim was to compare the physical and chemical properties achieved by this type of selective surface treatment with those achieved by the conventional treatment. Laser power of different values (700 and 1000 W with four corresponding different laser scanning speeds (0.5, 1, 2, and 3 m•min−1 was adopted to reach the optimum conditions for impact toughness, wear, and corrosion resistance for laser heat treated (LHT samples. The 0 °C impact energy of LHT samples indicated higher values compared to the conventionally heat treated (CHT samples. This was accompanied by the formation of a hard surface layer and a soft interior base metal. Microhardness was studied to determine the variation of hardness values with respect to the depth under the treated surface. The wear resistance at the surface was enhanced considerably. Microstructure examination was characterized using optical and scanning electron microscopes. The corrosion behavior of the LHT samples was also studied and its correlation with the microstructures was determined. The corrosion data was obtained in 3.5% NaCl solution at room temperature by means of a potentiodynamic polarization technique.

  15. Characterization of a Laser Surface-Treated Martensitic Stainless Steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Sayed, S R; Hussein, A A; Nofal, A A; Hassab Elnaby, S I; Elgazzar, H

    2017-05-29

    Laser surface treatment was carried out on AISI 416 machinable martensitic stainless steel containing 0.225 wt.% sulfur. Nd:YAG laser with a 2.2-KW continuous wave was used. The aim was to compare the physical and chemical properties achieved by this type of selective surface treatment with those achieved by the conventional treatment. Laser power of different values (700 and 1000 W) with four corresponding different laser scanning speeds (0.5, 1, 2, and 3 m•min-1) was adopted to reach the optimum conditions for impact toughness, wear, and corrosion resistance for laser heat treated (LHT) samples. The 0 °C impact energy of LHT samples indicated higher values compared to the conventionally heat treated (CHT) samples. This was accompanied by the formation of a hard surface layer and a soft interior base metal. Microhardness was studied to determine the variation of hardness values with respect to the depth under the treated surface. The wear resistance at the surface was enhanced considerably. Microstructure examination was characterized using optical and scanning electron microscopes. The corrosion behavior of the LHT samples was also studied and its correlation with the microstructures was determined. The corrosion data was obtained in 3.5% NaCl solution at room temperature by means of a potentiodynamic polarization technique.

  16. Surface microstructure of bitumen characterized by atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiaokong; Burnham, Nancy A; Tao, Mingjiang

    2015-04-01

    Bitumen, also called asphalt binder, plays important roles in many industrial applications. It is used as the primary binding agent in asphalt concrete, as a key component in damping systems such as rubber, and as an indispensable additive in paint and ink. Consisting of a large number of hydrocarbons of different sizes and polarities, together with heteroatoms and traces of metals, bitumen displays rich surface microstructures that affect its rheological properties. This paper reviews the current understanding of bitumen's surface microstructures characterized by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). Microstructures of bitumen develop to different forms depending on crude oil source, thermal history, and sample preparation method. While some bitumens display surface microstructures with fine domains, flake-like domains, and dendrite structuring, 'bee-structures' with wavy patterns several micrometers in diameter and tens of nanometers in height are commonly seen in other binders. Controversy exists regarding the chemical origin of the 'bee-structures', which has been related to the asphaltene fraction, the metal content, or the crystallizing waxes in bitumen. The rich chemistry of bitumen can result in complicated intermolecular associations such as coprecipitation of wax and metalloporphyrins in asphaltenes. Therefore, it is the molecular interactions among the different chemical components in bitumen, rather than a single chemical fraction, that are responsible for the evolution of bitumen's diverse microstructures, including the 'bee-structures'. Mechanisms such as curvature elasticity and surface wrinkling that explain the rippled structures observed in polymer crystals might be responsible for the formation of 'bee-structures' in bitumen. Despite the progress made on morphological characterization of bitumen using AFM, the fundamental question whether the microstructures observed on bitumen surfaces represent its bulk structure remains to be addressed. In addition

  17. Mapping of the seasonal dynamic properties of building walls in actual periodic conditions and effects produced by solar radiation incident on the outer and inner surfaces of the wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazzeo, D.; Oliveti, G.; Arcuri, N.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Dynamic thermal behaviour of building walls subjected to actual periodic loadings. • Dynamic parameters of wall in terms of energy and of heat flux are defined. • Different solar absorption coefficients and orientations of wall are considered. • On the internal surface is present or absent a shortwave radiant field. • Seasonal thermal characteristics for different plant operating regime are provided. - Abstract: In this work, the dynamic characteristics of the external walls of air-conditioned buildings subject to the joint action of periodic non-sinusoidal external and internal loadings are determined. The dynamic parameters used are the energy decrement factor, which is evaluated by means of the fluctuating heat flux in a semi-period exiting and entering the wall, the decrement factor of the maximum peak and minimum peak of the heat flux in a period and the relative time lags. The fluctuating heat flux in the wall in steady periodic regime conditions is determined with an analytical model obtained by resolving the equivalent electrical circuit. The preceding parameters are used for a study of the influence of solar radiation on the dynamic characteristics of the walls in summer and winter air-conditioning. Solar radiation is considered as operating on the external surface and on the internal surface due to the presence in the indoor environments of a shortwave radiant field. The absorbed solar heat flux by the external surface varies, modifying the solar absorption coefficient and wall orientation. Indoors, we considered a continuous operating regime of the plant and a regime with nocturnal attenuation. The results obtained, relating to 1152 different boundary conditions, were used for the construction of maps of dynamic characteristics, different on variation of the plant functioning regime and of the shortwave radiant load on the internal surface. The maps show the dependence of the decrement factors and of the time lags on variation of

  18. Dispersion of multi-wall carbon nanotubes in polyhistidine: Characterization and analytical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalmasso, Pablo R.; Pedano, María L.; Rivas, Gustavo A.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Polyhistidine (Polyhis) is an efficient dispersing agent of MWCNT. ► MWCNT/Polyhis ratio and sonication time are critical variables when dispersing MWCNT. ► MWCNT–Polyhis deposited at GCE largely catalyzes the oxidation of ascorbic acid. ► GCE/MWCNT–Polyhis allows the selective and sensitive quantification of UA and Do. - Abstract: We report for the first time the use of polyhistidine (Polyhis) to efficiently disperse multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). The optimum dispersion MWCNT–Polyhis was obtained by sonicating for 30 min 1.0 mg mL −1 MWCNTs in 0.25 mg mL −1 Polyhis solution prepared in 75:25 (v/v) ethanol/0.200 M acetate buffer solution pH 5.00. The dispersion was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, and by cyclic voltammetry and amperometry using ascorbic acid as redox marker. The modification of glassy carbon electrodes with MWCNT–Polyhis produces a drastic decrease in the overvoltage for the oxidation of ascorbic acid (580 mV) at variance with the response observed at glassy carbon electrodes modified just with Polyhis, where the charge transfer is more difficult due to the blocking effect of the polymer. The reproducibility for the sensitivities obtained after 10 successive calibration plots using the same surface was 6.3%. The MWCNT-modified glassy carbon electrode demonstrated to be highly stable since after 45 days storage at room temperature the response was 94.0% of the original. The glassy carbon electrode modified with MWCNT–Polyhis dispersion was successfully used to quantify dopamine or uric acid at nanomolar levels, even in the presence of large excess of ascorbic acid. Determinations of uric acid in human blood serum samples demonstrated a very good correlation with the value reported by Wienner laboratory.

  19. Dispersion of multi-wall carbon nanotubes in polyhistidine: Characterization and analytical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalmasso, Pablo R. [INFIQC, Departamento de Fisicoquimica, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, Ciudad Universitaria, 5000 Cordoba (Argentina); Pedano, Maria L., E-mail: mlpedano@fcq.unc.edu.ar [INFIQC, Departamento de Fisicoquimica, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, Ciudad Universitaria, 5000 Cordoba (Argentina); Rivas, Gustavo A., E-mail: grivas@mail.fcq.unc.edu.ar [INFIQC, Departamento de Fisicoquimica, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, Ciudad Universitaria, 5000 Cordoba (Argentina)

    2012-01-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Polyhistidine (Polyhis) is an efficient dispersing agent of MWCNT. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MWCNT/Polyhis ratio and sonication time are critical variables when dispersing MWCNT. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MWCNT-Polyhis deposited at GCE largely catalyzes the oxidation of ascorbic acid. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer GCE/MWCNT-Polyhis allows the selective and sensitive quantification of UA and Do. - Abstract: We report for the first time the use of polyhistidine (Polyhis) to efficiently disperse multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). The optimum dispersion MWCNT-Polyhis was obtained by sonicating for 30 min 1.0 mg mL{sup -1} MWCNTs in 0.25 mg mL{sup -1} Polyhis solution prepared in 75:25 (v/v) ethanol/0.200 M acetate buffer solution pH 5.00. The dispersion was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, and by cyclic voltammetry and amperometry using ascorbic acid as redox marker. The modification of glassy carbon electrodes with MWCNT-Polyhis produces a drastic decrease in the overvoltage for the oxidation of ascorbic acid (580 mV) at variance with the response observed at glassy carbon electrodes modified just with Polyhis, where the charge transfer is more difficult due to the blocking effect of the polymer. The reproducibility for the sensitivities obtained after 10 successive calibration plots using the same surface was 6.3%. The MWCNT-modified glassy carbon electrode demonstrated to be highly stable since after 45 days storage at room temperature the response was 94.0% of the original. The glassy carbon electrode modified with MWCNT-Polyhis dispersion was successfully used to quantify dopamine or uric acid at nanomolar levels, even in the presence of large excess of ascorbic acid. Determinations of uric acid in human blood serum samples demonstrated a very good correlation with the value reported by Wienner laboratory.

  20. Production and characterization of polymer nanocomposite with aligned single wall carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Wei; Tao Xiaoming

    2006-01-01

    We reported a simple method to fabricate polymer nanocomposites with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) having exceptional alignment and improved mechanical properties. The composite films were fabricated by casting a suspension of single walled carbon nanotubes in a solution of thermoplastic polyurethane and tetrahydrofuran. The orientation as well as dispersion of nanotubes was determined by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and polarized Raman spectroscopy. The macroscopic alignment probably results from solvent-polymer interaction induced orientation of soft segment chain during swelling and moisture curing. The tensile behavior of the aligned nanotube composite film was also studied. At a 0.5 wt.% nanotube loading, a 1.9-fold increase in Young's modulus was achieved

  1. Mechanical and microstructural characterization of low activation steels as first wall of nuclear fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez, M.T.; Lapena, J.; Diego, G. de; Schirra, M.

    1996-01-01

    Currently, the design development of fusion reactors and the possible materials to use in them are being studied in parallel. One of the most critical problems in this research is the structural materials selection for the first wall and blanket. The aim of the present work is to study three low activation alloys designed in Germany in which niobium has been substituted by tantalum or cerium. The mechanical results show that the alloys containing cerium are in the same order of the low activation materials known to date, but the tantalum doped alloy produces TaC 3 precipitation that destabilizes the matrix and provokes large microstructural changes. This causes a decrease of the mechanical properties at about 600 degree centigree. This fact makes this alloy insuitable for the first wall on fusion reactors, because the working temperature is near 550 degree centigree. (Author) 11 refs

  2. Structure and Characterization of Vertically Aligned Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Bundles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marquez, F.; Morant, C.; Elizalde, E.; Roque-Malherbe, R.; Lopez, V.; Zamora, F.; Domingo, C.

    2010-01-01

    Arrays of vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotube bundles, SWCNTs, have been synthesized by simple alcohol catalytic chemical vapor deposition process, carried out at 800 degree C. The formed SWCNTs are organized in small groups perpendicularly aligned and attached to the substrate. These small bundles show a constant diameter of ca. 30 nm and are formed by the adhesion of no more than twenty individual SWCNTs perfectly aligned along their length.

  3. Enzymes in biogenesis of plant cell wall polysaccharides. Enzyme characterization using tracer techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickinson, D.B.

    1975-01-01

    Enzymes and metabolic pathways, by which starch and cell wall polysaccharides are formed, were investigated in order to learn how these processes are regulated and to identify the enzymatic regulatory mechanisms involved. Germinating lily pollen was used for studies of cell wall formation, and pollen and maize endosperm for studies of starch biosynthesis. Hexokinase being the first step in conversion of hexoses to starch, wall polysaccharides and respiratory substrates, maize endosperm enzyme was assayed by its conversion of 14 C-hexose to 14 C-hexose-6-P, and rapid separation of the two labelled compounds on anion-exchange paper. This enzyme did not appear to be under tight regulation by feed-back inhibition or activation, nor to be severely inhibited by glucose-6-P or activated by citrate. ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase and other pyrophosphorylases were assayed radiochemically with 14 C-glucose-1-P (forward direction) or 32-PPsub(i) (reverse direction). They showed that the maize endosperm enzyme was activated by the glycolytic intermediates fructose-6-P and 3-phosphoglycerate, and that low levels of the enzyme were present in the high sucrose-low starch mutant named shrunken-2. Under optimal in-vitro assay conditions, the pollen enzyme reacted four times faster than the observed in-vivo rate of starch accumulation. Biogenesis of plant cell wall polysaccharides requires the conversion of hexose phosphates to various sugar nucleotides and utilization of the latter by the appropriate polysaccharide synthetases. Lily pollen possesses a β-1,3-glucan synthetase which is activated up to six-fold by β-linked oligosaccharides. Hence, the in-vivo activity of this enzyme may be modulated by such effector molecules

  4. Alignment characterization of single-wall carbon nanotubes by Raman scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Pijun; Liu Liyue; Zhang Yafei

    2003-01-01

    A novel method for identifying the Raman modes of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT) based on the symmetry of the vibration modes has been studied. The Raman intensity of each vibration mode varies with polarization direction, and the relationship can be expressed as analytical functions. This method avoids troublesome numerical calculation and easily gives clear relations between Raman intensity and polarization direction. In this way, one can distinguish each Raman-active mode of SWNT through the polarized Raman spectrum

  5. Characterization of the Micro-shell Surface Using Holographic Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandras, F.; Hermerel, C.; Choux, A.; Merillot, P.; Pin, G.; Jeannot, L. [CEA Valduc, Dept Rech Mat Nucl, Serv Microcibles, 21 - Is-sur-Tille (France)

    2009-05-15

    To characterize the shape, the quality, and the roughness of micro-shells, typically used technologies are scanning electron microscopy, scanning interferometric microscopy, or atomic force microscopy. One of the drawbacks of these techniques is that they are generally slow because of their scanning process. Digital holographic microscopy technology is an innovation that can offer ability adapted to these studies. It captures holograms instead of intensity images, as done by conventional microscopes. The holograms are then digitally interpreted (10 per second) to reconstruct a double image, one for the intensity and another one for the phase. Using a rotation axis, the bump counting for the complete micro-shell surface is possible with a very high speed. Using an image stitching software, mapping can be done in a few minutes. Wavelets such as 'Mexican hat' are used to model the bumps. Each bump can then be characterized on the map by its position, diameter, and height. (authors)

  6. Facet Model and Mathematical Morphology for Surface Characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abidi, B.R.; Goddard, J.S.; Hunt, M.A.; Sari-Sarraf, H.

    1999-11-13

    This paper describes an algorithm for the automatic segmentation and representation of surface structures and non-uniformities in an industrial setting. The automatic image processing and analysis algorithm is developed as part of a complete on-line web characterization system of a papermaking process at the wet end. The goal is to: (1) link certain types of structures on the surface of the web to known machine parameter values, and (2) find the connection between detected structures at the beginning of the line and defects seen on the final product. Images of the pulp mixture (slurry), carried by a fast moving table, are obtained using a stroboscopic light and a CCD camera. This characterization algorithm succeeded where conventional contrast and edge detection techniques failed due to a poorly controlled environment. The images obtained have poor contrast and contain noise caused by a variety of sources. After a number of enhancement steps, conventional segmentation methods still f ailed to detect any structures and are consequently discarded. Techniques tried include the Canny edge detector, the Sobel, Roberts, and Prewitt's filters, as well as zero crossings. The facet model algorithm, is then applied to the images with various parameter settings and is found to be successful in detecting the various topographic characteristics of the surface of the slurry. Pertinent topographic elements are retained and a filtered image computed. Carefully tailored morphological operators are then applied to detect and segment regions of interest. Those regions are then selected according to their size, elongation, and orientation. Their bounding rectangles are computed and represented. Also addressed in this paper are aspects of the real time implementation of this algorithm for on-line use. The algorithm is tested on over 500 images of slurry and is found to segment and characterize nonuniformities on all 500 images.

  7. Graphene oxide/multi-walled carbon nanotubes as nanofeatured scaffolds for the assisted deposition of nanohydroxyapatite: characterization and biological evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigues BV

    2016-06-01

    characterize the nanocomposites, including transmission electron microscopy (TEM, Raman spectroscopy, thermogravimetry, and gas adsorption (the Brunauer–Emmett–Teller method. We used simulated body fluid to evaluate their bioactivity and human osteoblasts (bone-forming cells to evaluate cytocompatibility. We also investigated their bactericidal effect against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. TEM analysis revealed homogeneous distributions of nHAp crystal grains along the MWCNT-GO surfaces. All nanocomposites were proved to be bioactive, since carbonated nHAp was found after 21 days in simulated body fluid. All nanocomposites showed potential for biomedical applications with no cytotoxicity toward osteoblasts and impressively demonstrated a bactericidal effect without the use of antibiotics. All of the aforementioned properties make these materials very attractive for bone tissue engineering applications, either as a matrix or as a reinforcement material for numerous polymeric nanocomposites.Keywords: nanohydroxyapatite, multi-walled carbon nanotubes, graphene oxide, in vitro, bactericidal effect, bioactivity, bone cells, tissue engineering

  8. Microanalytical characterization of surface decoration in Majolica pottery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padilla, R.; Schalm, O.; Janssens, K.; Arrazcaeta, R.; Espen, P. van

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents the results of the characterization of the surface finishing works in archaeological pottery fragments belonging to several Majolica types. The homogeneity, thickness and inclusions of both ground glaze and color decorations were, among other characteristics, inspected by scanning electron microscopy X-ray analysis (SEM-EDX). The identification of the main constituents in the decoration motifs was performed by means of scanning micro X-ray fluorescence analysis. Additionally, compositional classification based on non-destructive quantitative analysis of the ground glaze was performed

  9. Properties, characterization, and decay of sticky rice–lime mortars from the Wugang Ming dynasty city wall (China)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Ya [State Key Laboratory for Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Cultural Relics and Archaeology Institute of Hunan, Changsha 410083 (China); Fu, Xuan; Gu, Haibing [Cultural Relics and Archaeology Institute of Hunan, Changsha 410083 (China); Gao, Feng [State Key Laboratory for Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Liu, Shaojun, E-mail: liumatthew@csu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China)

    2014-04-01

    Urgent restoration of the Wugang Ming dynasty city wall brings about the need for a study of the formulation and properties of mortars. In the present paper, mortar samples from the Wugang Ming dynasty city wall were characterized in a combination of sheet polarized light optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy with X-ray energy dispersive spectrometer, thermogravimetric/differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray powder diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and inductively coupled plasma emission spectroscopy. Results show that mortars are mainly built up from inorganic calcium carbonate based organic–inorganic hybrid material with a small amount of sticky rice, which plays a crucial role in forming dense and compact microstructure of mortars and effectively hindering penetration of water and air into mortars. Analysis of decayed products shows that the detrimental soluble salts originates from ambient environment. - Highlights: • Mortars used in the Wugang city wall are a calcium carbonate-sticky rice hybrid bonding material. • Carbonation processing is extremely slow due to dense and compact microstructure of mortars. • Decying of mortars results from the appearance of soluble salt from ambient environment.

  10. Characterization of non-calcareous 'thin' red clay from south-eastern Brazil: applicability in wall tile manufacture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sousa, S. J.G.; Holanda, J. N.F., [Grupo de Materiais Ceramicos - LAMAV-CCT, Universidade Estadual do Norte Fluminense Darcy Ribeiro, Campos dos Goytacazes, RJ (Brazil)

    2012-04-15

    In this work the use of 'thin' red clay from south-eastern Brazil (Campos dos Goytacazes, RJ) as raw material for the manufacture of wall tile was investigated. A wide range of characterization techniques was employed, including X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray fluorescence (XRF), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), grain-size analysis, and thermogravimetric analysis. The wall tile body was prepared by the dry process. The tile pieces were uniaxially pressed and fired between 1080 - 1180 deg C using a fast-firing cycle. The following technological properties were determined: linear shrinkage, water absorption, apparent density, and flexural strength. The development of the microstructure was followed by SEM and XRD analyses. It was found that the 'thin' red clay is kaolinitic type containing a substantial amount of quartz. The results also showed that the 'thin' red clay could be used in the manufacture of wall tiles, as they present properties compatible with those specified for class BIII of ISO 13006 standard. (author)

  11. Isolation and characterization of beta-glucan synthase: A potential biochemical regulator of gravistimulated differential cell wall loosening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzmanoff, K. M.

    1984-01-01

    In plants, gravity stimulates differential growth in the upper and lower halves of horizontally oriented organs. Auxin regulation of cell wall loosening and elongation is the basis for most models of this phenomenon. Auxin treatment of pea stem tissue rapidly increases the activity of Golgi-localized Beta-1,4-glucan synthase, an enzyme involved in biosynthesis of wall xyloglucan which apparently constitutes the substrate for the wall loosening process. The primary objective is to determine if auxin induces de novo formation of Golgi glucan synthase and increases the level of this glucan synthase mRNA. This shall be accomplished by (a) preparation of a monoclonal antibody to the synthase, (b) isolation, and characterization of the glucan synthase, and (c) examination for cross reactivity between the antibody and translation products of auxin induced mRNAs in pea tissue. The antibody will also be used to localize the glucan synthase in upper and lower halves of pea stem tissue before, during and after the response to gravity.

  12. Properties, characterization, and decay of sticky rice–lime mortars from the Wugang Ming dynasty city wall (China)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao, Ya; Fu, Xuan; Gu, Haibing; Gao, Feng; Liu, Shaojun

    2014-01-01

    Urgent restoration of the Wugang Ming dynasty city wall brings about the need for a study of the formulation and properties of mortars. In the present paper, mortar samples from the Wugang Ming dynasty city wall were characterized in a combination of sheet polarized light optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy with X-ray energy dispersive spectrometer, thermogravimetric/differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray powder diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and inductively coupled plasma emission spectroscopy. Results show that mortars are mainly built up from inorganic calcium carbonate based organic–inorganic hybrid material with a small amount of sticky rice, which plays a crucial role in forming dense and compact microstructure of mortars and effectively hindering penetration of water and air into mortars. Analysis of decayed products shows that the detrimental soluble salts originates from ambient environment. - Highlights: • Mortars used in the Wugang city wall are a calcium carbonate-sticky rice hybrid bonding material. • Carbonation processing is extremely slow due to dense and compact microstructure of mortars. • Decying of mortars results from the appearance of soluble salt from ambient environment

  13. Comparison of optical methods for surface roughness characterization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feidenhans'l, Nikolaj Agentoft; Hansen, Poul Erik; Pilny, Lukas

    2015-01-01

    We report a study of the correlation between three optical methods for characterizing surface roughness: a laboratory scatterometer measuring the bi-directional reflection distribution function (BRDF instrument), a simple commercial scatterometer (rBRDF instrument), and a confocal optical profiler....... For each instrument, the effective range of spatial surface wavelengths is determined, and the common bandwidth used when comparing the evaluated roughness parameters. The compared roughness parameters are: the root-mean-square (RMS) profile deviation (Rq), the RMS profile slope (Rdq), and the variance...... of the scattering angle distribution (Aq). The twenty-two investigated samples were manufactured with several methods in order to obtain a suitable diversity of roughness patterns.Our study shows a one-to-one correlation of both the Rq and the Rdq roughness values when obtained with the BRDF and the confocal...

  14. Surface tension effects on the behavior of a cavity growing, collapsing, and rebounding near a rigid wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhen-yu; Zhang, Hui-sheng

    2004-11-01

    Surface tension effects on the behavior of a pure vapor cavity or a cavity containing some noncondensible contents, which is growing, collapsing, and rebounding axisymmetrically near a rigid wall, are investigated numerically by the boundary integral method for different values of dimensionless stand-off parameter gamma, buoyancy parameter delta, and surface tension parameter beta. It is found that at the late stage of the collapse, if the resultant action of the Bjerknes force and the buoyancy force is not small, surface tension will not have significant effects on bubble behavior except that the bubble collapse time is shortened and the liquid jet becomes wider. If the resultant action of the two force is small enough, surface tension will have significant and in some cases substantial effects on bubble behavior, such as changing the direction of the liquid jet, making a new liquid jet appear, in some cases preventing the bubble from rebound before jet impact, and in other cases causing the bubble to rebound or even recollapse before jet impact. The mechanism of surface tension effects on the collapsing behavior of a cavity has been analyzed. The mechanisms of some complicated phenomena induced by surface tension effects are illustrated by analysis of the computed velocity fields and pressure contours of the liquid flow outside the bubble at different stages of the bubble evolution.

  15. Study on the Surface Integrity of a Thin-Walled Aluminum Alloy Structure after a Bilateral Slid Rolling Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laixiao Lu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available For studying the influence of a bilateral slid rolling process (BSRP on the surface integrity of a thin-walled aluminum alloy structure, and revealing the generation mechanism of residual stresses, a self-designed BSRP appliance was used to conduct rolling experiments. With the aid of a surface optical profiler, an X-ray stress analyzer, and a scanning electron microscope (SEM, the differences in surface integrity before and after BSRP were explored. The internal changing mechanism of physical as well as mechanical properties was probed. The results show that surface roughness (Ra is reduced by 23.7%, microhardness is increased by 21.6%, and the depth of the hardening layer is about 100 μm. Serious plastic deformation was observed within the subsurface of the rolled region. The residual stress distributions along the depth of the rolling surface and milling surface were tested respectively. Residual stresses with deep and high amplitudes were generated via the BSRP. Based on the analysis of the microstructure, the generation mechanism of the residual stresses was probed. The residual stress of the rolling area consisted of two sections: microscopic stresses caused by local plastic deformation and macroscopic stresses caused by overall non-uniform deformation.

  16. A comparison of liver surface and hepatic vein wall ultrasound as markers for fibrosis or cirrhosis of the liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allan, Richard B.; Thoirs, Kerry A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Clinical management of patients with suspected chronic liver disease (CLD) relies on liver biopsy which carries significant risks. This study aimed to compare the diagnostic accuracy of two previously described ultrasound techniques of liver assessment in patients who were clinically at risk of cirrhosis or fibrosis. Methods: We obtained approval from our institutional review board prior to commencement of this prospective, blinded, observational study. A sample of convenience (n = 65) was recruited from the Flinders Medical Centre endoscopy unit to compare the liver biopsy results and ultrasound assessments of the liver surface and the hepatic vein wall. The diagnostic accuracy of each ultrasound technique was measured by calculating the sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative likelihood ratios, positive and negative predictive values and diagnostic accuracy. Comparisons between diagnostic performance of the two techniques was calculated with McNemar's χ 2 test. Results: Highest diagnostic accuracy (0.721) was demonstrated for assessment of the left lobe liver surface. Highest specificity was demonstrated for assessments of the left lobe liver (0.94) and right liver surfaces (0.98) and sensitivity was low for all ultrasound assessments (0–0.5). Conclusion: Compared to the hepatic vein wall image, the left surface image has higher specificity and diagnostic accuracy, a higher technical success rate, and has higher inter-reader agreement. The high specificity and low false positive rate for ultrasound assessment of liver surface indicates that a patient testing negative can potentially be ruled out of having CLD without the need for liver biopsy

  17. Laser surface textured titanium alloy (Ti–6Al–4V): Part 1 – Surface characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfleging, Wilhelm [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, IAM-AWP, P.O. Box 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Karlsruhe Nano Micro Facility, H.-von-Helmholtz-Pl. 1, 76344 Egg.-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Kumari, Renu [Department of Metal. and Maters. Eng., I. I. T. Kharagpur, WB 721302 (India); Besser, Heino [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, IAM-AWP, P.O. Box 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Scharnweber, Tim [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, IBG-1, P.O. Box 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Majumdar, Jyotsna Dutta, E-mail: jyotsna@metal.iitkgp.ernet.in [Department of Metal. and Maters. Eng., I. I. T. Kharagpur, WB 721302 (India)

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • Texturing of Ti–6Al–4V with linear and dimple patterns are developed with ArF laser. • Linear textures have width of 25 μm and are at an interval of 20 μm. • Dimple textures are equi-spaced and have a diameter of 60 μm. • Significant refinement of microstructure in textured zone as compared to substrate. • Increased wettability of the textured surface against simulated body fluid. - Abstract: In the present study, a detailed study of the characterization of laser-surface textured titanium alloy (Ti–6Al–4V) with line and dimple geometry developed by using an ArF excimer laser operating at a wavelength of 193 nm with a pulse length of 5 ns is undertaken. The characterization of the textured surface (both the top surface and cross section) is carried out by scanning electron microscopy, electron back scattered diffraction (EBSD) technique and X-ray diffraction techniques. There is refinement of microstructure along with presence of titanium oxides (rutile, anatase and few Ti{sub 2}O{sub 3} phase) in the textured surface as compared to as-received one. The area fractions of linear texture and dimple texture measured by image analysis software are 45% and 20%, respectively. The wettability is increased after laser texturing. The total surface energy is decreased due to linear (29.6 mN/m) texturing and increased due to dimple (67.6 mN/m) texturing as compared to as-received Ti–6Al–4V (37 mN/m). The effect of polar component is more in influencing the surface energy of textured surface.

  18. Laser surface textured titanium alloy (Ti–6Al–4V): Part 1 – Surface characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfleging, Wilhelm; Kumari, Renu; Besser, Heino; Scharnweber, Tim; Majumdar, Jyotsna Dutta

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Texturing of Ti–6Al–4V with linear and dimple patterns are developed with ArF laser. • Linear textures have width of 25 μm and are at an interval of 20 μm. • Dimple textures are equi-spaced and have a diameter of 60 μm. • Significant refinement of microstructure in textured zone as compared to substrate. • Increased wettability of the textured surface against simulated body fluid. - Abstract: In the present study, a detailed study of the characterization of laser-surface textured titanium alloy (Ti–6Al–4V) with line and dimple geometry developed by using an ArF excimer laser operating at a wavelength of 193 nm with a pulse length of 5 ns is undertaken. The characterization of the textured surface (both the top surface and cross section) is carried out by scanning electron microscopy, electron back scattered diffraction (EBSD) technique and X-ray diffraction techniques. There is refinement of microstructure along with presence of titanium oxides (rutile, anatase and few Ti_2O_3 phase) in the textured surface as compared to as-received one. The area fractions of linear texture and dimple texture measured by image analysis software are 45% and 20%, respectively. The wettability is increased after laser texturing. The total surface energy is decreased due to linear (29.6 mN/m) texturing and increased due to dimple (67.6 mN/m) texturing as compared to as-received Ti–6Al–4V (37 mN/m). The effect of polar component is more in influencing the surface energy of textured surface.

  19. Excitation of surface waves of ultracold neutrons on absorbing trap walls as anomalous loss factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bokun, R.Ch.

    2006-01-01

    One analyzed probability of excitation of surface waves of ultracold neutrons in terms of a plane model consisting of three media: vacuum, a finite depth neutron absorbing substance layer and a neutron reflecting substrate. One demonstrated the absence of the mentioned surface waves in terms of the generally accepted model of two media: vacuum contiguous to the plane surface of a substance filled half-space. One pointed out the effect of the excited surface waves of ultracold neutrons on the increase of their anomalous losses in traps [ru

  20. Surface characterization and stability of an epoxy resin surface modified with polyamines grafted on polydopamine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaubroeck, David, E-mail: David.Schaubroeck@elis.ugent.be [Center for Microsystems Technology (CMST), imec and Ghent University, Technologiepark 914A, B-9052 Ghent (Belgium); Vercammen, Yannick; Van Vaeck, Luc [Biomolecular and Analytical Mass Spectrometry, University of Antwerp, Universiteitsplein 1, B-2610 Wilrijk (Belgium); Vanderleyden, Els; Dubruel, Peter [Polymer Chemistry and Biomaterials Research Group, Ghent University, Krijgslaan 281 S4 bis, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Vanfleteren, Jan [Center for Microsystems Technology (CMST), imec and Ghent University, Technologiepark 914A, B-9052 Ghent (Belgium)

    2014-06-01

    This paper reports on polydopamine and polyamine surface modifications of an etched epoxy cresol novolac (ECN) resin using the ‘grafting to’ method. Three different polyamines are used for the grafting reactions: branched polyethyleneimine (B-PEI), linear polyethyleneimine (L-PEI) and diethylenetriamine (DETA). These modifications are compared to control materials prepared via direct deposition of polyamines. The stability of the modifications toward a concentrated hydrochloric acid (HCl) environment is evaluated. The modified surfaces are characterized with scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and time-of-flight static secondary ion mass spectroscopy (TOF-S-SIMS).

  1. Vp130, a chloroviral surface protein that interacts with the host Chlorella cell wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onimatsu, Hideki; Sugimoto, Ichiro; Fujie, Makoto; Usami, Shoji; Yamada, Takashi

    2004-01-01

    A protein, Vp130, that interacts with the host cell wall was isolated from Chlorovirus CVK2. From its peptide sequence, the gene for Vp130 was identified on the PBCV-1 genomic sequence as an ORF combining A140R and A145R. In Vp130, the N-terminus was somehow modified and the C-terminus was occupied by 23-26 tandem repeats of a PAPK motif. In the internal region, Vp130 contained seven repeats of 70-73 amino acids, each copy of which was separated by PAPK sequences. This protein was well conserved among NC64A viruses. A recombinant rVp130N protein formed in Escherichia coli was shown not only to bind directly to the host cell wall in vitro but also to specifically bind to the host cells, as demonstrated by fluorescence microscopy. Because externally added rVp130N competed with CVK2 to bind to host cells, Vp130 is most likely to be a host-recognizing protein on the virion

  2. Polyphasic approach to characterize heterotrophic bacteria of biofilms and patina on walls of the Suburban Bath of the Herculaneum's archaeological excavations in Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventorino, V.; Pepe, O.; Sannino, L.; Blaiotta, G.; Palomba, S.

    2012-04-01

    plates were purified in the same growth medium by streaking and differentiated by assessing their morphological (phase-contrast microscopy) and biochemical characteristics (Gram-stains KOH-lysis and catalase activity). Cultural-based method allow us to identify by 16S and 26S rRNA partial sequence analysis, heterotrophic bacteria belonging to different genera as Bacillus, Pseudomonas, Aeromonas and Microbacterium. By using this approach, Bacillus-related species (B. benzoevorans, B. megaterium and B. pumilis and B. megaterium/B. simplex group) as well as Aeromonas sobria/Aeromonas salmonicida/Aeromonas hydrophila group, Pseudomonas plecoglossicida and Microbacterium esteraromaticum were isolated in different sample points analysed. DGGE analysis of PCR amplified V3 region of rDNA from DNA directly recovered from samples of biofilms and patina, enabled identification of bacterial species not found using culturable technology, as those closest related to Aeromonas, Paenibacillus, Brevibacterium, Exiguobacterium, Microbacterium, Brevibacterium, Stenothophomonas and Streptomyces. Combination of culture-dependent and independent methods provide a better characterization of heterotrophic microbiota that colonize the surface of ancient decorated walls and can contribute to understand the potential of biodeterioration activity by heterotrophic microorganisms.

  3. Evaluation of shot peened surfaces using characterization technique of three-dimensional surface topography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurokawa, S; Ariura, Y

    2005-01-01

    Objective parameters to characterize global topography of three-dimensional surfaces have been derived. The idea of this evaluation is to separate the topography into two global form deviations and residual ones according to the degree of curved surfaces. A shot peened Almen strip is measured by profilometer and concrete parameters of inclination and circular-arc shaped global topography are extracted using the characterization technique. The arc height is calculated using the circular arc-shaped part and compared with a value measured by an Almen gauge. The relation between the coverage and roughness parameters is also investigated. The advantage of this evaluation is that it is possible to determine the arc height and the coverage at the same time from single measured topography. In addition, human error can be excluded from measurement results. This method has the wide application in the field of measurement

  4. Characterization of metallic surfaces in phosphorous-bronze ordered packings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandru, Claudia; Titescu, Gh.

    1997-01-01

    Copper and its alloys, particularly the phosphorous bronze, are characterized by a high water wettability as compared with other materials. This feature led to utilization of phosphorous bronze in fabrication of contact elements, a packing type equipping the distillation columns. For heavy water separation by isotopic distillation under vacuum, ordered packings of phosphorous bronze networks were fabricated. The superior performances of these packings are determined by the material and also by the geometrical form and the state of the metallic surface. Thus, a procedure of evaluating the wettability has been developed, based on tests of the network material. The results of the tests constitute a criterion of rating the functional performances of packings, particularly of their efficiencies. Also, investigation techniques of the chemical composition and of the thickness of superficial layer on the packing were developed. It was found that the packing surface presents a layer of about 5-20 μm formed mainly by oxides of copper, tin, and, depending on the packing treatment, of oxides of other elements coming from the treatment agent. The paper presents characterization of phosphorous bronze treated with potassium permanganate, a specific treatment for improving the functional performances of the packings used in the heavy water concentration and re-concentration installations

  5. Surface Resistance Measurements and Estimate of the Beam-Induced Resistive Wall Heating of the LHC Dipole Beam Screen

    CERN Document Server

    Caspers, Friedhelm; Ruggiero, F; Tan, J

    1999-01-01

    An estimate of the resistive losses in the LHC beam screen is given from cold surface resistance measurements using the shielded pair technique, with particular emphasis on the effect of a high magnetic field. Two different copper coating methods, namely electro-deposition and co-lamination, have been evaluated. Experimental data are compared with theories including the anomalous skin effect and the magneto-resistance effect. It is shown whether the theory underestimates or not the losses depends strongly on the RRR value, on the magnetic field and on the surface characteristics. In the pessimistic case and for nominal machine parameters, the estimated beam-induced resistive wall heating can be as large as 260 mW/m for two circulating beams.

  6. Surface modification of indium tin oxide films by amino ion implantation for the attachment of multi-wall carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiao Jiao; Liu Chenyao; Chen Qunxia; Li Shuoqi; Hu Jingbo; Li Qilong

    2010-01-01

    Amino ion implantation was carried out at the energy of 80 keV with fluence of 5 x 10 15 ions cm -2 for indium tin oxide film (ITO) coated glass, and the existence of amino group on the ITO surface was verified by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis and Fourier transform infrared spectra. Scanning electron microscopy images show that multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) directly attached to the amino ion implanted ITO (NH 2 /ITO) surface homogeneously and stably. The resulting MWCNTs-attached NH 2 /ITO (MWCNTs/NH 2 /ITO) substrate can be used as electrode material. Cyclic voltammetry results indicate that the MWCNTs/NH 2 /ITO electrode shows excellent electrochemical properties and obvious electrocatalytic activity towards uric acid, thus this material is expected to have potential in electrochemical analysis and biosensors.

  7. Surface anisotropy of Cr xN1-x films prepared on an inner wall by magnetic sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng, F.; Liang, R.; Li, X.W.; Wen, S.P.; Gao, Y.; Gu, Y.L.; Pan, F.

    2007-01-01

    The Cr x N 1-x films were prepared by magnetic sputtering on an inner wall of a column. Their surface morphologies were studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and found to be anisotropic. The 3-D AFM images indicate the grains grow upward along the rotational axis of the system. The AFM top views show a mosaic-like pattern for all samples. Analysis of the height-height correlation function demonstrates that correlation length along the rotational axis of the system is longer than that vertical to the axis. The correlation length and RMS roughness increase with the flow rate of N 2 . A deposition model proposed that the shadowing effect of the reactive gas N 2 is the dominant factor for surface anisotropy. The bias added on the substrate is regarded to modulate the grain direction to the rotation axis and enhance roughness and defects

  8. Observation and Characterization of Fragile Organometallic Molecules Encapsulated in Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisuke Ogawa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermally fragile tris(η5-cyclopentadienylerbium (ErCp3 molecules are encapsulated in single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs with high yield. We realized the encapsulation of ErCp3 with high filling ratio by using high quality SWCNTs at an optimized temperature under higher vacuum. Structure determination based on high-resolution transmission electron microscope observations together with the image simulations reveals the presence of almost free rotation of each ErCp3 molecule in SWCNTs. The encapsulation is also confirmed by X-ray diffraction. Trivalent character of Er ions (i.e., Er3+ is confirmed by X-ray absorption spectrum.

  9. Nano-Welding of Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes on Silicon and Silica Surface by Laser Irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanping Yuan

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a continuous fiber laser (1064 nm wavelength, 30 W/cm2 is used to irradiate multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs on different substrate surfaces. Effects of substrates on nano-welding of MWCNTs are investigated by scanning electron microscope (SEM. For MWCNTs on silica, after 3 s irradiation, nanoscale welding with good quality can be achieved due to breaking C–C bonds and formation of new graphene layers. While welding junctions can be formed until 10 s for the MWCNTs on silicon, the difference of irradiation time to achieve welding is attributed to the difference of thermal conductivity for silica and silicon. As the irradiation time is prolonged up to 12.5 s, most of the MWCNTs are welded to a silicon substrate, which leads to their frameworks of tube walls on the silicon surface. This is because the accumulation of absorbed energy makes the temperature rise. Then chemical reactions among silicon, carbon and nitrogen occur. New chemical bonds of Si–N and Si–C achieve the welding between the MWCNTs and silicon. Vibration modes of Si3N4 appear at peaks of 363 cm−1 and 663 cm−1. There are vibration modes of SiC at peaks of 618 cm−1, 779 cm−1 and 973 cm−1. The experimental observation proves chemical reactions and the formation of Si3N4 and SiC by laser irradiation.

  10. Nano-Welding of Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes on Silicon and Silica Surface by Laser Irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yanping; Chen, Jimin

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a continuous fiber laser (1064 nm wavelength, 30 W/cm2) is used to irradiate multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) on different substrate surfaces. Effects of substrates on nano-welding of MWCNTs are investigated by scanning electron microscope (SEM). For MWCNTs on silica, after 3 s irradiation, nanoscale welding with good quality can be achieved due to breaking C–C bonds and formation of new graphene layers. While welding junctions can be formed until 10 s for the MWCNTs on silicon, the difference of irradiation time to achieve welding is attributed to the difference of thermal conductivity for silica and silicon. As the irradiation time is prolonged up to 12.5 s, most of the MWCNTs are welded to a silicon substrate, which leads to their frameworks of tube walls on the silicon surface. This is because the accumulation of absorbed energy makes the temperature rise. Then chemical reactions among silicon, carbon and nitrogen occur. New chemical bonds of Si–N and Si–C achieve the welding between the MWCNTs and silicon. Vibration modes of Si3N4 appear at peaks of 363 cm−1 and 663 cm−1. There are vibration modes of SiC at peaks of 618 cm−1, 779 cm−1 and 973 cm−1. The experimental observation proves chemical reactions and the formation of Si3N4 and SiC by laser irradiation. PMID:28344293

  11. Characterization for fusion first-wall damage studies of using tailored D-T neutron fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dierckx, R.; Emigh, C.R.

    1979-01-01

    The approximation required to apply the Bullough-Haynes results to the present calculations is somewhat crude and may imply that the details of the results contain considerable error. However, when the results for each neutron source are viewed in a relative context, several valid and important observations can be made. The almost identical swelling results obtained for the intense neutron source (INS) with a standard blanket and the fusion first wall are most striking. A further comparison with a fusion reactor shows that even the spatial and energy distributions of the neutron flux are similar. In both the INS with blanket and at the first wall of a fusion reactor, there is a radial source flux component of 14-MeV neutrons and a more or less isotropic flux component of low energy (< 14-MeV) neutrons. One must therefore conclude that from the point-of-view of neutron radiation damage, the INS with a blanket, unlike all other types of neutron sources, is not a simulation environment. It is, in fact, a small scale fusion device, and data obtained from INS irradiation experiments would represent fusion reactor results. Such data could then be used to develop correlative procedures for applying data obtained from other simulation sources to fusion reactor conditions

  12. A study of cladding technology on tube wall surface by a hand-held laser torch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terada, Takaya; Nishimura, Akihiko; Oka, Kiyoshi; Moriyama, Taku; Matsuda, Hiroyasu

    2015-01-01

    New maintenance technique was proposed using a hand-held laser torch for aging chemical plants and power plants. The hand-held laser torch was specially designed to be able to access limited tubular space in various cases. A composite-type optical fiberscope was composed of a center fiber for beam delivery and surrounded fibers for visible image delivery. Laser irradiation on a work pieces with the best accuracy of filler wire was carried out. And, we found that the optimized wire-feed speed was 2 mm/s in laser cladding. We succeeded to make a line clad on the inner wall of 23 mm tube. This technique was discussed to be applied to the maintenance for cracks or corrosions of tubes in various harsh environments. (author)

  13. Surface Characterization and Electrochemical Oxidation of Metal Doped Uranium Dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jeongmook; Kim, Jandee; Youn, Young-Sang; Kim, Jong-Goo; Ha, Yeong-Keong; Kim, Jong-Yun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Trivalent element in UO{sub 2} matrix makes the oxygen vacancy from loss of oxygen for charge compensation. Tetravalent element alters lattice parameter of UO{sub 2} due to diameter difference between the tetravalent element and replaced U. These structural changes have significant effect on not only relevant fuel performance but also the kinetics of fuel oxidation. Park and Olander explained the stabilization of Ln (III)-doped UO{sub 2} against oxidation based on oxygen potential calculations. In this work, we have been investigated the effect of Gd{sup 3+} and Th{sup 4+} doping on the UO{sub 2} structure with Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction to characterize the surface structure of nuclear fuel material. For Gd doped UO{sub 2}, its electrochemical oxidation behaviors are also investigated. The Gd and Th doped uranium dioxide solid solution pellets with various doping level were investigated by XRD, Raman spectroscopy, SEM, electrochemical experiments to investigate surface structure and electro chemical oxidation behaviors. The lattice parameter evaluated from XRD spectra indicated the formation of solid solutions. Raman spectra showed the existence of the oxygen vacancy. SEM images showed the grain structure on the surface of Gd doped uranium dioxide depending on doping level and oxygen-to-metal ratio.

  14. Comparison of optical methods for surface roughness characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feidenhans’l, Nikolaj A; Hansen, Poul-Erik; Madsen, Morten H; Petersen, Jan C; Pilný, Lukáš; Bissacco, Giuliano; Taboryski, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    We report a study of the correlation between three optical methods for characterizing surface roughness: a laboratory scatterometer measuring the bi-directional reflection distribution function (BRDF instrument), a simple commercial scatterometer (rBRDF instrument), and a confocal optical profiler. For each instrument, the effective range of spatial surface wavelengths is determined, and the common bandwidth used when comparing the evaluated roughness parameters. The compared roughness parameters are: the root-mean-square (RMS) profile deviation (Rq), the RMS profile slope (Rdq), and the variance of the scattering angle distribution (Aq). The twenty-two investigated samples were manufactured with several methods in order to obtain a suitable diversity of roughness patterns.Our study shows a one-to-one correlation of both the Rq and the Rdq roughness values when obtained with the BRDF and the confocal instruments, if the common bandwidth is applied. Likewise, a correlation is observed when determining the Aq value with the BRDF and the rBRDF instruments.Furthermore, we show that it is possible to determine the Rq value from the Aq value, by applying a simple transfer function derived from the instrument comparisons. The presented method is validated for surfaces with predominantly 1D roughness, i.e. consisting of parallel grooves of various periods, and a reflectance similar to stainless steel. The Rq values are predicted with an accuracy of 38% at the 95% confidence interval. (paper)

  15. Root hairs aid soil penetration by anchoring the root surface to pore walls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengough, A Glyn; Loades, Kenneth; McKenzie, Blair M

    2016-02-01

    The physical role of root hairs in anchoring the root tip during soil penetration was examined. Experiments using a hairless maize mutant (Zea mays: rth3-3) and its wild-type counterpart measured the anchorage force between the primary root of maize and the soil to determine whether root hairs enabled seedling roots in artificial biopores to penetrate sandy loam soil (dry bulk density 1.0-1.5g cm(-3)). Time-lapse imaging was used to analyse root and seedling displacements in soil adjacent to a transparent Perspex interface. Peak anchorage forces were up to five times greater (2.5N cf. 0.5N) for wild-type roots than for hairless mutants in 1.2g cm(-3) soil. Root hair anchorage enabled better soil penetration for 1.0 or 1.2g cm(-3) soil, but there was no significant advantage of root hairs in the densest soil (1.5g cm(-3)). The anchorage force was insufficient to allow root penetration of the denser soil, probably because of less root hair penetration into pore walls and, consequently, poorer adhesion between the root hairs and the pore walls. Hairless seedlings took 33h to anchor themselves compared with 16h for wild-type roots in 1.2g cm(-3) soil. Caryopses were often pushed several millimetres out of the soil before the roots became anchored and hairless roots often never became anchored securely.The physical role of root hairs in anchoring the root tip may be important in loose seed beds above more compact soil layers and may also assist root tips to emerge from biopores and penetrate the bulk soil. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  16. Synthesis and Characterization of Hexahapto-Chromium Complexes of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    KAUST Repository

    Kalinina, Irina; Bekyarova, Elena; Sarkar, Santanu; Itkis, Mikhail E.; Niyogi, Sandip; Jha, Neetu; Wang, Qingxiao; Zhang, Xixiang; Al-Hadeethi, Yas Fadel; Haddon, Robert C.

    2016-01-01

    ), with in-depth characterization of the products using some of the techniques, such as thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Purified electric arc (EA)-produced SWNTs (P2-SWNT

  17. Convective heat transport of high-pressure flows inside active, thick walled-tubes with isothermal outer surfaces: usage of Nusselt correlation equations for an inactive, thin walled-tube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campo, Antonio [Idaho State Univ., Nuclear Engineering Dept., Pocatello, ID (United States); Sanchez, Alejo [Universidad de los Andes, Depto. de Ingenieria Mecanica, Merida (Venezuela)

    1998-03-01

    A semi-analytical analysis was conducted for the prediction of the mean bulk- and interface temperatures of gaseous and liquid fluids moving laminarly at high pressures inside thick-walled metallic tubes. The outer surfaces of the tubes are isothermal. The central goal of this article is to critically examine the thermal response of this kind of in-tube flows utilizing two versions of the 1-D lumped model: one is differential-numerical while the other is differential-algebraic. For the former, the local Nusselt number characterizing an inactive, isothermal tube was taken from correlation equations reported in the heat transfer literature. For the latter, a streamwise-mean Nusselt number associated with an active, isothermal tube was taken from standard correlation equations that appear in text-books on basic heat transfer. For the two different versions of the 1-D lumped model tested, the computed results consistently demonstrate that the differential-algebraic, provides accurate estimates of both the mean bulk- and the interface temperatures when compared with those temperature results computed with formal 2-D differential models. (author)

  18. Characterization of slow-cycling cells in the mouse cochlear lateral wall.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Li

    Full Text Available Cochlear spiral ligament fibrocytes (SLFs play essential roles in the physiology of hearing including ion recycling and the generation of endocochlear potential. In adult animals, SLFs can repopulate after damages, yet little is known about the characteristics of proliferating cells that support SLFs' self-renewal. Here we report in detail about the characteristics of cycling cells in the spiral ligament (SL. Fifteen P6 mice and six noise-exposed P28 mice were injected with 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU for 7 days and we chased BrdU retaining cells for as long as 60 days. Immunohistochemistry revealed that the BrdU positive IB4 (an endotherial marker negative cells expressed an early SLF marker Pou3f4 but negative for cleaved-Caspase 3. Marker studies revealed that type 3 SLFs displayed significantly higher percentage of BrdU+ cells compared to other subtypes. Notably, the cells retained BrdU until P72, demonstrating they were dividing slowly. In the noise-damaged mice, in contrast to the loss of the other types, the number of type 3 SLFs did not altered and the BrdU incorporating- phosphorylated Histone H3 positive type 3 cells were increased from day 1 to 14 after noise exposure. Furthermore, the cells repopulating type 1 area, where the cells diminished profoundly after damage, were positive for the type 3 SLF markers. Collectively, in the latral wall of the cochlea, type 3 SLFs have the stem cell capacity and may contribute to the endogenous regeneration of lateral wall spiral ligament. Manipulating type 3 cells may be employed for potential regenerative therapies.

  19. Static and dynamic characterization of robust superhydrophobic surfaces built from nano-flowers on silicon micro-post arrays

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Longquan

    2010-09-01

    Superhydrophobic nano-flower surfaces were fabricated using MEMS technology and microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD) of carbon nanotubes on silicon micro-post array surfaces. The nano-flower structures can be readily formed within 1-2 min on the micro-post arrays with the spacing ranging from 25 to 30 μm. The petals of the nano-flowers consisted of clusters of multi-wall carbon nanotubes. Patterned nano-flower structures were characterized using various microscopy techniques. After MPCVD, the apparent contact angle (160 ± 0.2°), abbreviated as ACA (defined as the measured angle between the apparent solid surface and the tangent to the liquid-fluid interface), of the nano-flower surfaces increased by 139% compared with that of the silicon micro-post arrays. The measured ACA of the nano-flower surface is consistent with the predicted ACA from a modified Cassie-Baxter equation. A high-speed CCD camera was used to study droplet impact dynamics on various micro/nanostructured surfaces. Both static testing (ACA and sliding angle) and droplet impact dynamics demonstrated that, among seven different micro/nanostructured surfaces, the nano-flower surfaces are the most robust superhydrophobic surfaces. © 2010 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  20. Static and dynamic characterization of robust superhydrophobic surfaces built from nano-flowers on silicon micro-post arrays

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Longquan; Xiao, Zhiyong; Chan, Philip C H; Lee, Yi-Kuen

    2010-01-01

    Superhydrophobic nano-flower surfaces were fabricated using MEMS technology and microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD) of carbon nanotubes on silicon micro-post array surfaces. The nano-flower structures can be readily formed within 1-2 min on the micro-post arrays with the spacing ranging from 25 to 30 μm. The petals of the nano-flowers consisted of clusters of multi-wall carbon nanotubes. Patterned nano-flower structures were characterized using various microscopy techniques. After MPCVD, the apparent contact angle (160 ± 0.2°), abbreviated as ACA (defined as the measured angle between the apparent solid surface and the tangent to the liquid-fluid interface), of the nano-flower surfaces increased by 139% compared with that of the silicon micro-post arrays. The measured ACA of the nano-flower surface is consistent with the predicted ACA from a modified Cassie-Baxter equation. A high-speed CCD camera was used to study droplet impact dynamics on various micro/nanostructured surfaces. Both static testing (ACA and sliding angle) and droplet impact dynamics demonstrated that, among seven different micro/nanostructured surfaces, the nano-flower surfaces are the most robust superhydrophobic surfaces. © 2010 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  1. Contribution of the characterization of radioactive surfaces after sodium corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menken, G.; Holl, M.

    1978-01-01

    Since 1972 INTERATOM is performing sodium mass and activity transfer investigations in an SNR-corrosion mockup loop which allows to study the transport of activated corrosion products in the primary heat transfer system of a sodium cooled reactor. The loop simulates the temperature and flow conditions and the materials combination of the SNR 300. The mass transfer examinations were aimed at the determination of the following: the linear corrosion and deposition rates; the selective corrosion of the alloying elements; the transfer of activated corrosion products. The results of a number of corrosion runs will be used in the following contribution to characterize the contaminated and corroded surface layers of reactor components. The loop reached a total operation time of 12300 h while the cold trap temperature was changed between 105 deg. C and 165 deg. C in successive runs

  2. Transient space-time surface waves characterization using Gabor analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, L; Wilkie-Chancellier, N; Caplain, E [Universite de Cergy Pontoise, ENS Cachan, UMR CNRS 8029, Laboratoire Systemes et Applications des Techniques de l' Information et de l' Energie (SATIE), 5 mail Gay-Lussac, F 9500 Cergy-Pontoise (France); Glorieux, C; Sarens, B, E-mail: nicolas.wilkie-chancellier@u-cergy.f [Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Laboratorium voor Akoestiek en Thermische Fysica (LATF), Celestijnenlaan 200D, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium)

    2009-11-01

    Laser ultrasonics allow the observation of transient surface waves along their propagation media and their interaction with encountered objects like cracks, holes, borders. In order to characterize and localize these transient aspects in the Space-Time-Wave number-Frequency domains, the 1D, 2D and 3D Gabor transforms are presented. The Gabor transform enables the identification of several properties of the local wavefronts such as their shape, wavelength, frequency, attenuation, group velocity and the full conversion sequence along propagation. The ability of local properties identification by Gabor transform is illustrated by two experimental studies: Lamb waves generated by an annular source on a circular quartz and Lamb wave interaction with a fluid droplet. In both cases, results obtained with Gabor transform enable ones to identify the observed local waves.

  3. Surface Characterization of a Paper Web at the Wet End

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abidi, B.R.; Goddard, J.S.; Sari-Sarraf, H.

    1999-01-01

    We present an algorithm for the detection and representation of structures and non-uniformities on the surface of a paper web at the wet end (slurry). This image processing/analysis algorithm is developed as part of a complete on-line web characterization system. Images of the slurry, carried by a fast moving table, are obtained using a stroboscopic light and a CCD camera. The images have very poor contrast and contain noise from a variety of sources. Those sources include the acquisition system itself, the lighting, the vibrations of the moving table being imaged, and the scattering water from the same table's movement. After many steps of enhancement, conventional edge detection methods were still inconclusive and were discarded. The facet model algorithm, is applied to the images and is found successful in detecting the various topographic characteristics of the surface of the slurry. Pertinent topographic elements are retained and a filtered image is computed based on the general appearance and characteristics of the structures in question. Morphological operators are applied to detect and segment regions of interest. Those regions are then filtered according to their size, elongation, and orientation.Their bounding rectangles are computed and superimposed on the original image. Real time implementation of this algorithm for on-line use is also addressed in this paper. The algorithm is tested on over 500 images of slurry and is found to detect nonuniformities on all 500 images. Locating and characterizing all different size structures is also achieved on all 500 images of the web

  4. Characterizing bars in low surface brightness disc galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Wesley; Kuzio de Naray, Rachel

    2018-05-01

    In this paper, we use B-band, I-band, and 3.6 μm azimuthal light profiles of four low surface brightness galaxies (LSBs; UGC 628, F568-1, F568-3, F563-V2) to characterize three bar parameters: length, strength, and corotation radius. We employ three techniques to measure the radius of the bars, including a new method using the azimuthal light profiles. We find comparable bar radii between the I-band and 3.6 μm for all four galaxies when using our azimuthal light profile method, and that our bar lengths are comparable to those in high surface brightness galaxies (HSBs). In addition, we find the bar strengths for our galaxies to be smaller than those for HSBs. Finally, we use Fourier transforms of the B-band, I-band, and 3.6 μm images to characterize the bars as either `fast' or `slow' by measuring the corotation radius via phase profiles. When using the B- and I-band phase crossings, we find three of our galaxies have faster than expected relative bar pattern speeds for galaxies expected to be embedded in centrally dense cold dark matter haloes. When using the B-band and 3.6 μm phase crossings, we find more ambiguous results, although the relative bar pattern speeds are still faster than expected. Since we find a very slow bar in F563-V2, we are confident that we are able to differentiate between fast and slow bars. Finally, we find no relation between bar strength and relative bar pattern speed when comparing our LSBs to HSBs.

  5. Comparative inhalation toxicity of multi-wall carbon nanotubes, graphene, graphite nanoplatelets and low surface carbon black.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma-Hock, Lan; Strauss, Volker; Treumann, Silke; Küttler, Karin; Wohlleben, Wendel; Hofmann, Thomas; Gröters, Sibylle; Wiench, Karin; van Ravenzwaay, Bennard; Landsiedel, Robert

    2013-06-17

    Carbon nanotubes, graphene, graphite nanoplatelets and carbon black are seemingly chemically identical carbon-based nano-materials with broad technological applications. Carbon nanotubes and carbon black possess different inhalation toxicities, whereas little is known about graphene and graphite nanoplatelets. In order to compare the inhalation toxicity of the mentioned carbon-based nanomaterials, male Wistar rats were exposed head-nose to atmospheres of the respective materials for 6 hours per day on 5 consecutive days. Target concentrations were 0.1, 0.5, or 2.5 mg/m3 for multi-wall carbon nanotubes and 0.5, 2.5, or 10 mg/m3 for graphene, graphite nanoplatelets and low-surface carbon black. Toxicity was determined after end of exposure and after three-week recovery using broncho-alveolar lavage fluid and microscopic examinations of the entire respiratory tract. No adverse effects were observed after inhalation exposure to 10 mg/m3 graphite nanoplatelets or relatively low specific surface area carbon black. Increases of lavage markers indicative for inflammatory processes started at exposure concentration of 0.5 mg/m3 for multi-wall carbon nanotubes and 10 mg/m3 for graphene. Consistent with the changes in lavage fluid, microgranulomas were observed at 2.5 mg/m3 multi-wall carbon nanotubes and 10 mg/m3 graphene. In order to evaluate volumetric loading of the lung as the key parameter driving the toxicity, deposited particle volume was calculated, taking into account different methods to determine the agglomerate density. However, the calculated volumetric load did not correlate to the toxicity, nor did the particle surface burden of the lung. The inhalation toxicity of the investigated carbon-based materials is likely to be a complex interaction of several parameters. Until the properties which govern the toxicity are identified, testing by short-term inhalation is the best option to identify hazardous properties in order to avoid unsafe applications or select

  6. Comparative inhalation toxicity of multi-wall carbon nanotubes, graphene, graphite nanoplatelets and low surface carbon black

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Carbon nanotubes, graphene, graphite nanoplatelets and carbon black are seemingly chemically identical carbon-based nano-materials with broad technological applications. Carbon nanotubes and carbon black possess different inhalation toxicities, whereas little is known about graphene and graphite nanoplatelets. Methods In order to compare the inhalation toxicity of the mentioned carbon-based nanomaterials, male Wistar rats were exposed head-nose to atmospheres of the respective materials for 6 hours per day on 5 consecutive days. Target concentrations were 0.1, 0.5, or 2.5 mg/m3 for multi-wall carbon nanotubes and 0.5, 2.5, or 10 mg/m3 for graphene, graphite nanoplatelets and low-surface carbon black. Toxicity was determined after end of exposure and after three-week recovery using broncho-alveolar lavage fluid and microscopic examinations of the entire respiratory tract. Results No adverse effects were observed after inhalation exposure to 10 mg/m3 graphite nanoplatelets or relatively low specific surface area carbon black. Increases of lavage markers indicative for inflammatory processes started at exposure concentration of 0.5 mg/m3 for multi-wall carbon nanotubes and 10 mg/m3 for graphene. Consistent with the changes in lavage fluid, microgranulomas were observed at 2.5 mg/m3 multi-wall carbon nanotubes and 10 mg/m3 graphene. In order to evaluate volumetric loading of the lung as the key parameter driving the toxicity, deposited particle volume was calculated, taking into account different methods to determine the agglomerate density. However, the calculated volumetric load did not correlate to the toxicity, nor did the particle surface burden of the lung. Conclusions The inhalation toxicity of the investigated carbon-based materials is likely to be a complex interaction of several parameters. Until the properties which govern the toxicity are identified, testing by short-term inhalation is the best option to identify hazardous properties in

  7. Characterization of ancient construction materials (mud walls and adobe in the churches at Cisneros, Villada and Boada de Campos (Palencia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sánchez Hernández, R.

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to characterize the ancient building materials (mud wall and adobe of three churches in the province of Palencia. This is the first part of a study which seeks to evaluate how the mud walls of the tower of the church of Cisneros reacted to restoration treatment which consisted of a structural reinforcement made by injecting a highly fluid grout of cement/lime/sand mortar. This treatment implies the introduction of large quantities of water into the fabric. The mud walls of the tower of Cisneros are compositionally and texturally very similar to each other, which indicates that despite their large dimensions, care was taken in the homogeneity of the materials. These mud walls are also very similar to those of the church of Villada. The original raw material is mud with some additives (rubble, ashes, bones, etc. and some remains of lime used as a stabiliser. Although there is a very high proportion of clay, no effervescing clay has been detected. Hence it is deduced that once the mud wall was built, there were no important changes in volume due to variation in the humidity of the fabric. The characteristics of the adobe of the tower of Boada are logically different form those of the mud walls, being made of less sandy, more clayey mud with a high proportion of straw that the mud walls do not have, and without the addition of bricks, bones, etc.

    El objetivo de este trabajo es caracterizar los materiales antiguos de construcción (tapial y adobe de tres iglesias en la provincia de Falencia. El trabajo es la primera parte de un estudio en el que se pretende evaluar el comportamiento de los tapiales de la torre de la iglesia de Cisneros frente al tratamiento de restauración, consistente en un cosido estructural mediante la realización de perforaciones en las que se introduce una barra de acero y donde, posteriormente, se inyecta una lechada muy fluidificada de mortero de cemento/cal/arena. Este tratamiento implica la

  8. A novel beta-glucosidase from the cell wall of maize (Zea mays L.): rapid purification and partial characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nematollahi, W. P.; Roux, S. J.

    1999-01-01

    Plants have a variety of glycosidic conjugates of hormones, defense compounds, and other molecules that are hydrolyzed by beta-glucosidases (beta-D-glucoside glucohydrolases, E.C. 3.2.1.21). Workers have reported several beta-glucosidases from maize (Zea mays L.; Poaceae), but have localized them mostly by indirect means. We have purified and partly characterized a 58-Ku beta-glucosidase from maize, which we conclude from a partial sequence analysis, from kinetic data, and from its localization is not identical to any of those already reported. A monoclonal antibody, mWP 19, binds this enzyme, and localizes it in the cell walls of maize coleoptiles. An earlier report showed that mWP19 inhibits peroxidase activity in crude cell wall extracts and can immunoprecipitate peroxidase activity from these extracts, yet purified preparations of the 58 Ku protein had little or no peroxidase activity. The level of sequence similarity between beta-glucosidases and peroxidases makes it unlikely that these enzymes share epitopes in common. Contrary to a previous conclusion, these results suggest that the enzyme recognized by mWP19 is not a peroxidase, but there is a wall peroxidase closely associated with the 58 Ku beta-glucosidase in crude preparations. Other workers also have co-purified distinct proteins with beta-glucosidases. We found no significant charge in the level of immunodetectable beta-glucosidase in mesocotyls or coleoptiles that precedes the red light-induced changes in the growth rate of these tissues.

  9. Kinetic and Surface Study of Single-Walled Aluminosilicate Nanotubes and Their Precursors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauricio Molina

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The structural and surface changes undergone by the different precursors that are produced during the synthesis of imogolite are reported. The surface changes that occur during the synthesis of imogolite were determined by electrophoretic migration (EM measurements, which enabled the identification of the time at which the critical precursor of the nanoparticles was generated. A critical parameter for understanding the evolution of these precursors is the isoelectric point (IEP, of which variation revealed that the precursors modify the number of active ≡Al-OH and ≡Si-OH sites during the formation of imogolite. We also found that the IEP is displaced to a higher pH level as a consequence of the surface differentiation that occurs during the synthesis. At the same time, we established that the pH of the reaction (pHrx decreases with the evolution and condensation of the precursors during aging. Integration of all of the obtained results related to the structural and surface properties allows an overall understanding of the different processes that occur and the products that are formed during the synthesis of imogolite.

  10. Interaction of multi-walled carbon nanotubes with perfluorinated sulfonic acid ionomers and surface treatment studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Shuang Ma; Dhiman, Rajnish; Borghei, Maryam

    2014-01-01

    The interaction between high surface area nano-carbon catalyst supports for proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) and perfluorinated sulfonic acid (Nafion®) ionomer was studied 19 fluorine nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (19F-NMR). The method was developed and improved for more...

  11. Roles for Cell Wall Glycopeptidolipid in Surface Adherence and Planktonic Dispersal of Mycobacterium avium

    Science.gov (United States)

    The opportunistic pathogen Mycobacterium avium is a significant inhabitant of biofilms in drinking water distribution systems. M. avium expresses on its cell surface serovar-specific glycopeptidolipids (ssGPLs). Studies have implicated the core GPL in biofilm formation by M. aviu...

  12. Surface, interface and bulk materials characterization using Indus synchrotron sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phase, Deodatta M.

    2014-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation sources, providing intense, polarized and stable beams of ultra violet, soft and hard x-ray photons, are having great impact on physics, chemistry, biology, materials science and other areas research. In particular synchrotron radiation has revolutionized materials characterization techniques by enhancing its capabilities for investigating the structural, electronic and magnetic properties of solids. The availability of synchrotron sources and necessary instrumentation has led to considerable improvements in spectral resolution and intensities. As a result, application scope of different materials characterization techniques has tremendously increased particularly in the analysis of solid surfaces, interfaces and bulk materials. The Indian synchrotron storage ring, Indus-1 and Indus-2 are in operation at RRCAT, Indore. The UGC-DAE CSR with the help of university scientist had designed and developed an angle integrated photoelectron spectroscopy (AlPES) beam line on Indus-1 storage ring of 450 MeV and polarized light beam line for soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy (SXAS) on Indus-2 storage ring of 2.5 GeV. (author)

  13. Surface characterization after subaperture reactive ion beam etching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miessler, Andre; Arnold, Thomas; Rauschenbach, Bernd [Leibniz-Institut fuer Oberflaechenmodifizierung (IOM), Leipzig (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    In usual ion beam etching processes using inert gas (Ar, Xe, Kr..) the material removal is determined by physical sputtering effects on the surface. The admixture of suitable gases (CF{sub 4}+O{sub 2}) into the glow discharge of the ion beam source leads to the generation of reactive particles, which are accelerated towards the substrate where they enhance the sputtering process by formation of volatile chemical reaction products. During the last two decades research in Reactive Ion Beam Etching (RIBE) has been done using a broad beam ion source which allows the treatment of smaller samples (diameter sample < diameter beam). Our goal was to apply a sub-aperture Kaufman-type ion source in combination with an applicative movement of the sample with respect to the source, which enables us to etch areas larger than the typical lateral dimensions of the ion beam. Concerning this matter, the etching behavior in the beam periphery plays a decisive role and has to be investigated. We use interferometry to characterize the final surface topography and XPS measurements to analyze the chemical composition of the samples after RIBE.

  14. Gypsum plasterboard walls: inspection, pathological characterization and statistical survey using an expert system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaião, C.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an expert system to support the inspection and diagnosis of partition walls or wall coverings mounted using the Drywall (DW construction method. This system includes a classification of anomalies in DW and their probable causes. This inspection system was used in a field work that included the observation of 121 DWs. This paper includes a statistical analysis of the anomalies observed during these inspections and their probable causes. The correlation between anomalies and causes in the sample is also thoroughly analyzed. Anomalies are also evaluated for area affected, size, repair urgency and aesthetic value of the affected area. The conclusions of the statistical analysis allowed the creation of an inventory of preventive measures to be implemented in the design, execution and use phases in order to lessen the magnitude or eradicate the occurrence of anomalies in DW. These measures could directly help improve the quality of construction.

    Este trabajo presenta un sistema experto de apoyo a la inspección y diagnóstico de tabiques o revestimientos de yeso laminado. Dicho sistema, que permite la clasificación de las anomalías del yeso laminado y sus causas probables, se empleó en un trabajo de campo en el que se estudiaron 121 elementos construidos con este material. El trabajo incluye el análisis estadístico de las anomalías detectadas durante las inspecciones y sus motivos probables. También se analizó en detalle la correlación entre las anomalías y sus causas, evaluándose aquellas en función de la superficie afectada, la urgencia de las reparaciones y el valor estético de la zona implicada. Las conclusiones del análisis estadístico permitieron la elaboración de un inventario de medidas preventivas que deberían implantarse en las fases de proyecto, ejecución y utilización de estos elementos a fin de erradicar la aparición de anomalías en el yeso laminado o reducir su frecuencia. Dichas

  15. Characterization of the antigenicity of Cpl1, a surface protein of Cryptococcus neoformans var. neoformans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Jian-Piao; Liu, Ling-Li; To, Kelvin K W; Lau, Candy C Y; Woo, Patrick C Y; Lau, Susanna K P; Guo, Yong-Hui; Ngan, Antonio H Y; Che, Xiao-Yan; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2015-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans var. neoformans is an important fungal pathogen. The capsule is a well established virulence factor and a target site for diagnostic tests. The CPL1 gene is required for capsular formation and virulence. The protein product Cpl1 has been proposed to be a secreted protein, but the characteristics of this protein have not been reported. Here we sought to characterize Cpl1. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the Cpl1 of C. neoformans var. neoformans and the Cpl1 orthologs identified in C. neoformans var. grubii and C. gattii formed a distinct cluster among related fungi; while the putative ortholog found in Trichosporon asahii was distantly related to the Cryptococcus cluster. We expressed Cpl1 abundantly as a secreted His-tagged protein in Pichia pastoris. The protein was used to immunize guinea pigs and rabbits for high titer mono-specific polyclonal antibody that was shown to be highly specific against the cell wall of C. neoformans var. neoformans and did not cross react with C. gattii, T. asahii, Aspergillus spp., Candida spp. and Penicillium spp. Using the anti-Cpl1 antibody, we detected Cpl1 protein in the fresh culture supernatant of C. neoformans var. neoformans and we showed by immunostaining that the Cpl1 protein was located on the surface. The Cpl1 protein is a specific surface protein of C. neoformans var. neoformans. © 2015 by The Mycological Society of America.

  16. Surface roughness effect on ultracold neutron interaction with a wall and implications for computer simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Steyerl, A.; Malik, S. S.; Desai, A. M.; Kaufman, C.

    2009-01-01

    We review the diffuse scattering and the loss coefficient in ultracold neutron reflection from slightly rough surfaces, report a surprising reduction in loss coefficient due to roughness, and discuss the possibility of transition from quantum treatment to ray optics. The results are used in a computer simulation of neutron storage in a recent neutron lifetime experiment that re-ported a large discrepancy of neutron lifetime with the current particle data value. Our partial re-analysis suggest...

  17. Fabrication and electrochemical characterization of multi-walled carbon nanotube electrodes for applications to nano-electrochemical sensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Sookhyun; Choi, Hyonkwang; Jeon, Minhyon; Vedala, Harindra; Kim, Taehyung; Choi, Wonbong

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we fabricated and electrochemically characterized two types of individual carbon nanotube electrodes: an as-produced multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWNT) electrode and a modified MWNT electrode. As-produced MWNTs were electrically contacted with Au/Ti layers by using nanolithography and RF magnetron sputtering. Open-ended modified MWNT electrodes were fabricated by using a reactive ion etching treatment under an oxygen atmosphere. We also performed cyclic voltammetry measurements to detect aqueous dopamine solutions with different concentrations. We found that an individual MWNT electrode, which had a small effective area, showed good electrochemical performance. The electrocatalytic behavior of the modified electrode, which had 'broken' open ends were better than that of the as-produced electrode with respect to sensitivity. The modified electrode was capable of detecting dopamine at the picomolar level. Therefore, an individual modified MWNT electrode has potential for applications to active components in nanobiosensors.

  18. Desorption of 1,3,5-Trichlorobenzene from Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes: Impact of Solution Chemistry and Surface Chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheikh Uddin

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The strong affinity of carbon nanotubes (CNTs to environmental contaminants has raised serious concern that CNTs may function as a carrier of environmental pollutants and lead to contamination in places where the environmental pollutants are not expected. However, this concern will not be realized until the contaminants are desorbed from CNTs. It is well recognized that the desorption of environmental pollutants from pre-laden CNTs varies with the environmental conditions, such as the solution pH and ionic strength. However, comprehensive investigation on the influence of solution chemistry on the desorption process has not been carried out, even though numerous investigations have been conducted to investigate the impact of solution chemistry on the adsorption of environmental pollutants on CNTs. The main objective of this study was to determine the influence of solution chemistry (e.g., pH, ionic strength and surface functionalization on the desorption of preloaded 1,3,5-trichlorobenzene (1,3,5-TCB from multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs. The results suggested that higher pH, ionic strength and natural organic matter in solution generally led to higher desorption of 1,3,5-TCB from MWNTs. However, the extent of change varied at different values of the tested parameters (e.g., pH 7. In addition, the impact of these parameters varied with MWNTs possessing different surface functional groups, suggesting that surface functionalization could considerably alter the environmental behaviors and impact of MWNTs.

  19. Surface roughness effect on ultracold neutron interaction with a wall and implications for computer simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steyerl, A.; Malik, S. S.; Desai, A. M.; Kaufman, C.

    2010-01-01

    We review the diffuse scattering and the loss coefficient in ultracold neutron reflection from slightly rough surfaces, report a surprising reduction in loss coefficient due to roughness, and discuss the possibility of transition from quantum treatment to ray optics. The results are used in a computer simulation of neutron storage in a recent neutron lifetime experiment that reported a large discrepancy of neutron lifetime with the current particle data value. Our partial reanalysis suggests the possibility of systematic effects that were not included in this publication.

  20. MHD Flow Towards a Permeable Surface with Prescribed Wall Heat Flux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishak, Anuar; Nazar, Roslinda; Pop, Ioan

    2009-01-01

    The steady magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) mixed convection flow towards a vertical permeable surface with prescribed heat flux is investigated. The governing partial differential equations are transformed into a system of ordinary differential equations, which is then solved numerically by a finite-difference method. The features of the flow and heat transfer characteristics for different values of the governing parameters are analysed and discussed. Both assisting and opposing flows are considered. It is found that dual solutions exist for the assisting flow, besides the solutions usually reported in the literature for the opposing fow

  1. Attachment of Salmonella strains to a plant cell wall model is modulated by surface characteristics and not by specific carbohydrate interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Michelle Sze-Fan; Moore, Sean C; Tabor, Rico F; Fegan, Narelle; Rahman, Sadequr; Dykes, Gary A

    2016-09-15

    Processing of fresh produce exposes cut surfaces of plant cell walls that then become vulnerable to human foodborne pathogen attachment and contamination, particularly by Salmonella enterica. Plant cell walls are mainly composed of the polysaccharides cellulose, pectin and hemicelluloses (predominantly xyloglucan). Our previous work used bacterial cellulose-based plant cell wall models to study the interaction between Salmonella and the various plant cell wall components. We demonstrated that Salmonella attachment was favoured in the presence of pectin while xyloglucan had no effect on its attachment. Xyloglucan significantly increased the attachment of Salmonella cells to the plant cell wall model only when it was in association with pectin. In this study, we investigate whether the plant cell wall polysaccharides mediate Salmonella attachment to the bacterial cellulose-based plant cell wall models through specific carbohydrate interactions or through the effects of carbohydrates on the physical characteristics of the attachment surface. We found that none of the monosaccharides that make up the plant cell wall polysaccharides specifically inhibit Salmonella attachment to the bacterial cellulose-based plant cell wall models. Confocal laser scanning microscopy showed that Salmonella cells can penetrate and attach within the tightly arranged bacterial cellulose network. Analysis of images obtained from atomic force microscopy revealed that the bacterial cellulose-pectin-xyloglucan composite with 0.3 % (w/v) xyloglucan, previously shown to have the highest number of Salmonella cells attached to it, had significantly thicker cellulose fibrils compared to other composites. Scanning electron microscopy images also showed that the bacterial cellulose and bacterial cellulose-xyloglucan composites were more porous when compared to the other composites containing pectin. Our study found that the attachment of Salmonella cells to cut plant cell walls was not mediated by

  2. Surface and Electrical Characterization of Conjugated Molecular Wires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demissie, Abel Tesfahun

    This thesis describes the surface and electrical characterization of ultrathin organic films and interfaces. These films were synthesized on the surface of gold by utilizing layer by layer synthesis via imine condensation. Film growth by imine click (condensation) chemistry is particularly useful for molecular electronics experiments because it provides a convenient means to obtain and extend ?-conjugation in the growth direction. However, in the context of film growth from a solid substrate, the reaction yield per step has not been characterized previously, though it is critically important. To address these issues, my research focused on a comprehensive characterization of oligophenyleneimine (OPI) wires via Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE), reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS), and cyclic voltammetry (CV). In addition, we had the unique opportunity of developing the first of its kind implementation of nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) to probe the intensity of carbon atoms after each addition step. Overall the combination of various techniques indicated that film growth proceeds in a quantitative manner. Furthermore, the NRA experiment was optimized to measure the carbon content in self-assembled monolayers of alkyl thiols. The results indicated well-resolved coverage values for ultrathin films with consecutive steps of 2 carbon atoms per molecule. Another fundamental problem in molecular electronics is the vast discrepancy in the values of measured resistance per molecule between small and large area molecular junctions. In collaboration with researchers at the National University of Singapore, we addressed these issues by comparing the electrical properties of OPI wires with the eutectic gallium indium alloy (EGaIn) junction (1000 mum2), and conducting probe atomic force microscopy (CP-AFM) junction (50 nm2). Our results showed that intensive (i.e., area

  3. Physical and chemical characterization of surfaces of nitrogen implanted steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moncoffre, N.

    1986-01-01

    The studied steels are of industrial type (42CD4, 100C6, Z200C13). Very often, the low carbon steel XCO6 has been used as a reference material. The aim of the research is to understand and to explain the mechanisms of wear resistance to improvement. A good characterization of the implanted layer is thus necessary. It implies to establish the distribution profiles of the implanted ions to identify the chemical and structural state of the phases created during implantation as a function of various implantation parameters (dose, temperature). Temperature is the particularly parameter. Its influence is put in evidence both during implantation and during annealings under vacuum. Nitrogen distribution profiles are performed thanks to the non destructive 15 N(p,αγ) 12 C nuclear reaction. The chemical state of the Fe-N phases formed by implantation is determined using first Electron Conversion Moessbauer Spectroscopy and secondly, as a complement, using grazing angle X ray diffraction. The detected compounds are ε-nitrides, ε-carbonitrides, (N) - martensite and α-Fe 16 N 2 whose evolution is carefully followed versus temperature. The diffraction technique reveals a texture of the implanted layer. This preferentiel orientation is found to be temperature dependent but dose independent. The carbon presence at the surface is studied as a function of implantation conditions (vacuum, temperature, dose). Carbon profiling is obtained using α backscattering ( 12 C(α,α') reaction at 5,7 MeV). Thus is achieved a complete characterization of the implanted zone whose evolution as a function of implantation parameters (especially temperature) is correlated with tribological results [fr

  4. The adsorption of biomolecules to multi-walled carbon nanotubes is influenced by both pulmonary surfactant lipids and surface chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Bing

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During production and processing of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs, they may be inhaled and may enter the pulmonary circulation. It is essential that interactions with involved body fluids like the pulmonary surfactant, the blood and others are investigated, particularly as these interactions could lead to coating of the tubes and may affect their chemical and physical characteristics. The aim of this study was to characterize the possible coatings of different functionalized MWCNTs in a cell free environment. Results To simulate the first contact in the lung, the tubes were coated with pulmonary surfactant and subsequently bound lipids were characterized. The further coating in the blood circulation was simulated by incubating the tubes in blood plasma. MWCNTs were amino (NH2- and carboxyl (-COOH-modified, in order to investigate the influence on the bound lipid and protein patterns. It was shown that surfactant lipids bind unspecifically to different functionalized MWCNTs, in contrast to the blood plasma proteins which showed characteristic binding patterns. Patterns of bound surfactant lipids were altered after a subsequent incubation in blood plasma. In addition, it was found that bound plasma protein patterns were altered when MWCNTs were previously coated with pulmonary surfactant. Conclusions A pulmonary surfactant coating and the functionalization of MWCNTs have both the potential to alter the MWCNTs blood plasma protein coating and to determine their properties and behaviour in biological systems.

  5. Characterization of the Eimeria maxima sporozoite surface protein IMP1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, M C; Fetterer, R; Miska, K; Tuo, W; Kwok, O; Dubey, J P

    2015-07-30

    The purpose of this study was to characterize Eimeria maxima immune-mapped protein 1 (IMP1) that is hypothesized to play a role in eliciting protective immunity against E. maxima infection in chickens. RT-PCR analysis of RNA from unsporulated and sporulating E. maxima oocysts revealed highest transcription levels at 6-12h of sporulation with a considerable downregulation thereafter. Alignment of IMP1 coding sequence from Houghton, Weybridge, and APU-1 strains of E. maxima revealed single nucleotide polymorphisms that in some instances led to amino acid changes in the encoded protein sequence. The E. maxima (APU-1) IMP1 cDNA sequence was cloned and expressed in 2 different polyHis Escherichia coli expression vectors. Regardless of expression vector, recombinant E. maxima IMP1 (rEmaxIMP1) was fairly unstable in non-denaturing buffer, which is consistent with stability analysis of the primary amino acid sequence. Antisera specific for rEmaxIMP1 identified a single 72 kDa protein or a 61 kDa protein by non-reducing or reducing SDS-PAGE/immunoblotting. Immunofluorescence staining with anti-rEmaxIMP1, revealed intense surface staining of E. maxima sporozoites, with negligible staining of merozoite stages. Immuno-histochemical staining of E. maxima-infected chicken intestinal tissue revealed staining of E. maxima developmental stages in the lamnia propia and crypts at both 24 and 48 h post-infection, and negligible staining thereafter. The expression of IMP1 during early stages of in vivo development and its location on the sporozoite surface may explain in part the immunoprotective effect of this protein against E. maxima infection. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. A Structurally Specialized Uniform Wall Layer is Essential for Constructing Wall Ingrowth Papillae in Transfer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Xue; Zhang, Hui-Ming; Offler, Christina E.; Patrick, John W.

    2017-01-01

    Transfer cells are characterized by wall labyrinths with either a flange or reticulate architecture. A literature survey established that reticulate wall ingrowth papillae ubiquitously arise from a modified component of their wall labyrinth, termed the uniform wall layer; a structure absent from flange transfer cells. This finding sparked an investigation of the deposition characteristics and role of the uniform wall layer using a Vicia faba cotyledon culture system. On transfer of cotyledons to culture, their adaxial epidermal cells spontaneously trans-differentiate to a reticulate architecture comparable to their abaxial epidermal transfer cell counterparts formed in planta. Uniform wall layer construction commenced once adaxial epidermal cell expansion had ceased to overlay the original outer periclinal wall on its inner surface. In contrast to the dense ring-like lattice of cellulose microfibrils in the original primary wall, the uniform wall layer was characterized by a sparsely dispersed array of linear cellulose microfibrils. A re-modeled cortical microtubule array exerted no influence on uniform wall layer formation or on its cellulose microfibril organization. Surprisingly, formation of the uniform wall layer was not dependent upon depositing a cellulose scaffold. In contrast, uniform wall cellulose microfibrils were essential precursors for constructing wall ingrowth papillae. On converging to form wall ingrowth papillae, the cellulose microfibril diameters increased 3-fold. This event correlated with up-regulated differential, and transfer-cell specific, expression of VfCesA3B while transcript levels of other cellulose biosynthetic-related genes linked with primary wall construction were substantially down-regulated. PMID:29259611

  7. Surface characterization of hemodialysis membranes based on streaming potential measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, C; Jacobasch, H J; Reichelt, G

    1995-01-01

    Hemodialysis membranes made from cellulose (CUPROPHAN, HEMOPHAN) and sulfonated polyethersulfone (SPES) were characterized using the streaming potential technique to determine the zeta potential at their interfaces against well-defined aqueous solutions of varied pH and potassium chloride concentrations. Streaming potential measurements enable distinction between different membrane materials. In addition to parameters of the electrochemical double layer at membrane interfaces, thermodynamic characteristics of adsorption of different solved species were evaluated. For that aim a description of double layer formation as suggested by Börner and Jacobasch (in: Electrokinetic Phenomena, p. 231. Institut für Technologie der Polymere, Dresden (1989)) was applied which is based on the generally accepted model of the electrochemical double layer according to Stern (Z. Elektrochemie 30, 508 (1924)) and Grahame (Chem. Rev. 41, 441 (1947)). The membranes investigated show different surface acidic/basic and polar/nonpolar behavior. Furthermore, alterations of membrane interfaces through adsorption processes of components of biologically relevant solutions were shown to be detectable by streaming potential measurements.

  8. Characterization of microchannel anechoic corners formed by surface acoustic waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Destgeer, Ghulam; Alam, Ashar; Ahmed, Husnain; Park, Jinsoo; Jung, Jin Ho; Park, Kwangseok; Sung, Hyung Jin

    2018-02-01

    Surface acoustic waves (SAWs) generated in a piezoelectric substrate couple with a liquid according to Snell's law such that a compressional acoustic wave propagates obliquely at a Rayleigh angle ( θ t) inside the microchannel to form a region devoid of a direct acoustic field, which is termed a microchannel anechoic corner (MAC). In the present study, we used microchannels with various heights and widths to characterize the width of the MAC region formed by a single travelling SAW. The attenuation of high-frequency SAWs produced a strong acoustic streaming flow that moved the particles in and out of the MAC region, whereas reflections of the acoustic waves within the microchannel resulted in standing acoustic waves that trapped particles at acoustic pressure nodes located within or outside of the MAC region. A range of actuation frequencies and particle diameters were used to investigate the effects of the acoustic streaming flow and the direct acoustic radiation forces by the travelling as well as standing waves on the particle motion with respect to the MAC region. The width of the MAC ( w c), measured experimentally by tracing the particles, increased with the height of the microchannel ( h m) according to a simple trigonometric equation w c = h m × tan ( θ t ).

  9. Characterization of Glutamatergic Neurons in the Rat Atrial Intrinsic Cardiac Ganglia that Project to the Cardiac Ventricular Wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ting; Miller, Kenneth E.

    2016-01-01

    The intrinsic cardiac nervous system modulates cardiac function by acting as an integration site for regulating autonomic efferent cardiac output. This intrinsic system is proposed to be composed of a short cardio-cardiac feedback control loop within the cardiac innervation hierarchy. For example, electrophysiological studies have postulated the presence of sensory neurons in intrinsic cardiac ganglia for regional cardiac control. There is still a knowledge gap, however, about the anatomical location and neurochemical phenotype of sensory neurons inside intrinsic cardiac ganglia. In the present study, rat intrinsic cardiac ganglia neurons were characterized neurochemically with immunohistochemistry using glutamatergic markers: vesicular glutamate transporters 1 and 2 (VGLUT1; VGLUT2), and glutaminase (GLS), the enzyme essential for glutamate production. Glutamatergic neurons (VGLUT1/VGLUT2/GLS) in the ICG that have axons to the ventricles were identified by retrograde tracing of wheat germ agglutinin-horseradish peroxidase (WGA-HRP) injected in the ventricular wall. Co-labeling of VGLUT1, VGLUT2, and GLS with the vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT) was used to evaluate the relationship between post-ganglionic autonomic neurons and glutamatergic neurons. Sequential labeling of VGLUT1 and VGLUT2 in adjacent tissue sections was used to evaluate the co-localization of VGLUT1 and VGLUT2 in ICG neurons. Our studies yielded the following results: (1) intrinsic cardiac ganglia contain glutamatergic neurons with GLS for glutamate production and VGLUT1 and 2 for transport of glutamate into synaptic vesicles; (2) atrial intrinsic cardiac ganglia contain neurons that project to ventricle walls and these neurons are glutamatergic; (3) many glutamatergic ICG neurons also were cholinergic, expressing VAChT. (4) VGLUT1 and VGLUT2 co-localization occurred in ICG neurons with variation of their protein expression level. Investigation of both glutamatergic and cholinergic ICG

  10. Preparation and characterization of multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNTs)-supported Pt-Ru catalyst for methanol electrooxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang Chunwei [Department of Applied Chemistry, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China)], E-mail: cw.yang@hit.edu.cn; Wang Dianlong; Hu Xinguo; Dai Changsong [Department of Applied Chemistry, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Zhang Liang [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China)

    2008-01-10

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) as a support of PtRu catalyst nanocomposites were prepared by colloid method in this work. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) all indicate that ultrasonic treatment can effectively functionalize MWCNTs, endowing them with groups that can act as nucleation sites which can favor well-dispersed deposition of PtRu clusters on their surface. The PtRu/MWCNTs catalysts have a high and homogeneous dispersion of spherical PtRu metal particles with a narrow particle-size distribution. From XPS tests, in PtRu/MWCNTs catalysts Ru can weaken the out-shell electrons of Pt because a part of Ru form alloy with Pt. The remnant Ru exists in oxidation and provides abundant oxygen to nearby Pt, as accelerated desorption and oxidation of intermediate products of methanol oxidation at surface of Pt. By a series of electrochemistry measurements, the PtRu/MWCNTs catalysts display significantly higher performance than the PtRu/XC-72 catalysts. Finally, schematic procedures for the oxidation of MWCNTs and synthesis of PtRu/MWCNTs catalysts were given.

  11. Preparation and characterization of multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNTs)-supported Pt-Ru catalyst for methanol electrooxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Chunwei; Wang Dianlong; Hu Xinguo; Dai Changsong; Zhang Liang

    2008-01-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) as a support of PtRu catalyst nanocomposites were prepared by colloid method in this work. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) all indicate that ultrasonic treatment can effectively functionalize MWCNTs, endowing them with groups that can act as nucleation sites which can favor well-dispersed deposition of PtRu clusters on their surface. The PtRu/MWCNTs catalysts have a high and homogeneous dispersion of spherical PtRu metal particles with a narrow particle-size distribution. From XPS tests, in PtRu/MWCNTs catalysts Ru can weaken the out-shell electrons of Pt because a part of Ru form alloy with Pt. The remnant Ru exists in oxidation and provides abundant oxygen to nearby Pt, as accelerated desorption and oxidation of intermediate products of methanol oxidation at surface of Pt. By a series of electrochemistry measurements, the PtRu/MWCNTs catalysts display significantly higher performance than the PtRu/XC-72 catalysts. Finally, schematic procedures for the oxidation of MWCNTs and synthesis of PtRu/MWCNTs catalysts were given

  12. Electrochemical Characterization of O2 Plasma Functionalized Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube Electrode for Legionella pneumophila DNA Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Eun Jin; Lee, Jun-Yong; Hyup Kim, Jun; Kug Kim, Sun; Lee, Cheol Jin; Min, Nam Ki

    2010-08-01

    An electrochemical DNA sensor for Legionella pneumophila detection was constructed using O2 plasma functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) film as a working electrode (WE). The cyclic voltammetry (CV) results revealed that the electrocatalytic activity of plasma functionalized MWCNT (pf-MWCNT) significantly changed depending on O2 plasma treatment time due to some oxygen containing functional groups on the pf-MWCNT surface. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) images and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) spectra were also presented the changes of their surface morphologies and oxygen composition before and after plasma treatment. From a comparison study, it was found that the pf-MWCNT WEs had higher electrocatalytic activity and more capability of probe DNA immobilization: therefore, electrochemical signal changes by probe DNA immobilization and hybridization on pf-MWCNT WEs were larger than on Au WEs. The pf-MWCNT based DNA sensor was able to detect a concentration range of 10 pM-100 nM of target DNA to detect L. pneumophila.

  13. Tabique walls composite earth-based material characterization in the Alto Douro wine region, Portugal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui CARDOSO

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The Alto Douro Wine Region, located in the northeast of Portugal, a UNESCO World Heritage Site, presents a relevant tabique building stock, a traditional vernacular building technology. A technology based on a timber framed structure filled with a composite earth-based material. Meanwhile, previous research works have revealed that, principally in rural areas, this Portuguese heritage is highly deteriorated and damaged because of the rareness of conservation and strengthening works, which is partly related to the non-engineered character of this technology and to the growing phenomenon of rural to urban migration. Those aspects associated with the lack of scientific studies related to this technology motivated the writing of this paper, whose main purpose is the physical and chemical characterization of the earth-based material applied in the tabique buildings of that region. Consequently, an experimental work was conducted and the results obtained allowed, among others, the proposal of a particle size distribution envelope in respect to this material. This information will provide the means to assess the suitability of a given earth-based material in regard to this technology. The knowledge from this study could be very useful for the development of future normative documents and as a reference for architects and engineers that work with earth to guide and regulate future conservation, rehabilitation or construction processes helping to preserve this fabulous legacy.

  14. Surface confined metallosupramolecular architectures: formation and scanning tunneling microscopy characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shan-Shan; Northrop, Brian H; Yuan, Qun-Hui; Wan, Li-Jun; Stang, Peter J

    2009-02-17

    Metallosupramolecular compounds have attracted a great deal of attention over the past two decades largely because of their unique, highly complex structural characteristics and their potential electronic, magnetic, optical, and catalytic properties. These molecules can be prepared with relative ease using coordination-driven self-assembly techniques. In particular, the use of electron-poor square-planar Pt(II) transition metals in conjunction with rigid, electron-rich pyridyl donors has enabled the spontaneous self-assembly of a rich library of 2D metallacyclic and 3D metallacage assemblies via the directional-bonding approach. With this progress in the preparation and characterization of metallosupramolecules, researchers have now turned their attention toward fully exploring and developing their materials properties. Assembling metallosupramolecular compounds on solid supports represents a vitally important step toward developing their materials properties. Surfaces provide a means of uniformly aligning and orienting these highly symmetric metallacycles and metallacages. This uniformity increases the level of coherence between molecules above that which can be achieved in the solution phase and provides a way to integrate adsorbed layers, or adlayers, into a solid-state materials setting. The dynamic nature of kinetically labile Pt(II)-N coordination bonds requires us to adjust deposition and imaging conditions to retain the assemblies' stability. Toward these aims, we have used scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) to image these adlayers and to understand the factors that govern surface self-assembly and the interactions that influence their structure and stability. This Account describes our efforts to deposit 2D rectangular and square metallacycles and 3D trigonal bipyramidal and chiral trigonal prism metallacages on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) and Au(111) substrates to give intact assemblies and ordered adlayers. We have investigated the effects

  15. A comparison RSM and ANN surface roughness models in thin-wall machining of Ti6Al4V using vegetable oils under MQL-condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohruni, Amrifan Saladin; Yanis, Muhammad; Sharif, Safian; Yani, Irsyadi; Yuliwati, Erna; Ismail, Ahmad Fauzi; Shayfull, Zamree

    2017-09-01

    Thin-wall components as usually applied in the structural parts of aeronautical industry require significant challenges in machining. Unacceptable surface roughness can occur during machining of thin-wall. Titanium product such Ti6Al4V is mostly applied to get the appropriate surface texture in thin wall designed requirements. In this study, the comparison of the accuracy between Response Surface Methodology (RSM) and Artificial Neural Networks (ANN) in the prediction of surface roughness was conducted. Furthermore, the machining tests were carried out under Minimum Quantity Lubrication (MQL) using AlCrN-coated carbide tools. The use of Coconut oil as cutting fluids was also chosen in order to evaluate its performance when involved in end milling. This selection of cutting fluids is based on the better performance of oxidative stability than that of other vegetable based cutting fluids. The cutting speed, feed rate, radial and axial depth of cut were used as independent variables, while surface roughness is evaluated as the dependent variable or output. The results showed that the feed rate is the most significant factors in increasing the surface roughness value followed by the radial depth of cut and lastly the axial depth of cut. In contrary, the surface becomes smoother with increasing the cutting speed. From a comparison of both methods, the ANN model delivered a better accuracy than the RSM model.

  16. Structural characterization of pectic hairy regions isolated from apple cell walls = Structuurkenmerken van vertakte pectine fragmenten afkomstig van de celwanden van appel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schols, H.

    1995-01-01

    Cell wall pectic substances have a great influence on the production and quality aspects of apple juice. Apple juices were characterized by their polysaccharide content and composition. A pectic fraction, retained by ultrafiltration of a liquefaction juice, was isolated and termed MHR

  17. Surface mineralization and characterization of tobacco mosaic virus biotemplated nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freer, Alexander S.

    The genetically engineered tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) has been utilized as a biotemplate in the formation of nanoparticles with the intent of furthering the understanding of the biotemplated nanoparticles formed in the absence of an external reducing agent. Specifically, the work aims to provide better knowledge of the final particle characteristics and how these properties could be altered to better fit the need of functional devices. Three achievements have been accomplished including a method for controlling final particle size, characterizing the resistivity of palladium coated TMV, and the application of TMV as an additive in nanometric calcium carbonate synthesis. Until the last 5 years, formation of metal nanoparticles on the surface of TMV has always occurred with the addition of an external reducing agent. The surface functionalities of genetically engineered TMV allow for the reduction of palladium in the absence of an external reducing agent. This process has been furthered to understand how palladium concentration affects the final coating uniformity and thickness. By confirming an ideal ratio of palladium and TMV concentrations, a uniform coat of palladium is formed around the viral nanorod. Altering the number of palladium coating cycles at these concentrations allows for a controllable average diameter of the final nanorods. The average particle diameter was determined by small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) analysis by comparing the experimental results to the model of scattering by an infinitely long cylinder. The SAXS results were confirmed through transmission electron microscopy images of individual Pd-TMV nanorods. Secondly, methodologies to determine the electrical resistivity of the genetically engineered TMV biotemplated palladium nanoparticles were created to provide valuable previously missing information. Two fairly common nanoelectronic characterization techniques were combined to create the novel approach to obtain the desired

  18. Characterization of Lactococcus lactis response to ampicillin and ciprofloxacin using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Panxue; Pang, Shintaro; Zhang, Hua; Fan, Mingtao; He, Lili

    2016-01-01

    Decades of antibiotic use or misuse has resulted in antibiotic resistance in lactic acid bacteria, a group of common culture starters and probiotic microorganisms. This has urged researchers to study how lactic acid bacteria respond to antibiotics, so as to have a better strategy to identify and predict the antibiotic-resistant bacteria. This study aimed to characterize the biochemical profiles of Lactococcus lactis responding to antibiotics using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). Lactococcus lactis exposed to antibiotics was mixed with 50-nm gold nanoparticles for subsequent SERS measurements. The SERS spectra analyzed by principal component analysis showed no significant change after 30 min of antibiotic treatment, whereas distinct changes were clearly observed after 60 and 90 min of antibiotic treatment. Different antibiotics induced different spectral changes, and these changes revealed the detailed biochemical information of cellular responses. This study demonstrates that the SERS method developed not only senses the changes in the bacterial cell wall, but also reveals details of the biochemical profiles, which help us to understand how lactic acid bacteria respond to antibiotics, as well as to set a base for the detection of antibiotic susceptibility of bacteria by SERS.

  19. A stent for co-delivering paclitaxel and nitric oxide from abluminal and luminal surfaces: Preparation, surface characterization, and in vitro drug release studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallo, Annemarie; Mani, Gopinath, E-mail: Gopinath.Mani@usd.edu

    2013-08-15

    Most drug-eluting stents currently available are coated with anti-proliferative drugs on both abluminal (toward blood vessel wall) and luminal (toward lumen) surfaces to prevent neointimal hyperplasia. While the abluminal delivery of anti-proliferative drugs is useful for controlling neointimal hyperplasia, the luminal delivery of such drugs impairs or prevents endothelialization which causes late stent thrombosis. This research is focused on developing a bidirectional dual drug-eluting stent to co-deliver an anti-proliferative agent (paclitaxel – PAT) and an endothelial cell promoting agent (nitric oxide – NO) from abluminal and luminal surfaces of the stent, respectively. Phosphonoacetic acid, a polymer-free drug delivery platform, was initially coated on the stents. Then, the PAT and NO donor drugs were co-coated on the abluminal and luminal stent surfaces, respectively. The co-coating of drugs was collectively confirmed by the surface characterization techniques such as Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), 3D optical surface profilometry, and contact angle goniometry. SEM showed that the integrity of the co-coating of drugs was maintained without delamination or cracks formation occurring during the stent expansion experiments. In vitro drug release studies showed that the PAT was released from the abluminal stent surfaces in a biphasic manner, which is an initial burst followed by a slow and sustained release. The NO was burst released from the luminal stent surfaces. Thus, this study demonstrated the co-delivery of PAT and NO from abluminal and luminal stent surfaces, respectively. The stent developed in this study has potential applications in inhibiting neointimal hyperplasia as well as encouraging luminal endothelialization to prevent late stent thrombosis.

  20. A stent for co-delivering paclitaxel and nitric oxide from abluminal and luminal surfaces: Preparation, surface characterization, and in vitro drug release studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallo, Annemarie; Mani, Gopinath

    2013-01-01

    Most drug-eluting stents currently available are coated with anti-proliferative drugs on both abluminal (toward blood vessel wall) and luminal (toward lumen) surfaces to prevent neointimal hyperplasia. While the abluminal delivery of anti-proliferative drugs is useful for controlling neointimal hyperplasia, the luminal delivery of such drugs impairs or prevents endothelialization which causes late stent thrombosis. This research is focused on developing a bidirectional dual drug-eluting stent to co-deliver an anti-proliferative agent (paclitaxel – PAT) and an endothelial cell promoting agent (nitric oxide – NO) from abluminal and luminal surfaces of the stent, respectively. Phosphonoacetic acid, a polymer-free drug delivery platform, was initially coated on the stents. Then, the PAT and NO donor drugs were co-coated on the abluminal and luminal stent surfaces, respectively. The co-coating of drugs was collectively confirmed by the surface characterization techniques such as Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), 3D optical surface profilometry, and contact angle goniometry. SEM showed that the integrity of the co-coating of drugs was maintained without delamination or cracks formation occurring during the stent expansion experiments. In vitro drug release studies showed that the PAT was released from the abluminal stent surfaces in a biphasic manner, which is an initial burst followed by a slow and sustained release. The NO was burst released from the luminal stent surfaces. Thus, this study demonstrated the co-delivery of PAT and NO from abluminal and luminal stent surfaces, respectively. The stent developed in this study has potential applications in inhibiting neointimal hyperplasia as well as encouraging luminal endothelialization to prevent late stent thrombosis.

  1. Spinorial characterizations of surfaces into 3-dimensional psuedo-Riemannian space forms

    OpenAIRE

    Lawn , Marie-Amélie; Roth , Julien

    2011-01-01

    9 pages; We give a spinorial characterization of isometrically immersed surfaces of arbitrary signature into 3-dimensional pseudo-Riemannian space forms. For Lorentzian surfaces, this generalizes a recent work of the first author in $\\mathbb{R}^{2,1}$ to other Lorentzian space forms. We also characterize immersions of Riemannian surfaces in these spaces. From this we can deduce analogous results for timelike immersions of Lorentzian surfaces in space forms of corresponding signature, as well ...

  2. Pt nanoparticle modified single walled carbon nanotube network electrodes for electrocatalysis: control of the specific surface area over three orders of magnitude

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miller, T.S.; Sansuk, S.; Lai, Stanley; Macpherson, J.V.; Unwin, P.R.

    2015-01-01

    The electrodeposition of Pt nanoparticles (NPs) on two-dimensional single walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) network electrodes is investigated as a means of tailoring electrode surfaces with a well-defined amount of electrocatalytic material. Both Pt NP deposition and electrocatalytic studies are

  3. A global model for SF6 plasmas coupling reaction kinetics in the gas phase and on the surface of the reactor walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kokkoris, George; Panagiotopoulos, Apostolos; Gogolides, Evangelos; Goodyear, Andy; Cooke, Mike

    2009-01-01

    Gas phase and reactor wall-surface kinetics are coupled in a global model for SF 6 plasmas. A complete set of gas phase and surface reactions is formulated. The rate coefficients of the electron impact reactions are based on pertinent cross section data from the literature, which are integrated over a Druyvesteyn electron energy distribution function. The rate coefficients of the surface reactions are adjustable parameters and are calculated by fitting the model to experimental data from an inductively coupled plasma reactor, i.e. F atom density and pressure change after the ignition of the discharge. The model predicts that SF 6 , F, F 2 and SF 4 are the dominant neutral species while SF 5 + and F - are the dominant ions. The fit sheds light on the interaction between the gas phase and the reactor walls. A loss mechanism for SF x radicals by deposition of a fluoro-sulfur film on the reactor walls is needed to predict the experimental data. It is found that there is a net production of SF 5 , F 2 and SF 6 , and a net consumption of F, SF 3 and SF 4 on the reactor walls. Surface reactions as well as reactions between neutral species in the gas phase are found to be important sources and sinks of the neutral species.

  4. Construction and characterization of a new high current ion source for research of impact of hydrogen irradiation on wall materials for use in nuclear fusion reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arredondo Parra, Rodrigo; Neu, Rudolf [Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, Garching (Germany); Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Garching (Germany); Oberkofler, Martin; Schmid, Klaus; Weghorn, Arno [Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, Garching (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    The HSQ (HochStromQuelle) is a high current DuoPIGatron type ion source used for research in surface properties of wall materials for nuclear fusion reactors. The existing HSQ-I will be replaced by the conceptually identical HSQ-II, currently under construction. Varying the acceleration potential and optimizing gas inflow and beam focusing grid voltage, ion currents before the deflecting magnet between 10 and 875 μA were reached for acceleration voltages of 0.7 to 8 kV. The ion beam footprint will be characterized, and ion optics will be installed before and after the deflecting magnet, capable of bending 10 keV Ar. A monoenergetic beam of a single species (e.g. D{sub 3}{sup +}) will finally be used for irradiation of samples in the separate implantation chamber at a base pressure of 10{sup -8} mbar. The energy of the impinging particles ranges from 200 eV/D to several keV/D. Fluxes of 10{sup 15} D/cm{sup 2}/s to the target are expected. The temperature of the sample is varied via electron impact heating and the sample weight can be assessed in situ by means of a magnetic suspension balance.

  5. Characterization methods of nano-patterned surfaces generated by induction heating assisted injection molding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Peter Torben; Ravn, Christian; Menotti, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    An induction heating-assisted injection molding (IHAIM) process developed by the authors is used to replicate surfaces containing random nano-patterns. The injection molding setup is developed so that an induction heating system rapidly heats the cavity wall at rates of up to 10◦C/s. In order...

  6. Dependence of optical phase modulation on anchoring strength of dielectric shield wall surfaces in small liquid crystal pixels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isomae, Yoshitomo; Shibata, Yosei; Ishinabe, Takahiro; Fujikake, Hideo

    2018-03-01

    We demonstrated that the uniform phase modulation in a pixel can be realized by optimizing the anchoring strength on the walls and the wall width in the dielectric shield wall structure, which is the needed pixel structure for realizing a 1-µm-pitch optical phase modulator. The anchoring force degrades the uniformity of the phase modulation in ON-state pixels, but it also keeps liquid crystals from rotating against the leakage of an electric field. We clarified that the optimal wall width and anchoring strength are 250 nm and less than 10-4 J/m2, respectively.

  7. Characterizing the surface charge of synthetic nanomembranes by the streaming potential method

    OpenAIRE

    Datta, Subhra; Conlisk, A. T.; Kanani, Dharmesh M.; Zydney, Andrew L.; Fissell, William H.; Roy, Shuvo

    2010-01-01

    The inference of the surface charge of polyethylene glycol (PEG)-coated and uncoated silicon membranes with nanoscale pore sizes from streaming potential measurements in the presence of finite electric double layer (EDL) effects is studied theoretically and experimentally. The developed theoretical model for inferring the pore wall surface charge density from streaming potential measurements is applicable to arbitrary pore cross-sectional shapes and accounts for the effect of finite salt conc...

  8. Electrochemical characterization of mixed self-assembled films of water-soluble single-walled carbon nanotube-poly(m-aminobenzene sulfonic acid) and Iron(II) tetrasulfophthalocyanine

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Agboola, BO

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The redox activities of water-soluble iron(II) tetrasulfophthalocyanine (FeTSPc) and single-walled carbon nanotube-poly(m-aminobenzene sulfonic acid) (SWCNT-PABS) adsorbed on a gold surface precoated with a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of 2...

  9. Effect of the fluorination technique on the surface-fluorination patterning of double-walled carbon nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyubov G. Bulusheva

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWCNTs are fluorinated using (1 fluorine F2 at 200 °C, (2 gaseous BrF3 at room temperature, and (3 CF4 radio-frequency plasma functionalization. These have been comparatively studied using transmission electron microscopy and infrared, Raman, X-ray photoelectron, and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS spectroscopy. A formation of covalent C–F bonds and a considerable reduction in the intensity of radial breathing modes from the outer shells of DWCNTs are observed for all samples. Differences in the electronic state of fluorine and the C–F vibrations for three kinds of the fluorinated DWCNTs are attributed to distinct local surroundings of the attached fluorine atoms. Possible fluorine patterns realized through a certain fluorination technique are revealed from comparison of experimental NEXAFS F K-edge spectra with quantum-chemical calculations of various models. It is proposed that fluorination with F2 and BrF3 produces small fully fluorinated areas and short fluorinated chains, respectively, while the treatment with CF4 plasma results in various attached species, including single or paired fluorine atoms and –CF3 groups. The results demonstrate a possibility of different patterning of carbon surfaces through choosing the fluorination method.

  10. Tritium retention on the surface of stainless steel samples fixed on the plasma-facing wall in LHD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuyama, Masao; Abe, Shinsuke; Nishimura, Kiyohiko; Ashikawa, Naoko; Sagara, Akio; Oya, Yasuhisa; Okuno, Kenji; Yamauchi, Yuji; Nobuta, Yuji

    2014-01-01

    Effects of pre-heating for retention and distribution of tritium have been studied using samples fixed on the wall of the Large Helical Device during a plasma campaign. The samples were fixed at four different locations. The plasma-facing surface of the samples was covered with deposition layers of different thickness in each sample. Retention behavior in deposition layers was observed using β-ray-induced X-ray spectrometry and imaging plate technique. Pre-heating of the samples in vacuum was changed in a temperature range from 300 to 623 K, and subsequent tritium exposure was carried out at 300 K in every runs. Non-uniformity of tritium distribution clearly appeared even in the as-received samples which was not pre-heated. It is considered, therefore, that non-uniform adsorption sites of tritium have been produced during a formation process of deposition layers. In addition, it was seen that the amount of tritium retention increased with an increase in the pre-heating temperature, indicating that adsorption sites of tritium were newly formed in the deposition layers by heating in vacuum. (author)

  11. Cellobiose Dehydrogenase Aryl Diazonium Modified Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes: Enhanced Direct Electron Transfer through a Positively Charged Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    One of the challenges in the field of biosensors and biofuel cells is to establish a highly efficient electron transfer rate between the active site of redox enzymes and electrodes to fully access the catalytic potential of the biocatalyst and achieve high current densities. We report on very efficient direct electron transfer (DET) between cellobiose dehydrogenase (CDH) from Phanerochaete sordida (PsCDH) and surface modified single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT). Sonicated SWCNTs were adsorbed on the top of glassy carbon electrodes and modified with aryl diazonium salts generated in situ from p-aminobenzoic acid and p-phenylenediamine, thus featuring at acidic pH (3.5 and 4.5) negative or positive surface charges. After adsorption of PsCDH, both electrode types showed excellent long-term stability and very efficient DET. The modified electrode presenting p-aminophenyl groups produced a DET current density of 500 μA cm−2 at 200 mV vs normal hydrogen reference electrode (NHE) in a 5 mM lactose solution buffered at pH 3.5. This is the highest reported DET value so far using a CDH modified electrode and comes close to electrodes using mediated electron transfer. Moreover, the onset of the electrocatalytic current for lactose oxidation started at 70 mV vs NHE, a potential which is 50 mV lower compared to when unmodified SWCNTs were used. This effect potentially reduces the interference by oxidizable matrix components in biosensors and increases the open circuit potential in biofuel cells. The stability of the electrode was greatly increased compared with unmodified but cross-linked SWCNTs electrodes and lost only 15% of the initial current after 50 h of constant potential scanning. PMID:21417322

  12. Critical role of surface chemical modifications induced by length shortening on multi-walled carbon nanotubes-induced toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bussy Cyrill

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Given the increasing use of carbon nanotubes (CNT in composite materials and their possible expansion to new areas such as nanomedicine which will both lead to higher human exposure, a better understanding of their potential to cause adverse effects on human health is needed. Like other nanomaterials, the biological reactivity and toxicity of CNT were shown to depend on various physicochemical characteristics, and length has been suggested to play a critical role. We therefore designed a comprehensive study that aimed at comparing the effects on murine macrophages of two samples of multi-walled CNT (MWCNT specifically synthesized following a similar production process (aerosol-assisted CVD, and used a soft ultrasonic treatment in water to modify the length of one of them. We showed that modification of the length of MWCNT leads, unavoidably, to accompanying structural (i.e. defects and chemical (i.e. oxidation modifications that affect both surface and residual catalyst iron nanoparticle content of CNT. The biological response of murine macrophages to the two different MWCNT samples was evaluated in terms of cell viability, pro-inflammatory cytokines secretion and oxidative stress. We showed that structural defects and oxidation both induced by the length reduction process are at least as responsible as the length reduction itself for the enhanced pro-inflammatory and pro-oxidative response observed with short (oxidized compared to long (pristine MWCNT. In conclusion, our results stress that surface properties should be considered, alongside the length, as essential parameters in CNT-induced inflammation, especially when dealing with a safe design of CNT, for application in nanomedicine for example.

  13. Spectral characterization of surface emissivities in the thermal infrared

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niclòs, Raquel; Mira, Maria; Valor, Enric; Caselles, Diego; García-Santos, Vicente; Caselles, Vicente; Sánchez, Juan M.

    2015-04-01

    Thermal infrared (TIR) remote sensing trends to hyperspectral sensors on board satellites in the last decades, e.g., the current EOS-MODIS and EOS-ASTER and future missions like HyspIRI, ECOSTRESS, THIRSTY and MISTIGRI. This study aims to characterize spectrally the emissive properties of several surfaces, mostly soils. A spectrometer ranging from 2 to 16 μm, D&P Model 102, has been used to measure samples with singular spectral features, e.g. a sandy soil rich in gypsum sampled in White Sands (New Mexico, USA), salt samples, powdered quartz, and powdered calcite. These samples were chosen for their role in the assessment of thermal emissivity of soils, e.g., the calcite and quartz contents are key variables for modeling TIR emissivities of bare soils, along with soil moisture and organic matter. Additionally, the existence of large areas in the world with abundance of these materials, some of them used for calibration/validation activities of satellite sensors and products, makes the chosen samples interesting. White Sands is the world's largest gypsum dune field encompassing 400 km^2; the salt samples characterize the Salar of Uyuni (Bolivia), the largest salt flat in the world (up to 10,000 km^2), as well as the Jordanian and Israeli salt evaporation ponds at the south end of the Dead Sea, or the evaporation lagoons in Aigües-Mortes (France); and quartz is omnipresent in most of the arid regions of the world such as the Algodones Dunes or Kelso Dunes (California, USA), with areas around 700 km2 and 120 km^2, respectively. Measurements of target leaving radiance, hemispherical radiance reflected by a diffuse reflectance panel, and the radiance from a black body at different temperatures were taken to obtain thermal spectra with the D&P spectrometer. The good consistency observed between our measurements and laboratory spectra of similar samples (ASTER and MODIS spectral libraries) indicated the validity of the measurement protocol. Further, our study showed the

  14. Control and characterization of textured, hydrophobic ionomer surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xueyuan

    Polymer thin films are of increasing interest in many industrial and technological applications. Superhydrophobic, self-cleaning surfaces have attracted a lot of attention for their application in self-cleaning, anti-sticking coatings, stain resistance, or anti-contamination surfaces in diverse technologies, including medical, transportation, textiles, electronics and paints. This thesis focuses on the preparation of nanometer to micrometer-size particle textured surfaces which are desirable for super water repellency. Textured surfaces consisting of nanometer to micrometer-sized lightly sulfonated polystyrene ionomer (SPS) particles were prepared by rapid evaporation of the solvent from a dilute polymer solution cast onto silica. The effect of the solvent used to spin coat the film, the molecular weight of the ionomer, and the rate of solvent evaporation were investigated. The nano-particle or micron-particle textured ionomer surfaces were prepared by either spin coating or solution casting ionomer solutions at controlled evaporation rates. The surface morphologies were consistent with a spinodal decomposition mechanism where the surface first existed as a percolated-like structure and then ripened into droplets if molecular mobility was retained for sufficient time. The SPS particles or particle aggregates were robust and resisted deformation even after annealing at 120°C for one week. The water contact angles on as-prepared surfaces were relatively low, ~ 90° since the polar groups in ionomer reduce the surface hydrophobicity. After chemical vapor deposition of 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorooctyltrichlorosilane, the surface contact angles increased to ~ 109° on smooth surfaces and ~140° on the textured surfaces. Water droplets stuck to these surfaces even when tilted 90 degrees. Superhydrophobic surfaces were prepared by spraying coating ionomer solutions and Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) of 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorooctyltrichlorosilane onto textured surfaces. The

  15. Electrochemical characterization of single-walled carbon nanotubes for electrochemical double layer capacitors using non-aqueous electrolyte

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruch, P.W.; Koetz, R.; Wokaun, A.

    2009-01-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) were investigated by cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy in a non-aqueous electrolyte, 1 M Et 4 NBF 4 in acetonitrile, suitable for supercapacitors. Further, in situ dilatometry and in situ conductance measurements were performed on single electrodes and the results compared to an activated carbon, YP17. Both materials show capacitive behavior characteristic of high surface area electrodes for supercapacitors, with the maximum full cell gravimetric capacitance being 34 F/g for YP17 and 20 F/g for SWCNTs at 2.5 V with respect to the total active electrode mass. The electronic resistance of SWCNTs and activated carbon decreases significantly during charging, showing similarities of the two materials during electrochemical doping. The SWCNT electrode expands irreversibly during the first electrochemical potential sweep as verified by in situ dilatometry, indicative of at least partial debundling of the SWCNTs. A reversible periodic swelling and shrinking during cycling is observed for both materials, with the magnitude of expansion depending on the type of ions forming the double layer.

  16. Formation of transition metal cluster adducts on the surface of single-walled carbon nanotubes: HRTEM studies

    KAUST Repository

    Kalinina, Irina V.; Bekyarova, Elena B.; Wang, Qingxiao; Al-Hadeethi, Yas Fadel; Zhang, Xixiang; Al-Agel, Faisel; Al-Marzouki, Fahad M.; Yaghmour, Saud Jamil; Haddon, Robert C.

    2014-01-01

    We report the formation of chromium clusters on the outer walls of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). The clusters were obtained by reacting purified SWNTs with chromium hexacarbonyl in dibutyl ether at 100°C. The functionalized SWNTs were

  17. Multitechnique characterization of CPTi surfaces after electro discharge machining (EDM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinelis, Spiros; Al Jabbari, Youssef S; Thomas, Andrew; Silikas, Nick; Eliades, George

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to comparatively assess the surface roughness parameters, the hardness, and the elemental and molecular alterations induced on CPTi surfaces after conventional finishing and finishing with electro discharge machining (EDM). A completed cast model of an arch that received four implants was used for the preparation of two grade II CPTi castings. One framework was conventionally finished (CF), whereas the other was subjected to EDM finishing. The surface morphology was imaged employing SEM. 3D surface parameters (S a, S q, S z, S ds, S dr, and S ci) were calculated by optical profilometry. The elemental composition of the treated surfaces was determined by energy dispersive X-ray analysis, whereas the elemental and chemical states of the outmost layer were investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectrometry. Surface hardness was also tested with a Knoop indenter. The results of surface roughness parameters, elemental analysis, and hardness were compared using unpaired t test (a = 0.05). The EDM group demonstrated a rougher surface, with a significant uptake of C and Cu. The CF surface mainly consisted of TiO2. On EDM surface though, Ti was probed in different chemicals states (TiO2, Ti2O3, TiC and metallic Ti) and Cu was traced as Cu2O and CuO. Hardness after EDM was almost ten times higher than CF. EDM significantly affected surface roughness, chemical state, and hardness properties of grade II CPTi castings in comparison with CF. The morphological and elemental alterations of EDM-treated CPTi surfaces may strongly contribute to the reduced corrosion resistance documented for this procedure. The degradation of electrochemical properties may have further biological implications through ionic release in the oral environment.

  18. Specific binding of a naturally occurring amyloidogenic fragment of Streptococcus mutans adhesin P1 to intact P1 on the cell surface characterized by solid state NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Wenxing; Bhatt, Avni [University of Florida, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, College of Medicine (United States); Smith, Adam N. [University of Florida, Department of Chemistry, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences (United States); Crowley, Paula J.; Brady, L. Jeannine, E-mail: jbrady@dental.ufl.edu [University of Florida, Department of Oral Biology, College of Dentistry (United States); Long, Joanna R., E-mail: jrlong@ufl.edu [University of Florida, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, College of Medicine (United States)

    2016-02-15

    The P1 adhesin (aka Antigen I/II or PAc) of the cariogenic bacterium Streptococcus mutans is a cell surface-localized protein involved in sucrose-independent adhesion and colonization of the tooth surface. The immunoreactive and adhesive properties of S. mutans suggest an unusual functional quaternary ultrastructure comprised of intact P1 covalently attached to the cell wall and interacting with non-covalently associated proteolytic fragments thereof, particularly the ∼57-kDa C-terminal fragment C123 previously identified as Antigen II. S. mutans is capable of amyloid formation when grown in a biofilm and P1 is among its amyloidogenic proteins. The C123 fragment of P1 readily forms amyloid fibers in vitro suggesting it may play a role in the formation of functional amyloid during biofilm development. Using wild-type and P1-deficient strains of S. mutans, we demonstrate that solid state NMR (ssNMR) spectroscopy can be used to (1) globally characterize cell walls isolated from a Gram-positive bacterium and (2) characterize the specific binding of heterologously expressed, isotopically-enriched C123 to cell wall-anchored P1. Our results lay the groundwork for future high-resolution characterization of the C123/P1 ultrastructure and subsequent steps in biofilm formation via ssNMR spectroscopy, and they support an emerging model of S. mutans colonization whereby quaternary P1-C123 interactions confer adhesive properties important to binding to immobilized human salivary agglutinin.

  19. Specific binding of a naturally occurring amyloidogenic fragment of Streptococcus mutans adhesin P1 to intact P1 on the cell surface characterized by solid state NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Wenxing; Bhatt, Avni; Smith, Adam N.; Crowley, Paula J.; Brady, L. Jeannine; Long, Joanna R.

    2016-01-01

    The P1 adhesin (aka Antigen I/II or PAc) of the cariogenic bacterium Streptococcus mutans is a cell surface-localized protein involved in sucrose-independent adhesion and colonization of the tooth surface. The immunoreactive and adhesive properties of S. mutans suggest an unusual functional quaternary ultrastructure comprised of intact P1 covalently attached to the cell wall and interacting with non-covalently associated proteolytic fragments thereof, particularly the ∼57-kDa C-terminal fragment C123 previously identified as Antigen II. S. mutans is capable of amyloid formation when grown in a biofilm and P1 is among its amyloidogenic proteins. The C123 fragment of P1 readily forms amyloid fibers in vitro suggesting it may play a role in the formation of functional amyloid during biofilm development. Using wild-type and P1-deficient strains of S. mutans, we demonstrate that solid state NMR (ssNMR) spectroscopy can be used to (1) globally characterize cell walls isolated from a Gram-positive bacterium and (2) characterize the specific binding of heterologously expressed, isotopically-enriched C123 to cell wall-anchored P1. Our results lay the groundwork for future high-resolution characterization of the C123/P1 ultrastructure and subsequent steps in biofilm formation via ssNMR spectroscopy, and they support an emerging model of S. mutans colonization whereby quaternary P1-C123 interactions confer adhesive properties important to binding to immobilized human salivary agglutinin

  20. Specific binding of a naturally occurring amyloidogenic fragment of Streptococcus mutans adhesin P1 to intact P1 on the cell surface characterized by solid state NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Wenxing; Bhatt, Avni; Smith, Adam N; Crowley, Paula J; Brady, L Jeannine; Long, Joanna R

    2016-02-01

    The P1 adhesin (aka Antigen I/II or PAc) of the cariogenic bacterium Streptococcus mutans is a cell surface-localized protein involved in sucrose-independent adhesion and colonization of the tooth surface. The immunoreactive and adhesive properties of S. mutans suggest an unusual functional quaternary ultrastructure comprised of intact P1 covalently attached to the cell wall and interacting with non-covalently associated proteolytic fragments thereof, particularly the ~57-kDa C-terminal fragment C123 previously identified as Antigen II. S. mutans is capable of amyloid formation when grown in a biofilm and P1 is among its amyloidogenic proteins. The C123 fragment of P1 readily forms amyloid fibers in vitro suggesting it may play a role in the formation of functional amyloid during biofilm development. Using wild-type and P1-deficient strains of S. mutans, we demonstrate that solid state NMR (ssNMR) spectroscopy can be used to (1) globally characterize cell walls isolated from a Gram-positive bacterium and (2) characterize the specific binding of heterologously expressed, isotopically-enriched C123 to cell wall-anchored P1. Our results lay the groundwork for future high-resolution characterization of the C123/P1 ultrastructure and subsequent steps in biofilm formation via ssNMR spectroscopy, and they support an emerging model of S. mutans colonization whereby quaternary P1-C123 interactions confer adhesive properties important to binding to immobilized human salivary agglutinin.

  1. NIMONIC 263 microstructure and surface characterization after laser shock peening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Drobnjak

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The Laser Shock Peening (LSP is applied to the surface of Nimonic 263 alloy. The changes in microstructure and surface topography are observed and analyzed by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM, profilometer and microhardness tester. Various laser regimes are chosen which provoke effects of both mechanical and thermo-mechanical treatments of the sample surface. The optimal process parameters, that result in the finest microstructure, smooth and clean surface, are determined. Some wanted and unwanted phases leading to the crack formation are observed.

  2. Seismic fragility of RC shear walls in nuclear power plant Part 1: Characterization of uncertainty in concrete constitutive model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syed, Sammiuddin; Gupta, Abhinav

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A framework is proposed for seismic fragility assessment of Reinforced Concrete structures. • Experimentally validated finite element models are used to conduct nonlinear simulations. • Critical parameters in concrete constitutive model are identified to conduct nonlinear simulations. • Uncertainties in model parameters of concrete damage plasticity model is characterized. • Closed form expressions are used to compute the damage variables and plasticity. - Abstract: This two part manuscript proposes a framework for seismic fragility assessment of reinforced concrete structures in nuclear energy facilities. The novelty of the proposed approach lies in the characterization of uncertainties in the parameters of the material constitutive model. Concrete constitutive models that comprehensively address different damage states such as tensile cracking, compression failure, stiffness degradation, and recovery of degraded stiffness due to closing of previously formed cracks under dynamic loading are generally defined in terms of a large number of variables to characterize the plasticity and damage at material level. Over the past several years, many different studies have been presented on evaluation of fragility for reinforced concrete structures using nonlinear time history simulations. However, almost all of these studies do not consider uncertainties in the parameters of a comprehensive constitutive model. Part-I of this two-part manuscript presents a study that is used to identify uncertainties associated with the critical parameters in nonlinear concrete damage plasticity model proposed by Lubliner et al. (1989. Int. J. Solids Struct., 25(3), 299) and later modified by Lee and Fenves (1998a. J. Eng. Mech., ASCE, 124(8), 892) and Lee and Fenves (1998b. Earthquake Eng. Struct. Dyn., 27(9), 937) for the purpose of seismic fragility assessment. The limitations in implementation of the damage plasticity model within a finite element framework and

  3. Seismic fragility of RC shear walls in nuclear power plant Part 1: Characterization of uncertainty in concrete constitutive model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syed, Sammiuddin [Department of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering, North Carolina State University, 426 Mann Hall, Campus Box 7908, Raleigh, NC 27695-7908 (United States); Gupta, Abhinav, E-mail: agupta1@ncsu.edu [Department of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering, North Carolina State University, 413 Mann Hall, Campus Box 7908, Raleigh, NC 27695-7908 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • A framework is proposed for seismic fragility assessment of Reinforced Concrete structures. • Experimentally validated finite element models are used to conduct nonlinear simulations. • Critical parameters in concrete constitutive model are identified to conduct nonlinear simulations. • Uncertainties in model parameters of concrete damage plasticity model is characterized. • Closed form expressions are used to compute the damage variables and plasticity. - Abstract: This two part manuscript proposes a framework for seismic fragility assessment of reinforced concrete structures in nuclear energy facilities. The novelty of the proposed approach lies in the characterization of uncertainties in the parameters of the material constitutive model. Concrete constitutive models that comprehensively address different damage states such as tensile cracking, compression failure, stiffness degradation, and recovery of degraded stiffness due to closing of previously formed cracks under dynamic loading are generally defined in terms of a large number of variables to characterize the plasticity and damage at material level. Over the past several years, many different studies have been presented on evaluation of fragility for reinforced concrete structures using nonlinear time history simulations. However, almost all of these studies do not consider uncertainties in the parameters of a comprehensive constitutive model. Part-I of this two-part manuscript presents a study that is used to identify uncertainties associated with the critical parameters in nonlinear concrete damage plasticity model proposed by Lubliner et al. (1989. Int. J. Solids Struct., 25(3), 299) and later modified by Lee and Fenves (1998a. J. Eng. Mech., ASCE, 124(8), 892) and Lee and Fenves (1998b. Earthquake Eng. Struct. Dyn., 27(9), 937) for the purpose of seismic fragility assessment. The limitations in implementation of the damage plasticity model within a finite element framework and

  4. Surface characterization of amorphous and crystallized Fe 80B 20

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntley, D. R.; Overbury, S. H.; Zehner, D. M.; Budai, J. D.; Brower, W. E.

    1986-11-01

    Recent studies of catalysis by amorphous metals have prompted an interest in their surface properties. We have utilized Auger electron spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and low energy alkali ion scattering to study the surface composition, electronic properties and topography of amorphous and crystallized Fe 80B 20 ribbons. The majorresults are that the surface stoichiometry is approximately that of the bulk, unaltered by segregation. Bulk crystallization results in the diffusion of impurities to the surface, but does not change the Fe/B ratio. A small shift in the B1s core level binding energy was observed on crystalline, annealed surfaces relative to amorphous or sputtered surfaces, but no shifts were observed in the iron core level energies. A weak feature due to the B2p levels was observed in the valence band spectra from sputtered surfaces. The surfaces exhibit atomic scale roughness which is not altered by bulk crystallization. Finally, there were no observable differences in the structure, composition or electronic properties between the two sides of the ribbons.

  5. Waste Volume Reduction Using Surface Characterization and Decontamination By Laser Ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pellin, Michael J.; Savina, Michael R.; Reed, Claude B.; Zhiyue, Xu; Yong, Wang

    2000-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's nuclear complex, a nation-wide system of facilities for research and production of nuclear materials and weapons, contains large amounts of radioactively contaminated concrete[1]. This material must be disposed of prior to the decommissioning of the various sites. Often the radioactive contaminants in concrete occupy only the surface and near-surface (∼3-6 mm deep) regions of the material. Since many of the structures such as walls and floors are 30 cm or more thick, it makes environmental and economic sense to try to remove and store only the thin contaminated layer rather than to treat the entire structure as waste. Current mechanical removal methods, known as scabbling, are slow and labor intensive, suffer from dust control problems, and expose workers to radiation fields. Improved removal methods are thus in demand[2-5]. Prior to decontamination, the surface must be characterized to determine the types and amounts of contaminants present i n order to decide on an appropriate cleaning strategy. Contamination occurs via exposure to air and water-borne radionuclides and by neutron activation. The radionuclides of greatest concern are (in order of abundance) [1]: 137Cs and 134Cs, 238U, 60Co, and 90Sr, followed by 3H, radioactive iodine, and a variety of Eu isotopes and transuranics. A system capable of on- line analysis is valuable since operators can determine the type of contaminants in real time and make more efficient use of costly sampling and characterization techniques. Likewise, the removed waste itself must be analyzed to insure that proper storage and monitoring techniques are used. The chemical speciation of radionuclides in concrete is largely unknown. Concrete is a complex material comprising many distinct chemical and physical phases on a variety of size scales[6-8]. Most studies of radionuclides in cements and concrete are for the most part restricted to phenomenological treatments of diffusion of ion s, particularly

  6. SRF Cavity Surface Topography Characterization Using Replica Techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. Xu, M.J. Kelley, C.E. Reece

    2012-07-01

    To better understand the roll of topography on SRF cavity performance, we seek to obtain detailed topographic information from the curved practical cavity surfaces. Replicas taken from a cavity interior surface provide internal surface molds for fine Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and stylus profilometry. In this study, we confirm the replica resolution both on surface local defects such as grain boundary and etching pits and compare the surface uniform roughness with the aid of Power Spectral Density (PSD) where we can statistically obtain roughness parameters at different scales. A series of sampling locations are at the same magnetic field chosen at the same latitude on a single cell cavity to confirm the uniformity. Another series of sampling locations at different magnetic field amplitudes are chosen for this replica on the same cavity for later power loss calculation. We also show that application of the replica followed by rinsing does not adversely affect the cavity performance.

  7. Surface characterization of polyethylene terephthalate/silica nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parvinzadeh, Mazeyar, E-mail: mparvinzadeh@gmail.com [Department of Textile, Islamic Azad University, Science and Research Branch, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Moradian, Siamak [Department of Polymer and Color Engineering, Amirkabir University of Technology, P.O. Box 15875-4413, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rashidi, Abosaeed [Department of Textile, Islamic Azad University, Science and Research Branch, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Yazdanshenas, Mohamad-Esmail [Department of Textile, Islamic Azad University, Yazd Branch, Yazd (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2010-02-15

    Poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) based nanocomposites containing hydrophilic (i.e. Aerosil 200 or Aerosil TT 600) or hydrophobic (i.e. Aerosil R 972) nano-silica were prepared by melt compounding. Influence of nano-silica type on surface properties of the resultant nanocomposites was investigated by the use of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), atomic force microscopy (AFM), contact angle measurement (CAM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and reflectance spectroscopy (RS). The possible interaction between nano-silica particles and PET functional groups at bulk and surface were elucidated by transmission FTIR and FTIR-ATR spectroscopy, respectively. AFM studies of the resultant nanocomposites showed increased surface roughness compared to pure PET. Contact angle measurements of the resultant PET composites demonstrated that the wettability of such composites depends on surface treatment of the particular nano-silica particles used. SEM images illustrated that hydrophilic nano-silica particles tended to migrate to the surface of the PET matrix.

  8. Characterization of surface processes on mineral surfaces in aqueous solutions. Annual report for fiscal year 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leckie, J.O.

    1993-11-01

    Performance assessments by Los Alamos National Laboratory for the DOE's Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP) are being done investigating the environmental risk related to long-term disposal of hazardous wastes resulting from the use of radioactive materials that must subsequently be isolated from the environment. The YMP site, located in southwestern Nevada, is intended for the storage of high-level wastes generated by nuclear energy-related activities, including spent fuel and waste from reprocessed fuel rods. The work covered by this contract is necessary for producing a defensible model and dataset, and may be critical for evaluation of repository compliance. This work, performed by the Environmental Engineering and Science research group at Stanford University, will quantify the adsorption of uranyl on various minerals. The project's principle objective is to provide sorption coefficients for uranyl and other ions of interest to predict radionuclide movements form the repository to accessible environments. This adsorption data is essential for the unambiguous interpretation of field experiments and observations. In this report, details of the activity and progress made with respect to the study of uranyl adsorption on mineral surfaces is presented and discussed

  9. Surface characterization for high purity Fe-Cr alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwai, H.; Oiwa, R.; Takaki, S.; Abiko, K.

    1995-01-01

    Fe-50mass%Cr was prepared in a cold crucible furnace with induction heating, then refined by floating-zone melting (FZM). The chemistries on the surface before and after FZM were compared by XPS measurement. C and O were observed on top surfaces both before and after as a hydrocarbon, carbonyl group and carboxyl group which are adsorbed chemical components. The other impurities were observed on the surface in both cases; however, the number and level of impurities on the surface after FZM were much larger than those on the surface before FZM; these adhered to the surface during sample preparation for XPS measurement. It is concluded that sample preparation introduces contamination which affects the detection limit of chemical analytical instruments. Sn was only observed on the top surface after FZM. It was segregated Sn which was contained in chromium as a starting material. It must be eliminated before starting. From XPS depth profiling results, it was concluded that 0.2 nm thickness of carbon such as hydrocarbon and organic components are adsorbed on the 1 nm thickness of oxide layer. Below the oxide layer, a lack of Cr was observed down to a depth of 6 nm. (orig.)

  10. Synthesis, Characterization and Application of Poly (Styrene-4- Vinyl Pyridine) Membranes Assembled With Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    KAUST Repository

    He, Haoze

    2011-06-01

    Poly(styrene‐4‐vinylpyridine) (PS‐P4VP) isoporous membranes were prepared and their properties were evaluated in this research. The solution was prepared by dissolving PS‐P4VP polymer with necessary additives into a 1:1:1 1,4‐dioxane – N,N‐dimethyl formamide – tetrahydrofuran (DOX‐DMF‐THF, DDT) solvent. Then 0.5‐1.0 mL of the primary solution was cast onto the non‐woven substrate membrane on a glass slide, evaporated for 15‐20 sec and immersed into de‐ionized water for more than 30 min for the solidification of isoporous structure and for the formation of the primary films, which could be post‐processed in different ways for different tests. The membrane surface presents a well‐ordered, hexagonal self‐assembly structure, which is fit for aqueous and gaseous filtration. The pore size of the isoporous surface is 30~40 nm. The pore size is also sensitive to [H+] in the solution and a typical pair of S‐shape pH‐correlation curves with significant hysteresis was found. Four techniques were tried to improve the properties of the membranes in this research: 1) 1,4‐diiodobutane was introduced to chemically change the structure as a cross‐linking agent. 2) single‐wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) was linked to the membranes in order to strengthen the stability and rigidity and to reduce the hysteresis. 3) Homo‐poly(4‐vinylpyridine) (homo‐P4VP) was added and inserted into the PS‐P4VP micelles to affect the pore size and surface structure. 4) Copper acetate (Cu(Ac)2) was used as substitute of dioxane to prepare the Cu(Ac)2‐DMF‐THF (CDT) mixed solvent, for a better SWCNT dispersion. All the possible improvements were judged by the atomic force microscopy (AFM) images, water and gas flux tests and pH‐correlation curves. The introduction of SWCNT was the most important innovation in this research and is promising in future applications.

  11. 3D Human cartilage surface characterization by optical coherence tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brill, Nicolai; Riedel, Jörn; Schmitt, Robert; Tingart, Markus; Jahr, Holger; Nebelung, Sven; Truhn, Daniel; Pufe, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Early diagnosis and treatment of cartilage degeneration is of high clinical interest. Loss of surface integrity is considered one of the earliest and most reliable signs of degeneration, but cannot currently be evaluated objectively. Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) is an arthroscopically available light-based non-destructive real-time imaging technology that allows imaging at micrometre resolutions to millimetre depths. As OCT-based surface evaluation standards remain to be defined, the present study investigated the diagnostic potential of 3D surface profile parameters in the comprehensive evaluation of cartilage degeneration. To this end, 45 cartilage samples of different degenerative grades were obtained from total knee replacements (2 males, 10 females; mean age 63.8 years), cut to standard size and imaged using a spectral-domain OCT device (Thorlabs, Germany). 3D OCT datasets of 8  ×  8, 4  ×  4 and 1  ×  1 mm (width  ×  length) were obtained and pre-processed (image adjustments, morphological filtering). Subsequent automated surface identification algorithms were used to obtain the 3D primary profiles, which were then filtered and processed using established algorithms employing ISO standards. The 3D surface profile thus obtained was used to calculate a set of 21 3D surface profile parameters, i.e. height (e.g. Sa), functional (e.g. Sk), hybrid (e.g. Sdq) and segmentation-related parameters (e.g. Spd). Samples underwent reference histological assessment according to the Degenerative Joint Disease classification. Statistical analyses included calculation of Spearman’s rho and assessment of inter-group differences using the Kruskal Wallis test. Overall, the majority of 3D surface profile parameters revealed significant degeneration-dependent differences and correlations with the exception of severe end-stage degeneration and were of distinct diagnostic value in the assessment of surface integrity. None of the 3D

  12. Surface characterization of weathered wood using a laser scanning system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnold, M.; Lemaster, R.L.; Dost, W.A.

    1992-01-01

    Most of the existing methods to assess the effect of weathering on wood surfaces have some drawbacks that limit their use to specific tasks. The amount of surface erosion is often used as a measure for the weathering action. The application of a laser scanning system to reproduce surface profiles and to measure weathering erosion was tested on various samples and was found to be a very useful and superior alternative to existing methods. Further improvements of the system used can be made by refinements of the calibration procedures and by more comprehensive profile analyses. (author)

  13. Analytical methods for the characterization of surface finishing in bricks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nardini, I.; Zendri, E.; Biscontin, G.; Brunetin, A.

    2006-01-01

    The recent restoration works of Santo Stefano Church Facade (XV century) in Venice have shown traces variously saved of different kind of surface finishes. These finishes were found on the brick's surface both in the masonry and in the decorative elements. Different brick's surface and decorative tile samples were investigated using several techniques: optical microscopy, scanning electron-microscopy, thermal analysis, infrared spectroscopy and reflectance Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy. The evaluation of the reached results was used to understand the decorative techniques and to recognize the material employed

  14. Spinorial Characterizations of Surfaces into 3-dimensional Pseudo-Riemannian Space Forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawn, Marie-Amélie; Roth, Julien

    2011-01-01

    We give a spinorial characterization of isometrically immersed surfaces of arbitrary signature into 3-dimensional pseudo-Riemannian space forms. This generalizes a recent work of the first author for spacelike immersed Lorentzian surfaces in ℝ 2,1 to other Lorentzian space forms. We also characterize immersions of Riemannian surfaces in these spaces. From this we can deduce analogous results for timelike immersions of Lorentzian surfaces in space forms of corresponding signature, as well as for spacelike and timelike immersions of surfaces of signature (0, 2), hence achieving a complete spinorial description for this class of pseudo-Riemannian immersions.

  15. Surface characterization of pretreated and microbial-treated populus cross-sections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tolbert, Allison K. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-05-01

    The first objective of this thesis is to illustrate the advantages of surface characterization in biomass utilization studies. The second objective is to gain insight into the workings of potential consolidated bioprocessing microorganisms on the surface of poplar samples. The third objective is to determine the impact biomass recalcitrance has on enzymatic hydrolysis and microbial fermentation in relation to the surface chemistry.

  16. Characterization of neutrophil adhesion to different titanium surfaces

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Scanning electron microscopy and flow cytometry were used to measure .... discs containing neutrophils were inverted and placed in a tube assembly that ... Representative AFM images of smooth (a) and rough (b) Ti surfaces. The arithmetic ...

  17. Surface characterization of bacterial cells relevant to the mineral industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sharma, PK; Rao, KH

    Bacteria belonging to the Acidithiobacilli group are widely used in the mineral processing industry in bioleaching and biobeneficiation operations. Paenibacillus polymyxa has also found application in biobeneficiation studies. Microbial adhesion to mineral surface is an essential step,for both

  18. Surface modification and characterization of aramid fibers with hybrid coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Jianrui; Zhu, Yaofeng; Ni, Qingqing; Fu, Yaqin, E-mail: fyq01@zstu.edu.cn; Fu, Xiang

    2014-12-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Aramid fibers modification sizing synthesized by sol–gel in the absence of water. • The strength and interfacial adhesion property of modified fibers were improved. • Modified fibers show a special surface structure. • The mechanism explains the function of structure. - Abstract: Aramid fibers were modified through solution dip-coating and interfacial in situ polymerization using a newly synthesized SiO{sub 2}/shape memory polyurethane (SiO{sub 2}/SMPU) hybrid. Fourier transform infrared and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicated that the synthesized SiO{sub 2}/SMPU hybrid successfully coated the fiber surface. The surface morphology of the aramid fibers and the single fiber tensile strength and interfacial shear strength (IFSS) of the composites were determined. The IFSS of the fiber coated with the hybrid improved by 45%, which benefited from a special “pizza-like” structure on the fiber surface.

  19. Surface modification and characterization of aramid fibers with hybrid coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Jianrui; Zhu, Yaofeng; Ni, Qingqing; Fu, Yaqin; Fu, Xiang

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Aramid fibers modification sizing synthesized by sol–gel in the absence of water. • The strength and interfacial adhesion property of modified fibers were improved. • Modified fibers show a special surface structure. • The mechanism explains the function of structure. - Abstract: Aramid fibers were modified through solution dip-coating and interfacial in situ polymerization using a newly synthesized SiO 2 /shape memory polyurethane (SiO 2 /SMPU) hybrid. Fourier transform infrared and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicated that the synthesized SiO 2 /SMPU hybrid successfully coated the fiber surface. The surface morphology of the aramid fibers and the single fiber tensile strength and interfacial shear strength (IFSS) of the composites were determined. The IFSS of the fiber coated with the hybrid improved by 45%, which benefited from a special “pizza-like” structure on the fiber surface

  20. Characterization and phylogenetic analysis of lectin gene cDNA isolated from sea cucumber ( Apostichopus japonicus) body wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Zhuang; Li, Hui; Liu, Yang; Zhou, Wei; Sun, Jing; Wang, Xiuli

    2017-12-01

    As a `living fossil' of species origin and `rich treasure' of food and nutrition development, sea cucumber has received a lot of attentions from researchers. The cDNA library construction and EST sequencing of blood had been conducted previously in our lab. The bioinformatic analysis provided a gene fragment which is highly homologous with the genes of lectin family, named AjL ( Apostichopus japonicus lectin). To characterize and determine the phylogeny of AjL genes in early evolution, we isolated a full-length cDNA of lectin gene from the body wall of A. japonicus. The open reading frame of this gene contained 489 bp and encoded a 163 amino acids secretory protein being homologous to lectins of mammals and aquatic organisms. The deduced protein included a lectin-like domain. SDS-PAGE analysis showed that AjL migrated as a specific band (about 36.09 kDa under reducing), and agglutinated against rabbit red blood cells. AjL was similar to chain A of CEL-IV in space structure. We predicted that AjL may play the same role of CEL-IV. Our results suggested that more than one lectin gene functioned in sea cucumber and most of other species, which was fused by uncertain sequences during the evolution and encoded different proteins with diverse functions. Our findings provided the insights into the function and characteristics of lectin genes invertebrates. The results will also be helpful for the identification and structural, functional, and evolutionary analyses of lectin genes.

  1. Structural and surface compositional characterization of silver thin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Silver thin films were deposited on microscope glass slides by the electroless Solution Growth Technique (SGT). The films were characterized by x-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The films were found to exhibit a random orientation with peak positions ...

  2. Characterization of the Eimeria maxima sporozoite surface protein IMP1

    Science.gov (United States)

    The purpose of this study was to characterize Eimeria maxima immunoprotective protein IMP1 that is hypothesized to play a role in eliciting protective immunity against E. maxima infection in chickens. RT-PCR analysis of RNA from unsporulated and sporulating E. maxima oocysts revealed highest transc...

  3. Spatial characterization of nanotextured surfaces by visual color imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feidenhans'l, Nikolaj Agentoft; Murthy, Swathi; Madsen, Morten H.

    2016-01-01

    We present a method using an ordinary color camera to characterize nanostructures from the visual color of the structures. The method provides a macroscale overview image from which micrometer-sized regions can be analyzed independently, hereby revealing long-range spatial variations...

  4. Surface characterization of current composites after toothbrush abrasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Rena; Jin, Jian; Nikaido, Toru; Tagami, Junji; Hickel, Reinhard; Kunzelmann, Karl-Heinz

    2013-01-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate the surface roughness and the gloss of current composites before and after toothbrush abrasion. We assessed forty dimensionally standardized composite specimens (n=8/group) from five composites: two nanohybrids (i. e., IPS Empress Direct Enamel and IPS Empress Direct Dentin), two microhybrids (i. e., Clearfil AP-X and Filtek Z250) and one organically modified ceramics (Admira). All of the specimens were polished with 4000-grid silicon carbide papers. Surface roughness was measured with a profilometer and gloss was measured with a glossmeter before and after powered toothbrush abrasion with a 1:1 slurry (dentifrice/tap water) at 12,000 strokes in a toothbrush simulator. There was a significant increase in the surface roughness and a reduction in gloss after toothbrush abrasion in all of the composites except Clearfil AP-X (pgloss (R(2)=0.191, p<0.001).

  5. Characterization of a Laser Surface-Treated Martensitic Stainless Steel

    OpenAIRE

    S.R. Al-Sayed; A.A. Hussein; A.A. Nofal; S.I. Hassab Elnaby; H. Elgazzar

    2017-01-01

    Laser surface treatment was carried out on AISI 416 machinable martensitic stainless steel containing 0.225 wt.% sulfur. Nd:YAG laser with a 2.2-KW continuous wave was used. The aim was to compare the physical and chemical properties achieved by this type of selective surface treatment with those achieved by the conventional treatment. Laser power of different values (700 and 1000 W) with four corresponding different laser scanning speeds (0.5, 1, 2, and 3 m?min?1) was adopted to reach the op...

  6. Surface Characterization for Land-Atmosphere Studies of CLASIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, T. J.; Kustas, W.; Torn, M. S.; Meyers, T.; Prueger, J.; Fischer, M. L.; Avissar, R.; Yueh, S.; Anderson, M.; Miller, M.

    2006-12-01

    The Cloud and Land Surface Interaction Campaign will focus on interactions between the land surface, convective boundary layer, and cumulus clouds. It will take place in the Southern Great Plains (SGP) area of the U.S, specifically within the US DOE ARM Climate Research Facility. The intensive observing period will be June of 2007, which typically covers the winter wheat harvest in the region. This region has been the focus of several related experiments that include SGP97, SGP99, and SMEX03. For the land surface, some of the specific science questions include 1) how do spatial variations in land cover along this trajectory modulate the cloud structure and the low-level water vapor budget, 2) what are the relationships between land surface characteristics (i.e., soil texture, vegetation type and fractional cover) and states (particularly soil moisture and surface temperature) and the resulting impact of the surface energy balance on boundary layer and cloud structure and dynamics and aerosol loading; and 3) what is the interplay between cumulus cloud development and surface energy balance partitioning between latent and sensible heat, and implications for the carbon flux? Most of these objectives will require flux and state measurements throughout the dominant land covers and distributed over the geographic domain. These observations would allow determining the level of up- scaling/aggregation required in order to understand the impact of landscape changes affecting energy balance/flux partitioning and impact on cloud/atmospheric dynamics. Specific contributions that are planned to be added to CLASIC include continuous tower-based monitoring of surface fluxes for key land cover types prior to, during, and post-IOP, replicate towers to quantify flux variance within each land cover, boundary layer properties and fluxes from a helicopter-based system, airplane- and satellite-based flux products throughout the region, aircraft- and tower-based concentration data for

  7. Real-time, automated characterization of surfaces for alpha and beta radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egidi, P.V.

    1997-01-01

    A new data collection system, called ABACUS trademark, has been developed that automates and expedites the collection, conversion, and reporting of radiological survey data of surfaces. Field testing of the system by Oak Ridge National Laboratory/Environmental Technology Section is currently underway. Preliminary results are presented. The system detects, discriminates, and separately displays the results for alpha and beta contamination scans on floors and walls with a single pass. Fixed-position static counting is also possible for quantitative measuring. The system is currently configured with five 100 cm 2 dual-phosphor plastic scintillation detectors mounted in a lightweight aluminum fixture that holds the detectors in a fixed array. ABACUS trademark can be configured with other detectors if desired. Ratemeter/scalars traditionally coupled to individual detectors have been replaced by a single unit that houses the power supply and discriminator circuit boards to support up to five detectors. The system is designed to be used by a single operator. Each detector's position and data are transmitted once per second and recorded on a nearby laptop computer. The data are converted to appropriate units, color-coded, and mapped to display graphically the findings for each detector in real-time. Reports can be generated immediately following the survey. Survey data can be exported in a variety of formats. Benefits of ABACUS trademark are: (1) immediate feedback to decision makers using the observational approach to characterization or remediation, (2) thorough documentation of survey results, (3) increased statistical confidence in scans by recording counts every second, (4) reduced paperwork and elimination of transcription errors, and (5) time and cost savings for collection, conversion, mapping, evaluating, and reporting data over traditional methods

  8. Characterization and use of crystalline bacterial cell surface layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleytr, Uwe B.; Sára, Margit; Pum, Dietmar; Schuster, Bernhard

    2001-10-01

    Crystalline bacterial cell surface layers (S-layers) are one of the most common outermost cell envelope components of prokaryotic organisms (archaea and bacteria). S-layers are monomolecular arrays composed of a single protein or glycoprotein species and represent the simplest biological membranes developed during evolution. S-layers as the most abundant of prokaryotic cellular proteins are appealing model systems for studying the structure, synthesis, genetics, assembly and function of proteinaceous supramolecular structures. The wealth of information existing on the general principle of S-layers have revealed a broad application potential. The most relevant features exploited in applied S-layer research are: (i) pores passing through S-layers show identical size and morphology and are in the range of ultrafiltration membranes; (ii) functional groups on the surface and in the pores are aligned in well-defined positions and orientations and accessible for chemical modifications and binding functional molecules in very precise fashion; (iii) isolated S-layer subunits from a variety of organisms are capable of recrystallizing as closed monolayers onto solid supports (e.g., metals, polymers, silicon wafers) at the air-water interface, on lipid films or onto the surface of liposomes; (iv) functional domains can be incorporated in S-layer proteins by genetic engineering. Thus, S-layer technologies particularly provide new approaches for biotechnology, biomimetics, molecular nanotechnology, nanopatterning of surfaces and formation of ordered arrays of metal clusters or nanoparticles as required for nanoelectronics.

  9. Investigations of surface characterization of silicone rubber due to ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    †Department of Polymer Technology, Crescent Engineering College, Chennai 600 048, India. Abstract. In the present work, tracking ... Silicone rubber; surface degradation; tracking; WAXD; TG–DTA. 1. Introduction. Power transmission at ... mena in polymer insulators under d.c. voltages. Hence the tracking phenomena ...

  10. Characterization of self-assembled monolayers on a ruthenium surface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shaheen, Amrozia; Sturm, Jacobus Marinus; Ricciardi, R.; Huskens, Jurriaan; Lee, Christopher James; Bijkerk, Frederik

    2017-01-01

    We have modified and stabilized the ruthenium surface by depositing a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of 1-hexadecanethiol on a polycrystalline ruthenium thin film. The growth mechanism, dynamics, and stability of these monolayers were studied. SAMs, deposited under ambient conditions, on

  11. Industrial characterization of nano-scale roughness on polished surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feidenhans'l, Nikolaj Agentoft; Hansen, Poul-Erik; Pilny, Lukas

    2015-01-01

    with a thin liquid film. It is shown that the changes in the angular scattering intensities can be compensated for the liquid film, using empirically determined relations. This allows a restoration of the “true” scattering intensities which would be measured from a corresponding clean surface. The compensated...

  12. Superparamagnetic bead interactions with functionalized surfaces characterized by an immunomicroarray

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skottrup, Peter Durand; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt; Moresco, Jacob Lange

    2010-01-01

    optimized Polyethylene glycol-based surfaces with different end groups on the anchor molecule, 2,4,6-trichloro-1,3,5-triazine (TsT), were synthesized and compared with the standard (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane (APTS)/glutaraldehyde chemistry APTS/glutaraldehyde, directly linked TsT and bare H2O2-activated...

  13. Electrochemical and surface characterization of a nickel-titanium alloy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wever, Dirk; Veldhuizen, AG; de Vries, J; Busscher, HJ; Uges, DRA; van Horn, James

    1998-01-01

    For clinical implantation purposes of shape memory metals the nearly equiatomic nickel-titanium (NiTi) alloy is generally used. In this study, the corrosion properties and surface characteristics of this alloy were investigated and compared with two reference controls, AISI 316 LVM stainless steel

  14. Surface characterization of polymethylmetacrylate bombarded by charged water droplets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiraoka, Kenzo; Takaishi, Riou; Asakawa, Daiki; Sakai, Yuji; Iijima, Yoshitoki

    2009-01-01

    The electrospray droplet impact (EDI), in which the charged electrospray water droplets are introduced in vacuum, accelerated, and allowed to impact the sample, is applied to polymethylmetacrylate (PMMA). The secondary ions generated were measured by an orthogonal time-of-flight mass spectrometer. In EDI mass spectra for PMMA, fragment ions originating from PMMA could not be detected. This is due to the fact that the proton affinities of fragments formed from PMMA are smaller than those from acetic acid contained in the charged droplet. The x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy spectra of PMMA irradiated by water droplets did not change with prolonged cluster irradiation, i.e., EDI is capable of shallow surface etching for PMMA with a little damage of the sample underneath the surface.

  15. Electrochemical Characterization of Surface Reactions on Biomedical Titanium alloys

    OpenAIRE

    Alkhateeb, Emad Hashim

    2008-01-01

    Titanium and its alloys are successfully used as implant materials for dental, orthopedic and osteosynthesis applications. The processes that take place at the implant tissue interface are important for the acceptance and integration of the implant. This thesis is divided into two parts: the first part deals with surface modification of titanium to improve the osseointegration, and the second part studies metastable pitting of titanium and its alloys. The weakly attached layer of a bone-like ...

  16. Characterization of surface complexes in enhanced Raman scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, D.; Furtak, T.E.

    1984-01-01

    An indicator molecule, para-nitrosodimethylanaline (p-NDMA), has been used to study the chemical nature of surface complexes involving the active site for SERS in the electrochemical environment. We present evidence for positively charged Ag atoms stabilized by coadsorbed Cl - ions as the primary sites which are produced during the oxidation reduction cycle treatment of an Ag electrode. Depending on the relative number of Cl - ions which influence the Ag site the active site demonstrates a greater or lesser electron accepting character toward p-NDMA. This character is influenced by the applied voltage and by the presence of Tl + ions in the bulk of the solution near the surface. As in previously studied systems p-NDMA/Cl - /Ag complexes demonstrate charge transfer excitation which in this case is from the p-NDMA to the Ag site. These results further solidify the importance of complex formation in electrochemical SERS and suggest that caution should be applied when using SERS as a quantitative measure of surface coverage

  17. Surface characterization and cytotoxicity response of biodegradable magnesium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pompa, Luis; Rahman, Zia Ur; Munoz, Edgar; Haider, Waseem

    2015-01-01

    Magnesium alloys have raised an immense amount of interest to many researchers because of their evolution as a new kind of third generation materials. Due to their biocompatibility, density, and mechanical properties, magnesium alloys are frequently reported as prospective biodegradable implant materials. Moreover, magnesium alloys experience a natural phenomenon to biodegrade in aqueous solutions due to its corrosion activity, which is excellent for orthopedic and cardiovascular applications. However, a major concern with such alloys is fast and non-uniform corrosion degradation. Controlling the degradation rate in the physiological environment determines the success of biodegradable implants. In this investigation, three different grades of magnesium alloys: AZ31B, AZ91E and ZK60A were studied for their corrosion resistance and biocompatibility. Scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy and contact angle meter are used to study surface morphology, chemistry, roughness and wettability, respectively. Additionally, the cytotoxicity of the leached metal ions was evaluated by using a tetrazolium based bio-assay, MTS. - Highlights: • Micro-textured features formed after the anodization of magnesium alloys. • Contact angle increased and surface free energy decreased by anodization. • Corrosion rate increased for anodized surfaces compared to untreated samples. • Cell viability was greater than 75% implying the cytocompatibility of Mg alloys

  18. Surface characterization and cytotoxicity response of biodegradable magnesium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pompa, Luis; Rahman, Zia Ur; Munoz, Edgar; Haider, Waseem, E-mail: haiderw@utpa.edu

    2015-04-01

    Magnesium alloys have raised an immense amount of interest to many researchers because of their evolution as a new kind of third generation materials. Due to their biocompatibility, density, and mechanical properties, magnesium alloys are frequently reported as prospective biodegradable implant materials. Moreover, magnesium alloys experience a natural phenomenon to biodegrade in aqueous solutions due to its corrosion activity, which is excellent for orthopedic and cardiovascular applications. However, a major concern with such alloys is fast and non-uniform corrosion degradation. Controlling the degradation rate in the physiological environment determines the success of biodegradable implants. In this investigation, three different grades of magnesium alloys: AZ31B, AZ91E and ZK60A were studied for their corrosion resistance and biocompatibility. Scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy and contact angle meter are used to study surface morphology, chemistry, roughness and wettability, respectively. Additionally, the cytotoxicity of the leached metal ions was evaluated by using a tetrazolium based bio-assay, MTS. - Highlights: • Micro-textured features formed after the anodization of magnesium alloys. • Contact angle increased and surface free energy decreased by anodization. • Corrosion rate increased for anodized surfaces compared to untreated samples. • Cell viability was greater than 75% implying the cytocompatibility of Mg alloys.

  19. Wall conditioning and particle control in Extrap T2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergsåker, H.; Larsson, D.; Brunsell, P.; Möller, A.; Tramontin, L.

    1997-02-01

    The Extrap T2 reversed field pinch experiment is operated with the former OHTE vacuum vessel, of dimensions R = 1.24 m and a = 0.18 m and with a complete graphite liner. It is shown that a rudimentary density control can be achieved by means of frequent helium glow discharge conditioning of the wall. The standard He-GDC is well characterized and reproducible. The trapping and release of hydrogen and impurities at the wall surfaces have been studied by mass spectrometry and surface analysis. The shot to shot particle exchange between wall and plasma can be approximately accounted for.

  20. Characterization of mechanical properties of hydroxyapatite-silicon-multi walled carbon nano tubes composite coatings synthesized by EPD on NiTi alloys for biomedical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalili, Vida; Khalil-Allafi, Jafar; Sengstock, Christina; Motemani, Yahya; Paulsen, Alexander; Frenzel, Jan; Eggeler, Gunther; Köller, Manfred

    2016-06-01

    Release of Ni(1+) ions from NiTi alloy into tissue environment, biological response on the surface of NiTi and the allergic reaction of atopic people towards Ni are challengeable issues for biomedical application. In this study, composite coatings of hydroxyapatite-silicon multi walled carbon nano-tubes with 20wt% Silicon and 1wt% multi walled carbon nano-tubes of HA were deposited on a NiTi substrate using electrophoretic methods. The SEM images of coated samples exhibit a continuous and compact morphology for hydroxyapatite-silicon and hydroxyapatite-silicon-multi walled carbon nano-tubes coatings. Nano-indentation analysis on different locations of coatings represents the highest elastic modulus (45.8GPa) for HA-Si-MWCNTs which is between the elastic modulus of NiTi substrate (66.5GPa) and bone tissue (≈30GPa). This results in decrease of stress gradient on coating-substrate-bone interfaces during performance. The results of nano-scratch analysis show the highest critical distance of delamination (2.5mm) and normal load before failure (837mN) as well as highest critical contact pressure for hydroxyapatite-silicon-multi walled carbon nano-tubes coating. The cell culture results show that human mesenchymal stem cells are able to adhere and proliferate on the pure hydroxyapatite and composite coatings. The presence of both silicon and multi walled carbon nano-tubes (CS3) in the hydroxyapatite coating induce more adherence of viable human mesenchymal stem cells in contrast to the HA coated samples with only silicon (CS2). These results make hydroxyapatite-silicon-multi walled carbon nano-tubes a promising composite coating for future bone implant application. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Map of natural gamma radiation in Spain: radiometric characterization of different types of surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suarez Mahou, E.; Fernandez Amigot, J.A.; Botas Medina, J.

    1997-01-01

    The gamma radioactivity flowing from ground and rocks is due to the presence in these of uranium, thorium and potassium-40. The method of radiometric characterization depends on the purpose of the undertaking. Radiometric characterization can be realized on big surfaces (tens or hundreds of square kilometres studied on a national scale), medium size surfaces (50 to 1000 square kilometres, for example, in epidemiological or biological studies in areas with a determined radiometric background) small surfaces of less than 50 square kilometres (industrial sites, pre-operational studies, etc.). This article considers aspects of radiometric characterization on surfaces of interest and describes the contribution of the MARNA (Natural Provisional Radiation Map of Spain) Project selection and radiometric characterization

  2. Characterization of surface position in a liquid dispensing orifice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farahi, R H [ORNL; Passian, Ali [ORNL; Thundat, Thomas George [ORNL; Lereu, Aude L [ORNL; Tetard, Laurene [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK) & Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Jones, Yolanda [ORNL

    2009-01-01

    Precision microdispencing technology delivers picoliter amounts of fluid for printing, electronic, optical, chemical and biomedical applications. In particular, microjetting is capable of accurate, flexible, and non-contact coating with polymers, thus allowing the functionalization of delicate microsensors such as microcantilevers. Information on various phases of droplet formation are important to control volume, uniformity, velocity and rate. One such aspect is the ringing of the meniscus after droplet breakoff which can affect subsequent drop formation. We present analysis of an optical characterization technique and experimental results on the behaviour of menisus oscillations in an orifice of a piezoelectric microjet.

  3. Analytic model of the stress waves propagation in thin wall tubes, seeking the location of a harmonic point source in its surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boaratti, Mario Francisco Guerra

    2006-01-01

    Leaks in pressurized tubes generate acoustic waves that propagate through the walls of these tubes, which can be captured by accelerometers or by acoustic emission sensors. The knowledge of how these walls can vibrate, or in another way, how these acoustic waves propagate in this material is fundamental in the detection and localization process of the leak source. In this work an analytic model was implemented, through the motion equations of a cylindrical shell, with the objective to understand the behavior of the tube surface excited by a point source. Since the cylindrical surface has a closed pattern in the circumferential direction, waves that are beginning their trajectory will meet with another that has already completed the turn over the cylindrical shell, in the clockwise direction as well as in the counter clockwise direction, generating constructive and destructive interferences. After enough time of propagation, peaks and valleys in the shell surface are formed, which can be visualized through a graphic representation of the analytic solution created. The theoretical results were proven through measures accomplished in an experimental setup composed of a steel tube finished in sand box, simulating the condition of infinite tube. To determine the location of the point source on the surface, the process of inverse solution was adopted, that is to say, known the signals of the sensor disposed in the tube surface , it is determined through the theoretical model where the source that generated these signals can be. (author)

  4. Spectroscopic characterization of the on-surface induced (cyclo) dehydrogenation of a N-heteroaromatic compound on noble metal surfaces

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Palacio, I.; Pinardi, A. L.; Martínez, J. I.; Preobrajenski, A.; Cossaro, A.; Jančařík, Andrej; Stará, Irena G.; Starý, Ivo; Méndez, J.; Martín-Gago, J.A.; López, M.F.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 33 (2017), s. 22454-22461 ISSN 1463-9076 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : dibenzohelicene * on-surface (cyclo)dehydrogenation * spectroscopic characterization Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry OBOR OECD: Organic chemistry Impact factor: 4.123, year: 2016

  5. Molecular characterization of two Arabidopsis thaliana glycosyltransferase mutants, rra1 and rra2, which have a reduced residual arabinose content in a polymer tightly associated with the cellulosic wall residue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egelund, Jack; Obel, Nicolai; Ulvskov, Peter

    2007-01-01

    identified and characterized at the molecular and biochemical level. Monosaccharide compositional analyses of cell wall material isolated from the meristematic region showed a ca. 20% reduction in the arabinose content in the insoluble/undigested cell wall residue after enzymatic removal of xyloglucan...... and pectic polysaccharides. These data indicate that both RRA-1 and -2 play a role in the arabinosylation of cell wall component(s)....

  6. Characterizing developing adverse pressure gradient flows subject to surface roughness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brzek, Brian; Chao, Donald; Turan, Özden; Castillo, Luciano

    2010-04-01

    An experimental study was conducted to examine the effects of surface roughness and adverse pressure gradient (APG) on the development of a turbulent boundary layer. Hot-wire anemometry measurements were carried out using single and X-wire probes in all regions of a developing APG flow in an open return wind tunnel test section. The same experimental conditions (i.e., T ∞, U ref, and C p) were maintained for smooth, k + = 0, and rough, k + = 41-60, surfaces with Reynolds number based on momentum thickness, 3,000 carefully designed such that the x-dependence in the flow field was known. Despite this fact, only a very small region of the boundary layer showed a balance of the various terms in the integrated boundary layer equation. The skin friction computed from this technique showed up to a 58% increase due to the surface roughness. Various equilibrium parameters were studied and the effect of roughness was investigated. The generated flow was not in equilibrium according to the Clauser (J Aero Sci 21:91-108, 1954) definition due to its developing nature. After a development region, the flow reached the equilibrium condition as defined by Castillo and George (2001), where Λ = const, is the pressure gradient parameter. Moreover, it was found that this equilibrium condition can be used to classify developing APG flows. Furthermore, the Zagarola and Smits (J Fluid Mech 373:33-79, 1998a) scaling of the mean velocity deficit, U ∞δ*/δ, can also be used as a criteria to classify developing APG flows which supports the equilibrium condition of Castillo and George (2001). With this information a ‘full APG region’ was defined.

  7. Surface Characterization of the LCLS RF Gun Cathode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brachmann, Axel; Decker, Franz-Josef; Ding, Yuantao; Dowell, David; Emma, Paul; Frisch, Josef; Gilevich, Sasha; Hays, Gregory; Hering, Philippe; Huang, Zhirong; Iverson, Richard; Loos, Henrik; Miahnahri, Alan; Nordlund, Dennis; Nuhn, Heinz-Dieter; Pianetta, Piero; Turner, James; Welch, James; White, William; Wu, Juhao; Xiang, Dao

    2012-01-01

    The first copper cathode installed in the LCLS RF gun was used during LCLS commissioning for more than a year. However, after high charge operation (> 500 pC), the cathode showed a decline of quantum efficiency within the area of drive laser illumination. They report results of SEM, XPS and XAS studies that were carried out on this cathode after it was removed from the gun. X-ray absorption and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy reveal surface contamination by various hydrocarbon compounds. In addition they report on the performance of the second installed cathode with emphasis on the spatial distribution of electron emission.

  8. Characterization of groundwater flow for near surface disposal facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-02-01

    The main objective of this report is to provide a description of the site investigation techniques and modelling approaches that can be used to characterise the flow of subsurface water at near surface disposal facilities in relation to the various development stages of the repositories. As one of the main goals of defining groundwater flow is to establish the possible contaminant migration, certain aspects related to groundwater transport are also described. Secondary objectives are to discuss the implications of various groundwater conditions with regard to the performance of the isolation systems

  9. Characterization of metal additive manufacturing surfaces using synchrotron X-ray CT and micromechanical modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantzos, C. A.; Cunningham, R. W.; Tari, V.; Rollett, A. D.

    2018-05-01

    Characterizing complex surface topologies is necessary to understand stress concentrations created by rough surfaces, particularly those made via laser power-bed additive manufacturing (AM). Synchrotron-based X-ray microtomography (μ XCT) of AM surfaces was shown to provide high resolution detail of surface features and near-surface porosity. Using the CT reconstructions to instantiate a micromechanical model indicated that surface notches and near-surface porosity both act as stress concentrators, while adhered powder carried little to no load. Differences in powder size distribution had no direct effect on the relevant surface features, nor on stress concentrations. Conventional measurements of surface roughness, which are highly influenced by adhered powder, are therefore unlikely to contain the information relevant to damage accumulation and crack initiation.

  10. Relating Nanoscale Accessibility within Plant Cell Walls to Improved Enzyme Hydrolysis Yields in Corn Stover Subjected to Diverse Pretreatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowe, Jacob D; Zarger, Rachael A; Hodge, David B

    2017-10-04

    Simultaneous chemical modification and physical reorganization of plant cell walls via alkaline hydrogen peroxide or liquid hot water pretreatment can alter cell wall structural properties impacting nanoscale porosity. Nanoscale porosity was characterized using solute exclusion to assess accessible pore volumes, water retention value as a proxy for accessible water-cell walls surface area, and solute-induced cell wall swelling to measure cell wall rigidity. Key findings concluded that delignification by alkaline hydrogen peroxide pretreatment decreased cell wall rigidity and that the subsequent cell wall swelling resulted increased nanoscale porosity and improved enzyme binding and hydrolysis compared to limited swelling and increased accessible surface areas observed in liquid hot water pretreated biomass. The volume accessible to a 90 Å dextran probe within the cell wall was found to be correlated to both enzyme binding and glucose hydrolysis yields, indicating cell wall porosity is a key contributor to effective hydrolysis yields.

  11. Surface characterization and wear behaviour of laser surface melted AISI 316L stainless steel

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kumar, A

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study concerns an in depth investigation of the influence of laser surface melting of AISI 316L stainless steel using Ar and N2 as shrouding atmosphere. Laser surface melting has been carried out using a 5 kW continuous wave (CW) fibre...

  12. Simulations of a spectral gamma-ray logging tool response to a surface source distribution on the borehole wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, R.D.; Conaway, J.G.

    1991-01-01

    We have developed Monte Carlo and discrete ordinates simulation models for the large-detector spectral gamma-ray (SGR) logging tool in use at the Nevada Test Site. Application of the simulation models produced spectra for source layers on the borehole wall, either from potassium-bearing mudcakes or from plate-out of radon daughter products. Simulations show that the shape and magnitude of gamma-ray spectra from sources distributed on the borehole wall depend on radial position with in the air-filled borehole as well as on hole diameter. No such dependence is observed for sources uniformly distributed in the formation. In addition, sources on the borehole wall produce anisotropic angular fluxes at the higher scattered energies and at the source energy. These differences in borehole effects and in angular flux are important to the process of correcting SGR logs for the presence of potassium mudcakes; they also suggest a technique for distinguishing between spectral contributions from formation sources and sources on the borehole wall. These results imply the existence of a standoff effect not present for spectra measured in air-filled boreholes from formation sources. 5 refs., 11 figs

  13. Surface grafted chitosan gels. Part II. Gel formation and characterization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Chao; Thormann, Esben; Claesson, Per M.

    2014-01-01

    Responsive biomaterial hydrogels attract significant attention due to their biocompatibility and degradability. In order to make chitosan based gels, we first graft one layer of chitosan to silica, and then build a chitosan/poly(acrylic acid) multilayer using the layer-by-layer approach. After...... cross-linking the chitosan present in the polyelectrolyte multilayer, poly(acrylic acid) is partly removed by exposing the multilayer structure to a concentrated carbonate buffer solution at a high pH, leaving a surface-grafted cross-linked gel. Chemical cross-linking enhances the gel stability against...... detachment and decomposition. The chemical reaction between gluteraldehyde, the cross-linking agent, and chitosan was followed in situ using total internal reflection Raman (TIRR) spectroscopy, which provided a molecular insight into the complex reaction mechanism, as well as the means to quantify the cross...

  14. Nanodiamond preparation and surface characterization for biological applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodhams, Ben J.; Knowles, Helena S.; Kara, Dhiren M.; Atatüre, Mete; Bohndiek, Sarah E.

    2017-02-01

    Nanodiamonds contain stable fluorescent emitters and hence can be used for molecular fluorescence imaging and precision sensing of electromagnetic fields. The physical properties of these emitters together with their low reported cytotoxicity make them attractive for biological imaging applications. The controlled application of nanodiamonds for cellular imaging requires detailed understanding of surface chemistry, size ranges and aggregation, as these can all influence cellular interactions. We compared these characteristics for graphitic and oxidized nanodiamonds. Oxidation is generally used for surface functionalization, and was optimized by Thermogravimetric Analysis, achieved by 445+/-5°C heating in air for 5 hours, then confirmed via Raman and Infrared spectroscopies. Size ranges and aggregation were assessed using Atomic Force Microscopy and Dynamic Light Scattering. Biocompatibility in breast cancer cell lines was measured using a proliferation assay. Heating at 445+/-5°C reduced the Raman signal of graphitic carbon (1575 cm-1) as compared to that of diamond (1332 cm-1) from 0.31+/-0.07 Raman intensity units to 0.07+/-0.04. This temperature was substantially below the onset of major mass loss (observed at 535+/-1°C) and therefore achieved cost efficiency, convenience and high yield. Graphitic and oxidized nanodiamonds formed aggregates in water, with a mean particle size of 192+/-4nm and 166+/-2nm at a concentration of 66μg/mL. We then applied the graphitic and oxidized nanodiamonds to cells in culture at 1μg/mL and found no significant change in the proliferation rate (-5+/-2% and -1+/-3% respectively). Nanodiamonds may therefore be suitable for development as a novel transformative tool in the life sciences.

  15. Characterization and flip angle calibration of 13C surface coils for hyperpolarization studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Rie Beck; Gutte, Henrik; Larsen, Majbrit M E

    The aim of the present work is to address the challenge of optimal The aim of the present work is to address the challenge of optimal flflip angle calibration of ip angle calibration of C surface coils in C surface coils in hyperpolarization studies. To this end, we characterize the spatial pro h...

  16. Validation of in-line surface characterization by light scattering in Robot Assisted Polishing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilny, Lukas; Bissacco, Giuliano; De Chiffre, Leonardo

    2014-01-01

    The suitability of a commercial scattered light sensor for in-line characterization of fine surfaces in the roughness range Sa 1 – 30 nm generated by the Robot Assisted Polishing (RAP) was investigated and validated. A number of surfaces were generated and directly measured with the scattered light...

  17. Characterization of holding brake friction pad surface after pin-on-plate wear test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drago, N.; Gonzalez Madruga, D.; De Chiffre, L.

    2018-01-01

    This article concerns the metrological characterization of the surface on a holding brake friction material pin after a pin-on-plate (POP) wear test. The POP test induces the formation of surface plateaus that affect brake performances such as wear, friction, noise and heat. Three different...

  18. Functional properties of bio-inspired surfaces: characterization and technological applications

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Favret, Eduardo A; Fuentes, Néstor O

    2009-01-01

    ... technological materials. It analyses how such surfaces can be described and characterized using microscopic techniques and thus reproduced, encompassing the important areas of current surface replication techniques and the associated acquisition of good master structures. It is well known that biological systems have the ability to sense, ...

  19. An expert system to characterize the surface morphological properties according to their functionalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bigerelle, M; Mathia, T; Iost, A; Correvits, T; Anselme, K

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we propose a new methodology to characterize the morphological properties of a surface in relation with its functionality (tribological properties, surface coating adhesion, brightness, wettability...). We create a software based on experimental design and surface profile recording. Using an appropriate database structure, the roughness parameters are automatically computed at different scales. The surface files are saved in a hard disk directory and roughness parameters are computed at different scales. Finally, a statistical analysis system proposes the roughness parameter (or the pair of roughness parameters) that better describe(s) the functionality of the surface and the spatial scales at which the parameter(s) is (are) the more relevant.

  20. An expert system to characterize the surface morphological properties according to their functionalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bigerelle, M [Laboratoire Roberval, UMR 6253, UTC/CNRS, UTC Centre de Recherches de Royallieu BP 20529, 60205 Compiegne France stol BS1 6BE (United Kingdom); Mathia, T [Laboratoire de Tribologie et Dynamique des Systemes, UMR 5513, Ecole Centrale de Lyon, 36 Av Guy de Collongue, 69134 Ecully Cedex (France); Iost, A [Laboratoire de Mecanique de Lille, UMR CNRS 8107, Arts et Metiers ParisTech - Lille, 8, boulevard Louis XIV 59046 Lille (France); Correvits, T [Laboratoire de Metrologie. Arts et Metiers ParisTech, ENSAM, 8 boulevard Louis XIV, 59046 LILLE Cedex (France); Anselme, K, E-mail: maxence.bigerelle@utc.fr [Institut De Sciences Des Materiaux De Mulhouse, CNRS LRC 7228, 15, rue Jean Starcky, Universite De Haute-Alsace, BP 2488, 68057 Mulhouse (France)

    2011-08-19

    In this paper we propose a new methodology to characterize the morphological properties of a surface in relation with its functionality (tribological properties, surface coating adhesion, brightness, wettability...). We create a software based on experimental design and surface profile recording. Using an appropriate database structure, the roughness parameters are automatically computed at different scales. The surface files are saved in a hard disk directory and roughness parameters are computed at different scales. Finally, a statistical analysis system proposes the roughness parameter (or the pair of roughness parameters) that better describe(s) the functionality of the surface and the spatial scales at which the parameter(s) is (are) the more relevant.

  1. In-duct removal of mercury from coal-fired power plant flue gas by activated carbon: assessment of entrained flow versus wall surface contributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scala, F.; Chirone, R.; Lancia, A. [CNR, Naples (Italy). Institute for Research on Combustion

    2008-12-15

    In-duct mercury capture efficiency by activated carbon from coal-combustion flue gas was investigated. To this end, elemental mercury capture experiments were conducted at 100 C in a purposely designed 65-mm ID labscale pyrex apparatus operated as an entrained flow reactor. Gas residence times were varied between 0.7 and 2.0 s. Commercial-powdered activated carbon was continuously injected in the reactor and both mercury concentration and carbon elutriation rate were followed at the outlet. Transient mercury concentration profiles at the outlet showed that steady-state conditions were reached in a time interval of 15-20 min, much longer than the gas residence time in the reactor. Results indicate that the influence of the walls is non-negligible in determining the residence time of fine carbon particles in the adsorption zone, because of surface deposition and/or the establishment of a fluid-dynamic boundary layer near the walls. Total mercury capture efficiencies of 20-50% were obtained with carbon injection rates in the range 0.07-0.25 g/min. However, only a fraction of this capture was attributable to free-flowing carbon particles, a significant contribution coming from activated carbon staying near the reactor walls. Entrained bed experiments at lab-scale conditions are probably not properly representative of full-scale conditions, where the influence of wall interactions is lower. Moreover, previously reported entrained flow lab-scale mercury capture data should be reconsidered by taking into account the influence of particle-wall interactions.

  2. Evaluation for activities of component of Cyclotron-Based Epithermal Neutron Source (C-BENS) and the surface of concrete wall in irradiation room

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imoto, M., E-mail: masayuki.imoto@gmail.com [Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Tanaka, H. [Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, Osaka 590-0494 (Japan); Fujita, K.; Mitsumoto, T. [Sumitomo Heavy Industries, Ltd., Tokyo 141-6025 (Japan); Ono, K.; Maruhashi, A.; Sakurai, Y. [Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, Osaka 590-0494 (Japan)

    2011-12-15

    The workers employed in BNCT must enter the irradiation room just after an irradiation under the condition of remaining activities. To reduce the radiation exposure for the workers, it is important to identify the origins of the activities. In this research, the activities induced on the concrete wall surface were evaluated using MCNP-5 and the measurement results of thermal neutron distribution. Furthermore, the radioisotopes produced in the moderator were identified with a High Purity Germanium detector. It was found that the activities of the wall were mainly caused by {sup 46}Sc, {sup 60}Co and {sup 152}Eu, and that {sup 24}Na and {sup 56}Mn were mainly produced in the moderator.

  3. A significant reduction of ice adhesion on nanostructured surfaces that consist of an array of single-walled carbon nanotubes: A molecular dynamics simulation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Luyao; Huang, Zhaoyuan; Priezjev, Nikolai V.; Chen, Shaoqiang; Luo, Kai; Hu, Haibao

    2018-04-01

    It is well recognized that excessive ice accumulation at low-temperature conditions can cause significant damage to civil infrastructure. The passive anti-icing surfaces provide a promising solution to suppress ice nucleation and enhance ice removal. However, despite extensive efforts, it remains a challenge to design anti-icing surfaces with low ice adhesion. Using all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, we show that surfaces with single-walled carbon nanotube array (CNTA) significantly reduce ice adhesion due to the extremely low solid areal fraction. It was found that the CNTA surface exhibits up to a 45% decrease in the ice adhesion strength in comparison with the atomically smooth graphene surface. The details of the ice detachment from the CNTA surface were examined for different water-carbon interaction energies and temperatures of the ice cube. Remarkably, the results of MD simulations demonstrate that the ice detaching strength depends linearly on the ratio of the ice-surface interaction energy and the ice temperature. These results open the possibility for designing novel robust surfaces with low ice adhesion for passive anti-icing applications.

  4. Characterization of highly anisotropic three-dimensionally nanostructured surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Generalized ellipsometry, a non-destructive optical characterization technique, is employed to determine geometrical structure parameters and anisotropic dielectric properties of highly spatially coherent three-dimensionally nanostructured thin films grown by glancing angle deposition. The (piecewise) homogeneous biaxial layer model approach is discussed, which can be universally applied to model the optical response of sculptured thin films with different geometries and from diverse materials, and structural parameters as well as effective optical properties of the nanostructured thin films are obtained. Alternative model approaches for slanted columnar thin films, anisotropic effective medium approximations based on the Bruggeman formalism, are presented, which deliver results comparable to the homogeneous biaxial layer approach and in addition provide film constituent volume fraction parameters as well as depolarization or shape factors. Advantages of these ellipsometry models are discussed on the example of metal slanted columnar thin films, which have been conformally coated with a thin passivating oxide layer by atomic layer deposition. Furthermore, the application of an effective medium approximation approach to in-situ growth monitoring of this anisotropic thin film functionalization process is presented. It was found that structural parameters determined with the presented optical model equivalents for slanted columnar thin films agree very well with scanning electron microscope image estimates. - Highlights: • Summary of optical model strategies for sculptured thin films with arbitrary geometries • Application of the rigorous anisotropic Bruggeman effective medium applications • In-situ growth monitoring of atomic layer deposition on biaxial metal slanted columnar thin film

  5. Genomic characterization of plant cell wall degrading enzymes and in silico analysis of xylanses and polygalacturonases of Fusarium virguliforme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plant cell wall degrading enzymes (PCWDEs) are important effectors for plant pathogens to invade plants. In this study, the composition of PCWDEs in Fusarium virguliforme that were grown for 5-days and 20 days in liquid medium was determined by RNA-Seq. Differential expression analysis showed more P...

  6. Development of laser-based techniques for in situ characterization of the first wall in ITER and future fusion devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Philipps, V.; Malaquias, A.; Hakola, A.; Karhunen, J.; Maddaluno, G.; Almaviva, S.; Caneve, L.; Colao, F.; Fortuna, E.; Gasior, P.; Kubkowska, M.; Czarnecka, A.; Laan, M.; Lissovski, A.; Paris, P.; van der Meiden, H. J.; Petersson, P.; Rubel, M.; Huber, A.; Zlobinski, M.; Schweer, B.; Gierse, N.; Xiao, Q.; Sergienko, G.

    2013-01-01

    Analysis and understanding of wall erosion, material transport and fuel retention are among the most important tasks for ITER and future devices, since these questions determine largely the lifetime and availability of the fusion reactor. These data are also of extreme value to improve the

  7. Research status and future trends on surface pre-grouting technology in reforming wall rock of vertical shafts in coal mines in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hua

    2018-02-01

    In the mine construction, the surface pre-grouting technology is an important method to prevent water blast in excavation process of vertical shaft when the shaft must pass through the thick, water-rich and high water-pressure bedrock aquifer. It has been nearly 60 years since the technology was used to reform wall rock of vertical shaft in coal mine in China for the first time, and the existing technology can basically meet the needs of constructing 1000m deep vertical shaft. Firstly, the article introduces that in view of Magg’s spherical seepage theory and Karol’s spherical seepage theory, Chinese scholars found that the diffusion of grout from borehole into the surrounding strata in horizontal direction is irregular through a lot of research and engineering practice of using the surface pre-grouting technology to reform wall rock of vertical shafts, and put forward the selecting principles of grout’s effective diffusion radius in one grouting engineering; Secondly, according to the shape of the grouting boreholes, surface pre-grouting technology of vertical shaft is divided into two stages: vertical borehole stage and S-type borehole stage. Thirdly, the development status of grouting materials and grouting equipment for the technology is introduced. Fourthly, grouting mode, stage height and pressure of the technology are introduced. Finally, it points out that with the increasing depth of coal mining in China, the technology of reforming wall rock of 1000~2000m deep vertical shafts will face many problems, such as grouting theory, grouting equipment, grouting finishing standard, testing and evaluation of grouting effect, and so on. And it put forward a preliminary approach to solving these problems. This paper points out future research directions of the surface pre-grouting technology in China.

  8. Electron backscatter diffraction characterization of laser-induced periodic surface structures on nickel surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sedao, Xxx, E-mail: sedao.xxx@gmail.com [Laboratoire Hubert Curien, Université Jean Monnet, 42000 St-Etienne (France); Maurice, Claire [Laboratoire Georges Friedel, Ecole Nationale Supérieure des Mines, 42023 St-Etienne (France); Garrelie, Florence; Colombier, Jean-Philippe; Reynaud, Stéphanie [Laboratoire Hubert Curien, Université Jean Monnet, 42000 St-Etienne (France); Quey, Romain; Blanc, Gilles [Laboratoire Georges Friedel, Ecole Nationale Supérieure des Mines, 42023 St-Etienne (France); Pigeon, Florent [Laboratoire Hubert Curien, Université Jean Monnet, 42000 St-Etienne (France)

    2014-05-01

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlight: •Lattice rotation and its distribution in laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) and the subsurface region on a nickel substrate are revealed using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). -- Abstract: We report on the structural investigation of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) generated in polycrystalline nickel target after multi-shot irradiation by femtosecond laser pulses. Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) is used to reveal lattice rotation caused by dislocation storage during LIPSS formation. Localized crystallographic damages in the LIPSS are detected from both surface and cross-sectional EBSD studies. A surface region (up to 200 nm) with 1–3° grain disorientation is observed in localized areas from the cross-section of the LIPSS. The distribution of the local disorientation is inhomogeneous across the LIPSS and the subsurface region.

  9. 3D scanning electron microscopy applied to surface characterization of fluorosed dental enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limandri, Silvina; Galván Josa, Víctor; Valentinuzzi, María Cecilia; Chena, María Emilia; Castellano, Gustavo

    2016-05-01

    The enamel surfaces of fluorotic teeth were studied by scanning electron stereomicroscopy. Different whitening treatments were applied to 25 pieces to remove stains caused by fluorosis and their surfaces were characterized by stereomicroscopy in order to obtain functional and amplitude parameters. The topographic features resulting for each treatment were determined through these parameters. The results obtained show that the 3D reconstruction achieved from the SEM stereo pairs is a valuable potential alternative for the surface characterization of this kind of samples. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Surface characterization and corrosion behavior of micro-arc oxidized Ti surface modified with hydrothermal treatment and chitosan coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neupane, Madhav Prasad; Park, Il Song; Lee, Min Ho

    2014-01-01

    In the present work, we describe the surface modification of commercially pure titanium (CP-Ti) by a composite/multilayer coating approach for biomedical applications. CP-Ti samples were treated by micro-arc oxidation (MAO) and subsequently some of the samples were coated with chitosan (Chi) by dip coating method, while others were subjected to hydrothermal treatment (HT) followed by chitosan coating. The MAO, MAO/Chi, and MAO/HT/Chi coated Ti were characterized and their characteristics were compared with CP-Ti. X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy were used to assess the structural and morphological characteristics. The average surface roughness was determined using a surface profilometer. The corrosion resistance of untreated and surface modified Ti in commercial saline at 298 K was evaluated by potentiodynamic polarization test. The results indicated that the chitosan coating is very well integrated with the MAO and MAO/HT coating by physically interlocking itself with the coated layer and almost sealed all the pores. The surface roughness of hydrothermally treated and chitosan coated MAO film was superior evidently to that with other sample groups. The corrosion studies demonstrated that the MAO, hydrothermally treated and chitosan coated sample enhanced the corrosion resistance of titanium. The result indicates that fabrication of hydrothermally treated MAO surface coatings with chitosan is a significant approach to protect the titanium from corrosion, hence enhancing the potential use of titanium as bio-implants. - Highlights: • Micro-arc oxidized (MAO) and hydrothermally treated (HT) Ti surfaces are coated with chitosan (Chi). • The MAO/HT/Chi surface exhibits pores sealing and enhanced the surface roughness. • The MAO/HT/Chi surface significantly increase the corrosion resistance. • The MAO/HT/Chi can be a potential surface of titanium for bio-implants

  11. Long-term stability of superhydrophilic oxygen plasma-modified single-walled carbon nanotube network surfaces and the influence on ammonia gas detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min, Sungjoon [Department of Biomicrosystem Technology, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Joonhyub [Department of Control and Instrumentation Engineering, Korea University, 2511 Sejong-ro, Sejong City 339-770 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Chanwon [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Kangwon National University, Chuncheon 200-701 (Korea, Republic of); Jin, Joon-Hyung, E-mail: jj1023@chol.com [Department of Chemical Engineering, Kyonggi University, 154-42 Gwanggyosan-ro, Yeongtong-gu, Suwon-si, Gyeonggi-do 16227 (Korea, Republic of); Min, Nam Ki, E-mail: nkmin@korea.ac.kr [Department of Biomicrosystem Technology, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-07-15

    Graphical abstract: Superhydrophilic single-walled carbon nanotube obtained by O{sub 2} plasma treatment voluntarily and non-reversibly reverts to a metastable state. This aerobic aging is an essential process to develop a stable carbon nanotube-based sensor. - Highlights: • Superhydrophilic single-walled carbon nanotube network can be obtained by O{sub 2} plasma-based surface modification. • The modified carbon nanotube surface invariably reverts to a metastable state in a non-reversible manner. • Aerobic aging is essential to stabilize the modified carbon nanotube and the carbon nanotube-based sensing device due to minimized sensor-to-sensor variation. - Abstract: Single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) networks are subjected to a low-powered oxygen plasma for the surface modification. Changes in the surface chemical composition and the stability of the plasma-treated SWCNT (p-SWCNT) with aging in air for up to five weeks are studied using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and contact angle analysis. The contact angle decreases from 120° of the untreated hydrophobic SWCNT to 0° for the superhydrophilic p-SWCNT. Similarly, the ratio of oxygen to carbon (O:C) based on the XPS spectra increases from 0.25 to 1.19, indicating an increase in surface energy of the p-SWCNT. The enhanced surface energy is gradually dissipated and the p-SWCNT network loses the superhydrophilic surface property. However, it never revert to the original hydrophobic surface state but to a metastable hydrophilic state. The aging effect on sensitivity of the p-SWCNT network-based ammonia sensor is investigated to show the importance of the aging process for the stabilization of the p-SWCNT. The best sensitivity for monitoring NH{sub 3} gas is observed with the as-prepared p-SWCNT, and the sensitivity decreases as similar as the p-SWCNT loses its hydrophilicity with time goes by. After a large performance degradation during the aging time for about two weeks, the response

  12. The Chameleon Effect: characterization challenges due to the variability of nanoparticles and their surfaces of nanoparticles and their surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baer, Donald R.

    2018-05-01

    Nanoparticles in a variety of forms are increasing important in fundamental research, technological and medical applications, and environmental or toxicology studies. Physical and chemical drivers that lead to multiple types of particle instabilities complicate both the ability to produce, appropriately characterize, and consistently deliver well-defined particles, frequently leading to inconsistencies and conflicts in the published literature. This perspective suggests that provenance information, beyond that often recorded or reported, and application of a set of core characterization methods, including a surface sensitive technique, consistently applied at critical times can serve as tools in the effort minimize reproducibility issues.

  13. Effect of Geometry on Electrokinetic Characterization of Solid Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Abhijeet; Kleinen, Jochen; Venzmer, Joachim; Gambaryan-Roisman, Tatiana

    2017-08-01

    An analytical approach is presented to describe pressure-driven streaming current (I str ) and streaming potential (U str ) generation in geometrically complex samples, for which the classical Helmholtz-Smoluchowski (H-S) equation is known to be inaccurate. The new approach is valid under the same prerequisite conditions that are used for the development of the H-S equation, that is, the electrical double layers (EDLs) are sufficiently thin and surface conductivity and electroviscous effects are negligible. The analytical methodology is developed using linear velocity profiles to describe liquid flow inside of EDLs and using simplifying approximations to describe macroscopic flow. At first, a general expression is obtained to describe the I str generated in different cross sections of an arbitrarily shaped sample. Thereafter, assuming that the generated U str varies only along the pressure-gradient direction, an expression describing the variation of generated U str along the sample length is obtained. These expressions describing I str and U str generation constitute the theoretical foundation of this work, which is first applied to a set of three nonuniform cross-sectional capillaries and thereafter to a square array of cylindrical fibers (model porous media) for both parallel and transverse fiber orientation cases. Although analytical solutions cannot be obtained for real porous substrates because of their random structure, the new theory provides useful insights into the effect of important factors such as fiber orientation, sample porosity, and sample dimensions. The solutions obtained for the model porous media are used to device strategies for more accurate zeta potential determination of porous fiber plugs. The new approach could be thus useful in resolving the long-standing problem of sample geometry dependence of zeta potential measurements.

  14. Technical note: Influence of surface roughness and local turbulence on coated-wall flow tube experiments for gas uptake and kinetic studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Li

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Coated-wall flow tube reactors are frequently used to investigate gas uptake and heterogeneous or multiphase reaction kinetics under laminar flow conditions. Coating surface roughness may potentially distort the laminar flow pattern, induce turbulence and introduce uncertainties in the calculated uptake coefficient based on molecular diffusion assumptions (e.g., Brown/Cooney–Kim–Davis (CKD/Knopf–Pöschl–Shiraiwa (KPS methods, which has not been fully resolved in earlier studies. Here, we investigate the influence of surface roughness and local turbulence on coated-wall flow tube experiments for gas uptake and kinetic studies. According to laminar boundary theory and considering the specific flow conditions in a coated-wall flow tube, we derive and propose a critical height δc to evaluate turbulence effects in the design and analysis of coated-wall flow tube experiments. If a geometric coating thickness δg is larger than δc, the roughness elements of the coating may cause local turbulence and result in overestimation of the real uptake coefficient (γ. We further develop modified CKD/KPS methods (i.e., CKD-LT/KPS-LT to account for roughness-induced local turbulence effects. By combination of the original methods and their modified versions, the maximum error range of γCKD (derived with the CKD method or γKPS (derived with the KPS method can be quantified and finally γ can be constrained. When turbulence is generated, γCKD or γKPS can bear large difference compared to γ. Their difference becomes smaller for gas reactants with lower uptake (i.e., smaller γ and/or for a smaller ratio of the geometric coating thickness to the flow tube radius (δg ∕ R0. On the other hand, the critical height δc can also be adjusted by optimizing flow tube configurations and operating conditions (i.e., tube diameter, length, and flow velocity, to ensure not only unaffected laminar flow patterns but also other specific requirements for an

  15. Edge dynamics in pellet-fuelled inner-wall jet discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, S.A.; Ehrenberg, J.; Bartlett, D.V.

    1987-01-01

    This paper reports on the density behavior in JET during pellet-fuelled inner-wall discharges without auxiliary heating. Certain discharges, characterized by minor disruptions at the q = 2 surface, show a ten times more rapid decay of the plasma density than previously observed. It is shown that this is related to the combined effects of plasma and wall properties

  16. Surface and Subsurface Geodesy Combined with Active Borehole Experimentation for the Advanced Characterization of EGS Reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elsworth, Derek [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Im, Kyungjae [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Guglielmi, Yves [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Mattioli, Glen [Univ. of Texas, Arlington, TX (United States). UNAVCO

    2016-11-14

    We explore the utility of combining active downhole experimentation with borehole and surface geodesy to determine both the characteristics and evolving state of EGS reservoirs during stimulation through production. The study is divided into two parts. We demonstrate the feasibility of determining in situ reservoir characteristics of reservoir size, strain and fracture permeability and their dependence on feedbacks of stress and temperature using surface and borehole geodetic measurements (Part I). We then define the opportunity to apply the unique hydraulic pulse protocol (HPP) borehole tool to evaluate reservoir state. This can be accomplished by monitoring and co-inverting measured reservoir characteristics (from the HPP tool) with surface geodetic measurements of deformation, tilt and strain with continuous measurements of borehole-wall strain (via optical fiber and fiber Bragg gratings) and measured flow rates (Part II).

  17. Formation and Characterization of Stacked Nanoscale Layers of Polymers and Silanes on Silicon Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochoa, Rosie; Davis, Brian; Conley, Hiram; Hurd, Katie; Linford, Matthew R.; Davis, Robert C.

    2008-10-01

    Chemical surface patterning at the nanoscale is a critical component of chemically directed assembly of nanoscale devices or sensitive biological molecules onto surfaces. Complete and consistent formation of nanoscale layers of silanes and polymers is a necessary first step for chemical patterning. We explored methods of silanizing silicon substrates for the purpose of functionalizing the surfaces. The chemical functionalization, stability, flatness, and repeatability of the process was characterized by use of ellipsometry, water contact angle, and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). We found that forming the highest quality functionalized surfaces was accomplished through use of chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Specifically, surfaces were plasma cleaned and hydrolyzed before the silane was applied. A polymer layer less then 2 nm in thickness was electrostatically bound to the silane layer. The chemical functionalization, stability, flatness, and repeatability of the process was also characterized for the polymer layer using ellipsometry, water contact angle, and AFM.

  18. Wall roughness induces asymptotic ultimate turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiaojue; Verschoof, Ruben A.; Bakhuis, Dennis; Huisman, Sander G.; Verzicco, Roberto; Sun, Chao; Lohse, Detlef

    2018-04-01

    Turbulence governs the transport of heat, mass and momentum on multiple scales. In real-world applications, wall-bounded turbulence typically involves surfaces that are rough; however, characterizing and understanding the effects of wall roughness on turbulence remains a challenge. Here, by combining extensive experiments and numerical simulations, we examine the paradigmatic Taylor-Couette system, which describes the closed flow between two independently rotating coaxial cylinders. We show how wall roughness greatly enhances the overall transport properties and the corresponding scaling exponents associated with wall-bounded turbulence. We reveal that if only one of the walls is rough, the bulk velocity is slaved to the rough side, due to the much stronger coupling to that wall by the detaching flow structures. If both walls are rough, the viscosity dependence is eliminated, giving rise to asymptotic ultimate turbulence—the upper limit of transport—the existence of which was predicted more than 50 years ago. In this limit, the scaling laws can be extrapolated to arbitrarily large Reynolds numbers.

  19. Effect of steady magnetic field on laser-induced breakdown spectroscopic characterization of EAST-like wall materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hai, R.; Liu, P.; Wu, D.; Xiao, Q.; Sun, L.; Ding, H.

    2015-01-01

    Our recent investigations were focused on the feasibility of the LIBS method proposed for EAST under vacuum conditions as well as with a magnetic field. Aluminum (replaced Be)–lithium alloys were used as a substitute for a uniform lithium deposition layer on the first wall. Detailed information of divertor tiles (multi-element doped graphite) and aluminum–lithium alloys were obtained by analyzing the spectra from 200 to 980 nm. With the magnetic field (0.94 T), various line emissions obtained from the constituents of samples shown an enhancement (>2 times) in intensity due to the increase in the effective plasma density and temperature as a result of magnetic confinement. The effect of magnetic field on the emission intensity of LIBS at the different pressure (1.0 × 10 −5 –1000 mbar) would help us to develop a quantitative LIBS approach to monitor impurity deposition and fuel retention on the first wall

  20. Elemental Characterization of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotube Certified Reference Material by Neutron and Prompt gamma Activation Analysis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kučera, Jan; Bennett, J. W.; Oflaz, R.; Paul, R. L.; De Nadai Fernandes, E. A.; Kubešová, Marie; Bacchi, M. A.; Stopic, A. J.; Sturgeon, R. E.; Grinberg, P.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 87, č. 7 (2015), s. 3699-3705 ISSN 0003-2700 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP108/12/G108; GA MŠk LM2011019 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : Neutron Activation Analyses * nanotechnology * Carbon nanotubes * Chemical activation * Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCN) Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 5.886, year: 2015

  1. Atomic force microscopy characterization of the surface wettability of natural fibres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pietak, Alexis; Korte, Sandra; Tan, Emelyn; Downard, Alison; Staiger, Mark P.

    2007-01-01

    Natural fibres represent a readily available source of ecologically friendly and inexpensive reinforcement in composites with degradable thermoplastics, however chemical treatments of fibres are required to prepare feasible composites. It is desirable to characterize the surface wettability of fibres after chemical treatment as the polarity of cellulose-based fibres influences compatibility with a polymer matrix. Assessment of the surface wettability of natural fibres using conventional methods presents a challenge as the surfaces are morphologically and chemically heterogeneous, rough, and can be strongly wicking. In this work it is shown that under atmospheric conditions the adhesion force between an atomic force microscopy (AFM) tip and the fibre surface can estimate the water contact angle and surface wettability of the fibre. AFM adhesion force measurements are suitable for the more difficult surfaces of natural fibres and in addition allow for correlations between microstructural features and surface wettability characteristics

  2. Characterization of carrier transport properties in strained crystalline Si wall-like structures in the quasi-quantum regime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayberry, C. S.; Huang, Danhong, E-mail: danhong.huang@us.af.mil; Kouhestani, C. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Space Vehicles Directorate, Kirtland Air Force Base, New Mexico 87117 (United States); Balakrishnan, G. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87106 (United States); Islam, N. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Missouri-Columbia, Columbia, Missouri 65211 (United States); Brueck, S. R. J. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87106 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87106 (United States); Sharma, A. K. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Space Vehicles Directorate, Kirtland Air Force Base, New Mexico 87117 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87106 (United States)

    2015-10-07

    We report the transport characteristics of both electrons and holes through narrow constricted crystalline Si “wall-like” long-channels that were surrounded by a thermally grown SiO{sub 2} layer. The strained buffering depth inside the Si region (due to Si/SiO{sub 2} interfacial lattice mismatch) is where scattering is seen to enhance some modes of the carrier-lattice interaction, while suppressing others, thereby changing the relative value of the effective masses of both electrons and holes, as compared to bulk Si. In the narrowest wall devices, a considerable increase in conductivity was observed as a result of higher carrier mobilities due to lateral constriction and strain. The strain effects, which include the reversal splitting of light- and heavy-hole bands as well as the decrease of conduction-band effective mass by reduced Si bandgap energy, are formulated in our microscopic model for explaining the experimentally observed enhancements in both conduction- and valence-band mobilities with reduced Si wall thickness. Also, the enhancements of the valence-band and conduction-band mobilities are found to be associated with different aspects of theoretical model.

  3. Characterization of Modified and Polymer Coated Alumina Surfaces by Infrared Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashraf Yehia El-Naggar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The prepared, modified, and coated alumina surfaces were characterized by infrared spectroscopy (FTIR to investigate the surface properties of the individual and double modified samples. FTIR helps in reporting the changes occurred in hydroxyl groups as well as the structure changes as a result of thermal treating, hydrothermal treating, silylation treating, alkali metal treating, coating, and bonding with polymer. FTIR spectroscopy represents the strength and abundance of surface acidic OH which determine the adsorption properties of polar and nonpolar sorbents. Generally, all treated samples exhibit decrease of OH groups compared with those of parent ones producing alumina surfaces of different adsorptive powers.

  4. Wavelet-fractal approach to surface characterization of nanocrystalline ITO thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raoufi, Davood; Kalali, Zahra

    2012-01-01

    In this study, indium tin oxide (ITO) thin films were prepared by electron beam deposition method on glass substrates at room temperature (RT). Surface morphology characterization of ITO thin films, before and after annealing at 500 °C, were investigated by analyzing the surface profile of atomic force microscopy (AFM) images using wavelet transform formalism. The wavelet coefficients related to the thin film surface profiles have been calculated, and then roughness exponent (α) of the films has been estimated using the scalegram method. The results reveal that the surface profiles of the films before and after annealing process have self-affine nature.

  5. Short communication: Unexpected findings on the physicochemical characterization of the silver nanoparticle surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loran, S.; Yelon, A.; Sacher, E.

    2018-01-01

    The bactericidal properties of silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) have been variously attributed to the action of the NP surface and/or the Ag ions released therefrom. However, the published literature does not appear to contain any information on the physicochemical characterization of the NP surface. Herein, we report on the surprisingly reactive surface of the Ag NP, which has an almost total lack of free Ag on atmospheric exposure. Rather, an abundance of surface hydrocarbons, hydrides and oxides, as well as amines and oxidized N, argues for a reinterpretation of their bactericidal action.

  6. Characterization of non-calcareous 'thin' red clay from south-eastern Brazil: applicability in wall tile manufacture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sousa, S.J.G.; Holanda, J.N.F., E-mail: sidnei_rjsousa@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: holanda@uenf.br [Grupo de Materiais Ceramicos - LAMAV-CCT, Universidade Estadual do Norte Fluminense Darcy Ribeiro, Campos dos Goytacazes, RJ (Brazil)

    2012-04-15

    In this work the use of 'thin' red clay from south-eastern Brazil (Campos dos Goytacazes, RJ) as raw material for the manufacture of wall tile was investigated. A wide range of characterization techniques was employed, including X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray fluorescence (XRF), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), grain-size analysis, and thermogravimetric analysis. The wall tile body was prepared by the dry process. The tile pieces were uniaxially pressed and fired between 1080 - 1180 deg C using a fast-firing cycle. The following technological properties were determined: linear shrinkage, water absorption, apparent density, and flexural strength. The development of the microstructure was followed by SEM and XRD analyses. It was found that the 'thin' red clay is kaolinitic type containing a substantial amount of quartz. The results also showed that the 'thin' red clay could be used in the manufacture of wall tiles, as they present properties compatible with those specified for class BIII of ISO 13006 standard. (author)

  7. Surface decoration of short-cut polyimide fibers with multi-walled carbon nanotubes and their application for reinforcement of lightweight PC/ABS composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Le; Han, Enlin; Wu, Yulun; Wang, Xiaodong; Wu, Dezhen

    2018-06-01

    The surface decoration of short-cut polyimide (PI) fibers with multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) was performed by fabricating a polydopamine (PDA) coating layer on the fiber surface and then immobilizing MWCNTs onto the coating layer via covalent bonding. This successful surface decoration was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Fourier-transform infrared microscopy and static water contact angle. The application of the surface-decorated PI fibers as reinforcing fibers for reinforcement of polycarbonate (PC)/acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene copolymer (ABS) alloy was investigated, which indicated that the MWCNTs-decorated PI fibers not only could effectively reinforce the PC/ABS alloy but also generated a significant lightweighting effect on the resulting composites. The maximum mechanical properties were achieved for the composites at a fiber content of 20 wt.% and a fiber length of 3 mm. This significant reinforcement effect is attributed to the enhancement of interaction bonding strength between the fibers and matrix as a result of the surface decoration of PI fibers with MWCNTs. The morphological investigation suggested that fiber rupture was the major energy dissipation mechanism in the tensile and impact failures, whereas fiber debonding and pullout were partly involved in the fracture energy dissipation. In addition, the presence of surface-decorated PI fibers slightly enhanced the thermal stability and load bearing capability of composites. This work can provide a type of high-performance lightweight composite material for automobile and aviation industries.

  8. Characterization of gloss properties of differently treated polymer coating surfaces by surface clarity measurement methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, Dieter P; Buder-Stroisznigg, Michael; Wallner, Gernot; Strauß, Bernhard; Jandel, Lothar; Lang, Reinhold W

    2012-07-10

    With one measurement configuration, existing gloss measurement methodologies are generally restricted to specific gloss levels. A newly developed image-analytical gloss parameter called "clarity" provides the possibility to describe the perceptual result of a broad range of different gloss levels with one setup. In order to analyze and finally monitor the perceived gloss of products, a fast and flexible method also for the automated inspection is highly demanded. The clarity parameter is very fast to calculate and therefore usable for fast in-line surface inspection. Coated metal specimens were deformed by varying degree and polished afterwards in order to study the clarity parameter regarding the quantification of varying surface gloss types and levels. In order to analyze the correlation with the human gloss perception a study was carried out in which experts were asked to assess gloss properties of a series of surface samples under standardized conditions. The study confirmed clarity to exhibit considerably better correlation to the human perception than alternative gloss parameters.

  9. Micro and nanostructural characterization of surfaces and interfaces of Portland cement mortars using atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barreto, M.F.O.; Brandao, P.R.G.

    2014-01-01

    The characterization of Portland cement mortars is very important in the study the interfaces and surfaces that make up the system grout/ceramic block. In this sense, scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive (X-ray) spectrometer are important tools in investigating the morphology and chemical aspects. However, more detailed topographic information can be necessary in the characterization process. In this work, the aim was to characterize topographically surfaces and interfaces of mortars applied onto ceramic blocks. This has been accomplished by using the atomic force microscope (AFM) - MFP-3D-SA Asylum Research. To date, the results obtained from this research show that the characterization of cementitious materials with the help of AFM has an important contribution in the investigation and differentiation of hydrated calcium silicates (CSH), calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH)2, ettringite and calcium carbonate by providing morphological and micro topographical data, which are extremely important and reliable for the understanding of cementitious materials. (author)

  10. Stress-intensity factors for a thick-walled cylinder containing an annular imbedded or external or internal surface crack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdol, R.; Erdogan, F.

    1976-01-01

    The elastostatic axisymmetric problem for a long thick-walled cylinder containing a ring-shaped internal or edge crack is considered. Using the standard transform technique the problem is formulated in terms of an integral equation which has a simple Cauchy kernel for the internal crack and a generalized Cauchy kernel for the edge crack as the dominant part. As examples the uniform axial load and the steady-state thermal stress problems have been solved and the related stress intensity factors have been calculated. Among other findings the results show that in the cylinder under uniform axial stress containing an internal crack the stress intensity factor at the inner tip is always greater than that at the outer tip for equal net ligament thicknesses and in the cylinder with an edge crack which is under a state of thermal stress the stress intensity factor is a decreasing function of the crack depth, tending to zero as the crack depth approaches the wall thickness.

  11. Site characterization field manual for near surface geologic disposal of low-level radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCray, J.G.; Nowatzki, E.A.

    1985-01-01

    This field manual has been developed to aid states and regions to do a detailed characterization of a proposed near-surface low-level waste disposal site. The field manual is directed at planners, staff personnel and experts in one discipline to acquaint them with the requirements of other disciplines involved in site characterization. While it can provide a good review, it is not designed to tell experts how to do their job within their own discipline

  12. On the preparation of as-produced and purified single-walled carbon nanotube samples for standardized X-ray diffraction characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allaf, Rula M.; Rivero, Iris V.; Spearman, Shayla S.; Hope-Weeks, Louisa J.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this research was to specify proper sample conditioning for acquiring representative X-ray diffraction (XRD) profiles for single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) samples. In doing so, a specimen preparation method for quantitative XRD characterization of as-produced and purified arc-discharge SWCNT samples has been identified. Series of powder XRD profiles were collected at different temperatures, states, and points of time to establish appropriate conditions for acquiring XRD profiles without inducing much change to the specimen. It was concluded that heating in the 300-450 deg. C range for 20 minutes, preferably vacuum-assisted, and then sealing the sample is an appropriate XRD specimen preparation technique for purified arc-discharge SWCNT samples, while raw samples do not require preconditioning for characterization. - Graphical Abstract: A sample preparation method for XRD characterization of as-produced and purified arc-discharge SWCNT samples is identified. The preparation technique seeks to acquire representative XRD profiles without inducing changes to the samples. Purified samples required 20 minutes of heating at (300-450)deg. C, while raw samples did not require preconditioning for characterization. Highlights: → Purification routines may induce adsorption onto the SWCNT samples. → Heating a SWCNT sample may result in material loss, desorption, and SWCNTs closing. → Raw arc-discharge samples do not require preparation for XRD characterization. → Heating is appropriate specimen preparation for purified and heat-treated samples. → XRD data fitting is required for structural analysis of SWCNT bundles.

  13. Electronic and structural characterizations of unreconstructed {0001} surfaces and the growth of graphene overlayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emtsev, Konstantin

    2009-01-01

    The present work is focused on the characterization of the clean unreconstructed SiC{0001} surfaces and the growth of graphene overlayers thereon. Electronic properties of SiC surfaces and their interfaces with graphene and few layer graphene films were investigated by means of angle resolved photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and low energy electron diffraction. Structural characterizations of the epitaxial graphene films grown on SiC were carried out by atomic force microscopy and low energy electron microscopy. Supplementary data was obtained by scanning tunneling microscopy. (orig.)

  14. Quantitative roughness characterization and 3D reconstruction of electrode surface using cyclic voltammetry and SEM image

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhillon, Shweta; Kant, Rama, E-mail: rkant@chemistry.du.ac.in

    2013-10-01

    Area measurements from cyclic voltammetry (CV) and image from scanning electron microscopy (SEM) are used to characterize electrode statistical morphology, 3D surface reconstruction and its electroactivity. SEM images of single phased materials correspond to two-dimensional (2D) projections of 3D structures, leading to an incomplete characterization. Lack of third dimension information in SEM image is circumvented using equivalence between denoised SEM image and CV area measurements. This CV-SEM method can be used to estimate power spectral density (PSD), width, gradient, finite fractal nature of roughness and local morphology of the electrode. We show that the surface morphological statistical property like distribution function of gradient can be related to local electro-activity. Electrode surface gradient micrographs generated here can provide map of electro-activity sites. Finally, the densely and uniformly packed small gradient over the Pt-surface is the determining criterion for high intrinsic electrode activity.

  15. Quantitative roughness characterization and 3D reconstruction of electrode surface using cyclic voltammetry and SEM image

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhillon, Shweta; Kant, Rama

    2013-01-01

    Area measurements from cyclic voltammetry (CV) and image from scanning electron microscopy (SEM) are used to characterize electrode statistical morphology, 3D surface reconstruction and its electroactivity. SEM images of single phased materials correspond to two-dimensional (2D) projections of 3D structures, leading to an incomplete characterization. Lack of third dimension information in SEM image is circumvented using equivalence between denoised SEM image and CV area measurements. This CV-SEM method can be used to estimate power spectral density (PSD), width, gradient, finite fractal nature of roughness and local morphology of the electrode. We show that the surface morphological statistical property like distribution function of gradient can be related to local electro-activity. Electrode surface gradient micrographs generated here can provide map of electro-activity sites. Finally, the densely and uniformly packed small gradient over the Pt-surface is the determining criterion for high intrinsic electrode activity.

  16. Surface modification and characterization for dispersion stability of inorganic nanometer-scaled particles in liquid media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamiya, Hidehiro; Iijima, Motoyuki

    2010-01-01

    Inorganic nanoparticles are indispensable for science and technology as materials, pigments and cosmetics products. Improving the dispersion stability of nanoparticles in various liquids is essential for those applications. In this review, we discuss why it is difficult to control the stability of nanoparticles in liquids. We also overview the role of surface interaction between nanoparticles in their dispersion and characterization, e.g. by colloid probe atomic force microscopy (CP-AFM). Two types of surface modification concepts, post-synthesis and in situ modification, were investigated in many previous studies. Here, we focus on post-synthesis modification using adsorption of various kinds of polymer dispersants and surfactants on the particle surface, as well as surface chemical reactions of silane coupling agents. We discuss CP-AFM as a technique to analyze the surface interaction between nanoparticles and the effect of surface modification on the nanoparticle dispersion in liquids. (topical review)

  17. Surface modification and characterization for dispersion stability of inorganic nanometer-scaled particles in liquid media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidehiro Kamiya and Motoyuki Iijima

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Inorganic nanoparticles are indispensable for science and technology as materials, pigments and cosmetics products. Improving the dispersion stability of nanoparticles in various liquids is essential for those applications. In this review, we discuss why it is difficult to control the stability of nanoparticles in liquids. We also overview the role of surface interaction between nanoparticles in their dispersion and characterization, e.g. by colloid probe atomic force microscopy (CP-AFM. Two types of surface modification concepts, post-synthesis and in situ modification, were investigated in many previous studies. Here, we focus on post-synthesis modification using adsorption of various kinds of polymer dispersants and surfactants on the particle surface, as well as surface chemical reactions of silane coupling agents. We discuss CP-AFM as a technique to analyze the surface interaction between nanoparticles and the effect of surface modification on the nanoparticle dispersion in liquids.

  18. Fabrication and characterization of ZnO-coated multi-walled carbon nanotubes with enhanced photocatalytic activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Linqin; Gao Lian

    2005-01-01

    Through noncovalent modification of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) with the dispersant of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), ZnO nanocrystals-coated MWNTs composite was fabricated. The electrostatic interaction mechanism is used to illustrate the formation of ZnO/MWNTs nanocomposite. The ZnO-coated MWNTs composite shows a small blue-shift absorption compared with pure ZnO nanomaterial and preserves the electronic energy states of MWNTs. The photocatalytic experiments exhibit that this composite has a higher photocatalytic activity than ZnO bulk material or the mechanical mixture of MWNTs and ZnO

  19. γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} magnetic nanoparticle functionalized with carboxylated multi walled carbon nanotube: Synthesis, characterization, analytical and biomedical application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kılınç, Ersin, E-mail: kilincersin@gmail.com

    2016-03-01

    In recent years, magnetic nanoparticles attained special interest in nanobiotechnology and nanomedicine due to their uniqe properties and biocompatibilities. From this perspective, hybride nanostructure composed from γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} magnetic nanoparticle and carboxylated multi walled carbon nanotube was synthesized and characterized by FT-IR, VSM, SEM, HR-TEM and ICP-OES. Microscopy images showed that magnetic nanoparticles were nearly spherical structure that arranged on the axis of carboxylated MWCNT. Particle size was found lower than 10 nm. VSM results showed that the obtained magnetic nanoparticles presented superparamagnetic properties at room temperature. The magnetic saturation value was determined as 35.2 emu/g. It was used for the adsorption and controlled release of harmane, a potent tremor-producing neurotoxin. Maximum adsorption capacity was calculated as 151.5 mg/g from Langmuir isotherm. Concentration of harmane was determined by HPLC with fluorescence detection. The antimicrobial activity of synthesized magnetic nanoparticle was investigated against gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria. However, no activity was observed. - Highlights: • A nanomaterial from gamma iron oxide and multi walled carbon nanotube was synthesized. • It was characterized and microstructure was investigated. • No antimicrobial activity was observed. • Adsorption and release of harmane on its were examined.

  20. γ-Fe_2O_3 magnetic nanoparticle functionalized with carboxylated multi walled carbon nanotube: Synthesis, characterization, analytical and biomedical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kılınç, Ersin

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, magnetic nanoparticles attained special interest in nanobiotechnology and nanomedicine due to their uniqe properties and biocompatibilities. From this perspective, hybride nanostructure composed from γ-Fe_2O_3 magnetic nanoparticle and carboxylated multi walled carbon nanotube was synthesized and characterized by FT-IR, VSM, SEM, HR-TEM and ICP-OES. Microscopy images showed that magnetic nanoparticles were nearly spherical structure that arranged on the axis of carboxylated MWCNT. Particle size was found lower than 10 nm. VSM results showed that the obtained magnetic nanoparticles presented superparamagnetic properties at room temperature. The magnetic saturation value was determined as 35.2 emu/g. It was used for the adsorption and controlled release of harmane, a potent tremor-producing neurotoxin. Maximum adsorption capacity was calculated as 151.5 mg/g from Langmuir isotherm. Concentration of harmane was determined by HPLC with fluorescence detection. The antimicrobial activity of synthesized magnetic nanoparticle was investigated against gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria. However, no activity was observed. - Highlights: • A nanomaterial from gamma iron oxide and multi walled carbon nanotube was synthesized. • It was characterized and microstructure was investigated. • No antimicrobial activity was observed. • Adsorption and release of harmane on its were examined.

  1. Characterization and anti-settlement aspects of surface micro-structures from Cancer pagurus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sullivan, T; Regan, F; McGuinness, K; Connor, N E O’

    2014-01-01

    Tuning surface and material properties to inhibit or prevent settlement and attachment of microorganisms is of interest for applications such as antifouling technologies. Here, optimization of nano- and microscale structures on immersed surfaces can be utilized to improve cell removal while reducing adhesion strength and the likelihood of initial cellular attachment. Engineered surfaces capable of controlling cellular behaviour under natural conditions are challenging to design due to the diversity of attaching cell types in environments such as marine waters, where many variations in cell shape, size and adhesion strategy exist. Nevertheless, understanding interactions between a cell and a potential substrate for adhesion, including topographically driven settlement cues, offers a route to designing surfaces capable of controlling cell settlement. Biomimetic design of artificial surfaces, based upon microscale features from natural surfaces, can be utilized as model surfaces to understand cell–surface interactions. The microscale surface features of the carapace from the crustacean Cancer pagurus has been previously found to influence the rate of attachment of particular organisms when compared to smooth controls. However, the nature of microscale topographic features from C. pagurus have not been examined in sufficient detail to allow design of biomimetic surfaces. In this work, the spatial distribution, chemical composition, size and shape descriptors of microscale surface features from C. pagurus are characterized in detail for the first time. Additionally, the influence of topography from C. pagurus on the settlement of marine diatoms is examined under field conditions. (paper)

  2. Nonlinear vibration of double-walled boron nitride and carbon nanopeapods under multi-physical fields with consideration of surface stress effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorbanpour Arani, A.; Sabzeali, M.; BabaAkbar Zarei, H.

    2017-12-01

    In this study, the nonlinear thermo-electro vibrations of double-walled boron nitride nanopeapods (DWBNNPPs) and double-walled carbon nanopeapods (DWCNPPs) under magnetic field embedded in an elastic medium is investigated. DWBNNPPs are made of piezoelectric and smart materials therefore, electric field is effective on them; meanwhile, DWCNPPs are made of carbon thus, magnetic field can be useful to control them. The Pasternak model is used to simulate the effects of elastic medium which surrounds the system. Nanotubes are modeled with assumption of the Euler-Bernoulli beam (EBB) theory and the surface effects are considered to achieve accurate response of the system. Moreover, interaction between two layers is modeled by van der Waals (vdW) forces. The equations of motion are derived using the energy method and the Hamilton principle. Then the governing equations are solved by using Galerkin's method and incremental harmonic balance method (IHBM). The influences of various parameters such as the magnetic field, different types of DWCNPPs and DWBNNPPs, elastic medium, existence of fullerene and surface effect on the vibration behavior of the system are investigated. The results demonstrate that DWBNNPPs have more influence on the frequency of the system than DWCNPPs. In addition, the presence of fullerene in nanotubes has a negative impact on the frequency behavior of revisionthe system.

  3. COLUROUTE : a mobile gonio-reflectometer to characterize the road surface photometry

    OpenAIRE

    MUZET, Valérie; PAUMIER, Jean Luc; GUILLARD, Yannick

    2008-01-01

    Designing a lighting installation involves accounting for site-specific geometric parameters and photometric characteristics of both the light sources and the road surface. The standard tool for characterizing road surface photometry is the reduced luminance coefficient table (or R-table), as defined in the 70's by the CIE. However, recent studies have shown that these tables are no longer representative. In this context, measuring road photometry is necessary for optimizing a lighting ins...

  4. SEM, Scanning Auger and XPS characterization of chemically pretreated Ti surfaces intended for biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pisarek, M. [Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Warsaw University of Technology, Woloska 141, 02-507 Warsaw (Poland); Institute of Physical Chemistry, Polish Academy of Sciences, Kasprzaka 44/52, 01-224 Warsaw (Poland)], E-mail: marcinp@ichf.edu.pl; Lewandowska, M. [Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Warsaw University of Technology, Woloska 141, 02-507 Warsaw (Poland); Roguska, A. [Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Warsaw University of Technology, Woloska 141, 02-507 Warsaw (Poland); Institute of Physical Chemistry, Polish Academy of Sciences, Kasprzaka 44/52, 01-224 Warsaw (Poland); Kurzydlowski, K.J. [Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Warsaw University of Technology, Woloska 141, 02-507 Warsaw (Poland); Janik-Czachor, M. [Institute of Physical Chemistry, Polish Academy of Sciences, Kasprzaka 44/52, 01-224 Warsaw (Poland)

    2007-07-15

    Titanium is known as a biocompatible metal characterized by biological and corrosion immunity and good mechanical properties, including a high fracture toughness. In a variety of environments, this metal undergoes 'natural' oxidation which determine its resistance to corrosion. It can also be exposed to chemical treatments in acidic or alkaline solutions which 'enforces' chemical and morphological changes of Ti surface. Those methods, if well controlled, may increase the effective Ti surface area, making it more biocompatible. However, the morphological and chemical factors responsible for their interactions with biological cells are still not well known. The aim of this work was to compare surface chemical and morphological changes introduced by commonly used aqueous NaOH pretreatment with those occurring in a new 'piranha' acidic solution. Particular attention was paid to possible changes which may be decisive for the biocompatibility of the Ti-elements subjected to these surface modifications. Surface analytical techniques such as Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) or X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) combined with Ar{sup +} ion sputtering allowed us to investigate in detail the chemical composition of Ti oxide layers. SEM examinations provided morphological characterization of the surface of Ti samples. The results revealed large difference in morphology of Ti surfaces pretreated with different procedures whereas only minor difference in the chemistry of the surfaces were detected.

  5. A study of the flow boiling heat transfer in a minichannel for a heated wall with surface texture produced by vibration-assisted laser machining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piasecka, Magdalena; Strąk, Kinga; Grabas, Bogusław; Maciejewska, Beata

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents results concerning flow boiling heat transfer in a vertical minichannel with a depth of 1.7 mm and a width of 16 mm. The element responsible for heating FC-72, which flowed laminarly in the minichannel, was a plate with an enhanced surface. Two types of surface textures were considered. Both were produced by vibration-assisted laser machining. Infrared thermography was used to record changes in the temperature on the outer smooth side of the plate. Two-phase flow patterns were observed through a glass pane. The main aim of the study was to analyze how the two types of surface textures affect the heat transfer coefficient. A two-dimensional heat transfer approach was proposed to determine the local values of the heat transfer coefficient. The inverse problem for the heated wall was solved using a semi-analytical method based on the Trefftz functions. The results are presented as relationships between the heat transfer coefficient and the distance along the minichannel length and as boiling curves. The experimental data obtained for the two types of enhanced heated surfaces was compared with the results recorded for the smooth heated surface. The highest local values of the heat transfer coefficient were reported in the saturated boiling region for the plate with the type 1 texture produced by vibration-assisted laser machining. (paper)

  6. Characterization of holding brake friction pad surface after pin-on-plate wear test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drago, N.; Gonzalez Madruga, D.; De Chiffre, L.

    2018-03-01

    This article concerns the metrological characterization of the surface on a holding brake friction material pin after a pin-on-plate (POP) wear test. The POP test induces the formation of surface plateaus that affect brake performances such as wear, friction, noise and heat. Three different materials’ surfaces have been characterized after wear from data obtained with a focus variation 3D microscope. A new surface characterization approach with plateau identification is proposed, using the number of plateau on the surface, equivalent diameter, length and breadth as measurands. The identification method is based on determining and imposing ISO 27158-2 lower plateau limit (LPL) in material probability curves; and on applying a combined criterion of height segmentation threshold and equivalent diameter threshold. The method determines the criterion thresholds for each material since LPL appears typical by material. The proposed method has allowed quantifying the surface topography at two different levels of wear. An expanded measurement uncertainty of 3.5 µm for plateau dimensions in the range 50–2000 µm and one of 0.15 µm for plateau heights up to 10 µm have been documented.

  7. Genetic and biochemical characterization of the cell wall hydrolase activity of the major secreted protein of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingmar J J Claes

    Full Text Available Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG produces two major secreted proteins, designated here Msp1 (LGG_00324 or p75 and Msp2 (LGG_00031 or p40, which have been reported to promote the survival and growth of intestinal epithelial cells. Intriguingly, although each of these proteins shares homology with cell wall hydrolases, a physiological function that correlates with such an enzymatic activity remained to be substantiated in LGG. To investigate the bacterial function, we constructed knock-out mutants in the corresponding genes aiming to establish a genotype to phenotype relation. Microscopic examination of the msp1 mutant showed the presence of rather long and overly extended cell chains, which suggests that normal daughter cell separation is hampered. Subsequent observation of the LGG wild-type cells by immunofluorescence microscopy revealed that the Msp1 protein accumulates at the septum of exponential-phase cells. The cell wall hydrolyzing activity of the Msp1 protein was confirmed by zymogram analysis. Subsequent analysis by RP-HPLC and mass spectrometry of the digestion products of LGG peptidoglycan (PG by Msp1 indicated that the Msp1 protein has D-glutamyl-L-lysyl endopeptidase activity. Immunofluorescence microscopy and the failure to construct a knock-out mutant suggest an indispensable role for Msp2 in priming septum formation in LGG.

  8. The role of the substrate surface morphology and water in growth of vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pint, Cary; Pheasant, Sean; Nicholas, Nolan; Horton, Charles; Hauge, Robert

    2008-11-01

    Growth of high quality, vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes (carpets) is achieved using a rapid insertion hot filament chemical vapor deposition (HF-CVD) technique. The effect of the substrate morphology on growth is explored by comparing carpets grown on epitaxially polished MgO substrates to those grown on "as-cut", macroscopically rough MgO substrates. Depending on the substrate morphology, we observe differences in both the overall carpet morphology as well as the diameter distribution of nanotubes grown in the carpet based on optical measurements. In addition, we explore the role of water in the growth of carpets on MgO and the conventional Al2O3 coated Si substrates. We find that the addition of a small amount of water is beneficial to the growth rates of the SWNT carpets, enhancing the growth rates by