WorldWideScience

Sample records for wall polysaccharide composition

  1. Elevated CO2 concentration impacts cell wall polysaccharide composition of green microalgae of the genus Chlorella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Y-S; Labavitch, J M; VanderGheynst, J S

    2015-01-01

    The effect of CO2 concentration on the relative content of starch, lipid and cell wall carbohydrates in microalgal biomass was investigated for the four following Chlorella strains: C. vulgaris (UTEX 259), C. sorokiniana (UTEX 2805), C. minutissima (UTEX 2341) and C. variabilis (NC64A). Each strain had a different response to CO2 concentration. The starch content was higher in UTEX259 and NC64A cultured with 2% CO2 in the air supply than in cells cultured with ca. 0·04% CO2 (ambient air), while starch content was not affected for UTEX 2805 and UTEX 2341. The lipid content was higher in Chlorella minutissima UTEX 2341 cultured in 2% CO2 than in cells cultured in ambient air, but was unchanged for the other three strains. All four Chlorella strains tended to have a higher percentage of uronic acids and lower percentage of neutral sugars in their cell wall polysaccharide complement when grown with 2% CO2 supply. Although the percentage of neutral sugars in the cell walls varied with CO2 concentration, the relative proportions of different neutral sugar constituents remained constant for both CO2 conditions. The results demonstrate the importance of considering the effects of CO2 on the cell wall carbohydrate composition of microalgae. Microalgae have the potential to produce products that will reduce society's reliance on fossil fuels and address challenges related to food and feed production. An overlooked yet industrially relevant component of microalgae are their cell walls. Cell wall composition affects cell flocculation and the recovery of intracellular products. In this study, we show that increasing CO2 level results in greater cell wall polysaccharide and uronic acid content in the cell walls of three strains of microalgae. The results have implications on the management of systems for the capture of CO2 and production of fuels, chemicals and food from microalgae. © 2014 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  2. Structural analysis of cell wall polysaccharides using PACE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mortimer, Jennifer C. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Joint BioEnergy Institute

    2017-01-01

    The plant cell wall is composed of many complex polysaccharides. The composition and structure of the polysaccharides affect various cell properties including cell shape, cell function and cell adhesion. Many techniques to characterize polysaccharide structure are complicated, requiring expensive equipment and specialized operators e.g. NMR, MALDI-MS. PACE (Polysaccharide Analysis using Carbohydrate gel Electrophoresis) uses a simple, rapid technique to analyze polysaccharide quantity and structure (Goubet et al. 2002). Whilst the method here describes xylan analysis, it can be applied (by use of the appropriate glycosyl hydrolase) to any cell wall polysaccharide.

  3. Monomer composition of polysaccharides of seed cell walls and the taxonomy of the Vochysiaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayworm, M A; Buckeridge, M S; Salatino, A

    2000-11-01

    The distribution of polysaccharides from the seed cell walls of 57 samples of Vochysiaceae native to Brazil were studied, comprising 16 species distributed among the genera Callisthene, Qualea, Salvertia and Vochysia. The polysaccharides were extracted with hot water, then hydrolyzed with the resulting monomers analyzed by HPLC. All samples yielded arabinose, galactose, glucose. mannose and rhamnose, the relative amounts of each monomer, however, varying from one sample to another. Arabinose was always the predominant component, which implies that it might possibly be used as a marker of the Vochysiaceae. The quantitative distribution of monosaccharides was similar between the species of Qualea and Callisthene, characterized by the predominance of arabinose and mannose, and between the species of Salvertia and Vochysia, which contained higher amounts of arabinose and galactose. Such results are consistent with affinities inferred from floral morphology, wood anatomy and molecular data. Substantial intraspecific variation was observed for some species. UPGMA analysis based on the distribution of the monosaccharides reveals two main clusters, according to the links commented above. The resultant phenogram is not coherent with the current sectional classification of the Vochysiaceae, but the differences in the monosaccharides distribution between the two clusters are strongly supported by ANOVA.

  4. Cell wall polysaccharides in black currants and bilberries-characterisation in berries, juice, and press cake

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilz, H.; Bakx, E.J.; Schols, H.A.; Voragen, A.G.J.

    2005-01-01

    Cell wall polysaccharides from black currants and bilberries were characterised in three approaches. First, compositions of skin, pulp, and seeds show the distribution of polysaccharides over these tissues. A sequential extraction of cell wall material with different aqueous extractants informs

  5. Compositional changes in cell wall polysaccharides from five sweet cherry (Prunus avium L.) cultivars during on-tree ripening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basanta, María F; Ponce, Nora M A; Salum, María L; Raffo, María D; Vicente, Ariel R; Erra-Balsells, Rosa; Stortz, Carlos A

    2014-12-24

    Excessive softening is a major cause of postharvest deterioration during transportation and storage of fresh cherries. In continuing our studies to identify the factors determining the textural differences between sweet cherry fruit genotypes, we evaluated the solubilization, depolymerization, and monosaccharide composition of pectin and hemicelluloses from five sweet cherry cultivars ('Chelan', 'Sumele', 'Brooks', 'Sunburst', and 'Regina') with contrasting firmness and cracking susceptibility at two developmental stages (immature and ripe). In contrast to what is usually shown in most fruits, cherry softening could occur is some cultivars without marked increases in water-soluble pectin. Although polyuronide and hemicellulose depolymerization was observed in the water-soluble and dilute-alkali-soluble fractions, only moderate association occurs between initial polymer size and cultivar firmness. In all the genotypes the Na2CO3-soluble polysaccharides (NSF) represented the most abundant and dynamic wall fraction during ripening. Firm cultivars showed upon ripening a lower neutral sugars/uronic acid ratio in the NSF, suggesting that they have a lower proportion of highly branched polyuronides. The similar molar ratios of arabinose plus galactose to rhamnose [(Ara+Gal)/Rha] suggest that the cultivars differed in their relative proportion of homogalacturonan (HG) and rhamnogalacturonan I (RG-I) rather than in the size of the RG side chains; with greater proportions of HG in firmer cherries. Ultraviolet matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry was useful to identify the depolymerization patterns of weakly bound pectins, but gave less accurate results on ionically bound pectins, and was unable to find any pattern on covalently bound pectins.

  6. Composition and architecture of the cell walls of grasses and the mechanisms of synthesis of cell wall polysaccharides. Final report for period September 1, 1988 - April 30, 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carpita, Nicholas C.

    2001-10-18

    This program was devoted toward complete understanding of the polysaccharide structure and architecture of the primary cell walls grasses and cereals, and the biosynthesis of the mixed-linkage beta-glucane, a cellulose interacting polymer that is synthesized uniquely by grass species and close relatives. With these studies as focal point, the support from DOE was instrumental in the development of new analytical means that enabled us to characterize carbohydrate structure, to reveal new features of cell wall dynamics during cell growth, and to apply these techniques in other model organisms. The support by DOE in these basic studies was acknowledged on numerous occasions in review articles covering current knowledge of cell wall structure, architecture, dynamics, biosynthesis, and in all genes related to cell wall biogenesis.

  7. Compositional changes in cell wall polysaccharides from apple fruit callus cultures modulated by different plant growth regulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alayón-Luaces, Paula; Ponce, Nora M A; Mroginski, Luis A; Stortz, Carlos A; Sozzi, Gabriel O

    2012-04-01

    The cell wall composition of apples callus cultures showed changes in the presence of 5 mg l(-1) of three different plant growth regulators (PGRs), namely picloram, abscisic acid and gibberellic acid. Although the structural functions of cell walls do not generally allow for pronounced variations of the total pectin and matrix glycan content, this work provides evidence that the addition of these plant growth regulators can rule, at least partly, cell wall metabolism in apple callus cultures. The chelator- and carbonate-extracts always had the analytical characteristics of pectins, with high proportions of uronic acids, arabinose and galactose as the main monosaccharides, and a significant proportion of rhamnose, but the cross-linking glycan fractions were still rich in RG-I-like material. The application of PGRs produced shifts of uronic acid and neutral sugars between fractions. Arabinose was the neutral sugar exhibiting more variations in apple callus cell wall. Picloram and abscisic acid produced an increase of the uronic acid contents of the cell walls. The AIRs obtained from calluses treated with different PGRs did not show large amounts of high molecular weight products, as determined by size-exclusion chromatography. For the carbonate-extract only the callus treated with picloram displayed two separated peaks for products of different molecular weights. The chromatographic profiles for the 4% KOH-extract displayed two peaks for all the treatments, one very sharp with high molecular weight, and another one wider of smaller molecular weight, whereas the difference between treatments can only be appraised through the areas of the peaks. This is the first report on cell wall composition from fruit calluses supplemented with different PGRs.

  8. Microanalysis of Plant Cell Wall Polysaccharides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nicolai Obel; Veronika Erben; Tatjana Schwarz; Stefan Kühne; Andrea Fodor; Markus Pauly

    2009-01-01

    Oligosaccharide Mass Profiling (OLIMP) allows a fast and sensitive assessment of cell wall polymer structure when coupled with Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionisation Time Of Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). The short time required for sample preparation and analysis makes possible the study of a wide range of plant organs, revealing a high degree of heterogeneity in the substitution pattern of wall polymers such as the cross-linking glycan xyloglucan and the pectic polysaccharide homogalacturonan. The high sensitivity of MALDI-TOF allows the use of small amounts of samples, thus making it possible to investigate the wall structure of single cell types when material is collected by such methods as laser micro-dissection. As an example, the analysis of the xyloglucan structure in the leaf cell types outer epidermis layer, entire epidermis cell layer, palisade mesophyll cells, and vascular bundles were investigated. OLIMP is amenable to in situ wall analysis, where wall polymers are analyzed on unprepared plant tissue itself without first iso-lating cell walls. In addition, OLIMP enables analysis of wall polymers in Golgi-enriched fractions, the location of nascent matrix polysaccharide biosynthesis, enabling separation of the processes of wall biosynthesis versus post-deposition apo-plastic metabolism. These new tools will make possible a semi-quantitative analysis of the cell wall at an unprecedented level.

  9. Induction of innate immunity by Apergillus fumigatus cell wall polysaccharides is enhanced by the composite presentation of chitin and beta-glucan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dubey, L. K.; Moeller, J. B.; Schlosser, A.;

    2014-01-01

    , TNF-alpha and TSLP production in mice lungs. Selective destruction of chitin or beta-glucan from AIF significantly reduced eosinophil and neutrophil recruitment as well as chitinase activity and cytokine expression by macrophages, indicating the synergistic effect of the cell wall polysaccharides when...... that Aspergillus fumigatus alkali-insoluble cell wall fragments (AIF), composed of chitin linked covalently to beta-glucan, induced enhanced immune responses when compared with individual cell wall polysaccharides. Intranasal administration of AIF induced eosinophil and neutrophil recruitment, chitinase activity...

  10. Plant Cell Wall Matrix Polysaccharide Biosynthesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ajay Pal S. Sandhu; Gursharn S. Randhawa; Kanwarpal S. Dhugga

    2009-01-01

    The wall of an expanding plant cell consists primarily of cellulose microfibrils embedded in a matrix of hemi-cellulosic and pectic polysaccharides along with small amounts of structural and enzymatic proteins. Matrix polysacchar-ides are synthesized in the Golgi and exported to the cell wall by exocytosis, where they intercalate among cellulose microfibrUs, which are made at the plasma membrane and directly deposited into the cell wall. Involvement of Golgi glucan synthesis in auxin-induced cell expansion has long been recognized; however, only recently have the genes corresponding to glucan synthases been identified. Biochemical purification was unsuccessful because of the labile nature and very low abundance of these enzymes. Mutational genetics also proved fruitless. Expression of candidate genes identified through gene expression profiling or comparative genomics in heterologous systems followed by functional characterization has been relatively successful. Several genes from the cellulose synthase-like (Cs/) family have been found to be involved in the synthesis of various hemicellulosic glycans. The usefulness of this approach, however, is limited to those enzymes that probably do not form complexes consisting of unrelated proteins. Nonconventional approaches will continue to incre-mentally unravel the mechanisms of Golgi polysaccharide biosynthesis.

  11. Enzymatic Modification of Plant Cell Wall Polysaccharides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Øbro, Jens; Hayashi, Takahisa; Mikkelsen, Jørn Dalgaard

    2011-01-01

    for sustainable processes that replace chemical treatments with white biotechnology. Plants can contribute significantly to this sustainable process by producing plant or microbialenzymes in planta that are necessary for plant cell wall modification or total degradation. This will give rise to superior food......Plant cell walls are intricate structures with remarkable properties, widely used in almost every aspect of our life. Cell walls consist largely of complex polysaccharides and there is often a need for chemical and biochemical processing before industrial use. There is an increasing demand...... fibres, hydrocolloids, paper,textile, animal feeds or biofuels. Classical microbial-based fermentation systems could in the future face serious competition from plant-based expression systems for enzyme production. Plant expressed enzymes can either be targeted to specific cellular compartments...

  12. Enzymatic Modification of Plant Cell Wall Polysaccharides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Øbro, Jens; Hayashi, Takahisa; Mikkelsen, Jørn Dalgaard

    2011-01-01

    fibres, hydrocolloids, paper,textile, animal feeds or biofuels. Classical microbial-based fermentation systems could in the future face serious competition from plant-based expression systems for enzyme production. Plant expressed enzymes can either be targeted to specific cellular compartments......Plant cell walls are intricate structures with remarkable properties, widely used in almost every aspect of our life. Cell walls consist largely of complex polysaccharides and there is often a need for chemical and biochemical processing before industrial use. There is an increasing demand...... for sustainable processes that replace chemical treatments with white biotechnology. Plants can contribute significantly to this sustainable process by producing plant or microbialenzymes in planta that are necessary for plant cell wall modification or total degradation. This will give rise to superior food...

  13. NMR analysis of compositional heterogeneity in polysaccharides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Many copolysaccharides are compositionally heterogeneous, and the composition determined by the usual analytical or spectroscopic methods provides only an average value. For some polysaccharides, the NMR data contain copolymer sequence information, such as diad, triad, and tetrad sequence intensiti...

  14. Characterisation of cell wall polysaccharides in bilberries and black currants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilz, H.

    2007-01-01

    During berry juice production, polysaccharides are released from the cell walls and cause thickening and high viscosity when the berries are mashed. Consequences are a low juice yield and a poor colour. This can be prevented by the use of enzymes that degrade these polysaccharides. To use these enzy

  15. Structure of Plant Cell Walls : XXVI. The Walls of Suspension-Cultured Sycamore Cells Contain a Family of Rhamnogalacturonan-I-Like Pectic Polysaccharides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, T; Thomas, J; Darvill, A; Albersheim, P

    1989-02-01

    Considerable information has been obtained about the primary structures of suspension-cultured sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus) cell-wall pectic polysaccharides, i.e. rhamnogalacturonan I, rhamnogalacturonan II, and homogalacturonan. However, these polysaccharides, which are solubilized from the walls by endo-alpha-1,4-polygalacturonase, account for only about half of the pectic polysaccharides known to be present in sycamore cell walls. We now report that, after exhaustive treatment with endo-alpha-1,4-polygalacturonase, additional pectic polysaccharides were extracted from sycamore cell walls by treatment with Na(2)CO(3) at 1 and 22 degrees C. These previously uncharacterized polysaccharides accounted for approximately 4% of the cell wall. Based on the glycosyl and glycosyl-linkage compositions and the nature of the products obtained by treating the quantitatively predominant NaCO(3)-extracted polysaccharides with lithium metal dissolved in ethylenediamine, the polysaccharides were found to strongly resemble rhamnogalacturonan I. However, unlike rhamnogalacturonan I that characteristically had equal amounts of 2- and 2,4-linked rhamnosyl residues in its backbone, the polysaccharides extracted in Na(2)CO(3) at 1 degrees C had markedly disparate ratios of 2- to 2,4-linked rhamnosyl residues. We concluded that polysaccharides similar to rhamnogalacturonan I but with different degrees of branching are present in the walls of suspension-cultured sycamore cells.

  16. Pectin, a versatile polysaccharide present in plant cell walls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voragen, A.G.J.; Coenen, G.J.; Verhoef, R.P.; Schols, H.A.

    2009-01-01

    Pectin or pectic substances are collective names for a group of closely associated polysaccharides present in plant cell walls where they contribute to complex physiological processes like cell growth and cell differentiation and so determine the integrity and rigidity of plant tissue. They also pla

  17. Aspergillus enzymes involved in degradation of plant cell wall polysaccharides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, de R.P.; Visser, J.

    2001-01-01

    Degradation of plant cell wall polysaccharides is of major importance in the food and feed, beverage, textile, and paper and pulp industries, as well as in several other industrial production processes. Enzymatic degradation of these polymers has received attention for many years and is becoming a m

  18. The digestion of yeast cell wall polysaccharides in veal calves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaillard, B.D.E.; Weerden, van E.J.

    1976-01-01

    1. The digestibility of the cell wall polysaccharides of an alkane-grown yeast in different parts of the digestive tract of two veal calves fitted with re-entrant cannulas at the end of the ileum was studied by replacing part of the skim-milk powder of their ‘normal’, milk-substitute (all-milk-prote

  19. O-acetylation of Plant Cell Wall Polysaccharides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sascha eGille

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Plant cell walls are composed of structurally diverse polymers, many of which are O-acetylated. How plants O-acetylate wall polymers and what its function is remained elusive until recently, when two protein families were identified in the model plant Arabidopsis that are involved in the O-acetylation of wall polysaccharides – the reduced wall acetylation (RWA and the trichome birefringence-like (TBL proteins. This review discusses the role of these two protein families in polysaccharide O-acetylation and outlines the differences and similarities of polymer acetylation mechanisms in plants, fungi, bacteria and mammals. Members of the TBL protein family had been shown to impact pathogen resistance, freezing tolerance, and cellulose biosynthesis. The connection of TBLs to polysaccharide O-acetylation thus gives crucial leads into the biological function of wall polymer O-acetylation.From a biotechnological point understanding the O-acetylation mechanism is important as acetyl-substituents inhibit the enzymatic degradation of wall polymers and released acetate can be a potent inhibitor in microbial fermentations, thus impacting the economic viability of e.g. lignocellulosic based biofuel production.

  20. Screening of Arabidopsis thaliana stems for variation in cell wall polysaccharides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Sara L; Burrell, M M; Fry, Stephen C

    2002-06-01

    A high-throughput method is described by which Arabidopsis thaliana stems can be screened for variation in cell wall composition after hydrolysis with Driselase or trifluoroacetic acid (TFA). Driselase, a mixture of fungal enzymes, hydrolyses cellulose (to glucose) and all the major matrix polysaccharides (to monosaccharides and/or characteristic disaccharides); TFA hydrolyses the matrix polysaccharides, but not cellulose, to monosaccharides. Two different wild-type ecotypes, Columbia and Wassilewskija, showed only minor differences in wall carbohydrate composition. A small number of T-DNA-tagged populations that were screened contained individuals in which the proportion of cellulose, xyloglucan or xylan differed quantitatively from the wild-type. Differences from the wild-type were also observed in the susceptibility of the hemicelluloses to hydrolysis by Driselase, probably reflecting differences in wall architecture.

  1. Comparative in situ analyses of cell wall matrix polysaccharide dynamics in developing rice and wheat grain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Richard; Cornuault, Valérie; Marcus, Susan E; Knox, J Paul; Shewry, Peter R; Tosi, Paola

    2015-03-01

    Cell wall polysaccharides of wheat and rice endosperm are an important source of dietary fibre. Monoclonal antibodies specific to cell wall polysaccharides were used to determine polysaccharide dynamics during the development of both wheat and rice grain. Wheat and rice grain present near synchronous developmental processes and significantly different endosperm cell wall compositions, allowing the localisation of these polysaccharides to be related to developmental changes. Arabinoxylan (AX) and mixed-linkage glucan (MLG) have analogous cellular locations in both species, with deposition of AX and MLG coinciding with the start of grain filling. A glucuronoxylan (GUX) epitope was detected in rice, but not wheat endosperm cell walls. Callose has been reported to be associated with the formation of cell wall outgrowths during endosperm cellularisation and xyloglucan is here shown to be a component of these anticlinal extensions, occurring transiently in both species. Pectic homogalacturonan (HG) was abundant in cell walls of maternal tissues of wheat and rice grain, but only detected in endosperm cell walls of rice in an unesterified HG form. A rhamnogalacturonan-I (RG-I) backbone epitope was observed to be temporally regulated in both species, detected in endosperm cell walls from 12 DAA in rice and 20 DAA in wheat grain. Detection of the LM5 galactan epitope showed a clear distinction between wheat and rice, being detected at the earliest stages of development in rice endosperm cell walls, but not detected in wheat endosperm cell walls, only in maternal tissues. In contrast, the LM6 arabinan epitope was detected in both species around 8 DAA and was transient in wheat grain, but persisted in rice until maturity.

  2. Changes in Cell Wall Composition during Ripening of Grape Berries1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunan, Kylie J.; Sims, Ian M.; Bacic, Antony; Robinson, Simon P.; Fincher, Geoffrey B.

    1998-01-01

    Cell walls were isolated from the mesocarp of grape (Vitis vinifera L.) berries at developmental stages from before veraison through to the final ripe berry. Fluorescence and light microscopy of intact berries revealed no measurable change in cell wall thickness as the mesocarp cells expanded in the ripening fruit. Isolated walls were analyzed for their protein contents and amino acid compositions, and for changes in the composition and solubility of constituent polysaccharides during development. Increases in protein content after veraison were accompanied by an approximate 3-fold increase in hydroxyproline content. The type I arabinogalactan content of the pectic polysaccharides decreased from approximately 20 mol % of total wall polysaccharides to about 4 mol % of wall polysaccharides during berry development. Galacturonan content increased from 26 to 41 mol % of wall polysaccharides, and the galacturonan appeared to become more soluble as ripening progressed. After an initial decrease in the degree of esterification of pectic polysaccharides, no further changes were observed nor were there large variations in cellulose (30–35 mol % of wall polysaccharides) or xyloglucan (approximately 10 mol % of wall polysaccharides) contents. Overall, the results indicate that no major changes in cell wall polysaccharide composition occurred during softening of ripening grape berries, but that significant modification of specific polysaccharide components were observed, together with large changes in protein composition. PMID:9808722

  3. Antioxidant properties of cell wall polysaccharides of Stevia rebaudiana leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mediesse Kengne Francine

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To examine the total phenolic and protein contents, and the antioxidant activities of cell wall polysaccharide fractions of Stevia rebaudiana leaves. Methods: Three different polysaccharide-enriched fractions, namely FPE (extract with 50 mmol/ L ethylene diamine tetra acetic acid, FPK (extract with 0.05 mol/L KOH and FH (extract with 4 mol/L KOH were extracted from Stevia rebaudiana leaves. The antioxidant activity of these fractions was evaluated based on their ability to scavenge DPPH (1, 1-diphenyl-2-picryl hydrazyl free radical, to reduce ferric power, to chelate ferrous ion and to protect human DNA. Results: The results indicated that protein content was found to be higher in FPK polysaccharide enriched fraction (47.48 µg per mg of FPK. Furthermore, the phenolic compound analysis according to the Folin-Ciocalteu method was higher in FPK (17.71 µg ferulic acid. The DPPH maximal inhibition percentage of the three polysaccharide-enriched fractions at 400 µg/mL was 27.66%, 59.90% and 23.21% respectively for FPE, FPK and FH. All the polysaccharide fractions exhibited a ferric reducing power except the FH one. The three fractions also exhibited lipid peroxidation inhibition, and they completely reverted the DNA damage induced by H2O2/FeCl2. FPK showed the strongest scavenging activity against the DPPH radical, the best chelating ability and lipid peroxidation inhibition. Conclusions: Stevia cell wall polysaccharide fractions are potent protective agents against oxidative stress. The analysis revealed major differences in the antioxidant activity in the three polysaccharides fractions. However, the 0.05 mol/L KOH pectin fraction (FPK showed better antioxidant activity.

  4. Antioxidant properties of cell wall polysaccharides of Stevia rebaudiana leaves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mediesse Kengne Francine; Woguia Alice Louise; Fogue Souopgui Pythagore; Atogho-Tiedeu Barbara; Simo Gustave; Thadde Boudjeko

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To examine the total phenolic and protein contents, and the antioxidant activities of cell wall polysaccharide fractions of Stevia rebaudiana leaves.Methods:L ethylene diamine tetra acetic acid), FPK (extract with 0.05 mol/L KOH) and FH (extract with 4 mol/L KOH) were extracted from Stevia rebaudiana leaves. The antioxidant activity of these fractions was evaluated based on their ability to scavenge DPPH (1, 1-diphenyl-2-picryl hydrazyl) free radical, to reduce ferric power, to chelate ferrous ion and to protect human DNA. Three different polysaccharide-enriched fractions, namely FPE (extract with 50 mmol/Results: The results indicated that protein content was found to be higher in FPK polysaccharide enriched fraction (47.48 µg per mg of FPK). Furthermore, the phenolic compound analysis according to the Folin-Ciocalteu method was higher in FPK (17.71 µg ferulic acid). The DPPH maximal inhibition percentage of the three polysaccharide-enriched fractions at 400 µg/mL was 27.66%, 59.90% and 23.21% respectively for FPE, FPK and FH. All the polysaccharide fractions exhibited a ferric reducing power except the FH one. The three fractions also exhibited lipid peroxidation inhibition, and they completely reverted the DNA damage induced by H2O2/FeCl2. FPK showed the strongest scavenging activity against the DPPH radical, the best chelating ability and lipid peroxidation inhibition.Conclusions: Stevia cell wall polysaccharide fractions are potent protective agents against oxidative stress. The analysis revealed major differences in the antioxidant activity in the three polysaccharides fractions. However, the 0.05 mol/L KOH pectin fraction (FPK) showed better antioxidant activity.

  5. Microanalysis of Plant Cell Wall Polysaccharides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Obel, N.; Erben, V.; Schwarz, T.; Kühnel, S.; Fodor, A.; Pauly, M.

    2009-01-01

    Oligosaccharide Mass Profiling (OLIMP) allows a fast and sensitive assessment of cell wall polymer structure when coupled with Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionisation Time Of Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). The short time required for sample preparation and analysis makes possible the s

  6. Small molecule probes for plant cell wall polysaccharide imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian eWallace

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Plant cell walls are composed of interlinked polymer networks consisting of cellulose, hemicelluloses, pectins, proteins, and lignin. The ordered deposition of these components is a dynamic process that critically affects the development and differentiation of plant cells. However, our understanding of cell wall synthesis and remodeling, as well as the diverse cell wall architectures that result from these processes, has been limited by a lack of suitable chemical probes that are compatible with live-cell imaging. In this review, we summarize the currently available molecular toolbox of probes for cell wall polysaccharide imaging in plants, with particular emphasis on recent advances in small molecule-based fluorescent probes. We also discuss the potential for further development of small molecule probes for the analysis of cell wall architecture and dynamics.

  7. Targeted and non-targeted effects in cell wall polysaccharides from transgenetically modified potato tubers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huang, J.H.

    2016-01-01

    The plant cell wall is a chemically complex network composed mainly of polysaccharides. Cell wall polysaccharides surround and protect plant cells and are responsible for the stability and rigidity of plant tissue. Pectin is a major component of primary cell wall and the middle lamella of plants. Ho

  8. Ultrastructure of acidic polysaccharides from the cell walls of brown algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Leonardo R; Salgado, Leonardo T; Farina, Marcos; Pereira, Mariana S; Mourão, Paulo A S; Amado Filho, Gilberto M

    2004-03-01

    We have studied the ultrastructure of acidic polysaccharides from the cell walls of brown algae using a variety of electron microscopy techniques. Polysaccharides from Padina gymnospora present self assembled structures, forming trabecular patterns. Purified fractions constituted by alginic acid and sulfated fucan also form well-organized ultrastructures, but the pattern of organization varies depending on the polysaccharide species. Alginic acid presents sponge-like structures. Sulfated fucan exhibits particles with polygonal forms with a polycrystalline structure. These particles are in fact constituted by sulfated fucan molecules since they are recognized by a lectin specific for alpha-l-fucosyl residues. X-ray microanalysis reveal that S is a constituent element, as expected for sulfated groups. Finally, an exhaustive purified sulfated fucan shows the same ultrastructure formed by polygonal forms. Furthermore, elemental analyses of acidic polysaccharides indicate that they retain Zn, when algae were collected from a contaminated area. This observation is supported by direct quantification of heavy metal in the biomass and also in the solubilized polysaccharides compared with the algae from a non-contaminated site. We conclude that these molecules have specific ultrastructure and elemental composition; and act as metal binder for the nucleation and precipitation of heavy metals when the algae are exposed to a metal contaminated environment.

  9. Decreased Polysaccharide Feruloylation Compromises Plant Cell Wall Integrity and Increases Susceptibility to Necrotrophic Fungal Pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan T Reem

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The complexity of cell wall composition and structure determines the strength, flexibility, and function of the primary cell wall in plants. However, the contribution of the various components to cell wall integrity and function remains unclear. Modifications of cell wall composition can induce plant responses known as Cell Wall Integrity control. In this study, we used transgenic expression of the fungal feruloyl esterase AnFAE to examine the effect of post-synthetic modification of Arabidopsis and Brachypodium cell walls. Transgenic Arabidopsis plants expressing AnFAE showed a significant reduction of monomeric ferulic acid, increased amounts of wall-associated extensins, and increased susceptibility to Botrytis cinerea, compared with wild type. Transgenic Brachypodium showed reductions in monomeric and dimeric ferulic acids and increased susceptibility to Bipolaris sorokiniana. Upon infection, transgenic Arabidopsis and Brachypodium plants also showed increased expression of several defense-related genes compared with wild type. These results demonstrate a role, in both monocot and dicot plants, of polysaccharide feruloylation in plant cell wall integrity, which contributes to plant resistance to necrotrophic pathogens.

  10. Polysaccharide composition of raw and cooked chayote (Sechium edule Sw.) fruits and tuberous roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiga, Tânia M; Peroni-Okita, Fernanda Helena Gonçalves; Carpita, Nicholas C; Lajolo, Franco Maria; Cordenunsi, Beatriz Rosana

    2015-10-05

    Chayote is a multipurpose table vegetable widely consumed in Latin America countries. Chayote fruits, leaves and tuberous roots contain complex carbohydrates as dietary fiber and starch, vitamins and minerals. The complex polysaccharides (cell walls and starch) were analyzed in the black and green varieties of chayote fruits as well as in green chayote tuberous root before and after a controlled cooking process to assess changes in their composition and structure. The monosaccharide composition and linkage analysis indicated pectins homogalacturonans and rhamnogalacturonan I backbones constitute about 15-20% of the wall mass, but are heavily substituted with, up to 60% neutral arabinans, galactans, arabinogalactans. The remainder is composed of xyloglucan, glucomannans and galactoglucomannans. Chayote cell-wall polysaccharides are highly stable under normal cooking conditions, as confirmed by the optical microscopy of wall structure. We found also that tuberous roots constitute a valuable additional source of quality starch and fiber.

  11. Cell wall carbohydrates from fruit pulp of Argania spinosa: structural analysis of pectin and xyloglucan polysaccharides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboughe-Angone, Sophie; Nguema-Ona, Eric; Ghosh, Partha; Lerouge, Patrice; Ishii, Tadashi; Ray, Bimalendu; Driouich, Azeddine

    2008-01-14

    Isolated cell walls of Argania spinosa fruit pulp were fractionated into their polysaccharide constituents and the resulting fractions were analysed for monosaccharide composition and chemical structure. The data reveal the presence of homogalacturonan, rhamnogalacturonan-I (RG-I) and rhamnogalacturonan-II (RG-II) in the pectic fraction. RG-I is abundant and contains high amounts of Ara and Gal, indicative of an important branching in this polysaccharide. RG-II is less abundant than RG-I and exists as a dimer. Structural characterisation of xyloglucan using enzymatic hydrolysis, gas chromatography, MALDI-TOF-MS and methylation analysis shows that XXGG, XXXG, XXLG and XLLG are the major subunit oligosaccharides in the ratio of 0.6:1:1.2:1.6. This finding demonstrates that the major neutral hemicellulosic polysaccharide is a galacto-xyloglucan. In addition, Argania fruit xyloglucan has no XUFG, a novel xyloglucan motif recently discovered in Argania leaf cell walls. Finally, the isolation and analysis of arabinogalactan-proteins showed that Argania fruit pulp is rich in these proteoglycans.

  12. Water stress and cell wall polysaccharides in the apical root zone of wheat cultivars varying in drought tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leucci, Maria Rosaria; Lenucci, Marcello Salvatore; Piro, Gabriella; Dalessandro, Giuseppe

    2008-07-31

    Glycosyl composition and linkage analysis of cell wall polysaccharides were examined in apical root zones excised from water-stressed and unstressed wheat seedlings (Triticum durum Desf.) cv. Capeiti ("drought-tolerant") and cv. Creso ("drought sensitive"). Wall polysaccharides were sequentially solubilized to obtain three fractions: CDTA+Na(2)CO(3) extract, KOH extract and the insoluble residue (alpha-cellulose). A comparison between the two genotypes showed only small variations in the percentages of matrix polysaccharides (CDTA+Na(2)CO(3) plus KOH extract) and of the insoluble residues (alpha-cellulose) in water-stressed and unstressed conditions. Xylosyl, glucosyl and arabinosyl residues represented more than 90 mol% of the matrix polysaccharides. The linkage analysis of matrix polysaccharides showed high levels of xyloglucans (23-39 mol%), and arabinoxylans (38-48 mol%) and a low amount of pectins and (1-->3), (1-->4)-beta-D-glucans. The high level of xyloglucans was supported by the release of the diagnostic disaccharide isoprimeverose after Driselase digestion of KOH-extracted polysaccharides. In the "drought-tolerant" cv. Capeiti the mol% of side chains of rhamnogalacturonan I and II significantly increased in response to water stress, whereas in cv. Creso, this increase did not occur. The results support a role of the pectic side chains during water stress response in a drought-tolerant wheat cultivar.

  13. Decreased Polysaccharide Feruloylation Compromises Plant Cell Wall Integrity and Increases Susceptibility to Necrotrophic Fungal Pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reem, Nathan T; Pogorelko, Gennady; Lionetti, Vincenzo; Chambers, Lauran; Held, Michael A; Bellincampi, Daniela; Zabotina, Olga A

    2016-01-01

    The complexity of cell wall composition and structure determines the strength, flexibility, and function of the primary cell wall in plants. However, the contribution of the various components to cell wall integrity (CWI) and function remains unclear. Modifications of cell wall composition can induce plant responses known as CWI control. In this study, we used transgenic expression of the fungal feruloyl esterase AnFAE to examine the effect of post-synthetic modification of Arabidopsis and Brachypodium cell walls. Transgenic Arabidopsis plants expressing AnFAE showed a significant reduction of monomeric ferulic acid, decreased amounts of wall-associated extensins, and increased susceptibility to Botrytis cinerea, compared with wild type. Transgenic Brachypodium showed reductions in monomeric and dimeric ferulic acids and increased susceptibility to Bipolaris sorokiniana. Upon infection, transgenic Arabidopsis and Brachypodium plants also showed increased expression of several defense-related genes compared with wild type. These results demonstrate a role, in both monocot and dicot plants, of polysaccharide feruloylation in plant CWI, which contributes to plant resistance to necrotrophic pathogens.

  14. Genes Required for Bacillus anthracis Secondary Cell Wall Polysaccharide Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, So-Young; Lunderberg, J. Mark; Chateau, Alice; Schneewind, Olaf

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The secondary cell wall polysaccharide (SCWP) is thought to be essential for vegetative growth and surface (S)-layer assembly in Bacillus anthracis; however, the genetic determinants for the assembly of its trisaccharide repeat structure are not known. Here, we report that WpaA (BAS0847) and WpaB (BAS5274) share features with membrane proteins involved in the assembly of O-antigen lipopolysaccharide in Gram-negative bacteria and propose that WpaA and WpaB contribute to the assembly of the SCWP in B. anthracis. Vegetative forms of the B. anthracis wpaA mutant displayed increased lengths of cell chains, a cell separation defect that was attributed to mislocalization of the S-layer-associated murein hydrolases BslO, BslS, and BslT. The wpaB mutant was defective in vegetative replication during early logarithmic growth and formed smaller colonies. Deletion of both genes, wpaA and wpaB, did not yield viable bacilli, and when depleted of both wpaA and wpaB, B. anthracis could not maintain cell shape, support vegetative growth, or assemble SCWP. We propose that WpaA and WpaB fulfill overlapping glycosyltransferase functions of either polymerizing repeat units or transferring SCWP polymers to linkage units prior to LCP-mediated anchoring of the polysaccharide to peptidoglycan. IMPORTANCE The secondary cell wall polysaccharide (SCWP) is essential for Bacillus anthracis growth, cell shape, and division. SCWP is comprised of trisaccharide repeats (→4)-β-ManNAc-(1→4)-β-GlcNAc-(1→6)-α-GlcNAc-(1→) with α-Gal and β-Gal substitutions; however, the genetic determinants and enzymes for SCWP synthesis are not known. Here, we identify WpaA and WpaB and report that depletion of these factors affects vegetative growth, cell shape, and S-layer assembly. We hypothesize that WpaA and WpaB are involved in the assembly of SCWP prior to transfer of this polymer onto peptidoglycan. PMID:27795328

  15. Composite polysaccharide fibers prepared by electrospinning and coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, N; Miao, J; Simmons, T J; Dordick, J S; Linhardt, R J

    2014-02-15

    Composite polysaccharide fibers composed two oppositely charged natural polysaccharides, chitosan and hyaluronic acid, were prepared by electrospinning and subsequent coating. The fiber size distribution was characterized by scanning electron microscopy. Chitosan/hyaluronic acid composite fibers were stable in water but showed controlled release of hyaluronic acid into phosphate buffered saline, and the presence of 3-wt% hyaluronic acid coating improved the swelling ratio to 30%. The resulting composite polysaccharide fibers have a number of potential biomedical applications in wound healing applications and in drug delivery systems.

  16. A sycamore cell wall polysaccharide and a chemically related tomato leaf polysaccharide possess similar proteinase inhibitor-inducing activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, C A; Bishop, P; Pearce, G

    1981-09-01

    A large pectic polysaccharide, called rhamnogalacturonan I, that is solubilized by a fungal endo-alpha-1,4-polygalacturonase from the purified walls of suspension-cultured sycamore cells possesses proteinase inhibitor-inducing activity similar to that of the proteinase inhibitor-inducing factor, a pectic-like oligosaccharide fraction isolated from tomato leaves. This suggests that the proteinase inhibitor-inducing activity resides in particular polysaccharide fragments which can be released when plant cell walls are exposed to appropriate enzyme degradation as a result of either wounding or pest attack.

  17. Composite polysaccharide fibers prepared by electrospinning and coating

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Composite polysaccharide fibers composed two oppositely charged natural polysaccharides, chitosan and hyaluronic acid, were prepared by electrospinning and subsequent coating The fiber size distribution was characterized by scanning electron microscopy. Chitosan/hyaluronic acid composite fibers were stable in water but showed controlled release of hyaluronic acid into phosphate buffered saline, and the presence of 3-wt% hyaluronic acid coating improved the swelling ratio to 30%. The resulting...

  18. Modifications of Saccharomyces pastorianus cell wall polysaccharides with brewing process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastos, Rita; Coelho, Elisabete; Coimbra, Manuel A

    2015-06-25

    The cell wall polysaccharides of brewers spent yeast Saccharomyces pastorianus (BSY) and the inoculum yeast (IY) were studied in order to understand the changes induced by the brewing process. The hot water and alkali extractions performed solubilized mainly mannoproteins, more branched for BSY than those of IY. Also, (31)P solid state NMR showed that the BSY mannoproteins were 3 times more phosphorylated. By electron microscopy it was observed that the final residues of alkali sequential extraction until 4M KOH preserved the yeast three-dimensional structure. The final residues, composed mainly by glucans (92%), showed that the BSY, when compared with IY, contained higher amount of (1→4)-linked Glc (43% for BSY and 16% for IY) and lower (1→3)-linked Glc (17% for BSY and 42% for IY). The enzymatic treatment of final residue showed that both BSY and IY had (α1→4)-linked Glc and (β1→4)-linked Glc, in a 2:1 ratio, showing that S. pastorianus increases their cellulose-like linkages with the brewing process.

  19. Space, composition, vertical wall ...

    OpenAIRE

    Despot, Katerina; Sandeva, Vaska

    2016-01-01

    The space in which it is an integral segment of our life is nourished with many functional and decorative elements. One aspect for consideration of vertical walls or The vertical gardens and their aesthetic impact in space called function. Vertical gardens bordering the decoration to totally functional garden in areas where there is little oxygen and space, ideal for residential buildings and public spaces where missing greenery, special place occupies in interior design where their expres...

  20. Cell wall polysaccharides released during the alcoholic fermentation by Schizosaccharomyces pombe and S. japonicus: quantification and characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domizio, P; Liu, Y; Bisson, L F; Barile, D

    2017-02-01

    The present work demonstrates that yeasts belonging to the Schizosaccharomyces genus release a high quantity of polysaccharides of cell wall origin starting from the onset of the alcoholic fermentation. By the end of the alcoholic fermentation, all of the Schizosaccharomyces yeast strains released a quantity of polysaccharides approximately 3-7 times higher than that released by a commercial Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast strain under the same fermentative conditions of synthetic juice. A higher content of polysaccharide was found in media fermented by Schizosaccharomyces japonicus with respect to that of Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Some of the strains evaluated were also able to produce high levels of pyruvic acid, which has been shown to be an important compound for color stability of wine. The presence of strains with different malic acid consumption patterns along with high polysaccharide release would enable production of naturally modified wines with enhanced mouth feel and reduced acidity. The chemical analysis of the released polysaccharides demonstrated divergence between the two yeast species S. pombe and S. japonicus. A different mannose/galactose ratio and a different percentage of proteins was observed on the polysaccharides released by S. pombe as compared to S. japonicus. Analysis of the proteins released in the media revealed the presence of a glycoprotein with a molecular size around 32-33 kDa only for the species S. japonicus. Mass spectrometry analysis of carbohydrate moieties showed similar proportions among the N-glycan chains released in the media by both yeast species but differences between the two species were also observed. These observations suggest a possible role of rapid MALDI-TOF screening of N-glycans compositional fingerprint as a taxonomic tool for this genus. Polysaccharides release in the media, in particular galactomannoproteins in significant amounts, could make these yeasts particularly interesting also for the industrial

  1. Quantification and characterization of cell wall polysaccharides released by non-Saccharomyces yeast strains during alcoholic fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovani, Giovanna; Rosi, Iolanda; Bertuccioli, Mario

    2012-11-15

    In order to improve knowledge about the oenological characteristics of non-Saccharomyces yeast strains, and to reconsider their contribution to wine quality, we studied the release of polysaccharides by 13 non-Saccharomyces strains of different species (three wine yeasts, six grape yeasts, and three spoilage yeasts) during alcoholic fermentation in synthetic must. Three Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains were included for comparison. All of the non-Saccharomyces strains released polysaccharides into fermentation medium; the amount released depended on the yeast species, the number of cells formed and their physiological conditions. Normalizing the quantity of macromolecules released to the cell biomass revealed that most non-Saccharomyces strains produced a greater quantity of polysaccharides compared to S. cerevisiae strains after 7 and 14days of fermentation. This capacity was particularly expressed in the studied wine spoilage yeasts (Saccharomycodes ludwigii, Zygosaccharomyces bailii, and Brettanomyces bruxellensis). Chemical characterization of exocellular polysaccharides produced by non-Saccharomyces yeasts revealed them to essentially be mannoproteins with high mannose contents, ranging from 93% for S'codes. ludwigii to 73-74% for Pichia anomala and Starmerella bombicola. Protein contents varied from 9% for P. anomala to 29% for Z. bailii. These compositions were very similar to those of the S. cerevisiae strains, and to the chemical composition of the cell wall mannoproteins of different yeast species. The presence of galactose, in addition to mannose and glucose, in the exocellular polysaccharides released by Schizosaccharomyces pombe, confirmed the parietal nature of the polysaccharides released by non-Saccharomyces yeasts; only this species has a galactomannan located in the outer layer of the cell wall.

  2. Mass spectrometry for characterizing plant cell wall polysaccharides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan eBauer

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Mass spectrometry is a selective and powerful technique to obtain identification and structural information on compounds present in complex mixtures. Since it requires only small sample amount it is an excellent tool for researchers interested in detecting changes in composition of complex carbohydrates of plants. This mini-review gives an overview of common mass spectrometry techniques applied to the analysis of plant cell wall carbohydrates. It presents examples in which mass spectrometry has been used to elucidate the structure of oligosaccharides derived from hemicelluloses and pectins and illustrates how information on sequence, linkages, branching and modifications are obtained from characteristic fragmentation patterns.

  3. Structure of Plant Cell Walls : XVIII. An Analysis of the Extracellular Polysaccharides of Suspension-Cultured Sycamore Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, T T; McNeil, M; Darvill, A G; Albersheim, P

    1986-04-01

    The water-soluble polysaccharides (SEPS) secreted into the medium by suspension-cultured sycamore cells were examined to determine whether the polysaccharides were the same as those present in the walls of sycamore cells. The SEPS were made more amenable to fractionation by treatment with a highly purified alpha-1,4-endopolygalacturonase (EPG). The EPG-treated SEPS were fractionated by anion-exchange and gelpermeation chromatography. The following polysaccharides were found: xyloglucan, arabinoxylan, at least two arabinogalactans, a rhamnogalacturonan-II-like polysaccharide, and a polygalacturonic acid-rich polysaccharide. The oligogalacturonide fragments expected from EPG-digested homogalacturonan were also identified. Evidence was obtained for the presence of a rhamnogalacturonan-I-like polysaccharide. All of the above polysaccharides have been isolated from or are believed to be present in sycamore cell walls. Furthermore, all of the noncellulosic polysaccharides known to be present in sycamore cell-walls appear to be present in the SEPS.

  4. Understanding the relationship between cotton fiber properties and non-cellulosic cell wall polysaccharides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rajasundaram, Dhivyaa; Runavot, Jean-Luc; Guo, Xiaoyuan;

    2014-01-01

    A detailed knowledge of cell wall heterogeneity and complexity is crucial for understanding plant growth and development. One key challenge is to establish links between polysaccharide-rich cell walls and their phenotypic characteristics. It is of particular interest for some plant material, like...... different cotton species were studied. The glycan array was generated by sequential extraction of cell wall polysaccharides from mature cotton fibers and screening samples against eleven extensively characterized cell wall probes. Also, phenotypic characteristics of cotton fibers such as length, strength...... and phenotypic traits. In addition, the analysis also identified specific polysaccharides which may play a major role during fiber development for the final fiber characteristics. Three different regression methods identified a negative correlation between micronaire and the xyloglucan and homogalacturonan...

  5. Understanding the relationship between cotton fiber properties and non-cellulosic cell wall polysaccharides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rajasundaram, Dhivyaa; Runavot, Jean-Luc; Guo, Xiaoyuan

    2014-01-01

    different cotton species were studied. The glycan array was generated by sequential extraction of cell wall polysaccharides from mature cotton fibers and screening samples against eleven extensively characterized cell wall probes. Also, phenotypic characteristics of cotton fibers such as length, strength......A detailed knowledge of cell wall heterogeneity and complexity is crucial for understanding plant growth and development. One key challenge is to establish links between polysaccharide-rich cell walls and their phenotypic characteristics. It is of particular interest for some plant material, like...... and phenotypic traits. In addition, the analysis also identified specific polysaccharides which may play a major role during fiber development for the final fiber characteristics. Three different regression methods identified a negative correlation between micronaire and the xyloglucan and homogalacturonan...

  6. Demonstration of pectic polysaccharides in cork cell wall from Quercus suber L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, S M; Coimbra, M A; Delgadillo, I

    2000-06-01

    Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and chemical analysis were used to observe the cell wall changes that occur in cork with "mancha amarela", when compared to a standard cork. To mimic the microbial attack exhibited in cork with mancha amarela, the standard cork was treated enzymatically with commercial pectinase and hemicellulase preparations. The tissues treated with pectinase were comparable with those attacked with mancha amarela. Both were composed by deformed and wrinkly cells and exhibited cell wall separation at the middle lamella level, which suggests solubilization/removal of the pectic polysaccharides. The cork cell wall material, prepared as alcohol-insoluble residue, was fractionated by hot water (Pect(H)()2(O)) and hot dilute acid (Pect(acid)). The relatively large amount of hexuronic acid and the occurrence of Ara in the SPect(H)()2(O) and SPect(acid) allow to confirm, as far as we know, for the first time the presence of pectic polysaccharides in the cell walls of cork from Quercus suber L. They accounted for ca. 1.5% of the cork and may consist of polymers with long side chains of arabinosyl residues. These polymers have to be taken into account in any realistic model of the cork cell wall. Cork with mancha amarela contained a smaller amount of pectic polysaccharides (ca. 0.5%), which confirms that the cellular separation observed by SEM is related to the degradation/removal of the middle lamella pectic polysaccharides.

  7. 2-Fluoro-L-Fucose Is a Metabolically Incorporated Inhibitor of Plant Cell Wall Polysaccharide Fucosylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalobos, Jose A; Yi, Bo R; Wallace, Ian S

    2015-01-01

    The monosaccharide L-fucose (L-Fuc) is a common component of plant cell wall polysaccharides and other plant glycans, including the hemicellulose xyloglucan, pectic rhamnogalacturonan-I (RG-I) and rhamnogalacturonan-II (RG-II), arabinogalactan proteins, and N-linked glycans. Mutations compromising the biosynthesis of many plant cell wall polysaccharides are lethal, and as a result, small molecule inhibitors of plant cell wall polysaccharide biosynthesis have been developed because these molecules can be applied at defined concentrations and developmental stages. In this study, we characterize novel small molecule inhibitors of plant fucosylation. 2-fluoro-L-fucose (2F-Fuc) analogs caused severe growth phenotypes when applied to Arabidopsis seedlings, including reduced root growth and altered root morphology. These phenotypic defects were dependent upon the L-Fuc salvage pathway enzyme L-Fucose Kinase/ GDP-L-Fucose Pyrophosphorylase (FKGP), suggesting that 2F-Fuc is metabolically converted to the sugar nucleotide GDP-2F-Fuc, which serves as the active inhibitory molecule. The L-Fuc content of cell wall matrix polysaccharides was reduced in plants treated with 2F-Fuc, suggesting that this molecule inhibits the incorporation of L-Fuc into these polysaccharides. Additionally, phenotypic defects induced by 2F-Fuc treatment could be partially relieved by the exogenous application of boric acid, suggesting that 2F-Fuc inhibits RG-II biosynthesis. Overall, the results presented here suggest that 2F-Fuc is a metabolically incorporated inhibitor of plant cellular fucosylation events, and potentially suggest that other 2-fluorinated monosaccharides could serve as useful chemical probes for the inhibition of cell wall polysaccharide biosynthesis.

  8. Combined Enzymatic and High-Pressure Processing Affect Cell Wall Polysaccharides in Berries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilz, H.; Lille, M.; Poutanen, K.; Schols, H.A.; Voragen, A.G.J.

    2006-01-01

    The effect of high-pressure processing (HPP) on cell wall polysaccharides in berries was investigated. HPP decreased the degree of methyl esterification (DM), probably by activation of pectin methyl esterase (PME), and improved the extractability of pectins. When commercial enzyme mixtures were adde

  9. Dissecting the polysaccharide-rich grape cell wall matrix using recombinant pectinases during winemaking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gao, Yu; Fangel, Jonatan Ulrik; Willats, William George Tycho;

    2016-01-01

    The effectiveness of enzyme-mediated-maceration in red winemaking relies on the use of an optimum combination of specific enzymes. A lack of information on the relevant enzyme activities and the corresponding polysaccharide-rich berry cell wall structure is a major limitation. This study used...

  10. Structures of two cell wall-associated polysaccharides of a Streptococcus mitis biovar 1 strain. A unique teichoic acid-like polysaccharide and the group O antigen which is a C-polysaccharide in common with pneumococci

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergström, N; Jansson, P.-E.; Kilian, Mogens

    2000-01-01

    The cell wall of Streptococcus mitis biovar 1 strain SK137 contains the C-polysaccharide known as the common antigen of a closely related species Streptococcus pneumoniae, and a teichoic acid-like polysaccharide with a unique structure. The two polysaccharides are different entities and could...... to that of one of the two structures of C-polysaccharide previously identified in S. pneumoniae. C-polysaccharide of S. mitis is characterized by the presence, in each repeating unit, of two residues of phosphocholine and both galactosamine residues in the N-acetylated form. Immunochemical analysis showed that C......-polysaccharide constitutes the Lancefield group O antigen. Studies using mAbs directed against the backbone and against the phosphocholine moiety of the C-polysaccharide revealed several different patterns of these epitopes among 95 S. mitis and Streptococcus oralis strains tested and the exclusive presence of the group O...

  11. Polysaccharides as cell carriers for tissue engineering: the use of cellulose in vascular wall reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bačáková, L; Novotná, K; Pařízek, M

    2014-01-01

    Polysaccharides are long carbohydrate molecules of monosaccharide units joined together by glycosidic bonds. These biological polymers have emerged as promising materials for tissue engineering due to their biocompatibility, mostly good availability and tailorable properties. This complex group of biomolecules can be classified using several criteria, such as chemical composition (homo- and heteropolysaccharides), structure (linear and branched), function in the organism (structural, storage and secreted polysaccharides), or source (animals, plants, microorganisms). Polysaccharides most widely used in tissue engineering include starch, cellulose, chitosan, pectins, alginate, agar, dextran, pullulan, gellan, xanthan and glycosaminoglycans. Polysaccharides have been applied for engineering and regeneration of practically all tissues, though mostly at the experimental level. Polysaccharides have been tested for engineering of blood vessels, myocardium, heart valves, bone, articular and tracheal cartilage, intervertebral discs, menisci, skin, liver, skeletal muscle, neural tissue, urinary bladder, and also for encapsulation and delivery of pancreatic islets and ovarian follicles. For these purposes, polysaccharides have been applied in various forms, such as injectable hydrogels or porous and fibrous scaffolds, and often in combination with other natural or synthetic polymers or inorganic nanoparticles. The immune response evoked by polysaccharides is usually mild, and can be reduced by purifying the material or by choosing appropriate crosslinking agents.

  12. Identification of Lignin and Polysaccharide Modifications in Populus Wood by Chemometric Analysis of 2D NMR Spectra from Dissolved Cell Walls

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mattias Hedenstrom; Susanne Wiklund-Lindstrom; Tommy (O)man; Fachuang Lu; Lorenz Gerber; Paul Schatz; Bj(o)rn Sundberg; John Ralph

    2009-01-01

    2D ~(13)C-~1H HSQC NMR spectroscopy of acetylated cell walls in solution gives a detailed fingerprint that can be used to assess the chemical composition of the complete wall without extensive degradation. We demonstrate how multivariate analysis of such spectra can be used to visualize cell wall changes between sample types as high-resolution 2D NMR loading spectra. Changes in composition and structure for both lignin and polysaccharides can subsequently be interpreted on a molecular level. The multivariate approach alleviates problems associated with peak picking of overlap-ping peaks, and it allows the deduction of the relative importance of each peak for sample discrimination. As a first proof of concept, we compare Populus tension wood to normal wood. All well established differences in cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin compositions between these wood types were readily detected, confirming the reliability of the multivariate approach. In a second example, wood from transgenic Populus modified in their degree of pectin methylesterification was compared to that of wild-type trees. We show that differences in both lignin and polysaccharide composition that are difficult to detect with traditional spectral analysis and that could not be a priori predicted were revealed by the multi-variate approach. 2D NMR of dissolved cell wall samples combined with multivariate analysis constitutes a novel approach in cell wall analysis and provides a new tool that will benefit cell wall research.

  13. Composition of pectic polysaccharides in a Portuguese apple (Malus domestica Borkh. cv Bravo de Esmolfe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana S. Silva

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Malus domestica Borkh. cv Bravo de Esmolfe is a typical Portuguese apple cultivar classified as Protected Designation and Origin (PDO. It is a traditional product produced under strict conditions and labelled with a specific law protected designation. This cultivar presents quite good sweetness and flavor. The monosaccharide composition of the pectic polysaccharides from this traditional apple is herein reported for the first time. Based on the molar ratios obtained from the sugar composition, the presumable pectin structure could be inferred. The cell-wall polysaccharides present in the alcohol-insoluble residue (AIR of unpeeled BE apple were sequentially fractionated. In addition, pectic material was also extracted by citric acid treatment prior to heat extraction at acidic pH. The water soluble pectin, imidazole soluble pectin and sodium carbonate soluble pectin account for 44, 16 and 40 % of the AIR, respectively. The pectic polysaccharides extracted in the presence of citric acid had lower galacturonic acid content and higher neutral sugars content. The homogalacturonan (HG and less-substituted rhamnogalacturonan (RG domains are extracted first. Pectin treated with citric acid has been shown to contain more substituted polymers, especially RG-I. In addition, the relatively higher Xylose/Galacturonic acid ratio found in the citric acid extract demonstrates that the xylogalacturonan (XG domain presumably is present in the pectic material of the unpeeled BE apple.

  14. Characterisation of cell-wall polysaccharides from mandarin segment membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coll-Almela, L.; Saura-Lopez, D.; Laencina-Sanchez, J.; Schols, H.A.; Voragen, A.G.J.; Ros-García, J.M.

    2015-01-01

    In an attempt to develop a process of enzymatic peeling of mandarin segments suitable for use on an industrial scale, the cell wall fraction of the segment membrane of Satsuma mandarin fruits was extracted to obtain a chelating agent-soluble pectin fraction (ChSS), a dilute sodium hydroxide-soluble

  15. Investigation on Adsorption of Lithospermum erythrorhizon onto Fungal Cell Wall Polysaccharides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孟琴; 薛莲

    2003-01-01

    A culture of Lithosperrnum erythrorhizon adsorbed on fungal cell wall polysaccharides, a novel bioadsorbent made from fungal cell wall, has been established in this paper. Three steps were involved in this immobilization. The first step was preparation of suspended plant cells from tightly aggregated plant cell clumps. The disassembled ratio of 0.715g·g-1 (the disassembled cells over total cells) was obtained under optimum condition for the enzymatic reaction. Then, the adsorption of plant cells onto fungal cell wall polysaccharides was conducted and the saturated capacity of 12g cell per gram of carrier was obtained in adsorption immobilization. Finally, the culture of cells adsorbed on fungal cell wall polysaccharides was compared with that of cells entrapped in alginate or suspension cell culture. While exposed to in situ liquid paraffin extraction coupled with cell culture, the shikonin productivity of immobilized cells by adsorption was 10.67g·L-1, which was 1.8 times of that in suspension culture and 1.5 times of that entrapped in alginate.

  16. Effect of Agave tequilana juice on cell wall polysaccharides of three Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains from different origins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar-Uscanga, Blanca; Arrizon, Javier; Ramirez, Jesús; Solis-Pacheco, Josué

    2007-02-01

    In this study, a characterization of cell wall polysaccharide composition of three yeasts involved in the production of agave distilled beverages was performed. The three yeast strains were isolated from different media (tequila, mezcal and bakery) and were evaluated for the beta(1,3)-glucanase lytic activity and the beta-glucan/ mannan ratio during the fermentation of Agave tequilana juice and in YPD media (control). Fermentations were performed in shake flasks with 30 g l(-1) sugar concentration of A. tequilana juice and with the control YPD using 30 g l(-1) of glucose. The three yeasts strains showed different levels of beta-glucan and mannan when they were grown in A. tequilana juice in comparison to the YPD media. The maximum rate of cell wall lyses was 50% lower in fermentations with A. tequilana juice for yeasts isolated from tequila and mezcal than compared to the bakery yeast.

  17. Polysaccharides from the green seaweed Codium decorticatum. Structure and cell wall distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Paula Virginia; Raffo, María Paula; Alberghina, Josefina; Ciancia, Marina

    2015-03-06

    The cell wall polysaccharides from Codium decorticatum and their assembly were studied and these results were compared with those obtained previously for this genus. The water soluble polysaccharides are: (i) Pyruvylated and sulfated 3- and 6-linked β-D-galactans with sulfate mainly on C-4 and also on C-6. Pyruvate ketals are linked to O-3 and O-4 of terminal β-D-galactose or O-4 and O-6 of 3-linked β-D-galactose. (ii) Sulfated 3-linked β-L-arabinans substituted on C-2 or C-2 and C-4 predominantly with sulfate, but also with single stubs of arabinose, and (iii) 4-linked β-D-mannans with a low degree of sulfation on C-2. The whole polysaccharide system comprises 6.9% of sulfated polysaccharides and 32.9% of fibrillar polysaccharides, mostly insoluble mannans. By in situ localization it was possible to detect two similar fibrillar layers separated by a zone rich in charged polymers. Besides, arabinogalactan proteins co-localized with the fibrillar components.

  18. Recognition and degradation of plant cell wall polysaccharides by two human gut symbionts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric C Martens

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Symbiotic bacteria inhabiting the human gut have evolved under intense pressure to utilize complex carbohydrates, primarily plant cell wall glycans in our diets. These polysaccharides are not digested by human enzymes, but are processed to absorbable short chain fatty acids by gut bacteria. The Bacteroidetes, one of two dominant bacterial phyla in the adult gut, possess broad glycan-degrading abilities. These species use a series of membrane protein complexes, termed Sus-like systems, for catabolism of many complex carbohydrates. However, the role of these systems in degrading the chemically diverse repertoire of plant cell wall glycans remains unknown. Here we show that two closely related human gut Bacteroides, B. thetaiotaomicron and B. ovatus, are capable of utilizing nearly all of the major plant and host glycans, including rhamnogalacturonan II, a highly complex polymer thought to be recalcitrant to microbial degradation. Transcriptional profiling and gene inactivation experiments revealed the identity and specificity of the polysaccharide utilization loci (PULs that encode individual Sus-like systems that target various plant polysaccharides. Comparative genomic analysis indicated that B. ovatus possesses several unique PULs that enable degradation of hemicellulosic polysaccharides, a phenotype absent from B. thetaiotaomicron. In contrast, the B. thetaiotaomicron genome has been shaped by increased numbers of PULs involved in metabolism of host mucin O-glycans, a phenotype that is undetectable in B. ovatus. Binding studies of the purified sensor domains of PUL-associated hybrid two-component systems in conjunction with transcriptional analyses demonstrate that complex oligosaccharides provide the regulatory cues that induce PUL activation and that each PUL is highly specific for a defined cell wall polymer. These results provide a view of how these species have diverged into different carbohydrate niches by evolving genes that target

  19. Cell wall polysaccharides of Chinese Wolfberry (Lycium barbarum) : Part 1. Characterisation of soluble and insoluble polymer fractions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Redgwell, Robert J.; Curti, Delphine; Wang, Juankuan; Dobruchowska, Justyna M.; Gerwig, Gerrit J.; Kamerling, Johannis P.; Bucheli, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Water-soluble polysaccharides (WSP) and insoluble cell wall material (CWM) were isolated from Wolfberry fruit (Lycium barbarum). WSP were fractionated by treatment with a quaternary ammonium salt and anion-exchange chromatography. Pectic polysaccharides were major components but a glucan, xylan and

  20. Cell wall polysaccharides of Chinese Wolfberry (Lycium barbarum) : Part 1. Characterisation of soluble and insoluble polymer fractions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Redgwell, Robert J.; Curti, Delphine; Wang, Juankuan; Dobruchowska, Justyna M.; Gerwig, Gerrit J.; Kamerling, Johannis P.; Bucheli, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Water-soluble polysaccharides (WSP) and insoluble cell wall material (CWM) were isolated from Wolfberry fruit (Lycium barbarum). WSP were fractionated by treatment with a quaternary ammonium salt and anion-exchange chromatography. Pectic polysaccharides were major components but a glucan, xylan and

  1. Soft X-ray induced chemical modification of polysaccharides in vascular plant cell walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cody, George D. [Geophysical Laboratory, Carnegie Institution of Washington, 5251 Broad Branch Rd. NW, Washington, DC 20015 (United States)], E-mail: cody@gl.ciw.edu; Brandes, Jay [Skidaway Institute of Oceangraphy, Savannah, GA (United States); Jacobsen, Chris; Wirick, Susan [Department of Physics, State University of New York, Stony Brook, NY (United States)

    2009-03-15

    Scanning transmission X-ray microscopy and micro carbon X-ray Absorption Near Edge Spectroscopy (C-XANES) can provide quantitative information regarding the distribution of the biopolymers cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin in vascular plant cell walls. In the case of angiosperms, flowering plants, C-XANES may also be able to distinguish variations in lignin monomer distributions throughout the cell wall. Polysaccharides are susceptible to soft X-ray irradiation induced chemical transformations that may complicate spectral analysis. The stability of a model polysaccharide, cellulose acetate, to variable doses of soft X-rays under conditions optimized for high quality C-XANES spectroscopy was investigated. The primary chemical effect of soft X-ray irradiation on cellulose acetate involves mass loss coincident with de-acetylation. A lesser amount of vinyl ketone formation also occurs. Reduction in irradiation dose via defocusing does enable high quality pristine spectra to be obtained. Radiation induced chemical modification studies of oak cell wall reveals that cellulose and hemicellulose are less labile to chemical modification than cellulose acetate. Strategies for obtaining pristine C-XANES spectra of polysaccharides are presented.

  2. Water-polysaccharide interactions in the primary cell wall of Arabidopsis thaliana from polarization transfer solid-state NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Paul B; Wang, Tuo; Park, Yong Bum; Cosgrove, Daniel J; Hong, Mei

    2014-07-23

    Polysaccharide-rich plant cell walls are hydrated under functional conditions, but the molecular interactions between water and polysaccharides in the wall have not been investigated. In this work, we employ polarization transfer solid-state NMR techniques to study the hydration of primary-wall polysaccharides of the model plant, Arabidopsis thaliana. By transferring water (1)H polarization to polysaccharides through distance- and mobility-dependent (1)H-(1)H dipolar couplings and detecting it through polysaccharide (13)C signals, we obtain information about water proximity to cellulose, hemicellulose, and pectins as well as water mobility. Both intact and partially extracted cell wall samples are studied. Our results show that water-pectin polarization transfer is much faster than water-cellulose polarization transfer in all samples, but the extent of extraction has a profound impact on the water-polysaccharide spin diffusion. Removal of calcium ions and the consequent extraction of homogalacturonan (HG) significantly slowed down spin diffusion, while further extraction of matrix polysaccharides restored the spin diffusion rate. These trends are observed in cell walls with similar water content, thus they reflect inherent differences in the mobility and spatial distribution of water. Combined with quantitative analysis of the polysaccharide contents, our results indicate that calcium ions and HG gelation increase the amount of bound water, which facilitates spin diffusion, while calcium removal disrupts the gel and gives rise to highly dynamic water, which slows down spin diffusion. The recovery of spin diffusion rates after more extensive extraction is attributed to increased water-exposed surface areas of the polysaccharides. Water-pectin spin diffusion precedes water-cellulose spin diffusion, lending support to the single-network model of plant primary walls in which a substantial fraction of the cellulose surface is surrounded by pectins.

  3. Graft Copolymerization of Acrylic Acid onto Fungal Cell Wall Structural Polysaccharide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Acrylic acid was graft-copolymerized onto Rhi. oryzae's cell wall structural polysacchaxide directly and efficiently in aqueous solution with ceric ammonium nitrate as initiator. The maximal grafting percentage of 135.5% was obtained under the condition of [Ce4+]=5mmol.L-1, [AA]=1mol.L-1, T=60°C and t=3h. Graft copolymerization was suggested to proceed through free radical reaction mechanism. Grafting occurred primarily on chitosan. Acrylic acid was also attempted to be grafted onto Asp. niger cell wall structural polysaccharide, and only 44.2% of grafting percentage was resulted.

  4. Composite panel, wall assembly and components therefor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruger, P.J.

    1988-12-20

    This invention is concerned with improvements in wall assemblies made of a plurality of composite wall panels, such as concrete wall panels, and components and connectors for such assemblies. The invention is also concerned with a method of making such composite wall panels by molding concrete to form a concrete panel. It is particularly applicable for the provision of upstanding walls around oil tanks and hydrocarbon storage facilities, thereby to form part of a containment structure that can satisfy safety regulations for spills around such facilities. In accordance with another aspect of the invention, there is provided a composite building product comprising a concrete panel, said panel being obtained by molding a respective concrete composition. The panel has at least one metal hinge element integrally secured at a respective peripheral edge, with said metal hinge element being secured at the panel to project sufficiently therefrom so as to present a first hinge element. Several of the panels can be connected in a corral-type wall assembly in a variety of configuration. Another aspect of the invention provides, for use in a wall assembly, a portable composite panel comprising a concrete panel body, which is obtained by molding a respective concrete composition; and a frame assembly for reinforcing the peripheral edges of said concrete panel body. The frame assembly includes at least one metal member for provision of a first hing element for connecting a plurality of said panels in a corral-type wall assembly. 7 figs.

  5. Environmental and biofilm-dependent changes in a Bacillus cereus secondary cell wall polysaccharide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candela, Thomas; Maes, Emmanuel; Garénaux, Estelle; Rombouts, Yoann; Krzewinski, Frédéric; Gohar, Michel; Guérardel, Yann

    2011-09-09

    Bacterial species from the Bacillus genus, including Bacillus cereus and Bacillus anthracis, synthesize secondary cell wall polymers (SCWP) covalently associated to the peptidoglycan through a phospho-diester linkage. Although such components were observed in a wide panel of B. cereus and B. anthracis strains, the effect of culture conditions or of bacterial growth state on their synthesis has never been addressed. Herein we show that B. cereus ATCC 14579 can synthesize not only one, as previously reported, but two structurally unrelated secondary cell wall polymers (SCWP) polysaccharides. The first of these SCWP, →4)[GlcNAc(β1-3)]GlcNAc(β1-6)[Glc(β1-3)][ManNAc(α1-4)]GalNAc(α1-4)ManNAc(β1→, although presenting an original sequence, fits to the already described the canonical sequence motif of SCWP. In contrast, the second polysaccharide was made up by a totally original sequence, →6)Gal(α1-2)(2-R-hydroxyglutar-5-ylamido)Fuc2NAc4N(α1-6)GlcNAc(β1→, which no equivalent has ever been identified in the Bacillus genus. In addition, we established that the syntheses of these two polysaccharides were differently regulated. The first one is constantly expressed at the surface of the bacteria, whereas the expression of the second is tightly regulated by culture conditions and growth states, planktonic, or biofilm.

  6. Structural elucidation of the nonclassical secondary cell wall polysaccharide from Bacillus cereus ATCC 10987. Comparison with the polysaccharides from Bacillus anthracis and B. cereus type strain ATCC 14579 reveals both unique and common structural features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leoff, Christine; Choudhury, Biswa; Saile, Elke; Quinn, Conrad P; Carlson, Russell W; Kannenberg, Elmar L

    2008-10-31

    Nonclassical secondary cell wall polysaccharides constitute a major cell wall structure in the Bacillus cereus group of bacteria. The structure of the secondary cell wall polysaccharide from Bacillus cereus ATCC 10987, a strain that is closely related to Bacillus anthracis, was determined. This polysaccharide was released from the cell wall with aqueous hydrogen fluoride (HF) and purified by gel filtration chromatography. The purified polysaccharide, HF-PS, was characterized by glycosyl composition and linkage analyses, mass spectrometry, and one- and two-dimensional NMR analysis. The results showed that the B. cereus ATCC 10987 HF-PS has a repeating oligosaccharide consisting of a -->6)-alpha-GalNAc-(1-->4)-beta-ManNAc-(1-->4)-beta-GlcNAc-(1--> trisaccharide that is substituted with beta-Gal at O3 of the alpha-GalNAc residue and nonstoichiometrically acetylated at O3 of the N-acetylmannosamine (ManNAc) residue. Comparison of this structure with that of the B. anthracis HF-PS and with structural data obtained for the HF-PS from B. cereus type strain ATCC 14579 revealed that each HF-PS had the same general structural theme consisting of three HexNAc and one Hex residues. A common structural feature in the HF-PSs from B. cereus ATCC 10987 and B. anthracis was the presence of a repeating unit consisting of a HexNAc(3) trisaccharide backbone in which two of the three HexNAc residues are GlcNAc and ManNAc and the third can be either GlcNAc or GalNAc. The implications of these results with regard to the possible functions of the HF-PSs are discussed.

  7. Cell wall polysaccharides hydrolysis of malting barley (Hordeum vulgare L.: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamar, C.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Malting quality results from the different steps of the malting process. Malting uses internal changes of the seed occurring during germination, such as enzymes synthesis, to obtain a good hydrolysis process and the components required. Among the three main hydrolytic events observed, that are namely starch degradation, cell wall breakdown and protein hydrolysis, an efficient cell wall polysaccharides hydrolysis is an essential condition for a final product of quality. Indeed, because of the physical barrier of the cell wall, cell wall polysaccharides hydrolysis is one of the first steps expected from the process to gain access to the cell components. Moreover, viscosity problem and haze formation in malting industry are related to their presence during the process when inefficient degradation occurs, leading to increased production time and cost. Understanding the key elements in cell wall degradation is important for a better control. (1-3,1-4-β-glucans and arabinoxylans are the main constituents of cell wall. (1-3,1-4-β-glucans are unbranched chains of β-D-glucopyranose residues with β-(1,3 linkages and β-(1,4 linkages. Arabinoxylan consists in a backbone of D-xylanopyranosyl units linked by β-(1-4 bonds connected to single L-arabinofuranose by α-(1→2 or α-(1→3-linkages. Degradation of (1-3,1-4-β-glucans is processed by the (1-3,1-4-β-glucanases, the β-glucosidases and the β-glucane exohydrolases. It seems that the (1-3-β-glucanases are also involved. Arabinoxylans are mainly decomposed by (1-4-β-xylan endohydrolase, arabinofuranosidase and β-xylosidase.

  8. Molecular Weight and Monosaccharide Composition of Astragalus Polysaccharides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Pei Wang

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Two polysaccharides (APS-I and APS-II were isolated from the water extract of Radix Astragali and purified through ethanol precipitation, deproteination and by ion-exchange and gel-filtration chromatography. Their molecular weight was determined using high performance liquid chromatography and gel permeation chromatography (HPLC-GPC and their monosaccharide composition was analyzed by TLC and HPLC methods, using a refractive index detector (RID and an NH2 column. It was shown that APS-I consisted of arabinose and glucose and APS-II consisted of rhamnose, arabinose and glucose, in a molar ratio of 1:3.45 and 1:6.25:17.86, respectively. The molecular weights (Mw of APS-I and APS-II were 1,699,100 Da and 1,197,600 Da, respectively.

  9. Temperature modulates the cell wall mechanical properties of rice coleoptiles by altering the molecular mass of hemicellulosic polysaccharides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Yukiko; Wakabayashi, Kazuyuki; Hoson, Takayuki

    2003-01-01

    The present study was conducted to investigate the mechanism inducing the difference in the cell wall extensibility of rice (Oryza sativa L. cv. Koshihikari) coleoptiles grown under various temperature (10-50 degrees C) conditions. The growth rate and the cell wall extensibility of rice coleoptiles exhibited the maximum value at 30-40 degrees C, and became smaller as the growth temperature rose or dropped from this temperature range. The amounts of cell wall polysaccharides per unit length of coleoptile increased in coleoptiles grown at 40 degrees C, but not at other temperature conditions. On the other hand, the molecular size of hemicellulosic polysaccharides was small at temperatures where the cell wall extensibility was high (30-40 degrees C). The autolytic activities of cell walls obtained from coleoptiles grown at 30 and 40 degrees C were substantially higher than those grown at 10, 20 and 50 degrees C. Furthermore, the activities of (1-->3),(1-->4)-beta-glucanases extracted from coleoptile cell walls showed a similar tendency. When oat (1-->3),(1-->4)-beta-glucans with high molecular mass were incubated with the cell wall enzyme preparations from coleoptiles grown at various temperature conditions, the extensive molecular mass downshifts were brought about only by the cell wall enzymes obtained from coleoptiles grown at 30-40 degrees C. There were close correlations between the cell wall extensibility and the molecular mass of hemicellulosic polysaccharides or the activity of beta -glucanases. These results suggest that the environmental temperature regulates the cell wall extensibility of rice coleoptiles by modifying mainly the molecular mass of hemicellulosic polysaccharides. Modulation of the activity of beta-glucanases under various temperature conditions may be involved in the alteration of the molecular size of hemicellulosic polysaccharides.

  10. Inositol Metabolism in Plants. III. Conversion of Myo-inositol-2-H to Cell Wall Polysaccharides in Sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus L.) Cell Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, R M; Loewus, F

    1966-11-01

    Prolonged growth of cell cultures of sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus L.) on agar medium containing myo-inositol-2-(3)H resulted in incorporation of label predominately into uronosyl and pentosyl units of cell wall polysaccharides. Procedures normally used to distinguish between pectic substance and hemicellulose yielded carbohydrate-rich fractions with solubility characteristics ranging from pectic substance to hemicellulose yet the uronic acid and pentose composition of these fractions was decidedly pectic. Galacturonic acid was the only uronic acid present in each fraction. Subfractionation of alkali-soluble (hemicellulosic) polysaccharide by neutralization followed by ethanol precipitation gave 3 fractions, a water-insoluble, an ethanol-insoluble, and an ethanol-soluble fraction, each progressively poorer in galacturonic acid units and progressively richer in arabinose units; all relatively poor in xylose units.Apparently, processes involved in biosynthesis of primary cell wall continued to produce pectic substance during cell enlargement while processes leading to biosynthesis of typically secondary cell wall polysaccharide such as 4-0-methyl glucuronoxylan were not activated.

  11. Genes involved in cell wall localization and side chain formation of rhamnose-glucose polysaccharide in Streptococcus mutans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Y; Tsukioka, Y; Tomihisa, K; Nakano, Y; Koga, T

    1998-11-01

    We identified in Streptococcus mutans six new genes (rgpA through rgpF), whose disruption results in a loss of serotype-specific antigenicity, specified by the glucose side chains of rhamnose-glucose polysaccharide from the cell wall. Rhamnose and glucose content of the cell wall decreased drastically in all these disruption mutants, except that in the rgpE mutant only the glucose content decreased. RgpC and RgpD are homologous to ATP-binding cassette transporter components and may be involved in polysaccharide export, whereas RgpE may be a transferase of side chain glucose.

  12. Changes in the cell-wall polysaccharides of outer pericarp tissues of kiwifruit during development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xingjun; Nakagawa, Naoki; Nevins, Donald J; Sakurai, Naoki

    2006-01-01

    Changes in pectin, hemicelluloses and cellulose in the cell walls of outer pericarp tissues of kiwifruit (Actinidia deliciosa cv. Hayward) were determined during development. An extensive amylase digestion was employed to remove possible contaminating starch before and after fractionation of wall polysaccharides. An initial treatment of crude cell walls with alpha-amylase and iso-amylase or DMSO, was found to be insufficient removing the contaminating starch from wall polysaccharides. After EDTA and alkaline extraction, the pectic and hemicellulose fractions were again treated with the combination of alpha-amylase and iso-amylase. The amounts of predominant pectic sugars Gal, Rha and Ara, unaffected by the first and second amylase digestion, decreased markedly during the early fruit enlargement (8-12 weeks after anthesis, WAA), then increased during 16-20 WAA, and finally declined during fruit maturity (20-25 WAA). The molecular-mass of pectic polysaccharides decreased during fruit enlargement (8-16 WAA), and then changed little during fruit maturity. The higher molecular-mass components of hemicelluloses in HC-I and HC-II fractions detected at the early stage of fruit enlargement (8-12 WAA) were degraded at the late stage of fruit enlargement (16 WAA), but then remained stable at the much lower molecular-mass till fruit maturity. The amount of Xyl in the HC-II fraction decreased during the early fruit enlargement and fruit maturity, an observation that was consistent with xyloglucan (XG) content. The gel permeation profiles of XG showed a slight increase in higher molecular-mass components during 8-12 WAA, but thereafter there was no significant down-shift of molecular-mass until harvest time. The cellulose fraction increased steadily during fruit enlargement through maturity, but the XG contents in HC-I and HC-II fractions remained at a low level during these stages. Methylation analysis of HC-I and HC-II fractions confirmed the low level of XG in the

  13. Cell Wall Microstructure Analysis Implicates Hemicellulose Polysaccharides in Cell Adhesion in Tomato Fruit Pericarp Parenchyma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jose J. Ordaz-Ortiz; Susan E. Marcus; J. Paul Knox

    2009-01-01

    Methods developed to isolate intact cells from both unripe and ripe tomato fruit pericarp parenchyma have allowed the cell biological analysis of polysaccharide epitopes at the surface of separated cells. The LM7 pectic homoga-lacturonan epitope is a marker of the junctions of adhesion planes and intercellular spaces in parenchyma systems. The LM7 epitope persistently marked the former edge of adhesion planes at the surface of cells separated from unripe and ripened tomato fruit and also from fruits with the Cnr mutation. The LM 11 xylan epitope was associated, in sections, with cell walls lining intercellular space but the epitope was not detected at the surface of isolated cells, being lost during cell isolation. The LM15 xyloglucan epitope was present at the surface of cells isolated from unripe fruit in a pattern reflecting the former edge of cell adhesion planes/intercellular space but with gaps and apparent breaks, An equivalent pattern ofLM15 epitope occurrence was revealed at the surface of cells isolated by pectate lyase action but was not present in cells isolated from ripe fruit or from Cnr fruit. In contrast to wild-type cells, the LM5 galactan and LM21 mannan epitopes oc-curred predominantly in positions reflecting intercellular space in Cnr, suggesting a concerted alteration in cell wall mi-crostructure in response to this mutation. Galactanase and mannanase, along with pectic homogalacturonan-degrading enzymes, were capable of releasing cells from unripe fruit parenchyma. These observations indicate that hemicellulose polymers are present in architectural contexts reflecting cell adhesion and that several cell wall polysaccharide classes are likely to contribute to cell adhesion/cell separation in tomato fruit pericarp parenchyma.

  14. Highly acidic glycans from sea cucumbers. Isolation and fractionation of fucose-rich sulfated polysaccharides from the body wall of Ludwigothurea grisea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourão, P A; Bastos, I G

    1987-08-03

    The body wall of the sea cucumber contains high amounts of sulfated glycans, which differ in structure from glycosaminoglycans of animal tissues and also from the fucose-rich sulfated polysaccharides isolated from marine algae and from the jelly coat of sea urchin eggs. In Ludwigothurea grisea, glycans can be separated into three fractions which differ in molecular mass and chemical composition. The fraction containing a high-molecular-mass component has a high proportion of fucose and small amounts of amino sugars, whereas another fraction contains primarily a sulfated fucan. The third fraction, which represents the major portion of the sea cucumber polysaccharides, contains besides fucose, approximately equimolar proportions of glucuronic acid and amino sugars, and has a sulfate content higher than that in the other two fractions. Both D and L-isomers of fucose are found in these polysaccharides, and the sulfate is linked to the O-3 position of the fucose residues. The attachment position of the sulfate groups to the glucuronic acid units and amino sugars is still undetermined. It is possible that these compounds are involved in maintaining the integrity of the sea cucumber's body wall, in analogy with the role of other macromolecules in the vertebrate connective tissue.

  15. Extractability and digestibility of plant cell wall polysaccharides during hydrothermal and enzymatic degradation of wheat straw (Triticum aestivum L.)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Mads A.T.; Ahl, Louise I.; Pedersen, Henriette L.

    2014-01-01

    , regardless their extractability in water or only alkali. Based on the results, AX and MLG appear to be loosely bound in the cell wall matrix while the other polysaccharides are bound more tightly and shielded from enzymatic attack by AX and MLG until pretreatment. The gradual solubilisation and digestion...... and by comprehensive microarray polymer profiling (CoMPP). This way, the effects of each degradation step to the intermolecular organisation of specific polysaccharides in the cell walls were elucidated. After pretreatment, the degree of polymerisation (DP) of released xylo-oligosaccharides in both samples was up...... to about 20, but mostly around 3-8, and notably more acetylated in stems. Arabinoxylan (AX) and mixed-linkage glucan (MLG) became water-extractable while xylan, xyloglucan (XG), mannan and glucan remained only alkali-extractable. All polysaccharides became partly digestible after pretreatment however...

  16. Investigation of the Relationship between Lactococcal Host Cell Wall Polysaccharide Genotype and 936 Phage Receptor Binding Protein Phylogeny

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahony, Jennifer; Kot, Witold Piotr; Murphy, James;

    2013-01-01

    Comparative genomics of 11 lactococcal 936-type phages combined with host range analysis allowed subgrouping of these phage genomes, particularly with respect to their encoded receptor binding proteins. The so-called pellicle or cell wall polysaccharide of Lactococcus lactis, which has been impli...

  17. Investigation of the Relationship between Lactococcal Host Cell Wall Polysaccharide Genotype and 936 Phage Receptor Binding Protein Phylogeny

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahony, Jennifer; Kot, Witold Piotr; Murphy, James

    2013-01-01

    Comparative genomics of 11 lactococcal 936-type phages combined with host range analysis allowed subgrouping of these phage genomes, particularly with respect to their encoded receptor binding proteins. The so-called pellicle or cell wall polysaccharide of Lactococcus lactis, which has been impli...

  18. Cell Wall Composition and Candidate Biosynthesis Gene Expression During Rice Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Fan; Manisseri, Chithra; Fagerström, Alexandra; Peck, Matthew L.; Vega-Sánchez, Miguel E.; Williams, Brian; Chiniquy, Dawn M.; Saha, Prasenjit; Pattathil, Sivakumar; Conlin, Brian; Zhu, Lan; Hahn, Michael G.; Willats, William G. T.; Scheller, Henrik V.; Ronald, Pamela C.; Bartley, Laura E.

    2016-08-01

    Cell walls of grasses, including cereal crops and biofuel grasses, comprise the majority of plant biomass and intimately influence plant growth, development and physiology. However, the functions of many cell wall synthesis genes, and the relationships among and the functions of cell wall components remain obscure. To better understand the patterns of cell wall accumulation and identify genes that act in grass cell wall biosynthesis, we characterized 30 samples from aerial organs of rice (Oryza sativa cv. Kitaake) at 10 developmental time points, 3-100 d post-germination. Within these samples, we measured 15 cell wall chemical components, enzymatic digestibility and 18 cell wall polysaccharide epitopes/ligands. We also used quantitative reverse transcription-PCR to measure expression of 50 glycosyltransferases, 15 acyltransferases and eight phenylpropanoid genes, many of which had previously been identified as being highly expressed in rice. Most cell wall components vary significantly during development, and correlations among them support current understanding of cell walls. We identified 92 significant correlations between cell wall components and gene expression and establish nine strong hypotheses for genes that synthesize xylans, mixed linkage glucan and pectin components. This work provides an extensive analysis of cell wall composition throughout rice development, identifies genes likely to synthesize grass cell walls, and provides a framework for development of genetically improved grasses for use in lignocellulosic biofuel production and agriculture.

  19. Shear-resistant behavior of light composite shear wall

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李升才; 董毓利

    2015-01-01

    Shear test results for a composite wall panel in a light composite structure system are compared with test results for shear walls in Japan. The analysis results show that this kind of composite wall panel works very well, and can be regarded as a solid panel. The composite wall panel with a hidden frame is essential for bringing its effect on shear resistance into full play. Comprehensive analysis of the shear-resistant behavior of the composite wall panel suggests that the shear of the composite shear wall panel can be controlled by the cracking strength of the web shearing diagonal crack.

  20. Shear-Resistant Behavior Analysis of Light Composite Shear Walls

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李升才; 江见鲸; 于庆荣

    2002-01-01

    Shear test results for a composite wall panel in a light composite structure system are compared with test results for shear walls in Japan in this paper. The analysis results show that this kind of composite wall panel works very well, and can be regarded as a solid panel. The composite wall panel with a hidden frame is essential for bringing its effect on shear resistance into full play. Comprehensive analysis of the shear-resistant behavior of the composite wall panel suggests that the shear of the composite shear wall panel can be controlled by the cracking strength of the web shearing diagonal crack.

  1. Fingerprinting of polysaccharides attacked by hydroxyl radicals in vitro and in the cell walls of ripening pear fruit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, S C; Dumville, J C; Miller, J G

    2001-08-01

    Hydroxyl radicals (*OH) may cause non-enzymic scission of polysaccharides in vivo, e.g. in plant cell walls and mammalian connective tissues. To provide a method for detecting the action of endogenous *OH in vivo, we investigated the products formed when polysaccharides were treated with *OH (generated in situ by ascorbate-H(2)O(2)-Cu(2+) mixtures) followed by NaB(3)H(4). Treatment with *OH increased the number of NaB(3)H(4)-reacting groups present in citrus pectin, homogalacturonan and tamarind xyloglucan. This increase is attributed partly to the formation of glycosulose and glycosulosuronic acid residues, which are then reduced back to the original (but radioactive) sugar residues and their epimers by NaB(3)H(4). The glycosulose and glycosulosuronic acid residues were stable for >16 h at 20 degrees C in ethanol or buffer (pH 4.7), but were destroyed in alkali. Driselase-digestion of the radiolabelled polysaccharides yielded characteristic patterns of (3)H-products, which included galactose and galacturonate from pectin, and isoprimeverose, galactose, glucose and arabinose from xyloglucan. Pectin yielded at least eight (3)H-labelled anionic products, separable by electrophoresis at pH 3.5. The patterns of radioactive products form useful 'fingerprints' by which *OH-attacked polysaccharides may be recognized. Applied to the cell walls of ripening pear (Pyrus communis) fruit, the method gave evidence for progressive *OH radical attack on polysaccharides during the softening process.

  2. Cell wall composition as a maize defense mechanism against corn borers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barros-Rios, Jaime; Malvar, Rosa A; Jung, Hans-Joachim G; Santiago, Rogelio

    2011-04-01

    European and Mediterranean corn borers are two of the most economically important insect pests of maize (Zea mays L.) in North America and southern Europe, respectively. Cell wall structure and composition were evaluated in pith and rind tissues of resistant and susceptible inbred lines as possible corn borer resistance traits. Composition of cell wall polysaccharides, lignin concentration and composition, and cell wall bound forms of hydroxycinnamic acids were measured. As expected, most of the cell wall components were found at higher concentrations in the rind than in the pith tissues, with the exception of galactose and total diferulate esters. Pith of resistant inbred lines had significantly higher concentrations of total cell wall material than susceptible inbred lines, indicating that the thickness of cell walls could be the initial barrier against corn borer larvae attack. Higher concentrations of cell wall xylose and 8-O-4-coupled diferulate were found in resistant inbreds. Stem tunneling by corn borers was negatively correlated with concentrations of total diferulates, 8-5-diferulate and p-coumarate esters. Higher total cell wall, xylose, and 8-coupled diferulates concentrations appear to be possible mechanisms of corn borer resistance. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Molecular mapping of the cell wall polysaccharides of the human pathogen Streptococcus agalactiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaussart, Audrey; Péchoux, Christine; Trieu-Cuot, Patrick; Hols, Pascal; Mistou, Michel-Yves; Dufrêne, Yves F.

    2014-11-01

    The surface of many bacterial pathogens is covered with polysaccharides that play important roles in mediating pathogen-host interactions. In Streptococcus agalactiae, the capsular polysaccharide (CPS) is recognized as a major virulence factor while the group B carbohydrate (GBC) is crucial for peptidoglycan biosynthesis and cell division. Despite the important roles of CPS and GBC, there is little information available on the molecular organization of these glycopolymers on the cell surface. Here, we use atomic force microscopy (AFM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to analyze the nanoscale distribution of CPS and GBC in wild-type (WT) and mutant strains of S. agalactiae. TEM analyses reveal that in WT bacteria, peptidoglycan is covered with a very thin (few nm) layer of GBC (the ``pellicle'') overlaid by a 15-45 nm thick layer of CPS (the ``capsule''). AFM-based single-molecule mapping with specific antibody probes shows that CPS is exposed on WT cells, while it is hardly detected on mutant cells impaired in CPS production (ΔcpsE mutant). By contrast, both TEM and AFM show that CPS is over-expressed in mutant cells altered in GBC expression (ΔgbcO mutant), indicating that the production of the two surface glycopolymers is coordinated in WT cells. In addition, AFM topographic imaging and molecular mapping with specific lectin probes demonstrate that removal of CPS (ΔcpsE), but not of GBC (ΔgbcO), leads to the exposure of peptidoglycan, organized into 25 nm wide bands running parallel to the septum. These results indicate that CPS forms a homogeneous barrier protecting the underlying peptidoglycan from environmental exposure, while the presence of GBC does not prevent peptidoglycan detection. This work shows that single-molecule AFM, combined with high-resolution TEM, represents a powerful platform for analysing the molecular arrangement of the cell wall polymers of bacterial pathogens.

  4. A general method for assaying homo-and hetero-transglycanase activities that act on plant cell-wall polysaccharides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lenka Frankova; Stephen C. Fry

    2015-01-01

    Transglycanases (endotransglycosylases) cleave a polysaccharide (donor-substrate) in mid-chain, and then transfer a portion onto another poly- or oligosaccharide (acceptor-substrate). Such enzymes contribute to plant cell-wall assembly and/or re-structuring. We sought a general method for revealing novel homo- and hetero-trans-glycanases, applicable to diverse polysaccharides and oligosaccharides, separating transglycanase-generated 3H-polysaccharides from unreacted 3H-oligosaccharides—the former immobilized (on filter-paper, silica-gel or glass-fiber), the latter eluted. On filter-paper, certain polysaccharides [e.g. (1!3, 1!4)-b-D-glucans] remained satisfactorily adsorbed when water-washed; others (e.g. pectins) were partially lost. Many oligosaccharides (e.g. arabinan-, galactan-, xylo-glucan-based) were successfully eluted in appropriate sol-vents, but others (e.g. [3H]xylohexaitol, [3H]mannohexaitol [3H]cellohexaitol) remained immobile. On silica-gel, all 3H-oligosaccharides left an immobile‘ghost’ spot (contaminating any 3H-polysaccharides), which was diminished but not prevented by additives e.g. sucrose or Triton X-100. The best stratum was glass-fiber (GF), onto which the reaction-mixture was dried then washed in 75%ethanol. Washing led to minimal loss or lateral migration of 3H-polysaccharides if conducted by slow percolation of acidified ethanol. The effectiveness of GF-blotting was well demonstrated for Chara vulgaris trans-b-mannanase. In conclusion, our novel GF-blotting technique efficiently frees transglycanase-gener-ated 3H-polysaccharides from unreacted 3H-oligosaccharides, enabling high-throughput screening of multiple postulated transglycanase activities utilising chemically diverse donor-and acceptor-substrates.

  5. Influences of acidic reaction and hydrolytic conditions on monosaccharide composition analysis of acidic, neutral and basic polysaccharides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qing-Chi; Zhao, Xia; Pu, Jiang-Hua; Luan, Xiao-Hong

    2016-06-05

    Monosaccharide composition analysis is important for structural characterization of polysaccharides. To investigate the influences of acidic reaction and hydrolytic conditions on monosaccharide composition analysis of polysaccharides, we chose alginate, starch, chitosan and chondroitin sulfate as representative of acidic, neutral, basic and complex polysaccharides to compare the release degree of monosaccharides under different hydrolytic conditions. The hydrolysis stability of 10 monosaccharide standards was also explored. Results showed that the basic sugars were hard to release but stable, the acidic sugars (uronic acids) were easy to release but unstable, and the release and stability of neutral sugars were in between acidic and basic sugars. In addition, the hydrolysis process was applied to monosaccharide composition analysis of Hippocampus trimaculatus polysaccharide and the appropriate hydrolytic condition was accorded with that of the above four polysaccharides. Thus, different hydrolytic conditions should be used for the monosaccharide composition analysis of polysaccharides based on their structural characteristics.

  6. Immuno and Affinity Cytochemical Analysis of Cell Wall Composition in the Moss Physcomitrella patens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Elizabeth A; Tran, Mai L; Dimos, Christos S; Budziszek, Michael J; Scavuzzo-Duggan, Tess R; Roberts, Alison W

    2016-01-01

    In contrast to homeohydric vascular plants, mosses employ a poikilohydric strategy for surviving in the dry aerial environment. A detailed understanding of the structure, composition, and development of moss cell walls can contribute to our understanding of not only the evolution of overall cell wall complexity, but also the differences that have evolved in response to selection for different survival strategies. The model moss species Physcomitrella patens has a predominantly haploid lifecycle consisting of protonemal filaments that regenerate from protoplasts and enlarge by tip growth, and leafy gametophores composed of cells that enlarge by diffuse growth and differentiate into several different types. Advantages for genetic studies include methods for efficient targeted gene modification and extensive genomic resources. Immuno and affinity cytochemical labeling were used to examine the distribution of polysaccharides and proteins in regenerated protoplasts, protonemal filaments, rhizoids, and sectioned gametophores of P. patens. The cell wall composition of regenerated protoplasts was also characterized by flow cytometry. Crystalline cellulose was abundant in the cell walls of regenerating protoplasts and protonemal cells that developed on media of high osmolarity, whereas homogalactuonan was detected in the walls of protonemal cells that developed on low osmolarity media and not in regenerating protoplasts. Mannan was the major hemicellulose detected in all tissues tested. Arabinogalactan proteins were detected in different cell types by different probes, consistent with structural heterogneity. The results reveal developmental and cell type specific differences in cell wall composition and provide a basis for analyzing cell wall phenotypes in knockout mutants.

  7. Immuno and affinity cytochemical analysis of cell wall composition in the moss Physcomitrella patens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth A. Berry

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In contrast to homeohydric vascular plants, mosses employ a poikilohydric strategy for surviving in the dry aerial environment. A detailed understanding of the structure, composition, and development of moss cell walls can contribute to our understanding of not only the evolution of overall cell wall complexity, but also the differences that have evolved in response to selection for different survival strategies. The model moss species Physcomitrella patens has a predominantly haploid lifecycle consisting of protonemal filaments that regenerate from protoplasts and enlarge by tip growth, and leafy gametophores composed of cells that enlarge by diffuse growth and differentiate into several different types. Advantages for genetic studies include methods for efficient targeted gene modification and extensive genomic resources. Immuno and affinity cytochemical labeling were used to examine the distribution of polysaccharides and proteins in regenerated protoplasts, protonemal filaments, rhizoids, and sectioned gametophores of P. patens. The cell wall composition of regenerated protoplasts was also characterized by flow cytometry. Crystalline cellulose was abundant in the cell walls of regenerating protoplasts and protonemal cells that developed on media of high osmolarity, whereas homogalacturonan was detected in the walls of protonemal cells that developed on low osmolarity media and not in regenerating protoplasts. Mannan was the major hemicellulose detected in all tissues tested. Arabinogalactan proteins were detected in different cell types by different probes, consistent with structural heterogeneity. The results reveal developmental and cell type specific differences in cell wall composition and provide a basis for analyzing cell wall phenotypes in knockout mutants.

  8. Effects of Plant Cell Wall Matrix Polysaccharides on Bacterial Cellulose Structure Studied with Vibrational Sum Frequency Generation Spectroscopy and X-ray Diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Yong Bum; Lee, Christopher M; Kafle, Kabindra; Park, Sunkyu; Cosgrove, Daniel; Kim, Seong H

    2014-07-14

    The crystallinity, allomorph content, and mesoscale ordering of cellulose produced by Gluconacetobacter xylinus cultured with different plant cell wall matrix polysaccharides were studied with vibrational sum frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD).

  9. Soya beans and Maize : The effect of chemical and physical structure of cell wall polysaccharides on fermentation kinetics

    OpenAIRE

    Laar, van de, P.

    2000-01-01

    The analysis of the relationship between cell wall composition and fermentation of endosperm cell walls of soya beans and maize was approached from three different angles. Firstly, the fermentation (rate and extent of fermentation, the sugar degradation pattern, and volatile fatty acid production) of soya bean and maize cell walls was analysed, both in situ and in vitro. This analysis revealed that the physical structure of the cell wall (particle size and cell wall thickness) influences cell...

  10. Effect of okra cell wall and polysaccharide on physical properties and stability of ice cream.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuennan, Pilapa; Sajjaanantakul, Tanaboon; Goff, H Douglas

    2014-08-01

    Stabilizers are used in ice cream to increase mix viscosity, promote smooth texture, and improve frozen stability. In this study, the effects of varying concentrations (0.00%, 0.15%, 0.30%, and 0.45%) of okra cell wall (OKW) and its corresponding water-soluble polysaccharide (OKP) on the physical characteristics of ice cream were determined. Ice cream mix viscosity was measured as well as overrun, meltdown, and consumer acceptability. Ice recrystallization was determined after ice cream was subjected to temperature cycling in the range of -10 to -20 °C for 10 cycles. Mix viscosity increased significantly as the concentrations of OKW and OKP increased. The addition of either OKW or OKP at 0.15% to 0.45% significantly improved the melting resistance of ice cream. OKW and OKP at 0.15% did not affect sensory perception score for flavor, texture, and overall liking of the ice cream. OKW and OKP (0.15%) reduced ice crystal growth to 107% and 87%, respectively, as compared to 132% for the control (0.00%). Thus, our results suggested the potential use of OKW and OKP at 0.15% as a stabilizer to control ice cream quality and retard ice recrystallization. OKP, however, at 0.15% exhibited greater effect on viscosity increase and on ice recrystallization inhibition than OKW.

  11. The dynamics of plant cell-wall polysaccharide decomposition in leaf-cutting ant fungus gardens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel E Moller

    Full Text Available The degradation of live plant biomass in fungus gardens of leaf-cutting ants is poorly characterised but fundamental for understanding the mutual advantages and efficiency of this obligate nutritional symbiosis. Controversies about the extent to which the garden-symbiont Leucocoprinus gongylophorus degrades cellulose have hampered our understanding of the selection forces that induced large scale herbivory and of the ensuing ecological footprint of these ants. Here we use a recently established technique, based on polysaccharide microarrays probed with antibodies and carbohydrate binding modules, to map the occurrence of cell wall polymers in consecutive sections of the fungus garden of the leaf-cutting ant Acromyrmex echinatior. We show that pectin, xyloglucan and some xylan epitopes are degraded, whereas more highly substituted xylan and cellulose epitopes remain as residuals in the waste material that the ants remove from their fungus garden. These results demonstrate that biomass entering leaf-cutting ant fungus gardens is only partially utilized and explain why disproportionally large amounts of plant material are needed to sustain colony growth. They also explain why substantial communities of microbial and invertebrate symbionts have evolved associations with the dump material from leaf-cutting ant nests, to exploit decomposition niches that the ant garden-fungus does not utilize. Our approach thus provides detailed insight into the nutritional benefits and shortcomings associated with fungus-farming in ants.

  12. Engineering temporal accumulation of a low recalcitrance polysaccharide leads to increased C6 sugar content in plant cell walls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega-Sánchez, Miguel E; Loqué, Dominique; Lao, Jeemeng; Catena, Michela; Verhertbruggen, Yves; Herter, Thomas; Yang, Fan; Harholt, Jesper; Ebert, Berit; Baidoo, Edward E K; Keasling, Jay D; Scheller, Henrik V; Heazlewood, Joshua L; Ronald, Pamela C

    2015-09-01

    Reduced cell wall recalcitrance and increased C6 monosaccharide content are desirable traits for future biofuel crops, as long as these biomass modifications do not significantly alter normal growth and development. Mixed-linkage glucan (MLG), a cell wall polysaccharide only present in grasses and related species among flowering plants, is comprised of glucose monomers linked by both β-1,3 and β-1,4 bonds. Previous data have shown that constitutive production of MLG in barley (Hordeum vulgare) severely compromises growth and development. Here, we used spatio-temporal strategies to engineer Arabidopsis thaliana plants to accumulate significant amounts of MLG in the cell wall by expressing the rice CslF6 MLG synthase using secondary cell wall and senescence-associated promoters. Results using secondary wall promoters were suboptimal. When the rice MLG synthase was expressed under the control of a senescence-associated promoter, we obtained up to four times more glucose in the matrix cell wall fraction and up to a 42% increase in saccharification compared to control lines. Importantly, these plants grew and developed normally. The induction of MLG deposition at senescence correlated with an increase of gluconic acid in cell wall extracts of transgenic plants in contrast to the other approaches presented in this study. MLG produced in Arabidopsis has an altered structure compared to the grass glucan, which likely affects its solubility, while its molecular size is unaffected. The induction of cell wall polysaccharide biosynthesis in senescing tissues offers a novel engineering alternative to enhance cell wall properties of lignocellulosic biofuel crops.

  13. Genes Involved in Cell Wall Localization and Side Chain Formation of Rhamnose-Glucose Polysaccharide in Streptococcus mutans

    OpenAIRE

    Yamashita, Yoshihisa; Tsukioka, Yuichi; Tomihisa, Kiyotaka; Nakano, Yoshio; Koga, Toshihiko

    1998-01-01

    We identified in Streptococcus mutans six new genes (rgpA through rgpF), whose disruption results in a loss of serotype-specific antigenicity, specified by the glucose side chains of rhamnose-glucose polysaccharide from the cell wall. Rhamnose and glucose content of the cell wall decreased drastically in all these disruption mutants, except that in the rgpE mutant only the glucose content decreased. RgpC and RgpD are homologous to ATP-binding cassette transporter components and may be involve...

  14. Synthesis, Structural, and Adsorption Properties and Thermal Stability of Nanohydroxyapatite/Polysaccharide Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skwarek, Ewa; Goncharuk, Olena; Sternik, Dariusz; Janusz, Wladyslaw; Gdula, Karolina; Gun'ko, Vladimir M.

    2017-02-01

    A series of composites based on nanohydroxyapatite (nHAp) and natural polysaccharides (PS) (nHAp/agar, nHAp/chitosan, nHAp/pectin FB300, nHAp/pectin APA103, nHAp/sodium alginate) was synthesized by liquid-phase two-step method and characterized using nitrogen adsorption-desorption, DSC, TG, FTIR spectroscopy, and SEM. The analysis of nitrogen adsorption-desorption data shows that composites with a nHAp: PS ratio of 4:1 exhibit a sufficiently high specific surface area from 49 to 82 m2/g. The incremental pore size distributions indicate mainly mesoporosity. The composites with the component ratio 1:1 preferably form a film-like structure, and the value of S BET varies from 0.3 to 43 m2/g depending on the nature of a polysaccharide. Adsorption of Sr(II) on the composites from the aqueous solutions has been studied. The thermal properties of polysaccharides alone and in nHAp/PS show the influence of nHAp, since there is a shift of characteristic DSC and DTG peaks. FTIR spectroscopy data confirm the presence of functional groups typical for nHAp as well as polysaccharides in composites. Structure and morphological characteristics of the composites are strongly dependent on the ratio of components, since nHAp/PS at 4:1 have relatively large S BET values and a good ability to adsorb metal ions. The comparison of the adsorption capacity with respect to Sr(II) of nHAp, polysaccharides, and composites shows that it of the latter is higher than that of nHAp (per 1 m2 of surface).

  15. Alfalfa stem tissues: Cell wall deposition, composition, and degradability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jung, H.G.; Engels, F.M.

    2002-01-01

    Declining cell wall degradability of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) stems with maturation limits the nutritional value of alfalfa for ruminants. This study characterized changes in cell wall concentration, composition, and degradability by rumen microbes resulting from alfalfa stem tissue proliferatio

  16. Alfalfa stem tissues: Cell wall deposition, composition, and degradability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jung, H.G.; Engels, F.M.

    2002-01-01

    Declining cell wall degradability of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) stems with maturation limits the nutritional value of alfalfa for ruminants. This study characterized changes in cell wall concentration, composition, and degradability by rumen microbes resulting from alfalfa stem tissue

  17. Alfalfa stem tissues: Cell wall deposition, composition, and degradability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jung, H.G.; Engels, F.M.

    2002-01-01

    Declining cell wall degradability of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) stems with maturation limits the nutritional value of alfalfa for ruminants. This study characterized changes in cell wall concentration, composition, and degradability by rumen microbes resulting from alfalfa stem tissue proliferatio

  18. Natural polysaccharides promote chondrocyte adhesion and proliferation on magnetic nanoparticle/PVA composite hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Ruixia; Nie, Lei; Du, Gaolai; Xiong, Xiaopeng; Fu, Jun

    2015-08-01

    This paper aims to investigate the synergistic effects of natural polysaccharides and inorganic nanoparticles on cell adhesion and growth on intrinsically cell non-adhesive polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) hydrogels. Previously, we have demonstrated that Fe2O3 and hydroxyapatite (nHAP) nanoparticles are effective in increasing osteoblast growth on PVA hydrogels. Herein, we blended hyaluronic acid (HA) and chondroitin sulfate (CS), two important components of cartilage extracellular matrix (ECM), with Fe2O3/nHAP/PVA hydrogels. The presence of these natural polyelectrolytes dramatically increased the pore size and the equilibrium swelling ratio (ESR) while maintaining excellent compressive strength of hydrogels. Chondrocytes were seeded and cultured on composite PVA hydrogels containing Fe2O3, nHAP and Fe2O3/nHAP hybrids and Fe2O3/nHAP with HA or CS. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8) assay consistently confirmed that the addition of HA or CS promotes chondrocyte adhesion and growth on PVA and composite hydrogels. Particularly, the combination of HA and CS exhibited further promotion to cell adhesion and proliferation compared with any single polysaccharide. The results demonstrated that the magnetic composite nanoparticles and polysaccharides provided synergistic promotion to cell adhesion and growth. Such polysaccharide-augmented composite hydrogels may have potentials in biomedical applications.

  19. Transmission Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy allows simultaneous assessment of cutin and cell-wall polysaccharides of Arabidopsis petals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazurek, Sylwester; Mucciolo, Antonio; Humbel, Bruno M; Nawrath, Christiane

    2013-06-01

    A procedure for the simultaneous analysis of cell-wall polysaccharides, amides and aliphatic polyesters by transmission Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy (FTIR) has been established for Arabidopsis petals. The combination of FTIR imaging with spectra derivatization revealed that petals, in contrast to other organs, have a characteristic chemical zoning with high amount of aliphatic compounds and esters in the lamina and of polysaccharides in the stalk of the petal. The hinge region of petals was particular rich in amides as well as in vibrations potentially associated with hemicellulose. In addition, a number of other distribution patterns have been identified. Analyses of mutants in cutin deposition confirmed that vibrations of aliphatic compounds and esters present in the lamina were largely associated with the cuticular polyester. Calculation of spectrotypes, including the standard deviation of intensities, allowed detailed comparison of the spectral features of various mutants. The spectrotypes not only revealed differences in the amount of polyesters in cutin mutants, but also changes in other compound classes. For example, in addition to the expected strong deficiencies in polyester content, the long-chain acyl CoA synthase 2 mutant showed increased intensities of vibrations in a wavelength range that is typical for polysaccharides. Identical spectral features were observed in quasimodo2, a cell-wall mutant of Arabidopsis with a defect in pectin formation that exhibits increased cellulose synthase activity. FTIR thus proved to be a convenient method for the identification and characterization of mutants affected in the deposition of cutin in petals.

  20. Identification and characterization of glycosyltransferases involved in the synthesis of the side chains of the cell wall pectic polysaccharide rhamnogalacturonan II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Neill, Malcolm [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States)

    2015-08-31

    Our goal was to gain insight into the genes and proteins involved in the biosynthesis of rhamnogalacturonan II (RG-II), a borate cross-linked and structurally conserved pectic polysaccharide present in the primary cell walls of all vascular plants. The research conducted during the funding period established that (i) Avascular plants have the ability to synthesize UDP-apiose but lack the glycosyltransferase machinery required to synthesize RG-II or other apiose-containing cell wall glycans. (ii) RG-II structure is highly conserved in the Lemnaceae (duckweeds and relatives). However, the structures of other wall pectins and hemicellulose have changed substantial during the diversification of the Lemnaceae. This supports the notion that a precise structure of RG-II must be maintained to allow borate cross-linking to occur in a controlled manner. (iii) Enzymes involved in the conversion of UDP-GlcA to UDP-Api, UDP-Xyl, and UDP-Ara may have an important role in controlling the composition of duckweed cell walls. (iv) RG-II exists as the borate ester cross-linked dimer in the cell walls of soybean root hairs and roots. Thus, RG-II is present in the walls of plants cells that grow by tip or by expansive growth. (v) A reduction in RG-II cross-linking in the maize tls1 mutant, which lacks a borate channel protein, suggests that the growth defects observed in the mutant are, at least in part, due to defects in the cell wall.

  1. A Clostridium difficile Cell Wall Glycopolymer Locus Influences Bacterial Shape, Polysaccharide Production and Virulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertolo, Lisa; Monteiro, Mario A.; Agellon, Al; Viswanathan, V. K.; Vedantam, Gayatri

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is a diarrheagenic pathogen associated with significant mortality and morbidity. While its glucosylating toxins are primary virulence determinants, there is increasing appreciation of important roles for non-toxin factors in C. difficile pathogenesis. Cell wall glycopolymers (CWGs) influence the virulence of various pathogens. Five C. difficile CWGs, including PSII, have been structurally characterized, but their biosynthesis and significance in C. difficile infection is unknown. We explored the contribution of a conserved CWG locus to C. difficile cell-surface integrity and virulence. Attempts at disrupting multiple genes in the locus, including one encoding a predicted CWG exporter mviN, were unsuccessful, suggesting essentiality of the respective gene products. However, antisense RNA-mediated mviN downregulation resulted in slight morphology defects, retarded growth, and decreased surface PSII deposition. Two other genes, lcpA and lcpB, with putative roles in CWG anchoring, could be disrupted by insertional inactivation. lcpA- and lcpB- mutants had distinct phenotypes, implying non-redundant roles for the respective proteins. The lcpB- mutant was defective in surface PSII deposition and shedding, and exhibited a remodeled cell surface characterized by elongated and helical morphology, aberrantly-localized cell septae, and an altered surface-anchored protein profile. Both lcpA- and lcpB- strains also displayed heightened virulence in a hamster model of C. difficile disease. We propose that gene products of the C. difficile CWG locus are essential, that they direct the production/assembly of key antigenic surface polysaccharides, and thereby have complex roles in virulence. PMID:27741317

  2. A Clostridium difficile Cell Wall Glycopolymer Locus Influences Bacterial Shape, Polysaccharide Production and Virulence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Chu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile is a diarrheagenic pathogen associated with significant mortality and morbidity. While its glucosylating toxins are primary virulence determinants, there is increasing appreciation of important roles for non-toxin factors in C. difficile pathogenesis. Cell wall glycopolymers (CWGs influence the virulence of various pathogens. Five C. difficile CWGs, including PSII, have been structurally characterized, but their biosynthesis and significance in C. difficile infection is unknown. We explored the contribution of a conserved CWG locus to C. difficile cell-surface integrity and virulence. Attempts at disrupting multiple genes in the locus, including one encoding a predicted CWG exporter mviN, were unsuccessful, suggesting essentiality of the respective gene products. However, antisense RNA-mediated mviN downregulation resulted in slight morphology defects, retarded growth, and decreased surface PSII deposition. Two other genes, lcpA and lcpB, with putative roles in CWG anchoring, could be disrupted by insertional inactivation. lcpA- and lcpB- mutants had distinct phenotypes, implying non-redundant roles for the respective proteins. The lcpB- mutant was defective in surface PSII deposition and shedding, and exhibited a remodeled cell surface characterized by elongated and helical morphology, aberrantly-localized cell septae, and an altered surface-anchored protein profile. Both lcpA- and lcpB- strains also displayed heightened virulence in a hamster model of C. difficile disease. We propose that gene products of the C. difficile CWG locus are essential, that they direct the production/assembly of key antigenic surface polysaccharides, and thereby have complex roles in virulence.

  3. Changes in the sugar composition and molecular mass distribution of matrix polysaccharides during cotton fiber development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokumoto, Hayato; Wakabayashi, Kazuyuki; Kamisaka, Seiichiro; Hoson, Takayuki

    2002-04-01

    Cotton (Gossypium herbaceum L.) fiber development consists of a fiber elongation stage (up to 20 d post-anthesis) and a subsequent cell wall thickening stage. Cell wall analysis revealed that the extractable matrix (pectic and hemicellulosic) polysaccharides accounted for 30-50% of total sugar content in the fiber elongation stage but less than 3% in the cell wall thickening stage. By contrast, cellulose increased dramatically after the fiber elongation ceased. The amounts of extractable xyloglucans and arabinose- and galactose-containing polymers per seed increased in the early fiber elongation stage and decreased thereafter. The amounts of extractable acidic polymers and non-cellulosic beta-glucans (mainly composed of beta-1,3-glucans) increased in parallel with fiber elongation and then decreased. The molecular masses of extractable non-cellulosic beta-glucans, and arabinose- and galactose-containing polymers decreased during both fiber elongation and cell wall thickening stages. The molecular mass of extractable xyloglucans also decreased during the fiber elongation stage, but this decrease ceased during the cell wall thickening stage. Conversely, the molecular size of acidic polymers in the extractable pectic fraction increased during both stages. Thus, not only the amounts but also the molecular size of the extractable matrix polysaccharides showed substantial changes during cotton fiber development.

  4. Improved method for the analysis of the composition of polysaccharides by total acid hydrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mochtar, M.; Delavier, H.J.; Oei Ban Liang

    1985-06-20

    The analysis of the composition of polysaccharides, i.e. dextran, by total acid hydrolysis, in the presence or absence of oxygen, and by different methods of neutralization of the hydrolysate, is presented. It was found that hydrolysis of polysaccharides under nitrogen atmosphere, in the absence of oxygen, diminishes the possibility of a decomposition of monosaccharides formed during hydrolysis. The neutralization of the acid hydrolysate by passing it through a column of weak-base ion exchange resin. Amberlite IRA-94, instead of neutralizing the hydrolysate by Ba(OH)/sub 2/ diminishes the possibility of epimerization of glucose to other saccharides. This improved method gives more reliable results, even in the presence of readily decomposed polysaccharides.

  5. Chemical composition and in vitro polysaccharide fermentation of different beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos-Vega, R; Reynoso-Camacho, R; Pedraza-Aboytes, G; Acosta-Gallegos, J A; Guzman-Maldonado, S H; Paredes-Lopez, O; Oomah, B D; Loarca-Piña, G

    2009-09-01

    The composition of bioactives including polysaccharide yield and resistant starch (RS) content of 4 raw and cooked bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) cultivars was evaluated. Polysaccharide was fermented in vitro by incubation with human gut flora under anaerobic conditions and short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) production was compared at 6, 12, and 24 h by gas chromatography. Polysaccharide and soluble fiber contents increased upon cooking with stachyose as the major oligosaccharide. Cooked bean of cultivar Bayo Madero had the highest yield of polysaccharides (55%) and resistant starch (37%), followed by those of Negro 8025 (48% and 32%, respectively). Acetate was the most abundant SCFAs formed in all bean varieties. The concentration of SCFAs was cultivar-dependent; Bayo Madero and Negro 8025 displayed the highest concentration of butyrate (15 mmol/L), while Azufrado Higuera had the lowest and highest concentrations of acetate (39 mmol/L) and propionate (14 mmol/L), respectively. The results suggest that the common bean is an excellent source of polysaccharides that can be fermented in the colon and produce SCFAs, compounds previously reported to exert health benefits.

  6. Primary cell wall composition of bryophytes and charophytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popper, Zoë A; Fry, Stephen C

    2003-01-01

    Major differences in primary cell wall (PCW) components between non-vascular plant taxa are reported. (1) Xyloglucan: driselase digestion yielded isoprimeverose (the diagnostic repeat unit of xyloglucan) from PCW-rich material of Anthoceros (a hornwort), mosses and both leafy and thalloid liverworts, as well as numerous vascular plants, showing xyloglucan to be a PCW component in all land plants tested. In contrast, charophycean green algae (Klebsormidium flaccidium, Coleochaete scutata and Chara corallina), thought to be closely related to land plants, did not contain xyloglucan. They did not yield isoprimeverose; additionally, charophyte material was not digestible with xyloglucan-specific endoglucanase or cellulase to give xyloglucan-derived oligosaccharides. (2) Uronic acids: acid hydrolysis of PCW-rich material from the charophytes, the hornwort, thalloid and leafy liverworts and a basal moss yielded higher concentrations of glucuronic acid than that from the remaining land plants including the less basal mosses and all vascular plants tested. Polysaccharides of the hornwort Anthoceros contained an unusual repeat-unit, glucuronic acid-alpha(1-->3)-galactose, not found in appreciable amounts in any other plants tested. Galacturonic acid was consistently the most abundant PCW uronic acid, but was present in higher concentrations in acid hydrolysates of bryophytes and charophytes than in those of any of the vascular plants. Mannuronic acid was not detected in any of the species surveyed. (3) Mannose: acid hydrolysis of charophyte and bryophyte PCW-rich material also yielded appreciably higher concentrations of mannose than are found in vascular plant PCWs. (4) Mixed-linkage glucan (MLG) was absent from all algae and bryophytes tested; however, upon digestion with licheninase, PCW-rich material from the alga Ulva lactuca and the leafy liverwort Lophocolea bidentata yielded penta- to decasaccharides, indicating the presence of MLG-related polysaccharides. Our

  7. Impact of the composition of polysaccharide composite gels on small molecules diffusion: A rheological and NMR study

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    The gelation mechanism of carrageenan depends on the amount and nature of the polysaccharide, and is cation sensitive. From a rheological approach, this specificity leads to different textural properties. In composite gels with carrageenans, starch and sucrose, the presence of κ/κ2-carrageenan, even at low levels, has an impact on textural and structural properties. In this study, rheological and diffusion NMR measurements were performed on composite gels to probe gel structure at the macro- ...

  8. Mass Spectrometric Imaging of Wheat (Triticum spp.) and Barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) Cultivars: Distribution of Major Cell Wall Polysaccharides According to Their Main Structural Features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veličković, Dušan; Saulnier, Luc; Lhomme, Margot; Damond, Aurélie; Guillon, Fabienne; Rogniaux, Hélène

    2016-08-17

    Arabinoxylans (AX) and (1→3),(1→4)-β-glucans (BG) are the main components of cereal cell walls and influence many aspects of their end uses. Important variations in the composition and structure of these polysaccharides have been reported among cereals and cultivars of a given species. In this work, the spatial distribution of AX and BG in the endosperm of mature grains was established for nine wheat varieties and eight barley varieties using enzymatically assisted mass spectrometry imaging (MSI). Important structural features of the AX and BG polymers that were previously shown to influence their physicochemical properties were assessed. Differences in the distribution of AX and BG structures were observed, both within the endosperm of a given cultivar and between wheat and barley cultivars. This study provides a unique picture of the structural heterogeneity of AX and BG polysaccharides at the scale of the whole endosperm in a series of wheat and barley cultivars. Thus, it can participate meaningfully in a strategy aiming at understanding the structure-function relationships of these two polymers.

  9. Fungal cell wall polysaccharides: purification and characterization / Polissacarídeos de parede celular fúngica: purificação e caracterização

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria de Lourdes Corradi da Silva

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The cell wall is a rigid structure essential for the survival of fungi. A knowledge of its composition is therefore useful for the development of novel anti-fungal drugs. In this context, polysaccharides as main components of the fungal cell wall have been the subject of intense scientific study over the years. The information gained from the knowledge of the structure of these macrobiomolecules could therefore be valuable in elucidating the mechanisms of their biosynthesis in the cell walls of pathogenic fungi infecting plants and animals alike. Determination of the chemical structures of these polysaccharides (endo is preceded by their extraction and purification. The extractions, generally lead to neutral and/ or alkaline soluble biopolymers in groups according to their solubilities. Mixtures of polysaccharides in these extracts can then be purified by a combination of chemical and chromatographic methods. Following purification, the polysaccharides, considered homogeneous, can be characterized structurally using conventional techniques of carbohydrate chemistry, such as hydrolysis, methylation analysis, and FT-IR, 13C- and 1H- NMR spectroscopy. This review surveys the main scientific literature that characterizes polysaccharides constituting the fungal cell wall.A parede celular é uma estrutura rígida, essencial para a sobrevivência dos fungos, e o conhecimento de sua composição poderá ser útil para o desenvolvimento de novas drogas antifúngicas. Neste contexto, os polissacarídeos estão entre os seus principais componentes que têm sido alvos de intensa investigação científica. As informações, provenientes do conhecimento da estrutura dessas macromoléculas, poderão ser valiosas para o entendimento dos mecanismos de síntese da parede celular de fungos causadores de patologias, tanto em plantas quanto em animais. A determinação da estrutura química de um endopolissacarídeo deve ser precedida por experimentos de extra

  10. Soya beans and maize : the effect of chemical and physical structure of cell wall polysaccharides on fermentation kinetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laar, van H.

    2000-01-01

    The analysis of the relationship between cell wall composition and fermentation of endosperm cell walls of soya beans and maize was approached from three different angles. Firstly, the fermentation (rate and extent of fermentation, the sugar degradation pattern, and volatile fatty acid prod

  11. Soya beans and maize : the effect of chemical and physical structure of cell wall polysaccharides on fermentation kinetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laar, van H.

    2000-01-01

    The analysis of the relationship between cell wall composition and fermentation of endosperm cell walls of soya beans and maize was approached from three different angles. Firstly, the fermentation (rate and extent of fermentation, the sugar degradation pattern, and volatile fatty acid

  12. Soya beans and Maize : The effect of chemical and physical structure of cell wall polysaccharides on fermentation kinetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laar, van H.

    2000-01-01

    The analysis of the relationship between cell wall composition and fermentation of endosperm cell walls of soya beans and maize was approached from three different angles. Firstly, the fermentation (rate and extent of fermentation, the sugar degradation pattern, and volatile fatty acid production) o

  13. Cell wall matrix polysaccharide distribution and cortical microtubule organization: two factors controlling mesophyll cell morphogenesis in land plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotiriou, P; Giannoutsou, E; Panteris, E; Apostolakos, P; Galatis, B

    2016-03-01

    This work investigates the involvement of local differentiation of cell wall matrix polysaccharides and the role of microtubules in the morphogenesis of mesophyll cells (MCs) of three types (lobed, branched and palisade) in the dicotyledon Vigna sinensis and the fern Asplenium nidus. Homogalacturonan (HGA) epitopes recognized by the 2F4, JIM5 and JIM7 antibodies and callose were immunolocalized in hand-made leaf sections. Callose was also stained with aniline blue. We studied microtubule organization by tubulin immunofluorescence and transmission electron microscopy. In both plants, the matrix cell wall polysaccharide distribution underwent definite changes during MC differentiation. Callose constantly defined the sites of MC contacts. The 2F4 HGA epitope in V. sinensis first appeared in MC contacts but gradually moved towards the cell wall regions facing the intercellular spaces, while in A. nidus it was initially localized at the cell walls delimiting the intercellular spaces, but finally shifted to MC contacts. In V. sinensis, the JIM5 and JIM7 HGA epitopes initially marked the cell walls delimiting the intercellular spaces and gradually shifted in MC contacts, while in A. nidus they constantly enriched MC contacts. In all MC types examined, the cortical microtubules played a crucial role in their morphogenesis. In particular, in palisade MCs, cortical microtubule helices, by controlling cellulose microfibril orientation, forced these MCs to acquire a truncated cone-like shape. Unexpectedly in V. sinensis, the differentiation of colchicine-affected MCs deviated completely, since they developed a cell wall ingrowth labyrinth, becoming transfer-like cells. The results of this work and previous studies on Zea mays (Giannoutsou et al., Annals of Botany 2013; 112: : 1067-1081) revealed highly controlled local cell wall matrix differentiation in MCs of species belonging to different plant groups. This, in coordination with microtubule-dependent cellulose microfibril

  14. CHARACTERIZATION OF CELL WALL POLYSACCHARIDES OF THE COENCOCYTIC GREEN SEAWEED BRYOPSIS PLUMOSA (BRYOPSIDACEAE, CHLOROPHYTA) FROM THE ARGENTINE COAST(1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciancia, Marina; Alberghina, Josefina; Arata, Paula Ximena; Benavides, Hugo; Leliaert, Frederik; Verbruggen, Heroen; Estevez, Jose Manuel

    2012-04-01

    Bryopsis sp. from a restricted area of the rocky shore of Mar del Plata (Argentina) on the Atlantic coast was identified as Bryopsis plumosa (Hudson) C. Agardh (Bryopsidales, Chlorophyta) based on morphological characters and rbcL and tufA DNA barcodes. To analyze the cell wall polysaccharides of this seaweed, the major room temperature (B1) and 90°C (X1) water extracts were studied. By linkage analysis and NMR spectroscopy, the structure of a sulfated galactan was determined, and putative sulfated rhamnan structures and furanosidic nonsulfated arabinan structures were also found. By anion exchange chromatography of X1, a fraction (F4), comprising a sulfated galactan as major structure was isolated. Structural analysis showed a linear backbone constituted of 3-linked β-d-galactose units, partially sulfated on C-6 and partially substituted with pyruvic acid forming an acetal linked to O-4 and O-6. This galactan has common structural features with those of green seaweeds of the genus Codium (Bryopsidales, Chlorophyta), but some important differences were also found. This is the first report about the structure of the water-soluble polysaccharides biosynthesized by seaweeds of the genus Bryopsis. These sulfated galactans and rhamnans were in situ localized mostly in two layers, one close to the plasma membrane and the other close to the apoplast, leaving a middle amorphous, unstained cell wall zone. In addition, fibrillar polysaccharides, comprising (1→3)-β-d-xylans and cellulose, were obtained by treatment of the residue from the water extractions with an LiCl/DMSO solution at high temperature. These polymers were also localized in a bilayer arrangement.

  15. Composition of pectic polysaccharides in a Portuguese apple (Malus domestica Borkh. cv Bravo de Esmolfe)

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Malus domestica Borkh. cv Bravo de Esmolfe is a typical Portuguese apple cultivar classified as Protected Designation and Origin (PDO). It is a traditional product produced under strict conditions and labelled with a specific law protected designation. This cultivar presents quite good sweetness and flavor. The monosaccharide composition of the pectic polysaccharides from this traditional apple is herein reported for the first time. Based on the molar ratios obtained from the sugar compositio...

  16. LytR-CpsA-Psr enzymes as determinants of Bacillus anthracis secondary cell wall polysaccharide assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liszewski Zilla, Megan; Chan, Yvonne G Y; Lunderberg, Justin Mark; Schneewind, Olaf; Missiakas, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis, the causative agent of anthrax, replicates as chains of vegetative cells by regulating the separation of septal peptidoglycan. Surface (S)-layer proteins and associated proteins (BSLs) function as chain length determinants and bind to the secondary cell wall polysaccharide (SCWP). In this study, we identified the B. anthracis lcpD mutant, which displays increased chain length and S-layer assembly defects due to diminished SCWP attachment to peptidoglycan. In contrast, the B. anthracis lcpB3 variant displayed reduced cell size and chain length, which could be attributed to increased deposition of BSLs. In other bacteria, LytR-CpsA-Psr (LCP) proteins attach wall teichoic acid (WTA) and polysaccharide capsule to peptidoglycan. B. anthracis does not synthesize these polymers, yet its genome encodes six LCP homologues, which, when expressed in S. aureus, promote WTA attachment. We propose a model whereby B. anthracis LCPs promote attachment of SCWP precursors to discrete locations in the peptidoglycan, enabling BSL assembly and regulated separation of septal peptidoglycan.

  17. Extracellular polysaccharide composition of Azospirillum brasilense and its relation with cell aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdman, S; Jurkevitch, E; Soria-Díaz, M E; Serrano, A M; Okon, Y

    2000-08-15

    The exopolysaccharide (EPS) and capsular polysaccharide (CPS) composition of four Azospirillum brasilense strains differing in their aggregation capacity was analyzed by high performance anion exchange chromatography. When growing the different strains in an aggregation inducing medium containing a high carbon:nitrogen (C:N) ratio, both EPS and CPS showed a positive correlation between aggregation and the relative amount of arabinose. Arabinose was not detected in polysaccharides from Sp72002, a pleiotrophic Tn5 mutant strain impaired in aggregation. Arabinose was also not detected in extracellular polysaccharides of bacteria grown in a low C:N ratio, non-inducing aggregation medium, with exception for a relatively small amount found in the CPS of FAJ0204, a super-aggregating mutant strain. The only monosaccharides able to significantly inhibit aggregation at low sugar concentration when tested in a bioassay were arabinose (at a higher extent) and galactose. The possibility that residues of arabinose present in the extracellular polysaccharides are involved in the aggregation of A. brasilense is discussed.

  18. Multidimensional solid-state NMR studies of the structure and dynamics of pectic polysaccharides in uniformly 13C-labeled Arabidopsis primary cell walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dick-Perez, Marilu; Wang, Tuo; Salazar, Andre; Zabotina, Olga A.; Hong, Mei

    2012-07-08

    Plant cell wall (CW) polysaccharides are responsible for the mechanical strength and growth of plant cells; however, the high-resolution structure and dynamics of the CW polysaccharides are still poorly understood because of the insoluble nature of these molecules. Here, we use 2D and 3D magic-angle-spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR (SSNMR) to investigate the structural role of pectins in the plant CW. Intact and partially depectinated primary CWs of Arabidopsis thaliana were uniformly labeled with 13C and their NMR spectra were compared. Recent 13C resonance assignment of the major polysaccharides in Arabidopsis thaliana CWs allowed us to determine the effects of depectination on the intermolecular packing and dynamics of the remaining wall polysaccharides. 2D and 3D correlation spectra show the suppression of pectin signals, confirming partial pectin removal by chelating agents and sodium carbonate. Importantly, higher cross peaks are observed in 2D and 3D 13C spectra of the depectinated CW, suggesting higher rigidity and denser packing of the remaining wall polysaccharides compared with the intact CW. 13C spin–lattice relaxation times and 1H rotating-frame spin–lattice relaxation times indicate that the polysaccharides are more rigid on both the nanosecond and microsecond timescales in the depectinated CW. Taken together, these results indicate that pectic polysaccharides are highly dynamic and endow the polysaccharide network of the primary CW with mobility and flexibility, which may be important for pectin functions. This study demonstrates the capability of multidimensional SSNMR to determine the intermolecular interactions and dynamic structures of complex plant materials under near-native conditions. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Structural characteristics of polysaccharides from olive fruit cell walls in relation to ripening and processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vierhuis, E.

    2002-01-01

    Key words: Olive fruit; olive oil; pectic polysaccharides; xyloglucans; xylans; enzyme preparations; phenolic compounds; processing; ripening Technical enzyme preparations can be used as processing aids in the olive oil industry to obtain a higher yield and a better quality of the oil. These technic

  20. Effects of light curing method and resin composite composition on composite adaptation to the cavity wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikawa, Takako; Morigami, Makoto; Sadr, Alireza; Tagami, Junji

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effects of the light curing method and resin composite composition on marginal sealing and resin composite adaptation to the cavity wall. Cylindrical cavities were prepared on the buccal or lingual cervical regions. The teeth were restored using Clearfil Liner Bond 2V adhesive system and filled with Clearfil Photo Bright or Palfique Estelite resin composite. The resins were cured using the conventional or slow-start light curing method. After thermal cycling, the specimens were subjected to a dye penetration test. The slow-start curing method showed better resin composite adaptation to the cavity wall for both composites. Furthermore, the slow-start curing method resulted in significantly improved dentin marginal sealing compared with the conventional method for Clearfil Photo Bright. The light-cured resin composite, which exhibited increased contrast ratios duringpolymerization, seems to suggest high compensation for polymerization contraction stress when using the slow-start curing method.

  1. Composition, characteristics, and in-vitro physiological effects of the water-soluble polysaccharides from Cassia seed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ya-Ling; Chow, Chau-Jen; Tsai, Yung-Hsiang

    2012-10-15

    The popular beverage ingredients Cassia obtusifolia and Cassia tora were found to have considerable amounts of water-soluble polysaccharides (WSPs) (58.5 and 55.9/100g of dried extract). The composition, characteristics, and in-vitro physiological effects of these polysaccharides and their possible health benefits were investigated. The major polysaccharide components in the WSP of C. obtusifolia were possibly pectic polysaccharides and hemicellulose, while C. tora WSP was mainly composed of arabinoglucan and pectic polysaccharides. These WSPs had inhibitory effects on the activities of α-amylase and pancreatic lipase, while they rendered an increase in protease activity. These WSPs also had the ability to bind bile acids and reduce the amount of cholesterol available for absorption. This suggested that these WSPs had potential application as herbal ingredients in beverages. Further investigations on their in-vivo hypocholesterolaemic effects and intestinal functions using animal-feeding experiments are under way.

  2. [Composition of cell walls of 2 mutant strains of Streptomyces chrysomallus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaretskaia, M Sh; Nefelova, M V; Baratova, L A; Polin, A N

    1984-12-01

    The cell walls and peptidoglycans of two mutant strains, Streptomyces chrysomallus var. carotenoides and Streptomyces chrysomallus var. macrotetrolidi, were studied. The strains are organisms producing carotenes and antibiotics of the macrotetrolide group. By the qualitative composition of the peptidoglycans the mutants belong to Streptomyces and are similar. Their glycan portion consists of equimolar quantities of N-acetyl glucosamine and muramic acid. The peptide subunit is presented by glutamic acid, L, L-diaminopimelic acid, glycine and alanine. The molar ratio of alanine is 1.2-1.3. The mutant strains differ in the content of carbohydrates, total phosphorus and phosphorus belonging to teichoic acids. Teichoic acids of the cell walls of the both strains are of the ribitolhosphate nature. The cell walls of the mutants contain polysaccharides differing from teichoic acids and consisting of glucose, galactose, arabinose and fucose. The influence of the cell wall composition of the mutant strains on their morphology and metabolism and comparison of the data relative to the mutant strains with those relative to the starting strain are discussed.

  3. Titanium dioxide, single-walled carbon nanotube composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yuan; Li, Gonghu; Gray, Kimberly; Lueptow, Richard M.

    2015-07-14

    The present invention provides titanium dioxide/single-walled carbon nanotube composites (TiO.sub.2/SWCNTs), articles of manufacture, and methods of making and using such composites. In certain embodiments, the present invention provides membrane filters and ceramic articles that are coated with TiO.sub.2/SWCNT composite material. In other embodiments, the present invention provides methods of using TiO.sub.2/SWCNT composite material to purify a sample, such as a water or air sample.

  4. Chemical compositions and bioactivities of crude polysaccharides from tea leaves beyond their useful date.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Jianbo; Huo, Jianglei; Jiang, Huixian; Yang, Fan

    2011-12-01

    The chemical compositions and bioactivities of crude tea polysaccharides (TPS) from the out-of-date tea leaves (beyond their useful date), namely Xihu Longjing (XTPS), Anxi Tieguanyin (TTPS), Chawentianxia (CTPS) and Huizhoulvcha (HTPS), in market were investigated. These TPS showed similar neutral sugar content and different distribution of molecular weight (1-800 kD). These crude TPS were mainly composed of rhamnose, arabinose, galactose, glucose, xylose, mannose, and galacturonic acid. IR spectra confirmed that these crude TPS were composed of polysaccharide, protein and uronic acids. These TPS showed similar DPPH scavenging activity and exhibited lower DPPH scavenging activities than Vc within 25-200 μg/mL. However, these TPS with higher concentrations (200-400 μg/mL) showed similar DPPH scavenging activity with Vc. HTPS exhibited significant higher superoxide anion scavenging activity than others TPS and gallic acid. XTPS showed significant higher inhibitory effects on α-glucosidase and α-amylase with inhibitory percentages of 64.35% and 82.24% than others TPS. TTPS, XTPS, and HTPS exhibited similar inhibition ability on α-d-glucosidase and α-amylase. The overdue tea leaves can be a resource of tea polysaccharides as function food.

  5. A Composite Steel Plate Shear Walls for Offshore Constructions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Badri Albarody Thar M.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A new-type of weldable composite steel plate shear wall, which consists of a steel plate sandwiched by either of two or one composite panels at each side or at one side, has been proposed. An analytical model for such shear wall – via shell model is derived and the vibrational modes are discussed. Truss reinforcement is used to increase the integration between the steel and composite layers and the cross sectional properties were graded by magnetic nanoparticles fillers. The thickness shear modes at the composite wall appear higher than those of thickness stretch modes, but they are varied in a very orderly manner with respect to the vibrational mode. Also, some of characteristics are examined.

  6. Monosaccharide composition analysis of immunomodulatory polysaccharides by on-line hollow fiber microextraction with high-performance liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Nani; Wang, Xuping; Huang, Xiaowen; Mao, Zhujun; Zhang, Yang; Yu, Yong; Shou, Dan

    2016-03-01

    The monosaccharide compositions of functional polysaccharides are essential for structure elucidation and biological activity determination. A sensitive method based on on-line hollow-fiber liquid-phase microextraction with high-performance liquid chromatography has been established for the analysis of ten monosaccharide compositions (two uronic acids, two amino sugars and six neutral sugars) of the immunomodulatory polysaccharides. After derivatization, the sample was injected into the lumen of a hollow fiber immersed in butyl ether and separated by liquid chromatography. Under optimized conditions, the calibration curves were linear (r ≥ 0.9996) in the range of 10-2000 μmol L(-1) . The limits of detection were in the range of 0.04-1.58 μmol L(-1) , and the recoveries were in the range of 92.1-99.6%, which shows that the method is applicable to the analysis of the monosaccharide composition of various polysaccharides.

  7. Structural Investigation of Cell Wall Xylan Polysaccharides from the Leaves of Algerian Argania spinosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hachem, Kadda; Faugeron, Céline; Kaid-Harche, Meriem; Gloaguen, Vincent

    2016-11-21

    Xylan-type polysaccharides were isolated from the leaves of Argania spinosa (L.) Skeels collected in the Tindouf area (southwestern Algeria). Xylan fractions were obtained by sequential alkaline extractions and purified on Sepharose CL-4B. The xylan structure was investigated by enzymatic hydrolysis with an endo-β(1→4)-xylanase followed by chromatography of the resulting fragments on Biogel P2, characterization by sugar analysis and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS ). The results show that the A. spinosa xylan is composed of a β-(1→4)-d-xylopyranose backbone substituted with 4-O-methyl-d-glucuronic acid and L-arabinose residues.

  8. Structural Investigation of Cell Wall Xylan Polysaccharides from the Leaves of Algerian Argania spinosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kadda Hachem

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Xylan-type polysaccharides were isolated from the leaves of Argania spinosa (L. Skeels collected in the Tindouf area (southwestern Algeria. Xylan fractions were obtained by sequential alkaline extractions and purified on Sepharose CL-4B. The xylan structure was investigated by enzymatic hydrolysis with an endo-β(1→4-xylanase followed by chromatography of the resulting fragments on Biogel P2, characterization by sugar analysis and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS . The results show that the A. spinosa xylan is composed of a β-(1→4-d-xylopyranose backbone substituted with 4-O-methyl-d-glucuronic acid and L-arabinose residues.

  9. Localization and structural analysis of a conserved pyruvylated epitope in Bacillus anthracis secondary cell wall polysaccharides and characterization of the galactose-deficient wall polysaccharide from avirulent B. anthracis CDC 684.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsberg, L Scott; Abshire, Teresa G; Friedlander, Arthur; Quinn, Conrad P; Kannenberg, Elmar L; Carlson, Russell W

    2012-08-01

    Bacillus anthracis CDC 684 is a naturally occurring, avirulent variant and close relative of the highly pathogenic B. anthracis Vollum. Bacillus anthracis CDC 684 contains both virulence plasmids, pXO1 and pXO2, yet is non-pathogenic in animal models, prompting closer scrutiny of the molecular basis of attenuation. We structurally characterized the secondary cell wall polysaccharide (SCWP) of B. anthracis CDC 684 (Ba684) using chemical and NMR spectroscopy analysis. The SCWP consists of a HexNAc trisaccharide backbone having identical structure as that of B. anthracis Pasteur, Sterne and Ames, →4)-β-d-ManpNAc-(1 → 4)-β-d-GlcpNAc-(1 → 6)-α-d-GlcpNAc-(1→. Remarkably, although the backbone is fully polymerized, the SCWP is the devoid of all galactosyl side residues, a feature which normally comprises 50% of the glycosyl residues on the highly galactosylated SCWPs from pathogenic strains. This observation highlights the role of defective wall assembly in virulence and indicates that polymerization occurs independently of galactose side residue attachment. Of particular interest, the polymerized Ba684 backbone retains the substoichiometric pyruvate acetal, O-acetate and amino group modifications found on SCWPs from normal B. anthracis strains, and immunofluorescence analysis confirms that SCWP expression coincides with the ability to bind the surface layer homology (SLH) domain containing S-layer protein extractable antigen-1. Pyruvate was previously demonstrated as part of a conserved epitope, mediating SLH-domain protein attachment to the underlying peptidoglycan layer. We find that a single repeating unit, located at the distal (non-reducing) end of the Ba684 SCWP, is structurally modified and that this modification is present in identical manner in the SCWPs of normal B. anthracis strains. These polysaccharides terminate in the sequence: (S)-4,6-O-(1-carboxyethylidene)-β-d-ManpNAc-(1 → 4)-[3-O-acetyl]-β-d-GlcpNAc-(1 → 6)-α-d-GlcpNH(2)-(1→.

  10. Carbohydrate-active enzymes in pythium and their role in plant cell wall and storage polysaccharide degradation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo M Zerillo

    Full Text Available Carbohydrate-active enzymes (CAZymes are involved in the metabolism of glycoconjugates, oligosaccharides, and polysaccharides and, in the case of plant pathogens, in the degradation of the host cell wall and storage compounds. We performed an in silico analysis of CAZymes predicted from the genomes of seven Pythium species (Py. aphanidermatum, Py. arrhenomanes, Py. irregulare, Py. iwayamai, Py. ultimum var. ultimum, Py. ultimum var. sporangiiferum and Py. vexans using the "CAZymes Analysis Toolkit" and "Database for Automated Carbohydrate-active Enzyme Annotation" and compared them to previously published oomycete genomes. Growth of Pythium spp. was assessed in a minimal medium containing selected carbon sources that are usually present in plants. The in silico analyses, coupled with our in vitro growth assays, suggest that most of the predicted CAZymes are involved in the metabolism of the oomycete cell wall with starch and sucrose serving as the main carbohydrate sources for growth of these plant pathogens. The genomes of Pythium spp. also encode pectinases and cellulases that facilitate degradation of the plant cell wall and are important in hyphal penetration; however, the species examined in this study lack the requisite genes for the complete saccharification of these carbohydrates for use as a carbon source. Genes encoding for xylan, xyloglucan, (galacto(glucomannan and cutin degradation were absent or infrequent in Pythium spp.. Comparative analyses of predicted CAZymes in oomycetes indicated distinct evolutionary histories. Furthermore, CAZyme gene families among Pythium spp. were not uniformly distributed in the genomes, suggesting independent gene loss events, reflective of the polyphyletic relationships among some of the species.

  11. Optimization for ultrasound-assisted extraction of polysaccharides with chemical composition and antioxidant activity from the Artemisia sphaerocephala Krasch seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Quan; Ren, Daoyuan; Yang, Nana; Yang, Xingbin

    2016-10-01

    Artemisia sphaerocephala Krasch seeds polysaccharides have been reported to have a variety of important biological activities. However, effective extraction of Artemisia sphaerocephala Krasch seeds polysaccharides is still an unsolved issue. In this study, the orthogonal rotatable central composite design was employed to optimize ultrasound-assisted extraction conditions of Artemisia sphaerocephala Krasch seeds polysaccharides. Based on a single-factor analysis method, ultrasonic power, extraction time, solid-liquid ratio and extraction temperature were shown to significantly affect the yield of polysaccharides extracted from the A. sphaerocephala Krasch seeds. The optimal conditions for extraction of Artemisia sphaerocephala Krasch seeds polysaccharides were determined as following: ultrasonic power 243W, extraction time 125min, solid-liquid ratio 64:1 and extraction temperature 64°C, where the experimental yield was 14.78%, which was well matched with the predicted value of 14.81%. Furthermore, ASKP was identified as a typical heteropolysaccharide with d-galacturonic acid (38.8%) d-galactose (20.2%) and d-xylose (15.5%) being the main constitutive monosaccharides. Moreover, Artemisia sphaerocephala Krasch seeds polysaccharides exhibited high total reducing power and considerable scavenging activities on DPPH, hydroxyl and superoxide radicals, in a concentration-dependent manner in vitro.

  12. Structural investigation of cell wall polysaccharides of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus 17.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinogradov, E; Sadovskaya, I; Cornelissen, A; van Sinderen, D

    2015-09-01

    Lactobacilli are valuable strains for commercial (functional) food fermentations. Their cell surface-associated polysaccharides (sPSs) possess important functional properties, such as acting as receptors for bacteriophages (bacterial viruses), influencing autolytic characteristics and providing protection against antimicrobial peptides. The current report provides an elaborate molecular description of several surface carbohydrates of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus strain 17. The cell surface of this strain was shown to contain short chain poly(glycerophosphate) teichoic acids and at least two different sPSs, designated here as sPS1 and sPS2, whose chemical structures were examined by 2D nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and methylation analysis. Neutral branched sPS1, extracted with n-butanol, was shown to be composed of hexasaccharide repeating units (-[α-d-Glcp-(1-3)-]-4-β-l-Rhap2OAc-4-β-d-Glcp-[α-d-Galp-(1-3)]-4-α-Rhap-3-α-d-Galp-), while the major component of the TCA-extracted sPS2 was demonstrated to be a linear d-galactan with the repeating unit structure being (-[Gro-3P-(1-6)-]-3-β-Galf-3-α-Galp-2-β-Galf-6-β-Galf-3-β-Galp-).

  13. Linkage of phenolic acids to cell-wall polysaccharides of bamboo shoot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, T; Hiroi, T

    1990-10-10

    Hydrolysis of bamboo shoot cell walls with Driselase (a fungal enzyme preparation) gave xyloglucan and arabinoxylan oligosaccharides containing ferulic and p-coumaric acids, respectively. The structures of two oligosaccharides containing phenolic acids are here determined to be O-(4-O-trans-feruloyl-alpha-D-xylopyranosyl)-(1----6)-D-glucopy rano se and O-[5-O-(trans-p-coumaroyl(-alpha-L-arabinofuranosyl]-(1----3)-O-be ta-D-xylopyranosyl-(1----4)-D-xylopyranose, on the basis of n.m.r. spectroscopy, methylation analysis, and f.a.b.-m.s. The possible role of phenolic acid substituents in cell-wall architecture is discussed.

  14. Numerical Modelling of Double-Steel Plate Composite Shear Walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michaela Elmatzoglou

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Double-steel plate concrete composite shear walls are being used for nuclear plants and high-rise buildings. They consist of thick concrete walls, exterior steel faceplates serving as reinforcement and shear connectors, which guarantee the composite action between the two different materials. Several researchers have used the Finite Element Method to investigate the behaviour of double-steel plate concrete walls. The majority of them model every element explicitly leading to a rather time-consuming solution, which cannot be easily used for design purposes. In the present paper, the main objective is the introduction of a three-dimensional finite element model, which can efficiently predict the overall performance of a double-steel plate concrete wall in terms of accuracy and time saving. At first, empirical formulations and design relations established in current design codes for shear connectors are evaluated. Then, a simplified finite element model is used to investigate the nonlinear response of composite walls. The developed model is validated using results from tests reported in the literature in terms of axial compression and monotonic, cyclic in-plane shear loading. Several finite element modelling issues related to potential convergence problems, loading strategies and computer efficiency are also discussed. The accuracy and simplicity of the proposed model make it suitable for further numerical studies on the shear connection behaviour at the steel-concrete interface.

  15. Divergent selection for ester-linked diferulates in maize pith stalk tissues. Effects on cell wall composition and degradability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barros-Rios, Jaime; Malvar, Rosa A; Jung, Hans-Joachim G; Bunzel, Mirko; Santiago, Rogelio

    2012-11-01

    Cross-linking of grass cell wall components through diferulates (DFAs) has a marked impact on cell wall properties. However, results of genetic selection for DFA concentration have not been reported for any grass species. We report here the results of direct selection for ester-linked DFA concentration in maize stalk pith tissues and the associated changes in cell wall composition and biodegradability. After two cycles of divergent selection, maize populations selected for higher total DFA (DFAT) content (CHs) had 16% higher DFAT concentrations than populations selected for lower DFAT content (CLs). These significant DFA concentration gains suggest that DFA deposition in maize pith parenchyma cell walls is a highly heritable trait that is genetically regulated and can be modified trough conventional breeding. Maize populations selected for higher DFAT had 13% less glucose and 10% lower total cell wall concentration than CLs, suggesting that increased cross-linking of feruloylated arabinoxylans results in repacking of the matrix and possibly in thinner and firmer cell walls. Divergent selection affected esterified DFAT and monomeric ferulate ether cross link concentrations differently, supporting the hypothesis that the biosynthesis of these cell wall components are separately regulated. As expected, a more higher DFA ester cross-coupled arabinoxylan network had an effect on rumen cell wall degradability (CLs showed 12% higher 24-h total polysaccharide degradability than CHs). Interestingly, 8-8-coupled DFAs, previously associated with cell wall strength, were the best predictors of pith cell wall degradability (negative impact). Thus, further research on the involvement of these specific DFA regioisomers in limiting cell wall biodegradability is encouraged.

  16. Hydrophobin gene expression affects hyphal wall composition in Schizophyllum commune

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wetter, MA; Wosten, HAB; Sietsma, JH; Wessels, JGH

    2000-01-01

    Disruption of the SC3 hydrophobin gene of Schizophyllum commune (Delta SC3 strain) affected the composition of the cell wall. Compared to a wild-type strain the amount of mucilage (i.e., water-soluble (1-3)beta -glucan with single glucose residues attached by (I-G)P-linkages) increased considerably,

  17. The predominance of alternatively activated macrophages following challenge with cell wall peptide-polysaccharide after prior infection with Sporothrix schenckii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alegranci, Pamela; de Abreu Ribeiro, Livia Carolina; Ferreira, Lucas Souza; Negrini, Thais de Cássia; Maia, Danielle Cardoso Geraldo; Tansini, Aline; Gonçalves, Amanda Costa; Placeres, Marisa Campos Polesi; Carlos, Iracilda Zeppone

    2013-08-01

    Sporotrichosis is a subcutaneous mycosis that is caused by the dimorphic fungus Sporothrix schenckii. This disease generally occurs within the skin and subcutaneous tissues, causing lesions that can spread through adjacent lymphatic vessels and sometimes leading to systemic diseases in immunocompromised patients. Macrophages are crucial for proper immune responses against a variety of pathogens. Furthermore, macrophages can play different roles in response to different microorganisms and forms of activation, and they can be divided into "classic" or "alternatively" activated populations, as also known as M1 and M2 macrophages. M1 cells can lead to tissue injury and contribute to pathogenesis, whereas M2 cells promote angiogenesis, tissue remodeling, and repair. The aim of this study was to investigate the roles of M1 and M2 macrophages in a sporotrichosis model. Toward this end, we performed phenotyping of peritoneal exudate cells and evaluated the concomitant production of several immunomediators, including IL-12, IL-10, TGF-β, nitric oxide, and arginase-I activity, which were stimulated ex vivo with cell wall peptide-polysaccharide. Our results showed the predominance of the M2 macrophage population, indicated by peaks of arginase-I activity as well as IL-10 and TGF-β production during the 6th and 8th weeks after infection. These results were consistent with cellular phenotyping that revealed increases in CD206-positive cells over this period. This is the first report of the participation of M2 macrophages in sporotrichosis infections.

  18. Selective Acid Hydrolysis Condition for the Composition and Linkage with a Fructofuranosyl Backbone of a Polysaccharide from Angelica sinensis (Oliv) Diels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gui Yun XU; Yang CHEN; Ru Xian CHEN

    2006-01-01

    A new polysaccharide was extracted and purified from the roots of Angelica sinensis (Oliv) Diels (ASD). Its composition and linkage was elucidated by selective hydrolysis and GC/MS analysis of its derivatives. The polysaccharide was made of→1) Fruf(2→and→6) GlCp (1→as its backbone with highly branched structure. To our best knowledge, this is the first report of the fructose residue in polysaccharides from the roots of the ASD.

  19. Thick-walled carbon composite multifunctional structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haake, John M.; Jacobs, Jack H.; McIlroy, Bruce E.

    1997-06-01

    Satellite programs are moving in the direction of smaller and lighter structures. Technological advances have permitted more sophisticated equipment to be consolidated into compact spaces. Micro-satellites, between 10 and 100 kg, will incorporate micro-electric devices into the lay-up of the satellite structure. These structures will be designed to carry load, provide thermal control, enhance damping, and include integrated passive electronics. These multifunctional structures offer lighter weight, reduced volume, and a 'smarter' overall package for incorporation of sensors, electronics, fiber optics, powered appendages or active components. McDonnell Douglas Corporation (MDC) has applied technology from the synthesis and processing of intelligent cost effective structures (SPICES) and independent research and development (IRAD) programs to the modular instrument support system (MISS) for multifunctional space structures and micro-satellites. The SPICES program was funded by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) to develop affordable manufacturing processes for smart materials to be used in vibration control, and the MISS program was funded by NASA-Langley. The MISS program was conceived to develop concepts and techniques to make connections between different multifunctional structures. MDA fabricated a trapezoidal carbon composite structure out of IM7/977-3 tape prepreg. Flex circuits, thermal and optical conduits were embedded to realize a utility modular connector. These provide electrical, thermal, optical and mechanical connections between micro- satellite components. A quick disconnect mount was also developed to accommodate a variety of devices such as solar arrays, power sources, thermal transfer and vibration control modules.

  20. Synthetic, biological and composite scaffolds for abdominal wall reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meintjes, Jennifer; Yan, Sheng; Zhou, Lin; Zheng, Shusen; Zheng, Minghao

    2011-03-01

    The reconstruction of abdominal wall defects remains a huge surgical challenge. Tension-free repair is proven to be superior to suture repair in abdominal wall reconstruction. Scaffolds are essential for tension-free repair. They are used to bridge a defect or reinforce the abdominal wall. A huge variety of scaffolds are now commercially available. Most of the synthetic scaffolds are composed of polypropylene. They provide strong tissue reinforcement, but cause a foreign body reaction, which can result in serious complications. Absorbable synthetic scaffolds, such as Dexon™ (polyglycolic acid) and Vicryl™ (polyglactin 910), are not suitable for abdominal wall reconstruction as they usually require subsequent surgeries to repair recurrent hernias. Composite scaffolds combine the strength of nonabsorbable synthetic scaffolds with the antiadhesive properties of the absorbable scaffold, but require long-term follow-up. Biological scaffolds, such as Permacol™, Surgisis(®) and Alloderm(®), are derived from acellular mammalian tissues. Non-cross-linked biological scaffolds show excellent biocompatibility and degrade slowly over time. However, remnant DNA has been found in several products and the degradation leads to recurrence. Randomized controlled trials with long-term follow-up studies are lacking for all of the available scaffolds, particularly those derived from animal tissue. This article provides an overview of the different types of scaffolds available, and presents the key clinical studies of the commercially available synthetic, composite and biological scaffolds for abdominal wall reconstruction.

  1. The dynamics of plant cell-wall polysaccharide decomposition in leaf-cutting ant fungus gardens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moller, Isabel Eva; de Fine Licht, Henrik Hjarvard; Harholt, Jesper;

    2011-01-01

    communities of microbial and invertebrate symbionts have evolved associations with the dump material from leaf-cutting ant nests, to exploit decomposition niches that the ant garden-fungus does not utilize. Our approach thus provides detailed insight into the nutritional benefits and shortcomings associated......The degradation of live plant biomass in fungus gardens of leaf-cutting ants is poorly characterised but fundamental for understanding the mutual advantages and efficiency of this obligate nutritional symbiosis. Controversies about the extent to which the garden-symbiont Leucocoprinus gongylophorus......, to map the occurrence of cell wall polymers in consecutive sections of the fungus garden of the leaf-cutting ant Acromyrmex echinatior. We show that pectin, xyloglucan and some xylan epitopes are degraded, whereas more highly substituted xylan and cellulose epitopes remain as residuals in the waste...

  2. The dynamics of plant cell-wall polysaccharide decomposition in leaf-cutting ant fungus gardens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moller, Isabel Eva; de Fine Licht, Henrik Hjarvard; Harholt, Jesper;

    2011-01-01

    The degradation of live plant biomass in fungus gardens of leaf-cutting ants is poorly characterised but fundamental for understanding the mutual advantages and efficiency of this obligate nutritional symbiosis. Controversies about the extent to which the garden-symbiont Leucocoprinus gongylophorus......, to map the occurrence of cell wall polymers in consecutive sections of the fungus garden of the leaf-cutting ant Acromyrmex echinatior. We show that pectin, xyloglucan and some xylan epitopes are degraded, whereas more highly substituted xylan and cellulose epitopes remain as residuals in the waste...... material that the ants remove from their fungus garden. These results demonstrate that biomass entering leaf-cutting ant fungus gardens is only partially utilized and explain why disproportionally large amounts of plant material are needed to sustain colony growth. They also explain why substantial...

  3. A nano-hydroxyapatite--pullulan/dextran polysaccharide composite macroporous material for bone tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fricain, Jean Christophe; Schlaubitz, Silke; Le Visage, Catherine; Arnault, Isabelle; Derkaoui, Sidi Mohammed; Siadous, Robin; Catros, Sylvain; Lalande, Charlotte; Bareille, Reine; Renard, Martine; Fabre, Thierry; Cornet, Sandro; Durand, Marlène; Léonard, Alain; Sahraoui, Nouredine; Letourneur, Didier; Amédée, Joëlle

    2013-04-01

    Research in bone tissue engineering is focused on the development of alternatives to allogenic and autologous bone grafts that can stimulate bone healing. Here, we present scaffolds composed of the natural hydrophilic polysaccharides pullulan and dextran, supplemented or not with nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite particles (nHA). In vitro studies revealed that these matrices induced the formation of multicellular aggregates and expression of early and late bone specific markers with human bone marrow stromal cells in medium deprived of osteoinductive factors. In absence of any seeded cells, heterotopic implantation in mice and goat, revealed that only the composite macroporous scaffold (Matrix + nHA) (i) retained subcutaneously local growth factors, including Bone Morphogenetic Protein 2 (BMP2) and VEGF165, (ii) induced the deposition of a biological apatite layer, (iii) favored the formation of a dense mineralized tissue subcutaneously in mice, as well osteoid tissue after intramuscular implantation in goat. The composite scaffold was thereafter implanted in orthotopic preclinical models of critical size defects, in small and large animals, in three different bony sites, i.e. the femoral condyle of rat, a transversal mandibular defect and a tibial osteotomy in goat. The Matrix + nHA induced a highly mineralized tissue in the three models whatever the site of implantation, as well as osteoid tissue and bone tissue regeneration in direct contact to the matrix. We therefore propose this composite matrix as a material for stimulating bone cell differentiation of host mesenchymal stem cells and bone formation for orthopedic and maxillofacial surgical applications.

  4. Extraction optimization, isolation, preliminary structural characterization and antioxidant activities of the cell wall polysaccharides in the petioles and pedicels of Chinese herbal medicine Qian (Euryale ferox Salisb.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chengying; Wang, Xinsheng; Wang, Hong; Shen, Bei; He, Xiaoxiao; Gu, Wei; Wu, Qinan

    2014-03-01

    Cell wall polysaccharides in the petioles and pedicels of Qian (Euryale ferox Salisb.) (EFPP) were extracted using ultrasound-assisted technique. Response surface methodology (RSM) based on Box-Behnken design (BBD) was employed to optimize extraction parameters for the maximum purity of polysaccharides. The results showed that the optimum extraction conditions were extraction temperature of 80 °C, extraction time of 32 min, ultrasonic power of 270W and liquid-to-solid ratio of 40 mL/g. Under the optimal conditions, the experimental purity of polysaccharides was 62.57% ± 1.68%, which was very close to the predicted. The crude EFPP were isolated using DEAE-52 column and four major fractions (EFPP-1, EFPP-2, EFPP-3 and EFPP-4) were obtained. Typical functional groups of polysaccharides were characteristic for EFPP-1, EFPP-3 and EFPP-4 from FT-IR spectrum. Furthermore, the crude EFPP and three fractions (EFPP-1, EFPP-3 and EFPP-4) possessed appreciable in vitro antioxidant effects on α,α-diphenyl-β-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), 2,2'-azinobis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) (ABTS), hydroxyl radical scavenging and reducing powers. Then, the crude EFPP and EFPP-4 could effective against H2O2-induced injury on HUVEC and VSMC through enhancement of T-AOC, SOD and CAT activities and decrease of MDA content.

  5. Cell wall polysaccharides of near-isogenic lines of melon (Cucumis melo L.) and their inbred parentals which show differential flesh firmness or physiological behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos-Santos, Noelia; Jimenez-Araujo, Ana; Rodriguez-Arcos, Rocio; Fernandez-Trujillo, J Pablo

    2011-07-27

    We characterized differences in cell wall material and polysaccharide structures, due to the quantitative trait loci associated with higher flesh firmness in a nonclimacteric near-isogenic line (NIL) SC7-2, and with the climacteric behavior of the NIL SC3-5-1, using their nonclimacteric inbred parentals, "Piel de Sapo" (PS) and PI 161375 (SC). PS was firmer and had a higher ripening index and greater hemicellulosic content than SC, with its lower wall material yield, and uronic acid, neutral sugar, cellulose and free sugar content and higher pectic content. SC3-5-1 showed lower uronic acid values, a higher soluble solid content, and similar flesh firmness to PS. SC3-5-1 yielded mainly high molecular weight polysaccharides in the imidazole-soluble fraction than PS. SC7-2 showed greater flesh firmness, a higher neutral sugar (especially galactose and mannose) and uronic acid content, together with a larger cellulose and α-cellulose residue than PS. SC7-2 also contained more polysaccharides of low molecular weight in the first pectic fraction and shifted toward higher molecular weights in the main peak of the 4 M potassium-soluble fraction compared with PS.

  6. Single walled carbon nanotube composites for bone tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Ashim; Woods, Mia D; Illingworth, Kenneth David; Niemeier, Ryan; Schafer, Isaac; Cady, Craig; Filip, Peter; El-Amin, Saadiq F

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) and poly lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLAGA) composites for orthopedic applications and to evaluate the interaction of human stem cells (hBMSCs) and osteoblasts (MC3T3-E1 cells) via cell growth, proliferation, gene expression, extracellular matrix production and mineralization. PLAGA and SWCNT/PLAGA composites were fabricated with various amounts of SWCNT (5, 10, 20, 40, and 100 mg), characterized and degradation studies were performed. Cells were seeded and cell adhesion/morphology, growth/survival, proliferation and gene expression analysis were performed to evaluate biocompatibility. Imaging studies demonstrated uniform incorporation of SWCNT into the PLAGA matrix and addition of SWCNT did not affect the degradation rate. Imaging studies revealed that MC3T3-E1 and hBMSCs cells exhibited normal, non-stressed morphology on the composites and all were biocompatible. Composites with 10 mg SWCNT resulted in highest rate of cell proliferation (p composites. Gene expression of alkaline phosphatase, collagen I, osteocalcin, osteopontin, Runx-2, and Bone Sialoprotein was observed on all composites. In conclusion, SWCNT/PLAGA composites imparted beneficial cellular growth capabilities and gene expression, and mineralization abilities were well established. These results demonstrate the potential of SWCNT/PLAGA composites for musculoskeletal regeneration and bone tissue engineering (BTE) and are promising for orthopedic applications.

  7. Structural and biochemical changes induced by pulsed electric field treatments on Cabernet Sauvignon grape berry skins: impact on cell wall total tannins and polysaccharides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cholet, Céline; Delsart, Cristèle; Petrel, Mélina; Gontier, Etienne; Grimi, Nabil; L'hyvernay, Annie; Ghidossi, Remy; Vorobiev, Eugène; Mietton-Peuchot, Martine; Gény, Laurence

    2014-04-02

    Pulsed electric field (PEF) treatment is an emerging technology that is arousing increasing interest in vinification processes for its ability to enhance polyphenol extraction performance. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of PEF treatment on grape skin histocytological structures and on the organization of skin cell wall polysaccharides and tannins, which, until now, have been little investigated. This study relates to the effects of two PEF treatments on harvested Cabernet Sauvignon berries: PEF1 (medium strength (4 kV/cm); short duration (1 ms)) and PEF2 (low intensity (0.7 kV/cm); longer duration (200 ms)). Histocytological observations and the study of levels of polysaccharidic fractions and total amounts of tannins allowed differentiation between the two treatments. Whereas PEF1 had little effect on the polyphenol structure and pectic fraction, PEF2 profoundly modified the organization of skin cell walls. Depending on the PEF parameters, cell wall structure was differently affected, providing variable performance in terms of polyphenol extraction and wine quality.

  8. Self-repairing composite walls for pressurized space habitats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dry, Carolyn

    2016-04-01

    A most important factor for human occupied habitats in space is to ensure that the pressurized habitat does not lose pressure catastrophically by the penetration of space debris or micrometeorites through the wall and into the pressurized space. Regenerative self repairing composites used for the space station habitat to prevent loss of pressure was demonstrated in tests The wall sample had ambient pressurized on one side with vacuum on the other, then was punctured all the way through; the pressure reading went from -26 inches of mercury to -26 inches and stayed there indefinitely. There was no loss of pressure! This will be a game changer for space habitat design. This represents a proposed test bed experimental effort on the International Space Station for self repairing regenerative walls of pressurized habitats, supported by significant puncture over vacuum and puncture testing performed to date, which will provide NASA with an innovative new light weight multi-hit superior Astronaut Protective Wall solution for pressurized space habitats.

  9. The effect of charge on the release kinetics from polysaccharide-nanoclay composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Buffa, Stefano; Grifoni, Emanuele; Ridi, Francesca; Baglioni, Piero

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this study was to integrate inorganic halloysite nanotubes (HNT) with chitosan and hyaluronic acid to obtain hybrid nanocomposites with opposing charges and to investigate their potential in the controlled release of drug model probes. Two oppositely charged polysaccharides, chitosan and hyaluronic acid, were selected for their biocompatibility and their importance in biomedical applications. The high surface area and the hollow nanometric-sized lumen of HNT allowed for the efficient loading of rhodamine 110 and carboxyfluorescein, used as models for oppositely charged drugs. In the case of chitosan, the preparation of the nanocomposite was carried out exploiting the electrostatic interaction between the polymer and HNT in water, while with hyaluronic acid, a covalent functionalization strategy was employed to couple the polymer with the clay. Nanocomposites were characterized with thermal, microscopic, and spectroscopic techniques, and the release kinetics of the model compounds was assessed by fluorescence measurements. The release curves were fitted with a model able to account for the desorption process from the external and the internal halloysite surfaces. The results show that both polymeric coatings alter the release of the probes, indicating a key role of both charge and coating composition on the initial and final amount of released dye, as well as on the rate of the desorption process.

  10. Effect of shear connectors on local buckling and composite action in steel concrete composite walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Kai, E-mail: kai-zh@purdue.edu [School of Civil Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN (United States); Varma, Amit H., E-mail: ahvarma@purdue.edu [School of Civil Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN (United States); Malushte, Sanjeev R., E-mail: smalusht@bechtel.com [Bechtel Power Corporation, Frederick, MD (United States); Gallocher, Stewart, E-mail: stewart.gallocher@steelbricks.com [Modular Walling Systems Ltd., Glasgow (United Kingdom)

    2014-04-01

    Steel concrete composite (SC) walls are being used for the third generation nuclear power plants, and also being considered for small modular reactors. SC walls consist of thick concrete walls with exterior steel faceplates serving as reinforcement. These steel faceplates are anchored to the concrete infill using shear connectors, for example, headed steel studs. The steel faceplate thickness (t{sub p}) and yield stress (F{sub y}), and the shear connector spacing (s), stiffness (k{sub s}), and strength (Q{sub n}) determine: (a) the level of composite action between the steel plates and the concrete infill, (b) the development length of steel faceplates, and (c) the local buckling of the steel faceplates. Thus, the shear connectors have a significant influence on the behavior of composite SC walls, and should be designed accordingly. This paper presents the effects of shear connector design on the level of composite action and development length of steel faceplates in SC walls. The maximum steel plate slenderness, i.e., ratio of shear connector spacing-to-plate thickness (s/t{sub p}) ratio to prevent local buckling before yielding is also developed based on the existing experimental database and additional numerical analysis.

  11. Comparing the sugar profiles and primary structures of alkali-extracted water-soluble polysaccharides in cell wall between the yeast and mycelial phases from Tremella fuciformis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hanyu; Yuan, Yuan; Liu, Juan; Zheng, Liesheng; Chen, Liguo; Ma, Aimin

    2016-05-01

    To gain insights into dimorphism, cell wall polysaccharides from Tremella fuciformis strains were obtained from alkali-extracted water-soluble fractions PTF-M38 (from the mycelial form), PTF-Y3 and PTF-Y8 (from the yeast form) of T. fuciformis strains were used to gain some insights into dimorphism study. Their chemical properties and structural features were investigated using gel permeation chromatography, gas chromatography, UV and IR spectrophotometry and Congo red binding reactions. The results indicated that the backbones of PTF-M38, PTF-Y3 and PTF-Y8 were configured with α-linkages with average molecular weights of 1.24, 1.08, and 1.19 kDa, respectively. PTF-M38 was mainly composed of xylose, mannose, glucose, and galactose in a ratio of 1:1.47:0.48:0.34, while PTF-Y3 and PTF-Y8 were mainly composed of xylose, mannose and glucose in a ratio of 1:1.65:4.06 and 1:1.21:0.44, respectively. The sugar profiles of PTF-M38, PTF-Y3 and PTF-Y8 were also established for further comparison. These profiles showed that all three polysaccharides contained the same sugars but in different ratios, and the carbon sources (xylose, mannose, glucose, and galactose) affected the sugar ratios within the polysaccharides.

  12. Identification of Quantitative Trait Loci Affecting Hemicellulose Characteristics Based on Cell Wall Composition in a Wild and Cultivated Rice Species

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Si-Ju Zhang; Xue-Qin Song; Bai-Sheng Yu; Bao-Cai Zhang; Chuan-Qing Sun; J. Paul Knox; Yi-Hua Zhou

    2012-01-01

    Cell wall hemicellulosic polysaccharides are structurally complex and diverse.Knowledge about the synthesisof cell wall hemicelluloses and their biological roles is limited.Quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping is a helpful tool for the dissection of complex phenotypes for gene identification.In this study,we exploited the natural variation in cell wall monosaccharide levels between a common wild rice,Yuanj,and an elite indica cultivar,Teqing,and performed QTL mapping with their introgression lines (ILs).Chemical analyses conducted on the culms of Yuanj and Teqing showed that the major alterations are found in glucose and xylose levels,which are correlated with specific hemicellulosic polymers.Glycosidic linkage examination revealed that,in Yuanj,an increase in glucose content results from a higher level of mixed linkage β-glucan (MLG),whereas a reduction in xylose content reflects a low level of xylan backbone and a varied arabinoxylan (AX) structure.Seventeen QTLs for monosaccharides have been identified through composition analysis of the culm residues of 95 core ILs.Four major QTLs affecting xylose and glucose levels are responsible for 19 and 21% of the phenotypic variance,respectively.This study provides a unique resource for the genetic dissection of rice cell wall formation and remodeling in the vegetative organs.

  13. Determining the Subcellular Location of Synthesis and Assembly of the Cell Wall Polysaccharide (1,3; 1,4)-β-d-Glucan in Grasses[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Sarah M.; Ho, Yin Ying; Lampugnani, Edwin R.; Van de Meene, Allison M.L.; Bain, Melissa P.; Bacic, Antony; Doblin, Monika S.

    2015-01-01

    The current dogma for cell wall polysaccharide biosynthesis is that cellulose (and callose) is synthesized at the plasma membrane (PM), whereas matrix phase polysaccharides are assembled in the Golgi apparatus. We provide evidence that (1,3;1,4)-β-d-glucan (mixed-linkage glucan [MLG]) does not conform to this paradigm. We show in various grass (Poaceae) species that MLG-specific antibody labeling is present in the wall but absent over Golgi, suggesting it is assembled at the PM. Antibodies to the MLG synthases, cellulose synthase-like F6 (CSLF6) and CSLH1, located CSLF6 to the endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi, secretory vesicles, and the PM and CSLH1 to the same locations apart from the PM. This pattern was recreated upon expression of VENUS-tagged barley (Hordeum vulgare) CSLF6 and CSLH1 in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves and, consistent with our biochemical analyses of native grass tissues, shown to be catalytically active with CSLF6 and CSLH1 in PM-enriched and PM-depleted membrane fractions, respectively. These data support a PM location for the synthesis of MLG by CSLF6, the predominant enzymatically active isoform. A model is proposed to guide future experimental approaches to dissect the molecular mechanism(s) of MLG assembly. PMID:25770111

  14. A comparative assessment of the potential of polysaccharide production and intracellular sugar composition within Lingzhi or Reishi medicinal mushroom, Ganoderma lucidum (W.Curt.:Fr.)P. Karst. (Aphyllophoromycetideae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stajić, Mirjana; Glamoclija, Jasmina; Maksimović, Vuk; Vukojević, Jelena; Simonić, Jasmina; Zervakis, George

    2011-01-01

    Ganoderma lucidum is a well-known medicinal mushroom species in which polysaccharides are one of the major sources of biological activity. The species was considered as a species-complex due to significant variations in morphological, biochemical, and genetic features among populations with a worldwide distribution. This fact was the basis for setting the aim of this research: to study intraspecific diversity in polysaccharide production and intracellular sugar composition among selected G. lucidum strains. The presence ofintraspecific diversity among 10 G. lucidum strains, from different areas worldwide, was noted. Values of produced mycelia biomass and intracellular polysaccharides were found in wide ranges (3.1 - 28.2 g L(-1) and 20.0 - 53.3 mg g(-1), respectively), while differences in extracellular polysaccharide amounts were minor (0.2 - 1.5 mg mL(-1)). The significant quantitative and qualitative differences in intracellular sugar composition were noted. Glucose was the predominant sugar in almost all strains except one (HAI 447), where sucrose was dominant. The potential of polysaccharide production and intracellular sugar composition could be one more taxonomic criterion for strain characterization within G. lucidum. The differences in intracellular sugar composition and proportions could be reflected in features of produced polysaccharides and also in their biological activities.

  15. Change in wall composition of transfer and aleurone cells during wheat grain development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, P; Jamme, F; Barron, C; Bouchet, B; Saulnier, L; Dumas, P; Guillon, F

    2011-02-01

    In addition to the starchy endosperm, a specialized tissue accumulating storage material, the endosperm of wheat grain, comprises the aleurone layer and the transfer cells next to the crease. The transfer cells, located at the ventral region of the grain, are involved in nutrient transfer from the maternal tissues to the developing endosperm. Immunolabeling techniques, Raman spectroscopy, and synchrotron infrared micro-spectroscopy were used to study the chemistry of the transfer cell walls during wheat grain development. The kinetic depositions of the main cell wall polysaccharides of wheat grain endosperm, arabinoxylan, and (1-3)(1-4)-β-glucan in transfer cell walls were different from kinetics previously observed in the aleurone cell walls. While (1-3)(1-4)-β-glucan appeared first in the aleurone cell walls at 90°D, arabinoxylan predominated in the transfer cell walls from 90 to 445°D. Both aleurone and transfer cell walls were enriched in (1-3)(1-4)-β-glucan at the mature stage of wheat grain development. Arabinoxylan was more substituted in the transfer cell walls than in the aleurone walls. However, arabinoxylan was more feruloylated in the aleurone than in the transfer cell walls, whatever the stage of grain development. In the transfer cells, the ferulic acid was less abundant in the outer periclinal walls while para-coumarate was absent. Possible implications of such differences are discussed.

  16. Blast testing and analysis of composite steel stud wall panels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wesevich, J.W.; Lowak, M.J.; Hu, W.; Bingham, B.L. [Baker Engineering and Risk Consultants Inc., San Antonio, TX (United States); Hallisy, J. [Fiberwrap Composite Technologies, Calverton, NY (United States); Calcetas, P. [Lafarge North America, Concord, ON (Canada)

    2007-07-01

    This paper described a novel modular blast resistant composite steel stud wall panel system. The system was manufactured by casting steel studs with thin, high-strength concrete. Ten composite panel design specimens were evaluated and tested at a shock tube test facility. Specimens included both 12 and 16 gauge 6 inch cold-formed double or single studs spaced at either 12 or 16 inches on center. Samples also included both steam and ambient cured concretes with steel or organic fibers ranging in thickness between 1 and 2 inches. A welded wire mesh within the concrete layer was used to provide composite action. Results of the blast tests showed that the composite panels achieved minimal damage levels under applied blast loads, which ranged from between 15.9 psi to 205 psi. Peak dynamic reflections ranged from between 2.75 increase to 12 inches. It was concluded that finite element models and single-degree-of-freedom (SDOF) analyses showed good agreement with the experimental studies.

  17. Synthesis and characterization of polysaccharide-maghemite composite nanoparticles and their antibacterial properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iconaru, Simona Liliana; Prodan, Alina Mihaela; Motelica-Heino, Mikael; Sizaret, Stanislas; Predoi, Daniela

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this study was to obtain saccharide (dextran and sucrose)-coated maghemite nanoparticles with antibacterial activity. The polysaccharide-coated maghemite nanoparticles were synthesized by an adapted coprecipitation method. X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies demonstrate that the obtained polysaccharide-coated maghemite nanoparticles can be indexed into the spinel cubic lattice with a lattice parameter of 8.35 Å. The refinement of XRD spectra indicated that no other phases except the maghemite are detectable. The characterization of the polysaccharide-coated maghemite nanoparticles by various techniques is described. The antibacterial activity of these polysaccharide-coated maghemite nanoparticles (NPs) was tested against Pseudomonas aeruginosa 1397, Enterococcus faecalis ATCC 29212, Candida krusei 963, and Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 and was found to be dependent on the polysaccharide type. The antibacterial activity of dextran-coated maghemite was significantly higher than that of sucrose-coated maghemite. The antibacterial studies showed the potential of dextran-coated iron oxide NPs to be used in a wide range of medical infections.

  18. Chemical composition and antioxidant activity of an acidic polysaccharide extracted from Cucurbita moschata Duchesne ex Poiret.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xingbin; Zhao, Yan; Lv, You

    2007-06-13

    A simple and sensitive high-performance capillary electrophoresis (HPCE) method was designed for quantitative analysis of the component monosaccharides of an acidic polysaccharide extracted from pumpkin. In this method, the polysaccharide was hydrolyzed into component monosaccharides with 2.0 M trifluoroacetic acid at 100 degrees C for 6 h and then labeled with 1-phenyl-3-methyl-5-pyrazolone, and subsequently the labeled monosaccharide derivatives were separated by HPCE. As a result, glucose (21.7%) and glucuronic acid (18.9%) were identified to be the main component monosaccharides, followed by galactose (11.5%), arabinose (9.8%), xylose (4.4%), and rhamnose (2.8%). Furthermore, the pumpkin polysaccharide was also demonstrated to effectively inhibit the H2O2-caused decrease of cell viability, lactate dehydrogenase leakage, and malondialdehyde formation, and also reduced the H2O2-caused decline of superoxide dismutase activity and glutathione depletion in cultured mouse peritoneal macrophages, indicating that pumpkin polysaccharide possessed significant cytoprotective effect and antioxidative activity.

  19. Bacillus anthracis acetyltransferases PatA1 and PatA2 modify the secondary cell wall polysaccharide and affect the assembly of S-layer proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunderberg, J Mark; Nguyen-Mau, Sao-Mai; Richter, G Stefan; Wang, Ya-Ting; Dworkin, Jonathan; Missiakas, Dominique M; Schneewind, Olaf

    2013-03-01

    The envelope of Bacillus anthracis encompasses a proteinaceous S-layer with two S-layer proteins (Sap and EA1). Protein assembly in the envelope of B. anthracis requires S-layer homology domains (SLH) within S-layer proteins and S-layer-associated proteins (BSLs), which associate with the secondary cell wall polysaccharide (SCWP), an acetylated carbohydrate that is tethered to peptidoglycan. Here, we investigated the contributions of two putative acetyltransferases, PatA1 and PatA2, on SCWP acetylation and S-layer assembly. We show that mutations in patA1 and patA2 affect the chain lengths of B. anthracis vegetative forms and perturb the deposition of the BslO murein hydrolase at cell division septa. The patA1 and patA2 mutants are defective for the assembly of EA1 in the envelope but retain the ability of S-layer formation with Sap. SCWP isolated from the patA1 patA2 mutant lacked acetyl moieties identified in wild-type polysaccharide and failed to associate with the SLH domains of EA1. A model is discussed whereby patA1- and patA2-mediated acetylation of SCWP enables the deposition of EA1 as well as BslO near the septal region of the B. anthracis envelope.

  20. Cell-fractionation analysis of glucan synthase I and II distribution and polysaccharide secretion in soybean protoplasts : Evidence for the involvement of coated vesicles in wall biogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffing, L R; Mersey, B G; Fowke, L C

    1986-02-01

    The organelles of soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) protoplasts were separated using a recently developed procedure which allows rapid (3-h) recovery of a fraction enriched for coated vesicles (CVs). As determined by marker-enzyme enrichment and ultrastructural analysis of isolated membrane fractions, endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi membranes, glucan-synthase-II (EC 2.4.1.34)-containing membranes (putative plasma membrane), mitochondria, and CVs were enriched in separate fractions in a sucrose density gradient. Glucan synthase I (EC 2.4.1.12) had the highest specific activity in the Golgi-enriched and CV-enriched fractions and was found to comigrate with CVs upon rate-zonal centrifugation of a CV-enriched fraction. For further elucidation of the role of these latter organelles in cell-wall regeneration, freshly isolated protoplasts were pulsed with [(3)H]glucose for 20 min, and the disappearance of label from the organelles was followed for the ensuing 1 h. Although a CV-enriched fraction contained glucan synthase I, it contained very small amounts of labelled polysaccharide during the period of study. Pulse-chase experiments with [(3)H]glucose helped to confirm the role of the Golgi apparatus in secretion of matrix polysaccharides by protoplasts.

  1. Spatial organization of cellulose microfibrils and matrix polysaccharides in primary plant cell walls as imaged by multichannel atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tian; Zheng, Yunzhen; Cosgrove, Daniel J

    2016-01-01

    We used atomic force microscopy (AFM), complemented with electron microscopy, to characterize the nanoscale and mesoscale structure of the outer (periclinal) cell wall of onion scale epidermis - a model system for relating wall structure to cell wall mechanics. The epidermal wall contains ~100 lamellae, each ~40 nm thick, containing 3.5-nm wide cellulose microfibrils oriented in a common direction within a lamella but varying by ~30 to 90° between adjacent lamellae. The wall thus has a crossed polylamellate, not helicoidal, wall structure. Montages of high-resolution AFM images of the newly deposited wall surface showed that single microfibrils merge into and out of short regions of microfibril bundles, thereby forming a reticulated network. Microfibril direction within a lamella did not change gradually or abruptly across the whole face of the cell, indicating continuity of the lamella across the outer wall. A layer of pectin at the wall surface obscured the underlying cellulose microfibrils when imaged by FESEM, but not by AFM. The AFM thus preferentially detects cellulose microfibrils by probing through the soft matrix in these hydrated walls. AFM-based nanomechanical maps revealed significant heterogeneity in cell wall stiffness and adhesiveness at the nm scale. By color coding and merging these maps, the spatial distribution of soft and rigid matrix polymers could be visualized in the context of the stiffer microfibrils. Without chemical extraction and dehydration, our results provide multiscale structural details of the primary cell wall in its near-native state, with implications for microfibrils motions in different lamellae during uniaxial and biaxial extensions. © 2015 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Characterization of the glucansucrase GTF180 W1065 mutant enzymes producing polysaccharides and oligosaccharides with altered linkage composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Xiangfeng; Pijning, Tjaard; Tietema, Martin; Dobruchowska, Justyna M; Yin, Huifang; Gerwig, Gerrit J; Kralj, Slavko; Dijkhuizen, Lubbert

    2017-02-15

    Exopolysaccharides produced by lactic acid bacteria are extensively used for food applications. Glucansucrase enzymes of lactic acid bacteria use sucrose to catalyze the synthesis of α-glucans with different linkage compositions, size and physico-chemical properties. Crystallographic studies of GTF180-ΔN show that at the acceptor binding sites +1 and +2, residue W1065 provides stacking interactions to the glucosyl moiety. However, the detailed functional roles of W1065 have not been elucidated. We performed random mutagenesis targeting residue W1065 of GTF180-ΔN, resulting in the generation of 10 mutant enzymes that were characterized regarding activity and product specificity. Characterization of mutant enzymes showed that residue W1065 is critical for the activity of GTF180-ΔN. Using sucrose, and sucrose (donor) plus maltose (acceptor) as substrates, the mutant enzymes synthesized polysaccharides and oligosaccharides with changed linkage composition. The stacking interaction of an aromatic residue at position 1065 is essential for polysaccharide synthesis.

  3. Compositional profile and variation of Distillers Dried Grains with Solubles from various origins with focus on non-starch polysaccharides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Mads Brøgger; Dalsgaard, S.; Knudsen, Knud Erik Bach

    2014-01-01

    Spectroscopy for common constituents, while 63 DDGS samples along with 11 corn samples were characterized for their non-starch polysaccharide (NSP) content. The results indicated that the compositional profile of DDGS reflected the nutrient content of the parent grain but with a greater content of remaining...... of the DDGS, principal component analysis allowed for a visual differentiation of corn DDGS from five different ethanol plants, indicating the potential of each ethanol plant to produce DDGS with consistent compositional characteristics. Furthermore, investigation of corn and corresponding DDGS indicated...... that the NSP fraction is modified during the fermentation process, especially arabinoxylan, by an increase in soluble arabinoxylan proportion in DDGS. In addition, the arabinose/xylose (Pindicating...

  4. Effect of different drying methods on chemical composition and bioactivity of finger citron polysaccharides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhen

    2015-05-01

    Traditionally, people like to take dried finger citron fruits (FC) as adjuvant herbal medicines to treat a diversity of chronic diseases like asthma, hypertension and respiratory tract infections. Many healing properties are attributed to FC polysaccharides (FCPs), one of the main active ingredients of FC. Three drying methods, freeze drying (FDM), hot air drying (HDM) and vacuum drying methods (VDM) were comparatively studied on the physicochemical and antioxidant properties of FCPs. The results showed these FCPs were similar in UV and FT-IR spectrum. However, they showed significant differences (pFDM resulted in the properties of FCPs with lower molecular weight distribution, higher reducing power and scavenging abilities on DPPH, OH, and O2(-). Available data obtained in vitro models suggested that FDM was an appropriate and effective treatment for obtaining crude polysaccharides from FC fruits. Hence, drying methods used for preparation of FCPs can affect physicochemical and associated functional properties. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Changes in red wine soluble polysaccharide composition induced by malolactic fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dols-Lafargue, Marguerite; Gindreau, Emmanuel; Le Marrec, Claire; Chambat, Gérard; Heyraud, Alain; Lonvaud-Funel, Aline

    2007-11-14

    The polysaccharide content of wine is generally assumed to originate from grapes and yeasts, independent of bacterial metabolism, except for the action of certain spoilage species. This study shows that malolactic fermentation (MLF) significantly modifies the soluble polysaccharide (SP) concentration of various red Bordeaux wines. Wines with the highest initial SP concentration go on to present decreased SP concentration, whereas those with the lowest initial SP concentration rather go on to have a higher SP concentration after MLF. These tendencies were observed whatever the Oenococcus oeni strain (indigenous or starter) used for MLF. Neutral and charged SPs were affected, but to a degree that depended on the microorganisms driving the MLF. The SP modifications were directly linked to bacterial development, because non MLF controls did not present any significant change of SP concentration.

  6. Investigation of transient heat transfer in composite walls using carbon/epoxy composites as an example

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terpiłowski Janusz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the application of similarity theory to investigations of transient heat transfer in materials with complex structure. It describes the theoretical-experimental method for identification and design of the structure of two-component composite walls based on the research of the thermal diffusivity for the composite and its matrix separately. The thermal diffusivity was measured by means of the modified flash method. The method was tested on two samples of double-layer ‘epoxy resin – polyamide’. All the investigated samples had the same diameter of 12 mm and thickness ranging from 1.39–2.60 mm and their equivalent value of thermal diffusivity ranging from (1.21–1.98×10−7 m2/s. Testing the method and research on carbon/epoxy composites was carried out at temperatures close to room temperature.

  7. Phenolic components of the primary cell wall. Feruloylated disaccharides of D-galactose and L-arabinose from spinach polysaccharide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, S C

    1982-05-01

    1. Cell walls from rapidly growing cell suspension cultures of Spinacia oleracea L. contained ferulic acid and p-coumaric acid esterified with a water-insoluble polymer. 2. Prolonged treatment with trypsin did not release may feruloyl esters from dearabinofuranosylated cell walls, and the polymer was also insoluble in phenol/acetic acid/water (2:1:1, w/v/v). 3. Treatment of the cell walls with the fungal hydrolase preparation "Driselase' did liberate low-Mr feruloyl esters. The major esters were 4-O-(6-O-feruloyl-beta-D-galactopyranosyl)-D-galactose and 3?-O-feruloyl-alpha-L-arabinopyranosyl)-L-arabinose. These two esters accounted for about 60% of the cell-wall ferulate. 4. It is concluded that the feruloylation of cell-wall polymers is not a random process, but occurs at very specific sites, probably on the arabinogalactan component of pectin. 5. The possible role of such phenolic substituents in cell-wall architecture and growth is discussed.

  8. Experiment and calculation on seismic behavior of RC composite core walls with concealed steel truss

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wanlin CAO; Weihua CHANG; Changjun ZHAO; Jianwei ZHANG

    2009-01-01

    To improve the seismic performance of reinforced concrete core walls, reinforced concrete com-posite core walls with concealed steel truss were proposed and systemically investigated. Two 1/6 scale core wall specimens, including a normal reinforced concrete core wall and a reinforced concrete composite core wall with concealed steel truss, were designed. The experimental study on seismic performance under cyclic loading was carried out. The load-carrying capacity, stiffness, ductility,hysteretic behavior and energy dissipation of the core walls were discussed. The test results showed that the seismic performance of core walls is improved greatly by the concealed steel truss. The calculated results were found to agree well with the actual measured ones.

  9. The Structure of Plant Cell Walls: I. The Macromolecular Components of the Walls of Suspension-cultured Sycamore Cells with a Detailed Analysis of the Pectic Polysaccharides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talmadge, K W; Keegstra, K; Bauer, W D; Albersheim, P

    1973-01-01

    This is the first in a series of papers dealing with the structure of cell walls isolated from suspension-cultured sycamore cells (Acer pseudoplatanus). These studies have been made possible by the availability of purified hydrolytic enzymes and by recent improvements in the techniques of methylation analysis. These techniques have permitted us to identify and quantitate the macromolecular components of sycamore cell walls. These walls are composed of 10% arabinan, 2% 3,6-linked arabinogalactan, 23% cellulose, 9% oligo-arabinosides (attached to hydroxyproline), 8% 4-linked galactan, 10% hydroxyproline-rich protein, 16% rhamnogalacturonan, and 21% xyloglucan.The structures of the pectic polymers (the neutral arabinan, the neutral galactan, and the acidic rhamnogalacturonan) were obtained, in part, by methylation analysis of fragments of these polymers which were released from the sycamore walls by the action of a highly purified endopolygalacturonase. The data suggest a branched arabinan and a linear 4-linked galactan occurring as side chains on the rhamnogalacturonan. Small amounts or pieces of a xyloglucan, the wall hemicellulose, appear to be covalently linked to some of the galactan chains. Thus, the galactan appears to serve as a bridge between the xyloglucan and rhamnogalacturonan components of the wall.The rhamnogalacturonan consists of an alpha-(1 --> 4)-linked galacturonan chain which is interspersed with 2-linked rhamnosyl residues. The rhamnosyl residues are not randomly distributed in the chain but probably occur in units of rhamnosyl- (1 --> 4)-galacturonosyl- (1 --> 2)-rhamnosyl. This sequence appears to alternate with a homogalacturonan sequence containing approximately 8 residues of 4-linked galacturonic acid. About half of the rhamnosyl residues are branched, having a substituent attached to carbon 4. This is likely to be the site of attachment of the 4-linked galactan.The hydroxyprolyl oligo-arabinosides of the hydroxyproline-rich glycoprotein

  10. Seismic Performance of Composite Shear Walls Constructed Using Recycled Aggregate Concrete and Different Expandable Polystyrene Configurations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wenchao; Cao, Wanlin; Zhang, Jianwei; Qiao, Qiyun; Ma, Heng

    2016-01-01

    The seismic performance of recycled aggregate concrete (RAC) composite shear walls with different expandable polystyrene (EPS) configurations was investigated. Six concrete shear walls were designed and tested under cyclic loading to evaluate the effect of fine RAC in designing earthquake-resistant structures. Three of the six specimens were used to construct mid-rise walls with a shear-span ratio of 1.5, and the other three specimens were used to construct low-rise walls with a shear-span ratio of 0.8. The mid-rise and low-rise shear walls consisted of an ordinary recycled concrete shear wall, a composite wall with fine aggregate concrete (FAC) protective layer (EPS modules as the external insulation layer), and a composite wall with sandwiched EPS modules as the insulation layer. Several parameters obtained from the experimental results were compared and analyzed, including the load-bearing capacity, stiffness, ductility, energy dissipation, and failure characteristics of the specimens. The calculation formula of load-bearing capacity was obtained by considering the effect of FAC on composite shear walls as the protective layer. The damage process of the specimen was simulated using the ABAQUS Software, and the results agreed quite well with those obtained from the experiments. The results show that the seismic resistance behavior of the EPS module composite for shear walls performed better than ordinary recycled concrete for shear walls. Shear walls with sandwiched EPS modules had a better seismic performance than those with EPS modules lying outside. Although the FAC protective layer slightly improved the seismic performance of the structure, it undoubtedly slowed down the speed of crack formation and the stiffness degradation of the walls. PMID:28773274

  11. Seismic Performance of Composite Shear Walls Constructed Using Recycled Aggregate Concrete and Different Expandable Polystyrene Configurations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenchao Liu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The seismic performance of recycled aggregate concrete (RAC composite shear walls with different expandable polystyrene (EPS configurations was investigated. Six concrete shear walls were designed and tested under cyclic loading to evaluate the effect of fine RAC in designing earthquake-resistant structures. Three of the six specimens were used to construct mid-rise walls with a shear-span ratio of 1.5, and the other three specimens were used to construct low-rise walls with a shear-span ratio of 0.8. The mid-rise and low-rise shear walls consisted of an ordinary recycled concrete shear wall, a composite wall with fine aggregate concrete (FAC protective layer (EPS modules as the external insulation layer, and a composite wall with sandwiched EPS modules as the insulation layer. Several parameters obtained from the experimental results were compared and analyzed, including the load-bearing capacity, stiffness, ductility, energy dissipation, and failure characteristics of the specimens. The calculation formula of load-bearing capacity was obtained by considering the effect of FAC on composite shear walls as the protective layer. The damage process of the specimen was simulated using the ABAQUS Software, and the results agreed quite well with those obtained from the experiments. The results show that the seismic resistance behavior of the EPS module composite for shear walls performed better than ordinary recycled concrete for shear walls. Shear walls with sandwiched EPS modules had a better seismic performance than those with EPS modules lying outside. Although the FAC protective layer slightly improved the seismic performance of the structure, it undoubtedly slowed down the speed of crack formation and the stiffness degradation of the walls.

  12. Oocyst wall formation and composition in coccidian parasites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly Mai

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The oocyst wall of coccidian parasites is a robust structure that is resistant to a variety of environmental and chemical insults. This resilience allows oocysts to survive for long periods, facilitating transmission from host to host. The wall is bilayered and is formed by the sequential release of the contents of two specialized organelles - wall forming body 1 and wall forming body 2 - found in the macrogametocyte stage of Coccidia. The oocyst wall is over 90% protein but few of these proteins have been studied. One group is cysteine-rich and may be presumed to crosslink via disulphide bridges, though this is yet to be investigated. Another group of wall proteins is rich in tyrosine. These proteins, which range in size from 8-31 kDa, are derived from larger precursors of 56 and 82 kDa found in the wall forming bodies. Proteases may catalyze processing of the precursors into tyrosine-rich peptides, which are then oxidatively crosslinked in a reaction catalyzed by peroxidases. In support of this hypothesis, the oocyst wall has high levels of dityrosine bonds. These dityrosine crosslinked proteins may provide a structural matrix for assembly of the oocyst wall and contribute to its resilience.

  13. Production and composition of extracellular polysaccharide synthesized by a Rhizobium isolate of Vigna mungo (L.) Hepper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Santi Mohan; Ray, Bimalendu; Dey, Satyahari; Pati, Bikas Ranjan

    2007-08-01

    An extracellular polysaccharide (EPS) was produced by a Rhizobium sp. isolated from the root nodules of Vigna mungo (L.) Hepper. Maximum EPS production (346 mg l(-1)) was when the yeast extract basal medium was supplemented with mannitol (1%), biotin (1.5 mg l(-1)) and asparagine (0.3%). Ribose (53%) and mannose (47%) were the principle monomers of the EPS. Chemical, chromatographic and spectroscopic analysis showed that this polymer, which has Man(4)Rib(1) as an oligomeric subunit, has an apparent molecular mass of 750 kDa.

  14. Investigation on Adsorption of Lithospermum erythrorhizon onto Fungal Cell Wall Polysaccharides%真菌细胞壁多糖的紫草细胞吸附固定化研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孟琴; 薛莲

    2003-01-01

    A culture of Lithospermum erythrorhizon adsorbed on fungal cell wall polysaccharides, a novel bio-adsorbent made from fnngal cell wall, has been established in this paper. Three steps were involved in this immo-bilization. The first step was preparation of suspended plant cells from tightly aggregated plant cell clumps. Thedisassembled ratio of 0.715g.g-1 (the disassembled cells over total cells) was obtained under optimum conditionfor the enzymatic reaction. Then, the adsorption of plant cells onto fungal cell wall polysaccharides was conductedand the saturated capacity of 12 g cell per gram of carrier was obtained in adsorption immobilization. Finally, theculture of cells adsorbed on fungal cell wall polysaccharides was compared with that of cells entrapped in alginateor suspension cell culture. While exposed to in situ liquid paraffin extraction coupled with cell culture, the shikoninproductivity of immobilized cells by adsorption was 10.67 g.L-1, which was 1.8 times of that in suspension cultureand 1.5 times of that entrapped in alginate.

  15. Relating Water Deficiency to Berry Texture, Skin Cell Wall Composition, and Expression of Remodeling Genes in Two Vitis vinifera L. Varieties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, J C; Cobb, F; Tracana, S; Costa, G J; Valente, I; Goulao, L F; Amâncio, S

    2015-04-22

    The cell wall (CW) is a dynamic structure that responds to stress. Water shortage (WS) impacts grapevine berry composition and its sensorial quality. In the present work, berry texture, skin CW composition, and expression of remodeling genes were investigated in two V. vinifera varieties, Touriga Nacional (TN) and Trincadeira (TR), under two water regimes, Full Irrigation (FI) and No Irrigation (NI). The global results allowed an evident separation between both varieties and the water treatments. WS resulted in increased anthocyanin contents in both varieties, reduced amounts in cellulose and lignin at maturation, but an increase in arabinose-containing polysaccharides more tightly bound to the CW in TR. In response to WS, the majority of the CW related genes were down-regulated in a variety dependent pattern. The results support the assumption that WS affects grape berries by stiffening the CW through alteration in pectin structure, supporting its involvement in responses to environmental conditions.

  16. Ultrasound enhances calcium absorption of jujube fruit by regulating the cellular calcium distribution and metabolism of cell wall polysaccharides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhi, Huanhuan; Liu, Qiqi; Xu, Juan; Dong, Yu; Liu, Mengpei; Zong, Wei

    2017-04-26

    Ultrasound has been applied in fruit pre-washing processes. However, it is not sufficient to protect fruit from pathogenic infection throughout the entire storage period, and sometimes ultrasound causes tissue damage. The goal of this study was to investigate the effects of calcium chloride (CaCl2 , 10 g L(-1) ) and ultrasound (350 W at 40 kHz), separately and in combination, on jujube fruit quality, antioxidant status, tissue Ca(2+) content and distribution along with cell wall metabolism at 20 °C for 6 days. All three treatments significantly maintained fruit firmness and peel color, reduced respiration rate, decay incidence, superoxide anion, hydrogen peroxide and malondialdehyde and preserved higher enzymatic (superoxide dismutase, catalase and peroxidase) and non-enzymatic (ascorbic acid and glutathione) antioxidants compared with the control. Moreover, the combined treatment was more effective in increasing tissue Ca(2+) content and distribution, inhibiting the generation of water-soluble and CDTA-soluble pectin fractions, delaying the solubilization of Na2 CO3 -soluble pectin and having lower activities of cell wall-modifying enzymes (polygalacturonase and pectate lyase) during storage. These results demonstrated that the combination of CaCl2 and ultrasound has potential commercial application to extend the shelf life of jujube fruit by facilitating Ca(2+) absorption and stabilizing the cell wall structure. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  17. Composition and cytotoxicity of a novel polysaccharide from brown alga (Laminaria japonica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Zhenfei; Liu, Min; Fang, Zhexiang; Wu, Jiulin; Zhang, Qiqing

    2012-08-01

    A novel polysaccharide WPS-2-1, with an average molecular weight of 80 kDa, was purified from aqueous extracts of Laminaria japonica. Monosaccharides analysis revealed that WPS-2-1 was composed of mannose, rhamnose and fucose with a molar ratio of 1.0:2.3:1.2. Analysis by periodate oxidation-Smith degradation indicated that WPS-2-1 had a backbone of array by (1→4)-glycosidic linkages. Cytotoxicity assay showed that WPS-2-1 presented significantly higher antitumor activities against A375 and BGC823 cells with a dose-dependent manner, and exhibited lower cytotoxicity to vascular smooth muscle cells. The results suggested that WPS-2-1 should be explored as a potential antitumor agent with low toxicity.

  18. The secondary cell wall polysaccharide of Bacillus anthracis provides the specific binding ligand for the C-terminal cell wall-binding domain of two phage endolysins, PlyL and PlyG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganguly, Jhuma; Low, Lieh Y; Kamal, Nazia; Saile, Elke; Forsberg, L Scott; Gutierrez-Sanchez, Gerardo; Hoffmaster, Alex R; Liddington, Robert; Quinn, Conrad P; Carlson, Russell W; Kannenberg, Elmar L

    2013-07-01

    Endolysins are bacteriophage enzymes that lyse their bacterial host for phage progeny release. They commonly contain an N-terminal catalytic domain that hydrolyzes bacterial peptidoglycan (PG) and a C-terminal cell wall-binding domain (CBD) that confers enzyme localization to the PG substrate. Two endolysins, phage lysin L (PlyL) and phage lysin G (PlyG), are specific for Bacillus anthracis. To date, the cell wall ligands for their C-terminal CBD have not been identified. We recently described structures for a number of secondary cell wall polysaccharides (SCWPs) from B. anthracis and B. cereus strains. They are covalently bound to the PG and are comprised of a -ManNAc-GlcNAc-HexNAc- backbone with various galactosyl or glucosyl substitutions. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) showed that the endolysins PlyL and PlyG bind to the SCWP from B. anthracis (SCWPBa) with high affinity (i.e. in the μM range with dissociation constants ranging from 0.81 × 10(-6) to 7.51 × 10(-6) M). In addition, the PlyL and PlyG SCWPBa binding sites reside with their C-terminal domains. The dissociation constants for the interactions of these endolysins and their derived C-terminal domains with the SCWPBa were in the range reported for other protein-carbohydrate interactions. Our findings show that the SCWPBa is the ligand that confers PlyL and PlyG lysin binding and localization to the PG. PlyL and PlyG also bound the SCWP from B. cereus G9241 with comparable affinities to SCWPBa. No detectable binding was found to the SCWPs from B. cereus ATCC (American Type Culture Collection) 10987 and ATCC 14579, thus demonstrating specificity of lysin binding to SCWPs.

  19. Comparison of Physicochemical Characteristics and Anticoagulant Activities of Polysaccharides from Three Sea Cucumbers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengmin Wang

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In order to search for sulfated polysaccharides in different invertebrate connective tissues and to examine their biological activities, we have isolated three types of polysaccharides from the body wall of the three sea cucumbers Holothuria edulis, Apostichopus japonicas and Holothuria nobilis. The physicochemical properties and anticoagulant activities of these polysaccharides were examined and compared. The chemical composition analysis and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR analysis indicate that two types of polysaccharides, sulfated fucan and fucosylated chondroitin sulfate (FuCS, were found in all of the three species and in addition a neutral glycan was observed in H. edulis. The neutral α-glucan was firstly obtained from sea cucumber. The same type of polysaccharides from different species of sea cucumbers have similar physicochemical properties and anticoagulant activities, but those of different types of glycans are significantly different, possibly due to their different monosaccharide compositions, electric charges and average molecular weights. The FuCSs have stronger anticoagulant activities than the sulfated fucans, although the molecular sizes of the FuCSs are lower than those of the sulfated fucans, whereas the neutral glucan has no activity, as expected from the absence of sulfate. Thus, anticoagulant activities of the different type of polysaccharides are likely to relate to monosaccharide composition and sulfate content. Preliminary analysis suggests that the sulfation patterns of the FuCSs may result in the difference in anticoagulant activities. Our data could help elucidate the structure-activity relationship of the sea cucumber polysaccharides.

  20. Comparison of physicochemical characteristics and anticoagulant activities of polysaccharides from three sea cucumbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Lan; Wu, Mingyi; Xu, Li; Lian, Wu; Xiang, Jingying; Lu, Feng; Gao, Na; Xiao, Chuang; Wang, Shengmin; Zhao, Jinhua

    2013-02-05

    In order to search for sulfated polysaccharides in different invertebrate connective tissues and to examine their biological activities, we have isolated three types of polysaccharides from the body wall of the three sea cucumbers Holothuria edulis, Apostichopus japonicas and Holothuria nobilis. The physicochemical properties and anticoagulant activities of these polysaccharides were examined and compared. The chemical composition analysis and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis indicate that two types of polysaccharides, sulfated fucan and fucosylated chondroitin sulfate (FuCS), were found in all of the three species and in addition a neutral glycan was observed in H. edulis. The neutral α-glucan was firstly obtained from sea cucumber. The same type of polysaccharides from different species of sea cucumbers have similar physicochemical properties and anticoagulant activities, but those of different types of glycans are significantly different, possibly due to their different monosaccharide compositions, electric charges and average molecular weights. The FuCSs have stronger anticoagulant activities than the sulfated fucans, although the molecular sizes of the FuCSs are lower than those of the sulfated fucans, whereas the neutral glucan has no activity, as expected from the absence of sulfate. Thus, anticoagulant activities of the different type of polysaccharides are likely to relate to monosaccharide composition and sulfate content. Preliminary analysis suggests that the sulfation patterns of the FuCSs may result in the difference in anticoagulant activities. Our data could help elucidate the structure-activity relationship of the sea cucumber polysaccharides.

  1. Covalent cross-linking of cell-wall polysaccharides through esterified diferulates as a maize resistance mechanism against corn borers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barros-Rios, Jaime; Santiago, Rogelio; Jung, Hans-Joachim G; Malvar, Rosa A

    2015-03-04

    There is strong evidence to suggest that cross-linking of cell-wall polymers through ester-linked diferulates has a key role in plant resistance to pests; however, direct experimentation to provide conclusive proof is lacking. This study presents an evaluation of the damage caused by two corn borer species on six maize populations particularly selected for divergent diferulate concentrations in pith stem tissues. Maize populations selected for high total diferulate concentration had 31% higher diferulates than those selected for low diferulates. Stem tunneling by corn borer species was 29% greater in the population with the lowest diferulates than in the population with the highest diferulates (31.7 versus 22.6 cm), whereas total diferulate concentration was negatively correlated with stem tunneling by corn borers. Moreover, orthogonal contrasts between groups of populations evaluated showed that larvae fed in laboratory bioassays on pith stem tissues from maize populations with higher diferulates had 30-40% lower weight than larvae fed on the same tissues from maize populations with lower diferulates. This is the first report that shows a direct relationship between diferulate deposition in maize cell walls and corn borer resistance. Current findings will help to develop adapted maize varieties with an acceptable level of resistance against borers and be useful in special kinds of agriculture, such as organic farming.

  2. Strengthening of Unreinforced Masonry Walls with Composite Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioana-Sorina Enţuc

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Unreinforced masonry (URM is considered one of the oldest construction materials being until the end of XIXth century, the basic material for: foundations, walls, columns, volts, staircases, floor joints, roofs, retaining walls, drainage channels, barrages, etc. Construction with URM elements posses a series of advantages such as: fire resistance, thermal an acoustic insulations between interior and outside spaces, humidity resistance. However the URM elements have some significant inconveniences such as: large self weight (heaviness causes cracks in the other elements of structures, reduced mechanical strengths in comparison with other traditional materials (steel and concrete, low tenacity, great manual labor consumptions, and vulnerability to earthquakes. Various factors cause deteriorations which must be overcome by strengthening solutions. Some strengthening solutions based on fiber reinforced polymers (FRP products applied directly on URM brick walls are presented in the paper.

  3. Differences between easy- and difficult-to-mill chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) genotypes. Part III: free sugar and non-starch polysaccharide composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Jennifer A; Knights, Edmund J; Campbell, Grant M; Choct, Mingan

    2014-05-01

    Parts I and II of this series of papers identified several associations between the ease of milling and the chemical compositions of different chickpea seed fractions. Non-starch polysaccharides were implicated; hence, this study examines the free sugars and sugar residues. Difficult milling is associated with: (1) lower glucose and xylose residues (less cellulose and xyloglucans) and more arabinose, rhamnose and uronic acid in the seed coat, suggesting a more flexible seed coat that resists cracking and decortication; (2) a higher content of soluble and insoluble non-starch polysaccharide fractions in the cotyledon periphery, supporting a pectic polysaccharide mechanism comprising arabinogalacturonan, homogalacturonan, rhamnogalalcturonan, and glucuronan backbone structures; (3) higher glucose and mannose residues in the cotyledon periphery, supporting a lectin-mediated mechanism of adhesion; and (4) higher arabinose and glucose residues in the cotyledon periphery, supporting a mechanism involving arabinogalactan-proteins. This series has shown that the chemical composition of chickpea does vary in ways that are consistent with physical explanations of how seed structure and properties relate to milling behaviour. Seed coat strength and flexibility, pectic polysaccharide binding, lectins and arabinogalactan-proteins have been implicated. Increased understanding in these mechanisms will allow breeding programmes to optimise milling performance in new cultivars. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  4. Role of the Group B antigen of Streptococcus agalactiae: a peptidoglycan-anchored polysaccharide involved in cell wall biogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Élise Caliot

    Full Text Available Streptococcus agalactiae (Group B streptococcus, GBS is a leading cause of infections in neonates and an emerging pathogen in adults. The Lancefield Group B carbohydrate (GBC is a peptidoglycan-anchored antigen that defines this species as a Group B Streptococcus. Despite earlier immunological and biochemical characterizations, the function of this abundant glycopolymer has never been addressed experimentally. Here, we inactivated the gene gbcO encoding a putative UDP-N-acetylglucosamine-1-phosphate:lipid phosphate transferase thought to catalyze the first step of GBC synthesis. Indeed, the gbcO mutant was unable to synthesize the GBC polymer, and displayed an important growth defect in vitro. Electron microscopy study of the GBC-depleted strain of S. agalactiae revealed a series of growth-related abnormalities: random placement of septa, defective cell division and separation processes, and aberrant cell morphology. Furthermore, vancomycin labeling and peptidoglycan structure analysis demonstrated that, in the absence of GBC, cells failed to initiate normal PG synthesis and cannot complete polymerization of the murein sacculus. Finally, the subcellular localization of the PG hydrolase PcsB, which has a critical role in cell division of streptococci, was altered in the gbcO mutant. Collectively, these findings show that GBC is an essential component of the cell wall of S. agalactiae whose function is reminiscent of that of conventional wall teichoic acids found in Staphylococcus aureus or Bacillus subtilis. Furthermore, our findings raise the possibility that GBC-like molecules play a major role in the growth of most if not all beta-hemolytic streptococci.

  5. Mixed Convection in a Composite System Bounded by Vertical Walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Srivastava

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A combined convection process between two parallel vertical infinite walls, containing an incompressible viscous fluid layer and a fluid saturated porous layer has been presented analytically. There is a vertical axial variation of temperature in the upward direction along the walls. The Brinkman extended Darcy model is applied to describe the momentum transfer in the porous region. The viscosity of the fluid layer and the effective viscosity of the porous layer are assumed to be different. Also the thermal conductivities of both fluid and porous layers are assumed to be different. The graphs and tables have been used to distinguish the influence of distinct parameters on the velocity and skin-friction. It is determined that the velocity is intensified on making greater the temperature difference between the walls while increment in the viscosity ratio (porous/fluid parameter diminishes the velocity of the fluid. It has been observed that the numerical values of the skin-frictions have an increasing tendency with the increment in the values of temperature difference between the walls while decreasing tendency with the increment in the viscosity ratio parameter (porous/fluid.

  6. Down-regulation of UDP-glucuronic Acid Biosynthesis Leads to Swollen Plant Cell Walls and Severe Developmental Defects Associated with Changes in Pectic Polysaccharides*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reboul, Rebecca; Geserick, Claudia; Pabst, Martin; Frey, Beat; Wittmann, Doris; Lütz-Meindl, Ursula; Léonard, Renaud; Tenhaken, Raimund

    2011-01-01

    UDP-glucose dehydrogenase (UGD) plays a key role in the nucleotide sugar biosynthetic pathway, as its product UDP-glucuronic acid is the common precursor for arabinose, xylose, galacturonic acid, and apiose residues found in the cell wall. In this study we characterize an Arabidopsis thaliana double mutant ugd2,3 that lacks two of the four UGD isoforms. This mutant was obtained from a cross of ugd2 and ugd3 single mutants, which do not show phenotypical differences compared with the WT. In contrast, ugd2,3 has a strong dwarfed phenotype and often develops seedlings with severe root defects suggesting that the UGD2 and UGD3 isoforms act in concert. Differences in its cell wall composition in comparison to the WT were determined using biochemical methods indicating a significant reduction in arabinose, xylose, apiose, and galacturonic acid residues. Xyloglucan is less substituted with xylose, and pectins have a reduced amount of arabinan side chains. In particular, the amount of the apiose containing side chains A and B of rhamnogalacturonan II is strongly reduced, resulting in a swollen cell wall. The alternative pathway to UDP-glucuronic acid with the key enzyme myo-inositol oxygenase is not up-regulated in ugd2,3. The pathway also does not complement the ugd2,3 mutation, likely because the supply of myo-inositol is limited. Taken together, the presented data underline the importance of UDP GlcA for plant primary cell wall formation. PMID:21949134

  7. Down-regulation of UDP-glucuronic acid biosynthesis leads to swollen plant cell walls and severe developmental defects associated with changes in pectic polysaccharides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reboul, Rebecca; Geserick, Claudia; Pabst, Martin; Frey, Beat; Wittmann, Doris; Lütz-Meindl, Ursula; Léonard, Renaud; Tenhaken, Raimund

    2011-11-18

    UDP-glucose dehydrogenase (UGD) plays a key role in the nucleotide sugar biosynthetic pathway, as its product UDP-glucuronic acid is the common precursor for arabinose, xylose, galacturonic acid, and apiose residues found in the cell wall. In this study we characterize an Arabidopsis thaliana double mutant ugd2,3 that lacks two of the four UGD isoforms. This mutant was obtained from a cross of ugd2 and ugd3 single mutants, which do not show phenotypical differences compared with the WT. In contrast, ugd2,3 has a strong dwarfed phenotype and often develops seedlings with severe root defects suggesting that the UGD2 and UGD3 isoforms act in concert. Differences in its cell wall composition in comparison to the WT were determined using biochemical methods indicating a significant reduction in arabinose, xylose, apiose, and galacturonic acid residues. Xyloglucan is less substituted with xylose, and pectins have a reduced amount of arabinan side chains. In particular, the amount of the apiose containing side chains A and B of rhamnogalacturonan II is strongly reduced, resulting in a swollen cell wall. The alternative pathway to UDP-glucuronic acid with the key enzyme myo-inositol oxygenase is not up-regulated in ugd2,3. The pathway also does not complement the ugd2,3 mutation, likely because the supply of myo-inositol is limited. Taken together, the presented data underline the importance of UDP GlcA for plant primary cell wall formation.

  8. Study on the Isolation and Composition of Hosta ensata Polysaccharides%东北玉簪多糖提取分离及组成研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    柳怀玉; 王莲萍; 丁云录; 李庆杰; 杨丽; 南敏伦

    2011-01-01

    [Objective]To study the isolation and composition of polysaccharides from Hosta ensata. [ Method]Crude polysaccharide was obtained by water extraction and then precipitated respectively by 30% ,50% and 80% alcohol to get CP1, CP2 and CP3.CP4 and CP5 were isolated through Superdex G-100 gel column chromatography. Content of total sugar and composition of monose were analyzed by using spectrum and chro matography. [ Result ]Of five polysaccharide samples from Hosta ensata,the content of acidic polysaccharides ranged from 20. 36% to 52.76% , while that of neutral polysaccharides was in the range of 34.07% -55.62%. [Conclusion]All CP1 -CP5 from Hosta ensata were the mixture of acid and neutral sugar.%[目的]研究玉簪多糖的提取分离及其组成.[方法]利用水提醇沉法得粗多糖,并依次用30%、50%、80%乙醇分部沉淀得多糖CP1、CP2、CP3;经Superdex-100凝胶柱色谱分离得CP4、CP5.采用光谱法和色谱法对其总糖含量、单糖组成等进行了分析.[结果]东北玉簪5个多糖样品酸性糖含量为20.36%~52.76%、中性糖含量为34.07% ~55.62%.[结论]东北玉簪多糖CP1~CP5均为中性糖和酸性糖的混合物.

  9. Axial compression behavior and partial composite action of SC walls in safety-related nuclear facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kai

    Steel-plate reinforced concrete (SC) composite walls typically consist of thick concrete walls with two exterior steel faceplates. The concrete core is sandwiched between the two steel faceplates, and the faceplates are attached to the concrete core using shear connectors, for example, ASTM A108 steel headed shear studs. The shear connectors and the concrete infill enhance the stability of the steel faceplates, and the faceplates serve as permanent formwork for concrete placement. SC composite walls were first introduced in the 1980's in Japan for nuclear power plant (NPP) structures. They are used in the new generation of nuclear power plants (GIII+) and being considered for small modular reactors (SMR) due to their structural efficiency, economy, safety, and construction speed. Steel faceplates can potentially undergo local buckling at certain locations of NPP structures where compressive forces are significant. The steel faceplates are usually thin (0.25 to 1.50 inches in Customary units, or 6.5 to 38 mm in SI units) to maintain economical and constructional efficiency, the geometric imperfections and locked-in stresses induced during construction make them more vulnerable to local buckling. Accidental thermal loading may also reduce the compressive strength and exacerbate the local buckling potential of SC composite walls. This dissertation presents the results from experimental and numerical investigations of the compressive behavior of SC composite walls at ambient and elevated temperatures. The results are used to establish a slenderness limit to prevent local buckling before yielding of the steel faceplates and to develop a design approach for calculating the compressive strength of SC composite walls with non-slender and slender steel faceplates at ambient and elevated temperatures. Composite action in SC walls is achieved by the embedment of shear connectors into the concrete core. The strength and stiffness of shear connectors govern the level of

  10. Analysis and seismic tests of composite shear walls with CFST columns and steel plate deep beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Hongying; Cao, Wanlin; Wu, Haipeng; Zhang, Jianwei; Xu, Fangfang

    2013-12-01

    A composite shear wall concept based on concrete filled steel tube (CFST) columns and steel plate (SP) deep beams is proposed and examined in this study. The new wall is composed of three different energy dissipation elements: CFST columns; SP deep beams; and reinforced concrete (RC) strips. The RC strips are intended to allow the core structural elements — the CFST columns and SP deep beams — to work as a single structure to consume energy. Six specimens of different configurations were tested under cyclic loading. The resulting data are analyzed herein. In addition, numerical simulations of the stress and damage processes for each specimen were carried out, and simulations were completed for a range of location and span-height ratio variations for the SP beams. The simulations show good agreement with the test results. The core structure exhibits a ductile yielding mechanism characteristic of strong column-weak beam structures, hysteretic curves are plump and the composite shear wall exhibits several seismic defense lines. The deformation of the shear wall specimens with encased CFST column and SP deep beam design appears to be closer to that of entire shear walls. Establishing optimal design parameters for the configuration of SP deep beams is pivotal to the best seismic behavior of the wall. The new composite shear wall is therefore suitable for use in the seismic design of building structures.

  11. Isolation of the Cell Wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canut, Hervé; Albenne, Cécile; Jamet, Elisabeth

    2017-01-01

    This chapter describes a method allowing the purification of the cell wall for studying both polysaccharides and proteins. The plant primary cell wall is mainly composed of polysaccharides (90-95 % in mass) and of proteins (5-10 %). At the end of growth, specialized cells may synthesize a lignified secondary wall composed of polysaccharides (about 65 %) and lignin (about 35 %). Due to its composition, the cell wall is the cellular compartment having the highest density and this property is used for its purification. It plays critical roles during plant development and in response to environmental constraints. It is largely used in the food and textile industries as well as for the production of bioenergy. All these characteristics and uses explain why its study as a true cell compartment is of high interest. The proposed method of purification can be used for large amount of material but can also be downscaled to 500 mg of fresh material. Tools for checking the quality of the cell wall preparation, such as protein analysis and microscopy observation, are also provided.

  12. Electrophoretic deposition of organic/inorganic composite coatings on metallic substrates for bone replacement applications: mechanisms and development of new bioactive materials based on polysaccharides

    OpenAIRE

    Cordero Arias, Luis Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    Regarding the need to improve the usually encountered osteointegration of metallic implants with the surrounding body tissue in bone replacement applications, bioactive organic/inorganic composite coatings on metallic substrates were developed in this work using electrophoretic deposition (EPD) as coating technology. In the present work three polysaccharides, namely alginate, chondroitin sulfate and chitosan were used as the organic part, acting as the matrix of the coating and enabling the c...

  13. Composition Estimation in Dividing-Wall Columns Using Temperature Measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Ghadrdan, Maryam; Ivar J. Halvorsen; Skogestad, Sigurd

    2011-01-01

    In this work, we propose a method to estimate the product compositions in a distillation column section based on a combination of a number of temperature measurements from different locations in the column stages.

  14. Stomatal cell wall composition: distinctive structural patterns associated with different phylogenetic groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shtein, Ilana; Shelef, Yaniv; Marom, Ziv; Zelinger, Einat; Schwartz, Amnon; Popper, Zoë A; Bar-On, Benny; Harpaz-Saad, Smadar

    2017-04-01

    Stomatal morphology and function have remained largely conserved throughout ∼400 million years of plant evolution. However, plant cell wall composition has evolved and changed. Here stomatal cell wall composition was investigated in different vascular plant groups in attempt to understand their possible effect on stomatal function. A renewed look at stomatal cell walls was attempted utilizing digitalized polar microscopy, confocal microscopy, histology and a numerical finite-elements simulation. The six species of vascular plants chosen for this study cover a broad structural, ecophysiological and evolutionary spectrum: ferns ( Asplenium nidus and Platycerium bifurcatum ) and angiosperms ( Arabidopsis thaliana and Commelina erecta ) with kidney-shaped stomata, and grasses (angiosperms, family Poaceae) with dumbbell-shaped stomata ( Sorghum bicolor and Triticum aestivum ). Three distinct patterns of cellulose crystallinity in stomatal cell walls were observed: Type I (kidney-shaped stomata, ferns), Type II (kidney-shaped stomata, angiosperms) and Type III (dumbbell-shaped stomata, grasses). The different stomatal cell wall attributes investigated (cellulose crystallinity, pectins, lignin, phenolics) exhibited taxon-specific patterns, with reciprocal substitution of structural elements in the end-walls of kidney-shaped stomata. According to a numerical bio-mechanical model, the end walls of kidney-shaped stomata develop the highest stresses during opening. The data presented demonstrate for the first time the existence of distinct spatial patterns of varying cellulose crystallinity in guard cell walls. It is also highly intriguing that in angiosperms crystalline cellulose appears to have replaced lignin that occurs in the stomatal end-walls of ferns serving a similar wall strengthening function. Such taxon-specific spatial patterns of cell wall components could imply different biomechanical functions, which in turn could be a consequence of differences in

  15. Photo-degradation of Methyl Orange by Polysaccharides/LaFe0.8Cu0.2O3 Composite Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aojie Deng

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to prepare a series of composite films (polysaccharides with LaFe0.8Cu0.2O3 for the degradation of methyl orange under ultraviolet irradiation. LaFe0.8Cu0.2O3 was prepared by a sol-gel method, and the composite films were obtained by cross-linking reactions between polysaccharides (xylan and chitosan and LaFe0.8Cu0.2O3. Physical and chemical properties of the composite films were investigated by XRD, FTIR, SEM, and BET. Moreover, the influence of the weight ratio of polysaccharide to LaFe0.8Cu0.2O3 on the methyl orange degradation reaction was also studied. Results showed that 67% of the degradation efficiency was achieved within 480 min using chitosan/LaFe0.8Cu0.2O3 (2:1 as photocatalysts, while 58% was for xylan/LaFe0.8Cu0.2O3 (1:1. The difference was due to the variety in the structure of chitosan and xylan.

  16. In vitro antimicrobial properties of silver-polysaccharide coatings on porous fiber-reinforced composites for bone implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nganga, Sara; Travan, Andrea; Marsich, Eleonora; Donati, Ivan; Söderling, Eva; Moritz, Niko; Paoletti, Sergio; Vallittu, Pekka K

    2013-12-01

    Biostable fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) implants prepared from bisphenol-A-dimethacrylate and triethyleneglycoldimethacrylate resin reinforced with E-glass fibers have been successfully used in cranial reconstructions in 15 patients. Recently, porous FRC structures were suggested as potential implant materials. Compared with smooth surface, porous surface allows implant incorporation via bone ingrowth, but is also a subject to bacterial attachment. Non-cytotoxic silver-polysaccharide nanocomposite coatings may provide a way to decrease the risk of bacterial contamination of porous FRC structures. This study is focused on the in vitro characterization of the effect porosity on the antimicrobial efficiency of the coatings against Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa by a series of microbiological tests (initial adhesion, antimicrobial efficacy, and biofilm formation). Characterization included confocal laser scanning microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The effect of porosity on the initial attachment of S. aureus was pronounced, but in the case of P. aeruginosa the effect was negligible. There were no significant effects of the coatings on the initial bacterial attachment. In the antimicrobial efficacy test, the coatings were potent against both strains regardless of the sample morphology. In the biofilm tests, there were no clear effects either of morphology or of the coating. Further coating development is foreseen to achieve a longer-term antimicrobial effect to inhibiting bacterial implant colonization.

  17. Genome-Wide Association Mapping for Cell Wall Composition and Properties in Temperate Grasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bellucci, Andrea

    -glucans. Plant cell wall biosynthesis is regulated by a large number of genes and regulatory factors but very few of these are known and characterized. This PhD project aimed to the identification of putative candidate genes involved in plant cell wall composition and properties using a genome wide (GWAS......) approach. The species investigate were wheat, barley and B. distachyon, considered a model plant for temperate cereals. Agronomical traits as yield and plant height were also included in the analysis along with cell wall composition and saccharification properties. Several marker-trait associations were......Plant cell wall confers flexibility, support for the vital processes of the plant and resistance to abiotic stresses and pathogen. It is constituted by a complex matrix of cellulose, hemicellulose, pectins and polyphenolic compounds as lignin. These main components interact with each other...

  18. Macroporous silica–alumina composites with mesoporous walls

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Gautam Gundiah

    2001-04-01

    Macroporous silica–alumina composites with mesopores have been prepared by employing polymethylmethacrylate beads as templates in the presence of the cationic surfactant, N-cetyl-N,N,N-trimethylammonium bromide. The Si/Al ratio in the composites has been varied between 4.5 and 48 and the occurrence of mesopores has been verified by X-ray diffraction. The surface areas of the samples vary between 676 and 1038 m2g–1, with the highest value in the sample with Si/Al = 48.

  19. Finite Element Analysis of Composite Hardened Walls Subjected to Blast Loads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Girum S. Urgessa

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: There is currently no standard design guideline to determine the number of composites needed to retrofit masonry walls in order to withstand a given explosion. Past design approaches were mainly based on simplified single-degree-of-freedom analysis. A finite element analysis was conducted for concrete masonry walls hardened with composites and subjected to short duration blast loads. Approach: The analysis focused on displacement time history responses which form the basis for retrofit design guidelines against blast loadings. The blast was determined from 0.5 kg equivalent TNT explosive at 1.83 m stand-off distance to simulate small mailroom bombs. Two and four layered retrofitted walls were investigated. Uncertainties in the finite model analysis of walls such as pressure distributions, effect of mid height explosive bursts versus near the ground explosive bursts and variations in modulus of elasticity of the wall were presented. Results: Uniformly distributed blast loads over the retrofitted wall height produced a small difference in peak displacement results when compared to the non-uniform pressure distribution. Ground explosive burst was shown to produce a 62.7% increase in energy and a higher peak displacement response when compared to mid-height explosive burst. Conclusion: The parametric study on the variation of modulus of elasticity of concrete masonry showed no significant effect on peak displacement affirming the use of the resistance deflection contribution of the composite in retrofit designs.

  20. In Plan Shear Retrofit of Masonry Walls with Fibre Reinforced Polymer Composites Experimental Investigations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamás Nagy-György

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results from tests on clay brick masonry walls strengthened using fiber reinforced polymer (FRP composites. Five 1.50x1.50 m wall specimens have been subjected to pure in plan shear loads up to failure and then retrofitted on one side, with different types, percentages and lay-ups of the fiber sheets. Based on the experi¬mental results, it was proven the effectiveness of using externally bonded composites for retrofitting brick masonry walls, with less disruption during strengthening, and in this way with reduced costs compared with other conventional repairing and strengthening tech¬niques. Performances of the different strengthening configurations were compared in terms of ultimate load, strain in composite and failure mechanism.

  1. Characterization of Cell Wall Components and Their Modifications during Postharvest Storage of Asparagus officinalis L.: Storage-Related Changes in Dietary Fiber Composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, Judith; Wagner, Steffen; Trierweiler, Bernhard; Bunzel, Mirko

    2016-01-20

    Changes in cell wall composition during storage of plant foods potentially alter the physiological effects of dietary fiber components. To investigate postharvest cell wall modifications of asparagus and their consequences in terms of insoluble dietary fiber structures, asparagus was stored at 20 and 1 °C for different periods of time. Structural analyses demonstrated postharvest changes in the polysaccharide profile, dominated by decreased portions of galactans. Increasing lignin contents correlated with compositional changes (monolignol ratios and linkage types) of the lignin polymer as demonstrated by chemical and two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (2D-NMR) methods. Depending on the storage time and temperature, syringyl units were preferentially incorporated into the lignin polymer. Furthermore, a drastic increase in the level of ester-linked phenolic monomers (i.e., p-coumaric acid and ferulic acid) and polymer cross-links (di- and triferulic acids) was detected. The attachment of p-coumaric acid to lignin was demonstrated by 2D-NMR experiments. Potential consequences of postharvest modifications on physiological effects of asparagus dietary fiber are discussed.

  2. Optimization, Composition, and Antioxidant Activities of Exo- and Intracellular Polysaccharides in Submerged Culture of Cordyceps gracilis (Grev. Durieu & Mont.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sapan Kumar Sharma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Under present experiments, EPS and IPS production, monosaccharide composition, and antioxidant activities of C. gracilis were studied for the first time under submerged culture conditions. Effect of different factors on polysaccharides production was studied by orthogonal experiments using one-factor-at-a-time method. Incubation of culture in the medium with capacity 200 mL (675.12 ± 5.01 and 385.20 ± 5.01 mg/L, rotation speed 150 rpm (324.62 ± 3.32 and 254.62 ± 4.62 mg/L, 6-day culture incubation time (445.24 ± 1.11, 216.60 ± 1.71 mg/L, pH 6.0 (374.81 ± 2.52 and 219.45 ± 2.59 mg/L, and temperature 23°C (405.24 ± 1.11 and 215.60 ± 1.71 mg/L produced higher EPS and IPS, respectively. Maximum EPS and IPS production was observed in the medium supplemented with glucose as a carbon source (464.82 ± 2.12 and 264.42 ± 2.62 mg/L and yeast extract as a nitrogen source (465.21 ± 3.11 and 245.17 ± 3.24 mg/L, respectively. Carbon to nitrogen ratio for maximum EPS and IPS production was observed as 10 : 1 (395.29 ± 2.15 and 235.62 ± 1.40 mg/L, respectively. Glucose was found to be the major monosaccharide (62.15 ± 7.33%. Both EPS and IPS of C. gracilis showed significant DPPH radical scavenging activity, ABTS radical scavenging activity, reducing power, and iron chelating activity.

  3. Optimization, Composition, and Antioxidant Activities of Exo- and Intracellular Polysaccharides in Submerged Culture of Cordyceps gracilis (Grev.) Durieu & Mont.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sapan Kumar; Atri, Narender Singh

    2015-01-01

    Under present experiments, EPS and IPS production, monosaccharide composition, and antioxidant activities of C. gracilis were studied for the first time under submerged culture conditions. Effect of different factors on polysaccharides production was studied by orthogonal experiments using one-factor-at-a-time method. Incubation of culture in the medium with capacity 200 mL (675.12 ± 5.01 and 385.20 ± 5.01 mg/L), rotation speed 150 rpm (324.62 ± 3.32 and 254.62 ± 4.62 mg/L), 6-day culture incubation time (445.24 ± 1.11, 216.60 ± 1.71 mg/L), pH 6.0 (374.81 ± 2.52 and 219.45 ± 2.59 mg/L), and temperature 23°C (405.24 ± 1.11 and 215.60 ± 1.71 mg/L) produced higher EPS and IPS, respectively. Maximum EPS and IPS production was observed in the medium supplemented with glucose as a carbon source (464.82 ± 2.12 and 264.42 ± 2.62 mg/L) and yeast extract as a nitrogen source (465.21 ± 3.11 and 245.17 ± 3.24 mg/L), respectively. Carbon to nitrogen ratio for maximum EPS and IPS production was observed as 10 : 1 (395.29 ± 2.15 and 235.62 ± 1.40 mg/L), respectively. Glucose was found to be the major monosaccharide (62.15 ± 7.33%). Both EPS and IPS of C. gracilis showed significant DPPH radical scavenging activity, ABTS radical scavenging activity, reducing power, and iron chelating activity. PMID:25878715

  4. Enhancement of X-ray detection by single-walled carbon nanotube enriched flexible polymer composite

    OpenAIRE

    Han, Heetak; Lee, Sanggeun; Seo, Jungmok; Mahata, Chandreswar; Cho, Sung Hwan; Han, A-Reum; Hong, Keun-Sung; Park, Joon-Ho; Soh, Myung-Jin; Park, Cheolmin; Lee, Taeyoon

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Although organic-based direct conversion X-ray detectors have been developed, their photocurrent generation efficiency has been limited by recombination of excitons due to the intrinsically poor electrical properties of organic materials. In this report, we fabricated a polymer-based flexible X-ray detector and enhanced the X-ray detection sensitivity using a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) enriched polymer composite. When this SWNT enriched polymer composite was used as the act...

  5. Optical characterization and composition of abdominal wall muscle from rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Luís; Lage, Armindo; Pais Clemente, M.; Tuchin, Valery

    2009-06-01

    Complete optical characterization of biological tissue is desirable to develop clinical methods using optical technologies. Particularly, to develop optical clearing methods in biological tissues, it is necessary to know the composition of the tissue, the percentage of each constituent and corresponding refractive indexes. To obtain such information for rat muscle, we used a simple method to characterize tissue constituents for both content percentage and refractive index. The study consisted on measuring mass with a precision weighting scale and the refractive index with an Abbe refractometer during tissue dehydration. With the collected data, we used a theoretical model to calculate the refractive index and percentage for both interstitial fluid and solid part of the rat muscle. The results obtained are in good agreement with data published by other authors, and were considered of vital information for the optical clearing studies that we planned to perform.

  6. Thermal postbuckling of thin-walled composite stiffeners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noor, Ahmed K.; Peters, J. M.

    1991-01-01

    A study is made of the thermal postbuckling response of composite stiffeners subjected to prescribed edge displacement and a temperature rise. The flanges and web of the stiffeners are modeled by using two-dimensional plate finite elements. A mixed formulation is used with the fundamental unknowns consisting of the generalized displacements and the stress resultants of the plate. A reduction method is used in conjunction with mixed finite element models for determining the postbuckling response of the stiffeners. Sensitivity derivatives are evaluated and used to study the effects of variations in the different lamination and material parameters of the stiffeners on their postbuckling response characteristics. Numerical studies are presented for anisotropic stiffeners with Zee and channel sections.

  7. Bayesian decision and mixture models for AE monitoring of steel-concrete composite shear walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhidzadeh, Alireza; Epackachi, Siamak; Salamone, Salvatore; Whittaker, Andrew S.

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents an approach based on an acoustic emission technique for the health monitoring of steel-concrete (SC) composite shear walls. SC composite walls consist of plain (unreinforced) concrete sandwiched between steel faceplates. Although the use of SC system construction has been studied extensively for nearly 20 years, little-to-no attention has been devoted to the development of structural health monitoring techniques for the inspection of damage of the concrete behind the steel plates. In this work an unsupervised pattern recognition algorithm based on probability theory is proposed to assess the soundness of the concrete infill, and eventually provide a diagnosis of the SC wall’s health. The approach is validated through an experimental study on a large-scale SC shear wall subjected to a displacement controlled reversed cyclic loading.

  8. Quantitative CT: Associations between Emphysema, Airway Wall Thickness and Body Composition in COPD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rutten, Erica P A; Grydeland, Thomas B; Pillai, Sreekumar G

    2011-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to determine the association between CT phenotypes-emphysema by low attenuation area and bronchitis by airway wall thickness-and body composition parameters in a large cohort of subjects with and without COPD. In 452 COPD subjects and 459 subjects without COPD...

  9. Deformability of plastering compositions in design solutions of modern thermal protective exterior walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.R. Vakhitov

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, appearance of new constructive decisions for multilayer thermal efficient walls in the practice of design and construction caused the increasing use of protective and decorative plaster compositions. Comprehensive protective plaster systems nowadays are used in the facade insulation systems as a protective layer on the surface of polystyrene foam or mineral wool boards, forming the insulating layer to the outer walls of concrete blocks. They are also used for exterior finish of walls made of gas-concrete blocks, plastering the brickwork of the buildings operated by rehabilitation, in particular, apartment houses of old mass series. The problem of ensuring durability of thermal efficient external walls with the use of protective and decorative plaster systems were identified in this article. The factors, affecting the resistance of facade plasters to the action of external conditions in operating process were considered. The weaknesses in the necessary characteristics of plaster mixtures provided by material manufacturers are revealed. The existing methods for determining crack resistance of plaster compositions are monitored. The author's method of determining the maximum stretch of plaster compositions is given. The article presents tests results of various plaster compositions, confirming the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  10. Stability of cell wall composition and saccharification efficiency in Miscanthus across diverse environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weijde, van der Tim; Dolstra, Oene; Visser, Richard G.F.; Trindade, Luisa M.

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the potential effects of differences between growth locations on the cell wall composition and saccharification efficiency of the bioenergy crop miscanthus, a diverse set of 15 accessions were evaluated in six locations across Europe for the first 3 years following establishment. H

  11. Crystallization and melting behavior of multi-walled carbon nanotube-reinforced nylon-6 composites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Phang, In Yee; Ma, Jianhua; Shen, Lu; Liu, Tianxi; Zhang, Wei-De

    2006-01-01

    The crystallization and melting behavior of neat nylon-6 (PA6) and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs)/PA6 composites prepared by simple melt-compounding was comparatively studied. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) results show two crystallization exotherms (TCC, 1 and TCC, 2) for PA6/MWNTs

  12. Properties of novel composite meshes in chest wall reconstruction: A comparative animal study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Zardo

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: We consider composite grafts a suitable alternative for chest wall reconstruction. They are characterized by good overall biointegration and limited perigraft-fibrosis, thus potentially facilitating redo-procedures, even though a hydrophilic coating per se does not appear to prevent intrathoracic adhesion formation.

  13. Maize stover and cob cell wall composition and ethanol potential as affected by nitrogen fertilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maize (Zea mays L.) stover and cobs are potential feedstock sources for cellulosic ethanol production. Nitrogen (N) fertilization is an important management decision that influences cellulosic biomass and grain production, but its effect on cell wall composition and subsequent cellulosic ethanol pro...

  14. Crystallization and melting behavior of multi-walled carbon nanotube-reinforced nylon-6 composites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Phang, In Yee; Ma, Jianhua; Shen, Lu; Liu, Tianxi; Zhang, Wei-De

    2006-01-01

    The crystallization and melting behavior of neat nylon-6 (PA6) and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs)/PA6 composites prepared by simple melt-compounding was comparatively studied. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) results show two crystallization exotherms (TCC, 1 and TCC, 2) for PA6/MWNTs

  15. Cell wall composition throughout development for the model grass Brachypodium distanchyon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David eRancour

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Temperate perennial grasses are important worldwide as a livestock nutritive energy source and a potential feedstock for lignocellulosic biofuel production. The annual temperate grass Brachypodium distanchyon has been championed as a useful model system to facilitate biological research in agriculturally important temperate forage grasses based on phylogenetic relationships. To physically corroborate genetic predictions, we determined the chemical composition profiles of organ-specific cell walls throughout the development of two common diploid accessions of Brachypodium distanchyon, Bd21-3 and Bd21. Chemical analysis was performed on cell walls isolated from distinct organs (i.e. leaves, sheaths, stems and roots at three developmental stages of 1 12-day seedling, 2 vegetative-to-reproductive transition, and 3 mature seed-fill. In addition, we have included cell wall analysis of embryonic callus used for genetic transformations. Composition of cell walls based on components lignin, hydroxycinnamates, uronosyls, neutral sugars, and protein suggests that Brachypodium distanchyon is similar chemically to agriculturally important forage grasses. There were modest compositional differences in hydroxycinnamate profiles between accessions Bd21-3 and Bd21. In addition, when compared to agronomical important C3 grasses, more mature Brachypodium stem cell walls have a relative increase in glucose of 48% and a decrease in lignin of 36%. Though differences exists between Brachypodium and agronomical important C3 grasses, Brachypodium distanchyon should be still a useful model system for genetic manipulation of cell wall composition to determine the impact upon functional characteristics such as rumen digestibility or energy conversion efficiency for bioenergy production.

  16. In vitro anti-HIV activity of sulfated cell-wall polysaccharides from gametic, carposporic and tetrasporic stages of the Mediterranean red alga Asparagopsis armata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haslin, C; Lahaye, M; Pellegrini, M; Chermann, J C

    2001-06-01

    The gametic, carposporic and tetrasporic reproductive stages from the Mediterranean red alga Asparagopsis armata contain peculiar sulfated galactans with galactose:3,6-anhydrogalactose:sulfates molar ratio of 1:0.01:1.23, 1:0.04:0.47 and 1:0.01:1.13, respectively. These water-soluble polysaccharides were studied for their in vitro activity against the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1). Gametic and tetrasporic galactans inhibit HIV replication at 10 and 8 micrograms/ml, respectively, as measured by HIV-induced syncitium formation as well as reverse transcriptase activity in cell-free culture supernatant. The carposporic polysaccharide is ineffective, even at 100 micrograms/ml. The maximal antiviral effect involves the presence of the polysaccharides after or during infection but not before infection. This time of action suggests an inhibition of an early step of HIV infection.

  17. [Surface modification and microstructure of single-walled carbon nanotubes for dental composite resin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Yang; Zhang, Feimin; Xu, Li'na; Gu, Ning

    2006-12-01

    In order to improve its dispersion condition in dental composite resin and enhance its interaction with the matrix, single-walled carbon nanotubes(SWNTs) were refluxed and oxidized, then treated by APTE. Their outer surface were coated by nano-SiO2 particles using sol-gel process, then further treated by organosilanes ATES. IR and TEM were used to analyze modification results. TEM pictures showed nano-particles were on the surface of SWNTs; IR showed characteristic adsorbing bands of SiO2. Composite resin specimen with modified SWNTs was prepared and examined by TEM. SWNTs were detected in composite resin matrix among other inorganic fillers.

  18. Numerical Analysis of Composite Steel Concrete Structural Shear Walls with Steel Encased Profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Dan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of common reinforced concrete shear walls in high rise buildings is sometimes limited because of the large amount of reinforcement localized at the end of the element. A good alternative in avoiding this disadvantage is to use composite steel concrete structural shear walls with steel encased profiles. This solution used for high rise buildings, offers to designers lateral stiffness, shear capacity and high bending resisting moment of structural walls. The encasement of the steel shapes in concrete is applied also for the following purposes: flexural stiffening and strengthening of compression elements; fire protection; potentially easier repairs after moderate damage; economy with respect both to material and construction. Until now in the national and international literature poor information about nonlinear behaviour of composite steel concrete structural shear walls with steel encased profiles is available. A theoretical and experimental program related to the behaviour of steel concrete structural shear walls with steel encased profiles is developed at “Politehnica” University of Timişoara. The program refers to six different elements, which differ by the shape of the steel encased profile and also by the arrangement of steel shapes on the cross section of the element. In order to calibrate the elements for experimental study some numerical analysis were made. The paper presents the results of numerical analysis with details of stress distribution, crack distribution, structural stiffness at various loads, and load bearing capacity of the elements.

  19. The biosynthesis, composition and assembly of the outer pollen wall: A tough case to crack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quilichini, Teagen D; Grienenberger, Etienne; Douglas, Carl J

    2015-05-01

    The formation of the durable outer pollen wall, largely composed of sporopollenin, is essential for the protection of the male gametophyte and plant reproduction. Despite its apparent strict conservation amongst land plants, the composition of sporopollenin and the biosynthetic pathway(s) yielding this recalcitrant biopolymer remain elusive. Recent molecular genetic studies in Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) and rice have, however, identified key genes involved in sporopollenin formation, allowing a better understanding of the biochemistry and cell biology underlying sporopollenin biosynthesis and pollen wall development. Herein, current knowledge of the biochemical composition of the outer pollen wall is reviewed, with an emphasis on enzymes with characterized biochemical activities in sporopollenin and pollen coat biosynthesis. The tapetum, which forms the innermost sporophytic cell layer of the anther and envelops developing pollen, plays an essential role in sporopollenin and pollen coat formation. Recent studies show that several tapetum-expressed genes encode enzymes that metabolize fatty acid derived compounds to form putative sporopollenin precursors, including tetraketides derived from fatty acyl-CoA starter molecules, but analysis of mutants defective in pollen wall development indicate that other components are also incorporated into sporopollenin. Also highlighted are the many uncertainties remaining in the development of a sporopollenin-fortified pollen wall, particularly in relation to the mechanisms of sporopollenin precursor transport and assembly into the patterned form of the pollen wall. A working model for sporopollenin biosynthesis is proposed based on the data obtained largely from studies of Arabidopsis, and future challenges to complete our understanding of pollen wall biology are outlined.

  20. Lubrication effectiveness of composite lubricants during P/M electrostatic die wall lubrication and warm compaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xia Yang; Shiju Guo; Farid Akhtar

    2006-01-01

    The lubrication effectiveness of the composite lubricants, 50wt% ethylene bis-stearamide (EBS) wax + 50wt% graphite and 50wt% EBS wax + 50wt% BN, during the powder metallurgy (P/M) electrostatic die wall lubrication and warm compaction was studied. The results show that the combination of 50wt% EBS wax and 50wt% graphite has excellent lubrication performance, resulting in fairly high green densities, but the mixture of 50wt% EBS wax and 50wt% BN has less beneficial effect. In addition, corresponding die temperatures should be applied when different die wall lubricants are used to achieve the highest green densities.

  1. Synthesis and Electrochemical Characterization of Polypyrrole/Multi-walled Carbon Nanotube Composite Electrodes for Supercapacitor Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul, Santhosh; Lee, Yoon Sung; Choi, Ji Ae; Kang, Yun Chan; Kim, Dong Won [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-05-15

    The nanocomposites of polypyrrole (PPy) and multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) with different composition are synthesized by the chemical oxidative polymerization method. In these composites, the MWCNTs are uniformly coated by PPy with different thickness. The electrochemical properties of the composite electrodes are investigated by cyclic voltammetry, galvanostatic charge-discharge cycling and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The full cells assembled with the PPy/MWCNT composite electrodes deliver initial specific capacitances ranging from 146.3 to 167.2 F/g at 0.5 mA/cm{sup 2} and exhibit stable cycling characteristics. The effect of content of MWCNT in the composite on cycling performance of the cells is also investigated.

  2. Chemical composition of three polysaccharides from Gynostemma pentaphyllum and their antioxidant activity in skeletal muscle of exercised mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Aiping; Tang, Liang; Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Kunru

    2012-12-01

    To investigate the effects of polysaccharide from Gynostemma pentaphyllum on antioxidant activity in skeletal muscle of mice exercised to exhaustion. Three polysaccharide fractions were obtained from G. pentaphyllum polysaccharide (GPP) and termed GPP1-a, GPP2-b, and GPP3-a. Gas chromatography (GC) and infrared spectrum of the polysaccharides were determined. The fractions were orally administrated to mice once daily for 1 wk. The exercise time to exhaustion was assessed using a forced swim test of mice after a week. The glucose, creatine phosphokinase, and lactic dehydrogenase in serum; the activity of superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase; and the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) and glycogen in muscle were determined. The results of GC demonstrated that GPP1-a, GPP2-b, and GPP3-a were composed of different monosaccharides with distinct molar ratios. Infrared spectrum showed that the main typicals of GPP1-a and GPP2-b were β-configuration and the main typical of GPP3-a was α-configuration. Among the 3 fractions of GPP, GPP1-a administration significantly prolonged exercise time to exhaustion of mice, increased glycogen level and some of antioxidant enzyme activities, and decreased MDA level in muscle. The mechanism by which GPP1-a prolonged exercise time to exhaustion in mice may be associated with scavenging reactive oxygen species excessively produced and further increasing glycogen levels in skeletal muscle.

  3. Development and Analysis of Synthetic Composite Materials Emulating Patient AAA Wall Material Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margossian, Christa M.

    Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA) rupture accounts for 14,000 deaths a year in the United States. Since the number of ruptures has not decreased significantly in recent years despite improvements in imaging and surgical procedures, there is a need for an accurate, noninvasive technique capable of establishing rupture risk for specific patients and discriminating lesions at high risk. In this project, synthetic composite materials replicating patient-specific wall stiffness and strength were developed and their material properties evaluated. Composites utilizing various fibers were developed to give a range of stiffness from 1825.75 kPa up through 8187.64 kPa with one base material, Sylgard 170. A range of strength from 631.12 kPa to 1083 kPa with the same base material was also found. By evaluating various base materials and various reinforcing fibers, a catalogue of stiffnesses and strengths was started to allow for adaptation to specific patient properties. Three specific patient properties were well-matched with two composites fabricated: silk thread-reinforced Sylgard 170 and silk thread-reinforced Dragon Skin 20. The composites showed similar stiffnesses to the specific patients while reaching target stresses at particular strains. Not all patients were matched with composites as of yet, but recommendations for future matches are able to be determined. These composites will allow for the future evaluation of flow-induced wall stresses in models replicating patient material properties and geometries.

  4. Free vibrations of thin-walled semicircular graphite-epoxy composite frames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noor, Ahmed K.; Carden, Huey D.; Peters, Jeanne M.

    1991-01-01

    A detailed study is made of the effects of variations in lamination and material parameters of thin-walled composite frames on their vibrational characteristics. The structures considered are semicircular thin-walled frames with I and J sections. The flanges and webs of the frames are modeled by using two-dimensional shell and plate finite elements. A mixed formulation is used with the fundamental unknowns consisting of both the generalized displacements and stress resultants in the frame. The frequencies and modes predicted by the two-dimensional finite-element model are compared with those obtained from experiments, as well as with the predictions of a one-dimensional, thin-walled-beam, finite-element model. A detailed study is made of the sensitivity of the vibrational response to variations in the fiber orientation, material properties of the individual layers, and boundary conditions.

  5. wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irshad Kashif

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Maintaining indoor climatic conditions of buildings compatible with the occupant comfort by consuming minimum energy, especially in a tropical climate becomes a challenging problem for researchers. This paper aims to investigate this problem by evaluating the effect of different kind of Photovoltaic Trombe wall system (PV-TW on thermal comfort, energy consumption and CO2 emission. A detailed simulation model of a single room building integrated with PV-TW was modelled using TRNSYS software. Results show that 14-35% PMV index and 26-38% PPD index reduces as system shifted from SPV-TW to DGPV-TW as compared to normal buildings. Thermal comfort indexes (PMV and PPD lie in the recommended range of ASHARE for both DPV-TW and DGPV-TW except for the few months when RH%, solar radiation intensity and ambient temperature were high. Moreover PVTW system significantly reduces energy consumption and CO2 emission of the building and also 2-4.8 °C of temperature differences between indoor and outdoor climate of building was examined.

  6. POE/PLGA composite microspheres: formation and in vitro behavior of double walled microspheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yi-Yan; Shi, Meng; Goh, Suat-Hong; Moochhala, Shabbir M; Ng, Steve; Heller, Jorge

    2003-03-07

    The poly(ortho ester) (POE) and poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) 50:50 (PLGA) composite microspheres were fabricated by a water-in-oil-in-water (w/o/w) double emulsion process. The morphology of the composite microspheres varied depending on POE content. When the POE content was 50, 60 or 70% in weight, the double walled microspheres with a dense core of POE and a porous shell of PLGA were formed. The formation of the double walled POE/PLGA microspheres was analysed. Their in vitro degradation behavior was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, gel permeation chromatography, Fourier-transform infrared microscopy and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR). It was found that compared to the neat POE or PLGA microspheres, distinct degradation mechanism was achieved in the double walled POE/PLGA microspheres system. The degradation of the POE core was accelerated due to the acidic microenvironment produced by the hydrolysis of the outer PLGA layer. The formation of hollow microspheres became pronounced after the first week in vitro. 1H NMR spectra showed that the POE core was completely degraded after 4 weeks. On the other hand, the outer PLGA layer experienced slightly retarded degradation after the POE core disappeared. PLGA in the double walled microspheres kept more than 32% of its initial molecular weight over a period of 7 weeks.

  7. Deformation and Failure of a Multi-Wall Carbon Nanotube Yarn Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gates, Thomas S.; Jefferson, Gail D.; Frankland, Sarah-Jane V.

    2008-01-01

    Forests of multi-walled carbon nanotubes can be twisted and manipulated into continuous fibers or yarns that exhibit many of the characteristics of traditional textiles. Macro-scale analysis and test may provide strength and stiffness predictions for a composite composed of a polymer matrix and low-volume fraction yarns. However, due to the nano-scale of the carbon nanotubes, it is desirable to use atomistic calculations to consider tube-tube interactions and the influence of simulated twist on the effective friction coefficient. This paper reports laboratory test data on the mechanical response of a multi-walled, carbon nanotube yarn/polymer composite from both dynamic and quasi-static tensile tests. Macroscale and nano-scale analysis methods are explored and used to define some of the key structure-property relationships. The measured influence of hot-wet aging on the tensile properties is also reported.

  8. Experimental and analytical study on seismic behavior of steel-concrete multienergy dissipation composite shear walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Hongying; Cao, Wanlin; Wu, Haipeng; Qiao, Qiyun; Yu, Chuanpeng

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, a steel-concrete multi-energy dissipation composite shear wall, comprised of steel-reinforced concrete (SRC) columns, steel plate (SP) deep beams, a concrete wall and energy dissipation strips, is proposed. In order to study the multi-energy dissipation behavior and restorability after an earthquake, two stages of low cyclic loading tests were carried out on ten test specimens. In the first stage, test on five specimens with different number of SP deep beams was carried out, and the test lasted until the displacement drift reached 2%. In the second stage, thin SPs were welded to both sides of the five specimens tested in the first stage, and the same test was carried out on the repaired specimens (designated as new specimens). The load-bearing capacity, stiffness, ductility, hysteretic behavior and failure characteristics were analyzed for both stages and the results are discussed herein. Extrapolating from these results, strength calculation models and formulas are proposed herein and simulations using ABAQUS carried out; they show good agreement with the test results. The study demonstrates that SRC columns, SP deep beams, concrete wall and energy dissipation strips cooperate well and play an important role in energy dissipation. In addition, this study shows that the shear wall has good recoverability after an earthquake, and that the welding of thin SP's to repair a deformed wall is a practicable technique.

  9. Experimental Study of Multi-Walled Composite Shell Fragments under Thermal Force Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. P. Tairova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Multi-walled composite shells are a relatively new prospective type of load carrying structures for rocket and space engineering. These CFRP structures are produced by injection and infusion methods and have several advantages in comparison with common structures such as stringer-frame, grid and sandwich structures with a light core. In particular, those have more structural parameters, which enable one to control mechanical properties of the structure, and this is important in designing the load carrying structures of different purpose.Presently, there are few national and foreign publications on experimental investigations of mechanical properties of multi-walled shells. That is why the objective of the paper is to conduct the experimental study of deformation and failure processes of a multi-walled panel both under steady-state heating and under unsteady-state one.The paper presents the results of two tests: (1 the study of deformation and failure modes under compression and complete heating up to a specified temperature and (2 validation of working capability of multi-walled samples under single-side heating and compression simulating a start and flight version of the “ Proton” launch vehicle.Experimental results have shown that average elastic properties of multi-walled samples slightly depend on temperature for the studied range (from room temperature up to 195C while strength properties considerably decrease with increasing temperature, and this is typical for CFRP structures under compression. However, under unsteady-state short-term heating the structure has a strength that exceeds the minimal necessary strength of load carrying structures of the “Proton” launch vehicle (the samples satisfy simulated start conditions of the “Proton” launch vehicle. This is because of a low heat conductivity of the multi-walled core: an unheated sheet holds a low temperature and high load carrying capacity.Obtained results can be used in

  10. Vibration and Stability of Variable Cross Section Thin-Walled Composite Shafts with Transverse Shear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Jing-min

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A dynamic model of composite shaft with variable cross section is presented. Free vibration equations of the variable cross section thin-walled composite shaft considering the effect of shear deformation are established based on a refined variational asymptotic method and Hamilton’s principle. The numerical results calculated by Galerkin method are analyzed to indicate the effects of ply angle, taper ratio, and transverse shear deformation on the first natural frequency and critical rotating speed. The results are compared with those obtained by using finite element package ANSYS and available in the literature using other models.

  11. Characterizations of Enriched Metallic Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes in Polymer Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bin; Li, Jing; Lu, Yijiang; Cinke, Martin; Au, Dyng; Harmon, Julie P.; Muisener, Patricia Anne O.; Clayton, LaNetra; D'Angelo, John

    2003-01-01

    Using different processing conditions, we disperse the single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) into the polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) to form composites. In the melt-blended sample, the SWNTs originally semiconducting - became predominantly metallic after dispersion into the melt-blended composite. The interaction of the PMMA and SWNT is investigated by the polarized Raman studies. The structure changes in the PMMA and SWNT shows that the anisotropic interactions are responsible for SWNT electronic density of states (DOS) changes. The increased metallic SWNT percentage is confirmed by the conductivity and dielectric constant measurements .

  12. Rheological and mechanical study of regenerated cellulose/multi-walled carbon nanotube composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Wei; Wang, Shuxia; Liu, Hui; Wu, Jimin; Huang, Min; Ma, Wenjing; Huang, Chaobo

    2016-09-01

    Regenerated cellulose (RC)-based composites reinforced with multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were prepared by a facile casting method. The morphology and microstructure of the fabricated composites were characterized using transmission electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and Raman spectroscopy. Thermogravimetry and derivative thermogravimetric analysis were conducted to investigate the effect of MWCNTs on the thermal behaviors of the RC. The results showed that the introduction of MWCNTs enhanced the thermal stability of the RC. Moreover, the effect of the dispersion state of MWCNTs in microcrystalline cellulose/ZnCl2 solutions with varying MWCNT loadings was studied by rheological tests. The mechanical properties of composite films were remarkably improved compared to those of pure RC film. Specifically, the composite film containing 3 wt% of MWCNTs exhibits a 123% enhancement in tensile strength and a 163% enhancement in the Young’s modulus compared with the pure RC film.

  13. Synthesis and Characterization of Multi Wall Carbon Nanotubes (MWCNT) Reinforced Sintered Magnesium Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijaya Bhaskar, S.; Rajmohan, T.; Palanikumar, K.; Bharath Ganesh Kumar, B.

    2016-04-01

    Metal matrix composites (MMCs) reinforced with ceramic nano particles (less than 100 nm), termed as metal matrix nano composites (MMNCs), can overcome those disadvantages associated with the conventional MMCs. MMCs containing carbon nanotubes are being developed and projected for diverse applications in various fields of engineering like automotive, avionic, electronic and bio-medical sectors. The present investigation deals with the synthesis and characterization of hybrid magnesium matrix reinforced with various different wt% (0-0.45) of multi wall carbon nano tubes (MWCNT) and micro SiC particles prepared through powder metallurgy route. Microstructure and mechanical properties such as micro hardness and density of the composites were examined. Microstructure of MMNCs have been investigated by scanning electron microscope, X-ray diffraction and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) for better observation of dispersion of reinforcement. The results indicated that the increase in wt% of MWCNT improves the mechanical properties of the composite.

  14. Seasonal biochemical changes in composition of body wall tissues of sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Fei; XU Qiang; YANG Hongsheng

    2011-01-01

    Seasonal variation in proximate, amino acid and fatty acid composition of the body wall of sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus was evaluated. The proximate composition, except for ash content, changed significantly among seasons (P<0.05). Alanine, glycine, glutamic acid and asparagic acid were the most abundant amino acids. Total amino acid and essential amino acid contents both varied clearly with seasons (P<0.05). 16:0 and 16:1n7 were the primary saturated fatty acid (SFA)and monounsaturated fatty acid (MUFA) respectively for all months. EPA (20:5n-3), AA (20:4n-6)and DHA (22:6n-3) were the major polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA). The proportions of SFA and PUFA yielded significant seasonal variations (P<0.001), but MUFA did not changed significantly.The results indicated that the biochemical compositions of the body wall in A. japonicus were significantly influenced by seasons and that the body wall tissue is an excellent source of protein,MUFA and n-3 PUFA for humans.

  15. Isolation of Polysaccharides Sulfated during Early Embryogenesis in Fucus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogsett, W E; Quatrano, R S

    1975-01-01

    Beginning 10 hours after fertilization, zygotes of Fucus distichus L. Powell incorporate (35)S into polysaccharides as a sulfate ester of fucose. These sulfated polysaccharides are sequestered in only the rhizoid cell of the two-celled embryo and can serve as a marker of cellular differentiation. Zygotes were pulsed at different times after fertilization with Na(2) (35)SO(4) to identify and isolate the fucans localized within the region of cytoplasm destined to become the rhizoid cell. Low molecular weight pools of (35)S were saturated within 60 minutes, with the greatest incorporation into ethanol-soluble and insoluble fractions occurring with 0.1 mm Na(2)SO(4) in the artificial sea water medium. At the time of rhizoid formation, four fucose-containing polysaccharide fractions incorporated (35)S. When each fraction was subjected to diethylaminoethyl chromatography, two components were eluted with KCl that contained over 84% of the fucose and 93% of the (35)S of the particular fraction. Highvoltage paper electrophoresis of each fraction also resulted in the separation of these two major components. Both components from each of the four fractions behaved identically when separated by diethylaminoethyl chromatography and paper electrophoresis. By comparing the incorporation of (35)S into the polysaccharide fractions at 4 and 16 hours after fertilization, the fucan-sulfate components that are localized in the cytoplasm at the time of rhizoid formation were isolated. Although sulfated polysaccharides in brown algae are reported to be very heterogeneous in terms of their sugar composition and complexes with other heteropolymers, we propose that there are two major components that are sulfated during early embryogenesis in Fucus. The location of these two sulfated polysaccharides in different chemical fractions may reflect their subcellular localization (e.g., cytoplasmic vesicles or cell walls), or their association with other heteropolymers.

  16. Competitive adsorption of Reactive Orange 16 and Reactive Brilliant Blue R on polyaniline/bacterial extracellular polysaccharides composite-A novel eco-friendly polymer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janaki, V. [Department of Chemistry, Periyar University, Salem 636011, Tamil Nadu (India); Vijayaraghavan, K. [Singapore-Delft Water Alliance, National University of Singapore, 117577 (Singapore); Ramasamy, A.K. [Department of Chemistry, Periyar University, Salem 636011, Tamil Nadu (India); Lee, Kui-Jae [Division of Biotechnology, Advanced Institute of Environment and Bioscience, College of Environmental and Bioresource Sciences, Chonbuk National University, Iksan 570752 (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Byung-Taek, E-mail: btoh@jbnu.ac.kr [Division of Biotechnology, Advanced Institute of Environment and Bioscience, College of Environmental and Bioresource Sciences, Chonbuk National University, Iksan 570752 (Korea, Republic of); Kamala-Kannan, Seralathan, E-mail: kannan@jbnu.ac.kr [Division of Biotechnology, Advanced Institute of Environment and Bioscience, College of Environmental and Bioresource Sciences, Chonbuk National University, Iksan 570752 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-11-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Competitive adsorption of reactive dyes onto polyaniline/bacterial extracellular polysaccharides composite. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The composite have functional groups of both polyaniline and bacterial extracellular polysaccharides. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The presence of Reactive Brilliant Blue R diminished the uptake of Reactive Orange 16. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Electrostatic interaction was identified as a major mechanism in adsorption process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Reactive Brilliant Blue R and Reactive Orange 16 adsorption was endothermic process. - Abstract: The performance of polyaniline/extracellular polymeric substances (Pn/EPS) composite as an adsorbent to remove the anionic reactive dyes, Reactive Brilliant Blue R (RBBR) and Reactive Orange 16 (RO), was investigated in single and binary systems. The pH{sub pzc} of Pn/EPS composite was calculated as 3.7 through potentiometric mass titration method. Electrostatic interaction between the dye anion and the nitrogen present in the polymer was identified as a major mechanism in adsorption process. Single component isotherms followed the Langmuir model with the maximum adsorption capacity of 0.5775 mmol g{sup -1} for RBBR and 0.4748 mmol g{sup -1} for RO. In binary system, both the reactive dye anions compete with each other and resulted in lower uptake. Binary adsorption data were interpreted well by the Sheindorf-Rehbun-Sheintuch equation as compared to extended Langmuir model with constant interaction factor. Kinetic analysis of single solute followed pseudo-first order model. Thermodynamic studies computed that RBBR and RO adsorption was endothermic, spontaneous, and feasible process.

  17. Chemical composition and biotechnological properties of a polysaccharide from the peels and antioxidative content from the pulp of Passiflora liguralis fruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tommonaro, G; Rodríguez, C S Segura; Santillana, M; Immirzi, B; Prisco, R De; Nicolaus, B; Poli, A

    2007-09-05

    A new polysaccharide with a high molecular weight (greater than 1 x 106 Da) was extracted and characterized from the peels of Passiflora liguralis (granadilla) fruits. Chemical composition of the biopolymer, performed by using a high pressure anion exchange-pulsed amperometric detector (HPAE-PAD), showed the presence of six different sugar residues: xylose, glucose, galactose, galactosamine, an unknown component, and fucose in the relative ratio of 1:0.5:0.2:0.06:0.05:trace. The optical rotation of this xyloglucan was [alpha](D)(25) degrees C = -186.42 (concentration of 1.4 mg/mL of H(2)O), and the viscosity was dependent on the concentration and pH, showing a maximum value of 1.4 eta at a concentration of 3% in distilled water and a maximum value of 7.0 eta in citrate buffer solution. Thermogravimetric analysis indicated that this biopolymer was very stable at high temperatures, showing a degradation temperature at 280 degrees C. The characterization of the polysaccharide was also investigated by spectroscopic methods (1H NMR and IR) pointing out the complexity of this biopolymer and the presence of sugar residues in alpha-manno, alpha-gluco-galacto, and beta-gluco-galacto configurations. The formation of a biodegradable film using this novel xyloglucan was reported, and the anticytotoxic activity of the polysaccharide was studied in a brine shrimp bioassay. Considerable antioxidant activity (Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC) value of 0.32 microM/mg fresh product) was noted in the lipophilic extracts of Passiflora liguralis fruits, indicating, in this fruit, an alternative source of bioactive compounds.

  18. Review of Ballistic Limit Equations for Composite Structure Walls of Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Frank K.*; Schneider, E.; Lambert, M.

    2004-08-01

    In this paper a review of existing ballistic limit equations for CFRP (Carbon Fibre Reinforced Plastics) structure walls of satellites is given, and two new ballistic limit equations are presented. The predictive capabilities of the equations are compared to a set of experimental hypervelocity impact test data of CFRP plates and CFRP honeycomb sandwich panels (satellite structure wall) from ENVISAT, AXAF, and a generic technology program. In the literature, three ballistic limit equations for sandwich panels (SP) made from CFRP face-sheets and Al- honeycomb (H/C) core were found and analyzed (Frost's approach, Approach using Christiansen's Whipple shield Ballistic Limit Equation (BLE), and Taylor's approach). Furthermore, in this paper, a new ballistic limit equation was proposed for CFRP H/C SP (Modified ESA Triple Wall Equation) and for composite panels (plates) with and without MLI attached to the surface. The amount of impact data on CFRP structure walls of satellites found in the literature was rather scarce. The new BLE for CFRP plates makes good predictions to the available set of test data. For the BLE for CFRP H/C SP, it was found that Frost's approach and application of Christiansen's BLE to CFRP H/C SP lead to an overprediction of the ballistic limit diameters for ENVISAT structure walls and the samples of the generic technology program. Taylor's approach and the newly designed MET ballistic limit equation have both yielded good predictions for all samples except for the AXAF samples that had rather thin-walled face-sheets and a thin Al H/C core: for these samples the predictions were conservative. Thus, for use in risk analysis tools for satellites (e. g. ESA's ESABASE/DEBRIS tool or NASA's BUMPER code), it is recommended to use either the MET or Taylor equation.

  19. Synthesis of benzimidazole-grafted graphene oxide/multi-walled carbon nanotubes composite for supercapacitance application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, Rajesh Kr., E-mail: r05bhu@gmail.com [Division of Physics and Applied Physics, School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, 637371 Singapore (Singapore); Xingjue, Wang [Division of Physics and Applied Physics, School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, 637371 Singapore (Singapore); Kumar, Vinod [Department of Zoology, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi (India); Srivastava, Anchal [Department of Physics, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi (India); Singh, Vidya Nand [CSIR-National Physical Laboratory, New Delhi (India)

    2014-11-05

    Highlights: • We are reporting supercapacitance performance of BI-GO/MWCNTs composite. • The specific capacitance of BI-GO/MWCNTs is 275 and 460 F/g at 200 and 5 mV/s scan rate. • This composite has shown 224 F/g capacitance after 1300 cycles at 200 mV/s scan rate. - Abstract: We are reporting the fabrication, characterizations and supercapacitance performance of benzimidazole-grafted graphene oxide/multi-walled carbon nanotubes (BI-GO/MWCNTs) composite. The synthesis of BI-GO materials involves cyclization reaction of carboxylic groups on GO among the hydroxyl and amino groups on o-phenylenediamine. The BI-GO/MWCNTs composite has been fabricated via in situ reduction of BI-GO using hydrazine in presence of MWCNTs. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) have been used to characterize its surface and elemental composition. The uniform dispersion of MWCNTs with BI-GO helps to improve the charge transfer reaction during electrochemical process. The specific capacitance of BI-GO/MWCNTs composite is 275 and 460 F/g at 200 and 5 mV/s scan rate in 1 mol/L aqueous solution of H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. This BI-GO/MWCNTs composite has shown 224 F/g capacitance after 1300 cycles at 200 mV/s scan rate, which represents its good electrochemical stability.

  20. Wet spinning of PVA composite fibers with a large fraction of multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dengpan Lai

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available PVA composites fibers with a large fraction of multi-walled carbon nanotubes modified by both covalent and non-covalent functionalization were produced by a wet-spinning process. Model XQ-1 tensile tester, thermogravimetric analysis, scanning electron microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, and wide-angle X-ray diffraction were used to characterize the properties of PVA/MWNT composite fibers. The TGA results suggested that MWNTs content in composite fibers were ranged from 5.3 wt% to 27.6 wt%. The mechanical properties of PVA/MWNT composite fibers were obviously superior to pure PVA fiber. The Young׳s modulus of composite fibers enhanced with increasing the content of MWNTs, and it rised gradually from 6.7 GPa for the pure PVA fiber to 12.8 GPa for the composite fibers with 27.6 wt% MWNTs. Meanwhile, the tensile strength increased gradually from 0.39 GPa for the pure PVA fiber to 0.74 GPa for the composite fibers with 14.4 wt% MWNTs. Nevertheless, the tensile strength of the composite fibers decreased as the MWNTs content up to 27.6 wt%. SEM results indicated that the MWNTs homogeneously dispersed in the composite fibers, however some agglomerates also existed when the content of MWNTs reached 27.6 wt%. DSC results proved strong interfacial interaction between MWNTs and PVA chain, which benefited composite fibers in the efficient stress-transfer. WXAD characterization showed that the orientation of PVA molecules declined from 94.1% to 90.9% with the increasing of MWNTs content. The good dispersibility of MWNTs throughout PVA matrix and efficient stress-transfer between MWNTs and PVA matrix may contributed to significant enhancement in the mechanical properties.

  1. Computation of macro-fiber composite integrated thin-walled smart structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, S. Q.; Zhang, S. Y.; Chen, M.; Bai, J.; Li, J.

    2016-07-01

    Due to high flexibility, reliability, and strong actuation forces, piezo fiber based composite smart material, macro-fiber composite (MFC), is increasingly applied in various fields for vibration suppression, shape control, and health monitoring. The complexity arrangement of MFC materials makes them difficult in numerical simulations. This paper develops a linear electro-mechanically coupled finite element (FE) model for composite laminated thin-walled smart structures bonded with MFC patches considering arbitrary piezo fiber orientation. Two types of MFCs are considered, namely, MFC-d31 in which the d 31 effect dominates the actuation forces, and MFC-d33 which mainly uses the d 33 effect. The proposed FE model is validated by static analysis of an MFC bonded smart plate.

  2. Magnetic Property Measurements on Single Wall Carbon Nanotube-Polyimide Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Keun J.; Wincheski, Russell A.; Park, Cheol

    2008-01-01

    Temperature and magnetic field dependent magnetization measurements were performed on polyimide nanocomposite samples, synthesized with various weight percentages of single wall carbon nanotubes. It was found that the magnetization of the composite, normalized to the mass of nanotube material in the sample, decreased with increasing weight percentage of nanotubes. It is possible that the interfacial coupling between the carbon nanotube (CNT) fillers and the polyimide matrix promotes the diamagnetic response from CNTs and reduces the total magnetization of the composite. The coercivity of the samples, believed to originate from the residual magnetic catalyst particles, was enhanced and had a stronger temperature dependence as a result of the composite synthesis. These changes in magnetic properties can form the basis of a new approach to investigate the interfacial properties in the CNT nanocomposites through magnetic property measurements.

  3. Structure and Properties of poly (para phynelyne benzobisoxazole) (PBO) /single wall carbon nano tube composite fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Satish; Zhang, Xiefei; Bhattacharyya, Arup R.; Min, Byung G.; Dang, T. D.; Arnold, F. E.; Vaia, Richard A.; Ramesh, S.; Willis, P. A.; Hauge, R. H.; Smalley, R. E.

    2002-03-01

    The liquid crystalline compositions are prepared by the in-situ polycondensation of diamines and diacid monomers in the presence of single wall carbon nano tubes (SWNT). Processing of the new compositions into fibers provide hybrid materials with improved mechanical properties. The in-situ polymerizations were carried out in polyphosphoric acid (PPA). Carbon nano tubes as high as 10 wt.polymer weight have been utilized. Fiber spinning has been carried out using dry jet wet spinning using a piston driven spinning system and the fiber coagulated in water and subsequently vacuum dried and heat treated in nitrogen at 400oC. Structure and properties of these fibers have been studied. Tensile strength of the composite fibers increased by about 50morphology of these fibers have been studied using X- ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy.

  4. Magnetic studies of polystyrene/iron-filled multi-wall carbon nanotube composite films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarova, T. L.; Zakharchuk, I.; Geydt, P.; Lahderanta, E.; Komlev, A. A.; Zyrianova, A. A.; Kanygin, M. A.; Sedelnikova, O. V.; Suslyaev, V. I.; Bulusheva, L. G.; Okotrub, A. V.

    2016-10-01

    Polystyrene/iron-filled multi-wall carbon nanotube composite films were prepared by solution processing, forge-rolling and stretching methods. Elongated iron carbide nanoparticles formed because of catalytic growth are situated inside the hollow cavity of the nanotubes. Magnetic susceptibility measurements as well as records of isothermal hysteresis loops performed in three perpendicular directions of magnetic field confirmed that the nanotubes have a preferential alignment in the matrix. Strong diamagnetic anisotropy in the composites emerges not only from the MWCNTs but also from the polystyrene matrix. The polymer sticks to the honeycomb lattice through the interaction of the π-orbitals of the phenyl ring and those of the carbon nanotube, contributing to anisotropic diamagnetic response. The contribution of iron nanoparticles to overall magnetic response strongly depends on nanotube concentration in the composite as well as on matrix-filler non-covalent stacking, which influences magnetic interparticle interactions.

  5. Curved walls: Grain growth, settling, and composition patterns in T Tauri disk dust submlimation fronts

    CERN Document Server

    McClure, M K; Calvet, N; Espaillat, C; Hartmann, L; Sargent, B; Watson, D M; Ingleby, L; Hernandez, J

    2013-01-01

    The dust sublimation walls of disks around T Tauri stars represent a directly observable cross-section through the disk atmosphere and midplane. Their emission properties can probe the grain size distribution and composition of the innermost regions of the disk, where terrestrial planets form. Here we calculate the inner dust sublimation wall properties for four classical T Tauri stars with a narrow range of spectral types and inclination angles and a wide range of mass accretion rates to determine the extent to which the walls are radially curved. Best-fits to the near- and mid-IR excesses are found for curved, 2-layer walls in which the lower layer contains larger, hotter, amorphous pyroxene grains with Mg/(Mg+Fe)=0.6 and the upper layer contains submicron, cooler, mixed amorphous olivine and forsterite grains. As the mass accretion rates decrease from 10^(-8) to 10^(-10) Msol/yr, the maximum grain size in the lower layer decreases from 3 to 0.5 microns. We attribute this to a decrease in fragmentation and ...

  6. Study on Composite Enzymatic Extraction of D.rubrovalvata Polysaccharides%复合酶法提取红托竹荪多糖的工艺研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    叶敏

    2012-01-01

    Composite enzymatic(cellulase,protease and pectase) extraction of D.rubrovalvata polysaccharides was studied in this paper.The main factors that affect extraction yield in the final product were analyzed,such as enzyma reaction temperature,pH,time and enzyma concentration.By means of single factor experiment and orthogonal design,optimum parameters were confirmed as enzyma reaction temperature 50℃,enzyma reaction pH4.5,enzyma reaction time 120 min and enzyma concentration 1.5%.The extraction yield of D.rubrovalvata polysaccharide is 7.98% under the above conditions.%采用复合酶法提取红托竹荪中的水溶性多糖,通过单因素试验和正交试验研究酶浓度、酶解时间、酶解温度以及酶解pH值对多糖得率的影响.确定复合酶法提取红托竹荪水溶性多糖的最佳条件为:酶浓度为1.5%,酶解时间120 min,酶解温度50℃,酶解pH值为4.5,此条件下的红托竹荪多糖得率为7.98%.

  7. 2003 Plant Cell Walls Gordon Conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel J. Cosgrove

    2004-09-21

    This conference will address recent progress in many aspects of cell wall biology. Molecular, genetic, and genomic approaches are yielding major advances in our understanding of the composition, synthesis, and architecture of plant cell walls and their dynamics during growth, and are identifying the genes that encode the machinery needed to make their biogenesis possible. This meeting will bring together international scientists from academia, industry and government labs to share the latest breakthroughs and perspectives on polysaccharide biosynthesis, wood formation, wall modification, expansion and interaction with other organisms, and genomic & evolutionary analyses of wall-related genes, as well as to discuss recent ''nanotechnological'' advances that take wall analysis to the level of a single cell.

  8. Plasma-activated multi-walled carbon nanotube-polystyrene composite substrates for biosensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez-Sanchez, Cesar; Orozco, Jahir; Jimenez-Jorquera, Cecilia [Instituto de Microelectronica de Barcelona, IMB-CNM (CSIC), Campus UAB, E-08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain); Pellicer, Eva; Lechuga, Laura M; Mendoza, Ernest, E-mail: cesar.fernandez@imb-cnm.csic.e [Nanobiosensors and Molecular Nanobiophysics Group, Research Center on Nanoscience and Nanotechnology (CIN2) CSIC-ICN, ETSE, Campus UAB-Edificio Q, E-08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain)

    2009-08-19

    Carbon nanotube-polymer composites have shown to be suitable materials for the fabrication of electrochemical transducers. The exposed surface of these materials is commonly passivated by a very thin layer of the polymer component that buries the conductive carbon particles. Working with multi-walled carbon nanotube-polystyrene (MWCNT-PS) composite structures, it was previously described how a simple low power oxygen plasma process produced an effective etching of the composite surface, thereby exposing the conductive surface of CNTs. This work shows how this plasma process not only gave rise to a suitable composite conductive surface for electrochemical sensing but simultaneously exposed and created a high density of oxygen-containing functional groups at both the CNT and the PS components, without affecting the material's mechanical stability. These chemical groups could be effectively modified for the stable immobilization of biological receptors. A detailed chemical characterization of the plasma-activated composite surface was possible using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The material reactivity towards the tethering of a protein was studied and protein-protein interactions were then evaluated on the modified composite transducers by scanning electron microscopy. Finally, an amperometric immunosensor approach for the detection of rabbit Immunoglobulin G target analyte was described and a minimum concentration of 3 ng ml{sup -1} was easily measured.

  9. Isolate-dependent growth, virulence, and cell wall composition in the human pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nansalmaa Amarsaikhan

    Full Text Available The ubiquitous fungal pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus is a mediator of allergic sensitization and invasive disease in susceptible individuals. The significant genetic and phenotypic variability between and among clinical and environmental isolates are important considerations in host-pathogen studies of A. fumigatus-mediated disease. We observed decreased radial growth, rate of germination, and ability to establish colony growth in a single environmental isolate of A. fumigatus, Af5517, when compared to other clinical and environmental isolates. Af5517 also exhibited increased hyphal diameter and cell wall β-glucan and chitin content, with chitin most significantly increased. Morbidity, mortality, lung fungal burden, and tissue pathology were decreased in neutropenic Af5517-infected mice when compared to the clinical isolate Af293. Our results support previous findings that suggest a correlation between in vitro growth rates and in vivo virulence, and we propose that changes in cell wall composition may contribute to this phenotype.

  10. Grass Cell Walls: A Story of Cross-Linking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatfield, Ronald D.; Rancour, David M.; Marita, Jane M.

    2017-01-01

    Cell wall matrices are complex composites mainly of polysaccharides, phenolics (monomers and polymers), and protein. We are beginning to understand the synthesis of these major wall components individually, but still have a poor understanding of how cell walls are assembled into complex matrices. Valuable insight has been gained by examining intact components to understand the individual elements that make up plant cell walls. Grasses are a prominent group within the plant kingdom, not only for their important roles in global agriculture, but also for the complexity of their cell walls. Ferulate incorporation into grass cell wall matrices (C3 and C4 types) leads to a cross-linked matrix that plays a prominent role in the structure and utilization of grass biomass compared to dicot species. Incorporation of p-coumarates as part of the lignin structure also adds to the complexity of grass cell walls. Feruoylation results in a wall with individual hemicellulosic polysaccharides (arabinoxylans) covalently linked to each other and to lignin. Evidence strongly suggests that ferulates not only cross-link arabinoxylans, but may be important factors in lignification of the cell wall. Therefore, the distribution of ferulates on arabinoxylans could provide a means of structuring regions of the matrix with the incorporation of lignin and have a significant impact upon localized cell wall organization. The role of other phenolics in cell wall formation such as p-coumarates (which can have concentrations higher than ferulates) remains unknown. It is possible that p-coumarates assist in the formation of lignin, especially syringyl rich lignin. The uniqueness of the grass cell wall compared to dicot sepcies may not be so much in the gross composition of the wall, but how the distinctive individual components are organized into a functional wall matrix. These features are discussed and working models are provided to illustrate how changing the organization of feruoylation and p

  11. Cell Wall Biology: Perspectives from Cell Wall Imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kieran J.D.Lee; Susan E.Marcus; J.Paul Knox

    2011-01-01

    Polysaccharide-rich plant cell walls are important biomaterials that underpin plant growth,are major repositories for photosynthetically accumulated carbon,and,in addition,impact greatly on the human use of plants. Land plant cell walls contain in the region of a dozen major polysaccharide structures that are mostly encompassed by cellulose,hemicelluloses,and pectic polysaccharides. During the evolution of land plants,polysaccharide diversification appears to have largely involved structural elaboration and diversification within these polysaccharide groups. Cell wall chemistry is well advanced and a current phase of cell wall science is aimed at placing the complex polysaccharide chemistry in cellular contexts and developing a detailed understanding of cell wall biology. Imaging cell wall glycomes is a challenging area but recent developments in the establishment of cell wall molecular probe panels and their use in high throughput procedures are leading to rapid advances in the molecular understanding of the spatial heterogeneity of individual cell walls and also cell wall differences at taxonomic levels. The challenge now is to integrate this knowledge of cell wall heterogeneity with an understanding of the molecular and physiological mechanisms that underpin cell wall properties and functions.

  12. Three-dimensional analysis of cavity wall deformation after composite restoration of masticatory teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manchorova-Veleva, Neshka A

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to study the size of cavity wall deformation in eight class I and II defects after composite restoration. 1. Creating a geometric model - data on the size of the left maxillary second premolar were obtained from a routine craniofacial scanning of a 20-year-old patient with a 2,5 Dental CT scanner (General Electric), with high resolution and 0.625mm-thin slices. The contour of each of the 33 cross-sections of tooth 25 was delineated using graphics software (CorelDraw 7.0) and transferred to a specialized product for engineering design (SolidWorks Office Premium 2010, SolidWorks Corp. USA). The pulp cavity and periodontal ligament were created in the same manner and were integrated in the premolar body; 2. Generation of a finite element method - the geometric model was exported to specialized software for analysis by the finite element method - COSMOSWorks 2010, which automatically builds a 3D finite elements mesh. Based on the generated model, eight additional models of class I and II cavities with different geometries, adhesive layer and nanofilled composite restorations were constructed. The polymerization shrinkage was modelled by thermal deformation, with a negative temperature difference (cooling), corresponding to the actual volume shrinkage of the composite materials by 2.1%. In models A and B, the maximum cavity wall displacement was small - 0.014 mm and 0.015 mm, respectively. In models Al, B1, C1 and C, the displacement was at the expense of large deformation of the dental tissues. The maximum cavity wall displacements were 0.020 mm, 0.026 mm, 0.020 mm, 0.035 mm, respectively. The least cavity wall displacement was in models A2 and B2 with 0.008 mm and 0.017 mm, respectively. The least displacement resulting from cavity wall deformation is found in patient-friendly class I and II preparations. Preservation of the dental tissues reduces the risk of mechanical pressure on the dentinal lymph and the likelihood of post

  13. Polysaccharide Degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Bruce A.; Svensson, Birte; Collins, Michelle E.; Rastall, Robert A.

    An overview of current and potential enzymes used to degrade polysaccharides is presented. Such depolymerases are comprised of glycoside hydrolases, glycosyl transferases, phosphorylases and lyases, and their classification, active sites and action patterns are discussed. Additionally, the mechanisms that these enzymes use to cleave glycosidic linkages is reviewed as are inhibitors of depolymerase activity; reagents which react with amino acid residues, glycoside derivatives, transition state inhibitors and proteinaceous inhibitors. The characterization of various enzymes of microbial, animal or plant origin has led to their widespread use in the production of important oligosaccharides which can be incorporated into food stuffs. Sources of polysaccharides of particular interest in this chapter are those from plants and include inulin, dextran, xylan and pectin, as their hydrolysis products are purported to be functional foods in the context of gastrointestinal health. An alternative use of degraded polysaccharides is in the treatment of disease. The possibility exists to treat bacterial exopolysaccharide with lyases from bacteriophage to produce oligosaccharides exhibiting bioactive sequences. Although this area is currently in its infancy the knowledge is available to investigate further.

  14. Cell wall polysaccharides of common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L. Polissacarídeos de parede celular de feijões (Phasealus vulgaris L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tânia M. Shiga

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available The soluble and insoluble cotyledon (SPF-Co and IPF-Co and tegument (SPF-Te and IPF-Te cell wall polymer fractions of common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris were isolated using a chemical-enzymatic method. The sugar composition showed that SPF-Co was constituted of 38.6% arabinose, 23.4% uronic acids, 12.7% galactose, 11.2% xylose, 6.4% mannose and 6.1% glucose, probably derived from slightly branched and weakly bound polymers. The IPF-Co was fractionated with chelating agent (CDTA and with increasing concentrations of NaOH. The bulk of the cell wall polymers (29.4% were extracted with 4.0M NaOH and this fraction contained mainly arabinose (55.0%, uronic acid (18.9%, glucose (10.7%, xylose (10.3% and galactose (3.4%. About 8.7% and 10.6% of the polymers were solubilised with CDTA and 0.01M NaOH respectively and were constituted of arabinose (52.0 and 45.9%, uronic acids (25.8 and 29.8%, xylose (9.6 and 10.2%, galactose (6.1 and 3.9% and glucose (6.5 and 3.8%. The cell wall polymers were also constituted of small amounts (5.6 and 7.2% of cellulose (CEL and of non-extractable cell wall polymers (NECW. About 16.8% and 17.2% of the polymers were solubilised with 0.5 and 1.0M NaOH and contained, respectively, 92.1 and 90.7% of glucose derived from starch (IST. The neutral sugar and polymers solubilization profiles showed that weakly bound pectins are present mainly in SPF-Co (water-soluble, CDTA and 0.01-0.1M NaOH soluble fractions. Less soluble, highly cross-linked pectins were solubilised with 4.0M NaOH. This pectin is arabinose-rich, probably highly branched and has a higher molecular weight than the pectin present in SPF-Co, CDTA and 0.01-0.1M NaOH fractions.Foram isoladas por método enzimático-químico as frações da parede celular de feijão (Phaseolus vulgaris L. contendo polímeros solúveis e insolúveis obtidos do cotilédone (SPF-Co e IPF-Co e tegumento (SPF-Te e IPF-Te. A análise da composição de açúcares mostrou que a SPF-Co era

  15. Sugar composition of the pectic polysaccharides of charophytes, the closest algal relatives of land-plants: presence of 3-O-methyl-D-galactose residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Rourke, Christina; Gregson, Timothy; Murray, Lorna; Sadler, Ian H; Fry, Stephen C

    2015-08-01

    During evolution, plants have acquired and/or lost diverse sugar residues as cell-wall constituents. Of particular interest are primordial cell-wall features that existed, and in some cases abruptly changed, during the momentous step whereby land-plants arose from charophytic algal ancestors. Polysaccharides were extracted from four charophyte orders [Chlorokybales (Chlorokybus atmophyticus), Klebsormidiales (Klebsormidium fluitans, K. subtile), Charales (Chara vulgaris, Nitella flexilis), Coleochaetales (Coleochaete scutata)] and an early-diverging land-plant (Anthoceros agrestis). 'Pectins' and 'hemicelluloses', operationally defined as extractable in oxalate (100 °C) and 6 m NaOH (37 °C), respectively, were acid- or Driselase-hydrolysed, and the monosaccharides analysed chromatographically. One unusual monosaccharide, 'U', was characterized by (1)H/(13)C-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and also enzymically. 'U' was identified as 3-O-methyl-D-galactose (3-MeGal). All pectins, except in Klebsormidium, contained acid- and Driselase-releasable galacturonate, suggesting homogalacturonan. All pectins, without exception, released rhamnose and galactose on acid hydrolysis; however, only in 'higher' charophytes (Charales, Coleochaetales) and Anthoceros were these sugars also efficiently released by Driselase, suggesting rhamnogalacturonan-I. Pectins of 'higher' charophytes, especially Chara, contained little arabinose, instead possessing 3-MeGal. Anthoceros hemicelluloses were rich in glucose, xylose, galactose and arabinose (suggesting xyloglucan and arabinoxylan), none of which was consistently present in charophyte hemicelluloses. Homogalacturonan is an ancient streptophyte feature, albeit secondarily lost in Klebsormidium. When conquering the land, the first embryophytes already possessed rhamnogalacturonan-I. In contrast, charophyte and land-plant hemicelluloses differ substantially, indicating major changes during terrestrialization. The presence of 3

  16. The pore size of non-graminaceous plant cell walls is rapidly decreased by borate ester cross-linking of the pectic polysaccharide rhamnogalacturonan II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleischer, A.; O' Neill, M.A.; Ehwald, R.

    1999-11-01

    The walls of suspension-cultured Chenopodium album L. cells grown continually for more than 1 year on B-deficient medium contained monomeric rhamnogalacturonan (mRG-II) but not the borate ester cross-linked RG II dimer (dRG-II-B). The walls of these cells had an increased size limit for dextran permeation, which is a measure of wall pore size. Adding boric acid to growing B-deficient cells resulted in B binding to the wall, the formation of dRG-II-B from mRG-II, and a reduction in wall pore size within 10 min. The wall pore size of denatured B-grown cells was increased by treatment at pH {le} 2.0 or by treatment with Ca{sup 2+}-chelating agents. The acid-mediated increase in wall pore size was prevented by boric acid alone at pH 2.0 and by boric acid together with Ca{sup 2+}, but not by Na{sup +} or Mg{sup 2+} ions at pH 1.5. The Ca{sup 2+}-chelator-mediated increase in pore size was partially reduced by boric acid. Their results suggest that B-mediated cross-linking of RG-II in the walls of living plant cells generates a pectin network with a decreased size exclusion limit for polymers. The formation, stability, and possible functions of a borate ester cross-linked pectic network in the primary walls of nongraminaceous plant cells are discussed.

  17. Metal coated functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes for composite applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Qiang

    This study is considered as a method for producing multifunctional composite materials by using metals coated Single-walled Carbon Nanotubes (SWCNTs). In this research, various metals (Ni, Cu, Ag) were successfully deposited onto the surface of SWCNTs. It has been found that homogenous dispersion and dense nucleation sites are the necessary conditions to form uniform coatings on SWCNTs. Functionalization has been applied to achieve considerable improvement in the dispersion of purified SWCNTs and creates more nucleation sites for subsequent metal deposition. A three-step electroless plating approach was used and the coating mechanism is described in the paper. The samples were characterized by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), Raman spectroscopy, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). Bulk copper/aluminum-SWNT composites were processed by powder metallurgy with wet mixing techniques. Coated SWCNTs were well dispersed in the metal matrix. Cold pressing followed by sintering was applied to control porosity. The relationships between hardness and SWCNTs addition were discussed. Ni-SWCNTs composite coatings were prepared by electro-composite deposition. SWCNTs were suspended in a Ni deposition electrolyte and deposited together with nickel during electrodeposition. SWCNTs concentrations in the coatings were found to be related to the SWCNTs concentration in the solution, current density and agitation rate. The microstructure of the coatings has been examined by electron microscopy. Ni coated SWCNTs were also incorporated into the high temperature Bismaleimide (BMI)/graphite composite to improve Electromagnetic Interference (EMI) shielding and surface conductivity. The vacuum assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) was used to process these composites. Surface and volume resistivity and EMI shielding effectiveness of the composites

  18. Effective permittivity of single-walled carbon nanotube composites: Two-fluid model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moradi, Afshin, E-mail: a.moradi@kut.ac.ir [Department of Engineering Physics, Kermanshah University of Technology, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Nano Sciences, Institute for Studies in Theoretical Physics and Mathematics (IPM), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Zangeneh, Hamid Reza; Moghadam, Firoozeh Karimi [Department of Photonics, Faculty of Physics, University of Kashan, Kashan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    We develop an effective medium theory to obtain effective permittivity of a composite of two-dimensional (2D) aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes. Electronic excitations on each nanotube surface are modeled by an infinitesimally thin layer of a 2D electron gas represented by two interacting fluids, which takes into account different nature of the σ and π electrons. Calculations of both real and imaginary parts of the effective dielectric function of the system are presented, for different values of the filling factor and radius of carbon nanotubes.

  19. Effective permittivity of single-walled carbon nanotube composites: Two-fluid model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi, Afshin; Zangeneh, Hamid Reza; Moghadam, Firoozeh Karimi

    2015-12-01

    We develop an effective medium theory to obtain effective permittivity of a composite of two-dimensional (2D) aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes. Electronic excitations on each nanotube surface are modeled by an infinitesimally thin layer of a 2D electron gas represented by two interacting fluids, which takes into account different nature of the σ and π electrons. Calculations of both real and imaginary parts of the effective dielectric function of the system are presented, for different values of the filling factor and radius of carbon nanotubes.

  20. The effects of functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotube on mechanical properties of multi-walled carbon nanotube/epoxy composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Ardjmand

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The mechanical properties of the multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT/epoxy composites affected by carboxyl and amino functionalized MWCNT are investigated. Tensile tests of the specimens were carried out to obtain mechanical properties of MWCNT/epoxy composites for various weight-percents (wt % of MWCNTs. In order to properly predict the mechanical properties of MWCNT reinforced epoxy composites, the effect of MWCNTs de bonding is considered through applying a correction factor to a Halpin-Tsai equation. Applicability of the modified model was endorsed by the experimental results.

  1. Magnetic studies of polystyrene/iron-filled multi-wall carbon nanotube composite films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makarova, T.L., E-mail: Tatyana.makarova@lut.fi [Lappeenranta University of Technology, FI-53851 Lappeenranta (Finland); Ioffe Institute, St Petersburg 194021 (Russian Federation); Zakharchuk, I.; Geydt, P.; Lahderanta, E. [Lappeenranta University of Technology, FI-53851 Lappeenranta (Finland); Komlev, A.A. [St Petersburg State Electrotechnical University, St Petersburg 197376 (Russian Federation); Zyrianova, A.A. [Ioffe Institute, St Petersburg 194021 (Russian Federation); Kanygin, M.A. [Nikolaev Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, SB RAS, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Sedelnikova, O.V. [Nikolaev Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, SB RAS, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Suslyaev, V.I [Tomsk State University, Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation); Bulusheva, L.G.; Okotrub, A.V. [Nikolaev Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, SB RAS, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation)

    2016-10-01

    Polystyrene/iron-filled multi-wall carbon nanotube composite films were prepared by solution processing, forge-rolling and stretching methods. Elongated iron carbide nanoparticles formed because of catalytic growth are situated inside the hollow cavity of the nanotubes. Magnetic susceptibility measurements as well as records of isothermal hysteresis loops performed in three perpendicular directions of magnetic field confirmed that the nanotubes have a preferential alignment in the matrix. Strong diamagnetic anisotropy in the composites emerges not only from the MWCNTs but also from the polystyrene matrix. The polymer sticks to the honeycomb lattice through the interaction of the π-orbitals of the phenyl ring and those of the carbon nanotube, contributing to anisotropic diamagnetic response. The contribution of iron nanoparticles to overall magnetic response strongly depends on nanotube concentration in the composite as well as on matrix-filler non-covalent stacking, which influences magnetic interparticle interactions. - Highlights: • . Nanotube/polystyrene composites were prepared by stretching and forge-rolling methods. • Anisotropic response of the composites mainly comes from the phenyl aromatic rings. • Magnetism of iron-based nanoparticles is governed by interactions with the matrix.

  2. Characterizing formation of interfacial domain wall and exchange coupling strength in laminated exchange coupled composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, H.-C.; Kirby, B. J.; Gao, K. Z.; Lai, C.-H.

    2013-04-01

    We have studied the N-dependent switching behavior of composite magnets, comprised of a hard CoPtCr-SiO2 (CPCS) film and a laminated soft [Pt/CPCS]N multilayer. First order reversal curve magnetometry provides evidence of interfacial domain wall (iDW) assisted reversal for N ≥ 5. The magnetic depth profiles determined from polarized neutron reflectometry (PNR) explicitly demonstrate that the composite magnets are more rigidly coupled for N = 3 than for N = 7, and suggest that for N = 7 reversal occurs via formation of iDW. By fitting the PNR profile into the energy surface calculations, we can further deduce the vertical coupling strength in the laminated soft layer.

  3. Measurement of interfacial shear strength in single wall carbon nanotubes reinforced composite using Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Debdulal; Bhattacharyya, Sanjib; Rachamim, A.; Plati, A.; Saboungi, Marie-Louise

    2010-02-01

    A novel method of measuring interfacial shear strength using Raman peak shift is reported. Carbon nanotubes (CNT) functionalized with biomolecules have been used to form a composite with polyvinyl alcohol. Type I collagen has proven to improve the load transfer from the matrix to the tubes leading to improvement of interfacial shear strength. Collagen interacts with single wall CNTs and probably wraps around it. When a composite structure is formed with the collagen, load transfer takes place through the collagen molecule. The interfacial strength of the nanotubes-matrix interface was found to be larger than 160 MPa, which is significantly higher than that observed before. A similar shear strength is estimated using a simple analytical calculation.

  4. Quantitative trait loci and comparative genomics of cereal cell wall composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazen, Samuel P; Hawley, Robin M; Davis, Georgia L; Henrissat, Bernard; Walton, Jonathan D

    2003-05-01

    Quantitative trait loci (QTLs) affecting sugar composition of the cell walls of maize (Zea mays) pericarp were mapped as an approach to the identification of genes involved in cereal wall biosynthesis. Mapping was performed using the IBM (B73 x Mo17) recombinant inbred line population. There were statistically significant differences between B73 and Mo17 in content of xylose (Xyl), arabinose (Ara), galactose (Gal), and glucose. Thirteen QTLs were found, affecting the content of Xyl (two QTLs), Ara (two QTLs), Gal (five QTLs), Glc (two QTLs), Ara + Gal (one QTL), and Xyl + Glc (one QTL). The chromosomal regions corresponding to two of these, affecting Ara + Gal and Ara on maize chromosome 3, could be aligned with a syntenic region on rice (Oryza sativa) chromosome 1, which has been completely sequenced and annotated. The contiguous P1-derived artificial chromosome rice clones covering the QTLs were predicted to encode 117 and 125 proteins, respectively. Two of these genes encode putative glycosyltransferases, displaying similarity to carbohydrate-active enzyme database family GT4 (galactosyltransferases) or to family GT64 (C-terminal domain of animal heparan synthases). The results illustrate the potential of using natural variation, emerging genomic resources, and homeology within the Poaceae to identify candidate genes involved in the essential process of cell wall biosynthesis.

  5. Dynamic stiffness matrix of thin-walled composite I-beam with symmetric and arbitrary laminations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Nam-Il; Shin, Dong Ku; Park, Young-Suk

    2008-11-01

    For the spatially coupled free vibration analysis of thin-walled composite I-beam with symmetric and arbitrary laminations, the exact dynamic stiffness matrix based on the solution of the simultaneous ordinary differential equations is presented. For this, a general theory for the vibration analysis of composite beam with arbitrary lamination including the restrained warping torsion is developed by introducing Vlasov's assumption. Next, the equations of motion and force-displacement relationships are derived from the energy principle and the first order of transformed simultaneous differential equations are constructed by using the displacement state vector consisting of 14 displacement parameters. Then explicit expressions for displacement parameters are derived and the exact dynamic stiffness matrix is determined using force-displacement relationships. In addition, the finite-element (FE) procedure based on Hermitian interpolation polynomials is developed. To verify the validity and the accuracy of this study, the numerical solutions are presented and compared with analytical solutions, the results from available references and the FE analysis using the thin-walled Hermitian beam elements. Particular emphasis is given in showing the phenomenon of vibrational mode change, the effects of increase of the modulus and the bending-twisting coupling stiffness for beams with various boundary conditions.

  6. Composite Behavior of Insulated Concrete Sandwich Wall Panels Subjected to Wind Pressure and Suction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Insub Choi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A full-scale experimental test was conducted to analyze the composite behavior of insulated concrete sandwich wall panels (ICSWPs subjected to wind pressure and suction. The experimental program was composed of three groups of ICSWP specimens, each with a different type of insulation and number of glass-fiber-reinforced polymer (GFRP shear grids. The degree of composite action of each specimen was analyzed according to the load direction, type of the insulation, and number of GFRP shear grids by comparing the theoretical and experimental values. The failure modes of the ICSWPs were compared to investigate the effect of bonds according to the load direction and type of insulation. Bonds based on insulation absorptiveness were effective to result in the composite behavior of ICSWP under positive loading tests only, while bonds based on insulation surface roughness were effective under both positive and negative loading tests. Therefore, the composite behavior based on surface roughness can be applied to the calculation of the design strength of ICSWPs with continuous GFRP shear connectors.

  7. Pressureless sintering and mechanical properties of hydroxyapatite/functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotube composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abden, M J; Afroze, J D; Alam, M S; Bahadur, N M

    2016-10-01

    This work aims to study the optimum sintering conditions of hydroxyapatite/functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotube (HA/f-MWCNT) composite with improved mechanical properties for bone implant applications using a pressureless sintering technique. The carboxyl functional group (COOH) introduced by the acid treatment on the MWCNT surface by which HA molecules are grafted onto the surface of functionalized MWCNT with strong interfacial bonding. The composite exhibits a lower hemolytic rate of 1.27%. The flexible nature of f-MWCNT makes them bend and attached to the HA grains, indicates that f-MWCNT bear significant stress by sharing a portion of the load and it leads to improve their mechanical properties. The maximum Vickers hardness of 3.6GPa is obtained for the HA/f-MWCNT composite sintered at 1100°C, whereas the highest compressive strength of 481.7MPa and fracture toughness of 2.38MPa.m(1/2) achieved after sintering at 1150°C. This study demonstrated that HA/f-MWCNT composite create suitable structures by vacuum pressureless sintering technique to satisfy the mechanical requirements for bone tissues.

  8. Composite Behavior of Insulated Concrete Sandwich Wall Panels Subjected to Wind Pressure and Suction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Insub; Kim, JunHee; Kim, Ho-Ryong

    2015-01-01

    A full-scale experimental test was conducted to analyze the composite behavior of insulated concrete sandwich wall panels (ICSWPs) subjected to wind pressure and suction. The experimental program was composed of three groups of ICSWP specimens, each with a different type of insulation and number of glass-fiber-reinforced polymer (GFRP) shear grids. The degree of composite action of each specimen was analyzed according to the load direction, type of the insulation, and number of GFRP shear grids by comparing the theoretical and experimental values. The failure modes of the ICSWPs were compared to investigate the effect of bonds according to the load direction and type of insulation. Bonds based on insulation absorptiveness were effective to result in the composite behavior of ICSWP under positive loading tests only, while bonds based on insulation surface roughness were effective under both positive and negative loading tests. Therefore, the composite behavior based on surface roughness can be applied to the calculation of the design strength of ICSWPs with continuous GFRP shear connectors. PMID:28788001

  9. Study of the surface chemistry and morphology of single walled carbon nanotube-magnetite composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquez-Linares, F.; Uwakweh, O. N. C.; Lopez, N.; Chavez, E.; Polanco, R.; Morant, C.; Sanz, J. M.; Elizalde, E.; Neira, C.; Nieto, S.; Roque-Malherbe, R.

    2011-03-01

    The study of the morphologies of the single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT), magnetite nanoparticles (MNP), and the composite based on them was carried with combined X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy (RS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). These techniques together with thermogravimetric analyses (TGA) and diffuse reflectance infrared transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) confirmed the production of pure single phases, and that the composite material consisted of MNP attached to the outer surface of the SWCNT. The Mössbauer spectroscopy (MS) research showed the presence of a large quantity of Lewis acid sites in the highly dispersed magnetite particles supported on the SWCNT outer surface. The DRIFTS carbon dioxide adsorption study of the composites revealed significant adsorption of carbon dioxide, fundamentally in the Lewis acid sites. Then, the Lewis acid sites were observed to be catalytically active. Further, the electron exchange between the Lewis acid sites and the basic or amphoteric adsorbed molecules could influence the magnetic properties of the magnetite. Consequently, together with this first ever use of MS in the study of Lewis acid sites, this investigation revealed the potential of the composites for catalytic and sensors applications.

  10. Electrospun single-walled carbon nanotube/polyvinyl alcohol composite nanofibers: structure property relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naebe, Minoo; Lin, Tong; Staiger, Mark P.; Dai, Liming; Wang, Xungai

    2008-07-01

    Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) nanofibers and single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT)/PVA composite nanofibers have been produced by electrospinning. An apparent increase in the PVA crystallinity with a concomitant change in its main crystalline phase and a reduction in the crystalline domain size were observed in the SWNT/PVA composite nanofibers, indicating the occurrence of a SWNT-induced nucleation crystallization of the PVA phase. Both the pure PVA and SWNT/PVA composite nanofibers were subjected to the following post-electrospinning treatments: (i) soaking in methanol to increase the PVA crystallinity, and (ii) cross-linking with glutaric dialdehyde to control the PVA morphology. Effects of the PVA morphology on the tensile properties of the resultant electrospun nanofibers were examined. Dynamic mechanical thermal analyses of both pure PVA and SWNT/PVA composite electrospun nanofibers indicated that SWNT-polymer interaction facilitated the formation of crystalline domains, which can be further enhanced by soaking the nanofiber in methanol and/or cross-linking the polymer with glutaric dialdehyde.

  11. Electrospun single-walled carbon nanotube/polyvinyl alcohol composite nanofibers: structure-property relationships

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naebe, Minoo; Lin Tong; Wang Xungai [Centre for Material and Fibre Innovation, Deakin University, Geelong, VIC 3217 (Australia); Staiger, Mark P [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Canterbury, Christchurch (New Zealand); Dai Liming [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Dayton, Dayton, OH 45469 (United States)], E-mail: tong.lin@deakin.edu.au

    2008-07-30

    Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) nanofibers and single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT)/PVA composite nanofibers have been produced by electrospinning. An apparent increase in the PVA crystallinity with a concomitant change in its main crystalline phase and a reduction in the crystalline domain size were observed in the SWNT/PVA composite nanofibers, indicating the occurrence of a SWNT-induced nucleation crystallization of the PVA phase. Both the pure PVA and SWNT/PVA composite nanofibers were subjected to the following post-electrospinning treatments: (i) soaking in methanol to increase the PVA crystallinity, and (ii) cross-linking with glutaric dialdehyde to control the PVA morphology. Effects of the PVA morphology on the tensile properties of the resultant electrospun nanofibers were examined. Dynamic mechanical thermal analyses of both pure PVA and SWNT/PVA composite electrospun nanofibers indicated that SWNT-polymer interaction facilitated the formation of crystalline domains, which can be further enhanced by soaking the nanofiber in methanol and/or cross-linking the polymer with glutaric dialdehyde.

  12. THERMAL DECOMPOSITION AND FLAMMABILITY OF ACRYLONITRILE-BUTADIENE-STYRENE/MULTI-WALLED CARBON NANOTUBES COMPOSITES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-fang Tong; Hai-yun Ma; Zheng-ping Fang

    2008-01-01

    Thermal and flammability properties of acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene copolymer (ABS) with the addition of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) were studied. ABS/MWNTs composites were prepared via melt blending with the MWNTs content varied from 0.2% to 4.0% by mass. Thermogravimetry results showed that the addition of MWNTs accelerated the degradation of ABS during the whole process under air atmosphere, and both onset and maximum degradation temperature were lower than those of pure ABS. The destabilization effect of MWNTs on the thermal stability of the composites became unobvious under nitrogen, and the addition of MWNTs could improve the maximum degradation temperature. The heat release rate and time of ignition (tign) for the composites reduced greatly with the addition of MWNTs especially when the concentration of nanotubes was higher than 1.0%. The accumulation of carbon nanotubes with a network structure was observed and the char layer became thicker with increasing nanotubes concentration. Results from Raman spectra showed a higher degree of graphitization for the residues of ABS/MWNTs composites.

  13. Parameter Sensitivity Analysis on Deformation of Composite Soil-Nailed Wall Using Artificial Neural Networks and Orthogonal Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianbin Hao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the back-propagation algorithm of artificial neural networks (ANNs, this paper establishes an intelligent model, which is used to predict the maximum lateral displacement of composite soil-nailed wall. Some parameters, such as soil cohesive strength, soil friction angle, prestress of anchor cable, soil-nail spacing, soil-nail diameter, soil-nail length, and other factors, are considered in the model. Combined with the in situ test data of composite soil-nail wall reinforcement engineering, the network is trained and the errors are analyzed. Thus it is demonstrated that the method is applicable and feasible in predicting lateral displacement of excavation retained by composite soil-nailed wall. Extended calculations are conducted by using the well-trained intelligent forecast model. Through application of orthogonal table test theory, 25 sets of tests are designed to analyze the sensitivity of factors affecting the maximum lateral displacement of composite soil-nailing wall. The results show that the sensitivity of factors affecting the maximum lateral displacement of composite soil nailing wall, in a descending order, are prestress of anchor cable, soil friction angle, soil cohesion strength, soil-nail spacing, soil-nail length, and soil-nail diameter. The results can provide important reference for the same reinforcement engineering.

  14. Development of pH-sensitive tamarind seed polysaccharide-alginate composite beads for controlled diclofenac sodium delivery using response surface methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, Amit Kumar; Pal, Dilipkumar

    2011-11-01

    The present study deals with the development of novel pH-sensitive tamarind seed polysaccharide (TSP)-alginate composite beads for controlled diclofenac sodium delivery using response surface methodology by full 3(2) factorial design. The effect of polymer-blend ratio (sodium alginate:TSP) and cross-linker (CaCl(2)) concentration on the drug encapsulation efficiency (DEE, %) and drug release from diclofenac sodium loaded TSP-alginate composite beads prepared by ionotropic gelation was optimized. The observed responses were coincided well with the predicted values by the experimental design. The DEE (%) of these beads containing diclofenac sodium was within the range between 72.23±2.14 and 97.32±4.03% with sustained in vitro drug release (69.08±2.36-96.07±3.54% in 10 h). The in vitro drug release from TSP-alginate composite beads containing diclofenac sodium was followed by controlled-release pattern (zero-order kinetics) with case-II transport mechanism. Particle size range of these beads was 0.71±0.03-1.33±0.04 mm. The swelling and degradation of the developed beads were influenced by different pH of the test medium. The FTIR and NMR analyses confirmed the compatibility of the diclofenac sodium with TSP and sodium alginate used to prepare the diclofenac sodium loaded TSP-alginate composite beads. The newly developed TSP-alginate composite beads are suitable for controlled delivery of diclofenac sodium for prolonged period. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Primary Cell Wall Structure in the Evolution of Land Plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Investigation of the primary cell walls of lower plants improves our understanding of the cell biology of these organisms but also has the potential to improve our understanding of cell wall structure and function in angiosperms that evolved from lower plants. Cell walls were prepared from eight species, ranging from a moss to advanced gymnosperms, and subjected to sequential chemical extraction to separate the main polysaccharide fractions. The glycosyl compositions of these fractions were then determined by gas chromatography. The results were compared among the eight plants and among data from related studies reported in the existing published reports to identify structural features that have been either highly conserved or clearly modified during evolution. Among the highly conserved features are the presence of a cellulose framework, the presence of certain hemicelluloses such as xyloglucan, and the presence of rhamnogalacturonan Ⅱ, a domain in pectic polysaccharides. Among the modified features are the abundance of mannosyl-containing hemicelluloses and the presence of methylated sugars.

  16. Experimental, numerical, and analytical studies on the seismic response of steel-plate concrete (SC) composite shear walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epackachi, Siamak

    The seismic performance of rectangular steel-plate concrete (SC) composite shear walls is assessed for application to buildings and mission-critical infrastructure. The SC walls considered in this study were composed of two steel faceplates and infill concrete. The steel faceplates were connected together and to the infill concrete using tie rods and headed studs, respectively. The research focused on the in-plane behavior of flexure- and flexure-shear-critical SC walls. An experimental program was executed in the NEES laboratory at the University at Buffalo and was followed by numerical and analytical studies. In the experimental program, four large-size specimens were tested under displacement-controlled cyclic loading. The design variables considered in the testing program included wall thickness, reinforcement ratio, and slenderness ratio. The aspect ratio (height-to-length) of the four walls was 1.0. Each SC wall was installed on top of a re-usable foundation block. A bolted baseplate to RC foundation connection was used for all four walls. The walls were identified to be flexure- and flexure-shear critical. The progression of damage in the four walls was identical, namely, cracking and crushing of the infill concrete at the toes of the walls, outward buckling and yielding of the steel faceplates near the base of the wall, and tearing of the faceplates at their junctions with the baseplate. A robust finite element model was developed in LS-DYNA for nonlinear cyclic analysis of the flexure- and flexure-shear-critical SC walls. The DYNA model was validated using the results of the cyclic tests of the four SC walls. The validated and benchmarked models were then used to conduct a parametric study, which investigated the effects of wall aspect ratio, reinforcement ratio, wall thickness, and uniaxial concrete compressive strength on the in-plane response of SC walls. Simplified analytical models, suitable for preliminary analysis and design of SC walls, were

  17. Cell-wall architecture and lignin composition of wheat developed in a microgravity environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, L. H.; Heyenga, A. G.; Levine, H. G.; Choi, J.; Davin, L. B.; Krikorian, A. D.; Lewis, N. G.; Sager, J. C. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    The microgravity environment encountered during space-flight has long been considered to affect plant growth and developmental processes, including cell wall biopolymer composition and content. As a prelude to studying how microgravity is perceived - and acted upon - by plants, it was first instructive to investigate what gross effects on plant growth and development occurred in microgravity. Thus, wheat seedlings were exposed to microgravity on board the space shuttle Discovery (STS-51) for a 10 day duration, and these specimens were compared with their counterparts grown on Earth under the same conditions (e.g. controls). First, the primary roots of the wheat that developed under both microgravity and 1 g on Earth were examined to assess the role of gravity on cellulose microfibril (CMF) organization and secondary wall thickening patterns. Using a quick freeze/deep etch technique, this revealed that the cell wall CMFs of the space-grown wheat maintained the same organization as their 1 g-grown counterparts. That is, in all instances, CMFs were randomly interwoven with each other in the outermost layers (farthest removed from the plasma membrane), and parallel to each other within the individual strata immediately adjacent to the plasma membranes. The CMF angle in the innermost stratum relative to the immediately adjacent stratum was ca 80 degrees in both the space and Earth-grown plants. Second, all plants grown in microgravity had roots that grew downwards into the agar; they did not display "wandering" and upward growth as previously reported by others. Third, the space-grown wheat also developed normal protoxylem and metaxylem vessel elements with secondary thickening patterns ranging from spiral to regular pit to reticulate thickenings. Fourthly, both the space- and Earth-grown plants were essentially of the same size and height, and their lignin analyses revealed no substantial differences in their amounts and composition regardless of the gravitational

  18. Insights into cell wall structure of Sida hermaphrodita and its influence on recalcitrance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damm, Tatjana; Pattathil, Sivakumar; Günl, Markus; Jablonowski, Nicolai David; O'Neill, Malcolm; Grün, Katharina Susanne; Grande, Philipp Michael; Leitner, Walter; Schurr, Ulrich; Usadel, Björn; Klose, Holger

    2017-07-15

    The perennial plant Sida hermaphrodita (Sida) is attracting attention as potential energy crop. Here, the first detailed view on non-cellulosic Sida cell wall polysaccharide composition, structure and architecture is given. Cell walls were prepared from Sida stems and sequentially extracted with aqueous buffers and alkali. The structures of the quantitatively predominant polysaccharides present in each fraction were determined by biochemical characterization, glycome profiling and mass spectrometry. The amounts of glucose released by Accellerase-1500(®) treatment of the cell wall and the cell wall residue remaining after each extraction were used to assess the roles of pectin and hemicellulose in the recalcitrance of Sida biomass. 4-O-Methyl glucuronoxylan with a low proportion of side substitutions was identified as the major non-cellulosic glycan component of Sida stem cell walls. Pectic polysaccharides and xylans were found to be associated with lignin, suggesting that these polysaccharides have roles in Sida cell wall recalcitrance to enzymatic hydrolysis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Convergent synthesis of a tetrasaccharide repeating unit of the O-specific polysaccharide from the cell wall lipopolysaccharide of Azospirillum brasilense strain Sp7

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pintu Kumar Mandal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A straightforward convergent synthesis has been carried out for the tetrasaccharide repeating unit of the O-specific cell wall lipopolysaccharide of the strain Sp7 of Azospirillum brasilense. The target tetrasaccharide has been synthesized from suitably protected monosaccharide intermediates in 42% overall yield in seven steps by using a [2 + 2] block glycosylation approach.

  20. The fungal symbiont of Acromyrmex leaf-cutting ants expresses the full spectrum of genes to degrade cellulose and other plant cell wall polysaccharides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grell, Morten N; Linde, Tore; Nygaard, Sanne; Nielsen, Kåre L; Boomsma, Jacobus J; Lange, Lene

    2013-12-28

    The fungus gardens of leaf-cutting ants are natural biomass conversion systems that turn fresh plant forage into fungal biomass to feed the farming ants. However, the decomposition potential of the symbiont Leucocoprinus gongylophorus for processing polysaccharides has remained controversial. We therefore used quantifiable DeepSAGE technology to obtain mRNA expression patterns of genes coding for secreted enzymes from top, middle, and bottom sections of a laboratory fungus-garden of Acromyrmex echinatior leaf-cutting ants. A broad spectrum of biomass-conversion-relevant enzyme genes was found to be expressed in situ: cellulases (GH3, GH5, GH6, GH7, AA9 [formerly GH61]), hemicellulases (GH5, GH10, CE1, GH12, GH74), pectinolytic enzymes (CE8, GH28, GH43, PL1, PL3, PL4), glucoamylase (GH15), α-galactosidase (GH27), and various cutinases, esterases, and lipases. In general, expression of these genes reached maximal values in the bottom section of the garden, particularly for an AA9 lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase and for a GH5 (endocellulase), a GH7 (reducing end-acting cellobiohydrolase), and a GH10 (xylanase), all containing a carbohydrate binding module that specifically binds cellulose (CBM1). Although we did not directly quantify enzyme abundance, the profile of expressed cellulase genes indicates that both hydrolytic and oxidative degradation is taking place. The fungal symbiont of Acromyrmex leaf-cutting ants can degrade a large range of plant polymers, but the conversion of cellulose, hemicellulose, and part of the pectin occurs primarily towards the end of the decomposition process, i.e. in the bottom section of the fungus garden. These conversions are likely to provide nutrients for the fungus itself rather than for the ants, whose colony growth and reproductive success are limited by proteins obtained from ingesting fungal gongylidia. These specialized hyphal tips are hardly produced in the bottom section of fungus gardens, consistent with the ants

  1. 红芪多糖3中4个组分的单糖组成分析及多糖含量测定%Analysis of the Composition of Monosaccharides and the Contents of Polysaccharides in Four Components of Radix Hedysari Polysaccharide 3

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈同强; 封士兰; ADILBEKOV J.; 赵良功; 王娟; 沈孝丽; 石义凯; 胡芳弟; 王昌; 赵安娜

    2012-01-01

    目的 对红芪多糖3(HPS-3)进行分离纯化,研究红芪多糖3中4个组分单糖组成以及多糖含量测定.方法 红芪多糖经水提醇沉,Sevag法脱蛋白,H2O2脱色,醇沉,透析,再经DEAE-cellulose 52和Sephadex G-100柱色谱纯化,得到HPS-3-A、HPS-3-B、HPS-3-C、HPS-3-D 4个组分;HPGPC法分析,4个组分均为单一组分;TLC法与GC法分析4个组分单糖组成;改良苯酚硫酸法测定4个组分中多糖含量.结果 HPS-3-A主要由葡萄糖组成,多糖含量为99.2%;而HPS-3-B、HPS-3-C、HPS-3-D主要由阿拉伯糖与半乳糖组成.多糖含量依次为96.5%,95.3%,95.2%.结论 本实验为红芪多糖3构效关系研究提供基础.%OBJECTIVE To isolate and purify radix hedysari polysaccharide 3(HPS-3) and determine the monosaccharide composition and the contents of polysaccharide in its four components. METHODS Radix Hedysari polysaccharide was extracted by water, precipitated with ethanol, treated with Sevag method, decolored with H2O2 , then precipitated with ethanol and dialyzed. By using DEAE-cellulose 52 and Sephadex G-100, HPS-3-A, HPS-3-B, HPS-3-C and HPS-3-D were purified. Their purity were determined by high performance gel permeation chromatography ( HPGPC). By TLC and GC, the monosaccharide composition of four components was analyzed, and then the modified phenol sulfuric acid method was used to determine the content of polysaccharide of the four fractions. RESULTS HPS-3-A was composed mainly of glucose, and the content of polysaccharide was 99. 2%. But HPS-3-B, HPS-3-C and HPS-3-D were all composed mainly of arabinose and galactose. The contents of polysaccharide of them were 96. 5% , 95. 3% and 95. 2% , respectively. CONCLUSION This study provides the foundation for the research of structure-function relationship of Radix Hedysari polysaccharide 3.

  2. Experimental Research on the Thermal Performance of Composite PCM Hollow Block Walls and Validation of Phase Transition Heat Transfer Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A type of concrete hollow block with typical structure and a common phase change material (PCM were adopted. The PCM was filled into the hollow blocks by which the multiform composite PCM hollow blocks were made. The temperature-changing hot chamber method was used to test the thermal performance of block walls. The enthalpy method and the effective heat capacity method were used to calculate the heat transfer process. The results of the two methods can both reach the reasonable agreement with the experimental data. The unsteady-state thermal performance of the PCM hollow block walls is markedly higher than that of the wall without PCM. Furthermore, if the temperature of the PCM in the wall does not exceed its phase transition temperature range, the PCM wall can reach high thermal performance.

  3. Modulation, functionality, and cytocompatibility of three-dimensional printing materials made from chitosan-based polysaccharide composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chin-San

    2016-12-01

    The mechanical properties, cytocompatibility, and fabrication of three-dimensional (3D) printing strips of composite materials containing polylactide (PLA) and chitosan (CS) were evaluated. Maleic anhydride-grafted polylactide (PLA-g-MA) and CS were used to enhance the desired characteristics of these composites. The PLA-g-MA/CS materials exhibited better mechanical properties than the PLA/CS composites; this effect was attributed to a greater compatibility between the grafted polyester and CS. The water resistance of the PLA-g-MA/CS composites was greater than that of the PLA/CS composites; cytocompatibility evaluation with human foreskin fibroblasts (FBs) indicated that both materials were nontoxic. Moreover, CS enhanced the antibacterial activity properties of PLA-g-MA and PLA/CS composites.

  4. Infrared and microwave properties of polypyrrole/multi-walled carbon nanotube composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Qi; Wang, Yongsheng, E-mail: yshwang@bjtu.edu.cn; He, Dawei, E-mail: dwhe@bjtu.edu.cn; Gao, Lei; Zhou, Yikang; Fu, Ming

    2014-08-01

    This study analyses the formation of polypyrrole/multi-walled carbon nanotube (PPy/MWCNT) composite materials using chemical oxidation with varying amounts of MWCNTs added. The samples are characterized by scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared emission spectroscopy, a four-probe method, and infrared thermal imaging using electromagnetic parameters. According to the test results, it is seen that the formation of PPy with the addition of MWCNTs can affect the material’s infrared properties and increase the material’s microwave return losses (up to −19 dB). This production procedure can also make the peak frequency of the microwave return losses adjustable, and the composite’s infrared and microwave performance becomes compatible and adjustable. - Highlights: • A one step in-situ synthesis method of PPy/MWCNT polymerization is proposed. • The composites were used for infrared camouflage and for their microwave properties. • The microwave return losses and infrared emissivity of the composites are adjustable. • The mechanism relies on changes in the composites’ conductivity.

  5. Power transmission through double-walled laminated composite panels considering porous layer-air gap insulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M H SHOJAEIFARD; R TALEBITOOTI; B RANJBAR; R AHMADI

    2014-01-01

    The acoustic behavior of double-walled laminated composite panels consisting of two porous and air gap middle layers is studied within the classical laminated plate theory (CLPT). Thus, viscous and inertia coupling in a dynamic equation, as well as stress transfer, thermal and elastic coupling of porous material are based on the Biot theory. In addition, the wave equations are extracted according to the vibration equation of composite layers. The transmission loss (TL) of the structure is then calculated by solving these equations simultaneously. Statistical energy analysis (SEA) is developed to divide the structure into specific subsystems, and power transmission is extracted with balancing power flow equations of the subsystems. Comparison between the present work and the results reported elsewhere shows excellent agreement. The results also indicate that, although favorable enhancement is seen in noise control particularly at high frequencies, the corresponding parameters associated with fluid phase and solid phase of the porous layer are important on TL according to the boundary condition interfaces. Finally, the influence of composite material and stacking sequence on power transmission is discussed.

  6. Broad Microwave Dielectric Property of Single-walled Carbon Nanotube Composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Junhua WU

    2008-01-01

    Microwave dielectric measurements over the broad bandwith of 10 MHz to 20 GHz were conducted on composites comprising bundles of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) embedded in an epoxy matrix, in comparison to the nano-graphite and MWNT. It is found that both relative real and imaginary permittivity of the nanocomposites are strong functions of the SWNT concentration, showing large, wide dielectric and electrical response. Distinct resonance around 1.5 GHz is observed at high SWNT concentrations, accompanied by the downshift of the resonance frequency with increasing concentration. Largely, the SWNT-epoxy composites share the behavior of the MWNT owing to structural similarity, much more effective than the nano-graphite. The remarkable, broadband dielectric and electrical properties of the nanotubes acquired in the work originate from their unique seamless graphene architectures, modeled by two major contributions, dielectric relaxation/resonance and electronic conduction, which is substantiated by the agreement between theoretical analysis and experimental results. The carbon nanotube composites are prospective for microwave applications and offer experimental evidence for fundamental studies in low-dimensional systems.

  7. Quantitative Conductive Atomic Force Microscopy on Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube-Based Polymer Composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bârsan, Oana A; Hoffmann, Günter G; van der Ven, Leendert G J; de With, Gijsbertus

    2016-08-03

    Conductive atomic force microscopy (C-AFM) is a valuable technique for correlating the electrical properties of a material with its topographic features and for identifying and characterizing conductive pathways in polymer composites. However, aspects such as compatibility between tip material and sample, contact force and area between the tip and the sample, tip degradation and environmental conditions render quantifying the results quite challenging. This study aims at finding the suitable conditions for C-AFM to generate reliable, reproducible, and quantitative current maps that can be used to calculate the resistance in each point of a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) network, nonimpregnated as well as impregnated with a polymer. The results obtained emphasize the technique's limitation at the macroscale as the resistance of these highly conductive samples cannot be distinguished from the tip-sample contact resistance. Quantitative C-AFM measurements on thin composite sections of 150-350 nm enable the separation of sample and tip-sample contact resistance, but also indicate that these sections are not representative for the overall SWCNT network. Nevertheless, the technique was successfully used to characterize the local electrical properties of the composite material, such as sample homogeneity and resistance range of individual SWCNT clusters, at the nano- and microscale.

  8. Composition of Lycium barbarum polysaccharides and their apoptosis-inducing effect on human hepatoma SMMC-7721 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Zhang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Lycium barbarum polysaccharide (LBP is a natural functional component that has a variety of biological activities. The molecular structures and apoptosis-inducing activities on human hepatoma SMMC-7721 cells of two LBP fractions, LBP-d and LBP-e, were investigated. Results: The results showed that LBP-d and LBP-e both consist of protein, uronic acid, and neutral sugars in different proportions. The structure of LBP was characterized by gas chromatography, periodate oxidation, and Smith degradation. LBP-d was composed of eight kinds of monosaccharides (fucose, ribose, rhamnose, arabinose, xylose, mannose, galactose, and glucose, while LBP-e was composed of six kinds of monosaccharides (fucose, rhamnose, arabinose, mannose, galactose, and glucose. LBP-d and LBP-e blocked SMMC-7721 cells at the G0/G1 and S phases with an inhibition ratio of 26.70 and 45.13%, respectively, and enhanced the concentration of Ca2 + in the cytoplasm of SMMC-7721. Conclusion: The contents of protein, uronic acid, and galactose in LBP-e were much higher than those in LBP-d, which might responsible for their different bioactivities. The results showed that LBP can be provided as a potential chemotherapeutic agent drug to treat cancer.

  9. Chest wall reconstruction in thoracoabdominal ectopia cordis: using the pedicled osteomuscular latissimus dorsi composite flap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampert, Joshua A; Harmaty, Marco; Thompson, Elizabeth Chabner; Sett, Suvro; Koch, R Michael

    2010-11-01

    Ectopia cordis is a rare congenital defect characterized by complete or partial displacement of the heart outside the thoracic cavity. Repair of ectopia cordis can present a reconstructive challenge often requiring a staged approach. Ideally, structural integrity and protection of the heart are restored using autologous tissues capable of growth. In addition, reconstruction of the thorax must proceed without compromise to pulmonary or cardiovascular stability. The following article describes repair of thoracoabdominal ectopia cordis in a patient with pentalogy of Cantrell. Reconstruction of the chest wall was accomplished using a musculoosseus composite flap involving segments of the 9th and 10th ribs and overlying pedicled latissimus dorsi muscle. This is the first report known to the authors of such a repair.

  10. Nitrogen fertilization affects silicon concentration, cell wall composition and biofuel potential of wheat straw

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murozuka, Emiko; Laursen, Kristian Holst; Lindedam, Jane

    2014-01-01

    Nitrogen is an essential input factor required for plant growth and biomass production. However, very limited information is available on how nitrogen fertilization affects the quality of crop residues to be used as lignocellulosic feedstock. In the present study, straw of winter wheat plants grown...... linearly from 0.32% to 0.71% over the range of nitrogen treatments. Cellulose and hemicellulose were not affected by the nitrogen supply while lignin peaked at medium rates of nitrogen application. The nitrogen treatments had a distinct influence on the silicon concentration, which decreased from 2.5% to 1...... saccharification efficiency was negatively correlated with the rate of nitrogen supply. We conclude that the level of nitrogen supply to wheat plants alters the composition of cell wall components in the straw and that this may result in reduced saccharification efficiency....

  11. Fabrication of carbon/SiO2 composites from the hydrothermal carbonization process of polysaccharide and their adsorption performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yinhui; Li, Kunyu; Su, Min; Ren, Yanmei; Li, Ying; Chen, Jianxin; Li, Liang

    2016-11-20

    In this work, carbon/SiO2 composites, using amylose and tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) as raw materials, were successfully prepared by a facial hydrothermal carbonization process. The carbon/SiO2 composites were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS), transmission electron microscope (TEM), N2 adsorption and Thermogravimetric (TG) analysis. The composites, which were made up of amorphous SiO2 and amorphous carbon, were found to have hierarchical porous structures. The mass ratios of amylose and SiO2 and the hydrothermal carbonization time had significant effects on the morphology of the composites, which had three shapes including monodispersed spheres, porous pieces and the nano-fibers combined with nano-spheres structures. The adsorption performance of the composites was studied using Pb(2+) as simulated contaminants from water. When the mass ratio of amylose and SiO2 was 9/1, the hydrothermal time was 30h and the hydrothermal temperature was 180°C, the adsorption capacity of the composites achieved to 52mg/g. Experimental data show that adsorption kinetics of the carbon/SiO2 composites can be fitted well by the Elovich model, while the isothermal data can be perfectly described by the Langmuir adsorption model and Freundlich adsorption model. The maximum adsorption capacity of the carbon/SiO2 composites is 56.18mgg(-1).

  12. Interplay of domain walls and magnetization rotation on dynamic magnetization process in iron/polymer-matrix soft magnetic composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobák, Samuel; Füzer, Ján; Kollár, Peter; Fáberová, Mária; Bureš, Radovan

    2017-03-01

    This study sheds light on the dynamic magnetization process in iron/resin soft magnetic composites from the viewpoint of quantitative decomposition of their complex permeability spectra into the viscous domain wall motion and magnetization rotation. We present a comprehensive view on this phenomenon over the broad family of samples with different average particles dimension and dielectric matrix content. The results reveal the pure relaxation nature of magnetization processes without observation of spin resonance. The smaller particles and higher amount of insulating resin result in the prevalence of rotations over domain wall movement. The findings are elucidated in terms of demagnetizing effects rising from the heterogeneity of composite materials.

  13. Secondary cell wall composition and candidate gene expression in developing willow (Salix purpurea) stems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Yongfang; Gritsch, Cristina; Tryfona, Theodora; Ray, Mike J; Andongabo, Ambrose; Hassani-Pak, Keywan; Jones, Huw D; Dupree, Paul; Karp, Angela; Shewry, Peter R; Mitchell, Rowan A C

    2014-05-01

    The properties of the secondary cell wall (SCW) in willow largely determine the suitability of willow biomass feedstock for potential bioenergy and biofuel applications. SCW development has been little studied in willow and it is not known how willow compares with model species, particularly the closely related genus Populus. To address this and relate SCW synthesis to candidate genes in willow, a tractable bud culture-derived system was developed in Salix purpurea, and cell wall composition and RNA-Seq transcriptome were followed in stems during early development. A large increase in SCW deposition in the period 0-2 weeks after transfer to soil was characterised by a big increase in xylan content, but no change in the frequency of substitution of xylan with glucuronic acid, and increased abundance of putative transcripts for synthesis of SCW cellulose, xylan and lignin. Histochemical staining and immunolabeling revealed that increased deposition of lignin and xylan was associated with xylem, xylem fibre cells and phloem fibre cells. Transcripts orthologous to those encoding xylan synthase components IRX9 and IRX10 and xylan glucuronyl transferase GUX1 in Arabidopsis were co-expressed, and showed the same spatial pattern of expression revealed by in situ hybridisation at four developmental stages, with abundant expression in proto-xylem, xylem fibre and ray parenchyma cells and some expression in phloem fibre cells. The results show a close similarity with SCW development in Populus species, but also give novel information on the relationship between spatial and temporal variation in xylan-related transcripts and xylan composition.

  14. Electrochemical detection and degradation of ibuprofen from water on multi-walled carbon nanotubes-epoxy composite electrode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sorina Motoc; Adriana Remes; Aniela Pop; Florica Manea; Joop Schoonman

    2013-01-01

    This work describes the electrochemical behaviour of ibuprofen on two types of multi-walled carbon nanotubes based composite electrodes,i.e.,multi-walled carbon nanotubes-epoxy (MWCNT) and silver-modified zeolite-multi-walled carbon nanotubes-epoxy (AgZMWCNT) composites electrodes.The composite electrodes were obtained using two-roll mill procedure.SEM images of surfaces of the composites revealed a homogeneous distribution of the composite components within the epoxy matrix.AgZMWCNT composite electrode exhibited the better electrical conductivity and larger electroactive surface area.The electrochemical determination of ibuprofen (IBP) was achieved using AgZMWCNT by cyclic voltammetry,differential-pulsed voltammetry,square-wave voltammetry and chronoamperometry.The IBP degradation occurred on both composite electrodes under controlled electrolysis at 1.2 and 1.75 V vs.Ag/AgCl,and IBP concentration was determined comparatively by differential-pulsed voltammetry,under optimized conditions using AgZMWCNT electrode and UV-Vis spectrophotometry methods to determine the IBP degradation performance for each electrode.AgZMWCNT electrode exhibited a dual character allowing a double application in IBP degradation process and its control.

  15. Characterization of diferuloylated pectic polysaccharides from quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa WILLD.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wefers, Daniel; Gmeiner, Bianca M; Tyl, Catrin E; Bunzel, Mirko

    2015-08-01

    In plants belonging to the order of Caryophyllales, pectic neutral side chains can be substituted with ferulic acid. The ability of ferulic acid to form intra- and/or intermolecular polysaccharide cross-links by dimerization was shown by the isolation and characterization of diferulic acid oligosaccharides from monocotyledonous plants. In this study, two diferulic acid oligosaccharides were isolated from the enzymatic hydrolyzate of seeds of the dicotyledonous pseudocereal quinoa by gel permeation chromatography and preparative HPLC and unambiguously identified by LC-MS(2) and 1D/2D NMR spectroscopy. The isolated oligosaccharides are comprised of 5-5- and 8-O-4-diferulic acid linked to the O2-position of the nonreducing residue of two (1→5)-linked arabinobioses. To get insight into the structure and the degree of phenolic acid substitution of the diferuloylated polysaccharides, polymeric sugar composition, glycosidic linkages, and polysaccharide-bound monomeric phenolic acids and diferulic acids were analyzed. This study demonstrates that diferulic acids are involved into intramolecular and/or intermolecular cross-linking of arabinan chains and may have a major impact on cell wall architecture of quinoa and other dicotyledonous plants of the order of Caryophyllales.

  16. 信息动态%Preparation of Polysaccharide Derivatives-based Composite Chiral Stationary Phases and Their Chiral Recognition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Two coated-type composite chiral stationary phases (CSPs) were prepared based on cellulose tris(3,5-dimethylphenylcarbamate) (CDMPC) and amylose tris (3,5-dimethylphenylcarbamate)(ADMPC) by coating the corresponding derivatives onto 3-aminopropyl silica gel separately and then mixing or by coating the mixed derivatives onto silica gel. The CSPs containing only CDMPC or ADMPC were also prepared for comparison. The mixing method does not significantly influence the enantioselectivities. The composite CSPs generally show chiral recognition abilities intermediate between those of the two individual phases, while some racemates were poorer and at the same time one was better resolved on the composite CSPs.

  17. Effect of Continuous Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes on Thermal and Mechanical Properties of Flexible Composite Film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Ji Eun; Kim, Seong Yun; Lee, Seung Hee

    2016-10-12

    To investigate the effect of continuous multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) on the thermal and mechanical properties of composites, we propose a fabrication method for a buckypaper-filled flexible composite film prepared by a two-step process involving buckypaper fabrication using vacuum filtration of MWCNTs, and composite film fabrication using the dipping method. The thermal conductivity and tensile strength of the composite film filled with the buckypaper exhibited improved results, respectively 76% and 275% greater than those of the individual MWCNT-filled composite film. It was confirmed that forming continuous MWCNT fillers is an important factor which determines the physical characteristics of the composite film. In light of the study findings, composite films using buckypaper as a filler and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) as a flexible matrix have sufficient potential to be applied as a heat-dissipating material, and as a flexible film with high thermal conductivity and excellent mechanical properties.

  18. Effect of Continuous Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes on Thermal and Mechanical Properties of Flexible Composite Film

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Eun Cha

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the effect of continuous multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs on the thermal and mechanical properties of composites, we propose a fabrication method for a buckypaper-filled flexible composite film prepared by a two-step process involving buckypaper fabrication using vacuum filtration of MWCNTs, and composite film fabrication using the dipping method. The thermal conductivity and tensile strength of the composite film filled with the buckypaper exhibited improved results, respectively 76% and 275% greater than those of the individual MWCNT-filled composite film. It was confirmed that forming continuous MWCNT fillers is an important factor which determines the physical characteristics of the composite film. In light of the study findings, composite films using buckypaper as a filler and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS as a flexible matrix have sufficient potential to be applied as a heat-dissipating material, and as a flexible film with high thermal conductivity and excellent mechanical properties.

  19. Investigation of Crack Resistance in Single Walled Carbon Nanotube Reinforced Polymer Composites Based on FEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hosein Hemmatian

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotube (CNT is considered as a new generation of material possessing superior mechanical, thermal and electrical properties. The applications of CNT, especially in composite materials, i.e. carbon nanotube reinforced polymer have received great attention and interest in recent years. To characterize the influence of CNT on the stress intensity factor of nanocomposites, three fracture modes (opening, shearing and tearing are considered. The stress intensity factor of nanocomposites is evaluated using a representative volume element (RVE based on the continuum mechanics and finite element method (FEM. Inter-atomic interactions of CNT are simulated by beam elements in the finite element (FE model. Non-linear springbased line elements are employed to simulate the van der Waals (vdW bonds. In all fracture modes, the stress intensity factor was determined for pure matrix and matrix reinforced with single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT. Numerical results indicate that the load carrying capacities of the CNTs in a matrix are evident. Addition of CNTs in a matrix can increase the stiffness of the composite. Finally, the results showed that utilizing of SWCNT decreased the stress intensity factor and improved crack resistance.

  20. Structure and Properties of Self-assembled Narural Rubber/Multi-walled Carbon Nanotube Composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG Zheng; FENG Chunfang; LUO Yongyue; YI Zhifeng; KONG Lingxue

    2011-01-01

    Natural rubber (NR)/multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNTs) composites were prepared by combining self-assembly and latex compounding techniques.The acid-treated MWCNTs (H2SO4∶HNO3=3∶1,volume ratio) were self-assembled with poly (diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDDA) through electrostatic adhesion.In the second assembling,NR/MWCNTs composites were developed by mixing MWCNTs/PDDA solution with NR latex.The results show that MWCNTs are homogenously distributed throughout the NR matrix as single tube and present a great interfacial adhesion with NR phase when MWCNTs contents are less than 3 wt%.Moreover,the addition of the MWCNTs brings about the remarkable enhancement in tensile strength and crosslink density compared with the NR host,and the data peak at 2 wt% MWCNTs loadings.When more MWCNTs are loaded,aggregations of MWCNTs are gradually generated,and the tensile strength and crosslink both decrease to a certain extent.

  1. Compositional change of some first wall materials by considering multiple step nuclear reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noda, Tetsuji; Utsumi, Misako; Fujita, Mitsutane [National Research Inst. for Metals, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1997-03-01

    The conceptual system for nuclear material design is considered and some trials on WWW server with functions of the easily accessible simulation of nuclear reactions are introduced. Moreover, as an example of the simulation on the system using nuclear data, transmutation calculation was made for candidate first wall materials such as 9Cr-2W steel, V-5Cr-5Ti and SiC in SUS316/Li{sub 2}O/H{sub 2}O(SUS), 9Cr-2WLi{sub 2}O/H{sub 2}O(RAF), V alloy/Li/Be(V), and SiC/Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3}/He(SiC) blanket/shield systems based on ITER design model. Neutron spectrum varies with different blanket/shield compositions. The flux of low energy neutrons decreases in order of V-SiC-RAF-SUS blanket/shield systems. Fair amounts of W depletion in 9Cr-2W steel and the increase of Cr content in V-5Cr-5Ti were predicted in SUS or RAF systems. Concentration change in W and Cr is estimated to be suppressed if Li coolant is used in place of water. Helium and hydrogen production are not strongly affected by the different blanket/shield compositions. (author)

  2. Temperature-compensated force/pressure sensor based on multi-walled carbon nanotube epoxy composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinh, Nghia Trong; Kanoun, Olfa

    2015-05-12

    In this study, we propose a multi-walled carbon nanotube epoxy composite sensor for force and pressure sensing in the range of 50 N-2 kN. A manufacturing procedure, including material preparation and deposition techniques, is proposed. The electrode dimensions and the layer thickness were optimized by the finite element method. Temperature compensation is realized by four nanocomposites elements, where only two elements are exposed to the measurand. In order to investigate the influence of the filler contents, samples with different compositions were prepared and investigated. Additionally, the specimens are characterized by cyclical and stepped force/pressure loads or at defined temperatures. The results show that the choice of the filler content should meet a compromise between sensitivity, temperature influence and noise behavior. At constant temperature, a force of at least 50N can be resolved. The measurement error due to the temperature influence is 150N in a temperature range of -20°C-50°C.

  3. Defect Characterization in a Thin Walled Composite RP-1 Tank: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langsing, Matthew D.; Walker, James L., II; Russell, Samual S.

    2000-01-01

    A full scale thin walled composite tank, designed and fabricated for the storage of pressurized RP- I rocket fuel, was fully inspected with digital infrared thermography (IR) during assembly and prior to proof testing. The tank featured a "pill capsule" design with the equatorial bondline being overwrapped on both the inner and outer surfaces. A composite skirt was bonded to the aft dome of the tank to serve as a structural support when the tank was stood on end in service. Numerous anomalies were detected and mapped prior to proof testing, some along bondlines and some scattered throughout the acreage. After the tank was intentionally burst, coupons were cut from the regions including thermographic anomalies. These coupons were again inspected thermographically to document the growth of any indications due to proof testing. Ultrasonic inspections (UT) were also performed on the coupons for comparison to thermography. Several coupons were dissected and micrographed. Relationships between IR and UT indications and the physical nature of the dissected material are presented.

  4. Evidence for land plant cell wall biosynthetic mechanisms in charophyte green algae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Maria Dalgaard; Harholt, Jesper; Ulvskov, Peter

    2014-01-01

    to colonize land. These cell walls provide support and protection, are a source of signalling molecules, and provide developmental cues for cell differentiation and elongation. The cell wall of land plants is a highly complex fibre composite, characterized by cellulose cross-linked by non......BACKGROUND AND AIMS: The charophyte green algae (CGA) are thought to be the closest living relatives to the land plants, and ancestral CGA were unique in giving rise to the land plant lineage. The cell wall has been suggested to be a defining structure that enabled the green algal ancestor......-cellulosic polysaccharides, such as xyloglucan, embedded in a matrix of pectic polysaccharides. How the land plant cell wall evolved is currently unknown: early-divergent chlorophyte and prasinophyte algae genomes contain a low number of glycosyl transferases (GTs), while land plants contain hundreds. The number of GTs...

  5. Electrochemical Determination of Pentachlorophenol in Water on a Multi-Wall Carbon Nanotubes-Epoxy Composite Electrode

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Remes, A.; Pop, A.; Manea, F.; Baciu, A.; Picken, S.J.; Schoonman, J.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was the preparation, characterization, and application of a multi-wall carbon nanotubes-epoxy composite electrode (MWCNT-EP) with 25%, wt. MWCNTs loading for the voltammetric/amperometric determination of pentachlorophenol (PCP) in aqueous solutions. The structural and

  6. Electrochemical Determination of Pentachlorophenol in Water on a Multi-Wall Carbon Nanotubes-Epoxy Composite Electrode

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Remes, A.; Pop, A.; Manea, F.; Baciu, A.; Picken, S.J.; Schoonman, J.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was the preparation, characterization, and application of a multi-wall carbon nanotubes-epoxy composite electrode (MWCNT-EP) with 25%, wt. MWCNTs loading for the voltammetric/amperometric determination of pentachlorophenol (PCP) in aqueous solutions. The structural and morpholo

  7. Biochemical Aspects of Non-Starch Polysaccharides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodica Căpriţă

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Polysaccharides are macromolecules of monosaccharides linked by glycosidic bonds. Non-starch polysaccharides (NSP are principally non-α-glucan polysaccharides of the plant cell wall. They are a heterogeneous group of polysaccharides with varying degrees of water solubility, size, and structure. The water insoluble fiber fraction include cellulose, galactomannans, xylans, xyloglucans, and lignin, while the water-soluble fibers are the pectins, arabinogalactans, arabinoxylans, and β-(1,3(1,4-D-glucans (β-glucans. Knowledge of the chemical structure of NSP has permitted the development of enzyme technology to overcome their antinutritional effects. The physiological effects of NSP on the digestion and absorption of nutrients in human and monogastric animals have been attributed to their physicochemical properties: hydration properties, viscosity, cation exchange capacity and organic compound absorptive properties. This paper reviews and presents information on NSPs chemistry, physicochemical properties and physiological effects on the nutrient entrapment.

  8. Composition and Antitumor Activity of Polysaccharides from Sarcodon imbricatus%黑虎掌菌多糖的组成和抗肿瘤活性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈健; 张灵芝; 韦丁; 徐晓飞

    2011-01-01

    Two kinds of polysaccharides, namely SIPa and SIPb, were obtained from the fruit body of Sarcodon im-bricatus via isolation and purification. Then, the IR spectra of the products were investigated, and the relative molecular mass and monosaccharide composition of each product were determined by means of high-performance gel permeation chromatography and gas chromatography. Moreover, the antitumor activities of the two products were evaluated by means of the MTT method. The results show that (1) SIPa and SIPb both possess typical infrared absorptions of polysaccharides; (2) the sugar chain of SIPa is mainly β-configuration pyranoside; (3) the weight-average relative molecular mass of SIPa and SIPb are respectively 2. 12 × 105 and 1. 05 × 104; (4) SIPa is a kind of glucan while SIPb is a kind of heteroglycan containing fucose, mannose, glucose and galactose in a molar ratio of 8. 93:1:4. 25:29. 18; and (5) both SIPa and SIPb remarkably inhibit the growth of human liver cancer cell line Hep G2 and human ovarian cancer cell line HO-8910 in a dose-dependent manner.%从黑虎掌菌的子实体中分离纯化得到两种多糖SIPa和SIPb,考察了它们的红外光谱特征,通过高效凝胶渗透色谱法和气相色谱法测定其相对分子质量和单糖组成,用MTT比色法进行抗肿瘤活性评价.结果表明:SIPa和SIPb都具有典型的多糖红外吸收,SIPa的糖链以β型吡喃糖苷为主;SIPa和SIPb的重均相对分子质量分别为2.12×105和1.05×104;SIPa是一种葡聚糖,SIPb是一种杂多糖,含有岩藻糖、甘露糖、葡萄糖和半乳糖,摩尔比为8.93:1:4.25:29.18;SIPa和SIPb对人肝癌细胞Hep G2和人卵巢癌细胞HO-8910都具有明显的抑制作用,且呈剂量依赖性.

  9. The nature of an in vivo anti-capsular polysaccharide response is markedly influenced by the composition and/or architecture of the bacterial subcapsular domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arjunaraja, Swadhinya; Massari, Paola; Wetzler, Lee M; Lees, Andrew; Colino, Jesus; Snapper, Clifford M

    2012-01-15

    In vivo anti-polysaccharide Ig responses to isolated polysaccharide (PS) are T cell independent, rapid, and fail to generate memory. However, little is known regarding PS-specific Ig responses to intact gram-positive and gram-negative extracellular bacteria. We previously demonstrated that intact heat-killed Streptococcus pneumoniae, a gram-positive bacterium, elicited a rapid primary pneumococcal capsular PS (PPS) response in mice that was dependent on CD4(+) T cells, B7-dependent costimulation, and CD40-CD40L interactions. However, this response was ICOS independent and failed to generate a boosted PPS-specific secondary IgG response. In the current study, we analyzed the murine meningococcal type C PS (MCPS)-specific Ig response to i.p.-injected intact, heat-killed Neisseria meningitidis, serogroup C (MenC), a gram-negative bacterium. In contrast to S. pneumoniae, the IgG anti-MCPS response to MenC exhibited delayed primary kinetics and was highly boosted after secondary immunization, whereas the IgG anti-MCPS response to isolated MCPS was rapid, without secondary boosting, and consisted of only IgG1 and IgG3, as opposed to all four IgG isotypes in response to intact MenC. The secondary, but not primary, IgG anti-MCPS response to MenC was dependent on CD4(+) T cells, CD40L, CD28, and ICOS. The primary and secondary IgG anti-MCPS responses were lower in TLR4-defective (C3H/HeJ) but not TLR2(-/-) or MyD88(-/-) mice, but secondary boosting was still observed. Of interest, coimmunization of S. pneumoniae and MenC resulted in a boosted secondary IgG anti-PPS response to S. pneumoniae. Our data demonstrate that the nature of the in vivo anti-PS response is markedly influenced by the composition and/or architecture of the bacterial subcapsular domain.

  10. Characterization of the glucansucrase GTF180 W1065 mutant enzymes producing polysaccharides and oligosaccharides with altered linkage composition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meng, Xiangfeng; Pijning, Tjaard; Tietema, Martin; Dobruchowska, Justyna M; Yin, Huifang; Gerwig, Gerrit J; Kralj, Slavko; Dijkhuizen, Lubbert

    2017-01-01

    Exopolysaccharides produced by lactic acid bacteria are extensively used for food applications. Glucansucrase enzymes of lactic acid bacteria use sucrose to catalyze the synthesis of α-glucans with different linkage compositions, size and physico-chemical properties. Crystallographic studies of

  11. Crystallization and mechanical properties of functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes/polyvinylidene fluoride composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Jing; Iftekharul Haque, Rubaiyet; Larsen, Mikael

    2012-01-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes were purified and functionalized by nitric acid and octadecylamine. Raman and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy were used to characterize the functionalization of the single-walled carbon nanotubes. Polyvinylidene flouride nanocomposites containing 1 wt......% purified or functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes were prepared by solution blending and injection molding. The dispersion of different carbon nanotubes in dimethylformamide and in polyvinylidene flouride has been investigated. Mechanical properties show that adding single-walled carbon nanotubes...

  12. Changes in tissue composition of the vaginal wall of premenopausal women with prolapse

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerkhof, M.H.; Ruiz-Zapata, A.M.; Bril, H.; Bleeker, M.C.G.; Belien, J.A.M.; Stoop, R.; Helder, M.N.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to compare histological and biochemical features of the (normal) precervical anterior vaginal wall and the prolapsed anterior vaginal wall of women with pelvic organ prolapse (POP). These data were compared to tissue of the precervical anterior vaginal wall

  13. Cell wall composition and candidate biosynthesis gene expression during rice development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lin, Fan; Manisseri, Chithra; Fagerström, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    Cell walls of grasses, including cereal crops and biofuel grasses, comprise the majority of plant biomass and intimately influence plant growth, development and physiology. However, the functions of many cell wall synthesis genes, and the relationships among and the functions of cell wall...

  14. Polysaccharides of green Arabica and Robusta coffee beans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, M; Reimann, S; Trovato, V; Redgwell, R J

    2001-01-15

    Two independent procedures for the quantitative determination of the polysaccharide content of Arabica Caturra (Coffea arabica var. Caturra) and Robusta ROM (Coffea canephora var. ROM) green coffee beans showed that they both contained identical amounts of polysaccharide. Cell wall material (CWM) was prepared from the beans and partial solubilisation of component polysaccharides was effected by sequential extraction with water, 1 M KOH, 0.3% NaClO2, 4 M KOH and 8 M KOH. The monosaccharide compositions of the CWMs were similar, although Arabica beans contained slightly more mannose than Robusta. In the latter, more arabinogalactan was solubilised during preparation of the CWM and the water-soluble fraction of the CWM contained higher amounts of galactomannan than in Arabica. Linkage analysis indicated that the galactomannans possessed unbranched to branched mannose ratios between 14:1 and 30:1 which is higher than previously reported. No major difference in the structural features of the galactomannans between species was found. The arabinogalactans were heterogeneous both with regard to the degree of branching and the degree of polymerisation of their arabinan side-chains. Compared to Arabica, Robusta appeared to contain greater amounts of arabinogalactans with longer side chains. It is concluded that there was no detectable difference between the Arabica and Robusta varieties of this study in their absolute polysaccharide content or in the gross structural features of their galactomannans. Differences were apparent both in the structural features and ease of solubility of the arabinogalactans but a more detailed study of several varieties of Arabica and Robusta will be required to determine whether these differences occur consistently between species.

  15. Trans-Golgi Network-An Intersection of Trafficking Cell Wall Components

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Natasha Worden; Eunsook Park; Georgia Drakakaki

    2012-01-01

    The cell wall,a crucial cell compartment,is composed of a network of polysaccharides and proteins,providing structural support and protection from external stimuli.While the cell wall structure and biosynthesis have been extensively studied,very little is known about the transport of polysaccharides and other components into the developing cell wall.This review focuses on endomembrane trafficking pathways involved in cell wall deposition.Cellulose synthase complexes are assembled in the Golgi,and are transported in vesicles to the plasma membrane.Non-cellulosic polysaccharides are synthesized in the Golgi apparatus,whereas cellulose is produced by enzyme complexes at the plasma membrane.Polvsaccharides and enzymes that are involved in cell wall modification and assembly are transported by distinct vesicle types to their destinations; however,the precise mechanisms involved in selection,sorting and delivery remain to be identified.The endomembrane system orchestrates the delivery of Golgi-derived and possibly endocytic vesicles carrying cell wall and cell membrane components to the newly-formed cell plate.However,the nature of these vesicles,their membrane compositions,and the timing of their delivery are largely unknown.Emerging technologies such as chemical genomics and proteomics are promising avenues to gain insight into the trafficking of cell wall components.

  16. Characterization of serological cross-reactivity between polysaccharide antigens of Streptococcus mutans serotypes c and d.

    OpenAIRE

    Grossi, S.; Prakobphol, A; Linzer, R; Campbell, L K; Knox, K W

    1983-01-01

    Immunological assays with antisera prepared against purified Streptococcus mutans serotype c polysaccharide demonstrated that a cross-reacting determinant on c polysaccharide reacted with the wall-associated rhamnose-glucose polysaccharide from S. mutans serotype d. Studies with 60 antisera prepared against chemostat cultures of S. mutans Ingbritt (c) demonstrated that the rhamnose-glucose polysaccharide cross-reactive determinant was consistently expressed on c antigen under a variety of gro...

  17. Compositional profile and variation of Distillers Dried Grains with Solubles from various origins with focus on non-starch polysaccharides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Mads Brøgger; Dalsgaard, S.; Knudsen, Knud Erik Bach

    2014-01-01

    Corn-, wheat- and mixed cereal Distillers' Dried Grains with Solubles (DDGS) were investigated for compositional variability among DDGS origins, ethanol plants, and the relationship between corn and corresponding DDGS. A total of 138 DDGS samples were analyzed by use of Near Infrared Reflectance...... nutrients (e.g. protein, fat, fibre and minerals) after fermentation of starch to ethanol. Corn DDGS differentiated from wheat DDGS by a greater content of fat (P≤0.006), insoluble-NSP (P... of the DDGS, principal component analysis allowed for a visual differentiation of corn DDGS from five different ethanol plants, indicating the potential of each ethanol plant to produce DDGS with consistent compositional characteristics. Furthermore, investigation of corn and corresponding DDGS indicated...

  18. Mechanically relevant consequences of the composite laminate-like design of the abdominal wall muscles and connective tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Stephen H M

    2012-05-01

    Together, three abdominal wall muscles (external oblique, internal oblique and transversus abdominis) form a tightly bound muscular sheet that has been likened to a composite-laminate structure. Previous work has demonstrated the ability of force generated by these three muscles to be passed between one another through connective tissue linkages. Muscle fibres in each muscle are obliquely oriented with respect to its neighbouring muscles. It is proposed here is that this unique morphology of the abdominal wall muscles functions, through the application of constraining forces amongst the muscles, to increase force- and stiffness-generating capabilities. This paper presents a mathematical formulation of the stress-strain relationship for a transversely isotropic fibrous composite, and establishes a strengthening and stiffening effect when stress can be transferred between the fibrous layers. Application of empirical mechanical properties to this formulation demonstrates this effect for the abdominal wall muscles and, in greater proportion, for the anterior aponeurosis of the abdominal wall. This has implications for increasing the stiffness and passive load bearing ability of the abdominal wall muscles, and has the potential to modulate the whole muscle force-length and force-velocity relationships during contraction.

  19. Carbohydrate composition and in vitro digestibility of dry matter and nonstarch polysaccharides in corn, sorghum, and wheat and coproducts from these grains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaworski, N W; Lærke, H N; Bach Knudsen, K E; Stein, H H

    2015-03-01

    The objectives of this work were to determine carbohydrate composition and in vitro digestibility of DM and nonstarch polysaccharides (NSP) in corn, wheat, and sorghum and coproducts from these grains. In the initial part of this work, the carbohydrate composition of 12 feed ingredients was determined. The 12 ingredients included 3 grains (corn, sorghum, and wheat), 3 coproducts from the dry grind industry (corn distillers dried grains with solubles [DDGS] and 2 sources of sorghum DDGS), 4 coproducts from the wet milling industry (corn gluten meal, corn gluten feed, corn germ meal, and corn bran), and 2 coproducts from the flour milling industry (wheat middlings and wheat bran). Results indicated that grains contained more starch and less NSP compared with grain coproducts. The concentration of soluble NSP was low in all ingredients. Cellulose, arabinoxylans, and other hemicelluloses made up approximately 22, 49, and 29% (DM basis), respectively, of the NSP in corn and corn coproducts and approximately 25, 43, and 32% (DM basis), respectively, of the NSP in sorghum and sorghum DDGS. Cellulose, arabinoxylans, and other hemicelluloses made up approximately 16, 64, and 20% (DM basis), respectively, of the NSP in wheat and wheat coproducts. The concentration of lignin in grains was between 0.8 and 1.8% (DM basis), whereas coproducts contained between 2.2 and 11.5% lignin (DM basis). The in vitro ileal digestibility of NSP was close to zero or negative for all feed ingredients, indicating that pepsin and pancreas enzymes have no effect on in vitro degradation of NSP. A strong negative correlation ( = 0.97) between in vitro ileal digestibility of DM and the concentration of NSP in feed ingredients was observed. In vitro total tract digestibility of NSP ranged from 6.5% in corn bran to 57.3% in corn gluten meal. In conclusion, grains and grain coproducts contain mostly insoluble NSP and arabinoxylans make up the majority of the total NSP fraction. The in vitro

  20. Following the compositional changes of fresh grape skin cell walls during the fermentation process in the presence and absence of maceration enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zietsman, Anscha J J; Moore, John P; Fangel, Jonatan U; Willats, William G T; Trygg, Johan; Vivier, Melané A

    2015-03-18

    Cell wall profiling technologies were used to follow compositional changes that occurred in the skins of grape berries (from two different ripeness levels) during fermentation and enzyme maceration. Multivariate data analysis showed that the fermentation process yielded cell walls enriched in hemicellulose components because pectin was solubilized (and removed) with a reduction as well as exposure of cell wall proteins usually embedded within the cell wall structure. The addition of enzymes caused even more depectination, and the enzymes unravelled the cell walls enabling better access to, and extraction of, all cell wall polymers. Overripe grapes had cell walls that were extensively hydrolyzed and depolymerized, probably by natural grape-tissue-ripening enzymes, and this enhanced the impact that the maceration enzymes had on the cell wall monosaccharide profile. The combination of the techniques that were used is an effective direct measurement of the hydrolysis actions of maceration enzymes on the cell walls of grape berry skin.

  1. Inkjet printing of multi-walled carbon nanotube/polymer composite thin film for interconnection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lok, Boon Keng; Ng, You Min; Liang, Yen Nan; Hu, Xiao

    2010-07-01

    In this paper, multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) ink was selectively patterned by inkjet printing on substrates to form conductive traces and electrodes for interconnection application. MWCNT was firstly functionalized using concentrated acid and dispersed in deionized water to form a colloidal solution. Various concentrations of MWCNT were formulated to test the stability of the solution. The printability of the MWCNT ink was examined against printing temperature, ink concentration and ink droplet pitch. Rheological properties of the ink were determined by rheometer and sessile drop method. The electrical conductivity of the MWCNT pattern was measured against multiple printing of MWCNT on the same pattern (up to 10 layers). While single layer printing pattern exhibited highest resistance, the CNT entangled together and formed a random network with more printed layers has higher conductivity. The electrical properties of the printed film was compared to a composite ink of CNT and conducting polymer (CNT ink was mixed with conductive polymer solution, Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)-Poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS)). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to observe the surface structure and atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to study the morphology of the printed film under different conditions.

  2. Stability of Cell Wall Composition and Saccharification Efficiency in Miscanthus across Diverse Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Weijde, Tim; Dolstra, Oene; Visser, Richard G. F.; Trindade, Luisa M.

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the potential effects of differences between growth locations on the cell wall composition and saccharification efficiency of the bioenergy crop miscanthus, a diverse set of 15 accessions were evaluated in six locations across Europe for the first 3 years following establishment. High-throughput quantification of cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin contents, as well as cellulose and hemicellulose conversion rates was achieved by combining near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy (NIRS) and biochemical analysis. Prediction models were developed and found to predict biomass quality characteristics with high accuracy. Location significantly affected biomass quality characteristics in all three cultivation years, but location-based differences decreased toward the third year as the plants reached maturity and the effect of location-dependent differences in the rate of establishment reduced. In all locations extensive variation in accession performance was observed for quality traits. The performance of the different accessions in the second and third cultivation year was strongly correlated, while accession performance in the first cultivation year did not correlate well with performance in later years. Significant genotype-by-environment (G × E) interactions were observed for most traits, revealing differences between accessions in environmental sensitivity. Stability analysis of accession performance for calculated ethanol yields suggested that selection for good and stable performance is a viable approach. Environmental influence on biomass quality is substantial and should be taken into account in order to match genotype, location and end-use of miscanthus as a lignocellulose feedstock. PMID:28111583

  3. Unusual thermal conduction characteristics of phase change composites with single-walled carbon nanotube inclusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harish, Sivasankaran; Ishikawa, Kei; Chiashi, Shohei; Shiomi, Junichiro; Maruyama, Shigeo

    2013-03-01

    Thermal energy storage using phase transition materials is often employed in many engineering applications. However, the low thermal conductivity of such materials inhibits its use for large scale applications. Recently, Zheng et al. [Nature Comm. 2011] demonstrated an efficient technique using graphite suspensions to tune the thermal and electrical conductivity using temperature regulation. In this work, we report large contrasts in thermal conductivity enhancement of nano composites with single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) inclusions using first order phase transition process. SWCNTs synthesized by alcohol CVD were dispersed in n-octadecane by tip-sonication with sodium deoxycholate as the surfactant. Thermal conductivity measurements were carried out with transient hot-wire system [Mater. Express 2012]. Thermal conductivity enhancement in the liquid state was found to be nominal and is consistent with the predictions of Maxwell- Garnett type effective medium theory. However, in the frozen state nearly a 2.5 fold increase in thermal conductivity was observed. Similar temperature dependent thermal conductivity contrast was observed when exfoliated graphite nanoplatelets were used as the inclusions. Financial support from Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research (22226006 and 19054003), Monbukagakusho Scholarship, Global Center of Excellence for Mechanical Systems Innovation

  4. Potentiometric urea biosensor based on multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs)/silica composite material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahuja, Tarushee [National Physical Laboratory (Council of Scientific and Industrial Research), Dr. K.S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi-110012 (India); Department of Applied Chemistry, Delhi College of Engineering, University of Delhi, Bawana Road, Delhi-110042 (India); Kumar, D. [Department of Applied Chemistry, Delhi College of Engineering, University of Delhi, Bawana Road, Delhi-110042 (India); Singh, Nahar; Biradar, A.M. [National Physical Laboratory (Council of Scientific and Industrial Research), Dr. K.S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi-110012 (India); Rajesh, E-mail: rajesh_csir@yahoo.com [National Physical Laboratory (Council of Scientific and Industrial Research), Dr. K.S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi-110012 (India)

    2011-03-12

    A novel potentiometric urea biosensor has been fabricated with urease (Urs) immobilized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) embedded in silica matrix deposited on the surface of indium tin oxide (ITO) coated glass plate. The enzyme Urs was covalently linked with the exposed free -COOH groups of functionalized MWCNTs (F-MWCNTs), which are subsequently incorporated within the silica matrix by sol-gel method. The Urs/MWCNTs/SiO{sub 2}/ITO composite modified electrode was characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) and UV-visible spectroscopy. The morphologies and electrochemical performance of the modified Urs/MWCNTs/SiO{sub 2}/ITO electrode have been investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and potentiometric method, respectively. The synergistic effect of silica matrix, F-MWCNTs and biocompatibility of Urs/MWCNTs/SiO{sub 2} made the biosensor to have the excellent electro catalytic activity and high stability. The resulting biosensor exhibits a good response performance to urea detection with a wide linear range from 2.18 x 10{sup -5} to 1.07 x 10{sup -3} M urea. The biosensor shows a short response time of 10-25 s and a high sensitivity of 23 mV/decade/cm{sup 2}.

  5. Production and mechanical properties of aligned multi-walled carbon nanotubes-M140 composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the production of M140, aligned multi-walled carbon nanotubes (A-MWNTs) reinforced M140 composites (A-MWNTs-M140) and their mechanical properties including their compressive and bending properties as well as their microstructure characteristic of bend fracture surface. M140 was first produced by speed change mixing technics with commercial materials, water-bath curing at normal temperature. In addition, two different A-MWNTs dispersions including carbonyl disper- sions of A-MWNTs (C-A-MWNTs) and aqueous dispersions of A-MWNTs (A-A-MWNTs) with the addition of 0.01wt% A-MWNTs were utilized to obtain enhanced mechanical properties with respect to plain M140. The results indicated that the use of A-MWNTs dispersions allows increasing compressive strength and flexural strength by 8.4% and 5.4%, respectively for the C-A-MWNTs-M140, and by 15.9% and 20.7% for the A-A-MWNTs-M140, respectively. The SEM and EPMA examinations of fracture surface also showed that the bond interface between the nanotubes and matrix is moderate and the main reinforcing mechanisms are microfilling effect, CNTs pull-out and debond. The aqueous dispersion of A-MWNTs is an appropriate method and is more compatible with the M140.

  6. Production and mechanical properties of aligned multi-walled carbon nanotubes-M140 composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU ShiLang; GAO LiangLi; JIN WeiJun

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the production of M140, aligned multi-walled carbon nanotubes (A-MWNTs)reinforced M140 composites (A-MWNTs-M140) and their mechanical properties including their compressive and bending properties as well as their microstructure characteristic of bend fracture surface.M140 was first produced by speed change mixing technics with commercial materials, water-bath curing at normal temperature. In addition, two different A-MWNTs dispersions including carbonyl dispersions of A-MWNTs (C-A-MWNTs) and aqueous dispersions of A-MWNTs (A-A-MWNTs) with the addition of 0.01wt% A-MWNTs were utilized to obtain enhanced mechanical properties with respect to plain M140. The results indicated that the use of A-MWNTs dispersions allows increasing compressive strength and flexural strength by 8.4% and 5.4%, respectively for the C-A-MWNTs-M140, and by 15.9% and 20.7% for the A-A-MWNTs-M140, respectively. The SEM and EPMA examinations of fracture surface also showed that the bond interface between the nanotubes and matrix is moderate and the main reinforcing mechanisms are microfilling effect, CNTs pull-out and debond. The aqueous dispersion of A-MWNTs is an appropriate method and is more compatible with the M140.

  7. Raman and electrochemical impedance studies of sol-gel titanium oxide and single walled carbon nanotubes composite films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rincón, M E; Trujillo-Camacho, M E; Miranda-Hernández, M; Cuentas-Gallegos, A K; Orozco, G

    2007-01-01

    Titanium oxide grown by a sol-gel route on single-walled carbon nanotubes was studied by Raman and Electrochemical Impedance techniques and compared with mixtures obtained by mechanical grinding. In spite of the superior dispersion of single-walled carbon nanotubes bundles in sol-gel composites, the lost of the small-diameter carbon nanotubes in the oxidizing sol-gel bath was inferred from their Raman spectra and the lower capacitive current of the voltammograms in 0.1 M H2SO4. We proposed proton electrosorption as the main charge storage mechanism for sol-gel composites, favoured by the hydroxylation and n-type conductivity of the oxide, while electrodes based on mixtures were dominated by double-layer charging, developing some pseudocapacitance with potential cycling due to the reversible oxidation of carbon nanotubes. Comparsion with TiO2/Carbon Blacks composites shows the effective role of single-walled carbon nanotubes as templates to control the mesoporous nature of sol-gel composite electrodes.

  8. In vitro evaluation of three-dimensional single-walled carbon nanotube composites for bone tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Ashim; Main, Benjamin J; Taylor, Brittany L; Gupta, Manu; Whitworth, Craig A; Cady, Craig; Freeman, Joseph W; El-Amin, Saadiq F

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop three-dimensional single-walled carbon nanotube composites (SWCNT/PLAGA) using 10-mg single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) for bone regeneration and to determine the mechanical strength of the composites, and to evaluate the interaction of MC3T3-E1 cells via cell adhesion, growth, survival, proliferation, and gene expression. PLAGA (polylactic-co-glycolic acid) and SWCNT/PLAGA microspheres and composites were fabricated, characterized, and mechanical testing was performed. MC3T3-E1 cells were seeded and cell adhesion/morphology, growth/survival, proliferation, and gene expression analysis were performed to evaluate biocompatibility. Imaging studies demonstrated microspheres with uniform shape and smooth surfaces, and uniform incorporation of SWCNT into PLAGA matrix. The microspheres bonded in a random packing manner while maintaining spacing, thus resembling trabeculae of cancellous bone. Addition of SWCNT led to greater compressive modulus and ultimate compressive strength. Imaging studies revealed that MC3T3-E1 cells adhered, grew/survived, and exhibited normal, nonstressed morphology on the composites. SWCNT/PLAGA composites exhibited higher cell proliferation rate and gene expression compared with PLAGA. These results demonstrate the potential of SWCNT/PLAGA composites for musculoskeletal regeneration, for bone tissue engineering, and are promising for orthopedic applications as they possess the combined effect of increased mechanical strength, cell proliferation, and gene expression.

  9. Chemical composition and molecular structure of polysaccharide-protein biopolymer from Durio zibethinus seed: extraction and purification process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amid Bahareh

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The biological functions of natural biopolymers from plant sources depend on their chemical composition and molecular structure. In addition, the extraction and further processing conditions significantly influence the chemical and molecular structure of the plant biopolymer. The main objective of the present study was to characterize the chemical and molecular structure of a natural biopolymer from Durio zibethinus seed. A size-exclusion chromatography coupled to multi angle laser light-scattering (SEC-MALS was applied to analyze the molecular weight (Mw, number average molecular weight (Mn, and polydispersity index (Mw/Mn. Results The most abundant monosaccharide in the carbohydrate composition of durian seed gum were galactose (48.6-59.9%, glucose (37.1-45.1%, arabinose (0.58-3.41%, and xylose (0.3-3.21%. The predominant fatty acid of the lipid fraction from the durian seed gum were palmitic acid (C16:0, palmitoleic acid (C16:1, stearic acid (C18:0, oleic acid (C18:1, linoleic acid (C18:2, and linolenic acid (C18:2. The most abundant amino acids of durian seed gum were: leucine (30.9-37.3%, lysine (6.04-8.36%, aspartic acid (6.10-7.19%, glycine (6.07-7.42%, alanine (5.24-6.14%, glutamic acid (5.57-7.09%, valine (4.5-5.50%, proline (3.87-4.81%, serine (4.39-5.18%, threonine (3.44-6.50%, isoleucine (3.30-4.07%, and phenylalanine (3.11-9.04%. Conclusion The presence of essential amino acids in the chemical structure of durian seed gum reinforces its nutritional value.

  10. Rapid Determination of the Monosaccharide Composition and Contents in Tea Polysaccharides from Yingshuang Green Tea by Pre-Column Derivatization HPLC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yujie Ai

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A pre-column derivatization high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC method was developed and optimized to characterize and quantify the monosaccharides present in tea polysaccharides (TPS isolated from Yingshuang green tea. TPS sample was hydrolyzed with trifluoroacetic acid, subjected to pre-column derivatization using 1-phenyl-3-methyl-5-pyrazolone (PMP, and separated on an Agilent TC-C18 column (4.6 mm × 250 mm, 5 μm with UV detection at 250 nm. A mixture of ten PMP derivatives of standard monosaccharides (mannose, ribose, rhamnose, glucuronic acid, galacturonic acid, glucose, xylose, galactose, arabinose, and fucose could be baseline separated within 20 min. Moreover, quantitative analysis of the component monosaccharides in Yingshuang green tea TPS was achieved, indicating the TPS consisted of mannose, ribose, rhamnose, glucuronic acid, galacturonic acid, glucose, xylose, galactose, and arabinose in the molar contents of 0.72, 0.78, 0.89, 0.13, 0.15, 0.36, 0.39, 0.36, 0.36, and 0.38 μM, respectively. Recovery efficiency for component monosaccharides from TPS ranged from 93.6 to 102.4% with RSD values lower than 2.5%. In conclusion, pre-column derivatization HPLC provides a rapid, reproducible, accurate, and quantitative method for analysis of the monosaccharide composition and contents in TPS, which may help to further explore the relationship between TPS monosaccharides isolated from different tea varieties and their biological activity.

  11. Thioridazine Induces Major Changes in Global Gene Expression and Cell Wall Composition in Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus USA300

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsing, Mette; Klitgaard, Janne Kudsk; Atilano, Magda L.

    2013-01-01

    . In the present study, we have examined the effect of a subinhibitory concentration of TDZ on antimicrobial resistance, the global transcriptome, and the cell wall composition of MRSA USA300. We show that TDZ is able to sensitize the bacteria to several classes of antimicrobials targeting the late stages...... and the transcriptomic response of S. aureus to known inhibitors of cell wall synthesis suggests that TDZ disturbs PGN biosynthesis at a stage that precedes transpeptidation by penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs). In support of this notion, dramatic changes in the muropeptide profile of USA300 were observed following...... a major impact on the cell wall biosynthesis pathway in S. aureus and provides new insights into how MRSA may be sensitized towards β-lactam antibiotics....

  12. Variable-viscosity thermal hemodynamic slip flow conveying nanoparticles through a permeable-walled composite stenosed artery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbar, Noreen Sher; Tripathi, Dharmendra; Bég, O. Anwar

    2017-07-01

    This paper presents a mathematical model for simulating viscous, incompressible, steady-state blood flow containing copper nanoparticles and coupled heat transfer through a composite stenosed artery with permeable walls. Wall slip hydrodynamic and also thermal buoyancy effects are included. The artery is simulated as an isotropic elastic tube, following Joshi et al. (2009), and a variable viscosity formulation is employed for the flowing blood. The equations governing the transport phenomena are non-dimensionalized and the resulting boundary value problem is solved analytically in the steady state subject to physically appropriate boundary conditions. Numerical computations are conducted to quantify the effects of relevant hemodynamic, thermophysical and nanoscale parameters emerging in the model on velocity and temperature profiles, wall shear stress, impedance resistance and also streamline distributions. The model may be applicable to drug fate transport modeling with nanoparticle agents and also to the optimized design of nanoscale medical devices for diagnosing stenotic diseases in circulatory systems.

  13. Fabrication of single/multi-walled hybrid buckypaper composites and their enhancement of electromagnetic interference shielding performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Shaowei; Shao, Junyan; Ma, Keming; Wang, Xiaoqiang; Zhang, Lu; Meng, Qingshi

    2016-11-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes and single-walled carbon nanotubes show great potential for the application as an electromagnetic interference shielding material. In this paper, the electromagnetic interference shielding the effectiveness of a composite surface coated single/multi-walled carbon nanotube hybrid buckypaper was measured, which showed an average shielding effectiveness of ~55 dB with a buckypaper thickness of 50 µm, and bukypaper density of 0.76 g cm-3, it is much higher than other carbon nanotube/resin materials when sample thickness is on the similar order. The structural, specific surface area and conductivity of the buckypapers were examined by field-emission scanning electron microscopy, specific surface area analyzer and four probes resistance tester, respectively.

  14. The composition of cell wall skeleton and outermost lipids of Mycobacterium vaccae is modified by ethambutol treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumijowska-Galewicz, Anna; Korycka-Machała, Małgorzata; Lisowska, Katarzyna; Dziadek, Jarosław

    2008-01-01

    Ethambutol (EMB) is a first line drug in tuberculosis treatment inhibiting the biosynthesis of arabinogalactan, which is a component of the mycobacterial cell wall. The growth of Mycobacterium vaccae cells in the presence of EMB increases cell wall permeability, which was monitored by beta-sitosterol biotransformation. GC/MS and GLC/MS (gas chromatography/mass spectrometry) analysis revealed dramatic changes in the content of covalently bound mycolic acids and in molar ratio galactose (Gal) to arabinose (Ara) in the cell envelopes of EMB-treated cells. The detected variations in the compositions of fatty acids indicate that both the cell wall skeleton and outer layer (free lipids) are decomposed due to EMB treatment.

  15. 肉苁蓉多糖水解产物单糖组分的气相色谱法测定%Determination of monosaccharides composition of Cistanche tubulosa polysaccharides by gas chromatography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王鑫彤; 张敏; 仰榴青; 王未; 吴慧玉; 汪松美; 刘红阳; 李倩; 贾清东; 张胜洋; 赵婷

    2016-01-01

    目的:研究气相色谱法测定肉苁蓉多糖中单糖组分的方法。方法:采用单因素实验,考察各因素对肉苁蓉多糖水解的影响;采用气相色谱法测定肉苁蓉多糖中的单糖组成。结果:肉苁蓉多糖水解的最佳条件为硫酸浓度3.0 mol/L,水解时间8 h和水解温度110℃;各单糖精密度RSD为0.92%~4.68%,重复性RSD为0.92%~1.77%,稳定性RSD为1.61%~3.61%,加样回收率为99.3%~100.3%,精密度、重复性、稳定性和回收率良好;肉苁蓉多糖主要由甘露糖、葡萄糖和半乳糖组成,摩尔比为2.01∶5.72∶2。结论:此法适用于肉苁蓉多糖中单糖组成分析。%Objective:To explore the optimal methods for analysis of the monosaccharides composition of Cistanche tubulosa polysaccharide.Methods:To investigate modifying factors of the polysaccharide hydroly-sis was determined by single factor method,and the monosaccharide composition analysis of Cistanche tubu-losa polysaccharide by gas chromatography.Results:The optimal hydrolysis conditions were sulfuric acid concentration 3.0 mol/L,hydrolysis time 8 h and temperature 1 10 ℃;the RSD value of precision was be-tween 0.92% and 4.68%,the RSD value of repeatability was between 0.92%and 1 .77%,the RSD value of stability was between 1.61% and 3.61%,the recovery rate were between 99.3% and 100.3%;Cistanche tubulosa polysaccharide was mainly composed of mannose,glucose and galactose in a molar ratio of 2.01 ∶5.72 ∶2.Conclusion:The refined method can be used for monosaccharides composition analy-sis of Cistanche tubulosa polysaccharides.

  16. Ion-exchange chromatography combined with direct current amperometric detection at CuNPs/reduced graphene oxide-chitosan composite film modified electrode for determination of monosaccharide composition of polysaccharides from Phellinus igniarius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Lingling; Wang, Fengli; Zhu, Zuoyi; Huang, Zhongping; Zhu, Yan

    2014-02-01

    A novel Cu nanoparticles/reduced graphene oxide-chitosan (CuNPs/r-GO-chitosan) composite film modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE) was fabricated by dispersing CuNPs uniformly on a stable r-GO-chitosan thin film through electrodeposition process. The modified electrode was characterized by cyclic voltammetry, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), and exhibited efficiently electrocatalytic oxidation toward monosaccharides with high stability. The good electrocatalytic activity of this modified electrode might be attributed to the synergistic effect of r-GO and CuNPs, and the stability might be attributed to the r-GO and chitosan thin matrix film. When the CuNPs/r-GO-chitosan/GCE was used as an electrochemical sensor in high performance anion exchange chromatography-direct current amperometric detection (HPAEC-DC) flowing system for the determination of monosaccharides under constant working potential of +0.55 V, the detection limits (S/N=3) ranged from 0.006 to 0.02 mg L(-1) for the analyzed sugars, and the dynamic linear ranges spanned from 0.02 to 500 mg L(-1). The proposed method has been applied for the determination of monosaccharide composition of crude polysaccharides from phellinus igniarius real samples, and the results were satisfactory.

  17. MODELING OF NONLINEAR CYCLIC LOAD BEHAVIOR OF I-SHAPED COMPOSITE STEEL-CONCRETE SHEAR WALLS OF NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AHMER ALI

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In recent years steel-concrete composite shear walls have been widely used in enormous high-rise buildings. Due to high strength and ductility, enhanced stiffness, stable cycle characteristics and large energy absorption, such walls can be adopted in the auxiliary building; surrounding the reactor containment structure of nuclear power plants to resist lateral forces induced by heavy winds and severe earthquakes. This paper demonstrates a set of nonlinear numerical studies on I-shaped composite steel-concrete shear walls of the nuclear power plants subjected to reverse cyclic loading. A three-dimensional finite element model is developed using ABAQUS by emphasizing on constitutive material modeling and element type to represent the real physical behavior of complex shear wall structures. The analysis escalates with parametric variation in steel thickness sandwiching the stipulated amount of concrete panels. Modeling details of structural components, contact conditions between steel and concrete, associated boundary conditions and constitutive relationships for the cyclic loading are explained. Later, the load versus displacement curves, peak load and ultimate strength values, hysteretic characteristics and deflection profiles are verified with experimental data. The convergence of the numerical outcomes has been discussed to conclude the remarks.

  18. Oligo- and polysaccharide synthesis by Rhizobium leguminosarum and Rhizobium meliloti.

    OpenAIRE

    Breedveld, M W

    1992-01-01

    Rhizobium and Agrobacterium species are capable of synthesizing a variety of extracellular and cellular oligo- and polysaccharides. Changes in environmental conditions may all affect the composition, physical properties, and relative amounts of oligo- and polysaccharides. Interest in the field of Rhizobium polys accharides has resulted from a development in two distinct areas, (i) the role of oligo- and polysaccharides in the microbe- plant interaction, and (ii) studies on the physico- chemic...

  19. Examination of nanoparticles as a drug carrier on blood flow through catheterized composite stenosed artery with permeable walls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ijaz, S; Nadeem, S

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we have discussed the influence of copper nanoparticles on a blood flow through composite stenosed artery with permeable walls. The nature of blood is discussed mathematically by considering it as viscous nanofluid. The study is carried out for a blood vessel under mild stenosis approximations and expressions of the temperature, velocity, resistance impedance to flow, wall shear stress and the pressure gradient is obtained by using corresponding boundary conditions. Results for the effects of permeability on blood flow through composite stenosis have been discussed graphically. The considered analysis also summarizes that the drug copper nanoparticles are efficient to reduce hemodynamics of stenosis and could be helpful to predict important uses for biomedical applications. Results indicate that nanoparticles are helpful as drug carriers to minimize the effects of resistance impedance to blood flow or coagulation factors due to stenosis.

  20. SEM STUDY OF THE INTERFACE BETWEEN THE CAVITY WALL AND COMPOSITE RESIN IN CAVITIES FILLED USING VIBRATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianina Iovan

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Oscillation energy has been proposed in a new method to condense resin composites. The principle of this technique assumes that vibration lowers the viscosity of the resin, allowing the material to flow and easily adapt to the cavity walls, in a similar way as a flowable composite. The aim of the study was to assess the efficiency and quality of composite compaction, using one of these new devices. MATERIALS AND METHOD: The study included 20 class I cavities prepared in extracted human molars. The teeth were randomly divided into two groups of 10 cavities. Both groups were filled with composite material Filtek Z250 and the adhesive system Single Bond Plus Adhesive Adper TM Adhesive (3M ESPE.  In the control group, condensation of the composite was done with standard instruments. In the experimental group, condensation was done using a vibration instrument: Compothixo (Kerr.  The prepared sections were observed on a scanning electron microscope (SEM, VEGA II model LSH (TESCAN. RESULTS: When using Compothixo, the average working time was 8.53 min / restoration while, when using standard instruments, the average working time was 10.32 min, which seems to indicate that the vibration technique was more effective than traditional condensation. Microscopic images have shown that neither vibrating condensation nor manual condensation precluded the formation of a hiatus in some areas of the interface between the restoration and the cavity walls, especially in areas of small irregularities. CONCLUSIONS: Condensation of composite resins can be faster when using vibrating instruments. Adaptation of the material to the cavity walls is comparable to that obtained by traditional techniques.

  1. Biomechanics of isolated tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) fruit cuticles: the role of the cutin matrix and polysaccharides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Casado, Gloria; Matas, Antonio J; Domínguez, Eva; Cuartero, Jesús; Heredia, Antonio

    2007-01-01

    The mechanical characteristics of the cuticular membrane (CM), a complex composite biopolymer basically composed of a cutin matrix, waxes, and hydrolysable polysaccharides, have been described previously. The biomechanical behaviour and quantitative contribution of cutin and polysaccharides have been investigated here using as experimental material mature green and red ripe tomato fruits. Treatment of isolated CM with anhydrous hydrogen fluoride in pyridine allowed the selective elimination of polysaccharides attached to or incrusted into the cutin matrix. Cutin samples showed a drastic decrease in elastic modulus and stiffness (up to 92%) compared with CM, which clearly indicates that polysaccharides incorporated into the cutin matrix are responsible for the elastic modulus, stiffness, and the linear elastic behaviour of the whole cuticle. Reciprocally, the viscoelastic behaviour of CM (low elastic modulus and high strain values) can be assigned to the cutin. These results applied both to mature green and red ripe CM. Cutin elastic modulus, independently of the degree of temperature and hydration, was always significantly higher for the ripe than for the green samples while strain was lower; the amount of phenolics in the cutin network are the main candidates to explain the increased rigidity from mature green to red ripe cutin. The polysaccharide families isolated from CM were pectin, hemicellulose, and cellulose, the main polymers associated with the plant cell wall. The three types of polysaccharides were present in similar amounts in CM from mature green and red ripe tomatoes. Physical techniques such as X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy indicated that the polysaccharide fibres were mainly randomly oriented. A tomato fruit CM scenario at the supramolecular level that could explain the observed CM biomechanical properties is presented and discussed.

  2. Development of new techniques for functionalizing single-wall carbon nanotubes for composite and biological systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Jared Lee

    Building from established methods of using diazonium salts to derivatize single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), new methodologies for achieving functionalized individual nanotubes that are compatible with a wide variety of materials have been developed. The use of aryl triazenes as diazonium precursors to functionalize surfactant stabilized suspensions of individual SWNTs has resulted in the ability to synthesize more complex molecules bearing a diazonium salt precursor. Prior to this work, such functionality was difficult to install in complex molecules due to the required linearity of diazonium salt synthesis. A protocol to access individualized SWNTs without the use of scale-limiting techniques such as high powered sonication and centrifugation was achieved by the use of oleum as a solvent for underivatized SWNTs. This disentangled suspension of SWNTs was then treated with a modification of an established in-situ diazonium functionalization protocol to yield alcohol and water-soluble, exfoliated, nonroping SWNTs. Functionalized SWNTs were used as polymerization initiators for both anionic and atom transfer radical polymerization. They were used to reinforce poly(dimethylsiloxane) and poly(propylene fumarate) based composites. The functionalized SWNTs were also used as a support for neuronal interface systems and to reinforce the collagen network in rat cervical tissue. Through continued functionalization and PEGylation (poly(ethylene glycol) attachment) of cut SWNTs, the development of a SWNT-based, viable nanovector core has been achieved. Continued functionalization provides one with the ability to further derivatize aqueous suspensions of previously functionalized SWNTs, while the PEGylation of cut SWNTs offers solubility in water, irrigation saline, and phosphate buffered saline. Using the developed SWNT-based nanovector core, molecules that are relevant for attachment to a nanovector were targeted. This includes a fluorescein-5-isothiocyanate (FITC

  3. Analysis of Complex Carbohydrate Composition in Plant Cell Wall Using Fourier Transformed Mid-Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badhan, Ajay; Wang, Yuxi; McAllister, Tim A

    2017-01-01

    Fourier transformed mid-infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) is a powerful tool for compositional analysis of plant cell walls (Acebes et al., Front Plant Sci 5:303, 2014; Badhan et al., Biotechnol Biofuels 7:1-15, 2014; Badhan et al., BioMed Res Int 2015: 562952, 2015; Roach et al., Plant Physiol 156:1351-1363, 2011). The infrared spectrum generates a fingerprint of a sample with absorption peaks corresponding to the frequency of vibrations between the bonds of the atoms making up the material. Here, we describe a method focused on the use of FTIR in combination with principal component analysis (PCA) to characterize the composition of the plant cell wall. This method has been successfully used to study complex enzyme saccharification processes like rumen digestion to identify recalcitrant moieties in low-quality forage which resist rumen digestion (Badhan et al., BioMed Res Int 2015: 562952, 2015), as well as to characterize cell wall mutant lines or transgenic lines expressing exogenous hydrolases (Badhan et al., Biotechnol Biofuels 7:1-15, 2014; Roach et al., Plant Physiol 156:1351-1363, 2011). The FTIR method described here facilitates high-throughput identification of the major compositional differences across a large set of samples in a low cost and nondestructive manner.

  4. Analysis of Monosaccharide Composition in Tremella Polysaccharides by Precolumn Derivatization HPLC%柱前衍生化高效液相色谱法分析银耳多糖的单糖组成

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈英红; 姜翔之; 罗浩铭; 王颖; 姜瑞芝

    2012-01-01

    The reversed-phase high performance liquid chiomatographic (HPLC) method of precolumn-derivatization with l-phenyl-3-methyl-5-pyrazolone was used to establish the optimized separation condition of five traditional monosaccharides. And this optimized separation condition was used to analyze the monosaccharide composition of Tremella polysaccharides. The results of HPLC analysis showed that Tremella polysaccharides consisted of mannose, glucuronic acid, glucose, xylose, fucose with the molar ratio of 3.894:1.264:0.044:1.000: 0.265. The HPLC method is simple, rapid, sensitive, and convenient So it can be applied the quality control of Tremella polysaccharides.%采用1-苯基-3-甲基-5-吡唑啉酮柱前衍生化反相高效液相色谱法,建立了5种常见单糖的最佳分离条件,并将该条件用于银耳多糖的单糖组成分析.银耳多糖中含有甘露糖、葡萄糖醛酸、葡萄糖、木糖、岩藻糖,摩尔比为3.894:1.264:0.044:1.000:0.265.该方法简单、快速、灵敏度高、重现性良好,可用于银耳多糖的质量控制.

  5. Morphogenesis and cell wall changes in maize shoots under simulated microgravity conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoson, T; Kamisaka, S; Yamashita, M; Masuda, Y

    1995-12-01

    Various plant organs show a spontaneous curvature on a three-dimensional clinostat. Changes in the cell wall metabolism underlying the curvature were examined in maize shoots. In coleoptile nodes, no differences were detected in either the level or the composition of cell wall polysaccharides between the convex and the concave halves. However, the convex side showed a higher activity of (1 --> 3),(l --> 4)-beta-glucan breakdown, which appears to be associated with the curvature. In the elongating region of coleoptiles, the accumulation of wall polysaccharides occurred in the convex side. There was no significant difference in the glucanase activity between both sides. Thus, the spontaneous curvature in different regions of maize shoots may be brought about through different mechanisms under simulated microgravity conditions.

  6. Extraction and Composition Analysis of the Polysaccharide in Rabdosia rubescens%冬凌草多糖的提取、分离及理化性质研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    侯飞; 刘克为; 梁惠; 高华

    2011-01-01

    为研究冬凌草多糖的理化性质和质量,对冬凌草采用热水、稀碱提取,乙醇沉淀,等电点法脱蛋白后得到冬凌草粗多糖,经Q Sepharose 4 Fast Flow离子交换层析柱和Sephacryl S-100凝胶柱进一步纯化后得到4个纯度较高的组分STPS-Ⅰ、STPS-Ⅱ、JTPS-Ⅰ、JTPS-Ⅱ.对各组分的总糖含量、糖醛酸含量、硫酸根含量以及蛋白含量进行了测定,利用高效液相色谱法测定了单糖组成和分子量.结果 显示冬凌草多糖不同组分的分子量相近,化学组成及单糖组成明显不同.%To study the physical and chemical properties and quality of polysaccharides in Rabdosia rubescens. Crude polysaccharides of Rabdosia rubescens were obtained by extraction in hot water and dilute alkali successively, precipitation with ethanol and removal of protein by method of isoelectric point. STPS- Ⅰ, STPS- Ⅱ,JTPS- Ⅰ, JTPS-Ⅱ were isolated by a combination of ion exchange chromatography on Q Sepharose 4 Fast Flow and gel permeation over Sephacryl S-100 and with high purity. Their chemical characteristics including the content of total sugar, uronic acid, sulfate and protein as well as monosaccharide composition and molecular weight were investigated. The results showed that the molecular weight of different components of polysaccharides in Rabdosia rubescens was similar, while chemical composition and monosaccharide composition obvious different.

  7. Molecular level computational studies of polyethylene and polyacrylonitrile composites containing single walled carbon nanotubes: effect of carboxylic acid functionalization on nanotube-polymer interfacial properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shayesteh eHaghighatpanah

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Molecular dynamics and molecular mechanics methods have been used to investigate additive-polymer interfacial properties in single walled carbon nanotube – polyethylene and single walled carbon nanotube – polyacrylonitrile composites. Properties such as the interfacial shear stress and bonding energy are similar for the two composites. In contrast, functionalizing the single walled carbon nanotubes with carboxylic acid groups leads to an increase in these properties, with a larger increase for the polar polyacrylonitrile composite. Increasing the percentage of carbon atoms that were functionalized from 1% to 5% also leads to an increase in the interfacial properties. In addition, the interfacial properties depend on the location of the functional groups on the single walled carbon nanotube wall.

  8. Behaviour of a new composite mesh for the repair of full-thickness abdominal wall defects in a rabbit model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gemma Pascual

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Composite biomaterials designed for the repair of abdominal wall defects are composed of a mesh component and a laminar barrier in contact with the visceral peritoneum. This study assesses the behaviour of a new composite mesh by comparing it with two latest-generation composites currently used in clinical practice. METHODS: Defects (7x5cm created in the anterior abdominal wall of New Zealand White rabbits were repaired using a polypropylene mesh and the composites: Physiomesh(TM; Ventralight(TM and a new composite mesh with a three-dimensional macroporous polyester structure and an oxidized collagen/chitosan barrier. Animals were sacrificed on days 14 and 90 postimplant. Specimens were processed to determine host tissue incorporation, gene/protein expression of neo-collagens (RT-PCR/immunofluorescence, macrophage response (RAM-11-immunolabelling and biomechanical resistance. On postoperative days 7/14, each animal was examined laparoscopically to quantify adhesions between the visceral peritoneum and implant. RESULTS: The new composite mesh showed the lowest incidence of seroma in the short term. At each time point, the mesh surface covered with adhesions was greater in controls than composites. By day 14, the implants were fully infiltrated by a loose connective tissue that became denser over time. At 90 days, the peritoneal mesh surface was lined with a stable mesothelium. The new composite mesh induced more rapid tissue maturation than Physiomesh(TM, giving rise to a neoformed tissue containing more type I collagen. In Ventralight(TM the macrophage reaction was intense and significantly greater than the other composites at both follow-up times. Tensile strengths were similar for each biomaterial. CONCLUSIONS: All composites showed optimal peritoneal behaviour, inducing good peritoneal regeneration and scarce postoperative adhesion formation. A greater foreign body reaction was observed for Ventralight(TM. All composites induced

  9. Methods of saccharification of polysaccharides in plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, John; Fake, Gina

    2014-04-29

    Saccharification of polysaccharides of plants is provided, where release of fermentable sugars from cellulose is obtained by adding plant tissue composition. Production of glucose is obtained without the need to add additional .beta.-glucosidase. Adding plant tissue composition to a process using a cellulose degrading composition to degrade cellulose results in an increase in the production of fermentable sugars compared to a process in which plant tissue composition is not added. Using plant tissue composition in a process using a cellulose degrading enzyme composition to degrade cellulose results in decrease in the amount of cellulose degrading enzyme composition or exogenously applied cellulase required to produce fermentable sugars.

  10. Anticancer properties of polysaccharides isolated from fungi of the Basidiomycetes class.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemieszek, Marta; Rzeski, Wojciech

    2012-01-01

    Basidiomycete mushrooms represent a valuable source of biologically active compounds with anticancer properties. This feature is primarily attributed to polysaccharides and their derivatives. The anticancer potential of polysaccharides is linked to their origin, composition and chemical structure, solubility and method of isolation. Moreover, their activity can be significantly increased by chemical modifications. Anticancer effects of polysaccharides can be expressed indirectly (immunostimulation) or directly (cell proliferation inhibition and/or apoptosis induction). Among the wide range of polysaccharides with documented anticancer properties, lentinan, polysaccharide-K (PSK) and schizophyllan deserve special attention. These polysaccharides for many years have been successfully applied in cancer treatment and their mechanism of action is the best known.

  11. Ultra fast UV-photo detector based on single-walled carbon nanotube/PEDOT-PSS composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najeeb, Choolakadavil Khalid; Lee, Jae-Hyoek; Chang, Jingbo; Kang, Won-Seok; Kim, Jae-Ho

    2009-12-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT)/Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)-poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT-PSS), composites (SWNT/PEDOT-PSS) have been prepared using SWNTs surface modified with a natural gum, 'gum arabic' by simple mixing process. Thin films of SWNTs, PEDOT-PSS and the composites were prepared by vacuum filtration technique and were exposed to ultraviolet (UV) radiations for photoconductivity measurements. The surface resistivity of pristine SWNTs film increased from initial value of 50 omega to 92 omega and that of the polymer film decreased from 6.7 Komega to 3.1 Komega while the resistivity of the composite film decreased from 267 omega to 232 omega upon UV illumination. When the lamp was switched off, the initial resistivities of PEDOT: PSS and SWNTs films were recovered very slowly. Interestingly, on the other hand the composite films demonstrated a very fast relaxation within a few minutes. An on-off cycle ruled out the possibility of local heating effect and revealed that the switching property was originated from the fast transport of charge and heat in the composite films. This property of composite film might open up optoelectronic applications involving photoconductivity, such as photo sensors, organic light emitting diodes (OLED) and organic solar cells. Here in, we demonstrate the application of the SWNT/PEDOT-PSS composite film based device as a UV sensor.

  12. Polyvinylchloride-Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Composites: Thermal and Spectroscopic Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mircea Chipara

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanocomposites of single-walled carbon nanotubes dispersed within polyvinylchloride have been obtained by using the solution path. High-power sonication was utilized to achieve a good dispersion of carbon nanotubes. Thermogravimetric analysis revealed that during the synthesis, processing, or thermal analysis of these nanocomposites the released chlorine is functionalizing the single-walled carbon nanotubes. The loading of polyvinylchloride by single-walled carbon nanotubes increases the glass transition temperature of the polymeric matrix, demonstrating the interactions between macromolecular chains and filler. Wide Angle X-Ray Scattering data suggested a drop of the crystallite size and of the degree of crystallinity as the concentration of single-walled carbon nanotubes is increased. The in situ chlorination and amorphization of nanotube during the synthesis (sonication step is confirmed by Raman spectroscopy.

  13. Oligo- and polysaccharide synthesis by Rhizobium leguminosarum and Rhizobium meliloti.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breedveld, M.W.

    1992-01-01

    Rhizobium and Agrobacterium species are capable of synthesizing a variety of extracellular and cellular oligo- and polysaccharides. Changes in environmental conditions may all affect the composition, physical properties, and relative amounts of oligo- and polysaccharides. Interest in the field of Rh

  14. Theory of domain wall motion mediated magnetoelectric effects in a multiferroic composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, V. M.; Srinivasan, G.

    2014-10-01

    A model is discussed for magnetoelectric (ME) interactions originating from the motion of magnetic domain walls (DWs) in a multiferroic composite of orthoferrites RFeO3 (RFO) with magnetic stripe domains and a piezoelectric such as lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate (PMN-PT). The DWs in RFO can be set in motion with an ac magnetic field up to a critical speed of 20 km/s, the highest for any magnetic system, leading to the excitation of bulk and shear magnetoacoustic waves. Thus, the ME coupling will arise from flexural deformation associated with DW motion (rather than the Joule magnetostriction mediated coupling under a static or quasistatic condition). A c plane orthoferrite with a single Néel-type DW in the bc plane and an ac magnetic field H along the c axis is assumed. The deflection in the bilayer due to DW motion is obtained when the DW velocity is a linear function H and the resulting induced voltage across PMN-PT is estimated. It is shown that a combination of spatial and time harmonics of the bending deformation leads to (i) a linear ME coefficient defined by αE=E/H and (ii) a quadratic ME coefficient αEQ=E/H2. The model is applied to yttrium orthoferrites (YFO) and a PMN-PT bilayer since YFO has one of the highest DW mobility amongst the orthoferrites. The coefficient αE is dependent on the DW position, and it is maximum when the DW equilibrium position is at the center of the sample. In YFO/PMN-PT the estimated low-frequency αE ˜ 30 mV/cm Oe and resonance value is 1.5 V/(cm Oe). Since orthoferrites (and PMN-PT) are transparent in the visible region and have a large Faraday rotation, the DW dynamics and the ME coupling could be studied simultaneously. The theory discussed here is of interest for studies on ME coupling and for applications such as magnetically controlled electro-optic devices.

  15. The Role of Pectin Acetylation in the Organization of Plant Cell Walls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fimognari, Lorenzo

    All plant cells are surrounded by one or more cell wall layers. The cell wall serves as a stiff mechanical support while it allows cells to expand and provide a protective barrier to invading pathogens. Cell walls are dynamic structures composed of entangled cell wall polysaccharides that must...... adopt defined 3D organization to allow their composition/interactions to be tweaked upon developmental need. Failure to build functional cell wall architecture will affect plant growth and resistance to stresses. In this PhD dissertation I explored the role of pectin acetylation in controlling...... that the loss of structural integrity in the cell wall was the underlying cause for triggering defenses response. This hypothesis was tested in Manuscript II. Through a suppressor screen of 30.000 Arabidopsis rwa2 plants and mapping of mutations by next generation sequencing, we pinpointed pectin deacetylation...

  16. Performance, digesta characteristics, nutrient flux, plasma composition and organ weight in pigs as effected by dietary cation anion difference and non starch polysaccharide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dersjant-Li, Y.; Verstegen, M.W.A.; Schulze, H.; Zandstra, T.; Boer, H.; Schrama, J.W.; Verreth, J.A.J.

    2001-01-01

    Two dietary cation anion difference (CAD) levels (-100 and 200 mEq/kg) and two dietary nonstarch polysaccharide (NSP) levels (10 and 15€were used in a 2 x 2 factorial arrangement in two randomized blocks (trials) to evaluate performance, digesta pH and buffer capacity, apparent digestibility, plasma

  17. Preparation and properties of multi-wall carbon nanotube/SiC composites by aqueous tape casting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    L(U) ZhiHui; JIANG DongLiang; ZHANG JingXian; LIN QingLing

    2009-01-01

    MWCNTS/SiC composites were fabricated by aqueous tape casting. High solid content (50 vol%) SiC slurries with sintering additives and multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) as reinforcements were prepared using Tetramethylammonium hydroxide as the dispersant. The stability of MWCNTs/SiC slur-ries was studied and characterized in terms of zeta potential and rheology measurements. The relative density of the composite was about 98% after hot-pressing at 1850℃ (at 25 MPa in Ar for 30 min). The hardness of the composites decreased with the increase in MWCNTs content, The flexural strength and was 0,25 wt%. Further increase in MWCNTs content to 0.50 wt% did not lead to the increase in me-chanical properties. Most of MWCNTs were found to be located at SiC grain boundaries and the pull out of the MWCNTs was observed.

  18. Mechanical properties of PET composites using multi-walled carbon nanotubes functionalized by inorganic and itaconic acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. May-Pat

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs were oxidized by two different acid treatments and further functionalized with itaconic acid (IA. The functionalized MWCNTs were used to fabricate Poly(ethylene terephthalate (PET composites by melt mixing. The presence of functional groups on the surface of the treated MWCNTs was confirmed by infrared spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis. The MWCNTs oxidized with a concentrated mixture of HNO3 and H2SO4 exhibited more oxygen containing functional groups (OH, COOH but also suffer larger structural degradation than those oxidized by a mild treatment based on diluted HNO3 followed by H2O2. PET composites were fabricated using the oxidized-only and oxidized followed by functionalization with IA MWCNTs. PET composites fabricated with MWCNT oxidized by mild conditions showed improved tensile strength and failure strain, while harsh MWCNT oxidation render them overly brittle.

  19. Thermal property of regioregular poly(3-hexylthiophene)/nanotube composites using modified single-walled carbon nanotubes via ion irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adhikari, A R [College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering, State University of New York, Albany, NY 12203 (United States); Huang, M [College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering, State University of New York, Albany, NY 12203 (United States); Bakhru, H [College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering, State University of New York, Albany, NY 12203 (United States); Chipara, M [Department of Physics and Geology, University of Texas Pan American, Edinburg, TX 78541-2999 (United States); Ryu, C Y [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY 12180 (United States); Ajayan, P M [Department of Material Science and Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy and Rensselaer Nanotechnology Center, NY 12180 (United States)

    2006-12-28

    The effects of radiation-induced modifications on the thermal stability and phase transition behaviour of composites made of 1% pristine or ion irradiated single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) are reported. Thermogravimetry analysis (TGA), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), Raman spectroscopy and electron spin resonance (ESR) were used to investigate the radiation-induced functionalization of carbon nanotubes and to assess the effect of ionizing radiation on the adhesion between macromolecular polymer and carbon nanotubes. Irradiation was used to introduce defects in a controlled way solely within pristine nanotubes before composite synthesis. The addition of irradiated SWNTs to a polymer matrix was found to enhance thermo-oxidative stability and phase transition behaviour. Further, ESR studies demonstrate the electronic interaction through charge transfer between filler and matrix. These results could have immense applications in nanotube composite processing. Based on the experimental data, a model for the interaction between polymeric chains and carbon nanotubes is proposed.

  20. THE ANALYSIS OF THIN WALLED COMPOSITE LAMINATED HELICOPTER ROTOR WITH HIERARCHICAL WARPING FUNCTIONS AND FINITE ELEMENT METHOD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    诸德超; 邓忠民; 王荇卫

    2001-01-01

    In the present paper, a series of hierarchical warping functions is developed to analyze the static and dynamic problems of thin walled composite laminated helicopter rotors composed of several layers with single closed cell. This ethod is the development and extension of the traditional constrained warping theory of thin walled metallic beams, which had been proved very successful since 1940s. The warping distribution along the perimeter of each layer is expanded into a series of successively corrective warping functions with the traditional warping function caused by free torsion or free bending as the first term, and is assumed to be piecewise linear along the thickness direction of layers. The governing equations are derived based upon the variational principle of minimum potential energy for static analysis and Rayleigh Quotient for free vibration analysis. Then the hierarchical finite element method is introduced to form a numerical algorithm. Both static and natural vibration problems of sample box beams are analyzed with the present method to show the main mechanical behavior of the thin walled composite laminated helicopter rotor.

  1. Biomimetic synthesis of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid/multi-walled carbon nanotubes/apatite composite membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. L. Zhang

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Bioactive guided tissue regeneration (GTR membrane has had some success for periodontal therapy. In this study, poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA/multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs composite membranes were incubated in three supersaturated calcification solutions (SCS of different pH values for 21 days to prepare a PLGA/MWNTs/apatite composite. Scanning electron microscope (SEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS, water contact angle measurement and mechanical testing were used for characterization. It was found that after 21 days incubation, apatite with low crystallite size and crystallinity was formed on the PLGA/MWNTs composite membranes. The Ca-poor carbapatite was similar in morphology and composition to that of natural bone. The size and shape of the apatite crystals immersed in three SCS were different from each other. The hydrophilicity and mechanical properties of the PLGA/MWNTs composite membranes were significantly enhanced after mineralization. This indicated that biomimetic mineralization may be an effective method to improve the biocompatibility and bone inductivity of certain materials. The PLGA/MWNTs/apatite composites may be potentially useful in GTR applications, particularly as GTR membranes for periodontal tissue regeneration.

  2. Comparative thermal performance of static sunshade and brick cavity wall for energy efficient building envelope in composite climate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charde Meghana

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Energy efficient building technologies can reduce energy consumption in buildings. In present paper effect of designed static sunshade, brick cavity wall with brick projections and their combined effect on indoor air temperature has been analyzed by constructing three test rooms each of habitable dimensions (3.0 m × 4.0 m × 3.0 m and studying hourly temperatures on typical days for one month in summer and winter each. The three rooms have also been simulated using a software and the results have been compared with the experimental results. Designed static sunshade increased indoor air temperature in winter while proposed brick cavity wall with brick projections lowered it in summer. Combined effect of building elements lowered indoor air temperature in summer and increased it in winter as compared to outdoor air temperature. It is thus useful for energy conservation in buildings in composite climate.

  3. Spark plasma sintering of silicon carbide and multi-walled carbon nanotube reinforced zirconium diboride ceramic composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yadhukulakrishnan, Govindaraajan B.; Rahman, Arif; Karumuri, Sriharsha [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74078 (United States); Stackpoole, Margaret M. [ELORET Corporation, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Kalkan, A. Kaan; Singh, Raman P. [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74078 (United States); Harimkar, Sandip P., E-mail: sandip.harimkar@okstate.edu [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74078 (United States)

    2012-08-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dense SiC and carbon nanotube reinforced ZrB{sub 2} composites were spark plasma sintered. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SiC and carbon nanotube reinforcement favored the densification of ZrB{sub 2} composites. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SiC and carbon nanotube reinforcement resulted in toughening of ZrB{sub 2} composites. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Carbon nanotubes were retained in the spark plasma sintered ZrB{sub 2} composites. - Abstract: In this paper spark plasma sintering (SPS) of silicon carbide and multi-walled carbon nanotube reinforced zirconium diboride ultra-high temperature ceramic matrix composites is reported. Systematic investigations on the effect of reinforcement type (SiC and CNTs) and content (10-40 vol.% SiC and 2-6 vol.% CNTs) on densification behavior, microstructure development, and mechanical properties (microhardness, bi-axial flexural strength, and indentation fracture toughness) are presented. With the similar SPS processing parameters (1900 Degree-Sign C, 70 MPa pressure, and 15 min soaking time), near-full densification (>99% relative density) was achieved with 10-40% SiC (in ZrB{sub 2}-SiC) and 4-6% CNT (in ZrB{sub 2}-CNT) reinforced composites. The SiC and CNT reinforcement further improved the indentation fracture toughness of the composites through a range of toughening mechanisms, including particle shearing, crack deflection at the particle-matrix interface, and grain pull-outs for ZrB{sub 2}-SiC composites, and CNT pull-outs and crack deflection in ZrB{sub 2}-CNT composites.

  4. Insights into plant cell wall structure, architecture, and integrity using glycome profiling of native and AFEXTM-pre-treated biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattathil, Sivakumar; Hahn, Michael G; Dale, Bruce E; Chundawat, Shishir P S

    2015-07-01

    Cell walls, which constitute the bulk of plant biomass, vary considerably in their structure, composition, and architecture. Studies on plant cell walls can be conducted on both native and pre-treated plant biomass samples, allowing an enhanced understanding of these structural and compositional variations. Here glycome profiling was employed to determine the relative abundance of matrix polysaccharides in several phylogenetically distinct native and pre-treated plant biomasses. Eight distinct biomass types belonging to four different subgroups (i.e. monocot grasses, woody dicots, herbaceous dicots, and softwoods) were subjected to various regimes of AFEX™ (ammonia fiber expansion) pre-treatment [AFEX is a trademark of MBI, Lansing (http://www.mbi.org]. This approach allowed detailed analysis of close to 200 cell wall glycan epitopes and their relative extractability using a high-throughput platform. In general, irrespective of the phylogenetic origin, AFEX™ pre-treatment appeared to cause loosening and improved accessibility of various xylan epitope subclasses in most plant biomass materials studied. For most biomass types analysed, such loosening was also evident for other major non-cellulosic components including subclasses of pectin and xyloglucan epitopes. The studies also demonstrate that AFEX™ pre-treatment significantly reduced cell wall recalcitrance among diverse phylogenies (except softwoods) by inducing structural modifications to polysaccharides that were not detectable by conventional gross composition analyses. It was found that monitoring changes in cell wall glycan compositions and their relative extractability for untreated and pre-treated plant biomass can provide an improved understanding of variations in structure and composition of plant cell walls and delineate the role(s) of matrix polysaccharides in cell wall recalcitrance. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  5. Estimation of indigestible NDF in forages and concentrates from cell wall composition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krämer, Monika; Weisbjerg, Martin Riis; Lund, Peter

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the potential of plant cell wall fractions as predictors of indigestible neutral detergent fibre (INDF) in forages with respect to species within plant type, cut number and stage of maturity (harvest time) within primary growth, and for concentrates with respect to species...... within plant type, where INDF is defined as the portion of plant cell walls not digested after 288 h rumen incubation in Dacron bags with 12 μm pore size. INDF is one of the more important parameters determining the net energy (NE) value of a diet in some recently developed ruminant feed evaluation...... to develop regression equations for INDF intended for use in practice based on a total of 321 samples. Plant type and species within plant type affected (Pcell wall fractions. The INDF/lignin(sa) ratio varied substantially from the 2.4 factor used in the Cornell Net Carbohydrate and Protein...

  6. Voltammetric determination of theophylline at a Nafion/multi-wall carbon nanotubes composite film-modified glassy carbon electrode

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Suling Yang; Ran Yang; Gang Li; Jianjun Li; Lingbo Qu

    2010-11-01

    A Nafion/multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) composite film-modified electrode was fabricated and applied to the sensitive and convenient determination of theophylline (TP). Multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) were easily dispersed homogeneously into 0.1% Nafion methanol solution by sonication. Appropriate amount of Nafion/MWNTs suspension was coated on a glassy carbon electrode. After evaporating methanol, a Nafion/MWNTs composite film-modified electrode was achieved. TP could effectively accumulate at Nafion/MWNTs composite film-modified electrode and cause a sensitive anodic peak at around 1180 mV (vs SCE) in 0.01 mol/L H2SO4 medium (pH 1.8). In contrast with the bare glassy carbon electrode, Nafion film-modified electrode, Nafion/MWNTs film-modified electrode could remarkably increase the anodic peak current and decreased the overpotential of TP oxidation. Under the optimized conditions, the anodic peak current was proportional to TP concentration in the range of 8.0 × 10-8-6.0 × 10-5 mol/L, with a detection limit of 2.0 × 10-8 mol/L. This newly developed method was used to determine TP in drug samples with good percentage of recoveries.

  7. External nitrogen input affects pre- and post-harvest cell wall composition but not the enzymatic saccharification of wheat straw

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baldwin, Laetitia Andrée; Glazowska, Sylwia Emilia; Mravec, Jozef

    2017-01-01

    Wheat is one of the most important crops for food and feed and its straw is a potential feedstock for biorefinery purposes. Nitrogen (N) is an essential input factor in wheat agriculture but no information is available on how it affects straw composition during maturation and at harvest. To inves......Wheat is one of the most important crops for food and feed and its straw is a potential feedstock for biorefinery purposes. Nitrogen (N) is an essential input factor in wheat agriculture but no information is available on how it affects straw composition during maturation and at harvest....... To investigate this, we conducted a large scale field experiment in which wheat plants were cultivated at three levels of externally applied N. The plants were harvested at different stages of maturation, spanning green straw at heading (ear emergence) to fully yellow straw at final maturity. Defined parts...... of the straw were analyzed for cell wall characteristics relevant for further biomass processing. The straw N concentration corroborated with the level of N input, but the yield of straw biomass was not largely affected. High N treatment modified cell wall composition, namely increased abundance...

  8. Mechanically durable and highly conductive elastomeric composites from long single-walled carbon nanotubes mimicking the chain structure of polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ata, Seisuke; Kobashi, Kazufumi; Yumura, Motoo; Hata, Kenji

    2012-06-13

    By using long single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) as a filler possessing the highest aspect ratio and small diameter, we mimicked the chain structure of polymers in the matrix and realized a highly conductive elastomeric composite (30 S/cm) with an excellent mechanical durability (4500 strain cycles until failure), far superior to any other reported conductive elastomers. This exceptional mechanical durability was explained by the ability of long and traversing SWNTs to deform in concert with the elastomer with minimum stress concentration at their interfaces. The conductivity was sufficient to operate many active electronics components, and thus this material would be useful for practical stretchable electronic devices.

  9. Beryllium migration and evolution of first wall surface composition in the JET ILW configuration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krieger, K.; Brezinsek, S.; M. Reinelt,; Lisgo, S. W.; Coenen, J. W.; Jachmich, S.; Marsen, S.; Meigs, A.; van Rooij, G. J.; Stamp, M.; O. van Hoey,; Ivanova, D.; Loarer, T.; Philipps, V.

    2013-01-01

    Material migration and the resulting evolution of plasma facing surfaces were studied at the beginning of the JET ILW campaign using the singular opportunity of well-defined initial conditions with virgin Be and W wall components. In a sequence of identical Ohmically heated discharges the evolution

  10. Genome-Wide Association Mapping for Cell Wall Composition and Properties in Temperate Grasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bellucci, Andrea

    Plant cell wall confers flexibility, support for the vital processes of the plant and resistance to abiotic stresses and pathogen. It is constituted by a complex matrix of cellulose, hemicellulose, pectins and polyphenolic compounds as lignin. These main components interact with each other with a...

  11. Incorporation of p-coumarates into the cell walls of alfalfa changes the lignin composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    In general, monocots can contain a significant amount of an ester-linked p-coumarate (pCA) in their cell walls, but its function is unclear. One hypothesis is that pCA aids in the formation of syringyl-rich regions during lignification. Alfalfa (Medicago sativa), a dicot, is a cultivated perennial f...

  12. Synthesis of conducting polythiophene composites with multi-walled carbon nanotube by the {gamma}-radiolysis polymerization method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karim, Mohammad Rezaul [Division of Image System Science and Engineering, Pukyong National University, Busan 608-739 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Advanced Organic Materials Science and Engineering, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Yeum, Jeong Hyun [Department of Advanced Organic Materials Science and Engineering, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Mu Sang [Department of Chemistry, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Kwon Taek [Division of Image System Science and Engineering, Pukyong National University, Busan 608-739 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: ktlim@pknu.ac.kr

    2008-12-20

    Composites of conducting polythiophene (PTh) with the host filler multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWNT) have been synthesized by the in situ {gamma}-radiation-induced chemical polymerization method at room temperature. The resultant cable-like morphology of the composite (PTh-MWNT) structures was characterized by field-emission-scanning electron microscopy with the energy dispersive spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared, thermal gravimetric analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The characterizations of the molecular structure of the PTh-MWNT composites indicated that interfacial entrapment occurred between the MWNT and PTh; and the MWNT functioned as a template for PTh polymerization. The standard four-point probe method was utilized for measuring the conductivity of the samples. The conductivity through the PTh-MWNT composites was much higher than the value obtained for the bulk PTh powders synthesized by the same method. The PTh-MWNT composites showed improved thermogravimetric stability compared to the PTh homopolymer in the temperature range 0-800 deg. C.

  13. Feasibility Study of Opening Composite Wall Divided Into Composite Beam and Composite Column%开洞组合墙划分成组合梁和组合柱的可行性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐风光; 须亚平

    2012-01-01

    In the reinforced concrete masonry composite structure, window lintel and masonry constitute a composite beam, window frame and construction columns and masonry constitute a composite column. This paper used ANSYS to analyze a 11-layer composite walls whole structure stress and analyze the stress of cross-section of composite beam and composite column, confirmed the feasibility study of the bearing capacity that the opening wall, according to the constraint, can be divided into composite beam and composite column.%在钢筋混凝土-砌体组合结构中,窗过梁与圈梁和砌体构成组合梁,窗边框与构造柱和砌体构成组合柱.本文采用ANSYS对单片11层组合墙结构整体分析和对组合梁、组合柱的正截面进行应力分析,初步证实开洞组合墙可以根据约束划分成组合梁和组合柱进行承载力研究的可行性.

  14. Research of polysaccharide complexes from asteraceae family plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Світлана Михайлівна Марчишин

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim of research. Depth study of polysaccharides in some little-known plant species of Asteraceae family is pressing question, considering that polysaccharides are important biologically active compounds widely used in pharmaceutical and medical practice as remedies and preventive medications. The aim of research was to determinate both quantitative content and monomeric composition of polysaccharide complexes from Asteraceae family plant species – Tagetes genus, Arnica genus, and Bellis genus.Materials and methods. Determination of polysaccharides was carried out by the precipitation reaction, using 96 % ethyl alcohol P and Fehling's solution after acid hydrolysis; quantitative content of this group of compounds was determined by gravimetric analysis. On purpose to identify the monomeric composition hydrolysis under sulfuric acid conditions was conducted. Qualitative monomeric composition of polysaccharides after hydrolysis was carried out by paper chromatography method in n-Butanol – Pyridine – Distilled water P (6:4:3 system along with saccharides reference samples.Results. Polysaccharide complexes from Tagetes erecta, Tagetes patula, Tagetes tenuifolia, Arnica montana, Arnica foliosa, wild and cultivated Bellis perennis herbs were studied. Water-soluble polysaccharides and pectin fractions were isolated from studied objects; their quantitative content and monomeric composition were determined.Conclusion. The highest amount of water-soluble polysaccharides was found in cultivated Bellis perennis herb (10,13 %, the highest amount of pectin compounds – in Tagetes tenuifolia herb (13,62 %; the lowest amount of water-soluble polysaccharides and pectin compounds was found in Arnica montana herb (4,61 % and Tagetes patula herb (3,62 %, respectively. It was found that polysaccharide complexes from all studied species include glucose and arabinose

  15. Fabrication and Characterization of Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube (MWCNT) and Ni-Coated Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube (Ni-MWCNT) Repair Patches for Carbon Fiber Reinforced Composite Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Brienne; Caraccio, Anne; Tate, LaNetra; Jackson, Dionne

    2011-01-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT)/epoxy and nickel-coated multi-walled carbon nanotube (Ni-MWCNT)/epoxy systems were fabricated into carbon fiber composite repair patches via vacuum resin infusion. Two 4 ply patches were manufactured with fiber orientations of [90/ 90/ 4590] and [0/90/ +45/ -45]. Prior to resin infusion, the MWCNT/Epoxy system and NiMWCNT/ epoxy systems were optimized for dispersion quality. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and optical microscopy (OM) were used to determine the presence ofcarbon nanotubes and assess dispersion quality. Decomposition temperatures were determined via thermogravametric analysis (TGA). SEM and TGA were also used to evaluate the composite repair patches.

  16. Extraction and Composition Analysis of Polysaccharides in Bulbus lilii%百合多糖提取及成分分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张国强; 杨正平

    2012-01-01

    采用水提醇沉法提取百合(Bulbus lilii)中的多糖成分,Sevage法除蛋白质,凝胶色谱法进行多糖纯化,制备3-甲基-1-苯基-2-吡唑啉酮(PMP)衍生物进行高效液相色谱分析.结果表明,百合多糖由鼠李糖、阿拉伯糖、葡萄糖、木糖、半乳糖5种单糖组成,其含量分别为4.82%、12.79%、47.02%、13.01%、22.36%.%Polysaccharide was extracted and isolated from Bulbus lilii by water extracting-alcohol precipitating method and purified by Sevage method and gel permeation chromatography. The components of the polysaccharide were identified and quantified by HPLC of the PMP derivatives. The results showed that the main monosaccharides contained in B. Lilii polysaccharide were rhamnose, arabinose, glucose, xylose and galactose, with content of 4.82%, 12.79%, 47.02%, 13.01% and 22.36%, respectively.

  17. Oligo- and polysaccharide synthesis by Rhizobium leguminosarum and Rhizobium meliloti

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breedveld, M.W.

    1992-01-01

    Rhizobium and Agrobacterium species are capable of synthesizing a variety of extracellular and cellular oligo- and polysaccharides. Changes in environmental conditions may all affect the composition, physical properties, and relative amounts of

  18. Brewer's yeast cell wall affects microbiota composition and decreases Bacteroides fragilis populations in an anaerobic gut intestinal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakashimada, Yutaka; Michinaka, Atsuko; Watanabe, Kentaro; Nishio, Naomichi; Fujii, Toshio

    2011-02-01

    Brewer's yeast cell wall (BYC) has been reported to have prebiotic activity that improves the microbiotal composition of the human gut. To understand the precise effect of BYC on gut microbiota and its metabolism, we used a three-stage continuous-flow reactor system that mimicked the environment of the large intestine. The reactor system was able to maintain the bacterial community stably for a week. The Bacteroides fragilis population decreased drastically after the addition of BYC into this system while the number of Lactobacillus was stably maintained. In addition, propionate and acetate levels increased drastically. This metabolic change correlated with an increase in a number of specific operational taxonomic units annotated to the genus Veillonella and Megasphaella. These results suggest that BYC affects the composition of microbiota in an in vitro model system. Copyright © 2010 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Fucoidans - sulfated polysaccharides of brown algae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Usov, Anatolii I; Bilan, M I [N.D.Zelinsky Institute of Organic Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2009-08-31

    The methods of isolation of fucoidans and determination of their chemical structures are reviewed. The fucoidans represent sulfated polysaccharides of brown algae, the composition of which varies from simple fucan sulfates to complex heteropolysaccharides. The currently known structures of such biopolymers are presented. A variety of the biological activities of fucoidans is briefly summarised.

  20. Fucoidans — sulfated polysaccharides of brown algae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usov, Anatolii I.; Bilan, M. I.

    2009-08-01

    The methods of isolation of fucoidans and determination of their chemical structures are reviewed. The fucoidans represent sulfated polysaccharides of brown algae, the composition of which varies from simple fucan sulfates to complex heteropolysaccharides. The currently known structures of such biopolymers are presented. A variety of the biological activities of fucoidans is briefly summarised.

  1. Preparation of composite of block copolymer/gold nanoparticle based alginate polysaccharide%海藻多糖基嵌段共聚物/纳米金复合物的制备

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘意; 吴石楷; 李金炜; 孙福强; 崔英德

    2014-01-01

    Objective The composite was prepared in situ about polyvinyl pyrrolidone block copolymer/nano-gold ( SA-330-S2-Au ) based alginate polysaccharides. Methods The dithioester base alginate polysaccharides was synthesised at first, and then used as a chain transfer agent ( CTA ) for RAFT polymerization, to sythesis polyvinyl pyrrolidone block copolymer ( SA-330-S2 ) based alginate polysaccharides. By the self-assembly properties of SA-330-S2 ,the composite of polyvinyl pyrrolidone block copolymer/nano-gold ( SA-330-S2-Au ) based alginate polysaccharides was prepared in situ, and characterized by using methods such as FT-IR,NMR,DSC,TEM and SEM et al. Results The size of the gold nanoparticles was about 10-30 nm . But the average particle size of composite nanoparticles was about 54.4 nm when it was measured by the method of DLS in wet. Due to the stabilizing effect of block copolymers based seaweed polysaccharide of the shell layer of composite nanoparticles,the storage of SA-330-S2-Au aqueous was more than six months,and there was significant fluorescence. Conclusion The SA-330-S2-Au aqueous solution is very stable with fluorescence properties,and is expected to be used in tumor diagnosis and treatment.%目的:原位法制备海藻多糖基聚乙烯基吡咯烷酮嵌段共聚物/纳米金复合物( SA-330-S2-Au)。方法首先合成改性海藻多糖基二硫代酯,并用作RAFT聚合的链转移剂(CTA),制备海藻多糖基聚乙烯基吡咯烷酮嵌段的共聚物( SA-330-S2),然后利用SA-330-S2自组装特性,原位法制备SA-330-S2-Au,并用FT-IR、NMR、DSC、TEM、SEM等方法进行分析表征。结果复合物SA-330-S2-Au中的纳米金粒子大小约10~30 nm,湿态时纳米复合纳米粒子的平均粒径约为54.4 nm,由于复合纳米粒子外壳层的海藻多糖基嵌段共聚物的稳定化作用,SA-330-S2-Au水溶液储存期超过6个月,且有明显荧光。结论 SA-330-S2-Au水溶液稳定且具有荧光特性,有望应用于肿瘤诊疗领域。

  2. Control of Dynamic Response of Thin-Walled Composite Beams using Structural Tailoring and Piezoelectric Actuation

    OpenAIRE

    Na, Sungsoo

    1997-01-01

    A dual approach integrating structural tailoring and adaptive materials technology and designed to control the dynamic response of cantilever beams subjected to external excitations is addressed. The cantilevered structure is modeled as a thin-walled beam of arbitrary cross-section and incorporates a number of non-classical effects such as transverse shear, warping restraint, anisotropy of constituent materials and heterogeneity of the construction. Whereas structura...

  3. A Wearable and Wireless Gas-Sensing System Using Flexible Polymer/Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube Composite Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Chern Chiou

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, an integrated flexible gas sensor was developed based on a polymer/multi-walled carbon nanotube composite film by using Bluetooth wireless communication/interface technology. Polymer/multi-walled carbon nanotube composite films were deposited over a polyimide flexible substrate for building a gas sensor array by using a drop-casting method. Sensor response was acquired through interdigitated electrodes and multi-channel sensor boards, which were linked to a Bluetooth wireless transceiver. Additionally, a double-spiral-shaped heater was built into the backside of the gas sensor array as a thermostat to protect it from the influence of ambient temperature. Multi-channel sensing responses were read on a display screen via a smartphone application (app. The advantages of this system include light weight, low cost, highly integrated sensors, wireless telecommunication, and real-time functioning. Thus, it is a promising candidate for deployment in a wearable gas-sensing system used to study air pollution.

  4. Composition and ultrastructure of the suberized cell wall of isolated crystal idioblasts from Agave americana L. leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espelie, K E; Wattendorff, J; Kolattukudy, P E

    1982-07-01

    Styloid-calcium-oxalate-crystal-containing idioblasts possess an interior cell-wall layer which has a lamellar ultrastructure. Idioblasts were isolated by centrifugation of an Agave americana leaf homogenate through 2M sucrose. The aliphatic monomers of the polymeric material from an idioblast fraction were primarily ω-hydroxy acids (32%) and dicarboxylic acids (35%), with C18:1 dicarboxylic acid being the most dominant monomer (25%). Nitrobenzene oxidation of the idioblasts yielded syringaldehyde and vanillin in a ratio of 0.46:1. The major class of wax associated with the idioblasts was free fatty acids (34%). A major homologue of both the fatty acid and fatty alcohol fractions of this wax was C22. The hydrocarbon fraction of the wax had a broad chainlength distribution with a large amount of even-numbered (47%) and shorter-chain homologues. The ultrastructure, the composition of the aliphatic and aromatic components of the polymeric material as well as the composition of the wax show that the idioblast cell wall is suberized. The wax and cutin polymer of the epidermis of A. americana leaves were chemically characterized for comparative purposes.

  5. Impaired Chloroplast Biogenesis in Immutans, an Arabidopsis Variegation Mutant, Modifies Developmental Programming, Cell Wall Composition and Resistance to Pseudomonas syringae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gennady V Pogorelko

    Full Text Available The immutans (im variegation mutation of Arabidopsis has green- and white- sectored leaves due to action of a nuclear recessive gene. IM codes for PTOX, a plastoquinol oxidase in plastid membranes. Previous studies have revealed that the green and white sectors develop into sources (green tissues and sinks (white tissues early in leaf development. In this report we focus on white sectors, and show that their transformation into effective sinks involves a sharp reduction in plastid number and size. Despite these reductions, cells in the white sectors have near-normal amounts of plastid RNA and protein, and surprisingly, a marked amplification of chloroplast DNA. The maintenance of protein synthesis capacity in the white sectors might poise plastids for their development into other plastid types. The green and white im sectors have different cell wall compositions: whereas cell walls in the green sectors resemble those in wild type, cell walls in the white sectors have reduced lignin and cellulose microfibrils, as well as alterations in galactomannans and the decoration of xyloglucan. These changes promote susceptibility to the pathogen Pseudomonas syringae. Enhanced susceptibility can also be explained by repressed expression of some, but not all, defense genes. We suggest that differences in morphology, physiology and biochemistry between the green and white sectors is caused by a reprogramming of leaf development that is coordinated, in part, by mechanisms of retrograde (plastid-to-nucleus signaling, perhaps mediated by ROS. We conclude that variegation mutants offer a novel system to study leaf developmental programming, cell wall metabolism and host-pathogen interactions.

  6. Gel spinning of PVA composite fibers with high content of multi-walled carbon nanotubes and graphene oxide hybrids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yizhe; Lai, Dengpan; Zou, Liming; Ling, Xinlong; Lu, Hongwei; Xu, Yongjing

    2015-07-01

    In this report, poly (vinyl alcohol) (PVA) composite fibers with high content of multi-walled carbon nanotubes and graphene oxide (MWCNTs-GO) hybrids were prepared by gel spinning, and were characterized by TGA, DSC, SEM, XL-2 yarn strength tester and electrical conductivity measurement. The total content of MWCNTs-GO hybrids in the PVA composite fibers, which is up to 25 wt%, was confirmed by TGA analysis. The DSC measurement shows that the melting and crystallization peaks decreased after the addition of nano-fillers. This is due to the reason that the motion of PVA chains is completely confined by strong hydrogen bonding interaction between PVA and nano-fillers. After the addtion of GO, the dispersibility of MWCNTs in composite fibers improved slightly. And the tensile strength and Young's modulus increased by 38% and 67%, respectively. This is caused by the increased hydrogen bonding interaction and synergistic effect through hybridization of MWCNTs and GO. More significantly, the electrical conductivity of PVA/MWCNTs/GO composite fibers enhanced by three orders of magnitude with the addition of GO.

  7. Effects of Operating Temperature on Droplet Casting of Flexible Polymer/Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube Composite Gas Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiou, Jin-Chern; Wu, Chin-Cheng; Huang, Yu-Chieh; Chang, Shih-Cheng; Lin, Tse-Mei

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the performance of a flexible polymer/multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) composite sensor array as a function of operating temperature. The response magnitudes of a cost-effective flexible gas sensor array equipped with a heater were measured with respect to five different operating temperatures (room temperature, 40 °C, 50 °C, 60 °C, and 70 °C) via impedance spectrum measurement and sensing response experiments. The selected polymers that were droplet cast to coat a MWCNT conductive layer to form two-layer polymer/MWCNT composite sensing films included ethyl cellulose (EC), polyethylene oxide (PEO), and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP). Electrical characterization of impedance, sensing response magnitude, and scanning electron microscope (SEM) morphology of each type of polymer/MWCNT composite film was performed at different operating temperatures. With respect to ethanol, the response magnitude of the sensor decreased with increasing operating temperatures. The results indicated that the higher operating temperature could reduce the response and influence the sensitivity of the polymer/MWCNT gas sensor array. The morphology of polymer/MWCNT composite films revealed that there were changes in the porous film after volatile organic compound (VOC) testing. PMID:28025507

  8. Nonlinear optical properties of polyaniline and poly (o-toluidine) composite thin films with multi walled carbon nano tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaraja, K. K.; Pramodini, S.; Poornesh, P.; Telenkov, M. P.; Kityk, I. V.

    2017-05-01

    We report the improved third-order nonlinear optical properties of polyaniline and poly (o-toluidine) with different doping concentrations of multi walled carbon nano tube (MWCNTs) composite thin films investigated using z-scan technique and continuous wave He-Ne laser at 633 nm wavelength was used as source of excitation. Thin films were prepared by spin coating technique on glass substrate. The structural properties of the composite films were analysed by X-ray diffraction studies and the characteristic peaks corresponding to MWCNTs and polymers have been observed. The surface morphology of the deposited films was analysed using scanning electron microscopy and it confirms that the polymer in the composites has been coated on the MWCNTs homogeneously. The z-scan results reveal that the films exhibit reverse saturable absorption and self-defocusing nonlinearity. The third-order nonlinear optical susceptibility χ(3) is found to be of the order of 10-3 esu. Also, optical power limiting and clamping experiment was performed. The clamping values increases with increase in concentration and the lowest clamping observed for composite films are 1 mW and 0.7 mW.

  9. Nonlinear optical properties of polyaniline and poly (o-toluidine) composite thin films with multi walled carbon nano tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagaraja, K.K. [National University of Science and Technology “MISiS”, Leninskii pr. 4, Moscow 119049 (Russian Federation); Pramodini, S. [Department of Physics, School of Engineering and Technology, Jain University, Jakkasandra Post, Bengaluru 5621112, Karnataka (India); Poornesh, P., E-mail: poorneshp@gmail.com [Nonlinear Optics Research Laboratory, Department of Physics, Manipal Institute of Technology, Manipal University, Manipal 576 104, Karnataka (India); Telenkov, M.P. [National University of Science and Technology “MISiS”, Leninskii pr. 4, Moscow 119049 (Russian Federation); Kityk, I.V. [Electrical Engineering Department, Czestochowa University Technology, Czestochowa (Poland)

    2017-05-01

    We report the improved third-order nonlinear optical properties of polyaniline and poly (o-toluidine) with different doping concentrations of multi walled carbon nano tube (MWCNTs) composite thin films investigated using z-scan technique and continuous wave He–Ne laser at 633 nm wavelength was used as source of excitation. Thin films were prepared by spin coating technique on glass substrate. The structural properties of the composite films were analysed by X-ray diffraction studies and the characteristic peaks corresponding to MWCNTs and polymers have been observed. The surface morphology of the deposited films was analysed using scanning electron microscopy and it confirms that the polymer in the composites has been coated on the MWCNTs homogeneously. The z-scan results reveal that the films exhibit reverse saturable absorption and self-defocusing nonlinearity. The third-order nonlinear optical susceptibility χ{sup (3)} is found to be of the order of 10{sup −3} esu. Also, optical power limiting and clamping experiment was performed. The clamping values increases with increase in concentration and the lowest clamping observed for composite films are 1 mW and 0.7 mW.

  10. Effects of Operating Temperature on Droplet Casting of Flexible Polymer/Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube Composite Gas Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Chern Chiou

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the performance of a flexible polymer/multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT composite sensor array as a function of operating temperature. The response magnitudes of a cost-effective flexible gas sensor array equipped with a heater were measured with respect to five different operating temperatures (room temperature, 40 °C, 50 °C, 60 °C, and 70 °C via impedance spectrum measurement and sensing response experiments. The selected polymers that were droplet cast to coat a MWCNT conductive layer to form two-layer polymer/MWCNT composite sensing films included ethyl cellulose (EC, polyethylene oxide (PEO, and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP. Electrical characterization of impedance, sensing response magnitude, and scanning electron microscope (SEM morphology of each type of polymer/MWCNT composite film was performed at different operating temperatures. With respect to ethanol, the response magnitude of the sensor decreased with increasing operating temperatures. The results indicated that the higher operating temperature could reduce the response and influence the sensitivity of the polymer/MWCNT gas sensor array. The morphology of polymer/MWCNT composite films revealed that there were changes in the porous film after volatile organic compound (VOC testing.

  11. Effect of cooling rate on the properties of high density polyethylene/multi-walled carbon nanotube composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiang, Dong; Harkin-Jones, Eileen [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Queen’s University Belfast, BT9 5AH (United Kingdom); Linton, David [School of Electronics, Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Queen’s University Belfast, BT9 5AH (United Kingdom)

    2015-05-22

    High density polyethylene (HDPE)/multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) nanocomposites were prepared by melt mixing using twin-screw extrusion. The extruded pellets were compression moulded at 200°C for 5min followed by cooling at different cooling rates (20°C/min and 300°C/min respectively) to produce sheets for characterization. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) shows that the MWCNTs are uniformly dispersed in the HDPE. At 4 wt% addition of MWCNTs composite modulus increased by over 110% compared with the unfilled HDPE (regardless of the cooling rate). The yield strength of both unfilled and filled HDPE decreased after rapid cooling by about 10% due to a lower crystallinity and imperfect crystallites. The electrical percolation threshold of composites, irrespective of the cooling rate, is between a MWCNT concentration of 1∼2 wt%. Interestingly, the electrical resistivity of the rapidly cooled composite with 2 wt% MWCNTs is lower than that of the slowly cooled composites with the same MWCNT loading. This may be due to the lower crystallinity and smaller crystallites facilitating the formation of conductive pathways. This result may have significant implications for both process control and the tailoring of electrical conductivity in the manufacture of conductive HDPE/MWCNT nanocomposites.

  12. Cytochemical Localization of Polysaccharides in Dendrobium officinale and the Involvement of DoCSLA6 in the Synthesis of Mannan Polysaccharides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Chunmei; Wu, Kunlin; Zhang, Jianxia; Liu, Xuncheng; Zeng, Songjun; Yu, Zhenming; Zhang, Xinghua; Teixeira da Silva, Jaime A; Deng, Rufang; Tan, Jianwen; Luo, Jianping; Duan, Jun

    2017-01-01

    Dendrobium officinale is a precious traditional Chinese medicinal plant because of its abundant polysaccharides found in stems. We determined the composition of water-soluble polysaccharides and starch content in D. officinale stems. The extracted water-soluble polysaccharide content was as high as 35% (w/w). Analysis of the composition of monosaccharides showed that the water-soluble polysaccharides were dominated by mannose, to a lesser extent glucose, and a small amount of galactose, in a molar ratio of 223:48:1. Although starch was also found, its content was less than 10%. This result indicated that the major polysaccharides in D. officinale stems were non-starch polysaccharides, which might be mannan polysaccharides. The polysaccharides formed granules and were stored in plastids similar to starch grains, were localized in D. officinale stems by semi-thin and ultrathin sections. CELLULOSE SYNTHASE-LIKE A (CSLA) family members encode mannan synthases that catalyze the formation of mannan polysaccharides. To determine whether the CSLA gene from D. officinale was responsible for the synthesis of mannan polysaccharides, 35S:DoCSLA6 transgenic lines were generated and characterized. Our results suggest that the CSLA family genes from D. officinale play an important role in the biosynthesis of mannan polysaccharides.

  13. Controlling nanotube dimensions: correlation between composition, diameter, and internal energy of single-walled mixed oxide nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konduri, Suchitra; Mukherjee, Sanjoy; Nair, Sankar

    2007-12-01

    Control over the diameter of nanotubes is of significance in manipulating their properties, which depend on their dimensions in addition to their structure and composition. This aspect has remained a challenge in both carbon and inorganic nanotubes, since there is no obvious aspect of the formation mechanism that allows facile control over nanotube curvature. Here we develop and analyze a quantitative correlation between the composition, diameter, and internal energy of a class of single-walled mixed oxide aluminosilicogermanate (AlSiGeOH) nanotubes. A series of synthetic AlSiGeOH nanotubes with varying Si/Ge ratio are characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, vibrational spectroscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction to relate their compositions and diameters. We then study these nanotubes computationally by first parametrizing and validating a suitable interatomic potential model, and then using this potential model to investigate the internal energy of the nanotube as a function of diameter and composition via molecular dynamics simulations. There are minima in the internal energy as a function of diameter which progressively shift to larger nanotube diameters with increasing Ge content. An approximate analytical theory of nanotube diameter control, which contains a small number of physically significant fitted parameters, well describes the computational data by relating the composition and geometry to the strain energy of bending into a nanotube. The predicted composition-dependent shift in the energetically favored diameter follows the experimental trends. We suggest related methods of controlling nanotube energetics and their role in engineering nanotubes of controlled dimensions by liquid-phase chemistry.

  14. New practical method of homogeneous dispersion of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) into Mg matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Teng; Du, Shuangming; Sun, Wanchang; Zhang, Jumei; Niu, Libin; Hua, Xiaohu

    2017-03-01

    It is difficult to disperse multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) into Mg matrix composites homogeneously due to the high specific surface energy between MWCNTs. This would affect the mechanical properties of magnesium matrix composites reinforced by MWCNTs tremendously. The key is to overcome MWCNTs aggregate together, and gain the homogeneous dispersion of MWCNTs. Moreover, the density difference of Mg matrix and MWCNTs is another problem which prevents MWCNTs from dispersing homogeneously into Mg matrix composites. In order to solve these problems, a new practical method of homogeneous dispersion of carbon nanotubes into Mg matrix composites was presented basing on combination the tow step ball milling and ultrasonication dispersion methods. First, a certain amount of MWCNTs was ball-milled in ethanol solution contain 5 wt.% sodium stearate at various rotation speeds (100 rpm-300 rpm) and ball-milled times (0.5 H-2 H) to break MWCNTs hard aggregation. Second, MWCNTs which were subjected to the ball-milling were dispersed further in ethanol solution containing (SDS, DBS) using ultrasonication method. Third, the Mg powers were mixed with good dispersion of carbon nanotubes solution and ball-milled for 1 H to make MWCNTs coated uniformly on the surface of the magnesium substrate. The results were mainly examined by field emission scanning electron microscopy (SEM). It was found that MWCNTs were dispersed well and some of these MWCNTs had directional arrangement. Furthermore, MWCNTs were homogeneously dispersed into Mg matrix composites. These results suggest that this method has good application for magnesium matrix composites reinforced by carbon nanotubes.

  15. Optical Limiting Properties of Two Soluble Polymer/Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube Composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIU Xue-Qiong; Wu Hui-Xia; TONG Rui; QIAN Shi-Xiong; LIN Yang-Hui; CAI Rui-Fang

    2008-01-01

    Two soluble polymer grafted multi-walled carbon nanotubes(MWNTs),including poly(N-vinylcarbazole)-MwNTs and poly(methyl methacrylate)-MWNTs,are synthesized.Their nonlinear optical properties and optical limiting(OL)performances are investigated by z-scan method with 527nm nanosecond laser pulses.These grafted MWNTs dissolved in chlorform show much better optical limiting performance than those of MWNTs and C60 in toluene solution.Nonlinear absorption and nonlinear scattering mechanism are taken into consideration for explaining the observed results.The comparison of the experimental results shows that nonlinear absorption is the dominant mechanism for OL performance of these new samples.

  16. Development of scalable methods for the utilization of multi-walled carbon nanotubes in polymer and metal matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vennerberg, Danny Curtis

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) have received considerable attention as reinforcement for composites due to their high tensile strength, stiffness, electrical conductivity and thermal conductivity as well as their low coefficient of thermal expansion. However, despite the availability of huge quantities of low-cost, commercially synthesized nanotubes, the utilization of MWCNTs in engineering composites is extremely limited due to difficulties in achieving uniform dispersion and strong interfacial bonding with the matrix. A proven method of enhancing the nanotube-polymer interface and degree of MWCNT dispersion involves functionalizing the MWCNTs through oxidation with strong acids. While effective at laboratory scales, this technique is not well-suited for large-scale operations due to long processing times, poor yield, safety hazards, and environmental concerns. This work aims to find scalable solutions to several of the challenges associated with the fabrication of MWCNT-reinforced composites. For polymer matrix composite applications, a rapid, dry, and cost-effective method of oxidizing MWCNTs with O3 in a fluidized bed was developed as an alternative to acid oxidation. Oxidized MWCNTs were further functionalized with silane coupling agents using water and supercritical carbon dioxide as solvents in order to endow the MWCNTs with matrix-specific functionalities. The effect of silanization on the cure kinetics, rheological behavior, and thermo-mechanical properties of model epoxy nanocomposites were investigated. Small additions of functionalized MWCNTs were found to increase the glass transition temperature, strength, and toughness of the epoxy. In order to achieve composite properties approaching those of individual nanotubes, new approaches are needed to allow for high loadings of MWCNTs. One strategy involves making macroscopic mats of nanotubes called buckypaper (BP) and subsequently infiltrating the mats with resin in processes familiar to

  17. Effect of adhesion to cavity walls on the mechanical properties of resin composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayif, Ma'an M; Nakajima, Masatoshi; Aksornmuang, Juthatip; Ikeda, Masaomi; Tagami, Junji

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate the regional mechanical properties of resin composite under free and constrained conditions during polymerization. Forty cavities (8mm diameter and 5mm depth) were fabricated in resin blocks. Half of the cavities were bonded and the other half left un-bonded. The cavities were bulk-filled with one of the following composites: flowable composite (Palfique Estelite LV, Unifil Lo Flo), and Universal composites (Clearfil AP-X, Palfique Estelite Sigma), followed by photo-curing for 30s. After 24h storage, each specimen was sliced parallel to the long axis to harvest three slabs. The middle slab was serially sliced to harvest five sticks, which were trimmed to an hour-glass shape for measurement of regional ultimate tensile strength (UTS). The remaining semi-circular slabs were polished for microhardness measurement (KHN). Data were analyzed using three-way ANOVA followed by Tukey's HSD test and t-test (alpha=.05). The KHNs of all the resin composites were not significantly different between the bonded and unbonded groups at each cavity depth (p>0.05). The Ucapital TE, CyrillicS of the bonded group of flowable composites was significantly lower than those of the un-bonded group at the upper regions (pcomposites, there were no significant differences in UTS between the bonded and un-bonded groups (p>0.05), although Clearfil AP-X had a trend toward lower UTS under the constrained condition at the upper regions. The UTS of resin composite decreases due to polymerization shrinkage stress when polymerized under a constrained condition, however, these effects were dependent upon regions in the cavity and the resin materials.

  18. Seasonal variations in aerosol compositions at Great Wall Station in Antarctica

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yuanhui; WANG Yanmin; ZHANG Miming; CHEN Liqi; LIN Qi; YAN Jinpei; LI Wei; LIN Hongmei; ZHAO Shuhui

    2015-01-01

    AbstractHigh volume aerosol samplers at Great Wall Station in Antarctica were used to collect73 aerosol samplesbetween January 2012 andNovember 2013. The main ions in these aerosol samples, Cl−, NO3−, SO42−, Na+, K+, Ca2+, Mg2+, NH4+, as well as methane sulfonic acid, were analyzed using ion chromatography. Trace metals in these samples, including Pb, Cu, Cd, V, Zn, Fe, and Al, were determined by inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Results showed thatsea salt was the main component in aerosols atGreat Wall Station. Most ions exhibited signiifcant seasonal variations, with higher concentrations in summer and autumn than in winter and spring. Variations in ions and trace metals were related toseveral processes (or sources), including sea salt emission, secondary aerosol formation, and anthropogenic pollution from both local and distant sources. The sources of ions and trace metals were identiifed using enrichment factor, correlation, and factor analyses. Clearly, Na+, K+, Ca2+, and Mg2+were from marine sources, while Cu, Pb, Zn, and Cdwere from anthropogenic pollution, and Al and V were mainly from crustal sources.

  19. Modified polysaccharides as alternative binders for foundry industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Kaczmarska

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Polysaccharides constitute a wide group of important polymers with many commercial applications, for example food packaging, fibres, coatings, adhesives etc. This review is devoted to the presentation of polysaccharide application in foundry industry. In this paper the selected properties of foundry moulding sand and core sand containing modified polysaccharides as binders are presented according to foreign literature data. Also, author’s own research about effect of using moulding sand binder consisting of modified polysaccharide (modified starch or its composition with non-toxic synthetic polymers are discussed. Based on technologies taken under consideration in this paper, it could be concluded that polysaccharides are suitable as an alternative for use as binder in foundry moulding applications.

  20. Composite Behavior of a Novel Insulated Concrete Sandwich Wall Panel Reinforced with GFRP Shear Grids: Effects of Insulation Types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JunHee Kim

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A full-scale experimental program was used in this study to investigate the structural behavior of novel insulated concrete sandwich wall panels (SWPs reinforced with grid-type glass-fiber-reinforced polymer (GFRP shear connectors. Two kinds of insulation-expanded polystyrene (EPS and extruded polystyrene (XPS with 100 mm thickness were incased between the two concrete wythes to meet the increasing demand for the insulation performance of building envelope. One to four GFRP shear grids were used to examine the degree of composite action of the two concrete wythes. Ten specimens of SWPs were tested under displacement control subjected to four-point concentrated loads. The test results showed that the SWPs reinforced with GFRP grids as shear connectors developed a high degree of composite action resulting in high flexural strength. The specimens with EPS foam exhibited an enhanced load-displacement behavior compared with the specimens with XPS because of the relatively stronger bond between insulation and concrete. In addition, the ultimate strength of the test results was compared to the analytical prediction with the mechanical properties of only GRFP grids. The specimens with EPS insulation presented higher strength-based composite action than the ones with XPS insulation.

  1. Preparation and properties of multi-wall carbon nanotube/SiC composites by aqueous tape casting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    MWCNTS/SiC composites were fabricated by aqueous tape casting. High solid content (50 vol%) SiC slurries with sintering additives and multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) as reinforcements were prepared using Tetramethylammonium hydroxide as the dispersant. The stability of MWCNTs/SiC slur-ries was studied and characterized in terms of zeta potential and rheology measurements. The relative density of the composite was about 98% after hot-pressing at 1850℃ (at 25 MPa in Ar for 30 min). The hardness of the composites decreased with the increase in MWCNTs content. The flexural strength and the fracture toughness were 742.17 MPa and 4.63 MPa·m1/2, respectively when the MWCNTs content was 0.25 wt%. Further increase in MWCNTs content to 0.50 wt% did not lead to the increase in mechanical properties. Most of MWCNTs were found to be located at SiC grain boundaries and the pull out of the MWCNTs was observed.

  2. Preparation and characterization of poly[Ni(salen)(crown receptor)]/multi-walled carbon nanotube composite films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tedim, J.; Hillman, A.R. [Department of Chemistry, University of Leicester, Leicester LE1 7 RH (United Kingdom); Goncalves, F.; Pereira, M.F.R.; Figueiredo, J.L. [Laboratorio de Catalise e Materiais, Departamento de Engenharia Quimica, Faculdade de Engenharia, Universidade do Porto, 4200-465 Porto (Portugal); Moura, C. [CIQ, Departamento de Quimica, Faculdade de Ciencias, Universidade do Porto, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal); Freire, C. [REQUIMTE, Departamento de Quimica, Faculdade de Ciencias, Universidade do Porto, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal)

    2008-10-01

    Nanocomposite films comprising multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) embedded within poly[Ni(3-Mesalophen-b15-c5)] were deposited on Pt and ITO electrode surfaces by the potentiodynamic polymerisation of [Ni(3-Mesalophen-b15-c5)] from solutions containing dispersed MWCNTs. Composites incorporating carbon nanotubes subject to a range of oxidising pre-treatments were compared with those incorporating untreated carbon nanotubes and with the pure polymer. In both cases, the use of CH{sub 3}CN and CH{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} as fabrication and characterization media were explored. Films were characterized by voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The coating of the carbon nanotubes with polymer varied significantly with pre-treatment and solvent medium; this influenced the final composite morphology and electrical properties. Performance enhancement of the polymer component by the presence of the carbon nanotubes was manifested through the ability to store charge and the ease with which this could be accomplished; these were parameterized via increased redox capacitance and decreased charge-transfer resistance, respectively. Correlation of impedance parameters with SEM images provided a morphological rationale for composite electrical properties. (author)

  3. Immunomodulatory dietary polysaccharides: a systematic review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson Erika D

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A large body of literature suggests that certain polysaccharides affect immune system function. Much of this literature, however, consists of in vitro studies or studies in which polysaccharides were injected. Their immunologic effects following oral administration is less clear. The purpose of this systematic review was to consolidate and evaluate the available data regarding the specific immunologic effects of dietary polysaccharides. Methods Studies were identified by conducting PubMed and Google Scholar electronic searches and through reviews of polysaccharide article bibliographies. Only articles published in English were included in this review. Two researchers reviewed data on study design, control, sample size, results, and nature of outcome measures. Subsequent searches were conducted to gather information about polysaccharide safety, structure and composition, and disposition. Results We found 62 publications reporting statistically significant effects of orally ingested glucans, pectins, heteroglycans, glucomannans, fucoidans, galactomannans, arabinogalactans and mixed polysaccharide products in rodents. Fifteen controlled human studies reported that oral glucans, arabinogalactans, heteroglycans, and fucoidans exerted significant effects. Although some studies investigated anti-inflammatory effects, most studies investigated the ability of oral polysaccharides to stimulate the immune system. These studies, as well as safety and toxicity studies, suggest that these polysaccharide products appear to be largely well-tolerated. Conclusions Taken as a whole, the oral polysaccharide literature is highly heterogenous and is not sufficient to support broad product structure/function generalizations. Numerous dietary polysaccharides, particularly glucans, appear to elicit diverse immunomodulatory effects in numerous animal tissues, including the blood, GI tract and spleen. Glucan extracts from the Trametes versicolor

  4. Polysaccharides and Oligosaccharides Produced on Malvar Wines Elaborated with Torulaspora delbrueckii CLI 918 and Saccharomyces cerevisiae CLI 889 Native Yeasts from D.O. "Vinos de Madrid".

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Margarita; Apolinar-Valiente, Rafael; Williams, Pascale; Esteve-Zarzoso, Braulio; Arroyo, Teresa; Crespo, Julia; Doco, Thierry

    2017-08-09

    Polysaccharides and oligosaccharides released into Malvar white wines elaborated through pure, mixed, and sequential cultures with Torulaspora delbrueckii CLI 918 and Saccharomyces cerevisiae CLI 889 native yeasts from D.O. "Vinos de Madrid" were studied. Both fractions from different white wines were separated by high-resolution size-exclusion chromatography. Glycosyl composition and wine polysaccharide linkages were determined by GC-EI-MS chromatography. Molar-mass distributions were determined by SEC-MALLS, and intrinsic viscosity was determined by differential viscometer. Yeast species and type of inoculation have a significant impact on wine carbohydrate composition and structure. Mannose residues from mannoproteins were significantly predominant in those cultures where T. delbrueckii was present in the fermentation process in comparison with when pure cultures of S. cerevisiae were present in the fermenation process. Galactose residues from polysaccharides rich in arabinose and galactose presented greater values in pure cultures of S. cerevisiae, indicating that S. cerevisiae released fewer mannoproteins than T. delbrueckii. Moreover, we reported structural differences between mannoproteins released by T. delbrueckii CLI 918 and those released by S. cerevisiae CLI 889. These findings help to provide important information about the polysaccharides and oligosaccharides released from the cell walls of Malvar grapes and the carbohydrates released from each yeast species.

  5. Long-term evolution of the impurity composition and impurity events with the ITER-like wall at JET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coenen, J. W.; Sertoli, M.; Brezinsek, S.; Coffey, I.; Dux, R.; Giroud, C.; Groth, M.; Huber, A.; Ivanova, D.; Krieger, K.; Lawson, K.; Marsen, S.; Meigs, A.; Neu, R.; Puetterich, T.; van Rooij, G. J.; Stamp, M. F.; Contributors, JET-EFDA

    2013-07-01

    This paper covers aspects of long-term evolution of intrinsic impurities in the JET tokamak with respect to the newly installed ITER-like wall (ILW). At first the changes related to the change over from the JET-C to the JET-ILW with beryllium (Be) as the main wall material and tungsten (W) in the divertor are discussed. The evolution of impurity fluxes in the newly installed W divertor with respect to studying material migration is described. In addition, a statistical analysis of transient impurity events causing significant plasma contamination and radiation losses is shown. The main findings comprise a drop in carbon content (×20) (see also Brezinsek et al (2013 J. Nucl. Mater. 438 S303)), low oxygen content (×10) due to the Be first wall (Douai et al 2013 J. Nucl. Mater. 438 S1172-6) as well as the evolution of the material mix in the divertor. Initially, a short period of repetitive ohmic plasmas was carried out to study material migration (Krieger et al 2013 J. Nucl. Mater. 438 S262). After the initial 1600 plasma seconds the material surface composition is, however, still evolving. With operational time, the levels of recycled C are increasing slightly by 20% while the Be levels in the deposition-dominated inner divertor are dropping, hinting at changes in the surface layer material mix made of Be, C and W. A steady number of transient impurity events, consisting of W and constituents of inconel, is observed despite the increase in variation in machine operation and changes in magnetic configuration as well as the auxiliary power increase.

  6. Experimental evidence of localized plasmon resonance in composite materials containing single-wall carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuba, M. V.; Paddubskaya, A. G.; Plyushch, A. O.; Kuzhir, P. P.; Slepyan, G. Ya.; Maksimenko, S. A.; Ksenevich, V. K.; Buka, P.; Seliuta, D.; Kasalynas, I.; Macutkevic, J.; Valusis, G.; Thomsen, C.; Lakhtakia, A.

    2012-04-01

    Experimental proof of localized plasmon resonance was found in thin films containing either single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) or SWNT bundles of different length. All samples were prepared by a simple technique that permitted the selection of different SWNT lengths in different samples without significant differences in electronic properties. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy showed that an optical-density peak, the same as a terahertz conductivity peak, shifts to higher frequencies as the SWNT lengths are reduced—in agreement with a similar tendency predicted for the localized plasmon resonance in finite-length SWNTs [Slepyan , Phys. Rev. BPRBMDO1098-012110.1103/PhysRevB.81.205423 81, 205423 (2010)].

  7. Electrical and mechanical characterisation of single wall carbon nanotubes based composites for tissue engineering applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whulanza, Yudan; Battini, Elena; Vannozzi, Lorenzo; Vomero, Maria; Ahluwalia, Arti; Vozzi, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the realisation of conductive matrices for application to tissue engineering research. We used poly(L-lactide (PLLA)), poly(epsilon-caprolactone) (PCL), and poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) as polymer matrix, because they are biocompatible and biodegradable. The conductive property was integrated to them by adding single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) into the polymer matrix. Several SWNTs concentrations were introduced aiming to understand how they influence and modulate mechanical properties, impedance features and electric percolation threshold of polymer matrix. It was observed that a concentration of 0.3% was able to transform insulating matrix into conductive one. Furthermore, a conductive model of the SWNT/polymer was developed by applying power law of percolation threshold.

  8. STUDY OF SINGLE WALLED CARBON NANOTUBE REINFORCED POLYMER COMPOSITES BY HANSEN SOLUBILITY PARAMETERS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Jing

    Single Walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) possess superior mechanical, thermal and electrical properties. The use of SWNTs as a reinforcement in polymer matrix is a hot research topic. However, the poor dispersion of SWNTs in polymers and the weak interface between the nanotubes and polymers are two...... the chemical compatibility between polymer and SWNTs, and correlate the parameters with the dispersion of SWNTs and interfacial properties between SWNTs and polymers. Several different surface modifications on carbon nanotubes and different polymers are considered. The dispersion of SWNTs in solvents...... is evaluated by Dynamic Light scattering (DLS). The functional groups attached to SWNTs and degree of functionalization, and also the size of the nanotubes affect the HSP of the SWNTs. The extent by which functionalization take place is affected by the amount of defects on the nanotube surface. The strain...

  9. An in vitro model of the glomerular capillary wall using electrospun collagen nanofibres in a bioartificial composite basement membrane.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadie C Slater

    Full Text Available The filtering unit of the kidney, the glomerulus, contains capillaries whose walls function as a biological sieve, the glomerular filtration barrier. This comprises layers of two specialised cells, glomerular endothelial cells (GEnC and podocytes, separated by a basement membrane. Glomerular filtration barrier function, and dysfunction in disease, remains incompletely understood, partly due to difficulties in studying the relevant cell types in vitro. We have addressed this by generation of unique conditionally immortalised human GEnC and podocytes. However, because the glomerular filtration barrier functions as a whole, it is necessary to develop three dimensional co-culture models to maximise the benefit of the availability of these cells. Here we have developed the first two tri-layer models of the glomerular capillary wall. The first is based on tissue culture inserts and provides evidence of cell-cell interaction via soluble mediators. In the second model the synthetic support of the tissue culture insert is replaced with a novel composite bioartificial membrane. This consists of a nanofibre membrane containing collagen I, electrospun directly onto a micro-photoelectroformed fine nickel supporting mesh. GEnC and podocytes grew in monolayers on either side of the insert support or the novel membrane to form a tri-layer model recapitulating the human glomerular capillary in vitro. These models will advance the study of both the physiology of normal glomerular filtration and of its disruption in glomerular disease.

  10. Supramolecular Interactions in Secondary Plant Cell Walls: Effect of Lignin Chemical Composition Revealed with the Molecular Theory of Solvation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, Rodrigo L; Stoyanov, Stanislav R; Gusarov, Sergey; Skaf, Munir S; Kovalenko, Andriy

    2015-01-02

    Plant biomass recalcitrance, a major obstacle to achieving sustainable production of second generation biofuels, arises mainly from the amorphous cell-wall matrix containing lignin and hemicellulose assembled into a complex supramolecular network that coats the cellulose fibrils. We employed the statistical-mechanical, 3D reference interaction site model with the Kovalenko-Hirata closure approximation (or 3D-RISM-KH molecular theory of solvation) to reveal the supramolecular interactions in this network and provide molecular-level insight into the effective lignin-lignin and lignin-hemicellulose thermodynamic interactions. We found that such interactions are hydrophobic and entropy-driven, and arise from the expelling of water from the mutual interaction surfaces. The molecular origin of these interactions is carbohydrate-π and π-π stacking forces, whose strengths are dependent on the lignin chemical composition. Methoxy substituents in the phenyl groups of lignin promote substantial entropic stabilization of the ligno-hemicellulosic matrix. Our results provide a detailed molecular view of the fundamental interactions within the secondary plant cell walls that lead to recalcitrance.

  11. SpyB, a small heme-binding protein, affects the composition of the cell wall in Streptococcus pyogenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca J Edgar

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pyogenes (Group A Streptococcus or GAS is a haemolytic human pathogen associated with a wide variety of infections ranging from minor skin and throat infections to life-threatening invasive diseases. The cell wall of GAS consists of peptidoglycan sacculus decorated with a carbohydrate comprising a polyrhamnose backbone with immunodominant N-acetylglucosamine side-chains. All GAS genomes contain the spyBA operon, which encodes a 35-amino-acid membrane protein SpyB, and a membrane-bound C3-like ADP-ribosyltransferase SpyA. In this study we addressed the function of SpyB in GAS. Phenotypic analysis of a spyB deletion mutant revealed increased bacterial aggregation, and reduced sensitivity to β-lactams of the cephalosporin class and peptidoglycan hydrolase PlyC. Glycosyl composition analysis of cell wall isolated from the spyB mutant suggested an altered carbohydrate structure compared with the wild-type strain. Furthermore, we found that SpyB associates with heme and protoporphyrin IX. Heme binding induces SpyB dimerization, which involves disulfide bond formation between the subunits. Thus, our data suggest the possibility that SpyB activity is regulated by heme.

  12. SpyB, a Small Heme-Binding Protein, Affects the Composition of the Cell Wall in Streptococcus pyogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgar, Rebecca J; Chen, Jing; Kant, Sashi; Rechkina, Elena; Rush, Jeffrey S; Forsberg, Lennart S; Jaehrig, Bernhard; Azadi, Parastoo; Tchesnokova, Veronika; Sokurenko, Evgeni V; Zhu, Haining; Korotkov, Konstantin V; Pancholi, Vijay; Korotkova, Natalia

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes (Group A Streptococcus or GAS) is a hemolytic human pathogen associated with a wide variety of infections ranging from minor skin and throat infections to life-threatening invasive diseases. The cell wall of GAS consists of peptidoglycan sacculus decorated with a carbohydrate comprising a polyrhamnose backbone with immunodominant N-acetylglucosamine side-chains. All GAS genomes contain the spyBA operon, which encodes a 35-amino-acid membrane protein SpyB, and a membrane-bound C3-like ADP-ribosyltransferase SpyA. In this study, we addressed the function of SpyB in GAS. Phenotypic analysis of a spyB deletion mutant revealed increased bacterial aggregation, and reduced sensitivity to β-lactams of the cephalosporin class and peptidoglycan hydrolase PlyC. Glycosyl composition analysis of cell wall isolated from the spyB mutant suggested an altered carbohydrate structure compared with the wild-type strain. Furthermore, we found that SpyB associates with heme and protoporphyrin IX. Heme binding induces SpyB dimerization, which involves disulfide bond formation between the subunits. Thus, our data suggest the possibility that SpyB activity is regulated by heme.

  13. Composition of Bamboo Walls and Compressed Earth Block Walls in a Simple House that Produces Energy Efficient to Heat and Embodied Energy in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincentius Totok NOERWASITO

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Building materials have a major effect on the depletion of natural resources and energy in the world. Local raw materials are some of the best building materials, which can be found in every location; for example, compressed earth block and bamboo. This study adds to previous studies on compressed earth blocks without using combustion in the same location. The study focused on how to obtain a rural housing design by using compressed earth block walls and bamboo walls, which are adaptive to local materials and climate. Moreover, the ratio of the use of the compressed earth block walls with the walls is also examined to produce optimum embodied energy and heat energy buildings. The method used in this study was to analyze the characteristics of the compressed earth block and bamboo materials used as wall construction. While embodied energy and heat energy were calculated by using simulation model building, the heat energy calculation was found using the Archipak program. The results of the study shows that the optimum wall materials for the embodied energy and heat energy was compressed earth block with an area of 11 m2 and bamboo walls with an area of 19 m2.

  14. Analysis of interlaminar fracture toughness and damage mechanisms in composite laminates reinforced with sprayed multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    KAUST Repository

    Almuhammadi, Khaled

    2014-01-01

    The present work is focused on the nanoreinforcement of prepreg based carbon fiber composite laminates to improve delamination resistance. Functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were dispersed over the interface between prepreg layers through solvent spraying and the resulting mode I interlaminar fracture toughness was determined. For comparison, baseline samples with neat prepregs were also prepared. Results indicate that the introduction of functionalized MWCNTs can favorably affect the interlaminar fracture toughness, and the associated mechanisms of failure have been investigated. The manufacturing procedures and the interfacial reinforcing mechanism were explored by analyzing (i) the wettability between CNTs-solvent solution and prepreg surface, (ii) CNTs dispersion and (iii) the fractured surfaces through high resolution scanning electron microscopy and Raman mapping. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

  15. HIGHLY DISPERSED MULTI-WALLED CARBON NANOTUBES IN WATER/ETHANOL AND ITS APPLICATION FOR PVA COMPOSITE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Y. Li; X.B. Zhang; X.Y. Tao; J.M. Xu; F. Liu; G.L. Xu

    2005-01-01

    Two carboxylation processes were carried out to modify multi-walled carbon nanotube bundles (m-MWNTs). The results showed that both of the m-MWNTs could be highly dispersed in water with the concentration up to 25 and 15mg/mL in ethanol without obvious deposition or conglomeration over 6 months. FTIR, Raman, TGA and TEM characterizations of the mMWNTs showed that hydroxyl and carboxyl groups have been attached with MWNTs, and that the nanotube structure was only damaged a little after modification treatments in mixed acids over 24h. Above prepared nanotube suspensions in water were successfully used as a filler of thermoplastic PVA composite to enhance its electrical conductivity. The results showed that the addition of m-MWNTs greatly improved the conductivity and the threshold of mass fraction was about 5wt%. The results also proved that purification process was not needed because of high purity of the raw MWNTs prepared in our group.

  16. Rheological and electrical percolation in melt-processed poly(ether ether ketone)/multi-wall carbon nanotube composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bangarusampath, D. S.; Ruckdäschel, Holger; Altstädt, Volker; Sandler, Jan K. W.; Garray, Didier; Shaffer, Milo S. P.

    2009-11-01

    Multi-wall carbon nanotubes were dispersed homogeneously throughout a poly(ether ether ketone) matrix by melt processing. The influence of nanotube content on both rheological and electrical properties was analysed. The dynamic storage modulus, G', shows a characteristic solid-like behavior above 1 wt% nanotubes. A sharp transition from an electrically insulating to a conductive composite was observed between 1 and 1.5 wt%. By applying a power-law relation, the rheological and electrical percolation thresholds were found to be 0.9 wt%, and 1.3 wt%, respectively. Considering this data, Guth's filler reinforcement theory provides a valuable estimation of the aspect ratio of the nanotubes after processing and indicates substantial length degradation during the dispersion process.

  17. Comparative study on dispersion and interfacial properties of single walled carbon nanotube/polymer composites using Hansen solubility parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jing; Larsen, Raino Mikael

    2013-02-01

    Dispersion and interfacial strain transfer of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are two major challenges for the utilization of SWNTs as reinforcements in polymer composites. Surface modifications could help change the dispersion and interfacial properties. In this study, nanocomposites were fabricated by solution blending 1 wt % SWNTs with various modification (nonmodified, nitric acid functionalized, and amine functionalized SWNTs) and three kinds of polymeric materials (polycarbonate, polyvinylidene fluoride, and epoxy). Chemical compatibilities between SWNTs and solvents or polymers are calculated by the Hansen solubility parameters (HSP) method. The dispersion of the SWNTs in solvents is evaluated by dynamic light scattering. The dispersion of SWNTs in polymers evaluated by a light optical microscope (LOM) generally agrees with the HSP prediction. The strain transfer from the matrix to SWNTs is mainly related to the dispersion, the bundle size, the residual thermal stresses on the sample, and, to lesser degree, the HSP.

  18. Effect of pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis of wheat straw on cell wall composition, hydrophobicity and cellulase adsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiss-Blanquet, Senta; Zheng, Dan; Lopes Ferreira, Nicolas; Lapierre, Catherine; Baumberger, Stéphanie

    2011-05-01

    The present study aimed to determine the impact of cell wall composition and lignin content on enzyme adsorption and degradability. Thioacidolysis analysis of residual lignins in wheat straw after steam-explosion or organosolv pretreatment revealed an increase in lignin condensation degree of 27% and 33%, respectively. Surface hydrophobicity assessed through wettability tests decreased after the pretreatments (contact angle decrease of 20-50%), but increased with enzymatic conversion (30% maximum contact angle increase) and correlatively to lignin content. Adsorption of the three major cellulases Cel7A, Cel6A and Cel7B from Trichoderma reesei decreased with increasing hydrolysis time, down to 7%, 31% and 70% on the sample with the highest lignin content, respectively. The fraction of unspecifically bound enzymes was dependent both on the enzyme and the lignin content. Adsorption and specific activity were shown to be inversely proportional to lignin content and hydrophobicity, suggesting that lignin is one of the factors restricting enzymatic hydrolysis.

  19. Comparative Study on Dispersion and Interfacial Properties of Single Walled Carbon Nanotube/Polymer Composites Using Hansen Solubility Parameters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Jing; Larsen, Mikael

    2013-01-01

    Dispersion and interfacial strain transfer of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are two major challenges for the utilization of SWNTs as reinforcements in polymer composites. Surface modifications could help change the dispersion and interfacial properties. In this study, nanocomposites were...... fabricated by solution blending 1 wt % SWNTs with various modification (nonmodified, nitric acid functionalized, and amine functionalized SWNTs) and three kinds of polymeric materials (polycarbonate, polyvinylidene fluoride, and epoxy). Chemical compatibilities between SWNTs and solvents or polymers...... are calculated by the Hansen solubility parameters (HSP) method. The dispersion of the SWNTs in solvents is evaluated by dynamic light scattering. The dispersion of SWNTs in polymers evaluated by a light optical microscope (LOM) generally agrees with the HSP prediction. The strain transfer from the matrix...

  20. Quasi-Static Crushing Simulation Research and Failure Mode Analysis of Composite Thin-Walled C-Channel Specimen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    XIE Jiang

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available To study the crushing energy-absorbing characteristics and failure mode, the multi-shells finite element model of composite thin-walled C-channel specimen was established based on the quasi-static crushing test results. The simulation results show that the delamination failure, local buckling and beam bending failure of C-channel specimen can be simulated with the multi-shells finite element model. The load-displacement curve well fits the test results, and the deviation of initial peak load (Fmax, specific energy absorption (Es and crushing mean load (Fmean is small compared with the test results. The initial peak load of C-channel specimen is larger and the load efficiency is lower, so it is necessary to further reduce the initial peak load by the design optimization.

  1. Abnormal physiological properties and altered cell wall composition in Streptococcus pneumoniae grown in the presence of clavulanic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severin, A; Severina, E; Tomasz, A

    1997-01-01

    Subinhibitory concentrations of clavulanate caused premature induction of stationary-phase autolysis, sensitization to lysozyme, and reductions in the MICs of deoxycholate and penicillin for Streptococcus pneumoniae. In the range of clavulanate concentrations producing these effects, this beta-lactam compound was selectively bound to PBP 3. Cell walls isolated from pneumococci grown in the presence of clavulanate showed increased sensitivity to the hydrolytic action of purified pneumococcal autolysin in vitro. High-performance liquid chromatography analysis of the peptidoglycan isolated from the clavulanate-grown cells showed major qualitative and quantitative changes in stem peptide composition, the most striking feature of which was the accumulation of peptide species carrying intact D-alanyl-D-alanine residues at the carboxy termini. The altered biological and biochemical properties of the clavulanate-grown pneumococci appear to be the consequences of suppressed D,D-carboxypeptidase activity. PMID:9055983

  2. Enhanced luminance of MEH-PPV based PLEDs using single walled carbon nanotube composite as an electron transporting layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Inderpreet, E-mail: inderpreetsingh_05@rediffmail.co [Materials Laboratory, Department of Electronic Science, University of Delhi South Campus, Benito Juarez Road, New Delhi 110021 (India); Madhwal, Devinder; Verma, A.; Kumar, A.; Rait, S. [Materials Laboratory, Department of Electronic Science, University of Delhi South Campus, Benito Juarez Road, New Delhi 110021 (India); Kaur, I.; Bharadwaj, L.M. [Central Scientific Instruments Organization, Sector-30, Chandigarh (India); Bhatia, C.S. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National University of Singapore (Singapore); Bhatnagar, P.K.; Mathur, P.C. [Materials Laboratory, Department of Electronic Science, University of Delhi South Campus, Benito Juarez Road, New Delhi 110021 (India)

    2010-11-15

    An efficient electron transporting layer (ETL) based on single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) composites has been developed for poly [2-methoxy-5-(2'-ethyl-hexyloxy)-1,4-phenylene vinylene] (MEH-PPV) based orange polymer light emitting diodes (PLEDs) and its effect on the performance of PLEDs has been examined. It is observed that with increase in SWCNT concentration, in ETL, the luminance and luminous efficiency of the PLEDs increase (about 5 times increase in luminance is observed at 5% w/w SWCNT concentration). The SWCNTs present in the MEH-PPV ETL boost the mobility of electrons injected from the cathode towards the emissive layer by establishing highly conducting percolation paths. This balances the concentration of holes and electrons in the emissive layer, which leads to enhanced emission from the PLEDs.

  3. Cellular uptake of single-walled carbon nanotubes in 3D extracellular matrix-mimetic composite collagen hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Hongli; Kawazoe, Naoki; Chen, Guoping

    2014-03-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) exhibit intrinsic unique physical and chemical properties that make them attractive candidates for biological and biomedicine applications. An efficient cellular uptake of CNTs is vital for many of these applications. However, most of the cellular uptake studies have been performed with a two-dimensional cell culture system. In this study, cellular uptake of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) was investigated by using a three-dimensional cell culture system. Bovine articular chondrocytes cultured in SWCNTs/collagen composite hydrogels maintained their proliferation capacity when compared to the culture in collagen hydrogels. Ultraviolet-visible-near-infrared spectroscopy analysis revealed a high amount of SWCNTs were internalized by cells. Confocal Raman imaging showed that most of the internalized SWCNTs were distributed in the perinuclear region. The results indicated that SWCNTs could be internalized by chondrocytes when SWCNTs were incorporated in the three-dimensional biomimetic collagen hydrogels.

  4. Structural characterization and bioactivities of sulfated polysaccharide from Monostroma oxyspermum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seedevi, Palaniappan; Moovendhan, Meivelu; Sudharsan, Sadhasivam; Vasanthkumar, Shanmugam; Srinivasan, Alagiri; Vairamani, Shanmugam; Shanmugam, Annaian

    2015-01-01

    Sulfated polysaccharide was isolated from Monostroma oxyspermum through hot water extraction, anion-exchange and gel permeation column chromatography. The sulfated polysaccharide contained 92% of carbohydrate, 0% of protein, 7.8% of uronic acid, 22% of ash and 33% of moisture respectively. The elemental composition was analyzed using CHNS/O analyzer. The molecular weight of sulfated polysaccharide determined through PAGE was found to be as 55 kDa. Monosaccharides analysis revealed that sulfated polysaccharide was composed of rhamnose, fructose, galactose, xylose, and glucose. The structural features of sulfated polysaccharide were analyzed by NMR spectroscopy. Further the sulfated polysaccharide showed total antioxidant and DPPH free radical scavenging activity were as 66.29% at 250 μg/ml and 66.83% at 160 μg/ml respectively. The sulfated polysaccharide also showed ABTS scavenging ability and reducing power were as 83.88% at 125 μg/ml and 15.81% at 400 μg/ml respectively. The anticoagulant activity was determined for human plasma with respect to Activated Partial Thromboplastin Time (APTT) and Prothrombin Time (PT) was 20.09 IU and 1.79 IU at 25 μg/ml respectively. These results indicated that the sulfated polysaccharide from M. oxyspermum had potent antioxidant and anticoagulant activities.

  5. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes/polymer composites in absence and presence of acrylic elastomer (ACM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, S; Rath, T; Mahaling, R N; Mukherjee, M; Khatua, B B; Das, C K

    2009-05-01

    Polyetherimide/Multiwall carbon nanotube (MWNTs) nanocomposites containing as-received and modified (COOH-MWNT) carbon nanotubes were prepared through melt process in extruder and then compression molded. Thermal properties of the composites were characterized by thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA). Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) images showed that the MWNTs were well dispersed and formed an intimate contact with the polymer matrix without any agglomeration. However the incorporation of modified carbon nanotubes formed fascinating, highly crosslinked, and compact network structure throughout the polymer matrix. This showed the increased adhesion of PEI with modified MWNTs. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) also showed high degree of dispersion of modified MWNTs along with broken ends. Dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) results showed a marginal increase in storage modulus (E') and glass transition temperature (T(g)) with the addition of MWNTs. Increase in tensile strength and impact strength of composites confirmed the use the MWNTs as possible reinforcement agent. Both thermal and electrical conductivity of composites increased, but effect is more pronounced on modification due to formation of network of carbon nanotubes. Addition of acrylic elastomer to developed PEI/MWNTs (modified) nanocomposites resulted in the further increase in thermal and electrical properties due to the formation of additional bond between MWNTs and acrylic elastomers at the interface. All the results presented are well corroborated by SEM and FESEM studies.

  6. Thin-walled composite tubes using fillers subjected to quasistatic axial compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    AL-Qrimli, Haidar F.; Mahdi, Fadhil A.; Ismail, Firas B.; Alzorqi, Ibrahim S.

    2015-04-01

    It has been demonstrated that composites are lightweight, fatigue resistant and easily melded, a seemingly attractive alternative to metals. However, there has been no widespread switch from metals to composites in the automotive sector. This is because there are a number of technical issues relating to the use of composite materials that still need to be resolved including accurate material characterization, manufacturing and joining process. The total of 36 specimens have been fabricated using the fibre-glass and resin (epoxy) with a two different geometries (circular and corrugated) each one will be filled with five types of filler (Rice Husk, Wood Chips, Aluminium Chips, Coconut Fibre, Palm Oil Fibre) all these type will be compared with empty Tubes for circular and corrugated in order to comprehend the crashworthiness parameters (initial failure load, average load, maximum crushing load, load ratio, energy absorption, specific energy absorption, volumetric energy absorption, crushing force efficiency and crush strain relation) which are considered very sufficient parameters in the design of automotive industry parts. All the tests have been done using the “INSTRON Universal machine” which is computerized in order to simply give a high precision to the collection of the results, along with the use of quasi-static load to test and observe the behaviour of the fabricated specimens.

  7. Thermal studies on natural polysaccharide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sunil B Bothara; Sudarshan Singh

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To characterize thermal property of natural gums obtained from the seeds of Diospyros melonoxylon(D. melonoxylon) Roxb, Buchanania lanzan (B. lanzan) spreng and Manilkara zapota (M. zapota) (Linn.) P. Royen syn. Methods: Natural gums were thermally characterized using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), differential thermal analysis (DTA) and thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA) under nitrogen atmosphere. Major thermal transitions as well as activation energies of the major decomposition stages were determined. Elemental analysis was performed in order to determine the composition of carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen and sulfur. Results: DSC traces indicated a major intense exothermic transition (around 200℃) followed by weaker exotherm(s). Thermogravimetric analysis showed two phase of weight loss. The first phase has minor weight loss in samples is attributed to the loss of adsorbed and structural water of biopolymers or due to desorption of moisture as hydrogen bound water to the saccharide structure. The second weight loss event may be attributed to the polysaccharide decomposition. The initial decomposition temperature (IDT) was calculated from thermograms obtained of TGA, seed Polysaccharide of D. melonoxylon (IDT 221.21℃), B. lanzan (IPDT 170.4℃) and M. zapota (IPDT 178.6℃) were obtained. According to the integral procedural decomposition temperature (IPDT) values calculated based on the TGA thermograms; D. melonoxylon (IPDT 563.3℃), B. lanzan (IPDT 598.1℃) and M. zapota (IPDT 600.6℃) were obtained respectively. The elemental analysis study shows that the isolated natural Polysaccharides consist of certain percentage of carbon, nitrogen, sulphur and hydrogen in all the gums. Conclusions: The results of the present investigation reveal that the natural gums are thermally stable and these gums can be used as release modifiers in various dosage forms.

  8. Quantitative Prediction of Cell Wall Polysaccharide Composition in Grape (Vitis vinifera L.) and Apple (Malus domestica) Skins from Acid Hydrolysis Monosaccharide Profiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnous, Anis; Meyer, Anne S.

    2009-01-01

    On the basis of monosaccharide analysis after acid hydrolysis of fruit skin samples of three wine grape cultivars, Vitis vinifera L. Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, and Shiraz, and of two types of apple, Malus domestica Red Delicious and Golden Delicious, an iterative calculation method is reported...

  9. Grinding Characteristic of Multi-walled Carbon Nanotubes-alumina Composite Particle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    B MUNKHBAYAR; Nasan BAYARAA; Hafizur REHMAN; Junhyo KIM; Hanshik CHUNG; Hyomin JEONG

    2012-01-01

    The synthesis of new materials containing multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and the microstructure of alumina particles were investigated and characterized.The MWCNTs and alumina particles were ground under both the dry and wet conditions with various rotation speeds (200-400 r/min) in planetary ball milling machine,and their combination characteristics were described.The experimental results were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM),X-ray diff action (XRD),transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and particle sizing analysis (PSA).SEM result revealed that the combination of MWCNTs -Alumina particles mixed quite well under both the dry and wet grinding with rotation speed of 400 r/min.XRD characterization indicated the better result could get in ground samples at a rotation speed of 400 r/min.PSA result showed the particle size decreased with increase the grinding speeds.From the overall results,we observed that the grinding method can be used to synthesize new material with high efficiency.

  10. Fiber and nonstarch polysaccharide content and variation in common crops used in broiler diets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Knud Erik Bach

    2014-01-01

    AX, but β-glucan can also be present mainly in rye and wheat brans. The CW composition of seeds and grains of protein crops and feedstuffs are different from that of cereals. The main CW polymers are pectic substances (homogalacturonan, rhamnogalacturonan type I and II, xylogalacturonan......The current paper reviews content and variation in fiber and nonstarch polysaccharides (NSP) of common crops used in broiler diets. The cereal grain is a complex structure, and its cell walls (CW) differ in their composition and hence properties. Arabinoxylan (AX), mixed linkage (1→3; 1→4)-β......-glucan (β-glucan), cellulose, and the noncarbohydrate component lignin are the predominant polymers in cereals. They occur in different proportions depending on the species and tissue type. Rye, triticale, wheat, corn, and sorghum are all rich in AX, whereas barley and oats contain a high level of β...

  11. Sonochemical Degradation of Reactive Black 5 with a Composite Catalyst of TiO2/Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Eunju; Choi, Jongbok; Lee, Yonghyeon; Park, Jeong Min; Khim, Jeehyeong

    2013-07-01

    In the sonocatalytic process, composites of TiO2-carbon were used because carbon provides more adsorption sites and acts like an electron sink to prevent the recombination of an electron/hole. Therefore, in the present study, the characteristics of a TiO2/single-walled carbon nanotubes catalyst (TiO2/SWCNTs) have been investigated, and the optimal weight ratio of SWCNTs and the dose for degradation of reactive black 5 (RB5) were also evaluated. TiO2/SWCNT composite was characterized using Brunauer-Emmett-Teller analysis, scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction microanalysis and spectra, and X-ray diffraction patterns. The degradation rate constants of RB5 with the ratio of SWCNTs were found to depend on the adsorption phenomenon of a surface catalyst, light absorbance, and the recombination of electrons and holes. As a result, the optimal ratio of carbon in the sono-TiO2/SWCNTs process for degradation of RB5 was TiO2:SWCNTs= 200:1. Additionally, the optimal dose of the catalyst was 0.5 g/L.

  12. Effects of Multi-walled Carbon Nanotubes on the Electromagnetic Absorbing Characteristics of Composites Filled with Carbonyl Iron Particles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yonggang Xu; Deyuan Zhang; Jun Cai; Liming Yuan; Wenqiang Zhang

    2012-01-01

    The electromagnetic (EM) wave absorbing property of silicone rubber filled with carbonyl iron particles (CIPs) and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) was examined. Absorbents including MWCNTs and spherical/ flaky CIPs were added to silicone rubber using a two-roll mixer. The complex permittivity and complex permeability were measured over the frequency range of 1-18 GHz. The two EM parameters were verified and the uniform dispersion of MWCNTs and ClPs was confirmed by comparing the measured reflection loss (RL) with the calculated one. As the MWCNT weight percent increased, the RL of the spherical CIPs/silicone rubber composites changed insignificantly. It was attributed to the random distribution of spherical ClPs and less content of MWCNTs. On the contrary, for composites filled with flaky ClPs the absorption bandwidth increased at thickness 0.5 mm (RL value lower than -5 dB in 8-18 GHz) and the absorption ratio increased at lower frequency (minimum -35 dB at 3.5 GHz). This effect was attributed to the oriented distribution of flaky CIPs caused by interactions between the two absorbents. Therefore, mixing MWCNTs and flaky CIPs could achieve wider-band and higher-absorption ratio absorbing materials.

  13. Novel capacitance-type humidity sensor based on multi-wall carbon nanotube/SiO2 composite films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Xiaowei; Zhao Zhengang; Li Tuo; Wang Xin

    2011-01-01

    A novel capacitance-type relative humidity (RH) sensor based on multi-wall carbon nanotubc/SiO2 (MWCNTs/SiO2) composite film is reported.Details of the fabrication process,possible sensing mechanism and sensing characteristics,such as linearity and sensitivity,are described.The capacitance of the MWCNTs/SiO2 composite film shows typical concentration percolation behavior with increasing MWCNT loading.At loadings below the percolation threshold (1.842wt%),the sensor capacitance increases obviously with increasing MWCNTs.The water condensed in the MWCNTs/SiO2 layer can lower the percolation threshold and increase the sensor capacitance.The sensor with MWCNT concentration of 1 wt% has the best properties.The sensor has a humidity sensitivity of about 673 pF/% RH and a linearity correlation of 0.98428.The response time of the sensor to RH is about 40 s and the recovery time is about 2 s.

  14. C-LFP-multi-walled carbon nanotubes composite cathode materials synthesized by solid-state reaction for lithium ion batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Yun-Hwa; Prabakar, S J Richard; Pyo, Myoungho

    2013-08-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNT) was utilized as a conductive additive to enhance the capacity and rate capability of carbon coated LiFePO4 (C-LFP). Composites of C-LFP with MWNT (C-LFP-MWNT) were prepared by blending MWNT at different stages of C-LFP synthesis. The pre-blending (PrB) of MWNT (5, 10, 15 wt%) with LFP precursor (PrB-C-LFP-MWNT) before calcination in a reducing environment (5 vol% H2 in N2) at 750 degrees C, produced phase pure crystalline LFP with a reduction in particle size as increase in MWNT content. This was contrasted with post-blending (PoB) of MWNT with as-synthesized C-LFP (PoB-C-LFP-MWNT), which gave inferior electrochemical performances. The PrB-C-LFP-MWNT (10 wt%) composite showed better cycle stability, higher rate capability, and faster Li diffusion characteristics than PoB-C-LFP-MWNT.

  15. Enhanced electrical conductivity and hardness of silver-nickel composites by silver-coated multi-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dongmok; Sim, Jeonghyun; Kim, Wonyoung; Moon, Chuldong; Cho, Wookdong; Baik, Seunghyun

    2015-07-24

    We investigated electrical conductivity and Vickers hardness of Ag- and Ni-based composites prepared by powder metallurgy involving spark plasma sintering. The starting composition was Ag:Ni = 61:39 vol%, which provided an electrical conductivity of 3.30 × 10(5) S cm(-1) and a hardness of 1.27 GPa. The addition of bare multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs, 1.45 vol%) increased hardness (1.31 GPa) but decreased electrical conductivity (2.99 × 10(5) S cm(-1)) and carrier mobility (11 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1)) due to the formation of Ni3C in the interface between the MWNTs and Ni during spark plasma sintering. The formation of Ni3C was prevented by coating the surface of the nanotubes with Ag (nAgMWNTs), concomitantly increasing electrical conductivity (3.43 × 10(5) S cm(-1)) and hardness (1.37 GPa) of the sintered specimen (Ag:Ni:nAgMWNTs = 59.55:39:1.45 vol%). The electrical contact switching time (133 357) was also increased by 30%, demonstrating excellent feasibility as electrical contact materials for electric power industries.

  16. A composite reactor with wetted-wall column for mineral carbonation study in three-phase systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chen; Yao, Xizhi; Zhao, Liang; Teng, H. Henry

    2016-11-01

    Despite the availability of various reactors designed to study gas-liquid reactions, no appropriate devices are available to accurately investigate triple-phased mineral carbonation reactions involving CO2 gas, aqueous solutions (containing divalent cations), and carbonate minerals. This report presents a composite reactor that combines a modified conventional wetted-wall column, a pH control module, and an attachment to monitor precipitation reactions. Our test and calibration experiments show that the absorption column behaved largely in agreement with theoretical predictions and previous observations. Experimental confirmation of CO2 absorption in NaOH and ethanolamine supported the effectiveness of the column for gas-liquid interaction. A test run in the CO2-NH3-MgCl2 system carried out for real time investigation of the relevant carbonation reactions shows that the reactor's performance closely followed the expected reaction path reflected in pH change, the occurrence of precipitation, and the rate of NH3 addition, indicating the appropriateness of the composite device in studying triple-phase carbonation process.

  17. 大豆分离蛋白-水溶性大豆多糖可食性复合膜的制备与性质%Preparation and characterization of soy protein isolates and soluble soybean polysaccharides composite film

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵欣; 管骁

    2013-01-01

    Soy protein isolates (SPI) and soluble soybean polysaccharides (SSPS) were used as the main raw material to prepare edible composite film.The properties of the film were studies.The ratio of SPI to SSPS,the a ddition amount of glycerin and sodium alginate and calcium ion concentration were chosen as the effect factors.Single factor experiment and orthogonal tests were conducted to explore the optimal formula of SPI and SSPS composite film.The properties of the composite film were evaluated by water soluble,water vapor permeability,tensile strength,and breaking elongation rate.The results showed that the optimal formula of SPI and SSPS composite film was:SPI to SSPS ratio 1∶ 7,glycerin addition amount 2%,sodium alginate 4%,and calcium ion concentration 1.0mol/L.Under the optimal process conditions,the comprehensive performance of SPI and SSPS compound film had highest score of 67.79.%以大豆分离蛋白(soy protein isolates,SPI)和水溶性大豆多糖(soluble soybean polysaccharides,SSPS)为主要原料进行了可食性复合膜的制备与性质研究.综合考虑SPI与SSPS的比例、甘油、海藻酸钠添加量及钙离子浓度等影响因素,通过单因素与正交实验对成膜配方进行研究,得到了复合膜的最佳配比,并从水溶性、水蒸气透过性、抗拉伸强度、断裂延伸率等方面对膜的性质进行了综合评价.结果显示:在SPI∶ SSPS质量比为1∶7,甘油添加量2%,海藻酸钠添加量4%,Ca2浓度为1.0mol/L的条件下,复合膜的综合性能评分最高,为67.8.

  18. 超声波破壁提取葡萄酒酵母泥中多糖的研究%Study on extraction of polysaccharide by ultrasonic dilapidating walls from waste wine yeast slurry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡云峰; 陈君然; 胡晗艳; 崔瀚元; 杨秋月

    2013-01-01

    Objective To establish a method for the extraction of polysaccharide of waste wine yeast slurry by ultrasonic method. Methods On the basis of single factor experiments, the effects of operating con-ditions, such as yeast concentration, ultrasonic-assisted extraction temperature, and ultrasonic-assisted extrac-tion time, were analyzed by response surface methodology. Results The optimized conditions of ultrason-ic-assisted extraction are as following: yeast concentration 9.10%, ultrasonic-assisted extraction temperature 65.42 ℃, and ultrasonic-assisted extraction time 132.97 min. Under the optimized conditions, the extraction yield of yeast polysaccharide was 1.85%. The optimum technological condition was validated. the actual ex-traction yield of yeast polysaccharide was 1.86%. It showed that the result was stable. Conclusion The ultra-sonic-assisted extraction method has a high extraction rate in extracting the polysaccharide of waste wine yeast slurry. The method is simple and practical.%目的:利用超声波法提取葡萄酒酵母泥中多糖。方法研究了酵母浓度、超声温度、超声时间对葡萄酒酵母泥中多糖得率的影响,并采用响应面分析法对葡萄酒酵母泥中多糖提取工艺进行优化设计。结果超声波法提取葡萄酒酵母泥中多糖的最佳条件为:酵母浓度9.10%,超声温度为65.42℃,超声时间为132.97 min。最终酵母多糖得率为1.85%,对最佳工艺条件进行验证,酵母多糖实际得率为1.86%,结果重复性较好。结论超声波辅助提取葡萄酒酵母泥中的多糖,工艺简便,多糖得率较高,具有实际的应用价值。

  19. Curing behavior and kinetic analysis of epoxy resin/multi-walled Carbon nanotubes composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FANG Zhengping; WANG Jianguo; GU Aijuan; TONG Lifang

    2007-01-01

    The effect of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs).both amino-functionalized(f-MWNTs) and unfunctionalized (p-MWNTs) on the curing behavior of epoxy resin (EP) cured with triethanolamine (TEA),was investigated using differential scanning calorimetry(DSC).Because the triethylenetetramine (TETA) grafted on the f-MWNTs could act as curing agent and the produced tertiary amine as negative ionic catalysts of curing reaction of EP so the activation energy of the EP/TEA system was decreased by the addition of f-MWNTs.Viscosity played a key role in the curing behavior of the EP/TEA/MWNTs system,for high viscosity of the EP/TEA/MWNTs system could hinder the motion of the functional grows.The curing heat in EP/TEA/f-MWNTs (weight ratio 1/0.1/0.01) system was higher than the neat EP/TEA(weight ratio 1/0.1) system,while the curing heat in EP/TEA/p-MWMTs (weight ratio 1/0.1/0.01) was lower than the neat system.When the content of f-MWNTs was increased to 2 phr(weight ratio of 1/0.1/0.02).the curing heat became lower than that of the neat EP/TEA system,which was the result of the higher viscosity of the EP/f-MWNTs/TEA system.Since the curing heat indicated the curing degree of the system generally,the addition of the f-MWNTs was thought to increase the curing degree of the epoxy matrix at a relatively low content.

  20. [Gravity resistance, another graviresponse in plants--function of anti-gravitational polysaccharides].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoson, Takayuki; Wakabayashi, Kazuyuki; Soga, Kouichi

    2003-08-01

    The involvement of anti-gravitational polysaccharides in gravity resistance, one of two major gravity responses in plants, was discussed. In dicotyledons, xyloglucans are the only cell wall polysaccharides, whose level, molecular size, and metabolic turnover were modified under both hypergravity and microgravity conditions, suggesting that xyloglucans act as anti-gravitational polysaccharides. In monocotyledonous Poaceae, (1-->3),(1-->4)-beta glucans, instead of xyloglucans, were shown to play a role as anti-gravitational polysaccharides. These polysaccharides are also involved in plant responses to other environmental factors, such as light and temperature, and to some phytohormones, such as auxin and ethylene. Thus, the type of anti-gravitational polysaccharides is different between dicotyledons and Poaceae, but such polysaccharides are universally involved in plant responses to environmental and hormonal signals. In gravity resistance, the gravity signal may be received by the plasma membrane mechanoreceptors, transformed and transduced within each cell, and then may modify the processes of synthesis and secretion of the anti-gravitational polysaccharides and the cell wall enzymes responsible for their degradation, as well as the apoplastic pH, leading to the cell wall reinforcement. A series of events inducing gravity resistance are quite independent of those leading to gravitropism.

  1. Plant Cell Wall Proteins: A Large Body of Data, but What about Runaways?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albenne, Cécile; Canut, Hervé; Hoffmann, Laurent; Jamet, Elisabeth

    2014-04-17

    Plant cell wall proteomics has been a very dynamic field of research for about fifteen years. A full range of strategies has been proposed to increase the number of identified proteins and to characterize their post-translational modifications. The protocols are still improving to enlarge the coverage of cell wall proteomes. Comparisons between these proteomes have been done based on various working strategies or different physiological stages. In this review, two points are highlighted. The first point is related to data analysis with an overview of the cell wall proteomes already described. A large body of data is now available with the description of cell wall proteomes of seventeen plant species. CWP contents exhibit particularities in relation to the major differences in cell wall composition and structure between these plants and between plant organs. The second point is related to methodology and concerns the present limitations of the coverage of cell wall proteomes. Because of the variety of cell wall structures and of the diversity of protein/polysaccharide and protein/protein interactions in cell walls, some CWPs can be missing either because they are washed out during the purification of cell walls or because they are covalently linked to cell wall components.

  2. Plant Cell Wall Proteins: A Large Body of Data, but What about Runaways?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cécile Albenne

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Plant cell wall proteomics has been a very dynamic field of research for about fifteen years. A full range of strategies has been proposed to increase the number of identified proteins and to characterize their post-translational modifications. The protocols are still improving to enlarge the coverage of cell wall proteomes. Comparisons between these proteomes have been done based on various working strategies or different physiological stages. In this review, two points are highlighted. The first point is related to data analysis with an overview of the cell wall proteomes already described. A large body of data is now available with the description of cell wall proteomes of seventeen plant species. CWP contents exhibit particularities in relation to the major differences in cell wall composition and structure between these plants and between plant organs. The second point is related to methodology and concerns the present limitations of the coverage of cell wall proteomes. Because of the variety of cell wall structures and of the diversity of protein/polysaccharide and protein/protein interactions in cell walls, some CWPs can be missing either because they are washed out during the purification of cell walls or because they are covalently linked to cell wall components.

  3. 复合酶法提取鸡腿菇多糖的工艺优化%Optimization of Extraction of Polysaccharides from Coprinus comatus by Composite Enzyme method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑义; 李超; 王卫东; 王乃馨; 王健龙; 张雷; 尹蓬

    2011-01-01

    The optimum processing conditions of the enzymatic extraction of polysaccharides from Coprinus comatus were studied.By using papain and cellulase complex processing method,the effects of liquid-to-solid ratio,the amount of composite enzyme adding,mass ratio of papain to cellulase,enzymolysis time,enzymolysis pH value,extraction time on the yield of polysaccharides were investigated by the single factor experiments.Technology parameters were optimized by Box–Behnken statistical design,then regression mathematical model was established,the model fitted significantly well and the optimum combination was obtained.When the extraction parameters were controlled at enzymolysis temperature 51.4 ℃,enzymolysis pH value 5.2 and mass ratio of papain to cellulase 0.86,the polysaccharides yield could be up to 6.42%.%为优化鸡腿菇多糖的提取工艺,采用木瓜蛋白酶与纤维素酶复合处理,通过单因素试验研究了液料比、复合酶添加量、木瓜蛋白酶与纤维素酶质量比、酶解温度、pH值和提取时间对鸡腿菇多糖得率的影响。在单因素试验的基础上,采用Box-Benhnken中心组合试验设计,建立了具有较好预测性能的鸡腿菇多糖提取条件的回归模型,获得了复合酶法提取鸡腿菇多糖的最佳工艺,即酶解温度51.4℃、酶解pH值5.2、木瓜蛋白酶与纤维素酶质量比0.86,在此条件下鸡腿菇多糖得率可达6.42%。

  4. Determination of monosaccharide composition in polysaccharide of ant nest of Macrotermes annadalei by HPLC%高效液相色谱法测定土垅大白蚁菌圃多糖的单糖组成

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林葵; 苏青; 黄岛平; 黄瑞松; 徐慧; 刘婧

    2013-01-01

    Objective:To determine monosaccharide composition in polysaccharide of ant nest of Macrotermes annadalei by high performance liquid chromatography.Methods:The polysaccharides of ant nest of Macrotermes annadalei were extracted by water extraction and alcohol precipitation method,and then hydrolyzed by trifluoroacetic acid.The hydrolysate was reacted with 1-phenyl-3-methyl-5-pyrazolone (PMP)to produce the PMP derivatives that were analyzed by HPLC.The chromatographic conditions were as follows:chromatographic column C18 (4.6 mm × 250 mm,5 μm),column temperature 25 ℃ ;the mobile phase consisted of 0.05 mol · L-1 potassium dihydrogen phosphate solution (pH 6.8) and methyl cyanide,the flow rate was 1.0 mL · min-1 with gradient mode of time gradient 0→5→10→30→35 min,the corresponding gradient of PBS phosphate buffer solution was 83%→82%→81%→80%→83% ;the detection wavelength was 250 nm with the sample volume of 10μL.Results:The molar ratio of mannose,rhamnose,galacturonicaicd,glucose,galactose and xylose arabonose was 3.55∶ 1.00∶ 1.19∶3.54∶ 2.54∶ 4.41∶1.90 in polysaccharide of ant nest of Macrotermes annadalei.Conclusion:This method is simple,rapid,with high separating efficiency,and can be used to determine monosaccharide composition in polysaccharide of ant nest of Macrotermes annadalei.%目的:测定土垅大白蚁菌圃多糖中单糖的组成.方法:采用水提醇沉法提取土垅大白蚁菌圃多糖,三氟乙酸水解后,经衍生化试剂1-苯基-3-甲基-吡唑啉酮(PMP)衍生化,高效液相色谱法(HPLC)分析.色谱条件:色谱柱C18 (4.6 mm×250 mm,5μ,m),柱温25℃;流动相为0.05 mol·L-1磷酸二氢钾溶液(pH 6.8)-乙腈,流速1.0 mL·min-1,梯度模式:时间梯度为0→5→10→30→35 min,相应的磷酸盐缓冲溶液梯度为83%→82%→81%→80%→83%;检测波长250 nm;进样体积10 μL.结果:土垅大白蚁菌圃多糖中含甘露糖、鼠李糖、半乳糖醛酸、葡萄糖

  5. Non-cellulosic polysaccharides from cotton fibre are differently impacted by textile processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Runavot, Jean-Luc; Guo, Xiaoyuan; Willats, William George Tycho;

    2014-01-01

    Cotton fibre is mainly composed of cellulose, although non-cellulosic polysaccharides play key roles during fibre development and are still present in the harvested fibre. This study aimed at determining the fate of non-cellulosic polysaccharides during cotton textile processing. We analyzed non......-cellulosic cotton fibre polysaccharides during different steps of cotton textile processing using GC-MS, HPLC and comprehensive microarray polymer profiling to obtain monosaccharide and polysaccharide amounts and linkage compositions. Additionally, in situ detection was used to obtain information on polysaccharide...... localization and accessibility. We show that pectic and hemicellulosic polysaccharide levels decrease during cotton textile processing and that some processing steps have more impact than others. Pectins and arabinose-containing polysaccharides are strongly impacted by the chemical treatments, with most being...

  6. Non-cellulosic polysaccharides from cotton fibre are differently impacted by textile processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Runavot, Jean-Luc; Guo, Xiaoyuan; Willats, William George Tycho

    2014-01-01

    Cotton fibre is mainly composed of cellulose, although non-cellulosic polysaccharides play key roles during fibre development and are still present in the harvested fibre. This study aimed at determining the fate of non-cellulosic polysaccharides during cotton textile processing. We analyzed non......-cellulosic cotton fibre polysaccharides during different steps of cotton textile processing using GC-MS, HPLC and comprehensive microarray polymer profiling to obtain monosaccharide and polysaccharide amounts and linkage compositions. Additionally, in situ detection was used to obtain information on polysaccharide...... localization and accessibility. We show that pectic and hemicellulosic polysaccharide levels decrease during cotton textile processing and that some processing steps have more impact than others. Pectins and arabinose-containing polysaccharides are strongly impacted by the chemical treatments, with most being...

  7. Characterization of polysaccharides with marked inhibitory effect on lipid accumulation in Pleurotus eryngii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jingjing; Yong, Yangyang; Xing, Meichun; Gu, Yifan; Zhang, Zhao; Zhang, Shizhu; Lu, Ling

    2013-09-12

    Mushrooms have a great potential for the production of useful bioactive metabolites. To explore the bioactive compounds from edible mushrooms for interfering with the development of macrophage-derived foam cells, which is recognized as the hallmark of early atherosclerosis, eight types of mushrooms polysaccharides had been selected to be tested. Consequently, different mushrooms polysaccharides displayed diverse component profiles. Of polysaccharides that we tested, the Pleurotus eryngii polysaccharide had the strongest inhibitory effect on lipid accumulation. Furthermore, through fractionation of DEAE-52 and Sephadex G-100, the polysaccharide from P. eryngii had been successfully purified and identified. By the analysis of IR, GC, and HPLC, the purified polysaccharide was estimated to be 30-38 kDa for the average molecular weight with the monosaccharide composition mainly composed of D-types of mannose, glucose and galactose. Findings presented in this report firstly provide direct evidence, which links the purified polysaccharide moiety with the biological function in foam-cell model.

  8. [Study on totai flavonoids of Epimedium assisted with soybean polysaccharide spray-drying powder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Hong-mei; Jia, Xiao-bin; Zhang, Zhen-hai; Sun, E; Deng, Jia-hui

    2015-08-01

    In order to evaluate the characteristics of the spray drying of total flavonoids of Epimedium extracts assisted with soybean polysaccharide, a certain percentage of soybean polysaccharide or polyvidone were added to the total flavonoids of Epimedium extract to conduct the spray drying. The effect of soybean polysaccharides against the wall sticking effect of the spray drying was detected, as well as the powder property of total flavonoids of Epimedium spray drying powder and the dissolution in vitro behavior of the effective component. Compared with the total flavonoids of Epimedium spray drying powder, soybean polysaccharide revealed a significant anti-wall sticking effect. The spray drying power which had no notable change in the grain size made a increase in the fluidity, improvement in the moisture absorption and remarkable rise in the dissolution in vitro behavior. It was worth further studying the application of soybean polysaccharide in spray drying power of traditional Chinese medicine.

  9. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes/graphene oxide hybrid and nanohydroxyapatite composite: A novel coating to prevent dentin erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahorny, Sídnei; Zanin, Hudson; Christino, Vinie Abreu; Marciano, Fernanda Roberta; Lobo, Anderson Oliveira; Soares, Luís Eduardo Silva

    2017-10-01

    To date is emergent the development of novel coatings to protect erosion, especially to preventive dentistry and restorative dentistry. Here, for the first time we report the effectiveness of multi-walled carbon nanotube/graphene oxide hybrid carbon-base material (MWCNTO-GO) combined with nanohydroxyapatite (nHAp) as a protective coating for dentin erosion. Fourier transform Raman spectroscopy (FT-Raman), scanning electron (SEM), and transmission electron (TEM) microscopy were used to investigated the coatings and the effect of acidulated phosphate fluoride gel (APF) treatment on bovine teeth root dentin before and after erosion. The electrochemical corrosion performance of the coating was evaluated. Raman spectra identified that: (i) the phosphate (ν1PO4(3-)) content of dentin was not significantly affected by the treatments and (ii) the carbonate (ν1CO3(2-)) content in dentin increased when nHAp was used. However, the nHAp/MWCNTO-GO composite exposited lower levels of organic matrix (CH bonds) after erosion compared to other treatments. Interesting, SEM micrographs identified that the nHAp/MWCNTO-GO formed layers after erosive cycling when associate with APF treatment, indicating a possible chemical bond among them. Treatments of root dentin with nHAp, MWCNTO-GO, APF_MWCNTO-GO, and APF_nHAp/MWCNTO-GO increased the carbonate content, carbonate/phosphate ratio, and organic matrix band area after erosion. The potentiodynamic polarization curves and Nyquist plot showed that nHAp, MWCNT-GO and nHAp/MWCNT-GO composites acted as protective agents against corrosion process. Clearly, the nHAp/MWCNTO-GO composite was stable after erosive cycling and a thin and acid-resistant film was formed when associated to APF treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Application of polypyrrole multi-walled carbon nanotube composite layer for detection of mercury, lead and iron ions using surface plasmon resonance technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadrolhosseini, Amir Reza; Noor, A S M; Bahrami, Afarin; Lim, H N; Talib, Zainal Abidin; Mahdi, Mohd Adzir

    2014-01-01

    Polypyrrole multi-walled carbon nanotube composite layers were used to modify the gold layer to measure heavy metal ions using the surface plasmon resonance technique. The new sensor was fabricated to detect trace amounts of mercury (Hg), lead (Pb), and iron (Fe) ions. In the present research, the sensitivity of a polypyrrole multi-walled carbon nanotube composite layer and a polypyrrole layer were compared. The application of polypyrrole multi-walled carbon nanotubes enhanced the sensitivity and accuracy of the sensor for detecting ions in an aqueous solution due to the binding of mercury, lead, and iron ions to the sensing layer. The Hg ion bonded to the sensing layer more strongly than did the Pb and Fe ions. The limitation of the sensor was calculated to be about 0.1 ppm, which produced an angle shift in the region of 0.3° to 0.6°.

  11. Electrocatalytic Activity of Tungsten Trioxide Micro-spheres, Tungsten Carbide Microspheres and Multi-walled Carbon Nanotube-tungsten Carbide Composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Hongzhi; YAN Taining

    2009-01-01

    Tungsten trioxide micropheres were prepared by spray pyrolysis, and tungsten carbidemicrospheres were produced by spray pyrolysis-low temperature reduction and carbonization technology.Multi-walled carbon nanotube-tungsten carbide composites were prepared by the continuous reductionand carbonization process using multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and WO_3 precursor by mo-lecular level mixing and calcination. The morphology and structure of the samples were characterized byscanning electron microscope and transmission electron microscope. Furthermore, the crystal phase was identified by X-ray diffraction. The electrocatalytic activity of the sample was analyzed by means of me-thanol oxidation. Tungsten carbide microspheres were catalytic active for methanol oxidation reaction.Nevertheless tungsten trioxide microspheres and multi-walled carbon nanotube-tungsten carbide compos-ites were not catalytic active for methanol oxidation reaction. These results indicate that tungsten carbide micropheres are promising catalyst for methanol oxidation.

  12. Synthesis of Oligosaccharide Fragments of the Pectic Polysaccharide Rhamnogalacturonan I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zakharova, Alexandra

    Pectin is a highly heterogeneous polysaccharide of plant origin. It is found in the primary cell wall and contributes to various cell functions, including support, defense, signaling, and cell adhesion. Pectin also plays important role as a food additive, serving as stabilizing and thickening age...

  13. Steel-plate composite (SC) walls for safety related nuclear facilities: Design for in-plane forces and out-of-plane moments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varma, Amit H., E-mail: ahvarma@purdue.edu [Bowen Laboratory, School of Civil Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN (United States); Malushte, Sanjeev R., E-mail: smalusht@bechtel.com [Bechtel Power Corporation, Frederick, MD (United States); Sener, Kadir C., E-mail: ksener@purdue.edu [Bowen Laboratory, School of Civil Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN (United States); Lai, Zhichao, E-mail: laiz@purdue.edu [Bowen Laboratory, School of Civil Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN (United States)

    2014-04-01

    Steel-concrete (SC) composite walls being considered and used as an alternative to conventional reinforced concrete (RC) walls in safety-related nuclear facilities due to their construction economy and structural efficiency. However, there is a lack of standardized codes for SC structures, and design guidelines and approaches are still being developed. This paper presents the development and verification of: (a) mechanics based model, and (b) detailed nonlinear finite element model for predicting the behavior and failure of SC wall panels subjected to combinations of in-plane forces. The models are verified using existing test results, and the verified models are used to explore the behavior of SC walls subjected to combinations of in-plane forces and moments. The results from these investigations are used to develop an interaction surface in principle force (S{sub p1}–S{sub p2}) space that can be used to design or check the adequacy of SC wall panels. The interaction surface is easy to develop since it consists of straight line segments connecting anchor points defined by the SC wall section strengths in axial tension, in-plane shear, and compression. Both models and the interaction surface (for design) developed in this paper are recommended for future work. However, in order to use these approaches, the SC wall section should be detailed with adequate shear connector and tie bar strength and spacing to prevent non-ductile failure modes.

  14. Experimental thermal study and numerical simulation of a composite solar wall. Optimization of the energetic performances; Etude thermique experimentale et simulation numerique d`un mur solaire composite. Optimisation des performances energetiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zalewski, L.

    1996-11-27

    The objective of this work is the analysis of a passive solar component: the composite solar wall, a building component, which includes an insulating panel located behind the massive wall. This panel has two vents located at the top and at the bottom, which allow the air to circulate from the room to the layer in contact with the back of the massive wall, where it is heated, and then back to the room. The solar energy is transferred to the building by conduction through the massive wall, and then by convection using a thermosyphon phenomenon. The monitoring of 2 solar houses in Verdun-Thierville (Meuse, France) has clearly shown, control issues of the air layer. The wall must be operated as autonomously as possible, to not be a constraint for the occupants and to get an optimization of the energy gains. To solve these problems, a composite solar wall prototype was erected in a test cell at Cadarache and tested in real operating conditions. This allows to use a more complete instrumentation, to have access more easily to the sensors and to study various configurations. The first experiments revealed an inverse thermosyphon phenomenon. To avoid this effect, two systems were designed, tested at Cadarache and then implemented in the walls at Verdun. (author) 77 refs.

  15. Electrochemical determination of sulphide at multi-walled carbon nanotubes-dihexadecyl hydrogen phosphate composite film modified electrodes based on in situ synthesis of methylene blue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    An Min Xiang; Li Zhou; Cheng Guo Hu; Sheng Shui Hu

    2008-01-01

    A novel electrochemical method for the determination of sulphide at a multi-walled carbon nanotube-dihexadecyl hydrogenphosphate composite film coated glassy carbon electrode (MWNTs-DHP/GCE) based on in situ synthesis of methylene blue (MB)was established.

  16. Cobalt hexacyanoferrate modified multi-walled carbon nanotubes/graphite composite electrode as electrochemical sensor on microfluidic chip

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Xinchun [School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Sun Yat-sen University, 132 Waihuan East Road of Higher Education Mega Centre, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Chen Zuanguang, E-mail: chenzg@mail.sysu.edu.cn [School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Sun Yat-sen University, 132 Waihuan East Road of Higher Education Mega Centre, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Zhong Yuwen, E-mail: yu0106@163.com [Center for Disease Control and Prevention of Guangdong Province, 176 Xingangxi, Guangzhou 510300 (China); Yang Fan; Pan Jianbin; Liang Yajing [School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Sun Yat-sen University, 132 Waihuan East Road of Higher Education Mega Centre, Guangzhou 510006 (China)

    2012-01-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CoHCF nanoparticles modified MWCNTs/graphite electrode use for electrochemistry on electrophoresis microchip for the first time. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Simultaneous, rapid, and sensitive electrochemical detection of hydrazine and isoniazid in real samples. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An exemplary work of CME sensor assembly onto microchip for determination of analytes with environmental significance. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Manifestation of the applicability and flexibility of CME sensor for electroanalysis on microfluidic chip. - Abstract: Nanomaterial-based electrochemical sensor has received significant interest. In this work, cobalt hexacyanoferrate modified multi-walled carbon nanotubes/graphite composite electrode was electrochemically prepared and exploited as an amperometric detector for microchip electrophoresis. The prepared sensor displayed rapid and sensitive response towards hydrazine and isoniazid oxidation, which was attributed to synergetic electrocatalytic effect of cobalt hexacyanoferrate and multi-walled carbon nanotubes. The sensitivity enhancement with nearly two orders of magnitude was gained, compared with the bare carbon paste electrode, with the detection limit of 0.91 {mu}M (S/N = 3) for hydrazine. Acceptable repeatability of the microanalysis system was verified by consecutive eleven injections of hydrazine without chip and electrode treatments, the RSDs for peak current and migration time were 3.4% and 2.1%, respectively. Meanwhile, well-shaped electrophoretic peaks were observed, mainly due to fast electron transfer of electroactive species on the modified electrode. The developed microchip-electrochemistry setup was successfully applied to the determination of hydrazine and isoniazid in river water and pharmaceutical preparation, respectively. Several merits of the novel electrochemical sensor coupled with microfluidic platform, such as comparative stability, easy fabrication and

  17. Structural studies of the O-specific polysaccharide(s) from the lipopolysaccharide of Azospirillum brasilense type strain Sp7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigida, Elena N; Fedonenko, Yuliya P; Shashkov, Alexander S; Zdorovenko, Evelina L; Konnova, Svetlana A; Ignatov, Vladimir V; Knirel, Yuriy A

    2013-10-18

    Lipopolysaccharide was obtained by phenol-water extraction from dried bacterial cells of Azospirillum brasilense type strain Sp7. Mild acid hydrolysis of the lipopolysaccharide followed by GPC on Sephadex G-50 resulted in a polysaccharide mixture, which was studied by composition and methylation analyses, Smith degradation and (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopy. The following polysaccharide structures were established, where italics indicate a non-stoichiometric (∼40%) 2-O-methylation of l-rhamnose.

  18. Association Mapping of Cell Wall Synthesis Regulatory Genes and Cell Wall Quality in Switchgrass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartley, Laura [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States). Dept. of Microbiology and Plant Biology; Wu, Y. [Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater, OK (United States); Zhu, L. [Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater, OK (United States); Brummer, E. C. [Noble Foundation, Ardmore, OK (United States); Saha, M. [Noble Foundation, Ardmore, OK (United States)

    2016-05-31

    Inefficient conversion of biomass to biofuels is one of the main barriers for biofuel production from such materials. Approximately half of polysaccharides in biomass remain unused by typical biochemical conversion methods. Conversion efficiency is influenced by the composition and structure of cell walls of biomass. Grasses such as wheat, maize, and rice, as well as dedicated perennial bioenergy crops, like switchgrass, make up ~55% of biomass that can be produced in the United States. Grass cell walls have a different composition and patterning compared with dicotyledonous plants, including the well-studied model plant, Arabidopsis. This project identified genetic determinants of cell wall composition in grasses using both naturally occurring genetic variation of switchgrass and gene network reconstruction and functional assays in rice. In addition, the project linked functional data in rice and other species to switchgrass improvement efforts through curation of the most abundant class of regulators in the switchgrass genome. Characterizing natural diversity of switchgrass for variation in cell wall composition and properties, also known as quality, provides an unbiased avenue for identifying biologically viable diversity in switchgrass cell walls. To characterizing natural diversity, this project generated cell wall composition and enzymatic deconstruction data for ~450 genotypes of the Switchgrass Southern Association Collection (SSAC), a diverse collection composed of 36 switchgrass accessions from the southern U.S. distribution of switchgrass. Comparing these data with other measures of cell wall quality for the same samples demonstrated the complementary nature of the diverse characterization platforms now being used for biomass characterization. Association of the composition data with ~3.2K single nucleotide variant markers identified six significant single nucleotide variant markers co-associated with digestibility and another compositional trait. These

  19. Effect of Polysaccharides on the Properties of Wheat Gluten Films and Wheat Gluten-lipid Composite Films%多糖类物质对谷朊粉蛋白膜性能的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    佟颖; 张春红; 常南; 李新华

    2012-01-01

    Researched the effect ofpolysaccharides on the properties of wheat gluten films. Polysaccharides can improve the transmittance, water resistance, mechanical strength and oxygen barrier performance of the wheat gluten films. The suitable dosage of polysaccharide substance is 0.03 g/g WG - 0.05g/g WG. Both fructose and chitosan have great influence on the properties of wheat gluten films. Fructose decreased the water vapor transmission rate by 12.75%; it increased oxygen permeability, tensile strength and elongation at break by 18.54%, 20.31% and 30.63% respectively. The cross-linking degree between carrageen and gluten is relatively small; the performance of the wheat gluten films did not improve significantly. The effects of polysaccharide on gluten-lipid composite film and wheat gluten film were similar. Fructose improved the mechanical properties and oxygen barrier performance of the WG-lipid composite films, the water resistance was better than that of WG-lipid composite films, but far below the wheat gluten films. Infrared spectrum analysis showed fructose can improved the performance of composite films, fructose and gluten molecules has a good bonding, the hydrogen bonding interaction strengthened.%研究了多糖类物质对谷朊粉蛋白膜及其脂类复合膜性能的影响。结论表明,添加多糖类物质能提高谷朊粉蛋白膜的透光率、阻水性、机械性和阻氧性,多糖物质的适宜添加量为0.03g/gWG~0.05g/gWG。果胶和壳聚糖对谷朊粉蛋白膜性能的影响较大。添加果胶可使膜的水蒸气透过率下降12.75%,阻氧性、抗拉强度和断裂伸长率分别提高18.54%,20.31%和30.63%;卡拉胶与谷朊粉交联程度相对较小,膜的性能提高不显著。添加多糖类物质对谷朊粉一脂类复合膜的改性与其对谷朊粉蛋白膜具有相似的变化趋势,添加果胶改善了WG-脂类复合膜的机械性能和阻氧性,阻水性虽比WG-脂类复合

  20. Tabique walls composite earth-based material characterization in the Alto Douro wine region, Portugal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui CARDOSO

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The Alto Douro Wine Region, located in the northeast of Portugal, a UNESCO World Heritage Site, presents a relevant tabique building stock, a traditional vernacular building technology. A technology based on a timber framed structure filled with a composite earth-based material. Meanwhile, previous research works have revealed that, principally in rural areas, this Portuguese heritage is highly deteriorated and damaged because of the rareness of conservation and strengthening works, which is partly related to the non-engineered character of this technology and to the growing phenomenon of rural to urban migration. Those aspects associated with the lack of scientific studies related to this technology motivated the writing of this paper, whose main purpose is the physical and chemical characterization of the earth-based material applied in the tabique buildings of that region. Consequently, an experimental work was conducted and the results obtained allowed, among others, the proposal of a particle size distribution envelope in respect to this material. This information will provide the means to assess the suitability of a given earth-based material in regard to this technology. The knowledge from this study could be very useful for the development of future normative documents and as a reference for architects and engineers that work with earth to guide and regulate future conservation, rehabilitation or construction processes helping to preserve this fabulous legacy.

  1. Equivalent Linearization of Polymer Matrix Composite Infill Wall Subjected to Seismic Ground Motions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BuSeog Ju

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Polymer Matrix Composite (PMC material was introduced as a new conceptual infill construction for seismic retrofitting. A proposed PMC-infilled system was composed of two basic structural components: inner PMC-infilled sandwich and outer FRP damping panels designed toconstrain the energy-dissipating layers. These two components along with the steel frame were intended for providing the desired stiffness and damping following different drift values. The observed behavior of the proposed PMC-infilled system was evaluated experimentally based on the stiffness, the mode of failure and the energy dissipation outputs. In this study, a piece-wise linear dynamic analysis for a proposed PMC-infilled frame was performed according to the previous research, for the assessment of their effectiveness and the responses under the simulated earthquake loading. Upon comparing the results of undamped (without PMC panel and damped (with PMC panel structures, numerical results showed that structural damping with passive interface damping layer could significantly enhance the seismic response. Furthermore, the numerical simulation response showed that the response of theequivalent linearized model produces more conservative results, in comparison to the response of piece-wise linear model.

  2. Dielectric properties of ultraviolet cured poly(dimethyl siloxane) sub-percolative composites containing percolative amounts of multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goswami, Kaustav; Daugaard, Anders Egede; Skov, Anne Ladegaard

    2015-01-01

    In this study a new method of multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) incorporation was employed in the preparation of ultraviolet (UV) curable MWCNT-filled poly(dimethyl siloxane) (PDMS) composites. The composites were designed to contain amounts of MWCNT above the percolation threshold, without...... irradiated, resulting in a layer of hyperbranched PDMS forming around the MWCNTs. This MWCNT mixture was added to a hyperbranched long chain PDMS to provide concentrations of MWCNT of 0.33%, 0.66% and 1%, and a fully crosslinked system was obtained in a final photochemical curing. Rheology of the composites...

  3. Novel Enzymes for Targeted Hydrolysis of Algal Cell Walls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schultz-Johansen, Mikkel

    are incapable of breaking the complex polysaccharides found in seaweed cell walls. Therefore, new enzymes are needed for degradation of seaweed biomass. Bacteria that colonize the surfaces of seaweed secrete enzymes that allow them to degrade and utilize seaweed polysaccharides as energy. In addition, sea...... urchins are known algae-eaters and may therefore be inhabited by endosymbiotic bacteria that help in degradation of algal cell wall constituents. This thesis work investigated bacteria associated with seaweed, seagrass and sea urchins for their enzymatic activities against algal cell wall polysaccharides...

  4. Preparation and characterization of functionalized single walled carbon nanotubes (fSWCNT)/ Hydroxyapatite (HAp)-Nylon hybridized composite biomaterial to study the mechanical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanal, Suraj; Leventouri, Theodora; Mahfuz, Hassan; Rondinone, Adam

    2014-03-01

    Synthetic hydroxyapatite (HAp) bears poor mechanical properties that limit its applicability in orthopedics. We study the possibility of overcoming such limitations by incorporating functionalized single walled carbon nanotubes (fSWCNT) in a biocompatible/bioactive nano-composite. We present results from synthesis and characterization of samples prepared under different processing parameters. Ultra sonication method was to disperse functionalized single walled carbon nanotubes (fSWCNT) in HAp followed by a simple hot assorting method to incorporate with polymerized ɛ-caprolactam. The fracture toughness of the composite materials was tested in compliance with the ASTM D-5045 standard. We have found that while the fracture toughness strongly depends on the processing parameters, a value comparable to the one for cortical bone is achieved. Mechanical properties, electron microscopy and crystal structure properties of the composite materials will be discussed.

  5. Isolation purification of polysaccharide from the pumpkin and the study of its monosaccharide composition%南瓜多糖的组成及摩尔比测定

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孔庆胜; 蒋滢

    2000-01-01

    目的:研究南瓜多糖的单糖组成及摩尔比.方法:南瓜(Pumpkin)干粉经热水提取,Sevag法弃蛋白,透析,乙醇沉淀,沉淀干燥物再经Sephadex G-100柱层析纯化,即得南瓜多糖纯品(Pumpkin Polysaccharide, 简称PP).用聚丙烯酰胺凝胶电泳证明为均一体.结果:凝胶过滤法测其分子量为1.6×104.PP用酸完全水解,经纸层析表明由D-葡萄糖、D-半乳糖、L-阿拉伯糖、木糖和D-葡萄糖醛酸组成.其摩尔比分别为0.181∶0.083∶0.069∶0.031∶0.175. 结论:南瓜多糖将有可能作为一种新的高效低毒的降血糖药物.

  6. 川牛膝多糖的分离、纯化及单糖组成%ISOLATION, PURIFICATION AND MONOSACCHARIDE COMPOSITION OF POLYSACCHARIDE FROM CYATHULA OFFICINALIS KUAN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘颖华; 何开泽; 张军峰; 蒙义文

    2003-01-01

    采用水提醇沉法提取川牛膝多糖粗品CPC,经685弱碱阴离子交换柱层析和Bio-Gel P2凝胶柱层析进一步纯化,得到川牛膝多糖RCP(refined Cyathula officinalis Kuan polysaccharide).紫外扫描、高效液相色谱、聚丙烯酰胺盘状凝胶电泳证明RCP为均一组分.质谱图显示RCP的分子量(Mr)主要分布在1 000~2 200.薄层正交试验确定了RCP完全水解的最优条件.薄层层析及高效液相色谱-蒸发光散射检测(HPLC-ELSD)技术揭示,RCP单糖组成为D-果糖和D-葡萄糖. 图11 表2 参18

  7. Mechanical characterization and validation of poly (methyl methacrylate)/multi walled carbon nanotube composite for the polycentric knee joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arun, S; Kanagaraj, S

    2015-10-01

    Trans femoral amputation is one of the most uncomfortable surgeries in patient׳s life, where the prosthesis consisting of a socket, knee joint, pylon and foot is used to do the walking activities. The artificial prosthetic knee joint imitates the functions of human knee to achieve the flexion-extension for the above knee amputee. The objective of present work is to develop a light weight composite material for the knee joint to reduce the metabolic cost of an amputee. Hence, an attempt was made to study the mechanical properties of multi walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) reinforced Poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) prepared through melt mixing technique and optimize the concentration of reinforcement. The PMMA nanocomposites were prepared by reinforcing 0, 0.1, 0.2, 0.25, 0.3 and 0.4 wt% of MWCNT using injection moulding machine via twin screw extruder. It is observed that the tensile and flexural strength of PMMA, which were studied as per ASTM D638 and D790, respectively, were increased by 32.9% and 26.3% till 0.25 wt% reinforcement of MWCNT. The experimental results of strength and modulus were compared with theoretical prediction, where a good correlation was noted. It is concluded that the mechanical properties of PMMA were found to be increased to maximum at 0.25 wt% reinforcement of MWCNT, where the Pukanszky model and modified Halpin-Tsai model are suggested to predict the strength and modulus, respectively, of the PMMA/MWCNT composite, which can be opted as a suitable materiel for the development of polycentric knee joint.

  8. Enhanced thermal conductivity of form-stable phase change composite with single-walled carbon nanotubes for thermal energy storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Tingting; Li, Jinhong; Feng, Wuwei; Nian, Hong'en

    2017-03-16

    A striking contrast in the thermal conductivities of polyethylene glycol (PEG)/diatomite form-stable phase change composite (fs-PCC) with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNs) as nano-additive has been reported in our present study. Compared to the pure PEG, the thermal conductivity of the prepared fs-PCC has increased from 0.24 W/mK to 0.87 W/Mk with a small SWCNs loading of 2 wt%. SWCNs are decorated on the inner surface of diatomite pores whilst retaining its porous structure. Compared to PEG/diatomite fs-PCC, the melting and solidification time of the PEG/diatomite/SWCNs fs-PCC are respectively decreased by 54.7% and 51.1%, and its thermal conductivity is 2.8 times higher. The composite can contain PEG as high as 60 wt% and maintain its original shape perfectly without any PEG leakage after subjected to 200 melt-freeze cycles. DSC results indicates that the melting point of the PEG/diatomite/SWCNs fs-PCC shifts to a lower temperature while the solidification point shifts to a higher temperature due to the presence of SWCNs. Importantly, the use of SWCNs is found to have clear beneficial effects for enhancing the thermal conductivity and thermal storage/release rates, without affecting thermal properties, chemical compatibility and thermal stability. The prepared PEG/diatomite/SWCNs fs-PCC exhibits excellent chemical and thermal durability and has potential application in solar thermal energy storage and solar heating.

  9. Enhanced thermal conductivity of form-stable phase change composite with single-walled carbon nanotubes for thermal energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Tingting; Li, Jinhong; Feng, Wuwei; Nian, Hong'En

    2017-03-01

    A striking contrast in the thermal conductivities of polyethylene glycol (PEG)/diatomite form-stable phase change composite (fs-PCC) with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNs) as nano-additive has been reported in our present study. Compared to the pure PEG, the thermal conductivity of the prepared fs-PCC has increased from 0.24 W/mK to 0.87 W/Mk with a small SWCNs loading of 2 wt%. SWCNs are decorated on the inner surface of diatomite pores whilst retaining its porous structure. Compared to PEG/diatomite fs-PCC, the melting and solidification time of the PEG/diatomite/SWCNs fs-PCC are respectively decreased by 54.7% and 51.1%, and its thermal conductivity is 2.8 times higher. The composite can contain PEG as high as 60 wt% and maintain its original shape perfectly without any PEG leakage after subjected to 200 melt-freeze cycles. DSC results indicates that the melting point of the PEG/diatomite/SWCNs fs-PCC shifts to a lower temperature while the solidification point shifts to a higher temperature due to the presence of SWCNs. Importantly, the use of SWCNs is found to have clear beneficial effects for enhancing the thermal conductivity and thermal storage/release rates, without affecting thermal properties, chemical compatibility and thermal stability. The prepared PEG/diatomite/SWCNs fs-PCC exhibits excellent chemical and thermal durability and has potential application in solar thermal energy storage and solar heating.

  10. Characterization of mechanical properties of hydroxyapatite-silicon-multi walled carbon nano tubes composite coatings synthesized by EPD on NiTi alloys for biomedical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalili, Vida; Khalil-Allafi, Jafar; Sengstock, Christina; Motemani, Yahya; Paulsen, Alexander; Frenzel, Jan; Eggeler, Gunther; Köller, Manfred

    2016-06-01

    Release of Ni(1+) ions from NiTi alloy into tissue environment, biological response on the surface of NiTi and the allergic reaction of atopic people towards Ni are challengeable issues for biomedical application. In this study, composite coatings of hydroxyapatite-silicon multi walled carbon nano-tubes with 20wt% Silicon and 1wt% multi walled carbon nano-tubes of HA were deposited on a NiTi substrate using electrophoretic methods. The SEM images of coated samples exhibit a continuous and compact morphology for hydroxyapatite-silicon and hydroxyapatite-silicon-multi walled carbon nano-tubes coatings. Nano-indentation analysis on different locations of coatings represents the highest elastic modulus (45.8GPa) for HA-Si-MWCNTs which is between the elastic modulus of NiTi substrate (66.5GPa) and bone tissue (≈30GPa). This results in decrease of stress gradient on coating-substrate-bone interfaces during performance. The results of nano-scratch analysis show the highest critical distance of delamination (2.5mm) and normal load before failure (837mN) as well as highest critical contact pressure for hydroxyapatite-silicon-multi walled carbon nano-tubes coating. The cell culture results show that human mesenchymal stem cells are able to adhere and proliferate on the pure hydroxyapatite and composite coatings. The presence of both silicon and multi walled carbon nano-tubes (CS3) in the hydroxyapatite coating induce more adherence of viable human mesenchymal stem cells in contrast to the HA coated samples with only silicon (CS2). These results make hydroxyapatite-silicon-multi walled carbon nano-tubes a promising composite coating for future bone implant application.

  11. Adhesive analysis of voids in class II composite resin restorations at the axial and gingival cavity walls restored under in vivo versus in vitro conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purk, John H.; Dusevich, Vladimir; Glaros, Alan; Eick, J. David

    2007-01-01

    Objectives Adhesive analysis, under the scanning electron microscope of microtensile specimens that failed through the adhesive interface, was conducted to evaluate the amount of voids present at the axial versus gingival cavity walls of class II composite restorations restored under in vivo and in vitro conditions. Methods Five patients received class II resin composite restorations, under in vivo and in vitro conditions. A total of 14 premolar teeth yielded 59 (n = 59) microtensile adhesive specimens that fractured through the adhesive interface. The fractured surfaces of all specimens were examined and the % area of voids was measured. Results Voids at the adhesive joint were highly predictive of bond strengths. An increase in the number of voids resulted in a decrease in the microtensile bond strength. The area of voids at the adhesive interface was as follows: in vivo axial 13.6 ± 25.6% (n = 12); in vivo gingival 48.8 ± 29.2% (n = 12); in vitro axial 0.0 ± 0.0% (n = 19) and in vitro gingival 11.7 ± 17.6% (n = 16). Significance Composite resin may bond differently to dentin depending upon the amount of voids and the cavity wall involved. The bond to the gingival wall was not as reliable as the bond to the axial wall. An increase in the amount of surface voids was a major factor for reducing microtensile bond strengths of adhesive to dentin. PMID:16950506

  12. Polysaccharide enriched immunomodulatory fractions from Tinospora cordifolia (Willd) miers ax hook. f. & Thoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Upendra; Bala, Manju; Saini, Rikki; Verma, Praveen Kumar; Kumar, Neeraj; Singh, Bikram; Munshi, Renuka Kulkarni; Bhalerao, Supriya

    2012-09-01

    Tinospora cordifolia is used in Ayurveda as "Rasayanas" to improve the immune system and the body resistance against infections. Polysaccharides are the main constituents which are considered to be responsible for immune enhancement. In this study, immunomodulatory activity of three polysaccharide enriched fractions was evaluated using the polymorphonuclear leukocyte function test. Sugar composition was determined by GC-MS analysis of the derivatised fractions. The active polysaccharide fractions mainly constitute glucose, fructose and arabinose as monomer units.

  13. Characterization and localization of insoluble organic matrices associated with diatom cell walls: insight into their roles during cell wall formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benoit Tesson

    Full Text Available Organic components associated with diatom cell wall silica are important for the formation, integrity, and function of the cell wall. Polysaccharides are associated with the silica, however their localization, structure, and function remain poorly understood. We used imaging and biochemical approaches to describe in detail characteristics of insoluble organic components associated with the cell wall in 5 different diatom species. Results show that an insoluble organic matrix enriched in mannose, likely the diatotepum, is localized on the proximal surface of the silica cell wall. We did not identify any organic matrix embedded within the silica. We also identified a distinct material consisting of glucose polymer with variable localization depending on the species. In some species this component was directly involved in the morphogenesis of silica structure while in others it appeared to be only a structural component of the cell wall. A novel glucose-rich structure located between daughter cells during division was also identified. This work for the first time correlates the structure, composition, and localization of insoluble organic matrices associated with diatom cell walls. Additionally we identified a novel glucose polymer and characterized its role during silica structure formation.

  14. Surface-Anchored Poly(4-vinylpyridine)–Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube–Metal Composites for Gas Detection

    KAUST Repository

    Yoon, Bora

    2016-08-05

    A platform for chemiresistive gas detectors based upon single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) dispersions stabilized by poly(4-vinylpyridine) (P4VP) covalently immobilized onto a glass substrate was developed. To fabricate these devices, a glass substrate with gold electrodes is treated with 3-bromopropyltrichlorosilane. The resulting alkyl bromide coating presents groups that can react with the P4VP to covalently bond (anchor) the polymer–SWCNT composite to the substrate. Residual pyridyl groups in P4VP not consumed in this quaternization reaction are available to coordinate metal nanoparticles or ions chosen to confer selectivity and sensitivity to target gas analytes. Generation of P4VP coordinated to silver nanoparticles produces an enhanced response to ammonia gas. The incorporation of soft Lewis acidic Pd2+ cations by binding PdCl2 to P4VP yields a selective and highly sensitive device that changes resistance upon exposure to vapors of thioethers. The latter materials have utility for odorized fuel leak detection, microbial activity, and breath diagnostics. A third demonstration makes use of permanganate incorporation to produce devices with large responses to vapors of volatile organic compounds that are susceptible to oxidation.

  15. Facile preparation of disposable immunosensor for Shigella flexneri based on multi-wall carbon nanotubes/chitosan composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao Guangying, E-mail: zhaogy-user@163.co [Food Safety Key Lab of Zhejiang Province, Department of Food Quality and Safety, Zhejiang Gongshang University, 149, Jiaogong Road, Hangzhou 310035, Zhejiang Province (China); Zhan Xuejia [Food Safety Key Lab of Zhejiang Province, Department of Food Quality and Safety, Zhejiang Gongshang University, 149, Jiaogong Road, Hangzhou 310035, Zhejiang Province (China)

    2010-02-28

    Based on multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT)/chitosan/horseradish peroxidase labeled antibodies to Shigella flexneri (HRP-anti-S. flexneri) biocomposite film on a screen-printed electrode (SPE) surface, a disposable immunosensor has been developed for the rapid detection of S. flexneri. The HRP-anti-S. flexneri can be entrapped into MWCNT/chitosan composite matrix without other cross-linking agent. Thionine and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} were used as the mediator and substrate, respectively. The surface morphologies of modified films were characterized by atomic force microscope (AFM). Cyclic voltammery (CV) was carried out to characterize the electrochemical properties of the immobilization of materials on the electrode surface and quantified S. flexneri. Due to the strong electrocatalytic properties of MWCNT and HRP toward H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, the response signal was significantly amplified. S. flexneri could be detected by the decrease of the reduction peak current before and after immunoreaction. Under optimal conditions, S. flexneri could be detected in the range of 10{sup 4} to 10{sup 10} cfu mL{sup -1}, with a detection limit of 2.3 x 10{sup 3} cfu mL{sup -1} (S/N = 3). Furthermore, the proposed immunosensor exhibited a satisfactory specificity, reproducibility, stability and accuracy, indicating that the proposed immunosensor has potential application for a facile, rapid and harmless immunoassay.

  16. Lateral load-carrying capacity analyses of composite shear walls with double steel plates and filled concrete with binding bars

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周德源; 刘凌飞; 朱立猛

    2016-01-01

    A method is developed to predict the lateral load-carrying capacity of composite shear walls with double steel plates and filled concrete with binding bars (SCBs). Nonlinear finite element models of SCBs were established by using the finite element tool, Abaqus. Tie constraints were used to connect the binding bars and the steel plates. Surface-to-surface contact provided by the Abaqus was used to simulate the interaction between the steel plate and the core concrete. The established models could predict the lateral load-carrying capacity of SCBs with a reasonable degree of accuracy. A calculation method was developed by superposition principle to predict the lateral load-carrying capacity of SCBs for the engineering application. The concrete confined by steel plates and binding bars is under multi-axial compression; therefore, its shear strength was calculated by using the Guo-Wang concrete failure criterion. The shear strength of the steel plates of SCBs was calculated by using the von Mises yielding criterion without considering buckling. Results of the developed method are in good agreement with the testing and finite element results.

  17. Direct electrochemistry of cytochrome c immobilized on titanium nitride/multi-walled carbon nanotube composite for amperometric nitrite biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haldorai, Yuvaraj; Hwang, Seung-Kyu; Gopalan, Anantha-Iyengar; Huh, Yun Suk; Han, Young-Kyu; Voit, Walter; Sai-Anand, Gopalan; Lee, Kwang-Pill

    2016-05-15

    In this report, titanium nitride (TiN) nanoparticles decorated multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNTs) nanocomposite is fabricated via a two-step process. These two steps involve the decoration of titanium dioxide nanoparticles onto the MWCNTs surface and a subsequent thermal nitridation. Transmission electron microscopy shows that TiN nanoparticles with a mean diameter of ≤ 20 nm are homogeneously dispersed onto the MWCNTs surface. Direct electrochemistry and electrocatalysis of cytochrome c immobilized on the MWCNTs-TiN composite modified on a glassy carbon electrode for nitrite sensing are investigated. Under optimum conditions, the current response is linear to its concentration from 1 µM to 2000 µM with a sensitivity of 121.5 µA µM(-1)cm(-2) and a low detection limit of 0.0014 µM. The proposed electrode shows good reproducibility and long-term stability. The applicability of the as-prepared biosensor is validated by the successful detection of nitrite in tap and sea water samples.

  18. Cerium oxide nanoparticles/multi-wall carbon nanotubes composites: Facile synthesis and electrochemical performances as supercapacitor electrode materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Dongyang; Chen, Nan; Li, Yuxiu; Xing, Xinxin; Liu, Xu; Xiao, Xuechun; Wang, Yude

    2017-02-01

    Cerium oxide nanoparticles/multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) composites are synthesized by a facile hydrothermal method without any surfactant or template. The morphology and microstructure of samples are examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transition electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectrum and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Electrochemical properties of the MWCNTs, the pure CeO2, and the CeO2/MWCNTs nanocomposites electrodes are investigated by cyclic voltammetry (CV), galvanostatic charge/discharge (GDC) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements. The CeO2/MWCNTs nanocomposite (at the mole ratio of 1:1) electrode exhibits much larger specific capacitance compared with both the MWCNTs electrode and the pure CeO2 electrode and significantly improves cycling stability compared to the pure CeO2 electrode. The CeO2/MWCNTs nanocomposite (at the mole ratio of 1:1) achieves a specific capacitance of 455.6 F g-1 at the current density of 1 A g-1. Therefore, the as prepared CeO2/MWCNTs nanocomposite is a promising electrode material for high-performance supercapacitors.

  19. Hybrid optical-electrochemical electronic nose system based on Zn-porphyrin and multi-walled carbon nanotube composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kladsomboon, Sumana; Lutz, Mario; Pogfay, Tawee; Puntheeranurak, Theeraporn; Kerdcharoen, Teerakiat

    2012-07-01

    In this work, we have enhanced the capability of an e-nose system based on combined optical and electrochemical transduction within a single gas sensor array. The optical part of this e-nose is based on detection of the absorption changes of light emitted from eight light emitting diodes (LEDs) as measured by a CMOS photo-detector. The electrochemical part works by measuring the change in electrical resistivity of the sensing materials upon contact with the sample vapor. Zinc-5,10,15,20-tetra-phenyl-21H,23H-porphyrin (ZnTPP) and multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) composite was used as the sensing materials based on its good optoelectronic properties. This sensing layer was characterized by UV-Vis spectroscopy and atomic force microscope and tested with various VOC vapors. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations were performed to investigate the electronic properties and interaction energies between ZnTPP and analyte molecules. It can be clearly seen that this hybrid optical-electrochemical electronic nose system can classify the vapor of different volatile organic compounds.

  20. Phytoremediation of cadmium-contaminated soils by young Douglas fir trees: effects of cadmium exposure on cell wall composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astier, Cédric; Gloaguen, Vincent; Faugeron, Céline

    2014-01-01

    Douglas fir trees grown on an artificially Cd-contaminated soil, can tolerate this trace element (up to 68 mg/kg in soil) during several months. Most of the absorbed Cd is retained in roots (25 mg/kg DM), but transfer to aerial part is also effective. Showing the highest content, up to 6 mg/kg DM, among all the aboveground parts, barks seem to be a preferred storage compartment. However, the transfer factor is quite low, about 0.3. Another objective of this study was to compare the cell wall components of trees exposed to increasing Cd amounts in soil. A decrease in lignin and an increase in pectin contents were observed in response to increasing soil cadmium concentration. A concurrent reduction in methyl-esterification of pectin suggests than the structure of this major binding site could therefore be modified as a reaction to cadmium contamination. Future prospects will focus on the modulation of pectin composition in response to Cd exposure.

  1. Effect of anti-biofouling potential of multi-walled carbon nanotubes-filled polydimethylsiloxane composites on pioneer microbial colonization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yuan; Lang, Yanhe; Sun, Qian; Liang, Shuang; Liu, Yongkang; Zhang, Zhizhou

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, two carbon nanotube (CNT) nanofillers, namely the multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and the carboxyl-modified MWCNTs (cMWCNTs), were introduced into the polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) matrix respectively, in order to produce the PDMS composites with reinforced anti-biofouling properties. The anti-biofouling capacity of the silicone-based coatings, including the unfilled PDMS (P0), the MWCNTs-filled PDMS (PM) and the cMWCNTs-filled PDMS (PC), was examined via the field assays conducted in Weihai, China. The effect of different silicone-based coatings on the dynamic variations of the pioneer microbial-community diversity was analyzed using the single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) technique. The PM and PC surfaces have exhibited excellent anti-biofouling properties in contrast to that of the PDMS surface, with extremely low attachment of the early colonizers, such as juvenile invertebrates, seaweeds and algae sporelings. The PM and PC surfaces can effectively prevent biofouling for more than 12 weeks. These combined results suggest that the incorporation of MWCNTs or cMWCNTs into the PDMS matrix can dramatically reinforce its anti-biofouling properties. The SSCP analysis reveals that compared with the PDMS surfaces, the PM and PC surfaces have strong modulating effect on the pioneer prokaryotic and eukaryotic communities, particularly on the colonization of pioneer eukaryotic microbes. The significantly reduced pioneer eukaryotic-community diversity may contribute to the weakening of the subsequent colonization of macrofoulers.

  2. Temperature effect on buckling properties of ultra-thin-walled lenticular collapsible composite tube subjected to axial compression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bai Jiangbo; Xiong Junjiang

    2014-01-01

    This paper seeks to outline the temperature effect on the buckling properties of ultra-thin-walled lenticular collapsible composite tube (LCCT) subjected to axial compression. The buckling tests of the LCCT specimens subjected to axial compression were carried out on INSTRON-500N servo-hydraulic machine in dry state and at the temperatures of 25 ?C, 100 ?C and ?80 ?C. The load-displacement curves and buckling initiation loads were measured and the buckling initiation mechanism was discussed from experimental observations. Experiments show that the buckling initiation load, on average, is only about 2.2% greater at the low temperature of ?80 ?C than at the room temperature of 25 ?C due to the material hardening, demonstrating an insignificant increase in the buckling initiation load, whereas it is about 19.5%lower at the high temperature of 100 ?C than at the room temperature owing to the material softening, implying a significant decrease in the buckling initiation load. The failure mode of the LCCT in axial compres-sion tests at three different temperatures can be reckoned to be characteristic of the buckling initi-ation and propagation around the central region until rupture. The finite element (FE) model is presented to simulate the buckling initiation mechanism based on the eigenvalue-based methodol-ogy. Good correlation between experimental and numerical results is achieved.

  3. Multilayer structured amperometric immunosensor built by self-assembly of a redox multi-wall carbon nanotube composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su Huilan [Key Laboratory on Luminescence and Real-Time Analysis, Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715 (China); Yuan Ruo [Key Laboratory on Luminescence and Real-Time Analysis, Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715 (China)], E-mail: yuanruo@swu.edu.cn; Chai Yaqin; Zhuo Ying; Hong Chenglin; Liu Zhongyuan; Yang Xia [Key Laboratory on Luminescence and Real-Time Analysis, Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715 (China)

    2009-07-01

    In this paper, a novel reagentless amprometric immunosensor was built on the conductive multilayer, comprised of Nafion-coated multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT), thionine (Thi) and gold nanoparticles (nano-Au). First, Nafion-MWCNT homogeneous composite was dropped on the surface of the glass carbon electrode (GCE). Then Thi was chemisorbed by both carboxylic MWCNT and cation exchanger Nafion. Furthermore, the negative-charged nano-Au, which was used to immobilize biomolecules, was chemisorbed onto Thi film through the electrostatic force with the amino groups of Thi. The stepwise self-assembly process of the immunosensor was characterized by means of cyclic voltammetry (CV), and the microstructure of modified film was observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Using {alpha}-1-fetoprotein (AFP) as a model, this novel immunosensor presented amplified sensitivity, good stability, and a broader linear response in two ranges from 0.5-20 ng/mL and 20-200 ng/mL with a detection limit of 0.26 ng/mL, as well as good selectivity and storage stability.

  4. Xyloglucan endotransglucosylase and cell wall extensibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miedes, E; Zarra, I; Hoson, T; Herbers, K; Sonnewald, U; Lorences, E P

    2011-02-15

    Transgenic tomato hypocotyls with altered levels of an XTH gene were used to study how XET activity could affect the hypocotyl growth and cell wall extensibility. Transgenic hypocotyls showed significant over-expression (line 13) or co-suppression (line 33) of the SlXTH1 in comparison with the wild type, with these results being correlated with the results on specific soluble XET activity, suggesting that SlXTH1 translates mainly for a soluble XET isoenzyme. A relationship between XET activity and cell wall extensibility was found, and the highest total extensibility was located in the apical hypocotyl segment of the over-expressing SlXTH1 line, where the XET-specific activity and hypocotyl growth were also highest compared with the wild line. Also, in the co-suppression SlXTH1 line, total extensibility values were lower than in the wild type line. The study of linkages between cell wall polysaccharides by FTIR showed that hypocotyls over-expressing SlXTH1 and having a higher XET-specific activity, were grouped away from the wild line, indicating that the linkages between pectins and between cellulose and xyloglucans might differ. These results suggested that the action of the increased XET activity in the transgenic line could be responsible for the cell wall structural changes, and therefore, alter the cell wall extensibility. On the other hand, results on xyloglucan oligosaccharides composition of the xyloglucan by MALDI TOF-MS showed no differences between lines, indicating that the xyloglucan structure was not affected by the XET action. These results provide evidences that XTHs from group I are involved mainly in the restructuring of the cell wall during growth and development, but they are not the limiting factor for plant growth.

  5. Thermal analysis of bulk filled composite resin polymerization using various light curing modes according to the curing depth and approximation to the cavity wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoon-Sang Chang

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to investigate the polymerization temperature of a bulk filled composite resin light-activated with various light curing modes using infrared thermography according to the curing depth and approximation to the cavity wall. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Composite resin (AeliteFlo, Bisco, Schaumburg, IL, USA was inserted into a Class II cavity prepared in the Teflon blocks and was cured with a LED light curing unit (Dr's Light, GoodDoctors Co., Seoul, Korea using various light curing modes for 20 s. Polymerization temperature was measured with an infrared thermographic camera (Thermovision 900 SW/TE, Agema Infra-red Systems AB, Danderyd, Sweden for 40 s at measurement spots adjacent to the cavity wall and in the middle of the cavity from the surface to a 4 mm depth. Data were analyzed according to the light curing modes with one-way ANOVA, and according to curing depth and approximation to the cavity wall with two-way ANOVA. RESULTS: The peak polymerization temperature of the composite resin was not affected by the light curing modes. According to the curing depth, the peak polymerization temperature at the depth of 1 mm to 3 mm was significantly higher than that at the depth of 4 mm, and on the surface. The peak polymerization temperature of the spots in the middle of the cavity was higher than that measured in spots adjacent to the cavity wall. CONCLUSION: In the photopolymerization of the composite resin, the temperature was higher in the middle of the cavity compared to the outer surface or at the internal walls of the prepared cavity.

  6. Thermal analysis of bulk filled composite resin polymerization using various light curing modes according to the curing depth and approximation to the cavity wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    CHANG, Hoon-Sang; CHO, Kyu-Jeong; PARK, Su-Jung; LEE, Bin-Na; HWANG, Yun-Chan; OH, Won-Mann; HWANG, In-Nam

    2013-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to investigate the polymerization temperature of a bulk filled composite resin light-activated with various light curing modes using infrared thermography according to the curing depth and approximation to the cavity wall. Material and Methods Composite resin (AeliteFlo, Bisco, Schaumburg, IL, USA) was inserted into a Class II cavity prepared in the Teflon blocks and was cured with a LED light curing unit (Dr's Light, GoodDoctors Co., Seoul, Korea) using various light curing modes for 20 s. Polymerization temperature was measured with an infrared thermographic camera (Thermovision 900 SW/TE, Agema Infra-red Systems AB, Danderyd, Sweden) for 40 s at measurement spots adjacent to the cavity wall and in the middle of the cavity from the surface to a 4 mm depth. Data were analyzed according to the light curing modes with one-way ANOVA, and according to curing depth and approximation to the cavity wall with two-way ANOVA. Results The peak polymerization temperature of the composite resin was not affected by the light curing modes. According to the curing depth, the peak polymerization temperature at the depth of 1 mm to 3 mm was significantly higher than that at the depth of 4 mm, and on the surface. The peak polymerization temperature of the spots in the middle of the cavity was higher than that measured in spots adjacent to the cavity wall. Conclusion In the photopolymerization of the composite resin, the temperature was higher in the middle of the cavity compared to the outer surface or at the internal walls of the prepared cavity. PMID:24037066

  7. Molecular characterization of two Arabidopsis thaliana glycosyltransferase mutants, rra1 and rra2, which have a reduced residual arabinose content in a polymer tightly associated with the cellulosic wall residue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egelund, Jack; Obel, Nicolai; Ulvskov, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Two putative glycosyltransferases in Arabidopsis thaliana, designated reduced residual arabinose-1 and -2 (RRA1 and RRA2), are characterized at the molecular level. Both genes are classified in CAZy GT-family-77 and are phylogenetically related to putative glycosyltranferases of Chlamydomonas...... identified and characterized at the molecular and biochemical level. Monosaccharide compositional analyses of cell wall material isolated from the meristematic region showed a ca. 20% reduction in the arabinose content in the insoluble/undigested cell wall residue after enzymatic removal of xyloglucan...... and pectic polysaccharides. These data indicate that both RRA-1 and -2 play a role in the arabinosylation of cell wall component(s)....

  8. Thaxtomin A affects CESA-complex density, expression of cell wall genes, cell wall composition, and causes ectopic lignification in Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bischoff, Volker; Cookson, Sarah Jane; Wu, Shuang; Scheible, Wolf-Rüdiger

    2009-01-01

    Thaxtomin A, a phytotoxin produced by Streptomyces eubacteria, is suspected to act as a natural cellulose synthesis inhibitor. This view is confirmed by the results obtained from new chemical, molecular, and microscopic analyses