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Sample records for wall magnetic shift

  1. Magnetic phase shift reconstruction for uniformly magnetized nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akhtari-Zavareh, Azadeh [Department of Physics, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, British Columbia (Canada); De Graef, Marc [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Kavanagh, Karen L. [Department of Physics, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, British Columbia (Canada)

    2017-01-15

    A new analytical model is developed for the magnetic phase shift of uniformly magnetized nanowires with ideal cylindrical geometry. The model is applied to experimental data from off-axis electron holography measurements of the phase shift of CoFeB nanowires, and the saturation induction of a selected wire, as well as its radius, aspect ratio, position and orientation, is determined by fitting the model parameters. The saturation induction value of 1.7 T of the CoFeB nanowire is found to be similar, to be within the measurement error, to values reported in the literature. - Highlights: • We describe a mathematical model for the magnetic phase shift of a cylindrical nanowire. • We discuss electron holography experiments on magnetic nanowires. • We obtain an accurate fit of the measured magnetic phase shift profile. • We extract the magnetic induction of the nanowire from the phase shift model. • The magnetic induction of 1.7 T agrees well with literature results.

  2. Domain walls in single-chain magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pianet, Vivien; Urdampilleta, Matias; Colin, Thierry; Clérac, Rodolphe; Coulon, Claude

    2017-12-01

    The topology and creation energy of domain walls in different magnetic chains (called Single-Chain Magnets or SCMs) are discussed. As these domain walls, that can be seen as "defects", are known to control both static and dynamic properties of these one-dimensional systems, their study and understanding are necessary first steps before a deeper discussion of the SCM properties at finite temperature. The starting point of the paper is the simple regular ferromagnetic chain for which the characteristics of the domain walls are well known. Then two cases will be discussed (i) the "mixed chains" in which isotropic and anisotropic classical spins alternate, and (ii) the so-called "canted chains" where two different easy axis directions are present. In particular, we show that "strictly narrow" domain walls no longer exist in these more complex cases, while a cascade of phase transitions is found for canted chains as the canting angle approaches 45∘. The consequence for thermodynamic properties is briefly discussed in the last part of the paper.

  3. Constricted nanowire with stabilized magnetic domain wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sbiaa, R.; Al Bahri, M.

    2016-01-01

    Domain wall (DW)-based magnetic memory offers the possibility for increasing the storage capacity. However, stability of DW remains the major drawback of this scheme. In this letter, we propose a stepped nanowire for pinning DW in a desirable position. From micromagnetic simulation, the proposed design applied to in-plane magnetic anisotropy materials shows that by adjusting the nanowire step size and its width it is possible to stabilize DW for a desirable current density range. In contrast, only a movement of DW could be seen for conventional nanowire. An extension to a multi-stepped nanowire could be used for multi-bit per cell magnetic memory. - Highlights: • A stepped nanowire is proposed to pin domain wall in desired position. • The new structure can be made by a simple off set of two single nanowires. • The critical current for moving domain wall from one state to the other could be tuned by adjusting the geometry of the device. • The device could be used for multi-bit per cell memory by extending the steps in the device.

  4. Magnetic field driven domain-wall propagation in magnetic nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, X.R.; Yan, P.; Lu, J.; He, C.

    2009-01-01

    The mechanism of magnetic field induced magnetic domain-wall (DW) propagation in a nanowire is revealed: A static DW cannot exist in a homogeneous magnetic nanowire when an external magnetic field is applied. Thus, a DW must vary with time under a static magnetic field. A moving DW must dissipate energy due to the Gilbert damping. As a result, the wire has to release its Zeeman energy through the DW propagation along the field direction. The DW propagation speed is proportional to the energy dissipation rate that is determined by the DW structure. The negative differential mobility in the intermediate field is due to the transition from high energy dissipation at low field to low energy dissipation at high field. For the field larger than the so-called Walker breakdown field, DW plane precesses around the wire, leading to the propagation speed oscillation.

  5. Chiral damping of magnetic domain walls

    KAUST Repository

    Jué , Emilie; Safeer, C.  K.; Drouard, Marc; Lopez, Alexandre; Balint, Paul; Buda-Prejbeanu, Liliana; Boulle, Olivier; Auffret, Stephane; Schuhl, Alain; Manchon, Aurelien; Miron, Ioan Mihai; Gaudin, Gilles

    2015-01-01

    Structural symmetry breaking in magnetic materials is responsible for the existence of multiferroics1, current-induced spin–orbit torques2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 and some topological magnetic structures8, 9, 10, 11, 12. In this Letter we report that the structural inversion asymmetry (SIA) gives rise to a chiral damping mechanism, which is evidenced by measuring the field-driven domain-wall (DW) motion in perpendicularly magnetized asymmetric Pt/Co/Pt trilayers. The DW dynamics associated with the chiral damping and those with Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya interaction (DMI) exhibit identical spatial symmetry13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19. However, both scenarios are differentiated by their time reversal properties: whereas DMI is a conservative effect that can be modelled by an effective field, the chiral damping is purely dissipative and has no influence on the equilibrium magnetic texture. When the DW motion is modulated by an in-plane magnetic field, it reveals the structure of the internal fields experienced by the DWs, allowing one to distinguish the physical mechanism. The chiral damping enriches the spectrum of physical phenomena engendered by the SIA, and is essential for conceiving DW and skyrmion devices owing to its coexistence with DMI (ref. 20).

  6. Chiral damping of magnetic domain walls

    KAUST Repository

    Jué, Emilie

    2015-12-21

    Structural symmetry breaking in magnetic materials is responsible for the existence of multiferroics1, current-induced spin–orbit torques2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 and some topological magnetic structures8, 9, 10, 11, 12. In this Letter we report that the structural inversion asymmetry (SIA) gives rise to a chiral damping mechanism, which is evidenced by measuring the field-driven domain-wall (DW) motion in perpendicularly magnetized asymmetric Pt/Co/Pt trilayers. The DW dynamics associated with the chiral damping and those with Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya interaction (DMI) exhibit identical spatial symmetry13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19. However, both scenarios are differentiated by their time reversal properties: whereas DMI is a conservative effect that can be modelled by an effective field, the chiral damping is purely dissipative and has no influence on the equilibrium magnetic texture. When the DW motion is modulated by an in-plane magnetic field, it reveals the structure of the internal fields experienced by the DWs, allowing one to distinguish the physical mechanism. The chiral damping enriches the spectrum of physical phenomena engendered by the SIA, and is essential for conceiving DW and skyrmion devices owing to its coexistence with DMI (ref. 20).

  7. Domain wall motion in magnetically frustrated nanorings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubarda, M. V.; Escobar, M. A.; Li, S.; Chang, R.; Fullerton, E. E.; Lomakin, V.

    2012-06-01

    We describe a magnetically frustrated nanoring (MFNR) configuration which is formed by introducing antiferromagnetic coupling across an interface orthogonal to the ring's circumferential direction. Such structures have the unique characteristic that only one itinerant domain wall (DW) can exist in the ring, which does not need to be nucleated or injected into the structure and can never escape making it analogous to a magnetic Möbius strip. Numerical simulations show that the DW in a MFNR can be driven consecutively around the ring with a prescribed cyclicity, and that the frequency of revolutions can be controlled by the applied field. The energy landscapes can be controlled to be flat allowing for low fields of operation or to have a barrier for thermal stability. Potential logic and memory applications of MFNRs are considered and discussed.

  8. Pressure-induced shift of the plasma in a helical system with ideally conducting wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pustovitov, V.D.

    2004-01-01

    The global plasma shift is calculated analytically for a helical system with an ideal wall. The derived expression for the plasma shift, incorporating both the finite-β plasma expansion and the opposing reaction of the nearby ideal wall, can be used for interpreting the observable high-β equilibrium effects in LHD and other helical devices. (author)

  9. Wall locking and multiple nonlinear states of magnetic islands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persson, Mikael; Australian National Univ., Canberra, ACT

    1994-01-01

    The nonlinear evolution of magnetic islands is analysed in configurations with multiple resonant magnetic surfaces. The existence of multiple nonlinear steady states, is discussed. These are shown to be associated with states where the dynamics around the different rational surfaces are coupled or decoupled and in the presence of a wall of finite resistivity may correspond wall-locked or non-wall-locked magnetic islands. For the case of strong wall stabilization the locking is shown to consist of two different phases. During the first phase the locking of the plasma at the different rational surfaces occurs. Only when the outermost resonant magnetic surface has locked to the inner surfaces can the actual wall locking process take place. Consequently, wall locking, of a global mode, involving more than one rational surface, can be prevented by the decoupling of the resonant magnetic surfaces by plasma rotation. Possible implications on tokamak experiments are discussed. (author)

  10. Intense Magnetized Plasma-Wall Interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, Bruno S. [UNR; Fuelling, Stephan [UNR

    2013-11-30

    This research project studied wall-plasma interactions relevant to fusion science. Such interactions are a critical aspect of Magneto-Inertial Fusion (MIF) because flux compression by a pusher material, in particular the metal for the liner approach to MIF, involves strong eddy current heating on the surface of the pusher, and probably interactions and mixing of the pusher with the interior fuel during the time when fusion fuel is being burned. When the pusher material is a metal liner, high-energy-density conditions result in fascinating behavior. For example, "warm dense matter" is produced, for which material properties such as resistivity and opacity are not well known. In this project, the transformation into plasma of metal walls subjected to pulsed megagauss magnetic fields was studied with an experiment driven by the UNR 1 MA Zebra generator. The experiment was numerically simulated with using the MHRDR code. This simple, fundamental high-energy-density physics experiment, in a regime appropriate to MIF, has stimulated an important and fascinating comparison of numerical modeling codes and tables with experiment. In addition, we participated in developing the FRCHX experiment to compress a field-reversed-configuration (FRC) plasma with a liner, in collaboration with researchers from Air Force Research Laboratory and Los Alamos National Lab, and we helped develop diagnostics for the Plasma Liner Experiment (PLX) at LANL. Last, but not least, this project served to train students in high-energy-density physics.

  11. Magnetic domain wall gratings for magnetization reversal tuning and confined dynamic mode localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trützschler, Julia; Sentosun, Kadir; Mozooni, Babak; Mattheis, Roland; McCord, Jeffrey

    2016-08-04

    High density magnetic domain wall gratings are imprinted in ferromagnetic-antiferromagnetic thin films by local ion irradiation by which alternating head-to-tail-to-head-to-tail and head-to-head-to-tail-to-tail spatially overlapping domain wall networks are formed. Unique magnetic domain processes result from the interaction of anchored domain walls. Non-linear magnetization response is introduced by the laterally distributed magnetic anisotropy phases. The locally varying magnetic charge distribution gives rise to localized and guided magnetization spin-wave modes directly constrained by the narrow domain wall cores. The exchange coupled multiphase material structure leads to unprecedented static and locally modified dynamic magnetic material properties.

  12. Spin motive forces due to magnetic vortices and domain walls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lucassen, M.E.; Kruis, G.C.F.L.; Lavrijsen, R.; Swagten, H.J.M.; Koopmans, B.; Duine, R.A.

    2011-01-01

    We study spin motive forces, that is, spin-dependent forces and voltages induced by time-dependent magnetization textures, for moving magnetic vortices and domain walls. First, we consider the voltage generated by a one-dimensional field-driven domain wall. Next, we perform detailed calculations on

  13. Magnetic domain wall conduits for single cell applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Donolato, Marco; Torti, A.; Kostesha, Natalie

    2011-01-01

    The ability to trap, manipulate and release single cells on a surface is important both for fundamental studies of cellular processes and for the development of novel lab-on-chip miniaturized tools for biological and medical applications. In this paper we demonstrate how magnetic domain walls...... walls over 16 hours. Moreover, we demonstrate the controlled transport and release of individual yeast cells via displacement and annihilation of individual domain walls in micro- and nano-sized magnetic structures. These results pave the way to the implementation of magnetic devices based on domain...... walls technology in lab-on-chip systems devoted to accurate individual cell trapping and manipulation....

  14. The Effect of a Pulsed Magnetic Field on Domain Wall Resistance in Magnetic Nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majidi, R; Tehranchi, M M; Tabrizi, K Ghafoori [Department of Physics, G.C., Shahid Beheshti University, Evin, 19838-63113, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Phirouznia, A, E-mail: Teranchi@cc.sbu.ac.ir [Department of Physics, Azarbaijan University of Tarbiat Moallem, 53714-161 Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-04-01

    The effect of a pulsed magnetic field on domain wall magnetoresistance for an ideal one-dimensional magnetic nanowire with a domain wall has been investigated. The analysis has been based on the Boltzmann transport equation, within the relaxation time approximation. The results indicate that the domain wall resistance increase when enhancing the magnetic field. The evaluation of local magnetization has been considered in the presence of a pulsed magnetic field. The time evaluation of the magnetization also has an effect on the domain wall resistance. The resistance depends on the contribution of the Zeeman and exchange interactions.

  15. The Effect of a Pulsed Magnetic Field on Domain Wall Resistance in Magnetic Nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majidi, R; Tehranchi, M M; Tabrizi, K Ghafoori; Phirouznia, A

    2011-01-01

    The effect of a pulsed magnetic field on domain wall magnetoresistance for an ideal one-dimensional magnetic nanowire with a domain wall has been investigated. The analysis has been based on the Boltzmann transport equation, within the relaxation time approximation. The results indicate that the domain wall resistance increase when enhancing the magnetic field. The evaluation of local magnetization has been considered in the presence of a pulsed magnetic field. The time evaluation of the magnetization also has an effect on the domain wall resistance. The resistance depends on the contribution of the Zeeman and exchange interactions.

  16. Liquid first walls for magnetic fusion energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moir, R.W.

    1996-01-01

    Liquids (∼7 neutron mean free paths thick) with certain restrictions can probably be used in magnetic fusion designs between the burning plasma and the structural materials of the plant. If this works there are a number of profound advantages: lower the cost of electricity by more than 35%; remove the need to develop first wall materials saving over 4B$ in development costs; reduce the amount and kind of wastes generated in the plant; and permit a wider choice of materials. Evaporated liquid must be efficiently ionized in an edge plasma to prevent penetrating into the burning plasma and diminishing the burn rate. The fraction of evaporated material ionized is estimated to be 0.993 for Li, 0.98 for Flibe and 0.9999 for Li 17 Pb 83 . This ionized vapor would be swept along open field lines into a remote burial chamber. The most practical systems would be those with topological open field lines on the outer surface as is the case of a field reversed configuration (FRC), a Spheromak, a Z-pinch, or a mirror machine. In a Tokamak, including the Spherical Tokamak, the field lines outside the separatrix are restricted to a small volume inside the toroidal coil making for difficulties in introducing the liquid and removing the ionized vapor

  17. Magnetization reversal in ferromagnetic spirals via domain wall motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumm, Ryan D.; Kunz, Andrew

    2016-11-01

    Domain wall dynamics have been investigated in a variety of ferromagnetic nanostructures for potential applications in logic, sensing, and recording. We present a combination of analytic and simulated results describing the reliable field driven motion of a domain wall through the arms of a ferromagnetic spiral nanowire. The spiral geometry is capable of taking advantage of the benefits of both straight and circular wires. Measurements of the in-plane components of the spirals' magnetization can be used to determine the angular location of the domain wall, impacting the magnetoresistive applications dependent on the domain wall location. The spirals' magnetization components are found to depend on the spiral parameters: the initial radius and spacing between spiral arms, along with the domain wall location. The magnetization is independent of the parameters of the rotating field used to move the domain wall, and therefore the model is valid for current induced domain wall motion as well. The speed of the domain wall is found to depend on the frequency of the rotating driving field, and the domain wall speeds can be reliably varied over several orders of magnitude. We further demonstrate a technique capable of injecting multiple domain walls and show the reliable and unidirectional motion of domain walls through the arms of the spiral.

  18. Electromagnetic properties of inner double walled carbon nanotubes investigated by nuclear magnetic resonance

    KAUST Repository

    Bouhrara, M.; Abou-Hamad, E.; Alabedi, G.; Al-Taie, I.; Kim, Y.; Wagberg, T.; Goze-Bac, C.

    2013-01-01

    The nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analytical technique was used to investigate the double walled carbon nanotubes (DWNTs) electromagnetic properties of inner walls. The local magnetic and electronic properties of inner nanotubes in DWNTs were analyzed using 25% 13C enriched C 60 by which the effect of dipolar coupling could be minimized. The diamagnetic shielding was determined due to the ring currents on outer nanotubes in DWNTs. The NMR chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) spectra and spin-lattice relaxation studies reveal the metallic properties of the inner nanotubes with a signature of the spin-gap opening below 70 K.

  19. Hegemonic Shifts: The Latest from the Walls of Northern Ireland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tony Crowley

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This essay considers the changes that have taken place in the murals of Northern Ireland over the past decade or so. It will be argued that although there have been important developments in the murals that reflect the consolidation of ‘peace’ during this period, the walls also tell a different story.  It will be shown that, perhaps predictably, given the paralysis and stagnation that have characterised the power-sharing arrangements, and the disillusionment, cynicism and bitterness towards the political settlement which is now evident, a number of murals offer representations that indicate the growth of tendencies that present latent but real dangers.

  20. Domain wall motion in ferromagnetic systems with perpendicular magnetization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szambolics, H.; Toussaint, J.-Ch.; Marty, A.; Miron, I.M.; Buda-Prejbeanu, L.D.

    2009-01-01

    Although we lack clear experimental evidence, apparently out-of-plane magnetized systems are better suited for spintronic applications than the in-plane magnetized ones, mainly due to the smaller current densities required for achieving domain wall motion. [Co/Pt] multilayers belong to the first category of materials, the out-of-plane magnetization orientation arising from the strong perpendicular magnetocrystalline anisotropy. If the magnetization arranges itself out-of-plane narrow Bloch walls occur. In the present paper, both field and current-driven domain wall motion have been investigated for this system, using micromagnetic simulations. Three types of geometries have been taken into account: bulk, thin film and wire, and for all of them a full comparison is done between the effect of the applied field and injected current. The reduction of the system's dimension induces the decrease of the critical field and the critical current, but it does not influence the domain wall displacement mechanism.

  1. Walker-type velocity oscillations of magnetic domain walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vella-Coleiro, G.P.

    1976-01-01

    We report stroboscopic observations of the radial motion of a magnetic bubble domain wall in an epitaxial LuGdAl iron garnet film. At high drive fields, initial velocities up to 9500 cm/sec were measured, and the domain wall was observed to move backwards during the field pulse, in agreement with calculations based on the Walker model

  2. Effective slip for Stokes flow between two grooved walls with an arbitrary phase shift

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, Chiu-On, E-mail: cong@hku.hk [Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road (Hong Kong)

    2017-04-15

    This work aims to determine how the effective slip length for a wall-bounded flow may depend on, among other geometrical parameters, the phase shift between patterns on the two walls. An analytical model is developed for Stokes flow through a channel bounded by walls patterned with a regular array of rectangular ribs and grooves, where the patterns on the two walls can be misaligned by any phase shift. This study incorporates several previous studies as limiting or special cases. It is shown that the phase shift can have qualitatively different effects on the flow rate and effective slip length, depending on the flow direction. In a narrow channel, increasing the phase shift may mildly decrease the flow rate and effective slip length for flow parallel to the grooves, but can dramatically increase the flow rate and effective slip length for flow transverse to the grooves. It is found that unless the channel height is much larger than the period of the wall pattern, the effect due to wall confinement has to be taken into account on evaluating the effective slip lengths. (paper)

  3. Geometric Control Over the Motion of Magnetic Domain Walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    N.A. Sinitsyn; V.V. Dobrovitski; S. urazhdin; Avadh Saxena

    2008-01-01

    We propose a method that enables a precise control of magnetic patterns and relies only on the fundamental properties of the wire as well as on the choice of the path in the controlled parameter space but not on the rate of motion along this path. Possible experimental realizations of this mechanism are discussed. In particular, we show that the domain walls in magnetic nanowires can be translated by rotation of the magnetic easy axis or by applying pulses of magnetic field directed transverse to the magnetic easy axis

  4. Magnetic field exposure stiffens regenerating plant protoplast cell walls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haneda, Toshihiko; Fujimura, Yuu; Iino, Masaaki

    2006-02-01

    Single suspension-cultured plant cells (Catharanthus roseus) and their protoplasts were anchored to a glass plate and exposed to a magnetic field of 302 +/- 8 mT for several hours. Compression forces required to produce constant cell deformation were measured parallel to the magnetic field by means of a cantilever-type force sensor. Exposure of intact cells to the magnetic field did not result in any changes within experimental error, while exposure of regenerating protoplasts significantly increased the measured forces and stiffened regenerating protoplasts. The diameters of intact cells or regenerating protoplasts were not changed after exposure to the magnetic field. Measured forces for regenerating protoplasts with and without exposure to the magnetic field increased linearly with incubation time, with these forces being divided into components based on the elasticity of synthesized cell walls and cytoplasm. Cell wall synthesis was also measured using a cell wall-specific fluorescent dye, and no changes were noted after exposure to the magnetic field. Analysis suggested that exposure to the magnetic field roughly tripled the Young's modulus of the newly synthesized cell wall without any lag.

  5. Bound eigenstate dynamics under a sudden shift of the well's wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granot, Er'El; Marchewka, Avi

    2010-03-01

    We investigate the dynamics of the eigenstate of an infinite well under an abrupt shift of the well’s wall. It is shown that when the shift is small compared to the initial well’s dimensions, the short-time behavior changes from the well-known t3/2 behavior to t1/2. It is also shown that the complete dynamical picture converges to a universal function, which has fractal structure with dimensionality D=1.25.

  6. Bound eigenstate dynamics under a sudden shift of the well's wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Granot, Er'el; Marchewka, Avi

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the dynamics of the eigenstate of an infinite well under an abrupt shift of the well's wall. It is shown that when the shift is small compared to the initial well's dimensions, the short-time behavior changes from the well-known t 3/2 behavior to t 1/2 . It is also shown that the complete dynamical picture converges to a universal function, which has fractal structure with dimensionality D=1.25.

  7. Induced Magnetic Moment in Defected Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Hong

    2006-01-01

    The existence of a large induced magnetic moment in defect single-walled carbon nanotube(SWNT) is predicted using the Green's function method. Specific to this magnetic moment of defect SWNT is its magnitude which is several orders of magnitude larger than that of perfect SWNT. The induced magnetic moment also shows certain remarkable features. Therefore, we suggest that two pair-defect orientations in SWNT can be distinguished in experiment through the direction of the induced magnetic moment at some Specific energy points

  8. High-frequency domain wall excitations in magnetic garnet films with in-plane magnetization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Synogach, V.T.; Doetsch, H.

    1996-01-01

    Magnetic garnet films of compositions (YBi) 3 Fe 5 O 12 and (LuBi) 3 Fe 5 O 12 are grown by liquid-phase epitaxy on [110]- and [100]-oriented substrates of gadolinium gallium garnet, respectively. All films have in-plane magnetization. 180 degree and 90 degree domain walls in these films are studied by microwave technique. In addition to the known low-frequency mode of wall translation new multiple resonant modes of both 90 degree and 180 degree domain walls with very small linewidth (4.2 MHz) are observed at frequencies near 1 GHz. Resonances are effectively excited by an rf magnetic field which is parallel or perpendicular to the wall plane. Resonance frequencies are shown to have nonlinear dispersion dependence on the mode number: they decrease with increasing in-plane magnetic field normal to the wall plane. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  9. Permanent Magnetic System Design for the Wall-Climbing Robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Shen

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the design and analysis of the permanent magnetic system for a wall-climbing robot with permanent magnetic tracks. Based on the behaviour of gecko lizards, the architecture of the robot was designed and built, including the structure of the adhesion mechanism, the mechanical architecture and the anti-toppling mechanism. The permanent magnetic adhesion mechanism and the tracked locomotion mechanism were employed in this kind of wall-climbing robot. Through static and dynamic force analysis of the robot under different situations, design requirements for the adhesion mechanism were derived. Two different types of structures were put forward for the permanent magnetic units and are further discussed in this paper. These two types of structures are also analysed in detail. In addition, a finite-element method was used to verify the results of magnetic units. Finally, two wall-climbing robots, equipped with different magnetic systems described previously, are explained and their applications are discussed in this paper.

  10. Domain wall propagation tuning in magnetic nanowires through geometric modulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arzuza, L.C.C., E-mail: luisarzuza179@gmail.com [Instituto de Física Gleb Wataghin, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, 13083-859 Campinas (SP) (Brazil); Universidad de la Costa, Departamento de Ciencias Naturales y Exactas, Calle 58 No. 55-66, Barranquilla (Colombia); López-Ruiz, R. [Instituto de Física Gleb Wataghin, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, 13083-859 Campinas (SP) (Brazil); Salazar-Aravena, D. [Instituto de Física Gleb Wataghin, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, 13083-859 Campinas (SP) (Brazil); Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Tarapacá, 1000007 Arica (Chile); Knobel, M. [Instituto de Física Gleb Wataghin, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, 13083-859 Campinas (SP) (Brazil); Brazilian Nanotechnology National Laboratory, Centro Nacional de Pesquisa em Energia e Materiais (CNPEM), 13083-970 Campinas (SP) (Brazil); Béron, F.; Pirota, K.R. [Instituto de Física Gleb Wataghin, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, 13083-859 Campinas (SP) (Brazil)

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • The modulated nanowires dynamics occurs through two reversal modes. • Modulated nanowires show a change in the χ in contrast to homogeneous ones. • The FORC method reveals a non-uniform stray field due to shape modulation. - Abstract: The magnetic behavior of nickel modulated nanowires embedded in porous alumina membranes is investigated. Their diameters exhibit a sharp transition between below (35 nm) and above (52 nm) the theoretical limit for transverse and vortex domain walls. Magnetic hysteresis loops and first-order reversal curves (FORCs) were measured on several ordered nanowire arrays with different wide-narrow segment lengths ratio and compared with those from homogenous nanowires. The experimental magnetic response evidences a rather complex susceptibility behavior for nanowires with modulated diameter. Micromagnetic simulations on isolated and first-neighbors arrays of nanowires show that the domain wall structure, which depends on the segment diameter, suffers a transformation while crossing the diameter modulation, but without any pinning. The experimental array magnetic behavior can be ascribed to a heterogeneous stray field induced by the diameter modulation, yielding a stronger interaction field at the wide extremity than at the narrow one. The results evidence the possibility to control the domain wall propagation and morphology by modulating the lateral aspect of the magnetic entity.

  11. Non-volatile polarization switch of magnetic domain wall velocity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Z.; Stolichnov, I.; Setter, N. [Ceramics Laboratory, EPFL-Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Lausanne 1015 (Switzerland); Bernand-Mantel, A.; Schott, Marine; Pizzini, S.; Ranno, L. [University of Grenoble Alpes, Institut Néel, F-38042 Grenoble (France); CNRS, Institut Néel, F-38042 Grenoble (France); Auffret, S.; Gaudin, G. [SPINTEC, UMR-8191, CEA/CNRS/UJF/GINP, INAC, F-38054 Grenoble (France)

    2015-12-21

    Controlled propagation speed of individual magnetic domains in metal channels at the room temperature is obtained via the non-volatile field effect associated with the switchable polarization of P(VDF-TrFE) (polyvinylidene fluoride-trifluoroethylene) ferroelectric polymer. Polarization domains directly written using conducting atomic force microscope probe locally accelerate/decelerate the magnetic domains in the 0.6 nm thick Co film. The change of the magnetic domain wall velocity is consistent with the magnetic anisotropy energy modulation through the polarization upward/downward orientation. Excellent retention is observed. The demonstrated local non-destructive and reversible change of magnetic properties via rewritable patterning of ferroelectric domains could be attractive for exploring the ultimate limit of miniaturization in devices based on ferromagnetic/ferroelectric bilayers.

  12. Electric-field control of magnetic domain-wall velocity in ultrathin cobalt with perpendicular magnetization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiba, D; Kawaguchi, M; Fukami, S; Ishiwata, N; Shimamura, K; Kobayashi, K; Ono, T

    2012-06-06

    Controlling the displacement of a magnetic domain wall is potentially useful for information processing in magnetic non-volatile memories and logic devices. A magnetic domain wall can be moved by applying an external magnetic field and/or electric current, and its velocity depends on their magnitudes. Here we show that the applying an electric field can change the velocity of a magnetic domain wall significantly. A field-effect device, consisting of a top-gate electrode, a dielectric insulator layer, and a wire-shaped ferromagnetic Co/Pt thin layer with perpendicular anisotropy, was used to observe it in a finite magnetic field. We found that the application of the electric fields in the range of ± 2-3 MV cm(-1) can change the magnetic domain wall velocity in its creep regime (10(6)-10(3) m s(-1)) by more than an order of magnitude. This significant change is due to electrical modulation of the energy barrier for the magnetic domain wall motion.

  13. Magneto-optical study of domain wall dynamics and giant Barkhausen jump in magnetic microwires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chizhik, A.; Zhukov, A.; Blanco, J.M.; Gonzalez, J.

    2012-01-01

    Investigation of surface domain walls motion in Co-rich magnetic microwires has been performed in circular and axial magnetic fields. The dc axial magnetic field acceleration of the domain wall motion related to the influence of the axial field on the structure of the moving domain wall has been discovered. Pulsed axial magnetic field induced unidirectional motion of surface domain wall also has been found.

  14. Computational study of the shift of the G band of double-walled carbon nanotubes due to interlayer interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, Valentin N.; Levshov, Dmitry I.; Sauvajol, Jean-Louis; Paillet, Matthieu

    2018-04-01

    The interactions between the layers of double-walled carbon nanotubes induce a measurable shift of the G bands relative to the isolated layers. While experimental data on this shift in freestanding double-walled carbon nanotubes has been reported in the past several years, a comprehensive theoretical description of the observed shift is still lacking. The prediction of this shift is important for supporting the assignment of the measured double-walled nanotubes to particular nanotube types. Here, we report a computational study of the G-band shift as a function of the semiconducting inner layer radius and interlayer separation. We find that with increasing interlayer separation, the G band shift decreases, passes through zero and becomes negative, and further increases in absolute value for the wide range of considered inner layer radii. The theoretical predictions are shown to agree with the available experimental data within the experimental uncertainty.

  15. Domain-wall dynamics in glass-coated magnetic microwires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varga, R.; Zhukov, A.; Usov, N.; Blanco, J.M.; Gonzalez, J.; Zhukova, V.; Vojtanik, P.

    2007-01-01

    Glass-coated magnetic microwires with positive magnetostriction show peculiar domain structure that consists mostly of one large domain with magnetization-oriented axially. It was shown that small closure domains appear at the end of the microwire in order to decrease the stray fields. As a result of such domain structure, the magnetization reversal in axial direction runs through the depinning of one of such closure domains and subsequent propagation of the corresponding domain wall. Quite unusual domain-wall (DW) dynamics of the DW propagation predicted previously from the theory has been found in such amorphous microwires. In this paper, we are dealing with the DW dynamics of glass-coated microwires with small positive magnetostriction. The DW damping coming from the structural relaxation dominates at low temperatures as a result of the decrease of the mobility of the structural atomic-level defects. Negative critical propagation field points to the possible DW propagation without applied magnetic field. Probable explanation could be in terms of the effective mass of the DW

  16. Mass ablation and magnetic flux losses through a magnetized plasma-liner wall interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Rubio, F.; Sanz, J.

    2017-07-01

    The understanding of energy and magnetic flux losses in a magnetized plasma medium confined by a cold wall is of great interest in the success of magnetized liner inertial fusion (MagLIF). In a MagLIF scheme, the fuel is magnetized and subsonically compressed by a cylindrical liner. Magnetic flux conservation is degraded by the presence of gradient-driven transport processes such as thermoelectric effects (Nernst) and magnetic field diffusion. In previous publications [Velikovich et al., Phys. Plasmas 22, 042702 (2015)], the evolution of a hot magnetized plasma in contact with a cold solid wall (liner) was studied using the classical collisional Braginskii's plasma transport equations in one dimension. The Nernst term degraded the magnetic flux conservation, while both thermal energy and magnetic flux losses were reduced with the electron Hall parameter ωeτe with a power-law asymptotic scaling (ωeτe)-1/2. In the analysis made in the present paper, we consider a similar situation, but with the liner being treated differently. Instead of a cold solid wall acting as a heat sink, we model the liner as a cold dense plasma with low thermal conduction (that could represent the cryogenic fuel layer added on the inner surface of the liner in a high-gain MagLIF configuration). Mass ablation comes into play, which adds notably differences to the previous analysis. The direction of the plasma motion is inverted, but the Nernst term still convects the magnetic field towards the liner. Magnetization suppresses the Nernst velocity and improves the magnetic flux conservation. Thermal energy in the hot plasma is lost in heating the ablated material. When the electron Hall parameter is large, mass ablation scales as (ωeτe)-3/10, while both the energy and magnetic flux losses are reduced with a power-law asymptotic scaling (ωeτe)-7/10.

  17. Magnetic hysteresis and domain wall dynamics in single chain magnets with antiferromagnetic interchain coupling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bukharov, A A; Ovchinnikov, A S; Baranov, N V [Department of Physics, Ural State University, Ekaterinburg, 620083 (Russian Federation); Inoue, K [Institute for Advanced Materials Research, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan)

    2010-11-03

    Using Monte Carlo simulations we investigate magnetic hysteresis in two- and three-dimensional systems of weakly antiferromagnetically coupled spin chains based on a scenario of domain wall (kink) motion within the chains. By adapting the model of walkers to simulate the domain wall dynamics and using the Ising-like dipole-dipole model, we study the effects of interchain coupling, temperature and anisotropy axis direction on hysteresis curves.

  18. Bladder wall thickness mapping for magnetic resonance cystography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Yang; Liang Zhengrong; Zhu Hongbin; Han Hao; Yan Zengmin; Duan Chaijie; Lu Hongbing; Gu Xianfeng

    2013-01-01

    Clinical studies have shown evidence that the bladder wall thickness is an effective biomarker for bladder abnormalities. Clinical optical cystoscopy, the current gold standard, cannot show the wall thickness. The use of ultrasound by experts may generate some local thickness information, but the information is limited in field-of-view and is user dependent. Recent advances in magnetic resonance (MR) imaging technologies lead MR-based virtual cystoscopy or MR cystography toward a potential alternative to map the wall thickness for the entire bladder. From a high-resolution structural MR volumetric image of the abdomen, a reasonable segmentation of the inner and outer borders of the bladder wall can be achievable. Starting from here, this paper reviews the limitation of a previous distance field-based approach of measuring the thickness between the two borders and then provides a solution to overcome the limitation by an electric field-based strategy. In addition, this paper further investigates a surface-fitting strategy to minimize the discretization errors on the voxel-like borders and facilitate the thickness mapping on the three-dimensional patient-specific bladder model. The presented thickness calculation and mapping were tested on both phantom and human subject datasets. The results are preliminary but very promising with a noticeable improvement over the previous distance field-based approach. (paper)

  19. Modulated Magnetic Nanowires for Controlling Domain Wall Motion: Toward 3D Magnetic Memories

    KAUST Repository

    Ivanov, Yurii P.; Chuvilin, Andrey; Lopatin, Sergei; Kosel, Jü rgen

    2016-01-01

    Cylindrical magnetic nanowires are attractive materials for next generation data storage devices owing to the theoretically achievable high domain wall velocity and their efficient fabrication in highly dense arrays. In order to obtain control over domain wall motion, reliable and well-defined pinning sites are required. Here, we show that modulated nanowires consisting of alternating nickel and cobalt sections facilitate efficient domain wall pinning at the interfaces of those sections. By combining electron holography with micromagnetic simulations, the pinning effect can be explained by the interaction of the stray fields generated at the interface and the domain wall. Utilizing a modified differential phase contrast imaging, we visualized the pinned domain wall with a high resolution, revealing its three-dimensional vortex structure with the previously predicted Bloch point at its center. These findings suggest the potential of modulated nanowires for the development of high-density, three-dimensional data storage devices. © 2016 American Chemical Society.

  20. Modulated Magnetic Nanowires for Controlling Domain Wall Motion: Toward 3D Magnetic Memories

    KAUST Repository

    Ivanov, Yurii P.

    2016-05-03

    Cylindrical magnetic nanowires are attractive materials for next generation data storage devices owing to the theoretically achievable high domain wall velocity and their efficient fabrication in highly dense arrays. In order to obtain control over domain wall motion, reliable and well-defined pinning sites are required. Here, we show that modulated nanowires consisting of alternating nickel and cobalt sections facilitate efficient domain wall pinning at the interfaces of those sections. By combining electron holography with micromagnetic simulations, the pinning effect can be explained by the interaction of the stray fields generated at the interface and the domain wall. Utilizing a modified differential phase contrast imaging, we visualized the pinned domain wall with a high resolution, revealing its three-dimensional vortex structure with the previously predicted Bloch point at its center. These findings suggest the potential of modulated nanowires for the development of high-density, three-dimensional data storage devices. © 2016 American Chemical Society.

  1. Interplay of domain walls and magnetization rotation on dynamic magnetization process in iron/polymer–matrix soft magnetic composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobák, Samuel, E-mail: samuel.dobak@student.upjs.sk [Institute of Physics, Faculty of Science, Pavol Jozef Šafárik University, Park Angelinum 9, 041 54 Košice (Slovakia); Füzer, Ján; Kollár, Peter [Institute of Physics, Faculty of Science, Pavol Jozef Šafárik University, Park Angelinum 9, 041 54 Košice (Slovakia); Fáberová, Mária; Bureš, Radovan [Institute of Materials Research, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Watsonova 47, 043 53 Košice (Slovakia)

    2017-03-15

    This study sheds light on the dynamic magnetization process in iron/resin soft magnetic composites from the viewpoint of quantitative decomposition of their complex permeability spectra into the viscous domain wall motion and magnetization rotation. We present a comprehensive view on this phenomenon over the broad family of samples with different average particles dimension and dielectric matrix content. The results reveal the pure relaxation nature of magnetization processes without observation of spin resonance. The smaller particles and higher amount of insulating resin result in the prevalence of rotations over domain wall movement. The findings are elucidated in terms of demagnetizing effects rising from the heterogeneity of composite materials. - Highlights: • A first decomposition of complex permeability into domain wall and rotation parts in soft magnetic composites. • A pure relaxation nature of dynamic magnetization processes. • A complete loss separation in soft magnetic composites. • The domain walls activity is considerably suppressed in composites with smaller iron particles and higher matrix content. • The demagnetizing field acts as a significant factor at the dynamic magnetization process.

  2. First-wall design limitations for linear magnetic fusion (LMF) reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gryczkowski, G.E.; Krakowski, R.A.; Steinhauer, L.C.; Zumdieck, J.

    1978-01-01

    One approach to the endloss problem in linear magnetic fusion (LMF) uses high magnetic field to reduce the required confinement time. This approach is limited by magnet stresses and bremsstrahlung heating of the first wall; the first-wall thermal-pulsing issue is addressed. Pertinent thermophysical parameters are developed in the context of high-field LMF to identify promising first-wall materials, and thermal fatigue experiments relevant to LMF first walls are reviewed. High-flux first-wall concepts are described which include both solid and evaporating first-wall configurations

  3. Magnetization reversal of the transverse domain wall confined between two clusters of magnetic impurities in a ferromagnetic planar nanowire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toscano, D., E-mail: danilotoscano@fisica.ufjf.br [Departamento de Física, Laboratório de Simulação Computacional, Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, Juiz de Fora, Minas Gerais 36036–330 (Brazil); Leonel, S.A., E-mail: sidiney@fisica.ufjf.br [Departamento de Física, Laboratório de Simulação Computacional, Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, Juiz de Fora, Minas Gerais 36036–330 (Brazil); Coura, P.Z., E-mail: pablo@fisica.ufjf.br [Departamento de Física, Laboratório de Simulação Computacional, Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, Juiz de Fora, Minas Gerais 36036–330 (Brazil); Sato, F., E-mail: sjfsato@fisica.ufjf.br [Departamento de Física, Laboratório de Simulação Computacional, Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, Juiz de Fora, Minas Gerais 36036–330 (Brazil); Costa, B.V., E-mail: bvc@fisica.ufmg.br [Departamento de Física, Laboratório de Simulação, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais 30123–970 (Brazil); Vázquez, M., E-mail: mvazquez@icmm.csic.es [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, CSIC. 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2016-12-01

    Numerical simulations have been used to investigate the polarity reversal of the transverse domain wall in rectangular magnetic nanowires and the stabilization of the domain wall position after occurring the polarity reversal. In order to control the wall position we have considered two clusters of magnetic impurities, identical and equidistant from the nanowire width axis. Traps of pinning and blocking for the transverse domain wall can be originated from magnetic impurities, consisting of a local variation of the exchange constant. Under suitable excitation amplitudes it is possible to switch the polarity of the transverse domain wall by applying a nanosecond axial magnetic field pulse in a fast and controllable way. - Highlights: • Traps for pinning and blocking transverse domain walls are proposed. • The traps consisting of localized modifications of the magnetic properties. • The wall polarity can be reversed in a fast and controllable way.

  4. LiWall Fusion - The New Concept of Magnetic Fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakharov, L.E.

    2011-01-01

    Utilization of the outstanding abilities of a liquid lithium layer in pumping hydrogen isotopes leads to a new approach to magnetic fusion, called the LiWall Fusion. It relies on innovative plasma regimes with low edge density and high temperature. The approach combines fueling the plasma by neutral injection beams with the best possible elimination of outside neutral gas sources, which cools down the plasma edge. Prevention of cooling the plasma edge suppresses the dominant, temperature gradient related turbulence in the core. Such an approach is much more suitable for controlled fusion than the present practice, relying on high heating power for compensating essentially unlimited turbulent energy losses.

  5. Domain walls in (Ga,Mn)As diluted magnetic semiconductor

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sugawara, A.; Kasai, H.; Tonomura, A.; Brown, P.D.; Campion, R. P.; Edmonds, K. W.; Gallagher, B. L.; Zemen, Jan; Jungwirth, Tomáš

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 100, č. 4 (2008), 047202/1-047202/4 ISSN 0031-9007 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC510; GA ČR GEFON/06/E002; GA ČR GA202/05/0575; GA ČR GA202/04/1519 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 015728 - NANOSPIN Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : dilute ferromagnetic semiconductor * Néel domain walls * electron holography * Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert simulation Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 7.180, year: 2008

  6. General planar transverse domain walls realized by optimized transverse magnetic field pulses in magnetic biaxial nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mei; Wang, Jianbo; Lu, Jie

    2017-02-01

    The statics and field-driven dynamics of transverse domain walls (TDWs) in magnetic nanowires (NWs) have attracted continuous interests because of their theoretical significance and application potential in future magnetic logic and memory devices. Recent results demonstrate that uniform transverse magnetic fields (TMFs) can greatly enhance the wall velocity, meantime leave a twisting in the TDW azimuthal distribution. For application in high-density NW devices, it is preferable to erase the twisting so as to minimize magnetization frustrations. Here we report the realization of a completely planar TDW with arbitrary tilting attitude in a magnetic biaxial NW under a TMF pulse with fixed strength and well-designed orientation profile. We smooth any twisting in the TDW azimuthal plane thus completely decouple the polar and azimuthal degrees of freedom. The analytical differential equation describing the polar angle distribution is derived and the resulting solution is not the Walker-ansatz form. With this TMF pulse comoving, the field-driven dynamics of the planar TDW is investigated with the help of the asymptotic expansion method. It turns out the comoving TMF pulse increases the wall velocity under the same axial driving field. These results will help to design a series of modern magnetic devices based on planar TDWs.

  7. Magnetic hysteresis scaling in thulium: Implication of irreversibility-related scaling for soliton wall motion in an Ising system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Satoru

    2013-01-01

    We report low-field magnetic hysteresis scaling in thulium with strong uniaxial anisotropy. A power-law hysteresis scaling with an exponent of 1.13±0.02 is found between hysteresis loss and remanent flux density of minor loops in the low-temperature ferrimagnetic phase. This exponent value is slightly lower than 1.25–1.4 observed previously for ferromagnets and helimagnets. Unlike spiral and/or Bloch walls with a finite transition width, typical for Dy, Tb, and Ho with planar anisotropy, a soliton wall with a sudden phase shift between neighboring domains may dominate in Tm due to its Ising-like character. The observations imply the presence of universality class of hysteresis scaling that depends on the type of magnetic anisotropy. - Highlights: ► We observe magnetic hysteresis scaling in thulium with a power law exponent of 1.13. ► Irreversibility of soliton walls dominates owing to its strong uniaxial anisotropy. ► The exponent is lower than those for Bloch wall and spiral wall. ► The results imply the presence of universality class that depends on the wall type.

  8. Magnetic domain-wall tilting due to domain-wall speed asymmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dae-Yun; Park, Min-Ho; Park, Yong-Keun; Kim, Joo-Sung; Nam, Yoon-Seok; Hwang, Hyun-Seok; Kim, Duck-Ho; Je, Soong-Geun; Min, Byoung-Chul; Choe, Sug-Bong

    2018-04-01

    Broken symmetries in diverse systems generate a number of intriguing phenomena and the analysis on such broken symmetries often provides decisive clues for exploring underlying physics in the systems. Recently, in magnetic thin-film systems, the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI)—induced by the broken symmetry of structural inversion—accounts for various chiral phenomena, which are of timely issues in spintronics. Here, we report an experimental observation on unexpected tilting of magnetic domain walls (DWs) due to the broken symmetry under the application of the magnetic field transverse to the magnetic wire systems. It has been predicted that the DMI possibly causes such DW tilting in the direction of the energy minimization. However, very interestingly, experimental observation reveals that the DW tilting does not follow the prediction based on the energy minimization, even for the tilting direction. Instead, the DW tilting is governed by the DW speed asymmetry that is initiated by the DW pinning at wire edges. A simple analytic model is proposed in consideration of the DW speed asymmetry at wire edges, which successfully explains the experimental observation of the DW tilting directions and angles, as confirmed by numerical simulation. The present study manifests the decisive role of the DW pinning with the DW speed asymmetry, which determines the DW configuration and consequently, the dynamics.

  9. Magnetic domain wall motion in notch patterned permalloy nanowire devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Ting-Chieh; Kuo, Cheng-Yi; Mishra, Amit K.; Das, Bipul; Wu, Jong-Ching, E-mail: phjcwu@cc.ncue.edu.tw

    2015-11-01

    We report a study of magnetization reversal process of notch-patterned permalloy (Py) nanowires (NWs) by using an in-situ magnetic force microscopy (MFM). Three neighboring straight NWs and an individual straight NW with discs connected to the wires ends are fabricated by standard electron beam lithography through a lift-off technique. MFM images are taken in the presence of an in-plane magnetic field applied along the wires length. As a result, the nucleation, pinning and depinning of domain walls (DWs) along the NW are observed. The artificial constraints (notch) in such symmetrical geometry of NWs indeed serve as pinning sites to pin the DWs. The nature of magnetization reversal, pinning field and depinning field for the DWs that are observed in these permalloy NWs, indicate the key roles of notch depth, the terminal connection structure of NW end and the inter-wire interaction among the NWs. The in-situ MFM measurements are examined with the micromagnetic simulations. Consequently, good agreements are obtained for the DW structures and the effect of DWs pining/depinning, however a dissimilarity in experimental and simulation observations for the direction of propagation of DWs in NWs needs further investigation.

  10. Molecular magnetic resonance imaging of atherosclerotic vessel wall disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noerenberg, Dominik [Charite - University Medicine Berlin, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); University of Munich - Grosshadern, Department of Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany); Ebersberger, Hans U. [Heart Center Munich-Bogenhausen, Department of Cardiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Munich (Germany); Diederichs, Gerd; Hamm, Bernd [Charite - University Medicine Berlin, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); Botnar, Rene M. [King' s College London, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, London (United Kingdom); Makowski, Marcus R. [Charite - University Medicine Berlin, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); King' s College London, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, London (United Kingdom)

    2016-03-15

    Molecular imaging aims to improve the identification and characterization of pathological processes in vivo by visualizing the underlying biological mechanisms. Molecular imaging techniques are increasingly used to assess vascular inflammation, remodeling, cell migration, angioneogenesis and apoptosis. In cardiovascular diseases, molecular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers new insights into the in vivo biology of pathological vessel wall processes of the coronary and carotid arteries and the aorta. This includes detection of early vascular changes preceding plaque development, visualization of unstable plaques and assessment of response to therapy. The current review focuses on recent developments in the field of molecular MRI to characterise different stages of atherosclerotic vessel wall disease. A variety of molecular MR-probes have been developed to improve the non-invasive detection and characterization of atherosclerotic plaques. Specifically targeted molecular probes allow for the visualization of key biological steps in the cascade leading to the development of arterial vessel wall lesions. Early detection of processes which lead to the development of atherosclerosis and the identification of vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques may enable the early assessment of response to therapy, improve therapy planning, foster the prevention of cardiovascular events and may open the door for the development of patient-specific treatment strategies. (orig.)

  11. Molecular magnetic resonance imaging of atherosclerotic vessel wall disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noerenberg, Dominik; Ebersberger, Hans U.; Diederichs, Gerd; Hamm, Bernd; Botnar, Rene M.; Makowski, Marcus R.

    2016-01-01

    Molecular imaging aims to improve the identification and characterization of pathological processes in vivo by visualizing the underlying biological mechanisms. Molecular imaging techniques are increasingly used to assess vascular inflammation, remodeling, cell migration, angioneogenesis and apoptosis. In cardiovascular diseases, molecular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers new insights into the in vivo biology of pathological vessel wall processes of the coronary and carotid arteries and the aorta. This includes detection of early vascular changes preceding plaque development, visualization of unstable plaques and assessment of response to therapy. The current review focuses on recent developments in the field of molecular MRI to characterise different stages of atherosclerotic vessel wall disease. A variety of molecular MR-probes have been developed to improve the non-invasive detection and characterization of atherosclerotic plaques. Specifically targeted molecular probes allow for the visualization of key biological steps in the cascade leading to the development of arterial vessel wall lesions. Early detection of processes which lead to the development of atherosclerosis and the identification of vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques may enable the early assessment of response to therapy, improve therapy planning, foster the prevention of cardiovascular events and may open the door for the development of patient-specific treatment strategies. (orig.)

  12. On-Chip Manipulation of Protein-Coated Magnetic Beads via Domain-Wall Conduits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Donolato, Marco; Vavassori, Paolo; Gobbi, Marco

    2010-01-01

    Geometrically constrained magnetic domain walls (DWs) in magnetic nanowires can be manipulated at the nanometer scale. The inhomogeneous magnetic stray field generated by a DW can capture a magnetic nanoparticle in solution. On-chip nanomanipulation of individual magnetic beads coated with proteins...

  13. Magnet Fall inside a Conductive Pipe: Motion and the Role of the Pipe Wall Thickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donoso, G.; Ladera, C. L.; Martin, P.

    2009-01-01

    Theoretical models and experimental results are presented for the retarded fall of a strong magnet inside a vertical conductive non-magnetic tube. Predictions and experimental results are in good agreement modelling the magnet as a simple magnetic dipole. The effect of varying the pipe wall thickness on the retarding magnetic drag is studied for…

  14. Spin Hall driven domain wall motion in magnetic bilayers coupled by a magnetic oxide interlayer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Furuta, Masaki; Zhu, Jian-Gang Jimmy

    2018-05-01

    mCell, previously proposed by our group, is a four-terminal magnetoresistive device with isolated write- and read-paths for all-spin logic and memory applications. A mCell requires an electric-insulating magnetic layer to couple the spin Hall driven write-path to the magnetic free layer of the read-path. Both paths are magnetic layers with perpendicular anisotropy and their perpendicularly oriented magnetization needs to be maintained with this insertion layer. We have developed a magnetic oxide (FeOx) insertion layer to serve for these purposes. We show that the FeOx insertion layer provides sufficient magnetic coupling between adjacent perpendicular magnetic layers. Resistance measurement shows that this magnetic oxide layer can act as an electric-insulating layer. In addition, spin Hall driven domain wall motion in magnetic bi-layers coupled by the FeOx insertion layer is significantly enhanced compared to that in magnetic single layer; it also requires low voltage threshold that poses possibility for power-efficient device applications.

  15. Substrate Shift Reveals Roles for Members of Bacterial Consortia in Degradation of Plant Cell Wall Polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlos, Camila; Fan, Huan; Currie, Cameron R

    2018-01-01

    Deconstructing the intricate matrix of cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin poses a major challenge in biofuel production. In diverse environments in nature, some microbial communities, are able to overcome plant biomass recalcitrance. Identifying key degraders of each component of plant cell wall can help improve biological degradation of plant feedstock. Here, we sequenced the metagenome of lignocellulose-adapted microbial consortia sub-cultured on xylan and alkali lignin media. We observed a drastic shift on community composition after sub-culturing, independently of the original consortia. Proteobacteria relative abundance increased after growth in alkali lignin medium, while Bacteroidetes abundance increased after growth in xylan medium. At the genus level, Pseudomonas was more abundant in the communities growing on alkali lignin, Sphingobacterium in the communities growing on xylan and Cellulomonas abundance was the highest in the original microbial consortia. We also observed functional convergence of microbial communities after incubation in alkali lignin, due to an enrichment of genes involved in benzoate degradation and catechol ortho-cleavage pathways. Our results represent an important step toward the elucidation of key members of microbial communities on lignocellulose degradation and may aide the design of novel lignocellulolytic microbial consortia that are able to efficiently degrade plant cell wall polymers.

  16. Substrate Shift Reveals Roles for Members of Bacterial Consortia in Degradation of Plant Cell Wall Polymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Carlos

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Deconstructing the intricate matrix of cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin poses a major challenge in biofuel production. In diverse environments in nature, some microbial communities, are able to overcome plant biomass recalcitrance. Identifying key degraders of each component of plant cell wall can help improve biological degradation of plant feedstock. Here, we sequenced the metagenome of lignocellulose-adapted microbial consortia sub-cultured on xylan and alkali lignin media. We observed a drastic shift on community composition after sub-culturing, independently of the original consortia. Proteobacteria relative abundance increased after growth in alkali lignin medium, while Bacteroidetes abundance increased after growth in xylan medium. At the genus level, Pseudomonas was more abundant in the communities growing on alkali lignin, Sphingobacterium in the communities growing on xylan and Cellulomonas abundance was the highest in the original microbial consortia. We also observed functional convergence of microbial communities after incubation in alkali lignin, due to an enrichment of genes involved in benzoate degradation and catechol ortho-cleavage pathways. Our results represent an important step toward the elucidation of key members of microbial communities on lignocellulose degradation and may aide the design of novel lignocellulolytic microbial consortia that are able to efficiently degrade plant cell wall polymers.

  17. Structural anisotropy of magnetically aligned single wall carbon nanotube films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, B. W.; Benes, Z.; Luzzi, D. E.; Fischer, J. E.; Walters, D. A.; Casavant, M. J.; Schmidt, J.; Smalley, R. E.

    2000-01-01

    Thick films of aligned single wall carbon nanotubes and ropes have been produced by filtration/deposition from suspension in strong magnetic fields. We measured mosaic distributions of rope orientations in the film plane, for samples of different thicknesses. For an ∼1 μm film the full width at half maximum (FWHM) derived from electron diffraction is 25 degree sign -28 degree sign . The FWHM of a thicker film (∼7 μm) measured by x-ray diffraction is slightly broader, 35±3 degree sign . Aligned films are denser than ordinary filter-deposited ones, and much denser than as-grown material. Optimization of the process is expected to yield smaller FWHMs and higher densities. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics

  18. Light induced kickoff of magnetic domain walls in Ising chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogani, Lapo

    2012-02-01

    Controlling the speed at which systems evolve is a challenge shared by all disciplines, and otherwise unrelated areas use common theoretical frameworks towards this goal. A particularly widespread model is Glauber dynamics, which describes the time evolution of the Ising model and can be applied to any binary system. Here we show, using molecular nanowires under irradiation, that Glauber dynamics can be controlled by a novel domain-wall kickoff mechanism. Contrary to known processes, the kickoff has unambiguous fingerprints, slowing down the spin-flip attempt rate by several orders of magnitude, and following a scaling law. The required irradiation power is very low, a substantial improvement over present methods of magnetooptical switching: in our experimental demonstration we switched molecular nanowires with light, using powers thousands of times lower than in previous optical switching methods. This manipulation of stochastic dynamic processes is extremely clean, leading to fingerprint signatures and scaling laws. These observations can be used, in material science, to better study domain-wall displacements and solitons in discrete lattices. These results provide a new way to control and study stochastic dynamic processes. Being general for Glauber dynamics, they can be extended to different kinds of magnetic nanowires and to a myriad of fields, ranging from social evolution to neural networks and chemical reactivity. For nanoelectronics and molecular spintronics the kickoff affords external control of molecular spin-valves and a magnetic fingerprint in single molecule measurements. It can also be applied to the dynamics of mechanical switches and the related study of phasons and order-disorder transitions.

  19. Magnet fall inside a conductive pipe: motion and the role of the pipe wall thickness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donoso, G; Ladera, C L; Martin, P [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Simon BolIvar, Apdo. 89000, Caracas 1080 (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of)], E-mail: clladera@usb.ve, E-mail: pmartin@usb.ve

    2009-07-15

    Theoretical models and experimental results are presented for the retarded fall of a strong magnet inside a vertical conductive non-magnetic tube. Predictions and experimental results are in good agreement modelling the magnet as a simple magnetic dipole. The effect of varying the pipe wall thickness on the retarding magnetic drag is studied for pipes of different materials. Conductive pipes of thinner walls produce less dragging force and the retarded fall of the magnet is seen to consist of an initial transient accelerated regime followed by a stage of uniform motion. Alternative models of the magnet field are also presented that improve the agreement between theory and experiments.

  20. Magnetic field control of 90°, 180°, and 360° domain wall resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majidi, Roya

    2012-10-01

    In the present work, we have compared the resistance of the 90°, 180°, and 360° domain walls in the presence of external magnetic field. The calculations are based on the Boltzmann transport equation within the relaxation time approximation. One-dimensional Néel-type domain walls between two domains whose magnetization differs by angle of 90°, 180°, and 360° are considered. The results indicate that the resistance of the 360° DW is more considerable than that of the 90° and 180° DWs. It is also found that the domain wall resistance can be controlled by applying transverse magnetic field. Increasing the strength of the external magnetic field enhances the domain wall resistance. In providing spintronic devices based on magnetic nanomaterials, considering and controlling the effect of domain wall on resistivity are essential.

  1. Current-induced domain wall motion in magnetic nanowires with spatial variation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ieda, Jun'ichi; Sugishita, Hiroki; Maekawa, Sadamichi

    2010-01-01

    We model current-induced domain wall motion in magnetic nanowires with the variable width. Employing the collective coordinate method we trace the wall dynamics. The effect of the width modulation is implemented by spatial dependence of an effective magnetic field. The wall destination in the potential energy landscape due to the magnetic anisotropy and the spatial nonuniformity is obtained as a function of the current density. For a nanowire of a periodically modulated width, we identify three (pinned, nonlinear, and linear) current density regimes for current-induced wall motion. The threshold current densities depend on the pulse duration as well as the magnitude of wire modulation. In the nonlinear regime, application of ns order current pulses results in wall displacement which opposes or exceeds the prediction of the spin transfer mechanism. The finding explains stochastic nature of the domain wall displacement observed in recent experiments.

  2. Effects of magnetized walls on the particle structure and the yield stress of magnetorheological fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Jianfeng, E-mail: zhoujianfeng@njtech.edu.cn [School of Mechanical and Power Engineering, Nanjing Tech University, Nanjing 211816, Jiangsu (China); Mo, Jingwen [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Shao, Chunlei [School of Mechanical and Power Engineering, Nanjing Tech University, Nanjing 211816, Jiangsu (China); Li, Zhigang [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon (Hong Kong)

    2015-09-01

    In this work, we investigate the quasi-static shear deformation of magnetic particles (MPs) in a Couette flow of magnetorheological (MR) fluids through Stokesian dynamic simulations. The magnetized walls are modeled by a congregation of magnetic dipoles and their effects on the MPs are considered. The simple shear flow of the base fluid with linear velocity distribution is used to generate the shear deformation of the MP structure and the yield stresses under different shear rates are obtained. Comparing with the relatively long chains forming in base fluid without the effect of magnetized walls, the initial structure of MPs is mainly in the form of short chains due to the attractive force of walls. At the beginning of the shear deformation of the MP structure, the concentration of MPs near the walls is found. As the shear deformation develops, however, the chains concentrate at the center of the simulation domain and the MPs near wall boundaries are attracted to the center. The yield stress depends on the initial structure of MPs which is affected by the magnetized walls. It is revealed that the larger shear rate of base fluid results in the larger yield stress, and the effects of the magnetization intensity of the walls and their space distance on the yield stress are also investigated. - Highlights: • We model a Couette flow of magnetorheological fluid considering magnetized walls. • The walls are modeled by a congregation of magnetic dipoles. • Initial structure of MPs is remarkably affected by the walls, so is yield stress. • Larger base fluid shear rate causes the larger shear deformation and larger yield stress.

  3. Effects of magnetized walls on the particle structure and the yield stress of magnetorheological fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Jianfeng; Mo, Jingwen; Shao, Chunlei; Li, Zhigang

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we investigate the quasi-static shear deformation of magnetic particles (MPs) in a Couette flow of magnetorheological (MR) fluids through Stokesian dynamic simulations. The magnetized walls are modeled by a congregation of magnetic dipoles and their effects on the MPs are considered. The simple shear flow of the base fluid with linear velocity distribution is used to generate the shear deformation of the MP structure and the yield stresses under different shear rates are obtained. Comparing with the relatively long chains forming in base fluid without the effect of magnetized walls, the initial structure of MPs is mainly in the form of short chains due to the attractive force of walls. At the beginning of the shear deformation of the MP structure, the concentration of MPs near the walls is found. As the shear deformation develops, however, the chains concentrate at the center of the simulation domain and the MPs near wall boundaries are attracted to the center. The yield stress depends on the initial structure of MPs which is affected by the magnetized walls. It is revealed that the larger shear rate of base fluid results in the larger yield stress, and the effects of the magnetization intensity of the walls and their space distance on the yield stress are also investigated. - Highlights: • We model a Couette flow of magnetorheological fluid considering magnetized walls. • The walls are modeled by a congregation of magnetic dipoles. • Initial structure of MPs is remarkably affected by the walls, so is yield stress. • Larger base fluid shear rate causes the larger shear deformation and larger yield stress

  4. Numerical analysis of plasma-wall interaction for an oblique magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chodura, R.

    1982-01-01

    A numerical code is used to calculate energy and incidence angle of plasma ions and electrons impinging on an absorbing wall. Plasma particles coming from a plasma of given density and temperature traverse a transition layer with an electric space charge field perpendicular to the wall and a given magnetic field of arbitrary angle before being adsorbed in the wall. The 1d electrostatic particle code determines the electric field and the change of particle velocity distributions in the transition layer. When the incidence angle psi of the magnetic field is varied from 0 0 (normal) to 90 0 (tangential), the impact energies W of ions and electrons at the wall stay nearly unchanged. Electrons reach the wall according to an isotropic Maxwellian distribution except for large angles psi where only electrons travelling along the magnetic field have a chance to escape the plasma. Ions hit the wall at increasing angles theta for increasing psi. The incidence angle of cold ions (Tsub(i0) = 0) is always steeper than that of the magnetic field. For nearly grazing incidence angle of the magnetic field psi →90 0 the ion incidence angle theta becomes grazing as well. After the distribution function is determined the sputtering yield of wall incident ions is calculated for different magnetic field angles psi showing maximum yield for psi near to 90 0 . (orig.)

  5. Time-resolved magnetization dynamics of cross-tie domain walls in permalloy microstructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miguel, J; Kurde, J; Piantek, M; Kuch, W; Sanchez-Barriga, J; Heitkamp, B; Kronast, F; Duerr, H A; Bayer, D; Aeschlimann, M

    2009-01-01

    We report on a picosecond time-resolved x-ray magnetic circular dichroic-photoelectron emission microscopy study of the evolution of the magnetization components of a microstructured permalloy platelet comprising three cross-tie domain walls. A laser-excited photoswitch has been used to apply a triangular 80 Oe, 160 ps magnetic pulse. Micromagnetic calculations agree well with the experimental results, both in time and frequency, illustrating the large angle precession in the magnetic domains with magnetization perpendicular to the applied pulse, and showing how the magnetic vortices revert their core magnetization while the antivortices remain unaffected.

  6. Time-resolved magnetization dynamics of cross-tie domain walls in permalloy microstructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miguel, J; Kurde, J; Piantek, M; Kuch, W [Institut fuer Experimentalphysik, Freie Universitaet Berlin, Arnimallee 14, D-14195 Berlin (Germany); Sanchez-Barriga, J; Heitkamp, B; Kronast, F; Duerr, H A [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin fuer Materialien und Energie, Elektronenspeicherring BESSY II, Albert-Einstein-Strasse 15, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Bayer, D; Aeschlimann, M, E-mail: jorge.miguel@fu-berlin.d [Fachbereich Physik, Universitaet Kaiserslautern, Erwin-Schroedinger Strasse 46, D-67663 Kaiserslautern (Germany)

    2009-12-02

    We report on a picosecond time-resolved x-ray magnetic circular dichroic-photoelectron emission microscopy study of the evolution of the magnetization components of a microstructured permalloy platelet comprising three cross-tie domain walls. A laser-excited photoswitch has been used to apply a triangular 80 Oe, 160 ps magnetic pulse. Micromagnetic calculations agree well with the experimental results, both in time and frequency, illustrating the large angle precession in the magnetic domains with magnetization perpendicular to the applied pulse, and showing how the magnetic vortices revert their core magnetization while the antivortices remain unaffected.

  7. Altering critical depinning current via domain wall pile-up in magnetic nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geng, Liwei D.; Jin, Yongmei M.

    2015-01-01

    An important role of domain wall pile-up in current-driven domain wall depinning in magnetic nanowires is revealed using micromagnetic simulations. It is found that the critical current for domain wall depinning can be substantially reduced and conveniently tuned by controlling domain wall number in the pile-up at pinning site, in analogy to dislocation pile-up responsible for Hall–Petch effect in mechanical strength. Domain wall pinning and depinning at an s-shape bend is considered, and the effects of curvature and current crowding in magnetic circuit on domain wall behaviors are discussed. - Highlights: • Advance fundamental knowledge of current-driven domain wall phenomena. • Provide a novel approach to drastically reduce the critical depinning current. • Solve an outstanding problem of effective control of domain wall pinning/depinning. • Report appealing new findings of magnetic domain wall pile-up mechanism. • Overcome the limitations of materials properties for domain wall-based devices

  8. Effect of magnetic axis shift on neoclassical transport in helical torus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanuki, Heiji; Todoroki, Jiro

    2004-01-01

    Neoclassical transport for large helical device (LHD) configurations is studied by solving the bounce-averaged Fokker-Planck equation. Numerical code employed in the present paper (CHD1) is much faster and more efficient than existing transport codes. Effects of the magnetic axis shift on the mono-energetic transport coefficients are studied in detail for the LHD configurations, revealing that a strong inward shift of the magnetic axis can reduce remarkably the neoclassical ripple transport. (author)

  9. PHYSICAL BASES OF SYSTEMS CREATION FOR MAGNETIC-IMPULSIVE ATTRACTION OF THIN-WALLED SHEET METALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Batygin

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The work is dedicated to the physical base of systems creating for the thin-walled sheet metals magnetic pulse attraction. Some practical realization models of the author’s suggestions are represented.

  10. The plasma-wall transition layers in the presence of collisions with a magnetic field parallel to the wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moritz, J.; Faudot, E.; Devaux, S.; Heuraux, S.

    2018-01-01

    The plasma-wall transition is studied by means of a particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation in the configuration of a parallel to the wall magnetic field (B), with collisions between charged particles vs. neutral atoms taken into account. The investigated system consists of a plasma bounded by two absorbing walls separated by 200 electron Debye lengths (λd). The strength of the magnetic field is chosen such as the ratio λ d / r l , with rl being the electron Larmor radius, is smaller or larger than unity. Collisions are modelled with a simple operator that reorients randomly ion or electron velocity, keeping constant the total kinetic energy of both the neutral atom (target) and the incident charged particle. The PIC simulations show that the plasma-wall transition consists in a quasi-neutral region (pre-sheath), from the center of the plasma towards the walls, where the electric potential or electric field profiles are well described by an ambipolar diffusion model, and in a second region at the vicinity of the walls, called the sheath, where the quasi-neutrality breaks down. In this peculiar geometry of B and for a certain range of the mean-free-path, the sheath is found to be composed of two charged layers: the positive one, close to the walls, and the negative one, towards the plasma and before the neutral pre-sheath. Depending on the amplitude of B, the spatial variation of the electric potential can be non-monotonic and presents a maximum within the sheath region. More generally, the sheath extent as well as the potential drop within the sheath and the pre-sheath is studied with respect to B, the mean-free-path, and the ion and electron temperatures.

  11. Effects of Fast-Ion Injection on a Magnetized Sheath near a Floating Wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jiajia; Hu Zhanghu; Song Yuanhong; Wang Younian

    2013-01-01

    A fully kinetic particle-in-cell/Monte Carlo model is employed to self-consistently study the effects of fast-ion injection on sheath potential and electric field profile in collisional magnetized plasma with a floating absorbing wall. The influences of the fast-ion injection velocity and density, the magnetic field and angle θ 0 formed by the magnetic field and the x-axis on the sheath potential and electric field are discussed in detail. Numerical results show that increasing fast-ion injection density or decreasing injection velocity can enhance the potential drop and electric field in the sheath. Also, increasing the magnetic field strength can weaken the loss of charged particles to the wall and thus decrease the potential and electric field in the sheath. The time evolution of ion flux and velocity distribution on the wall is found to be significantly affected by the magnetic field.

  12. An Omni-Directional Wall-Climbing Microrobot with Magnetic Wheels Directly Integrated with Electromagnetic Micromotors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoning Tang

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an omni-directional wall-climbing microrobot with magnetic wheels. The integral design with an actuator and adhesive is realized by integrating stators and rotors of an MEMS-based electromagnetic micromotor with a magnetic wheel. The omni-directional wall-climbing mechanism is designed by a set of steering gears and three standard magnetic wheels. The required torque and magnetic force for microrobot movement are derived by its static analysis. The size of the magnetic wheel is optimized, with consideration of its own design constraints, by ANSOFT and Pro/Engineer simulation so as to reduce unnecessary torque consumption under the same designed load. Related experiments demonstrate that the microrobot (diameter: 26mm; height: 16.4; mass: 7.2g; load capacity: 3g we have developed has a good wall-climbing ability and flexible mobility, and it can perform visual detection in a ferromagnetic environment.

  13. Development of Vmax III. Magnetic wall climbing robot with holonomic and omni-directional mobility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuru, Kiyoshi; Hirose, Shigeo

    2012-01-01

    Wall-climbing robots having holonomic and omni-directional mobility would enhance the manipulation performance of the mounted arm and enable it to execute various tasks on the surface of large structures. This study focuses on the wall-climbing robots having permanent magnet attractive units to stick to the surface of iron structure such as atomic reactors and discuss the development of a specific holonomic and omni-directional wall-climbing mechanisms. Basic driving mechanism of the wall-climbing robot is based on our former invention named Omni Disk which consists of multiple rollers attached to one side of a rotating disk and having a mechanism to direct the rollers to the same direction. We firstly discuss about the mechanical improvements of the Omni Disk to make it lightweight and low cost. We next discusses about four types of methods to attach permanent magnets to the wall-climbing robot and generates attractive force on the iron wall and select the best type based on the motion experiments about the constructed models. As the result of these considerations, we developed a holonomic and omni-directional wall-climbing robot named Vmax III which consists of three Omni Disks having permanent magnet at their center having the function to change the magnetic attractive force. By using the Vmax III, we studied about the relation among the magnetic attractive force of three Omni Disks, posture of the Vmax III and inclination angle of the iron wall and clarified the optimized distribution of the magnetic attractive force of the Omni Disks in different inclination of the iron wall. (author)

  14. Simulations of super-structure domain walls in two dimensional assemblies of magnetic nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jordanovic, J.; Frandsen, C.; Beleggia, M.; Schiøtz, J.

    2015-01-01

    We simulate the formation of domain walls in two-dimensional assemblies of magnetic nanoparticles. Particle parameters are chosen to match recent electron holography and Lorentz microscopy studies of almost monodisperse cobalt nanoparticles assembled into regular, elongated lattices. As the particles are small enough to consist of a single magnetic domain each, their magnetic interactions can be described by a spin model in which each particle is assigned a macroscopic “superspin.” Thus, the magnetic behaviour of these lattices may be compared to magnetic crystals with nanoparticle superspins taking the role of the atomic spins. The coupling is, however, different. The superspins interact only by dipolar interactions as exchange coupling between individual nanoparticles may be neglected due to interparticle spacing. We observe that it is energetically favorable to introduce domain walls oriented along the long dimension of nanoparticle assemblies rather than along the short dimension. This is unlike what is typically observed in continuous magnetic materials, where the exchange interaction introduces an energetic cost proportional to the area of the domain walls. Structural disorder, which will always be present in realistic assemblies, pins longitudinal domain walls when the external field is reversed, and makes a gradual reversal of the magnetization by migration of longitudinal domain walls possible, in agreement with previous experimental results

  15. Asymmetric driven dynamics of Dzyaloshinskii domain walls in ultrathin ferromagnetic strips with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sánchez-Tejerina, L. [Dpto. Electricidad y Electrónica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Valladolid, 47011 Valladolid (Spain); Alejos, Ó., E-mail: oscaral@ee.uva.es [Dpto. Electricidad y Electrónica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Valladolid, 47011 Valladolid (Spain); Martínez, E. [Dpto. Física Aplicada, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Salamanca, 37011 Salamanca (Spain); Muñoz, J.M. [Dpto. Electricidad y Electrónica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Valladolid, 47011 Valladolid (Spain)

    2016-07-01

    The dynamics of domain walls in ultrathin ferromagnetic strips with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy is studied from both numerical and analytical micromagnetics. The influence of a moderate interfacial Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya interaction associated to a bi-layer strip arrangement has been considered, giving rise to the formation of Dzyaloshinskii domain walls. Such walls possess under equilibrium conditions an inner magnetization structure defined by a certain orientation angle that make them to be considered as intermediate configurations between Bloch and Néel walls. Two different dynamics are considered, a field-driven and a current-driven dynamics, in particular, the one promoted by the spin torque due to the spin-Hall effect. Results show an inherent asymmetry associated with the rotation of the domain wall magnetization orientation before reaching the stationary regime, characterized by a constant terminal speed. For a certain initial DW magnetization orientation at rest, the rotation determines whether the reorientation of the DW magnetization prior to reach stationary motion is smooth or abrupt. This asymmetry affects the DW motion, which can even reverse for a short period of time. Additionally, it is found that the terminal speed in the case of the current-driven dynamics may depend on either the initial DW magnetization orientation at rest or the sign of the longitudinally injected current. - Highlights: • The asymmetric response of domain walls in bilayer strips with PMA is studied. • Out-of-plane fields and SHE longitudinal currents are applied. • The response is associated to the rotation of the domain wall inner magnetization. • Clockwise and counter-clockwise magnetization rotations are not equivalent. • The asymmetry results in different travelled distances and/or terminal speeds.

  16. Asymmetric driven dynamics of Dzyaloshinskii domain walls in ultrathin ferromagnetic strips with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sánchez-Tejerina, L.; Alejos, Ó.; Martínez, E.; Muñoz, J.M.

    2016-01-01

    The dynamics of domain walls in ultrathin ferromagnetic strips with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy is studied from both numerical and analytical micromagnetics. The influence of a moderate interfacial Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya interaction associated to a bi-layer strip arrangement has been considered, giving rise to the formation of Dzyaloshinskii domain walls. Such walls possess under equilibrium conditions an inner magnetization structure defined by a certain orientation angle that make them to be considered as intermediate configurations between Bloch and Néel walls. Two different dynamics are considered, a field-driven and a current-driven dynamics, in particular, the one promoted by the spin torque due to the spin-Hall effect. Results show an inherent asymmetry associated with the rotation of the domain wall magnetization orientation before reaching the stationary regime, characterized by a constant terminal speed. For a certain initial DW magnetization orientation at rest, the rotation determines whether the reorientation of the DW magnetization prior to reach stationary motion is smooth or abrupt. This asymmetry affects the DW motion, which can even reverse for a short period of time. Additionally, it is found that the terminal speed in the case of the current-driven dynamics may depend on either the initial DW magnetization orientation at rest or the sign of the longitudinally injected current. - Highlights: • The asymmetric response of domain walls in bilayer strips with PMA is studied. • Out-of-plane fields and SHE longitudinal currents are applied. • The response is associated to the rotation of the domain wall inner magnetization. • Clockwise and counter-clockwise magnetization rotations are not equivalent. • The asymmetry results in different travelled distances and/or terminal speeds.

  17. Magnetic moment jumps in flat and nanopatterned Nb thin-walled cylinders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsindlekht, M.I., E-mail: mtsindl@vms.huji.ac.il [The Racah Institute of Physics, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, 91904 Jerusalem (Israel); Genkin, V.M.; Felner, I.; Zeides, F.; Katz, N. [The Racah Institute of Physics, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, 91904 Jerusalem (Israel); Gazi, Š.; Chromik, Š. [The Institute of Electrical Engineering SAS, Dúbravská cesta 9, 84104 Bratislava (Slovakia); Dobrovolskiy, O.V. [Physikalisches Institut, Goethe University, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Physics Department, V. Karazin Kharkiv National University, 61077 Kharkiv (Ukraine); Sachser, R.; Huth, M. [Physikalisches Institut, Goethe University, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • Magnetization curves of as-prepared and patterned thin-walled cylinders were measured in magnetic fields applied parallel to cylinders axis. • Magnetic moment jumps were observed in magnetic fields lower and above Hc1. • Critical current density in isthmus between two antidots is higher than in a film itself. - Abstract: Penetration of magnetic flux into hollow superconducting cylinders is investigated by magnetic moment measurements. The magnetization curves of a flat and a nanopatterned thin-walled superconducting Nb cylinders with a rectangular cross section are reported for the axial field geometry. In the nanopatterned sample, a row of micron-sized antidots (holes) was milled in the film along the cylinder axis. Magnetic moment jumps are observed for both samples at low temperatures for magnetic fields not only above H{sub c1}, but also in fields lower than H{sub c1}, i. e., in the vortex-free regime. The positions of the jumps are not reproducible and they change from one experiment to another, resembling vortex lattice instabilities usually observed for magnetic fields larger than H{sub c1}. At temperatures above 0.66T{sub c} and 0.78T{sub c} the magnetization curves become smooth for the patterned and the as-prepared sample, respectively. The magnetization curve of a reference flat Nb film in the parallel field geometry does not exhibit jumps in the entire range of accessible temperatures.

  18. Influence of boundary geometry in domain wall propagation in magnetic films with asymmetric holes: Micromagnetic calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alija, A; Sobrado, I; Rodriguez-RodrIguez, G; Velez, M; Alameda, J M; MartIn, J I; Parrondo, J M R

    2010-01-01

    Micromagnetic simulations have been performed in uniaxial magnetic films with 2D array of asymmetric arrow shape holes. In order to understand the asymmetric pinning potential created by the holes, different boundary geometries conditions are used on the simulations. The depinning fields for forward and backward domain wall propagation have been calculated by the analysis of the energy landscapes as a function of the domain wall position. Domain wall depinning occurs preferentially at the free ends of the domain wall at the film boundaries. We have found that the domain wall propagation is different at the top/bottom boundaries of the simulated film which can be understood in terms of the magnetostatic energy and the chirality of the domain wall.

  19. Development of Disk Rover, wall-climbing robot using permanent magnet disk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirose, Shigeo; Tsutsumitake; Hiroshi; Toyama, Ryousei; Kobayashi, Kengo.

    1992-01-01

    A new type of wall climbing robot, named Disk Rover, using permanent magnet disks are developed. The newly introduced permanent magnet disk is to rotate the magnet disk on the surface of wall with partly contacted posture. It allows to produce high magnetic attraction force compared with conventional permanent wheel which utilizes only a small portion of the magnet installed around the wheel. The optimum design of the magnetic wheel is done by using finit element method and it is shown that the magnetic attraction force vs. weight ratio can be designed about three times higher than conventional type magnet wheel. The developed Disk Rover is 25 kg in weight including controller and battery, about 685 mm in diameter, 239 mm in height and has a pair of permanent magnet disks. It is demonstrated by the experiments that the Disk Rover can move around on the surface of the wall quite smoothly by radio control and has payload of about its own weight. Several considerations are also done in order to surmount bead weld. (author)

  20. Simultaneous Observations of p-mode Light Walls and Magnetic Reconnection Ejections above Sunspot Light Bridges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, Yijun; Zhang, Jun; Li, Ting; Yang, Shuhong; Li, Xiaohong, E-mail: yijunhou@nao.cas.cn, E-mail: zjun@nao.cas.cn [Key Laboratory of Solar Activity, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China)

    2017-10-10

    Recent high-resolution observations from the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph reveal bright wall-shaped structures in active regions (ARs), especially above sunspot light bridges. Their most prominent feature is the bright oscillating front in the 1400/1330 Å channel. These structures are named light walls and are often interpreted to be driven by p-mode waves. Above the light bridge of AR 12222 on 2014 December 06, we observed intermittent ejections superimposed on an oscillating light wall in the 1400 Å passband. At the base location of each ejection, the emission enhancement was detected in the Solar Dynamics Observatory 1600 Å channel. Thus, we suggest that in wall bases (light bridges), in addition to the leaked p-mode waves consistently driving the oscillating light wall, magnetic reconnection could happen intermittently at some locations and eject the heated plasma upward. Similarly, in the second event occurring in AR 12371 on 2015 June 16, a jet was simultaneously detected in addition to the light wall with a wave-shaped bright front above the light bridge. At the footpoint of this jet, lasting brightening was observed, implying magnetic reconnection at the base. We propose that in these events, two mechanisms, p-mode waves and magnetic reconnection, simultaneously play roles in the light bridge, and lead to the distinct kinetic features of the light walls and the ejection-like activities, respectively. To illustrate the two mechanisms and their resulting activities above light bridges, in this study we present a cartoon model.

  1. Properties of Cs-intercalated single wall carbon nanotubes investigated by 133Cs Nuclear Magnetic resonance

    KAUST Repository

    Schmid, Marc R.

    2012-11-01

    In the present study, we investigated Cs-intercalated single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) using 133Cs Nuclear Magnetic resonance. We show that there are two types of Cs cations depending on the insertion level. Indeed, at low concentrations, Static spectra analysis shows that the Cs (α)+ species are fully ionized, i.e. α equal ca.1, while at higher concentrations a second paramagnetically shifted line appears, indicating the formation of Cs (β)+ ions with β < α ∼ +1. At low concentrations and low temperatures the Cs (α)+ ions exhibit a weak hyperfine coupling to the SWCNT conduction electrons, whereas, at higher temperatures, a thermally activated slow-motion diffusion process of the Cs (α)+ ions occurs along the interstitial channels present within the carbon nanotube bundles. At high concentrations, the Cs (β)+ ions seem to occupy well defined positions relative to the carbon lattice. As a matter of fact, the Korringa relaxation behavior suggests a strong hyperfine coupling between Cs nuclei and conduction electrons in the carbon nanotubes and a partial charge transfer, which suggest a plausible Cs(6s)-C(2p) hybridization. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Functional Properties at Domain Walls in BiFeO3: Electrical, Magnetic, and Structural investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Qing; Yang, C.-H.; Yu, P.; Gajek, M.; Seidel, J.; Ramesh, R.; Wang, F.; Chu, Y.-H.; Martin, L. W.; Spaldin, N.; Rother, A.

    2009-03-01

    BiFeO3 (BFO) is a widely studied robust ferroelectric, antiferromagnetic multiferroic. Conducting-atomic force microscopy studies reveal the presence of enhanced conductivity at certain types of domain walls in BFO. We have completed detailed TEM studies of the physical structure at these domain walls as well as in-depth DFT calculations of the evolution of electronic structure at these domain walls. These studies reveal two major contributions to the observed conduction: the formation of an electrostatic potential at the domain walls as well as a structurally-driven change in the electronic structure (i.e., a lower band gap locally) at the domain walls. We will discuss the use of optical characterization techniques as a way of probing this change in electronic structure at domain walls as well as detailed IV characterization both in atmospheric and UHV environments. Finally, the evolution of magnetism at these domain walls has been studied through the use of photoemission measurements. Initial findings point to a significant change in the magnetic order at these domain walls in BFO.

  3. An improved method for measuring the magnetic inhomogeneity shift in hydrogen masers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhardt, V. S.; Peters, H. E.

    1975-01-01

    The reported method makes it possible to conduct all maser frequency measurements under conditions of low magnetic field intensity for which the hydrogen maser is most stable. Aspects concerning the origin of the magnetic inhomogeneity shift are examined and the available approaches for measuring this shift are considered, taking into account certain drawbacks of currently used methods. An approach free of these drawbacks can be based on the measurement of changes in a parameter representing the difference between the number of atoms in the involved states.

  4. Magnetic forces on a ferromagnetic HT-9 first wall/blanket and coolant pipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lechtenberg, T.A.; Dahms, C.; Attaya, H.; Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison)

    1984-01-01

    The GFUN 3D code was used to model the toroidal fields and determine the magnetic body forces on the STARFIRE design for coolant pipes exiting the first wall sector and first wall/blanket modules. The HT-9 coolant pipes were modeled on the basis of a square bar having the same length and material volume as the coolant pipes. The stress analysis was performed using these magnetic forces applied to a pipe of 4 meters length, 8.25 cm O.D., and 0.75 cm thickness by the MODSAP stress analysis code. For the first wall/blanket module, GFUN 3D does not allow full modeling of the complex thin-walled structure or numerous small tubes because of the element aspect ratio limitations. Therefore, to obtain three dimensional loads, a solid homogeneous equivalent structure was used

  5. Direct observation of stochastic domain-wall depinning in magnetic nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Im, Mi-Young; Bocklage, Lars; Fischer, Peter; Meier, Guido

    2008-11-01

    The stochastic field-driven depinning of a domain wall pinned at a notch in a magnetic nanowire is directly observed using magnetic X-ray microscopy with high lateral resolution down to 15 nm. The depinning-field distribution in Ni{sub 80}Fe{sub 20} nanowires considerably depends on the wire width and the notch depth. The difference in the multiplicity of domain-wall types generated in the vicinity of a notch is responsible for the observed dependence of the stochastic nature of the domain wall depinning field on the wire width and the notch depth. Thus the random nature of the domain wall depinning process is controllable by an appropriate design of the nanowire.

  6. A micromagnetic study of the oscillations of pinned domain walls in magnetic ribbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alejos, Oscar [Dpto. Electricidad y Electronica, Universidad de Valladolid, 47071 Valladolid (Spain)]. E-mail: oscaral@ee.uva.es; Torres, Carlos [Dpto. Electricidad y Electronica, Universidad de Valladolid, 47071 Valladolid (Spain); Hernandez-Gomez, Pablo [Dpto. Electricidad y Electronica, Universidad de Valladolid, 47071 Valladolid (Spain); Lopez-Diaz, Luis [Dpto. Fisica Aplicada, Universidad de Salamanca, 37071 Salamanca (Spain); Torres, Luis [Dpto. Fisica Aplicada, Universidad de Salamanca, 37071 Salamanca (Spain); Martinez, Eduardo [Dpto. Ingenieria Electromecanica, Universidad de Burgos, 09001 Burgos (Spain)

    2007-09-15

    The work studies the dynamics of domain walls in magnetic ribbons with thicknesses of the order of magnitude of the permalloy exchange length (5.7 nm) by means of micromagnetic simulations. Two small defects are symmetrically placed on both edges of the ribbon, one on each edge, occupying the whole ribbon thickness. One transverse domain wall is pinned by the defects, in a head-to-head configuration. A free wall oscillation is forced by applying a static external magnetic field in the direction of the large axis until the wall reaches a new equilibrium position (elongation), and then removed. Three dynamic regimes are observed depending on the size of the cross ribbon section.

  7. A micromagnetic study of the oscillations of pinned domain walls in magnetic ribbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alejos, Oscar; Torres, Carlos; Hernandez-Gomez, Pablo; Lopez-Diaz, Luis; Torres, Luis; Martinez, Eduardo

    2007-01-01

    The work studies the dynamics of domain walls in magnetic ribbons with thicknesses of the order of magnitude of the permalloy exchange length (5.7 nm) by means of micromagnetic simulations. Two small defects are symmetrically placed on both edges of the ribbon, one on each edge, occupying the whole ribbon thickness. One transverse domain wall is pinned by the defects, in a head-to-head configuration. A free wall oscillation is forced by applying a static external magnetic field in the direction of the large axis until the wall reaches a new equilibrium position (elongation), and then removed. Three dynamic regimes are observed depending on the size of the cross ribbon section

  8. Organic-soluble lanthanide nuclear magnetic resonance shift reagents for sulfonium and isothiouronium salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wenzel, T.J.; Zaia, J.

    1987-01-01

    Lanthanide complexes of the formula [Ln(fod) 4 ] - (FOD, 6,6,7,7,8,8,8-heptafluoro-2,2-dimethyl-3,5-octanedione) are effective organic-soluble nuclear magnetic resonance shift reagents for sulfonium and isothiouronium salts. The shift reagent is formed in solution from Ln(fod) 3 and Ag(fod) or K(fod). The selection of Ag(fod) or K(fod) in forming the shift reagent is dependent on the anion of the organic salt. Ag(fod) is more effective with halide salts, whereas K(fod) is preferred with tetrafluoroborate salts. Resolution of diastereotopic hydrogen atoms was observed in the shifted spectra of certain substrates. Enantiomeric resolution was obtained in the spectrum of sec-butylisothiouronium chloride with a chiral shift reagent. The reagents can be employed in solvents such as chloroform and benzene

  9. Lead-glass wall addition to the SPEAR Mark 1 magnetic detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feller, J.M.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Dorfan, J.M.; Ely, R.; Feldman, G.J.; Fong, A.; Gobbi, B.; Hanson, G.; Heile, F.B.; Jaros, J.A.; Kwan, B.P.; Lecomte, P.; Litke, A.M.; Luke, D.; Madaras, R.J.; Martin, J.B.

    1978-01-01

    A ''Lead-Glass Wall,'' consisting of 318 lead-glass Cherenkov shower counters and three wire spark chambers, has been added to one octant of the SPEAR Mark I Magnetic Detector. The wall covers a solid angle of approximately 6% of 4π steradians and has been used to identify and measure the energies of electrons and photons produced in electron-positron collisions. The design, calibration, gain-monitoring, and performance of the system are described. 3 refs

  10. Irradiation capsule for testing magnetic fusion reactor first-wall materials at 60 and 2000C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conlin, J.A.

    1985-08-01

    A new type of irradiation capsule has been designed, and a prototype has been tested in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor (ORR) for low-temperature irradiation of Magnetic Fusion Reactor first-wall materials. The capsule meets the requirements of the joint US/Japanese collaborative fusion reactor materials irradiation program for the irradiation of first-wall fusion reactor materials at 60 and 200 0 C. The design description and results of the prototype capsule performance are presented

  11. Combined centroid-envelope dynamics of intense, magnetically focused charged beams surrounded by conducting walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiuza, K.; Rizzato, F.B.; Pakter, R.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we analyze the combined envelope-centroid dynamics of magnetically focused high-intensity charged beams surrounded by conducting walls. Similar to the case where conducting walls are absent, it is shown that the envelope and centroid dynamics decouple from each other. Mismatched envelopes still decay into equilibrium with simultaneous emittance growth, but the centroid keeps oscillating with no appreciable energy loss. Some estimates are performed to analytically obtain characteristics of halo formation seen in the full simulations

  12. The effect of magnetic mirror on near wall conductivity in Hall thrusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, D.; Liu, H.; Fu, H.; Cao, Y.

    2008-01-01

    The effect of magnetic mirror on near wall conductivity is studied in the acceleration region of Hall thrusters. The electron dynamics process in the plasma is described by test particle method, in which electrons are randomly emitted from the centerline towards the inner wall of the channel. It is found that the effective collision coefficient, i.e. the rate of electrons colliding with the wall, changes dramatically with the magnetic mirror effect being considered; and that it decreases further with the increase of magnetic mirror ratio to enhance the electron mobility accordingly. In particular, under anistropic electron velocity distribution conditions, the magnetic mirror effect becomes even more prominent. Furthermore, due to decrease in magnetic mirror ratio from the exhaust plane to the anode in Hall thrusters, the axial gradient of electron mobility with magnetic mirror effect is greater than without it. The magnetic mirror effects on electron mobility are derived analytically and the results are found in agreement with the simulation. (copyright 2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  13. Magnetic scanning gate microscopy of a domain wall nanosensor using microparticle probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corte-León, H., E-mail: hector.corte@npl.co.uk [National Physical Laboratory, Teddington TW11 0LW (United Kingdom); Royal Holloway University of London, Egham TW20 0EX (United Kingdom); Gribkov, B. [National Physical Laboratory, Teddington TW11 0LW (United Kingdom); Krzysteczko, P. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Braunschweig D-38116 (Germany); Marchi, F.; Motte, J.-F. [University of Grenoble Alpes, Inst. NEEL, Grenoble F-38042 (France); CNRS, Inst. NEEL, Grenoble F-38042 (France); Schumacher, H.W. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Braunschweig D-38116 (Germany); Antonov, V. [Royal Holloway University of London, Egham TW20 0EX (United Kingdom); Kazakova, O. [National Physical Laboratory, Teddington TW11 0LW (United Kingdom)

    2016-02-15

    We apply the magnetic scanning gate microscopy (SGM) technique to study the interaction between a magnetic bead (MB) and a domain wall (DW) trapped in an L-shaped magnetic nanostructure. Magnetic SGM is performed using a custom-made probe, comprising a hard magnetic NdFeB bead of diameter 1.6 µm attached to a standard silicon tip. The MB–DW interaction is detected by measuring changes in the electrical resistance of the device as a function of the tip position. By scanning at different heights, we create a 3D map of the MB–DW interaction and extract the sensing volume for different widths of the nanostructure's arms. It is shown that for 50 nm wide devices the sensing volume is a cone of 880 nm in diameter by 1.4 µm in height, and reduces down to 800 nm in height for 100 nm devices with almost no change in its diameter. - Highlights: • AFM tips with a magnetic bead attached used to test interaction with domain wall. • Domain wall inside a nanostructure affect the electrical resistance. • Recording electrical resistance while scanning with modified AFM probe. • Change of resistance as a function of the position of the magnetic bead. • This allows comparing different devices in a reproducible and controllable way.

  14. Characteristics of the magnetic wall reflection model on ion acceleration in gas-puff z pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishio, M.; Takasugi, K.

    2013-01-01

    The magnetic wall reflection model was examined with the numerical simulation of the trajectory calculation of particles. This model is for the ions accelerated by some current-independent mechanism. The trajectory calculation showed angle dependency of highest velocities of accelerated particles. This characteristics is of the magnetic wall reflection model, not of the other current-independent acceleration mechanism. Thomson parabola measurements of accelerated ions produced in the gas-puff z-pinch experiments were carried out for the verification of the angle dependency. (author)

  15. Interstellar Dust in the Heliosheath: Tentative Discovery of the Magnetic Wall of the Heliosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisch, P. C.

    2005-12-01

    The evident identification of interstellar dust grains entrained in the magnetic wall of the heliosphere is reported. It is shown that the distribution of dust grains causing the weak polarization of light from nearby stars is consistent with polarization by small charged interstellar dust grains captured in the heliosphere magnetic wall (Tinbergen 1982, Frisch 2005). There is an offset between the deflected small charged polarizing dust grains, radius less than 0.2 microns, and the undeflected large grain population, radius larger than 0.2 microns. The region of maximum polarization is towards ecliptic coordinates lambda,beta = 295,0 deg, which is offset along the ecliptic longitude by about 35 deg from the heliosphere nose and extends to low ecliptic latitudes where the heliosphere magnetic wall is expected. An offset is also found between the best aligned dust grains, near lambda=281 deg to 220 deg, and the upwind direction of the undeflected inflow of large grains seen by Ulysses and Galileo. In the aligned-grain region, the polarization strength anti-correlates with ecliptic latitude, indicating that the magnetic wall was predominantly at negative ecliptic latitudes when these data were acquired. These data are consistent with model predictions for an interstellar magnetic field which is tilted by 60 deg with respect to the ecliptic plane, and parallel to the galactic plane. References: Tinbergen, 1982: AA, v105, p53; Frisch, 2005: to appear in ApJL.

  16. Stability of a pinned magnetic domain wall as a function of its internal configuration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montaigne, F.; Duluard, A.; Briones, J.; Lacour, D.; Hehn, M. [Institut Jean Lamour, Université de Lorraine, CNRS, BP 70239, F-54506 Vandoeuvre lès Nancy (France); Childress, J. R. [HGST San Jose Research Center, 3403 Yerba Buena Rd, San Jose, California 95135 (United States)

    2015-01-14

    It is shown that there are many stable configurations for a domain wall pinned by a notch along a magnetic stripe. The stability of several of these configurations is investigated numerically as a function of the thickness of the magnetic film. The depinning mechanism depends on the structure of the domain wall and on the thickness of the magnetic film. In the case of a spin-valve structure, it appears that the stray fields emerging from the hard layer at the notch location influence the stability of the micromagnetic configuration. Different depinning mechanisms are thus observed for the same film thickness depending on the magnetization orientation of the propagating domain. This conclusion qualitatively explains experimental magnetoresistance measurements.

  17. Nanoscale thermoelectrical detection of magnetic domain wall propagation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krzysteczko, P.; Wells, J.; Scarioni, A.F.; Šobáň, Zbyněk; Janda, Tomáš; Hu, X.; Saidl, Vít; Campion, R. P.; Mansell, R.; Lee, J.H.; Cowburn, R.P.; Němec, P.; Kazakova, O.; Wunderlich, Joerg; Schumacher, H.W.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 95, č. 22 (2017), s. 1-6, č. článku 220410. ISSN 2469-9950 R&D Projects: GA ČR GB14-37427G EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 610115 - SC2 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : microscope * driven * wire Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.) Impact factor: 3.836, year: 2016

  18. David Adler Lectureship Award in the Field of Materials Physics: Racetrack Memory - a high-performance, storage class memory using magnetic domain-walls manipulated by current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkin, Stuart

    2012-02-01

    Racetrack Memory is a novel high-performance, non-volatile storage-class memory in which magnetic domains are used to store information in a ``magnetic racetrack'' [1]. The magnetic racetrack promises a solid state memory with storage capacities and cost rivaling that of magnetic disk drives but with much improved performance and reliability: a ``hard disk on a chip''. The magnetic racetrack is comprised of a magnetic nanowire in which a series of magnetic domain walls are shifted to and fro along the wire using nanosecond-long pulses of spin polarized current [2]. We have demonstrated the underlying physics that makes Racetrack Memory possible [3,4] and all the basic functions - creation, and manipulation of a train of domain walls and their detection. The physics underlying the current induced dynamics of domain walls will also be discussed. In particular, we show that the domain walls respond as if they have mass, leading to significant inertial driven motion of the domain walls over long times after the current pulses are switched off [3]. We also demonstrate that in perpendicularly magnetized nanowires there are two independent current driving mechanisms: one derived from bulk spin-dependent scattering that drives the domain walls in the direction of electron flow, and a second interfacial mechanism that can drive the domain walls either along or against the electron flow, depending on subtle changes in the nanowire structure. Finally, we demonstrate thermally induced spin currents are large enough that they can be used to manipulate domain walls. [4pt] [1] S.S.P. Parkin, US Patent 6,834,005 (2004); S.S.P. Parkin et al., Science 320, 190 (2008); S.S.P. Parkin, Scientific American (June 2009). [0pt] [2] M. Hayashi, L. Thomas, R. Moriya, C. Rettner and S.S.P. Parkin, Science 320, 209 (2008). [0pt] [3] L. Thomas, R. Moriya, C. Rettner and S.S.P. Parkin, Science 330, 1810 (2010). [0pt] [4] X. Jiang et al. Nat. Comm. 1:25 (2010) and Nano Lett. 11, 96 (2011).

  19. Domain wall oscillations induced by spin torque in magnetic nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sbiaa, R., E-mail: rachid@squ.edu.om [Department of Physics, Sultan Qaboos University, P.O. Box 36, PC 123, Muscat (Oman); Chantrell, R. W. [Department of Physics, University of York, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom)

    2015-02-07

    Using micromagnetic simulations, the effects of the non-adiabatic spin torque (β) and the geometry of nanowires on domain wall (DW) dynamics are investigated. For the case of in-plane anisotropy nanowire, it is observed that the type of DW and its dynamics depends on its dimension. For a fixed length, the critical switching current decreases almost exponentially with the width W, while the DW speed becomes faster for larger W. For the case of perpendicular anisotropy nanowire, it was observed that DW dynamics depends strongly on β. For small values of β, oscillations of DW around the center of nanowire were revealed even after the current is switched off. In addition to nanowire geometry and intrinsic material properties, β could provide a way to control DW dynamics.

  20. High resolution detection and excitation of resonant magnetic perturbations in a wall-stabilized tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maurer, David A. [Physics Department, Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama 36849 (United States); Shiraki, Daisuke; Levesque, Jeffrey P.; Bialek, James; Angelini, Sarah; Byrne, Patrick; DeBono, Bryan; Hughes, Paul; Mauel, Michael E.; Navratil, Gerald A.; Peng Qian; Rhodes, Dov; Rath, Nickolaus; Stoafer, Christopher [Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States)

    2012-05-15

    We report high-resolution detection of the 3D plasma magnetic response of wall-stabilized tokamak discharges in the High Beta Tokamak-Extended Pulse [T. H. Ivers et al., Phys. Plasmas 3, 1926 (1996)] device. A new adjustable conducting wall has been installed on HBT-EP made up of 20 independent, movable, wall segments instrumented with three distinct sets of 40 modular coils that can be independently driven to generate a wide variety of magnetic perturbations. High-resolution detection of the plasma response is made with 216 poloidal and radial magnetic sensors that have been located and calibrated with high-accuracy. Static and dynamic plasma responses to resonant and non-resonant magnetic perturbations are observed through measurement of the step-response following a rapid change in the toroidal phase of the applied perturbations. Biorthogonal decomposition of the full set of magnetic sensors clearly defines the structures of naturally occurring external kinks as being composed of independent m/n = 3/1 and 6/2 modes. Resonant magnetic perturbations were applied to discharges with pre-existing, saturated m/n = 3/1 external kink mode activity. This m/n = 3/1 kink mode was observed to lock to the applied perturbation field. During this kink mode locked period, the plasma resonant response is characterized by a linear, a saturated, and a disruptive plasma regime dependent on the magnitude of the applied field and value of the edge safety factor and plasma rotation.

  1. Plasma behavior and plasma-wall interaction in magnetic fusion divices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohtsuka, Hideo

    1984-10-01

    To study the fundamental behavior of plasma in magnetic field is the main subject in the early stage of the magnetic fusion research. At the next stage, it is necessary to overcome some actual problems in order to attain reactor grade plasmas. One of them is to control impurities in the plasma. In these points of view, we carried out several experiments or theoretical analyses. Firstly, anomalous loss mechanisms in magnetic field were investigated in a toroidal multipole device JFT-1 and the role of motions of charged particles in the magnetic field was exhibited. Various measurements of plasma in the scrape-off layer were made in a divertor tokamak JFT-2a and in an ordinary tokamak JFT-2. The former study demonstrated the first successful divertor operation of the tokamak device and the latter one clarified the mechanism of arcing on the tokamak first wall. As to arcing, a new theory which describes the retrograde motion, the well known strange motion of arcs in a magnetic field, was proposed. Good agreement with the experimental results was shown. Finally, by considering a zero-dimensional sputtering model a self-consistent relation between light and metal impurities in tokamak plasmas was obtained. It was shown that the relation well describes some fundamental aspects of the plasma-wall interaction. As a conclusion, the importance of simple behavior of charged particles in magnetic fields was pointed out not only for the plasma confinement but also for the plasma-wall interaction. (author)

  2. Characterization and modeling of magnetic domain wall dynamics using reconstituted hysteresis loops from Barkhausen noise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ducharne, B., E-mail: Benjamin.ducharne@insa-lyon.fr; Le, M.Q.; Sebald, G.; Cottinet, P.J.; Guyomar, D.; Hebrard, Y.

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • Barkhausen noise energy versus excitation field hysteresis cycles MBN{sub energy}(H). • Difference in the dynamics of the induction field B and of the MBN{sub energy}. • Dynamic behavior of MBN{sub energy}(H) cycles is first-order. • Dynamic behavior of B(H) cycles is non-entire order. - Abstract: By means of a post-processing technique, we succeeded in plotting magnetic Barkhausen noise energy hysteresis cycles MBN{sub energy}(H). These cycles were compared to the usual hysteresis cycles, displaying the evolution of the magnetic induction field B versus the magnetic excitation H. The divergence between these comparisons as the excitation frequency was increased gave rise to the conclusion that there was a difference in the dynamics of the induction field and of the MBN{sub energy} related to the domain wall movements. Indeed, for the MBN{sub energy} hysteresis cycle, merely the domain wall movements were involved. On the other hand, for the usual B(H) cycle, two dynamic contributions were observed: domain wall movements and diffusion of the magnetic field excitation. From a simulation point of view, it was demonstrated that over a large frequency bandwidth a correct dynamic behavior of the domain wall movement MBN{sub energy}(H) cycle could be taken into account using first-order derivation whereas fractional orders were required for the B(H) cycles. The present article also gives a detailed description of how to use the developed process to obtain the MBN{sub energy}(H) hysteresis cycle as well as its evolution as the frequency increases. Moreover, this article provides an interesting explanation of the separation of magnetic loss contributions through a magnetic sample: a wall movement contribution varying according to first-order dynamics and a diffusion contribution which in a lump model can be taken into account using fractional order dynamics.

  3. A study of hydrogen isotopes fuel control by wall effect in magnetic fusion devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Motevalli, S.M., E-mail: motavali@umz.ac.ir; Safari, M.

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • A particle balance model for the main plasma and wall inventory in magnetic fusion device has been represented. • The dependence of incident particles energy on the wall has been considered in 10–300 eV for the sputtering yield and recycling coefficient. • The effect of fueling methods on plasma density behavior has been studied. - Abstract: Determination of plasma density behavior in magnetic confinement system needs to study the plasma materials interaction in the facing components such as first wall, limiter and divertor. Recycling of hydrogen isotope is an effective parameter in plasma density rate and plasma fueling. Recycling coefficient over the long pulse operation, gets to the unity, so it has a significant effect on steady state in magnetic fusion devices. Typically, sputtered carbon atoms from the plasma facing components form hydrocarbons and they redeposit on the wall. In this case little rate of hydrogen loss occurs. In present work a zero dimensional particle equilibrium model has been represented to determine particles density rate in main plasma and wall inventory under recycling effect and codeposition of hydrogen in case of continues and discontinues fueling methods and effective parameters on the main plasma decay has been studied.

  4. Metallic Interface Emerging at Magnetic Domain Wall of Antiferromagnetic Insulator: Fate of Extinct Weyl Electrons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youhei Yamaji

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Topological insulators, in contrast to ordinary semiconductors, accompany protected metallic surfaces described by Dirac-type fermions. Here, we theoretically show that another emergent two-dimensional metal embedded in the bulk insulator is realized at a magnetic domain wall. The domain wall has long been studied as an ingredient of both old-fashioned and leading-edge spintronics. The domain wall here, as an interface of seemingly trivial antiferromagnetic insulators, emergently realizes a functional interface preserved by zero modes with robust two-dimensional Fermi surfaces, where pyrochlore iridium oxides proposed to host the condensed-matter realization of Weyl fermions offer such examples at low temperatures. The existence of in-gap states that are pinned at domain walls, theoretically resembling spin or charge solitons in polyacetylene, and protected as the edges of hidden one-dimensional weak Chern insulators characterized by a zero-dimensional class-A topological invariant, solves experimental puzzles observed in R_{2}Ir_{2}O_{7} with rare-earth elements R. The domain wall realizes a novel quantum confinement of electrons and embosses a net uniform magnetization that enables magnetic control of electronic interface transports beyond the semiconductor paradigm.

  5. Numerical analysis of the shifting slabs applied in a wireless power transfer system to enhance magnetic coupling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yayun Dong

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Shifting medium is a kind of metamaterial, which can optically shift a space or an object a certain distance away from its original position. Based on the shifting medium, we propose a concise pair of shifting slabs covering the transmitting or receiving coil in a two-coil wireless power transfer system to decrease the equivalent distance between the coils. The electromagnetic parameters of the shifting slabs are calculated by transformation optics. Numerical simulations validate that the shifting slabs can approximately shift the electromagnetic fields generated by the covered coil; thus, the magnetic coupling and the efficiency of the system are enhanced while remaining the physical transmission distance unchanged. We also verify the advantages of the shifting slabs over the magnetic superlens. Finally, we provide two methods to fabricate shifting slabs based on split-ring resonators.

  6. Numerical analysis of the shifting slabs applied in a wireless power transfer system to enhance magnetic coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yayun; Yang, Xijun; Jin, Nan; Li, Wenwen; Yao, Chen; Tang, Houjun

    2017-05-01

    Shifting medium is a kind of metamaterial, which can optically shift a space or an object a certain distance away from its original position. Based on the shifting medium, we propose a concise pair of shifting slabs covering the transmitting or receiving coil in a two-coil wireless power transfer system to decrease the equivalent distance between the coils. The electromagnetic parameters of the shifting slabs are calculated by transformation optics. Numerical simulations validate that the shifting slabs can approximately shift the electromagnetic fields generated by the covered coil; thus, the magnetic coupling and the efficiency of the system are enhanced while remaining the physical transmission distance unchanged. We also verify the advantages of the shifting slabs over the magnetic superlens. Finally, we provide two methods to fabricate shifting slabs based on split-ring resonators.

  7. First-wall and blanket engineering development for magnetic-fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, C.; Herman, H.; Maroni, V.; Turner, L.; Clemmer, R.; Finn, P.; Johnson, C.; Abdou, M.

    1981-01-01

    A number of programs in the USA concerned with materials and engineering development of the first wall and breeder blanket systems for magnetic-fusion power reactors are described. Argonne National Laboratory has the lead or coordinating role, with many major elements of the research and engineering tests carried out by a number of organizations including industry and other national laboratories

  8. Novel Chiral Magnetic Domain Wall Structure in Fe/Ni/Cu(001) Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, G.; Zhu, J.; Quesada, A.; Li, J.; N'Diaye, A. T.; Huo, Y.; Ma, T. P.; Chen, Y.; Kwon, H. Y.; Won, C.; Qiu, Z. Q.; Schmid, A. K.; Wu, Y. Z.

    2013-04-01

    Using spin-polarized low energy electron microscopy, we discovered a new type of domain wall structure in perpendicularly magnetized Fe/Ni bilayers grown epitaxially on Cu(100). Specifically, we observed unexpected Néel-type walls with fixed chirality in the magnetic stripe phase. Furthermore, we find that the chirality of the domain walls is determined by the film growth order with the chirality being right handed in Fe/Ni bilayers and left handed in Ni/Fe bilayers, suggesting that the underlying mechanism is the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction at the film interfaces. Our observations may open a new route to control chiral spin structures using interfacial engineering in transition metal heterostructures.

  9. Equilibrium properties of the plasma sheath with a magnetic field parallel to the wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krasheninnikova, Natalia S.; Tang Xianzhu

    2011-01-01

    Motivated by the Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF), a systematic investigation of the equilibrium properties of a 1D plasma sheath with a magnetic field parallel to the wall was carried out using analytical theory and kinetic simulations. Initially uniform full Maxwellian plasma consisting of equal temperature collisionless electrons and ions is allowed to interact with a perfectly absorbing conducting wall, which charges positively due to large ions gyro-radii. The analysis of the steady-state plasma and field profiles reveals the importance of the relation between electron and ion thermal Larmor radii and plasma Debye length. In particular, the sheath width scaling, the details of the particle flows and the break-down of force balance components exhibit different behaviors in three possible regimes. Despite our primary motivation, the results in this paper can also be applicable to the divertor and the first wall of tokamaks.

  10. Damping of the domain walls motion in Co-based amorphous ribbons with helical magnetic anisotropy: Part III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhmetko, D.N.; Zhmetko, S.D.

    2009-01-01

    The damping of the motion of domain walls of a sandwich domain structure by the eddy currents magnetic fields, the stray fields and the hysteresis friction fields is investigated. The blocking of the motion of domain walls by the eddy currents magnetic fields is discovered.

  11. Study of Individual Characteristic Abdominal Wall Thickness Based on Magnetic Anchored Surgical Instruments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ding-Hui Dong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Magnetic anchored surgical instruments (MASI, relying on magnetic force, can break through the limitations of the single port approach in dexterity. Individual characteristic abdominal wall thickness (ICAWT deeply influences magnetic force that determines the safety of MASI. The purpose of this study was to research the abdominal wall characteristics in MASI applied environment to find ICAWT, and then construct an artful method to predict ICAWT, resulting in better safety and feasibility for MASI. Methods: For MASI, ICAWT is referred to the thickness of thickest point in the applied environment. We determined ICAWT through finding the thickest point in computed tomography scans. We also investigated the traits of abdominal wall thickness to discover the factor that can be used to predict ICAWT. Results: Abdominal wall at C point in the middle third lumbar vertebra plane (L3 is the thickest during chosen points. Fat layer thickness plays a more important role in abdominal wall thickness than muscle layer thickness. "BMI-ICAWT" curve was obtained based on abdominal wall thickness of C point in L3 plane, and the expression was as follow: f(x = P1 × x 2 + P2 × x + P3, where P1 = 0.03916 (0.01776, 0.06056, P2 = 1.098 (0.03197, 2.164, P3 = −18.52 (−31.64, −5.412, R-square: 0.99. Conclusions: Abdominal wall thickness of C point at L3 could be regarded as ICAWT. BMI could be a reliable predictor of ICAWT. In the light of "BMI-ICAWT" curve, we may conveniently predict ICAWT by BMI, resulting a better safety and feasibility for MASI.

  12. Current-supported domain wall movement to the target spot with a magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nam, Chunghee; Jang, Y.M.; Lee, K.S.; Lee, S.K.; Kim, T.W.; Cho, B.K.

    2007-01-01

    Current-driven domain wall (DW) motion in a submicron-size magnetic strip, which consists of Cu/IrMn/NiFe/Cu/NiFe/Cu pseudo-spin-valve with natural defects, was investigated by measuring the giant-magnetoresistance signal. The magnetic DW movement was induced by the injection of a high current density of 4x10 7 A/cm 2 . It was also found that a DW can be manipulated in more convenient way by the application of both current and magnetic field at the same time

  13. Effects of metal and 'magnetic wall' on the dispersion characteristic of magnetostatic waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lock, Edwin H.; Vashkovsky, Anatoly V.

    2006-01-01

    The dispersion relation of magnetostatic waves tangentially magnetized to saturation ferrite film, with a 'magnetic wall' condition (tangential component of microwave magnetic field is equal to zero) on one of the film surface and with a metal condition on the opposite surface is analyzed. The dispersion characteristics show that unidirectional magnetostatic waves appear in this structure: they can transfer energy in one direction only and fundamentally cannot transfer energy in the opposite direction. The dispersion-free propagation of magnetostatic waves also is possible in the structure in a wide frequency interval

  14. Magnetic configuration dependence of the shafranov shift in the Large Helical Device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobuchi, T; Ida, K; Yamada, H; Yokoyama, M; Watanabe, K Y; Sakakibara, S; Yoshinuma, M [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi-Cho, Toki-City, 509-5292 (Japan)

    2006-06-15

    The dependence of the Shafranov shift on magnetic field configuration, toroidicity and central rotational transform {iota}(0) in neutral beam heated plasma has been experimentally investigated in the Large Helical Device. The toroidicity of the plasma is controlled by the quadrupole field, while the central {iota}(0) is controlled by changing the distance of the current centre of the helical coil to the plasma. It is experimentally confirmed that both the lower toroidicity and the higher {iota}(0) contribute to the reduction of the Shafranov shift as predicted by the three-dimensional equilibrium code, VMEC.

  15. Quantum Phase Shift of a Moving Dipole under a Magnetic Field at a Distance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kang-Ho; Kim, Young-Wan; Kang, Kicheon

    2018-03-01

    We predict a quantum phase shift of a moving electric dipole in the presence of an external magnetic field at a distance. On the basis of the Lorentz-covariant field interaction approach, we show that a phase shift appears in the internal dipole state under the condition that the dipole is moving in the field-free region, which is distinct from the topological He-McKellar-Wilkens phase generated by a direct overlap of the dipole and the field. We discuss the experimental feasibility of detecting this phase with atomic interferometry and argue that detection of this phase will resolve the question of the locality in quantum electromagnetic interaction.

  16. Magnetic field control of 90 Degree-Sign , 180 Degree-Sign , and 360 Degree-Sign domain wall resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majidi, Roya, E-mail: royamajidi@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Shahid Rajaee Teacher Training University, Lavizan, 16788-15811 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-10-01

    In the present work, we have compared the resistance of the 90 Degree-Sign , 180 Degree-Sign , and 360 Degree-Sign domain walls in the presence of external magnetic field. The calculations are based on the Boltzmann transport equation within the relaxation time approximation. One-dimensional Neel-type domain walls between two domains whose magnetization differs by angle of 90 Degree-Sign , 180 Degree-Sign , and 360 Degree-Sign are considered. The results indicate that the resistance of the 360 Degree-Sign DW is more considerable than that of the 90 Degree-Sign and 180 Degree-Sign DWs. It is also found that the domain wall resistance can be controlled by applying transverse magnetic field. Increasing the strength of the external magnetic field enhances the domain wall resistance. In providing spintronic devices based on magnetic nanomaterials, considering and controlling the effect of domain wall on resistivity are essential.

  17. Magnetic domain walls as reconfigurable spin-wave nano-channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Kai

    Research efforts to utilize spin waves as information carriers for wave based logic in micro- and nano-structured ferromagnetic materials have increased tremendously over the recent years. However, finding efficient means of tailoring and downscaling guided spin-wave propagation in two dimensions, while maintaining energy efficiency and reconfigurability, still remains a delicate challenge. Here we target these challenges by spin-wave transport inside nanometer-scaled potential wells formed along magnetic domain walls. For this, we investigate the magnetization dynamics of a rectangular-like element in a Landau state exhibiting a so called 180° Néel wall along its center. By microwave antennae the rf-excitation is constricted to one end of the domain wall and the spin-wave intensities are recorded by means of Brillouin-Light Scattering microscopy revealing channeled transport. Additional micromagnetic simulations with pulsed as well as cw-excitation are performed to yield further insight into this class of modes. We find several spin-wave modes quantized along the width of the domain wall yet with well defined wave vectors along the wall, exhibiting positive dispersion. In a final step, we demonstrate the flexibility of these spin-wave nano-channels based on domain walls. In contrast to wave guides realised by fixed geometries, domain walls can be easily manipulated. Here we utilize small external fields to control its position with nanometer precision over a micrometer range, while still enabling transport. Domain walls thus, open the perspective for reprogrammable and yet non-volatile spin-wave waveguides of nanometer width. Financial support by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft within project SCHU2922/1-1 is gratefully acknowledged.

  18. Reducing Torque Ripples of the Axial Flux PM Motors by Magnet Stepping and Shifting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Cetin

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Higher efficiency on electric machines is the research goal of many studies. An example is the axial flux permanent magnet machines. These machines have some advantages like their watt/kg efficiency and torque density. This study aims to develop the performance characteristics of the axial flux permanent magnet machines. A new rotor magnet poles design in axial flux machines is suggested to mitigate the torque ripples. The method of stepping and shifting of the magnets is used. Two different designs are compared to verify the proposed approach. 3D finite element analysis is used for simulations. Torque ripple and back electromotive force waveforms are obtained from computer analysis. As a conclusion, the suggested method is found to be useable and mitigates the torque ripples. In addition to that, back EMF waveforms are turned to sinusoidal by the suggested design.

  19. Strain-controlled magnetic domain wall propagation in hybrid piezoelectric/ferromagnetic structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Na; Devolder, Thibaut; Agnus, Guillaume; Aubert, Pascal; Daniel, Laurent; Kim, Joo-Von; Zhao, Weisheng; Trypiniotis, Theodossis; Cowburn, Russell P; Chappert, Claude; Ravelosona, Dafiné; Lecoeur, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    The control of magnetic order in nanoscale devices underpins many proposals for integrating spintronics concepts into conventional electronics. A key challenge lies in finding an energy-efficient means of control, as power dissipation remains an important factor limiting future miniaturization of integrated circuits. One promising approach involves magnetoelectric coupling in magnetostrictive/piezoelectric systems, where induced strains can bear directly on the magnetic anisotropy. While such processes have been demonstrated in several multiferroic heterostructures, the incorporation of such complex materials into practical geometries has been lacking. Here we demonstrate the possibility of generating sizeable anisotropy changes, through induced strains driven by applied electric fields, in hybrid piezoelectric/spin-valve nanowires. By combining magneto-optical Kerr effect and magnetoresistance measurements, we show that domain wall propagation fields can be doubled under locally applied strains. These results highlight the prospect of constructing low-power domain wall gates for magnetic logic devices.

  20. Exciton diamagnetic shift and optical properties in CdSe nanocrystal quantum dots in magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shudong; Cheng, Liwen

    2018-04-01

    The magnetic field dependence of the optical properties of CdSe nanocrystal quantum dots (NQDs) is investigated theoretically using a perturbation method within the effective-mass approximation. The results show that the magnetic field lifts the degeneracy of the electron (hole) states. A blue-shift in the absorption spectra of m ≥ 0 exciton states is observed while the absorption peak of m attributed to the interplay of the orbital Zeeman effect and the additive confinement induced by the magnetic field. The excitonic absorption coefficient is almost independent of B in the strong confinement regime. The applied magnetic field causes the splitting of degenerated exciton states, resulting in the new absorption peaks. Based on the first-order perturbation theory, we propose the analytical expressions for the exciton binding energy, exciton transition energy and exciton diamagnetic shift of 1s, 1p-1, 1p0, 1p1, 1d-2, 1d-1, 1d0, 1d1, 1d2 and 2s exciton states on the applied magnetic field in the strong confinement regime.

  1. Effects of multi-walled carbon nanotube materials on Ruditapes philippinarum under climate change: The case of salinity shifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Marchi, Lucia; Neto, Victor; Pretti, Carlo; Figueira, Etelvina; Chiellini, Federica; Morelli, Andrea; Soares, Amadeu M V M; Freitas, Rosa

    2018-06-01

    The toxicity of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is closely related to their physico-chemical characteristics as well as the physico-chemical parameters of the media where CNTs are dispersed. In a climate change scenario, changes in seawater salinity are becoming a topic of concern particularly in estuarine and coastal areas. Nevertheless, to our knowledge no information is available on how salinity shifts may alter the sensitivity (in terms of biochemical responses) of bivalves when exposed to different CNTs. For this reason, a laboratory experiment was performed exposing the Manila clam Ruditapes philippinarum, one of the most dominant bivalves of the estuarine and coastal lagoon environments, for 28 days to unfunctionalized multi-walled carbon nanotube MWCNTs (Nf-MWCNTs) and carboxylated MWCNTs (f-MWCNTs), maintained at control salinity (28) and low salinity 21. Concentration-dependent toxicity was demonstrated in individuals exposed to both MWCNT materials and under both salinities, generating alterations of energy reserves and metabolism, oxidative status and neurotoxicity compared to non-contaminated clams. Moreover, our results showed greater toxic impacts induced in clams exposed to f-MWCNTs compared to Nf-MWCNTs. In the present study it was also demonstrated how salinity shifts altered the toxicity of both MWCNT materials as well as the sensitivity of R. philippinarum exposed to these contaminates in terms of clam metabolism, oxidative status and neurotoxicity. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Domain walls dynamics in the amorphous ribbon with a helical magnetic anisotropy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhmetko, D.N.; Savin, V.V.; Lemish, P.V.; Troschenkov, Y.N.

    2006-01-01

    The damping mechanism for motion of domain walls, which form the sandwich structure and move from the middle plane of the ribbon to opposite surfaces during the dynamic magnetization reversal, have been investigated. The difference between the real and ideal sandwich domain structure, the actual distribution of the anisotropy easy directions through the ribbon thickness and the M-bar s deviation from local easy directions under the action of applied magnetic field have been taken into account. It was revealed that the maximum of the total damping coefficient β tot (x) near the half-way of the domain wall run is due to the influence of the magnetic stray fields. These fields have a character of irregular oscillations and are directed approximately perpendicular to the local easy direction of the ribbon layer through which the domain wall propagates. The damping coefficient β e.c. (x) determined by eddy-currents has the maximal value close to the ribbon middle and decreases linearly to zero when the domain wall approaches the ribbon surface

  3. Simulations of super-structure domain walls in two dimensional assemblies of magnetic nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jordanovic, Jelena; Beleggia, Marco; Schiøtz, Jakob

    2015-01-01

    We simulate the formation of domain walls in two-dimensional assemblies of magnetic nanoparticles. Particle parameters are chosen to match recent electron holography and Lorentz microscopy studies of almost monodisperse cobalt nanoparticles assembled into regular, elongated lattices. As the parti......We simulate the formation of domain walls in two-dimensional assemblies of magnetic nanoparticles. Particle parameters are chosen to match recent electron holography and Lorentz microscopy studies of almost monodisperse cobalt nanoparticles assembled into regular, elongated lattices...... taking the role of the atomic spins. The coupling is, however, different. The superspins interact only by dipolar interactions as exchange coupling between individual nanoparticles may be neglected due to interparticle spacing. We observe that it is energetically favorable to introduce domain walls...... oriented along the long dimension of nanoparticle assemblies rather than along the short dimension. This is unlike what is typically observed in continuous magnetic materials, where the exchange interaction introduces an energetic cost proportional to the area of the domain walls. Structural disorder...

  4. Domain wall manipulation in magnetic nanotubes induced by electric current pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otálora, J A; López-López, J A; Landeros, P; Núñez, A S

    2012-01-01

    We propose that the injection of electric currents can be used to independently manipulate the position and chirality of vortex-like domain walls in metallic ferromagnetic nanotubes. We support this proposal upon theoretical and numerical assessment of the magnetization dynamics driven by such currents. We show that proper interplay between the tube geometry, magnitude of the electric current and the duration of a current pulse, can be used to manipulate the position, velocity and chirality of a vortex domain wall. Our calculations suggest that domain wall velocities greater than 1 km s -1 can be achieved for tube diameters of the order of 30 nm and increasing with it. We also find that the transition from steady to precessional domain wall motion occurs for very high electric current densities, of the order of 10 13 A m -2 . Furthermore, the great stability displayed by such chiral magnetic configurations, and the reduced Ohmic loses provided by the current pulses, lead to highly reproducible and efficient domain wall reversal mechanisms.

  5. Logic and memory concepts for all-magnetic computing based on transverse domain walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vandermeulen, J; Van de Wiele, B; Dupré, L; Van Waeyenberge, B

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a non-volatile digital logic and memory concept in which the binary data is stored in the transverse magnetic domain walls present in in-plane magnetized nanowires with sufficiently small cross sectional dimensions. We assign the digital bit to the two possible orientations of the transverse domain wall. Numerical proofs-of-concept are presented for a NOT-, AND- and OR-gate, a FAN-out as well as a reading and writing device. Contrary to the chirality based vortex domain wall logic gates introduced in Omari and Hayward (2014 Phys. Rev. Appl. 2 044001), the presented concepts remain applicable when miniaturized and are driven by electrical currents, making the technology compatible with the in-plane racetrack memory concept. The individual devices can be easily combined to logic networks working with clock speeds that scale linearly with decreasing design dimensions. This opens opportunities to an all-magnetic computing technology where the digital data is stored and processed under the same magnetic representation. (paper)

  6. Comparison of Maximal Wall Thickness in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Differs Between Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Transthoracic Echocardiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bois, John P; Geske, Jeffrey B; Foley, Thomas A; Ommen, Steve R; Pellikka, Patricia A

    2017-02-15

    Left ventricular (LV) wall thickness is a prognostic marker in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HC). LV wall thickness ≥30 mm (massive hypertrophy) is independently associated with sudden cardiac death. Presence of massive hypertrophy is used to guide decision making for cardiac defibrillator implantation. We sought to determine whether measurements of maximal LV wall thickness differ between cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and transthoracic echocardiography (TTE). Consecutive patients were studied who had HC without previous septal ablation or myectomy and underwent both cardiac MRI and TTE at a single tertiary referral center. Reported maximal LV wall thickness was compared between the imaging techniques. Patients with ≥1 technique reporting massive hypertrophy received subset analysis. In total, 618 patients were evaluated from January 1, 2003, to December 21, 2012 (mean [SD] age, 53 [15] years; 381 men [62%]). In 75 patients (12%), reported maximal LV wall thickness was identical between MRI and TTE. Median difference in reported maximal LV wall thickness between the techniques was 3 mm (maximum difference, 17 mm). Of the 63 patients with ≥1 technique measuring maximal LV wall thickness ≥30 mm, 44 patients (70%) had discrepant classification regarding massive hypertrophy. MRI identified 52 patients (83%) with massive hypertrophy; TTE, 30 patients (48%). Although guidelines recommend MRI or TTE imaging to assess cardiac anatomy in HC, this study shows discrepancy between the techniques for maximal reported LV wall thickness assessment. In conclusion, because this measure clinically affects prognosis and therapeutic decision making, efforts to resolve these discrepancies are critical. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Coupling between Current and Dynamic Magnetization : from Domain Walls to Spin Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucassen, M. E.

    2012-05-01

    So far, we have derived some general expressions for domain-wall motion and the spin motive force. We have seen that the β parameter plays a large role in both subjects. In all chapters of this thesis, there is an emphasis on the determination of this parameter. We also know how to incorporate thermal fluctuations for rigid domain walls, as shown above. In Chapter 2, we study a different kind of fluctuations: shot noise. This noise is caused by the fact that an electric current consists of electrons, and therefore has fluctuations. In the process, we also compute transmission and reflection coefficients for a rigid domain wall, and from them the linear momentum transfer. More work on fluctuations is done in Chapter 3. Here, we consider a (extrinsically pinned) rigid domain wall under the influence of thermal fluctuations that induces a current via spin motive force. We compute how the resulting noise in the current is related to the β parameter. In Chapter 4 we look into in more detail into the spin motive forces from field driven domain walls. Using micro magnetic simulations, we compute the spin motive force due to vortex domain walls explicitly. As mentioned before, this gives qualitatively different results than for a rigid domain wall. The final subject in Chapter 5 is the application of the general expression for spin motive forces to magnons. Although this might seem to be unrelated to domain-wall motion, this calculation allows us to relate the β parameter to macroscopic transport coefficients. This work was supported by Stichting voor Fundamenteel Onderzoek der Materie (FOM), the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research (NWO), and by the European Research Council (ERC) under the Seventh Framework Program (FP7).

  8. Domain Wall Motion in Magnetic Nanostrips under the Influence of Rashba Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vito Puliafito

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Spin-orbit Rashba effect applies a torque on the magnetization of a ferromagnetic nanostrip in the case of structural inversion asymmetry, also affecting the steady domain wall motion induced by a spin-polarized current. This influence is here analytically studied in the framework of the extended Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation, including the Rashba effect as an additive term of the effective field. Results of previous micromagnetic simulations and experiments have shown that this field yields an increased value of the Walker breakdown current together with an enlargement of the domain wall width. In order to analytically describe these results, the standard travelling wave ansatz for the steady domain wall motion is here adopted. Results of our investigations reveal the impossibility to reproduce, at the same time, the previous features and suggest the need of a more sophisticated model whose development requires, in turn, additional information to be extracted from ad hoc micromagnetic simulations.

  9. Time-dependent behavior of magnetic fields confined by conducting walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kidder, R.E.; Cecil, A.B.

    1983-01-01

    An equation is derived which describes the total current flowing in a moving conducting surface surrounding a magnetic field, where diffusion of the field into the conductor is taken into account. Analytic and numerical solutions of the current equation are obtained for the cases of exponential and linear compression of the magnetic field with time, respectively. It is assumed that the electrical conductivity is constant, that the conducting surfaces are axially symmetric, and that the thickness and radius of curvature of the conducting walls is large compared with the effective depth of penetration of the field

  10. Tentative Identification of Interstellar Dust in the Magnetic Wall of the Heliosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisch, P. C.

    2006-06-01

    Data showing that light from nearby stars, Tinbergen (1982) and Piirola (1977), were acquired during the solar minimum of the mid-1970's when the magnetic wall was expected to form at negative ecliptic latitudes because the solar magnetic polarity was north-pole-positive. The polarization is seen primarily at negative ecliptic latitudes, consistent with the expected magnetic wall position. The interstellar magnetic field direction at the Sun is derived from these data. The small dust grains most likely to cause the polarization are also the grains excluded from the heliosphere by small gyroradii, <100 AU. The direction of maximum polarization is offset by ˜ 20 --40 deg. from the inflow direction of the large grains that are gravitationally focused in the heliosphere tail. Interstellar dust grains in and near the heliosphere form a potential contaminant of the cosmic microwave background signal, which should then be identifiable because the spatial behavior of these grains depends on the phase of the 22 year solar magnetic activity cycle. The author would like to thank NASA for supporting her research.

  11. Analysis of domain wall dynamics based on skewness of magnetic Barkhausen noise for applied stress determination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Song [College of Electrical Engineering and Control Science, Nanjing Tech University, Nanjing, Jiangsu 211816 (China); School of Automation Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210016 (China); Tian, GuiYun, E-mail: tian280@hotmail.com [School of Automation Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210016 (China); School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Merz Court, University of Newcastle upon Tyne, Newcastle NE1 7RU (United Kingdom); Dobmann, Gerd; Wang, Ping [School of Automation Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210016 (China)

    2017-01-01

    Skewness of Magnetic Barkhausen Noise (MBN) signal is used as a new feature for applied stress determination. After experimental studies, skewness presents its ability for measuring applied tensile stress compared with conventional feature, meanwhile, a non-linear behavior of this new feature and an independence of the excitation conditions under compressive stress are found and discussed. Effective damping during domain wall motion influencing the asymmetric shape of the MBN statistical distribution function is discussed under compressive and tensile stress variation. Domain wall (DW) energy and distance between pinning edges of the DW are considered altering the characteristic relaxation time, which is the reason for the non-linear phenomenon of skewness. - Highlights: • The skewness of magnetic Barkhausen noise profile is proposed as a new feature for applied stress determination. • The skewness is sensitive to applied stress and independent to excitation frequency. • Domain wall energy and pinning distance influence the relaxation time of domain wall, which leads to a non-linear behavior of skewness under compressive stress.

  12. Magnetic orientation of single-walled carbon nanotubes or their composites using polymer wrapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroaki Yonemura et al

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The magnetic orientation of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs or the SWNT composites wrapped with polymer using poly[2-methoxy-5-(2'-ethylhexyloxy-1,4-phenylene vinylene] (MEHPPV as the conducting polymer were examined. The formation of SWNT/MEHPPV composites was confirmed by examining absorption and fluorescence spectra. The N,N-dimethylformamide solution of SWNT/MEHPPV composites or the aqueous solution of the shortened SWNTs was introduced dropwise onto a mica or glass plate. The magnetic processing of the composites or the SWNTs was carried out using a superconducting magnet with a horizontal direction (8 T. The AFM images indicated that the SWNT/MEHPPV composites or the SWNTs were oriented randomly without magnetic processing, while with magnetic processing (8 T, they were oriented with the tube axis of the composites or the SWNTs parallel to the magnetic field. In polarized absorption spectra of SWNT/MEHPPV composites on glass plates without magnetic processing, the absorbance due to semiconducting SWNT in the near-IR region in horizontal polarized light was almost the same as that in vertical polarized light. In contrast, with magnetic processing (8 T, the absorbance due to semiconducting SWNT in the horizontal polarization direction against the direction of magnetic field was stronger than that in the vertical polarization direction. Similar results were obtained from the polarized absorption spectra for the shortened SWNTs. These results of polarized absorption spectra also support the magnetic orientation of the SWNT/MEHPPV composites or the SWNTs. On the basis of a comparison of the composites and the SWNTs alone, the magnetic orientation of SWNT/MEHPPV composites is most likely ascribable to the anisotropy in susceptibilities of SWNTs.

  13. Control of first-wall surface conditions in the 2XIIB Magnetic Mirror Plasma Confinement experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simonen, T.C.; Bulmer, R.H.; Coensgen, F.H.

    1976-01-01

    The control of first-wall surface conditions in the 2XIIB Magnetic Mirror Plasma Confinement experiment is described. Before each plasma shot, the first wall is covered with a freshly gettered titanium surface. Up to 5 MW of neutral beam power has been injected into 2XIIB, resulting in first-wall bombardment fluxes of 10 17 atoms . cm -2 . s -1 of 13-keV mean energy deuterium atoms for several ms. The background gas flux is measured with a calibrated, 11-channel, fast-atom detector. Background gas levels are found to depend on surface conditions, injected beam current, and beam pulse duration. For our best operating conditions, an efective reflex coefficient of 0.3 can be inferred from the measurements. Experiments with long-duration and high-current beam injection are limited by charge exchange; however, experiments with shorter beam duration are not limited by first-wall surface conditions. It is concluded that surface effects will be reduced further with smoother walls. (Auth.)

  14. Nu shifts in betatron oscillations from uniform perturbations in the presence of non-linear magnetic guide fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crebbin, K.C.

    1985-05-01

    Uniform magnetic field perturbations cause a closed orbit distortion in a circular accelerator. If the magnetic guide field is non-linear these perturbations can also cause a Nu shift in the betatron oscillations. Such a shift in radial Nu values has been observed in the Bevalac while studying the low energy resonant extraction system. In the Bevalac, the radial perturbation comes from the quadrants being magnetically about 0.8% longer than 90 0 . The normal effect of this type of perturbation is a radial closed orbit shift and orbit distortion. The Nu shift, associated with this type of perturbation in the presence of a non-linear guide field, is discussed in this paper. A method of handling the non-linear n values is discussed as well as the mechanism for the associated Nu shift. Computer calculations are compared to measurements. 2 refs., 4 figs

  15. Influence of the structural properties on the pseudocritical magnetic behavior of single-wall ferromagnetic nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salazar-Enriquez, C.D. [PCM Computational Applications, Universidad Nacional de Colombia - Sede Manizales, A.A. 127 Manizales (Colombia); Restrepo-Parra, E., E-mail: erestrepopa@unal.edu.co [PCM Computational Applications, Universidad Nacional de Colombia - Sede Manizales, A.A. 127 Manizales (Colombia); Restrepo, J. [Grupo de Magnetismo y Simulacion Gplus, Instituto de Fisica, Universidad de Antioquia, A.A. 1226 Medellin (Colombia)

    2012-04-15

    In this work we address the influence of the crystalline structure, concretely when the system under study is formed by square or hexagonal unit cells, upon the magnetic properties and pseudocritical behavior of single-wall ferromagnetic nanotubes. We focus not only on the effect of the geometrical shape of the unit cell but also on their dimensions. The model employed is based on the Monte Carlo method, the Metropolis dynamics and a nearest neighbors classical Heisenberg Hamiltonian. Magnetization per magnetic site, magnetic susceptibility, specific heat and magnetic energy were computed. These properties were computed varying the system size, unit cell dimension and temperature. The dependence of the nearest neighbor exchange integral on the nanotubes geometrical characteristics is also discussed. Results revealed a strong influence of the system topology on the magnetic properties caused by the difference in the coordination number between square and hexagonal unit cell. Moreover, the nanotubes diameter influence on magnetic properties is only observed at very low values, when the distance between atoms is less than it, presented by the 2D sheet. On the other hand, it was concluded that the surface-related finite-size effects do not influence the magnetic nanotubes properties, contrary to the case of other nano-systems as thin films and nanoparticles among others. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Unit cell geometry has strong influence on the magnetic properties in ferromagnetic nanotubes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The nanotube diameter increase produces a decrease of interaction between nearest neighbor. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Surface-related finite-size effects do not influence the magnetic nanotubes properties.

  16. Influence of the structural properties on the pseudocritical magnetic behavior of single-wall ferromagnetic nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salazar-Enríquez, C.D.; Restrepo-Parra, E.; Restrepo, J.

    2012-01-01

    In this work we address the influence of the crystalline structure, concretely when the system under study is formed by square or hexagonal unit cells, upon the magnetic properties and pseudocritical behavior of single-wall ferromagnetic nanotubes. We focus not only on the effect of the geometrical shape of the unit cell but also on their dimensions. The model employed is based on the Monte Carlo method, the Metropolis dynamics and a nearest neighbors classical Heisenberg Hamiltonian. Magnetization per magnetic site, magnetic susceptibility, specific heat and magnetic energy were computed. These properties were computed varying the system size, unit cell dimension and temperature. The dependence of the nearest neighbor exchange integral on the nanotubes geometrical characteristics is also discussed. Results revealed a strong influence of the system topology on the magnetic properties caused by the difference in the coordination number between square and hexagonal unit cell. Moreover, the nanotubes diameter influence on magnetic properties is only observed at very low values, when the distance between atoms is less than it, presented by the 2D sheet. On the other hand, it was concluded that the surface-related finite-size effects do not influence the magnetic nanotubes properties, contrary to the case of other nano-systems as thin films and nanoparticles among others. - Highlights: ► Unit cell geometry has strong influence on the magnetic properties in ferromagnetic nanotubes. ► The nanotube diameter increase produces a decrease of interaction between nearest neighbor. ► Surface-related finite-size effects do not influence the magnetic nanotubes properties.

  17. Equilibrium properties of the plasma sheath with a magnetic field parallel to the wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krasheninnikova, Natalia S.; Tang Xianzhu

    2010-01-01

    Motivated by the magnetized target fusion (MTF) experiment [R. E. Siemon et al., Comments Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 18, 363 (1999)], a systematic investigation of the force balance and equilibrium plasma flows was carried out using analytical theory and the particle-in-cell code VPIC[K. J. Bowers et al., Phys. Plasmas 15, 055703 (2008)] for a one-dimensional plasma sheath with a magnetic field parallel to the wall. Initially uniform full Maxwellian plasma consisting of equal temperature collisionless electrons and ions is allowed to interact with a perfectly absorbing wall. The analysis of the steady-state force balance of the entire plasma as well as its individual components illuminates the roles that the hydrodynamic, magnetic, and electric forces play. In particular, when ρ thi D , the magnetic force balances the divergence of the pressure tensor. As the magnetic field is decreased, the electric force becomes prominent in areas where quasineutrality breaks, which can be a substantial part of the sheath. Its importance depends on the relation between three parameters, namely, electron and ion thermal Larmor radii and plasma Debye length: ρ the , ρ thi , and λ D . The relative importance of the electron and ion current in the magnetic or Lorentz force term can be understood through the analysis of the two-fluid force balance. It reveals that the current is carried primarily by the electrons. This is due to the direction of the electric field that helps confine the ions, but not the electrons, which are forced to carry a large current to confine themselves magnetically. In the regimes where the electric field is negligible, the ions also need the current for confinement, but in these cases the divergence of ion pressure tensor is much smaller than that of the electrons. Consequently the ion current is also smaller. The study of the electron and ion flow parallel to the wall clarifies this picture even further. In the regime of strong magnetic field, the

  18. Determination of spin, magnetic moment and isotopic shift of neutron rich 205Hg by optical pumping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, J.; Bonn, J.; Huber, G.; Kluge, H.J.; Otten, E.W.; European Organisation for Nuclear Research, Geneva

    1975-01-01

    Neutron rich 205 Hg(Tsub(1/2) = 5.2 min) was produced and on-line mass separated at the ISOLDE facility at CERN. The polarization achieved by optical pumping via the atomic line (6s 21 S 0 - 6s6p 3 P 1 , lambda = 2,537 A) was monitored by the β decay asymmetry. Hyperfine structure and isotopic shift of the 205 Hg absorption line was determined by Zeeman scanning. In addition a magnetic resoncance was performed on the polarized 205 Hg nuclei in the atomic ground state. The results are: I( 205 Hg) = 1/2 (confirmed); μ(I, 205 Hg) = 0.5915(1)μ(N) (uncorrected for diamagnetism); isotopic shift deltaν(204/205) = ν( 205 Hg) - ν( 204 Hg) = -1.8(1)GHz. μ(I) and IS are discussed briefly in the frame of current literature. (orig.) [de

  19. Domain wall oscillation in magnetic nanowire with a geometrically confined region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sbiaa, R.; Bahri, M. Al; Piramanayagam, S. N.

    2018-06-01

    In conventional magnetic devices such as magnetic tunnel junctions, a steady oscillation of a soft layer magnetization could find its application in various electronic systems. However, these devices suffer from their low output signal and large spectral linewidth. A more elegant scheme based on domain wall oscillation could be a solution to these issues if DW dynamics could be controlled precisely in space and time. In fact, in DW devices, the magnetic configuration of domain wall and its position are strongly dependent on the device geometry and material properties. Here we show that in a constricted device with judiciously adjusted dimensions, a DW can be trapped within the central part and keep oscillating with a single frequency f. For 200 nm by 40 nm nanowire, f was found to vary from 2 GHz to 3 GHz for a current density between 4.8 × 1012 A/m2 and 5.6 × 1012 A/m2. More interestingly, the device fabrication is simply based on two long nanowires connected by adjusting the offset in both x and y directions. This new type of devices enables the conversion of dc-current to an ac-voltage in a controllable manner opening thus the possibility of a new nano-oscillators with better performance.

  20. Electrical and proximity-magnetic effects induced quantum Goos–Hänchen shift on the surface of topological insulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuai, Jian [School of Physics and Electronics, Yancheng Teachers College, Yancheng, 224002 Jiangsu (China); Da, H.X., E-mail: haixia8779@163.com [Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, National University of Singapore, 4 Engineering Drive 3, 117576 (Singapore)

    2014-03-15

    We use scattering matrix method to theoretically demonstrate that the quantum Goos–Hänchen shift of the surface on three-dimensional topological insulator coated by ferromagnetic strips is sensitive to the magnitude of ferromagnetic magnetization. The dependence of quantum Goos–Hänchen shift on magnetization and gate bias is investigated by performing station phase approach. It is found that quantum Goos–Hänchen shift is positive and large under the magnetic barrier but may be positive as well as negative values under the gate bias. Furthermore, the position of quantum Goos–Hänchen peak can also be modulated by the combination of gate bias and proximity magnetic effects. Our results indicate that topological insulators are another candidates to support quantum Goos–Hänchen shift. - Highlights: • Quantum Goos–Hänchen shift of the surface on three-dimensional topological insulators is first investigated. • The magnetization affects quantum Goos–Hänchen shift of the surface on three-dimensional topological insulators. • Quantum Goos–Hänchen shift of the surface on three-dimensional topological insulators can be manipulated by the gate voltages.

  1. Detection of cerebral hemorrhage in rabbits by time-difference magnetic inductive phase shift spectroscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wencai Pan

    Full Text Available Cerebral hemorrhage, a difficult issue in clinical practice, is often detected and studied with computed tomography (CT, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, and positron emission tomography (PET. However, these expensive devices are not readily available in economically underdeveloped regions, and hence are unable to provide bedside and emergency on-site monitoring. The magnetic inductive phase shift (MIPS is an emerging technology that may become a new tool to detect cerebral hemorrhage and to serve as an inexpensive partial substitute to medical imaging. In order to study a wider band of cerebral hemorrhage MIPS and to provide more useful information for measuring cerebral hemorrhage, we established a cerebral hemorrhage magnetic induction phase shift spectroscopy (MIPSS detection system. Thirteen rabbits with five cerebral hemorrhage states were studied using a single coil-coil within a 1 MHz-200 MHz frequency range in linear sweep. A feature band (FB with the highest detection sensitivity and the greatest stability was selected for further analysis and processing. In addition, a maximum conductivity cerebrospinal fluid (CSF MRI was performed to verify and interpret the MIPSS result. The average phase shift change induced by a 3 ml injection of autologous blood under FB was -7.7503° ± 1.4204°, which was considerably larger than our previous work. Data analysis with a non-parametric statistical Friedman M test showed that in the FB, MIPSS could distinguish the five states of cerebral hemorrhage in rabbits, with a statistical significance of p<0.05. A B-F distribution profile was designed according to the MIPSS under FB that can provide instantaneous diagnostic information about the cerebral hemorrhage severity from a single set of measurements. The results illustrate that the MIPSS detection method is able to provide a new possibility for real-time monitoring and diagnosis of the severity of cerebral hemorrhage.

  2. Detection of Cerebral Hemorrhage in Rabbits by Time-Difference Magnetic Inductive Phase Shift Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Wencai; Yan, Qingguang; Qin, Mingxin; Jin, Gui; Sun, Jian; Ning, Xu; Zhuang, Wei; Peng, Bin; Li, Gen

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral hemorrhage, a difficult issue in clinical practice, is often detected and studied with computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and positron emission tomography (PET). However, these expensive devices are not readily available in economically underdeveloped regions, and hence are unable to provide bedside and emergency on-site monitoring. The magnetic inductive phase shift (MIPS) is an emerging technology that may become a new tool to detect cerebral hemorrhage and to serve as an inexpensive partial substitute to medical imaging. In order to study a wider band of cerebral hemorrhage MIPS and to provide more useful information for measuring cerebral hemorrhage, we established a cerebral hemorrhage magnetic induction phase shift spectroscopy (MIPSS) detection system. Thirteen rabbits with five cerebral hemorrhage states were studied using a single coil-coil within a 1 MHz-200 MHz frequency range in linear sweep. A feature band (FB) with the highest detection sensitivity and the greatest stability was selected for further analysis and processing. In addition, a maximum conductivity cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) MRI was performed to verify and interpret the MIPSS result. The average phase shift change induced by a 3 ml injection of autologous blood under FB was -7.7503° ± 1.4204°, which was considerably larger than our previous work. Data analysis with a non-parametric statistical Friedman M test showed that in the FB, MIPSS could distinguish the five states of cerebral hemorrhage in rabbits, with a statistical significance of phemorrhage severity from a single set of measurements. The results illustrate that the MIPSS detection method is able to provide a new possibility for real-time monitoring and diagnosis of the severity of cerebral hemorrhage. PMID:26001112

  3. Numerical study of plasma-wall transition in an oblique magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valsaque, Fabrice; Manfredi, Giovanni

    2001-01-01

    The interaction of a plasma with a fixed wall is investigated numerically. The ions are described by a kinetic model, while the electrons are assumed to be at thermal equilibrium. Finite Debye length effects are taken into account. An Eulerian code is used for the ion dynamics, which enables us to obtain a fine resolution of both position and velocity space. First, we analyse the effect of ionization and collisions, which bring the ion flow to supersonic velocity at the entrance of the Debye sheath (Bohm's criterion). Second, we consider a collisionless sheath with an oblique magnetic field. A magnetic presheath, which has a width of several ion gyroradii, is located between the Debye sheath and the bulk plasma. We perform a systematic numerical study of these sheaths for different incidences of the magnetic field

  4. Direct Observation of Domain-Wall Surface Tension by Deflating or Inflating a Magnetic Bubble

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xueying; Vernier, Nicolas; Zhao, Weisheng; Yu, Haiming; Vila, Laurent; Zhang, Yue; Ravelosona, Dafiné

    2018-02-01

    The surface energy of a magnetic domain wall (DW) strongly affects its static and dynamic behaviors. However, this effect is seldom directly observed, and some of the related phenomena are not well understood. Moreover, a reliable method to quantify the DW surface energy is still absent. Here, we report a series of experiments in which the DW surface energy becomes a dominant parameter. We observe that a semicircular magnetic domain bubble can spontaneously collapse under the Laplace pressure induced by DW surface energy. We further demonstrate that the surface energy can lead to a geometrically induced pinning when the DW propagates in a Hall cross or from a nanowire into a nucleation pad. Based on these observations, we develop two methods to quantify the DW surface energy, which can be very helpful in the estimation of intrinsic parameters such as Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interactions or exchange stiffness in magnetic ultrathin films.

  5. Effect of resonance line shape on precision measurements of nuclear magnetic resonance shifts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kachurin, A.M.; Smelyanskij, A.Ya.

    1986-01-01

    Effect of resonance line shape on the systematic error of precision measurements of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) shifts of high resolution (on the center of NMR dispersion line) is analysed. Effect of the device resonance line form-function asymmetry is evaluated; the form-function is determined by configuration of the spectrometer magnetic field and enters the convolution, which describes the resonance line form. It is shown that with the increase of the relaxation line width the form-function effect on the measurement error yields to zero. The form-function effect on measurements and correction of a phase angle of NMR detection is evaluated. The method of semiquantitative evaluation of resonance line and NMR spectrometer parameters, guaranteeing the systematic error of the given infinitesimal, is presented

  6. Reconfigurable logic via gate controlled domain wall trajectory in magnetic network structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murapaka, C.; Sethi, P.; Goolaup, S.; Lew, W. S.

    2016-01-01

    An all-magnetic logic scheme has the advantages of being non-volatile and energy efficient over the conventional transistor based logic devices. In this work, we present a reconfigurable magnetic logic device which is capable of performing all basic logic operations in a single device. The device exploits the deterministic trajectory of domain wall (DW) in ferromagnetic asymmetric branch structure for obtaining different output combinations. The programmability of the device is achieved by using a current-controlled magnetic gate, which generates a local Oersted field. The field generated at the magnetic gate influences the trajectory of the DW within the structure by exploiting its inherent transverse charge distribution. DW transformation from vortex to transverse configuration close to the output branch plays a pivotal role in governing the DW chirality and hence the output. By simply switching the current direction through the magnetic gate, two universal logic gate functionalities can be obtained in this device. Using magnetic force microscopy imaging and magnetoresistance measurements, all basic logic functionalities are demonstrated. PMID:26839036

  7. Comprehensive kinetic analysis of the plasma-wall transition layer in a strongly tilted magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tskhakaya, D. D.; Kos, L.

    2014-01-01

    The magnetized plasma-wall transition (MPWT) layer at the presence of the obliquity of the magnetic field to the wall consists of three sub-layers: the Debye sheath (DS), the magnetic pre-sheath (MPS), and the collisional pre-sheath (CPS) with characteristic lengths λ D (electron Debye length), ρ i (ion gyro-radius), and ℓ (the smallest relevant collision length), respectively. Tokamak plasmas are usually assumed to have the ordering λ D ≪ρ i ≪ℓ, when the above-mentioned sub-layers can be distinctly distinguished. In the limits of ε Dm (λ D /ρ i )→0 and ε mc (ρ i /ℓ)→0 (“asymptotic three-scale (A3S) limits”), these sub-layers are precisely defined. Using the smallness of the tilting angle of the magnetic field to the wall, the ion distribution functions are found for three sub-regions in the analytic form. The equations and characteristic length-scales governing the transition (intermediate) regions between the neighboring sub-layers (CPS – MPS and MPS – DS) are derived, allowing to avoid the singularities arising from the ε Dm →0 and ε mc →0 approximations. The MPS entrance and the related kinetic form of the Bohm–Chodura condition are successfully defined for the first time. At the DS entrance, the Bohm condition maintains its usual form. The results encourage further study and understanding of physics of the MPWT layers in the modern plasma facilities

  8. Effect of Magnetic Mirror on the Asymmetry of the Radial Profile of Near-Wall Conductivity in Hall Thrusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Daren; Liu Hui; Fu Haiyang

    2009-01-01

    Considering the actual magnetic field configuration in a Hall thruster, the effect of magnetic mirror on the radial profile of near-wall conductivity (NWC) is studied in this paper. The plasma electron dynamic process is described by the test particle method. The Monte Carlo scheme is used to solve this model. The radial profile of electron mobility is obtained and the role of magnetic mirror in NWC is analysed both theoretically and numerically. The numerical results show that the electron mobility peak due to NWC is inversely proportional to the magnetic mirror ratio and the asymmetry of electron mobility along the radial direction gets greater when the magnetic mirror is considered. This effect indicates that apart from the disparity in the magnetic field strength, the difference in the magnetic mirror ratio near the inner and outer walls would actually augment the asymmetry of the radial profile of NWC in Hall thrusters.

  9. In vivo 3-dimensional Magnetic Resonance Wall Shear Stress Estimation in Ascending Aortic Dilatation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieging, Erik T.; Frydrychowicz, Alex; Wentland, Andrew; Landgraf, Benjamin R.; Johnson, Kevin M.; Wieben, Oliver; François, Christopher J.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To estimate surface-based wall shear stress (WSS) and evaluate flow patterns in ascending aortic dilatation (AscAD) using a high-resolution, time-resolved, three-dimensional (3D), three-directional velocity encoded, radially undersampled phase contrast magnetic resonance sequence (4D PC-MRI). Materials and Methods 4D PC-MRI was performed in 11 patients with AscAD (46.3±22.0 years) and 10 healthy volunteers (32.9±13.4 years) after written informed consent and IRB-approval. Following manual vessel wall segmentation of the ascending aorta (MATLAB, The Mathworks, Natick, MA), a 3D surface was created using spline interpolation. Spatial WSS variation based on surface division in 12 segments and temporal variation were evaluated in AscAD and normal aortas. Visual analysis of flow patterns was performed based on streamlines and particle traces using EnSight (v9.0, CEI, Apex, NC). Results AscAD was associated with significantly increased diastolic WSS, decreased systolic to diastolic WSS ratio, and delayed onset of peak WSS (all P wall of the ascending aorta. Vortical flow with highest velocities along the anterior wall and increased helical flow during diastole were observed in AscAD compared to controls. Conclusion Changes in WSS in the ascending aorta of AscAD correspond to observed alterations in flow patterns compared to controls. PMID:21563242

  10. Evaluation of the fetal abdomen by magnetic resonance imaging. Part 2: abdominal wall defects and tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Pinho Matos

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Although ultrasound is still the gold standard for the assessment of fetal malformations, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI has gained great prominence in recent years. In situations in which ultrasound has low sensitivity, such as maternal obesity, abdominal scarring, and oligohydramnios, MRI has proven to be a safe and accurate method. Regarding fetal abdominal wall defects, MRI appears to be widely used in the prognostic assessment of gastroschisis with intestinal atresia or of complications of omphalocele, allowing better perinatal management and parental counseling. In addition, MRI allows the assessment of local invasion of fetal abdominal tumors, with significant prognostic value for the postnatal period. In this article, we review the main MRI findings in the evaluation of fetal abdominal wall defects and tumors.

  11. Chirality dependent pinning and depinning of magnetic vortex domain walls at nano-constrictions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohanan P, Vineeth; Kumar, P.S. Anil, E-mail: anil@physics.iisc.ernet.in

    2017-01-15

    The implementation of magnetic domain wall (DW) based memory and logic devices critically depend on the control over DW assisted magnetization reversal processes. Here we investigate the magnetization reversal by DW injection, pinning and depinning at a geometrical constriction in permalloy nanowire (NW) driven by external in-plane magnetic field, using local electrical probes. The observations of two distinct depinning field values are identified with the help of micromagnetic simulations, as being due to vortex DWs of different chiralities. Statistical analysis gave an estimate of chirality dependent pinning probability of DWs at this constriction. The stochastic nature of the DW based reversal driven by magnetic field is revealed here. The asymmetry in the depinning field of the DWs to move to either side of constriction indicates the asymmetric nature of the barrier potential seen by the DWs. The results demonstrate the difficulties in achieving deterministic switching behavior of DW assisted reversal, and provide a platform to understand the main bottlenecks in the technological implementation of DWs.

  12. Model of a source-driven plasma interacting with a wall in an oblique magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahedo, E.; Carralero, D.

    2009-01-01

    A fluid model of a magnetized source-driven plasma is discussed for regimes with (Debye length)<<(ion Larmor radius)<<(plasma size and collisional mean-free path). Plasma collection by the wall is determined in terms of angle of incidence, magnetic strength, and plasma collisionality. For nonparallel incidence, a three-scale asymptotic analysis reveals a three-region matched structure consisting of a magnetically aligned bulk region, the Chodura layer, and the Debye sheath. Sonic Chodura and Bohm conditions define the singular region transitions. For near-parallel incidence, a separate analysis demonstrates the presence of a diffusive-collisional bulk region followed by a thin collisionless layer, which differs partially from the Chodura layer. A parametric analysis unveils the presence of four regimes depending on plasma collisionality: (1) a collisionless regime, with the magnetically channeled bulk region governed by plasma production; (2) a resistive semicollisional regime, where collisions retard the plasma transport in the bulk region; (3) a diffusive semicollisional regime, where the ExB drift dominates the ion flux in the bulk region; and (4) a collisional regime, where collisions cancel out magnetic effects. At grazing incidence, plasma collection is found to vary nonmonotonically with plasma collisionality. Nonzero Debye-length effects are discussed briefly.

  13. Wall enhancement on high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging may predict an unsteady state of an intracranial saccular aneurysm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Peng; Zhang, Hong-Qi [Capital Medical University, Department of Neurosurgery, Xuanwu Hospital, Beijing (China); Yang, Qi [Capital Medical University, Department of Radiology, Xuanwu Hospital, Beijing (China); Wang, Dan-Dan [Capital Medical University, Department of Clinical Pathology, Xuanwu Hospital, Beijing (China); Guan, Shao-Chen [Capital Medical University, Department of Evidence-Based Medicine, Xuanwu Hospital, Beijing (China)

    2016-10-15

    The aneurysm wall has been reported to play a critical role in the formation, development, and even rupture of an aneurysm. We used high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (HRMRI) to investigate the aneurysm wall in an effort to identify evidence of inflammation invasion and define its relationship with aneurysm behavior. Patients with intracranial aneurysms who were prospectively evaluated using HRMRI between July 2013 and June 2014 were enrolled in this study. The aneurysm's wall enhancement and evidence of inflammation invasion were determined. In addition, the relationship between aneurysm wall enhancement and aneurysm size and symptoms, including ruptured aneurysms, giant unruptured intracranial aneurysms (UIAs) presenting as mass effect, progressively growing aneurysms, and aneurysms associated with neurological symptoms, was statistically analyzed. Twenty-five patients with 30 aneurysms were available for the current study. Fourteen aneurysms showed wall enhancement, including 6 ruptured and 8 unruptured aneurysms. Evidence of inflammation was identified directly through histological studies and indirectly through intraoperative investigations and clinical courses. The statistical analysis indicated no significant correlation between aneurysm wall enhancement and aneurysm size. However, there was a strong correlation between wall enhancement and aneurysm symptoms, with a kappa value of 0.86 (95 % CI 0.68-1). Aneurysm wall enhancement on HRMRI might be a sign of inflammatory change. Symptomatic aneurysms exhibited wall enhancement on HRMRI. Wall enhancement had a high consistent correlation of symptomatic aneurysms. Therefore, wall enhancement on HRMRI might predict an unsteady state of an intracranial saccular aneurysm. (orig.)

  14. Mechanobiology of LDL mass transport in the arterial wall under the effect of magnetic field, part I: Diffusion rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aminfar, Habib, E-mail: hh_aminfar@tabrizu.ac.ir [Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, University of Tabriz, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mohammadpourfard, Mousa, E-mail: Mohammadpour@tabrizu.ac.ir [Faculty of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering, University of Tabriz, Tabriz 5166616471 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khajeh, Kosar, E-mail: k.khajeh.2005@tabrizu.ac.ir [Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, University of Tabriz, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    It is well-known that the Low Density Lipoprotein (LDL) can accumulate and penetrate into the arterial wall. Here, we have investigated the diffusion rate of macromolecules across the porous layer of blood vessel under the effects of magnetic force. By using a finite volume technique, it was found that magnetic field makes alterations in diffusion rate of LDLs, also surface concentration of macromolecules on the walls. As well, the influence of different value of Re and Sc number in the presence of a magnetic field have shown as nondimensional concentration profiles. Magnetic field considered as a body force, porous layer simulated by using Darcy's law and the blood regarded as nano fluid which was examined as a single phase model. - Highlights: • LDLs mass transfer across the arterial wall under magnetic field has simulated numerically. • Arterial wall assumed as a homogeneous porous layer by using Darcy's law. • Blood containing 4% Vol. Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} regarded as nanofluid and has examined by single phase model. • Magnetic field significantly affects the diffusion rate of LDLs through porous arterial wall.

  15. Shift of the eutectoid point in the Fe-C binary system by a high magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Y D; Esling, C; Calcagnotto, M; Gong, M L; Zhao, X; Zuo, L

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate experimentally the shift of the eutectoid point in the Fe-C binary system when applying a high magnetic field. The eutectoid carbon content is observed to shift from 0.77 wt% to 0.83 wt% under a 12 T magnetic field. A practical and complete calculation method is proposed-on the basis of the statistical thermodynamic model-to calculate the Gibbs free energy of the related phases and predict the shift of the eutectoid point due to a magnetic field in both composition and temperature coordinates. The composition values are seen to be in fair agreement with the experimental data. The calculation of both shifts shows that the rise in eutectoid temperature because of the 12 T field is 28.97 deg. C. The impact of the magnetic field on both eutectoid carbon content and eutectoid temperature is not linear. The rate of the shift of both carbon content and temperature decreases as the magnetic field rises

  16. Design and Optimal Research of a Non-Contact Adjustable Magnetic Adhesion Mechanism for a Wall-Climbing Welding Robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minghui Wu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Wall-climbing welding robots (WCWRs can replace workers in manufacturing and maintaining large unstructured equipment, such as ships. The adhesion mechanism is the key component of WCWRs. As it is directly related to the robot's ability in relation to adsorbing, moving flexibly and obstacle-passing. In this paper, a novel non-contact adjustably magnetic adhesion mechanism is proposed. The magnet suckers are mounted under the robot's axils and the sucker and wall are in non-contact. In order to pass obstacles, the sucker and the wheel unit can be pulled up and pushed down by a lifting mechanism. The magnetic adhesion force can be adjusted by changing the height of the gap between the sucker and the wall by the lifting mechanism. In order to increase the adhesion force, the value of the sucker's magnetic energy density (MED is maximized by optimizing the magnet sucker's structure parameters with a finite element method. Experiments prove that the magnetic adhesion mechanism has enough adhesion force and that the WCWR can complete wall-climbing work within a large unstructured environment.

  17. Carbon 13 nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shifts empiric calculations of polymers by multi linear regression and molecular modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Da Silva Pinto, P.S.; Eustache, R.P.; Audenaert, M.; Bernassau, J.M.

    1996-01-01

    This work deals with carbon 13 nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shifts empiric calculations by multi linear regression and molecular modeling. The multi linear regression is indeed one way to obtain an equation able to describe the behaviour of the chemical shift for some molecules which are in the data base (rigid molecules with carbons). The methodology consists of structures describer parameters definition which can be bound to carbon 13 chemical shift known for these molecules. Then, the linear regression is used to determine the equation significant parameters. This one can be extrapolated to molecules which presents some resemblances with those of the data base. (O.L.). 20 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  18. Quantum Interference Control of Ballistic Magneto- resistance in a Magnetic Nanowire Containing Two Atomic- Size Domain Walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Fallahi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The magnetoresistance of a one-dimensional electron gas in a metallic ferromagnetic nanowire containing two atomic-size domain walls has been investigated in the presence of spin-orbit interaction. The magnetoresistance is calculated in the ballistic regime, within the Landauer-Büttiker formalism. It has been demonstrated that the conductance of a magnetic nanowire with double domain walls can be controlled through the domain walls separation. Also, we have represented another alternative way that enables us to handle easily the magnetoresistance of such a system as well as its conductance by utilizing the Rashba-type spin-orbit interaction induced by the external gates.

  19. Influence of radial magnetic field on the peristaltic flow of Williamson fluid in a curved complaint walls channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tasawar Hayat

    Full Text Available Peristaltic transport of Williamson fluid in a curved geometry is modeled. Problem formulation is completed by complaint walls of channel. Radial magnetic field in the analysis is taken into account. Resulting problem formulation is simplified using long wavelength and low Reynolds number approximations. Series solution is obtained for small Weissenberg number. Influences of different embedded parameters on the axial velocity and stream function are examined. As expected the velocity in curved channel is not symmetric. Axial velocity is noticed decreasing for Hartman number. Trapped bolus increases for Hartman and curvature parameters. Keywords: Williamson fluid, Curved channel, Radial magnetic field, Complaint walls

  20. In-vivo quantification of wall motion in cerebral aneurysms from 2D cine phase contrast magnetic resonance images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karmonik, C. [The Methodist Hospital Research Inst., Houston (United States); Diaz, O.; Klucznik, R. [The Methodist Hospital, Houston (United States); Grossman, R. [The Methodist Hospital, Houston (United States). Neurosurgery

    2010-02-15

    Purpose: The quantification of wall motion in cerebral aneurysms is of interest for the assessment of aneurysmal rupture risk, for providing boundary conditions for computational simulations and as a validation tool for theoretical models. Materials and Methods: 2D cine phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging (2D pcMRI) in combination with quantitative magnetic resonance angiography (QMRA) was evaluated for measuring wall motion in 7 intracranial aneurysms. In each aneurysm, 2 (in one case 3) cross sections, oriented approximately perpendicular to each other, were measured. Results: The maximum aneurysmal wall distention ranged from 0.16 mm to 1.6 mm (mean 0.67 mm), the maximum aneurysmal wall contraction was -1.91 mm to -0.34 mm (mean 0.94 mm), and the average wall displacement ranged from 0.04 mm to 0.31 mm (mean 0.15 mm). Statistically significant correlations between average wall displacement and the shape of inflow curves (p-value < 0.05) were found in 7 of 15 cross sections; statistically significant correlations between the displacement of the luminal boundary center point and the shape of inflow curves (p-value < 0.05) were found in 6 of 15 cross sections. Conclusion: 2D pcMRI in combination with QMRA is capable of visualizing and quantifying wall motion in cerebral aneurysms. However, application of this technique is currently restricted by its limited spatial resolution. (orig.)

  1. Dynamic control of magnetic nanowires by light-induced domain-wall kickoffs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heintze, Eric; El Hallak, Fadi; Clauß, Conrad; Rettori, Angelo; Pini, Maria Gloria; Totti, Federico; Dressel, Martin; Bogani, Lapo

    2013-03-01

    Controlling the speed at which systems evolve is a challenge shared by all disciplines, and otherwise unrelated areas use common theoretical frameworks towards this goal. A particularly widespread model is Glauber dynamics, which describes the time evolution of the Ising model and can be applied to any binary system. Here we show, using molecular nanowires under irradiation, that Glauber dynamics can be controlled by a novel domain-wall kickoff mechanism. In contrast to known processes, the kickoff has unambiguous fingerprints, slowing down the spin-flip attempt rate by several orders of magnitude, and following a scaling law. The required irradiance is very low, a substantial improvement over present methods of magneto-optical switching. These results provide a new way to control and study stochastic dynamic processes. Being general for Glauber dynamics, they can be extended to different kinds of magnetic nanowires and to numerous fields, ranging from social evolution to neural networks and chemical reactivity.

  2. Virtual cathode microwave generation using inhomogeneous magnetic field and wave guide wall configuration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thode, L.E.; Kwan, T.J.T.

    1984-01-01

    Microwave generation from a virtual cathode system is investigated using two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation. In the typical virtual cathode geometry, the electron beam diode is separated from the output waveguide by a ground plane which is a thin foil or screen. By lowering the diode impedance sufficiently, it is possible to form a virtual cathode in the waveguide region a short distance from the ground plane. In this configuration two mechanisms can lead to microwave generation: 1) electron bunching due to reflection between the real and virtual cathode and 2) electron bunching due to virtual cathode oscillation. Both mechanisms are typically present, but it appears possible to make one mechanism dominant by adjusting the output waveguide radius. Although such a configuration might generate 1-10 GW output, electron deposition into the ground plane, waveguide wall, and output window causes breakdown. To overcome these disadvantages, the authors have investigated a configuration with no ground plane coupled with the use of an inhomogeneous external magnetic field and waveguide wall

  3. Magnetic field effects for copper suspended nanofluid venture through a composite stenosed arteries with permeable wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akbar, Noreen Sher; Butt, Adil Wahid, E-mail: adil.maths86@gmail.com

    2015-05-01

    In the present paper magnetic field effects for copper nanoparticles for blood flow through composite stenosis in arteries with permeable wall are discussed. The copper nanoparticles for the blood flow with water as base fluid is not explored yet. The equations for the Cu–water nanofluid are developed first time in the literature and simplified using long wavelength and low Reynolds number assumptions. Exact solutions have been evaluated for velocity, pressure gradient, the solid volume fraction of the nanoparticles and temperature profile. The effect of various flow parameters on the flow and heat transfer characteristics is utilized. - Highlights: • It is observed that the velocity profile is symmetric for all the parameters and when we increase slip parameter α then there will be more resistance between blood and arteries, hence the blood flow slows down and velocity profile decreases. • It is seen that the velocity field rises due to high electromagnetic forces and buoyancy forces as compared to viscous forces. • It is also noticed that velocity is high for all the parameters in case of pure water as compare to Cu-water because copper makes arteries more flexible that makes the blood flow speed slow. • When we rise heat absorption parameter β then definitely temperature increases rapidly. • The wall shear stress increases for different values of the slip parameter α and the Darcy number D{sub α} with rapid change in copper as compared to pure water.

  4. Effect of steady magnetic field on laser-induced breakdown spectroscopic characterization of EAST-like wall materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hai, R.; Liu, P.; Wu, D.; Xiao, Q.; Sun, L.; Ding, H.

    2015-01-01

    Our recent investigations were focused on the feasibility of the LIBS method proposed for EAST under vacuum conditions as well as with a magnetic field. Aluminum (replaced Be)–lithium alloys were used as a substitute for a uniform lithium deposition layer on the first wall. Detailed information of divertor tiles (multi-element doped graphite) and aluminum–lithium alloys were obtained by analyzing the spectra from 200 to 980 nm. With the magnetic field (0.94 T), various line emissions obtained from the constituents of samples shown an enhancement (>2 times) in intensity due to the increase in the effective plasma density and temperature as a result of magnetic confinement. The effect of magnetic field on the emission intensity of LIBS at the different pressure (1.0 × 10 −5 –1000 mbar) would help us to develop a quantitative LIBS approach to monitor impurity deposition and fuel retention on the first wall

  5. Study and optimization of magnetized ICRF discharges for tokamak wall conditioning and assessment of the applicability to ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wauters, T.

    2011-11-01

    This work is devoted to the study and optimization of the Ion Cyclotron Wall Conditioning (ICWC) technique. ICWC, operated in presence of the toroidal magnetic field, makes use of four main tokamak systems: the ICRF antennas to initiate and sustain the conditioning discharge, the gas injection valves to provide the discharge gas, the machine pumps to remove the wall desorbed particles, and the poloidal magnetic field system to optimize the discharge homogeneity. Additionally neutral gas and plasma diagnostics are required to monitor the discharge and the conditioning efficiency. In chapter 2 a general overview on ICWC is given. Chapter 3 treats the ICRF discharge homogeneity and the confinement properties of the employed magnetic field. In the first part we will discuss experimental facts on plasma homogeneity, and how experimental optimization led to its improvement. In the second part of the chapter the confinement properties of a partially ionized plasma in a toroidal magnetic field configuration with additional small vertical component are discussed. Chapter 4 gives an overview of experimental results on the efficiency of ICWC, obtained on TORE SUPRA, TEXTOR, JET and ASDEX Upgrade. In chapter 5 a 0D kinetic description of hydrogen-helium RF plasmas is outlined. The model, describing the evolution of ICRF plasmas from discharge initiation to the (quasi) steady state plasma stage, is developed to obtain insight on ICRF plasma parameters, particle fluxes to the walls and the main collisional processes. Chapter 6 presents a minimum structure for a 0D reservoir model of the wall to investigate in deeper detail the ICWC plasma wall interaction during isotopic exchange experiments. The hypothesis used to build up the wall model is that the same model structure should be able to describe the wall behavior during normal plasmas and conditioning procedures. Chapter 7 extrapolates the results to the envisaged application of ICWC on ITER

  6. Transverse magnetic field effect on the giant Goos–Hänchen shifts based on a degenerate two-level system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasehi, R.

    2018-06-01

    We study the effect of the Goos–Hänchen (GH) shifts through a cavity with degenerate two-level systems in the line of . For this purpose, we focus on the transverse magnetic field (TMF) in a Floquet frame to obtain the giant GH shifts. Physically, the collisional effects of TMF lead to increasing the population trapping in the ground state. However, we demonstrate that the population trapping generates the large negative or positive GH shifts and simultaneously switches from superluminal to subluminal (or vice versa). Also, we investigate the other optical properties such as the longitudinal magnetic field (LMF), which plays an important role in the control of the GH shifts and leads to the generation of new subsystems. In the next step, we evaluate the GH shifts beyond the multi-photon resonance condition by the control of TMF. Moreover, we compute the appearance of negative and positive GH shifts by setting the width of the incident Gaussian beams in the presence of a multi-photon resonance condition. Our results show that superluminal or subluminal light propagation can be simultaneously controlled by adjusting the rates of the TMF and LMF. The significant effects of these factors on the degenerate two-level systems provide different applications such as slow light, optical switches and quantum information storage.

  7. Current induced domain wall motion and tilting in Pt/Co/Ta structures with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy in the presence of the Dyzaloshinskii–Moriya interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Jijun; Li, Dong; Cui, Baoshan; Guo, Xiaobin; Wu, Kai; Zhang, Xu; Wang, Yupei; Mao, Jian; Zuo, Yalu; Xi, Li

    2018-04-01

    Current induced domain wall motion (CIDWM) was studied in Pt/Co/Ta structures with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy and the Dyzaloshinskii–Moriya interaction (DMI) by the spin-orbit torque (SOT). We measured the strength of DMI and SOT efficiency in Pt/Co/Ta with the variation of the thickness of Ta using a current induced hysteresis loop shift method. The results indicate that the DMI stabilizes a chiral Néel-type domain wall (DW), and the DW motion can be driven by the enhanced large SOT generated from Pt and Ta with opposite signs of spin Hall angle in Pt/Co/Ta stacks. The CIDWM velocity, which is 104 times larger than the field driven DW velocity, obeys a creep law, and reaches around tens of meters per second with current density of ~106 A cm‑2. We also found that the Joule heating accompanied with current also accelerates the DW motion. Meanwhile, a domain wall tilting was observed, which increases with current density increasing. These results can be explained by the spin Hall effect generated from both heavy metals Pt and Ta, inherent DMI, and the current accompanying Joule heating effect. Our results could provide some new designing prospects to move multiple DWs by SOT for achieving racetrack memories.

  8. Ratchet Effects and Domain Wall Energy Landscapes in Amorphous Magnetic Films with 2D Arrays of Asymmetric Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, J. I.; Alija, A.; Sobrado, I.; Perez-Junquera, A.; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, G.; Velez, M.; Alameda, J. M.; Marconi, V. I.; Kolton, A. B.; Parrondo, J. M. R.

    2009-03-01

    The driven motion of domain walls in extended magnetic films patterned with 2D arrays of asymmetric holes has been found to be subject to two different crossed ratchet effects [1] which results in an inversion of the sign of domain wall motion rectification as a function of the applied magnetic field. This effect can be understood in terms of the competition between drive, elasticity and asymmetric pinning as revealed by a simple 4̂-model. In order to optimize the asymmetric hole design, the relevant energy landscapes for domain wall motion across the array of asymmetric holes have been calculated by micromagnetic simulations as a function of array geometrical characteristics. The effects of a transverse magnetic field on these two crossed ratchet effects will also be discussed in terms of the decrease in domain wall energy per unit area and of the modifications in the magnetostatic barriers for domain wall pinning at the asymmetric inclusions. Work supported by Spanish MICINN.[1] A. Perez-Junquera et al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 100 (2008) 037203

  9. Introduction and pinning of domain walls in 50 nm NiFe constrictions using local and external magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zahnd, G.; Pham, V.T.; Marty, A.; Jamet, M.; Beigné, C.; Notin, L.; Vergnaud, C.; Rortais, F.; Vila, L.; Attané, J.-P.

    2016-01-01

    We study domain wall injection in 100 nm wide NiFe nanowires, followed by domain wall propagation and pinning on 50 nm wide constrictions. The injection is performed using local and external magnetic fields. Using several nucleation pad geometries, we show that at these small dimensions the use of an external field only does not allow obtaining a reproducible injection/pinning process. However, the use of an additional local field, created by an Oersted line, allows to nucleate a reversed domain at zero external applied field. Then, an external field of 5 mT enables the domain wall to propagate far from the Oersted line, and the pinning occurs reproducibly. We also show that notwithstanding the reproducibility of the pinning process, the depinning field is found to be stochastic, following a bimodal distribution. Using micromagnetic simulation we link two different DW configurations, vortex and transverse, to the two typical depinning fields. - Highlights: • Magnetic domain wall introduction and pinning in Permalloy nanowires with 50 nm wide constrictions. • Magnetic domain nucleation at zero external applied field. • Bimodal distribution of the domain wall configuration in the constriction.

  10. Design of a magnetic-tunnel-junction-oriented nonvolatile lookup table circuit with write-operation-minimized data shifting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Daisuke; Hanyu, Takahiro

    2018-04-01

    A magnetic-tunnel-junction (MTJ)-oriented nonvolatile lookup table (LUT) circuit, in which a low-power data-shift function is performed by minimizing the number of write operations in MTJ devices is proposed. The permutation of the configuration memory cell for read/write access is performed as opposed to conventional direct data shifting to minimize the number of write operations, which results in significant write energy savings in the data-shift function. Moreover, the hardware cost of the proposed LUT circuit is small since the selector is shared between read access and write access. In fact, the power consumption in the data-shift function and the transistor count are reduced by 82 and 52%, respectively, compared with those in a conventional static random-access memory-based implementation using a 90 nm CMOS technology.

  11. Enhancement of axial momentum lost to the radial wall by the upstream magnetic field in a helicon source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Kazunori; Ando, Akira

    2017-05-01

    Individual measurements of forces exerted to an upstream back wall, a radial source wall, and a magnetic field of a helicon plasma thruster, which has two solenoids upstream and downstream of a radiofrequency antenna, are precisely measured. Two different structures of magnetic field lines in the source are tested, where the solenoid current is supplied to either only the downstream solenoid or to both the solenoids. It is observed that the high density plasma exists upstream of the rf antenna when both the solenoids are powered, while the maximum density exists near the rf antenna when only the downstream solenoid is powered. Although the force exerted to the back wall is increased for the two solenoids case, the axial momentum lost to the radial wall is simultaneously enhanced; then the total force exerted to the whole structure of the thruster is found to be very similar for the two magnetic field configurations. It is shown that the individual force measurement provides useful information on the plasma momentum interacting with the physical boundaries and the magnetic fields.

  12. Liquid-metal flow through a thin-walled elbow in a plane perpendicular to a uniform magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, J.S.

    1986-04-01

    This paper presents analytical solutions for the liquid-metal flow through two straight pipes connected by a smooth elbow with the same inside radius. The pipes and the elbow lie in a plane which is perpendicular to a uniform, applied magnetic field. The strength of the magnetic field is assumed to be sufficiently strong that inertial and viscous effects are negligible. This assumption is appropriate for the liquid-lithium flow in the blanket of a magnetic confinement fusion reactor, such as a tokamak. The pipes and the elbow have thin metal walls

  13. Stiffness Matrix of Thin-Walled Open Bar Subject to Bending, Bending Torsion and Shift of Cross Section Middle Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panasenko, N. N.; Sinelschikov, A. V.

    2017-11-01

    One of the main stages in the analysis of complex 3D structures and engineering constructions made of thin-walled open bars using FEM is a stiffness matrix developing. Taking into account middle surface shear deformation caused by the work of tangential stresses in the formula to calculate a potential energy of thin-walled open bars, the authors obtain an important correction at calculation of the bar deformation and fundamental frequencies. The results of the analysis of the free end buckling of a cantilever H-bar under plane bending differ from exact solution by 0.53%. In the course of comparison of the obtained results with the cantilever bar buckling regardless the middle surface shear deformation, an increase made 16.6%. The stiffness matrix of a thin-walled open bar developed in the present work can be integrated into any software suite using FEM for the analysis of complex 3-D structures and engineering constructions with n-freedoms.

  14. Basic Principles of Thin-Walled Open Bars Taking into Account Where Influence Shifts of Cross Sections are Concerned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panasenko, N. N.; Sinelschikov, A. V.

    2017-11-01

    The finite element method is considered to be the most effective in relation to the calculation of strength and stability of buildings and engineering constructions. As a rule, for the modelling of supporting 3-D frameworks, finite elements with six degrees of freedom are used in each of the nodes. In practice, such supporting frameworks represent the thin-walled welded bars and hot-rolled bars of open and closed profiles in which cross-sectional deplanation must be taken into account. This idea was first introduced by L N Vorobjev and brought to one of the easiest variants of the thin-walled bar theory. The development of this approach is based on taking into account the middle surface shear deformation and adding the deformations of a thin-walled open bar to the formulas for potential and kinetic energy; these deformations depend on shearing stress and result in decreasing the frequency of the first tone of fluctuations to 13%. The authors of the article recommend taking into account this fact when calculating fail-proof dynamic systems.

  15. Three-dimensional imaging of the aortic vessel wall using an elastin-specific magnetic resonance contrast agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makowski, Marcus R; Preissel, Anne; von Bary, Christian; Warley, Alice; Schachoff, Sylvia; Keithan, Alexandra; Cesati, Richard R; Onthank, David C; Schwaiger, Markus; Robinson, Simon P; Botnar, René M

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility of high-resolution 3-dimensional aortic vessel wall imaging using a novel elastin-specific magnetic resonance contrast agent (ESMA) in a large animal model. The thoracic aortic vessel wall of 6 Landrace pigs was imaged using a novel ESMA and a nonspecific control agent. On day 1, imaging was performed before and after the administration of a nonspecific control agent, gadolinium diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA; Bayer Schering AG, Berlin, Germany). On day 3, identical scans were repeated before and after the administration of a novel ESMA (Lantheus Medical Imaging, North Billerica, Massachusetts). Three-dimensional inversion recovery gradient echo delayed-enhancement imaging and magnetic resonance (MR) angiography of the thoracic aortic vessel wall were performed on a 1.5-T MR scanner (Achieva; Philips Medical Systems, the Netherlands). The signal-to-noise ratio and the contrast-to-noise ratio of arterial wall enhancement, including the time course of enhancement, were assessed for ESMA and Gd-DTPA. After the completion of imaging sessions, histology, electron microscopy, and inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy were performed to localize and quantify the gadolinium bound to the arterial vessel wall. Administration of ESMA resulted in a strong enhancement of the aortic vessel wall on delayed-enhancement imaging, whereas no significant enhancement could be measured with Gd-DTPA. Ninety to 100 minutes after the administration of ESMA, significantly higher signal-to-noise ratio and contrast-to-noise ratio could be measured compared with the administration of Gd-DTPA (45.7 ± 9.6 vs 13.2 ± 3.5, P wall imaging using a novel ESMA in a large animal model under conditions resembling a clinical setting. Such an approach could be useful for the fast 3-dimensional assessment of the arterial vessel wall in the context of atherosclerosis, aortic aneurysms, and hypertension.

  16. Extraction of ochratoxin A in red wine with dopamine-coated magnetic multi-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Hong; Zhang, Bo; Bai, Xiao-Lin; Zhao, Yan; Xiao, Meng-Wei; Liao, Xun

    2017-10-01

    A new, rapid, green, and cost-effective magnetic solid-phase extraction of ochratoxin A from red wine samples was developed using polydopamine-coated magnetic multi-walled carbon nanotubes as the absorbent. The polydopamine-coated magnetic multi-walled carbon nanotubes were fabricated with magnetic multi-walled carbon nanotubes and dopamine by an in situ oxidative self-polymerization approach. Transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and vibrating sample magnetometry were used to characterize the absorbents. Ochratoxin A was quantified with high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with fluorescence detection, with excitation and emission wavelengths of 338 and 455 nm, respectively. The conditions affecting the magnetic solid-phase extraction procedure, such as pH, extraction solution, extraction time, absorbent amount, desorption solution and desorption time were investigated to obtain the optimal extraction conditions. Under the optimized conditions, the extraction recovery was 91.8-104.5% for ochratoxin A. A linear calibration curve was obtained in the range of 0.1-2.0 ng/mL. The limit of detection was 0.07 ng/mL, and the limit of quantitation was 0.21 ng/mL. The recoveries of ochratoxin A for spiked red wine sample ranged from 95.65 to 100.65% with relative standard deviation less than 8%. The polydopamine-coated magnetic multi-walled carbon nanotubes showed a high affinity toward ochratoxin A, allowing selective extraction and quantification of ochratoxin A from complex sample matrixes. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Enhancement of spin Hall effect induced torques for current-driven magnetic domain wall motion: Inner interface effect

    KAUST Repository

    Bang, Do; Yu, Jiawei; Qiu, Xuepeng; Wang, Yi; Awano, Hiroyuki; Manchon, Aurelien; Yang, Hyunsoo

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the current-induced domain wall motion in perpendicular magnetized Tb/Co wires with structure inversion asymmetry and different layered structures. We find that the critical current density to drive domain wall motion strongly depends on the layered structure. The lowest critical current density ∼15MA/cm2 and the highest slope of domain wall velocity curve are obtained for the wire having thin Co sublayers and more inner Tb/Co interfaces, while the largest critical current density ∼26MA/cm2 required to drive domain walls is observed in the Tb-Co alloy magnetic wire. It is found that the Co/Tb interface contributes negligibly to Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction, while the effective spin-orbit torque strongly depends on the number of Tb/Co inner interfaces (n). An enhancement of the antidamping torques by extrinsic spin Hall effect due to Tb rare-earth impurity-induced skew scattering is suggested to explain the high efficiency of current-induced domain wall motion.

  18. Enhancement of spin Hall effect induced torques for current-driven magnetic domain wall motion: Inner interface effect

    KAUST Repository

    Bang, Do

    2016-05-23

    We investigate the current-induced domain wall motion in perpendicular magnetized Tb/Co wires with structure inversion asymmetry and different layered structures. We find that the critical current density to drive domain wall motion strongly depends on the layered structure. The lowest critical current density ∼15MA/cm2 and the highest slope of domain wall velocity curve are obtained for the wire having thin Co sublayers and more inner Tb/Co interfaces, while the largest critical current density ∼26MA/cm2 required to drive domain walls is observed in the Tb-Co alloy magnetic wire. It is found that the Co/Tb interface contributes negligibly to Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction, while the effective spin-orbit torque strongly depends on the number of Tb/Co inner interfaces (n). An enhancement of the antidamping torques by extrinsic spin Hall effect due to Tb rare-earth impurity-induced skew scattering is suggested to explain the high efficiency of current-induced domain wall motion.

  19. Near-infrared magneto-optical study of excitonic states in single-walled carbon nanotubes under ultra-high magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokoi, H; Effendi, Mukhtar; Minami, N; Takeyama, S

    2011-01-01

    Singlet excitonic states at the first subband-edge in single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) have been studied through near-infrared magneto-absorption spectroscopy under magnetic fields to 105.9 T. Well-resolved absorption spectra of stretch-aligned SWCNT(CoMoCAT)-gelatin films were obtained above 100 T. By the application of magnetic fields in parallel to the alignment of SWCNTs, peak shift toward the lower energy was observed for (8, 4) and (7, 6) tubes and the opposite behavior was observed for (7, 5) and (6, 5) tubes. Above 28.8 T, new peaks emerged at the higher energy side of the peak for the (8, 4) and (7, 6) tubes, and at the lower energy side of the peaks for the (7, 5) and (6, 5) tubes. The magnetic splitting between the existing peak and the new peak was symmetric for every tube, which is in line with the energy splitting due to the Aharonov-Bohm effect. Judging from the energetic positions where the new peaks emerged, the singlet dark excitonic state locates at the lower energy than the singlet bright one in the (7, 5) and (6, 5) tubes while it is suggested strongly that the bright one locates at the lower energy in the (8, 4) and (7, 6) tubes.

  20. Magnetic properties, domain-wall creep motion, and the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction in Pt/Co/Ir thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepley, Philippa M.; Tunnicliffe, Harry; Shahbazi, Kowsar; Burnell, Gavin; Moore, Thomas A.

    2018-04-01

    We study the magnetic properties of perpendicularly magnetized Pt/Co/Ir thin films and investigate the domain-wall creep method of determining the interfacial Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya (DM) interaction in ultrathin films. Measurements of the Co layer thickness dependence of saturation magnetization, perpendicular magnetic anisotropy, and symmetric and antisymmetric (i.e., DM) exchange energies in Pt/Co/Ir thin films have been made to determine the relationship between these properties. We discuss the measurement of the DM interaction by the expansion of a reverse domain in the domain-wall creep regime. We show how the creep parameters behave as a function of in-plane bias field and discuss the effects of domain-wall roughness on the measurement of the DM interaction by domain expansion. Whereas modifications to the creep law with DM field and in-plane bias fields have taken into account changes in the energy barrier scaling parameter α , we find that both α and the velocity scaling parameter v0 change as a function of in-plane bias field.

  1. Electronic properties of Cs-intercalated single-walled carbon nanotubes derived from nuclear magnetic resonance

    KAUST Repository

    Abou-Hamad, E; Goze-Bac, C; Nitze, F; Schmid, M; Aznar, R; Mehring, M; Wå gberg, T

    2011-01-01

    We report on the electronic properties of Cs-intercalated single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). A detailed analysis of the 13C and 133Cs nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra reveals an increased metallization of the pristine SWNTs under Cs intercalation. The 'metallization' of CsxC materials where x=0–0.144 is evidenced from the increased local electronic density of states (DOS) n(EF) at the Fermi level of the SWNTs as determined from spin–lattice relaxation measurements. In particular, there are two distinct electronic phases called α and β and the transition between these occurs around x=0.05. The electronic DOS at the Fermi level increases monotonically at low intercalation levels x<0.05 (α-phase), whereas it reaches a plateau in the range 0.05≤x≤0.143 at high intercalation levels (β-phase). The new β-phase is accompanied by a hybridization of Cs(6s) orbitals with C(sp2) orbitals of the SWNTs. In both phases, two types of metallic nanotubes are found with a low and a high local n(EF), corresponding to different local electronic band structures of the SWNTs.

  2. Electronic properties of Cs-intercalated single-walled carbon nanotubes derived from nuclear magnetic resonance

    KAUST Repository

    Abou-Hamad, E

    2011-05-24

    We report on the electronic properties of Cs-intercalated single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). A detailed analysis of the 13C and 133Cs nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra reveals an increased metallization of the pristine SWNTs under Cs intercalation. The \\'metallization\\' of CsxC materials where x=0–0.144 is evidenced from the increased local electronic density of states (DOS) n(EF) at the Fermi level of the SWNTs as determined from spin–lattice relaxation measurements. In particular, there are two distinct electronic phases called α and β and the transition between these occurs around x=0.05. The electronic DOS at the Fermi level increases monotonically at low intercalation levels x<0.05 (α-phase), whereas it reaches a plateau in the range 0.05≤x≤0.143 at high intercalation levels (β-phase). The new β-phase is accompanied by a hybridization of Cs(6s) orbitals with C(sp2) orbitals of the SWNTs. In both phases, two types of metallic nanotubes are found with a low and a high local n(EF), corresponding to different local electronic band structures of the SWNTs.

  3. Investigating the Relationship between Cerebrospinal Fluid and Magnetic Induction Phase Shift in Rabbit Intracerebral hematoma expansion Monitoring by MRI

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Mingsheng; Yan, Qingguang; Sun, Jian; Jin, Gui; Qin, Mingxin

    2017-01-01

    In a prior study of intracerebral hemorrhage monitoring using magnetic induction phase shift (MIPS), we found that MIPS signal changes occurred prior to those seen with intracranial pressure. However, the characteristic MIPS alert is not yet fully explained. Combining the brain physiology and MIPS theory, we propose that cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) may be the primary factor that leads to hematoma expansion being alerted by MIPS earlier than with intracranial pressure monitoring. This paper inve...

  4. Vessel Wall Inflammation of Takayasu Arteritis Detected by Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Association with Disease Distribution and Activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoko Kato

    Full Text Available The assessment of the distribution and activity of vessel wall inflammation is clinically important in patients with Takayasu arteritis. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is a useful tool, but the clinical utility of late gadolinium enhancement (LGE in Takayasu arteritis has yet to be determined. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the utility of LGE in assessing vessel wall inflammation and disease activity in Takayasu arteritis.We enrolled 49 patients with Takayasu arteritis who had undergone 1.5 T MRI. Patients were divided into Active (n = 19 and Inactive disease (n = 30 groups. The distribution of vessel wall inflammation using angiography and LGE was assessed by qualitative analysis. In 79% and 63% of patients in Active and Inactive groups, respectively, greater distribution of vessel wall inflammation was observed with LGE than with conventional angiography. MRI values of pre- and post-contrast signal-to-noise ratios (SNR, SNR increment (post-SNR minus pre-SNR, pre- and post-contrast contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR, and CNR increment (post-CNR minus pre-CNR were evaluated at arterial wall sites with the highest signal intensity using quantitative analysis of post-contrast LGE images. No statistically significant differences in MRI parameters were observed between Active and Inactive groups. Contrast-enhanced MRI was unable to accurately detect active disease.Contrast-enhanced MRI has utility in detecting the distribution of vessel wall inflammation but has less utility in assessing disease activity in Takayasu arteritis.

  5. Carotid wall volume quantification from magnetic resonance images using deformable model fitting and learning-based correction of systematic errors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hameeteman, K; Niessen, W J; Klein, S; Van 't Klooster, R; Selwaness, M; Van der Lugt, A; Witteman, J C M

    2013-01-01

    We present a method for carotid vessel wall volume quantification from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The method combines lumen and outer wall segmentation based on deformable model fitting with a learning-based segmentation correction step. After selecting two initialization points, the vessel wall volume in a region around the bifurcation is automatically determined. The method was trained on eight datasets (16 carotids) from a population-based study in the elderly for which one observer manually annotated both the lumen and outer wall. An evaluation was carried out on a separate set of 19 datasets (38 carotids) from the same study for which two observers made annotations. Wall volume and normalized wall index measurements resulting from the manual annotations were compared to the automatic measurements. Our experiments show that the automatic method performs comparably to the manual measurements. All image data and annotations used in this study together with the measurements are made available through the website http://ergocar.bigr.nl. (paper)

  6. Frequency dependence of p-mode frequency shifts induced by magnetic activity in Kepler solar-like stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salabert, D.; Régulo, C.; Pérez Hernández, F.; García, R. A.

    2018-04-01

    The variations of the frequencies of the low-degree acoustic oscillations in the Sun induced by magnetic activity show a dependence on radial order. The frequency shifts are observed to increase towards higher-order modes to reach a maximum of about 0.8 μHz over the 11-yr solar cycle. A comparable frequency dependence is also measured in two other main sequence solar-like stars, the F-star HD 49933, and the young 1 Gyr-old solar analog KIC 10644253, although with different amplitudes of the shifts of about 2 μHz and 0.5 μHz, respectively. Our objective here is to extend this analysis to stars with different masses, metallicities, and evolutionary stages. From an initial set of 87 Kepler solar-like oscillating stars with known individual p-mode frequencies, we identify five stars showing frequency shifts that can be considered reliable using selection criteria based on Monte Carlo simulations and on the photospheric magnetic activity proxy Sph. The frequency dependence of the frequency shifts of four of these stars could be measured for the l = 0 and l = 1 modes individually. Given the quality of the data, the results could indicate that a physical source of perturbation different from that in the Sun is dominating in this sample of solar-like stars.

  7. Cogging Torque Reduction by Slot-Opening Shift for Permanent Magnet Machines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Ting; Huang, Shoudao; Gao, Jian

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, an effective cogging torque reduction method based on shifting the slot-openings is presented. Stator teeth are divided into groups and proper slot-opening shift is applied for each group. The cogging torque can then be greatly reduced while the back-EMF waveforms remain symmetrical...

  8. Domain wall energy landscapes in amorphous magnetic films with asymmetric arrays of holes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alija, A; Perez-Junquera, A; RodrIguez-RodrIguez, G; Velez, M; Alameda, J M; MartIn, J I; Marconi, V I; Kolton, A B; Parrondo, J M R; Anguita, J V

    2009-01-01

    Arrays of asymmetric holes have been defined in amorphous Co-Si films by e-beam lithography in order to study domain wall motion across the array subject to the asymmetric pinning potential created by the holes. Experimental results on Kerr effect magnetooptical measurements and hysteresis loops are compared with micromagnetic simulations in films with arrays of triangular holes. These show that the potential asymmetry favours forward wall propagation for flat walls but, if the wall contains a kink, net backward wall propagation is preferred at low fields, in agreement with minor loop experiments. The difference between the fields needed for forward and backward flat wall propagation increases as the size of the triangular holes is reduced, becoming maximum for 1 μm triangles, which is the characteristic length scale set by domain wall width.

  9. Domain wall energy landscapes in amorphous magnetic films with asymmetric arrays of holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alija, A.; Pérez-Junquera, A.; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, G.; Vélez, M.; Marconi, V. I.; Kolton, A. B.; Anguita, J. V.; Alameda, J. M.; Parrondo, J. M. R.; Martín, J. I.

    2009-02-01

    Arrays of asymmetric holes have been defined in amorphous Co-Si films by e-beam lithography in order to study domain wall motion across the array subject to the asymmetric pinning potential created by the holes. Experimental results on Kerr effect magnetooptical measurements and hysteresis loops are compared with micromagnetic simulations in films with arrays of triangular holes. These show that the potential asymmetry favours forward wall propagation for flat walls but, if the wall contains a kink, net backward wall propagation is preferred at low fields, in agreement with minor loop experiments. The difference between the fields needed for forward and backward flat wall propagation increases as the size of the triangular holes is reduced, becoming maximum for 1 µm triangles, which is the characteristic length scale set by domain wall width.

  10. Effect of Longitudinal Magnetic Field on Vibration Characteristics of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes in a Viscoelastic Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, D. P.; Lei, Y.; Shen, Z. B.

    2017-12-01

    The effect of longitudinal magnetic field on vibration response of a sing-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) embedded in viscoelastic medium is investigated. Based on nonlocal Euler-Bernoulli beam theory, Maxwell's relations, and Kelvin viscoelastic foundation model, the governing equations of motion for vibration analysis are established. The complex natural frequencies and corresponding mode shapes in closed form for the embedded SWCNT with arbitrary boundary conditions are obtained using transfer function method (TFM). The new analytical expressions for the complex natural frequencies are also derived for certain typical boundary conditions and Kelvin-Voigt model. Numerical results from the model are presented to show the effects of nonlocal parameter, viscoelastic parameter, boundary conditions, aspect ratio, and strength of the magnetic field on vibration characteristics for the embedded SWCNT in longitudinal magnetic field. The results demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed methods for vibration analysis of embedded SWCNTs under magnetic field.

  11. Ferroelectricity driven magnetism at domain walls in LaAlO3/PbTiO3 superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, P. X.; Dong, S.; Liu, H. M.; Ma, C. Y.; Yan, Z. B.; Zhong, C. G.; Liu, J. -M.

    2015-01-01

    Charge dipole moment and spin moment rarely coexist in single-phase bulk materials except in some multiferroics. Despite the progress in the past decade, for most multiferroics their magnetoelectric performance remains poor due to the intrinsic exclusion between charge dipole and spin moment. As an alternative approach, the oxide heterostructures may evade the intrinsic limits in bulk materials and provide more attractive potential to realize the magnetoelectric functions. Here we perform a first-principles study on LaAlO3/PbTiO3 superlattices. Although neither of the components is magnetic, magnetic moments emerge at the ferroelectric domain walls of PbTiO3 in these superlattices. Such a twist between ferroelectric domain and local magnetic moment, not only manifests an interesting type of multiferroicity, but also is possible useful to pursuit the electrical-control of magnetism in nanoscale heterostructures. PMID:26269322

  12. Anomalous dimension, chiral phase transition and inverse magnetic catalysis in soft-wall AdS/QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Zhen, E-mail: fangzhen@itp.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Institute of Theoretical Physics, Chinese Academy of Science, Beijing 100190 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China)

    2016-07-10

    A modified soft-wall AdS/QCD model with a z-dependent bulk scalar mass is proposed. We argue for the necessity of a modified bulk scalar mass from the quark mass anomalous dimension and carefully constrain the form of bulk mass by the corresponding UV and IR asymptotics. After fixing the form of bulk scalar mass, we calculate the mass spectra of (axial-)vector and pseudoscalar mesons, which have a good agreement with the experimental data. The behavior of chiral phase transition is also investigated, and the results are consistent with the standard scenario and lattice simulations. Finally, the issue of chiral magnetic effects is addressed. We find that the inverse magnetic catalysis emerges naturally from the modified soft-wall model, which is consistent with the recent lattice simulations.

  13. Studying behavior of multilayer materials: A 1-D model correlated to magnetic domain walls through complex permeability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmadi, B.; Chazal, H.; Waeckerle, T.; Roudet, J.

    2008-01-01

    Multilayer cores are suitable for integrated planar magnetic components. We proposed here to investigate the frequency behavior of multilayer nanocrystalline cores in the frame of a one-dimensional (1-D) electromagnetic propagation model. Electromagnetic wave equations are considered to explain the phenomena from the macroscopic point of view. A domain wall description is considered to take into account non-homogeneity of magnetic media. This mesoscopic model is correlated to macroscopic model through complex permeability. The scope of validity of the model is determined by means of indirect permeability measurement. Finally, the behavior of the multilayer core is predicted by using an equivalent electrical circuit and will interest component designers

  14. Validation of model-based brain shift correction in neurosurgery via intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging: preliminary results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Ma; Frisken, Sarah F.; Weis, Jared A.; Clements, Logan W.; Unadkat, Prashin; Thompson, Reid C.; Golby, Alexandra J.; Miga, Michael I.

    2017-03-01

    The quality of brain tumor resection surgery is dependent on the spatial agreement between preoperative image and intraoperative anatomy. However, brain shift compromises the aforementioned alignment. Currently, the clinical standard to monitor brain shift is intraoperative magnetic resonance (iMR). While iMR provides better understanding of brain shift, its cost and encumbrance is a consideration for medical centers. Hence, we are developing a model-based method that can be a complementary technology to address brain shift in standard resections, with resource-intensive cases as referrals for iMR facilities. Our strategy constructs a deformation `atlas' containing potential deformation solutions derived from a biomechanical model that account for variables such as cerebrospinal fluid drainage and mannitol effects. Volumetric deformation is estimated with an inverse approach that determines the optimal combinatory `atlas' solution fit to best match measured surface deformation. Accordingly, preoperative image is updated based on the computed deformation field. This study is the latest development to validate our methodology with iMR. Briefly, preoperative and intraoperative MR images of 2 patients were acquired. Homologous surface points were selected on preoperative and intraoperative scans as measurement of surface deformation and used to drive the inverse problem. To assess the model accuracy, subsurface shift of targets between preoperative and intraoperative states was measured and compared to model prediction. Considering subsurface shift above 3 mm, the proposed strategy provides an average shift correction of 59% across 2 cases. While further improvements in both the model and ability to validate with iMR are desired, the results reported are encouraging.

  15. Imaging of Magnetic Domains and Domain Walls in Spherical Fe-Si Powder Using Magnetic Force Microscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Strečková, M.; Baťková, M.; Baťko, I.; Hadraba, Hynek; Bureš, R.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 126, č. 1 (2014), s. 92-93 ISSN 0587-4246. [CSMAG Czech and Slovak Conference on Magnetism /15./. Košice, 17.06.2013-21.06.2013] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0068 Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : soft magnetic material * Fe-Si * magnetic force microscopy Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.530, year: 2014

  16. Design of a Laboratory Hall Thruster with Magnetically Shielded Channel Walls, Phase III: Comparison of Theory with Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira; Hofer, Richard R.; Goebel, Dan M.

    2012-01-01

    A proof-of-principle effort to demonstrate a technique by which erosion of the acceleration channel in Hall thrusters of the magnetic-layer type can be eliminated has been completed. The first principles of the technique, now known as "magnetic shielding," were derived based on the findings of numerical simulations in 2-D axisymmetric geometry. The simulations, in turn, guided the modification of an existing 6-kW laboratory Hall thruster. This magnetically shielded (MS) thruster was then built and tested. Because neither theory nor experiment alone can validate fully the first principles of the technique, the objective of the 2-yr effort was twofold: (1) to demonstrate in the laboratory that the erosion rates can be reduced by >order of magnitude, and (2) to demonstrate that the near-wall plasma properties can be altered according to the theoretical predictions. This paper concludes the demonstration of magnetic shielding by reporting on a wide range of comparisons between results from numerical simulations and laboratory diagnostics. Collectively, we find that the comparisons validate the theory. Near the walls of the MS thruster, theory and experiment agree: (1) the plasma potential has been sustained at values near the discharge voltage, and (2) the electron temperature has been lowered by at least 2.5-3 times compared to the unshielded (US) thruster. Also, based on carbon deposition measurements, the erosion rates at the inner and outer walls of the MS thruster are found to be lower by at least 2300 and 1875 times, respectively. Erosion was so low along these walls that the rates were below the resolution of the profilometer. Using a sputtering yield model with an energy threshold of 25 V, the simulations predict a reduction of 600 at the MS inner wall. At the outer wall ion energies are computed to be below 25 V, for which case we set the erosion to zero in the simulations. When a 50-V threshold is used the computed ion energies are below the threshold at both

  17. Magnetic field influences on the lateral dose response functions of photon-beam detectors: MC study of wall-less water-filled detectors with various densities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Looe, Hui Khee; Delfs, Björn; Poppinga, Daniela; Harder, Dietrich; Poppe, Björn

    2017-06-21

    The distortion of detector reading profiles across photon beams in the presence of magnetic fields is a developing subject of clinical photon-beam dosimetry. The underlying modification by the Lorentz force of a detector's lateral dose response function-the convolution kernel transforming the true cross-beam dose profile in water into the detector reading profile-is here studied for the first time. The three basic convolution kernels, the photon fluence response function, the dose deposition kernel, and the lateral dose response function, of wall-less cylindrical detectors filled with water of low, normal and enhanced density are shown by Monte Carlo simulation to be distorted in the prevailing direction of the Lorentz force. The asymmetric shape changes of these convolution kernels in a water medium and in magnetic fields of up to 1.5 T are confined to the lower millimetre range, and they depend on the photon beam quality, the magnetic flux density and the detector's density. The impact of this distortion on detector reading profiles is demonstrated using a narrow photon beam profile. For clinical applications it appears as favourable that the magnetic flux density dependent distortion of the lateral dose response function, as far as secondary electron transport is concerned, vanishes in the case of water-equivalent detectors of normal water density. By means of secondary electron history backtracing, the spatial distribution of the photon interactions giving rise either directly to secondary electrons or to scattered photons further downstream producing secondary electrons which contribute to the detector's signal, and their lateral shift due to the Lorentz force is elucidated. Electron history backtracing also serves to illustrate the correct treatment of the influences of the Lorentz force in the EGSnrc Monte Carlo code applied in this study.

  18. Magnetic charge distribution and stray field landscape of asymmetric néel walls in a magnetically patterned exchange bias layer system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zingsem, Norbert; Ahrend, Florian; Vock, Silvia; Gottlob, Daniel; Krug, Ingo; Doganay, Hatice; Holzinger, Dennis; Neu, Volker; Ehresmann, Arno

    2017-12-01

    The 3D stray field landscape above an exchange bias layer system with engineered domain walls has been fully characterized by quantitative magnetic force microscopy (qMFM) measurements. This method is based on a complete quantification of the MFM tip’s imaging properties and the subtraction of its contribution from the measured MFM data by deconvolution in Fourier space. The magnetically patterned Ir17Mn83/Co70Fe30-exchange-bias-multilayers have been designed to contain asymmetric head-to-head (hh)/tail-to-tail (tt) Néel walls between domains of different magnetic anisotropies for potential use in guided particle transport. In the current application, qMFM reveals the effective magnetic charge profile on the surface of the sample—with high spatial resolution and in an absolute quantitative manner. These data enable to calculate the magnetostatic potential and the full stray field landscape above the sample surface. It has been successfully tested against: (i) micromagnetic simulations of the magnetization structure of a comparable exchange-bias layer system, (ii) measurements of the magnetization profile across the domain boundary with x-ray photoemission electron microscopy, and (iii) direct stray field measurements obtained by scanning Hall probe microscopy at elevated scan heights. This approach results in a quantitative determination of the stray field landscape at close distances to the sample surface, which will be of importance for remote magnetic particle transport applications in lab-on-a-chip devices. Furthermore, the highly resolving and quantitative MFM approach reveals details of the domain transition across the artificially structured phase boundary, which have to be attributed to a continuous change in the materials parameters across this boundary, rather than an abrupt one.

  19. Magnetic and electronic properties of single-walled Mo2C nanotube: a first-principles study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalil, Abdul; Sun, Zhongti; Wang, Dayong; Wu, Xiaojun

    2018-04-01

    The structural, electronic, and magnetic properties of single-walled Mo2C nanotubes are investigated by using first-principles calculations. We establish that single-walled Mo2C nanotubes can be rolled up from a graphene-like Mo2C monolayer with H- or T-type phase, i.e. H-Mo2C and T-Mo2C nanotubes. The armchair-type T-Mo2C nanotubes are more energetically stable than H-Mo2C nanotubes with the same diameter, while zigzag-type H-Mo2C nanotubes are more energetically stable than T-Mo2C nanotubes. In particular, (8, 0) H-Mo2C nanotube are more stable than Mo2C monolayer due to structural deformation. All Mo2C nanotubes are magnetic metals, independent of their chirality, and the magnetic moments of Mo atoms in the outer layer are larger than the inner. The ionic and metallic bonds in Mo2C nanotubes and delocalized electrons around Mo atoms lead to the versatile electronic and magnetic properties in them, endowing them potential applications in catalysts and electronics.

  20. Application of lanthanide-shift reagents in pulsed Fourier-transform nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zektzer, A.S.

    1986-01-01

    The application of lanthanide-shift reagents (LSR's) to pulsed NMR is presented. Several areas were investigated in which the information content of the data was enhanced through the use of an LSR. The problem first investigated combines the ability of LSR's to influence both the shift and relaxation times of the substrate nuclei. Adamantan-2-ol which has a second-order proton spectra was simplified to first-order by the addition of Eu(fod) 3 at which time the T 1 -relaxation times of each resonance were measured at several ratios of [LSR]/[sub] in order to calculate the T 1 's of the bound species by multiple linear regression. The second application involved using LSR's to cause shift changes in compounds not usually accessible to LSR's. Sulfur heterocycles, which show little if any shift with LSR's, were found to exhibit large shifts when silver organic salts were used in combination with an LSR such as Dy(fod) 3 or Ho(fod) 3 . The last application was the assignment of the 1 H and 13 C resonances of a thieno-pyridine and the comparison of these assignments to those from high-field two-dimensional NMR techniques

  1. A Novel Compressed Sensing Method for Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Exponential Wavelet Iterative Shrinkage-Thresholding Algorithm with Random Shift

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yudong Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. It can help improve the hospital throughput to accelerate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI scanning. Patients will benefit from less waiting time. Task. In the last decade, various rapid MRI techniques on the basis of compressed sensing (CS were proposed. However, both computation time and reconstruction quality of traditional CS-MRI did not meet the requirement of clinical use. Method. In this study, a novel method was proposed with the name of exponential wavelet iterative shrinkage-thresholding algorithm with random shift (abbreviated as EWISTARS. It is composed of three successful components: (i exponential wavelet transform, (ii iterative shrinkage-thresholding algorithm, and (iii random shift. Results. Experimental results validated that, compared to state-of-the-art approaches, EWISTARS obtained the least mean absolute error, the least mean-squared error, and the highest peak signal-to-noise ratio. Conclusion. EWISTARS is superior to state-of-the-art approaches.

  2. A Novel Compressed Sensing Method for Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Exponential Wavelet Iterative Shrinkage-Thresholding Algorithm with Random Shift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yudong; Yang, Jiquan; Yang, Jianfei; Liu, Aijun; Sun, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Aim. It can help improve the hospital throughput to accelerate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanning. Patients will benefit from less waiting time. Task. In the last decade, various rapid MRI techniques on the basis of compressed sensing (CS) were proposed. However, both computation time and reconstruction quality of traditional CS-MRI did not meet the requirement of clinical use. Method. In this study, a novel method was proposed with the name of exponential wavelet iterative shrinkage-thresholding algorithm with random shift (abbreviated as EWISTARS). It is composed of three successful components: (i) exponential wavelet transform, (ii) iterative shrinkage-thresholding algorithm, and (iii) random shift. Results. Experimental results validated that, compared to state-of-the-art approaches, EWISTARS obtained the least mean absolute error, the least mean-squared error, and the highest peak signal-to-noise ratio. Conclusion. EWISTARS is superior to state-of-the-art approaches. PMID:27066068

  3. In-plane current induced domain wall nucleation and its stochasticity in perpendicular magnetic anisotropy Hall cross structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sethi, P.; Murapaka, C.; Lim, G. J.; Lew, W. S.

    2015-01-01

    Hall cross structures in magnetic nanowires are commonly used for electrical detection of magnetization reversal in which a domain wall (DW) is conventionally nucleated by a local Oersted field. In this letter, we demonstrate DW nucleation in Co/Ni perpendicular magnetic anisotropy nanowire at the magnetic Hall cross junction. The DWs are nucleated by applying an in-plane pulsed current through the nanowire without the need of a local Oersted field. The change in Hall resistance, detected using anomalous Hall effect, is governed by the magnetic volume switched at the Hall junction, which can be tuned by varying the magnitude of the applied current density and pulse width. The nucleated DWs are driven simultaneously under the spin transfer torque effect when the applied current density is above a threshold. The possibility of multiple DW generation and variation in magnetic volume switched makes nucleation process stochastic in nature. The in-plane current induced stochastic nature of DW generation may find applications in random number generation

  4. Concentration polarization effects on the macromolecular transport in the presence of non-uniform magnetic field: A numerical study using a lumen-wall model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohammadpourfard, M., E-mail: Mohammadpour@azaruniv.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Azarbaijan Shahid Madani University, Tabriz 53751-71379 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Aminfar, H., E-mail: hh_aminfar@tabrizu.ac.ir [Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, University of Tabriz, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khajeh, K., E-mail: khajeh.k.2005@gmail.com [Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, University of Tabriz, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-04-01

    In this paper, the concentration polarization phenomena in a two dimensional tube under steady state conditions containing ferrofluid (blood and 4 vol% Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) is reported in the presence of non-uniform magnetic field. Lumen-wall model has been used for solving the mass transport equation. Hemodynamics parameters such as flow rate, viscosity, wall shear stress (WSS) and the macromolecules surface concentration which accumulate on the blood vessel wall, influenced the formation and progression of atherosclerosis disease. Effective parameters on the low density lipoprotein (LDL) surface concentration (LSC) such as: the wall filtration velocity, inlet Reynolds number and WSS under applied non-uniform magnetic field have been examined. Numerical solution of governing equations of the flow field have been obtained by using the single-phase model and the control volume technique. Magnetic field is generated by an electric current going through a thin and straight wire oriented perpendicular to the tube. Results show WSS in the vicinity of magnetic field source increased and LSC decreased along the wall. - Highlights: • In this paper the concentration polarization phenomena of blood flow is reported in the presence of non-uniform magnetic field. • In presence of non-uniform magnetic field LSC will decrease along the wall due to the increasing the velocity gradients near the magnetic source. • When non-uniform magnetic field intensity increases, LSC along the wall becomes lower. • Non-uniform magnetic field can affects the flow more in low Reynolds numbers.

  5. Study of plasma convection and wall interactions in magnetic-confinement systems. Progress report, October 1, 1980-September 30, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    York, T.M.; Klevans, E.H.

    1981-01-01

    Experimental and analytical studies of plasma interactions with magnetic fields and end walls have been carried out. The final effort for studying flow on open-ended theta pinches has resulted in: (1) new understanding of collisional flow processes; and (2) has presented unique measurements of density and temperature near the end wall. An orignal effort to use Nd-glass lasers for Thomson scattering diagnostics is reported. Laser system conversion and efficiencies of frequency doubling are reported. The development of a compact toroid discharged is reported; this will be used as a plasma source to study transport, convection and wass interactions at plasma conditions appropriate for large scale fusion experiments. Computer codes predict compact toroid plasma scaling and magnetic field distribution resulting from guiding coils added at the ends of the theta pinch coil. The development of a multi-pass Fabry-Perot interferometer using visible light from a He-Ne laser is reported here. Theoretical study has been completed on an extension of a collisionless plasma flow model to include collision effects. Initial studies directed to analysis of plasma wall interactions are reported

  6. Stereoelectronic effects on 1H nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shifts in methoxybenzenes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lambert, Maja; Olsen, Lars; Jaroszewski, Jerzy W

    2006-01-01

    the Ar-OCH3 torsion out of the ring plane, resulting in large stereoelectronic effects on the chemical shift of Hpara. Conformational searches and geometry optimizations for 3-16 at the B3LYP/6-31G** level, followed by B3LYP/6-311++G(2d,2p) calculations for all low-energy conformers, gave excellent...

  7. Influence of slice thickness on the determination of left ventricular wall thickness and dimension by magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohnishi, Shusaku; Fukui, Sugao; Atsumi, Chisato and others

    1989-02-01

    Wall thickness of the ventricular septum and left ventricle, and left ventricular cavity dimension were determined on magnetic resonance (MR) images with slices 5 mm and 10 mm in thickness. Subjects were 3 healthy volunteers and 7 patients with hypertension (4), hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (one) or valvular heart disease (2). In visualizing the cardiac structures such as left ventricular papillary muscle and right and left ventricles, 5 mm-thick images were better than 10 mm-thick images. Edges of ventricular septum and left ventricular wall were more clearly visualized on 5 mm-thick images than 10 mm-thick images. Two mm-thick MR images obtained from 2 patients yielded the most excellent visualization in end-systole, but failed to reveal cardiac structures in detail in end-diastole. Phantom studies revealed no significant differences in image quality of 10 mm and 5 mm in thickness in the axial view 80 degree to the long axis. In the axial view 45 degree to the long axis, 10 mm-thick images were inferior to 5 mm-thick images in detecting the edge of the septum and the left ventricular wall. These results indicate that the selection of slice thickness is one of the most important determinant factors in the measurement of left ventricular wall thickness and cavity dimension. (Namekawa, K).

  8. Influence of slice thickness on the determination of left ventricular wall thickness and dimension by magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohnishi, Shusaku; Fukui, Sugao; Atsumi, Chisato

    1989-01-01

    Wall thickness of the ventricular septum and left ventricle, and left ventricular cavity dimension were determined on magnetic resonance (MR) images with slices 5 mm and 10 mm in thickness. Subjects were 3 healthy volunteers and 7 patients with hypertension (4), hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (one) or valvular heart disease (2). In visualizing the cardiac structures such as left ventricular papillary muscle and right and left ventricles, 5 mm-thick images were better than 10 mm-thick images. Edges of ventricular septum and left ventricular wall were more clearly visualized on 5 mm-thick images than 10 mm-thick images. Two mm-thick MR images obtained from 2 patients yielded the most excellent visualization in end-systole, but failed to reveal cardiac structures in detail in end-diastole. Phantom studies revealed no significant differences in image quality of 10 mm and 5 mm in thickness in the axial view 80 degree to the long axis. In the axial view 45 degree to the long axis, 10 mm-thick images were inferior to 5 mm-thick images in detecting the edge of the septum and the left ventricular wall. These results indicate that the selection of slice thickness is one of the most important determinant factors in the measurement of left ventricular wall thickness and cavity dimension. (Namekawa, K)

  9. Preparation of a Cobalt(II) Cage: An Undergraduate Laboratory Experiment That Produces a ParaSHIFT Agent for Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Patrick J.; Tsitovich, Pavel B.; Morrow, Janet R.

    2016-01-01

    Laboratory experiments that demonstrate the effect of paramagnetic complexes on chemical shifts and relaxation times of protons are a useful way to introduce magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) probes or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents. In this undergraduate inorganic chemistry experiment, a paramagnetic Co(II) cage complex is…

  10. Simultaneous synthesis of single-walled carbon nanotubes and graphene in a magnetically-enhanced arc plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian; Shashurin, Alexey; Kundrapu, Madhusudhan; Keidar, Michael

    2012-02-02

    Carbon nanostructures such as single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) and graphene attract a deluge of interest of scholars nowadays due to their very promising application for molecular sensors, field effect transistor and super thin and flexible electronic devices(1-4). Anodic arc discharge supported by the erosion of the anode material is one of the most practical and efficient methods, which can provide specific non-equilibrium processes and a high influx of carbon material to the developing structures at relatively higher temperature, and consequently the as-synthesized products have few structural defects and better crystallinity. To further improve the controllability and flexibility of the synthesis of carbon nanostructures in arc discharge, magnetic fields can be applied during the synthesis process according to the strong magnetic responses of arc plasmas. It was demonstrated that the magnetically-enhanced arc discharge can increase the average length of SWCNT (5), narrow the diameter distribution of metallic catalyst particles and carbon nanotubes (6), and change the ratio of metallic and semiconducting carbon nanotubes (7), as well as lead to graphene synthesis (8). Furthermore, it is worthwhile to remark that when we introduce a non-uniform magnetic field with the component normal to the current in arc, the Lorentz force along the J×B direction can generate the plasmas jet and make effective delivery of carbon ion particles and heat flux to samples. As a result, large-scale graphene flakes and high-purity single-walled carbon nanotubes were simultaneously generated by such new magnetically-enhanced anodic arc method. Arc imaging, scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM) and Raman spectroscopy were employed to analyze the characterization of carbon nanostructures. These findings indicate a wide spectrum of opportunities to manipulate with the properties of nanostructures produced in plasmas by means of controlling the

  11. Monitoring of arterial wall remodelling in atherosclerotic rabbits with a magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent binding to matrix metalloproteinases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyafil, Fabien; Vucic, Esad; Cornily, Jean-Christophe; Sharma, Rahul; Amirbekian, Vardan; Blackwell, Francis; Lancelot, Eric; Corot, Claire; Fuster, Valentin; Galis, Zorina S.; Feldman, Laurent J.; Fayad, Zahi A.

    2011-01-01

    Aims P947 is a gadolinium-based magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent with high affinity for several matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) involved in arterial wall remodelling. We tested whether the intensity of enhancement detected in vivo in the arterial wall with P947 and MRI correlates with actual tissue MMP-related enzymatic activity measured in a rabbit atherosclerotic model subjected to dietary manipulations. Methods and results Aortas of 15 rabbits in which atherosclerotic lesions were induced by balloon angioplasty and 4 months of hypercholesterolaemic diet were imaged at ‘baseline’ with P947-enhanced MRI. Atherosclerotic rabbits were divided into three groups: five rabbits were sacrificed (‘baseline’ group); five rabbits continued to be fed a lipid-supplemented diet (‘high-fat’ group); and five rabbits were switched from atherogenic to a purified chow diet (‘low-fat’ group). Four months later, a second P947-enhanced MRI was acquired in the 10 remaining rabbits. A significantly lower signal was detected in the aortic wall of rabbits from the ‘low-fat’ group as compared with rabbits from the ‘high-fat’ group (21 ± 6 vs. 46 ± 3%, respectively; P = 0.04). Such differences were not detected with the contrast agent P1135, which lacks the MMP-specific peptide sequence. In addition, the intensity of aortic wall enhancement detected with MRI after injection of P947 strongly correlated with actual MMP-2 gelatinolytic activity measured in corresponding aortic segments using zymography (r = 0.87). Conclusion P947-enhanced MRI can distinguish dietary-induced variations in MMP-related enzymatic activity within plaques in an experimental atherosclerotic model, supporting its utility as a clinical imaging tool for in vivo detection of arterial wall remodelling. PMID:21118852

  12. Temperature mapping using proton phase shift on a 0.3 T permanent magnet open MRI system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komura, Kazumi; Takahashi, Tetsuhiko; Dohi, Michiko; Harada, Junta

    2000-01-01

    Temperature mapping using proton phase shift (PPS) was evaluated for ex vivo objects. The evaluation was done on a 0.3 T permanent magnet open magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) machine, like those widely used for clinical diagnosis. Temperature maps were acquired using a gradient echo sequence (TR/TE =80/30 ms, flip angle =60 degrees, field of view =200 x 200 mm, slice thickness =8 mm, matrix size =128 x 128, data acquisition number =1, and imaging time =10.2 s). Specific first order data correction was performed to eliminate calculated temperature fluctuation due to magnetic field instability. A ham, 10 cm in diameter, was heated with a Nd: YAG laser with a wavelength of 1064 nm. The laser fiber was inserted into the ham to a depth of 3 cm. The laser power was 5, 8, or 10 W. Magnetic resonance images were taken continually during and after irradiation. Temperature maps were taken every 15 s. The maps taken during laser ablation showed color changes for the heated areas. Temperatures measured by the MRI and thermocouple had a linear relationship of r 2 =0.80. The inter-image standard deviation of the temperature maps of a non-heated object was 2.07 degrees for a 4.68 x 4.68 x 8 mm volume. This value is negligible for a monitored laser heating process since temperature rise is typically larger than 30 degrees. These results show that temperature mapping based on PPS is feasible for a 0.3 T permanent magnet open MRI system. (author)

  13. Wall conditioning with a high magnetic field in HT-7 superconducting tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jiangang; Gu Xuemao; Gao Xiang; Zhang Souying; Jie Yingxian; Yang Xiaokang

    2000-01-01

    ICRF wall conditioning techniques, which includes the hydrogen removal, impurity cleaning, boronization and siliconization, were described in this paper. This new technique has been demonstrated to be very effective for wall conditioning, recycling, isotopic control and used daily during experiments. The RF plasma parameters were measured as T e =3-8 eV, T i =0.5-2 keV, n e =0.3-5 x 10 17 m -3 by different diagnostics. The nontoxic and nonexplosive solid carborane powder was used for the RF boronization. Energetic ions cracked the carborane molecule and the boron ions impacted and deposited onto first wall. Comparing with GDC boronization, the B/C coating film shows the higher adhesion, better uniformity and longer lifetime to the plasma discharges. Siliconization was carried out by using a high field side long RF antenna, which made the discharge more uniform. The ratio of SiH 4 to helium is about 5:95 at the pressure range of P v =0.8-8 x 10 -2 Pa. Compare with boronization, it showed quicker recovery from a bad wall condition due to leakage of air to good wall condition. Plasma density could be easily controlled after siliconization. But the lifetime is much shorter than that obtained by boronization. Plasma performance has been improved after RF boronization and siliconization. (author)

  14. Switchable field-tuned control of magnetic domain wall pinning along Co microwires by 3D e-beam lithographed structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanco-Roldán, C., E-mail: c.blanco@cinn.es [Departamento de Física, Universidad de Oviedo, Avenida Calvo Sotelo s/n, 33007 Oviedo (Spain); Centro de Investigación en Nanomateriales y Nanotecnología CINN (CSIC, Universidad de Oviedo), Avenida de la Vega 4-6, 33940 El Entrego (Spain); Quirós, C.; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, G.; Vélez, M.; Martín, J.I.; Alameda, J.M. [Departamento de Física, Universidad de Oviedo, Avenida Calvo Sotelo s/n, 33007 Oviedo (Spain); Centro de Investigación en Nanomateriales y Nanotecnología CINN (CSIC, Universidad de Oviedo), Avenida de la Vega 4-6, 33940 El Entrego (Spain)

    2016-02-15

    Three-dimensional magnetic circuits composed of Co microwires crossed by elevated Co bridges have been patterned on Si substrate by e-beam lithography and lift-off process. The lithographic procedure includes a double resist procedure that optimizes the shape of the bridge, so that 200 nm air gaps can be routinely achieved in between the wire and bridge elements. Microwire magnetization reversal processes have been analyzed by magneto-optical Kerr effect microscopy with different remanent bridge configurations. When the Co bridge is magnetized along the in-plane direction parallel to the wire axis, its stray field induces a marked pinning effect on domain wall propagation along the wire below it, even without being in contact. Changing the sign of the remanent state of the bridge, domain wall pinning can be selected to occur in either the ascending or descending branches of the wire hysteresis loop. Thus, these wire-bridge 3D circuits provide a simple system for tunable domain wall pinning controllable through the pre-recorded bridge remanent state. - Highlights: • Electron beam lithography is used to fabricate a tridimensional magnetic circuit. • Proposed circuit is made of a Co bridge overcrossing a non-contacted Co microwire. • Domain wall propagation can be controlled by previous magnetization of the system. • Domain wall pinning in the wire depends on the applied magnetic field sign.

  15. Investigation of domain wall motion in RE-TM magnetic wire towards a current driven memory and logic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Awano, Hiroyuki

    2015-06-01

    Current driven magnetic domain wall (DW) motions of ferri-magnetic TbFeCo wires have been investigated. In the case of a Si substrate, the critical current density (Jc) of DW motion was successfully reduced to 3×10{sup 6} A/cm{sup 2}. Moreover, by using a polycarbonate (PC) substrate with a molding groove of 600 nm width, the Jc was decreased to 6×10{sup 5} A/cm{sup 2}. In order to fabricate a logic in memory, a current driven spin logics (AND, OR, NOT) have been proposed and successfully demonstrated under the condition of low Jc. These results indicate that TbFeCo nanowire is an excellent candidate for next generation power saving memory and logic.

  16. Manipulating Electromagnetic Waves in Magnetized Plasmas: Compression, Frequency Shifting, and Release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avitzour, Yoav; Shvets, Gennady

    2008-01-01

    A new approach to manipulating the duration and frequency of microwave pulses using magnetized plasmas is demonstrated. The plasma accomplishes two functions: (i) slowing down and spatially compressing the incident wave, and (ii) modifying the propagation properties (group velocity and frequency) of the wave in the plasma during a uniform in space adiabatic in time variation of the magnitude and/or direction of the magnetic field. The increase in the group velocity results in the shortening of the temporal pulse duration. Depending on the plasma parameters, the frequency of the outgoing compressed pulse can either change or remain unchanged. Such dynamic manipulation of radiation in plasma opens new avenues for manipulating high power microwave pulses

  17. Biomimetic three-dimensional nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite and magnetically synthesized single-walled carbon nanotube chitosan nanocomposite for bone regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Im O

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Owen Im1, Jian Li2, Mian Wang2, Lijie Grace Zhang2,3, Michael Keidar2,31Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, NC; 2Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, 3Institute for Biomedical Engineering and Institute for Nanotechnology, The George Washington University, Washington, DC, USABackground: Many shortcomings exist in the traditional methods of treating bone defects, such as donor tissue shortages for autografts and disease transmission for allografts. The objective of this study was to design a novel three-dimensional nanostructured bone substitute based on magnetically synthesized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT, biomimetic hydrothermally treated nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite, and a biocompatible hydrogel (chitosan. Both nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite and SWCNT have a biomimetic nanostructure, excellent osteoconductivity, and high potential to improve the load-bearing capacity of hydrogels.Methods: Specifically, three-dimensional porous chitosan scaffolds with different concentrations of nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite and SWCNT were created to support the growth of human osteoblasts (bone-forming cells using a lyophilization procedure. Two types of SWCNT were synthesized in an arc discharge with a magnetic field (B-SWCNT and without a magnetic field (N-SWCNT for improving bone regeneration.Results: Nanocomposites containing magnetically synthesized B-SWCNT had superior cytocompatibility properties when compared with nonmagnetically synthesized N-SWCNT. B-SWCNT have much smaller diameters and are twice as long as their nonmagnetically prepared counterparts, indicating that the dimensions of carbon nanotubes can have a substantial effect on osteoblast attachment.Conclusion: This study demonstrated that a chitosan nanocomposite with both B-SWCNT and 20% nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite could achieve a higher osteoblast density when compared with the other experimental groups, thus making this nanocomposite

  18. Magnetic impurities in single-wall carbon nanotubes and graphene: a review

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vejpravová, Jana; Pacáková, Barbara; Kalbáč, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 141, č. 9 (2016), s. 2639-2656 ISSN 0003-2654 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LL1301 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:61388955 Keywords : graphene * carbon nanotube * magnetic impurities Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism; CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry (UFCH-W) Impact factor: 3.885, year: 2016

  19. Biomimetic three-dimensional nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite and magnetically synthesized single-walled carbon nanotube chitosan nanocomposite for bone regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Owen; Li, Jian; Wang, Mian; Zhang, Lijie Grace; Keidar, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Background Many shortcomings exist in the traditional methods of treating bone defects, such as donor tissue shortages for autografts and disease transmission for allografts. The objective of this study was to design a novel three-dimensional nanostructured bone substitute based on magnetically synthesized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT), biomimetic hydrothermally treated nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite, and a biocompatible hydrogel (chitosan). Both nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite and SWCNT have a biomimetic nanostructure, excellent osteoconductivity, and high potential to improve the load-bearing capacity of hydrogels. Methods Specifically, three-dimensional porous chitosan scaffolds with different concentrations of nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite and SWCNT were created to support the growth of human osteoblasts (bone-forming cells) using a lyophilization procedure. Two types of SWCNT were synthesized in an arc discharge with a magnetic field (B-SWCNT) and without a magnetic field (N-SWCNT) for improving bone regeneration. Results Nanocomposites containing magnetically synthesized B-SWCNT had superior cytocompatibility properties when compared with nonmagnetically synthesized N-SWCNT. B-SWCNT have much smaller diameters and are twice as long as their nonmagnetically prepared counterparts, indicating that the dimensions of carbon nanotubes can have a substantial effect on osteoblast attachment. Conclusion This study demonstrated that a chitosan nanocomposite with both B-SWCNT and 20% nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite could achieve a higher osteoblast density when compared with the other experimental groups, thus making this nanocomposite promising for further exploration for bone regeneration. PMID:22619545

  20. Use of chemical fractionation and proton nuclear magnetic resonance to probe the physical structure of the primary plant cell wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, I.E.P.; Wallace, J.C.; MacKay, A.L.; Volke, F.

    1990-01-01

    Proton magnetic resonance has been used to monitor the microscopic physical properties of etiolated hypocotyl cell walls from Phaseolus vulgaris L. at all stages in a series of chemical fractionations with ammonium oxalate and potassium hydroxide. Solid echo measurements indicate that 75% of the polymers in the intact cell wall, including the cellulose and most of the hemicelluloses, are arranged such that there is almost complete restraint of molecular motion. The chemical fractionations generally altered the physical structures of the remaining cell wall components. Digestion with 0.25% ammonium oxalate/oxalic acid solubilized the pectin and increased the mobility of the hemicellulose I component. Extraction with 4% potassium hydroxide removed the hemicellulose I component and loosened the hemicellulose II. Further extraction with 24% potassium hydroxide removed the hemicellulose II and loosened some of the cellulose. The cellulose crystallinity, as monitored by Jeener echo measurements decreased from 83% to 63% during these fractionations. We conclude that, while hemicellulose I is firmly attached to hemicellulose II, it is not in a closely packed structure. Hemicellulose II is strongly bound to cellulose and has a much more closely packed structure

  1. Cine magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography and ultrasonography in the evaluation of chest wall invasion of lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokozaki, Michiya; Nawano, Shigeru; Nagai, Kanji; Moriyama, Noriyuki; Kodama, Tetsuro; Nishiwaki, Yutaka.

    1997-01-01

    To assess the usefulness of cine-magnetic resonance imaging (cine-MRI) in the evaluation of chest wall invasion, we compared the results of cine-MRI with those of computed tomography (CT) and ultrasonography (US). Eleven patients were examined who had no pain and who were difficult to diagnose by routine examinations. MRI was performed with a Magnetom SP/4000, 1.5T unit (Siemens, Germany). For cine imaging, continuous turbo-FLUSH (ultra fast low angle shot) images were obtained at an orthogonal section to the chest wall during slow deep breathing. A CT scan was performed using a TCT 900S or Super Helix (Toshiba, Japan) at 1 cm intervals, with section thicknesses of 1 cm throughout the entire chest. US was performed with a model SSA-270A (Toshiba, Japan) with 7.5-MHz linear array scanners (PLF-705S; Toshiba, Japan). Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were 67%, 75% and 73% for cine MRI, 67%, 63% and 64% for CT, 33%, 75% and 64% for US, respectively. These results indicate that cine MRI is potentially useful for the diagnosis of chest wall invasion of lung cancer. (author)

  2. Urban parks as green walls or green magnets? Interracial relations in neighborhood boundary parks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul H. Gobster

    1998-01-01

    A recent paper in this journal (Solecki and Welch, 1995) describes how urban parks that lie between racially different neighborhoods can become "green walls" or barriers to use and appreciation. Although this phenomenon is well grounded in the experience of many who plan for, manage, and live near parks in racially and ethnically segregated cities, an...

  3. Birth, growth and death of an antivortex during the propagation of a transverse domain wall in magnetic nanostrips

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, H.Y. [Physics Department, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon (Hong Kong); HKUST Shenzhen Research Institute, Shenzhen 518057 (China); Wang, X.R., E-mail: phxwan@ust.hk [Physics Department, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon (Hong Kong); HKUST Shenzhen Research Institute, Shenzhen 518057 (China)

    2014-11-15

    Antivortex birth, growth and death accompanying the propagation of a transverse domain wall (DW) in magnetic nanostrips are observed and analyzed. Antivortex formation is an intrinsic process of a strawberry-like transverse DW originated from magnetostatic interaction. Under an external magnetic field, the wider width region of a DW tends to move faster than the narrower one. This speed mismatch tilts and elongates DW center line. As a result, an antivortex with a well-defined polarity is periodically born near the tail of the DW center line. The antivortex either moves along the center line and dies on the other side of the nanostrip, or grows to its maximum size, detaches itself from the DW, and vanishes eventually. The former route reverses the polarity of DW while the later keeps the DW polarity unchanged. The evolution of the DW structures is analyzed using winding numbers assigned to each topological defects. The phase diagram in the field-width plane is obtained and the damping constant's influence on the phase diagram is discussed. - Highlights: • The magnetostatic interaction leads to a strawberry-like domain wall. • Two types of antivortices evolutions are identified. • Antivortex generation can cause decrease of Walker breakdown field. • The phase diagrams on the field-width plane are obtained.

  4. Role of quantitative chemical shift magnetic resonance imaging and chemical shift subtraction technique in discriminating adenomatous from non adenomatous adrenal solid lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed H. Afifi

    2017-03-01

    Conclusion: The signal intensity index and adrenal to spleen ratio are the most reliable quantitative chemical shift MRI methods in differentiation of adrenal adenomas from other non-adenomatous adrenal solid lesions. Chemical shift subtraction MRI is a recent technique that gives highly confident discrimination between two categories of pathology without using of any reference organ.

  5. Correcting and coating thin walled X-ray Optics via a combination of controlled film deposition and magnetic smart materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulmer, Melville

    The project goal is to demonstrate that thin walled (price. Since the desired surface area for the next generation X-ray telescope is >10x that of Chandra, the >10x requirement is then for >200 m^2 of surface area with a surface finish of better than 0.5 nm. Therefore, replication of some sort is called for. Because no replication technology has been shown to achieve ≤1" angular resolution, post fabrication figure corrections are likely going to be necessary. Some have proposed to do this in orbit and others prelaunch including us. Our prelaunch approach is to apply in-plane stresses to the thin walled mirror shells via a magnetic field. The field will be held in by some magnetically hard material such as NiCo. By use of a so called magnetic smart material (MSM) such as Terfenol-D, we already shown that strong enough stresses can be generated. Preliminary work has also shown that the magnetic field can be held in well enough to apply the figure correcting stresses pre-launch. What we call "set-it and forget-it." However, what is unique about our approach is that at the cost of complexity and some areal coverage, our concept will also accommodate in-orbit adjustments. Furthermore, to the best of our knowledge ours is one of two known stress modification processes that are bi-axial. Our plan is first to validate set-it and forget-it first on cantilevers and then to expand this to working on 5 cm x 5 cm pieces. We will work both with NiCo and glass or Si coated with Terfenol-D. Except for the NiCo, substrates we will also coat the samples with NiCo in order to have a film that will hold in the magnetic field. As part of the coating process, we will control the stress of the film by varying the voltage bias while coating. The bias stress control can be used to apply films with minimal stress such as Terfenol-D and X-ray reflecting coatings such as Ir. Ir is a highly desirable coating for soft X-ray astronomy mirrors that can have significant built in stress unless

  6. Chemical shift magnetic resonance spectroscopy of cingulate grey matter in patients with minimal hepatic encephalopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mechtcheriakov, Sergei; Kugener, Andre; Mattedi, Michael; Hinterhuber, Hartmann; Marksteiner, Josef; Schocke, Michael; Graziadei, Ivo W.; Vogel, Wolfgang

    2005-01-01

    Minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE) is frequently diagnosed in patients with liver cirrhosis who do not show overt clinical cirrhosis-associated neurological deficits. This condition manifests primarily with visuo-motor and attention deficits. We studied the association between visuo-motor deficits and magnetic resonance spectroscopic parameters in cingulate grey matter and white matter of centrum semiovale in patients with liver cirrhosis. The data revealed an increase in the glutamate-glutamine/creatine ratio and a decrease in choline/creatine and inositol/creatine ratios in patients with liver cirrhosis. The analysis of the data showed that cirrhosis-associated deterioration of the visuo-motor function significantly correlates with a decrease in the choline/creatine ratio and an increase in N-acetylaspartate/choline in cingulate grey matter but not in the neighbouring white matter. Furthermore, the increase in the glutamate-glutamine/creatine ratio correlated significantly with the increase in the N-acetylaspartate/creatine ratio. These data suggest an association between altered choline, glutamate-glutamine and NAA metabolism in cingulate grey matter and symptoms of MHE, and underline the importance of differentiation between grey and white matter in magnetic resonance spectroscopic studies on patients with cirrhosis-associated brain dysfunction. (orig.)

  7. A new method for detecting cerebral hemorrhage in rabbits by magnetic inductive phase shift.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Gui; Sun, Jian; Qin, Mingxin; Tang, Qinghua; Xu, Lin; Ning, Xu; Xu, Jia; Pu, Xianjie; Chen, Mingsheng

    2014-02-15

    Cerebral hemorrhage, which is an important clinical problem, is often monitored and studied using expensive devices, such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) that are unavailable in economically underdeveloped regions. Magnetic induction tomography (MIT) is a new type of non-contact, non-invasive, and low-cost detection technology, and exhibits prospects for wide application, especially for the detection of brain diseases. However, the previous studies on MIT have focused on laboratory models and rarely on in vivo applications because the induced signals produced by biological tissues are notably weak. Based on the symmetry between the two brain hemispheres and the fact that a local brain hemorrhage will not affect the contra-lateral hemisphere, a symmetric cancellation-type sensor detection system, which is characterized by one excitation coil and two receiving coils, was designed to improve the detection sensitivity of MIT. This method was subsequently used to detect the occurrence of cerebral hematomas in rabbits. The average phase drift induced by a 3-ml injection of autologous blood was 1.885°, which is a fivefold improvement compared with the traditional single excitation coil and single receiving coil method. The results indicate that this system has high sensitivity and anti-interference ability and high practical value. © 2013 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Observation of intensity of cosmic rays and daily magnetic shifts near meridian 70° in the South America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordaro, E. G.; Gálvez, D.; Laroze, D.

    2016-05-01

    In analysis of experiments carried during September 2008 using secondary cosmic ray detectors located in Chacaltaya (Bolivia) and Niteroi (Brazil), Augusto et al. (2010) showed an increase in the intensity of charged particles which takes place 3 h after sunrise and lasts until 1 h after sunset, furthermore they said that during this period the solar magnetic field lines overtake the Earth‧s surface. These stations are located within the South Atlantic Magnetic Anomaly (SAMA), having both different magnetic rigidities. To reproduce data from the Niteroi and Chacaltaya stations, we record data during the same hours and days using our neutron monitors, muon telescopes and magnetometers within the stations Putre and Los Cerrillos. Our observation stations in Putre and Cerrillos are located at 18°11‧47.8″S, 69°33‧10.9″W at an altitude of 3600 m and 33°29‧42.3″S, 70°42‧59.81″W with 570 m height above sea level, respectively. These stations are located within the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAMA) and are separated approximately 1700 km from each other and 1700 km from the center of the anomaly. Our network is composed furthermore by two auxiliary Cosmic Ray and/or Geomagnetic stations located at different latitudes along 70°W meridian, LARC and O'Higgins stations, which are located within Antarctic territory, covering a broad part of the Southern Hemisphere. Our magnetometer data shows that for each of the components, shifts in the magnetic field intensity for every station (even for those out of the SAMA) lasted between 3 and 4 h after sunrise and 1 and 2 h past sunset, which are the periods when the geomagnetic field is modulated by the transit of the dayside to nightside and nightside to dayside. We believe that, although the magnetometric data indicates the magnetic reconnection for the Chilean region, there is no direct influence from the SAMA other than the lower rigidity cut-off that leads to an increased count rate. Other details about the

  9. Domain wall motions in perpendicularly magnetized CoFe/Pd multilayer nanowire

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meng, Zhaoliang; Kumar, Manoj; Qiu, Jinjun

    2014-01-01

    Current-induced domain wall (DW) motion is investigated in a 600nm wide nanowire using multilayer film with a structure of Ta(5nm)/Pd(5nm)/[CoFe(0.4nm)/Pd(1.2nm)]15/Ta(5nm) in terms of anomalous Hall effect measurements. It is found that motion of DWs can be driven by a current density as low as 1...

  10. Optical absorption of zigzag single walled boron nitride nanotubes in axial magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chegel, Raad; Behzad, Somayeh

    2013-11-01

    We have investigated the effect of axial magnetic field on the band structure, dipole matrix elements and absorption spectrum in different energy ranges, using tight binding approximation. It is found that magnetic field breaks the degeneracy in the band structure and creates new allowed transitions in the dipole matrix which leads to creation of new peaks in the absorption spectrum. It is found that, unlike to CNTs which show metallic-semiconductor transition, the BNNTs remain semiconductor in any magnetic field strength. By calculation the diameter dependence of peak positions, we found that the positions of three first peaks in the lower energy region (E <5.3 eV) are proportional to n-2. In the middle energy region (7 < E < 7.5 eV) all (n, 0) zigzag BNNTs, with even and odd nanotube index, have two distinct peaks in the absence of magnetic field which these peaks may be used to identify zigzag BNNTs from other tube chiralities. For odd (even) tubes, in the middle energy region, applying the magnetic field leads to splitting of these two peaks into three (five) distinct peaks.

  11. Collective coordinate models of domain wall motion in perpendicularly magnetized systems under the spin hall effect and longitudinal fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nasseri, S. Ali, E-mail: ali.nasseri@isi.it [ISI Foundation - Via Alassio 11/c –10126 Torino (Italy); Politecnico di Torino - Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino (Italy); Moretti, Simone; Martinez, Eduardo [University of Salamanca - Cardenal Plá y Deniel, 22, 37008 Salamanca (Spain); Serpico, Claudio [ISI Foundation - Via Alassio 11/c –10126 Torino (Italy); University of Naples Federico II - Via Claudio 21, 80125 Napoli (Italy); Durin, Gianfranco [ISI Foundation - Via Alassio 11/c –10126 Torino (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Ricerca Metrologica (INRIM) - Strada delle Cacce 91, 10135 Torino (Italy)

    2017-03-15

    Recent studies on heterostructures of ultrathin ferromagnets sandwiched between a heavy metal layer and an oxide have highlighted the importance of spin-orbit coupling (SOC) and broken inversion symmetry in domain wall (DW) motion. Specifically, chiral DWs are stabilized in these systems due to the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI). SOC can also lead to enhanced current induced DW motion, with the Spin Hall effect (SHE) suggested as the dominant mechanism for this observation. The efficiency of SHE driven DW motion depends on the internal magnetic structure of the DW, which could be controlled using externally applied longitudinal in-plane fields. In this work, micromagnetic simulations and collective coordinate models are used to study current-driven DW motion under longitudinal in-plane fields in perpendicularly magnetized samples with strong DMI. Several extended collective coordinate models are developed to reproduce the micromagnetic results. While these extended models show improvements over traditional models of this kind, there are still discrepancies between them and micromagnetic simulations which require further work. - Highlights: • Moving DWs in PMA material maintain their structure under longitudinal in-plane fields. • As a result of longitudinal fields, magnetization in the domains becomes canted. • A critical longitudinal field was identified and correlated with the DMI strength. • A canted collective coordinate model was developed for DW motion under in-plane fields.

  12. Proton magnetic resonance chemical shift imaging (1H CSI)-directed stereotactic biopsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Son, B.-C.; Kim, B.-C.; Kang, J.-K.; Choi, B.-G.; Kim, E.-N.; Baik, H.-M.; Choe, B.-Y.; Naruse, S.

    2001-01-01

    Introduction. To add metabolic information during stereotactic biopsy target selection, the authors adopted proton chemical shift imaging ( 1 H CSI)-directed stereotactic biopsy. Currently, proton single voxel spectroscopy (SVS) technique has been reported in stereotactic biopsy. We performed 1 H CSI in combination with a stereotactic headframe and selected targets according to local metabolic information, and evaluated the pathological results. Patients and Method. The 1 H CSI-directed stereotactic biopsy was performed in four patients. 1 H CSI and conventional Gd-enhancement stereotactic MRI were performed simultaneously after the fitting of a stereotactic frame. After reconstructing the metabolic maps of N-acetylaspartate (NAA)/phosphocreatine (Cr), phosphocholine (Cho)/Cr, and Lactate/Cr ratios, focal areas of increased Cho/Cr ratio and Lac/Cr ratios were selected as target sites in the stereotactic MR images. Result. 1 H CSI is possible with the stereotactic headframe in place. No difficulty was experienced performing 1 H CSI or making a diagnosis. Pathological samples taken from areas of increased Cho/Cr ratios and decreased NAA/Cr ratios provided information upon increased cellularity, mitoses and cellular atypism, and facilitated diagnosis. Pathological samples taken from areas of increased Lac/ Cr ratio snowed predominant feature of necrosis. Conclusion. 1 H CSI was feasible with the stereotactic headframe in place. The final pathological results obtained were concordant with the local metabolic information from 1 H CSI. We believe that 1 H CSI-directed stereotactic biopsy has the potential to significantly improve the accuracy of stereotactic biopsy targeting. (author)

  13. Nanoscale control of stripe-ordered magnetic domain walls by vertical spin transfer torque in La0.67Sr0.33MnO3 film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Wu, Shizhe; Ma, Ji; Xie, Lishan; Wang, Chuanshou; Malik, Iftikhar Ahmed; Zhang, Yuelin; Xia, Ke; Nan, Ce-Wen; Zhang, Jinxing

    2018-02-01

    Stripe-ordered domains with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy have been intensively investigated due to their potential applications in high-density magnetic data-storage devices. However, the conventional control methods (e.g., epitaxial strain, local heating, magnetic field, and magnetoelectric effect) of the stripe-ordered domain walls either cannot meet the demands for miniaturization and low power consumption of spintronic devices or require high strength of the electric field due to the small value of the magnetoelectric effect at room temperature. Here, a domain-wall resistive effect of 0.1% was clarified in La0.67Sr0.33MnO3 thin films between the configurations of current in the plane and perpendicular to the plane of walls. Furthermore, a reversible nanoscale control of the domain-wall re-orientation by vertical spin transfer torque across the probe/film interface was achieved, where a probe voltage of 0.1 V was applied on a manganite-based capacitor. We also demonstrated that the stripe-ordered magnetic domain-wall re-orientation strongly depends on the AC frequency of the scanning probe voltage which was applied on the capacitor.

  14. Controlling magnetic domain wall motion in the creep regime in He+-irradiated CoFeB/MgO films with perpendicular anisotropy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrera Diez, L.; García-Sánchez, F.; Adam, J.-P.; Devolder, T.; Eimer, S.; El Hadri, M. S.; Ravelosona, D.; Lamperti, A.; Mantovan, R.; Ocker, B.

    2015-01-01

    This study presents the effective tuning of perpendicular magnetic anisotropy in CoFeB/MgO thin films by He + ion irradiation and its effect on domain wall motion in a low field regime. Magnetic anisotropy and saturation magnetisation are found to decrease as a function of the irradiation dose which can be related to the observed irradiation-induced changes in stoichiometry at the CoFeB/MgO interface. These changes in the magnetic intrinsic properties of the film are reflected in the domain wall dynamics at low magnetic fields (H) where irradiation is found to induce a significant decrease in domain wall velocity (v). For all irradiation doses, domain wall velocities at low fields are well described by a creep law, where Ln(v) vs. H −1∕4 behaves linearly, up to a maximum field H*, which has been considered as an approximation to the value of the depinning field H dep . In turn, H* ≈ H dep is seen to increase as a function of the irradiation dose, indicating an irradiation-induced extension of the creep regime of domain wall motion

  15. Controlling magnetic domain wall motion in the creep regime in He{sup +}-irradiated CoFeB/MgO films with perpendicular anisotropy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrera Diez, L., E-mail: liza.herrera-diez@ief.u-psud.fr; García-Sánchez, F.; Adam, J.-P.; Devolder, T.; Eimer, S.; El Hadri, M. S.; Ravelosona, D. [Institut d' Electronique Fondamentale, Université Paris-Sud, UMR CNRS 8622, 91405 Orsay (France); Lamperti, A.; Mantovan, R. [Laboratorio MDM, IMM-CNR, Via C. Olivetti 2, 20864 Agrate (MB) (Italy); Ocker, B. [Singulus Technology AG, Hanauer Landstrasse 103, 63796 Kahl am Main (Germany)

    2015-07-20

    This study presents the effective tuning of perpendicular magnetic anisotropy in CoFeB/MgO thin films by He{sup +} ion irradiation and its effect on domain wall motion in a low field regime. Magnetic anisotropy and saturation magnetisation are found to decrease as a function of the irradiation dose which can be related to the observed irradiation-induced changes in stoichiometry at the CoFeB/MgO interface. These changes in the magnetic intrinsic properties of the film are reflected in the domain wall dynamics at low magnetic fields (H) where irradiation is found to induce a significant decrease in domain wall velocity (v). For all irradiation doses, domain wall velocities at low fields are well described by a creep law, where Ln(v) vs. H{sup −1∕4} behaves linearly, up to a maximum field H*, which has been considered as an approximation to the value of the depinning field H{sub dep}. In turn, H* ≈ H{sub dep} is seen to increase as a function of the irradiation dose, indicating an irradiation-induced extension of the creep regime of domain wall motion.

  16. Modulation of the wall-heat transfer in turbulent thermomagnetic convection by magnetic field gradients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kenjeres, S.; Zinsmeester, R.; Pyrda, L.; Fornalik-Wajs, E.; Szmyd, J.

    2015-01-01

    We present combined experimental and numerical studies of the heat transfer of paramagnetic or diamagnetic fluid inside a differentially heated cubical enclosure subjected to the magnetic field gradients of different strength and orientation. In contrast to the previously reported studies in

  17. Manipulating antiferromagnets with magnetic fields: ratchet motion of multiple domain walls induced by asymmetric field pulses

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gomonay, O.; Kläui, M.; Sinova, Jairo

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 109, č. 14 (2016), 1-4, č. článku 142404. ISSN 0003-6951 R&D Projects: GA ČR GB14-37427G Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : spintronics * solitons * Mn 2 Au Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.411, year: 2016

  18. External field threshold for the unlocking of magnetic islands in the presence of resistive Wall effects and toroidal mode coupling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coelho, R.; Lazzaro, E.

    2000-01-01

    The unlocking of static resistive tearing modes by rotating external magnetic perturbations such as those which may arise from the natural tokamak error-field is discussed. For a single mode the balance between the accelerating torque imparted by the error-field and the braking torque due to the interaction of the mode with the wall sets a threshold for the error-field current [H. P. Furth et al. Phys. Fluids 6, 459 (1963)], below which the mode frequency will not lock to the error-field frequency. If the mode resonant with the error-field is coupled to another mode with a rational surface located elsewhere in the plasma, the unlocking process is more elaborated and substantial modifications to the current threshold are expected. The present analysis may contribute to the explanation of some mode unlocking events in tokamak discharges with a non negligible error-field. (orig.)

  19. Magnetic nanoparticles modified with polydimethylsiloxane and multi-walled carbon nanotubes for solid-phase extraction of fluoroquinolones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, S.; Jiang, C.; Lin, Y.; Jia, L.

    2012-01-01

    We have surface-functionalized magnetic particles (MPs) with polydimethylsiloxane and multi-walled carbon nanotubes in a two-step reaction. The MPs were applied to solid-phase extraction of the fluoroquinolones ofloxacin, norfloxacin, ciprofloxacin, enrofloxacin prior to their determination by capillary liquid chromatography. The effects of sample pH, adsorption time, type of eluent, desorption time and desorption temperature were investigated. Under the optimum conditions, the extraction efficiencies are in the range from 81.5 % to 94.1 %, with relative standard deviations (RSDs) of -1 . The method was applied to the analysis of spiked mineral water and honey. The recoveries for the fluoroquinolones in the real samples range from 84.0 % to 112 %, with RSDs ranging from 2.9 % to 7.8 %. (author)

  20. Surface anisotropy of Cr xN1-x films prepared on an inner wall by magnetic sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng, F.; Liang, R.; Li, X.W.; Wen, S.P.; Gao, Y.; Gu, Y.L.; Pan, F.

    2007-01-01

    The Cr x N 1-x films were prepared by magnetic sputtering on an inner wall of a column. Their surface morphologies were studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and found to be anisotropic. The 3-D AFM images indicate the grains grow upward along the rotational axis of the system. The AFM top views show a mosaic-like pattern for all samples. Analysis of the height-height correlation function demonstrates that correlation length along the rotational axis of the system is longer than that vertical to the axis. The correlation length and RMS roughness increase with the flow rate of N 2 . A deposition model proposed that the shadowing effect of the reactive gas N 2 is the dominant factor for surface anisotropy. The bias added on the substrate is regarded to modulate the grain direction to the rotation axis and enhance roughness and defects

  1. Fast microextraction of phthalate acid esters from beverage, environmental water and perfume samples by magnetic multi-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yan-Bo; Yu, Qiong-Wei; Yuan, Bi-Feng; Feng, Yu-Qi

    2012-02-15

    In this work, magnetic carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were prepared by mixing the magnetic particles and multi-walled carbon nanotubes dispersed solutions. Due to their excellent adsorption capability towards hydrophobic compounds, the magnetic CNTs were used as adsorbent of magnetic solid-phase extraction (MSPE) to extract phthalate acid esters (PAEs), which are widely used in many consumable products with potential carcinogenic properties. By coupling MSPE with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS), a rapid, sensitive and cost-effective method for the analysis of PAEs was established. Our results showed that the limits of detection (LODs) of 16 PAEs ranged from 4.9 to 38 ng L(-1), which are much lower compared to the previously reported methods. And good linearities of the detection method were obtained with correlation coefficients (R(2)) between 0.9821 and 0.9993. In addition, a satisfying reproducibility was achieved by evaluating the intra- and inter-day precisions with relative standard deviations (RSDs) less than 11.7% and 14.6%, respectively. Finally, the established MSPE-GC/MS method was successfully applied to the determination of PAEs from bottled beverages, tap water and perfume samples. The recoveries of the 16 PAEs from the real samples ranged from 64.6% to 125.6% with the RSDs less than 16.5%. Taken together, the MSPE-GC/MS method developed in current study provides a new option for the detection of PAEs from real samples with complex matrices. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Two simple methods for calculating the penetration time of a longitudinal magnetic field through the wall of a metallic tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jimenez D, H.; Colunga S, S.; Lopez C, R.; Melendez L, L.; Ramos S, J.; Cabral P, A.; Gonzalez T, L.; Chavez A, E.; Valencia A, R.

    1991-06-01

    Two simple and fast methods to calculate the penetration time of a longitudinal magnetic field through the wall of a long metallic tube of circular cross section are presented. The first method is based upon the proposition of an 'effective penetration thickness' given by the polar angle average of all possible straight-line transverse penetration paths of field lines through the tube wall. This method provides a quick calculation that yields a remarkably good approximation to experimental and reported values of the penetration time. In the second method the tube is considered as a RL circuit. Thus the penetration time is given by the ratio L T /R T where L T is the inductance of the tube considered as a one turn coil, and R T is the tube resistance. This method is faster to apply than the previous one but the values obtained provide only a rough approximation to the penetration time. Applications of the two methods are given for the tokamak chambers of the Japanese 'HYBTOK', the Brazilian 'TBR' and the Mexican 'Novillo'. The resulting values of the penetration time approximate very well to the reported ones in the first two cases and to the experimental one in the last. The methods are also applied to calculate the penetration time in two long tubes, one of aluminum and other of copper. Calculated values approximate very well to measured values. (Author)

  3. Coronary magnetic resonance imaging: visualization of the vessel lumen and the vessel wall and molecular imaging of arteriothrombosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spuentrup, Elmar; Botnar, Rene M.

    2006-01-01

    Coronary magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has dramatically emerged over the last decade. Technical improvements have enabled reliable visualization of the proximal and midportion of the coronary artery tree for exclusion of significant coronary artery disease. However, current technical developments focus also on direct visualization of the diseased coronary vessel wall and imaging of coronary plaque because plaques without stenoses are typically more vulnerable with higher risk of plaque rupture. Plaque rupture with subsequent thrombosis and vessel occlusion is the main cause of myocardial infarction. Very recently, the first success of molecular imaging in the coronary arteries has been demonstrated using a fibrin-specific contrast agent for selective visualization of coronary thrombosis. This demonstrates in general the high potential of molecular MR imaging in the field of coronary artery disease. In this review, we will address recent technical advances in coronary MR imaging, including visualization of the lumen and the vessel wall and molecular imaging of coronary arteriothrombosis. First results of these new approaches will be discussed. (orig.)

  4. Measuring the thickness of austenitic weld deposits on carbon steel walls using a magnetic method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, K.

    1988-01-01

    The theoretical background is described of a magnetic method characterized by a marked compensation of the undesirable effect of δ-ferrite content in the deposit, on the accuracy of measuring deposit thickness. A description is also given of the basic types of sensors and the results are summarized of comparing measurements performed on weld deposits of WWER-type reactor pressure vessels. (author). 7 figs., 5 refs

  5. Evaluation of thermal stress in the anode chamber wall of a large volume magnetic bucket ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wells, Russell; Horiike, Hiroshi; Kuriyama, Masaaki; Ohara, Yoshihiro

    1984-02-01

    Thermal stress analysis was performed on the plasma chamber of the Large Volume Magnetic Multipole Bucket Ion Source (LVB) designed for use on the JT-60 NBI system. The energy absorbed by the walls of the plasma chambers of neutral beam injectors is of the order of 1% of the accelerator electrical drain power. A previous study indicates that a moderately high heat flux, of about 600W/cm 2 , is concentrated on the magnetic field cusp lines during normal full power operation. Abnormal arc discharges during conditioning of a stainless steel LVB produced localized melting of the stainless steel at several locations near the cusps lines. The power contained in abnormal arc discharges (arc spots) was estimated from the observed melting. Thermal stress analysis was performed numerically on representative sections of the copper LVB design for both stable and abnormal arc discharge conditions. Results show that this chamber should not fail due to thermal fatigue stesses arising from normal arc discharges. However, fatigue failure may occur after several hundred to a few thousand arc spots of 30mS duration at any one location. Limited arc discharge operation of the copper bucket was performed to partially verify the chamber's durability. (author)

  6. Magnetic properties of iron catalyst particles in HiPco single wall carbon nanotubes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bittová, Barbara; Poltierová Vejpravová, Jana; Kalbáč, Martin; Burianová, Simona; Mantlíková, A.; Daniš, S.; Doyle, S.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 115, č. 35 (2011), s. 17303-17309 ISSN 1932-7447 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP204/10/1677 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520; CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : metal catalyst particles * carbon nanotubes * superparamagnet * core - shell model * inter-particle interactions Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 4.805, year: 2011 http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/jp203365g

  7. Investigating the Relationship between Cerebrospinal Fluid and Magnetic Induction Phase Shift in Rabbit Intracerebral hematoma expansion Monitoring by MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mingsheng; Yan, Qingguang; Sun, Jian; Jin, Gui; Qin, Mingxin

    2017-09-11

    In a prior study of intracerebral hemorrhage monitoring using magnetic induction phase shift (MIPS), we found that MIPS signal changes occurred prior to those seen with intracranial pressure. However, the characteristic MIPS alert is not yet fully explained. Combining the brain physiology and MIPS theory, we propose that cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) may be the primary factor that leads to hematoma expansion being alerted by MIPS earlier than with intracranial pressure monitoring. This paper investigates the relationship between CSF and MIPS in monitoring of rabbit intracerebral hemorrhage models, which is based on the MIPS measurements data, the quantified data on CSF from medical images and the amount of injected blood in the rabbit intracerebral hemorrhage model. In the investigated results, a R value of 0.792 with a significance of 0.019 is observed between the MIPS and CSF, which is closer than MIPS and injected blood. Before the reversal point of MIPS, CSF is the leading factor in MIPS signal changing in an early hematoma expansion stage. Under CSF compensation, CSF reduction compensates for hematoma expansion in the brain to keep intracranial pressure stable. MIPS decrease results from the reducing CSF volume. This enables MIPS to detect hematoma expansion earlier than intracranial pressure.

  8. Method and apparatus to produce and maintain a thick, flowing, liquid lithium first wall for toroidal magnetic confinement DT fusion reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolley, Robert D.

    2002-01-01

    A system for forming a thick flowing liquid metal, in this case lithium, layer on the inside wall of a toroid containing the plasma of a deuterium-tritium fusion reactor. The presence of the liquid metal layer or first wall serves to prevent neutron damage to the walls of the toroid. A poloidal current in the liquid metal layer is oriented so that it flows in the same direction as the current in a series of external magnets used to confine the plasma. This current alignment results in the liquid metal being forced against the wall of the toroid. After the liquid metal exits the toroid it is pumped to a heat extraction and power conversion device prior to being reentering the toroid.

  9. Cellulose-Pectin Spatial Contacts Are Inherent to Never-Dried Arabidopsis Primary Cell Walls: Evidence from Solid-State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tuo; Park, Yong Bum; Hong, Mei

    2015-01-01

    The structural role of pectins in plant primary cell walls is not yet well understood because of the complex and disordered nature of the cell wall polymers. We recently introduced multidimensional solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to characterize the spatial proximities of wall polysaccharides. The data showed extensive cross peaks between pectins and cellulose in the primary wall of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), indicating subnanometer contacts between the two polysaccharides. This result was unexpected because stable pectin-cellulose interactions are not predicted by in vitro binding assays and prevailing cell wall models. To investigate whether the spatial contacts that give rise to the cross peaks are artifacts of sample preparation, we now compare never-dried Arabidopsis primary walls with dehydrated and rehydrated samples. One-dimensional 13C spectra, two-dimensional 13C-13C correlation spectra, water-polysaccharide correlation spectra, and dynamics data all indicate that the structure, mobility, and intermolecular contacts of the polysaccharides are indistinguishable between never-dried and rehydrated walls. Moreover, a partially depectinated cell wall in which 40% of homogalacturonan is extracted retains cellulose-pectin cross peaks, indicating that the cellulose-pectin contacts are not due to molecular crowding. The cross peaks are observed both at −20°C and at ambient temperature, thus ruling out freezing as a cause of spatial contacts. These results indicate that rhamnogalacturonan I and a portion of homogalacturonan have significant interactions with cellulose microfibrils in the native primary wall. This pectin-cellulose association may be formed during wall biosynthesis and may involve pectin entrapment in or between cellulose microfibrils, which cannot be mimicked by in vitro binding assays. PMID:26036615

  10. Dual-echo, chemical shift gradient-echo magnetic resonance imaging to quantify hepatic steatosis: Implications for living liver donation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinella, Mary E; McCarthy, Richard; Thakrar, Kiran; Finn, John Paul; Rao, Sambasiva M; Koffron, Alan J; Abecassis, Michael; Blei, Andres T

    2003-08-01

    In living liver donation, a fatty liver poses risks for both recipient and donor. Currently, liver biopsy is the standard for assessing the presence and extent of steatosis. The goals of this study were to correlate a steatosis index derived from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to the histologic grade on biopsy as well as to determine the topographic distribution of steatosis within the liver. We examined the ability of dual-echo, chemical shift gradient-echo MRI to predict the degree of steatosis on liver biopsy. A total of 22 subjects received both a liver biopsy and detailed MRI evaluation. These individuals included 15 potential living donors and 7 patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. MRI steatosis index was then compared with histologic grade on liver biopsy. The topographic distribution of hepatic steatosis was determined from those subjects in whom MRI detected hepatic steatosis. The steatosis index had a positive correlation with grade of steatosis on liver biopsy (correlation coefficient, 0.84). There was no significant variation in the degree of steatosis among segments. A steatosis index of >0.2 had good positive and negative predictive value for the presence of significant steatosis (>15%) on biopsy. Our quantitative MRI protocol can predict the degree of hepatic steatosis when it is minimal to moderate, and may obviate the need for liver biopsy for the purpose of quantification of steatosis in living donors. Fat saturation added to the MRI protocol may further improve diagnostic accuracy. This technique may be applicable to the larger population with hepatic steatosis.

  11. Magnetic resonance investigation of magnetic-labeled baker's yeast cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godoy Morais, J.P.M.; Azevedo, R.B.; Silva, L.P.; Lacava, Z.G.M.; Bao, S.N.; Silva, O.; Pelegrini, F.; Gansau, C.; Buske, N.; Safarik, I.; Safarikova, M.; Morais, P.C.

    2004-01-01

    In this study, the interaction of DMSA-coated magnetite nanoparticles (5 and 10 nm core-size) with Saccharomyces cerevisae was investigated using magnetic resonance (MR) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The TEM micrographs revealed magnetite nanoparticles attached externally to the cell wall. The MR data support the strong interaction among the nanoparticles supported by the cells. A remarkable shift in the resonance field was used as signature of particle attachment to the cell wall

  12. γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} magnetic nanoparticle functionalized with carboxylated multi walled carbon nanotube: Synthesis, characterization, analytical and biomedical application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kılınç, Ersin, E-mail: kilincersin@gmail.com

    2016-03-01

    In recent years, magnetic nanoparticles attained special interest in nanobiotechnology and nanomedicine due to their uniqe properties and biocompatibilities. From this perspective, hybride nanostructure composed from γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} magnetic nanoparticle and carboxylated multi walled carbon nanotube was synthesized and characterized by FT-IR, VSM, SEM, HR-TEM and ICP-OES. Microscopy images showed that magnetic nanoparticles were nearly spherical structure that arranged on the axis of carboxylated MWCNT. Particle size was found lower than 10 nm. VSM results showed that the obtained magnetic nanoparticles presented superparamagnetic properties at room temperature. The magnetic saturation value was determined as 35.2 emu/g. It was used for the adsorption and controlled release of harmane, a potent tremor-producing neurotoxin. Maximum adsorption capacity was calculated as 151.5 mg/g from Langmuir isotherm. Concentration of harmane was determined by HPLC with fluorescence detection. The antimicrobial activity of synthesized magnetic nanoparticle was investigated against gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria. However, no activity was observed. - Highlights: • A nanomaterial from gamma iron oxide and multi walled carbon nanotube was synthesized. • It was characterized and microstructure was investigated. • No antimicrobial activity was observed. • Adsorption and release of harmane on its were examined.

  13. γ-Fe_2O_3 magnetic nanoparticle functionalized with carboxylated multi walled carbon nanotube: Synthesis, characterization, analytical and biomedical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kılınç, Ersin

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, magnetic nanoparticles attained special interest in nanobiotechnology and nanomedicine due to their uniqe properties and biocompatibilities. From this perspective, hybride nanostructure composed from γ-Fe_2O_3 magnetic nanoparticle and carboxylated multi walled carbon nanotube was synthesized and characterized by FT-IR, VSM, SEM, HR-TEM and ICP-OES. Microscopy images showed that magnetic nanoparticles were nearly spherical structure that arranged on the axis of carboxylated MWCNT. Particle size was found lower than 10 nm. VSM results showed that the obtained magnetic nanoparticles presented superparamagnetic properties at room temperature. The magnetic saturation value was determined as 35.2 emu/g. It was used for the adsorption and controlled release of harmane, a potent tremor-producing neurotoxin. Maximum adsorption capacity was calculated as 151.5 mg/g from Langmuir isotherm. Concentration of harmane was determined by HPLC with fluorescence detection. The antimicrobial activity of synthesized magnetic nanoparticle was investigated against gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria. However, no activity was observed. - Highlights: • A nanomaterial from gamma iron oxide and multi walled carbon nanotube was synthesized. • It was characterized and microstructure was investigated. • No antimicrobial activity was observed. • Adsorption and release of harmane on its were examined.

  14. High-resolution 13C nuclear magnetic resonance evidence of phase transition of Rb,Cs-intercalated single-walled nanotubes

    KAUST Repository

    Bouhrara, M.

    2011-09-06

    We present 13 C high-resolution magic-angle-turning (MAT) and magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance data of Cs and Rb intercalated single walled carbon nanotubes. We find two distinct phases at different intercalation levels. A simple charge transfer is applicable at low intercalation level. The new phase at high intercalation level is accompanied by a hybridization of alkali (s) orbitals with the carbon (sp2) orbitals of the single walled nanotubes, which indicate bundle surface sites is the most probable alkali site.

  15. Magnetic susceptibility as a direct measure of oxidation state in LiFePO4 batteries and cyclic water gas shift reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadyk, Thomas; Eikerling, Michael

    2015-08-14

    The possibility of correlating the magnetic susceptibility to the oxidation state of the porous active mass in a chemical or electrochemical reactor was analyzed. The magnetic permeability was calculated using a hierarchical model of the reactor. This model was applied to two practical examples: LiFePO4 batteries, in which the oxidation state corresponds with the state-of-charge, and cyclic water gas shift reactors, in which the oxidation state corresponds to the depletion of the catalyst. In LiFePO4 batteries phase separation of the lithiated and delithiated phases in the LiFePO4 particles in the positive electrode gives rise to a hysteresis effect, i.e. the magnetic permeability depends on the history of the electrode. During fast charge or discharge, non-uniform lithium distributionin the electrode decreases the hysteresis effect. However, the overall sensitivity of the magnetic response to the state-of-charge lies in the range of 0.03%, which makes practical measurement challenging. In cyclic water gas shift reactors, the sensitivity is 4 orders of magnitude higher and without phase separation, no hysteresis occurs. This shows that the method is suitable for such reactors, in which large changes of the magnetic permeability of the active material occurs.

  16. Energy-imbalance mechanism of domain wall motion induced by propagation spin waves in finite magnetic nanostripe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Jinrong; Han, Zhaoyan; Su, Yuanchang; Hu, Jingguo

    2014-01-01

    The mechanism of the domain wall (DW) motions induced by spin wave in finite magnetic nanostripe is studied by micromagnetic simulations. We find that the spin-wave induced DM motions are always accompanied by an energy imbalance between two sides of the DW. The DW motion can be attributed to the expansion of the low-energy-density area and the contraction of the high-energy-density area. The energy imbalance strongly depends on whether the spin wave passes through the DW or is reflected by the DW. In the area of the spin wave propagation, the energy density increases with the time. However, in the superposition area of the incident spin wave and the reflected spin wave, the energy density decreases with the increasing of the time. It shows that this energy imbalance can be controlled by tuning the frequency of the spin wave. Finally, the effect of the damping parameter value is discussed. - Highlights: • The mechanism of the spin-wave induced DW motions is studied. • The spin-wave induced DW motions and the energy imbalance mechanism are given. • The DW motion with the same direction to that of SW is explained. • The DW motion with the opposite direction to that of SW is explained

  17. Association between proximal internal carotid artery steno-occlusive disease and diffuse wall thickening in its petrous segment: a magnetic resonance vessel wall imaging study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xiaoyi; Li, Dongye [Capital Medical University and Beijing Institute for Brain Disorders, Center for Brain Disorders Research, Beijing (China); Tsinghua University School of Medicine, Center for Biomedical Imaging Research, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Beijing (China); Zhao, Huilin [Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Department of Radiology, Renji Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); Chen, Zhensen; Qiao, Huiyu; He, Le; Li, Rui [Tsinghua University School of Medicine, Center for Biomedical Imaging Research, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Beijing (China); Cui, Yuanyuan [PLA General Hospital, Department of Radiology, Beijing (China); Zhou, Zechen [Philips Research China, Healthcare Department, Beijing (China); Yuan, Chun [Tsinghua University School of Medicine, Center for Biomedical Imaging Research, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Beijing (China); University of Washington, Department of Radiology, Seattle, WA (United States); Zhao, Xihai [Tsinghua University School of Medicine, Center for Biomedical Imaging Research, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Beijing (China); Beijing Institute for Brain Disorders, Center for Stroke, Beijing (China)

    2017-05-15

    Significant stenosis or occlusion in carotid arteries may lead to diffuse wall thickening (DWT) in the arterial wall of downstream. This study aimed to investigate the correlation between proximal internal carotid artery (ICA) steno-occlusive disease and DWT in ipsilateral petrous ICA. Symptomatic patients with atherosclerotic stenosis (>0%) in proximal ICA were recruited and underwent carotid MR vessel wall imaging. The 3D motion sensitized-driven equilibrium prepared rapid gradient-echo (3D-MERGE) was acquired for characterizing the wall thickness and longitudinal extent of the lesions in petrous ICA and the distance from proximal lesion to the petrous ICA. The stenosis degree in proximal ICA was measured on the time-of-flight (TOF) images. In total, 166 carotid arteries from 125 patients (mean age 61.0 ± 10.5 years, 99 males) were eligible for final analysis and 64 showed DWT in petrous ICAs. The prevalence of severe DWT in petrous ICA was 1.4%, 5.3%, 5.9%, and 80.4% in ipsilateral proximal ICAs with stenosis category of 1%-49%, 50%-69%, 70%-99%, and total occlusion, respectively. Proximal ICA stenosis was significantly correlated with the wall thickness in petrous ICA (r = 0.767, P < 0.001). Logistic regression analysis showed that proximal ICA stenosis was independently associated with DWT in ipsilateral petrous ICA (odds ratio (OR) = 2.459, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.896-3.189, P < 0.001). Proximal ICA steno-occlusive disease is independently associated with DWT in ipsilateral petrous ICA. (orig.)

  18. Association between proximal internal carotid artery steno-occlusive disease and diffuse wall thickening in its petrous segment: a magnetic resonance vessel wall imaging study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Xiaoyi; Li, Dongye; Zhao, Huilin; Chen, Zhensen; Qiao, Huiyu; He, Le; Li, Rui; Cui, Yuanyuan; Zhou, Zechen; Yuan, Chun; Zhao, Xihai

    2017-01-01

    Significant stenosis or occlusion in carotid arteries may lead to diffuse wall thickening (DWT) in the arterial wall of downstream. This study aimed to investigate the correlation between proximal internal carotid artery (ICA) steno-occlusive disease and DWT in ipsilateral petrous ICA. Symptomatic patients with atherosclerotic stenosis (>0%) in proximal ICA were recruited and underwent carotid MR vessel wall imaging. The 3D motion sensitized-driven equilibrium prepared rapid gradient-echo (3D-MERGE) was acquired for characterizing the wall thickness and longitudinal extent of the lesions in petrous ICA and the distance from proximal lesion to the petrous ICA. The stenosis degree in proximal ICA was measured on the time-of-flight (TOF) images. In total, 166 carotid arteries from 125 patients (mean age 61.0 ± 10.5 years, 99 males) were eligible for final analysis and 64 showed DWT in petrous ICAs. The prevalence of severe DWT in petrous ICA was 1.4%, 5.3%, 5.9%, and 80.4% in ipsilateral proximal ICAs with stenosis category of 1%-49%, 50%-69%, 70%-99%, and total occlusion, respectively. Proximal ICA stenosis was significantly correlated with the wall thickness in petrous ICA (r = 0.767, P < 0.001). Logistic regression analysis showed that proximal ICA stenosis was independently associated with DWT in ipsilateral petrous ICA (odds ratio (OR) = 2.459, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.896-3.189, P < 0.001). Proximal ICA steno-occlusive disease is independently associated with DWT in ipsilateral petrous ICA. (orig.)

  19. Experimental root mean square charge radii, isotope shifts, ground state magnetic dipole and electric quadrupole moments of 1≤A≤ 239 nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antony, M.S.; Britz, J.

    1986-01-01

    A compilation of experimental root-mean square radii, isotope shifts, ground-state magnetic dipole and electric quadrupole moments of nuclei 1≤A≤239 is presented. Shell, sub-subshell closures and changes in nuclear deformations discernible from data are displayed graphically. The nuclear charge distribution, for 1≤A≤ 239 nuclei deduced from Coulomb displacement energies is shown for comparison

  20. Studies on the response of resistive-wall modes to applied magnetic perturbations in the EXTRAP T2R reversed field pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregoratto, D.; Drake, J. R.; Yadikin, D.; Liu, Y. Q.; Paccagnella, R.; Brunsell, P. R.; Bolzonella, T.; Marchiori, G.; Cecconello, M.

    2005-09-01

    Arrays of magnetic coils and sensors in the EXTRAP T2R [P. R. Brunsell et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 43 1457 (2001)] reversed-field pinch have been used to investigate the plasma response to an applied resonant magnetic perturbation in the range of the resistive-wall modes (RWMs). Measured RWM growth rates agree with predictions of a cylindrical ideal-plasma model. The linear growth of low-n marginally stable RWMs is related to the so-called resonant-field amplification due to a dominant ∣n∣=2 machine error field of about 2 G. The dynamics of the m =1 RWMs interacting with the applied field produced by the coils can be accurately described by a two-pole system. Estimated poles and residues are given with sufficient accuracy by the cylindrical model with a thin continuous wall.

  1. Development of a system for measuring wall shear stress in blood vessels using magnetic resonance imaging and computational fluid dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Keita; Nagao, Taisuke; Okada, Kouji; Miyazaki, Shohei; Yang, Xiaomei; Yamazaki, Youichi; Murase, Kenya

    2008-01-01

    We developed a system for measuring the wall shear stress (WSS) in blood vessels using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computational fluid dynamics (CFD). The time-dependent velocity at the center of the blood vessel was measured by phase-contrast MRI and was approximated by finite Fourier series, which was used for generating the velocity profile at the inlet for the boundary condition to the CFD method. To validate the CFD method, we compared the WSS obtained by the CFD method with the theoretical value in a straight cylinder with various radii for both steady and pulsatile flows. We also investigated the dependence of the WSS on the inlet velocity profile incorporated into the CFD method. For steady flow, there was a good agreement between the WSS obtained by the CFD method and the theoretical value. For pulsatile flow, there was a relatively good agreement between them when the radius of the cylinder was 2.5 mm and the inlet velocity profile was given by the Womersley solution for fully developed pulsatile flow in a straight circular cylinder. When the radius of the cylinder was 5 mm and/or the inlet velocity profile was assumed to be parabolic, large differences were observed between them, suggesting that the assumption of fully developed flow does not hold true in these cases. In human studies, the vortex due to the secondary blood flow in the carotid arterial sinus was clearly observed. The WSS in the bifurcation was the highest, while that in the carotid arterial sinus was the smallest. In conclusion, the system presented here appears to be useful for measuring the WSS in blood vessels and for analyzing the cause and/or extent of atherosclerosis, and our results suggest that the inlet velocity profile should be carefully considered. (author)

  2. High-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (HR-MRI) of the pleura and chest wall: Normal findings and pathological changes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bittner, R.C.; Schnoy, N.; Schoenfeld, N.; Grassot, A.; Loddenkemper, R.; Lode, H.; Kaiser, D.; Krumhaar, D.; Felix, R.

    1995-01-01

    To determine the value of high-resolution MRI in pleural and chest wall diseases, the normal and pathologic costal pleura and adjacent chest wall between paravertebral and the axillar region were examined with contrast enhanced high-resolution T 1 -weighted MRI images using a surface coil. Normal anatomy was evaluated in 5 healthy volunteers and a normal specimen of the thoracic wall, and correlation was made with corresponding HR-CT and histologic sections. CT-proved focal and diffuse changes of the pleura and the chest wall in 36 patients underwent HR-MRI, and visual comparison of MRI and CT was done retrospectively. Especially sagittal T 1 -weighted HR-MRI images allowed accurate delineation of the peripleural fat layer (PFL) and the innermost intercostal muscle (IIM), which served as landmarks of the intact inner chest wall. PFL and IIM were well delineated in 3/4 patients with tuberculous pleuritis, and in all 7 patients with non-specific pleuritis, as opposed to impairment of the PFL and/or the IIM, which was detected in 15/18 malignancies as a pattern of malignant chest wall involvement. In one case of tuberculous pleural empyema with edema of the inner chest wall HR-MRI produced false positive diagnosis of malignant disease. HR-MRI images improved non-invasive evaluation of pleural and chest wall diseases, and allowed for differentiation of bengin and malignant changes. (orig./MG) [de

  3. A Novel Choice Procedure of Magnetic Component Values for Phase Shifted Full Bridge Converters with a Variable Dead-Time Control Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Zhao

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic components are important parts of the phase shifted full bridge (PSFB converter. During the dead-time of switches located in the same leg, the converter can achieve zero-voltage-switching (ZVS by using the energies stored in magnetic components to discharge or charge the output capacitances of switches. Dead-time is usually calculated under a given set of pre-defined load condition which results in that the available energies are insufficient and ZVS capability is lost at light loads. In this paper, the PSFB converter is controlled by variable dead-time method and thus full advantage can be taken of the energies stored in magnetic components. Considering that dead-time has a great effect on ZVS, the relationship between available energies and magnetic component values is formulated by analyzing the equivalent circuits during dead-time intervals. Magnetic component values are chosen based on such relationship. The proposed choice procedure can make the available energies greater than the required energies for ZVS operation over a wide range of load conditions. Moreover, the burst mode control is adopted in order to reduce the standby power loss. Experimental results coincide with the theoretical analysis. The proposed method is a simple and practical solution to extend the ZVS range.

  4. A thick-walled sphere rotating in a uniform magnetic field: The next step to de-spin a space object

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurge, Mark A.; Youngquist, Robert C.; Caracciolo, Ryan A.; Peck, Mason; Leve, Frederick A.

    2017-08-01

    Modeling the interaction between a moving conductor and a static magnetic field is critical to understanding the operation of induction motors, eddy current braking, and the dynamics of satellites moving through Earth's magnetic field. Here, we develop the case of a thick-walled sphere rotating in a uniform magnetic field, which is the simplest, non-trivial, magneto-statics problem that leads to complete closed-form expressions for the resulting potentials, fields, and currents. This solution requires knowledge of all of Maxwell's time independent equations, scalar and vector potential equations, and the Lorentz force law. The paper presents four cases and their associated experimental results, making this topic appropriate for an advanced student lab project.

  5. The magnetic epoch-6 carbon shift: a change in the ocean's 13C/12C ratio 6.2 million years ago

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vincent, E.; Killingley, J.S.; Berger, W.H.

    1980-01-01

    Tropical Indian Ocean planktonic and benthic foraminifera have 13 C/ 12 C ratios which change abruptly within Magnetic Epoch 6 about 6.2 million years ago. All species analyzed in the Late Miocene section of DSDP Site 238 show a shift towards lighter values of delta 13 C by about 0.8 per thousand. The oxygen isotope signal indicates that the pre-shift period is climatically quiet while the post-shift period has strong fluctuations. The authors suggest that the shift reflects a sudden increase in the rate of supply of organic carbon from coastal lowlands and from shelves exposed by regression, as well as a change in deep circulation patterns and ocean fertility. The event marks the transition of the ocean-atmosphere system from a quiet Early and Middle Neogene climate regime toward a Late Neogene regime characterized by climatic amplifying mechanisms (albedo feedback, bottom water production) located around the northern North Atlantic. The beginning of this regime may have been strongly influenced by the isolation of the Mediterranean basin. (Auth.)

  6. Determination of lifetimes of nuclear excited states using the Recoil Distance Doppler Shift Method in combination with magnetic spectrometers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doncel, M. [Universidad de Salamanca, Laboratorio de Radiaciones Ionizantes, Salamanca (Spain); Royal Institute of Technology, Department of Physics, Stockholm (Sweden); University of Liverpool, Department of Physics, Oliver Lodge Laboratory, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Gadea, A. [CSIC-University of Valencia, Istituto de Fisica Corpuscular, Valencia (Spain); Valiente-Dobon, J.J. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Legnaro (Italy); Quintana, B. [Universidad de Salamanca, Laboratorio de Radiaciones Ionizantes, Salamanca (Spain); Modamio, V. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Legnaro (Italy); University of Oslo, Oslo (Norway); Mengoni, D. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Universita di Padova, Padova (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Padova, Padova (Italy); Moeller, O.; Pietralla, N. [Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Darmstadt (Germany); Dewald, A. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Universitaet Koeln (Germany)

    2017-10-15

    The current work presents the determination of lifetimes of nuclear excited states using the Recoil Distance Doppler Shift Method, in combination with spectrometers for ion identification, normalizing the intensity of the peaks by the ions detected in the spectrometer as a valid technique that produces results comparable to the ones obtained by the conventional shifted-to-unshifted peak ratio method. The technique has been validated using data measured with the γ-ray array AGATA, the PRISMA spectrometer and the Cologne plunger setup. In this paper a test performed with the AGATA-PRISMA setup at LNL and the advantages of this new approach with respect to the conventional Recoil Distance Doppler Shift Method are discussed. (orig.)

  7. Measuring the spin polarization of alkali-metal atoms using nuclear magnetic resonance frequency shifts of noble gases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. H. Liu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available We report a novel method of measuring the spin polarization of alkali-metal atoms by detecting the NMR frequency shifts of noble gases. We calculated the profile of 87Rb D1 line absorption cross sections. We then measured the absorption profile of the sample cell, from which we calculated the 87Rb number densities at different temperatures. Then we measured the frequency shifts resulted from the spin polarization of the 87Rb atoms and calculated its polarization degrees at different temperatures. The behavior of frequency shifts versus temperature in experiment was consistent with theoretical calculation, which may be used as compensative signal for the NMRG closed-loop control system.

  8. Vibration due to non-circularity of a rotating ring having discrete radial supports - With application to thin-walled rotor/magnetic bearing systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakkaew, Wichaphon; Cole, Matthew O. T.

    2018-06-01

    This paper investigates the vibration arising in a thin-walled cylindrical rotor subject to small non-circularity and coupled to discrete space-fixed radial bearing supports. A Fourier series description of rotor non-circularity is incorporated within a mathematical model for vibration of a rotating annulus. This model predicts the multi-harmonic excitation of the rotor wall due to bearing interactions. For each non-circularity harmonic there is a set of distinct critical speeds at which resonance can potentially arise due to flexural mode excitation within the rotor wall. It is shown that whether each potential resonance occurs depends on the multiplicity and symmetry of the bearing supports. Also, a sufficient number of evenly spaced identical supports will eliminate low order resonances. The considered problem is pertinent to the design and operation of thin-walled rotors with active magnetic bearing (AMB) supports, for which small clearances exist between the rotor and bearing and so vibration excitation must be limited to avoid contacts. With this motivation, the mathematical model is further developed for the case of a distributed array of electromagnetic actuators controlled by feedback of measured rotor wall displacements. A case study involving an experimental system with short cylindrical rotor and a single radial AMB support is presented. The results show that flexural mode resonance is largely avoided for the considered design topology. Moreover, numerical predictions based on measured non-circularity show good agreement with measurements of rotor wall vibration, thereby confirming the validity and utility of the theoretical model.

  9. Prognostic value of high-dose dobutamine stress magnetic resonance imaging in 1,493 consecutive patients: assessment of myocardial wall motion and perfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korosoglou, Grigorios; Elhmidi, Yacine; Steen, Henning; Schellberg, Dieter; Riedle, Nina; Ahrens, Johannes; Lehrke, Stephanie; Merten, Constanze; Lossnitzer, Dirk; Radeleff, Jannis; Zugck, Christian; Giannitsis, Evangelos; Katus, Hugo A

    2010-10-05

    This study sought to determine the prognostic value of wall motion and perfusion assessment during high-dose dobutamine stress (DS) cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in a large patient cohort. DS-MRI offers the possibility to integrate myocardial perfusion and wall motion analysis in a single examination for the detection of coronary artery disease (CAD). A total of 1,493 consecutive patients with suspected or known CAD underwent DS-MRI, using a standard protocol in a 1.5-T magnetic resonance scanner. Wall motion and perfusion were assessed at baseline and during stress, and outcome data including cardiac death, nonfatal myocardial infarction ("hard events"), and "late" revascularization performed >90 days after the MR scans were collected during a 2 ± 1 year follow-up period. Fifty-three hard events, including 14 cardiac deaths and 39 nonfatal infarctions, occurred during the follow-up period, whereas 85 patients underwent "late" revascularization. Using multivariable regression analysis, an abnormal result for wall motion or perfusion during stress yielded the strongest independent prognostic value for both hard events and late revascularization, clearly surpassing that of clinical and baseline magnetic resonance parameters (for wall motion: adjusted hazard ratio [HR] of 5.9 [95% confidence interval (CI): 2.5 to 13.6] for hard events and of 3.1 [95% CI: 1.7 to 5.6] for late revascularization, and for perfusion: adjusted HR of 5.4 [95% CI: 2.3 to 12.9] for hard events and of 6.2 [95% CI: 3.3 to 11.3] for late revascularization, p < 0.001 for all). DS-MRI can accurately identify patients who are at increased risk for cardiac death and myocardial infarction, separating them from those with normal findings, who have very low risk for future cardiac events. (Prognostic Value of High Dose Dobutamine Stress Magnetic Resonance Imaging; NCT00837005). Copyright © 2010 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. 1H NMR spectra. Part 30(+): 1H chemical shifts in amides and the magnetic anisotropy, electric field and steric effects of the amide group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Raymond J; Griffiths, Lee; Perez, Manuel

    2013-03-01

    The (1)H spectra of 37 amides in CDCl(3) solvent were analysed and the chemical shifts obtained. The molecular geometries and conformational analysis of these amides were considered in detail. The NMR spectral assignments are of interest, e.g. the assignments of the formamide NH(2) protons reverse in going from CDCl(3) to more polar solvents. The substituent chemical shifts of the amide group in both aliphatic and aromatic amides were analysed using an approach based on neural network data for near (≤3 bonds removed) protons and the electric field, magnetic anisotropy, steric and for aromatic systems π effects of the amide group for more distant protons. The electric field is calculated from the partial atomic charges on the N.C═O atoms of the amide group. The magnetic anisotropy of the carbonyl group was reproduced with the asymmetric magnetic anisotropy acting at the midpoint of the carbonyl bond. The values of the anisotropies Δχ(parl) and Δχ(perp) were for the aliphatic amides 10.53 and -23.67 (×10(-6) Å(3)/molecule) and for the aromatic amides 2.12 and -10.43 (×10(-6) Å(3)/molecule). The nitrogen anisotropy was 7.62 (×10(-6) Å(3)/molecule). These values are compared with previous literature values. The (1)H chemical shifts were calculated from the semi-empirical approach and also by gauge-independent atomic orbital calculations with the density functional theory method and B3LYP/6-31G(++) (d,p) basis set. The semi-empirical approach gave good agreement with root mean square error of 0.081 ppm for the data set of 280 entries. The gauge-independent atomic orbital approach was generally acceptable, but significant errors (ca. 1 ppm) were found for the NH and CHO protons and also for some other protons. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Rate-dependent extensions of the parametric magneto-dynamic model with magnetic hysteresis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Steentjes

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper extends the parametric magneto-dynamic model of soft magnetic steel sheets to account for the phase shift between local magnetic flux density and magnetic field strength. This phase shift originates from the damped motion of domain walls and is strongly dependent on the microstructure of the material. In this regard, two different approaches to include the rate-dependent effects are investigated: a purely phenomenological, mathematical approach and a physical-based one.

  12. Isomer shift and magnetic moment of the long-lived 1/2$^{+}$ isomer in $^{79}_{30}$Zn$_{49}$: signature of shape coexistence near $^{78}$Ni

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, X.F.; Xie, L.; Babcock, C.; Billowes, J.; Bissell, M.L.; Blaum, K.; Cheal, B.; Flanagan, K.T.; Garcia Ruiz, R. F.; Gins, W.; Gorges, C.; Grob, L.K.; Heylen, H.; Kaufmann, S.; Kowalska, M.; Kraemer, J.; Malbrunot-Ettenauer, S.; Neugart, R.; Neyens, G.; Nörtershäuser, W.; Papuga, J.; Sánchez, R.; Yordanov, D.T.

    2016-01-01

    Collinear laser spectroscopy has been performed on the $^{79}_{30}$Zn$_{49}$ isotope at ISOLDE-CERN. The existence of a long-lived isomer with a few hundred milliseconds half-life was confirmed, and the nuclear spins and moments of the ground and isomeric states in $^{79}$Zn as well as the isomer shift were measured. From the observed hyperfine structures, spins $I = 9/2$ and $I = 1/2$ are firmly assigned to the ground and isomeric states. The magnetic moment $\\mu$ ($^{79}$Zn) = $-$1.1866(10) $\\mu_{\\rm{N}}$, confirms the spin-parity $9/2^{+}$ with a $\

  13. Fragment-based {sup 13}C nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shift predictions in molecular crystals: An alternative to planewave methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartman, Joshua D.; Beran, Gregory J. O., E-mail: gregory.beran@ucr.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Riverside, California 92521 (United States); Monaco, Stephen; Schatschneider, Bohdan [The Pennsylvania State University, The Eberly Campus, 2201 University Dr, Lemont Furnace, Pennsylvania 15456 (United States)

    2015-09-14

    We assess the quality of fragment-based ab initio isotropic {sup 13}C chemical shift predictions for a collection of 25 molecular crystals with eight different density functionals. We explore the relative performance of cluster, two-body fragment, combined cluster/fragment, and the planewave gauge-including projector augmented wave (GIPAW) models relative to experiment. When electrostatic embedding is employed to capture many-body polarization effects, the simple and computationally inexpensive two-body fragment model predicts both isotropic {sup 13}C chemical shifts and the chemical shielding tensors as well as both cluster models and the GIPAW approach. Unlike the GIPAW approach, hybrid density functionals can be used readily in a fragment model, and all four hybrid functionals tested here (PBE0, B3LYP, B3PW91, and B97-2) predict chemical shifts in noticeably better agreement with experiment than the four generalized gradient approximation (GGA) functionals considered (PBE, OPBE, BLYP, and BP86). A set of recommended linear regression parameters for mapping between calculated chemical shieldings and observed chemical shifts are provided based on these benchmark calculations. Statistical cross-validation procedures are used to demonstrate the robustness of these fits.

  14. Modelling of plasma-antenna coupling and non-linear radio frequency wave-plasma-wall interactions in the magnetized plasma device under ion cyclotron range of frequencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, LingFeng

    2016-01-01

    Ion Cyclotron Resonant Heating (ICRH) by waves in 30-80 MHz range is currently used in magnetic fusion plasmas. Excited by phased arrays of current straps at the plasma periphery, these waves exist under two polarizations. The Fast Wave tunnels through the tenuous plasma edge and propagates to its center where it is absorbed. The parasitically emitted Slow Wave only exists close to the launchers. How much power can be coupled to the center with 1 A current on the straps? How do the emitted radiofrequency (RF) near and far fields interact parasitically with the edge plasma via RF sheath rectification at plasma-wall interfaces? To address these two issues simultaneously, in realistic geometry over the size of ICRH antennas, this thesis upgraded and tested the Self-consistent Sheaths and Waves for ICH (SSWICH) code. SSWICH couples self-consistently RF wave propagation and Direct Current (DC) plasma biasing via non-linear RF and DC sheath boundary conditions (SBCs) at plasma/wall interfaces. Its upgrade is full wave and was implemented in two dimensions (toroidal/radial). New SBCs coupling the two polarizations were derived and implemented along shaped walls tilted with respect to the confinement magnetic field. Using this new tool in the absence of SBCs, we studied the impact of a density decaying continuously inside the antenna box and across the Lower Hybrid (LH) resonance. Up to the memory limits of our workstation, the RF fields below the LH resonance changed with the grid size. However the coupled power spectrum hardly evolved and was only weakly affected by the density inside the box. In presence of SBCs, SSWICH-FW simulations have identified the role of the fast wave on RF sheath excitation and reproduced some key experimental observations. SSWICH-FW was finally adapted to conduct the first electromagnetic and RF-sheath 2D simulations of the cylindrical magnetized plasma device ALINE. (author) [fr

  15. Magnetic domain structure and domain-wall energy in UFe8Ni2Si2 and UFe6Ni4Si2 intermetallic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wyslocki, J.J.; Suski, W.; Wochowski, K.

    1994-01-01

    Magnetic domain structures in the UFe 8 Ni 2 Si 2 and UFe 6 Ni 4 Si 2 compounds were studied using the powder pattern method. The domain structure observed is typical for uniaxial materials. The domain-wall energy density γ was determined from the average surface domain width D s observed on surfaces perpendicular to the easy axis as equal to 16 erg/cm 2 for UFe 8 Ni 2 Si 2 and 10 erg/cm 2 for UFe 6 Ni 4 Si 2 . Moreover, the critical diameter for single domain particle D c was calculated for the studied compounds

  16. Hypertensive heart disease versus hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: multi-parametric cardiovascular magnetic resonance discriminators when end-diastolic wall thickness ≥ 15 mm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, Jonathan C.L. [University Hospitals Bristol NHS Foundation Trust, NIHR Bristol Cardiovascular Biomedical Research Unit, Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Department, Bristol Heart Institute (United Kingdom); University of Bristol, School of Physiology, Pharmacology and Neuroscience, Faculty of Biomedical Sciences (United Kingdom); Rohan, Stephen [University of Bristol, Medical School, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry (United Kingdom); Ghosh Dastidar, Amardeep; Harries, Iwan; Lawton, Christopher B. [University Hospitals Bristol NHS Foundation Trust, NIHR Bristol Cardiovascular Biomedical Research Unit, Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Department, Bristol Heart Institute (United Kingdom); Ratcliffe, Laura E.; Burchell, Amy E.; Nightingale, Angus K. [University Hospitals Bristol NHS Foundation Trust, CardioNomics Research Group, Clinical Research and Imaging Centre, Bristol Heart Institute (United Kingdom); Hart, Emma C.; Paton, Julian F.R. [University of Bristol, School of Physiology, Pharmacology and Neuroscience, Faculty of Biomedical Sciences (United Kingdom); University Hospitals Bristol NHS Foundation Trust, CardioNomics Research Group, Clinical Research and Imaging Centre, Bristol Heart Institute (United Kingdom); Hamilton, Mark C.K. [University Hospitals Bristol NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Radiology, Bristol Royal Infirmary (United Kingdom); Manghat, Nathan E. [University Hospitals Bristol NHS Foundation Trust, NIHR Bristol Cardiovascular Biomedical Research Unit, Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Department, Bristol Heart Institute (United Kingdom); University Hospitals Bristol NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Radiology, Bristol Royal Infirmary (United Kingdom)

    2017-03-15

    European guidelines state left ventricular (LV) end-diastolic wall thickness (EDWT) ≥15 mm suggests hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), but distinguishing from hypertensive heart disease (HHD) is challenging. We identify cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) predictors of HHD over HCM when EDWT ≥15 mm. 2481 consecutive clinical CMRs between 2014 and 2015 were reviewed. 464 segments from 29 HCM subjects with EDWT ≥15 mm but without other cardiac abnormality, hypertension or renal impairment were analyzed. 432 segments from 27 HHD subjects with EDWT ≥15 mm but without concomitant cardiac pathology were analyzed. Magnitude and location of maximal EDWT, presence of late gadolinium enhancement (LGE), LV asymmetry (>1.5-fold opposing segment) and systolic anterior motion of the mitral valve (SAM) were measured. Multivariate logistic regression was performed. Significance was defined as p<0.05. HHD and HCM cohorts were age-/gender-matched. HHD had significantly increased indexed LV mass (110±27 g/m{sup 2} vs. 91±31 g/m{sup 2}, p=0.016) but no difference in site or magnitude of maximal EDWT. Mid-wall LGE was significantly more prevalent in HCM. Elevated indexed LVM, mid-wall LGE and absence of SAM were significant multivariate predictors of HHD, but LV asymmetry was not. Increased indexed LV mass, absence of mid-wall LGE and absence of SAM are better CMR discriminators of HHD from HCM than EDWT ≥15 mm. circle Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is often diagnosed with end-diastolic wall thickness ≥15 mm. (orig.)

  17. Hypertensive heart disease versus hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: multi-parametric cardiovascular magnetic resonance discriminators when end-diastolic wall thickness ≥ 15 mm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, Jonathan C.L.; Rohan, Stephen; Ghosh Dastidar, Amardeep; Harries, Iwan; Lawton, Christopher B.; Ratcliffe, Laura E.; Burchell, Amy E.; Nightingale, Angus K.; Hart, Emma C.; Paton, Julian F.R.; Hamilton, Mark C.K.; Manghat, Nathan E.

    2017-01-01

    European guidelines state left ventricular (LV) end-diastolic wall thickness (EDWT) ≥15 mm suggests hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), but distinguishing from hypertensive heart disease (HHD) is challenging. We identify cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) predictors of HHD over HCM when EDWT ≥15 mm. 2481 consecutive clinical CMRs between 2014 and 2015 were reviewed. 464 segments from 29 HCM subjects with EDWT ≥15 mm but without other cardiac abnormality, hypertension or renal impairment were analyzed. 432 segments from 27 HHD subjects with EDWT ≥15 mm but without concomitant cardiac pathology were analyzed. Magnitude and location of maximal EDWT, presence of late gadolinium enhancement (LGE), LV asymmetry (>1.5-fold opposing segment) and systolic anterior motion of the mitral valve (SAM) were measured. Multivariate logistic regression was performed. Significance was defined as p<0.05. HHD and HCM cohorts were age-/gender-matched. HHD had significantly increased indexed LV mass (110±27 g/m"2 vs. 91±31 g/m"2, p=0.016) but no difference in site or magnitude of maximal EDWT. Mid-wall LGE was significantly more prevalent in HCM. Elevated indexed LVM, mid-wall LGE and absence of SAM were significant multivariate predictors of HHD, but LV asymmetry was not. Increased indexed LV mass, absence of mid-wall LGE and absence of SAM are better CMR discriminators of HHD from HCM than EDWT ≥15 mm. circle Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is often diagnosed with end-diastolic wall thickness ≥15 mm. (orig.)

  18. Shift Colors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Publications & News Shift Colors Pages default Sign In NPC Logo Banner : Shift Colors Search Navy Personnel Command > Reference Library > Publications & News > Shift Colors Top Link Bar Navy Personnel Library Expand Reference Library Quick Launch Shift Colors Shift Colors Archives Mailing Address How to

  19. Blue shift in optical absorption, magnetism and light-induced superparamagnetism in γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles formed in dendrimer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Domracheva, Natalia E., E-mail: ndomracheva@gmail.com; Vorobeva, Valerya E. [Zavoisky Kazan Physical-Technical Institute (Russian Federation); Gruzdev, Matvey S. [Institute of Solution Chemistry (Russian Federation); Pyataev, Andrew V. [Kazan Federal University (Russian Federation)

    2015-02-15

    We are presenting the investigation of the optical, magnetic, and photoinduced superparamagnetic properties of single-domain γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles (NPs) with diameters of about 2.5 nm formed in second-generation poly(propylene imine) dendrimer. The optical absorption studies indicated direct allowed transition with the band gap (4.5 eV), which is blue shift with respect to the value of the bulk material. Low-temperature blocking of the NPs magnetic moments at 18 K is determined by SQUID measurements. The influence of pulsed laser irradiation on the superparamagnetic properties of γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} NPs was studied by EPR spectroscopy. It has been shown that irradiation of the sample held in vacuo and cooled in zero magnetic field to 6.9 K leads to the appearance of a new EPR signal, which decays immediately after the irradiation is stopped. The appearance and disappearance of this new signal can be repeated many times at 6.9 K when we turn on/turn off the laser. We suppose that the generation of conduction band electrons by irradiation into the band gap of the γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} changes the superparamagnetic properties of NPs. Graphical Abstract: Features of the behavior of single-domain γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles formed in dendrimer were found by UV-Vis and EPR spectroscopy: “blue” shift in optical absorption, a significant increase in the band gap width and variation of superparamagnetic properties under light irradiation.

  20. Aharonov-Casher phase shift and the change in velocity of a moving magnet traversing an electric field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    March, N.H.

    2006-08-01

    Motivated by the theoretical work of Boyer [J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 39 (2006) 3455] plus the quite recent interferometric experiment of Shinohara, Aoki and Morinaga [Phys. Rev. A66 (2002) 042106] in which the scalar Aharonov-Bohm effect was studied, we re-open the extension to neutral particles carrying a magnetic moment and passing through a region of intense electric field, treated theoretically by Aharonov and Casher (AC) and independently by Anandan. An alternative interpretation of results on (a) neutrons and (b) TlF molecules to that afforded by AC is shown to involve only (i) the de Broglie wavelength of matter waves and (ii) the prediction from Maxwell's equations for the change in velocity of a neutral moving magnet as it enters or leaves an electric field. The exquisite sensitivity of experiment (b) allows a fractional change in velocity of order 10 -15 to be quantitatively determined. (author)

  1. A Reuse Evaluation for Solar-Cell Silicon Wafers via Shift Revolution and Tool Rotation Using Magnetic Assistance in Ultrasonic Electrochemical Micromachining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. S. Pa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A new reuse fabrication using a tool module with rotation and revolution through a process of magnetic assistance in ultrasonic electrochemical micromachining (UEMM for removal of the surface layers from silicon wafers of solar cells is demonstrated. The target of the proposed reuse fabrication method is to replace the current approach, which uses strong acid and grinding and may damage the physical structure of silicon wafers and pollute to the environment. A precisely engineered clean production approach to removal of surface microstructure layers from silicon wafers is to develop a mass production system for recycling defective or discarded silicon wafers of solar cells that can reduce pollution and cost. The high revolution speed of the shift with the high rotation speed of the designed tool increases the discharge mobility and improves the removal effect associated with the high feed rate of the workpiece. High frequency and high power of ultrasonic with large electrolyte flow rate and high magnetic strengths with a small distance between the two magnets provide a large discharge effect and good removal; only a short period of time is required to remove the epoxy film and Si3N4 layer easily and cleanly.

  2. EEG-guided transcranial magnetic stimulation reveals rapid shifts in motor cortical excitability during the human sleep slow oscillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergmann, Til O; Mölle, Matthias; Schmidt, Marlit A

    2012-01-01

    Evoked cortical responses do not follow a rigid input–output function but are dynamically shaped by intrinsic neural properties at the time of stimulation. Recent research has emphasized the role of oscillatory activity in determining cortical excitability. Here we employed EEG-guided transcranial......, closely resembling a spontaneous SO. However, both MEPs and TEPs were consistently larger when evoked during SO up-states than during down-states, and ampliudes within each SO state depended on the actual EEG potential at the time and site of stimulation. These results provide first-time evidence...... magnetic stimulation (TMS) during non-rapid eye movement sleep to examine whether the spontaneous

  3. Influence of frequency of the excitation magnetic field and material's electric conductivity on domain wall dynamics in ferromagnetic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chávez-González, A.F.; Pérez-Benítez, J.A.; Espina-Hernández, J.H.; Grössinger, R.; Hallen, J.M.

    2016-01-01

    The present work analyzes the influence of electric conductivity on the Magnetic Barkhausen Noise (MBN) signal using a microscopic model which includes the influence of eddy currents. This model is also implemented to explain the dependence of MBN on the frequency of the applied magnetic field. The results presented in this work allow analyzing the influence of eddy currents on MBN signals for different values of the material's electric conductivity and for different frequencies of applied magnetic field. Additionally, the outcomes of this research can be used as a reference to differentiate the influence of eddy currents from that of second phase particles in the MBN signal, which has been reported in previous works. - Highlights: • Electromagnetic simulation of MBN with eddy currents and micro-magnetism. • Influence of applied field frequency on MBN is explained. • Influence of electric conductivity on MBN is analyzed. • Hysteresis losses in ferromagnetic materials is analyzed using the model.

  4. Combined passive acoustic mapping and magnetic resonance thermometry for monitoring phase-shift nanoemulsion enhanced focused ultrasound therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crake, Calum; Meral, F. Can; Burgess, Mark T.; Papademetriou, Iason T.; McDannold, Nathan J.; Porter, Tyrone M.

    2017-08-01

    Focused ultrasound (FUS) has the potential to enable precise, image-guided noninvasive surgery for the treatment of cancer in which tumors are identified and destroyed in a single integrated procedure. However, success of the method in highly vascular organs has been limited due to heat losses to perfusion, requiring development of techniques to locally enhance energy absorption and heating. In addition, FUS procedures are conventionally monitored using MRI, which provides excellent anatomical images and can map temperature, but is not capable of capturing the full gamut of available data such as the acoustic emissions generated during this inherently acoustically-driven procedure. Here, we employed phase-shift nanoemulsions (PSNE) embedded in tissue phantoms to promote cavitation and hence temperature rise induced by FUS. In addition, we incorporated passive acoustic mapping (PAM) alongside simultaneous MR thermometry in order to visualize both acoustic emissions and temperature rise, within the bore of a full scale clinical MRI scanner. Focal cavitation of PSNE could be resolved using PAM and resulted in accelerated heating and increased the maximum elevated temperature measured via MR thermometry compared to experiments without nanoemulsions. Over time, the simultaneously acquired acoustic and temperature maps show translation of the focus of activity towards the FUS transducer, and the magnitude of the increase in cavitation and focal shift both increased with nanoemulsion concentration. PAM results were well correlated with MRI thermometry and demonstrated greater sensitivity, with the ability to detect cavitation before enhanced heating was observed. The results suggest that PSNE could be beneficial for enhancement of thermal focused ultrasound therapies and that PAM could be a critical tool for monitoring this process.

  5. Preparation of magnetic core mesoporous shell microspheres with C18-modified interior pore-walls for fast extraction and analysis of phthalates in water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhongbo; Huang, Danni; Fu, Chinfai; Wei, Biwen; Yu, Wenjia; Deng, Chunhui; Zhang, Xiangmin

    2011-09-16

    In this study, core-shell magnetic mesoporous microspheres with C18-functionalized interior pore-walls were synthesized through coating Fe(3)O(4) microspheres with a mesoporous inorganic-organic hybrid layer with a n-octadecyltriethoxysilane (C18TES) and tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) as the silica source and cetyltrimethylammonia bromide (CTAB) as a template. The obtained C18-functionalized Fe(3)O(4)@mSiO(2) microspheres possess numerous C18 groups anchored in the interior pore-walls, large surface area (274.7 m(2)/g, high magnetization (40.8 emu/g) and superparamagnetism, uniform mesopores (4.1 nm), which makes them ideal absorbents for simple, fast, and efficient extraction and enrichment of hydrophobic organic compounds in water samples. Several kinds of phthalates were used as the model hydrophobic organic compounds to systematically evaluate the performance of the C18-functionalized Fe(3)O(4)@mSiO(2) microspheres in extracting hydrophobic molecules by using a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Various parameters, including eluting solvent, the amounts of absorbents, extraction time and elution time were optimized. Hydrophobic extraction was performed in the interior pore of magnetic mesoporous microspheres, and the materials had the anti-interference ability to macromolecular proteins, which was also investigated in the work. Under the optimized conditions, C18-functionalized Fe(3)O(4)@mSiO(2) microspheres were successfully used to analyze the real water samples. The results indicated that this novel method was fast, convenient and efficient for the target compounds and could avoid being interfered by macromolecules. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Quantized beam shifts in graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Melo Kort-Kamp, Wilton Junior [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Sinitsyn, Nikolai [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Dalvit, Diego Alejandro Roberto [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-10-08

    We predict the existence of quantized Imbert-Fedorov, Goos-Hanchen, and photonic spin Hall shifts for light beams impinging on a graphene-on-substrate system in an external magnetic field. In the quantum Hall regime the Imbert-Fedorov and photonic spin Hall shifts are quantized in integer multiples of the fine structure constant α, while the Goos-Hanchen ones in multiples of α2. We investigate the influence on these shifts of magnetic field, temperature, and material dispersion and dissipation. An experimental demonstration of quantized beam shifts could be achieved at terahertz frequencies for moderate values of the magnetic field.

  7. Repeatability of two-dimensional chemical shift imaging multivoxel proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy for measuring human cerebral choline-containing compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puri, Basant K; Egan, Mary; Wallis, Fintan; Jakeman, Philip

    2018-03-22

    To investigate the repeatability of proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in the in vivo measurement of human cerebral levels of choline-containing compounds (Cho). Two consecutive scans were carried out in six healthy resting subjects at a magnetic field strength of 1.5 T. On each occasion, neurospectroscopy data were collected from 64 voxels using the same 2D chemical shift imaging (CSI) sequence. The data were analyzed in the same way, using the same software, to obtain the values for each voxel of the ratio of Cho to creatine. The Wilcoxon related-samples signed-rank test, coefficient of variation (CV), repeatability coefficient (RC), and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) were used to assess the repeatability. The CV ranged from 2.75% to 33.99%, while the minimum RC was 5.68%. There was excellent reproducibility, as judged by significant ICC values, in 26 voxels. Just three voxels showed significant differences according to the Wilcoxon related-samples signed-rank test. It is therefore concluded that when CSI multivoxel proton neurospectroscopy is used to measure cerebral choline-containing compounds at 1.5 T, the reproducibility is highly acceptable.

  8. Effect of a uniform magnetic induction field upon the flow of an electrically conducting fluid placed in a straight rectangular cross section, one of the walls of which, characterized by an infinite conductivity, presents uniform translation movement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herve, Patrick

    1975-01-01

    This is a theoretical study of an electrically viscous fluid flowing in a straight rectangular cross section channel, a wall of which, infinitely conducting, is placed perpendicularly to the direction of a uniform magnetic induction field. The three other walls of the channel being electrically insulating, remain motionless. Formulas giving velocity distribution law in the straight section of the flow in relation to the Hartmann's number, curves illustrating the accelerating effect produced across the whole section, by the application of the magnetic induction field, and example for the distribution of the electric current lines in case of a square section are given [fr

  9. Determination of type A trichothecenes in coix seed by magnetic solid-phase extraction based on magnetic multi-walled carbon nanotubes coupled with ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Maofeng; Si, Wenshuai; Wang, Weimin; Bai, Bing; Nie, Dongxia; Song, Weiguo; Zhao, Zhihui; Guo, Yirong; Han, Zheng

    2016-09-01

    Magnetic solid-phase extraction (m-SPE) is a promising sample preparation approach due to its convenience, speed, and simplicity. For the first time, a rapid and reliable m-SPE approach using magnetic multi-walled carbon nanotubes (m-MWCNTs) as the adsorbent was proposed for purification of type A trichothecenes including T-2 toxins (T2), HT-2 toxins (HT-2), diacetoxyscirpenol (DAS), and neosolaniol (NEO) in coix seed. The m-MWCNTs were synthesized by assembling the magnetic nanoparticles (Fe3O4) with MWCNTs by sonication through an aggregation wrap mechanism, and characterized by transmission electron microscope. Several key parameters affecting the performance of the procedure were extensively investigated including extraction solutions, desorption solvents, and m-MWCNT amounts. Under the optimal sample preparation conditions followed by analysis with ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS), high sensitivity (limit of quantification in the range of 0.3-1.5 μg kg(-1)), good linearity (R (2) > 0.99), satisfactory recovery (73.6-90.6 %), and acceptable precision (≤2.5 %) were obtained. The analytical performance of the developed method has also been successfully evaluated in real coix seed samples. Graphical Abstract Flow chart of determination of type A trichothecenes in coix seed by magnetic solid-phase extraction coupled with ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

  10. Spin-orbit-coupling induced torque in ballistic domain walls: Equivalence of charge-pumping and nonequilibrium magnetization formalisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yuan, Z.; Kelly, Paul J.

    2016-01-01

    To study the effect of spin-orbit coupling (SOC) on spin-transfer torque in magnetic materials, we have implemented two theoretical formalisms that can accommodate SOC. Using the “charge-pumping” formalism, we find two contributions to the out-of-plane spin-transfer torque parameter β in ballistic

  11. Chemical shift imaging: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brateman, L.

    1986-01-01

    Chemical shift is the phenomenon that is seen when an isotope possessing a nuclear magnetic dipole moment resonates at a spectrum of resonance frequencies in a given magnetic field. These resonance frequencies, or chemical shifts, depend on the chemical environments of particular nuclei. Mapping the spatial distribution of nuclei associated with a particular chemical shift (e.g., hydrogen nuclei associated with water molecules or with lipid groups) is called chemical shift imaging. Several techniques of proton chemical shift imaging that have been applied in vivo are presented, and their clinical findings are reported and summarized. Acquiring high-resolution spectra for large numbers of volume elements in two or three dimensions may be prohibitive because of time constraints, but other methods of imaging lipid of water distributions (i.e., selective excitation, selective saturation, or variations in conventional magnetic resonance imaging pulse sequences) can provide chemical shift information. These techniques require less time, but they lack spectral information. Since fat deposition seen by chemical shift imaging may not be demonstrated by conventional magnetic resonance imaging, certain applications of chemical shift imaging, such as in the determination of fatty liver disease, have greater diagnostic utility than conventional magnetic resonance imaging. Furthermore, edge artifacts caused by chemical shift effects can be eliminated by certain selective methods of data acquisition employed in chemical shift imaging

  12. Initial progress in the first wall, blanket, and shield Engineering Test Program for magnetically confined fusion-power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herman, H.; Baker, C.C.; Maroni, V.A.

    1981-10-01

    The first wall/blanket/shield (FW/B/S) Engineering Test Program (ETP) progressed from the planning stage into implementation during July, 1981. The program, generic in nature, comprises four Test Program Elements (TPE's), the emphasis of which is on defining the performance parameters for the Fusion Engineering Device (FED) and the major fusion device to follow FED. These elements are: (1) nonnuclear thermal-hydraulic and thermomechanical testing of first wall and component facsimiles with emphasis on surface heat loads and heat transient (i.e., plasma disruption) effects; (2) nonnuclear and nuclear testing of FW/B/S components and assemblies with emphasis on bulk (nuclear) heating effects, integrated FW/B/S hydraulics and mechanics, blanket coolant system transients, and nuclear benchmarks; (3) FW/B/S electromagnetic and eddy current effects testing, including pulsed field penetration, torque and force restraint, electromagnetic materials, liquid metal MHD effects and the like; and (4) FW/B/S Assembly, Maintenance and Repair (AMR) studies focusing on generic AMR criteria, with the objective of preparing an AMR designers guidebook; also, development of rapid remote assembly/disassembly joint system technology, leak detection and remote handling methods

  13. Hepatic fat quantification: a prospective comparison of magnetic resonance spectroscopy and analysis methods for chemical-shift gradient echo magnetic resonance imaging with histologic assessment as the reference standard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Bo-Kyeong; Yu, Eun Sil; Lee, Seung Soo; Lee, Youngjoo; Kim, Namkug; Sirlin, Claude B; Cho, Eun Yoon; Yeom, Suk Keu; Byun, Jae Ho; Park, Seong Ho; Lee, Moon-Gyu

    2012-06-01

    The aims of this study were to assess the confounding effects of hepatic iron deposition, inflammation, and fibrosis on hepatic steatosis (HS) evaluation by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and to assess the accuracies of MRI and MRS for HS evaluation, using histology as the reference standard. In this institutional review board-approved prospective study, 56 patients gave informed consents and underwent chemical-shift MRI and MRS of the liver on a 1.5-T magnetic resonance scanner. To estimate MRI fat fraction (FF), 4 analysis methods were used (dual-echo, triple-echo, multiecho, and multi-interference), and MRS FF was calculated with T2 correction. Degrees of HS, iron deposition, inflammation, and fibrosis were analyzed in liver resection (n = 37) and biopsy (n = 19) specimens. The confounding effects of histology on fat quantification were assessed by multiple linear regression analysis. Using the histologic degree of HS as the reference standard, the accuracies of each method in estimating HS and diagnosing an HS of 5% or greater were determined by linear regression and receiver operating characteristic analyses. Iron deposition significantly confounded estimations of FF by the dual-echo (P hepatic fat, with coexisting histologic abnormalities having no confounding effects.

  14. Fast switching and signature of efficient domain wall motion driven by spin-orbit torques in a perpendicular anisotropy magnetic insulator/Pt bilayer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avci, Can Onur; Rosenberg, Ethan; Baumgartner, Manuel; Beran, Lukáš; Quindeau, Andy; Gambardella, Pietro; Ross, Caroline A.; Beach, Geoffrey S. D.

    2017-08-01

    We report fast and efficient current-induced switching of a perpendicular anisotropy magnetic insulator thulium iron garnet by using spin-orbit torques (SOT) from the Pt overlayer. We first show that, with quasi-DC (10 ms) current pulses, SOT-induced switching can be achieved with an external field as low as 2 Oe, making TmIG an outstanding candidate to realize efficient switching in heterostructures that produce moderate stray fields without requiring an external field. We then demonstrate deterministic switching with fast current pulses (≤20 ns) with an amplitude of ˜1012 A/m2, similar to all-metallic structures. We reveal that, in the presence of an initially nucleated domain, the critical switching current is reduced by up to a factor of five with respect to the fully saturated initial state, implying efficient current-driven domain wall motion in this system. Based on measurements with 2 ns-long pulses, we estimate the domain wall velocity of the order of ˜400 m/s per j = 1012 A/m2.

  15. Modification of polydopamine-coated Fe3O4 nanoparticles with multi-walled carbon nanotubes for magnetic-μ-dispersive solid-phase extraction of antiepileptic drugs in biological matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ruiqi; Wang, Siming; Yang, Ye; Deng, Yulan; Li, Di; Su, Ping; Yang, Yi

    2018-06-01

    In this study, multi-walled carbon nanotubes were coated on the surface of magnetic nanoparticles modified by polydopamine. The synthesized composite was characterized and applied to magnetic-μ-dispersive solid-phase extraction of oxcarbazepine (OXC), phenytoin (PHT), and carbamazepine (CBZ) from human plasma, urine, and cerebrospinal fluid samples prior to analysis by a high-performance liquid chromatography-photodiode array detector. The extraction parameters were investigated and the optimum condition was obtained when the variables were set to the following: sorbent type, Fe 3 O 4 @polyDA-MWCNTs (length Graphical abstract Magnetic multi-walled carbon nanotube core-shell composites were applied as magnetic-μ-dispersive solid-phase extraction adsorbents for determination of antiepileptic drugs in biological matrices.

  16. Sorption and preconcentration of uranium and thorium from aqueous solutions using multi-walled carbon nanotubes decorated with magnetic nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zolfonoun, Ehsan; Yousefi, Seyed Reza [NFCRS, Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-07-01

    The presented study investigates application of MWCNTs-Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanocomposite as an adsorbent for solid phase extraction and preconcentration of uranium and thorium prior to inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry determination. The magnetic MWCNTs with adsorbed analytes can be easily separated from the aqueous solution by using an external magnet without additional centrifugation or filtration of the sample. Due to the high surface area of MWCNTs, satisfactory concentration factor and extraction recovery can be achieved with only 10 mg nanocomposite in 5 min. The effects of pH, sorbent amount, eluent type, chelating reagent concentration, sample volume and time on the recovery of the analytes were investigated. Under the optimum conditions, the detection limits for U(VI) and Th(IV) were 0.44 and 0.27 μg L{sup -1}, respectively.

  17. Metal-functionalized single-walled graphitic carbon nitride nanotubes: a first-principles study on magnetic property

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shenoy Vivek

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The magnetic properties of metal-functionalized graphitic carbon nitride nanotubes were investigated based on first-principles calculations. The graphitic carbon nitride nanotube can be either ferromagnetic or antiferromagnetic by functionalizing with different metal atoms. The W- and Ti-functionalized nanotubes are ferromagnetic, which are attributed to carrier-mediated interactions because of the coupling between the spin-polarized d and p electrons and the formation of the impurity bands close to the band edges. However, Cr-, Mn-, Co-, and Ni-functionalized nanotubes are antiferromagnetic because of the anti-alignment of the magnetic moments between neighboring metal atoms. The functionalized nanotubes may be used in spintronics and hydrogen storage.

  18. Strain-Encoded Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging as an Adjunct for Dobutamine Stress Testing. Incremental Value to Conventional Wall Motion Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korosoglou, Grigorios; Lossnitzer, Dirk; Schellberg, Dieter; Lewien, Antje; Wochele, Angela; Schaeufele, Tim; Neizel, Mirja; Steen, Henning; Giannitsis, Evangelos; Katus, Hugo A.; Osman, Nael F.

    2009-01-01

    Background High-dose dobutamine stress magnetic resonance imaging (DS-MRI) is safe and feasible for the diagnosis of coronary artery disease (CAD) in humans. However, the assessment of cine scans relies on the visual interpretation of regional wall motion, which is subjective. Recently, Strain-Encoded MRI (SENC) has been proposed for the direct color-coded visualization of myocardial strain. The purpose of our study was to compare the diagnostic value of SENC to that provided by conventional wall motion analysis for the detection of inducible ischemia during DS-MRI. Methods and Results Stress induced ischemia was assessed by wall motion analysis and by SENC in 101 patients with suspected or known CAD and in 17 healthy volunteers who underwent DS-MRI in a clinical 1.5T scanner. Quantitative coronary angiography deemed as the standard reference for the presence or absence of significant CAD (≥50% diameter stenosis). On a coronary vessel level, SENC detected inducible ischemia in 86/101 versus 71/101 diseased coronary vessels (p<0.01 versus cine), and showed normal strain response in 189/202 versus 194/202 vessels with <50% stenosis (p=NS versus cine). On a patient level, SENC detected inducible ischemia in 63/64 versus 55/64 patients with CAD (p<0.05 versus cine), and showed normal strain response in 32/37 versus 34/37 patients without CAD (p=NS versus cine).Quantification analysis demonstrated a significant correlation between strain rate reserve (SRreserve) and coronary artery stenosis severity (r²=0.56, p<0.001), and a cut-off value of SRreserve=1.64 deemed as a highly accurate marker for the detection of stenosis≥50% (AUC=0.96, SE=0.01, 95% CI = 0.94–0.98, p<0.001). Conclusions The direct color-coded visualization of strain on MR-images is a useful adjunct for DS-MRI, which provides incremental value for the detection of CAD compared to conventional wall motion readings on cine images. PMID:19808579

  19. Synergistic effect of non-covalent interaction in colloidal nematic liquid crystal doped with magnetic functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalir, Nima; Javadian, Soheila

    2018-03-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), CNT@Fe3O4, and Fe3O4 nanocomposites were doped to eutectic uniaxial nematic liquid crystal (NLC's) (E5CN7) to improve physiochemical properties such as phase transition temperature, activation energy (Ea), dielectric anisotropy, and electro-optical properties. The thermal study of nematic phase shows a decrease in the nematic to isotropic phase transition temperature as CNT is doped. However, higher doping concentration of CNTs leads to the further increase in transition temperature. The anchoring effect or π-π interaction plays a key role in N-I phase transition. The functionalization of SWCNTs with Fe3O4 diminishes the CNT aggregation while the magnetic susceptibility is increased. The functionalized CNT doping to NLC's decrease significantly the phase transition temperature compared to doping of non-functionalized CNTs. Attractive interaction between guest and host molecules by magnetic and geometry effect increased the enthalpy and entropy of phase transition in the SWCNT@Fe3O4 sample compared to non-functionalized CNT doped system. Also, the Ea values are decreased as SWCNT@Fe3O4 is doped to pure E5CN7. The difference of N-I phase transition temperature was observed in Fe3O4 and CNT@Fe3O4 compared to SWCNT doped systems. Finally, dielectric anisotropy was increased in the doped system compared to pure NLC.

  20. Thigh muscle segmentation of chemical shift encoding-based water-fat magnetic resonance images: The reference database MyoSegmenTUM.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Schlaeger

    Full Text Available Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI can non-invasively assess muscle anatomy, exercise effects and pathologies with different underlying causes such as neuromuscular diseases (NMD. Quantitative MRI including fat fraction mapping using chemical shift encoding-based water-fat MRI has emerged for reliable determination of muscle volume and fat composition. The data analysis of water-fat images requires segmentation of the different muscles which has been mainly performed manually in the past and is a very time consuming process, currently limiting the clinical applicability. An automatization of the segmentation process would lead to a more time-efficient analysis. In the present work, the manually segmented thigh magnetic resonance imaging database MyoSegmenTUM is presented. It hosts water-fat MR images of both thighs of 15 healthy subjects and 4 patients with NMD with a voxel size of 3.2x2x4 mm3 with the corresponding segmentation masks for four functional muscle groups: quadriceps femoris, sartorius, gracilis, hamstrings. The database is freely accessible online at https://osf.io/svwa7/?view_only=c2c980c17b3a40fca35d088a3cdd83e2. The database is mainly meant as ground truth which can be used as training and test dataset for automatic muscle segmentation algorithms. The segmentation allows extraction of muscle cross sectional area (CSA and volume. Proton density fat fraction (PDFF of the defined muscle groups from the corresponding images and quadriceps muscle strength measurements/neurological muscle strength rating can be used for benchmarking purposes.

  1. Synthesis and application of ion imprinting polymer coated magnetic multi-walled carbon nanotubes for selective adsorption of nickel ion

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Junnan; Shang, Hongzhou; Zhang, Xing; Sun, Xiaoran

    2018-01-01

    A novel nickel ion imprinted polymers (IIPs) based on multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were synthesized inverse emulsion system, using chitosan(CS) and acrylic acid as the functional monomers, Ni (II) as the template, and N' N-methylene bis-acrylamide as the cross-linker. The chemical structure and morphological feature of the IIPs were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Thermogravimetry (TG), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR). The studies indicated that the gel layer was well grafted on the surface of MWCNTs. Studies on the adsorption ability of the IIPs, by atomic absorption spectrophotometry, demonstrated that IIPs possessed excellent adsorption and selective ability towards Ni (II), fitting to pseudo second-order kinetic isotherms and with a maximum capacity of 19.86 mg/g, and selectivity factor of 13.09 and 4.42. The electrochemical performance of ion imprinting carbon paste electrode (CPE/IIPs) was characterized by Cyclic voltammetry (CV). Studies have shown that CPE/IIPs showed excellent electrochemical performance.

  2. Convenient method for resolving degeneracies due to symmetry of the magnetic susceptibility tensor and its application to pseudo contact shift-based protein–protein complex structure determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobashigawa, Yoshihiro; Saio, Tomohide; Ushio, Masahiro; Sekiguchi, Mitsuhiro; Yokochi, Masashi; Ogura, Kenji; Inagaki, Fuyuhiko

    2012-01-01

    Pseudo contact shifts (PCSs) induced by paramagnetic lanthanide ions fixed in a protein frame provide long-range distance and angular information, and are valuable for the structure determination of protein–protein and protein–ligand complexes. We have been developing a lanthanide-binding peptide tag (hereafter LBT) anchored at two points via a peptide bond and a disulfide bond to the target proteins. However, the magnetic susceptibility tensor displays symmetry, which can cause multiple degenerated solutions in a structure calculation based solely on PCSs. Here we show a convenient method for resolving this degeneracy by changing the spacer length between the LBT and target protein. We applied this approach to PCS-based rigid body docking between the FKBP12-rapamycin complex and the mTOR FRB domain, and demonstrated that degeneracy could be resolved using the PCS restraints obtained from two-point anchored LBT with two different spacer lengths. The present strategy will markedly increase the usefulness of two-point anchored LBT for protein complex structure determination.

  3. Convenient method for resolving degeneracies due to symmetry of the magnetic susceptibility tensor and its application to pseudo contact shift-based protein-protein complex structure determination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobashigawa, Yoshihiro; Saio, Tomohide [Hokkaido University, Department of Structural Biology, Faculty of Advanced Life Science (Japan); Ushio, Masahiro [Hokkaido University, Graduate School of Life Science (Japan); Sekiguchi, Mitsuhiro [Astellas Pharma Inc., Analysis and Pharmacokinetics Research Labs, Department of Drug Discovery (Japan); Yokochi, Masashi; Ogura, Kenji; Inagaki, Fuyuhiko, E-mail: finagaki@pharm.hokudai.ac.jp [Hokkaido University, Department of Structural Biology, Faculty of Advanced Life Science (Japan)

    2012-05-15

    Pseudo contact shifts (PCSs) induced by paramagnetic lanthanide ions fixed in a protein frame provide long-range distance and angular information, and are valuable for the structure determination of protein-protein and protein-ligand complexes. We have been developing a lanthanide-binding peptide tag (hereafter LBT) anchored at two points via a peptide bond and a disulfide bond to the target proteins. However, the magnetic susceptibility tensor displays symmetry, which can cause multiple degenerated solutions in a structure calculation based solely on PCSs. Here we show a convenient method for resolving this degeneracy by changing the spacer length between the LBT and target protein. We applied this approach to PCS-based rigid body docking between the FKBP12-rapamycin complex and the mTOR FRB domain, and demonstrated that degeneracy could be resolved using the PCS restraints obtained from two-point anchored LBT with two different spacer lengths. The present strategy will markedly increase the usefulness of two-point anchored LBT for protein complex structure determination.

  4. Scan time reduction in {sup 23}Na-Magnetic Resonance Imaging using the chemical shift imaging sequence. Evaluation of an iterative reconstruction method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weingaertner, Sebastian; Konstandin, Simon; Schad, Lothar R. [Heidelberg Univ., Mannheim (Germany). Computer Assisted Clinical Medicine; Wetterling, Friedrich [Heidelberg Univ., Mannheim (Germany). Computer Assisted Clinical Medicine; Dublin Univ. (Ireland) Trinity Inst. of Neuroscience; Fatar, Marc [Heidelberg Univ., Mannheim (Germany). Dept. of Neurology; Neumaier-Probst, Eva [Heidelberg Univ., Mannheim (Germany). Dept. of Neuroradiology

    2015-07-01

    To evaluate potential scan time reduction in {sup 23}Na-Magnetic Resonance Imaging with the chemical shift imaging sequence (CSI) using undersampled data of high-quality datasets, reconstructed with an iterative constrained reconstruction, compared to reduced resolution or reduced signal-to-noise ratio. CSI {sup 23}Na-images were retrospectively undersampled and reconstructed with a constrained reconstruction scheme. The results were compared to conventional methods of scan time reduction. The constrained reconstruction scheme used a phase constraint and a finite object support, which was extracted from a spatially registered {sup 1}H-image acquired with a double-tuned coil. The methods were evaluated using numerical simulations, phantom images and in-vivo images of a healthy volunteer and a patient who suffered from cerebral ischemic stroke. The constrained reconstruction scheme showed improved image quality compared to a decreased number of averages, images with decreased resolution or circular undersampling with weighted averaging for any undersampling factor. Brain images of a stroke patient, which were reconstructed from three-fold undersampled k-space data, resulted in only minor differences from the original image (normalized root means square error < 12%) and an almost identical delineation of the stroke region (mismatch < 6%). The acquisition of undersampled {sup 23}Na-CSI images enables up to three-fold scan time reduction with improved image quality compared to conventional methods of scan time saving.

  5. Magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, I.R.

    1984-01-01

    A magnet pole piece for an NMR imaging magnet is made of a plurality of magnetic wires with one end of each wire held in a non-magnetic spacer, the other ends of the wires being brought to a pinch, and connected to a magnetic core. The wires may be embedded in a synthetic resin and the magnetisation and uniformity thereof can be varied by adjusting the density of the wires at the spacer which forms the pole piece. (author)

  6. Adsorption of Nile Blue A from Wastewater Using Magnetic Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes: Kinetics and Equilibrium Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrnaz Ghoochian

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Synthetic dyes are serious pollutants and wide ranges of methods have been employed for their removal from aquatic systems. We studied the adsorption of "Nile blue A" (NBA, an anionic dye, from aqueous solution by oxidized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs. Methods: Scanning electron microscope and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy were used to characterize function groups produced at MWCNTs surface. Kinetics and adsorption isotherms of NBA, the effect of temperature, pH, contact time and initial dosage of nanotubes on the adsorption capacity were also assessed. The experimental data were analyzed by Langmuir and Freundlich models. Results: Most of the dye was removed in the first 5 min and best adsorption percentage was at pH 7.0. The equilibrium reached at 45 min. The experimental data were analyzed by Langmuir and Freundlich models and the results fitted well with the Freundlich model. The adsorption kinetic data were analyzed using first-order and the pseudo-second order model and the adsorption kinetic data of NBA dye onto MWCNTs fitted the pseudo-second order model. The maximum adsorption capacity was obtained as 169.49 mg g-1. Conclusion: Freundlich model suggested that the adsorption process followed heterogeneous distribution onto MWCNTs and pseudo-second model of adsorption implied that chemical processes controlled the rate-controlling step. Oxidized MWCNTs could be used as an effective adsorbent for the removal of "Nile Blue A" dye. Oxidization of MWCNTs by nitric acid, improves the efficiency of NBA removal due to increases in functional groups and total number of adsorption sites.

  7. Shifting Attention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingram, Jenni

    2014-01-01

    This article examines the shifts in attention and focus as one teacher introduces and explains an image that represents the processes involved in a numeric problem that his students have been working on. This paper takes a micro-analytic approach to examine how the focus of attention shifts through what the teacher and students do and say in the…

  8. Synthesis and application of novel ion-imprinted polymer coated magnetic multi-walled carbon nanotubes for selective solid phase extraction of lead(II) ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fayazi, Maryam, E-mail: maryam.fayazi@yahoo.com [Mineral Industries Research Center, Shahid Bahonar University of Kerman, Kerman (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Young Researchers Society, Shahid Bahonar University of Kerman, Kerman (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Taher, Mohammad Ali [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, Shahid Bahonar University of Kerman, Kerman (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Afzali, Daryoush [Department of Environment, Institute of Science and High Technology and Environmental Sciences, Graduate University of Advanced Technology, Kerman (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mostafavi, Ali [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, Shahid Bahonar University of Kerman, Kerman (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ghanei-Motlagh, Masoud, E-mail: m.ghaneimotlagh@yahoo.com [Young Researchers Society, Shahid Bahonar University of Kerman, Kerman (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, Shahid Bahonar University of Kerman, Kerman (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-03-01

    In this study, novel magnetic ion-imprinted polymer (MIIP) nanoparticles were utilized for the sensitive and selective detection of Pb(II) ions by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). The Pb(II)-imprinted polymer was synthesized by using 4-vinylpyridine (4VP) as the functional monomer, ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA) as the cross-linker, 2,3,5,6-tetra(2-pyridyl) pyrazine (TPPZ) as the chelating agent and magnetic multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MMWCNTs) as the carrier. The synthesized MIIP materials were characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). Various analytical parameters such as extraction and desorption time, eluent type and concentration, pH and sample volume were systematically examined. The selectivity of MIIP sorbent for Pb(II) ions in the presence of some cations was also evaluated. The limit of detection (LOD, 3S{sub b}) and the relative standard deviation (RSD, n = 8, c = 25 ng L{sup −1}) were found to be 2.4 ng L{sup −1} and 5.6%, respectively. The maximum sorption capacity of the MIIP for Pb(II) was found to be 48.1 mg g{sup −1}. Finally, the proposed analytical procedure was successfully applied to monitoring lead in human hair and water samples with satisfactory results for the spiked samples. - Highlights: • A selective and sensitive method based on MSPE-GFAAS was proposed. • The MIIP nanoparticles were characterized using FE-SEM, XRD, VSM and FT-IR techniques. • The synthesized MIIP material is efficient at extracting lead ions. • The method was applied to determine lead ions in several real samples.

  9. Age determination of vessel wall hematoma in spontaneous cervical artery dissection: A multi-sequence 3T Cardiovascular Magnetic resonance study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Previously proposed classifications for carotid plaque and cerebral parenchymal hemorrhages are used to estimate the age of hematoma according to its signal intensities on T1w and T2w MR images. Using these classifications, we systematically investigated the value of cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) in determining the age of vessel wall hematoma (VWH) in patients with spontaneous cervical artery dissection (sCAD). Methods 35 consecutive patients (mean age 43.6 ± 9.8 years) with sCAD received a cervical multi-sequence 3T CMR with fat-saturated black-blood T1w-, T2w- and TOF images. Age of sCAD was defined as time between onset of symptoms (stroke, TIA or Horner's syndrome) and the CMR scan. VWH were categorized into hyperacute, acute, early subacute, late subacute and chronic based on their signal intensities on T1w- and T2w images. Results The mean age of sCAD was 2.0, 5.8, 15.7 and 58.7 days in patients with acute, early subacute, late subacute and chronic VWH as classified by CMR (p hematomas with Cohen's kappa of 0.74 (p hematomas differs from that of cerebral hematomas. PMID:22122756

  10. Age determination of vessel wall hematoma in spontaneous cervical artery dissection: A multi-sequence 3T Cardiovascular Magnetic resonance study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Habs Maximilian

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previously proposed classifications for carotid plaque and cerebral parenchymal hemorrhages are used to estimate the age of hematoma according to its signal intensities on T1w and T2w MR images. Using these classifications, we systematically investigated the value of cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR in determining the age of vessel wall hematoma (VWH in patients with spontaneous cervical artery dissection (sCAD. Methods 35 consecutive patients (mean age 43.6 ± 9.8 years with sCAD received a cervical multi-sequence 3T CMR with fat-saturated black-blood T1w-, T2w- and TOF images. Age of sCAD was defined as time between onset of symptoms (stroke, TIA or Horner's syndrome and the CMR scan. VWH were categorized into hyperacute, acute, early subacute, late subacute and chronic based on their signal intensities on T1w- and T2w images. Results The mean age of sCAD was 2.0, 5.8, 15.7 and 58.7 days in patients with acute, early subacute, late subacute and chronic VWH as classified by CMR (p Conclusions Signal intensities of VWH in sCAD vary over time and multi-sequence CMR can help to determine the age of an arterial dissection. Furthermore, findings of this study suggest that the time course of carotid hematomas differs from that of cerebral hematomas.

  11. Darwin-Lagrangian analysis for the interaction of a point charge and a magnet: considerations related to the controversy regarding the Aharonov-Bohm and Aharonov-Casher phase shifts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyer, Timothy H

    2006-01-01

    The classical electromagnetic interaction of a point charge and a magnet is discussed by first calculating the interaction of a point charge with a simple model magnetic moment and then suggesting a multiparticle limit. The Darwin-Lagrangian is used to analyse the electromagnetic behaviour of the model magnetic moment (composed of two oppositely charged particles of different masses in an initially circular Coulomb orbit) interacting with a passing point charge. Considerations of force, energy, momentum and centre of energy are treated through second order in 1/c. The changing magnetic moment is found to put a force back on a passing charge; this force is of order 1/c 2 and depends upon the magnitude of the magnetic moment. The limit of a many-particle magnet arranged as a toroid is discussed. It is suggested that in the multiparticle limit, the electric fields of the passing charge are screened out of the body of the magnet while the magnetic fields of the passing charge penetrate into the body of the magnet. This is consistent with our understanding of the penetration of electromagnetic velocity fields into ohmic conductors. The proposed multiparticle limit is consistent with the conservation laws for energy and momentum, as well as constant motion of the centre of energy, and Newton's third law for the net Lorentz forces on the magnet and on the point charge. The work corresponds to a classical electromagnetic analysis of the interaction which is basic to understanding the controversy over the Aharonov-Bohm and Aharonov-Casher phase shifts and represents a refutation of the suggestions of Aharonov, Pearle and Vaidman

  12. Shadows on the wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swift, Diana.

    1984-01-01

    Canadian antinuclear groups, because of their shifting stances and fluid overlapping membership, are compared with shadows on a wall. They can be roughly classified as environmental, pacifist, concerned with energy, religious, or dedicated to nuclear responsibility. The author considers that such groups, despite their arguably unrealistic attitudes, have raised public awareness of the ethical, practical and financial aspects of power development in Canada and the world

  13. Spectral shift reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, W.R.; Piplica, E.J.

    1982-01-01

    A spectral shift pressurized water reactor comprising apparatus for inserting and withdrawing water displacer elements having differing neutron absorbing capabilities for selectively changing the water-moderator volume in the core thereby changing the reactivity of the core. The displacer elements comprise substantially hollow cylindrical low neutron absorbing rods and substantially hollow cylindrical thick walled stainless rods. Since the stainless steel displacer rods have greater neutron absorbing capability, they can effect greater reactivity change per rod. However, by arranging fewer stainless steel displacer rods in a cluster, the reactivity worth of the stainless steel displacer rod cluster can be less than a low neutron absorbing displacer rod cluster. (author)

  14. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    by B. Curé

    2011-01-01

    The magnet operation was very satisfactory till the technical stop at the end of the year 2010. The field was ramped down on 5th December 2010, following the successful regeneration test of the turbine filters at full field on 3rd December 2010. This will limit in the future the quantity of magnet cycles, as it is no longer necessary to ramp down the magnet for this type of intervention. This is made possible by the use of the spare liquid Helium volume to cool the magnet while turbines 1 and 2 are stopped, leaving only the third turbine in operation. This obviously requires full availability of the operators to supervise the operation, as it is not automated. The cryogenics was stopped on 6th December 2010 and the magnet was left without cooling until 18th January 2011, when the cryoplant operation resumed. The magnet temperature reached 93 K. The maintenance of the vacuum pumping was done immediately after the magnet stop, when the magnet was still at very low temperature. Only the vacuum pumping of the ma...

  15. Topological domain walls in helimagnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenherr, P.; Müller, J.; Köhler, L.; Rosch, A.; Kanazawa, N.; Tokura, Y.; Garst, M.; Meier, D.

    2018-05-01

    Domain walls naturally arise whenever a symmetry is spontaneously broken. They interconnect regions with different realizations of the broken symmetry, promoting structure formation from cosmological length scales to the atomic level1,2. In ferroelectric and ferromagnetic materials, domain walls with unique functionalities emerge, holding great promise for nanoelectronics and spintronics applications3-5. These walls are usually of Ising, Bloch or Néel type and separate homogeneously ordered domains. Here we demonstrate that a wide variety of new domain walls occurs in the presence of spatially modulated domain states. Using magnetic force microscopy and micromagnetic simulations, we show three fundamental classes of domain walls to arise in the near-room-temperature helimagnet iron germanium. In contrast to conventional ferroics, the domain walls exhibit a well-defined inner structure, which—analogous to cholesteric liquid crystals—consists of topological disclination and dislocation defects. Similar to the magnetic skyrmions that form in the same material6,7, the domain walls can carry a finite topological charge, permitting an efficient coupling to spin currents and contributions to a topological Hall effect. Our study establishes a new family of magnetic nano-objects with non-trivial topology, opening the door to innovative device concepts based on helimagnetic domain walls.

  16. Origin of variation of shift field via annealing at 400°C in a perpendicular-anisotropy magnetic tunnel junction with [Co/Pt]-multilayers based synthetic ferrimagnetic reference layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Honjo

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available We investigated properties of perpendicular-anisotropy magnetic tunnel junctions (p-MTJs with [Co/Pt]-multilayer based synthetic ferrimagnetic reference (SyF layer at elevated annealing temperature Ta from 350°C to 400°C. Shift field HS defined as center field of minor resistance versus magnetic field curve of the MTJs increased with increase of Ta from 350°C to 400°C. The variation of HS is attributed to the variation of saturation magnetic moment in the SyF reference layer. Cross sectional energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis revealed that Fe element of CoFeB in the reference layer diffuses to Co/Pt multilayers in the SyF reference layer.

  17. Lanthanide shift reagents, binding, shift mechanisms and exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boer, J.W.M. de

    1977-01-01

    Paramagnetic lanthanide shift reagents, when added to a solution of a substrate, induce shifts in the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrum of the substrate molecules. The induced shifts contain information about the structure of the shift reagent substrate complex. The structural information, however, may be difficult to extract because of the following effects: (1) different complexes between shift reagent and substrate may be present in solution, e.g. 1:1 and 1:2 complexes, and the shift observed is a weighed average of the shifts of the substrate nuclei in the different complexes; (2) the Fermi contact interaction, arising from the spin density at the nucleus, contributes to the induced shift; (3) chemical exchange effects may complicate the NMR spectrum. In this thesis, the results of an investigation into the influence of these effects on the NMR spectra of solutions containing a substrate and LSR are presented. The equations describing the pseudo contact and the Fermi contact shift are derived. In addition, it is shown how the modified Bloch equations describing the effect of the chemical exchange processes occurring in the systems studied can be reduced to the familiar equations for a two-site exchange case. The binding of mono- and bifunctional ethers to the shift reagent are reported. An analysis of the induced shifts is given. Finally, the results of the experiments performed to study the exchange behavior of dimethoxyethane and heptafluorodimethyloctanedionato ligands are presented

  18. Ambiguous walls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mody, Astrid

    2012-01-01

    The introduction of Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) in the built environment has encouraged myriad applications, often embedded in surfaces as an integrated part of the architecture. Thus the wall as responsive luminous skin is becoming, if not common, at least familiar. Taking into account how wall...

  19. Market shifting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forst, Michael

    2013-11-01

    After years of oversupply and artificially low module pricing, market analysts believe that the solar industry will begin to stabilize by 2017. While the market activities are shifting from Europe to the Asia Pacific region and the United States, the solar shakeout continues to be in full swing including solar cell and module manufacturing. (orig.)

  20. Tough Shift

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brewer, Robert S.; Verdezoto, Nervo; Holst, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    people to change their behavior at home. Leveraging prior research on encouraging reductions in residential energy use through game play, we introduce ShareBuddy: a casual mobile game intended to encourage players not only to reduce, but also to shift their electricity use. We conducted two field studies...... real-world resource use into a game....

  1. Ambiguous walls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mody, Astrid

    2012-01-01

    The introduction of Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) in the built environment has encouraged myriad applications, often embedded in surfaces as an integrated part of the architecture. Thus the wall as responsive luminous skin is becoming, if not common, at least familiar. Taking into account how walls...... have encouraged architectural thinking of enclosure, materiality, construction and inhabitation in architectural history, the paper’s aim is to define new directions for the integration of LEDs in walls, challenging the thinking of inhabitation and program. This paper introduces the notion...... of “ambiguous walls” as a more “critical” approach to design [1]. The concept of ambiguous walls refers to the diffuse status a lumious and possibly responsive wall will have. Instead of confining it can open up. Instead of having a static appearance, it becomes a context over time. Instead of being hard...

  2. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé

    2010-01-01

    Operation of the magnet has gone quite smoothly during the first half of this year. The magnet has been at 4.5K for the full period since January. There was an unplanned short stop due to the CERN-wide power outage on May 28th, which caused a slow dump of the magnet. Since this occurred just before a planned technical stop of the LHC, during which access in the experimental cavern was authorized, it was decided to leave the magnet OFF until 2nd June, when magnet was ramped up again to 3.8T. The magnet system experienced a fault also resulting in a slow dump on April 14th. This was triggered by a thermostat on a filter choke in the 20kA DC power converter. The threshold of this thermostat is 65°C. However, no variation in the water-cooling flow rate or temperature was observed. Vibration may have been the root cause of the fault. All the thermostats have been checked, together with the cables, connectors and the read out card. The tightening of the inductance fixations has also been checked. More tem...

  3. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2012-01-01

      The magnet was energised at the beginning of March 2012 at a low current to check all the MSS safety chains. Then the magnet was ramped up to 3.8 T on 6 March 2012. Unfortunately two days later an unintentional switch OFF of the power converter caused a slow dump. This was due to a misunderstanding of the CCC (CERN Control Centre) concerning the procedure to apply for the CMS converter control according to the beam-mode status at that time. Following this event, the third one since 2009, a discussion was initiated to define possible improvement, not only on software and procedures in the CCC, but also to evaluate the possibility to upgrade the CMS hardware to prevent such discharge from occurring because of incorrect procedure implementations. The magnet operation itself was smooth, and no power cuts took place. As a result, the number of magnetic cycles was reduced to the minimum, with only two full magnetic cycles from 0 T to 3.8 T. Nevertheless the magnet suffered four stops of the cryogeni...

  4. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2012-01-01

      Following the unexpected magnet stops last August due to sequences of unfortunate events on the services and cryogenics [see CMS internal report], a few more events and initiatives again disrupted the magnet operation. All the magnet parameters stayed at their nominal values during this period without any fault or alarm on the magnet control and safety systems. The magnet was stopped for the September technical stop to allow interventions in the experimental cavern on the detector services. On 1 October, to prepare the transfer of the liquid nitrogen tank on its new location, several control cables had to be removed. One cable was cut mistakenly, causing a digital input card to switch off, resulting in a cold-box (CB) stop. This tank is used for the pre-cooling of the magnet from room temperature down to 80 K, and for this reason it is controlled through the cryogenics control system. Since the connection of the CB was only allowed for a field below 2 T to avoid the risk of triggering a fast d...

  5. Pulse-driven magnetoimpedance sensor detection of cardiac magnetic activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinsuke Nakayama

    Full Text Available This study sought to establish a convenient method for detecting biomagnetic activity in the heart. Electrical activity of the heart simultaneously induces a magnetic field. Detection of this magnetic activity will enable non-contact, noninvasive evaluation to be made. We improved the sensitivity of a pulse-driven magnetoimpedance (PMI sensor, which is used as an electric compass in mobile phones and as a motion sensor of the operation handle in computer games, toward a pico-Tesla (pT level, and measured magnetic fields on the surface of the thoracic wall in humans. The changes in magnetic field detected by this sensor synchronized with the electric activity of the electrocardiogram (ECG. The shape of the magnetic wave was largely altered by shifting the sensor position within 20 mm in parallel and/or perpendicular to the thoracic wall. The magnetic activity was maximal in the 4th intercostals near the center of the sterna. Furthermore, averaging the magnetic activity at 15 mm in the distance between the thoracic wall and the sensor demonstrated magnetic waves mimicking the P wave and QRS complex. The present study shows the application of PMI sensor in detecting cardiac magnetic activity in several healthy subjects, and suggests future applications of this technology in medicine and biology.

  6. Wall Turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanratty, Thomas J.

    1980-01-01

    This paper gives an account of research on the structure of turbulence close to a solid boundary. Included is a method to study the flow close to the wall of a pipe without interferring with it. (Author/JN)

  7. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2012-01-01

      The magnet and its sub-systems were stopped at the beginning of the winter shutdown on 8th December 2011. The magnet was left without cooling during the cryogenics maintenance until 17th January 2012, when the cryoplant operation resumed. The magnet temperature reached 93 K. The vacuum pumping was maintained during this period. During this shutdown, the yearly maintenance was performed on the cryogenics, the vacuum pumps, the magnet control and safety systems, and the power converter and discharge lines. Several preventive actions led to the replacement of the electrovalve command coils, and the 20A DC power supplies of the magnet control system. The filters were cleaned on the demineralised water circuits. The oil of the diffusion pumps was changed. On the cryogenics, warm nitrogen at 343 K was circulated in the cold box to regenerate the filters and the heat exchangers. The coalescing filters have been replaced at the inlet of both the turbines and the lubricant trapping unit. The active cha...

  8. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2013-01-01

      The magnet was operated without any problem until the end of the LHC run in February 2013, apart from a CERN-wide power glitch on 10 January 2013 that affected the CMS refrigerator, causing a ramp down to 2 T in order to reconnect the coldbox. Another CERN-wide power glitch on 15 January 2013 didn’t affect the magnet subsystems, the cryoplant or the power converter. At the end of the magnet run, the reconnection of the coldbox at 2.5 T was tested. The process will be updated, in particular the parameters of some PID valve controllers. The helium flow of the current leads was reduced but only for a few seconds. The exercise will be repeated with the revised parameters to validate the automatic reconnection process of the coldbox. During LS1, the water-cooling services will be reduced and many interventions are planned on the electrical services. Therefore, the magnet cryogenics and subsystems will be stopped for several months, and the magnet cannot be kept cold. In order to avoid unc...

  9. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé

    2010-01-01

    The magnet was successfully operated at the end of the year 2009 despite some technical problems on the cryogenics. The magnet was ramped up to 3.8 T at the end of November until December 16th when the shutdown started. The magnet operation met a few unexpected stops. The field was reduced to 3.5 T for about 5 hours on December 3rd due to a faulty pressure sensor on the helium compressor. The following day the CERN CCC stopped unintentionally the power converters of the LHC and the experiments, triggering a ramp down that was stopped at 2.7 T. The magnet was back at 3.8 T about 6 hours after CCC sent the CERN-wide command. Three days later, a slow dump was triggered due to a stop of the pump feeding the power converter water-cooling circuit, during an intervention on the water-cooling plant done after several disturbances on the electrical distribution network. The magnet was back at 3.8 T in the evening the same day. On December 10th a break occurred in one turbine of the cold box producing the liquid ...

  10. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2011-01-01

    The CMS magnet has been running steadily and smoothly since the summer, with no detected flaw. The magnet instrumentation is entirely operational and all the parameters are at their nominal values. Three power cuts on the electrical network affected the magnet run in the past five months, with no impact on the data-taking as the accelerator was also affected at the same time. On 22nd June, a thunderstorm caused a power glitch on the service electrical network. The primary water cooling at Point 5 was stopped. Despite a quick restart of the water cooling, the inlet temperature of the demineralised water on the busbar cooling circuit increased by 5 °C, up to 23.3 °C. It was kept below the threshold of 27 °C by switching off other cooling circuits to avoid the trigger of a slow dump of the magnet. The cold box of the cryogenics also stopped. Part of the spare liquid helium volume was used to maintain the cooling of the magnet at 4.5 K. The operators of the cryogenics quickly restarted ...

  11. A novel redox-sensitive system based on single-walled carbon nanotubes for chemo-photothermal therapy and magnetic resonance imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hou L

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Lin Hou,1,2 Xiaomin Yang,1 Junxiao Ren,1 Yongchao Wang,1 Huijuan Zhang,1 Qianhua Feng,1 Yuyang Shi,1 Xiaoning Shan,1 Yujie Yuan,1 Zhenzhong Zhang1,21School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Zhengzhou University, Henan Province, Zhengzhou, People’s Republic of China; 2Collaborative Innovation Center of New Drug Research and Safety Evaluation, Henan Province, Zhengzhou, People’s Republic of ChinaAbstract: Recently, nanomaterials with multiple functions, such as drug carrier, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and optical imaging, and photothermal therapy, have become more and more popular in cancer research. In this work, a novel redox-sensitive system constructed from hyaluronic acid (HA, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs, doxorubicin (DOX, and gadolinium (Gd was successfully developed. Herein, HA-modified SWCNTs (SWCNTs-HA was first synthesized, and then DOX was conjugated with HA by disulfide bond (SWCNTs-HA-ss-DOX. Finally, MRI contrast agents, Gd3+-ion loading occurred through the sidewall defects of SWCNTs, whose cytotoxicity could be sequestered within the SWCNTs. In vitro release of DOX showed that this system accomplished much faster drug release under reducing condition. Confocal microscopy analysis confirmed that Gd/SWCNTs-HA-ss-DOX were capable of simultaneously delivering DOX and SWCNTs into Michigan Cancer Foundation-7 cells via HA receptor-mediated endocytosis followed by rapid transport of cargoes into the cytosol. Enhanced cytotoxicity of Gd/SWCNTs-HA-ss-DOX further proved that the sensitive system was more potent for intracellular drug delivery as compared with the insensitive control. Meanwhile, tumor cell killing potency was improved when Gd/SWCNTs-HA-ss-DOX were combined with near-infrared irradiation, with IC50 of 0.61 µg/mL at 48 hours. In vivo investigation demonstrated that Gd/SWCNTs-HA-ss-DOX could effectively accumulate in tumor sites and possessed the greatest synergistic antitumor efficacy, especially under the 808 nm

  12. Echo Particle Image Velocimetry for Estimation of Carotid Artery Wall Shear Stress: Repeatability, Reproducibility and Comparison with Phase-Contrast Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurung, Arati; Gates, Phillip E; Mazzaro, Luciano; Fulford, Jonathan; Zhang, Fuxing; Barker, Alex J; Hertzberg, Jean; Aizawa, Kunihiko; Strain, William D; Elyas, Salim; Shore, Angela C; Shandas, Robin

    2017-08-01

    Measurement of hemodynamic wall shear stress (WSS) is important in investigating the role of WSS in the initiation and progression of atherosclerosis. Echo particle image velocimetry (echo PIV) is a novel ultrasound-based technique for measuring WSS in vivo that has previously been validated in vitro using the standard optical PIV technique. We evaluated the repeatability and reproducibility of echo PIV for measuring WSS in the human common carotid artery. We measured WSS in 28 healthy participants (18 males and 10 females, mean age: 56 ± 12 y). Echo PIV was highly repeatable, with an intra-observer variability of 1.0 ± 0.1 dyn/cm 2 for peak systolic (maximum), 0.9 dyn/cm 2 for mean and 0.5 dyn/cm 2 for end-diastolic (minimum) WSS measurements. Likewise, echo PIV was reproducible, with a low inter-observer variability (max: 2.0 ± 0.2 dyn/cm 2 , mean: 1.3 ± 0.1 dyn/cm 2 , end-diastolic: 0.7 dyn/cm 2 ) and more variable inter-scan (test-retest) variability (max: 7.1 ± 2.3 dyn/cm 2 , mean: 2.9 ± 0.4 dyn/cm 2 , min: 1.5 ± 0.1 dyn/cm 2 ). We compared echo PIV with the reference method, phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (PC-MRI); echo PIV-based WSS measurements agreed qualitatively with PC-MRI measurements (r = 0.89, p PIV vs. PC-MRI): WSS at peak systole: 21 ± 7.0 dyn/cm 2 vs. 15 ± 5.0 dyn/cm 2 ; time-averaged WSS: 8.9 ± 3.0 dyn/cm 2 vs. 7.1 ± 3.0 dyn/cm 2 (p  0.05). For the first time, we report that echo PIV can measure WSS with good repeatability and reproducibility in adult humans with a broad age range. Echo PIV is feasible in humans and offers an easy-to-use, ultrasound-based, quantitative technique for measuring WSS in vivo in humans with good repeatability and reproducibility. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Enhanced wall pumping in JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehrenberg, J.; Harbour, P.J.

    1991-01-01

    The enhanced wall pumping phenomenon in JET is observed for hydrogen or deuterium plasmas which are moved from the outer (larger major radius) limiter position either to the inner wall or to the top/bottom wall of the vacuum vessel. This phenomenon is analysed by employing a particle recycling model which combines plasma particle transport with particle re-emission from and retention within material surfaces. The model calculates the important experimentally observable quantities, such as particle fluxes, global particle confinement time, plasma density and density profile. Good qualitative agreement is found and, within the uncertainties, the agreement is quantitative if the wall pumping is assumed to be caused by two simultaneously occurring effects: (1) Neutral particle screening at the inner wall and the top/bottom wall is larger than that at the outer limiter because of different magnetic topologies at different poloidal positions; and (2) although most of the particles (≥ 90%) impacting on the wall can be promptly re-emitted, a small fraction (≤ 10%) of them must be retained in the wall for a period of time which is similar to or larger than the global plasma particle confinement time. However, the wall particle retention time need not be different from that of the outer limiter, i.e. pumping can occur when there is no difference between the material properties of the limiter and those of the wall. (author). 45 refs, 18 figs

  14. Strain induced anomalous red shift in mesoscopic iron oxide

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nano magnetic oxides; red shift; magnetic storage. ... size and strain induced modifications of various physical properties viz. optical, magnetic and structural. ... ∼2, are synthesized by employing starch and ethylene glycol and starch and ...

  15. Fluid Shifts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenger, M. B.; Hargens, A. R.; Dulchavsky, S. A.; Arbeille, P.; Danielson, R. W.; Ebert, D. J.; Garcia, K. M.; Johnston, S. L.; Laurie, S. S.; Lee, S. M. C.; hide

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. NASA's Human Research Program is focused on addressing health risks associated with long-duration missions on the International Space Station (ISS) and future exploration-class missions beyond low Earth orbit. Visual acuity changes observed after short-duration missions were largely transient, but now more than 50 percent of ISS astronauts have experienced more profound, chronic changes with objective structural findings such as optic disc edema, globe flattening and choroidal folds. These structural and functional changes are referred to as the visual impairment and intracranial pressure (VIIP) syndrome. Development of VIIP symptoms may be related to elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) secondary to spaceflight-induced cephalad fluid shifts, but this hypothesis has not been tested. The purpose of this study is to characterize fluid distribution and compartmentalization associated with long-duration spaceflight and to determine if a relation exists with vision changes and other elements of the VIIP syndrome. We also seek to determine whether the magnitude of fluid shifts during spaceflight, as well as any VIIP-related effects of those shifts, are predicted by the crewmember's pre-flight status and responses to acute hemodynamic manipulations, specifically posture changes and lower body negative pressure. Methods. We will examine a variety of physiologic variables in 10 long-duration ISS crewmembers using the test conditions and timeline presented in the figure below. Measures include: (1) fluid compartmentalization (total body water by D2O, extracellular fluid by NaBr, intracellular fluid by calculation, plasma volume by CO rebreathe, interstitial fluid by calculation); (2) forehead/eyelids, tibia, and calcaneus tissue thickness (by ultrasound); (3) vascular dimensions by ultrasound (jugular veins, cerebral and carotid arteries, vertebral arteries and veins, portal vein); (4) vascular dynamics by MRI (head/neck blood flow, cerebrospinal fluid

  16. High-resolution 13C nuclear magnetic resonance evidence of phase transition of Rb,Cs-intercalated single-walled nanotubes

    KAUST Repository

    Bouhrara, M.; Saih, Y.; Wågberg, T.; Goze-Bac, C.; Abou-Hamad, E.

    2011-01-01

    charge transfer is applicable at low intercalation level. The new phase at high intercalation level is accompanied by a hybridization of alkali (s) orbitals with the carbon (sp2) orbitals of the single walled nanotubes, which indicate bundle surface sites

  17. Bloch walls in a nickel single crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, J.; Treimer, W.

    2001-01-01

    We present a consistent theory for the dependence of the magnetic structure in bulk samples on external static magnetic fields and corresponding experimental results. We applied the theory of micromagnetism to this crystal and calculated the Bloch wall thickness as a function of external magnetic fields. The theoretical results agree well with the experimental data, so that the Bloch wall thickness of a 71 deg. nickel single crystal was definitely determined with some hundred of nanometer

  18. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2011-01-01

    The magnet ran smoothly in the last few months until a fast dump occurred on 9th May 2011. Fortunately, this occurred in the afternoon of the first day of the technical stop. The fast dump was due to a valve position controller that caused the sudden closure of a valve. This valve is used to regulate the helium flow on one of the two current leads, which electrically connects the coil at 4.5 K to the busbars at room temperature. With no helium flow on the lead, the voltage drop and the temperatures across the leads increase up to the defined thresholds, triggering a fast dump through the Magnet Safety System (MSS). The automatic reaction triggered by the MSS worked properly. The helium release was limited as the pressure rise was just at the limit of the safety valve opening pressure. The average temperature of the magnet reached 72 K. It took four days to recover the temperature and refill the helium volumes. The faulty valve controller was replaced by a spare one before the magnet ramp-up resumed....

  19. Automated Fragmentation Polarizable Embedding Density Functional Theory (PE-DFT) Calculations of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Shielding Constants of Proteins with Application to Chemical Shift Predictions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Casper Steinmann; Bratholm, L.A.; Olsen, Jógvan Magnus Haugaard

    2017-01-01

    that are comparable with experiment. The introduction of a probabilistic linear regression model allows us to substantially reduce the number of snapshots that are needed to make comparisons with experiment. This approach is further improved by augmenting snapshot selection with chemical shift predictions by which we...

  20. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé

    2010-01-01

    The magnet worked very well at 3.8 T as expected, despite a technical issue that manifested twice in the cryogenics since June. All the other magnet sub-systems worked without flaw. The issue in the cryogenics was with the cold box: it could be observed that the cold box was getting progressively blocked, due to some residual humidity and air accumulating in the first thermal exchanger and in the adsorber at 65 K. This was later confirmed by the analysis during the regeneration phases. An increase in the temperature difference between the helium inlet and outlet across the heat exchanger and a pressure drop increase on the filter of the adsorber were observed. The consequence was a reduction of the helium flow, first compensated by the automatic opening of the regulation valves. But once they were fully opened, the flow and refrigeration power reduced as a consequence. In such a situation, the liquid helium level in the helium Dewar decreased, eventually causing a ramp down of the magnet current and a field...

  1. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    MAGNET During the winter shutdown, the magnet subsystems went through a full maintenance. The magnet was successfully warmed up to room temperature beginning of December 2008. The vacuum was broken later on by injecting nitrogen at a pressure just above one atmosphere inside the vacuum tank. This was necessary both to prevent any accidental humidity ingress, and to allow for a modification of the vacuum gauges on the vacuum tank and maintenance of the diffusion pumps. The vacuum gauges had to be changed, because of erratic variations on the measurements, causing spurious alarms. The new type of vacuum gauges has been used in similar conditions on the other LHC experiments and without problems. They are shielded against the stray field. The lubricants of the primary and diffusion pumps have been changed. Several minor modifications were also carried out on the equipment in the service cavern, with the aim to ease the maintenance and to allow possible intervention during operation. Spare sensors have been bough...

  2. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé.

    The magnet operation restarted end of June this year. Quick routine checks of the magnet sub-systems were performed at low current before starting the ramps up to higher field. It appeared clearly that the end of the field ramp down to zero was too long to be compatible with the detector commissioning and operations plans. It was decided to perform an upgrade to keep the ramp down from 3.8T to zero within 4 hours. On July 10th, when a field of 1.5T was reached, small movements were observed in the forward region support table and it was decided to fix this problem before going to higher field. At the end of July the ramps could be resumed. On July 28th, the field was at 3.8T and the summer CRAFT exercise could start. This run in August went smoothly until a general CERN wide power cut took place on August 3rd, due to an insulation fault on the high voltage network outside point 5. It affected the magnet powering electrical circuit, as it caused the opening of the main circuit breakers, resulting in a fast du...

  3. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2013-01-01

    The magnet is fully stopped and at room temperature. The maintenance works and consolidation activities on the magnet sub-systems are progressing. To consolidate the cryogenic installation, two redundant helium compressors will be installed as ‘hot spares’, to avoid the risk of a magnet downtime in case of a major failure of a compressor unit during operation. The screw compressors, their motors, the mechanical couplings and the concrete blocks are already available and stored at P5. The metallic structure used to access the existing compressors in SH5 will be modified to allow the installation of the two redundant ones. The plan is to finish the installation and commissioning of the hot spare compressors before the summer 2014. In the meantime, a bypass on the high-pressure helium piping will be installed for the connection of a helium drier unit later during the Long Shutdown 1, keeping this installation out of the schedule critical path. A proposal is now being prepared for the con...

  4. Anisotropy of domain wall resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viret; Samson; Warin; Marty; Ott; Sondergard; Klein; Fermon

    2000-10-30

    The resistive effect of domain walls in FePd films with perpendicular anisotropy was studied experimentally as a function of field and temperature. The films were grown directly on MgO substrates, which induces an unusual virgin magnetic configuration composed of 60 nm wide parallel stripe domains. This allowed us to carry out the first measurements of the anisotropy of domain wall resistivity in the two configurations of current perpendicular and parallel to the walls. At 18 K, we find 8.2% and 1.3% for the domain wall magnetoresistance normalized to the wall width (8 nm) in these two respective configurations. These values are consistent with the predictions of Levy and Zhang.

  5. Wall boilers connected to the controlled mechanical gas ventilation system cannot be shifted easily...; Les ''murales'' raccordees a la VMC gaz ne voyagent pas facilement...

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dujin, M. [CEP-Veritas, 75 - Paris (France)

    1999-10-01

    Mainly for aesthetical reasons, in renovated and new buildings, gas boilers are more and more often shifted from the kitchen (their traditional place) to other rooms (bathroom, storeroom, toilets..) and connected to the controlled mechanical ventilation system. In this case, several questions can arise concerning the respect of the gas safety regulations: compatibility of the ventilation system, conformability of the extraction system, sufficient amount of air supply, sufficient heating power etc.. This paper takes stock of this safety problem. (J.S.)

  6. Observations on resistive wall modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerwin, R.A.; Finn, J.M.

    1996-01-01

    Several results on resistive wall modes and their application to tokamaks are presented. First, it is observed that in the presence of collisional parallel dynamics there is an exact cancellation to lowest order of the dissipative and sound wave effects for an ideal Ohm's law. This is easily traced to the fact that the parallel dynamics occurs along the perturbed magnetic field lines for such electromagnetic modes. Such a cancellation does not occur in the resistive layer of a tearing-like mode. The relevance to models for resistive wall modes using an electrostatic Hammett-Perkins type operator to model Landau damping will be discussed. Second, we observe that with an ideal Ohm's law, resistive wall modes can be destabilized by rotation in that part of parameter space in which the ideal MHD modes are stable with the wall at infinity. This effect can easily be explained by interpreting the resistive wall instability in terms of mode coupling between the backward stable MHD mode and a stable mode locked into the wall. Such an effect can occur for very small rotation for tearing-resistive wall modes in which inertia dominates viscosity in the layer, but the mode is stabilized by further rotation. For modes for which viscosity dominates in the layer, rotation is purely stabilizing. For both tearing models, a somewhat higher rotation frequency gives stability essentially whenever the tearing mode is stable with a perfectly conducting wall. These tearing/resistive wall results axe also simply explained in terms of mode coupling. It has been shown that resonant external ideal modes can be stabilized in the presence of resistive wall and resistive plasma with rotation of order the nominal tearing mode growth rate. We show that these modes behave as resistive wall tearing modes in the sense above. This strengthens the suggestion that rotational stabilization of the external kink with a resistive wall is due to the presence of resistive layers, even for ideal modes

  7. Nuclear Magnetic Shielding of Monoboranes: Calculation and Assessment of B-11 NMR Chemical Shifts in Planar BX3 and in Tetrahedral [BX4](-) Systems

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Macháček, Jan; Bühl, M.; Fanfrlík, Jindřich; Hnyk, Drahomír

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 121, č. 50 (2017), s. 9631-9637 ISSN 1089-5639 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA17-08045S Institutional support: RVO:61388980 ; RVO:61388963 Keywords : Electrostatic potentials * Nonrelativistic * Nuclear magnetic shieldings Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry OBOR OECD: Inorganic and nuclear chemistry Impact factor: 2.847, year: 2016

  8. Shifting Sugars and Shifting Paradigms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegal, Mark L.

    2015-01-01

    No organism lives in a constant environment. Based on classical studies in molecular biology, many have viewed microbes as following strict rules for shifting their metabolic activities when prevailing conditions change. For example, students learn that the bacterium Escherichia coli makes proteins for digesting lactose only when lactose is available and glucose, a better sugar, is not. However, recent studies, including three PLOS Biology papers examining sugar utilization in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, show that considerable heterogeneity in response to complex environments exists within and between populations. These results join similar recent results in other organisms that suggest that microbial populations anticipate predictable environmental changes and hedge their bets against unpredictable ones. The classical view therefore represents but one special case in a range of evolutionary adaptations to environmental changes that all organisms face. PMID:25688600

  9. Shifting sugars and shifting paradigms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark L Siegal

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available No organism lives in a constant environment. Based on classical studies in molecular biology, many have viewed microbes as following strict rules for shifting their metabolic activities when prevailing conditions change. For example, students learn that the bacterium Escherichia coli makes proteins for digesting lactose only when lactose is available and glucose, a better sugar, is not. However, recent studies, including three PLOS Biology papers examining sugar utilization in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, show that considerable heterogeneity in response to complex environments exists within and between populations. These results join similar recent results in other organisms that suggest that microbial populations anticipate predictable environmental changes and hedge their bets against unpredictable ones. The classical view therefore represents but one special case in a range of evolutionary adaptations to environmental changes that all organisms face.

  10. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé

    The magnet subsystems resumed operation early this spring. The vacuum pumping was restarted mid March, and the cryogenic power plant was restarted on March 30th. Three and a half weeks later, the magnet was at 4.5 K. The vacuum pumping system is performing well. One of the newly installed vacuum gauges had to be replaced at the end of the cool-down phase, as the values indicated were not coherent with the other pressure measurements. The correction had to be implemented quickly to be sure no helium leak could be at the origin of this anomaly. The pressure measurements have been stable and coherent since the change. The cryogenics worked well, and the cool-down went quite smoothly, without any particular difficulty. The automated start of the turbines had to be fine-tuned to get a smooth transition, as it was observed that the cooling power delivered by the turbines was slightly higher than needed, causing the cold box to stop automatically. This had no consequence as the cold box safety system acts to keep ...

  11. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    During the winter shutdown, the magnet subsystems went through a full maintenance. The magnet was successfully warmed up to room temperature beginning of December 2008. The vacuum was broken later on by injecting nitrogen at a pressure just above one atmosphere inside the vacuum tank. This was necessary both to prevent any accidental humidity ingress, and to allow for a modification of the vacuum gauges on the vacuum tank and maintenance of the diffusion pumps. The vacuum gauges had to be changed, because of erratic variations on the measurements, causing spurious alarms. The new type of vacuum gauges has been used in similar conditions on the other LHC experiments and without problems. They are shielded against the stray field. The lubricants of the primary and diffusion pumps have been changed. Several minor modifications were also carried out on the equipment in the service cavern, with the aim to ease the maintenance and to allow possible intervention during operation. Spare sensors have been bought. Th...

  12. The Standardized Histogram Shift of T2 Magnetic Resonance Image (MRI) Signal Intensities of Nephroblastoma Does Not Predict Histopathological Diagnostic Information

    OpenAIRE

    M?ller, Sabine; David, Ruslan; Marias, Kostas; Graf, Norbert

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study is to assess standardized histograms of signal intensities of T2-weighted magnetic resonance image (MRI) modality before and after preoperative chemotherapy for nephroblastoma (Wilms? tumor). All analyzed patients are enrolled in the International Society of Paediatric Oncology (SIOP) 2001/GPOH trial.1 The question to be answered is whether the comparison of the histograms can add new knowledge by comparing them with the histology of the tumor after preoperative ch...

  13. Detailed discussion of a linear electric field frequency shift induced in confined gases by a magnetic field gradient: Implications for neutron electric-dipole-moment experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamoreaux, S.K.; Golub, R.

    2005-01-01

    The search for particle electric dipole moments (EDM's) is one of the best places to look for physics beyond the standard model of electroweak interaction because the size of time reversal violation predicted by the standard model is incompatible with present ideas concerning the creation of the baryon-antibaryon asymmetry. As the sensitivity of these EDM searches increases more subtle systematic effects become important. We develop a general analytical approach to describe a systematic effect recently observed in an electric dipole moment experiment using stored particles [J. M. Pendlebury et al., Phys. Rev. A 70, 032102 (2004)]. Our approach is based on the relationship between the systematic frequency shift and the velocity autocorrelation function of the resonating particles. Our results, when applied to well-known limiting forms of the correlation function, are in good agreement with both the limiting cases studied in recent work that employed a numerical and heuristic analysis. Our general approach explains some of the surprising results observed in that work and displays the rich behavior of the shift for intermediate frequencies, which has not been studied previously

  14. Influence of frequency of the excitation magnetic field and material's electric conductivity on domain wall dynamics in ferromagnetic materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chávez-González, A.F. [Laboratorio de Evaluación No Destructiva Electromagnética (LENDE), ESIME-SEPI, Edif. Z-4, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Zacatenco, México D.F., México (Mexico); Pérez-Benítez, J.A., E-mail: benitez_edl@yahoo.es [Laboratorio de Evaluación No Destructiva Electromagnética (LENDE), ESIME-SEPI, Edif. Z-4, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Zacatenco, México D.F., México (Mexico); Espina-Hernández, J.H. [Laboratorio de Evaluación No Destructiva Electromagnética (LENDE), ESIME-SEPI, Edif. Z-4, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Zacatenco, México D.F., México (Mexico); Grössinger, R. [Institute of Solid State Physics, Vienna University of Technology, Vienna (Austria); Hallen, J.M. [Departamento de Ingeniería Metalúrgica, ESIQIE, UPALM Edif. 7, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Zacatenco, C.P. 07738, México D.F., México (Mexico)

    2016-03-01

    The present work analyzes the influence of electric conductivity on the Magnetic Barkhausen Noise (MBN) signal using a microscopic model which includes the influence of eddy currents. This model is also implemented to explain the dependence of MBN on the frequency of the applied magnetic field. The results presented in this work allow analyzing the influence of eddy currents on MBN signals for different values of the material's electric conductivity and for different frequencies of applied magnetic field. Additionally, the outcomes of this research can be used as a reference to differentiate the influence of eddy currents from that of second phase particles in the MBN signal, which has been reported in previous works. - Highlights: • Electromagnetic simulation of MBN with eddy currents and micro-magnetism. • Influence of applied field frequency on MBN is explained. • Influence of electric conductivity on MBN is analyzed. • Hysteresis losses in ferromagnetic materials is analyzed using the model.

  15. Magnetic domain-wall motion study under an electric field in a Finemet{sup ®} thin film on flexible substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lan, Ngo Thi [Laboratoire des Sciences des Procédés et des Matériaux, CNRS-Université Paris XIII, 93430 Villetaneuse (France); Mercone, Silvana, E-mail: silvana.mercone@univ-paris13.fr [Laboratoire des Sciences des Procédés et des Matériaux, CNRS-Université Paris XIII, 93430 Villetaneuse (France); Moulin, Johan [Institut d' Electronique Fondamentale, UMR 8622 Université Paris Sud/CNRS, Orsay (France); Bahoui, Anouar El; Faurie, Damien; Zighem, Fatih; Belmeguenai, Mohamed; Haddadi, Halim [Laboratoire des Sciences des Procédés et des Matériaux, CNRS-Université Paris XIII, 93430 Villetaneuse (France)

    2015-01-01

    We study the influence of applied in-plane elastic strains on the static magnetic configuration of a 530 nm magnetostrictive FeCuNbSiB (Finemet{sup ®}) thin film. The in-plane strains are induced via the application of a voltage to a piezoelectric actuator on which the film/substrate system was glued. A quantitative characterization of the voltage dependence of the induced-strain at the surface of the film was performed using a digital image correlation technique. Magnetic Force Microscopy (MFM) images at remanence (H=0 Oe and U=0 V) clearly reveal the presence of weak stripe domains. The effect of the voltage-induced strain shows the existence of a voltage threshold value for the strike configuration break. For a maximum strain of ε{sub XX}∼0.5×10{sup −3} we succeed in destabilizing the stripes configuration helping the setting up of a complete homogeneous magnetic pattern. - Highlights: • Elastic strain effect on the magnetic domain structure of a Finemet/Kapton is investigated. • External loading is applied thanks to a piezo-actuator on which the sample is glued. • The amount of strains was measured by the Digital Image Correlation technique. • Magnetic Force Microscopy showed high mobility of magnetic stripes domains. • Bending, curving and branching of domains go into maze-like pattern.

  16. NMR strategies to study the local magnetic properties of carbon nanotubes

    KAUST Repository

    Abou-Hamad, Edy; Kim, Younghyun; Bouhrara, Mohamed; Saih, Youssef; Wå gberg, Thomas; Luzzi, David E.; Goze-Bac, Christophe

    2012-01-01

    The local magnetic properties of the one dimensional inner space of the nanotubes are investigated using 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of encapsulated fullerene molecules inside single walled carbon nanotubes. Isotope engineering and magnetically purified nanotubes have been advantageously used on our study to discriminate between the different diamagnetic and paramagnetic shifts of the resonances. Ring currents originating from the π electrons circulating on the nanotube, are found to actively screen the applied magnetic field by -36.9 ppm. Defects and holes in the nanotube walls cancel this screening locally. What is interesting, that at high magnetic fields, the modifications of the NMR resonances of the molecules from free to encapsulated can be exploited to determine some structural characteristics of the surrounding nanotubes, never observed experimentally. © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. NMR strategies to study the local magnetic properties of carbon nanotubes

    KAUST Repository

    Abou-Hamad, Edy

    2012-02-01

    The local magnetic properties of the one dimensional inner space of the nanotubes are investigated using 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of encapsulated fullerene molecules inside single walled carbon nanotubes. Isotope engineering and magnetically purified nanotubes have been advantageously used on our study to discriminate between the different diamagnetic and paramagnetic shifts of the resonances. Ring currents originating from the π electrons circulating on the nanotube, are found to actively screen the applied magnetic field by -36.9 ppm. Defects and holes in the nanotube walls cancel this screening locally. What is interesting, that at high magnetic fields, the modifications of the NMR resonances of the molecules from free to encapsulated can be exploited to determine some structural characteristics of the surrounding nanotubes, never observed experimentally. © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Magnetic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboud, Essam; El-Masry, Nabil; Qaddah, Atef; Alqahtani, Faisal; Moufti, Mohammed R. H.

    2015-06-01

    The Rahat volcanic field represents one of the widely distributed Cenozoic volcanic fields across the western regions of the Arabian Peninsula. Its human significance stems from the fact that its northern fringes, where the historical eruption of 1256 A.D. took place, are very close to the holy city of Al-Madinah Al-Monawarah. In the present work, we analyzed aeromagnetic data from the northern part of Rahat volcanic field as well as carried out a ground gravity survey. A joint interpretation and inversion of gravity and magnetic data were used to estimate the thickness of the lava flows, delineate the subsurface structures of the study area, and estimate the depth to basement using various geophysical methods, such as Tilt Derivative, Euler Deconvolution and 2D modeling inversion. Results indicated that the thickness of the lava flows in the study area ranges between 100 m (above Sea Level) at the eastern and western boundaries of Rahat Volcanic field and getting deeper at the middle as 300-500 m. It also showed that, major structural trend is in the NW direction (Red Sea trend) with some minor trends in EW direction.

  19. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé

    The cooling down to the nominal temperature of 4.5 K was achieved at the beginning of August, in conjunction with the completion of the installation work of the connection between the power lines and the coil current leads. The temperature gradient on the first exchanger of the cold box is now kept within the nominal range. A leak of lubricant on a gasket of the helium compressor station installed at the surface was observed and several corrective actions were necessary to bring the situation back to normal. The compressor had to be refilled with lubricant and a regeneration of the filters and adsorbers was necessary. The coil cool down was resumed successfully, and the cryogenics is running since then with all parameters being nominal. Preliminary tests of the 20kA coil power supply were done earlier at full current through the discharge lines into the dump resistors, and with the powering busbars from USC5 to UXC5 without the magnet connected. On Monday evening August 25th, at 8pm, the final commissionin...

  20. MAGNET

    CERN Document Server

    B. Curé

    The first phase of the commissioning ended in August by a triggered fast dump at 3T. All parameters were nominal, and the temperature recovery down to 4.5K was carried out in two days by the cryogenics. In September, series of ramps were achieved up to 3 and finally 3.8T, while checking thoroughly the detectors in the forward region, measuring any movement of and around the HF. After the incident of the LHC accelerator on September 19th, corrective actions could be undertaken in the forward region. When all these displacements were fully characterized and repetitive, with no sign of increments in displacement at each field ramp, it was possible to start the CRAFT, Cosmic Run at Four Tesla (which was in fact at 3.8T). The magnet was ramped up to 18.16kA and the 3 week run went smoothly, with only 4 interruptions: due to the VIP visits on 21st October during the LHC inauguration day; a water leak on the cooling demineralized water circuit, about 1 l/min, that triggered a stop of the cooling pumps, and resulte...

  1. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé

    2013-01-01

    Maintenance work and consolidation activities on the magnet cryogenics and its power distribution are progressing according to the schedules. The manufacturing of the two new helium compressor frame units has started. The frame units support the valves, all the sensors and the compressors with their motors. This activity is subcontracted. The final installation and the commissioning at CERN are scheduled for March–April 2014. The overhauls of existing cryogenics equipment (compressors, motors) are in progress. The reassembly of the components shall start in early 2014. The helium drier, to be installed on the high-pressure helium piping, has been ordered and will be delivered in the first trimester of 2014. The power distribution for the helium compressors in SH5 on the 3.3kV network is progressing. The 3.3kV switches, between each compressor and its hot spare compressor, are being installed, together with the power cables for the new compressors. The 3.3kV electrical switchboards in SE5 will ...

  2. Magnetic resonance annual 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kressel, H.Y.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains papers written on magnetic resonance during 1986. Topics include: musculosketetal magnetic resonance imaging; imaging of the spine; magnetic resonance chemical shift imaging; magnetic resonance imaging in the central nervous system; comparison to computed tomography; high resolution magnetic resonance imaging using surface coils; magnetic resonance imaging of the chest; magnetic resonance imaging of the breast; magnetic resonance imaging of the liver; magnetic resonance spectroscopy of neoplasms; blood flow effects in magnetic resonance imaging; and current and potential applications of clinical sodium magnetic resonance imaging

  3. Domain wall motion and magnetization reversal processes in a FeSi picture frame single crystal studied by the time-dependent neutron depolarization technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaik, F.J. van.

    1979-01-01

    The three dimensional neutron depolarization technique, which gives detailed information about the static properties of ferromagnetic materials, has been extended to a method by means of which the time dependence of magnetic phenomena can be studied. The measurement of the neutron depolarization against time is made possible by applying a periodical magnetic field on the investigated specimen and by continuous sampling of the transmitted neutron intensity in time channels, which are started synchronously with the applied field. The technique has been used in the study of the magnetic domain structure at room temperature of a (010) [001] picture frame FeSi single crystal (3.5 wt.% Si) with outer dimensions of (15 x 10 x 0.26) mm and a frame width of 2.78 mm. (Auth.)

  4. A NEW TREND IN MAGNETIC-PULSE METAL WORKING ASSOCIATED WITH THIN-WALLED SHEET METAL ATTRACTION. HISTORY AND DEVELOPMENT PROSPECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.V. Gnatov

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Within the scope of this article, a summary is presented on the main world achievements of the new trend in magnetic-pulse metal working associated with attraction of specified sheet metal sections in vehicle production and repair. The importance of the new trend has been justified, its basic sources disclosed. Alternative straightening methods for damaged sheet metals are given.

  5. Preparation of magnetic graphene/mesoporous silica composites with phenyl-functionalized pore-walls as the restricted access matrix solid phase extraction adsorbent for the rapid extraction of parabens from water-based skin toners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Jianan; He, Xinying; Liu, Xiaodan; Sun, Xueni; Li, Yan

    2016-09-23

    In this work, phenyl-functionalized magnetic graphene/mesoporous silica composites (MG-mSiO2-Ph) were prepared and applied as restricted access matrix solid phase extraction (RAM-SPE) adsorbents to determine the parabens in commercially available retail cosmetics. MG-mSiO2-Ph composites were synthesized by a surfactant-mediated co-condensation reaction in which mesoporous silica with phenyl-functionalized pore-walls was coated on a magnetic graphene sheet. The obtained nano-composites were proven to be of sufficient quality for an ideal RAM-SPE adsorbent with a large specific surface area of 369m(2)g(-1), uniform mesopores of 2.8nm, and special phenyl-functionalized pore-walls. Parabens, such as methyl paraben, ethyl paraben and propyl paraben, were extracted from water-based skin toners using one step of the RAM-SPE and were then analysed by a HPLC-DAD system. The SPE conditions were optimized by studying the parameters, such as the adsorbent amount, elution solvent type, adsorption time and desorption time, that influence the extraction efficiency. For each analyte, there were good linearities of approximately 0.10-120μgmL(-1) with determination coefficients (R(2))>0.995. The sensitivity was as low as 0.01-0.025μgmL(-1) for the LOD, and the percent recoveries were 98.37-105.84%. The intra-day and inter-day RSDs were 1.44-6.11% (n=6) and 3.12-11.70% (n=6), respectively. The results indicated that this method with novel RAM-SPE adsorbents is sensitive and convenient. The results also offered an attractive alternative for the extraction and determination of paraben preservatives in a complex matrix, such as cosmetics. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Magnon specific heat and free energy of Heisenberg ferromagnetic single-walled nanotubes: Green's function approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mi, Bin-Zhou, E-mail: mbzfjerry2008@126.com [Department of Basic Curriculum, North China Institute of Science and Technology, Beijing 101601 (China); Department of Physics, School of Mathematics and Physics, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Zhai, Liang-Jun [The School of Mathematics and Physics, Jiangsu University of Technology, Changzhou 213001 (China); Hua, Ling-Ling [Department of Basic Curriculum, North China Institute of Science and Technology, Beijing 101601 (China)

    2016-01-15

    The effect of magnetic spin correlation on the thermodynamic properties of Heisenberg ferromagnetic single-walled nanotubes are comprehensively investigated by use of the double-time Green's function method. The influence of temperature, spin quantum number, diameter of the tube, anisotropy strength and external magnetic field to internal energy, free energy, and magnon specific heat are carefully calculated. Compared to the mean field approximation, the consideration of the magnetic correlation effect significantly improves the internal energy values at finite temperature, while it does not so near zero temperature, and this effect is related to the diameter of the tube, anisotropy strength, and spin quantum number. The magnetic correlation effect lowers the internal energy at finite temperature. As a natural consequence of the reduction of the internal energy, the specific heat is reduced, and the free energy is elevated. - Highlights: • Magnon specific heat and free energy of Heisenberg ferromagnetic single-walled nanotubes (HFM-SWNTs) are investigated. • The magnetic correlations effect has a considerable contribution to the thermodynamics properties of HFM-SWNTs. • Magnetic correlation effects are always to lower the internal energy at finite temperature. • At Curie point, magnetic correlation energy is much less than zero. • The peak values of magnon specific heat curves rise and shift right towards higher temperatures with the diameter of tubes, the anisotropy strength, and the spin quantum number rising.

  7. Magnetization processes in thin magnetic wires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varga, R.; Garcia, K.L.; Zhukov, A.; Vazquez, M.; Ipatov, M.; Gonzalez, J.; Zhukova, V.; Vojtanik, P.

    2006-01-01

    Amorphous magnetic microwires are novel materials, which are characterized by the unique magnetic properties. Their magnetization process runs through the depining and subsequent propagation of the single-domain wall. This allows us to study the magnetization processes of the single-domain wall either in static (when the domain wall lies in its potential) or dynamic (when the domain wall propagates along the wire) mode. In the given work, we present surprising results that were found during the single-domain wall switching and propagation in microwires. The negative critical propagation field during the propagation of the single-domain wall in microwires has been found. Moreover, new contribution (based on the structural relaxation) to the domain wall damping during its propagation in microwire was found. The complex shape of the single-domain wall potential, which consists of two contributions, has been found in microwires. The magnetoelastic one coming from the magnetoelastic interaction of the domain wall with the stresses applied on microwires and the stresses introduced during the microwire's production and stabilization one coming from the structural relaxation on atomic level

  8. First wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omori, Junji.

    1991-01-01

    Graphite and C/C composite are used recently for the first wall of a thermonuclear device since materials with small atom number have great impurity allowable capacity for plasmas. Among them, those materials having high thermal conduction are generally anisotropic and have an upper limit for the thickness upon production. Then, anisotropic materials are used for a heat receiving plate, such that the surfaces of the heat receiving plate on the side of lower heat conductivity are brought into contact with each other, and the side of higher thermal conductivity is arranged in parallel with small radius direction and the toroidal direction of the thermonuclear device. As a result, the incident heat on an edge portion can be transferred rapidly to the heat receiving plate, which can suppress the temperature elevation at the surface to thereby reduce the amount of abrasion. Since the heat expansion coefficient of the anisotropic materials is great in the direction of the lower heat conductivity and small in the direction of the higher heat conductivity, the gradient of a thermal load distribution in the direction of the higher heat expansion coefficient is small, and occurrence of thermal stresses due to temperature difference is reduced, to improve the reliability. (N.H.)

  9. Falling walls

    CERN Multimedia

    It was 20 years ago this week that the Berlin wall was opened for the first time since its construction began in 1961. Although the signs of a thaw had been in the air for some time, few predicted the speed of the change that would ensue. As members of the scientific community, we can take a moment to reflect on the role our field played in bringing East and West together. CERN’s collaboration with the East, primarily through links with the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, JINR, in Dubna, Russia, is well documented. Less well known, however, is the role CERN played in bringing the scientists of East and West Germany together. As the Iron curtain was going up, particle physicists on both sides were already creating the conditions that would allow it to be torn down. Cold war historian Thomas Stange tells the story in his 2002 CERN Courier article. It was my privilege to be in Berlin on Monday, the anniversary of the wall’s opening, to take part in a conference entitled &lsquo...

  10. Individual domain wall resistance in submicron ferromagnetic structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danneau, R; Warin, P; Attané, J P; Petej, I; Beigné, C; Fermon, C; Klein, O; Marty, A; Ott, F; Samson, Y; Viret, M

    2002-04-15

    The resistance generated by individual domain walls is measured in a FePd nanostructure. Combining transport and magnetic imaging measurements, the intrinsic domain wall resistance is quantified. It is found positive and of a magnitude consistent with that predicted by models based on spin scattering effects within the walls. This magnetoresistance at a nanometer scale allows a direct counting of the number of walls inside the nanostructure. The effect is then used to measure changes in the magnetic configuration of submicron stripes under application of a magnetic field.

  11. Solid phase extraction of heavy metal ions based on a novel functionalized magnetic multi-walled carbon nanotube composite with the aid of experimental design methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taghizadeh, Mohsen; Asgharinezhad, Ali Akbar; Samkhaniany, Noorallah; Tadjarodi, Azadeh; Abbaszadeh, Abolfazl; Pooladi, Mohsen

    2014-01-01

    We report that magnetic multiwalled carbon nanotubes functionalized with 8-aminoquinoline can be applied to the preconcentration of Cd(II), Pb(II) and Ni(II) ions. The parameters affecting preconcentration were optimized by a Box-Behnken design through response surface methodology. Three variables (extraction time, magnetic sorbent amount, and pH value) were selected as the main factors affecting sorption, and four variables (type, volume and concentration of the eluent; elution time) were selected for optimizing elution. Following sorption and elution, the ions were quantified by FAAS. The LODs are 0.09, 0.72, and 1.0 ng mL −1 for Cd(II), Ni(II), and Pb(II) ions, respectively. The relative standard deviations are <5.1 % for five separate batch determinations at 30 ng mL −1 level of Cd(II), Ni(II), and Pb(II) ions. The sorption capacities (in mg g −1 ) of this new sorbent are 201 for Cd(II), 150 for Pb(II), and 172 Ni(II). The composite was successfully applied to the rapid extraction of trace quantities of heavy metal ions in fish, sediment, soil, and water samples. (author)

  12. A Novel Diagnostic Aid for Detection of Intra-Abdominal Adhesions to the Anterior Abdominal Wall Using Dynamic Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Randall

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Abdominal adhesions can cause serious morbidity and complicate subsequent operations. Their diagnosis is often one of exclusion due to a lack of a reliable, non-invasive diagnostic technique. Development and testing of a candidate technique are described below. Method. During respiration, smooth visceral sliding motion occurs between the abdominal contents and the walls of the abdominal cavity. We describe a technique involving image segmentation and registration to calculate shear as an analogue for visceral slide based on the tracking of structures throughout the respiratory cycle. The presence of an adhesion is attributed to a resistance to visceral slide resulting in a discernible reduction in shear. The abdominal movement due to respiration is captured in sagittal dynamic MR images. Results. Clinical images were selected for analysis, including a patient with a surgically confirmed adhesion. Discernible reduction in shear was observed at the location of the adhesion while a consistent, gradually changing shear was observed in the healthy volunteers. Conclusion. The technique and its validation show encouraging results for adhesion detection but a larger study is now required to confirm its potential.

  13. A Novel Diagnostic Aid for Detection of Intra-Abdominal Adhesions to the Anterior Abdominal Wall Using Dynamic Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall, David; Fenner, John; Gillott, Richard; Ten Broek, Richard; Strik, Chema; Spencer, Paul; Bardhan, Karna Dev

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Abdominal adhesions can cause serious morbidity and complicate subsequent operations. Their diagnosis is often one of exclusion due to a lack of a reliable, non-invasive diagnostic technique. Development and testing of a candidate technique are described below. Method. During respiration, smooth visceral sliding motion occurs between the abdominal contents and the walls of the abdominal cavity. We describe a technique involving image segmentation and registration to calculate shear as an analogue for visceral slide based on the tracking of structures throughout the respiratory cycle. The presence of an adhesion is attributed to a resistance to visceral slide resulting in a discernible reduction in shear. The abdominal movement due to respiration is captured in sagittal dynamic MR images. Results. Clinical images were selected for analysis, including a patient with a surgically confirmed adhesion. Discernible reduction in shear was observed at the location of the adhesion while a consistent, gradually changing shear was observed in the healthy volunteers. Conclusion. The technique and its validation show encouraging results for adhesion detection but a larger study is now required to confirm its potential.

  14. A Novel Diagnostic Aid for Detection of Intra-Abdominal Adhesions to the Anterior Abdominal Wall Using Dynamic Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall, David; Fenner, John; Gillott, Richard; ten Broek, Richard; Strik, Chema; Spencer, Paul; Bardhan, Karna Dev

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Abdominal adhesions can cause serious morbidity and complicate subsequent operations. Their diagnosis is often one of exclusion due to a lack of a reliable, non-invasive diagnostic technique. Development and testing of a candidate technique are described below. Method. During respiration, smooth visceral sliding motion occurs between the abdominal contents and the walls of the abdominal cavity. We describe a technique involving image segmentation and registration to calculate shear as an analogue for visceral slide based on the tracking of structures throughout the respiratory cycle. The presence of an adhesion is attributed to a resistance to visceral slide resulting in a discernible reduction in shear. The abdominal movement due to respiration is captured in sagittal dynamic MR images. Results. Clinical images were selected for analysis, including a patient with a surgically confirmed adhesion. Discernible reduction in shear was observed at the location of the adhesion while a consistent, gradually changing shear was observed in the healthy volunteers. Conclusion. The technique and its validation show encouraging results for adhesion detection but a larger study is now required to confirm its potential. PMID:26880884

  15. Sideways wall force produced during tokamak disruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, H.; Paccagnella, R.; Breslau, J.; Sugiyama, L.; Jardin, S.

    2013-07-01

    A critical issue for ITER is to evaluate the forces produced on the surrounding conducting structures during plasma disruptions. We calculate the non-axisymmetric ‘sideways’ wall force Fx, produced in disruptions. Simulations were carried out of disruptions produced by destabilization of n = 1 modes by a vertical displacement event (VDE). The force depends strongly on γτwall, where γ is the mode growth rate and τwall is the wall penetration time, and is largest for γτwall = constant, which depends on initial conditions. Simulations of disruptions caused by a model of massive gas injection were also performed. It was found that the wall force increases approximately offset linearly with the displacement from the magnetic axis produced by a VDE. These results are also obtained with an analytical model. Disruptions are accompanied by toroidal variation of the plasma current Iφ. This is caused by toroidal variation of the halo current, as verified computationally and analytically.

  16. Dynamics of one-dimensional domain walls interacting with disorder potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krusin-Elbaum, L.; Shibauchi, T.; Argyle, B.; Gignac, L.; Zabel, T.; Weller, D.

    2001-01-01

    Dynamics of 1D perpendicular-anisotropy domain walls in a few monolayer-thin Co films is imaged by polar Kerr microscopy. When domain walls, driven by a square-pulsed magnetic fields, travel through a random disordered potential landscape, they display Gaussian-distributed roughness characteristic of this landscape. Average velocity of the domain wall driven by a constant magnetic field strongly depends on a strain field which modifies (increases) the elastic energy of the wall and reduces the wall velocity

  17. Magnetoexcitons and Faraday rotation in single-walled carbon nanotubes and graphene nanoribbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Have, Jonas; Pedersen, Thomas G.

    2018-03-01

    The magneto-optical response of single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) is studied theoretically, including excitonic effects. Both diagonal and nondiagonal response functions are obtained and employed to compute Faraday rotation spectra. For single-walled CNTs in a parallel field, the results show field-dependent splitting of the exciton absorption peaks caused by brightening a dark exciton state. Similarly, for GNRs in a perpendicular magnetic field, we observe a field-dependent shift of the exciton peaks and the emergence of an absorption peak above the energy gap. Results show that excitonic effects play a significant role in the optical response of both materials, particularly for the off-diagonal tensor elements.

  18. Sunspot Light Walls Suppressed by Nearby Brightenings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Shuhong; Zhang, Jun; Hou, Yijun; Li, Xiaohong [CAS Key Laboratory of Solar Activity, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Erdélyi, Robertus [Solar Physics and Space Plasma Research Centre, School of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Sheffield, Hicks Building, Hounsfield Road, Sheffield S3 7RH (United Kingdom); Yan, Limei, E-mail: shuhongyang@nao.cas.cn [Key Laboratory of Earth and Planetary Physics, Institute of Geology and Geophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100029 (China)

    2017-07-01

    Light walls, as ensembles of oscillating bright structures rooted in sunspot light bridges, have not been well studied, although they are important for understanding sunspot properties. Using the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph and Solar Dynamics Observatory observations, here we study the evolution of two oscillating light walls each within its own active region (AR). The emission of each light wall decays greatly after the appearance of adjacent brightenings. For the first light wall, rooted within AR 12565, the average height, amplitude, and oscillation period significantly decrease from 3.5 Mm, 1.7 Mm, and 8.5 minutes to 1.6 Mm, 0.4 Mm, and 3.0 minutes, respectively. For the second light wall, rooted within AR 12597, the mean height, amplitude, and oscillation period of the light wall decrease from 2.1 Mm, 0.5 Mm, and 3.0 minutes to 1.5 Mm, 0.2 Mm, and 2.1 minutes, respectively. Particularly, a part of the second light wall even becomes invisible after the influence of a nearby brightening. These results reveal that the light walls are suppressed by nearby brightenings. Considering the complex magnetic topology in light bridges, we conjecture that the fading of light walls may be caused by a drop in the magnetic pressure, where the flux is canceled by magnetic reconnection at the site of the nearby brightening. Another hypothesis is that the wall fading is due to the suppression of driver source ( p -mode oscillation), resulting from the nearby avalanche of downward particles along reconnected brightening loops.

  19. Domain wall engineering through exchange bias

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albisetti, E.; Petti, D.

    2016-01-01

    The control of the structure and position of magnetic domain walls is at the basis of the development of different magnetic devices and architectures. Several nanofabrication techniques have been proposed to geometrically confine and shape domain wall structures; however, a fine tuning of the position and micromagnetic configuration is hardly achieved, especially in continuous films. This work shows that, by controlling the unidirectional anisotropy of a continuous ferromagnetic film through exchange bias, domain walls whose spin arrangement is generally not favored by dipolar and exchange interactions can be created. Micromagnetic simulations reveal that the domain wall width, position and profile can be tuned by establishing an abrupt change in the direction and magnitude of the exchange bias field set in the system. - Highlights: • Micromagnetic simulations study domain walls in exchange biased thin films. • Novel domain wall configurations can be stabilized via exchange bias. • Domain walls nucleate at the boundary of regions with different exchange bias. • Domain wall width and spin profile are controlled by tuning the exchange bias.

  20. Periodical plasma structures controlled by external magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweigert, I. V.; Keidar, M.

    2017-11-01

    The plasma of Hall thruster type in external magnetic field is studied in 2D3V kinetic simulations using PIC MCC method. The periodical structure with maxima of electron and ion densities is formed and becomes more pronounced with increase of magnetic field incidence angle in the plasma. These ridges of electron and ion densities are aligned with the magnetic field vector and shifted relative each other. This leads to formation of two-dimensional double-layers structure in cylindrical plasma chamber. Depending on Larmor radius and Debye length up to nineteen potential steps appear across the oblique magnetic field. The electrical current gathered on the wall is associated with the electron and ion density ridges.

  1. Lamb shift of Rydberg atoms in a resonator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belov, A.A.; Lozovik, Yu.E.; Pokrovsky, V.L.

    1988-08-01

    The Lamb shift of a Rydberg atom in a cavity is shown to be enhanced with the resonance interaction of a virtual atomic transition and cavity modes. The dependence of the Lamb shift on quantum numbers and atomic number changes drastically. Shifting cavity walls and scanning the atomic beam one can vary the Lamb shift. The value of the Lamb shift in a cavity may exceed a typical magnitude of the fine structure energy. For a rough resonance tuning the Coulumb multiplet occurs to be strongly mixed and a novel classification is necessary. (author). 8 refs, 2 figs

  2. INTOR impurity control and first wall system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdou, M.A.

    1983-04-01

    The highlights of the recent INTOR effort on examining the key issues of the impurity control/first wall system are summarized. The emphasis of the work was an integrated study of the edge-region physics, plasma-wall interaction, materials, engineering and magnetic considerations associated with the poloidal divertor and pump limiter. The development of limiter and divertor collector plate designs with an acceptable lifetime was a major part of the work

  3. Hysteresis loop design by geometry of garnet film element with single domain wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skidanov, V A; Vetoshko, P M; Stempkovskiy, A L

    2011-01-01

    Numerical modeling and experimental investigation of magnetostatic stable states of two-domain structure in Bi-substituted uniaxial garnet film elements was made. Single domain walls (DW) between two opposite normally magnetized parts in isolated rectangular strip and strip-like bridge are found to exhibit different behavior. DW inside strip (bridge) suffers increasing repulsion (attraction) from nearest edge when shifted from element center. DW position center position is stable in isolated strip but bridge is magnetized spontaneously to one of two saturated states in zero external field. Isolated strip magnetization process occurs reversibly while bridge magnetization reversal occurs by coercive manner. Strip susceptibility and bridge coercive field are entirely defined by magnetostatic barrier created by element boundary stray field in case of constant DW length during magnetization reversal. Variation of strip and bridge boundary shape along DW trajectory gives the opportunity to create additional controllable potential profile due to DW surface energy modulation by DW length. Garnet elements with high Faraday rotation and low light switching field were developed for fine magnetic sensing and optical data processing applications.

  4. Micropatch Antenna Phase Shifting

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Thursby, Michael

    2000-01-01

    .... We have been looking at the ability of embedded element to adjust the phase shift seen by the element with the goal of being able to remove the phase shifting devices from the antenna and replace...

  5. Micropatch Antenna Phase Shifting

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Thursby, Michael

    1999-01-01

    .... We have been looking at the ability of embedded element to adjust the phase shift seen by the element wit the goal of being able to remove the phase shifting devices from the antenna and replace...

  6. OpenShift Workshop

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; Rodriguez Peon, Alberto

    2017-01-01

    Workshop to introduce developers to the OpenShift platform available at CERN. Several use cases will be shown, including deploying an existing application into OpenShift. We expect attendees to realize about OpenShift features and general architecture of the service.

  7. Contact angle dependence on the fluid-wall dispersive energy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horsch, M.; Heitzig, M.; Dan, C.M.; Harting, J.D.R.; Hasse, H.; Vrabec, J.

    2010-01-01

    Menisci of the truncated and shifted Lennard-Jones fluid between parallel planar walls are investigated by molecular dynamics simulation. Thereby, the characteristic energy of the unlike dispersive interaction between fluid molecules and wall atoms is systematically varied to determine its influence

  8. Imaging of chest wall infections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chelli Bouaziz, Mouna; Jelassi, Helmi; Chaabane, Skander; Ladeb, Mohamed Fethi; Ben Miled-Mrad, Khaoula

    2009-01-01

    A wide variety of infections can affect the chest wall including pyogenic, tuberculous, fungal, and some other unusual infections. These potentially life-threatening disorders are frequent especially among immunocompromised patients but often misdiagnosed by physical examination and radiographs. The purpose of this article is to describe the clinical and imaging features of these different chest wall infections according to the different imaging modalities with emphasis on ultrasound (US), computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The outcome of chest wall infection depends on early diagnosis, severity of the immunosuppression, offending organism, and extent of infection. Because clinical findings and laboratory tests may be not contributive in immunocompromised patients, imaging plays an important role in the early detection and precise assessment of the disease. US, CT, and MRI are all useful: bone destruction is more accurately detected with CT whereas soft tissue involvement are better visualized with US and MRI. CT and US are also used to guide percutaneous biopsy and drainage procedures. MR images are helpful in pre-operative planning of extensive chest wall infections. (orig.)

  9. Core shift effect in blazars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, A.; Mohan, P.; Gupta, Alok C.; Mangalam, A.; Volvach, A. E.; Aller, M. F.; Aller, H. D.; Gu, M. F.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Tornikoski, M.; Volvach, L. N.

    2017-07-01

    We studied the pc-scale core shift effect using radio light curves for three blazars, S5 0716+714, 3C 279 and BL Lacertae, which were monitored at five frequencies (ν) between 4.8 and 36.8 GHz using the University of Michigan Radio Astronomical Observatory (UMRAO), the Crimean Astrophysical Observatory (CrAO) and Metsähovi Radio Observatory for over 40 yr. Flares were Gaussian fitted to derive time delays between observed frequencies for each flare (Δt), peak amplitude (A) and their half width. Using A ∝ να, we infer α in the range of -16.67-2.41 and using Δ t ∝ ν ^{1/k_r}, we infer kr ∼ 1, employed in the context of equipartition between magnetic and kinetic energy density for parameter estimation. From the estimated core position offset (Ωrν) and the core radius (rcore), we infer that opacity model may not be valid in all cases. The mean magnetic field strengths at 1 pc (B1) and at the core (Bcore) are in agreement with previous estimates. We apply the magnetically arrested disc model to estimate black hole spins in the range of 0.15-0.9 for these blazars, indicating that the model is consistent with expected accretion mode in such sources. The power-law-shaped power spectral density has slopes -1.3 to -2.3 and is interpreted in terms of multiple shocks or magnetic instabilities.

  10. Experimental Investigation of the Near-Wall Region in the NASA HiVHAc EDU2 Hall Thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shastry, Rohit; Kamhawi, Hani; Huang, Wensheng; Haag, Thomas W.

    2015-01-01

    The HiVHAc propulsion system is currently being developed to support Discovery-class NASA science missions. Presently, the thruster meets the required operational lifetime by utilizing a novel discharge channel replacement mechanism. As a risk reduction activity, an alternative approach is being investigated that modifies the existing magnetic circuit to shift the ion acceleration zone further downstream such that the magnetic components are not exposed to direct ion impingement during the thruster's lifetime while maintaining adequate thruster performance and stability. To measure the change in plasma properties between the original magnetic circuit configuration and the modified, "advanced" configuration, six Langmuir probes were flush-mounted within each channel wall near the thruster exit plane. Plasma potential and electron temperature were measured for both configurations across a wide range of discharge voltages and powers. Measurements indicate that the upstream edge of the acceleration zone shifted downstream by as much as 0.104 channel lengths, depending on operating condition. The upstream edge of the acceleration zone also appears to be more insensitive to operating condition in the advanced configuration, remaining between 0.136 and 0.178 channel lengths upstream of the thruster exit plane. Facility effects studies performed on the original configuration indicate that the plasma and acceleration zone recede further upstream into the channel with increasing facility pressure. These results will be used to inform further modifications to the magnetic circuit that will provide maximum protection of the magnetic components without significant changes to thruster performance and stability.

  11. Characterization of the Sclerotinia sclerotiorum cell wall proteome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Longzhou; Free, Stephen J

    2016-08-01

    We used a proteomic analysis to identify cell wall proteins released from Sclerotinia sclerotiorum hyphal and sclerotial cell walls via a trifluoromethanesulfonic acid (TFMS) digestion. Cell walls from hyphae grown in Vogel's glucose medium (a synthetic medium lacking plant materials), from hyphae grown in potato dextrose broth and from sclerotia produced on potato dextrose agar were used in the analysis. Under the conditions used, TFMS digests the glycosidic linkages in the cell walls to release intact cell wall proteins. The analysis identified 24 glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored cell wall proteins and 30 non-GPI-anchored cell wall proteins. We found that the cell walls contained an array of cell wall biosynthetic enzymes similar to those found in the cell walls of other fungi. When comparing the proteins in hyphal cell walls grown in potato dextrose broth with those in hyphal cell walls grown in the absence of plant material, it was found that a core group of cell wall biosynthetic proteins and some proteins associated with pathogenicity (secreted cellulases, pectin lyases, glucosidases and proteases) were expressed in both types of hyphae. The hyphae grown in potato dextrose broth contained a number of additional proteins (laccases, oxalate decarboxylase, peroxidase, polysaccharide deacetylase and several proteins unique to Sclerotinia and Botrytis) that might facilitate growth on a plant host. A comparison of the proteins in the sclerotial cell wall with the proteins in the hyphal cell wall demonstrated that sclerotia formation is not marked by a major shift in the composition of cell wall protein. We found that the S. sclerotiorum cell walls contained 11 cell wall proteins that were encoded only in Sclerotinia and Botrytis genomes. © 2015 The Authors. Molecular Plant Pathology published by British Society for Plant Pathology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Entropy of a bit-shift channel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baggen, Stan; Balakirsky, Vladimir; Denteneer, Dee; Egner, Sebastian; Hollmann, Henk; Tolhuizen, Ludo; Verbitskiy, Evgeny

    2006-01-01

    We consider a simple transformation (coding) of an iid source called a bit-shift channel. This simple transformation occurs naturally in magnetic or optical data storage. The resulting process is not Markov of any order. We discuss methods of computing the entropy of the transformed process, and

  13. Choice Shifts in Groups

    OpenAIRE

    Kfir Eliaz; Debraj Ray

    2004-01-01

    The phenomenon of "choice shifts" in group decision-making is fairly ubiquitous in the social psychology literature. Faced with a choice between a ``safe" and ``risky" decision, group members appear to move to one extreme or the other, relative to the choices each member might have made on her own. Both risky and cautious shifts have been identified in different situations. This paper demonstrates that from an individual decision-making perspective, choice shifts may be viewed as a systematic...

  14. Implementing OpenShift

    CERN Document Server

    Miller, Adam

    2013-01-01

    A standard tutorial-based approach to using OpenShift and deploying custom or pre-built web applications to the OpenShift Online cloud.This book is for software developers and DevOps alike who are interested in learning how to use the OpenShift Platform-as-a-Service for developing and deploying applications, how the environment works on the back end, and how to deploy their very own open source Platform-as-a-Service based on the upstream OpenShift Origin project.

  15. Insomnia in shift work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallières, Annie; Azaiez, Aïda; Moreau, Vincent; LeBlanc, Mélanie; Morin, Charles M

    2014-12-01

    Shift work disorder involves insomnia and/or excessive sleepiness associated with the work schedule. The present study examined the impact of insomnia on the perceived physical and psychological health of adults working on night and rotating shift schedules compared to day workers. A total of 418 adults (51% women, mean age 41.4 years), including 51 night workers, 158 rotating shift workers, and 209 day workers were selected from an epidemiological study. An algorithm was used to classify each participant of the two groups (working night or rotating shifts) according to the presence or absence of insomnia symptoms. Each of these individuals was paired with a day worker according to gender, age, and income. Participants completed several questionnaires measuring sleep, health, and psychological variables. Night and rotating shift workers with insomnia presented a sleep profile similar to that of day workers with insomnia. Sleep time was more strongly related to insomnia than to shift work per se. Participants with insomnia in the three groups complained of anxiety, depression, and fatigue, and reported consuming equal amounts of sleep-aid medication. Insomnia also contributed to chronic pain and otorhinolaryngology problems, especially among rotating shift workers. Work productivity and absenteeism were more strongly related to insomnia. The present study highlights insomnia as an important component of the sleep difficulties experienced by shift workers. Insomnia may exacerbate certain physical and mental health problems of shift workers, and impair their quality of life. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Active compliant wall for skin friction reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pätzold, A.; Peltzer, I.; Nitsche, W.; Goldin, N.; King, R.; Haller, D.; Woias, P.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Objective: Delay of laminar-turbulent transition on a wing by active wall actuation. • Natural, convective TS-instabilities are damped by travelling counter waves. • Piezo driven active wall and model predictive controller were developed. • TS amplitudes were damped by 83.6% (equals 15.7 dB within instability band). • Significant effect on skin friction distribution. -- Abstract: In order to reduce skin friction drag, an active laminarisation method is developed. Laminar-turbulent boundary layer transition caused by Tollmien–Schlichting (TS) waves is delayed by attenuation of these convective instabilities. An actively driven compliant wall is integrated as part of a wing’s surface. Different configurations of piezo-based actuators are combined with an array of sensitive surface flow sensors. Wall-normal actuation as well as inclined wall displacement are investigated. Together with a realtime-control strategy, transition onset is shifted downstream by six average TS-wave lengths. Using the example of flow velocity, the influence of variable flow conditions on TS-damping rates was investigated. Besides, the boundary layer flow downstream of the active wall area as well as required wall deflections and the global damping effect on skin friction are presented in this paper

  17. Magnetic moment measurement of magnetic nanoparticles using atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, J-W; Lee, E-C; Ju, H; Yoo, I S; Chang, W-S; Chung, B H; Kim, B S

    2008-01-01

    Magnetic moment per unit mass of magnetic nanoparticles was found by using the atomic force microscope (AFM). The mass of the nanoparticles was acquired from the resonance frequency shift of the particle-attached AFM probe and magnetic force measurement was also carried out with the AFM. Combining with magnetic field strength, the magnetic moment per unit mass of the nanoparticles was determined as a function of magnetic field strength. (technical design note)

  18. Anomalous feedback and negative domain wall resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, Ran; Xiao, Di; Zhu, Jian-Gang

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic induction can be regarded as a negative feedback effect, where the motive-force opposes the change of magnetic flux that generates the motive-force. In artificial electromagnetics emerging from spintronics, however, this is not necessarily the case. By studying the current-induced domain wall dynamics in a cylindrical nanowire, we show that the spin motive-force exerting on electrons can either oppose or support the applied current that drives the domain wall. The switching into the anomalous feedback regime occurs when the strength of the dissipative torque β is about twice the value of the Gilbert damping constant α . The anomalous feedback manifests as a negative domain wall resistance, which has an analogy with the water turbine. (paper)

  19. Fluctuation and dipolar interaction effects on the pinning of domain walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chui, S.T.

    2001-01-01

    We discuss the effect of the dipolar interaction on the pinning of domain walls. Domain walls are usually pinned near the boundaries between grains. Magnetic charges accumulated at the domain wall make the wall more unstable and easier to depin. We discuss how the grain-orientation and thermal fluctuations affect these magnetic charges and hence the depinning of the domain walls. Our results are illustrated by finite temperature Monte Carlo simulation on periodic arrays of large cells separated by walls consisting of faces of pyramids

  20. Shifted Independent Component Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørup, Morten; Madsen, Kristoffer Hougaard; Hansen, Lars Kai

    2007-01-01

    Delayed mixing is a problem of theoretical interest and practical importance, e.g., in speech processing, bio-medical signal analysis and financial data modelling. Most previous analyses have been based on models with integer shifts, i.e., shifts by a number of samples, and have often been carried...

  1. Homogeneous bilateral block shifts

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Douglas class were classified in [3]; they are unilateral block shifts of arbitrary block size (i.e. dim H(n) can be anything). However, no examples of irreducible homogeneous bilateral block shifts of block size larger than 1 were known until now.

  2. OpenShift cookbook

    CERN Document Server

    Gulati, Shekhar

    2014-01-01

    If you are a web application developer who wants to use the OpenShift platform to host your next big idea but are looking for guidance on how to achieve this, then this book is the first step you need to take. This is a very accessible cookbook where no previous knowledge of OpenShift is needed.

  3. Heat transfer models for fusion blanket first walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fillo, J.A.

    1977-01-01

    In the development of magnetically confined fusion reactors, the ability to cool the first wall, i.e., the first material surface interfacing the plasma, appears to be a critical factor involved in establishing the wall load limit. In order to understand the thermal behavior of the first wall time-dependent, one-dimensional heat conduction models are reviewed with differing modes of heat extraction and cooling

  4. Josephson shift registers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Przybysz, J.X.

    1989-01-01

    This paper gives a review of Josephson shift register circuits that were designed, fabricated, or tested, with emphasis on work in the 1980s. Operating speed is most important, since it often limits system performance. Older designs used square-wave clocks, but most modern designs use offset sine waves, with either two or three phases. Operating margins and gate bias uniformity are key concerns. The fastest measured Josephson shift register operated at 2.3 GHz, which compares well with a GaAs shift register that consumes 250 times more power. The difficulties of high-speed testing have prevented many Josephson shift registers from being operated at their highest speeds. Computer simulations suggest that 30-GHz operation is possible with current Nb/Al 2 O 3 /Nb technology. Junctions with critical current densities near 10 kA/cm 2 would make 100-GHz shift registers feasible

  5. The LHCb magnet

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2004-01-01

    The LHCb magnet consists of two huge 27 tonne coils mounted inside a 1450 tonne iron yoke. As charged particles pass through the magnet's field their trajectories will be bent according to their momentum, allowing their momentum to be measured as they pass through the detector walls. LHCb will study bottom quarks, which will be produced close to the two colliding proton beams.

  6. Behaviour of neutrons passing through the Bloch wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaerpf, O.

    1976-01-01

    In part I of the present paper the pertinent knowledge about Bloch walls is presented and developed insofar as it appears necessary for the experiments with neutrons, that is to say the direction of magnetization within the domains, the calculation of the variation of magnetization in the wall, the wall thickness, and the zigzag structure of the Bloch wall. In part II it is first clarified why the Bloch wall can be treated as a continuum problem. It shows that this is possible far away from Laue reflexes. For angles far away from Laure-reflex angles the interaction of the periodic structure of the magnetization can be described with the aid of an averaged magnetic flux density. The consequence of it is the possibility of treating the problem by means of a Schroedinger equation with continous interaction. This leads to a law of refraction. The question of the possibilities for explaining the intensity behavior is treated in part III. This part, from different aspects, describes the fact, which already was pointed out in Schaerpf, O., Vehoff, H., Schwink, Ch. 1973, that the spin of the neutrons in passing through the wall is partly taken along by the magnetization gradually rotating in the wall. (orig./WBU) [de

  7. Abdominal wall fat pad biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amyloidosis - abdominal wall fat pad biopsy; Abdominal wall biopsy; Biopsy - abdominal wall fat pad ... is the most common method of taking an abdominal wall fat pad biopsy . The health care provider cleans the ...

  8. Current Controlled Magnetization Switching in Cylindrical Nanowires for High-Density 3D Memory Applications

    KAUST Repository

    Mohammed, Hanan

    2018-04-18

    A next-generation memory device utilizing a three-dimensional nanowire system requires the reliable control of domain wall motion. In this letter, domain walls are studied in cylindrical nanowires consisting of alternating segments of cobalt and nickel. The material interfaces acting as domain wall pinning sites, are utilized in combination with current pulses, to control the position of the domain wall, which is monitored using magnetoresistance measurements. Magnetic force microscopy results further confirm the occurrence of current assisted domain wall depinning. Data bits are therefore shifted along the nanowire by sequentially pinning and depinning a domain wall between successive interfaces, a requirement necessary for race-track type memory devices. We demonstrate that the direction, amplitude and duration of the applied current pulses determine the propagation of the domain wall across pinning sites. These results demonstrate a multi-bit cylindrical nanowire device, utilizing current assisted data manipulation. The prospect of sequential pinning and depinning in these nanowires allows the bit density to increase by several Tbs, depending on the number of segments within these nanowires.

  9. Current Controlled Magnetization Switching in Cylindrical Nanowires for High-Density 3D Memory Applications

    KAUST Repository

    Mohammed, Hanan; Corte-Leó n, Hector; Ivanov, Yurii P.; Lopatin, Sergei; Moreno, Julian A.; Chuvilin, Andrey; Salimath, Akshaykumar; Manchon, Aurelien; Kazakova, Olga; Kosel, Jü rgen

    2018-01-01

    A next-generation memory device utilizing a three-dimensional nanowire system requires the reliable control of domain wall motion. In this letter, domain walls are studied in cylindrical nanowires consisting of alternating segments of cobalt and nickel. The material interfaces acting as domain wall pinning sites, are utilized in combination with current pulses, to control the position of the domain wall, which is monitored using magnetoresistance measurements. Magnetic force microscopy results further confirm the occurrence of current assisted domain wall depinning. Data bits are therefore shifted along the nanowire by sequentially pinning and depinning a domain wall between successive interfaces, a requirement necessary for race-track type memory devices. We demonstrate that the direction, amplitude and duration of the applied current pulses determine the propagation of the domain wall across pinning sites. These results demonstrate a multi-bit cylindrical nanowire device, utilizing current assisted data manipulation. The prospect of sequential pinning and depinning in these nanowires allows the bit density to increase by several Tbs, depending on the number of segments within these nanowires.

  10. Magnetic particle separation using controllable magnetic force switches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Zunghang; Lee, C.-P.; Lai, M.-F.

    2010-01-01

    Magnetic particle separation is very important in biomedical applications. In this study, a magnetic particle microseparator is proposed that uses micro magnets to produce open/closed magnetic flux for switching on/off the separation. When all magnets are magnetized in the same direction, the magnetic force switch for separation is on; almost all magnetic particles are trapped in the channel side walls and the separation rate can reach 95%. When the magnetization directions of adjacent magnets are opposite, the magnetic force switch for separation is off, and most magnetic particles pass through the microchannel without being trapped. For the separation of multi-sized magnetic particles, the proposed microseparator is numerically demonstrated to have high separation rate.

  11. Liquid Wall Chambers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meier, W R

    2011-02-24

    The key feature of liquid wall chambers is the use of a renewable liquid layer to protect chamber structures from target emissions. Two primary options have been proposed and studied: wetted wall chambers and thick liquid wall (TLW) chambers. With wetted wall designs, a thin layer of liquid shields the structural first wall from short ranged target emissions (x-rays, ions and debris) but not neutrons. Various schemes have been proposed to establish and renew the liquid layer between shots including flow-guiding porous fabrics (e.g., Osiris, HIBALL), porous rigid structures (Prometheus) and thin film flows (KOYO). The thin liquid layer can be the tritium breeding material (e.g., flibe, PbLi, or Li) or another liquid metal such as Pb. TLWs use liquid jets injected by stationary or oscillating nozzles to form a neutronically thick layer (typically with an effective thickness of {approx}50 cm) of liquid between the target and first structural wall. In addition to absorbing short ranged emissions, the thick liquid layer degrades the neutron flux and energy reaching the first wall, typically by {approx}10 x x, so that steel walls can survive for the life of the plant ({approx}30-60 yrs). The thick liquid serves as the primary coolant and tritium breeding material (most recent designs use flibe, but the earliest concepts used Li). In essence, the TLW places the fusion blanket inside the first wall instead of behind the first wall.

  12. Dynamics of domain wall driven by spin-transfer torque

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chureemart, P.; Evans, R. F. L.; Chantrell, R. W.

    2011-01-01

    Spin-torque switching of magnetic devices offers new technological possibilities for data storage and integrated circuits. We have investigated domain-wall motion in a ferromagnetic thin film driven by a spin-polarized current using an atomistic spin model with a modified Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation including the effect of the spin-transfer torque. The presence of the spin-transfer torque is shown to create an out-of-plane domain wall, in contrast to the external-field-driven case where an in-plane wall is found. We have investigated the effect of the spin torque on domain-wall displacement, domain-wall velocity, and domain-wall width, as well as the equilibration time in the presence of the spin-transfer torque. We have shown that the minimum spin-current density, regarded as the critical value for domain-wall motion, decreases with increasing temperature.

  13. Current-driven domain wall motion based memory devices: Application to a ratchet ferromagnetic strip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Tejerina, Luis; Martínez, Eduardo; Raposo, Víctor; Alejos, Óscar

    2018-04-01

    Ratchet memories, where perpendicular magnetocristalline anisotropy is tailored so as to precisely control the magnetic transitions, has been recently proven to be a feasible device to store and manipulate data bits. For such devices, it has been shown that the current-driven regime of domain walls can improve their performances with respect to the field-driven one. However, the relaxing time required by the traveling domain walls constitutes a certain drawback if the former regime is considered, since it results in longer device latencies. In order to speed up the bit shifting procedure, it is demonstrated here that the application of a current of inverse polarity during the DW relaxing time may reduce such latencies. The reverse current must be sufficiently high as to drive the DW to the equilibrium position faster than the anisotropy slope itself, but with an amplitude sufficiently low as to avoid DW backward shifting. Alternatively, it is possible to use such a reverse current to increase the proper range of operation for a given relaxing time, i.e., the pair of values of the current amplitude and pulse time that ensures single DW jumps for a certain latency time.

  14. Fourfold magnetic anisotropy, coercivity and magnetization reversal of Co/V bilayers grown on MgO(0 0 1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calleja, J F; Muro, M GarcIa del; Presa, B; Matarranz, R; Corrales, J A; Labarta, A; Contreras, M C

    2007-01-01

    Magnetic anisotropy and magnetization reversal of Al/Co/V/MgO(0 0 1) thin films have been investigated. The films were fabricated by magnetron sputtering. The roles of both Co and V layers thicknesses have been studied. Magnetic characterization has been carried out by transverse susceptibility (TS) measurements and hysteresis loops. Cobalt is grown in the hcp structure on V with the c axis parallel to the film plane. Two types of hcp Co crystal are grown with the c axes perpendicular to each other. This structure gives rise to a fourfold magnetic anisotropy. When the V layer thickness is below 40 A a superimposed uniaxial anisotropy develops, the effect of which is a depression in the TS, in agreement with theoretical calculations. This uniaxial anisotropy is induced by the substrate and due to a discontinuous growth of the V layer. For hcp Co grown on V, the magnetic anisotropy rapidly increases with Co layer thickness. In this case, unexpected shifted hysteresis loops along the hard axes were observed when the films were not saturated. This has been explained by taking into account the magnetization reversal along the hard axis: it proceeds via magnetization rotation of some portions of the film at high fields, and by domain wall motion of the rest of the film at lower field values

  15. Fourfold magnetic anisotropy, coercivity and magnetization reversal of Co/V bilayers grown on MgO(0 0 1)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calleja, J F [Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Oviedo, Calvo Sotelo s/n, 33007 Oviedo (Spain); Muro, M GarcIa del [Departament de Fisica Fonamental and Institut de Nanociencia i Nanotecnologia IN2UB de la Universitat de Barcelona, MartIi Franques, 1, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Presa, B [Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Oviedo, Calvo Sotelo s/n, 33007 Oviedo (Spain); Matarranz, R [Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Oviedo, Calvo Sotelo s/n, 33007 Oviedo (Spain); Corrales, J A [Departmento de Informatica, Universidad de Oviedo, Edificio Departamental 1, Campus de Viesques s/n, 33204 Gijon (Spain); Labarta, A [Departament de Fisica Fonamental and Institut de Nanociencia i Nanotecnologia IN2UB de la Universitat de Barcelona, MartIi Franques, 1, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Contreras, M C [Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Oviedo, Calvo Sotelo s/n, 33007 Oviedo (Spain)

    2007-11-21

    Magnetic anisotropy and magnetization reversal of Al/Co/V/MgO(0 0 1) thin films have been investigated. The films were fabricated by magnetron sputtering. The roles of both Co and V layers thicknesses have been studied. Magnetic characterization has been carried out by transverse susceptibility (TS) measurements and hysteresis loops. Cobalt is grown in the hcp structure on V with the c axis parallel to the film plane. Two types of hcp Co crystal are grown with the c axes perpendicular to each other. This structure gives rise to a fourfold magnetic anisotropy. When the V layer thickness is below 40 A a superimposed uniaxial anisotropy develops, the effect of which is a depression in the TS, in agreement with theoretical calculations. This uniaxial anisotropy is induced by the substrate and due to a discontinuous growth of the V layer. For hcp Co grown on V, the magnetic anisotropy rapidly increases with Co layer thickness. In this case, unexpected shifted hysteresis loops along the hard axes were observed when the films were not saturated. This has been explained by taking into account the magnetization reversal along the hard axis: it proceeds via magnetization rotation of some portions of the film at high fields, and by domain wall motion of the rest of the film at lower field values.

  16. Nurses' shift reports

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buus, Niels; Hoeck, Bente; Hamilton, Bridget Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To identify reporting practices that feature in studies of nurses' shift reports across diverse nursing specialities. The objectives were to perform an exhaustive systematic literature search and to critically review the quality and findings of qualitative field studies...... of nurses' shift reports. BACKGROUND: Nurses' shift reports are routine occurrences in healthcare organisations that are viewed as crucial for patient outcomes, patient safety and continuity of care. Studies of communication between nurses attend primarily to 1:1 communication and analyse the adequacy...... and accuracy of patient information and feature handovers at the bedside. Still, verbal reports between groups of nurses about patients are commonplace. Shift reports are obvious sites for studying the situated accomplishment of professional nursing at the group level. This review is focused exclusively...

  17. Shift Verification and Validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandya, Tara M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Evans, Thomas M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Davidson, Gregory G [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Johnson, Seth R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Godfrey, Andrew T. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-09-07

    This documentation outlines the verification and validation of Shift for the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL). Five main types of problems were used for validation: small criticality benchmark problems; full-core reactor benchmarks for light water reactors; fixed-source coupled neutron-photon dosimetry benchmarks; depletion/burnup benchmarks; and full-core reactor performance benchmarks. We compared Shift results to measured data and other simulated Monte Carlo radiation transport code results, and found very good agreement in a variety of comparison measures. These include prediction of critical eigenvalue, radial and axial pin power distributions, rod worth, leakage spectra, and nuclide inventories over a burn cycle. Based on this validation of Shift, we are confident in Shift to provide reference results for CASL benchmarking.

  18. Molecular Electronic Shift Registers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beratan, David N.; Onuchic, Jose N.

    1990-01-01

    Molecular-scale shift registers eventually constructed as parts of high-density integrated memory circuits. In principle, variety of organic molecules makes possible large number of different configurations and modes of operation for such shift-register devices. Several classes of devices and implementations in some specific types of molecules proposed. All based on transfer of electrons or holes along chains of repeating molecular units.

  19. Physics of resistive wall modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Igochine, V.

    2012-01-01

    The advanced tokamak regime is a promising candidate for steady-state tokamak operation which is desirable for a fusion reactor. This regime is characterized by a high bootstrap current fraction and a flat or reversed safety factor profile, which leads to operation close to the pressure limit. At this limit, an external kink mode becomes unstable. This external kink is converted into the slowly growing resistive wall mode (RWM) by the presence of a conducting wall. Reduction of the growth rate allows one to act on the mode and to stabilize it. There are two main factors which determine the stability of the RWM. The first factor comes from external magnetic perturbations (error fields, resistive wall, feedback coils, etc). This part of RWM physics is the same for tokamaks and reversed field pinch configurations. The physics of this interaction is relatively well understood and based on classical electrodynamics. The second ingredient of RWM physics is the interaction of the mode with plasma flow and fast particles. These interactions are particularly important for tokamaks, which have higher plasma flow and stronger trapped particle effects. The influence of the fast particles will also be increasingly more important in ITER and DEMO which will have a large fraction of fusion born alpha particles. These interactions have kinetic origins which make the computations challenging since not only particles influence the mode, but also the mode acts on the particles. Correct prediction of the ‘plasma–RWM’ interaction is an important ingredient which has to be combined with external field's influence (resistive wall, error fields and feedback) to make reliable predictions for RWM behaviour in tokamaks. All these issues are reviewed in this paper. (special topic)

  20. Shaped superconductor cylinder retains intense magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrandt, A. F.; Wahlquist, H.

    1964-01-01

    The curve of the inner walls of a superconducting cylinder is plotted from the flux lines of the magnetic field to be contained. This shaping reduces maximum flux densities and permits a stronger and more uniform magnetic field.

  1. Active control of multiple resistive wall modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunsell, P. R.; Yadikin, D.; Gregoratto, D.; Paccagnella, R.; Liu, Y. Q.; Bolzonella, T.; Cecconello, M.; Drake, J. R.; Kuldkepp, M.; Manduchi, G.; Marchiori, G.; Marrelli, L.; Partin, P.; Menmuir, S.; Ortolani, S.; Rachlew, E.; Spizzo, S.; Zanca, P.

    2005-01-01

    Active magnetic feedback suppression of resistive wall modes is of common interest for several fusion concepts relying on close conducting walls for stabilization of ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modes. In the advanced tokamak without plasma rotation the kink mode is not completely stabilized, but rather converted into an unstable resistive wall mode (RWM) with a growth time comparable to the wall magnetic flux penetration time. The reversed field pinch (RFP) is similar to the advanced tokamak in the sense that it uses a conducting wall for kink mode stabilization. Also both configurations are susceptible to resonant field error amplification of marginally stable modes. However, the RFP has a different RWM spectrum and, in general, a range of modes is unstable. Hence, the requirement for simultaneous feedback stabilization of multiple independent RWMs arises for the RFP configuration. Recent experiments on RWM feedback stabilization, performed in the RFP device EXTRAP T2R [1], are presented. The experimental results obtained are the first demonstration of simultaneous feedback control of multiple independent RWMs [2]. Using an array of active magnetic coils, a reproducible suppression of several RWMs is achieved for the duration of the discharge, 3-5 wall times, through feedback action. An array with 64 active saddle coils at 4 poloidal times 16 toroidal positions is used. The important issues of side band generation by the active coil array and the accompanying coupling of different unstable modes through the feedback action are addressed in this study. Open loop control experiments have been carried out to quantitatively study resonant field error amplification. (Author)

  2. PREFACE: Domain wall dynamics in nanostructures Domain wall dynamics in nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrows, C. H.; Meier, G.

    2012-01-01

    Domain structures in magnetic materials are ubiquitous and have been studied for decades. The walls that separate them are topological defects in the magnetic order parameter and have a wide variety of complex forms. In general, their investigation is difficult in bulk materials since only the domain structure on the surface of a specimen is visible. Cutting the sample to reveal the interior causes a rearrangement of the domains into a new form. As with many other areas of magnetism, the study of domain wall physics has been revitalised by the advent of nanotechnology. The ability to fabricate nanoscale structures has permitted the formation of simplified and controlled domain patterns; the development of advanced microscopy methods has permitted them to be imaged and then modelled; subjecting them to ultrashort field and current pulses has permitted their dynamics to be explored. The latest results from all of these advances are described in this special issue. Not only has this led to results of great scientific beauty, but also to concepts of great applicability to future information technologies. In this issue the reader will find the latest results for these domain wall dynamics and the high-speed processes of topological structures such as domain walls and magnetic vortices. These dynamics can be driven by the application of magnetic fields, or by flowing currents through spintronic devices using the novel physics of spin-transfer torque. This complexity has been studied using a wide variety of experimental techniques at the edge of the spatial and temporal resolution currently available, and can be described using sophisticated analytical theory and computational modelling. As a result, the dynamics can be engineered to give rise to finely controlled memory and logic devices with new functionality. Moreover, the field is moving to study not only the conventional transition metal ferromagnets, but also complex heterostructures, novel magnets and even other

  3. Magnetic field mapping equipment for KEK 1 m hydrogen bubble chamber magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otake, Yuji

    1979-01-01

    Magnetic field mapping was carried out for the 1 m hydrogen bubble chamber magnet in November, 1976, and March, 1977 at the National Laboratory for High Energy Physics (KEK). The magnetic field mapping equipment was manufactured for the main purposes of getting low cost and short time in manufacture, sufficient accuracy of measurement, fairly fast speed of measurement and automatic measurement. The design was made, aiming at 18 kgauss of field intensity and 10 -3 of measuring accuracy. The magnetic field mapping system consists of seven parts as shown in the block diagram. The measuring elements are Hall elements, and three elements are mounted on three surfaces of the inner wall so that three directional (X, Y and Z) components can be determined by moving the magnetic field mapping equipment. The control circuit of the equipment regulates the shift of the equipment by 5 cm step in X and Y directions. Other circuits, relays and switches are explained. Since 100 V AC power relays were placed together with TTL's and IC's in this system, relay circuits became serious noise sources. The countermeasures such as separation of IC power supply, independent grounding, are suppression and so on were taken. Of these, it was effective that relay circuit and IC circuit were put in respective shield cases, and wirings in both circuits were made so as not to intersect each other as far as possible. Finally the points to be noticed in manufacturing, obtained from the experiences, are summarized. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  4. Ballistic rectification of vortex domain wall chirality at nanowire corners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omari, K.; Bradley, R. C.; Broomhall, T. J.; Hodges, M. P. P.; Hayward, T. J. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom); Rosamond, M. C.; Linfield, E. H. [School of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Im, M.-Y. [Center for X-Ray Optics, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology, Daegu 711-873 (Korea, Republic of); Fischer, P. [Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Cruz, California 94056 (United States)

    2015-11-30

    The interactions of vortex domain walls with corners in planar magnetic nanowires are probed using magnetic soft X-ray transmission microscopy. We show that when the domain walls are propagated into sharp corners using applied magnetic fields above a critical value, their chiralities are rectified to either clockwise or anticlockwise circulation depending on whether the corners turn left or right. Single-shot focused magneto-optic Kerr effect measurements are then used to demonstrate how, when combined with modes of domain propagation that conserve vortex chirality, this allows us to dramatically reduce the stochasticity of domain pinning at artificial defect sites. Our results provide a tool for controlling domain wall chirality and pinning behavior both in further experimental studies and in future domain wall-based memory, logic and sensor technologies.

  5. Dynamics of cylindrical domain walls in smectic C liquid crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, I W; Wigham, E J

    2009-01-01

    An analysis of the dynamics of cylindrical domain walls in planar aligned samples of smectic C liquid crystals is presented. A circular magnetic field, induced by an electric current, drives a time-dependent reorientation of the corresponding radially dependent director field. Nonlinear approximations to the relevant nonlinear dynamic equation, derived from smectic continuum theory, are solved in a comoving coordinated frame: exact solutions are found for a π-wall and numerical solutions are calculated for π/2-walls. Each calculation begins with an assumed initial state for the director that is a prescribed cylindrical domain wall. Such an initial wall will proceed to expand or contract as its central core propagates radially inwards or outwards, depending on the boundary conditions for the director, the elastic constants, the magnitude of the field and the sign of the magnetic anisotropy of the liquid crystal

  6. Magnetostatic coupling of 90 domain walls in FeNi/Cu/Co trilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurde, Julia; Miguel, Jorge; Kuch, Wolfgang [Freie Universitaet, Berlin (Germany); Bayer, Daniela; Aeschlimann, Martin [Technische Universitaet, Kaiserslautern (Germany); Sanchez-Barriga, Jaime; Kronast, Florian; Duerr, Herrmann A. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin fuer Materialien und Energie (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    The magnetic interlayer coupling of FeNi/Cu/Co trilayered microstructures has been studied by means of X-ray magnetic circular dichroism in combination with photoelectron emission microscopy (XMCD-PEEM). We find that a parallel coupling between magnetic domains coexists with a non-parallel coupling between magnetic domain walls of each ferromagnetic layer. We attribute the non-parallel coupling of the two magnetic layers to local magnetic stray fields arising at domain walls in the magnetically harder Co layer. In the magnetically softer FeNi layer non-ordinary domain walls such as 270 and 90 domain walls with overshoot of the magnetization either inwards or outwards relative to the turning direction of the Co magnetization are identified. Micromagnetic simulations reveal that in the absence of magnetocrystalline anisotropy, both types of overshooting domain walls are energetically equivalent. However, if a uniaxial in-plane anisotropy is present, the relative orientation of the domain walls with respect to the anisotropy axis determines which of these domain walls is energetically favorable.

  7. Wall Finishes; Carpentry: 901895.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dade County Public Schools, Miami, FL.

    The course outline is designed to provide instruction in selecting, preparing, and installing wall finishing materials. Prerequisites for the course include mastery of building construction plans, foundations and walls, and basic mathematics. Intended for use in grades 11 and 12, the course contains five blocks of study totaling 135 hours of…

  8. Wall Construction; Carpentry: 901892.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dade County Public Schools, Miami, FL.

    The curriculum guide outlines a course designed to provide instruction in floor and wall layout, and in the diverse methods and construction of walls. Upon completion of this course the students should have acquired a knowledge of construction plans and structural foundations in addition to a basic knowledge of mathematics. The course consists of…

  9. International Divider Walls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruis, A.; Sneller, Lineke

    2013-01-01

    The subject of this teaching case is the Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) system implementation at International Divider Walls, the world market leader in design, production, and sales of divider walls. The implementation in one of the divisions of this multinational company had been successful,

  10. Supersymmetric domain walls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergshoeff, Eric A.; Kleinschmidt, Axel; Riccioni, Fabio

    2012-01-01

    We classify the half-supersymmetric "domain walls," i.e., branes of codimension one, in toroidally compactified IIA/IIB string theory and show to which gauged supergravity theory each of these domain walls belong. We use as input the requirement of supersymmetric Wess-Zumino terms, the properties of

  11. Magnetic reheating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saga, Shohei; Tashiro, Hiroyuki; Yokoyama, Shuichiro

    2018-02-01

    We provide a new bound on the amplitude of primordial magnetic fields (PMFs) by using a novel mechanism, magnetic reheating. The damping of the magnetohydrodynamics fluid motions in a primordial plasma brings the dissipation of the PMFs. In the early Universe with z ≳ 2 × 106, cosmic microwave background (CMB) photons are quickly thermalized with the dissipated energy and shift to a different Planck distribution with a new temperature. In other words, the PMF dissipation changes the baryon-to-photon number ratio, and we name such a process magnetic reheating. From the current baryon-to-photon number ratio obtained from the big bang nucleosynthesis and CMB observations, we put the strongest constraint on the PMFs on small scales which CMB observations cannot access, B0 ≲ 1.0 μG at the scales 104 generation mechanisms of PMFs in the early Universe.

  12. Lamb shift of energy levels in quantum rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kryuchkyan, G Yu; Kyriienko, O; Shelykh, I A

    2015-01-01

    We study the vacuum radiative corrections to energy levels of a confined electron in quantum rings. The calculations are provided for the Lamb shift of energy levels in a low-momentum region of virtual photons and for both one-dimensional and two-dimensional quantum rings. We show that contrary to the well known case of a hydrogen atom the value of the Lamb shift increases with the magnetic momentum quantum number m. We also investigate the dependence of the Lamb shift on magnetic flux piercing the ring and demonstrate a presence of magnetic-flux-dependent oscillations. For a one-dimensional ring the value of the shift strongly depends on the radius of the ring. It is small for semiconductor rings but can attain measurable quantities in natural organic ring-shape molecules, such as benzene, cycloalcanes and porphyrins. (paper)

  13. Microstructure, magnetic properties and magnetic hardening in 2:17 Sm-Co magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, W.; Zhang, Y.; Hadjipanayis, G.C.

    2002-01-01

    A comprehensive and systematic study has been made on Sm(Co,Fe,M,L) z magnets (M=Cu or Ni, and L=Zr or Ti) to completely understand the effects of composition and processing on the microstructure and magnetic properties of magnets. Ti-containing magnets do not have a lamellar phase but exhibit only a cellular microstructure, resulting in a much lower coercivity (below 10 kOe). Ni-containing magnets exhibit a perfect cellular/lamellar microstructure, but without a large domain wall energy gradient at the interface of the 2:17 and 1:5 phases, leading to a low coercivity. Only in the magnets containing both Cu and Zr, a uniform and stable cellular/lamellar microstructure with a high domain wall energy gradient across the 1:5 phase is formed, resulting in high coercivity. These results indicate that the conditions for effective magnetic hardening are: (1) Formation of a cellular/lamellar microstructure, and (2) establishment of a domain wall energy gradient at the cell boundaries. Based on all of these experimental results, the magnetization reversal mechanism of 2:17 Sm-Co magnets can be explained by both the domain wall pinning and nucleation models. The nucleation mechanism holds at any temperature in the Cu-rich magnets, and only above the Curie temperature of the 1:5 phase in the alloys with the lower Cu content. In these cases, the 2:17 cells become magnetically decoupled. (orig.)

  14. Solar Walls in tsbi3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wittchen, Kim Bjarne

    tsbi3 is a user-friendly and flexible computer program, which provides support to the design team in the analysis of the indoor climate and the energy performance of buildings. The solar wall module gives tsbi3 the capability of simulating solar walls and their interaction with the building....... This version, C, of tsbi3 is capable of simulating five types of solar walls say: mass-walls, Trombe-walls, double Trombe-walls, internally ventilated walls and solar walls for preheating ventilation air. The user's guide gives a description of the capabilities and how to simulate solar walls in tsbi3....

  15. Nonlinear control of magnetic signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemoczynski, Bogdan

    Magnetic properties of ferrite structures are known to cause fluctuations in Earth's magnetic field around the object. These fluctuations are known as the object's magnetic signature and are unique based on the object's geometry and material. It is a common practice to neutralize magnetic signatures periodically after certain time intervals, however there is a growing interest to develop real time degaussing systems for various applications. Development of real time degaussing system is a challenging problem because of magnetic hysteresis and difficulties in measurement or estimation of near-field flux data. The goal of this research is to develop a real time feedback control system that can be used to minimize magnetic signatures for ferrite structures. Experimental work on controlling the magnetic signature of a cylindrical steel shell structure with a magnetic disturbance provided evidence that the control process substantially increased the interior magnetic flux. This means near field estimation using interior sensor data is likely to be inaccurate. Follow up numerical work for rectangular and cylindrical cross sections investigated variations in shell wall flux density under a variety of ambient excitation and applied disturbances. Results showed magnetic disturbances could corrupt interior sensor data and magnetic shielding due to the shell walls makes the interior very sensitive to noise. The magnetic flux inside the shell wall showed little variation due to inner disturbances and its high base value makes it less susceptible to noise. This research proceeds to describe a nonlinear controller to use the shell wall data as an input. A nonlinear plant model of magnetics is developed using a constant tau to represent domain rotation lag and a gain function k to describe the magnetic hysteresis curve for the shell wall. The model is justified by producing hysteresis curves for multiple materials, matching experimental data using a particle swarm algorithm, and

  16. Identification of Novel Cell Wall Components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michelle Momany

    2009-10-26

    Our DOE Biosciences-funded work focused on the fungal cell wall and morphogenesis. We are especially interested in how new cell wall material is targeted to appropriate areas for polar (asymmetric) growth. Polar growth is the only way that filamentous fungi explore the environment to find suitable substrates to degrade. Work funded by this grant has resulted in a total of twenty peer-reviewed publications. In work funded by this grant, we identified nine Aspergillus nidulans temperature-sensitive (ts) mutants that fail to send out a germ tube and show a swollen cell phenotype at restrictive temperature, the swo mutants. In other organisms, a swollen cell phenotype is often associated with misdirected growth or weakened cell walls. Our work shows that several of the A. nidulans swo mutants have defects in the establishment and maintenance of polarity. Cloning of several swo genes by complementation also showed that secondary modification of proteins seems is important in polarity. We also investigated cell wall biosynthesis and branching based on leads in literature from other organisms and found that branching and nuclear division are tied and that the cell wall reorganizes during development. In our most recent work we have focused on gene expression during the shift from isotropic to polar growth. Surprisingly we found that genes previously thought to be involved only in spore formation are important in early vegetative growth as well.

  17. Transverse field-induced nucleation pad switching modes during domain wall injection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryan, M. T.; Fry, P. W.; Schrefl, T.; Gibbs, M. R. J.; Allwood, D. A.; Im, M.-Y.; Fischer, P.

    2010-03-12

    We have used magnetic transmission X-ray microscopy (M-TXM) to image in-field magnetization configurations of patterned Ni{sub 80}Fe{sub 20} domain wall 'injection pads' and attached planar nanowires. Comparison with micromagnetic simulations suggests that the evolution of magnetic domains in rectangular injection pads depends on the relative orientation of closure domains in the remanent state. The magnetization reversal pathway is also altered by the inclusion of transverse magnetic fields. These different modes explain previous results of domain wall injection into nanowires. Even more striking was the observation of domain walls injecting halfway across the width of wider (>400 nm wide) wires but over wire lengths of several micrometers. These extended Neel walls can interact with adjacent nanowires and cause a switching in the side of the wire undergoing reversal as the domain wall continues to expand.

  18. Mechanical spectral shift reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherwood, D.G.; Wilson, J.F.; Salton, R.B.; Fensterer, H.F.

    1981-01-01

    A mechanical spectral shift reactor comprises apparatus for inserting and withdrawing water displacer elements from the reactor core for selectively changing the water-moderator volume in the core thereby changing the reactivity of the core. The apparatus includes drivemechanisms for moving the displacer elements relative to the core and guide mechanisms for guiding the displayer rods through the reactor vessel

  19. Mechanical spectral shift reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherwood, D.G.; Wilson, J.F.; Salton, R.B.; Fensterer, H.F.

    1982-01-01

    A mechanical spectral shift reactor comprises apparatus for inserting and withdrawing water displacer elements from the reactor core for selectively changing the water-moderator volume in the core thereby changing the reactivity of the core. The apparatus includes drive mechanisms for moving the displacer elements relative to the core and guide mechanisms for guiding the displacer rods through the reactor vessel. (author)

  20. Nanoscale magnetic heat pumps and engines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bauer, G.E.W.; Bretzel, S.; Brataas, A.; Tserkovnyak, Y.

    2010-01-01

    We present the linear-response matrix for a sliding domain wall in a rotatable magnetic nanowire, which is driven out of equilibrium by temperature and voltage bias, mechanical torque, and magnetic field. An expression for heat-current-induced domain-wall motion is derived. Application of Onsager’s

  1. Plasma-wall interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behrisch, Rainer

    1978-01-01

    The plasma wall interactions for two extreme cases, the 'vacuum model' and the 'cold gas blanket' are outlined. As a first step for understanding the plasma wall interactions the elementary interaction processes at the first wall are identified. These are energetic ion and neutral particle trapping and release, ion and neutral backscattering, ion sputtering, desorption by ions, photons and electrons and evaporation. These processes have only recently been started to be investigated in the parameter range of interest for fusion research. The few measured data and their extrapolation into regions not yet investigated are reviewed

  2. Domain-walls motion in glass-coated CoFeSiB amorphous microwires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antonov, A.S. E-mail: as.antonov@mtu-net.ru; Buznikov, N.A.; Granovsky, A.B.; Joura, A.V.; Rakhmanov, A.L.; Yakunin, A.M

    2002-08-01

    A method for observation of domain-walls motion in amorphous microwires with circular magnetic anisotropy is proposed. Using the method, the magnetization reversal of glass-coated Co-based microwires induced by current pulses of high amplitude is studied. The magnetization reversal is shown to occur due to the nucleation of the domain walls at the sample ends and their subsequent motion along the microwire. The dependencies of the domain-wall velocity on the current pulse amplitude and a longitudinal DC magnetic field are measured. A model describing main features of experimental data is presented.

  3. Domain-walls motion in glass-coated CoFeSiB amorphous microwires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antonov, A.S.; Buznikov, N.A.; Granovsky, A.B.; Joura, A.V.; Rakhmanov, A.L.; Yakunin, A.M.

    2002-01-01

    A method for observation of domain-walls motion in amorphous microwires with circular magnetic anisotropy is proposed. Using the method, the magnetization reversal of glass-coated Co-based microwires induced by current pulses of high amplitude is studied. The magnetization reversal is shown to occur due to the nucleation of the domain walls at the sample ends and their subsequent motion along the microwire. The dependencies of the domain-wall velocity on the current pulse amplitude and a longitudinal DC magnetic field are measured. A model describing main features of experimental data is presented

  4. Anterior chest wall examination reviewed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Trotta

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Anterior chest wall involvement is not infrequently observed within inflammatory arthropaties, particularly if one considers seronegative spondiloarthritides and SAPHO syndrome. Physical examination is unreliable and conventional X-rays analysis is an unsatisfactory tool during diagnostic work-up of this region. Scintigraphic techniques yield informations both on the activity and on the anatomical extent of the disease while computerized tomography visualize the elementary lesions, such as erosions, which characterize the process. Moreover, when available, magnetic resonance imaging couple the ability to finely visualize such lesions with the possibility to show early alterations and to characterize the “activity” of the disease, presenting itself as a powerful tool both for diagnosis and follow-up. This review briefly shows the applications of imaging techniques for the evaluation of the anterior chest wall focusing on what has been done in the SAPHO syndrome which can be considered prototypical for this regional involvement since it is the osteo-articular target mainly affected by the disease.

  5. magnetic horn

    CERN Document Server

    Neutrinos and antineutrinos are ideal for probing the weak force because it is effectively the only force they feel. How were they made? Protons fired into a metal target produce a tangle of secondary particles. A magnetic horn like this one, invented by Simon Van der Meer, selected pions and focused them into a sharp beam. Pions decay into muons and neutrinos or antineutrinos. The muons were stopped in a wall of 3000 tons of iron and 1000 tons of concrete, leaving the neutrinos or antineutrinos to reach the Gargamelle bubble chamber. A simple change of magnetic field direction on the horn flipped between focusing positively- or negatively-charged pion beams, and so between neutrinos and antineutrinos.

  6. Advanced walling systems

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    De Villiers, A

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The question addressed by this chapter is: How should advanced walling systems be planned, designed, built, refurbished, and end their useful lives, to classify as smart, sustainable, green or eco-building environments?...

  7. Fusion: first wall problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behrisch, R.

    1976-01-01

    Some of the relevant elementary atomic processes which are expected to be of significance to the first wall of a fusion reactor are reviewed. Up to the present, most investigations have been performed at relatively high ion energies, typically E greater than 5 keV, and even in this range the available data are very poor. If the plasma wall interaction takes place at energies of E greater than 1 keV the impurity introduction and first wall erosion which will take place predominantly by sputtering, will be large and may severely limit the burning time of the plasma. The wall bombardment and surface erosion will presumably not decrease substantially by introducing a divertor. The erosion can only be kept low if the energy of the bombarding ions and neutrals can be kept below the threshold for sputtering of 1 to 10 eV. 93 refs

  8. The OPERA magnetic spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Ambrosio, M; Dusini, S; Dulach, B; Fanin, C; Felici, G; Corso, F D; Garfagnini, A; Grianti, F; Gustavino, C; Monacelli, P; Paoloni, A; Stanco, L; Spinetti, M; Terranova, F; Votano, L

    2004-01-01

    The OPERA neutrino oscillation experiment foresees the construction of two magnetized iron spectrometers located after the lead-nuclear emulsion targets. The magnet is made up of two vertical walls of rectangular cross section connected by return yokes. The particle trajectories are measured by high precision drift tubes located before and after the arms of the magnet. Moreover, the magnet steel is instrumented with Resistive Plate Chambers that ease pattern recognition and allow a calorimetric measurement of the hadronic showers. In this paper we review the construction of the spectrometers. In particular, we describe the results obtained from the magnet and RPC prototypes and the installation of the final apparatus at the Gran Sasso laboratories. We discuss the mechanical and magnetic properties of the steel and the techniques employed to calibrate the field in the bulk of the magnet. Moreover, results of the tests and issues concerning the mass production of the Resistive Plate Chambers are reported. Final...

  9. Basic study of magnetic microwires for sensor applications: Variety of magnetic structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chizhik, Alexander, E-mail: oleksandr.chyzhyk@ehu.es [Universidad del Pais Vasco, UPV/EHU, 20080 San Sebastian (Spain); Zhukov, Arcady [Universidad del Pais Vasco, UPV/EHU, 20080 San Sebastian (Spain); IKERBASQUE, 48011 Bilbao (Spain); Gonzalez, Julian [Universidad del Pais Vasco, UPV/EHU, 20080 San Sebastian (Spain); Stupakiewicz, Andrzej [Laboratory of Magnetism, University of Bialystok, 15-245 Bialystok (Poland)

    2017-01-15

    We examine magnetic glass-coated microwires used for magnetic sensors. Images of domain structures and magnetization reversal were obtained with magneto-optical Kerr microscopy. Of particular importance were temperature-induced transformations of surface magnetic structures. Different surface magnetic domains coexist, characterized by various domain periods, magnetization directions, and nobilities of domain walls. - Highlights: • Temperature induced transformation of the domain structure in the microwires. • Co-existence of two magnetic structures differing in period and mobility of domain walls. • Short review of the basic domain structures in microwire.

  10. Suppression of resistive wall instabilities with distributed, independently controlled, active feedback coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cates, C.; Shilov, M.; Mauel, M. E.; Navratil, G. A.; Maurer, D.; Mukherjee, S.; Nadle, D.; Bialek, J.; Boozer, A.

    2000-01-01

    External kink instabilities are suppressed in a tokamak experiment by either (1) energizing a distributed array of independently controlled active feedback coils mounted outside a segmented resistive wall or (2) inserting a second segmented wall having much higher electrical conductivity. When the active feedback coils are off and the highly conducting wall is withdrawn, kink instabilities excited by plasma current gradients grow at a rate comparable to the magnetic diffusion rate of the resistive wall. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics

  11. Plasma-wall interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reichle, R.

    2004-01-01

    This document gathers the 43 slides presented in the framework of the week long lecture 'hot plasmas 2004' and dedicated to plasma-wall interaction in a tokamak. This document is divided into 4 parts: 1) thermal load on the wall, power extraction and particle recovery, 2) basic edge plasma physics, 3) processes that drive the plasma-solid interaction, and 4) material conditioning (surface treatment...) for ITER

  12. Dynamic wall demonstration project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakatsui, L.; Mayhew, W.

    1990-12-01

    The dynamic wall concept is a ventilation strategy that can be applied to a single family dwelling. With suitable construction, outside air can be admitted through the exterior walls of the house to the interior space to function as ventilation air. The construction and performance monitoring of a demonstration house built to test the dynamic wall concept in Sherwood Park, Alberta, is described. The project had the objectives of demonstrating and assessing the construction methods; determining the cost-effectiveness of the concept in Alberta; analyzing the operation of the dynamic wall system; and determining how other components and systems in the house interact with the dynamic wall. The exterior wall construction consisted of vinyl siding, spun-bonded polyolefin-backed (SBPO) rigid fiberglass sheathing, 38 mm by 89 mm framing, fiberglass batt insulation and 12.7 mm drywall. The mechanical system was designed to operate in the dynamic (negative pressure) mode, however flexibility was provided to allow operation in the static (balanced pressure) mode to permit monitoring of the walls as if they were in a conventional house. The house was monitored by an extensive computerized monitoring system. Dynamic wall operation was dependent on pressure and temperature differentials between indoor and outdoor as well as wind speed and direction. The degree of heat gain was found to be ca 74% of the indoor-outdoor temperature differential. Temperature of incoming dynamic air was significantly affected by solar radiation and measurement of indoor air pollutants found no significant levels. 4 refs., 34 figs., 11 tabs.

  13. Orbital wall fractures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iinuma, Toshitaka; Ishio, Ken-ichirou; Yoshinami, Hiroyoshi; Kuriyama, Jun-ichi; Hirota, Yoshiharu.

    1993-01-01

    A total of 59 cases of mild facial fractures (simple orbital wall fractures, 34 cases, other facial fractures, 25 cases) with the clinical suspects of orbital wall fractures were evaluated both by conventional views (Waters' and Caldwell views) and coronal CT scans. Conventional views were obtained, as an average, after 4 days and CT after 7 days of injuries. Both the medial wall and the floor were evaluated at two sites, i.e., anterior and posterior. The ethmoid-maxillary plate was also included in the study. The degree of fractures was classified as, no fractures, fractures of discontinuity, dislocation and fragmentation. The coronal CT images in bone window condition was used as reference and the findings were compared between conventional views and CT. The correct diagnosis was obtained as follows: orbital floor (anterior, 78%, posterior, 73%), medial orbital wall (anterior, 72%, posterior, 72%) and ethmoid-maxillary plate (64%). The false positive diagnosis was as follows: orbital floor (anterior only, 13%), medial orbital wall (anterior only, 7%) and ethmoid-maxillary plate (11%). The false negative diagnosis was as follows: orbital floor (anterior, 9%, posterior, 10%), medial orbital wall (anterior, 21%, posterior, 28%) and ethmoid-maxillary plate (21%). The results were compared with those of others in the past. (author)

  14. Domain walls and fermion scattering in grand unified models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steer, D.A.; Vachaspati, T.

    2006-01-01

    Motivated by grand unification, we study the properties of domain walls formed in a model with SU(5)xZ 2 symmetry which is spontaneously broken to SU(3)xSU(2)xU(1)/Z 6 , and subsequently to SU(3)xU(1)/Z 3 . Even after the first stage of symmetry breaking, the SU(3) symmetry is broken to SU(2)xU(1)/Z 2 on the domain wall. In a certain range of parameters, flux tubes carrying color- and hyper-charge live on the domain wall and appear as 'boojums' when viewed from one side of the domain wall. Magnetic monopoles are also formed in the symmetry breaking and those carrying color and hyper-charge can be repelled from the wall due to the Meissner effect, or else their magnetic flux can penetrate the domain wall in quantized units. After the second stage of symmetry breaking, fermions can transmute when they scatter with the domain wall, providing a simpler version of fermion-monopole scattering: for example, neutrinos can scatter into d-quarks, leaving behind electric charge and color which is carried by gauge field excitations living on the domain wall

  15. Initial phase wall conditioning in KSTAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Suk-Ho; Kim, Kwang-Pyo; Kim, Sungwoo; Lee, Dong-Su; Kim, Kyung-Min; Lee, Kun-Su; Kim, Jong-Su; Park, Jae-Min; Kim, Woong-Chae; Kim, Hak-Kun; Park, Kap-Rai; Yang, Hyung-Lyeol; Sun, Jong-Ho; Woo, Hyun-Jong; Lee, Sang-Yong; Lee, Sang-Hwa; Park, Eun-Kyung; Park, Sang-Joon; Kim, Sun-Ho; Wang, Sun-Jung

    2011-01-01

    The initial phase wall conditioning in KSTAR is depicted. The KSTAR wall conditioning procedure consists of vessel baking, glow discharge cleaning (GDC), ICRH wall conditioning (ICWC) and boronization (Bz). Vessel baking is performed for the initial vacuum conditioning in order to remove various kinds of impurities including H 2 O, carbon and oxygen and for the plasma operation. The total outgassing rates after vessel baking in three successive KSTAR campaigns are compared. GDC is regularly performed as a standard wall cleaning procedure. Another cleaning technique is ICWC, which is useful for inter-shot wall conditioning under a strong magnetic field. In order to optimize the operation time and removal efficiency of ICWC, a parameter scan is performed. Bz is a standard technique to remove oxygen impurity from a vacuum vessel. KSTAR has used carborane powder which is a non-toxic boron-containing material. The KSTAR Bz has been successfully performed through two campaigns: water and oxygen levels in the vacuum vessel are reduced significantly. As a result, KSTAR has achieved its first L-H mode transition, although the input power was marginal for the L-H transition threshold. The characteristics of boron-containing thin films deposited for boronization are investigated.

  16. Mechanical spectral shift reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, J.F.; Sherwood, D.G.

    1982-01-01

    A mechanical spectral shift reactor comprises a reactive core having fuel assemblies accommodating both water displacer elements and neutron absorbing control rods for selectively changing the volume of water-moderator in the core. The fuel assemblies with displacer and control rods are arranged in alternating fashion so that one displacer element drive mechanism may move displacer elements in more than one fuel assembly without interfering with the movement of control rods of a corresponding control rod drive mechanisms. (author)

  17. Structural domain walls in polar hexagonal manganites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumagai, Yu

    2014-03-01

    The domain structure in the multiferroic hexagonal manganites is currently intensely investigated, motivated by the observation of intriguing sixfold topological defects at their meeting points [Choi, T. et al,. Nature Mater. 9, 253 (2010).] and nanoscale electrical conductivity at the domain walls [Wu, W. et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 077203 (2012).; Meier, D. et al., Nature Mater. 11, 284 (2012).], as well as reports of coupling between ferroelectricity, magnetism and structural antiphase domains [Geng, Y. et al., Nano Lett. 12, 6055 (2012).]. The detailed structure of the domain walls, as well as the origin of such couplings, however, was previously not fully understood. In the present study, we have used first-principles density functional theory to calculate the structure and properties of the low-energy structural domain walls in the hexagonal manganites [Kumagai, Y. and Spaldin, N. A., Nature Commun. 4, 1540 (2013).]. We find that the lowest energy domain walls are atomically sharp, with {210}orientation, explaining the orientation of recently observed stripe domains and suggesting their topological protection [Chae, S. C. et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 167603 (2012).]. We also explain why ferroelectric domain walls are always simultaneously antiphase walls, propose a mechanism for ferroelectric switching through domain-wall motion, and suggest an atomistic structure for the cores of the sixfold topological defects. This work was supported by ETH Zurich, the European Research Council FP7 Advanced Grants program me (grant number 291151), the JSPS Postdoctoral Fellowships for Research Abroad, and the MEXT Elements Strategy Initiative to Form Core Research Center TIES.

  18. KETERASINGAN DALAM FILM WALL-E

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahmadya Putra Nugraha

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Modern society nowadays technological advances at first create efficiency in human life. Further development of the technology thus drown human in a routine and automation of work created. The State is to be one of the causes of man separated from fellow or the outside world and eventually experiencing alienation. The movie as a mass media function to obtain the movie and entertainment can be informative or educative function is contained, even persuasive. The purpose of this research was conducted to find out the alienation in the movie Wall E. The concepts used to analyze the movie Wall E this is communication, movie, and alienation. The concept of alienation of human alienation from covering its own products of human alienation from its activities, the human alienation from nature of his humanity and human alienation from each other. Paradigm used is a critical paradigm with type a descriptive research with qualitative approach. The method used is the analysis of semiotics Roland Barthes to interpretation the scope of social alienation and fellow humans in the movie.This writing research results found that alienation of humans with other humans influenced the development of the technology and how the human it self represented of technology, not from our fellow human beings. Masyarakat modern saat ini kemajuan teknologi pada awalnya membuat efisiensi dalam kehidupan manusia. Perkembangan selanjutnya teknologi justru menenggelamkan manusia dalam suatu rutinitas dan otomatisasi kerja yang diciptakan. Keadaan itulah yang menjadi salah satu penyebab manusia terpisah dari sesama atau dunia luar dan akhirnya mengalami keterasingan. Film sebagai media massa berfungsi untuk memperoleh hiburan dan dalam film dapat terkandung fungsi informatif maupun edukatif, bahkan persuasif. Tujuan Penelitian ini dilakukan untuk mengetahui Keterasingan dalam film Wall E. Konsep-konsep yang digunakan untuk menganalisis film Wall E ini adalah komunikasi, film, dan

  19. Influence of Ba/Fe mole ratios on magnetic properties, crystallite size and shifting of X-ray diffraction peaks of nanocrystalline BaFe12O19 powder, prepared by sol gel auto combu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suastiyanti, Dwita; Sudarmaji, Arif; Soegijono, Bambang

    2012-06-01

    Barium hexaferrite BaFe12O19 (BFO) is of great importance as permanent magnets, particularly for magnetic recording as well as in microwave devices. Nano-crystalline BFO powders were prepared by sol gel auto combustion method in citric acid - metal nitrates system. Hence the mole ratios of Ba/Fe were variated at 1:12; 1:11.5 and 1:11. Ratio of cation to fuel was fixed at 1:1. An appropriate amount of amonia solution was added dropwise to this solution with constant stirring until the PH reached 7 in all cases. Heating at 850oC for 10 hours for each sample to get final formation of BFO nanocrystalline. The data from XRD showing the lattice parameters a,c and the unit-cell volume V, confirm that BFO with ratio 1:12 has same crystall parameters with ratio 1:11. Ratio of Ba/Fe 1:12 and 1:11 have diffraction pattern similarly at almost each 2 θ for each samples. Ratio of Ba/Fe 1: 11.5 has the finest crystallite size 22 nm. Almost diffraction pattern peaks of Ba/Fe 1:11.5 move to the left from of Ba/Fe 1:12 then return to diffraction pattern of Ba/Fe 1:12 for Ba/Fe 1:11. SEM observations show the particle size less than 100 nm and the same shape for each sample. Ratio of Ba/Fe 1: 12 gives the highest intrinsic coercive Hc = 427.3 kA/m. The highest remanent magnetization is at ratio 1:11 with Mr = 0.170 T. BFO with mole ratio 1:11.5 has the finest grain 22 nm, good magnetic properties and the highest value of best FoM 89%.

  20. Magnetization reversal mechanisms under oblique magnetic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ntallis, N.; Efthimiadis, K.G., E-mail: kge@auth.gr

    2017-03-01

    In this work finite element micromagnetic simulations were performed in order to study the reversal mechanisms of spherical ferromagnetic particles with uniaxial magnetocrystalline anisotropy, when they are magnetized along an oblique direction with respect to the anisotropy axis. Magnetization loops are taken in different directions of external magnetic field, at different anisotropy constants and particle sizes. In the simulation results, the three reversal mechanisms (coherent, curling and domains) are observed and new phenomena arise due to the action of oblique magnetic fields. Moreover, the dependence of the critical fields with respect to the angle of the external field is presented. - Highlights: • Finite element micromagnetic simulation of the three different reversal mechanisms. • For the curling mechanism, the new phenomenon is the rotation of the vortex. • In the domain reversal mechanism, the formed domain wall is smaller than 180°. • In soft ferromagnetic particles a rearrangement of the magnetic domains is observed.

  1. Influence Of The Switching field On The Magnetization Process Thin Film Magneto optic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atmono, Tri Mardji

    1996-01-01

    The investigation of influence of switching field on the magnetic reversal process of bilayer Fe Tb/FeTbCo has been done. Thin film has been produced by sputtering method using mosaic target placed as cathode. The experiment shows that the interface wall between two layers is created due to the shifting of the switching field from the coercive force of the single layer. At the temperature of 26 o C, the special magnetization process accurst because the two layers have the same value of switching field : For the range of the magnetic field -3.8 kg o C o C. This mean that the compensation point lies in this temperature range

  2. High-frequency parameters of magnetic films showing magnetization dispersion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sidorenkov, V.V.; Zimin, A.B.; Kornev, Yu.V.

    1988-01-01

    Magnetization dispersion leads to skewed resonance curves shifted towards higher magnetizing fields, together with considerable reduction in the resonant absorption, while the FMR line width is considerably increased. These effects increase considerably with frequency, in contrast to films showing magnetic-anisotropy dispersion, where they decrease. It is concluded that there may be anomalies in the frequency dependence of the resonance parameters for polycrystalline magnetic films

  3. Empirical isotropic chemical shift surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czinki, Eszter; Csaszar, Attila G.

    2007-01-01

    A list of proteins is given for which spatial structures, with a resolution better than 2.5 A, are known from entries in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) and isotropic chemical shift (ICS) values are known from the RefDB database related to the Biological Magnetic Resonance Bank (BMRB) database. The structures chosen provide, with unknown uncertainties, dihedral angles φ and ψ characterizing the backbone structure of the residues. The joint use of experimental ICSs of the same residues within the proteins, again with mostly unknown uncertainties, and ab initio ICS(φ,ψ) surfaces obtained for the model peptides For-(l-Ala) n -NH 2 , with n = 1, 3, and 5, resulted in so-called empirical ICS(φ,ψ) surfaces for all major nuclei of the 20 naturally occurring α-amino acids. Out of the many empirical surfaces determined, it is the 13C α ICS(φ,ψ) surface which seems to be most promising for identifying major secondary structure types, α-helix, β-strand, left-handed helix (α D ), and polyproline-II. Detailed tests suggest that Ala is a good model for many naturally occurring α-amino acids. Two-dimensional empirical 13C α - 1 H α ICS(φ,ψ) correlation plots, obtained so far only from computations on small peptide models, suggest the utility of the experimental information contained therein and thus they should provide useful constraints for structure determinations of proteins

  4. Induced motion of domain walls in multiferroics with quadratic interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerasimchuk, Victor S., E-mail: viktor.gera@gmail.com [National Technical University of Ukraine “Kyiv Polytechnic Institute”, Peremohy Avenue 37, 03056 Kiev (Ukraine); Shitov, Anatoliy A., E-mail: shitov@mail.ru [Donbass National Academy of Civil Engineering, Derzhavina Street 2, 86123 Makeevka, Donetsk Region (Ukraine)

    2013-10-15

    We theoretically study the dynamics of 180-degree domain wall of the ab-type in magnetic materials with quadratic magnetoelectric interaction in external alternating magnetic and electric fields. The features of the oscillatory and translational motions of the domain walls and stripe structures depending on the parameters of external fields and characteristics of the multiferroics are discussed. The possibility of the domain walls drift in a purely electric field is established. - Highlights: • We study DW and stripe DS in multiferroics with quadratic magnetoelectric interaction. • We build up the theory of oscillatory and translational (drift) DW and DS motion. • DW motion can be caused by crossed alternating electric and magnetic fields. • DW motion can be caused by alternating “pure” electric field. • DW drift velocity is formed by the AFM and Dzyaloshinskii interaction terms.

  5. The shifting beverage landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storey, Maureen

    2010-04-26

    STOREY, M.L. The shifting beverage landscape. PHYSIOL BEHAV, 2010. - Simultaneous lifestyle changes have occurred in the last few decades, creating an imbalance in energy intake and energy expenditure that has led to overweight and obesity. Trends in the food supply show that total daily calories available per capita increased 28% since 1970. Total energy intake among men and women has also increased dramatically since that time. Some have suggested that intake of beverages has had a disproportional impact on obesity. Data collected by the Beverage Marketing Corporation between 1988-2008 demonstrate that, in reality, fewer calories per ounce are being produced by the beverage industry. Moreover, data from the National Cancer Institute show that soft drink intake represents 5.5% of daily calories. Data from NHANES 1999-2003 vs. 2003-06 may demonstrate a shift in beverage consumption for age/gender groups, ages 6 to>60years. The beverages provided in schools have significantly changed since 2006 when the beverage industry implemented School Beverage Guidelines. This voluntary action has removed full-calorie soft drinks from participating schools across the country. This shift to lower-calorie and smaller-portion beverages in school has led to a significant decrease in total beverage calories in schools. These data support the concept that to prevent and treat obesity, public health efforts should focus on energy balance and that a narrow focus on sweetened beverages is unlikely to have any meaningful impact on this complex problem. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Current-driven vortex domain wall motion in wire-tube nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espejo, A. P. [Departamento de Física, Universidad de Santiago de Chile (USACH), Av. Ecuador 3493, 9170124 Santiago (Chile); Institute of Nanostructure and Solid State Physics, University of Hamburg, Jungiusstrasse 11, D-20355 Hamburg (Germany); Vidal-Silva, N. [Departamento de Física, Universidad de Santiago de Chile (USACH), Av. Ecuador 3493, 9170124 Santiago (Chile); López-López, J. A. [Departamento de Física, Universidad Técnica Federico Santa María, Av. España 1680, Valparaíso (Chile); Goerlitz, D.; Nielsch, K. [Institute of Nanostructure and Solid State Physics, University of Hamburg, Jungiusstrasse 11, D-20355 Hamburg (Germany); Escrig, J. [Departamento de Física, Universidad de Santiago de Chile (USACH), Av. Ecuador 3493, 9170124 Santiago (Chile); Center for the Development of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology (CEDENNA), Av. Ecuador 3493, 9170124 Santiago (Chile)

    2015-03-30

    We have investigated the current-driven domain wall motion in nanostructures comprised of a pair of nanotube and nanowire segments. Under certain values of external magnetic fields, it is possible to pin a vortex domain wall in the transition zone between the wire and tube segments. We explored the behavior of this domain wall under the action of an electron flow applied in the opposite direction to the magnetic field. Thus, for a fixed magnetic field, it is possible to release a domain wall pinned simply by increasing the intensity of the current density, or conversely, for a fixed current density, it is possible to release the domain wall simply decreasing the magnetic external field. When the domain wall remains pinned due to the competition between the current density and the magnetic external field, it exhibits a oscillation frequency close to 8 GHz. The amplitude of the oscillations increases with the current density and decreases over time. On the other hand, when the domain wall is released and propagated through the tube segment, this shows the standard separation between a steady and a precessional regime. The ability to pin and release a domain wall by varying the geometric parameters, the current density, or the magnetic field transforms these wire-tube nanostructures in an interesting alternative as an on/off switch nano-transistor.

  7. Mechanical spectral shift reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doshi, P.K.; George, R.A.; Dollard, W.J.

    1982-01-01

    A mechanical spectral shift arrangement for controlling a nuclear reactor includes a plurality of reactor coolant displacer members which are inserted into a reactor core at the beginning of the core life to reduce the volume of reactor coolant-moderator in the core at start-up. However, as the reactivity of the core declines with fuel depletion, selected displacer members are withdrawn from the core at selected time intervals to increase core moderation at a time when fuel reactivity is declining. (author)

  8. Kinetic wall from Israel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godolphin, D.

    1985-05-01

    An unusual solar mass wall is described. At the turn of a handle it can change from a solar energy collector to a heat-blocker. An appropriate name for it might be the rotating prism wall. An example of the moving wall is at work in an adobe test home in Sede Boqer. Behind a large south-facing window stand four large adobe columns that are triangular in plan. One face of each of them is painted black to absorb sunlight, a second is covered with panels of polystyrene insulation, and a third is painted to match the room decor. These columns can rotate. On winter nights, the insulated side faces the glass, keeping heat losses down. The same scheme works in summer to keep heat out of the house. Small windows provide ventilation.

  9. Timber frame walls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ernst Jan de Place; Brandt, Erik

    2010-01-01

    A ventilated cavity is usually considered good practice for removing moisture behind the cladding of timber framed walls. Timber frame walls with no cavity are a logical alternative as they are slimmer and less expensive to produce and besides the risk of a two-sided fire behind the cladding....... It was found that the specific damages made to the vapour barrier as part of the test did not have any provable effect on the moisture content. In general elements with an intact vapour barrier did not show a critical moisture content at the wind barrier after four years of exposure....

  10. Computational quantum magnetism: Role of noncollinear magnetism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freeman, Arthur J.; Nakamura, Kohji

    2009-01-01

    We are witnessing today a golden age of innovation with novel magnetic materials and with discoveries important for both basic science and device applications. Computation and simulation have played a key role in the dramatic advances of the past and those we are witnessing today. A goal-driving computational science-simulations of every-increasing complexity of more and more realistic models has been brought into greater focus with greater computing power to run sophisticated and powerful software codes like our highly precise full-potential linearized augmented plane wave (FLAPW) method. Indeed, significant progress has been achieved from advanced first-principles FLAPW calculations for the predictions of surface/interface magnetism. One recently resolved challenging issue is the role of noncollinear magnetism (NCM) that arises not only through the SOC, but also from the breaking of symmetry at surfaces and interfaces. For this, we will further review some specific advances we are witnessing today, including complex magnetic phenomena from noncollinear magnetism with no shape approximation for the magnetization (perpendicular MCA in transition-metal overlayers and superlattices; unidirectional anisotropy and exchange bias in FM and AFM bilayers; constricted domain walls important in quantum spin interfaces; and curling magnetic nano-scale dots as new candidates for non-volatile memory applications) and most recently providing new predictions and understanding of magnetism in novel materials such as magnetic semiconductors and multi-ferroic systems

  11. Repetition and Translation Shifts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Zupan

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Repetition manifests itself in different ways and at different levels of the text. The first basic type of repetition involves complete recurrences; in which a particular textual feature repeats in its entirety. The second type involves partial recurrences; in which the second repetition of the same textual feature includes certain modifications to the first occurrence. In the article; repetitive patterns in Edgar Allan Poe’s short story “The Fall of the House of Usher” and its Slovene translation; “Konec Usherjeve hiše”; are compared. The author examines different kinds of repetitive patterns. Repetitions are compared at both the micro- and macrostructural levels. As detailed analyses have shown; considerable microstructural translation shifts occur in certain types of repetitive patterns. Since these are not only occasional; sporadic phenomena; but are of a relatively high frequency; they reduce the translated text’s potential for achieving some of the gothic effects. The macrostructural textual property particularly affected by these shifts is the narrator’s experience as described by the narrative; which suffers a reduction in intensity.

  12. The profile of the domain walls in amorphous glass-covered microwires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beck, F.; Rigue, J.N. [Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Campus Cachoeira do Sul, RS (Brazil); Carara, M., E-mail: carara@smail.ufsm.br [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Santa Maria, RS (Brazil)

    2017-08-01

    Highlights: • Glass-covered microwires with positive magnetostriction were studied. • The single domain wall dynamics was studied under different conditions. • We have evaluated the profile and shape of the moving domain walls. • The domain wall evolves from a bell shape to a parabolic one when a current is applied. - Abstract: We have studied the domain wall dynamics in Joule-annealed amorphous glass-covered microwires with positive magnetostriction in the presence of an electric current, in order to evaluate the profile and shape of the moving domain wall. Such microwires are known to present magnetic bi-stability when axially magnetized. The single domain wall dynamics was evaluated under different conditions, under an axially applied stress and an electric current. We have observed the well known increasing of the domain wall damping with the applied stress due to the increase in the magnetoelastic anisotropy and, when the current is applied, depending on the current intensity and direction, a modification on the axial domain wall damping. When the orthogonal motion of the domain wall is considered, we have observed that the associated velocity present a smaller dependence on the applied current intensity. It was observed a modification on both the domain wall shape and length. In a general way, the domain wall evolves from a bell shape to a parabolic shape as the current intensity is increased. The results were explained in terms of the change in the magnetic energy promoted by the additional Oersted field.

  13. Shift Work: Improving Daytime Sleep

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... night. Good daytime sleep is possible, though, if shift work is a necessary part of your work life. ... mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/adult-health/expert-answers/shift-work/faq-20057991 . Mayo Clinic Footer Legal Conditions and ...

  14. Effect of modes interaction on the resistive wall mode stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Longxi; Wu Bin

    2013-01-01

    Effects of modes interaction on the resistive wall mode (RWM) stability are studied. When considering the modes interaction effects, the linear growth rate of the most unstable (3, 1) mode decreases. After linear evolution, the RWM saturates at the nonlinear phase. The saturation can be attributed to flux piling up on the resistive wall. When some modes exist, the (3, 1) mode saturates at lower level compared with single mode evolution. Meanwhile, the magnetic energy of the (5, 2) mode increases correspondingly, but the magnetic energy saturation level of the (2, 1) mode changes weakly. (authors)

  15. Shape-shifting colloids via stimulated dewetting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youssef, Mena; Hueckel, Theodore; Yi, Gi-Ra; Sacanna, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    The ability to reconfigure elementary building blocks from one structure to another is key to many biological systems. Bringing the intrinsic adaptability of biological systems to traditional synthetic materials is currently one of the biggest scientific challenges in material engineering. Here we introduce a new design concept for the experimental realization of self-assembling systems with built-in shape-shifting elements. We demonstrate that dewetting forces between an oil phase and solid colloidal substrates can be exploited to engineer shape-shifting particles whose geometry can be changed on demand by a chemical or optical signal. We find this approach to be quite general and applicable to a broad spectrum of materials, including polymers, semiconductors and magnetic materials. This synthetic methodology can be further adopted as a new experimental platform for designing and rapidly prototyping functional colloids, such as reconfigurable micro swimmers, colloidal surfactants and switchable building blocks for self-assembly. PMID:27426418

  16. Effect of wall conductances on hydromagnetic flow and heat transfer in a rotating channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazumder, B.S.

    1977-01-01

    Wall conductance effects on the hydromagnetic flow and heat transfer between two parallel plates in a rotating frame of reference has been studied when the liquid is permeated by a transverse magnetic field. An exact solution of the governing equation has been obtained. It is found that the velocity current density and the temperature depend only on the sum of the wall conductances phi 1 + phi 2 = phi but magnetic field depends on the individual values of phi 1 and phi 2 where phi 1 and phi 2 are respectively the wall conductance ratios of the upper and lower walls. (Auth.)

  17. Domain wall magnetoresistance in BiFeO3 thin films measured by scanning probe microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingo, N; Farokhipoor, S; Santiso, J; Noheda, B; Catalan, G

    2017-08-23

    We measure the magnetotransport properties of individual 71° domain walls in multiferroic BiFeO 3 by means of conductive-atomic force microscopy (C-AFM) in the presence of magnetic fields up to one Tesla. The results suggest anisotropic magnetoresistance at room temperature, with the sign of the magnetoresistance depending on the relative orientation between the magnetic field and the domain wall plane. A consequence of this finding is that macroscopically averaged magnetoresistance measurements for domain wall bunches are likely to underestimate the magnetoresistance of each individual domain wall.

  18. OSCILLATING LIGHT WALL ABOVE A SUNSPOT LIGHT BRIDGE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Shuhong; Zhang, Jun; Jiang, Fayu [Key Laboratory of Solar Activity, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Xiang, Yongyuan, E-mail: shuhongyang@nao.cas.cn [Fuxian Solar Observatory, Yunnan Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650011 (China)

    2015-05-10

    With the high tempo-spatial Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph 1330 Å images, we find that many bright structures are rooted in the light bridge of NOAA 12192, forming a light wall. The light wall is brighter than the surrounding areas, and the wall top is much brighter than the wall body. The New Vacuum Solar Telescope Hα and the Solar Dynamics Observatory 171 and 131 Å images are also used to study the light-wall properties. In 1330, 171, and 131 Å, the top of the wall has a higher emission, while in the Hα line, the wall-top emission is very low. The wall body corresponds to bright areas in 1330 Å and dark areas in the other lines. The top of the light wall moves upward and downward successively, performing oscillations in height. The deprojected mean height, amplitude, oscillation velocity, and the dominant period are determined to be 3.6 Mm, 0.9 Mm, 15.4 km s{sup −1}, and 3.9 minutes, respectively. We interpret the oscillations of the light wall as the leakage of p-modes from below the photosphere. The constant brightness enhancement of the wall top implies the existence of some kind of atmospheric heating, e.g., via the persistent small-scale reconnection or the magneto-acoustic waves. In another series of 1330 Å images, we find that the wall top in the upward motion phase is significantly brighter than in the downward phase. This kind of oscillation may be powered by the energy released due to intermittent impulsive magnetic reconnection.

  19. Faktor Dan Penjadualan Shift Kerja

    OpenAIRE

    Maurits, Lientje Setyawati; Widodo, Imam Djati

    2008-01-01

    Work shift has negative effect in physical and mental health, work performance and job accident. Disturbance of circadian rhythms is indicated as source of the problems. This article explores some researches related to the impacts of work shift and establishes basic principles of work shift scheduling that considers human need and limitation.

  20. Isotope shifting capacity of rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blattner, P.; Department of Scientific and Industrial Research, Lower Hutt

    1980-01-01

    Any oxygen isotope shifted rock volume exactly defines a past throughput of water. An expression is derived that relates the throughput of an open system to the isotope shift of reservoir rock and present-day output. The small isotope shift of Ngawha reservoir rock and the small, high delta oxygen-18 output are best accounted for by a magmatic water source

  1. Dispersive elastic properties of Dzyaloshinskii domain walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegren, James; Lau, Derek; Sokalski, Vincent

    Recent studies on the asymmetric field-driven growth of magnetic bubble domains in perpendicular thin films exhibiting an interfacial Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI) have provided a wealth of experimental evidence to validate models of creep phenomena, as key properties of the domain wall (DW) can be altered with the application of an external in-plane magnetic field. While asymmetric growth behavior has been attributed to the highly anisotropic DW energy, σ (θ) , which results from the combination of DMI and the in-plane field, many experimental results remain anomalous. In this work, we demonstrate that the anisotropy of DW energy alters the elastic response of the DW as characterized by the surface stiffness, σ (θ) = σ (θ) + σ (θ) , and evaluate the impact of this stiffness on the creep law. We find that at in-plane fields larger than and antiparallel to the effective field due to DMI, the DW stiffness decreases rapidly, suggesting that higher energy walls can actually become more mobile than their low energy counterparts. This result is consistent with experiments on CoNi multilayer films where velocity curves for domain walls with DMI fields parallel and antiparallel to the applied field cross over at high in-plane fields.

  2. eWALL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kyriazakos, Sofoklis; Mihaylov, Mihail; Anggorojati, Bayu

    2016-01-01

    challenge with impact in multiple sectors. In this paper we present an innovative ICT solution, named eWALL, that aims to address these challenges by means of an advanced ICT infrastructure and home sensing environment; thus differentiating from existing eHealth and eCare solutions. The system of e...

  3. Abdominal wall surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... as liposuction , which is another way to remove fat. But, abdominal wall surgery is sometimes combined with liposuction. ... from the middle and lower sections of your abdomen to make it firmer ... removes excess fat and skin (love handles) from the sides of ...

  4. Occupy Wall Street

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Michael J.; Bang, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    This article analyzes the political form of Occupy Wall Street on Twitter. Drawing on evidence contained within the profiles of over 50,000 Twitter users, political identities of participants are characterized using natural language processing. The results find evidence of a traditional...

  5. Endometriosis Abdominal wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez, M.; Carriquiry, L.

    2003-01-01

    Endometriosis of abdominal wall is a rare entity wi ch frequently appears after gynecological surgery. Case history includes three cases of parietal endometriosis wi ch were treated in Maciel Hospital of Montevideo. The report refers to etiological diagnostic aspects and highlights the importance of total resection in order to achieve definitive healing

  6. Chronic Abdominal Wall Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koop, Herbert; Koprdova, Simona; Schürmann, Christine

    2016-01-29

    Chronic abdominal wall pain is a poorly recognized clinical problem despite being an important element in the differential diagnosis of abdominal pain. This review is based on pertinent articles that were retrieved by a selective search in PubMed and EMBASE employing the terms "abdominal wall pain" and "cutaneous nerve entrapment syndrome," as well as on the authors' clinical experience. In 2% to 3% of patients with chronic abdominal pain, the pain arises from the abdominal wall; in patients with previously diagnosed chronic abdominal pain who have no demonstrable pathological abnormality, this likelihood can rise as high as 30% . There have only been a small number of clinical trials of treatment for this condition. The diagnosis is made on clinical grounds, with the aid of Carnett's test. The characteristic clinical feature is strictly localized pain in the anterior abdominal wall, which is often mischaracterized as a "functional" complaint. In one study, injection of local anesthesia combined with steroids into the painful area was found to relieve pain for 4 weeks in 95% of patients. The injection of lidocaine alone brought about improvement in 83-91% of patients. Long-term pain relief ensued after a single lidocaine injection in 20-30% of patients, after repeated injections in 40-50% , and after combined lidocaine and steroid injections in up to 80% . Pain that persists despite these treatments can be treated with surgery (neurectomy). Chronic abdominal wall pain is easily diagnosed on physical examination and can often be rapidly treated. Any physician treating patients with abdominal pain should be aware of this condition. Further comparative treatment trials will be needed before a validated treatment algorithm can be established.

  7. The shift in windpower

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gipe, P.

    1992-01-01

    Despite new production records, the near-term market for new windpower projects in the US remains bleak. Congressional incentives and project proposals in the mid-1990s offer promise, but for now most development has shifted to Europe. During 1992 and 1993 the largest wind projects developed by US companies will not be in the US, but in the United Kingdom and Spain. Indeed, most of the US's windpower industry is going abroad, establishing offices overseas. This move toward Europe comes as little surprise. New project development for US firms has faltered at home while the European market has burgeoned. The topics of the article include the move to Europe, a reduction in California's share of producing wind power plants, a rise in Europe's share of producing wind power plants, the future market for wind power in the US, and reawakening California's market

  8. Rapid and reliable protein structure determination via chemical shift threading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafsa, Noor E; Berjanskii, Mark V; Arndt, David; Wishart, David S

    2018-01-01

    Protein structure determination using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy can be both time-consuming and labor intensive. Here we demonstrate how chemical shift threading can permit rapid, robust, and accurate protein structure determination using only chemical shift data. Threading is a relatively old bioinformatics technique that uses a combination of sequence information and predicted (or experimentally acquired) low-resolution structural data to generate high-resolution 3D protein structures. The key motivations behind using NMR chemical shifts for protein threading lie in the fact that they are easy to measure, they are available prior to 3D structure determination, and they contain vital structural information. The method we have developed uses not only sequence and chemical shift similarity but also chemical shift-derived secondary structure, shift-derived super-secondary structure, and shift-derived accessible surface area to generate a high quality protein structure regardless of the sequence similarity (or lack thereof) to a known structure already in the PDB. The method (called E-Thrifty) was found to be very fast (often chemical shift refinement, these results suggest that protein structure determination, using only NMR chemical shifts, is becoming increasingly practical and reliable. E-Thrifty is available as a web server at http://ethrifty.ca .

  9. Chiral magnetic effect of light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayata, Tomoya

    2018-05-01

    We study a photonic analog of the chiral magnetic (vortical) effect. We discuss that the vector component of magnetoelectric tensors plays a role of "vector potential," and its rotation is understood as "magnetic field" of a light. Using the geometrical optics approximation, we show that "magnetic fields" cause an anomalous shift of a wave packet of a light through an interplay with the Berry curvature of photons. The mechanism is the same as that of the chiral magnetic (vortical) effect of a chiral fermion, so that we term the anomalous shift "chiral magnetic effect of a light." We further study the chiral magnetic effect of a light beyond geometric optics by directly solving the transmission problem of a wave packet at a surface of a magnetoelectric material. We show that the experimental signal of the chiral magnetic effect of a light is the nonvanishing of transverse displacements for the beam normally incident to a magnetoelectric material.

  10. Current-induced domain wall motion in nanoscale ferromagnetic elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malinowski, G [Laboratoire de Physique des Solides, CNRS, Universite Paris-sud 11, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Boulle, O [SPINTEC, CEA/CNRS/UJF/GINP, INAC, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Klaeui, M, E-mail: Klaeui@uni-mainz.de [SwissFEL, Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Laboratory of Nanomagnetism and Spin Dynamics, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2011-09-28

    We review the details of domain wall (DW) propagation due to spin-polarized currents that could potentially be used in magnetic data storage devices based on domains and DWs. We discuss briefly the basics of the underlying spin torque effect and show how the two torques arising from the interaction between the spin-polarized charge carriers and the magnetization lead to complex dynamics of a spin texture such as a DW. By direct imaging we show how confined DWs in nanowires can be displaced using currents in in-plane soft-magnetic materials, and that when using short pulses, fast velocities can be attained. For high-anisotropy out-of-plane magnetized wires with narrow DWs we present approaches to deducing the torque terms and show that in these materials potentially more efficient domain wall motion could be achieved.

  11. Nuclear magnetic resonance diagnostic apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugimoto, H.

    1985-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance diagnostic apparatus including a coil for generating a gradient field in a plane perpendicular to a static magnetic field, means for controlling the operation of the coil to rotationally shift in angular steps the gradient direction of the gradient field at an angle pitch of some multiple of the unit index angle through a plurality of rotations to assume all the shift positions of the gradient direction, a rough image reconstructor for reconstructing a rough tomographic image on the basis of nuclear magnetic resonance signals acquired during a rotation of the second gradient magnetic field, a rough image display for depicting the rough tomographic image, a final image reconstructor for reconstructing a final tomographic image on the basis of all nuclear magnetic resonance signals corresponding to all of the expected rotation shift positions acquired during a plurality of rotations and a final image display for depicting the final tomographic image

  12. Wind tunnels with adapted walls for reducing wall interference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganzer, U.

    1979-01-01

    The basic principle of adaptable wind tunnel walls is explained. First results of an investigation carried out at the Aero-Space Institute of Berlin Technical University are presented for two dimensional flexible walls and a NACA 0012 airfoil. With five examples exhibiting very different flow conditions it is demonstrated that it is possible to reduce wall interference and to avoid blockage at transonic speeds by wall adaptation.

  13. Rising damp in building walls: the wall base ventilation system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guimaraes, A.S.; Delgado, J.M.P.Q.; Freitas, V.P. de [Faculdade de Engenharia da Universidade do Porto, Laboratorio de Fisica das Construcoes (LFC), Departamento de Engenharia Civil, Porto (Portugal)

    2012-12-15

    This work intends to validate a new system for treating rising damp in historic buildings walls. The results of laboratory experiments show that an efficient way of treating rising damp is by ventilating the wall base, using the HUMIVENT technique. The analytical model presented describes very well the observed features of rising damp in walls, verified by laboratory tests, who contributed for a simple sizing of the wall base ventilation system that will be implemented in historic buildings. (orig.)

  14. Magnetic vortex racetrack memory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geng, Liwei D.; Jin, Yongmei M., E-mail: ymjin@mtu.edu

    2017-02-01

    We report a new type of racetrack memory based on current-controlled movement of magnetic vortices in magnetic nanowires with rectangular cross-section and weak perpendicular anisotropy. Data are stored through the core polarity of vortices and each vortex carries a data bit. Besides high density, non-volatility, fast data access, and low power as offered by domain wall racetrack memory, magnetic vortex racetrack memory has additional advantages of no need for constrictions to define data bits, changeable information density, adjustable current magnitude for data propagation, and versatile means of ultrafast vortex core switching. By using micromagnetic simulations, current-controlled motion of magnetic vortices in cobalt nanowire is demonstrated for racetrack memory applications. - Highlights: • Advance fundamental knowledge of current-driven magnetic vortex phenomena. • Report appealing new magnetic racetrack memory based on current-controlled magnetic vortices in nanowires. • Provide a novel approach to adjust current magnitude for data propagation. • Overcome the limitations of domain wall racetrack memory.

  15. High-R Walls for Remodeling: Wall Cavity Moisture Monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiehagen, J.; Kochkin, V.

    2012-12-01

    The focus of the study is on the performance of wall systems, and in particular, the moisture characteristics inside the wall cavity and in the wood sheathing. Furthermore, while this research will initially address new home construction, the goal is to address potential moisture issues in wall cavities of existing homes when insulation and air sealing improvements are made.

  16. High-R Walls for Remodeling. Wall Cavity Moisture Monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiehagen, J. [NAHB Research Center Industry Partnership, Upper Marlboro, MD (United States); Kochkin, V. [NAHB Research Center Industry Partnership, Upper Marlboro, MD (United States)

    2012-12-01

    The focus of the study is on the performance of wall systems, and in particular, the moisture characteristics inside the wall cavity and in the wood sheathing. Furthermore, while this research will initially address new home construction, the goal is to address potential moisture issues in wall cavities of existing homes when insulation and air sealing improvements are made.

  17. Wall insulation system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kostek, P.T.

    1987-08-11

    In a channel specially designed to fasten semi-rigid mineral fibre insulation to masonry walls, it is known to be constructed from 20 gauge galvanized steel or other suitable material. The channel is designed to have pre-punched holes along its length for fastening of the channel to the drywall screw. The unique feature of the channel is the teeth running along its length which are pressed into the surface of the butted together sections of the insulation providing a strong grip between the two adjacent pieces of insulation. Of prime importance to the success of this system is the recent technological advancements of the mineral fibre itself which allow the teeth of the channel to engage the insulation fully and hold without mechanical support, rather than be repelled or pushed back by the inherent nature of the insulation material. After the insulation is secured to the masonry wall by concrete nail fastening systems, the drywall is screwed to the channel.

  18. Nondestructive evaluation of wall thinning occurred under reinforced plate by MFL method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, Hiroaki; Sato, Kaito; Shimizu, Isamu

    2013-01-01

    Basic study on applying magnetic flux leakage (MFL) method using ac excitation to a nondestructive evaluation of wall thinning occurred under reinforcing plates in nuclear power plants were performed. Frequently, MFL method by means of dc field for exciting specimens is adopted, and only intensity of magnetic flux density is evaluated. On the other hand, MFL with alternating current enable us to utilize not only amplitude of magnetic flux density but also phase difference, which contributes to evaluation with higher accuracy. Here, specimens with slit and pipe with imitated wall thinning are prepared and magnetized using magnetic yoke with ac field, and then the leakage magnetic flux density and the phase difference on the specimen surface are investigated. Additionally, specimens imitated wall thinning occurred under reinforcing plates were investigated by MFL with ac excitation. (author)

  19. Analytical expression for initial magnetization curve of Fe-based soft magnetic composite material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birčáková, Zuzana, E-mail: zuzana.bircakova@upjs.sk [Institute of Physics, Faculty of Science, Pavol Jozef Šafárik University, Park Angelinum 9, 04154 Košice (Slovakia); Kollár, Peter; Füzer, Ján [Institute of Physics, Faculty of Science, Pavol Jozef Šafárik University, Park Angelinum 9, 04154 Košice (Slovakia); Bureš, Radovan; Fáberová, Mária [Institute of Materials Research, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Watsonova 47, 04001 Košice (Slovakia)

    2017-02-01

    The analytical expression for the initial magnetization curve for Fe-phenolphormaldehyde resin composite material was derived based on the already proposed ideas of the magnetization vector deviation function and the domain wall annihilation function, characterizing the reversible magnetization processes through the extent of deviation of magnetization vectors from magnetic field direction and the irreversible processes through the effective numbers of movable domain walls, respectively. As for composite materials the specific dependences of these functions were observed, the ideas were extended meeting the composites special features, which are principally the much higher inner demagnetizing fields produced by magnetic poles on ferromagnetic particle surfaces. The proposed analytical expression enables us to find the relative extent of each type of magnetization processes when magnetizing a specimen along the initial curve. - Highlights: • Analytical expression of the initial curve derived for SMC. • Initial curve described by elementary magnetization processes. • Influence of inner demagnetizing fields on magnetization process in SMC.

  20. Scalable Resolution Display Walls

    KAUST Repository

    Leigh, Jason; Johnson, Andrew; Renambot, Luc; Peterka, Tom; Jeong, Byungil; Sandin, Daniel J.; Talandis, Jonas; Jagodic, Ratko; Nam, Sungwon; Hur, Hyejung; Sun, Yiwen

    2013-01-01

    This article will describe the progress since 2000 on research and development in 2-D and 3-D scalable resolution display walls that are built from tiling individual lower resolution flat panel displays. The article will describe approaches and trends in display hardware construction, middleware architecture, and user-interaction design. The article will also highlight examples of use cases and the benefits the technology has brought to their respective disciplines. © 1963-2012 IEEE.